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Sample records for ve-supplemented rats support

  1. The effect of loss of occlusal support on mandibular morphology in growing rats

    OpenAIRE

    Farias-Neto, A; Martins, APVB; Rizzatti-Barbosa, CM

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the effects of unilateral and bilateral premature loss of posterior occlusal support on mandibular bone dimensions in growing rats. Materials and Methods: Thirty female Wistar rats (5 weeks old) were randomized into three groups: control, unilateral mandibular molar teeth extraction, and bilateral mandibular molar teeth extraction. After 8 weeks, animals were sacrificed and acrylic rapid-prototyped templates of the mandibles were constructed. Mandibular length, ramus he...

  2. NASA's Desert RATS Science Backroom: Remotely Supporting Planetary Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Barbara A.; Eppler, Dean; Gruener, John; Horz, Fred; Ming, Doug; Yingst, R. Aileen

    2012-01-01

    NASA's Desert Research and Technology Studies (Desert RATS) is a multi-year series of tests designed to exercise planetary surface hardware and operations in conditions where long-distance, multi-day roving is achievable. In recent years, a D-RATS science backroom has conducted science operations and tested specific operational approaches. Approaches from the Apollo, Mars Exploration Rovers and Phoenix missions were merged to become the baseline for these tests. In 2010, six days of lunar-analog traverse operations were conducted during each week of the 2-week test, with three traverse days each week conducted with voice and data communications continuously available, and three traverse days conducted with only two 1-hour communications periods per day. In 2011, a variety of exploration science scenarios that tested operations for a near-earth asteroid using several small exploration vehicles and a single habitat. Communications between the ground and the crew in the field used a 50-second one-way delay, while communications between crewmembers in the exploration vehicles and the habitat were instantaneous. Within these frameworks, the team evaluated integrated science operations management using real-time science operations to oversee daily crew activities, and strategic level evaluations of science data and daily traverse results. Exploration scenarios for Mars may include architectural similarities such as crew in a habitat communicating with crew in a vehicle, but significantly more autonomy will have to be given to the crew rather than step-by-step interaction with a science backroom on Earth.

  3. Fructose-driven glycolysis supports anoxia resistance in the naked mole-rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Thomas J; Reznick, Jane; Peterson, Bethany L; Blass, Gregory; Omerbašić, Damir; Bennett, Nigel C; Kuich, P Henning J L; Zasada, Christin; Browe, Brigitte M; Hamann, Wiebke; Applegate, Daniel T; Radke, Michael H; Kosten, Tetiana; Lutermann, Heike; Gavaghan, Victoria; Eigenbrod, Ole; Bégay, Valérie; Amoroso, Vince G; Govind, Vidya; Minshall, Richard D; Smith, Ewan St J; Larson, John; Gotthardt, Michael; Kempa, Stefan; Lewin, Gary R

    2017-04-21

    The African naked mole-rat's (Heterocephalus glaber) social and subterranean lifestyle generates a hypoxic niche. Under experimental conditions, naked mole-rats tolerate hours of extreme hypoxia and survive 18 minutes of total oxygen deprivation (anoxia) without apparent injury. During anoxia, the naked mole-rat switches to anaerobic metabolism fueled by fructose, which is actively accumulated and metabolized to lactate in the brain. Global expression of the GLUT5 fructose transporter and high levels of ketohexokinase were identified as molecular signatures of fructose metabolism. Fructose-driven glycolytic respiration in naked mole-rat tissues avoids feedback inhibition of glycolysis via phosphofructokinase, supporting viability. The metabolic rewiring of glycolysis can circumvent the normally lethal effects of oxygen deprivation, a mechanism that could be harnessed to minimize hypoxic damage in human disease. Copyright © 2017, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  4. Hormones Restore Biomechanical Properties of the Vagina and Supportive Tissues After Surgical Menopause in Young Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moalli, Pamela A; Debes, Kristen M.; Meyn, Leslie A.; Howden, Nancy; Abramowitch, Steven D.

    2010-01-01

    Objective To determine the impact of hormones on the biomechanical properties of the vagina and its supportive tissues following surgical menopause in young vs middle aged rats. Methods Long-Evans rats [4-month virgin (N = 34), 4-month parous (N = 36), and 9-month parous (N = 34)], underwent ovariectomy (OVX) or sham surgery. OVX'd animals received hormones [estrogen (E2) or estrogen plus progesterone (E2 + P4)], placebo, or the Matrix Metalloproteinase inhibitor (CMT-8). Animals were sacrificed after 8 weeks and the biomechanical properties of the vagina and supportive tissues determined. Data was analyzed using a one-way analysis of variance and post-hoc tests. Results OVX induced a rapid decline in the biomechanical properties of pelvic tissues in young but not middle aged rats. Supplementation with E2, E2 + P4, or CMT-8 restored tissues of young rats to control levels with no effect on middle aged tissues. Parity did not impact tissue behavior. Conclusions OVX has a differential effect on the tissues of young vs middle aged rats. PMID:18395691

  5. Histologic analysis of the effects of three different support materials within rat middle ear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dogru, Salim; Haholu, Abdulah; Gungor, Atila; Kucukodaci, Zafer; Cincik, Hakan; Ozdemir, Taner; Sen, Huseyin

    2009-02-01

    To investigate histologic changes in the mucosa of rat middle ear after implantation of three different support materials. A prospective, controlled animal study. Three types of absorbable materials were implanted into the middle ear cavity of rats: (1) Gelfoam (purified gelatin) (Pharmacia & Upjohn Company, New York, NY), (2) Sepragel (viscoelastic gel composed of cross-linked polymers of hyaluronan) (GENZYME Corp, Ridgefield, NJ), and (3) Nasopore (a biodegradable/fragmentable, synthetic polyurethane foam) (Polyganics, Groningen, The Netherlands). Rats were sacrificed after 3 and 20 days to ascertain early and late histologic changes. The bulla of each rat was excised and prepared for microscopic examination. The histologic changes were evaluated by observation of the middle ear cavity and mucosa in terms of polymorphonuclear leucocytes (PMNL), macrophages, giant cells, fibroblasts and other cells, fibrosis, and remnant materials. The histologic appearance of gelfoam-treated middle ears was characterized by more severe acute inflammation in the short-term and prominent fibrosis in the long-term in comparison with sepragel- and nasopore-treated groups. Nasopore appeared to be prone to remnant formation and reorganization by means of fibroblastic activity. Compared with gelfoam, both sepragel and nasopore caused less histologic alterations.

  6. Tail nerve electrical stimulation induces body weight-supported stepping in rats with spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shu-Xin; Huang, Fengfa; Gates, Mary; White, Jason; Holmberg, Eric G

    2010-03-30

    Walking or stepping has been considered the result from the activation of the central pattern generator (CPG). In most patients with spinal cord injury (SCI) the CPG is undamaged. To date, there are no noninvasive approaches for activating the CPG. Recently we developed a noninvasive technique, tail nerve electrical stimulation (TANES), which can induce positive hind limb movement of SCI rats. The purpose of this study is to introduce the novel technique and examine the effect of TANES on CPG activation. A 25 mm contusion injury was produced at spinal cord T10 of female, adult Long-Evans rats by using the NYU impactor device. Rats received TANES ( approximately 40 mA at 4 kHz) 7 weeks after injury. During TANES all injured rats demonstrated active body weight-supported stepping of hind limbs with left-right alternation and occasional front-hind coordination, resulting in significant, temporary increase in BBB scores (pfunctional electrical stimulation. Therefore the TANES may have considerable potential for achieving improvement of functional recovery in animal models and a similar method may be suggested for human study. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Calcium bioavailability of vegetarian diets in rats: potential application in a bioregenerative life-support system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickel, K. P.; Nielsen, S. S.; Smart, D. J.; Mitchell, C. A.; Belury, M. A.

    1997-01-01

    Calcium bioavailability of vegetarian diets containing various proportions of candidate crops for a controlled ecological life-support system (CELSS) was determined by femur 45Ca uptake. Three vegetarian diets and a control diet were labeled extrinsically with 45Ca and fed to 5-wk old male rats. A fifth group of rats fed an unlabeled control diet received an intraperitoneal (IP) injection of 45Ca. There was no significant difference in mean calcium absorption of vegetarian diets (90.80 +/- 5.23%) and control diet (87.85 +/- 5.25%) when calculated as the percent of an IP dose. The amounts of phytate, oxalate, and dietary fiber in the diets did not affect calcium absorption.

  8. Prior Exposure to Alcohol Has No Effect on Cocaine Self-Administration and Relapse in Rats: Evidence from a Rat Model that Does Not Support the Gateway Hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fredriksson, Ida; Adhikary, Sweta; Steensland, Pia; Vendruscolo, Leandro F; Bonci, Antonello; Shaham, Yavin; Bossert, Jennifer M

    2017-04-01

    The gateway hypothesis posits that initial exposure to legal drugs promotes subsequent addiction to illicit drugs. However, epidemiological studies are correlational and cannot rule out the alternative hypothesis of shared addiction vulnerability to legal and illegal drugs. We tested the gateway hypothesis using established rat alcohol exposure procedures and cocaine self-administration and reinstatement (relapse) procedures. We gave Wistar or alcohol-preferring (P) rats intermittent access to water or 20% alcohol in their homecage for 7 weeks (three 24-h sessions/week). We also exposed Wistar rats to air or intoxicating alcohol levels in vapor chambers for 14-h/day for 7 weeks. We then tested the groups of rats for acquisition of cocaine self-administration using ascending cocaine doses (0.125, 0.25, 0.5, 1.0 mg/kg/infusion) followed by a dose-response curve after acquisition of cocaine self-administration. We then extinguished lever pressing and tested the rats for reinstatement of drug seeking induced by cocaine-paired cues and cocaine priming (0, 2.5, 5, 10 mg/kg, i.p.). Wistar rats consumed moderate amounts of alcohol (4.6 g/kg/24 h), P rats consumed higher amounts of alcohol (7.6 g/kg/24 h), and Wistar rats exposed to alcohol vapor had a mean blood alcohol concentration of 176.2 mg/dl during the last week of alcohol exposure. Alcohol pre-exposure had no effect on cocaine self-administration, extinction responding, and reinstatement of drug seeking. Pre-exposure to moderate, high, or intoxicating levels of alcohol had no effect on cocaine self-administration and relapse to cocaine seeking. Our data do not support the notion that alcohol is a gateway drug to cocaine.

  9. Impact of food supplementation and methionine on high densities of cotton rats: Support of the amino-acid-quality hypothesis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, R.E.; Leslie, David M.; Lochmiller, R.L.; Masters, R.E.

    2005-01-01

    Considerable research supports the tenet that quantity and quality of food limit vertebrate populations. We evaluated predictions that increased availabilities of food and the essential amino acid methionine were related to population limitation of the hispid cotton rat (Sigmodon hispidus). Effects of supplemental food and methionine on density, survival, and reproductive parameters of wild cotton rats were assessed in north-central Oklahoma in 1998-1999. Twelve enclosed groups of 16 adult cotton rats each (8 male, 8 female) were randomly assigned to either no supplementation (control), supplementation with a mixed ration that had methionine at slightly below maintenance levels (0.20%), or a methionine-enhanced mixed ration (1.20%). In general, densities of cotton rats were twice as high and were sustained longer with dietary supplementation, and methionine-supplemented populations maintained the highest densities. Treatment effects on survival depended on time of year, with higher survival in supplemented enclosures in October and November. Per capita recruitment was highest with methionine-enhanced food. Treatment effects on proportions of overall and female cotton rats in reproductive condition depended on sampling date, but males were most reproductively active with methionine supplementation. Methionine supplementation resulted in an earlier and longer reproductive season. Density-dependent and density-independent factors no doubt interplay to determine population dynamics of cotton rats, but our results suggest that methionine plays a role in the population dynamics of wild cotton rats, apparently by enhancing overall density, recruitment, and reproductive activity of males.

  10. Standardized environmental enrichment supports enhanced brain plasticity in healthy rats and prevents cognitive impairment in epileptic rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raafat P Fares

    Full Text Available Environmental enrichment of laboratory animals influences brain plasticity, stimulates neurogenesis, increases neurotrophic factor expression, and protects against the effects of brain insult. However, these positive effects are not constantly observed, probably because standardized procedures of environmental enrichment are lacking. Therefore, we engineered an enriched cage (the Marlau™ cage, which offers: (1 minimally stressful social interactions; (2 increased voluntary exercise; (3 multiple entertaining activities; (4 cognitive stimulation (maze exploration, and (5 novelty (maze configuration changed three times a week. The maze, which separates food pellet and water bottle compartments, guarantees cognitive stimulation for all animals. Compared to rats raised in groups in conventional cages, rats housed in Marlau™ cages exhibited increased cortical thickness, hippocampal neurogenesis and hippocampal levels of transcripts encoding various genes involved in tissue plasticity and remodeling. In addition, rats housed in Marlau™ cages exhibited better performances in learning and memory, decreased anxiety-associated behaviors, and better recovery of basal plasma corticosterone level after acute restraint stress. Marlau™ cages also insure inter-experiment reproducibility in spatial learning and brain gene expression assays. Finally, housing rats in Marlau™ cages after severe status epilepticus at weaning prevents the cognitive impairment observed in rats subjected to the same insult and then housed in conventional cages. By providing a standardized enriched environment for rodents during housing, the Marlau™ cage should facilitate the uniformity of environmental enrichment across laboratories.

  11. Spirulina acceptability trials in rats. A study for the ``Melissa'' life-support system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tranquille, N.; Emeis, J. J.; de Chambure, D.; Binot, R.; Tamponnet, C.

    1994-11-01

    Groups of five rats were fed for sixteen weeks a slightly deficient diet, supplemented with 0-40% of a dried preparation of the blue-green alga Spirulina as a protein source. Control groups were fed a normal rat diet. No significant differences between groups were found in food intake, growth rate or carbon dioxide production. All animals remained apparently healthy, and had similar organ weights. The study suggests taht Spirulina may be used as a protein source in rat diets.

  12. Memory-related gene expression profile of the male rat hippocampus induced by teeth extraction and occlusal support recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iida, Sachiyo; Hara, Tetsuya; Araki, Daisuke; Ishimine-Kuroda, Chisa; Kurozumi, Akimasa; Sakamoto, Shunichi; Miyazaki, Takako; Minagi, Shogo

    2014-02-01

    The present study aimed to identify the effect of memory-related genes on male rats tested for spatial memory with either molar teeth extraction or its restoration by occlusal support using experimental dentures. Memory-related genes were detected from hippocampi of male Wistar rats (exposed to teeth extraction with or without dentures, or no extraction (control)) (7-week old) after behavioural testing (via the radial maze task) using a DNA microarray. The time course of the expression of these genes was evaluated by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) (on 49-week-old rats). In preliminary experiments, to determine which memory genes are affected by spatial memory training, DNA microarray analysis revealed that thyrotropin-releasing hormone (Trh) and tenascin XA (Tnxa) were up-regulated and neuronatin (Nnat) and S100a9 were down-regulated after the maze training. The expression of Tnxa, Nnat and S100a9 of 49-week-old rats (during the time course) via quantitative real-time PCR was consistent with the results of microarrays of the preliminary experiment. Expression of Trh that was evaluated by quantitative real-time PCR did not agree with the results for this gene from the microarray for all groups. Therefore, expression of Trh may have increased in only young, trained rats. The expression of S100a9 prior to the maze task was down-regulated in only the extraction group. These results demonstrated that Trh, Tnxa and Nnat genes were affected according to the degree of memory in male rats. This study also indicated that S100a9 is a memory-related gene, which is affected by the presence of occlusal support. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Vitamin D2 from light-exposed edible mushrooms is safe, bioavailable and effectively supports bone growth in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvo, M S; Babu, U S; Garthoff, L H; Woods, T O; Dreher, M; Hill, G; Nagaraja, S

    2013-01-01

    Widespread poor vitamin D status, a health risk for bone disease, increases the need for new food sources of vitamin D. Light-exposed edible mushrooms synthesize vitamin D(2). Bioavailability, safety, and efficacy of high levels of vitamin D(2) from mushrooms to support bone health was established in chronically fed growing rats. Poor vitamin D status from reduced sun exposure is made worse by limited access to vitamin D-containing foods. Exposing white button mushrooms to ultraviolet B (UVB) light markedly increases their vitamin D(2) content, creating a new food source of vitamin D. We used a growing rat model to determine safety, bioavailability, and efficacy in support of bone growth by vitamin D(2) from UVB-exposed mushrooms. We fed 150 weanling female rats one of five diets for 10 weeks, all formulated on AIN-93 G. Control diets contained no mushrooms either with or without vitamin D(3). Other diets contained 2.5% and 5.0% of UVB-exposed or -unexposed mushrooms. Safety of the high levels of vitamin D(2) from mushrooms was assessed by animal growth and by Von Kossa staining for soft tissue calcification. Bioavailability was determined from changes in circulating levels of 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] and parathyroid hormone (PTH). Efficacy in support of bone growth was determined from measures of femur bending properties, size, mineralization, and microarchitecture. Diets containing 2.5% and 5.0% light-exposed mushrooms significantly raised 25(OH)D and suppressed PTH levels compared to control-fed rats or rats fed 5.0% mushroom unexposed to light. Microarchitecture and trabecular mineralization were only modestly higher in the light-treated mushroom-fed rats compared to the controls. Von Kossa staining revealed no soft tissue calcification despite very high plasma 25(OH)D. Vitamin D(2) from UVB-exposed mushrooms is bioavailable, safe, and functional in supporting bone growth and mineralization in a growing rat model without evidence of toxicity.

  14. β-Hydroxybutyrate supports synaptic vesicle cycling but reduces endocytosis and exocytosis in rat brain synaptosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hrynevich, Sviatlana V; Waseem, Tatyana V; Hébert, Audrey; Pellerin, Luc; Fedorovich, Sergei V

    2016-02-01

    The ketogenic diet is used as a prophylactic treatment for different types of brain diseases, such as epilepsy or Alzheimer's disease. In such a diet, carbohydrates are replaced by fats in everyday food, resulting in an elevation of blood-borne ketone bodies levels. Despite clinical applications of this treatment, the molecular mechanisms by which the ketogenic diet exerts its beneficial effects are still uncertain. In this study, we investigated the effect of replacing glucose by the ketone body β-hydroxybutyrate as the main energy substrate on synaptic vesicle recycling in rat brain synaptosomes. First, we observed that exposing presynaptic terminals to nonglycolytic energy substrates instead of glucose did not alter the plasma membrane potential. Next, we found that synaptosomes were able to maintain the synaptic vesicle cycle monitored with the fluorescent dye acridine orange when glucose was replaced by β-hydroxybutyrate. However, in presence of β-hydroxybutyrate, synaptic vesicle recycling was modified with reduced endocytosis. Replacing glucose by pyruvate also led to a reduced endocytosis. Addition of β-hydroxybutyrate to glucose-containing incubation medium was without effect. Reduced endocytosis in presence of β-hydroxybutyrate as sole energy substrate was confirmed using the fluorescent dye FM2-10. Also we found that replacement of glucose by ketone bodies leads to inhibition of exocytosis, monitored by FM2-10. However this reduction was smaller than the effect on endocytosis under the same conditions. Using both acridine orange in synaptosomes and the genetically encoded sensor synaptopHluorin in cortical neurons, we observed that replacing glucose by β-hydroxybutyrate did not modify the pH gradient of synaptic vesicles. In conclusion, the nonglycolytic energy substrates β-hydroxybutyrate and pyruvate are able to support synaptic vesicle recycling. However, they both reduce endocytosis. Reduction of both endocytosis and exocytosis together with

  15. Injectable Polyurethane Composite Scaffolds Delay Wound Contraction and Support Cellular Infiltration and Remodeling in Rat Excisional Wounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adolph, Elizabeth J.; Hafeman, Andrea E.; Davidson, Jeffrey M.; Nanney, Lillian B.; Guelcher, Scott A.

    2011-01-01

    Injectable scaffolds present compelling opportunities for wound repair and regeneration due to their ability to fill irregularly shaped defects and deliver biologics such as growth factors. In this study, we investigated the properties of injectable polyurethane biocomposite scaffolds and their application in cutaneous wound repair using a rat excisional model. The scaffolds have a minimal reaction exotherm and clinically relevant working and setting times. Moreover, the biocomposites have mechanical and thermal properties consistent with rubbery elastomers. In the rat excisional wound model, injection of settable biocomposite scaffolds stented the wounds at early time points, resulting in a regenerative rather than a scarring phenotype at later time points. Measurements of wound width and thickness revealed that the treated wounds were less contracted at day 7 compared to blank wounds. Analysis of cell proliferation and apoptosis showed that the scaffolds were biocompatible and supported tissue ingrowth. Myofibroblast formation and collagen fiber organization provided evidence that the scaffolds have a positive effect on extracellular matrix remodeling by disrupting the formation of an aligned matrix under elevated tension. In summary, we have developed an injectable biodegradable polyurethane biocomposite scaffold that enhances cutaneous wound healing in a rat model. PMID:22105887

  16. Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexey Kondrashov

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We aimed to perform a chemical analysis of both Alibernet red wine and an alcohol-free Alibernet red wine extract (AWE and to investigate the effects of AWE on nitric oxide and reactive oxygen species production as well as blood pressure development in normotensive Wistar Kyoto (WKY and spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs. Total antioxidant capacity together with total phenolic and selected mineral content was measured in wine and AWE. Young 6-week-old male WKY and SHR were treated with AWE (24,2 mg/kg/day for 3 weeks. Total NOS and SOD activities, eNOS and SOD1 protein expressions, and superoxide production were determined in the tissues. Both antioxidant capacity and phenolic content were significantly higher in AWE compared to wine. The AWE increased NOS activity in the left ventricle, aorta, and kidney of SHR, while it did not change NOS activity in WKY rats. Similarly, increased SOD activity in the plasma and left ventricle was observed in SHR only. There were no changes in eNOS and SOD1 expressions. In conclusion, phenolics and minerals included in AWE may contribute directly to increased NOS and SOD activities of SHR. Nevertheless, 3 weeks of AWE treatment failed to affect blood pressure of SHR.

  17. Superstoichiometric Ca2+ uptake supported by hydrolysis of endogenous ATP in rat liver mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, M D; Lehninger, A L

    1975-10-10

    The nature of the energy store causing rapid superstoichiometric leads to H+/2e minus ejection and leads to Ca2+/2e minus uptake ratios in rat liver mitochondria pulsed with Ca2+ has been investigated. The extent and the rate of the initial fast superstoichiometric phase of H plus ejection were greatly reduced by oligomycin and other ATPase inhibitors; the subsequent shoichiometric phase was unaffected. No such inhibition was seen with atractyloside. Similarly, the initial fast phase of Ca2+ uptake was reduced in extent by oligomycin, whereas the slower stoichiometric phase was unaffected. Moreover, the ATP content of mitochondria previously incubated with succinate decreased by about 80% within 5 s after pulsing with Ca2+. The energy store for superstoichiometric Ca2+ uptake and H plus injection is thus identified as endogenous ATP.

  18. Brain glycogen and its role in supporting glutamate and GABA homeostasis in a type 2 diabetes rat model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sickmann, Helle Mark; Waagepetersen, Helle S.; Schousboe, Arne

    2012-01-01

    The number of people suffering from diabetes is hastily increasing and the condition is associated with altered brain glucose homeostasis. Brain glycogen is located in astrocytes and being a carbohydrate reservoir it contributes to glucose homeostasis. Furthermore, glycogen has been indicated...... to be important for proper neurotransmission under normal conditions. Previous findings from our laboratory suggested that glucose metabolism was reduced in type 2 diabetes, and thus we wanted to investigate more specifically how brain glycogen metabolism contributes to maintain energy status in the type 2...... diabetic state. Also, our objective was to elucidate the contribution of glycogen to support neurotransmitter glutamate and GABA homeostasis. A glycogen phosphorylase (GP) inhibitor was administered to Sprague-Dawley (SprD) and Zucker Diabetic Fatty (ZDF) rats in vivo and after one day of treatment [1...

  19. Support for the slip hypothesis from whisker-related tactile perception of rats in a noisy environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waiblinger, Christian; Brugger, Dominik; Whitmire, Clarissa J.; Stanley, Garrett B.; Schwarz, Cornelius

    2015-01-01

    Rodents use active whisker movements to explore their environment. The “slip hypothesis” of whisker-related tactile perception entails that short-lived kinematic events (abrupt whisker movements, called “slips”, due to bioelastic whisker properties that occur during active touch of textures) carry the decisive texture information. Supporting this hypothesis, previous studies have shown that slip amplitude and frequency occur in a texture-dependent way. Further, experiments employing passive pulsatile whisker deflections revealed that perceptual performance based on pulse kinematics (i.e., signatures that resemble slips) is far superior to the one based on time-integrated variables like frequency and intensity. So far, pulsatile stimuli were employed in a noise free environment. However, the realistic scenario involves background noise (e.g., evoked by rubbing across the texture). Therefore, if slips are used for tactile perception, the tactile neuronal system would need to differentiate slip-evoked spikes from those evoked by noise. To test the animals under these more realistic conditions, we presented passive whisker-deflections to head-fixed trained rats, consisting of “slip-like” events (waveforms mimicking slips occurring with touch of real textures) embedded into background noise. Varying the (i) shapes (ramp or pulse); (ii) kinematics (amplitude, velocity, etc.); and (iii) the probabilities of occurrence of slip-like events, we observed that rats could readily detect slip-like events of different shapes against noisy background. Psychophysical curves revealed that the difference of slip event and noise amplitude determined perception, while increased probability of occurrence (frequency) had barely any effect. These results strongly support the notion that encoding of kinematics dominantly determines whisker-related tactile perception while the computation of frequency or intensity plays a minor role. PMID:26528148

  20. Support for the slip hypothesis from whisker-related tactile perception of rats in a noisy environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian eWaiblinger

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Rodents use active whisker movements to explore their environment. The ‘slip hypothesis’ of whisker-related tactile perception entails that short-lived kinematic events (abrupt whisker movements, called ‘slips’, due to bioelastic whisker properties that occur during active touch of textures carry the decisive texture information. Supporting this hypothesis, previous studies have shown that slip amplitude and frequency occur in a texture dependent way. Further, experiments employing passive pulsatile whisker deflections revealed that perceptual performance based on pulse kinematics (i.e. signatures that resemble slips is far superior to the one based on time-integrated variables like frequency and intensity. So far, pulsatile stimuli were employed in a noise free environment. However, the realistic scenario involves background noise (e.g. evoked by rubbing across the texture. Therefore, if slips are used for tactile perception, the tactile neuronal system would need to differentiate slip-evoked spikes from those evoked by noise. To test the animals under these more realistic conditions, we presented passive whisker-deflections to head-fixed trained rats, consisting of 'slip-like' events (waveforms mimicking slips occurring with touch of real textures embedded into background noise. Varying the i shapes (ramp or pulse, ii kinematics (amplitude, velocity, etc., and iii the probabilities of occurrence of slip-like events, we observed that rats could readily detect slip-like events of different shapes against noisy background. Psychophysical curves revealed that the difference of slip event and noise amplitude determined perception, while increased probability of occurrence (frequency had barely any effect. These results strongly support the notion that encoding of kinematics dominantly determines whisker-related tactile perception while the computation of frequency or intensity plays a minor role.

  1. The role of subcutaneous adipose tissue in supporting the copper balance in rats with a chronic deficiency in holo-ceruloplasmin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ekaterina Y Ilyechova

    Full Text Available We have previously shown that (1 an acute deficiency in blood serum holo-ceruloplasmin (Cp developed in rats that were fed fodder containing silver ions (Ag-fodder for one month and (2 the deficiency in holo-Cp was compensated by non-hepatic holo-Cp synthesis in rats that were chronically fed Ag-fodder for 6 months (Ag-rats. The purpose of the present study is to identify the organ(s that compensate for the hepatic holo-Cp deficiency in the circulation. This study was performed on rats that were fed Ag-fodder (40 mg Ag·kg-1 body mass daily for 6 months. The relative expression levels of the genes responsible for copper status were measured by RT-PCR. The in vitro synthesis and secretion of [14C]Cp were analyzed using a metabolic labeling approach. Oxidase activity was determined using a gel assay with o-dianisidine. Copper status and some hematological indexes were measured. Differential centrifugation, immunoblotting, immunoelectrophoresis, and atomic absorption spectrometry were included in the investigation. In the Ag-rats, silver accumulation was tissue-specific. Skeletal muscles and internal (IAT and subcutaneous (SAT adipose tissues did not accumulate silver significantly. In SAT, the mRNAs for the soluble and glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored ceruloplasmin isoforms were expressed, and their relative levels were increased two-fold in the Ag-rats. In parallel, the levels of the genes responsible for Cp metallation (Ctr1 and Atp7a/b increased correspondingly. In the SAT of the Ag-rats, Cp oxidase activity was observed in the Golgi complex and plasma membrane. Moreover, full-length [14C]Cp polypeptides were released into the medium by slices of SAT. The possibilities that SAT is part of a system that controls the copper balance in mammals, and it plays a significant role in supporting copper homeostasis throughout the body are discussed.

  2. A biphasic and brain-region selective down-regulation of cyclic adenosine monophosphate concentrations supports object recognition in the rat.

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    Maïte Hotte

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: We aimed to further understand the relationship between cAMP concentration and mnesic performance. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Rats were injected with milrinone (PDE3 inhibitor, 0.3 mg/kg, i.p., rolipram (PDE4 inhibitor, 0.3 mg/kg, i.p. and/or the selective 5-HT4R agonist RS 67333 (1 mg/kg, i.p. before testing in the object recognition paradigm. Cyclic AMP concentrations were measured in brain structures linked to episodic-like memory (i.e. hippocampus, prefrontal and perirhinal cortices before or after either the sample or the testing phase. Except in the hippocampus of rolipram treated-rats, all treatment increased cAMP levels in each brain sub-region studied before the sample phase. After the sample phase, cAMP levels were significantly increased in hippocampus (1.8 fold, prefrontal (1.3 fold and perirhinal (1.3 fold cortices from controls rat while decreased in prefrontal cortex (∼0.83 to 0.62 fold from drug-treated rats (except for milrinone+RS 67333 treatment. After the testing phase, cAMP concentrations were still increased in both the hippocampus (2.76 fold and the perirhinal cortex (2.1 fold from controls animals. Minor increase were reported in hippocampus and perirhinal cortex from both rolipram (respectively, 1.44 fold and 1.70 fold and milrinone (respectively 1.46 fold and 1.56 fold-treated rat. Following the paradigm, cAMP levels were significantly lower in the hippocampus, prefrontal and perirhinal cortices from drug-treated rat when compared to controls animals, however, only drug-treated rats spent longer time exploring the novel object during the testing phase (inter-phase interval of 4 h. CONCLUSIONS: Our results strongly suggest that a "pre-sample" early increase in cAMP levels followed by a specific lowering of cAMP concentrations in each brain sub-region linked to the object recognition paradigm support learning efficacy after a middle-term delay.

  3. AAV9 supports wide-scale transduction of the CNS and TDP-43 disease modeling in adult rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kasey L Jackson

    Full Text Available AAV9 has emerged as an efficient adeno-associated virus (AAV serotype for gene transfer to the central nervous system. We have used this technique to study aspects of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS by administering AAV encoding the ALS-related gene transactive response DNA binding protein of 43 kDa (TDP-43 to neonatal rats. However, inducing the expression in adult subjects would be preferable to mimic the adult onset of symptoms in ALS. We expressed either green fluorescent protein (GFP or TDP-43 in adult rats after an intravenous (i.v. route of administration to attempt wide-scale transduction of the spinal cord for disease modeling. In order to optimize the gene transfer, we made comparisons of efficiency by age, gender, and across several AAV serotypes (AAV1, AAV8, AAV9, and AAV10. The data indicate more efficient neuronal transduction in neonates, with little evidence of glial transduction at either age, no gender-related differences in transduction, and that AAV9 was efficient in adults relative to the other serotypes tested. Based on these data, AAV9 TDP-43 was expressed at three vector doses in adult female rats yielding highly consistent, dose-dependent motor deficits. AAV9 can be delivered i.v. to adult rats to achieve consistent pathophysiological changes and a relevant adult-onset system for disease modeling.

  4. AAV9 supports wide-scale transduction of the CNS and TDP-43 disease modeling in adult rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Kasey L; Dayton, Robert D; Klein, Ronald L

    2015-01-01

    AAV9 has emerged as an efficient adeno-associated virus (AAV) serotype for gene transfer to the central nervous system. We have used this technique to study aspects of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) by administering AAV encoding the ALS-related gene transactive response DNA binding protein of 43 kDa (TDP-43) to neonatal rats. However, inducing the expression in adult subjects would be preferable to mimic the adult onset of symptoms in ALS. We expressed either green fluorescent protein (GFP) or TDP-43 in adult rats after an intravenous (i.v.) route of administration to attempt wide-scale transduction of the spinal cord for disease modeling. In order to optimize the gene transfer, we made comparisons of efficiency by age, gender, and across several AAV serotypes (AAV1, AAV8, AAV9, and AAV10). The data indicate more efficient neuronal transduction in neonates, with little evidence of glial transduction at either age, no gender-related differences in transduction, and that AAV9 was efficient in adults relative to the other serotypes tested. Based on these data, AAV9 TDP-43 was expressed at three vector doses in adult female rats yielding highly consistent, dose-dependent motor deficits. AAV9 can be delivered i.v. to adult rats to achieve consistent pathophysiological changes and a relevant adult-onset system for disease modeling.

  5. Curcumin Pharmacokinetic and Pharmacodynamic Evidences in Streptozotocin-Diabetic Rats Support the Antidiabetic Activity to Be via Metabolite(s).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutierres, Vânia Ortega; Campos, Michel Leandro; Arcaro, Carlos Alberto; Assis, Renata Pires; Baldan-Cimatti, Helen Mariana; Peccinini, Rosângela Gonçalves; Paula-Gomes, Silvia; Kettelhut, Isis Carmo; Baviera, Amanda Martins; Brunetti, Iguatemy Lourenço

    2015-01-01

    This study measures the curcumin concentration in rat plasma by liquid chromatography and investigates the changes in the glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity of streptozotocin-diabetic rats treated with curcumin-enriched yoghurt. The analytical method for curcumin detection was linear from 10 to 500 ng/mL. The C max⁡ and the time to reach C max⁡ (t max⁡) of curcumin in plasma were 3.14 ± 0.9 μg/mL and 5 minutes (10 mg/kg, i.v.) and 0.06 ± 0.01 μg/mL and 14 minutes (500 mg/kg, p.o.). The elimination half-time was 8.64 ± 2.31 (i.v.) and 32.70 ± 12.92 (p.o.) minutes. The oral bioavailability was about 0.47%. Changes in the glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity were investigated in four groups: normal and diabetic rats treated with yoghurt (NYOG and DYOG, resp.) and treated with 90 mg/kg/day curcumin incorporated in yoghurt (NC90 and DC90, resp.). After 15 days of treatment, the glucose tolerance and the insulin sensitivity were significantly improved in DC90 rats in comparison with DYOG, which can be associated with an increase in the AKT phosphorylation levels and GLUT4 translocation in skeletal muscles. These findings can explain, at least in part, the benefits of curcumin-enriched yoghurt to diabetes and substantiate evidences for the curcumin metabolite(s) as being responsible for the antidiabetic activity.

  6. Evidence Supporting a Role for Mammalian Chitinases in Efficacy of Caspofungin against Experimental Aspergillosis in Immunocompromised Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verwer, Patricia E. B.; ten Kate, Marian T.; Falcone, Franco H.; Morroll, Shaun; Verbrugh, Henri A.; Bakker-Woudenberg, Irma A. J. M.; van de Sande, Wendy W. J.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Caspofungin, currently used as salvage therapy for invasive pulmonary aspergillosis (IPA), strangely only causes morphological changes in fungal growth in vitro but does not inhibit the growth. In vivo it has good efficacy. Therefore the question arises how this in vivo activity is reached. Caspofungin is known to increase the amount of chitin in the fungal cell wall. Mammals produce two chitinases, chitotriosidase and AMCase, which can hydrolyse chitin. We hypothesized that the mammalian chitinases play a role in the in vivo efficacy of caspofungin. Methods In order to determine the role of chitotriosidase and AMCase in IPA, both chitinases were measured in rats which did or did not receive caspofungin treatment. In order to understand the role of each chitinase in the breakdown of the caspofungin-exposed cells, we also exposed caspofungin treated fungi to recombinant enzymes in vitro. Results IPA in immunocompromised rats caused a dramatic increase in chitinase activity. This increase in chitinase activity was still noted when rats were treated with caspofungin. In vitro, it was demonstrated that the action of both chitinases were needed to lyse the fungal cell wall upon caspofungin exposure. Conclusion Caspofungin seemed to alter the cell wall in such a way that the two chitinases, when combined, could lyse the fungal cell wall and assisted in clearing the fungal pathogen. We also found that both chitinases combined had a direct effect on the fungus in vitro. PMID:24155872

  7. Zipper-like series of desmosomes supported by subplasmalemmal actin belts in thymic epithelial reticular cells in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusu, M C; Pop, F; Mănoiu, V M; Lupuşoru, M O; Didilescu, A C

    2013-07-01

    Remodeling of epithelial tissues requires coordinated cell migration. Most of the mechanisms regulating desmosome assembly and stability in migrating epithelial cells are still unknown. The actin cytoskeleton is a significant component of desmosome assembly and maturation. The association of the actin cytoskeleton with adherens junctions requires additional ultrastructural investigations. A transmission electron microscopic study was performed on five samples of rat thymus. Interepithelial series of desmosomes up to 6.5 μm length were found as were composite series of junctions (tight, adherens, and desmosomes). As a particular feature, subplasmalemmal belts of microfilaments, apparently of actin, ran adjacent to the inner dense plaques of desmosomes, passing beneath and at a distance to the tight junctions. They were not found beneath the adherens junctions. The series of desmosomes were termed zipper-like desmosomes (ZLDs), and were either complete, or imperfect. Terminal imperfect or incomplete desmosomes were found at the ends of the zipper-like series. Alpha-smooth muscle actin immune labeling on six other samples of rat thymus was strongly suggestive of the existence of subplasmalemmal actin belts in the epithelial reticular system. Further studies are needed to establish the exact role of the ZLDs during processes of epithelial remodeling. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  8. Data supporting the rat brain sample preparation and validation assays for simultaneous determination of 8 neurotransmitters and their metabolites using liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aneta Wojnicz

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The data presented in this article supports the rat brain sample preparation procedure previous to its injection into the liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry (LC–MS/MS system to monitor levels of adrenaline, noradrenaline, glutamic acid, γ-aminobutyric acid, dopamine, 5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-hydroxyindole acetic acid, and 3-methoxy-4-hydroxyphenylglycol. In addition, we describe the method validation assays (such as calibration curve, lower limit of quantification, precision and accuracy intra- and inter-day, selectivity, extraction recovery and matrix effect, stability, and carry-over effect according to the United States Food and Drug Administration and European Medicine Agency to measure in one step different neurotransmitters and their metabolites. The data supplied in this article is related to the research study entitled: “Simultaneous determination of 8 neurotransmitters and their metabolite levels in rat brain using liquid chromatography in tandem with mass spectrometry: application to the murine Nrf2 model of depression” (Wojnicz et al. 2016 [1].

  9. Enhancement of brain plasticity and recovery of locomotive function after lumbar spinal cord stimulation in combination with gait training with partial weight support in rats with cerebral ischemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Yoon-Hee; Lee, Shi-Uk

    2017-05-01

    Lumbar spinal cord stimulation (LSCS) is reportedly effective for the recovery of locomotive intraspinal neural network, motor cortex and basal ganglia in animals with complete spinal cord injury and parkinsonism. We evaluated the effect of LSCS in combination with gait training on the recovery of locomotive function and brain plasticity using a rat model of brain ischemia. Adult male Sprague Dawley rats with ischemia were randomly assigned into one of four groups: sham treatment (group 1), LSCS only (group 2), LSCS with gait training and 50% (group 3) and 80% (group 4) of body weight support. Evaluations before randomization and 4weeks after intervention included motor scoring index, real-time PCR and Western blot. Motor scoring index was significantly improved after the intervention in groups 2 and 3. The ratio of phospho-protein kinase C (PKC) to PKC measured in the infarcted area tended to be higher in groups 3 and 4. Protein expression of mGluR2 and mRNA expression of mGluR1 measured in the contralateral cortex were lower in groups 3 and 4. The ratio of phospho-Akt to Akt and mRNA expression of vascular endothelial growth factor measured in the ischemic border zone were higher in group 2. The mRNA expression of MAP1b measured in the infarcted area was significantly higher in group 2. The findings suggest that LSCS and gait training with an adequate amount of body weight support may promote brain plasticity and facilitate the functional recovery. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Protective Role of Selenium and High Dose Vitamin E against Cisplatin - Induced Nephrotoxicty in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aksoy, Asude; Karaoglu, Aziz; Akpolat, Nusret; Naziroglu, Mustafa; Ozturk, Turkan; Karagoz, Zuhal Karaca

    2015-01-01

    Cisplatin (CDDP) is one of the most active cytotoxic agents in the treatment of cancer. We investigated the effect of selenium (Se) with high dose vitamin E (VE) administration to prevent CDDP-induced nephrotoxicity in rats. In this study, 40 female Wistar rats were randomly divided into five equal groups. The first group, which served as the control, was administered physiological saline (2.5 cc/day, 5 days) intraperitoneally (IP), while group A was administered cisplatin (6 mg/kg BW/ single dose) plus physiological saline IP. Groups B, C, D received IP five doses of Se (1.5 mg/kg BW), and a high dose of VE (1000 mg/kg BW) (Se-VE) in combination before, simultaneously, and after CDDP, respectively. The rats were sacrificed five days after CDDP administration. Plasma malondialdehide (MDA), glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px), reduced glutathione (GSH), catalase, urea, creatinine levels, renal histopathological changes were measured. The histopathological injury score, plasma levels of MDA, urea, creatinine were found to increase in group A compared to the control (p<0.05), while plasma levels of GSH-Px, GSH and catalase decreased (p<0.05). In contrast, plasma levels of MDA decreased (p<0.05) in groups B, C, D, which were treated with Se- VE, whereas levels of GSH-Px, GSH were found to increase only for group D (p<0.05). Plasma urea, creatinine levels improved in the treatment groups compared to group A (p<0.001). Histopathological changes caused by CDDP were also significantly improved after Se-VE treatment (p<0.05). Oxidative stress increases with CDDP-induced nephrotoxicity in rats. Se-VE supplementation might thus play a role in the prevention of CDDP-induced nephrotoxicity in patients.

  11. An evolutionary conserved region (ECR in the human dopamine receptor D4 gene supports reporter gene expression in primary cultures derived from the rat cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haddley Kate

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Detecting functional variants contributing to diversity of behaviour is crucial for dissecting genetics of complex behaviours. At a molecular level, characterisation of variation in exons has been studied as they are easily identified in the current genome annotation although the functional consequences are less well understood; however, it has been difficult to prioritise regions of non-coding DNA in which genetic variation could also have significant functional consequences. Comparison of multiple vertebrate genomes has allowed the identification of non-coding evolutionary conserved regions (ECRs, in which the degree of conservation can be comparable with exonic regions suggesting functional significance. Results We identified ECRs at the dopamine receptor D4 gene locus, an important gene for human behaviours. The most conserved non-coding ECR (D4ECR1 supported high reporter gene expression in primary cultures derived from neonate rat frontal cortex. Computer aided analysis of the sequence of the D4ECR1 indicated the potential transcription factors that could modulate its function. D4ECR1 contained multiple consensus sequences for binding the transcription factor Sp1, a factor previously implicated in DRD4 expression. Co-transfection experiments demonstrated that overexpression of Sp1 significantly decreased the activity of the D4ECR1 in vitro. Conclusion Bioinformatic analysis complemented by functional analysis of the DRD4 gene locus has identified a a strong enhancer that functions in neurons and b a transcription factor that may modulate the function of that enhancer.

  12. Proteomic and transcriptomic analysis of heart failure due to volume overload in a rat aorto-caval fistula model provides support for new potential therapeutic targets - monoamine oxidase A and transglutaminase 2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petrak Jiri

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic hemodynamic overloading leads to heart failure (HF due to incompletely understood mechanisms. To gain deeper insight into the molecular pathophysiology of volume overload-induced HF and to identify potential markers and targets for novel therapies, we performed proteomic and mRNA expression analysis comparing myocardium from Wistar rats with HF induced by a chronic aorto-caval fistula (ACF and sham-operated rats harvested at the advanced, decompensated stage of HF. Methods We analyzed control and failing myocardium employing iTRAQ labeling, two-dimensional peptide separation combining peptide IEF and nano-HPLC with MALDI-MS/MS. For the transcriptomic analysis we employed Illumina RatRef-12v1 Expression BeadChip. Results In the proteomic analysis we identified 2030 myocardial proteins, of which 66 proteins were differentially expressed. The mRNA expression analysis identified 851 differentially expressed mRNAs. Conclusions The differentially expressed proteins confirm a switch in the substrate preference from fatty acids to other sources in the failing heart. Failing hearts showed downregulation of the major calcium transporters SERCA2 and ryanodine receptor 2 and altered expression of creatine kinases. Decreased expression of two NADPH producing proteins suggests a decreased redox reserve. Overexpression of annexins supports their possible potential as HF biomarkers. Most importantly, among the most up-regulated proteins in ACF hearts were monoamine oxidase A and transglutaminase 2 that are both potential attractive targets of low molecular weight inhibitors in future HF therapy.

  13. Effect of selected Egyptian cooking methods on faba bean nutritive value and dietary protein utilization 2: ability of faba bean products to support hemoglobin response in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakr, A A; Bayomy, M F

    1997-01-01

    To evaluate the dietary protein utilization and iron deficiency anemia as affected by the faba bean nutrient intake, a bioassay with rats was carried out with different experimental diets containing four faba bean products (stewed beans 'Medammis', deep fried dough 'Falafel', boiled germinated beans 'Nabet Soup' and poured paste 'Bissara') widely consumed in the Middle East. Amino acid composition of all faba bean products was determined and compared to raw beans. Severe heat-processing markedly decreased some essential amino acids, especially phenylalanine, cystine, methionine and tryptophan. Protein scores were 24.6, 19.5, 29.2, 28.2 and 35.6 for raw faba beans, 'Medammis', 'Falafel', 'Nabet Soup' and 'Bissara', respectively. 'Bissara' possessed the highest nutritional value, since it had the lowest GDR value [Grams consumed of product to cover the daily requirements for adult man in protein (63 g) and in energy (2900 kcal)] for the limiting amino acids (L A A). As indicated by P S/150 values [Satisfaction of the daily requirements of the adult man when 150 g (one can content) are consumed of product] for L A A, i.e. methionine+cystine (lowest P S/150 value), the above-mentioned faba bean products cover about 53, 77, 77 and 97% of the daily requirements of adult man in L A A, respectively. Fecal nitrogen excretion increased and true nitrogen digestibility decreased significantly (p < 0.01) with the inclusion of 'Medammis' in the diet. 'Nabet Soup' exhibited the highest true nitrogen digestibility. In contrast, the biological value of nitrogen was apparently unaffected. Highest blood hemoglobin level was found in rats fed diets containing 'Bissara', 'Falafel' and 'Nabet Soup', whereas the addition of 'Medammis' in the diet induced a significant (p < 0.05) reduction in blood hemoglobin level of fed rats.

  14. Data supporting the involvement of the adenine nucleotide translocase conformation in opening the Tl+-induced permeability transition pore in Ca2+-loaded rat liver mitochondria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergey M. Korotkov

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available There we made available information about the effects of the adenine nucleotide translocase (ANT ‘c’ conformation fixers (phenylarsine oxide (PAO, tert-butylhydroperoxide (tBHP, and carboxyatractyloside as well as thiol reagent (4,4′-diisothiocyanostilbene-2,2′-disulfonate (DIDS on isolated rat liver mitochondria. We observed a decrease in A540 (mitochondrial swelling and respiratory control rates (RCRADP [state 3/state 4] and RCRDNP [2,4-dinitrophenol-uncoupled state/basal state or state 4], as well as an increase in Ca2+-induced safranin fluorescence (F485/590, arbitrary units, showed a dissipation in the inner membrane potential (ΔΨmito, in experiments with energized rat liver mitochondria, injected into the buffer containing 25–75 mM TlNO3, 125 mM KNO3, and 100 µM Ca2+. The fixers and DIDS, in comparison to Ca2+ alone, greatly increased A540 decline and the rate of Ca2+-induced ΔΨmito dissipation. These reagents also markedly decreased RCRADP and RCRDNP. The MPTP inhibitors (ADP, cyclosporin A, bongkrekic acid, and N-ethylmaleimide fixing the ANT in ‘m’ conformation significantly hindered the above-mentioned effects of the fixers and DIDS. A more complete scientific analysis of these findings may be obtained from the manuscript “To involvement the conformation of the adenine nucleotide translocase in opening the Tl+-induced permeability transition pore in Ca2+-loaded rat liver mitochondria” (Korotkov et al., 2016 [1].

  15. Discovery of a Novel Coronavirus, China Rattus Coronavirus HKU24, from Norway Rats Supports the Murine Origin of Betacoronavirus 1 and Has Implications for the Ancestor of Betacoronavirus Lineage A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Susanna K. P.; Woo, Patrick C. Y.; Li, Kenneth S. M.; Tsang, Alan K. L.; Fan, Rachel Y. Y.; Luk, Hayes K. H.; Cai, Jian-Piao; Chan, Kwok-Hung; Zheng, Bo-Jian; Wang, Ming

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT We discovered a novel Betacoronavirus lineage A coronavirus, China Rattus coronavirus (ChRCoV) HKU24, from Norway rats in China. ChRCoV HKU24 occupied a deep branch at the root of members of Betacoronavirus 1, being distinct from murine coronavirus and human coronavirus HKU1. Its unique putative cleavage sites between nonstructural proteins 1 and 2 and in the spike (S) protein and low sequence identities to other lineage A betacoronaviruses (βCoVs) in conserved replicase domains support ChRCoV HKU24 as a separate species. ChRCoV HKU24 possessed genome features that resemble those of both Betacoronavirus 1 and murine coronavirus, being closer to Betacoronavirus 1 in most predicted proteins but closer to murine coronavirus by G+C content, the presence of a single nonstructural protein (NS4), and an absent transcription regulatory sequence for the envelope (E) protein. Its N-terminal domain (NTD) demonstrated higher sequence identity to the bovine coronavirus (BCoV) NTD than to the mouse hepatitis virus (MHV) NTD, with 3 of 4 critical sugar-binding residues in BCoV and 2 of 14 contact residues at the MHV NTD/murine CEACAM1a interface being conserved. Molecular clock analysis dated the time of the most recent common ancestor of ChRCoV HKU24, Betacoronavirus 1, and rabbit coronavirus HKU14 to about the year 1400. Cross-reactivities between other lineage A and B βCoVs and ChRCoV HKU24 nucleocapsid but not spike polypeptide were demonstrated. Using the spike polypeptide-based Western blot assay, we showed that only Norway rats and two oriental house rats from Guangzhou, China, were infected by ChRCoV HKU24. Other rats, including Norway rats from Hong Kong, possessed antibodies only against N protein and not against the spike polypeptide, suggesting infection by βCoVs different from ChRCoV HKU24. ChRCoV HKU24 may represent the murine origin of Betacoronavirus 1, and rodents are likely an important reservoir for ancestors of lineage A βCoVs. IMPORTANCE While

  16. Development of hollow fiber-supported liquid-phase microextraction and HPLC-DAD method for the determination of pyrethroid metabolites in human and rat urine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartosz, Wielgomas; Marcin, Wiśniewski; Wojciech, Czarnowski

    2014-05-01

    A simple hollow fiber liquid-phase microextraction method for the determination of synthetic pyrethroid metabolites, 3-phenoxybenzoic acid and 4-hydroxy-3-phenoxybenzoic acid, in human and rat urine was developed and validated. A polypropylene hollow fiber tightly fitted onto a Nylon rod and impregnated with organic solvent served as a disposable extraction device. Desorption of analytes was carried out in NaOH solution, analyzed further by gradient HPLC and diode array detection method. Important factors were identified using Taguchi OA16 (4(5) ) orthogonal array design and further optimized using univariate approach. The optimum method performance was observed when 1 mL of urine hydrolyzed with 0.2 mL of concentrated HCl was further supplemented with 100 mg of NaCl and extracted for 120 min into dihexyl ether immobilized in the pores of the hollow fiber. Metabolites were desorbed into 0.1 mL of 0.1 M NaOH for another 120 min. Limits of detection and quantitation of 15 and 50 ng/mL were obtained for both analytes. Relative standard deviations of 1.6-12.6% over the linear range (50-10,000 ng/mL, r > 0.9906) were observed. Intra- and inter-day accuracies of the method ranged from 98.3 to 109.5% and from 93.3 to 110.9%, respectively. The optimized method was applied to the analysis of real urine samples collected from rats exposed orally to cypermethrin. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. Local application of adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells supports the healing of fistula: prospective randomised study on rat model of fistulising Crohn's disease

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ryska, Ondřej; Šerclová, Z.; Měšťák, O.; Matoušková, E.; Veselý, P.; Mrázová, I.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 52, č. 5 (2017), s. 543-550 ISSN 0036-5521 R&D Projects: GA MZd(CZ) NV16-31806A Institutional support: RVO:67985904 Keywords : mesenchymal stem cell * perianal fistula * bioluminescence Subject RIV: FJ - Surgery incl. Transplants Impact factor: 2.526, year: 2016

  18. Helper virus-free HSV-1 vectors packaged both in the presence of VSV G protein and in the absence of HSV-1 glycoprotein B support gene transfer into neurons in the rat striatum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, J; Yang, T; Ghosh, H P; Geller, A I

    2001-12-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV-1) vectors have potential for gene transfer into quiescent cells, but the gene transfer process could be more efficient. In other vector systems, both the titers and the efficiency of gene transfer have been enhanced by pseudotyping the vector particles with vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) G protein. In this report, we pseudotyped helper virus-free HSV-1 plasmid vectors with VSV G protein. Packaging was performed in the presence of both VSV G protein and a deletion in an essential HSV-1 glycoprotein, gB. The resulting vector stocks supported gene transfer into both fibroblast and neuronal cell lines. VSV G protein was required for gene transfer because preincubation of these vector stocks with antibodies directed against either VSV G protein or VSV reduced the titer to undetectable levels. Although the titers were lower than those obtained using the unmodified vector system, the titers were not increased by use of chimeric proteins that contain the extracellular domain of VSV G protein and the transmembrane and/or cytoplasmic domains of specific HSV-1 glycoproteins. Also, the titers were not increased by performing the packaging in the presence of deletions in multiple HSV-1 glycoproteins. Nonetheless, pHSVlac pseudotyped with VSV G protein supported gene transfer into striatal neurons in the rat brain. Thus, HSV-1 vectors pseudotyped with VSV G protein may be useful for specific gene transfer studies.

  19. Support of the supporters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stiefel, F

    2008-02-01

    A growing body of evidence indicates that health care professionals working with severely ill patients are in need of support. Beside "external" factors, such as heavy clinical patient volume or administrative duties, "intra-psychic stressors," related to the inner significance of contextual factors, are an important source of clinician's distress. Identification of and working through intrapsychic stressors can considerably reduce psychological distress and thus provide effective and long-lasting support of the oncology clinician. This article discusses key elements of intra-psychic stressors, namely (1) emotions towards the patient, (2) awareness of own limits, (3) confusion about empathy, identification, counter-transference and collusion, (4) the influence of early development and life trajectory on career choices and professional identity and (5) the conflicting roles a health care professional being in need of support has to face.

  20. Tech Support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beem, Kate

    2002-01-01

    Discusses technology-support issues, including staff training, cost, and outsourcing. Describes how various school districts manage technology-support services. Features the Technology Support Index, developed by the International Society for Technology in Education, to gauge the operation of school district technology-support programs. (PKP)

  1. Combined treatment with platelet-rich plasma and brain-derived neurotrophic factor-overexpressing bone marrow stromal cells supports axonal remyelination in a rat spinal cord hemi-section model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Tengfei; Yan, Weiqi; Xu, Kan; Qi, Yiying; Dai, Xuesong; Shi, Zhongli

    2013-07-01

    Combining biologic matrices is becoming a better choice to advance stem cell-based therapies. Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) is a biologic product of concentrated platelets and has been used to promote regeneration of peripheral nerves after injury. We examined whether PRP could induce rat bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) differentiation in vitro and whether a combination of BMSCs, PRP and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) could provide additive therapeutic benefits in vivo after spinal cord injury (SCI). BMSCs and BDNF-secreting BMSCs (BDNF-BMSCs) were cultured with PRP for 7 days and 21 days, respectively, and neurofilament (NF)-200, glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), microtubule-associated protein 2 (MAP2) and ribosomal protein S6 kinase (p70S6K) gene levels were assessed. After T10 hemi-section in 102 rats, 15-μL scaffolds (PRP alone, BMSCs, PRP/BMSCs, BDNF-BMSCs or PRP/BDNF-BMSCs) were transplanted into the lesion area, and real-time polymerase chain reaction, Western blot, immunohistochemistry and ultrastructural studies were performed. The messenger RNA expression of NF-200, GFAP, MAP2 and p70S6K was promoted in BMSCs and BDNF-BMSCs after culture with PRP in vitro. BDNF levels were significantly higher in the injured spinal cord after implantation of BDNF-BMSCs. In the PRP/BDNF-BMSCs group at 8 weeks postoperatively, more GFAP was observed, with less accumulation of astrocytes at the graft-host interface. Rats that received PRP and BDNF-BMSC implants showed enhanced hind limb locomotor performance at 8 weeks postoperatively compared with control animals, with more axonal remyelination. A combined treatment comprising PRP and BDNF-overexpressing BMSCs produced beneficial effects in rats with regard to functional recovery after SCI through enhancing migration of astrocytes into the transplants and axonal remyelination. Copyright © 2013 International Society for Cellular Therapy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Gene Expression Profiling Identifies Lobe-Specific and Common Disruptions of Multiple Gene Networks in Testosterone-Supported, 17β-Estradiol- or Diethylstilbestrol-Induced Prostate Dysplasia in Noble Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neville N.C. Tam

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The xenoestrogen diethylstilbestrol (DES is commonly believed to mimic the action of the natural estrogen 17β-estradiol (E2. To determine if these two estrogens exert similar actions in prostate carcinogenesis, we elevated circulating levels of estrogen in Noble (NBL rats with E2/DES-filled implants, while maintaining physiological levels of testosterone (T in the animals with T-filled implants. The two estrogens induced dysplasia in a lobe-specific manner, with E2 targeting only the lateral prostate (LP and DES impacting only the ventral prostate (VP. Gene expression profiling identified distinct and common E2-disrupted versus DES-disrupted gene networks in each lobe. More importantly, hierarchical clustering analyses revealed that T + E2 treatment primarily affected the gene expression pattern in the LP, whereas T + DES treatment primarily affected the gene expression profile in the VP. Gene ontology analyses and pathway mapping suggest that the two hormone treatments disrupt unique and/or common cellular processes, including cell development, proliferation, motility, apoptosis, and estrogen signaling, which may be linked to dysplasia development in the rat prostate. These findings suggest that the effects of xenoestrogens and natural estrogens on the rat prostate are more divergent than previously suspected and that these differences may explain the lobe-specific carcinogenic actions of the hormones.

  3. Nutritional Support

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nutritional support is therapy for people who cannot get enough nourishment by eating or drinking. You may need it ... nutrients through your digestive system You receive nutritional support through a needle or catheter placed in your ...

  4. Supporting Families to Support Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, John; Rossen, Eric; Cowan, Katherine C.

    2018-01-01

    Collaboration between students' families and the school is an essential component to promoting student mental and behavioral health. Many schools structure their mental health services using a Multi-Tiered System of Supports that offers three different tiers of support from universal supports to personalized help for students with serious…

  5. Witnessing traumatic events causes severe behavioral impairments in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patki, Gaurav; Solanki, Naimesh; Salim, Samina

    2014-12-01

    Witnessing a traumatic event but not directly experiencing it can be psychologically quite damaging. In North America alone, ∼30% of individuals who witness a traumatic event develop post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). While effects of direct trauma are evident, consequences of indirect or secondary trauma are often ignored. Also unclear is the role of social support in the consequences of these experiences. The social defeat paradigm, which involves aggressive encounters by a large Long-Evans male rat (resident) towards a smaller Sprague-Dawley male rat (intruder), is considered a rodent model of PTSD. We have modified this model to create a trauma witness model (TWM) and have used our TWM model to also evaluate social support effects. Basically, when an intruder rat is placed into the home cage of a resident rat, it encounters an agonistic behavior resulting in intruder subordination. The socially defeated intruder is designated the SD rat. A second rat, the cage mate of the SD, is positioned to witness the event and is the trauma witnessing (TW) rat. Experiments were performed in two different experimental conditions. In one, the SD and TW rats were cagemates and acclimatized together. Then, one SD rat was subjected to three sessions of social defeat for 7 d. TW rat witnessed these events. After each social defeat exposure, the TW and SD rats were housed together. In the second, the TW and SD rats were housed separately starting after the first defeat. At the end of each protocol, depression-anxiety-like behavior and memory tests were conducted on the SD and TW rats, blood withdrawn and specific organs collected. Witnessing traumatic events led to depression- and anxiety-like behavior and produced memory deficits in TW rats associated with elevated corticosterone levels.

  6. Pair-housing of male and female rats during chronic stress exposure results in gender-specific behavioral responses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westenbroek, C.; Snijders, T.A.B.; Den Boer, J.A.; Gerrits, Marjolein; Fokkema, D.S.; ter Horst, G.J

    Social support has a positive influence on the course of a depression and social housing of rats could provide an animal model for studying the neurobiological mechanisms of social support. Male and female rats were subjected to chronic footshock stress for 3 weeks and pair-housing of rats was used

  7. BALLOON SUPPORT,

    Science.gov (United States)

    Two instrument bearing arrays were supported by balloons on the Double Tracks event. One large balloon supported a 750-foot high by 1,500-foot wide...array at 2,500 feet downwind from ground zero, and 8 small evenly spaced balloons supported instruments up to 1,000 feet high over a 7,500foot wide...area at 13,000 feet downwind from ground zero. Air samplers, cascade impactors, and sticky cylinders were supported by the arrays. The balloons used for

  8. Sleep in spontaneous dwarf rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterfi, Zoltan; Obal, Ferenc; Taishi, Ping; Gardi, Janos; Kacsoh, Balint; Unterman, Terry; Krueger, James M

    2006-09-07

    Spontaneous dwarf rats (SDRs) display growth hormone (GH) deficiency due to a mutation in the GH gene. This study investigated sleep in SDRs and their somatotropic axis and compared to Sprague-Dawley rats. SDRs had almost undetectable levels of plasma GH. Hypothalamic GH-releasing hormone (GHRH) mRNA was increased, whereas GHRH-receptor (GHRH-R) and somatostatin mRNAs were decreased in SDRs. Hypothalamic GHRH and somatostatin peptide content decreased in SDRs. Quantitative immunohistochemistry for GHRH and GHRH-R corroborated and extended these findings. In the arcuate nucleus, the number of GHRH-positive cells was significantly higher, whereas GHRH-R-positive perikarya were diminished in SDRs. Cortical GHRH and GHRH-R measurements showed similar expression characteristics as those found in the hypothalamus. SDRs had less rapid eye movement sleep (REMS) and more non-REMS (NREMS) than the control rats during the light period. The electroencephalogram (EEG) delta and theta power decreased during NREMS in the SDRs. After 4-h of sleep deprivation, SDRs had a significantly reduced REMS rebound compared to the controls, whereas NREMS rebound was normal in SDRs. The enhancement in delta power was significantly less than in the control group during recovery sleep. Intracerebroventricular (icv) administration of GHRH promoted NREMS in both strains of rats; however, increased REMS and EEG delta activity was observed only in control rats. Icv injection of insulin-like growth factor 1 increased NREMS in control rats, but not in the SDRs. These results support the ideas that GHRH is involved in NREMS regulation and that GH is involved in the regulation of REMS and in EEG slow wave activity regulation during NREMS.

  9. ventilatory support

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Kinfu Betemariam, Gebreyesus Hagos. Abstract. Background: Mechanical Ventilation is a supportive measure for patients who are in respiratory failure. Objective: Designed to identify the commonest pathology responsible for admission to the unit for mechanical respiratory support. Method: A prospective case study ...

  10. Dimerization effect of sucrose octasulfate on rat FGF1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kulahin, Nikolaj; Kiselyov, Vladislav; Kochoyan, Artur

    2008-01-01

    signalling pathways. The structure of rat FGF1 crystallized in the presence of SOS has been determined at 2.2 A resolution. SOS-mediated dimerization of FGF1 was observed, which was further supported by gel-filtration experiments. The major contributors to the sulfate-binding sites in rat FGF1 are Lys113...

