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Sample records for vastsndinute emade rinnapiimas

  1. A Comparison of Musical and Semantic Rhythm of Radif in Saddi’s and Emad Faghih’s Sonnets (Ghazals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam KhaliliJahantigh

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract  Radif is an instrument to create music and complete meaning or focus on it which can be studied both semantically and musically. In terms of the former, since the meaning of the Radif has a hidden connection to the spirit of the poet, it can show his inner spiritual matters and worries. In addition, Radif is a repetitive poetic element whose meaning carries an important role in observing content and literary traditions of sonnet. However, word or words which are Radif have an important musical role. Therefore, studying the role of Radif in creating music and reasons which increase this music is considerable. The present study, in line with this approach, investigated Radif in Saddi’s and Emad Faghih Kermani’s sonnets. These two poets belong to a period when Persian sonnet had greatly developed both semantically and musically.

  2. Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 566: EMAD Compound, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada with ROTC-1, Revision 0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mark Krauss

    2011-06-01

    This Closure Report (CR) presents information supporting the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 566: EMAD Compound, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada. Corrective Action Unit 566 comprises Corrective Action Site (CAS) 25-99-20, EMAD Compound, located within Area 25 of the Nevada National Security Site. The purpose of this CR is to provide documentation supporting the completed corrective actions and provide data confirming that the closure objectives for CAU 566 were met. To achieve this, the following actions were performed: • Review the current site conditions, including the concentration and extent of contamination. • Implement any corrective actions necessary to protect human health and the environment. • Properly dispose of corrective action and investigation wastes. • Document Notice of Completion and closure of CAU 566 issued by the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection. From October 2010 through May 2011, closure activities were performed as set forth in the Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration Plan for CAU 566: EMAD Compound, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada. The purposes of the activities as defined during the data quality objectives process were as follows: • Determine whether contaminants of concern (COCs) are present. • If COCs are present, determine their nature and extent, implement appropriate corrective actions, and properly dispose of wastes. Analytes detected during the closure activities were evaluated against final action levels (FALs) to determine COCs for CAU 566. Assessment of the data from collected soil samples, and from radiological and visual surveys of the site, indicates the FALs were exceeded for polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), semivolatile organic compounds (SVOCs), and radioactivity. Corrective actions were implemented to remove the following: • Radiologically contaminated soil assumed greater than FAL at two locations • Radiologically contaminated soil assumed greater than FAL with

  3. Early motion and directed exercise (EMADE) versus usual care post ankle fracture fixation: study protocol for a pragmatic randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Paul A; Scammell, Brigitte E; Ali, Arfan; Coughlin, Timothy; Nightingale, Jessica; Khan, Tanvir; Ollivere, Ben J

    2018-05-31

    Following surgical fixation of ankle fractures, the traditional management has included immobilisation for 6 weeks in a below-knee cast. However, this can lead to disuse atrophy of the affected leg and joint stiffness. While early rehabilitation from 2 weeks post surgery is viewed as safe, controversy remains regarding its benefits. We will compare the effectiveness of early motion and directed exercise (EMADE) ankle rehabilitation, against usual care, i.e. 6 weeks' immobilisation in a below-knee cast. We have designed a pragmatic randomised controlled trial (p-RCT) to compare the EMADE intervention against usual care. We will recruit 144 independently living adult participants, absent of tissue-healing comorbidities, who have undergone surgical stabilisation of isolated Weber B ankle fractures. The EMADE intervention consists of a non-weight-bearing progressive home exercise programme, complemented with manual therapy and education. Usual care consists of immobilisation in a non-weight-bearing below-knee cast. The intervention period is between week 2 and week 6 post surgery. The primary outcome is the Olerud and Molander Ankle Score (OMAS) patient-reported outcome measure (PROM) at 12 weeks post surgery. Secondary PROMs include the EQ-5D-5 L questionnaire, return to work and return to driving, with objective outcomes including ankle range of motion. Analysis will be on an intention-to-treat basis. An economic evaluation will be included. The EMADE intervention is a package of care designed to address the detrimental effects of disuse atrophy and joint stiffness. An advantage of the OMAS is the potential of meta-analysis with other designs. Within the economic evaluation, the cost-utility analysis, may be used by commissioners, while the use of patient-relevant outcomes, such as return to work and driving, will ensure that the study remains pertinent to patients and their families. As it is being conducted in the clinical environment, this p-RCT has high external

  4. Safety assessment document for spent fuel handling, packaging, and storage demonstrations at the E-MAD facility on the Nevada Test Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-04-01

    The objectives for spent fuel handling and packaging demonstration are to develop the capability to satisfactorily encapsulate typical commercial nuclear reactor spent fuel assemblies and to establish the suitability of interim dry surface and near surface storage concepts. To accomplish these objectives, spent fuel assemblies from a pressurized water reactor have been received, encapsulated in steel canisters, and emplaced in on-site storage facilities and subjected to other tests. As an essential element of these demonstrations, a thorough safety assessment of the demonstration activities conducted at the E-MAD facility has been completed. This document describes the site location and characteristics, the existing E-MAD facility, and the facility modifications and equipment additions made specifically for the demonstrations. The document also summarizes the Quality Assurance Program utilized, and specifies the principal design criteria applicable to the facility modifications, equipment additions, and process operations. Evaluations have been made of the radiological impacts of normal operations, abnormal operations, and postulated accidents. Analyses have been performed to determine the affects on nuclear criticality safety of postulated accidents and credible natural phenomena. The consequences of postulated accidents resulting in fission product gas release have also been estimated. This document identifies the engineered safety features, procedures, and site characteristics that (1) prevent the occurrence of potential accidents or (2) assure that the consequences of postulated accidents are either insignificant or adequately mitigated

  5. MODO DE VIDA CAMPONESA: MUDANÇAS E PERMANÊNCIAS NA COMUNIDADE BOM JESUS NA ESTRADA DA EMADE –TEFÉ-AM/Mode of camponesa life: changes and permanences in the community Bom Jesus on the road of EMADE -Tefé/AM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nágila dos Santos Situba

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Esta pesquisa teve como objetivo analisar as mudanças e permanências dos modos de vida camponesa da comunidade Bom Jesus, situada na estrada da Emade, município de Tefé-Amazonas. Neste sentido, as transformações e permanências ocorridas nesta comunidade estão relacionadas à abertura da estrada da Emade (1997 e a instalação da Empresa Amazonense de Dendê na década de 1980. Além disto, outro elemento agregado a essas mudanças é o processo de urbanização que se expandiu em todo o globo terrestre, trazendo consigo transformações nos modos de vida, no cotidiano e na relação cidade e comunidade. Os resultados obtidos apontam mudanças no que se refere aos modos de vida, hábitos alimentares e atividades agrícolas que caracterizavam os camponeses. Além disto, outras atividades se inseriram no cotidiano dos camponeses como: extração de madeira, carpintaria, comércio, produção de carvão, servidor público etc.

  6. Emad kinolinal / Maria Ulfsak-Sheripova

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Ulfsak-Šeripova, Maria, 1981-

    2007-01-01

    Filmid : Roger Mitchelli "Ema", Douglas Sirki "Kõik, mida taevas lubab", Rainer Werner Fassbinderi "Hirm närib hinge seest", Todd Haynesi "On taevas nii kaugel", Alfred Hitchcocki "Psühho", Woody Alleni "New Yorgi lood", Lars von Trieri "Idioodid", "Alieni" filmid, Pedro Almodovari "Kõik minu emast" ja Catherine Breillat' "Romanss"

  7. Rikas egiptlane Emad Aziz jahib finantsraskustes American Toursi / Emad Aziz ; interv. Toivo Tänavsuu

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Aziz, Emad

    2004-01-01

    Egiptuse ärimees ja reisibüroo Marhaba Tours omanik soovib võimaldada Eesti turistidele uusi atraktiivseid sihtkohti, kuhu Tallinnast varem lennatud pole. American Tours'i osta sooviv ärimees plaanib Tallinnasse ehitada hotelle. Vt. samas: Epp Rääbis: kuulen süüdistustest vaid meedia vahendusel. Lisad: Rikas härra; Reisibüroo American Tours

  8. Stiilsed emad ja tütred / Keilit Aedma

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Aedma, Keilit

    2016-01-01

    Sisearhitekt Aet Pieli ja tema tütre Anrike Pieli, moedisainer Roberta Eineri ja tema ema Ljudmilla Eineri, tekstiilikunstnik Signe Kivi ja tema tütre Liisa Kivi, ajakirjanik Keilit Aedma ja tema ema Kadi Aedma-Reiningu riietumisstiilist

  9. Tom ja Anni ajavad isad-emad naerma / Kai Väärtnõu

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Väärtnõu, Kai

    2007-01-01

    ETV lastesaate "Saame kokku Tomi juures" stsenarist on Jaak Urmet ehk Wimberg. Teksti improviseerivad ka näitlejad Karol Kuntsel ja Maria Soomets. Lisaks tutvustus "Pööningule purjetab proua Õietolmutuust"

  10. Beebitoidu müüki hakkab korraldama range koodeks / Eha Laanepere

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Laanepere, Eha, 1963-

    1995-01-01

    Rinnapiima asendajate reklaami ja müüki reguleerivast rahvusvahelisest koodeksist International Baby Food Action Network (IBFAN), mis on vastu võetud 1982. aastal, selle seadustiku vajalikkusest Eestis

  11. Video and Course Context Discussion on Massive Open Online Courses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dubosson, Magali; Emad, Sabine; Broillet, Alexandra

    2014-01-01

    Video and Course Content Discussion on Massive Open Online Courses: An Exploratory Research—Magali Dubosson (HEG Fribourg), Sabine Emad (HEG Genève), Alexandra Broillet (University of Geneva and Webster University Geneva), Constance Kampf (Aarhus University, Denmark)...

