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Sample records for vector species composition

  1. Dynamics of anopheline vector species composition and reported ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dynamics of anopheline vector species composition and reported malaria cases during rain and dry seasons in two selected communities of Kwara State. A.O. Oduola, O.J. Adelaja, Z.O. Aiyegbusi, M Tola, A Obembe, A.T. Ande, S Awolola ...

  2. VIP Barcoding: composition vector-based software for rapid species identification based on DNA barcoding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Long; Hui, Jerome H L; Yu, Zu Guo; Chu, Ka Hou

    2014-07-01

    Species identification based on short sequences of DNA markers, that is, DNA barcoding, has emerged as an integral part of modern taxonomy. However, software for the analysis of large and multilocus barcoding data sets is scarce. The Basic Local Alignment Search Tool (BLAST) is currently the fastest tool capable of handling large databases (e.g. >5000 sequences), but its accuracy is a concern and has been criticized for its local optimization. However, current more accurate software requires sequence alignment or complex calculations, which are time-consuming when dealing with large data sets during data preprocessing or during the search stage. Therefore, it is imperative to develop a practical program for both accurate and scalable species identification for DNA barcoding. In this context, we present VIP Barcoding: a user-friendly software in graphical user interface for rapid DNA barcoding. It adopts a hybrid, two-stage algorithm. First, an alignment-free composition vector (CV) method is utilized to reduce searching space by screening a reference database. The alignment-based K2P distance nearest-neighbour method is then employed to analyse the smaller data set generated in the first stage. In comparison with other software, we demonstrate that VIP Barcoding has (i) higher accuracy than Blastn and several alignment-free methods and (ii) higher scalability than alignment-based distance methods and character-based methods. These results suggest that this platform is able to deal with both large-scale and multilocus barcoding data with accuracy and can contribute to DNA barcoding for modern taxonomy. VIP Barcoding is free and available at http://msl.sls.cuhk.edu.hk/vipbarcoding/. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Changes in vector species composition and current vector biology and behaviour will favour malaria elimination in Santa Isabel Province, Solomon Islands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beebe Nigel W

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In 2009, Santa Isabel Province in the Solomon Islands embarked on a malaria elimination programme. However, very little is known in the Province about the anopheline fauna, which species are vectors, their bionomics and how they may respond to intensified intervention measures. The purpose of this study was to provide baseline data on the malaria vectors and to ascertain the possibility of successfully eliminating malaria using the existing conventional vector control measures, such as indoor residual spraying (IRS and long-lasting insecticidal nets (LLIN. Methods Entomological surveys were undertaken during October 2009. To determine species composition and distribution larval surveys were conducted across on the whole island. For malaria transmission studies, adult anophelines were sampled using human landing catches from two villages - one coastal and one inland. Results Five Anopheles species were found on Santa Isabel: Anopheles farauti, Anopheles hinesorum, Anopheles lungae, Anopheles solomonis, and Anopheles nataliae. Anopheles hinesorum was the most widespread species. Anopheles farauti was abundant, but found only on the coast. Anopheles punctulatus and Anopheles koliensis were not found. Anopheles farauti was the only species found biting in the coastal village, it was incriminated as a vector in this study; it fed early in the night but equally so indoors and outdoors, and had a low survival rate. Anopheles solomonis was the main species biting humans in the inland village, it was extremely exophagic, with low survival rates, and readily fed on pigs. Conclusion The disappearance of the two major vectors, An. punctulatus and An. koliensis, from Santa Isabel and the predominance of An. hinesorum, a non-vector species may facilitate malaria elimination measures. Anopheles farauti was identified as the main coastal vector with An. solomonis as a possible inland vector. The behaviour of An. solomonis is novel as it has

  4. Leafhoppers and Cixiids in Phytoplasma-infected Carrot Fields: Species Composition and Potential Phytoplasma Vectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanja Drobnjaković

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The first molecular analysis of samples collected in southern Bačka (Serbia confirmed the presence of aster yellows (16SrI and stolbur phytoplasmas (16SrXII in insects belonging to the family Cicadellidae, as well as in carrot plants where the insects were collected. A correct identification of the phytoplasmas and their vectors is essential to arrange effective control strategies to prevent diseases associated with phytoplasmas from spreading to carrots and other vegetable crops. In order to enhance knowledgeabout insect vectors of aster yellows and stolbur phytoplasmas in Serbia, Cicadellidae and Cixiidae (Homoptera Auchenorrhyncha, the most common vectors of these phytoplasmas,were monitored in southern Bačka during 2008. Adults leaf- and planthoppers were collected and identified at species level using standard entomological methods,and tested for phytoplasma presence by means of PCR/RFLP. A total of 13 insect species of Cicadellidae were identified, as follows: a three species of the subfamily Agallinae: Anaceratagallia ribauti (Ossiannilsson, Anaceratagallia venosa (Fourcroy,and Anaceratagallia laevis (Ribaut; b seven species of the subfamily Deltocephalinae: Psammotettix confinis (Dahlbom, Psammotettix striatus (Linnaues Psammottettix alienus (Dahlbom, Macrosteles sexnotatus (Fallén, Ophiola decumana (Kontkanen,Errastunus ocellaris Fallén, and Scaphoideus titanus Ball; c three species of the subfamily Typhlocibinae: Eupteryx atropunctata (Goeze, Eupteryx mellissae Curtis, Zyginidia pullula (Boheman. Female specimens of the genus Euscelis (Deltocephalinae were also collected, as well as one species of Reptalus quinquecostatus (Dufour of the family Cixiidae. Stolbur phytoplasmas were detected in A. laevis, A. ribauti, A. venosa, P. striatus, P. confinis and P. alienus. The species: A. laevis, O. decumana, and P. confinis were AY-infected (subgroup 16SrI-A, while subgroup 16SrI-C was found only in one specimen of P. confinis. Since some

  5. Vector species composition and malaria infectivity rates in Mkuzi, Muheza District, north-eastern Tanzania

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kweka, E J; Mahande, A M; Nkya, W M M

    2008-01-01

    Entomological surveys were conducted in Mkuzi village in Muheza District, north-east Tanzania from April to September 2003. The objectives were to determine the species composition and infectivity rates of mosquitoes in Mkuzi village. Mosquito collection was done using CDC light trap and pyrethrum...... spray catch (PSC) techniques. The light trap: spray catch ratio was 2.2:1. A total of 2157 mosquitoes were collected (light trap = 1483; PSC = 674). Anopheles gambiae s.s. accounted for 56.7% (N = 1224) of all mosquitoes collected. Other species were An. funestus complex (19.2%) and Culex...... quinquefasciatus (24.1%).The mosquito density per room was 74.15 and 33.7 for light trap and PSC techniques, respectively. A total of 1637 Anopheles mosquitoes were tested for circumsporozoite protein by Enzyme linked Immunosobent Assay (ELISA). The overall infectivity rate for circumsporozoite protein for P...

  6. The effects of monitoring the abundance and species composition of aphids as virus vectors on seed potato production in Serbia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Drago Milošević

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Aphids are the most important vectors of potato viruses during the crop’s growing season. The most widespread and damaging viruses, the potato virus Y and potato leaf roll virus, are transmitted by aphids in non-persistent and persistent manner, respectively. The two viruses cause the greatest concern of potato producers and a great constraint to seed potato production in Serbia, the region and across the world. Potato virus Y is particularly harmful, given its distribution and spreading rate. Seed potato production systems under well-managed conditions involve a series of virus control measures, including the monitoring of outbreaks of winged aphids, their abundance and species composition, in order to forecast virosis, i.e. potential plant and tuber infection periods. Monitoring the aphid vectors of potato viruses enables determination of optimum dates for haulm destruction when higher than normal numbers of winged aphids as vectors of economically harmful diseases have been observed. Haulm destruction in a potato crop reduces the risk of plant infection and virus translocation from the aboveground parts to tubers, thus keeping the proportion of infected tubers within tolerance limits allowed for certain categories of seed potatoes. This practice has positive effects if used in combination with other viral disease control measures; otherwise, it becomes ineffective. This paper provides an integral analysis of the effects and role of monitoring outbreaks of aphids, their abundance and species composition in timing haulm growth termination to prevent plant infection, virus translocation and tuber infestation in potato crops in Serbia and the wider region.

  7. Characterizing the species composition of European Culicoides vectors by means of the Köppen-Geiger climate classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brugger, Katharina; Rubel, Franz

    2013-11-22

    Biting midges of the genus Culicoides spp. (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) are vectors for the Bluetongue virus, the African horse sickness virus and the recently emerged Schmallenberg virus. Here, species of the C. obsoletus complex, the C. pulicaris complex and C. imicola were considered. The objective was to compile a map of these Culicoides species and their relation to the popular climate classification defined by Wladimir Köppen and Rudolf Geiger to provide a quick view on the species composition in Europe. Major parts of Central and Northern Europe are covered by a warm temperate fully humid climate, characterized by warm summers. For this so-called Cfb climate fractions of 89% C. obsoletus complex and 11% C. pulicaris complex were estimated. Further investigations comprise the continental climate Dfb (76% C. obsoletus, 24% C. pulicaris), the warm temperate climate with hot summers Cfa (35% C. obsoletus, 65% C. pulicaris), the warm temperate dry climate, characterized by warm summers Csb (38% C. obsoletus, 51% C. pulicaris, 11% C. imicola) and the warm temperate dry climate with hot summers Csa of the Mediterranean area (11% C. obsoletus, 12% C. pulicaris, 77% C. imicola). A highly significant association coefficient of RV = 0.64 (Cramer's V) confirms the correlation between Culicoides spp. and climate zones. Moreover, climate projections for the end of the century give an impression on expected changes in the European Culicoides spp. composition.

  8. Species composition of mosquito and public perception about Dengue vector of hemorrhagic fever in Bareng Tenes Malang

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gama, Zulfaidah Penata; Pratiwi, Jenvia Rista

    2017-11-01

    Dengue Hemorrhagic Fever (DHF) is a mosquito-borne tropical disease caused by the dengue virus. Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus are the mosquito vectors of DHF. Malang city was an endemic region of dengue disease in East Java. One of the villages that had a high number of DHF cases was Bareng Tenes. The Case Fatality Rate (CFR) in Malang city totaled 5 patients out of 879 cases (Health Department of Malang city, 2010). Bareng Tenes RW 02 was one of the densely populated regions of Malang city. The objectives of this research were to identify mosquito composition and to analyze the public perception about the DHF vectors in Bareng Tenes RW 02 Malang. This research used two kinds of survey methods of mosquitoes. The first method for collecting larvae was used by direct capture using pipettes from artificial containers and the second method was collecting egg of mosquitoes by using an ovitrap. Public perception was calculated using the questionnaire technique. The accidental sampling technique in this research was Likert scale. The composition of mosquitoes found in Bareng Tenes RW 02 was Aedes aegypti, Aedes albopictus and Culex quinquefasciatus. The mosquito survey showed that Aedes aegypti was the dominant species and the IVI value for the ovitrap survey was 118.06% while the value of IVI for the larval survey was 103.51%. Based on the public perception data, it showed that the community has a very good understanding of DHF knowledge, DHF vectors and ways of DHF prevention, but the undertaken activities by the community have not yet appeared to control the mosquito population especially for their larvae.

  9. Aphid (Hemiptera: Aphididae) species composition and potential aphid vectors of plum pox virus in Pennsylvania peach orchards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallis, C M; Fleischer, S J; Luster, D; Gildow, F E

    2005-10-01

    Plum pox, an invasive disease recently identified in Pennsylvania stone fruit orchards, is caused by the aphid-transmitted Plum pox virus (genus Potyvirus, family Potyviridae, PPV). To identify potential vectors, we described the aphid species communities and the seasonal dynamics of the dominant aphid species within Pennsylvania peach orchards. Aphids were trapped weekly in 2002 and 2003 from mid-April through mid-November within two central Pennsylvania orchards by using yellow and green water pan traps. In total, 42 aphid species were identified from both orchards over 2 yr. Within orchards, actual species richness ranged from 24 to 30 species. The Abundance Based Coverage Estimator predicted species richness to range from 30 to 36 species, indicating that trap catches were identifying most aphid species expected to occur in the orchard. Three species, Rhopalosiphum maidis (Fitch), Aphis spiraecola Patch, and Myzus persicae (Sulzer), were consistently dominant across locations and years. Orchard-trapped populations of these three species peaked in a similar chronological sequence each year. As expected, trap color influenced the total number and distribution of the predominate species collected. However, the same dominant species occurred in both yellow and green traps. Based on the seasonal population dynamics reported here and on published vector efficacy studies, the most probable significant PPV vector was identified as A. spiraecola. If the PPV pathogen escapes current quarantine or if subsequent reintroductions of PPV occur, these data will be useful for developing plum pox management strategies.

  10. Species composition, seasonal occurrence, habitat preference and altitudinal distribution of malaria and other disease vectors in eastern Nepal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhimal, Meghnath; Ahrens, Bodo; Kuch, Ulrich

    2014-11-28

    It is increasingly recognized that climate change can alter the geographical distribution of vector-borne diseases (VBDs) with shifts of disease vectors to higher altitudes and latitudes. In particular, an increasing risk of malaria and dengue fever epidemics in tropical highlands and temperate regions has been predicted in different climate change scenarios. The aim of this paper is to expand the current knowledge on the seasonal occurrence and altitudinal distribution of malaria and other disease vectors in eastern Nepal. Adult mosquitoes resting indoors and outdoors were collected using CDC light trap and aspirators with the support of flash light. Mosquito larvae were collected using locally constructed dippers. We assessed the local residents' perceptions of the distribution and occurrence of mosquitoes using key informant interview techniques. Generalized linear models were fitted to assess the effect of season, resting site and topography on the abundance of malaria vectors. The known malaria vectors in Nepal, Anopheles fluviatilis, Anopheles annularis and Anopheles maculatus complex members were recorded from 70 to 1,820 m above sea level (asl). The vectors of chikungunya and dengue virus, Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus, the vector of lymphatic filariasis, Culex quinquefasciatus, and that of Japanese encephalitis, Culex tritaeniorhynchus, were found from 70 to 2,000 m asl in eastern Nepal. Larvae of Anopheles, Culex and Aedes species were recorded up to 2,310 m asl. Only season had a significant effect on the abundance of An. fluviatilis, season and resting site on the abundance of An. maculatus complex members, and season, resting site and topography on the abundance of An. annularis. The perceptions of people on mosquito occurrence are consistent with entomological findings. This study provides the first vertical distribution records of vector mosquitoes in eastern Nepal and suggests that the vectors of malaria and other diseases have already

  11. Species Composition of Sand Flies (Diptera: Psychodidae) and Modeling the Spatial Distribution of Main Vectors of Cutaneous Leishmaniasis in Hormozgan Province, Southern Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanafi-Bojd, Ahmad Ali; Khoobdel, Mehdi; Soleimani-Ahmadi, Moussa; Azizi, Kourosh; Aghaei Afshar, Abbas; Jaberhashemi, Seyed Aghil; Fekri, Sajjad; Safari, Reza

    2017-12-13

    Cutaneous Leishmaniasis (CL) is one of the main neglected vector-borne diseases in the Middle East, including Iran. This study aimed to map the spatial distribution and species composition of sand flies in Hormozgan Province and to predict the best ecological niches for main CL vectors in this area. A database that included all earlier studies on sand flies in Hormozgan Province was established. Sand flies were also collected from some localities across the province. Prediction maps for main vectors were developed using MaxEnt model. A total of 27 sand fly species were reported from the study area. Phlebotomus papatasi Scopoli, Phlebotomus sergenti s.l. Parrot, Phlebotomus alexandri Sinton, Sergentomyia sintoni Pringle, Sergentomyia clydei Sinton, Sergentomyia tiberiadis Adler, and Sergentomyia baghdadis Adler (Diptera: Psychodidae) had the widest distribution range. The probability of their presence as the main vectors of CL was calculated to be 0.0003-0.9410 and 0.0031-0.8880 for P. papatasi and P. sergenti s.l., respectively. The best ecological niches for P. papatasi were found in the central south, southeast, and a narrow area in southwest, whereas central south to northern area had better niches for P. sergenti s.l. The endemic areas are in Bandar-e Jask, where transmission occurs, whereas in Bastak, the cases were imported from endemic foci of Fars province. In conclusion, proven and suspected vectors of CL and VL were recorded in this study. Due to the existence of endemic foci of CL, and favorite ecological niches for its vectors, there is potential risk of emerging CL in new areas. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Towards a phylogenetic approach to the composition of species complexes in the North and Central American Triatoma, vectors of Chagas disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Rúa, Nicholas M; Bustamante, Dulce M; Menes, Marianela; Stevens, Lori; Monroy, Carlota; Kilpatrick, C William; Rizzo, Donna; Klotz, Stephen A; Schmidt, Justin; Axen, Heather J; Dorn, Patricia L

    2014-06-01

    Phylogenetic relationships of insect vectors of parasitic diseases are important for understanding the evolution of epidemiologically relevant traits, and may be useful in vector control. The sub-family Triatominae (Hemiptera:Reduviidae) includes ∼140 extant species arranged in five tribes comprised of 15 genera. The genus Triatoma is the most species-rich and contains important vectors of Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas disease. Triatoma species were grouped into complexes originally by morphology and more recently with the addition of information from molecular phylogenetics (the four-complex hypothesis); however, without a strict adherence to monophyly. To date, the validity of proposed species complexes has not been tested by statistical tests of topology. The goal of this study was to clarify the systematics of 19 Triatoma species from North and Central America. We inferred their evolutionary relatedness using two independent data sets: the complete nuclear internal transcribed spacer-2 ribosomal DNA (ITS-2 rDNA) and head morphometrics. In addition, we used the Shimodaira-Hasegawa statistical test of topology to assess the fit of the data to a set of competing systematic hypotheses (topologies). An unconstrained topology inferred from the ITS-2 data was compared to topologies constrained based on the four-complex hypothesis or one inferred from our morphometry results. The unconstrained topology represents a statistically significant better fit of the molecular data than either the four-complex or the morphometric topology. We propose an update to the composition of species complexes in the North and Central American Triatoma, based on a phylogeny inferred from ITS-2 as a first step towards updating the phylogeny of the complexes based on monophyly and statistical tests of topologies. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Species Composition, Larval Habitats, Seasonal Occurrence and Distribution of Potential Malaria Vectors and Associated Species of Anopheles (Diptera: Culicidae) from the Republic of Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-17

    voucher specimens for this work. Emergent adults were pinned on paper points, each given a unique collection number, and identified using diagnostic...numbers for the above are in Wilkerson et al [12] and Li et al [14]. Direct sequen- cing was carried out for about 8,000 samples. Voucher specimens and...uncultivated fields. All field-collected specimens were identified to species, and relationships among habitats and locations based on species composition

  14. Species Composition (SC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    John F. Caratti

    2006-01-01

    The FIREMON Species Composition (SC) method is used to provide ocular estimates of cover and height measurements for plant species on a macroplot. The SC method provides plant species composition and coverage estimates to describe a stand or plant community and can be used to document changes over time. It is suited for a wide variety of vegetation types and is...

  15. Host Life History Strategy, Species Diversity, and Habitat Influence Trypanosoma cruzi Vector Infection in Changing Landscapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottdenker, Nicole L.; Chaves, Luis Fernando; Calzada, José E.; Saldaña, Azael; Carroll, C. Ronald

    2012-01-01

    Background Anthropogenic land use may influence transmission of multi-host vector-borne pathogens by changing diversity, relative abundance, and community composition of reservoir hosts. These reservoir hosts may have varying competence for vector-borne pathogens depending on species-specific characteristics, such as life history strategy. The objective of this study is to evaluate how anthropogenic land use change influences blood meal species composition and the effects of changing blood meal species composition on the parasite infection rate of the Chagas disease vector Rhodnius pallescens in Panama. Methodology/Principal Findings R. pallescens vectors (N = 643) were collected in different habitat types across a gradient of anthropogenic disturbance. Blood meal species in DNA extracted from these vectors was identified in 243 (40.3%) vectors by amplification and sequencing of a vertebrate-specific fragment of the 12SrRNA gene, and T. cruzi vector infection was determined by pcr. Vector infection rate was significantly greater in deforested habitats as compared to contiguous forests. Forty-two different species of blood meal were identified in R. pallescens, and species composition of blood meals varied across habitat types. Mammals (88.3%) dominated R. pallescens blood meals. Xenarthrans (sloths and tamanduas) were the most frequently identified species in blood meals across all habitat types. A regression tree analysis indicated that blood meal species diversity, host life history strategy (measured as rmax, the maximum intrinsic rate of population increase), and habitat type (forest fragments and peridomiciliary sites) were important determinants of vector infection with T. cruzi. The mean intrinsic rate of increase and the skewness and variability of rmax were positively associated with higher vector infection rate at a site. Conclusions/Significance In this study, anthropogenic landscape disturbance increased vector infection with T. cruzi, potentially

  16. Host life history strategy, species diversity, and habitat influence Trypanosoma cruzi vector infection in Changing landscapes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole L Gottdenker

    Full Text Available Anthropogenic land use may influence transmission of multi-host vector-borne pathogens by changing diversity, relative abundance, and community composition of reservoir hosts. These reservoir hosts may have varying competence for vector-borne pathogens depending on species-specific characteristics, such as life history strategy. The objective of this study is to evaluate how anthropogenic land use change influences blood meal species composition and the effects of changing blood meal species composition on the parasite infection rate of the Chagas disease vector Rhodnius pallescens in Panama.R. pallescens vectors (N = 643 were collected in different habitat types across a gradient of anthropogenic disturbance. Blood meal species in DNA extracted from these vectors was identified in 243 (40.3% vectors by amplification and sequencing of a vertebrate-specific fragment of the 12SrRNA gene, and T. cruzi vector infection was determined by pcr. Vector infection rate was significantly greater in deforested habitats as compared to contiguous forests. Forty-two different species of blood meal were identified in R. pallescens, and species composition of blood meals varied across habitat types. Mammals (88.3% dominated R. pallescens blood meals. Xenarthrans (sloths and tamanduas were the most frequently identified species in blood meals across all habitat types. A regression tree analysis indicated that blood meal species diversity, host life history strategy (measured as r(max, the maximum intrinsic rate of population increase, and habitat type (forest fragments and peridomiciliary sites were important determinants of vector infection with T. cruzi. The mean intrinsic rate of increase and the skewness and variability of r(max were positively associated with higher vector infection rate at a site.In this study, anthropogenic landscape disturbance increased vector infection with T. cruzi, potentially by changing host community structure to favor hosts

  17. Approximate gauge symemtry of composite vector bosons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, Mahiko

    2010-06-01

    It can be shown in a solvable field theory model that the couplings of the composite vector mesons made of a fermion pair approach the gauge couplings in the limit of strong binding. Although this phenomenon may appear accidental and special to the vector bosons made of a fermion pair, we extend it to the case of bosons being constituents and find that the same phenomenon occurs in more an intriguing way. The functional formalism not only facilitates computation but also provides us with a better insight into the generating mechanism of approximate gauge symmetry, in particular, how the strong binding and global current conservation conspire to generate such an approximate symmetry. Remarks are made on its possible relevance or irrelevance to electroweak and higher symmetries.

  18. A Multi-species Bait for Chagas Disease Vectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mota, Theo; Vitta, Ana C. R.; Lorenzo-Figueiras, Alicia N.; Barezani, Carla P.; Zani, Carlos L.; Lazzari, Claudio R.; Diotaiuti, Liléia; Jeffares, Lynne; Bohman, Björn; Lorenzo, Marcelo G.

    2014-01-01

    Background Triatomine bugs are the insect vectors of Trypanosoma cruzi, the etiological agent of Chagas disease. These insects are known to aggregate inside shelters during daylight hours and it has been demonstrated that within shelters, the aggregation is induced by volatiles emitted from bug feces. These signals promote inter-species aggregation among most species studied, but the chemical composition is unknown. Methodology/Principal Findings In the present work, feces from larvae of the three species were obtained and volatile compounds were identified by solid phase microextraction-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (SPME-GC-MS). We identified five compounds, all present in feces of all of the three species: Triatoma infestans, Panstrongylus megistus and Triatoma brasiliensis. These substances were tested for attractivity and ability to recruit insects into shelters. Behaviorally active doses of the five substances were obtained for all three triatomine species. The bugs were significantly attracted to shelters baited with blends of 160 ng or 1.6 µg of each substance. Conclusions/Significance Common compounds were found in the feces of vectors of Chagas disease that actively recruited insects into shelters, which suggests that this blend of compounds could be used for the development of baits for early detection of reinfestation with triatomine bugs. PMID:24587457

  19. Compositions of nuclear maps with vector measures and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The properties of the compositions of nuclear maps, between two locally convex spaces, with vector measures and measurable functions are investigated. The composition with a vector measure has improved variational properties and a precompact range. The measurability and integrability properties of the composition of ...

  20. Spontaneous symmetry breaking in the composite-vector-boson model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garavaglia, T.

    1986-11-15

    Spontaneous symmetry breaking is discussed in the Abelian, QED-like, composite-vector-boson model. When the auxiliary vector field has a nonzero vacuum expectation value, a global symmetry, Lorentz invariance, is broken. It is shown that the regularization of the saddle-point conditions for the quantum fluctuation generating functional is consistent only with a spacelike vacuum expectation value for the auxiliary vector field.

  1. Implications of vector boson scattering unitarity in composite Higgs models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buarque Franzosi, Diogo; Ferrarese, Piero

    2017-09-01

    The strong nature of composite Higgs models manifests at high energies through the growing behavior of the scattering amplitudes of longitudinally polarized weak bosons that leads to the formation of composite resonances as well as nonresonant strong effects. In this work the unitarity of these scattering amplitudes is used as a tool to assess the profile of the composite spectrum of the theory, including nonresonant enhancements, vector resonances and the C P -even scalar excitation. These three signatures are then studied in realistic scattering processes at hadron colliders, aiming to estimate the potential to exclude dynamically motivated scenarios of composite Higgs models.

  2. Vegetation composition and structure influences bird species ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Vegetation composition and structure influences bird species community assemblages in the highland agricultural landscape of Nyandarua, Kenya. ... Bird species diversity increased with increasing density of woody plant species and vegetation structural heterogeneity. Two gradients of increasing vegetation structural ...

  3. Extending TF1: Argument parsing, function composition, and vectorization

    CERN Document Server

    Tsang Mang Kin, Arthur Leonard

    2017-01-01

    In this project, we extend the functionality of the TF1 function class in root. We add argument parsing, making it possible to freely pass variables and parameters into pre-defined and user-defined functions. We also introduce a syntax to use certain compositions of functions, namely normalized sums and convolutions, directly in TF1. Finally, we introduce some simple vectorization functionality to TF1 and demonstrate the potential to speed up parallelizable computations.

  4. Micromechanics of Composite Materials Governed by Vector Constitutive Laws

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bednarcyk, Brett A.; Aboudi, Jacob; Arnold, Steven M.

    2017-01-01

    The high-fidelity generalized method of cells micromechanics theory has been extended for the prediction of the effective property tensor and the corresponding local field distributions for composites whose constituents are governed by vector constitutive laws. As shown, the shear analogy, which can predict effective transverse properties, is not valid in the general three-dimensional case. Consequently, a general derivation is presented that is applicable to both continuously and discontinuously reinforced composites with arbitrary vector constitutive laws and periodic microstructures. Results are given for thermal and electric problems, effective properties and local field distributions, ordered and random microstructures, as well as complex geometries including woven composites. Comparisons of the theory's predictions are made to test data, numerical analysis, and classical expressions from the literature. Further, classical methods cannot provide the local field distributions in the composite, and it is demonstrated that, as the percolation threshold is approached, their predictions are increasingly unreliable. XXXX It has been observed that the bonding between the fibers and matrix in composite materials can be imperfect. In the context of thermal conductivity, such imperfect interfaces have been investigated in micromechanical models by Dunn and Taya (1993), Duan and Karihaloo (2007), Nan et al. (1997) and Hashin (2001). The present HFGMC micromechanical method, derived for perfectly bonded composite materials governed by vector constitutive laws, can be easily generalized to include the effects of weak bonding between the constituents. Such generalizations, in the context of the mechanical micromechanics problem, involve introduction of a traction-separation law at the fiber/matrix interface and have been presented by Aboudi (1987), Bednarcyk and Arnold (2002), Bednarcyk et al. (2004) and Aboudi et al. (2013) and will be addressed in the future.

  5. Vector resonances at LHC Run II in composite 2HDM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiara, Stefano Di [National Institute of Chemical Physics and Biophysics,Rävala 10, 10143 Tallinn (Estonia); Heikinheimo, Matti; Tuominen, Kimmo [Helsinki Institute of Physics, University of Helsinki,P.O. Box 64, FI-000140, Helsinki (Finland); Department of Physics, University of Helsinki,P.O. Box 64, FI-000140, Helsinki (Finland)

    2017-03-02

    We consider a model where the electroweak symmetry breaking is driven by strong dynamics, resulting in an electroweak doublet scalar condensate, and transmitted to the standard model matter fields via another electroweak doublet scalar. At low energies the effective theory therefore shares features with a type-I two Higgs doublet model. However, important differences arise due to the rich composite spectrum expected to contain new vector resonances accessible at the LHC. We carry out a systematic analysis of the vector resonance signals at LHC and find that the model remains viable, but will be tightly constrained by direct searches as the projected integrated luminosity, around 200 fb{sup −1}, of the current run becomes available.

  6. Malaria vector Anopheles culicifacies sibling species differentiation using egg morphometry and morphology

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tyagi, Varun; Sharma, A K; Dhiman, Sunil; Srivastava, A R; Yadav, Ruchi; Sukumaran, D; Agrawal, O P; Veer, Vijay

    2016-01-01

    .... Currently, for the first time egg morphometry and morphology has been used to differentiate the three known vector sibling species of Anopheles culicifacies collected from malaria endemic Madhya...

  7. Anthropogenic influence on the distribution, abundance and diversity of sandfly species (Diptera: Phlebotominae: Psychodidae, vectors of cutaneous leishmaniasis in Panama

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anayansi Valderrama

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available In Panama, species of the genus Lutzomyia are vectors of American cutaneous leishmaniasis (ACL. There is no recent ecological information that may be used to develop tools for the control of this disease. Thus, the goal of this study was to determine the composition, distribution and diversity of Lutzomyia species that serve as vectors of ACL. Sandfly sampling was conducted in forests, fragmented forests and rural environments, in locations with records of ACL. Lutzomyia gomezi, Lutzomyia panamensis and Lutzomyia trapidoi were the most widely distributed and prevalent species. Analysis of each sampling point showed that the species abundance and diversity were greatest at points located in the fragmented forest landscape. However, when the samples were grouped according to the landscape characteristics of the locations, there was a greater diversity of species in the rural environment locations. The Kruskal Wallis analysis of species abundance found that Lu. gomezi and Lu. trapidoi were associated with fragmented environments, while Lu. panamensis, Lutzomyia olmeca bicolor and Lutzomyia ylephiletor were associated with forested environments. Therefore, we suggest that human activity influences the distribution, composition and diversity of the vector species responsible for leishmaniasis in Panama.

  8. Plasmodium prevalence across avian host species is positively associated with exposure to mosquito vectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medeiros, Matthew C I; Ricklefs, Robert E; Brawn, Jeffrey D; Hamer, Gabriel L

    2015-11-01

    The prevalence of vector-borne parasites varies greatly across host species, and this heterogeneity has been used to relate infectious disease susceptibility to host species traits. However, a few empirical studies have directly associated vector-borne parasite prevalence with exposure to vectors across hosts. Here, we use DNA sequencing of blood meals to estimate utilization of different avian host species by Culex mosquitoes, and relate utilization by these malaria vectors to avian Plasmodium prevalence. We found that avian host species that are highly utilized as hosts by avian malaria vectors are significantly more likely to have Plasmodium infections. However, the effect was not consistent among individual Plasmodium taxa. Exposure to vector bites may therefore influence the relative number of all avian Plasmodium infections among host species, while other processes, such as parasite competition and host-parasite coevolution, delimit the host distributions of individual Plasmodium species. We demonstrate that links between avian malaria susceptibility and host traits can be conditioned by patterns of exposure to vectors. Linking vector utilization rates to host traits may be a key area of future research to understand mechanisms that produce variation in the prevalence of vector-borne pathogens among host species.

  9. What determines the Fermi wave vector of composite fermions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamburov, D; Liu, Yang; Mueed, M A; Shayegan, M; Pfeiffer, L N; West, K W; Baldwin, K W

    2014-11-07

    Composite fermions (CFs), exotic particles formed by pairing an even number of flux quanta to each electron, provide a fascinating description of phenomena exhibited by interacting two-dimensional electrons at high magnetic fields. At and near Landau level filling ν=1/2, CFs occupy a Fermi sea and exhibit commensurability effects when subjected to a periodic potential modulation. We observe a pronounced asymmetry in the magnetic field positions of the commensurability resistance minima of CFs with respect to the field at ν=1/2. This unexpected asymmetry is consistent with the CFs' Fermi wave vector being determined by the minority carriers in the lowest Landau level, and suggests a breaking of the particle-hole symmetry for CFs near ν=1/2.

  10. species composition, relative abundance and distribution

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Preferred Customer

    habitat size (Willis, 1979), foraging modes. (Marone, 1991) and floristic composition (Wiens and Rotenberry, 1981) have influence in the distribution of the species. The highest number of avian species was observed in the forest habitat. This is probably due to the diversity of vegetation that provided heterogeneous habitat ...

  11. Fatty acid composition of forage herb species

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Warner, D.; Jensen, Søren Krogh; Cone, J.W.

    2010-01-01

    The use of alternative forage species in grasslands for intensive livestock production is receiving renewed attention. Data on fatty acid composition of herbs are scarce, so four herbs (Plantago lanceolata, Achillea millefolium, Cichorium intybus, Pastinaca sativa) and one grass species (timothy......, Phleum pratense) were sown in a cutting trial. The chemical composition and concentration of fatty acids (FA) of individual species were determined during the growing season. Concentrations of crude protein and FA were generally higher in the herbs than in timothy. C. intybus had the highest nutritive...

  12. Culicoides Species Communities Associated with Wild Ruminant Ecosystems in Spain: Tracking the Way to Determine Potential Bridge Vectors for Arboviruses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Talavera

    Full Text Available The genus Culicoides Latreille 1809 is a well-known vector for protozoa, filarial worms and, above all, numerous viruses. The Bluetongue virus (BTV and the recently emerged Schmallenberg virus (SBV are responsible for important infectious, non-contagious, insect-borne viral diseases found in domestic ruminants and transmitted by Culicoides spp. Both of these diseases have been detected in wild ruminants, but their role as reservoirs during the vector-free season still remains relatively unknown. In fact, we tend to ignore the possibility of wild ruminants acting as a source of disease (BTV, SBV and permitting its reintroduction to domestic ruminants during the following vector season. In this context, a knowledge of the composition of the Culicoides species communities that inhabit areas where there are wild ruminants is of major importance as the presence of a vector species is a prerequisite for disease transmission. In this study, samplings were conducted in areas inhabited by different wild ruminant species; samples were taken in both 2009 and 2010, on a monthly basis, during the peak season for midge activity (in summer and autumn. A total of 102,693 specimens of 40 different species of the genus Culicoides were trapped; these included major BTV and SBV vector species. The most abundant vector species were C. imicola and species of the Obsoletus group, which represented 15% and 11% of total numbers of specimens, respectively. At the local scale, the presence of major BTV and SBV vector species in areas with wild ruminants coincided with that of the nearest sentinel farms included in the Spanish Bluetongue Entomological Surveillance Programme, although their relative abundance varied. The data suggest that such species do not exhibit strong host specificity towards either domestic or wild ruminants and that they could consequently play a prominent role as bridge vectors for different pathogens between both types of ruminants. This finding

  13. Nephele: genotyping via complete composition vectors and MapReduce

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mardis Scott

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Current sequencing technology makes it practical to sequence many samples of a given organism, raising new challenges for the processing and interpretation of large genomics data sets with associated metadata. Traditional computational phylogenetic methods are ideal for studying the evolution of gene/protein families and using those to infer the evolution of an organism, but are less than ideal for the study of the whole organism mainly due to the presence of insertions/deletions/rearrangements. These methods provide the researcher with the ability to group a set of samples into distinct genotypic groups based on sequence similarity, which can then be associated with metadata, such as host information, pathogenicity, and time or location of occurrence. Genotyping is critical to understanding, at a genomic level, the origin and spread of infectious diseases. Increasingly, genotyping is coming into use for disease surveillance activities, as well as for microbial forensics. The classic genotyping approach has been based on phylogenetic analysis, starting with a multiple sequence alignment. Genotypes are then established by expert examination of phylogenetic trees. However, these traditional single-processor methods are suboptimal for rapidly growing sequence datasets being generated by next-generation DNA sequencing machines, because they increase in computational complexity quickly with the number of sequences. Results Nephele is a suite of tools that uses the complete composition vector algorithm to represent each sequence in the dataset as a vector derived from its constituent k-mers by passing the need for multiple sequence alignment, and affinity propagation clustering to group the sequences into genotypes based on a distance measure over the vectors. Our methods produce results that correlate well with expert-defined clades or genotypes, at a fraction of the computational cost of traditional phylogenetic methods run on

  14. Vectors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boeriis, Morten; van Leeuwen, Theo

    2017-01-01

    This article revisits the concept of vectors, which, in Kress and van Leeuwen’s Reading Images (2006), plays a crucial role in distinguishing between ‘narrative’, action-oriented processes and ‘conceptual’, state-oriented processes. The use of this concept in image analysis has usually focused...... on the most salient vectors, and this works well, but many images contain a plethora of vectors, which makes their structure quite different from the linguistic transitivity structures with which Kress and van Leeuwen have compared ‘narrative’ images. It can also be asked whether facial expression vectors...... should be taken into account in discussing ‘reactions’, which Kress and van Leeuwen link only to eyeline vectors. Finally, the question can be raised as to whether actions are always realized by vectors. Drawing on a re-reading of Rudolf Arnheim’s account of vectors, these issues are outlined...

  15. Identification and rearing of four thrips species vectors of Tospovirus in the Federal District, Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    Nagata, Tatsuya; Mound, Laurence A; França, Felix H.; Ávila, Antonio C. de

    1999-01-01

    The disease caused by the viruses belonging to the genus Tospovirus is a serious problem in horticultural and ornamental crops in Brazil. In the field, this virus group is transmitted by the insect vector, thrips. Little is known about the thrips species occurring in Brazil, and which species are important for the dissemination of these diseases. For the study of epidemiology of this virus group, different thrips populations, which may have the capacity to be vectors of tospoviruses, were col...

  16. Geographical distribution of Culicoides (DIPTERA: CERATOPOGONIDAE) in mainland Portugal: Presence/absence modelling of vector and potential vector species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramilo, David W; Nunes, Telmo; Madeira, Sara; Boinas, Fernando; da Fonseca, Isabel Pereira

    2017-01-01

    Vector-borne diseases are not only accounted responsible for their burden on human health-care systems, but also known to cause economic constraints to livestock and animal production. Animals are affected directly by the transmitted pathogens and indirectly when animal movement is restricted. Distribution of such diseases depends on climatic and social factors, namely, environmental changes, globalization, trade and unplanned urbanization. Culicoides biting midges are responsible for the transmission of several pathogenic agents with relevant economic impact. Due to a fragmentary knowledge of their ecology, occurrence is difficult to predict consequently, limiting the control of these arthropod vectors. In order to understand the distribution of Culicoides species, in mainland Portugal, data collected during the National Entomologic Surveillance Program for Bluetongue disease (2005-2013), were used for statistical evaluation. Logistic regression analysis was preformed and prediction maps (per season) were obtained for vector and potentially vector species. The variables used at the present study were selected from WorldClim (two climatic variables) and CORINE databases (twenty-two land cover variables). This work points to an opposite distribution of C. imicola and species from the Obsoletus group within mainland Portugal. Such findings are evidenced in autumn, with the former appearing in Central and Southern regions. Although appearing northwards, on summer and autumn, C. newsteadi reveals a similar distribution to C. imicola. The species C. punctatus appears in all Portuguese territory throughout the year. Contrary, C. pulicaris is poorly caught in all areas of mainland Portugal, being paradoxical present near coastal areas and higher altitude regions.

  17. Vector species richness increases haemorrhagic disease prevalence through functional diversity modulating the duration of seasonal transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Andrew W; Cleveland, Christopher A; Dallas, Tad A; Corn, Joseph L

    2016-06-01

    Although many parasites are transmitted between hosts by a suite of arthropod vectors, the impact of vector biodiversity on parasite transmission is poorly understood. Positive relationships between host infection prevalence and vector species richness (SR) may operate through multiple mechanisms, including (i) increased vector abundance, (ii) a sampling effect in which species of high vectorial capacity are more likely to occur in species-rich communities, and (iii) functional diversity whereby communities comprised species with distinct phenologies may extend the duration of seasonal transmission. Teasing such mechanisms apart is impeded by a lack of appropriate data, yet could highlight a neglected role for functional diversity in parasite transmission. We used statistical modelling of extensive host, vector and microparasite data to test the hypothesis that functional diversity leading to longer seasonal transmission explained variable levels of disease in a wildlife population. We additionally developed a simple transmission model to guide our expectation of how an increased transmission season translates to infection prevalence. Our study demonstrates that vector SR is associated with increased levels of disease reporting, but not via increases in vector abundance or via a sampling effect. Rather, the relationship operates by extending the length of seasonal transmission, in line with theoretical predictions.

  18. Fermi wave vector for the partially spin-polarized composite-fermion Fermi sea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Coimbatore Balram, Ajit; Jain, Jainendra

    2017-01-01

    The fully spin polarized composite fermion (CF) Fermi sea at half filled lowest Landau level has a Fermi wave vector $k^*_{\\rm F}=\\sqrt{4\\pi\\rho_e}$, where $\\rho_e$ is the density of electrons or composite fermions, supporting the notion that the interaction between composite fermions can...... CFFSs at $\

  19. Mineral composition of basidiomes of Amanita species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vetter, János

    2005-06-01

    Basidiomes of 43 samples of eight Amanita species were gathered from different habitats of Hungary. The mineral composition (22 elements) was analysed by the ICP method in three independent replications, and mineral compositions found as discussed and compared. The Amanita species analysed were very different in As-, Cd-, Cr-, Mo-, Mn-, Se- and mainly in V-content. Other elements (Al, B, Ba, Ca, Co, Cu, Fe, Mg, Na, Ni, Sr, Ti, Zn) occur in the basidiomes in balanced concentrations. The K and P contents have the lowest differences. Summarizing all the data (n = 43), the average mineral status of species of Amanita can be deduced. The lowest variability measured was for K and P, and the highest for chromium, nickel and vanadium. Specific, significant accumulation was found only for vanadium, due to the previously demonstrated occurrence of a binding molecule 'amavadine' in the basidiomes of A. muscaria. Remarkable Cd-levels were estimated in A. pantherina and A. muscaria (11.4 and 12.3 mg kg(-1) D.M., respectively). The higher contents of other elements (e.g. K, practically in all species; Se in A. strobiliformis) are analytical facts but, not accumulations. The mineral compositions of the ectomycorrhizal genus Amanita, of litter decomposing Agaricus and of wood decaying Trametes were compared. Some significant differences were found (AsAmanita KTrametes; PAmanita > PTrametes) but it seems that the mineral composition of the basidiomes is practically independent of the ectomycorrhizal habit. The specificities of the fungi-tree symbiotic interactions are known, and well documented (higher uptake and transport of certain elements first of all of P), however, the differences found in the mineral components are due to other factors (e.g. substrates, accumulating ability) and not to the mycorrhizal status.

  20. NOAA Composite Shoreline - Vectorized Shoreline Derived From NOAA-NOS Coastal Survey Maps and Aerial Photographs

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NOAA Composite Shoreline is primarily intended for high-resolution cartographic representation of the shoreline. It is a high-resolution vector shoreline based...

  1. Biting behaviour of African malaria vectors: 1. where do the main vector species bite on the human body?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braack, Leo; Hunt, Richard; Koekemoer, Lizette L; Gericke, Anton; Munhenga, Givemore; Haddow, Andrew D; Becker, Piet; Okia, Michael; Kimera, Isaac; Coetzee, Maureen

    2015-02-04

    Malaria control in Africa relies heavily on indoor vector management, primarily indoor residual spraying and insecticide treated bed nets. Little is known about outdoor biting behaviour or even the dynamics of indoor biting and infection risk of sleeping household occupants. In this paper we explore the preferred biting sites on the human body and some of the ramifications regarding infection risk and exposure management. We undertook whole-night human landing catches of Anopheles arabiensis in South Africa and Anopheles gambiae s.s. and Anopheles funestus in Uganda, for seated persons wearing short sleeve shirts, short pants, and bare legs, ankles and feet. Catches were kept separate for different body regions and capture sessions. All An. gambiae s.l. and An. funestus group individuals were identified to species level by PCR. Three of the main vectors of malaria in Africa (An. arabiensis, An. gambiae s.s. and An. funestus) all have a preference for feeding close to ground level, which is manifested as a strong propensity (77.3% - 100%) for biting on lower leg, ankles and feet of people seated either indoors or outdoors, but somewhat randomly along the lower edge of the body in contact with the surface when lying down. If the lower extremities of the legs (below mid-calf level) of seated people are protected and therefore exclude access to this body region, vector mosquitoes do not move higher up the body to feed at alternate body sites, instead resulting in a high (58.5% - 68.8%) reduction in biting intensity by these three species. Protecting the lower limbs of people outdoors at night can achieve a major reduction in biting intensity by malaria vector mosquitoes. Persons sleeping at floor level bear a disproportionate risk of being bitten at night because this is the preferred height for feeding by the primary vector species. Therefore it is critical to protect children sleeping at floor level (bednets; repellent-impregnated blankets or sheets, etc

  2. Current Knowledge of Leishmania Vectors in Mexico: How Geographic Distributions of Species Relate to Transmission Areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, Camila; Rebollar-Téllez, Eduardo A.; Ibáñez-Bernal, Sergio; Becker-Fauser, Ingeborg; Martínez-Meyer, Enrique; Peterson, A. Townsend; Sánchez-Cordero, Víctor

    2011-01-01

    Leishmaniases are a group of vector-borne diseases with different clinical manifestations caused by parasites transmitted by sand fly vectors. In Mexico, the sand fly Lutzomyia olmeca olmeca is the only vector proven to transmit the parasite Leishmania mexicana to humans, which causes leishmaniasis. Other vector species with potential medical importance have been obtained, but their geographic distributions and relation to transmission areas have never been assessed. We modeled the ecological niches of nine sand fly species and projected niches to estimate potential distributions by using known occurrences, environmental coverages, and the algorithms GARP and Maxent. All vector species were distributed in areas with known recurrent transmission, except for Lu. diabolica, which appeared to be related only to areas of occasional transmission in northern Mexico. The distribution of Lu. o. olmeca does not overlap with all reported cutaneous leishmaniasis cases, suggesting that Lu. cruciata and Lu. shannoni are likely also involved as primary vectors in those areas. Our study provides useful information of potential risk areas of leishmaniasis transmission in Mexico. PMID:22049037

  3. Fatty acids composition of 10 microalgal species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thidarat Noiraksar

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Fatty acids composition of 10 species of microalgae was determined at the exponential phase and the stationary phase. The microalgae consist of two species of diatoms, Bacillariophyceae, (Nitzschia cf. ovalis, Thalassiosira sp. five species of green microalgae, Prasinophyceae (Tetraselmis sp. and Chlorophyceae, (Dictyosphaerium pulchellum, Stichococcus sp., Chlorella sp., Scenedesmus falcatus and three species of blue green microalgae, Cyanophyceae (Anacystis sp., Synechococcus sp., Synechocystis sp..Medium for culture diatoms and green microalgae was F/2, and BG-11 media was used for Cyanophyceae. The microalgae were cultured beneath light intensity 143 μEm-2s-1, light: dark illustration 12:12 hrs., temperature 28ºC, and salinities 8-30 psu. The microalgae were harvested for analyzing fatty acid by centrivugal machine at 3500 rpm. for 5 min. at temperature 20ºC and stored at -80ºC prior to analysis.Fatty acids composition of microalgae differed from species to species. The majority fatty acids composition of diatoms at the exponential phase and the stationary phase were C16:1n-7 (17.12-31.47% and 28.22-42.02%, C16:0 (13.25-19.61% and 18.83-20.67%, C20:5 n-3 (16.65-26.67% and 11.32-23.68% respectively. The principle fatty acids composition of green microalgae, Prasinophyceae, Tetraselmis sp. were C18:3n-3 (16.17-16.67%, C16:0 (15.33-17.45%, C18:1n-9 (12.25-15.43%, C18:2n-6 (9.66-19.97%. The fatty acids composition of green microalgae, Chlorophyceae, were C18:3 n-3 (20.02-26.49% and 15.35- 30.63%, C16:0 (5.76-17.61% and 11.41-20.03%, C18:2n-6 (4.67-17.54% and 7.48-20.61% respectively. The major amounts of fatty acids content of blue green microalgae were C16:1n-7 (9.28-34.91% and 34.48- 35.04%, C14:0 (13.34-25.96% and 26.69-28.24%, C16:0 (5.89-29.15% and 5.70-16.81% except for Anacystis sp.which had a high amount of C18:3 n-3 (23.18-27.98% but low amount of C14:0 (3.66-4.98%.Bacillariophyceae contained the highest amount of highly unsaturated

  4. Community composition and species richness of parasitoids infesting Yponomeuta species in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cleary, Daniel F.R.

    2004-01-01

    Parasitoid assemblages infesting Yponomeuta species in the Netherlands were investigated. Parasitoid species richness and community composition were related to host species, habitat, temporal and spatial variation. Both community structure and species richness did not differ among habitats. There

  5. A revision of thirteen species of Triatominae (Hemiptera: Reduviidae vectors of Chagas disease in Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salazar-Schettino Paz Maria

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Vectors of Trypanosoma cruzi, parasite responsible for Chagas disease, are divided in intradomestic, peridomestic and sylvatic. The intradomestic are Triatoma barberi and Triatoma dimidiata, two species that represent the highest health risk among the Mexican population. Triatoma dimidiata is a species found mainly inside human habitats, but in Yucatan, it corresponds to the peridomicile vectors. Also in the peridomicile most of Chagas disease vectors are found: Meccus bassolsae, M. longipennis, M. mazzottii, M pallidipennis, M. phyllosomus, M picturata, Triatoma gerstaeckeri, T mexicana, T rubida, Dipetalogaster máxima (the last two are in the process of becoming adapted to the domicile, Panstrongylus rufotuberculatus which occasionally enters the domicile in its adult stage, and Rhodnius prolixus, which is practically controlled in the country. Peridomestic vectors are of lower risk in the transmission dynamics, as compared to the intradomestic ones. For the control of the intradomestic vectors, health education programs, improvements of housing, and the use of pesticides are essential To control the peridomestic vectors, health education programs are required, as well as the use of mosquito nets on doors and windows and around beds, aside from cementing the stone wall fences.

  6. Measurement of lentiviral vector titre and copy number by cross-species duplex quantitative PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christodoulou, I; Patsali, P; Stephanou, C; Antoniou, M; Kleanthous, M; Lederer, C W

    2016-01-01

    Lentiviruses are the vectors of choice for many preclinical studies and clinical applications of gene therapy. Accurate measurement of biological vector titre before treatment is a prerequisite for vector dosing, and the calculation of vector integration sites per cell after treatment is as critical to the characterisation of modified cell products as it is to long-term follow-up and the assessment of risk and therapeutic efficiency in patients. These analyses are typically based on quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR), but as yet compromise accuracy and comparability between laboratories and experimental systems, the former by using separate simplex reactions for the detection of endogene and lentiviral sequences and the latter by designing different PCR assays for analyses in human cells and animal disease models. In this study, we validate in human and murine cells a qPCR system for the single-tube assessment of lentiviral vector copy numbers that is suitable for analyses in at least 33 different mammalian species, including human and other primates, mouse, pig, cat and domestic ruminants. The established assay combines the accuracy of single-tube quantitation by duplex qPCR with the convenience of one-off assay optimisation for cross-species analyses and with the direct comparability of lentiviral transduction efficiencies in different species.

  7. Vector and axial-vector resonances in composite models of the Higgs boson

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franzosi, Diogo Buarque [II. Physikalisches Institut, Universität Göttingen,Friedrich-Hund-Platz 1, 37077 Göttingen (Germany); Cacciapaglia, Giacomo; Cai, Haiying; Deandrea, Aldo [Univ Lyon, Université Lyon 1, CNRS/IN2P3, IPNL,F-69622, Villeurbanne (France); Frandsen, Mads [CP-Origins & Danish Institute for Advanced Study DIAS, University of Southern Denmark,Campusvej 55, DK-5230 Odense M (Denmark)

    2016-11-11

    We provide a non-linear realisation of composite Higgs models in the context of the SU(4)/Sp(4) symmetry breaking pattern, where the effective Lagrangian of the spin-0 and spin-1 resonances is constructed via the CCWZ prescription using the Hidden Symmetry formalism. We investigate the EWPT constraints by accounting the effects from reduced Higgs couplings and integrating out heavy spin-1 resonances. This theory emerges from an underlying theory of gauge interactions with fermions, thus first principle lattice results predict the massive spectrum in composite Higgs models. This model can be used as a template for the phenomenology of composite Higgs models at the LHC and at future 100 TeV colliders, as well as for other application. In this work, we focus on the formalism for spin-1 resonances and their bounds from di-lepton and di-boson searches at the LHC.

  8. Vector and Axial-vector resonances in composite models of the Higgs boson

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Franzosi, Diogo Buarque; Cacciapaglia, Giacomo; Cai, Haiying

    2016-01-01

    We provide a non-linear realisation of composite Higgs models in the context of the SU(4)/Sp(4) symmetry breaking pattern, where the effective Lagrangian of the spin-0 and spin-1 resonances is constructed via the CCWZ prescription using the Hidden Symmetry formalism. We investigate the EWPT const...... as a template for the phenomenology of composite Higgs models at the LHC and at future 100 TeV colliders, as well as for other application. In this work, we focus on the formalism for spin-1 resonances and their bounds from di-lepton and di-boson searches at the LHC....

  9. Species Distribution Models and Ecological Suitability Analysis for Potential Tick Vectors of Lyme Disease in Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Illoldi-Rangel

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Species distribution models were constructed for ten Ixodes species and Amblyomma cajennense for a region including Mexico and Texas. The model was based on a maximum entropy algorithm that used environmental layers to predict the relative probability of presence for each taxon. For Mexico, species geographic ranges were predicted by restricting the models to cells which have a higher probability than the lowest probability of the cells in which a presence record was located. There was spatial nonconcordance between the distributions of Amblyomma cajennense and the Ixodes group with the former restricted to lowlands and mainly the eastern coast of Mexico and the latter to montane regions with lower temperature. The risk of Lyme disease is, therefore, mainly present in the highlands where some Ixodes species are known vectors; if Amblyomma cajennense turns out to be a competent vector, the area of risk also extends to the lowlands and the east coast.

  10. Bartonella species in small mammals and their potential vectors in Asia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tawisa Jiyipong

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In this article, authors review the current knowledge of Bartonella infection in small mammals including rodents, insectivores, bats and exotic small mammal pets and their vectors in Asia. Species of Bartonella are Gram-negative intracellular bacteria that infect erythrocytes of various mammalian and non-mammalian animals and mainly transmitted by blood sucking arthropod vectors. The genus Bartonella includes several species of important human diseases with severe clinical signs. Several new Bartonella species were isolated from rodents and other small mammals, and from human patients in Asia. Bartonella species are identified using standard polymerase chain reaction amplification and a sequencing targeting two housekeeping genes (gltA and rpoB and the internal transcribed spacer fragment. Authors also discuss the implications in term of potential emerging zoonotic diseases.

  11. Human/vector relationships during human African trypanosomiasis: initial screening of immunogenic salivary proteins of Glossina species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poinsignon, Anne; Cornelie, Sylvie; Remoue, Franck; Grébaut, Pascal; Courtin, David; Garcia, Andre; Simondon, Francois

    2007-02-01

    The morbidity and mortality of vector-borne diseases is closely linked to exposure of the human host to vectors. Qualitative and quantitative evaluation of individual exposure to arthropod bites by investigation of the specific immune response to vector saliva would make it possible to monitor individuals at risk of vectorial transmission of pathogens. The objective of this study was to evaluate and compare the antibody (IgG) response to saliva from uninfected Glossina species, vectors, or non-vectors of Trypanosoma brucei gambiense by detecting immunogenic proteins in humans residing in an area endemic for human African trypanosomiasis in the Democratic Republic of Congo. Our results suggest that the immunogenic profiles observed seemed specific to the Glossina species (vector or non-vector species) and to the infectious status of exposed individuals (infected or not infected). This preliminary work tends to support the feasibility of development of an epidemiologic tool based on this antibody response to salivary proteins.

  12. Vector status of Aedes species determines geographical risk of autochthonous Zika virus establishment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauren Gardner

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The 2015-16 Zika virus pandemic originating in Latin America led to predictions of a catastrophic global spread of the disease. Since the current outbreak began in Brazil in May 2015 local transmission of Zika has been reported in over 60 countries and territories, with over 750 thousand confirmed and suspected cases. As a result of its range expansion attention has focused on possible modes of transmission, of which the arthropod vector-based disease spread cycle involving Aedes species is believed to be the most important. Additional causes of concern are the emerging new links between Zika disease and Guillain-Barre Syndrome (GBS, and a once rare congenital disease, microcephaly.Like dengue and chikungunya, the geographic establishment of Zika is thought to be limited by the occurrence of its principal vector mosquito species, Ae. aegypti and, possibly, Ae. albopictus. While Ae. albopictus populations are more widely established than those of Ae. aegypti, the relative competence of these species as a Zika vector is unknown. The analysis reported here presents a global risk model that considers the role of each vector species independently, and quantifies the potential spreading risk of Zika into new regions. Six scenarios are evaluated which vary in the weight assigned to Ae. albopictus as a possible spreading vector. The scenarios are bounded by the extreme assumptions that spread is driven by air travel and Ae. aegypti presence alone and spread driven equally by both species. For each scenario destination cities at highest risk of Zika outbreaks are prioritized, as are source cities in affected regions. Finally, intercontinental air travel routes that pose the highest risk for Zika spread are also ranked. The results are compared between scenarios.Results from the analysis reveal that if Ae. aegypti is the only competent Zika vector, then risk is geographically limited; in North America mainly to Florida and Texas. However, if Ae

  13. Species Composition, Relative Abundance and Distribution of the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... Composition, Relative Abundance and Distribution of the Avian Fauna of Entoto Natural ... A study on avian species composition, relative abundance, diversity and ... Eucalyptus plantation, soil erosion, deforestation, habitat fragmentation, ...

  14. Body composition of chronic renal patients: anthropometry and bioimpedance vector analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Soares, Viviane; Avelar, Ivan Silveira de; Andrade, Sara Rosa de Sousa; Vieira, Marcus Fraga; Silva, Maria Sebastiana

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: to compare the body composition of patients undergoing hemodialysis with that of healthy individuals using different methods. METHOD: cross-sectional study assessing male individuals using anthropometric markers, electrical bioimpedance and vector analysis. RESULTS: the healthy individuals presented larger triceps skinfold and arm circumference (p

  15. THE TEMPERATURE AND COMPOSITION DEPENDENCE OF THE MODULATION WAVE VECTOR OF INCOMMENSURATE CALAVERITE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    BALZUWEIT, K; HOVESTAD, A; MEEKES, H; DEBOER, JL

    Single crystals of incommensurately modulated calaverite, with and without silver were grown and analysed using different techniques. The modulation wave vectors of some well characterised samples were measured as a function of both composition and temperature. The thus obtained results were

  16. Heavy Vector Partners of the Light Composite Higgs

    CERN Document Server

    Lane, Kenneth

    2016-01-01

    If the Higgs boson $H(125)$ is a composite due to new strong interactions at high energy, it has spin-one partners, $\\rho_H$ and $a_H$, analogous to the $\\rho$ and $a_1$ mesons of QCD. These bosons are heavy, their mass determined by the strong interaction scale. The strongly interacting particles light enough for $\\rho_H$ and $a_H$ to decay to are the longitudinal weak bosons $V_L = W_L,\\, Z_L$ and the Higgs boson $H$. These decay signatures are consistent with resonant diboson excesses recently reported near 2 TeV by ATLAS and CMS. We calculate $\\sigma\\times BR(\\rho_H \\to VV) =$ few fb and $\\sigma\\times BR(a_H \\to VH) =$ 0.5-1 fb at $\\sqrt{s} =$ 8 TeV, increasing by a factor of 5-7 at 13 TeV. Other tests of the hypothesis of the strong-interaction nature of the diboson resonances are suggested.

  17. Vector diagram of the chemical compositions of tektites and earth lavas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kvasha, L. G.; Gorshkov, G. S.

    1978-01-01

    The chemical compositions of tektites and various volcanic glasses, similar in composition to tektites are compared by a petrochemical method. The advantage of the method is that a large number of chemical analyses of igneous rocks can be graphically compared with the help of vectors, plotted in relation to six parameters. These parameters, calculated from ratios of the main oxides given by silicate analysis, reflect the chief characteristics of igneous rock. Material for the study was suppled by data from chemical analysis characterizing tektites of all known locations and data from chemical analyses of obsidians similar in chemical composition to tektites of various petrographical provinces.

  18. Evaluation of organophosphorus and synthetic pyrethroid insecticides against six vector mosquitoe species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Domingo Montada Dorta

    1993-12-01

    Full Text Available Three organophosphorus compounds- malathion, folithion and temephos- and two synthetic pyrethroids- alphamethrin and deltamethrin- were used for monitoring the susceptibility status of larvae and adults of six vector mosquitoe species: Culex quinquefasciatus (Filariasis and Aedes albopictus (Dengue (both laboratory and field strains; laboratory strains of Aedes aegypti (Dengue, Anopheles slephensi and Anopheles culicifacies (Malaria, and Culex tritaeniorhynchus (Japanese encephalitis in India. From the LC50 values obtained for these insecticides, it was found that all mosquito species including the field strains of Cx. quinquefasciatus and Ae. albopictus were highly susceptible Except for Cx. quinquefasciatus (field strain against malathion, 100% mortality was observed at the discriminating dosages recommended by World Health Organization. The residual effect of alphamethrin, deltamethrin, malathion and folithion at 25 mg (ai/m² on different surfaces against six species of vector mosquitoes showed that alphamethrin was the most effective on all four treated surfaces (mud, plywood, cement and thatch. Nevertheless, residual efficacy lasted longer on thatch than on the other surfaces. Therefore, synthetic pyrethroids such as alphamethrin can be effectively employed in integrated vector control operations.

  19. Evaluation of organophosphorus and synthetic pyrethroid insecticides against six vector mosquitoe species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Montada Dorta Domingo

    1993-01-01

    Full Text Available Three organophosphorus compounds- malathion, folithion and temephos- and two synthetic pyrethroids- alphamethrin and deltamethrin- were used for monitoring the susceptibility status of larvae and adults of six vector mosquitoe species: Culex quinquefasciatus (Filariasis and Aedes albopictus (Dengue (both laboratory and field strains; laboratory strains of Aedes aegypti (Dengue, Anopheles slephensi and Anopheles culicifacies (Malaria, and Culex tritaeniorhynchus (Japanese encephalitis in India. From the LC50 values obtained for these insecticides, it was found that all mosquito species including the field strains of Cx. quinquefasciatus and Ae. albopictus were highly susceptible Except for Cx. quinquefasciatus (field strain against malathion, 100% mortality was observed at the discriminating dosages recommended by World Health Organization. The residual effect of alphamethrin, deltamethrin, malathion and folithion at 25 mg (ai/m² on different surfaces against six species of vector mosquitoes showed that alphamethrin was the most effective on all four treated surfaces (mud, plywood, cement and thatch. Nevertheless, residual efficacy lasted longer on thatch than on the other surfaces. Therefore, synthetic pyrethroids such as alphamethrin can be effectively employed in integrated vector control operations.

  20. Immunogenicity of ORFV-based vectors expressing the rabies virus glycoprotein in livestock species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Mathias; Joshi, Lok R; Rodrigues, Fernando S; Anziliero, Deniz; Frandoloso, Rafael; Kutish, Gerald F; Rock, Daniel L; Weiblen, Rudi; Flores, Eduardo F; Diel, Diego G

    2017-11-01

    The parapoxvirus Orf virus (ORFV) encodes several immunomodulatory proteins (IMPs) that modulate host-innate and pro-inflammatory responses and has been proposed as a vaccine delivery vector for use in animal species. Here we describe the construction and characterization of two recombinant ORFV vectors expressing the rabies virus (RABV) glycoprotein (G). The RABV-G gene was inserted in the ORFV024 or ORFV121 gene loci, which encode for IMPs that are unique to parapoxviruses and inhibit activation of the NF-κB signaling pathway. The immunogenicity of the resultant recombinant viruses (ORFV∆024RABV-G or ORFV∆121RABV-G, respectively) was evaluated in pigs and cattle. Immunization of the target species with ORFV∆024RABV-G and ORFV∆121RABV-G elicited robust neutralizing antibody responses against RABV. Notably, neutralizing antibody titers induced in ORFV∆121RABV-G-immunized pigs and cattle were significantly higher than those detected in ORFV∆024RABV-G-immunized animals, indicating a higher immunogenicity of ORFVΔ121-based vectors in these animal species. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Species composition and depth variation of cutlassfish ( Trichiurus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cutlassfish trawl fisheries have been used in the Persian Gulf, but very little information about species composition of the large rates of bycatch caught in this region is available. The data on total species composition of 40 hauls from vessels operating off the fishing grounds of Persian Gulf was collected from May 1st 2009 to ...

  2. Species composition and depth variation of cutlassfish (Trichiurus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ajl yemi

    2011-11-30

    Nov 30, 2011 ... Cutlassfish trawl fisheries have been used in the Persian Gulf, but very little information about species composition of the large rates of bycatch caught in this region is available. The data on total species composition of 40 hauls from vessels operating off the fishing grounds of Persian Gulf was collected.

  3. Lutzomyia umbratilis, the main vector of Leishmania guyanensis, represents a novel species complex?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vera Margarete Scarpassa

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Lutzomyia umbratilis is an important Leishmania guyanensis vector in South America. Previous studies have suggested differences in the vector competence between L. umbratilis populations situated on opposite banks of the Amazonas and Negro Rivers in the central Amazonian Brazil region, likely indicating a species complex. However, few studies have been performed on these populations and the taxonomic status of L. umbratilis remains unclear. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Phylogeographic structure was estimated for six L. umbratilis samples from the central Amazonian region in Brazil by analyzing mtDNA using 1181 bp of the COI gene to assess whether the populations on opposite banks of these rivers consist of incipient or distinct species. The genetic diversity was fairly high and the results revealed two distinct clades ( = lineages with 1% sequence divergence. Clade I consisted of four samples from the left bank of the Amazonas and Negro Rivers, whereas clade II comprised two samples from the right bank of Negro River. No haplotypes were shared between samples of two clades. Samples within clades exhibited low to moderate genetic differentiation (F(ST = -0.0390-0.1841, whereas samples between clades exhibited very high differentiation (F(ST = 0.7100-0.8497 and fixed differences. These lineages have diverged approximately 0.22 Mya in the middle Pleistocene. Demographic expansion was detected for the lineages I and II approximately 30,448 and 15,859 years ago, respectively, in the late Pleistocene. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The two genetic lineages may represent an advanced speciation stage suggestive of incipient or distinct species within L. umbratilis. These findings suggest that the Amazonas and Negro Rivers may be acting as effective barriers, thus preventing gene flow between populations on opposite sides. Such findings have important implications for epidemiological studies, especially those related to vector

  4. Species composition, Plant Community structure and Natural ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Belete forest is one of the very few remnant moist evergreen montane forests in Ethiopia. The objective of this work was to study the vegetation structure, composition and Natural regeneration status of Belete moist evergreen montane forest. To investigate the plant community structure, composition and regeneration status ...

  5. Proximate and chemical composition of three species of snails in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This trial was conducted to determine the proximate and chemical composition of three common species of snails in Nigeria. The species were Archachatina marginata (T1), Achatina achatina (T2), and Achatina fulica (T3). The three species constituted the three treatments and thirty-six adult snails were used for this trial ...

  6. Body composition of chronic renal patients: anthropometry and bioimpedance vector analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viviane Soares

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: to compare the body composition of patients undergoing hemodialysis with that of healthy individuals using different methods. METHOD: cross-sectional study assessing male individuals using anthropometric markers, electrical bioimpedance and vector analysis. RESULTS: the healthy individuals presented larger triceps skinfold and arm circumference (p<0.001. The bioimpedance variables also presented significant higher values in this group. Significant difference was found in the confidence interval of the vector analysis performed for both the patients and healthy individuals (p<0.0001. The tolerance intervals showed that 55.20% of the patients were dehydrated, 10.30% presented visible edema, and 34.50% were within normal levels of hydration. Bioimpedance and vector analysis revealed that 52% of the patients presented decreased cell mass while 14.00% presented increased cell mass. CONCLUSIONS: the differences in the body composition of patients and healthy individuals were revealed through bioimpedance and vector analysis but not through their measures of arm circumference and arm muscle area.