  11. (Linn.) stem bark methanol extract in male rats

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Proven fertile male rats were gavaged 100% methanol extract of A. squamosa stem bark at the dose level of 50, 100 and 200 mg/rat/day for 60 days. Fertility ... The findings of the study support contraceptive allege of Annoa squamosa however this contraceptive activity was reversible after withdrawal of the drug treatment.

  12. Reproductive effects of Ficus asperifolia (Moraceae) in female rats ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... immature rats were sensitive to the treatment with Ficus asperifolia than the ovariectomized ones. Our results give added scientific support to the popular use of Ficus asperifolia in the treatment of some cases of women's sterility/infertility related problems. Keywords: Ficus asperifolia , implantation, fertility, uterotrophic, rat

  13. Prior access to a sweet is more protective against cocaine self-administration in female rats than male rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cason, Angie M.; Grigson, Patricia S.

    2013-01-01

    It is well established that female rats are more sensitive than male rats to the reinforcing effects of cocaine (Lynch, 2008 for review). We hypothesized that greater preference for cocaine would support greater avoidance of a cocaine-paired taste cue in female vs. male rats. Moreover, at least in male rats, greater avoidance of the taste cue is associated with greater cocaine self-administration (Grigson & Twining, 2002). Thus, we anticipated that female rats would not only demonstrate greater avoidance of the drug-paired taste cue, but greater drug-taking as well. We tested these hypotheses by examining avoidance of a saccharin cue in male and female rats following several pairings with self-administered saline or cocaine (0.16, 0.33, or 0.66 mg/infusion). Contrary to expectations, the results showed that female rats exhibited less avoidance of the cocaine-associated saccharin cue than male rats and self-administered less, rather than more, cocaine, Thus, while female rats reportedly take more drug than male rats when the drug is presented in the absence of an alternative reward, they take less drug than male rats when the opportunity to self-administer cocaine is preceded by access to a palatable sweet. Females, then, may not simply be more sensitive to the rewarding properties of drug, but also to the reinforcing properties of natural rewards and this increase in sensitivity to sweets may serve to protect against drug-taking behavior. PMID:23474135

  14. Effects of controlled and pressure support mechanical ventilation on rat diaphragm muscle Efeitos da ventilação mecânica controlada e por pressão de suporte no músculo diafragma de ratos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André de Sá Braga Oliveira

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: The objective of this study was to analyze the effects of Pressure Controlled Ventilation mode (PCV-C and PSV mode in diaphragm muscle of rats. METHODS: Wistar rats (n=18 were randomly assigned to the control group or to receive 6 hours of PCV and PSV. After this period, animals were euthanized and their diaphragms were excised, frozen in liquid nitrogen and stored in at -80º C for further histomorphometric analysis. RESULTS: Results showed a 15% decrease in cross-sectional area of muscle fibers on the PCV-C group when compared to the control group (p0.05. CONCLUSION: Short-term controlled mechanical ventilation seems to lead to muscular atrophy in diaphragm fibers. The PSV mode may attenuate the effects of VIDD.OBJETIVO: Avaliar os efeitos do modo ventilatório controlado por pressão controlada (PCV-C e do modo PSV sobre o músculo diafragma de ratos. MÉTODOS: Ratos (n = 18 da linhagem Wistar foram distribuídos no grupo controle (RE ou para receber AVM por 6 horas no modo PCV-C e no modo PSV. Após esse período, os animais foram eutanasiados, o diafragma retirado e encaminhado para a análise histológica e morfométrica. RESULTADOS: Os resultados revelaram uma redução da área das fibras musculares de 15% no grupo PCV-C em comparação ao controle (p0,05. CONCLUSÃO: O grupo PCV-C apresentou atrofia muscular em um período curto de ventilação mecânica. O modo PSV parece atenuar os efeitos da DDIV.

  15. Coexpression of Tyrosine Hydroxylase, GTP Cyclohydrolase I, Aromatic Amino Acid Decarboxylase, and Vesicular Monoamine Transporter 2 from a Helper Virus-Free Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 Vector Supports High-Level, Long-Term Biochemical and Behavioral Correction of a Rat Model of Parkinson’s Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    SUN, MEI; KONG, LINGXIN; WANG, XIAODAN; HOLMES, COURTNEY; GAO, QINGSHENG; ZHANG, GUO-RONG; PFEILSCHIFTER, JOSEF; GOLDSTEIN, DAVID S.; GELLER, ALFRED I.

    2006-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease is due to the selective loss of nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurons. Consequently, many therapeutic strategies have focused on restoring striatal dopamine levels, including direct gene transfer to striatal cells, using viral vectors that express specific dopamine biosynthetic enzymes. The central hypothesis of this study is that coexpression of four dopamine biosynthetic and transporter genes in striatal neurons can support the efficient production and regulated, vesicular release of dopamine: tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) converts tyrosine to l-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (l -DOPA), GTP cyclohydrolase I (GTP CH I) is the rate-limiting enzyme in the biosynthesis of the cofactor for TH, aromatic amino acid decarboxylase (AADC) converts l -DOPA to dopamine, and a vesicular monoamine transporter (VMAT-2) transports dopamine into synaptic vesicles, thereby supporting regulated, vesicular release of dopamine and relieving feedback inhibition of TH by dopamine. Helper virus-free herpes simplex virus type 1 vectors that coexpress the three dopamine biosynthetic enzymes (TH, GTP CH I, and AADC; 3-gene-vector) or these three dopamine biosynthetic enzymes and the vesicular monoamine transporter (TH, GTP CH I, AADC, and VMAT-2; 4-gene-vector) were compared. Both vectors supported production of dopamine in cultured fibroblasts. These vectors were microinjected into the striatum of 6-hydroxydopamine-lesioned rats. These vectors carry a modified neurofilament gene promoter, and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-ergic neuron-specific gene expression was maintained for 14 months after gene transfer. The 4-gene-vector supported higher levels of correction of apomorphine-induced rotational behavior than did the 3-gene-vector, and this correction was maintained for 6 months. Proximal to the injection sites, the 4-gene-vector, but not the 3-gene-vector, supported extracellular levels of dopamine and dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC) that were similar to those observed in

  16. Palmitoylated PrRP analog decreases body weight in DIO rats but not in ZDF rats

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Holubová, M.; Zemenová, J.; Mikulášková, Barbora; Panajotová, V.; Stöhr, J.; Haluzík, M.; Kuneš, Jaroslav; Železná, B.; Maletínská, L.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 229, č. 2 (2016), s. 85-96 ISSN 0022-0795 R&D Projects: GA TA ČR(CZ) TE01020028; GA ČR(CZ) GA15-08679S Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : prolactin-releasing peptide * lipidization * diet-induced obesity * ZDF rats * food intake rat Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 4.706, year: 2016

  17. Palmitoylated PrRP analog decreases body weight in DIO rats but not in ZDF rats

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Holubová, Martina; Zemenová, Jana; Mikulášková, Barbora; Panajotová, V.; Stöhr, J.; Haluzík, M.; Kuneš, Jaroslav; Železná, Blanka; Maletínská, Lenka

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 229, č. 2 (2016), s. 85-96 ISSN 0022-0795 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA15-08679S; GA TA ČR(CZ) TE01020028 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : prolactin-releasing peptide * lipidization * diet-induced obesity * ZDF rats * food intake * rat Subject RIV: FB - Endocrinology, Diabetology, Metabolism, Nutrition Impact factor: 4.706, year: 2016

  18. Supporting Information

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This is the supporting information for the journal article. This dataset is associated with the following publication: Rankin, K., S. Mabury, T. Jenkins, and J....

  19. Supporting Info

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Supporting Information. This dataset is associated with the following publication: Washington , J., T. Jenkins, and E. Weber. Identification of Unsaturated and 2H...

  20. Supporting Info

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Supporting Info. This dataset is associated with the following publication: Washington , J., and T. Jenkins. Abiotic Hydrolysis of Fluorotelomer-Based Polymers as a...

  1. Rat-bite fever

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... dwellings may help prevent rat-bite fever. Taking antibiotics by mouth after a rat bite may also help prevent this illness. Alternative Names Streptobacillary fever; Streptobacillosis; Haverhill fever; Epidemic arthritic ...

  2. Rat Genome Database (RGD)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Rat Genome Database (RGD) is a collaborative effort between leading research institutions involved in rat genetic and genomic research to collect, consolidate,...

  3. Rat Bite Fever

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Issues Listen Español Text Size Email Print Share Rat Bite Fever Page Content Article Body Rat-bite fever is a disease that occurs in humans who have been bitten by an infected rat or, in some cases, squirrels, mice, cats, and ...

  4. Respiratory Support

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    can be caused by inappropriate mechanical ventilation. This soft-cover review of the current practice of appropriate respiratory support is not controversia(it describes in an easily readable and concise fashio-n the development, physiological implications, mechanical and technological basis, safety aspects and careful ...

  5. Supporting ATLAS

    CERN Multimedia

    maximilien brice

    2003-01-01

    Eighteen feet made of stainless steel will support the barrel ATLAS detector in the cavern at Point 1. In total, the ATLAS feet system will carry approximately 6000 tons, and will give the same inclination to the detector as the LHC accelerator.

  6. Obesity-resistant S5B rats showed great cocaine conditioned place preference than the obesity-prone OM rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thanos, P.K.; Wang, G.; Thanos, P.K..; Kim, R.; Cho, J.; Michaelides, M.; Anderson, B.J.; Primeaux, S.D.; Bray, G.A.; Wang, G.-J.; Robinson, J.K.; Volkow, N.D.

    2010-12-01

    Dopamine (DA) and the DA D2 receptor (D2R) are involved in the rewarding and conditioned responses to food and drug rewards. Osborne-Mendel (OM) rats are genetically prone and S5B/P rats are genetically resistant to obesity when fed a high-fat diet. We hypothesized that the differential sensitivity of these two rat strains to natural rewards may also be reflected in sensitivity to drugs of abuse. Therefore, we tested whether OM and S5B/P rats showed a differential preference to cocaine using conditioned place preference (CPP). To also evaluate whether there is specific involvement of the D2R in this differential conditioning sensitivity, we then tested whether the D2R agonist bromocriptine (BC) would differentially affect the effects of cocaine in the two strains. OM and S5B/P rats were conditioned with cocaine (5 or 10 mg/kg) in one chamber and saline in another for 8 days. Rats were then tested for cocaine preference. The effects of BC (0.5, 1, 5, 10, 20 mg/kg) on cocaine preference were then assessed in subsequent test sessions. OM rats did not show a significant preference for the cocaine-paired chamber on test day. Only the S5B/P rats showed cocaine CPP. Later treatment with only the highest dose of BC resulted in reduced cocaine CPP in S5B/P rats when treated with 5 mg/kg cocaine and in OM rats treated with 10 mg/kg cocaine. Our results indicated that obesity-resistant S5B rats showed greater cocaine CPP than the obesity-prone OM rats. These findings do not support a theory of common vulnerability for reinforcer preferences (food and cocaine). However, they show that BC reduced cocaine conditioning effects supporting at least a partial regulatory role of D2R in conditioned responses to drugs.

  7. Swelling of rat hepatocytes stimulates glycogen synthesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baquet, A.; Hue, L.; Meijer, A. J.; van Woerkom, G. M.; Plomp, P. J.

    1990-01-01

    In hepatocytes from fasted rats, several amino acids are known to stimulate glycogen synthesis via activation of glycogen synthase. The hypothesis that an increase in cell volume resulting from amino acid uptake may be involved in the stimulation of glycogen synthesis is supported by the following

  8. Supporting members

    Science.gov (United States)

    Life Supporting Members L. Thomas Aldrich Thomas D. Barrow Hugh J . A. Chivers Allan V. Cox Samuel S. Goldich Pembroke J. Hart A. Ivan Johnson Helmut E. Landsberg Paolo Lanzano Murli H. Manghnani L. L. Nettleton Charles B. Officer Hyman Orlin Ned A. Ostenso Erick O. Schonstedt Waldo E. Smith Athelstan Spilhaus A. F. Spilhaus, Jr. John W. Townsend, Jr. James A. Van Allen Leonard W. Weis Charles A. Whitten J. Tuzo Wilson

  9. Fetal rat pancreas transplantation in BB rats: immunohistochemical and functional evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yderstraede, K B; Starklint, H; Steinbruchel, D; Jørgensen, T W; Gotfredsen, C F

    1993-01-01

    Spontaneously diabetic BB/Wor rats received either a syngeneic fetal pancreas transplant or adult islets. In the former, 4-8 fetal pancreases were transplanted, and in the latter, 3-5000 islets. Transplantation was performed by transferring a blood clot containing the pancreases or islets to the renal subcapsular space. Insulin therapy was undertaken postoperatively, except in one experiment with adult islets. Of the fetal pancreas transplanted BB rats, 52% became normoglycaemic, and 21% remained so throughout an observation period of 10 months. Nephrectomy caused a prompt return of diabetes. The histological appearance of the grafts transplanted to the diabetic animals closely resembled that of grafts transplanted to normal rats in a parallel series. For comparison a group of BB rats received a syngeneic transplant of isolated adult islets from WF rats or BBW rats. Following adult islet transplantation, 5 out of 6 animals became hyperglycaemic after a median of 20.5 days when no insulin was given post-transplantation. Four out of 5 animals became hyperglycaemic after a median of 23 days when supportive insulin therapy was administered after the transplantation. The results indicate that recurrent diabetes is not inevitable following syngeneic fetal pancreas transplantation to spontaneously diabetic BB rats. Recurrent diabetes was only occasionally associated with mononuclear cell infiltration. Transplanted tissue was well-preserved and vascularized; mega-islets were a constant finding.

  10. Invasive rats on tropical islands: Their population biology and impacts on native species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grant A. Harper

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The three most invasive rat species, black or ship rat Rattus rattus, brown or Norway rats, R. norvegicus and Pacific rat, R. exulans have been incrementally introduced to islands as humans have explored the world’s oceans. They have caused serious deleterious effects through predation and competition, and extinction of many species on tropical islands, many of which are biodiversity hotspots. All three rat species are found in virtually all habitat types, including mangrove and arid shrub land. Black rats tend to dominate the literature but despite this the population biology of invasive rats, particularly Norway rats, is poorly researched on tropical islands. Pacific rats can often exceed population densities of well over 100 rats ha−1 and black rats can attain densities of 119 rats ha−1, which is much higher than recorded on most temperate islands. High densities are possibly due to high recruitment of young although the data to support this are limited. The generally aseasonally warm climate can lead to year-round breeding but can be restricted by either density-dependent effects interacting with resource constraints often due to aridity. Apparent adverse impacts on birds have been well recorded and almost all tropical seabirds and land birds can be affected by rats. On the Pacific islands, black rats have added to declines and extinctions of land birds caused initially by Pacific rats. Rats have likely caused unrecorded extinctions of native species on tropical islands. Further research required on invasive rats on tropical islands includes the drivers of population growth and carrying capacities that result in high densities and how these differ to temperate islands, habitat use of rats in tropical vegetation types and interactions with other tropical species, particularly the reptiles and invertebrates, including crustaceans.

  11. Naloxone suppresses feeding and drinking but not wheel running in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carey, M P; Ross, J A; Enns, M P

    1981-04-01

    The effects of naloxone hydrochloride on food and water intake and number of wheel revolutions were measured in male rats. The administration of 10 mg/kg naloxone but not 1 mg/kg suppressed the 3-hr food and water intake in nondeprived rats. Naloxone injections (1 mg/kg or 10 mg/kg) were ineffective in altering the number of wheel revolutions in nondeprived or food deprived rats. These results support the interpretation that the suppressive effects of naloxone previously reported with deprived rats are evident in nondeprived rats and are specific to feeding and drinking.

  12. Supporting ATLAS

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    Eighteen feet made of stainless steel will support the barrel ATLAS detector in the cavern at Point 1. In total, the ATLAS feet system will carry approximately 6000 tons, and will give the same inclination to the detector as the LHC accelerator. The installation of the feet is scheduled to finish during January 2004 with an installation precision at the 1 mm level despite their height of 5.3 metres. The manufacture was carried out in Russia (Company Izhorskiye Zavody in St. Petersburg), as part of a Russian and JINR Dubna in-kind contribution to ATLAS. Involved in the installation is a team from IHEP-Protvino (Russia), the ATLAS technical co-ordination team at CERN, and the CERN survey team. In all, about 15 people are involved. After the feet are in place, the barrel toroid magnet and the barrel calorimeters will be installed. This will keep the ATLAS team busy for the entire year 2004.

  13. Neuroprotective effects of octreotide on diabetic neuropathy in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solmaz, Volkan; Çınar, Bilge Piri; Yiğittürk, Gürkan; Özlece, Hatice Köse; Avni Eroglu, Hüseyin; Tekatas, Aslan; Erbaş, Oytun; Taşkıran, Dilek

    2017-05-01

    The purpose of the present study is to investigate the possible healing effects of octreotide (OCT) on motor performance, electrophysiological and histopathological findings of diabetic neuropathy in a rat model of diabetes mellitus (DM). To induce diabetes, rats were administered a single dose (60mg/kg) of streptozotocin (STZ). Diabetic rats were treated either with saline (1ml/kg/day, n=7) or OCT (0.1mg/kg/day, n=7) for four weeks. Seven rats served as control group and received no treatment. At the end of the study, electromyography (EMG), gross motor function (inclined plate test), general histology and the perineural thickness of sciatic nerve were evaluated. At the end of study, weight loss was significantly lower in OCT treated rats than that of saline treated ones (pneuropathy, which promisingly support the use of OCT as a neuroprotective agent in patients with diabetic neuropathy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. The queer life of a lab rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettit, Michael

    2012-08-01

    The laboratory rat is an important, if neglected, actor in the history of sexuality. From the 1920s and 1940s, a series of reports emerged from American psychology laboratories detailing instances of spontaneous "reversals" in sexual behavior within their rat colonies. Frank Beach, then at the American Museum of Natural History, developed a model for the "nature" of sexuality that stressed that all organisms had the neurological capacity to perform behavior of either sex. Beach enrolled his emerging specialty, behavioral endocrinology, in support of Alfred Kinsey's controversial findings. Both scientists highlighted the multitude of potential sexual outlets pursued by organisms and the prevalence of nonprocreative sexual behaviors. This article draws on elements of queer theory to elucidate how the landscape of the comparative psychologist's rat colony with its organisms, apparatus, practices, and rituals served an integral function in the redefinition of sex in the 20th century. Queer theory calls into question easy proclamations about what counts as natural or normal by drawing attention to the presumed binaries that frequently govern the classification of sex. The maintenance of the colony required the careful management of sex with its obstruction devices, hypersexualized indicator animals, segregation cages, and castrated rats injected with hormones. Moreover, Beach's own writings indicate how his own domestic life became entangled with the sex lives of the rats. An irony animates this Rockefeller-funded sexology: Research funded to elucidate the mechanisms underlying heterosexuality came to question its innateness and universality. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved).

  15. Postprandial hypoglycemic effect of mulberry leaf in Goto-Kakizaki rats and counterpart control Wistar rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Ji Min; Bong, Ha Yoon; Jeong, Hye In; Kim, Yeon Kyoung; Kim, Ji Yeon; Kwon, Oran

    2009-01-01

    Postprandial hypoglycemic effect of mulberry leaf (Morus alba L.) was compared in two animal models: Goto-Kakizaki (GK) rats, a spontaneous non-obese animal model for type II diabetes, and their counterpart control Wistar rats. First, the effect of a single oral administration of mulberry leaf aqueous extract (MLE) on postprandial glucose responses was determined using maltose or glucose as substrate. With maltose-loading, MLE reduced peak responses of blood glucose significantly in both GK and Wistar rats (P glucose-loading, MLE also significantly reduced blood glucose concentrations, measured at 30 min, in both animal models (P glucose transport by MLE. Next, dried mulberry leaf powder (MLP) was administered for 8 weeks by inclusion in the diet. By MLP administration, fasting blood glucose was significantly reduced at weeks 4 and 5 (P rats. Insulin, HOMA-IR, C-reactive protein, and triglycerides tended to be decreased by MLP treatment in GK rats. All other biochemical parameters were not changed by MLP administration in GK rats. Collectively, these findings support that MLE has significant postprandial hypoglycemic effect in both non-obese diabetic and healthy animals, which may be beneficial as food supplement to manage postprandial blood glucose. Inhibitions of glucose transport as well as alpha-glucosidase in the small intestine were suggested as possible mechanisms related with the postprandial hypoglycemic effect of MLE.

  16. SWEEP Project RAT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ibsen, Lars Bo; Madsen, Søren; Petersen, L. B.

    This report presents the results from the design analyses made for the clustered suction caisson used as foundation for a Riser Access Tower (RAT). The RAT is intended built next to the K15-FA-1 Platform in the Dutch Sector of the North Sea....

  17. Prior access to a sweet is more protective against cocaine self-administration in female rats than in male rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cason, Angie M; Grigson, Patricia S

    2013-03-15

    It is well established that female rats are more sensitive than male rats to the reinforcing effects of cocaine (Lynch, 2008 [42] for review). We hypothesized that greater preference for cocaine would support greater avoidance of a cocaine-paired taste cue in female vs. male rats. Moreover, at least in male rats, greater avoidance of the taste cue is associated with greater cocaine self-administration (Grigson and Twining, 2002 [3]). Thus, we anticipated that female rats would not only demonstrate greater avoidance of the drug-paired taste cue, but greater drug-taking as well. We tested these hypotheses by examining avoidance of a saccharin cue in male and female rats following several pairings with self-administered saline or cocaine (0.16, 0.33, or 0.66 mg/infusion). Contrary to expectations, the results showed that female rats exhibited less avoidance of the cocaine-associated saccharin cue than male rats and self-administered less, rather than more, cocaine, Thus, while female rats reportedly take more drug than male rats when the drug is presented in the absence of an alternative reward, they take less drug than male rats when the opportunity to self-administer cocaine is preceded by access to a palatable sweet. Females, then, may not simply be more sensitive to the rewarding properties of drug, but also to the reinforcing properties of natural rewards and this increase in sensitivity to sweets may serve to protect against drug-taking behavior. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. No Evidence of Rat Hepatitis E Virus Excretion in Urine Samples of Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tian-Cheng; Yoshizaki, Sayaka; Ami, Yasushi; Suzaki, Yuriko; Johne, Reimar; Wakita, Takaji

    2017-05-24

    To investigate whether rat hepatitis E virus (rat HEV) is excreted in the urine of HEV-infected rats, we infected 3 Wistar and 6 nude rats with rat HEV and examined the rat-HEV RNA in serum, fecal, and urine samples. We detected rat-HEV RNA in the serum and fecal samples of all 9 rats but not in any of the urine samples. Our results suggest that in rats, rat HEV is not transmitted via urine.

  19. Social partnering alters sleep in fear-conditioned Wistar rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DaSilva, Jamie K; Husain, Eram; Lei, Yanlin; Mann, Graziella L; Morrison, Adrian R; Tejani-Butt, Shanaz

    2017-01-01

    Social support, when provided following a traumatic experience, is associated with a lower incidence of stress-related psychiatric disorders. Our hypothesis was that providing a social interaction period with a naive conspecific would improve sleep architecture in response to cued fear conditioning in Wistar rats. Rats were randomly assigned to either the socially isolated or socially partnered groups. Rats assigned to the socially isolated group were individually housed following electrode implantation and fear conditioning. Rats assigned to the socially partnered group were initially paired-housed, and then one rat from each pair was randomly chosen for sleep electrode implantation and fear conditioning. Rats from both groups were habituated to a recording chamber, and baseline sleep was recorded over 22 hours. One day later (Training Day), they were fear-conditioned to 10 presentations of a tone (800 Hz, 90 dB, 5 sec) co-terminating with a mild electric foot shock (1.0 mA, 0.5 sec), at 30-sec intervals. While rats in the socially isolated group were left undisturbed in their home cage for 30-min, socially partnered rats interacted for 30 minutes with their non-stressed rat partner immediately after fear conditioning and while the auditory tones were presented on Days 1 and 14. The results indicated that social interaction increased sleep efficiency in partnered rats compared to isolated rats following the fear conditioning procedure. This was due to an increase in the amount of rapid eye movement sleep (REMS) during the light phase. Evaluation of REMS microarchitecture revealed that the increase in REMS was due to an increase in the number of single REMS episodes (siREMS), which represented a more consolidated REMS pattern. A surprising finding was that partnered rats had a greater number of sequential REMS episodes (seqREMS) at Baseline, on the Training Day and on Day 1 when compared to isolated rats. The greater number of seqREMS episodes in partnered rats may

  20. Development of the microcirculation of the secondary ossification center in rat humeral head

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Morini, S; Continenza, MA; Ricciardi, G; Gaudio, E; Pannarale, L

    This work investigated the origin and development of microcirculation in the rat humeral head and the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) as a factor supporting the vascular growth and the development of the secondary ossification centers. Sixty rats aging 1, 3-4, 6-8, 11, and 21

  1. Pharmacological profiling of Argemone mexicana for its aphrodisiac potentials in male Wistar rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asuntha G

    2014-06-01

    Conclusion: The EEAM has elevated sexual dysfunctions in male rats. These potentials may be related to protopine alkaloids and flavanols by means of physiological stimulus for penile vasculature. Thus, results support the use of EEAM in enhancing sexual behavior in sluggish male rats.

  2. Reduction of dimethylarsinic acid to the highly toxic dimethylarsinous acid by rats and rat liver cytosol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Németi, Balázs; Gregus, Zoltán

    2013-03-18

    Dimethylarsinic acid (DMAs(V)), the major urinary metabolite of inorganic arsenic, is weakly cytotoxic, whereas its reduced form, dimethylarsinous acid (DMAs(III)), is highly toxic. Although glutathione S-transferase omega 1 (GSTO1) and arsenic methyltransferase have been shown or thought to catalyze DMAs(V) reduction, their role in DMAs(V) reduction in vivo, or in cell extracts is uncertain. Therefore, the reduction of DMAs(V) to DMAs(III) in rats and in rat liver cytosol was studied to better understand its mechanism. To assess DMAs(V) reduction in rats, a novel procedure was devised based on following the accumulation of red blood cell (RBC)-bound dimethylarsenic (DMAs), which represents DMAs(III), in the blood of DMAs(V)-injected anesthetized rats. These studies indicated that rats reduced DMAs(V) to DMAs(III) to a significant extent, as in 90 min 31% of the injected 50 μmol/kg DMAs(V) dose was converted to DMAs(III) that was sequestered by the circulating erythrocytes. Pretreatment of rats with glutathione (GSH) depletors (phorone or BSO) delayed the elimination of DMAs(V) and the accumulation of RBC-bound DMAs, whereas the indirect methyltransferase inhibitor periodate-oxidized adenosine was without effect. Assessment of DMAs(V)-reducing activity of rat liver cytosol revealed that reduction of DMAs(V) required cytosolic protein and GSH and was inhibited by thiol reagents, GSSG and dehydroascorbate. Although thioredoxin reductase (TRR) inhibitors (aurothioglucose and Sb(III)) inhibited cytosolic DMAs(V) reduction, recombinant rat TRR plus NADPH, alone or when added to the cytosol, failed to support DMAs(V) reduction. On ultrafiltration of the cytosol through a 3 kDa filter, the reducing activity in the retentate was lost but was largely restored by NADPH. Such experiments also suggested that the reducing enzyme was larger than 100 kDa and was not GSTO1. In summary, reduction of DMAs(V) to the highly toxic DMAs(III) in rats and rat liver cytosol is a GSH

  3. Longtransplantatie bij de rat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marck, Klaas Willem

    1983-01-01

    Op grond van de resultaten van het hierboven beschreven onderzoek en de eraan gewijde beschouwingen zijn de volgende conclasies getrokken: 1. Orthotope linkszijdige longtransplantatie bij de rat is operatietechnisch mogelijk. 2. Longpercusiescintigrafie met radioactief ,,gelabelde" microbolletjes is

  4. Enhanced post-ischemic neurogenesis in aging rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yao-Fang Tan

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Hippocampal neurogenesis persists in adult mammals, but its rate declines dramatically with age. Evidence indicates that experimentally-reduced levels of neurogenesis (e.g. by irradiation in young rats has profound influence on cognition as determined by learning and memory tests. In the present study we asked whether in middle-aged, 10-13 months old rats, cell production can be restored towards the level present in young rats. To manipulate neurogenesis we induced bilateral carotid occlusion with hypotension. This procedure is known to increase neurogenesis in young rats, presumably in a compensatory manner, but until now, has never been tested in aging rats. Cell production was measured at 10, 35 and 90 days after ischemia. The results indicate that neuronal proliferation and differentiation can be transiently restored in middle-aged rats. Furthermore, the effects are more pronounced in the dorsal as opposed to ventral hippocampus thus restoring the dorso-ventral gradient seen in younger rats. Our results support previous findings showing that some of the essential features of the age-dependent decline in neurogenesis are reversible. Thus, it may be possible to manipulate neurogenesis and improve learning and memory in old age.

  5. The Rat Genome Database 2009: variation, ontologies and pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwinell, Melinda R; Worthey, Elizabeth A; Shimoyama, Mary; Bakir-Gungor, Burcu; DePons, Jeffrey; Laulederkind, Stanley; Lowry, Timothy; Nigram, Rajni; Petri, Victoria; Smith, Jennifer; Stoddard, Alexander; Twigger, Simon N; Jacob, Howard J

    2009-01-01

    The Rat Genome Database (RGD, http://rgd.mcw.edu) was developed to provide a core resource for rat researchers combining genetic, genomic, pathway, phenotype and strain information with a focus on disease. RGD users are provided with access to structured and curated data from the molecular level through to the level of the whole organism, including the variations associated with disease phenotypes. To fully support use of the rat as a translational model for biological systems and human disease, RGD continues to curate these datasets while enhancing and developing tools to allow efficient and effective access to the data in a variety of formats including linear genome viewers, pathway diagrams and biological ontologies. To support pathophysiological analysis of data, RGD Disease Portals provide an entryway to integrated gene, QTL and strain data specific to a particular disease. In addition to tool and content development and maintenance, RGD promotes rat research and provides user education by creating and disseminating tutorials on the curated datasets, submission processes, and tools available at RGD. By curating, storing, integrating, visualizing and promoting rat data, RGD ensures that the investment made into rat genomics and genetics can be leveraged by all interested investigators.

  6. Running-based pica and taste avoidance in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakajima, Sadahiko

    2017-11-09

    Running in an activity wheel generates pica behavior (kaolin clay intake) in rats. Wheel running also results in Pavlovian conditioned avoidance of the taste solution consumed immediately before the running. Since pica has been considered a behavioral marker of nausea in rats, these findings suggest that wheel running induces nausea, which is the underlying physiological state for establishing taste avoidance. This article reports a replication of running-based pica in rats (Experiment 1) and concurrent demonstrations of running-based pica and taste avoidance in the same animals (Experiments 2 and 3). Also shown is that pica does not alleviate running-based taste avoidance (Experiment 3). Another finding is that pica is generated by a nausea-inducing lithium chloride injection but not by a pain-inducing hypertonic saline injection (Experiment 4). These results, when taken together, support the hypothesis that pica behavior generated by wheel running reflects nausea in rats.

  7. Variation in nocturnality and circadian activity rhythms between photoresponsive F344 and nonphotoresponsive Sprague Dawley rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johnson Cynthia E

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Variation in circadian rhythms and nocturnality may, hypothetically, be related to or independent of genetic variation in photoperiodic mediation of seasonal changes in physiology and behavior. We hypothesized that strain variation in photoperiodism between photoperiodic F344 rats and nonphotoperiodic Harlan Sprague Dawley (HSD rats might be caused by underlying variation in clock function. We predicted that HSD rats would have more activity during the day or subjective day, longer free-running rhythms, poor entrainment to short day length, and shorter duration of activity, traits that have been associated with nonphotoperiodism in other laboratory rodent species, relative to F344 rats. An alternative hypothesis, that differences are due to variation in melatonin secretion or responses to melatonin, predicts either no such differences or inconsistent combinations of differences. Methods We tested these predictions by examining activity rhythms of young male F344 and HSD rats given access to running wheels in constant dark (DD, short day length (L8:D16; SD, and long day length (L16:D8; LD. We compared nocturnality (the proportion of activity during night or subjective night, duration of activity (alpha, activity onset and offset, phase angle of entrainment, and free running rhythms (tau of F344 and HSD rats. Results HSD rats had significantly greater activity during the day, were sometimes arrhythmic in DD, and had significantly longer tau than F344 rats, consistent with predictions. However, HSD rats had significantly longer alpha than F344 rats and both strains entrained to SD, inconsistent with predictions. Conclusion The ability of HSD rats to entrain to SD, combined with longer alpha than F344 rats, suggests that the circadian system of HSD rats responds correctly to SD. These data offer best support for the alternative hypothesis, that differences in photoresponsiveness between F344 and HSD rats are caused by non

  8. Aripiprazole-induced adverse metabolic alterations in polyl:C neurodevelopmental model of schizophrenia in rats

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Horská, K.; Rudá-Kučerová, J.; Dražanová, Eva; Karpíšek, M.; Demlová, R.; Kašpárek, T.; Kotolová, H.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 123, SEP (2017), s. 148-158 ISSN 0028-3908 Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : adipokine * aripiprazole * leptin * polyl:C * schizophrenia * wistar rats Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 5.012, year: 2016

  9. Group Decision Process Support

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gøtze, John; Hijikata, Masao

    1997-01-01

    Introducing the notion of Group Decision Process Support Systems (GDPSS) to traditional decision-support theorists.......Introducing the notion of Group Decision Process Support Systems (GDPSS) to traditional decision-support theorists....

  10. Promotion of hepatocarcinogenesis by suxibuzone in rats initiated with 3'-methyl-4-dimethylaminoazobenzene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanagi, S; Sakamoto, M; Takahashi, S; Tsutsumi, M; Konishi, Y; Shibata, K; Kamiya, T

    1987-07-01

    Among phenylbutazone (PZ) and its related compounds, suxibuzone (SUX) caused the most extensive decrease in pyruvate kinase (PK) activity with lower toxicity. Therefore, we studied the effect of SUX on rat hepatocarcinogenesis to confirm our assumption that an agent which causes a prolonged decrease in PK activity in rat liver promotes hepatocarcinogenesis. For initiation rats were fed a diet containing 0.06% 3'-methyl-4-dimethylaminoazobenzene (3'-Me-DAB) for 4 weeks. At the end of 53 weeks of the experiment the incidences of liver tumors were 14.3 and 70.0% in the rats fed basal diet and in the rats fed 0.5% SUX diet, respectively, after the initiation. No tumors were observed in rats fed the SUX diet without the initiation. The result shows that SUX promotes hepatocarcinogenesis and supports the above assumption.

  11. OSMOTICALLY LYSED RAT LIVER MITOCONDRIA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasington, Frank D.; Greenawalt, John W.

    1968-01-01

    Osmotically lysed rat liver mitochondria have been utilized for a study of the biochemical and ultrastructural properties in relation to divalent ion accumulation. Osmotic lysis of mitochondria by suspension and washing in cold, distilled water results in the extraction of about 50% of the mitochondrial protein, the loss of the outer mitochondrial membrane, an increase in respiration, and a marked decrease in the ability to catalyze oxidative phosphorylation. Nevertheless, except for a decrease in the ability to accumulate Sr2+ by an ATP-supported process, these lysed mitochondria retain full capacity to accumulate massive amounts of divalent cations by respiration-dependent and ATP-supported mechanisms. The decreased ability of osmotically lysed mitochondria to accumulate Sr2+ by an ATP-energized process does not appear to be due to a loss or inactivation of a specific Sr2+-activated ATPase. The energy-dependent accumulation processes in lysed mitochondria show an increased sensitivity to inhibition by monovalent cations. Extraction of cytochrome c from osmotically lysed mitochondria results in a complete loss of phosphorylation and the respiration-dependent accumulation of Ca2+; a lesser, but significant, decrease in the ATP-supported accumulation of Ca2+ also was observed. The addition of cytochrome c fully restores the respiration-dependent accumulation of Ca2+ to the level present in unextracted, osmotically lysed mitochondria. The ATP-supported process is not affected by the addition of cytochrome c to extracted mitochondria, indicating that cytochrome c is not involved in ion transport energized by ATP. The osmotically lysed mitochondria are devoid of outer membranes and contain relatively little matrix substance. The accumulation of Ca2+ and Pi by lysed mitochondria under massive loading conditions is accompanied by the formation of electron-opaque deposits within the lysed mitochondria associated with the inner membranes. This finding suggests that the

  12. Methylphenidate reduces impulsive behaviour in juvenile Wistar rats, but not in adult Wistar, SHR and WKY rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bizot, Jean-Charles; Chenault, Nicolas; Houzé, Bérengère; Herpin, Alexandre; David, Sabrina; Pothion, Stéphanie; Trovero, Fabrice

    2007-08-01

    Impulsivity is a core symptom of attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). The spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) is a strain commonly used as an animal model of ADHD. However, there is no clear evidence that psychostimulants, which are used for treatment of ADHD, reduce impulsivity in SHR. Because ADHD mainly affects children, it may be relevant to study psychostimulants on juvenile animals. Using tolerance to delay of reward as index of impulsivity, the effects of methylphenidate were assessed in adult SHR, Wistar Kyoto (WKY) and Wistar rats and in juvenile Wistar rats. Animals were trained in a T-maze to choose between a small-but-immediate and a large-but-delayed reward. Adult SHR, WKY and Wistar rats were compared for their ability to tolerate a 15-s delay. The effect of methylphenidate on the tolerance to a 30-s delay was studied in adult rats of the three strains and in juvenile (4.5 to 6.5-week-old) Wistar rats. In adult rats, the waiting ability was lower in SHR than in control strains. Waiting ability was improved by methylphenidate (3 and 5 mg/kg) in juveniles, but not by methylphenidate (3 mg/kg) in adults. These data support the idea that SHR are more impulsive than control strains. However, at the dose studied, methylphenidate fails to improve tolerance to delay in adult rats whatever the strain used. The reduction of impulsivity induced by methylphenidate in juvenile Wistar rats indicates that juvenile animals may be suitable for testing the therapeutic potential of drugs intended to the treatment of ADHD in children.

  13. Glutamatergic signaling and low prodynorphin expression are associated with intact memory and reduced anxiety in rat models of healthy aging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline eMenard

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The LOU/C/Jall (LOU rat strain is considered a model of healthy aging due to its increased longevity, maintenance of stable body weight (BW throughout life and low incidence of age-related diseases. However, aging LOU rat cognitive and anxiety status has yet to be investigated. In the present study, male and female LOU rat cognitive performances (6-42 months were assessed using novel object recognition and Morris Water Maze tasks. Recognition memory remained intact in all LOU rats up to 42 months of age. As for spatial memory, old LOU rat performed similarly as young animals for learning acquisition, reversal learning and retention. While LOU rat BW remained stable despite aging, 20-month-old ad-libitum-fed (OAL male Sprague Dawley rats become obese. We determined if long-term caloric restriction (LTCR prevents age-related BW increase and cognitive deficits in this rat strain, as observed in the obesity-resistant LOU rats. Compared to young animals, recognition memory was impaired in OAL but intact in 20-month-old calorie-restricted (OCR rats. Similarly, OAL spatial learning acquisition was impaired but LTCR prevented the deficits. Exacerbated stress responses may favor age-related cognitive decline. In the elevated plus maze and open field tasks, LOU and OCR rats exhibited high levels of exploratory activity whereas OAL rats displayed anxious behaviors. Expression of prodynorphin (Pdyn, an endogenous peptide involved in stress-related memory impairments, was increased in the hippocampus of OAL rats. Group 1 metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 and immediate early genes Homer 1a and Arc expression, both associated with successful cognitive aging, were unaltered in aging LOU rats but lower in OAL than OCR rats. Altogether, our results, supported by principal component analysis and correlation matrix, suggest that intact memory and low anxiety are associated with glutamatergic signaling and low Pdyn expression in the hippocampus of non obese aging

  14. Glutamatergic signaling and low prodynorphin expression are associated with intact memory and reduced anxiety in rat models of healthy aging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ménard, Caroline; Quirion, Rémi; Bouchard, Sylvain; Ferland, Guylaine; Gaudreau, Pierrette

    2014-01-01

    The LOU/C/Jall (LOU) rat strain is considered a model of healthy aging due to its increased longevity, maintenance of stable body weight (BW) throughout life and low incidence of age-related diseases. However, aging LOU rat cognitive and anxiety status has yet to be investigated. In the present study, male and female LOU rat cognitive performances (6–42 months) were assessed using novel object recognition and Morris Water Maze tasks. Recognition memory remained intact in all LOU rats up to 42 months of age. As for spatial memory, old LOU rat performed similarly as young animals for learning acquisition, reversal learning, and retention. While LOU rat BW remained stable despite aging, 20-month-old ad-libitum-fed (OAL) male Sprague Dawley rats become obese. We determined if long-term caloric restriction (LTCR) prevents age-related BW increase and cognitive deficits in this rat strain, as observed in the obesity-resistant LOU rats. Compared to young animals, recognition memory was impaired in OAL but intact in 20-month-old calorie-restricted (OCR) rats. Similarly, OAL spatial learning acquisition was impaired but LTCR prevented the deficits. Exacerbated stress responses may favor age-related cognitive decline. In the elevated plus maze and open field tasks, LOU and OCR rats exhibited high levels of exploratory activity whereas OAL rats displayed anxious behaviors. Expression of prodynorphin (Pdyn), an endogenous peptide involved in stress-related memory impairments, was increased in the hippocampus of OAL rats. Group 1 metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 and immediate early genes Homer 1a and Arc expression, both associated with successful cognitive aging, were unaltered in aging LOU rats but lower in OAL than OCR rats. Altogether, our results, supported by principal component analysis and correlation matrix, suggest that intact memory and low anxiety are associated with glutamatergic signaling and low Pdyn expression in the hippocampus of non-obese aging rats. PMID

  15. Carriage of Clostridium difficile by wild urban Norway rats (Rattus norvegicus) and black rats (Rattus rattus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Himsworth, Chelsea G; Patrick, David M; Mak, Sunny; Jardine, Claire M; Tang, Patrick; Weese, J Scott

    2014-02-01

    Clostridium difficile is an important cause of enteric infections in humans. Recently, concerns have been raised regarding whether animals could be a source of C. difficile spores. Although colonization has been identified in a number of domestic species, the ability of commensal pests to serve as a reservoir for C. difficile has not been well investigated. The objective of this study was to determine whether urban rats (Rattus spp.) from Vancouver, Canada, carry C. difficile. Clostridium difficile was isolated from the colon contents of trapped rats and was characterized using ribotyping, toxinotyping, and toxin gene identification. Generalized linear mixed models and spatial analysis were used to characterize the ecology of C. difficile in rats. Clostridium difficile was isolated from 95 of 724 (13.1%) rats, although prevalence differed from 0% to 46.7% among city blocks. The odds of being C. difficile positive decreased with increasing weight (odds ratio [OR], 0.67; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.53 to 0.87), suggesting that carriage is more common in younger animals. The strains isolated included 9 ribotypes that matched recognized international designations, 5 identified by our laboratory in previous studies, and 21 "novel" ribotypes. Some strains were clustered geographically; however, the majority were dispersed throughout the study area, supporting environmental sources of exposure and widespread environmental contamination with a variety of C. difficile strains. Given that urban rats are the source of a number of other pathogens responsible for human morbidity and mortality, the potential for rats to be a source of C. difficile for humans deserves further consideration.

  16. Proliferation of reticuloendothelial system (RES) in rats with altered vision or smell (to the hypothetic neural regulation of the RES).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansa, P; Urbánek, K; Riegrová, D

    1993-12-01

    A long-term administration of an azo-dye, trypan blue, induced a reactive proliferation of RES in rats. Reaction of the RES was followed in rats whose optical analyzer was eliminated by enucleation of bulbs after the birth, in rats whose smell analyzer was altered by a repeated long-term exposition to ammoniac and in normal rats. Blind rats showed a striking proliferation of histiocytes of the RES in the liver, while the reaction was weak in the spleen and lymph nodes. In contrary to that, rats with altered smell and also the normal rats exhibited standard reactive changes in the spleen and lymph nodes and distinctly weaker reaction in the liver. The obtained results support an idea that vegetative neural mechanisms play a role in control and coordination of RES reactions.

  17. Altered explorative strategies and reactive coping style in the FSL rat model of depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salvatore eMagara

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Modeling depression in animals is based on the observation of behaviors interpreted as analogue to human symptoms. Typical tests used in experimental depression research are designed to evoke an either-or outcome. It is known that explorative and coping strategies are relevant for depression, however these aspects are generally not considered in animal behavioral testing. Here we investigate the Flinders Sensitive Line (FSL, a rat model of depression, compared to the Sprague-Dawley (SD rat in three independent tests where the animals are allowed to express a more extensive behavioral repertoire. The multivariate concentric square field™ (MCSF and the novel cage tests evoke exploratory behaviors in a novel environment and the home cage change test evokes social behaviors in the re-establishment of a social hierarchy. In the MCSF test, FSL rats exhibited less exploratory drive and more risk-assessment behavior compared to SD rats. When re-exposed to the arena, FSL, but not SD rats, increased their exploratory behavior compared to the first trial and displayed risk-assessment behavior to the same extent as SD rats. Thus, the behavior of FSL rats was more similar to that of SDs when the rats were familiar with the arena. In the novel cage test FSL rats exhibited a reactive coping style, consistent with the reduced exploration observed in the MCSF. Reactive coping is associated with less aggressive behavior. Accordingly, FSL rats displayed less aggressive behavior in the home cage change test. Taken together, our data show that FSL rats express altered explorative behavior and reactive coping style. Reduced interest is a core symptom of depression, and individuals with a reactive coping style are more vulnerable to the disease. Our results support the use of FSL rats as an animal model of depression and increase our understanding of the FSL rat beyond the behavioral dimensions targeted by the traditional depression-related tests.

  18. Characterization of three newly established rat sarcoma cell clones

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Holubová, Monika; Leba, M.; Sedmíková, M.; Vannucci, Luca; Horák, Vratislav

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 48, č. 10 (2012), s. 610-618 ISSN 1071-2690 R&D Projects: GA MŠk 2B08063 Institutional support: RVO:67985904 Keywords : sarcoma * cell clones * lewis rat Subject RIV: FD - Oncology ; Hematology Impact factor: 1.289, year: 2012

  19. Comparative histology of mouse, rat, and human pelvic ligaments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwanaga, Ritsuko; Orlicky, David J; Arnett, Jameson; Guess, Marsha K; Hurt, K Joseph; Connell, Kathleen A

    2016-11-01

    The uterosacral (USL) and cardinal ligaments (CL) provide support to the uterus and pelvic organs, and the round ligaments (RL) maintain their position in the pelvis. In women with pelvic organ prolapse (POP), the connective tissue, smooth muscle, vasculature, and innervation of the pelvic support structures are altered. Rodents are commonly used animal models for POP research. However, the pelvic ligaments have not been defined in these animals. In this study, we hypothesized that the gross anatomy and histological composition of pelvic ligaments in rodents and humans are similar. We performed an extensive literature search for anatomical and histological descriptions of the pelvic support ligaments in rodents. We also performed anatomical dissections of the pelvis to define anatomical landmarks in relation to the ligaments. In addition, we identified the histological components of the pelvic ligaments and performed quantitative analysis of the smooth muscle bundles and connective tissue of the USL and RL. The anatomy of the USL, CL, and RL and their anatomical landmarks are similar in mice, rats, and humans. All species contain the same cellular components and have similar histological architecture. However, the cervical portion of the mouse USL and RL contain more smooth muscle and less connective tissue compared with rat and human ligaments. The pelvic support structures of rats and mice are anatomically and histologically similar to those of humans. We propose that both mice and rats are appropriate, cost-effective models for directed studies in POP research.

  20. Importance Rat Liver Morphology and Vasculature in Surgical Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vdoviaková, Katarína; Vdoviaková, Katarína; Petrovová, Eva; Krešáková, Lenka; Maloveská, Marcela; Teleky, Jana; Jenčová, Janka; Živčák, Jozef; Jenča, Andrej

    2016-12-02

    BACKGROUND The laboratory rat is one of the most popular experimental models for the experimental surgery of the liver. The objective of this study was to investigate the morphometric parameters, physiological data, differences in configuration of liver lobes, biliary system, and vasculature (arteries, veins, and lymphatic vessels) of the liver in laboratory rats. In addition, this study supports the anatomic literature and identified similarities and differences with human and other mammals. MATERIAL AND METHODS Forty laboratory rats were dissected to prepare corrosion casts of vascular system specimens (n=20), determine the lymph vessels and lymph nodes (n=10), and for macroscopic anatomical dissection (n=10) of the rat liver. The results are listed in percentages. The anatomical nomenclature of the liver morphology, its arteries, veins, lymph nodes, and lymphatic vessels are in accordance with Nomina Anatomica Veterinaria. RESULTS We found many variations in origin, direction, and division of the arterial, venous, and lymphatic systems in rat livers, and found differences in morphometric parameters compared to results reported by other authors. The portal vein was formed by 4 tributaries in 23%, by 3 branches in 64%, and by 2 tributaries in 13%. The liver lymph was drained to the 2 different lymph nodes. The nomenclature and morphological characteristics of the rat liver vary among authors. CONCLUSIONS Our results may be useful for the planing of experimental surgery and for cooperation with other investigation methods to help fight liver diseases in human populations.

  1. in albino rats

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    hope&shola

    2010-09-23

    Sep 23, 2010 ... cell carcinoma, malignant fibrous histiocytoma, atrophy, fibro- sarcoma, chronic inflammation, squamous cell carcinoma in situ and osteoma at the end of the experiment. The lesions were then diagnosed according to the histopathological changes by using ether to anesthetize the rats. All the animals were ...

  2. CAMALDULENSIS IN RATS

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR. AMIN

    ABSTRACT. Sub – acute toxicity study of the aqueous leaf extract of Eucalyptus camaldulensis was carried out on albino rats. Doses of 250mg, 500mg, 750mg and 1000mg per kilogram body weight of the extract were administered orally for 21 days. The activities of Alanine Aminotransferase (ALT),. Aspartate ...

  3. The academic rat race

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Landes, Xavier; Andersen, Martin Marchman; Nielsen, Morten Ebbe Juul

    2012-01-01

    : an increased pressure to produce articles (in peer-reviewed journals) has created an unbalanced emphasis on the research criterion at the expense of the latter two. More fatally, this pressure has turned academia into a rat race, leading to a deep change in the fundamental structure of academic behaviour...

  4. Running the rat race

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SASA Refresher Course Texts: Running the rat race. 74. 2014;20(1) ... and feelings of existential despair which characterise the human condition, to emerge as they are today: whole, satisfied, well .... Pure efficiency only exists on paper. In the ...

  5. Rat on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    This image taken on Mars by the panoramic camera on the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity shows the rover's rock abrasion tool, also known as 'rat' (circular device in center), located on its instrument deployment device, or 'arm.' The image was acquired on the ninth martian day or sol of the rover's mission.

  6. Support Spinor Machine

    OpenAIRE

    Kanjamapornkul, Kabin; Pinčák, Richard; Chunithpaisan, Sanphet; Bartoš, Erik

    2017-01-01

    We generalize a support vector machine to a support spinor machine by using the mathematical structure of wedge product over vector machine in order to extend field from vector field to spinor field. The separated hyperplane is extended to Kolmogorov space in time series data which allow us to extend a structure of support vector machine to a support tensor machine and a support tensor machine moduli space. Our performance test on support spinor machine is done over one class classification o...

  7. Behavior modulation of rats to a robotic rat in multi-rat interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Qing; Ishii, Hiroyuki; Tanaka, Katsuaki; Sugahara, Yusuke; Takanishi, Atsuo; Okabayashi, Satoshi; Huang, Qiang; Fukuda, Toshio

    2015-09-28

    In this paper, we study the behavioral response of rats to a robotic rat during multi-rat interaction. Experiments are conducted in an open-field where a robotic rat called WR-5 is put together with three laboratory rats. WR-5 is following one rat (target), while avoiding the other two rats (outside observers) during interaction. The behavioral characteristics of each target rat is evaluated by scoring its locomotor activity and frequencies of performing rearing, body grooming and mounting actions. Additionally, the frequency of being mounted by other rats is also measured. Experimental results show that the target becomes more active after interaction. The rat species, with more active behavioral characteristics, is more susceptible to being adjusted by the robot. The increased time spent by the outside observers in the vicinity of the robot indicates that a biomimetic robot has the promise for modulating rat behavior even without direct interaction. Thus, this study provide a novel approach to shaping the sociality of animals living in groups.

  8. Moringa oleifera-rich diet and T cell calcium signaling in spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attakpa, E S; Bertin, G A; Chabi, N W; Ategbo, J-M; Seri, B; Khan, N A

    2017-11-24

    Moringa oleifera is a plant whose fruits, roots and leaves have been advocated for traditional medicinal uses. The physicochemical analysis shows that Moringa oleifera contains more dietary polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) than saturated fatty acids (SFA). The consumption of an experimental diet enriched with Moringa oleifera extracts lowered blood pressure in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR), but not in normotensive Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rats as compared to rats fed an unsupplemented control diet. Anti-CD3-stimulated T cell proliferation was diminished in both strains of rats fed the Moringa oleifera. The experimental diet lowered secretion of interleukin-2 in SHR, but not in WKY rats compared with rats fed the control diet. Studies of platelets from patients with primary hypertension and from SHR support the notion that the concentration of intracellular free calcium [Ca(2+)](i) is modified in both clinical and experimental hypertension. We observed that the basal, [Ca(2+)](i) was lower in T cells of SHR than in those of WKY rats fed the control diet. Feeding the diet with Moringa oleifera extracts to WKY rats did not alter basal [Ca(2+)](i) in T cells but increased basal [Ca(2+)](i) in SHR. Our study clearly demonstrated that Moringa oleifera exerts antihypertensive effects by inhibiting the secretion of IL-2 and modulates T cell calcium signaling in hypertensive rats.

  9. Running and addiction: precipitated withdrawal in a rat model of activity-based anorexia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanarek, Robin B; D'Anci, Kristen E; Jurdak, Nicole; Mathes, Wendy Foulds

    2009-08-01

    Exercise improves cardiovascular health, strengthens muscles and bones, stimulates neuroplasticity, and promotes feelings of well-being. However, when taken to extremes, exercise can develop into an addictive-like behavior. To assess the addictive potential of exercise, withdrawal symptoms following injections of 1.0 mg/kg naloxone were compared in active and inactive male and female rats. Active and inactive rats were given food for 1 hr or 24 hr/day. Additionally, a group of inactive rats was pair-fed the amount of food consumed on the previous day by food-restricted active rats. Rats fed for 1 hr/day decreased food intake and lost weight. Additionally, food-restricted active rats increased wheel running. There was a direct relationship between the intensity of running and the severity of withdrawal symptoms. Active food-restricted rats displayed the most withdrawal symptoms, followed by active rats given 24-hr access to food. Only minimal withdrawal symptoms were observed in inactive rats. These findings support the hypothesis that exercise-induced increases in endogenous opioid peptides act in a manner similar to chronic administration of opiate drugs. 2009 APA, all rights reserved

  10. Deformation-based brain morphometry in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaser, Christian; Schmidt, Silvio; Metzler, Martin; Herrmann, Karl-Heinz; Krumbein, Ines; Reichenbach, Jürgen R; Witte, Otto W

    2012-10-15

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-based morphometry provides in vivo evidence for macro-structural plasticity of the brain. Experiments on small animals using automated morphometric methods usually require expensive measurements with ultra-high field dedicated animal MRI systems. Here, we developed a novel deformation-based morphometry (DBM) tool for automated analyses of rat brain images measured on a 3-Tesla clinical whole body scanner with appropriate coils. A landmark-based transformation of our customized reference brain into the coordinates of the widely used rat brain atlas from Paxinos and Watson (Paxinos Atlas) guarantees the comparability of results to other studies. For cross-sectional data, we warped images onto the reference brain using the low-dimensional nonlinear registration implemented in the MATLAB software package SPM8. For the analysis of longitudinal data sets, we chose high-dimensional registrations of all images of one data set to the first baseline image which facilitate the identification of more subtle structural changes. Because all deformations were finally used to transform the data into the space of the Paxinos Atlas, Jacobian determinants could be used to estimate absolute local volumes of predefined regions-of-interest. Pilot experiments were performed to analyze brain structural changes due to aging or photothrombotically-induced cortical stroke. The results support the utility of DBM based on commonly available clinical whole-body scanners for highly sensitive morphometric studies on rats. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Aliskiren toxicity in juvenile rats is determined by ontogenic regulation of intestinal P-glycoprotein expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffmann, Peter, E-mail: peterk.hoffmann@novartis.com [Preclinical Safety, Novartis Institutes for BioMedical Research, East Hanover, NJ (United States); Beckman, David; McLean, Lee Anne [Preclinical Safety, Novartis Institutes for BioMedical Research, East Hanover, NJ (United States); Yan, Jing-He [Drug Metabolism and Pharmacokinetics, Novartis Institutes for BioMedical Research, East Hanover, NJ (United States)

    2014-02-15

    Juvenile rat toxicity studies with the direct renin inhibitor aliskiren were initiated to support treatment in the pediatric population. In Study 1, aliskiren was administered orally to juvenile rats at doses of 0, 30, 100 or 300 mg/kg/day with repeated dosing from postpartum day (PPD) 8 to PPD 35/36. In-life, clinical pathology, anatomic pathology, and toxicokinetics evaluations were performed. In Study 2, single oral doses of aliskiren (0, 100 or 300 mg/kg) were given to 14-, 21-, 24-, 28-, 31- or 36-day-old rats; in-life data and toxicokinetics were evaluated. Study 3 was a single dose (3 mg/kg i.v.) pharmacokinetic study in juvenile rats on PPD 8, 14, 21 and 28. In Study 4, naïve rats were used to investigate ontogenic changes of the multidrug-resistant protein 1 (MDR1) and the organic anion transporting polypeptide (OATP) mRNA in several organs. Oral administration of aliskiren at 100 and 300 mg/kg caused unexpected mortality and severe morbidity in 8-day-old rats. Aliskiren plasma and tissue concentrations were increased in rats aged 21 days and younger. Expression of MDR1 and OATP mRNA in the intestine, liver and brain was significantly lower in very young rats. In conclusion, severe toxicity and increased exposure in very young rats after oral administration of aliskiren are considered to be the result of immature drug transporter systems. Immaturity of MDR1 in enterocytes appears to be the most important mechanism responsible for the high exposure. - Highlights: • Aliskiren was orally administered to juvenile rats. • Unexpected severe toxicity and acute mortality occurred in rats aged 8 days. • Toxicity was associated with increased aliskiren plasma and tissue exposure. • Developmental changes of exposure correlated with ontogeny of transporters. • Immaturity of MDR1 in enterocytes causes increased exposure in very young rats.

  12. Calixarene-supported clusters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taylor, Stephanie M.; McIntosh, Ruaraidh D.; Piligkos, Stergios

    2012-01-01

    A combination of complementary cluster ligands results in the formation of a new calixarene-supported ferromagnetic [Mn(5)] cage that displays the characteristic bonding modes of each support.......A combination of complementary cluster ligands results in the formation of a new calixarene-supported ferromagnetic [Mn(5)] cage that displays the characteristic bonding modes of each support....

  13. Identification and genomic characterization of a novel rat bocavirus from brown rats in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Susanna K P; Yeung, Hazel C; Li, Kenneth S M; Lam, Carol S F; Cai, Jian-Piao; Yuen, Ming-Chi; Wang, Ming; Zheng, Bo-Jian; Woo, Patrick C Y; Yuen, Kwok-Yung

    2017-01-01

    Despite recent discoveries of novel animal bocaparvoviruses, current understandings on the diversity and evolution of bocaparvoviruses are still limited. We report the identification and genome characterization of a novel bocaparvovirus, rat bocaparvovirus (RBoV), in brown rats (Rattus norvegicus) in China. RBoV was detected in 11.5%, 2.4%, 16.2% and 0.3% of alimentary, respiratory, spleen and kidney samples respectively, of 636 brown rats by PCR, but not in samples of other rodent species, suggesting that brown rats are the primary reservoir of RBoV. Six RBoV genomes sequenced from three brown rats revealed the presence of three ORFs, characteristic of bocaparvoviruses. Phylogenetic analysis showed that RBoV was distantly related to other bocaparvoviruses, forming a distinct cluster within the genus, with ≤55.5% nucleotide identities to the genome of ungulate bocaparvovirus 3, supporting its classification as a novel bocaparvovirus species. RBoV possessed a putative second exon encoding the C-terminal region of NS1 and conserved RNA splicing signals, similar to human bocaparvoviruses and canine bocaparvovirus. In contrast to human, feline and canine bocaparvoviruses which demonstrates inter/intra-host viral diversity, partial VP1/VP2 sequences of 49 RBoV strains demonstrated little inter-host genetic diversity, suggesting a single genetic group. Although the pathogenicity of RBoV remains to be determined, its presence in different host tissues suggests wide tissue tropism. RBoV represents the first bocaparvovirus in rodents with genome sequenced, which extends our knowledge on the host range of bocaparvoviruses. Further studies are required to better understand the epidemiology, genetic diversity and pathogenicity of bocaparvoviruses in different rodent populations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Laughing rats are optimistic.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafal Rygula

    Full Text Available Emotions can bias human decisions- for example depressed or anxious people tend to make pessimistic judgements while those in positive affective states are often more optimistic. Several studies have reported that affect contingent judgement biases can also be produced in animals. The animals, however, cannot self-report; therefore, the valence of their emotions, to date, could only be assumed. Here we present the results of an experiment where the affect-contingent judgement bias has been produced by objectively measured positive emotions. We trained rats in operant Skinner boxes to press one lever in response to one tone to receive a food reward and to press another lever in response to a different tone to avoid punishment by electric foot shock. After attaining a stable level of discrimination performance, the animals were subjected to either handling or playful, experimenter-administered manual stimulation - tickling. This procedure has been confirmed to induce a positive affective state in rats, and the 50-kHz ultrasonic vocalisations (rat laughter emitted by animals in response to tickling have been postulated to index positive emotions akin to human joy. During the tickling and handling sessions, the numbers of emitted high-frequency 50-kHz calls were scored. Immediately after tickling or handling, the animals were tested for their responses to a tone of intermediate frequency, and the pattern of their responses to this ambiguous cue was taken as an indicator of the animals' optimism. Our findings indicate that tickling induced positive emotions which are directly indexed in rats by laughter, can make animals more optimistic. We demonstrate for the first time a link between the directly measured positive affective state and decision making under uncertainty in an animal model. We also introduce innovative tandem-approach for studying emotional-cognitive interplay in animals, which may be of great value for understanding the emotional

  15. Electroejaculation of chimeric rats

    OpenAIRE

    McCoy, Marina R.; Montonye, Daniel; Bryda, Elizabeth C.

    2013-01-01

    With the advent of genetic engineering of rodents came the need to assess fertility and germline competency, especially in chimeric rodents generated using embryonic stem cells. Traditional methods rely on natural mating and progeny testing, which is time- and cost-intensive. Electroejaculation is a faster method of collecting sperm for genetic analysis and offers the additional benefit of using fewer animals. This column describes a refined electroejaculation technique for chimeric rats usin...