  12. WE FRIENDS, Lääne-Eesti arengupartnerlus / Ingrit Kera

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Kera, Ingrit

    2006-01-01

    Naised saavad osa hiidlaste kirjutatud europrojektist "We Friends", mille eesmärk on Lääne-Eesti madala konkurentsivõimega naiste ja lapsi üksi kasvatavate noorte emade tööhõivele kaasaaitamine

  13. Commercial Nuclear Waste Research and Development Program. Annual report, fiscal year 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-12-01

    Nuclear waste handling, packaging, and dry storage testing for the Department of Energy (DOE) Commercial Nuclear Waste Research and Development Program are conducted at the E-MAD (Engine Maintenance, Assembly and Disassembly) facility in Area 25 of the Nevada Test Site. Brief discussions of E-MAD activities are included in this report. Significant accomplishments for this period are as follows: (1) Integrity monitoring of the 17 fuel assemblies located at E-MAD was performed to determine if handling, packaging, or storage had affected the overall integrity of the fuel. (2) The 24-month Dry Storage Fuel Integrity Demonstration Test being conducted at the E-MAD facility was completed. Two fuel rods, removed from the assembly prior to the test, were reinserted into the fuel assembly. (3) The remaining nine fuel assemblies were removed from their seal-welded canisters and characterized to verify their integrity following storage tests. (4) The decay heat rates of five fuel assemblies were measured using the E-MAD boiling water calorimeter. The measured decay heat rates were compared to predicted rates. (5) At DOE/NV request, plans were prepared and submitted to ship the 17 E-MAD fuel assemblies to the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory and then shut down the E-MAD facility. (6) The revised safety assessment document was approved and transmitted to DOE/NV. (7) Quality Assurance personnel assisted in the completion of the DOE/NV Quality Assurance Manual and it was approved and published. (8) Technical support was provided to Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories in the decontamination of electronic equipment

  14. Kas asjalood muutuvad? / Christine Ockrent

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Ockrent, Christine

    2007-01-01

    Saksamaa kantsler Angela Merkel ja Tšiili presidendi Michelle Bachelet on oma tegevusega lükanud ümber kahtlused, mis neid saatsid riigijuhi ametisse asumisel. Presidendiametisse pürgivad Segolene Royal ja Hillary Clinton kasutavad mõlemad argumenti: nad on oma meesoponentidest erinevad, sest nad on emad

  15. Degradable Systems: A Survey of Multistate System Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-08-01

    and Subtitle) S. TYPE OF REPORT & PERIOD COVERED C. O DEGRADABLE SYSTEMS: A SURVEY OF MULTISTATE TECHNICAL SYSTEM THEORY 6. PERFORMING ORG. REPORT...THIS PAGE(R7,en Date £nt.,.d) AEoS-T- 8- 9 2 0 Degradable Systems: A Survey of Multistate System Theory by 1 2Emad El-Neweihi and Frank Proschan

  16. HIV-positiivsete ja narkomaanide kohta tahetakse luua andmebaas / Erika Prave

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Prave, Erika, 1970-

    2004-01-01

    Vt. ka Severnoje Poberezhje 18. veebr., lk. 3. Projekti "HIV-positiivsete avastamine Jõhvis" raames sai Jõhvi noorteabikeskus läinud aasta detsembris informatsiooni 50 HIV-positiivse kohta, neist viis on väikese lapsega haiglas olnud emad

  17. Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 143: Area 25 Contaminated Waste Dumps, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tobiason, D. S.

    2002-01-01

    This Closure Report (CR) has been prepared for the Area 25 Contaminated Waste Dumps (CWD), Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 143 in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order [FFACO] (FFACO, 1996) and the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP)-approved Corrective Action Plan (CAP) for CAU 143: Area 25, Contaminated Waste Dumps, Nevada Test Site, Nevada. CAU 143 consists of two Corrective Action Sites (CASs): 25-23-09 CWD No.1, and 25-23-03 CWD No.2. The Area 25 CWDs are historic disposal units within the Area 25 Reactor Maintenance, Assembly, and Disassembly (R-MAD), and Engine Maintenance, Assembly, and Disassembly (E-MAD) compounds located on the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The R-MAD and E-MAD facilities originally supported a portion of the Nuclear Rocket Development Station in Area 25 of the NTS. CWD No.1 CAS 25-23-09 received solid radioactive waste from the R-MAD Compound (East Trestle and West Trench Berms) and 25-23-03 CWD No.2 received solid radioactive waste from the E-MAD Compound (E-MAD Trench)

  18. Reference Aid, Abbreviations, Acronyms and Special Terms in the Press of Greece and Cyprus

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-11-14

    Laokratiki Lisesi Musik Lycee Musical Dimokratia Toplulugu Society LDG LIMAN-SEN Laiki German Kibris Turk Turkish Cypriot Dimokratia Democratic...Fishing Alieia EM Ethnikon National Front Metopon [C] EMA Elliniki Greek Music Mousiki Academy Akadimia EMAD Efippa Mikta Mounted Joint...Kibris Turk Turkish Cypriot Kibris Turk Turkish Cypriot Kadinlar Women’s Musiki Music Society Komitesi Committee Cemiyeti Kibris Turk Turkish Cypriot

  19. Quality-Assurance Program Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kettell, R.A.

    1981-05-01

    This Quality Assurance Program Plan (QAPP) is provided to describe the Quality Assurance Program which is applied to the waste management activities conducted by AESD-Nevada Operations at the E-MAD Facility located in Area 25 of the Nevada Test Site. The AESD-Nevada Operations QAPP provides the necessary systematic and administrative controls to assure activities that affect quality, safety, reliability, and maintainability during design, procurement, fabrication, inspection, shipments, tests, and storage are conducted in accordance with established requirements

  20. Commercial Nuclear Waste Research and Development Program. Annual report, fiscal year 1984

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    This document is a report of fiscal year 1984 activities performed to meet task objectives of the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations (NNWSI) Project Plan. Noteworthy accomplishments were: operation of a fuel temperature test which evaluates fuel performance in an environment expected for metal cask storage. This test is being performed for the DOE Richland Operations Dry Storage Fuel Integrity Demonstration Program; characterization of fuel assemblies and storage canisters, which includes fuel assembly visual inspection, videotape and still photography, and contamination swipe sampling; and canister gas and full volume filtration sampling, contamination swipe sampling, and residue collection; removal of fuel assemblies from seal welded storage canisters, using the E-MAD canister cutter; integrity monitoring of fuel assemblies in seal welded canisters, by sampling and analysis of canister cover gas; and fuel assemblies in unwelded canisters, by collection and analysis of fuel surface contamination swipe samples and canister residue; emplacement/removal of canisterized fuel assemblies in the E-MAD drywells; and preparation of a summary storage history of all fuel assemblies at the E-MAD facility, including FY 1983 activities involving those fuel assemblies

  1. Impacts of transportation on a test and evaluation facility for nuclear waste disposal: a systems analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varadarajan, R.V.; Peterson, R.W.; Joy, D.S.; Gibson, S.M.

    1983-01-01

    An essential element of the Test and Evaluation Facility (TEF) is a waste packaging facility capable of producing a small number Test and Evaluation Facility of packages consisting of several different waste forms. The study envisions three scenarios for such a packaging facility: (1) modify an existing hot cell facility such as the Engine Maintenance Assembly and Disassembly (EMAD) facility at the Nevada Test Site so that it can serve as a packaging facility for the TEF. This scenario is referred to as the EMAD Option. (2) Build a new generic packaging facility (GPF) at the site of the TEF. In other words, colocate the GPF and the TEF. This scenario is referred to as the GPF Option, and (3) utilize the EMAD facility in conjunction with a colocated GPF (of minimal size and scope) at the TEF. This scenario is referred to as the Split Option. The results of the system study clearly bring out the fact that transportation has a significant impact on the selection and siting of the waste packaging facility. Preliminary conclusions, subject to the assumptions of the study, include the following: (1) regardless of the waste form, the GPF option is preferable to the other two in minimizing both transportation costs and logistical problems, (2) for any given scenario and choice of waste forms, there exists a candidate TEF location for which the transportation costs are at a minimum compared to the other locations, (3) in spite of the increased transportation costs and logistical complexity, the study shows that the overall system costs favor modification of an existing hot cell facility for the particular case considered

  2. Spent fuel dry storage technology development: thermal evaluation of three adjacent drywells (each containing a 0.6 kW PWR spent fuel assembly)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Unterzuber, R.; Hanson, J.P.

    1981-09-01

    A spent fuel Adjacent Drywell Test was conducted at the Engine-Maintenance, Assembly and Disassembly (E-MAD) facility on the Nevada Test Site utilizing three nearly identical pressurized water reactor spent fuel assemblies each having a decay heat level of approximately 0.6 kW. Each fuel assembly was encapsulated inside the E-MAD Hot Bay and placed in an instrumented near-surface drywell storage cell for thermal testing. Each fuel assembly was sealed inside a 14-in. diam, 168-in.-long stainless steel canister and attached to a concrete-filled, 20-in.-diam, 34-in.-long, shield plug. The canister assembly was then placed in a carbon steel drywell liner which had been grouted into a hole drilled in the soil adjacent to E-MAD. The three drywells were located 25 feet apart in a linear array. Thermocouples, provided to measure canister, liner and soil temperatures, were inserted into tubes on the outside of the canister and drywell liner and were attached to plastic pipes which were grouted into holes in the soil. Temperatures from the three drywells and the adjacent soil were recorded throughout the Adjacent Drywell Test. Drywell thermal data showed virtually no thermal interaction between adjacent drywells. However, peak temperatures reached by the three drywells did show a fairly significant difference. Peak canister and drywell liner temperatures were reached in August 1981 for all three drywells. The two previously unused drywells responded similarly with peak canister and liner temperatures reaching 199 0 F and 158 0 F, respectively. Comparable peak temperatures for the third drywell which had previously contained spent fuel for nearly 21 months prior to the Adjacent Drywell Test reached 210 0 F for the canister and 169 0 F for the drywell liner. This difference is attributed to a decrease in soil thermal conductivity caused by the dryout of soil around the drywell used for previous spent fuel testing

  3. Caliban : [luuletused] / Lörinc Szab̤ ; tlk. Ellen Niit

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Szab̤, Lörinc

    2004-01-01

    Sisu: Caliban ; Paani kingitus ; Mütoloogia ; Ei puutu sind, vaid vaatan, kuidas magad ; Kõik mittemillegi eest ; Jütsist saab hiiglane ; Separaatrahu ; Palve laste eest ; SIRTSUSIRIN : Rahulik ime ; Mu isa ; Veduriga ; Mu ema laulis ; Emad ; Mis öelnuksin ; Su nimi ; Mu isa surm ; Südametromboos, Tihany ; Miskolci puukirikus ; KAHEKÜMNE KUUES AASTA : Et pole sind ; Kahekümne kahe aastane ; Nüüd ainult vaimus ; Nagu haldjas! ; Ei iial ; Mozartit kuulates. Andmeid autori kohta lk. 45-46

  4. Validation of the STAFF-5 computer model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fletcher, J.F.; Fields, S.R.