  7. Diversity of Thrips Species and Vectors of Tomato Spotted Wilt Virus in Tomato Production Systems in Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macharia, Isaac; Backhouse, David; Skilton, Rob; Ateka, Elijah; Wu, Shu-Biao; Njahira, Moses; Maina, Solomon; Harvey, Jagger

    2015-02-01

    Thrips have been recognized as primary vectors of tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) with Frankliniella occidentalis (Pergande) reported as the most important and efficient vector, while other species such as Thrips tabaci Lindeman also include populations that can vector the virus. A study was undertaken to establish the diversity of thrips and presence of vectors for TSWV in four major tomato production areas in Kenya. The cytochrome oxidase 1 (CO1) gene was used to generate sequences from thrips samples collected from tomatoes and weeds, and phylogenetic analysis done to establish the variation within potential vector populations. Ceratothripoides brunneus Bagnall was the predominant species of thrips in all areas. F. occidentalis and T. tabaci were abundant in Nakuru, Kirinyaga, and Loitokitok but not detected at Bungoma. Other vectors of tospoviruses identified in low numbers were Frankliniella schultzei (Trybom) and Scirtothrips dorsalis Hood. Variation was observed in T. tabaci, F. occidentalis, and F. schultzei. Kenyan specimens of T. tabaci from tomato belonged to the arrhenotokous group, while those of F. occidentalis clustered with the Western flower thrips G group. The detection of RNA of TSWV in both of these species of thrips supported the role they play as vectors. The study has demonstrated the high diversity of thrips species in tomato production and the occurrence of important vectors of TSWV and other tospoviruses. © The Authors 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Colonization of the Mediterranean basin by the vector biting midge species Culicoides imicola: an old story.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacquet, S; Garros, C; Lombaert, E; Walton, C; Restrepo, J; Allene, X; Baldet, T; Cetre-Sossah, C; Chaskopoulou, A; Delecolle, J-C; Desvars, A; Djerbal, M; Fall, M; Gardes, L; de Garine-Wichatitsky, M; Goffredo, M; Gottlieb, Y; Gueye Fall, A; Kasina, M; Labuschagne, K; Lhor, Y; Lucientes, J; Martin, T; Mathieu, B; Miranda, M; Pages, N; Pereira da Fonseca, I; Ramilo, D W; Segard, A; Setier-Rio, M-L; Stachurski, F; Tabbabi, A; Talla Seck, M; Venter, G; Zimba, M; Balenghien, T; Guis, H; Chevillon, C; Bouyer, J; Huber, K

    2015-11-01

    Understanding the demographic history and genetic make-up of colonizing species is critical for inferring population sources and colonization routes. This is of main interest for designing accurate control measures in areas newly colonized by vector species of economically important pathogens. The biting midge Culicoides imicola is a major vector of orbiviruses to livestock. Historically, the distribution of this species was limited to the Afrotropical region. Entomological surveys first revealed the presence of C. imicola in the south of the Mediterranean basin by the 1970s. Following recurrent reports of massive bluetongue outbreaks since the 1990s, the presence of the species was confirmed in northern areas. In this study, we addressed the chronology and processes of C. imicola colonization in the Mediterranean basin. We characterized the genetic structure of its populations across Mediterranean and African regions using both mitochondrial and nuclear markers, and combined phylogeographical analyses with population genetics and approximate Bayesian computation. We found a west/east genetic differentiation between populations, occurring both within Africa and within the Mediterranean basin. We demonstrated that three of these groups had experienced demographic expansions in the Pleistocene, probably because of climate changes during this period. Finally, we showed that C. imicola could have colonized the Mediterranean basin in the Late Pleistocene or Early Holocene through a single event of introduction; however, we cannot exclude the hypothesis involving two routes of colonization. Thus, the recent bluetongue outbreaks are not linked to C. imicola colonization event, but rather to biological changes in the vector or the virus. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. species composition, relative abundance and distribution

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Preferred Customer

    migratory breeding in the Palaearctic region and. 69 are mainly African (south of the Sahara desert) or tropical species which also occur in the. Palaearctic region. There are 199 Palaearctic winter visitors in Ethiopia, including 21 passage migrants. Of these, 169 are only visitors with no resident forms. There are 47 species, ...

  10. MALDI-TOF MS Profiling-Advances in Species Identification of Pests, Parasites, and Vectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jayaseelan Murugaiyan

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Invertebrate pests and parasites of humans, animals, and plants continue to cause serious diseases and remain as a high treat to agricultural productivity and storage. The rapid and accurate species identification of the pests and parasites are needed for understanding epidemiology, monitoring outbreaks, and designing control measures. Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS profiling has emerged as a rapid, cost effective, and high throughput technique of microbial species identification in modern diagnostic laboratories. The development of soft ionization techniques and the release of commercial pattern matching software platforms has resulted in the exponential growth of applications in higher organisms including parasitology. The present review discusses the proof-of-principle experiments and various methods of MALDI MS profiling in rapid species identification of both laboratory and field isolates of pests, parasites and vectors.

  11. Composite Weak Vector Bosons in a Left-Right Symmetric Preon Model : Particles and fields

    OpenAIRE

    Motoo, SEKIGUTI; Shin, ISHIDA; Hiroaki, WADA; Atomic Energy Research Institute, College of Science and Technology Nihon University

    1996-01-01

    We take the viewpoint that the standard model is a low energy effective theory among composite quarks, leptons and weak bosons in a left-right (LR) symmetric preon model with a hypercolor SU(N)_ gauge interaction. Starting from NJL-type interactions with glohal SU(2)_L × SU(2)_R symmetry, we construct the composite weak vector bosons from a pair of spinor preons and derive their effective interactions with quarks and leptons, which are essentially identical, at the tree diagram level, to thos...

  12. Anthropophilic Anopheles species composition and malaria in Tierradentro, Córdoba, Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Joachim Schiemann

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Malaria is still a primary health problem in Colombia. The locality of Tierradentro is situated in the municipality of Montelíbano, Córdoba, in the northwest of Colombia, and has one of the highest annual parasite index of malaria nationwide. However, the vectors involved in malaria transmission in this locality have not yet been identified. In this study, the local anthropophilic Anopheles composition and natural infectivity with Plasmodium were investigated. In August 2009, 927 female Anopheles mosquitoes were collected in eight localities using the human landing catch method and identified based on their morphology. Cryptic species were determined by restriction fragment length polymorphism-internal transcribed spacer (ITS2 molecular analysis. Eight species [Anopheles nuneztovari s.l. (92.8%, Anopheles darlingi (5.1%, Anopheles triannulatus s.l. (1.8%, Anopheles pseudopunctipennis s.l. (0.2%, Anopheles punctimacula s.l. (0.2%, Anopheles apicimacula (0.1%, Anopheles albimanus (0.1% and Anopheles rangeli (0.1%] were identified and species identity was confirmed by ITS2 sequencing. This is the first report of An. albimanus, An. rangeli and An. apicimacula in Tierradentro. Natural infectivity with Plasmodium was determined by ELISA. None of the mosquitoes was infectious for Plasmodium. An. nuneztovari s.l. was the predominant species and is considered the primary malaria vector; An. darlingi and An. triannulatus s.l. could serve as secondary vectors.

  13. ESSENTIAL OIL COMPOSITION OF FOUR ARTEMISIA SPECIES ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    B. S. Chandravanshi

    leaves of A. absinthium L. from Ethiopia (previously called A. rehan) and A. absinthium (from Europe) was also conducted. ... composition of the essential oils of A. schimperi, A. afra and A. abyssinica are mainly dominated by irregular monoterpenes: ... Sch. Bip. ex A. Rich., A. afra Jacq. ex Willd., and A. absinthium L. [1].

  14. Species composition, abundance and biomass of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nearshore marine environments are influenced by an array of variables that can either be land-derived or of marine origin, and nearshore phytoplankton communities may differ in their taxonomic composition and biomass in response to such variables. The KwaZulu-Natal Bight (hereafter referred to as 'the bight') is an ...

  15. Species composition of developing Central Appalachian hardwood stands following clearcutting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lance A. Vickers; Thomas Fox

    2015-01-01

    This study examined the species composition of 47 paired stands on submesic sites on the Appalachian Plateau of West Virginia. Paired stands consisted of a mature stand adjacent to a young clearcut that was

  16. Changes in woody species composition following establishing ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Restoring vegetation in low rainfall areas is difficult and urges the need to design an effective and low-cost method of vegetation restoration. This study was undertaken in the lowlands of northern Ethiopia to: (1) investigate how exclosure age affects restoration of degraded native plant species richness, diversity and ...

  17. Microplastics as a vector for the transport of the bacterial fish pathogen species Aeromonas salmonicida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viršek, Manca Kovač; Lovšin, Marija Nika; Koren, Špela; Kržan, Andrej; Peterlin, Monika

    2017-12-15

    Microplastics is widespread in the marine environment where it can cause numerous negative effects. It can provide space for the growth of organisms and serves as a vector for the long distance transfer of marine microorganisms. In this study, we examined the sea surface concentrations of microplastics in the North Adriatic and characterized bacterial communities living on the microplastics. DNA from microplastics particles was isolated by three different methods, followed by PCR amplification of 16S rDNA, clone libraries preparation and phylogenetic analysis. 28 bacterial species were identified on the microplastics particles including Aeromonas spp. and hydrocarbon-degrading bacterial species. Based on the 16S rDNA sequences the pathogenic fish bacteria Aeromonas salmonicida was identified for the first time on microplastics. Because A. salmonicida is responsible for illnesses in fish, it is crucial to get answers if and how microplastics pollution is responsible for spreading of diseases. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Variation in species composition and species richness within Phragmites australis dominated riparian zones

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lenssen, J.P.M.; Menting, F.B.J.; Van der Putten, W.H.; Blom, C.W.P.M.

    2000-01-01

    In riparian wetlands total standing crop often fails to account for a significant part of the observed variation in species richness and species composition within communities. In this study, we used abundance of the dominant species instead of total standing crop as the biotic predictor variable

  19. Effects of Zika Virus Strain and Aedes Mosquito Species on Vector Competence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bialosuknia, Sean M.; Zink, Steven D.; Brecher, Matthew; Ehrbar, Dylan J.; Morrissette, Madeline N.; Kramer, Laura D.

    2017-01-01

    In the Western Hemisphere, Zika virus is thought to be transmitted primarily by Aedes aegypti mosquitoes. To determine the extent to which Ae. albopictus mosquitoes from the United States are capable of transmitting Zika virus and the influence of virus dose, virus strain, and mosquito species on vector competence, we evaluated multiple doses of representative Zika virus strains in Ae. aegypti and Ae. albopictus mosquitoes. Virus preparation (fresh vs. frozen) significantly affected virus infectivity in mosquitoes. We calculated 50% infectious doses to be 6.1–7.5 log10 PFU/mL; minimum infective dose was 4.2 log10 PFU/mL. Ae. albopictus mosquitoes were more susceptible to infection than Ae. aegypti mosquitoes, but transmission efficiency was higher for Ae. aegypti mosquitoes, indicating a transmission barrier in Ae. albopictus mosquitoes. Results suggest that, although Zika virus transmission is relatively inefficient overall and dependent on virus strain and mosquito species, Ae. albopictus mosquitoes could become major vectors in the Americas. PMID:28430564

  20. Molecular identification of bloodmeals and species composition in Culicoides biting midges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettersson, E; Bensch, S; Ander, M; Chirico, J; Sigvald, R; Ignell, R

    2013-03-01

    Investigations of host preferences in haematophagous insects, including Culicoides biting midges (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae), are critical in order to assess transmission routes of vector-borne diseases. In this study, we collected and morphologically identified 164 blood-engorged Culicoides females caught in both light traps and permanent 12-m high suction traps during 2008-2010 in Sweden. Molecular analysis of the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI) gene in the biting midges was performed to verify species classification, discern phylogenetic relationships and uncover possible cryptic species. Bloodmeal analysis using universal vertebrate cytochrome b primers revealed a clear distinction in host selection between mammalophilic and ornithophilic Culicoides species. Host sequences found matches in horse (n = 59), sheep (n = 39), cattle (n = 26), Eurasian elk (n = 1) and 10 different bird species (n = 18). We identified 15 Culicoides species previously recorded in Scandinavia and four additional species haplotypes that were distinctly different from the described species. All ornithophilic individuals (n = 23) were caught exclusively in the suction traps, as were, interestingly, almost all mammalophilic species (n = 41), indicating that many biting midge species may be able to cover long distances after completing a bloodmeal. These results add new information on the composition of Culicoides species and their host preferences and their potential long-distance dispersal while blood-engorged. © 2012 The Authors. Medical and Veterinary Entomology © 2012 The Royal Entomological Society.

  1. Essential Oil Composition of Two Grammosciadium DC Species, G ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To investigate and compare the essential oil composition of two Grammosciadium species obtained by hydrodistillation. Methods: The essential oil of the aerial parts of two species was obtained by hydrodistillation and analyzed by gas chromatography (GC) and gas chromatography - mass spectrometry (GC-MS).

  2. Floristic composition, species diversity and vegetation structure of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Floristic composition, species diversity and vegetation structure of Gera Moist Montane Forest was conducted in Jimma Zone of Oromia National Regional State, southwest Ethiopia. A total of 132 plant species in 112 genera and 59 families were identified from this forest. Fabaceae was the most dominant family with ten ...

  3. Tree species composition within Kano State University of science ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study accessed the tree species composition within the Kano State University of Science and Technology Wudil, Kano State, Nigeria with the view of providing information that will help in the management and conservation of tree species within the campus. The study area was stratified into four (4) sections from which ...

  4. Tree species composition, richness and diversity in the northern ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... variability in tree species composition, richness, density and diversity across the northern forest-savanna ecotone of Ghana. The information could be crucial for monitoring and managing agro-ecosystems sustainability. A future study would be required to isolate proximate factors of tree species distribution in the ecotone.

  5. Fish species composition and abundance on a subtropical, artificial ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The composition and abundance of fish species on a derelict rocky pier on the Durban beachfront, KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa, were assessed by means of underwater visual census, using transects. A total of 74 species were recorded on the reef, with convict surgeons (Acanthurus triostegus), sash damsels ...

  6. Estimating forest species composition using a multi-sensor approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    P.T. Wolter

    2009-01-01

    The magnitude, duration, and frequency of forest disturbance caused by the spruce budworm and forest tent caterpillar has increased over the last century due to a shift in forest species composition linked to historical fire suppression, forest management, and pesticide application that has fostered the increase in dominance of host tree species. Modeling approaches...

  7. Species Composition and Distribution of Adult Anopheles (Diptera: Culicidae) in Panama

    Science.gov (United States)

    LOAIZA, J. R.; BERMINGHAM, E.; SCOTT, M. E.; ROVIRA, J. R.; CONN, J. E.

    2010-01-01

    Anopheles (Diptera: Culicidae) species composition and distribution were studied using human landing catch data over a 35-yr period in Panama. Mosquitoes were collected from 77 sites during 228 field trips carried out by members of the National Malaria Eradication Service. Fourteen Anopheles species were identified. The highest average human biting rates were recorded from Anopheles (Nyssorhynchus) albimanus (Wiedemann) (9.8 bites/person/night) and Anopheles (Anopheles) punctimacula (Dyar and Knab) (6.2 bites/person/night). These two species were also the most common, present in 99.1 and 74.9%, respectively, of the sites. Anopheles (Nyssorhynchus) aquasalis (Curry) was encountered mostly in the indigenous Kuna Yala Comarca along the eastern Atlantic coast, where malaria case history and average human biting rate (9.3 bites/person/night) suggest a local role in malaria transmission. An. albimanus, An. punctimacula, and Anopheles (Anopheles) vestitipennis (Dyar and Knab) were more abundant during the rainy season (May–December), whereas An. aquasalis was more abundant in the dry season (January–April). Other vector species collected in this study were Anopheles (Kerteszia) neivai (Howard, Dyar, and Knab) and Anopheles (Anopheles) pseudopunctipennis s.l. (Theobald). High diversity of Anopheles species and six confirmed malaria vectors in endemic areas of Panama emphasize the need for more detailed studies to better understand malaria transmission dynamics. PMID:18826025

  8. Parasite Killing in Malaria Non-Vector Mosquito Anopheles culicifacies Species B: Implication of Nitric Oxide Synthase Upregulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijay, Sonam; Rawat, Manmeet; Adak, Tridibes; Dixit, Rajnikant; Nanda, Nutan; Srivastava, Harish; Sharma, Joginder K.; Prasad, Godavarthi B. K. S.; Sharma, Arun

    2011-01-01

    Background Anopheles culicifacies, the main vector of human malaria in rural India, is a complex of five sibling species. Despite being phylogenetically related, a naturally selected subgroup species B of this sibling species complex is found to be a poor vector of malaria. We have attempted to understand the differences between vector and non-vector Anopheles culicifacies mosquitoes in terms of transcriptionally activated nitric oxide synthase (AcNOS) physiologies to elucidate the mechanism of refractoriness. Identification of the differences between genes and gene products that may impart refractory phenotype can facilitate development of novel malaria transmission blocking strategies. Methodology/Principal Findings We conducted a study on phylogenetically related susceptible (species A) and refractory (species B) sibling species of An. culicifacies mosquitoes to characterize biochemical and molecular differences in AcNOS gene and gene elements and their ability to inhibit oocyst growth. We demonstrate that in species B, AcNOS specific activity and nitrite/nitrates in mid-guts and haemolymph were higher as compared to species A after invasion of the mid-gut by P. vivax at the beginning and during the course of blood feeding. Semiquantitative RT-PCR and real time PCR data of AcNOS concluded that this gene is more abundantly expressed in midgut of species B than in species A and is transcriptionally upregulated post blood meals. Dietary feeding of L-NAME along with blood meals significantly inhibited midgut AcNOS activity leading to an increase in oocyst production in An. culicifacies species B. Conclusions/Significance We hypothesize that upregulation of mosquito innate cytotoxicity due to NOS in refractory strain to Plasmodium vivax infection may contribute to natural refractoriness in An. culicifacies mosquito population. This innate capacity of refractory mosquitoes could represent the ancestral function of the mosquito immune system against the parasite and

  9. Seasonal Dynamics of Phlebotomine Sand Fly Species Proven Vectors of Mediterranean Leishmaniasis Caused by Leishmania infantum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bulent Alten

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The recent geographical expansion of phlebotomine vectors of Leishmania infantum in the Mediterranean subregion has been attributed to ongoing climate changes. At these latitudes, the activity of sand flies is typically seasonal; because seasonal phenomena are also sensitive to general variations in climate, current phenological data sets can provide a baseline for continuing investigations on sand fly population dynamics that may impact on future scenarios of leishmaniasis transmission. With this aim, in 2011-2013 a consortium of partners from eight Mediterranean countries carried out entomological investigations in sites where L. infantum transmission was recently reported.A common protocol for sand fly collection included monthly captures by CDC light traps, complemented by sticky traps in most of the sites. Collections were replicated for more than one season in order to reduce the effects of local weather events. In each site, the trapping effort was left unchanged throughout the survey to legitimate inter-seasonal comparisons. Data from 99,000 collected specimens were analyzed, resulting in the description of seasonal dynamics of 56,000 sand flies belonging to L. infantum vector species throughout a wide geographical area, namely P. perniciosus (Portugal, Spain and Italy, P. ariasi (France, P. neglectus (Greece, P. tobbi (Cyprus and Turkey, P. balcanicus and P. kandelakii (Georgia. Time of sand fly appearance/disappearance in collections differed between sites, and seasonal densities showed variations in each site. Significant correlations were found between latitude/mean annual temperature of sites and i the first month of sand fly appearance, that ranged from early April to the first half of June; ii the type of density trend, varying from a single peak in July/August to multiple peaks increasing in magnitude from May through September. A 3-modal trend, recorded for P. tobbi in Cyprus, represents a novel finding for a L. infantum vector

  10. Seasonal Dynamics of Phlebotomine Sand Fly Species Proven Vectors of Mediterranean Leishmaniasis Caused by Leishmania infantum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alten, Bulent; Maia, Carla; Afonso, Maria Odete; Campino, Lenea; Jiménez, Maribel; González, Estela; Molina, Ricardo; Bañuls, Anne Laure; Prudhomme, Jorian; Vergnes, Baptiste; Toty, Celine; Cassan, Cécile; Rahola, Nil; Thierry, Magali; Sereno, Denis; Bongiorno, Gioia; Bianchi, Riccardo; Khoury, Cristina; Tsirigotakis, Nikolaos; Dokianakis, Emmanouil; Antoniou, Maria; Christodoulou, Vasiliki; Mazeris, Apostolos; Karakus, Mehmet; Ozbel, Yusuf; Arserim, Suha K; Erisoz Kasap, Ozge; Gunay, Filiz; Oguz, Gizem; Kaynas, Sinan; Tsertsvadze, Nikoloz; Tskhvaradze, Lamzira; Giorgobiani, Ekaterina; Gramiccia, Marina; Volf, Petr; Gradoni, Luigi

    2016-02-01

    The recent geographical expansion of phlebotomine vectors of Leishmania infantum in the Mediterranean subregion has been attributed to ongoing climate changes. At these latitudes, the activity of sand flies is typically seasonal; because seasonal phenomena are also sensitive to general variations in climate, current phenological data sets can provide a baseline for continuing investigations on sand fly population dynamics that may impact on future scenarios of leishmaniasis transmission. With this aim, in 2011-2013 a consortium of partners from eight Mediterranean countries carried out entomological investigations in sites where L. infantum transmission was recently reported. A common protocol for sand fly collection included monthly captures by CDC light traps, complemented by sticky traps in most of the sites. Collections were replicated for more than one season in order to reduce the effects of local weather events. In each site, the trapping effort was left unchanged throughout the survey to legitimate inter-seasonal comparisons. Data from 99,000 collected specimens were analyzed, resulting in the description of seasonal dynamics of 56,000 sand flies belonging to L. infantum vector species throughout a wide geographical area, namely P. perniciosus (Portugal, Spain and Italy), P. ariasi (France), P. neglectus (Greece), P. tobbi (Cyprus and Turkey), P. balcanicus and P. kandelakii (Georgia). Time of sand fly appearance/disappearance in collections differed between sites, and seasonal densities showed variations in each site. Significant correlations were found between latitude/mean annual temperature of sites and i) the first month of sand fly appearance, that ranged from early April to the first half of June; ii) the type of density trend, varying from a single peak in July/August to multiple peaks increasing in magnitude from May through September. A 3-modal trend, recorded for P. tobbi in Cyprus, represents a novel finding for a L. infantum vector. Adults

  11. Studies on the Bacillus sphaericus Larvicidal Activity against Malarial Vector Species in Amazonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigues Iléa Brandão

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work, bioassays were carried out in laboratory conditions (average temperature 26 ± 2ºC to test ten strains of Bacillus sphaericus, isolated from Brazilian soils against third instar larvae from anopheline species recorded as malaria vectors in Amazonian - Anopheles nuneztovari and An. darlingi. With the former mosquito, three strains - S2, S20 and S46 showed relative activity, in 24 and 48 hr exposure to the B. spahericus strains. With the latter only the S2 and S20 were effective in the 48 hr reading. The studied strains that showed the most adequate response in the Amazonian region were S2 and S20 showing broader and more efficient results. Therefore, S2 was the most effective when the 24 and 48 hr readings were considered, because it showed the greatest relative activity values.

  12. Multiple dispersal vectors drive range expansion in an invasive marine species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Mark F; Sherman, Craig D H; Lee, Randall S; Bott, Nathan J; Hirst, Alastair J

    2016-10-01

    The establishment and subsequent spread of invasive species is widely recognized as one of the most threatening processes contributing to global biodiversity loss. This is especially true for marine and estuarine ecosystems, which have experienced significant increases in the number of invasive species with the increase in global maritime trade. Understanding the rate and mechanisms of range expansion is therefore of significant interest to ecologists and conservation managers alike. Using a combination of population genetic surveys, environmental DNA (eDNA) plankton sampling and hydrodynamic modelling, we examined the patterns of introduction of the predatory Northern Pacific seastar (Asterias amurensis) and pathways of secondary spread within southeast Australia. Genetic surveys across the invasive range reveal some genetic divergence between the two main invasive regions and no evidence of ongoing gene flow, a pattern that is consistent with the establishment of the second invasive region via a human-mediated translocation event. In contrast, hydrodynamic modelling combined with eDNA plankton sampling demonstrated that the establishment of range expansion populations within a region is consistent with natural larval dispersal and recruitment. Our results suggest that both anthropogenic and natural dispersal vectors have played an important role in the range expansion of this species in Australia. The multiple modes of spread combined with high levels of fecundity and a long larval duration in A. amurensis suggests it is likely to continue its range expansion and significantly impact Australian marine ecosystems. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Assessment of Anopheles salivary antigens as individual exposure biomarkers to species-specific malaria vector bites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Zakia M I

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Malaria transmission occurs during the blood feeding of infected anopheline mosquitoes concomitant with a saliva injection into the vertebrate host. In sub-Saharan Africa, most malaria transmission is due to Anopheles funestus s.s and to Anopheles gambiae s.l. (mainly Anopheles gambiae s.s. and Anopheles arabiensis. Several studies have demonstrated that the immune response against salivary antigens could be used to evaluate individual exposure to mosquito bites. The aim of this study was to assess the use of secreted salivary proteins as specific biomarkers of exposure to An. gambiae and/or An. funestus bites. Methods For this purpose, salivary gland proteins 6 (SG6 and 5′nucleotidases (5′nuc from An. gambiae (gSG6 and g-5′nuc and An. funestus (fSG6 and f-5′nuc were selected and produced in recombinant form. The specificity of the IgG response against these salivary proteins was tested using an ELISA with sera from individuals living in three Senegalese villages (NDiop, n = 50; Dielmo, n = 38; and Diama, n = 46 that had been exposed to distinct densities and proportions of the Anopheles species. Individuals who had not been exposed to these tropical mosquitoes were used as controls (Marseille, n = 45. Results The IgG responses against SG6 recombinant proteins from these two Anopheles species and against g-5′nucleotidase from An. gambiae, were significantly higher in Senegalese individuals compared with controls who were not exposed to specific Anopheles species. Conversely, an association was observed between the level of An. funestus exposure and the serological immune response levels against the f-5′nucleotidase protein. Conclusion This study revealed an Anopheles salivary antigenic protein that could be considered to be a promising antigenic marker to distinguish malaria vector exposure at the species level. The epidemiological interest of such species-specific antigenic markers is discussed.

  14. Structure and species composition of novel forests dominated by an introduced species in northcentral Puerto Rico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oscar J. Abelleira Martinez; Mariela A. Rodríguez; Ivonne Rosario; Nataly Soto; Armando López; Ariel E. Lugo

    2010-01-01

    The African tulip tree, Spathodea campanulata Beauv., is an introduced species forming novel forest types in Puerto Rico. These forests develop naturally after deforestation, agricultural use and land abandonment, and there are many questions as to their ecological characteristics. We sampled structure and species composition of large, small, and juvenile trees (C10,...

  15. Spatio-temporal analysis of abundances of three malaria vector species in southern Benin using zero-truncated models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moiroux, Nicolas; Djènontin, Armel; Bio-Bangana, Abdul S; Chandre, Fabrice; Corbel, Vincent; Guis, Hélène

    2014-03-12

    A better understanding of the ecology and spatial-temporal distribution of malaria vectors is essential to design more effective and sustainable strategies for malaria control and elimination. In a previous study, we analyzed presence-absence data of An. funestus, An. coluzzii, and An. gambiae s.s. in an area of southern Benin with high coverage of vector control measures. Here, we further extend the work by analysing the positive values of the dataset to assess the determinants of the abundance of these three vectors and to produce predictive maps of vector abundance. Positive counts of the three vectors were assessed using negative-binomial zero-truncated (NBZT) mixed-effect models according to vector control measures and environmental covariates derived from field and remote sensing data. After 8-fold cross-validation of the models, predictive maps of abundance of the sympatric An. funestus, An. coluzzii, and An. gambiae s.s. were produced. Cross-validation of the NBZT models showed a satisfactory predictive accuracy. Almost all changes in abundance between two surveys in the same village were well predicted by the models but abundances for An. gambiae s.s. were slightly underestimated. During the dry season, predictive maps showed that abundance greater than 1 bite per person per night were observed only for An. funestus and An. coluzzii. During the rainy season, we observed both increase and decrease in abundance of An. funestus, which are dependent on the ecological setting. Abundances of both An. coluzzii and An. gambiae s.s. increased during the rainy season but not in the same areas. Our models helped characterize the ecological preferences of three major African malaria vectors. This works highlighted the importance to study independently the binomial and the zero-truncated count processes when evaluating vector control strategies. The study of the bio-ecology of malaria vector species in time and space is critical for the implementation of timely and

  16. [Additional evidence for the species composition of mosquitoes (Diptera, Psichodidae, Phlebotominae) in the visceral leishmaniasis foci of Uzbekistan].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatullaeva, A A; Kovalenko, D A; Baranets, M S; Ponirovskiĭ, E N

    2014-01-01

    The species composition of mosquitoes was studied in the foci of visceral leishmaniasis in the Navoiy and Samarkand Provinces of Uzbekistan. The human settlements where these observations were made were located at 1000-1200 m above sea level. Seven species: Phlebotomus sergenti, P. caucasicus, P. longiductus, P. papatasi, P. alexandri, Sergetomyia sumbarica, and S. grecovi were found. The predominant species was P. sergenti; P. longiductus was a vector for visceral leishmaniasis, which was present in all the collected samples. Bovine animal and small cattle yards were ascertained to be the hatching of mosquito eggs.

  17. Measurement of lentiviral vector titre and copy number by cross-species duplex quantitative PCR

    OpenAIRE

    Christodoulou, I.; Patsali, P; Stephanou, C.; Antoniou, M; Kleanthous, M; Lederer, C. W.

    2016-01-01

    Lentiviruses are the vectors of choice for many preclinical studies and clinical applications of gene therapy. Accurate measurement of biological vector titre before treatment is a prerequisite for vector dosing, and the calculation of vector integration sites per cell after treatment is as critical to the characterisation of modified cell products as it is to long-term follow-up and the assessment of risk and therapeutic efficiency in patients. These analyses are typically based on quantitat...

  18. Seasonal phenology and species composition of the aphid fauna in a northern crop production area.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sascha M Kirchner

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The species diversity of aphids and seasonal timing of their flight activity can have significant impacts on crop production, as aphid species differ in their ability to transmit plant viruses and flight timing affects virus epidemiology. The aim of the study was to characterise the species composition and phenology of aphid fauna in Finland in one of the northernmost intensive crop production areas of the world (latitude 64°. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Flight activity was monitored in four growing seasons (2007-010 using yellow pan traps (YPTs placed in 4-8 seed potato fields and a Rothamsted suction trap. A total of 58,528 winged aphids were obtained, identified to 83 taxa based on morphology, and 34 species were additionally characterised by DNA barcoding. Seasonal flight activity patterns analysed based on YPT catch fell into three main phenology clusters. Monoecious taxa showed early or middle-season flight activity and belonged to species living on shrubs/trees or herbaceous plants, respectively. Heteroecious taxa occurred over the entire potato growing season (ca. 90 days. Abundance of aphids followed a clear 3-year cycle based on suction trap data covering a decade. Rhopalosiphum padi occurring at the end of the potato growing season was the most abundant species. The flight activity of Aphis fabae, the main vector of Potato virus Y in the region, and Aphis gossypii peaked in the beginning of potato growing season. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Detailed information was obtained on phenology of a large number aphid species, of which many are agriculturally important pests acting as vectors of plant viruses. Aphis gossypii is known as a pest in greenhouses, but our study shows that it occurs also in the field, even far in the north. The novel information on aphid phenology and ecology has wide implications for prospective pest management, particularly in light of climate change.

  19. Carbohydrate composition of immunoglobulins from diverse species of verterbrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Acton, R.T.; Niedermeier, W.; Weinheimer, P.F.; Clem, L.W.; Leslie, G.A.; Bennett, J.C.

    1972-08-01

    Immunoglobulins and their respective heavy (H) and light (L) polypeptide chains from species representing the major classes of vertebrates were analyzed for their carbohydrate composition by gas chromatography of the alditol acetate derivatives of the monosaccharides released by acid hydrolysis. Mannose, galactose, glucosamine and sialic acid were present in the immunoglobulins from all the species investigated. Most of the carbohydrate was found associated with the H chains. Whereas species representative of the mammals and birds had mannose to galactose ratios greater than one, the ratio to these sugars to each other in the immunoglobulins from animals below the birds was on the order of one.

  20. Fish species composition, size structure and distribution in non ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Fish diversity studies in littoral non-trawlable areas of Lake Victoria (Tanzania) were undertaken during six systematic surveys (November 2000 to December 2002). Information on fish species composition, size structure as well as spatial and temporal distribution was generated from gill-netting, beach-seining and electric ...

  1. Seasonal variations in biomass and species composition of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    This study was carried out to evaluate the seasonal variations of seaweed biomass and species composition at six different sites along the coastal areas in Bushehr Province. Sampling depths varied among sites, from 0.3 to 2.0 m below mean sea level. A total of 37 (i.e., 10 Chlorophyta, 12 Phaeophyta and 15. Rhodophyta) ...

  2. Fish species composition, diversity and abundance of the lower New ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A thirteen-week investigation to determine the fish species composition, diversity and abundance of the Lower New Calabar River, in Rivers State, aimed at providing information on the fish stock and their status for documentation, knowledge improvement, and development of conservation and management strategies was ...

  3. The distribution, composition and abundance of fish species in two ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Fish composition and abundance of two Gold mine reservoir were investigated between May, 2008 and May, 2009. Seven fish families comprising of twelve species of fish were caught during the period of study. The families of fish caught included Anabantidae, Channidae, Clariidae, Cichlidae, Melanopluridae, Mormyridae ...

  4. Comparison of lignocellulose composition in four major species of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Miscanthus is a perennial grass rich in lignocellulose that has attracted interest as a non-food crop for renewable bioenergy with major environmental and economic benefits for China. The lignocellulose composition of whole stems of four major species of Miscanthus was assessed. The average values of total moisture ...

  5. Determining sample size for assessing species composition in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Species composition is measured in grasslands for a variety of reasons. Commonly, observations are made using the wheel-point apparatus, but the problem of determining optimum sample size has not yet been satisfactorily resolved. In this study the wheel-point apparatus was used to record 2 000 observations in each of ...

  6. Essential oil composition of four Artemisia species from Ethiopia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The essential oil composition of four Artemisia species, namely A. schimperi Sch. Bip. ex Engl. A. abyssinica Sch. Bip. ex A. Rich., A. afra Jacq. ex Willd., and A. absinthium L. (previously called A. rehan) from Ethiopia has been studied. The essential oil obtained from A. absinthium (seedling from Europe) grown in two places ...

  7. Sampling efficiency for species composition assessments using the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A pilot survey to determine the sampling efficiency of the wheel-point method, using the nearest plant method, to assess species composition (using replicate similarity related to sampling intensity, and total sampling time) was conducted on three plot sizes (20 x 20m, 30 x 30m, 40 x 40m) at two sites in a semi-arid savanna.

  8. Assessment of Soil Seedbank Composition of Woody Species in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Bheema

    forests. In present work, soil seedbank assessment of woody plant species was made in. Hgumbirda national forest priority area so as to evaluate composition ... Deforestation and conversion of land to permanent cultivation is the primary cause for ... In fact, restoration/rehabilitation of degraded lands is a subject receiving.

  9. Tree species composition, structure and utilisation in Maruzi Hills ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study investigated the tree species composition, vegetation structure and harvesting pattern to guide management of the Maruzi Hills Forest Reserve. Stratified random sampling was used to site six (100 m × 100 m) permanent sample plots in the woodland, bushland and grassland vegetation types identified in the ...

  10. Interannual variability in species composition explained as seasonally entrained chaos

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dakos, V.; Beninca, E.; Nes, van E.H.; Philippart, C.J.M.; Scheffer, M.; Huisman, J.

    2009-01-01

    The species composition of plankton, insect and annual plant communities may vary markedly from year to year. Such interannual variability is usually thought to be driven by year-to-year variation in weather conditions. Here we examine an alternative explanation. We studied the effects of regular

  11. Fish species composition in a tropical lentic freshwater ecosystem ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Fish species composition of a tropical lentic freshwater ecosystem (Umudike Water Reservoir, Umuahia, Nigeria) belonging to the National Root Crops Research Institute (NRCRI) was investigated from July 2004 to December 2004. The fishes were sampled twice every week using cast nets, traditional baskets traps (drum ...

  12. Considerations on the biochemical composition of some freshwater zooplankton species.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicoletta RICCARDI

    1999-02-01

    Full Text Available The mean elemental (C, H, N and biochemical composition (lipids, carbohydrates and proteins of some abundant crustacean zooplankton species of Italian insubric lakes has been estimated by the analysis of samples collected at different seasons from various environments (Lake Maggiore, Lake Varese, Lake Comabbio, Lake Monate. From each sample an adequate number of specimens of each abundant species was sorted and analyzed by a CHN elemental analyzer. The percentage of lipids, carbohydrates and proteins and the calorific content were calculated from the elemental composition according to Gnaiger & Bitterlich (1984. Inter- and intraspecific variability of biochemical composition was quite high, while elemental composition and calorific content were less variable. An estimate of the mean elemental and biochemical composition of each species was obtained by pooling the data. These mean values have been used to estimate the pools of elements and compounds in the crustacean zooplankton of Lake Comabbio to provide an example of the importance of a multiple approach in zooplankton studies.

  13. Distribution, species composition and relative abundances of sandflies in North Waziristan Agency, Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, N; Ullah, A; Wahid, S; Khisroon, M; Rasheed, S B

    2016-03-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the diversity of sandflies (Psychodidae: Phlebotominae) and the incidence of leishmaniasis in three villages of North Waziristan Agency, Pakistan. Sandflies were sampled monthly during 2012, at dusk and dawn, in selected indoor habitats including both bedrooms and animal sheds using a knock-down spray catch method. A total of 3687 sandflies were collected, including 1444 individuals in Drezanda, 1193 in Damdil and 1050 in Dattakhel. This study revealed 14 species of two genera, Phlebotomus (Phlebotomus sergenti, Phlebotomus papatasi, Phlebotomus caucasicus, Phlebotomus kazeruni, Phlebotomus alexandri and Phlebotomus salehi) and Sergentomyia (Sergentomyia dentate, Sergentomyia baghdadis, Sergentomyia babu, Sergentomyia theodori, Sergentomyia sumbarica, Sergentomyia dreyfussitur kestanica, Sergentomyia hogsoni pawlowskyi and Sergentomyia fallax afghanica) (both: Diptera: Psychodidae). Phlebotomus sergenti was the most abundant species (42.1%), followed by S. dentata (17.7%) and S. baghdadis (17.4%). The number of males collected represented about twice that of female flies, and the maximum number was collected in July, followed by August. The determination of the species composition of sandfly populations, seasonal variations, relative abundances and estimations of infection in the vector population may provide information about the dynamics of leishmaniasis transmission that is useful in planning vector control activities. © 2015 The Royal Entomological Society.

  14. Thermal limits of wild and laboratory strains of two African malaria vector species, Anopheles arabiensis and Anopheles funestus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lyons Candice L

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Malaria affects large parts of the developing world and is responsible for almost 800,000 deaths annually. As climates change, concerns have arisen as to how this vector-borne disease will be impacted by changing rainfall patterns and warming temperatures. Despite the importance and controversy surrounding the impact of climate change on the potential spread of this disease, little information exists on the tolerances of several of the vector species themselves. Methods Using a ramping protocol (to assess critical thermal limits - CT and plunge protocol (to assess lethal temperature limits - LT information on the thermal tolerance of two of Africa’s important malaria vectors, Anopheles arabiensis and Anopheles funestus was collected. The effects of age, thermal acclimation treatment, sex and strain (laboratory versus wild adults were investigated for CT determinations for each species. The effects of age and sex for adults and life stage (larvae, pupae, adults were investigated for LT determinations. Results In both species, females are more tolerant to low and high temperatures than males; larvae and pupae have higher upper lethal limits than do adults. Thermal acclimation of adults has large effects in some instances but small effects in others. Younger adults tend to be more tolerant of low or high temperatures than older age groups. Long-standing laboratory colonies are sufficiently similar in thermal tolerance to field-collected animals to provide reasonable surrogates when making inferences about wild population responses. Differences between these two vectors in their thermal tolerances, especially in larvae and pupae, are plausibly a consequence of different habitat utilization. Conclusions Limited plasticity is characteristic of the adults of these vector species relative to others examined to date, suggesting limited scope for within-generation change in thermal tolerance. These findings and the greater tolerance

  15. Surveillance study of vector species on board passenger ships, Risk factors related to infestations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hatzoglou Chrissi

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Passenger ships provide conditions suitable for the survival and growth of pest populations. Arthropods and rodents can gain access directly from the ships' open spaces, can be carried in shiploads, or can be found on humans or animals as ectoparasites. Vectors on board ships may contaminate stored foods, transmit illness on board, or, introduce diseases in new areas. Pest species, ship areas facilitating infestations, and different risk factors related to infestations were identified in 21 ferries. Methods 486 traps for insects and rodents were placed in 21 ferries. Archives of Public Health Authorities were reviewed to identify complaints regarding the presence of pest species on board ferries from 1994 to 2004. A detail questionnaire was used to collect data on ship characteristics and pest control practices. Results Eighteen ferries were infested with flies (85.7%, 11 with cockroaches (52.3%, three with bedbugs, and one with fleas. Other species had been found on board were ants, spiders, butterflies, beetles, and a lizard. A total of 431 Blattella germanica species were captured in 28 (9.96% traps, and 84.2% of them were nymphs. One ship was highly infested. Cockroach infestation was negatively associated with ferries in which Hazard Analysis Critical Control Point system was applied to ensure food safety on board (Relative Risk, RR = 0.23, p = 0.03, and positively associated with ferries in which cockroaches were observed by crew (RR = 4.09, p = 0.007, no cockroach monitoring log was kept (RR = 5.00, p = 0.02, and pesticide sprays for domestic use were applied by crew (RR = 4.00, p = 0.05. Cockroach infested ships had higher age (p = 0.03. Neither rats nor mice were found on any ship, but three ferries had been infested with a rodent in the past. Conclusion Integrated pest control programs should include continuing monitoring for a variety of pest species in different ship locations; pest control measures should be more

  16. Culicoides (Avaritia) gornostaevae Mirzaeva, 1984 (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) a possible vector species of the Obsoletus group new to the European fauna

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkeby, Carsten; Dominiak, Patrycja

    2014-01-01

    Culicoides gornostaevae Mirzaeva, 1984, known previously only from Siberia, is a boreal species included into the Obsoletus group of Culicoides sg. Avaritia. Members of the subgenus can act as vectors of various diseases. In Europe they are involved in the transmission of the Schmallenberg virus...

  17. Control of the multifocal properties of composite vector beams in tightly focusing systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Hanming; Sui, Guorong; Weng, Xiaoyu; Dong, Xiangmei; Hu, Qi; Zhuang, Songlin

    2011-11-21

    The numbers of the focal spots and the dominant field (i.e., whether the axial field or the transverse fields play dominant role in the focusing field) have significant effects on various applications. In this paper, we have derived the universal imaging model of the composite vector beam (CVB) composed of two orthogonally linearly polarized beams with inhomogeneous polarization modulation, which is also suitable for various polarized beams, such as linearly, circularly, radially, azimuthally, and vortex polarized beams. Moreover, the sin&cos amplitude modulation with arbitrary orders and the pupil filters with cylindrical symmetry are also involved in this imaging model. On the basis of this imaging model, the regulars to control the focal numbers and the dominant field are drawn. For the various applications, some important conclusions and constructive advices are given. © 2011 Optical Society of America

  18. Essential oil composition of four Artemisia species from Ethiopia

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    N. Asfaw

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The essential oil composition of four Artemisia species, namely A. schimperi Sch. Bip. ex Engl. A. abyssinica Sch. Bip. ex A. Rich., A. afra Jacq. ex Willd., and A. absinthium L. (previously called A. rehan from Ethiopia has been studied. The essential oil obtained from A. absinthium (seedling from Europe grown in two places in Ethiopia (Addis Ababa and Butajira was also analyzed for comparison. Morphological study on the leaves of A. absinthium L. from Ethiopia (previously called A. rehan and A. absinthium (from Europe was also conducted. The essential oils were obtained by hydrodistillation using a Clevenger apparatus and analyzed by capillary GC and GC/MS. Forty three compounds representing 76 to 94% of the oils were identified. The composition of the essential oils of A. schimperi, A. afra and A. abyssinica are mainly dominated by irregular monoterpenes: yogomi alcohol (13.5-37.6%, artemisyl acetate (12.7-35.5%, and artemisia ketone (2.3-13.2%. The composition of the oil of A. absinthium (previously A. rehan however, differs from the other three species in having camphor (21.2-28.3% and davanone (21.3-26.5% as major components. The composition of A. absinthum (Europe was found to have β-thujone (42.3-66.4% and chamazulene (11.3-24.2% as major components. The study indicated that the composition of the essential oil of A. absinthium (previously A. rehan is not only different from the other three species but also from A. absinthium from Europe and does not belong to any of the chemotypes described for the species in the literature. The morphological study on the leaves also showed that it differs from that of A. absinthium from Europe. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.4314/bcse.v29i1.11

  19. Trypanosoma cruzi over the ocean: Insular zones of Chile with presence of infected vector Mepraia species.

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    Rives-Blanchard, Ninette; Torres-Pérez, Fernando; Ortiz, Silvia; Solari, Aldo; Campos-Soto, Ricardo

    2017-08-01

    Chagas disease is one of the main zoonosis mediated by vectors in America. The etiologic agent Trypanosoma cruzi infects different mammals and is transmitted principally by the subfamily Triatominae. Mepraia is a genus endemic to Chile, responsible for transmitting T. cruzi in the sylvatic cycle. Mepraia includes three species: M. gajardoi and M. parapatrica inhabit coastal areas, while M. spinolai inhabits coastal and interior valleys. Previous studies reported the occurrence of Mepraia in Pan de Azucar Island, currently classified as M. parapatrica, but T. cruzi has not been reported in these insects. It is suggested that this could be due to infrequent insect feeding on mammalian hosts. In order to detect T. cruzi in insects from coastal islands, specimens from Pan de Azucar and Santa Maria Islands were examined. A region of kDNA of T. cruzi was amplified by PCR and hybridization assays were performed for T. cruzi genotyping of insect feces. The presence of infected insect and mixed T. cruzi infections was demonstrated. This is the first report of infected Triatominae in coastal islands in Chile. We discuss T. cruzi detection in insular zones, and the presumptive reservoirs that may participate in maintaining its transmission cycle in this habitat. Mixed and unidentified infections suggest that there are complex and unknown reservoir interactions in these habitats. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Assessing the importance of four sandfly species (Diptera: Psychodidae) as vectors of Leishmania mexicana in Campeche, Mexico.

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    Pech-May, A; Peraza-Herrera, G; Moo-Llanes, D A; Escobedo-Ortegón, J; Berzunza-Cruz, M; Becker-Fauser, I; Montes DE Oca-Aguilar, A C; Rebollar-Téllez, E A

    2016-09-01

    Localized cutaneous leishmaniasis represents a public health problem in many areas of Mexico, especially in the Yucatan Peninsula. An understanding of vector ecology and bionomics is of great importance in evaluations of the transmission dynamics of Leishmania parasites. A field study was conducted in the county of Calakmul, state of Campeche, during the period from November 2006 to March 2007. Phlebotomine sandfly vectors were sampled using Centers for Disease Control light traps, baited Disney traps and Shannon traps. A total of 3374 specimens were captured in the two villages of Once de Mayo (93.8%) and Arroyo Negro (6.1%). In Once de Mayo, the most abundant species were Psathyromyia shannoni, Lutzomyia cruciata, Bichromomyia olmeca olmeca and Psychodopygus panamensis (all: Diptera: Psychodidae). The Shannon trap was by far the most efficient method of collection. The infection rate, as determined by Leishmania mexicana-specific polymerase chain reaction, was 0.3% in Once de Mayo and infected sandflies included Psy. panamensis, B. o. olmeca and Psa. shannoni. There were significant differences in human biting rates across sandfly species and month of sampling. Ecological niche modelling analyses showed an overall overlap of 39.1% for the four species in the whole state of Campeche. In addition, the finding of nine vector-reservoir pairs indicates a potential interaction. The roles of the various sandfly vectors in Calakmul are discussed. © 2016 The Royal Entomological Society.

  1. Morphology of reproductive accessory glands in eight species of blood-feeding Hemiptera (Hemiptera, Reduviidae) insect vectors of Chagas disease.

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    Chiang, R G; Chiang, J A; Sarquis, O; Lima, M M

    2012-05-01

    This paper documents the morphology of previously undescribed adult reproductive accessory glands in eight species of blood-feeding Hemiptera, vectors of Chagas disease. These species are three Triatoma (T. dimidiata, T. klugi, T. sordida), three Rhodnius (R. brethesi, R. nasutus, R. pictipes), and one species each from Nesotriatoma (N. bruneri) and Panstrongylus (P. megistus). This survey shows that the male reproductive systems between species of four genera of Reduviidae adhere to the same general plan seen in previously described vectors of Chagas disease. This morphological similarity suggests that reproductive success of the male is contingent on the delivery of a vital set of male accessory gland secretions to the female in conjunction with material from the testes and seminal vesicle. However, variations were observed in the accessory glands of females, especially at the level of the genus. The spermathecae are morphologically distinct, and the posterior accessory glands are absent in some. The differences in spermathecae morphology likely reflect physiological adaptations associated with speciation driven by cryptic female choice in which the female determines which sperm are used for fertilization. Differences in the posterior reproductive accessory gland can be correlated with variations in ovipositioning behaviour. Since reproductive physiology is important for species success, this information also augments epidemiological studies by providing a comparison to R. prolixus, a Chagas disease vector for which the physiology is well known. Crown Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Genetic variation of North American Triatomines (Insecta: Hemiptera: Reduviidae): initial divergence between species and populations of Chagas disease vector.

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    Espinoza, Bertha; Martínez-Ibarra, Jose Alejandro; Villalobos, Guiehdani; De La Torre, Patricia; Laclette, Juan Pedro; Martínez-Hernández, Fernando

    2013-02-01

    The triatomines vectors of Trypanosoma cruzi are principal factors in acquiring Chagas disease. For this reason, increased knowledge of domestic transmission of T. cruzi and control of its insect vectors is necessary. To contribute to genetic knowledge of North America Triatominae species, we studied genetic variations and conducted phylogenetic analysis of different triatomines species of epidemiologic importance. Our analysis showed high genetic variations between different geographic populations of Triatoma mexicana, Meccus longipennis, M. mazzottii, M. picturatus, and T. dimidiata species, suggested initial divergence, hybridation, or classifications problems. In contrast, T. gerstaeckeri, T. bolivari, and M. pallidipennis populations showed few genetics variations. Analysis using cytochrome B and internal transcribed spacer 2 gene sequences indicated that T. bolivari is closely related to the Rubrofasciata complex and not to T. dimidiata. Triatoma brailovskyi and T. gerstaeckeri showed a close relationship with Dimidiata and Phyllosoma complexes.

  3. Optimized Pan-species and speciation duplex real-time PCR assays for Plasmodium parasites detection in malaria vectors.

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    Maurice Marcel Sandeu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: An accurate method for detecting malaria parasites in the mosquito's vector remains an essential component in the vector control. The Enzyme linked immunosorbent assay specific for circumsporozoite protein (ELISA-CSP is the gold standard method for the detection of malaria parasites in the vector even if it presents some limitations. Here, we optimized multiplex real-time PCR assays to accurately detect minor populations in mixed infection with multiple Plasmodium species in the African malaria vectors Anopheles gambiae and Anopheles funestus. METHODS: Complementary TaqMan-based real-time PCR assays that detect Plasmodium species using specific primers and probes were first evaluated on artificial mixtures of different targets inserted in plasmid constructs. The assays were further validated in comparison with the ELISA-CSP on 200 field caught Anopheles gambiae and Anopheles funestus mosquitoes collected in two localities in southern Benin. RESULTS: The validation of the duplex real-time PCR assays on the plasmid mixtures demonstrated robust specificity and sensitivity for detecting distinct targets. Using a panel of mosquito specimen, the real-time PCR showed a relatively high sensitivity (88.6% and specificity (98%, compared to ELISA-CSP as the referent standard. The agreement between both methods was "excellent" (κ=0.8, P<0.05. The relative quantification of Plasmodium DNA between the two Anopheles species analyzed showed no significant difference (P=0, 2. All infected mosquito samples contained Plasmodium falciparum DNA and mixed infections with P. malariae and/or P. ovale were observed in 18.6% and 13.6% of An. gambiae and An. funestus respectively. Plasmodium vivax was found in none of the mosquito samples analyzed. CONCLUSION: This study presents an optimized method for detecting the four Plasmodium species in the African malaria vectors. The study highlights substantial discordance with traditional ELISA-CSP pointing out the

  4. Optimized Pan-species and Speciation Duplex Real-time PCR Assays for Plasmodium Parasites Detection in Malaria Vectors

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    Sandeu, Maurice Marcel; Moussiliou, Azizath; Moiroux, Nicolas; Padonou, Gilles G.; Massougbodji, Achille; Corbel, Vincent; Tuikue Ndam, Nicaise

    2012-01-01

    Background An accurate method for detecting malaria parasites in the mosquito’s vector remains an essential component in the vector control. The Enzyme linked immunosorbent assay specific for circumsporozoite protein (ELISA-CSP) is the gold standard method for the detection of malaria parasites in the vector even if it presents some limitations. Here, we optimized multiplex real-time PCR assays to accurately detect minor populations in mixed infection with multiple Plasmodium species in the African malaria vectors Anopheles gambiae and Anopheles funestus. Methods Complementary TaqMan-based real-time PCR assays that detect Plasmodium species using specific primers and probes were first evaluated on artificial mixtures of different targets inserted in plasmid constructs. The assays were further validated in comparison with the ELISA-CSP on 200 field caught Anopheles gambiae and Anopheles funestus mosquitoes collected in two localities in southern Benin. Results The validation of the duplex real-time PCR assays on the plasmid mixtures demonstrated robust specificity and sensitivity for detecting distinct targets. Using a panel of mosquito specimen, the real-time PCR showed a relatively high sensitivity (88.6%) and specificity (98%), compared to ELISA-CSP as the referent standard. The agreement between both methods was “excellent” (κ = 0.8, PPlasmodium DNA between the two Anopheles species analyzed showed no significant difference (P = 0, 2). All infected mosquito samples contained Plasmodium falciparum DNA and mixed infections with P. malariae and/or P. ovale were observed in 18.6% and 13.6% of An. gambiae and An. funestus respectively. Plasmodium vivax was found in none of the mosquito samples analyzed. Conclusion This study presents an optimized method for detecting the four Plasmodium species in the African malaria vectors. The study highlights substantial discordance with traditional ELISA-CSP pointing out the utility of employing an accurate

  5. Combining Climatic Projections and Dispersal Ability: A Method for Estimating the Responses of Sandfly Vector Species to Climate Change

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    Fischer, Dominik; Moeller, Philipp; Thomas, Stephanie M.; Naucke, Torsten J.; Beierkuhnlein, Carl

    2011-01-01

    Background In the Old World, sandfly species of the genus Phlebotomus are known vectors of Leishmania, Bartonella and several viruses. Recent sandfly catches and autochthonous cases of leishmaniasis hint on spreading tendencies of the vectors towards Central Europe. However, studies addressing potential future distribution of sandflies in the light of a changing European climate are missing. Methodology Here, we modelled bioclimatic envelopes using MaxEnt for five species with proven or assumed vector competence for Leishmania infantum, which are either predominantly located in (south-) western (Phlebotomus ariasi, P. mascittii and P. perniciosus) or south-eastern Europe (P. neglectus and P. perfiliewi). The determined bioclimatic envelopes were transferred to two climate change scenarios (A1B and B1) for Central Europe (Austria, Germany and Switzerland) using data of the regional climate model COSMO-CLM. We detected the most likely way of natural dispersal (“least-cost path”) for each species and hence determined the accessibility of potential future climatically suitable habitats by integrating landscape features, projected changes in climatic suitability and wind speed. Results and Relevance Results indicate that the Central European climate will become increasingly suitable especially for those vector species with a current south-western focus of distribution. In general, the highest suitability of Central Europe is projected for all species in the second half of the 21st century, except for P. perfiliewi. Nevertheless, we show that sandflies will hardly be able to occupy their climatically suitable habitats entirely, due to their limited natural dispersal ability. A northward spread of species with south-eastern focus of distribution may be constrained but not completely avoided by the Alps. Our results can be used to install specific monitoring systems to the projected risk zones of potential sandfly establishment. This is urgently needed for adaptation

  6. Mapping Forest Species Composition Using Imaging Spectrometry and Airborne Laser Scanner Data

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    Torabzadeh, H.; Morsdorf, F.; Leiterer, R.; Schaepman, M. E.

    2013-09-01

    Accurate mapping of forest species composition is an important aspect of monitoring and management planning related to ecosystem functions and services associated with water refinement, carbon sequestration, biodiversity, and wildlife habitats. Although different vegetation species often have unique spectral signatures, mapping based on spectral reflectance properties alone is often an ill-posed problem, since the spectral signature is as well influenced by age, canopy gaps, shadows and background characteristics. Thus, reducing the unknown variation by knowing the structural parameters of different species should improve determination procedures. In this study we combine imaging spectrometry (IS) and airborne laser scanning (ALS) data of a mixed needle and broadleaf forest to differentiate tree species more accurately as single-instrument data could do. Since forest inventory data in dense forests involve uncertainties, we tried to refine them by using individual tree crowns (ITC) position and shape, which derived from ALS data. Comparison of the extracted spectra from original field data and the modified one shows how ALS-derived shape and position of ITCs can improve separablity of the different species. The spatially explicit information layers containing both the spectral and structural components from the IS and ALS datasets were then combined by using a non-parametric support vector machine (SVM) classifier.

  7. Classification of Echolocation Calls from 14 Species of Bat by Support Vector Machines and Ensembles of Neural Networks

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    Stuart Parsons

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Calls from 14 species of bat were classified to genus and species using discriminant function analysis (DFA, support vector machines (SVM and ensembles of neural networks (ENN. Both SVMs and ENNs outperformed DFA for every species while ENNs (mean identification rate – 97% consistently outperformed SVMs (mean identification rate – 87%. Correct classification rates produced by the ENNs varied from 91% to 100%; calls from six species were correctly identified with 100% accuracy. Calls from the five species of Myotis, a genus whose species are considered difficult to distinguish acoustically, had correct identification rates that varied from 91 – 100%. Five parameters were most important for classifying calls correctly while seven others contributed little to classification performance.

  8. VBORNET gap analysis: Mosquito vector distribution models utilised to identify areas of potential species distribution in areas lacking records.

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    Francis Schaffner

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This is the second of a number of planned data papers presenting modelled vector distributions produced originally during the ECDC funded VBORNET project. This work continues under the VectorNet project now jointly funded by ECDC and EFSA. Further data papers will be published after sampling seasons when more field data will become available allowing further species to be modelled or validation and updates to existing models.  The data package described here includes those mosquito species first modelled in 2013 & 2014 as part of the VBORNET gap analysis work which aimed to identify areas of potential species distribution in areas lacking records. It comprises three species models together with suitability masks based on land class and environmental limits. The species included as part of this phase are the mosquitoes 'Aedes vexans', 'Anopheles plumbeus' and 'Culex modestus'. The known distributions of these species within the area covered by the project (Europe, the ­Mediterranean Basin, North Africa, and Eurasia are currently incomplete to a greater or lesser degree. The models are designed to fill the gaps with predicted distributions, to provide a assistance in ­targeting surveys to collect distribution data for those areas with no field validated information, and b a first indication of the species distributions within the project areas.

  9. Prediction of endoplasmic reticulum resident proteins using fragmented amino acid composition and support vector machine

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    Ravindra Kumar

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Background The endoplasmic reticulum plays an important role in many cellular processes, which includes protein synthesis, folding and post-translational processing of newly synthesized proteins. It is also the site for quality control of misfolded proteins and entry point of extracellular proteins to the secretory pathway. Hence at any given point of time, endoplasmic reticulum contains two different cohorts of proteins, (i proteins involved in endoplasmic reticulum-specific function, which reside in the lumen of the endoplasmic reticulum, called as endoplasmic reticulum resident proteins and (ii proteins which are in process of moving to the extracellular space. Thus, endoplasmic reticulum resident proteins must somehow be distinguished from newly synthesized secretory proteins, which pass through the endoplasmic reticulum on their way out of the cell. Approximately only 50% of the proteins used in this study as training data had endoplasmic reticulum retention signal, which shows that these signals are not essentially present in all endoplasmic reticulum resident proteins. This also strongly indicates the role of additional factors in retention of endoplasmic reticulum-specific proteins inside the endoplasmic reticulum. Methods This is a support vector machine based method, where we had used different forms of protein features as inputs for support vector machine to develop the prediction models. During training leave-one-out approach of cross-validation was used. Maximum performance was obtained with a combination of amino acid compositions of different part of proteins. Results In this study, we have reported a novel support vector machine based method for predicting endoplasmic reticulum resident proteins, named as ERPred. During training we achieved a maximum accuracy of 81.42% with leave-one-out approach of cross-validation. When evaluated on independent dataset, ERPred did prediction with sensitivity of 72.31% and specificity of 83

  10. SPECIES COMPOSITION OF PSAMMOPHILIC CILIATES OF SUMGAIT CASPIAN COAST

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    I. Kh. Alekperov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. Comparative data on the species composition and species saprobic indicators of the psammon ciliates from Sumgait coast of the Caspian Sea are given.Methods. “Alive” samples were collected using a small clean plastic wide mouth bottles. Further processing was carried out under laboratory conditions. Small quantities of soil were examined under a binocular microscope MBS-9 . Ciliates detected microvessel caught and fixed castors for further impregnation kinetoma silver nitrate (Chatton et Lwoff, 1930 or silver proteinate. To determine the keys for ciliates used Foyssner’s major publications (Foissner et al., 1991, 1992, 1999 and “Free-living ciliates Atlas” (Alekperov, 2005.Results. We observed 75 species of ciliates during the studies, which species composition and distribution of the collection points are shown in table 1. Diagrams with average data were made relations groups psammophilous ciliates indicators saprobity different zones for each of the sites investigated Sumgait coast.Main conclusions. Environmental analysis using benthic ciliates indicators saprobity different zones showed that as expected, the industrial zone of Sumgayit coast coast, despite the decline in recent years, the total amount of pollution that is still highly contaminated portion of the coastal zone of the Caspian Sea.

  11. Predicted altitudinal shifts and reduced spatial distribution of Leishmania infantum vector species under climate change scenarios in Colombia.

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    González, Camila; Paz, Andrea; Ferro, Cristina

    2014-01-01

    Visceral leishmaniasis (VL) is caused by the trypanosomatid parasite Leishmania infantum (=Leishmania chagasi), and is epidemiologically relevant due to its wide geographic distribution, the number of annual cases reported and the increase in its co-infection with HIV. Two vector species have been incriminated in the Americas: Lutzomyia longipalpis and Lutzomyia evansi. In Colombia, L. longipalpis is distributed along the Magdalena River Valley while L. evansi is only found in the northern part of the Country. Regarding the epidemiology of the disease, in Colombia the incidence of VL has decreased over the last few years without any intervention being implemented. Additionally, changes in transmission cycles have been reported with urban transmission occurring in the Caribbean Coast. In Europe and North America climate change seems to be driving a latitudinal shift of leishmaniasis transmission. Here, we explored the spatial distribution of the two known vector species of L. infantum in Colombia and projected its future distribution into climate change scenarios to establish the expansion potential of the disease. An updated database including L. longipalpis and L. evansi collection records from Colombia was compiled. Ecological niche models were performed for each species using the Maxent software and 13 Worldclim bioclimatic coverages. Projections were made for the pessimistic CSIRO A2 scenario, which predicts the higher increase in temperature due to non-emission reduction, and the optimistic Hadley B2 Scenario predicting the minimum increase in temperature. The database contained 23 records for L. evansi and 39 records for L. longipalpis, distributed along the Magdalena River Valley and the Caribbean Coast, where the potential distribution areas of both species were also predicted by Maxent. Climate change projections showed a general overall reduction in the spatial distribution of the two vector species, promoting a shift in altitudinal distribution for L

  12. The overall and fat composition of milk of various species

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    Vesna Gantner

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Milk, an essential source of offspring nourishment, varies in it’s composition and properties significantly across species. In human nutrition, fresh milk and dairy products are valuable sources of protein, fat and energy, and are an important part of daily meals. Most of the world’s milk production (85 % comes from cows followed by buffaloes, goats, ewes, mares and donkeys. However milk related food allergies in infants may be a reason for health problems and may cause a decrease in milk. The objective of this paper was to give an overview of the overall composition of milk and fat from different species in comparison to women milk. Regarding the overall milk composition remarkable differences in energy content, fat, lactose, protein and ash of the various milks were found, but also some similarities among milk from ruminants and non-ruminants were detected. The structures of fat globule membranes were similar among non-ruminants and women milk, while the milk fat globule structure in ruminants differed significantly. The size of fat globules was significantly different between species and highly correlated to the milk fat content, regardless of the specie. The amount of triacylglycerols was notably higher, while the amount of free fatty acids and phospholipids was notably lower in milk from ruminants and women compared to milk from mares and donkeys. The triacylglycerol structure in women and non-ruminantsˈ was similar. The percentage of saturated and monounsaturated fatty acids was lower, while the unsaturated fatty acid content was higher in milk from non-ruminants, with a remarkably higher percentage of C-18:2 and C-18:3. The cholesterol content was similar in women and ruminantsˈ milk, but lower in that of non-ruminants. This review indicates that milk from non-ruminants could be more suitable for human nourishment than milk from ruminants.

  13. VBORNET Gap Analysis: Sand Fly Vector Distribution Models Utilised to Identify Areas of Potential Species Distribution in Areas Lacking Records

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    Bulent Alten

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This is the first of a number of planned data papers presenting modelled vector distributions, the models in this paper were produced during the ECDC funded VBORNET project. This work continues under the VectorNet project now jointly funded by ECDC and EFSA. This data paper contains the sand fly model outputs produced as part of the VBORNET project. Further data papers will be published after sampling seasons when more field data will become available allowing further species to be modelled or validation and updates to existing models. The data package described here includes those sand fly species first modelled in 2013 and 2014 as part of the VBORNET gap analysis work which aimed to identify areas of potential species distribution in areas lacking records. It comprises four species models together with suitability masks based on land class and environmental limits. The species included within this paper are 'Phlebotomus ariasi', 'Phlebotomus papatasi', 'Phlebotomus perniciosus' and 'Phlebotomus tobbi'. The known distributions of these species within the project area (Europe, the Mediterranean Basin, North Africa, and Eurasia are currently incomplete to a greater or lesser degree. The models are designed to fill the gaps with predicted distributions, to provide a assistance in targeting surveys to collect ­distribution data for those areas with no field validated information, and b a first indication of project wide distributions.

  14. SPECIES COMPOSITION OF MALARIAL MOSQUITOES KHARKIV REGION. NATURAL FACTORS OF MALARIA TRANSMISSION

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    Gazzawi - Rogozinа L. V.

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. This article describes the species composition of the dominant Anopheles mosquitoes in the Kharkiv region, the season of their possible effective infection, as well as ongoing anti-malaria activities . Key words: malaria , mosquitoes, p . Anopheles, epidemiology, census, hydraulic events. Material & methods. The analysis of entomological and meteorological situation in Ukraine and in the Kharkiv region according to data of the Ukrainian Center of control and monitoring of diseases of the Ministry of Health of Ukraine and Kharkiv regional laboratory center. Collection of material (imaginal and larval was carried out on the territory of natural and artificial water bodies of Kharkiv region in the period 2013 - 2014. When collecting the material used conventional accounting methods mosquito populations. On the territory of the region under study, we have found 30 species of mosquitoes three genera: Anopheles, Culex, Aedes. Results & discussion. Epidemiological role of each species of mosquitoes depends on several conditions. Dangerous vector species can only be found in large numbers, a significant percentage of individuals in a population that feeds on the blood of man, having a sufficiently long season activity and a sufficient number of females surviving to age possible maturation of sporozoites in their body. In Ukraine, the major carriers - Anopheles maculipennis, An. m. messeae, An. m. atroparvus, An. claviger, An. plumbeus, An. hyrcanus. Mosquito species registered in the territory of the Kharkiv region are susceptible to currently known types of human malaria parasites . Moreover, the dominant species in terms of urban landscapes are An.maculipennis and An.messeae . These species possess all the qualities necessary to be considered dangerous malaria vector control. They are well infected with the three main types of human parasites. In the study area , in terms of urban landscapes, gonoaktivnye females occurs within 3

  15. An integrated overview of the midgut bacterial flora composition of Phlebotomus perniciosus, a vector of zoonotic visceral leishmaniasis in the Western Mediterranean Basin.