  16. Teaching Adult Rats Spinalized as Neonates to Walk Using Trunk Robotic Rehabilitation: Elements of Success, Failure, and Dependence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udoekwere, Ubong I; Oza, Chintan S; Giszter, Simon F

    2016-08-10

    Robot therapy promotes functional recovery after spinal cord injury (SCI) in animal and clinical studies. Trunk actions are important in adult rats spinalized as neonates (NTX rats) that walk autonomously. Quadrupedal robot rehabilitation was tested using an implanted orthosis at the pelvis. Trunk cortical reorganization follows such rehabilitation. Here, we test the functional outcomes of such training. Robot impedance control at the pelvis allowed hindlimb, trunk, and forelimb mechanical interactions. Rats gradually increased weight support. Rats showed significant improvement in hindlimb stepping ability, quadrupedal weight support, and all measures examined. Function in NTX rats both before and after training showed bimodal distributions, with "poor" and "high weight support" groupings. A total of 35% of rats initially classified as "poor" were able to increase their weight-supported step measures to a level considered "high weight support" after robot training, thus moving between weight support groups. Recovered function in these rats persisted on treadmill with the robot both actuated and nonactuated, but returned to pretraining levels if they were completely disconnected from the robot. Locomotor recovery in robot rehabilitation of NTX rats thus likely included context dependence and/or incorporation of models of robot mechanics that became essential parts of their learned strategy. Such learned dependence is likely a hurdle to autonomy to be overcome for many robot locomotor therapies. Notwithstanding these limitations, trunk-based quadrupedal robot rehabilitation helped the rats to visit mechanical states they would never have achieved alone, to learn novel coordinations, and to achieve major improvements in locomotor function. Neonatal spinal transected rats without any weight support can be taught weight support as adults by using robot rehabilitation at trunk. No adult control rats with neonatal spinal transections spontaneously achieve similar changes

  17. Gravitational Biology: The Rat Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    In this session, Session JP3, the discussion focuses on the following topics: Morphology of brain, pituitary and thyroid in the rats exposed to altered gravity; Biochemical Properties of B Adrenoceptors After Spaceflight (LMS-STS78) or Hindlimb Suspension in Rats; Influence of Hypergravity on the Development of Monoaminergic Systems in the Rat Spinal Cord; A Vestibular Evoked Potentials (VsEPs) Study of the Function of the Otolith Organs in Different Head Orientations with respect to Earth Gravity Vector in the Rat; Quantitative Observations on the Structure of Selected Proprioceptive Components in Adult Rats that Underwent About Half of their Fetal Development in Space; Effects of a Nine-Day Shuttle Mission on the Development of the Neonatal Rat Nervous System, A Behavioral Study; Muscle Atrophy Associated to Microgravity in Rat, Basic Data For Countermeasures; Simulated Weightlessness by Unloading in the Rat, Results of a Time Course Study of Biochemical Events Occurring During Unloading and Lack of Effect of a rhBNP-2 Treatment on Bone Formation and Bone Mineral Content in Unloading Rats; and Cytological Mechanism of the Osteogenesis Under Microgravity Conditions.

  18. Effect of marginal or severe dietary zinc deficiency on testicular development and functions of the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamdi, S A; Nassif, O I; Ardawi, M S

    1997-01-01

    The effects of marginal (MZD) and severe (SZD) zinc-deficient diets on testicular function and development were studied in rats maintained on dietary treatment for 6 weeks after weaning. SZD produced variable degrees of histological changes as compared with pair-fed controls, including a significant decrease in the diameter of seminiferous tubules (p SZD rats showed marked decreases in serum levels of testosterone (17.8-fold, p SZD rats, with the latter showing the greatest decrease. SZD rats were asospermic, whereas MZD rats exhibited marked decrease in sperm counts (by 22.9%, p < .05) as compared with respective controls. The results reflect a direct action of zinc deficiency on testicular steroidogenesis and strongly support the idea that hypogonadism of zinc deficiency results mainly from changes in testicular steroidogenesis or indirectly from Leydig cell failure.

  19. Alterations in erythrocyte survival parameters in rats after 19.5 days aboard Cosmos 782

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leon, H. A.; Serova, L. V.; Cummins, J.; Landaw, S. A.

    1978-01-01

    Rats were subjected to 19.5 days of weightless space flight aboard the Soviet biosatellite, Cosmos 782. Based on the output of CO-14, survival parameters of a cohort of erythrocytes labeled 15.5 days preflight were evaluated upon return from orbit. These were compared to vivarium control rats injected at the same time. Statistical evaluation indicates that all survival factors were altered by the space flight. The mean potential lifespan, which was 63.0 days in the control rats, was decreased to 59.0 days in the flight rats, and random hemolysis was increased three-fold in the flight rats. The measured size of the cohort was decreased, lending further support to the idea that hemolysis was accelerated during some portion of the flight. A number of factors that might be contributory to these changes are discussed, including forces associated with launch and reentry, atmospheric and environmental parameters, dietary factors, radiation, and weightlessness.

  20. NASA Desert RATS 2011 Education Pilot Project and Classroom Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruener, J. E.; McGlone, M.; Allen, J.; Tobola, K.; Graff, P.

    2012-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA's) Desert Research and Technology Studies (Desert RATS) is a multi-year series of tests of hardware and operations carried out annually in the high desert of Arizona, as an analog to future exploration activities beyond low Earth orbit [1]. For the past several years, these tests have occurred in the San Francisco Volcanic Field, north of Flagstaff. For the 2011 Desert RATS season, the Exploration Systems Mission Directorate (ESMD) at NASA headquarters provided support to develop an education pilot project that would include student activities to parallel the Desert RATS mission planning and exploration activities in the classroom, and educator training sessions. The development of the pilot project was a joint effort between the NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC) Astromaterials Research and Exploration Science (ARES) Directorate and the Aerospace Education Services Project (AESP), managed at Penn State University.

  1. Blockade of RAGE in Zucker obese rats with experimental periodontitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grauballe, M B; Østergaard, J A; Schou, S

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: Periodontitis and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D) are two interrelated chronic diseases. Periodontitis is more prevalent in patients with T2D than in healthy subjects, and studies indicate that periodontitis impacts the metabolic control of patients with T2D. Hyperglycemia...... on the interrelationship between periodontitis and T2D in a rat model of both diseases. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Zucker obese rats (HsdHlr:ZUCKER-Lepr (fa/fa) ) and their lean littermates were divided into five treatment groups, with and without periodontitis. Monoclonal anti-RAGE IgG3 were injected into the rats three times...... evaluated in plasma. Kidney complications were evaluated by quantitative real-time PCR, the creatinine clearance rate, the albumin excretion rate and kidney hypertrophy. Periodontitis was evaluated by morphometric registration of alveolar bone loss and radiographic recording of bone support. RESULTS...

  2. Spontaneously hypertensive rats have more orexin neurons in their medial hypothalamus than normotensive rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clifford, Liam; Dampney, Bruno W; Carrive, Pascal

    2015-04-01

    What is the central question of this study? Blockade of orexin receptors reduces blood pressure in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs) but not in normotensive Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rats, suggesting that upregulation of orexin signalling underlies the hypertensive phenotype of the SHR. However, it is not known what causes this upregulation. What is the main finding and its importance? Using orexin immunolabelling, we show that SHRs have 20% more orexin neurons than normotensive WKY and Wistar rats in the medial hypothalamus, which is a good match to their blood pressure phenotype. In contrast, there is no such match for the orexin neurons of the lateral hypothalamus. Essential hypertension may be linked to an increase in orexin neurons in the medial hypothalamus. The neuropeptide orexin contributes to the regulation of blood pressure as part of its role in the control of arousal during wakefulness and motivated behaviour (including responses to psychological stress). Recent work shows that pharmacological blockade of orexin receptors reduces blood pressure in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs) but not in normotensive Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rats. It is not clear why orexin signalling is upregulated in the SHR, but one possibility is that these animals have more orexin neurons than their normotensive WKY and Wistar relatives. To test this possibility, SHRs, WKY and Wistar male rats (6-16 weeks old) were killed, perfused and their brains sectioned and immunolabelled for orexin A. Labelled neurons were plotted and counted in the six best labelled hemisections (120 μm apart) of each brain. There were significantly more orexin neurons (+20%) in the medial hypothalamus (medial to fornix) of SHRs compared with WKY and Wistar rats (126 ± 4 versus 106 ± 5 and 104 ± 5 per hemisection, respectively, P hypothalamus did not match the blood pressure phenotypes (69 ± 2 versus 50 ± 3 and 76 ± 4, respectively). The results support the idea that orexin signalling is upregulated

  3. Generation of Hprt-disrupted rat through mouse←rat ES chimeras

    OpenAIRE

    Ayako Isotani; Kazuo Yamagata; Masaru Okabe; Masahito Ikawa

    2016-01-01

    We established rat embryonic stem (ES) cell lines from a double transgenic rat line which harbours CAG-GFP for ubiquitous expression of GFP in somatic cells and Acr3-EGFP for expression in sperm (green body and green sperm: GBGS rat). By injecting the GBGS rat ES cells into mouse blastocysts and transplanting them into pseudopregnant mice, rat spermatozoa were produced in mouse?rat ES chimeras. Rat spermatozoa from the chimeric testis were able to fertilize eggs by testicular sperm extraction...

  4. Reiki improves heart rate homeostasis in laboratory rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, Ann Linda; Wagers, Christina; Schwartz, Gary E

    2008-05-01

    To determine whether application of Reiki to noise-stressed rats can reduce their heart rates (HRs) and blood pressures. In a previous study, we showed that exposure of rats to 90 dB white noise for 15 minutes caused their HRs and blood pressures to significantly increase. Reiki has been shown to significantly decrease HR and blood pressure in a small group of healthy human subjects. However, use of humans in such studies has the disadvantage that experimental interpretations are encumbered by the variable of belief or skepticism regarding Reiki. For that reason, noise-stressed rats were used as an animal model to test the efficacy of Reiki in reducing elevated HR and blood pressure. Three unrestrained, male Sprague-Dawley rats implanted with radiotelemetric transducers were exposed daily for 8 days to a 15-minute white noise regimen (90 dB). For the last 5 days, the rats received 15 minutes of Reiki immediately before the noise and during the noise period. The experiment was repeated on the same animals but using sham Reiki. The animals were housed in a quiet room in University of Arizona Animal Facility. Mean HRs and blood pressure were determined before Reiki/sham Reiki, during Reiki/sham Reiki, and during the noise in each case. Reiki, but not sham Reiki, significantly reduced HR compared to initial values. With Reiki, there was a high correlation between change in HR and initial HR, suggesting a homeostatic effect. Reiki, but not sham Reiki, significantly reduced the rise in HR produced by exposure of the rats to loud noise. Neither Reiki nor sham Reiki significantly affected blood pressure. Reiki is effective in modulating HR in stressed and unstressed rats, supporting its use as a stress-reducer in humans.

  5. Pathogenesis of rhinitis in rats with experimentally induced hypothyroidism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eyigor, Hulya; Basak, Sema; Kozaci, Didem; Culhaci, Nil; Dost, Turhan; Ulutas, Pinar

    2012-01-01

    Hypothyroidism is accepted as one of the hormonal factors leading to non-allergic rhinitis. Nasal obstruction and runny nose due to an increase in submucosal connective tissue and mucous gland hypertrophy are the prominent symptoms in hypothyroidism-induced rhinitis at humans. The aim of this study was to analyze the biochemical and histopathological changes in the nasal mucosa of the rats with thyroidectomy-induced hypothyroidism and to compare them with those of a control group. A total of 60 adult male Wistar Albino rats were included in the study. The rats constituting the test and the control groups were randomly divided into 3 subgroups (T1-3 and C 1-3). While the rats in the test group underwent thyroidectomy, in the control group the incision was sutured without any interventions after exposure of thyroid tissues of the rats. The nasal and paranasal sinus regions of all the rats were carefully dissected and tissue samples were obtained for pathological examinations. In the rats in T1, T2, and T3, the decrease in serum glucuronic acid levels before and after thyroidectomy was statistically significant (p = 0.001, p = 0.003, and p = 0.002, respectively). The difference between the test and the control groups was statistically significant in terms of inflammation at the end of 12 weeks (p = 0.002). An increase in acid mucopolysaccharidase production due to TSH has been suggested to cause congestion in tissues. Although our study supports the data in the literature up to date, we consider that further clinical and experimental studies are necessary for this verification.

  6. The influence of diet consistence, drinking water and bedding on periodontal disease in Sprague-Dawley rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Björnsson, Magnús Jón; Velschow, Sten; Stoltze, Kaj; Havemose-Poulsen, Anne; Schou, Søren; Holmstrup, Palle

    2003-12-01

    Although rats have been extensively used in periodontal research, pre-experimental periodontal inspection has not been given high priority in previous studies of experimental periodontal disease in rats. An inspection of 50 Sprague-Dawley rats, which were to be used in a model of experimental periodontal disease, revealed signs of periodontal disease in a considerable proportion of the animals. The objectives of the present study were to describe disease progression, identify factors responsible for induction of periodontal disease and test a method for breeding of healthy rats. A longitudinal study revealed that 33% of rats, bred under the same conditions, showed signs of periodontal disease during, or shortly after, eruption of the molars. Regular diet caused significantly more horizontal bone loss (P = 0.0001) and significantly less periodontal bone support (P diet with a smaller grain size. Wood chip bedding in the rats' cages significantly reduced periodontal bone support (P diet and bedding decreased it even further (P = 0.0023). Finally, by using finely milled diet, a wire mesh floor and tap water, instead of conventional breeding methods of regular diet, bedding and acidic water, it was possible to breed rats with minimal signs of periodontal disease. The results of the present study emphasize the need for pre- experimental examination of rats. They also show that diet and bedding conditions have the potential of seriously influencing outcomes of studies of periodontal disease in rats.

  7. EVALUATIN OF ANTIHYPERTENSIVE ACTIVITY OF SONCHUS ASPER L. IN RATS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mushtaq, Muhammad Naveed; Akhtar, Muhammad Shoaib; Alamgeer; Ahmad, Taseer; Khan, Hafeez Ullah; Maheen, Safirah; Ahsan, Haseeb; Naz, Huma; Asif, Hira; Younis, Waqas; Tabassum, Nazia

    2016-01-01

    The present investigation was carried out to evaluate the effect of aerial parts of Sonchus asper L. in normotensive, glucose and egg feed diet induced hypertensive rats. Aqueous-methanolic extract of Sonchus asper in 250, 500 and 1000 mg/kg doses was studied in normotensive and glucose induced hypertensive rats using the non-invasive technique. The results obtained showed that the extract has significantly (p < 0.5 - p < 0.001) decreased the blood pressure and heart rate in dose dependent manner. The dose 1000 mg/kg of the extract produced the maximum antihypertensive effect and was selected for further experiments. The extract was found to prevent the rise in blood pressure of egg and glucose fed rats as compared to control group in 21 days study. The LD50 of the plant extract was 3500 mg/kg b.w. in mice and sub-chronic toxicity study showed that there was no significant alteration in the blood chemistry of the extract treated rats. It is conceivable, therefore, that the aqueous-methanolic extract of Sonchus asper has exerted considerable antihypertensive activity in rats and has duly supported traditional medicinal use of plant in hypertension.

  8. Direct behavioral evidence for retronasal olfaction in rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shree Hari Gautam

    Full Text Available The neuroscience of flavor perception is becoming increasingly important to understand abnormal feeding behaviors and associated chronic diseases such as obesity. Yet, flavor research has mainly depended on human subjects due to the lack of an animal model. A crucial step towards establishing an animal model of flavor research is to determine whether the animal uses the retronasal mode of olfaction, an essential element of flavor perception. We designed a go- no go behavioral task to test the rat's ability to detect and discriminate retronasal odorants. In this paradigm, tasteless aqueous solutions of odorants were licked by water-restricted head-fixed rats from a lick spout. Orthonasal contamination was avoided by employing a combination of a vacuum around the lick-spout and blowing clean air toward the nose. Flow models support the effectiveness of both approaches. The licked odorants were successfully discriminated by rats. Moreover, the tasteless odorant amyl acetate was reliably discriminated against pure distilled water in a concentration-dependent manner. The results from this retronasal odor discrimination task suggest that rats are capable of smelling retronasally. This direct behavioral evidence establishes the rat as a useful animal model for flavor research.

  9. Endogenous L-Carnosine Level in Diabetes Rat Cardiac Muscle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yali Liu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel method for quantitation of cardiac muscle carnosine levels using HPLC-UV is described. In this simple and reliable method, carnosine from the rat cardiac muscle and the internal standard, thymopentin, were extracted by protein precipitation with acetonitrile. The method was linear up to 60.96 μg·mL−1 for L-carnosine. The calibration curve was linear in concentration ranges from 0.5 to 60.96 μg·mL−1. The relative standard deviations obtained for intra- and interday precision were lower than 12% and the recoveries were higher than 90% for both carnosine and internal standard. We successfully applied this method to the analysis of endogenous carnosine in cardiac muscle of the diabetes rats and healthy control rats. The concentration of carnosine was significantly lower in the diabetes rats group, compared to that in the healthy control rats. These results support the usefulness of this method as a means of quantitating carnosine and illustrate the important role of L-carnosine in cardiac muscle.

  10. Decreased reward sensitivity in rats from the Fischer344 strain compared to Wistar rats is paralleled by differences in endocannabinoid signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theresa Brand

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The aim of the present study was to examine if differences in the endocannabinoid (ECB system might be linked to strain specific variations in reward-related behavior in Fischer344 (Fischer and Wistar rats. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Two rat strains, the Fischer and the Wistar strain, were tested for different aspects of reward sensitivity for a palatable food reward (sweetened condensed milk, SCM in a limited-access intake test, a progressive ratio (PR schedule and the pleasure-attenuated startle (PAS paradigm. Additionally, basic differences in the ECB system and cannabinoid pharmacology were examined in both rat strains. Fischer rats were found to express lower reward sensitivity towards SCM compared to Wistar rats. These differences were observed for consummatory, motivational and hedonic aspects of the palatable food reward. Western blot analysis for the CB1 receptor and the ECB degrading enzyme fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH revealed a lower expression of both proteins in the hippocampus (HPC of Fischer rats compared to the Wistar strain. Furthermore, increased cannabinoid-stimulated extracellular-regulated kinase (ERK phosphorylation was detected in Wistar rats compared to the Fischer strain, indicating alterations in ECB signaling. These findings were further supported by the pharmacological results, where Fischer rats were found to be less sensitive towards the effects of the CB1 receptor antagonist/inverse agonist SR141716 and the cannabinoid agonist WIN 55,212-2. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our present findings indicate differences in the expression of the CB1 receptor and FAAH, as well as the activation of ECB signaling pathways between Fischer and Wistar rats. These basic differences in the ECB system might contribute to the pronounced differences observed in reward sensitivity between both rat strains.

  11. MSUD Family Support Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... The Treatment Of MSUD The MSUD Family Support Group has provided funds to Buck Institute for its ... of the membership of the MSUD Family Support Group, research for improved treatments and potential cure was ...

  12. Social support portlet

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aleksieva-Petrova, Adelina; Petrov, Milen

    2009-01-01

    Aleksieva-Petrova, A., & Petrov, M. (2009). Social support portlet. A first implementation of the social support tool as Liferay portlet. Available under the three clause BSD licence, Copyright TENCompetence Foundation.

  13. Anxiety Disorders: Support Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Ages) Palm Beach Gardens OCD Support Group for Kids & Teens Center for Psychological & Behavioral Science Palm Beach Gardens ... Science Palm Beach Gardens OCD Support Group for Kids & Teens Palm Beach Gardens, FL Palm Beach Gardens OCD ...

  14. Paladin Software Support Lab

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Paladin Software Support Environment (SSE) occupies 2,241 square-feet. It contains the hardware and software tools required to support the Paladin Automatic Fire...

  15. Nutrition support in hospitals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kondrup, Jens

    2005-01-01

    Nutrition support in hospitals is becoming an area of focus because of the evidence showing improved clinical outcome with nutrition support, its status as a human rights issue and its integration into quality assurance.......Nutrition support in hospitals is becoming an area of focus because of the evidence showing improved clinical outcome with nutrition support, its status as a human rights issue and its integration into quality assurance....

  16. Substitution effects of a carbonated hydroxyapatite biomaterial against intoxication chloride nickel-exposed rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulila, Salha; Elfeki, Abdelfattah; Oudadesse, Hassane; Elfeki, Hafed

    2015-03-01

    This study aimed to investigate the potential effects of a synthetic apatite (carbonated hydroxyapatite) on the detoxification of a group of male "Wistar" rats exposed to nickel chloride. Toxicity was evaluated by rats' bioassay of nickel chloride. Wistar rats received this metal daily by gavage for seven days (4 mg/ml nickel chloride/200 g body weight, BW). To detoxify this organism, a subcutaneous implantation of the apatite is made. The results revealed that exposure to nickel induced oxidative stress, disorders in the balances of ferric phosphocalcic, renal failures, liver toxicity and significant increase in nickel rates in the bones of intoxicated rats. The application of the carbonated hydroxyapatite presented in this study restored those disorders back to normal. The synthetic apatite protected the rats against the toxic effects of nickel by lowering the levels of lipid peroxidation markers and improving the activities of defense enzymes. It also amended ferric and phosphocalcic equilibriums, protected liver and kidney functions and reduced the nickel rate in the bones of the rats. Overall, the results provided strong support for the protective role of carbonated hydroxyapatite in the detoxification of rats exposed to nickel. Those beneficial effects were further confirmed by physico-chemical characterization (X-ray diffraction and infrared spectroscopy), which revealed its property of anionic and cationic substitution, thus supporting its promising candidacy for future biomedical application. The hydroxyapatite is an effective biomaterial to solve health problems, particularly detoxification against metals (nickel).

  17. model in female wistar rats

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2013-12-31

    Dec 31, 2013 ... cyclodextrin on wister rats : histopathologic analoges. Fundan Clin. Pharmacol.; 23(6) :747-755. Sandor, V., Cuparencu, B., Dumitrascu, L.D., Birt, A.M. and Krausz, L.T. (2006). Protective effects of amphetamine on gastric ulcerations induced by indomethacin in rats. World J. Gastroenterol.; 12(44): ...

  18. Effect of housing conditions on sex differences in spatial cognition in rats

    OpenAIRE

    Harris, Anjanette Patricia

    2009-01-01

    Male mammals typically outperform females in tests of spatial ability. However, in laboratory rats (Rattus norvegicus), from which the majority of data in support of this difference come, sex differences are not consistently found. Since stress affects cognition in males and females differently, I investigated possible sources of stress (e.g. housing conditions, spatial tasks) and the impact they have on cognitive performance in male and female rats. Firstly, I investigated ...

  19. Supported microporous ceramic membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, Elizabeth; Anderson, Marc

    1993-01-01

    A method for permformation of microporous ceramic membranes onto a porous support includes placing a colloidal suspension of metal or metal oxide particles on one side of the porous support and exposing the other side of the porous support to a drying stream of gas or a reactive gas stream so that the particles are deposited on the drying side of the support as a gel. The gel so deposited can be sintered to form a supported ceramic membrane useful for ultrafiltration, reverse osmosis, or molecular sieving having mean pore sizes less than 100 Angstroms.

  20. Evidence supporting a circadian control of natural killer cell function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arjona, Alvaro; Sarkar, Dipak K

    2006-09-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells participate in the immune response against infection and cancer. An emerging body of epidemiological data supports that circadian homeostasis may constitute a factor risk for cancer development. Physiological rhythms under circadian control persist in the absence of light entrainment and ultimately rely on a molecular clock. We have previously shown that NK cell cytolytic activity follows a daily rhythm and that NK cells enriched from light-entrained rats present 24-h oscillations of clock genes, cytolytic factors, and cytokines. To investigate whether these oscillations are under a genuine circadian control, we assessed the daily expression of clock genes (Per1, Per2, Clock, and Bmal1), a clock-controlled gene (Dbp), cytolytic factors (granzyme B and perforin), and cytokines (IFN-gamma and TNF-alpha) in NK cells enriched from rats maintained in constant darkness (DD). In addition, we investigated whether the disruption of the NK cell clock by RNA interference (RNAi) affects the expression of cytolytic factors and cytokines. Persistent 24-h oscillations were found in the expression levels of clock genes, cytolytic factors, and cytokines in NK cells enriched from DD rats. In addition, RNAi-mediated Per2 knockdown caused a significant decrease of granzyme B and perforin levels in the rat derived NK cell line RNK16. Taken together, these results provide evidence supporting that NK cell function is under circadian regulation.

  1. Do rats have orgasms?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James G. Pfaus

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Although humans experience orgasms with a degree of statistical regularity, they remain among the most enigmatic of sexual responses; difficult to define and even more difficult to study empirically. The question of whether animals experience orgasms is hampered by similar lack of definition and the additional necessity of making inferences from behavioral responses. Method: Here we define three behavioral criteria, based on dimensions of the subjective experience of human orgasms described by Mah and Binik, to infer orgasm-like responses (OLRs in other species: 1 physiological criteria that include pelvic floor and anal muscle contractions that stimulate seminal emission and/or ejaculation in the male, or that stimulate uterine and cervical contractions in the female; 2 short-term behavioral changes that reflect immediate awareness of a pleasurable hedonic reward state during copulation; and 3 long-term behavioral changes that depend on the reward state induced by the OLR, including sexual satiety, the strengthening of patterns of sexual arousal and desire in subsequent copulations, and the generation of conditioned place and partner preferences for contextual and partner-related cues associated with the reward state. We then examine whether physiological and behavioral data from observations of male and female rats during copulation, and in sexually-conditioned place- and partner-preference paradigms, are consistent with these criteria. Results: Both male and female rats display behavioral patterns consistent with OLRs. Conclusions: The ability to infer OLRs in rats offers new possibilities to study the phenomenon in neurobiological and molecular detail, and to provide both comparative and translational perspectives that would be useful for both basic and clinical research.

  2. Do rats have orgasms?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfaus, James G; Scardochio, Tina; Parada, Mayte; Gerson, Christine; Quintana, Gonzalo R; Coria-Avila, Genaro A

    2016-01-01

    Although humans experience orgasms with a degree of statistical regularity, they remain among the most enigmatic of sexual responses; difficult to define and even more difficult to study empirically. The question of whether animals experience orgasms is hampered by similar lack of definition and the additional necessity of making inferences from behavioral responses. Here we define three behavioral criteria, based on dimensions of the subjective experience of human orgasms described by Mah and Binik, to infer orgasm-like responses (OLRs) in other species: 1) physiological criteria that include pelvic floor and anal muscle contractions that stimulate seminal emission and/or ejaculation in the male, or that stimulate uterine and cervical contractions in the female; 2) short-term behavioral changes that reflect immediate awareness of a pleasurable hedonic reward state during copulation; and 3) long-term behavioral changes that depend on the reward state induced by the OLR, including sexual satiety, the strengthening of patterns of sexual arousal and desire in subsequent copulations, and the generation of conditioned place and partner preferences for contextual and partner-related cues associated with the reward state. We then examine whether physiological and behavioral data from observations of male and female rats during copulation, and in sexually-conditioned place- and partner-preference paradigms, are consistent with these criteria. Both male and female rats display behavioral patterns consistent with OLRs. The ability to infer OLRs in rats offers new possibilities to study the phenomenon in neurobiological and molecular detail, and to provide both comparative and translational perspectives that would be useful for both basic and clinical research.

  3. Do rats have orgasms?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfaus, James G.; Scardochio, Tina; Parada, Mayte; Gerson, Christine; Quintana, Gonzalo R.; Coria-Avila, Genaro A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Although humans experience orgasms with a degree of statistical regularity, they remain among the most enigmatic of sexual responses; difficult to define and even more difficult to study empirically. The question of whether animals experience orgasms is hampered by similar lack of definition and the additional necessity of making inferences from behavioral responses. Method Here we define three behavioral criteria, based on dimensions of the subjective experience of human orgasms described by Mah and Binik, to infer orgasm-like responses (OLRs) in other species: 1) physiological criteria that include pelvic floor and anal muscle contractions that stimulate seminal emission and/or ejaculation in the male, or that stimulate uterine and cervical contractions in the female; 2) short-term behavioral changes that reflect immediate awareness of a pleasurable hedonic reward state during copulation; and 3) long-term behavioral changes that depend on the reward state induced by the OLR, including sexual satiety, the strengthening of patterns of sexual arousal and desire in subsequent copulations, and the generation of conditioned place and partner preferences for contextual and partner-related cues associated with the reward state. We then examine whether physiological and behavioral data from observations of male and female rats during copulation, and in sexually-conditioned place- and partner-preference paradigms, are consistent with these criteria. Results Both male and female rats display behavioral patterns consistent with OLRs. Conclusions The ability to infer OLRs in rats offers new possibilities to study the phenomenon in neurobiological and molecular detail, and to provide both comparative and translational perspectives that would be useful for both basic and clinical research. PMID:27799081

  4. Electroejaculation of chimeric rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCoy, Marina R; Montonye, Daniel; Bryda, Elizabeth C

    2013-06-01

    With the advent of genetic engineering of rodents came the need to assess fertility and germline competency, especially in chimeric rodents generated using embryonic stem cells. Traditional methods rely on natural mating and progeny testing, which is time- and cost-intensive. Electroejaculation is a faster method of collecting sperm for genetic analysis and offers the additional benefit of using fewer animals. This column describes a refined electroejaculation technique for chimeric rats using light gas anesthesia and a custom-made platform for sperm collection.

  5. Eszopiclone and dexmedetomidine depress ventilation in obese rats with features of metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filbey, William A; Sanford, David T; Baghdoyan, Helen A; Koch, Lauren G; Britton, Steven L; Lydic, Ralph

    2014-05-01

    differences in sleep between lean/fit and obese rats. These findings also encourage future studies of obese/metabolic syndrome rats that quantify the effect of sedative/hypnotic drugs on respiratory mechanics as well as hypoxic and hypercapnic ventilatory responses. Continued findings of favorable homology between obese humans and rodents will support the interpretation that these obese rats offer a unique animal model for mechanistic studies.

  6. Serum testosterone concentration in chloroquine- treated rats ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ONOS

    2010-07-05

    Jul 5, 2010 ... The effects of ascorbic acid (vitamin C) and alpha-tocopherol (vitamin E) were studied on serum testosterone concentration in chloroquine-treated rats. Thirty five (35) adult male rats weighing 160 - 200 g were divided into seven groups of five (5) rats each. Group I rats served as the control and received 2.

  7. Serum testosterone concentration in chloroquinetreated rats: effects ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effects of ascorbic acid (vitamin C) and alpha-tocopherol (vitamin E) were studied on serum testosterone concentration in chloroquine-treated rats. Thirty five (35) adult male rats weighing 160 - 200 g were divided into seven groups of five (5) rats each. Group I rats served as the control and received 2 ml/kg of normal ...

  8. Differences in Anticipatory Behaviour between Rats (Rattus norvegicus Housed in Standard versus Semi-Naturalistic Laboratory Environments.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I Joanna Makowska

    Full Text Available Laboratory rats are usually kept in relatively small cages, but research has shown that they prefer larger and more complex environments. The physiological, neurological and health effects of standard laboratory housing are well established, but fewer studies have addressed the sustained emotional impact of a standard cage environment. One method of assessing affective states in animals is to look at the animals' anticipatory behaviour between the presentation of a cue signalling the arrival of a reward and the arrival of that reward. The primary aim of this study was to use anticipatory behaviour to assess the affective state experienced by female rats a reared and housed long-term in a standard laboratory cage versus a semi-naturalistic environment, and b before and after treatment with an antidepressant or an anxiolytic. A secondary aim was to add to the literature on anticipatory behaviour by describing and comparing the frequency and duration of individual elements of anticipatory behaviour displayed by rats reared in these two systems. In all experiments, total behavioural frequency was higher in standard-housed rats compared to rats from the semi-naturalistic condition, suggesting that standard-housed rats were more sensitive to rewards and experiencing poorer welfare than rats reared in the semi-naturalistic environment. What rats did in anticipation of the reward also differed between housing treatments, with standard-housed rats mostly rearing and rats from the semi-naturalistic condition mostly sitting facing the direction of the upcoming treat. Drug interventions had no effect on the quantity or form of anticipatory behaviour, suggesting that the poorer welfare experienced by standard-housed rats was not analogous to depression or anxiety, or alternatively that the drug interventions were ineffective. This study adds to mounting evidence that standard laboratory housing for rats compromises rat welfare, and provides further

  9. Differences in Anticipatory Behaviour between Rats (Rattus norvegicus) Housed in Standard versus Semi-Naturalistic Laboratory Environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makowska, I Joanna; Weary, Daniel M

    2016-01-01

    Laboratory rats are usually kept in relatively small cages, but research has shown that they prefer larger and more complex environments. The physiological, neurological and health effects of standard laboratory housing are well established, but fewer studies have addressed the sustained emotional impact of a standard cage environment. One method of assessing affective states in animals is to look at the animals' anticipatory behaviour between the presentation of a cue signalling the arrival of a reward and the arrival of that reward. The primary aim of this study was to use anticipatory behaviour to assess the affective state experienced by female rats a) reared and housed long-term in a standard laboratory cage versus a semi-naturalistic environment, and b) before and after treatment with an antidepressant or an anxiolytic. A secondary aim was to add to the literature on anticipatory behaviour by describing and comparing the frequency and duration of individual elements of anticipatory behaviour displayed by rats reared in these two systems. In all experiments, total behavioural frequency was higher in standard-housed rats compared to rats from the semi-naturalistic condition, suggesting that standard-housed rats were more sensitive to rewards and experiencing poorer welfare than rats reared in the semi-naturalistic environment. What rats did in anticipation of the reward also differed between housing treatments, with standard-housed rats mostly rearing and rats from the semi-naturalistic condition mostly sitting facing the direction of the upcoming treat. Drug interventions had no effect on the quantity or form of anticipatory behaviour, suggesting that the poorer welfare experienced by standard-housed rats was not analogous to depression or anxiety, or alternatively that the drug interventions were ineffective. This study adds to mounting evidence that standard laboratory housing for rats compromises rat welfare, and provides further scientific support for

  10. PENICILLIN EPILEPSY IN RATS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Voja Pavlović

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to test, in a model of experimental penicillin epilepsy, a hypothesis of primary and dominant role of cortex in genesis of epileptic discharges, by using recordings of electrocorticograms (EcoG. The experiments were made with around two and a half old male rats. The rats were divided into four groups of five animals each. In the case of the first group, antibiotics were applied intraperitoneally (i.p.. Epileptic generalized discharges of this group were not registered until administering a dosage of antibiotics higher than 1.8 x 106 IU/kg. In the second group, application of a dosage of 1.2 x 106 IU/kg resulted in individual discharges. In the third group, antibiotics were applied intracortically (i.c. in a dosage of 50 IU and caused individual discharges without big seizures. The fourth group needed a dosage of 100 IU/kg of penicillin applied i.c. to develop a big seizure. Discharges in the first three groups were registered first as unilateral with a subsequent development of bilateral synchrony. In the case of the fourth group, immediately and abruptly after the application of penicillin big seizures developed violently and repeated several times. We consider that the very implantation of electrodes provokes occurrence of discharging.

  11. The Rat Race

    CERN Multimedia

    Stephen Haywood

    Dear Muriel, Being an animal, you are probably more familiar with rats than most of us. Yet it seems to me that our Community (not just ATLAS) is stuck in a huge "rat race". I am somewhat mystified as to how we have got ourselves into this and I wonder whether you or your readers could explain this - I give my own observations below. In HEP and ATLAS specifically, we are all working long hours and we are all becoming exhausted. There are people at Point 1 who are working day and night, every day of the week; there are people writing software who send emails round the clock, including weekends. It is one thing to have bursts of activity which require us to put in some longer hours, but in ATLAS, the bursts last months or years. I have been on ATLAS 14 years and it has felt like one endless rush. Why do we do this? We are all highly motivated, we love our work and want to succeed individually and collectively. We are parts of various teams, and we do not want to let the side down. We worked hard at school an...

  12. Postural development in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lelard, T; Jamon, M; Gasc, J-P; Vidal, P-P

    2006-11-01

    Mammals adopt a limited number of postures during their day-to-day activities. These stereotyped skeletal configurations are functionally adequate and limit the number of degrees of freedom to be controlled by the central nervous system. The temporal pattern of emergence of these configurations in altricial mammals is unknown. We therefore carried out an X-ray study in unrestrained rats from birth (P0) until postnatal day 23 (P23). The X-rays showed that many of the skeletal configurations described in adult rodents were already present at birth. By contrast, limb placement changed abruptly at around P10. These skeletal configurations, observed in anesthetized pups, required the maintenance of precise motor control. On the other hand, motor control continued to mature, as shown by progressive changes in resting posture and head movements from P0 to P23. We suggest that a few innate skeletal configurations provide the necessary frames of reference for the gradual construction of an adult motor repertoire in altricial mammals, such as the rat. The apparent absence of a requirement for external sensorial cues in the maturation of this repertoire may account for the maturation of postural and motor control in utero in precocial mammals (Muir et al., 2000 for a review on the locomotor behavior of altricial and precocial animals).

  13. Cryogenic support system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicol, T.H.; Niemann, R.C.; Gonczy, J.D.

    1988-11-01

    A support system is disclosed for restraining large masses at very low or cryogenic temperatures. The support system employs a tie bar that is pivotally connected at opposite ends to an anchoring support member and a sliding support member. The tie bar extends substantially parallel to the longitudinal axis of the cold mass assembly, and comprises a rod that lengthens when cooled and a pair of end attachments that contract when cooled. The rod and end attachments are sized so that when the tie bar is cooled to cryogenic temperature, the net change in tie bar length is approximately zero. Longitudinal force directed against the cold mass assembly is distributed by the tie bar between the anchoring support member and the sliding support member. 7 figs.

  14. Editorial: Support (November 2007)

    OpenAIRE

    Dru Lavigne

    2007-01-01

    What is your first thought when you encounter the term "open source support"? A programmer typing the answer to a question using a chat utility? Hours spent scouring the Internet for a working configuration sample? Contacting a support engineer at a commercial call centre? If you find it difficult to think about a support engineer, you're not alone. Actuate's recently published 2007 Open Source Survey of senior personnel from financial services, Telco, and public sector organizations across N...

  15. Bentonite-supported catalase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. CEYLAN

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available The properties of the clay bentonite as a support for enzyme immobilization were studied using the enzyme catalase. Such an immobilization does not result in enzyme inactivation and constitutes a valuable method for immobilizing catalase at high ionic strength. The bentonite-supported catalase was characterized in terms of pH and ionic strength dependencies, thermal and storage stability and kinetic parameters. These studies indicate that bentonite is a valuable support for the simple adsorption of enzymes.

  16. MAINTENANCE SUPPORT FORMULAS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Research is reported on the development of a quantitative decision model that can be used in the selection of the most appropriate method of support ...which constitute a cost estimation model by which overall costs (including logistical costs) of alternate methods of support may be compared and the...item for study and the alternatives to be considered, including a major component formula; and (4) examples of model application to end items supported by Frankford Arsenal. (Author)

  17. Oxidative Stress in Aged Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damisela Ramírez Ramírez

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: aging is one of the major problems that the world is facing today due to its impact on all areas of society. Objective: to determine the concentrations of advanced oxidation protein products and malondialdehyde as indicators of oxidative damage and to determine the antioxidant defense capacity of the enzymes superoxide dismutase, catalase and the reduced glutathione concentration in aged rats. Methods: a total of 20 male Wistar rats with a body weight of approximately 200 to 250 grams were selected to form two groups with 10 young adult rats and 10 old rats. 2 ml of blood was drawn from the paranasal sinus. The sample was collected in 5 ml vials and after being homogenized, it was sent to the Biomedical Research Center, where it was used to assess the following oxidative stress variables: degree of oxidative damage and antioxidant defense level. An analysis of variance was performed to study the behavior of the different groups. Differences were considered significant when P value was less than 0.05. Results: no significant changes were found in the concentrations of malondialdehyde and glutathione, as well as in the superoxide dismutase and catalase activity in aged rats compared to young. Concentration of advanced oxidation protein products increased significantly in aged rats. Conclusions: aged rats showed an increase in oxidative damage to proteins. Antioxidant defense capacity of the enzymes superoxide dismutase and catalase and reduced glutathione concentration showed no changes.

  18. Morocco - Enterprise Support

    Data.gov (United States)

    Millennium Challenge Corporation — The evaluation will measure the specific contribution of the training and support program on key business outcomes. There have been no rigorous evaluations conducted...

  19. INITIAL WEAPON SYSTEM SUPPORT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Program which can improve early support of the combined F4B (Navy)/F4C (AF) Program, and other weapon system programs. The findings, in general, in the...F4 aircraft program support those found in the TITAN II Missile Program which are being implemented by the Air Force, i.e., the value of the use of the...provisioning team concept and of a reduction in the lay-in time of spare parts. There appears to be a requirement for stronger intra-Service support of the aircraft leading to possible economic inter-Service support . (Author)

  20. Carbenoxolone treatment ameliorated metabolic syndrome in WNIN/Ob obese rats, but induced severe fat loss and glucose intolerance in lean rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siva Sankara Vara Prasad Sakamuri

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: 11beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 (11β-HSD1 regulates local glucocorticoid action in tissues by catalysing conversion of inactive glucocorticoids to active glucocorticoids. 11β-HSD1 inhibition ameliorates obesity and associated co-morbidities. Here, we tested the effect of 11β-HSD inhibitor, carbenoxolone (CBX on obesity and associated comorbidities in obese rats of WNIN/Ob strain, a new animal model for genetic obesity. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Subcutaneous injection of CBX (50 mg/kg body weight or volume-matched vehicle was given once daily for four weeks to three month-old WNIN/Ob lean and obese rats (n = 6 for each phenotype and for each treatment. Body composition, plasma lipids and hormones were assayed. Hepatic steatosis, adipose tissue morphology, inflammation and fibrosis were also studied. Insulin resistance and glucose intolerance were determined along with tissue glycogen content. Gene expressions were determined in liver and adipose tissue. CBX significantly inhibited 11β-HSD1 activity in liver and adipose tissue of WNIN/Ob lean and obese rats. CBX significantly decreased body fat percentage, hypertriglyceridemia, hypercholesterolemia, insulin resistance in obese rats. CBX ameliorated hepatic steatosis, adipocyte hypertrophy, adipose tissue inflammation and fibrosis in obese rats. Tissue glycogen content was significantly decreased by CBX in liver and adipose tissue of obese rats. Severe fat loss and glucose- intolerance were observed in lean rats after CBX treatment. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We conclude that 11β-HSD1 inhibition by CBX decreases obesity and associated co-morbidities in WNIN/Ob obese rats. Our study supports the hypothesis that inhibition of 11β-HSD1 is a key strategy to treat metabolic syndrome. Severe fat loss and glucose -intolerance by CBX treatment in lean rats suggest that chronic 11β-HSD1 inhibition may lead to insulin resistance in normal conditions.

  1. Carbenoxolone treatment ameliorated metabolic syndrome in WNIN/Ob obese rats, but induced severe fat loss and glucose intolerance in lean rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad Sakamuri, Siva Sankara Vara; Sukapaka, Mahesh; Prathipati, Vijay Kumar; Nemani, Harishankar; Putcha, Uday Kumar; Pothana, Shailaja; Koppala, Swarupa Rani; Ponday, Lakshmi Raj Kumar; Acharya, Vani; Veetill, Giridharan Nappan; Ayyalasomayajula, Vajreswari

    2012-01-01

    11beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 (11β-HSD1) regulates local glucocorticoid action in tissues by catalysing conversion of inactive glucocorticoids to active glucocorticoids. 11β-HSD1 inhibition ameliorates obesity and associated co-morbidities. Here, we tested the effect of 11β-HSD inhibitor, carbenoxolone (CBX) on obesity and associated comorbidities in obese rats of WNIN/Ob strain, a new animal model for genetic obesity. Subcutaneous injection of CBX (50 mg/kg body weight) or volume-matched vehicle was given once daily for four weeks to three month-old WNIN/Ob lean and obese rats (n = 6 for each phenotype and for each treatment). Body composition, plasma lipids and hormones were assayed. Hepatic steatosis, adipose tissue morphology, inflammation and fibrosis were also studied. Insulin resistance and glucose intolerance were determined along with tissue glycogen content. Gene expressions were determined in liver and adipose tissue. CBX significantly inhibited 11β-HSD1 activity in liver and adipose tissue of WNIN/Ob lean and obese rats. CBX significantly decreased body fat percentage, hypertriglyceridemia, hypercholesterolemia, insulin resistance in obese rats. CBX ameliorated hepatic steatosis, adipocyte hypertrophy, adipose tissue inflammation and fibrosis in obese rats. Tissue glycogen content was significantly decreased by CBX in liver and adipose tissue of obese rats. Severe fat loss and glucose- intolerance were observed in lean rats after CBX treatment. We conclude that 11β-HSD1 inhibition by CBX decreases obesity and associated co-morbidities in WNIN/Ob obese rats. Our study supports the hypothesis that inhibition of 11β-HSD1 is a key strategy to treat metabolic syndrome. Severe fat loss and glucose -intolerance by CBX treatment in lean rats suggest that chronic 11β-HSD1 inhibition may lead to insulin resistance in normal conditions.

  2. Serum lipidomics analysis of ovariectomized rats under Curcuma comosa treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinayavekhin, Nawaporn; Sueajai, Jetjamnong; Chaihad, Nichaboon; Panrak, Ratchanee; Chokchaisiri, Ratchanaporn; Sangvanich, Polkit; Suksamrarn, Apichart; Piyachaturawat, Pawinee

    2016-11-04

    Curcuma comosa Roxb. (C. comosa) or Wan Chak Motluk, Zingiberaceae family, has been used in Thai traditional medicine for the treatment of gynecological problems and inflammation. This study aimed to investigate the therapeutic potential of C. comosa by determining the changes in the lipid profiles in the ovariectomized rats, as a model of estrogen-deficiency-induced hyperlipidemia, after treatment with different components of C. comosa using an untargeted lipidomics approach. Lipids were extracted from the serum of adult female rats subjected to a sham operation (SHAM; control), ovariectomy (OVX), or OVX with 12-week daily doses of estrogen (17β-estradiol; E 2 ), (3R)-1,7-diphenyl-(4E,6E)-4,6-heptadien-3-ol (DPHD; a phytoestrogen from C. comosa), powdered C. comosa rhizomes or its crude ethanol extract. They were then analyzed by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry, characterized, and subjected to the orthogonal projections to latent structures discriminant analysis statistical model to identify tentative biomarkers. Levels of five classes of lipids (ceramide, ceramide-1-phosphate, sphingomyelin, 1-O-alkenyl-lysophosphatidylethanolamine and lysophosphatidylethanolamine) were elevated in the OVX rats compared to those in the SHAM rats, while the monoacylglycerols and triacylglycerols were decreased. The E 2 treatment only reversed the levels of ceramides, whereas treatments with DPHD, C. comosa extract or powder returned the levels of all upregulated lipids back to those in the SHAM control rats. The findings suggest the potential beneficial effects of C. comosa on preventing the increased ceramide levels in OVX rats, a possible cause of metabolic disturbance under estrogen deficiency. Overall, the results demonstrated the power of untargeted lipidomics in discovering disease-relevant biomarkers, as well as evaluating the effectiveness of treatment by C. comosa components (DPHD, extract or powder) as utilized in Thai traditional medicine, and also providing

  3. Decoding bipedal locomotion from the rat sensorimotor cortex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigosa, J.; Panarese, A.; Dominici, N.; Friedli, L.; van den Brand, R.; Carpaneto, J.; DiGiovanna, J.; Courtine, G.; Micera, S.

    2015-10-01

    Objective. Decoding forelimb movements from the firing activity of cortical neurons has been interfaced with robotic and prosthetic systems to replace lost upper limb functions in humans. Despite the potential of this approach to improve locomotion and facilitate gait rehabilitation, decoding lower limb movement from the motor cortex has received comparatively little attention. Here, we performed experiments to identify the type and amount of information that can be decoded from neuronal ensemble activity in the hindlimb area of the rat motor cortex during bipedal locomotor tasks. Approach. Rats were trained to stand, step on a treadmill, walk overground and climb staircases in a bipedal posture. To impose this gait, the rats were secured in a robotic interface that provided support against the direction of gravity and in the mediolateral direction, but behaved transparently in the forward direction. After completion of training, rats were chronically implanted with a micro-wire array spanning the left hindlimb motor cortex to record single and multi-unit activity, and bipolar electrodes into 10 muscles of the right hindlimb to monitor electromyographic signals. Whole-body kinematics, muscle activity, and neural signals were simultaneously recorded during execution of the trained tasks over multiple days of testing. Hindlimb kinematics, muscle activity, gait phases, and locomotor tasks were decoded using offline classification algorithms. Main results. We found that the stance and swing phases of gait and the locomotor tasks were detected with accuracies as robust as 90% in all rats. Decoded hindlimb kinematics and muscle activity exhibited a larger variability across rats and tasks. Significance. Our study shows that the rodent motor cortex contains useful information for lower limb neuroprosthetic development. However, brain-machine interfaces estimating gait phases or locomotor behaviors, instead of continuous variables such as limb joint positions or speeds

  4. Evidence for Facial Nerve–Independent Mechanisms of Blinking in the Rat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heaton, James T.; Kowaleski, Jeffrey; Edwards, Colin; Smitson, Christopher

    2010-01-01

    Purpose. The rat facial nerve (CN VII) controls the orbicularis oculi (OO) muscle, which contracts to close the palpebral fissure during blinking. It was recently observed that rats are able to achieve nearly complete eye closure shortly after CN VII lesion, and hypothesized that the retractor bulbi (RB) muscle assumes an important compensatory role after CN VII lesion. This study was undertaken to determine the maintenance of rat corneal health and eye closure capability after lesion of the OO, RB, or both. Methods. Twenty-two rats underwent RB transection; 12 of them had undergone complete unilateral CN VII transection (OO denervation) 15 weeks earlier. Corneal appearance and ability to blink in response to a corneal air puff was monitored weekly for 9 weeks. An additional 13 rats received CN VII transection and were video recorded (1000 frames/s) during elicited blinks at days 1, 3, 5/6, and 11 after surgery. Results. Rats achieved nearly full or full eye closure after OO paralysis or RB myotomy, respectively. Ninety-two percent of rats maintained good corneal health after OO denervation over 9 weeks, consistent with compensatory eyelid movement served by the RB muscles. In contrast, only 40% of rats with loss of RB function alone and only 17% of rats with concurrent OO and RB paralysis were able to maintain corneal health by week 3. Conclusions. Like other small mammals, the rat RB musculature can support nearly complete eye closure when CN VII is lesioned, and must be carefully considered when using blink as a functional recovery parameter of facial nerve lesion. PMID:19710413

  5. Evidence for facial nerve-independent mechanisms of blinking in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heaton, James T; Kowaleski, Jeffrey; Edwards, Colin; Smitson, Christopher; Hadlock, Tessa A

    2010-01-01

    The rat facial nerve (CN VII) controls the orbicularis oculi (OO) muscle, which contracts to close the palpebral fissure during blinking. It was recently observed that rats are able to achieve nearly complete eye closure shortly after CN VII lesion, and hypothesized that the retractor bulbi (RB) muscle assumes an important compensatory role after CN VII lesion. This study was undertaken to determine the maintenance of rat corneal health and eye closure capability after lesion of the OO, RB, or both. Twenty-two rats underwent RB transection; 12 of them had undergone complete unilateral CN VII transection (OO denervation) 15 weeks earlier. Corneal appearance and ability to blink in response to a corneal air puff was monitored weekly for 9 weeks. An additional 13 rats received CN VII transection and were video recorded (1000 frames/s) during elicited blinks at days 1, 3, 5/6, and 11 after surgery. Rats achieved nearly full or full eye closure after OO paralysis or RB myotomy, respectively. Ninety-two percent of rats maintained good corneal health after OO denervation over 9 weeks, consistent with compensatory eyelid movement served by the RB muscles. In contrast, only 40% of rats with loss of RB function alone and only 17% of rats with concurrent OO and RB paralysis were able to maintain corneal health by week 3. Like other small mammals, the rat RB musculature can support nearly complete eye closure when CN VII is lesioned, and must be carefully considered when using blink as a functional recovery parameter of facial nerve lesion.

  6. Raloxifene prevents skeletal fragility in adult female Zucker Diabetic Sprague-Dawley rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill Gallant, Kathleen M; Gallant, Maxime A; Brown, Drew M; Sato, Amy Y; Williams, Justin N; Burr, David B

    2014-01-01

    Fracture risk in type 2 diabetes is increased despite normal or high bone mineral density, implicating poor bone quality as a risk factor. Raloxifene improves bone material and mechanical properties independent of bone mineral density. This study aimed to determine if raloxifene prevents the negative effects of diabetes on skeletal fragility in diabetes-prone rats. Adult Zucker Diabetic Sprague-Dawley (ZDSD) female rats (20-week-old, n = 24) were fed a diabetogenic high-fat diet and were randomized to receive daily subcutaneous injections of raloxifene or vehicle for 12 weeks. Blood glucose was measured weekly and glycated hemoglobin was measured at baseline and 12 weeks. At sacrifice, femora and lumbar vertebrae were harvested for imaging and mechanical testing. Raloxifene-treated rats had a lower incidence of type 2 diabetes compared with vehicle-treated rats. In addition, raloxifene-treated rats had blood glucose levels significantly lower than both diabetic vehicle-treated rats as well as vehicle-treated rats that did not become diabetic. Femoral toughness was greater in raloxifene-treated rats compared with both diabetic and non-diabetic vehicle-treated ZDSD rats, due to greater energy absorption in the post-yield region of the stress-strain curve. Similar differences between groups were observed for the structural (extrinsic) mechanical properties of energy-to-failure, post-yield energy-to-failure, and post-yield displacement. These results show that raloxifene is beneficial in preventing the onset of diabetes and improving bone material properties in the diabetes-prone ZDSD rat. This presents unique therapeutic potential for raloxifene in preserving bone quality in diabetes as well as in diabetes prevention, if these results can be supported by future experimental and clinical studies.

  7. Rat traps: filling the toolbox for manipulating the rat genome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Boxtel, R.; Cuppen, E.

    2010-01-01

    The laboratory rat is rapidly gaining momentum as a mammalian genetic model organism. Although traditional forward genetic approaches are well established, recent technological developments have enabled efficient gene targeting and mutant generation. Here we outline the current status, possibilities

  8. The effect of hypertension on adult hippocampal neurogenesis in young adult spontaneously hypertensive rats and Dahl rats

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pištíková, Adéla; Brožka, Hana; Bencze, Michal; Radostová, Dominika; Valeš, Karel; Stuchlík, Aleš

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 66, č. 5 (2017), s. 881-887 ISSN 0862-8408 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GBP304/12/G069 Grant - others:Rada Programu interní podpory projektů mezinárodní spolupráce AV ČR(CZ) M200111204 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : adult neurogenesis * Captopril * hypertension * Dahl rats * SHR * young animals Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 1.461, year: 2016

  9. Rock support design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vandewalle, M. [N.V. Bekaert (Belgium)

    1999-02-01

    Steel fibre imparts to concrete and shotcrete a high degree of ductibility which not only allow the linings to absorb rock movement but also increases its bearing capacity by a redistribution of the loads. The article discusses the variety of uses of shotcrete for support of underground excavations, mainly for support of permanent mine openings such as ramps, haulages, shaft stations and crusher chambers.

  10. Magnetic support system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijsse, G.J.P.; Spronck, J.W.

    1999-01-01

    There is described a support system enabling supporting an object such as a platform (1) free from vibration, in that bearing elements (50) have a stiffness (k) which at a working point (z0) equals zero. A bearing element (50) comprises two magnetic couplings (51, 52) provided by permanent magnets

  11. Disability and Human Supports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeff McNair

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This article provides a brief overview of models of disability growing out of the field of disability studies and leading to a call for interventions going beyond a simply medical model approach. A brief discussion of human supports/services is provided such that readers engaged in the development of services/supports can base them on best principles.

  12. Synthesis of supported catalysts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jong, Krijn P. de

    1999-01-01

    Research reports on the synthesis of supported catalysts during the review period (1997-1998) have shown the use of carbon nanotubes and new hetropolyanions as examples of novel supports and of novel precursors of active components, respectively. Studies of absorption and precipitation chemistry

  13. Nanostructured catalyst supports

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yimin; Goldman, Jay L.; Qian, Baixin; Stefan, Ionel C.

    2012-10-02

    The present invention relates to SiC nanostructures, including SiC nanopowder, SiC nanowires, and composites of SiC nanopowder and nanowires, which can be used as catalyst supports in membrane electrode assemblies and in fuel cells. The present invention also relates to composite catalyst supports comprising nanopowder and one or more inorganic nanowires for a membrane electrode assembly.

  14. Effects of Obesity on Bone Mass and Quality in Ovariectomized Female Zucker Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafaela G. Feresin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Obesity and osteoporosis are two chronic conditions that have been increasing in prevalence. Despite prior data supporting the positive relationship between body weight and bone mineral density (BMD, recent findings show excess body weight to be detrimental to bone mass, strength, and quality. To evaluate whether obesity would further exacerbate the effects of ovariectomy on bone, we examined the tibiae and fourth lumbar (L4 vertebrae from leptin receptor-deficient female (Leprfa/fa Zucker rats and their heterozygous lean controls (Leprfa/+ that were either sham-operated or ovariectomized (Ovx. BMD of L4 vertebra was measured using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry, and microcomputed tomography was used to assess the microstructural properties of the tibiae. Ovariectomy significantly (P<0.001 decreased the BMD of L4 vertebrae in lean and obese Zucker rats. Lower trabecular number and greater trabecular separation (P<0.001 were also observed in the tibiae of lean- and obese-Ovx rats when compared to sham rats. However, only the obese-Ovx rats had lower trabecular thickness (Tb.Th (P<0.005 than the other groups. These findings demonstrated that ovarian hormone deficiency adversely affected bone mass and quality in lean and obese rats while obesity only affected Tb.Th in Ovx-female Zucker rats.

  15. Cardioprotective Effects of HuoxueAnshen Recipe against Myocardial Injuries Induced by Sleep Deprivation in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rong Yuan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Traditional Chinese Medicine is extensively used in China and HuoxueAnshen Recipe (HAR was formulated according to its method in treating CHD accompanied with insomnia in clinic. However, there are few studies related to the effect of HAR on myocardial injury and sleep disorders. Purpose. To investigate the effects of HAR on sleep deprivation- (SD- induced myocardial I/R injury. Methods. Male Wistar rats receiving a daily gavage of HAR or vehicle were exposed to SD intervention while control rats had normal sleep. Then all rats were exposed to myocardial I/R. Hormone, vascular endothelial, and inflammatory related factors were detected before and after I/R, while cardiac injury, cardiac function, myocardial infarct size, and apoptosis were detected after I/R. Results. Levels of neuropeptide Y, vascular endothelial and inflammatory related factors were significantly increased while melatonin was decreased in vehicle-treated SD rats but not in HAR-treated SD rats after SD. In addition, cardiac injury, cardiac dysfunction, myocardial infarct size, and myocardial apoptosis were deteriorated in vehicle-treated SD rats but were ameliorated in HAR-treated SD rats after I/R. Conclusion. HAR not only improved SD-induced hormone disorders, inflammation, and endothelial dysfunction, but also alleviated I/R injury, which supports protective usage in CHD and psychocardiology.

  16. Dominant rats are natural risk takers and display increased motivation for food reward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, J F; Krause, E G; Melhorn, S J; Sakai, R R; Benoit, S C

    2009-08-04

    Risk-taking behavior is a vital aspect mediating the formation of social structure in animals. Here, we utilized the visible burrow system (VBS), a model in which rats form dominance hierarchies, to test the hypothesis that dominant rats in the VBS are natural risk takers and display an increased motivational state after VBS exposure. In particular, we predicted that dominant rats would have attenuated anxiety-like behavior and augmented acquisition of operant responding for food reward relative to subordinate and controls. We further hypothesized that these behaviors would correlate with elevated mesocortical orexin signaling. Prior to burrow exposure, male Long-Evans rats were tested on the elevated plus maze (EPM), and subsequently exposed to the VBS for seven consecutive days. At the conclusion of burrow exposure body weight and plasma corticosterone were used to confirm social rank within each colony. Interestingly, rats that went on to become dominant in the VBS spent significantly more time in the open arms of the EPM prior to burrow exposure and displayed increased operant responding for food reward. This effect was present over a range of reinforcement schedules and also persisted for up to 1 month following VBS exposure. Moreover, dominant rats displayed increased orexin receptor mRNA in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) relative to subordinate and control rats. These data support previous findings from our group and are consistent with the hypothesis that risk-taking behavior may precede dominance formation in social hierarchies.

  17. Protein kinase C is activated in glomeruli from streptozotocin diabetic rats. Possible mediation by glucose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Craven, P.A.; DeRubertis, F.R.

    1989-05-01

    Glomerular inositol content and the turnover of polyphosphoinositides was reduced by 58% in 1-2 wk streptozotocin diabetic rats. Addition of inositol to the incubation medium increased polyphosphoinositide turnover in glomeruli from diabetic rats to control values. Despite the reduction in inositol content and polyphosphoinositide turnover, protein kinase C was activated in glomeruli from diabetic rats, as assessed by an increase in the percentage of enzyme activity associated with the particulate cell fraction. Total protein kinase C activity was not different between glomeruli from control and diabetic rats. Treatment of diabetic rats with insulin to achieve near euglycemia prevented the increase in particulate protein kinase C. Moreover, incubation of glomeruli from control rats with glucose (100-1,000 mg/dl) resulted in a progressive increase in labeled diacylglycerol production and in the percentage of protein kinase C activity which was associated with the particulate fraction. These results support a role for hyperglycemia per se in the enhanced state of activation of protein kinase C seen in glomeruli from diabetic rats. Glucose did not appear to increase diacylglycerol by stimulating inositol phospholipid hydrolysis in glomeruli. Other pathways for diacylglycerol production, including de novo synthesis and phospholipase C mediated hydrolysis of phosphatidylcholine or phosphatidyl-inositol-glycan are not excluded.

  18. Effects of obesity on bone mass and quality in ovariectomized female Zucker rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feresin, Rafaela G; Johnson, Sarah A; Elam, Marcus L; Jo, Edward; Arjmandi, Bahram H; Hakkak, Reza

    2014-01-01

    Obesity and osteoporosis are two chronic conditions that have been increasing in prevalence. Despite prior data supporting the positive relationship between body weight and bone mineral density (BMD), recent findings show excess body weight to be detrimental to bone mass, strength, and quality. To evaluate whether obesity would further exacerbate the effects of ovariectomy on bone, we examined the tibiae and fourth lumbar (L4) vertebrae from leptin receptor-deficient female (Lepr(fa/fa)) Zucker rats and their heterozygous lean controls (Lepr(fa/+)) that were either sham-operated or ovariectomized (Ovx). BMD of L4 vertebra was measured using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry, and microcomputed tomography was used to assess the microstructural properties of the tibiae. Ovariectomy significantly (P BMD of L4 vertebrae in lean and obese Zucker rats. Lower trabecular number and greater trabecular separation (P obese-Ovx rats when compared to sham rats. However, only the obese-Ovx rats had lower trabecular thickness (Tb.Th) (P obese rats while obesity only affected Tb.Th in Ovx-female Zucker rats.

  19. Severe respiratory changes at end stage in a FUS-induced disease state in adult rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Kasey L; Dhaibar, Hemangini A; Dayton, Robert D; Cananzi, Sergio G; Mayhan, William G; Glasscock, Edward; Klein, Ronald L

    2016-10-28

    Fused in sarcoma (FUS) is an RNA-binding protein associated with the neurodegenerative diseases amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal lobar degeneration. ALS manifests in patients as a progressive paralysis which leads to respiratory dysfunction and failure, the primary cause of death in ALS. We expressed human FUS in rats to determine if FUS would induce ALS relevant respiratory changes to serve as an early stage disease indicator. The FUS expression was initiated in adult rats by way of an intravenously administered adeno-associated virus vector serotype 9 (AAV9) providing an adult onset model. The rats developed progressive motor impairments observed as early as 2-3 weeks post gene transfer. Respiratory abnormalities manifested 4-7 weeks post gene transfer including increased respiratory frequency and decreased tidal volume. Rats with breathing abnormalities also had arterial blood acidosis. Similar detailed plethysmographic changes were found in adult rats injected with AAV9 TDP-43. FUS gene transfer to adult rats yielded a consistent pre-clinical model with relevant motor paralysis in the early to middle stages and respiratory dysfunction at the end stage. Both FUS and TDP-43 yielded a similar consistent disease state. This modeling method yields disease relevant motor and respiratory changes in adult rats. The reproducibility of the data supports the use of this method to study other disease related genes and their combinations as well as a platform for disease modifying interventional strategies.