    1981-04-01

    STAFF-5 is a dynamic heat-transfer-fluid-flow stress model designed for computerized prediction of the temperature-stress performance of spent LWR fuel assemblies under storage/disposal conditions. Validation of the temperature calculating abilities of this model was performed by comparing temperature calculations under specified conditions to experimental data from the Engine Maintenance and Dissassembly (EMAD) Fuel Temperature Test Facility and to calculations performed by Battelle Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) using the HYDRA-1 model. The comparisons confirmed the ability of STAFF-5 to calculate representative fuel temperatures over a considerable range of conditions, as a first step in the evaluation and prediction of fuel temperature-stress performance

  5. Corrective action investigation plan for Corrective Action Unit 143: Area 25 contaminated waste dumps, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 1 (with Record of Technical Change No. 1 and 2)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    USDOE Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV)

    1999-06-28

    This plan contains the US Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office's approach to collect the data necessary to evaluate correction action alternatives appropriate for the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 143 under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Corrective Action Unit 143 consists of two waste dumps used for the disposal of solid radioactive wastes. Contaminated Waste Dump No.1 (CAS 25-23-09) was used for wastes generated at the Reactor Maintenance Assembly and Disassembly (R-MAD) Facility and Contaminated Waste Dump No.2 (CAS 25-23-03) was used for wastes generated at the Engine Maintenance Assembly and Disassembly (E-MAD) Facility. Both the R-MAD and E-MAD facilities are located in Area 25 of the Nevada Test Site. Based on site history, radionuclides are the primary constituent of concern and are located in these disposal areas; vertical and lateral migration of the radionuclides is unlikely; and if migration has occurred it will be limited to the soil beneath the Contaminated Waste Disposal Dumps. The proposed investigation will involve a combination of Cone Penetrometer Testing within and near the solid waste disposal dumps, field analysis for radionuclides and volatile organic compounds, as well as sample collection from the waste dumps and surrounding areas for off-site chemical, radiological, and geotechnical analyses. The results of this field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of corrective action alternatives in the corrective action decision document.

  6. Authorized Limits for the Release of a 25 Ton Locomotive, Serial Number 21547, at the Area 25 Engine Maintenance, Assembly, and Disassembly Facility, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gwin, Jeremy; Frenette, Douglas

    2010-01-01

    This document contains process knowledge and radiological data and analysis to support approval for release of the 25-ton locomotive, Serial Number 21547, at the Area 25 Engine Maintenance, Assembly, and Disassembly (EMAD) Facility, located on the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The 25-ton locomotive is a small, one-of-a-kind locomotive used to move railcars in support of the Nuclear Engine for Rocket Vehicle Application project. This locomotive was identified as having significant historical value by the Nevada State Railroad Museum in Boulder City, Nevada, where it will be used as a display piece. A substantial effort to characterize the radiological conditions of the locomotive was undertaken by the NTS Management and Operations Contractor, National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec). During this characterization process, seven small areas on the locomotive had contamination levels that exceeded the NTS release criteria (limits consistent with U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order DOE O 5400.5, 'Radiation Protection of the Public and the Environment'). The decision was made to perform radiological decontamination of these known accessible impacted areas to further the release process. On February 9, 2010, NSTec personnel completed decontamination of these seven areas to within the NTS release criteria. Although all accessible areas of the locomotive had been successfully decontaminated to within NTS release criteria, it was plausible that inaccessible areas of the locomotive (i.e., those areas on the locomotive where it was not possible to perform radiological surveys) could potentially have contamination above unrestricted release limits. To access the majority of these inaccessible areas, the locomotive would have to be disassembled. A complete disassembly for a full radiological survey could have permanently destroyed parts and would have ruined the historical value of the locomotive. Complete disassembly would also add an unreasonable financial burden for the

  7. Spent LWR fuel encapsulation and dry storage demonstration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bahorich, R.J.; Durrill, D.C.; Cross, T.E.; Unterzuber, R.

    1980-01-01

    In 1977 the Spent Fuel Handling and Packaging Program (SFHPP) was initiated by the Department of Energy to develop and test the capability to satisfactorily encapsulate typical spent fuel assemblies from commercial light-water nuclear power plants and to establish the suitability of one or more surface and near surface concepts for the interim dry storage of the encapsulated spent fuel assemblies. The E-MAD Facility at the Nevada Test Site, which is operated for the Department of Energy by the Advanced Energy Systems Division (AESD) of the Westinghouse Electric Corporation, was chosen as the location for this demonstration because of its extensive existing capabilities for handling highly radioactive components and because of the desirable site characteristics for the proposed storage concepts. This paper describes the remote operations related to the process steps of handling, encapsulating and subsequent dry storage of spent fuel in support of the Demonstration Program

  8. Between the carrot and slamming the door. Teaching ad honorem at the UBA Entre el portazo y la zanahoria. La docencia por el honor en la UBA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Hobert

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Institutional and structural erosion of the largest Argentine national university has produced, among other things, space shortage, overcrowded classrooms, lack of materials, administrative chaos, lack of scholarships, irregular assignment of positions and research budgets, informal recruiting of teachers without payment, and finally the fall of its representative system, far away from classroom reality. The article analyzes <em>ad honorem teaching at the University of Buenos Aires. More than a third of UBA teachers do not receive payment for their services. This work delves into the actors' perspectives in a context of difficult institutional and labor conditions.

    El desgaste institucional y estructural de la universidad nacional más grande de la Argentina se ha traducido, entre otros aspectos, en profundos niveles de decadencia edilicia, hacinamiento en las cursadas, falta de materiales didácticos, descontrol administrativo, escasez de concursos, discrecionalidad en los nombramientos docentes y en la asignación presupuestaria a proyectos de investigación, reclutamiento informal de docentes con bajos o inexistentes salarios, y la degradación de su sistema representativo, alejado de la realidad constitutiva de los claustros.

    En el presente trabajo es analizada la problemática de los docentes <em>ad honorem, categoría docente en la cual se encuentran comprendidos más de un tercio de los docentes de la Universidad de Buenos Aires (UBA. Entre el portazo y la zanahoria intenta acercar la perspectiva de los actores en la especificidad de un contexto de marcado deterioro institucional y de las condiciones laborales en el campo académico.

  9. Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit 135: Area 25 Underground Storage Tanks, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cox, D. H.

    2000-01-01

    The Area 25 Underground Storage Tanks site Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 135 will be closed by unrestricted release decontamination and verification survey, in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consert Order (FFACO, 1996). The CAU includes one Corrective Action Site (CAS). The Area 25 Underground Storage Tanks, (CAS 25-02-01), referred to as the Engine-Maintenance Assembly and Disassembly (E-MAD) Waste Holdup Tanks and Vault, were used to receive liquid waste from all of the radioactive drains at the E-MAD Facility. Based on the results of the Corrective Action Investigation conducted in June 1999 discussed in the Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 135: Area 25 Underground Storage Tanks, Nevada Test Site, Nevada (DOE/NV,1999a), one sample from the radiological survey of the concrete vault interior exceeded radionuclide preliminary action levels. The analytes from the sediment samples that exceeded the preliminary action levels are polychlorinated biphenyls, Resource Conservation and Recovery Act metals, total petroleum hydrocarbons as diesel-range organics, and radionuclides. Unrestricted release decontamination and verification involves removal of concrete and the cement-lined pump sump from the vault. After verification that the contamination has been removed, the vault will be repaired with concrete, as necessary. The radiological- and chemical-contaminated pump sump and concrete removed from the vault would be disposed of at the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site. The vault interior will be field surveyed following removal of contaminated material to verify that unrestricted release criteria have been achieved

  10. Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit 135: Area 25 Underground Storage Tanks, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D. H. Cox

    2000-07-01

    The Area 25 Underground Storage Tanks site Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 135 will be closed by unrestricted release decontamination and verification survey, in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consert Order (FFACO, 1996). The CAU includes one Corrective Action Site (CAS). The Area 25 Underground Storage Tanks, (CAS 25-02-01), referred to as the Engine-Maintenance Assembly and Disassembly (E-MAD) Waste Holdup Tanks and Vault, were used to receive liquid waste from all of the radioactive drains at the E-MAD Facility. Based on the results of the Corrective Action Investigation conducted in June 1999 discussed in the Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 135: Area 25 Underground Storage Tanks, Nevada Test Site, Nevada (DOE/NV,1999a), one sample from the radiological survey of the concrete vault interior exceeded radionuclide preliminary action levels. The analytes from the sediment samples that exceeded the preliminary action levels are polychlorinated biphenyls, Resource Conservation and Recovery Act metals, total petroleum hydrocarbons as diesel-range organics, and radionuclides. Unrestricted release decontamination and verification involves removal of concrete and the cement-lined pump sump from the vault. After verification that the contamination has been removed, the vault will be repaired with concrete, as necessary. The radiological- and chemical-contaminated pump sump and concrete removed from the vault would be disposed of at the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site. The vault interior will be field surveyed following removal of contaminated material to verify that unrestricted release criteria have been achieved.