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    Wael Fraihi

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The Leishmania developmental life cycle within its sand fly vector occurs exclusively in the lumen of the insect's digestive tract in the presence of symbiotic bacteria. The composition of the gut microbiota and the factors that influence its composition are currently poorly understood. A set of factors, including the host and its environment, may influence this composition. It has been demonstrated that the insect gut microbiota influences the development of several human pathogens, such as Plasmodium falciparum. For sand flies and Leishmania, understanding the interactions between the parasite and the microbial environment of the vector midgut can provide new tools to control Leishmania transmission.The midguts of female Phlebotomus perniciosus from laboratory colonies or from the field were collected during the months of July, September and October 2011 and dissected. The midguts were analyzed by culture-dependent and culture-independent methods. A total of 441 and 115 cultivable isolates were assigned to 30 and 11 phylotypes from field-collected and colonized P. perniciosus, respectively. Analysis of monthly variations in microbiota composition shows a species diversity decline in October, which is to the end of the Leishmania infantum transmission period. In parallel, a compilation and a meta-analysis of all available data concerning the microbiota of two Psychodidae genera, namely Phlebotomus and Lutzomyia, was performed and compared to P. perniciosus, data obtained herein. This integrated analysis did not reveal any substantial divergences between Old and New world sand flies with regards to the midgut bacterial phyla and genera diversity. But clearly, most bacterial species (>76% are sparsely distributed between Phlebotominae species.Our results pinpoint the need for a more exhaustive understanding of the bacterial richness and abundance at the species level in Phlebotominae sand flies in order to capture the role of midgut bacteria

  16. Fatty Acid Composition and Antioxidant Potential of Ten Cephalaria Species

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    Nazli Boke Sarikahya

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper focused on the assessment of fatty acid composition and antioxidant properties of ten Cephalaria (C. aytachii, C. taurica, C. tuteliana, C. procera, C. speciosa, C. tchihatchewii, C. hirsuta, C. elazigensis var. elazigensis,C. anatolica and C. aristata species. The principal fatty acids in all species were oleic acid (10.28-31.65%, linoleic acid (17.81–37.67% and palmitic acid (10.54–23.81%. L inolenic acid was also the most abundant fatty acid component in C. tuteliana (24.42% and in C. speciosa (36.65% . Invitro antioxidant capacity of the hexane extracts of ten Cephalaria species was investigated by CUPRAC and DPPH methods. Total phenolic content of hexane extracts was also examined. The results showed that all species of Cephalaria have antioxidant properties with the highest trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity (1.005 ± 0.13 mmol trolox equivalent per gram extact in C. aristata and the highest radical scavenging activity (IC 50 value 3.768 ± 0.67 mg/mL in C. tchihatchewii . It was found that reducing power of C. aristata and radical scavenging potential of C. tchihatchewii were mainly due to highest phenolic contents of these species (2.907 ± 0.146 and 3.037 ± 0.156 mg gallic acid equivalent per gram extract, respectively. These findings suggest that the Cephalaria species might be used as a potential source of unsaturated fatty acids as well as phenolic constituents possessing antioxidant activity in food, cosmetics and pharmaceutical industries

  17. Vector-Enabled Metagenomic (VEM Surveys Using Whiteflies (Aleyrodidae Reveal Novel Begomovirus Species in the New and OldWorlds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karyna Rosario

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Whitefly-transmitted viruses belonging to the genus Begomovirus (family Geminiviridae represent a substantial threat to agricultural food production. The rapid evolutionary potential of these single-stranded DNA viruses combined with the polyphagous feeding behavior of their whitefly vector (Bemisia tabaci can lead to the emergence of damaging viral strains. Therefore, it is crucial to characterize begomoviruses circulating in different regions and crops globally. This study utilized vector-enabled metagenomics (VEM coupled with high-throughput sequencing to survey begomoviruses directly from whiteflies collected in various locations (California (USA, Guatemala, Israel, Puerto Rico, and Spain. Begomoviruses were detected in all locations, with the highest diversity identified in Guatemala where up to seven different species were identified in a single field. Both bipartite and monopartite viruses were detected, including seven new begomovirus species from Guatemala, Puerto Rico, and Spain. This begomovirus survey extends the known diversity of these highly damaging plant viruses. However, the new genomes described here and in the recent literature appear to reflect the outcome of interactions between closely-related species, often resulting from recombination, instead of unique, highly divergent species.

  18. The developmental transcriptome of the mosquito Aedes aegypti, an invasive species and major arbovirus vector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akbari, Omar S; Antoshechkin, Igor; Amrhein, Henry; Williams, Brian; Diloreto, Race; Sandler, Jeremy; Hay, Bruce A

    2013-09-04

    Mosquitoes are vectors of a number of important human and animal diseases. The development of novel vector control strategies requires a thorough understanding of mosquito biology. To facilitate this, we used RNA-seq to identify novel genes and provide the first high-resolution view of the transcriptome throughout development and in response to blood feeding in a mosquito vector of human disease, Aedes aegypti, the primary vector for Dengue and yellow fever. We characterized mRNA expression at 34 distinct time points throughout Aedes development, including adult somatic and germline tissues, by using polyA+ RNA-seq. We identify a total of 14,238 novel new transcribed regions corresponding to 12,597 new loci, as well as many novel transcript isoforms of previously annotated genes. Altogether these results increase the annotated fraction of the transcribed genome into long polyA+ RNAs by more than twofold. We also identified a number of patterns of shared gene expression, as well as genes and/or exons expressed sex-specifically or sex-differentially. Expression profiles of small RNAs in ovaries, early embryos, testes, and adult male and female somatic tissues also were determined, resulting in the identification of 38 new Aedes-specific miRNAs, and ~291,000 small RNA new transcribed regions, many of which are likely to be endogenous small-interfering RNAs and Piwi-interacting RNAs. Genes of potential interest for transgene-based vector control strategies also are highlighted. Our data have been incorporated into a user-friendly genome browser located at www.Aedes.caltech.edu, with relevant links to Vectorbase (www.vectorbase.org).

  19. The fauna, monthly activity and species composition of anophelines mosquito larva in breeding places, Qom province

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abedin Saghafipour

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: There is need to develop updated database related to malaria mosquito, because there is back prevalence of malaria in the past two decades in some areas of north and northwest of Iran categorized as epidemiologically clean areas previously. Vectors control is one of the main strategies in controlling the epidemics. In this study, species composition and monthly activity of anopheles mosquito larva in different breeding places in Qom province was assessed. Material and Methods: The present study was a cross-sectional one. It was carried out in all 5 parts of geographical areas of Qom province. Samples were collected every 15 days from the natural and artificial breeding places from April to October 2010, using dipping standard method of WHO. Mosquito larvae conserved in lactophenol medium. In the laboratory, the specimens were mounted in likidophor medium and microscopic slides were prepared from larvae, and identified using illustrated keys for Iranian mosquitoes. Results: A total of 298 larvae samples were collected and identified from different breeding places in various areas of Qom province. This larvae belonged to two subgenus of Anopheles and Cellia and including four species of An.(Ano.marteri, An.(Ano.claviger, An.(Cel.superpictus, and An.(Cel.turkhudi. An.(Ano. claviger, An.(Ano.marteri, and An.(Cel.turkhudi are reported for the first time in this province. An.(Ano.claviger was dominant species of larvae in the breeding places in Qom province and found in different larva habitats. The peak of activity of recent species is in late July and early August and its seasonal activity is in late April to late October. Conclusion: An.(Cel.superpictus which is Malaria vector in different parts of the world and Iran is the dominant species of the area had the second frequency. Having high potential for transmission and possibility of establishing a transmission cycle with low abundance is the characteristics of first species. Anopheles

  20. Role of Culex and Anopheles mosquito species as potential vectors of rift valley fever virus in Sudan outbreak, 2007

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galal Fatma H

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Rift Valley fever (RVF is an acute febrile arthropod-borne viral disease of man and animals caused by a member of the Phlebovirus genus, one of the five genera in the family Bunyaviridae. RVF virus (RVFV is transmitted between animals and human by mosquitoes, particularly those belonging to the Culex, Anopheles and Aedes genera. Methods Experiments were designed during RVF outbreak, 2007 in Sudan to provide an answer about many raised questions about the estimated role of vector in RVFV epidemiology. During this study, adult and immature mosquito species were collected from Khartoum and White Nile states, identified and species abundance was calculated. All samples were frozen individually for further virus detection. Total RNA was extracted from individual insects and RVF virus was detected from Culex, Anopheles and Aedes species using RT-PCR. In addition, data were collected about human cases up to November 24th, 2007 to asses the situation of the disease in affected states. Furthermore, a historical background of the RVF outbreaks was discussed in relation to global climatic anomalies and incriminated vector species. Results A total of 978 mosquitoes, belonging to 3 genera and 7 species, were collected during Sudan outbreak, 2007. Anopheles gambiae arabiensis was the most frequent species (80.7% in White Nile state. Meanwhile, Cx. pipiens complex was the most abundant species (91.2% in Khartoum state. RT-PCR was used and successfully amplified 551 bp within the M segment of the tripartite negative-sense single stranded RNA genome of RVFV. The virus was detected in female, male and larval stages of Culex and Anopheles species. The most affected human age interval was 15-29 years old followed by ≥ 45 years old, 30-44 years old, and then 5-14 years old. Regarding to the profession, housewives followed by farmers, students, shepherd, workers and the free were more vulnerable to the infection. Furthermore, connection between

  1. Spontaneous morphogenetic juvenilization observed in laboratory populations of vector species of Chagas disease (Triatominae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alina Perlowagora-Szumlewicz

    1973-08-01

    Full Text Available Reported are observations on spontaneous occurring morphogenetic juvenilization in laboratory populations of vector species of Chagas disease. Two general effects have been observed: arrested development and uncoordinated development. These are manifested by supernumerary nymphs (6th stage, intermediate nymphal-adult stages, badly deformed adults developed from 5th instar nymphs, uncoordinated development manifested by grotesque forms of adults, supernumerary adults unable to complete metamorphosis and complete supernumerary adults produced by 6th stage nymphs. The reoccurrence of insects with identical grades of juvenilization in the population is an indication that this is a genetic trait that might be inherited. The factors responsible for morphogenetic juvenilization cannot be transmitted through the juvenilized insects because they are sterile, than they were transmitted through normal insects probably as a recessive or a group recessive factors. The spontaneous morphogenetic juvenilization observed in laboratory populations has a striking similarity to juvenilizing effects induced by application of juvenile hormone analogues, described in the literature and also obtained in our laboratory in a study to be published. Thus it is suggested that both; the altered phenotypes occurring in wild populations and their "phenocopies" induced by the application of juvenile hormone analogues are products of gene controlled identical reactions.São relatadas observações sobre a ocorrência espontâea de juvenilização morfogenética em populações de espécies transmissoras da doença de Chagas, mantidas no laboratório. Dois efeitos gerais foram observados: a interrupção e a descoordenação do desenvolvimento. Tais efeitos são manifestados: 1 por ninfas supernumerárias (6º estádio, 2 por estágios intermediários (ninfa-adulto, 3 por adultos sensivelmente deformados, provenientes de ninfas do 5º estágio, 4 pelo desenvolvimento d

  2. Colonization of a newly constructed urban wetland by mosquitoes in England: implications for nuisance and vector species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medlock, Jolyon M; Vaux, Alexander G C

    2014-12-01

    Urban wetlands are being created in the UK as part of sustainable urban drainage strategies, to create wetland habitats lost during development, to provide a habitat for protected species, and to increase the public's access to 'blue-space' for the improvement of health and well-being. Sewage treatment reedbeds are also being incorporated into newly constructed wetlands to offer an alternative approach to dealing with sewage. This field study aims to provide the first UK evidence of how such newly constructed aquatic habitats are colonized by mosquitoes. A number of new aquatic habitats were surveyed for immature mosquitoes every fortnight over the first two years following wetland construction. The majority of mosquitoes collected were Culex sp. and were significantly associated with the sewage treatment reedbed system, particularly following storm events and sewage inflow. Other more natural aquatic habitats that were subject to cycles of drying and re-wetting contributed the majority of the remaining mosquitoes colonizing. Colonization of permanent habitats was slow, particularly where fluctuations in water levels inhibited emergent vegetation growth. It is recommended that during the planning process for newly constructed wetlands consideration is given on a case-by-case basis to the impact of mosquitoes, either as a cause of nuisance or as potential vectors. Although ornithophagic Culex dominated in this wetland, their potential role as enzootic West Nile virus vectors should not be overlooked. © 2014 The Society for Vector Ecology.

  3. How did this snail get here? Several dispersal vectors inferred for an aquatic invasive species

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Leeuwen, C.H.A.; Huig, N.; Van der Velde, G.; Van Alen, T.; Wagemaker, C.A.M.; Sherman, C.D.H.; Klaassen, M.R.J.; Figuerola, J.

    2013-01-01

    How species reach and persist in isolated habitats remains an open question in many cases, especially for rapidly spreading invasive species. This is particularly true for temporary freshwater ponds, which can be remote and may dry out annually, but may still harbour high biodiversity. Persistence

  4. Vector control improves survival of three species of prairie dogs (Cynomys) in areas considered enzootic for plague

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biggins, Dean E.; Godbey, Jerry L.; Gage, Kenneth L.; Carter, Leon G.; Montenieri, John A.

    2010-01-01

    Plague causes periodic epizootics that decimate populations of prairie dogs (PDs) (Cynomys), but the means by which the causative bacterium (Yersinia pestis) persists between epizootics are poorly understood. Plague epizootics in PDs might arise as the result of introductions of Y. pestis from sources outside PD colonies. However, it remains possible that plague persists in PDs during interepizootic periods and is transmitted at low rates among highly susceptible individuals within and between their colonies. If this is true, application of vector control to reduce flea numbers might reduce mortality among PDs. To test whether vector control enhances PD survival in the absence of obvious plague epizootics, we reduced the numbers of fleas (vectors for Y. pestis) 96–98% (1 month posttreatment) on 15 areas involving three species of PDs (Cynomys leucurus, Cynomys parvidens in Utah, and Cynomys ludovicianus in Montana) during 2000–2004 using deltamethrin dust delivered into burrows as a pulicide. Even during years without epizootic plague, PD survival rates at dusted sites were 31–45% higher for adults and 2–34% higher for juveniles compared to survival rates at nondusted sites. Y. pestis was cultured from 49 of the 851 flea pools tested (6882 total fleas) and antibodies against Y. pestis were identified in serum samples from 40 of 2631 PDs. Although other explanations are possible, including transmission of other potentially fatal pathogens by fleas, ticks, or other ectoparasites, our results suggest that plague might be maintained indefinitely in PD populations in the absence of free epizootics and widespread mortality among these animals. If PDs and their fleas support enzootic cycles of plague transmission, there would be important implications for the conservation of these animals and other species.

  5. Seasonality of sand flies (Diptera: Psychodidae) and Leishmania DNA detection in vector species in an area with endemic visceral leishmaniasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saraiva, Lara; Leite, Camila Gonçalves; Lima, Ana Cristina Vianna Mariano da Rocha; Carvalho, Luiz Otávio Alves de; Pereira, Agnes Antônia Sampaio; Rugani, Jerônimo Marteleto Nunes; Rego, Felipe Dutra; Gontijo, Célia Maria Ferreira; Andrade, José Dilermando

    2017-04-01

    Leishmaniases are a serious health problem in southeast Brazil, including the city of Belo Horizonte (BH), Minas Gerais state (MG), where there are high rates of incidence and mortality due to visceral leishmaniases. BH is divided into nine sanitary districts (SD) of which one, the Venda Nova SD, was selected for this study because it has high rates of positivity for canine leishmaniasis and high incidence of human leishmaniasis. This study aimed to survey the sand fly fauna in Venda Nova SD from August 2011 to July 2013 and perform a descriptive analysis of the vector population. The sampling was carried out using automatic HP light traps at all covered areas of the Venda Nova SD, in a total of eighteen light traps. Sampled specimens were identified following Galati (2003), and females were submitted to molecular techniques for the detection and identification of Leishmania DNA. A simple environmental description was done for it area and Kernel estimation was used to infer vector density for each study site. A total of 2,427 sand fly specimens belonging to eight species and five genera were collected of which 95.3% were Lutzomyia longipalpis. The seasonal variation curve was delineated by this species. Lu. longipalpis was the most abundant at all collection points and in all months of the study, and exhibited a natural infection rate of 1.01% for Leishmania infantum and 1.77% for Leishmania braziliensis. The results show the presence and adaptation of Lu. longipalpis to the anthropic environment of BH and reinforces its role as the main vector of L. infantum in the region.

  6. Infestation of arboreal nests of coatis by triatomine species, vectors of Trypanosoma cruzi, in a large Neotropical wetland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Lima, Juliane Saab; Rocha, Fabiana Lopes; Alves, Fernanda Moreira; Lorosa, Elias Seixas; Jansen, Ana Maria; de Miranda Mourão, Guilherme

    2015-12-01

    The coati (Nasua nasua, Carnivora) is a medium-sized mammal common in the Pantanal of Brazil. Unlike most mammals, coatis construct arboreal nests used for resting and reproduction. In this region, the coati is an important host of Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas disease. There are two possible routes through coatis can be infected by T. cruzi: the oral route or the vectorial route. However, the relative importance of each of these routes in the infection of coatis and its role in the sylvatic cycle of the parasite are unknown. Our objectives were to investigate: (i) whether coati nests were infested by triatomine bugs, (ii) what species were frequent in the nests, (iii) whether the triatomines in nests were infected by T. cruzi, and (iv) what were the food resources of these triatomines. Eight of the 24 nests sampled were infested with triatomines, a total of 37 specimens of at least two species (Rhodnius stali and Triatoma sordida). In one nest, R. stali and T. sordida co-occurred and both fed on multiple resources, including coatis. This is the first report of triatomines occurring in arboreal nests of coatis. The co-occurrence of two different genera of triatomine vectors and coatis within the limited space of the coati nests provide multiple opportunities for the exchange of the protozoan parasite through both the vectorial and oral transmission routes. © 2015 The Society for Vector Ecology.

  7. Bacterial communities of disease vectors sampled across time, space, and species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Ryan T; Knight, Rob; Martin, Andrew P

    2010-02-01

    A common strategy of pathogenic bacteria is to form close associations with parasitic insects that feed on animals and to use these insects as vectors for their own transmission. Pathogens interact closely with other coexisting bacteria within the insect, and interactions between co-occurring bacteria may influence the vector competency of the parasite. Interactions between particular lineages can be explored through measures of alpha-diversity. Furthermore, general patterns of bacterial community assembly can be explored through measures of beta-diversity. Here, we use pyrosequencing (n=115,924 16S rRNA gene sequences) to describe the bacterial communities of 230 prairie dog fleas sampled across space and time. We use these communinty characterizations to assess interactions between dominant community members and to explore general patterns of bacterial community assembly in fleas. An analysis of co-occurrence patterns suggests non-neutral negative interactions between dominant community members (Pspace (phylotype-based: R=0.418, Pspecies (phylotype-based: R=0.160, P=0.011; phylogenetic-based: not significant). Collectively, our results show that flea-associated bacterial communities are not random assemblages; rather, an individual flea's bacterial community is governed by interactions between bacterial lineages and by the flea's place in space and time.

  8. Understanding species composition from NEON high resolution hyperspectral-LIDAR data across a heterogeneous landscape: Effects of land use, fire regime and topography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohlman, S.; Graves, S.; Shahriari Nia, M.; Paul, G.; Leila, K.; Wang, D. Z.

    2015-12-01

    The 2014 NEON hyperspectral LIDAR data allows landscape scale analysis of how abiotic factors and management history affect ecosystem composition and function. At the Ordway Swisher Biological Station (OSBS) in Florida, the core terrestrial NEON site in the Southeast U.S., we are developing a framework applicable to all NEON sites for mapping and analyzing species composition. In this region, small changes in topography (elevation varies by only 20 m at OSBS) along with fire history are the dominant controls on tree species composition. To discriminate species, we use compare support vector machines (SVMs) with possibilistic classifiers (POCs), which may classify species as unknown and represent ambiguity among spectrally similar species better than common classifiers than (SVM). Species classification was most accurate (90%) using POC in the dominant upland longleaf pine forest type (where most trees belonged to just two species: Pinus palustris and Quercus laevis). It was lower ( 10 hardwood species commonly co-occur, including multiple Quercus). For co-occurring hardwood species that were difficult to separate spectrally, we combined the NEON hyperspectral data with additional data sets (global and regional plant trait databases, state-level maps of ecosystem type, and U.S. Forest Service inventory data) in a possibilistic framework to increase the separability of species identity. We then generate a landscape-scale map of species composition at OSBS. Combining this species map with a LIDAR-derived topography, we show that species associations vary with topography. For example, some Quercus species tend to co-occur with each other in uplands, but not in mesic hammocks. We examine potential factors causing changes in community composition, including topography, water table depth, soil type, current fire management regime, and historical land use. By combining the NEON hyperspectral and LIDAR data with detailed records prescribed fire, we also examine how fire

  9. Support vector machine for classification of meiotic recombination hotspots and coldspots in Saccharomyces cerevisiae based on codon composition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sun Xiao

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Meiotic double-strand breaks occur at relatively high frequencies in some genomic regions (hotspots and relatively low frequencies in others (coldspots. Hotspots and coldspots are receiving increasing attention in research into the mechanism of meiotic recombination. However, predicting hotspots and coldspots from DNA sequence information is still a challenging task. Results We present a novel method for classification of hot and cold ORFs located in hotspots and coldspots respectively in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, using support vector machine (SVM, which relies on codon composition differences. This method has achieved a high classification accuracy of 85.0%. Since codon composition is a fusion of codon usage bias and amino acid composition signals, the ability of these two kinds of sequence attributes to discriminate hot ORFs from cold ORFs was also investigated separately. Our results indicate that neither codon usage bias nor amino acid composition taken separately performed as well as codon composition. Moreover, our SVM based method was applied to the full genome: We predicted the hot/cold ORFs from the yeast genome by using cutoffs of recombination rate. We found that the performance of our method for predicting cold ORFs is not as good as that for predicting hot ORFs. Besides, we also observed a considerable correlation between meiotic recombination rate and amino acid composition of certain residues, which probably reflects the structural and functional dissimilarity between the hot and cold groups. Conclusion We have introduced a SVM-based novel method to discriminate hot ORFs from cold ones. Applying codon composition as sequence attributes, we have achieved a high classification accuracy, which suggests that codon composition has strong potential to be used as sequence attributes in the prediction of hot and cold ORFs.

  10. Species richness and composition of bird community in Abalo ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This species pool comprises of seven (near) endemic species and ten highland biome- and six Somali-Masai-restricted species, indicating that this forest has significant importance for bird conservation. Based on mean values of the relative abundance index scores obtained from the eight transects, over half of the species ...

  11. Seasonal variation in biomass and species composition of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The stranded weeds constituted a total of 62 species during the entire study period.Of this,Rhodophyta ranked high with 26 species followed by Chlorophyta with 22 species and Phaeophyta with 14 species.The stranded seaweeds that were washed ashore provide valuable floristic information about the intertidal and near ...

  12. Changes in Species Richness and Composition of Tiger Moths (Lepidoptera: Erebidae: Arctiinae among Three Neotropical Ecoregions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hernán Mario Beccacece

    Full Text Available Paraná, Yungas and Chaco Serrano ecoregions are among the most species-rich terrestrial habitats at higher latitude. However, the information for tiger moths, one of the most speciose groups of moths, is unknown in these ecoregions. In this study, we assess their species richness and composition in all three of these ecoregions. Also we investigated whether the species composition of tiger moths is influenced by climatic factors and altitude. Tiger moth species were obtained with samples from 71 sites using standardized protocols (21 sites were in Yungas, 19 in Paraná and 31 in Chaco Serrano. Rarefaction-extrapolation curves, non-parametric estimators for incidence and sample coverage indices were performed to assess species richness in the ecoregions studied. Non metric multidimensional scaling and adonis tests were performed to compare the species composition of tiger moths among ecoregions. Permutest analysis and Pearson correlation were used to evaluate the relationship among species composition and annual mean temperature, annual temperature range, annual precipitation, precipitation seasonality and altitude. Among ecoregions Paraná was the richest with 125 species, followed by Yungas with 63 species and Chaco Serrano with 24 species. Species composition differed among these ecoregions, although Yungas and Chaco Serrano were more similar than Paraná. Species composition was significantly influenced by climatic factors and altitude. This study showed that species richness and species composition of tiger moths differed among the three ecoregions assessed. Furthermore, not only climatic factors and altitude influence the species composition of tiger moths among ecoregions, but also climatic seasonality at higher latitude in Neotropical South America becomes an important factor.

  13. Oil content and fatty acid composition variability in wild peanut species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wild peanut species are useful genetic resources for improving the levels of disease/pest resistance and enhancing the quality of seed composition by interspecific hybridization. The variation in oil content and fatty acid composition of wild peanut species in the USDA germplasm collection is unknow...

  14. Species Composition of Down Dead and Standing Live Trees: Implications for Forest Inventory Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christopher W. Woodall; Linda Nagel

    2005-01-01

    The assessment of species composition in most forest inventory analysis relies solely on standing live tree information characterized by current forest type. With the implementation of the third phase of the U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service's Forest Inventory and Analysis program, the species composition of down dead trees, otherwise termed coarse...

  15. The effects of fire-breaks on plant diversity and species composition ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    There is a dearth of knowledge on the effects of annual burning of fire-breaks on species composition, plant diversity and soil properties. Whittaker's plant diversity technique was used to gather data on species composition and diversity in four grassland communities on the Loskop Dam Nature Reserve (LDNR). The study ...

  16. Species composition and biomass estimates of zooplankton in some ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Three stations were sampled from each water body using a plankton net (40 µm mesh size) hauled vertically through the water column. The zooplankton community comprised mainly crustacea and rotifers. The results show that the number of species collected during the wet and dry seasons was 31 species and 28 species ...

  17. EPICUTICULAR WAX COMPOSITION OF SOME EUROPEAN SEDUM SPECIES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    STEVENS, JF; THART, H; BOLCK, A; ZWAVING, JH; MALINGRE, TM

    Epicuticular waxes from 30 species of Sedum and 2 species of Sempervivoideae, i.e. Aeonium spathulatum and Sempervivum nevadense, have been analysed by GC and GC-MS. The Sedum taxa examined were S. acre, S. album, S. series Alpestria (13 species), S. anglicum, S. brevifolium, S. litoreum, S. lydium,

  18. Relationship between species composition and homegarden size in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    From the data, Euphorbiaceae, Solanaceae, Rutaceae, Malvaceae, Caesalpiniaceae, Poaceae and Apocynaceae (in order of decreasing number of species) were the most frequent Families. Taxa such as Musa species, Vernonia amygdalina, Citrus species, Psidium guajava and Terminalia catappa were found to be the ...

  19. The influence of species composition on flow field's optical computerized tomography diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun-yun, Chen; Fang, Gu; Ling-bing, Bu; Ying-ying, Zhang

    2017-07-01

    The species composition is one of the factors which could affect the refractive index of flow fields. So, the determination of species composition should be a key point, when optical computerized tomography (OCT) methods are applied to measure the key parameters of flow fields. In this paper, the influence of species composition on flow field's temperature diagnosis will be discussed both in theory and experiment. The final results manifest that the determination of species composition could affect not only the specific temperature values, but also the structure and distribution of the temperature. Meanwhile, it is also found that the nonlinear regular of the maximal temperature variation with the distance between the cross section and nozzle is the same in different models. Finally, the condition, which could be applied to judge whether the effect of species composition can be omitted, is proposed.

  20. Detection of Leishmania major DNA within wild caught Phlebotomus papatasi and species composition of sand flies in endemic focus of cutaneous leishmaniasis, in western Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vahabi, A; Rassi, Y; Oshaghi, M A; Sayyadi, M; Rafizadeh, S

    2016-03-01

    Cutaneous leishmaniasis is one of the most important public health problem in many developing countries. The present study was conducted to determine the vector(s), the parasite and the species composition of sand flies in the Dehloran County during May-November 2012. Sand flies were collected by sticky traps and mounted in Puri's medium for species identification. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) techniques of kDNA, ITS1-rDNA, followed by restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) were used for identification of DNA of Leishmania parasites in infected sand flies. A total of 82443 specimens comprising 15 species of sand flies (5 Phlebotomus and 10 Sergentomyia) were collected and identified. The species of Phlebotomus papatasi was dominant in outdoor and indoor resting places. Among the 280 specimens of female P. papatasi tested by PCR of kDNA, ITS1-rDNA genes of the parasite followed by RFLP, only 5 of them (1.8 %) were positive to Leishmania major parasites. This is the first molecular detection of leishmania infection of P. papatasi to L. major in this region. The results indicated that, P. papatasi was only species found infected by L. major and the principal vector of disease agent to human.

  1. Species composition and natural infectivity of anthropophilic Anopheles (Diptera: Culicidae) in Córdoba and Antioquia states in northwestern Colombia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez, Lina A; González, John J; Gómez, Giovan F; Castro, Martha I; Rosero, Doris A; Luckhart, Shirley; Conn, Jan E; Correa, Margarita M

    2011-01-01

    Malaria is a serious health problem in Córdoba and Antioquia states in northwestern Colombia, where 64.4% of the total Colombian cases were reported in 2007. Because little entomological information is available in this region, the aim of this work was to identify the Anopheles species composition and natural infectivity of mosquitoes distributed in seven localities with the highest malaria transmission. A total of 1,768 Anopheles mosquitoes were collected using human landing catches from March 2007 to July 2008. Ten species were identified; overall, An. nuneztovari s.l. was the most widespread (62%) and showed the highest average human biting rates. There were six other species of the Nyssorhynchus subgenus: An. albimanus (11.6%), An. darlingi (9.8%), An. braziliensis (6.6%), An. triannulatus s.l. (3.5%), An. albitarsis s.l. and An. oswaldoi s.l. at <1%; and three of the Anopheles subgenus: An. punctimacula, An. pseudopunctipennis s.l. and An. neomaculipalpus at <1% each. Two species from Córdoba, An. nuneztovari and An. darlingi, were detected naturally infected by Plasmodium vivax VK247 using ELISA and confirmed by nested PCR. All species were active indoors and outdoors. These results provide basic information for targeted vector control strategies in these localities. PMID:20140372

  2. Combination of the Manifold Dimensionality Reduction Methods with Least Squares Support vector machines for Classifying the Species of Sorghum Seeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Y. M.; Lin, P.; He, J. Q.; He, Y.; Li, X. L.

    2016-01-01

    This study was carried out for rapid and noninvasive determination of the class of sorghum species by using the manifold dimensionality reduction (MDR) method and the nonlinear regression method of least squares support vector machines (LS-SVM) combing with the mid-infrared spectroscopy (MIRS) techniques. The methods of Durbin and Run test of augmented partial residual plot (APaRP) were performed to diagnose the nonlinearity of the raw spectral data. The nonlinear MDR methods of isometric feature mapping (ISOMAP), local linear embedding, laplacian eigenmaps and local tangent space alignment, as well as the linear MDR methods of principle component analysis and metric multidimensional scaling were employed to extract the feature variables. The extracted characteristic variables were utilized as the input of LS-SVM and established the relationship between the spectra and the target attributes. The mean average precision (MAP) scores and prediction accuracy were respectively used to evaluate the performance of models. The prediction results showed that the ISOMAP-LS-SVM model obtained the best classification performance, where the MAP scores and prediction accuracy were 0.947 and 92.86%, respectively. It can be concluded that the ISOMAP-LS-SVM model combined with the MIRS technique has the potential of classifying the species of sorghum in a reasonable accuracy.

  3. Kennard-Stone combined with least square support vector machine method for noncontact discriminating human blood species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Linna; Li, Gang; Sun, Meixiu; Li, Hongxiao; Wang, Zhennan; Li, Yingxin; Lin, Ling

    2017-11-01

    Identifying whole bloods to be either human or nonhuman is an important responsibility for import-export ports and inspection and quarantine departments. Analytical methods and DNA testing methods are usually destructive. Previous studies demonstrated that visible diffuse reflectance spectroscopy method can realize noncontact human and nonhuman blood discrimination. An appropriate method for calibration set selection was very important for a robust quantitative model. In this paper, Random Selection (RS) method and Kennard-Stone (KS) method was applied in selecting samples for calibration set. Moreover, proper stoichiometry method can be greatly beneficial for improving the performance of classification model or quantification model. Partial Least Square Discrimination Analysis (PLSDA) method was commonly used in identification of blood species with spectroscopy methods. Least Square Support Vector Machine (LSSVM) was proved to be perfect for discrimination analysis. In this research, PLSDA method and LSSVM method was used for human blood discrimination. Compared with the results of PLSDA method, this method could enhance the performance of identified models. The overall results convinced that LSSVM method was more feasible for identifying human and animal blood species, and sufficiently demonstrated LSSVM method was a reliable and robust method for human blood identification, and can be more effective and accurate.

  4. Molecular Identification of Two Vector Species, Cacopsylla melanoneura and Cacopsylla picta (Hemiptera: Psyllidae), of Apple Proliferation Disease and Further Common Psyllids of Northern Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oettl, Sabine; Schlink, Katja

    2015-10-01

    The psyllid species Cacopsylla melanoneura (Förster) and Cacopsylla picta (Förster) are vectors of 'Candidatus Phytoplasma mali', the causal agent of apple proliferation, one of the economically most important apple diseases in Europe. Both vectors are present in apple orchards of South Tyrol and Trentino provinces in Northern Italy. As no direct treatment of the disease is possible, monitoring of the psyllids provides information about the vector presence in the orchards and enables targeted control. Thus, fast and reliable identification of the various psyllids occurring in the apple orchards is required. Morphological differentiation is problematic due to extensive resemblance of some psyllid species especially among females and is error-prone for nymphs. Here we present a rapid and cost-effective polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism method based on the cytochrome c oxidase subunit I region for the molecular identification of the vector species as well as eight further Cacopsylla species present in the orchards. This method was verified through 98.9% consensus with morphologically identified males, through sequencing and subsequent phylogenetic analysis. In case of doubtful morphological identification of females, the method was able to provide a refined species assignment and could also remarkably facilitate the identification of nymphs. © The Authors 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. Web mapping GIS: GPS under the GIS umbrella for Aedes species dengue and chikungunya vector mosquito surveillance and control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Palaniyandi

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The mosquito nuisance and the mosquito borne diseases have become major important challenging public health problems in India especially in the fast developing city like Pondicherry urban agglomeration. The Pondicherry government has been implemented full-fledged mosquito control measures, however, dengue and chikungunya epidemics was accelerating trend in Pondicherry for the recent years, and therefore, the directorate of public health, Pondicherry was requested vector control research centre (VCRC, to conduct a mosquito control evaluation survey. A team of field staff of VCRC headed by the author, Pondicherry, have conducted a detailed reconnaissance survey for collecting the site specifications of houses and the streetwise mosquito data for analyzing the density of vector mosquitoes in the wards / blocks and delineating the areas vulnerable to disease epidemics in the urban areas. The GPS GARMIN 12 XL was used to collect the field data. The ARC GIS 10.0 software was used to map the site locations (houses with mosquito’s data. The digital map of block boundary of Pondicherry was used for mapping purpose. A systematic grid sampling was applied to conduct a rapid survey for mapping Aedes species mosquito genic condition in the urban areas and the coordinates of sites of house information with breeding habitats positive in the grid sectors was collected using GPS, and the mean value of positive habitats was analyzed by quintiles method for mapping. The four blocks were selected for Aedes mosquito survey where the mosquito problem was identified as comparatively high, four numbers of wards were selected from each block, and the 40 number of houses was selected with 100 meter interval distance for mosquito breeding survey in the domestic and peripheral domestic areas in each wards. The problematic areas were identified, highlighted and recommended for web mapping GIS for Aedes mosquito surveillance continuously for monitoring the mosquito control

  6. MosquitoMap and the Mal-area calculator: new web tools to relate mosquito species distribution with vector borne disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christensen Jamie

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mosquitoes are important vectors of diseases but, in spite of various mosquito faunistic surveys globally, there is a need for a spatial online database of mosquito collection data and distribution summaries. Such a resource could provide entomologists with the results of previous mosquito surveys, and vector disease control workers, preventative medicine practitioners, and health planners with information relating mosquito distribution to vector-borne disease risk. Results A web application called MosquitoMap was constructed comprising mosquito collection point data stored in an ArcGIS 9.3 Server/SQL geodatabase that includes administrative area and vector species x country lookup tables. In addition to the layer containing mosquito collection points, other map layers were made available including environmental, and vector and pathogen/disease distribution layers. An application within MosquitoMap called the Mal-area calculator (MAC was constructed to quantify the area of overlap, for any area of interest, of vector, human, and disease distribution models. Data standards for mosquito records were developed for MosquitoMap. Conclusion MosquitoMap is a public domain web resource that maps and compares georeferenced mosquito collection points to other spatial information, in a geographical information system setting. The MAC quantifies the Mal-area, i.e. the area where it is theoretically possible for vector-borne disease transmission to occur, thus providing a useful decision tool where other disease information is limited. The Mal-area approach emphasizes the independent but cumulative contribution to disease risk of the vector species predicted present. MosquitoMap adds value to, and makes accessible, the results of past collecting efforts, as well as providing a template for other arthropod spatial databases.

  7. Hyperspectral Imaging and Support Vector Machine: A Powerful Combination to Differentiate Black Cohosh (Actaea racemosa) from Other Cohosh Species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tankeu, Sidonie; Vermaak, Ilze; Chen, Weiyang; Sandasi, Maxleene; Kamatou, Guy; Viljoen, Alvaro

    2017-10-06

    Actaea racemosa (black cohosh) has a history of traditional use in the treatment of general gynecological problems. However, the plant is known to be vulnerable to adulteration with other cohosh species. This study evaluated the use of shortwave infrared hyperspectral imaging (SWIR-HSI) in tandem with chemometric data analysis as a fast alternative method for the discrimination of four cohosh species (Actaea racemosa, Actaea podocarpa, Actaea pachypoda, Actaea cimicifuga) and 36 commercial products labelled as black cohosh. The raw material and commercial products were analyzed using SWIR-HSI and ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (UHPLC-MS) followed by chemometric modeling. From SWIR-HSI data (920 - 2514 nm), the range containing the discriminating information of the four species was identified as 1204 - 1480 nm using Matlab software. After reduction of the data set range, partial least squares discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) and support vector machine discriminant analysis (SVM-DA) models with coefficients of determination (R2 ) of ≥ 0.8 were created. The novel SVM-DA model showed better predictions and was used to predict the commercial product content. Seven out of 36 commercial products were recognized by the SVM-DA model as being true black cohosh while 29 products indicated adulteration. Analysis of the UHPLC-MS data demonstrated that six commercial products could be authentic black cohosh. This was confirmed using the fragmentation patterns of three black cohosh markers (cimiracemoside C; 12-β,21-dihydroxycimigenol-3-O-L-arabinoside; and 24-O-acetylhydroshengmanol-3-O-β-D-xylopyranoside). SWIR-HSI in conjunction with chemometric tools (SVM-DA) could identify 80% adulteration of commercial products labelled as black cohosh. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  8. Effects of tree species composition on within-forest distribution of understorey species

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oijen, van D.; Feijen, M.; Hommel, P.W.F.M.; Ouden, den J.; Waal, de R.W.

    2005-01-01

    Question: Do tree species, with different litter qualities, affect the within-forest distribution of forest understorey species on intermediate to base-rich soils? Since habitat loss and fragmentation have caused ancient forest species to decline, those species are the main focus of this study.

  9. Macronutrient composition of three cucurbit species cultivated for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    .) Matsum. & Nakai., Cucumeropsis mannii Naudin, and Cucumis melo var. agrestis L.] largely cultivated in Côte d'Ivoire and consumed as sauce thickeners were analyzed for their proximate composition and compared to a local landrace of ...

  10. Species composition, relative abundance and habitat association of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Point count technique and chi-square test were employed to see the association of birds with the different vegetation strata. A total of 101 bird species were recorded, out of which 91 were residents (three endemics) and 10 were Palaearctic migrants. The Zegie Peninsula had high species diversity and evenness (0.96 and ...

  11. Effect of Cropping Practices on Weed Species Composition in a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    It was shown that although the groundnut crop had more than a dozen week species, the most dominant species were Commelina benghalensis, Rhynchelytrum repens, Eleucine Indica, Bidens pilosa, Acanthospermum hispidus. Although the effect of the hoe-weeding regimes on the subsequent weed flore were subtle, it is ...

  12. Anuran Species Composition of an Impacted Seasonal Lake in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    There is a possibility that the low species diversity recorded could be due to the impact of human activities around the Lake. The need to minimize human activities around water bodies is highly recommended to reduce species loss and ultimately, amphibian decline. Keywords: anuran diversity, impacted seasonal Lake, ...

  13. Culicoides (Avaritia) gornostaevae Mirzaeva, 1984 (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae)--a possible vector species of the Obsoletus group new to the European fauna.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkeby, Carsten; Dominiak, Patrycja

    2014-09-30

    Culicoides gornostaevae Mirzaeva, 1984, known previously only from Siberia, is a boreal species included into the Obsoletus group of Culicoides sg. Avaritia. Members of the subgenus can act as vectors of various diseases. In Europe they are involved in the transmission of the Schmallenberg virus and bluetongue virus. Culicoides gornostaevae Mirzaeva, 1984 is reported for the first time in Europe with new country records from Norway, Poland and Sweden. Culicoides gornostaevae Mirzaeva, 1984 has not been previously mentioned from Europe, even though there has been an extensive monitoring of Culicoides species during the last decades. Most probably this species has been notoriously overlooked in the materials, because of the problems with identification of the females of the subgenus Avaritia. Similar to other species of the Obsoletus group, C. gornostaevae should be regarded as a possible vector for Schmallenberg and bluetongue virus.

  14. Effect of blue and violet light on polymerization shrinkage vectors of a CQ/TPO-containing composite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampaio, Camila S; Atria, Pablo J; Rueggeberg, Frederick A; Yamaguchi, Satoshi; Giannini, Marcelo; Coelho, Paulo G; Hirata, Ronaldo; Puppin-Rontani, Regina M

    2017-07-01

    To evaluate the effect of light-curing wavelengths on composite filler particle displacement, and thus to visualize localized polymerization shrinkage in a resin-based composite (RBC) containing camphorquinone (CQ) and Lucirin TPO (TPO). Three light-curing units (LCUs) were used to light-cure a RBC containing CQ and TPO: a violet-only, a blue-only, and a dual-wavelength, conventional (Polywave ® , emitting violet and blue wavelengths simultaneously). Zirconia fillers were added to the RBC to act as filler particle displacement tracers. LCUs were characterized for total emitted power (mW) and spectral irradiant output (mW/cm 2 /nm). 2-mm high, 7-mm diameter silanized glass cylindrical specimens were filled in a single increment with the RBC, and micro-computed tomography (μ-CT) scans were obtained before and after light-curing, according to each LCU (n=6). Filler particle movement identified polymerization shrinkage vectors, traced using software, at five depths (from 0 up to 2mm): top, top-middle, middle, middle-bottom and bottom. Considering different RBC depths within the same LCU, use of violet-only and conventional LCUs showed filler particle movement decreased with increased depth. Blue-only LCU showed homogeneous filler particle movement along the depths. Considering the effect of different LCUs within the same depth, filler particle movement within LCUs was not statistically different until the middle of the samples (P>.05). However, at the middle-bottom and bottom depths (1.5 and 2mm, respectively), blue-only LCU compared to violet-only LCU showed higher magnitude of displacement vector values (P.05). With respect to the direction of particle movement vectors, use of violet-only LCU showed a greater displacement when close to the incident violet LED; blue-only LCU showed equally distributed particle displacement values within entire depth among the samples; and the conventional LCU showed greater filler displacement closer to the blue LED locations

  15. Long-term changes of tree species composition and distribution in Korean mountain forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Boknam; Lee, Hoontaek; Cho, Sunhee; Yoon, Jongguk; Park, Jongyoung; Kim, Hyun Seok

    2017-04-01

    Long-term changes in the abundance and distribution of tree species in the temperate forests of South Korea remain poorly understood. We investigated how tree species composition and stand distribution change across temperate mountainous forests using the species composition and DBH size collected over the past 15 years (1998-2012) across 130 permanent forest plots of 0.1 ha in Jiri and Baegun mountains in South Korea. The overall net change of tree communities over the years showed positive in terms of stand density, richness, diversity, and evenness. At the species level, the change of relative species composition has been led by intermediate and shade-tolerant species, such as Quercus mongolica, Carpinus laxiflora, Quercus serrate, Quercus variabilis, Styrax japonicus, Lindera erythrocarpa, and Pinus densiflora and was categorized into five species communities, representing gradual increase or decrease, establishment, extinction, fluctuation of species population. At the community level, the change in species composition appeared to have consistent and directional patterns of increase in the annual rate of change in the mean species traits including species density, pole growth rate, adult growth rate, and adult stature. Based on the additive models, the distribution of species diversity was significantly related to topographical variables including elevation, latitude, longitude, slope, topographic wetness index, and curvature where elevation was the most significant driver, followed by latitude and longitude. However, the change in distribution of species diversity was only significantly influenced by latitude and longitude. This is the first study to reveal the long-term dynamics of change in tree species composition and distribution, which are important to broaden our understanding of temperate mountainous forest ecosystem in South Korea.

  16. Identity rather than richness drives local neighbourhood species composition effects on oak sapling growth in a young forest

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dillen, Mathias; Kris, Verheyen; Smit, Christian

    2016-01-01

    In light of global biodiversity loss, the influence of species composition on ecosystem functioning has attracted increasing attention. However, questions remain whether neighbourhood species richness or identity is more important and what mechanisms drive these composition effects. We investigated

  17. Nutritional composition of five food trees species products used in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The proximate compositions, minerals and amino acids contents of Detarium microcarpum, Gardenia erubescens, Parkia biglobosa, Adansonia digitata pulp, seeds of Boscia senegalensis and leaves of A. digitata were studied and quantified in Burkina Faso. Using the conventional procedures described by the Association ...

  18. Seasonal species composition of invertebrates in several Oregon streams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pamela E. Porter; William R. Meehan

    1987-01-01

    The invertebrate communities ofeight Oregon streams were sampled seasonally from 1974 to 1976. Benthic, drift, and two types of aerial-trap samples were collected. Occurrence and percentage composition are summarized by sample type, season, and geographic area (coastal, Cascade, central, and eastern Oregon). Within 276 families, 426 taxa were identified; the 20...

  19. Essential Oil Composition of Two Grammosciadium DC Species, G ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Turk J Bot 2012; 36: 637-643. 7. Buchbauer G. The detailed analysis of essential oils leads to the understanding of their properties. Perfumer. & Flavourist 2000; 25: 64-67. 8. Tzakou O, Pitarokili D, Chinou IB, Harvala C. Composition and antimicrobial activity of the essential oil of Salvia ringens. Planta Med 2001; 67: 81-83.

  20. Mineral Composition Of Selected Tree Species Used For Chewing ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The mineral analysis revealed that the percentage composition of Sodium ion, Potassium ion, Calcium ion, and Zinc ion, in Massularia accumiinata (Pako-Ijebu) is higher than the others. Hence, it is most commonly used in the society. It was also found that chewing sticks contain little or no amount of lead, which is a heavy ...

  1. Grass species composition, yield and quality under and outside tree ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A two-year study was conducted in lightly grazed areas of Matopos Research Station, Zimbabwe, to evaluate the impact of widely spaced trees on understorey grass composition, yield and quality. The study trees were Terminalia sericea and Acacia karroo. Ordination techniques using grass density and biomass as indices ...

  2. Seasonal and species variation in chemical composition of five ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ABUBAKER

    Association of Official Analytical Chemists,. International ®. AOAC International, Gaithersburg, Maryland. Batista, A.M.V., Mustafa, A.F., Santos, G.R.A., de Carvalho, F.F.R., Dubeux Jr, J.C.B., Lira, M.A. &. Barbosa, S.B.P., 2003. Chemical composition and ruminal dry matter and crude protein degradability of spineless cactus.

  3. Nutrient limitation and nutrient-driven shifts in plant species composition in a species-rich fen meadow

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoek, van der D.; Mierlo, van A.J.E.M.; Groenendael, van J.M.

    2004-01-01

    Question: We studied the development and persistence of the effects of nutrient pulses on biomass production and species composition in a fen meadow. Location: Nature reserve, central Netherlands, 5 m a.s.l. Methods: Single pulse fertilization with N and P in a factorial design on an undrained

  4. Modeling and Predicting the Electrical Conductivity of Composite Cathode for Solid Oxide Fuel Cell by Using Support Vector Regression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, J. L.; Cai, C. Z.; Xiao, T. T.; Huang, S. J.

    2012-07-01

    The electrical conductivity of solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) cathode is one of the most important indices affecting the efficiency of SOFC. In order to improve the performance of fuel cell system, it is advantageous to have accurate model with which one can predict the electrical conductivity. In this paper, a model utilizing support vector regression (SVR) approach combined with particle swarm optimization (PSO) algorithm for its parameter optimization was established to modeling and predicting the electrical conductivity of Ba0.5Sr0.5Co0.8Fe0.2 O3-δ-xSm0.5Sr0.5CoO3-δ (BSCF-xSSC) composite cathode under two influence factors, including operating temperature (T) and SSC content (x) in BSCF-xSSC composite cathode. The leave-one-out cross validation (LOOCV) test result by SVR strongly supports that the generalization ability of SVR model is high enough. The absolute percentage error (APE) of 27 samples does not exceed 0.05%. The mean absolute percentage error (MAPE) of all 30 samples is only 0.09% and the correlation coefficient (R2) as high as 0.999. This investigation suggests that the hybrid PSO-SVR approach may be not only a promising and practical methodology to simulate the properties of fuel cell system, but also a powerful tool to be used for optimal designing or controlling the operating process of a SOFC system.

  5. Polytopic Vector Analysis (PVA) modelling of whole-rock and apatite chemistry from the Karkonosze composite pluton (Poland, Czech Republic)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisowiec, Katarzyna; Słaby, Ewa; Förster, Hans-Jürgen

    2015-08-01

    This study presents a novel approach for analysing the magma evolution path in composite plutons, applying the so-termed Polytopic Vector Analysis (PVA) to whole-rock and apatite chemistry. As an example of a multiphase magmatic body the Karkonosze granitoid pluton was chosen, which formed by a combination of magma mixing and fractional crystallization of two distinct melts - granitic crust-derived and lamprophyric mantle-derived. The goal was to model end-member magma compositions recorded by apatite and to estimate to what extent these end-members interacted with each other. Although using single minerals as proxies to magma compositions is tricky, the studied apatite well reflects the compositional trends within the magma (e.g., decreasing LREE/Y ratios, varying halogen content, increasing Mn and Na concentrations). The results of PVA simulations for whole-rock geochemistry demonstrate a model similar to that constrained from previous studies. Apart from the main trend of mixing between a felsic ( 80 wt.% SiO2) and a mafic ( 53 wt.% SiO2) end-member (EM), an additional process has been recognized, representing most probably the continuous evolution of the mafic end-member, responsible for the compositional diversity of some rocks. One felsic (REE-poor, Mn-F-rich) and one mafic (Cl-Sr-Si-REE-rich) apatite end-members were recognized, whereas the third one represents most probably a fluid component (enriched in Si, Y, Ce and Nd), present at all magmatic stages, however, most prominent during the late stage. The widest range of EM proportions and the highest contribution of the mafic EM are displayed by apatites from the early stage. During the middle and late stages, the apatites present a narrow range of EM proportions, with almost all apatites bearing a felsic signature. This pattern reflects the progressive homogenization of the system. Although the PVA method applied to mineral chemistry poses some limitations, it may provide a more detailed image of the

  6. Seasonal variations in biomass and species composition of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A total of 37 (i.e., 10 Chlorophyta, 12 Phaeophyta and 15 Rhodophyta) seaweed species were collected. Studies were conducted for quantifying the seaweeds during four seasons from October 2008 until July 2009. During present research, Ulva intestinalis and Cladophora nitellopsis of green, Polycladia myrica, ...

  7. Assessment of Soil Seedbank Composition of Woody Species in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Bheema

    6. REFERENCE. Abdella Gure. 2004. Seed-borne fungi of the afromontane tree species Podocarpus falcatus and Prunus africana in Ethiopia. Doctoral thesis, Swedish University of Agricultural. Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden (unpubl.). Abella, S.R & Springer, J.D. 2011. Soil seed banks in a mature coniferous forest landscape:.

  8. Research Note Herbaceous plant species richness and composition ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Grazing veld condition was established using the spike-point sampling technique and the benchmark method for data analysis. The relationship between the herbaceous plant species richness and the veld condition scores was determined using the linear and curvilinear correlation analysis. Veld condition scores for the 12 ...

  9. Species composition and distribution of zooplankton in the lower ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Taxa richness was highest in the lower reach station 6 with a value of 6.79. A general trend of increase in species diversity and richness from upstream to downstream was observed. Inter-and intra-specific relationship revealed highly significant positive correlation (p < 0.01) between Cnidarians and Copepods (r = 0.896), ...

  10. Fish species composition and distribution in an urban perturbed ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The abundance and distribution of fish species in River Orogodo were studied. Sampling was conducted in three stations of the river, from January 2006 to December 2007. The river was demarcated in accordance with local hydrographic conditions as well as intensity of anthropogenic activities along the stretch.

  11. Diel variations in the fish species composition of river Orogodo ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An investigation to assess the diel distribution of fish species in River Orogodo was carried out between January 2006 and December 2007. Fish sampling was conducted monthly for the 24 months based on day and night sampling effort in three different stations of the river. A total of 5,153 (55.83%) and 4,076 (44.17%) ...

  12. Composition and distribution of economic tree species in Nagi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The inventory of economic trees in Nagi Natural Forest Reserve, Benue state was carried out to determine the status and dominance tree species. A total area of 0.4ha was sampled representing twenty percent of the reserve. Ten (10) sample plots of equal size (20 m x 20m) were randomly selected using simple random ...

  13. Nutrient composition of four species of winged termites consumed in western Kenya

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kinyuru, J N; Konyole, S O; Roos, Nanna

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to gain knowledge on the nutrient composition of Macrotermes subhylanus, Pseudacanthotermes militaris, Macrotermes bellicosus and P. spiniger termite species, which are consumed in western Kenya. Proximate, iron, zinc, calcium and fatty acid composition were analyz...... deficiencies as well as poor supply of dietary polyunsaturated fatty acid sources....

  14. Phytoplankton species composition of four ecological provinces in Yellow Sea, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaoqian; Feng, Yuanyuan; Leng, Xiaoyun; Liu, Haijiao; Sun, Jun

    2017-12-01

    The ecological province based on phytoplankton species composition is important to understanding the interplay between environmental parameters and phytoplankton species composition. The aim of this study was to establish phytoplankton species composition ecological pattern thus elucidate the relationship between environmental factors and the phytoplankton species composition in the ecological provinces. Phytoplankton samples were collected from 31 stations in Yellow Sea (121.00°-125.00°E, 32.00°-39.22°N) in November 2014. The samples were enumerated and identified with the Utermöhl method under an optical inverted microscope-AE2000 with magnifications of 200 × or 400 ×. In the present study, a total of 141 taxa belonging to 60 genera of 4 phyla of phytoplankton were identified, among them 101 species of 45 genera were Bacillariophyta, 36 species of 11 genera were Dinophyta, 3 species of 3 genera were Chrysophyta and 1 species of 1 genera was Chlorophyta. The study area was divided into 4 ecological provinces according to an unsupervised cluster algorithm applied to the phytoplankton biomass. A T-S (Temperature-Salinity) scatter diagram depicted with data of water temperature and salinity defined by environmental provinces matched well with the ecological provinces. The results of Canonical Correspondence Analysis (CCA) indicated that the phytoplankton species composition was mainly correlated with temperature, salinity and silicate concentration in the studied area. A method of establishing ecological provinces is useful to further understanding the environmental effects on the marine phytoplankton species composition and the consequent marine biogeochemistry.

  15. Dinucleotide Composition in Animal RNA Viruses Is Shaped More by Virus Family than by Host Species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Giallonardo, Francesca; Schlub, Timothy E; Shi, Mang; Holmes, Edward C

    2017-04-15

    Viruses use the cellular machinery of their hosts for replication. It has therefore been proposed that the nucleotide and dinucleotide compositions of viruses should match those of their host species. If this is upheld, it may then be possible to use dinucleotide composition to predict the true host species of viruses sampled in metagenomic surveys. However, it is also clear that different taxonomic groups of viruses tend to have distinctive patterns of dinucleotide composition that may be independent of host species. To determine the relative strength of the effect of host versus virus family in shaping dinucleotide composition, we performed a comparative analysis of 20 RNA virus families from 15 host groupings, spanning two animal phyla and more than 900 virus species. In particular, we determined the odds ratios for the 16 possible dinucleotides and performed a discriminant analysis to evaluate the capability of virus dinucleotide composition to predict the correct virus family or host taxon from which it was isolated. Notably, while 81% of the data analyzed here were predicted to the correct virus family, only 62% of these data were predicted to their correct subphylum/class host and a mere 32% to their correct mammalian order. Similarly, dinucleotide composition has a weak predictive power for different hosts within individual virus families. We therefore conclude that dinucleotide composition is generally uniform within a virus family but less well reflects that of its host species. This has obvious implications for attempts to accurately predict host species from virus genome sequences alone. IMPORTANCE Determining the processes that shape virus genomes is central to understanding virus evolution and emergence. One question of particular importance is why nucleotide and dinucleotide frequencies differ so markedly between viruses. In particular, it is currently unclear whether host species or virus family has the biggest impact on dinucleotide frequencies and

  16. SPECIES COMPOSITION OF THE FISH SPECIES IN KEMER RESERVOIR AND AKCAY STREAM, AYDIN, TURKEY

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    Gulnaz ÖZCAN

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The study was carried out in Kemer Reservoir and Akcay Stream between December 2004 and June 2006. Fish samples were caught by using gill nets, cast nets and electrofishing. Fifteen species belonging to 6 families were caught during the study. Four species, Acanthobrama mirabilis (47.0, Lepomis gibbosus (18.8, Chondrostoma meandrense (12.8 and Barbus pectoralis (8.6 are dominant fish species in the reservoir.

  17. Sponge species composition, abundance, and cover in marine lakes and coastal mangroves in Berau, Indonesia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Becking, L.E.; Cleary, D.F.R.; Voogd, de N.J.

    2013-01-01

    We compared the species composition, abundance, and cover of sponges in 2 marine lakes (Kakaban Lake and Haji Buang Lake) and adjacent coastal mangroves on the islands of Kakaban and Maratua in the Berau region of Indonesia. We recorded a total of 115 sponge species, 33 of which were restricted to

  18. Species composition of understory vegetation in coal mined land in Central Bengkulu, Indonesia

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    WIRYONO

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Wiryono, Siahaan AB. 2013. Species composition of understory vegetation in coal mined land in Central Bengkulu, Indonesia. Biodiversitas 14: 31-36. Coal stripmining in forest area has destroyed forest ecosystem and created barren land. Reclamation of mined land is done by revegetating the land. In addition to planted species, pioneer species usually grow naturally in mined land. The objectives of this study were to know the species composition of understory vegetation growing naturally in coal mined land planted with Gmelina arborea in Central Bengkulu, Indonesia, and to compare that composition with that of unreclaimed coal mined land and of natural forests. Data were collected by sampling understory vegetation in study site. Each plant was identified, harvested and oven-dried to find the biomass. Results showed that the reclaimed mined land had 16 understory species from 6 families, and the abandoned mined land had 10 species from 3 families, lower than that of natural forests, which were 92 and 112. The three most important species were Scleria sumatrensis Retz, Eragrostis chariis (Schult. Hitchc and Paspalum conjugatum Berg. The species composition of understory vegetation in reclaimed mined land had high similarity with that of abandoned mined land but was totally different from that of natural forests.

  19. Species composition, diversity and structure of novel forests of Castilla elastica in Puerto Rico

    Science.gov (United States)

    J. Fonseca da Silva; NO-VALUE

    2014-01-01

    Attributes of novel forests (secondary forests containing introduced species) were compared with those of native secondary forests of similar age. The study area was the biological reserve called El Tallonal, in Puerto Rico. Species composition, tree density, basal area and soil bulk density were characterized; Importance value index (IVI), Shannon’s diversity index (H...

  20. Species of the subfamily Triatominae Jeannel, 1919 (Hemiptera: Reduviidae present in the Collection of Chagas Disease Vectors (FIOCRUZ-COLVEC, State of Minas Gerais

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    Rita de Cássia Moreira de Souza

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Biological collections are depositories of information on different species and contribute to the knowledge, protection, conservation and maintenance of biodiversity. Methods A list of triatomine species currently included in the Collection of Chagas Disease Vectors (FIOCRUZ-COLVEC was prepared from the database made available by the Reference Center on Environmental Information. Results COLVEC curatorship houses 4,778 specimens of triatomines, of which 811 come from other American countries (Argentina, Bolivia, Colombia, Costa Rica, the United States of America, Guatemala, Mexico, Peru, Uruguay and Venezuela and 3,967 are autochthonous from Brazil. Altogether, 56 species of Chagas disease vectors are represented in the COLVEC: two species of the Tribe Cavernicolini Usinger, 1944; fifteen species of the tribe Rhodniini Pinto, 1926, of which 12 are of the genus Rhodnius and 3 are of the genus Psamolestes; and 39 species of the tribe Triatomini Jeannel, 1919, represented by the genus Dipetalogaster, two species of the genus Eratyrus, two of the genus Meccus, seven of the genus Panstrongylus and 27 of the genus Triatoma. Conclusions This list provides important data on the diversity of triatomines currently included in COLVEC, including the expanded area of Panstrongylus lutzi occurrence in the municipalities Pirapora and Januária, State of Minas Gerais. The maintenance and expansion of the collection ensures the preservation of biodiversity and further studies.

  1. Species composition of a soil invertebrate multi-species test system determines the level of ecotoxicity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sechi, Valentina; D'Annibale, Alessandra; Maraldo, Kristine

    2014-01-01

    of earthworm food. After 8 weeks, the EC50 was 0.76 mg kg−1 for enchytraeids and ranged between 2.7 and 18.9 mg kg−1 for collembolans, more sensitive than previously observed with single species. Changes observed in the community structure and function illustrates the strength of a multi-species test system...

  2. Long-Term Changes in Species Composition and Relative Abundances of Sharks at a Provisioning Site

    OpenAIRE

    Brunnschweiler, Juerg M; Abrantes, Kátya G.; Barnett, Adam

    2014-01-01

    Diving with sharks, often in combination with food baiting/provisioning, has become an important product of today’s recreational dive industry. Whereas the effects baiting/provisioning has on the behaviour and abundance of individual shark species are starting to become known, there is an almost complete lack of equivalent data from multi-species shark diving sites. In this study, changes in species composition and relative abundances were determined at the Shark Reef Marine Reserve, a multi-...

  3. Influences of forest structure, climate and species composition on tree mortality across the eastern US.

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    Emily R Lines

    Full Text Available Few studies have quantified regional variation in tree mortality, or explored whether species compositional changes or within-species variation are responsible for regional patterns, despite the fact that mortality has direct effects on the dynamics of woody biomass, species composition, stand structure, wood production and forest response to climate change. Using bayesian analysis of over 430,000 tree records from a large eastern US forest database we characterised tree mortality as a function of climate, soils, species and size (stem diameter. We found (1 mortality is U-shaped vs. stem diameter for all 21 species examined; (2 mortality is hump-shaped vs. plot basal area for most species; (3 geographical variation in mortality is substantial, and correlated with several environmental factors; and (4 individual species vary substantially from the combined average in the nature and magnitude of their mortality responses to environmental variation. Regional variation in mortality is therefore the product of variation in species composition combined with highly varied mortality-environment correlations within species. The results imply that variation in mortality is a crucial part of variation in the forest carbon cycle, such that including this variation in models of the global carbon cycle could significantly narrow uncertainty in climate change predictions.

  4. Wood chemical composition in species of Cactaceae: the relationship between lignification and stem morphology.

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    Jorge Reyes-Rivera

    Full Text Available In Cactaceae, wood anatomy is related to stem morphology in terms of the conferred support. In species of cacti with dimorphic wood, a unique process occurs in which the cambium stops producing wide-band tracheids (WBTs and produces fibers; this is associated with the aging of individuals and increases in size. Stem support and lignification have only been studied in fibrous tree-like species, and studies in species with WBTs or dimorphic wood are lacking. In this study, we approach this process with a chemical focus, emphasizing the role of wood lignification. We hypothesized that the degree of wood lignification in Cactaceae increases with height of the species and that its chemical composition varies with wood anatomy. To test this, we studied the chemical composition (cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin content in 13 species (2 WBTs wood, 3 dimorphic, and 8 fibrous with contrasting growth forms. We also analyzed lignification in dimorphic and fibrous species to determine the chemical features of WBTs and fibers and their relationship with stem support. The lignin contents were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and high performance liquid chromatography. We found that 11 species have a higher percentage (>35% of lignin in their wood than other angiosperms or gymnosperms. The lignin chemical composition in fibrous species is similar to that of other dicots, but it is markedly heterogeneous in non-fibrous species where WBTs are abundant. The lignification in WBTs is associated with the resistance to high water pressure within cells rather than the contribution to mechanical support. Dimorphic wood species are usually richer in syringyl lignin, and tree-like species with lignified rays have more guaiacyl lignin. The results suggest that wood anatomy and lignin distribution play an important role in the chemical composition of wood, and further research is needed at the cellular level.

  5. Species effects on ecosystem processes are modified by faunal responses to habitat composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulling, Mark T; Solan, Martin; Dyson, Kirstie E; Hernandez-Milian, Gema; Luque, Patricia; Pierce, Graham J; Raffaelli, Dave; Paterson, David M; White, Piran C L

    2008-12-01

    Heterogeneity is a well-recognized feature of natural environments, and the spatial distribution and movement of individual species is primarily driven by resource requirements. In laboratory experiments designed to explore how different species drive ecosystem processes, such as nutrient release, habitat heterogeneity is often seen as something which must be rigorously controlled for. Most small experimental systems are therefore spatially homogeneous, and the link between environmental heterogeneity and its effects on the redistribution of individuals and species, and on ecosystem processes, has not been fully explored. In this paper, we used a mesocosm system to investigate the relationship between habitat composition, species movement and sediment nutrient release for each of four functionally contrasting species of marine benthic invertebrate macrofauna. For each species, various habitat configurations were generated by selectively enriching patches of sediment with macroalgae, a natural source of spatial variability in intertidal mudflats. We found that the direction and extent of faunal movement between patches differs with species identity, density and habitat composition. Combinations of these factors lead to concomitant changes in nutrient release, such that habitat composition effects are modified by species identity (in the case of NH4-N) and by species density (in the case of PO4-P). It is clear that failure to accommodate natural patterns of spatial heterogeneity in such studies may result in an incomplete understanding of system behaviour. This will be particularly important for future experiments designed to explore the effects of species richness on ecosystem processes, where the complex interactions reported here for single species may be compounded when species are brought together in multi-species combinations.

  6. DNA barcoding of shark meats identify species composition and CITES-listed species from the markets in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shang-Yin Vanson; Chan, Chia-Ling Carynn; Lin, Oceana; Hu, Chieh-Shen; Chen, Chaolun Allen

    2013-01-01

    An increasing awareness of the vulnerability of sharks to exploitation by shark finning has contributed to a growing concern about an unsustainable shark fishery. Taiwan's fleet has the 4th largest shark catch in the world, accounting for almost 6% of the global figures. Revealing the diversity of sharks consumed by Taiwanese is important in designing conservation plans. However, fins make up less than 5% of the total body weight of a shark, and their bodies are sold as filets in the market, making it difficult or impossible to identify species using morphological traits. In the present study, we adopted a DNA barcoding technique using a 391-bp fragment of the mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase I (COI) gene to examine the diversity of shark filets and fins collected from markets and restaurants island-wide in Taiwan. Amongst the 548 tissue samples collected and sequenced, 20 major clusters were apparent by phylogenetic analyses, each of them containing individuals belonging to the same species (most with more than 95% bootstrap values), corresponding to 20 species of sharks. Additionally, Alopias pelagicus, Carcharhinus falciformis, Isurus oxyrinchus, and Prionace glauca consisted of 80% of the samples we collected, indicating that these species might be heavily consumed in Taiwan. Approximately 5% of the tissue samples used in this study were identified as species listed in CITES Appendix II, including two species of Sphyrna, C. longimanus and Carcharodon carcharias. DNA barcoding provides an alternative method for understanding shark species composition when species-specific data is unavailable. Considering the global population decline, stock assessments of Appendix II species and highly consumed species are needed to accomplish the ultimate goal of shark conservation.

  7. DNA barcoding of shark meats identify species composition and CITES-listed species from the markets in Taiwan.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shang-Yin Vanson Liu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: An increasing awareness of the vulnerability of sharks to exploitation by shark finning has contributed to a growing concern about an unsustainable shark fishery. Taiwan's fleet has the 4th largest shark catch in the world, accounting for almost 6% of the global figures. Revealing the diversity of sharks consumed by Taiwanese is important in designing conservation plans. However, fins make up less than 5% of the total body weight of a shark, and their bodies are sold as filets in the market, making it difficult or impossible to identify species using morphological traits. METHODS: In the present study, we adopted a DNA barcoding technique using a 391-bp fragment of the mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase I (COI gene to examine the diversity of shark filets and fins collected from markets and restaurants island-wide in Taiwan. RESULTS: Amongst the 548 tissue samples collected and sequenced, 20 major clusters were apparent by phylogenetic analyses, each of them containing individuals belonging to the same species (most with more than 95% bootstrap values, corresponding to 20 species of sharks. Additionally, Alopias pelagicus, Carcharhinus falciformis, Isurus oxyrinchus, and Prionace glauca consisted of 80% of the samples we collected, indicating that these species might be heavily consumed in Taiwan. Approximately 5% of the tissue samples used in this study were identified as species listed in CITES Appendix II, including two species of Sphyrna, C. longimanus and Carcharodon carcharias. CONCLUSION: DNA barcoding provides an alternative method for understanding shark species composition when species-specific data is unavailable. Considering the global population decline, stock assessments of Appendix II species and highly consumed species are needed to accomplish the ultimate goal of shark conservation.

