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Sample records for vegetable ash evaluacion

  1. Results of the Interlaboratory Exercise CNS/CIEMAT-05 among Environmental Radioactivity Laboratories (Vegetable Ash); Evaluacion de la Intercomparacion CSN/CIEMAT-2005 entre Laboratorios Nacionales Radiactividad Ambiental (Ceniza Vegetal)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romero Gonzalez, M. L.; Barrera Izquierdo, M.; Valino Garcia, F.

    2006-07-01

    The document describes the outcome of the CSN/CIEMAT-05 interlaboratory test comparison among environmental radioactivity laboratories. The exercise was organised according to the ISO-43 and the IUPAC {sup I}nternational harmonised protocol for the proficiency testing of analytical chemistry laboratories{sup .} The exercise has been designed to evaluate the capability of national laboratories to determine environmental levels of radionuclides in vegetable ash samples. The sample has been prepared by the Environmental Radiation Laboratory, from the University of Barcelona, and it contains the following radionuclides: Sr-90, Pu-238, Am-241, Th-230, Pb-210, U-238, Ra-226, K-40, Ra-228, TI-208, Cs- 137 and Co-60. Reference values have been established TROUGH the kind collaboration of three international laboratories of recognized experience: IAEA MEL and IRSN-Orsay. The results of the exercise were computed for 35 participating laboratories and their analytical performance was assessed using the z-score approach. Robust statistics of the participant's results was applied to obtain the median and standard deviation, to achieve a more complete and objetiva study of the laboratories' performance. Some difficulties encountered to dissolve the test sample caused a lower response of analyses involving radiochemical separation, thus some laboratories couldn't apply their routine methods and no conclusions on PU-238, Am-241 and Th-230 performances have been obtained. The exercise has revealed an homogeneous behaviour of laboratories, being statistical parameters from the results close to the reference values. The study has shown that participant laboratories perform radioactive determinations in vegetable ash samples with satisfactory quality levels. (Author) 6 refs.

  2. Can vegetative ash be water repellent?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodí, M. B.; Cerdà, A.; Mataix-Solera, J.; Doerr, S. H.

    2012-04-01

    In most of the literature, ash is referred to as a highly wettable material (e.g. Cerdà and Doerr, 2008; Etiegni and Campbell, 1991; Woods and Balfour 2010). However, the contrary was suggested in few articles, albeit with no further quantification (Gabet and Sternberg, 2008; Khanna et al., 1996; Stark, 1977). To clarify this question, water repellency measurements on ash using the Water Drop Penetration Times (WDPT) method were performed on ash from Mediterranean ecosystems and it was found to be water repellent (Bodí et al. 2011). Water repellency on ash from different wildfires ranged from 40 to 10 % occurrence with samples being extreme repellent (lasting more than 3600 s to penetrate). Part of the ash produced in the laboratory was also water repellent. After that, other ash samples had been found water repellent in wildfires in Colorado (unpublished results), Portugal (Gonzalez-Pelayo, 2009), or in prescribed fires in Australia (Bodí et al. 2011b; Petter Nyman, personnal communication). All the samples exhibiting water repellent properties had in common that were combusted at low temperatures, yielding in general ash with dark colour and contents of organic carbon of more than 18 % (Bodí et al. 2011a), although these properties were not exactly proportional to its water repellency occurrence or persistence. In addition, the species studied in Bodí et al. (2011) had been found to produce different levels of WR repellency, being ash from Pinus halepensis more repellent than that from Quercus coccifera and Rosmarins officinalis. Ash from Eucaliptus radiata had been found also very water repellent, as Pinus halepensis (unpublished data). The reasons of the existance of water repellent ash are that the charred residue produced by fire (an also contained in the ash) can contain aromatic compounds that have a lower free energy than water and therefore behave as hydrophobic materials with reduced solubility (Almendros et al., 1992 and Knicker, 2007

  3. 488-D Ash Basin Vegetative Cover Treatibility Study

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    Barton, Christopher; Marx, Don; Blake, John; Adriano, Domy; Koo, Bon-Jun; Czapka, Stephen

    2003-01-01

    The 488-D Ash Basin is an unlined containment basin that received ash and coal reject material from the operation of a powerhouse at the USDOE's Savannah River Site, SC. They pyretic nature of the coal rejects has resulted in the formation of acidic drainage (AD), which has contributed to groundwater deterioration and threatens biota in down gradient wetlands. Establishment of a vegetative cover was examined as a remedial alternative for reducing AD generation within this system by enhanced utilization of rainwater and subsequent non-point source water pollution control. The low nutrient content, high acidity, and high salinity of the basin material, however, was deleterious to plant survivability. As such, studies to identify suitable plant species and potential adaptations, and pretreatment techniques in the form of amendments, tilling, and/or chemical stabilization were needed. A randomized block design consisting of three subsurface treatments (blocks) and five duplicated surface amendments (treatments) was developed. One hundred inoculated pine trees were planted on each plot. Herbaceous species were also planted on half of the plots in duplicated 1-m2 beds. After two growing seasons, deep ripping, subsurface amendments and surface covers were shown to be essential for the successful establishment of vegetation on the basin. This is the final report of the study.

  4. Volcanic Ash fall Impact on Vegetation, Colima 2005

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, M. G.; Martin, A.; Fonseca, R.; Nieto, A.; Radillo, R.; Armienta, M.

    2007-05-01

    An ash sampling network was established arround Colima Volcano in 2005. Ash fall was sampled on the North, Northeast, East, Southeast, South, Southwest and West of the volcano. Samples were analyzed for ash components, geochemistry and leachates. Ash fall ocurred on April (12), May (10, 23), June (2, 6, 9, 10, 12, 14), July (27), September (27), October (23) and November (24). Most of the ash is made of andesitic dome-lithics but shows diferences in crystal, juvenile material and lithic content. In May, some samples contained grey and dark pumice (scoria). Texture varies from phi >4 to phi 0. Leachate concentration were low: SO4 (7.33-54.19) Cl- (2.29-4.97) and F- (0.16-0.37). During 2005, Colima Volcano's ash fall rotted some of the guava and peach fruits and had a drying effect on spearment and epazote plants. Even these small ash amounts could have hindered sugar cane and agave growth.

  5. Causes of Variability in the Effects of Vegetative Ash on Post-Fire Runoff and Erosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balfour, V.; Woods, S.

    2008-12-01

    Vegetative ash formed during forest wildfires has varying effects on post-fire runoff and erosion. In some cases the ash layer reduces runoff and erosion by storing rainfall and by protecting the soil surface from surface sealing and rainsplash detachment. In other cases, the ash layer increases runoff and erosion by forming a surface crust, clogging soil pores, and providing a ready source of highly erodible fine material. Since only a handful of studies have measured the hydrogeomorphic effect of ash, it is unclear whether the observed variability in its effect reflects initial spatial variability in the ash properties due to factors such as fuel type and fire severity, or differences that develop over time due to compaction and erosion or exposure of the ash to rainfall and air. The goal of our research was to determine if the observed differences in the effect of ash on runoff and erosion are due to: 1) variability in initial ash hydrologic properties due to differences in combustion temperature and fuel type, or 2) variability in ash hydrologic properties caused by mineralogical phase changes that develop after the ash is exposed to water. We created ash in the laboratory using wood and needles of Lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta), Ponderosa pine (Pinus Ponderosa) and Douglas fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii) and at 100° C temperature increments from 300 to 900° C. A subsample of ash from each fuel type / temperature combination was saturated, left undisturbed for 24 hours and then oven dried at 104° C. Dry and wetted ash samples were characterized in terms of: structure (using a scanning electron microscope), carbon content, mineralogy (using X-ray diffraction), porosity, water retention properties and hydraulic conductivity. Ash produced at the higher combustion temperatures from all three fuel types contained lime (CaO), which on wetting was transformed to portlandite (Ca(OH)2) and calcite (CaCO3). This mineralogical transformation resulted in irreversible

  6. Accumulation of metals in vegetation established in wood ash; Upptag av metaller i vegetation som etablerats i vedaska

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hemstroem, Kristian; Fransson, Sara; Wik, Ola

    2009-04-15

    From an environmental point of view, a considerable amount of natural resources can be preserved if ashes were used in geotechnical constructions, e.g. in embankments, roads, hard surfaces, landfill coverage, and in soil stabilizations. However, when using ashes in constructions an assessment of the risks the content of contaminants in the ash might pose, must be done. Today, there is a lack of basic data to make a full risk assessment of ash material in constructions. The risk may differ depending on whether the construction is in operation or in a post operational phase. In the post operational phase, the fate and exposure routs of the contaminants in the ash might change over time. For example, a forest road out of use can with time be overgrown and become a more or less integrated part of the surrounding environment. Contaminants from the ash material might then be assimilated in the established vegetation. As primary producers, plants constitute the basis of the terrestrial food chain, and metals accumulated in plants might be transported further to plant eating animals. The accumulation of metals in vegetation may pose a risk to these herbivores especially when the metals are translocated to grazable parts, e.g. leaves and shoots. In the present study metal concentrations in different parts of vegetation established in ash material was determined and compared to concentrations in vegetation grown in a reference material. Studied materials where i) a wood ash, a waste product possible to use in geotechnical constructions, and ii) crushed stone, a non-controversial geotechnical construction material. The ash material was taken from an older lysimeter that can be seen as a snapshot picture of a geotechnical construction that was built with ash and then taken out of use 15 years ago. The aim of the study was to document and compare the accumulation and distribution of metals in vegetation that had self established in the studied materials. The results obtained in

  7. Fire vegetative ash and erosion in the Mediterranean areas. State of the art and future perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Paulo; Cerdà, Artemi

    2013-04-01

    Fire is a global phenomenon with important ecological impacts. Among all ecosystems, the Mediterranean is frequently visited by severe wildfires with serious impacts on soil properties and increase soil vulnerability to erosion due vegetation removal. After the fire the ash distributed in soil surface can mitigate soil exposition to erosion and rain splash (Cerda and Doerr, 2008), however, this depends on the fire severity that have implications on the type of ash produced (Pereira et al., 2010). High fire severities produced thinner ash that it is easily transported by wind, contrary to low severity wildfires where combustion is not so intense and the mass loss is less, providing a better soil protection in the immediate period after the fire. Soil protection after the fire highly depends on fire severity (Pereira et al. 2013a; Pereira et al. 2013b). Ash it is a highly mobile material, thus this protection can change in space and time, providing a better cover in some areas and worst in others. In the period immediate after the fire, ash can change soil hydrological properties, increasing water retention and reducing sediment transport in relation to bare soil areas (Cerda and Doerr, 2008), but also clog soil pores, seal the soil and increase erosion (Onda et al., 2008). In fact results are controversial and the impacts of vegetative ash in soil erosion may rely on the proprieties of ash produced, that can be extremely variable, even in small distances (Pereira and Úbeda, 2010), due the different conditions of combustions. Ash produced at low severity temperatures can be highly hydrophilic (Bodi et al., 2011) and induce soil hydrophobicity (Bodi et al., 2012). Other mechanisms as the direct impact of fire in soil, can induce soil water repellency, and do not have any interference of vegetative ash. This fire can induce direct (e.g temperature) and indirect (e.g. ash properties) on soil wettability, with obvious implications on spatio-temporal pattern of soil

  8. Assessment of compost application to coal ash disposal sites to promote the rapid vegetation establishment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Repmann, F.; Slazak, A.; Babic, M.; Schneider, B. U.; Schaaf, W.; Hüttl, R. F.

    2009-04-01

    In the city of Tuzla, located in Bosnia and Herzegovina, a coal fired thermo electric power plant is operated by the company JP ELEKTROPRIVERDA BIH TERMOELEKTRANA "TUZLA". High amounts of ash are produced by the power plant, which are currently disposed into settlement ponds bordered by dams in natural valleys. A total of four ash disposal sites covering an area of approx. 170 ha have been established during the last decades. Due to the fact that residual ash from coal combustion was found to contain a variety of trace elements (Ni, Cr, As, B), it must be assumed that ash disposal of that magnitude constitutes an environmental problem which is investigated within the EU-FP6 / STREP project "Reintegration of Coal Ash Disposal Sites and Mitigation of Pollution in the West Balkan Area" RECOAL. The main hazards relate to soil and groundwater contamination due to leaching toxins, dust dispersion, and toxins entering the food chain as these disposal sites are used for agricultural purposes. In order to rapidly establish a vegetation cover on barren ash dumps that particularly would prevent dust erosion we assessed the applicability of compost, produced from locally available municipal and industrial organic residues as an amendment to ash to improve substrate fertility. The envisaged remediation technology was considered to be a low cost, easy applicable and rapid method capable of substantially enhancing living conditions of residents in the vicinity of the abandoned disposal sites. Various compost application rates were evaluated in the field on experimental site Divkovici I in Tuzla and additionally in the greenhouse environment at Brandenburg Technical University Cottbus. Field and laboratory tests revealed that plant growth and cover rate can substantially be improved by mixing compost into the upper ash layer to a maximum depth of approx. 20 cm. Besides direct growth observations in the field analysis of soil parameters gave evidence that the fertility of ashy

  9. Vegetation type and the presence of ash as factors in the evolution of soil water repellency after a forest fire

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Jiménez-Pinilla

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available After wildfires, burning may induce the occurrence of soil water repellency. Soil water repellency may vary in space and time in function of vegetation, the presence of ash and soil moisture. This study analyzes the evolution of fire-induced soil water repellency in function of these factors, and proposes measures to promote the restoration of fire-affected soils. Burnt and unburnt (control soil plots under pine and shrub from a recently burned area (Gorga, Alicante, SE Spain were established. Three treatments were applied: in some of the plots, the original ash layer was kept on the ground; in a second group, the ash layer was removed for simulating the effects of erosion; finally, in a third group, percolating irrigation was conducted to simulate a possible good input of water into the soil profile after burning, that could occur if the first rains were with high quantity but low intensity. During the dry season, soil moisture content was significantly lower in burned plots due to fire-induced water repellency and reduced vegetation cover. During the wet season, soil moisture decreased in the control unburnt plots due to direct evaporation of water intercepted by vegetation and consumption by roots. Fire increased soil water repellency only in plots under pine. Water repellency decreased during the wet season, disappearing in January and reappearing after declining rainfalls. This baseline recovery of soil water repellency was lower where ash removal was simulated. In unburned plots, seasonal fluctuations were less important. In general, ash removal promotes a rapid reduction of water repellency, since it can induce washing of hydrophobic compounds. Irrigation performed immediately after the fire also contributed to decreased water repellency.

  10. Twenty-three years of vegetation change in a fly-ash leachate impacted meadow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlovic, Noel B.; Leicht-Young, Stacey A.; Wilcox, Douglas; Hiebert, Ron; Murphy, Marilyn K.; Mason, Daniel; Frohnapple, Krystal

    2009-01-01

    1. Blag Slough, located in Indiana Dunes National Lakeshore, has received leachates from nearby fly-ash ponds for 13 years (1967-1980). We have monitored vegetation and sediment of Blag Slough since 1982, two years after the sealing of the fly-ash ponds and one year after the substrate was first exposed. The pH of the soil has increased one order of magnitude from 3.0 to 4.0 over the 23 years (1982-2005). If the pH further increases the solubility of many heavy metals will decrease, except for arsenic. We provide evidence that boron and zinc were bioaccumulating in the leaves of woody plants in 1984. The ratio of leaf concentration and soil concentration of aluminum suggests this element was not bioaccumulating in woody plants in 1984. 2. Soil concentrations of iron, aluminum, arsenic, and strontium were higher nearest the fly-ash ponds in 2005. The southwest corner of Blag Slough and middle position of transect X had the highest elevated levels of these metals and correlated with the occurrence of mixed spikerush association (dominated by Eleocharis olivacea). 3. Only a few exotic species occurred in the Blag Slough. Common reed (Phragmites australis) was among such species that occurred in three large clones. Other exotic species included dandelion (Taraxacum officinale), mullein (Verbascum thapsis), Jerusalem oak goosefoot (Chenopodium botrys), and sheep sorrel (Rumex acetosella). Ruderal species have occurred including thistle (Cirsium spp.), fire weed (Erechtites hieracifolium), and horseweed (Conyza canadensis). While occasional cattail (Typha) have been sampled and mapped in Blag Slough they have never persisted for very long. 4. Species richness leveled off between 1991 and 2005, except for Transect X that had a peak in 1986-7. After an extreme rainfall event in August 18, 1990, Transect V had an average water depth of 0.70 cm, W had 7.1 cm, and X had 26.90 cm. Richness in Transect X declined to a low level in 1990 and 1991 after the extreme flooding event

  11. Accumulation of metals in vegetation established in ash constructions; Ackumulering av metaller i vegetation paa geotekniska askkonstruktioner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hemstroem, Kristian; Wik, Ola (SGI, Statens geotekniska institut (Sweden)); Bramryd, Torleif; Johansson, Michael (Lunds Universitet, Miljoestrategi (Sweden)); Jaegerbrand, Annika (VTI, Statens Vaeg och transportforskningsinstitut (Sweden))

    2012-07-01

    The overall aim of this study was to investigate how the use of ash in a long-term perspective affects the surrounding flora and fauna with regard to the accumulation of metals in the ecosystem through plant uptake and exposure to grazing animals. The study included a field study and a cultivation experiment. In the field study, the accumulation of metals and metalloids in leaves of trees and shrubs that had self established and grown in lysimeters with aged MSWI bottom ash and aged biofuel ash was determined. In the cultivation experiment, the accumulation of metals and metalloids from the studied materials in ryegrass was determined. Reference materials in the cultivation experiment were two conventional geotechnical materials, crushed rock and excavated soil. Leaves from trees and bushes in the vicinity of the ash lysimeters were used as reference materials in the field study. Contamination of plant samples with particles, through splashing during rain, dusting, or in connection with sampling, proved to have had a major impact on the measured metal and metalloid concentrations in several grass samples in the cultivation experiment. The results also indicate that contamination of plant samples with particles occurred in the field study. In this case, probably due to atmospheric deposition. The particle contamination complicated the evaluation of some of the results in the project since the intention was to study accumulation by roots from the studied ash materials, but, on the other hand, the particle contamination showed the importance of taking into account the spreading of contaminants through particles as an exposure route for grazing animals. In the field study, only Cd and Zn in aspen, willow and birch exhibited elevated levels in the leaves due to root uptake from MSWI bottom ash compared to the reference samples. In addition, elevated levels of As was observed in leaves from trees in the biofuel ash. The total content of As was similar in all studied

  12. Accumulation of metals in vegetation established in ash constructions; Ackumulering av metaller i vegetation paa geotekniska askkonstruktioner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hemstroem, Kristian; Wik, Ola (SGI, Statens geotekniska institut (Sweden)); Bramryd, Torleif; Johansson, Michael (Lunds Universitet, Miljoestrategi (Sweden)); Jaegerbrand, Annika (VTI, Statens Vaeg och transportforskningsinstitut (Sweden))

    2012-02-15

    The overall aim of this study was to investigate how the use of ash in a long-term perspective affects the surrounding flora and fauna with regard to the accumulation of metals in the ecosystem through plant uptake and exposure to grazing animals. The study included a field study and a cultivation experiment. In the field study, the accumulation of metals and metalloids in leaves of trees and shrubs that had self established and grown in lysimeters with aged MSWI bottom ash and aged biofuel ash was determined. In the cultivation experiment, the accumulation of metals and metalloids from the studied materials in ryegrass was determined. Reference materials in the cultivation experiment were two conventional geotechnical materials, crushed rock and excavated soil. Leaves from trees and bushes in the vicinity of the ash lysimeters were used as reference materials in the field study. Contamination of plant samples with particles, through splashing during rain, dusting, or in connection with sampling, proved to have had a major impact on the measured metal and metalloid concentrations in several grass samples in the cultivation experiment. The results also indicate that contamination of plant samples with particles occurred in the field study. In this case, probably due to atmospheric deposition. The particle contamination complicated the evaluation of some of the results in the project since the intention was to study accumulation by roots from the studied ash materials, but, on the other hand, the particle contamination showed the importance of taking into account the spreading of contaminants through particles as an exposure route for grazing animals. In the field study, only Cd and Zn in aspen, willow and birch exhibited elevated levels in the leaves due to root uptake from MSWI bottom ash compared to the reference samples. In addition, elevated levels of As was observed in leaves from trees in the biofuel ash. The total content of As was similar in all studied

  13. Canopy spectra and remote sensing of Ashe juniper and associated vegetation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everitt, J H; Yang, C; Johnson, H B

    2007-07-01

    A study was conducted in central Texas to determine the potential of using remote sensing technology to distinguish Ashe juniper (Juniperus ashei Buchholz) infestations on rangelands. Plant canopy reflectance measurements showed that Ashe juniper had lower near-infrared reflectance than other associated woody plant species and lower visible reflectance than mixed herbaceous species in spring and summer. Ashe juniper could be distinguished on color-infrared aerial photographs acquired in March, April, June, and August and on QuickBird false color satellite imagery obtained in June, where it had a distinct dark reddish-brown tonal response. Unsupervised classification techniques were used to classify aerial photographic and satellite imagery of study sites. An accuracy assessment performed on a computer classified map of a photographic image showed that Ashe juniper had producer's and user's accuracies of 100% and 92.9%, respectively, whereas an accuracy assessment performed on a classified map of a satellite image of the same site showed that Ashe juniper had producer's and user's accuracies of 94.1% and 88.1%, respectively. Accuracy assessments performed on classified maps of satellite images of two additional study sites showed that Ashe juniper had producer's and user's accuracies that ranged from 87.1% to 96.4%. These results indicate that both color-infrared photography and false color satellite imagery can be used successfully for distinguishing Ashe juniper infestations.

  14. Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-129 Ashe-Marion #2 [Mile 150-157])

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jahn, Oden W. [Bonneville Power Administration, Portland, OR (United States)

    2003-03-07

    Vegetation Management for the Ashe-Marion #2 500 kV transmission line from structure 150/2 through structure 157/7. Bonneville Power Administration proposes to remove unwanted vegetation along the right-of-way, access roads and around tower structures along the subject transmission line corridors.

  15. Chemical composition of overland flow produced on soils covered with vegetative ash

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.B. Bodí

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to ascertain the differences between the soluble elements of ash obtained under laboratory conditions and the dissolved in overland flow from soils covered with a layer of ash. The overland flow was obtained during series of rainfall simulations over soils covered with two different types of ash. This study indicates that the soluble elements released from ash can modify water quality increasing its pH, electrical conductivity and especially cation content. The nutrients solubilised are not necessarily the same as the elemental composition of ash itself. Runoff composition depends on the volume of water produced, on the solubility of the ash components and on the chemical interactions with water from rainfall and soil. After the first intense rain event, most of the elements are solubilised and lixiviated or washed out, however, some of them may increase in the runoff or soil water some weeks later due to chemical interactions with water from rainfall and soil nutrients.

  16. Mercury mobilisation from soils and ashes after a wildfire and rainfall events: effects of vegetation type and fire severity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos, Isabel; Abrantes, Nelson; Keizer, Jan Jacob; Vale, Carlos; Serpa, Dalila; Pereira, Patrícia

    2016-04-01

    Wildfire is a major disturbance of forests worldwide, with huge environmental impacts. The number of catastrophic wildfires is increasing over the past few decades mainly due to a combined effect of climate change and poor land-use management. Interestingly, wildfires have an important role in contaminants production and mobilization and, thus, on their biogeochemical cycles. For instance, trace elements could be mobilized during a wildfire from burnt vegetation and ashes and may eventually achieve the aquatic systems upon a rainfall period. In this regard, wildfires represent a relevant diffuse source of trace elements to aquatic systems that has, so far, been poorly investigated. The current study aims to mitigate such lack of knowledge for mercury, a well-recognized persistent toxicant with potential harmful impacts on the environment and on human health. Thus, a field study was conducted in two Portuguese forests (Ermida and S. Pedro do Sul, North-centre of Portugal) with distinct fire severity. Fire was classified as moderate in Ermida and moderate to high severity in S. Pedro do Sul. In Ermida, soil samples and ashes were collected in the seven hillslopes (three burnt eucalypt, three burnt pine and one unburnt eucalypt) immediately and 4 months after the fire, the latter following an episode of intense rainfall. In S. Pedro do Sul, sampling took place immediately after the fire in four hillslopes (one burnt eucalypt and three burnt pine). Mercury analysis was performed in an Hg analyser in which samples were thermally decomposed by controlled heating. The final decomposition products were passed through an Hg amalgamator heated to 700 °C and Hg(0) was released and detected by absorption spectrometry at 254 nm. Burnt soil samples showed significantly lower levels of mercury than non-burnt soil, confirming the potential of a forest fire to release accumulated mercury in soil prior to the burning. Such process could be particularly relevant for this element due

  17. Sealing layer of fly ashes and sewage sludge and vegetation establishment in treatment of mine tailings impoundments; Flygaska och roetslam som taetskikt vid efterbehandling av sandmagasin med vegetationsetablering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greger, Maria; Neuschuetz, Clara [Stockholm Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Botany; Isaksson, Karl-Erik [Boliden Mineral AB (Sweden)

    2006-02-15

    Each year the Swedish mining industry produces 25 Mtonnes of mine tailings that are disposed of in extensive natural impoundments. As this sand, containing more or less sulphide-rich minerals, is penetrated by oxygen and water, it starts weathering resulting in formation of acidic and metal-rich drainage water. To prevent oxygen penetration the mine tailings can be covered with a sealing layer covered with a protective cover that facilitates establishment of vegetation. The aim of this study has been to examine the function of fly ash and sewage sludge in sealing layers at impoundments of pyrite rich mine tailings, and the ability of different plant species, which are suitable for establishment in these areas, to penetrate the sealing layer with their roots and what impact they have on the drainage water. Experiments have been performed in field and greenhouse environment, with sealing layers consisting of fly ash and sewage sludge mixtures, covered with protective covers of sewage sludge or till. Plant establishment has been studied in a survey of naturally established plants at sewage sludge disposal sites close to mining areas, and by sowing and planting of selected plants, for instance fast growing grass species and fibre hemp at the test plots in field and in greenhouse experiments. Large scale application of ashes, sewage sludge and an ash/sludge mixture have been performed in field at three test plots with the size of 0.3-1 ha. Leakage of nutrients and metals from sealing layers has been studied in field and greenhouse tests. In addition, the ability of plant roots to penetrate sealing layers made of different ash/sludge mixtures have been examined in greenhouse experiments. This investigation is a cooperation between Stockholm University and Boliden Mineral AB, and the field experiments have been performed at the mine tailings impoundments at Gillervattnet, Boliden. Other collaborating participants are Skellefteaa Kraft and Munksund, who have produced the

  18. Photosynthetic pigment concentrations, gas exchange and vegetative growth for selected monocots and dicots treated with two contrasting coal fly ashes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yunusa, I.A.M.; Burchett, M.D.; Manoharan, V.; DeSilva, D.L.; Eamus, D.; Skilbeck, C.G. [University of Technology Sydney, Sydney, NSW (Australia). Dept. of Environmental Science

    2009-07-15

    There is uncertainty as to the rates of coal fly ash needed for optimum physiological processes and growth. In the current study we tested the hyothesis that photosynthetic pigments concentrations and CO{sub 2} assimilation (A) are more sensitive than dry weights in plants grown on media amended with coal fly ash. We applied the Terrestrial Plant Growth Test (Guideline 208) protocols of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) to monocots (barley (Hordeum vulgare) and ryegrass (Secale cereale)) and dicots (canola (Brasica napus), radish (Raphanus sativus), field peas (Pisum sativum), and lucerne (Medicago sativa)) on media amended with fly ashes derived from semi-bituminous (gray ash) or lignite (red ash) coals at rates of 0, 2.5, 5.0, 10, or 20 Mg ha(-1). The red ash had higher elemental concentrations and salinity than the gray ash. Fly ash addition had no significant effect on germination by any of the six species. At moderate rates ({<=}10 Mg ha{sup -1}) both ashes increased (P < 0.05) growth rates and concentrations of chlorophylls a and b, but reduced carotenoid concentrations. Addition of either ash increased A in radish and transpiration in barley. Growth rates and final dry weights were reduced for all of the six test species when addition rates exceeded 10 Mg ha{sup -1} for gray ash and 5 Mg ha{sup -1} for red ash. We concluded that plant dry weights, rather than pigment concentrations and/or instantaneous rates of photosynthesis, are more consistent for assessing subsequent growth in plants supplied with fly ash.

  19. Evaluation of used vegetable oil for biogas production in Spain; Evaluacion del potencial de aceite vegetal usado para la obtencion de biogasoleo en la Comunidad de Castilla y Leon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antolin, G.; Tinaut, F. V.; Saez, A. R.; Vegas, L.; Briceno, Y. [Universidad de Valladolid (Spain)

    2002-07-01

    This work studies the potential of the residual vegetal oil that is generated in the Community of Castilla and Leon, evaluating the one that could be destined for the production of biogas. Also, it sets out a management model that will allow to establish a suitable collection and processing of this oil. (Author) 10 refs.

  20. Vegetation responses to simulated emerald ash borer infestation in Fraxinus nigra dominated wetlands of Upper Michigan, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshua C. Davis; Joseph P. Shannon; Nicholas W. Bolton; Randall K. Kolka; Thomas G. Pypker

    2017-01-01

    The invasive emerald ash borer (EAB) (Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae)) is a significant threat to biodiversity and ecosystem processes in North American forests. Of particular concern is the fate of Fraxinus nigra (black ash), which is frequently a dominant canopy species across much of its range. To...

  1. Results Assessment of Intercomparison Exercise CSN/CIEMAT-2010 among Spanish National Laboratories of Environmental Radioactivity (Diet Ashes); Evaluacion de la Intercomparacion CSN/CIEMAT-2010 entre los Laboratorios Nacionales de Radiactividad Ambiental (Ceniza de Dieta)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gasco, C.; Trinidad, J. A.; Llaurado, M.; Suarez, J. A.

    2012-06-08

    This report describes the results assessment of the intercomparison exercise among environmental radioactivity laboratories, organised by Spanish Regulatory Institution (CSN) and prepared and evaluated by UAB and CIEMAT respectively. The exercise has been carried out following the international standards ISO-43 and ISO/IUPAC that provide a useful guide to perform proficiency tests and inter-laboratories comparisons. The selected matrix for this year (2010) was a diet ash obtained from the ashing of a whole fresh diet (breakfast, lunch and dinner), that was enriched with artificial radionuclides (Cs-137, Co-60,Fe-55,Ni-63,Sr-90,Am-241,Pu-238,Pu-239,240 y C-14) and contained natural radionuclides (U-234, U-238, U-natural Th-230, Th-234, Ra-226, Ra-228, Pb-210, Pb-212, Pb-214, Bi-214, Ac-228, Tl-208, K-40) at environmental level of activity concentration. The z-score test was applied to determine how much the laboratories differ from the reference value. The reference value for this exercise was the median of the results from the different laboratories and their standard deviations to achieve a more complete and objective study of the laboratories performance. The participant laboratories have demonstrated a satisfactory quality level for measuring the natural and artificial radionuclides content in this matrix. The reference values obtained through the medians show a negative bias for Pb-210 and Th-234 when comparing to the given values of external qualified laboratories from ENEA and IRSN and positive one for K-40. (Author)

  2. Influence of vegetation and sewage sludge on sealing layer of fly ashes in post-treatment of mine tailings impoundments; Inverkan av vegetation och roetslam paa taetskikt av flygaska vid efterbehandling av sandmagasin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greger, Maria; Neuschuetz, Clara (Inst. of Bothany, Stockholm Univ., Stockholm (Sweden)); Isaksson, Karl-Erik (Boliden Mineral AB, Stockholm (Sweden))

    2009-03-15

    Mining industry produces 25 Mton mine tailings yearly that are deposited in impoundments in the nature. When this sand, containing sulphur rich minerals, reacts with oxygen and water it starts to weather and acidic metal rich water is formed. To prevent this, the sand can be covered with a sealing layer and a protective cover layer with vegetation. As sealing and cover materials fly ashes and sewage sludge can be used. The aim of this investigation was to find out: 1) how sealing layer of fly ashes with and without sewage sludge, and a cover with sewage sludge can be placed practically on mine tailings in a cold climate. 2) how such a cover should be constructed to minimize the risk of root penetration and leakage of nutrients and metals 3) which vegetation that is most suitable This was investigated in field- and greenhouse tests with a sealing layer of fly ash and/or sewage sludge with a cover layer of sewage sludge in which different plant species were established. The practical application was performed in 0.3-1 ha plots at a mine tailings impoundments at Boliden. The ability of plant roots to penetrate a sealing layer was investigated, as well as the effect of simulated root exudates on the penetration resistance in hardened ash. Leakage of nutrients and metals from cover layer of sewage sludge, in some cases with sealing layers beneath, was investigated in field and greenhouse lysimeters. Various plant species were compared on their ability to affect metal and nutrient leakage as well as root penetration and shattering of the hardened ashes. The project was a cooperation between Stockholm University and Boliden Mineral AB, and the field tests were performed at the impoundment Gillervattnet in Boliden and in Garpenberg. Cooperating were also Iggesund Paperboard, Skellefteaa Kraft, Stora Enso Fors, Umeaa Energi and Vattenfall, all producers of ashes that were used, as well as Stockholm Vatten AB, which produced the sewage sludge. The most important conclusions

  3. ashing, non-ashing

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    cistvr

    Three commonly used techniques, namely atomic absorption spectrophotometry (AAS-Ashing and. AAS-Non Ashing) and titrimetry (potassium permanganate titration) have been evaluated in this study to determine the calcium content in six food samples whose calcium levels ranged from 0 to more than. 250mg/100g ...

  4. Vegetation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Epstein, H.E.; Walker, D.A.; Bhatt, U.S.

    2012-01-01

    • Over the past 30 years (1982-2011), the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI), an index of green vegetation, has increased 15.5% in the North American Arctic and 8.2% in the Eurasian Arctic. In the more southern regions of Arctic tundra, the estimated aboveground plant biomass has...... in vegetation (including shrub tundra expansion) and thunderstorm activity, each a result of Arctic warming, have created conditions that favor a more active Arctic fire regime....

  5. Application of coal fly ash, cow dung and grass cuttings mix in cultivation of few vegetables of Solanaceae family

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rani, K.; Kalpana, S. [Government College, Kota (India). PG Dept. of Chemistry

    2009-07-15

    Addition of coal fly ash (CFA), a by-product of Thermal Power Plants, with soil alters its physical and chemical properties. Few pot and field experiments were conducted to study the impact of bio modified CFA in cultivation of selected varieties of tomato and brinjal/egg plant fruit and physicochemical studies have been carried out for different composts obtained by successive replacement of CFA for soil/earth in constituents of original or reference compost. Cow dung and grass cuttings were used as organic manure. CFA obtained from Kota Super Thermal Power Plant was used. Increase in rate of growth and improvement in quality of product was observed with the increase in percentage of CFA.

  6. Influence of vegetation in the energetic balance outdoor urban spaces: Analysis and evaluation of its microclimatic effect; Influencia de la vegetacion en el balance energetico de los espacios exteriores urbanos: Analisis y evaluacion de sus efectos microclimaticos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ochoa, J. Manuel [Universidad de Sonora, Hermosillo, Sonora (Mexico); Roset, Jaume [Universidad Politecnica de Cataluna, Barcelona (Spain)

    2000-07-01

    We present design guidelines to detect and to control the energy fluxes within and urban space. The main purpose is to create outdoor spaces with appropriate comfort conditions and to improve energy efficiency of adjacent buildings, by modifying its surrounding areas, approaching outdoor environment to the desired indoor conditions. The design guidelines as well as the concepts developed on this paper are explained in a language familiar to architects, urban planners and landscape designers, which have to take energetic and bioclimatic decisions up the first stage of a project process. A case study analysis of an urban scenery is presented, and conclusions about the advantage of using the vegetation as an instrument of microclimatic control are given. [Spanish] En este articulo se presentan pautas de diseno, que estan encaminadas, a saber detectar y en caso necesario reconducir, los flujos de energia dentro del espacio urbano. El proposito es crear espacios exteriores, con condiciones de confort ambiental, adecuadas a los usuarios de dicho espacio y por otro lado, mejorar la eficiencia energetica de los edificios, al modificar su entorno inmediato. Tanto las pautas de diseno, como los conceptos desarrollados en este trabajo, estan explicados con un discurso orientado al lenguaje de los profesionales dedicados al diseno urbano, arquitectonico y del paisaje, que son quienes deben hacer las consideraciones energeticas y bioclimaticas, desde las primeras etapas de un proyecto. Finalmente se presenta el ejemplo de un escenario urbano, donde se han realizado mediciones de los parametros climaticos, analizando cualitativa y cuantitativamente la influencia de la vegetacion y otros elementos del paisaje urbano sobre el microclima, y se dan conclusiones sobre la conveniencia de utilizar la vegetacion como un instrumento para el control microclimatico en los espacios exteriores urbanos.

  7. La calidad de las evaluaciones de manuscritos en Gaceta Sanitaria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    García A.M.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo: Describir las cualidades y limitaciones de las evaluaciones externas de los manuscritos remitidos a Gaceta Sanitaria para mejorar la selección de los evaluadores, aumentar la calidad de las evaluaciones y establecer un sistema interno que pudiera incorporarse al proceso editorial de gestión de los manuscritos. Métodos: Se incluyeron 100 evaluaciones de 55 manuscritos recibidos durante los años 2000 y 2001. Se aplicó un formulario de preguntas cerradas en el que se valoraban aspectos específicos y generales de calidad en las evaluaciones (respuestas sí/no o sobre una escala de 1 a 5. Se llevó a cabo un análisis descriptivo y de correlación entre los distintos ítems del formulario. Se calculó un Índice de Calidad como suma de las puntuaciones de los ítems específicos. Resultados: Las evaluaciones obtuvieron puntuaciones más elevadas en relación con la compleción del formulario para los revisores (84%, la utilización de un tono constructivo con los autores (evaluaciones por encima de 3: 63%, la identificación de cualidades y limitaciones metodológicas (evaluaciones por encima de 3: 59% y la fundamentación de los comentarios del evaluador (evaluaciones por encima de 3: 58%. Con menor frecuencia, se valora la relevancia (evaluaciones por encima de 3: 40% o la originalidad (evaluaciones por encima de 3: 35% del manuscrito. La utilidad global de la evaluación para el editor y la calidad global de la evaluación mostraron una elevada correlación con el resto de ítems específicos en el formulario y con el Índice de Calidad. Conclusiones: La calidad general de las evaluaciones externas de manuscritos en Gaceta Sanitaria se puede considerar alta. Se ponen de manifiesto los aspectos mejorables de las evaluaciones. Se podría establecer un proceso sistemático de valoración de las evaluaciones externas utilizando indicadores simples como la valoración global de la utilidad o de la calidad de la evaluación en su

  8. Sustentos ontologicos, teleologicos y metodologicos de los modelos de evaluacion curricular aplicados en la educacion superior en Venezuela

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gonzalez Lopez, Rosalina

    2010-01-01

    ... evaluacion. Por ello esta investigacion tuvo como objetivo determinar los sustentos ontologicos, teleologicos y metodologicos de los modelos de evaluacion curricular aplicados mayoritariamente en el pais...

  9. Evaluacion de bibliotecas universitarias: un modelo de avance y desarrollo

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tarango, Javier; Hernandez-Orozco, Guillermo

    2009-01-01

    ... (sociedad del conocimiento). El modelo teorico de evaluacion bibliotecaria que se propone en este documento representa una alternativa innovadora para valorar a la biblioteca en una dimension mas objetiva, trascendente...

  10. Algunas relaciones entre ciencia y tecnologia, evaluacion tecnologica y la teoria del posicionamiento

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Cardenas Salgado, Enrique

    2010-01-01

    El presente articulo busca establecer algunas relaciones entre ciencia y tecnologia junto con los planteamientos del construccionismo social, la teoria del posicionamiento y la evaluacion tecnologica...

  11. Addition of ash on drained forested peatlands in southern Sweden. Effects on forest production, fluxes of greenhouse gases, peat properties, understorey vegetation and groundwater chemistry; Tillfoersel av aska i skog paa dikad torvmark i soedra Sverige. Effekter paa skogsproduktion, floeden av vaexthusgaser, torvegenskaper, markvegetation och grundvattenkemi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sikstroem, Ulf; Bjoerk, Robert G.; Ring, Eva; Ernfors, Maria; Jacobson, Staffan; Nilsson, Mats; Klemedtsson, Leif

    2009-02-15

    The objective of the present study was to evaluate effects of wood-ash addition on drained peatlands in southern Sweden. Tree growth, greenhouse gases, peat properties, microbial biomass and processes, understory vegetation and groundwater chemistry were measured in three field experiments (some variables were not measured in all experiments): (i) 168 Perstorp, an oligotrophic mire with Scotch pine (Pinus sylvestris L.), where 2.5 tonnes d.w. of wood ash/ha (2.5WA) was added in 1982; (ii) 273 Anderstorp, also an oligotrophic mire with Scots pine, where 3.3 tonnes d.w. crushed ash/ha (3.3KA) and 6.6 tonnes d.w. crushed/ha (6.6KA) was added in 2003; (iii) 278 Skogaryd, a minerotrophic mire with Norway spruce (Picea abies L. Karst.), where the same doses of crushed ash as in Anderstorp were added in 2006. Untreated controls were included in all experiments. At Anderstorp, increased tree growth was indicated, at least in the treatment with the highest ash dose during the first five years after treatment. The annual emissions of CO{sub 2}, CH4 and N{sub 2}O from the peat were unaffected. At Skogaryd, the growth was unaffected and the emissions of both CO{sub 2} and N{sub 2}O were reduced during the first two years after treatment. In general, the significant ash effects (2.5WA and 3.3KA evaluated) on peat characteristics, microbial biomass and processes were found in the upper soil (0-5 cm) at the recently treated sites (Anderstorp and Skogaryd), and at greater depths (5-30 cm) at Perstorp, where the ash was added 25 years ago. In the ash treatment at Perstorp, there was a shift in the plant community structure and a decrease in species diversity of the understory vegetation. However, at this point of time, the forest stand had become substantially denser than on the control plots. Hence, these effects on the understory vegetation may have been an indirect effect of the ash-induced altered tree stand properties. In Skogaryd, no shift in the plant community was found

  12. Ash in fire affected ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Paulo; Jordan, Antonio; Cerda, Artemi; Martin, Deborah

    2015-04-01

    the role of ash in fire affected areas. Acknowledgments The 'Litfire' Project (MIP-048/2011; 181 Pereira) funded by the Lithuanian Research Council, Soil quality, erosion control and plant cover recovery under different post-firemanagement scenarios (POSTFIRE), funded by the Spanish Ministry of Economy and Competitiveness (CGL2013-47862-C2-1-R), Preventing and Remediating Degradation of Soils in Europe Through Land Care (RECARE) funded by the European Commission (FP7-ENV-2013-TWO STAGE) and European Research Project LEDDRA (243857) and COST action ES1306 (Connecting European connectivity research). References Balfour, V.N., Determining wildfire ash saturated hydraulic conductivity and sorptivity with laboratory and field methods. Catena. doi:10.1016/j.catena.2014.01.009 Barreiro, A., Fontúrbel, M.T., Lombao, A., Martín, C., Vega, J.A., Fernández, C., Carballas, T., Díaz-Raviña, M., Using phospholipid fatty acid and community level physiological profiling techniques to characterize soil microbial communities following an experimental fire and different stabilization treatments. Catena. doi:10.1016/j.catena.2014.07.011 Bodi, M., Martin, D.A., Santin, C., Balfour, V., Doerr, S.H., Pereira, P., Cerda, A., Mataix-Solera, J. (2014) Wildland fire ash: production, composition and eco-hydro-geomorphic effects. Earth-Science Reviews, 130, 103-127. Bodí, M.B., Doerr, S.H., Cerdà, A. and Mataix-Solera, J. (2012) Hydrological effects of a layer of vegetation ash on underlying wettable and water repellent soils. Geoderma, 191, 14-23. Burjachs, F., Expósito, I., Charcoal and pollen analysis: examples of Holocene fire dynamics in Mediterranean Iberian Peninsula. Catena. doi:10.1016/j.catena.2014.10.006 Burns, K., Gabet, E., The effective viscosity of slurries laden with vegetative ash. Catena. doi:10.1016/j.catena.2014.06.008 Cerdà, A. Doerr, S.H. (2008). The effect of ash and needle cover on surface runoff and erosion in the immediate post-fire period. Catena, 74 , 256

  13. CZECH FLUID SULFOCALCIC ASH AND FLY ASH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frantisek Skvara

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Sulfocalcic ash is formed during the fluidized bed combustion of coal in the presence of limestone. It differs from classical fly ash by its composition and properties. Sulfocalcic ash contains free CaO, CaSO₄ and partially sintered aluminosilicates. In contact with water, it produces Ca(OH₂, expansive ettringite and a small amount of the CSH phase. There is little information about these ashes in the literature. At present, the possibility of using fluid sulfocalcic ashes is quite limited because of the formation of expansive ettringite. More research in the field of sulfocalcic ashes is a necessity because increasing quantities of this product are rejected by the energy-generation industry.

  14. [Ash Meadows Purchase Proposal

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — A proposal sent to the Richard King Mellon Foundation for a loan to fund the purchase of Ash Meadows by the Nature Conservancy. Ash Meadows, set outside of Las Vegas...

  15. Asymmetric Ashes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-11-01

    , it is. "This has some impact on the use of Type Ia supernovae as standard candles," says Ferdinando Patat. "This kind of supernovae is used to measure the rate of acceleration of the expansion of the Universe, assuming these objects behave in a uniform way. But asymmetries can introduce dispersions in the quantities observed." "Our discovery puts strong constraints on any successful models of thermonuclear supernova explosions," adds Wang. Models have suggested that the clumpiness is caused by a slow-burn process, called 'deflagration', and leaves an irregular trail of ashes. The smoothness of the inner regions of the exploding star implies that at a given stage, the deflagration gives way to a more violent process, a 'detonation', which travels at supersonic speeds - so fast that it erases all the asymmetries in the ashes left behind by the slower burning of the first stage, resulting in a smoother, more homogeneous residue.

  16. Vegetable seedling production with sugarcane bagasse ash

    Science.gov (United States)

    The eleven sugarcane mills in Louisiana processed 380,000 ac and 12.8 million tons of harvested sugarcane in 2014, producing 1.5 million tons of raw sugar (brown sugar), and an estimated 3 million tons of the fibrous plant residue called bagasse. Bagasse is the fibrous material remaining after remov...

  17. Generic index of aquatic vegetation (IVAM) for a rapid assessment of ecological quality of Spanish rivers: taxonomic resolution and application to Castilla-La Mancha region; Indice Generico de Vegetacion Acuatica (IVAM): Propuesta de evaluacion rapida del estado ecologico de los rios ibericos en aplicacion de la Directiva Marco del Agua

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moreno, J. L.; Navarro, C.; Hera, J. de las

    2005-07-01

    The Water Framework Directive proposes the use of aquatic flora as a valid bio indicator for assessing the ecological status of European rivers. Due to the lack of an aquatic vegetation index for Spanish rivers, we present an index to assess trophic status or eutrophication in rivers and streams. Thus, we calculated tolerance scores and indicator values for tax from nutrient levels. the index is called IVAM (Macroscopic Aquatic Vegetation Index). The index takes into account either macrophyte or microphytes (the latter making up macroscopic growth forms) including briophytes. The IVAM showed the best correlation with nutrients besides other quality indices, indicating a solid tool to assess trophic status or eutrophication. (Author) 15 refs.

  18. Metodo de identificacion-medicion-evaluacion de riesgos para la direccion estrategica

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bolano-Rodriguez, Yuniel; Alfonso-Robaina, Daniel; Ramirez-Moro, Aliec; Hernandez-Rodriguez, Arturo Abel

    2011-01-01

    En este trabajo se presenta un Metodo de Identificacion-Medicion y Evaluacion de riesgos para la Direccion Estrategica, utilizando el enfoque a procesos y aportando como valor cientifico la medicion...

  19. Evaluacion de los resultados de servicio al por menor segun la perspectiva del consumidor

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Francisco-Maffezzolli, Eliane Cristine; Muller Prado, Paulo Henrique

    2013-01-01

    Este estudio pretende evaluar la relacion entre los resultados financieros y la evaluacion no financiera desde la perspectiva del consumidor, teniendo en cuenta el contexto de la telefonia movil en Brasil...

  20. Competencia digital en la educacion superior: instrumentos de evaluacion y nuevos entornos

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Esteve Mon, Francesc; Gisbert Cervera, Merce

    2013-01-01

    .... Sin embargo, los instrumentos existentes para su desarrollo y evaluacion no siempre cubren todas las areas o dimensiones de estas competencias, por lo cual resulta esencial explorar nuevos entornos...

  1. Simulacion y evaluacion de una propuesta de implementacion del minimo vital de agua potable en Colombia

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mendez Sayago, Jhon Alexander; Mendez Sayago, Johanna Mildred

    2011-01-01

    Este articulo presenta la simulacion y evaluacion de la implementacion del minimo vital de agua potable para los usuarios de los estratos uno y dos, subsidiada a partir del incremento en las tarifas...

  2. Metodos estadisticos de evaluacion de la concordancia y la reproducibilidad de pruebas diagnosticas

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Cortes-Reyes, Edgar; Rubio-Romero, Jorge Andres; Gaitan-Duarte, Hernando

    2010-01-01

    Introduccion: en la evaluacion de la utilidad de una prueba diagnostica, se requiere en algunas situaciones valorar la reproducibilidad de los resultados o la concordancia de los mismos al compararla...

  3. La evaluacion del desempeno docente: consideraciones desde el enfoque por competencias

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rueda Beltran, Mario

    2009-01-01

    ... de las propuestas sobre las competencias docentes. Se proponen criterios y estrategias para desarrollar programas de evaluacion de los profesores en el contexto de un ambiente generalizado en el sector educativo que esta adoptando el modelo...

  4. REVISIÓN DE LAS EVALUACIONES ADAPTATIVAS COMPUTARIZADAS (CAT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruber López

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available En este artículo presentamos una revisión de las Evaluaciones Adaptativas Computarizadas. A diferencia de los test convencionales, estas evaluaciones plantean un examen adaptado a las necesidades y capacidades de cada uno de los evaluados, lo cual redunda en una mejor experiencia para el evaluado y en una mayor precisión del resultado. Las evaluaciones adaptativas se fundamentan en la teoría de respuesta a ítems, que define las directrices y condiciones para que este tipo de pruebas sea posible. A partir de esta teoría, surgen distintos modelos que permiten modelar diferentes rasgos de los evaluados y la relación de estos con la probabilidad de acertar un ítem dado. Para llevar a cabo el proceso de evaluación, un test adaptativo debe estar conformado de un banco de ítems, un método que permita la selección de estos y un criterio de terminación. Todos estos componentes articulan la prueba y la ayudan a concretarse adecuadamente. AbstractThis paper is a review of the Computerized Adaptive Testing Process. Unlike conventional tests, these assessments propose a test adapted to every examinee’s needs and capabilities, which results in a better experience for those assessed and a more accurate score. Adaptive assessments are based on item response theory, which defines the guidelines and conditions for such tests to be carried out. From this theory, different models that allow the repositioning of different traits of the examinees and their relationship with the probability to succeed in a given item, arise. To complete the assessment process, an adaptive test should consist of a set of items, a method which allows the selection of these and a termination criterion. All the aforementioned components articulate the test and help to properly materialize it.

  5. Shedding of ash deposits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zbogar, Ana; Frandsen, Flemming; Jensen, Peter Arendt

    2009-01-01

    Ash deposits formed during fuel thermal conversion and located on furnace walls and on convective pass tubes, may seriously inhibit the transfer of heat to the working fluid and hence reduce the overall process efficiency. Combustion of biomass causes formation of large quantities of troublesome...... ash deposits which contain significant concentrations of alkali, and earth-alkali metals. The specific composition of biomass deposits give different characteristics as compared to coal ash deposits, i.e. different physical significance of the deposition mechanisms, lower melting temperatures, etc....... Low melting temperatures make straw ashes especially troublesome, since their stickiness is higher at lower temperatures, compared to coal ashes. Increased stickiness will eventually lead to a higher collection efficiency of incoming ash particles, meaning that the deposit may grow even faster...

  6. Wildland fire ash: future research directions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodí, Merche B.; Martins, Deborah A.; Cerdà, Artemi; Balfour, Victoria N.; Santin, Cristina; Doerr, Stefan H.; Pereira, Paulo; Mataix-Solera, Jorge

    2014-05-01

    depth, density, and size fraction distribution compared to that of the underlying soil, f) To measure the spatial variability of ash at the plot or hillslope scale, g) To address issues of how much ash stays on site after fire, especially how much is incorporated into underlying soil layers, compared to how much is eroded by wind and water and becomes incorporated into depositional environments located away from the site. iii) ash effects h) To study the connectivity of patches of ash to make progress in understanding the role of ash in infiltration, the generation of runoff and erosion, i) To take into account the role of ash in the fate of the ecosystem immediately after the fire, as well as the combination of ash and other cover, such as the needles, in the post-fire period, j) To study the amount and forms of C in ash, including studies characterizing its chemical and biological reactivity and degradability in soil and sedimentary environments, k) To understanding the legacy of atmospherically-deposited elements (e.g. P, Si, Mn) and dust to fully understand the complex chemistry of ash, and at the same time assess its effects on human health. iii) enhance collaboration across the globe on the multidisciplinary topic of ash research since research in large areas of the world that burn (e.g., Africa and Russia) is underrepresented. We are sure that several activities, such as land and water supply management, risk reduction, and planning for societal and ecosystem resilience in the face of a changing climate, will benefit from the insights gained from the ash research community. Acknowledgements The research projects GL2008-02879/BTE, LEDDRA 243857 and RECARE FP7 project 603498 supported this research. References: Bodí, M. B., Mataix-Solera, J., Doerr, S. H., Cerdà, A. 2011.The wettability of ash from burned vegetation and its relatioship to Mediterranean plant species type, burn. Geoderma 160: 599-607. Bodí, M.B. Doerr, S.H., Cerdà, A. and Mataix-Solera, J. 2012

  7. Ash tracer technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hald, P.

    1995-12-01

    This report describes the ash tracer technique which has been developed, used and evaluated for description of the extent of burnout for Cerrejon coal and wheat straw converted in a pressurized entrained-flow reactor. The uncertainty in the calculated extent of burnout depends on the uncertainty in the ash percentages determined for fuel and fuel sample. The uncertainty increases with decreasing amounts of material used for the ash percent determinations, as the natural variation within the fuel and fuel sample becomes obvious. Ash percentages for the original fuels have an absolute deviation within 0.2% with a remaining ash amount of minimum 100 mg and of 2% when using thermogravimetric analysis equipment where 0.4 - 4 mg was remaining. Repeated ash percent determinations by thermogravimetric analysis equipment of 40 samples showed an average absolute deviation of 3%. A temperature of 1000 deg. C is shown to be the best choice for the ash percent determinations in order to reduce the uncertainties. collection of representative straw samples is shown to make higher demands to the sampling procedure than collection of those for coal. A representative sample collection is shown to be easier from combustion experiments that form gasification and pyrolysis experiments. The ash tracer technique is verified by elemental ash analyses. (au) 14 tabs., 6 refs.

  8. Melting and Sintering of Ashes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Lone Aslaug

    1997-01-01

    The thesis contains an experimental study of the fusion and sintering of ashes collected during straw and coal/straw co-firing.A laboratory technique for quantitative determination of ash fusion has been developed based on Simultaneous Thermal Analysis (STA). By means of this method the fraction...... of melt in the investigated ashes has been determined as a function of temperature. Ash fusion results have been correlated to the chemical and mineralogical composition of the ashes, to results from a standard ash fusion test and to results from sintering experiments. Furthermore, the ash fusion results...... have been employed in a simple model for prediction of ash deposit formation, the results of which have been compared to ash deposition formation rates measured at the respective boilers.The ash fusion results were found to directly reflect the ash compositional data:a) Fly ashes and deposits from...

  9. Trace elements in coal ash

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deonarine, Amrika; Kolker, Allan; Doughten, Michael W.

    2015-01-01

    Coal ash is a residual waste product primarily produced by coal combustion for electric power generation. Coal ash includes fly ash, bottom ash, and flue-gas desulfurization products (at powerplants equipped with flue-gas desulfurization systems). Fly ash, the most common form of coal ash, is used in a range of products, especially construction materials. A new Environmental Protection Agency ruling upholds designation of coal ash as a non-hazardous waste under Subtitle D of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, allowing for the continued beneficial use of coal ash and also designating procedures and requirements for its storage.

  10. assessment of assessment of bagasse ash bagasse ash bagasse ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    eobe

    This study was carried out to evaluate the effect of bagasse ash s carried out to evaluate the effect of bagasse ash s carried out to evaluate the effect of bagasse ash on the California bearing ratio of lateritic soil. on the California bearing ratio of lateritic soil. Laboratory tests were performed on the natural and bagasse ash ...

  11. Ash storms: impacts of wind-remobilised volcanic ash on rural communities and agriculture following the 1991 Hudson eruption, southern Patagonia, Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, T. M.; Cole, J. W.; Stewart, C.; Cronin, S. J.; Johnston, D. M.

    2011-04-01

    Tephra fall from the August 1991 eruption of Volcán Hudson affected some 100,000 km2 of Patagonia and was almost immediately reworked by strong winds, creating billowing clouds of remobilised ash, or `ash storms'. The immediate impacts on agriculture and rural communities were severe, but were then greatly exacerbated by continuing ash storms. This paper describes the findings of a 3-week study tour of the diverse environments of southern Patagonia affected by ash storms, with an emphasis on determining the impacts of repeated ash storms on agriculture and local practices that were developed in an attempt to mitigate these impacts. Ash storms produce similar effects to initial tephra eruptions, prolonged for considerable periods. These have included the burial of farmland under dune deposits, abrasion of vegetation and contamination of feed supplies with fine ash. These impacts can then cause problems for grazing animals such as starvation, severe tooth abrasion, gastrointestinal problems, corneal abrasion and blindness, and exhaustion if sheep fleeces become laden with ash. In addition, ash storms have led to exacerbated soil erosion, human health impacts, increased cleanup requirements, sedimentation in irrigation canals, and disruption of aviation and land transport. Ash deposits were naturally stabilised most rapidly in areas with high rainfall (>1,500 mm/year) through compaction and enhanced vegetation growth. Stabilisation was slowest in windy, semi-arid regions. Destruction of vegetation and suppression of regrowth by heavy tephra fall (>100 mm) hindered the stabilisation of deposits for years, and reduced the surface friction which increased wind erosivity. Stabilisation of tephra deposits was improved by intensive tillage, use of windbreaks and where there was dense and taller vegetative cover. Long-term drought and the impracticality of mixing ash deposits with soil by tillage on large farms was a barrier to stabilising deposits and, in turn

  12. Fusion characterization of biomass ash

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ma, Teng; Fan, Chuigang; Hao, Lifang

    2016-01-01

    characteristics of six types of biomass ash have been measured by TMA. Compared with standard ash fusibility temperatures (AFT) test, TMA is more suitable for measuring the fusion characteristics of biomass ash. The glassy molten areas of the ash samples are sticky and mainly consist of K-Ca-silicates....