  20. The development of "roughness" in the play fighting of rats: a Laban Movement Analysis perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foroud, Afra; Pellis, Sergio M

    2003-01-01

    With increasing age, rats, when play fighting, become rougher. In part, this change can be accounted for by the increasing likelihood of using adult-typical fighting tactics. However, even when using the same tactics, adults appear rougher than juveniles in their play. In this study, videotaped sequences of play fighting in rats from the juvenile (30 days) to the post-pubertal (70 days) period were analyzed using Laban Movement Analysis (LMA). Movement qualities called Effort Factors in LMA captured the character of some of this change. Juveniles tended to use Indulging Efforts, whereas older rats tended to use Condensing Efforts. The latter are related to performing movements that are more controlled. This greater level of control was also evident in the way older rats maintained postural support during play fights. When standing over supine partners, juveniles are more likely to stand on the partner with all four paws, reducing their postural stability, and hence ability to control their partner's movements. Older rats are more likely to place their hind paws on the ground, thus providing a firmer anchor for movements with their upper bodies and forepaws. These age-related changes in behavior were found for both males and females. The findings lend support to a growing body of evidence that play fighting in the juvenile phase of rats is not just a more frequently occurring version of that present in adults, but rather, has unique organizational properties. Copyright 2003 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Reversible Testicular Toxicity of Piperine on Male Albino Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinta, Gopichand; Coumar, Mohane Selvaraj; Periyasamy, Latha

    2017-10-01

    Piperine was widely used in traditional medicine for inducing sterility and abortion. To evaluate the effect of the piperine on testis of male albino rats. Adult male rats were divided into four groups (n = 12). Group I (control): Rats were given vehicle p.o. i.e. 0.5% carboxymethyl cellulose in normal saline daily for 60 days, Group II (ED): Rats received piperine at a dose of 10 mg/kg body weight (b.w.) daily, Group III (E4D): Rats received piperine at a dose of 10 mg/kg b.w. on every 4(th) day, Group IV (E7D): Rats received piperine at a dose of 10 mg/kg b.w. on every 7(th) day. Half of the animals from each group were sacrificed after the treatment period (60 days), and the remaining were kept for drug-free withdrawal period (60 days) and then sacrificed. Piperine significantly decreased the reproductive organ weights in groups ED and E4D. Piperine induced hormonal imbalance by altering the serum levels of follicle-stimulating hormone, luteinizing hormone, sex hormone binding globulin, serum, and testicular testosterone in groups ED and E4D. Furthermore, piperine decreased the activity of germ cell markers and Leydig cellular steroidogenic enzymes in the groups ED and E4D after 60 days. All the above-altered values returned to normal levels after withdrawal period. Histopathological findings also supported the above findings. From the above data, it can be concluded that piperine could be a good lead molecule for the development of reversible oral male contraceptive. Piperine was employed for the contraceptive purposes in traditional medicinePiperine significantly impaired the spermatogenesis by decreasing the testicular hormone synthesis in groups ED and E4DPiperine disrupted the testicular antioxidant system by promoting the ROS production and hydroxyl radical generation in rat testis in groups ED and E4DHistopathological evidence supported the disruption of spermatogenesis by piperineAll the effects of piperine after the treatment period (i.e. 60 days) were

  2. Supportive leadership via rapport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warner, S L

    1981-01-01

    As the health care system is staffed by more and more professionals, the need for more supportive type leadership based on referent power will increase. In order to achieve the goals of the organization, leaders must begin to rely on their ability to communicate "themselves" to others, rather than on their coercive or legitimate power. Rapport (through empathy, respect, and warmth) is suggested as a means of influencing the attitudes of others and developing supportive leadership capabilities. The ever increasing professionalization of radiologic technology will necessitate more supportive type leadership both in the work place and within professional organizations.

  3. Sucrose and IQ induced mutations in rat colon by independent

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Max; Hald, M. T.; Autrup, H.

    2004-01-01

    Sucrose-rich diets have repeatedly been observed to have co-carcinogenic actions in colon and liver of rats and to increase the number of 2-amino-3-methylimidazo[4,5-f]quinoline (IQ) induced aberrant crypt foci in rat colon. To investigate a possible interaction between sucrose and IQ...... on the genotoxicity in rat liver and colon, we gave Big Blue rats(TM) a diet containing sucrose (0%, 3.45% or 13.4% w/w) and/or IQ (70 ppm) for a period of 3 weeks. Sucrose and IQ increased the mutation frequency in the colon. The effect of combined treatments with IQ and sucrose on the mutation frequencies...... was additive indicating that sucrose and IQ act independently. This was supported by the mutation spectra where sucrose expands the background mutations in the colon, whereas IQ, in other studies, more specifically has induced G:C --> T:A transversions. In the liver IQ increased the mutation frequency, whereas...

  4. Sesamolin inhibits lipid peroxidation in rat liver and kidney.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, M H; Naito, M; Tsujihara, N; Osawa, T

    1998-06-01

    Although the sesame lignans, sesaminol and sesamolinol, have been shown to possess antioxidative activity, less is known about the metabolism and antioxidative properties of sesamolin, a major constituent of sesame oil. To determine the ability of sesamolin to act as an antioxidant in vivo, we fed rats a diet containing 1% sesamolin for 2 wk and studied its metabolism and its effects on oxidative stress. About 75% of the ingested sesamolin was excreted unmetabolized in feces, but it was not detected in urine. Sesamolin and its metabolites, sesamol and sesamolinol, were excreted primarily as sulfates and glucuronides. The amount of sesamolin and its metabolites was lower in the plasma than in the liver or kidneys. When we compared rats fed a diet containing 1% sesamolin for 14 d with those fed a control diet, we found that liver weight was significantly greater in the former group. Lipid peroxidation activity, measured as 2-thiobarbituric acid reactive substances, was significantly lower in the kidneys and liver of the sesamolin-fed rats than in the controls. In addition, the amount of 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine excreted in the urine was significantly lower in the sesamolin-fed rats. These results suggest that sesamolin and its metabolites may contribute to the antioxidative properties of sesame seeds and oil and support our hypothesis that sesame lignans reduce susceptibility to oxidative stress.

  5. [Study on EEG changes after occlusal trauma during sleep in rats].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Chun-xiu; Liu, Di; Zhao, Xiao; Wang, Shi-qin; Cao, Jian-bo; Ji, Ping

    2014-02-01

    To explore the electroencephalogram (EEG) changes after occlusal trauma in rats. Health Wistar rats were divided into 2 groups: traumatic occlusion group (1-day, 3-day, 7-day, 14-day, 28-day group) and control group. The electrodes were inserted in the hippocampus of anesthetized rats guided by stereotaxic apparatus of brain and then the hippocampal EEG were recorded during sleep. Data were analysed by SPSS 17.0 software package for ANOVA. The δ waves were increased and the frequency and amplitude of EEG were significantly reduced in 1-day traumatic group(PEEG were significantly increased in 3-day traumatic group(PEEG were significantly increased (PEEG of the rat during sleep. It mainly affects the deep sleep, and reduces sleep quality. Supported by Innovation Fund of Shandong University (2010GN048).

  6. Sign-tracking predicts increased choice of cocaine over food in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tunstall, Brendan J; Kearns, David N

    2015-03-15

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether the tendency to sign-track to a food cue was predictive of rats' choice of cocaine over food. First, rats were trained on a procedure where insertion of a retractable lever was paired with food. A sub-group of rats - sign-trackers - primarily approached and contacted the lever, while another sub-group - goal-trackers - approached the site of food delivery. Rats were then trained on a choice task where they could choose between an infusion of cocaine (1.0 mg/kg) and a food pellet (45 mg). Sign-trackers chose cocaine over food significantly more often than did goal-trackers. These results support the incentive-salience theory of addiction and add to a growing number of studies which suggest that sign-trackers may model an addiction-prone phenotype. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Effect of seven days of spaceflight on hindlimb muscle protein, RNA and DNA in adult rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steffen, J. M.; Musacchia, X. J.

    1985-01-01

    Effects of seven days of spaceflight on skeletal muscle (soleus, gastrocnemius, EDL) content of protein, RNA and DNA were determined in adult rats. Whereas total protein contents were reduced in parallel with muscle weights, myofibrillar protein appeared to be more affected. There were no significant changes in absolute DNA contents, but a significant (P less than 0.05) increase in DNA concentration (microgram/milligram) in soleus muscles from flight rats. Absolute RNA contents were significantly (P less than 0.025) decreased in the soleus and gastrocnemius muscles of flight rats, with RNA concentrations reduced 15-30 percent. These results agree with previous ground-based observations on the suspended rat with unloaded hindlimbs and support continued use of this model.

  8. Fathers Can Support Breastfeeding

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... topics covered in each of the materials. FATHERS CAN SUPPORT BREASTFEEDING Poster - FNS 354 Be a Part ... following topics: Why Should Fathers Encourage Breastfeeding? How Can Fathers Be a Part of the Breastfeeding Team? ...

  9. Anode Support Creep

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2015-01-01

    Initial reduction temperature of an SOC is kept higher than the highest intended operation temperature of the SOC to keep the electrolyte under compression by the Anode Support at all temperatures equal to and below the maximum intended operation temperature....

  10. Teachers: The vision supported

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tuomi, J.

    1994-12-31

    A support system is necessary to implement the vision of standards-based science education. The National Science Resources Center has studied isolated areas where innovations have succeeded and finds that the successful enterprises have these elements in common: 1. The availability of high-quality, inquiry-centered science curriculum units that are appropriate for children; 2. Teacher education programs to prepare and support elementary teachers to teach hands-on, inquiry-centered science; 3. Support systems for supplying science materials and equipment to teachers; 4. Assessment methods for evaluating student performance that are consistent with the goals of an effective science program; and, 5. Administrative and community support for an effective science program.

  11. [Support in addictology: hydrotherapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hibou, Alain; Bordeau, Annick; Pean, Isabelle; Rouland, Elina; Charpentier, Maud

    2013-01-01

    Hydrotherapy is a corporal mediation treatment used with patients with addictions by the Mayenne centre for addiction support therapy and prevention. A demonstration of the benefit of hydrotherapy for these patients through a patient's case.

  12. Hemodynamic Support in Sepsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatih Yildiz

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Sepsis is called systemic inflammatory response syndrome due to infection. When added to organs failure and perfusion abnormality is defined in severe sepsis, Hypotension that do not respond to fluid therapy is as defined septic shock. Fluid resuscitation is a most important parts of the treatment in patients with septic shock. Ongoing hypotension that despite of the adequate fluid therapy, vasopressor support initiation is required. Sepsis and septic shock, hemodynamic support is often understood as the hemodynamic support. The different approaches to the development of methods to track and objective comes up. Patients with severe sepsis and septic shock should be follow in the intensive care unit and rapid fluid replacement and effectual hemodynamic support should be provided.

  13. Chromatography resin support

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobos, James G.

    2002-01-01

    An apparatus and method of using an improved chromatography resin support is disclosed. The chromatography support platform is provided by a stainless steel hollow cylinder adapted for being inserted into a chromatography column. An exterior wall of the stainless steel cylinder defines a groove for carrying therein an "O"-ring. The upper surface of the stainless steel column is covered by a fine stainless steel mesh welded to the edges of the stainless steel cylinder. When placed upon a receiving ledge defined within a chromatography column, the "O"-ring provides a fluid tight seal with the inner edge wall of the chromatography cylinder. The stainless steel mesh supports the chromatography matrix and provides a back flushable support which is economical and simple to construct.

  14. Measurement for Decision Support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheehan, Bernard S.

    1984-01-01

    In order to explore possible impacts of changing information technology on the role of the institutional research analyst, three institutional research foundations, measurement, human information processing, and decision support technology are examined. (Author/MLW)

  15. Online social support networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Neil; Atreja, Ashish

    2015-04-01

    Peer support groups have a long history and have been shown to improve health outcomes. With the increasing familiarity with online social networks like Facebook and ubiquitous access to the Internet, online social support networks are becoming popular. While studies have shown the benefit of these networks in providing emotional support or meeting informational needs, robust data on improving outcomes such as a decrease in health services utilization or reduction in adverse outcomes is lacking. These networks also pose unique challenges in the areas of patient privacy, funding models, quality of content, and research agendas. Addressing these concerns while creating patient-centred, patient-powered online support networks will help leverage these platforms to complement traditional healthcare delivery models in the current environment of value-based care.

  16. Editorial: Support (November 2007

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dru Lavigne

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available What is your first thought when you encounter the term "open source support"? A programmer typing the answer to a question using a chat utility? Hours spent scouring the Internet for a working configuration sample? Contacting a support engineer at a commercial call centre? If you find it difficult to think about a support engineer, you're not alone. Actuate's recently published 2007 Open Source Survey of senior personnel from financial services, Telco, and public sector organizations across North America and Europe indicates that 46.3% of respondents cite the lack of availability of long term support as a major barrier to their company's adoption of open source technologies.

  17. Supported inorganic membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sehgal, Rakesh; Brinker, Charles Jeffrey

    1998-01-01

    Supported inorganic membranes capable of molecular sieving, and methods for their production, are provided. The subject membranes exhibit high flux and high selectivity. The subject membranes are substantially defect free and less than about 100 nm thick. The pores of the subject membranes have an average critical pore radius of less than about 5 .ANG., and have a narrow pore size distribution. The subject membranes are prepared by coating a porous substrate with a polymeric sol, preferably under conditions of low relative pressure of the liquid constituents of the sol. The coated substrate is dried and calcined to produce the subject supported membrane. Also provided are methods of derivatizing the surface of supported inorganic membranes with metal alkoxides. The subject membranes find use in a variety of applications, such as the separation of constituents of gaseous streams, as catalysts and catalyst supports, and the like.

  18. Cable Supported Bridges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gimsing, Niels Jørgen

    Cable supported bridges in the form of suspension bridges and cable-stayed bridges are distinguished by their ability to overcome large spans.The book concentrates on the synthesis of cable supported bridges, covering both design and construction aspects. The analytical part covers simple methods...... to quantify the different structural configurations and allows a preliminary optimization of the main structure.Included are the most recent advances in structural design, corrosion protection of cables, aerodynamic safety, and erection procedures....

  19. STATE SUPPORT IN FISHERY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irena Jahutka

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available By passing the law on state support in agriculture, fishery and forestry the former support system has been changed. Fishery support beneficiaries can use several kinds of support and help. Former financial stimulations for fishery regulated by law from 1995 to 1st January 2003 were settled by the production stimulation model. Besides that well received model, there are the capital investment model, the support in production insurance, the right to use blue diesel, and granting credit for production of freshwater and saltwater fry, adult fish and shells. These five models of support and help can be used by freshwater and saltwater fish and shell breeders, while for fishing the marine fish the production stimulation model is applied (fishing of small pelagic fish, as well as the capital investment model and right to use blue diesel. Marine and freshwater processors can use the production stimulation and the capital investment model. All these models have in common the fact that all physical and legal entities registered for fishing activities (having licence for commercial fishery, aquaculture (the licence for aquaculture or the one for fish and other marine organisam breeding and processing (having the regulated veterinarian and sanitary conditions, the registration document and having been registered in the List of approved facilities have the right to use them.

  20. LHC magnet support post

    CERN Multimedia

    1995-01-01

    A prototype magnet support for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The magnet supports have to bridge a difference in temperature of 300 degrees. Electrical connections, instrumentation and the posts on which the magnets stand are the only points where heat transfer can happen through conduction. They are all carefully designed to draw off heat progressively. The posts are made of 4 mm thick glass-fibre– epoxy composite material. Each post supports 10 000 kg of magnet and leaks just 0.1 W of heat. This piece required a long development period which started in the early ’90s and continued until the end of the decade. The wires next to the support post are wires from strain gauges, which are employed to measure the stress level in the material when the support is mechanically loaded. These supports are mechanically optimized to withstand a weight of up to 100Kn (10 tons) while being as thin as possible to minimize conduction heat to magnets. This is the reason why the stress measurement was extensively done...

  1. Speech perception in rats: use of duration and rise time cues in labeling of affricate/fricative sounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Phil; Howell, Peter; Sackin, Stevie; Pizzimenti, Lisa; Rosen, Stuart

    2003-01-01

    The voiceless affricate/fricative contrast has played an important role in developing auditory theories of speech perception. This type of theory draws some of its support from experimental data on animals. However, nothing is known about differential responding of affricate/fricative continua by animals. In the current study, the ability of hooded rats to "label" an affricate/fricative continuum was tested. Transfer (without retraining) to analogous nonspeech continua was also tested. The nonspeech continua were chosen so that if transfer occurred, it would indicate whether the animals had learned to use rise time or duration cues to differentiate affricates from fricatives. The data from 9 of 10 rats indicated that rats can discriminate between these cues and do so in a similar manner to human subjects. The data from 9 of 10 rats also demonstrated that the rise time of the stimulus was the basis of the discrimination; the remaining rat appeared to use duration. PMID:14674729

  2. Characterization of primary rat nasal epithelial cultures in CFTR knockout rats as a model for CF sinus disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tipirneni, Kiranya E; Cho, Do-Yeon; Skinner, Daniel F; Zhang, Shaoyan; Mackey, Calvin; Lim, Dong-Jin; Woodworth, Bradford A

    2017-11-01

    The objectives of the current experiments were to develop and characterize primary rat nasal epithelial cultures and evaluate their usefulness as a model of cystic fibrosis (CF) sinonasal transepithelial transport and CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) function. Laboratory in vitro and animal studies. CFTR+/+ and CFTR-/- rat nasal septal epithelia (RNSE) were cultured on semipermeable supports at an air-liquid interface to confluence and full differentiation. Monolayers were mounted in Ussing chambers for pharmacologic manipulation of ion transport and compared to similar filters containing murine (MNSE) and human (HSNE) epithelia. Histology and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were completed. Real-time polymerase chain reaction of CFTR+/+ RNSE, MNSE, and HSNE was performed to evaluate relative CFTR gene expression. Forskolin-stimulated anion transport (ΔIsc in μA/cm2 ) was significantly greater in epithelia derived from CFTR+/+ when compared to CFTR-/- animals (100.9 ± 3.7 vs. 10.5 ± 0.9; P rats at 4 months. CFTR expression was similar among species. The successful development of the CFTR-/- rat enables improved evaluation of CF sinus disease based on characteristic abnormalities of ion transport. NA. Laryngoscope, 127:E384-E391, 2017. © 2017 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  3. Acetaminophen-induced liver injury in rats and mice: Comparison of protein adducts, mitochondrial dysfunction, and oxidative stress in the mechanism of toxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGill, Mitchell R.; Williams, C. David; Xie, Yuchao; Ramachandran, Anup; Jaeschke, Hartmut, E-mail: hjaeschke@kumc.edu

    2012-11-01

    Acetaminophen (APAP) overdose is the most common cause of acute liver failure in the West. In mice, APAP hepatotoxicity can be rapidly induced with a single dose. Because it is both clinically relevant and experimentally convenient, APAP intoxication has become a popular model of liver injury. Early data demonstrated that rats are resistant to APAP toxicity. As a result, mice are the preferred species for mechanistic studies. Furthermore, recent work has shown that the mechanisms of APAP toxicity in humans are similar to mice. Nevertheless, some investigators still use rats. New mechanistic information from the last forty years invites a reevaluation of the differences between these species. Comparison may provide interesting insights and confirm or exclude the rat as an option for APAP studies. To this end, we treated rats and mice with APAP and measured parameters of liver injury, APAP metabolism, oxidative stress, and activation of the c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK). Consistent with earlier data, we found that rats were highly resistant to APAP toxicity. Although overall APAP metabolism was similar in both species, mitochondrial protein adducts were significantly lower in rats. Accordingly, rats also had less oxidative stress. Finally, while mice showed extensive activation and mitochondrial translocation of JNK, this could not be detected in rat livers. These data support the hypothesis that mitochondrial dysfunction is critical for the development of necrosis after APAP treatment. Because mitochondrial damage also occurs in humans, rats are not a clinically relevant species for studies of APAP hepatotoxicity. Highlights: ► Acetaminophen overdose causes severe liver injury only in mice but not in rats. ► APAP causes hepatic GSH depletion and protein adduct formation in rats and mice. ► Less protein adducts were measured in rat liver mitochondria compared to mouse. ► No oxidant stress, peroxynitrite formation or JNK activation was present in rats. ► The

  4. Supportive therapy for schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckley, Lucy A; Maayan, Nicola; Soares-Weiser, Karla; Adams, Clive E

    2015-04-14

    Supportive therapy is often used in everyday clinical care and in evaluative studies of other treatments. To review the effects of supportive therapy compared with standard care, or other treatments in addition to standard care for people with schizophrenia. For this update, we searched the Cochrane Schizophrenia Group's register of trials (November 2012). All randomised trials involving people with schizophrenia and comparing supportive therapy with any other treatment or standard care. We reliably selected studies, quality rated these and extracted data. For dichotomous data, we estimated the risk ratio (RR) using a fixed-effect model with 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Where possible, we undertook intention-to-treat analyses. For continuous data, we estimated the mean difference (MD) fixed-effect with 95% CIs. We estimated heterogeneity (I(2) technique) and publication bias. We used GRADE to rate quality of evidence. Four new trials were added after the 2012 search. The review now includes 24 relevant studies, with 2126 participants. Overall, the evidence was very low quality.We found no significant differences in the primary outcomes of relapse, hospitalisation and general functioning between supportive therapy and standard care.There were, however, significant differences favouring other psychological or psychosocial treatments over supportive therapy. These included hospitalisation rates (4 RCTs, n = 306, RR 1.82 CI 1.11 to 2.99, very low quality of evidence), clinical improvement in mental state (3 RCTs, n = 194, RR 1.27 CI 1.04 to 1.54, very low quality of evidence) and satisfaction of treatment for the recipient of care (1 RCT, n = 45, RR 3.19 CI 1.01 to 10.7, very low quality of evidence). For this comparison, we found no evidence of significant differences for rate of relapse, leaving the study early and quality of life.When we compared supportive therapy to cognitive behavioural therapy CBT), we again found no significant differences in primary

  5. Hepato-renal protective effects of hydroethanolic extract of Senna alata on enzymatic and nonenzymatic antioxidant systems in streptozotocin induced diabetic rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohanasundaram Sugumar

    2016-12-01

    Conclusion: From the above said observations, it was very clear that, Senna alata has helped to manage the oxidative tension in diabetic rats, which in turn may greatly support the hypoglycaemic potency of Senna alata L.

  6. Population Structure of Rat-Derived Pneumocystis carinii in Danish Wild Rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Palmer, Robert J.; Settnes, Osvald P.; Lodal, Jens

    2000-01-01

    The rat model of Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia is frequently used to study human P. carinii infection, but there are many differences between the rat and human infections. We studied naturally acquired P. carinii in wild rats to examine the relevance of the rat model for human infection. P. cari...

  7. TRANSFER OF A RESPONSE TO NAIVE RATS BY INJECTION OF RIBONUCLEIC ACID EXTRACTED FROM TRAINED RATS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    BABICH, F R; JACOBSON, A L; BUBASH, S; JACOBSON, A

    1965-08-06

    Rats were trained in a Skinner box to approach the food cup when a distinct click was sounded. Ribonucleic acid was extracted from the brains of these rats and injected into untrained rats. The untrained rats then manifested a significant tendency (as compared with controls) to approach the food cup when the click, unaccompanied by food, was presented.

  8. Peer influences on drug self-administration: an econometric analysis in socially housed rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peitz, Geoffrey W; Strickland, Justin C; Pitts, Elizabeth G; Foley, Mark; Tonidandel, Scott; Smith, Mark A

    2013-04-01

    Social-learning theories of substance use propose that members of peer groups influence the drug use of other members by selectively modeling, reinforcing, and punishing either abstinence-related or drug-related behaviors. The objective of the present study was to examine the social influences on cocaine self-administration in isolated and socially housed rats, under conditions where the socially housed rats were tested simultaneously with their partner in the same chamber. To this end, male rats were obtained at weaning and housed in isolated or pair-housed conditions for 6 weeks. Rats were then implanted with intravenous catheters and cocaine self-administration was examined in custom-built operant conditioning chambers that allowed two rats to be tested simultaneously. For some socially housed subjects, both rats had simultaneous access to cocaine; for others, only one rat of the pair had access to cocaine. An econometric analysis was applied to the data, and the reinforcing strength of cocaine was measured by examining consumption (i.e. quantity demanded) and elasticity of demand as a function of price, which was manipulated by varying the dose and ratio requirements on a fixed ratio schedule of reinforcement. Cocaine consumption decreased as a function of price in all groups. Elasticity of demand did not vary across groups, but consumption was significantly lower in socially housed rats paired with a rat without access to cocaine. These data suggest that the presence of an abstaining peer decreases the reinforcing strength of cocaine, thus supporting the development of social interventions in drug abuse prevention and treatment programs.

  9. Antidiabetic and antihyperlipidemic potential of Abelmoschus esculentus (L. Moench. in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V Sabitha

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives : The present investigation was aimed to study the antidiabetic and antihyperlipidemic potential of Abelmoschus esculentus peel and seed powder (AEPP and AESP in streptozotocin (STZ-induced diabetic rats. Materials and Methods : Acute toxicity of AEPP and AESP was studied in rats at 2000 mg/kg dose and diabetes was induced in rats by administration of STZ (60 mg/kg, i.p.. After 14 days of blood glucose stabilization, diabetic rats received AEPP, AESP, and glibenclamide up to 28 days. The blood samples were collected on day 28 to estimate the hemoglobin (Hb, glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c, serum glutamate-pyruvate transferase (SGPT, total protein (TP, and lipid profile levels. Results : In acute toxicity study, AESP and AESP did not show any toxicity or death up to a dose of 2000 mg/kg. Therefore, to assess the antidiabetic action, one by fifth and one by tenth dose of both powders were selected. Administration of AEPP and AESP at 100 and 200 mg/kg dose in diabetic rats showed significant (P < 0.001 reduction in blood glucose level and increase in body weight than diabetic control rats. A significant (P < 0.001 increased level of Hb, TP, and decreased level of HbA1c, SGPT were observed after the treatment of both doses of AEPP and AESP. Also, elevated lipid profile levels returned to near normal in diabetic rats after the administration of AEPP and AESP, 100 and 200 mg/kg dose, compared to diabetic control rats. Conclusion : The present study results, first time, support the antidiabetic and antihyperlipidemic potential of A. esculentus peel and seed powder in diabetic rats.

  10. Visual Decision Support Tool for Supporting Asset ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abstract:Managing urban water infrastructures faces the challenge of jointly dealing with assets of diverse types, useful life, cost, ages and condition. Service quality and sustainability require sound long-term planning, well aligned with tactical and operational planning and management. In summary, the objective of an integrated approach to infrastructure asset management is to assist utilities answer the following questions:•Who are we at present?•What service do we deliver?•What do we own?•Where do we want to be in the long-term?•How do we get there?The AWARE-P approach (www.aware-p.org) offers a coherent methodological framework and a valuable portfolio of software tools. It is designed to assist water supply and wastewater utility decision-makers in their analyses and planning processes. It is based on a Plan-Do-Check-Act process and is in accordance with the key principles of the International Standards Organization (ISO) 55000 standards on asset management. It is compatible with, and complementary to WERF’s SIMPLE framework. The software assists in strategic, tactical, and operational planning, through a non-intrusive, web-based, collaborative environment where objectives and metrics drive IAM planning. It is aimed at industry professionals and managers, as well as at the consultants and technical experts that support them. It is easy to use and maximizes the value of information from multiple existing data sources, both in da

  11. Palpability Support Demonstrated

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brønsted, Jeppe; Grönvall, Erik; Fors, David

    2007-01-01

    the situation. The concept of palpable computing, introduced by the PalCom project, denotes systems which support such understandability. In PalCom, a set of prototype scenarios provide input for an open software architecture and a conceptual framework for palpable computing. One of these prototype scenarios...... is based on the Active Surfaces concept in which therapists rehabilitate physically and mentally impaired children by means of an activity that stimulates the children both physically and cognitively. In this paper we demonstrate how palpability can be supported in a prototype of the Active Surfaces....... Services on the tiles have been developed using the PalCom service framework that allows them to be combined into PalCom assemblies. The support for palpability is shown by examples of use scenarios from the work of the therapist who can inspect and alter the runtime state of the tiles to change...

  12. Decision support systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, L.N.; Noe, E.; Langvad, A.M.

    2007-01-01

    by these three groups to make their decisions varies and therefore different ways of using decision support systems need to be provided. Decision support systems need to be developed in close dialogue and collaboration with user groups.......The highly complex knowledge of scientific disciplines makes nuanced analysis and modelling possible. However, the information produced often does not reach farmers because it is presented in a way that does not correspond to the way their work is carried out in practice. The decision support...... 1000 farmers). A sociological investigation of farmers' decision-making styles in the area of crop protection has shown that arable farmers can be divided into three major groups: (a) system-orientated farmers, (b) experience-based farmers and (c) advisory-orientated farmers. The information required...

  13. Enhanced muscimol-induced behavioral responses after 6-OHDA lesions: relevance to susceptibility for self-mutilation behavior in neonatally lesioned rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breese, G.R.; Hulebak, K.L.; Napier, T.C.; Baumeister, A.; Frye, G.; Mueller, R.A.

    2010-01-01

    Adult rats lesioned with 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA), either as neonates or as adults, demonstrated increased turning, compared to unlesioned controls, when muscimol was unilaterally microinjected into the substantia nigra reticulata (SNR). At the higher doses of muscimol, the lesioned rats were so intensely lateralized that circling was impeded. These data suggest a functional supersensitivity of receptors associated with GABA function in the SNR of 6-OHDA-lesioned rats. When 30 ng muscimol was administered bilaterally into the SNR, self-mutilation behavior (SMB) was observed in 2/11 of the control unlesioned rats, in 0/8 adult 6-OHDA-lesioned rats, and in 11/11 of the neonatally-lesioned rats tested. The ability of muscimol to produce SMB in the rats lesioned as neonates was dose related. Behavioral observations indicated that behaviors associated with SMB (self-biting and taffy pulling) were present in neonatal, but not adult lesioned rats. Behavioral responses to dopamine agonist administration were also different between rats lesioned as neonates and those lesioned as adults with 6-OHDA. These data support the view that lesions of dopaminergic neurons cause an increased functional responsiveness of receptors acted upon by muscimol in the SNR, and that the increased susceptibility for SMB in neonatally lesioned rats is determined by neurons distal to the GABA receptor complex in the SNR. PMID:3104958

  14. A temporary face support

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Popov, V.I.; Bakhtin, V.N.; Tolkachev, N.I.

    1980-03-30

    A temporary face support is proposed. It includes a beam supported by hydraulic jacks on the housing of the cutter-loader with a working tool and rotary pressure regulator. It differs in that to decrease the volume of unsecured roofing in the face space between the leading edge of the beam and the cutting tool of the cutter-loader, the beam is hinged onto the housing of the rotary pressure regulator by a fastened connecting rod, and the hydraulic jacks are provided with additional powered elements with a mechanism that regulates the length of the cut-off plate of the hydraulic pump when the seam pressure changes.

  15. Starship Life Support

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Harry W.

    2009-01-01

    The design and mass cost of a starship and its life support system are investigated. The mission plan for a multi generational interstellar voyage to colonize a new planet is used to describe the starship design, including the crew habitat, accommodations, and life support. Only current technology is assumed. Highly reliable life support systems can be provided with reasonably small additional mass, suggesting that they can support long duration missions. Bioregenerative life support, growing crop plants that provide food, water, and oxygen, has been thought to need less mass than providing stored food for long duration missions. The large initial mass of hydroponics systems is paid for over time by saving the mass of stored food. However, the yearly logistics mass required to support a bioregenerative system exceeds the mass of food solids it produces, so that supplying stored dehydrated food always requires less mass than bioregenerative food production. A mixed system that grows about half the food and supplies the other half dehydrated has advantages that allow it to breakeven with stored dehydrated food in about 66 years. However, moderate increases in the hydroponics system mass to achieve high reliability, such as adding spares that double the system mass and replacing the initial system every 100 years, increase the mass cost of bioregenerative life support. In this case, the high reliability half food growing, half food supplying system does not breakeven for 389 years. An even higher reliability half and half system, with three times original system mass and replacing the system every 50 years, never breaks even. Growing food for starship life support requires more mass than providing dehydrated food, even for multigeneration voyages of hundreds of years. The benefits of growing some food may justify the added mass cost. Much more efficient recycling food production is wanted but may not be possible. A single multigenerational interstellar voyage to

  16. Aerogel-supported filament

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wuest, Craig R.; Tillotson, Thomas M.; Johnson, III, Coleman V.

    1995-01-01

    The present invention is a thin filament embedded in a low density aerogel for use in radiation detection instruments and incandescent lamps. The aerogel provides a supportive matrix that is thermally and electrically nonconductive, mechanically strong, highly porous, gas-permeable, and transparent to ionizing radiation over short distances. A low density, open-cell aerogel is cast around a fine filament or wire, which allows the wire to be positioned with little or no tension and keeps the wire in place in the event of breakage. The aerogel support reduces the stresses on the wire caused by vibrational, gravitational, electrical, and mechanical forces.

  17. Dependence of normal development of skeletal muscle in neonatal rats on load bearing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohira, Y.; Tanaka, T.; Yoshinaga, T.; Kawano, F.; Nomura, T.; Nonaka, I.; Allen, D. L.; Roy, R. R.; Edgerton, V. R.

    2000-01-01

    Antigravity function plays an important role in determining the morphological and physiological properties of the neuromuscular system. Inhibition of the normal development of the neuromuscular system is induced by hindlimb unloading during the neonatal period in rats. However, the role of gravitational loading on the development of skeletal muscle in rats is not well understood. It could be hypothesized that during the early postnatal period, i.e. when minimal weight-supporting activity occurs, the activity imposed by gravity would be of little consequence in directing the normal development of the skeletal musculature. We have addressed this issue by limiting the amount of postnatal weight-support activity of the hindlimbs of rats during the lactation period. We have focused on the development of three characteristics of the muscle fibers, i.e. size, myonuclear number and myosin heavy chain expression.

  18. Whey Protein Concentrate and Dexamethasone Protected Rat ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr Olaleye

    ABSTRACT. The possible radioprotective effect of Immunocal® (whey protein]) supplement and dexamethasone on gamma-irradiated cerebellar tissue of Wistar rat was investigated in this study. Forty male albino rats were acclimatized and randomized into four groups of 10 animals each. Group I rats served as control; ...

  19. seed on haematological parameters of albino rats

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr Ejere

    2015-06-23

    Jun 23, 2015 ... albino rats (Rattus novergicus). Ejere, Vincent C.*, Ugwu, Godwin C., Chukwuka, Christian O. and Nnamonu, Emmanuel I. ... Similarly, lectin from M. sloanei has been reported as an effective and suitable cell ... male albino rats were then assigned into four groups (A, B, C, and. D) of 12 rats per group.

  20. The serotonin transporter knockout rat : A review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Olivier, Jocelien; Cools, Alexander; Ellenbroek, Bart A.; Cuppen, E.; Homberg, Judith; Kalueff, Allan V.; LaPorte, Justin L.

    2010-01-01

    This chapter dicusses the most recent data on the serotonin transporter knock-out rat, a unique rat model that has been generated by target-selected N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU) driven mutagenesis. The knock-out rat is the result of a premature stopcodon in the serotonin transporter gene, and the

  1. Tuberculosis Detection by Giant African Pouched Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poling, Alan; Weetjens, Bart; Cox, Christophe; Beyene, Negussie; Durgin, Amy; Mahoney, Amanda

    2011-01-01

    In recent years, operant discrimination training procedures have been used to teach giant African pouched rats to detect tuberculosis (TB) in human sputum samples. This article summarizes how the rats are trained and used operationally, as well as their performance in studies published to date. Available data suggest that pouched rats, which can…

  2. Whey protein concentrate and dexamethasone protected rat ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The possible radioprotective effect of Immunocal® (whey protein]) supplement and dexamethasone on gamma-irradiated cerebellar tissue of Wistar rat was investigated in this study. Forty male albino rats were acclimatized and randomized into four groups of 10 animals each. Group I rats served as control; Group II: ...

  3. Chronic study on BHT in rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Würtzen, G.; Olsen, P.

    1986-01-01

    Groups of 40, 29, 39 and 44 F0 rats of each sex were fed a semi-synthetic diet containing butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT) in concentrations to provide intakes of 0, 25, 100 or 500 mg/kg body weight/day, respectively. The F0 rats were mated, and groups of 100, 80, 80 and 100 F1 rats of each sex wer...

  4. Rat penis as a replantation model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karamürsel, Sebat; Karamürsel, Tamer; Celebioğlu, Selim

    2005-11-01

    The aim of this study is to assess the feasibility of rat penile replantation as a new microsurgical training model. The study was performed in 2 parts. ANATOMIC STUDIES: Fifteen Wistar albino rats were used to study and document the penile vascular anatomy. In 5 rats, dissections were performed after colored silicone injections, while 5 rats were operated under anesthesia to develop the strategy of flap elevation. In the remaining 5 rats, microangiographic study was performed with silicone-lead oxide mixture. FLAP STUDIES: As flap studies in 5 rats, penis were elevated based on right-side internal pudendal artery and internal pudendal vein and resutured. In 6 rats, penis were elevated as free flaps, and in 3 rats the penis were implanted in right thigh of the rats being the femoral artery and vein recipient. In the remaining 3 rats, penis were resutured in their original place, with saphenous artery and vein being the recipient and rerouted to the pubic region. At postoperative fifth day, the penis were examined for viability, and selected ones were histologically examined. Rat penis has a dual blood supply from bilateral internal pudendal arteries. Venous drainage is via both crural veins and dorsal vein. One side of the internal pudendal artery and anastomotic vein (branch of pudendal plexus) may be used as the vascular pedicle of the flap. Rat penis may be successfully elevated as a free flap and also may be replanted in its original place.

  5. Neuroprotective Effect of Melatonin Against PCBs Induced Behavioural, Molecular and Histological Changes in Cerebral Cortex of Adult Male Wistar Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bavithra, S; Selvakumar, K; Sundareswaran, L; Arunakaran, J

    2017-02-01

    There is ample evidence stating Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) as neurotoxins. In the current study, we have analyzed the behavioural impact of PCBs exposure in adult rats and assessed the simultaneous effect of antioxidant melatonin against the PCBs action. The rats were grouped into four and treated intraperitoneally with vehicle, PCBs, PCBs + melatonin and melatonin alone for 30 days, respectively. After the treatment period the rats were tested for locomotor activity and anxiety behaviour analysis. We confirmed the neuronal damage in the cerebral cortex by molecular and histological analysis. Our data indicates that there is impairment in locomotor activity and behaviour of PCBs treated rats compared to control. The simultaneous melatonin treated rat shows increased motor coordination and less anxiety like behaviour compared to PCBs treated rats. Molecular and histological analysis supports that, the impaired motor coordination in PCBs treated rats is due to neurodegeneration in motor cortex region. The results proved that melatonin treatment improved the motor co-ordination and reduced anxiety behaviour, prevented neurodegeneration in the cerebral cortex of PCBs-exposed adult male rats.

  6. The Effects of Habitat Fragmentation on the Behavior of the Cotton Rat (Sigmodon hispidus):Phase II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barrett, G.W.; Drelin, E.A.; Mabry, K.E.

    2001-07-01

    The authors studied the movements of cotton rats and cotton mice in experimental landscapes at the SRS in order to determine the effects of fragmentation and connectivity between habitat patches on dispersal movements and population dynamics. Densities between connected and isolated patches were not different. Small patches tended to support higher densities. Cotton rats were more common in corridors than expected and cotton mice were more likely to leave by a corridor.

  7. Further evidence for hierarchical chunking in rat spatial memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macuda, T; Roberts, W A

    1995-01-01

    In Experiment 1, rats were given a test to determine the order of preference among 3 types of food. Two groups of rats then were trained on a 12-arm radial maze in Experiment 2, with the 3 foods placed in fixed-arm locations for 1 group and in locations that varied randomly across sessions for the other group. The results replicated those of Dallal and Meck (1990) by showing faster learning and more clustering of arm choices by food type in the fixed-locations group than in the random-locations group. Two further experiments were performed to test the chunking hypothesis. Observations of working memory in Experiment 3 and the reorganization of reference memory in Experiment 4 both supported the chunking hypothesis by showing superior spatial memory and arm chunking by food type when chunk integrity was maintained than when it was compromised.

  8. Supporting Transparency between Students

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalsgaard, Christian

    The paper presents the results of a case study that explores the potentials of weblogs and social bookmarking to support transparency in a university course. In the course, groups of students used weblogs and social bookmarking in their work. The objective of the case was to empower students...

  9. Supporting Information.pdf

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    Supporting information. Excited State Dynamics of 9,9´-Bianthryl in Room Temperature Ionic Liquids as. Revealed by Picosecond Time-Resolved Fluorescence Study. Dinesh Chandra Khara, Aniruddha Paul, K. Santhosh and Anunay Samanta*. School of Chemistry, University of Hyderabad, Hyderabad 500046, India.

  10. Student support infrastructure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nøhr, Christian

    2004-01-01

    The development and diffusion of distance learning programmes has made it possible for students to choose their preferred location to study and consequently, they are expected to be able to use new technologies in order to gain necessary support in a wide range of ares. When universities implement...

  11. Support Vector Components Analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Ree, Michiel; Roerdink, Johannes; Phillips, Christophe; Garraux, Gaetan; Salmon, Eric; Wiering, Marco

    2017-01-01

    In this paper we propose a novel method for learning a distance metric in the process of training Support Vector Machines (SVMs) with the radial basis function kernel. A transformation matrix is adapted in such a way that the SVM dual objective of a classification problem is optimized. By using a

  12. Support or Barrier?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sanden, Guro Refsum; Lønsmann, Dorte

    This study offers a critical look at how corporate-level language management influences front-line language practices among employees in three multinational corporations (MNCs) headquartered in Scandinavia. Based on interview and document data, we examine, firstly, what front-line practices emplo...... to a discussion of how a company’s language policy may be seen as both support and a barrier....

  13. Potential support ratios

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjærgaard, Søren; Canudas-Romo, Vladimir

    2017-01-01

    The ‘prospective potential support ratio’ has been proposed by researchers as a measure that accurately quantifies the burden of ageing, by identifying the fraction of a population that has passed a certain measure of longevity, for example, 17 years of life expectancy. Nevertheless, the prospect......The ‘prospective potential support ratio’ has been proposed by researchers as a measure that accurately quantifies the burden of ageing, by identifying the fraction of a population that has passed a certain measure of longevity, for example, 17 years of life expectancy. Nevertheless......, the prospective potential support ratio usually focuses on the current mortality schedule, or period life expectancy. Instead, in this paper we look at the actual mortality experienced by cohorts in a population, using cohort life tables. We analyse differences between the two perspectives using mortality models......, historical data, and forecasted data. Cohort life expectancy takes future mortality improvements into account, unlike period life expectancy, leading to a higher prospective potential support ratio. Our results indicate that using cohort instead of period life expectancy returns around 0.5 extra younger...

  14. Supporting clinicians in infrastructuring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, Jesper; Hertzum, Morten; Karasti, Helena

    2015-01-01

    the notion of infrastructuring, we carry out an infrastructural analysis of eWBs and approach our joint efforts as unfolding and continuing the con-figuration of participatory design activities. We identify a need for local support and novel competences among the clinicians in order for them to engage...

  15. Evaluating meeting support tools

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Post, W.M.; Huis in 't Veld, M. M.A.; Boogaard, S.A.A. van den

    2007-01-01

    Many attempts are underway for developing meeting support tools, but less attention is paid to the evaluation of meetingware. This article describes the development and testing of an instrument for evaluating meeting tools. First, we specified the object of evaluation -meetings- by means of a set of

  16. Evaluating meeting support tools

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Post, W.M.; Huis in't Veld, M.A.A.; Boogaard, S.A.A. van den

    2008-01-01

    Many attempts are underway for developing meeting support tools, but less attention is paid to the evaluation of meetingware. This article describes the development and testing of an instrument for evaluating meeting tools. First, we specified the object of evaluation - meetings - by means of a set

  17. Visual management support system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee Anderson; Jerry Mosier; Geoffrey Chandler

    1979-01-01

    The Visual Management Support System (VMSS) is an extension of an existing computer program called VIEWIT, which has been extensively used by the U. S. Forest Service. The capabilities of this program lie in the rapid manipulation of large amounts of data, specifically opera-ting as a tool to overlay or merge one set of data with another. VMSS was conceived to...

  18. Supporting Music Teacher Mentors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaffini, Erin Dineen

    2015-01-01

    While much discussion and research is focused on the importance of music teacher mentors for preservice teachers and novice in-service music educators, little discussion has been devoted to the topic of how we, as members of the music education profession, can support the role of music teacher mentors. This article explores some of the benefits…

  19. Rhode Island Model Evaluation & Support System: Support Professional. Edition II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhode Island Department of Education, 2015

    2015-01-01

    Rhode Island educators believe that implementing a fair, accurate, and meaningful evaluation and support system for support professionals will help improve student outcomes. The primary purpose of the Rhode Island Model Support Professional Evaluation and Support System (Rhode Island Model) is to help all support professionals do their best work…

  20. NASA Weather Support 2017

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, Matt

    2017-01-01

    In the mid to late 1980's, as NASA was studying ways to improve weather forecasting capabilities to reduce excessive weather launch delays and to reduce excessive weather Launch Commit Criteria (LCC) waivers, the Challenger Accident occurred and the AC-67 Mishap occurred.[1] NASA and USAF weather personnel had advance knowledge of extremely high levels of weather hazards that ultimately caused or contributed to both of these accidents. In both cases, key knowledge of the risks posed by violations of weather LCC was not in the possession of final decision makers on the launch teams. In addition to convening the mishap boards for these two lost missions, NASA convened expert meteorological boards focusing on weather support. These meteorological boards recommended the development of a dedicated organization with the highest levels of weather expertise and influence to support all of American spaceflight. NASA immediately established the Weather Support Office (WSO) in the Office of Space Flight (OSF), and in coordination with the United Stated Air Force (USAF), initiated an overhaul of the organization and an improvement in technology used for weather support as recommended. Soon after, the USAF established a senior civilian Launch Weather Officer (LWO) position to provide meteorological support and continuity of weather expertise and knowledge over time. The Applied Meteorology Unit (AMU) was established by NASA, USAF, and the National Weather Service to support initiatives to place new tools and methods into an operational status. At the end of the Shuttle Program, after several weather office reorganizations, the WSO function had been assigned to a weather branch at Kennedy Space Center (KSC). This branch was dismantled in steps due to further reorganization, loss of key personnel, and loss of budget line authority. NASA is facing the loss of sufficient expertise and leadership required to provide current levels of weather support. The recommendation proposed

  1. Voluntary Sleep Loss in Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oonk, Marcella; Krueger, James M.; Davis, Christopher J.

    2016-01-01

    Study Objectives: Animal sleep deprivation (SDEP), in contrast to human SDEP, is involuntary and involves repeated exposure to aversive stimuli including the inability of the animal to control the waking stimulus. Therefore, we explored intracranial self-stimulation (ICSS), an operant behavior, as a method for voluntary SDEP in rodents. Methods: Male Sprague-Dawley rats were implanted with electroencephalography/electromyography (EEG/EMG) recording electrodes and a unilateral bipolar electrode into the lateral hypothalamus. Rats were allowed to self-stimulate, or underwent gentle handling-induced SDEP (GH-SDEP), during the first 6 h of the light phase, after which they were allowed to sleep. Other rats performed the 6 h ICSS and 1 w later were subjected to 6 h of noncontingent stimulation (NCS). During NCS the individual stimulation patterns recorded during ICSS were replayed. Results: After GH-SDEP, ICSS, or NCS, time in nonrapid eye movement (NREM) sleep and rapid eye movement (REM) sleep increased. Further, in the 24 h after SDEP, rats recovered all of the REM sleep lost during SDEP, but only 75% to 80% of the NREM sleep lost, regardless of the SDEP method. The magnitude of EEG slow wave responses occurring during NREM sleep also increased after SDEP treatments. However, NREM sleep EEG slow wave activity (SWA) responses were attenuated following ICSS, compared to GH-SDEP and NCS. Conclusions: We conclude that ICSS and NCS can be used to sleep deprive rats. Changes in rebound NREM sleep EEG SWA occurring after ICSS, NCS, and GH-SDEP suggest that nonspecific effects of the SDEP procedure differentially affect recovery sleep phenotypes. Citation: Oonk M, Krueger JM, Davis CJ. Voluntary sleep loss in rats. SLEEP 2016;39(7):1467–1479. PMID:27166236

  2. A Focused Microarray for Screening Rat Embryonic Stem Cell Lines

    OpenAIRE

    Hong, James; He, Hong; Bui, Phuoc; Ryba-White, Ben; Rumi, Mohammad A.K.; Soares, Michael J.; Dutta, Debasree; Paul, Soumen; Kawamata, Masaki; Ochiya, Takahiro; Ying, Qi-Long; Rajanahalli, Pavan; Mark L. Weiss

    2012-01-01

    Here, we describe a focused microarray for screening rat embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and provide validation data that this array can distinguish undifferentiated rat ESCs from rat trophoblast stem (TS) cells, rat extraembryonic endoderm cells, mouse embryonic fibroblast feeder cells, and differentiated rat ESCs. Using this tool, genuine rat ESC lines, which have been expanded in a conventional rat ESC medium containing two inhibitors (2i), for example, glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK3) and mi...

  3. Parametrial adipose tissue and metabolic dysfunctions induced by fructose-rich diet in normal and neonatal-androgenized adult female rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alzamendi, Ana; Castrogiovanni, Daniel; Ortega, Hugo H; Gaillard, Rolf C; Giovambattista, Andres; Spinedi, Eduardo

    2010-03-01

    Hyperandrogenemia predisposes an organism toward developing impaired insulin sensitivity. The aim of our study was to evaluate endocrine and metabolic effects during early allostasis induced by a fructose-rich diet (FRD) in normal (control; CT) and neonatal-androgenized (testosterone propionate; TP) female adult rats. CT and TP rats were fed either a normal diet (ND) or an FRD for 3 weeks immediately before the day of study, which was at age 100 days. Energy intake, body weight (BW), parametrial (PM) fat characteristics, and endocrine/metabolic biomarkers were then evaluated. Daily energy intake was similar in CT and TP rats regardless of the differences in diet. When compared with CT-ND rats, the TP-ND rats were heavier, had larger PM fat, and were characterized by basal hypoadiponectinemia and enhanced plasma levels of non-esterified fatty acid (NEFA), plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1), and leptin. FRD-fed CT rats, when compared with CT-ND rats, had high plasma levels of NEFA, triglyceride (TG), PAI-1, leptin, and adiponectin. The TP-FRD rats, when compared with TP-ND rats, displayed enhanced leptinemia and triglyceridemia, and were hyperinsulinemic, with glucose intolerance. The PM fat taken from TP rats displayed increase in the size of adipocytes, decrease in adiponectin (protein/gene), and a greater abundance of the leptin gene. PM adipocyte response to insulin was impaired in CT-FRD, TP-ND, and TP-FRD rats. A very short duration of isocaloric FRD intake in TP rats induced severe metabolic dysfunction at the reproductive age. Our study supports the hypothesis that the early-androgenized female rat phenotype is highly susceptible to developing endocrine/metabolic dysfunction. In turn, these abnormalities enhance the risk of metabolic syndrome, obesity, type 2 diabetes, and cardiovascular disease.

  4. Transient inactivation of the anterior cingulate cortex in rats disrupts avoidance of a dynamic object

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Svoboda, Jan; Lobellová, Veronika; Popelíková, Anna; Ahuja, Nikhil; Kelemen, Eduard; Stuchlík, Aleš

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 139, Mar 2017 (2017), s. 144-148 ISSN 1074-7427 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-03627S; GA MŠk(CZ) LH14053 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : enemy avoidance * moving goal * navigation * avoidance * rat * robot Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 3.543, year: 2016

  5. An investigation into the feasibility of culturing rat embryos in media ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    related nutritional disorders in serum of monkeys and humans ... to be inferior to rat serum in supporting embryonic growth and differentiation. However, the medium used to dilute the sheep serum was reported to be toxic to early embryos when used ..... on morphogenesis of cranial neural folds and neural crest in cultured.

  6. Contralateral Disconnection of the Rat Prelimbic Cortex and Dorsomedial Striatum Impairs Cue-Guided Behavioral Switching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Phillip M.; Ragozzino, Michael E.

    2014-01-01

    Switches in reward outcomes or reward-predictive cues are two fundamental ways in which information is used to flexibly shift response patterns. The rat prelimbic cortex and dorsomedial striatum support behavioral flexibility based on a change in outcomes. The present experiments investigated whether these two brain regions are necessary for…

  7. Genetic, physiological and comparative genomic studies of hypertension and insulin resistance in the spontaneously hypertensive rat

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Coan, P. M.; Hummel, O.; Diaz, A. G.; Barrier, M.; Alfazema, N.; Norsworthy, P. J.; Pravenec, Michal; Petretto, E.; Hübner, N.; Aitman, T. J.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 10, č. 3 (2017), s. 297-306 ISSN 1754-8403 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP301/12/0696 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : rat * congenic * genomic * hypertension * insulin resistance Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 4.691, year: 2016

  8. A Novel Role for the Rat Retrosplenial Cortex in Cognitive Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Andrew J. D.; Hindley, Emma L.; Haddon, Josephine E.; Vann, Seralynne D.; Aggleton, John P.

    2014-01-01

    By virtue of its frontal and hippocampal connections, the retrosplenial cortex is uniquely placed to support cognition. Here, we tested whether the retrosplenial cortex is required for frontal tasks analogous to the Stroop Test, i.e., for the ability to select between conflicting responses and inhibit responding to task-irrelevant cues. Rats first…

  9. Trans-generational neurochemical modulation of ethamphetamine in the adult brain of the Wistar rat

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Fujáková-Lipski, M.; Kaping, D.; Šírová, J.; Horáček, J.; Páleníček, T.; Zach, P.; Klaschka, Jan; Kačer, P.; Syslová, K.; Vrajová, M.; Bubeníková-Valešová, V.; Beste, D.; Šlamberová, R.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 91, č. 10 (2017), s. 3373-3384 ISSN 0340-5761 Grant - others:GA MŠk(CZ) LO1611; GA ČR(CZ) GA14-03708S Institutional support: RVO:67985807 Keywords : prenatal drug exposure * methamphetamine * nNeurotransmitters * in-vivo microdialysis * rats Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 5.901, year: 2016

  10. Genetic animal models for Absence epilepsy: a review of the WAG/Rij strain of rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coenen, A.M.L.; Luijtelaar, E.L.J.M. van

    2003-01-01

    Based on the reviewed literature and the data presented in this paper, conclusions can be drawn with respect to the validity of the WAG/Rij strain of rats as a model for absence epilepsy in humans. The view that the WAG/Rij model has "face validity" is supported by the simultaneous presence of

  11. Effects of Maternal Retinoic Acid Administration on Lung Angiogenesis in Oligohydramnios-Exposed Fetal Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chung-Ming Chen

    2013-04-01

    Conclusion: Maternal retinoic acid treatment did not increase lung VEGF expression or enhance lung development in oligohydramnios-exposed fetal rats. These results do not support the use of maternal retinoic acid to prevent oligohydramnios-induced pulmonary hypoplasia in the pseudoglandular stage.

  12. Hepatotoxic effects of fenofibrate in spontaneously hypertensive rats expressing human C-reactive protein

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Škop, V.; Trnovská, J.; Oliyarnyk, O.; Marková, I.; Malínská, H.; Kazdová, L.; Zídek, Václav; Landa, Vladimír; Mlejnek, Petr; Šimáková, Miroslava; Kůdela, M.; Pravenec, Michal; Šilhavý, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 65, č. 6 (2016), s. 891-899 ISSN 0862-8408 R&D Projects: GA MZd(CZ) NT14325 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : fenofibrate * rosuvastatin * C-reactive protein * transgenic * spontaneously hypertensive rat * inflammation * hepatotoxic Subject RIV: FB - Endocrinology, Diabetology, Metabolism, Nutrition Impact factor: 1.461, year: 2016

  13. Delta Cell Hyperplasia in Adult Goto-Kakizaki (GK/MolTac) Diabetic Rats

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Alán, Lukáš; Olejár, Tomáš; Cahová, M.; Zelenka, Jaroslav; Berková, Z.; Smětáková, M.; Saudek, F.; Matěj, R.; Ježek, Petr

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 2015, č. 2015 (2015), s. 385395 ISSN 2314-6745 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA13-06666S Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : Goto Kakizaki rats * diabetes * delta cell hyperplasia * somatostatin * pancreatic polypeptide deficiency Subject RIV: FB - Endocrinology, Diabetology, Metabolism, Nutrition Impact factor: 2.431, year: 2015

  14. Chronic stress and social housing differentially affect neurogenesis in male and female rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westenbroek, Christel; Boer, Johan A. den; Veenhuis, Maarten; Horst, Gert J. ter

    2004-01-01

    Stress plays an important role in the development of affective disorders. Women show a higher prevalence for these disorders than men. The course of a depression is thought to be positively influenced by social support. We have used a chronic stress model in which rats received foot-shocks daily for

  15. Swimming-based pica in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakajima, Sadahiko

    2016-09-01

    We have recently demonstrated that voluntary or forced running in activity wheels yields pica behavior (kaolin clay intake) in rats (Nakajima, 2016; Nakajima and Katayama, 2014). The present study provides experimental evidence that a single 40-min session of swimming in water also generates pica in rats, while showering rats with water does not produce such behavior. Because kaolin intake has been regarded as a measure of nausea in rats, this finding suggests that swimming activity, as well as voluntary or forced running, induces nausea in rats. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  16. Daily intraparaventricular orexin-A treatment induces weight loss in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novak, Colleen M; Levine, James A

    2009-08-01

    The neuropeptide orexin (hypocretin) increases energy expenditure partially through increasing spontaneous physical activity. The ability of exogenous orexin to alter body weight has never been established, however. We sought to determine whether orexin-A microinjected into the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVN) induced weight loss in rats. Chronic guide cannulae were implanted into rats, aimed at the PVN. Rats were given daily microinjections of orexin (0.5 nmol) or vehicle into the PVN for 6 days; food intake and body weight were measured daily. In a separate group of rats, we injected orexin-A and vehicle intra-PVN and measured daily activity levels. Daily orexin treatment induced weight loss: orexin-A-treated rats lost significantly more weight than their vehicle-injected counterparts without a significant difference in food intake. Rats were significantly more active after intra-PVN orexin compared to vehicle. These results support the concept that orexinergic agents have the potential to produce negative energy balance through increasing physical activity. This presents a promising, untapped potential resource for weight loss.

  17. Effects of Sweet Bee Venom on the respiratory system in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jong Young Lee

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: This study was performed to analyse the effects of Sweet Bee Venom(SBV-purified melittin supported by G&V Co., the major component of honey bee venom on the respiratory system in rats. Methods: All experiments were conducted at Biotoxtech Company, a non-clinical studies authorized institution, under the regulations of Good Laboratory Practice(GLP. Male rats of 5 weeks old were chosen for this study and after confirming condition of rats was stable, SBV was administered in thigh muscle of rats in 0.175, 0.35 and 0.7 mg/kg dosage. And checked the effects of SBV on the respiratory system using the whole body plethysmography. And respiratory rate, tidal volume and minute volume of rats were checked after administered SBV (melittin. Results: 1. In the measurement of respiratory rate, there were not observed any significant differences compared with control group. 2. In the measurement of tidal volume, there was not observed any significant differences compared with control group. 3. In the measurement of minute volume, 0.35 dosage group showed significant differences compared with control group. But we estimated that this result was caused by individual differences. Conclusions: Above findings suggest that SBV seems to be safe treatment in the respiratory system of rats. And further studies on the subject should be conducted to yield more concrete evidences.

  18. Vagus nerve stimulation delivered during motor rehabilitation improves recovery in a rat model of stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khodaparast, Navid; Hays, Seth A; Sloan, Andrew M; Fayyaz, Tabbassum; Hulsey, Daniel R; Rennaker, Robert L; Kilgard, Michael P

    2014-09-01

    Neural plasticity is widely believed to support functional recovery following brain damage. Vagus nerve stimulation paired with different forelimb movements causes long-lasting map plasticity in rat primary motor cortex that is specific to the paired movement. We tested the hypothesis that repeatedly pairing vagus nerve stimulation with upper forelimb movements would improve recovery of motor function in a rat model of stroke. Rats were separated into 3 groups: vagus nerve stimulation during rehabilitation (rehab), vagus nerve stimulation after rehab, and rehab alone. Animals underwent 4 training stages: shaping (motor skill learning), prelesion training, postlesion training, and therapeutic training. Rats were given a unilateral ischemic lesion within motor cortex and implanted with a left vagus nerve cuff. Animals were allowed 1 week of recovery before postlesion baseline training. During the therapeutic training stage, rats received vagus nerve stimulation paired with each successful trial. All 17 trained rats demonstrated significant contralateral forelimb impairment when performing a bradykinesia assessment task. Forelimb function was recovered completely to prelesion levels when vagus nerve stimulation was delivered during rehab training. Alternatively, intensive rehab training alone (without stimulation) failed to restore function to prelesion levels. Delivering the same amount of stimulation after rehab training did not yield improvements compared with rehab alone. These results demonstrate that vagus nerve stimulation repeatedly paired with successful forelimb movements can improve recovery after motor cortex ischemia and may be a viable option for stroke rehabilitation. © The Author(s) 2014.

  19. A Comparative Assessment of Implant Site Viability in Humans and Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, C-H; Pei, X; Tulu, U S; Aghvami, M; Chen, C-T; Gaudillière, D; Arioka, M; Maghazeh Moghim, M; Bahat, O; Kolinski, M; Crosby, T R; Felderhoff, A; Brunski, J B; Helms, J A

    2017-12-01

    Our long-term objective is to devise methods to improve osteotomy site preparation and, in doing so, facilitate implant osseointegration. As a first step in this process, we developed a standardized oral osteotomy model in ovariectomized rats. There were 2 unique features to this model: first, the rats exhibited an osteopenic phenotype, reminiscent of the bone health that has been reported for the average dental implant patient population. Second, osteotomies were produced in healed tooth extraction sites and therefore represented the placement of most implants in patients. Commercially available drills were then used to produce osteotomies in a patient cohort and in the rat model. Molecular, cellular, and histologic analyses demonstrated a close alignment between the responses of human and rodent alveolar bone to osteotomy site preparation. Most notably in both patients and rats, all drilling tools created a zone of dead and dying osteocytes around the osteotomy. In rat tissues, which could be collected at multiple time points after osteotomy, the fate of the dead alveolar bone was followed. Over the course of a week, osteoclast activity was responsible for resorbing the necrotic bone, which in turn stimulated the deposition of a new bone matrix by osteoblasts. Collectively, these analyses support the use of an ovariectomy surgery rat model to gain insights into the response of human bone to osteotomy site preparation. The data also suggest that reducing the zone of osteocyte death will improve osteotomy site viability, leading to faster new bone formation around implants.

  20. Business process support

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carle, Adriana; Fiducia, Daniel [Transportadora de Gas del Sur S.A. (TGS), Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2005-07-01

    This paper is about the own development of business support software. The developed applications are used to support two business processes: one of them is the process of gas transportation and the other is the natural gas processing. This software has interphases with the ERP SAP, software SCADA and on line gas transportation simulation software. The main functionalities of the applications are: entrance on line real time of clients transport nominations, transport programming, allocation of the clients transport nominations, transport control, measurements, balanced pipeline, allocation of gas volume to the gas processing plants, calculate of product tons processed in each plant and tons of product distributed to clients. All the developed software generates information to the internal staff, regulatory authorities and clients. (author)

  1. Support your local species

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stärk, Johanna

    Nearly a quarter of all animal species within the European Union are threatened with extinction. Protecting many of these species will require the full spectrum of conservation actions from in-situ to ex-situ management. Holding an estimated 44% of EU Red Listed terrestrial vertebrates, zoos hereby...... play an important role in protecting local species. However, outcomes of conservation actions are often highly uncertain and if European zoos want to support the conservation of threatened species, they are faced with the question of which species to target first and which conservation strategy...... to choose. Current decision-making in resource allocation and conservation planning is often, as in many other disciplines, based on little scientific ground. Here, we propose a Decision Analysis framework to support the Ex-situ guidelines of the Species Survival Commission of the IUCN. In which we assessed...

  2. Susceptibility of laboratory rats against genotypes 1, 3, 4, and rat hepatitis E viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tian-Cheng; Yoshizaki, Sayaka; Ami, Yasushi; Suzaki, Yuriko; Yasuda, Shumpei P; Yoshimatsu, Kumiko; Arikawa, Jiro; Takeda, Naokazu; Wakita, Takaji

    2013-04-12

    To determine whether or not rats are susceptible to hepatitis E virus (HEV) infection, each of group containing three laboratory rats (Wistar) were experimentally inoculated with genotypes 1, 3, 4 and rat HEV by intravenous injection. Serum and stool samples were collected and used to detect HEV RNA and anti-HEV antibodies by RT-PCR and ELISA, respectively. The virus infection was monitored up to 3 months after inoculation. None of the serum or stool samples collected from the rats inoculated with G1, G3, or G4 HEV indicated positive sign for virus replication. Although no alteration was observed in ALT level, rat HEV RNA was detected in stools from both of the rats inoculated with rat HEV, and both rats were positive for anti-rat HEV IgG and IgM from 3 weeks after inoculation. These results demonstrated that rats are susceptible to rat HEV but not to G1, G3, and G4 HEV. We also confirm that the nude rats were useful for obtaining a large amount of rat HEV and that the rat HEV was transmitted by the fecal-oral route. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Supporting shop floor intelligence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carstensen, Peter; Schmidt, Kjeld; Wiil, Uffe Kock

    1999-01-01

    Many manufacturing enterprises are now trying to introduce various forms of flexible work organizations on the shop floor. However, existing computer-based production planning and control systems pose severe obstacles for autonomous working groups and other kinds of shop floor control to become r......-to-day production planning by supporting intelligent and responsible workers in their situated coordination activities on the shop floor....