  8. Remnant trees affect species composition but not structure of tropical second-growth forest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandor, Manette E; Chazdon, Robin L

    2014-01-01

    Remnant trees, spared from cutting when tropical forests are cleared for agriculture or grazing, act as nuclei of forest regeneration following field abandonment. Previous studies on remnant trees were primarily conducted in active pasture or old fields abandoned in the previous 2-3 years, and focused on structure and species richness of regenerating forest, but not species composition. Our study is among the first to investigate the effects of remnant trees on neighborhood forest structure, biodiversity, and species composition 20 years post-abandonment. We compared the woody vegetation around individual remnant trees to nearby plots without remnant trees in the same second-growth forests ("control plots"). Forest structure beneath remnant trees did not differ significantly from control plots. Species richness and species diversity were significantly higher around remnant trees. The species composition around remnant trees differed significantly from control plots and more closely resembled the species composition of nearby old-growth forest. The proportion of old-growth specialists and generalists around remnant trees was significantly greater than in control plots. Although previous studies show that remnant trees may initially accelerate secondary forest growth, we found no evidence that they locally affect stem density, basal area, and seedling density at later stages of regrowth. Remnant trees do, however, have a clear effect on the species diversity, composition, and ecological groups of the surrounding woody vegetation, even after 20 years of forest regeneration. To accelerate the return of diversity and old-growth forest species into regrowing forest on abandoned land, landowners should be encouraged to retain remnant trees in agricultural or pastoral fields.

  9. Effects of Previous Land-Use on Plant Species Composition and Diversity in Mediterranean Forests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouba, Yacine; Martínez-García, Felipe; de Frutos, Ángel; Alados, Concepción L

    2015-01-01

    At some point in their history, most forests in the Mediterranean Basin have been subjected to intensive management or converted to agriculture land. Knowing how forest plant communities recovered after the abandonment of forest-management or agricultural practices (including livestock grazing) provides a basis for investigating how previous land management have affected plant species diversity and composition in forest ecosystems. Our study investigated the consequences of historical "land management" practices on present-day Mediterranean forests by comparing species assemblages and the diversity of (i) all plant species and (ii) each ecological group defined by species' habitat preferences and successional status (i.e., early-, mid-, and late-successional species). We compared forest stands that differed both in land-use history and in successional stage. In addition, we evaluated the value of those stands for biodiversity conservation. The study revealed significant compositional differentiation among stands that was due to among-stand variations in the diversity (namely, species richness and evenness) of early-, intermediate-, and late-successional species. Historical land management has led to an increase in compositional divergences among forest stands and the loss of late-successional forest species.

  10. Tree Species Composition and Regeneration Status of Shitalpur Forest Beat under Chittagong North Forest Division, Bangladesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asadozzaman Nur

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Biodiversity erosion particularly in developing countries is a matter of great concern to the global ecological community. Species composition and regeneration indicate the health of forest. This study explored tree species composition and regeneration of natural hill forest of Shitalpur under Chittagong North Forest Division through 27 sample plots of 20 m × 20 m for trees and 2 m × 2 m for regeneration. A total of 47 tree species belonging to 29 families and 17 regenerating species belonging to 15 families were recorded. The tree stem density, basal area, and wood volume were 0.49 m2/ha, 1425 stem/ha, and 189.9 m3/ha, respectively. Mean regeneration was significantly higher in bottom hill (14374 seedlings/ha compared to top hill (9671 seedlings/ha. Toona ciliata was highest (4444 seedlings/ha at the bottom hill compared to other hill positions. The result shows that only 36% of the tree species (17 out of 47 are regenerating in the study area, meaning majority of the tree species (64% are not getting favorable conditions to regenerate. This might be due to absence of mature tree species as a result of overexploitation by local people. The findings may help in monitoring the species composition changes over time and adopting specific conservation programs for Shitalpur Forest.

  11. Species composition and bathymetric distribution of gorgonians (Anthozoa: Octocorallia on the Southern Mexican Pacific coast

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    Rosalinda Abeytia

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Gorgonians are important components of coastal ecosystems, as they provide niches, natural compounds with medical applications and are used as bioindicators. Species composition and assemblage structure of gorgonians (Anthozoa: Octocorallia were studied along a bathymetric profile in the Southern Mexican Pacific coast. Species composition was based on specimens collected within a depth range of 0-70m in 15 sites. The relative abundance of species was determined in six sites at four depths (5, 10, 20 and 25m using three 10m2 transects at each depth level. Twenty-seven species of gorgonians belonging to six genera and three families were registered. The species composition varied with depth: 11 species were distributed between 0-25m depth, while 17 species were found between 40-70m depth interval. The shallow zone is characterized by a relatively large abundance of gorgonians, dominated by colonies of Leptogorgia cuspidata and L. ena. In contrast, the deepest zone was characterized by relatively low abundance of gorgonians, dominated by L. alba, the only species observed in both depth intervals. The similarity analysis showed differences in the composition and abundance of species by depth and site, suggesting that the main factor in determining the assemblage structure is depth. Results of this study suggest that the highest richness of gorgonian species in the study area may be located at depths of 40-70m, whereas the highest abundances are found between 5 and 10m depth. This study represents a contribution to the poorly known eastern Pacific gorgonian biota.

  12. Species composition and bathymetric distribution of gorgonians (Anthozoa: Octocorallia) on the Southern Mexican Pacific coast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abeytia, Rosalinda; Guzmán, Hector M; Breedy, Odalisca

    2013-09-01

    Gorgonians are important components of coastal ecosystems, as they provide niches, natural compounds with medical applications and are used as bioindicators. Species composition and assemblage structure of gorgonians (Anthozoa: Octocorallia) were studied along a bathymetric profile in the Southern Mexican Pacific coast. Species composition was based on specimens collected within a depth range of 0-70 m in 15 sites. The relative abundance of species was determined in six sites at four depths (5, 10, 20 and 25 m) using three 10 m2 transects at each depth level. Twenty-seven species of gorgonians belonging to six genera and three families were registered. The species composition varied with depth: 11 species were distributed between 0-25m depth, while 17 species were found between 40-70 m depth interval. The shallow zone is characterized by a relatively large abundance of gorgonians, dominated by colonies of Leptogorgia cuspidata and L. ena. In contrast, the deepest zone was characterized by relatively low abundance of gorgonians, dominated by L. alba, the only species observed in both depth intervals. The similarity analysis showed differences in the composition and abundance of species by depth and site, suggesting that the main factor in determining the assemblage structure is depth. Results of this study suggest that the highest richness of gorgonian species in the study area may be located at depths of 40-70 m, whereas the highest abundances are found between 5 and 10 m depth. This study represents a contribution to the poorly known eastern Pacific gorgonian biota.

  13. Anthocyanins in the bracts of Curcuma species and relationship of the species based on anthocyanin composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koshioka, Masaji; Umegaki, Naoko; Boontiang, Kriangsuk; Pornchuti, Witayaporn; Thammasiri, Kanchit; Yamaguchi, Satoshi; Tatsuzawa, Fumi; Nakayama, Masayoshi; Tateishi, Akira; Kubota, Satoshi

    2015-03-01

    Five anthocyanins, delphinidin 3-O-rutinoside, cyanidin 3-O-rutinoside, petunidin 3-O-rutinoside, malvidin 3-O-glucoside and malvidin 3-O-rutinoside, were identified. Three anthocyanins, delphinidin 3-O-glucoside, cyanidin 3-O-glucoside and pelargonidin 3-O-rutinoside, were putatively identified based on C18 HPLC retention time, absorption spectrum, including λmax, and comparisons with those of corresponding standard anthocyanins, as the compounds responsible for the pink to purple-red pigmentation of the bracts of Curcuma alismatifolia and five related species. Cluster analysis based on four major anthocyanins formed two clusters. One consisted of only one species, C. alismatifolia, and the other consisted of five. Each cluster further formed sub-clusters depending on either species or habitats.

  14. Essential Oils Composition and Antioxidant Properties of Three Thymus Species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamzeh Amiri

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The essential oils of three wild-growing Thymus species, collected from west of Iran during the flowering stage, were obtained by hydrodistillation and analyzed by gas chromatography (GC and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC-MS. Under the optimum extraction and analysis conditions, 44, 38, and 38 constituents (mainly monoterpenes compounds were identified in T. kotschyanus Boiss. and Hohen, T. eriocalyx (Ronniger Jalas, and T. daenensis subsp lancifolius (Celak Jalas which represented 89.9%, 99.7%, and 95.8% of the oils, respectively. The main constituents were thymol (16.4–42.6%, carvacrol (7.6–52.3%, and γ-terpinene (3–11.4%. Antioxidant activity was employed by two complementary test systems, namely, 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH free-radical scavenging and β-carotene/linoleic acid systems. Antioxidant activity of polar subfraction of T. daenensis subsp lancifolius (Celak Jalas was found to be higher than those of the others in DPPH assay, while nonpolar subfraction of T. eriocalyx (Ronniger Jalas has most antioxidant activity in β-carotene/linoleic acid test (19.1±0.1 μg/mL and 96.1±0.8% inhibition rate, resp..

  15. Species composition and environmental adaptation of indigenous Chinese cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yahui; Gautier, Mathieu; Ding, Xiangdong; Zhang, Hao; Wang, Yachun; Wang, Xi; Faruque, Md Omar; Li, Junya; Ye, Shaohui; Gou, Xiao; Han, Jianlin; Lenstra, Johannes A; Zhang, Yi

    2017-11-23

    Indigenous Chinese cattle combine taurine and indicine origins and occupy a broad range of different environments. By 50 K SNP genotyping we found a discontinuous distribution of taurine and indicine cattle ancestries with extremes of less than 10% indicine cattle in the north and more than 90% in the far south and southwest China. Model-based clustering and f4-statistics indicate introgression of both banteng and gayal into southern Chinese cattle while the sporadic yak influence in cattle in or near Tibetan area validate earlier findings of mitochondrial DNA analysis. Geographic patterns of taurine and indicine mitochondrial and Y-chromosomal DNA diversity largely agree with the autosomal cline. The geographic distribution of the genomic admixture of different bovine species is proposed to be the combined effect of prehistoric immigrations, gene flow, major rivers acting as genetic barriers, local breeding objectives and environmental adaptation. Whole-genome scan for genetic differentiation and association analyses with both environmental and morphological covariables are remarkably consistent with previous studies and identify a number of genes implicated in adaptation, which include TNFRSF19, RFX4, SP4 and several coat color genes. We propose indigenous Chinese cattle as a unique and informative resource for gene-level studies of climate adaptation in mammals.

  16. Distribution of the species of the Anopheles gambiae complex and first evidence of Anopheles merus as a malaria vector in Madagascar

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    Le Goff Gilbert

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Members of the Anopheles gambiae complex are amongst the best malaria vectors in the world, but their vectorial capacities vary between species and populations. A large-scale sampling of An. gambiae sensu lato was carried out in various bioclimatic domains of Madagascar. Local abundance of an unexpected member of this complex raised questions regarding its role in malaria transmission. Methods Sampling took place at 38 sites and 2,067 females were collected. Species assessment was performed using a PCR targeting a sequence in the IGS of the rDNA. Analysis focused on the relative prevalence of the species per site, bioclimatic domain and altitude. Infectivity of Anopheles merus was assessed using an ELISA to detect the presence of malarial circumsporozoite protein in the head-thorax. Results Three species were identified: An. gambiae, Anopheles arabiensis and An. merus. The distribution of each species is mainly a function of bioclimatic domains and, to a lesser extent, altitude. An. arabiensis is present in all bioclimatic domains with highest prevalence in sub-humid, dry and sub-arid domains. An. gambiae has its highest prevalence in the humid domain, is in the minority in dry areas, rare in sub-humid and absent in sub-arid domains. An. merus is restricted to the coastal fringe in the south and west; it was in the majority in one southern village. The majority of sites were sympatric for at least two of the species (21/38 and two sites harboured all three species. The role of An. merus as malaria vector was confirmed in the case of two human-biting females, which were ELISA-positive for Plasmodium falciparum. Conclusion Despite the huge environmental (mainly man-made changes in Madagascar, the distribution of An. gambiae and An. arabiensis appears unchanged for the past 35 years. The distribution of An. merus is wider than was previously known, and its effectiveness as a malaria vector has been shown for the first time; this

  17. Fatty acid composition of bacteria associated with the toxic dinoflagellate Ostreopsis lenticularis and with Caribbean Palythoa species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carballeira, N M; Emiliano, A; Sostre, A; Restituyo, J A; González, I M; Colón, G M; Tosteson, C G; Tosteson, T R

    1998-06-01

    The fatty acid composition of a Pseudomonas sp. (Alteromonas) and its host, the dinoflagellate Ostreopsis lenticularis, vectors in ciguatera fish poisoning, has been studied. The major fatty acids in O. lenticularis were 16:0, 20:5n-3, and 22:6n-3, but 18:2n-6, 18:3n-3, and 18:n-3 were also identified. In contrast to other dinoflagellates, 1 8:5n-3 was not detected in O. lenticularis. Even-chain fatty acids such as 9-16:1, 11-18:1, and 13-20:1 predominated in the Pseudomonas sp. from O. lenticularis, but 1 6-20% of (E)-11-methyl-12-octadecenoic acid was also identified. The chirality of the latter was confirmed by total synthesis (28% overall yield) starting from oxacyclotridecan-2-one. The fatty acid compositions of two other Pseudomonas species, from the palytoxin-producing zoanthids Palythoa mamillosa and P. caribdea, were also studied and were similar to that of the Pseudomonas sp. from O. lenticularis. The possibility of using some of these fatty acids as chemotaxonomic lipids in identifying marine animals that consume toxic dinoflagellates or zoanthids is discussed.

  18. Species Composition at the Sub-Meter Level in Discontinuous Permafrost in Subarctic Sweden

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, S. M.; Palace, M. W.; Layne, M.; Varner, R. K.; Crill, P. M.

    2013-12-01

    Northern latitudes are experiencing rapid warming. Wetlands underlain by permafrost are particularly vulnerable to warming which results in changes in vegetative cover. Specific species have been associated with greenhouse gas emissions therefore knowledge of species compositional shift allows for the systematic change and quantification of emissions and changes in such emissions. Species composition varies on the sub-meter scale based on topography and other microsite environmental parameters. This complexity and the need to scale vegetation to the landscape level proves vital in our estimation of carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4) emissions and dynamics. Stordalen Mire (68°21'N, 18°49'E) in Abisko and is located at the edge of discontinuous permafrost zone. This provides a unique opportunity to analyze multiple vegetation communities in a close proximity. To do this, we randomly selected 25 1x1 meter plots that were representative of five major cover types: Semi-wet, wet, hummock, tall graminoid, and tall shrub. We used a quadrat with 64 sub plots and measured areal percent cover for 24 species. We collected ground based remote sensing (RS) at each plot to determine species composition using an ADC-lite (near infrared, red, green) and GoPro (red, blue, green). We normalized each image based on a Teflon white chip placed in each image. Textural analysis was conducted on each image for entropy, angular second momentum, and lacunarity. A logistic regression was developed to examine vegetation cover types and remote sensing parameters. We used a multiple linear regression using forwards stepwise variable selection. We found statistical difference in species composition and diversity indices between vegetation cover types. In addition, we were able to build regression model to significantly estimate vegetation cover type as well as percent cover for specific key vegetative species. This ground-based remote sensing allows for quick quantification of vegetation

  19. Explicitly correlated composite thermochemistry of transition metal species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bross, David H; Hill, J Grant; Werner, H-J; Peterson, Kirk A

    2013-09-07

    Atomization energies were calculated using explicitly correlated coupled cluster methods with correlation consistent basis sets for a series of 19 small molecules containing 3d transition metal atoms. The atomization energies were calculated using a modified Feller-Peterson-Dixon approach in which CCSD(T) complete basis set (CBS) limits were obtained using extrapolations of aVTZ∕aVQZ CCSD(T)-F12b correlation energies, and then a series of additive contributions for relativity, core correlation, higher order correlation, and zero-point vibrations were included. The frozen-core CBS limits calculated with F12 methods closely matched the more computational expensive conventional awCVQZ∕awCV5Z CBS extrapolations, with a mean unsigned deviation of just 0.1 kcal∕mol. In particular, the CCSD(T∗)-F12b∕aVDZ and aVTZ atomization energies were more accurate on average than the conventional CCSD(T)∕aVQZ and aV5Z results, respectively. In several cases the effects of higher order correlation beyond CCSD(T), as judged by CCSDT and CCSDT(Q)Λ calculations, were greater than 1 kcal∕mol, reaching 4.5 kcal∕mol for CrO3. For the 16 molecules of this study with experimental uncertainties of ∼3.5 kcal∕mol or less, the final composite heats of formation have a mean unsigned deviation (MUD) from experiment of just 1.3 kcal∕mol, which is slightly smaller than the average of the experimental uncertainties, 1.8 kcal∕mol. The root mean square deviation (RMS) is only slightly larger at 1.7 kcal∕mol. Without the contributions due to higher order correlation effects, the MUD and RMS rise to 2.1 and 2.8 kcal∕mol, respectively. To facilitate the F12 calculations, new (aug-)cc-pVnZ∕MP2Fit (n = Q, 5) and (aug-)cc-pwCVTZ∕MP2Fit auxiliary basis sets were also developed for the transition metal atoms.

  20. Genetic composition of resident populations influences establishment success of immigrant species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Meester, Luc; Louette, Gerald; Duvivier, Cathy; Van Damme, Celien; Michels, Erik

    2007-08-01

    We conducted an outdoor container experiment to test the hypothesis that the genetic composition of resident populations influences the establishment success of immigrant species. We manipulated the genetic compositions (source populations) of populations of the water flea Daphnia magna, a strong competitor in pond and shallow lake zooplankton communities, and monitored the establishment success of immigrant cladoceran species of a regional species pool. We show that establishment success is affected by the source population of the resident D. magna as well as by the presence/absence of macrophytes and the presence/absence of fish in the containers. Our results provide evidence that the genetic composition of resident populations can impact community assembly and metacommunity dynamics, and that community genetics can influence ecosystem functioning.

  1. Global pattern of phylogenetic species composition of shark and its conservation priority.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hungyen; Kishino, Hirohisa

    2015-10-01

    The diversity of marine communities is in striking contrast with the diversity of terrestrial communities. In all oceans, species richness is low in tropical areas and high at latitudes between 20 and 40°. While species richness is a primary metric used in conservation and management strategies, it is important to take into account the complex phylogenetic patterns of species compositions within communities. We measured the phylogenetic skew and diversity of shark communities throughout the world. We found that shark communities in tropical seas were highly phylogenetically skewed, whereas temperate sea communities had phylogenetically diversified species compositions. Interestingly, although geographically distant from one another, tropical sea communities were all highly skewed toward requiem sharks (Carcharhinidae), hammerhead sharks (Sphyrnidae), and whale sharks (Rhincodon typus). Worldwide, the greatest phylogenetic evenness in terms of clades was found in the North Sea and coastal regions of countries in temperate zones, such as the United Kingdom, Ireland, southern Australia, and Chile. This study is the first to examine patterns of phylogenetic diversity of shark communities on a global scale. Our findings suggest that when establishing conservation activities, it is important to take full account of phylogenetic patterns of species composition and not solely use species richness as a target. Protecting areas of high phylogenetic diversity in sharks, which were identified in this study, could form a broader strategy for protecting other threatened marine species.

  2. Plant species richness and composition in the arable land of Kosovo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Mehmeti

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates today’s plant species richness and composition in cultivated and recently abandoned arable land of Kosovo. Relationships between these aspects of vegetation and both environmental features and agricultural management measures are studied at the regional and plot scale. In 2006, 432 vegetation relevés with a standard plot size of 25 m² were recorded in cultivated fields. In 2007, data collection focussed on 41 plots in arable fields that had been abandoned the year before. With respect to the environment, data analysis accounts for topography, soil base-richness and moisture, and geographic location. As to the management, crops and weed control are considered. A total number of 235 species was documented. In comparison to literature dating back to about 1980, the regional weed flora considerably changed. At the plot scale, today’s weed flora of Kosovo is fairly species-poor and species composition is rather uniform between plots. According to General Regression Model analyses, Indicator Species Analyses and Detrended Correspondence Analyses, species richness and composition mainly differ between crops and weed management, with highest mean species richness in recently abandoned and lowest in herbicide-treated maize fields.

  3. Factors associated with long-term species composition in dry tropical forests of Central India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwala, M.; DeFries, R. S.; Qureshi, Q.; Jhala, Y. V.

    2016-10-01

    The long-term future of species composition in forests depends on regeneration. Many factors can affect regeneration, including human use, environmental conditions, and species’ traits. This study examines the influence of these factors in a tropical deciduous forest of Central India, which is heavily used by local, forest-dependent residents for livestock grazing, fuel-wood extraction, construction and other livelihood needs. We measure size-class proportions (the ratio of abundance of a species at a site in a higher size class to total abundance in both lower and higher size classes) for 39 tree species across 20 transects at different intensities of human use. The size-class proportions for medium to large trees and for small to medium-sized trees were negatively associated with species that are used for local construction, while size class proportions for saplings to small trees were positively associated with those species that are fire resistant and negatively associated with livestock density. Results indicate that grazing and fire prevent non-fire resistant species from reaching reproductive age, which can alter the long term composition and future availability of species that are important for local use and ecosystem services. Management efforts to reduce fire and forest grazing could reverse these impacts on long-term forest composition.

  4. Mycorrhizal Fungal Diversity and Community Composition in Two Closely Related Platanthera (Orchidaceae) Species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, Fabiana; Jacquemyn, Hans; Waud, Michael; Tyteca, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    While it is generally acknowledged that orchid species rely on mycorrhizal fungi for completion of their life cycle, little is yet known about how mycorrhizal fungal diversity and community composition vary within and between closely related orchid taxa. In this study, we used 454 amplicon pyrosequencing to investigate variation in mycorrhizal communities between pure (allopatric) and mixed (sympatric) populations of two closely related Platanthera species (Platanthera bifolia and P. chlorantha) and putative hybrids. Consistent with previous research, the two species primarily associated primarily with members of the Ceratobasidiaceae and, to a lesser extent, with members of the Sebacinales and Tulasnellaceae. In addition, a large number of ectomycorrhizal fungi belonging to various families were observed. Although a considerable number of mycorrhizal fungi were common to both species, the fungal communities were significantly different between the two species. Individuals with intermediate morphology showed communities similar to P. bifolia, confirming previous results based on the genetic architecture and fragrance composition that putative hybrids essentially belonged to one of the parental species (P. bifolia). Differences in mycorrhizal communities between species were smaller in mixed populations than between pure populations, suggesting that variation in mycorrhizal communities was largely controlled by local environmental conditions. The small differences in mycorrhizal communities in mixed populations suggests that mycorrhizal fungi are most likely not directly involved in maintaining species boundaries between the two Platanthera species. However, seed germination experiments are needed to unambiguously assess the contribution of mycorrhizal divergence to reproductive isolation.

  5. Forest Age and Plant Species Composition Determine the Soil Fungal Community Composition in a Chinese Subtropical Forest.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Ting Wu

    Full Text Available Fungal diversity and community composition are mainly related to soil and vegetation factors. However, the relative contribution of the different drivers remains largely unexplored, especially in subtropical forest ecosystems. We studied the fungal diversity and community composition of soils sampled from 12 comparative study plots representing three forest age classes (Young: 10-40 yrs; Medium: 40-80 yrs; Old: ≥80 yrs in Gutianshan National Nature Reserve in South-eastern China. Soil fungal communities were assessed employing ITS rDNA pyrotag sequencing. Members of Basidiomycota and Ascomycota dominated the fungal community, with 22 putative ectomycorrhizal fungal families, where Russulaceae and Thelephoraceae were the most abundant taxa. Analysis of similarity showed that the fungal community composition significantly differed among the three forest age classes. Forest age class, elevation of the study plots, and soil organic carbon (SOC were the most important factors shaping the fungal community composition. We found a significant correlation between plant and fungal communities at different taxonomic and functional group levels, including a strong relationship between ectomycorrhizal fungal and non-ectomycorrhizal plant communities. Our results suggest that in subtropical forests, plant species community composition is the main driver of the soil fungal diversity and community composition.

  6. DNA sequence characterisation and phylogeography of Lymnaea cousini and related species, vectors of fascioliasis in northern Andean countries, with description of L. meridensis n. sp. (Gastropoda: Lymnaeidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bargues M Dolores

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Livestock fascioliasis is a problem throughout Ecuador, Colombia and Venezuela, mainly in Andean areas where the disease also appears to affect humans. Transmission patterns and epidemiological scenarios of liver fluke infection have shown to differ according to the lymnaeid vector snail species involved. These Andean countries present the vectors Lymnaea cousini, L. bogotensis and L. ubaquensis, unknown in the rest of Latin America. An exhaustive combined haplotype study of these species is performed by means of DNA sequencing of the nuclear ribosomal 18S RNA gene, ITS-2 and ITS-1, and mitochondrial DNA cox1 gene. Results The conserved 5.8S rDNA sequence corroborated that no pseudogenes are involved in the numerous non-microsatellite/minisatellite-related indels appearing between the ITS-2 and ITS-1 sequences when comparing different L. cousini - L. bogotensis populations. Sequence analyses and phylogenetic reconstruction methods including other lymnaeid vector species show that (i L. bogotensis is a synonym of L. cousini, (ii L. ubaquensis is a synonym of Pseudosuccinea columella, and (iii populations of L. cousini hitherto known from Venezuelan highlands indeed belong to a new species for which the name L. meridensis n. sp. is proposed. This new species is described and a complete phenotypic differentiation provided. Conclusions ITS-2, ITS-1 and cox1 prove to be good markers for specimen classification and haplotype characterisation of these morphologically similar lymnaeids in endemic areas. Analysis of the 18S gene and phylogenetic reconstructions indicate that L. cousini and L. meridensis n. sp. cluster in an evolutionary line different from the one of P. columella, despite their external resemblance. This suggests an evolutionary phenotypic convergence related to similar environments and which has given rise to frequent specimen misclassification. Body size and phylogenetic relationships of L. meridensis n. sp. with

  7. Developing Universal Genetic Tools for Rapid and Efficient Deletion Mutation in Vibrio Species Based on Suicide T-Vectors Carrying a Novel Counterselectable Marker, vmi480.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Luo

    Full Text Available Despite that Vibrio spp. have a significant impact on the health of humans and aquatic animals, the molecular basis of their pathogenesis is little known, mainly due to the limited genetic tools for the functional research of genes in Vibrio. In some cases, deletion of target DNAs in Vibrio can be achieved through the use of suicide vectors. However, these strategies are time-consuming and lack universality, and the widely used counterselectable gene sacB does not work well in Vibrio cells. In this study, we developed universal genetic tools for rapid and efficient deletion mutations in Vibrio species based on suicide T-Vectors carrying a novel counterselectable marker, vmi480. We explored two uncharacterized genes, vmi480 and vmi470, in a genomic island from Vibrio mimicus VM573 and confirmed that vmi480 and vmi470 constitute a two-component toxin-antitoxin system through deletion and expression of vmi480 and vmi470. The product of vmi480 exhibited strong toxicity to Escherichia coli cells. Based on vmi480 and the PBAD or PTAC promoter system, we constructed two suicide T-vectors, pLP11 and pLP12, and each of these vectors contained a multiple cloning region with two AhdI sites. Both vectors linearized by AhdI digestion could be stored and directly ligated with purified PCR products without a digestion step. By using pLP11 and pLP12 coupled with a highly efficient conjugation system provided by E. coli β2163, six genes from four representative Vibrio species were easily deleted. By using the counterselective marker vmi480, we obtained 3-12 positive colonies (deletion mutants among no more than 20 colonies randomly selected on counterselection plates. The strategy does not require the digestion of PCR products and suicide vectors every time, and it avoids large-scale screening colonies on counterselective plates. These results demonstrate that we successfully developed universal genetic tools for rapid and efficient gene deletion in Vibrio

  8. Flea and Small Mammal Species Composition in Mixed-Grass Prairies: Implications for the Maintenance of Yersinia pestis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maestas, Lauren P; Britten, Hugh B

    2017-07-01

    Maintenance of sylvatic plague in prairie dogs (Cynomis spp.) was once thought unlikely due to high mortality rates; yet more recent findings indicate that low-level enzootic plague may be maintained in susceptible prairie dog populations. Another hypothesis for the maintenance of sylvatic plague involves small mammals, other than prairie dogs, as an alternative reservoir in the sylvatic plague system. These hypotheses, however, are not mutually exclusive, as both prairie dogs and small mammals could together be driving sylvatic cycles of plague. The concept of a bridging vector has been used to explain the transmission of pathogens from one host species to another. In the case of sylvatic plague, this would require overlap in fleas between small mammals and prairie dogs, and potentially other species such as carnivores. Our goal was to evaluate the level of flea sharing between black-tailed prairie dogs (Cynomis ludovicianus) and other small mammals in a mixed-grass prairie in South Dakota. We investigated the species richness of small mammals and small-mammal fleas in a mixed-grass prairie system and compared findings with previous studies from a short-grass ecosystem in Colorado. Over the summer field seasons 2014-2016 we live-trapped small mammals, collected fleas, and showed differences between both the flea and small mammal composition of the two systems. We also recorded higher densities of deer mice and lower densities of northern grasshopper mice in mixed versus shortgrass prairies. We confirmed, as is the case in shortgrass prairies, a lack of substantial flea species overlap on small mammal hosts and fleas from prairie dogs and their burrows. Moreover this study demonstrates that although small mammals may not play a large part in interepizootic plague cycling in shortgrass prairie ecosystems, their role in mixed-grass prairies requires further evaluation.

  9. Nutrient composition of important fish species in Bangladesh and potential contribution to recommended nutrient intakes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bogard, Jessica R.; Thilsted, Shakuntala H.; Marks, Geoffrey C.

    2015-01-01

    Fish, in Bangladesh where malnutrition remains a significant development challenge, is an irreplaceable animal-source food in the diet of millions. However, existing data on the nutrient composition of fish do not reflect the large diversity available and have focused on only a few select nutrients....... The purpose of this study was to fill the gaps in existing data on the nutrient profiles of common fish in Bangladesh by analysing the proximate, vitamin, mineral and fatty acid composition of 55 fish, shrimp and prawn species from inland capture, aquaculture and marine capture fisheries. When comparing...... indigenous species, which should guide policy and programmes to improve food and nutrition security in Bangladesh....

  10. Composition and diversity of fish species in seagrass bed ecosystem at Muara Binuangeun, Lebak, Banten

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kholis, N.; Patria, M. P.; Soedjiarti, T.

    2017-07-01

    Research of composition and diversity of fish species in seagrass bed ecosystem at Muara Binuangeun, Lebak, Banten, had been conducted in May and November 2015. Catch per Unit of Effort (CPUE) was used as a method with push net and boat net as fishing gear. Fishing was conducted during low tide. Collected samples were preserved with 10 % Formalin Solution and then being identified in the laboratory. In total, 286 fishes were collected from 17 families and 38 species. Moolgarda sp. was the most relative abundant species (17,13 %) and Istiblennius edentulus was a fish species with the highest relative frequency. Diversity index value of seagrass bed ecosystem was 2,973. Different sampling time showed the different composition of fish, in an example of Arothron immaculatus.

  11. Site and plant species are important determinants of the Methylobacterium community composition in the plant phyllosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knief, Claudia; Ramette, Alban; Frances, Lisa; Alonso-Blanco, Carlos; Vorholt, Julia A

    2010-06-01

    The plant phyllosphere constitutes a habitat for numerous microorganisms; among them are members of the genus Methylobacterium. Owing to the ubiquitous occurrence of methylobacteria on plant leaves, they represent a suitable target for studying plant colonization patterns. The influence of the factor site, host plant species, time and the presence of other phyllosphere bacteria on Methylobacterium community composition and population size were evaluated in this study. Leaf samples were collected from Arabidopsis thaliana or Medicago truncatula plants and from the surrounding plant species at several sites. The abundance of cultivable Methylobacterium clearly correlated with the abundance of other phyllosphere bacteria, suggesting that methylobacteria constitute a considerable and rather stable fraction of the phyllosphere microbiota under varying environmental conditions. Automated ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis (ARISA) was applied to characterize the Methylobacterium community composition and showed the presence of similar communities on A. thaliana plants at most sites in 2 consecutive years of sampling. A substantial part of the observed variation in the community composition was explained by site and plant species, especially in the case of the plants collected at the Arabidopsis sites (50%). The dominating ARISA peaks that were detected on A. thaliana plants were found on other plant species grown at the same site, whereas some different peaks were detected on A. thaliana plants from other sites. This indicates that site-specific factors had a stronger impact on the Methylobacterium community composition than did plant-specific factors and that the Methylobacterium-plant association is not highly host plant species specific.

  12. Tree species composition affects the abundance of rowan (Sorbus aucuparia L.) in urban forests in Finland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamberg, Leena; Lehvävirta, Susanna; Kotze, D Johan; Heikkinen, Juha

    2015-03-15

    Recent studies have shown a considerable increase in the abundance of rowan (Sorbus aucuparia) saplings in urban forests in Finland, yet the reasons for this increase are not well understood. Here we investigated whether canopy cover or tree species composition, i.e., the basal areas of different tree species in Norway spruce dominated urban forests, affects the abundances of rowan seedlings, saplings and trees. Altogether 24 urban forest patches were investigated. We sampled the number of rowan and other saplings, and calculated the basal areas of trees. We showed that rowan abundance was affected by tree species composition. The basal area of rowan trees (≥ 5 cm in diameter at breast height, dbh) decreased with increasing basal area of Norway spruce, while the cover of rowan seedlings increased with an increase in Norway spruce basal area. However, a decrease in the abundance of birch (Betula pendula) and an increase in the broad-leaved tree group (Acer platanoides, Alnus glutinosa, Alnus incana, Amelanchier spicata, Prunus padus, Quercus robur, Rhamnus frangula and Salix caprea) coincided with a decreasing number of rowans. Furthermore, rowan saplings were scarce in the vicinity of mature rowan trees. Although it seems that tree species composition has an effect on rowan, the relationship between rowan saplings and mature trees is complex, and therefore we conclude that regulating tree species composition is not an easy way to keep rowan thickets under control in urban forests in Finland. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Chemical composition of hydroethanolic extracts from five species of the Passiflora genus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marna E Sakalem

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The diversified genus Passiflora is well distributed all over Brazil, and many species have been long used as medicinal plants, mainly against anxiety disturbances. This effect has been attributed to its rich flavonoid composition. Flavonoids’ main class, flavonoid glycosides, has presented central action, particularly as sedative-hypnotic, anxiolytic and analgesic. The objective of the present study was to make a phytochemical screening of five little studied Passiflora species, in order to evaluate their phenolic composition. For this aim, HPLC-DAD-ESI-MS/MS was used. After the preparation of the hydroalcoholic extracts, each species was evaluated by direct injection electrospray ionization (ESI and tandem mass spectrometry. Although belonging to the same genus, the composition of each species presented particularities; this justifies the importance of studies aiming for the phenolic composition of different Passiflora species. Flavones C-glycosides were detected in all extracts, and are found as the main constituents in P. vitifolia, P. coccinea, P. bahiensis and P. sidifolia. In this last one, flavone-6,8-di-C-glycoside, apigenin-6-C-rhamnosyl-8-C-arabinoside are present in high content. Cyclopassiflosides were found in high content together with cyanogenic glycosides in P. quadrangularis, while in P. coccinea, besides flavones-C-glycosides were also found procyanidins.

  14. Chemical composition of hydroethanolic extracts from five species of the Passiflora genus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marna E Sakalem

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The diversified genus Passiflora is well distributed all over Brazil, and many species have been long used as medicinal plants, mainly against anxiety disturbances. This effect has been attributed to its rich flavonoid composition. Flavonoids’ main class, flavonoid glycosides, has presented central action, particularly as sedative-hypnotic, anxiolytic and analgesic. The objective of the present study was to make a phytochemical screening of five little studied Passiflora species, in order to evaluate their phenolic composition. For this aim, HPLC-DAD-ESI-MS/MS was used. After the preparation of the hydroalcoholic extracts, each species was evaluated by direct injection electrospray ionization (ESI and tandem mass spectrometry. Although belonging to the same genus, the composition of each species presented particularities; this justifies the importance of studies aiming for the phenolic composition of different Passiflora species. Flavones C-glycosides were detected in all extracts, and are found as the main constituents in P. vitifolia, P. coccinea, P. bahiensis and P. sidifolia. In this last one, flavone-6,8-di-C-glycoside, apigenin-6-C-rhamnosyl-8-C-arabinoside are present in high content. Cyclopassiflosides were found in high content together with cyanogenic glycosides in P. quadrangularis, while in P. coccinea, besides flavones-C-glycosides were also found procyanidins.

  15. Rolling bearing fault detection and diagnosis based on composite multiscale fuzzy entropy and ensemble support vector machines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Jinde; Pan, Haiyang; Cheng, Junsheng

    2017-02-01

    To timely detect the incipient failure of rolling bearing and find out the accurate fault location, a novel rolling bearing fault diagnosis method is proposed based on the composite multiscale fuzzy entropy (CMFE) and ensemble support vector machines (ESVMs). Fuzzy entropy (FuzzyEn), as an improvement of sample entropy (SampEn), is a new nonlinear method for measuring the complexity of time series. Since FuzzyEn (or SampEn) in single scale can not reflect the complexity effectively, multiscale fuzzy entropy (MFE) is developed by defining the FuzzyEns of coarse-grained time series, which represents the system dynamics in different scales. However, the MFE values will be affected by the data length, especially when the data are not long enough. By combining information of multiple coarse-grained time series in the same scale, the CMFE algorithm is proposed in this paper to enhance MFE, as well as FuzzyEn. Compared with MFE, with the increasing of scale factor, CMFE obtains much more stable and consistent values for a short-term time series. In this paper CMFE is employed to measure the complexity of vibration signals of rolling bearings and is applied to extract the nonlinear features hidden in the vibration signals. Also the physically meanings of CMFE being suitable for rolling bearing fault diagnosis are explored. Based on these, to fulfill an automatic fault diagnosis, the ensemble SVMs based multi-classifier is constructed for the intelligent classification of fault features. Finally, the proposed fault diagnosis method of rolling bearing is applied to experimental data analysis and the results indicate that the proposed method could effectively distinguish different fault categories and severities of rolling bearings.

  16. Long-term changes in species composition and relative abundances of sharks at a provisioning site.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juerg M Brunnschweiler

    Full Text Available Diving with sharks, often in combination with food baiting/provisioning, has become an important product of today's recreational dive industry. Whereas the effects baiting/provisioning has on the behaviour and abundance of individual shark species are starting to become known, there is an almost complete lack of equivalent data from multi-species shark diving sites. In this study, changes in species composition and relative abundances were determined at the Shark Reef Marine Reserve, a multi-species shark feeding site in Fiji. Using direct observation sampling methods, eight species of sharks (bull shark Carcharhinus leucas, grey reef shark Carcharhinus amblyrhynchos, whitetip reef shark Triaenodon obesus, blacktip reef shark Carcharhinus melanopterus, tawny nurse shark Nebrius ferrugineus, silvertip shark Carcharhinus albimarginatus, sicklefin lemon shark Negaprion acutidens, and tiger shark Galeocerdo cuvier displayed inter-annual site fidelity between 2003 and 2012. Encounter rates and/or relative abundances of some species changed over time, overall resulting in more individuals (mostly C. leucas of fewer species being encountered on average on shark feeding dives at the end of the study period. Differences in shark community composition between the years 2004-2006 and 2007-2012 were evident, mostly because N. ferrugineus, C. albimarginatus and N. acutidens were much more abundant in 2004-2006 and very rare in the period of 2007-2012. Two explanations are offered for the observed changes in relative abundances over time, namely inter-specific interactions and operator-specific feeding protocols. Both, possibly in combination, are suggested to be important determinants of species composition and encounter rates, and relative abundances at this shark provisioning site in Fiji. This study, which includes the most species from a spatially confined shark provisioning site to date, suggests that long-term provisioning may result in competitive

  17. Long-term changes in species composition and relative abundances of sharks at a provisioning site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunnschweiler, Juerg M; Abrantes, Kátya G; Barnett, Adam

    2014-01-01

    Diving with sharks, often in combination with food baiting/provisioning, has become an important product of today's recreational dive industry. Whereas the effects baiting/provisioning has on the behaviour and abundance of individual shark species are starting to become known, there is an almost complete lack of equivalent data from multi-species shark diving sites. In this study, changes in species composition and relative abundances were determined at the Shark Reef Marine Reserve, a multi-species shark feeding site in Fiji. Using direct observation sampling methods, eight species of sharks (bull shark Carcharhinus leucas, grey reef shark Carcharhinus amblyrhynchos, whitetip reef shark Triaenodon obesus, blacktip reef shark Carcharhinus melanopterus, tawny nurse shark Nebrius ferrugineus, silvertip shark Carcharhinus albimarginatus, sicklefin lemon shark Negaprion acutidens, and tiger shark Galeocerdo cuvier) displayed inter-annual site fidelity between 2003 and 2012. Encounter rates and/or relative abundances of some species changed over time, overall resulting in more individuals (mostly C. leucas) of fewer species being encountered on average on shark feeding dives at the end of the study period. Differences in shark community composition between the years 2004-2006 and 2007-2012 were evident, mostly because N. ferrugineus, C. albimarginatus and N. acutidens were much more abundant in 2004-2006 and very rare in the period of 2007-2012. Two explanations are offered for the observed changes in relative abundances over time, namely inter-specific interactions and operator-specific feeding protocols. Both, possibly in combination, are suggested to be important determinants of species composition and encounter rates, and relative abundances at this shark provisioning site in Fiji. This study, which includes the most species from a spatially confined shark provisioning site to date, suggests that long-term provisioning may result in competitive exclusion among shark

  18. Estimating species and size composition of rockfishes to verify targets in acoustic surveys of untrawlable areas

    OpenAIRE

    Rooper, Christopher N.; Martin, Michael H.; Butler, John L.; Jones, Darin T.; Zimmermann, Mark

    2012-01-01

    Rockfish (Sebastes spp.) biomass is difficult to assess with standard bottom trawl or acoustic surveys because of their propensity to aggregate near the seafloor in highrelief areas that are inaccessible to sampling by trawling. We compared the ability of a remotely operated vehicle (ROV), a modified bottom trawl, and a stereo drop camera system (SDC) to identify rockfish species and estimate their size composition. The ability to discriminate species was highest for the bottom trawl...

  19. Do temperate tree species diversity and identity influence soil microbial community function and composition?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khlifa, Rim; Paquette, Alain; Messier, Christian; Reich, Peter B; Munson, Alison D

    2017-10-01

    Studies of biodiversity-ecosystem function in treed ecosystems have generally focused on aboveground functions. This study investigates intertrophic links between tree diversity and soil microbial community function and composition. We examined how microbial communities in surface mineral soil responded to experimental gradients of tree species richness (SR), functional diversity (FD), community-weighted mean trait value (CWM), and tree identity. The site was a 4-year-old common garden experiment near Montreal, Canada, consisting of deciduous and evergreen tree species mixtures. Microbial community composition, community-level physiological profiles, and respiration were evaluated using phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) analysis and the MicroResp™ system, respectively. The relationship between tree species richness and glucose-induced respiration (GIR), basal respiration (BR), metabolic quotient (qCO 2) followed a positive but saturating shape. Microbial communities associated with species mixtures were more active (basal respiration [BR]), with higher biomass (glucose-induced respiration [GIR]), and used a greater number of carbon sources than monocultures. Communities associated with deciduous tree species used a greater number of carbon sources than those associated with evergreen species, suggesting a greater soil carbon storage capacity. There were no differences in microbial composition (PLFA) between monocultures and SR mixtures. The FD and the CWM of several functional traits affected both BR and GIR. In general, the CWM of traits had stronger effects than did FD, suggesting that certain traits of dominant species have more effect on ecosystem processes than does FD. Both the functions of GIR and BR were positively related to aboveground tree community productivity. Both tree diversity (SR) and identity (species and functional identity-leaf habit) affected soil microbial community respiration, biomass, and composition. For the first time, we identified

  20. Cryptic Species Identification and Composition of Bemisia tabaci (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae) Complex in Henan Province, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiu, Min; Hu, Jian; Wang, Lun-Ji; Dong, Jun-Feng; Song, Yue-Qin; Sun, Hui-Zhong

    2017-05-01

    Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius) (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae) is a cryptic species complex, causing significant crop losses in China during the last decade. Although knowledge of cryptic species composition and dynamics within B. tabaci complex is critical for developing sustainable pest management strategies, limited information is available on this pest in the Henan province of China. A systematic survey of the cryptic species composition and distribution of B. tabaci complex in different locations of Henan province was conducted in 2012. The results of RAPD-PCR and the gene for the mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase subunit-1 (mtCOI) based phylogenetic relationships established using Bayesian method indicated there were four known cryptic species MEAM1, MED, Asia II 3, Asia II 9 and a new cryptic species named China 6 in Henan province. In the survey, the invasive cryptic species MED and MEAM1 were found to be predominant with wide spread distribution across the surveyed regions. On the contrary, the indigenous B. tabaci cryptic species including Asia II 3, Asia II 9 and China 6 remained with low prevalence in some surveyed regions. Cryptic species MEAM1 and MED have not completely displaced the native B. tabaci in Henan province. This current study for the first time unifies our knowledge of the diversity and distribution of B. tabaci across Henan province of China. © The Authors 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America.

  1. Effects of timber harvest on structural diversity and species composition in hardwood forests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    FARZAM TAVANKAR

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Tavankar F, Bonyad AE. 2015. Effects of timber harvest on structural diversity and species composition in hardwood forests. Biodiversitas 16: 1-9. Forest management leads to changes in structure and species composition of stands. In this research vertical and horizontal structure and species composition were compared in two harvested and protected stands in the Caspian forest of Iran. The results indicated the tree and seedling density, total basal area and stand volume was significantly (P < 0.01 higher in the protected stand. The Fagus orientalis L. had the most density and basal area in the both stands. Species importance value (SIV of Fagus orientalis in the protected stand (92.5 was higher than in the harvested stand (88.5. While, the SIV of shade-intolerant tree species such as Acer insigne, Acer cappadocicum and Alnus subcordata was higher in the harvested stand. The density of trees and seedling of rare tree species, such as Ulmus glabra, Tilia begonifolia, Zelkova caprinifolia and Fraxinus coriarifolia, was also higher in the protected stand. The Shannon-Wiener diversity index in the protected stand (0.84 was significantly higher (P < 0.01 than in the harvested stand (0.72. The highest diversity value in the harvested stand was observed in DBH of 10-40 cm class, while DBH of 40-70 cm had the highest diversity value in the protected stand.

  2. The invasive ambrosia beetle Euwallacea fornicates vectors an exotic symbiotic Fusarium species that threatens avocado production in Israel

    Science.gov (United States)

    The invasive ambrosia beetle (Euwallacea fornicatus Eichhoff) was first recorded in Israel in 2009, and it has been shown to vector an exotic fusarial pathogen. Multilocus molecular phylogenetic analyses indicate that the pathogen represents a novel symbiotic Fusarium sp. within Clade 3 of the Fusar...

  3. The ghosts of trees past: savanna trees create enduring legacies in plant species composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stahlheber, Karen A; Crispin, Kimberly L; Anton, Cassidy; D'Antonio, Carla M

    2015-09-01

    Isolated trees in savannas worldwide are known to modify their local environment and interact directly with neighboring plants. Less is known about how related tree species differ in their impacts on surrounding communities, how the effects of trees vary between years, and how composition might change following loss of the tree. To address these knowledge gaps, we explored the following questions: How do savanna trees influence the surrounding composition of herbaceous plants? Is the influence of trees consistent across different species and years? How does this change following the death of the tree? We surveyed herbaceous species composition and environmental attributes surrounding living and dead evergreen and deciduous Quercus trees in California (USA) savannas across several years that differed in their total precipitation. Oak trees of all species created distinct, homogenous understory communities dominated by exotic grasses across several sites. The composition of the low-diversity understory communities showed less interannual variation than open grassland, despite a two-fold difference in precipitation between the driest and wettest year. Vegetation composition was correlated with variation in soil properties, which were strongly affected by trees. Oaks also influenced the communities beyond the edge of the crown, but this depended on site and oak species. Low-diversity understory communities persisted up to 43 years following the death of the tree. A gradual decline in the effect of trees on the physical, environment following death did not result in vegetation becoming more similar to open grassland over time. The presence of long-lasting legacies of past tree crowns highlights the difficulty of assigning control of the current distribution of herbaceous species in grassland to their contemporary environment.

  4. Larval species composition and genetic structures of Carposina sasakii, Grapholita dimorpha, and Grapholita molesta from Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, D H; Kwon, H K; Kim, D H; Yang, C Y

    2017-07-31

    Rapid determination of the larval species composition and understanding of their genetic structure is important to establish the appropriate management system for multiple species infesting in fruits. We established accurate and rapid diagnostic methods based on multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) diagnostic techniques to discriminate the three major lepidopteran species in orchard, Carposina sasakii, Grapholita dimorpha, and Grapholita molesta. Each species was identified by amplifying species-specific PCR products (375 bp for C. sasakii, 125 and 234 bp for G. dimorpha, and 125 bp for G. molesta). Based on species composition analysis from six types of infested fruits, G. dimorpha constituted the highest proportion (47.8%), followed by 35.2 and 13.5% for G. molesta and C. sasakii, respectively. Interestingly, high prevalence was found in G. dimorpha and G. molesta for plum and peach, respectively. Based on genetic diversity analysis, the three insect species exhibited moderate or high haplotype diversity and low nucleotide diversity, ranging from 0.319 to 0.699 and 0.0006 to 0.0045, respectively. Demographic expansion was not detected according to either a neutrality test or mismatch distribution analysis. Moreover, no significant genetic structure corresponding to province, host plant, fruit type, or collection period was observed. These results suggest that the population of each species would have high dispersal ability following fruit-generating periods via intrinsic host adaptation ability regardless of the spatial and temporal conditions. Determination of larval composition on fruit is valuable for establishing appropriate management systems that take the species into consideration; additionally, population genetic approaches can be utilized to understand the effects of environmental factors (province, host fruit, fruit type, etc.) on population structures.

  5. INSECTICIDAL ACTIVITIES OF ESSENTIAL OILS EXTRACTED FROM THREE SPECIES OF POACEAE ON ANOPHELES GAMBIAE SPP, MAJOR VECTOR OF MALARIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dominique C. K. Sohounhloué

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the insecticidal activities on Anopheles gambiae spp of the essential oils (EO extracted from the dry leaves of some species collected in Benin were studied. The essential oil yields are 2.8, 1.7 and 1.4�0respectively for Cymbopogon schoanenthus (L. Spreng (CS, Cymbopogon citratus Stapf. (CC and Cymbopogon giganteus (Hochst. Chiov (CG. The GC/MS analysis showed that the EO of CS had a larger proportion in oxygenated monoterpenes (86.3�20whereas those of the sheets of CC and CG are relatively close proportions (85.5�0and 82.7�0respectively with. The piperitone (68.5�  2-carene (11.5� and -eudesmol (4.6�20are the major components of the EO of CS while trans para-mentha-1(7,8-dien-2-ol (31.9� trans para-mentha-2,8-dien-1-ol (19.6� cis para-mentha-2,8-dien-1-ol (7.2� trans piperitol (6.3�20and limonene (6.3�20prevailed in the EO of CG. The EO of CC revealed a rich composition in geranial (41.3� neral (33� myrcene (10.4� and geraniol (6.6� The biological tests have shown that these three EO induced 100�0mortality of Anopheles gambiae to 1.1, 586.58 and 1549 µg•cm-2 respectively for CC, CS and CG. These effects are also illustrated by weak lethal concentration for 50�0anopheles population (CC: 0.306; CS: 152.453 and CG: 568.327 µg•cm-2 in the same order of reactivity. The EO of CC appeared most active on two stocks (sensitive and resistant of Anopheles gambiae.

  6. Species composition of and fumonisin production by the Fusarium fujikuroi species complex isolated from Korean cereals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jung-Hye; Lee, Seolhee; Nah, Ju-Young; Kim, Hee-Kyoung; Paek, Ji-Seon; Lee, Soohyung; Ham, Hyeonheui; Hong, Sung Kee; Yun, Sung-Hwan; Lee, Theresa

    2018-02-21

    To assess the risk of fumonisin contamination in Korean cereals, we isolated colonies of the Fusarium fujikuroi species complex (FFSC) from barley, maize, rice and soybean samples from 2011 to 2015. A total of 878 FFSC strains were isolated mostly from maize and rice, and species identity of the isolates were determined using the DNA sequence of the translation elongation factor 1-α (TEF-1α) and RNA polymerase II (RPB2) genes. Fusaria recovered from Korean cereals included F. fujikuroi (317 isolates and a frequency of 36%), F. proliferatum (212 isolates and 24.1%), F. verticillioides (170 isolates and 19.4%), F. concentricum (86 strains and 9.8%), F. andiyazi (56 isolates and 6.4%), F. subglutinans (28 isolates and 3.2%), F. thapsinum (5 isolates and 0.6%), and F. circinatum (2 isolates and 0.2%). The rice samples were dominated by F. fujikuroi (47.4%), F. proliferatum (27.3%), and F. concentricum (15.1%), whereas maize samples were dominated by F. verticillioides (33.9%), F. fujikuroi (25.3%), and F. proliferatum (21.1%). A phylogenetic analysis of 70 representative isolates demonstrated that each species was resolved as genealogically exclusive in the ML tree. Fumonisin production potential was evaluated using a PCR assay for the fumonisin biosynthesis gene, FUM1 in all of the isolates. Most of the isolates tested (94%) were positive for FUM1. All of the isolates assigned to F. fujikuroi, F. proliferatum, F. verticillioides and F. thapsinum were positive for FUM1 irrespective of their host origin. Seventy-seven representative isolates positive for FUM1 were examined for fumonisin production in rice medium. The majority of F. proliferatum (26/27, 96.3%), F. verticillioides (16/17, 94.1%) and F. fujikuroi (19/25, 76.0%) produced both FB 1 and FB 2 . Notably, 16 of 19 fumonisin-producing F. fujikuroi produced >1000μg/g of fumonisins (FB 1 +FB 2 ) in rice medium, which is higher than that in previous reports. These results suggest that F. fujikuroi can produce

  7. Species composition and richness of amphibians in logged forests at Hulu Terengganu, Peninsular Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izam, Nur Amalina Mohd; Ahmad, Amirrudin; Grismer, L. Lee; Saidin, Ahmad Nazri; Nor, Shukor Md.; Ahmad, Norhayati

    2016-11-01

    A study was done to compare amphibian species composition and richness between a disturbed forest due to logging/dam construction and a 30-year old logged forest at Hulu Terengganu, Peninsular Malaysia. This study was conducted from August to October 2014, using drift fenced-pitfall traps. The upstream (UP) and downstream riverine area (DP) of a dam called Puah Dam (PD) represented the disturbed forest habitat, while Sg. Deka Wildlife Reserve (SDWR) represented a 30-year old regenerating logged forest. There were six amphibian species found at SDWR, while four species were recorded at UP and DP.

  8. Vegetation in Bangalore's Slums: Composition, Species Distribution, Density, Diversity, and History

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopal, Divya; Nagendra, Harini; Manthey, Michael

    2015-06-01

    There is widespread acknowledgement of the need for biodiversity and greening to be part of urban sustainability efforts. Yet we know little about greenery in the context of urban poverty, particularly in slums, which constitute a significant challenge for inclusive development in many rapidly growing cities. We assessed the composition, density, diversity, and species distribution of vegetation in 44 slums of Bangalore, India, comparing these to published studies on vegetation diversity in other land-use categories. Most trees were native to the region, as compared to other land-use categories such as parks and streets which are dominated by introduced species. Of the most frequently encountered tree species, Moringa oleifera and Cocos nucifera are important for food, while Ficus religiosa plays a critical cultural and religious role. Tree density and diversity were much lower in slums compared to richer residential neighborhoods. There are also differences in species preferences, with most plant (herb, shrub and vines) species in slums having economic, food, medicinal, or cultural use, while the species planted in richer residential areas are largely ornamental. Historic development has had an impact on species distribution, with older slums having larger sized tree species, while recent slums were dominated by smaller sized tree species with greater economic and food use. Extensive focus on planting trees and plant species with utility value is required in these congested neighborhoods, to provide livelihood support.

  9. Chemical composition of Achillea schischkinii Sosn., an endemic species from Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    In this study, we investigated the chemical composition of an endemic species of Achillea schischkinii Sosn. (Asteraceae) collected from an eastern part of Turkey (Van). Air-dried aerial parts were subjected to water-distillation using a Clevenger-type system. The essential oil was analyzed by GC-MS...

  10. The impact of fertilization veld in terms of species composition and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The impact of fertilization on veld in the Potchefstroom area was investigated. Nitrogen and phosphorus were applied annually from 1972/73 until 1981/82. The control plots and the fertilized plots were grazed with year-old steers. Species composition and basal cover were recorded using the wheelpoint technique.

  11. Species composition influences management outcomes following mountain pine beetle in lodgepole pine-dominated forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristen Pelz; C. C. Rhoades; R. M. Hubbard; M. A. Battaglia; F. W. Smith

    2015-01-01

    Mountain pine beetle outbreaks have killed lodgepole pine on more than one million hectares of Colorado and southern Wyoming forest during the last decade and have prompted harvest operations throughout the region. In northern Colorado, lodgepole pine commonly occurs in mixed stands with subalpine fir, Engelmann spruce, and aspen. Variation in tree species composition...

  12. Species composition and structure of regenerated and remnant forest patches within an urban landscape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wayne C. Zipperer

    2002-01-01

    Regenerated and remnant forest patches were inventoried in Syracuse, New York, USA to determine differences in structure, species composition, human disturbances, and landscape context. Patches had similar mean stem diameter, total stem density, and total basal areas, but differed with respect to diameter distribution, disturbance regime, landscape context, and...

  13. Impact of soil scarification on the composition of regeneration and species diversity in an oak shelterwood

    Science.gov (United States)

    James J. Zaczek; Joseph Harding; James Welfley

    1997-01-01

    This study was conducted in a fenced 1-yr-old 70-acre mixed-oak shelterwood to determine the impact of soil scarification on species composition and the production of oak regeneration from abundant northern red oak (Quercus rubra L.) acorns. In October 1993, seven replicates were established and randomly divided into control and scarified plots....

  14. Influence of Tree Species Composition and Community Structure on Carbon Density in a Subtropical Forest.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanqiu Hu

    Full Text Available We assessed the impact of species composition and stand structure on the spatial variation of forest carbon density using data collected from a 4-ha plot in a subtropical forest in southern China. We found that 1 forest biomass carbon density significantly differed among communities, reflecting a significant effect of community structure and species composition on carbon accumulation; 2 soil organic carbon density increased whereas stand biomass carbon density decreased across communities, indicating that different mechanisms might account for the accumulation of stand biomass carbon and soil organic carbon in the subtropical forest; and 3 a small number of tree individuals of the medium- and large-diameter class contributed predominantly to biomass carbon accumulation in the community, whereas a large number of seedlings and saplings were responsible for a small proportion of the total forest carbon stock. These findings demonstrate that both biomass carbon and soil carbon density in the subtropical forest are sensitive to species composition and community structure, and that heterogeneity in species composition and stand structure should be taken into account to ensure accurate forest carbon accounting.

  15. Earthworm abundance and species composition in abandoned tropical croplands: comparisons of tree plantations and secondary forests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    G. Gonzalez; X. Zou; S. Borges

    1996-01-01

    We compared patterns of earthworms abundance and species composition in tree plantation and secondary forest of Puerto Rico. Tree plantations included pine (Pinus caribea Morelet) and mahogany (Swietenia macrophylla King) established in the 1930's; 1960's; and 1970's; secondary forests were naturally regenerated in areas adjacent to these plantations. We...

  16. Plant biomass and species composition along an environmental gradient in montane riparian meadows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kathleen A. Dwire; J. Boone Kauffman; E. N. Jack Brookshire; John E. Baham

    2004-01-01

    In riparian meadows, narrow zonation of the dominant vegetation frequently occurs along the elevational gradient from the stream edge to the floodplain terrace. We measured plant species composition and above- and belowground biomass in three riparian plant communities - a priori defined as wet, moist, and dry meadow - along short streamside topographic gradients in...

  17. The pristine rain forest? Remnants of historical human impacts on current tree species composition and diversity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gemerden, Barend S. van; Olff, Han; Parren, Marc P.E.; Bongers, Frans

    2003-01-01

    Aim: Tropical rain forests are often regarded as pristine and undisturbed by humans. In Central Africa, community-wide disturbances by natural causes are rare and therefore current theory predicts that natural gap phase dynamics structure tree species composition and diversity. However, the dominant

  18. The pristine rain forest? Remnants of historical human impacts on current tree species composition and diversity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gemerden, van B.S.; Olff, H.; Parren, M.P.E.; Bongers, F.J.J.M.

    2003-01-01

    Aim Tropical rain forests are often regarded as pristine and undisturbed by humans. In Central Africa, community-wide disturbances by natural causes are rare and therefore current theory predicts that natural gap phase dynamics structure tree species composition and diversity. However, the dominant

  19. An imputed forest composition map for New England screened by species range boundaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthew J. Duveneck; Jonathan R. Thompson; B. Tyler. Wilson

    2015-01-01

    Initializing forest landscape models (FLMs) to simulate changes in tree species composition requires accurate fine-scale forest attribute information mapped continuously over large areas. Nearest-neighbor imputation maps, maps developed from multivariate imputation of field plots, have high potential for use as the initial condition within FLMs, but the tendency for...

  20. Multi-sensor data fusion for estimating forest species composition and abundance in northern Minnesota

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peter P. Wolter; Phillip A. Townsend

    2011-01-01

    The magnitude, duration, and frequency of forest disturbance caused by the spruce budworm and forest tent caterpillar in northern Minnesota and neighboring Ontario, Canada have increased over the last century due to a shift in forest species composition linked to historical fire suppression, forest management, and pesticide application that has fostered increased...

  1. Species composition and diversity of non-forest woody vegetation along roads in the agricultural landscape

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tóth Attila

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Non-forest woody vegetation represents an important component of green infrastructure in the agricultural landscape, where natural and semi-natural forest cover has only a low land use proportion. This paper focuses on linear woody vegetation structures along roads in the agricultural landscape and analyses them in three study areas in the Nitra Region, Slovakia. We evaluate species composition and diversity, species occurrence frequency or spatial distribution, their structure according to relatively achievable age and origin. For the evaluation of occurrence frequency, a Frequency Factor was proposed and applied. This factor allows a better comparison of different study areas and results in more representative findings. The study areas were divided into sectors based on visual landscape features, which are easily identifiable in the field, such as intersections and curves in roads, and intersections of roads with other features, such as cadastral or land boundaries, watercourses, etc. Based on the species abundance, woody plants present within the sectors were categorised into 1 predominant, 2 complementary and 3 mixed-in species; and with regard to their origin into 1 autochthonous and 2 allochthonous. Further, trees were categorised into 1 long-lived, 2 medium-lived and 3 short-lived tree species. The main finding is that among trees, mainly allochthonous species dominated. Robinia pseudoacacia L. was the predominant tree species in all three study areas. It was up to 4 times more frequent than other predominant tree species. Introduced tree species prevailed also among complementary and mixed-in species. Among shrubs, mainly native species dominated, while non-native species had a significantly lower proportion and spatial distribution. Based on these findings, several measures have been proposed to improve the overall ecological stability, the proportion and spatial distribution of native woody plant species. The recommendations and

  2. Changes in seagrass species composition in northwestern Gulf of Mexico estuaries: effects on associated seagrass fauna.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brandon R Ray

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to measure the communities associated with different seagrass species to predict how shifts in seagrass species composition may affect associated fauna. In the northwestern Gulf of Mexico, coverage of the historically dominant shoal grass (Halodule wrightii is decreasing, while coverage of manatee grass (Syringodium filiforme and turtle grass (Thalassia testudinum is increasing. We conducted a survey of fishes, crabs, and shrimp in monospecific beds of shoal, manatee, and turtle grass habitats of South Texas, USA to assess how changes in sea grass species composition would affect associated fauna. We measured seagrass parameters including shoot density, above ground biomass, epiphyte type, and epiphyte abundance to investigate relationships between faunal abundance and these seagrass parameters. We observed significant differences in communities among three seagrass species, even though these organisms are highly motile and could easily travel among the different seagrasses. Results showed species specific relationships among several different characteristics of the seagrass community and individual species abundance. More work is needed to discern the drivers of the complex relationships between individual seagrass species and their associated fauna.

  3. Chemical composition, mineral content and amino acid and lipid profiles in bones from various fish species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toppe, Jogeir; Albrektsen, Sissel; Hope, Britt; Aksnes, Anders

    2007-03-01

    The chemical composition, content of minerals and the profiles of amino acids and fatty acids were analyzed in fish bones from eight different species of fish. Fish bones varied significantly in chemical composition. The main difference was lipid content ranging from 23 g/kg in cod (Gadus morhua) to 509 g/kg in mackerel (Scomber scombrus). In general fatty fish species showed higher lipid levels in the bones compared to lean fish species. Similarly, lower levels of protein and ash were observed in bones from fatty fish species. Protein levels differed from 363 g/kg lipid free dry matter (dm) to 568 g/kg lipid free dm with a concomitant inverse difference in ash content. Ash to protein ratio differed from 0.78 to 1.71 with the lowest level in fish that naturally have highest swimming and physical activity. Saithe (Pollachius virens) and salmon (Salmo salar) were found to be significantly different in the levels of lipid, protein and ash, and ash/protein ratio in the bones. Only small differences were observed in the level of amino acids although species specific differences were observed. The levels of Ca and P in lipid free fish bones were about the same in all species analyzed. Fatty acid profile differed in relation to total lipid levels in the fish bones, but some minor differences between fish species were observed.

  4. Changes in seagrass species composition in northwestern Gulf of Mexico estuaries: effects on associated seagrass fauna.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Brandon R; Johnson, Matthew W; Cammarata, Kirk; Smee, Delbert L

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to measure the communities associated with different seagrass species to predict how shifts in seagrass species composition may affect associated fauna. In the northwestern Gulf of Mexico, coverage of the historically dominant shoal grass (Halodule wrightii) is decreasing, while coverage of manatee grass (Syringodium filiforme) and turtle grass (Thalassia testudinum) is increasing. We conducted a survey of fishes, crabs, and shrimp in monospecific beds of shoal, manatee, and turtle grass habitats of South Texas, USA to assess how changes in sea grass species composition would affect associated fauna. We measured seagrass parameters including shoot density, above ground biomass, epiphyte type, and epiphyte abundance to investigate relationships between faunal abundance and these seagrass parameters. We observed significant differences in communities among three seagrass species, even though these organisms are highly motile and could easily travel among the different seagrasses. Results showed species specific relationships among several different characteristics of the seagrass community and individual species abundance. More work is needed to discern the drivers of the complex relationships between individual seagrass species and their associated fauna.

  5. Composition and species richness phytoplankton in a subtropical floodplain lake: a long-term study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jascieli Carla Bortolini

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available AIM: Phytoplankton species diversity in floodplain lakes is influenced by different conditions imposed by the hydrosedimentological regime of the main channel. This study evaluated the predictors of composition and species richness phytoplankton in the long-term scale, in a floodplain lake directly connected to the Paraná River. We hypothesized that species richness of the floodplain lake is directly related to the degree of connectivity with the main channel. METHODS: Quarterly samplings were conducted between February 2000 and March 2013 (except in 2001 and 2003, under the water surface of the pelagic zone of the lake. Data were analyzed with Spearman correlation, PCA, DCA, ANOVA and regression analysis. RESULTS: We identified 397 taxa with high contribution of rare species (72%. Chlorophyceans and diatoms were the most frequent groups. There was a trend of increasing of diatoms and decrease of cyanobacteria. The DCA showed differences in phytoplankton composition. The highest mean richness values were found in years with high number of days under potamophase. Significant differences between years were detected for total species richness and first axis of DCA. Regression analysis indicated that the predictors of species richness were Zeu and Zmax. CONCLUSION: The species richness phytoplankton of the floodplain lake is directly related to the level of connectivity with the main channel.