  13. Utilisation of coal ash to improve acid soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shigeru Kato

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available The study on utilization of coal ash to improve acid soil was carried out in a greenhouse at the Land Development Regional Office 1, Pathum Thani Province, Central Thailand, from January-May 2003. Fly ash mixture (fly ash plus gypsum and lime at the proportion 5:4:1 and clinker ash mixture (clinker ash plus gypsum and lime at the proportion 5:4:1 were used as soil amendments at varying rates i.e., 0, 6.25,12.5, 18.75 and 25 t/ha to improve the soil. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of application of coal ash on acid soil and the growth of a vegetable (Chinese kale. Chinese kale cultivars were planted in a randomized complete block design with three replications. Pak Chong soil series (Ultisols was used as the growth medium. Twenty-day-old seedlings were transplanted in 270 pots (two plants per pot containing acid soil with different treatments of coal ash mixture which were as follows: 1 control, 2 fly ash mixture 6.25 t/ha, 3 fly ash mixture 12.5 t/ha, 4 fly ash mixture 18.75 t/ha, 5 fly ash mixture 25 t/ha, 6 clinker ash mixture 6.25 t/ha, 7 clinker ash mixture 12.5 t/ha, 8 clinker ash mixture 18.75 t/ha and 9 clinker ash mixture 25 t/ha. Chemical fertilizers were applied at the rate of 250 kg/ha using a grade of 15-15-15 of N, P and K, respectively. Plants were harvested 40 days after transplanting. Among the treatments, application of fly ashmixture at a rate of 25t/ha (4t/rai substantially increased soil pH up to 5.7. Fly ash was found more effective than clinker ash in increasing soil pH. The highest yield of Chinese kale was also obtained when fly ash mixture was applied at a rate of 25 t/ha followed by fly ash mixture at 18.75 t/ha and clinker ash mixture at 18.75 t/ha with an average yield per plant of 4.980, 3.743 and 3.447 grams, respectively. It can be concluded that the application of coal ash mixture, either fly- or clinker ash, at 18.75-25 t/ha (3-4 t/rai was the most effective in terms of plant yield. The use of

  14. Silica from Ash

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Chemical. Tech.) ... waste disposal but also recovers a valuable silica product, together with certain useful associate recoveries. ... (consisting of residue digested ash, sodium-silicate, water and free sodium hydroxide). In the second step of the ...

  15. Phenolic acids as bioindicators of fly ash deposit revegetation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    L. Djurdjevic; M. Mitrovic; P. Pavlovic; G. Gajic; O. Kostic [Institute for Biological Research ' Sinisa Stankovic,' Belgrade (Serbia and Montenegro). Department of Ecology

    2006-05-15

    The floristic composition, the abundance, and the cover of pioneer plant species of spontaneously formed plant communities and the content of total phenolics and phenolic acids, as humus constituents, of an ash deposit after 7 years of recultivation were studied. The restoration of both the soil and the vegetation on the ash deposits of the 'Nikola Tesla-A' thermoelectric power plant in Obrenovac (Serbia) is an extremely slow process. Unfavorable physical and chemical characteristics, the toxicity of fly ash, and extreme microclimatic conditions prevented the development of compact plant cover. The abundance and cover of plants increased from the central part of the deposit towards its edges. Festuca rubra L., Crepis setosa Hall., Erigeron canadensis L., Cirsium arvense (L.) Scop., Calamagrostis epigeios (L.) Roth., and Tamarix gallica L. were the most abundant species, thus giving the highest cover. Humus generated during the decomposition process of plant remains represents a completely new product absent in the ash as the starting material. The amount of total phenolics and phenolic acids in fly ash increased from the center of the deposit towards its edges in correlation with the increase in plant abundance and cover. The presence of phenolic acids indicates the ongoing process of humus formation in the ash, in which the most abundant pioneer plants of spontaneously formed plant communities play the main role. Phenolic compounds can serve as reliable bioindicators in an assessment of the success of the recultivation process of thermoelectric power plants' ash deposits.

  16. Cs-137 in biofuel and reuse of the ash; Radiocesium i biobraenslen och aateranvaendning av askan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johanson, K. J. [Swedish Univ. of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala (Sweden). Dept. of Forest Mycology and Pathology

    1999-07-01

    The activity concentration of {sup 137}Cs in sheep fescue grown in pots where ashes had been added to forest soil were studied. The added ash corresponded to 3000 kg per hectare and were either mixed into the forest soil or spread above the soil. The results were expressed as percentage of control value from sheep fescue grown on the same forest soil but without adding ash. In the first harvest the {sup 137}Cs were 60 and 33 % of the control value in the pots where fly ash respectively wet ash was mixed with the forest soil before starting the experiment. In the pots where the ash was spread on the soil 80 and 76 % of control values were found in fly ash respectively wet ash pots. In the second harvest 87 and 10 % of control values were found in fly ash respectively wet ash in the pots where ash were mixed with soil. The corresponding values in pots where the ash was spread on the soil were 31 respectively 42 %. The results show that we probably can expect at least a 50 % decrease in the {sup 137}Cs activity concentrations after adding ash particularly if the ash is spread on the soil. There will take a certain time before the optimal reduction occur and after spreading in the forest there will probably take one year before maximum reduction is obtained. In a field experiment using potassium fertilization we obtained about the same reduction in {sup 137}Cs levels in bilberry, lingonberry and heather and also in some fungal species. The reduction could be seen even after 7 vegetation periods. It thus seems that the adding of ash to forest soil should be a rather effective counter measure with expected reduction of {sup 137}Cs levels of about 50 %.

  17. Sugarcane boiler ash as an amendment for soilless growing media

    Science.gov (United States)

    In 2016, research was conducted to investigate the use of sugarcane bagasse ash (SBA) as an amendment to soilless planting media for the production of vegetable seedlings. Typically, the eleven Louisiana sugarcane mills use a portion of the sugarcane bagasse for fuel, producing over 60,000 tons of S...

  18. Emerald ash borer aftermath forests: the future of ash ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kathleen S. Knight; Daniel A. Herms; John Cardina; Robert Long; Kamal J.K. Gandhi; Catharine P. Herms

    2011-01-01

    The effects of emerald ash borer (EAB) (Agrilus planipennis) on forest ecosystems are being studied through a collaborative research program between the U.S. Forest Service and The Ohio State University. We are monitoring ash demographics, understory light availability, EAB population dynamics, native and non-native plants, and effects of ash...

  19. Hygroscopic properties of volcanic ash

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    T. L. Lathem; P. Kumar; A. Nenes; J. Dufek; I. N. Sokolik; M. Trail; A. Russell

    2011-01-01

      Volcanic ash is hygroscopic Water vapor adsorption is the main proceess controlling ash hygroscopicity The results can be parameterized in a simple correlation for use in models Limited observational...

  20. Evaluacion de indicadores biometricos en llamas (Lama glama) de las variedades Ch'accu y K'ara

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Llacsa M., Javier; Urviola S., J. Martin; Leyva V., Victor

    2007-01-01

    .... Las evaluaciones se hicieron al primer, tercer y setimo mes de edad de las crias. Los calculos del VM y del ASG se hicieron mediante figuras geometricas de cono truncado y trapecio, respectivamente, utilizando el programa de ingenieria Autocad...

  1. Evaluacion del impacto del aprendizaje basado en proyectos en cursos de ingenieria utilizando analisis de correspondencias multiples

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Fernandez-Samaca, Liliana; Ramirez, Jose M; Vasquez, Jesus E

    2013-01-01

    Este articulo presenta una experiencia sobre la evaluacion del impacto del aprendizaje basado en proyectos en cursos de ingenieria mediante el uso de analisis de correspondencias multiples y agrupacion jerarquica...

  2. Taller de diseno de una pauta de evaluacion de trabajos escritos desde la perspectiva de alfabetizacion academica: estudio de caso

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lopez, Karen Shirley; Gomez, Nora Lucia; Pedraza, Carmen Eugenia

    2012-01-01

    .... Este estudio de caso da cuenta de una experiencia de formacion de profesorado universitario en aspectos de la alfabetizacion academica y de la evaluacion formativa pertinentes en la elaboracion...

  3. Congruencia entre el diseno curricular y la evaluacion de los aprendizajes esperados en catedras impartidas en una Universidad Chilena

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ayala, Ricardo; Messing, Helga; Labbe, Caroline; Obando, N. Isabel

    2010-01-01

    Estudio Cuantitativo que evalua la consistencia interna de asignaturas impartidas en una universidad privada, especificamente en cuanto a la evaluacion del aprendizaje y su coherencia con los objetivos planificados...

  4. Analisis y resultados de un modelo de evaluacion, apoyo y mejora de proyectos empresariales impulsados por jovenes emprendedores

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Revuelto Taboada, Lorenzo; Fernandez Guerrero, Rafael

    2009-01-01

    .... Este trabajo tiene como objetivo avanzar en la mejora de los sistemas de evaluacion de programas de ayuda a emprendedores y mostrar como las mejoras introducidas pueden tener efectos sobre la calidad...

  5. Rising from the ashes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Short, G. [RockTron Advanced Products (United States)

    2010-05-15

    The paper describes a new process for recovering useful minerals from the world's stockpile of waste fly ash. The technology from RockTron allows separation and recycling of minerals from fly ash so they can be used again in the rubber, plastics and coatings industries. Cenospheres, carbon, magnetite and finally alumino-silicates can be recovered. The first recycling plant in the UK has been built at Fiddler's Ferry power station in Widnes and another plant is being built at Gale Common. 2 photos.

  6. The normalised wildfire ash index (NWAI): a remote sensing approach for quantifying post-wildfire ash loads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chris, Chafer; Doerr, Stefan; Santin, Cristina

    2017-04-01

    The impacts of wildfire ash, the powdery residue from fuel burning, on post-fire ecosystems are many and diverse. Ash is a source of nutrients and can help the recovery of vegetation. It can also contain substantial amounts of recalcitrant carbon and thus contribute to long-term carbon storage. In its initial state, the ash layer on the ground can protect the bare soil, mitigating post-fire water erosion by runoff. However, when the adsorbent capability of this layer is exceeded, ash can be transported into the hydrological network and be a major contributor to water contamination. Ash can also contribute to post-fire mass movements such as debris flows. The eco-hydro-geomorphic impacts of ash on post-fire ecosystems are therefore important, but remain poorly quantified. A fundamental step in that direction is the understanding of ash production and distribution at the landscape scale, which would allow incorporating ash as a key parameter into post-fire risk models. We have developed a new spectral index (NWAI) using Landsat imagery to model the spatial distribution of ash loads in the post-fire landscape. It was developed based on a severe wildfire that burnt 13,000 ha of dry eucalyptus forest near Sydney and has also been tested for a forested area burnt by the catastrophic 2009 Black Saturday fires near Melbourne. Although ecosystem and fire characteristics differed substantially between the Sydney and Melbourne fires, our NWAI index performs well. In this contribution we will discuss the (i) the principles of the NWAI and (ii) its potential for pollution risk forecasting.

  7. Fusion characterization of biomass ash

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Teng [State Key Laboratory ofMultiphase Complex Systems, Institute of Process Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, No. 1 Zhongguancun North Second Street, Beijing 100190 (China); Sino-Danish Center for Education and Research, Beijing, 100190 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Fan, Chuigang; Hao, Lifang [State Key Laboratory ofMultiphase Complex Systems, Institute of Process Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, No. 1 Zhongguancun North Second Street, Beijing 100190 (China); Li, Songgeng, E-mail: sgli@ipe.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory ofMultiphase Complex Systems, Institute of Process Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, No. 1 Zhongguancun North Second Street, Beijing 100190 (China); Song, Wenli [State Key Laboratory ofMultiphase Complex Systems, Institute of Process Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, No. 1 Zhongguancun North Second Street, Beijing 100190 (China); Lin, Weigang [State Key Laboratory ofMultiphase Complex Systems, Institute of Process Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, No. 1 Zhongguancun North Second Street, Beijing 100190 (China); Department of Chemical and Biochemical Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, 2800 Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark)

    2016-08-20

    Highlights: • A novel method is proposed to analyze fusion characteristics of biomass ash. • T{sub m} can represent the severe melting temperature of biomass ash. • Compared with AFT, TMA is the better choice to analyze the fusion characteristics of biomass ash. - Abstract: The ash fusion characteristics are important parameters for thermochemical utilization of biomass. In this research, a method for measuring the fusion characteristics of biomass ash by Thermo-mechanical Analyzer, TMA, is described. The typical TMA shrinking ratio curve can be divided into two stages, which are closely related to ash melting behaviors. Several characteristics temperatures based on the TMA curves are used to assess the ash fusion characteristics. A new characteristics temperature, T{sub m}, is proposed to represent the severe melting temperature of biomass ash. The fusion characteristics of six types of biomass ash have been measured by TMA. Compared with standard ash fusibility temperatures (AFT) test, TMA is more suitable for measuring the fusion characteristics of biomass ash. The glassy molten areas of the ash samples are sticky and mainly consist of K-Ca-silicates.

  8. Electrodialytic treatment of fly ash

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Pernille Erland; Pedersen, Anne Juul; Kirkelund, Gunvor Marie

    Heavy metals are removed from the fly ashes by an electrodialytic treatment with the aim of up-grading the ashes for reuse in stead of disposal in landfill.A great potential for upgrading of bio- and waste incineration ashes by electrodialytic treatment exists. In the future, the applicability...

  9. Root penetration of sealing layers made of fly ash and sewage sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuschütz, Clara; Stoltz, Eva; Greger, Maria

    2006-01-01

    Fly ash and sewage sludge are suggested materials for constructing sealing layers covering mine tailings impoundments. Little is known, however, of their effect on vegetation or resistance to root penetration. We investigate: (i) the ability of different plant species to grow in sealing layers comprising fly ash and sewage sludge, (ii) the impact on plant growth of freshly hardened fly ash compared to aged and leached ash, and (iii) the plant stress response to fly ashes of different properties. A 6-mo greenhouse study using birch (Betula pendula Roth.), Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.), Kentucky bluegrass (Poa pratensis L.), and willow (Salix viminalis L.) demonstrated that no roots could grow into a compacted layer consisting only of ash, while a 6:4, ash-sludge mixture admitted roots into the upper part and a 1:9, ash-sludge mixture was totally penetrated (to 15 cm in depth) by roots of willow and Scots pine. Freshly hardened ash prevented root growth more effectively than aged ash did, as was observed in tests using reed canarygrass (Phalaris arundinacea L.) and pea (Pisum sativum L.). Furthermore, extracts of highly alkaline ash were more toxic to pea in a 48-h toxicity test than less alkaline ash was. However, stress responses to diluted ash extracts of lower pH, measured as enzyme capacities in dwarf bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.), were more related to the metal and ion contents. Root penetration of sealing layers is most effectively prevented if little sewage sludge is added, and if ash of high alkalinity is chosen.

  10. Method of Automated Dynamic Assessment of reading literacy for Secondary Education (EdilLEC)/'Metodo de evaluacion dinamica automatizado' de competencias lectoras para educacion secundaria

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Perez, Ramiro Gilabert; Lloria, Amelia Mana; Pelluch, Laura Gil; Tatay, Ana C. Llorens; Clemente, Vicenta Avila; Gamez, Eduardo Vidal-Abarca

    2016-01-01

    .... Keywords reading literacy; PISA; dynamic assessment; Secondary Education Se presenta un nuevo metodo de evaluacion dinamica de la competencia lectora automatizado para educacion secundaria (EdiLEC...

  11. Emerald Ash Borer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deborah G. McCullough; Steven A. Katovich

    2004-01-01

    An exotic beetle from Asia was discovered in July 2002 feeding on ash (Fraxinus spp.) trees in southeastern Michigan. It was identified as Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae). Larvae feed in the cambium between the bark and wood, producing galleries that eventually girdle and kill branches and entire trees. Evidence suggests that A. planipennis has...

  12. Fly ash for defluoridation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tzimou-Tsitouridou, R.

    1985-05-01

    The authors report a study of the use of a lignite fly ash to retain fluoride ions and remove them from their solutions, with a view to the use of this process for the defluoridation of water. Results are presented and the chemistry of the process is examined.

  13. Fire severity effects on ash extractable Total Phosphorous

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Paulo; Úbeda, Xavier; Martin, Deborah

    2010-05-01

    Phosphorous (P) is a crucial element to plant nutrition and limits vegetal production. The amounts of P in soil are lower and great part of this nutrient is absorbed or precipitated. It is well known that fire has important implications on P cycle, that can be lost throughout volatilization, evacuated with the smoke, but also more available to transport after organic matter mineralization imposed by the fire. The release of P depends on ash pH and their chemical and physical characteristics. Fire temperatures impose different severities, according to the specie affected and contact time. Fire severity is often evaluated by ash colour and this is a low-cost and excellent methodology to assess the fire effects on ecosystems. The aim of this work is study the ash properties physical and chemical properties on ash extractable Total Phosphorous (TP), collected in three wildfires, occured in Portugal, (named, (1) Quinta do Conde, (2) Quinta da Areia and (3) Casal do Sapo) composed mainly by Quercus suber and Pinus pinaster trees. The ash colour was assessed using the Munsell color chart. From all three plots we analyzed a total of 102 ash samples and we identified 5 different ash colours, ordered in an increasing order of severity, Very Dark Brown, Black, Dark Grey, Very Dark Grey and Light Grey. In order to observe significant differences between extractable TP and ash colours, we applied an ANOVA One Way test, and considered the differences significant at a pLSD test, significant at a p<0.05. The results obtained showed significant differences between the extractable TP from Very dark Brown and Black ash, produced at lower severities, in relation to Dark Grey, Very Dark Grey and Light Grey ash, generated at higher severities. The means of the first group were higher than the observed in the second one. This indicates that ash produced lower temperatures release in solution higher amounts of TP. These divergences occur due temperature of combustion, affected specie, ash

  14. Phenolic acids as bioindicators of fly ash deposit revegetation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djurdjević, L; Mitrović, M; Pavlović, P; Gajić, G; Kostić, O

    2006-05-01

    The floristic composition, the abundance, and the cover of pioneer plant species of spontaneously formed plant communities and the content of total phenolics and phenolic acids, as humus constituents, of an ash deposit after 7 years of recultivation were studied. The restoration of both the soil and the vegetation on the ash deposits of the "Nikola Tesla-A" thermoelectric power plant in Obrenovac (Serbia) is an extremely slow process. Unfavorable physical and chemical characteristics, the toxicity of fly ash, and extreme microclimatic conditions prevented the development of compact plant cover. The abundance and cover of plants increased from the central part of the deposit towards its edges (ranging from 1-80%). Festuca rubra L., Crepis setosa Hall., Erigeron canadensis L., Cirsium arvense (L.) Scop., Calamagrostis epigeios (L.) Roth., and Tamarix gallica L. were the most abundant species, thus giving the highest cover. Humus generated during the decomposition process of plant remains represents a completely new product absent in the ash as the starting material. The amount of total phenolics and phenolic acids (38.07-185.16 microg/g of total phenolics and 4.12-27.28 microg/g of phenolic acids) in fly ash increased from the center of the deposit towards its edges in correlation with the increase in plant abundance and cover. Ash samples contained high amounts of ferulic, vanillic, and p-coumaric acid, while the content of both p-hydroxybenzoic and syringic acid was relatively low. The presence of phenolic acids indicates the ongoing process of humus formation in the ash, in which the most abundant pioneer plants of spontaneously formed plant communities play the main role. Phenolic compounds can serve as reliable bioindicators in an assessment of the success of the recultivation process of thermoelectric power plants' ash deposits.

  15. Mapping ash properties using principal components analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Paulo; Brevik, Eric; Cerda, Artemi; Ubeda, Xavier; Novara, Agata; Francos, Marcos; Rodrigo-Comino, Jesus; Bogunovic, Igor; Khaledian, Yones

    2017-04-01

    In post-fire environments ash has important benefits for soils, such as protection and source of nutrients, crucial for vegetation recuperation (Jordan et al., 2016; Pereira et al., 2015a; 2016a,b). The thickness and distribution of ash are fundamental aspects for soil protection (Cerdà and Doerr, 2008; Pereira et al., 2015b) and the severity at which was produced is important for the type and amount of elements that is released in soil solution (Bodi et al., 2014). Ash is very mobile material, and it is important were it will be deposited. Until the first rainfalls are is very mobile. After it, bind in the soil surface and is harder to erode. Mapping ash properties in the immediate period after fire is complex, since it is constantly moving (Pereira et al., 2015b). However, is an important task, since according the amount and type of ash produced we can identify the degree of soil protection and the nutrients that will be dissolved. The objective of this work is to apply to map ash properties (CaCO3, pH, and select extractable elements) using a principal component analysis (PCA) in the immediate period after the fire. Four days after the fire we established a grid in a 9x27 m area and took ash samples every 3 meters for a total of 40 sampling points (Pereira et al., 2017). The PCA identified 5 different factors. Factor 1 identified high loadings in electrical conductivity, calcium, and magnesium and negative with aluminum and iron, while Factor 3 had high positive loadings in total phosphorous and silica. Factor 3 showed high positive loadings in sodium and potassium, factor 4 high negative loadings in CaCO3 and pH, and factor 5 high loadings in sodium and potassium. The experimental variograms of the extracted factors showed that the Gaussian model was the most precise to model factor 1, the linear to model factor 2 and the wave hole effect to model factor 3, 4 and 5. The maps produced confirm the patternd observed in the experimental variograms. Factor 1 and 2

  16. Fast techniques for the evaluation of reservoirs capacity; Metodos de evaluacion rapida de capacidad de yacimentos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flores Armenta, Magaly del Carmen [Gerencia de Proyectos Geotermoelectricos de la Comision Federal de Electricidad, Morelia (Mexico)

    1995-05-01

    Fast techniques for the evaluation of geothermal reservoirs allow us to have an approach of its electrical potential. Based on the laws of conservation of mass and energy, considering infinite permeability, this paper presents techniques for fast reservoir evaluation. These techniques let us calculate in a very practical way, the electric power that can be obtained from a geothermal field. These techniques can be an important tool to solve practical problems, and are useful during the preliminary development of geothermal sources. [Espanol] Los metodos de evaluacion rapida de yacimientos permiten estimar de manera aproximada la potencia electrica maxima y minima de los mismos. Se presentan tecnicas de evaluacion basadas en las leyes de conservacion de masa y energia, considerando permeabilidad infinita. Las tecnicas utilizadas pueden ser una herramienta importante para la solucion de problemas practicos y para la toma de decisiones en etapas de prefactibilidad.

  17. Volcanic ash melting under conditions relevant to ash turbine interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Wenjia; Lavallée, Yan; Hess, Kai-Uwe; Kueppers, Ulrich; Cimarelli, Corrado; Dingwell, Donald B

    2016-03-02

    The ingestion of volcanic ash by jet engines is widely recognized as a potentially fatal hazard for aircraft operation. The high temperatures (1,200-2,000 °C) typical of jet engines exacerbate the impact of ash by provoking its melting and sticking to turbine parts. Estimation of this potential hazard is complicated by the fact that chemical composition, which affects the temperature at which volcanic ash becomes liquid, can vary widely amongst volcanoes. Here, based on experiments, we parameterize ash behaviour and develop a model to predict melting and sticking conditions for its global compositional range. The results of our experiments confirm that the common use of sand or dust proxy is wholly inadequate for the prediction of the behaviour of volcanic ash, leading to overestimates of sticking temperature and thus severe underestimates of the thermal hazard. Our model can be used to assess the deposition probability of volcanic ash in jet engines.

  18. Volcanic ash melting under conditions relevant to ash turbine interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Wenjia; Lavallée, Yan; Hess, Kai-Uwe; Kueppers, Ulrich; Cimarelli, Corrado; Dingwell, Donald B.

    2016-03-01

    The ingestion of volcanic ash by jet engines is widely recognized as a potentially fatal hazard for aircraft operation. The high temperatures (1,200-2,000 °C) typical of jet engines exacerbate the impact of ash by provoking its melting and sticking to turbine parts. Estimation of this potential hazard is complicated by the fact that chemical composition, which affects the temperature at which volcanic ash becomes liquid, can vary widely amongst volcanoes. Here, based on experiments, we parameterize ash behaviour and develop a model to predict melting and sticking conditions for its global compositional range. The results of our experiments confirm that the common use of sand or dust proxy is wholly inadequate for the prediction of the behaviour of volcanic ash, leading to overestimates of sticking temperature and thus severe underestimates of the thermal hazard. Our model can be used to assess the deposition probability of volcanic ash in jet engines.

  19. Evaluacion preliminar de toxicidad, genotoxicidad y actividad antimicrobiana de Sida rhombifolia L

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bruges, Keile; Reguero Reza, Maria Teresa

    2007-01-01

    ... la planta Sida rhombifolia L. a la cual se le realizo la evaluacion de la toxicidad de extractos y fracciones utilizando como organismos de prueba Daphnia magna, Hydra attenuata y Artemia salina. La actividad biologica fue evaluada mediante la prueba de sensibilidad a antimicrobianos y la genotoxicidad con el ensayo Cometa. Los ensayos de toxicidad aguda con los organismos de prueba muestran que los extractos acuosos son practicamente no toxicos (C[L.sub.50] >1000 ppm), lo cual sugiere que su us...

  20. Ashes for organic farming

    OpenAIRE

    Kousa, T.; Heinonen, M; Suoniitty, T.; Peltonen, K

    2013-01-01

    Nowadays only eight percent of the cultivated field area is used for organic farming. The Ministry of Agriculture and Forestry has published the guidelines for the program of organic farming to diversify the supply and the consumption of organic food. The aim is to increase organically arable land to 20% by the year 2020.The demand of organic fertilizer products is strongly increasing. Interest in forestry by-products (ash, bark, zero fiber, etc.) for use in organic production has recently be...

  1. Circle of Ashes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Circle of Ashes This plot tells astronomers that a pulsar, the remnant of a stellar explosion, is surrounded by a disk of its own ashes. The disk, revealed by the two data points at the far right from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope, is the first ever found around a pulsar. Astronomers believe planets might rise up out of these stellar ashes. The data in this plot, or spectrum, were taken by ground-based telescopes and Spitzer. They show that light from around the pulsar can be divided into two categories: direct light from the pulsar, and light from the dusty disk swirling around the pulsar. This excess light was detected by Spitzer's infrared array camera. Dust gives off more infrared light than the pulsar because it's cooler. The pulsar, called 4U 0142+61, was once a massive star, until about 100,000 years ago, when it blew up in a supernova explosion and scattered dusty debris into space. Some of that debris was captured into what astronomers refer to as a 'fallback disk,' now circling the leftover stellar core, or pulsar. The disk resembles protoplanetary disks around young stars, out of which planets are thought to be born. The data have been corrected to remove the effects of light scattering from dust that lies between Earth and the pulsar. The ground-based data is from the Keck I telescope atop Mauna Kea, Hawaii.

  2. Energy evaluation process of electric domestic refrigerators; Proceso de evaluacion energetica de refrigeradores electrodomesticos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malacara Toral, Manuel; Ruiz Neblina, Joaquin [Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas, Cuernavaca (Mexico)

    1992-12-31

    A description is made of an energy evaluation study on electric domestic refrigerators carried out by the Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas (IIE), in its strategy for diminishing the energy consumption through the design enhancement, the manufacture, the operation and the standardization of the electric appliances. In order to initiate the evaluation-standardization process, the Mexican (NOM), the American (ANSI/AHAM) and the Canadian (CAN/CSA) standards were taken as a base to harmonize the procedures and the parameters of the tests. The energy assessment demonstrated that there are significant differences among the standards encompassed by the study, therefore, recommendations were made for the harmonization of the standards. [Espanol] Se describe un estudio de evaluacion energetica sobre refrigeradores electrodomesticos realizado en el Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas (IIE) dentro de la estrategia para disminuir los consumos de energia a traves de mejoras en el diseno, la manufactura, la operacion y la normalizacion de equipos electricos. Se tomo como base las normas mexicanas (NOM), americana (ANSI/AHAM) y canadiense (CAN/CSA) para iniciar el proceso de evaluacion-normalizacion a fin de armonizar los procedimientos y parametros de las pruebas. La evaluacion energetica demostro que existen diferencias significativas entre las normas que abarco el estudio por lo que se presentan recomendaciones para la armonizacion de las normas.

  3. Melting Behavior of Volcanic Ash relevant to Aviation Ash Hazard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, W.; Hess, K.; Lavallee, Y.; Cimarelli, C.; Dingwell, D. B.

    2013-12-01

    Volcanic ash is one of the major hazards caused by volcanic eruptions. In particular, the threat to aviation from airborne volcanic ash has been widely recognized and documented. In the past 12 years, more than 60 modern jet airplanes, mostly jumbo jets, have been damaged by drifting clouds of volcanic ash that have contaminated air routes and airport facilities. Seven of these encounters are known to have caused in-flight loss of engine power to jumbo jets carrying a total of more than 2000 passengers. The primary cause of engine thrust loss is that the glass in volcanic ash particles is generated at temperatures far lower than the temperatures in the combustion chamber of a jet engine ( i.e. > 1600 oC) and when the molten volcanic ash particles leave this hottest section of the engine, the resolidified molten volcanic ash particles will be accumulated on the turbine nozzle guide vanes, which reduced the effective flow of air through the engine ultimately causing failure. Thus, it is essential to investigate the melting process and subsequent deposition behavior of volcanic ash under gas turbine conditions. Although few research studies that investigated the deposition behavior of volcanic ash at the high temperature are to be found in public domain, to the best our knowledge, no work addresses the formation of molten volcanic ash. In this work, volcanic ash produced by Santiaguito volcano in Guatemala in November 8, 2012 was selected for study because of their recent activity and potential hazard to aircraft safety. We used the method of accessing the behavior of deposit-forming impurities in high temperature boiler plants on the basis of observations of the change in shape and size of a cylindrical coal ash to study the sintering and fusion phenomena as well as determine the volcanic ash melting behavior by using characteristic temperatures by means of hot stage microscope (HSM), different thermal analysis (DTA) and Thermal Gravimetric Analysis (TGA) to

  4. Physical characteristics, chemical composition and water contamination potential from Canadian wildfire ash

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santin, Cristina; Doerr, Stefan; Arcenegui, Vicky; Otero, Xose Luis

    2017-04-01

    Wildland fires leave a powdery residue on the ground: wildfire ash, which consists of mineral materials and charred organic components. Its quantities and characteristics depend mainly on the total amount and type of fuel burnt and the fire characteristics. Up to several tens of tons of ash per hectare have been quantified in different post-fire environments. As a new material present after a wildland fire, ash can have profound effects on ecosystems. It affects biogeochemical cycles, including the carbon cycle, stimulates microbial activity and helps the recovery of vegetation. Ash incorporated into the soil increases soil pH and nutrient pools temporarily and changes soil physical properties such as albedo, soil texture and hydraulic properties. Ash also modifies soil and landscape-scale hydrological behaviour. Its high porosity makes it very effective at absorbing rainfall, but it can also contribute to catastrophic debris flows when ash is mobilised by large storm events. Its 'fragile' nature makes ash very susceptible to wind and water erosion, facilitating its transfer to the hydrological system. Runoff containing ash from burnt areas carries soluble nutrients and pollutants, which can have detrimental impacts on aquatic ecosystems and the supply of potable water. In this presentation we will report for the first time on the physical characteristics, chemical composition and associated water pollution risk from ash produced in four typical Canadian boreal forest fires: two high-intensity fires in jack pine stands, and one high-intensity and one smouldering fire in black spruce stands.

  5. Leaching from biomass combustion ash

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maresca, Alberto; Astrup, Thomas Fruergaard

    2014-01-01

    The use of biomass combustion ashes for fertilizing and liming purposes has been widely addressed in scientific literature. Nevertheless, the content of potentially toxic compounds raises concerns for a possible contamination of the soil. During this study five ash samples generated at four...... in water. The content of the selected heavy metals (i.e. Cr, Ni, Pb and Cd) complied with the Danish Statutory Order on the use of bio-ash for agricultural purposes; however, critical releases of Cr were detected in the leachate extracts, especially in the fly ash. High alkaline pHs were measured in all...

  6. Proximate and nutrient analysis of selected vegetable species: A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Karak, an arid region, have limited water and land resources to cultivate various crops specially vegetables. However, a few seasonal vegetable are available to the local communities in meager quantities. The ash, carbohydrate, protein, moisture, fat, fiber contents, energy values and nutrient composition of eight ...

  7. Proximate analysis of some dry season vegetables in Anyigba, Kogi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-05-16

    May 16, 2008 ... the exotic vegetables cultivated in Nigeria are cabbage, lettuce, cauli-flower and turnip leafy as well as stems such as Carrot (Aliyu, 2006). ... at 550°C for 48 h, proximate chemical composition of each vegetable sample was carried out to determine the moisture, ash, fat, crude fibre, protein and carbohydrate ...

  8. Controlled release from bio ash spread on forest soils; Styrd utlakning ur bioaska som sprids i skogsmark

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fjaellberg, Leif; Lagerblad, Bjoern; Moosberg Bustnes, Helena [Swedish Cement and Concrete Research Inst., Stockholm (Sweden); Bjurstroem, Henrik [AaF-Process AB, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2005-10-01

    In order to minimize the costs for forestry, recycling ashes from biofuels should be done on freshly logged locations. A condition is that the ash that is spread on forest soils is well stabilized, with a negligible leakage of nutrients during a few years. However, these nutrients should be released when vegetation can take them up, about 15 years after replanting. In this report are presented the results of a prestudy on the possibilities to stabilize ash and to coat ash pellets with a protective layer that provides the desired delay in leaching. The chemistry of ashes is complex and similar to that of cement. In this prestudy, we tried to utilize the ash chemistry and investigated the balance between calcium oxide and silicon dioxide as well as its effect on cementing properties. The hypothesis is that by combining different ashes and/or by adding components a more stable product that is less prone to leaching may be obtained. Alkali such as potassium salts could be immobilized in silicates. Samples of ca 10 ashes were collected from plants in order to create a variety of compositions. The ashes have been characterized with regard to chemical and mineralogical composition, particle size distribution. Their binding properties have been investigated. Ashes from fluidized bed combusters bonded best and fastest. The results would have been clearer if most ashes had not been slaked when they reached the laboratory, although they were taken out dry from the plants. Some weakly bonding ashes were mixed with strongly bonding ashes, and with silica fume in one experiment. The weak ashes could be stabilized to a product with a satisfactory compressive strength. The mineralogy of the hydrated ashes was studied. Several leaching tests were performed: by mixing an ash yielding high concentration of salts in the leachate with an ash yielding low concentrations a halving of the concentration could be obtained. Silica fume yielded similar results. Attempts to coat ash pellets

  9. Fly ash quality and utilization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barta, L.E.; Lachner, L.; Wenzel, G.B. [Inst. for Energy, Budapest (Hungary); Beer, M.J. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States)

    1995-12-01

    The quality of fly ash is of considerable importance to fly ash utilizers. The fly ash puzzolanic activity is one of the most important properties that determines the role of fly ash as a binding agent in the cementing process. The puzzolanic activity, however is a function of fly ash particle size and chemical composition. These parameters are closely related to the process of fly ash formation in pulverized coal fired furnaces. In turn, it is essential to understand the transformation of mineral matter during coal combustion. Due to the particle-to-particle variation of coal properties and the random coalescence of mineral particles, the properties of fly ash particles e.g. size, SiO{sub 2} content, viscosity can change considerably from particle to particle. These variations can be described by the use of the probability theory. Since the mean values of these randomly changing parameters are not sufficient to describe the behavior of individual fly ash particles during the formation of concrete, therefore it is necessary to investigate the distribution of these variables. Examples of these variations were examined by the Computer Controlled Scanning Electron Microscopy (CCSEM) for particle size and chemical composition for Texas lignite and Eagel Butte mineral matter and fly ash. The effect of combustion on the variations of these properties for both the fly ash and mineral matter were studied by using a laminar flow reactor. It is shown in our paper, that there are significant variations (about 40-50% around the mean values) of the above-listed properties for both coal samples. By comparing the particle size and chemical composition distributions of the mineral matter and fly ash, it was possible to conclude that for the Texas lignite mineral matter, the combustion did not effect significantly the distribution of these properties, however, for the Eagel Butte coal the combustion had a major impact on these mineral matter parameters.

  10. Implications of fly ash application to soil for plant growth and feed quality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hammermeister, A.M.; Naeth, M.A.; Chanasyk, D.S. [University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB (Canada). Dept. of Renewable Resources

    1998-02-01

    Fly ash has shown potential as a soil amendment and a source of trace elements beneficial to plants. However, agricultural utilization of fly ash has been restricted due to variability in chemical composition, elemental toxicity, induced nutrient imbalances in plants and inconsistent response of vegetation to fly ash amendment. Fly ash was applied to reclaimed mine soil near Edmonton, Alberta, at rates of 0, 25, 50, 100, 200 and 400 t ha{sup -1}. Total and water soluble concentrations of selected elements were determined from soil samples collected at 0 to 15 cm. Growth, development, and elemental uptake of barley (Hordeum vulgare, L., Jackson cv.), brome (Bromus inermis, Leyss), and alfalfa (Medicago sativa, L., Beaver cv.) were measured at selected stages of development. Water soluble concentrations of B, Mo, Ca, Cr, K, Mg, Mo, Na, P, Se and Sr variably increased with increasing fly ash rate. Boron concentration in plant tissue increased significantly to toxic levels with symptoms evident at early stages of barley development and increasingly severe at later stages. Toxicity symptoms were less severe for brome and alfalfa. The Cu:Mo ratio of vegetation decreased with increased fly ash rate to levels which could cause Cu deficiency in livestock. Yield of barley silage was significantly increased at intermediate rates of fly ash application, but significantly reduced at 400 t ha{sup -1}.

  11. Ash Properties of Alternative Biomass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Capablo, Joaquin; Jensen, Peter Arendt; Pedersen, Kim Hougaard

    2009-01-01

    The ash behavior during suspension firing of 12 alternative solid biofuels, such as pectin waste, mash from a beer brewery, or waste from cigarette production have been studied and compared to wood and straw ash behavior. Laboratory suspension firing tests were performed on an entrained flow...

  12. Dielectric properties of fly ash

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Abstract. This paper reports the dielectric properties of fly ash. The dielectric measurements were performed as a function of frequency and temperature. The sample of fly ash shows almost similar behaviour in the frequency and temperature range studied. The large value of dielectric constant in the typical frequency range.

  13. Common Ash (Fraxinus excelsior L.)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Douglas, G.C.; Pliura, A.; Dufour, J.; Mertens, P.; Jacques, D.; Buiteveld, J.

    2013-01-01

    Common ash (Fraxinus excelsior L.) has an extensive natural distribution across Europe and extends as far east as the Volga river and south into northern Iran. Country statistics and national programmes show that common ash has major economic and ecological importance in many countries. Genetic

  14. Emerald ash borer life cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leah S. Bauer; Robert A. Haack; Deborah L. Miller; Toby R. Petrice; Houping Liu

    2004-01-01

    The emerald ash borer (EAB), Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae), native to several Asian countries, was discovered in southeastern Michigan and nearby Ontario in June of 2002. EAB was identified as the cause of extensive ash (Fraxinus spp.) mortality in approximately 2,500 mi2, and...

  15. Wildfire Ash: Chemical Composition, Ash-Soil Interactions and Environmental Impacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brook, Anna; Hamzi, Seham; Wittenberg, Lea

    2015-04-01

    Of the five classical factors of soil formation, climate, parent material, topography, time, organisms, and recently recognized human activity, it is the latter factor which discretely includes fire and post-burn impact. However, it is considered that soil undergoing fire just experience a temporary removal of the top organic horizon, thus slightly modified and often labeled as 'temporarily disturbed' soil or soil 'under restoration/rehabilitation'. In fact the suggested seventh factor, post-burned produced ash, can act both dependently and independently of the other soil forming factors (Levin et al., 2013; Certini 2013). They are interdependent in cases where ash influences occur on time scales similar to 'natural' soil formation (Keesstra et ai., 2014) such as changes in vegetation. On the other hand, in post-fire areas a strong dependency is expected between soil-water retention mechanism, climate and topography. Wild-land fires exert many changes on the physical, chemical, mineralogical, biological, and morphological properties of soil that, in turn, affect the soil's hydrology and nutrient flux, modifying its ability to support vegetation and resist erosion. The ash produced by forest fires is a complex mixture composed of organic and inorganic particles characterized by vary physical-chemical and morphological properties. The importance of this study is straightforwardly related to the frequency and large-scales wildfires in Mediterranean region. In fact, wildfires are major environmental and land management concern in the world, where the number and severity of wildfires has increased during the past decades (Bodi, 2013). Certini (2013) assumed that cumulatively all of the vegetated land is burned in about 31 years annually affecting 330-430 Mha (over 3% of the Earth's surface) and wide range of land cover types worldwide including forests, peatlands, shrublands and grasslands. Whereas, the fire is identified as an important factor in soil formation, the

  16. La utilidad de las evaluaciones de sistemas educativos: el valor de la consideración del contexto.

    OpenAIRE

    Orden Hoz, Arturo de la; Jornet Meliá, J. M.

    2012-01-01

    En este artículo se hace una revisión de los procedimientos de evaluación de sistemas educativos. A partir de esta revisión, se analizan algunos factores relacionados con la baja utilidad de este tipo de evaluaciones. El análisis se dirige hacia el diseño deficiente de los cuestionarios de contexto. Se observa que los cuestionarios de contexto no llegan a explicar el rendimiento. Su baja capacidad de explicación del rendimiento es la causa de la baja utilidad de las evaluaciones de sistemas e...

  17. Large-scale reintroduction of ash

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronald. Overton

    2010-01-01

    No strategies currently exist for reintroducing ash; progression of emerald ash borer (EAB) through the eastern United States is likely to be a decades-long process, and extirpation of ash from this area is likely to take even longer. Reintroduction of ash into areas where it has been extirpated by EAB will require addressing technical issues as well as social and...

  18. Wildland fire ash: Production, composition and eco-hydro-geomorphic effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodi, Merche B.; Martin, Deborah; Balfour, Victoria N.; Santin, Cristina; Doerr, Stefan H.; Pereira, Paulo; Cerda, Artemi; Mataix-Solera, Jorge

    2014-01-01

    material present after a wildland fire, ash can have profound effects on ecosystems. It affects biogeochemical cycles, including the C cycle, not only within the burned area, but also globally. Ash incorporated into the soil increases temporarily soil pH and nutrient pools and changes physical properties such as albedo, soil texture and hydraulic properties including water repellency. Ash modifies soil hydrologic behavior by creating a two-layer system: the soil and the ash layer, which can function in different ways depending on (1) ash depth and type, (2) soil type and (3) rainfall characteristics. Key parameters are the ash's water holding capacity, hydraulic conductivity and its potential to clog soil pores. Runoff from burned areas carries soluble nutrients contained in ash, which can lead to problems for potable water supplies. Ash deposition also stimulates soil microbial activity and vegetation growth.Further work is needed to (1) standardize methods for investigating ash and its effects on the ecosystem, (2) characterize ash properties for specific ecosystems and wildland fire types, (3) determine the effects of ash on human and ecosystem health, especially when transported by wind or water, (4) investigate ash's controls on water and soil losses at slope and catchment scales, (5) examine its role in the C cycle, and (6) study its redistribution and fate in the environment.

  19. Presettlement Vegetation

    Data.gov (United States)

    Minnesota Department of Natural Resources — Presettlement vegetation of Minnesota based on Marschner's original analysis of Public Land Survey notes and landscape patterns. Marschner compiled his results in...

  20. Characterisation of wood combustion ashes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maresca, Alberto

    for their composition and leaching properties. Despite the relatively large variations in the contents of nutrients and trace metals, the overall levels were comparable to typical ranges reported in the literature for other wood combustion ashes, as well as with regards to leaching. In general, the composition......The combustion of wood chips and wood pellets for the production of renewable energy in Denmark increased from 5.7 PJ to 16 PJ during the period 2000-2015, and further increases are expected to occur within the coming years. In 2012, about 22,300 tonnes of wood ashes were generated in Denmark....... Currently, these ashes are mainly landfilled, despite Danish legislation allowing their application onto forest and agricultural soils for fertilising and/or liming purposes. During this PhD work, 16 wood ash samples generated at ten different Danish combustion plants were collected and characterised...

  1. AshMeadowsNaucorid_CH

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — These data identify the areas where final critical habitat for the Ash Meadows Naucorid (Ambrysus amargosus) occur. "Nevada, Nye County. Point of Rocks Springs and...

  2. Characterisation of wood combustion ashes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maresca, Alberto

    of the ashes complied with Danish ash quality criteria, indicating that they may be applied onto forest soil. However, according to EU landfill waste acceptance criteria, the leachates corresponded to “non-hazardous” or “hazardous” waste, thereby suggesting that recirculation of the same ashes to forestry land...... to fewer than two years on the field scale). While an overall increase in the leached amounts of As and Cu from the organic soil horizon were observed in the case of ash application (from 2.2 to 5.0-5.8 mg/m2 for As and from 2.0 to 4.9-7.6 mg/m2 for Cu), their concentration levels in the percolating soil...

  3. Fly ash. Quality recycling material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blomster, D.; Leisio, C.

    1996-11-01

    Imatran Voima`s coal-fired power plants not only generate power and heat but also produce fly ash which is suitable raw material for recycling. This material for recycling is produced in the flue gas cleaning process. It is economical and, thanks to close quality control, is suitable for use as a raw material in the building materials industry, in asphalt production, and in earthworks. Structures made from fly ash are also safe from an environmental point of view. (orig.)

  4. Evaluation of a integral systems greenhouse - solar dryer for small growers; Evaluacion de un sistema integral invernadero - secadero solar para pequenos productores

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia, Victor O; Iriarte, Adolfo A [INENCO, Universidad Nacional de Catamarca, Catamarca (Argentina); Carabajal, Dante; Sabadzija, Gabriela; Tomalino, Luis [E.E.A. INTA, Catamarca, Catamarca (Argentina)

    2000-07-01

    Due to poor yielding capacity in the province of Catamarca, Argentina, it is necessary to improve solar drying systems in order to have a better quality final product. It is also essential to divide the costs of infrastructure with other complementary activities because of the need to make drying methods profitable. The system proposed in this work is a dryer-greenhouse with a double purposed macrotunnel greenhouse: during Winter it is used as a yielding system, and in Summer it is prepared to fulfill the functions of a solar dryer. The crops evaluated in winter were: small vegetable marrow (Curcubita maxima L), melon (Cucumis melo), ad cucumber (Cucuis sativus). Crop cycle, harvest time and tield in Kg/m were determined for each species. The assessment of the dryer was made using pepper for paprika observation of the thermal behavior of the product during drying and its final quality. The product obtained had a very good quality in color, taste and aroma with a classification of extra quality according to the Argentine Nutritional Code and the 7541 ISO Standard. Drying time decreased considerably compared to that observed in open air drying, 1995, 1996 and 1997 campaigns were economically assessed, and an evaluation of investments in five years was also conducted obtaining a positive VAN and a TIR above the cost of the best alternative for money expenditure. This integrated system is valid alternative in a sustainable production for small growers. [Spanish] Debido a las caracteristicas productivas de la Provincia de Catamarca Argentina, es necesario optimizar los procesos del secado solar teniendo en cuenta la calidad final del producto. Ademas, debido a la necesidad de rentabilizar los metodos de secado, imprescindible repartir los costos de infraestructura con otro tipo de actividad complementaria. El sistema propuesto en este trabajo es un invernadero secadero que utiliza un invernadero macrotunel que cumple una doble funcion, durante el invierno se usa como

  5. Rainfall and wet and dry cycle's impact on ash thickness. A laboratory experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Paulo; Keestra, Saskia; Peters, Piet; Cerdà, Artemi

    2016-04-01

    Ash is the most important and effective soil protection in the immediate period after the fire (Cerda and Doerr, 2008; Pereira et al., 2015a). This protection can last for days or weeks depending on the fire severity, topography of the burned area and post-fire meteorological conditions. In the initial period after the fire, ash is easily transported by wind. However after the first rainfalls, ash is eroded, or bind in soil surface (Pereira et al., 2013, 2015a). Ash thickness has implications on soil protection. The soil protection against the erosion and the ash capacity to retain water increases with the ash thickness (Bodi et al., 2014). Ash cover is very important after fire because store water and releases into soil a large amount of nutrients, fundamental to vegetation recuperation (Pereira et al., 2014). Despite the importance of ash thickness in post fire environments, little information is available about the effects of rainfall and wet and dry cycle's effects on ash thickness. This work aims to fill this gap. The objective of this study is to investigate the impacts of rainfall and wet and dry cycles in the ash thickness of two different under laboratory conditions. Litter from Oak (Quercus robur) and Spruce (Picea abis) were collected to and exposed during 2 hours to produce ash at 200 and 400 C. Subsequently a layer of 15 mm ash was spread on soil surface in small boxes (24x32 cm) and then subjected to rainfall simulation. Boxes were placed at a 17% of inclination and a rainfall intensity of 55 mm/h during 40 minutes was applied. After the rainfall simulation the plots were stored in an Oven at the temperature of 25 C during four days, in order to identify the effects of wet and dry cycles (Bodi et al., 2013). Ash thickness was measured after the first rainfall (AFR), before the second rainfall (BSR) - after the dry period of 4 days - and after the second rainfall (ASR). In each box a grid with 57 points was designed in order to analyse ash thickness

  6. Evaluacion de las condiciones de mezcla y su influencia sobre el cloro residual en tanques de compensacion de un sistema de distribucion de agua potable

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Montoya, C; Cruz, C.H; Torres, P; Lain, S; Escobar, J.C

    2012-01-01

    Se llevo a cabo una evaluacion a escala real de las condiciones de mezcla y su influencia sobre la calidad del agua en un tanque de compensacion del sistema de distribucion de agua potable de la ciudad de Cali (Colombia...

  7. Evaluacion sensorial de arroz biofortificado, variedad IDIAP Santa Cruz 11, en granjas autosostenibles del Patronato de Nutricion en la Provincia de Cocle, Panama

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Camargo Buitrago, Ismael; Henriquez, Teresita; Montenegro, Salvador; Vergara de Caballero, Eira; Espinosa, Juan; Vergara, Omaris; Mojica de Torres, Eyra

    2011-01-01

    .... En cada comunidad 30 madres de familias participaron en la evaluacion. Para el analisis sensorial se utilizo la prueba discriminativa triangular, en la que las madres de familia debian identificar la muestra...

  8. Engineering Behavior and Characteristics of Wood Ash and Sugarcane Bagasse Ash

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Francisco Grau; Hyunwook Choo; Jong Wan Hu; Jongwon Jung

    2015-01-01

    .... Plenty of biomasses are produced nationwide. Biomasses are mostly combusted and usually discarded or disposed of without treatment as biomass ashes, which include wood and sugarcane bagasse ashes...

  9. Characterization of ashes from biofuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frandsen, F.J.; Hansen, L.A. [Technical Univ. of Denmark. Dept. of Chemical Engineering (Denmark); Soerensen, H.S. [Geological Survey of Denmark and Greenland (Denmark); Hjuler, K. [dk-TEKNIK. Energy and Environment (Denmark)

    1998-02-01

    One motivation for initiating the present project was that the international standard method of estimating the deposit propensity of solid fuels, of which a number of variants exist (e.g. ISO, ASTM, SD, DIN), has shown to be unsuitable for biomass ashes. This goal was addressed by the development of two new methods for the detection of ash fusibility behaviour based on Simultaneous Thermal Analysis (STA) and High Temperature Light Microscopy (HTLM), respectively. The methods were developed specifically for ashes from biofuels, but are suitable for coal ashes as well. They have been tested using simple salt mixtures, geological standards and samples from straw CHP and coal-straw PF combustion plants. All samples were run in a nitrogen atmosphere at a heating rate of 10 deg. C/min. In comparison with the standard method, the new methods are objective and have superior repeatability and sensitivity. Furthermore, the two methods enable the melting behavior to be characterized by a continuous measurement of melt fraction versus temperature. Due to this two-dimensional resolution of the results, the STA and HTLM methods provide more information than the standard method. The study of bottom ash and fly ash as well as deposit samples from straw test firings at the Haslev and Slagelse Combined Heat and Power plants resulted in a better understanding of mineral behaviour during straw grate firing. In these tests a number of straws were fired which had been carefully selected for having different qualities with respect to sort and potassium and chlorine contents. By studying bottom ashes from Slagelse it was found that the melting behaviour correlated with the deposition rate on a probe situated at the outlet part of the combustion zone. (EG)

  10. Characterisation of Turkish fly ashes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bayat, O. [Cukurova University, Adana (Turkey). Mining Engineering Dept.

    1998-07-01

    The mineralogical, morphological, physical and chemical properties of 7 fly ashes from coal fields in Turkey are compared. The mineral matter in the fly ashes, determined by X-ray diffraction, is dominated by anhydride, lime, quartz and hematite + ferrite spinel. The three low-calcium ashes have the typical, relatively simple, crystalline phase Q, M, H and FS. The high-calcium fly ashes have the most complex assemblage of crystalline phases. The much higher calcium concentrations in these samples result in the formation of lime (CaO), melilite ((Ca, Na){sub 2}(Mg,Al,Fe)(Si,Al){sub 2}O{sub 7}) and merwinite. The presence of anhydride in all samples indicates that the high activity of calcium not only promotes the formation of sulfates from calcite but also the dehydration of gypsum during and after combustion, which occurs at temperatures above 400-500{degree}C. It is important to understand the interaction of high-calcium fly ashes with water occurring in Portland cement (C{sub 3}A,C{sub 2}S), Ah, which hydrates to give gypsum and lime, with the latter hydrating to give the Ca(OH){sub 2} solutions that promote pozzolonic reactions. Some of the particles comprised irregularly formed, vesicular particles with some well-formed individual spheres in Catalagzi and Tuncbilek fly ashes. About 55-80 wt% was less than 45 {mu}m in size for Yatagan, Soma, Yenikoy and Afsin-Elbistan fly ashes. The fly ashes were mainly composed of CaO, SiO{sub 2} and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. They have a potential use in wastewater treatment since they can be easily obtained in large quantities at low price or even free. The chemical and mineralogical compositions of the high-calcium Turkish fly ashes investigated make them a good binding agent and a possible substitute for slags, pozzolana and gypsum in the amelioration of clinker. 53 refs., 10 figs., 5 tabs.

  11. Alkali ash material: a novel fly ash-based cement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hossein Rostami; William Brendley [Philadelphia University, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2003-08-01

    The United States generates 110 million t of coal ash annually. Approximately 70 million t of this coal ash is fly ash, of which 27% is recycled and the remaining 73% is landfilled. Disposal of such a huge quantity of ash poses a significant environmental problem. A new cementitious material has been developed, called alkali ash material (AAM), which is used to produce concrete for construction. AAM can be used to create a variety of concrete strengths and could revolutionize the concrete product manufacturing industry due to its economic advantage. AAM contains 40-95% Class F fly ash and is used as cement to bind sand, stone, and fibers creating concrete. AAM concrete has been tested for strength, durability, mechanical properties, and, most importantly, economic viability. AAM concrete is economically and technically viable for many construction applications. Some properties include rapid strength gain (90% of ultimate in 1 d), high ultimate strengths (110 MPa or 16 000 psi in 1 d), excellent acid resistance, and freeze-thaw durability. AAM's resistance to chemical attack, such as sulfuric (H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}), nitric (HNO{sub 3}), hydrochloric (HCl), and organic acids, is far better than portland cement concrete. AAM is resistant to freeze-thaw attack based on ASTM C-666 specifications. Potential immediate applications of AAM are blocks, pipe, median barriers, sound barriers, and overlaying materials. Eventual markets are high strength construction products, bridge beams, prestressed members, concrete tanks, highway appurtenances, and other concrete products. 28 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. Ash phloem reduction models vary among species and growing conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tara L. Bal; Andrew J. Storer; Linda M. Nagel

    2011-01-01

    The exotic insect, emerald ash borer (Agrilus planipennis), is responsible for the death of millions of ash trees. Removal of ash from areas in close proximity to outlier populations will reduce the potential population density of emerald ash borer (EAB).

  13. Kuchler Vegetation

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — Digital version of potential natural plant communites as compiled and published on 'Map of the Natural Vegetation of California' by A. W. Kuchler, 1976. Source map...

  14. Wieslander Vegetation

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — Digital version of the 1945 California Vegetation Type Maps by A. E. Wieslander of the U.S. Forest Service. Source scale of maps are 1:100,000. These compiled maps...

  15. Development of novel ash hybrids to introgress resistance to emerald ash borer into north American ash species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennifer L. Koch; David W. Carey; Mary E. Mason

    2008-01-01

    Currently, there is no evidence that any of the native North American ash species have any resistance to the emerald ash borer (EAB). This means that the entire ash resource of the eastern United States and Canada is at risk of loss due to EAB. In contrast, outbreaks of EAB in Asian ash species are rare and appear to be isolated responses to stress (Bauer et al. 2005,...

  16. Emerald ash borer biocontrol in ash saplings: the potential for early stage recovery of North American ash

    Science.gov (United States)

    In many parts of North America, ash stands have been reduced by the emerald ash borer (Agrilus planipennis) invasion to a few surviving mature trees and young basal sprouts, saplings, and seedlings. Without a seed bank, ash tree recovery will require survival and maturation of these younger cohorts...

  17. Exploring the molecular and biochemical basis of ash resistance to emerald ash borer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Justin G.A. Whitehill; Daniel A. Herms; Pierluigi. Bonello

    2010-01-01

    Larvae of the emerald ash borer (EAB) (Agrilus planipennis) feed on phloem of ash (Fraxinus spp.) trees. It is hypothesized that the resistance of Asian species of ash (e.g., Manchurian ash, F. mandshurica) to EAB is due to endogenous defenses present in phloem tissues in the form of defensive proteins and/or...