  4. COM Support in BETA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Ole Lehrmann

    1999-01-01

    Component technologies based on binary units of independent production are some of the most important contributions to software architecture and reuse during recent years. Especially the COM technologies and the CORBA standard from the Object Management Group have contributed new and interesting ...... principles for software architecture, and proven to be useful in parctice. In this paper ongoing work with component support in the BETA language is described....

  5. Forklift Support Dolly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, W.; Witcher, H. C.

    1985-01-01

    Long, heavy loads handled safely. Forklift support dolly enables operator to manipulate safely large sections of materials around corners and through narrow aisles and doorways. Dolly has pivoting tandem wheels for maneuverability. Plate laid out lengthwise along truck axis, with one end clamped to forklift and other end clamped to dolly. With this arrangement, minimum width of passage determined by short side of plate rather than by long side.

  6. Social support in development

    OpenAIRE

    Mariska Kromhout; Peteke Feijten; Frieke Vonk; Mirjam de Klerk; Anna Maria Marangos; Wouter Mensink; Maaike den Draak; Alice de Boer; m.m.v. Jurjen Iedema

    2014-01-01

    Original title: De Wmo in beweging. Evaluatie Wet maatschappelijke ondersteuning 2010-2012 The goal of the Dutch Social Support Act (Wet maatschappelijke ondersteuning – Wmo) is to make it possible for people to manage within and outside their homes and to participate in society. Within the frameworks of the Wmo, local authorities develop policy to bring achievement of that goal closer. At the request of the Dutch Ministry of Health, Welfare and Sport (VWS), the Netherlands Institute for Soci...

  7. Career support in medicine

    OpenAIRE

    Buddeberg-Fischer, B; Vetsch, E.; Mattanza, G

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: Until now, mentoring has hardly been used by the medical profession in German-speaking countries as a means of supporting junior physicians in their careers. The aim of the mentoring project described here was to obtain information for promoting and developing future mentoring programs at a university hospital. Method: A new integrated mentoring model was developed and implemented over a 12-month period. Peer groups were advised on the mentoring process by mentors and program manager...

  8. Integrated Logistics Support Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-07-03

    achievable values of logis- for improved supportability tics and R&M parameters Technological Opportunities CONCEPT (LSA Task 204) EXPLORATION o Define...the award will be Manager identifies and defines what logis- based. In contrast, competitive proposals tics considerations should be addressed in...expandable? b. Software (1) Will diagnostic software changes be possible? (2) Will the organizacional structure allow for continuing software update? (3

  9. Clinical decision support systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beeler, Patrick Emanuel; Bates, David Westfall; Hug, Balthasar Luzius

    2014-01-01

    Clinical decision support (CDS) systems link patient data with an electronic knowledge base in order to improve decision-making and computerised physician order entry (CPOE) is a requirement to set up electronic CDS. The medical informatics literature suggests categorising CDS tools into medication dosing support, order facilitators, point-of-care alerts and reminders, relevant information display, expert systems and workflow support. To date, CDS has particularly been recognised for improving processes. CDS successfully fostered prevention of deep-vein thrombosis, improved adherence to guidelines, increased the use of vaccinations, and decreased the rate of serious medication errors. However, CDS may introduce errors, and therefore the term "e-iatrogenesis" has been proposed to address unintended consequences. At least two studies reported severe treatment delays due to CPOE and CDS. In addition, the phenomenon of "alert fatigue" - arising from a high number of CDS alerts of low clinical significance - may facilitate overriding of potentially critical notifications. The implementation of CDS needs to be carefully planned, CDS interventions should be thoroughly examined in pilot wards only, and then stepwise introduced. A crucial feature of CPOE in combination with CDS is speed, since time consumption has been found to be a major factor determining failure. In the near future, the specificity of alerts will be improved, notifications will be prioritised and offer detailed advice, customisation of CDS will play an increasing role, and finally, CDS is heading for patient-centred decision support. The most important research question remains whether CDS is able to improve patient outcomes beyond processes.

  10. Carvedilol Protects against Cyclosporine Nephropathy in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Kotolová

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of our experimental work was to study whether carvedilol is able to protect renal tissue from cyclosporine toxic effect in animal model of cyclosporine nephropathy. The study was performed on twenty Wistar rats divided in two experimental groups: control (treated with placebo and carvedilol (treated with p.o. dose 10mg/kg/day in 1 ml solution. Cyclosporine in oral dose of 15 mg/kg/day was administered to all animals during 15 days of experiment. Urine was collected daily for the assessment of diuresis, proteinuria, and determination of urea and creatinine levels. Serum collected at the end of the experiment (day 15 was used for the determination of urea and transferrin levels. The level of renal tissue damage was evaluated by the Jones method for basal membranes, glomeruli and tubuli impregnation, and by the Kossa method for calcium impregnation. For the determination of paranuclear inclusions presence we used chromanilinblue (CAB method. Statistically significant differences between total protein levels in urine on day 7 of the experiment and urea levels in serum at the end of the experiment in the control group and the carvedilol-treated group indicate a protective effect of carvedilol on renal tissue, which is supported also by the results of a histological examination of renal tissue. Significant increase in the serum transferrin level was registered in the carvedilol-treated group and no significant changes were noted in ceruloplasmin serum levels. In conclusion, our pilot study showed that carvedilol has the ability to protect renal tissue from cyclosporine induced nephropathy in rats.

  11. Lubiprostone stimulates duodenal bicarbonate secretion in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizumori, Misa; Akiba, Yasutada; Kaunitz, Jonathan D

    2009-10-01

    Lubiprostone, a bicyclic fatty acid, is used for the treatment of chronic constipation. No published study has addressed the effect of lubiprostone on intestinal ion secretion in vivo. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that lubiprostone augments duodenal HCO(3) (-) secretion (DBS). Rat proximal duodenal loops were perfused with pH 7.0 Krebs, control vehicle (medium-chain triglycerides), or lubiprostone (0.1-10 microM). We measured DBS with flow-through pH and CO(2) electrodes, perfusate [Cl(-)] with a Cl(-) electrode, and water flux using a non-absorbable ferrocyanide marker. Some rats were pretreated with a potent, selective CFTR antagonist, CFTR(inh)-172 (1 mg/kg, ip), 1 h before experiments. Perfusion of lubiprostone concentration dependently increased DBS, whereas net Cl(-) output and net water output were only increased at 0.1 microM, compared with vehicle. CFTR(inh)-172 reduced lubiprostone (10 microM)-induced DBS increase, whereas net Cl(-) output was also unchanged. Nevertheless, CFTR(inh)-172 reduced basal net water output, which was reversed by lubiprostone. Furthermore, lubiprostone-induced DBS was inhibited by EP4 receptor antagonist, not by an EP1/2 receptor antagonist or by indomethacin pretreatment. In this first study of the effect of lubiprostone on intestinal ion secretion in vivo, lubiprostone stimulated CFTR-dependent DBS without changing net Cl(-) secretion. This effect supports the hypothesis that Cl(-) secreted by CFTR is recycled across the apical membrane by anion exchangers. Recovery of water output during CFTR inhibition suggests that lubiprostone may improve the intestinal phenotype in CF patients. Furthermore, increased DBS suggests that lubiprostone may protect the duodenum from acid-induced injury via EP4 receptor activation.

  12. Increased periodontal bone loss in temporarily B lymphocyte-deficient rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klausen, B; Hougen, H P; Fiehn, N E

    1989-01-01

    In order to study the role of T lymphocytes and B lymphocytes in the development of marginal periodontitis, experiments were performed on specific-pathogen-free (SPF) rats with various immunologic profiles. The study comprised nude (congenitally T lymphocyte-deficient), thymus-grafted nude (T-lym......-lymphocyte deficiency did not interfere with the development of periodontal disease in this model, whereas a temporary and moderate reduction in B-lymphocyte numbers seemed to predispose for aggravation of periodontal bone loss.......In order to study the role of T lymphocytes and B lymphocytes in the development of marginal periodontitis, experiments were performed on specific-pathogen-free (SPF) rats with various immunologic profiles. The study comprised nude (congenitally T lymphocyte-deficient), thymus-grafted nude (T...... had significantly less periodontal bone support than controls. Anti-mu treated inoculated rats had significantly less periodontal bone support than nude and normal rats, whereas no difference was found between normal, nude, and thymus-grafted rats. It is concluded that permanent T...

  13. Hippocampal Infusion of Zeta Inhibitory Peptide Impairs Recent, but Not Remote, Recognition Memory in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jena B. Hales

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Spatial memory in rodents can be erased following the infusion of zeta inhibitory peptide (ZIP into the dorsal hippocampus via indwelling guide cannulas. It is believed that ZIP impairs spatial memory by reversing established late-phase long-term potentiation (LTP. However, it is unclear whether other forms of hippocampus-dependent memory, such as recognition memory, are also supported by hippocampal LTP. In the current study, we tested recognition memory in rats following hippocampal ZIP infusion. In order to combat the limited targeting of infusions via cannula, we implemented a stereotaxic approach for infusing ZIP throughout the dorsal, intermediate, and ventral hippocampus. Rats infused with ZIP 3–7 days after training on the novel object recognition task exhibited impaired object recognition memory compared to control rats (those infused with aCSF. In contrast, rats infused with ZIP 1 month after training performed similar to control rats. The ability to form new memories after ZIP infusions remained intact. We suggest that enhanced recognition memory for recent events is supported by hippocampal LTP, which can be reversed by hippocampal ZIP infusion.

  14. Hepatic Stellate Cells Support Hematopoiesis and are Liver-Resident Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claus Kordes

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Hematopoiesis can occur in the liver, when the bone marrow fails to provide an adequate environment for hematopoietic stem cells. Hepatic stellate cells possess characteristics of stem/progenitor cells, but their contribution to hematopoiesis is not known thus far. Methods: Isolated hepatic stellate cells from rats were characterized with respect to molecular markers of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSC and treated with adipocyte or osteocyte differentiation media. Stellate cells of rats were further co-cultured with murine stem cell antigen-1+ hematopoietic stem cells selected by magnetic cell sorting. The expression of murine hematopoietic stem cell markers was analyzed by mouse specific quantitative PCR during co-culture. Hepatic stellate cells from eGFP+ rats were transplanted into lethally irradiated wild type rats. Results: Desmin-expressing stellate cells were associated with hematopoietic sites in the fetal rat liver. Hepatic stellate cells expressed MSC markers and were able to differentiate into adipocytes and osteocytes in vitro. Stellate cells supported hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells during co-culture similar to bone marrow MSC, but failed to differentiate into blood cell lineages after transplantation. Conclusion: Hepatic stellate cells are liver-resident MSC and can fulfill typical functions of bone marrow MSC such as the differentiation into adipocytes or osteocytes and support of hematopoiesis.

  15. Carriage of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus by wild urban Norway rats (Rattus norvegicus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Himsworth, Chelsea G; Miller, Ruth R; Montoya, Vincent; Hoang, Linda; Romney, Marc G; Al-Rawahi, Ghada N; Kerr, Thomas; Jardine, Claire M; Patrick, David M; Tang, Patrick; Weese, J Scott

    2014-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is an important cause of multi-drug-resistant infections in people, particularly indigent populations. MRSA can be transmitted between people and domestic animals, but the potential for transmission between people and commensal pests, particularly rodents, had not been investigated. The objective of this study was to identify the presence and characterize the ecology of MRSA in rats (Rattus spp.) from in an impoverished, inner-city neighborhood. Oropharyngeal swabs were collected from rats trapped in 33 city blocks and one location within the adjacent port. Bacterial culture was performed and MRSA isolates were characterized using a variety of methods, including whole-genome sequencing (WGS). The ecology of MRSA in rats was described using phylogenetic analysis, geospatial analysis, and generalized linear mixed models. MRSA was identified 22 of 637 (3.5%) rats tested, although prevalence varied from 0 - 50% among blocks. Isolates belonged to 4 clusters according to WGS, with the largest cluster (n = 10) containing isolates that were genetically indistinguishable from community-acquired USA300 MRSA strains isolated from people within the study area. MRSA strains demonstrated both geographic clustering and dispersion. The odds of an individual rat carrying MRSA increased with increased body fat (OR = 2.53, 95% CI = 1.33-4.82), and in the winter (OR = 5.29, 95% CI = 1.04-26.85) and spring (OR = 5.50, 95% CI = 1.10-27.58) compared to the fall. The results show that urban rats carried the same MRSA lineages occurring in local human and/or animal populations, supporting recent transmission from external sources. MRSA carriage was influenced by season, most likely as a result of temporal variation in rat behavior and rat-human interactions.

  16. Differences in social interaction- vs. cocaine reward in mouse vs. rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kummer, Kai K; Hofhansel, Lena; Barwitz, Constanze M; Schardl, Aurelia; Prast, Janine M; Salti, Ahmad; El Rawas, Rana; Zernig, Gerald

    2014-01-01

    We previously developed rat experimental models based on the conditioned place preference (CPP) paradigm in which only four 15-min episodes of dyadic social interaction with a sex- and weight-matched male Sprague Dawley (SD) rat (1) reversed CPP from cocaine to social interaction despite continuing cocaine training, and (2) prevented the reacquisition/re-expression of cocaine CPP. In a concurrent conditioning schedule, pairing one compartment with social interaction and the other compartment with 15 mg/kg cocaine injections, rats spent the same amount of time in both compartments and the most rewarding sensory component of the composite stimulus social interaction was touch (taction). In the present study, we validated our experimental paradigm in C57BL/6 mice to investigate if our experimental paradigm may be useful for the considerable number of genetically modified mouse models. Only 71% of the tested mice developed place preference for social interaction, whereas 85% of the rats did. Accordingly, 29% of the mice developed conditioned place aversion (CPA) to social interaction, whereas this was true for only 15% of the rats. In support of the lesser likelihood of mice to develop a preference for social interaction, the average amount of time spent in direct contact was 17% for mice vs. 79% for rats. In animals that were concurrently conditioned for social interaction vs. cocaine, the relative reward strength for cocaine was 300-fold higher in mice than in rats. Considering that human addicts regularly prefer drugs of abuse to drug-free social interaction, the present findings suggest that our experimental paradigm of concurrent CPP for cocaine vs. social interaction is of even greater translational power if performed in C57BL/6 mice, the genetic background for most transgenic rodent models, than in rats.

  17. RNAi-induced down-regulation of Mecp2 expression in the rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Jing; Bao, Xinhua; Wang, Hansen; Pan, Hong; Zhang, Yuzhi; Wu, Xiru

    2008-08-01

    The MECP2 (methyl-CpG-binding protein 2) gene has been implicated in the pathogenesis of Rett Syndrome. A rat model with a down-regulated Mecp2 was established using a recombinant lentiviral vector expressing small hairpin RNA of the rat Mecp2 gene. Four recombinant vectors were constructed by inserting sequences of small hairpin RNA targeting the rat Mecp2 gene. To determine which vector resulted in optimal down-regulation, rat skin fibroblasts were transfected with four recombinant vectors, respectively. The recombinant vector mecp2-sh-1 decreased expression of Mecp2 mRNA and protein relative to the Control group. 12-24h after birth, neonatal rat pups were divided into three groups, Re-Lenti group (injected with recombinant lentiviral vector, mecp2-sh-1), Lenti group (injected with lentivirus containing no inserted sequences) and a non-injected Control group (Control group). Rats in the injection groups were given intraventricular injections. 7 days and 21 days following injection, no inflammation was observed in the rat brain in the two injected groups, whereas EGFP expression was readily detectable. Sensory-motor reflexes were transiently abnormal in Re-Lenti group, whereas no abnormality was observed in either Control group. Mecp2 mRNA was lower in the hippocampus and cerebral cortex in the Re-Lenti group relative to the Lenti and Control groups. Although no typical RTT like symptoms were observed, the neonatal rats injected with recombinant lentivirus displayed some transient neurobehavioral abnormalities during early development. Bdnf mRNA expression decreased in the hippocampus, supporting the hypothesis that Bdnf may be a target gene of MeCP2 in the CNS.

  18. Carriage of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus by wild urban Norway rats (Rattus norvegicus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chelsea G Himsworth

    Full Text Available Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA is an important cause of multi-drug-resistant infections in people, particularly indigent populations. MRSA can be transmitted between people and domestic animals, but the potential for transmission between people and commensal pests, particularly rodents, had not been investigated. The objective of this study was to identify the presence and characterize the ecology of MRSA in rats (Rattus spp. from in an impoverished, inner-city neighborhood. Oropharyngeal swabs were collected from rats trapped in 33 city blocks and one location within the adjacent port. Bacterial culture was performed and MRSA isolates were characterized using a variety of methods, including whole-genome sequencing (WGS. The ecology of MRSA in rats was described using phylogenetic analysis, geospatial analysis, and generalized linear mixed models. MRSA was identified 22 of 637 (3.5% rats tested, although prevalence varied from 0 - 50% among blocks. Isolates belonged to 4 clusters according to WGS, with the largest cluster (n = 10 containing isolates that were genetically indistinguishable from community-acquired USA300 MRSA strains isolated from people within the study area. MRSA strains demonstrated both geographic clustering and dispersion. The odds of an individual rat carrying MRSA increased with increased body fat (OR = 2.53, 95% CI = 1.33-4.82, and in the winter (OR = 5.29, 95% CI = 1.04-26.85 and spring (OR = 5.50, 95% CI = 1.10-27.58 compared to the fall. The results show that urban rats carried the same MRSA lineages occurring in local human and/or animal populations, supporting recent transmission from external sources. MRSA carriage was influenced by season, most likely as a result of temporal variation in rat behavior and rat-human interactions.

  19. Respiratory Network Enhances the Sympathoinhibitory Component of Baroreflex of Rats Submitted to Chronic Intermittent Hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moraes, Davi J A; Bonagamba, Leni G H; da Silva, Melina P; Mecawi, André S; Antunes-Rodrigues, José; Machado, Benedito H

    2016-10-01

    Chronic intermittent hypoxia (CIH) produces respiratory-related sympathetic overactivity and hypertension in rats. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that the enhanced central respiratory modulation of sympathetic activity after CIH also decreases the sympathoinhibitory component of baroreflex of rats, which may contribute to the development of hypertension. Wistar rats were exposed to CIH or normoxia (control group) for 10 days. Phrenic nerve, thoracic sympathetic nerve, and neurons in the rostral ventrolateral medulla and caudal ventrolateral medulla were recorded in in situ preparations of rats. Baroreflex regulation of thoracic sympathetic nerve, rostral ventrolateral medulla, and caudal ventrolateral medulla neurons activities were evaluated in different phases of respiration in response to either aortic depressor nerve stimulation or pressure stimuli. CIH rats presented higher respiratory-related thoracic sympathetic nerve and rostral ventrolateral medulla presympathetic neurons activities at the end of expiration in relation to control rats, which are indexes of respiratory-related sympathetic overactivity. Baroreflex-evoked thoracic sympathetic nerve inhibition during expiration, but not during inspiration, was enhanced in CIH when compared with control rats. In addition, CIH selectively enhanced the expiratory-related baroreceptor inputs, probably through caudal ventrolateral medulla neurons, to the respiratory-modulated bulbospinal rostral ventrolateral medulla presympathetic neurons. These findings support the concept that the onset of hypertension, mediated by sympathetic overactivity, after 10 days of CIH is not secondary to a reduction in sympathoinhibitory component of baroreflex. Instead, it was observed an increase in the gain of sympathoinhibitory component in in situ preparations of rats, suggesting that changes in the respiratory-related sympathetic network after CIH also play a key role in preventing greater increase in arterial pressure

  20. Effects of oxytocin on methamphetamine-seeking exacerbated by predator odor pre-exposure in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferland, Chantelle L; Reichel, Carmela M; McGinty, Jacqueline F

    2016-03-01

    The endogenous oxytocin system has emerged as an inhibitor of drug-seeking and stress in preclinical models. The goal of this study was to examine whether systemic oxytocin administration attenuated methamphetamine (METH)-seeking in rats pre-exposed to a predator odor threat. In Experiment 1, rats were exposed for 5 days to the predator odor, 2,5-dihydro-2,4,5-trimethylthiazoline (TMT), or saline before METH self-administration began. After extinction training, rats were injected with 1 mg/kg, ip oxytocin (OXT) or saline 30 min before a cue-induced reinstatement test followed by re-extinction and a TMT-induced reinstatement test. In Experiment 2, TMT pre-exposure was followed by 10 days of 1 mg/kg OXT or saline injections before METH self-administration, extinction, and a TMT-induced reinstatement test. In Experiment 1, TMT pre-exposed rats that were injected with saline 30 min before reinstatement exhibited greater drug-seeking induced by conditioned cues or TMT than that exhibited by saline pre-exposed rats. A single injection of OXT 30 min before reinstatement suppressed METH-seeking in both saline- and TMT pre-exposed rats. In Experiment 2, TMT pre-exposed rats that received saline injections for 10 days prior to METH self-administration exhibited enhanced drug-seeking induced by TMT during stress-induced reinstatement. OXT injections for 10 days prior to METH self-administration blocked only the stress-induced exacerbation of drug-seeking in TMT pre-exposed rats. These results support further research on the development of oxytocin as a novel therapeutic drug that has enduring effects on drug-seeking exacerbated by stress.

  1. Immunochemistry of Rat Lung Tumorigenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-01-01

    3 * f.*. b; 3 - .’ • ~ -•. -. 3 *. 3 . , . 3• • . .• . • used in this set of experiments. Animals were anesthetized with methoxyflurane and...by supplying methoxyflurane to the rats’ noses in a small plastic funnel. The surgery consisted of making a small slit in the neck and injecting the

  2. wheat flour (dubbie) in rats

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2 Central Food Technological Research Institute. Mysore 570013, Mysore, India. ABSTRACT: Anaemic rats were fed on diets containing sour dough bread. (Di/'0 dabbo) or porridge prepared from soy-fortified wheat flour (Dubbie) as the source of nonheme iron. The criteria used to determine the relative biological.

  3. CCl4 cirrhosis in rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fischer-Nielsen, A; Poulsen, H E; Hansen, B A

    1991-01-01

    Cirrhosis of the rat liver was induced by a 12 week individualized CCl4/phenobarbital treatment. After treatment, all surviving animals (81%) showed cirrhosis of the liver. The cirrhosis induced was irreversible when evaluated 24 weeks after cessation of treatment. Quantitative liver function...

  4. Tubuloglomerular feedback in Dahl rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karlsen, F M; Leyssac, P P; Holstein-Rathlou, N H

    1998-01-01

    We have previously demonstrated a loss of autoregulation in Dahl salt-sensitive (Dahl-S) rats rendered hypertensive on a high-salt diet. To determine whether this was due to a decreased activity of either the myogenic or the tubuloglomerular feedback (TGF) response, we tested the TGF response...

  5. The rat GPRC6A

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wellendorph, Petrine; Burhenne, Nicole; Christiansen, Bolette

    2007-01-01

    GPRC6A is a novel member of family C of G protein-coupled receptors with so far elusive biological function. GPRC6A has been described in human and mouse as a promiscuous l-alpha-amino acid receptor. We now report the cloning, expression analysis and, functional characterization of the rat orthol...

  6. induced hepatic injury in rats

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Toxicological evaluation of Thymelaea hirsuta and protective effect against CCl 4 -induced hepatic injury in rats. ... There were no significant differences in red blood cells count (p<0.05), in Hemoglobin and Hematocrit serum levels but a significant increase in white blood cells count (p<0.001) and in platelets (p< 0.05) for all ...

  7. Immunohistochemical localization of glucagon and pancreatic polypeptide on rat endocrine pancreas: coexistence in rat islet cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    YH Huang

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available We used immunofluorescence double staining method to investigate the cellular localization of glucagon and pancreatic polypeptide (PP in rat pancreatic islets. The results showed that both A-cells (glucagon-secreting cells and PP-cells (PPsecreting cells were located in the periphery of the islets. However, A-cells and PP-cells had a different regional distribution. Most of A-cells were located in the splenic lobe but a few of them were in the duodenal lobe of the pancreas. In contrast, the majority of PP-cells were found in the duodenal lobe and a few of them were in the splenic lobe of the pancreas. Furthermore, we found that 67.74% A-cells had PP immunoreactivity, 70.92% PP-cells contained glucagon immunoreactivity with immunofluorescence double staining. Our data support the concept of a common precursor stem cell for pancreatic hormone-producing cells.

  8. ideal hepatotoxicity model in rats using carbon tetrachloride (ccl4)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR. AMINU

    ABSTRACT. A study to produce ideal Hepatotoxicity rats' models using varying concentrations of carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) was carried out. A total of seventy five rats were divided into five (5) groups of twenty five (25) rats each; rats in group I are negative control, were not induced with lipid peroxidation. Rats in groups II, ...

  9. Age-related declines in thirst and salt appetite responses in male Fischer 344×Brown Norway rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thunhorst, Robert L; Beltz, Terry; Johnson, Alan Kim

    2014-08-01

    The F344×BN strain is the first generational cross between Fischer 344 (F344) and Brown Norway (BN) rats. The F344×BN strain is widely used in aging studies as it is regarded as a model of "healthy" aging (Sprott, 1991). In the present work, male F344×BN rats aged 4mo (young, n=6) and 20mo (old, n=9) received a series of experimental challenges to body fluid homeostasis to determine their thirst and salt appetite responses. Corresponding urinary responses were measured in some of the studies. Following sodium depletion, old rats ingested less saline solution (0.3M NaCl) than young rats on a body weight basis, but both ages drank enough saline solution to completely repair the accrued sodium deficits. Following intracellular dehydration, old rats drank less water than young rats, again on a body weight basis, and were less able than young rats to drink amounts of water proportionate to the osmotic challenge. Compared with young rats, old rats drank less of both water and saline solution after combined food and fluid restriction, and also were refractory to the stimulatory effects of low doses of captopril on water drinking and sodium ingestion. Age differences in urinary water and sodium excretion could not account for the age differences in accumulated water and sodium balances. These results extend observations of diminished behavioral responses of aging animals to the F344×BN rat strain and support the idea that impairments in behavior contribute more to the waning ability of aging animals to respond to body fluid challenges than do declines in kidney function. In addition, the results suggest that behavioral defense of sodium homeostasis is less diminished with age in the F344×BN strain compared to other strains so far studied. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  10. Evaluation of the Hypoglycaemic Activity of Petiveria alliacea (Guinea Hen Weed) Extracts in Normoglycaemic and Diabetic Rat Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christie, S-L; Levy, A

    2013-11-01

    Petiveria alliacea (P alliacea) has ethno-traditional use as a hypoglycaemic agent in Jamaica and is yet to be scientifically validated as such. Therefore, extracts of aerial parts of the plant were evaluated for hypoglycaemic activity in normoglycaemic and diabetic rats. Aqueous and hexane extracts prepared from leaves of P alliacea were tested for hypoglycaemic activity. An acute administration of the extracts (200 and 400 mg/kg body weight) was evaluated in normoglycaemic rats. Additionally, the hypoglycaemic effect of sub-chronic administration was assessed in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. Blood glucose was recorded using a glucometer and test strips. Data were analysed using Student's t-test (p ≤ 0.05). The aqueous and hexane extracts demonstrated no significant reduction of fasting blood glucose (FBG) and no significant improvement of glucose tolerance in normal rats. The aqueous extract (400 mg/kg body weight) increased FBG from 4.75 ± 0.28 mmol/L to 5.88 ± 0.46 when compared to control (p ≤ 0.001). In diabetic rats, the hexane extract (400 mg/kg body weight) caused reduction of FBG after two weeks of treatment (p ≤ 0.010), but this was not sustained. The aqueous extract showed no reduction of FBG in diabetic rats. The aqueous extract of P alliacea demonstrated a hyperglycaemic effect in normoglycaemic rats and showed no hypoglycaemic activity in diabetic rats. The hexane extract caused no hypoglycaemic action in normal rats and failed to sustain an initial hypoglycaemic action in diabetic rats. This study presents evidence that does not support significant hypoglycaemic activity of P alliacea; this could hold significant implications for its use in ethno-traditional medicine.

  11. Relevant Anatomic and Morphological Measurements of the Rat Spine: Considerations for Rodent Models of Human Spine Trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaumard, Nicolas V; Leung, Jennifer; Gokhale, Akhilesh J; Guarino, Benjamin B; Welch, William C; Winkelstein, Beth A

    2015-10-15

    Basic science study measuring anatomical features of the cervical and lumbar spine in rat with normalized comparison with the human. The goal of this study is to comprehensively compare the rat and human cervical and lumbar spines to investigate whether the rat is an appropriate model for spine biomechanics investigations. Animal models have been used for a long time to investigate the effects of trauma, degenerative changes, and mechanical loading on the structure and function of the spine. Comparative studies have reported some mechanical properties and/or anatomical dimensions of the spine to be similar between various species. However, those studies are largely limited to the lumbar spine, and a comprehensive comparison of the rat and human spines is lacking. Spines were harvested from male Holtzman rats (n = 5) and were scanned using micro- computed tomography and digitally rendered in 3 dimensions to quantify the spinal bony anatomy, including the lateral width and anteroposterior depth of the vertebra, vertebral body, and spinal canal, as well as the vertebral body and intervertebral disc heights. Normalized measurements of the vertebra, vertebral body, and spinal canal of the rat were computed and compared with corresponding measurements from the literature for the human in the cervical and lumbar spinal regions. The vertebral dimensions of the rat spine vary more between spinal levels than in humans. Rat vertebrae are more slender than human vertebrae, but the width-to-depth axial aspect ratios are very similar in both species in both the cervical and lumbar regions, especially for the spinal canal. The similar spinal morphology in the axial plane between rats and humans supports using the rat spine as an appropriate surrogate for modeling axial and shear loading of the human spine.

  12. Contribution of microglia and astrocytes to the central sensitization, inflammatory and neuropathic pain in the juvenile rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ikeda Hiroshi

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The development of pain after peripheral nerve and tissue injury involves not only neuronal pathways but also immune cells and glia. Central sensitization is thought to be a mechanism for such persistent pain, and ATP involves in the process. We examined the contribution of glia to neuronal excitation in the juvenile rat spinal dorsal horn which is subjected to neuropathic and inflammatory pain. Results In rats subjected to neuropathic pain, immunoreactivity for the microglial marker OX42 was markedly increased. In contrast, in rats subjected to inflammatory pain, immunoreactivity for the astrocyte marker glial fibrillary acidic protein was increased slightly. Optically-recorded neuronal excitation induced by single-pulse stimulation to the dorsal root was augmented in rats subjected to neuropathic and inflammatory pain compared to control rats. The bath application of a glial inhibitor minocycline and a p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase inhibitor SB203580 inhibited the neuronal excitation in rats subjected to neuropathic pain. A specific P2X1,2,3,4 antagonist TNP-ATP largely inhibited the neuronal excitation only in rats subjected to neuropathic pain rats. In contrast, an astroglial toxin L-alpha-aminoadipate, a gap junction blocker carbenoxolone and c-Jun N-terminal kinase inhibitor SP600125 inhibited the neuronal excitation only in rats subjected to inflammatory pain. A greater number of cells in spinal cord slices from rats subjected to neuropathic pain showed Ca2+ signaling in response to puff application of ATP. This Ca2+ signaling was inhibited by minocycline and TNP-ATP. Conclusions These results directly support the notion that microglia is more involved in neuropathic pain and astrocyte in inflammatory pain.

  13. Voluntary Sleep Loss in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oonk, Marcella; Krueger, James M; Davis, Christopher J

    2016-07-01

    Animal sleep deprivation (SDEP), in contrast to human SDEP, is involuntary and involves repeated exposure to aversive stimuli including the inability of the animal to control the waking stimulus. Therefore, we explored intracranial self-stimulation (ICSS), an operant behavior, as a method for voluntary SDEP in rodents. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were implanted with electroencephalography/electromyography (EEG/EMG) recording electrodes and a unilateral bipolar electrode into the lateral hypothalamus. Rats were allowed to self-stimulate, or underwent gentle handling-induced SDEP (GH-SDEP), during the first 6 h of the light phase, after which they were allowed to sleep. Other rats performed the 6 h ICSS and 1 w later were subjected to 6 h of noncontingent stimulation (NCS). During NCS the individual stimulation patterns recorded during ICSS were replayed. After GH-SDEP, ICSS, or NCS, time in nonrapid eye movement (NREM) sleep and rapid eye movement (REM) sleep increased. Further, in the 24 h after SDEP, rats recovered all of the REM sleep lost during SDEP, but only 75% to 80% of the NREM sleep lost, regardless of the SDEP method. The magnitude of EEG slow wave responses occurring during NREM sleep also increased after SDEP treatments. However, NREM sleep EEG slow wave activity (SWA) responses were attenuated following ICSS, compared to GH-SDEP and NCS. We conclude that ICSS and NCS can be used to sleep deprive rats. Changes in rebound NREM sleep EEG SWA occurring after ICSS, NCS, and GH-SDEP suggest that nonspecific effects of the SDEP procedure differentially affect recovery sleep phenotypes. © 2016 Associated Professional Sleep Societies, LLC.

  14. Supporting the academic mission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunnick, N Reed

    2010-03-01

    The mission of an academic radiology department includes not only high-quality patient care, but also the educating of a broad variety of health care professionals, the conducting of research to advance the field, and volunteering service to the medical center and our professional societies. While funding is available for the research and educational aspects, it is insufficient to cover the actual costs. Furthermore, it is becoming increasingly difficult to make up the deficit by using a portion of the clinical revenues. Development and revenues derived from intellectual property are becoming essential to support the academic mission.

  15. AIS, ADMINISTRATIVE INFORMATION SUPPORT

    CERN Multimedia

    AS-DB/AS-SU

    1999-01-01

    The AS-DB and AS-SU groups within the Administrative Support division now offer a central entry point to the computer based Information Services under their responsibilities: the AIS Web site at http://ais.cern.ch.It features comprehensive search and navigation facilities as well as an activity based business map to guide AIS users to the information they want. Users will be able to launch any AIS WEB application from its desktop.Enjoy a visit of the site, we value your feedback at ais.webmaster@cern.ch!AS-DB/AS-SU

  16. Supporting irrational suicide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardcastle, Valerie Gray; Stewart, Rosalyn Walker

    2002-09-01

    In this essay, we present three case studies which suggest that sometimes we are better off supporting a so-called irrational suicide, and that emotional or psychological distress--even if medically controllable--might justify a suicide. We underscore how complicated these decisions are and how murky a physician's moral role can be. We advocate a more individualized route to end-of-life care, eschewing well-meaning, principled, generalizations in favor of highly contextualized, patient-centered approach. We conclude that our Western traditions of promoting reasoned behavior and life themselves may at times be counter-productive.

  17. Support open access publishing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ekstrøm, Jeannette

    2013-01-01

    Projektet Support Open Access Publishing har til mål at få opdateret Sherpa/Romeo databasen (www.sherpa.ac.uk/romeo) med fagligt relevante, danske tidsskrifter. Projektet skal endvidere undersøge mulighederne for at få udviklet en database, hvor forskere på tværs af relevante tidsskriftsinformati...... tidsskriftsinformationer (faglig disciplin, BFI niveau, Impact Factor, Open Access) vil kunne danne sig et hurtigt overblik, for derved at kunne træffe et kvalificeret valg om, hvor og hvordan man skal publicere sine forskningsresultater....

  18. Environmental analysis support

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, R.L.

    1996-06-01

    Activities in environmental analysis support included assistance to the Morgantown and Pittsburgh Energy Technology Centers (METC and PETC) in reviewing and preparing documents required by the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) for projects selected for the Clean Coal Technology (CCT) Program. An important activity was the preparation for METC of a final Environmental Assessment (EA) for the proposed Externally Fired Combined Cycle (EFCC) Project in Warren, Pennsylvania. In addition, a post-project environmental analysis was prepared for PETC to evaluate the Demonstration of Advanced Combustion Techniques for a Tangentially-Fired Boiler in Lynn Haven, Florida.

  19. Support system, excavation arrangement, and process of supporting an object

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arnold, Bill W.

    2017-08-01

    A support system, an excavation arrangement, and a process of supporting an object are disclosed. The support system includes a weight-bearing device and a camming mechanism positioned below the weight-bearing device. A downward force on the weight-bearing device at least partially secures the camming mechanism to opposing surfaces. The excavation arrangement includes a borehole, a support system positioned within and secured to the borehole, and an object positioned on and supported by the support system. The process includes positioning and securing the support system and positioning the object on the weight-bearing device.

  20. Kangaroo rat bone compared to white rat bone after short-term disuse and exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muths, E.; Reichman, O. J.

    1996-01-01

    Kangaroo rats (Dipodomys ordii) were used to study the effects of confinement on mechanical properties of bone with a long range objective of proposing an alternative to the white rat model for the study of disuse osteoporosis. Kangaroo rats exhibit bipedal locomotion, which subjects their limbs to substantial accelerative forces in addition to the normal stress of weight bearing. We subjected groups of kangaroo rats and white rats (Rattus norvegicus) to one of two confinement treatments or to an exercise regime; animals were exercised at a rate calculated to replicate their (respective) daily exercise patterns. White laboratory rats were used as the comparison because they are currently the accepted model used in the study of disuse osteoporosis. After 6 weeks of treatment, rats were killed and the long bones of their hind limbs were tested mechanically and examined for histomorphometric changes. We found that kangaroo rats held in confinement had less ash content in their hind limbs than exercised kangaroo rats. In general, treated kangaroo rats showed morphometric and mechanical bone deterioration compared to controls and exercised kangaroo rats appeared to have slightly “stronger” bones than confined animals. White rats exhibited no significant differences between treatments. These preliminary results suggest that kangaroo rats may be an effective model in the study of disuse osteoporosis.

  1. Modeling binge-like ethanol drinking by peri-adolescent and adult P rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Richard L.; Rodd, Zachary A.; Smith, Rebecca J.; Toalston, Jamie E.; Franklin, Kelle M.; McBride, William J.

    2011-01-01

    Alcohol binge-drinking, especially among adolescents and young adults, is a serious public health concern. The present study examined ethanol binge-like drinking by peri-adolescent [postnatal days (PNDs 30—72)] and adult (PNDs 90—132) alcohol-preferring (P) rats with a drinking-in-the-dark—multiple-scheduled-acces (DID-MSA) procedure used by our laboratory. Male and female P rats were provided concurrent access to 15% and 30% ethanol for three 1-hr sessions across the dark cycle 5 days/week. For the 1st week, adolescent and adult female P rats consumed 3.4 and 1.6 g/kg of ethanol, respectively, during the 1st hr of access, whereas for male rats the values were 3.5 and 1.1 g/kg of ethanol, respectively. Adult intakes increased to ~2.0 g/kg/hr and adolescent intakes decreased to ~2.5 g/kg/hr across the 6 weeks of ethanol access. The daily ethanol intake of adult DID-MSA rats approximated or modestly exceeded that seen in continuous access (CA) rats or the selection criterion for P rats (≥ 5g/kg/day). However, in general, the daily ethanol intake of DID-MSA peri-adolescent rats significantly exceeded that of their CA counterparts. BELs were assessed at 15-min intervals across the 3rd hr of access during the 4th week. Ethanol intake was 1.7 g/kg vs. 2.7 g/kg and BELs were 57 mg% vs. 100 mg% at 15- and 60-min, respectively. Intoxication induced by DID-MSA in female P rats was assessed during the 1st vs. 4th week of ethanol access. Level of impairment did not differ between the 2 weeks (106 vs. 97 sec latency to fall, 120 sec criterion) and was significant (vs. naïve controls) only during the 4th week. Overall, these findings support the use of the DID-MSA procedure in rats, and underscore the presence of age- and sex-dependent effects mediating ethanol binge-like drinking in P rats. PMID:21824488

  2. Advances on genetic rat models of epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serikawa, Tadao; Mashimo, Tomoji; Kuramoto, Takashi; Voigt, Birger; Ohno, Yukihiro; Sasa, Masashi

    2014-01-01

    Considering the suitability of laboratory rats in epilepsy research, we and other groups have been developing genetic models of epilepsy in this species. After epileptic rats or seizure-susceptible rats were sporadically found in outbred stocks, the epileptic traits were usually genetically-fixed by selective breeding. So far, the absence seizure models GAERS and WAG/Rij, audiogenic seizure models GEPR-3 and GEPR-9, generalized tonic-clonic seizure models IER, NER and WER, and Canavan-disease related epileptic models TRM and SER have been established. Dissection of the genetic bases including causative genes in these epileptic rat models would be a significant step toward understanding epileptogenesis. N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU) mutagenesis provides a systematic approach which allowed us to develop two novel epileptic rat models: heat-induced seizure susceptible (Hiss) rats with an Scn1a missense mutation and autosomal dominant lateral temporal epilepsy (ADLTE) model rats with an Lgi1 missense mutation. In addition, we have established episodic ataxia type 1 (EA1) model rats with a Kcna1 missense mutation derived from the ENU-induced rat mutant stock, and identified a Cacna1a missense mutation in a N-Methyl-N-nitrosourea (MNU)-induced mutant rat strain GRY, resulting in the discovery of episodic ataxia type 2 (EA2) model rats. Thus, epileptic rat models have been established on the two paths: ‘phenotype to gene’ and ‘gene to phenotype’. In the near future, development of novel epileptic rat models will be extensively promoted by the use of sophisticated genome editing technologies. PMID:25312505

  3. Advances on genetic rat models of epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serikawa, Tadao; Mashimo, Tomoji; Kuramoro, Takashi; Voigt, Birger; Ohno, Yukihiro; Sasa, Masashi

    2015-01-01

    Considering the suitability of laboratory rats in epilepsy research, we and other groups have been developing genetic models of epilepsy in this species. After epileptic rats or seizure-susceptible rats were sporadically found in outbred stocks, the epileptic traits were usually genetically-fixed by selective breeding. So far, the absence seizure models GAERS and WAG/Rij, audiogenic seizure models GEPR-3 and GEPR-9, generalized tonic-clonic seizure models IER, NER and WER, and Canavan-disease related epileptic models TRM and SER have been established. Dissection of the genetic bases including causative genes in these epileptic rat models would be a significant step toward understanding epileptogenesis. N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU) mutagenesis provides a systematic approach which allowed us to develop two novel epileptic rat models: heat-induced seizure susceptible (Hiss) rats with an Scn1a missense mutation and autosomal dominant lateral temporal epilepsy (ADLTE) model rats with an Lgi1 missense mutation. In addition, we have established episodic ataxia type 1 (EA1) model rats with a Kcna1 missense mutation derived from the ENU-induced rat mutant stock, and identified a Cacna1a missense mutation in a N-Methyl-N-nitrosourea (MNU)-induced mutant rat strain GRY, resulting in the discovery of episodic ataxia type 2 (EA2) model rats. Thus, epileptic rat models have been established on the two paths: 'phenotype to gene' and 'gene to phenotype'. In the near future, development of novel epileptic rat models will be extensively promoted by the use of sophisticated genome editing technologies.

  4. Hepatoprotective activities of rosmarinic acid against extrahepatic cholestasis in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Shih-Yi; Wang, Ya-Yu; Chen, Wen-Ying; Liao, Su-Lan; Chou, Su-Tze; Yang, Ching-Ping; Chen, Chun-Jung

    2017-10-01

    Though rosmarinic acid possesses nutritional, pharmaceutical, and toxic properties and shows therapeutic potential on liver diseases, its therapeutic effects against cholestatic liver diseases have not been proven. Using an extrahepatic cholestasis rat model by bile-duct ligation (BDL), daily oral administration of rosmarinic acid showed improvement effects on liver histology, serum biochemicals, ductular reaction, oxidative stress, inflammation, and fibrosis. Rosmarinic acid alleviated BDL-induced transforming growth factor beta-1 (TGF-β1) production and hepatic collagen deposition, and the anti-fibrotic effects were accompanied by reductions in matrix-producing cells and Smad2/3. BDL rats showed increased hepatic NF-κB/AP-1 activities, inflammatory cell infiltration/accumulation, and cytokine production, and these signs of hepatic inflammation were ameliorated by rosmarinic acid. Mechanistic study revealed an inhibitory effect of rosmarinic acid on the axis of the high mobility group box-1 (HMGB1)/toll-like receptor-4 (TLR4) in BDL rats. Results of cultured hepatic stellate cells further showed the impacts of rosmarinic acid which attenuated TGF-β1-induced stellate cell mitogenic and fibrogenic activation. Our findings support the concept that rosmarinic acid could serve as a hepatoprotective agent, and dietary rosmarinic acid supplementation may be beneficial in terms of improving cholestasis-related liver injury via mechanisms involving resolution of oxidative burden and down-regulation of HMGB1/TLR4, NF-κB, AP-1, and TGF-β1/Smad signaling. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Sphaeranthus indicus attenuates testosterone induced prostatic hypertrophy in albino rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nahata, Alok; Dixit, Vinod Kumar

    2011-12-01

    The present study reports the attenuating effect of Sphaeranthus indicus extracts (SI) on prostatic hyperplasia induced by testosterone in albino rats. In vitro studies were conducted to assess the 5α-reductase inhibitory potential of the petroleum ether, ethanolic and aqueous extracts of SI. A biochemical marker, β-sitosterol, was isolated and extracts were characterized utilizing HPTLC. Testosterone (3 mg/kg s.c.) was administered to the rats along with the test extracts and isolated β-sitosterol for a period of 28 days. The weight of the rats, the urine output, serum testosterone concentrations and prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels were recorded. The prostate/body weight ratio (P/BW) was calculated and histological studies were performed to observe the changes in the histoarchitecture of the prostate. Finasteride was used as a positive control (1 mg/kg p.o.). Sphaeranthus indicus extracts attenuated the increase in the P/BW ratio induced by testosterone in the treated groups. The petroleum ether extract exhibited the best activity, although the ethanol and aqueous extracts also exhibited significant activity. Urine output was also improved significantly, demonstrating the clinical implications of the study. Histological studies, testosterone levels which were measured weekly and PSA levels measured at the end of the study also support claims for the potential use of Sphaeranthus indicus in the treatment of prostatic hyperplasia. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Exenatide promotes regeneration of injured rat sciatic nerve

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ersin Kuyucu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Damage to peripheral nerves results in partial or complete dysfunction. After peripheral nerve injuries, a full functional recovery usually cannot be achieved despite the standard surgical repairs. Neurotrophic factors and growth factors stimulate axonal growth and support the viability of nerve cells. The objective of this study is to investigate the neurotrophic effect of exenatide (glucagon like peptide-1 analog in a rat sciatic nerve neurotmesis model. We injected 10 μg/d exenatide for 12 weeks in the experimental group (n = 12 and 0.1 mL/d saline for 12 weeks in the control group (n = 12. We evaluated nerve regeneration by conducting electrophysiological and motor functional tests. Histological changes were evaluated at weeks 1, 3, 6, and 9. Nerve regeneration was monitored using stereomicroscopy. The electrophysiological and motor functions in rats treated with exenatide were improved at 12 weeks after surgery. Histological examination revealed a significant increase in the number of axons in injured sciatic nerve following exenatide treatment confirmed by stereomicroscopy. In an experimentally induced neurotmesis model in rats, exenatide had a positive effect on nerve regeneration evidenced by electromyography, functional motor tests, histological and stereomicroscopic findings.

  7. Ontogeny of neural circuits underlying spatial memory in the rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Alexander Ainge

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Spatial memory is a well characterised psychological function in both humans and rodents. The combined computations of a network of systems including place cells in the hippocampus, grid cells in the medial entorhinal cortex and head direction cells found in numerous structures in the brain have been suggested to form the neural instantiation of the cognitive map as first described by Tolman in 1948. However, while our understanding of the neural mechanisms underlying spatial representations in adults is relatively sophisticated, we know substantially less about how this network develops in young animals. In this article we review studies examining the developmental timescale that these systems follow. Electrophysiological recordings from very young rats show that directional information is at adult levels at the outset of navigational experience. The systems supporting allocentric memory, however, take longer to mature. This is consistent with behavioural studies of young rats which show that spatial memory based on head direction develops very early but that allocentric spatial memory takes longer to mature. We go on to report new data demonstrating that memory for associations between objects and their spatial locations is slower to develop than memory for objects alone. This is again consistent with previous reports suggesting that adult like spatial representations have a protracted development in rats and also suggests that the systems involved in processing non-spatial stimuli come online earlier.

  8. The Fischer 344 rat as a model of presbycusis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syka, Josef

    2010-06-01

    Due to the rising number of the aged human population all over the world, presbycusis is a phenomenon that deserves the increasing attention of the medical community as regards to prevention and treatment. This requires finding appropriate animal models for human presbycusis that will be useful in future experiments. Among the available rat strains, the Fischer 344 (F344) strain promises to serve as a model producing prompt and profound presbycusis. Hearing thresholds begin to increase in this strain during the first year of life; toward the end of the second year, the thresholds are very high. The threshold shifts progress independently in both ears. The rapid deterioration of distortion product otoacoustic emissions, with the majority of outer hair cells (OHC) being present and morphologically intact, is apparently produced by the disruption of prestin. The age-related changes within inner ear function are accompanied by deterioration of acoustical signal processing within central auditory system, mainly due to impaired GABA inhibition. The loss of GABA inhibition in old animals is expressed primarily in the inferior colliculus but is also present in the cochlear nuclei and the auditory cortex. Sound-evoked behavioral reactions are also impaired in old F344 rats. Taken together, the described characteristics of the aging F344 rat auditory system supports the idea that this strain may serve as a suitable model for studying the mechanisms of presbycusis, its prevention and treatment. Copyright 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Glutamatergic alterations in the cortex of genetic absence epilepsy rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Didier-Bazes Marianne

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In absence epilepsy, the neuronal hyper-excitation and hyper-synchronization, which induce spike and wave discharges in a cortico-thalamic loop are suspected to be due to an imbalance between GABA and glutamate (GLU neurotransmission. In order to elucidate the role played by GLU in disease outcome, we measured cortical and thalamic extracellular levels of GLU and GABA. We used an in vivo quantitative microdialysis approach (no-net-flux method in an animal model of absence epilepsy (GAERS. In addition, by infusing labelled glutamate through the microdialysis probe, we studied in vivo glutamate uptake in the cortex and thalamus in GAERS and non-epileptic control (NEC rats. Expression of the vesicular glutamate transporters VGLUT1 and VGLUT2 and a synaptic component, synaptophysin, was also measured. Results Although extracellular concentrations of GABA and GLU in the cortex and thalamus were not significantly different between GAERS and NEC rats, cortical GLU uptake was significantly decreased in unrestrained awake GAERS. Expression of VGLUT2 and synaptophysin was increased in the cortex of GAERS compared to NEC rats, but no changes were observed in the thalamus. Conclusion The specific decrease in GLU uptake in the cortex of GAERS linked to synaptic changes suggests impairment of the glutamatergic terminal network. These data support the idea that a change in glutamatergic neurotransmission in the cortex could contribute to hyperexcitability in absence epilepsy.

  10. Repeated-dose toxicity of common ragweed on rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tivadar Kiss

    Full Text Available Ambrosia artemisiifolia L. is an invasive species with highly allergenic pollens. Ragweed originates from North America, but it also occurs and is spreading in Europe, causing seasonal allergic rhinitis for millions of people. Recently, the herb of A. artemisiifolia has gained popularity as medicinal plant and food. The effects of its long-term intake are unknown; there are no toxicological data to support the safe use of this plant. The aim of our study was to assess the repeated dose toxicity of A. artemisiifolia on animals. Ragweed puree was administered in low dose (500 mg/kg b. w. and high dose (1000 mg/kg b. w. to male Wistar rats according to 407 OECD Guidelines for the Testing of Chemicals. Clinical symptoms, various blood chemical parameters, body weight and organ weights of the rats were measured. Reduced liver function enzymes (AST, ALT, reduced triglyceride level in the low dose and increased carbamide level in the high dose group were observed. The weight of the liver relative to body weight was significantly reduced in both groups, while the brain weight relative to body weight was significantly elevated in both groups. According to our results, the repeated use of ragweed resulted in toxic effects in rats and these results question the safety of long-term human consumption of common ragweed.

  11. Cardioprotective effect of amlodipine in oxidative stress induced by experimental myocardial infarction in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudhira Begum

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The present study investigated whether the administration of amlodipine ameliorates oxidative stress induced by experimental myocardial infarction in rats. Adrenaline was administered and myocardial damage was evaluated biochemically [significantly increased serum aspertate aminotransferase (AST, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH and malondialdehyde (MDA levels of myocardial tissue] and histologically (morphological changes of myocardium. Amlodipine was administered as pretreatment for 14 days in adrenaline treated rats. Statistically significant amelioration in all the biochemical parameters supported by significantly improved myocardial morphology was observed in amlodipine pretreatment. It was concluded that amlodipine afforded cardioprotection by reducing oxidative stress induced in experimental myocardial infarction of catecholamine assault.

  12. Increased cellular proliferation in rat skeletal muscle and tendon in response to exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skovgaard, Dorthe; Bayer, Monika L; Mackey, Abigail

    2010-01-01

    PURPOSE: The purpose of this study is to investigate exercise-induced cellular proliferation in rat skeletal muscle/tendon with the use of 3'-[F-18]fluoro-3'deoxythymidine (FLT) and to quantitatively study concomitant changes in the proliferation-associated factor, Ki67. PROCEDURES: Wistar rats (......-derived results were supported by a correlation in calf muscle to Ki67 (protein and mRNA level), while this coherence was not found in tendon. CONCLUSION: FLT-PET seems to be a promising tool for imaging of exercise-induced cellular proliferation in musculo-tendinous tissue....

  13. Effects of the Cosmos 1129 Soviet paste diet on body composition in the growing rat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pace, N.; Rahlmann, D. F.; Smith, A. H.; Pitts, G. C.

    1981-01-01

    Six Simonsen albino rats (45 days of age) were placed on a regimen of 40 g/day the semipurified Soviet paste diet used in the 18.5 day Cosmos 1129 spacecraft was to support the rats for various experiments on the physiological effects of weightlessness. The animals were maintained on the Soviet paste diet for 35 days, metabolic rate was measured and body composition was determined by direct analysis. The results were compared with a control group of rates of the same age, which had been kept on a standard commercial grain diet during the same period of time.

  14. Further support for a palaearctic origin of Leishmania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara F Kerr

    2000-08-01

    Full Text Available The fossil record and systematics of murid rodents, reservoirs of zoonotic cutaneous leishmaniasis in the Palaearctic, Oriental, African, Nearctic and Neotropical, strongly support a Palaearctic origin of Leishmania. The fossil record and systematics of phlebotomine sand flies reinforce this idea. Interpretations of molecular data that place the origin of Leishmania in the Neotropical are inconsistent with the natural histories of reservoirs and vectors. The evolutionary pattern of New World rats (Sigmodontinae indicates that they may be the most important reservoirs of zoonotic cutaneous leishmaniasis throughout their range.

  15. Benzyl alcohol increases voluntary ethanol drinking in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etelälahti, T J; Eriksson, C J P

    2014-09-01

    The anabolic steroid nandrolone decanoate has been reported to increase voluntary ethanol intake in Wistar rats. In recent experiments we received opposite results, with decreased voluntary ethanol intake in both high drinking AA and low drinking Wistar rats after nandrolone treatment. The difference between the two studies was that we used pure nandrolone decanoate in oil, whereas in the previous study the nandrolone product Deca-Durabolin containing benzyl alcohol (BA) was used. The aims of the present study were to clarify whether the BA treatment could promote ethanol drinking and to assess the role of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal-gonadal axes (HPAGA) in the potential BA effect. Male AA and Wistar rats received subcutaneously BA or vehicle oil for 14 days. Hereafter followed a 1-week washout and consecutively a 3-week voluntary alcohol consumption period. The median (± median absolute deviation) voluntary ethanol consumption during the drinking period was higher in BA-treated than in control rats (4.94 ± 1.31 g/kg/day vs. 4.17 ± 0.31 g/kg/day, p = 0.07 and 1.01 ± 0.26 g/kg/day vs. 0.38 ± 0.27 g/kg/day, p = 0.05, for AA and Wistar rats, respectively; combined effect p < 0.01). The present results can explain the previous discrepancy between the two nandrolone studies. No significant BA effects on basal and ethanol-mediated serum testosterone and corticosterone levels were observed in blood samples taken at days 1, 8 and 22. However, 2h after ethanol administration significantly (p = 0.02) higher frequency of testosterone elevations was detected in high drinking AA rats compared to low drinking Wistars, which supports our previous hypotheses of a role of testosterone elevation in promoting ethanol drinking. Skin irritation and dermatitis were shown exclusively in the BA-treated animals. Altogether, the present results indicate that earlier findings obtained with Deca-Durabolin containing BA need to be re-evaluated. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All

  16. Stress and hunger alter the anorectic efficacy of fluoxetine in binge-eating rats with a history of caloric restriction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Placidi, Rachel J; Chandler, Paula C; Oswald, Kimberly D; Maldonado, Christine; Wauford, Pamela K; Boggiano, Mary M

    2004-11-01

    We examined the effect of fluoxetine to suppress binge eating in rats with a history of caloric restriction (CR) and the extent to which this effect was altered by stress and hunger. To detect heightened sensitivity to fluoxetine, young female rats were used to determine a subthreshold anorectic dose (2 mg/kg, intraperitonally). Another group of rats was either fed ad libitum or given multiple CR (to 90% body weight) and refeeding-to-satiety cycles. One half of the rats were then either spared or subjected to foot shock stress before fluoxetine treatment. A history of CR alone produced bingelike eating on palatable food (p stress did not affect intake, it rendered CR rats hypersensitive to the satiety effect of fluoxetine. The feeding-suppression was mainly for chow (p < .05) and the effect was abolished if the rats were in negative energy balance. Results support the utility of this animal model to elucidate serotonergic changes linking dieting to binge eating. The diverse effects of fluoxetine on the type of food, and in hungry versus sated rats, suggest alternate brain mechanisms should be concomitantly targeted for improved treatment of binge eating disorders.

  17. Gender- and region-dependent changes of redox biomarkers in the brain of successfully aging LOU/C rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moyse, Emmanuel; Arseneault, Madeleine; Gaudreau, Pierrette; Ferland, Guylaine; Ramassamy, Charles

    2015-07-01

    The LOU/C (LOU) rat is an obesity resistant strain with higher longevity and healthspan than common rats. The management of oxidative stress being important to successful aging, we characterized this process in the aging LOU rat. Male/female LOU rats were euthanized at 4, 20, and 29 months. Macrodissected hippocampus, striatum, parietal cortex, cerebellum were assayed for tissue concentrations of glutathione (GSH), gamma-glutamyl-cysteine-synthetase (γ-GCS), total thiols, protein carbonyls, mRNAs of clusterin and the known protective enzymes thioredoxine-1 (TRX-1), glutaredoxine-1 (GLRX-1), superoxide dismutase-1 (SOD-1). Brain levels of GSH, γ-GCS, total thiols remained constant with age, except for GSH and γ-GCS which decreases in females. Clusterin, TRX-1, GLRX-1, SOD-1 mRNA levels were maintained or increased in the hippocampus with age. Age-dependency of the markers differed between sexes, with SOD-1 and TRX-1 decreases out of hippocampus in females. Since antioxidants were reported to decrease with age in the brain of Wistar rats, maintenance of GSH levels and of protective enzymes mRNA levels in the LOU rat brain could contribute to the preservation of cognitive functions in old age. Altogether, the successful aging of LOU rats may, at least in part, involve the conservation of functional antioxidant mechanisms in the brain, supporting the oxidative stress theory of aging. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Lack of effect of Pitressin on the learning ability of Brattleboro rats with diabetes insipidus using positively reinforced operant conditioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laycock, J F; Gartside, I B

    1985-08-01

    Brattleboro rats with hereditary hypothalamic diabetes insipidus (BDI) received daily subcutaneous injections of vasopressin in the form of Pitressin tannate (0.5 IU/24 hr). They were initially deprived of food and then trained to work for food reward in a Skinner box to a fixed ratio of ten presses for each pellet received. Once this schedule had been learned the rats were given a discrimination task daily for seven days. The performances of these BDI rats were compared with those of rats of the parent Long Evans (LE) strain receiving daily subcutaneous injections of vehicle (arachis oil). Comparisons were also made between these two groups of treated animals and untreated BDI and LE rats studied under similar conditions. In the initial learning trial, both control and Pitressin-treated BDI rats performed significantly better, and manifested less fear initially, than the control or vehicle-injected LE rats when first placed in the Skinner box. Once the initial task had been learned there was no marked difference in the discrimination learning between control or treated BDI and LE animals. These results support the view that vasopressin is not directly involved in all types of learning behaviour, particularly those involving positively reinforced operant conditioning.

  19. Citrulline counteracts overweight- and aging-related effects on adiponectin and leptin gene expression in rat white adipose tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nolwenn Joffin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We recently demonstrated that citrulline (CIT reduced the expression of inflammatory genes in cultured explants from retroperitoneal (RET white adipose tissue (WAT from young (2–4 months but not old (25 months rats. Here we show that in RET WAT from old rats and high-fat-diet-fed (HFD young rats, the basal expression of the leptin gene was increased (275–345% whereas that of the adiponectin gene was decreased (48–60%, when compared to those from control-diet-fed (CD young rats. We show also that in RET WAT from old rats, a diet supplemented with CIT for 3 months reduced macrophage (F4/80, CD68 and inflammation (interleukin-6, tumor necrosis factor-α marker genes 23–97%. CIT supplementation lowered leptin mRNA 62% and increased adiponectin mRNA 232%. In cultured explants of RET WAT from 4 month-old CD, 4 month-old HFD and 25-month-old CD rats, the exposure to 2.5 mmol/L CIT for 24 h up-regulated adiponectin gene expression 151%, 362% and 216% respectively. In contrast, leptin gene expression was down-regulated 66% selectively in CIT-treated explants from 25-month-old CD rats. These results further support the proposed beneficial effect of CIT to counteract the deleterious effects of aging and overweight on the metabolic, inflammatory and endocrine functions of WAT.

  20. Supporting analyses and assessments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohi, J. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)

    1995-09-01

    Supporting analysis and assessments can provide a sound analytic foundation and focus for program planning, evaluation, and coordination, particularly if issues of hydrogen production, distribution, storage, safety, and infrastructure can be analyzed in a comprehensive and systematic manner. The overall purpose of this activity is to coordinate all key analytic tasks-such as technology and market status, opportunities, and trends; environmental costs and benefits; and regulatory constraints and opportunities-within a long-term and systematic analytic foundation for program planning and evaluation. Within this context, the purpose of the project is to help develop and evaluate programmatic pathway options that incorporate near and mid-term strategies to achieve the long-term goals of the Hydrogen Program. In FY 95, NREL will develop a comprehensive effort with industry, state and local agencies, and other federal agencies to identify and evaluate programmatic pathway options to achieve the long-term goals of the Program. Activity to date is reported.

  1. The supportive expatriate spouse:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauring, Jakob; Selmer, Jan

    2010-01-01

    Previous research on the influence of accompanying expatriate spouses has emphasized the negative impact on the business expatriates that could contribute to unsuccessful outcomes of the foreign assignments. But spouses' influences could also be positive. Applying ethnographic field-work methodol....... These findings are consistent with recent theoretical developments focusing on positive outcomes of the work-family interface and social capital theory and are in line with empirical research on repatriation and post-assignment careers.......-work methodology, this study investigated female spouses' involvement in the career of a sample of Danish business expatriates living in the same compound in Saudi Arabia. Results showed that the accompanying partners were active in trying to support and further their expatriate husbands' immediate careers...

  2. Perioperative nutritional support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morán López, Jesús Manuel; Piedra León, María; García Unzueta, María Teresa; Ortiz Espejo, María; Hernández González, Miriam; Morán López, Ruth; Amado Señaris, José Antonio

    2014-01-01

    The relationship between preoperative malnutrition and morbi-mortality has been documented for years. Despite the existence of tools that allow its detection, and therefore treat this entity, their introduction into clinical practice is not wide-spread. Both perioperative insulin resistance and hyperglycemia are associated with increased perioperative morbidity and length of hospital stay. The intake of carbohydrate-rich drinks 2-4h prior to surgery reduces insulin resistance. In the immediate postoperative period, the enteral route is safe and well tolerated and its early use reduces hospital stay and postoperative complications compared with parenteral nutritional support. Inmunonutrition has been proven effective to decrease postoperative complications and hospital stay. In view of these data we opted for the adoption of these measures replacing bowel rest and the indiscriminate use of postoperative parenteral nutrition. Copyright © 2013 AEC. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  3. Office support staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choat, Dennis E

    2005-11-01

    The pace at which we live and practice in this new century leaves little time to manage many of the menial tasks of day-to-day survival. This is especially true in the field of medicine. With today's insurance policies and procedures, Health Information Privacy Protection Act (HIPPA) regulations, and the low return of payment for time invested, it is crucial to have a supportive group of people around you to help make your valuable time as meaningful as possible. This article will describe an arrangement of ancillary office staff for a colorectal practice. There will be detailed information on job descriptions, expectations, and level of training required for each. Upon completion of this article, one should be able to identify the personnel needed to establish and manage an efficient office from the front desk to the billing department and ultimately the practice manager.