  6. A Review of the Composition of the Essential Oils and Biological Activities of Angelica Species

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    Kandasamy Sowndhararajan

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available A number of Angelica species have been used in traditional systems of medicine to treat many ailments. Especially, essential oils (EOs from the Angelica species have been used for the treatment of various health problems, including malaria, gynecological diseases, fever, anemia, and arthritis. EOs are complex mixtures of low molecular weight compounds, especially terpenoids and their oxygenated compounds. These components deliver specific fragrance and biological properties to essential oils. In this review, we summarized the chemical composition and biological activities of EOs from different species of Angelica. For this purpose, a literature search was carried out to obtain information about the EOs of Angelica species and their bioactivities from electronic databases such as PubMed, Science Direct, Wiley, Springer, ACS, Google, and other journal publications. There has been a lot of variation in the EO composition among different Angelica species. EOs from Angelica species were reported for different kinds of biological activities, such as antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial, immunotoxic, and insecticidal activities. The present review is an attempt to consolidate the available data for different Angelica species on the basis of major constituents in the EOs and their biological activities.

  7. Linking land cover and species distribution models to project potential ranges of malaria vectors: an example using Anopheles arabiensis in Sudan and Upper Egypt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fuller Douglas O

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Anopheles arabiensis is a particularly opportunistic feeder and efficient vector of Plasmodium falciparum in Africa and may invade areas outside its normal range, including areas separated by expanses of barren desert. The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate how spatial models can project future irrigated cropland and potential, new suitable habitat for vectors such as An. arabiensis. Methods Two different but complementary spatial models were linked to demonstrate their synergy for assessing re-invasion potential of An. arabiensis into Upper Egypt as a function of irrigated cropland expansion by 2050. The first model (The Land Change Modeler was used to simulate changes in irrigated cropland using a Markov Chain approach, while the second model (MaxEnt uses species occurrence points, land cover and other environmental layers to project probability of species presence. Two basic change scenarios were analysed, one involving a more conservative business-as-usual (BAU assumption and second with a high probability of desert-to-cropland transition (Green Nile to assess a broad range of potential outcomes by 2050. Results The results reveal a difference of 82,000 sq km in potential An. arabiensis range between the BAU and Green Nile scenarios. The BAU scenario revealed a highly fragmented set of small, potential habitat patches separated by relatively large distances (maximum distance = 64.02 km, mean = 12.72 km, SD = 9.92, while the Green Nile scenario produced a landscape characterized by large patches separated by relatively shorter gaps (maximum distance = 49.38, km, mean = 4.51 km, SD = 7.89 that may be bridged by the vector. Conclusions This study provides a first demonstration of how land change and species distribution models may be linked to project potential changes in vector habitat distribution and invasion potential. While gaps between potential habitat patches remained large in the

  8. Species composition and seasonal variation of butterflies in Dalma Wildlife Sanctuary, Jharkhand, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.K. Verma

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Dalma Wildlife Sanctuary is located 10km from Jamshedpur in Jharkhand, India. The species composition and seasonal variation of butterflies was analyzed in this sanctuary over the course of 2 years. A total of 39 species belonging to 31 genera and 4 families were identified. Of these, Nymphalidae and Pieridae were found to be the dominant families, in comparison to Lycaenidae and Papilionidae. The monthly diversity was calculated by using the Shannon-Weiner diversity index. The highest diversity was found during late winter and spring while a comparatively low diversity was observed during the rainy season and summer. Nymphalidae showed the greatest variation with respect to distribution of species richness throughout the year. Nymphalidae and Lycaenidae showed greatest species richness and relative abundance during the rainy season. Little seasonal variation in species richness was observed in case of families Pieridae and Papilionidae

  9. Warming impacts on fish species composition in the Kattegat-Belt Sea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bryndum, Karoline Minna; MacKenzie, Brian

    -2013 and bottom temperature data (observed and model outputs from a regional phyical oceanographic model) to test these ideas. Species richness has increased significantly during the time period in both seasons of the year, and the increases 21 were significantly correlated with bottom temperatures. Analysis......Sea temperatures have been rising in the waters near Denmark during the past 1-2 decades and are expected to affect marine populations, species, communities and foodwebs. Here we investigate whether and how the species richness and composition of the marine fish community in the Kattegat and Belt...... Sea have been influenced by these changes. We hypothesize that the recent warming has led to an increase in species richness of the local community and that this increase is due to immigration of species from warmer areas. We use spring and fall survey data collected by DTU Aqua during the years 1994...

  10. Tree species composition influences enzyme activities and microbial biomass in the rhizosphere: a rhizobox approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Shengzuo; Liu, Dong; Tian, Ye; Deng, Shiping; Shang, Xulan

    2013-01-01

    Monoculture causes nutrient losses and leads to declines in soil fertility and biomass production over successive cultivation. The rhizosphere, a zone of usually high microbial activities and clearly distinct from bulk soil, is defined as the volume of soil around living roots and influenced by root activities. Here we investigated enzyme activities and microbial biomass in the rhizosphere under different tree compositions. Six treatments with poplar, willow, and alder mono- or mixed seedlings were grown in rhizoboxes. Enzyme activities associated with nitrogen cycling and microbial biomass were measured in all rhizosphere and bulk soils. Both enzyme activities and microbial biomass in the rhizosphere differed significantly tree compositions. Microbial biomass contents were more sensitive to the changes of the rhizosphere environment than enzyme activities. Tree species coexistence did not consistently increase tested enzyme activities and microbial biomass, but varied depending on the complementarities of species traits. In general, impacts of tree species and coexistence were more pronounced on microbial composition than total biomass, evidenced by differences in microbial biomass C/N ratios stratified across the rhizosphere soils. Compared to poplar clone monoculture, other tree species addition obviously increased rhizosphere urease activity, but greatly reduced rhizosphere L-asparaginase activity. Poplar growth was enhanced only when coexisted with alder. Our results suggested that a highly productive or keystone plant species in a community had greater influence over soil functions than the contribution of diversity.

  11. Floral scent composition predicts bee pollination system in five butterfly bush (Buddleja, Scrophulariaceae) species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, W-C; Chen, G; Vereecken, N J; Dunn, B L; Ma, Y-P; Sun, W-B

    2015-01-01

    Traditionally, plant-pollinator interactions have been interpreted as pollination syndrome. However, the validity of pollination syndrome has been widely doubted in modern studies of pollination ecology. The pollination ecology of five Asian Buddleja species, B. asiatica, B. crispa, B. forrestii, B. macrostachya and B. myriantha, in the Sino-Himalayan region in Asia, flowering in different local seasons, with scented inflorescences were investigated during 2011 and 2012. These five species exhibited diverse floral traits, with narrow and long corolla tubes and concealed nectar. According to their floral morphology, larger bees and Lepidoptera were expected to be the major pollinators. However, field observations showed that only larger bees (honeybee/bumblebee) were the primary pollinators, ranging from 77.95% to 97.90% of total visits. In this study, floral scents of each species were also analysed using coupled gas chromatography and mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Although the five Buddleja species emitted differentiated floral scent compositions, our results showed that floral scents of the five species are dominated by substances that can serve as attractive signals to bees, including species-specific scent compounds and principal compounds with larger relative amounts. This suggests that floral scent compositions are closely associated with the principal pollinator assemblages in these five species. Therefore, we conclude that floral scent compositions rather than floral morphology traits should be used to interpret plant-pollinator interactions in these Asian Buddleja species. © 2014 German Botanical Society and The Royal Botanical Society of the Netherlands.

  12. Antimosquito activity of aqueous kernel extract of soapnut Sapindus emarginatus: impact on various developmental stages of three vector mosquito species and nontarget aquatic insects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koodalingam, Arunagirinathan; Mullainadhan, Periasamy; Arumugam, Munusamy

    2009-10-01

    Aqueous (physiological saline) extracts of seed kernel from seven indigenous plants were initially screened for their antimosquito activity against eggs, larvae of all instars, and pupae of Aedes aegypti. Among various seed kernels tested, the soapnut Sapindus emarginatus (Sapindaceae) extract was found to exhibit, for the first time, a strong antimosquito activity as evident from its ability to inflict 100% mortality of all the developmental stages of A. aegypti. Furthermore, the kernel extract of S. emarginatus also exerted ovicidal, larvicidal, and pupicidal activity against two other important vector mosquitoes, namely, Anopheles stephensi and Culex quinquefasciatus. Differential susceptibility of the various developmental stages of the three mosquito species exposed to soapnut extract was also noticed. The kernel extract was found to be safe for two nontarget aquatic insects tested: the larvae of Chironomus costatus and the nymphs of Diplonychus rusticus. Lethal concentration values of soapnut extract to these nontarget insects were always threefold or fivefold higher than those that produced 100% mortality of the larvae of the three mosquito species examined. The findings of this study clearly demonstrate that the aqueous kernel extract of S. emarginatus has potent antimosquito activity detectable against all the developmental stages of three important vector mosquito species as well as it is safe for nontarget aquatic organisms, and thus this new botanical resource could be used as an eco-friendly alternative biocidal agent in control of mosquitoes.

  13. Species composition of the vegetation along the Sherichhu River, lower montane area of Eastern Bhutan

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    Tenzin Jamtsho

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available An investigation of the riparian vegetation along the Sherichhu River, lower montane area of Eastern Bhutan was conducted from April to December 2015 to explore the plant communities in terms of species composition. A total number of 18 plots were placed within the remnant patches of the vegetation on either side of the river. In total, 172 species of vascular plant has been recorded. The cluster analysis suggested four types of plant communities in the study area viz., the MallotusDesmodium-Rhus shrubland and the Syzygium venosum woodland communities, which are located in V-shaped valleys and the Albizia-Flueggea woodland and Quercus glauca woodland communities located in U-shaped valleys. In broad-spectrum, the topographic features and environmental variables i.e. litter accumulation and flooding condition might also have some impact on the species composition of the plant communities of this vegetation.

  14. Composition of semivolatile compounds of 10 Cinnamomum species from China and Myanmar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thantsin, Khin; Zhang, Qin; Yang, Jie; Wang, Qiang

    2008-05-10

    The semivolatile composition of stem-bark of 10 Cinnamomum species, collected from China and Myanmar, were obtained by extraction with diethyl ether and analyzed by GC-FID and GC-MS. Identification of the substances was made by comparison of standards, mass spectra, and retention indices with literature records. Total of 74 compounds were identified. All data were statistically processed with principal component analysis and cluster analysis. Cinnamaldehyde and alpha-cubebene were found as the common constituent of the investigated population. Except Cinnamomum multiflorum, volatile terpenoids were the main constituents of all taxa. Major constituent of C. multiflorum was phenylpropanoid. Cluster subset gave the information that chemical components variation was influenced by geographical sources. Here, the first information on the semivolatile composition of six never investigated species viz. C. multiflorum, C. obtusifolium, C. inunctum, C. chartophyllum, C. pathenoxylon, and C. glanduliferum. Furthermore, those species could be alternative source of bioactive compounds.

  15. Assessment of Local Mosquito Species Incriminates Aedes aegypti as the Potential Vector of Zika Virus in Australia

    OpenAIRE

    Sonja Hall-Mendelin; Alyssa T. Pyke; Moore, Peter R.; Mackay, Ian M.; Jamie L McMahon; Scott A. Ritchie; Carmel T. Taylor; Moore, Frederick A.J.; van den Hurk, Andrew F.

    2016-01-01

    Background Within the last 10 years Zika virus (ZIKV) has caused unprecedented epidemics of human disease in the nations and territories of the western Pacific and South America, and continues to escalate in both endemic and non-endemic regions. We evaluated the vector competence of Australian mosquitoes for ZIKV to assess their potential role in virus transmission. Methodology/Principal Findings Mosquitoes were exposed to infectious blood meals containing the prototype African ZIKV strain. A...

  16. The species composition of thrips (insecta: thysanoptera) inhabiting mango orchards in pulau pinang, malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aliakbarpour, Hamaseh; Rawi, Che Salmah Md

    2012-05-01

    A field study was conducted at two localities on Pulau Pinang, Malaysia, during two consecutive mango flowering seasons in 2009 to identify variations in the species composition of thrips infesting treated and untreated mango (Mangifera indica L.) orchards. The CO2 immobilisation technique and the cutting method were used to recover different thrips species from mango panicles and weed host plants, respectively. The mango panicles and various weed species within the treated orchard were found to harbour four thrips species from the family Thripidae. These species were identified as Thrips hawaiiensis (Morgan), Scirtothrips dorsalis (Hood), Frankliniella schultzei (Trybom) and Megalurothrips usitatus (Bagnall). The weed species Mimosa pudica, Cleome rutidosperma, Echinochloa colonum, Borreria laevicaulis, Veronia cinerea and Asystasia coromandeliana served as additional hosts to these thrips. Six thrips species were found in the untreated orchard. These species included Thrips palmi (Karny), Haplothrips sp. (Amyot and Serville) and the four thrips species found in the treated orchard. A brief description of the larvae for each genus is provided.

  17. [Species composition and spatial structure of plants in urban parks of Beijing].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Juan-Juan; Ouyang, Zhi-Yun; Zheng, Hua; Xu, Wei-Hua; Wang, Xiao-Ke

    2009-02-01

    By the method of stratified random sampling, the species composition and spatial structure of the plants in 53 parks in Beijing urban area were investigated, aimed to provide basic information for the protection of plant diversity in the parks and the management of the parks. A total of 492 plant species belong to 96 families and 283 genera were recorded. Based on the data of 21 investigation items about the trees, shrubs, and grasses in the study area and related statistical analyses, the plant structural patterns commonly seen in the green space of the parks of Beijing urban area were introduced. Among the plants in the parks, native species occupied 53.86% of the total. The chorological composition of the genera embraced broad kinds of geographical elements in China, and the predominance of dominant plants was remarkable. In most green patches of the parks, herbaceous species were more abundant and had higher coverage, shrubs had relatively low coverage and were less beneath tree canopy, and trees and shrubs had lower species richness and density. The canopy breadth and the diameter of breast height of trees as well as the breadth of shrubs and the heights of trees and shrubs were basically at the second grade, but the canopy structure of the trees were better, with good conditions of sunlight and growth. The crown missing of the shrubs was relatively low. It was suggested from correlation analyses and document survey of Beijing parks construction history that park landscape design, alien species introduction; and cultivation management were the main factors affecting the species composition and spatial structure of the plants in Beijing urban parks.

  18. Combining projected changes in species richness and composition reveals climate change impacts on coastal Mediterranean fish assemblages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albouy, Camille; Guilhaumon, François; Bastos Araujo, Miguel

    2012-01-01

    Species Temporal Turnover (STT) is one of the most familiar metrics to assess changes in assemblage composition as a consequence of climate change. However, STT mixes two components in one metric, changes in assemblage composition caused by a process of species loss or gain (i.e. the nestedness......, the joint exploration of changes in species richness and composition coupled with the distinction between species replacement and nestedness bears important information for understanding the nature of climate change impacts on biodiversity. These methodological advances should help decision...... component) and changes in assemblage composition caused by a process of species replacement (i.e. the species replacement component). Drawing on previous studies investigating spatial patterns of beta diversity, we propose measures of STT that allow analysing each component (species replacement vs...

  19. Large-scale processes underpinning fish species composition patterns in estuarine ecosystems worldwide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Cardoso

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The present study aimed to understand how assembly mechanisms drive the global and regional patterns of fish assemblage composition in estuaries. The approach used applied a bootstrapped hierarchical cluster analysis based on pairwise beta-dissimilarities (Beta sim of fish assemblages between 393 estuaries to define biogeographical units. A set of large and small-scale filters were then used to test their influence on beta-dissimilarity patterns, through distance-based linear models (DISTLM. The global pattern obtained (i.e. seven major biogeographical units was explained by large-scale filters related with geographic barriers (e.g. Isthmus of Panama and temperature/current filters, in addition to their evolutionary history. Meanwhile, species composition within each biogeographical unit was also determined by large-scale filters, with only a minor influence of a few small-scale filters (i.e. tide range, estuary type and estuary area. Overall, the global pattern of fish composition in estuaries was mainly driven by dispersal limitation assembly mechanism (i.e. evolutionary history and geographical barriers/filters. In contrast with known species richness patterns, results support a weak influence of environmental filtering on species composition at regional scales, which was also driven by dispersal limitation. Results suggest a hierarchical influence of environmental filtering mechanism that acts at increasingly finer scales.

  20. Accurate Identification and Quantification of DNA Species by Next-Generation Sequencing in Adeno-Associated Viral Vectors Produced in Insect Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penaud-Budloo, Magalie; Lecomte, Emilie; Guy-Duché, Aurélien; Saleun, Sylvie; Roulet, Alain; Lopez-Roques, Céline; Tournaire, Benoît; Cogné, Benjamin; Léger, Adrien; Blouin, Véronique; Lindenbaum, Pierre; Moullier, Philippe; Ayuso, Eduard

    2017-06-01

    Recombinant adeno-associated viral (rAAV) vectors have proven excellent tools for the treatment of many genetic diseases and other complex diseases. However, the illegitimate encapsidation of DNA contaminants within viral particles constitutes a major safety concern for rAAV-based therapies. Moreover, the development of rAAV vectors for early-phase clinical trials has revealed the limited accuracy of the analytical tools used to characterize these new and complex drugs. Although most published data concerning residual DNA in rAAV preparations have been generated by quantitative PCR, we have developed a novel single-strand virus sequencing (SSV-Seq) method for quantification of DNA contaminants in AAV vectors produced in mammalian cells by next-generation sequencing (NGS). Here, we describe the adaptation of SSV-Seq for the accurate identification and quantification of DNA species in rAAV stocks produced in insect cells. We found that baculoviral DNA was the most abundant contaminant, representing less than 2.1% of NGS reads regardless of serotype (2, 8, or rh10). Sf9 producer cell DNA was detected at low frequency (≤0.03%) in rAAV lots. Advanced computational analyses revealed that (1) baculoviral sequences close to the inverted terminal repeats preferentially underwent illegitimate encapsidation, and (2) single-nucleotide variants were absent from the rAAV genome. The high-throughput sequencing protocol described here enables effective DNA quality control of rAAV vectors produced in insect cells, and is adapted to conform with regulatory agency safety requirements.

  1. Degradation in the dentin-composite interface subjected to multi-species biofilm challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Y; Carrera, C; Chen, R; Li, J; Lenton, P; Rudney, J D; Jones, R S; Aparicio, C; Fok, A

    2014-01-01

    Oral biofilms can degrade the components in dental resin-based composite restorations, thus compromising marginal integrity and leading to secondary caries. This study investigates the mechanical integrity of the dentin-composite interface challenged with multi-species oral biofilms. While most studies used single-species biofilms, the present study used a more realistic, diverse biofilm model produced directly from plaques collected from donors with a history of early childhood caries. Dentin-composite disks were made using bovine incisor roots filled with Z100(TM) or Filtek(TM) LS (3M ESPE). The disks were incubated for 72 h in paired CDC biofilm reactors, using a previously published protocol. One reactor was pulsed with sucrose, and the other was not. A sterile saliva-only control group was run with sucrose pulsing. The disks were fractured under diametral compression to evaluate their interfacial bond strength. The surface deformation of the disks was mapped using digital image correlation to ascertain the fracture origin. Fracture surfaces were examined using scanning electron microscopy/energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy to assess demineralization and interfacial degradation. Dentin demineralization was greater under sucrose-pulsed biofilms, as the pH dropped Biofilm growth with sucrose pulsing also caused preferential degradation of the composite-dentin interface, depending on the composite/adhesive system used. Specifically, Z100 specimens showed greater bond strength reduction and more frequent cohesive failure in the adhesive layer. This was attributed to the inferior dentin coverage by Z100 adhesive, which possibly led to a higher level of chemical and enzymatic degradation. The results suggested that factors other than dentin demineralization were also responsible for interfacial degradation. A clinically relevant in vitro biofilm model was therefore developed, which would effectively allow assessment of the degradation of the dentin-composite

  2. Comparison of Phylogeny, Venom Composition and Neutralization by Antivenom in Diverse Species of Bothrops Complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peixoto, Pedro S.; Bernardoni, Juliana L.; Oliveira, Sâmella S.; Portes-Junior, José Antonio; Mourão, Rosa Helena V.; Lima-dos-Santos, Isa; Sano-Martins, Ida S.; Chalkidis, Hipócrates M.; Valente, Richard H.; Moura-da-Silva, Ana M.

    2013-01-01

    In Latin America, Bothrops snakes account for most snake bites in humans, and the recommended treatment is administration of multispecific Bothrops antivenom (SAB – soro antibotrópico). However, Bothrops snakes are very diverse with regard to their venom composition, which raises the issue of which venoms should be used as immunizing antigens for the production of pan-specific Bothrops antivenoms. In this study, we simultaneously compared the composition and reactivity with SAB of venoms collected from six species of snakes, distributed in pairs from three distinct phylogenetic clades: Bothrops, Bothropoides and Rhinocerophis. We also evaluated the neutralization of Bothrops atrox venom, which is the species responsible for most snake bites in the Amazon region, but not included in the immunization antigen mixture used to produce SAB. Using mass spectrometric and chromatographic approaches, we observed a lack of similarity in protein composition between the venoms from closely related snakes and a high similarity between the venoms of phylogenetically more distant snakes, suggesting little connection between taxonomic position and venom composition. P-III snake venom metalloproteinases (SVMPs) are the most antigenic toxins in the venoms of snakes from the Bothrops complex, whereas class P-I SVMPs, snake venom serine proteinases and phospholipases A2 reacted with antibodies in lower levels. Low molecular size toxins, such as disintegrins and bradykinin-potentiating peptides, were poorly antigenic. Toxins from the same protein family showed antigenic cross-reactivity among venoms from different species; SAB was efficient in neutralizing the B. atrox venom major toxins. Thus, we suggest that it is possible to obtain pan-specific effective antivenoms for Bothrops envenomations through immunization with venoms from only a few species of snakes, if these venoms contain protein classes that are representative of all species to which the antivenom is targeted. PMID

  3. Floral traits influence pollen vectors' choices in higher elevation communities in the Himalaya-Hengduan Mountains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yan-Hui; Ren, Zong-Xin; Lázaro, Amparo; Wang, Hong; Bernhardt, Peter; Li, Hai-Dong; Li, De-Zhu

    2016-05-24

    How floral traits and community composition influence plant specialization is poorly understood and the existing evidence is restricted to regions where plant diversity is low. Here, we assessed whether plant specialization varied among four species-rich subalpine/alpine communities on the Yulong Mountain, SW China (elevation from 2725 to 3910 m). We analyzed two factors (floral traits and pollen vector community composition: richness and density) to determine the degree of plant specialization across 101 plant species in all four communities. Floral visitors were collected and pollen load analyses were conducted to identify and define pollen vectors. Plant specialization of each species was described by using both pollen vector diversity (Shannon's diversity index) and plant selectiveness (d' index), which reflected how selective a given species was relative to available pollen vectors. Pollen vector diversity tended to be higher in communities at lower elevations, while plant selectiveness was significantly lower in a community with the highest proportion of unspecialized flowers (open flowers and clusters of flowers in open inflorescences). In particular, we found that plant species with large and unspecialized flowers attracted a greater diversity of pollen vectors and showed higher selectiveness in their use of pollen vectors. Plant species with large floral displays and high flower abundance were more selective in their exploitation of pollen vectors. Moreover, there was a negative relationship between plant selectiveness and pollen vector density. These findings suggest that flower shape and flower size can increase pollen vector diversity but they also increased plant selectiveness. This indicated that those floral traits that were more attractive to insects increased the diversity of pollen vectors to plants while decreasing overlap among co-blooming plant species for the same pollen vectors. Furthermore, floral traits had a more important impact on the

  4. Construction of a stable replicating shuttle vector for Caldicellulosiruptor species: use for extending genetic methodologies to other members of this genus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daehwan Chung

    Full Text Available The recalcitrance of plant biomass is the most important barrier to its economic conversion by microbes to products of interest. Thermophiles have special advantages for biomass conversion and members of the genus Caldicellulosiruptor are the most thermophilic cellulolytic microbes known. In this study, we report the construction of a replicating shuttle vector for Caldicellulosiruptor species based on pBAS2, the smaller of two native C. bescii plasmids. The entire plasmid was cloned into an E. coli cloning vector containing a pSC101 origin of replication and an apramycin resistance cassette for selection in E. coli. The wild-type C. bescii pyrF locus was cloned under the transcriptional control of the regulatory region of the ribosomal protein S30EA (Cbes2105, and the resulting vector was transformed into a new spontaneous deletion mutant in the pyrFA locus of C. bescii that allowed complementation with the pyrF gene alone. Plasmid DNA was methylated in vitro with a recently described cognate methyltransferase, M.CbeI, and transformants were selected for uracil prototrophy. The plasmid was stably maintained in low copy with selection but rapidly lost without selection. There was no evidence of DNA rearrangement during transformation and replication in C. bescii. A similar approach was used to screen for transformability of other members of this genus using M.CbeI to overcome restriction as a barrier and was successful for transformation of C. hydrothermalis, an attractive species for many applications. Plasmids containing a carbohydrate binding domain (CBM and linker region from the C. bescii celA gene were maintained with selection and were structurally stable through transformation and replication in C. bescii and E. coli.

  5. Changes in plant species composition of coastal dune habitats over a 20-year period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Vecchio, Silvia; Prisco, Irene; Acosta, Alicia T R; Stanisci, Angela

    2015-03-05

    Coastal sandy ecosystems are increasingly being threatened by human pressure, causing loss of biodiversity, habitat degradation and landscape modifications. However, there are still very few detailed studies focussing on compositional changes in coastal dune plant communities over time. In this work, we investigated how coastal dune European Union (EU) habitats (from pioneer annual beach communities to Mediterranean scrubs on the landward fixed dunes) have changed during the last 20 years. Using phytosociological relevés conducted in 1989-90 and in 2010-12, we investigated changes in floristic composition over time. We then compared plant cover and the proportion of ruderal, alien and habitat diagnostic species ('focal species') in the two periods. Finally, we used Ellenberg indicator values to define the 'preferences' of the plant species for temperature and moisture. We found that only fore dune habitats showed significant differences in species cover between the two time periods, with higher plant cover in the more recent relevés and a significant increase in thermophilic species. Although previous studies have demonstrated consistent habitat loss in this area, we observed that all coastal dune plant communities remain well represented, after a 20-year period. However, fore dunes have been experiencing significant compositional changes. Although we cannot confirm whether the observed changes are strictly related to climatic changes, to human pressure or to both, we hypothesize that a moderate increment in average yearly temperature may have promoted the increase in plant cover and the spread of thermophilic species. Thus, even though human activities are major driving forces of change in coastal dune vegetation, at the community scale climatic factors may also play important roles. Our study draws on re-visitation studies which appear to constitute a powerful tool for the assessment of the conservation status of EU habitats. Published by Oxford University

  6. The composition of mixed-species foraging flocks of birds in Kruger National Park, South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guy Hausler

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Mixed-species foraging flocks (MSFFs of birds can be defined as aggregations of more than two species that actively initiate and continue their association while foraging, without being drawn to a single resource. MSFFs have been well documented for terrestrial habitats globally, but rarely in southern Africa. This study describes the composition of MSFFs in two habitat types (Acacia and Combretum within the southern Kruger National Park, South Africa during the late dry season. Thirty-one MSFFs were recorded in each of the two habitat types, with 1251 individuals of 74 different species being observed. We found that compared to Combretum, (mean: 10.7 ± 5.2 s.d. Acacia had significantly more individuals per MSFFs (mean: 21.5 ± 12.6 s.d. and more species per MSFF (Acacia mean: 8.7 ± 3.5 s.d.; Combretum mean: 5.9 ± 1.7 s.d.. The mean number of individuals per species per 31 MSFFs was 9.3 (± 4.5 s.d. and 7.6 (± 5.6 s.d. in the Acacia and Combretum habitat types respectively. The most frequently occurring species in both habitat types was the Fork-tailed Drongo (Dicrurus adsimilis. There was a significant association between certain species pairs in both habitats. Future studies in this area could be done to investigate the reasons behind the differences in MSFF sizes and species numbers between habitats. The season during which this study was performed excluded all summer migrants and a similar investigation in the wet season may reveal a different MSFF composition.Conservation implications: Understanding the dynamics and compositions of MSFFs, could form a valuable component of avian biodiversity monitoring both in and outside of protected areas. Within a given area, changes in the composition and behaviour of MSFFs over time could potentially be used as early indicator of threats to biodiversity.Keywords: avian; habitat; savanna

  7. Characterisation of larval habitats, species composition and factors associated with the seasonal abundance of mosquito fauna in Gezira, Sudan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahgoub, Mostafa M; Kweka, Eliningaya J; Himeidan, Yousif E

    2017-02-08

    Larval source management (LSM), which requires an understanding of the ecology and composition of the local mosquito fauna, is an important parameter in successful vector control programmes. The present study was conducted to understand the distribution of larval habitats, species composition and factors associated with the seasonal abundance of mosquito larvae in Gezira irrigation Scheme in Gezira state, central Sudan. Cross-sectional larval surveys were carried out in the communities of Barakat (urban) and El-Kareiba (semi-urban), in Wad Madani, Gezira. A standard dipper was used for sampling larvae in all possible breeding sites and enamel bowls were employed for larvae sorting. Habitats were characterised using physical features and all larvae specimens were identified morphologically. A total of 331 larval habitats were surveyed, out of which 166 were found to be positive breeding sites for Anopheles (56.78%), Culicinae (29.67%) and Aedes (13.55%) species. A total of 5 525 larvae collected were categorised as Culex (2 617, 47.37%), Anopheles (2 600, 47.06%) and Aedes (308, 5.57%). There was a high number of positive habitats during the rainy season, while the lowest proportion was reported during the hot dry season, in both study sites (Barakat [χ (2) = 10.641, P = 0.0090], El-Kareiba [χ (2) = 23.765, P = 0.0001]). The main breeding site for Anopheles larvae was leaking water pipes (51.5%), followed by irrigation channels (34.2%), hoof prints (6.4%), tyre tracks (5.5%) and water tanks (2.4%). A logistic regression analysis showed that the abundance of Anopheles larvae was reduced by the presence of predators (backswimmers, tadpoles) and grass cover. Adult productivity (number of adult females emerged/m(2)) was not homogeneousfor all habitats; the highest productivity was found in irrigation channels (0.78 females/m(2)) for Anopheles, and in septic tanks (2.86 females/m(2)) for Culicinae and (0.86 females/m(2)) for Aedes. Anopheles arabiensis

  8. [Studies on difference of chemical compositions in plant species of Tripterygium genus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yi-Long; Liu, Xiang; Qu, Xian-You; Yao, Yuan-Yuan; Li, Na; Liang, Xu-Ming; Zhang, Yu-Yu; Yang, Da-Jian; Zhang, Xiao-Mei

    2017-01-01

    We studied the content of chemical compositions and correlation among species of Tripterygium genus by principal component analysis(PCA) and variance analysis(ANOVA), and we also studied the difference among the 3 species.Using [BMIm]PF6 ionic liquid-based ultrasonic-assisted extraction, we determined the contents of 11 compounds including wilforgine, wilforzine, triptophenolide, wilforine, triptoquinone A, triptolide, tripterin, egallocatechin, epigallocatechin, catechin, and epicatechin in 28 batches of the Tripterygium species by HPLC and PCA. Partial least squares analysis (PLS) and ANOVA were also performed to verify the results.The analysis results of PCA and PLS showed that three species of Tripterygium genus were clustered into three regions respectively, and triptoquinone A was the important factor which affected the aggregation of these three species.There was a significant difference among the contents of 11 chemical components in the three species(Pwork, the content determination method is rapid and accurate, and the analysis method is simple and convenient, which provides a reference for the classification, the efficacy and the toxicity of the species. Copyright© by the Chinese Pharmaceutical Association.

  9. Combining projected changes in species richness and composition reveals climate change impacts on coastal Mediterranean fish assemblages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albouy, Camille; Guilhaumon, François; Bastos Araujo, Miguel

    2012-01-01

    future climatic niches of 288 coastal Mediterranean fish species based on a global warming scenario. We then aggregated geographically the species-level projections to analyse the projected changes in species richness and composition. Our results show that projected changes in assemblage composition......Species Temporal Turnover (STT) is one of the most familiar metrics to assess changes in assemblage composition as a consequence of climate change. However, STT mixes two components in one metric, changes in assemblage composition caused by a process of species loss or gain (i.e. the nestedness...... are caused by different processes (species replacement vs. nestedness) in several areas of the Mediterranean Sea. In addition, our mapping strategy highlights that the coastal fish fauna in several regions of the Mediterranean Sea could experience a ‘cul-de-sac’ effect if exposed to climate warming. Overall...

  10. The Species Composition on Agricultural Terraces in NW Part of Slovakia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Machová Iva

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The article contributes to a deeper understanding of agricultural terraces in NW Slovakia. The agricultural terraces found in 12 mountain ranges were characterised in detail on 32 localities. The slope parts of the studied terraces are on average only 2.3 m wide and current and former agricultural areas between them are on average 11 m wide. Furthermore, seventy phytosociological relevés were made on the terraces. Overall, 360 species of vascular plants were found in the relevés, 66 of which appeared regularly The localities were evaluated by DCA analysis. The main factor infuencing the species composition appears to be the geological composition of the bedrock and, probably the altitude as well. High coverage of the herb layer (median value 95%, low coverage of the shrub layer (median value 5% and the absence or a very low coverage of the tree layer is typical for these terraces.

  11. Walker Branch Throughfall Displacement Experiment Data Report: Site Characterization, System Performance, Weather, Species Composition, and Growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanson, P.J.

    2001-09-04

    This numeric data package provides data sets, and accompanying documentation, on site characterization, system performance, weather, species composition, and growth for the Throughfall Displacement Experiment, which was established in the Walker Branch Watershed of East Tennessee to provide data on the responses of forests to altered precipitation regimes. The specific data sets include soil water content and potential, coarse fraction of the soil profile, litter layer temperature, soil temperature, monthly weather, daily weather, hourly weather, species composition of trees and saplings, mature tree and sapling annual growth, and relative leaf area index. Fortran and SAS{trademark} access codes are provided to read the ASCII data files. The data files and this documentation are available without charge on a variety of media and via the Internet from the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC).

  12. Greenhouse gas emissions from dung pats vary with dung beetle species and with assemblage composition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irene Piccini

    Full Text Available Cattle farming is a major source of greenhouse gases (GHGs. Recent research suggests that GHG fluxes from dung pats could be affected by biotic interactions involving dung beetles. Whether and how these effects vary among beetle species and with assemblage composition is yet to be established. To examine the link between GHGs and different dung beetle species assemblages, we used a closed chamber system to measure fluxes of carbon dioxide (CO2, methane (CH4 and nitrous oxide (N2O from cattle dung pats. Targeting a total of four dung beetle species (a pat-dwelling species, a roller of dung balls, a large and a small tunnelling species, we ran six experimental treatments (four monospecific and two mixed and two controls (one with dung but without beetles, and one with neither dung nor beetles. In this setting, the overall presence of beetles significantly affected the gas fluxes, but different species contributed unequally to GHG emissions. When compared to the control with dung, we detected an overall reduction in the total cumulative CO2 flux from all treatments with beetles and a reduction in N2O flux from the treatments with the three most abundant dung beetle species. These reductions can be seen as beneficial ecosystem services. Nonetheless, we also observed a disservice provided by the large tunneler, Copris lunaris, which significantly increased the CH4 flux-an effect potentially traceable to the species' nesting strategy involving the construction of large brood balls. When fluxes were summed into CO2-equivalents across individual GHG compounds, dung with beetles proved to emit less GHGs than did beetle-free dung, with the mix of the three most abundant species providing the highest reduction (-32%. As the mix of multiple species proved the most effective in reducing CO2-equivalents, the conservation of diverse assemblages of dung beetles emerges as a priority in agro-pastoral ecosystems.

  13. Composition and anti-insect activity of essential oils from Tagetes L. species (Asteraceae, Helenieae) on Ceratitis capitata Wiedemann and Triatoma infestans Klug.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López, Sandra B; López, María L; Aragón, Liliana M; Tereschuk, María L; Slanis, Alberto C; Feresin, Gabriela E; Zygadlo, Julio A; Tapia, Alejandro A

    2011-05-25

    Essential oils from four species of the genus Tagetes L. (Asteraceae, Helenieae) collected in Tucumán province, Argentina, were evaluated for their chemical composition, toxicity, and olfactory activity on Mediterranean fruit fly Ceratitis capitata Wiedemann adults and for repellent properties on Triatoma infestans (Klug) (Chagas disease vector). Yields of essential oils range from 0.2 to 0.8% (v/w). The same main constituents among Tagetes minuta L., Tagestes rupestris Cabrera, and Tagetes terniflora Kunth, (cis-trans)-ocimenes, (cis-trans)-tagetones, and (cis-trans)-ocimenones showed important differences in their relative compositions. Tagetes filifolia Lag. was characterized by the recognized phenylpropanoids methylchavicol and trans-anethole as the main components. LD(50) was ≤20 μg/insect in topical bioassays. T. rupestris was the most toxic to C. capitata females, whereas the other oils presented similar toxicities against males and females. Tagetes rupestris oil attracted both sexes of C. capitata at 5 μg, whereas T. minuta showed opposite activities between males (attractant) and females (repellent). Oils from T. minuta and T. filifolia were the most repellent to T. infestans. The results suggest that compositions of essential oils influence their insecticidal and olfactory properties. The essential oils from Tagetes species show an important potential as infochemical agents on insects' behaviors. This study highlights the chemical variability of essential oils as a source of variation of anti-insect properties.

  14. Species Composition and Spatio-Temporal Variations of Phytoplankton of Lake Uluabat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nurhayat DALKIRAN

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This study was carried out at three stations of Lake Uluabat between March 2006 and January 2007. Composition, density and spatio-temporal variations of phytoplankton of Lake Uluabat were investigated. During the study period, a total of 169 taxa were identified. 56 taxa belong to Bacillariophyta, 51 to Chlorophyta, 25 to Cyanobacteria, 19 to Euglenophyta, 7 to Miozoa, 6 to Charophyta and 5 to Ochrophyta. The results of this study were compared with the previous studies, indicated that the phytoplankton taxa richness were approximately reduced by half in Lake Uluabat. According to RDA analysis, water temperature and nitrate nitrogen were the most important physicochemical parameters that affect species composition, density and spatio-temporal variations of phytoplankton of Lake Uluabat. The phytoplankton composition of Lake Uluabat indicated that the trophic state of lake was eutrophic.

  15. Equisetum species show uniform epicuticular wax structures but diverse composition patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brune, Thomas; Haas, Klaus

    2011-01-01

    Only few data on the epicuticular waxes (EWs) of horsetails are available. This contribution therefore focuses on the wax micromorphology and chemical composition of Equisetum species of the subgenera Equisetum and Hippochaete. Distribution patterns and structural details of EW on the shoots were studied by scanning electron microscopy. After extraction with chloroform, the chemical composition of wax isolates was analysed by gas chromatography. Epicuticular wax crystals were non-oriented platelets or membraneous platelets. They were usually located on subsidiary cells of stomata and adjacent cells. Other parts of the shoots were covered mainly with a smooth wax film or small granules only. The chemical constituents found were alkanes, esters, aldehydes, primary alcohols and free fatty acids in a range of C(20)-C(36) (in esters C(36)-C(56)). All species of the subgenus Hippochaete showed a similar pattern of fractions with high percentages of alkanes and aldehydes, whereas the subgenus Equisetum species had distinctly different wax compositions. Extracts from the internodes-surfaces without well-developed EW crystals and only few stomata-showed the lowest contents of aldehydes. The covering with EW crystals will provide unhindered gas exchange and, combined with intracuticular wax, may prevent excess water loss during winter in the evergreen shoots of the subgenus Hippochaete. The results indicate that the Equisetum wax micromorphology and biosynthesis are comparable to EW of other pteridophyte classes and mosses.

  16. Near infra-red spectroscopy quantitative modelling of bivalve protein, lipid and glycogen composition using single-species versus multi-species calibration and validation sets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartlett, Jill K.; Maher, William A.; Purss, Matthew B. J.

    2018-03-01

    Near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) quantitative modelling was used to measure the protein, lipid and glycogen composition of five marine bivalve species (Saccostrea glomerata, Ostrea angasi, Crassostrea gigas, Mytilus galloprovincialis and Anadara trapezia) from multiple locations and seasons. Predictive models were produced for each component using individual species and aggregated sample populations for the three oyster species (S. glomerata, O. angasi and C. gigas) and for all five bivalve species. Whole animal tissues were freeze dried, ground to > 20 μm and scanned by NIRS. Protein, lipid and glycogen composition were determined by traditional chemical analyses and calibration models developed to allow rapid NIRS-measurement of these components in the five bivalve species. Calibration modelling was performed using wavelet selection, genetic algorithms and partial least squares analysis. Model quality was assessed using RPIQ and RMESP. For protein composition, single species model results had RPIQ values between 2.4 and 3.5 and RMSEP between 8.6 and 18%, the three oyster model had an RPIQ of 2.6 and an RMSEP of 10.8% and the five bivalve species had an RPIQ of 3.6 and RMSEP of 8.7% respectively. For lipid composition, single species models achieved RPIQ values between 2.9 and 5.3 with RMSEP between 9.1 and 11.2%, the oyster model had an RPIQ of 3.6 and RMSEP of 6.8 and the five bivalve model had an RPIQ of 5.2 and RMSEP of 6.8% respectively. For glycogen composition, the single species models had RPIQs between 3.8 and 18.9 with RMSEP between 3.5 and 9.2%, the oyster model had an RPIQ of 5.5 and RMSEP of 7.1% and the five bivalve model had an RPIQ of 4 and RMSEP of 7.6% respectively. Comparison between individual species models and aggregated models for three oyster species and five bivalve species for each component indicate that aggregating data from like species produces high quality models with robust and reliable quantitative application. The benefit of

  17. Diet composition and resource partitioning in two small flatfish species in the German Bight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schückel, S.; Sell, A.; Kröncke, I.; Reiss, H.

    2011-10-01

    Since the late 1980s, the small-sized non-commercial flatfish species solenette ( Buglossidium luteum) and scaldfish ( Arnoglossus laterna) have increased in abundance in the southern North Sea. Because these species are considered as possible competitors for prey of commercial flatfish, this study aimed at advancing knowledge of their feeding ecology. Between January 2009 and January 2010 stomach contents of solenette and scaldfish and benthic infauna were sampled seasonally in a study area in the German Bight. The objectives were to investigate the seasonal variability of feeding activity and diet composition of both flatfish species related to benthic prey availability. For both flatfish, the highest feeding activity was found in summer, at the same time that the highest prey densities occurred in the study area. A reduced feeding activity was observed during the winter of 2010, but not in the winter of 2009, probably related to higher 2009 water temperatures. In all seasons, diet composition of solenette was dominated by meiofauna, mainly harpacticoid copepods. Macrofauna prey species, namely juveniles of bivalves and echinoderms became important in spring. An increase in amphipods and cumaceans was found in the stomach contents during summer and autumn, simultaneously with their increased abundance in the benthic infauna. In contrast, polychaetes were rarely found in the diet, but dominated the infauna during all seasons. Diet composition of scaldfish was dominated by larger and mobile prey, and, during all seasons, was mainly comprised of crustaceans. Amphipods characterised the diet in both winters, while decapods such as Crangon spp. and Liocarcinus spp. were the dominant prey from spring to autumn. Additionally, juveniles of flatfish (Pleuronectids) and bivalves were found in the scaldfish diet in spring, replaced by cumaceans in summer. No dietary overlap between both flatfish species was found across seasons, indicating partitioning of prey resources

  18. The Costs of Evaluating Species Densities and Composition of Snakes to Assess Development Impacts in Amazonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Fraga, Rafael; Stow, Adam J.; Magnusson, William E.; Lima, Albertina P.

    2014-01-01

    Studies leading to decision-making for environmental licensing often fail to provide accurate estimates of diversity. Measures of snake diversity are regularly obtained to assess development impacts in the rainforests of the Amazon Basin, but this taxonomic group may be subject to poor detection probabilities. Recently, the Brazilian government tried to standardize sampling designs by the implementation of a system (RAPELD) to quantify biological diversity using spatially-standardized sampling units. Consistency in sampling design allows the detection probabilities to be compared among taxa, and sampling effort and associated cost to be evaluated. The cost effectiveness of detecting snakes has received no attention in Amazonia. Here we tested the effects of reducing sampling effort on estimates of species densities and assemblage composition. We identified snakes in seven plot systems, each standardised with 14 plots. The 250 m long centre line of each plot followed an altitudinal contour. Surveys were repeated four times in each plot and detection probabilities were estimated for the 41 species encountered. Reducing the number of observations, or the size of the sampling modules, caused significant loss of information on species densities and local patterns of variation in assemblage composition. We estimated the cost to find a snake as $ 120 U.S., but general linear models indicated the possibility of identifying differences in assemblage composition for half the overall survey costs. Decisions to reduce sampling effort depend on the importance of lost information to target-issues, and may not be the preferred option if there is the potential for identifying individual snake species requiring specific conservation actions. However, in most studies of human disturbance on species assemblages, it is likely to be more cost-effective to focus on other groups of organisms with higher detection probabilities. PMID:25147930

  19. Identification of Different Bile Species and Fermentation Time of Bile Arisaema Based on An Intelligent Electronic Nose and Least Squares Support Vector Machine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Chaoqun; Xie, Dashuai; Liu, Yujie; Wu, Chun-Jie; Wen, Chuanbiao; Huang, Xiwei; Guo, Jinhong

    2018-02-03

    Fermentation is one of the most traditionally utilized methods to process the raw materials of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM). Bile Arisaema (BA) is produced by the fermentation of the roots of Arisaema heterophyllu with bile. Fermentation time and bile species are the key factors in producing BA. The study was aimed to develop a new and rapid method for the identification of different fermentation time and bile species of BA. The polysaccharide content (PC), protease activity (PA) and amylase activity (AC) of BA were determined. The changes of PC, PA and AC were significant indicators for the evaluation of different fermentation time. Based on the odor data of BA obtained by electronic nose technology (E-nose), the Principal Component Analysis (PCA) was used to identify bile species. The results were further verified by the Least Squares Support Vector Machine (LS-SVM). The trained LS-SVM was also used to predict the PC, PA and AC of the samples to identify fermentation time. The present study indicated that E-nose combined with LS-SVM could effectively predict the PC, PA and AC of the samples, identify the bile species and fermentation time of BA, and it was proved to be a useful strategy for quality control of fermented products of TCMs.

  20. Greenhouse gas emissions from dung pats vary with dung beetle species and with assemblage composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnieri, Fabrizio; Caprio, Enrico; Nervo, Beatrice; Pelissetti, Simone; Palestrini, Claudia; Roslin, Tomas; Rolando, Antonio

    2017-01-01

    Cattle farming is a major source of greenhouse gases (GHGs). Recent research suggests that GHG fluxes from dung pats could be affected by biotic interactions involving dung beetles. Whether and how these effects vary among beetle species and with assemblage composition is yet to be established. To examine the link between GHGs and different dung beetle species assemblages, we used a closed chamber system to measure fluxes of carbon dioxide (CO2), methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O) from cattle dung pats. Targeting a total of four dung beetle species (a pat-dwelling species, a roller of dung balls, a large and a small tunnelling species), we ran six experimental treatments (four monospecific and two mixed) and two controls (one with dung but without beetles, and one with neither dung nor beetles). In this setting, the overall presence of beetles significantly affected the gas fluxes, but different species contributed unequally to GHG emissions. When compared to the control with dung, we detected an overall reduction in the total cumulative CO2 flux from all treatments with beetles and a reduction in N2O flux from the treatments with the three most abundant dung beetle species. These reductions can be seen as beneficial ecosystem services. Nonetheless, we also observed a disservice provided by the large tunneler, Copris lunaris, which significantly increased the CH4 flux–an effect potentially traceable to the species’ nesting strategy involving the construction of large brood balls. When fluxes were summed into CO2-equivalents across individual GHG compounds, dung with beetles proved to emit less GHGs than did beetle-free dung, with the mix of the three most abundant species providing the highest reduction (-32%). As the mix of multiple species proved the most effective in reducing CO2-equivalents, the conservation of diverse assemblages of dung beetles emerges as a priority in agro-pastoral ecosystems. PMID:28700590

  1. Species composition and population dynamics of thrips (Thysanoptera) in mango orchards of northern peninsular Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aliakbarpour, H; Che Salmah, M R; Dieng, H

    2010-10-01

    Thrips are key pests of mango, Mangifera indica (L.), in Malaysia, including the Northern Peninsular. As Penang has year-round equatorial climate and high of rainfall, the populations of thrips may be subject to variations in composition and size. With a goal of developing an appropriate control strategy, a survey was conducted in Penang to determine species composition and abundance in relation to some environmental factors. Sprayed and unsprayed orchards were sampled on weekly basis through two flowering seasons of 2009 using CO(2) collection technique. Larval population falling into the ground to pupate and adults emerging from the soil were investigated in both orchards. Thrips hawaiiensis (Morgan) and Scirtothrips dorsalis (Hood) were the most prevalent species in the sprayed and the unsprayed orchards, respectively. The abundance of thrips was high during the flowering period of the dry season and decreased during the flowering period of the rainy season. This latter period coincided with decreased temperature and increased relative humidity. Percentage of adult emergence from the soil was lower in the rainy season than recorded in the dry season in both orchards. Taken together, these observations suggest that T. hawaiiensis and S. dorsalis are the main thrips species pests of mango panicles in Penang. Direct control with insecticides focusing on these two species may help to reduce cosmetic injuries and other damages on mango fruits.

  2. Integrating species composition and leaf nitrogen content to indicate effects of nitrogen deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Enzai

    2017-02-01

    Nitrogen (N) deposition has been increasing globally and has arisen concerns of its impacts on terrestrial ecosystems. Ecological indicators play an important role in ecosystem monitoring, assessment and management in the context of an anthropogenic transformation of the global N cycle. By integrating species composition and leaf N stoichiometry, a new community N indicator was defined and validated in the understory plots of an N enrichment (as NH4NO3) experiment in an old-growth boreal forest in Northeast China. Three-year N additions showed no significant effect on the understory species richness, but an obvious shift in species composition occurred. The response of leaf N content to N additions was generally positive but varied by species. Overall, the community N indicator increased significantly with higher N addition level and soil available N content, being in the shape of a non-linear saturation response curve. The results suggest that the community N indicator could be an effective tool to indicate changes in ecosystem N availability. Critical values of the community N indicator for specific vegetation type could potentially provide useful information for nature conservation managers and policy makers. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Chemical composition and yield of essential oil from three Croton species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuliane Sampaio de Souza

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: Marmeleiros are popularly known for the medicinal properties ascribed to their essential oils. This research aimed to analyze the essential oil of leaves from three Croton species (Croton argyrophylloides, Croton jacobinensis, and Croton sincorensis, to verify whether the daily time and harvest season in the year may interfere with their essential oils performance and composition. From each species, 1,500g of green leaves were harvested in Viçosa do Ceará - CE, at 6am and 12pm, during both dry and rainy seasons. Essential oil extraction was conducted by the method of water vapor drag and chemical profile was analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/MS. The highest yield was obtained at 12pm in the dry season for C. argyrophylloides and C. jacobinensis, and at 6am in the rainy season for C. sincorensis. Bicyclogermacrene demonstrated higher relative abundance in C. argyrophylloides (28.09 to 30.59%, C. jacobinensis (25.2 to 30.14%, and C. sincorensis (23.86 and 21.71%, and the only exception was at 6am in C. sincorensis, where (E-caryophyllene was the most abundant compound (25.34%. The yield and composition of the studied species were influenced by rainfall, temperature, and sunlight, presenting statistical significant differences between the different periods studied. The species produce constituents with specific biological properties; and therefore, they can be used as a natural source.

  4. Amatoxin and phallotoxin composition in species of the genus Amanita in Colombia: a taxonomic perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas, N; Bernal, A; Sarria, V; Franco-Molano, A; Restrepo, S

    2011-11-01

    Some species in the genus Amanita have a great variety of toxic secondary metabolites. They are characterized macroscopically by having a white spore print and free gills, and microscopically by the presence of a divergent hymenophoral trama. Some species of Amanita present in Colombia were chemically characterized by analyzing their toxin composition using HPLC. Samples were collected in oak (Quercus humboldtii) and pine (Pinus radiata) forests. Twelve species were recovered, Amanita fuligineodisca, Amanita xylinivolva, Amanita flavoconia, Amanita rubescens, Amanita bisporigera, Amanita muscaria, Amanita humboldtii, Amanita sororcula, Amanita brunneolocularis, Amanita colombiana, Amanita citrina, Amanita porphyria as well as two unreported species. Results showed that most of the analyzed species have α -amanitin in concentrations ranging from 50 ppm to 6000 ppm. Concentrations of α-amanitin in the pileus were significantly greater than in the stipe. Phalloidin and phallacidin were only present in A. bisporigera. Chromatographic profiles are proposed as an additional taxonomic tool since specific peaks with similar retention times were conserved at the species level. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Larval habitats and species composition of mosquitoes in Darjeeling Himalayas, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aditya, Gautam; Pramanik, Mihir K; Saha, Goutam K

    2006-03-01

    A preliminary survey of larval mosquito habitats and temporal variation in mosquito diversity in the hill town of Darjeeling, India was made during 2003, for a qualitative and quantitative assessment of mosquito distribution. The possible larval habitats of mosquitoes were surveyed and the species diversity in the sites positive for mosquito larvae was noted. Bi-weekly sampling from a particular habitat was carried out to reveal the temporal variation in mosquito species. A good number of lentic aquatic habitats were found to be hosting mosquito immatures, though difference in the physical and biological features of these habitats was prominent. Altogether, immatures of six mosquito species, belonging to four genera--Aedes, Armigeres, Culex and Toxorhynchites were noted with significant difference in temporal variation in their relative and absolute numbers. A positive correlation (r = + 0.707) was found between population of the prey mosquito immatures and the population of immatures of Tx. splendens. The species diversity index (H') for the mosquitoes remained between 0.87 and 1.53. The evenness components ranged between 54.03 and 95.03% and differed significantly. In the present study, the aquatic bodies could be categorised into six types depending on the size and structural complexity that may account for the observed variation in the species composition of the larval habitats. In addition to this, other factors like temperature, rainfall and other related climatic attributes may be responsible for the observed species variation, which needs to be confirmed through further studies.

  6. Effects of the Domestic Cooking on Elemental Chemical Composition of Beans Species (Phaseolus vulgaris L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra S. T. Ferreira

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cooking is imperative for beans owing to the presence of compounds that can negatively affect nutritional value. Additionally, the heating of beans can increase protein digestibility and induce desirable sensory properties. However, cooking also causes considerable changes in the composition of numerous chemical constituents, including amino acids, vitamins, and minerals. For this, effects of domestic cooking on the essential element concentrations in various beans species (Phaseolus vulgaris L. were investigated using jalo, fradinho, rajado, rosinha, bolinha, black, and common species. Elemental determination was made with flame atomic absorption spectrometry and inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry after sample digestion in a closed-vessel microwave oven using a diluted oxidant mixture. Analytical methods were evaluated with an addition and recovery test and analysis of certified reference materials (apple and citrus leaves. Ca, Cu, K, and Mg were present mainly in rajado, Cu in jalo, Fe in black, S and Zn in fradinho, and P in rosinha species. Thermal treatment did not affect Cu, Fe, S, and Zn concentrations, but it increased Ca, K, Mg, P, and Zn concentrations in jalo and black species. Ca concentration decreased in fradinho and rajado species, as did Fe concentration in jalo and rajado species.

  7. [Species composition, distribution and phenological characters of pollen-allergenic plants in Beijing urban area].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouyang, Zhi-Yun; Xin, Jia-Nan; Zheng, Hua; Meng, Xue-Song; Wang, Xiao-Ke

    2007-09-01

    In order to know the species composition, distribution pattern, and phenological characteristics of pollen-allergenic plants in Beijing urban area, an investigation was made, combined with literature survey and experts interviews. The results showed that within the fifth ring of Beijing, there were 99 pollen-allergenic plant species belonging to 32 genera and 19 families, among which, 52 species were native plants, accounting for 52.5% of the total, 26 species were introduced from other regions of China, occupying 26.3% of the total, and 21 species were introduced from foreign countries, being 21.2% of the total. The 32 genera of pollen-allergenic plants in Beijing urban area were mainly North Temperate elements, occupying 40.6% , followed by Cosmopolitan and Pantropic elements. In all functional sections of Beijing urban area, the pollen-allergenic plants were most diversified in urban parks, and had the highest proportion in street tree species. The coverage of herbs with strong pollen allergy was in the order of waste lands > gym centers and institution yards > greenbelts > parks > residential areas > squares. The blooming period of pollen-allergenic arbors in Beijing urban area was concentrated in March and April, while that of pollen-allergenic herbs was from July to September.

  8. Morphology, Diet Composition, Distribution and Nesting Biology of Four Lark Species in Mongolia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galbadrakh Mainjargal

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available We aimed to enhance existing knowledge of four lark species (Mongolian lark , Horned lark, Eurasian skylark, and Lesser short-toed lark, with respect to nesting biology, distribution, and diet, using long-term dataset collected during 2000–2012. Nest and egg measurements substantially varied among species. For pooled data across species, the clutch size averaged 3.72 ± 1.13 eggs and did not differ among larks. Body mass of nestlings increased signi fi cantly with age at weighing. Daily increase in body mass of lark nestlings ranged between 3.09 and 3.89 gram per day. Unsurprisingly, the majority of lark locations occurred in steppe ecosystems, followed by human created systems; whereas only 1.8% of the pooled locations across species were observed in forest ecosystem. Diet composition did not vary among species in the proportions of major food categories consumed. The most commonly occurring food items were invertebrates and frequently consumed were being beetles (e.g. Coleoptera: Carabidae, Scarabaeidae, and Curculionidae and grasshoppers (e.g. Orthoptera: Acrididae, and their occurrences accounted for 63.7% of insect related food items. Among the fi ve morphological traits we measured, there were signi fi cant differences in wing span, body mass, bill, and tarsus; however tail lengths did not differ across four species.

  9. Efficient and accurate machine-learning interpolation of atomic energies in compositions with many species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artrith, Nongnuch; Urban, Alexander; Ceder, Gerbrand

    2017-07-01

    Machine-learning potentials (MLPs) for atomistic simulations are a promising alternative to conventional classical potentials. Current approaches rely on descriptors of the local atomic environment with dimensions that increase quadratically with the number of chemical species. In this paper, we demonstrate that such a scaling can be avoided in practice. We show that a mathematically simple and computationally efficient descriptor with constant complexity is sufficient to represent transition-metal oxide compositions and biomolecules containing 11 chemical species with a precision of around 3 meV/atom. This insight removes a perceived bound on the utility of MLPs and paves the way to investigate the physics of previously inaccessible materials with more than ten chemical species.

  10. Susceptibility to Campylobacter infection is associated with the species composition of the human fecal microbiota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dicksved, Johan; Ellström, Patrik; Engstrand, Lars; Rautelin, Hilpi

    2014-09-16

    The gut microbiota is essential for human health, but very little is known about how the composition of this ecosystem can influence and respond to bacterial infections. Here we address this by prospectively studying the gut microbiota composition before, during, and after natural Campylobacter infection in exposed poultry abattoir workers. The gut microbiota composition was analyzed with 16S amplicon sequencing of fecal samples from poultry abattoir workers during the peak season of Campylobacter infection in Sweden. The gut microbiota compositions were compared between individuals who became culture positive for Campylobacter and those who remained negative. Individuals who became Campylobacter positive had a significantly higher abundance of Bacteroides (P = 0.007) and Escherichia (P = 0.002) species than those who remained culture negative. Furthermore, this group had a significantly higher abundance of Phascolarctobacterium (P = 0.017) and Streptococcus (P = 0.034) sequences than the Campylobacter-negative group, which had an overrepresentation of Clostridiales (P = 0.017), unclassified Lachnospiraceae (P = 0.008), and Anaerovorax (P = 0.015) sequences. Intraindividual comparisons of the fecal microbiota compositions yielded small differences over time in Campylobacter-negative participants, but significant long-term changes were found in the Campylobacter-positive group (P microbiota reduces resistance to Campylobacter colonization in humans and that Campylobacter infection can have long-term effects on the composition of the human fecal microbiota. Studies using mouse models have made important contributions to our understanding of the role of the gut microbiota in resistance to bacterial enteropathogen colonization. The relative abundances of Escherichia coli and Bacteroides species have been pointed out as important determinants of susceptibility to Gram-negative pathogens in general and Campylobacter infection in particular. In this study, we assessed the

  11. Chemical composition and digestibility of some browse plant species collected from Algerian arid rangelands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boufennara, S.; Lopez, S.; Boussebouna, H.; Bodas, R.; Bouazza, L.

    2012-11-01

    Many wild browse and bush species are undervalued mainly because of insufficient knowledge about their potential feeding value. The objective was to evaluate some nutritional attributes of various Algerian browse and shub species (Atriplex halimus, Artemisia campestris, Artemisia herba-alba, Astragalus gombiformis, Calobota saharae, Retama raetam, Stipagrostis pungens, Lygeum spartum and Stipa tenacissima). Chemical composition, phenols and tannins concentration, in vitro digestibility, in vitro gas production kinetics and in vitro bio-assay for assessment of tannins using buffered rumen fluid, and in situ disappearence of the edible parts of the plants (leaves, thin twigs and flowers) were determined. In general, protein content in dicotyledon species was always greater than in monocotyledon grasses, these showing higher neutral and acid detergent fibre and lower lignin contents than dicots. The tannin concentrations varied considerably between species, but in general the plants investigated in this study had low tannin contents (except for Artemisia spp. and S. tenacissima). Monocots showed lower in vitro and in situ digestibilities, fermentation rate, cumulative gas production and extent of degradation than dicot species. The plants were clustered by principal components analysis in two groups: poor-quality grasses and the most digestible dicot species. Chemical composition (neutral detergent fibre and protein) and digestibility were the main influential variables determining the ranking. In conclusion, A. halimus, A. campestris, A. herba-alba and A. gombiformis can be considered of greater nutritional value than the highly fibrous and low digestible grasses (S. pungens, L. spartum and S. tenacissima) that should be considered emergency roughages. (Author) 46 refs.

  12. Seed Carotenoid and Tocochromanol Composition of Wild Fabaceae Species Is Shaped by Phylogeny and Ecological Factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatriz Fernández-Marín

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Carotenoids distribution and function in seeds have been very scarcely studied, notwithstanding their pivotal roles in plants that include photosynthesis and phytohormone synthesis, pigmentation, membrane stabilization and antioxidant activity. Their relationship with tocochromanols, whose critical role in maintaining seed viability has already been evidenced, and with chlorophylls, whose retention in mature seed is thought to have negative effects on storability, remain also unexplored. Here, we aimed at elucidating seed carotenoids relationship with tocochromanols and chlorophylls with regard to phylogenetic and ecological traits and at understanding their changes during germination. The composition and distribution of carotenoids were investigated in seeds of a wide range of wild species across the Fabaceae (the second-most economically important family after the Poaceae. Photosynthetic pigments and tocochromanols were analyzed by HPLC in mature dry seeds of 50 species representative of 5 subfamilies within the Fabaceae (including taxa that represent all continents, biomes and life forms within the family and at key timepoints during seedling establishment in three species representative of distinct clades. Total-carotenoids content positively correlated with tocopherols in the basal subfamilies Detarioideae, Cercidoideae, and Dialioideae, and with chlorophylls in the Papilionoideae. Papilionoideae lacked tocotrienols and had the highest total-carotenoids, chlorophyll and γ-tocopherol contents. Interestingly, lutein epoxide was present in 72% of the species including several herbs from different subfamilies. Overall, species original from temperate biomes presented higher carotenoids and lower tocochromanols levels than those from tropical biomes. Also shrub species showed higher carotenoids content than herbs and trees. During germination, total content of photosynthetic pigments increased in parallel to changes in relative abundance of

  13. Seed Carotenoid and Tocochromanol Composition of Wild Fabaceae Species Is Shaped by Phylogeny and Ecological Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Marín, Beatriz; Míguez, Fátima; Méndez-Fernández, Leire; Agut, Agustí; Becerril, José M.; García-Plazaola, José I.; Kranner, Ilse; Colville, Louise

    2017-01-01

    Carotenoids distribution and function in seeds have been very scarcely studied, notwithstanding their pivotal roles in plants that include photosynthesis and phytohormone synthesis, pigmentation, membrane stabilization and antioxidant activity. Their relationship with tocochromanols, whose critical role in maintaining seed viability has already been evidenced, and with chlorophylls, whose retention in mature seed is thought to have negative effects on storability, remain also unexplored. Here, we aimed at elucidating seed carotenoids relationship with tocochromanols and chlorophylls with regard to phylogenetic and ecological traits and at understanding their changes during germination. The composition and distribution of carotenoids were investigated in seeds of a wide range of wild species across the Fabaceae (the second-most economically important family after the Poaceae). Photosynthetic pigments and tocochromanols were analyzed by HPLC in mature dry seeds of 50 species representative of 5 subfamilies within the Fabaceae (including taxa that represent all continents, biomes and life forms within the family) and at key timepoints during seedling establishment in three species representative of distinct clades. Total-carotenoids content positively correlated with tocopherols in the basal subfamilies Detarioideae, Cercidoideae, and Dialioideae, and with chlorophylls in the Papilionoideae. Papilionoideae lacked tocotrienols and had the highest total-carotenoids, chlorophyll and γ-tocopherol contents. Interestingly, lutein epoxide was present in 72% of the species including several herbs from different subfamilies. Overall, species original from temperate biomes presented higher carotenoids and lower tocochromanols levels than those from tropical biomes. Also shrub species showed higher carotenoids content than herbs and trees. During germination, total content of photosynthetic pigments increased in parallel to changes in relative abundance of carotenoids

  14. Microphytobenthic biomass and species composition in intertidal flats of the Nakdong River estuary, Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, GuoYing; Son, Moonho; Yun, Misun; An, Soonmo; Chung, Ik Kyo

    2009-05-01

    Intertidal microphytobenthos (MPB) were investigated monthly from August 2006 to March 2008 at four different sites in the sand flats of Nakdong River estuary, Korea. Samples of surface sediment (ca. 1 cm) were collected, and chlorophyll a was extracted as biomass estimation. Species identification and enumeration were carried out by light microscopy, assisted where necessary by scanning electronic microscopy. Biomass varied between 0.47 and 16.58 μg cm -3, abundance changed from 5.25 to 414.75 × 10 3 cells cm -3, while the Shannon diversity indexes ranged between 0.69 and 2.35 H'. Thirty-nine MPB taxa were identified, primarily composed of epipelic diatoms, among which Amphora and Navicula were the most abundant genera. Based on the biomass, abundance, species composition and their dynamics, MPB assemblages of sampling sites were grouped into three distinct communities corresponding to their sediment composition characteristics. Multivariate correlation analysis revealed that biomass was positively related to mud and very fine sand, negatively related to fine and medium sand, but not significantly related to environmental factors such as pore water nutrients, light intensity and salinity, which fluctuated rapidly during emersion period. Cluster analysis corroborated the division of MPB communities according to site types on seasonal scales, and also showed seasonality between sites by cluster of all summer groups. Principal component analysis identified that variability in species composition was significantly affected by mud, very fine sand, fine sand, light intensity, and sediment temperature. This study suggests that sediment composition plays an important role in the functioning of intertidal MPB communities in estuarine ecosystems.

  15. Temporal Decay in Timber Species Composition and Value in Amazonian Logging Concessions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa A Richardson

    Full Text Available Throughout human history, slow-renewal biological resource populations have been predictably overexploited, often to the point of economic extinction. We assess whether and how this has occurred with timber resources in the Brazilian Amazon. The asynchronous advance of industrial-scale logging frontiers has left regional-scale forest landscapes with varying histories of logging. Initial harvests in unlogged forests can be highly selective, targeting slow-growing, high-grade, shade-tolerant hardwood species, while later harvests tend to focus on fast-growing, light-wooded, long-lived pioneer trees. Brazil accounts for 85% of all native neotropical forest roundlog production, and the State of Pará for almost half of all timber production in Brazilian Amazonia, the largest old-growth tropical timber reserve controlled by any country. Yet the degree to which timber harvests beyond the first-cut can be financially profitable or demographically sustainable remains poorly understood. Here, we use data on legally planned logging of ~17.3 million cubic meters of timber across 314 species extracted from 824 authorized harvest areas in private and community-owned forests, 446 of which reported volumetric composition data by timber species. We document patterns of timber extraction by volume, species composition, and monetary value along aging eastern Amazonian logging frontiers, which are then explained on the basis of historical and environmental variables. Generalized linear models indicate that relatively recent logging operations farthest from heavy-traffic roads are the most selective, concentrating gross revenues on few high-value species. We find no evidence that the post-logging timber species composition and total value of forest stands recovers beyond the first-cut, suggesting that the commercially most valuable timber species become predictably rare or economically extinct in old logging frontiers. In avoiding even more destructive land

  16. Temporal Decay in Timber Species Composition and Value in Amazonian Logging Concessions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Vanessa A; Peres, Carlos A

    2016-01-01

    Throughout human history, slow-renewal biological resource populations have been predictably overexploited, often to the point of economic extinction. We assess whether and how this has occurred with timber resources in the Brazilian Amazon. The asynchronous advance of industrial-scale logging frontiers has left regional-scale forest landscapes with varying histories of logging. Initial harvests in unlogged forests can be highly selective, targeting slow-growing, high-grade, shade-tolerant hardwood species, while later harvests tend to focus on fast-growing, light-wooded, long-lived pioneer trees. Brazil accounts for 85% of all native neotropical forest roundlog production, and the State of Pará for almost half of all timber production in Brazilian Amazonia, the largest old-growth tropical timber reserve controlled by any country. Yet the degree to which timber harvests beyond the first-cut can be financially profitable or demographically sustainable remains poorly understood. Here, we use data on legally planned logging of ~17.3 million cubic meters of timber across 314 species extracted from 824 authorized harvest areas in private and community-owned forests, 446 of which reported volumetric composition data by timber species. We document patterns of timber extraction by volume, species composition, and monetary value along aging eastern Amazonian logging frontiers, which are then explained on the basis of historical and environmental variables. Generalized linear models indicate that relatively recent logging operations farthest from heavy-traffic roads are the most selective, concentrating gross revenues on few high-value species. We find no evidence that the post-logging timber species composition and total value of forest stands recovers beyond the first-cut, suggesting that the commercially most valuable timber species become predictably rare or economically extinct in old logging frontiers. In avoiding even more destructive land-use patterns, managing

  17. Species Diversity and Botanical Composition of Permanent Grassland as a Response to Different Grazing Management Practices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie Štýbnarová

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The effects of different levels of grazing utilization (two, three and four grazing cycles per year and mineral fertilization (nil-fertilization; N100P30K60 on the botanical composition of permanent grasslands were studied in the locality of Rapotín (Czech Republic, 332 m a.s.l. from 2003–2010. The vegetation of the experimental pasture was classified as Cynosurion. It was found that moderate treatment (three grazing cycles per year without mineral fertilization showed the highest value of diversity index (DI = 6.08, and maximum dominance of legumes (Dmax = 9.1%, particularly Trifolium repens. The highest dominance of grasses (Dmax = 77.7%, mainly Dactylis glomerata and Elytrigia repens, was achieved with the fertilized treatment utilized in two grazing cycles per year. Based on RDA results, tested management treatments explained 26% of species composition variability, where effect of number of grazing cycles per year was five-times higher than effect of fertilization. We recommend grassland utilization in three grazing cycles per year as the most suitable way from the objective of both species diversity and botanical composition of pastures in similar site conditions. Pasture fertilization should be more controlled by careful consideration of individual pasture goals, actual nutrient status of the soil and possible environmental risks.