  18. Rasgos del temperamento de los perros domésticos (Canis familiaris: evaluaciones conductuales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ADRIANA JAKOVCEVIC

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Los rasgos del temperamento se definen como tendencias conductuales estables entre situaciones similares y a lo largo del tiempo. En el presente trabajo se revisan las pruebas conductuales diseñadas para la evaluación de rasgos aislados del temperamento en los perros domésticos. Para cada dimensión se describen los estímulos empleados, las respuestas evaluadas y el correlato psiológico de las mismas. Los rasgos más estudiados fueron la temerosidad, la agresividad y la sociabilidad. Sin embargo, sólo la primera cuenta con correlatos psiológicos bien establecidos. Finalmente, las evaluaciones conductuales resultan de suma importancia para la selección de los perros para las distintas funciones que cumplen en la sociedad humana: detección de drogas, compañía, guardia, rescate de personas, etc.

  19. Transcriptomic signatures of ash (Fraxinus spp. phloem.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaodong Bai

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Ash (Fraxinus spp. is a dominant tree species throughout urban and forested landscapes of North America (NA. The rapid invasion of NA by emerald ash borer (Agrilus planipennis, a wood-boring beetle endemic to Eastern Asia, has resulted in the death of millions of ash trees and threatens billions more. Larvae feed primarily on phloem tissue, which girdles and kills the tree. While NA ash species including black (F. nigra, green (F. pennsylvannica and white (F. americana are highly susceptible, the Asian species Manchurian ash (F. mandshurica is resistant to A. planipennis perhaps due to their co-evolutionary history. Little is known about the molecular genetics of ash. Hence, we undertook a functional genomics approach to identify the repertoire of genes expressed in ash phloem. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using 454 pyrosequencing we obtained 58,673 high quality ash sequences from pooled phloem samples of green, white, black, blue and Manchurian ash. Intriguingly, 45% of the deduced proteins were not significantly similar to any sequences in the GenBank non-redundant database. KEGG analysis of the ash sequences revealed a high occurrence of defense related genes. Expression analysis of early regulators potentially involved in plant defense (i.e. transcription factors, calcium dependent protein kinases and a lipoxygenase 3 revealed higher mRNA levels in resistant ash compared to susceptible ash species. Lastly, we predicted a total of 1,272 single nucleotide polymorphisms and 980 microsatellite loci, among which seven microsatellite loci showed polymorphism between different ash species. CONCLUSIONS AND SIGNIFICANCE: The current transcriptomic data provide an invaluable resource for understanding the genetic make-up of ash phloem, the target tissue of A. planipennis. These data along with future functional studies could lead to the identification/characterization of defense genes involved in resistance of ash to A. planipennis

  20. assessment of assessment of bagasse ash bagasse ash bagasse ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    eobe

    Clay material of Group A-6 using AASHTO classification and inorganic clay material. 6 using AASHTO ... Construction Industry Research and Information .... The chemical composition of the Bagasse ash (BA) was determined at the Center for Energy Research and Training. (CERT), A. B. U. Zaria using the method of Energy.

  1. Gasification of high ash, high ash fusion temperature bituminous coals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Guohai; Vimalchand, Pannalal; Peng, WanWang

    2015-11-13

    This invention relates to gasification of high ash bituminous coals that have high ash fusion temperatures. The ash content can be in 15 to 45 weight percent range and ash fusion temperatures can be in 1150.degree. C. to 1500.degree. C. range as well as in excess of 1500.degree. C. In a preferred embodiment, such coals are dealt with a two stage gasification process--a relatively low temperature primary gasification step in a circulating fluidized bed transport gasifier followed by a high temperature partial oxidation step of residual char carbon and small quantities of tar. The system to process such coals further includes an internally circulating fluidized bed to effectively cool the high temperature syngas with the aid of an inert media and without the syngas contacting the heat transfer surfaces. A cyclone downstream of the syngas cooler, operating at relatively low temperatures, effectively reduces loading to a dust filtration unit. Nearly dust- and tar-free syngas for chemicals production or power generation and with over 90%, and preferably over about 98%, overall carbon conversion can be achieved with the preferred process, apparatus and methods outlined in this invention.

  2. Evaluation of fly ash quality control tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-30

    Many entities currently use fly ash in portland cement concrete (PCC) pavements and structures. Although the body of knowledge is : great concerning the use of fly ash, several projects per year are subject to poor performance where fly ash is named ...

  3. Survival of emerald ash borer in chips

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deborah G. McCullough; Therese M. Poland; David L. Cappaert

    2005-01-01

    The ability of emerald ash borer (EAB), Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire, to survive following chipping or grinding of infested ash trees remains a critical question for regulatory officials. In October 2002, we felled eight infested ash trees and sampled sections of the trunk and large branches from each tree to estimate EAB density.

  4. Mineral matter and ash in coal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vorres, K.S. (ed.)

    1986-01-01

    The ACS Division of Fuel Chemistry was responsible for the symposium, held in Philadelphia in 1984, that gave rise to the 38 typescript papers in this volume. They are concerned with the chemistry of coal mineral matter, coal ash properties and their prediction, coal ash deposition in boilers, and catalysis by ash and mineral matter in coal utilization.

  5. Evaluation of the useful life of steam turbine rotors; Evaluacion de vida util de rotores de turbinas de vapor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carnero Parra, Antonio; Garcia Illescas, Rafael; Kubiak Szyszka, Janusz [Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas, Temixco, Morelos (Mexico)

    1999-07-01

    This article presents the methodology applied by the Management of Turbomachinery of the Institute of Investigaciones Electricas (IIE), for the evaluation of the remaining useful life of steam turbine rotors in the phase of initiation of fissures. The evaluation of the remaining useful life of turbines, will reveal the real state of health of the rotor and will serve as a base for the future decision making that guarantees their structural integrity. [Spanish] El presentes articulo presenta la metodologia aplicada por la Gerencia de Turbomaquinaria del Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas (IIE), para la evaluacion de la vida util remanente de rotores de turbinas de vapor en la fase de iniciacion de fisuras. La evaluacion de la vida util de turbinas, revelar el estado real de salud del rotor y servira de base para la toma de decisiones futuras que garanticen su integridad estructural.

  6. Utilization of Coal Fly Ash

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    sample. Harrison et al. (1985) found that most of the aliphatic hydrocarbons were paraffins and terpenoids . Roy et al. (1984) found the majority of their...P. Rombout, "Effects of Acute Inhalation of Respirable Coal Fly Ash on Metabolic Defense Capability of the Rat Lung," Inhalation Toxicology, v.2: 361

  7. Coal ash removal in Schkopau

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geisler

    1945-05-22

    This short paper outlined an ash removal process as revealed by a conversation with a Mr. Boerner. Boerner worked with Dr. Strohfeldt in February and March of 1945 on an ash removal process performed at the Schkopau Works. A mill supplied 3 tons/hr of crushed coal, which was mixed with a dilute HCl solution. The acid suspension was immediately supplied to the first concentrator. The thickened paste was transferred by means of a diaphragm pump to the second concentator where a small amount of HCl solution was added. After concentrating in the second apparatus, the paste went to a tank car where the suspension was maintained by air bubbling. Difficulty in filtration was avoided by introduction of a rotating filter cake remover and equally-sized coal granules. The filter yield was estimated at 150 kg of wet cake per m/sup 2/ per hr. The water content of the cake was approximately 50% to 55%, and it was thought that a decrease in water content would result by slowing down the throughput rate. Ash and water analyses of the processed coal were set up, but were not run. No other specific values were given such as ash content, acid concentation, or amounts of reagents added.

  8. The ash in forest fire affected soils control the soil losses. Part 1. The pioneer research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerdà, Artemi; Pereira, Paulo

    2013-04-01

    After forest fires, the ash and the remaining vegetation cover on the soil surface are the main protection against erosion agents. The control ash exert on runoff generation mechanism was researched during the 90's (Cerdà, 1998a; 1998b). This pioneer research demonstrated that after forest fires there is a short period of time that runoff and surface wash by water is controlled by the high infiltration rates achieved by the soil, which were high due to the effect of ash acting as a mulch. The research of Cerdà (1998a; 1998b) also contributed to demonstrate that runoff was enhanced four month later upon the wash of the ash by the runoff, but also due to the removal of ash due to dissolution and water infiltration. As a consequence of the ephemeral ash cover the runoff and erosion reached the peak after the removal of the ash (usually four month), and for two years the soil erosion reached the peak (Cerdà, 1998a). Research developed during the last decade shown that the ash and the litter cover together contribute to reduce the soil losses after the forest fire (Cerdà and Doerr, 2008). The fate of the ash is related to the climatic conditions of the post-fire season, as intense thunderstorms erode the ash layer and low intensity rainfall contribute to a higher infiltration rate and the recovery of the vegetation. Another, key factor found during the last two decades that determine the fate of the ash and the soil and water losses is the impact of the fauna (Cerdà and Doerr, 2010). During the last decade new techniques were developed to study the impact of ash in the soil system, such as the one to monitor the ash changes by means of high spatial resolution photography (Pérez Cabello et al., 2012), and laboratory approaches that show the impact of ash as a key factor in the soil hydrology throughout the control they exert on the soil water repellency (Bodí et al., 2012). Laboratory approaches also shown that the fire severity is a key factor on the ash chemical

  9. Engineering Behavior and Characteristics of Wood Ash and Sugarcane Bagasse Ash

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grau, Francisco; Choo, Hyunwook; Hu, Jong Wan; Jung, Jongwon

    2015-01-01

    Biomasses are organic materials that are derived from any living or recently-living structure. Plenty of biomasses are produced nationwide. Biomasses are mostly combusted and usually discarded or disposed of without treatment as biomass ashes, which include wood and sugarcane bagasse ashes. Thus, recycling or treatment of biomass ashes leads to utilizing the natural materials as an economical and environmental alternative. This study is intended to provide an environmental solution for uncontrolled disposal of biomass ashes by way of recycling the biomass ash and replacing the soils in geotechnical engineering projects. Therefore, in this study, characteristic tests of wood and sugarcane bagasse ashes that are considered the most common biomass ashes are conducted. The test of chemical compositions of biomass ashes is conducted using energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), and Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM), and heavy metal analysis is also conducted. Engineering behaviors including hydraulic conductivity, constrained modulus and shear modulus are examined. Also, coal fly ash Class C is used in this study for comparison with biomass ashes, and Ottawa 20/30 sands containing biomass ashes are examined to identify the soil replacement effect of biomass ashes. The results show that the particle sizes of biomass ashes are halfway between coal fly ash Class C and Ottawa 20/30 sand, and biomass ashes consist of a heterogeneous mixture of different particle sizes and shapes. Also, all heavy metal concentrations were found to be below the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) maximum limit. Hydraulic conductivity values of Ottawa 20/30 sand decrease significantly when replacing them with only 1%–2% of biomass ashes. While both the constrained modulus and shear modulus of biomass ashes are lower than Ottawa 20/30 sand, those of mixtures containing up to 10% biomass ashes are little affected by replacing the soils with biomass ashes. PMID:28793611

  10. Identifying glass compositions in fly ash

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine eAughenbaugh

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, four Class F fly ashes were studied with a scanning electron microscope; the glassy phases were identified and their compositions quantified using point compositional analysis with k-means clustering and multispectral image analysis. The results showed that while the bulk oxide contents of the fly ashes were different, the four fly ashes had somewhat similar glassy phase compositions. Aluminosilicate glasses (AS, calcium aluminosilicate glasses (CAS, a mixed glass, and, in one case, a high iron glass were identified in the fly ashes. Quartz and iron crystalline phases were identified in each fly ash as well. The compositions of the three main glasses identified, AS, CAS, and mixed glass, were relatively similar in each ash. The amounts of each glass were varied by fly ash, with the highest calcium fly ash containing the most of calcium-containing glass. Some of the glasses were identified as intermixed in individual particles, particularly the calcium-containing glasses. Finally, the smallest particles in the fly ashes, with the most surface area available to react in alkaline solution, such as when mixed with portland cement or in alkali-activated fly ash, were not different in composition than the large particles, with each of the glasses represented. The method used in the study may be applied to a fly ash of interest for use as a cementing material in order to understand its potential for reactivity.

  11. Geotechnical engineering properties of incinerator ash mixes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhunthan, B; Taha, R; Said, J

    2004-08-01

    The incineration of solid waste produces large quantities of bottom and fly ash. Landfilling has been the primary mode of disposal of these waste materials. Shortage in landfill space and the high cost of treatment have, however, prompted the search for alternative uses of these waste materials. This study presents an experimental program that was conducted to determine the engineering properties of incinerator ash mixes for use as construction materials. Incinerator ash mixes were tested as received and around optimum compacted conditions. Compaction curves, shear strength, and permeability values of fly ash, bottom ash, and their various blends were investigated. Bottom ash tends to achieve maximum dry density at much lower water content than does fly ash. The mixes displayed a change in their cohesion and friction angle values when one of the two mix components was altered or as a result of the addition of water. The permeability of bottom ash is quite comparable to that of sand. The permeability of fly ash lies in the range of those values obtained for silts and clays. A 100% bottom ash compacted at the optimum water content has a lower density value and yields a higher friction angle and cohesion values than most construction fills. This would encourage the use of bottom ash as a fill or embankment material because free drainage of water will prevent the buildup of pore water pressures.

  12. The Proximate and Elemental Analysis of some Leafy Vegetables ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    triangulare), fluted pumpkin ( Telferia occidentalis), bitter leaf ( Vernonia amygdalina) and drumstick ( Moringa oleifera).Among the four leafy vegetables, Talinum triangulare contains the highest amount moisture (91.6%), Vernonia had the highest ash and lipid content (2.5%) and (0.7%) respectively. Moringa had the ...

  13. Proximate and nutrient analysis of selected vegetable species: A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-06-17

    Jun 17, 2009 ... ascorbic acid and palpable concentration of trace minerals (Prakash and Pal, ... vegetables plays a crucial role in assessing their nutri- tional significance .... Table 4. Correlation matrix of the various parameters studied for the proximate analysis of selected plant species. Moisture. (wet). Moistures. (dry). Ash.

  14. Strength Properties of Processed Fly Ash Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sivakumar Anandan

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The present paper reports on the mechanical treatment of fly ash for improving the delayed reactivity of fly ash with the hydration product of cement. Grinding of fly ash was carried out in a ball mill for different time durations and processing time was optimized for maximum fineness. Concrete mixes were prepared using various proportions of processed and unprocessed fly ash replacement in cement (25% and 50%. The influence of steel fiber addition on the mechanical properties of the concrete was studied for different curing periods. The test results on pozzolanic activity and lime reactivity indicate that the processed fly ash exhibited a higher strength gain than the unprocessed fly ash, with a maximum increase in compressive strength of up to 12%. Improved pozzolanic properties were noticed due to the increase in fineness of the fly ash particles.

  15. A geotechnical classification system for coal ashes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prakash, K.; Sridharan, A. [S.J. College of Engineering, Mysore (India). Dept. of Civil Engineering

    2006-04-15

    Most of the existing soil classification systems make use of the plasticity chart for classifying fine-grained soils and some coarse-grained soils as well. They cannot classify those granular materials that are non-plastic through appropriate group symbols indicative of their non-plastic nature without any ambiguity. Coal ashes, consisting of fly ash (known as pulverised fuel ash in the UK), bottom ash and pond ash, are produced in large quantities and are occasionally used in geotechnical applications. As they are non-plastic materials, the existing classification systems fail to classify them appropriately. This paper discusses this issue in detail. A classification system for coal ashes that are essentially non-plastic is formulated and proposed in this paper. It is shown through illustrative examples that the coal ashes can be classified easily and without any ambiguity using the proposed system.

  16. Recycling of wood- and peat-ash. A successful way to establish full plant cover and dense birch stand on a cut-away peatland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huotari, N.

    2012-07-01

    Mechanical harvesting of peat changes the original mire ecosystem completely, and without active measures these areas may remain non-vegetated even for decades. Afforestation is one of the most popular after-use options for cut-away peatlands in Finland since it has both economic and aesthetic values. Recycling of wood-ash as a fertilizer has been studied extensively in peatlands drained for forestry. Wood-ash is reported to promote tree growth in these areas without any significant negative impact to the environment and could, therefore, be a suitable option also on cut-away peatlands. However, the environmental effects of ash-fertilization on cut-away areas and on ground vegetation are not fully understood. The impact of wood- and peat-ash application on the early establishment of ground vegetation and downy birch (Betula pubescens) seedlings and on post-fertilization element concentrations in plants and peat substrate were studied in a cut-away peatland. Six treatments of wood-ash, peat-ash, biotite or Forest PK-fertilizer were replicated in three blocks in different mixtures and quantities corresponding to 50 kg ha-1 of phosphorus. All the fertilizers accelerated the revegetation of the bare peat surface significantly, whereas the establishment of plants in the unfertilized area was non-existent even several years after the peat harvesting had ceased. The most striking difference between the wood- and peat-ash-fertilizers and the commercial Forest PK-fertilizer was the extensive coverage of fire-loving moss species in all the areas where ash was spread. Wood- and peat-ash application also accelerated the germination and early establishment of downy birch seedlings more efficiently than the PK-fertilizer. Ground vegetation proved to be highly important in increasing the early biomass production and carbon sequestration on ash-fertilized cut-away peatland. In addition, the below-ground biomass was equal to the above-ground biomass, or even greater. Both wood- and

  17. Dynamics of volcanic ash remobilisation by wind through the Patagonian steppe after the eruption of Cordón Caulle, 2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panebianco, Juan E; Mendez, Mariano J; Buschiazzo, Daniel E; Bran, Donaldo; Gaitán, Juan J

    2017-03-28

    Wind erosion of freshly-deposited volcanic ash causes persistent storms, strongly affecting ecosystems and human activity. Wind erosion of the volcanic ash was measured up to 17 months after the ash deposition, at 7 sites located within the ash-deposition area. The mass flux was measured up to 1.5 m above ground level. Mass transport rates were over 125 times the soil wind-erosion rates observed before the ash deposition, reaching up to 6.3 kg m-1 day-1. Total mass transport of ash during the 17 months ranged between 113.6 and 969.9 kg m-1 depending on topographic location and wind exposure. The vertical distribution of the mass flux at sites with higher vegetation cover was generally inverted as compared to sites with lower vegetation cover. This situation lasted 7 months and then a shift towards a more uniform vertical distribution was observed, in coincidence with the beginning of the decline of the mass transport rates. Decay rates differed between sites. Despite changes over time, an inverse linear correlation between the mass transports and the mass-flux gradients was found. Both the mass-flux gradients and the average mass-transport rates were not linked with shear-stress partition parameters, but with the ratio: ash-fall thickness to total vegetation cover.

  18. Ash wettability conditions splash erosion in the postfire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordillo-Rivero, Ángel J.; de Celis, Reyes; García-Moreno, Jorge; Jiménez-Compán, Elizabeth; Alanís, Nancy; Cerdà, Artemi; Pereira, Paulo; Zavala, Lorena M.; Jordán, Antonio

    2015-04-01

    1. INTRODUCTION Soil sustainability and recovery after fire depend on physical, chemical and biological processes and fire severity (Neary et al., 1999; Mataix-Solera and Guerrero, 2007). Fire effects on soils are divided in two types: direct effects, as a consequence of combustion and temperature reached and indirect effects (Neary et al., 1999) as consequence of changes in other ecosystem components, such as decrease in vegetal coverage or ash and partially burned litter contribution including changes in flora (Pausas and Verdú, 2005; Trabaud, 2000). Low intensity fires, during which high temperatures are not reached, affect vegetal coverage but will not cause major impacts on soil. In contrast, prolonged, recurrent, or high-intensity fires may cause important impacts on the soil system functioning (De Celis et al., 2013; DeBano, 1991; Mataix-Solera et al., 2009; Zavala et al., 2014), aggregation (Mataix-Solera et al., 2011), organic matter content and quality (Sevink et al., 1989), water repellency (DeBano, 2000; Doerr et al., 2000), soil nutrients (Stark, 1977), soil erosion (Larsen et al., 2009) and others. In these cases, the restoration period of the initial conditions can be very long and changes may become permanent (DeBano, 1991). During combustion, fuel (biomass, necromass and soil organic matter) is transformed in materials with new physical and chemical properties. After burn, the soil surface is covered by a layer of ash and charred organic residues. Ash has important ecological, hydrological and geomorphological effects, even after being rearranged or mobilized by runoff or wind (Bodí et al., 2014). Ash properties will depend on the burned species, the amount of affected biomass, fuel flammability and structure, temperature and the residence time of thermal peaks (Pereira et al., 2009). Some studies have emphasized the role of ash on soil protection during the after fire period, in which the vegetable coverage could be drastically decreased (Cerd

  19. The Effects of Bottom Ash on Setting Time and Compressive Strength of Fly Ash Geopolymer Paste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Affandhie, B. A.; Kurniasari, P. T.; Darmawan, M. S.; Subekti, S.; Wibowo, B.; Husin, N. A.; Bayuaji, R.; Irawan, S.

    2017-11-01

    This research is to find out the contribution of waste energy utilization of fly ash and bottom ash coal as binding agent of geopolymer concrete. This research methodology uses experimental approach in laboratory by making cylinder paste test object with dimension diameter of 2.5 cm x height 5 cm with some combination of fly ash and bottom ash mix with time setting test (ASTM C 191-04a) and compressive strength (ASTM C 39-04a). The research concludes that the effect of bottom ash on fly ash-based geopolymer paste shows good results in setting time and compressive strength.

  20. Ultrasonic ash/pyrite liberation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yungman, B.A.; Buban, K.S.; Stotts, W.F.

    1990-06-01

    The objective of this project was to develop a coal preparation concept which employed ultrasonics to precondition coal prior to conventional or advanced physical beneficiation processes such that ash and pyrite separation were enhanced with improved combustible recovery. Research activities involved a series of experiments that subjected three different test coals, Illinois No. 6, Pittsburgh No. 8, and Upper Freeport, ground to three different size fractions (28 mesh [times] 0, 200 mesh [times] 0, and 325 mesh [times] 0), to a fixed (20 kHz) frequency ultrasonic signal prior to processing by conventional and microbubble flotation. The samples were also processed by conventional and microbubble flotation without ultrasonic pretreatment to establish baseline conditions. Product ash, sulfur and combustible recovery data were determined for both beneficiation processes.

  1. The Ashes of Marci Shore

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zbigniew Kopeć

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The article discusses Marci Shore’s social and historical thought, as presented in her books: Caviar and Ashes: A Warsaw Generation’s Life and Death in Marxism, 1918-1968 (2006, The Taste of Ashes (2013, and her essays recently published in Polish translation. The author follows the American historian, presenting her concept of modernity, but focuses on the main theme of her research: the contribution of Jewish writers, poets, artists, and intellectuals to the creation of Marxism. The author acknowledges the great value of Marci Shore’s writings, but argues that her panorama of the 20th century would be fuller if her discussion included a reflection on the religious attitude of many Jewish thinkers to Marxism and the USSR. This topic was discussed by Nikolai Berdyaev and Polish thinkers who published in pre-war social journals.

  2. Geopolymer Mortar with Fly Ash

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saloma

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The cement industry accounts for about 7% of all CO2 emissions caused by humans. Therefore, it is necessary to find another material in order to support sustainable material. An alternative way is replacing cement material with alternative material as fly ash. Fly ash as binder need to be added alkaline activator in the form of sodium silicate (Na2SiO3 or potassium silicate (K2SiO3 and sodium hydroxide (NaOH or potassium hydroxide (KOH. The purpose of this research is to analyze the effect of activator liquid concentration on geopolymer mortar properties and to know the value of compressive strength. Molarity variation of NaOH are 8, 12, 14, and 16 M with ratio of Na2SiO3/NaOH = 1.0. Ratio of sand/fly ash = 2.75 and ratio of activator/fly ash = 0.8. The cube-shaped specimen 50 × 50 × 50 mm is cured by steam curing with a temperature of 60°C for 48 hours. The experimental result of fresh mortar reported that the molarity of NaOH affect the slump flow and setting time, higher of NaOH produces the smaller value of slump and the faster time of setting. The experimental of density results reported that the increase of specific gravity when the molarity of NaOH increased. The experimental results of the compressive strength are showed that the maximum compressive strength of geopolymer mortar 14 M is 10.06 MPa and the lowest compressive strength produced by geopolymer mortar 8 M is 3.95 MPa. Testing the compressive strength of geopolymer mortar 16 M produces compressive strength lower than 14 M geopolymer mortar is 9.16 MPa.

  3. Radionuclide concentrations in vegetation at the Los Alamos National Laboratory in 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    G. J. Gonzales; P. R. Fresquez; M. A. Mullen; L. Naranjo, Jr.

    2000-03-01

    This report summarizes and evaluates the concentrations of {sup 3}H, {sup 137}Cs, {sup 238}Pu, {sup 239,240}Pu, {sup 241}Am, {sup 90}Sr, and total U in understory and overstory vegetation collected from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), its perimeter, and regional background areas in 1998. Comparisons to conservative toxicity reference value safe limits were also made. The arithmetic mean LANL radionuclide concentrations in understory were 501 pCi L{sup {minus}1} for {sup 3}H, 0.581 pCi ash g{sup {minus}1} for {sup 137}Cs, 0.001 pCi ash g{sup {minus}1} for {sup 238}Pu, 0.008 pCi ash g{sup {minus}1} for {sup 239,240}Pu, 0.007 pCi ash g{sup {minus}1} for {sup 241}Am, 1.46 pCi ash g{sup {minus}1} for {sup 90}Sr, and 0.233 {micro}g ash g{sup {minus}1} for total uranium. The mean LANL radionuclide concentrations in overstory were 463 pCi L{sup {minus}1} for {sup 3}H, 1.51 pCi ash g{sup {minus}1} for {sup 137}Cs, 0.0004 pCi ash g{sup {minus}1} {sup 238}Pu, 0.008 pCi ash g{sup {minus}1} for {sup 239,240}Pu, 0.014 pCi ash g{sup {minus}1} for {sup 241}Am, 1.97 pCi ash g{sup {minus}1} for {sup 90}Sr, and 0.388 {micro}g ash g{sup {minus}1} for total uranium. Concentrations of radionuclides and total U in both understory and overstory vegetation at LANL generally were not statistically higher than in perimeter and regional background vegetation ({alpha} = 0.05). The exceptions were LANL {sup 3}H > perimeter {sup 3}H (understory) and LANL {sup 3}H background {sup 3}H (overstory). All maximum radionuclide concentrations were lower than toxicity reference values. With the exception of total U, the relationship between contaminant concentration in soil vs. vegetation was insignificant ({alpha} = 0.05). Generally, as the concentration of total U in soil decreased, the concentration in vegetation increased. This held true for both understory and overstory and regardless of whether data were separated by general location (LANL, perimeter, and background) or not. There was no

  4. Possibilities of utilizing power plant fly ashes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mezencevová Andrea

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available The burning of fossil fuels in industrial power stations plays a significant role in the production of thermal and electrical energy. Modern thermal power plants are producing large amounts of solid waste, mainly fly ashes. The disposal of power plant waste is a large environmental problem at the present time. In this paper, possibilities of utilization of power plant fly ashes in industry, especially in civil engineering, are presented. The fly ash is a heterogeneous material with various physical, chemical and mineralogical properties, depending on the mineralogical composition of burned coal and on the used combustion technology. The utilization of fly ashes is determined of their properties. The fineness, specific surface area, particle shape, density, hardness, freeze-thaw resistance, etc. are decisive. The building trade is a branch of industry, which employs fly ash in large quantities for several decades.The best utilization of fluid fly ashes is mainly in the production of cement and concrete, due to the excellent pozzolanic and cementitious properties of this waste. In the concrete processing, the fly ash is utilized as a replacement of the fine aggregate (fine filler or a partial replacement for cement (active admixture. In addition to economic and ecological benefits, the use of fly ash in concrete improves its workability and durability, increases compressive and flexural strength, reduces segregation, bleeding, shrinkage, heat evolution and permeability and enhances sulfate resistance of concrete.The aim of current research is to search for new technologies for the fly ash utilization. The very interesting are biotechnological methods to recovery useful components of fly ashes and unconventional methods of modification of fly ash properties such as hydrothermal zeolitization and mechanochemical modification of its properties. Mechanochemistry deals with physico - chemical transformations and chemical reactions of solids induced by

  5. Volcanic ash impacts on critical infrastructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Thomas M.; Stewart, Carol; Sword-Daniels, Victoria; Leonard, Graham S.; Johnston, David M.; Cole, Jim W.; Wardman, Johnny; Wilson, Grant; Barnard, Scott T.

    2012-01-01

    Volcanic eruptions can produce a wide range of hazards. Although phenomena such as pyroclastic flows and surges, sector collapses, lahars and ballistic blocks are the most destructive and dangerous, volcanic ash is by far the most widely distributed eruption product. Although ash falls rarely endanger human life directly, threats to public health and disruption to critical infrastructure services, aviation and primary production can lead to significant societal impacts. Even relatively small eruptions can cause widespread disruption, damage and economic loss. Volcanic eruptions are, in general, infrequent and somewhat exotic occurrences, and consequently in many parts of the world, the management of critical infrastructure during volcanic crises can be improved with greater knowledge of the likely impacts. This article presents an overview of volcanic ash impacts on critical infrastructure, other than aviation and fuel supply, illustrated by findings from impact assessment reconnaissance trips carried out to a wide range of locations worldwide by our international research group and local collaborators. ‘Critical infrastructure’ includes those assets, frequently taken for granted, which are essential for the functioning of a society and economy. Electricity networks are very vulnerable to disruption from volcanic ash falls. This is particularly the case when fine ash is erupted because it has a greater tendency to adhere to line and substation insulators, where it can cause flashover (unintended electrical discharge) which can in turn cause widespread and disruptive outages. Weather conditions are a major determinant of flashover risk. Dry ash is not conductive, and heavy rain will wash ash from insulators, but light rain/mist will mobilise readily-soluble salts on the surface of the ash grains and lower the ash layer’s resistivity. Wet ash is also heavier than dry ash, increasing the risk of line breakage or tower/pole collapse. Particular issues for water

  6. Sample Collection of Ash and Burned Soils from the October 2007 Southern California Wildfires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoefen, Todd M.; Kokaly, Raymond F.; Martin, Deborah A.; Rochester, Carlton; Plumlee, Geoffrey S.; Mendez, Greg; Reichard, Eric G.; Fisher, Robert N.

    2009-01-01

    Between November 2 through 9, 2007 scientists from the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) collected samples of ash and burned soils from 28 sites in six areas burned as a result of the Southern California wildfires of October 2007, including the Harris, Witch, Santiago, Ammo, Canyon, and Grass Valley Fires. The primary goal of this sampling and analysis effort was to understand how differences in ash and burned soil composition relate to vegetation type, underlying bedrock geology, burn intensity, and residential versus wildland. Sampling sites were chosen with the input of local experts from the USGS Water Resources and Biological Resources Disciplines to help understand possible effects of the fires on water supplies, ecosystems, and endangered species. The sampling was also carried out in conjunction with detailed field analysis of the spectral reflectance characteristics of the ash, so that chemical and mineralogical characteristics of the field samples could be used to help interpret data collected as part of an airborne, hyperspectral remote-sensing survey of several of the burned areas in mid-late November, 2007. This report presents an overview of the field sampling methodologies used to collect the samples, includes representative photos of the sites sampled, and summarizes important characteristics of each of the collection sites. In this report we use the term 'ash' to refer collectively to white mineral ash, which results from full combustion of vegetation and black charred organic matter from partial combustion of vegetation or other materials. These materials were found to be intermingled as a deposited residue on the soil surface following the Southern California fires of 2007.

  7. Use of unwounded ash trees for the detection of emerald ash borer adults: EAB landing behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan M. Marshall; Melissa J. Porter; Andrew J. Storer

    2011-01-01

    Incorporation of multiple trapping techniques and sites within a survey program is essential to adequately identify the range of emerald ash borer (EAB) (Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire) infestation. Within natural forests, EAB lands on stick band traps wrapped around girdled ash trees at a rate similar to that on unwounded ash trees. The objective of...

  8. Emerald Ash Borer: Invasion of the Urban Forest and the Threat to North America's Ash Resource

    Science.gov (United States)

    Therese M. Poland; Deborah G. McCullough

    2006-01-01

    The emerald ash borer (EAB), a phloem-feeding beetle native to Asia, was discovered killing ash trees in southeastern Michigan and Windsor, Ontario, in 2002. Like several other invasive forest pests, the EAB likely was introduced and became established in a highly urbanized setting, facilitated by international trade and abundant hosts. Up to 15 million ash trees in...

  9. Factors affecting the survival of ash (Fraxinus spp.) trees infested by emerald ash borer (Agrilus planipennis)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kathleen S. Knight; John P. Brown; Robert P. Long

    2013-01-01

    Emerald ash borer (Agrilus planipennis) (EAB), an Asian woodboring beetle accidentally introduced in North America, has killed millions of ash (Fraxinus spp.) trees and is spreading rapidly. This study examined the effects of tree- and site-level factors on the mortality of ash trees in stands infested by EAB in OH, USA. Our data...

  10. The Role of Biocontrol of Emerald Ash Borer in Protecting Ash Regeneration after Invasion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emerald ash borer (EAB) is an invasive Asian beetle that is destroying ash in forests over much of eastern North America because of the high susceptibility of our native ash and a lack of effective natural enemies. To increase mortality of EAB larvae and eggs, the USDA (FS, ARS and APHIS) is carryin...

  11. Attraction of the emerald ash borer to ash trees stressed by girdling, herbicide treatment, or wounding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deborah McCullough; Therese Poland; David. Cappaert

    2009-01-01

    New infestations of emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire, an invasive pest native to Asia, are difficult to detect until densities build and symptoms appear on affected ash (Fraxinus spp). We compared the attraction of A. planipennis to ash trees stressed by girdling (bark and phloem removed...

  12. Integral power evaluation in fossil fuel power plants; Evaluacion energetica integral en unidades de centrales termoelectricas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Figueroa I, Luis R; Sanchez H, Laura E; Rodriguez M, Jose H [Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas, Cuernavaca, Morelos (Mexico); Nebradt G, Jesus [Unidad de Investigacion y Desarrollo de la Subdireccion de Generacion de la Comision Federal de Electricidad, (Mexico)

    2006-07-01

    In this occasion, a methodology is presented that carries out an integral energy evaluation of fossil fuel power plants units (FFPPU) with the purpose of determining the root of the significant decrements of power produced soon after the annual maintenance service. This proposal, besides identifying the origin of the energy efficiency problems, offers information about the contributions of each one of the involved equipment in the total decrement of the unit. With this methodology, the maintenance focuses in the equipment that contributes to the greater energy loss. This document presents such methodology along with its application in a real case, results and necessary remedial actions, demonstrating that its application offers bases for the investment in corrective measures. [Spanish] En esta ocasion se presenta una metodologia que efectua una evaluacion energetica integral de las unidades de centrales termoelectricas (UCT) con el fin de determinar la raiz de los decrementos de potencia significativos producidos luego del servicio anual de mantenimiento. Dicha propuesta, ademas de identificar el origen de los problemas de eficiencia energetica, brinda informacion acerca de las aportaciones de cada uno de los equipos involucrados al decremento total de la unidad. Con esta metodologia, el mantenimiento se enfoca a los equipos que contribuyen a la mayor perdida de potencia. Este documento exhibe tal metodologia junto con su aplicacion en un caso real, resultados y las acciones correctivas necesarias, demostrando que su aplicacion ofrece bases para una inversion futura en medidas correctivas.

  13. The potential of utilizing wood ash and peat ash on organic soils in Sweden; Arealer foer skogsgoedsling med traeaska och torvaska paa organogena jordar i Sverige

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haanell, Bjoern [Swedish Univ. of Agricultural Sciences, Umeaa (Sweden). Dept. of Silviculture

    2004-01-01

    Nutrients removed from the forest when branches and treetops are harvested as fuel can be returned to the site by recycling the remaining wood ash after combustion. This compensation measure is presently not carried out to any appreciable extent, partly because there is no economic incentive for the landowner. In sites where this measure has been applied, only on mineral soils (e.g. moraine) until now, greater margins for sustainable maintenance of the long-term site productivity can be expected. The ash contains all elements required for tree growth except for nitrogen (N). Therefore the ash amendment does not result in increased stand growth on these soils because the most important element for a growth response (N) is missing. In contrast, on organic soils N is often abundant whereas the amounts of other mineral nutrients are small. Thus, the elements lacking in the soils of peatland forests are available in the ash. This is especially true for phosphorus (P) and potassium (K). This means that peatland forests provide an opportunity for ash amendment in order to increase forest production. Old fertilization trials using wood ash show that the growth increase can be very large. The aim of this study was to (i) calculate the area of peat covered land that with respect to stand growth responses could be regarded as most suitable for bio-ash (wood ash and peat ash) fertilization, and (ii) assess the amount of bio-ash needed for fertilizing this area. Peat ash, although not as much studied, also has potential to be used to provide nutrients for increasing peatland forest growth. Most of the area calculations were based on data from the National Forest Inventory (NFI) 1997-2001. Sites were selected with guidance from existing knowledge about ash fertilization effects on tree growth and with the aid of registrations made in NFI regarding peat depth, site productivity, drainage, condition of drains, dominating field vegetation, and degree of stand development

  14. Characterization of ash cenospheres in fly ash from Australian power stations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ling-ngee Ngu; Hongwei Wu; Dong-ke Zhang [Curtin University of Technology, Perth, WA (Australia). Centre for Fuels and Energy and Department of Chemical Engineering

    2007-12-15

    Ash cenospheres in fly ashes from five Australian power stations have been characterized. The experimental data show that ash cenosphere yield varies across the power stations. Ash partitioning occurred in the process of ash cenosphere formation during combustion. Contradictory to conclusions from the literature, iron does not seem to be essential to ash cenosphere formation in the cases examined in the present work. Further investigation was also undertaken on a series of size-fractioned ash cenosphere samples from Tarong power station. It is found that about 70 wt% of ash cenospheres in the bulk sample have sizes between 45 and 150 {mu}m. There are two different ash cenosphere structures, that is, single-ring structure and network structure. The percentage of ash cenospheres of a network structure increases with increasing ash cenosphere size. Small ash cenospheres (in the size fractions {lt}150 {mu}m) have a high SiO{sub 2}/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} ratio, and the majority of the ash cenospheres are spherical and of a single-ring structure. Large ash cenosphere particles (in the size fractions of 150-250 {mu}m and {gt}250 {mu}m) have a low SiO{sub 2}/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} ratio, and a high proportion of the ash cenospheres are nonspherical and of a network structure. A novel quantitative technique has been developed to measure the diameter and wall thickness of ash cenospheres on a particle-to-particle basis. A monolayer of size-fractioned ash cenospheres was dispersed on a pellet, which was then polished carefully before being examined using a scanning electron microscope and image analysis. The ash cenosphere wall thickness broadly increases with increasing ash cenosphere size. The ratios between wall thickness and diameter of ash cenospheres are limited between an upper bound of about 10.5% and a lower bound of about 2.5%, irrespective of the ash cenosphere size. 52 refs., 9 figs., 4 tabs.

  15. Treatment of fly ash for use in concrete

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boxley, Chett [Park City, UT

    2012-05-15

    A process for treating fly ash to render it highly usable as a concrete additive. A quantity of fly ash is obtained that contains carbon and which is considered unusable fly ash for concrete based upon foam index testing. The fly ash is mixed with a quantity of spray dryer ash (SDA) and water to initiate a geopolymerization reaction and form a geopolymerized fly ash. The geopolymerized fly ash is granulated. The geopolymerized fly ash is considered usable fly ash for concrete according to foam index testing. The geopolymerized fly ash may have a foam index less than 40%, and in some cases less than 20%, of the foam index of the untreated fly ash. An optional alkaline activator may be mixed with the fly ash and SDA to facilitate the geopolymerization reaction. The alkaline activator may contain an alkali metal hydroxide, carbonate, silicate, aluminate, or mixtures thereof.

  16. Effect of blanching and drying methods on the nutritional and sensory quality of leafy vegetables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onayemi, O; Badifu, G I

    1987-01-01

    The nutrient retention and sensory quality factors of vegetables blanched by two methods and solar-dried or dried in the cabinet dryer were evaluated. The type and conditions of the blanching treatment prior to drying affect the retention of ascorbic acid, carotene, and ash in the dried vegetables. The sun-dried vegetables had inferior colour, texture and acceptibility compared to the vegetables dried in the cabinet dryer. There were significant differences in the rehydration and drying ratio of the dried vegetables. The implications of the blanching and drying processes for an effective preservation technique are discussed.

  17. Porous Geopolymer Insulating Core from a Metakaolin/Biomass Ash Composite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annalisa Natali Murri

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Ashes derived from the combustion of vegetal and animal biomass still represent a mostly unexplored secondary raw material for the production of alkali-activated materials, given their peculiar chemical nature. In this work, calcium phosphate biomass ashes were successfully used as partially reactive fillers in a metakaolin-based geopolymer composite to produce, by direct foaming, sustainable and lightweight boards with thermal insulating properties. The investigated materials were obtained by activating a blend of metakaolin and biomass ash in a weight ratio of 1: 1 and foamed with the addition of H2O2 in measure of 5 wt. %, to maximize the volume of disposed ash and ensure adequate properties to the material at the same time. The obtained geopolymer composite was characterized by microstructural, chemical-physical, mechanical and thermal analysis: the obtained results showed that biomass ash and metakaolin well integrated in the microstructure of the final porous material, which was characterized by a density of about 310 kg/m3 and a thermal conductivity of 0.073 W/mK at a mean test temperature of 30 °C, coupled with an acceptable compressive strength of about 0.6 MPa. Dilatometric and thermogravimetric analysis, performed up to 1000 °C, highlighted the thermal stability of the composite, which could be regarded as a promising material for low-cost, self-bearing thermal insulating partitions or lightweight cores for thermostructural sandwich panels.

  18. Emerald ash borer biocontrol in ash saplings: The potential for early stage recovery of North American ash trees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jian J. Duan; Leah S. Bauer; Roy G. Van Driesche

    2017-01-01

    In many parts of North America, ash (Fraxinus) stands have been reduced by the emerald ash borer (Agrilus planipennis) invasion to a few surviving mature trees, saplings, basal sprouts, and seedlings. Without a soil seed bank for Fraxinus spp., tree recovery will require survival and maturation of these...

  19. Characteristics of spanish fly ashes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Luxán, M. P.

    1988-03-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is the characterization of fly ashes produced by Spanish thermoelectric power plants, according to sampling taken in 1981 and 1982. The study takes in the following characteristics: physical characteristics (size distribution of particles, ...; chemical ones (chemical analysis...; and mineralogical ones (application of instrumental techniques of X-ray diffraction and infrared absorption spectroscopy. From a general point of view, it can be said that the samples of Spanish fly ashes are similar to those produced in other countries. The results obtained are a contribution to the knowledge of Spanish fly ashes and form part of the antecedents of investigations carried out in subsequent years.

    Este trabajo tiene por objeto la caracterización de las cenizas volantes producidas en las Centrales Termoeléctricas españolas, según un muestreo realizado entre 1981 y 1982. El estudio comprende las siguientes características: físicas (distribución del tamaño de partículas,...; químicas (análisis químico, …; y mineralógicas (aplicación de las técnicas instrumentales de difracción de rayos X y espectroscopía de absorción infrarroja. Desde un punto de vista general, se puede afirmar que las muestras de ceniza volante estudiadas son semejantes a las producidas en otros países. Los resultados obtenidos son una aportación al conocimiento de las cenizas volantes españolas y forman parte de los antecedentes de las investigaciones llevadas a cabo en años posteriores.

  20. Experimental Study on Volume for Fly Ash of Building Block

    OpenAIRE

    Ling Wang; He Sun; Zhihui Sun; Enqing Ma

    2013-01-01

    Fly ash is a waste substance from thermal power plants, steel mills, etc. That is found in abundance in the world. It has polluted the environment, wasting the cultivated land. This study introduces an experimental research on fly ash being reused effectively, the study introduces raw materials of fly ash brick, production process and product inspection, fly ash content could be amounted to 40%~75%. High doping fly ash bricks are manufactured, which selects wet fly ash from the power plants, ...

  1. Characterization of fly ash from bio and municipal waste

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lima, Ana T.; Ottosen, Lisbeth M.; Pedersen, Anne Juul

    2008-01-01

    Four different fly ashes are characterized in the present paper. The ashes differ in the original fuel type and were sampled at distinct plants. The investigation includes two different ashes from municipal solid waste incineration (with and without sorbents addition), a straw ash and an ash from...... potentiality to be valorized. The main conclusion of this paper regards fly ash’s profound dissimilarity, where each ash should be studied separately....

  2. Las evaluaciones externas y el rendimiento académico de los alumnos como instrumento de mejora educativa

    OpenAIRE

    López Bertomeo, Eduardo; González Olivares, Ángel Luis

    2018-01-01

    El presente artículo refleja la importancia que han adquirido las evaluaciones externas como instrumento de control, por parte de las Administraciones, del estado general de los sistemas educativos. Aunque es un tema de actualidad, la utilización de pruebas externas estandarizadas es tan antigua como los propios sistemas educativos, girando ya desde el inicio en torno al rendimiento académico de los alumnos. En la actualidad esas pruebas sirven de guía para la elaboración de leyes educativas ...

  3. The effect of wood ash fertilization on soil respiration and tree stand growth in boreal peatland forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liimatainen, Maarit; Maljanen, Marja; Hytönen, Jyrki

    2017-04-01

    Out of Finland's original 10 million hectares of peatlands over half has been drained for forestry. Natural peatlands act as a sink for carbon but when peatland is drained, increased oxygen concentration in the peat accelerates the aerobic decomposition of the old organic matter of the peat leading to carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions to atmosphere. Increasing use of bioenergy increases also the amount of ash produced as a byproduct in power plants. Wood ash contains all essential nutrients for trees to grow except nitrogen. Therefore, wood ash is ideal fertilizer for nitrogen rich peatland forests where lack of phosphorus or potassium may restrict tree growth. At the moment, wood ash is the only available PK-fertilizer for peatland forests in Finland and areas of peatland forests fertilized with ash are increasing annually. The effects of wood ash on vegetation, soil properties and tree growth are rather well known although most of the studies have been made using fine ash whereas nowadays mostly stabilized ash (e.g. granulated) is used. Transporting and spreading of stabilized ash is easier than that of dusty fine ash. Also, slower leaching rate of nutrients is environmentally beneficial and prolongs the fertilizer effect. The knowledge on the impact of granulated wood ash on greenhouse gas emissions is still very limited. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of granulated wood ash on CO2 emissions from peat and tree stand growth. Field measurements were done in two boreal peatland forests in 2011 and 2012. One of the sites is more nutrient rich with soil carbon to nitrogen ratio (C/N) of 18 whereas the other site is nutrient poor with C/N ratio of 82. Both sites were fertilized with granulated wood ash in 2003 (5000 kg ha-1). The effect of fertilization was followed with tree stand measurements conducted 0, 5 and 10 years after the fertilization. The CO2 emissions of the decomposing peat (heterotrophic respiration) were measured from study plots where

  4. Emerald ash borer biology and invasion history

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert A. Haack; Yuri Baranchikov; Leah S. Bauer; Therese M. Poland

    2015-01-01

    The emerald ash borer (EAB), Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae), is native to eastern Asia and is primarily a pest of ash (Fraxinus) trees (Fig. 1). Established populations of EAB were first detected in the United States and Canada in 2002 (Haack et al., 2002), and based on a dendrochronology study by Siegert...

  5. Ash basin reclamation with forest trees

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horton, J.H.; McMinn, J.W.

    1977-09-01

    An ash basin at the Savannah River Plant, Aiken, South Carolina is growing trees as well as, and with some species better than, a local soil. The basin contains ashes from a stoker-fed boiler and was last used about 12 years before the trees were planted. The concentrations of 24 chemical elements were measured in ashes, soil and trees. The concentrations of most of the chemical elements were higher in ashes than in soil; however, with a few exceptions, these elements were less available to the trees on ashes than to the trees on soil. The trees do not show any toxicity or deficiency symptoms, but the concentration of manganese in sycamore growing on ashes indicates a possible deficiency. No concentration of an element in trees appears to be high enough to be toxic to the trees. A longer period of study will be required to determine whether the ashes can produce commercial timber, but trees can be used to stabilize ash basins and improve their appearance.

  6. Wet physical separation of MSWI bottom ash

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Muchova, L.

    2010-01-01

    Bottom ash (BA) from municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI) has high potential for the recovery of valuable secondary materials. For example, the MSWI bottom ash produced by the incinerator at Amsterdam contains materials such as non-ferrous metals (2.3%), ferrous metals (8-13%), gold (0.4 ppm),

  7. AsH3 ultraviolet photochemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith-Freeman, L A; Schroeder, W P; Wittig, C

    2009-03-12

    High-n Rydberg time-of-flight spectroscopy has been used to study the 193.3 nm photolysis of AsH(3). The center-of-mass translational energy distribution for the 1-photon process, AsH(3) + h nu --> AsH(2) + H, P(E(c.m.)), indicates that AsH(2) internal excitation accounts for approximately 64% of the available energy [i.e., h nu - D(0)(H(2)As - H)]. Secondary AsH(2) photodissociation also takes place. Analyses of superimposed structure atop the broad P(E(c.m.)) distribution suggest that AsH(2) is formed with significant a-axis rotation as well as bending excitation. Comparison of the results obtained with AsH(3) versus those of the lighter group-V hydrides (NH(3), PH(3)) lends support to the proposed mechanisms. Of the group-V hydrides, AsH(3) lies intermediate between the nonrelativistic and relativistic regimes, requiring high-level electronic structure theory.

  8. Biology of emerald ash borer parasitoids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leah S. Bauer; Jian J. Duan; Jonathan P. Lelito; Houping Liu; Juli R. Gould

    2015-01-01

    The emerald ash borer (EAB) (Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae), an invasive beetle introduced from China (Bray et al., 2011), was identified as the cause of ash (Fraxinus spp.) mortality in southeast Michigan and nearby Ontario in 2002 (Haack et al., 2002; Federal Register, 2003; Cappaert et al., 2005)....

  9. Physicochemical characterization of Spanish fly ashes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Querol, X.; Umana, J.C.; Alastuey, A.; Bertrana, C.; Lopez-Soler, A.; Plana, F.

    1999-12-01

    This article summarizes the results obtained from the physical, chemical, and mineralogical characterization of 14 fly ash samples. Major features that influence the utilization of each fly ash for zeolite synthesis are evidenced, and several fly ash types were selected as potential high-quality starting material for zeolite synthesis and ceramic applications. The main parameters influencing this selection were relatively small grain size; high Al and Si contents; high glass content; low CaO, S, and Fe contents; and relatively low heavy metal concentration. The Compostilla and Cou He fly ashes have high potential applications because of the low content of major impurities (such as Ca, Fe, and S) and the low content of soluble hazardous elements. The Espiel, Escucha, Los Barrios, As Pontes, Soto de Ribera, Meirama, Narcea, and Teruel fly ashes have important application potential, but this potential is slightly limited by the intermediate content of nonreactive impurities, such as Fe and Ca. The La Robla fly ash is of moderate interest, since the relatively high Ca and Fe oxide contents may reduce its potential applications. Finally, the Puertollano fly ash also has limited application because of the very high concentration of some heavy metals such as As, Cd, Ge, Hg, Pb, and Zn. From a mineralogical point of view, the Compostilla, Espiel, and Soto de Ribera fly ashes show the highest aluminum-silicate glass content and, consequently, the highest industrial application potential.

  10. Physiochemical characterization of Spanish fly ashes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Querol, X.; Umana, J.C.; Alastuey, A.; Bertrana, C.; Lopez Soler, A.; Plana, F.

    1999-12-01

    This article summarizes the results obtained from the physical, chemical, and mineralogical characterization of 14 fly ash samples. Major features that influence the utilization of each fly ash for zeolite synthesis are evidenced, and several fly ash types were selected as potential high-quality starting material for zeolite synthesis and ceramic applications. The main parameters influencing this selection were relatively small grain size; high Al and Si contents; high glass content; low CaO, S, and Fe contents; and relatively low heavy metal concentration. The Compostilla and Dou He fly ashes have high potential applications because of the low content of major impurities (such as Ca, Fe, and S) and the low content of soluble hazardous elements. The Espiel, Escucha, Los Barrios, As Pontes, Soto de Ribera, Meirama, Narcea, and Teruel fly ashes have important application potential, but this potential is slightly limited by the intermediate content of nonreactive impurities, such as Fe and Ca. The La Robla fly ash is of moderate interest, since the relatively high Ca and Fe oxide contents may reduce its potential applications. Finally, the Puertollano fly ash also has limited application because of the very high concentration of some heavy metals such as As, Cd, Ge, Hg, Pb, and Zn. From a mineralogical point of view, the Compostilla, Espiel, and Soto de Ribera fly ashes show the highest aluminum-silicate glass content and, consequently, the highest industrial application potential. (author)

  11. Flight potential of the emerald ash borer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leah S. Bauer; Deborah L. Miller; Robin A.J. Taylor; Robert A. Haack

    2004-01-01

    The emerald ash borer (EAB), Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae), is an invasive pest of ash trees (Fraxinus spp.) in North America. Native to several Asian countries, EAB was discovered in six southeastern Michigan counties and southwestern Ontario in 2002. EAB presumably emerged from infested solid wood...

  12. Adhesion Strength of Biomass Ash Deposits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laxminarayan, Yashasvi; Jensen, Peter Arendt; Wu, Hao

    2016-01-01

    Ash deposition on boiler surfaces is a major problem encountered during biomass combustion. Ash deposition adversely influences the boiler efficiency, may corrode heat transfer surfaces, and may even completely block flue gas channels in severe cases, causing expensive unscheduled boiler shutdown...

  13. Mazama ash in the northeastern pacific.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, C H; Kulm, L D; Carlson, P R; Duncan, J R

    1968-07-05

    Volcanic glass in marine sediments off Oregon and Washington correlates with continental deposits of Mount Mazama ash by stratigraphic position, refractive index, and radiocarbon dating. Ash deposited in the abyssal regions by turbidity currents is used for tracing of the dispersal routes of postglacial sediments and for evaluation of marine sedimentary processes.

  14. Column leaching from biomass combustion ashes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maresca, Alberto; Astrup, Thomas Fruergaard

    2015-01-01

    The utilization of biomass combustion ashes for forest soil liming and fertilizing has been addressed in literature. Though, a deep understanding of the ash chemical composition and leaching behavior is necessary to predict potential benefits and environmental risks related to this practice...

  15. Wet physical separation of MSWI bottom ash

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Breugel, K.; Muchova, L.

    Bottom ash (BA) from municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI) has high potential for the recovery of valuable secondary materials. For example, the MSWI bottom ash produced by the incinerator at Amsterdam contains materials such as non-ferrous metals (2.3%), ferrous metals (8-13%), gold (0.4 ppm),

  16. Laboratory rearing of emerald ash borer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leah S. Bauer; Robert A. Haack; Deborah L. Miller; Houping Liu; Toby Petrice

    2004-01-01

    The emerald ash borer (EAB), Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae), native to several Asian countries, was identified in 2002 as the cause of ash (Fraxinus spp.) mortality throughout southeastern Michigan and southwestern Ontario. More isolated infestations continue to be found throughout Lower Michigan, northern...

  17. Microbial control of the emerald ash borer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leah S. Bauer; Houping Liu; Deborah L. Miller

    2004-01-01

    In June 2002, emerald ash borer (EAB), Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire, a buprestid native to several Asian countries, was identified as the causative agent of ash (Fraxinus spp.) mortality in southeastern Michigan and southwestern Ontario. Currently, the only method known to control EAB is limited to identifying and destroying...

  18. Evaluation of atomic absorption Spectrophotometry (ashing, non ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Three commonly used techniques, namely atomic absorption spectrophotometry (AAS-Ashing and AAS-Non Ashing) and titrimetry (potassium permanganate titration) have been evaluated in this study to determine the calcium content in six food samples whose calcium levels ranged from 0 to more than 250mg/100g ...

  19. Coal Bottom Ash for Portland Cement Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Argiz

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Because of industrialization growth, the amount of coal power plant wastes has increased very rapidly. Particularly, the disposal of coal bottom ash (CBA is becoming an increasing concern for many countries because of the increasing volume generated, the costs of operating landfill sites, and its potential hazardous effects. Therefore, new applications of coal bottom ash (CBA have become an interesting alternative to disposal. For instance, it could be used as a Portland cement constituent leading to more sustainable cement production by lowering energy consumption and raw material extracted from quarries. Coal fly and bottom ashes are formed together in the same boiler; however, the size and shape of these ashes are very different, and hence their effect on the chemical composition as well as on the mineralogical phases must be studied. Coal bottom ash was ground. Later, both ashes were compared from a physical, mechanical, and chemical point of view to evaluate the potential use of coal bottom ash as a new Portland cement constituent. Both ashes, produced by the same electrical power plant, generally present similar chemical composition and compressive strength and contribute to the refill of mortar capillary pores with the reaction products leading to a redistribution of the pore size.

  20. Properties and Leachability of Self-Compacting Concrete Incorporated with Fly Ash and Bottom Ash

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadir, Aeslina Abdul; Ikhmal Haqeem Hassan, Mohd; Jamaluddin, Norwati; Bakri Abdullah, Mohd Mustafa Al

    2016-06-01

    The process of combustion in coal-fired power plant generates ashes, namely fly ash and bottom ash. Besides, coal ash produced from coal combustion contains heavy metals within their compositions. These metals are toxic to the environment as well as to human health. Fortunately, treatment methods are available for these ashes, and the use of fly ash and bottom ash in the concrete mix is one of the few. Therefore, an experimental program was carried out to study the properties and determine the leachability of selfcompacting concrete incorporated with fly ash and bottom ash. For experimental study, self-compacting concrete was produced with fly ash as a replacement for Ordinary Portland Cement and bottom ash as a replacement for sand with the ratios of 10%, 20%, and 30% respectively. The fresh properties tests conducted were slump flow, t500, sieve segregation and J-ring. Meanwhile for the hardened properties, density, compressive strength and water absorption test were performed. The samples were then crushed to be extracted using Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure and heavy metals content within the samples were identified accordingly using Atomic Absorption Spectrometry. The results demonstrated that both fresh and hardened properties were qualified to categorize as self-compacting concrete. Improvements in compressive strength were observed, and densities for all the samples were identified as a normal weight concrete with ranges between 2000 kg/m3 to 2600 kg/m3. Other than that, it was found that incorporation up to 30% of the ashes was safe as the leached heavy metals concentration did not exceed the regulatory levels, except for arsenic. In conclusion, this study will serve as a reference which suggests that fly ash and bottom ash are widely applicable in concrete technology, and its incorporation in self-compacting concrete constitutes a potential means of adding value to appropriate mix and design.