  11. Study of heavy metals in urban runoff

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nabizadeh, R.; Mahvi, A.; Mardani, G.; Yunesian, M.

    2005-01-01

    A cross-sectional survey was conducted through Tehran city and a field study was conducted to prepare main and accessory drainage channels map. Three main drainage channels were identified for this research and some sampling stations were chosen. Three stations selected in south of Tehran. The reason for selecting these stations is that all urban surface run off completely pass through these points and samples taken from these points are representative of all kinds of pollutants that transit from city surface. Another three stations were selected in center and further three stations were selected at north of Tehran. Surface runoff flow in three main channels, from north of south of Tehran, converge at south of Rey city and finally end up to Ghom Salt lake. The stations were chosen at three trajectories Sorkhe Hesar, Emad Avard, Kan. At each month two samples were from nine different stations. After collection of samples with respect to standard methods, they were dissolved in nitric acid and then analyzed by atomic absorption device. The results show that the concentrations of pollutants increased from north to south. For instance, Zinc had most concentration with monthly average of 0.98 mg/l and Nickel had the lowest amount with 0.02 mg/l in southern stations. Average concentration of Zn, Pb, Cd, Cu and Ni were: 0.638, 0.97, 0.04 and 0.035 mg/l respectively. Total average concentrations of heavy metals at three main channels were of 0.177, 0.176 and 0.145 mg/l. Emad Avard was the most polluted channel

  12. Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 135: Areas 25 Underground Storage Tanks, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D. H. Cox

    2001-06-01

    Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 135, Area 25 Underground Storage Tanks, was closed in accordance with the approved Corrective Action Plan (DOE/NV, 2000). CAU 135 consists of three Corrective Action Sites (CAS). Two of these CAS's were identified in the Corrective Action Investigation Data Quality Objective meeting as being improperly identified as underground storage tanks. CAS 25-02-03 identified as the Deluge Valve Pit was actually an underground electrical vault and CAS 25-02-10 identified as an Underground Storage Tank was actually a former above ground storage tank filled with demineralized water. Both of these CAS's are recommended for a no further action closure. CAS 25-02-01 the Underground Storage Tanks commonly referred to as the Engine Maintenance Assembly and Disassembly Waste Holdup Tanks and Vault was closed by decontaminating the vault structure and conducting a radiological verification survey to document compliance with the Nevada Test Site unrestricted use release criteria. The Area 25 Underground Storage Tanks, (CAS 25-02-01), referred to as the Engine Maintenance, Assembly, and Disassembly (E-MAD) Waste Holdup Tanks and Vault, were used to receive liquid waste from all of the radioactive and cell service area drains at the E-MAD Facility. Based on the results of the Corrective Action Investigation conducted in June 1999, discussed in ''The Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 135: Area 25 Underground Storage Tanks, Nevada Test Site, Nevada'' (DOE/NV, 199a), one sample from the radiological survey of the concrete vault interior exceeded radionuclide preliminary action levels. The analytes from the sediment samples exceeded the preliminary action levels for polychlorinated biphenyls, Resource Conservation and Recovery Act metals, total petroleum hydrocarbons as diesel-range organics, and radionuclides. The CAU 135 closure activities consisted of scabbling radiological ''hot spots

  13. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 262: Area 25 Septic Systems and Underground Discharge Point, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision No. 1 (9/2001)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    This corrective action investigation plan contains the U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office's approach to collect data necessary to evaluate corrective action alternatives appropriate for the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 262 under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Corrective Action Unit 262 consists of nine Corrective Action Sites (CASs): Underground Storage Tank (25-02-06), Septic Systems A and B (25-04-06), Septic System (25-04-07), Leachfield (25-05-03), Leachfield (25-05-05), Leachfield (25-05-06), Radioactive Leachfield (25-05-08), Leachfield (25-05-12), and Dry Well (25-51-01). Situated in Area 25 at the Nevada Test Site (NTS), sites addressed by CAU 262 are located at the Reactor-Maintenance, Assembly, and Disassembly (R-MAD); Test Cell C; and Engine-Maintenance, Assembly, and Disassembly (E-MAD) facilities. The R-MAD, Test Cell C, and E-MAD facilities supported nuclear rocket reactor and engine testing as part of the Nuclear Rocket Development Station. The activities associated with the testing program were conducted between 1958 and 1973. Based on site history collected to support the Data Quality Objectives process, contaminants of potential concern (COPCs) for the site include oil/diesel-range total petroleum hydrocarbons, volatile organic compounds, semivolatile organic compounds, polychlorinated biphenyls, Resource Conservation and Recovery Act metals, and gamma-emitting radionuclides, isotopic uranium, isotopic plutonium, strontium-90, and tritium. The scope of the corrective action field investigation at the CAU will include the inspection of portions of the collection systems, sampling the contents of collection system features in situ of leachfield logging materials, surface soil sampling, collection of samples of soil underlying the base of inlet and outfall ends of septic tanks and outfall ends of diversion structures and distribution boxes, collection of soil samples from biased or a combination of

  14. Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit 262: Area 25 Septic Systems and Underground Discharge Point, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    K. B. Campbell email = campbek@nv.doe.gov

    2002-01-01

    This Corrective Action Plan (CAP) provides selected corrective action alternatives and proposes the closure methodology for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 262, Area 25 Septic Systems and Underground Discharge Point. CAU 262 is identified in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) of 1996. Remediation of CAU 262 is required under the FFACO. CAU 262 is located in Area 25 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS), approximately 100 kilometers (km) (62 miles [mi]) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. The nine Corrective Action Sites (CASs) within CAU 262 are located in the Nuclear Rocket Development Station complex. Individual CASs are located in the vicinity of the Reactor Maintenance, Assembly, and Disassembly (R-MAD); Engine Maintenance, Assembly, and Disassembly (E-MAD); and Test Cell C compounds. CAU 262 includes the following CASs as provided in the FFACO (1996); CAS 25-02-06, Underground Storage Tank; CAS 25-04-06, Septic Systems A and B; CAS 25-04-07, Septic System; CAS 25-05-03, Leachfield; CAS 25-05-05, Leachfield; CAS 25-05-06, Leachfield; CAS 25-05-08, Radioactive Leachfield; CAS 25-05-12, Leachfield; and CAS 25-51-01, Dry Well. Figures 2, 3, and 4 show the locations of the R-MAD, the E-MAD, and the Test Cell C CASs, respectively. The facilities within CAU 262 supported nuclear rocket reactor engine testing. Activities associated with the program were performed between 1958 and 1973. However, several other projects used the facilities after 1973. A significant quantity of radioactive and sanitary waste was produced during routine operations. Most of the radioactive waste was managed by disposal in the posted leachfields. Sanitary wastes were disposed in sanitary leachfields. Septic tanks, present at sanitary leachfields (i.e., CAS 25-02-06,2504-06 [Septic Systems A and B], 25-04-07, 25-05-05,25-05-12) allowed solids to settle out of suspension prior to entering the leachfield. Posted leachfields do not contain septic tanks. All CASs located in CAU 262 are

  15. Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration Plan for Corrective Action Unit 398: Area 25 Spill Sites, Nevada Test Site, Nevada; TOPICAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    K. B. Campbell

    2001-01-01

    This Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) plan addresses the activities necessary to close Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 398: Area 25 Spill Sites. CAU 398, located in Area 25 of the Nevada Test Site, is currently listed in Appendix III of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) (FFACO, 1996), and consists of the following 13 Corrective Action Sites (CASs) (Figure 1): (1) CAS 25-44-01 , a fuel spill on soil that covers a concrete pad. The origins and use of the spill material are unknown, but the spill is suspected to be railroad bedding material. (2) CAS 25-44-02, a spill of liquid to the soil from leaking drums. (3) CAS 25-44-03, a spill of oil from two leaking drums onto a concrete pad and surrounding soil. (4) CAS 25-44-04, a spill from two tanks containing sulfuric acid and sodium hydroxide used for a water demineralization process. (5) CAS 25-25-02, a fuel or oil spill from leaking drums that were removed in 1992. (6) CAS 25-25-03, an oil spill adjacent to a tipped-over drum. The source of the drum is not listed, although it is noted that the drum was removed in 1991. (7) CAS 25-25-04, an area on the north side of the Engine-Maintenance, Assembly, and Disassembly (E-MAD) facility, where oils and cooling fluids from metal machining operations were poured directly onto the ground. (8) CAS 25-25-05, an area of oil and/or hydraulic fluid spills beneath the heavy equipment once stored there. (9) CAS 25-25-06, an area of diesel fuel staining beneath two generators that have since been removed. (10) CAS 25-25-07, an area of hydraulic oil spills associated with a tunnel-boring machine abandoned inside X-Tunnel. (11) CAS 25-25-08, an area of hydraulic fluid spills associated with a tunnel-boring machine abandoned inside Y-Tunnel. (12) CAS 25-25-16, a diesel fuel spill from an above-ground storage tank located near Building 3320 at Engine Test Stand-1 (ETS-1) that was removed in 1998. (13) CAS 25-25-17, a hydraulic oil spill

  16. Facility Decontamination and Decommissioning Program Surveillance and Maintenance Plan, Revision 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poderis, Reed J. [NSTec; King, Rebecca A. [NSTec