  18. Species composition and gear characteristics of the Macrobrachium fishery of the Cross River Estuary, Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nwosu, Francis M.

    2010-03-01

    The Cross River Estuary, Nigeria, is an important shrimping area for artisanal fishermen of the coastal communities. The multi-species Macrobrachium fishery is exploited with three main gears, namely beach seine, push net and trap. Studies on species composition of this fishery recorded thirteen shrimp species, one swimming crab ( Callinectes amnicola) and two fish species ( Eleotris sp. and Pellonula leonensis). The shrimp species identified included Macrobrachium macrobrachion (83.39% and 55.69% by number and weight, respectively), M. vollenhovenii (9.66% and 37.18%), M. equidens (3.8% and 2.87%), juveniles-sub-adults of Penaeus notialis (1.11% and 1.3%), M. dux, M. felicinum, Palaemonetes africanus, Palaemon maculatus, Palaemon elegans, Desmocaris sp., Leander sp., Nematopalaemon hastatus and Alpheus pontederiae. While the selectivity index for trap was 0.25, beach seine and push net had a lower index of 0.063. The results present the first comprehensive and representative report for the Estuary shrimp fishery and will assist in the management of the biodiversity of this ecosystem.

  19. Mast species composition alters seed fate in North American rodent-dispersed hardwoods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lichti, Nathanael I; Steele, Michael A; Zhang, Hao; Swihart, Robert K

    2014-07-01

    Interactions between plants and scatter-hoarding animals may shift from mutualism to predation as a function of the resources available to those animals. Because seed species differ in their nutrient content and defenses to predation, resource selection and cache management by scatter-hoarders, and thus seed fate, may also depend on the relative availability of different seed types. We tracked the fates of tagged Castanea dentata, Quercus alba, and Q. rubra seeds presented to rodents in pairwise combinations and found that C. dentata, which has moderate dormancy prior to germination, survived better in the presence of Q. alba (no dormancy) than with Q. rubra (longer dormancy). Decisions made by scatter-hoarders in response to the composition of available seed resources can alter the relationship between masting and seed dispersal effectiveness in individual tree species and may have influenced the evolution of asynchrony among species-specific masting patterns in temperate forests. In theory, preferential allocation of certain seed species to storage or consumption could also result in indirect apparent predation by one seed species on another.

  20. Phytotoxic activity and chemical composition of aqueous volatile fractions from Eucalyptus species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jinbiao; An, Min; Wu, Hanwen; Liu, De Li; Stanton, Rex

    2014-01-01

    The essential oils from four Eucalyptus species (E. spathulata, E. salubris, E. brockwayii and E. dundasii) have been previously confirmed to have stronger inhibitory effects on germination and seedling growth of silverleaf nightshade (Solanum elaeagnifolium Cav.). The aqueous volatile fractions (AVFs) were the water soluble volatile fractions produced together with the essential oils (water insoluble fractions) during the steam distillation process. The aim of this study was to further assess the phytotoxicity of AVFs from the four Eucalyptus species and their chemical composition. The fresh leaves of the four Eucalyptus species were used for the extraction of AVFs. The AVFs were tested for their phytotoxic effects on the perennial weed, silverleaf nightshade under laboratory conditions. The chemical compositions of the AVFs were determined by gas chromatograph-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Our results showed that the AVFs had strong inhibition on the germination and seedling growth of silverleaf nightshade. The inhibition index increased with the increasing concentrations of AVFs. The inhibitory effects of the AVFs varied between different Eucalyptus species. The AVF from E. salubris demonstrated the highest inhibitory activity on the weed tested, with complete inhibition on germination and seedling growth at a concentration of 75%. The GC-MS analysis revealed that 1,8-cineole, isopentyl isovalerate, isomenthol, pinocarvone, trans-pinocarveol, alpha-terpineol and globulol were the main compounds in the AVFs. These results indicated that all AVFs tested had differential inhibition on the germination and seedling growth of silverleaf nightshade, which could be due to the joint effects of compounds present in the AVFs as these compounds were present in different quantities and ratio between Eucalyptus species.

  1. Phytotoxic activity and chemical composition of aqueous volatile fractions from Eucalyptus species.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinbiao Zhang

    Full Text Available The essential oils from four Eucalyptus species (E. spathulata, E. salubris, E. brockwayii and E. dundasii have been previously confirmed to have stronger inhibitory effects on germination and seedling growth of silverleaf nightshade (Solanum elaeagnifolium Cav.. The aqueous volatile fractions (AVFs were the water soluble volatile fractions produced together with the essential oils (water insoluble fractions during the steam distillation process. The aim of this study was to further assess the phytotoxicity of AVFs from the four Eucalyptus species and their chemical composition. The fresh leaves of the four Eucalyptus species were used for the extraction of AVFs. The AVFs were tested for their phytotoxic effects on the perennial weed, silverleaf nightshade under laboratory conditions. The chemical compositions of the AVFs were determined by gas chromatograph-mass spectrometry (GC-MS. Our results showed that the AVFs had strong inhibition on the germination and seedling growth of silverleaf nightshade. The inhibition index increased with the increasing concentrations of AVFs. The inhibitory effects of the AVFs varied between different Eucalyptus species. The AVF from E. salubris demonstrated the highest inhibitory activity on the weed tested, with complete inhibition on germination and seedling growth at a concentration of 75%. The GC-MS analysis revealed that 1,8-cineole, isopentyl isovalerate, isomenthol, pinocarvone, trans-pinocarveol, alpha-terpineol and globulol were the main compounds in the AVFs. These results indicated that all AVFs tested had differential inhibition on the germination and seedling growth of silverleaf nightshade, which could be due to the joint effects of compounds present in the AVFs as these compounds were present in different quantities and ratio between Eucalyptus species.

  2. Plant compartment and biogeography affect microbiome composition in cultivated and native Agave species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman-Derr, Devin; Desgarennes, Damaris; Fonseca-Garcia, Citlali; Gross, Stephen; Clingenpeel, Scott; Woyke, Tanja; North, Gretchen; Visel, Axel; Partida-Martinez, Laila P; Tringe, Susannah G

    2016-01-01

    Desert plants are hypothesized to survive the environmental stress inherent to these regions in part thanks to symbioses with microorganisms, and yet these microbial species, the communities they form, and the forces that influence them are poorly understood. Here we report the first comprehensive investigation of the microbial communities associated with species of Agave, which are native to semiarid and arid regions of Central and North America and are emerging as biofuel feedstocks. We examined prokaryotic and fungal communities in the rhizosphere, phyllosphere, leaf and root endosphere, as well as proximal and distal soil samples from cultivated and native agaves, through Illumina amplicon sequencing. Phylogenetic profiling revealed that the composition of prokaryotic communities was primarily determined by the plant compartment, whereas the composition of fungal communities was mainly influenced by the biogeography of the host species. Cultivated A. tequilana exhibited lower levels of prokaryotic diversity compared with native agaves, although no differences in microbial diversity were found in the endosphere. Agaves shared core prokaryotic and fungal taxa known to promote plant growth and confer tolerance to abiotic stress, which suggests common principles underpinning Agave-microbe interactions. No claim to US Government works. New Phytologist © 2015 New Phytologist Trust.

  3. Composition and diversity of tree species in transects of location lowland evergreen forest of Ecuador

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Caranqui A.

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The study was conducted in 9 transects 1000m2 of lowland evergreen forest, located in two locations on the coast and one in eastern Ecuador. It was to contribute to knowledge of the diversity and composition of woody plants over 10 cm diameter at breast height (DBH plus infer the state of conservation of forests based on the composition, the number of species, indices diversity and importance value (IV, found in 9 transects of 1000 m² of forest: 156 species, 107 genera and 39 families distributed in 9 transects, in each one the Simpson diversity index is of 0.92 to 0.95, in this case are diversity because all approaches 1. Most were found species aren´t present in all transects, the index value in each transect does not exceed 40%. Grouping transects match three locations exception made to transect 5 and 8 were conducted in disturbed sites, the most transects are intermediate disturbance that their high levels of diversity.

  4. Factors affecting plant species composition of hedgerows: relative importance and hierarchy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deckers, Bart; Hermy, Martin; Muys, Bart

    2004-07-01

    Although there has been a clear quantitative and qualitative decline in traditional hedgerow network landscapes during last century, hedgerows are crucial for the conservation of rural biodiversity, functioning as an important habitat, refuge and corridor for numerous species. To safeguard this conservation function, insight in the basic organizing principles of hedgerow plant communities is needed. The vegetation composition of 511 individual hedgerows situated within an ancient hedgerow network landscape in Flanders, Belgium was recorded, in combination with a wide range of explanatory variables, including a selection of spatial variables. Non-parametric statistics in combination with multivariate data analysis techniques were used to study the effect of individual explanatory variables. Next, variables were grouped in five distinct subsets and the relative importance of these variable groups was assessed by two related variation partitioning techniques, partial regression and partial canonical correspondence analysis, taking into account explicitly the existence of intercorrelations between variables of different factor groups. Most explanatory variables affected significantly hedgerow species richness and composition. Multivariate analysis showed that, besides adjacent land use, hedgerow management, soil conditions, hedgerow type and origin, the role of other factors such as hedge dimensions, intactness, etc., could certainly not be neglected. Furthermore, both methods revealed the same overall ranking of the five distinct factor groups. Besides a predominant impact of abiotic environmental conditions, it was found that management variables and structural aspects have a relatively larger influence on the distribution of plant species in hedgerows than their historical background or spatial configuration.

  5. First human cases of Leishmania (Viannia) naiffi infection in Ecuador and identification of its suspected vector species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Hirotomo; Calvopiña, Manuel; Criollo, Hipatia; Hashiguchi, Yoshihisa

    2013-12-01

    Epidemiological surveillance of leishmaniasis was conducted in a northern Amazonian region of Ecuador, in which cutaneous leishmaniasis cases were recently reported. Sand flies were captured in the military training camp, and the natural infection of sand flies by Leishmania species was examined. Out of 334 female sand flies dissected, the natural infection by flagellates was microscopically detected in 3.9% of Lutzomyia yuilli yuilli and 3.7% of Lutzomyia tortura, and the parasite species were identified as Endotrypanum and Leishmania (Viannia) naiffi, respectively. After the sand fly surveillance, specimens from cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL) patients considered to have acquired the infection in the training camp area were obtained, and the infected parasite species were identified as L. (V.) naiffi. The present study reported first cases of CL caused by L. (V.) naiffi infection in Ecuador. In addition, a high ratio of infection of Lu. tortura by L. (V.) naiffi in the same area strongly suggested that Lu. tortura is responsible for the transmission of L. (V.) naiffi in this area. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. [Species and size composition of fishes in Barra de Navidad lagoon, Mexican central Pacific].

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Sansón, Gaspar; Aguilar-Betancourt, Consuelo; Kosonoy-Aceves, Daniel; Lucano-Ramírez, Gabriela; Ruiz-Ramírez, Salvador; Flores-Ortega, Juan Ramón; Hinojosa-Larios, Angel; de Asís Silva-Bátiz, Francisco

    2014-03-01

    Coastal lagoons are considered important nursery areas for many coastal fishes. Barra de Navidad coastal lagoon (3.76km2) is important for local economy as it supports tourism development and artisanal fisheries. However, the role of this lagoon in the dynamics of coastal fish populations is scarcely known. Thus, the objectives of this research were: to characterize the water of the lagoon and related weather conditions, to develop a systematic list of the ichthyofauna, and to estimate the proportion of juveniles in the total number of individuals captured of most abundant species. Water and fish samples were collected between March 2011 and February 2012. Physical and chemical variables were measured in rainy and dry seasons. Several fishing gears were used including a cast net, beach purse seine and gillnets of four different mesh sizes. Our results showed that the lagoon is most of the time euhaline (salinity 30-40ups), although it can be mixopolyhaline (salinity 18-30ups) during short periods. Chlorophyll and nutrients concentrations suggested eutrophication in the lagoon. Mean water temperature changed seasonally from 24.9 degrees C (April, high tide) to 31.4 degrees C (October, low tide). Considering ichthyofauna species, a total of 36 448 individuals of 92 species were collected, 31 of them adding up to 95% of the total of individuals caught. Dominant species were Anchoa spp. (44.6%), Diapterus peruvianus (10.5%), Eucinostomus currani (8.1%), Cetengraulis mysticetus (7.8%), Mugil curema (5.2%) and Opisthonema libertate (4.5%). The lagoon is an important juvenile habitat for 22 of the 31 most abundant species. These included several species of commercial importance such as snappers (Lutjanus argentiventris, L. colorado and L. novemfasciatus), snook (Centropomus nigrescens) and white mullet (Mugil curema). Other four species seem to use the lagoon mainly as adults. This paper is the first contribution on the composition of estuarine ichthyofauna in Jalisco

  7. pCO2 effects on species composition and growth of an estuarine phytoplankton community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grear, Jason S.; Rynearson, Tatiana A.; Montalbano, Amanda L.; Govenar, Breea; Menden-Deuer, Susanne

    2017-05-01

    The effects of ongoing changes in ocean carbonate chemistry on plankton ecology have important implications for food webs and biogeochemical cycling. However, conflicting results have emerged regarding species-specific responses to pCO2 enrichment and thus community responses have been difficult to predict. To assess community level effects (e.g., production) of altered carbonate chemistry, studies are needed that capitalize on the benefits of controlled experiments but also retain features of intact ecosystems that may exacerbate or ameliorate the effects observed in single-species or single cohort experiments. We performed incubations of natural plankton communities from Narragansett Bay, RI, USA in winter at ambient bay temperatures (5-13 °C), light and nutrient concentrations. Three levels of controlled and constant CO2 concentrations were imposed, simulating past, present and future conditions at mean pCO2 levels of 224, 361, and 724 μatm respectively. Samples for carbonate analysis, chlorophyll a, plankton size-abundance, and plankton species composition were collected daily and phytoplankton growth rates in three different size fractions (20 μm) were measured at the end of the 7-day incubation period. Community composition changed during the incubation period with major increases in relative diatom abundance, which were similar across pCO2 treatments. At the end of the experiment, 24-hr growth responses to pCO2 levels varied as a function of cell size. The smallest size fraction (20 μm size fraction. Cell size distribution shifted toward smaller cells in both the Past and Future treatments but remained unchanged in the Present treatment. Similarity in Past and Future treatments for cell size distribution and growth rate (5-20 μm size fraction) illustrate non-monotonic effects of altered pCO2 on ecological indicators and may be related to opposing physiological effects of high CO2 and low pH both within and among species. Interaction of these effects

  8. Species composition, richness and nestedness of lizard assemblages from Restinga habitats along the brazilian coast

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    CFD. Rocha

    Full Text Available Habitat fragmentation is well known to adversely affect species living in the remaining, relatively isolated, habitat patches, especially for those having small range size and low density. This negative effect has been critical in coastal resting habitats. We analysed the lizard composition and richness of restinga habitats in 16 restinga habitats encompassing three Brazilian states (Rio de Janeiro, Espírito Santo and Bahia and more than 1500km of the Brazilian coast in order to evaluate if the loss of lizard species following habitat reduction occur in a nested pattern or at random, using the “Nestedness Temperature Calculator” to analyse the distribution pattern of lizard species among the restingas studied. We also estimated the potential capacity that each restinga has to maintain lizard species. Eleven lizard species were recorded in the restingas, although not all species occurred in all areas. The restinga with the richest lizard fauna was Guriri (eight species whereas the restinga with the lowest richness was Praia do Sul (located at Ilha Grande, a large coastal island. Among the restingas analysed, Jurubatiba, Guriri, Maricá and Praia das Neves, were the most hospitable for lizards. The matrix community temperature of the lizard assemblages was 20.49° (= P <0.00001; 5000 randomisations; randomisation temperature = 51.45° ± 7.18° SD, indicating that lizard assemblages in the coastal restingas exhibited a considerable nested structure. The degree in which an area is hospitable for different assemblages could be used to suggest those with greater value of conservation. We concluded that lizard assemblages in coastal restingas occur at a considerable level of ordination in restinga habitats and that some restinga areas such as Jurubatiba, Guriri, Maricá and Praia das Neves are quite important to preserve lizard diversity of restinga environments.

  9. About vectors

    CERN Document Server

    Hoffmann, Banesh

    1975-01-01

    From his unusual beginning in ""Defining a vector"" to his final comments on ""What then is a vector?"" author Banesh Hoffmann has written a book that is provocative and unconventional. In his emphasis on the unresolved issue of defining a vector, Hoffmann mixes pure and applied mathematics without using calculus. The result is a treatment that can serve as a supplement and corrective to textbooks, as well as collateral reading in all courses that deal with vectors. Major topics include vectors and the parallelogram law; algebraic notation and basic ideas; vector algebra; scalars and scalar p

  10. Vector analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Newell, Homer E

    2006-01-01

    When employed with skill and understanding, vector analysis can be a practical and powerful tool. This text develops the algebra and calculus of vectors in a manner useful to physicists and engineers. Numerous exercises (with answers) not only provide practice in manipulation but also help establish students' physical and geometric intuition in regard to vectors and vector concepts.Part I, the basic portion of the text, consists of a thorough treatment of vector algebra and the vector calculus. Part II presents the illustrative matter, demonstrating applications to kinematics, mechanics, and e

  11. Chemical composition and larvicidal activity of Elaeagnus indica Servett. (Elaeagnaceae plant leaf extracts against dengue and malaria vectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramalingam Srinivasan

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available MMosquito control is facing a threat due to the emergence of resistance to synthetic insecticides. Insecticides of botanical origin may serve as suitable alternative biocontrol techniques in the future. The acetone, chloroform, ethyl acetate, hexane, methanol and petroleum benzene leaf extracts of E. indica were tested against fourth instar larvae of malaria vector, Anopheles stephensi and dengue vector, Aedes aegypti. The larval mortality was observed after 24 h of exposure. Highest larval mortality was found in acetone leaf extracts against A. aegypti (LC50 and LC90 values of 2.97027and 5.9820 mg/ml and A. stephensi (LC50 and LC90 values of 3.92501 and 68.3250 mg/ml respectively. GC-MS analysis of plant extracts of acetone solvent revealed 19 compounds, of which the major compounds were -Thujone 1-Isopropyl-4-Methylbicyclo(3.1.0Hexan-3-One 1- (6.71%, 1,6- Cyclodecadiene, 1-Methyl-5-Methylene-8-(1-Methylethyl-, [S-(E,E]-Germacra-1(10,4(15,5-Trie N (3.11%, L-(+-Ascorbic Acid 2,6-Dihexadecanoate (4.06%, 2-Cyclohexylcyclohexanol [1,1'-Bicyclohexyl]-2-Ol (3.16%, Dotriacontane N- Bicetyl (58.7% and Tetrapentacontane (3.85%. E. indica offers promise as potential biocontrol agent against major dengue and malaria mosquitoes particularly in larvicidal effect. Our results shows acetone leaf extracts of E. indica have the potential to be used as an ideal eco-friendly approach for control of mosquito vectors.

  12. Logging impacts on avian species richness and composition differ across latitudes and foraging and breeding habitat preferences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaManna, Joseph A; Martin, Thomas E

    2017-08-01

    Understanding the causes underlying changes in species diversity is a fundamental pursuit of ecology. Animal species richness and composition often change with decreased forest structural complexity associated with logging. Yet differences in latitude and forest type may strongly influence how species diversity responds to logging. We performed a meta-analysis of logging effects on local species richness and composition of birds across the world and assessed responses by different guilds (nesting strata, foraging strata, diet, and body size). This approach allowed identification of species attributes that might underlie responses to this anthropogenic disturbance. We only examined studies that allowed forests to regrow naturally following logging, and accounted for logging intensity, spatial extent, successional regrowth after logging, and the change in species composition expected due to random assembly from regional species pools. Selective logging in the tropics and clearcut logging in temperate latitudes caused loss of species from nearly all forest strata (ground to canopy), leading to substantial declines in species richness (up to 27% of species). Few species were lost or gained following any intensity of logging in lower-latitude temperate forests, but the relative abundances of these species changed substantially. Selective logging at higher-temperate latitudes generally replaced late-successional specialists with early-successional specialists, leading to no net changes in species richness but large changes in species composition. Removing less basal area during logging mitigated the loss of avian species from all forests and, in some cases, increased diversity in temperate forests. This meta-analysis provides insights into the important role of habitat specialization in determining differential responses of animal communities to logging across tropical and temperate latitudes. © 2016 Cambridge Philosophical Society.

  13. Logging impacts on avian species richness and composition differ across latitudes relative to foraging and breeding habitat preferences

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaManna, Joseph A.; Martin, Thomas E.

    2017-01-01

    Understanding the causes underlying changes in species diversity is a fundamental pursuit of ecology. Animal species richness and composition often change with decreased forest structural complexity associated with logging. Yet differences in latitude and forest type may strongly influence how species diversity responds to logging. We performed a meta-analysis of logging effects on local species richness and composition of birds across the world and assessed responses by different guilds (nesting strata, foraging strata, diet, and body size). This approach allowed identification of species attributes that might underlie responses to this anthropogenic disturbance. We only examined studies that allowed forests to regrow naturally following logging, and accounted for logging intensity, spatial extent, successional regrowth after logging, and the change in species composition expected due to random assembly from regional species pools. Selective logging in the tropics and clearcut logging in temperate latitudes caused loss of species from nearly all forest strata (ground to canopy), leading to substantial declines in species richness (up to 27% of species). Few species were lost or gained following any intensity of logging in lower-latitude temperate forests, but the relative abundances of these species changed substantially. Selective logging at higher-temperate latitudes generally replaced late-successional specialists with early-successional specialists, leading to no net changes in species richness but large changes in species composition. Removing less basal area during logging mitigated the loss of avian species from all forests and, in some cases, increased diversity in temperate forests. This meta-analysis provides insights into the important role of habitat specialization in determining differential responses of animal communities to logging across tropical and temperate latitudes.

  14. Leptospirosis risk increases with changes in species composition of rat populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theuerkauf, Jörn; Perez, Julie; Taugamoa, Alefosio; Niutoua, Iasinito; Labrousse, Didier; Gula, Roman; Bogdanowicz, Wieslaw; Jourdan, Hervé; Goarant, Cyrille

    2013-04-01

    Rats are major reservoirs of leptospirosis and considered as a main threat to biodiversity. A recent introduction of Rattus rattus to the island of Futuna (Western Polynesia) provided the opportunity to test if a possible change in species composition of rat populations would increase the risk of leptospirosis to humans. We trapped rodents on Wallis and Futuna and assessed Leptospira carriage in 357 rodents ( Rattus norvegicus, R. rattus, Rattus exulans, and Mus domesticus) from 2008 to 2012. While Leptospira prevalence in rodents and the composition of rat populations on Futuna fluctuated with rainfall, the biomass of Leptospira-carrying rodents has been continuously rising from 2008 to 2012. Our results suggest that the introduction of R. rattus increases the risk to humans being infected with leptospirosis by rats.

  15. Chemotaxonomic Evaluation of Species of Turkish Salvia: Fatty Acid Composition of Seed Oils. II

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    Turgut Kılıç

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Fatty acids composition of seed oil of Salvia viridis, S. hydrangea, S. blepharochleana, S. chianantha, S. staminea, S. hypergeia,, S. cilicica, S. caespitosa, S. sclarea, S. cadmica, S. microstegia, S. pachystachys and S. verticillata were analyzed by GC/MS. The main compound were found to be as linoleic acid (18:2; 12.8 % to 52.2 %, linolenic acid (18:3; 3.2 % to 47.7 %, oleic acid (18:1; 11.3 % to 25.6 %, palmitic acid (16:0; 0.7 % to 16.8 % and stearic acid (18:0; 1.8 % to 4.8 %. A phylogenetic tree of species of Salvia were reported and compared to 18:3/18:2 ratio of the seed oils. Fatty acid composition of Salvia seed oils could be used as a chemotaxonomical marker.

  16. Closely related intertidal and deep-sea Halomonhystera species have distinct fatty acid compositions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Campenhout, Jelle; Vanreusel, Ann

    2017-01-01

    The deep-sea free-living nematode Halomonhystera hermesi, dominant in the sulphidic sediments of the Håkon Mosby mud volcano (1280 m, Barent sea slope), is part of the mainly estuarine Halomonhystera disjuncta species complex consisting of five cryptic species (GD1-GD5). Cryptic species have a very similar morphology raising questions on their specific environmental differences. This study analyzed total fatty acid (FA) compositions of H. hermesi and GD1, one of H. hermesi's closest relatives. Additionally, we experimentally investigated the effect of a temperature reduction, salinity increase and sulphide concentrations on GD1's FA composition. Because nematodes are expected to have low amounts of storage FA, total FA compositions most likely reflect FA contents of cellular membranes. The deep-sea nematode H. hermesi had significantly lower saturation levels and increased highly unsaturated fatty acid (HUFAs) proportions due to the presence of docosahexanoic acid (DHA—22:6ω3) and higher eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA—20:5ω3) proportions. HUFAs were absent in H. hermesi's food source indicating the ability and need for this nematode to synthesize HUFAs in a deep-sea environment. Our experimental data revealed that only a decrease in temperature resulted in lower saturated fatty acids proportions, indicating that the FA content of H. hermesi is most likely a response to temperature but not to sulphide concentrations or salinity differences. In experimental nematodes, EPA proportions were low and DHA was absent indicating that other factors than temperature, salinity and sulphides mediate the presence of these HUFAs in H. hermesi.

  17. Population abundance and species composition of chaetognaths in the Bombay harbour-Thana and Bassein creek estuarine complex

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Ramaiah, Neelam; Nair, V.R.

    Detailed study on the abundance, distribution and species composition of chaetognaths from the Bombay harbour-Thana and Bassein creek estuarine complex was carried out from October 1985 to September 1986. Percentage contribution of chaetognaths...

  18. Effects of Climate and Land Use on Herbaceous Species Richness and Vegetation Composition in West African Savanna Ecosystems

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Zerbo, Issouf; Bernhardt-Römermann, Markus; Ouédraogo, Oumarou; Hahn, Karen; Thiombiano, Adjima

    2016-01-01

    .... Introduction West African Savanna ecosystems are undergoing severe changes in their vegetation composition and species cover due to the impact of human land use and changes in climatic conditions....

  19. Environmental integrity and damselfly species composition in Amazonian streams at the "arc of deforestation" region, Mato Grosso, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leandro Schlemmer Brasil

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available AIMS: Investigated how the loss of environmental integrity affects damselfly species composition in nine sites with different levels of environmental integrity in a Cerrado-Amazon transition region known as "arc of deforestation" in Mato Grosso State, Brazil. We also tested the influence of environmental variables on species composition. METHODS: We collected in transects of 100 m and used ordination (PCoA and simple linear regression. RESULTS: Species composition was strongly influenced by the environmental quality of sites, and the best model to explain species composition included variables related to channel morphology. CONCLUSIONS: These results are connected to the environmental homogenization and loss of environmental integrity as a result of extensive agricultural practices which alter stream communities of dragonflies in this region.

  20. Bud composition, branching patterns and leaf phenology in cerrado woody species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damascos, M A; Prado, C H B A; Ronquim, C C

    2005-11-01

    Plants have complex mechanisms of aerial biomass exposition, which depend on bud composition, the period of the year in which shoot extension occurs, branching pattern, foliage persistence, herbivory and environmental conditions. The influence of water availability and temperature on shoot growth, the bud composition, the leaf phenology, and the relationship between partial leaf fall and branching were evaluated over 3 years in Cerrado woody species Bauhinia rufa (BR), Leandra lacunosa (LL) and Miconia albicans (MA). Deciduous BR preformed organs in buds and leaves flush synchronously at the transition from the dry to the wet season. The expansion time of leaves is <1 month. Main shoots (first-order axis, A1 shoots) extended over 30 d and they did not branch. BR budding and foliage unfolds were brought about independently of inter-annual rainfall variations. By contrast, in LL and MA evergreen species, the shoot extension rate and the neoformation of aerial organs depended on rainfall. Leaf emergence was continuous for 2-6 months and lamina expansion took place over 1-4 months. The leaf life span was 5-20 months and the main A1 shoot extension happened over 122-177 d. Both evergreen species allocated biomass to shoots, leaves or flowers continuously during the year, branching in the middle of the wet season to form second-order (A2 shoots) and third-order (A3 shoots) axis in LL and A2 shoots in MA. Partial shed of A1 shoot leaves would facilitate a higher branching intensity A2 shoot production in LL than in MA. MA presented a longer leaf life span, produced a lower percentage of A2 shoots but had a higher meristem persistence on A1 and A2 shoots than LL. It was possible to identify different patterns of aerial growth in Cerrado woody species defined by shoot-linked traits such as branching pattern, bud composition, meristem persistence and leaf phenology. These related traits must be considered over and above leaf deciduousness for searching functional guilds in a

  1. [AEROMONAS BACTERIA ISOLATED FROM BITHYNIIDAE MOLLUSKS AND THEIR HABITATS: SPECIES COMPOSITION AND BIOLOGICAL PROPERTIES. COMMUNICATION 1].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepanova, T F; Bukharin, O V; Kataeva, L V; Perunova, N B; Karpukhina, N F

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to study the species composition and biological properties of Aeromonas bacteria isolated from Bithyniidae mollusks and their habitat (a water reservoir). The Bithyniidae mollusks and water from their habitat were the material to be studied. A total of 176 Aeromonas strains were isolated from the mollusks and water. A. veronii, A. hydrophila, and A. ichthiosmia were most common in the mollusks and A. veronii and A. ichthiosmia were in the water. All the strains isolated had hemolytic activity and no lysozyme or plasma coagulase activity. The magnitude of lecithinase and antilysozymic activities and biofilm formation of the Aeromonas bacteria varied with the isolation source of their strains.

  2. Glucosinolate composition of young shoots and flower buds of capers (Capparis species) growing wild in Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthäus, Bertrand; Ozcan, Musa

    2002-12-04

    The content and glucosinolate composition of young shoots and raw flower buds of Capparis spinosa var. spinosa and Capparis ovata Desf. var. canescens at three different sizes (x 13 mm) were investigated by HPLC with UV detection. Samples were harvested in August 2001 in Turkey. Twelve different glucosinolates were identified in the young shoots and buds of both species. Total content of glucosinolates ranged from 6.55 micromol/g (large buds of C. spinosa) to 45.56 micromol/g (young shoots of C. ovata). The main glucosinolate was glucocapperin, which amounted to approximately 90% of the total glucosinolates. In both species the total glucosinolate content varied in dependence on the bud size, whereas a greater variability was given for buds from C. spinosa.

  3. Fatty Acid Composition of Fourteen Wood-decaying Basidiomycete Species Growing in Permafrost Conditions

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    Daniil N. Olennikov

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The fatty acid (FA compositions of 14 wild wood-decaying basidiomycete species (Bjerkandera adusta, Daedaleopsis septentrionalis, Dichomitus squalens, Inonotus hispidus, I.radiatus, Irpex lacteus, Fomitopsis cajanderi, F.pinicola, F. rosea, Gloeophyllum protractum, Lenzites betulina, Phellinus pini, Trametes gibbosa, T. ochracea growing in permafrost conditions in Katanga region (Russian Federation were investigated using GC-MS. Generally, C18:2 ω 6 (linoleic acid, C18:1 ω 9 (oleic acid, C16:0 (palmitic acid and C20:0 (arachinic acid were found to be the major FA in fungal species. Data about chemical components of Daedaleopsis septentrionalis , Fomitopsis cajanderi and Gloeophyllum protractum were obtained at the first time. Increased level of degree of FA unsaturation was probably a result of extreme environmental conditions.

  4. Diatom species composition in the Raška river (Southwestern Serbia

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    Vidaković Danijela P.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents data on the composition of epilithic diatoms in the Raška River. Samples were collected by scraping stone surfaces with a brush from 5 localities along the Raška River in April, June, August and November 2011 and March and May 2012. Diatom frustules were cleaned using cold acid method, and mounted on permanent slides. An investigation of the Raška River resulted in description of 106 diatom taxa. The most species rich genera are Navicula (10, Gomphonema (10 and Nitzschia (9, while other genera are presented with one or more species. Detailed floristic analysis of the benthic diatom flora in this river has not been conducted before. Therefore, this paper provides a groundwork for future researches. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. TR 037009

  5. Cellular fatty acid composition of Haemophilus species, Pasteurella multocida, Actinobacillus Actinomycetemcomitans and Haemophilus vaginalis (Corynebacterium vaginale).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jantzen, E; Berdal, B P; Omland, T

    1980-04-01

    The fatty acid composition of 35 Haemophilus influenzae strains was found to be grossly similar and characterized by relatively large amounts of 14:0, 3-OH-14:0, 16:1 and 16:0. The three C18 fatty acids 18:2, 18:1 and 18:0 were also present, but in much lower concentrations. This general pattern was also found for most of the other species of Haemophilus examined (H. aegyptius, H. aphrophilus, H. canis, H. gallinarum, H. haemolyticus, and H. parainfluenzae). Small but distinct quantitative discrepancies were detected for H. ducreyi and the haemin-independent species H. paraphrohaemolyticus, H. paraphrophilus and H. suis. Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans was found to be indistinguishable from H. influenzae. Pasteurella multocida also exhibited a fatty acid pattern closely related to that of Haemophilus, but could be distinguished by its higher concentration levels of the C18 fatty acids. The fatty acid pattern of H. vaginalis was considerably different from those of the other species examined. This species lacked 3-OH-14:0 and 18:2 and contained small amounts of 14:0 and 16:0, whereas 18:1 and 18:0 were the major constituents.

  6. Mosquito species occurrence in association with landscape composition in green urban areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. R. G. Montagner

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Aedes aegypti prefers densely populated habitats, but has been shown to explore less anthropogenic environments. We investigated composition of the abundance of mosquitoes in forested areas and assessed relationships between species occurrences and different types of land use and land cover at three spatial scales (100m, 500m and 1000m. Mosquitoes were collected from October 2012 to March 2013 using oviposition traps. We collected 4,179 mosquitoes in total including at least 10 species. Aedes albopictus and Limatus durhami were eudominant species, representing 90% of all collected individuals. We found intraspecific differences in response to land use and land cover, and species response patterns were similar at all spatial scales. Ae. albopictus relative abundance was associated with urbanized areas, while Li. durhami, Haemagogus leucocelaenus and Toxorhynchites sp., abundances were associated with native forest. Aedes aegypti were found in five of the eight areas studied, including in an Atlantic forest fragment at a considerable distance from the forest edge (370 m. Aedes aegypti occurrence was not influenced by type of land use or land cover.

  7. Consistency of effects of tropical-forest disturbance on species composition and richness relative to use of indicator taxa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stork, N E; Srivastava, D S; Eggleton, P; Hodda, M; Lawson, G; Leakey, R R B; Watt, A D

    2017-08-01

    Lawton et al. (1998) found, in a highly cited study, that the species richness of 8 taxa each responds differently to anthropogenic disturbance in Cameroon forests. Recent developments in conservation science suggest that net number of species is an insensitive measure of change and that understanding which species are affected by disturbance is more important. It is also recognized that all disturbance types are not equal in their effect on species and that grouping species according to function rather than taxonomy is more informative of responses of biodiversity to change. In a reanalysis of most of the original Cameroon data set (canopy and ground ants, termites, canopy beetles, nematodes, and butterflies), we focused on changes in species and functional composition rather than richness and used a more inclusive measure of forest disturbance based on 4 component drivers of change: years since disturbance, tree cover, soil compaction, and degree of tree removal. Effects of disturbance on compositional change were largely concordant between taxa. Contrary to Lawton et al.'s findings, species richness for most groups did not decline with disturbance level, providing support for the view that trends in species richness at local scales do not reflect the resilience of ecosystems to disturbance. Disturbance affected species composition more strongly than species richness for butterflies, canopy beetles, and litter ants. For these groups, disturbance caused species replacements rather than just species loss. Only termites showed effects of disturbance on species richness but not composition, indicating species loss without replacement. Although disturbance generally caused changes in composition, the strength of this relationship depended on the disturbance driver. Butterflies, litter ants, and nematodes were correlated with amount of tree cover, canopy beetles were most strongly correlated with time since disturbance, and termites were most strongly correlated with

  8. Composition of sugars, organic acids, and total phenolics in 25 wild or cultivated berry species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikulic-Petkovsek, Maja; Schmitzer, Valentina; Slatnar, Ana; Stampar, Franci; Veberic, Robert

    2012-10-01

    Sugars, organic acids, and total phenolic content in fruit of 25 wild and cultivated berry species were identified and quantified with high-performance liquid chromatograph. The composition of sugars, organic acids, and total phenolic compounds in various species of Vaccinium, Rubus, Ribes, and Fragaria genus was evaluated. Additonally, total phenolics of less known berry species of the Morus, Amelanchier, Sorbus, Sambucus, Rosa, Lycium, Actinidia, and Aronia genus were determined in wild growing as well as in cultivated fruits. Significant differences in the concentration of sugars and organic acids were detected among the berry species. Glucose and fructose were the most abundant sugars in berry fruits and the major organic acids were malic and citric acid. However, in kiwi fruit, sucrose represented as much as 71.9% of total sugars. Sorbitol has been detected and quantified in chokeberry, rowanberry, and eastern shadbush fruit. The highest content of total analyzed sugars was determined in rowanberry fruit, followed by dog rose, eastern shadbush, hardy kiwifruit, American cranberry, chokeberry, and jostaberry fruit. Rowanberry stands out as the fruit with the highest content of total analyzed organic acids, followed by jostaberry, lingonberry, red gooseberry, hardy kiwifruit, and black currant. The berries of white gooseberry, black currant, red currant, and white currant had the lowest sugar/organic acid ratio and were thus perceptively the sourest species analyzed. On the other hand, the species with highest sugar/organic acid ratio were goji berry, eastern shadbush, black mulberry, and wild grown blackberry. The highest amounts of total phenols were quantified in chokeberry fruit. Wild strawberry, raspberry, and blackberry had 2- to 5-fold more total phenolics compared to cultivated plants. The fruit of analyzed berry species contained different levels of sugars, organic acids, and total phenolics. Moreover, it has been demonstrated that wild grown species

  9. Effects of ‘Target’ Plant Species Body Size on Neighbourhood Species Richness and Composition in Old-Field Vegetation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schamp, Brandon S.; Aarssen, Lonnie W.; Wight, Stephanie

    2013-01-01

    Competition is generally regarded as an important force in organizing the structure of vegetation, and evidence from several experimental studies of species mixtures suggests that larger mature plant size elicits a competitive advantage. However, these findings are at odds with the fact that large and small plant species generally coexist, and relatively smaller species are more common in virtually all plant communities. Here, we use replicates of ten relatively large old-field plant species to explore the competitive impact of target individual size on their surrounding neighbourhoods compared to nearby neighbourhoods of the same size that are not centred by a large target individual. While target individuals of the largest of our test species, Centaurea jacea L., had a strong impact on neighbouring species, in general, target species size was a weak predictor of the number of other resident species growing within its immediate neighbourhood, as well as the number of resident species that were reproductive. Thus, the presence of a large competitor did not restrict the ability of neighbouring species to reproduce. Lastly, target species size did not have any impact on the species size structure of neighbouring species; i.e. they did not restrict smaller, supposedly poorer competitors, from growing and reproducing close by. Taken together, these results provide no support for a size-advantage in competition restricting local species richness or the ability of small species to coexist and successfully reproduce in the immediate neighbourhood of a large species. PMID:24349177

  10. Effects of 'target' plant species body size on neighbourhood species richness and composition in old-field vegetation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brandon S Schamp

    Full Text Available Competition is generally regarded as an important force in organizing the structure of vegetation, and evidence from several experimental studies of species mixtures suggests that larger mature plant size elicits a competitive advantage. However, these findings are at odds with the fact that large and small plant species generally coexist, and relatively smaller species are more common in virtually all plant communities. Here, we use replicates of ten relatively large old-field plant species to explore the competitive impact of target individual size on their surrounding neighbourhoods compared to nearby neighbourhoods of the same size that are not centred by a large target individual. While target individuals of the largest of our test species, Centaurea jacea L., had a strong impact on neighbouring species, in general, target species size was a weak predictor of the number of other resident species growing within its immediate neighbourhood, as well as the number of resident species that were reproductive. Thus, the presence of a large competitor did not restrict the ability of neighbouring species to reproduce. Lastly, target species size did not have any impact on the species size structure of neighbouring species; i.e. they did not restrict smaller, supposedly poorer competitors, from growing and reproducing close by. Taken together, these results provide no support for a size-advantage in competition restricting local species richness or the ability of small species to coexist and successfully reproduce in the immediate neighbourhood of a large species.

  11. Natural Chemical Composition of Commercial Fish Species: Characterisation of Pangasius, Wild and Farmed Turbot and Barramundi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika Manthey-Karl

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available To comply with the relevant legal requirements and correct labelling, it is necessary for business operators and inspection authorities to know the natural characteristics of the raw material. This study gives a comprehensive overview of muscle flesh composition of farmed and wild Atlantic turbot (Scophthalmus maximus and barramundi (Lates calcarifer and of farmed pangasius (Pangasianodon hypophthalmus. The proximate composition, di- and triphosphates and citric acid values are presented in order to evaluate possible indicators for a hidden treatment during processing to fillets. All moisture contents were ≤80%. Even for pangasius, protein values for deep skinned fillets of ≥18% were determined. Only small quantities of naturally occurring citric acid (up to 0.03 g·kg−1 were detectable. The lipid content was the most varying main component within the different species, ranging between 1.2% to 2.0% and 0.3% to 3.0% for farmed turbot and barramundi, respectively. Pangasius flesh had a mean lipid content of 7.8%. Trimming and separation of the red layer reduced the lipid content of the commercially sold white-flesh fillets to 2.7% to 3.5%. Fatty acids profiles, free amino acids, and minerals were analysed to show the nutritional quality of the aquaculture fish species and compared to wild turbot and barramundi. Despite some natural variation, these components can be considered as comparable.

  12. Natural Chemical Composition of Commercial Fish Species: Characterisation of Pangasius, Wild and Farmed Turbot and Barramundi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manthey-Karl, Monika; Lehmann, Ines; Ostermeyer, Ute; Schröder, Ute

    2016-01-01

    To comply with the relevant legal requirements and correct labelling, it is necessary for business operators and inspection authorities to know the natural characteristics of the raw material. This study gives a comprehensive overview of muscle flesh composition of farmed and wild Atlantic turbot (Scophthalmus maximus) and barramundi (Lates calcarifer) and of farmed pangasius (Pangasianodon hypophthalmus). The proximate composition, di- and triphosphates and citric acid values are presented in order to evaluate possible indicators for a hidden treatment during processing to fillets. All moisture contents were ≤80%. Even for pangasius, protein values for deep skinned fillets of ≥18% were determined. Only small quantities of naturally occurring citric acid (up to 0.03 g·kg−1) were detectable. The lipid content was the most varying main component within the different species, ranging between 1.2% to 2.0% and 0.3% to 3.0% for farmed turbot and barramundi, respectively. Pangasius flesh had a mean lipid content of 7.8%. Trimming and separation of the red layer reduced the lipid content of the commercially sold white-flesh fillets to 2.7% to 3.5%. Fatty acids profiles, free amino acids, and minerals were analysed to show the nutritional quality of the aquaculture fish species and compared to wild turbot and barramundi. Despite some natural variation, these components can be considered as comparable. PMID:28231154

  13. Plant species composition alters the sign and strength of an emergent multi-predator effect by modifying predator foraging behaviour.

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    Andrew Wilby

    Full Text Available The prediction of pest-control functioning by multi-predator communities is hindered by the non-additive nature of species functioning. Such non-additivity, commonly termed an emergent multi-predator effect, is known to be affected by elements of the ecological context, such as the structure and composition of vegetation, in addition to the traits of the predators themselves. Here we report mesocosm experiments designed to test the influence of plant density and species composition (wheat monoculture or wheat and faba bean polyculture on the emergence of multi-predator effects between Adalia bipunctata and Chrysoperla carnea, in their suppression of populations of the aphid Metopolophium dirhodum. The mesocosm experiments were followed by a series of behavioural observations designed to identify how interactions among predators are modified by plant species composition and whether these effects are consistent with the observed influence of plant species composition on aphid population suppression. Although plant density was shown to have no influence on the multi-predator effect on aphid population growth, plant composition had a marked effect. In wheat monoculture, Adalia and Chrysoperla mixed treatments caused greater suppression of M. dirhodum populations than expected. However this positive emergent effect was reversed to a negative multi-predator effect in wheat and faba bean polyculture. The behavioural observations revealed that although dominant individuals did not respond to the presence of faba bean plants, the behaviour of sub-dominants was affected markedly, consistent with their foraging for extra-floral nectar produced by the faba bean. This interaction between plant composition and predator community composition on the foraging behaviour of sub-dominants is thought to underlie the observed effect of plant composition on the multi-predator effect. Thus, the emergence of multi-predator effects is shown to be strongly influenced by

  14. Plant species composition alters the sign and strength of an emergent multi-predator effect by modifying predator foraging behaviour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilby, Andrew; Anglin, Linda Anderson; Nesbit, Christopher M

    2013-01-01

    The prediction of pest-control functioning by multi-predator communities is hindered by the non-additive nature of species functioning. Such non-additivity, commonly termed an emergent multi-predator effect, is known to be affected by elements of the ecological context, such as the structure and composition of vegetation, in addition to the traits of the predators themselves. Here we report mesocosm experiments designed to test the influence of plant density and species composition (wheat monoculture or wheat and faba bean polyculture) on the emergence of multi-predator effects between Adalia bipunctata and Chrysoperla carnea, in their suppression of populations of the aphid Metopolophium dirhodum. The mesocosm experiments were followed by a series of behavioural observations designed to identify how interactions among predators are modified by plant species composition and whether these effects are consistent with the observed influence of plant species composition on aphid population suppression. Although plant density was shown to have no influence on the multi-predator effect on aphid population growth, plant composition had a marked effect. In wheat monoculture, Adalia and Chrysoperla mixed treatments caused greater suppression of M. dirhodum populations than expected. However this positive emergent effect was reversed to a negative multi-predator effect in wheat and faba bean polyculture. The behavioural observations revealed that although dominant individuals did not respond to the presence of faba bean plants, the behaviour of sub-dominants was affected markedly, consistent with their foraging for extra-floral nectar produced by the faba bean. This interaction between plant composition and predator community composition on the foraging behaviour of sub-dominants is thought to underlie the observed effect of plant composition on the multi-predator effect. Thus, the emergence of multi-predator effects is shown to be strongly influenced by plant species

  15. Species composition of the international shark fin trade assessed through a retail-market survey in Hong Kong.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fields, Andrew T; Fischer, Gunter A; Shea, Stanley K H; Zhang, Huarong; Abercrombie, Debra L; Feldheim, Kevin A; Babcock, Elizabeth A; Chapman, Demian D

    2017-10-27

    The shark fin trade is a major driver of shark exploitation in fisheries all over the world, most of which are not managed on a species-specific basis. Species-specific trade information highlights taxa of particular concern and can be used to assess the efficacy of management measures and anticipate emerging threats. The species composition of the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region of China, one of the world's largest fin trading hubs, was partially assessed in 1999-2001. We randomly selected and genetically identified fin trimmings (n = 4800), produced during fin processing, from the retail market of Hong Kong in 2014-2015 to assess contemporary species composition of the fin trade. We used nonparametric species estimators to determine that at least 76 species of sharks, batoids, and chimaeras supplied the fin trade and a Bayesian model to determine their relative proportion in the market. The diversity of traded species suggests species substitution could mask depletion of vulnerable species; one-third of identified species are threatened with extinction. The Bayesian model suggested that 8 species each comprised >1% of the fin trimmings (34.1-64.2% for blue [Prionace glauca], 0.2-1.2% for bull [Carcharhinus leucas] and shortfin mako [Isurus oxyrinchus]); thus, trade was skewed to a few globally distributed species. Several other coastal sharks, batoids, and chimaeras are in the trade but poorly managed. Fewer than 10 of the species we modeled have sustainably managed fisheries anywhere in their range, and the most common species in trade, the blue shark, was not among them. Our study and approach serve as a baseline to track changes in composition of species in the fin trade over time to better understand patterns of exploitation and assess the effects of emerging management actions for these animals. © 2017 The Authors. Conservation Biology published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of Society for Conservation Biology.

  16. Forest vegetation in western Romania in relation to climate variables: Does community composition reflect modelled tree species distribution?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Heinrichs

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available European beech (Fagus sylvatica L. is the prevailing tree species of mesic forests in Central Europe. Increasing summer temperatures and decreasing precipitation, as climate change scenarios predict, may, however, negatively influence beech growth and induce a shift to more thermophilous forest communities. Temperatures as expected in the future for western Central Europe are currently found in parts of western Romania. In light of this climate analogy we investigated forest vegetation as an indicator for future vegetation changes in five regions of western Romania representing a climatic gradient. We related species composition to climate variables and examined if tree and understorey species composition respond similarly to the climatic gradient. We further analysed if tree species occurrences correspond with their modelled distance to the rear niche edge. We found evidence for climatic effects on vegetation composition among regions as well as within deciduous and pine forests, respectively. This underlines that vegetation composition is a useful indicator for environmental change. Tree and understorey species compositions were closely linked showing that community-based characterization of forest stands can provide additional information on tree species suitability along environmental gradients. Both, vegetation composition and a climatic marginality index demonstrate the rear niche edge occurrence of beech in the studied sites of Romania and can predict the site suitability for different tree species. While vegetation surveys indicate Quercus petraea to be associated to moderately mesic forests, the marginality index suggested an inner niche position of sessile oak along the climatic gradient. Phytosociological relevés that differentiate between subspecies (or microspecies of sessile oak with differing habitat requirements should be considered to complement national forest inventories and species distribution maps when modelling rear

  17. Long-Term Dynamics of Standing Crop and Species Composition after the Cessation of Fertilizer Application to Mown Grassland

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Olff, H.; Bakker, J.P.

    1991-01-01

    (1) Current agricultural overproduction in Western Europe has led to an increase in the area of unfertilized grassland. This paper reports an experiment where fertilizer application was stopped to try to restore former species-rich vegetation. (2) Standing crop and species composition of three

  18. Elementary vectors

    CERN Document Server

    Wolstenholme, E Œ

    1978-01-01

    Elementary Vectors, Third Edition serves as an introductory course in vector analysis and is intended to present the theoretical and application aspects of vectors. The book covers topics that rigorously explain and provide definitions, principles, equations, and methods in vector analysis. Applications of vector methods to simple kinematical and dynamical problems; central forces and orbits; and solutions to geometrical problems are discussed as well. This edition of the text also provides an appendix, intended for students, which the author hopes to bridge the gap between theory and appl

  19. Monitoring of Water Quality and Microalgae Species Composition of Penaeus monodon Ponds in Pulau Pinang, Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaari, Asma Liyana; Surif, Misni; Latiff, Faazaz Abd.; Omar, Wan Maznah Wan; Ahmad, Mohd Noor

    2011-01-01

    Many reports have revealed that the abundance of microalgae in shrimp ponds vary with changes in environmental factors such as light, temperature, pH, salinity and nutrient level throughout a shrimp culture period. In this study, shrimp cultivation period was divided into three stages (initial = week 0–5, mid = week 6–10 and final = week 11–15). Physical and chemical parameters throughout the cultivation period were studied and species composition of microalgae was monitored. Physical parameters were found to fluctuate widely with light intensity ranging between 182.23–1278 μmol photon m−2s−1, temperature between 29.56°C −31.59°C, dissolved oxygen (DO) between 4.56–8.21 mg/l, pH between 7.65–8.49 and salinity between 20‰–30‰. Ammonium (NH4+-N), nitrite (NO2−-N), nitrate (NO3−-N), and orthophosphate (PO43−-P) concentrations in the pond at all cultivation stages ranged from 0.017 to 0.38 mg/l, 0.24 to 2.12 mg/l, 0.06 to 0.98 mg/l and 0.16 to 1.93 mg/l respectively. Statistical test (ANOVA) showed that there were no significant difference (pmicroalgae species were found in the shrimp pond, with diatoms contributing up to 72% of the species followed by Chlorophyta (11%) and Cyanophyta (11%). However, weekly species abundance varied through the study period. At the initial stage, when there were no shrimps in the pond, Anabaena spp. and Oscillatoria spp. (Cyanophyta) were the dominant species, followed by Chlorella sp. and Dunaliella sp. (Chlorophyta). When shrimps were introduced into the pond, Amphora sp., Navicula sp. Gyrosigma sp. and Nitzschia sp. (diatoms) started to exist. At the middle and towards the final stage of the shrimp culture period diatoms were the dominant species. The Chlorophyta (Chlorella sp.) domination took place only twice, which was at week 2 and 13. The absence of some of the coastal water microalgae species in the shrimp pond was most likely due to the fact that they could not tolerate the physicochemical

  20. Monitoring of Water Quality and Microalgae Species Composition of Penaeus monodon Ponds in Pulau Pinang, Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaari, Asma Liyana; Surif, Misni; Latiff, Faazaz Abd; Omar, Wan Maznah Wan; Ahmad, Mohd Noor

    2011-05-01

    Many reports have revealed that the abundance of microalgae in shrimp ponds vary with changes in environmental factors such as light, temperature, pH, salinity and nutrient level throughout a shrimp culture period. In this study, shrimp cultivation period was divided into three stages (initial = week 0-5, mid = week 6-10 and final = week 11-15). Physical and chemical parameters throughout the cultivation period were studied and species composition of microalgae was monitored. Physical parameters were found to fluctuate widely with light intensity ranging between 182.23-1278 μmol photon m(-2)s(-1), temperature between 29.56°C -31.59°C, dissolved oxygen (DO) between 4.56-8.21 mg/l, pH between 7.65-8.49 and salinity between 20‰-30‰. Ammonium (NH4 (+)-N), nitrite (NO2 (-)-N), nitrate (NO3 (-)-N), and orthophosphate (PO4 (3-)-P) concentrations in the pond at all cultivation stages ranged from 0.017 to 0.38 mg/l, 0.24 to 2.12 mg/l, 0.06 to 0.98 mg/l and 0.16 to 1.93 mg/l respectively. Statistical test (ANOVA) showed that there were no significant difference (pmicroalgae species were found in the shrimp pond, with diatoms contributing up to 72% of the species followed by Chlorophyta (11%) and Cyanophyta (11%). However, weekly species abundance varied through the study period. At the initial stage, when there were no shrimps in the pond, Anabaena spp. and Oscillatoria spp. (Cyanophyta) were the dominant species, followed by Chlorella sp. and Dunaliella sp. (Chlorophyta). When shrimps were introduced into the pond, Amphora sp., Navicula sp. Gyrosigma sp. and Nitzschia sp. (diatoms) started to exist. At the middle and towards the final stage of the shrimp culture period diatoms were the dominant species. The Chlorophyta (Chlorella sp.) domination took place only twice, which was at week 2 and 13. The absence of some of the coastal water microalgae species in the shrimp pond was most likely due to the fact that they could not tolerate the physicochemical factors of

  1. The Perfect Burrow, but for What? Identifying Local Habitat Conditions Promoting the Presence of the Host and Vector Species in the Kazakh Plague System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilschut, Liesbeth; Addink, Elisabeth; Ageyev, Vladimir; Yeszhanov, Aidyn; Sapozhnikov, Valerij; Belayev, Alexander; Davydova, Tania; Eagle, Sally; Begon, Mike

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The wildlife plague system in the Pre-Balkhash desert of Kazakhstan has been a subject of study for many years. Much progress has been made in generating a method of predicting outbreaks of the disease (infection by the gram negative bacterium Yersinia pestis) but existing methods are not yet accurate enough to inform public health planning. The present study aimed to identify characteristics of individual mammalian host (Rhombomys opimus) burrows related to and potentially predictive of the presence of R.opimus and the dominant flea vectors (Xenopsylla spp.). Methods Over four seasons, burrow characteristics, their current occupancy status, and flea and tick burden of the occupants were recorded in the field. A second data set was generated of long term occupancy trends by recording the occupancy status of specific burrows over multiple occasions. Generalised linear mixed models were constructed to identify potential burrow properties predictive of either occupancy or flea burden. Results At the burrow level, it was identified that a burrow being occupied by Rhombomys, and remaining occupied, were both related to the characteristics of the sediment in which the burrow was constructed. The flea burden of Rhombomys in a burrow was found to be related to the tick burden. Further larger scale properties were also identified as being related to both Rhombomys and flea presence, including latitudinal position and the season. Conclusions Therefore, in advancing our current predictions of plague in Kazakhstan, we must consider the landscape at this local level to increase our accuracy in predicting the dynamics of gerbil and flea populations. Furthermore this demonstrates that in other zoonotic systems, it may be useful to consider the distribution and location of suitable habitat for both host and vector species at this fine scale to accurately predict future epizootics. PMID:26325073

  2. Abortive long-lasting sporogony of two Haemoproteus species (Haemosporida, Haemoproteidae) in the mosquito Ochlerotatus cantans, with perspectives on haemosporidian vector research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valkiūnas, Gediminas; Kazlauskienė, Rita; Bernotienė, Rasa; Palinauskas, Vaidas; Iezhova, Tatjana A

    2013-06-01

    Haemoproteus spp. are cosmopolitan vector-born haemosporidian parasites, some species of which cause diseases in non-adapted birds. Recent polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based studies have detected mitochondrial cytochrome b gene lineages of these Haemoproteus parasites in blood-sucking mosquitoes and speculated about possible involvement of these insects in transmission of avian haemoproteids. However, development of Haemoproteus lineages has not been documented in mosquitoes. We infected 304 individuals of Ochlerotatus cantans, a widespread Eurasian mosquito, with Haemoproteus tartakovskyi (lineage hSISKIN1) and Haemoproteus balmorali (lineage hROBIN1). Mosquitoes were allowed to take non-infected and infected blood meals and maintained in the laboratory until 17 days post-infection (dpi). They were tested for presence of sporogonic stages by microscopic and PCR-based methods. Microscopic examination revealed partial development of both parasites in the infected insects. Numerous ookinetes were seen in the gut area and adjacent tissues located in the head, thorax and abdomen of mosquitoes between 1 and 5 dpi. Numerous oocysts were seen in the midgut wall between 4 and 15 dpi; they were also present in the head and thorax of infected mosquitoes testifying to the active movement of ookinetes throughout the body. Oocysts degenerated between 11 and 17 dpi. Sporozoites were not seen in oocysts or mosquito salivary glands, indicating abortive sporogonic development at the oocyst stage. In accordance with microscopy data, PCR and sequencing revealed presence of the lineages hSISKIN1 and hROBIN1 in experimental mosquitoes as long as 15 and 17 dpi, respectively, demonstrating relatively long survival of Haemoproteus parasites in the resistant insects without DNA degeneration. The present study shows that PCR-based diagnostics should be carefully used in vector studies of haemosporidians because it detects parasites in insects for several weeks after initial

  3. Effects of permethrin (Flypor) and fenvalerate (Acadrex60, Arkofly) on Culicoides species-the vector of Bluetongue virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmahl, Günter; Klimpel, Sven; Walldorf, Volker; Schumacher, Bärbel; Jatzlau, Antja; Al-Quraishy, Saleh; Mehlhorn, Heinz

    2009-03-01

    Bluetongue disease struggles ruminants in Europe since summer 2006, introducing high levels of morbidity and mortality. Besides vaccination, the application of insecticides is another means to protect cattle and sheep from infections with the Bluetongue virus, which is transmitted in Europe by female specimens of Culicoides species (Culicoides obsoletus and in a few cases of Culicoides pulicaris and Culicoides dewulfi). The present study deals with the effects of permethrin (Flypor) and fenvalerate (Arkofly, Acadrex 60) on freshly caught Culicoides specimens when brought into contact for 15, 30, 60 or 120 s with hair of cattle or sheep treated topically 7,14, 21, 28 or 35 days before. The experiments clearly showed that the lege arte application of these compounds (products) onto the hair of the experimental animals succeeds in killing Culicoides specimens when brought into contact with hair from feet of animals being treated even 35 days before. This test was needed to make sure that the products do reach the feet and belly of the animals in sufficient amounts, since this region is the predominant biting site of the Culicoides midges.

  4. Spectral Estimation of Soil Properties in Siberian Tundra Soils and Relations with Plant Species Composition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harm Bartholomeus

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Predicted global warming will be most pronounced in the Arctic and will severely affect permafrost environments. Due to its large spatial extent and large stocks of soil organic carbon, changes to organic matter decomposition rates and associated carbon fluxes in Arctic permafrost soils will significantly impact the global carbon cycle. We explore the potential of soil spectroscopy to estimate soil carbon properties and investigate the relation between soil properties and vegetation composition. Soil samples are collected in Siberia, and vegetation descriptions are made at each sample point. First, laboratory-determined soil properties are related to the spectral reflectance of wet and dried samples using partial least squares regression (PLSR and stepwise multiple linear regression (SMLR. SMLR, using selected wavelengths related with C and N, yields high calibration accuracies for C and N. PLSR yields a good prediction model for K and a moderate model for pH. Using these models, soil properties are determined for a larger number of samples, and soil properties are related to plant species composition. This analysis shows that variation of soil properties is large within vegetation classes, but vegetation composition can be used for qualitative estimation of soil properties.

  5. Acceleration and novelty: community restoration speeds recovery and transforms species composition in Andean cloud forest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Sarah Jane; Rhemtulla, Jeanine M

    2016-01-01

    Community-based tropical forest restoration projects, often promoted as a win-win solution for local communities and the environment, have increased dramatically in number in the past decade. Many such projects are underway in Andean cloud forests, which, given their extremely high biodiversity and history of extensive clearing, are understudied. This study investigates the efficacy of community-based tree-planting projects to accelerate cloud forest recovery, as compared to unassisted natural regeneration. This study takes place in northwest Andean Ecuador, where the majority of the original, highly diverse cloud forests have been cleared, in five communities that initiated tree-planting projects to restore forests in 2003. In 2011, we identified tree species along transects in planted forests (n = 5), naturally regenerating forests (n = 5), and primary forests (n = 5). We also surveyed 120 households about their restoration methods, tree preferences, and forest uses. We found that tree diversity was higher in planted than in unplanted secondary forest, but both were less diverse than primary forests. Ordination analysis showed that all three forests had distinct species compositions, although planted forests shared more species with primary forests than did unplanted forests. Planted forests also contained more animal-dispersed species in both the planted canopy and in the unplanted, regenerating understory than unplanted forests, and contained the highest proportion of species with use value for local people. While restoring forest increased biodiversity and accelerated forest recovery, restored forests may also represent novel ecosystems that are distinct from the region's previous ecosystems and, given their usefulness to people, are likely to be more common in the future.

  6. Chemical composition and antibacterial activities of seven Eucalyptus species essential oils leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebei, Khaled; Sakouhi, Fawzi; Herchi, Wahid; Khouja, Mohamed Larbi; Boukhchina, Sadok

    2015-01-19

    In this paper, we have studied the essential oils chemical composition of the leaves of seven Eucalyptus species developed in Tunisia. Eucalyptus leaves were picked from trees growing in different arboretums in Tunisia. Choucha and Mrifeg arboretums located in Sedjnene, region of Bizerte (Choucha: E. maideni, E. astrengens et E. cinerea; Mrifeg : E. leucoxylon), Korbous arboretums located in the region of Nabeul, North East Tunisia with sub-humid bioclimate, (E. lehmani), Souiniet-Ain Drahem arboretum located in region of Jendouba (E. sideroxylon, E. bicostata). Essential oils were individually tested against a large panel of microorganisms including Staphylococcus aureus (ATCC 6539), Escherichia coli (ATCC 25922), Enterococcus faecalis (ATCC29212), Listeria ivanovii (RBL 30), Bacillus cereus (ATCC11778). The yield of essential oils ranged from 1.2% to 3% (w/w) for the different Eucalyptus species. All essential oils contain α-pinene, 1,8-cineol and pinocarveol-trans for all Eucalyptus species studied. The 1,8-cineol was the major compound in all species (49.07 to 83.59%). Diameter of inhibition zone of essential oils of Eucalyptus species varied from 10 to 29 mm. The largest zone of inhibition was obtained for Bacillus cereus (E. astrengens) and the lowest for Staphylococcus aureus (E. cinerea). The essential oils from E. maideni, E. astrengens, E. cinerea (arboretum of Bizerte), E. bicostata (arboretum of Aindraham) showed the highest antibacterial activity against Listeria ivanovii and Bacillus cereus. The major constituents of Eucalyptus leaves essential oils are 1,8-cineol (49.07 to 83.59%) and α-pinene (1.27 to 26.35%). The essential oils from E. maideni, E. astrengens, E. cinerea, E. bicostata showed the highest antibacterial activity against Listeria ivanovii and Bacillus cereus, they may have potential applications in food and pharmaceutical products.

  7. Bryophyte Species Richness and Composition along an Altitudinal Gradient in Gongga Mountain, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Shou-Qin; Wu, Yan-Hong; Wang, Gen-Xu; Zhou, Jun; Yu, Dong; Bing, Hai-Jian; Luo, Ji

    2013-01-01

    An investigation of terrestrial bryophyte species diversity and community structure along an altitudinal gradient from 2,001 to 4,221 m a.s.l. in Gongga Mountain in Sichuan, China was carried out in June 2010. Factors which might affect bryophyte species composition and diversity, including climate, elevation, slope, depth of litter, vegetation type, soil pH and soil Eh, were examined to understand the altitudinal feature of bryophyte distribution. A total of 14 representative elevations were chosen along an altitudinal gradient, with study sites at each elevation chosen according to habitat type (forests, grasslands) and accessibility. At each elevation, three 100 m × 2 m transects that are 50 m apart were set along the contour line, and three 50 cm × 50 cm quadrats were set along each transect at an interval of 30 m. Species diversity, cover, biomass, and thickness of terrestrial bryophytes were examined. A total of 165 species, including 42 liverworts and 123 mosses, are recorded in Gongga mountain. Ground bryophyte species richness does not show any clear elevation trend. The terrestrial bryophyte cover increases with elevation. The terrestrial bryophyte biomass and thickness display a clear humped relationship with the elevation, with the maximum around 3,758 m. At this altitude, biomass is 700.3 g m−2 and the maximum thickness is 8 cm. Bryophyte distribution is primarily associated with the depth of litter, the air temperature and the precipitation. Further studies are necessary to include other epiphytes types and vascular vegetation in a larger altitudinal range. PMID:23472146

  8. Biochemical composition of three algal species proposed as food for captive freshwater mussels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatenby, C.M.; Orcutt, D.M.; Kreeger, D.A.; Parker, B.C.; Jones, V.A.; Neves, R.J.