  1. Fly Ash Amendments Catalyze Soil Carbon Sequestration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amonette, James E.; Kim, Jungbae; Russell, Colleen K.; Palumbo, A. V.; Daniels, William L.

    2003-09-15

    We tested the effects of four alkaline fly ashes {Class C (sub-bituminous), Class F (bituminous), Class F [bituminous with flue-gas desulfurization (FGD) products], and Class F (lignitic)} on a reaction that simulates the enzyme-mediated formation of humic materials in soils. The presence of FGD products completely halted the reaction, and the bituminous ash showed no benefit over an ash-free control. The sub-bituminous and lignitic fly ashes, however, increased the amount of polymer formed by several-fold. The strong synergetic effect of these ashes when enzyme is present apparently arises from the combined effects of metal oxide co-oxidation (Fe and Mn oxides), alkaline pH, and physical stabilization of the enzyme (porous silica cenospheres).

  2. Adsorption of phenolic compounds on fly ash

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akgerman, A.; Zardkoohi, M. [Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX (United States). Chemical Engineering Dept.

    1996-03-01

    Adsorption isotherms for adsorption of phenol, 3-chlorophenol, and 2,4-dichlorophenol from water onto fly ash were determined. These isotherms were modeled by the Freundlich isotherm. The fly ash adsorbed 67, 20, and 22 mg/g for phenol, chlorophenol, and 2,4-dichlorophenol, respectively, for the highest water phase concentrations used. The affinity of phenolic compounds for fly ash is above the expected amount corresponding to a monolayer coverage considering that the surface area of fly ash is only 1.87 m{sup 2}/g. The isotherms for contaminants studied were unfavorable, indicating that adsorption becomes progressively easier as more solutes are taken up. Phenol displayed a much higher affinity for fly ash than 3-chlorophenol and 2,4-dichlorophenol.

  3. Effects of Wood Ash on Soil Fungi

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cruz Paredes, Carla

    in a Norway spruce forest where different amounts of wood ash were spread on the soil to study the effects on ectomycorrhizal (ECM) fungi, bioaccumulation of metals in sporocarps, and microbial communities. Laboratory microcosm experiments were run in parallel to the field studies, to compare the effects...... were used. However, the AM colonization was as abundant and active as in the untreated plots. In the Norway spruce experiment, ECM mycelial production and nitrogen (N) retention capacity remained unaffected. Moreover, ECM fungal richness, diversity and community composition did not change with wood ash......Reutilizing biomass ash on soil has been proposed to counteract soil acidity and to save fertilizer inputs by recycling valuable nutrients contained in biomass ash such as calcium (Ca), magnesium (Mg) and phosphorus (P). However, the heavy metal content of biomass ashes, such as cadmium (Cd...

  4. NPK Fertilizer with Slow Release Fly Ash

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadhira Izzatur Silmi

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Fly ash is the solid of the remaining coal combustion carried along with the exhaust gas and captured by the air controller. Fluids in fly ash are Al2O3, SiO2, Fe2O3, CaO, MgO, Na2, and SO3 which are similar to zeolites. So that fly ash can be used as a substitute for zeolite for various carrier of fertilizer. The result of slow release test is known that N element has higher release level. The NPK fertilizer activity test of Fly Ash Slow Release was done on chilli plant with parameter of variation of fertilizer composition and plant height. Based on research result, fly ash-TSP 2: 1 fertilizer has the best result.

  5. Geotechnical characterization of some Indian fly ashes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Das, S.K.; Yudhbir [Indian Institute for Technology, Kanpur (India). Dept. of Civil Engineering

    2005-10-01

    This paper reports the findings of experimental studies with regard to some common engineering properties (e.g., grain size, specific gravity, compaction characteristics, and unconfined compression strength) of both low and high calcium fly ashes, to evaluate their suitability as embankment materials and reclamation fills. In addition, morphology, chemistry, and mineralogy of fly ashes are studied using scanning electron microscope, electron dispersive x-ray analyzer, x-ray diffractometer, and infrared absorption spectroscopy. In high calcium fly ash, mineralogical and chemical differences are observed for particles, {gt}75 {mu} m and the particles of {lt} 45 {mu} m size. The mode and duration of curing significantly affect the strength and stress-strain behavior of fly ashes. The geotechnical properties of fly ash are governed by factors like lime content (CaO), iron content (Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}) and loss on ignition. The distinct difference between self-hardening and pozzolanic reactivity has been emphasized.

  6. Treatment of fly ash for use in concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boxley, Chett; Akash, Akash; Zhao, Qiang

    2013-01-08

    A process for treating fly ash to render it highly usable as a concrete additive. A quantity of fly ash is obtained that contains carbon and which is considered unusable fly ash for concrete based upon foam index testing. The fly ash is mixed with an activator solution sufficient to initiate a geopolymerization reaction and for a geopolymerized fly ash. The geopolymerized fly ash is granulated. The geopolymerized fly ash is considered usable fly ash for concrete according to foam index testing. The geopolymerized fly ash may have a foam index less than 35% of the foam index of the untreated fly ash, and in some cases less than 10% of the foam index of the untreated fly ash. The activator solution may contain an alkali metal hydroxide, carbonate, silicate, aluminate, or mixtures thereof.

  7. Treatment of fly ash for use in concrete

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boxley, Chett [Park City, UT; Akash, Akash [Salt lake City, UT; Zhao, Qiang [Natick, MA

    2012-05-08

    A process for treating fly ash to render it highly usable as a concrete additive. A quantity of fly ash is obtained that contains carbon and which is considered unusable fly ash for concrete based upon foam index testing. The fly ash is mixed with an activator solution sufficient to initiate a geopolymerization reaction and for a geopolymerized fly ash. The geopolymerized fly ash is granulated. The geopolymerized fly ash is considered usable fly ash for concrete according to foam index testing. The geopolymerized fly ash may have a foam index less than 35% of the foam index of the untreated fly ash, and in some cases less than 10% of the foam index of the untreated fly ash. The activator solution may contain an alkali metal hydroxide, carbonate, silicate, aluminate, or mixtures thereof.

  8. Architecture's models: Integral thermal evaluation; Modelos en arquitectura: evaluacion termica integral

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roset, Jaume [Universidad Politecnica de Cataluna, Barcelona (Spain); Marincic, Irene; Ochoa, J. Manuel [Universidad de Sonora, Hermosillo, Sonora (Mexico)

    2000-07-01

    fin, se utilizan modelos que representen tanto la descripcion de los objetos y conceptos arquitectonicos, como las hipotesis sobre su comportamiento espacio-temporal. La cantidad y tipo de informacion que es necesario suministrar a un modelo para hacerlo operativo ha sido, y es, objeto de grandes controversias. La cuestion es: hasta que punto son mas utiles modelos con gran cantidad de entradas que otros mas simples? Entendiendo por modelos simples aquellos que habitualmente contienen cierta cantidad de coeficientes empiricos, lo que reduce el numero de datos, llevando el calculo a una aproximacion. Por otro lado, en el dominio de la arquitectura la informacion se presenta de manera habitual, sobre soportes de diferente tipo (tablas de valores numericos, planos, maquetas, ...). Las informaciones suministradas en cada tipo de soporte deben, necesariamente, ser combinadas de manera que se maximice la informacion contenida sobre el sistema global. En este trabajo, presentamos ejemplos referentes a estudios termicos que hemos realizado sobre diferentes maneras de abordar la evaluacion de modelos variables relacionados con el comportamiento termico de los edificios, la interaccion de estos con el medio ambiente que los rodea y su influencia sobre el confort en el interior de los mismos. Como conclusion general, podriamos decir que un modelo deberia tener las minimas entradas posibles con las cuales abordar los efectos mas significativos, que puedan representar de la manera mas aproximada posible al comportamiento real. Las hipotesis y condiciones de evaluacion de estos efectos deben ser comprendidas y asumidas por el usuario.

  9. Evaluacion cuantitativa del riesgo de entrada del virus de la gripe aviar altamente patogeno en la Comunidad Valenciana por importacion de aves vivas

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sanchez-Vizcaino Buendia, F; Lainez Andres, M; Sanchez-Vizcaino Rodriguez, J.M

    2008-01-01

    ...) a lo largo de su historia. El objetivo de este trabajo es realizar una evaluacion cuantitativa del riesgo que hay de que el virus HPAI entre en la CV y sus provincias por importacion de aves vivas, e identificar los paises...

  10. RASGOS DEL TEMPERAMENTO DE LOS PERROS DOMÉSTICOS (CANIS FAMILIARIS: EVALUACIONES CONDUCTUALES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ADRIANA JAKOVCEVIC

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available

    Los rasgos del temperamento se definen como tendencias conductuales estables entre situaciones similares y a lo largo del tiempo. En el presente trabajo se revisan las pruebas conductuales diseñadas para la evaluación de rasgos aislados del temperamento en los perros domésticos. Para cada dimensión se describen los estímulos empleados, las respuestas evaluadas y el correlato fisiológico de las mismas. Los rasgos más estudiados fueron la temerosidad, la agresividad y la sociabilidad. Sin embargo, sólo la primera cuenta con correlatos fisiológicos bien establecidos. Finalmente, las evaluaciones conductuales resultan de suma importancia para la selección de los perros para las distintas funciones que cumplen en la sociedad humana: detección de drogas, compañía, guardia, rescate de personas, etc.

  11. Forty years of vegetation change on the Missouri River floodplain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, W. Carter; Dixon, Mark D.; Scott, Michael L.; Rabbe, Lisa; Larson, Gary; Volke, Malia; Werner, Brett

    2012-01-01

    Comparative inventories in 1969 and 1970 and in 2008 of vegetation from 30 forest stands downstream of Garrison Dam on the Missouri River in central North Dakota showed (a) a sharp decline in Cottonwood regeneration; (b) a strong compositional shift toward dominance by green ash; and (c) large increases in invasive understory species, such as smooth brome, reed canary grass, and Canada thistle. These changes, and others discovered during remeasurement, have been caused by a complex of factors, some related to damming (altered hydrologic and sediment regimes, delta formation, and associated wet-dry cycles) and some not (diseases and expansion of invasive plants). Dominance of green ash, however, may be short lived, given the likelihood that the emerald ash borer will arrive in the Dakotas in 5-10 years, with potentially devastating effects. The prospects for recovery of this valuable ecosystem, rich in ecosystem goods and services and in American history, are daunting.

  12. Effects of burn temperature on ash nutrient forms and availability from cattail (Typha domingensis) and sawgrass (Cladium jamaicense) in the Florida Everglades.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Y; Miao, S L; Gu, B; Li, Y C

    2009-01-01

    Plant ash derived from fire plays an important role in nutrient balance and cycling in ecosystems. Factors that determine the composition and availability of ash nutrients include fire intensity (burn temperature and duration), plant species, habitat nutrient enrichment, and leaf type (live or dead leaf). We used laboratory simulation methods to evaluate temperature effects on nutrient composition and metals in the residual ash of sawgrass (Cladium jamaicense) and cattail (Typha domingensis), particularly on post-fire phosphorus (P) availability in plant ash. Live and dead leaf samples were collected from Water Conservation Area 2A in the northern Everglades along a soil P gradient, where prescribed fire may be used to accelerate recovery of this unique ecosystem. Significant decreases in total carbon and total nitrogen were detected with increasing fire temperature. Organic matter combustion was nearly complete at temperatures > or = 450 degrees C. HCl-extractable P (average, 50% of total P in the ash) and NH(4)Cl-extractable P (average, 33% of total P in the ash) were the predominant P fractions for laboratory-burned ash. Although a low-intensity fire could induce an elevation of P availability, an intense fire generally resulted in decreased water-soluble P. Significant differences in nutrient compositions were observed between species, habitat nutrient status, and leaf types. More labile inorganic P remained in sawgrass ash than in cattail ash; hence, sawgrass ash has a greater potential to release available P than cattail. Fire intensity affected plant ash nutrient composition, particularly P availability, and the effects varied with plant species and leaf type. Therefore, it is important to consider fire intensity and vegetation community when using a prescribed fire for ecosystem management.

  13. The climatic impact of supervolcanic ash blankets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Morgan T.; Sparks, R. Stephen J.; Valdes, Paul J.

    2007-11-01

    Supervolcanoes are large caldera systems that can expel vast quantities of ash, volcanic gases in a single eruption, far larger than any recorded in recent history. These super-eruptions have been suggested as possible catalysts for long-term climate change and may be responsible for bottlenecks in human and animal populations. Here, we consider the previously neglected climatic effects of a continent-sized ash deposit with a high albedo and show that a decadal climate forcing is expected. We use a coupled atmosphere-ocean General Circulation Model (GCM) to simulate the effect of an ash blanket from Yellowstone volcano, USA, covering much of North America. Reflectivity measurements of dry volcanic ash show albedo values as high as snow, implying that the effects of an ash blanket would be severe. The modeling results indicate major disturbances to the climate, particularly to oscillatory patterns such as the El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO). Atmospheric disruptions would continue for decades after the eruption due to extended ash blanket longevity. The climatic response to an ash blanket is not significant enough to instigate a change to stadial periods at present day boundary conditions, though this is one of several impacts associated with a super-eruption which may induce long-term climatic change.

  14. The climatic impact of supervolcanic ash blankets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, Morgan T.; Sparks, R.S.J. [University of Bristol, Department of Earth Sciences, Bristol (United Kingdom); Valdes, Paul J. [University of Bristol, School of Geographical Sciences, Bristol (United Kingdom)

    2007-11-15

    Supervolcanoes are large caldera systems that can expel vast quantities of ash, volcanic gases in a single eruption, far larger than any recorded in recent history. These super-eruptions have been suggested as possible catalysts for long-term climate change and may be responsible for bottlenecks in human and animal populations. Here, we consider the previously neglected climatic effects of a continent-sized ash deposit with a high albedo and show that a decadal climate forcing is expected. We use a coupled atmosphere-ocean General Circulation Model (GCM) to simulate the effect of an ash blanket from Yellowstone volcano, USA, covering much of North America. Reflectivity measurements of dry volcanic ash show albedo values as high as snow, implying that the effects of an ash blanket would be severe. The modeling results indicate major disturbances to the climate, particularly to oscillatory patterns such as the El Nino Southern Oscillation (ENSO). Atmospheric disruptions would continue for decades after the eruption due to extended ash blanket longevity. The climatic response to an ash blanket is not significant enough to investigate a change to stadial periods at present day boundary conditions, though this is one of several impacts associated with a super-eruption which may induce long-term climatic change. (orig.)

  15. Development of fly ash quality control system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ban, K. [Chubu Electric Power Company Inc., Nagoya (Japan). Thermal Power Dept.

    1997-12-31

    Since fly ash is designated as one of the by-products in the Japanese law related to the promotion of effective use of reclaimed materials (the recycling law) that prescribes the promotion of effective use of reclaimed materials, it is necessary to promote its effective use positively. However, there can be problems in using fly ash as it is difficult to assure a product with uniform properties, because the properties of fly ash can vary depending on the type of coal and the burning conditions of the boilers. For this reason, studies were made from 1994 to 1995 through experiments on the ash handling system of the No. 3 coal-fired boiler at the Hekinan Thermal Power Plant. The study was made in response to the needs of the users who wanted to effectively use the ash, and included the development of a quality control system for the selection and storage of ash which measured and analyzed the properties of the ash in real time. This paper outlines this quality control system and describes the results of the studies to date. 10 figs., 4 tabs.

  16. NEW TECHNOLOGY OF ASH AND SLAG CONCRETES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PAVLENKO T. M.

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Summary. Purpose. Development of scientific-technical bases of manufacture and application of concrete on the basis of ash and slag mixes of thermal power plants. Methods. It is proposed a new technology of preparation of ash and slag concrete mixes. First the ash and slag mix is dispersed through the sieve with meshes 5 mm in a fine-grained fraction and slag. Then, in accordance with the composition of the concrete, obtained fine-grained fraction, slag, cement and tempering water are separately dosed into the mixer. Results. It is proven the high efficiency of the proposed technology of manufacture of ash and slag concretes. It is established that this technological solution allows to increase the strength of concrete by 20...30%, and in the preparation of full-strength concrete to reduce the cement consumption by 15...20%. Scientific novelty. It is developed the new technology of ash and slag mixes application. The concrete mix on the basis of ash and slag mix has an optimal particle size distribution, which ensures the best compaction and, accordingly, the greatest strength of ash and slag concrete with the given cement consumption. Practical significance. The research results promote the mass application of ash and slag mixes of thermal power plants in construction, obtaining of products from the proposed concretes of low cost with high physical-mechanical properties. Conclusion. It is proven the high efficiency of the proposed technology of production of ash and slag concretes. It is established that this technological solution allows increasing concrete strength, and obtaining full-strength concrete to reduce cement consumption. The extensive application of such concrete in construction makes it possible to solve the problem of aggregates for concrete, promotes recycling of TPP waste and consequently the protection of the environment.

  17. Hypocotyl derived in vitro regeneration of pumpkin ash (Fraxinus profunda)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micah E. Stevens; Paula M. Pijut

    2012-01-01

    Pumpkin ash (Fraxinus profunda (Bush) Bush) is at risk for extirpation by an exotic insect, the emerald ash borer (EAB). Pumpkin ash is limited to wetland areas of the Eastern United States, and has been listed as an endangered species because of EAB activity. Pumpkin ash provides many benefits to the ecosystem, and its wood is used in the...

  18. Electrodialytic removal of heavy metals from fly ashes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Anne Juul

    2002-01-01

    The aim of the Ph.D. work was to develop the electrodialytic remediation method for removal of heavy metals from fly ashes. The work was focused on two types of fly ashes: fly ashes from wood combustion and fly ashes from municipal solid waste incineration....

  19. Evaluacion del clima organizacional en la Facultad de Odontologia de la Pontificia Universidad Javeriana desde una perspectiva integradora y participativa.(clima organizacional, Facultad de Odontologia de la Pontificia Universidad Javeriana )

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gomez Villamizar, Mariela; Bermudez Gomez, Maria Constanza; Velosa Porras, Juliana; Paez Becerra, Francisco Javier; Ferro Camargo, Maria Beatriz

    2012-01-01

    Objetivo: en este articulo se presentan los resultados de la evaluacion diagnostica del clima organizacional de la Facultad de Odontologia de la Pontificia Universidad Javeriana de Bogota, Colombia. Metodos...

  20. Heavy metals in MSW incineration fly ashes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ferreira, Celia; Ribeiro, Alexandra B.; Ottosen, Lisbeth M.

    2003-01-01

    is characterized regarding its physical-chemical properties: pH, solubility, chemical composition, and leaching, amongst others. Results indicate a high alkalinity and the presence of large amounts of calcium, chlorides, sulfates, carbonates, sodium and potassium. Metal concentrations in fly ash are: 6,2 g....../kg for zinc, 2,4 g/kg for lead, 1,7 g/kg for iron, and 7,9 g/kg for magnesium. Copper, manganese, chromium and cadmium are also present with 546, 338, 104 and 91 mg/kg of fly ash, respectively. These results are extremely important in subsequent studies on the treatment of fly ash....

  1. Adhesion Strength of Biomass Ash Deposits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laxminarayan, Yashasvi; Jensen, Peter Arendt; Wu, Hao

    2015-01-01

    This study investigates the shear adhesion strength of biomass ash deposits on superheater tubes. Artificial biomass ash deposits were prepared on superheater tubes and sintered in an oven at temperatures up to 1000°C. Subsequently, the deposits were sheared off with the help of an electrically...... controlled arm. Higher sintering temperatures resulted in greater adhesion strengths, with a sharp increase observed near the melting point of the ash. Repetition of experiments with fixed operation conditions revealed considerable variation in the obtained adhesion strengths, portraying the stochastic...

  2. Leaching of radioactive isotopes from ash

    OpenAIRE

    Aycik, G.A.; Paul, M.; Sandström, Åke; Paul, Jan

    2003-01-01

    The aim of the study is to reduce the environmental impact of ash deposits. Ash from coal and biomass combustion, containing uranium and thorium from Yatagan-Silopi and Tuncbilek coal; cesium-137 from forests in northeastern Turkey and central Sweden. Turkey is dependent on coal for power generation and huge volumes of ash (>15 Mton/yr) are produced every year. Because of that certain coals, in particular Yatagan, with known problems from Mo and U leaching to the ground water, and Silopi o...

  3. Usability value and heavy metals accumulation in forage grasses grown on power station ash deposit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simić Aleksandar S.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The study of five forage grasses (Lolium multiflorum, Festuca rubra, Festuca arundinacea, Arrhenatherum elatius and Dactylis glomerata was conducted on an uncontaminated cultivated land, of leached chernozem type, and on “Nikola Tesla A” (TENT A thermal power station ash deposit. The concentrations of: As, Pb, Cd, Zn, Ni, Fe i Cu in grasses grown on two media were compared. Grass samples have been collected in tillering stage, when they were in full development. During the vegetative period three replications cut was conducted at about 3-5 cm height, imitating mowing and grazing. The concentrations of As and Ni were elevated in media samples collected from TENT A ash deposit, while the level of all studied elements in soil samples collected from cultivated land were within allowed limits. The variance of certain elements amounts in plant material collected from TENT A ash deposit was less homogeneous; the concentrations of As, Fe and Ni were higher in grasses collected from ash deposit, but Pb and Cu concentrations were higher in grasses grown on cultivated land. The concentrations of Zn were approximately the same in plants collected from the sites, whereas Cd concentrations were slightly increased in grasses grown on ash deposit. In general, it can be concluded from the results of this study that the concentrations of heavy metals in plants collected from both sites do not exceed maximal tolerant levels for fodder. The use of grasses grown on ash deposit for forage production should be taken with reserve. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. TR 31016: Unapređenje tehnologije gajenja krmnih biljaka na oranicama i travnjacima

  4. Development of Soil Bacterial Communities in Volcanic Ash Microcosms in a Range of Climates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerfahi, Dorsaf; Tateno, Ryunosuke; Takahashi, Koichi; Cho, HyunJun; Kim, Hyoki; Adams, Jonathan M

    2017-05-01

    There is considerable interest in understanding the processes of microbial development in volcanic ash. We tested the predictions that there would be (1) a distinctive bacterial community associated with soil development on volcanic ash, including groups previously implicated in weathering studies; (2) a slower increase in bacterial abundance and soil C and N accumulation in cooler climates; and (3) a distinct communities developing on the same substrate in different climates. We set up an experiment, taking freshly fallen, sterilized volcanic ash from Sakurajima volcano, Japan. Pots of ash were positioned in multiple locations, with mean annual temperature (MAT) ranging from 18.6 to -3 °C. Within 12 months, bacteria were detectable by qPCR in all pots. By 24 months, bacterial copy numbers had increased by 10-100 times relative to a year before. C and N content approximately doubled between 12 and 24 months. HiSeq and MiSeq sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene revealed a distinctive bacterial community, different from developed vegetated soils in the same areas, for example in containing an abundance of unclassified bacterial groups. Community composition also differed between the ash pots at different sites, while showing no pattern in relation to MAT. Contrary to our predictions, the bacterial abundance did not show any relation to MAT. It also did not correlate to pH or N, and only C was statistically significant. It appears that bacterial community development on volcanic ash can be a rapid process not closely sensitive to temperature, involving distinct communities from developed soils.

  5. Lake Bathymetric Aquatic Vegetation

    Data.gov (United States)

    Minnesota Department of Natural Resources — Aquatic vegetation represented as polygon features, coded with vegetation type (emergent, submergent, etc.) and field survey date. Polygons were digitized from...

  6. Successive development of soil ecosystems at abandoned coal-ash landfills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pen-Mouratov, Stanislav; Shukurov, Nosir; Yu, Jun; Rakhmonkulova, Shakhnoza; Kodirov, Obidjon; Barness, Gineta; Kersten, Michael; Steinberger, Yosef

    2014-07-01

    The main goal of the present study was to determine the effect of the native vegetation on the successive development of the soil ecosystem at abandoned coal-ash landfills of the Angren coal-fired power plant in Uzbekistan. Two different landfills (one not in use for 3 years, termed newer, and the other not in use for 10 years, termed older) with different degrees of vegetation cover were chosen to assess the time and vegetation effects on soil biota and habitat development. The soil biotic structure, including soil microorganisms and soil free-living nematode communities, was investigated both at open plots and under different native plants at the coal-ash landfill area. The observed soil microorganisms were found to be the most important component of the observed ecosystems. Total abundance, biomass, species, trophic and sexual diversity of soil free-living nematodes, along with fungi and organic-matter content, were found to be correlated with trace metals. The nematode trophic and species abundance and diversity increased from the newer toward the older coal-ash landfills. The sex ratio of the nematode communities was found to be dependent on the environmental conditions of the study area, with the males being the most sensitive nematode group. All applied ecological indices confirmed that open landfill plots distant from plants are the most unfavorable areas for soil biota. In that respect, the native plants Alhagi maurorum Desv. and Tamarix sp. were found to be important environmental components for the natural remediation of a soil ecosystem in the coal-ash landfill area.

  7. Electrodialytic removal of Cd from biomass combustion fly ash

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Anne Juul; Ottosen, Lisbeth M.; Simonsen, Peter

    2004-01-01

    . The initial Cd concentration in the ashes varied between 8.8 mg Cd/kg DM (co-firing ash) and 64 mg Cd/kg DM (pre-washed straw ash), and pH varied from 3.7 to 13.3. In spite of large differences in ash characteristics, the electrodialytic remediation experiments indicated a good remediation potential for all......Due to a high concentration of Cd, biomass combustion fly ash often fails to meet the Danish legislative requirements for recycling on agricultural fields. In this work the potential of using the method Electrodialytic Remediation to reduce the concentration of Cd in different biomass combustion...... fly ashes was studied. Four fly ashes were investigated, originating from combustion of straw (two ashes), wood chips, and co-firing of wood pellets and fuel oil, respectively. One of the straw ashes had been pre-washed and was obtained suspended in water, the other ashes were obtained naturally dry...

  8. Rice Husk Ash Derived Zeolite Blended with Water Hyacinth Ash for Enhanced Adsorption of Cadmium Ions

    OpenAIRE

    G. W. Mbugua; H.M. Mbuvi; J. W. Muthengia

    2014-01-01

    In order to helpcurtail or imposesustained control to the offensive water hyacinth plant,it is essential to explore ways of generatingwater remediation materials from it. In the current study, the capacity and efficacy of water hyacinth ash (WHA),its insoluble residue (WHAR) and rice husk ash (RHA)to remove cadmium ionsand methylene blue from contaminated water was investigated. Mixtures of the two ashes were used to formulatezeolitic materialsby hydrothermal reactions. Material A, ZMA was pr...

  9. Outlook for ash in your forest: results of emerald ash borer research and implications for management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kathleen S. Knight

    2014-01-01

    Since its accidental introduction near Detroit, Michigan, in the mid-1990s, emerald ash borer (EAB) has rapidly spread through much of the U.S. and adjacent Canada, leaving millions of dead ash trees in Midwestern states (4,11). Unfortunately, EAB attacks trees as small as an inch in stem diameter and it attacks all five ash species native to the region - white, green...

  10. Revisiting "Vegetables" to combat modern epidemic of imbalanced glucose homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, Ashok Kumar

    2014-04-01

    Vegetables have been part of human food since prehistoric times and are considered nutritionally necessary and good for health. Vegetables are rich natural resource of biological antioxidants and possess capabilities of maintaining glucose homeostasis. When taken before starch-rich diet, juice also of vegetables such as ridge gourd, bottle gourd, ash gourd, chayote and juice of leaves of vegetables such as radish, Indian Dill, ajwain, tropical green amaranth, and bladder dock are reported to arrest significantly the rise in postprandial blood glucose level. Juice of vegetables such as ash gourd, squash gourd, and tropical green amaranth leaves are observed to tone-down sweet-beverages such as sucrose, fructose, and glucose-induced postprandial glycemic excursion. On the other hand, juice of egg-plant and juice of leaves of Ceylon spinach, Joyweed, and palak are reported to augment starch-induced postprandial glycemic excursion; and juice of leaves of Ceylon spinach, Joyweed, and radish supplement to the glucose-induced postprandial glycemia. Vegetables possess multifaceted antihyperglycemic activities such as inhibition of pancreatic α-amylase and intestinal α-glucosidase, inhibition of protein-tyrosine phosphatase 1β in liver and skeletal muscles, and insulin mimetic and secretagogue activities. Furthermore, they are also reported to influence polyol pathway in favor of reducing development of oxidative stress, and consequently the development of diabetic complications. In the wake of emergence of modern maladaptive diet-induced hyperglycemic epidemic therefore, vegetables may offer cost-effective dietary regimen to control diet-induced glycemic over load and future development of diabetes mellitus. However, for vegetables have been reported to do both, mitigate as well as supplement to the diet-induced postprandial glycemic load, care is required in selection of vegetables when considered as medicament.

  11. Recirculation of biomass ashes onto forest soils: Ash composition, mineralogy and leaching properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maresca, Alberto; Hyks, J.; Astrup, Thomas Fruergaard

    2017-01-01

    In Denmark, increasing amounts of wood ashes are generated from biomass combustion for energy production. The utilisation of ashes on top of forest soil for liming purposes has been proposed asan alternative to landfilling. Danish wood ash samples were collected and characterised with respect...... to chemical composition, mineralogy and leaching properties (batch leaching at L/S 2 and 10L/kg, and pH-dependent leaching at 10L/kg). Large variations in the ash liming properties were observed (ANC7.5: 1.8-6.4meqH+/g), indicating that similar soil application dosages may result in different liming effects...

  12. Ash Decline Assessment in Emerald Ash Borer Infested Natural Forests Using High Spatial Resolution Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justin Murfitt

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The invasive emerald ash borer (EAB, Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire infects and eventually kills endemic ash trees and is currently spreading across the Great Lakes region of North America. The need for early detection of EAB infestation is critical to managing the spread of this pest. Using WorldView-2 (WV2 imagery, the goal of this study was to establish a remote sensing-based method for mapping ash trees undergoing various infestation stages. Based on field data collected in Southeastern Ontario, Canada, an ash health score with an interval scale ranging from 0 to 10 was established and further related to multiple spectral indices. The WV2 image was segmented using multi-band watershed and multiresolution algorithms to identify individual tree crowns, with watershed achieving higher segmentation accuracy. Ash trees were classified using the random forest classifier, resulting in a user’s accuracy of 67.6% and a producer’s accuracy of 71.4% when watershed segmentation was utilized. The best ash health score-spectral index model was then applied to the ash tree crowns to map the ash health for the entire area. The ash health prediction map, with an overall accuracy of 70%, suggests that remote sensing has potential to provide a semi-automated and large-scale monitoring of EAB infestation.

  13. Chemical qualities of oils from some fresh and market vegetable ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    vegetables. Moisture content of 5.006, 3.500, 4.870, 37.002, 9.147, and 63.650%; crude fat of 59.195, 67.807, 33.490, 32.303, and 12.511, and 0.939%; and ash levels of 4.605, 2.833, 1.903, 1.728, and 1.305% were reported for seeds obtained from almond, castor, palm kernel, groundnut, mango and kola nuts respectively.

  14. Volcanic Ash Advisory Database, 1983-2003

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Volcanic ash is a significant hazard to aviation and can also affect global climate patterns. To ensure safe navigation and monitor possible climatic impact, the...

  15. Quantitative shape measurements of distal volcanic ash

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Colleen M. Riley; William I. Rose; Gregg J. S. Bluth

    2003-01-01

    ...‐shaped particles affect transport processes and radiative transfer measurements. In this study, a methodology was developed to characterize particle shapes, sizes, and terminal velocities for three ash samples of different compositions...

  16. Clay Improvement with Burned Olive Waste Ash

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Utkan Mutman

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Olive oil is concentrated in the Mediterranean basin countries. Since the olive oil industries are incriminated for a high quantity of pollution, it has become imperative to solve this problem by developing optimized systems for the treatment of olive oil wastes. This study proposes a solution to the problem. Burned olive waste ash is evaluated for using it as clay stabilizer. In a laboratory, bentonite clay is used to improve olive waste ash. Before the laboratory, the olive waste is burned at 550°C in the high temperature oven. The burned olive waste ash was added to bentonite clay with increasing 1% by weight from 1% to 10%. The study consisted of the following tests on samples treated with burned olive waste ash: Atterberg Limits, Standard Proctor Density, and Unconfined Compressive Strength Tests. The test results show promise for this material to be used as stabilizer and to solve many of the problems associated with its accumulation.

  17. AshMeadowsSpeckledDace_CH

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — These data identify the areas where final critical habitat for the Ash Meadows Amargosa pupfish (Cyprinodon nevadensis mionectes) occur. "Nevada, Nye County: Each of...

  18. Swirl chamber for vitrification of fly ashes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zarzycki Robert

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The study presents the concept of a swirl chamber used for vitrification of fly ashes. It assumes the use of coal dust in the process of fly ash melting. The coal dust supplied to the swirl chamber and gasified in the atmosphere of O2, CO2 and H2O allows for obtaining combustible gases composed of CO and H2, which are burnt with the pneumatically supplied fly ash. The above process allows for obtaining a product in the form of a molten slag which does not contain coal grains. The study presents numerical calculations for the process of combustion and gasification of coal dust and opportunities for ensuring adequate parameters in the fly ash melting zone. The combustible gases obtained during the process of gasification can be supplied to the chamber of a pulverized-bed boiler.

  19. AshMeadowsAmargosaPupfish_CH

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — These data identify the areas where final critical habitat for the Ash Meadows Amargosa pupfish (Cyprinodon nevadensis mionectes) occur. "Nevada, Nye County: Each of...

  20. Two-Phase Flow Evaluation in Geothermal Pipelines; Evaluacion de flujos bifasicos en tuberias geotermicas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Del Rio Garcia, Luis [Gerencia de Proyectos Geotermoelectricos de la Comision Federal de Electricidad, Morelia (Mexico)

    1996-01-01

    Pipe transportation of two phase-flow is a common practice in Mexican geothermal fields under commercial exploitation. Steam is separated from water using a centrifugal separator installed nearby a power plant. Afterwards, steam is conduced to the turbine and the water is reinjected into the reservoir. Sometimes the separation equipment are shared by two or more two-phase producing wells, so that the individual mass flow rate of each well is unknown. This paper is concerned with the evaluation of two-phase mass flow rates through sharp edged orifice plates, and attempts to establish the limits of steam quality in order that Murdock`s correlation gives acceptable results. This correlation was experimentally applied to well Az-25 of Los Azufres Geothermal field. In this case the single phase flows were determined after its separation by standard orifice plates (steam) and the weir box method. The results show that the Murdock`s correlation can be used for steam qualities of 50% and higher. [Espanol] El transporte de flujos bifasicos a traves de tuberias es una practica comun en los campos geotermicos mexicanos en la etapa de explotacion comercial. El vapor se separa del agua usando separadores centrifugos instalados en la vecindad de las unidades turbogeneradoras. Despues de esto, el vapor se conduce a las turbinas y el agua es reinyectada al yacimiento. En ocasiones, los equipos de separacion son compartidos por dos o mas pozos que producen flujos en dos fases, por lo que normalmente se desconocen tanto el gasto masico como la evolucion de la produccion de cada pozo. En este trabajo se propone una tecnica util en la evaluacion de flujos bifasicos, empleando placas orificio a partir de la correlacion de Murdock y se establece el intervalo de humedad para el cual el metodo proporciona resultados confiables. El metodo de Murdock fue aplicado experimentalmente al pozo Az-25 del campo geotermico de Los Azufres, para calidades de vapor entre 25 y 50%. En este caso los

  1. Evaluacion ambiental estrategica para cuencas prioritarias de los Andes Colombianos: dilemas, desafios y necesidades

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Guevara, Giovany

    2014-01-01

    ... (la mas poblada del pais), sufren varios impactos antropogenicos relacionados con cambios en la cobertura vegetal y el uso y manejo del suelo, que comprometen su calidad y cantidad de agua, y el suministro de otros bienes...

  2. Aggregation of volcanic ash in explosive eruptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Telling, J. W.; Dufek, J.

    2009-12-01

    We present the result of a recent experimental and numerical investigation of ash aggregation in volcanic plumes. Eruption dynamics are sensitive to microphysical processes, like ash aggregation, yet are difficult to parameterize based on dynamics simulations of whole eruption columns due to the lack of sufficient resolution. Here we present the results of experiments that develop a probabilistic relationship for ash aggregation based on impact velocity and atmospheric conditions (water vapor and atmospheric pressure). The probabilistic relationship can be integrated, in conjunction with a reconstructed velocity distribution of the ash in the column, and then can be readily incorporated in large-scale simulations of eruption column behavior. We also conduct detailed Eulerian-Lagrangian simulations at the scale of our experiment as a test of the ash aggregation relationship. The physical experiment was carried out in a contained tank designed to allow for the control of ‘atmospheric’ conditions. The tank can be depressurized as needed, using the gas inlet and the attached vacuum pump, and the ambient humidity can be altered by adjusting the gas mixture at the inlet. Image data is recorded with a high speed camera and post-processed to determine the number of collisions, energy of collisions and probability of aggregation. We will present the results of aggregation probability and the effects of incorporating these results into a multiphase model of a three-dimensional eruption column, where the effects of ash aggregation are especially important in regions of high shear and high granular temperature.

  3. Ash melting behaviour - status of the standardisation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hofbauer, H. [Vienna University of Technology, Vienna (Austria). Institute of Chemical Engineering

    2004-07-01

    The ash melting behaviour is an important property for the thermal utilization of biomass. Experience shows that there exists a extremely wide range of ash melting temperatures for different biofuels which makes it necessary to determine this property very carefully. Low melting ashes can lead to slagging and deposits in different parts of the plant. In consequence a technical specification for the determination of the ash melting behaviour of solid biofuels is necessary to compare the data from different sources. The information of the European Project ''BioNorm'' referring to the ash melting behaviour was used as starting point. Two different methods are identified for this purpose. One method is based on the existing standards used for coal ashes and a novel method based on ''Melt Area Fraction'' has been developed by dk-Teknik. As the latter one is not commonly used by several testing laboratories it was decided to adapt the existing method also for biofuels. (orig.)

  4. Training resources in renewable energy: study and evaluation; Recursos de capacitacion en energia renovable: estudio y evaluacion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Buen Rodriguez, Odon [Energia, Tecnologia y Educacion, S.C., ENTE, S.C. (Mexico)

    2010-07-01

    The report herein describes the results of an evaluation process carried out to identify, document and analyze teaching and training capacities in the field of renewable energy for those who participate in the development, acquisition, installation, inspection and operation and maintenance of small- and large-scale wind, photovoltaic and solar water heating systems in North America. The document is divided into four sections. Chapter 1 presents the results of the evaluation process, expressed according to different parameters, as well as some of the significant findings. Chapter 2 responds to several questions related to difficulties, challenges, opportunities for improvement and recommendations, with a trilateral perspective. Chapter 3 evaluates the three technologies that are the focus of this study: photovoltaic, wind and solar heat. Chapter 4 describes the knowledge needed by those who professionally work in activities related to the three technologies mentioned, as well as their institutional context. The list of courses identified through this evaluation process are available on the CCA website, at www.cec.org/cursosenergia. [Spanish] El presente informe describe los resultados de un proceso de evaluacion llevado a cabo para identificar, documentar y analizar las capacidades en materia de ensenanza y capacitacion en energia renovable de quienes participan en la elaboracion, adquisicion, instalacion, inspeccion y operacion y mantenimiento de sistemas eolicos, fotovoltaicos y de calentamiento solar de agua -tanto pequenos como de gran escala-, en America del Norte. El documento se divide en cuatro partes. El capitulo 1 presenta los resultados del proceso de evaluacion, expresandolos en funcion de diferentes parametros, asi como ciertos hallazgos importantes. El capitulo 2 responde a diversas preguntas relativas a las dificultades, retos, oportunidades de mejoramiento y recomendaciones, con una perspectiva trilateral. El capitulo 3 evalua las tres tecnologias

  5. The ash in forest fire affected soils control the soil losses. Part 2. Current and future research challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Paulo; Cerdà, Artemi

    2013-04-01

    have implications on ash spatial distribution and if soil micro topography changes with time? What the factors that controls it? What it is the impact of ash in vegetation recuperation and the implications of this recover in ash spatial distribution? We need studies with better spatial and temporal resolution, especially in the immediate period after the fire, when the major spatial and temporal changes on ash distribution and impacts occur. Based on high level research conducted by Artemi Cerdà and others, our future research will be focused in these and other aspects in order to have a better knowledge about the impacts of ash on post-fire spatio-temporal erosion. Acknowledgements, Lithuanian Research Council. Project LITFIRE, Fire effects on Lithuanian soils and ecosystems (MIP-48/2011) and the research projects GL2008-02879/BTE and LEDDRA 243857. References Bodí, M., Mataix-Solera, J., Doerr, S., and Cerdà, A. 2011b. The wettability of ash from burned vegetation and its relationship to Mediterranean plant species type, burn severity and total organic carbon content. Geoderma, 160, 599-607. Cerdà, A. 1998a. Postfire dynamics of erosional processes under mediterranean climatic conditions. Z. Geomorphol., 42 (3) 373-398. Cerdà, A. 1998b. Changes in overland flow and infiltration after a rangeland fire in a Mediterranean scrubland.Hydrological Processes, 12, 1031-1042. Cerdà, A., and Doerr, S.H. 2008. The effect of ash and needle cover on surface runoff and erosion in the immediate post-fire period. Catena, 74, 256-263. Onda, Y., Dietrich W. E., and Booker, F. 2008. Evolution of overland flow after severe forest fire, Point Reyes, California, Catena, 72, 13-20. Pereira, P. Cerdà, A., Úbeda, X., Mataix-Solera, J. Arcenegui, V., Zavala, L. 2013. Modelling the impacts of wildfire on ash thickness in a short-term period, Land Degradation and Development, (In press) Pereira, P., Bodi. M., Úbeda, X., Cerdà, A., Mataix-Solera, J., Balfour, V, Woods, S. 2010. Las

  6. Dissolution of granulated wood ash examined by in situ incubation: Effects of tree species and soil type

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Callesen, Ingeborg; Ingerslev, M.; Raulund-Rasmussen, K.

    2007-01-01

    handling and to avoid undesired effects on vegetation and leaching of nutrients. Forest ecosystems with different tree species and soils provide variable conditions for mineral dissolution with respect to pH, amount of organic ligands and humidity in the forest floor and the top soil. To study the effects...... of tree species and soil type on wood ash dissolution, granulated wood ash with particle size 2-4 mm was incubated in situ for 7 years in polyamide mesh bags. The bags were placed under the organic horizon of beech, oak, Norway spruce and Douglas-fir on a nutrient poor soil (typic Haplorthod......) and a nutrient-rich soil (oxyaquic Hapludalf) in Denmark. After 7 years of incubation, the weight loss of the wood ash granulates was 20% in both soil types. Nutrient losses determined by total element analysis were about 35% for calcium, magnesium and potassium and 19% for phosphorus, regardless of tree species...

  7. Summary of the program 'Environmentally correct utilization of ashes' at Vaermeforsk 2002-2005; Syntes av delprogrammet 'Miljoeriktig anvaendning av askor' foer 2002-2005

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bjurstroem, Henrik [AaF-Process AB, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2006-04-15

    has been thought to be. However, highly soluble salts may be a cause for restrictions. Although one should interpret results from calculations with cautiousness it seems that dust from the roads settling on vegetables grown in the vicinity of a road is a larger problem. The tests used today to determine the geotechnical properties of materials aim primarily at checking if these are within specifications. As for other recovered materials, somewhat different tests must be used to ascertain that ashes can be used to provide a function. Three bottom ashes were investigated, and the results confirmed that the tests proposed are relevant. Some of the tests need to be refined. The properties related to moisture may become critical, in particular frost-heave in moist ashes. Work has been concluded with a handbook containing guidelines for building unpaved roads using fly ashes. The standards in force today on the use of ashes in cement and concrete refer to the utilization of coal ashes rich in silica. The Swedish ashes from biofuels do not fit into these standards. Their use as fine filler in concrete has been developed and demonstrated. Fly ash has been shown to be a replacement for cement in mines. The main thrust in the Ash Programme for landfills is on covers using ash and sludge from municipal wastewater treatment. Ashes provide the cover layer a high pH value that hinders biological degradation of the sludge as well as mechanical stability. Projects have investigated mixing proportions between ash and digested sludge and prepared in all four pilot surfaces on landfills, with satisfactory results. These projects have been complemented with an investigation of the chemical stability of the digested sludge. Mine tailings have been studied in two projects: In the first project digested sludge is used as support for vegetation on the mounds. The second role filled by the sludge is to prevent oxygen from reaching the sulphides tailings. To prevent roots from the vegetation

  8. Electrodialytic removal of Cd from biomass combustion fly ash suspensions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkelund, Gunvor M.; Ottosen, Lisbeth M.; Damoe, Anne J.

    2013-01-01

    was investigated with the aim of enabling reuse of the ashes. The ashes originated from combustion of straw (two ashes), wood chips, and co-firing of wood pellets and fuel oil, respectively. A series of laboratory scale electrodialytic remediation experiments were conducted with each ash. The initial Cd...... the final Cd concentration was below 2.0. mg Cd/kg DM in at least one experiment done with each ash. This was obtained within 2 weeks of remediation and at liquid to solid (L/S) ratios of L/S 16 for the pre-washed straw ash and L/S 8 for the straw, co-firing and wood ash. © 2013 Elsevier B.V.......Due to relatively high concentrations of Cd, biomass combustion fly ashes often fail to meet Danish legislative requirements for recycling as fertilizer. In this study, the potential of using electrodialytic remediation for removal of Cd from four different biomass combustion fly ashes...

  9. Comparative study on the characteristics of fly ash and bottom ash geopolymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chindaprasirt, Prinya; Jaturapitakkul, Chai; Chalee, Wichian; Rattanasak, Ubolluk

    2009-02-01

    This research was conducted to compare geopolymers made from fly ash and ground bottom ash. Sodium hydroxide (NaOH) and sodium silicate (Na(2)SiO(3)) solutions were used as activators. A mass ratio of 1.5 Na(2)SiO(3)/NaOH and three concentrations of NaOH (5, 10, and 15M) were used; the geopolymers were cured at 65 degrees C for 48 h. A Fourier transform infrared spectrometer (FT-IR), differential scanning calorimeter (DSC), and scanning electron microscope (SEM) were used on the geopolymer pastes. Geopolymer mortars were also prepared in order to investigate compressive strength. The results show that both fly ash and bottom ash can be utilized as source materials for the production of geopolymers. The properties of the geopolymers are dependent on source materials and the NaOH concentration. Fly ash is more reactive and produces a higher degree of geopolymerization in comparison with bottom ash. The moderate NaOH concentration of 10 M is found to be suitable and gives fly ash and bottom ash geopolymer mortars with compressive strengths of 35 and 18 MPa.

  10. Differential response in foliar chemistry of three ash species to emerald ash borer adult feeding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yigen Chen; Justin G.A. Whitehill; Pierluigi Bonello; Therese M. Poland

    2011-01-01

    The emerald ash borer (EAB; Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire; Coleoptera: Buprestidae), is an exotic wood-boring beetle that has been threatening North American ash (Fraxinus spp.) resources since its discovery in Michigan and Ontario in 2002. In this study, we investigated the phytochemical responses of the three most common North...

  11. Density and morphology studies on bottom ash and fly ash geopolymer brick

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deraman, Laila Mardiah; Abdullah, Mohd Mustafa Al Bakri; Ming, Liew Yun; Hussin, Kamarudin

    2017-04-01

    This paper studies the finding density and morphology analysis of geopolymer bricks using bottom ash and fly ash as a geopolymer raw material. The study has been conducted to produce bottom ash and fly ash geopolymer bricks by varying the ratio of fly ash/bottom ash, ratio solid/liquid and ratio sodium silicate (Na2SiO3)/ sodium hydroxide (NaOH) in the mix design. The compressive strength range between 3.8-4.5 Mpa was obtained in theprevious study [9]. The density and morphology analysis are done based on the optimum ratio selected from bottom ash/fly ash, solid/liquidand Na2SiO3/NaOH which is 1:2, 2.0 and 4.0 respectively for non-loading application brick. The morphology analysis of the bricks is closely related to the density recorded. The highest density shows the highest value of compressive strength and a denser microstructure of morphology.

  12. The role of biocontrol of emerald ash borer in protecting ash regeneration after invasion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jian J. Duan; Roy G. Van Driesche; Leah S. Bauer; Richard Reardon; Juli Gould; Joseph S. Elkinton

    2017-01-01

    Long-term monitoring in Michigan and several northeastern states has documented increasing parasitism and reduced EAB attack rates. Ash regeneration is currently benefiting from releases of introduced parasitoids, which now cause 20-80% parasitism of EAB larvae in ash saplings (1-2 inch dia.) and young trees (5-8 inch dia.).

  13. Evaluaciones económicas en salud: Conceptos básicos y clasificación

    OpenAIRE

    ZÁRATE,VÍCTOR

    2010-01-01

    El alza creciente de los costos en salud ha creado la urgente necesidad de evaluar económicamente las intervenciones de salud con el objetivo de priorizar aquellas que ofrecen un mejor valor o beneficio en relación a sus costos en un contexto local. El propósito de este artículo es entregar algunos principios básicos de evaluaciones económicas que mejorarán el conocimiento médico acerca de la metodología utilizada en este tipo de análisis y además ayudará a demostrar como la práctica clínica ...

  14. El impacto social en las evaluaciones de impacto ambiental: su conceptualización y práctica

    OpenAIRE

    Pardo Buendía, Mercedes

    1994-01-01

    El análisis del impacto social de las obras públicas es parte integrante de las Evaluaciones de Impacto Ambiental (EIA) en España. En este artículo se analiza el impacto social a través de la investigación de las Declaraciones oficiales de Impacto Ambiental y situándolas en un marco más amplio relativo al tipo de conceptualización del impacto social que se hace en la legislación aplicable, en las guías metodológicas de análisis para este campo y en los estudios de impacto ambiental concretos....

  15. A rapid appraisal process on an irrigation system in Pakistan; Evaluacion rapida de una zona de riego tipica de Pakistan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruiz-Carmona, Victor Manuel; Ojeda-Bustamante, Waldo [Instituto Mexicano de Tecnologia del Agua, Jiutepec, Morelos (Mexico); Contijoch, Manuel [Banco Mundial (Mexico)

    2006-07-15

    This paper presents the results obtained on the implementation of a rapid appraisal process on an irrigation system in the province of Punjab in Pakistan. The purpose of the evaluation was to know the present irrigation service quality and to propose some alternative to improve it. The evaluation results were: the canal inflow is smaller than peak crop water requirement; net aquifer loss; crops are always under stress which is reflected on low crop yields, the secondary canal network has not control structures and was not designed for rotation, insufficient human-human communication between canal operators; the operators have no complementary training course to enhance their capacity; discrepancy between the service the canal is supposed to provide and the real service it offers. The suggested actions to improve the irrigation service were: the irrigation service must be client oriented; the irrigation users should participate to determine the irrigation service characteristics; the difference between actual and stage irrigation service must be eliminated; clear definition on water allocation; implement a modernization program to provide the irrigation service required. The evaluation methodology used can be applied in other countries like Mexico for the analysis of large irrigation systems making an optimal use of time and resources. [Spanish] En el presente trabajo se muestran los resultados obtenidos al aplicar una metodologia de evaluacion rapida de sistemas de riego a una zona de la provincia del Punjab, Pakistan. El objetivo de la evaluacion fue conocer el estado actual del servicio de riego que ofrece la agencia responsable del manejo del riego en un distrito del Punjab y proponer alternativas para mejorarlo. Los principales resultados de esta evaluacion fueron los siguientes: la falta de capacidad de los canales, el abatimiento neto del acuifero; el estres hidrico continuo de los cultivos, que propicia un bajo rendimiento; la red secundaria de canales no

  16. Control and evaluation methodology of reclaimed surfaces in coal mines; Metodologia para el Seguimiento y Evaluacion de Superficies Restauradas en Minas de Carbon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-07-01

    The objective of the project has been to establish a control and evaluation methodology of reclaimed surfaces in coal mines, ash dumps,... etc. to be applied especially in locations with limited availability of ton soil, and to be used by mining companies to establish an internal quality control of the reclamation carried out. This methodology has been developed based on the evaluation of the results obtained from the reclamation that Endesa carries out at the Puentes mine. An operating and simplified method which may be adopted by smaller sites has been developed. This project has been carried out during the period 1994-1996 and includes a study about the physicochemical conditions of reclaimed surfaces, soil organisms study and about vegetation productivity associated to micorrizae. The conclusions and recommendations obtained include reclamation techniques (study and management of the deposit dumped, top soil management, addition of basic correctors, fertilization, top soil and maintenance works) and reclaimed surface control techniques (physicochemical soil conditions, soil organisms and vegetation). (Author)

  17. Insight of the fusion behavior of volcanic ash: Implications for Volcanic ash Hazards to Aircraft Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Wenjia; Hess, Kai-Uwe; Küppers, Ulrich; Scheu, Bettina; Cimarelli, Corrado; Lavallée, Yan; Sohyun, Park; Gattermann, Ulf; Müller, Dirk; Dingwell, Donald Bruce

    2014-05-01

    The interaction of volcanic ash with jet turbines during via ingestion of ash into engines operating at supra-volcanic temperatures is widely recognized as a potentially fatal hazard for jet aircraft. In the past 12 years, more than 60 modern jet airplanes, mostly jumbo jets, have been damaged by drifting clouds of volcanic ash that have contaminated air routes and airport facilities. Seven of these encounters are known to have caused in flight loss of engine power to jumbo jets carrying a total of more than 2000 passengers. The fusibility of volcanic ash is believed to impact strongly its deposition in the hotter parts of jet engines. Despite this, explicit investigation of ash sintering using standardized techniques is in its infancy. Volcanic ash may vary widely in its physical state and chemical composition between and even within explosive volcanic eruptions. Thus a comparative study of the fusibility of ash which involves a standard recognized techniques would be highly desirable. In this work, nine samples of fine ash, deposited from co-pyroclastic offrom nine different volcanoes which cover a broad range of chemical composition, were investigated. Eight of them were collected from 2001-2009 eruptions. Because of the currently elevated level of eruptive activity and its potential hazards to aircraft safety and the remaining one sample was collected from a 12,121 ± 114 yr B.P. eruption. We used the method of accessing the behavior of deposit-forming impurities in high temperature boiler plants on the basis of observations of the change in shape and size of a cylindrical coal ash to study the fusion phenomena as well as determine the volcanic ash melting behavior by defining four characteristic temperatures (shrinkage temperature, deformation temperature, hemispherical temperature, and flow temperature) by means of heating microscope instrument and different thermal analysis methods. Here, we find that there are similar sticking ability and flow behavior of

  18. Mechanical Properties of Concrete Using Eggshell Ash and Rice Husk Ash As Partial Replacement Of Cement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afizah Asman Nurul Shahadahtul

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This research was carried out to determine the optimum percentage of eggshell ash and rice husk ash (RHA as partial cement replacement. The samples were tested for its mechanical properties by using concrete grade G30 with cube mould (100 mm × 100 mm × 100 mm and prisms (100 mm × 100 mm × 500 mm. The samples were mixed with eggshell ash and RHA admixture with different proportions (2%:8%, 4%:6%, 6%:4%. Several types of test were conducted towards the samples, which are the slump test, compressive and flexural test. Based on previous researches, the strength of concrete reduced as replaced with eggshells. Most of the researches show the similar trend when partial cement is replaced using eggshell ash. Thus, to increase the strength, an admixture which has pozzolanic reactivity called rice husk ash (RHA is introduced into mix design which has been proved can help to improve the strength of concrete.

  19. International Database of Volcanic Ash Impacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, K.; Cameron, C.; Wilson, T. M.; Jenkins, S.; Brown, S.; Leonard, G.; Deligne, N.; Stewart, C.

    2015-12-01

    Volcanic ash creates extensive impacts to people and property, yet we lack a global ash impacts catalog to organize, distribute, and archive this important information. Critical impact information is often stored in ephemeral news articles or other isolated resources, which cannot be queried or located easily. A global ash impacts database would improve 1) warning messages, 2) public and lifeline emergency preparation, and 3) eruption response and recovery. Ashfall can have varying consequences, such as disabling critical lifeline infrastructure (e.g. electrical generation and transmission, water supplies, telecommunications, aircraft and airports) or merely creating limited and expensive inconvenience to local communities. Impacts to the aviation sector can be a far-reaching global issue. The international volcanic ash impacts community formed a committee to develop a database to catalog the impacts of volcanic ash. We identify three user populations for this database: 1) research teams, who would use the database to assist in systematic collection, recording, and storage of ash impact data, and to prioritize impact assessment trips and lab experiments 2) volcanic risk assessment scientists who rely on impact data for assessments (especially vulnerability/fragility assessments); a complete dataset would have utility for global, regional, national and local scale risk assessments, and 3) citizen science volcanic hazard reporting. Publication of an international ash impacts database will encourage standardization and development of best practices for collecting and reporting impact information. Data entered will be highly categorized, searchable, and open source. Systematic cataloging of impact data will allow users to query the data and extract valuable information to aid in the development of improved emergency preparedness, response and recovery measures.

  20. Chemical characterization of ash from gasification of alfalfa stems: Implications for ash management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mozaffari, M.; Rosen, C.J.; Russelle, M.P.; Nater, E.A.

    2000-06-01

    Electricity generation from biomass is an attractive option from an environmental perspective. Pilot studies have indicated that alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) stems are suitable feedstock for energy generation via gasification. Detailed information on chemical characteristics of the ash generated from gasification of alfalfa stem is required to develop environmentally and economically sound ash management strategies. Alfalfa fly and bottom ashes were characterized with respect to chemical properties that are important in developing ash management practices with emphasis on beneficial utilization as a soil amendment. Mean concentrations of total C, K, Ca, and Cl were 424, 120, 85, and 26 g kg{sup {minus}1}, respectively, in fly ash. In bottom ash, the mean concentrations of C, K, and Ca, were 63, 61, and 193 g kg{sup {minus}1}. Concentrations of total Pb, As, Cd, Co, and Se were below detection limits in both ash types. Naphthalene ranged from 6.2 to 74 mg kg{sup {minus}1}, but concentrations of many other polyaromatic hydrocarbons were low or below mg kg{sup {minus}1} detection limits. Available K and P in fly ash were 90 to 120 and 8 to 10 g kg{sup {minus}1}, respectively. Mean CaCO{sub 3} equivalent value of fly ash was 400 g kg{sup {minus}1}, its electrical conductivity (EC) and pH were 127 dS m{sup {minus}1} and 11.5, respectively. These results suggest that when managed properly, gasified alfalfa ash could potentially be utilized as a beneficial soil amendment with few potential environmental concerns.