    2013-09-30

    This Surveillance and Maintenance (S&M) Plan describes the activities performed between deactivation and final decommissioning of the following facilities located on the Nevada National Security Site, as documented in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order under the Industrial Sites program as decontamination and decommissioning sites: ? Engine Maintenance, Assembly, and Disassembly (EMAD) Facility: o EMAD Building (Building 25-3900) o Locomotive Storage Shed (Building 25-3901) ? Test Cell C (TCC) Facility: o Equipment Building (Building 25-3220) o Motor Drive Building (Building 25-3230) o Pump Shop (Building 25-3231) o Cryogenic Lab (Building 25-3232) o Ancillary Structures (e.g., dewars, water tower, piping, tanks) These facilities have been declared excess and are in various stages of deactivation (low-risk, long-term stewardship disposition state). This S&M Plan establishes and implements a solid, cost-effective, and balanced S&M program consistent with federal, state, and regulatory requirements. A graded approach is used to plan and conduct S&M activities. The goal is to maintain the facilities in a safe condition in a cost-effective manner until their final end state is achieved. This plan accomplishes the following: ? Establishes S&M objectives and framework ? Identifies programmatic guidance for S&M activities to be conducted by National Security Technologies, LLC, for the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Field Office (NNSA/NFO) ? Provides present facility condition information and identifies hazards ? Identifies facility-specific S&M activities to be performed and their frequency ? Identifies regulatory drivers, NNSA/NFO policies and procedures, and best management practices that necessitate implementation of S&M activities ? Provides criteria and frequencies for revisions and updates ? Establishes the process for identifying and dispositioning a condition that has not been previously identified or

  17. Pushed monocanalicular intubation versus probing as a primary management for congenital nasolacrimal obstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elsawaby EA

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Emad Abdelaal Elsawaby, Rania Asem El Essawy, Sameh Hassan Abdelbaky, Yomna Magdy Ismail Department of Ophthalmology, Faculty of Medicine, Cairo University, Cairo, Egypt Purpose: Evaluation of efficiency, complications, and advantages of pushed monocanalicular intubation using Masterka® tube versus simple probing in patients with congenital nasolacrimal duct obstruction (CNLDO.Patients and methods: This is a case-controlled study that included 60 eyes (of 53 patients; 30 eyes underwent probing and 30 eyes intubation using the Masterka tube as a primary treatment for CNLDO. The children were aged between 6 months and 36 months at the time of surgery, with no previous nasolacrimal surgical procedure, and had one or more of the following clinical signs of nasolacrimal duct obstruction: epiphora, mucous discharge, and/or increased tear lake.Results: We defined success by absence of epiphora, mucous discharge, or increased tear lake 1 month after tube removal. The overall success rate in the probing group was 80%, while it was 83.3% in the intubation group.Conclusion: Pushed monocanalicular intubation is an effective method for treatment of CNLDO; it requires only mask inhalation anesthesia and could be considered as an appropriate alternative procedure with imperceptible complications. Keywords: epiphora, probing, intubation, monocanalicular, nasolacrimal

  18. Triangular model integrating clinical teaching and assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdelaziz A

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Adel Abdelaziz,1,2 Emad Koshak3 1Medical Education Development Unit, Faculty of Medicine, Al Baha University, Al Baha, Saudi Arabia; 2Medical Education Department, Faculty of Medicine, Suez Canal University, Egypt; 3Dean and Internal Medicine Department, Faculty of Medicine, Al Baha University, Al Baha, Saudi Arabia Abstract: Structuring clinical teaching is a challenge facing medical education curriculum designers. A variety of instructional methods on different domains of learning are indicated to accommodate different learning styles. Conventional methods of clinical teaching, like training in ambulatory care settings, are prone to the factor of coincidence in having varieties of patient presentations. Accordingly, alternative methods of instruction are indicated to compensate for the deficiencies of these conventional methods. This paper presents an initiative that can be used to design a checklist as a blueprint to guide appropriate selection and implementation of teaching/learning and assessment methods in each of the educational courses and modules based on educational objectives. Three categories of instructional methods were identified, and within each a variety of methods were included. These categories are classroom-type settings, health services-based settings, and community service-based settings. Such categories have framed our triangular model of clinical teaching and assessment. Keywords: curriculum development, teaching, learning, assessment, apprenticeship, community-based settings, health service-based settings

  19. Lastekirjandus vallutab uusi tippe : eesti lastekirjandus 2009 / Jaanus Vaiksoo

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Vaiksoo, Jaanus, 1967-

    2010-01-01

    Ülevaade 2009. aasta eesti lastekirjandusest. Pikemalt käsitletakse järgmisi autoreid ja nende teoseid: Kadi Hinrikus "Kui emad olid väikesed", Kristiina Kass "Peeter ja mina", Mika Keränen "Varastatud oranž jalgratas", Andrus Kivirähk "Kaka ja kevad", Aino Pervik "Ühes väikses veidras linnas", Maarja Undusk "Päkapikk Ingo", Ilmar Tomusk "Vend Johannes", Indrek Koff "Enne kooli", Piret Raud "Härra Linnu lugu", Wimberg "Suur pidusöök", Artur Jurin "Puru kuningriigi lood II", Joonas Sildre "Maailma naba", kogumik "Uued eesti muinasjutud", Aino Pervik "Tirilinna lood", Aimeé Beekman "Päästekoer Walter", Eve Ernis "Karupoeg Nummi seiklused", Priit Aimla "Torisev vanatoi", Juhani Püttsepp "Väikese hundi lood" ja "Lauajupi Madonna", Epp Petrone "Siis, kui seened veel rääkisid", Heiki Vilep "Habemega nali", "Nõiutud linn", Leelo Tungal "Naljatilgad lähevad laulupeole", "Kama üks ja kama kaks", koos Peep Pedmansoniga Miriami lood"(esimene 3D-piltidega lasteraamat), Aidi Vallik "Pints ja Tutsik" 2. osa, Mare Müürsepp "Viis vaba kutsikat", Tiia Selli "Kass Kriibik", Aleksei Turovski "Kassipoeg Võilill", Kaider Vardja "Vana maja lugu", Merca "Mullivesi", Ülle Kütsen "Väike puu ja rändur kuu", Lehte Hainsalu "Mängiks midagi", Peep Veedla "Pöialpoiss"

  20. Dry rod consolidation technology development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rasmussen, T.L.; Schoonen, D.H.; Feldman, E.M.; Fisher, M.W.

    1987-01-01

    The Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) is funding a program to consolidate commercial spent fuel for testing in dry storage casks and to develop technology that will be fed into other OCRWM programs, e.g., Prototypical Consolidation Demonstration Program (PCDP). The program is being conducted at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) by the INEL Operating Contractor EG and G Idaho, Inc. Hardware and software have been designed and fabricated for installation in a hot cell adjacent to the Test Area North (TAN) Hot Shop Facility. This equipment is used to perform dry consolidation of commercial spent fuel from the Virginia Power (VP) Cooperative Agreement Spent Fuel Storage Cask (SFSC) Demonstration Program and assemblies that had previously been stored at the Engine Maintenance and Disassembly (EMAD) facility in Nevada. Consolidation is accomplished by individual, horizontal rod pulling. A computerized semiautomatic control system with operator involvement is utilized to conduct consolidation operations. During consolidation operations, data is taken to characterize this technology. Still photo, video tape, and other documentation will be generated to make developed information available to interested parties. Cold checkout of the hardware and software was completed in September of 1986. Following installation in the hot cell, consolidation operations begins in May 1987. Resulting consolidated fuel will be utilized in the VP Cooperative Agreement SFSC Program

  1. Dry rod consolidation technology development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rasmussen, T.L.; Schoonen, D.H.; Fisher, M.W.

    1986-01-01

    The Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) is funding a Program to consolidate commercial spent fuel for testing in dry storage casks and to develop technology that will be fed into other OCRWM Programs, e.g., Prototypical Consolidation Demonstration Program. The Program is being conducted at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) by the Operating Contractor, EGandG Idaho, Inc. Hardware and software have been designed and fabricated for installation in a hot cell adjacent to the Test Area North (TAN) Hot Shop Facility. This equipment will be used to perform dry consolidation of commercial spent fuel from the Virginia Power (VP) Cooperative Agreement Spent Fuel Storage Cask (SPSC) Demonstration Program and assemblies that had previously been stored at the Engine Maintenance and Disassembly (EMAD) facility in Nevada. Consolidation will be accomplished by individual, horizontal rod pulling. A computerized semi-automatic control system with operator involvement will be utilized to conduct consolidation operations. Special features have been incorporated in the design to allow crud collection and measurement of rod pulling forces. During consolidation operations, data will be taken to characterize this technology. Still photo, video tape, and other documentation will be generated to make developed information available to interested parties. Cold checkout of the hardware and software will complete in September of 1986. Following installation in the hot cell, consolidation operations will begin in January 1987. Resulting consolidated fuel will be utilized in the VP Cooperative Agreement SFSC Program

  2. Automated nondestructive assay system for the measurement of irradiated Rover fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Augustson, R.H.; Menlove, H.O.; Smith, D.B.; Bond, A.L.; Durrill, D.C.; Hollowell, W.P.; Bromley, C.P.

    1975-01-01

    With the termination of the Nuclear Rocket Propulsion (Rover) Program, and associated reactor testing at the Nuclear Rocket Development Station (NRDS), Nevada, plans are progressing to recover the 93 percent enriched uranium contained in irradiated fuel from twenty various test reactors. This fuel is being packaged into 7-cm-dia by 137-cm-long cardboard tubes, using the remote handling facilities (E-MAD Bldg) of NRDS. After packaging, the fuel is shipped to Allied Chemical Corporation, Idaho Falls, Idaho, for uranium recovery. About 4000 tubes will be needed to package and ship the inventory of fuel elements presently at NRDS. This represents a total of approximately 2500 kg of enriched uranium. To complete the accounting records each tube is being nondestructively assayed and records kept on a reactor-by-reactor basis where possible. The assayed values for a reactor are then compared with original input inventory values and discrepancies resolved. The tubes are being assayed by an active neutron interrogation system designed and fabricated by Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory (LASL) and operated by Westinghouse Astronuclear Laboratory (WANL)-Nevada Operations personnel. WANL is the operating contractor in charge of loading and shipping this fuel. (U.S.)