  4. Predatory Bacteria Attenuate Klebsiella pneumoniae Burden in Rat Lungs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth Shatzkes

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus and Micavibrio aeruginosavorus are predatory bacteria that naturally—and obligately—prey on other Gram-negative bacteria, and their use has been proposed as a potential new approach to control microbial infection. The ability of predatory bacteria to prey on Gram-negative human pathogens in vitro is well documented; however, the in vivo safety and efficacy of predatory bacteria have yet to be fully assessed. In this study, we examined whether predatory bacteria can reduce bacterial burden in the lungs in an in vivo mammalian system. Initial safety studies were performed by intranasal inoculation of rats with predatory bacteria. No adverse effects or lung pathology were observed in rats exposed to high concentrations of predatory bacteria at up to 10 days postinoculation. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA of the immune response revealed a slight increase in inflammatory cytokine levels at 1 h postinoculation that was not sustained by 48 h. Additionally, dissemination experiments showed that predators were efficiently cleared from the host by 10 days postinoculation. To measure the ability of predatory bacteria to reduce microbial burden in vivo, we introduced sublethal concentrations of Klebsiella pneumoniae into the lungs of rats via intranasal inoculation and followed with multiple doses of predatory bacteria over 24 h. Predatory bacteria were able to reduce K. pneumoniae bacterial burden, on average, by more than 3.0 log10 in the lungs of most rats as measured by CFU plating. The work presented here provides further support for the idea of developing predatory bacteria as a novel biocontrol agent.

  5. Transcriptional response to 131I exposure of rat thyroid gland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudqvist, Nils; Spetz, Johan; Schüler, Emil; Parris, Toshima Z; Langen, Britta; Helou, Khalil; Forssell-Aronsson, Eva

    2017-01-01

    Humans are exposed to 131I in medical diagnostics and treatment but also from nuclear accidents, and better knowledge of the molecular response in thyroid is needed. The aim of the study was to examine the transcriptional response in thyroid tissue 24 h after 131I administration in rats. The exposure levels were chosen to simulate both the clinical situation and the case of nuclear fallout. Thirty-six male rats were i.v. injected with 0-4700 kBq 131I, and killed at 24 h after injection (Dthyroid = 0.0058-3.0 Gy). Total RNA was extracted from individual thyroid tissue samples and mRNA levels were determined using oligonucleotide microarray technique. Differentially expressed transcripts were determined using Nexus Expression 3.0. Hierarchical clustering was performed in the R statistical computing environment. Pathway analysis was performed using the Ingenuity Pathway Analysis tool and the Gene Ontology database. T4 and TSH plasma concentrations were measured using ELISA. Totally, 429 differentially regulated transcripts were identified. Downregulation of thyroid hormone biosynthesis associated genes (e.g. thyroglobulin, thyroid peroxidase, the sodium-iodine symporter) was identified in some groups, and an impact on thyroid function was supported by the pathway analysis. Recurring downregulation of Dbp and Slc47a2 was found. Dbp exhibited a pattern with monotonous reduction of downregulation with absorbed dose at 0.0058-0.22 Gy. T4 plasma levels were increased and decreased in rats whose thyroids were exposed to 0.057 and 0.22 Gy, respectively. Different amounts of injected 131I gave distinct transcriptional responses in the rat thyroid. Transcriptional response related to thyroid function and changes in T4 plasma levels were found already at very low absorbed doses to thyroid.

  6. Ureter smooth muscle cell orientation in rat is predominantly longitudinal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spronck, Bart; Merken, Jort J; Reesink, Koen D; Kroon, Wilco; Delhaas, Tammo

    2014-01-01

    In ureter peristalsis, the orientation of the contracting smooth muscle cells is essential, yet current descriptions of orientation and composition of the smooth muscle layer in human as well as in rat ureter are inconsistent. The present study aims to improve quantification of smooth muscle orientation in rat ureters as a basis for mechanistic understanding of peristalsis. A crucial step in our approach is to use two-photon laser scanning microscopy and image analysis providing objective, quantitative data on smooth muscle cell orientation in intact ureters, avoiding the usual sectioning artifacts. In 36 rat ureter segments, originating from a proximal, middle or distal site and from a left or right ureter, we found close to the adventitia a well-defined longitudinal smooth muscle orientation. Towards the lamina propria, the orientation gradually became slightly more disperse, yet the main orientation remained longitudinal. We conclude that smooth muscle cell orientation in rat ureter is predominantly longitudinal, though the orientation gradually becomes more disperse towards the proprial side. These findings do not support identification of separate layers. The observed longitudinal orientation suggests that smooth muscle contraction would rather cause local shortening of the ureter, than cause luminal constriction. However, the net-like connective tissue of the ureter wall may translate local longitudinal shortening into co-local luminal constriction, facilitating peristalsis. Our quantitative, minimally invasive approach is a crucial step towards more mechanistic insight into ureter peristalsis, and may also be used to study smooth muscle cell orientation in other tube-like structures like gut and blood vessels.

  7. Aromatase and neuroinflammation in rat focal brain ischemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Yu H; Dhawan, Jasbeer; Kovoor, Joel A; Sullivan, John; Zhang, Wei X; Choi, Dennis; Biegon, Anat

    2017-11-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that expression of aromatase, the enzyme responsible for the conversion of androgens to estrogens, is transiently upregulated in rat stroke models. It was further suggested that increased aromatase expression is linked to neuroinflammation and that it is neuroprotective in females. Our goal was to investigate aromatase upregulation in male rats subjected to experimental stroke in relationship to neuroinflammation, infarct and response to treatment with different putative neuroprotective agents. Intact male rats were subjected to transient (90min) middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) and administered selfotel (N-methyl-d-aspartic acid (NMDA) receptor competitive antagonist), TPEN (a zinc chelator), a combination of the two drugs or vehicle, injected immediately after reperfusion. Animals were killed 14days after MCAO and consecutive brain sections used to measure aromatase expression, cerebral infarct volume and neuroinflammation. Quantitative immunohistochemistry (IHC) demonstrated increased brain aromatase expression in the peri-infarct area relative to contralesional area, which was partially abrogated by neuroprotective agents. There was no correlation between aromatase expression in the peri-infarct zone and infarct volume, which was reduced by neuroprotective agents. Microglial activation, measured by quantitative autoradiography, was positively correlated with infarct and inversely correlated with aromatase expression in the peri-infarct zone. Our findings indicate that focal ischemia upregulates brain aromatase in the male rat brain at 14days post surgery, which is within the time frame documented in females. However, the lack of negative correlation between aromatase expression and infarct volume and lack of positive correlation between microgliosis and aromatase do not support a major role for aromatase as a mediator of neuroprotection or a causal relationship between microglial activation and increased aromatase

  8. Parietal lesions produce illusory conjunction errors in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raymond PIERRE Kesner

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available When several different objects are presented, visual objects are perceived correctly only if their features are identified and then bound together. Illusory-conjunction errors result when an object is correctly identified but is combined incorrectly. The parietal cortex (PPC has been shown repeatedly to play an important role in feature binding. The present study builds on a series of recent studies that have made use of visual search paradigms to elucidate the neural system involved in feature binding. This experiment attempts to define the role the PPC plays in binding the properties of a visual object that varies on the features of color and size in rats. Rats with PPC lesions or control surgery were exposed to three blocks of 20 trials administered over a 1-week period, with each block containing ten-one feature and ten-two feature trials. The target object consisted of one color object (e.g. black and white and one size object (e.g. short and tall. Of the ten one feature trials, five of the trials were tailored specifically for size discrimination and five for color discrimination. In the two-feature condition, the animal was required to locate the targeted object among four objects with two objects differing in size and two objects differing in color. The results showed a significant decrease in learning the task for the PPC lesioned rats compared to controls, especially for the two-feature condition. Based on a subsequent error analysis for color and size, the results showed a significant increase in illusory conjunction errors for the PPC lesioned rats relative to controls for color and relative to color discrimination, suggesting that the PPC may support feature binding as it relates to color. There was an increase in illusory conjunctions errors for both the PPC lesioned and control animals for size, but this appeared to be due to a difficulty with size discrimination.

  9. Spinal control of erection by glutamate in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rampin, Olivier; Monnerie, Régine; Jérôme, Nathalie; McKenna, Kevin; Maurin, Yves

    2004-04-01

    The lumbosacral spinal network controlling penile erection is activated by information from peripheral and supraspinal origins. We tested the hypothesis that glutamate, released by sensory afferents from the genitals, activates this proerectile network. In anesthetized intact and T8 spinalized (i.e., freed from supraspinal inhibition) male rats, the parameters of electrical stimulation of the dorsal penile nerve (DPN) that elicited intracavernous pressure (ICP) rises were determined. In T8 spinalized rats, DPN stimulations were applied in the presence of d(-)-2-amino-5-phosphonopentanoic acid (d-AP5), a competitive NMDA receptor antagonist, or of 2,3-dioxo-6-nitro-1,2,3,4-tetrahydrobenzo[f]quinoxaline-7-sulphonamide (NBQX), an AMPA-kainate receptor antagonist, injected intrathecally at the lumbosacral level. Both antagonists, alone or in combination, dose dependently decreased the ICP rise and increased its latency. In conscious rats, reflexive erections were depressed by d-AP5 and NBQX, as revealed by an increased latency of the first erection and by decreases of the number of rats displaying erections, of the number of erection clusters and of the number of erections per cluster. In anesthetized ats, the combined administration of the glutamatergic agonists NMDA and AMPA elicited ICP rises in the absence of DPN stimulation. In contrast, both agonists moderately decreased the ICP rise elicited by DPN stimulation but did not affect its latency. These results support our hypothesis that glutamate, released on stimulation of the genitals and acting at AMPA and NMDA receptors, is a potent reactivator of the spinal proerectile network.

  10. Community Supported Stardust Compendia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westphal, Andrew J.; DeGregorio, Bradley; Lettieri, Robert; Frank, David R.; Zolensky, Michael E.

    2013-01-01

    The Stardust cometary and interstellar collections present unprecedented challenges in sample preparation and analysis. The ensemble of approx.80 tracks and dozens of foil craters from the cometary collection for which we have analyses exhibits a bewildering complexity and diversity of materials. The interstellar collection is even more challenging, because of the extremely low fluence of interstellar dust, a relatively large background of secondary ejecta from impacts on the spacecraft, and the small size of interstellar dust, approximately three orders of magnitude smaller in mass than typical cometary particles. Unlike with the other returned sample collections, characterization of these samples beyond basic photo-documentation is not generally practical at JSC. Even among the other small-particle collections, currently the cosmic dust and Hayabusa samples, SEM/EDX can provide basic chemistry. This is not possible with Stardust particles without destructive and invasive sample preparation. Furthermore, SEM/EDX requires isolating small grains from adhering aerogel. A reliable technique to carry out this task does not exist. Complete characterization of particles requires coordinated analyses using synchrotron and electron-beam microprobes, which do not exist at any one lab. Thus, it was recognized since the Stardust Preliminary Examination in 2006 that characterization of the samples would rely on the worldwide community of Stardust Investigators. Here we announce the development of community-editable, wiki-style Stardust compendia that will support this effort. Our intention is that this will facilitate sample requests by providing basic characterization of tracks. We expect that this will also support comprehensive meta-analyses (global syntheses of analyses) of the collections.

  11. Sevoflurane-induced pica in female rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Kouichi; Yamamoto, Emiri; Sugimoto, Toru; Sagakami, Takuya; Yamatodani, Atsushi

    2016-05-01

    We examined the effects of volatile anesthetics on pica, which can be used to assess nausea and vomiting in rats. We found that inhalation anesthesia with sevoflurane significantly induced pica in female but not male rats. Among the female rats, young rats (8 weeks old) were more susceptible to its induction than adult rats (20 weeks old) with ovariectomy or sham-surgery. Anti-emetic drugs that are used to prevent postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV) inhibited the pica. These results suggest that sevoflurane-induced pica in young female rats has the potential to be an animal model of PONV in humans. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Running-based pica in rats. Evidence for the gastrointestinal discomfort hypothesis of running-based taste aversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakajima, Sadahiko; Katayama, Tomomi

    2014-12-01

    Voluntary running in an activity wheel establishes aversion to paired taste in rats. A proposed mechanism underlying this taste aversion learning is gastrointestinal discomfort caused by running. We tested this hypothesis by measuring the pica behavior (kaolin clay intake) of rats, because it is known that rats engage in pica behavior after various nausea-inducing treatments including irradiation, motion sickness, and injection of emetic drugs such as lithium chloride (LiCl). Following a demonstration of the already-known phenomenon of LiCl-based pica in Experiment 1, we successfully showed running-based pica behavior in Experiment 2 where the running treatment was compared with a non-running control treatment (i.e., confinement in a locked wheel). These results suggest that not only LiCl but also running induces nausea in rats, supporting the gastrointestinal discomfort hypothesis of running-based taste aversion learning. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Cardiovascular end-organ damage in Ren-2 transgenic rats compared to spontaneously hypertensive rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pinto, YM; Buikema, H; vanGilst, WH; vanGeel, PP; deGraeff, PA; Wagner, J; Paul, M

    To compare hypertensive end-organ damage in two genetic forms of hypertension we assessed cardiovascular function in two rat strains of generic hypertension: transgenic rats overexpressing the mouse Ren-2 gene [(TGR(mREN2)27]) and blood pressure matched spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR). Despite

  14. Unraveling the Obesity of OLETF Rats

    OpenAIRE

    Moran, Timothy H.

    2007-01-01

    Cholecystokinin (CCK) is a brain gut peptide that plays an important role in satiety. CCK inhibits food intake by reducing meal size. CCK’s satiety actions are mediating through its interaction with CCK1 receptors. Otsuka Long Evans Tokushima Fatty (OLETF) rats are a CCK1 receptor knockout model that allows the study of multiple CCK functions. OLETF rats are hyperphagic with the hyperphagia expressed as a significant increase in the size of meals. OLETF rat obesity is secondary to the hyperph...

  15. The thymus reconstituted nude rat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hougen, H P; Klausen, B

    1987-01-01

    The monoclonal antibodies OX6, OX19, W3/13, OX7, OX8, and W3/25 were used to gain information about the distribution of different lymphocyte subpopulations in peripheral lymphoid organs of neonatally isogeneic and allogeneic thymus reconstituted nude rats. Splenic mitogen responsiveness, xenogeneic...... skin rejection, and antibody titers were also measured in the same groups of animals. The experiments showed that both allogeneic and isogeneic thymus grafting cause a significant amplification of cells in the different T lymphocyte subpopulations. The functional tests, however, indicate that the T...... cell response is far better following isografting. We, therefore, conclude that isogeneic thymus grafting is an easy method of reconstituting the nude rat immunologically....

  16. Isolation of rat adrenocortical mitochondria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Solinas, Paola [Department of Pharmacology, School of Medicine, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH 44106 (United States); Department of Medicine, Center for Mitochondrial Disease, School of Medicine, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH 44106 (United States); Fujioka, Hisashi [Electron Microscopy Facility, Department of Pharmacology, Center for Mitochondrial Disease, School of Medicine, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH 44106 (United States); Tandler, Bernard [Department of Biological Sciences, School of Dental Medicine, Center for Mitochondrial Disease, School of Medicine, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH 44106 (United States); Hoppel, Charles L., E-mail: charles.hoppel@case.edu [Department of Pharmacology, School of Medicine, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH 44106 (United States); Department of Medicine, Center for Mitochondrial Disease, School of Medicine, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH 44106 (United States)

    2012-10-12

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A method for isolation of adrenocortical mitochondria from the adrenal gland of rats is described. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The purified isolated mitochondria show excellent morphological integrity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The properties of oxidative phosphorylation are excellent. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The method increases the opportunity of direct analysis of adrenal mitochondria from small animals. -- Abstract: This report describes a relatively simple and reliable method for isolating adrenocortical mitochondria from rats in good, reasonably pure yield. These organelles, which heretofore have been unobtainable in isolated form from small laboratory animals, are now readily accessible. A high degree of mitochondrial purity is shown by the electron micrographs, as well as the structural integrity of each mitochondrion. That these organelles have retained their functional integrity is shown by their high respiratory control ratios. In general, the biochemical performance of these adrenal cortical mitochondria closely mirrors that of typical hepatic or cardiac mitochondria.

  17. Phosphodiesterases in the rat ovary

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Tonny Studsgaard; Stahlhut, Martin; Andersen, Claus Yding

    2015-01-01

    Phosphodiesterases (PDEs) are important regulators of the intracellular cAMP concentration, which is a central second messenger that affects a multitude of intracellular functions. In the ovaries, cAMP exerts diverse functions, including regulation of ovulation and it has been suggested...... that augmented cAMP levels stimulate primordial follicle growth. The present study examined the gene expression, enzyme activity and immunolocalization of the different cAMP hydrolysing PDEs families in the rat ovary. Further, the effect of PDE4 inhibition on primordial follicle activation in cultured neonatal...... rat ovaries was also evaluated. We found varied expression of all eight families in the ovary with Pde7b and Pde8a having the highest expression each accounting for more than 20% of the total PDE mRNA. PDE4 accounted for 15-26% of the total PDE activity. Immunoreactive PDE11A was found in the oocytes...

  18. LIEER OF WISTAR RAT MODELS

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    homeostasis synthesised in the liver, has been raised in cases of impaired liver. fimcflun. ... Bil rats served as co:|rtrols, while Eflmts more test animals. The .... between 13D-15tJg were used. These anin1alswe1'edividedlntotwo[2]n1eiJ1 groups: the control group and the test animals. Each group comprised sixty [60].

  19. Renal function in streptozotocin-diabetic rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, P K; Christiansen, J S; Steven, K

    1981-01-01

    Renal function was examined with micropuncture methods in the insulin-treated streptozotocin-diabetic rat. Kidney glomerular filtration rate was significantly higher in the diabetic rats (1.21 ml/min) than in the control group (0.84 ml/min) Nephron glomerular filtration rate increased in proportion...... to the rise in kidney glomerular filtration rate (diabetic rats: 37.0 nl/min; control rats: 27.9 nl/min). Likewise renal plasma flow was significantly higher in the diabetic rats (4.1 ml/min) than in the control group (3.0 ml/min). Glomerular capillary pressure was identical in both groups (56.0 and 56.0 mm......-1mmHg-1). Kidney weight was significantly higher in the diabetic rats (1.15 g; control rats: 0.96 g) while body weight was similar in both groups (diabetic rats: 232 g; control rats: 238 g). Calculations indicate that the increases in transglomerular hydraulic pressure, renal plasma flow...

  20. Automatic Training of Rat Cyborgs for Navigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yipeng; Wu, Zhaohui; Xu, Kedi; Gong, Yongyue; Zheng, Nenggan; Zheng, Xiaoxiang; Pan, Gang

    2016-01-01

    A rat cyborg system refers to a biological rat implanted with microelectrodes in its brain, via which the outer electrical stimuli can be delivered into the brain in vivo to control its behaviors. Rat cyborgs have various applications in emergency, such as search and rescue in disasters. Prior to a rat cyborg becoming controllable, a lot of effort is required to train it to adapt to the electrical stimuli. In this paper, we build a vision-based automatic training system for rat cyborgs to replace the time-consuming manual training procedure. A hierarchical framework is proposed to facilitate the colearning between rats and machines. In the framework, the behavioral states of a rat cyborg are visually sensed by a camera, a parameterized state machine is employed to model the training action transitions triggered by rat's behavioral states, and an adaptive adjustment policy is developed to adaptively adjust the stimulation intensity. The experimental results of three rat cyborgs prove the effectiveness of our system. To the best of our knowledge, this study is the first to tackle automatic training of animal cyborgs. PMID:27436999

  1. Effect of Commiphora opobalsamum (L.) Engl. (Balessan) on experimental gastric ulcers and secretion in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Howiriny, Tawfeq; Al-Sohaibani, Mohammed; Al-Said, Mansour; Al-Yahya, Mohammed; El-Tahir, Kamal; Rafatullah, Syed

    2005-04-26

    The ulcer protective potential of an ethanol extract of Commiphora opobalsamum (L.) Engl. (Burseraceae) 'Balessan' was assessed against different acute gastric ulcer models in rats induced by necrotizing agents (80% ethanol, 0.2M NaOH and 25% NaCl), hypothermic restraint stress, pyloric ligation (Shay) and indomethacin. Balessan, 250 and 500 mg/kg administered orally (intraperitoneally in Shay rat model) showed a dose-dependent ulcer protective effects in all the above ulcer models. Besides, the extract offered protection against ethanol-induced depletion of stomach wall mucus and reduction in nonprotein sulfhydryl (NP-SH) concentration. Ethanol treatment also caused histopathological lesions of the stomach wall. Pretreatment with Balessan extract provided a complete protection of gastric mucosa through supporting both the offensive and defensive factors. Balessan extract was also showed a large margin of safety without any apparent adverse effects in rats.

  2. [Effect of fluoride on the expression of endoplasmic reticulum chaperone in ameloblast of rat incisor].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Kai-qiang; Zhang, Ying; Liu, Lu; Gu, He-feng; Ma, Lin

    2013-10-01

    To investigate the effect of different concentrations of fluoride on the expression of endoplasmic reticulum chaperone, and to explore the mechanism of dental fluorosis in rat. Thirty Wistar rats were randomly divided into 3 groups. Immunohistochemistry was used to detect the expression of CRT, GRP78, XBP-1 and caspase-12 in rat incisors. Metamorph microscope images analysis system and SPSS 13.0 software package was used to analyze the data. Typical features of dental fluorosis were found in the fluoride group. Results of immunohistochemistry showed that CRT (F=238.6, Pameloblasts and in status of endoplasmic reticulum stress and caspase-12 plays an important role during ameloblast apoptosis. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (81072245) and Natural Science Foundation of Liaoning Province (20102278).

  3. Effects of dehydroepiandrosterone in rats injected with streptozotocin during the neonatal period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giroix, M H; Malaisse-Lagae, F; Portha, B; Sener, A; Malaisse, W J

    1997-06-01

    Control rats and diabetic animals injected with streptozotocin during the neonatal period were either maintained on a standard diet or given access to food supplemented with dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA, 0.2%) for 11 days before sacrifice. In both control and diabetic rats, DHEA feeding augmented the activity of the mitochondrial FAD-linked glycerophosphate dehydrogenase and cytosolic NADP-linked malate dehydrogenase in liver, but not so in either the parotid gland or pancreatic islets. DHEA lowered, in both control and diabetic rats, the ratio between D-glucose oxidation and utilization and the rate of insulin release in pancreatic islets exposed to a high concentration of D-glucose, as well as the insulin concentration and insulin/glucose ratio in plasma. These findings support the view that, in diabetes, DHEA, by increasing sensitivity to insulin, may allow islet B-cells to avoid the otherwise unfavorable consequences of chronic hyperactivity.

  4. A comparative analysis shows morphofunctional differences between the rat and mouse melanin-concentrating hormone systems.

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    Sophie Croizier

    Full Text Available Sub-populations of neurons producing melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH are characterized by distinct projection patterns, birthdates and CART/NK3 expression in rat. Evidence for such sub-populations has not been reported in other species. However, given that genetically engineered mouse lines are now commonly used as experimental models, a better characterization of the anatomy and morphofunctionnal organization of MCH system in this species is then necessary. Combining multiple immunohistochemistry experiments with in situ hybridization, tract tracing or BrdU injections, evidence supporting the hypothesis that rat and mouse MCH systems are not identical was obtained: sub-populations of MCH neurons also exist in mouse, but their relative abundance is different. Furthermore, divergences in the distribution of MCH axons were observed, in particular in the ventromedial hypothalamus. These differences suggest that rat and mouse MCH neurons are differentially involved in anatomical networks that control feeding and the sleep/wake cycle.

  5. Hyperparathyroidism is augmented by ovariectomy in Nagase analbuminemic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inaba, M; Morii, H; Katsumata, T; Goto, H; Ishimura, E; Kawagishi, T; Kamao, M; Okano, T; Nishizawa, Y

    2000-06-01

    The role of albumin in bone metabolism was studied in Nagase analbuminemic (NA) rats. Serum calcium (Ca), inorganic phosphate (Pi) and magnesium (Mg) concentrations did not differ between female NA and control Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats at the time of ovariectomy (ovx), although serum ionized Ca was significantly lower in NA rats than in SD rats. Serum parathyroid hormone (PTH) and osteocalcin (OC) concentrations and urinary Ca excretion were significantly greater in NA rats than in SD rats, suggesting hyperparathyroidism and the resultant enhanced bone turnover in NA rats. Paradoxically, ovx increased serum PTH and OC in NA rats but not in SD rats. Ovx-induced exacerbation of hyperparathyroidism was confirmed by significantly greater conversion of 25-hydroxyvitamin D to 1, 25-dihydroxyvitamin D in ovx NA rats even after normalization to vitamin D-binding protein. Bone mineral density (BMD) in proximal tibia increased similarly in a time-dependent manner in sham-operated NA and SD rats. However, ovx ablated the time-dependent increase of BMD in SD rats and significantly decreased BMD in NA rats by 2 wk after ovx, resulting in a significantly lower BMD in ovx NA rats than in ovx SD rats. In summary, NA rats, which are analbuminemic with compensatory increases in lipid and protein synthesis, developed hyperparathyroidism, possibly due to an increase in serum Pi and a reduction of ionized Ca, and ovx induced a greater BMD reduction in NA rats than in SD rats, probably by exacerbating hyperparathyroidism.

  6. Stevia preferences in Wistar rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Núñez Martínez, Paula; Argüelles Luis, Juan; Perillán Méndez, Carmen

    2016-11-01

    The Stevia rebaudiana plant is likely to become a major source of high-potency sweetener for the growing natural-food market. S. rebaudiana is the source of a number of sweet diterpenoid glycosides, but the major sweet constituents are rebaudioside A and stevioside. These two constituents have similar pharmacokinetic and metabolic profiles in rats and humans, and thus, studies carried out with either steviol glycoside are relevant to both. Other studies illustrate the diversity of voluntary sweet intake in mammals. This study was done using a series of two-bottle tests that compared a wide range of sweetener concentrations versus saccharin concentrations and versus water. Wistar rats displayed preferences for stevia extract and pure rebaudioside A solutions over water at a range of concentrations (0.001% to 0.3%), and their intake peak occurred at 0.1% concentration. They also preferred solutions prepared with a commercial rebaudioside A plus erythritol mixture to water, and their peak was at 2% concentration. The present study provides new information about the responses of Wistar rats to stevia compounds and commercial stevia products such as Truvia. These results could help with the appropriate dosage selection for focused behavioral and physiological studies on stevia.

  7. Pathophysiology of the Belgrade Rat

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    Tania eVeuthey

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The Belgrade rat is an animal model of Divalent Metal Transporter-1 (DMT1 deficiency. This strain originates from an X-irradiation experiment first reported in 1966. Since then, the Belgrade rat’s pathophysiology has helped to reveal the importance of iron balance and the role of DMT1. This review discusses our current understanding of iron transport homeostasis and summarizes molecular details of DMT1 function. We describe how studies of the Belgrade rat have revealed key roles for DMT1 in iron distribution to red blood cells as well as duodenal iron absorption. The Belgrade rat’s pathology has extended our knowledge of hepatic iron handling, pulmonary and olfactory iron transport as well as brain iron uptake and renal iron handling. For example, relationships between iron and manganese metabolism have been discerned since both are essential metals transported by DMT1. Pathophysiologic features of the Belgrade rat provide us with a unique and interesting animal model to understand iron homeostasis.

  8. Prepulse inhibition predicts spatial working memory performance in the inbred Roman high- and low-avoidance rats and in genetically heterogeneous NIH-HS rats: relevance for studying pre-attentive and cognitive anomalies in schizophrenia

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    Ignasi eOliveras

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Animal models of schizophrenia-relevant symptoms are increasingly important for progress in our understanding of the neurobiological basis of the disorder and for discovering novel and more specific treatments. Prepulse inhibition (PPI and working memory, which are impaired in schizophrenic patients, are among the symptoms/processes modeled in those animal analogues. We have evaluated whether a genetically-selected rat model, the Roman high-avoidance inbred strain (RHA-I, displays PPI deficits as compared with its Roman low-avoidance (RLA-I counterpart and the genetically heterogeneous NIH-HS rat stock. We have investigated whether PPI deficits predict spatial working memory impairments (in the Morris water maze; MWM in these three rat types (Experiment 1, as well as in a separate sample of NIH-HS rats stratified according to their extreme (High, Medium, Low PPI scores (Experiment 2. The results from Exp. 1 show that RHA-I rats display PPI and spatial working memory deficits compared to both RLA-I and NIH-HS rats. Likewise, in Exp. 2, Low-PPI NIH-HS rats present significantly impaired working memory with respect to Medium-PPI and High-PPI NIH-HS subgroups. Further support to these results comes from correlational, factorial and multiple regression analyses, which reveal that PPI is positively associated with spatial working memory performance. Conversely, cued learning in the MWM was not associated with PPI. Thus, using genetically-selected and genetically heterogeneous rats, the present study shows, for the first time, that PPI is a positive predictor of performance in a spatial working memory task. These results may have translational value for schizophrenia symptom research in humans, as they suggest that either by psychogenetic selection or by focusing on extreme PPI scores from a genetically heterogeneous rat stock, it is possible to detect a useful (perhaps at risk phenotype to study cognitive anomalies linked to schizophrenia.

  9. Astrocytes and Müller cells changes during retinal degeneration in a transgenic rat model of retinitis pigmentosa.

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    Laura eFernández-Sánchez

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Retinitis pigmentosa includes a group of progressive retinal degenerative diseases that affect the structure and function of photoreceptors. Secondarily to the loss of photoreceptors, there is a reduction in retinal vascularization, which seems to influence the cellular degenerative process. Retinal macroglial cells, astrocytes and Müller cells provide support for retinal neurons and are fundamental for maintaining normal retinal function. The aim of this study was to investigate the evolution of macroglial changes during retinal degeneration in P23H rats. Methods: Homozygous P23H line-3 rats aged from P18 to 18 months were used to study the evolution of the disease, and SD rats were used as controls. Immunolabeling with antibodies against GFAP, vimentin, and transducin were used to visualize macroglial cells and cone photoreceptors. Results: In P23H rats, increased GFAP labeling in Müller cells was observed as an early indicator of retinal gliosis. At 4 and 12 months of age, the apical processes of Müller cells in P23H rats clustered in firework-like structures, which were associated with ring-like shaped areas of cone degeneration in the outer nuclear layer. These structures were not observed at 16 months of age. The number of astrocytes was higher in P23H rats than in the SD matched controls at 4 and 12 months of age, supporting the idea of astrocyte proliferation. As the disease progressed, astrocytes exhibited a deteriorated morphology and marked hypertrophy. The increase in the complexity of the astrocytic processes correlated with greater connexin 43 expression and higher density of connexin 43 immunoreactive puncta within the ganglion cell layer of P23H versus SD rat retinas. Conclusions: In the P23H rat model of retinitis pigmentosa, the loss of photoreceptors triggers major changes in the number and morphology of glial cells affecting the inner retina.

  10. Understanding Associations among Family Support, Friend Support, and Psychological Distress

    OpenAIRE

    Horwitz, Briana N.; Reynolds, Chandra A.; Charles, Susan T.

    2014-01-01

    Emotional support from family and friends is associated with lower psychological distress. This study examined whether genetic and environmental influences explain associations among family support, friend support, and psychological distress. Data were drawn from the Midlife Development in the United States (MIDUS) study and included 947 pairs of MZ, same-sex DZ, and opposite-sex DZ twins. Results showed that a genetic factor explains the relationship between friend support and psychological ...

  11. Empirically Supported Interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wodarski, John S; Curtis, Sarah V

    2016-01-01

    Within the past four decades the social work profession has responded to the challenge to base practice on empirical evidence to adequately meet client needs. Most social workers would agree that the challenge has resulted in positive changes in the majority of cases-for example, in the execution of relevant research studies; the incorporation of more research findings into practice; the development of a technology of interpersonal helping; an emphasis on the incorporation of new knowledge bases, such as socio-behavioral and systems theory, in the curricula of schools of social work; and the development of services to meet emerging client needs and evidence-based practice. In this article the authors outline different references available pertaining to empirically supported interventions. A literature review revealed several textbooks, reference resources, journals, and handbooks that contain the most current research on therapeutic interventions. Different treatment components were explored in an effort to uncover the most cutting-edge developments in psychosocial treatments. These treatment components include treatment configuration, worker traits, compatibility of worker and client characteristics, professionals versus paraprofessionals, treatment length, and behavior acquisition.

  12. Support for safer behaviour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pujari, S

    1994-01-01

    Counseling persons about human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) testing and safe sex practices is performed in India at acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) counseling centers, such as the one in Pune. The center provides counseling to clients, primarily men, before and after HIV testing. Support groups are offered for HIV-positive persons. Clients are referred by doctors, sexually transmitted disease (STD) clinics, and health care institutions. Advertising is by word of mouth. Previously, when blood banks were sending HIV-positive persons for counseling, confirmatory testing had not been performed, and 30% were actually HIV negative. Now the center, in cooperation with the blood banks, contacts all HIV-positive patients. After counseling, a confirmatory test is performed, if the patient agrees. HIV-positive persons are encouraged, but not pressured, to contact partners. Breaking confidentially is avoided. The center also counsels patients at the local government STD clinic. Again, these are mainly men. All patients have a follow up session after diagnosis to discuss sexual practices, risk reduction practices, disease prevention, and condom use. In India, culture constrains open discussion about sex. However, if counselors begin with neutral topics, such as work or children, men are more willing to speak about sexual practices and lifestyles. Counselors discuss the possible reasons for unsafe behavior and offer practical solutions. Counseling men in STD clinics also indirectly reaches their partners, the wives and sex workers who are in less of a position to protect themselves.

  13. COMPUTER SUPPORT MANAGEMENT PRODUCTION

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    Svetlana Trajković

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The modern age in which we live today, modern and highly advanced technology that follows us all, gives great importance in the management of production within the computer support of management. Computer applications in production, the organization of production systems, in the organization of management and business, is gaining in importance. We live in a time when more and more uses computer technology and thus gives the opportunity for a broad and important area of application of computer systems in production, as well as some methods that enable us to successful implementation of a computer, such as in the management of production. Computer technology speeds up the processing and transfer of Information By needed in decision-making at various levels of management. Computer applications in production management and organizational management business production system gets more and more. New generation of computers caused the first technological revolution in industry. On these solutions the industry has been able to use all the modern technology of computers in manufacturing, automation and production management .

  14. Nonverbal support giving induces nonverbal support seeking in depressed patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geerts, E; Bouhuys, AL; Bloem, GM

    Nonverbal support seeking behavior of 11 mildly depressed patients was studied in relation to the nonverbal support giving behavior of a female interviewer. The patients were interviewed for 20 minutes during which the interviewer gave high and low nonverbal support for 10 minutes in a cross-over

  15. Positive interactions between desert granivores: localized facilitation of harvester ants by kangaroo rats.

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    Andrew J Edelman

    Full Text Available Facilitation, when one species enhances the environment or performance of another species, can be highly localized in space. While facilitation in plant communities has been intensely studied, the role of facilitation in shaping animal communities is less well understood. In the Chihuahuan Desert, both kangaroo rats and harvester ants depend on the abundant seeds of annual plants. Kangaroo rats, however, are hypothesized to facilitate harvester ants through soil disturbance and selective seed predation rather than competing with them. I used a spatially explicit approach to examine whether a positive or negative interaction exists between banner-tailed kangaroo rat (Dipodomys spectabilis mounds and rough harvester ant (Pogonomyrmex rugosus colonies. The presence of a scale-dependent interaction between mounds and colonies was tested by comparing fitted spatial point process models with and without interspecific effects. Also, the effect of proximity to a mound on colony mortality and spatial patterns of surviving colonies was examined. The spatial pattern of kangaroo rat mounds and harvester ant colonies was consistent with a positive interspecific interaction at small scales (<10 m. Mortality risk of vulnerable, recently founded harvester ant colonies was lower when located close to a kangaroo rat mound and proximity to a mound partly predicted the spatial pattern of surviving colonies. My findings support localized facilitation of harvester ants by kangaroo rats, likely mediated through ecosystem engineering and foraging effects on plant cover and composition. The scale-dependent effect of kangaroo rats on abiotic and biotic factors appears to result in greater founding and survivorship of young colonies near mounds. These results suggest that soil disturbance and foraging by rodents can have subtle impacts on the distribution and demography of other species.

  16. Mismatch negativity (MMN in freely-moving rats with several experimental controls.

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    Lauren Harms

    Full Text Available Mismatch negativity (MMN is a scalp-recorded electrical potential that occurs in humans in response to an auditory stimulus that defies previously established patterns of regularity. MMN amplitude is reduced in people with schizophrenia. In this study, we aimed to develop a robust and replicable rat model of MMN, as a platform for a more thorough understanding of the neurobiology underlying MMN. One of the major concerns for animal models of MMN is whether the rodent brain is capable of producing a human-like MMN, which is not a consequence of neural adaptation to repetitive stimuli. We therefore tested several methods that have been used to control for adaptation and differential exogenous responses to stimuli within the oddball paradigm. Epidural electroencephalographic electrodes were surgically implanted over different cortical locations in adult rats. Encephalographic data were recorded using wireless telemetry while the freely-moving rats were presented with auditory oddball stimuli to assess mismatch responses. Three control sequences were utilized: the flip-flop control was used to control for differential responses to the physical characteristics of standards and deviants; the many standards control was used to control for differential adaptation, as was the cascade control. Both adaptation and adaptation-independent deviance detection were observed for high frequency (pitch, but not low frequency deviants. In addition, the many standards control method was found to be the optimal method for observing both adaptation effects and adaptation-independent mismatch responses in rats. Inconclusive results arose from the cascade control design as it is not yet clear whether rats can encode the complex pattern present in the control sequence. These data contribute to a growing body of evidence supporting the hypothesis that rat brain is indeed capable of exhibiting human-like MMN, and that the rat model is a viable platform for the further

  17. Effects of saw palmetto extract on micturition reflex of rats and its autonomic receptor binding activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oki, Tomomi; Suzuki, Mayumi; Nishioka, Yasuhiko; Yasuda, Akio; Umegaki, Keizo; Yamada, Shizuo

    2005-04-01

    We examined the effects of saw palmetto extract (SPE) on the rat micturition reflex and on autonomic receptors in the lower urinary tract. The effect of SPE was examined on cystometrograms of anesthetized rats induced by intravesical infusion of saline or 0.1% acetic acid. SHR/NDmc-cp (cp/cp) rats received repeat oral administration of SPE and nighttime urodynamic function was determined. The autonomic receptor binding activity of SPE in the rat bladder and prostate was examined by radioligand binding assay. Intraduodenal administration of SPE (60 mg/kg) in anesthetized rat cystometry caused a significant increase in the micturition interval, micturition volume and bladder capacity during intravesical saline infusion. Also, similar administration of SPE at doses of 12 and 20 mg/kg significantly reversed the shortened micturition interval as well as the decreased micturition volume and bladder capacity due to 0.1% acetic acid infusion in a dose dependent manner. In conscious SHR/NDmc-cp (cp/cp) rats repeat oral administration of SPE (6 mg/kg daily) constantly increased the micturition interval and concomitantly decreased voiding frequency. SPE inhibited specific binding of [H]NMS ([N-methyl-H]scopolamine methyl chloride) (bladder) and [H]prazosin (prostate) with IC50 values of 46.1 and 183 microg/ml, respectively. SPE significantly alleviates urodynamic symptoms in hyperactive rat bladders by increasing bladder capacity and subsequently prolonging the micturition interval. Our data may support the clinical efficacy of SPE for the treatment of lower urinary tract symptoms.

  18. Atypical dopamine transporter inhibitors attenuate compulsive-like methamphetamine self-administration in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tunstall, Brendan J; Ho, Chelsea P; Cao, Jianjing; Vendruscolo, Janaína C M; Schmeichel, Brooke E; Slack, Rachel D; Tanda, Gianluigi; Gadiano, Alexandra J; Rais, Rana; Slusher, Barbara S; Koob, George F; Newman, Amy H; Vendruscolo, Leandro F

    2018-03-15

    Methamphetamine (METH) is a highly addictive drug, but no pharmacological treatment is yet available for METH use disorders. Similar to METH, the wake-promoting drug (R)-modafinil (R-MOD) binds to the dopamine transporter (DAT). Unlike METH, R-MOD is not a substrate for transport by DAT and has low abuse potential. We tested the hypothesis that the atypical DAT inhibitor R-MOD and compounds that are derived from modafinil would decrease METH intake by reducing the actions of METH at the DAT. We tested the effects of systemic injections of R-MOD and four novel modafinil-derived ligands with increased DAT affinity (JJC8-016, JJC8-088, JJC8-089, and JJC8-091) on intravenous (i.v.) METH self-administration in rats that were allowed short access (ShA; 1 h) or long access (LgA; 6 h) to the drug. ShA rats exhibited stable METH intake over sessions, whereas LgA rats exhibited an escalation of drug intake. R-MOD decreased METH self-administration in ShA and LgA rats (in the 1st hour only). JJC8-091 and JJC8-016 decreased METH self-administration in both ShA and LgA rats. JJC8-089 decreased METH self-administration in LgA rats only, whereas JJC8-088 had no effect on METH self-administration in either ShA or LgA rats. These findings support the potential of atypical DAT inhibitors for the treatment of METH use disorders and suggest several novel compounds as candidate drugs. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  19. Sweetener Intake by Rats Selectively Bred for Differential Saccharin Intake: Sucralose, Stevia, and Acesulfame Potassium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dess, Nancy K; Dobson, Kiana; Roberts, Brandon T; Chapman, Clinton D

    2017-06-01

    Behavioral responses to sweeteners have been used to study the evolution, mechanisms, and functions of taste. Occidental low and high saccharin consuming rats (respectively, LoS and HiS) have been selectively outbred on the basis of saccharin intake and are a valuable tool for studying variation among individuals in sweetener intake and its correlates. Relative to HiS rats, LoS rats consume smaller amounts of all nutritive and nonnutritive sweeteners tested to date, except aspartame. The lines also differ in intake of the commercial product Splenda; the roles of sucralose and saccharides in the difference are unclear. The present study extends prior work by examining intake of custom mixtures of sucralose, maltodextrin, and sugars and Splenda by LoS and HiS rats (Experiment 1A-1D), stevia and a constituent compound (rebaudioside A; Experiment 2A-2E), and acesulfame potassium tested at several concentrations or with 4 other sweeteners at one concentration each (Experiment 3A-3B). Results indicate that aversive side tastes limit intake of Splenda, stevia, and acesulfame potassium, more so among LoS rats than among HiS rats. In addition, regression analyses involving 5 sweeteners support the idea that both sweetness and bitterness are needed to account for intake of nonnutritive sweeteners, more so among LoS rats. These findings contribute to well developed and emerging literatures on sweetness and domain-general processes related to gustation. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Healing potential of Iranian traditional medicinal plants on burn wounds in alloxan-induced diabetic rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Ghasemi Pirbalouti

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Malva sylvestris, Punica granatum, Amygdalus communis, Arnebia euchroma and Scrophularia deserti are important medicinal plants in Iranian traditional medicine (Unani whose have been used as remedy against edema, burn, and wound and for their carminative, antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory activities. The ethanol extracts of M. sylvestris and P. granatum flowers, A. communis leaves, A. euchroma roots and S. deserti stems were used to evaluate the burn healing activity in alloxan-induced diabetic rats. Burns were induced in Wistar rats divided into nine groups as following; Group-I: normal rats were treated with simple ointment base (control, Group-II: diabetic rats were treated with simple ointment base (control, Groups-III and -VII: diabetic rats were treated with simple ointment base containing of extracts (diabetic animals, Groups VIII: diabetic rats were treated with simple ointment base containing of mixed extracts, Group-IX: diabetic rats received the standard drug (Silver Sulfadiazine. The efficacy of treatments was evaluated based on wound area, epithelialization time and histopathological characteristics. Wound contraction showed that there is high significant difference between the different groups (p<0.001. At the 18th day, A. euchroma, S. deserti, A. communis and mixed extract ointment treated groups healed 80-90%. At the 9th and 18th days the experiment, the best results were obtained with A. communis and standard drug, when compared to the other groups as well as to the controls. It may be concluded that almond leaves (sweet and bitter formulated in the simple ointment base is effective in the treatment of burns and thus supports its traditional use.

  1. Positive interactions between desert granivores: localized facilitation of harvester ants by kangaroo rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edelman, Andrew J

    2012-01-01

    Facilitation, when one species enhances the environment or performance of another species, can be highly localized in space. While facilitation in plant communities has been intensely studied, the role of facilitation in shaping animal communities is less well understood. In the Chihuahuan Desert, both kangaroo rats and harvester ants depend on the abundant seeds of annual plants. Kangaroo rats, however, are hypothesized to facilitate harvester ants through soil disturbance and selective seed predation rather than competing with them. I used a spatially explicit approach to examine whether a positive or negative interaction exists between banner-tailed kangaroo rat (Dipodomys spectabilis) mounds and rough harvester ant (Pogonomyrmex rugosus) colonies. The presence of a scale-dependent interaction between mounds and colonies was tested by comparing fitted spatial point process models with and without interspecific effects. Also, the effect of proximity to a mound on colony mortality and spatial patterns of surviving colonies was examined. The spatial pattern of kangaroo rat mounds and harvester ant colonies was consistent with a positive interspecific interaction at small scales (kangaroo rat mound and proximity to a mound partly predicted the spatial pattern of surviving colonies. My findings support localized facilitation of harvester ants by kangaroo rats, likely mediated through ecosystem engineering and foraging effects on plant cover and composition. The scale-dependent effect of kangaroo rats on abiotic and biotic factors appears to result in greater founding and survivorship of young colonies near mounds. These results suggest that soil disturbance and foraging by rodents can have subtle impacts on the distribution and demography of other species.

  2. Solanum muricatum Aiton Juice as A Hepatoprotective Agent in Wistar Rats Induced With Carbon Tetrachloride

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justine Sim Wei Yang

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Liver participates in various metabolic processes in human body. Exposures to toxins such as carbon tetrachloride (CCl4 results in hepatocyte destruction and release the cell contents. Enzymes such as serum glutamic pyruvic transaminase (SGPT were used as a parameter to diagnose liver damage. Pepino (Solanum muricatum Aiton contains antioxidants that protect liver from hepatoxicity. The aim of this experiment is to determine the effect of pepino in protecting the hepatocyte from hepatotoxic effect of CCl4. Methods: A total of 16 Wistar rats used as the subject were divided into Control and Therapeutic Group. The Control group was induced with CCl4 but was not given pepino juice. Meanwhile, the Therapeutic Group was given pepino juice for 10 days. For induction of hepatotoxicity, CCl4 10% was given at a dosage of 2.0 ml/kg intra-peritoneal. Each Wistar rat in Therapeutic Group was given 1.0 ml of 300 g/ml pepino juice via oral feeding. Spectrophotometer with adjusted wavelength of 340 nm was used to measure SGPT level of the Wistar rats and statistical T-test was used to analyze the data. Results: Wistar rats in Therapeutic group showed a larger decrease (6898.9 IU/L–79.1 IU/L in SGPT level compared to the Control group (6469.8 IU/L–418.5 IU/L. The SGPT level of the Wistar rat in Therapeutic group reached normal baseline (50 IU/L–150 IU/L. The significance of the experiment was supported by the T-test, P-value <0.05 Discussion: Pepino juice had antioxidants that protect the hepatocyte of Wistar rats from free radicals. The synergistic action of antioxidants and hepatocyte regeneration of Wistar rats in Therapeutic group caused a decrease in SGPT level. Therefore, the experiment concluded that pepino juice at the dosage of 300 g/ml has hepatoprotective effect.

  3. Anti-inflammatory effects of royal jelly on ethylene glycol induced renal inflammation in rats

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    Zeyneb Aslan

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: In this study, anti-inflammatory effects of Royal Jelly were investigated by inducing renal inflammation in rats with the use of ethylene glycol. For this purpose, the calcium oxalate urolithiasis model was obtained by feeding rats with ethylene glycol in drinking water. Materials and Methods: The rats were divided in five study groups. The 1st group was determined as the control group. The rats in the 2nd group received ethylene glycol (1% in drinking water. The rats in the 3rd group were daily fed with Royal Jelly by using oral gavage. The 4th group was determined as the preventive group and the rats were fed with ethylene glycol (1% in drinking water while receiving Royal Jelly via oral gavage. The 5th group was determined as the therapeutic group and received ethylene glycol in drinking water during the first 2 weeks of the study and Royal Jelly via oral gavage during the last 2 weeks of the study. Results: At the end of the study, proinflammatory/anti-inflammatory cytokines, TNF-α, IL-1β and IL-18 levels in blood and renal tissue samples from the rats used in the application were measured. Conclusion: The results have shown that ethylene glycol does induce inflammation and renal damage. This can cause the formation of reactive oxygen species. Royal Jelly is also considered to have anti-inflammatory effects due to its possible antiradical and antioxidative effects. It can have positive effects on both the prevention of urolithiasis and possible inflammation during the existing urolithiasis and support the medical treatment.

  4. Chronic loss of melanin-concentrating hormone affects motivational aspects of feeding in the rat.

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    Joram D Mul

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Current epidemic obesity levels apply great medical and financial pressure to the strenuous economy of obesity-prone cultures, and neuropeptides involved in body weight regulation are regarded as attractive targets for a possible treatment of obesity in humans. The lateral hypothalamus and the nucleus accumbens shell (AcbSh form a hypothalamic-limbic neuropeptide feeding circuit mediated by Melanin-Concentrating Hormone (MCH. MCH promotes feeding behavior via MCH receptor-1 (MCH1R in the AcbSh, although this relationship has not been fully characterized. Given the AcbSh mediates reinforcing properties of food, we hypothesized that MCH modulates motivational aspects of feeding.Here we show that chronic loss of the rat MCH-precursor Pmch decreased food intake predominantly via a reduction in meal size during rat development and reduced high-fat food-reinforced operant responding in adult rats. Moreover, acute AcbSh administration of Neuropeptide-GE and Neuropeptide-EI (NEI, both additional neuropeptides derived from Pmch, or chronic intracerebroventricular infusion of NEI, did not affect feeding behavior in adult pmch(+/+ or pmch(-/- rats. However, acute administration of MCH to the AcbSh of adult pmch(-/- rats elevated feeding behavior towards wild type levels. Finally, adult pmch(-/- rats showed increased ex vivo electrically evoked dopamine release and increased limbic dopamine transporter levels, indicating that chronic loss of Pmch in the rat affects the limbic dopamine system.Our findings support the MCH-MCH1R system as an amplifier of consummatory behavior, confirming this system as a possible target for the treatment of obesity. We propose that MCH-mediated signaling in the AcbSh positively mediates motivational aspects of feeding behavior. Thereby it provides a crucial signal by which hypothalamic neural circuits control energy balance and guide limbic brain areas to enhance motivational or incentive-related aspects of food consumption.

  5. Centrally Mediated Erectile Dysfunction in Rats with Type 1 Diabetes: Role of Angiotensin II and Superoxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Hong; Liu, Xuefei; Patel, Kaushik P.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Erectile dysfunction is a serious complication of diabetes mellitus. Apart from the peripheral actions, central mechanisms are also responsible for penile erection. Aim To determine the contribution of angiotensin (ANG) II in the dysfunction of central N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA)-nitric oxide (NO)-induced erectile responses in streptozotocin-induced type 1 diabetic (T1D) rats. Methods Three weeks after streptozotocin injections, rats were randomly treated with the angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor-enalapril, or the ANG II type 1 receptor blocker, losartan, or the superoxide dismutase mimetic, tempol or vehicle via chronic intracerebroventricular infusion by osmotic mini-pump for 2 weeks. Main Outcome Measure Central NMDA receptor stimulation or the administration of the NO donor, sodium nitroprusside (SNP)-induced penile erectile responses and concurrent behavioral responses were monitored in conscious rats. Results Two weeks of enalapril, losartan or tempol treatment significantly improved the erectile responses to central microinjection of both NMDA and SNP in the paraventricular nucleus (PVN) of conscious T1D rats (NMDA responses – T1D+enalapril: 1.7 ± 0.6, T1D+losartan: 2.0 ± 0.3, T1D+tempol: 2.0 ± 0.6 vs. T1D+vehicle: 0.6 ± 0.3 penile erections/rat in the first 20 min, P penile erections/rat in the first 20 min, P < 0.05). Concurrent behavioral responses including yawning and stretching, induced by central NMDA and SNP microinjections were also significantly increased in T1D rats after enalapril, losartan or tempol treatments. Neuronal NO synthase expression within the PVN was also significantly increased and superoxide production was reduced in T1D rats after these treatments. Conclusions These data strongly support the contention that enhanced ANG II mechanism/s within the PVN of T1D rats contributes to the dysfunction of central NMDA-induced erectile responses in T1D rats via stimulation of superoxide. PMID:23841890

  6. Asymmetrical development of the monoamine systems in 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid treated rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bortolozzi, Analía; Duffard, Ricardo; de Duffard, Ana María Evangelista

    2003-01-01

    respect to the left side in striata and accumbens nuclei in T2 female rats supporting the behavioral rotation previously registered by us in these rats. In addition, the increased 5-HT content detected in both the right and left striata observed in this study could be the answer to the behaviors observed and to the early alterations in dopamine in basal ganglia by 2,4-D in neonatal exposed rats, mediated by a serotonergic modulation on the dopaminergic system.

  7. The Effect of Sildenafil on Recuperation from Sciatic Nerve Injury in Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korkmaz, Mehmet Fatih; Parlakpınar, Hakan; Ceylan, Mehmet Fethi; Ediz, Levent; Şamdancı, Emine; Kekilli, Ersoy; Sağır, Mustafa

    2016-01-01

    Background: Severe functional and anatomical defects can be detected after the peripheral nerve injury. Pharmacological approaches are preferred rather than surgical treatment in the treatment of nerve injuries. Aims: The aim of this study is to perform histopathological, functional and bone densitometry examinations of the effects of sildenafil on nerve regeneration in a rat model of peripheral nerve crush injury. Study Design: Animal experiment. Methods: The study included a total of thirty adult Sprague-Dawley rats that were divided into three groups of ten rats each. In all rats, a crush injury was created by clamping the right sciatic nerve for one minute. One day before the procedure, rats in group 1 were started on a 28-day treatment consisting of a daily dose of 20 mg/kg body weight sildenafil citrate given orally via a nasogastric tube, while the rats in group 2 were started on an every-other-day dose of 10 mg/kg body weight sildenafil citrate. Rats from group 3 were not administered any drugs. Forty-two days after the nerve damage was created, functional and histopathological examination of both sciatic nerves and bone densitometric evaluation of the extremities were conducted. Results: During the rotarod test, rats from group 3 spent the least amount of time on the rod compared to the drug treatment groups at speeds of 20 rpm, 30 rpm and 40 rpm. In addition, the duration for which each animal could stay on the rod throughout the accelerod test significantly reduced in rats from group 3 compared to rats from groups 1 and 2 in the 4-min test. For the hot-plate latency time, there were no differences among the groups in either the basal level or after sciatic nerve injury. Moreover, there was no significant difference between the groups in terms of the static sciatic index (SSI) on the 42nd day (p=0.147). The amplitude was better evaluated in group 1 compared to the other two groups (p<0.05). Under microscopic evaluation, we observed the greatest amount of

  8. Environmental stress and vestibular inputs modulate cardiovascular responses to orthostasis in hypertensive rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raffai, Gábor; Csekő, Csongor; Nádasy, György; Kocsis, László; Dézsi, László; Hunyor, Stephen N; Monos, Emil

    2018-01-01

    support cardiovascular tolerance to sustained postural changes in a rat model of human 'essential' hypertension.

  9. Central command dysfunction in rats with heart failure is mediated by brain oxidative stress and normalized by exercise training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koba, Satoshi; Hisatome, Ichiro; Watanabe, Tatsuo

    2014-09-01

    Sympathoexcitation elicited by central command, a parallel activation of the motor and autonomic neural circuits in the brain, has been shown to become exaggerated in chronic heart failure (CHF). The present study tested the hypotheses that oxidative stress in the medulla in CHF plays a role in exaggerating central command-elicited sympathoexcitation, and that exercise training in CHF suppresses central command-elicited sympathoexcitation through its antioxidant effects in the medulla. In decerebrate rats, central command was activated by electrically stimulating the mesencephalic locomotor region (MLR) after neuromuscular blockade. The MLR stimulation at a current intensity greater than locomotion threshold in rats with CHF after myocardial infarction (MI) evoked larger (P rats (Sham) and rats with CHF that had completed longterm (8–12 weeks) exercise training (MI + TR). In the Sham and MI + TR rats, bilateral microinjection of a superoxide dismutase (SOD) mimetic Tempol into the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM) had no effects on MLR stimulation-elicited responses. By contrast, in MI rats, Tempol treatment significantly reduced MLR stimulation-elicited responses. In a subset of MI rats, treatment with Tiron, another SOD mimetic, within the RVLM also reduced responses. Superoxide generation in the RVLM, as evaluated by dihydroethidium staining, was enhanced in MI rats compared with that in Sham and MI + TR rats. Collectively, these results support the study hypotheses. We suggest that oxidative stress in the medulla in CHF mediates central command dysfunction, and that exercise training in CHF is capable of normalizing central command dysfunction through its antioxidant effects in the medulla.

  10. Effects of acute administration of ethanol on cerebral glucose utilization in adult alcohol-preferring and alcohol-nonpreferring rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strother, Wendy N; McBride, William J; Lumeng, Lawrence; Li, Ting-Kai

    2005-02-01

    Local cerebral glucose utilization (LCGU) rates, as determined by the [(14)C]-2-deoxyglucose (2-DG) technique, were examined after acute ethanol administration within selected brain regions of alcohol-preferring (P) and alcohol-nonpreferring (NP) rats. Adult male P and NP rats were injected with saline, 0.25 g/kg, or 1.0 g/kg ethanol, intraperitoneally (ip), 10 min before an intravenous bolus of [(14)C]2-DG (125 microCi/kg). Timed arterial blood samples were collected over 45 min and assayed for plasma glucose, ethanol, and [(14)C]2-DG levels. Image densities were determined using quantitative autoradiography and LCGU values calculated. Data were collected from several key limbic, basal ganglionic, cortical, and subcortical structures. Low-dose ethanol (0.25 g/kg) significantly decreased LCGU rates in several brain regions including the medial prefrontal cortex, olfactory tubercles, and the CA1 subregion of the hippocampus of P rats. Low-dose ethanol had no significant effects on LCGU rates in the NP rats. Moderate-dose ethanol (1.0 g/kg) also significantly lowered LCGU rates in many brain regions of P rats, including key limbic structures, such as the medial prefrontal cortex, olfactory tubercles, ventral tegmental area, basolateral nucleus of the amygdala, lateral septum, and ventral pallidum. Moderate-dose ethanol also significantly lowered LCGU rates in the medial prefrontal cortex as well as in the habenula of NP rats. All other regions were unaffected in the NP rats. These findings support the suggestion that certain central nervous system regions of P rats may be more sensitive than those of NP rats to the effects of low to intermediate doses of ethanol.

  11. Ketogenic diet-fed rats have increased fat mass and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Letícia C; Chittó, Ana L; Müller, Alexandre P; Rocha, Juliana K; Castro da Silva, Mariane; Quincozes-Santos, André; Nardin, Patrícia; Rotta, Liane N; Ziegler, Denize R; Gonçalves, Carlos-Alberto; Da Silva, Roselis S M; Perry, Marcos L S; Gottfried, Carmem

    2008-11-01

    The ketogenic diet (KD), characterized by high fat and low carbohydrate and protein contents, has been proposed to be beneficial in children with epilepsy disorders not helped by conventional anti-epileptic drug treatment. Weight loss and inadequate growth is an important drawback of this diet and metabolic causes are not well characterized. The aim of this study was to examine body weight variation during KD feeding for 6 wk of Wistar rats; fat mass and adipocyte cytosolic phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) activity were also observed. PEPCK activity was determined based on the [H(14)CO(3) (-)]-oxaloacetate exchange reaction. KD-fed rats gained weight at a less rapid rate than normal-fed rats, but with a significant increment in fat mass. The fat mass/body weight ratio already differed between ketogenic and control rats after the first week of treatment, and was 2.4 x higher in ketogenic rats. The visceral lipogenesis was supported by an increment in adipocyte PEPCK, aiming to provide glycerol 3-phosphate to triacylglycerol synthesis and this fat accumulation was accompanied by glucose intolerance. These data contribute to our understanding of the metabolic effects of the KD in adipose tissue and liver and suggest some potential risks of this diet, particularly visceral fat accumulation.

  12. Salicylate prevents virus-induced type 1 diabetes in the BBDR rat.

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    Chaoxing Yang

    Full Text Available Epidemiologic and clinical evidence suggests that virus infection plays an important role in human type 1 diabetes pathogenesis. We used the virus-inducible BioBreeding Diabetes Resistant (BBDR rat to investigate the ability of sodium salicylate, a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID, to modulate development of type 1 diabetes. BBDR rats treated with Kilham rat virus (KRV and polyinosinic:polycytidylic acid (pIC, a TLR3 agonist develop diabetes at nearly 100% incidence by ~2 weeks. We found distinct temporal profiles of the proinflammatory serum cytokines, IL-1β, IL-6, IFN-γ, IL-12, and haptoglobin (an acute phase protein in KRV+pIC treated rats. Significant elevations of IL-1β and IL-12, coupled with sustained elevations of haptoglobin, were specific to KRV+pIC and not found in rats co-treated with pIC and H1, a non-diabetogenic virus. Salicylate administered concurrently with KRV+pIC inhibited the elevations in IL-1β, IL-6, IFN-γ and haptoglobin almost completely, and reduced IL-12 levels significantly. Salicylate prevented diabetes in a dose-dependent manner, and diabetes-free animals had no evidence of insulitis. Our data support an important role for innate immunity in virus-induced type 1 diabetes pathogenesis. The ability of salicylate to prevent diabetes in this robust animal model demonstrates its potential use to prevent or attenuate human autoimmune diabetes.

  13. Distribution of Interstitial Cells of Cajal in the Esophagus of Fetal Rats with Esophageal Atresia

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    Caner Isbir

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Scarcity of the interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC is related to motility disorders. In the study, we aimed to evaluate the number and density of ICCs in the fetal rat esophagus in the adriamycin - esophageal atresia (EA model. Material and Method: Rat fetuses were divided into three groups as a control, adriamycin group without EA and adriamycin group with EA. Four doses of adriamycin, 2 mg/kg each, were injected intraperitoneally to the adriamycin group rats between on 6 and 9 days of gestation. The presence of ICCs in the esophagus of the rat fetuses was determined by using an immunohistochemistry technique (c-kit, CD117. The average numbers of ICCs were calculated with microscopic evaluation by using a visual scoring system (range1 to 3. Results: Seven fetuses were included in each group. The ICCs score 3 distributions of fetuses were 5 (72% fetuses in the control group, 3 (43% fetuses in the adriamycin group without EA, 1 (14% fetus in the adriamycin group with EA. It have been found that there was a marked reduction of ICCs distribution in the adriamycin group with EA compared to control group (p 0.05. Discussion: ICCs density was significantly decreased in the rat fetuses with EA compared to the fetuses without EA. These findings support the idea that ICCs density may be congenitally abnormal in EA. This may be led to dismotility seen in the operated esophagus due to EA.

  14. Respiratory mechanics and lung histology in normal rats anesthetized with sevoflurane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correa, F C; Ciminelli, P B; Falcão, H; Alcântara, B J; Contador, R S; Medeiros, A S; Zin, W A; Rocco, P R

    2001-08-01

    Respiratory system, lung, and chest wall mechanical properties were subdivided into their resistive, elastic, and viscoelastic/inhomogeneous components in normal rats, to define the sites of action of sevoflurane. In addition, we aimed to determine the extent to which pretreatment with atropine modified these parameters. Twenty-four rats were divided into four groups of six animals each: in the P group, rats were sedated (diazepam) and anesthetized with pentobarbital sodium; in the S group, sevoflurane was administered; in the AP and AS groups, atropine was injected 20 min before sedation/anesthesia with pentobarbital and sevoflurane, respectively. Sevoflurane increased lung viscoelastic/inhomogeneous pressures and static elastance compared with rats belonging to the P group. In AS rats, lung static elastance increased in relation to the AP group. In conclusion, sevoflurane anesthesia acted not at the airway level but at the lung periphery, stiffening lung tissues and increasing mechanical inhomogeneities. These findings were supported by the histological demonstration of increased areas of alveolar collapse and hyperinflation. The pretreatment with atropine reduced central and peripheral airway secretion, thus lessening lung inhomogeneities.