  1. Elucidation of the Two H3K36me3 Histone Methyltransferases Set2 and Ash1 in Fusarium fujikuroi Unravels Their Different Chromosomal Targets and a Major Impact of Ash1 on Genome Stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janevska, Slavica; Baumann, Leonie; Sieber, Christian M K; Münsterkötter, Martin; Ulrich, Jonas; Kämper, Jörg; Güldener, Ulrich; Tudzynski, Bettina

    2017-11-16

    In this work, we present a comprehensive analysis of the H3K36 histone methyltransferases Set2 and Ash1 in the filamentous ascomycete Fusarium fujikuroi In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, one single methyltransferase, Set2, confers all H3K36 methylation, while there are two members of the Set2 family in filamentous fungi, and even more H3K36 methyltransferases in higher eukaryotes. Whereas the yeast Set2 homolog has been analyzed in fungi previously, the second member of the Set2 family, designated Ash1, has not been described for any filamentous fungus. Western blot and ChIP-Seq analyses confirmed that F. fujikuroi Set2 and Ash1 are H3K36-specific histone methyltransferases that deposit H3K36me3 at specific loci: Set2 is most likely responsible for H3K36 methylation of euchromatic regions of the genome, while Ash1 methylates H3K36 at the subtelomeric regions (facultative heterochromatin) of all chromosomes including the accessory chromosome XII. Our data indicate that H3K36me3 cannot be considered a hallmark of euchromatin in F. fujikuroi, and likely also other filamentous fungi, making them different to what is known about nuclear characteristics in yeast and higher eukaryotes. We suggest that the H3K36 methylation mark exerts specific functions when deposited at euchromatic or subtelomeric regions by Set2 or Ash1, respectively. We found an enhanced level of H3K27me3, an increased instability of subtelomeric regions and losses of the accessory chromosome XII over time in Δash1 mutants, indicating an involvement of Ash1 in DNA repair processes. Further phenotypic analyses revealed a role of H3K36 methylation in vegetative growth, sporulation, secondary metabolite biosynthesis and virulence in F. fujikuroi. Copyright © 2017, Genetics.

  2. Soil amendments promote vegetation establishment and control acidity in coal combustion waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    R.M. Danker; D.C. Adriano; Bon-Jun Koo; C.D. Barton

    2003-01-01

    The effects of adding various soil amendments and a pyrite oxidation inhibitor to aid in the establishment of vegetation and to reduce acid drainage (AD) from coal fly ash and coal reject (FA + CR*) were assessed in an outdoor mesocosm study. Preliminary greenhouse experiments and field observations at the U.S. Department of Energy's Savannah River Site (SRS)...

  3. IMPACTO DE LAS EVALUACIONES INTERNACIONALES EN LAS POLÍTICAS CURRICULARES: LA EDUCACIÓN SECUNDARIA OBLIGATORIA EN ESPAÑA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandra Montané López

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available A través del análisis de los cambios legislativos en la Educación Secundaria Obligatoria (ESO en España, se analiza la relación, naturaleza e impacto de las evaluaciones internacionales de los alumnos y alumnas (concretamente PISA en las políticas educativas en general y, concretamente, en la configuración curricular de este periodo de la educación obligatoria. Asimismo, se relacionan estos cambios con los procesos neoliberales de privatización y estandarización promovidos por organismos transnacionales a través de uma agenda globalmente estructurada, mediante las evaluaciones internacionales, que determinan, de un modo gradual, contenidos y métodos educativos

  4. Effects of the addition of oil shale ash and coal ash on physic-chemical properties of CPJ45 cement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nabih K.

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available We focused our research on recycling industrial wastes, fly ash (F.A, bottom ash (B.A and oil shale ash (S.A in cement production. The study concerns physico-chemical characterization of these products and the influence of their addition on the mechanical proprieties of the CPJ45 cement. XRF allowed us to rank the three additives used according to their contents on major oxides. Coal ashes belong to the class F, and thus possess poozzolanic properties and oil shale ash belongs to the class C and possesses hydraulic and poozolanic properties. The crystalline phases constituting each ash were analysed by XRD. We observe in bottom ash the presence of quartz and mullite. The same crystals are found in fly ash with hematite and magnetite. Oil shale ash is composed of quartz, anhydrite, gehlenite, wollastonite and periclase. The microstructures of fly ash and bottom ash were studied using SEM. The bottom ash was composed respectively of fine particles that are generally irregularly shaped, their dimensions are between 5 and 28μm and of big particles(300 μm. The EDX analysis coupled with an electronic microscope provided some information about the major elements that constitute our samples. The dehydrations of anhydrous and three days hydrated cement were examined by DSC. For hydrated cements we noticed endothermic peaks related to the dehydration of CSH, CH and decomposition of carbonates. The study of the mechanical properties of CPJ45 cement by adding different proportions of fly ash, bottom ash and oil shale ash helped clarifying the percentage of ash that leaded to improve the 28 days mechanical strength. The results show that the cements studied have their maximum mechanical resistance with the addition at 7% of fly ash or 10% of oil shale ash.

  5. Life cycle adaption of biofuel ashes. Evaluation of new techniques for pelletizing of biofuel ashes, especially regarding operational properties and environmental effects in the forest after ash recycling. Stage 1; Kretsloppsanpassning av bioaskor. Utvaerdering av ny teknik foer pelletering av bioaska med avseende paa dels driftsegenskaper, dels miljoeeffekter i skogen av askaaterfoering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loevgren, Linnea [Stora Enso Environment, Falun (Sweden); Lundmark, Jan-Erik; Jansson, Charlotta [AssiDomaen AB, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2000-11-01

    The aim of the project 'Adaptation of Wood Ashes to Recycling' is to evaluate a new technique - roll pelleting - for making wood ash suitable for reuse as a fertiliser for woodland. The project is being carried out at the forest product companies AssiDomaen and Stora Enso. The main financier is the Swedish National Energy Administration. Other financiers are AssiDomaen, Stora Enso, The Thermal Engineering Research Institute and The Forestry Research Institute of Sweden. The project has involved the construction of a full-scale roll pelleter in a mobile container and its trial operation at two Swedish pulp and paper mills. The leaching properties of the ash products were studied with a laboratory method. In addition, the effects of ash fertilisation with these products are being studied in a four-year field trial. Effects on soil pH, nutrient supply, soil water chemistry and ground vegetation are being evaluated by The Forestry Research Institute of Sweden and will be reported separately in the year 2003. In a laboratory prestudy, the leaching properties of pellets from twelve different ash products made in a laboratory prototype machine were evaluated. The ash products were made from residues from the AssiDomaen Froevi mill and the Stora Enso Fors mill. Fly ash from Froevi was used alone and mixed with green liquor sludge and lime sludge respectively. Fly ash from Fors was also used alone and mixed with coating colour. The laboratory method used for the evaluation of leaching properties is the method developed by IVL The Swedish Environmental Research Institute Ltd. The results show that the progress of the leaching of roll pelleted ash is significantly slower than for the corresponding crushed product and a reference lime product. The speed of leaching, measured as acid neutralisation capacity, ANC, was significantly lower for the roll pelleted ash compared to self-hardened and crushed ash products. Because of the high content of calcium, lime has on the

  6. Ash aggregation in explosive volcanic eruptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Telling, J. W.; Dufek, J.

    2010-12-01

    We present the result of a recent experimental and numerical investigation of ash aggregation in volcanic plumes. Eruption dynamics are sensitive to microphysical processes, like ash aggregation, yet are difficult to parameterize based on dynamics simulations of whole eruption columns due to the lack of sufficient resolution. Here we present the results of experiments that develop a probabilistic relationship for ash aggregation based on particle size, collisional energy and atmospheric water vapor. These relationships can be integrated into large-scale simulations of eruption column behavior in conjunction with a reconstructed velocity distribution of the ash in the column. The physical experiment was carried out in a contained tank designed to allow for the control of atmospheric water vapor. Image data is recorded with a high speed camera and post-processed to determine the number of collisions, energy of collisions and probability of aggregation. We will present the results of aggregation probability and the effects of incorporating these results into a multiphase model of a three-dimensional eruption column, where the effects of ash aggregation are especially important in regions of high shear and high granular temperature.

  7. National volcanic ash operations plan for aviation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ,; ,

    2007-01-01

    The National Aviation Weather Program Strategic Plan (1997) and the National Aviation Weather Initiatives (1999) both identified volcanic ash as a high-priority informational need to aviation services. The risk to aviation from airborne volcanic ash is known and includes degraded engine performance (including flameout), loss of visibility, failure of critical navigational and operational instruments, and, in the worse case, loss of life. The immediate costs for aircraft encountering a dense plume are potentially major—damages up to $80 million have occurred to a single aircraft. Aircraft encountering less dense volcanic ash clouds can incur longer-term costs due to increased maintenance of engines and external surfaces. The overall goal, as stated in the Initiatives, is to eliminate encounters with ash that could degrade the in-flight safety of aircrews and passengers and cause damage to the aircraft. This goal can be accomplished by improving the ability to detect, track, and forecast hazardous ash clouds and to provide adequate warnings to the aviation community on the present and future location of the cloud. To reach this goal, the National Aviation Weather Program established three objectives: (1) prevention of accidental encounters with hazardous clouds; (2) reduction of air traffic delays, diversions, or evasive actions when hazardous clouds are present; and (3) the development of a single, worldwide standard for exchange of information on airborne hazardous materials. To that end, over the last several years, based on numerous documents (including an OFCMsponsored comprehensive study on aviation training and an update of Aviation Weather Programs/Projects), user forums, and two International Conferences on Volcanic Ash and Aviation Safety (1992 and 2004), the Working Group for Volcanic Ash (WG/VA), under the OFCM-sponsored Committee for Aviation Services and Research, developed the National Volcanic Ash Operations Plan for Aviation and Support of the

  8. Thermal treatment of ashes[Fly Ash from Municipal Waste Incineration]; Termisk rening av askor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wikman, Karin; Berg, Magnus; Bjurstroem, Henrik [AaF-Energi och Miljoe AB, Stockholm (Sweden); Nordin, Anders [Umeaa Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Applied Physics and Electronics

    2003-04-01

    In this project descriptions of different processes for thermal treatment of ashes have been compiled. A technical and economic evaluation of the processes has been done to identify possibilities and problems. The focus in the project lays on treatment of fly ash from municipal waste incineration but the processes can also be used to treat other ashes. When the ash is heated in the thermal treatment reactor, with or without additives, the material is sintered or vitrified and at the same time volatile substances (Zn, Pb, Cd, Hg etc.) are separated. In general the separation is more effective in processes with reducing conditions compared to oxidizing conditions. Oxidizing processes have both worse separation capacity and require more energy. The oxidizing processes are mainly used to stabilize the ash through vitrification and they are in some cases developed for management of municipal sewage sludge and bottom ash. However, these processes are often not as complex as for example an electric arc melting furnace with reducing conditions. The research today aim to develop more effective electrical melting systems with reducing conditions such as plasma melting furnaces, electric resistance melting furnaces and low frequency induction furnaces. A central question in the evaluation of different thermal treatment processes for ash is how the residues from the treatment can be used. It is not certain that the vitrified material is stable enough to get a high economic value, but it can probably be used as construction material. How the remaining metals in the ash are bound is very important in a long-time perspective. Further studies with leaching tests are necessary to clarify this issue. The heavy metal concentrate from the processes contains impurities, such as chlorine, which makes it unprofitable to obtain the metals. Instead the heavy metal concentrate has to be land filled. However, the amount of material for land filling will be much smaller if only the heavy

  9. Regular Recycling of Wood Ash to Prevent Waste Production (RecAsh). Technical Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersson, Lars E-mail: lars.t.andersson@skogsstyreslen.se

    2007-03-15

    At present, the extraction of harvest residues is predicted to increase in Sweden and Finland. As an effect of the intensified harvesting, the export of nutrients and acid buffering substances from the growth site is also increased. Wood ash could be used to compensate forest soils for such losses. Most wood fuel ash is today often deposited in landfills. If the wood ash is recycled, wood energy is produced without any significant waste production. Ash recycling would therefore contribute to decreasing the production of waste, and to maintaining the chemical quality of forest waters and biological productivity of forest soils in the long term. The project has developed, analysed and demonstrated two regular ash-recycling systems. It has also distributed knowledge gathered about motives for ash recycling as well as technical and administrative solutions through a range of media (handbooks, workshops, field demonstrations, reports, web page and information videos). Hopefully, the project will contribute to decreasing waste problems related to bio-energy production in the EU at large. The project has been organised as a separate structure at the beneficiary and divided in four geographically defined subprojects, one in Finland and three in Sweden (Central Sweden, Northern Sweden, and South-western Sweden). The work in each subproject has been lead by a subproject leader. Each subproject has organised a regional reference group. A project steering committee has been established consisting of senior officials from all concerned partners. The project had nine main tasks with the following main expected deliverables and output: 1. Development of two complete full-scale ash-recycling systems; 2. Production of handbooks of the ash recycling system; 3. Ash classification study to support national actions for recommendations; 4. Organise regional demonstrations of various technical options for ash treatment and spreading; 5. Organise national seminars and demonstrations of

  10. Quality characteristics of Greek fly ashes and potential uses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skodras, G.; Grammelis, P.; Kakaras, E. [Institute for Solid Fuels Technology and Applications, Ptolemais (Greece); Karangelos, D.; Anagnostakis, M.; Hinis, E. [Nuclear Engineering Section, Mechanical Engineering Department, National Technical University of Athens, Athens (Greece)

    2007-01-15

    The main characteristics of fly ash from Greek coal-fired boilers are presented in this paper in relation to its exploitation potential. Both fuel and fly ash samples were collected and analyzed according to the ASTM Standards. Apart from the typical analyses (proximate, ultimate, ash analysis and calorific value), an ICP-AES spectrometer was used for the analysis of heavy metals in the ash. Experimental measurements in order to determine the radioactivity content of raw fuel and the fly ash were carried out as well. A representative fly ash sample from Ptolemais power plant was evaluated and tested as filler in Self-Compacting Concrete (SCC). Ashes from the Greek brown coal are classified in type C, most of the fly ash being produced in Ptolemais of Northern Greece, while the rest in Megalopolis. Ptolemais fly ash is rich in calcium compounds, while Megalopolis fly ash contains more pyrite. Increased heavy metal concentrations are observed in the fly ash samples of Greek coal. Greek fly ash appears to have not only pozzolanic but also hydraulic behaviour. Furthermore, Greek fly ash, depending on its origin, may have relatively high natural radioactivity content, reaching in the case of Megalopolis fly ash 1 kBq kg{sup -1} of {sup 226}Ra. The laboratory results showed that fly ashes can be a competitive substitute to conventional limestone filler material in SCC. Fly ash is mostly used in Greece in cement industry replacing cement clinker and aiming to the production of special types of Portland cements. However, a more aggressive utilisation strategy should be developed, since low quantities of the total produced fly ash are currently further utilised. (author)

  11. Correlation between the critical viscosity and ash fusion temperatures of coal gasifier ashes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsieh, Peter Y. [National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Albany, OR (United States); Kwong, Kyei-Sing [National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Albany, OR (United States); Bennett, James [National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Albany, OR (United States)

    2015-09-27

    Coal gasification yields synthesis gas, an important intermediate in chemical manufacturing. It is also vital to the production of liquid fuels through the Fischer-Tropsch process and electricity in Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle power generation. Minerals naturally present in coal become molten in entrained-flow slagging gasifiers. Molten coal ash slag penetrates and dissolves refractory bricks, leading to costly plant shutdowns. The extent of coal ash slag penetration and refractory brick dissolution depends on the slag viscosity, the gasification temperature, and the composition of slag and bricks. Here, we measured the viscosity of several synthetic coal ash slags with a high-temperature rotary viscometer and their ash fusion temperatures through optical image analysis. We made all measurements in a carbon monoxide-carbon dioxide reducing atmosphere that approximates coal gasification conditions. Empirical correlation models based on ash fusion temperatures were used to calculate critical viscosity temperatures based on the coal ash compositions. These values were then compared with those obtained from thermodynamic phase-transition models. Finally, an understanding of slag viscosity as a function of ash composition is important to reducing refractory wear in slagging coal gasifiers, which would help to reduce the cost and environmental impact of coal for chemical and electricity production.

  12. Fly ash utilization to ecology purpose products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sasae, T.; Kinugawa, M. (En-Tech Research Institute Inc. (Japan))

    1993-01-01

    Fly ash contains many elements necessary for plant growth. En-Tech Research Institute has a 100 ton/month fly ash granulation plant which produces 0.5-10mm diameter granules which are used in the cultivation of approximately 15,000 Onsidumu and Denpharae orchids in a 3,000 m[sup 2] greenhouse and as a soil improver for a 1,600m[sup 2] test lawn. The granules are also used as agricultural chemical adsorbents for drainage of the test lawn. Orchids cultivated using the fly ash granules are shipped to market as cut flowers regularly. There they fetch the same price or a higher price than orchids cultivated in the usual way. Good results have also been achieved with the soil improvement test and the adsorption test. Tests to obtain design data are being carried out on two golf courses in the Kumamoto Prefecture. 8 figs., 10 tabs., 7 photos.

  13. Utilization of blended fluidized bed combustion (FBC) ash and pulverized coal combustion (PCC) fly ash in geopolymer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chindaprasirt, Prinya; Rattanasak, Ubolluk

    2010-04-01

    In this paper, synthesis of geopolymer from fluidized bed combustion (FBC) ash and pulverized coal combustion (PCC) fly ash was studied in order to effectively utilize both ashes. FBC-fly ash and bottom ash were inter-ground to three different finenesses. The ashes were mixed with as-received PCC-fly ash in various proportions and used as source material for synthesis of geopolymer. Sodium silicate (Na(2)SiO(3)) and 10M sodium hydroxide (NaOH) solutions at mass ratio of Na(2)SiO(3)/NaOH of 1.5 and curing temperature of 65 degrees C for 48h were used for making geopolymer. X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), degree of reaction, and thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA) were performed on the geopolymer pastes. Compressive strength was also tested on geopolymer mortars. The results show that high strength geopolymer mortars of 35.0-44.0MPa can be produced using mixture of ground FBC ash and as-received PCC-fly ash. Fine FBC ash is more reactive and results in higher degree of reaction and higher strength geopolymer as compared to the use of coarser FBC ash. Grinding increases reactivity of ash by means of increasing surface area and the amount of reactive phase of the ash. In addition, the packing effect due to fine particles also contributed to increase in strength of geopolymers. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Market assessment and technical feasibility study of PFBC ash use

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, V.E.; Bland, A.E.; Brown, T.H. [Western Research Inst., Laramie, WY (United States); Georgiou, D.N. [Jacques, Whitford and Associates Ltd., Dartmouth, NS (Canada); Wheeldon, J. [Electric Power Research Inst., Palo Alto, CA (United States)

    1994-10-01

    The overall objectives of this study are to determine the market potential and the technical feasibility of using PFBC ash in high volume ash use applications. The information will be of direct use to the utility industry in assessing the economics of PFBC power generation in light of ash disposal avoidance through ash marketing. In addition, the research is expected to result in the generation of generic data on the use of PFBC ash that could lead to novel processing options and procedures. The specific objectives of the proposed research and demonstration effort are: Define resent and future market potential of PFBC ash for a range of applications (Phase I); assess the technical feasibility of PFBC ash use in construction, civil engineering and agricultural applications (Phase II); and demonstrate the most promising of the market and ash use options in full-scale field demonstrations (Phase III).

  15. Fruits and vegetables (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    A healthy diet includes adding vegetables and fruit every day. Vegetables like broccoli, green beans, leafy greens, zucchini, cauliflower, cabbage, carrots, and tomatoes are low in calories and high in fiber, vitamins, and minerals. ...

  16. Total Vegetation 2002

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — These are polygons that contain vegetated pixels in the May, 2002 imagery from aerial overflight of the Grand Canyon. Vegetation was mapped between stage elevations...

  17. Wet physical separation of MSWI bottom ash

    OpenAIRE

    Muchova, L.

    2010-01-01

    Bottom ash (BA) from municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI) has high potential for the recovery of valuable secondary materials. For example, the MSWI bottom ash produced by the incinerator at Amsterdam contains materials such as non-ferrous metals (2.3%), ferrous metals (8-13%), gold (0.4 ppm), silver (10 ppm), stainless steel (0.1%) and minerals that can be converted into building products such as aggregates utilized for concrete, asphalt, etc. Since the composition of BA varies from cou...

  18. Utilization options for fly ash, bottom ash, and slag in Eastern Europe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manz, O.E.

    1995-12-01

    Since 1967, at least six ash utilization symposiums have been held in the United States, with papers presented by several European authors on the utilization of coal by-products in Eastern Europe. There is currently over 80,000 megawatts of installed coal-fired capacity available in that region. Unfortunately, of the 117,778,000 tonnes of fly ash, bottom ash, and slag produced in Eastern Europe in 1989, only 13% was utilized. This paper outlines the research and levels and kinds of coal by-product utilization taking place in Eastern Europe since the late 1960s.

  19. Environmental guidelines for reuse of ash in civil engineering applications - phase 2; Miljoeriktlinjer foer askanvaendning i anlaeggningsbyggande - etapp 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bendz, David; Wik, Ola; Elert, Mark; Haakansson, Karsten

    2006-07-15

    Producers, authorities and users have acknowledged the need for common environmental guidelines for residues. The objective of this project has been to develop a proposal for common environmental guidelines for reuse of ash in civil engineering applications. The project has a narrow risk assessment perspective and focus on a set of substances where a well developed environmental policy and knowledge are available. Health aspects for construction workers are not covered in the project. The starting point in the risk assessment is the assumption that ashes may be used just like any conventional construction material. Special requirements or regulations regarding precautionary actions in the handling of ashes, regarding the site or surroundings will be avoided. The guiding principle has been the precautionary principle: reuse of ash is acceptable only if it constitute an insignificant risk to health and environment. The calculations are based on defined emission- and exposure scenarios. The concept of insignificant risk imply that the impact in the defined points of compliance does not exceed established health- and environmental criteria. The model address health risks associated with spreading of particles and exposure by dust, oral intake, dermal contact and intake by vegetables or wild grown berries and consumption of ground water. Off-site environmental effects in surface waters and in soil as well as health- and environmental risks in the post use phase are also considered. Exposure by dust is addressed in the same way as in the Swedish Environmental Protection Agency's guidelines for contaminated soil. The guidelines values for exposure by dust, oral intake, dermal contact and intake by vegetables or wild grown berries are total content, whereas the guidelines for exposure by consumption of ground water or environmental effects in surface waters are based on leaching properties of the ash. The guidelines rely on a conceptual model, defined emissions and

  20. Evaluation of Fly Ash Quality Control Tools : Technical Summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-01

    Many entities currently use fl y ash in portland cement concrete (PCC) pavements and structures. Although : the body of knowledge is great concerning the use of fl y ash, several projects per year are subject to poor : performance where fl y ash is n...

  1. Evaluation of fly ash quality control tools : tech summary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-01

    Many entities currently use fl y ash in portland cement concrete (PCC) pavements and structures. Although : the body of knowledge is great concerning the use of fl y ash, several projects per year are subject to poor : performance where fl y ash is n...

  2. STABILIZATION OF EXPANSIVE SOIL USING BAGASSE ASH & LIME

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    tekimerry

    (MDD) and plasticity of the soil for all additives. But there was also a tremendous improvement in the CBR value when the soil is stabilized with a combination of lime and bagasse ash. This shows a potential of using bagasse ash as admixture in lime stabilized expansive soil. Keywords: Expansive soil, bagasse ash, lime,.

  3. Self hardening property of Botswana fly ash | Sahu | Botswana ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In the present investigation, an effort has been made to study the self hardening property of Botswana fly ash by testing penetration resistance of fly ash flowable fills and unconfined compressive strength of 3 soils mixed with fly ash and compacted to their optimum unit weight. It has been found that the strength of both ...

  4. Evaluation of Pollutant Leaching Potential of Coal Ashes for Recycling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, D.; Woo, N. C.; Kim, H.; Yoon, H.; Chung, D.

    2011-12-01

    By 2009, coal ashes produced from coal-based power plants in Korea have been reused as cement supplement materials; however, the rest is mostly disposed in landfills inside the plant properties. Continuous production of coal ashes and limited landfill sites require more recycles of coal ashes as base materials, specifically in constructions of roads and of huge industrial complex. Previous researches showed that coal ashes could contain various metals such as arsenic(As), chromium(Cr), lead(Pb), nickel(Ni), selenium(Se), etc. In this study, we collected four types of bottom ashes and two of fly ashes from four coal-based power plants. These ash samples were tested with distilled water through the column leaching process in oxidized conditions. The column test results were compared with those of total digestion, sequential extraction processes and TCLP. Concentrations of metals in outflows from columns are generally greater in fly ashes than in bottom ashes, specifically for As, Se, B, Sr and SO4. Only one fly ash (J2-F) shows high concentrations of arsenic and selenium in leachate. Sequential extraction results indicate that these metals are in readily soluble forms, such as adsorbed, carbonated, and reducible forms. Results of TCLP analysis indicate no potential contaminants leached from the ashes. In conclusion, recycling of coal combustion ashes could be encouraged with proper tests such as sequential and leaching experiments.

  5. Ashes from fluidized bed combustion of residual forest biomass

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cruz, Nuno C.; Rodrigues, Sónia M.; Carvalho, Lina; Duarte, Armando C.; Pereira, Eduarda; Romkens, Paul; Tarelho, Luís A.C.

    2017-01-01

    Although bottom ash (BA) [or mixtures of bottom and fly ash (FA)] from clean biomass fuels is currently used as liming agent, additive for compost, and fertilizer on agricultural and forest soils in certain European countries, in several other countries most of the ashes are currently disposed in

  6. 77 FR 55895 - Permanent Closure of Cincinnati Blue Ash Airport

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-11

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Permanent Closure of Cincinnati Blue Ash Airport AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of permanent closure of Cincinnati Blue Ash Airport (ISZ). SUMMARY: The... Cincinnati advising that on August 29, 2012, it was permanently closing Cincinnati Blue Ash Airport (ISZ...

  7. Mazama and Glacier Peak Volcanic Ash Layers: Relative Ages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fryxell, R

    1965-03-12

    Physiographic and stratigraphic evidence supports the regional correlation of two volcanic ash layers with extinct Mount Mazama at Crater Lake, Oregon, and Glacier Peak in the northern Cascade Range of Washington. A radiocarbon age of 12,000 +/- 310 years confirms geological evidence that ash derived from the Glacier Peak eruption is substantially older than ash from the Mazama eruption of 6600 years ago.

  8. Utilization of mixed pond ash in integrated steel plant for ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Utilization of mixed pond ash in integrated steel plant for manufacturing superior quality bricks. Piyush Kant Pandey Raj Kumar ... Fly ash (FA) poses serious problems to the industries. Integrated steel plants generate huge quantity of FA from their captive power plants and other furnaces. This ash is generally disposed off in ...

  9. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in municipal waste ashes from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The levels of isolated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) in ash residues of wastes from some major waste dumps in Lagos, Nigeria, were determined. The total amounts of the PAH in the ashes were in the range of 0.06 – 0.4 mg/g. The ash from the waste dump that contains the highest level also displayed greatest ...

  10. Effect of municipal solid waste ash on comprehensive strength ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The blocks were moulded in a CINVA-Ram machine by replacing 0%, 2%, 5% and 10% of municipal solid waste ash (MSW ash) as a stabilizing agent. The compressive strengths of individual blocks were obtained after curing for 7, 14 and 28 days. The 2%MSW ash replacement gave the highest compressive strength and ...

  11. Improving volcanic ash forecasts with ensemble-based data assimilation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fu, Guangliang

    2017-01-01

    The 2010 Eyjafjallajökull volcano eruption had serious consequences to civil aviation. This has initiated a lot of research on volcanic ash forecasting in recent years. For forecasting the volcanic ash transport after eruption onset, a volcanic ash transport and diffusion model (VATDM) needs to be

  12. Application of TEM to characterize fly ash- and slag cements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pietersen, H.S.

    1999-01-01

    A Portland fly ash cement containing 20% of a fine fly ash and a blast furnace slag cement of approximately 290 days old were examined with analytical transmission electron microscopy, in order to examine the (local) microstructure in these cements in detail. In the Portland fly ash cement the fly

  13. Use of Unprocessed Coal Bottom Ash as Partial Fine Aggregate ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2012r

    This paper investigates the use of unprocessed coal bottom ash as fine aggregate replacement in structural concrete in an attempt to contribute to a sound management of coal ash on the island of Mauritius. The coal bottom ash was obtained from FUEL thermal power station and had a loss of ignition of 11%. Experiments ...

  14. Optimizing and Characterizing Geopolymers from Ternary Blend of Philippine Coal Fly Ash, Coal Bottom Ash and Rice Hull Ash

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Ernesto Kalaw

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Geopolymers are inorganic polymers formed from the alkaline activation of amorphous alumino-silicate materials resulting in a three-dimensional polymeric network. As a class of materials, it is seen to have the potential of replacing ordinary Portland cement (OPC, which for more than a hundred years has been the binder of choice for structural and building applications. Geopolymers have emerged as a sustainable option vis-à-vis OPC for three reasons: (1 their technical properties are comparable if not better; (2 they can be produced from industrial wastes; and (3 within reasonable constraints, their production requires less energy and emits significantly less CO2. In the Philippines, the use of coal ash, as the alumina- and silica- rich geopolymer precursor, is being considered as one of the options for sustainable management of coal ash generation from coal-fired power plants. However, most geopolymer mixes (and the prevalent blended OPC use only coal fly ash. The coal bottom ash, having very few applications, remains relegated to dumpsites. Rice hull ash, from biomass-fired plants, is another silica-rich geopolymer precursor material from another significantly produced waste in the country with only minimal utilization. In this study, geopolymer samples were formed from the mixture of coal ash, using both coal fly ash (CFA and coal bottom ash (CBA, and rice hull ash (RHA. The raw materials used for the geopolymerization process were characterized using X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy (XRF for elemental and X-ray diffraction (XRD for mineralogical composition. The raw materials’ thermal stability and loss on ignition (LOI were determined using thermogravimetric analysis (TGA and reactivity via dissolution tests and inductively-coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP analysis. The mechanical, thermal and microstructural properties of the geopolymers formed were analyzed using compression tests, Fourier transform infra-red spectroscopy (FTIR

  15. Optimizing and Characterizing Geopolymers from Ternary Blend of Philippine Coal Fly Ash, Coal Bottom Ash and Rice Hull Ash

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalaw, Martin Ernesto; Culaba, Alvin; Hinode, Hirofumi; Kurniawan, Winarto; Gallardo, Susan; Promentilla, Michael Angelo

    2016-01-01

    Geopolymers are inorganic polymers formed from the alkaline activation of amorphous alumino-silicate materials resulting in a three-dimensional polymeric network. As a class of materials, it is seen to have the potential of replacing ordinary Portland cement (OPC), which for more than a hundred years has been the binder of choice for structural and building applications. Geopolymers have emerged as a sustainable option vis-à-vis OPC for three reasons: (1) their technical properties are comparable if not better; (2) they can be produced from industrial wastes; and (3) within reasonable constraints, their production requires less energy and emits significantly less CO2. In the Philippines, the use of coal ash, as the alumina- and silica- rich geopolymer precursor, is being considered as one of the options for sustainable management of coal ash generation from coal-fired power plants. However, most geopolymer mixes (and the prevalent blended OPC) use only coal fly ash. The coal bottom ash, having very few applications, remains relegated to dumpsites. Rice hull ash, from biomass-fired plants, is another silica-rich geopolymer precursor material from another significantly produced waste in the country with only minimal utilization. In this study, geopolymer samples were formed from the mixture of coal ash, using both coal fly ash (CFA) and coal bottom ash (CBA), and rice hull ash (RHA). The raw materials used for the geopolymerization process were characterized using X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy (XRF) for elemental and X-ray diffraction (XRD) for mineralogical composition. The raw materials’ thermal stability and loss on ignition (LOI) were determined using thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and reactivity via dissolution tests and inductively-coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP) analysis. The mechanical, thermal and microstructural properties of the geopolymers formed were analyzed using compression tests, Fourier transform infra-red spectroscopy (FTIR), scanning

  16. Optimizing and Characterizing Geopolymers from Ternary Blend of Philippine Coal Fly Ash, Coal Bottom Ash and Rice Hull Ash.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalaw, Martin Ernesto; Culaba, Alvin; Hinode, Hirofumi; Kurniawan, Winarto; Gallardo, Susan; Promentilla, Michael Angelo

    2016-07-15

    Geopolymers are inorganic polymers formed from the alkaline activation of amorphous alumino-silicate materials resulting in a three-dimensional polymeric network. As a class of materials, it is seen to have the potential of replacing ordinary Portland cement (OPC), which for more than a hundred years has been the binder of choice for structural and building applications. Geopolymers have emerged as a sustainable option vis-à-vis OPC for three reasons: (1) their technical properties are comparable if not better; (2) they can be produced from industrial wastes; and (3) within reasonable constraints, their production requires less energy and emits significantly less CO₂. In the Philippines, the use of coal ash, as the alumina- and silica- rich geopolymer precursor, is being considered as one of the options for sustainable management of coal ash generation from coal-fired power plants. However, most geopolymer mixes (and the prevalent blended OPC) use only coal fly ash. The coal bottom ash, having very few applications, remains relegated to dumpsites. Rice hull ash, from biomass-fired plants, is another silica-rich geopolymer precursor material from another significantly produced waste in the country with only minimal utilization. In this study, geopolymer samples were formed from the mixture of coal ash, using both coal fly ash (CFA) and coal bottom ash (CBA), and rice hull ash (RHA). The raw materials used for the geopolymerization process were characterized using X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy (XRF) for elemental and X-ray diffraction (XRD) for mineralogical composition. The raw materials' thermal stability and loss on ignition (LOI) were determined using thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and reactivity via dissolution tests and inductively-coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP) analysis. The mechanical, thermal and microstructural properties of the geopolymers formed were analyzed using compression tests, Fourier transform infra-red spectroscopy (FTIR), scanning

  17. Effect of ash circulation in gasification melting system on concentration and leachability of lead in melting furnace fly ash.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, Takashi; Suzuki, Masaru

    2013-11-30

    In some gasification-melting plants, generated melting furnace fly ash is returned back to the melting furnace for converting the ash to slag. This study investigated the effect of such ash circulation in the gasification-melting system on the concentration and leachability of lead in the melting furnace fly ash. The ash circulation in the melting process was simulated by a thermodynamic calculation, and an elemental analysis and leaching tests were performed on a melting furnace fly ash sample collected from the gasification-melting plant with the ash circulation. It was found that by the ash circulation in the gasification-melting, lead was highly concentrated in the melting furnace fly ash to the level equal to the fly ash from the ash-melting process. The thermodynamic calculation predicted that the lead volatilization by the chlorination is promoted by the ash circulation resulting in the high lead concentration. In addition, the lead extraction from the melting furnace fly ash into a NaOH solution was also enhanced by the ash circulation, and over 90% of lead in the fly ash was extracted in 5 min when using 0.5 mol l(-1) NaOH solution with L/S ratio of 10 at 100 °C. Based on the results, a combination of the gasification-melting with the ash circulation and the NaOH leaching method is proposed for the high efficient lead recovery. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Nutritional and defensive chemistry of three North American ash species: possible roles in host performance and preference by emerald ash borer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yigen Chen; Therese M. Poland

    2010-01-01

    Black ash (Fraxinus nigra), green ash (F. pennsylvanica), and white ash (F. americana) are the three most abundant ash species in the northeastern USA. We compared emerald ash borer (EAB), Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae), adult performance and preference among seedlings...

  19. Slowing ash mortality: a potential strategy to slam emerald ash borer in outlier sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deborah G. McCullough; Nathan W. Siegert; John Bedford

    2009-01-01

    Several isolated outlier populations of emerald ash borer (Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire) were discovered in 2008 and additional outliers will likely be found as detection surveys and public outreach activities...

  20. Predicting the ability to produce emerald ash borer: a comparison of riparian and upland ash forests in southern lower Michigan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susan J. Crocker; Deborah G. McCullough; Nathan W. Siegert

    2009-01-01

    Concern for the future of ash trees in the United States has risen since the 2002 discovery of emerald ash borer (EAB) (Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire) in southeastern Michigan. The ability of ash forests in the Southern Lower Peninsula of Michigan to produce EAB was compared by physiographic class and stand size. Results showed that EAB production...

  1. Source water contributions and hydrologic responses to simulated emerald ash borer infestations in depressional black ash wetlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthew J. Van Grinsven; Joseph P. Shannon; Joshua C. Davis; Nicholas W. Bolton; Joseph W. Wagenbrenner; Randall K. Kolka; Thomas Grant Pypker

    2017-01-01

    Forested wetlands dominated by black ash (Fraxinus nigra) are currently threatened by the rapid expansion of the exotic emerald ash borer (EAB) (Agrilus planipennis, Coleoptera: Buprestidae) in North America, and very little is known about the hydrology and ecology of black ash wetlands. The ecohydrological response of...

  2. Arthur Ashe Jr. Sports Scholars Awards 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elfman, Lois; Walker, Marlon A.

    2011-01-01

    "Diverse: Issues In Higher Education" established the Sports Scholars Awards to honor undergraduate students of color who have made achieving both academically and athletically a winning combination. Inspired by tennis legend Arthur Ashe Jr.'s commitment to education as well as his love for the game of tennis, "Diverse" invites every college and…

  3. Arthur Ashe Jr. Sports Scholars Awards 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elfman, Lois; Ford, William J.

    2010-01-01

    "Diverse: Issues In Higher Education" established the Sports Scholars Awards to honor undergraduate students of color who have made achieving both academically and athletically a winning combination. Inspired by tennis legend Arthur Ashe Jr.'s commitment to education as well as his love for the game of tennis, they invite every college and…

  4. FLY ASH RECYCLE IN DRY SCRUBBING

    Science.gov (United States)

    The paper describes the effects of fly ash recycle in dry scrubbing. (Previous workers have shown that the recycle of product solids improves the utilization of slaked lime--Ca(OH)2--for sulfur dioxide (SO2) removal by spray dryers with bag filters.) In laboratory-scale experimen...

  5. Phosphorus recovery from sewage sludge char ash

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Atienza-Martinez, M.; Gea, G.; Arauzo, J.; Kersten, Sascha R.A.; Kootstra, A.M.J.

    2014-01-01

    Phosphorus was recovered from the ash obtained after combustion at different temperatures (600 °C, 750 °C and 900 °C) and after gasification (at 820 °C using a mixture of air and steam as fluidising agent) of char from sewage sludge fast pyrolysis carried out at 530 °C. Depending on the leaching

  6. Properties and application of zeolitized fly ash

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steenbruggen, G.

    1999-01-01

    The combustion of coal produces large quantities of fly ash. This waste product is at present used for the production of building materials. This use may be reduced for a number of reasons, such as: stricter environmental regulations, changes in combustion techniques and competition with other

  7. Host range of emerald ash borer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert A. Haack; Toby R. Petrice; Deborah L. Miller; Leah S. Bauer; Nathan M. Schiff

    2004-01-01

    The emerald ash borer (EAB), Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire, is native to China, Korea, Japan, Mongolia, Russia, and Taiwan (Haack et al. 2002). Established populations of EAB were first discovered in Michigan and Ontario in 2002. Smaller populations, which resulted from human assisted movement of infested host material, were found in Ohio, Maryland,...

  8. FLY ASH: AN ALTERNATIVE TO POWDERED ACTIVATED ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Preferred Customer

    This paper reports the use of powdered activated carbon (PAC) and raw coal fly ash (RFA) in the removal of eosin dye from aqueous ... calculation is hereby reported to know the amount of adsorbent required for efficient removal of eosin dye. EXPERIMENTAL. Dye properties and preparation. Analytical grade eosin dye ...

  9. Assessing quality in volcanic ash soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terry L. Craigg; Steven W. Howes

    2007-01-01

    Forest managers must understand how changes in soil quality resulting from project implementation affect long-term productivity and watershed health. Volcanic ash soils have unique properties that affect their quality and function; and which may warrant soil quality standards and assessment techniques that are different from other soils. We discuss the concept of soil...

  10. Procedure for ash-poor cokes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geissler

    1945-04-01

    This article was composed of four sections which dealt with de-ashing processes or uses of ash-poor coke. The general procedure for de-ashing started with 1 mm coal grains mixed with dilute HCl and then decanted from a concentrator. The thick paste was crushed finely and pasted with tar from the Low Temperature Carbonization (LTC). The paste was kneaded, washed, and then formed. The resulting briquettes were dried, crushed, and reformed. The LTC then took place at 550/sup 0/C followed by coking at 900/sup 0/C. The oven dimensions were given as 3.25 m tall, 0.65 wide, and 4 m deep for the LTC sections, and 3.25 m x 0.60 m x 4 m for the coking section. These dimensions were designed for 100 kg coke per hour. Methods were discussed for decreasing costs of coke production by substitution of a cheaper binding tar than that of the LTC recycle. CS/sub 2/ production was proposed using coke processed by the above de-ashing procedure. This process which substituted coke for the usual charcoal was shown to work, but was very sensitive to ash and solids content in the coke. Coke substitution for reducing charcoal in the production of light metals was tested. It was found that the iron content of the coke product has to be less than 0.05%, so that the coal used must have only slight traces of iron. Experiments were carried out to use de-ashed cokes as fuel to power automibiles, where a major difficulty was found in the tendency of the coke briquettes to flake and crumble. Different methods and binders were tried for briquetting, thus eliminating many difficulties. For the production of electrode cokes, flotation, separation, and lye treatment preceeded the de-ashing procedure outlined above. It was concluded that the properties of the cokes were greatly influenced by the quality of the briquette binder. It was intended to research and classify the types of binders.

  11. Glass-ceramic from mixtures of bottom ash and fly ash.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vu, Dinh Hieu; Wang, Kuen-Sheng; Chen, Jung-Hsing; Nam, Bui Xuan; Bac, Bui Hoang

    2012-12-01

    Along with the gradually increasing yield of the residues, appropriate management and treatment of the residues have become an urgent environmental protection problem. This work investigated the preparation of a glass-ceramic from a mixture of bottom ash and fly ash by petrurgic method. The nucleation and crystallization kinetics of the new glass-ceramic can be obtained by melting the mixture of 80% bottom ash and 20% fly ash at 950 °C, which was then cooled in the furnace for 1h. Major minerals forming in the glass-ceramics mainly are gehlenite (Ca(2)Al(2)SiO(7)) & akermanite (Ca(2)MgSiO(7)) and wollastonite (CaSiO(3)). In addition, regarding chemical/mechanical properties, the chemical resistance showing durability, and the leaching concentration of heavy metals confirmed the possibility of engineering and construction applications of the most superior glass-ceramic product. Finally, petrurgic method of a mixture of bottom ash and fly ash at 950 °C represents a simple, inexpensive, and energy saving method compared with the conventional heat treatment. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Analysis list: Ash2l [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Ash2l Blood + mm9 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/target/Ash2l.1.tsv... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/target/Ash2l.5.tsv http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/target/Ash2...l.10.tsv http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/colo/Ash2l.Blood.tsv http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/colo/Blood.gml ...

  13. Analysis list: ash2 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ash2 Larvae + dm3 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/target/ash2.1.tsv ...http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/target/ash2.5.tsv http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/target/ash2....10.tsv http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/colo/ash2.Larvae.tsv http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/colo/Larvae.gml ...

  14. Ash contents of Costa Rican peat deposits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raymond, R. Jr.; Cohen, A.D.; Bish, D.L.

    1985-01-01

    Fourteen sites within 6 Costa Rican peat localities were sampled using MacCaulay samplers and soil augers. Sample localities included high mountain (>2500 meters), river floodplain, and Gulf coastal plain. Peat deposits ranged from as thin as 20 cm to greater than 460 cm. Within the peat deposits, ash (that material which will remain following combustion) occurs both dispersed within the peat layers and as layers containing nearly 100% inorganic material interstratified with the peat layers. Ash in Costa Rican peats includes material derived from both organic and inorganic origins. The predominant inorganically derived material is volcanic and may result from direct volcanic ashfall into the peat environment or as detritus transported into the peat areas. Volcanic ash is rapidly altered within the peats, leaving little if any relict structures. Alteration products are pedominantly kaolin and smectite clays and gibbsite. Unaltered minerals identified by x-ray diffraction include quartz, cristobalite, plagiolase feldspar, and anatase. Hematite and bassanite (identified by x-ray diffraction) are present but result from the alteration of iron-bearing minerals and organic sulfur or gypsum during sample preparation. Pyrite is present as a very minor component of some Costa Rican peats. Organically-derived ash constituents in Costa Rican peats include siliceous diatoms, siliceous sponge spicules, and silica phytoliths. The type and abundance of ash constituents within Costa Rican peats can be evaluated based on geographic location of the peat deposits, the geologic conditions affecting their deposition, and the plant communities existing during deposition. 6 refs., 11 figs., 3 tabs.

  15. Vegetal fibers in polymeric composites: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Henrique Fernandes Pereira

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The need to develop and commercialize materials containing vegetal fibers has grown in order to reduce environmental impact and reach sustainability. Large amounts of lignocellulosic materials are generated around the world from several human activities. The lignocellulosic materials are composed of cellulose, hemicellulose, lignin, extractives and ashes. Recently these constituents have been used in different applications; in particular, cellulose has been the subject of numerous works on the development of composite materials reinforced with natural fibers. Many studies have led to composite materials reinforced with fibers to improve the mechanical, physical, and thermal properties. Furthermore, lignocellulosic materials have been treated to apply in innovative solutions for efficient and sustainable systems. This paper aims to review the lignocellulosic fibers characteristics, as well as to present their applications as reinforcement in composites of different polymeric matrices.

  16. Possibilities of municipal solid waste incinerator fly ash utilisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, Silvie; Koval, Lukáš; Škrobánková, Hana; Matýsek, Dalibor; Winter, Franz; Purgar, Amon

    2015-08-01

    Properties of the waste treatment residual fly ash generated from municipal solid waste incinerator fly ash were investigated in this study. Six different mortar blends with the addition of the municipal solid waste incinerator fly ash were evaluated. The Portland cement replacement levels of the municipal solid waste incinerator fly ash used were 25%, 30% and 50%. Both, raw and washed municipal solid waste incinerator fly ash samples were examined. According to the mineralogical composition measurements, a 22.6% increase in the pozzolanic/hydraulic properties was observed for the washed municipal solid waste incinerator fly ash sample. The maximum replacement level of 25% for the washed municipal solid waste incinerator fly ash in mortar blends was established in order to preserve the compressive strength properties. Moreover, the leaching characteristics of the crushed mortar blend was analysed in order to examine the immobilisation of its hazardous contents. © The Author(s) 2015.

  17. The use of shale ash in dry mix construction materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulbe, L.; Setina, J.; Juhnevica, I.

    2017-10-01

    The research was made to determine the use of shale ash usage in dry mix construction materials by replacing part of cement amount. Cement mortar ZM produced by SIA Sakret and two types of shale ashes from Narva Power plant (cyclone ash and electrostatic precipitator ash) were used. Fresh mortar properties, hardened mortar bulk density, thermal conductivity (λ10, dry) (table value) were tested in mortar ZM samples and mortar samples in which 20% of the amount of cement was replaced by ash. Compressive strenght, frost resistance and resistance to sulphate salt solutions were checked. It was stated that the use of electrostatic precipitator ash had a little change of the material properties, but the cyclone ash significantly reduced the mechanical strength of the material.

  18. Synthetic aggregates from combustion ashes using an innovative rotary kiln.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wainwright, P J; Cresswell, D J

    2001-01-01

    This paper describes the use of a number of different combustion ashes to manufacture synthetic aggregates using an innovative rotary 'Trefoil' kiln. Three types of combustion ash were used, namely: incinerated sewage sludge ash (ISSA); municipal solid waste incinerator bottom ash (MSWIBA-- referred to here as BA); and pulverised fuel ash (Pfa). The fine waste ash fractions listed above were combined with a binder to create a plastic mix that was capable of being formed into 'green pellets'. These pellets were then fired in a Trefoil kiln to sinter the ashes into hard fused aggregates that were then tested for use as a replacement for the natural coarse aggregate in concrete. Results up to 28 days showed that these synthetic aggregates were capable of producing concretes with compressive strengths ranging from 33 to 51 MPa, equivalent to between 73 and 112% of that of the control concrete made with natural aggregates.

  19. Determination of baghouse performance from coal and ash properties: part

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bush, P.V.; Snyder, T.R.; Chang, R.L.

    1989-02-01

    Baghouse performance at utility coal-fired power plants is determined by baghouse design, operating procedures, and the characteristics of the ash that is collected as a dustcake on the fabric filter. The Electric Power Research Institute has conducted laboratory research to identify the fundamental properties of dustcake ash that influence baghouse performance. A database was assembled including measured characteristics of dustcake ash and data describing operating parameters and performance of full-scale and pilot-scale baghouses. Semi-empirical models were developed that describe the effects of particle morphology, particle size, ash cohesivity and ash chemistry on filtering pressure drop and particulate emissions. Cohesivity was identified as the primary ash characteristic affecting baghouse performance. Predictions of performance can be based on physical or chemical characterizations of the ash to be filtered.

  20. Quantification of fusion in ashes from solid fuel combustion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Lone Aslaug; Frandsen, Flemming; Dam-Johansen, Kim

    1999-01-01

    , for which the agreement with fusion as determined by phase diagrams is very good, and for straw (salt-rich) and coal (silicate-rich) ashes. Comparing ash fusion curves to index points of current standard ash fusion tests showed initial melting at temperatures typically between 50 degrees and 100 degrees C......The fusion of ashes produced during solid fuel combustion greatly affects the tendency of these ashes to cause operational problems in utility boilers. In this paper, a new and quantitative laboratory method for assessing the fusion of ashes based on simultaneous thermal analysis, STA, is described....... Using STA, melting is detected as an endothermic reaction involving no change in mass. The measurement signals are transferred into a fusion curve showing the melt fraction in the ash as a function of temperature. This is done either by a simple comparison of the energies used for melting in different...

  1. Comparison of emerald ash borer preference for ash of different species, sun exposure, age, and stress treatments in relation to foliar volatiles and nutrition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Therese M. Poland; Deepa S. Pureswaran; Yigen Chen

    2009-01-01

    We investigated the host selection behavior and feeding preference of the emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) on six different species of ash including Manchurian ash (F...

  2. Effects of nano-SiO(2) and different ash particle sizes on sludge ash-cement mortar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, K L; Chang, W C; Lin, D F; Luo, H L; Tsai, M C

    2008-09-01

    The effects of nano-SiO(2) on three ash particle sizes in mortar were studied by replacing a portion of the cement with incinerated sewage sludge ash. Results indicate that the amount of water needed at standard consistency increased as more nano-SiO(2) was added. Moreover, a reduction in setting time became noticeable for smaller ash particle sizes. The compressive strength of the ash-cement mortar increased as more nano-SiO(2) was added. Additionally, with 2% nano-SiO(2) added and a cure length of 7 days, the compressive strength of the ash-cement mortar with 1 microm ash particle size was about 1.5 times better that of 75microm particle size. Further, nano-SiO(2) functioned to fill pores for ash-cement mortar with different ash particle sizes. However, the effects of this pore-filling varied with ash particle size. Higher amounts of nano-SiO(2) better influenced the ash-cement mortar with larger ash particle sizes.

  3. Electrodialytic removal of heavy metals from different fly ashes. Influence of heavy metal speciation in the ashes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Anne Juul; Ottosen, Lisbeth M.; Villumsen, Arne

    2003-01-01

    in lab scale, and the results were discussed in relation to the expected heavy metal speciation in the ashes. In initial leaching experiments the pH-dependent desorption characteristics of the heavy metals Cd, Pb, Zn and Cu were analogous in the two MSWI ashes, and thus it was expected...... that the speciation of these metals was similar in the two ashes. On the other hand, the leaching behaviour (and concentration) of Cr was diverse. The apparent similar speciation of Cd, Pb, Zn and Cu was only partly confirmed in the following electrodialytic remediation experiments. Significant differences in re......Electrodialytic Remediation has recently been suggested as a potential method for removal of heavy metals from fly ashes. In this work electrodialytic remediation of three different fly ashes, i.e. two municipal solid waste incinerator (MSWI) fly ashes and one wood combustion fly ash was studied...

  4. How to deal with radiologically contaminated vegetation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilde, E.W.; Murphy, C.E.; Lamar, R.T.; Larson, M.J.

    1996-12-31

    This report describes the findings from a literature review conducted as part of a Department of Energy, Office of Technology Development Biomass Remediation Task. The principal objective of this project is to develop a process or group of processes to treat radiologically contaminated vegetation in a manner that minimizes handling, processing, and treatment costs. Contaminated, woody vegetation growing on waste sites at SRS poses a problem to waste site closure technologies that are being considered for these sites. It is feared that large sections of woody vegetation (logs) can not be buried in waste sites where isolation of waste is accomplished by capping the site. Logs or large piles of woody debris have the potential of decaying and leaving voids under the cap. This could lead to cap failure and entrance of water into the waste. Large solid objects could also interfere with treatments like in situ mixing of soil with grout or other materials to encapsulate the contaminated sediments and soils in the waste sites. Optimal disposal of the wood includes considerations of volume reduction, treatment of the radioactive residue resulting from volume reduction, or confinement without volume reduction. Volume reduction consists primarily of removing the carbon, oxygen, and hydrogen in the wood, leaving an ash that would contain most of the contamination. The only contaminant that would be released by volume reduction would by small amounts of the radioactive isotope of hydrogen, tritium. The following sections will describe the waste sites at SRS which contain contaminated vegetation and are potential candidates for the technology developed under this proposal. The description will provide a context for the magnitude of the problem and the logistics of the alternative solutions that are evaluated later in the review. 76 refs.

  5. Fundamental Study of Low NOx Combustion Fly Ash Utilization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    E. M. Suubert; I. Kuloats; K. Smith; N. Sabanegh; R.H. Hurt; W. D. Lilly; Y. M. Gao

    1997-05-01

    This study is principally concerned with characterizing the organic part of coal combustion fly ashes. High carbon fly ashes are becoming more common as by-products of low-NOx combustion technology, and there is need to learn more about this fraction of the fly ash. The project team consists of two universities, Brown and Princeton, and an electrical utility, New England Power. A sample suite of over forty fly ashes has been gathered from utilities across the United States, and includes ashes from a coals ranging in rank from bituminous to lignite. The characterizations of these ashes include standard tests (LOI, Foam Index), as well as more detailed characterizations of their surface areas, porosity, extractability and adsorption behavior. The ultimate goal is, by better characterizing the material, to enable broadening the range of applications for coal fly ash re-use beyond the current main market as a pozzolanic agent for concretes. The potential for high carbon-content fly ashes to substitute for activated carbons is receiving particular attention. The work performed to date has already revealed how very different the surfaces of different ashes produced by the same utility can be, with respect to polarity of the residual carbon. This can help explain the large variations in acceptability of these ashes as concrete additives.

  6. Fundamental Study of Low-Nox Combustion Fly Ash Utilization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    E. M. Suuberg; I. Kuloats; K. Smith; N. Sabanegh; R. H. Hurt; W. D. Lilly; Y. M. Gao

    1997-11-01

    This study is principally concerned with characterizing the organic part of coal combustion fly ashes. High carbon fly ashes are becoming more common as by-products of low-NOx combustion technology, and there is need to learn more about this fraction of the fly ash. The project team consists of two universities, Brown and Princeton, and an electrical utility, New England Power. A sample suite of over forty fly ashes has been gathered from utilities across the United States, and includes ashes from a coals ranging in rank from bituminous to lignite. The characterizations of these ashes include standard tests (LOI, Foam Index), as well as more detailed characterizations of their surface areas, porosity, extractability and adsorption behavior. The ultimate goal is, by better characterizing the material, to enable broadening the range of applications for coal fly ash re-use beyond the current main market as a pozzolanic agent for concretes. The potential for high carbon-content fly ashes to substitute for activated carbons is receiving particular attention. The work performed to date has already revealed how very different the surfaces of different ashes produced by the same utility can be, with respect to polarity of the residual carbon. This can help explain the large variations in acceptability of these ashes as concrete additives.

  7. Optical properties of volcanic ash: improving remote sensing observations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whelley, Patrick; Colarco, Peter; Aquila, Valentina; Krotkov, Nickolay; Bleacher, Jake; Garry, Brent; Young, Kelsey; Rocha Lima, Adriana; Martins, Vanderlei; Carn, Simon

    2016-04-01

    Many times each year explosive volcanic eruptions loft ash into the atmosphere. Global travel and trade rely on aircraft vulnerable to encounters with airborne ash. Volcanic ash advisory centers (VAACs) rely on dispersion forecasts and satellite data to issue timely warnings. To improve ash forecasts model developers and satellite data providers need realistic information about volcanic ash microphysical and optical properties. In anticipation of future large eruptions we can study smaller events to improve our remote sensing and modeling skills so when the next Pinatubo 1991 or larger eruption occurs, ash can confidently be tracked in a quantitative way. At distances >100km from their sources, drifting ash plumes, often above meteorological clouds, are not easily detected from conventional remote sensing platforms, save deriving their quantitative characteristics, such as mass density. Quantitative interpretation of these observations depends on a priori knowledge of the spectral optical properties of the ash in UV (>0.3μm) and TIR wavelengths (>10μm). Incorrect assumptions about the optical properties result in large errors in inferred column mass loading and size distribution, which misguide operational ash forecasts. Similarly, simulating ash properties in global climate models also requires some knowledge of optical properties to improve aerosol speciation.