  3. Vitruvian Character: The Case of the Egyptian Museum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khaled Asfour

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available In Vitruvius’ treatise, what makes good architecture is its ability to communicate to the public particular messages that reflects the program of the building with spaces and components arranged in an orderly way. According to Vitruvius these messages when acknowledges by the public the building posses strong character. This research discusses this idea by reflecting on the 1895 competition of the Egyptian Museum project. Marcel Dourgnon, the French architect of the winning scheme, showed profound understanding of character resulting in a building that had positive vibe with the local community.  Today Vitruvius’ idea is still living with us. Norman Foster succeeded in upgrading the British Museum in a way that addressed all cultures of the world through his grand atrium design.  Similarly, Emad Farid and Ramez Azmy revived the presence of the Egyptian Museum in public cognition.  Spatial experience that evokes similar perceptions to all its visitors is a timeless piece that transcends cultural boundaries.

  4. Assessment of the facilities on Jackass Flats and other Nevada Test Site facilities for the new nuclear rocket program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chandler, G.; Collins, D.; Dye, K.; Eberhart, C.; Hynes, M.; Kovach, R.; Ortiz, R.; Perea, J.; Sherman, D.

    1992-01-01

    Recent NASA/DOE studies for the Space Exploration Initiative have demonstrated a critical need for the ground-based testing of nuclear rocket engines. Experience in the ROVER/NERVA Program, experience in the Nuclear Weapons Testing Program, and involvement in the new nuclear rocket program has motivated our detailed assessment of the facilities used for the ROVER/NERVA Program and other facilities located at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The ROVER/NERVA facilities are located in the Nevada Research L, Development Area (NRDA) on Jackass Flats at NTS, approximately 85 miles northwest of Las Vegas. To guide our assessment of facilities for an engine testing program we have defined a program goal, scope, and process. To execute this program scope and process will require ten facilities. We considered the use of all relevant facilities at NTS including existing and new tunnels as well as the facilities at NRDA. Aside from the facilities located at remote sites and the inter-site transportation system, all of the required facilities are available at NRDA. In particular we have studied the refurbishment of E-MAD, ETS-1, R-MAD, and the interconnecting railroad. The total cost for such a refurbishment we estimate to be about $253M which includes additional contractor fees related to indirect, construction management, profit, contingency, and management reserves. This figure also includes the cost of the required NEPA, safety, and security documentation

  5. EVALUATION OF THE THORACOABDOMINAL MOBILITY OF OBESE SUBJECTS IN PRE-BARIATRIC SURGERY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veloso, Ana Paula Limongi Richardelli; Cusmanich, Karla Garcez

    Obesity can affect the thorax, diaphragm, and alterations in respiratory function even if the lungs are within normality. The respiratory compliance is very reduced by the increase in fat mass. To evaluate the effect of the physical therapeutic respiratory exercises on the thoracoabdominal mobility of obese individuals in pre-bariatric surgery. Cross-sectional and descriptive study, which used the cirtometry (axillary, xiphoid and abdominal) to evaluate the mobility of 74 individuals, 27 men and 47 women, in pre-bariatric surgery, assisted by the team EMAD, after eight weeks of physiotherapy, following a protocol of exercises, reevaluating and compared the measures pre and post intervention. Had positive correlation abdominal mobility in the total volume of all participants (p=0.010) and also for all the measures in the measurement of residual volume in three levels (p=0.000). Comparing genders, in total volume, cirtometry abdominal greater for women (p=0.015) when compared to men and residual volume, significance for either men or women in all measurements (p=0.000). Obese patients that underwent the physiotherapeutic treatment during the preoperative period, had pré respiratory dynamics improved by the increase in the mobility of the chest cavity and by the improvement of respiratory conscience. A obesidade pode afetar o tórax e o diafragma, determinando alterações na função respiratória, mesmo quando os pulmões se apresentam dentro da normalidade. A complacência respiratória é muito reduzida pelo aumento de massa gordurosa. Avaliar o efeito de exercícios fisioterapêuticos respiratórios sobre a mobilidade torácica de indivíduos obesos no pré-operatório de cirurgia bariátrica. Estudo transversal e descritivo, que utilizou a cirtometria (axilar, xifoide e abdominal) para avaliar a mobilidade de 74 indivíduos, 27 homens e 47 mulheres, em pré-operatório de cirurgia bariátrica, assistidos pela equipe EMAD, após oito semanas de fisioterapia

  6. Identification and Quantitation of Malonic Acid Biomarkers of In-Born Error Metabolism by Targeted Metabolomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambati, Chandra Shekar R.; Yuan, Furong; Abu-Elheiga, Lutfi A.; Zhang, Yiqing; Shetty, Vivekananda

    2017-05-01

    Malonic acid (MA), methylmalonic acid (MMA), and ethylmalonic acid (EMA) metabolites are implicated in various non-cancer disorders that are associated with inborn-error metabolism. In this study, we have slightly modified the published 3-nitrophenylhydrazine (3NPH) derivatization method and applied it to derivatize MA, MMA, and EMA to their hydrazone derivatives, which were amenable for liquid chromatography- mass spectrometry (LC-MS) quantitation. 3NPH was used to derivatize MA, MMA, and EMA, and multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) transitions of the corresponding derivatives were determined by product-ion experiments. Data normalization and absolute quantitation were achieved by using 3NPH derivatized isotopic labeled compounds 13C2-MA, MMA-D3, and EMA-D3. The detection limits were found to be at nanomolar concentrations and a good linearity was achieved from nanomolar to millimolar concentrations. As a proof of concept study, we have investigated the levels of malonic acids in mouse plasma with malonyl-CoA decarboxylase deficiency (MCD-D), and we have successfully applied 3NPH method to identify and quantitate all three malonic acids in wild type (WT) and MCD-D plasma with high accuracy. The results of this method were compared with that of underivatized malonic acid standards experiments that were performed using hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography (HILIC)-MRM. Compared with HILIC method, 3NPH derivatization strategy was found to be very efficient to identify these molecules as it greatly improved the sensitivity, quantitation accuracy, as well as peak shape and resolution. Furthermore, there was no matrix effect in LC-MS analysis and the derivatized metabolites were found to be very stable for longer time.

  7. Alterations in oral microbial flora induced by waterpipe tobacco smoking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shakhatreh MAK

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Muhamad Ali K Shakhatreh,1 Omar F Khabour,1 Karem H Alzoubi,2 Majed M Masadeh,3 Emad I Hussein,4 George N Bshara1 1Department of Medical Laboratory Sciences, Faculty of Applied Medical Sciences, Irbid, Jordan; 2Department of Clinical Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Jordan University of Science and Technology, Irbid, Jordan; 3Department of Pharmaceutical Technology, Faculty of Pharmacy, Jordan University of Science and Technology, Irbid, Jordan; 4Department of Biological Sciences, Yarmouk University, Irbid, Jordan Background: Waterpipe smoking is a global health problem and a serious public concern. Little is known about the effects of waterpipe smoking on oral health. In the current study, we examined the alterations of oral microbial flora by waterpipe smoking. Methods: One hundred adult healthy subjects (59 waterpipe smokers and 41 non-smokers were recruited into the study. Swabs were taken from the oral cavity and subgingival regions. Standard culturing techniques were used to identify types, frequency, and mean number of microorganisms in cultures obtained from the subjects. Results: It was notable that waterpipe smokers were significantly associated with a history of oral infections. In subgingiva, Acinetobacter and Moraxella species were present only in waterpipe smokers. In addition, the frequency of Candida albicans was higher in the subgingiva of waterpipe smokers (p = 0.023 while the frequency of Fusobacterium nucleatum was significantly lower in the subgingiva of waterpipe smokers (p = 0.036. However, no change was observed in other tested bacteria, such as Campylobacter species; Viridans group streptococci, Enterobacteriaceae, and Staphylococcus aureus. In oral cavity and when colony-forming units were considered, the only bacterial species that showed significant difference were the black-pigmented bacteria (p < 0.001. Conclusion: This study provides evidence indicating that some of the oral microflora is significantly altered by

  8. Hepatocellular carcinoma: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balogh J

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Julius Balogh,1,2 David Victor III,1,3,4 Emad H Asham,1,2 Sherilyn Gordon Burroughs,1,2 Maha Boktour,1,2 Ashish Saharia,1,2 Xian Li,1,2 R Mark Ghobrial,1,2 Howard P Monsour Jr,1,3,4 1Sherrie and Alan Conover Center for Liver Disease and Transplantation, 2Division of Transplantation, Department of Surgery, 3Department of Gastroenterology and Transplant Hepatology, 4Department of Medicine, Houston Methodist Hospital, Houston, TX, USA Abstract: Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC is the most common primary liver malignancy and is a leading cause of cancer-related death worldwide. In the United States, HCC is the ninth leading cause of cancer deaths. Despite advances in prevention techniques, screening, and new technologies in both diagnosis and treatment, incidence and mortality continue to rise. Cirrhosis remains the most important risk factor for the development of HCC regardless of etiology. Hepatitis B and C are independent risk factors for the development of cirrhosis. Alcohol consumption remains an important additional risk factor in the United States as alcohol abuse is five times higher than hepatitis C. Diagnosis is confirmed without pathologic confirmation. Screening includes both radiologic tests, such as ultrasound, computerized tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging, and serological markers such as α-fetoprotein at 6-month intervals. Multiple treatment modalities exist; however, only orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT or surgical resection is curative. OLT is available for patients who meet or are downstaged into the Milan or University of San Francisco criteria. Additional treatment modalities include transarterial chemoembolization, radiofrequency ablation, microwave ablation, percutaneous ethanol injection, cryoablation, radiation therapy, systemic chemotherapy, and molecularly targeted therapies. Selection of a treatment modality is based on tumor size, location, extrahepatic spread, and underlying liver function. HCC is an