  15. Gastrin treatment stimulates β-cell regeneration and improves glucose tolerance in 95% pancreatectomized rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Téllez, Noèlia; Joanny, Géraldine; Escoriza, Jéssica; Vilaseca, Marina; Montanya, Eduard

    2011-07-01

    β-Cell mass reduction is a central aspect in the development of type 1 and type 2 diabetes, and substitution or regeneration of the lost β-cells is a potentially curative treatment of diabetes. To study the effects of gastrin on β-cell mass in rats with 95% pancreatectomy (95%-Px), a model of pancreatic regeneration, rats underwent 95% Px or sham Px and were treated with [15 leu] gastrin-17 (Px+G and S+G) or vehicle (Px+V and S+V) for 15 d. In 95% Px rats, gastrin treatment reduced hyperglycemia (280 ± 52 mg vs. 436 ± 51 mg/dl, P Gastrin treatment induced β-cell regeneration by enhancing β-cell neogenesis (increased number of extraislet β-cells in Px+G: 0.42 ± 0.05 cells/mm(2) vs. Px+V: 0.27 ± 0.07 cells/mm(2), P gastrin-treated rats (Px+G: 0.07 ± 0.02%, Px+V: 0.23 ± 0.05%; P Gastrin action on β-cell regeneration and survival increased β-cell mass and improved glucose tolerance in 95% Px rats, supporting a potential role of gastrin in the treatment of diabetes.

  16. Antihyperglycemic Effect of Ginkgo biloba Extract in Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetes in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daye Cheng

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The Ginkgo biloba extract (GBE has been reported to have a wide range of health benefits in traditional Chinese medicine. The aim of this study was to evaluate the antihyperglycemic effects of GBE on streptozotocin- (STZ- induced diabetes in rats. Diabetes was induced in male Wistar rats by the administration of STZ (60 mg/kg b.w. intraperitoneally. GBE (100, 200, and 300 mg/kg b.w. was administered orally once a day for a period of 30 days. Body weight and blood glucose levels were determined in different experimental days. Serum lipid profile and antioxidant enzymes in hepatic and pancreatic tissue were measured at the end of the experimental period. Significant decreases in body weight and antioxidant ability and increases in blood glucose, lipid profile, and lipid peroxidation were observed in STZ-induced diabetic rats. The administration of GBE and glibenclamide daily for 30 days in STZ-induced diabetic rats reversed the above parameters significantly. GBE possesses antihyperglycemic, antioxidant, and antihyperlipidemia activities in STZ-induced chronic diabetic rats, which promisingly support the use of GBE as a food supplement or an adjunct treatment for diabetics.

  17. Pulsed electromagnetic fields accelerate wound healing in the skin of diabetic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goudarzi, Iran; Hajizadeh, Sohrab; Salmani, Mahmoud E; Abrari, Kataneh

    2010-05-01

    Delayed wound healing is a common complication in diabetes mellitus. From this point of view, the main purpose of the present study is to investigate the effect of extremely low frequency pulsed electromagnetic fields (ELF PEMFs) on skin wound healing in diabetic rats. In this study, diabetes was induced in male Wistar rats via a single subcutaneous injection of 65 mg/kg streptozocin (freshly dissolved in sterile saline, 0.9%). One month after the induction of diabetes, a full-thickness dermal incision (35 mm length) was made on the right side of the paravertebral region. The wound was exposed to ELF PEMF (20 Hz, 4 ms, 8 mT) for 1 h per day. Wound healing was evaluated by measuring surface area, percentage of healing, duration of healing, and wound tensile strength. Obtained results showed that the duration of wound healing in diabetic rats in comparison with the control group was significantly increased. In contrast, the rate of healing in diabetic rats receiving PEMF was significantly greater than in the diabetic control group. The wound tensile strength also was significantly greater than the control animals. In addition, the duration of wound healing in the control group receiving PEMF was less than the sham group. Based on the above-mentioned results we concluded that this study provides some evidence to support the use of ELF PEMFs to accelerate diabetic wound healing. Further research is needed to determine the PEMF mechanisms in acceleration of wound healing in diabetic rats.

  18. Brazilian Morus nigra Attenuated Hyperglycemia, Dyslipidemia, and Prooxidant Status in Alloxan-Induced Diabetic Rats

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    Ivanildo I. da S. Júnior

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Morus nigra has been used popularly for several proposes, including diabetic. In an attempt to support medicinal value, the acute hypoglycemic, hypolipidemic, and antioxidant effects of the ethanolic extract of Morus nigra (EEMn 200 or 400 mg/kg b.w. were evaluated in normal and alloxan-induced diabetic treated for 14 days. Serum biochemical and antioxidant analysis were performed at the end of experiment. Oral glucose tolerance test was performed at 10th and 15th days. Chromatographic analysis by HPLC-DAD of EEMn was performed. Insulin was used as positive control to glycemic metabolism as well as fenofibrate to lipid metabolism. EEMn (400 mg/kg/day reduced fasting and postprandial glycaemia, improved oral glucose tolerance, and reduced lipolysis and proteolysis in diabetic rats. EEMn decreased the blood levels of total cholesterol and increased HDL level when compared to the diabetic control rats. At higher levels, EEMn reduced triglycerides and VLDL levels in diabetic rats. Also, EEMn reduced malondialdehyde and increased the reduced glutathione levels in liver of diabetic rats. Chromatographic analysis identified the presence of the flavonoids rutin, isoquercetin, and kaempferitrin. Acute EEMn treatment reduced hyperglycemia, improved oral glucose tolerance, and minimized dyslipidemia and oxidative stress leading to a reduction in atherogenic index in alloxan-induced diabetic rats.

  19. Antidiabetic effect of Chloroxylon swietenia bark extracts on streptozotocin induced diabetic rats

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    B. Jayaprasad

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes has been increasing at an alarming rate around the world, and experts have relied on remedies from the utilization of ancient drugs that are essentially derived from plants. The present study aimed to evaluate the antidiabetic potential of Chloroxylon swietenia bark extracts on streptozotocin induced diabetic rats. Diabetes was induced in male albino Wistar rats by single intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin (STZ (50 mg/kg b.w.. The diabetic rats were administered orally with C. swietenia bark (CSB methanolic (CSBMEt and aqueous (CSBAEt (250 mg/kg b.w. extracts and glibenclamide (600 µg/kg b.w. by intragastric intubation for 45 days. The result showed a heavy loss in weight, increase in blood glucose and glycosylated hemoglobin level, and decline in plasma insulin and total hemoglobin content. Furthermore, glucose-6-phosphatase and fructose-1,6-bis phosphatase were found to be increased whereas hexokinase and glycogen contents were decreased in STZ induced diabetic rats. CSBAEt, CSBMEt and glibenclamide treated diabetic rats showed moderate reduction in blood glucose and glycosylated hemoglobin levels; in addition, plasma insulin and hemoglobin levels were elevated. The altered activities of carbohydrate metabolizing enzymes and liver glycogen were improved remarkably. CSBMEt results were comparable to the standard drug glibenclamide. The present findings support the usage of the plant extracts for the traditional treatment of diabetes.

  20. Beneficial effect of candesartan and lisinopril against haloperidol-induced tardive dyskinesia in rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakur, Kuldeep Singh; Prakash, Atish; Bisht, Rohit; Bansal, Puneet Kumar

    2015-12-01

    Tardive dyskinesia is a serious motor disorder of the orofacial region, resulting from chronic neuroleptic treatment of schizophrenia. Candesartan (AT1 antagonist) and lisinopril (ACE inhibitor) has been reported to possess antioxidant and neuroprotective effects. The present study is designed to investigate the effect of candesartan and lisinopril on haloperidol-induced orofacial dyskinesia and oxidative damage in rats. Tardive dyskinesia was induced by administering haloperidol (1 mg/kg i.p.) and concomitantly treated with candesartan (3 and 5 mg/kg p.o.) and lisinopril (10 and 15 mg/kg p.o.) for 3 weeks in male Wistar rats. Various behavioral parameters were assessed on days 0, 7, 14 and 21 and biochemical parameters were estimated at day 22. Chronic administration of haloperidol significantly increased stereotypic behaviors in rats, which were significantly improved by administration of candesartan and lisinopril. Chronic administration of haloperidol significantly increased oxidative stress and neuro-inflammation in the striatum region of the rat's brain. Co-administration of candesartan and lisinopril significantly attenuated the oxidative damage and neuro-inflammation in the haloperidol-treated rat. The present study supports the therapeutic use of candesartan and lisinopril in the treatment of typical antipsychotic-induced orofacial dyskinesia and possible antioxidant and neuro-inflammatory mechanisms. © The Author(s) 2014.

  1. Surgical Anatomy of the Gastrointestinal Tract and Its Vasculature in the Laboratory Rat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vdoviaková, Katarína; Petrovová, Eva; Maloveská, Marcela; Krešáková, Lenka; Teleky, Jana; Elias, Mario Zefanias Joao; Petrášová, Darina

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to describe and illustrate the morphology of the stomach, liver, intestine, and their vasculature to support the planning of surgical therapeutic methods in abdominal cavity. On adult Wistar rats corrosion casts were prepared from the arterial system and Duracryl Dental and PUR SP were used as a casting medium and was performed macroscopic anatomical dissection of the stomach, liver, and intestine was performed. The rat stomach was a large, semilunar shaped sac with composite lining. On the stomach was very marked fundus, which formed a blind sac (saccus cecus). The rat liver was divided into six lobes, but without gall bladder. Intestine of the rat was simple, but cecum had a shape as a stomach. The following variations were observed in the origin of the cranial mesenteric artery. On the corrosion cast specimens we noticed the presence of the anastomosis between middle colic artery (a. colica media) and left colic artery (a. colica sinistra). We investigated the second anastomosis between middle colic artery and left colic artery. The results of this study reveal that the functional anatomical relationship between the rat stomach, liver and intestine is important for the development of surgical research in human and veterinary medicine. PMID:26819602

  2. Oxidative stress, nitric oxide and prostaglandin E2 levels in the gastrointestinal tract of aging rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mármol, Frederic; Sánchez, Juan; López, Diego; Martínez, Nuria; Mitjavila, Maria Teresa; Puig-Parellada, Pere

    2009-02-01

    To evaluate the presence of oxidative stress and alterations in the levels of two cytoprotective agents, prostaglandin E2 and nitric oxide, in the gastrointestinal tract of aging rats. The production of superoxide anion, lipid peroxides, levels of superoxide dismutase and catalase, and production of prostaglandin E2 and nitric oxide in the stomach and duodenum of rats were determined at 1.5, 3, 12, 18 and 24 months of age. Oxidative stress was present in the stomach of the old rats (24 months), whereas prostaglandin E2 and nitric oxide production remained stable at 18 and 24 months. In the duodenum, no oxidative stress was observed at 24 months, but at 18 months, an increase in superoxide anion levels was detected. Prostaglandin E2 remained constant in the aged rats but nitric oxide decreased significantly at 24 months. The absence of macroscopic gastric injury throughout the gastrointestinal tract indicates that the oxidative stress in the stomach and the significant decrease of nitric oxide in the duodenum in the old rats are not sufficient to disrupt the mucosal defence network. The results support the notion that the disruption of the mucosal network is essentially regulated by the cytoprotective agents prostaglandin E2 and nitric oxide, and that injury appears only when both substances are concurrently reduced.

  3. Supporting Ice Seismology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, T.; Beaudoin, B. C.; Fowler, J. C.

    2010-12-01

    Climate change research, and glaciology in particular, has increasingly embraced seismology in recent years. The NSF supported IRIS/PASSCAL Instrument Center is working with researchers to develop the unique instruments and techniques for collecting data in this challenging environment. Global concern with sea level change along with strategic interests of the US government and other nations is driving a large investment in glaciological climate research. A number of groups have demonstrated new seismologically-derived constraints on glaciological conditions and processes. Environmental challenges include remote and precarious locations, necessitating robust yet quickly deployable seismic stations and long periods of autonomous operation. Temperature extremes and the possibility of immersion from large annual snow loads, resulting in a deployment surface that can vary from 50 feet of snow cover to bare ice with large melt pools in a single season are additional major challenges. There is also an urgency created by studies indicating that the high latitude continental ice sheets are metastable and that behavior is changing now. Scientists are presently commonly utilizing adaptations of available instrumentation designed for low latitude and milder field conditions as appropriate, but seek better, more capable, and more flexible solutions, including integration of environmental sensors and real-time data telemetry and station control as some of these experiments evolve into a monitoring effort. Seismic instrumentation is only produced by a small number of companies and, innovation for new instruments takes time and requires substantial investment. While pursuing longer-term innovation funding strategies, we are also adapting current instrumentation paradigms to glaciological use (e.g., by leveraging the cold instrument development for research in Antarctica during the IPY). We are also encouraging industrial partners to respond to these demands and challenges with

  4. Engineering Technical Support Center (ETSC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ETSC is EPA’s technical support and resource centers responsible for providing specialized scientific and engineering support to decision-makers in the Agency’s ten regional offices, states, communities, and local businesses.

  5. What Is Nutrition Support Therapy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Center Professional Development Calendar of Events What Is Nutrition Support Therapy All people need food to live. ... patient populations from pediatrics to geriatrics. Key Terms: Nutrition Support Therapy The provision of enteral or parenteral ...

  6. PERILAKU SUPPORTER SEPAKBOLA PSIM YOGYAKARTA

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    Vita Fradiantika

    2013-09-01

    Abstract This study aims to investigate the behavior of PSIM’s (Perserikatan Sepakbola Indonesia Mataram supporters. This study used qualitative methods with case study approach. Informants used in this study consist of three members of Brajamusti board and three members of the Maident board. For the triangulation, in this study the Brajamusti President, Chairman of The Maident, and two police officers were interviewed. The results showed that Brajamusti and The Maident are behave fanatic in providing support to PSIM, so that often cause fights between supporters. Factor that cause the broken of Brajamusti is political that made by certain parties for political interests. The positive impact of these two groups of supporters are their contribution for buying tickets in every time they watch PSIM, so it can be a financial support. While the negative impact of the two groups of supporters are the unfair competition between them  that makes support for PSIM become obscured. Keywords: behavior, football, supporters

  7. NGA Ebola Support Data Services

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Geospatial Intelligence Agency — In support of the ongoing Ebola crisis in Africa, NGA is providing to the public and humanitarian disaster response community these Ebola support data services. They...

  8. Information Technologies supporting students’ mobility

    OpenAIRE

    D. Morawska-Walasek; J. Piątkowski; T. Walasek

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: ESMOS is a project financially supported by the SOCRATES/Minerva European Commission initiative, which aims to enhance student mobility through online support. The ESMOS partnership has explored existing practice in student mobility support, particularly investigating how technology is being utilised to support students. It has also examined the factors that affect exchange students and has identified problems with meeting student mobility numbers.Design/methodology/approach: The r...

  9. Emotional support, instrumental support, and gambling participation among Filipino Americans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Isok; Kim, Wooksoo; Nochajski, Thomas H

    2014-08-01

    Using representative survey data of Filipino Americans in Honolulu and San Francisco (SF) (N = 2,259), we examined the roles of emotional support and instrumental support on gambling participation. With considerable difference in gambling environments between two regions, we conducted two sets of hierarchical regression analyses for Honolulu sample, which has restricted gambling laws, and SF sample, which has legal gambling environment, and compared the effects of two types of social support on gambling participation. The results indicated that emotional support was positively and instrumental support was negatively associated with gambling participation among Filipino Americans in Honolulu. However, neither type of social support was significantly associated with gambling participation among Filipino Americans living in SF. This study highlights the differing roles and effects of instrumental and emotional support on gambling where gambling is restricted. It also suggests that gambling behaviors of Filipino Americans are subject to situation- and environment-specific factors.

  10. Interference competition between introduced black rats and endemic Galápagos rice rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Donna B; Macdonald, David W

    2007-09-01

    Replicated field experiments were used to quantify and to describe the mechanism of competition between the introduced black rat Rattus rattus and the endemic Santiago rice rat Nesoryzomys swarthi on Santiago Island, Galápagos Islands, Ecuador. The removal of R. rattus significantly slowed the rate of seasonal population decline in N. swarthi. This effect was particularly evident for female, relative to male, N. swarthi and appeared to be driven solely by enhanced immigration; no other fitness or space use parameters were affected. The candidate hypotheses to explain the mechanism of competition were exploitation competition, interference by resource defense, and interference by aggressive encounter. To distinguish between hypotheses, we conducted a replicated resource supplementation experiment with patchy food, scattered food, and no food (control) treatments. The opportunistic R. rattus responded to the extra resources with increased adult immigration and juvenile recruitment, resulting in a significant abundance boost of sevenfold on patchy grids and fourfold on scattered grids. Females increased in body mass, and the breeding season was lengthened. In contrast, there was no change in the abundance of N. swarthi and no obvious benefit to reproduction. Instead, the costs of interference apparently outweighed the benefits of extra food: female N. swarthi increased in mass with supplementary food, but female (relative to male) immigration and residency were repressed on all supplemented areas. This response supported the hypothesis of interference by aggressive encounter, and we were able to rule out the alternative hypotheses. Although periodic population crashes of R. rattus on the arid north coast of Santiago may ameliorate its competitive impact, climate change may tip the balance. Control or eradication of R. rattus should improve future survival prospects for N. swarthi, but wildlife managers must be prepared for the potential eruption of the introduced

  11. Domestic Event Support Operations (DESO)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-01

    2000. Because major international events promise significant economic benefits , cities around the world will probably continue to compete hard for...bands based in Melbourne provided musical support to the Games’ Cultural Festival . Second, support was provided that offered operational or training...Subsequently, he commanded the Joint Task Forces that supported the Melbourne 2006 Commonwealth Games and the 2007 Asia-Pacific Economic

  12. Corporate Support of Education, 1983.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Council for Financial Aid to Education, New York, NY.

    Results of the Council for Financial Aid to Education's 1983 survey of 503 companies providing financial support to higher education are summarized and tabulated. Attention is directed to: national trends in corporate pretax net income and contributions; effects of inflation; corporate support in relation to total voluntary support and…

  13. Support Effects in Heterogeneous Catalysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oudenhuijzen, M.K.

    2002-01-01

    It is well known in literature that for many metal-catalyzed reactions the support influences the catalytic properties of the metal particles. It has also been observed that the electronic properties of the supported Pt particles depend on the acid/base properties of the support. However, the nature

  14. Path integration absent in scent-tracking fimbria-fornix rats: evidence for hippocampal involvement in "sense of direction" and "sense of distance" using self-movement cues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whishaw, I Q; Gorny, B

    1999-06-01

    Allothetic and idiothetic navigation strategies use very different cue constellations and computational processes. Allothetic navigation requires the use of the relationships between relatively stable external (visual, olfactory, auditory) cues, whereas idiothetic navigation requires the integration of cues generated by self-movement and/or efferent copy of movement commands. The flexibility with which animals can switch between these strategies and the neural structures that support these strategies are not well understood. By capitalizing on the proclivity of foraging rats to carry large food pellets back to a refuge for eating, the present study examined the contribution of the hippocampus to the use of allothetic versus idiothetic navigation strategies. Control rats and fimbria-fornix-ablated rats were trained to follow linear, polygonal, and octagonal scent trails that led to a piece of food. The ability of the rats to return to the refuge with the food via the shortest route using allothetic cues (visual cues and/or the odor trail available) or using ideothetic cues (the odor trail removed and the rats blindfolded or tested in infrared light) was examined. Control rats "closed the polygon" by returning directly home in all cue conditions. Fimbria-fornix rats successfully used allothetic cues (closed the polygon using visual cues or tracked back on the string) but were insensitive to the direction and distance of the refuge and were lost when restricted to idiothetic cues. The results support the hypothesis that the hippocampal formation is necessary for navigation requiring the integration of idiothetic cues.

  15. Virtual determination of liver and muscle glycogen obtained from fed rats and from 24-hour fasted rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.M.T.T. Trindidade et al

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Glycogen is the storage polysaccharide of animals, composed by glucoseresidues forming a branched polymer. The liver glycogen metabolism and hepaticgluconeogenesis are important buffer systems of blood glucose in different physiological orpathological situations, such as, during a fast period. Fasting muscle glycogenolysis alsooccurs, however, the release of glucose into the bloodstream is negligible because themuscle doesn’t have the enzyme glucose-6-P phosphatase, which is present in the liver.Objectives: This panel presents a learning object, mediated by computer, which simulatesthe determination of liver and muscle glycogen obtained from fed rats and from 24-hourfasted rats Materials and Methods: At first, cartoons were planned in order to show themethodology procedures and biochemical fundamentals. The most representative imageswere selected, edited, organized in a scene menu and inserted into an animationdeveloped with the aid of the Adobe ® Flash 8 software. The validation of this object wasperformed by the students of Biochemistry I (Pharmacy-UFRGS from the secondsemester of 2009 until the second semester of 2013. Results and Discussion: Theanalysis of students' answers revealed that 83% of them attributed the excellence rate tothe navigation program, to the display format and to the learning help. Conclusion:Therefore, this learning object can be considered an adequate teaching resource as wellas an innovative support in the construction of theoretical and practical knowledge ofBiochemistry. Support: SEAD-UFRGSAvailable at: http://www.ufrgs.br/gcoeb/obtencaodosagemglicogenio/

  16. Pleurotus ostreatus, an edible mushroom, enhances glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase, ascorbate peroxidase and reduces xanthine dehydrogenase in major organs of aged rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Philip Aloysius; Geraldine, Pitchairaj; Jayakumar, Thanasekaran

    2014-05-01

    Aging is now considered to be associated with an elevation in oxidative damage to macromolecules and enhanced levels of inflammation. Therefore, inhibition of age-related oxidative stress by natural supplement is an important study. To investigate whether the treatment with Pleurotus ostreatus (Jacq.: Fr) Kumm, (Pleurotaceae) can ameliorate oxidative damage in aged rats. Male Wistar rats were divided into three groups of six each: group 1, normal young rats; group 2, normal aged untreated rats; group 3, normal aged rats treated with P. ostreatus (200 mg/kg body wt administered intraperitoneally for 21 days). On the 22nd day, rats were sacrificed by decapitation; the liver, kidneys, heart and brain were removed from each rat for the biochemical and isozyme analyses of the antioxidant enzymes glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PDH), ascorbate peroxidase (Apx) and xanthine dehydrogenase (XDH). An elevated activity of XDH was observed in the liver (G2:13.72 ± 4.1 versus G1: 7.57 ± 1.15; p XDH and increased G6PDH and Apx activities in liver, kidneys, heart and brain. Interestingly, analyses of isozyme pattern of these enzymes are support the results obtained from the spectrophotometric determinations. These results suggest that an extract of P. ostreatus can protect the age-related oxidative damage in major organs of Wistar rats by enhancing the antioxidant enzymes G6PDH and Apx and by reducing XDH.

  17. Costimulation and autoimmune diabetes in BB rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beaudette-Zlatanova, BC; Whalen, B; Zipris, D; Yagita, H; Rozing, J; Groen, H; Benjamin, CD; Hunig, T; Drexhage, HA; Ansari, MJ; Leif, J; Mordes, JP; Greiner, DL; Sayegh, MH; Rossini, AA

    Costimulatory signals regulate T-cell activation. To investigate the role of costimulation in autoimmunity and transplantation, we studied the BB rat model of type 1 diabetes. Diabetes-prone BB (BBDP) rats spontaneously develop disease when 55-120 days of age. We observed that two anti-CD28

  18. THE GREATER CANE RATS (THRYONOMIS SWINDERIANUS,

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2017-01-12

    Jan 12, 2017 ... ABSTRACT. The adrenal glands of domesticated greater cane rats (Thryonomys swinderianus), were studied using histological and ultrastructural techniques. A total of seven (7) adult male greater cane rats, aged from 10-14 months, with an average weight of 1.89 kg (range: 1.6 -2.2 kg) were used in this ...

  19. Same-Different Categorization in Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasserman, Edward A.; Castro, Leyre; Freeman, John H.

    2012-01-01

    Same-different categorization is a fundamental feat of human cognition. Although birds and nonhuman primates readily learn same-different discriminations and successfully transfer them to novel stimuli, no such demonstration exists for rats. Using a spatial discrimination learning task, we show that rats can both learn to discriminate arrays of…

  20. Experimental Salmonella typhimurium infections in rats. I

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hougen, H P; Jensen, E T; Klausen, B

    1989-01-01

    The course of experimentally induced Salmonella typhimurium infection was studied in three groups of inbred LEW rats: homozygous +/+, athymic rnu/rnu and isogeneic thymus-grafted rnu/rnu rats. In the first experiment the animals were inoculated intraperitoneally with 10(8) bacteria and all animals...

  1. Bromsulphalein (BSP) clearance in ageing rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hollander, C.F.; Leeuw-Israel, F.R. de; Arp-Neefjes, J.M.

    1968-01-01

    Liver function in ageing rats was studied, using the bromsulphalein (BSP) clearance test. The test was done on ultramicro scale. This made it possible to repeat the test several times in the same animal and to start a longitudinal study. In 3-month-old rats the BSP retentions, measured 15, 30 and 45

  2. Attachment in rat pups, an experimental approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gispen, W.H.; Sigling, H.; Engeland, H. van; Spruijt, B.M.

    1998-01-01

    John Bowlby's attachment theory states that attachment behavior has been strengthened throughout evolution as a consequence of its adaptive value. We investigated the presence of attachment-like behavior in rat pups, by offering a choice between the home nest and a same aged other nest. Rat pups

  3. in Cardiac Muscles of Hemorrhagic Shocked Rats

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To investigate the protective effects of various resuscitating fluids on severe hemorrhagic shocked (HS) rats by comparing the expression changes of hsp90α in cardiac muscles and survival of rats. Methods: Western-blot and immunohistochemistry methods were performed to determine hsp90á expressions in ...

  4. growing African giant rats Cricetomys gambianus

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Thermoregulation and evaporative water loss in growing African giant rats Cricetomys gambianus. M.H. Knight. Mammal Research Institute, University of Pretoria, Pretoria. With an increase in mass, weaned giant rat pups. Cricetomys gambianus, showed a corresponding decline in mass specific metabolism, conductance ...

  5. Functional annotations of diabetes nephropathy susceptibility loci through analysis of genome-wide renal gene expression in rat models of diabetes mellitus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hu, Yaomin; Kaisaki, Pamela J; Argoud, Karène

    2009-01-01

    of spontaneous (genetically determined) mild hyperglycaemia and insulin resistance (Goto-Kakizaki-GK) and experimentally induced severe hyperglycaemia (Wistar-Kyoto-WKY rats injected with streptozotocin [STZ]). RESULTS: Different patterns of transcription regulation in the two rat models of diabetes likely...... that are responsive to hyperglycaemia and may contribute to renal functional and/or structural alterations. CONCLUSION: Combining transcriptomics in animal models and comparative genomics provides important information to improve functional annotations of disease susceptibility loci in humans and experimental support...

  6. Training pouched rats to find people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Londe, Kate B; Mahoney, Amanda; Edwards, Timothy L; Cox, Christophe; Weetjens, Bart; Durgin, Amy; Poling, Alan

    2015-01-01

    Giant African pouched rats equipped with video cameras may be a tenable option for locating living humans trapped under debris from collapsed structures. In the present study, 5 pouched rats were trained to contact human targets in a simulated collapsed building and to return to the release point after hearing a signal to do so. During test sessions, each rat located human targets more often than it located similar-sized inanimate targets on which it had not previously been trained and spent more time within 1 m of the human target than within 1 m of the other targets. Overall, the rats found humans, plastic bags containing clothes, and plastic bags without clothes on 83%, 37%, and 11% of trials, respectively. These findings suggest that using pouched rats to search for survivors in collapsed structures merits further attention. © Society for the Experimental Analysis of Behavior.

  7. Extended mission life support systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quattrone, P. D.

    1985-01-01

    Extended manned space missions which include interplanetary missions require regenerative life support systems. Manned mission life support considerations are placed in perspective and previous manned space life support system technology, activities and accomplishments in current supporting research and technology (SR&T) programs are reviewed. The life support subsystem/system technologies required for an enhanced duration orbiter (EDO) and a space operations center (SOC), regenerative life support functions and technology required for manned interplanetary flight vehicles, and future development requirements are outlined. The Space Shuttle Orbiters (space transportation system) is space cabin atmosphere is maintained at Earth ambient pressure of 14.7 psia (20% O2 and 80% N2). The early Shuttle flights will be seven-day flights, and the life support system flight hardware will still utilize expendables.

  8. blood pressure reducing effect of bitter kola in wistar rats

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DEAN'S OFFICE

    ABSTRACT: In this study the effect of Garcinia kola (GK) on blood pressure was investigated. Albino wistar rats were divided into three groups. Groups A rats had normal rat chow and water ad-libitum while groups B and C rats had Garcinia kola diet of 10% w/w and 15% w/w respectively, their blood pressures were ...

  9. Liver function of Streptozotocin- Induced Diabetic Rats Orally ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study evaluated the liver status of STZ- induced diabetic rats treated with aqueous root-bark extract of T. tetraptera for 35 days. Twenty-four (24) rats in four groups (normal control, diabetic control, T. tetraptera treated STZ induced diabetic rats at 150 mg/kg b. w. and T. tetraptera treated STZ-diabetic rats at 300 mg/kg ...

  10. Comparative bone marrow responses of albino rats experimentally ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    It involved laboratory based experimental infection of albino rats as research models. A total of 32 adult albino rats of mixed sexes were used for this investigation. The rats were randomly grouped into three groups, A, B, C made up of 8 rats each, and infected with T. congolense, T brucei and mixed infection of these species ...

  11. Social exclusion intensifies anxiety-like behavior in adolescent rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyunchan; Noh, Jihyun

    2015-05-01

    Social connection reduces the physiological reactivity to stressors, while social exclusion causes emotional distress. Stressful experiences in rats result in the facilitation of aversive memory and induction of anxiety. To determine the effect of social interaction, such as social connection, social exclusion and equality or inequality, on emotional change in adolescent distressed rats, the emotional alteration induced by restraint stress in individual rats following exposure to various social interaction circumstances was examined. Rats were assigned to one of the following groups: all freely moving rats, all rats restrained, rats restrained in the presence of freely moving rats and freely moving rats with a restrained rat. No significant difference in fear-memory and sucrose consumption between all groups was found. Change in body weight significantly increased in freely moving rats with a restrained rat, suggesting that those rats seems to share the stressful experience of the restrained rat. Interestingly, examination of the anxiety-like behavior revealed only rats restrained in the presence of freely moving rats to have a significant increase, suggesting that emotional distress intensifies in positions of social exclusion. These results demonstrate that unequally excluded social interaction circumstances could cause the amplification of distressed status and anxiety-related emotional alteration. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Correlation of histological and histometric changes in rats testes ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Histological and histometric changes in the testes of albino Wistar rats were correlated. Wistar rats weighing between 180-240g were randomly divided into three groups of ten rats each. One group served as control and the rats were given normal saline. The second and third groups received 2mg/kg and 4mg/kg body ...

  13. The Immunoexpression of FSH-R in the Ductuli Efferentes and the Epididymis of Men and Rat: Effect of FSH on the Morphology and Steroidogenic Activity of Rat Epididymal Epithelial Cells In Vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Małgorzata Świder-Al-Amawi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The Sertoli cells were regarded as the only target for FSH in male reproductive system. The expression of FSH receptor (FSH-R was detected also in epithelial cells of the caput epididymis of rat and monkey. We showed in the immunohistochemistry study the expression of FSH-R in rat and human ductuli efferentes and the caput, corpus, and cauda epididymis, moreover, by Western blot analysis in the caput and cauda epididymis of rat. Additionally, we presented that the morphology of rat epididymal epithelial cells in vitro was affected by FSH, and FSH stimulation resulted in the increase of 17β-estradiol synthesis by rat caput epididymal cells in dose-depended manner. In conclusion, the identification of FSH receptors in human and rat epididymides supports our results that the epididymis is a target organ not only for LH but additionally for FSH. On the basis of the results we showed for the first time that morphology of epididymal epithelial cells and epididymal steroidogenesis can be regulated by FSH.

  14. Supporting African refugees in Canada: insights from a support intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Miriam; Simich, Laura; Shizha, Edward; Makumbe, Knox; Makwarimba, Edward

    2012-09-01

    Although evidence suggests the importance of social support for refugees, this knowledge has not been invoked to systematically develop culturally congruent support interventions that help refugees adapt to life in receiving countries. The objective of this study was to design and pilot test a culturally congruent intervention that meets the support needs and preferences of two ethno-culturally distinct refugee groups. Support was delivered to Somali and Sudanese refugees (n = 58), by trained peer and professional facilitators. Face-to-face groups comprised of refugees, matched by gender and ethnicity, were created to enhance the depleted social networks of Somali and Sudanese refugees. Each peer support group met bi-weekly for a face-to-face session for 12 weeks. Peer facilitators delivered supplementary one-to-one support via the telephone. The ingredients of the support intervention included: (i) peer facilitators and professionals; (ii) provision of information, affirmation and emotional support; and (iii) accessibility (e.g. childcare, transportation). The study employed a qualitative participatory research design. Data collected for the study included (i) in-depth pre-intervention interviews with potential support group participants in 2008-2009 to assess intervention preferences; (ii) fieldnotes by peer and professional facilitators during the intervention in 2009-10; (iii) post-intervention group interviews with support group participants in 2010; and (iv) in-depth interviews with peer and professional helpers in 2010. A major perceived benefit of the support programme was connecting with people from African refugee participants' cultural communities. Participants appreciated the gender and culture-specific groups. Following the social support intervention, refugees reported increased social integration, decreased loneliness and expanded coping repertoire. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  15. Leucine and protein metabolism in obese Zucker rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pengxiang She

    Full Text Available Branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs are circulating nutrient signals for protein accretion, however, they increase in obesity and elevations appear to be prognostic of diabetes. To understand the mechanisms whereby obesity affects BCAAs and protein metabolism, we employed metabolomics and measured rates of [1-(14C]-leucine metabolism, tissue-specific protein synthesis and branched-chain keto-acid (BCKA dehydrogenase complex (BCKDC activities. Male obese Zucker rats (11-weeks old had increased body weight (BW, 53%, liver (107% and fat (∼300%, but lower plantaris and gastrocnemius masses (-21-24%. Plasma BCAAs and BCKAs were elevated 45-69% and ∼100%, respectively, in obese rats. Processes facilitating these rises appeared to include increased dietary intake (23%, leucine (Leu turnover and proteolysis [35% per g fat free mass (FFM, urinary markers of proteolysis: 3-methylhistidine (183% and 4-hydroxyproline (766%] and decreased BCKDC per g kidney, heart, gastrocnemius and liver (-47-66%. A process disposing of circulating BCAAs, protein synthesis, was increased 23-29% by obesity in whole-body (FFM corrected, gastrocnemius and liver. Despite the observed decreases in BCKDC activities per gm tissue, rates of whole-body Leu oxidation in obese rats were 22% and 59% higher normalized to BW and FFM, respectively. Consistently, urinary concentrations of eight BCAA catabolism-derived acylcarnitines were also elevated. The unexpected increase in BCAA oxidation may be due to a substrate effect in liver. Supporting this idea, BCKAs were elevated more in liver (193-418% than plasma or muscle, and per g losses of hepatic BCKDC activities were completely offset by increased liver mass, in contrast to other tissues. In summary, our results indicate that plasma BCKAs may represent a more sensitive metabolic signature for obesity than BCAAs. Processes supporting elevated BCAA]BCKAs in the obese Zucker rat include increased dietary intake, Leu and protein

  16. Mutant Wars2 gene in spontaneously hypertensive rats impairs brown adipose tissue function and predisposes to visceral obesity

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pravenec, Michal; Zídek, Václav; Landa, Vladimír; Mlejnek, Petr; Šilhavý, Jan; Šimáková, Miroslava; Trnovská, J.; Škop, V.; Marková, I.; Malínská, H.; Hüttl, M.; Kazdová, L.; Bardová, Kristina; Tauchmannová, Kateřina; Vrbacký, Marek; Nůsková, Hana; Mráček, Tomáš; Kopecký, Jan; Houštěk, Josef

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 66, č. 6 (2017), s. 917-924 ISSN 0862-8408 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA13-04420S Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : brown adipose tissue * spontaneously hypertensive rat * quantitative trait loci * transgenic * Wars2 gene * mitochondrial proteosynthesis Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 1.461, year: 2016

  17. Adenosine triphosphate levels during anaphylactic histamine release in rat mast cells in vitro. Effects of glycolytic and respiratory inhibitors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Torben

    1979-01-01

    The adenosine triphosphate (ATP) content of rat mast cells was studied during and after anaphylactic histamine release. The almost identical time course of ATP decrease from mast cells treated with either glycolytic or respiratory inhibitors supports the view that the ATP depletion was largely re...

  18. Tumor Progression Is Associated with Increasing CD11b(+) Cells and CCL2 in Lewis Rat Sarcoma

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mishra, Rajbardhan; Kovalská, Jana; Janda, Jozef; Vannucci, Luca; Rajmon, R.; Horák, Vratislav

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 35, č. 2 (2015), s. 703-712 ISSN 0250-7005 R&D Projects: GA MŠk ED2.1.00/03.0124 Institutional support: RVO:67985904 ; RVO:61388971 Keywords : Lewis rat sarcoma * CD11b+cells * neutrophils Subject RIV: FD - Oncology ; Hematology Impact factor: 1.895, year: 2015

  19. The protective effect of a reduction in intestinal flora on mortality of acute haemorrhagic pancreatitis in the rat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lange, J. F.; van Gool, J.; Tytgat, G. N.

    1987-01-01

    Both colectomy and intestinal lavage combined with kanamycin instillation proved effective in reducing mortality from sodium taurocholate-induced acute haemorrhagic pancreatitis (AHP) in the rat, supporting the concept that the intestinal flora must be considered a major factor influencing mortality

  20. GM-CSF-Producing Th Cells in Rats Sensitive and Resistant to Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stojić-Vukanić, Zorica; Pilipović, Ivan; Vujnović, Ivana; Nacka-Aleksić, Mirjana; Petrović, Raisa; Arsenović-Ranin, Nevena; Dimitrijević, Mirjana; Leposavić, Gordana

    2016-01-01

    Given that granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) is identified as the key factor to endow auto-reactive Th cells with the potential to induce neuroinflammation in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) models, the frequency and phenotype of GM-CSF-producing (GM-CSF+) Th cells in draining lymph nodes (dLNs) and spinal cord (SC) of Albino Oxford (AO) and Dark Agouti (DA) rats immunized for EAE were examined. The generation of neuroantigen-specific GM-CSF+ Th lymphocytes was impaired in dLNs of AO rats (relatively resistant to EAE induction) compared with their DA counterparts (susceptible to EAE) reflecting impaired CD4+ lymphocyte proliferation and less supportive of GM-CSF+ Th cell differentiation dLN cytokine microenvironment. Immunophenotyping of GM-CSF+ Th cells showed their phenotypic heterogeneity in both strains and revealed lower frequency of IL-17+IFN-γ+, IL-17+IFN-γ-, and IL-17-IFN-γ+ cells accompanied by higher frequency of IL-17-IFN-γ- cells among them in AO than in DA rats. Compared with DA, in AO rats was also found (i) slightly lower surface density of CCR2 (drives accumulation of highly pathogenic GM-CSF+IFN-γ+ Th17 cells in SC) on GM-CSF+IFN-γ+ Th17 lymphocytes from dLNs, and (ii) diminished CCL2 mRNA expression in SC tissue, suggesting their impaired migration into the SC. Moreover, dLN and SC cytokine environments in AO rats were shown to be less supportive of GM-CSF+IFN-γ+ Th17 cell differentiation (judging by lower expression of mRNAs for IL-1β, IL-6 and IL-23/p19). In accordance with the (i) lower frequency of GM-CSF+ Th cells in dLNs and SC of AO rats and their lower GM-CSF production, and (ii) impaired CCL2 expression in the SC tissue, the proportion of proinflammatory monocytes among peripheral blood cells and their progeny (CD45hi cells) among the SC CD11b+ cells were reduced in AO compared with DA rats. Collectively, the results indicate that the strain specificities in efficacy of several mechanisms

  1. Conceptualization of the social support and the social support network

    OpenAIRE

    Aranda B., Carolina; Instituto de Investigación en salud ocupacional, Departamento de salud pública, Universidad de Guadalajara, México; Pando M., Manuel; Instituto de Investigación en salud ocupacional, Departamento de salud pública, Universidad de Guadalajara, México

    2014-01-01

    Many are the concepts and approaches whose have been proposed in the study of the social support as social support networks, as well as the use of some of these concepts to relate either social support or social support networks to the conditions and its importance in the protective role of it. The route on the conceptualization of both variables occurs since the fifties to the most current, closing with some brief conclusions. Numerosos son los conceptos y abordajes que se han propuesto e...

  2. Anxiolytic Treatment Impairs Helping Behavior in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Ami Bartal, Inbal; Shan, Haozhe; Molasky, Nora M R; Murray, Teresa M; Williams, Jasper Z; Decety, Jean; Mason, Peggy

    2016-01-01

    Despite decades of research with humans, the biological mechanisms that motivate an individual to help others remain poorly understood. In order to investigate the roots of pro-sociality in mammals, we established the helping behavior test, a paradigm in which rats are faced with a conspecific trapped in a restrainer that can only be opened from the outside. Over the course of repeated test sessions, rats exposed to a trapped cagemate learn to open the door to the restrainer, thereby helping the trapped rat to escape (Ben-Ami Bartal et al., 2011). The discovery of this natural behavior provides a unique opportunity to probe the motivation of rodent helping behavior, leading to a deeper understanding of biological influences on human pro-sociality. To determine if an affective response motivates door-opening, rats receiving midazolam, a benzodiazepine anxiolytic, were tested in the helping behavior test. Midazolam-treated rats showed less helping behavior than saline-treated rats or rats receiving no injection. Yet, midazolam-treated rats opened a restrainer containing chocolate, highlighting the socially specific effects of the anxiolytic. To determine if midazolam interferes with helping through a sympatholytic effect, the peripherally restricted beta-adrenergic receptor antagonist nadolol was administered; nadolol did not interfere with helping. The corticosterone response of rats exposed to a trapped cagemate was measured and compared to the rats' subsequent helping behavior. Rats with the greatest corticosterone responses showed the least helping behavior and those with the smallest responses showed the most consistent helping at the shortest latency. These results are discussed in terms of their implications for the interaction between stress and pro-social behavior. Finally, we observed that door-opening appeared to be reinforcing. A novel analytical tool was designed to interrogate the pattern of door-opening for signs that a rat's behavior on one session

  3. Oxidative DNA and RNA damage in rat liver due to acetoxime: similarity to effects of 2-nitropropane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, N S; Conaway, C C; Guo, N; Asaad, W; Fiala, E S

    1990-06-01

    Acetoxime (ACO) and 2-nitropropane (2-NP), both industrially important chemicals and known hepatocarcinogens in rats, induced increased levels of 8-hydroxy-guanine in liver DNA and RNA of male Sprague-Dawley and F344 rats after either oral or i.p. administration. Both compounds also produced qualitatively the same patterns of other apparent modifications of liver DNA and RNA nucleosides, discernible by HPLC with electrochemical detection. Six hours after administration, the effects of 2-NP on liver nucleic acids were more pronounced in F344 rats than in Sprague-Dawley rats, suggesting that 2-NP may prove to be a stronger carcinogen in the F344 strain. The effects of ACO, a weaker carcinogen than 2-NP, were less than those of the nitroalkane in both rat strains. These results suggest that the hepatocarcinogenicity of ACO, like that of 2-NP, may depend on increased generation of reactive oxygen species capable of producing DNA and RNA base damage in rat liver. In addition, the data support the hypothesis that the hepatocarcinogenicity of ACO depends on its partial in vivo N-oxidation to 2-NP.

  4. Cardioprotective Effect of Aloe vera Biomacromolecules Conjugated with Selenium Trace Element on Myocardial Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yang; Yang, Ming; Ai, Fen; Huang, Congxin

    2017-06-01

    The present study was undertaken to evaluate the cardioprotection potential and underlying molecular mechanism afforded by a selenium (Se) polysaccharide (Se-AVP) from Aloe vera in the ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) model of rats in vivo. Myocardial I/R injury was induced by occluding the left anterior descending coronary artery (LAD) for 30 min followed by 2-h continuous reperfusion. Pretreatment with Se-AVP (100, 200, and 400 mg/kg) attenuated myocardial damage, as evidenced by reduction of the infarct sizes, increase in serum and myocardial endogenous antioxidants (superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GSH), and catalase (CAT)), and decrease in the malondialdehyde (MDA) level in the rats suffering I/R injury. This cardioprotective activity afforded by Se-AVP is further supported by the decreased levels of cardiac marker enzymes creatine kinase (CK) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), as well as the rise of myocardial Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase and Ca(2+)-Mg(2+)-ATPase activities in I/R rats. Additionally, cardiomyocytic apoptosis was measured by terminal-deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated nick end labeling (TUNEL) staining and the result showed that the percent of TUNEL-positive cells in myocardium of Se-AVP-treated groups was lower than I/R rats. In conclusion, we clearly demonstrated that Se-AVP had a protective effect against myocardial I/R injury in rats by augmenting endogenous antioxidants and protecting rat hearts from oxidative stress-induced myocardial apoptosis.

  5. Age-related changes in glutamate release in the CA3 and dentate gyrus of the rat hippocampus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, Michelle L.; Quintero, Jorge E.; Pomerleau, Francois; Huettl, Peter; Gerhardt, Greg A.

    2012-01-01

    The present studies employed a novel microelectrode array recording technology to study glutamate release and uptake in the dentate gyrus, CA3 and CA1 hippocampal subregions in anesthetized young, late-middle aged and aged male Fischer 344 rats. The mossy fiber terminals in CA3 showed a significantly decreased amount of KCl-evoked glutamate release in aged rats compared to both young and late-middle-aged rats. Significantly more KCl-evoked glutamate release was seen from perforant path terminals in the DG of late-middle-aged rats compared young and aged rats. The DG of aged rats developed an increased glutamate uptake rate compared to the DG of young animals, indicating a possible age-related change in glutamate regulation to deal with increased glutamate release that occurred in late-middle age. No age-related changes in resting levels of glutamate were observed in the DG, CA3 and CA1. Taken together, these data support dynamic changes to glutamate regulation during aging in subregions of the mammalian hippocampus that are critical for learning and memory. PMID:19535175

  6. Effects of mild calorie restriction on anxiety and hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis responses to stress in the male rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenny, Rachel; Dinan, Tara; Cai, Guohui; Spencer, Sarah J

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Chronic calorie restriction (CR) is one of the few interventions to improve longevity and quality of life in a variety of species. It also reduces behavioral indices of anxiety and influences some stress hormones under basal conditions. However, it is not known how CR influences hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis function or if those on a CR diet have heightened HPA axis responses to stress. We hypothesized elevated basal glucocorticoid levels induced by CR would lead to exacerbated HPA axis responses to the psychological stress, restraint, in the male rat. We first confirmed rats fed 75% of their normal calorie intake for 3 weeks were less anxious than ad libitum-fed (AD) rats in the elevated plus maze test for anxiety. The anxiolytic effect was mild, with only grooming significantly attenuated in the open field and no measured behavior affected in the light/dark box. Despite elevated basal glucocorticoids, CR rats had very similar hormonal and central responses to 15-min restraint to the AD rats. Both CR and AD rats responded to restraint stress with a robust increase in glucocorticoids that was resolved by 60 min. Both groups also showed robust neuronal activation in the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus and in other stress- and feeding-sensitive brain regions that was not substantially affected by calorie intake. Our findings thus demonstrate chronic mild CR is subtly anxiolytic and is not likely to affect HPA axis responses to psychological stress. These findings support research suggesting a beneficial effect of mild CR.

  7. Generation and characterization of rat liver stem cell lines and their engraftment in a rat model of liver failure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuijk, Ewart W; Rasmussen, Shauna; Blokzijl, Francis; Huch, Meritxell; Gehart, Helmuth; Toonen, Pim; Begthel, Harry; Clevers, Hans; Geurts, Aron M; Cuppen, Edwin

    2016-01-01

    The rat is an important model for liver regeneration. However, there is no in vitro culture system that can capture the massive proliferation that can be observed after partial hepatectomy in rats. We here describe the generation of rat liver stem cell lines. Rat liver stem cells, which grow as

  8. Lessons From Experiments in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albert Gramsbergen

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available In this essay a few relevant aspects of the neural and behavioral development of the brain in the human and in the rat are reviewed and related to the consequences of lesions in the central and peripheral nervous system at early and later age. Movements initially are generated by local circuits in the spinal cord and without the involvement of descending projections. After birth, both in humans and in rats it seems that the devlopment of postural control is the limiting factor for several motor behaviors to mature. Strong indications exist that the cerebellum is significantly involved in this control. Lesions in the CNS at early stages interfere with fundamental processes of neural development, such as the establishment of fiber connections and cell death patterns. Consequently, the functional effects are strongly dependent on the stage of development. The young and undisturbed CNS, on the other hand, has a much greater capacity than the adult nervous system for compensating abnormal reinnervation in the peripheral nervous system. Animal experiments indicated that the cerebellar cortex might play an important part in this compensation. This possibility should be investigated further as it might offer important perspectives for treatment in the human.

  9. ASME Code Efforts Supporting HTGRs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D.K. Morton

    2012-09-01

    In 1999, an international collaborative initiative for the development of advanced (Generation IV) reactors was started. The idea behind this effort was to bring nuclear energy closer to the needs of sustainability, to increase proliferation resistance, and to support concepts able to produce energy (both electricity and process heat) at competitive costs. The U.S. Department of Energy has supported this effort by pursuing the development of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant, a high temperature gas-cooled reactor. This support has included research and development of pertinent data, initial regulatory discussions, and engineering support of various codes and standards development. This report discusses the various applicable American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) codes and standards that are being developed to support these high temperature gascooled reactors during construction and operation. ASME is aggressively pursuing these codes and standards to support an international effort to build the next generation of advanced reactors so that all can benefit.

  10. ASME Code Efforts Supporting HTGRs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D.K. Morton

    2011-09-01

    In 1999, an international collaborative initiative for the development of advanced (Generation IV) reactors was started. The idea behind this effort was to bring nuclear energy closer to the needs of sustainability, to increase proliferation resistance, and to support concepts able to produce energy (both electricity and process heat) at competitive costs. The U.S. Department of Energy has supported this effort by pursuing the development of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant, a high temperature gas-cooled reactor. This support has included research and development of pertinent data, initial regulatory discussions, and engineering support of various codes and standards development. This report discusses the various applicable American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) codes and standards that are being developed to support these high temperature gascooled reactors during construction and operation. ASME is aggressively pursuing these codes and standards to support an international effort to build the next generation of advanced reactors so that all can benefit.

  11. ASME Code Efforts Supporting HTGRs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D.K. Morton

    2010-09-01

    In 1999, an international collaborative initiative for the development of advanced (Generation IV) reactors was started. The idea behind this effort was to bring nuclear energy closer to the needs of sustainability, to increase proliferation resistance, and to support concepts able to produce energy (both electricity and process heat) at competitive costs. The U.S. Department of Energy has supported this effort by pursuing the development of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant, a high temperature gas-cooled reactor. This support has included research and development of pertinent data, initial regulatory discussions, and engineering support of various codes and standards development. This report discusses the various applicable American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) codes and standards that are being developed to support these high temperature gascooled reactors during construction and operation. ASME is aggressively pursuing these codes and standards to support an international effort to build the next generation of advanced reactors so that all can benefit.

  12. Analysis of vkorc1 polymorphisms in Norway rats using the roof rat as outgroup.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz, Juan C; Song, Ying; Moore, Anthony; Borchert, Jeff N; Kohn, Michael H

    2010-05-24

    Certain mutations in the vitamin K epoxide reductase subcomponent 1 gene (vkorc1) mediate rodent resistance to warfarin and other anticoagulants. Testing for resistance often involves analysis of the vkorc1. However, a genetic test for the roof rat (Rattus rattus) has yet to be developed. Moreover, an available roof rat vkorc1 sequence would enable species identification based on vkorc1 sequence and the evaluation of natural selection on particular vkorc1 polymorphisms in the Norway rat (R. norvegicus). We report the coding sequence, introns and 5' and 3' termini for the vkorc1 gene of roof rats (R. r. alexandrinus and R. r. frugivorus) from Uganda, Africa. Newly designed PCR primers now enable genetic testing of the roof rat and Norway rat. Only synonymous and noncoding polymorphisms were found in roof rats from Uganda. Both nominal subspecies of roof rats were indistinguishable from each other but were distinct from R. losea and R. flavipectus; however, the roof rat also shares at least three coding sequence polymorphisms with R. losea and R. flavipectus. Many of recently published vkorc1 synonymous and non-synonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in Norway rats are likely SNPs from roof rats and/or other Rattus species. Tests applied to presumably genuine Norway rat vkorc1 SNPs are consistent with a role for selection in two populations carrying the derived Phe63Cys and Tyr139Cys mutations. Geographic mapping of vkorc1 SNPs in roof rats should be facilitated by our report. Our assay should be applicable to most species of Rattus, which are intermediate in genetic distance from roof and Norway rats. Vkorc1-mediated resistance due to non-synonymous coding SNPs is not segregating in roof rats from Uganda. By using the roof rat sequence as a reference vkorc1, SNPs now can be assigned to the correct rat species with more confidence. Sampling designs and genotyping strategies employed so far have helped detect candidate mutations underlying vkorc1-mediated

  13. Maternal immune activation in rats produces temporal perception impairments in adult offspring analogous to those observed in schizophrenia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashley R Deane

    Full Text Available The neurophysiology underlying temporal perception significantly overlaps with areas of dysfunction identified in schizophrenia. Patients commonly exhibit distorted temporal perception, which likely contributes to functional impairments. Thus, study of temporal perception in animal models of the disease may help to understand both cognitive and neurobiological factors involved in functional impairments in patients. As maternal immune activation (MIA has been shown to be a significant etiological risk factor in development of schizophrenia and other developmental psychiatric diseases, we tested interval timing in a rat model of MIA that has previously been shown to recapitulate several behavioural and neurophysiological impairments observed in the disease. Rats were tested on a temporal-bisection task, in which temporal duration stimuli were categorized as either "short" or "long" by responding to a corresponding lever. Data from this task were modeled to provide estimates of accuracy and sensitivity of temporal perception. Parameter estimates derived from the model fitting showed that MIA rats significantly overestimated the passage of time compared to controls. These results indicate that the MIA rat paradigm recapitulates timing distortions that are phenotypical of schizophrenia. These findings lend further support to the epidemiological validity of this MIA rat model, supporting its relevance for future research into the role of maternal immune activation in producing neurobiological and behavioural impairments in schizophrenia.

  14. Fire Support: 1995 and Beyond

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-04-05

    world politics in the early 1990s dictate that issues surrounding our Fire Support systems and structure be critically examined to ensure they can continue to meet our worldwide contingencies. This study will examine the current application of Fire Support within the U.S. Army and recommend doctrinal and structural issues needing resolution to facilitate successful future evolution. Modern technology, geopolitical conditions, and evolving doctrine of AirLand Battle-Future indicate broadening roles and changing emphasis for Fire Support. At

  15. Behavioral changes following a single episode of early-life seizures support the latent development of an autistic phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernard, Paul B; Castano, Anna M; Beitzel, Christy S; Carlson, Vivian B; Benke, Tim A

    2015-03-01

    We probed the developmental and behavioral consequences of a single episode of kainic acid-induced early-life seizures (KA-ELS) in the rat on postnatal day 7. Correlates of developmental trajectory were not altered, demonstrating that long-term consequences following KA-ELS are not initiated by secondary causes, such as malnourishment or alterations in maternal care. We report reduced marble burying in adult rats, suggestive of restricted interests, a trait common to experimental and clinical autism. We did not detect increased repetitive grooming during habituated cage behavior. However, we did detect reduced grooming in adult KA-ELS rats in the presence of an unfamiliar rat, supporting altered social anxiety following KA-ELS. Reanalysis of a social approach task further indicated abnormal social interactions. Taken together with previous physiological and behavioral data, these data support the hypothesis that KA-ELS lead to a latent autistic phenotype in adult rats not attributable to other early alterations in development. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. 75 FR 38611 - Child Support Enforcement Program; Intergovernmental Child Support

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-02

    ... Health and Human Services Administration for Children and Families 45 CFR Parts 301, 302, 303, 305, and 308 Child Support Enforcement Program; Intergovernmental Child Support; Final Rule #0;#0;Federal... AND HUMAN SERVICES Administration for Children and Families 45 CFR Parts 301, 302, 303, 305, and 308...

  17. Beyond support: Exploring support as existential phenomenon in the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Support in different modes, expressions and actions is at the core of the public welfare culture. In this paper, support is examined as an everyday interpersonal phenomenon with a variety of expressions in language and ways of relating, and its essential meaning is explored. The fulcrum for reflection is the lived experience ...

  18. Hierarchical scaling of marketing decision support systems, Decision Support Systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B. Wierenga (Berend); P.A.M. Oude Ophuis (Peter); K.R.E. Huizingh; P.F.A.M. Campen, van

    1994-01-01

    textabstractMarketing Decision Support Systems (MDSS) show a large variety in functionality and form. In this paper a scale is developed that measures the sophistication of a Marketing Decision Support System. This scale, based on Guttman's Scalogram Analysis, is hierarchical in nature: more

  19. Decline of umami preference in aged rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miura, Hirohito; Ooki, Makoto; Kanemaru, Norikazu; Harada, Shuitsu

    2014-08-08

    The effects of aging on the umami sensation were compared between the preference and neural responses from the greater superficial petrosal nerve (GSP innervating the soft palate) and the chorda tympani nerve (CT innervating the fungiform papillae) in the Sprague Dawley rat. A two-bottle preference test revealed that younger rats (5-12 weeks) preferred significantly 0.001 M 5'-inosine monophosphate (IMP), 0.01 M mono sodium glutamate (MSG), and binary mixtures of 0.001 M IMP+0.01 M MSG than deionized water. However, aged rats (21-22 months) showed no significant preference to these umami solutions compared to deionized water. Among the other four basic taste stimuli, there were no significant differences in preference between young and aged rats. Regardless of the age of the rat, neural responses from the GSP and CT produced robust integrated responses to all three umami solutions used in the two-bottle tests. These results indicate that the lack of preference to umami in aged rats is a central nervous system phenomenon and suggests that the loss of preference to umami taste in aged rats is caused by homeostatic changes in the brain incurred by aging. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Integrated Support Environment (ISE) Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Purpose:The Integrated Support Environment (ISE) Laboratory serves the fleet, in-service engineers, logisticians and program management offices by automatically and...

  1. ERLN Technical Support for Labs

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Environmental Response Laboratory Network provides policies and guidance on lab and data requirements, Standardized Analytical Methods, and technical support for water and radiological sampling and analysis

  2. Chronic variable stress prevents amphetamine-elicited 50-kHz calls in rats with low positive affectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kõiv, Kadri; Metelitsa, Mait; Vares, Marten; Tiitsaar, Kai; Raudkivi, Karita; Jaako, Külli; Vulla, Kaspar; Shimmo, Ruth; Harro, Jaanus

    2016-04-01

    The relationship between stress response and positive affective states is thought to be bidirectional: whilst stress can lead to a blunted hedonic response, positive affect reduces the negative effects of stress. We have previously shown that persistently high positive affectivity as measured by 50-kHz ultrasonic vocalizations (USVs) is protective against chronic variable stress (CVS). The present study examined the effect of CVS on 50-kHz USVs elicited by amphetamine administration, simultaneously considering the stable inter-individual differences in positive affectivity. Forty juvenile male Wistar rats were categorised as of high (HC) or low (LC) positive affectivity based on their 50-kHz USV response to imitation of rough-and-tumble play ('tickling'). As adults, the rats were subjected to four weeks of CVS, after which D-amphetamine was administered in five daily doses followed by a challenge dose (all 1mg/kg IP) nine days later. CVS reduced sucrose preference in LC-rats only. After CVS, amphetamine-elicited 50-kHz USVs were significantly reduced in LC-rats, the effect of stress in HC-rats being smaller and less consistent. In previously stressed and amphetamine-treated LC-rats, locomotor response to amphetamine was attenuated. In stressed LC-rats, DOPAC levels and dopamine turnover were increased in striatum after amphetamine treatment, and dopamine D1 receptor levels were upregulated in nucleus accumbens. LC-rats had lower isoleucine levels in frontal cortex. These results show that stress-related changes in response to amphetamine are dependent on inter-individual differences in positive affectivity both at neurochemical and behavioural levels, and further support the notion of higher vulnerability of animals with low positive affect. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. and ECNP. All rights reserved.

  3. Variable maternal stress in rats alters locomotor activity, social behavior, and recognition memory in the adult offspring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Christina A; Terry, Alvin V

    2013-03-01

    Rats repeatedly exposed to variable prenatal stress (PNS) exhibit behavioral signs that are similar to those manifested in several neuropsychiatric disorders such as deficits in attention and inhibitory control, and impairments in memory-related task performance. The purpose of the study described here was to conduct a comprehensive battery of tests to further characterize the behavioral phenotype of PNS rats as well as to evaluate the sensitivity of the model to therapeutic interventions (i.e., to compounds previously shown to have therapeutic potential in neuropsychiatric disorders). The results of this study indicated that PNS in rats is associated with: 1) increased locomotor activity and stereotypic behaviors, 2) elevated sensitivity to the psychostimulant amphetamine, 3) increased aggressive behaviors toward both adult and juvenile rats and 4) delay-dependent deficits in recognition memory. There was no evidence that PNS rats exhibited deficits in other areas of motor function/learning, sensorimotor gating, spatial learning and memory, social withdrawal, or anhedonia. In addition, the results revealed that the second generation antipsychotic risperidone attenuated amphetamine-related increases in locomotor activity in PNS rats; however, the effect was not sustained over time. Furthermore, deficits in recognition memory in PNS rats were attenuated by the norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor, atomoxetine, but not by the α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor partial agonist, GTS-21. This study supports the supposition that important phenomenological similarities exist between rats exposed to PNS and patients afflicted with neuropsychiatric disorders thus further establishing the face validity of the model for evaluating potential therapeutic interventions. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Microglial NLRP3 inflammasome activation mediates IL-1β-related inflammation in prefrontal cortex of depressive rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Ying; Chen, Xu-Yang; Zhang, Qing-Yu; Kong, Ling-Dong

    2014-10-01

    Depression is an inflammatory disorder. Pro-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β) may play a pivotal role in the central nervous system (CNS) inflammation of depression. Here, we investigated IL-1β alteration in serum, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and prefrontal cortex (PFC) of chronic unpredictable mild stress (CUMS)-exposed rats, a well-documented model of depression, and further explored the molecular mechanism by which CUMS procedure induced IL-1β-related CNS inflammation. We showed that 12-week CUMS procedure remarkably increased PFC IL-1β mRNA and protein levels in depressive-like behavior of rats, without significant alteration of serum and CSF IL-1β levels. We found that CUMS procedure significantly caused PFC nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) inflammatory pathway activation in rats. The intriguing finding in this study was the induced activation of nucleotide binding and oligomerization domain-like receptor family pyrin domain-containing 3 (NLRP3) inflammasome with the increased IL-1β maturation in PFC of CUMS rats, suggesting a new grade of regulatory mechanism for IL-1β-related CNS inflammation. Moreover, microglial activation and astrocytic function impairment were observed in PFC of CUMS rats. The increased co-location of NLRP3 and ionized calcium binding adaptor molecule 1 (Iba1) protein expression supported that microglia in glial cells was the primary contributor for CUMS-induced PFC NLRP3 inflammasome activation in rats. These alterations in CUMS rats were restored by chronic treatment of the antidepressant fluoxetine, indicating that fluoxetine-mediated rat PFC IL-1β reduction involves both transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulatory mechanisms. These findings provide in vivo evidence that microglial NLRP3 inflammasome activation is a mediator of IL-1β-related CNS inflammation during chronic stress, and suggest a new therapeutic target for the prevention and treatment of depression. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights

  5. The role of the angiotensin AT2 receptor on the diurnal variations of nociception and motor coordination in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pechlivanova, D M; Markova, P P; Popov, D; Stoynev, A G

    2013-01-01

    Phasic pain demonstrates significant diurnal variation in rats. Angiotensin II modulates pain transmission and the diurnal variation in nociception in several rodent pain models. The participation of AT2 receptors in the diurnal regulation of nociception is not yet elucidated. In the present study we investigated the effects of selective peptide AT2 agonist CGP 42112A and the nonpeptide AT2 receptor antagonist PD 123319 on the nociception, motor coordination and arterial blood pressure. Male Wistar 12 weeks old rats were used. CGP 42112A was injected at single doses of 1 and 5 μg/rat intracerebroventricularly (ICV) and infused chronically ICV at a dose of 12 μg/rat/day during 14 days by osmotic minipumps. PD123319 was injected at single doses of 1 and 5 μg/rat, ICV and chronically subcutaneously at a dose of 10 mg/kg/day/14 days. Nociception was assessed by an analgesimeter, arterial blood pressure (ABP) was measured by tail cuff method, and motor coordination by Rota-rod method. Single doses of CGP 42112A (1 and 5 μg/rat) provoked a short lasting antinociception. Unlike acute injection, chronic CGP 42112A infusion increased nociception at the beginning and the end of light phase thus attenuating the diurnal variations observed in the controls. Moreover, it produced an increase of ABP and improved motor coordination. Both acute (1 μg/rat) and chronic PD 123319 treatment resulted in a decrease of pain threshold and chronic treatment attenuated its diurnal fluctuation. Our data support a role for Ang II type 2 receptors in the control of diurnal variations of nociception in rats. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Proinsulin slows retinal degeneration and vision loss in the P23H rat model of retinitis pigmentosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Sánchez, Laura; Lax, Pedro; Isiegas, Carolina; Ayuso, Eduard; Ruiz, José M; de la Villa, Pedro; Bosch, Fatima; de la Rosa, Enrique J; Cuenca, Nicolás

    2012-12-01

    Proinsulin has been characterized as a neuroprotective molecule. In this work we assess the therapeutic potential of proinsulin on photoreceptor degeneration, synaptic connectivity, and functional activity of the retina in the transgenic P23H rat, an animal model of autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa (RP). P23H homozygous rats received an intramuscular injection of an adeno-associated viral vector serotype 1 (AAV1) expressing human proinsulin (hPi+) or AAV1-null vector (hPi-) at P20. Levels of hPi in serum were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), and visual function was evaluated by electroretinographic (ERG) recording at P30, P60, P90, and P120. Preservation of retinal structure was assessed by immunohistochemistry at P120. Human proinsulin was detected in serum from rats injected with hPi+ at all times tested, with average hPi levels ranging from 1.1 nM (P30) to 1.4 nM (P120). ERG recordings showed an amelioration of vision loss in hPi+ animals. The scotopic b-waves were significantly higher in hPi+ animals than in control rats at P90 and P120. This attenuation of visual deterioration correlated with a delay in photoreceptor degeneration and the preservation of retinal cytoarchitecture. hPi+ animals had 48.7% more photoreceptors than control animals. Presynaptic and postsynaptic elements, as well as the synaptic contacts between photoreceptors and bipolar or horizontal cells, were preserved in hPi+ P23H rats. Furthermore, in hPi+ rat retinas the number of rod bipolar cell bodies was greater than in control rats. Our data demonstrate that hPi expression preserves cone and rod structure and function, together with their contacts with postsynaptic neurons, in the P23H rat. These data strongly support the further development of proinsulin-based therapy to counteract retinitis pigmentosa.