  8. Environmentally friendly use of non-coal ashes in Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribbing, C

    2007-01-01

    The Swedish Thermal Engineering Research Institute (Värmeforsk) initiated an applied research program "Environmentally friendly use of non-coal ashes", in 2002. The program aims at increasing knowledge on the by-products of energy production and their application. The goal of formulating technical and environmental guidelines and assessments is a major point of the program, which is supported by about forty authorities and private organisations. The programme has been divided into four areas: recycling of ashes to forests, geotechnical applications, use in landfilling, and environmental aspects and chemistry. Among all results obtained, the following progress is shown: *Evidence for the positive effects of spreading ashes on forest growth. *A proposal for environmental guidelines on the utilisation of ashes in construction. *A handbook for using non-coal fly ashes in unpaved roads. *Technical and environmental assessments of MSWI bottom ashes in road construction. *Development of the use of ashes with municipal wastewater sludge as a cover for landfills and mine tailings. *Use of ashes from bio-fuels in concrete and replacement of cement in stoop mining. *A method to classify those by-products from combustion that have mirror entries in the EWC as a hazardous or non-hazardous compound. The Ash Programme has also made it possible to increase knowledge on ashes as valuable materials, on quality assurance and on markets for recovered materials.

  9. Treatment of fly ash from power plants using thermal plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sulaiman Al-Mayman

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Fly ash from power plants is very toxic because it contains heavy metals. In this study fly ash was treated with a thermal plasma. Before their treatment, the fly ash was analyzed by many technics such as X-ray fluorescence, CHN elemental analysis, inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy. With these technics, the composition, the chemical and physical proprieties of fly ash are determined. The results obtained by these analysis show that fly ash is mainly composed of carbon, and it contains also sulfur and metals such as V, Ca, Mg, Na, Fe, Ni, and Rh. The scanning electron microscopy analysis shows that fly ash particles are porous and have very irregular shapes with particle sizes of 20–50 μm. The treatment of fly ash was carried out in a plasma reactor and in two steps. In the first step, fly ash was treated in a pyrolysis/combustion plasma system to reduce the fraction of carbon. In the second step, the product obtained by the combustion of fly ash was vitrified in a plasma furnace. The leaching results show that the fly ash was detoxified by plasma vitrification and the produced slag is amorphous and glassy.

  10. Production of ceramics from coal fly ash

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angjusheva Biljana

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Dense ceramics are produced from fly ash from REK Bitola, Republic of Macedonia. Four types of fly ash from electro filters and one from the collected zone with particles < 0.063 mm were the subject of this research. Consolidation was achieved by pressing (P= 133 MPa and sintering (950, 1000, 1050 and 11000C and heating rates of 3 and 100/min. Densification was realized by liquid phase sintering and solid state reaction where diopside [Ca(Mg,Al(Si,Al2O6] was formed. Ceramics with optimal properties (porosity 2.96±0.5%, bending strength - 47.01±2 MPa, compressive strength - 170 ±5 MPa was produced at 1100ºC using the heating rate of 10ºC/min.

  11. Fly ash as a liming material for cotton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Gene; Dunn, David

    2004-01-01

    A field experiment was conducted to determine the effect of fly ash from a coal combustion electric power facility on soil acidity in a cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) field. Fresh fly ash was applied to a Bosket fine sandy loam (fine-loamy, mixed, thermic Mollic Hapludalf) soil with an initial soil pH(salt) of 4.8. The fly ash was equivalent to 42 g kg(-1) calcium carbonate with 97% passing through a 60 mesh (U.S. standard) sieve. Fly ash was applied one day before cotton planting in 1999 at 0, 3.4, 6.7, and 10.1 Mg ha(-1). No fly ash was applied in 2000. Within 60 d of fly ash application in 1999, all rates of fly ash significantly increased soil pH above 6.0. Manganese levels in cotton petioles were reduced significantly by 6.7 and 10.1 Mg ha(-1) of fly ash. Soil boron (B) and sodium (Na) concentrations were significantly increased with fly ash. In 1999, B in cotton leaves ranged from 72 to 84 mg kg(-1) in plots with fly ash applications. However, no visual symptoms of B toxicity in plants were observed. In 1999, cotton lint yield decreased on average 12 kg ha(-1) for each Mg of fly ash applied. In 2000, cotton yields were significantly greater for the residual 3.4 and 6.7 Mg fly ash ha(-1) plots than the untreated check. Due to the adverse yield effects measured in the first year following application, fly ash would not be a suitable soil amendment for cotton on this soil at this time.

  12. The ash in forest fire affected soils control the soil losses. Part 2. Current and future research challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Paulo; Cerdà, Artemi

    2013-04-01

    have implications on ash spatial distribution and if soil micro topography changes with time? What the factors that controls it? What it is the impact of ash in vegetation recuperation and the implications of this recover in ash spatial distribution? We need studies with better spatial and temporal resolution, especially in the immediate period after the fire, when the major spatial and temporal changes on ash distribution and impacts occur. Based on high level research conducted by Artemi Cerdà and others, our future research will be focused in these and other aspects in order to have a better knowledge about the impacts of ash on post-fire spatio-temporal erosion. Acknowledgements, Lithuanian Research Council. Project LITFIRE, Fire effects on Lithuanian soils and ecosystems (MIP-48/2011) and the research projects GL2008-02879/BTE and LEDDRA 243857. References Bodí, M., Mataix-Solera, J., Doerr, S., and Cerdà, A. 2011b. The wettability of ash from burned vegetation and its relationship to Mediterranean plant species type, burn severity and total organic carbon content. Geoderma, 160, 599-607. Cerdà, A. 1998a. Postfire dynamics of erosional processes under mediterranean climatic conditions. Z. Geomorphol., 42 (3) 373-398. Cerdà, A. 1998b. Changes in overland flow and infiltration after a rangeland fire in a Mediterranean scrubland.Hydrological Processes, 12, 1031-1042. Cerdà, A., and Doerr, S.H. 2008. The effect of ash and needle cover on surface runoff and erosion in the immediate post-fire period. Catena, 74, 256-263. Onda, Y., Dietrich W. E., and Booker, F. 2008. Evolution of overland flow after severe forest fire, Point Reyes, California, Catena, 72, 13-20. Pereira, P. Cerdà, A., Úbeda, X., Mataix-Solera, J. Arcenegui, V., Zavala, L. 2013. Modelling the impacts of wildfire on ash thickness in a short-term period, Land Degradation and Development, (In press) Pereira, P., Bodi. M., Úbeda, X., Cerdà, A., Mataix-Solera, J., Balfour, V, Woods, S. 2010. Las

  13. Manufacture of ceramic tiles from fly ash

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hnat, James G. (Collegeville, PA); Mathur, Akshay (Tampa, FL); Simpson, James C. (Perkiomenville, PA)

    1999-01-01

    The present invention relates to a process for forming glass-ceramic tiles. Fly ash containing organic material, metal contaminants, and glass forming materials is oxidized under conditions effective to combust the organic material and partially oxidize the metallic contaminants and the glass forming materials. The oxidized glass forming materials are vitrified to form a glass melt. This glass melt is then formed into tiles containing metallic contaminants.

  14. Manufacture of ceramic tiles from fly ash

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hnat, J.G.; Mathur, A.; Simpson, J.C.

    1999-08-10

    The present invention relates to a process for forming glass-ceramic tiles. Fly ash containing organic material, metal contaminants, and glass forming materials is oxidized under conditions effective to combust the organic material and partially oxidize the metallic contaminants and the glass forming materials. The oxidized glass forming materials are vitrified to form a glass melt. This glass melt is then formed into tiles containing metallic contaminants. 6 figs.

  15. FTIR analysis of ash in wine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jug Tjaša

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In a modern oenological laboratory determination of ash is a limiting factor regarding the speed of analysis, since functional FTIR analysis of ash are not common yet. Therefore 324 samples were analysed by FTIR spectroscopy on TDI Bacchus 3 as well as ISO 17025 accredited reference method (OIV–MA–AS2–04: R2009 in two duplicates. FTIR spectra and reference data were uploaded into software for the calibration development and validation performed. Already the original TDI calibration was ready to use, showing satisfying results. However, we tried to improve it. On 324 spectra, we have looked for optimal wavelengths and mathematical models, which gave the best results. The developed calibration was then confirmed by method validation: repeatability, reproducibility and accuracy. The expanded measurement uncertainty calculated was 0.3 g/L, which I slightly higher than of the reference method used. We have found another advantage over classical method: there is no influence of the air pressure or moisture. Nevertheless, we were able to confirm that our reference method was free of systematic error induced by the influence of the weather. Anyway, we can conclude that analysis of ash in wine by FTIR spectroscopy is a promising, fast and reliable new method.

  16. Ash plume top height estimation using AATSR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. H. Virtanen

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available An algorithm is presented for the estimation of volcanic ash plume top height using the stereo view of the Advanced Along Track Scanning Radiometer (AATSR aboard Envisat. The algorithm is based on matching top of the atmosphere (TOA reflectances and brightness temperatures of the nadir and 55° forward views, and using the resulting parallax to obtain the height estimate. Various retrieval parameters are discussed in detail, several quality parameters are introduced, and post-processing methods for screening out unreliable data have been developed. The method is compared to other satellite observations and in situ data. The proposed algorithm is designed to be fully automatic and can be implemented in operational retrieval algorithms. Combined with automated ash detection using the brightness temperature difference between the 11 and 12 μm channels, the algorithm allows efficient simultaneous retrieval of the horizontal and vertical dispersion of volcanic ash. A case study on the eruption of the Icelandic volcano Eyjafjallajökull in 2010 is presented.

  17. Soil and vegetation surveillance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antonio, E.J.

    1995-06-01

    Soil sampling and analysis evaluates long-term contamination trends and monitors environmental radionuclide inventories. This section of the 1994 Hanford Site Environmental Report summarizes the soil and vegetation surveillance programs which were conducted during 1994. Vegetation surveillance is conducted offsite to monitor atmospheric deposition of radioactive materials in areas not under cultivation and onsite at locations adjacent to potential sources of radioactivity.

  18. Interspecific comparison of constitutive ash phloem phenolic chemistry reveals compounds unique to Manchurian ash, a species resistant to emerald ash borer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Justin G.A. Whitehill; Stephen O. Opiyo; Jennifer L. Koch; Daniel A. Herms; Donald F. Cipollini; Pierluigi. Bonello

    2012-01-01

    The emerald ash borer (Agrilus planipennis, EAB) is an invasive wood-borer indigenous to Asia and is responsible for widespread ash (Fraxinus spp.) mortality in the U.S. and Canada. Resistance and susceptibility to EAB varies among Fraxinus spp., which is a result of their co-evolutionary history with the pest....

  19. Sistema de análisis de información de encuestas en línea para evaluaciones en clase

    OpenAIRE

    Insuasti Insuasti, David Armando

    2012-01-01

    En este documento se describe un sistema de análisis de información de encuestas en línea que puede ser aplicado para realizar evaluaciones en clase a un estudiantes y generar reportes con los resultados obtenidos, además se describen los procesos de carga de información al sistema, el modelo de jerarquía de objetos dentro de la aplicación y los diferentes tipos de visualización que se derivan de los resultados obtenidos de la prueba aplicada.

  20. A method for determination of {sup 90}Sr in vegetation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nygren, U

    1998-12-01

    This report describes a method for determination of {sup 90}Sr in vegetation. The method consists of wet-ashing the samples and separating Sr from the sample matrix by oxalate precipitation and extraction chromatography. {sup 90}Y ingrowth is awaited after which Y is separated from Sr and {sup 90}Y measured in a proportional counter. The method has been applied on two reference materials and the {sup 90}Sr results agree well with the recommended values. The method has also been used on 20 samples of blueberry twigs and the mean recovery of Sr was 74%

  1. Influence of antioxidant rich fresh vegetable juices on starch induced postprandial hyperglycemia in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, Ashok K; Reddy, K Srikanth; Radhakrishnan, Janani; Kumar, D Anand; Zehra, Amtul; Agawane, Sachin B; Madhusudana, K

    2011-09-01

    This research analyzed the major chemical components and multiple antioxidant activities present in the fresh juice of eight vegetables, and studied their influence on starch induced postprandial glycemia in rats. A SDS-PAGE based protein fingerprint of each vegetable juice was also prepared. The yields of juice, chemical components like total proteins, total polyphenols, total flavonoids, total anthocyanins and free radicals like the ABTS˙(+) cation, DPPH, H(2)O(2), scavenging activities and reducing properties for NBT and FeCl(3) showed wide variations. Vegetable juice from brinjal ranked first in displaying total antioxidant capacity. Pretreatment of rats with vegetable juices moderated starch induced postprandial glycemia. The fresh juice from the vegetables ridge gourd, bottle gourd, ash gourd and chayote significantly mitigated postprandial hyperglycemic excursion. Total polyphenol concentrations present in vegetable juices positively influenced ABTS˙(+) scavenging activity and total antioxidant capacity. However, NBT reducing activity of juices was positively affected by total protein concentration. Contrarily, however, high polyphenol content in vegetable juice was observed to adversely affect the postprandial antihyperglycemic activity of vegetable juices. This is the first report exploring antihyperglycemic activity in these vegetable juices and highlights the possible adverse influence of high polyphenol content on the antihyperglycemic activity of the vegetable juices. This journal is © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2011

  2. Three-year progression of emerald ash borer-induced decline and mortality in southeastern Michigan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamal J.K. Gandhi; Annemarie Smith; Robert P. Long; Robin A.J. Taylor; Daniel A. Herms

    2008-01-01

    We monitored the progression of ash (Fraxinus spp.) decline and mortality due to emerald ash borer (EAB), Agrilus planipennis, in 38 forest stands in the upper Huron River watershed region of southeastern Michigan from 2004-2007. Black ash (F. nigra), green ash (F. pennsylvanica), and white ash...

  3. Long-term leaching of nutrients and contaminants from wood combustion ashes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maresca, Alberto; Hyks, J.; Astrup, Thomas Fruergaard

    2017-01-01

    -term leaching from these residues are needed in order to assess potential environmental impacts associated with their utilisation. Two Danish wood ash samples, one fly ash and one mixed ash (a combination of fly ash and bottom ash), were evaluated in long-term percolation column tests (up to L/S ∼2000 L...

  4. Ecological and Topographic Features of Volcanic Ash-Influenced Forest Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mark Kimsey; Brian Gardner; Alan Busacca

    2007-01-01

    Volcanic ash distribution and thickness were determined for a forested region of north-central Idaho. Mean ash thickness and multiple linear regression analyses were used to model the effect of environmental variables on ash thickness. Slope and slope curvature relationships with volcanic ash thickness varied on a local spatial scale across the study area. Ash...

  5. Crowdsourcing genomic analyses of ash and ash dieback – power to the people

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MacLean Dan

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Ash dieback is a devastating fungal disease of ash trees that has swept across Europe and recently reached the UK. This emergent pathogen has received little study in the past and its effect threatens to overwhelm the ash population. In response to this we have produced some initial genomics datasets and taken the unusual step of releasing them to the scientific community for analysis without first performing our own. In this manner we hope to ‘crowdsource’ analyses and bring the expertise of the community to bear on this problem as quickly as possible. Our data has been released through our website at oadb.tsl.ac.uk and a public GitHub repository.

  6. AVAL - The ASTER Volcanic Ash Library

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, D.; Ramsey, M. S.

    2016-12-01

    Volcanic ash is a rich data source for understanding the causal mechanisms behind volcanic eruptions. Petrologic and morphometric information can provide direct information on the characteristics of the parent magma. Understanding how erupted ash interacts with the atmosphere can help quantify the effect that explosive volcanism has on the local to regional climate, whereas a measure of the particle size distribution enables more accurate modeling of plume propagation. Remote sensing is regularly employed to monitor volcanic plumes using a suite of high temporal/low spatial resolution sensors. These methods employ radiative transfer modeling with assumptions of the transmissive properties of infrared energy through the plume to determine ash density, particle size and sulfur dioxide content. However, such approaches are limited to the optically-transparent regions, and the low spatial resolution data are only useful for large-scale trends. In a new approach, we are treating the infrared-opaque regions of the plume in a similar way to a solid emitting surface. This allows high spatial resolution orbital thermal infrared data from the dense proximal plume to be modeled using a linear deconvolution approach coupled with a spectral library to extract the particle size and petrology. The newly created ASTER Volcanic Ash Library (AVAL) provides the end member spectral suite, and is comprised of laboratory emission measurements of volcanic ash taken from a variety of different volcanic settings, to obtain a wide range of petrologies. These samples have been further subdivided into particle size fractions to account for spectral changes due to diffraction effects. Once mapped to the ASTER sensor's spectral resolution, this library is applied to image data and the plume deconvolved to estimate composition and particle size. We have analyzed eruptions at the Soufrière Hills Volcano, Montserrat, Chaitén and Puyehue-Cordón Caulle, both Chile, and Eyjafjallajökull, Iceland

  7. Biofuel Combustion Fly Ash Influence on the Properties of Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aurelijus Daugėla

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Cement as the binding agent in the production of concrete can be replaced with active mineral admixtures. Biofuel combustion fly ash is one of such admixtures. Materials used for the study: Portland cement CEM I 42.5 R, sand of 0/4 fraction, gravel of 4/16 fraction, biofuel fly ash, superplasticizer, water. Six compositions of concrete were designed by replacing 0%, 5%, 10%, 15% 20%, and 25% of cement with biofuel fly ash. The article analyses the effect of biofuel fly ash content on the properties of concrete. The tests revealed that the increase of biofuel fly ash content up to 20% increases concrete density and compressive strength after 7 and 28 days of curing and decreases water absorption, with corrected water content by using plasticizing admixture. It was found that concrete where 20% of cement is replaced by biofuel ash has higher frost resistance.

  8. Residual Ash Formation during Suspension-Firing of Biomass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damø, Anne Juul; Jappe Frandsen, Flemming; Jensen, Peter Arendt

    2014-01-01

    Through 50+ years, high quality research has been conducted in order to characterize ash and deposit formation in utility boilers fired with coal, biomass and waste fractions. The basic mechanism of fly ash formation in suspension fired coal boilers is well described, documented and may even...... distribution. Thus, there is a good flair of the chemistry of fly ash formed in plants fired with biomass or waste fractions, either alone, or in conjunction with coal. But data on dedicated studies of the physical size development of fly ash, are almost non-existing for biomasses and waste fractions...... with increasing time, due to char oxidation/pyrolysis, fragmentation, and ash formation. For straw, an increase in the concentration of large particles at 1.0 – 2.0 s, indicated melting and agglomeration of ash particles. The transient release of K was massive (> 60 wt. %) for all fuels and throughout...

  9. Chemical and Physical Characterization of Fly Ash as Geopolymer Material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Risdanareni Puput

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Research on finding suitable cement substitute material becomes massive due to environmental effect. Geopolymer as inorganic material is potential to be the smart solution to overcome global warming issue. Fly ash is a waste material rich in silica and alumina becomes popular raw material to produce geopolymer. The best properties ofgeopolymer paste come from the high quality of fly ash. Therefore, it is important to investigate various types of fly ash and geopolymer properties. Their chemical and physical properties characterized by XRF, pH value, XRD and SEM. The results showed that type of fly ash depended on amount of Si-based of Ca-based compound which consisted of spherical morphology. Geopolymer paste produced from the ash with different compound has bulky and irregular shape morphology. The pH value of each ash has also a correlation with the setting time of fresh paste.

  10. Organic pollutants profiling of wood ashes from biomass power plants linked to the ash characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rey-Salgueiro, Ledicia; Omil, Beatriz; Merino, Agustín; Martínez-Carballo, Elena; Simal-Gándara, Jesús

    2016-02-15

    Wood ash, characterized by high content of certain nutrients and charcoal, can be applied to soils as a means of managing this waste product improving the soil quality. The associated environmental risk must be assessed. The objective of this study was to characterize the bottom and fly ash collected from 15 biomass power plants in Spain by determining the benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, xylene and styrene (BTEX+S), PAHs and aliphatic hydrocarbon contents of both types of ash. Biochar was also used for comparison purposes. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometric methods were used for the identification and determination of both BTEX+S and aliphatic hydrocarbon contents in bottom and fly ashes, as well as biochar. High performance liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection was used for PAHs measurements. Multivariate correlation analysis was used to determine the relationship between sample characteristics and pollutants identified by partial least squares regression analysis. In general, the degree to which organic matter in the sample is burned increases with T50 or the "50% burn off" temperature (possibly due to the addition of fuel), and the BTEX+S also tended to increase. However, as the Q/MO (the heat of combustion divided by organic matter mass) increased, the combustion decreased or proceeded with less oxygen, which appears to be related to an increased presence of PAHs. The results confirm that the amounts of organic pollutants (PAHs and BTEX+S, together with total aliphatic hydrocarbons) in the wood ash do not exceed limits established for different soil or industrial uses. Both types of ash, together with biochar, may therefore be suitable for application to soil as a fertilizer and an organic amendment, taking into account the target organic pollutants. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Vegetation survey: a new focus for Applied Vegetation Science

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chytry, M.; Schaminee, J.H.J.; Schwabe, A.

    2011-01-01

    Vegetation survey is an important research agenda in vegetation science. It defines vegetation types and helps understand differences among them, which is essential for both basic ecological research and applications in biodiversity conservation and environmental monitoring. In this editorial, we

  12. Recirculation of biomass ashes onto forest soils: ash composition, mineralogy and leaching properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maresca, A; Hyks, J; Astrup, T F

    2017-12-01

    In Denmark, increasing amounts of wood ashes are generated from biomass combustion for energy production. The utilisation of ashes on top of forest soil for liming purposes has been proposed asan alternative to landfilling. Danish wood ash samples were collected and characterised with respect to chemical composition, mineralogy and leaching properties (batch leaching at L/S 2 and 10L/kg, and pH-dependent leaching at 10L/kg). Large variations in the ash liming properties were observed (ANC7.5: 1.8-6.4meqH+/g), indicating that similar soil application dosages may result in different liming effects. High contents of Ca, Si, P, K and Mg were observed in all samples, while the highest contents of S and N were found in fly ashes and mixed ashes (combination of fly and bottom ashes). Similarly, the highest contents of some trace metals, e.g. Cd, Mo and Se, were observed for fly ash. Releases of major, minor and trace elements were affected significantly by pH: high releases of PO43-, Mg, Zn, Cu and Cd were found for acidic conditions relevant to forest soils, while the highest releases of Mo and Cr were observed in alkaline conditions. Mineral phases were selected based on XRD analyses and the existing literature, and they were applied as inputs for the geochemical modelling of pH-dependent leaching. Mineral dissolution was found adequate for a wide range of major elements and nutrients, while the description of trace elements could be done only for parts of the pH-range. Content and leaching of PAHs were observed below detection limits. The source-term release of Ca, K, Mg, Mn, and P in acidic conditions relevant to forest soils was higher than ten years of atmospheric deposition, in contrast to the relatively low release of Al, Fe and Na. The potential release of Cd was found to be the most critical element compared with soil quality criteria, whereas the maximum theoretical loads of Ba, Cd, Cr, Sr, Mo, Ni, Pb, Sb, Se, Sn and V were relatively low. Copyright © 2017

  13. Optical characterization of volcanic ash using diffuse reflection spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bravo, D. Kelly; Falcón, Nelsón; Narea, Freddy J.; Muñoz, Rafael A.; Muñoz, Aaron A.

    2013-11-01

    The determination of the optical parameters are important for remote sensing and aircraft, in this case allow the difference between a cloud composed solely of water and water plus ash. Therefore, this research is intended to determine the optical properties of the ash four active volcanoes, by studying the spectral resolution reflectance interpreting the results in the approximation of Kubelka - Munk equation through the transfer equation radiative. The results allow classifying these ashes depending on their place of origin.

  14. Utilization of ash from municipal solid waste combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, C.; Hahn, J.; Magee, B.; Yuen, N.; Sandefur, K.; Tom, J.; Yap, C.

    1999-09-01

    This ash study investigated the beneficial use of municipal waste combustion combined ash from the H-POWER facility in Oahu. These uses were grouped into intermediate cover for final closure of the Waipahu landfill, daily cover at the Waimanalo Gulch Landfill, and partial replacement for aggregate in asphalt for road paving. All proposed uses examine combined fly and bottom ash from a modern waste-to-energy facility that meets requirements of the Clean Air Act Amendments for Maximum Achievable Control Technology.

  15. Improved prediction and tracking of volcanic ash clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mastin, Larry G.; Webley, Peter

    2009-01-01

    During the past 30??years, more than 100 airplanes have inadvertently flown through clouds of volcanic ash from erupting volcanoes. Such encounters have caused millions of dollars in damage to the aircraft and have endangered the lives of tens of thousands of passengers. In a few severe cases, total engine failure resulted when ash was ingested into turbines and coating turbine blades. These incidents have prompted the establishment of cooperative efforts by the International Civil Aviation Organization and the volcanological community to provide rapid notification of eruptive activity, and to monitor and forecast the trajectories of ash clouds so that they can be avoided by air traffic. Ash-cloud properties such as plume height, ash concentration, and three-dimensional ash distribution have been monitored through non-conventional remote sensing techniques that are under active development. Forecasting the trajectories of ash clouds has required the development of volcanic ash transport and dispersion models that can calculate the path of an ash cloud over the scale of a continent or a hemisphere. Volcanological inputs to these models, such as plume height, mass eruption rate, eruption duration, ash distribution with altitude, and grain-size distribution, must be assigned in real time during an event, often with limited observations. Databases and protocols are currently being developed that allow for rapid assignment of such source parameters. In this paper, we summarize how an interdisciplinary working group on eruption source parameters has been instigating research to improve upon the current understanding of volcanic ash cloud characterization and predictions. Improved predictions of ash cloud movement and air fall will aid in making better hazard assessments for aviation and for public health and air quality. ?? 2008 Elsevier B.V.

  16. Ash chemistry and sintering, verification of the mechanisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hupa, M.; Skrifvars, B.J. [Aabo Akademi, Turku (Finland)

    1996-12-01

    In this project four sintering mechanisms have been studied, i.e., partial melting with a viscous liquid, partial melting with a non-viscous liquid, chemical reaction sintering and solid state sintering. The work has aimed at improving the understanding of ash sintering mechanisms and quantifying their role in combustion and gasification. The work has been oriented in particular on the understanding of biomass ash behavior. The work has not directly focused on any specific technical application. However, results can also be applied on other fuels such as brown coal, petroleum coke, black liquor and different types of wastes (PDF, RDF, MSW). In one part of study the melting behavior was calculated for ten biomass ashes and compared with lab measurements of sintering tendencies. The comparison showed that the T{sub 15} temperatures, i.e. those temperatures at which the ashes contained 15 % molten phase, correlated fairly well with the temperature at which the sintering measurements detected sintering. This suggests that partial melting can be predicted fairly accurate for some ashes already with the today existing thermodynamic calculation routines. In some cases, however the melting calculations did not correlate with the detected sintering temperatures. In a second part detailed measurements on ash behavior was conducted both in a semi full scale CFB and a lab scale FBC. Ashes and deposits were collected and analyzed in several different ways. These analyses show that the ash chemistry shifts radically when the fuel is shifted. Fuels with silicate based ashes behaved totally different than those with an oxide or salt based ash. The chemistry was also affected by fuel blending. The ultimate goal has been to be able to predict the ash thermal behavior during biomass thermal conversion, using the fuel and ash elemental analyses and a few operational key parameters as the only input data. This goal has not yet today been achieved. (author)

  17. ASSESSMENT OF VEGETATION COVER ON SODA WASTE DISPOSAL SITE AT JANIKOWO, FOLLOWING 13-YEAR-LONG RECLAMATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazimierz Henryk Dyguś

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The results are presented of vegetation survey on the alkaline and saline soda waste disposal site at Janikowo Soda Plant near Toruń (central Poland. The site was subject to reclamation using diverse techniques including sewage sludge and ash, starting from the year 2000 onwards. The survey was made to evaluate the status of plant succession as well as stability and diversity of vegetation cover. The vegetation was inventoried using the cover-frequency method, on a 10 x 10 m quadrat samples randomly distributed over the reclaimed area. Communities were classified using the Central-European approach by Braun-Blanquet (1964. In 2013, the vegetation was well established and provided a dense cover of the substrate. 108 plant species were found compared to some 5–8 plants which arrived spontaneously until the year 2000. Species richness increased 15 fold since the year when reclamation started. Species of graminoid and Asteraceae families prevailed in most patches of local vegetation. The vegetation cover on sites treated with a mixt of power plant ash and sewage sludge was less stable and less diverse than that on sites where sewage sludge only was applied. Annuals and biennials dominated in the vegetation on ash grounds while more competitive perennials prevailed on sewage sludge substrates. On the latter substrates there develop plant communities classified as an association of smooth meadow grass and common yarrow Poa pratensis-Achillea millefolium, whose species combination closely resembles that of seminatural fresh meadows. On the ash grounds, a variety of associations of ruderal plants were found with dominating Loesel mustard and common mugwort Sisymbrium loeselii-Artemisia vulgaris. Phytoindicatory methods using Ellenberg values have shown that waste substrates contained increased salt concentrations, however, there was no indication of increased heavy metal contents, as no plants tolerating excessive amounts of heavy metals were

  18. Geotechnical properties of ash deposits near Hilo, Hawaii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieczorek, G.F.; Jibson, R.W.; Wilson, R.C.; Buchanan-Banks, J. M.

    1982-01-01

    Two holes were hand augered and sampled in ash deposits near Hilo, Hawaii. Color, water content and sensitivity of the ash were measured in the field. The ash alternated between reddish brown and dark reddish brown in color and had water contents as high as 392%. A downhole vane shear device measured sensitivities as high as 6.9. A series of laboratory tests including grain size distribution, Atterberg limits, X-ray diffraction analysis, total carbon determination, vane shear, direct shear and triaxial tests were performed to determine the composition and geotechnical properties of the ash. The ash is very fine grained, highly plastic and composed mostly of gibbsite and amorphous material presumably allophane. The ash has a high angle of internal friction ranging from 40-43? and is classified as medium to very sensitive. A series of different ash layers was distinguished on the basis of plasticity and other geotechnical properties. Sensitivity may be due to a metastable fabric, cementation, leaching, high organic content, and thixotropy. The sensitivity of the volcanic ash deposits near Hilo is consistent with documented slope instability during earthquakes in Hawaii. The high angles of internal friction and cementation permit very steep slopes under static conditions. However, because of high sensitivity of the ash, these slopes are particularly susceptible to seismically-induced landsliding.

  19. Assessing fly ash treatment: Remediation and stabilization of heavy metals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lima, A.T.; Ottosen, Lisbeth M.; Ribeiro, Alexandra B.

    2012-01-01

    Fly ashes from Municipal Solid Waste (MSW), straw (ST) and co-combustion of wood (CW) are here analyzed with the intent of reusing them. Two techniques are assessed, a remediation technique and a solidification/stabilization one. The removal of heavy metals from fly ashes through...... the electrodialytic process (EDR) has been tried out before. The goal of removing heavy metals has always been the reuse of fly ash, for instance in agricultural fields (BEK). The best removal rates are here summarized and some new results have been added. MSW fly ashes are still too hazardous after treatment to even...

  20. Assessing fly ash treatment: Remediation and stabilization of heavy metals

    KAUST Repository

    Lima, A.T.

    2010-12-17

    Fly ashes from Municipal Solid Waste (MSW), straw (ST) and co-combustion of wood (CW) are here analyzed with the intent of reusing them. Two techniques are assessed, a remediation technique and a solidification/stabilization one. The removal of heavy metals from fly ashes through the electrodialytic process (EDR) has been tried out before. The goal of removing heavy metals has always been the reuse of fly ash, for instance in agricultural fields (BEK). The best removal rates are here summarized and some new results have been added. MSW fly ashes are still too hazardous after treatment to even consider application to the soil. ST ash is the only residue that gets concentrations low enough to be reused, but its fertilizing value might be questioned. An alternative reuse for the three ashes is here preliminary tested, the combination of fly ash with mortar. Fly ashes have been substituted by cement fraction or aggregate fraction. Surprisingly, better compressive strengths were obtained by replacing the aggregate fraction. CW ashes presented promising results for the substitution of aggregate in mortar and possibly in concrete. © 2010 Elsevier Ltd.

  1. Ash transformation during co-firing coal and straw

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zheng, Yuanjing; Jensen, Peter Arendt; Jensen, Anker Degn

    2007-01-01

    Co-firing straw with coal in pulverized fuel boilers can cause problems related to fly ash utilization, deposit formation, corrosion and SCR catalyst deactivation due to the high contents of Cl and K in the ash. To investigate the interaction between coal and straw ash and the effect of coal qual...... and magnesium in lignite reacts with silica so it is not available for reaction with potassium chloride. Reduction of Cl and increase of S in the deposits compared to the fly ashes could be attributed to sulphation of the deposits....

  2. Application of Fly Ash from Solid Fuel Combustion in Concrete

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Kim Hougaard

    2008-01-01

    Application of Fly Ash from Solid Fuel Combustion in Concrete Kim H. Pedersen Abstract Industrial utilization of fly ash from pulverized coal combustion plays an important role in environmentally clean and cost effective power generation. Today, the primary market for fly ash utilization is as po......Application of Fly Ash from Solid Fuel Combustion in Concrete Kim H. Pedersen Abstract Industrial utilization of fly ash from pulverized coal combustion plays an important role in environmentally clean and cost effective power generation. Today, the primary market for fly ash utilization...... is as pozzolanic additive in the production of concrete. However, the residual carbon in fly ash can adsorb the air entraining admixtures (AEAs) added to enhance air entrainment in concrete in order to increase its workability and resistance toward freezing and thawing conditions. The problem has increased...... Nordjyllandsværket, unit 3; 3) post treatment of fly ash to lower its AEA adsorptivity. The foam index test is the method usually employed to determine the degree of fly ash interference with AEAs in concrete. The test involves the use of commercial AEAs and visual observation of foam stability. These facts reduce...

  3. Levels of lead, cadmium and zinc in vegetables

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuchs, G.; Haegglund, J.; Jorhem, L.

    1976-01-01

    The concentrations of lead, cadmium and zinc have been determined in 455 samples of fresh fruit, vegetables and mushrooms by dry ashing and atomic absorption spectrophotometry. The lead content in all samples was in the range < 0.001-0.288 mg/kg, the mean being 0.02 mg/kg. Leaf vegetables (lettuce and spinach) showed higher values, mean 0.04 mg/kg. The mean values of the cadmium content in fruit, green vegetables, potatoes and root vegetables were 0.003, 0.013, 0.016 and 0.038 mg/kg respectively. The zinc contents were in the ppm range. The ratio Zn/Cd was also determined in some samples. All values concern edible parts and are calculated on wet weight basis. The fruit and vegetables were estimated to constitute about 2 percent and 8 percent respectively of the provisional tolerable weekly intake of these metals recommended by an FAO/WHO Expert Committee.

  4. Vegetable Production System (Veggie)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Howard G.; Smith, Trent M.

    2016-01-01

    The Vegetable Production System (Veggie) was developed by Orbital Technologies Corp. to be a simple, easily stowed, and high growth volume yet low resource facility capable of producing fresh vegetables on the International Space Station (ISS). In addition to growing vegetables in space, Veggie can support a variety of experiments designed to determine how plants respond to microgravity, provide real-time psychological benefits for the crew, and conduct outreach activities. Currently, Veggie provides the largest volume available for plant growth on the ISS.

  5. The relationship between the emerald ash borer (Agrilus planipennis) and ash (Fraxinus spp.) tree decline: Using visual canopy condition assessments and leaf isotope measurements to assess pest damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles E. Flower; Kathleen S. Knight; Joanne Rebbeck; Miquel A. Gonzalez-Meler

    2013-01-01

    Ash trees (Fraxinus spp.) in North America are being severely impacted by the invasive emerald ash borer (Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire) which was inadvertently introduced to the US in the 1990s from Asia. The emerald ash borer (EAB) is a phloem boring beetle which relies exclusively on ash trees to complete its life cycle. Larvae...

  6. Gas generation in incinerator ash; Gasbildning i aska

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arm, Maria; Lindeberg, Johanna; Rodin, Aasa; Oehrstroem, Anna; Backman, Rainer; Oehman, Marcus; Bostroem, Dan

    2006-02-15

    In recent years, explosions have occurred in certain phases of ash handling in Sweden. Investigations have revealed that hydrogen may have been present in all cases. The hydrogen is believed to be generated by chemical reactions of aluminium and other metals within the ash in the presence of water. The purpose with this study is to increase the knowledge of gas generation of incinerator ash. Thereby, guides for appropriate ash management can be introduced and the risk for further explosions prevented. The study has comprised analyses of the ash properties, such as chemical and physical composition and the pH, of ash from 14 incineration plants (mostly waste incineration plants). Different fractions of ash materials representing different parts of the process in each plant have been analysed. Furthermore, the fuel and the technical differences between the plants have been analysed. A tool for measuring the gas generation in the laboratory has been developed and the gas generation of the different ash materials at natural and increased pH was measured. Gas analyses and thermodynamic calculations have also been performed. The results showed that: bottom ash from fluidised bed boilers generated small amounts of gas at increased pH, much smaller amounts than the idle pass, cyclone and filter ash did, bottom ash from grate fired boilers generated more gas at increased pH than their cyclone ash and filter ash, with exception of the Linkoeping plant, all bio waste incineration plants generated ash with low gas generation potential, all fly ash materials with a gas generation potential of more than 10 l/kg originated from municipal waste incineration plants, filter ash that had been stored in oxygen rich environment generated significant less gas than fresh filter ash of the same origin, hardly any other gases were generated apart from hydrogen (very small amounts of acetone, furane, benzene and most likely methane were detected in some of the ash materials), there were no

  7. Effect of fire residues (ash and char) on microbial activity, respiration and methanogenesis in three subtropical wetland soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medvedeff, C.; Hogue, B.; Inglett, P.

    2011-12-01

    Prescribed fire is a common restoration and maintenance technique in the southern United States. Prescribed burns coupled with frequent natural fires in South Florida can have devastating effects on ecosystem function. To determine the effect fire residues have on carbon biogeochemical cycling litter material was obtained from two restored and one native marl wetland in Everglades National Park and manipulated in a laboratory setting to produce ash and vegetation derived char. Based on vegetation biomass removal pre and post fire (insitu) appropriate aliquots of each fire residue was added to experimental microcosms as a soil amendment. Soil enzymes (β-glucosidase, cellobiohydrolase, phosphatase, bis-phosphate and leucine amino peptidase), aerobic and anaerobic respiration (CO2) potentials, extractable C and methanogenesis were measured over a 25 day period. Regardless of site C enzymes responded to both amendments within 5 days of addition. Similarly amended soil contained more extractable carbon in the reference and one of the restored sites. In the restored sites ash and char inhibited methanogenesis, had no effect on anaerobic CO2 potentials, but stimulated aerobic respiration after ten days. In contrast, within the first ten days phosphatase enzyme activity was lower in the ash treatment when compared to the control treatment and stimulation of aerobic respiration was observed in both treatment soils. After ten days ash stimulated methanogenic processing while suppressing anaerobic CO2 production suggesting methanogens in this ecosystem may be dependant on usable carbon substrates derived from aerobic microbial processing. This study illustrates the variable response of C parameters to complete and incomplete combusted materials produced from both prescribed and natural fires with particular importance to fire adapted ecosystems.

  8. The Effect of Different Ratio Bottom Ash and Fly Ash Geopolymer Brick on Mechanical Properties for Non-loading Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mardiah Deraman Laila

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper studies the finding of strength and water absorption of geopolymer bricks using bottom ash and fly ash as a geopolymer raw material for non-loading application with minimum strength. The study has been conducted to produce bottom ash and fly ash geopolymer bricks by varying the ratio of fly ash-to-bottom ash, solid-to-liquid and sodium silicate (Na2SiO3-to-sodium hydroxide (NaOH in the mixing process. The compressive strength range between 3.8-4.5 MPa was obtained due to the minimum strength of non-loading application with 70°C curing temperature within 24 hours at 7 days of ageing. The optimum ratio selected of bottom ash-to-fly ash, solid-to-liquid and Na2SiO3-to-NaOH are 1:2, 2.0 and 4.0 respectively. The water absorption result is closely related to the amount of bottom ash used in the mix design.

  9. A review on the effect of fly ash characteristics and their variations on the synthesis of fly ash based geopolymer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wattimena, Oswyn K.; Antoni, Hardjito, Djwantoro

    2017-09-01

    There are more than four decades since the last 1970s where geopolymers concrete was first introduced and developed to use as a replacement to conventional concrete material which uses cement as a binder. And since the last two decades, geopolymers which utilized fly ash as aluminosilicate source material, i.e. fly ash based geopolymers, have been investigated. Many researchers present how to produce the best fly ash based geopolymer with a various source of constituent material as well as mixing formula to achieve exceptional concrete performance. Although there is a similar trend towards factors affecting the result of fly ash based geopolymer synthesis, there is still remain a wide range in mixture proportion. The considerable variation in fly ash characteristics as source material in the synthesis can very likely be one of the causes of this problem. This paper attempts to identify the effect of source material variation of geopolymer concrete, particularly which use fly ash as source material and focuses on the variation of its characteristics and the effects to properties of concrete. From the reviews it concluded that different sources (and even the same source, but different batch) of fly ash materials will give some different characteristics of the fly ash, where it would affect the synthesis process of the fly ash based geopolymer concretes.

  10. High temperature co-treatment of bottom ash and stabilized fly ashes from waste incineration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Mette Abildgaard; Mogensen, E.P.B.; Lundtorp, Kasper

    2001-01-01

    Bottom ashes from two Danish municipal solid waste incineration plants were heated at 900 degreesC with iron oxide stabilized air pollution control residues at actual mass flow ratios (9:1), simulating a treating method for the residues. The two residues were cotreated, producing one combined...

  11. Illinois basin coal fly ashes. 2. Equilibria relationships and qualitative modeling of ash-water reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, W.R.; Griffin, R.A.

    1984-01-01

    Alkaline and acidic Illinois Basin coal fly ash samples were each mixed with deionized water and equilibrated for about 140 days to simulate ash ponding environments. Common to both equilibrated solutions, anhydrite solubility dominated Ca2+ activities, and Al3+ activities were in equilibrium with both matrix mullite and insoluble aluminum hydroxide phases. Aqueous silica activities were controlled by both mullite and matrix silicates. The pH of the extract of the acidic fly ash was 4.1 after 24 h but increased to a pH value of 6.4 as the H2SO4, assumed to be adsorbed to the particle surfaces, was exhausted by the dissolution of matrix iron oxides and aluminosilicates. The activities of aqueous Al3+ and iron, initially at high levels during the early stages of equilibration, decreased to below analytical detection limits as the result of the formation of insoluble Fe and Al hydroxide phases. The pH of the extract of the alkaline fly ash remained above a pH value of 10 during the entire equilibration interval as a result of the hydrolysis of matrix oxides. As with the acidic system, Al3+ activities were controlled by amorphous aluminum hydroxide phases that began to form after about 7 days of equilibration. The proposed mechanisms and their interrelations are discussed in addition to the solubility diagrams used to deduce these relationships. ?? 1984 American Chemical Society.

  12. Detecting Volcanic Ash Plumes with GNSS Signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rainville, N.; Larson, K. M.; Palo, S. E.; Mattia, M.; Rossi, M.; Coltelli, M.; Roesler, C.; Fee, D.

    2016-12-01

    Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) receivers are commonly placed near volcanic sites to measure ground deformation. In addition to the carrier phase data used to measure ground position, these receivers also record Signal to Noise ratio (SNR) data. Larson (2013) showed that attenuations in SNR data strongly correlate with ash emissions at a series of eruptions of Redoubt Volcano. This finding has been confirmed at eruptions for Tongariro, Mt Etna, Mt Shindake, and Sakurajima. In each of these detections, very expensive geodetic quality GNSS receivers were used. If low-cost GNSS instruments could be used instead, a networked array could be deployed and optimized for plume detection and tomography. The outputs of this sensor array could then be used by both local volcanic observatories and Volcano Ash Advisory Centers. Here we will describe progress in developing such an array. The sensors we are working with are intended for navigation use, and thus lack the supporting power and communications equipment necessary for a networked system. Reliably providing those features is major challenge for the overall sensor design. We have built prototypes of our Volcano Ash Plume Receiver (VAPR), with solar panels, lithium-ion batteries and onboard data storage for preliminary testing. We will present results of our field tests of both receivers and antennas. A second critical need for our array is a reliable detection algorithm. We have tested our algorithm on data from recent eruptions and have incorporated the noise characteristics of the low-cost GNSS receiver. We have also developed a simulation capability so that the receivers can be deployed to optimize vent crossing GNSS signals.

  13. Modulus for the coal ash. Summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rank, V.

    1944-06-30

    This summary outlined the procedure for obtaining a modulus to determine the effects of varying ash content. This modulus was to indicate the relative amounts of aluminum oxide and silicon dioxide after addition of alkalais or alkaline-earth constituents found in catalysts. The calculation of the modulus was based upon stoichiometric ratios of these oxides to other major components of ash as represented in the major minerals in the ash. The assumptions about the conditions in low- to intermediate-temperature coking included the following: (1) magnesium oxide was found only in biotite, which contained potassium oxide, magnesium oxide, aluminum oxide, silicon dioxide, and water in the respective mole ratios 1:4:2:6:1. (2) Potassium oxide outside of biotite was found only in muscovite, which contained potassium oxide, aluminum oxide, silicon dioxide, and water in the respective mole ratios 1:1:6:2. (3) Sodium oxide was combined only with aluminum oxide and silicon dioxide in the mole ratios 1:1:6. (4) Phosphoric acid was found as aluminum phosphate. (5) Lime was found in anortite, which contained calcium sulfate, calcium carbonate, or calcium oxide combined with aluminum oxide and silicon dioxide in the mole ratios 1:1:2. (6) Aluminum oxide and silicon dioxide existed mainly in the hydrated state with the two of them combined with water in the mole ratios 1:2:2. The completed formula for the modulus was given as M = (aluminum oxide) + (silicon dioxide) - 0.65(magnesium oxide) - 4.90(potassium oxide + sodium oxide) - 3.96(calcium oxide) - 0.72(phosphorous pentoxide), where the parentheses should be filled by numbers in weight units for the respective compounds.

  14. A robust method to forecast volcanic ash clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denlinger, Roger P.; Pavolonis, Mike; Sieglaff, Justin

    2012-01-01

    Ash clouds emanating from volcanic eruption columns often form trails of ash extending thousands of kilometers through the Earth's atmosphere, disrupting air traffic and posing a significant hazard to air travel. To mitigate such hazards, the community charged with reducing flight risk must accurately assess risk of ash ingestion for any flight path and provide robust forecasts of volcanic ash dispersal. In response to this need, a number of different transport models have been developed for this purpose and applied to recent eruptions, providing a means to assess uncertainty in forecasts. Here we provide a framework for optimal forecasts and their uncertainties given any model and any observational data. This involves random sampling of the probability distributions of input (source) parameters to a transport model and iteratively running the model with different inputs, each time assessing the predictions that the model makes about ash dispersal by direct comparison with satellite data. The results of these comparisons are embodied in a likelihood function whose maximum corresponds to the minimum misfit between model output and observations. Bayes theorem is then used to determine a normalized posterior probability distribution and from that a forecast of future uncertainty in ash dispersal. The nature of ash clouds in heterogeneous wind fields creates a strong maximum likelihood estimate in which most of the probability is localized to narrow ranges of model source parameters. This property is used here to accelerate probability assessment, producing a method to rapidly generate a prediction of future ash concentrations and their distribution based upon assimilation of satellite data as well as model and data uncertainties. Applying this method to the recent eruption of Eyjafjallajökull in Iceland, we show that the 3 and 6 h forecasts of ash cloud location probability encompassed the location of observed satellite-determined ash cloud loads, providing an

  15. Experimental aggregation of volcanic ash: the role of liquid bonding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, S.; Kueppers, U.; Jacob, M.; Ayris, P. M.; Dingwell, D. B.

    2015-12-01

    Explosive volcanic eruptions may release vast quantities of ash. Because of its size, it has the greatest dispersal potential and can be distributed globally. Ash may pose severe risks for 1) air traffic, 2) human and animal health, 3) agriculture and 4) infrastructure. Such ash particles can however cluster and form ash aggregates that range in size from millimeters to centimeters. During their growth, weight and aerodynamic properties change. This leads to significantly changed transport and settling behavior. The physico-chemical processes involved in aggregation are quantitatively poorly constrained. We have performed laboratory ash aggregation experiments using the ProCell Lab System® of Glatt Ingenieurtechnik GmbH. Solid particles are set into motion in a fluidized bed over a range of well-controlled boundary conditions (e.g., air flow rate, gas temperature, humidity, liquid composition). In this manner we simulate the variable gas-particle flow conditions expected in eruption plumes and pyroclastic density currents. We have used 1) soda-lime glass beads as an analogue material and 2) natural volcanic ash from Laacher See Volcano (Germany). In order to influence form, size, stability and the production rate of aggregates, a range of experimental conditions (e.g., particle concentration, degree of turbulence, temperature and moisture in the process chamber and the composition of the liquid phase) have been employed. We have successfully reproduced several features of natural ash aggregates, including round, internally structured ash pellets up to 3 mm in diameter. These experimental results help to constrain the boundary conditions required for the generation of spherical, internally-structured ash aggregates that survive deposition and are preserved in the volcanological record. These results should also serve as input parameters for models of ash transport and ash mass distribution.

  16. Synthesis of geopolymer from biomass-coal ash blends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samadhi, Tjokorde Walmiki; Wulandari, Winny; Prasetyo, Muhammad Iqbal; Fernando, Muhammad Rizki; Purbasari, Aprilina

    2017-09-01

    Geopolymer is an environmentally attractive Portland cement substitute, owing to its lower carbon footprint and its ability to consume various aluminosilicate waste materials as its precursors. This work describes the development of geopolymer formulation based on biomass-coal ash blends, which is predicted to be the prevalent type of waste when biomass-based thermal energy production becomes mainstream in Indonesia. The ash blends contain an ASTM Class F coal fly ash (FA), rice husk ash (RHA), and coconut shell ash (CSA). A mixture of Na2SiO3 and concentrated KOH is used as the activator solution. A preliminary experiment identified the appropriate activator/ash mass ratio to be 2.0, while the activator Na2SiO3/KOH ratio varies from 0.8 to 2.0 with increasing ash blend Si/Al ratio. Both non-blended FA and CSA are able to produce geopolymer mortars with 7-day compressive strength exceeding the Indonesian national SNI 15-2049-2004 standard minimum value of 2.0 MPa stipulated for Portland cement mortars. Ash blends have to be formulated with a maximum RHA content of approximately 50 %-mass to yield satisfactory 7-day strength. No optimum ash blend composition is identified within the simplex ternary ash blend compositional region. The strength decreases with Si/Al ratio of the ash blends due to increasing amount of unreacted silicate raw materials at the end of the geopolymer hardening period. Overall, it is confirmed that CSA and blended RHA are feasible raw materials for geopolymer production..

  17. Vegetation survey of Sengwa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. C. Craig

    1983-12-01

    Full Text Available The approach and initial results of a vegetation survey of the Sengwa Wildlife Area are outlined. The objectives were to produce a vegetation classification and map sufficiently detailed to serve as a base for the management of the natural vegetation. The methods adopted consist of (a stratification of the area into homogeneous units using 1:10 000 colour aerial photographs; (b plotless random sampling of each stratum by recording cover abundance on the Braun-Blaunquet scale for all woody species; and (c analysis of the data by indicator species analysis using the computer programme 'Twinspan’. The classification produced is successful in achieving recognizable vegetation types which tie in well with known environmental features.

  18. Total Vegetation 1992

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The coverage contains 1992 vegetation polygons representing GCES monitoring sites. These data were developed by Dr. G. Waring Northern AZ. University for use in the...

  19. Total Vegetation 1984

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The coverage contains 1984 vegetation polygons representing GCES monitoring sites. These data were developed as study by Dr. G. Waring Northern AZ. University of...

  20. Total Vegetation 1965

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The coverage contains 1965 vegetation polygons representing GCES monitoring sites. These data were developed as study by Dr. G. Waring Northern AZ. University of...

  1. Total Vegetation 1973

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The coverage contains 1973 vegetation polygons representing GCES monitoring sites. These data were developed as study by Dr. G. Waring Northern AZ. University of...

  2. Description of vegetation types

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This document provides descriptions of five vegetation types found in Iowa- oak savannah, mature hardwoods, floodplain woods, scrub woods, and riparian woods. Oak...

  3. Vegetable Oil-Biorefinery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pudel, Frank; Wiesen, Sebastian

    2017-03-07

    Conventional vegetable oil mills are complex plants, processing oil, fruits, or seeds to vegetable fats and oils of high quality and predefined properties. Nearly all by-products are used. However, most of the high valuable plant substances occurring in oil fruits or seeds besides the oil are used only in low price applications (proteins as animal feeding material) or not at all (e.g., phenolics). This chapter describes the state-of-the-art of extraction and use of oilseed/oil fruit proteins and phyto-nutrients in order to move from a conventional vegetable oil processing plant to a proper vegetable oil-biorefinery producing a wide range of different high value bio-based products.

  4. Wood ash. A potential forest fertilizer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuokkanen, M.; Kuokkanen, T. (Univ. of Oulu, Dept. of Chemistry (Finland)). email: toivo,kuokkanen@oulu.fi; Poeykioe, R. (City of Kemi (Finland)); Nurmesniemi, H. (Stora Enso Oyj, Veitsiluoto Mill, Kemi (Finland))

    2009-07-01

    The enhancement of wood-derived energy plays an important role in the Finnish energy and climate strategies. The use of new and upgraded biomass fuels, e.g. pellets and briquettes, has become more common in recent years, especially fuel pellets which are well suited for home heating applications. Although electrical and district heating are still the most popular heating systems in news detached and row houses in Finland, stoves and fireplaces which burn biomass fuels, e.g. logs, pellets and briquettes, are commonly used as a secondary heating system. It has been estimated that about 100 000 wood fired heating systems are currently in operation in Finland. Thousands of small-scale boilers are sold annually, and about 30% of the wood heating systems are fuelled by wood chips or pellets. Compared to traditional firewood, pellets provide possibilities for automation and optimization in the same way as for oil, with high combustion efficiency and small combustion residues. In addition, wood pellets can be stored and traded at the regional, national and international level. These features, combined with the other advantages such as environmental benefits (i.e. CO{sub 2} neutral fuel), low moisture content and bulk density (i.e. 0.28 bulk-m3 of wood pellets is equivalent to 1 bulk-m3 of wood chips), as well as a relatively high heating (i.e. calorific) value (about 17 MJ/kg), which allows long-distance transport without affecting the energy balance make wood pellets attractive in many countries from both the demand and the supply side of the market. Wood ash usually contains mineral plant nutrients, especially base cations (e.g. Ca, Mg, K), and has a strongly alkaline pH. For this reason, it would be ecologically beneficial if the ash that contains plant nutrients could be returned back to the forest ecosystem. This would save primary resources and can be seen as an example of the sustainable use of biomass. The purpose of this study was to determine the physical and

  5. Land Cover Vegetation Changes and Hydrology in Central Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banta, J. R.; Slattery, R.

    2013-12-01

    Encroachment of woody vegetation into traditional savanna grassland ecosystems in central Texas has largely been attributed to land use practices of settlers, most notably overgrazing and fire suppression. Implementing changes in land cover vegetation (removing the woody vegetation and allowing native grasses to reestablish in the area, commonly referred to as brush management), could potentially change the hydrology in a watershed. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with several local, State, and Federal agencies, studied the hydrologic effects of ashe juniper (Juniperus ashei) removal as a brush management conservation practice in the Honey Creek State Natural Area in Comal County, Tex. Two adjacent watersheds of 104 and 159 hectares were used in a paired study. Rainfall, streamflow, evapotranspiration (Bowen ratio method), and water quality data were collected in both watersheds. Using a hydrologic mass balance approach, rainfall was allocated to surface-water runoff, evapotranspiration, and potential groundwater recharge. Groundwater recharge was not directly measured, but estimated as the residual of the hydrologic mass balance. After hydrologic data were collected in both watersheds for 3 years, approximately 80 percent of the woody vegetation (ashe juniper) was selectively removed from the 159 hectare watershed (treatment watershed). Brush management was not implemented in the other (reference) watershed. Hydrologic data were collected in both watersheds for six years after brush management implementation. The resulting data were examined for differences in the hydrologic budget between the reference and treatment watersheds as well as between pre- and post-brush management periods to assess effects of the treatment. Results indicate there are differences in the hydrologic budget and water quality between the reference and treatment watersheds, as well as between pre- and post-brush management periods.

  6. Effects of cooking additives on the content of vitamin C in some vegetables in southern Malawi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chirambo, George; Senga, Edward

    2004-03-01

    We report a study aimed to determine the effects of using soda sodium bicarbonate), chidulo (ashes obtained from certain plant materials), groundnut flour and cooking oil on the content of Vitamin C (ascorbic acid) in some common vegetables found in the south of Malawi. Soda and chidulo reduced significantly the content of ascorbic acid while groundnut flour and cooking oil increased the availability of ascorbic acid.

  7. Effects of cooking additives on the content of vitamin C in some vegetables in southern Malawi

    OpenAIRE

    Chirambo, George; Senga, Edward

    2004-01-01

    We report a study aimed to determine the effects of using soda sodium bicarbonate), chidulo (ashes obtained from certain plant materials), groundnut flour and cooking oil on the content of Vitamin C (ascorbic acid) in some common vegetables found in the south of Malawi. Soda and chidulo reduced significantly the content of ascorbic acid while groundnut flour and cooking oil increased the availability of ascorbic acid.

  8. Optimizing Use of Girdled Ash Trees for Management of Low-Density Emerald Ash Borer (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) Populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegert, Nathan W; McCullough, Deborah G; Poland, Therese M; Heyd, Robert L

    2017-06-01

    Effective survey methods to detect and monitor recently established, low-density infestations of emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae), remain a high priority because they provide land managers and property owners with time to implement tactics to slow emerald ash borer population growth and the progression of ash mortality. We evaluated options for using girdled ash (Fraxinus spp.) trees for emerald ash borer detection and management in a low-density infestation in a forested area with abundant green ash (F. pennsylvanica). Across replicated 4-ha plots, we compared detection efficiency of 4 versus 16 evenly distributed girdled ash trees and between clusters of 3 versus 12 girdled trees. We also examined within-tree larval distribution in 208 girdled and nongirdled trees and assessed adult emerald ash borer emergence from detection trees felled 11 mo after girdling and left on site. Overall, current-year larvae were present in 85-97% of girdled trees and 57-72% of nongirdled trees, and larval density was 2-5 times greater on girdled than nongirdled trees. Low-density emerald ash borer infestations were readily detected with four girdled trees per 4-ha, and 3-tree clusters were as effective as 12-tree clusters. Larval densities were greatest 0.5 ± 0.4 m below the base of the canopy in girdled trees and 1.3 ± 0.7 m above the canopy base in nongirdled trees. Relatively few adult emerald ash borer emerged from trees felled 11 mo after girdling and left on site through the following summer, suggesting removal or destruction of girdled ash trees may be unnecessary. This could potentially reduce survey costs, particularly in forested areas with poor accessibility. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America 2017. This work is written by US Government employees and is in the public domain in the US.