  9. Alcohol Exposure Alters Mouse Lung Inflammation in Response to Inhaled Dust

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jill A. Poole

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Alcohol exposure is associated with increased lung infections and decreased mucociliary clearance. Occupational workers exposed to dusts from concentrated animal feeding operations (CAFOs are at risk for developing chronic inflammatory lung diseases. Agricultural worker co-exposure to alcohol and organic dust has been established, although little research has been conducted on the combination effects of alcohol and organic dusts on the lung. Previously, we have shown in a mouse model that exposure to hog dust extract (HDE collected from a CAFO results in the activation of protein kinase C (PKC, elevated lavage fluid cytokines/chemokines including interleukin-6 (IL-6, and the development of significant lung pathology. Because alcohol blocks airway epithelial cell release of IL-6 in vitro, we hypothesized that alcohol exposure would alter mouse lung inflammatory responses to HDE. To test this hypothesis, C57BL/6 mice were fed 20% alcohol or water <em>ad libitum for 6 weeks and treated with 12.5% HDE by intranasal inhalation method daily during the final three weeks. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF, tracheas and lungs were collected. HDE stimulated a 2–4 fold increase in lung and tracheal PKCε (epsilon activity in mice, but no such increase in PKCε activity was observed in dust-exposed mice fed alcohol. Similarly, alcohol-fed mice demonstrated significantly less IL-6 in lung lavage in response to dust than that observed in control mice instilled with HDE. TNFα levels were also inhibited in the alcohol and HDE-exposed mouse lung tissue as compared to the HDE only exposed group. HDE-induced lung inflammatory aggregates clearly present in the tissue from HDE only exposed animals were not visually detectable in the HDE/alcohol co-exposure group. Statistically significant weight reductions and 20% mortality were also observed in the mice co-exposed to HDE and alcohol. These data suggest that alcohol exposure depresses the ability

  10. Pulse versus daily oral Alfacalcidol treatment of secondary hyperparathyroidism in hemodialysis patients: a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sawalmeh O

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Osama Sawalmeh,1 Shaheed Moala,1 Zakaria Hamdan,2 Huda Masri,3 Khubaib Ayoub,4 Emad Khazneh,2 Mujahed Shraim5 1Medicine Department, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, An-Najah National University, Nablus, Palestine; 2Nephrology Department, 3Pharmacy Department, 4Internal Medicine Department, An-Najah National University Hospital, Nablus, Palestine; 5Public Health Department, College of Health Sciences, Qatar University, Doha, Qatar Background: Secondary hyperparathyroidism is a common complication of chronic kidney disease and is managed using vitamin D replacement therapy. Very few studies have examined the effectiveness of pulse alfacalcidol therapy in comparison to daily oral alfacalcidol therapy in suppressing serum parathyroid hormone (PTH levels in hemodialysis patients. The aim of this randomized controlled trial was to replicate the findings of prior studies comparing effectiveness of pulse oral alfacalcidol therapy versus daily oral alfacalcidol therapy in suppressing PTH after 13 weeks of therapy using a Palestinian sample of hemodialysis patients, and to identify demographic and biomedical characteristics of patients that are independently associated with PTH levels.Methods: One hundred and sixty-seven patients completed the study, 88 in the daily group and 79 in the pulse group. The pulse group had more clinically significant reduction in mean PTH level by 75 pg/dL at 13 weeks than the daily group, but this was not statistically significant.Results: The effect of alfacalcidol therapy on metabolism of phosphate and corrected calcium levels was comparable in both groups, and pulse therapy was not associated with increased risk of hypercalcemia and hyperphosphatemia. Serum PTH levels were independently and inversely associated with older age and diabetes.Conclusion: Switching daily alfacalcidol therapy to thrice-weekly alfacalcidol pulse therapy seems safe and convenient, especially for hemodialysis patients with poor compliance

  11. Multidisciplinary management of clear-cell renal cell carcinoma in Africa and the Middle East: current practice and recommendations for improvement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zekri J

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Jamal Zekri,1 Lydia M Dreosti,2 Marwan Ghosn,3 Emad Hamada,4 Mohamed Jaloudi,5 Ola Khorshid,6 Blaha Larbaoui7 1College of Medicine, King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Centre, Alfaisal University, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia; 2Department of Medical Oncology, University of Pretoria, Pretoria, South Africa; 3Faculty of Medicine Hematology, Oncology Department, Saint Joseph University, Beirut, Lebanon; 4Faculty of Medicine, Cairo University, Kasr Alainy, Cairo, Egypt; 5Oncology Hematology Department, Tawam Hospital, Al Ain, Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates; 6National Cancer Institute, Cairo University, Kasr El Ainy, Cairo, Egypt; 7Oncology Service, Université Djillali Liabés, Sidi Bel Abbés, Algeria Abstract: The management of renal cell carcinoma (RCC has evolved considerably in recent years. This report represents the consensus of 22 relevant medical specialists from Africa and the Middle East region engaged in the management of RCC. Partial or radical nephrectomy is the standard of care for most patients with localized RCC. It is essential that patients are followed up appropriately after surgery to enable local and distant relapses to be identified and treated promptly. The treatment of advanced/metastatic disease has changed dramatically with the introduction of targeted therapies. Follow-up of these patients enables therapy optimization and assessment of response to treatment. There was universal agreement on the importance of management of RCC by a multidisciplinary team supported by a multidisciplinary tumor board. Barriers hindering this approach were identified. These included lack of awareness of the benefits of multidisciplinary team role, poor communication among relevant disciplines, time constraints, and specifics of private practice. Other challenges include shortage of expert specialists as urologists and oncologists and lack of local management guidelines in some countries. Solutions were proposed and discussed. Medical

  12. USO DA PGF2? NO PUERPÉRIO PARA REDUZIR O ANESTRO PÓS-PARTO DE CABRAS EM ALEITAMENTO CONTÍNUO E CONTROLADO USE OF PGF2? ON THE PUERPERIO TO REDUCE THE POS-PARTUM ANESTROUS OF CONTINUOS OR CONTROLLED SUCKLING GOATS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Fernandes Lima

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available

    Objetivou-se estudar os efeitos da administração da PGF2α sobre o período de anestro pós-parto de oitenta cabras, em aleitamento contínuo ou controlado, criadas em sistema semi-extensivo com acesso à água e sal mineral <em>ad libitum. As fêmeas, com idade entre dois e seis anos, foram aleatoriamente distribuídas em três grupos experimentais (GI, GII, GIII. As do GI (n = 30 receberam, na musculatura vulvar, 250µg de PGF2α no 6o e 12o dias após o parto. As do GII (n = 30 foram tratadas, pela mesma via e com a mesma dose de PGF2α, no 6o, 7o, 8o, 9o e 10o dias do pós-parto, e as do GIII (n = 20 serviram como controle. Realizou-se a detecção do estro por rufião com auxílio de pessoal habilitado e efetuaram-se as coberturas com reprodutores de fertilidade comprovada. Analisaram-se os dados através da ANOVA e do cálculo do erro-padrão da diferença entre proporções. Não se verificou diferença (P > 0,05 das porcentagens de estro entre os três grupos experimentais; todavia, a duração média do anestro pós-parto foi significativamente reduzida (P < 0,05 nos animais tratados com PGF2α. Houve redução significativa (P < 0,05 do anestro pós-parto das fêmeas em aleitamento controlado. Não se registrou diferença (P > 0,05 nas porcentagens de prenhez entre os diferentes grupos. Os dados obtidos permitem concluir que a administração da PGF2α no início do puerpério é eficiente para reduzir o período de anestro pós-parto, especialmente nas fêmeas em aleitamento controlado; contudo, não exerce influência sobre a fertilidade de cabras SRD com aptidão para produção de carne.

    PALAVRAS-CHAVES: Caprino, estro, prostaglandina, puerpério.

    This work aimed to

  13. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 127: Areas 25 and 26 Storage Tanks, Nevada Test Site, Nevada (Rev. No.: 0, August 2002)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    NNSA/NV

    2002-01-01

    This Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) contains the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Operations Offices's approach to collect the data necessary to evaluate corrective action alternatives appropriate for the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 127 under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Corrective Action Unit 127 is located on the Nevada Test Site approximately 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. This CAU is comprised of 12 Corrective Action Sites (CASs) located at Test Cell C; the Engine Maintenance, Assembly, and Disassembly (E-MAD) Facility; the X-Tunnel in Area 25; the Pluto Disassembly Facility; the Pluto Check Station; and the Port Gaston Training Facility in Area 26. These CASs include: CAS 25-01-05, Aboveground Storage Tank (AST); CAS 25-02-02, Underground Storage Tank (UST); CAS 25-23-11, Contaminated Materials; CAS 25-12-01, Boiler; CAS 25-01-06, AST; CAS 25-01-07, AST; CAS 25-02-13, UST; CAS 26- 01-01, Filter Tank (Rad) and Piping; CAS 26-01-02, Filter Tank (Rad); CAS 26-99-01, Radioactively Contaminated Filters; CAS 26-02-01, UST; CAS 26-23-01, Contaminated Liquids Spreader. Based on site history, process knowledge, and previous field efforts, contaminants of potential concern for CAU 127 include radionuclides, metals, total petroleum hydrocarbons, volatile organic compounds, asbestos, and polychlorinated biphenyls. Additionally, beryllium may be present at some locations. The sources of potential releases are varied, but releases of contaminated liquids may have occurred and may have migrated into and impacted soil below and surrounding storage vessels at some of the CASs. Also, at several CASs, asbestos-containing materials may be present on the aboveground structures and may be friable. Exposure pathways are limited to ingestion, inhalation, and dermal contact (adsorption) of soils/sediments or liquids, or inhalation of contaminants by site workers due to disturbance of

  14. Efficacy of local dexmedetomidine add-on for spermatic cord block anesthesia in patients undergoing intrascrotal surgeries: randomized controlled multicenter clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hetta DF