  7. Fetal rat pancreas transplantation in BB rats: immunohistochemical and functional evaluation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yderstræde, Knud Bonnet; Starklint, Henrik; Steinbrüchel, Daniel Andreas

    1993-01-01

    Spontaneously diabetic BB/Wor rats received either a syngeneic fetal pancreas transplant or adult islets. In the former, 4-8 fetal pancreases were transplanted, and in the latter, 3-5000 islets. Transplantation was performed by transferring a blood clot containing the pancreases or islets...... to the renal subcapsular space. Insulin therapy was undertaken postoperatively, except in one experiment with adult islets. Of the fetal pancreas transplanted BB rats, 52% became normoglycaemic, and 21% remained so throughout an observation period of 10 months. Nephrectomy caused a prompt return of diabetes....... The histological appearance of the grafts transplanted to the diabetic animals closely resembled that of grafts transplanted to normal rats in a parallel series. For comparison a group of BB rats received a syngeneic transplant of isolated adult islets from WF rats or BBW rats. Following adult islet...

  8. Analysis of segmental phosphate absorption in intact rats. A compartmental analysis approach.

    OpenAIRE

    Kayne, L H; D'Argenio, D Z; Meyer, J H; Hu, M S; Jamgotchian, N; Lee, D B

    1993-01-01

    Available information supports the dominance of the proximal intestine in inorganic phosphate (Pi) absorption. However, there is no strategy for analyzing segmental Pi absorption from a spontaneously propelled meal in an intact animal. We propose a solution using compartmental analysis. After intragastric administration of a 32P-labeled Pi liquid meal containing a nonabsorbable marker, [14C]polyethylene glycol (PEG), rats were killed at 2, 10, 20, 30, 60, 120, and 240 min. The gastrointestina...

  9. Downregulation of Plzf Gene Ameliorates Metabolic and Cardiac Traits in the Spontaneously Hypertensive Rat

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Liška, F.; Landa, Vladimír; Zídek, Václav; Mlejnek, Petr; Šilhavý, Jan; Šimáková, Miroslava; Strnad, Hynek; Trnovská, J.; Škop, V.; Kazdová, L.; Starker, C.G.; Voytas, D.F.; Izsvák, Z.; Mancini, M.; Šeda, O.; Křen, V.; Pravenec, Michal

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 69, č. 6 (2017), s. 1084-1091 ISSN 0194-911X R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GB14-36804G; GA MŠk(CZ) LL1204 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 ; RVO:68378050 Keywords : fibrosis * hypertension * hypertrophy * left ventricular rats * inbred * SHR * transcriptome Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 6.857, year: 2016

  10. Detection of rat hepatitis E virus in wild Norway rats (Rattus norvegicus) and Black rats (Rattus rattus) from 11 European countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryll, René; Bernstein, Samuel; Heuser, Elisa; Schlegel, Mathias; Dremsek, Paul; Zumpe, Maxi; Wolf, Sandro; Pépin, Michel; Bajomi, Daniel; Müller, Gabi; Heiberg, Ann-Charlotte; Spahr, Carina; Lang, Johannes; Groschup, Martin H; Ansorge, Hermann; Freise, Jona; Guenther, Sebastian; Baert, Kristof; Ruiz-Fons, Francisco; Pikula, Jiri; Knap, Nataša; Tsakmakidis, Ιoannis; Dovas, Chrysostomos; Zanet, Stefania; Imholt, Christian; Heckel, Gerald; Johne, Reimar; Ulrich, Rainer G

    2017-09-01

    Rat hepatitis E virus (HEV) is genetically only distantly related to hepeviruses found in other mammalian reservoirs and in humans. It was initially detected in Norway rats (Rattus norvegicus) from Germany, and subsequently in rats from Vietnam, the USA, Indonesia, China, Denmark and France. Here, we report on a molecular survey of Norway rats and Black rats (Rattus rattus) from 12 European countries for ratHEV and human pathogenic hepeviruses. RatHEV-specific real-time and conventional RT-PCR investigations revealed the presence of ratHEV in 63 of 508 (12.4%) rats at the majority of sites in 11 of 12 countries. In contrast, a real-time RT-PCR specific for human pathogenic HEV genotypes 1-4 and a nested broad-spectrum (NBS) RT-PCR with subsequent sequence determination did not detect any infections with these genotypes. Only in a single Norway rat from Belgium a rabbit HEV-like genotype 3 sequence was detected. Phylogenetic analysis indicated a clustering of all other novel Norway and Black rat-derived sequences with ratHEV sequences from Europe, the USA and a Black rat-derived sequence from Indonesia within the proposed ratHEV genotype 1. No difference in infection status was detected related to age, sex, rat species or density of human settlements and zoological gardens. In conclusion, our investigation shows a broad geographical distribution of ratHEV in Norway and Black rats from Europe and its presence in all settlement types investigated. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Electrocardiography in rats: a comparison to human.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konopelski, P; Ufnal, M

    2016-11-23

    Electrocardiography (ECG) in rats is a widely applied experimental method in basic cardiovascular research. The technique of ECG recordings is simple; however, the interpretation of electrocardiographic parameters is challenging. This is because the analysis may be biased by experimental settings, such as the type of anesthesia, the strain or age of animals. Here, we aimed to review electrocardiographic parameters in rats, their normal range, as well as the effect of experimental settings on the parameters variation. Furthermore, differences and similarities between rat and human ECG are discussed in the context of translational cardiovascular research.

  12. Oral Gavage in Rats: Animal Welfare Evaluation

    OpenAIRE

    Turner, Patricia V.; Vaughn, Elizabeth; Sunohara-Neilson, Janet; Ovari, Jelena; Leri, Francesco

    2012-01-01

    The effect of chronic daily orogastric gavage with water (5 mL/kg) on behavior and physiology was evaluated in male Sprague–Dawley rats. Treatment groups included: unmanipulated control, restraint control, dry gavage, and gavage, with all rats singly housed (n = 9 or 10 per group). In addition, a group of pair-housed rats (n = 18) was included to determine whether social housing affected response to gavage. Weekly body weights and food consumption were recorded as well as use of a nylon chew ...

  13. Impact of stress and levels of corticosterone on the development of breast cancer in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De la Roca-Chiapas JM

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available José María De la Roca-Chiapas,1 Gloria Barbosa-Sabanero,2 Jorge Antonio Martínez-García,3 Joel Martínez-Soto,1 Víctor Manuel Ramos-Frausto,1 Leivy Patricia González-Ramírez,1 Ken Nowack4 1Department of Psychology, 2Department of Medical Sciences, Division of Health Sciences, Campus Leon-University of Guanajuato, Guanajuato, 3General Regional Hospital of Leon, Guanajuato, Mexico; 4Envisia Learning, Inc., Santa Monica, CA, USA Abstract: Stress is experienced during cancer, and impairs the immune system's ability to protect the body. Our aim was to investigate if isolation stress has an impact on the development of tumors in rats, and to measure the size and number of tumors and the levels of corticosterone. Breast cancer was induced in two groups of female rats (N=20 by administration of a single dose of N-methyl-N-nitrosourea 50 mg/kg. Rats in the control group (cancer induction condition were allowed to remain together in a large cage, whereas in the second group, rats were also exposed to a stressful condition, that is, isolation (cancer induction and isolation condition, CIIC. The CIIC group displayed anxious behavior after 10 weeks of isolation. In the CIIC group, 16 tumors developed, compared with only eleven tumors in the control cancer induction condition group. In addition, compared with the control group, the volume of tumors in the CIIC group was greater, and more rats had more than one tumor and cells showed greater morphological damage. Levels of corticosterone were also significantly different between the two groups. This study supports the hypothesis that stress can influence the development of cancer, but that stress itself is not a sufficient factor for the development of cancer in rats. The study also provides new information for development of experimental studies and controlled environments. Keywords: breast cancer, corticosterone, isolation condition, psychoneuroimmunology, stress

  14. Effects of voluntary alcohol intake on risk preference and behavioral flexibility during rat adolescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMurray, Matthew S; Amodeo, Leslie R; Roitman, Jamie D

    2014-01-01

    Alcohol use is common in adolescence, with a large portion of intake occurring during episodes of binging. This pattern of alcohol consumption coincides with a critical period for neurocognitive development and may impact decision-making and reward processing. Prior studies have demonstrated alterations in adult decision-making following adolescent usage, but it remains to be seen if these alterations exist in adolescence, or are latent until adulthood. Here, using a translational model of voluntary binge alcohol consumption in adolescents, we assess the impact of alcohol intake on risk preference and behavioral flexibility during adolescence. During adolescence (postnatal day 30-50), rats were given 1-hour access to either a 10% alcohol gelatin mixture (EtOH) or a calorie equivalent gelatin (Control) at the onset of the dark cycle. EtOH consuming rats were classified as either High or Low consumers based on intake levels. Adolescent rats underwent behavioral testing once a day, with one group performing a risk preference task, and a second group performing a reversal-learning task during the 20-day period of gelatin access. EtOH-High rats showed increases in risk preference compared to Control rats, but not EtOH-Low animals. However, adolescent rats did a poor job of matching their behavior to optimize outcomes, suggesting that adolescents may adopt a response bias. In addition, adolescent ethanol exposure did not affect the animals' ability to flexibly adapt behavior to changing reward contingencies during reversal learning. These data support the view that adolescent alcohol consumption can have short-term detrimental effects on risk-taking when examined during adolescence, which does not seem to be attributable to an inability to flexibly encode reward contingencies on behavioral responses.

  15. Social instability stress differentially affects amygdalar neuron adaptations and memory performance in adolescent and adult rats

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    Sheng-Feng eTsai

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Adolescence is a time of developmental changes and reorganization in the brain. It has been hypothesized that stress has a greater neurological impact on adolescents than on adults. However, scientific evidence in support of this hypothesis is still limited. We treated adolescent (4-week-old and adult (8-week-old rats with social instability stress for five weeks and compared the subsequent structural and functional changes to amygdala neurons. In the stress-free control condition, the adolescent group showed higher fear-potentiated startle responses, larger dendritic arborization, more proximal dendritic spine distribution and lower levels of truncated TrkB than the adult rats. Social instability stress exerted opposite effects on fear-potentiated startle responses in these two groups, i.e., the stress period appeared to hamper the performance in adolescents but improved it in adult rats. Furthermore, whilst the chronic social stress applied to adolescent rats reduced their dendritic field and spine density in basal and lateral amygdala neurons, the opposite stress effects on neuron morphology were observed in the adult rats. Moreover, stress in adolescence suppressed the amygdala expression of synaptic proteins, i.e., full-length TrkB and SNAP-25, whereas, in the adult rats, chronic stress enhanced full-length and truncated TrkB expressions in the amygdala. In summary, chronic social instability stress hinders amygdala neuron development in the adolescent brain, while mature neurons in the amygdala are capable of adapting to the stress. The stress induced age-dependent effects on the fear-potentiated memory may occur by altering the BDNF-TrkB signaling and neuroplasticity in the amygdala.

  16. Metabolic alteration in obese diabetes rats upon treatment with Centella asiatica extract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maulidiani; Abas, F; Khatib, A; Perumal, V; Suppaiah, V; Ismail, A; Hamid, M; Shaari, K; Lajis, N H

    2016-03-02

    'Pegaga' is a traditional Malay remedy for a wide range of complaints. Among the 'pegaga', Centella asiatica has been used as a remedy for diabetes mellitus. Thus, we decided to validate this claim by evaluating the in vivo antidiabetic property of C. asiatica (CA) on T2DM rat model using the holistic (1)H NMR-based metabolomics approach. In this study, an obese diabetic (mimic of T2DM condition) animal model was developed using Sprague-Dawley rats fed with a high-fat diet and induced into diabetic condition by the treatment of a low dose of streptozotocin (STZ). The effect of C. asiatica extract on the experimental animals was followed based on the changes observed in the urinary and serum metabolites, measured by (1)H NMR of urine and blood samples collected over the test period. A long-term treatment of obese diabetic rats with CA extract could reverse the glucose and lipid levels, as well as the tricarboxylic acid cycle and amino acid metabolic disorders, back towards normal states. Biochemical analysis also showed an increase of insulin production in diabetic rats upon treatment of CA extract. This study has provided evidence that clearly supported the traditional use of CA as a remedy for diabetes. NMR-based metabolomics was successfully applied to show that CA produced both anti-hyperglycemic and anti-hyperlipidemic effects on a rat model. In addition to increasing the insulin secretion, the CA extract also ameliorates the metabolic pathways affected in the induced diabetic rats. This study further revealed the potential usage of CA extract in managing diabetes mellitus and the results of this work may contribute towards the further understanding of the underlying molecular mechanism of this herbal remedy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Effects of voluntary alcohol intake on risk preference and behavioral flexibility during rat adolescence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew S McMurray

    Full Text Available Alcohol use is common in adolescence, with a large portion of intake occurring during episodes of binging. This pattern of alcohol consumption coincides with a critical period for neurocognitive development and may impact decision-making and reward processing. Prior studies have demonstrated alterations in adult decision-making following adolescent usage, but it remains to be seen if these alterations exist in adolescence, or are latent until adulthood. Here, using a translational model of voluntary binge alcohol consumption in adolescents, we assess the impact of alcohol intake on risk preference and behavioral flexibility during adolescence. During adolescence (postnatal day 30-50, rats were given 1-hour access to either a 10% alcohol gelatin mixture (EtOH or a calorie equivalent gelatin (Control at the onset of the dark cycle. EtOH consuming rats were classified as either High or Low consumers based on intake levels. Adolescent rats underwent behavioral testing once a day, with one group performing a risk preference task, and a second group performing a reversal-learning task during the 20-day period of gelatin access. EtOH-High rats showed increases in risk preference compared to Control rats, but not EtOH-Low animals. However, adolescent rats did a poor job of matching their behavior to optimize outcomes, suggesting that adolescents may adopt a response bias. In addition, adolescent ethanol exposure did not affect the animals' ability to flexibly adapt behavior to changing reward contingencies during reversal learning. These data support the view that adolescent alcohol consumption can have short-term detrimental effects on risk-taking when examined during adolescence, which does not seem to be attributable to an inability to flexibly encode reward contingencies on behavioral responses.

  18. Persistent spatial working memory deficits in rats with bilateral cortical microgyria

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    Rosen Glenn D

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Anomalies of cortical neuronal migration (e.g., microgyria (MG and/or ectopias are associated with a variety of language and cognitive deficits in human populations. In rodents, postnatal focal freezing lesions lead to the formation of cortical microgyria similar to those seen in human dyslexic brains, and also cause subsequent deficits in rapid auditory processing similar to those reported in human language impaired populations. Thus convergent findings support the ongoing study of disruptions in neuronal migration in rats as a putative model to provide insight on human language disability. Since deficits in working memory using both verbal and non-verbal tasks also characterize dyslexic populations, the present study examined the effects of neonatally induced bilateral cortical microgyria (MG on working memory in adult male rats. Methods A delayed match-to-sample radial water maze task, in which the goal arm was altered among eight locations on a daily basis, was used to assess working memory performance in MG (n = 8 and sham (n = 10 littermates. Results Over a period of 60 sessions of testing (each session comprising one pre-delay sample trial, and one post-delay test trial, all rats showed learning as evidenced by a significant decrease in overall test errors. However, MG rats made significantly more errors than shams during initial testing, and this memory deficit was still evident after 60 days (12 weeks of testing. Analyses performed on daily error patterns showed that over the course of testing, MG rats utilized a strategy similar to shams (but with less effectiveness, as indicated by more errors. Conclusion These results indicate persistent abnormalities in the spatial working memory system in rats with induced disruptions of neocortical neuronal migration.

  19. Cognitive differences between male and female rats following exposure to 56Fe particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabin, Bernard; Shukitt-Hale, Barbara; Carrihill-Knoll, Kirsty; Luskin, Katharine; Long, Lauren; Joseph, James

    On exploratory class missions astronauts will be exposed to types and doses of radiation (HZE particles) that are not experienced in low earth orbit. While it is likely that the crew will consist of both male and female astronauts, there has been little research on the effects of exposure to HZE particles on cognitive performance in female subjects. While previous research has shown that exposure to HZE particles disrupts cognitive performance in male rats it remains to be established whether or not similar effects will occur with female subjects because estrogen may act as a neuroprotectant. Ovariectomized (OVX) female rats were obtained from Taconic Farms. Thirty mm segments of silastic tubing containing either 180 pg l7-estradiol/mL in sesame oil or vehicle alone were implanted subcutaneously in the neck. Three days following surgery the rats were exposed to 56Fe particles (1000 MeV/n, 0-200 cGy) at the NSRL. Following irradiation the rats were shipped to UMBC for behavioral testing. The results indicated that the pattern of decrements in cognitive performance differed between male and female rats. In addition, for female rats, there were differences in performance as a function of the presence or absence of estradiol. In the vehicle implanted subjects exposure to 56Fe particles did not affect operant responding on an ascending fixed-ratio schedule; whereas irradiation did disrupt responding in OVX animals given estradiol. These results suggest that estrogen may not be protective following exposure to HZE particles. This research was supported by Grant NNX08AM66G from NASA.

  20. The Naked Mole-Rat Response to Oxidative Stress: Just Deal with It

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Kaitlyn N.; Andziak, Blazej; Yang, Ting

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Significance: The oxidative stress theory of aging has been the most widely accepted theory of aging providing insights into why we age and die for over 50 years, despite mounting evidence from a multitude of species indicating that there is no direct relationship between reactive oxygen species (ROS) and longevity. Here we explore how different species, including the longest lived rodent, the naked mole-rat, have defied the most predominant aging theory. Recent Advances: In the case of extremely long-lived naked mole-rat, levels of ROS production are found to be similar to mice, antioxidant defenses unexceptional, and even under constitutive conditions, naked mole-rats combine a pro-oxidant intracellular milieu with high, steady state levels of oxidative damage. Clearly, naked mole-rats can tolerate this level of oxidative stress and must have mechanisms in place to prevent its translation into potentially lethal diseases. Critical Issues: In addition to the naked mole-rat, other species from across the phylogenetic spectrum and even certain mouse strains do not support this theory. Moreover, overexpressing or knocking down antioxidant levels alters levels of oxidative damage and even cancer incidence, but does not modulate lifespan. Future Directions: Perhaps, it is not oxidative stress that modulates healthspan and longevity, but other cytoprotective mechanisms that allow animals to deal with high levels of oxidative damage and stress, and nevertheless live long, relatively healthy lifespans. Studying these mechanisms in uniquely long-lived species, like the naked mole-rat, may help us tease out the key contributors to aging and longevity. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 19, 1388–1399. PMID:23025341

  1. Effects of Swimming on Functional Recovery after Incomplete Spinal Cord Injury in Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Rebecca R.; Shum-Siu, Alice; Baltzley, Ryan; Bunger, Michelle; Baldini, Angela; Burke, Darlene A.; Magnuson, David S.K.

    2010-01-01

    One of the most promising rehabilitation strategies for spinal cord injury is weight-supported treadmill training. This strategy seeks to re-train the spinal cord below the level of injury to generate a meaningful pattern of movement. However, the number of step cycles that can be accomplished is limited by the poor weight-bearing capability of the neuromuscular system after injury. We have begun to study swimming as a rehabilitation strategy that allows for high numbers of steps and a high step-cycle frequency in a standard rat model of contusive spinal cord injury. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the effect of swimming as a rehabilitation strategy in rats with contusion injuries at T9. We used a swimming strategy with or without cutaneous feedback based on original work in the chick by Muir and colleagues. Adult female rats (n = 27) received moderately-severe contusion injuries at T9. Walking and swimming performance were evaluated using the Open-Field Locomotor Scale (BBB; Basso et al., 1995) and a novel swimming assessment, the Louisville Swimming Scale (LSS). Rats that underwent swim-training with or without cutaneous feedback showed a significant improvement in hindlimb function during swimming compared to untrained animals. Rats that underwent swim-training without cutaneous feedback showed less improvement than those trained with cutaneous feedback. Rats in the non-swimming group demonstrated little improvement over the course of the study. All three groups showed the expected improvement in over-ground walking and had similar terminal BBB scores. These findings suggest that animals re-acquire the ability to swim only if trained and that cutaneous feedback improves the re-training process. Further, these data suggest that the normal course of recovery of over-ground walking following moderately-severe contusion injuries at T9 is the result of a re-training process. PMID:16774475

  2. Effects of an onion by-product on bioactivity and safety markers in healthy rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roldán-Marín, Eduvigis; Krath, Britta N; Poulsen, Morten; Binderup, Mona-Lise; Nielsen, Tom H; Hansen, Max; Barri, Thaer; Langkilde, Søren; Cano, M Pilar; Sánchez-Moreno, Concepción; Dragsted, Lars O

    2009-12-01

    Onions are excellent sources of bioactive compounds including fructo-oligosaccharides (FOS) and polyphenols. An onion by-product was characterised in order to be developed as a potentially bioactive food ingredient. Our main aim was to investigate whether the potential health and safety effects of this onion by-product were shared by either of two derived fractions, an extract containing the onion FOS and polyphenols and a residue fraction containing mainly cell wall materials. We report here on the effects of feeding these products on markers of potential toxicity, protective enzymes and gut environment in healthy rats. Rats were fed during 4 weeks with a diet containing the products or a control feed balanced in carbohydrate. The onion by-product and the extract caused anaemia as expected in rodents for Allium products. No other toxicity was observed, including genotoxicity. Glutathione reductase (GR) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx1) activities in erythrocytes increased when rats were fed with the onion extract. Hepatic gene expression of Gr, Gpx1, catalase, 5-aminolevulinate synthase and NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase was not altered in any group of the onion fed rats. By contrast, gamma-glutamate cysteine ligase catalytic subunit gene expression was upregulated but only in rats given the onion residue. The onion by-products as well as the soluble and insoluble fractions had prebiotic effects as evidenced by decreased pH, increased butyrate production and altered gut microbiota enzyme activities. In conclusion, the onion by-products have no in vivo genotoxicity, may support in vivo antioxidative defence and alter the functionality of the rat gut microbiota.

  3. Reversible Anti-Spermatogenic Effect of Piperine on Epididymis and Seminal Vesicles of Albino Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinta, G; Periyasamy, L

    2016-08-01

    We have recently proved the interactions of piperine with androgen receptor and androgen binding protein. The present study was aimed to evaluate the antifertility effect of piperine on male albino rats after the treatment period i. e., after 60 days and withdrawal period i. e., after 120 days. Adult male rats were divided into 4 groups (n=12). Group I: Rats were given vehicle p.o i. e., 0.5% carboxy methyl cellulose (CMC) in normal saline daily for 60 days, Group II: Rats were treated with piperine suspended in 0.5% CMC at a dose of 10 mg/kg daily/60 days. Group III: Rats were treated with piperine suspended in 0.5% CMC at a dose of 10 mg/kg on every 4(th) day for 60 days. Group IV: Rats were treated with piperine suspended in 0.5% CMC at a dose of 10 mg/kg on every 7(th) day for 60 days. Piperine significantly altered the epididymal sperm count, motility, viability, weight of the epididymis, cauda, caput, corpus and seminal vesicles. It also exhibited negative impact on biochemical markers via decreasing epididymal sialic acid levels, seminal fructose content, epididymal anti-oxidant enzyme activities of super oxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and by increasing the malondialdehyde content after the treatment period. Histopathological observations also supported the above findings. All the altered values were reinforced after the withdrawal period. From the results of this study, we can conclude that piperine has the potential to become a good lead for the reversible male oral contraceptive research. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  4. Rat disc torsional mechanics: effect of lumbar and caudal levels and axial compression load.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinoza Orías, Alejandro A; Malhotra, Neil R; Elliott, Dawn M

    2009-03-01

    Rat models with altered loading are used to study disc degeneration and mechano-transduction. Given the prominent role of mechanics in disc function and degeneration, it is critical to measure mechanical behavior to evaluate changes after model interventions. Axial compression mechanics of the rat disc are representative of the human disc when normalized by geometry, and differences between the lumbar and caudal disc have been quantified in axial compression. No study has quantified rat disc torsional mechanics. Compare the torsional mechanical behavior of rat lumbar and caudal discs, determine the contribution of combined axial load on torsional mechanics, and compare the torsional properties of rat discs to human lumbar discs. Cadaveric biomechanical study. Cyclic torsion without compressive load followed by cyclic torsion with a fixed compressive load was applied to rat lumbar and caudal disc levels. The apparent torsional modulus was higher in the lumbar region than in the caudal region: 0.081+/-0.026 (MPa/degrees, mean+/-SD) for lumbar axially loaded; 0.066+/-0.028 for caudal axially loaded; 0.091+/-0.033 for lumbar in pure torsion; and 0.056+/-0.035 for caudal in pure torsion. These values were similar to human disc properties reported in the literature ranging from 0.024 to 0.21 MPa/degrees. Use of the caudal disc as a model may be appropriate if the mechanical focus is within the linear region of the loading regime. These results provide support for use of this animal model in basic science studies with respect to torsional mechanics.

  5. Acrylonitrile-induced oxidative stress and oxidative DNA damage in male Sprague-Dawley rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pu, Xinzhu; Kamendulis, Lisa M; Klaunig, James E

    2009-09-01

    Studies have demonstrated that the induction of oxidative stress may be involved in brain tumor induction in rats by acrylonitrile. The present study examined whether acrylonitrile induces oxidative stress and DNA damage in rats and whether blood can serve as a valid surrogate for the biomonitoring of oxidative stress induced by acrylonitrile in the exposed population. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were treated with 0, 3, 30, 100, and 200 ppm acrylonitrile in drinking water for 28 days. One group of rats were also coadministered N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) (0.3% in diet) with acrylonitrile (200 ppm in drinking water) to examine whether antioxidant supplementation was protective against acrylonitrile-induced oxidative stress. Direct DNA strand breakage in white blood cells (WBC) and brain was measured using the alkaline comet assay. Oxidative DNA damage in WBC and brain was evaluated using formamidopyrimidine DNA glycosylase (fpg)-modified comet assay and with high-performance liquid chromatography-electrochemical detection. No significant increase in direct DNA strand breaks was observed in brain and WBC from acrylonitrile-treated rats. However, oxidative DNA damage (fpg comet and 8'hydroxyl-2-deoxyguanosine) in brain and WBC was increased in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, plasma levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) increased in rats administered acrylonitrile. Dietary supplementation with NAC prevented acrylonitrile-induced oxidative DNA damage in brain and WBC. A slight, but significant, decrease in the GSH:GSSG ratio was seen in brain at acrylonitrile doses > 30 ppm. These results provide additional support that the mode of action for acrylonitrile-induced astrocytomas involves the induction of oxidative stress and damage. Significant associations were seen between oxidative DNA damage in WBC and brain, ROS formation in plasma, and the reported tumor incidences. Since oxidative DNA damage in brain correlated with oxidative damage in WBC, these results suggest

  6. The effect of chronic alcohol administration on bone mineral content and bone strength in male rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broulík, P D; Vondrová, J; Růzicka, P; Sedlácek, R; Zíma, T

    2010-01-01

    Alcohol use has been identified as a risk factor for the development of osteoporosis. Eight male Wistar rats at two months of age were alcoho-fed (7.6 g 95 % ethanol/kg b.w. per day) to evaluate the effects of long-term administration (three months) of alcohol in drinking water. We have used a dose which is considered to be comparable to a dose of 1 liter of wine or 2.5 liters of 12(°) beer used in male adults daily. The bones were tested mechanically by a three-point bending test in a Mini Bionix (MTS) testing system. The bones from alcohol-fed rats were characterized by a reduction in bone density as well as in ash, calcium and phosphate content. In alcohol-fed rats the reduction in bone mineral density (10 %) was reflected by about 12 % reduction of mechanical strength of femur (158+/-5.5 vs. 178+/-3.2 N/mm(2)). Alcohol significantly altered femoral cortical thickness. In our experiment alcohol itself did not exert any antiandrogenic effect and it did not produce changes in the weight of seminal vesicles. Liver function test (GGT, ALP, AST) did not differ between alcohol-fed rats and control rats. Alcohol-induced bone loss is associated with increased bone resorption and decreased bone formation. These results document the efficacy of alcohol at the dose of 7.6 g 95 % ethanol/kg b.w. to cause bone loss and loss of bone mechanical strength in intact rats. The results of the present study may be interpreted as supporting the hypothesis of alcohol as a risk factor for osteoporosis.

  7. Differential effects of modafinil on memory in naïve and memory-impaired rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Vanessa Athaíde; Souza de Freitas, Betânia; Busato, Stefano Boemler; D'avila Portal, Bernardo Chaves; Piazza, Francisco Correa; Schröder, Nadja

    2013-12-01

    Modafinil is a wake-promoting drug and has been approved for the treatment of excessive daytime sleepiness in narcolepsy and obstructive sleep apnea. Modafinil was shown to improve learning and memory in rodents, and to reverse memory deficits induced by sleep deprivation or stress. However, depending on the memory paradigm used, modafinil might also impair memory. We aimed to investigate the effects of modafinil on memory consolidation and retrieval for object recognition and inhibitory avoidance in naïve adult rats. We also investigated whether acute or chronic administration of modafinil would reverse memory deficits induced by iron overload, a model of memory impairment related to neurodegenerative disorders. Adult naïve rats received modafinil (0.0, 0.75, 7.5 or 75 mg/kg) either immediately after training or 1 h prior to testing in object recognition or inhibitory avoidance. Iron-treated rats received modafinil immediately after training in object recognition. In order to investigate the effects of chronic modafinil, iron-treated rats received daily injections of modafinil for 17 days, and 24 h later they were trained in object recognition or inhibitory avoidance. Acute modafinil does not affect memory consolidation or retrieval in naive rats. A single injection of modafinil at the highest dose was able to recover recognition memory in iron-treated rats. Chronic modafinil completely recovered iron-induced recognition memory and emotional memory deficits. Additional preclinical and clinical studies are necessary in order to support the applicability of modafinil in recovering memory impairment associated with neurodegenerative disorders. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Chronic effects of arotinolol (S-596) in spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kishi, K; Kawashima, K; Sokabe, H; Saito, K

    1985-01-01

    Arotinolol (S-596, ARL) is a beta-adrenoceptor blocking drug with weak alpha-adrenoceptor blocking activity, and may be classified into the fourth generation. Antihypertensive effects of ARL were studied for 12 weeks in spontaneously hypertensive (SHR) rats. Propranolol (PPL) was used as the reference drug. ARL (20 and 100 mg/kg per day, p.o.) and PPL (100 mg/kg per day, p.o.) treatments significantly decreased heart rate, within a week after the drug treatments had started and thereafter. Tail blood pressure (BP), determined by prewarming the rat at 50 degrees C for 3 min, was slightly higher in the two ARL treated groups than in the control. Tail BP was slightly lower in the PPL treated group than in the control. Mean BP determined directly at the 12th week was lower in the two ARL and PPL groups than in the control by more than 20 mmHg. Both ARL (100 mg/kg per day) and PPL (100 mg/kg per day) treatments significantly reduced incidences of the vascular lesions, and also prevented the decrease of kidney weights usually associated with mild vascular lesions. Furthermore, these treatments showed a tendency to decrease plasma renin (PRC) and aldosterone (PAC) concentrations determined 20 h after the last administration. As mean BP must be more reliable than tail BP, it was concluded that ARL (20 and 100 mg/kg per day) showed almost the same chronic antihypertensive activity in SHR rats as PPL (100 mg/kg per day). Preventive effects of ARL on development of vascular lesions also supported the above view.

  9. Nicotine analog inhibition of nicotine self-administration in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowland, Neil E; Robertson, Kimberly; Soti, Ferenc; Kem, William R

    2008-09-01

    Partial agonists and antagonists of addictive drugs have been useful in the treatment of dependence. The purpose of this study is to determine whether nicotine analogs with partial agonist or antagonist properties at alpha4beta2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) inhibit self-administration of nicotine in rats. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were trained to self-administer nicotine (unit dose 0.017 mg/kg) intravenously contingent upon the completion of five lever presses. Once stable responding was established, rats were administered test agents, either as a subcutaneous injection before the daily session or co-infused with nicotine. The number of nicotine injections taken per session was reduced to approximately 50% of baseline after either pre-treatment with the broad spectrum nicotinic receptor antagonist, mecamylamine, or by substituting saline for nicotine (extinction). 4'-Trans-methyl-nicotine, a strong partial agonist, inhibited nicotine self-administration and substituted for nicotine to support self-administration. Partial agonists, prepared by substitution at the 1'-N-position with either ethyl or cyclopropylmethyl moieties, potently inhibited self-administration. Antagonists formed by 5'-methyl substitution also inhibited self-administration, with the 5'-trans-methyl enantiomer about ten times more potent than the 5'-cis-methyl enantiomer. In contrast, antagonists formed by aryl substitution at the 5 position of the pyridyl ring of nicotine did not inhibit self-administration. Intravenous co-infusions had similar effects to the pre-injections. In most instances, doses of the analogs that reduced nicotine self-administration had no effect on food intake when measured using a similar FR5 protocol. Nicotine analogs with alpha4beta2 nAChR partial agonist and antagonist efficacies can inhibit self-administration and may be considered as prototypical smoking-cessation agents.

  10. Detection of Leptospira in Rats Trapped from Households in Phraroj Village, Muang Sam Sip District, Ubon Ratchathani Province Using Polymerase Chain Reaction Technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wongbutdee, Jaruwan; Jittimanee, Jutharat

    2016-01-01

    Leptospirosis, a zoonotic disease caused by Leptospira, has been a health problem in Thailand for several years. Rats are a major reservoir host for Leptospira, and the people who are usually in contact with environments contaminated with rats' urine are at risk of infection. The prevalence rate of Leptospira infection in rats may result in the spread of leptospirosis in humans. This study aimed to determine the prevalence rate ofLeptospira infection in a total of 28 rats and develop a spatial database for leptospirosis surveillance in Phraroj village in Muang Sam Sip District, Ubon Ratchathani Province. The positions of the households and the rat-trapping area were tagged by using of a Global Positioning System (GPS). DNA samples were isolated fromn rats' kidneys. The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) technique was used for the detection of 16s rRNA and LipL32 genes specific to genus and pathogenic Leptospira respectively. All of the data were used to develop a geo-data base by the connection of spatial data and attributed data to be used for query and retrieval. A map of the positions of the households and the rat-trapping area in Phraroj village was created. No rats were found to be infected in the Leptospira survey. There was no trapped rat infected with Leptospira in Phraroj village. This result may involve unreported leptospirosis in patients in this village. The Leptospira survey in rats and the geo-database will be used as a primary resource to support and make decisions about surveillance, prevention, and control of leptospirosis.

  11. Strain-dependent effects of acute caffeine on anxiety-related behavior in PVG/c, Long-Evans and Wistar rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Robert N; Hancock, Nicola J

    2016-01-01

    To assess the possibility that acute caffeine's behavioral action might depend on rats' strain, effects of 50mg/kg of the drug were observed on activity, anxiety-related behavior and habituation learning in male and female rats from three different strains, namely PVG/c, Long-Evans and Wistar. All subjects were tested in an open field, an elevated plus maze and a light-dark box. For the three strains combined, increased occupancy of the center of the open field and entries of the open plus-maze arms with caffeine suggested caffeine-induced anxiolysis, whereas increased grooming in the open field, decreased rearing in the plus maze and increased risk assessment in the light-dark box were consistent with anxiogenesis. Caffeine also reduced open-field rearing only for PVG/c rats, and entries into and occupation of the light side of the light-dark box only for Long-Evans rats, and increased total defecation in the three types of apparatus for all three strains combined. Overall, caffeine appeared to be mainly anxiogenic. The drug also increased open-field ambulation for PVG/c rats and walking for all rats, but decreased open-field ambulation and entries into the plus maze closed arms for Wistar rats alone. In general, Wistar rats appeared to be the least and Long-Evans the most anxious of the three strains investigated. Caffeine also decreased within-session habituation of open-field ambulation for PVG/c rats alone, thereby suggesting strain-dependent interference with non-associative learning and short-term memory. Several overall sex differences were also observed that supported female rats being more active and less anxious than males. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Differential effects of brain-derived neurotrophic factor and neurotrophin-3 on hindlimb function in paraplegic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyce, Vanessa S; Park, Jihye; Gage, Fred H; Mendell, Lorne M

    2012-01-01

    We compared the effect of viral administration of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) or neurotrophin 3 (NT-3) on locomotor recovery in adult rats with complete thoracic (T10) spinal cord transection injuries, in order to determine the effect of chronic neurotrophin expression on spinal plasticity. At the time of injury, BDNF, NT-3 or green fluorescent protein (GFP) (control) was delivered to the lesion via adeno-associated virus (AAV) constructs. AAV-BDNF was significantly more effective than AAV-NT-3 in eliciting locomotion. In fact, AAV-BDNF-treated rats displayed plantar, weight-supported hindlimb stepping on a stationary platform, that is, without the assistance of a moving treadmill and without step training. Rats receiving AAV-NT-3 or AAV-GFP were incapable of hindlimb stepping during this task, despite provision of balance support. AAV-NT-3 treatment did promote the recovery of treadmill-assisted stepping, but this required continuous perineal stimulation. In addition, AAV-BDNF-treated rats were sensitized to noxious heat, whereas AAV-NT-3-treated and AAV-GFP-treated rats were not. Notably, AAV-BDNF-treated rats also developed hindlimb spasticity, detracting from its potential clinical applicability via the current viral delivery method. Intracellular recording from triceps surae motoneurons revealed that AAV-BDNF significantly reduced motoneuron rheobase, suggesting that AAV-BDNF promoted the recovery of over-ground stepping by enhancing neuronal excitability. Elevated nuclear c-Fos expression in interneurons located in the L2 intermediate zone after AAV-BDNF treatment indicated increased activation of interneurons in the vicinity of the locomotor central pattern generator. AAV-NT-3 treatment reduced motoneuron excitability, with little change in c-Fos expression. These results support the potential for BDNF delivery at the lesion site to reorganize locomotor circuits. © 2011 The Authors. European Journal of Neuroscience © 2011 Federation of

  13. Establishment of a novel dwarf rat strain: cartilage calcification insufficient (CCI) rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    TANAKA, Masami; WATANABE, Minoru; YOKOMI, Izuru; MATSUMOTO, Naoki; SUDO, Katsuko; SATOH, Hitoshi; IGARASHI, Tsuneo; SEKI, Azusa; AMANO, Hitoshi; OHURA, Kiyoshi; RYU, Kakei; SHIBATA, Shunichi; NAGAYAMA, Motohiko; TANUMA, Jun-ichi

    2014-01-01

    Rats with dwarfism accompanied by skeletal abnormalities, such as shortness of the limbs, tail, and body (dwarf rats), emerged in a Jcl-derived Sprague-Dawley rat colony maintained at the Institute for Animal Experimentation, St. Marianna University Graduate School of Medicine. Since the dwarfism was assumed to be due to a genetic mutation based on its frequency, we bred the dwarf rats and investigated their characteristics in order to identify the causative factors of their phenotypes and whether they could be used as a human disease model. One male and female that produced dwarf progeny were selected, and reproduction was initiated by mating the pair. The incidence of dwarfism was 25.8% among the resultant litter, and dwarfism occurred in both genders, suggesting that it was inherited in an autosomal recessive manner. At 12 weeks of age, the body weights of the male and female dwarf rats were 40% and 57% of those of the normal rats, respectively. In soft X-ray radiographic and histological examinations, shortening and hypoplasia of the long bones, such as the tibia and femur, were observed, which were suggestive of endochondral ossification abnormalities. An immunohistochemical examination detected an aggrecan synthesis disorder, which might have led to delayed calcification and increased growth plate thickening in the dwarf rats. We hypothesized that the principal characteristics of the dwarf rats were systemically induced by insufficient cartilage calcification in their long bones; thus, we named them cartilage calcification insufficient (CCI) rats. PMID:25736479

  14. Emotional reactivity and cognitive performance in aversively motivated tasks: a comparison between four rat strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Reenen Cornelis G

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cognitive function might be affected by the subjects' emotional reactivity. We assessed whether behavior in different tests of emotional reactivity is correlated with performance in aversively motivated learning tasks, using four strains of rats generally considered to have a different emotional reactivity. Methods The performance of male Brown Norway, Lewis, Fischer 344, and Wistar Kyoto rats in open field (OF, elevated plus-maze (EPM, and circular light-dark preference box (cLDB tasks, which are believed to provide measures of emotional reactivity, was evaluated. Spatial working and reference memory were assessed in two aversively motivated learning and memory tasks: the standard and the "repeated acquisition" versions of the Morris water maze escape task, respectively. All rats were also tested in a passive avoidance task. At the end of the study, levels of serotonin (5-HT and 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid, and 5-HT turnover in the hippocampus and frontal cortex were determined. Results Strain differences showed a complex pattern across behavioral tests and serotonergic measures. Fischer 344 rats had the poorest performance in both versions of the Morris water escape task, whereas Brown Norway rats performed these tasks very well but the passive avoidance task poorly. Neither correlation analysis nor principal component analysis provided convincing support for the notion that OF, EPM, and cLDB tasks measure the same underlying trait. Conclusions Our findings do not support the hypothesis that the level of emotional reactivity modulates cognitive performance in aversively motivated tasks. Concepts such as "emotional reactivity" and "learning and memory" cannot adequately be tapped with only one behavioral test. Our results emphasize the need for multiple testing.

  15. Detection of expressional changes induced by intrauterine growth restriction in the developing rat pancreas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lin; Chen, Wei; Dai, Yuee; Zhu, Ziyang; Liu, Qianqi

    2016-07-01

    Intrauterine growth retardation (IUGR) is a disorder that can result in permanent changes in the physiology and metabolism of the newborn, which increased the risk of disease in adulthood. Evidence supports IUGR as a risk factor for the development of diabetes mellitus, which could reflect changes in pancreas developmental pathways. We sought to characterize the IUGR-induced alterations of the complex pathways of pancreas development in a rat model of IUGR. We analyzed the pancreases of Sprague Dawley rats after inducing IUGR by feeding a maternal low calorie diet from gestational day 1 until term. IUGR altered the pancreatic structure, islet areas, and islet quantities and resulted in abnormal morphological changes during pancreatic development, as determined by HE staining and light microscopy. We identified multiple differentially expressed genes in the pancreas by RT-PCR. The genes of the insulin/FoxO1/Pdx1/MafA signaling pathway were first expressed at embryonic day 14 (E14). The expressions of insulin and MafA increased as the fetus grew while the expressions of FoxO1 and Pdx1 decreased. Compared with the control rats, the expressions of FoxO1, Pdx1, and MafA were lower in the IUGR rats, whereas insulin levels showed no change. Microarray profiling, in combination with quantitative real-time PCR, uncovered a subset of microRNAs that changed in their degree of expression throughout pancreatic development. In conclusion, our data support the hypothesis that IUGR influences the development of the rat pancreas. We also identified new pathways that appear to be programmed by IUGR. © 2016 by the Society for Experimental Biology and Medicine.

  16. Final Draft Programme Support Document

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Enemark, Ulrika; Schleimann, Finn; Vagnby, Bo Hellisen

    The HSPS III is the third phase of Danish support to the Ghanaian Health Sector. The support is in line with the Ministy of Health's Medium Term Strategy and the Second Five-Year Programme of Work; the latter also bring in line with the Ghana Poverty Reduction Strategy. The majority of funds (340...

  17. Business support within business incubators.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ratinho, Tiago; Harms, Rainer; Groen, Arend J.

    2009-01-01

    Business incubators (BI) have been established worldwide as tools for company creation and small businesses support. BIs claim to help their tenants by providing them with the optimal conditions for increasing early stage survival. Practitioners and researchers agree that business support is a

  18. Comparing Civilian Support for Terrorism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srobana Bhattacharya

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Terrorism is an extreme form of political violence, that is inherently abhorrent in nature. Yet, it continues to attain enough support to continue and survive. The recent proliferation of Islamic State and its ever increasing domestic and international civilian support base urges immediate attention to this question. While most research holds that provision of public goods by terrorist groups is the primary cause for high levels of civilian support, I argue that, terrorist groups are more interested in resource extraction rather than resource provision. Additionally, these studies pay scant attention to existing resource structure, especially territorial and political control to explain terrorist-civilian interaction. This paper emphasizes the bi-directional nature of this interaction – a. perception of civilians by the terrorist group and b. terrorist group’s perception of the civilians. To analyze levels of civilian support for terrorism, I compare fifteen terrorist groups using qualitative comparative analysis and show how territory, political competition, ethnicity, target selection and organizational structure combine to explain conditions that lead terrorist groups to include or exclude civilian population for support. Based on the variance in support networks of terrorist groups, counter-terrorism policies should also differ. High civilian support indicates the need to use non-military methods to decrease the appeal of terrorist groups. However, terrorist groups with more diffused and multiple support structures need more collaborative and coercive measures to intercept all the possible links to the main group.

  19. Modelling of magnetic fluid support

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bashtovoi, V.G. E-mail: bashv@reol1.itmo.by; Bossis, G.; Kabachnikov, D.N.; Krakov, M.S.; Volkova, O

    2002-11-01

    One kind of elastic magnetic fluid support representing the magnetic fluid drop with permanent magnet inside is investigated experimentally and numerically. The dependencies between the magneto static force in support and the geometrical parameters and properties of the magnet and the magnetic fluid are established.

  20. Setting and Supporting the Theater

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-11-01

    its as- signed mission. The theater sustain- ment command or expeditionary sustainment command provides mis- sion command for reception, staging...November–December 2015 Army Sustainment8 Setting and Supporting the Theater  By Kenneth R. Gaines and Dr. Reginald L. Snell RSOI 9...Army Sustainment November–December 2015 Setting and Supporting the Theater RSOI The 8th

  1. Stepchild Support Obligations of Stepparents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kargman, Marie Witkin

    1983-01-01

    Examines the legal responsibilities of support by stepparents for stepchildren during a remarriage and notes the impact of the divorce on child support and visitation and custody after divorce from the remarriage. Reviews recent state legislation and recent court decisions about stepchildren. (Author/JAC)

  2. Finding Family Support Resource Card

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... now available online and in person . Finding Family Support Pediatric Palliative Care Tips A child ’s serious illness affects the ... the patient’scare will be discussed. Reiterate that palliative care provides support for patients and family members during this difficult ...

  3. ENGINEER SUPPORT OF RIVER CROSSINGS,

    Science.gov (United States)

    The author discusses the basic missions of engineer support in forcing rivers from a drive, following planned preparations, and under special...conditions. Practical recommendations are made with respect to organizing engineer support in forcing rivers and the characteristics of crossing means is described. (Author)

  4. Smart Phones Support Smart Labor

    OpenAIRE

    Hübler, Michael; Hartje, Rebecca

    2015-01-01

    Besides enabling communication, mobile phones and smartphones support information flows and financial transactions, especially in developing countries, where the coverage of landline networks is limited. Drawing upon new data from rural households in Southeast Asia, this paper shows that mobile phone or smartphone ownership supports local employment and commuting while it reduces incentives for migration of workers.

  5. Business support within business incubators

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ratinho, Tiago; Harms, Rainer; Groen, Arend J.

    2009-01-01

    Business incubators (BI) have been established worldwide as tools for company creation and small businesses support. BIs claim to help their tenants by providing them with the optimal conditions for increasing early stage survival. Practitioners and researchers agree that business support is a

  6. The Neural Support Vector Machine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiering, Marco; van der Ree, Michiel; Embrechts, Mark; Stollenga, Marijn; Meijster, Arnold; Nolte, A; Schomaker, Lambertus

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes a new machine learning algorithm for regression and dimensionality reduction tasks. The Neural Support Vector Machine (NSVM) is a hybrid learning algorithm consisting of neural networks and support vector machines (SVMs). The output of the NSVM is given by SVMs that take a

  7. Assessing Teachers' Behavior Support Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Diane; Sugai, George; Simonsen, Brandi; Freeman, Jennifer

    2017-01-01

    In this article, the authors provide an overview of empirically supported practices and techniques for monitoring and assessing teachers' use of effective behavior support practices. They focus on how teacher preparation programs, administrators, and supervising teachers provide pre-service teachers with helpful feedback on their teaching…

  8. Thermally stable nanoparticles on supports

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roldan Cuenya, Beatriz; Naitabdi, Ahmed R.; Behafarid, Farzad

    2012-11-13

    An inverse micelle-based method for forming nanoparticles on supports includes dissolving a polymeric material in a solvent to provide a micelle solution. A nanoparticle source is dissolved in the micelle solution. A plurality of micelles having a nanoparticle in their core and an outer polymeric coating layer are formed in the micelle solution. The micelles are applied to a support. The polymeric coating layer is then removed from the micelles to expose the nanoparticles. A supported catalyst includes a nanocrystalline powder, thin film, or single crystal support. Metal nanoparticles having a median size from 0.5 nm to 25 nm, a size distribution having a standard deviation .ltoreq.0.1 of their median size are on or embedded in the support. The plurality of metal nanoparticles are dispersed and in a periodic arrangement. The metal nanoparticles maintain their periodic arrangement and size distribution following heat treatments of at least 1,000.degree. C.

  9. Case and Administrative Support Tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Case and Administrative Support Tools (CAST) is the secure portion of the Office of General Counsel (OGC) Dashboard business process automation tool used to help reduce office administrative labor costs while increasing employee effectiveness. CAST supports business functions which rely on and store Privacy Act sensitive data (PII). Specific business processes included in CAST (and respective PII) are: -Civil Rights Cast Tracking (name, partial medical history, summary of case, and case correspondance). -Employment Law Case Tracking (name, summary of case). -Federal Tort Claims Act Incident Tracking (name, summary of incidents). -Ethics Program Support Tools and Tracking (name, partial financial history). -Summer Honors Application Tracking (name, home address, telephone number, employment history). -Workforce Flexibility Initiative Support Tools (name, alternative workplace phone number). -Resource and Personnel Management Support Tools (name, partial employment and financial history).

  10. Supporting 'Young Carers' in Kenya

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skovdal, Morten; Campbell, C.; Onyango, V.

    2013-01-01

    African children who care for sick or dying adults are receiving less than optimal support due to confusion about whether or not young caregiving constitutes a form of child labour and the tendency of the authorities to play it "safe" and side with more abolitionist approaches to children's work......, avoiding engagement with support strategies that could be seen as support of child labour. To challenge this view, and move from policy paralysis to action, we present a study from western Kenya that explores community perceptions of children's work and caregiving as well as opportunities for support...... as community recommendations on how they and external service providers can work together in supporting children faced with excessive caregiving and income-generation responsibilities. We use our findings to call for less restrictive regulations of children's work and to develop a plan for policy and action...

  11. Counting electrons on supported nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lykhach, Yaroslava; Kozlov, Sergey M.; Skála, Tomáš; Tovt, Andrii; Stetsovych, Vitalii; Tsud, Nataliya; Dvořák, Filip; Johánek, Viktor; Neitzel, Armin; Mysliveček, Josef; Fabris, Stefano; Matolín, Vladimír; Neyman, Konstantin M.; Libuda, Jörg

    2016-03-01

    Electronic interactions between metal nanoparticles and oxide supports control the functionality of nanomaterials, for example, the stability, the activity and the selectivity of catalysts. Such interactions involve electron transfer across the metal/support interface. In this work we quantify this charge transfer on a well-defined platinum/ceria catalyst at particle sizes relevant for heterogeneous catalysis. Combining synchrotron-radiation photoelectron spectroscopy, scanning tunnelling microscopy and density functional calculations we show that the charge transfer per Pt atom is largest for Pt particles of around 50 atoms. Here, approximately one electron is transferred per ten Pt atoms from the nanoparticle to the support. For larger particles, the charge transfer reaches its intrinsic limit set by the support. For smaller particles, charge transfer is partially suppressed by nucleation at defects. These mechanistic and quantitative insights into charge transfer will help to make better use of particle size effects and electronic metal-support interactions in metal/oxide nanomaterials.

  12. Technical Support Essentials Advice to Succeed in Technical Support

    CERN Document Server

    Sanchez, Andrew

    2010-01-01

    Technical Support Essentials is a book about the many facets of technical support. It attempts to provide a wide array of topics to serve as points of improvement, discussion, or simply topics that you might want to learn. The topics range from good work habits to the way technical supportgroups establish their own style of work. This book applies theories, models, and concepts synthesized from existing research in other fields-such as management, economics, leadership, and psychology-and connects them to technical support. The goal is to build on the work of others and allow their success to

  13. Preliminary Study on Intrasplenic Implantation of Artificial Cell Bioencapsulated Stem Cells to Increase the Survival of 90% Hepatectomized Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zun Chang; Chang, Thomas M.S.

    2012-01-01

    We implanted artificial cell bioencapsulated bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells into the spleens of 90% hepatectomized (PH) rats. The resulting 14 days survival rate was 91%. This is compared to a survival rate of 21% in 90% hepatectomized rats and 25% for those receiving free MSCs transplanted the same way. Unlike free MSCs, the bioencapsulated MSCs are retained in the spleens and their hepatotrophic factors can continue to drain directly into the liver without dilution resulting in improved hepatic regeneration. In addition, with time the transdifferentiation of MSCs into hepatocyte-like cells in the spleen renders the spleen as a ectopic liver support. PMID:19132579

  14. The role of apelin in the retina of diabetic rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiang Lu

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Apelin is a novel adipocytokine participating in diabetes, but its role in diabetic retinopathy (DR is unknown. Our study aimed to investigate the effect of apelin on the proliferative potential in DR along with its antagonist inhibitory effects. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Strong staining of apelin, co-localized with glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF was observed in the retina of diabetic rats. Apelin, GFAP, and VEGF mRNA and protein levels were significantly increased in the sample's retinas. Moreover, exogenous apelin promoted retinal Müller cell proliferation in vivo. Simultaneously, apelin induced GFAP and VEGF expression. F13A markedly reduced retinal gliosis caused by diabetes. Furthermore, F13A suppressed both GFAP and VEGF expression in vivo. SIGNIFICANCE: Our results strongly suggest that apelin is associated with the development of DR and contributes to changes in the retinas of diabetic rats. Apelin induced promotion of cell proliferation lends support to the possibility that apelin may play a role in the progression of DR to a proliferative phase. This possible role deserves further investigation, which may offer new perspectives in the early prevention and treatment of DR.

  15. Rat hindlimb joint immobilization with acrylic resin orthoses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.A. da Silva

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the present study was to propose an orthosis of light material that would be functional for the animal and that would maintain only the ankle joint immobilized. Male Wistar rats (3 to 4 months old, 250-300 g were divided into 2 groups (N = 6: control and immobilized for 7 days. Rats were anesthetized with sodium pentobarbital (40 mg/kg weight and the left hindlimb was immobilized with the orthoses composed of acrylic resin model, abdominal belt and lateral supports. The following analyses were performed: glycogen content of the soleus, extensor digitorum longus, white gastrocnemius, red gastrocnemius, and tibialis anterior muscles by the phenol sulfuric method, and the weight, fiber area and intramuscular connective tissue of the soleus by the planimetric system. Data were analyzed statistically by the Kolmogorov-Smirnov, Student t and Wilcoxon tests. Immobilization decreased glycogen in all muscles (P < 0.05; soleus: 31.6%, white gastrocnemius: 56.6%, red gastrocnemius: 39%, extensor digitorum longus: 41.7%, tibialis anterior: 45.2% in addition to reducing soleus weight by 34% (P < 0.05. Furthermore, immobilization promoted reduction of the fiber area (43%, P < 0.05 and increased the connective tissue (200%, P < 0.05. The orthosis model was efficient comparing with another alternative immobilization model, like plaster casts, in promoting skeletal muscle alterations, indicating that it could be used as a new model in other studies related to muscle disuse.

  16. Sleep disturbance impairs stroke recovery in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zunzunegui, Cristina; Gao, Bo; Cam, Ertugrul; Hodor, Aleksandra; Bassetti, Claudio L

    2011-09-01

    There is a lack of experimental evidence to support the hypothesis that sleep may modulate stroke outcome as suggested by clinical observations. We have previously shown that sleep disturbance (SDis) over 3 days aggravates brain damage in a rat model of focal cerebral ischemia. The aim of this study is to further investigate effects of SDis on long-term stroke recovery and neuroplasticity as assessed by axonal sprouting, neurogenesis, and angiogenesis. Focal cerebral ischemia was induced by permanent occlusion of the distal branches of middle cerebral artery. Twelve hours after initiation of ischemia, SDis was performed over 3 consecutive days (deprivation of 80% sleep during the 12-h light phase). Weekly assessments on sensorimotor function by the single pellet reaching test (SPR) were performed for 5 weeks after surgery. Axonal sprouting was evaluated by anterograde tracing with biotinylated dextran amine (BDA) and neurogenesis/angiogenesis by bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) labelling along with cell-type markers. Control groups included ischemia without SDis, sham with SDis, and sham without SDis. Basic sleep research laboratory. Rats subjected to SDis after ischemia showed significantly less recovery of forearm motor skills during the post-stroke period of 5 weeks. This effect was accompanied by a substantial reduction in axonal sprouting, expression of synaptophysin, and the ischemia-stimulated neural and vascular cell proliferation. SDis has detrimental effects on functional and morphological/structural outcomes after stroke, suggesting a role of sleep in the modulation of recovery processes and neuroplasticity.

  17. Flavanol plasma bioavailability is affected by metabolic syndrome in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margalef, Maria; Pons, Zara; Iglesias-Carres, Lisard; Bravo, Francisca Isabel; Muguerza, Begoña; Arola-Arnal, Anna

    2017-09-15

    Flavanols, which exert several health benefits, are metabolized after ingestion. Factors such as the host physiological condition could affect the metabolism and bioavailability of flavanols, influencing their bioactivities. This study aimed to qualitatively evaluate whether a pathological state influenced flavanol plasma bioavailability. Standard and cafeteria (CAF) diet fed rats, a robust model of metabolic syndrome (MeS), were administered 1000mg/kg of flavanol enriched grape seed polyphenol extract (GSPE). Flavanols and their metabolites were quantified by HPLC-MS/MS in plasma before and at 2, 4, 7, 24, and 48h after GSPE ingestion. Results showed that in CAF administered rats the maximum time of plasma flavanol concentration was delayed and these animals presented higher levels of plasma phase-II metabolites as well as altered microbial metabolites. In conclusion, this study demonstrated that MeS pathological state modified flavanol bioavailability, supporting the hypothesis that flavanol metabolism, and therefore flavanol functionality, depend on the organism's state of health. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Data from quantitative label free proteomics analysis of rat spleen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khadar Dudekula

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The dataset presented in this work has been obtained using a label-free quantitative proteomic analysis of rat spleen. A robust method for extraction of proteins from rat spleen tissue and LC-MS-MS analysis was developed using a urea and SDS-based buffer. Different fractionation methods were compared. A total of 3484 different proteins were identified from the pool of all experiments run in this study (a total of 2460 proteins with at least two peptides. A total of 1822 proteins were identified from nine non-fractionated pulse gels, 2288 proteins and 2864 proteins were identified by SDS-PAGE fractionation into three and five fractions respectively. The proteomics data are deposited in ProteomeXchange Consortium via PRIDE PXD003520, Progenesis and Maxquant output are presented in the supported information. The generated list of proteins under different regimes of fractionation allow assessing the nature of the identified proteins; variability in the quantitative analysis associated with the different sampling strategy and allow defining a proper number of replicates for future quantitative analysis.

  19. Morphologic effects of cysteamine on the rat adenohypophysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cairns, P.D.; McComb, D.J.; Horvath, E.; Kovacs, K.; Milligan, J.V.; Szabo, S.

    1984-12-01

    In pituitary lactotrophs of female Sprague-Dawley rats given cysteamine (300 mg/kg, per os/day) for 7 days, forming granules were increased in number and contained many separate electron-dense structures suggesting crinophagy. Compared to control values, cysteamine treatment caused no change in blood prolactin (PRL) levels, measured by radioimmunoassay (RIA). 17 beta-Estradiol (50 micrograms, sc/day) for 7 days, induced lactotroph hyperplasia and increased blood PRL levels which were unaffected by simultaneous cysteamine administration. The ultrastructural changes did not reflect those due to bromocriptine suppression of secretory activity, and supported the concept that cysteamine altered lactotroph morphology by an unknown mechanism. In pituitary gonadotrophs following cysteamine treatment, increased electron lucency of luminal contents of dilated rough endoplasmic reticulum was noted; however, blood luteinizing hormone (LH) levels did not differ from those of control values. In ovariectomized rats, cysteamine suppressed castration cell formation and reduced blood LH levels, suggesting an interference with the cell's ability to respond to GnRH stimulation. The morphologic effects of cysteamine appeared to be selective to lactotrophs and gonadotrophs, and were not secondary to vascular impairment, as capillary endothelial cells were undamaged.

  20. Data from quantitative label free proteomics analysis of rat spleen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudekula, Khadar; Le Bihan, Thierry

    2016-09-01

    The dataset presented in this work has been obtained using a label-free quantitative proteomic analysis of rat spleen. A robust method for extraction of proteins from rat spleen tissue and LC-MS-MS analysis was developed using a urea and SDS-based buffer. Different fractionation methods were compared. A total of 3484 different proteins were identified from the pool of all experiments run in this study (a total of 2460 proteins with at least two peptides). A total of 1822 proteins were identified from nine non-fractionated pulse gels, 2288 proteins and 2864 proteins were identified by SDS-PAGE fractionation into three and five fractions respectively. The proteomics data are deposited in ProteomeXchange Consortium via PRIDE PXD003520, Progenesis and Maxquant output are presented in the supported information. The generated list of proteins under different regimes of fractionation allow assessing the nature of the identified proteins; variability in the quantitative analysis associated with the different sampling strategy and allow defining a proper number of replicates for future quantitative analysis.