  9. Thermal stability of nano structured fly ash synthesized by high ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The size, shape and texture of the fresh as well as nano structured fly ash were studied using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). The fresh ... The shape of the 30h milled particles is irregular and the surface morphology is rough. Isothermal ... Keywords: Nano materials, Particulates and Powders, XRD- analysis; Fly ash.

  10. Screening coal combustion fly ashes for application in geopolymers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Valcke, S.L.A.; Pipilikaki, P.; Sarabér, A.J.; Fischer, H.R.; Nugteren, H.W.

    2013-01-01

    Driven by cost and sustainability, secondary resource materials such as fly ash, blast furnace slag, and bottom ash are increasingly used for alternative types of concrete binders, such as geopolymers. Because secondary resources may be highly variable from the perspective of geopolymers, it is

  11. Control of emerald ash borer adults and larvae with insecticides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deborah G. McCullough; David Cappaert; Therese Poland; David R. Smitley

    2003-01-01

    Virtually no information is available from Asia regarding the ability of insecticide products and application methods to protect ash trees from emerald ash borer. Many landscapers in the Core infestation in southeastern Michigan have promoted various treatments to their customers, but there has been no objective evaluation of these products. Insecticides may also be...

  12. Developing attractants and trapping techniques for the emerald ash borer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Therese M. Poland; Peter de Groot; Gary Grant; Linda MacDonald; Deborah G. McCullough

    2003-01-01

    Shortly after the 2002 discovery of emerald ash borer (EAB), Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae), in southeastern Michigan and Windsor, Ontario, quarantines regulating the movement of ash logs, firewood, and nursery stock were established to reduce the risk of human-assisted spread of this exotic forest insect pest. Accurate...

  13. Survival of emerald ash borer in wood chips

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deborah G. McCullough; Therese M. Poland; David Cappaert

    2003-01-01

    Tremendous numbers of infested ash trees are being removed for control and ultimate eradication of the exotic emerald ash borer (EAB), Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) which was discovered in southeastern Michigan and Windsor, Ontario in 2002. Quarantine regulations have been imposed which restrict movement of all life stages...

  14. Metal analyses of ash derived alkalis from banana and plantain ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The objective of this work was to determine the metal content of plantain and banana peels ash derived alkali and the possibility of using it as alternate and cheap source of alkali in soap industry. This was done by ashing the peels and dissolving it in de-ionised water to achieve the corresponding hydroxides with pH above ...

  15. Observations on adult Agrilus planipennis on ash in Michigan

    Science.gov (United States)

    D. R. Lance; I. Fraser; V. C. Mastro

    2007-01-01

    Observations were carried out on adult emerald ash borers, Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire, on ash trees, Fraxinus spp., in park-like and field-edge settings in South Lyon, MI. Observations consisted of (1) counting beetles in various microhabitats; and (2) tracking behavior of individual beetles for periods of up to 15 min....

  16. Fly ash: Perspective resource for geo-polymer materials production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kargin, Aleksey; Baev, Vladimir; Mashkin, Nikolay; Uglyanica, Andrey

    2016-01-01

    The present paper presents the information about the chemical and mineralogical composition of the ash and slag and their amounts at the dumps of the thermoelectric plants located in the city of Kemerovo. It is known that about 85% of ash and slag from the thermoelectric plants in Russia are removed by means of the hydraulic sluicing systems and only about 15% - by the systems of pneumatic ash handling. Currently, however, the transition from the "wet" ash removal systems to the "dry" ones is outlined. This process is quite logical since the fly ash has the higher reactivity compared with the hydraulic sluicing ash and therefore it is of the great interest for recycling and use. On the other hand, the recent trend is the increased use of fly ash in the production of geo-polymers due to their availability, workability and the increased life of the final product. The analysis is carried out to check the possibility of using the fly ash from various Kemerovo thermoelectric plants as a raw material for the production of the alkali-activated binder.

  17. Volcanic Ash from the 1999 Eruption of Mount Cameroon Volcano ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Volcanic ash from the 1999 eruption of Mount Cameroon volcano has been characterized for its particle size and shape (by scanning electron microscopy, SEM), and mineralogy (by X-ray diffractometry, XRD). Also the total fluorine (F) content of the ash was determined by the selective ion electrode method. The results ...

  18. Dynamic response of fly ash reinforced functionally graded rubber ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The dynamic analysis of jute-epoxy sandwiches with fly ash reinforced functionally gradient (FG) flexible, compliant rubber core is presented. FG samples are prepared using conventional casting technique. Presence of gradation is quantified by weight method. An attempt is made to study the influence of fly ash weight ...

  19. Surface treated fly ash filled modified epoxy composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uma Dharmalingam

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Fly ash, an inorganic alumino silicate has been used as filler in epoxy matrix, but it reduces the mechanical properties due to its poor dispersion and interfacial bonding with the epoxy matrix. To improve its interfacial bonding with epoxy matrix, surface treatment of fly ash was done using surfactant sodium lauryl sulfate and silane coupling agent glycidoxy propyl trimethoxy silane. An attempt is also made to reduce the particle size of fly ash using high pressure pulverizer. To improve fly ash dispersion in epoxy matrix, the epoxy was modified by mixing with amine containing liquid silicone rubber (ACS. The effect of surface treated fly ash with varying filler loadings from 10 to 40% weight on the mechanical, morphological and thermal properties of modified epoxy composites was investigated. The surface treated fly ash was characterized by particle size analyzer and FTIR spectra. Morphological studies of surface treated fly ash filled modified epoxy composites indicate good dispersion of fillers in the modified epoxy matrix and improves its mechanical properties. Impact strength of the surface treated fly ash filled modified epoxy composites show more improvement than unmodified composites.

  20. Effectiveness of corn stalk ash in reducing tannin levels and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effectiveness of corn stalk ash in reducing tannin levels and improving In vitro enzymatic degradation of polysaccharides in crop residues. ... The findings suggest that treatment with corn stalk ash might be an effective means of detannifying and improving digestion of crop residues. Ghana Journal of Science Vol. 44, 2004: ...

  1. Use of Unprocessed Coal Bottom Ash as Partial Fine Aggregate ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... obtained from FUEL thermal power station and had a loss of ignition of 11%. Experiments were conducted by replacing fine aggregate with bottom ash by weight in varying percentages (20%, 30%, 40%, 60%, and 80% respectively). The results showed that an increase in bottom ash content causes workability and plastic ...

  2. GROUND NUT HUSK ASH (GHA) AS A PARTIAL REPLACEMENT ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    NIJOTECH

    %, 2%, 4%, 6%, 8% and 10% ash ... Groundnut is an important cash crop produced in large quantity in Nigeria. The production of ground nut ... that ash replacement level of more than 10% is not recommended. The results of water absorption ...

  3. Recovery of carbonates and hydroxides from cocoa pod ash ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ashes of cocoa pods contain alkali which is traditionally leached out and used to produce 'alata' soap. Ghana's Institute of Industrial Research has tested a pilot plant that produces liquid soap from cocoa pod ash, waste lime (Ca(OH)2), and palm kernel oil by initially converting the potassium carbonate in the leachate to ...

  4. Kaliophilite from fly ash: synthesis, characterization and stability

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Kaliophilite was synthesized by fusion method using fly ash as starting material. In this method, at first, alkaline fusion of fly ash with KOH occurs, followed by hydrothermal treatment in KOH medium. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) observations revealed that the synthesized kaliophilite (S-KAL) was a plate-like crystal.

  5. Stabilization of expansive soil using bagasse ash & lime | Wubshet ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    7-5 soil on the AASHTO classification was stabilized using 3% lime, 15% bagasse ash and 15% bagasse ash in combination with 3% lime by dry weight of the soil. The effect of the additives on the soil was investigated with respect to plastcity, ...

  6. Influence of Rice Husk Ash on Mechanical Properties and Stress ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An attempt has been made in the investigation reported in this paper to study the influence of rice husk ash on the fresh, hardened properties and stress-strain behaviour of standard grade (M 30) SCC. Three SCC mixes with optimized quantities of mineral admixtures like fly ash(FA), ground granulated blast furnace slag ...

  7. Effects of gas conditions on ASH induced agglomeration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ma, T.; Fan, C. G.; Hao, L. F.

    2016-01-01

    on agglomeration tendency with two types of biomass ash, including rice straw and wheat straw ash. The agglomerates are analyzed by SEM-EDS for morphology and elemental composition. Defluidization temperature (Td) in those two types of gas conditions is quite different. Tdin gasification condition is much lower...

  8. Speciation of arsenic and selenium during leaching of fly ash

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoek, E.E. van der

    1995-01-01

    The leaching (release) of large amounts of oxyanions, such as those of arsenic and selenium, is an major environmental problem when it comes to the disposal or use of coal fly ash. To predict environmentally safe conditions for the disposal or use of fly ash in, for example,

  9. Natural enemies of emerald ash borer in southeastern Michigan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leah S. Bauer; Houping Liu; Robert A. Haack; Toby R. Petrice; Deborah L. Miller

    2004-01-01

    Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae), the emerald ash borer (EAB), is native to China, Japan, Korea, Mongolia, Russian Far East, and Taiwan. In 2002, EAB was identified as the causative agent of extensive ash (Fraxinus spp.) mortality in southeastern Michigan and nearby southwestern Ontario. EAB was inadvertently...

  10. Phosphorus removal from wastewater by fly ash ceramsite in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Fly ash ceramsite-assisted phosphorus (P) removal from wastewater was investigated in this paper. First, the basic physical and chemical properties of two types of fly ash ceramsites were outlined. The adsorption capacity of P in wastewater was then examined by static interval experiments, in which the influence of ...

  11. Response of cowpea, okra and tomato sawdust ash manure ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Field experiments were conducted at Akure and Obaile in Southwest Nigeria to test effect of sawdust ash manure treatments on cowpea (var. 1T82D – 716), okra (var. NAAe – 47 – 4) and Roma variety of tomato. The nutrient analysis of leaf and pod of okra given by different sawdust ash manure treatments was done.

  12. Production of Mineral Water Using Palm Bunch Ash (PBA) From ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The composition of the palm bunch ash derived from oil palm Elaeis guineensis was determined and it was(PBA) found to contain potassium and magnesium in significant amounts. The ash solution was used to produce mineral water that has ionic composition comparable to those of some brands of bottled mineral water.

  13. Alternative method for vegetables cultivation in Benin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucia Recchia

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available In the developing countries populations, which are already vulnerable and food insecure, are likely to be the most seriously affected by the effects of climate change, e.g. yield decreases and price increases for the most important agricultural crops. The IPCC’s Fourth Assessment Report for Africa describes a trend of warming at a rate faster than the global average and increasing aridity: in many parts of Africa, it seems that warmer climates and changes in precipitation will destabilise agricultural production and aggravates food security. The present work concerns the vegetables cultivation in the Parakou region in Benin, where agriculture employs approximately 70% of the active population and contributes to 36% of the Gross Domestic Product and 88% of export earnings. However, the agricultural sector has been regarded as unproductive with low adaptation capacities because of structural factors (e.g. high level of poverty among rural populations, weak mechanization and intensification of production modes, but also because of natural constraints (e.g. poor management of water and soils, leading to soil degradation. Considering the aridity, the low carbon content and the reduced level of nutrients available in the soil, the use of an hydroponic module has been hypothesised. In this way sufficient yields of the crops may be assured and no agricultural machines will be needed for the tillage operations. In addition, the nutrients can be added to the growing solution using residual materials as poultry manure, ashes and green wastes. In order to verify if some construction or maintenance problems can occur and if a growing solution can be easily obtained using agricultural wastes, some tests have been carried out. Moreover laboratory analyses have been done for different solutions that may be adopted with different shares of water, poultry manure, ashes and green wastes. The tests have indicated that the hydroponic module could be used in Benin

  14. The impact of the characteristics of volcanic ash on forecasting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckett, Frances; Hort, Matthew; Millington, Sarah; Stevenson, John; Witham, Claire

    2013-04-01

    The eruption of Eyjafjallajökull during April - May 2010 and Grímsvötn in May 2011, Iceland, caused the widespread dispersion of volcanic ash across the NE Atlantic, and ultimately into UK and European airspace. This resulted in thousands of flights to and from affected countries across Europe to be cancelled. The Met Office, UK, is the home of the London VAAC, a Volcanic Ash Advisory Centre, and as such is responsible for providing reports and forecasts for the movement of volcanic ash clouds covering the UK, Iceland and the north-eastern part of the North Atlantic ocean. To forecast the dispersion of volcanic ash requires that the sedimentation of ash particles through the atmosphere is effectively modelled. The settling velocity of an ash particle is a function of its size, shape and density, plus the density and viscosity of the air through which it is falling. We consider the importance of characterising the physical properties of ash when modelling the long range dispersion of ash particles through the atmosphere. Using the Reynolds number dependent scheme employed by NAME, the Lagrangian particle model used operationally by the Met Office, we calculate the settling velocity and thus the maximum travel distance of an ash particle through an idealised atmosphere as a function of its size, shape and density. The results are compared to measured particle sizes from deposits across Europe following the eruption of Eyjafjallajökull in 2010. Further, the particle size distribution (PSD) of ash in a volcanic cloud with time is modelled using NAME: the particle density distribution and particle shape factor are varied and the modelled PSD compared to the PSD measured in the ash cloud during the eruption of Eyjafjallajökull in 2010 by the FAAM research aircraft. The influence of the weather on PSD is also considered by comparing model output using an idealised atmosphere to output using NWP driven meteorological fields. We discuss the sensitivity of forecasts of

  15. Fugitive particulate emission factors for dry fly ash disposal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Stephen F; Mallard, Jonathan W; Mao, Qi; Shaw, Stephanie L

    2013-07-01

    Dry fly ash disposal involves dropping ash from a truck and the movement of a heavy grader or similar vehicle across the ash surface. These operations are known to produce fugitive particulate emissions that are not readily quantifiable using standard emission measurement techniques. However there are numerous situations--such as applying for a source air permit--that require these emissions be quantified. Engineers traditionally use emission factors (EFs) derived from measurements of related processes to estimate fly ash disposal emissions. This study near a dry fly ash disposal site using state-of-the-art particulate monitoring equipment examines for the first time fugitive emissions specific to fly ash handling at an active disposal site. The study measured hourly airborne mass concentrations for particles smaller than 2.5 microm (PM2.5) and 10 microm (PM10) along with meteorological conditions and atmospheric turbidity at high temporal resolution to characterize and quantify fugitive fly ash emissions. Fugitive fly ash transport and dispersion were computed using the on-site meteorological data and a regulatory air pollutant dispersion model (AERMOD). Model outputs coupled with ambient measurements yielded fugitive fly ash EFs that averaged 96 g Mg(-1) (of ash processed) for the PM(c) fraction (= PM10 - PM2.5) and 18 g Mg(-1) for PM2.5. Median EFs were much lower due to the strongly skewed shape of the derived EF distributions. Fugitive EFs from nearby unpaved roads were also characterized. Our primary finding is that EFs for dry fly ash disposal are considerably less than EFs derived using US Environmental Protection Agency AP-42 Emissions Handbook formulations for generic aggregate materials. This appears to be due to a large difference (a factor of 10+) between fugitive vehicular EFs estimated using the AP-42 formulation for vehicles driving on industrial roads (in this case, heavy slow-moving grading equipment) and EFs derived by the current study. Fugitive

  16. Radioactive wastes dispersed in stabilized ash cements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rubin, J.B.; Taylor, C.M.V.; Sivils, L.D.; Carey, J.W.

    1997-12-31

    One of the most widely-used methods for the solidification/stabilization of low-level radwaste is by incorporation into Type-I/II ordinary portland cement (OPC). Treating of OPC with supercritical fluid carbon dioxide (SCCO{sub 2}) has been shown to significantly increase the density, while simultaneously decreasing porosity. In addition, the process significantly reduces the hydrogenous content, reducing the likelihood of radiolytic decomposition reactions. This, in turn, permits increased actinide loadings with a concomitant reduction in disposable waste volume. In this article, the authors discuss the combined use of fly-ash-modified OPC and its treatment with SCCO{sub 2} to further enhance immobilization properties. They begin with a brief summary of current cement immobilization technology in order to delineate the areas of concern. Next, supercritical fluids are described, as they relate to these areas of concern. In the subsequent section, they present an outline of results on the application of SCCO{sub 2} to OPC, and its effectiveness in addressing these problem areas. Lastly, in the final section, they proffer their thoughts on why they believe, based on the OPC results, that the incorporation of fly ash into OPC, followed by supercritical fluid treatment, can produce highly efficient wasteforms.

  17. Phosphorus Recovery from Ashes of Sewage Sludge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cornel, Peter; Schaum, Peter

    2003-07-01

    About 90% of the incoming phosphorus load of waste water is eliminated by waste water treatment and transferred into the sewage sludge. Considerable amounts of sewage sludge can not be used agriculturally but are incinerated. Thus the ash from mono sludge incineration plants contains significant amounts of phosphorus (up to 25% P{sub 2}O{sub 5}) and could be used as raw material in fertilizer industry. The ash is hygienically harmless and free of organic substances. The ratio of phosphorus to heavy metals is basically the same as in the sewage sludge. The first step in separating phosphorus from heavy metals is to dissolve phosphorus by extraction. The most promising way seems to be the release of phosphorus with acids or bases. With 1 m sulphuric acid it is possible to release phosphorus completely. By use of acid most of the heavy metals dissolve, too. With caustic soda as solvent, only 30-40% of the phosphorus can be dissolved but the eluate is almost free of heavy metals. The amount of phosphorus which can be released with caustic soda, depends on the applied precipitant (Al or Fe salts) for phosphorus elimination at the waste water treatment. (author)

  18. Analysis of Content of Selected Critical Elements in Fly Ash

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Makowska Dorota

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Pursuant to the new mineral policy of the European Union, searching for new sources of raw materials is required. Coal fly ash has long been considered as a potential source of a number of critical elements. Therefore, it is important to monitor the contents of the critical elements in fly ash from coal combustion. The paper presents the results of examinations of the contents of selected elements, i.e. beryllium, cobalt, chromium and germanium in fly ash from Polish power plants. The results of the conducted investigations indicate that the examined ash samples from bituminous coal combustion cannot be treated as a potential source of the analysed critical elements. The content of these elements in ash, though slightly higher than their average content in the sedimentary rocks, is, however, not high enough to make their recovery technologically and economically justified at this moment.

  19. Soil food web structure after wood ash application

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Louise Hindborg; Qin, Jiayi; Cruz-Paredes, Carla

    to be slightly negatively affected, however the bacteria feeding nematodes a bit less so. The effects had not yet transferred to the lower soil layer (3-6 cm) at the site. Sampling in 2016 and 2017 will clarify the variability of both indirect effects of wood ash application to the terrestrial food web......In 2006, the European Council established a mandatory target of 20 % renewable energy of consumption by 2020. Part of the replacement is burning biomass for heating and electricity. ~ Whole tree biomass harvesting for biofuel combustion intensifies removal of nutrients from the by applying ash from...... the consequences of returning wood ash to biofuel producing coniferous forest. We that the change in pH and increased availability of nutrients after ash application to forest floor can facilitate an increase in the bacteria to fungi ratio with possible effects for the soil food by applying ash of different...

  20. Wetting and Spreading of Molten Volcanic Ash in Jet Engines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Wenjia; Lavallée, Yan; Wadsworth, Fabian B; Hess, Kai-Uwe; Dingwell, Donald B

    2017-04-20

    A major hazard to jet engines posed by volcanic ash is linked to the wetting and spreading of molten ash droplets on engine component surfaces. Here, using the sessile drop method, we study the evolution of the wettability and spreading of volcanic ash. We employ rapid temperature changes up to 1040-1450 °C, to replicate the heating conditions experienced by volcanic ash entering an operating jet engine. In this scenario, samples densify as particles coalesce under surface tension until they form a large system-sized droplet (containing remnant gas bubbles and crystals), which subsequently spreads on the surface. The data exhibit a transition from a heterogeneous to a homogeneous wetting regime above 1315 °C as crystals in the drops are dissolved in the melt. We infer that both viscosity and microstructural evolution are key controls on the attainment of equilibrium in the wetting of molten volcanic ash droplets.

  1. Synthesis and characterization of zeolites prepared from industrial fly ash

    OpenAIRE

    Franus, Wojciech; Wdowin, Magdalena; Franus, Małgorzata

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we present the possibility of using fly ash to produce synthetic zeolites. The synthesis class F fly ash from the Stalowa Wola SA heat and power plant was subjected to 24 h hydrothermal reaction with sodium hydroxide. Depending on the reaction conditions, three types of synthetic zeolites were formed: Na-X (20 g fly ash, 0.5 dm3 of 3 mol · dm−3 NaOH, 75 °C), Na-P1 (20 g fly ash, 0.5 dm3 of 3 mol · dm−3 NaOH, 95 °C), and sodalite (20 g fly ash, 0.8 dm3 of 5 mol · dm−3 NaOH + 0.4...

  2. Thaumasite formation in concrete and mortars containing fly ash

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D.M. Mulenga; J. Stark; P. Nobst [Bauhaus-University, Weimar (Germany). F.A. Finger-Institute of Material Sciences

    2003-12-01

    Due to recent reports on deterioration of concrete structures, the thaumasite form of sulfate attack has become a subject of study and close investigation. This paper investigates the formation of thaumasite in concrete and mortars containing fly ash. The results show that thaumasite formation can occur within 84 days of exposure to sulfate solutions. High volumes of fly ash can limit or promote thaumasite formation depending on the type of cement used. Thaumasite and ettringite were found among the deterioration products. However, the thaumasite formation in the specimen prepared from sulfate resisting Portland cement was not accompanied by deterioration, except by 50% fly ash addition. The mixtures of Portland limestone cement with 40% fly ash exhibited a very limited thaumasite formation while the mixtures with 50% had no thaumasite at all. It is concluded that thaumasite can also be formed in mixtures incorporating fly ash.

  3. Electrodialytic removal of cadmium from straw combustion fly ash

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Henrik K.; Ottosen, Lisbeth M.; Villumsen, Arne

    2004-01-01

    Fly ash from straw combustion contains valuable nutrients when returned to agricultural soils. In many instances, however, this fly ash may contain heavy metals, such as cadmium, at levels which often exceed the limits given by the Danish legislation. Thus before utilizing the nutrients, cadmium...... must be removed from these ashes. The use of an electrodialytic remediation method to remove cadmium from fly ash arising from straw combustion and containing 11.2 mg Cd kg$+-1$/ DM (dry matter) was accessed. After 36 days of remediation at a constant current density of 5.6 mA cm$+-2$/ more than 97......% of the cadmium had been removed from around 150 g ash on a dry basis. $CPY 2004 Society of Chemical Industry....

  4. Ash Deposition Trials at Three Power Stations in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Karin; Frandsen, Flemming; Larsen, Ole Hede

    1998-01-01

    Six full-scale trials were conducted at three power stations in Denmark: Ensted, Funen, and Vendsyssel power stations. During these trials, pulverized coal, bottom ash, fly ash, and deposits from cooled probes were sampled and analyzed with various techniques. On the basis of SEM analyses......, the deposits can be grouped into five textural types, which all possess distinct textural and chemical characteristics. Likewise, the deposition mechanisms for these five types are characteristic and they may be used for constructing a model for the buildup and maturation of an ash deposit. The deposits...... collected on the probes were thin (maximum 2 mm after 9 h) and the influence of operational parameters and probe temperatures on the magnitude of the deposits were minor. The probe temperatures had no influence on the composition of the ash deposits for coals with low ash deposition propensities, whereas...

  5. Analysis list: ash-2 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ash-2 Adult,Embryo + ce10 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/ce10/target/as...h-2.1.tsv http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/ce10/target/ash-2.5.tsv http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc....jp/kyushu-u/ce10/target/ash-2.10.tsv http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/ce10/colo/ash-2.Adult.tsv,http://dbarchive.bioscience...dbc.jp/kyushu-u/ce10/colo/ash-2.Embryo.tsv http://dbarchive.bioscience...dbc.jp/kyushu-u/ce10/colo/Adult.gml,http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/ce10/colo/Embryo.gml ...

  6. STRATEGIES AND TECHNOLOGY FOR MANAGING HIGH-CARBON ASH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robert Hurt; Eric Suuberg; John Veranth; Xu Chen

    2002-09-10

    The overall objective of the present project is to identify and assess strategies and solutions for the management of industry problems related to carbon in ash. Specific research issues to be addressed include: (1) the effect of parent fuel selection on ash properties and adsorptivity, including a first ever examination of the air entrainment behavior of ashes from alternative (non-coal) fuels; (2) the effect of various low-NOx firing modes on ash properties and adsorptivity; and (3) the kinetics and mechanism of ash ozonation. This data will provide scientific and engineering support of the ongoing process development activities. During this fourth project period we completed the characterization of ozone-treated carbon surfaces and wrote a comprehensive report on the mechanism through which ozone suppresses the adsorption of concrete surfactants.

  7. Towards probabilistic forecasts of volcanic ash transport in the atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zidikheri, M. J.; Dare, R.; Potts, R.; Lucas, C.

    2015-12-01

    Satellite based remote sensing techniques are the primary means of identifying the location of volcanic ash during eruption events. This information is then used to initialize ash dispersion models, which employ meteorological fields to forecast the future locations of ash. Remote sensing of ash in tropical regions is especially challenging due to the difficulty of demarcating ash from the ice and water in convective clouds which results in frequent missed and false detections of ash. Dispersion models also contain uncertainties that arise from uncertainties in the meteorological fields and the source term such the height of the ash column. Communicating forecasting uncertainties is becoming increasingly important to stakeholders for the purposes of improved risk management. For these reasons the Bureau of Meteorology is engaged in research with the aim of providing probabilistic forecasts of ash in the near future based on ensembles of dispersion model simulations. The ensembles are constructed to reflect two fundamental uncertainties. Firstly, uncertainties in the meteorological fields are incorporated by the use of the Bureau's ensemble model system which issues a set of 24 meteorological forecasts representing possible states of the atmosphere. Secondly, uncertainties in the model parameters such as the ash column height are also incorporated. This is accomplished by running a suite of dispersion model simulations, each with a different value of the model parameter. Pattern correlations are then used to quantify the match between the model and observations. The model parameters which provide the best matches between model and observations are then employed in the ensemble to issue probabilistic forecasts of ash. This process can also ameliorate errors due to incorrect or missing model physics. The efficacy of these techniques shall be demonstrated by the use of several case studies.

  8. Fluidization characteristics of power-plant fly ashes and fly ash-charcoal mixtures. [MS Thesis; 40 references

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen, C.T.

    1980-03-01

    As a part of the continuing research on aluminum recovery from fly ash by HiChlor process, a plexiglass fluidization column system was constructed for measurement of fluidization parameters for power-plant fly ashes and fly ash-charcoal mixtures. Several bituminous and subbituminous coal fly ashes were tested and large differences in fluidization characteristics were observed. Fly ashes which were mechanically collected fluidized uniformly at low gas flow rates. Most fly ashes which were electrostatically precipitated exhibited channeling tendency and did not fluidize uniformly. Fluidization characteristics of electrostatically collected ashes improve when the finely divided charcoal powder is added to the mixture. The fluidization of the mixture was aided initially by a mechanical stirrer. Once the fluidization had succeeded, the beds were ready to fluidize without the assistance of a mechanical action. Smooth fluidization and large bed expansion were usually observed. The effects of charcoal size and aspect ratio on fluidization characteristics of the mixtures were also investigated. Fluidization characteristics of a fly ash-coal mixture were tested. The mixture fluidized only after being oven-dried for a few days.

  9. Emerald ash borer aftermath forests: The dynamics of ash mortality and the responses of other plant species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kathleen S. Knight; Daniel A. Herms; John Cardina; Robert Long; Joanne Rebbeck; Kamal J.K. Gandhi; Annemarie Smith; Wendy S. Klooster; Catherine P. Herms; Alejandro A. Royo

    2010-01-01

    The effects of emerald ash borer (EAB) (Agrilus planipennis) on forest ecosystems are being studied through a collaborative research program involving the U.S. Forest Service's Northern Research Station and The Ohio State University. We are monitoring the decline and mortality of >4,500 ash trees and saplings, EAB population density, changes...

  10. Optimizing use of girdled ash trees for management of low-density emerald ash borer (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nathan W. Siegert; Deborah G. McCullough; Therese M. Poland; Robert L. Heyd

    2017-01-01

    Effective survey methods to detect and monitor recently established, low-density infestations of emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae), remain a high priority because they provide land managers and property owners with time to implement tactics to slow emerald ash borer population growth and the progression of...

  11. Failure to phytosanitize ash firewood infested with emerald ash borer in a small dry kiln using ISPM-15 standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    P. Charles Goebel; Matthew S. Bumgardner; Daniel A. Herms; Andrew. Sabula

    2010-01-01

    Although current USDA-APHIS standards suggest that a core temperature of 71.1°C (160°F) for 75 min is needed to adequately sanitize emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire-infested firewood, it is unclear whether more moderate (and economical) treatment regimes will adequately eradicate emerald ash borer larvae and prepupae...

  12. Interactive influence of leaf age, light intensity, and girdling on green ash foliar chemistry and emerald ash borer development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yigen Chen; Therese M. Poland

    2009-01-01

    Biotic and abiotic environmental factors affect plant nutritional quality and defensive compounds that confer plant resistance to herbivory. Influence of leaf age, light availability, and girdling on foliar nutrition and defense of green ash (Fraxinus pennsylvanica Marsh) was examined in this study. Longevity of the emerald ash borer, ...

  13. Characterization of ash in algae and other materials by determination of wet acid indigestible ash and microscopic examination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Algae are known for high ash content. It is important to properly characterize their ash for value added utilization of algae as food, feed, and feedstock for biofuels. In this study, 12 algae of different sources were measured for proximate composition and mineral profile. Results showed that the r...

  14. Community ash densities and economic impact potential of emerald ash borer (Agrilus planipennis) in four midwestern states

    Science.gov (United States)

    T. Davis Sydnor; Matthew Bumgardner; Sakthi. Subburayalu

    2011-01-01

    A survey of 586 community representatives with urban tree canopy responsibilities was conducted to provide data on ash density within four states in the Midwestern U.S., and to examine potential economic losses should emerald ash borer (EAB) become established in their communities. One hundred twenty-three responses were received from communities of various sizes. Data...

  15. Behavioral and electrophysiological responses of the emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis, to induced volatiles of Manchurian ash, Fraxinus mandshurica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cesar Rodriguez-Saona; Therese M. Poland; James R. Miller; Lukasz L. Stelinski; Gary G. Grant; Peter de Groot; Linda Buchan; Linda Mac Donald

    2006-01-01

    We investigated the volatile emissions of Manchurian ash seedlings, Fraxinus mandshurica, in response to feeding by the emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis, and to exogenous application of methyl jasmonate (MeJA). Feeding damage by adult A. planipennis and MeJA treatment increased volatile emissions compared...

  16. Ash and heavy metals in fluidized bed-combustion; Tuhka ja raskasmetallit puuperaeisen jaetteen kerrosleijupoltossa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaessi, T.; Aittoniemi, P. [IVO International, Vantaa (Finland)

    1996-12-01

    Combustion ashes and submicron fly ash particles were characterized in two industrial boilers (bubbling vs. circulating fluidized bed) burning paper mill deinking sludge and bark or wood as support fuel. Bulk samples from fly ash, circulating ash and bottom ash were analyzed. Fine particles in fly ash were monitored and sampled for microscopic studies. The mass size distribution of fly ash was measured and the chemical composition according to particle size was analyzed. The results showed that ash consists of large and friable clusters formed by sintering of small mineral particles originating from paper fillers. Very few ash particles were fused and they were found only among the smallest particles. No agglomerates of fused particles were found. If the residence time in furnace is long enough sintering may proceed further and ash structure grows more dense. No indication of ash vaporization was detected. These results were similar for bubbling and circulating fluidized bed boilers. (author)

  17. Mapping fire effects on ash and soil properties. Current knowledge and future perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Paulo; Cerda, Artemi; Strielko, Irina

    2014-05-01

    Fire has heterogeneous impacts on ash and soil properties, depending on severity, topography of the burned area, type of soil and vegetation affected, and meteorological conditions during and post-fire. The heterogeneous impacts of fire and the complex topography of wildland environments impose the challenge of understand fire effects at diverse scales in space and time. Mapping is fundamental to identify the impacts of fire on ash and soil properties because allow us to recognize the degree of the fire impact, vulnerable areas, soil protection and distribution of ash and soil nutrients, important to landscape recuperation. Several methodologies have been used to map fire impacts on ash soil properties. Burn severity maps are very useful to understand the immediate and long-term impacts of fire on the ecosystems (Wagtendonk et al., 2004; Kokaly et al., 2007). These studies normally are carried out with remote sensing techniques and study large burned areas. On a large scale it is very important to detect the most vulnerable areas (e.g. with risk of runoff increase, flooding, erosion, sedimentation and debris flow) and propose -if necessary- immediate rehabilitation measures. Post-fire rehabilitation measures can be extremely costly. Thus the identification of the most affected areas will reduce the erosion risks and soil degradation (Miller and Yool, 2002; Robichaud et al., 2007; Robichaud, 2009), as the consequent economical, social and ecological impacts. Recently, the United States Department of Agriculture created a field guide to map post-fire burn severity, based on remote sensing and Geographical Information Systems (GIS) technologies. The map produced should reflect the effects of fire on soil properties, and identify areas where fire was more severe (Parsons et al. 2010). Remote sensing studies have made attempts to estimate soil and ash properties after the fire, as hydrophobicity (Lewis et al., 2008), water infiltration (Finnley and Glenn, 2010), forest

  18. Data acquisition system and calculation for the evaluation of polluting emissions in stacks; Sistema de adquisicion de datos y calculo para la evaluacion de emisiones contaminantes en chimeneas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leon Enriquez, Javier

    1999-06-01

    The present thesis work, was developed in Visual C++5, to replace the present procedure of calculation in Excel and to avoid the manual processing of the data obtained during the evaluation of polluting from stacks, with movable laboratories that make dilutions in the originating gaseous sample of the stack. Six projects in Visual C++5 were designed. The first five include the formulas and procedures of calculation to obtain the total particulate emission suspended originating of stationary sources (stacks), indicated in the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) part 60, emitted by the Environmental Protection Agency of the United Sates (EPA). The last one, includes the calculations necessary to read archives generated by a card of data acquisition and to consider the factor of dilution of the gaseous sample. A standard business card for the data acquisition is used during the monitoring process of the variables that requires the sixth mentioned project previously. The results of the monitoring of variables and result of the calculations are stored in archives that conform a data base of the made work, which allows future, to compare the results of the measurements and calculations in different evaluations from a same user. The made work can be used by evaluators companies of polluting emissions in stacks that count on dilution equipment during the evaluation. [Spanish] El presente trabajo de tesis, fue desarrollado en visual C++5, para sustituir el procedimiento actual de calculo en Excel y evitar el procesamiento manual de los datos obtenidos durante la evaluacion de emisiones contaminantes en chimeneas, con laboratorios moviles que realizan diluciones en la muestra gaseosa proveniente de la chimenea. Se disenaron 6 proyectos en visual C++5. Los primeros cinco incluyen las formulas y procedimientos de calculo para obtener la emision de particulas suspendidas totales provenientes de fuentes fijas (chimeneas), indicadores en el Codigo de Regulaciones Federales (CFR

  19. Creep Behaviour of Fly Ash-Based Geopolymer Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wallah S.E.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Fly ash-based geopolymer concrete is manufactured using fly ash as its source material and does not use Portland cement at all. Beside fly ash, alkaline solution is also utilized to make geopolymer paste which binds the aggregates to form geopolymer concrete. This paper presents the study of creep behaviour of fly ash-based geopolymer concrete. Four series of specimens with various compressive strengths were prepared to study its creep behaviour for the duration of test up to one year. The test method followed the procedures applied for Ordinary Portland Cement (OPC concrete. Test results show that fly ash-based geopolymer concrete undergoes low creep which is generally less than that of OPC concrete. After one year of loading, the results for specific creep of fly ash-based geopolymer concrete in this study ranges from 15 to 29 microstrain for concrete compressive strength 67–40 MPa respectively. From the test results, it is also found out that the creep coefficient of fly ash-based geopolymer concrete is about half of that predicted using Gilbert’s Method for OPC concrete.

  20. Smelting disposal of municipal solid waste incineration fly ash

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Q.; Lu, C.; Yang, J. [Chongqing Univ., Chongqing (China); Huang, B. [Southwest Petroleum Univ., Chengdu Sichuan (China)

    2008-07-01

    Municipal solid waste (MSW) fly ash contains a significant amount of heavy metals which must be treated safely as it has a negative impact on the environment and the sustainable development of cities. The primary disposal methods used around the world are landfilling and incineration. In China, the most widely used treatment methods of MSW are open-air stacking and landfill disposal due to protected research on incineration. This paper explored the technology of the smelting operation process. It discussed the proportion of hydrated lime in the process of solidification and the effect of temperature on the separation rate of heavy metals in fly ash. The paper described the experiment and presented the physical and chemical properties of fly ash. The leaching toxicities of heavy metals in fly ash were also displayed in table format. The melting separation process of MSW incineration fly ash was discussed with particular reference to the solidification of fly ash and melting separation technology for heavy metals. It was concluded that it was feasible to use the smelting separation technology for disposal of MSW incineration fly ash as it could eliminate pollution due to heavy metals and dioxins, reduce secondary pollution, and recycle many of the heavy metals present. 9 refs., 3 tabs., 3 figs.

  1. Thermal behaviour of ESP ash from municipal solid waste incinerators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Y; Xiao, Y; Wilson, N; Voncken, J H L

    2009-07-15

    Stricter environmental regulations demand safer treatment and disposal of incinerator fly ashes. So far no sound technology or a process is available for a sustainable and ecological treatment of the waste incineration ashes, and only partial treatment is practised for temporary and short-term solutions. New processes and technology need to be developed for comprehensive utilization and detoxification of the municipal solid waste (MSW) incinerator residues. To explore the efficiency of thermal stabilisation and controlled vitrification, the thermal behaviour of electrostatic precipitator (ESP) ash was investigated under controlled conditions. The reaction stages are identified with the initial moisture removal, volatilization, melting and slag formation. At the temperature higher than 1100 degrees C, the ESP ashes have a quicker weight loss, and the total weight loss reaches up to 52%, higher than the boiler ash. At 1400 degrees C a salt layer and a homogeneous glassy slag were formed. The effect of thermal treatment on the leaching characteristics of various elements in the ESP ash was evaluated with the availability-leaching test. The leaching values of the vitrified slag are significantly lowered than that of the original ash.

  2. Development of Classified Fly Ash as a Pozzolanic Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rukzon, Sumrerng; Chindaprasirt, Prinya

    This research studies the potential for using classified fly ash from Mae Moh power plant in Thailand as a pozzolanic material. Three different fly ash finenesses viz., coarse Original Fly Ash (OFA), Medium Fly Ash (MFA) and Fine Fly Ash (FFA) were used for the study. Ordinary Portland Cement (OPC) was partially replaced with fly ash at 20 and 40% by weight of binder. The water to binder ratio was kept constant at 0.5 and the flow of mortar was maintained at 110±5% with the aid of superplasticizer (SP). Compressive strength, carbonation depth and porosity test of mortars were determined. FFA has a high potential to be used as a good pozzolanic material. The use of FFA produces mortars with good strength and low porosity. The resistance to carbonation of mortar improves with partial replacement of FFA in comparison with the normal coarse fly ash. The use of FFA results in a strong and dense mortar which is due to better dispersion and filling effect as well as an increase in the pozzolanic reaction.

  3. Size distribution of rare earth elements in coal ash

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Clinton T.; Deonarine, Amrika; Kolker, Allan; Adams, Monique; Holland, James F.

    2015-01-01

    Rare earth elements (REEs) are utilized in various applications that are vital to the automotive, petrochemical, medical, and information technology industries. As world demand for REEs increases, critical shortages are expected. Due to the retention of REEs during coal combustion, coal fly ash is increasingly considered a potential resource. Previous studies have demonstrated that coal fly ash is variably enriched in REEs relative to feed coal (e.g, Seredin and Dai, 2012) and that enrichment increases with decreasing size fractions (Blissett et al., 2014). In order to further explore the REE resource potential of coal ash, and determine the partitioning behavior of REE as a function of grain size, we studied whole coal and fly ash size-fractions collected from three U.S commercial-scale coal-fired generating stations burning Appalachian or Powder River Basin coal. Whole fly ash was separated into , 5 um, to 5 to 10 um and 10 to 100 um particle size fractions by mechanical shaking using trace-metal clean procedures. In these samples REE enrichments in whole fly ash ranges 5.6 to 18.5 times that of feedcoals. Partitioning results for size separates relative to whole coal and whole fly ash will also be reported. 

  4. Ash dispersal dynamics: state of the art and perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulpizio, R.

    2013-05-01

    Volcanic ash, during dispersal and deposition, is among the major hazards from explosive eruptions. Volcanic ash fallout can disrupt communities downwind, interrupt surface transportation networks and lead to closure of airports. Airborne ash seriously threatens modern jet aircraft in flight. In several documented cases, encounters between aircraft and volcanic clouds have resulted in engine flameout and near crashes, so there is a need to accurately predict the trajectory of volcanic ash clouds in order to improve aviation safety and reduce economic losses. The ash clouds affect aviation even in distal regions, as demonstrated by several eruptions with far-range dispersal. Recent examples include Crater Peak 1992, Tungurahua 1999-2001, Mount Cleveland 2001, Chaitén 2008, Eyjafjallajökull 2010, Grimsvötn 2011, and Cordón-Caulle 2011. Amongst these, the April-May 2010 eruption of Eyjafjallajökull in Iceland provoked the largest civil aviation breakdown. Accumulation of tephra can produce roof collapse, interruption of lifelines (roads, railways, etc.), disruption to airport operations, and damage to communications and electrical power lines. Deposition of ash decreases soil permeability, increases surface runoff, and promotes floods. Ash leaching can result in the pollution of water resources, damage to agriculture, pastures, and livestock, impinge on aquatic ecosystems, and alteration of the geochemical environment on the seafloor. Despite the potential big impact, the dispersal dynamics of volcanic ash is still an unsolved problem for volcanologists, which claims for fiture high level research. Here, a critical overview about models (field, experimental and numerical) for inversion of field data to gain insights on physics of dispersal of volcanic ash is proposed. A special focus is devoted to some physical parameters that are far from a satisfactory inversion (e.g. reconstruction of total grain size distribution), and clues for future research are suggested.

  5. Ash formation, deposition, corrosion, and erosion in conventional boilers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benson, S.A.; Jones, M.L. [Univ. of North Dakota, Grand Forks, ND (United States)

    1995-12-01

    The inorganic components (ash-forming species) associated with coals significantly affect boiler design, efficiency of operation, and lifetimes of boiler parts. During combustion in conventional pulverized fuel boilers, the inorganic components are transformed into inorganic gases, liquids, and solids. This partitioning depends upon the association of the inorganic components in the coal and combustion conditions. The inorganic components are associated as mineral grains and as organically associated elements, and these associations of inorganic components in the fuel directly influence their fate upon combustion. Combustion conditions, such as temperature and atmosphere, influence the volatility and the interaction of inorganic components during combustion and gas cooling, which influences the state and size composition distribution of the particulate and condensed ash species. The intermediate species are transported with the bulk gas flow through the combustion systems, during which time the gases and entrained ash are cooled. Deposition, corrosion, and erosion occur when the ash intermediate species are transported to the heat-transfer surface, react with the surface, accumulate, sinter, and develop strength. Research over the past decade has significantly advanced understanding of ash formation, deposition, corrosion, and erosion mechanisms. Many of the advances in understanding and predicting ash-related issues can be attributed to advanced analytical methods to determine the inorganic composition of fuels and the resulting ash materials. These new analytical techniques have been the key to elucidation of the mechanisms of ash formation and deposition. This information has been used to develop algorithms and computer models to predict the effects of ash on combustion system performance.

  6. THE VEGETABLES MARKET IN ROMANIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Livia DAVID

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Romania, due to its favourable climatic conditions, is a country with a long tradition in growing vegetables. The importance of growing vegetables is demonstrated both by area cultivated with vegetables and by the large number of individual producers. In this context, the current study comprises, on the one hand, the evolution of vegetable crops specific indicators, and, on the other hand, the evolution of foreign trade. As for the actual production of vegetables in Romania, it cannot provide the requisites for domestic consumption and for this reason we resort to imports. The imports of vegetables and unprocessed products have a negative influence on the trade balance. The producers, processors and distributors of vegetables and vegetable products are faced with a series of problems that have a negative influence on their economic and financial results. Among these problems, the most important ones are generated by: the use of nonperforming traditional technologies that contributed to lower productions, as compared to the productions obtained by EU vegetable farmers; the difficulty in marketing the vegetables within an optimum time interval because vegetable farmers are not members of associations that have a viable marketing programme, which would ensure an adequate and efficient vegetables distribution; the use of nonperforming seeds in order to obtain vegetables. In conclusion, it is imperative to support vegetable farming in order to provide the requisites for consumption and in order to increase the producers’ revenues in the rural space. This can be achieved by accessing structural funds.

  7. High spatial resolution spectral unmixing for mapping ash species across a complex urban environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennifer Pontius; Ryan P. Hanavan; Richard A. Hallett; Bruce D. Cook; Lawrence A. Corp

    2017-01-01

    Ash (Fraxinus L.) species are currently threatened by the emerald ash borer (EAB; Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire) across a growing area in the eastern US. Accurate mapping of ash species is required to monitor the host resource, predict EAB spread and better understand the short- and long-term effects of EAB on the ash resource...

  8. Effects of Eggshells Ash (ESA) on the Setting Time of Cement ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Admixture properties of eggshells ash (ESA), with a focus on the setting time, were investigated. ESA was obtained by incinerating fowls' eggshells to ash. The ash was sieved through 75μm sieve. The ash passing the 75 μm sieve was used in the investigation. Consistency test was carried out to establish the quantity of ...

  9. Ash cap influences on site productivity and fertilizer response in forests of the Inland Northwest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariann T. Garrison-Johnston; Peter G. Mika; Dan L. Miller; Phil Cannon; Leonard R. Johnson

    2007-01-01

    Data from 139 research sites throughout the Inland Northwest were analyzed for effects of ash cap on site productivity, nutrient availability and fertilization response. Stand productivity and nitrogen (N) fertilizer response were greater on sites with ash cap than on sites without. Where ash was present, depth of ash had no effect on site productivity or N fertilizer...

  10. Electrodialytic removal of cadmium from biomass combustion fly ashes in larger scale

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Anne Juul; Ottosen, Lisbeth M.; Simonsen, Peter

    The paper presents results from the project: "Electrochemical removal of cadmium from biomass combustion fly ashes in larger scale and evaluation of the possibilities of reusing the treated ashes in concrete".......The paper presents results from the project: "Electrochemical removal of cadmium from biomass combustion fly ashes in larger scale and evaluation of the possibilities of reusing the treated ashes in concrete"....

  11. Volcanic ash as fertiliser for the surface ocean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Langmann

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Iron is a key limiting micro-nutrient for marine primary productivity. It can be supplied to the ocean by atmospheric dust deposition. Volcanic ash deposition into the ocean represents another external and so far largely neglected source of iron. This study demonstrates strong evidence for natural fertilisation in the iron-limited oceanic area of the NE Pacific, induced by volcanic ash from the eruption of Kasatochi volcano in August 2008. Atmospheric and oceanic conditions were favourable to generate a massive phytoplankton bloom in the NE Pacific Ocean which for the first time strongly suggests a connection between oceanic iron-fertilisation and volcanic ash supply.

  12. Magmatic and fragmentation controls on volcanic ash surface chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayris, Paul M.; Diplas, Spyros; Damby, David E.; Hornby, Adrian J.; Cimarelli, Corrado; Delmelle, Pierre; Scheu, Bettina; Dingwell, Donald B.

    2016-04-01

    The chemical effects of silicate ash ejected by explosive volcanic eruptions on environmental systems are fundamentally mediated by ash particle surfaces. Ash surfaces are a composite product of magmatic properties and fragmentation mechanisms, as well as in-plume and atmospheric alteration processes acting upon those surfaces during and after the eruption. Recent attention has focused on the capacity of alteration processes to shape ash surfaces; most notably, several studies have utilised X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), a technique probing the elemental composition and coordination state of atoms within the top 10 nm of ash surfaces, to identify patterns of elemental depletions and enrichments relative to bulk ash chemical composition. Under the presumption of surface and bulk equivalence, any disparities have been previously attributed to surface alteration processes, but the ubiquity of some depletions (e.g., Ca, Fe) across multiple ash studies, irrespective of eruptive origin, could suggest these to be features of the surface produced at the instant of magma fragmentation. To investigate this possibility further, we conducted rapid decompression experiments at different pressure conditions and at ambient and magmatic temperature on porous andesitic rocks. These experiments produced fragmented ash material untouched by secondary alteration, which were compared to particles produced by crushing of large clasts from the same experiments. We investigated a restricted size fraction (63-90 μm) from both fragmented and crushed materials, determining bulk chemistry and mineralogy via XRF, SEM-BSE and EPMA, and investigated the chemical composition of the ash surface by XPS. Analyses suggest that fragmentation under experimental conditions partitioned a greater fraction of plagioclase-rich particles into the selected size fraction, relative to particles produced by crushing. Trends in surface chemical composition in fragmented and crushed particles mirror that

  13. Mercury Retention by Fly Ashes from Oxy-fuel Processes

    OpenAIRE

    Fernández Miranda, Nuria; Villamil Rumayor, Marta; López Antón, María Antonia; Díaz Somoano, Mercedes; Martínez Tarazona, María Rosa

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study is to determine the mechanism of mercury retention in fly ashes, the main solid waste from coal combustion power plants, and to evaluate the interactions between the type of mercury and fly ashes. The work was based on the results of mercury speciation in the gas and the solid fly ash before and after mercury retention. The identification of the mercury species in the gas was performed using previously validated methods, but the speciation of the mercury retained i...

  14. Leaching of nutrient salts from fly ash from biomass combustion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Kaj; Vu, Duc Thuong; Stenby, Mette

    2005-01-01

    Methods to selectively leach nutrient salts from fly ash, while leaving cadmium un-dissolved were studied. Temperature, pH, water to fly ash ratio are all expected to influence the kinetics and the equilibrium boundaries for this process. Three different leaching methods were investigated...... moving bed process with agitation/centrifugation. It was found that a satisfactory leaching of the nutrient salts could be achieved with the third method using only two or three stages, depending on the water to fly ash ratio. It is an advantage to perform the process at temperatures above 50°C...

  15. Transformations of calcium sulphates in solidified carbonated volatile fluidized ashes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marian Jacek Łączny

    2017-01-01

    During the investigation it was assumed that calcium carbonate, being poorly water-soluble, would not react with the remaining components of the porous water of the volatile fluidized ash. Crystalline phases of calcium sulphates, anhydrite, gypsum and bassanite occurring in bound volatile fluidized ashes after carbonation demonstrate the possibility of crystallization in the presence of calcium carbonate. In particular, a change in the concentration of bassanite indicates that this phase, as a precursor to the crystallization of gypsum, may play a significant role in the process of binding carbonated volatile ashes.

  16. The Vegetables Turned:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carter, Dale

    2009-01-01

    lyricist Van Dyke Parks, the incongruous, semantically complex figure of the vegetable came to illuminate aspects of psychedelic consciousness and - part by design, part by accident - the link between LSD and Anglo-American popular music. It threw light, too, on the scope and limits of changes...

  17. Dioxins in Dutch vegetables

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoogerbrugge R; Bakker MI; Hijman WC; Boer AC den; Hartog RS den; Baumann RA; LAC; LVM; SIR

    2004-01-01

    The exposure to dioxins (including polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins, dibenzofurans and dioxin-like polychlorinated biphenyls) occurs predominantly via the intake of food. The main contribution to the total intake originates from the consumption of animal fat. Nevertheless, vegetables were estimated

  18. The Effect of Applied Organic Fertilizers on the Bioavailability of Heavy Metals in Lolium Perenne, Cultivated on Fly Ash Deposits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smaranda Mâşu

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The study aims to monitor the capacity of certain organic fertilizers (volcanic tuff and municipal sludge, applied as such and mixed with volcanic rocks with a high content in clinoptilolite, to determine the covering with vegetation of fly ash deposits resulted from the combustion of lignite in thermal plants. Both biosolids (20 t/ha and volcanic rock with high clinoptilolite content (5 t/ha determined the installation of a vegetative layer and diminished the soil metal bioavailability to the Lolium prerenne plant biomass. When using the organic-zeolite mixture, a synergistic effect is recorded of the two components of the treatment agent and an increase of the biomass with 448%. Moreover, the resulted biomass shows the highest reductions of metal bioaccumulations, of 38-46% for Zn and Fe, of 62% for Cu and between 82-89% for Cr, Ni and Pb.

  19. Evaluaciones Estandarizadas: Seis Reflexiones Críticas Standardized Assessments: Six Critical Reflections Avaliações Padronizadas: Seis Reflexões Críticas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ignacio Barrenechea

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Este trabajo presenta una revisión de la literatura que analiza seis limitaciones claves que tienen las evaluaciones estandarizadas. Las seis críticas que se presentan son: la tensión que existe entre el concepto de inteligencias múltiples y las evaluaciones estandarizadas, la desatención de componentes del curriculum real - el cual no necesariamente se agota en el curriculum prescripto, los riesgos de enseñar para el test, los incentivos que se generan de hacer trampa con los resultados, la falta de consideración de las diferencias socio económicas de los alumnos que son evaluados, y, por último, las limitaciones de los resultados de las evaluaciones estandarizadas para predecir el éxito laboral de los estudiantes. Este trabajo concluye que este tipo de evaluaciones, si bien pueden tener ciertas ventajas, cuando son usadas como el único instrumento para tomar decisiones educativas, las limitaciones son mayores que sus beneficios.

    This paper presents a review of the literature analyzing six key limitations of standardized evaluations. The six criticisms are the following: the tension that exists between the concept of multiple intelligences and the standardized evaluations, the disregard of components of the real curriculum - which is not necessarily exhausted in the prescribed curriculum, the risks of teaching to the test, the incentives that are generated to cheat or inflate the results of the tests, the lack of consideration of the economic differences of the pupils who are evaluated, and, finally, the limitations of the results of standardized evaluations as predictors of the labour success of the students. This paper concludes that when this type of evaluation is used as the only basis of educational decisions, the costs outweigh the benefits.


    Este trabalho apresenta uma revisão da literatura para a análise de seis limitações chave que têm testes padronizados. As seis limitações apresentados são: tens

  20. Evaluation of the energy saving potential in illumination using presence sensors; Evaluacion del potencial de ahorro de energia en iluminacion utilizando sensores de presencia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cortes Eslava, Alejandro [Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico (UNAM), Mexico, D. F. (Mexico)

    1999-07-01

    The analysis and the evaluation of the energy saving that would provide a system of illumination controlled by sensors of presence in an enclosure with low transit, evaluating the economic profitability of the system is presented. The data, from which the analysis is sustained and the results are deducted, coming from the use and installation of a timer in the area. [Spanish] Se presenta el analisis y la evaluacion de los ahorros de energia que suministraria un sistema de iluminacion controlado por sensores de presencia en un recinto con bajo transito, evaluando la rentabilidad economica del sistema. Los datos, a partir de los cuales se sustenta el analisis y se deducen los resultados, provienen de la utilizacion e instalacion de un contador de tiempo de uso en el recinto.

  1. Ash aggregation enhanced by deposition and redistribution of salt on the surface of volcanic ash in eruption plumes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Sebastian B; Ayris, Paul M; Wadsworth, Fabian B; Kueppers, Ulrich; Casas, Ana S; Delmelle, Pierre; Taddeucci, Jacopo; Jacob, Michael; Dingwell, Donald B

    2017-03-31

    Interactions with volcanic gases in eruption plumes produce soluble salt deposits on the surface of volcanic ash. While it has been postulated that saturation-driven precipitation of salts following the dissolution of ash surfaces by condensed acidic liquids is a primary mechanism of salt formation during an eruption, it is only recently that this mechanism has been subjected to detailed study. Here we spray water and HCl droplets into a suspension of salt-doped synthetic glass or volcanic ash particles, and produce aggregates. Deposition of acidic liquid droplets on ash particles promotes dissolution of existing salts and leaches cations from the underlying material surface. The flow of liquid, due to capillary forces, will be directed to particle-particle contact points where subsequent precipitation of salts will cement the aggregate. Our data suggest that volcanically-relevant loads of surface salts can be produced by acid condensation in eruptive settings. Several minor and trace elements mobilised by surface dissolution are biologically relevant; geographic areas with aggregation-mediated ash fallout could be "hotspots" for the post-deposition release of these elements. The role of liquids in re-distributing surface salts and cementing ash aggregates also offers further insight into the mechanisms which preserve well-structured aggregates in some ash deposits.

  2. Spatial Vegetation Data for Acadia National Park Vegetation Mapping Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (UMESC) has produced the Vegetation Spatial Database Coverage (vegetation map) for the...