    2003-01-01

    To identify potential diets for rearing captive freshwater mussels, the protein, carbohydrate (CHO), and lipid contents of two green algae, Neochloris oleoabundans, Bracteacoccus grandis, and one diatom, Phaeodactylum tricornutum, were compared at different growth stages. The fatty acid and sterol composition were also identified. Protein was greatest (55-70%) for all species at late log growth stage (LL), and declined in late stationary (LS) growth. CHO was greatest at LS stage for all species (33.9-56.4% dry wt). No significant change in lipid levels occurred with growth stage, but tended to increase in N. oleoabundans. Mean lipid content differed significantly in the order: N. oleoabundans > P. tricornutum > B. grandis. Total fatty acids (TFA) were higher at LS stage compared to other stages in the two green algae, and stationary stage in the diatom. Mean unsaturated fatty acids (UFA) as %TFA was significantly higher in N. oleoabundans than the other species. The green algae contained high percentages of C-18 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), while the diatom was abundant in C-16 saturated and mono-unsaturated fatty acids and C-20 PUFA fatty acids. Growth stage had no effect on sterol concentration of any species. B. grandis showed significantly higher sterol levels than the other species except P. tricornutum at S stage. B. grandis was characterized by predominantly ??5, C-29 sterols, while N. oleoabundans synthesized ??5,7, ??5,7,22, and ??7, C-28 sterols. P. tricornutum produced primarily a ??5,22, C-28 sterol, and a small amount of a ??7,22, C-28 sterol.

  9. Bryophyte species richness and composition along an altitudinal gradient in Gongga Mountain, China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shou-Qin Sun

    Full Text Available An investigation of terrestrial bryophyte species diversity and community structure along an altitudinal gradient from 2,001 to 4,221 m a.s.l. in Gongga Mountain in Sichuan, China was carried out in June 2010. Factors which might affect bryophyte species composition and diversity, including climate, elevation, slope, depth of litter, vegetation type, soil pH and soil Eh, were examined to understand the altitudinal feature of bryophyte distribution. A total of 14 representative elevations were chosen along an altitudinal gradient, with study sites at each elevation chosen according to habitat type (forests, grasslands and accessibility. At each elevation, three 100 m × 2 m transects that are 50 m apart were set along the contour line, and three 50 cm × 50 cm quadrats were set along each transect at an interval of 30 m. Species diversity, cover, biomass, and thickness of terrestrial bryophytes were examined. A total of 165 species, including 42 liverworts and 123 mosses, are recorded in Gongga mountain. Ground bryophyte species richness does not show any clear elevation trend. The terrestrial bryophyte cover increases with elevation. The terrestrial bryophyte biomass and thickness display a clear humped relationship with the elevation, with the maximum around 3,758 m. At this altitude, biomass is 700.3 g m(-2 and the maximum thickness is 8 cm. Bryophyte distribution is primarily associated with the depth of litter, the air temperature and the precipitation. Further studies are necessary to include other epiphytes types and vascular vegetation in a larger altitudinal range.

  10. Vector Surveillance to Determine Species Composition and Occurrence of Trypanosoma cruzi Infection at Three Military Installations in San Antonio, Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    disease cases in the MWD popula- tion. Prior to this, only a few sporadic cases were iden- tifi ed through serology and clinical diagnosis . In 2007...electrocardiograph, along with possible respiratory dis- tress. These cases can often be confused with chronic dilative cardiomyopathy observed in other...DR, Smith JH, Kirch-20. hoff LV. Postmortem diagnosis of autochthonous acute chagasic myocarditis by polymerase chain reaction amplifi cation of a

  11. Effects of copper on species composition of periphyton in a Sierra Nevada, California, stream

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leland, H.V.; Carter, J.L.

    1984-06-01

    Changes in species composition of the periphyton of an oliotrophic, Sierra Nevada stream continuously dosed for 1 year at three concentrations of copper (2.5, 5 and 10..mu..g 1/sup -1/ Cu/sub T/; approximately 12, 25 and 50 ng 1/sup -1/ Cu/sup 2 +/) were determined. The numerically most abundant taxa were Bacillariophyceae (Achnanthes minutissima, Cocconeis placentula, Cymbella microcephala, C. sinuata, Fragilaria construens, F. crotonensis, Navicula spp., Synedra acus and S. rumpens), and the Cyanophyta Lynbya spp., a co-dominant during spring and summer. Population densities of Lyngbya spp. were markedly reduced at all test concentrations of copper. Population densities of the principal Chlorophyta (Spirogyra spp. and Cladophora spp.) and the diatom Amphipleura pellucida were reduced at 5 ..mu..g 1/sup -1/ Cu/sub T/. Of the twenty-two most abundant taxa, sixteen were reduced in abundance by continuous exposure to 10 ..mu..g 1/sup -1/ Cu/sub T/. There was no commensurate reduction in standing crop (total number of individuals of all taxa). Achnanthes minutissima, a co-dominant in the control, was the primary replacement species. Other taxa that were more abundant at 5 ..mu..g 1/sup -1/ Cu/sub T/ than in the control were Ceratoneis arcus, Cocconeis placentula, Navicula spp. and Synedra rumpens. Only A. minutissima and Calothrix spp. were more abundant at l10 ..mu..g 1/sup -1/ than in the control. Three resemblance measures (Canberra metric, Bray-Curtis and Dice) and diversity (Brillouin's) were evaluated for detecting differences in species composition among experimental stream sections. The Canberra metric, an index sensitive to proportional rather than absolute differences, was the most informative of these indices.

  12. Assessing historical fish community composition using surveys, historical collection data, and species distribution models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ben Labay

    Full Text Available Accurate establishment of baseline conditions is critical to successful management and habitat restoration. We demonstrate the ability to robustly estimate historical fish community composition and assess the current status of the urbanized Barton Creek watershed in central Texas, U.S.A. Fish species were surveyed in 2008 and the resulting data compared to three sources of fish occurrence information: (i historical records from a museum specimen database and literature searches; (ii a nearly identical survey conducted 15 years earlier; and (iii a modeled historical community constructed with species distribution models (SDMs. This holistic approach, and especially the application of SDMs, allowed us to discover that the fish community in Barton Creek was more diverse than the historical data and survey methods alone indicated. Sixteen native species with high modeled probability of occurrence within the watershed were not found in the 2008 survey, seven of these were not found in either survey or in any of the historical collection records. Our approach allowed us to more rigorously establish the true baseline for the pre-development fish fauna and then to more accurately assess trends and develop hypotheses regarding factors driving current fish community composition to better inform management decisions and future restoration efforts. Smaller, urbanized freshwater systems, like Barton Creek, typically have a relatively poor historical biodiversity inventory coupled with long histories of alteration, and thus there is a propensity for land managers and researchers to apply inaccurate baseline standards. Our methods provide a way around that limitation by using SDMs derived from larger and richer biodiversity databases of a broader geographic scope. Broadly applied, we propose that this technique has potential to overcome limitations of popular bioassessment metrics (e.g., IBI to become a versatile and robust management tool for determining

  13. The essential oils chemical compositions and antimicrobial, antioxidant activities and toxicity of three Hyptis species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Dian-Hong; Huang, Ya-Si; Jiang, Dong-Qing; Yuan, Ke

    2013-09-01

    Hyptis suaveolens (Linn.) Poit., Hyptis rhomboidea Mart. et Gal., and Hyptis brevipes Poit., are three species of Hyptis Jacq. (Lamiaceae). Hyptis suaveolens is used for the treatment of fever, headache, gastrointestinal bloating and rheumatism in the traditional folk medicine; Hyptis rhomboidea for hepatitis, ulcer and swollen poison; and Hyptis brevipes for asthma and malaria. To characterize chemical compositions of the oils from three Hyptis species and evaluate their potential antimicrobial, radical scavenging activities and toxicities against brine shrimp. The oils were obtained by hydrodistillation, and their chemical compositions were investigated by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) were determined using the tube double-dilution technique. The antioxidant activities were investigated using the 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) assay and toxicities by the brine shrimp bioassay. Forty-seven, 33 and 28 constituents of oils isolated, respectively, from H. suaveolens, H. rhomboidea and H. brevipes were identified. Among the essential oils, the strongest antioxidant activity was exhibited by H. brevipes with an SC₅₀ value of 2.019 ± 0.25 μg mL⁻¹. The H. brevipes oil exhibited the strongest antimicrobial activity (3.125-6.25 μg mL⁻¹) on pathogens employed in the assay. They all showed significant toxicities with median lethal concentration (LC₅₀) values of 62.2 ± 3.07 μg mL⁻¹, 65.9 ± 6.55 μg mL⁻¹ and 60.8 ± 9.04 μg mL⁻¹, respectively. The three Hyptis species oils possess strong antimicrobial activities and toxicities. Hyptis rhomboidea and H. brevipes showed considerable antioxidant activity compared to the positive control.

  14. PHYTOPLANKTON SPECIES COMPOSITION OF THE RUSSIAN SECTOR OF THE CASPIAN SEA

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    A. Sh. Gasanova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Annotation. The taxonomic structure and the lists of species of the phytoplankton community in the Russian sector of the Caspian Sea have been presented. The dominant complexes have been detected. The predominance of small-cell types is characteristic of the modern structure of the summer phytoplankton. A high floristic diversity has been observed. Bacillariaphyta were the dominants. They made 42% of the species diversity. Cyanophyta algae were the basis of the group, whereas Bacillariaphyta were the basis of the biomass.Abstract. Aim.The composition of the species of the phytoplankton in the Russian sector of the Caspian Sea in conditions of transgression, anthropogenic and chemical contamination has been studied. Location. Russian sector of the Caspian Sea.Methods. The phytoplankton samples were collected at the depths of 8–100m and at the levels of 0, 10, 25, 50, 100 m by the use of the Nansen bathometer and subsequently were fixed in 4 % formalin. The fixed samples were kept in the dark for at least 15 days. The material was concentrated by the common method of deposition. The office processing was carried out in a box of Nozhotta type, which has the volume of 0.1 ml and the triplicate surface, under the light microscope of Biolam P15. The system of domestic diamotologists was used during the classification of Bacillariaphyta, as for the classification of Dinophyta, the Dodge scheme was applied. Cyanophyta algae were classified according to the system of A.A. Elenkina with the amendments adopted by A.I. Proshkina-Lavrenko and V.V. Makarova. The classification of the Chlorophyta division has been done according to the Smith system.Results. Presented the taxonomic structure and the lists of species of the phytoplankton community in the Russian sector of the Caspian Sea have been presented. The dominant complexes have been detected. A high floristic diversity of 71 species as well as the form and the variety of microalgae of 5

  15. Venom toxicity and composition in three Pseudomyrmex ant species having different nesting modes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Touchard, Axel; Labrière, Nicolas; Roux, Olivier; Petitclerc, Frédéric; Orivel, Jérôme; Escoubas, Pierre; Koh, Jennifer M S; Nicholson, Graham M; Dejean, Alain

    2014-09-01

    We aimed to determine whether the nesting habits of ants have influenced their venom toxicity and composition. We focused on the genus Pseudomyrmex (Pseudomyrmecinae) comprising terrestrial and arboreal species, and, among the latter, plant-ants that are obligate inhabitants of myrmecophytes (i.e., plants sheltering ants in hollow structures). Contrary to our hypothesis, the venom of the ground-dwelling species, Pseudomyrmex termitarius, was as efficacious in paralyzing prey as the venoms of the arboreal and the plant-ant species, Pseudomyrmex penetrator and Pseudomyrmex gracilis. The lethal potency of P. termitarius venom was equipotent with that of P. gracilis whereas the venom of P. penetrator was less potent. The MALDI-TOF MS analysis of each HPLC fraction of the venoms showed that P. termitarius venom is composed of 87 linear peptides, while both P. gracilis and P. penetrator venoms (23 and 26 peptides, respectively) possess peptides with disulfide bonds. Furthermore, P. penetrator venom contains three hetero- and homodimeric peptides consisting of two short peptidic chains linked together by two interchain disulfide bonds. The large number of peptides in P. termitarius venom is likely related to the large diversity of potential prey plus the antibacterial peptides required for nesting in the ground. Whereas predation involves only the prey and predator, P. penetrator venom has evolved in an environment where trees, defoliating insects, browsing mammals and ants live in equilibrium, likely explaining the diversity of the peptide structures. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Imbalances in faecal and duodenal Bifidobacterium species composition in active and non-active coeliac disease

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    Sanz Yolanda

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gut bifidobacteria are believed to influence immune-related diseases. The objective of this study was to assess the possible relationships between the gut bifidobacteria composition and coeliac disease (CD in children. A total of 48 faecal samples (30 and 18 samples from active and no active CD patients, respectively and 33 duodenal biopsy specimens of CD patients (25 and 8 samples from active and non-active CD patients, respectively were analysed. Samples (30 faecal samples and 8 biopsies from a control age-matched group of children were also included for comparative purposes. Gut Bifidobacterium genus and species were analyzed by real-time PCR. Results Active and non-active CD patients showed lower numbers of total Bifidobacterium and B. longum species in faeces and duodenal biopsies than controls, and these differences were particularly remarkable between active CD patients and controls. B. catenulatum prevalence was higher in biopsies of controls than in those of active and non-active CD patients, whereas B. dentium prevalence was higher in faeces of non-active CD patients than in controls. Correlations between levels of Bifidobacterium and B. longum species in faecal and biopsy samples were detected in both CD patients and controls. Conclusion Reductions in total Bifidobacterium and B. longum populations were associated with both active and non-active CD when compared to controls. These bacterial groups could constitute novel targets for adjuvant dietary therapies although the confirmation of this hypothesis would require further investigations.

  17. Yeast species composition differs between artisan bakery and spontaneous laboratory sourdoughs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vrancken, Gino; De Vuyst, Luc; Van der Meulen, Roel; Huys, Geert; Vandamme, Peter; Daniel, Heide-Marie

    2010-06-01

    Sourdough fermentations are characterized by the combined activity of lactic acid bacteria and yeasts. An investigation of the microbial composition of 21 artisan sourdoughs from 11 different Belgian bakeries yielded 127 yeast isolates. Also, 12 spontaneous 10-day laboratory sourdough fermentations with daily backslopping were performed with rye, wheat, and spelt flour, resulting in the isolation of 217 yeast colonies. The isolates were grouped according to PCR-fingerprints obtained with the primer M13. Representative isolates of each M13 fingerprint group were identified using the D1/D2 region of the large subunit rRNA gene, internal transcribed spacer sequences, and partial actin gene sequences, leading to the detection of six species. The dominant species in the bakery sourdoughs were Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Wickerhamomyces anomalus (formerly Pichia anomala), while the dominant species in the laboratory sourdough fermentations were W. anomalus and Candida glabrata. The presence of S. cerevisiae in the bakery sourdoughs might be due to contamination of the bakery environment with commercial bakers yeast, while the yeasts in the laboratory sourdoughs, which were carried out under aseptic conditions with flour as the only nonsterile component, could only have come from the flour used.

  18. Lipid content and composition of oocytes from five coral species: potential implications for future cryopreservation efforts.

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    Chiahsin Lin

    Full Text Available Given the previously documented importance of lipid concentration and composition in the successful cryopreservation of gorgonian corals, these parameters were assessed in oocytes of five species of scleractinian coral; Platygyra daedalea, Echinopora gemmacea, Echinophyllia aspera, Oxypora lacera and Astreopora expansa. Wax esters, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylcholine, and fatty acids were all measured at detectable levels, and the latter were produced at significantly elevated quantities in E. gemmacea, E. aspera, and O. lacera. On the other hand, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylcholine, and wax ester were found at significantly higher concentrations in A. expansa oocytes. Triacylglycerol was not present in any species. Interestingly, the total lipid content of oocytes from all five scleractinians was significantly lower than that of oocytes of two gorgonian species, Junceella juncea and Junceella fragilis. As higher total lipid concentrations may be correlated with greater degrees of cellular membrane fluidity at lower temperatures, it stands to reason that gorgonian coral oocytes may be more likely to survive the cryopreservation process than oocytes of scleractinian corals.

  19. BUGS in the analysis of biodiversity experiments: species richness and composition are of similar importance for grassland productivity.

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    Andy Hector

    Full Text Available The idea that species diversity can influence ecosystem functioning has been controversial and its importance relative to compositional effects hotly debated. Unfortunately, assessing the relative importance of different explanatory variables in complex linear models is not simple. In this paper we assess the relative importance of species richness and species composition in a multilevel model analysis of net aboveground biomass production in grassland biodiversity experiments by estimating variance components for all explanatory variables. We compare the variance components using a recently introduced graphical Bayesian ANOVA. We show that while the use of test statistics and the R² gives contradictory assessments, the variance components analysis reveals that species richness and composition are of roughly similar importance for primary productivity in grassland biodiversity experiments.

  20. Enhanced vector borne disease surveillance of California Culex mosquito populations reveals spatial and species-specific barriers of infection.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    VanderNoot, Victoria A.; Curtis, Deanna Joy; Koh, Chung-Yan; Brodsky, Benjamin H; Lane, Todd

    2014-08-01

    terium and c am p y l o bacter bac t er i al spec i e s . W e utilized the s e mic r obial transcri p tomes pre s e nt in g e ogra p hical l y defined Cul e x po p ul a tions to defi n e spatial and m osqui t o specie s -spec i fic ba r r iers of i n fecti o n. T he v i r ome and microbi o me c o mpos i tion id e ntified in e ach mosqui t o p o ol pr o v i ded suf f icient resolut i on to dete r m i ne both the mosq u ito species and the g e o graphic regi o n in Californ i a w h e re t h e mosqui t o po o l orig i n ated. T his d a ta pr o v i des ins i ght in t o the compl e x i t y of microb i al spec i es cir c ulati n g in med i cal l y i mport a nt Culex mosqui t oes a nd t h eir potent i al im p act o n t he tran s missi o n of v ector-b o rne human / veter i na r y p a t hogens in C a liforn i a.

  1. Assemblage composition of fungal wood-decay species has a major influence on how climate and wood quality modify decomposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venugopal, Parvathy; Junninen, Kaisa; Edman, Mattias; Kouki, Jari

    2017-03-01

    The interactions among saprotrophic fungal species, as well as their interactions with environmental factors, may have a major influence on wood decay and carbon release in ecosystems. We studied the effect that decomposer diversity (species richness and assemblage composition) has on wood decomposition when the climatic variables and substrate quality vary simultaneously. We used two temperatures (16 and 21°C) and two humidity levels (70% and 90%) with two wood qualities (wood from managed and old-growth forests) of Pinus sylvestris. In a 9-month experiment, the effects of fungal diversity were tested using four wood-decaying fungi (Antrodia xantha, Dichomitus squalens, Fomitopsis pinicola and Gloeophyllum protractum) at assemblage levels of one, two and four species. Wood quality and assemblage composition affected the influence of climatic factors on decomposition rates. Fungal assemblage composition was found to be more important than fungal species richness, indicating that species-specific fungal traits are of paramount importance in driving decomposition. We conclude that models containing fungal wood-decay species (and wood-based carbon) need to take into account species-specific and assemblage composition-specific properties to improve predictive capacity in regard to decomposition-related carbon dynamics. © FEMS 2017. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. CLIMATE CHANGE EFFECTS ON SPECIES COMPOSITION MEDIATES DECOMPOSITION IN AN OLD-FIELD ECOSYSTEM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tyner, M.L.; Classen, A.T.

    2007-01-01

    Decomposition of leaf litter collected from an old-fi eld community grown under a combination of elevated atmospheric CO2 concentrations (+300ppm) and elevated surface temperature (+ 3.2°C) was examined in ambient conditions over 8 months in two separate experiments. In the fi rst experiment, we examined the main effects and interactions of CO2 and warming on litter quality and subsequent mass loss rates. Multi-species litter bags were constructed with litter collected from chambers with ambient CO2 and ambient temperatures (ACAT), elevated CO2 and elevated temperature (ECET), ambient CO2 and elevated temperature (ACET), and elevated CO2 and ambient temperature (ECAT). Litter collected from 6 species in each chamber was represented in decomposition bags in equal proportions. There were no differences in initial litter percent carbon (C) or nitrogen (N) among treatments. After 8 months, litter collected from ACET chambers lost over 20% more mass than litter collected from ECET or ACAT chambers, although biological differences were small. In the second experiment, we examined the indirect effect climate change may have on plant community composition, litter inputs, and subsequent mass loss rates. Litter bags were made from the same chambers mentioned above, but the amount of litter in the bag from each species was proportional to peak standing biomass of that species within the treatment. Initial litter in ECAT bags had up to 4% less C and 29% less N than ECET and ACET bags. Mass loss from ACET bags was 48% higher than mass loss from ECAT bags and 37% higher than mass loss from ACAT bags after 8 months of decomposition. These differences may have been driven by the higher proportion of litter from Lespedeza, a N-fi xer, in the natural ACET bags. Taken together, these data suggest that climate change will have a larger effect on decomposition by causing shifts in plant communities than it will by altering litter quality.

  3. Sterol composition of shellfish species commonly consumed in the United States

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    Katherine M. Phillips

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Shellfish can be a component of a healthy diet due to a low fat and high protein content, but the cholesterol content of some species is often cited as a reason to limit their consumption. Data on levels of non-cholesterol sterols in commonly consumed species are lacking. Objective: Shellfish were sampled and analyzed to update sterol data in the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA National Nutrient Database for Standard Reference. Design: Using a nationwide sampling plan, raw shrimp and sea scallops, canned clams, and steamed oysters, blue crab, and lobster were sampled from 12 statistically selected supermarkets across the United States in 2007-08. For each species, four composites were analyzed, each comprised of samples from three locations; shrimp and scallops from six single locations were also analyzed separately. Using validated analytical methodology, 14 sterols were determined in total lipid extracts after saponification and derivatization to trimethylsilyethers, using gas chromatography for quantitation and mass spectrometry for confirmation of components. Results: Crab, lobster, and shrimp contained significant cholesterol (96.2–27 mg/100 g; scallops and clams had the lowest concentrations (23.4–30.1 mg/100 g. Variability in cholesterol among single-location samples of shrimp was low. The major sterols in the mollusks were brassicasterol (12.6–45.6 mg/100 g and 24-methylenecholesterol (16.7–41.9 mg/100 g, with the highest concentrations in oysters. Total non-cholesterol sterols were 46.5–75.6 mg/100 g in five single-location scallops samples, but 107 mg/100 g in the sixth, with cholesterol also higher in that sample. Other prominent non-cholesterol sterols in mollusks were 22-dehydrocholesterol, isofucosterol, clionasterol, campesterol, and 24-norcholesta-5,22-diene-3β-ol (4–21 mg/100 g. Conclusions: The presence of a wide range of sterols, including isomeric forms, in shellfish makes the analysis

  4. Effects of habitat and landscape characteristics on medium and large mammal species richness and composition in northern Uruguay

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    María José Andrade-Núñez

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The increasing world population and demand for food and other products has accelerated the conversion of natural habitats into agricultural lands, plantations and urban areas. Changes in habitat and landscape characteristics due to land-use change can have a significant effect on species presence, abundance, and distribution. Multi-scale approaches have been used to determine the proper spatial scales at which species and communities are responding to habitat transformation. In this context, we evaluated medium and large mammal species richness and composition in gallery forest (n = 10, grassland (n = 10, and exotic tree plantation (n = 10 in a region where grasslands have been converted into exotic tree plantations. We quantified mammal species richness and composition with camera traps and track surveys. The composition of the mammal community was related with local habitat variables, and landscape variables measured at seven spatial scales. We found 14 mammal species in forest, 11 species in plantation, and 7 mammal species in grassland. Two species are exotics, the wild boar Sus scrofa Linnaeus, 1758 and the European hare Lepus europaeus Pallas, 1778. The most common species are the crab-eating fox Cerdocyon thous Linnaeus, 1766, the nine-banded armadillo Dasypus novemcinctus Linnaeus, 1758 and the gray brocket deer Mazama gouazoubira G. Fischer, 1814 which are generalist species. Our results showed significant differences in mammal species richness and composition among the three habitat types. Plantations can have positive and negative effects on the presence of species restricted to grasslands. Positive effects are reflected in a wider local distribution of some forest species that rarely use grassland. The most important habitat and landscape variables that influenced mammal species richness and composition were vertical structure index, canopy cover, tree species diversity, percentage of grass, and the percentage of forest and grassland

  5. Chemical composition and antibacterial activities from the essential oils of myrtaceae species planted in Brazil

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    Cleber J. Silva

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The essential oils of seven Myrtaceae species were investigated for its chemical composition and antibacterial activity. The volatile oils were characterized by a high content of monoterpenoids of which 1,8-cineole (88.0, 65.0 and 77.0% for Melaleuca hypericifolia, Callistemon viminalis and Callistemon citrinus respectively, terpinen-4-ol (47.0 and 49.8% for Melaleuca thymifolia and Callistemon polandii respectively and α-pinene (54.5% for Kunzea ericoides were the major components. The oil from M. linariifolia was characterized by a high concentration of methyleugenol (87.2%. The oil from Melaleuca thymifolia was the most active, exhibiting high antimicrobial activity against all tested bacteria.

  6. Lipid composition and antioxidant activities of the seed oil from three Mlvaceae species

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    Tešević V.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The oil content and fatty acids, unsaponifiable composition and antioxidant activities of the seed oil from three Malvaceae species (Malva sylvestris L., Malva sylvestris L. var. mauritiana and Althaea officinalis L. from Serbia were determined. The oil yields from the seeds varied from 7.18 to 9.60%. The main fatty acids of the seed oils were linoleic acid (44.14-54.49%, oleic acid (13.00-16.99% and palmitic acid (11.45-24.29%. A small amount of cyclopropenoid acids, up to 1.85% was also established. The predominant sterol in all seed oils was β-sitosterol (11.51-17.34 mg/g of oil. The antioxidant potential of all the investigated seed oils was evaluated by radical scavenging activity using 2,2-diphenyl-1- picrylhydrazyl (DPPH assay.

  7. Chemical Composition, Nitrogen Fractions and Amino Acids Profile of Milk from Different Animal Species

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    Saima Rafiq

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Milk composition is an imperative aspect which influences the quality of dairy products. The objective of study was to compare the chemical composition, nitrogen fractions and amino acids profile of milk from buffalo, cow, sheep, goat, and camel. Sheep milk was found to be highest in fat (6.82%±0.04%, solid-not-fat (11.24%±0.02%, total solids (18.05%±0.05%, protein (5.15%±0.06% and casein (3.87%±0.04% contents followed by buffalo milk. Maximum whey proteins were observed in camel milk (0.80%±0.03%, buffalo (0.68%±0.02% and sheep (0.66%±0.02% milk. The non-protein-nitrogen contents varied from 0.33% to 0.62% among different milk species. The highest r-values were recorded for correlations between crude protein and casein in buffalo (r = 0.82, cow (r = 0.88, sheep (r = 0.86 and goat milk (r = 0.98. The caseins and whey proteins were also positively correlated with true proteins in all milk species. A favorable balance of branched-chain amino acids; leucine, isoleucine, and valine were found both in casein and whey proteins. Leucine content was highest in cow (108±2.3 mg/g, camel (96±2.2 mg/g and buffalo (90±2.4 mg/g milk caseins. Maximum concentrations of isoleucine, phenylalanine, and histidine were noticed in goat milk caseins. Glutamic acid and proline were dominant among non-essential amino acids. Conclusively, current exploration is important for milk processors to design nutritious and consistent quality end products.

  8. Essential oil composition from two species of Piperaceae family grown in Colombia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pino Benitez, Nayive; Meléndez León, Erika M; Stashenko, Elena E

    2009-10-01

    Essential oil compositions of aerial parts from two species in the Piper (Piperaceae family) genera: Piper lanceaefolium Kunth and Piper hispidum Sw., frequently called deflated (for the anti-inflammatory activity) or cord. Piperaceae leaves were collected in different regions of the Chocó department in northwestern Colombia and identified by botanists from Colombian National Herbarium, where a voucher of each specimen were deposited (No- COL 519993 and No- COL 519969, respectively). The essential oils were obtained by microwave-assisted hydrodistillation (MWHD) and analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The P. lanceaefolium essential oil was sesquiterpenoid type (71.7%). This composition was represented by sesquiterpenes hydrocarbons (58.5%) and by their oxygenated derivates (13.2%); the main compounds were, trans-beta-caryophyllene (11.6%) and germacrene D (10.7%) followed by alpha-selinene (7.8%), beta-pinene (5.4%), beta-selinene (4.8%), and alpha-cubebene (4.3%). The Piper hispidum essential oil also was sesquiterpene type (74.4%) and oxygenated sesquiterpenes (46.4%) followed by sesquiterpenes hydrocarbons (28.0%). The main compounds were trans-nerolidol (23.6%) and caryophyllene oxide (5.4%) followed by beta-elemene (5.1%), trans-beta-caryophyllene (5.1%), curzerene (4.9%), and germacrene B (4.5%). Trans-beta-caryophyllene presents the higher percentage of the common compounds in the two species' essential oil (11.6% and 5.1% in P. lanceaefolium and P. hispidum, respectively).

  9. Vector analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Brand, Louis

    2006-01-01

    The use of vectors not only simplifies treatments of differential geometry, mechanics, hydrodynamics, and electrodynamics, but also makes mathematical and physical concepts more tangible and easy to grasp. This text for undergraduates was designed as a short introductory course to give students the tools of vector algebra and calculus, as well as a brief glimpse into these subjects' manifold applications. The applications are developed to the extent that the uses of the potential function, both scalar and vector, are fully illustrated. Moreover, the basic postulates of vector analysis are brou

  10. Acidification of the humic Lake Skjervatjern; effects on the volume and species composition of phytoplankton

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brettum, P. (Norwegian Institute for Water Research, Oslo (Norway))

    1994-01-01

    This paper presents the effects of the experimental acidification on the volume and composition of phytoplankton from the investigations carried out in Lake Skjervatjern in connection with the HUMEX project. The results of the phytoplankton analysis are presented from Basin A, the acidified basin, and Basin B, the control, two years before the acidification started and two years during the acidification. In Basin B, the control basin, the succession of the main groups of phytoplankton throughout the growth season remained almost identical from year to year in the investigation period. The development of the phytoplankton was almost the same in the two basins before the acidification started. The results from the acidified Basin A in 1991 and 1992 show marked changes and an almost immediate response in the phytoplankton composition and percentage of the main algae groups, compared to the reference basin. The percentage of the green algae decreased, especially the species Oocystis submarina v. variabilis, while the dinoflagellate Peridinium inconspicuum and the cryptomonads increased in number and percentage of the total volume in the acidified basin. The total volume and the primary production measurements show an increase in Basin A compared to the control in the first year of acidification treatment (1991), but a decrease in the next year. 30 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Elemental compositions of lichens from Duolun County, Inner Mongolia, China: Origin, road effect and species difference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hua-Jie; Wang, Jing-Gong; Xia, Yu; Yang, Meng-Jie; Liu, Si-Wa; Zhao, Liang-Cheng; Guo, Xiu-Ping; Jiang, Yun-Jun; Li, Xin; Wu, Qing-Feng; Fang, Shi-Bo

    2017-07-17

    To assess the response of lichen elemental compositions to road traffic and species difference in the context of high dust input and anthropogenic emissions, two foliose epiphytic lichens (Phaeophyscia hirtuosa, PHh; Candelaria fibrosa, CAf) were sampled near a road adjacent to Dolon Nor Town (Duolun County, Inner Mongolia, China). Twenty elements (Ba, Ca, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, K, Mg, Mn, Mo, Na, Ni, P, Pb, Sb, Sr, Ti, V and Zn) in lichen and surface soil samples were analysed using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer (ICP-MS). The results demonstrate that lichen elemental compositions are highly influenced by both their natural environment and anthropogenic input. Windblown dust associated with sand dunes and degraded/desertified steppes represents the predominant source of lichen elements. Road traffic can enhance the lichen elemental burden by increasing the number of soil particles. Anthropogenic emissions from the town and road traffic have also led to the enrichment of Cd and Zn in lichens. PHh was higher than CAf in concentrations of 14 terrigenous metals. Both lichens are applicable to biomonitoring of atmospheric element deposition and, in most cases, yield comparable results.

  12. Geomorphic determinants of species composition of alpine tundra, Glacier National Park, U.S.A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George P. Malanson,; Bengtson, Lindsey E.; Fagre, Daniel B.

    2012-01-01

    Because the distribution of alpine tundra is associated with spatially limited cold climates, global warming may threaten its local extent or existence. This notion has been challenged, however, based on observations of the diversity of alpine tundra in small areas primarily due to topographic variation. The importance of diversity in temperature or moisture conditions caused by topographic variation is an open question, and we extend this to geomorphology more generally. The extent to which geomorphic variation per se, based on relatively easily assessed indicators, can account for the variation in alpine tundra community composition is analyzed versus the inclusion of broad indicators of regional climate variation. Visual assessments of topography are quantified and reduced using principal components analysis (PCA). Observations of species cover are reduced using detrended correspondence analysis (DCA). A “best subsets” regression approach using the Akaike Information Criterion for selection of variables is compared to a simple stepwise regression with DCA scores as the dependent variable and scores on significant PCA axes plus more direct measures of topography as independent variables. Models with geographic coordinates (representing regional climate gradients) excluded explain almost as much variation in community composition as models with them included, although they are important contributors to the latter. The geomorphic variables in the model are those associated with local moisture differences such as snowbeds. The potential local variability of alpine tundra can be a buffer against climate change, but change in precipitation may be as important as change in temperature.

  13. AN X-RAY-DIFFRACTION STUDY ON THE TEMPERATURE AND CHEMICAL-COMPOSITION DEPENDENCE OF THE MODULATION WAVE-VECTOR IN [(CH3)(4)N]2ZNCL4-XBRX COMPOUNDS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VOGELS, LJP; MEEKES, H; DEBOER, JL

    1994-01-01

    In this paper we study the behaviour of the modulation wave vector in [(CH3)(4)N]2ZnCl4-xBrx compounds as a function of composition (x) and temperature. We compare the results of this x-ray study with those of morphological experiments. The two results are quite well correlated, showing several

  14. Tree species, spatial heterogeneity, and seasonality drive soil fungal abundance, richness, and composition in Neotropical rainforests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kivlin, Stephanie N; Hawkes, Christine V

    2016-12-01

    Tropical ecosystems remain poorly understood and this is particularly true for belowground soil fungi. Soil fungi may respond to plant identity when, for example, plants differentially allocate resources belowground. However, spatial and temporal heterogeneity in factors such as plant inputs, moisture, or nutrients can also affect fungal communities and obscure our ability to detect plant effects in single time point studies or within diverse forests. To address this, we sampled replicated monocultures of four tree species and secondary forest controls sampled in the drier and wetter seasons over 2 years. Fungal community composition was primarily related to vegetation type and spatial heterogeneity in the effects of vegetation type, with increasing divergence partly reflecting greater differences in soil pH and soil moisture. Across wetter versus drier dates, fungi were 7% less diverse, but up to four-fold more abundant. The combined effects of tree species and seasonality suggest that predicted losses of tropical tree diversity and intensification of drought have the potential to cascade belowground to affect both diversity and abundance of tropical soil fungi. © 2016 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Species composition and seasonal abundance of sandflies (Diptera: Psychodidae: Phlebotominae in coffee agroecosystems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeanneth Perez

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The composition and seasonal occurrence of sandflies were investigated in coffee agroecosystems in the Soconusco region of Chiapas, Mexico. Insect sampling was performed on three plantations located at different altitudes: Finca Guadalupe Zajú [1,000 m above sea level (a.s.l.], Finca Argovia (613 m a.s.l. and Teotihuacán del Valle (429 m a.s.l.. Sandflies were sampled monthly from August 2007-July 2008 using three sampling methods: Shannon traps, CDC miniature light traps and Disney traps. Sampling was conducted for 3 h during three consecutive nights, beginning at sunset. A total of 4,387 sandflies were collected during the course of the study: 2,718 individuals in Finca Guadalupe Zajú, 605 in Finca Argovia and 1,064 in Teotihuacán del Valle. The Shannon traps captured 94.3% of the total sandflies, while the CDC light traps and Disney traps captured 4.9% and 0.8%, respectively. More females than males were collected at all sites. While the number of sandflies captured was positively correlated with temperature and relative humidity, a negative correlation was observed between sandfly numbers and rainfall. Five species of sandflies were captured: Lutzomyia cruciata , Lutzomyia texana , Lutzomyia ovallesi , Lutzomyia cratifer / undulata and Brumptomyia sp. Lu. cruciata , constituting 98.8% of the total, was the most abundant species. None of the captured sandflies was infected with Leishmania spp.

  16. Molecular diversity of Annona species and proximate fruit composition of selected genotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anuragi, Hirdayesh; Dhaduk, Haresh L; Kumar, Sushil; Dhruve, Jitendra J; Parekh, Mithil J; Sakure, Amar A

    2016-12-01

    Understanding the genetic variation in germplasm is of utmost importance for crop improvement. Therefore, efforts were made to analyse the molecular marker based genetic diversity of 20 Annona genotypes from five different species of family Annonaceae. During analysis, a set of 11 RAPD primers yielded a total of 152 bands with 80.01 % polymorphism and PIC for RAPD ranged from 0.86 to 0.92 with a mean of 0.89. With 93.05 % polymorphism, 12 SSR primers produced 39 amplicons. The PIC for SSRs ranged from 0.169 to 0.694 with of average of 0.339. The dendrogram produced from pooled molecular data of 11 RAPD and 12 SSR primers showed seven clusters at a cutoff value of 0.78. The dendrogram discriminated all the Annona genotypes suggesting that significant genetic diversity was present among the genotypes. Proximate fruit composition study of nine fruiting genotypes of Annona revealed that A. squamosa possessed significantly higher amount of most of studies biochemical which gives an opportunity to fruit breeders to improve the other Annona species. Likewise, A. muricata being rich in seed oil content can be exploited in oil industries.

  17. Chemosystematic Value of the Essential Oil Composition of Thuja species Cultivated in Poland—Antimicrobial Activity

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    Caroline Spyropoulos

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available In the framework of the correlation between chemotaxonomy and chemical analysis studies, the chemical composition of the essential oils of four varieties of Thuja species cultivated in Poland − T. occidentalis ‘globosa’, T. occidentalis ‘aurea’, T. plicata and T. plicata ‘gracialis’ − were investigated by GC and GC-MS. Thirty-one compounds were identified from T. occidentalis ‘globosa’, representing 96.92% of the total oil; twenty-seven from T. occidentalis ‘aurea’ (94.34%; thirty-one from T. plicata (94.75%; and thirty compounds from T. plicata ‘gracialis’ (96.36%. The main constituents in all samples were the monoterpene ketones α- and β-thujone, fenchone and sabinene, as well as the diterpenes beyerene and rimuene.The chemosystematic value of the total ketone content of all samples (which varied from 54.30–69.18% has been discussed and investigated. The constituents, beyerene and the mixture of α- and β-thujone, were isolated from the oils and tested against six Gram-positive and -negative bacteria and three pathogenic fungi. The oils of the two T. plicata species exhibited significant antimicrobial activity, while the mixture of α- and β-thujone showed very strong activity as well.

  18. Chemosystematic value of the essential oil composition of Thuja species cultivated in Poland-antimicrobial activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsiri, Dimitroula; Graikou, Konstantia; Pobłocka-Olech, Loretta; Krauze-Baranowska, Miroslawa; Spyropoulos, Caroline; Chinou, Ioanna

    2009-11-19

    In the framework of the correlation between chemotaxonomy and chemical analysis studies, the chemical composition of the essential oils of four varieties of Thuja species cultivated in Poland - T. occidentalis 'globosa', T. occidentalis 'aurea', T. plicata and T. plicata 'gracialis' - were investigated by GC and GC-MS. Thirty-one compounds were identified from T. occidentalis 'globosa', representing 96.92% of the total oil; twenty-seven from T. occidentalis 'aurea' (94.34%); thirty-one from T. plicata (94.75%); and thirty compounds from T. plicata 'gracialis' (96.36%). The main constituents in all samples were the monoterpene ketones alpha- and beta-thujone, fenchone and sabinene, as well as the diterpenes beyerene and rimuene. The chemosystematic value of the total ketone content of all samples (which varied from 54.30-69.18%) has been discussed and investigated. The constituents, beyerene and the mixture of alpha- and beta-thujone, were isolated from the oils and tested against six Gram-positive and -negative bacteria and three pathogenic fungi. The oils of the two T. plicata species exhibited significant antimicrobial activity, while the mixture of alpha- and beta-thujone showed very strong activity as well.

  19. Species composition and seasonal abundance of sandflies (Diptera: Psychodidae: Phlebotominae) in coffee agroecosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez, Jeanneth; Virgen, Armando; Rojas, Julio Cesar; Rebollar-Téllez, Eduardo Alfonso; Alfredo, Castillo; Infante, Francisco; Mikery, Oscar; Marina, Carlos Felix; Ibáñez-Bernal, Sergio

    2014-02-01

    The composition and seasonal occurrence of sandflies were investigated in coffee agroecosystems in the Soconusco region of Chiapas, Mexico. Insect sampling was performed on three plantations located at different altitudes: Finca Guadalupe Zajú [1,000 m above sea level (a.s.l.)], Finca Argovia (613 m a.s.l.) and Teotihuacán del Valle (429 m a.s.l.). Sandflies were sampled monthly from August 2007-July 2008 using three sampling methods: Shannon traps, CDC miniature light traps and Disney traps. Sampling was conducted for 3 h during three consecutive nights, beginning at sunset. A total of 4,387 sandflies were collected during the course of the study: 2,718 individuals in Finca Guadalupe Zajú, 605 in Finca Argovia and 1,064 in Teotihuacán del Valle. The Shannon traps captured 94.3% of the total sandflies, while the CDC light traps and Disney traps captured 4.9% and 0.8%, respectively. More females than males were collected at all sites. While the number of sandflies captured was positively correlated with temperature and relative humidity, a negative correlation was observed between sandfly numbers and rainfall. Five species of sandflies were captured: Lutzomyia cruciata , Lutzomyia texana , Lutzomyia ovallesi , Lutzomyia cratifer / undulata and Brumptomyia sp. Lu. cruciata , constituting 98.8% of the total, was the most abundant species. None of the captured sandflies was infected with Leishmania spp.

  20. Evaluation of the volatile composition and sensory properties of five species of microalgae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Durme, Jim; Goiris, Koen; De Winne, Ann; De Cooman, Luc; Muylaert, Koenraad

    2013-11-20

    Due to their high content of polyunsaturated fatty acids, antioxidants, and proteins, microalgae hold a lot of potential for nutritional applications. When microalgae are integrated into foodstuffs, the aroma is an important aspect to consider. In this study the aroma properties of microalgae were studied by correlating data on the volatile composition with sensory evaluations. Four species of marine microalgae ( Botryococcus braunii, , Rhodomonas , Tetraselmis species, and Nannochloropsis oculata ) and one fresh water microalga ( Chlorella vulgaris ) were investigated. Multivariate data processing revealed that microalgal samples having a seafood-like odor character contain high levels of sulfuric compounds (dimethyl disulfide, dimethyl trisulfide, and methional), diketones, α-ionone, and β-ionone. Fresh green, fruity flavors were linked with typical aldehydes such as 2,4-alkadienals and 2,4,6-alkatrienals. The presence of these compounds in fresh microalga pastes is explained by aroma formation mechanisms such as enzymatic lipid oxidation, enzymatic and chemical degradation of dimethylsulfoniopropionate (generating dimethyl sulfide), phenylalanine (generating benzaldehyde), and carotenoids (generating ionones).

  1. Evaluation of Chemical Composition and Antileishmanial and Antituberculosis Activities of Essential Oils of Piper Species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernuci, Karine Zanoli; Iwanaga, Camila Cristina; Fernandez-Andrade, Carla Maria Mariano; Lorenzetti, Fabiana Brusco; Torres-Santos, Eduardo Caio; Faiões, Viviane Dos Santos; Gonçalves, José Eduardo; do Amaral, Wanderlei; Deschamps, Cícero; Scodro, Regiane Bertin de Lima; Cardoso, Rosilene Fressatti; Baldin, Vanessa Pietrowski; Cortez, Diógenes Aparício Garcia

    2016-12-12

    Essential oils from fresh Piperaceae leaves were obtained by hydrodistillation and analyzed by gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS), and a total of 68 components were identified. Principal components analysis results showed a chemical variability between species, with sesquiterpene compounds predominating in the majority of species analyzed. The composition of the essential oil of Piper mosenii was described for the first time. The cytotoxicity of the essential oils was evaluated in peritoneal macrophages and the oils of P. rivinoides, P. arboretum, and P. aduncum exhibited the highest values, with cytotoxic concentration at 50% (CC50) > 200 µg/mL. Both P. diospyrifolium and P. aduncum displayed activity against Leishmania amazonensis, and were more selective for the parasite than for the macrophages, with a selectivity index (SI) of 2.35 and >5.52, respectively. These SI values were greater than the 1 for the standard drug pentamidine. The antileishmanial activity of the essential oils of P. diospyrifolium and P. aduncum was described for the first time. P. rivinoides, P. cernuum, and P. diospyrifolium displayed moderate activity against the Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv bacillus, with a minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of 125 µg/mL. These results are relevant and suggests their potential for therapeutic purposes. Nevertheless, further studies are required to explain the exact mechanism of action of these essential oils.

  2. Species composition and assemblages of ichthyoplankton during summer in the East China Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Han-Yang; Chiu, Mei-Yun; Shih, Yu-Ming; Chen, I.-Shiung; Lee, Ming-An; Shao, Kwang-Tsao

    2016-09-01

    The East China Sea (ECS) is one of the most important fish spawning and nursery grounds in the north Pacific. Even though summer is an important spawning season for many fishes in the region, large-scale molecular identification studies on ichthyoplankton during this season are few. In this study, we sampled 8,933 fish eggs and 12,161 fish larvae from 25 stations during the summer of 2009. Using DNA barcoding, a number of the fish eggs and larvae were identified and classified into 45 and 124 taxa, respectively. Principal component analysis (PCA) categorized the inshore stations of the Changjiang Diluted Water area as having the hydrographic features of low sea surface temperature (SST), salinity (SSS) and high chlorophyll a (SSC) contents, whereas the continental shelf and offshore stations under the influence of the Kuroshio Current displayed the opposite results. Ichthyoplankton was more abundant at the inshore stations than the offshore stations, but species diversity was lower at the former locations. Species compositions of both fish eggs and fish larvae at the 25 stations were categorized into three different assemblages based on a non-metric multidimensional scaling analysis. Combining the assemblage patterns of ichthyoplankton with the results of the PCA and satellite images of SST and SSC showed that the assemblage patterns of fish eggs were correlated with water mass, while those of the fish larvae were not.

  3. Nutritional status and body composition by bioelectrical impedance vector analysis: A cross sectional study in mild cognitive impairment and Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cova, Ilaria; Pomati, Simone; Maggiore, Laura; Forcella, Marica; Cucumo, Valentina; Ghiretti, Roberta; Grande, Giulia; Muzio, Fulvio; Mariani, Claudio

    2017-01-01

    Analysis of nutritional status and body composition in Alzheimer's disease (AD) and Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI). A cross-sectional study was performed in a University-Hospital setting, recruiting 59 patients with AD, 34 subjects with MCI and 58 elderly healthy controls (HC). Nutritional status was assessed by anthropometric parameters (body mass index; calf, upper arm and waist circumferences), Mini Nutritional Assessment (MNA) and body composition by bioelectrical impedance vector analysis (BIVA). Variables were analyzed by analysis of variance and subjects were grouped by cognitive status and gender. Sociodemographic variables did not differ among the three groups (AD, MCI and HC), except for females' age, which was therefore used as covariate in a general linear multivariate model. MNA score was significantly lower in AD patients than in HC; MCI subjects achieved intermediate scores. AD patients (both sexes) had significantly (p<0.05) higher height-normalized impedance values and lower phase angles (body cell mass) compared with HC; a higher ratio of impedance to height was found in men with MCI with respect to HC. With BIVA method, MCI subjects showed a significant displacement on the RXc graph on the right side indicating lower soft tissues (Hotelling's T2 test: men = 10.6; women = 7.9;p < 0,05) just like AD patients (Hotelling's T2 test: men = 18.2; women = 16.9; p<0,001). Bioelectrical parameters significantly differ from MCI and AD to HC; MCI showed an intermediate pattern between AD and HC. Longitudinal studies are required to investigate if BIVA could reflect early AD-changes in body composition in subjects with MCI.

  4. The Ecuadorian Artisanal Fishery for Large Pelagics: Species Composition and Spatio-Temporal Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Ortiz, Jimmy; Aires-da-Silva, Alexandre M.; Lennert-Cody, Cleridy E.; Maunder, Mark N.

    2015-01-01

    The artisanal fisheries of Ecuador operate within one of the most dynamic and productive marine ecosystems of the world. This study investigates the catch composition of the Ecuadorian artisanal fishery for large pelagic fishes, including aspects of its spatio-temporal dynamics. The analyses of this study are based on the most extensive dataset available to date for this fishery: a total of 106,963 trip-landing inspection records collected at its five principal ports during 2008 ‒ 2012. Ecuadorian artisanal fisheries remove a substantial amount of biomass from the upper trophic-level predatory fish community of the eastern tropical Pacific Ocean. It is estimated that at least 135 thousand metric tons (mt) (about 15.5 million fish) were landed in the five principal ports during the study period. The great novelty of Ecuadorian artisanal fisheries is the “oceanic-artisanal” fleet component, which consists of mother-ship (nodriza) boats with their towed fiber-glass skiffs (fibras) operating with pelagic longlines. This fleet has fully expanded into oceanic waters as far offshore as 100°W, west of the Galapagos Archipelago. It is estimated that nodriza operations produce as much as 80% of the total catches of the artisanal fishery. The remainder is produced by independent fibras operating in inshore waters with pelagic longlines and/or surface gillnets. A multivariate regression tree analysis was used to investigate spatio-environmental effects on the nodriza fleet (n = 6,821 trips). The catch species composition of the nodriza fleet is strongly influenced by the northwesterly circulation of the Humboldt Current along the coast of Peru and its associated cold waters masses. The target species and longline gear-type used by nodrizas change seasonally with the incursion of cool waters (< 25°C) from the south and offshore. During this season, dolphinfish (Coryphaena hippurus) dominates the catches. However, in warmer waters, the fishery changes to tuna

  5. The Ecuadorian Artisanal Fishery for Large Pelagics: Species Composition and Spatio-Temporal Dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jimmy Martínez-Ortiz

    Full Text Available The artisanal fisheries of Ecuador operate within one of the most dynamic and productive marine ecosystems of the world. This study investigates the catch composition of the Ecuadorian artisanal fishery for large pelagic fishes, including aspects of its spatio-temporal dynamics. The analyses of this study are based on the most extensive dataset available to date for this fishery: a total of 106,963 trip-landing inspection records collected at its five principal ports during 2008 ‒ 2012. Ecuadorian artisanal fisheries remove a substantial amount of biomass from the upper trophic-level predatory fish community of the eastern tropical Pacific Ocean. It is estimated that at least 135 thousand metric tons (mt (about 15.5 million fish were landed in the five principal ports during the study period. The great novelty of Ecuadorian artisanal fisheries is the "oceanic-artisanal" fleet component, which consists of mother-ship (nodriza boats with their towed fiber-glass skiffs (fibras operating with pelagic longlines. This fleet has fully expanded into oceanic waters as far offshore as 100°W, west of the Galapagos Archipelago. It is estimated that nodriza operations produce as much as 80% of the total catches of the artisanal fishery. The remainder is produced by independent fibras operating in inshore waters with pelagic longlines and/or surface gillnets. A multivariate regression tree analysis was used to investigate spatio-environmental effects on the nodriza fleet (n = 6,821 trips. The catch species composition of the nodriza fleet is strongly influenced by the northwesterly circulation of the Humboldt Current along the coast of Peru and its associated cold waters masses. The target species and longline gear-type used by nodrizas change seasonally with the incursion of cool waters (< 25°C from the south and offshore. During this season, dolphinfish (Coryphaena hippurus dominates the catches. However, in warmer waters, the fishery changes to tuna

  6. Fatty acid composition of the cypselae of two endemic Centaurea species (Asteraceae

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    Janaćković Peđa

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The fatty acid composition of cypselae of two endemic species from Macedonia, Centaurea galicicae and C. tomorosii, is analysed for the first time, using GC/MS (gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. In the cypselae of C. galicicae, 11 fatty acids were identified, palmitic (hexadecanoic acid (32.5% being the most dominant. Other fatty acids were elaidic [(E-octadec-9-enoic] acid (13.9%, stearic (octadecanoic acid (12.8% and linoleic [(9Z,12Z-9,12-octadecadienoic] acid (10.6%. Of the 11 identified fatty acids, seven were saturated fatty acids, which represented 41.5% of total fatty acids, while unsaturated fatty acids altogether constituted 58.5%. In the cypselae of C. tomorosii, five fatty acids were identified. The major fatty acid was linolelaidic [(9E,12E-octadeca- 9,12-dienoic] acid (48.8%. The second most dominant fatty acid was oleic [(9Z-octadec-9-enoic] acid (34.2%. Thus, unsaturated fatty acids were present with 83%. The other three fatty acids identified were saturated fatty acids, which represented 17% of total fatty acids. As a minor fatty acid, levulinic (4-oxopentanoic acid was determined in both C. galicicae and C. tomorosii (0.3% and 3.2%, respectively. The obtained results differ from published data on dominant fatty acids in the cypselae of other species belonging to the same section as the species investigated in the present paper (section Arenariae, subgenus Acrolophus, genus Centaurea. They also, differ from published data referable to other genera belonging to the same tribe (Cardueae. The general chemotaxonomic significance of fatty acids is discussed.

  7. Mapping Long-Term Changes in Mangrove Species Composition and Distribution in the Sundarbans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manoj Kumer Ghosh

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The Sundarbans mangrove forest is an important resource for the people of the Ganges Delta. It plays an important role in the local as well as global ecosystem by absorbing carbon dioxide and other pollutants from air and water, offering protection to millions of people in the Ganges Delta against cyclone and water surges, stabilizing the shore line, trapping sediment and nutrients, purifying water, and providing services for human beings, such as fuel wood, medicine, food, and construction materials. However, this mangrove ecosystem is under threat, mainly due to climate change and anthropogenic factors. Anthropogenic and climate change-induced degradation, such as over-exploitation of timber and pollution, sea level rise, coastal erosion, increasing salinity, effects of increasing number of cyclones and higher levels of storm surges function as recurrent threats to mangroves in the Sundarbans. In this situation, regular and detailed information on mangrove species composition, their spatial distribution and the changes taking place over time is very important for a thorough understanding of mangrove biodiversity, and this information can also lead to the adoption of management practices designed for the maximum sustainable yield of the Sundarbans forest resources. We employed a maximum likelihood classifier technique to classify images recorded by the Landsat satellite series and used post classification comparison techniques to detect changes at the species level. The image classification resulted in overall accuracies of 72%, 83%, 79% and 89% for the images of 1977, 1989, 2000 and 2015, respectively. We identified five major mangrove species and detected changes over the 38-year (1977–2015 study period. During this period, both Heritiera fomes and Excoecaria agallocha decreased by 9.9%, while Ceriops decandra, Sonneratia apelatala, and Xylocarpus mekongensis increased by 12.9%, 380.4% and 57.3%, respectively.

  8. Chemical composition, antioxidant and antibacterial activities of two Spondias species from Northeastern Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Ana Raquel Araújo; de Morais, Selene Maia; Marques, Márcia Maria Mendes; de Oliveira, Danielle Ferreira; Barros, Caroline Costa; de Almeida, Raimundo Rafael; Vieira, Ícaro Gusmão Pinto; Guedes, Maria Izabel Florindo

    2012-06-01

    The leaves of Spondias tuberosa Arr. Cam. (Anacardiaceae) and Spondias mombin L. have been traditionally used for medicinal purposes. Some studies reveal their antibacterial, antimicrobial, and antiviral properties. Determine the chemical composition, antioxidant, and antimicrobial activities of Spondias species to justify its ethnopharmacological use. Spondias species extracts were prepared with methanol:water 80:20 and analyzed by silica gel column chromatography and reversed phase liquid chromatography (HPLC). The antioxidant activity was evaluated by scavenging the radicals 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl radical (DPPH) and 2,2-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) (ABTS•+) and measuring antimicrobial activity (agar well diffusion method, minimum inhibitory concentration and minimum bactericidal concentrations). The HPLC analysis of Spondias extracts demonstrated the occurrence of high yield of flavonoids. Found in S. mombin were quercetin (2.36 ± 0.01 mg/g) and ellagic acid (41.56 ± 0.01 mg/g) and in S. tuberosa species rutin (53.38 ± 1.71 mg/g), quercetin (24.46 ± 0.87 mg/g), and ellagic acid (169.76 ± 0.17 mg/g). The antibacterial activity of the extracts against the various bacteria strains varied from 8.8 to 20.1 mm. MIC values from 62.5 to 125 µg/mL were satisfactory when compared with other plant products. Medium DPPH scavenging activity IC₅₀ for Spondias extracts varied from 0.042 to 0.558 mg/mL and for ABTS from 0.089 to 0.465 mg/mL. DPPH scavenging activity for constituent ellagic acid IC₅₀ = 0.042 mg/mL and for quercetin IC₅₀ = 0.081 mg/mL. The chemical study of Spondias leaf extracts showed the occurrence of quercetin, rutin and ellagic acid, substances with relevant antioxidant and antimicrobial activities.

  9. Rock climbing alters plant species composition, cover, and richness in Mediterranean limestone cliffs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorite, Juan; Serrano, Fabio; Lorenzo, Adrián; Cañadas, Eva M; Ballesteros, Miguel; Peñas, Julio

    2017-01-01

    Rock climbing is among the outdoor activities that have undergone the highest growth since the second half of the 20th century. As a result, cliff habitats, historically one of the least disturbed by human colonization worldwide, are facing more intense human pressure than ever before. However, there is little data on the impact of this activity in plant-communities, and such information is indispensable for adequate manager decision-making. The goal of this study was to determine the impact of rock climbing on plant communities in terms of cover, richness, and composition in relation to climbing intensity on typical Mediterranean limestone cliffs. Three rock-climbing sites were selected in the Baetic range (SE Spain), corresponding to qualitative categories of climbing frequentation: i)"low" (low frequentation with intermittent climbing), ii)"medium" (high frequentation without overcrowding), and iii) "high" (high frequentation with overcrowding). Within each site, we selected climbing routes and adjacent areas free of climbing, then we carried out a photoplot-based sampling by rappelling. We analysed the images to calculate: richness, species cover, and total cover. This study shows that rock climbing negatively affected the cliff plant community at all three study sites. A significant decrease in plant cover, species richness and a shift in the community composition were recorded for climbed areas, the cover being the variable most sensitive to rock climbing. Impact observed proved to be related to the frequentation level. Low-frequentation sites, with usually more specialized climbers, underwent relatively mild damages, whereas at high frequentation sites the impact was severe and the conservation of the species, especially rare ones, became jeopardized. Our study is the first one available to investigate climbing impact on plant communities in Mediterranean areas, but more research on the impact of rock climbing is needed to assess the regulation of this

  10. Rock climbing alters plant species composition, cover, and richness in Mediterranean limestone cliffs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Lorite

    Full Text Available Rock climbing is among the outdoor activities that have undergone the highest growth since the second half of the 20th century. As a result, cliff habitats, historically one of the least disturbed by human colonization worldwide, are facing more intense human pressure than ever before. However, there is little data on the impact of this activity in plant-communities, and such information is indispensable for adequate manager decision-making. The goal of this study was to determine the impact of rock climbing on plant communities in terms of cover, richness, and composition in relation to climbing intensity on typical Mediterranean limestone cliffs. Three rock-climbing sites were selected in the Baetic range (SE Spain, corresponding to qualitative categories of climbing frequentation: i"low" (low frequentation with intermittent climbing, ii"medium" (high frequentation without overcrowding, and iii "high" (high frequentation with overcrowding. Within each site, we selected climbing routes and adjacent areas free of climbing, then we carried out a photoplot-based sampling by rappelling. We analysed the images to calculate: richness, species cover, and total cover. This study shows that rock climbing negatively affected the cliff plant community at all three study sites. A significant decrease in plant cover, species richness and a shift in the community composition were recorded for climbed areas, the cover being the variable most sensitive to rock climbing. Impact observed proved to be related to the frequentation level. Low-frequentation sites, with usually more specialized climbers, underwent relatively mild damages, whereas at high frequentation sites the impact was severe and the conservation of the species, especially rare ones, became jeopardized. Our study is the first one available to investigate climbing impact on plant communities in Mediterranean areas, but more research on the impact of rock climbing is needed to assess the regulation

  11. Converging Human and Malaria Vector Diagnostics with Data Management towards an Integrated Holistic One Health Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitsakakis, Konstantinos; Hin, Sebastian; Müller, Pie; Wipf, Nadja; Thomsen, Edward; Coleman, Michael; Zengerle, Roland; Vontas, John; Mavridis, Konstantinos

    2018-02-03

    Monitoring malaria prevalence in humans, as well as vector populations, for the presence of Plasmodium , is an integral component of effective malaria control, and eventually, elimination. In the field of human diagnostics, a major challenge is the ability to define, precisely, the causative agent of fever, thereby differentiating among several candidate (also non-malaria) febrile diseases. This requires genetic-based pathogen identification and multiplexed analysis, which, in combination, are hardly provided by the current gold standard diagnostic tools. In the field of vectors, an essential component of control programs is the detection of Plasmodium species within its mosquito vectors, particularly in the salivary glands, where the infective sporozoites reside. In addition, the identification of species composition and insecticide resistance alleles within vector populations is a primary task in routine monitoring activities, aiming to support control efforts. In this context, the use of converging diagnostics is highly desirable for providing comprehensive information, including differential fever diagnosis in humans, and mosquito species composition, infection status, and resistance to insecticides of vectors. Nevertheless, the two fields of human diagnostics and vector control are rarely combined, both at the diagnostic and at the data management end, resulting in fragmented data and mis- or non-communication between various stakeholders. To this direction, molecular technologies, their integration in automated platforms, and the co-assessment of data from multiple diagnostic sources through information and communication technologies are possible pathways towards a unified human vector approach.

  12. Fatty acid composition of wild mushroom species of order Agaricales--examination by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and chemometrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marekov, Ilko; Momchilova, Svetlana; Grung, Bjørn; Nikolova-Damyanova, Boryana

    2012-12-01

    Applying gas chromatography-mass spectrometry of 4,4-dimethyloxazoline fatty acid derivatives, the fatty acid composition of 15 mushroom species belonging to 9 genera and 5 families of order Agaricales growing in Bulgaria is determined. The structure of 31 fatty acids (not all present in each species) is unambiguously elucidated, with linoleic, oleic and palmitic acids being the main components (ranging between 70.9% (Marasmius oreades) and 91.2% (Endoptychum agaricoides)). A group of three hexadecenoic positionally isomeric fatty acids, 6-, 9- and 11-16:1, appeared to be characteristic components of the examined species. By applying chemometrics it was possible to show that the fatty acid composition closely reflects the classification of the species. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Metagenomic systems biology and metabolic modeling of the human microbiome: from species composition to community assembly rules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Roie; Borenstein, Elhanan

    2014-01-01

    The human microbiome is a key contributor to health and development. Yet little is known about the ecological forces that are at play in defining the composition of such host-associated communities. Metagenomics-based studies have uncovered clear patterns of community structure but are often incapable of distinguishing alternative structuring paradigms. In a recent study, we integrated metagenomic analysis with a systems biology approach, using a reverse ecology framework to model numerous human microbiota species and to infer metabolic interactions between species. Comparing predicted interactions with species composition data revealed that the assembly of the human microbiome is dominated at the community level by habitat filtering. Furthermore, we demonstrated that this habitat filtering cannot be accounted for by known host phenotypes or by the metabolic versatility of the various species. Here we provide a summary of our findings and offer a brief perspective on related studies and on future approaches utilizing this metagenomic systems biology framework.

  14. Species-specific responses to climate change and community composition determine future calcification rates of Florida Keys reefs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okazaki, Remy R; Towle, Erica K; van Hooidonk, Ruben; Mor, Carolina; Winter, Rivah N; Piggot, Alan M; Cunning, Ross; Baker, Andrew C; Klaus, James S; Swart, Peter K; Langdon, Chris

    2017-03-01

    Anthropogenic climate change compromises reef growth as a result of increasing temperatures and ocean acidification. Scleractinian corals vary in their sensitivity to these variables, suggesting species composition will influence how reef communities respond to future climate change. Because data are lacking for many species, most studies that model future reef growth rely on uniform scleractinian calcification sensitivities to temperature and ocean acidification. To address this knowledge gap, calcification of twelve common and understudied Caribbean coral species was measured for two months under crossed temperatures (27, 30.3 °C) and CO2 partial pressures (pCO2 ) (400, 900, 1300 μatm). Mixed-effects models of calcification for each species were then used to project community-level scleractinian calcification using Florida Keys reef composition data and IPCC AR5 ensemble climate model data. Three of the four most abundant species, Orbicella faveolata, Montastraea cavernosa, and Porites astreoides, had negative calcification responses to both elevated temperature and pCO2 . In the business-as-usual CO2 emissions scenario, reefs with high abundances of these species had projected end-of-century declines in scleractinian calcification of >50% relative to present-day rates. Siderastrea siderea, the other most common species, was insensitive to both temperature and pCO2 within the levels tested here. Reefs dominated by this species had the most stable end-of-century growth. Under more optimistic scenarios of reduced CO2 emissions, calcification rates throughout the Florida Keys declined reefs, ranging 10-100%. Without considering bleaching, reef growth will likely decline on most reefs, especially where resistant species like S. siderea are not already dominant. This study demonstrates how species composition influences reef community responses to climate change and how reduced CO2 emissions can limit future declines in reef calcification. © 2016 John Wiley

  15. Geosmithia associated with bark beetles and woodborers in the western USA: taxonomic diversity and vector specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolařík, Miroslav; Hulcr, Jiri; Tisserat, Ned; De Beer, Wilhelm; Kostovčík, Martin; Kolaříková, Zuzana; Seybold, Steven J; Rizzo, David M

    2017-01-01

    Fungi in the genus Geosmithia (Ascomycota: Hypocreales) are frequent associates of bark beetles and woodborers that colonize hardwood and coniferous trees. One species, Geosmithia morbida, is an economically damaging invasive species. The authors surveyed the Geosmithia species of California and Colorado, USA, to (i) provide baseline data on taxonomy of Geosmithia and beetle vector specificity across the western USA; (ii) investigate the subcortical beetle fauna for alternative vectors of the invasive G. morbida; and (iii) interpret the community composition of this region within the emerging global biogeography of Geosmithia. Geosmithia was detected in 87% of 126 beetle samples obtained from 39 plant species. Twenty-nine species of Geosmithia were distinguished, of which 13 may be new species. Bark beetles from hardwoods, Cupressus, and Sequoia appear to be regular vectors, with Geosmithia present in all beetle gallery systems examined. Other subcortical insects appear to vector Geosmithia at lower frequencies. Overall, most Geosmithia have a distinct level of vector specificity (mostly high, sometimes low) enabling their separation to generalists and specialists. Plant pathogenic Geosmithia morbida was not found in association with any other beetle besides Pityophthorus juglandis. However, four additional Geosmithia species were found in P. juglandis galleries. When integrated with recent data from other continents, a global pattern of Geosmithia distribution across continents, latitudes, and vectors is emerging: of the 29 Geosmithia species found in the western USA, 12 have not been reported outside of the USA. The most frequently encountered species with the widest global distribution also had the broadest range of beetle vectors. Several Geosmithia spp. with very narrow vector ranges in Europe exhibited the similar degree of specialization in the USA. Such strong canalization in association could reflect an ancient origin of each individual association, or a

  16. Geochemistry and flooding as determining factors of plant species composition in Dutch winter-flooded riverine grasslands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beumer, Victor; van Wirdum, Geert; Beltman, Boudewijn; Griffioen, Jasper; Grootjans, Ab P; Verhoeven, Jos T A

    2008-08-25

    Dutch water policy aims for more frequent, controlled flooding of river valley floodplains to avoid unwanted flooding elsewhere; in anticipation of increased flooding risks resulting from climate changes. Controlled flooding usually takes place in winter in parts of the valleys which had not been subject to flooding in the last decades. It may thus affect existing nature with its conservation values. The goal of this study was to clarify the geochemical and hydrological factors determining plant species composition of winter-flooded river valley grasslands. A correlative study was carried out in 43 sites in 13 Dutch river valley floodplains, with measurements of flooding regime, vegetation composition, soil nutrients and soil pH status. With the use of canonical correspondence analysis (CCA) the plant species composition was investigated in relation to the geochemical variables and the winter winter-flooding regime. We found that the distributions of target species and non-target species were clearly correlated with geochemical characteristics and flooding regime. Clustering of sites within the CCA plots has led us to distinguish between four types of winter flooding in our areas: floodplains with (a) accumulating rain water, (b) low groundwater levels flooded with river water, (c) discharging groundwater and (d) high groundwater levels flooded with river water. Our major conclusions are (1) the winter groundwater level of winter-flooded grasslands was important for evaluating the effects of winter flooding on the geochemistry and plant species composition, and (2) winter winter-flooding effects were largely determined by the nature of the flooding. A high frequency of flooding particularly favoured a small set of common plant species. In areas with groundwater seepage, winter flooding may provide geochemical conditions suitable for diverse vegetation types with rare species. Rainwater flooded sites appeared less suitable for most target species.

  17. Malaria Vectors in Ecologically Heterogeneous Localities of the Colombian Pacific Region

    OpenAIRE

    Nelson Naranjo-Díaz; Mariano Altamiranda; Shirley Luckhart; Conn, Jan E.; Correa, Margarita M

    2014-01-01

    The Colombian Pacific region is second nationally in number of malaria cases reported. This zone presents great ecological heterogeneity and Anopheles species diversity. However, little is known about the current spatial and temporal distribution of vector species. This study, conducted in three ecologically different localities of the Pacific region, aimed to evaluate the composition and distribution of Anopheles species and characterize transmission intensity. A total of 4,016 Anopheles mos...