  3. Environmental guidelines for reuse of ash in civil engineering applications - including criteria for Sb and As; Miljoeriktlinjer foer askanvaendning i anlaeggningsbyggande - inklusive haltkriterier foer Sb och As

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bendz, David; Wik, Ola (Swedish Geotechnical Inst., Linkoeping (Sweden)); Jones, Celia; Pettersson, Michael; Elert, Mark (Kemakta, Stockholm (Sweden))

    2009-07-15

    Swedish producers, authorities and users have acknowledged the need for common environmental guidelines for residues. The objective of this project has been to develop a proposal for common environmental guidelines for reuse of ash in civil engineering applications. The project has a narrow risk assessment with application on an strictly nearfield, local perspective and focus on a limited set of substances. Health aspects for construction workers are not covered in the project. The starting point in the risk assessment is the assumption that ashes may be used just like any conventional construction material. Special requirements or regulations regarding precautionary actions in the handling of ashes, regarding the site or surroundings will be avoided. The guiding principle has been the precautionary principle: reuse of ash is acceptable only if it constitute an insignificant risk to health and environment. The calculations are based on defined emission- and exposure scenarios. The concept of insignificant risk imply that the impact in the defined points of compliance does not exceed established health- and environmental criteria. The model address health risks associated with spreading of particles and exposure by dust, oral intake, dermal contact and intake by vegetables or wild grown berries and consumption of ground water. Off-site environmental effects in surface waters and in soil as well as health- and environmental risks in the post use phase are also considered. Exposure by dust is addressed in the same way as in the Swedish Environmental Protection Agency's guidelines for contaminated soil [12]. The guidelines values for exposure by dust, oral intake, dermal contact and intake by vegetables or wild grown berrys are total content, whereas the guidelines for exposure by consumption of ground water or environmental effects in surface waters are based on leaching properties of the ash. The guidelines rely on a conceptual model, defined emissions and

  4. Wood ash used as partly sand and/or cement replacement in mortar

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ottosen, Lisbeth M.; Hansen, Esben Østergaard; Jensen, Pernille Erland

    2016-01-01

    , and the present work reports a characterization of three different WAs. Properties of mortar samples with the WAs used as partly cement and/or sand replacement are reported. Compressive strength development and porosity are the mortar properties in focus. The overall aim of the work is to evaluate the influence...... from the differences in ash characteristics to the properties of the mortar samples. The characteristics of the ashes did vary considerably. For example, one ash had very high loss on ignition (LoI) of 14% compared to 3% for the other ashes. Ash solubility in water ranged from 18% to 28%. Two...... to a reference without ash, however, the decrease was small for two of the ashes. Using the ash with the high LoI resulted in significantly lower compressive strength compared to the other two ashes. The mortar samples with two of the ashes (with low LoI) had qualities, which were very encouraging in order...

  5. Greenlandic Waste Incineration Fly And Bottom Ash As Secondary Resource In Mortar

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkelund, Gunvor Marie; Ottosen, Lisbeth M.; Jensen, Pernille Erland

    2016-01-01

    , the effects on compressive strengths of mortars by substituting cement or sand by raw, washed and electrodialytically treated fly ash or bottom ash were investigated. Parts of the experimental fly ash had been pre-treated by either washing with distilled water or electro-dialytically treated to remove salts...... and by the latter method, also heavy metals. Mortar samples were cast where cement (5%–20%) or sand (5%–10%) was replaced with fly ash or bottom ash, together with references without replacements. The compressive strengths were measured after 7, 14, 28 and 42 days. Replacing cement by fly ash resulted in lower...... and cement with fly ash. Based on the compressive strength tests, it is found that using Greenlandic incineration ashes in mortar as 5% cement replacement could consume all ash instead of disposals, and could thus turn the ashes into a local resource and simultaneously reduce the import of cement....

  6. La participación ciudadana como criterio de valor en evaluaciones de carácter integral. Una aproximación desde la experiencia de AEVAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana María Ruiz Martínez

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Desde hace años la cuestión de la participación ciudadana ha suscitado un notable interés. Tanto en el ámbito académico como desde organismos internacionales se han generado numerosos trabajos en relación con modelos y procesos de participación, evaluaciones de políticas públicas con enfoque participativo o considerando la participación como una variable explicativa de su éxito o fracaso. Sin embargo es dificultoso encontrar evaluaciones de políticas públicas que contemplen entre otros criterios de valor, el de participación. El problema que se pretende abordar en este artículo es cómo evaluar la participación ciudadana en procesos de evaluación de carácter integral y que por lo tanto abordan todo el ciclo de la política utilizando para ello múltiples criterios de valor. For years the issue of citizen participation has generated important interest. Both academia and international organizations have generated numerous studies concerning models and participatory processes, evaluations of public policies with participatory approach or considering participation as an explanatory variable for their success or failure. However it is difficult to find evaluations of public policies that include participation among other value criterion. The problem to be addressed in this article is how to evaluate public participation in comprehensive evaluation processes, and therefore address the full policy cycle using multiple value criteria.

  7. Methodology for evaluating the grounding system in electrical substations; Metodologia para la evaluacion del sistema de puesta a tierra en subestaciones electricas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torrelles Rivas, L.F [Universidad Nacional Experimental Politecnica: Antonio Jose de Sucre (UNEXPO), Guayana, Bolivar (Venezuela)]. E-mail: torrellesluis@gmail.com; Alvarez, P. [Petroleos de Venezuela S.A (PDVSA), Maturin, Monagas (Venezuela)]. E-mail: alvarezph@pdvsa.com

    2013-03-15

    The present work proposes a methodology for evaluating grounding systems in electrical substations from medium and high voltage, in order to diagnose the state of the elements of the grounding system and the corresponding electrical variables. The assessment methodology developed includes a visual inspection phase to the elements of the substation. Then, by performing measurements and data analysis, the electrical continuity between the components of the substation and the mesh ground is verified, the soil resistivity and resistance of the mesh. Also included in the methodology the calculation of the step and touch voltage of the substation, based on the criteria of the International IEEE standards. We study the case of the 115 kV Pirital Substation belonging to PDVSA Oriente Transmission Network. [Spanish] En el presente trabajo se plantea una metodologia para la evaluacion de sistemas de puesta a tierra en subestaciones electricas de media y alta tension, con la finalidad de diagnosticar el estado de los elementos que conforman dicho sistema y las variables electricas correspondientes. La metodologia de evaluacion desarrollada incluye una fase de inspeccion visual de los elementos que conforman la subestacion. Luego, mediante la ejecucion de mediciones y analisis de datos, se verifica la continuidad electrica entre los componentes de la subestacion y la malla de puesta a tierra, la resistividad del suelo y resistencia de la malla. Se incluye tambien en la metodologia el calculo de las tensiones de paso y de toque de la subestacion, segun lo fundamentado en los criterios de los estandares Internacionales IEEE. Se estudia el caso de la Subestacion Pirital 115 kV perteneciente a la Red de Transmision de PDVSA Oriente.

  8. Examination of the possibilities of the application of waste materials (gypsum, fly ash and bottom ash in construction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trifunović Prvoslav

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The possibilities of the application of waste gypsum (citrogypsum, nitrogyosum and sulphogypsum, fly ash and bottom ash in construction: for production of gypsum binders (a-calcium sulphate hemihydrate, b-calcium sulphata hemihydrate and b-anhydrite, for obtaining construction products (bricks and blocks and as component materials for road layers were presented in this work. Also, the possibilities of the application of sulphogypsum (or FGD gypsum for solidification and stabilization of fly ash were presented. The obtained results could have great importance in both ecological and economic views (elimination of important pollutants of water, air and soil, replacement of natural by waste materials, reduction of waste disposal cost.

  9. A Comprehensive Review on the Properties of Coal Bottom Ash in Concrete as Sound Absorption Material

    OpenAIRE

    Ramzi Hannan Nurul Izzati Raihan; Shahidan Shahiron; Ali Noorwirdawati; Maarof Mohamad Zulkhairi

    2017-01-01

    The government is currently implementing policies to increase the usage of coal as fuel for electricity generation. At the same time, the dependency on gas will be reduced. In addition, coal power plants in Malaysia produce large amounts of industrial waste such as bottom ash which is collected in impoundment ponds (ash pond). However, millions of tons of coal ash (bottom ash) waste are collected in ponds near power plant stations. Since bottom ash has been classified as hazardous material th...

  10. Reduction of metal leaching in brown coal fly ash using geopolymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bankowski, P; Zou, L; Hodges, R

    2004-10-18

    Current regulations classify fly ash as a prescribed waste and prohibit its disposal in regular landfill. Treatment of the fly ash can reduce the leach rate of metals, and allow it to be disposed in less prescribed landfill. A geopolymer matrix was investigated as a potential stabilisation method for brown coal fly ash. Precipitator fly ash was obtained from electrostatic precipitators and leached fly ash was collected from ash disposal ponds, and leaching tests were conducted on both types of geopolymer stabilised fly ashes. The ratio of fly ash to geopolymer was varied to determine the effects of different compositions on leaching rates. Fourteen metals and heavy metals were targeted during the leaching tests and the results indicate that a geopolymer is effective at reducing the leach rates of many metals from the fly ash, such as calcium, arsenic, selenium, strontium and barium. The major element leachate concentrations obtained from leached fly ash were in general lower than that of precipitator fly ash. Conversely, heavy metal leachate concentrations were lower in precipitator fly ash than leached pond fly ash. The maximum addition of fly ash to this geopolymer was found to be 60wt% for fly ash obtained from the electrostatic precipitators and 70wt% for fly ash obtained from ash disposal ponds. The formation of geopolymer in the presence of fly ash was studied using 29Si MAS-NMR and showed that a geopolymer matrix was formed. X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) imaging showed the interaction of the fly ash with the geopolymer, which was related to the leachate data and also the maximum percentage fly ash addition.

  11. Coal Ash Corrosion Resistant Materials Testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D. K. McDonald; P. L. Daniel; D. J. DeVault

    2007-12-31

    In April 1999, three identical superheater test sections were installed into the Niles Unit No.1 for the purpose of testing and ranking the coal ash corrosion resistance of candidate superheater alloys. The Niles boiler burns high sulfur coal (3% to 3.5%) that has a moderate alkali content (0.2% sodium equivalents), thus the constituents necessary for coal ash corrosion are present in the ash. The test sections were controlled to operate with an average surface metal temperature from approximately 1060 F to 1210 F which was within the temperature range over which coal ash corrosion occurs. Thus, this combination of aggressive environment and high temperature was appropriate for testing the performance of candidate corrosion-resistant tube materials. Analyses of the deposit and scale confirmed that aggressive alkali sulfate constituents were present at the metal surface and active in tube metal wastage. The test sections were constructed so that the response of twelve different candidate tube and/or coating materials could be studied. The plan was to remove and evaluate one of the three test sections at time intervals of 1 year, 3 years, and 5 years. This would permit an assessment of performance of the candidate materials as a function of time. Test Section A was removed in November 2001 after about 24 months of service at the desired steam temperature set point, with about 15.5 months of exposure at full temperature. A progress report, issued in October 2002, was written to document the performance of the candidate alloys in that test section. The evaluation described the condition of each tube sample after exposure. It involved a determination of the rate of wall thickness loss for these samples. In cases where there was more than one sample of a candidate material in the test section, an assessment was made of the performance of the alloy as a function of temperature. Test Sections B and C were examined during the November 2001 outage, and it was decided that

  12. Short Communication Energy and ash contents of sandy beach ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Currey 1970). Thus in large crustaceans. Table 4 Percentage ash contents of sandy beach species. Species. Tylos gralluialws. Pofttogeioides latipes. Eurydice iongicornis. Excirolana Nllalensis. Niambia. sp. TalochLrtia. capensis. Pseudharpi1lia ...

  13. Volcanic Ash Detection Using Raman LIDAR: "VADER" Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Volcanic ash is a significant hazard to aircraft engine and electronics and has caused damage to unwary aircraft and disrupted air travel for thousands of travelers,...

  14. On the visibility of airborne volcanic ash and mineral dust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinzierl, B.; Sauer, D. N.; Minikin, A.; Reitebuch, O.; Dahlkötter, F.; Mayer, B. C.; Emde, C.; Tegen, I.; Gasteiger, J.; Petzold, A.; Veira, A.; Kueppers, U.; Schumann, U.

    2012-12-01

    After the eruption of the Eyjafjalla volcano (Iceland) in April 2010 which caused the most extensive restrictions of the airspace over Europe since the end of World War II, the aviation safety concept of avoiding "visible ash", i.e. volcanic ash that can be seen by the human eye, was recommended. However so far, no clear definition of "visible ash" and no relation between the visibility of an aerosol layer and related aerosol mass concentrations are available. The goal of our study is to assess whether it is possible from the pilot's perspective in flight to detect the presence of volcanic ash and to distinguish between volcanic ash and other aerosol layers just by sight. In our presentation, we focus the comparison with other aerosols on aerosol types impacting aviation: Besides volcanic ash, dust storms are known to be avoided by aircraft. We use in-situ and lidar data as well photographs taken onboard the DLR research aircraft Falcon during the Saharan Mineral Dust Experiments (SAMUM) in 2006 and 2008 and during the Eyjafjalla volcanic eruption in April/May 2010. We complement this analysis with numerical modelling, using idealized radiative transfer simulations with the 3D Monte Carlo radiative transfer code MYSTIC for a variety of selected viewing geometries. Both aerosol types, Saharan mineral dust and volcanic ash, show an enhanced coarse mode (> 1 μm) aerosol concentration, but volcanic ash aerosol additionally contains a significant number of Aitken mode particles (Volcanic ash is slightly more absorbing than mineral dust, and the spectral behaviour of the refractive index is slightly different. According to our simulations, these differences are not detectable just by human eye. Furthermore, our data show, that it is difficult to define a lower threshold for the visibility of an aerosol layer because the visual detectability depends on many parameters, including the thickness of the aerosol layer, the brightness and color contrast between the airborne

  15. Emerald ash borer dispersal in Maryland: go forth young pest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chris Sargent; Dick Bean; Michael Raupp; Alan J. Sawyer

    2009-01-01

    The emerald ash borer (EAB) (Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire), an exotic invasive pest from Asia, was introduced into Maryland in April 2003 via infested nursery stock shipped from Michigan to a nursery in southern...

  16. Solid State Multiwavelength LIDAR for Volcanic Ash Monitoring Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Physical Sciences Inc. proposes to develop a compact, multiwavelength LIDAR with polarization analysis capability that will be able to identify volcanic ash clouds...

  17. Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge : A plan for the future

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The management plan is to maintain Ash Meadows Refuge as a natural ecosystem. To accomplish this, the area will be restored as much as possible to conditions which...

  18. Durability properties of high volume fly ash self compacting concretes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    P. Dinakar; K.G. Babu; Manu Santhanam [Indian Institute of Technology, Chennai (India). Building Technology Division

    2008-11-15

    This paper presents an experimental study on the durability properties of self compacting concretes (SCCs) with high volume replacements of fly ash. Eight fly ash self compacting concretes of various strength grades were designed at desired fly ash percentages of 0, 10, 30, 50, 70 and 85%, in comparison with five different mixtures of normal vibrated concretes (NCs) at equivalent strength grades. The durability properties were studied through the measurement of permeable voids, water absorption, acid attack and chloride permeation. The results indicated that the SCCs showed higher permeable voids and water absorption than the vibrated normal concretes of the same strength grades. However, in acid attack and chloride diffusion studies the high volume fly ash SCCs had significantly lower weight losses and chloride ion diffusion.

  19. Stability of volcanic ash aggregates and break-up processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Sebastian B; Kueppers, Ulrich; Ametsbichler, Jonathan; Cimarelli, Corrado; Merrison, Jonathan P; Poret, Matthieu; Wadsworth, Fabian B; Dingwell, Donald B

    2017-08-07

    Numerical modeling of ash plume dispersal is an important tool for forecasting and mitigating potential hazards from volcanic ash erupted during explosive volcanism. Recent tephra dispersal models have been expanded to account for dynamic ash aggregation processes. However, there are very few studies on rates of disaggregation during transport. It follows that current models regard ash aggregation as irrevocable and may therefore overestimate aggregation-enhanced sedimentation. In this experimental study, we use industrial granulation techniques to artificially produce aggregates. We subject these to impact tests and evaluate their resistance to break-up processes. We find a dependence of aggregate stability on primary particle size distribution and solid particle binder concentration. We posit that our findings could be combined with eruption source parameters and implemented in future tephra dispersal models.

  20. Genome sequence and genetic diversity of European ash trees

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sollars, Elizabeth S A; Harper, Andrea L; Kelly, Laura J

    2017-01-01

    Ash trees (genus Fraxinus, family Oleaceae) are widespread throughout the Northern Hemisphere, but are being devastated in Europe by the fungus Hymenoscyphus fraxineus, causing ash dieback, and in North America by the herbivorous beetle Agrilus planipennis. Here we sequence the genome of a low......-heterozygosity Fraxinus excelsior tree from Gloucestershire, UK, annotating 38,852 protein-coding genes of which 25% appear ash specific when compared with the genomes of ten other plant species. Analyses of paralogous genes suggest a whole-genome duplication shared with olive (Olea europaea, Oleaceae). We also re......-sequence 37 F. excelsior trees from Europe, finding evidence for apparent long-term decline in effective population size. Using our reference sequence, we re-analyse association transcriptomic data, yielding improved markers for reduced susceptibility to ash dieback. Surveys of these markers in British...

  1. Ash Meadows Pupfish Preserve: A proposal from The Nature Conservancy

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Ash Meadows region of southwest Nevada has evolved since the last period of glaciation into a unique alkali desert ecosystem. The remnant springs, pools and...

  2. Recoverable immobilization of transuranic elements in sulfate ash

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenhalgh, Wilbur O.

    1985-01-01

    Disclosed is a method of reversibly immobilizing sulfate ash at least about 20% of which is sulfates of transuranic elements. The ash is mixed with a metal which can be aluminum, cerium, samarium, europium, or a mixture thereof, in amounts sufficient to form an alloy with the transuranic elements, plus an additional amount to reduce the transuranic element sulfates to elemental form. Also added to the ash is a fluxing agent in an amount sufficient to lower the percentage of the transuranic element sulfates to about 1% to about 10%. The mixture of the ash, metal, and fluxing agent is heated to a temperature sufficient to melt the fluxing agent and the metal. The mixture is then cooled and the alloy is separated from the remainder of the mixture.

  3. Hydrogen isotope exchange experiments with Mt Mazama ash

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolan, G. S.; Bindeman, I. N.; Palandri, J. L.

    2011-12-01

    The 2H/H ratio in hydrous minerals and volcanic glass are routinely used as paleo proxies to infer ∂2H value of meteoric waters and thus paleo-climate conditions. There is a widely held assumption that once environmental water is taken up by the ash to ~3-4 wt%, hydrogen isotopes preserve original hydrologic environmental conditions through time. We report a series of 2H -H aqueous exposure experiments of 7600BP Mt Mazama ash from the Crater Lake eruption. Native Mt. Mazama ash, ~69% SiO2 contains ~3.75% H2O with ∂2H -145 %. Water exposure experiments for this ash were done at 70, 40 and 25°C, time from 0 to >7000 h, to evaluate rates of hydrogen uptake from deuterated waters (650 % to pure D2O). Measurements were performed on 1-2 mg of ash using TCEA-MAT253 GSMS. We also employ a KBr pellet technique with infrared spectroscopy to measure total water and molecular water peaks. In this fashion an estimation of the distribution of water vs. SiOH is possible. Time series experiments aided by infrared measurements demonstrate the following new results: 1) Depending on exposure time and temperature we observe 5 to >100 % 2H uptake in dried samples positively correlated with temperature. In as little as 48 hours approximately 5% ∂2H increases are seen in samples incubated at 70 °C with 650 % water. At this rate the ash at 70 °C would take ~2.9 years to fully react with 2H. Other separate samples reacted with pure D2O develop a clear infrared signal at ~ 2600 cm-1 due to OD bond stretching. 2) Step heating experiments on native ash indicate the ∂2H of the remaining water does not change until the ash is heated to past 200-220 °C. 3) A sample immersed in 650 % ∂2H water for >300 days at 70 °C degassed and sampled at increasing temperature intervals as above shows an enrichment ranging from 250 % at no water lost to 20 % at .10 % water when compared to native ash. 4) Ash dried under vacuum at ~130 °C shows mostly (~80%) loss of molecular water accompanied by

  4. Ash properties of some dominant Greek forest species

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liodakis, S. [Laboratory of Inorganic and Analytical Chemistry, Department of Chemical Engineering, National Technical University of Athens (NTUA), 9 Iroon Polytechniou Street, Athens 157 73 (Greece)]. E-mail: liodakis@central.ntua.gr; Katsigiannis, G. [Laboratory of Inorganic and Analytical Chemistry, Department of Chemical Engineering, National Technical University of Athens (NTUA), 9 Iroon Polytechniou Street, Athens 157 73 (Greece); Kakali, G. [Laboratory of Inorganic and Analytical Chemistry, Department of Chemical Engineering, National Technical University of Athens (NTUA), 9 Iroon Polytechniou Street, Athens 157 73 (Greece)

    2005-10-15

    The elemental and chemical wood ash compositions of six dominant Greek fuels was investigated using a variety of techniques, including thermal gravimetric analysis (TG), differential thermal analysis (DTA), atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). In addition, the alkalinity of wood ash was determined by titration. The ash was prepared by combustion at low (600 deg. C), middle (800 deg. C) and high temperatures (1000 deg. C). The ash composition is very important because thousands of hectares of wildlands are burned annually in Greece. The resulting deposits affect soil properties (i.e., pH) and provide a source of inorganic constituents (i.e., Ca, K, Na, Mg, etc.), while the most soluble compounds (i.e., sodium and potassium hydroxides and carbonates) do not persist through the wet season. The samples selected were: Pinus halepensis (Aleppo pine), Pinus brutia (Calabrian pine), Olea europaea (Olive), Cupressus sempervirens (Italian cypress), Pistacia lentiscus (Mastic tree), Quercus coccifera (Holly oak)

  5. Biomass ashes from pyrolytic wood liquefaction as novel soil amendments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Delgado Juárez, Marina; Gómez Brandón, María; Mazzier, Thomas; Schönegger, Deborah; Hermanns, Roy; Leijenhorst, Evert; Insam, Heribert

    2017-04-01

    What happens when an old soil amendment is in fact a new one? Traditionally, ashes from biomass combustion were considered as a valuable resource, and widely used as an agricultural soil amendment. However, in recent decades we have been reluctant to apply them to soils, despite the increase in the production of combustion ashes resulting from the development of new fuels derived from biomass residues. The production of Fast Pyrolysis Bio Oil (FPBO) out of various lignocellulosic biomass streams is one of the newest technologies for gaining a liquid biofuel that can be seen as a future substitute for mineral oils. During the pyrolysis process, the by-products (charcoal and low calorific gases) are combusted to generate energy, resulting in the production of ashes that contain the majority of the minerals and salts originally present in the feedstock. The main objective of the present work is to investigate if the recovered ashes from the pyrolysis process can be used as a soil amendment. A greenhouse trial was set up in order to evaluate the impact of the ashes on an acid grassland soil (eutric Cambisol) from the region of Tyrol (Austria). A two-level experimental design (ash treatment, and plant effect) was set up. The ashes were mixed with the soil columns at a ratio of 1% (w:w, fresh weight). A control treatment that consisted of soil without the addition of ashes was also included. Moreover, to understand the effect that the ashes would have on crop growth, ten seeds of a traditional wheat variety (Tiroler Früher Dinkel; Triticum aestivum subsp. spelta), were placed in half of the columns with and without ashes, so as to determine the seed germination index and plant growth. Moreover, specific microbial groups related to N cycle were quantified by real-time PCR. A total of 24 experimental units (2 ash treatments x 2 incubation times x 2 plant levels x 3 replicates) were analysed. After an equilibration period of 24 h at 4 °C (referred as time zero), the

  6. Pretreatment and utilization of waste incineration bottom ashes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Astrup, Thomas

    2007-01-01

    , however, have had a strong emphasis on lab experiments with little focus on full scale bottom ash upgrading methods. The introduction of regulatory limit values restricting leaching from utilized bottom ashes, has created a need for a better understanding of how lab scale experiences can be utilized....../aging, washing with and without additives, organic matter, sampling techniques, utilization options, and assessment tools. This paper provides an overview of these projects. The main results and experiences are discussed and evaluated with respect to bottom ash upgrading and utilization. Based on this discussion......Within recent years, researchers and authorities have had increasing focus on leaching properties from waste incineration bottom ashes. Researchers have investigated processes such as those related to carbonation, weathering, metal complexation, and leaching control. Most of these investigations...

  7. Ash formation under pressurized pulverized coal combustion conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davila Latorre, Aura Cecilia

    Coal combustion is a source of inorganic particulate matter (ash), which can deposit in boilers and also be emitted into the atmosphere becoming part of ambient fine particulate matter (PM 2.5). In order to decrease coal combustion emissions per unit of power produced, higher efficiency systems have been proposed, including systems operating at elevated pressures. These new operating conditions will affect pollutant formation mechanisms, particularly those associated with the conversion of mineral matter to ash. Ash particle formation mechanisms are particularly sensitive to changes in pressure as they are related to the structure of coal char particles at early stages of combustion. To assess the importance of pressure on ash particle formation, pyrolyzed chars and ash particles from pressurized pulverized combustion of two bituminous and one subbituminous U.S. coals at operating pressures up to 30 atm were studied. Pressure changes the distribution of char particle types, changing the spatial distribution of the minerals during the combustion process and therefore affecting particle formation mechanisms. Chars were examined by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and classified into two different types (cenospheric and solid) depending on porosity and wall thickness. A correlation for estimating the amount of these cenospheric char particles was then proposed for bituminous coals based on the operating conditions and coal maceral analysis. The ash particle size distribution of the coals combusted at different operating pressures was measured using Computer Controlled Scanning Electron Microscopy (CCSEM). The results of the char characterization and ash particle size distribution measurements were then incorporated into an ash particle formation algorithm that was proposed and implemented. The model predicts ash particle size and composition distributions at elevated pressures under conditions of complete char burnout. Ash predictions were calculated by first

  8. Multifrequency radar imaging of ash plumes: an experiment at Stromboli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donnadieu, Franck; Freret-Lorgeril, Valentin; Delanoë, Julien; Vinson, Jean-Paul; Peyrin, Frédéric; Hervier, Claude; Caudoux, Christophe; Van Baelen, Joël; Latchimy, Thierry

    2016-04-01

    Volcanic ash emissions in the atmosphere are hazardous to aviation while ash fallout affects people and human activities and may cause damage to infrastructures and economic losses. In the framework of the French Government Laboratory of Excellence ClerVolc initiative, an experiment was carried out on Stromboli volcano (Italy), between 28 September and 4 October 2015. The aim was to retrieve various physical properties of the ash plumes, especially the mass loading parameters which are critical for the modelling of ash dispersal. We used a complementary set of cutting edge techniques recording in different bands of the electromagnetic spectrum. The innovative instrument setup consisted in three radars, hyperspectral thermal infrared and dual-band UV cameras, a mini DOAS-Flyspec and a multigas sensor. A drone equipped with differential GPS was flown near the ash plumes with several sensors including SO2, CO2 and particle counter. We mainly focus on radar measurements of over 200 ash plumes and present some preliminary comparisons at three frequencies. The BASTA Doppler radar at 95 GHz, originally designed for atmospheric studies, was deployed at about 2.2 km in slant distance from the eruptive craters. It was configured to observe volumes above one of the active craters with a spatio-temporal resolution of 12.5 m and 1 s. From the same location, a 1.2 GHz volcano Doppler radar (VOLDORAD) was recording the signature of ballistics and small lapilli at 0.15 s in 60 m-deep volumes. In addition, a commercial 24 GHz micro rain Doppler radar (MRR) simultaneously recorded activity from the Rochette station, at 400 to 650 m from the active craters with a sampling rate of 10 s and a resolution of 25 m. The latter was pointing almost perpendicularly to the other radar beams. Reflectivity factors were measured inside the ash plume above the source vent by the BASTA radar (3 mm wavelength) spanning -9 to +21 dBZ. Fallout could sometimes be tracked during several minutes within

  9. Environmental impact of manganese due to its leaching from coal fly ash.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Bably; Mondal, Kajal K R

    2009-01-01

    In India, so far not much efforts have been made to use coal ash as backfill material in underground/ open cast mines and to predict its subsequent effect on ground water quality. One of the main problems in disposing of big quantities of coal ash is the possible leaching of different pollutants, including manganese. A thorough investigation regarding leaching of manganese from different fly ashes is required to know the impact of manganese due to its leaching from fly ash to ground water as well as surface water. In the present study, short term and long term leaching studies have been carried out on fly ash, bottom ash, pond ash and weathered ash of Chandrapura thermal power plant, Bokaro, Jharkhand and Ramagundam thermal power plant, Ramagundam, Andhra Pradesh. The amount of manganese released in different experiments has been evaluated. The leachate of Chandrapura fly ash has more manganese concentration (0.2001 mg/L) than the leachate of bottom ash, pond ash and weathered ash. A field investigation at Damoda abandoned open cast mine, filled with pond ash of Chandrapura thermal power plant revealed that concentration of manganese in ground water beneath the ash filled mine has been found very high (maximum up to 6.0 mg/L). But its migration to a long distance has not been seen. Remedial measures for coal ash disposal have also been formulated.

  10. The Effects of Design Strength, Fly Ash Content and Curing Method on Compressive Strength of High Volume Fly Ash Concrete: A Design of Experimental

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mochamad Solikin; Budi Setiawan

    2017-01-01

    ...) and the its durability increases significantly. This paper reports investigation on the effect of design strength, fly ash content and curing method on compressive strength of High Volume Fly Ash Concrete...

  11. Optimal Recycling Combination of Ash in South-East Finland

    OpenAIRE

    Deviatkin, Ivan; Havukainen, Jouni; Horttanainen, Mika

    2016-01-01

    The present world energy production is heavily relying on the combustion of solid fuels like coals, peat, biomass, municipal solid waste, whereas the share of renewable fuels is anticipated to increase in the future to mitigate climate change. In Finland, peat and wood are widely used for energy production. In any case, the combustion of solid fuels results in generation of several types of thermal conversion residues, such as bottom ash, fly ash, and boiler slag. The predominant residue type...

  12. Remote Sensing of Volcanic ASH at the Met Office

    OpenAIRE

    Marenco F.; Kent J.; Adam M; Buxmann J.; Francis P.; Haywood J.

    2016-01-01

    The eruption of Eyjafjallajökull in 2010 has triggered the rapid development of volcanic ash remote sensing activities at the Met Office. Volcanic ash qualitative and quantitative mapping have been achieved using lidar on board the Facility for Airborne Atmospheric Measurements (FAAM) research aircraft, and using improved satellite retrieval algorithms. After the eruption, a new aircraft facility, the Met Office Civil Contingencies Aircraft (MOCCA), has been set up to enable a rapid response,...

  13. Some studies on the reaction between fly ash and lime

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    (1997) also studied the hydrothermal reaction of fly ash with Ca(OH)2 and CaSO4⋅2H2O. Muntcan et al (1987) studied on the autoclaved limestone materials with addi- tion of fly ash. The physico-mechanical properties of the resulting ... tate in 1 litre of alcohol. It was standardized as follows: About 0⋅1 g of freshly ignited ...

  14. pozzolanicity and some engineering properties of rice husk ash

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    HON

    (Neville, 1996). Rice Husks have been found to contain very high silica content, slow firing at a room temperature of 500 to 700 degrees Celsius. (Roy, 1987). The resulting ash is amorphous with a porous structure (Massazza, 1979). The ash has a specific surface as high as 50,000m2/kg and a specific gravity of 1.9 to 2.4 ...

  15. Comparison of creep of the cement pastes included fly ash

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Padevět Pavel

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper is devoted to comparison of creep of cement pastes containing fly ash admixture. The size of creep in time depends on the amount of components of the cement paste. Attention is paid to the content of classical fly ash in cement paste and its impact on the size of creep. The moisture of cement pastes is distinguished because it significantly affects the rheological properties of the material.

  16. Concentration of heavy metals in ash produced from Lithuanian forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baltrenaite, Edita; Pereira, Paulo; Butkus, Donatas; Úbeda, Xavier

    2010-05-01

    Wood ash contains important amounts of heavy metals. This quantity depends on burned specie, temperature of exposition and heat duration time. Due the high mineralization imposed by the temperatures, ash is used as lime product in agriculture and forests. Also, after a forest fire large quantities of ash are produced and distributed in soil surface. This mineralized organic matter can induce important environmental problems, including soil toxicity provoked by heavy metals leachates from ash. There is an extensive literature about heavy metals contents on ash in different species. However, it recently highlighted that the same species placed in different environments can respond diversely to same temperatures. This question is of major importance because temperature effects on severity can be a function of the plant communities instead of specie characteristics. These findings add a higher degree of complexity in the understanding of temperature effects on ash composition and consequent availability of heavy metals. The aim of this study is to compare the ash chemical heavy metal composition, Cobalt (Co), Chromium (Cr), Cooper (Cu), Silver (Ag), Lead (Pb), Nickel (Ni), Manganese (Mn) and Zinc (Zn), from Pinus sylvestris and Betula pendula, collected in key and representative areas of Lithuanian forests, located in southern, coastal and central part. Samples were collected from alive trees, taken to laboratory and air dried. Subsequently were crushed and submitted to muffle furnace at temperature of 550°C during two hours. The ash samples were digested and in a HNO3-HCl solution and then analysed with AAS. Comparisons between species and sites were performed with a Non-parametric one-way ANOVA‘s on rank transformed data followed by Tukey‘s HSD, significant at a pcommunication.

  17. Identification and Quantification of Radionuclides in Coal Ash

    OpenAIRE

    Alleman, James E.; Clikeman, Franklyn M.; Skronski, Thomas

    1998-01-01

    One of the important environmental issues raised recently in regard to coal ash reuse for highway construction purposes (e.g., embankment development) is that of worker, and public, exposure to radiation which might possibly be emitted by these types of residuals. Radiation emission is, in fact, a natural phenomenon for most materials, both natural and man-made, but in the case of coal ash residuals the process of combustion produces an inevitable concentration of radionuclides from the origi...

  18. KINETICS OF FLY ASH BENEFICIATION BY CARBON BURNOUT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Joseph N.D. Dodoo; Dr. Joseph M. Okoh

    2000-11-01

    Surface area analyses performed on fly ash samples reveal that the surface area is controlled by carbon content. The higher surface areas found in large particles are due to the presence of highly porous carbonaceous particles. Adsorption-desorption isotherms and t-plots of fly ash samples indicate that fly ash is porous. BJH Adsorption/Desorption pore size analysis reveal that pore diameters are independent of sieve size. They appear to be dependent only on the nature of the material which confers porosity. Based on the results of Brown and Dykstra (41) it is reasonable to assume that calculations of reaction rates at temperatures above 550 C were confounded by weight losses from processes other than carbon oxidation and, therefore, are not useful in determination of the temperature dependence of carbon oxidation in fly ash. The results of the present study indicate that temperatures below 550 C should be used for future studies in order to satisfactorily assess the temperature dependence of carbon oxidation in fly ash. Furthermore, it is also advisable that percent carbon determinations be performed on fly ash samples after the oxidation reactions to determine whether all carbon present in fly ash is oxidized. This will ensure that reaction rates are representative of the complete oxidation of carbon. An inverse relationship was determined between reaction rates and oxygen concentration for this study. As discussed, this may be due to volatilization of volatiles from fly ash and ease of transport of products away from the reaction sites by the action of the vacuum applied to the samples. A more accurate determination of oxygen dependence of carbon oxidation can be accomplished by the use of specialty gases containing different concentrations of oxygen which could eliminate the need to apply vacuum to the samples.

  19. Pure zeolite synthesis from silica extracted from coal fly ashes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moreno, N.; Querol, X.; Plana, F.; Andres, J.M.; Janssen, M.; Nugteren, H. [CSIC, Barcelona (Spain). Inst. Earth Science ' Jaume Almera'

    2002-07-01

    Pure zeolites can be synthesised from silica extracted from fly ash by alkaline leaching. If the process is optimised the solid residue arising from this extraction may also contain a relatively high content of zeolitic material mixed with residual fly ash components. Both the pure and the impure zeolitic material have a high potential for application in waste-water and flue gas-cleaning technologies. The silica extraction potential of 23 European coal fly ashes covering most of the possible fly ash types is investigated in this study. Optimisation of leaching processes, by varying temperature, time and alkali/fly ash rates, permitted extraction yields up to 140 g of SiO{sub 2} per kg using a single step process, but the extraction yields may reach up to 210 g kg{sup -1} by applying thermal pre-treatments prior to the extraction. The solid residue arising from the silica extraction experiments shows a high NaP1 zeolite content. A high Si/Al ratio of the glass matrix, the occurrence of easily soluble silica phases in the original fly ash and a high reactive surface area were found to be the major parameters influencing silica extraction. High purity 4A and X zeolitic material was obtained by combining the silica extracts from the Meirama fly ash and a waste solution from the Al-anodising industry. The results allowed conversion of the silica extraction yields to an equivalent 630 g of pure 4A-X zeolite per kg of fly ash with a cation exchange capacity of 4.7 meq g{sup -1}.

  20. The Geomorphic Expression and Surface Patterns of Ash-flow Deposits on Earth: Implications for the Presence of Ash Deposits on Mars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Silva, S. L.; Bailey, J.

    2011-12-01

    The presence of ash deposits and explosive volcanism on Mars has been debated for over three decades. If correct this has implications for the style of volcanism, the evolution of magmas and volatiles in the mantle and crust, the presence of water, and the evolution of the atmosphere. Critical evidence supporting the ash hypotheses is the geomorphic expression and surface expression of the deposits. Sheet-like aspect, columnar jointing, yardangs, and differential induration in the Medusa Fossae Formation have led to an origin as ash flow tuffs (or ignimbrites) as the most likely origin. Ongoing work on the surface patterns of terrestrial ignimbrites in the Central Andes may help further our understanding. The ignimbrites in this region provide the best terrestrial analog for Martian regions because of their scale and exposure. The regions arid climate allows capture of high resolution satellite views of the surface morphology largely unhindered by vegetation and atmospheric filtering. While the most prominent geomorphic expressions are produced by fluvial and aeolian processes, these are superimposed on features that are the result of post-depositional thermal and degassing history. Evidence of the latter includes indurated ridges that control yardang development, polygonal fractures that appear to be the intersection of dominant joint directions and concentric radiating "rosettes" that appear to the focus of jointing in the ignimbrites. Field observations show that all these geomorphic features are clearly associated with extensive high temperature vapor phase alteration of the deposit visible in the field. The presence of the regularly spaced vapor phase altered rosettes is consistent with post depositional fumarolic gas rise. This coupled with joint spacing as a proxy for cooling rate suggests the rosettes are associated with rapid cooling associated with vapor fluxing. The location and spacing of rosettes implicates external water suggesting that formation of

  1. Utility of Rice Bran Mixed with Fermentation Extract of Vegetable Waste Unconditioned as Probiotics from Vegetable Market

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cahya Setya Utama

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The aimed of the study was to enhance utilization of Lactobacillus Sp. and Saccharomyces sp. as starter for fermentation of waste cabbage and green mustard to enhance the utility of rice bran as an ingredient of poultry feed. The first stage of the study was to characterize the extract of fermented wasted vegetable with difference concentration of glucose and different period of time for incubation. Completely randomized design using 3 x 3 factorial with three replications was used for the first stage of the study. The second stage of the study was to evaluate the effectiveness of the extract of fermented wasted vegetable to improve the quality and utility of rice bran. Completely randomized design with four treatments and 4 replications. The third stage of the study was to obtain the value of nitrogen, calcium and phosphorus retention, as well as metabolic energy of rice bran after fermentation in broiler hatching. The third stage analysis was conducted by t-test analysis. The results of the study showed that the microbial characteristics on the extract of fermented wasted vegetable in two days incubation time and 2% concentration of glucose was able to produce pH of 3.80, log of total lactic acid bacteria 7.38 and types of microbes that grow predominantly were Lactobacillus Sp. and Saccharomyces Sp. The effectiveness of the extract fermented wasted vegetable for the fermentation of rice bran were shown in additional concentration of extract wasted vegetable of 40% with a moisture content of  toluene 65.24%, 13.36% ash, 14.93% protein, 7.61% crude fat, 12.39% crude fiber, nitrogen free extract material (NFE 51.59% and 0.07% biomass. The biological value and the availability of fermented rice bran were higher than unfermented rice bran on the broiler chickens after hatching. The values were justified from nitrogen, calcium and phosphorus retention also metabolic energy. The study concluded that the benefits and utility of rice bran could

  2. Development of fly ash-based automotive brake lining

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohanty, S.; Chugh, Y.P. [South Illinois University, Carbondale, IL (United States). College of Engineering

    2007-07-15

    Coal-fired power plants all over the world generate huge amounts of fly ash each year, 70 million tons of which are produced in the United States alone. Only 40% of all fly ashes generated in the USA find beneficial applications and rest have to be disposed off, which is burden for the generation industry. Fly ash particles possess certain characteristics that make them suitable for use in friction composites as a filter material. An attempt has been made through this research to incorporate more than 50wt% of fly ash particles in automotive brake lining friction composites. This paper presents the research carried out on development of friction composites, using fly ash obtained from a specific power plant in Illinois. Ingredients such as phenolic resin, aramid pulp, glass fiber, potassium titanate, graphite, aluminum fiber and copper powder were used in the composite development phase, in addition to the fly ash. The developed brake lining composites have exhibited consistent coefficients of friction in the range of 0.35-0.4, and wear rates lower than 12wt%.

  3. Corrosion of Modified Concrete with Sugar Cane Bagasse Ash

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. E. Núñez-Jaquez

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Concrete is a porous material and the ingress of water, oxygen, and aggressive ions, such as chlorides, can cause the passive layer on reinforced steel to break down. Additives, such as fly ash, microsilica, rice husk ash, and cane sugar bagasse ash, have a size breakdown that allows the reduction of concrete pore size and, consequently, may reduce the corrosion process. The objective of this work is to determine the corrosion rate of steel in reinforced concrete by the addition of 20% sugar cane bagasse ash by weight of cement. Six prismatic specimens (7×7×10 cm with an embedded steel rod were prepared. Three contained 20% sugar cane bagasse ash by weight of cement and the other three did not. All specimens were placed in a 3.5% NaCl solution and the corrosion rate was determined using polarization resistance. The results showed that reinforced concrete containing sugar cane bagasse ash has the lowest corrosion rates in comparison to reinforced concrete without the additive.

  4. ZEOLITIZATION OF SEWAGE SLUDGE ASH WITH A FUSION METHOD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jolanta Latosińska

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The study shows the results of zeolitization of municipal sewage sludge ash with the indirect fusion method followed by a hydrothermal method. The zeolitization of sewage sludge ash was conducted at the melting temperature of 550°C and the melting time of 60 minutes, crystallization temperatures of 60°C and 90°C, crystallization time of 6 hours and the SSA:NaOH ratio of 1:1.8; 1:1.4. The research of modified sewage sludge ashes included the observation of changes of ash particles surface and the identification of crystalized phases. The zeolitization of sewage sludge ash at the ratio of SSA:NaOH 1.0:1.4 did not cause the formation of zeolite phases. On the other hand, the zeolitization at the ratio of SSA:NaOH 1.0:1.8 resulted in the formation of desired zeolite phases such as zeolite Y (faujasite and hydroxysodalite. The presented method of sewage sludge ash zeolitization allows to obtain highly usable material. Synthesized zeolites may be used as adsorbents and ion exchangers. They can be potentially used to remove heavy metals as well as ammonia from water and wastewater.

  5. Recyclability of Concrete Pavement Incorporating High Volume of Fly Ash

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isamu Yoshitake

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Recyclable concrete pavement was made from fly ash and crushed limestone sand and gravel as aggregates so that the concrete pavement could be recycled to raw materials for cement production. With the aim to use as much fly ash as possible for the sustainable development of society, while achieving adequate strength development, pavement concrete having a cement-replacement ratio of 40% by mass was experimentally investigated, focusing on the strength development at an early age. Limestone powder was added to improve the early strength; flexural strength at two days reached 3.5 MPa, the minimum strength for traffic service in Japan. The matured fly ash concrete made with a cement content of 200 kg/m3 achieved a flexural strength almost equal to that of the control concrete without fly ash. Additionally, Portland cement made from the tested fly ash concrete was tested to confirm recyclability, with the cement quality meeting the Japanese classification of ordinary Portland cement. Limestone-based recyclable fly ash concrete pavement is, thus, a preferred material in terms of sustainability.

  6. Suppressing Heavy Metal Leaching through Ball Milling of Fly Ash

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiliang Chen

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Ball milling is investigated as a method of reducing the leaching concentration (often termed stablilization of heavy metals in municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI fly ash. Three heavy metals (Cu, Cr, Pb loose much of their solubility in leachate by treating fly ash in a planetary ball mill, in which collisions between balls and fly ash drive various physical processes, as well as chemical reactions. The efficiency of stabilization is evaluated by analysing heavy metals in the leachable fraction from treated fly ash. Ball milling reduces the leaching concentration of Cu, Cr, and Pb, and water washing effectively promotes stabilization efficiency by removing soluble salts. Size distribution and morphology of particles were analysed by laser particle diameter analysis and scanning electron microscopy. X-ray diffraction analysis reveals significant reduction of the crystallinity of fly ash by milling. Fly ash particles can be activated through this ball milling, leading to a significant decrease in particle size, a rise in its BET-surface, and turning basic crystals therein into amorphous structures. The dissolution rate of acid buffering materials present in activated particles is enhanced, resulting in a rising pH value of the leachate, reducing the leaching out of some heavy metals.

  7. Study on solidification for municipal solid waste incineration fly ash

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, C.; Liu, Q.; Yang, J.; Xi, W. [Chongqing Univ., Chongqing (China); Huang, B. [Southwest Petroleum Univ., Chengdu (China)

    2008-07-01

    The appropriate management of municipal solid waste (MSW) is a major environmental issues, despite the significant efforts to prevent, reduce, reuse and recycle waste. Two primary options can be used for managing MSW incineration fly ash. These are landfill disposal or incineration. Incineration is effective in toxic substance destruction, waste volume reduction and energy recovery, as compared with landfill. MSW fly ash generally contains higher content of easily leachable heavy metals such as lead, cadmium, and zinc. In China, source separation of municipal solid wastes is not well practiced and has resulted in high concentrations of heavy metals being detected in the MSW fly ash. This paper presented a preliminary study to examine the properties of MSW fly ash and the fixing abilities of ordinary Portland cement and hydrated time on heavy metals. The paper discussed the effects of experimental parameters on the properties of solidified fly ash and the optimal technology conditions. The fly ash used in the study was collected from solid waste incineration plants in Shenzhen, Shanghai, and Chongqing, China. It was concluded that the effect on solidification got better and the leaching quantities of heavy metals such as zinc, lead, cadmium, or chromium decreased with the addition of cement used as adhesive. The optimal proportion of cement was 8 per cent. 14 refs., 5 tabs., 2 figs.

  8. Ash Reduction of Corn Stover by Mild Hydrothermal Preprocessing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M. Toufiq Reza; Rachel Emerson; M. Helal Uddin; Garold Gresham; Charles J. Coronella

    2014-04-22

    Lignocellulosic biomass such as corn stover can contain high ash content, which may act as an inhibitor in downstream conversion processes. Most of the structural ash in biomass is located in the cross-linked structure of lignin, which is mildly reactive in basic solutions. Four organic acids (formic, oxalic, tartaric, and citric) were evaluated for effectiveness in ash reduction, with limited success. Because of sodium citrate’s chelating and basic characteristics, it is effective in ash removal. More than 75 % of structural and 85 % of whole ash was removed from the biomass by treatment with 0.1 g of sodium citrate per gram of biomass at 130 °C and 2.7 bar. FTIR, fiber analysis, and chemical analyses show that cellulose and hemicellulose were unaffected by the treatment. ICP–AES showed that all inorganics measured were reduced within the biomass feedstock, except sodium due to the addition of Na through the treatment. Sodium citrate addition to the preconversion process of corn stover is an effective way to reduced physiological ash content of the feedstock without negatively impacting carbohydrate and lignin content.

  9. Recyclability of Concrete Pavement Incorporating High Volume of Fly Ash.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshitake, Isamu; Ishida, Takeo; Fukumoto, Sunao

    2015-08-21

    Recyclable concrete pavement was made from fly ash and crushed limestone sand and gravel as aggregates so that the concrete pavement could be recycled to raw materials for cement production. With the aim to use as much fly ash as possible for the sustainable development of society, while achieving adequate strength development, pavement concrete having a cement-replacement ratio of 40% by mass was experimentally investigated, focusing on the strength development at an early age. Limestone powder was added to improve the early strength; flexural strength at two days reached 3.5 MPa, the minimum strength for traffic service in Japan. The matured fly ash concrete made with a cement content of 200 kg/m3 achieved a flexural strength almost equal to that of the control concrete without fly ash. Additionally, Portland cement made from the tested fly ash concrete was tested to confirm recyclability, with the cement quality meeting the Japanese classification of ordinary Portland cement. Limestone-based recyclable fly ash concrete pavement is, thus, a preferred material in terms of sustainability.

  10. Seeding effect on cocomposting wastewater biosolids with coal fly ash

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fang, M.; Wong, J.W.C. [Hong Kong Baptist University, Hong Kong (China). Dept. of Biology

    2001-10-01

    The seeding effect on fly ash-amended biosolids composting was evaluated by inoculating a mixture of ash and biosolids with seeding materials before composting. These inocula included thermophilic bacteria (Bacillus. brevis, B. coagulans, and B. licheniformis) isolated from the ash-biosolids compost, a commercial decomposter, and recycled biosolids compost. Although the addition of these microbial additives to the ash-biosolids compost improved the population of thermophilic bacteria at the early stage of composting, the improvement was negligible after 4 days of composting. Inoculation with isolated bacterial culture, milk powder, or the decomposter, only, did not effectively improve the decomposition of organic matter compared with those receiving inoculation of both microbial additives and milk powder together. The isolated Bacillus species was as efficient as the commercial decomposter in accelerating the decomposition rate during ash-amended biosolids composting as indicated by the high amounts of carbon dioxide evolved and cumulative weight loss. Taking into consideration the lower operating cost and acceptable decomposition efficiency, recycled biosolids compost seemed to be a promising additive to ash-amended biosolids compost to improve composting efficiency.

  11. STRATEGIES AND TECHNOLOGY FOR MANAGING HIGH-CARBON ASH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robert Hurt; Eric Suuberg; John Veranth; Xu Chen; Indrek Kulaots

    2004-02-13

    The overall objective of the present project was to identify and assess strategies and solutions for the management of industry problems related to carbon in ash. Specific issues addressed included: (1) the effect of parent fuel selection on ash properties and adsorptivity, including a first ever examination of the air entrainment behavior of ashes from alternative (non-coal) fuels; (2) the effect of various low-NOx firing modes on ash properties and adsorptivity based on pilot-plant studies; and (3) the kinetics and mechanism of ash ozonation. This laboratory data has provided scientific and engineering support and underpinning for parallel process development activities. The development work on the ash ozonation process has now transitioned into a scale-up and commercialization project involving a multi-industry team and scheduled to begin in 2004. This report describes and documents the laboratory and pilot-scale work in the above three areas done at Brown University and the University of Utah during this three-year project.

  12. Producing a synthetic zeolite from secondary coal fly ash.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Chunyu; Yan, Chunjie; Zhou, Qi; Wang, Hongquan; Luo, Wenjun

    2016-11-01

    Secondary coal fly ash is known as a by-product produced by the extracting alumina industry from high-alumina fly ash, which is always considered to be solid waste. Zeolitization of secondary coal fly ash offers an opportunity to create value-added products from this industrial solid waste. The influence of synthesis parameters on zeolite NaA such as alkalinity, the molar ratio of SiO2/Al2O3, crystallization time and temperature was investigated in this paper. It was found that the types of synthetic zeolites produced were to be highly dependent on the conditions of the crystallization process. Calcium ion exchange capacity and whiteness measurements revealed that the synthesized product meets the standard for being used as detergent, indicating a promising use as a builder in detergent, ion-exchangers or selective adsorbents. Yield of up to a maximum of 1.54 g/g of ash was produced for zeolite NaA from the secondary coal fly ash residue. This result presents a potential use of the secondary coal fly ash to obtain a high value-added product by a cheap and alternative zeolitization procedure.

  13. Effect of interfacial properties on mechanical stability of ash deposit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Ontiveros-Ortega

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents a study on the cohesion of volcanic ash particles using surface free energy determination and zeta potential analyses. This is a subject of great interest in physical volcanology, as many researches on volcanic particle aggregation are frequently reported. In this case, special attention is paid to the role of structural or hydration forces between hydrophilic surfaces, which are a consequence of the electron-donor/electron-acceptor character of the interface. From this point of view, the results are potentially interesting as they could give valuable insights into this process. The results are presented in terms of the total energy of interaction between dispersed particles, computed from the extended DLVO theory. Contributions to the total free energy of interaction were determined from the zeta potential and surface free energy of ash, measured under different experimental conditions. Two samples of basaltic volcanic ash (black and white with silica contents of 44% and 63% respectively are studied. The surface free energy and zeta potential were analysed for ashes immersed in different electrolytes (NaCl, CaCl2, FeCl3. The presence of electrolytes changes the surface properties of the solid materials. The analysis of total interaction energy between the ash particles in aqueous medium shows that soil cohesion strongly depends on ash surface properties, chemical nature, the adsorbed cation on the surface, and pH value.

  14. Availability of sulfur in fly ash to plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elseewi, A.A.; Bingham, F.T.; Page, A.L.

    1978-01-01

    Fly ash from a coal-fired power plant was added to soil in variable amounts and the availability of sulfur to a variety of plant species from this source was compared to that of gypsum. The study was conducted under greenhouse conditions with a calcareous and two acid soils which were low in plant-available sulfur. The fly ash used contained 0.4% S, all of which is extractable by NH/sub 4/OAc. When mixed with a calcareous and an acid soil at rates of 1 to 2% by weight, the fly ash corrected a S deficiency in the soil and maximized the yield of alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) and bermudagrass (Cynodon dactylon L.). The increase in yield (twofold to threefold in alfalfa and 40 to 70% in bermudagrass) was accompanied by an increase in the S content of the plant tops from a deficiency level (<0.1%) to a sufficiency level (greater than or equal to 0.2%). The availability of fly ash-S and gypsum (CaSO/sub 4/ . 2H/sub 2/O)-S was compared by the addition of equal amounts of S from the two sources (25-, 50-, and 100-mg S/kg soil) to an acid soil. Yield and S content of turnip (Brassica rapa L.) and white clover (Trifolium repens L.) were equally improved, demonstrating that the availability of fly ash derived-S is equivalent to that of gympsum-S.

  15. Influence of fly-ash produced by lignite power station on humic substances in ectohumus horizons of Podzols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Jerzy; Jerzykiewicz, Maria; Jamroz, Elżbieta; Kocowicz, Andrzej; Dębicka, Magdalena; Ćwieląg-Piasecka, Irmina

    2017-04-01

    Literature on fly-ash influence on the environment report mainly on alkalization effect on vegetation and changes in chemistry of forest floor. As far as now soils were examined only for changes in pH in surface horizons, physical properties and heavy metal solubility. Soil properties strongly depend on soil organic matter content and humic substances properties, thus their modification plays a crucial role in soil forming processes and changes in the environment. From the other side, the alkalization effects on podzolization processes and particularly on humic substances have not been recognized. The aim of this paper was to characterize changes in properties of humic substances in ectohumus horizons of Podzols affected by alkali blown out from fly-ash dumping site of power station Bełchatów, central Poland. The objects of the investigation were Podzols derived from loose quartz sand, developed under pine forest. They surround the dumping site, which was established to store wastes from lignite combustion in Bełchatów power station. The samples were collected from ectohumus horizons in direct vicinity of the dumping site (50 m) as well as in the control area (7.3 km away) in five replications. Determination of elemental composition and spectroscopic analysis (EPR, FT-IR, ICP-OES and UV-Vis) were performed for humic acids, fulvic acids and humines extracted with standard IHSS procedure. An increase of pH in ectohumus horizons caused by the influence of fly-ash leads to change in humic substances structure. Obtained results showed that humic and fulvic acids from fly-ash affected Podzols indicated higher contents of nitrogen and sulphur, as well as higher O/C and lower C/N ratios. This points out a higher degree of their humification. Also EPR analyses of humic acids and humins affected by fly-ash indicated higher metal ions concentrations. However, the increase of Mn and Fe ions concentration did not affect the Fe(III) and Mn(II) band intensities of EPR spectra

  16. Performance of Olive pit Ash\\'s In Nitrate Removal from the Aqueous Solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MT Ghaneian

    2014-07-01

    Investigation of the effect of nitrate initial concentration showed that increasing initial concentration of nitrate from 50 to 150 mg/l and without changing absorbent dose would lead to decrease in the absorption efficiency from 88% to 48% but the absorption capacity (qe increased from 8.31 to 14.3. Moreover the maximum absorption took Place at 60 min of the first reaction. Conclusion: Nitrate removal by olive kernel ashes are considered as effective and appropriate method compared with other absorbents and the process is more efficient at acidic pH.

  17. Distribution of trunk-injected 14C-imidacloprid in ash trees and effects on emerald ash borer (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    David Mota-Sánchez; Bert M. Cregg; Deborah G. McCullough; Therese M. Poland; Robert M. Hollingworth

    2009-01-01

    The emerald ash borer (EAB), Agrilus planipennis (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) is a destructive exotic pest of North American ash (Fraxinus sp.) trees. Trunk injection of imidacloprid is commonly used to protect landscape ash trees from A. planipennis damage. Efficacy can vary and little is known about the...

  18. SLAM: A multi-agency pilot project to SL.ow A.sh M.ortality caused by emerald ash borer in outlier sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Therese M. Poland; Deborah G. McCullough

    2010-01-01

    Since its discovery in southeast Michigan in 2002, the emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae), has continued to spread and kill ash (Fraxinus) trees at an alarming rate. As of February 2010, EAB has killed tens of millions of ash trees in Michigan, at least 12 additional U.S. states, and the...

  19. Potential effects of foundation species loss on wetland communities: A case study of black ash wetlands threatened by emerald ash borer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melissa B. Youngquist; Sue L. Eggert; Anthony W. D' Amato; Brian J. Palik; Robert A. Slesak

    2017-01-01

    The emerald ash borer (EAB; Agrilus planipennis) is an invasive beetle that causes almost complete mortality of ash trees (Fraxinus spp.) in North America and Europe. Northern temperate wetlands, where black ash (F. nigra) is a dominant and foundation species, will likely undergo dramatic shifts after EAB...

  20. Effects of cutting time, stump height, and herbicide application on ash (Fraxinus spp.) stump sprouting and colonization by emerald ash borer (Agrilus planipennis)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toby R. Petrice; Robert A. Haack

    2011-01-01

    Efforts to eradicate or slow the spread of emerald ash borer (EAB) (Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire [Coleoptera: Buprestidae]) include cutting infested and nearby uninfested ash (Fraxinus spp.) trees. However, ash trees readily sprout after they have been cut, providing potential host material for EAB. In 2004-2005, we conducted...