  18. Amino acid and proximate composition of fish bone gelatin from different warm-water species: A comparative study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atma, Y.

    2017-03-01

    Research on fish bone gelatin has been increased in the last decade. The quality of gelatin depends on its physicochemical properties. Fish bone gelatin from warm-water fishes has a superior amino acid composition than cold-water fishes. The composition of amino acid can determine the strength and stability of gelatin. Thus, it is important to analyze the composition of amino acid as well as proximate composition for potential gelatin material. The warm water fish species used in this study were Grass carp, Pangasius catfish, Catfish, Lizard fish, Tiger-toothed croaker, Pink perch, Red snapper, Brown spotted grouper, and King weakfish. There werre five dominant amino acid in fish bone gelatin including glycine (21.2-36.7%), proline (8.7-11.7%), hydroxyproline (5.3-9.6%), alanine (8.48-12.9%), and glutamic acid (7.23-10.15%). Different warm-water species has some differences in amino acid composition. The proximate composition showed that fishbone gelatin from Pangasius catfish has the highest protein content. The water composition of all fishbone gelatin was well suited to the standard. Meanwhile, based on ash content, only gelatin from gelatin Pangasius catfish met the standard for food industries.

  19. Mare’s milk: composition and protein fraction in comparison with different milk species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krešimir Kuterovac

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The usage of the mare’s milk as functional food especial for children intolerant to cow’s milk, with neurodermitis, allergies and similar disorders desiring to improve the quality of life is fiercely debated for last decades but there were no scientific studies to suggest such use of mare’s milk based on scientific research. The objectives of this study were to determine similarities of mare’s milk in comparison with milk of ruminants (cattle, sheep and goat and human milk in terms of milk composition and protein fraction as whey proteins, caseins and micelles size. All differences were discussed regarding usage of mare’s milk in human diet and compared to milk which is usually used in human nutrition. Regarding composition, the mare’s milk is similar to human milk in of crude protein, salt and lactose content, but it has significantly lower content of fat. Fractions of main proteins are similar between human and mare’s milk, except nitrogen casein (casein N which has twice lower content in human than in mare’s milk. Content of casein N from all ruminants’ milk differ much more. Just for true whey N and non-protein nitrogen (NPN similar content as human and mare’s milk has also goat milk. The casein content is the lowest in human milk; this content is three times greater in mare’s milk and six to seven times greater in goat’s and cow’s milk, while in sheep’s milk it is more than 10 times grater. In many components and fractions mare’s milk is more similar to human milk than milk of ruminants. A detail comparison of protein fraction shows quite large differences between milk of different species. More study and clinical research are needed that can recommend usage of mare’s milk in human diet as functional food on scientific bases.

  20. Cloning vector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guilfoyle, R.A.; Smith, L.M.

    1994-12-27

    A vector comprising a filamentous phage sequence containing a first copy of filamentous phage gene X and other sequences necessary for the phage to propagate is disclosed. The vector also contains a second copy of filamentous phage gene X downstream from a promoter capable of promoting transcription in a bacterial host. In a preferred form of the present invention, the filamentous phage is M13 and the vector additionally includes a restriction endonuclease site located in such a manner as to substantially inactivate the second gene X when a DNA sequence is inserted into the restriction site. 2 figures.

  1. Cloning vector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guilfoyle, Richard A.; Smith, Lloyd M.

    1994-01-01

    A vector comprising a filamentous phage sequence containing a first copy of filamentous phage gene X and other sequences necessary for the phage to propagate is disclosed. The vector also contains a second copy of filamentous phage gene X downstream from a promoter capable of promoting transcription in a bacterial host. In a preferred form of the present invention, the filamentous phage is M13 and the vector additionally includes a restriction endonuclease site located in such a manner as to substantially inactivate the second gene X when a DNA sequence is inserted into the restriction site.

  2. Species composition and seasonal abundance of stink bugs (Hemiptera: Pentatomidae) in Louisiana soybean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temple, J H; Davis, J A; Micinski, S; Hardke, J T; Price, P; Leonard, B R

    2013-08-01

    In Louisiana during the last decade, the redbanded stink bug, Piezodorus guildinii (Westwood), has become a significant and yield-limiting pest of soybean. The redbanded stink bug was previously reported in the United States in 1892, but was never considered an economically important pest until recently. Soybeans representing four maturity groups (MG) III, IV, V, and VI were sampled weekly from beginning bloom (R1) to physiological maturity (R8) during 2008-2010 at five locations across Louisiana to determine the Pentatomidae composition. In total, 13,146 stink bugs were captured and subsequently identified to species. The predominant species included the redbanded stink bug (54.2%); southern green stink bug (27.1%), Nezara viridula L.; brown stink bug (6.6%), Euschistus servus (Say); and green stink bug (5.5%), Acrosternum hilare (Say). Redbanded stink bug comprised the largest percentage of the complex collected at four of the five survey sites. Numbers exceeding action thresholds of this stink bug complex were only detected during R4 to R7 growth stages. Redbanded stink bug accounted for the largest percentage of the stink bug complex in early maturing soybean varieties (MG III [86%] and IV [60%]) and declined in later maturing soybeans (MG V [54%] and VI [50%]). The redbanded stink bug was initially identified in southern Louisiana during 2000 and had been reported in all soybean producing regions in Louisiana by 2006. This survey is the first to report the redbanded stink bug as a predominant pest of soybeans from locations within the United States.

  3. Chemical Composition and Biological Activity of Essential Oils from Different Species of Piper from Panama.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santana, Ana I; Vila, Roser; Cañigueral, Salvador; Gupta, Mahabir P

    2016-07-01

    The chemical composition of leaf essential oils from 11 species of Piper from Panama was analyzed by a combination GC-FID and GC-MS procedures. Six of them had sesquiterpene hydrocarbons as major constituents, three were characterized by monoterpene hydrocarbons, one by a diterpene, and one by a phenylpropanoid, dillapiole. The main components identified in each species were: cembratrienol (25.4 %) in Piper augustum; β-pinene (26.6 %) in Piper corrugatum; α-pinene (19.4 %) in Piper curtispicum; trans-β-farnesene (63.7 %) in Piper darienense; p-cymene (43.9 %) in Piper grande; dillapiole (57.7 %) in Piper hispidum; linalool (14.5 %), α-phellandrene (13.8 %), and limonene (12.2 %) in Piper jacquemontianum; β-caryophyllene (45.2 %) in Piper longispicum; linalool (16.5 %), α-phellandrene (11.8 %), limonene (11.4 %), and p-cymene (9.0 %) in Piper multiplinervium; β-selinene (19.0 %), β-elemene (16.1 %), and α-selinene (15.5 %) in Piper reticulatum; and germacrene D (19.7 %) in Piper trigonum. The essential oils of P. hispidum and P. longispicum at a concentration of 250 µg/mL showed larvicidal activity against Aedes aegypti, while the oils from P. curtispicum, P. multiplinervium, P. reticulatum, and P. trigonum were inactive (LC100 ≥ 500 µg/mL). The essential oils of P. grande, P. jacquemontianum, and P. multiplinervium showed no significant antifungal activity (MIC > 250 µg/mL) against several yeasts and filamentous fungal strains. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  4. Zooplankton abundance, species composition and ecology of tropical high-mountain crater lake Wonchi, Ethiopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fasil Degefu

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The highlands of Ethiopia represent some of the remnants of undisturbed aquatic ecosystems; they are however highly threatened by significant socio–economic developments and associated anthropogenic impacts. Lake Wonchi is one of the few remaining fairly pristine high–mountain crater lakes in the central highlands and has never been investigated in detail. We present a first study on zooplankton taxa composition, abundance and biomass conducted over more than one year including the underlying environmental drivers. The lake is basic (pH 7.9-8.9, dilute (specific conductivity 185-245 µS cm-1 and oligotrophic with mean trophic status index of 36. The zooplankton community composition showed low species richness comprising a total of fourteen taxa with six cladocerans, one copepod and seven rotifers. Simpson´s index of diversity with values between 0.6 and 0.8 pointed towards a homogenous taxa occurrence within the single sample units. The overall mean (±SD standing biomass of zooplankton was 62.02±25.76 mg dry mass m-3,which is low compared to other highland and rift valley lakes in Ethiopia. Cyclopoid copepods, in particular Thermocyclops ethiopiensis were the most abundant group and contributed 50% to the total zooplankton abundance followed by cladocerans (38% and rotifers (12%. Non-metric multi-dimensional scaling resulted in a 3-dimensional model, which revealed similar community composition on successive sampling dates except in December/January and May. Temperature, alkalinity, conductivity and nitrate-N had significant influence on this seasonal pattern. A weak, but significant positive correlation (r=0.482, N=20, P=0.037 between Chlorophyll a and zooplankton biomass mirrors a bottom-up effect of phytoplankton biomass on zooplankton dynamics. The zooplankton of Lake Wonchi displayed some degree of segregation along the epi– and metalimnion during this study, but diel vertical migration was not observed. The results show that fish

  5. Molecular differences in the mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase I (mtCOI) gene and development of a species-specific marker for onion thrips, Thrips tabaci Lindeman, and melon thrips, T. palmi Karny (Thysanoptera: Thripidae), vectors of tospoviruses (Bunyaviridae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asokan, R; Krishna Kumar, N K; Kumar, Vikas; Ranganath, H R

    2007-10-01

    A quick and developmental-stage non-limiting method of the identification of vectors of tospoviruses, such as Thrips tabaci and T. palmi, is important in the study of vector transmission, insecticide resistance, biological control, etc. Morphological identification of these thrips vectors is often a stumbling block in the absence of a specialist and limited by polymorphism, sex, stage of development, etc. Molecular identification, on the other hand, is not hampered by the above factors and can easily be followed by a non-specialist with a little training. The mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase I (mtCOI) exhibits reliable inter-species variations as compared to the other markers. In this communication, we present the differences in the mtCOI partial sequence of morphologically identified specimens of T. tabaci and T. palmi collected from onion and watermelon, respectively. Species-specific markers, identified in this study, could successfully determine T. tabaci and T. palmi, which corroborated the morphological identification. Phylogenetic analyses showed that both T. tabaci and T. palmi formed different clades as compared to the other NCBI accessions. The implication of these variations in vector efficiency has to be investigated further. The result of this investigation is useful in the quick identification of T. tabaci and T. palmi, a critical factor in understanding the epidemiology of the tospoviruses, their management and also in quarantine.

  6. Induction of male sterility through manipulation of genetic mechanisms present in vector species of Triatominae. II. Partial restoration of male fertility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alina Perlowagora-Szumlewicz

    1976-12-01

    Full Text Available The development of integrated measures which involve sterile mate release to supplement the conventional insecticidal techniques used in controlagainst insects of medical importance, raised the question, whether the vectors of Chagas'disease possess the natural mechanisms by manipulation of which they may be controlled. Results of earlier expenments, that had been published previously, were restricted to fragmentary information that raised various questions, the answer to which became available in the study herein described. Interspecific hybrids were produced from reciprocal crosses between T. pseudomaculata and T. sórdida and from unilateral crosses between female T. pseudomaculata and male. T. infestans. These females mated with males, laid less than the normal complement of eggs, but offspring was relatively abundant. When T. pseudomaculata females were paired with T. brasiliensis males, hybridization was more difficult because few of the females mated and those that did had a strongly reduced fertility. Adults emerged from ali crosses but exhibited sex disproportion, females predominating in all populations but one. The two Rhodnius species tested were also found to cross, but only when female R. prolixus were paired with male R. neglectus. These females laid a relatively high complement o f eggs, had a strongly reduced fertility, but 50% of the fertile eggs developed into vigorous adults, males predominating females. Neither type of hybrid male elicited fertilized eggs from either parental type of female, through their vesicula seminal is were found to be packed with spermatozoa, some normal looking and moving, others underdeveloped and motionless. Although, no artificial insemination was performed, the sperm in itself did not appear to be the prime inducer of sterility. Females paired with these hybrids did mate, sperm was transfered, as evidenced by the discharged spermatophores smeared with sperm, but did notcontain spermatozoa in

  7. A hybrid model of support vector regression with genetic algorithm for forecasting adsorption of malachite green onto multi-walled carbon nanotubes: central composite design optimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghaedi, M; Dashtian, K; Ghaedi, A M; Dehghanian, N

    2016-05-11

    The aim of this work is the study of the predictive ability of a hybrid model of support vector regression with genetic algorithm optimization (GA-SVR) for the adsorption of malachite green (MG) onto multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs). Various factors were investigated by central composite design and optimum conditions was set as: pH 8, 0.018 g MWCNTs, 8 mg L(-1) dye mixed with 50 mL solution thoroughly for 10 min. The Langmuir, Freundlich, Temkin and D-R isothermal models are applied to fitting the experimental data, and the data was well explained by the Langmuir model with a maximum adsorption capacity of 62.11-80.64 mg g(-1) in a short time at 25 °C. Kinetic studies at various adsorbent dosages and the initial MG concentration show that maximum MG removal was achieved within 10 min of the start of every experiment under most conditions. The adsorption obeys the pseudo-second-order rate equation in addition to the intraparticle diffusion model. The optimal parameters (C of 0.2509, σ(2) of 0.1288 and ε of 0.2018) for the SVR model were obtained based on the GA. For the testing data set, MSE values of 0.0034 and the coefficient of determination (R(2)) values of 0.9195 were achieved.

  8. BUGS in the Analysis of Biodiversity Experiments: Species Richness and Composition Are of Similar Importance for Grassland Productivity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hector, A.; Bell, T.; Hautier, Y.; Isbell, F.; Kéry, M.; Reich, P.B.; Ruijven, van J.; Schmid, B.

    2011-01-01

    The idea that species diversity can influence ecosystem functioning has been controversial and its importance relative to compositional effects hotly debated. Unfortunately, assessing the relative importance of different explanatory variables in complex linear models is not simple. In this paper we

  9. Herbaceous species composition and richness of mesophytic cove forests in the southern Appalachians: synthesis and knowledge gaps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katherine J. Elliott; James M. Vose; Duke Rankin

    2014-01-01

    We synthesized the current information on mesophytic cove forests in the southern Appalachians, assessed the range of variation in herb species composition and diversity in stands with different disturbance histories and environmental conditions, identified key knowledge gaps, and suggested approaches to fill these knowledge gaps. The purpose of this synthesis was to...

  10. Species diversity and composition in old growth and second growth rich coves of the southern Appalachian Mountains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clay Jackson; Dan Pitillo; Lee Allen; Thomas R Wnetworth; Bronson P Bullock; David L. Loftis

    2009-01-01

    Because of ongoing debate over the long term impacts of logging, we conducteda study to assess if second growth (70 6 10 years) rich coves differ from old growth rich coves(. 125 years) in species diversity or composition. We sampled twenty-six 0.1 ha...

  11. Silvicultural options for early-successional stands in Maine: 6-year results of the Silvicultural Intensity and Species Composition Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrew S. Nelson; Robert G. Wagner; Mike R. Saunders

    2014-01-01

    The Silvicultural Intensity and Species Composition (SIComp) experiment was installed in 2003 on a recently clearcut mixedwood site within the Penobscot Experimental Forest in east-central Maine. This study was initiated because the response of early-successional stands to various intensities of silviculture was poorly understood in the region. The goal of SIComp is to...

  12. The effects of wood storage on the chemical composition and indigenous microflora of eucalyptus species used in the pulping industry

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Ramnath, L

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available eucalypt species [Eucalyptus nitens, E. grandis, and E. dunnii (of different site qualities)] wood and generated pulp was performed. This study aimed at determining the effects of wood storage at -20°C (for 6 months), by examining their chemical composition...

  13. Compositional changes in (iso)flavonoids and estrogenic activity of three edible Lupinus species by germination and Rhizopus-elicitation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aisyah, Siti; Vincken, Jean Paul; Andini, Silvia; Mardiah, Zahara; Gruppen, Harry

    2016-01-01

    The effects of germination and elicitation on (iso)flavonoid composition of extracts from three edible lupine species (Lupinus luteus, Lupinus albus, Lupinus angustifolius) were determined by RP-UHPLC-MS. n The total (iso)flavonoid content of lupine increased over 10-fold upon

  14. Decapod larvae distribution and species composition off the southern Portuguese coast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pochelon, Patricia N.; Pires, Rita F. T.; Dubert, Jesús; Nolasco, Rita; Santos, A. Miguel P.; Queiroga, Henrique; dos Santos, Antonina

    2017-12-01

    For decapod crustaceans, the larval phase is the main responsible for dispersal, given the direct emission from adult habitats into the water column. Circulation patterns and behavioural mechanisms control the dispersal distance and connectivity between different areas. Information on larval distribution and abundance is required to predict the size and location of breeding populations, and correctly manage marine resources. Spatial distribution and abundance data of decapod larvae, and environmental parameters were assessed in winter surveys off the southern Portuguese coast. To better understand the oceanic structures driving larval distribution patterns, in situ physical parameters were measured and a hydrodynamical model used. Inter-annual, cross-shore and alongshore differences on decapod larvae distribution were found. Brachyuran crabs dominated the samples and similar taxa composition was observed in the most dynamic areas. Coastal taxa dominated the nearshore survey and were almost absent in the more offshore one, that registered much lower abundances. An upwelling front allowed a clear cross-shore species separation, also evident in the abundance values and number of taxa. Hydrodynamical conditions and adult habitats were the main factors explaining the observed patterns. Important missing information to understand the distribution patterns of decapod larval communities and the mechanisms behind them is given for the region.

  15. Effects of fishing technique on assessing species composition in aquatic systems in semi-arid Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ESF Medeiros

    Full Text Available In most ecological field research, appropriate sampling is critical for the understanding of processes underlying fish populations and communities, and is even more important in heterogeneous environments such as the aquatic systems of the semi-arid region of Brazil. This study intends to make a contribution to the development of sampling programs and gear selection in aquatic systems of semi-arid Brazil by evaluating the effects of different fishing techniques on the assessment of richness and composition of the fish fauna in selected aquatic environments. Six sites were selected to represent typical artificial (reservoirs and natural (intermittent streams environments and four different types of sampling gear were applied to each site during four occasions. The present study shows that when selecting sampling techniques to be used in aquatic systems in semi-arid Brazil, one must consider the objectives of the study, e.g. ecological or taxonomic, in order to decide on inclusion of rare species in the sampling population. Also, the effect of the sampling gear on natural abundances of fish must be considered given that some sampling techniques are highly detrimental to fish population numbers.

  16. Chemical Composition and Acetylcholinesterase Inhibitory Activity of Essential Oils from Piper Species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Cai-Peng; Han, Jia-Xin; Li, Xing-Cong; Li, Yun-Hui; Zhang, Yi; Chen, Lin; Qu, Yan; Hao, Chao-Yun; Li, Hai-Zhou; Yang, Chong-Ren; Zhao, San-Jun; Xu, Min

    2017-05-10

    The essential oils (EOs) derived from aromatic plants such as Piper species are considered to play a role in alleviating neuronal ailments that are associated with inhibition of acetylcholinesterase (AChE). The chemical compositions of 23 EOs prepared from 16 Piper spp. were analyzed by both gas chromatography with a flame ionization detector (GC-FID) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). A total of 76 compounds were identified in the EOs from the leaves and stems of 19 samples, while 30 compounds were detected in the EOs from the fruits of four samples. Sesquiterpenes and phenylpropanoids were found to be rich in these EOs, of which asaricin, caryophyllene, caryophyllene oxide, isospathulenol, (+)-spathulenol, and β-bisabolene are the major constituents. The EOs from the leaves and stems of Piper austrosinense, P. puberulum, P. flaviflorum, P. betle, and P. hispidimervium showed strong AChE inhibitory activity with IC 50 values in the range of 1.51 to 13.9 mg/mL. A thin-layer chromatography (TLC) bioautography assay was employed to identify active compound(s) in the most active EO from P. hispidimervium. The active compound was isolated and identified as asaricin, which gave an IC 50 value of 0.44 ± 0.02 mg/mL against AChE, comparable to galantamine with an IC 50 0.15 ± 0.01 mg/mL.

  17. Comparative study of the chemical composition of essential oils of five Tagetes species collected in Venezuela.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armas, Kaylin; Rojas, Janne; Rojas, Luis; Morales, Antonio

    2012-09-01

    The leaves and inflorescences of five species of Tagetes, family Asteraceae, were collected from different locations in Mérida state, Venezuela, and their essential oils analyzed by GC and GC/MS. Several differences were observed in the composition of these oils, mainly regarding the major components, which for T. caracasana were trans-ocimenone (64.3%) and cis-tagetone (13.7%), and for T. erecta, piperitone (35.9%) and terpinolene (22.2%). High amounts of trans-anethole (87.5%) and estragole (10.7%) were observed in T. filifolia, while T. subulata essential oil contained terpinolene (26.0%), piperitenone (13.1%) and limonene (10.8%). For T. patula, two different oil samples were analyzed, leaves (TPL) and inflorescences (TPI). The TPL oil showed terpinolene (20.9%) and piperitenone (14.0%) as main components, while the TPI sample was composed mainly of beta-caryophyllene (23.7%), terpinolene (15.6%) and cis-beta-ocimene (15.5%).

  18. Composition of the essential oils of three Uzbek Scutellaria species (Lamiaceae) and their antioxidant activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamadalieva, Nilufar Zokirjonovna; Sharopov, Farukh; Satyal, Prabodh; Azimova, Shahnoz Sadykovna; Wink, Michael

    2017-05-01

    The chemical composition of the essential oils obtained from aerial parts of Scutellaria immaculata Nevski ex Juz., Scutellaria ramosissima M. Pop. and Scutellaria schachristanica Juz. (Lamiaceae) growing wild in Uzbekistan was analysed by GC and GC-MS. The main constituents of the essential oils from S. immaculata were acetophenone (30.39%), eugenol (20.61%), thymol (10.04%) and linalool (6.92%), whereas constituents of the essential oils fromS. schachristanica were acetophenone (34.74%), linalool (26.98%) and eugenol (20.67%). The S. ramosissima oil is dominated by germacrene D (23.96%), β-caryophyllene (11.09%), linalool (9.63%) and hexadecanoic acid (8.34%). The essential oils of Scutellaria species exhibited weaker antioxidant effects in DPPH, ABTS and FRAP assays. In FRAP assay, only eugenol exhibited a substantial reducing power IC 50  = 2476.92 ± 15.8 (mM Fe(II)/g).

  19. Differential Essential Oil Composition and Morphology between Perennial Satureja species Growing in Spain

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    David García-Rellán

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Chemical composition of the essential oils obtained by hydrodistillation from the aerial parts of thirty six samples of perennial Spanish savouries (Satureja montana L., Satureja innota (Pau G. López, Satureja cuneifolia Ten. and Satureja intricata Lange, was investigated by GC and GC-MS. A total of 72 compounds accounting between 98.25-99.55% of the total oil were identified. High content of carvacrol (59.72±1.50% followed by g -terpinene (17.40±1.11% were found in S.montana essential oils. S. cuneifolia yielded an oil rich in camphor (45.04±1.67% and camphene (12.42±1.71% whereas S. innota produces an essential oil with linalool (23.94±7.58% or geraniol (8.62±3.45% according to the locality of collection and S. intricata showed chemical polymorphism with camphor (16.02±1.75%, as the main compound followed with populations with myrcene (8.46±1.46% and populations with g -terpinene (8.22±1.33%. Although the morphological affinity between S. innota, S.cuneifolia and S. intricata could lead to consider the subspecies level, the phytochemical discriminant analysis support the taxonomic classification of Flora Iberica which ranks these taxa into species.

  20. Essential oil composition and preliminary molecular study of four Hungarian Thymus species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pluhár, Zsuzsanna; Kocsis, Marianna; Kuczmog, Anett; Csete, S; Simkó, Hella; Sárosi, Szilvia; Molnár, P; Horváth, Györgyi

    2012-03-01

    Chemical and genetic differences of twenty taxa belonging to four Thymus species were studied in order to determine whether molecular characters and essential oil components could be used as taxonomic markers and to examine the correlation between them. Plant samples, representing different taxa and geographic regions, were collected from experimentally grown populations. Essential oil samples were analysed by GC/MS and cluster analysis of volatile composition resulted in segregation of thymol chemotypes from sesquiterpenic ones. Thymol was characteristic for all the populations of Thymus glabrescens and T. pannonicus as well as for certain taxa belonging to T. praecox and T. pulegioides. Sesquiterpenes occurred in only two taxa of T. glabrescens, in each sample of T. praecox and in three taxa of T. pulegioides. Plant samples were analysed by random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD). The obtained dendrogram revealed high gene diversity. The 13 primers resulted 114 polymorphic RAPD bands, and the average percentage of polymorphism was 80.8%. The RAPD dendogram showed separation neither at interspecific nor at interpopulational levels. Therefore, further specific molecular studies involving more taxa are suggested. Partial correlation have been found between molecular and chemical assessments.

  1. Homogenization of tissues via picosecond-infrared laser (PIRL) ablation : Giving a closer view on the in-vivo composition of protein species as compared to mechanical homogenization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kwiatkowski, M.; Wurlitzer, M.; Krutilin, A.; Kiani, P.; Nimer, R.; Omidi, M.; Mannaa, A.; Bussmann, T.; Bartkowiak, K.; Kruber, S.; Uschold, S.; Steffen, P.; Luebberstedt, J.; Kuepker, N.; Petersen, H.; Knecht, R.; Hansen, N. O.; Zarrine-Afsar, A.; Robertson, W. D.; Miller, R. J. D.; Schlueter, H.

    2016-01-01

    Posttranslational modifications and proteolytic processing regulate almost all physiological processes. Dysregulation can potentially result in pathologic protein species causing diseases. Thus, tissue species proteomes of diseased individuals provide diagnostic information. Since the composition of

  2. Species-Dependent Effects of the Urban Environment on Fatty Acid Composition and Oxidative Stress in Birds

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    Caroline Isaksson

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Ecological impacts of urbanization include the loss of biodiversity and changes in species composition and population densities. However, how the urban environment affects fundamental physiological parameters is largely unknown. Here, we investigated physiological components related to health and nutrition, namely, plasma fatty acids (FA and lipid peroxidation at inter-habitat and interspecific levels. Specifically, we compared four passerine bird species—the great tit (Parus major, the blue tit (Cyanistes caeruleus, the house sparrow (Passer domesticus, and the tree sparrow (P. montanus—from urban and rural environments. Significant interactions between species and habitat were revealed for the majority of the FAs. Interestingly, the observed inter-habitat variation in FAs was frequently in opposite directions when comparing species from the two families (tits, Paridae; sparrows, Passeridae. These patterns suggest that sparrows and tits feed on different food sources, or modulate their FA metabolism differently, across the urban-rural gradient. By using canonical discriminant analyses (CDA, we further demonstrated species-specific signals in FA composition, with misclassification of species being <1% within habitats and <7% between habitats. Finally, the urban-rural FA differences between species and families were manifested in two indices of health. Firstly, urban blue tits had a higher total ω-6/ω-3 polyunsaturated FA ratio than rural conspecifics, which is believed to increase inflammatory responses. Secondly, urban sparrows of both species showed higher lipid peroxidation indices (indicating a higher susceptibility to lipid peroxidation if exposed to pro-oxidants, and consequently, a higher level of lipid peroxidation compared to their rural conspecifics. Collectively, the species- and habitat-specific differences in plasma FA composition, which are linked to nutrition and metabolism, suggest that the urban environment affect tits and

  3. Patterns in fish species composition and assemblage structure in the upper Salado River lakes, Pampa Plain, Argentina

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    Juan José Rosso

    Full Text Available The Pampa Plain, in the central region of Argentina, is mostly drained by the Salado River. The fish fauna of this river is mostly known from field collections in lower reach lakes. Consequently, we aimed to explore the composition and structure of the fish assemblages in the upper Salado River lakes. Patterns in dominance and persistence of species and assemblage level attributes were correlated with environmental and human activity-derived (NO3:NH4 variables. Overall, 19,913 individuals of 17 species included in 5 orders and 11 families were collected. Several species are first records for the upper Salado River lakes. There was a marked proliferation of species in the family Characidae. Conversely, the remainder 10 families were only represented by one or two species. The species composition along the study lakes changed slightly but their relative contribution to the total fish collected (dominance varied greatly. Rather few species were present in all collections suggesting an important interannual variability in assemblage stability. The gradient in water conductivity was an important factor for the persistence of particular species in the lakes. The gradients in water conductivity and NO3:NH4 ratio were associated with particular fish communities dominated by different groups of species. These results suggest that even when broad management and conservation strategies should encompass the system as a whole, lake-specific approaches must also be addressed. Overall, our results highlight that human impacts on surface waters may interact with environmental factors to influence the dynamics of fish species and the structure of their communities.

  4. Effects of environmental stresses on the species composition of phytoplankton populations. Final report, 1 March 1979-15 July 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryther, J. H.; Sanders, J. G.

    1980-07-01

    Studies concerned with the impact of anthropogenic stress associated with coastally located power plants on the species composition of marine phytoplankton assemblages have been underway under this Contract for 24 months. The impact of three pollutants associated with power plant cooling water systems has been studied: copper, chlorine, and thermal elevation. The primary goal has been to determine whether chronic addition of these pollutants at sublethal levels can affect the species composition and the succession of dominant species in natural phytoplankton assemblages. Stresses have been studied both singly and in combination. In conjunction with these primary objectives, a number of related problems imvolving phytoplankton response to pollutants and to zooplankton grazing have been studied. These experiments have been performed both in the large volume enclosures outdoors, and in laboratory cultures under constant conditions.

  5. The weed species composition in a reed canary grass (Phalaris arundinacea L. plantation for energy purposes depending on its age

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    Tomasz R. Sekutowski

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The present experiment, carried out in nine production fields of reed canary grass (Phalaris arundinacea grown for energy purposes, evaluated the effect of plantation age on the occurrence and species composition of weeds. The selected plantations were divided into 3 groups that were conventionally called “young” (1–2 years old, “middle-aged” (3–5 years old, and “older” plantations (6–8 years old. Regardless of plantation age, altogether 43 species were found in the experimental fields. Moreover, 6 species were common for all the plantations and were found in them regardless of plantation age. The least species, only 18, were found on the “young” plantations, almost twice more on the “older” ones (30 species, whereas the largest spectrum of species was found in the “middle-aged” plantations (33 species. In the “young” plantations, annual weeds were the most common, with the highest constancy and coverage index found for Chenopodium album, Matricaria maritima ssp. inodora and Echinochloa crus-galli. The greatest variation in species was found in the “middle-aged” plantations. However, only 4 species achieved the highest constancy and coverage index: Matricaria maritima ssp. inodora, Cirsium arvense, Poa trivialis and Taraxacum officinale. Furthermore, perennial weeds were found to be dominant in the “older” plantations. Within this group, Poa trivialis, Taraxacum officinale, Urtica dioica, Plantago maior, and Cirsium arvense had the highest constancy and coverage index.

  6. Diatom species composition and indices for determining the ecological status of coastal Mediterranean Spanish lakes

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    Antón-Garrido, Beatriz

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Diatom indices have been used and tested mainly for assessing the ecological status of rivers and deep lakes, but there are scarce studies that determine their effectiveness in shallow lakes and in coastal Mediterranean lakes. This study evaluates the validity of several common diatom indices (SPI, BDI, CEC and TDIL for the determination of the ecological quality of three coastal lakes (Valencia, Spain and presents descriptions and ecological data of the main diatom species recorded. Diatom samples were collected from phytobenthos, both from epiphyton of the dominant submerged macrophytes and the sediment. The ecological status of the systems was determined according to different physico-chemical variables and was compared with the results obtained from epiphytic diatom communities. The results showed discrepancies among diatom indices and also with the state determined by the environmental variables. The effectiveness of the indices depended on the number of species assessed for each index with respect to the total species recorded and the suitability of the weight assigned to each species. The results reveal the need to gather more information about the composition and ecology of the diatoms and microalgae characteristic of coastal Mediterranean standing waters. This work contributes to their better knowledge.Los índices de diatomeas han sido aplicados y contrastados principalmente en la evaluación del estado ecológico de los sistemas lóticos y lagos profundos, pero son escasos los estudios sobre su eficacia en lagos someros y lagunas litorales mediterráneas. Este trabajo evalúa la validez de varios índices conocidos de diatomeas (IPS, IBD, CEE y TDIL para la determinación de la calidad ecológica de tres lagunas litorales (Valencia, España y presenta las descripciones y datos ecológicos de las principales especies de diatomeas registradas. Las muestras de diatomeas se recogieron del fitobentos, tanto del epifiton desarrollado sobre

  7. Seasonal variation in soil seed bank size and species composition of selected habitat types in Maputaland, South Africa

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    M. J. S. Kellerman

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Seasonal variation in seed bank size and species composition of five selected habitat types within the Tembe Elephant Park. South Africa, was investigated. At three-month intervals, soil samples were randomly collected from five different habitat types: a, Licuati forest; b, Licuati thicket; c, a bare or sparsely vegetated zone surrounding the forest edge, referred to as the forest/grassland ecotone; d, grassland; and e, open woodland. Most species in the seed bank flora were either grasses, sedges, or forbs, with hardly any evidence of woody species. The Licuati forest and thicket soils produced the lowest seed densities in all seasons.  Licuati forest and grassland seed banks showed a two-fold seasonal variation in size, those of the Licuati thicket and woodland a three-fold variation in size, whereas the forest/grassland ecotone maintained a relatively large seed bank all year round. The woodland seed bank had the highest species richness, whereas the Licuati forest and thicket soils were poor in species. Generally, it was found that the greatest correspondence in species composition was between the Licuati forest and thicket, as well as the forest/grassland ecotone and grassland seed bank floras.

  8. Seasonal variation in soil seed bank size and species composition of selected habitat types in Maputaland, South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. J. S. Kellerman

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Seasonal variation in seed bank size and species composition of five selected habitat types within the Tembe Elephant Park. South Africa, was investigated. At three-month intervals, soil samples were randomly collected from five different habitat types: a, Licuati forest; b, Licuati thicket; c, a bare or sparsely vegetated zone surrounding the forest edge, referred to as the forest/grassland ecotone; d, grassland; and e, open woodland. Most species in the seed bank flora were either grasses, sedges, or forbs, with hardly any evidence of woody species. The Licuati forest and thicket soils produced the lowest seed densities in all seasons.  Licuati forest and grassland seed banks showed a two-fold seasonal variation in size, those of the Licuati thicket and woodland a three-fold variation in size, whereas the forest/grassland ecotone maintained a relatively large seed bank all year round. The woodland seed bank had the highest species richness, whereas the Licuati forest and thicket soils were poor in species. Generally, it was found that the greatest correspondence in species composition was between the Licuati forest and thicket, as well as the forest/grassland ecotone and grassland seed bank floras.

  9. Adjustment of pigment composition in Desmarestia (Desmarestiaceae species along a sub-Antarctic to Antarctic latitudinal gradient

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    Andrés Mansilla

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Photosynthesis at high latitudes demands efficient strategies of light utilization to maintain algal fitness and performance. The fitness, and physiological adaptation, of a plant or algae species depends in part on the abundance and efficiency of the pigments it can produce to utilize the light resource from its environment. We quantified pigment composition and concentration in six species of the brown macroalgal genus Desmarestia, collected from sub-Antarctic sites (Strait of Magellan, Beagle Channel–Cape Horn Province and sites on the Antarctic Peninsula and adjacent islands. Sub-Antarctic Desmarestia species exhibited lower concentrations of chlorophyll a, chlorophyll c and fucoxanthin than endemic Antarctic species. Antarctic samples of D. menziesii and D. antarctica collected along a decreasing latitudinal gradient showed spatial and interspecific differences in light-harvesting pigment composition. Our results suggest distinct physiological adjustments in Desmarestia species in response to heterogeneous abiotic environmental conditions. The marine sub-Antarctic and Antarctic ecosystems are characterized by harsh environments (e.g., extreme irradiance, photoperiod, temperature, salinity to which the physiology of macroalgal species must adapt.

  10. Species diversity and composition of fungal communities in a Scots pine forest affected by the great cormorant colony

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    Ernestas Kutorga

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available A Scots pine forest, affected by the great cormorant colony, was studied by plot-based fungal survey method during the years 2010-2012 in Lithuania. Diversity and composition of fungal communities were investigated at five zones that had been influenced by different stages of breeding colony establishment: starting-point and almost abandoned cormorant colony part (zones A and B, active part (zones C and D, and the edge of the colony (zone E. The control zone G in undamaged by cormorants pine stand was assessed too. A total of 257 fungal species of ascomycetes including anamorphic fungi, basidiomycetes and zygomycetes were recorded. Seven species were registered for the first time in Lithuania. Species richness in the examined zones varied, lowest being in zones B (51 species, C (46 and D (73 and almost twice as high in the zones A and E (129 and 120, respectively. The comparison of fungal species compositions of different zones showed that their similarity was rather low (SS: 0.22–0.59. The most obvious changes in the trophic structure of fungal communities in the territory occupied by the bird colony were a strong decrease of mycorrhizal species, the presence of coprophilous fungi on forest litter, and the appearance of host-specialized fungi on alien and non-forest plants that have established in the disturbed forest.

  11. The ichthyofauna of upper rio Capivari: defining conservation strategies based on the composition and distribution of fish species

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    Paulo dos Santos Pompeu

    Full Text Available Although the rio Capivari basin is recognized as an area of great importance for the ichthyofauna, it lacks virtually every basic requirement for the definition of appropriate conservation strategies, since not even its species composition is known. The objective of this work is to determine the composition and distribution of fish species in the upper rio Capivari basin, relating them to the local physical features, and to evaluate the effectiveness of proposed conservations units, delimited based on areas of native vegetation remains, on the conservation of local ichthyofauna. During 2007, 50 different watercourses were sampled with gillnets, cast nets and kick nets. A total of 1308 individuals belonging to 41 species were captured. Degree of conservation, altitude and width were the parameters that best explained fish species richness. Considering the recently proposed boundaries for potential conservation units in the region only 15 or 20 out of 41 species would be found in the State Park and Environmental Protection Area respectively. In practice, the proposed conservation units would not be effective tools for fish conservation, since it would be located in mountainous areas of high altitude, of headwaters streams and where few species are found. In such context, the conservation of specific stretches of larger rivers is critical.

  12. Essential oil yield and composition of Lamiaceae species growing in southern Brazil

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    Fabiana Agostini

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available The Lamiaceae family has been described to be rich in essential oil. The aim of the present work was to identify the native species of Rio Grande do Sul with potential use as the aromatic plants. Seven species of the family were collected in the different localities of the state. The essential oils were obtained by 1h hydrodistillation in a Clevenger apparatus. The constituents were identified by comparing their GC Kovats retention indices (RI, determined with reference to a homologous series of n-alkanes and by comparing their mass spectral fragmentation patterns with literature data. Cunila incisa and Mentha aquatica resulted in the higher esssential oil yields (1.94% v/w and 0.93% v/w, respectively. The composition of M. aquatica was 80% methone, with almost 14% pulegone. C. microcephala had 53% menthofuran and C. incisa nearly 45% of 1.8-cineol and 18% α-terpineol.Em vista do reconhecimento de espécies da família Lamiaceae como produtoras de óleos essenciais, este trabalho teve como objetivo identificar algumas espécies nativas do Rio Grande do Sul, bem como avaliar seu potencial aromático. Para isso, foram coletadas sete amostras pertencentes à esta família, em diferentes localidades do Estado. O óleo essencial foi obtido por hidrodestilação em aparelho Clevenger pelo período de 1 hora. Os compostos foram identificados por comparação de seus Índices de Retenção de Kovats (R.I, deterninados com referência a uma série homóloga de n-alcanos e por comparação de seus padrões de fragmentação de massa com dados da literatura. C. incisa e M. aquatica, apresentaram os melhores rendimentos de óleo essencial (1.94% v/p e 0.93% v/p respectivamente. M. aquatica também destacou-se por apresentar cerca de 80% de mentona, além de pouco mais de 14% de pulegona. C. microcephala apresentou aproximadamente 53% de mentofurano e C. incisa cerca de 45% de 1,8-cineol e 18% de α-terpineol.

  13. Divergent composition but similar function of soil food webs of individual plants: plant species and community effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezemer, T M; Fountain, M T; Barea, J M; Christensen, S; Dekker, S C; Duyts, H; van Hal, R; Harvey, J A; Hedlund, K; Maraun, M; Mikola, J; Mladenov, A G; Robin, C; de Ruiter, P C; Scheu, S; Setälä, H; Smilauer, P; van der Putten, W H

    2010-10-01

    Soils are extremely rich in biodiversity, and soil organisms play pivotal roles in supporting terrestrial life, but the role that individual plants and plant communities play in influencing the diversity and functioning of soil food webs remains highly debated. Plants, as primary producers and providers of resources to the soil food web, are of vital importance for the composition, structure, and functioning of soil communities. However, whether natural soil food webs that are completely open to immigration and emigration differ underneath individual plants remains unknown. In a biodiversity restoration experiment we first compared the soil nematode communities of 228 individual plants belonging to eight herbaceous species. We included grass, leguminous, and non-leguminous species. Each individual plant grew intermingled with other species, but all plant species had a different nematode community. Moreover, nematode communities were more similar when plant individuals were growing in the same as compared to different plant communities, and these effects were most apparent for the groups of bacterivorous, carnivorous, and omnivorous nematodes. Subsequently, we analyzed the composition, structure, and functioning of the complete soil food webs of 58 individual plants, belonging to two of the plant species, Lotus corniculatus (Fabaceae) and Plantago lanceolata (Plantaginaceae). We isolated and identified more than 150 taxa/groups of soil organisms. The soil community composition and structure of the entire food webs were influenced both by the species identity of the plant individual and the surrounding plant community. Unexpectedly, plant identity had the strongest effects on decomposing soil organisms, widely believed to be generalist feeders. In contrast, quantitative food web modeling showed that the composition of the plant community influenced nitrogen mineralization under individual plants, but that plant species identity did not affect nitrogen or carbon

  14. Thermal stability and microstructure of catalytic alumina composite support with lanthanum species

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ozawa, Masakuni, E-mail: ozawa@numse.nagoya-u.ac.jp; Nishio, Yoshitoyo

    2016-09-01

    Highlights: • Thermal stability of La-modified γ-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} with nanometer-scaled structure. • LaAlO{sub 3} particles are dispersed in the aggregated particles of alumina. • Increase of the surface basicity of La modified alumina using CO{sub 2}-TPD. - Abstract: Lanthanum (La) modified γ-alumina composite was examined for application toward thermostable catalytic support at elevated temperature. La added alumina was prepared through an aqueous process using lanthanum (III) nitrate and then characterized by surface area measurement, X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), differential thermal analysis (DTA), scanning electron microscope (SEM), transmission electron microscope (TEM), X-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS) and surface desorption of CO{sub 2}. It was found that the properties depended on the La content and heat treatment temperatures. The characterization of the surface, structural and chemical properties of La-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} showed the existence of a strong interaction between the La species and alumina via formation of new phase and modified surface in Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} samples. LaAlO{sub 3} nanoparticle formed among alumina particles by the solid phase reaction of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and La{sub 2}O{sub 3}. The increase of the surface basicity of La modified alumina was demonstrated using CO{sub 2} temperature programmed desorption experiments. The controlled surface interaction between La oxide and alumina provide the unique surface and structural properties of the resulting mixed oxides as catalysts and catalytic supports.

  15. Variation in species composition and infection rates of Anopheles mosquitoes at different altitudinal transects, and the risk of malaria in the highland of Dirashe Woreda, south Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daygena, Taye Yohannes; Massebo, Fekadu; Lindtjørn, Bernt

    2017-07-19

    The transmission of malaria is heterogeneous, and varies due to altitude. The information on whether the transmission of malaria is indigenous or imported to highland areas is scarce. Therefore, this study aimed to assess the species composition and infection rates of Anopheles at different altitudinal transects, and the risk of malaria if any in the highland of Dirashe Woreda, South Ethiopia. This study was conducted in Gato (low altitude; average elevation of 1273 m), Onota (mid-altitude; average elevation of 1707 m) and Layignaw-Arguba (high altitude; average elevation of 2337 m) from August 2015 to April 2016. Anopheles mosquitoes were sampled using Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) light traps from thirty houses (ten houses from each village). The circum-sporozoite proteins (CSPs) rate and entomological inoculation rate (EIR) of Anopheles mosquitoes were estimated. For the epidemiological survey, malaria cases were collected from laboratory registration books of selected health facilities from (August 2015-April 2016). A cross-sectional survey was done to collect data on malaria vector control activities in each village (August-September 2015). One thousand two hundred sixty-eight Anopheles mosquitoes comprising Anopheles arabiensis, An. demeilloni, An. cinereus, An. pharoensis, An. funestus-group, An. pretoriensis, An. christyi, An. ardensis and An. tenebrosus were identified in the study area. Anopheles arabiensis was the dominant species in Gato, whereas An. demeilloni was the dominant species in Layignaw-Arguba. Five mosquitoes, three An. arabiensis from Gato and two An. demeilloni from Layignaw-Arguba, were positive for Plasmodium falciparum CSPs. Plasmodium falciparum CSP rate was 0.4% (95% CI: 0.08-1.15) for An. arabiensis in Gato, and it was 0.64% (95% CI: 0.08-2.3) for An. demeilloni from Layignaw-Arguba. The P. falciparum EIR of An. arabiensis was 8.6 (95% CI: 2.4-33.4) infectious bites/person/nine-months in Gato. Plasmodium

  16. Spatial distribution and species composition of small pelagic fishes in the Gulf of California

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edgar Lanz

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Traditional regionalization methods in fisheries based on provinces or major fishing areas, includes large and arbitrary grids in which basic statistics or inferences on distribution or abundance are made. We describe a method for regionalization and analysis of fishing activities for small pelagic fisheries in the Gulf of California based on spatial patterns of landing and catch data in a Geographic Information System (GIS environment. A fisheries database from logbooks with spatial attributes from October 2002 to June 2007 was analyzed. Landings and catching data were transformed to a Weighted Region Index (WRI by using fuzzy logic operators. The WRI revealed fishing action centers characterized by areas with the highest WRI values, and a hierarchy for the relative importance of the regions was established. Guaymas, Desemboque de Caborca, Isla Patos, and Bahía San Rafael they were the most prominent ones. An analysis of the relative frequency of species composition showed that the Pacific sardine had an over 80 % abundance in the midriff islands, and remained as the most important in the upper gulf regions, while in the central part of the gulf, relative abundances of Pacific sardine and Northern anchovy were more balanced. Relative abundance of mackerel was significantly larger around Isla Patos than in any other place. Guaymas had the largest relative composition of Northern anchovy and the lowest values for Pacific sardine. Desemboque de Caborca showed the largest homogeneity in species relative composition. It is important to highlight that this results come from in situ data, while the results previously reported come from landing statistics by port. Therefore, the present method acknowledges the spatial differences of species by regions, additional to the traditional time series analysis. Rev. Biol. Trop. 56 (2: 575-590. Epub 2008 June 30.Los métodos tradicionales de regionalización en pesquerías, basados en provincias o grandes

  17. Species diversity and seasonal variation in the composition of a bat community in the semi-arid brazilian caatinga

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrício Adriano da Rocha

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The caatinga scrublands are relatively poorly-studied, and few data are available on the biome’s chiropteran fauna. The present study focuses on the bat community of the arboreal caatinga of Serra da Guia. Bats were trapped in mist-nets on three new moon nights per month between October, 2008, and September, 2009. Atotal of 157 individuals were captured, representing 12 species. Species richness estimated by Jackknife1 was 14.8. Glossophaga soricina and Carollia perspicillata were by far the most common species, accounting for 56.7% of the specimens captured. Species diversity was 1.80, while equitability was 0.72. There was no significant seasonal difference in species diversity or evenness. However, the present study recorded a clear seasonal shift in community structure. The principal difference in species composition was related to the temporal distribution of the rarest forms – all of the seven rarest species were recorded exclusively in only one season (dry or wet. The nectarivorous bats predominated numerically both in the dry season as in rainy, while frugivores became prominent, in terms of both the number of species and individuals, during the wet season. The predominance of stenodermatine bats during the wet season almost certainly reflects the increased availability of resources for this group during this part of the year.

  18. Floristic Composition of Home-garden Systems in Dumbara (Knuckles Conservation Area with an emphasis on Endemic Species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. M. A. J. Dissanayake

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Home gardens are multistoried ecosystems and are important not only for in-situ biodiversityconservation, but also as valuable food sources, fodder, medicine and spices. The main objective ofthis study was to make decisions about the variations of home garden composition and to identify theendemic species. Fifty five home gardens were studied in northern flank from January to April 2012.Two large (10x10m2 and four small (1x1m2 quadrates were studied in each home garden. Individuals≥ 1.5 m height and ≥ 1 cm DBH were measured to calculate IVI. Species identification was done onsite and further at the National Herbarium, Peradeniya. Total of 1335 individual woody-perennials and4603 herbs were found in 11,000 m2 of study area. One hundred and fifty two woody-perennial species(19 endemic, 44 naturalized exotics, 37 cultivated and 52 timber under 54 families and 56 herbspecies (46 medicinal belonging to 33 families were recorded. Euphorbiaceae was the dominantfamily with 15 species, followed by Fabaceae (11 species, Anacardiaceae (10 species, Rutaceae (10species, Myrtaceae (7 species, Rubiaceae (6 species, Arecaceae (6 species, Moraceae (5 species,Sapindaceae (4 species and Zingiberaceae (4 species. Highest number of plant families (43 wasrecorded in Pitawala, while the lowest number of plant families was recorded in Polommana (24.Based on the Importance Value Index (IVI, the species to pay highest priority for conservation wereselected. According to Shannon diversity values for different villages, Rathninda is the most stable andless disturbed, whereas Polommana is the most unstable and highly disturbed village. There were fiveendemic Anacardiaceae species (Campnosperma zeylanicum, Mangifera zeylanica, Semecarpuscoriaceae, Semecarpus nigro-viridis, Semecarpus walkeri. Twelve percent of the studied populationwere interested in timber trees such as Tectona grandis, Melia azedarach, Swietenia macrophylla andChloroxylon swietenia. Twelve percent of

  19. Tree Species Composition and Harvest Intensity Affect Herbivore Density and Leaf Damage on Beech, Fagus sylvatica, in Different Landscape Contexts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangels, Jule; Blüthgen, Nico; Frank, Kevin; Grassein, Fabrice; Hilpert, Andrea; Mody, Karsten

    2015-01-01

    Most forests are exposed to anthropogenic management activities that affect tree species composition and natural ecosystem processes. Changes in ecosystem processes such as herbivory depend on management intensity, and on regional environmental conditions and species pools. Whereas influences of specific forest management measures have already been addressed for different herbivore taxa on a local scale, studies considering effects of different aspects of forest management across different regions are rare. We assessed the influence of tree species composition and intensity of harvesting activities on arthropod herbivores and herbivore-related damage to beech trees, Fagus sylvatica, in 48 forest plots in three regions of Germany. We found that herbivore abundance and damage to beech trees differed between regions and that - despite the regional differences - density of tree-associated arthropod taxa and herbivore damage were consistently affected by tree species composition and harvest intensity. Specifically, overall herbivore damage to beech trees increased with increasing dominance of beech trees - suggesting the action of associational resistance processes - and decreased with harvest intensity. The density of leaf chewers and mines was positively related to leaf damage, and several arthropod groups responded to beech dominance and harvest intensity. The distribution of damage patterns was consistent with a vertical shift of herbivores to higher crown layers during the season and with higher beech dominance. By linking quantitative data on arthropod herbivore abundance and herbivory with tree species composition and harvesting activity in a wide variety of beech forests, our study helps to better understand the influence of forest management on interactions between a naturally dominant deciduous forest tree and arthropod herbivores.

  20. Vector geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Robinson, Gilbert de B

    2011-01-01

    This brief undergraduate-level text by a prominent Cambridge-educated mathematician explores the relationship between algebra and geometry. An elementary course in plane geometry is the sole requirement for Gilbert de B. Robinson's text, which is the result of several years of teaching and learning the most effective methods from discussions with students. Topics include lines and planes, determinants and linear equations, matrices, groups and linear transformations, and vectors and vector spaces. Additional subjects range from conics and quadrics to homogeneous coordinates and projective geom

  1. Earthworm species composition affects the soil bacterial community and net nitrogen mineralization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Postma-Blaauw, M.B.; Bloem, J.; Faber, J.H.; Groenigen, van J.W.; Goede, de R.G.M.; Brussaard, L.

    2006-01-01

    Knowledge of the effects of species diversity within taxonomic groups on nutrient cycling is important for understanding the role of soil biota in sustainable agriculture. We hypothesized that earthworm species specifically affect nitrogen mineralization, characteristically for their ecological

  2. A systematic study of the polyphenolic composition of aqueous extracts deriving from several Cistus genus species: evolutionary relationship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrajón-Catalán, Enrique; Fernández-Arroyo, Salvador; Roldán, Cristina; Guillén, Emilio; Saura, Domingo; Segura-Carretero, Antonio; Micol, Vicente

    2011-01-01

    Cistaceae is a large family of shrubs widely spread over the Mediterranean area. It includes Helianthemum, Halimium and Cistus genus. Cistus genus contains approximately 20 species distributed in three subgenus. The essential oil of Cistus species has been thoroughly studied, but the polyphenolic composition of the aerial parts of the different Cistus species needs further characterisation. To perform a comparative analysis of the qualitative and quantitative polyphenolic composition of the aerial parts of the most commonly distributed Spanish Cistus species in order to find a relationship between chemotype and subgenus. Thirteen aqueous extracts derived from 10 different Cistus species were analysed by using HPLC with diode array-detection coupled to electrospray ion trap mass spectrometry technique (HPLC-DAD-ESI-MS/MS). Their major compounds were identified and ellagitannins were quantified. Principal component analysis (PCA) was performed on the most relevant compounds to find out the statistical association between chemotype and variety. Three main groups of compounds were found, i.e. ellagitannins, flavonoids and phenolic acids derivatives. The polyphenolic profile was specific for each species, although the abundance of some compounds also varied depending on the soil type. Whereas C. ladanifer, C. salviifolius, C. populifolius and C. libanotis were specially rich in ellagitannins, C. clusii, C. laurifolius and C. monspeliensis contained significant amounts of flavonoids and much less ellagitannins. In contrast, C. crispus, C. incanus and C. albidus showed a polyphenolic profile mostly based on flavonoids. PCA analysis showed a strong relationship between Cistus subgenus and its chemotype based on the most relevant water-soluble polyphenolic compounds. Chemical composition of the leaves' aqueous extracts from plants belonging to the Cistus genus is strongly related to their subgenus, in agreement to previous taxonomical and phylogenetic divisions. In contrast

  3. Mangrove forest exploration of Tambelan And Serasan Islands: Species composition, mapping of mangrove forest distribution and potential threat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    YAYA IHYA ULUMUDDIN

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. Ulumuddin YI, Setyawan AD. 2017. Mangrove forest exploration of Tambelan And Serasan Islands: Species composition, mapping of mangrove forest distribution and potential threat. Pros Sem Nas Masy Biodiv Indon 3: 45-55. Knowledge of the exact species plant composition of mangroves in any country or government is a basic and an important prerequisite to understanding all the aspects of structure and function of mangroves, as well as their conservation and management. The present study is going to describe the results of Natuna Sea Expedition, involving the inventory of mangrove species, mangrove forest mapping, and interview about mangrove use. This expedition has been conducted at 4th-16th November 2010 in Tambelan and Serasan Islands, Natuna Waters, Riau Archipelago. The inventory was conducted by survey method through the mangrove area, and the mapping was conducted by satellite imagery interpretation of ALOS AVNIR-2 acquisitions year 2009 and 2010, combined with the data field of mangrove position. There were 18 mangrove species and 31 associates species in Tambelan and Serasan Islands, which were the destination of the expedition. The vegetation was distributed in mangrove forests in the bays, the stream narrows, and covered islands. Mangrove forests in such two islands have not been treated significantly, but there was threat potential regarding of the tendency to occupy mangrove area for the homeland.

  4. Temporal variation in the abundance and composition of phytoplankton species, collected with net in the Acapulco Bay, Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moreno-Díaz, G.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Phytoplankton community species were collected from September 2009 to April 2010 in Acapulco Bay, Mexico, in order to determine their composition and abundance. Samples were collected in two stations within the Bay. A total of 65 species were identified: 34 dinoflagellates, 26 diatoms, 1 cyanobacteria, 1 silicoflagellate, 2 chlorophytes and 1 charophyte. The dinoflagellate dominated during the dry season and the diatoms dominated during the rainy season. At least 5 potentially toxic dinoflagellates were recorded, which could increase their populations and generate harmful algal blooms (HABs if Bay environmental conditions are altered.

  5. [The species and karyotype composition of malaria mosquito larvae in different water reservoirs of the city of Moscow].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanygina, E Iu; Gordeev, M I; Moskaev, A V; Ganushkina, L A

    2014-01-01

    The species and karyotype composition of malaria mosquito larvae was investigated in different water reservoirs of the city of Moscow. Cytogenetic analysis identified 2 malaria mosquito species: An. maculipennis Mg and An. messeae Fall. An. messeae was predominant in all the biotopes studied. The proportion of An. maculipennis varied from 0 to 23.8% and averaged 6.27%. An. messeae larvae were found to have chromosomal polymorphism. Individual local An. messeae populations having a definite, historically established, time and space resistant karyotype structure were shown to form in Moscow. The resistance of the karyotype structure of the populations was provided by reversible fluctuations in the rate of chromosomal inversions.

  6. Plant community composition and species richness in the High Arctic tundra: from the present to the future

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nabe-Nielsen, Jacob; Normand, Signe; Hui, Francis K.C.

    2017-01-01

    of these conditions is limited due to the scarcity of studies, especially in the High Arctic. 2. We investigated variations in vascular plant community composition and species richness based on 288 plots distributed on three sites along a coast-inland gradient in Northeast Greenland using a stratified random design....... We used an information theoretic approach to determine whether variations in species richness were best explained by macroclimate, by factors related to local topography (including soil water) or by plant-plant interactions. Latent variable models were used to explain patterns in plant community...

  7. Snakes of an urban-rural landscape in the central Andes of Colombia: species composition, distribution, and natural history

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julián Andrés Rojas-Morales

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available From 2005 to 2011, I studied the composition, distribution and natural history of an Andean urban-rural snake assemblage at the Cordillera Central of Colombia, based on three data sources: (1 examination of specimens in the MHN-UC [Museo de Historia Natural, Universidad de Caldas], (2 incidental encounters by author, and (3 collection of data by other researchers. Additionally, I provide natural history notes for the species involved. A total of 14 species, including two subspecies of snakes, belonging to 12 genera and four families, have been found in the studied area (municipality of Manizales, Caldas. Taking into account this total, 10 had atleast one record in the urban area, 13 in the rural area and 14 in forested areas. Only Liophis epinephelus bimaculatus was found exclusively in forest environment. Three species (21.4% are apparently endemic to the region, six species (42.8% correspond to afauna representative of the Tropical–Andean range of South America, four species (28.5% are distributed from Central America to the tropical Andes, and only one species is widely distributed in the whole continent. The snake assemblage in Manizales is mostly terrestrial, and in general, the species tend to be more active in the rainy periods of the year (mainly from October–December, and most of them may occasionally be found in urban areas, mainly close to areas of vegetation such as crops and pastures.

  8. VECTOR INTEGRATION

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thomas, E. G. F.

    2012-01-01

    This paper deals with the theory of integration of scalar functions with respect to a measure with values in a, not necessarily locally convex, topological vector space. It focuses on the extension of such integrals from bounded measurable functions to the class of integrable functions, proving

  9. DNA barcoding reveals species composition of sharks and rays in the Indian commercial fishery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bineesh, K K; Gopalakrishnan, A; Akhilesh, K V; Sajeela, K A; Abdussamad, E M; Pillai, N G K; Basheer, V S; Jena, J K; Ward, Robert D

    2017-07-01

    DNA barcoding was successfully used for the accurate identification of chondrichthyans in the Indian commercial marine fishery. About 528 specimens of 111 chondrichthyan species and 34 families, collected from the Indian EEZ, were barcoded for a 655 bp region of the mitochondrial gene cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 (COI). Generally, five specimens per species were barcoded, but numbers ranged from 2 to 13. The average Kimura 2 parameter (K2P) distance separating individuals within species was 0.32%, and the average distance separating species within genera was 6.73%. Ten species were suggested as putative new species requiring formal descriptions. Based on the morphology and molecular support, 11 elasmobranch species were confirmed first records for Indian waters. The present study confirms the ability of DNA barcoding for the accurate identification of sharks, rays, and their products from Indian waters.

  10. Floral traits influence pollen vectors? choices in higher elevation communities in the Himalaya-Hengduan Mountains

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao, Y. H.; Z.X. Ren; Lázaro, Amparo; Wang, H.; Bernhardt, P; H. D. Li; Li, D. Z.

    2016-01-01

    Background How floral traits and community composition influence plant specialization is poorly understood and the existing evidence is restricted to regions where plant diversity is low. Here, we assessed whether plant specialization varied among four species-rich subalpine/alpine communities on the Yulong Mountain, SW China (elevation from 2725 to 3910?m). We analyzed two factors (floral traits and pollen vector community composition: richness and density) to determine the degree of plant s...

  11. The Vector Population Monitoring Tool (VPMT: High-Throughput DNA-Based Diagnostics for the Monitoring of Mosquito Vector Populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chris Bass

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Regular monitoring of mosquito vector populations is an integral component of most vector control programmes. Contemporary data on mosquito species composition, infection status, and resistance to insecticides are a prerequisite for effective intervention. For this purpose we, with funding from the Innovative Vector Control Consortium (IVCC, have developed a suite of high-throughput assays based on a single “closed-tube” platform that collectively comprise the “Vector Population Monitoring Tool” (VPMT. The VPMT can be used to screen mosquito disease vector populations for a number of traits including Anopheles gambiae s.l. and Anopheles funestus species identification, detection of infection with Plasmodium parasites, and identification of insecticide resistance mechanisms. In this paper we focus on the Anopheles-specific assays that comprise the VPMT and include details of a new assay for resistance todieldrin Rdl detection. The application of these tools, general and specific guidelines on their use based on field testing in Africa, and plans for further development are discussed.

  12. Flow regime in a restored wetland determines trophic links and species composition in the aquatic macroinvertebrate community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Ortegón, E; Walton, M E M; Moghaddam, B; Vilas, C; Prieto, A; Kennedy, H A; Pedro Cañavate, J; Le Vay, L

    2015-01-15

    In a restored wetland (South of Spain), where different flow regimes control water exchange with the adjacent Guadalquivir estuary, the native Palaemon varians coexists with an exotic counterpart species Palaemon macrodactylus. This controlled m\\acrocosm offers an excellent opportunity to investigate how the effects of water management, through different flow regimes, and the presence of a non-native species affect the aquatic community and the trophic niche (by gut contents and C-N isotopic composition) of the native shrimp Palaemon varians. We found that increased water exchange rate (5% day(-1) in mixed ponds vs. 0.1% day(-1) in extensive ponds) modified the aquatic community of this wetland; while extensive ponds are dominated by isopods and amphipods with low presence of P. macrodactylus, mixed ponds presented high biomass of mysids, corixids, copepods and both shrimp species. An estuarine origin of nutrients and primary production might explain seasonal and spatial differences found among ponds of this wetland. A combined analysis of gut contents and isotopic composition of the native and the exotic species showed that: (1) native P. varians is mainly omnivorous (2) while the non-native P. macrodactylus is more zooplanktivorous and (3) a dietary overlap occurred when both species coexist at mixed ponds where a higher water exchange and high abundance of mysids and copepods diversifies the native species' diet. Thus differences in the trophic ecology of both species are clearly explained by water management. This experimental study is a valuable tool for integrated management between river basin and wetlands since it allows quantification of wetland community changes in response to the flow regime. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Physical factors and their influence on fish species composition in Asa Lake, Ilorin, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.A Araoye

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The effect of physical factors on fish species composition was studied during 12 months in Asa Lake, Nigeria. Fish and water samples were collected bimonthly (March 2003 to February 2004 in the morning. Fish samples were caught with gill nets set at the surface and bottom habitats. There were 11 fish families and 21 species. Osteoglossidae, Anabantidae, Channidae, Schilbedae and Cyprinidae were rare and occurred seasonally in fishermen catches, while Mormyridae, Cichlidae, Mochokidae, Characidae, Bagridae and Clariidae showed less variation and were more common. Characidae and Cichlidae were the most abundant (23.0 and 18.6% respectively while Osteoglossidae, Channidae and Anabantidae were the least (1.7, 2.1 and 2.3% respectively. Clariidae and Mormyridae had the highest weight with 16.0% and 12.3% respectively, while Anabantidae had the lowest (3.4%. Surface water temperatures were generally higher than air temperatures during the afternoon, except from January to March when air temperatures were high (28.1 to 28.7 ºC due to low relative humidity (39 to 70%. In the morning, surface water temperatures (25.5 to 26.3 ºC became higher than air temperatures (25.2 to 26.0 ºC from May to December, when relative humidity values were also high (50 to 88%. The differences between surface and bottom water temperatures was generally higher (0.7 to 3.1 ºC; P Estudié la composición de especies de peces y las temperaturas durante 12 meses en el lago Asa, Nigeria. Recolecté muestras de peces y de agua bimestralmente en la mañana, de marzo 2003 a febrero 2004. Los peces (11 familias y 21 especies fueron capturados con atarrayas en la superficie y el fondo. Osteoglossidae, Anabantidae, Channidae, Schilbedae y Cyprinidae fueron raras y aparecieron estacionalmente en las capturas de pescadores, mientras que Mormyridae, Cichlidae, Mochokidae, Characidae, Bagridae y Clariidae mostraron menos variación y fueron más comunes. Las familias Characidae y

  14. Chemical composition and nutritional value of the most widely appreciated cultivated mushrooms: an inter-species comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reis, Filipa S; Barros, Lillian; Martins, Anabela; Ferreira, Isabel C F R

    2012-02-01

    Herein, it was reported and compared the chemical composition and nutritional value of the most consumed species as fresh cultivated mushrooms: Agaricus bisporus (white and brown mushrooms), Pleurotus ostreatus (oyster mushroom), Pleurotus eryngii (King oyster mushroom), Lentinula edodes (Shiitake) and Flammulina velutipes (Golden needle mushroom). Shiitake revealed the highest levels of macronutrients, unless proteins, as also the highest sugars, tocopherols and PUFA levels, and the lowest SFA content. White and brown mushrooms showed similar macronutrients composition, as also similar values of total sugars, MUFA, PUFA and total tocopherols. Oyster and king oyster mushrooms gave the highest MUFA contents with similar contents in PUFA, MUFA and SFA in both samples. They also revealed similar moisture, ash, carbohydrates and energy values. This study contributes to the elaboration of nutritional databases of the most consumed fungi species worldwide, allowing comparison between them. Moreover it was reported that cultivated and the wild samples of the same species have different chemical composition, including sugars, fatty acids and tocopherols profiles. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Species composition and density of weeds in a wheat crop depending on the soil tillage system in crop rotation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Yankov

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. The investigation was carried out in the trial field of Dobrudzha Agricultural Institute, General Toshevo on slightly leached chernozem soil type. For the purposes of this investigation, variants from a stationary field experiment initiated in 1987 and based on various soil tillage tools and operations were analyzed. The species composition and density of weeds were followed in a wheat crop grown after grain maize using the following soil tillage systems: plowing at 24 – 26 cm (for maize – disking at 10 – 12 cm (for wheat; cutting at 24 – 26 cm (for maize – cutting at 8 – 10 cm (for wheat; disking at 10 – 12 cm (for maize – disking at 10 – 12 cm (for wheat; no-tillage (for maize – no-tillage (for wheat.Weed infestation was read at the fourth rotation since the initiation of the trial. The observations were made in spring before treatment of the crop with herbicides. The soil tillage system had a significant effect on the species composition and density of weeds in the field with wheat grown after previous crop maize. The long-term alternation of plowing with disking in parallel with the usage of chemicals for weed control lead to lower weed infestation of the weed crop. The lower weed density after this soil tillage system was not related to changes in the species composition and the relative percent of the individual species in the total weed infestation. The long-term application in crop rotation of systems without turning of the soil layer and of minimal and no-tillage increased the amount of weeds. The reason is the greater variability of weed species which typically occur after shallow soil tillage.

  16. An introduction to vectors, vector operators and vector analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Joag, Pramod S

    2016-01-01

    Ideal for undergraduate and graduate students of science and engineering, this book covers fundamental concepts of vectors and their applications in a single volume. The first unit deals with basic formulation, both conceptual and theoretical. It discusses applications of algebraic operations, Levi-Civita notation, and curvilinear coordinate systems like spherical polar and parabolic systems and structures, and analytical geometry of curves and surfaces. The second unit delves into the algebra of operators and their types and also explains the equivalence between the algebra of vector operators and the algebra of matrices. Formulation of eigen vectors and eigen values of a linear vector operator are elaborated using vector algebra. The third unit deals with vector analysis, discussing vector valued functions of a scalar variable and functions of vector argument (both scalar valued and vector valued), thus covering both the scalar vector fields and vector integration.

  17. Changes in species richness and spatial distribution of mosquitoes (Diptera: Culicid