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Diab Fuad Hetta,1 Emad E Kamal,2 Ali M Mahran,2 Doaa G Ahmed,1 Abdelraheem Elawamy,3 Abdelraouf MS Abdelraouf3 1Department of Anesthesiology and Pain Management, South Egypt Cancer Institute, 2Department of Dermatology and Andrology, 3Department of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care, Faculty of Medicine, Assiut University, Assiut, Egypt Study objective: The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of adding dexmedetomidine (DEX to bupivacaine on the quality of spermatic cord block anesthesia and postoperative analgesia. Design: This is a randomized, double-blind study. Setting: This study was performed in an educational and research hospital. Patients: One hundred twenty adult males were scheduled for intrascrotal surgeries. Interventions: Patients were divided into two groups: group B received 10 mL of bupivacaine 0.25% for spermatic cord block and intravenous 50 µg of DEX and group BD received 10 mL of bupivacaine 0.25% added to 50 µg of DEX (9.5 mL bupivacaine 0. 25% + 0.5 mL [50 µg] DEX for spermatic cord block, and for masking purposes, the patients received isotonic saline intravenously. Measurements: Time to first analgesic request, analgesic consumption, and visual analog scale (VAS pain score in the first 24 hours postoperatively were assessed. Main results: Time to first rescue analgesic was significantly delayed in group BD in comparison with group B, median (interquartile range, 7 (6–12 hours versus 6 (5–7 hours, (p=0.000, the mean cumulative morphine consumption (mg in the first postoperative 24 hours was significantly lower in group BD compared with group B, 8.13±4.45 versus 12.7±3.79, with a mean difference (95% CI of −4.57 (−6.06 to −3.07 (p=0.000; also, there was a significant reduction of VAS pain score in group BD in comparison with group B at all measured time points, VAS 2 hours (1.28±0.9 vs 1.92±0.8, VAS 6 hours (2.62±1.5 vs 3.93±1.2, VAS 12 hours (2.40±1.1 vs 3.57±0.65, VAS 24 hours (1.90±0

  15. SOURCE AND PATHWAY DETERMINATION FOR BERYLLIUM FOUND IN BECHTEL NEVADA NORTH LAS VEGAS FACILITIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BECHTEL NEVADA

    2004-07-01

    In response to the report ''Investigation of Beryllium Exposure Cases Discovered at the North Las Vegas Facility of the National Nuclear Security Administration'', published by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) in August 2003, Bechtel Nevada (BN) President and General Manager Dr. F. A. Tarantino appointed the Beryllium Investigation & Assessment Team (BIAT) to identify both the source and pathway for the beryllium found in the North Las Vegas (NLV) B-Complex. From September 8 to December 18, 2003, the BIAT investigated the pathway for beryllium and determined that a number of locations existed at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) which could have contained sufficient quantities of beryllium to result in contamination if transported. Operations performed in the B-1 Building as a result of characterization activities at the Engine Maintenance, Assembly, and Disassembly (EMAD); Reactor Maintenance, Assembly, and Disassembly (RMAD); Test Cells A and C; and the Central Support Facility in Area 25 had the greatest opportunity for transport of beryllium. Investigative monitoring and sampling was performed at these sites with subsequent transport of sample materials, equipment, and personnel from the NTS to the B-1 Building. The timeline established by the BIAT for potential transport of the beryllium contamination into the B-1 Building was from September 1997 through November 2002. Based on results of recently completed swipe sampling, no evidence of transport of beryllium from test areas has been confirmed. Results less than the DOE beryllium action level of 0.2 ???g/100 cm2 were noted for work support facilities located in Area 25. All of the identified sites in Area 25 worked within the B-1 tenant's residency timeline have been remediated. Legacy contaminants have either been disposed of or capped with clean borrow material. As such, no current opportunity exists for release or spread of beryllium

  16. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 127: Areas 25 and 26 Storage Tanks, Nevada Test Site, Nevada (Rev. No.: 0, August 2002)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NNSA/NV

    2002-08-27

    This Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) contains the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Operations Offices's approach to collect the data necessary to evaluate corrective action alternatives appropriate for the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 127 under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Corrective Action Unit 127 is located on the Nevada Test Site approximately 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. This CAU is comprised of 12 Corrective Action Sites (CASs) located at Test Cell C; the Engine Maintenance, Assembly, and Disassembly (E-MAD) Facility; the X-Tunnel in Area 25; the Pluto Disassembly Facility; the Pluto Check Station; and the Port Gaston Training Facility in Area 26. These CASs include: CAS 25-01-05, Aboveground Storage Tank (AST); CAS 25-02-02, Underground Storage Tank (UST); CAS 25-23-11, Contaminated Materials; CAS 25-12-01, Boiler; CAS 25-01-06, AST; CAS 25-01-07, AST; CAS 25-02-13, UST; CAS 26- 01-01, Filter Tank (Rad) and Piping; CAS 26-01-02, Filter Tank (Rad); CAS 26-99-01, Radioactively Contaminated Filters; CAS 26-02-01, UST; CAS 26-23-01, Contaminated Liquids Spreader. Based on site history, process knowledge, and previous field efforts, contaminants of potential concern for CAU 127 include radionuclides, metals, total petroleum hydrocarbons, volatile organic compounds, asbestos, and polychlorinated biphenyls. Additionally, beryllium may be present at some locations. The sources of potential releases are varied, but releases of contaminated liquids may have occurred and may have migrated into and impacted soil below and surrounding storage vessels at some of the CASs. Also, at several CASs, asbestos-containing materials may be present on the aboveground structures and may be friable. Exposure pathways are limited to ingestion, inhalation, and dermal contact (adsorption) of soils/sediments or liquids, or inhalation of contaminants by site workers due to disturbance of

  17. Different individual areas of interaction and the effects on the behavior of players: applications to training in soccer Análisis de los diferentes espacios individuales de interacción y los efectos en las conductas motrices de los jugadores: aplicaciones al entrenamiento en fútbol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Casamichana

    2010-09-01

    >espacio individual de interacción, manteniendo constantes las variables: número de jugadores, presencia de porteros, disponibilidad de balones en el perímetro, aliento del entrenador y el nivel de los equipos.

    Se realizaron en tres sesiones consecutivas los tres juegos reducidos de cada uno de los espacios individuales de interacción. Posteriormente se registraron las diferentes conductas motrices de los jugadores mediante una herramienta de observación diseñada <em>ad hoc, que previamente mostró una elevada estabilidad entre observaciones. Y finalmente se llevaron a cabo análisis descriptivos e inferenciales. Las dimensiones del terreno afectan cualitativa y cuantitativamente en las conductas motrices de los jugadores, detectándose diferencias significativas en el juego. El espacio individual de interacción es una variable importante a considerar en el diseño de tareas de entrenamiento en fútbol.         
    Palabras Clave: : fútbol, juegos reducidos, análisis notacional, conductas motrices.

  18. Osservazioni in cattività sul ciclo stagionale del peso corporeo e sull'efficienza digestiva di Pipistrellus kuhlii e Hypsugo savii (Chiroptera: Vespertilionidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gianna Dondini

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available Molte specie di pipistrelli delle fasce climatiche temperato-fredde sono soggette a marcate variazioni stagionali di temperatura e disponibilità di cibo. L'accumulo di grasso in autunno è quindi un adattamento per trascorrere, in uno stato di profondo torpore definibile ibernazione, i mesi invernali, aumentando così la probabilità di sopravvivenza durante tale periodo. Nell?ambito di una attività pluriennale relativa alla raccolta, studio e, quando possibile, riabilitazione di pipistrelli in ambienti urbani, due esemplari di Pipistrellus kuhlii (2 femmine e due di Hypsugo savii (1 maschio e 1 femmina, in entrambi casi giovani che ancora non avevano acquisito una sufficiente capacità nel volo e quindi non liberabili, sono stati raccolti nella pianura di Firenze durante l?estate del 1998 e mantenuti in condizioni di temperatura ambientale oscillante tra i 17 e i 22°C, in un contenitore di 150x40x30 cm. Ogni sera sono stati pesati, prima della somministrazione di cibo e acqua, con una bilancia elettronica con precisione di 0.1 g (modello Tanita 1479. L'alimentazione è stata a base di vermi della farina (Tenebrio molitor. L?efficienza digestiva è calcolata nel seguente modo, su materiale disidratato: (quantità ingerita ? quantità escrementi/quantità ingerita*100. Per il calcolo di tale indice gli esemplari delle due specie sono stati separati e mantenuti per 24 ore a partire dalla successiva sera dell?ultima somministrazione, favorendo così lo svuotamento dell?intestino. Successivamente, per due giorni è stato fornito del cibo <em>ad libitum, pesando i singoli esemplari una volta terminata la fase di alimentazione, per determinare la quantità ingerita. Al termine abbiamo mantenuto gli esemplari a digiuno per 24 ore successive all?ultima somministrazione per permettere lo svuotamento dell?intestino. Gli escrementi raccolti sono stati posti in forno elettrico a 90 °C per 24 ore e successivamente pesati

  19. Corrective Action Decision Document/ Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 556: Dry Wells and Surface Release Points, Nevada Test Site, Nevada with Errata Sheet, Revision 0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grant Evenson

    2008-09-01

    This Corrective Action Decision Document (CADD)/Closure Report (CR) has been prepared for Corrective Action Unit 556, Dry Wells and Surface Release Points, located at the Nevada Test Site, Nevada, in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO, 1996; as amended February 2008). Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 556 is comprised of four corrective action sites (CASs): • 06-20-04, National Cementers Dry Well • 06-99-09, Birdwell Test Hole • 25-60-03, E-MAD Stormwater Discharge and Piping • 25-64-01, Vehicle Washdown and Drainage Pit The purpose of this CADD/CR is to provide justification and documentation supporting the recommendation for closure of CAU 556 with no further corrective action. To achieve this, corrective action investigation (CAI) activities began on February 7 and were completed on June 19, 2008, as set forth in the Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 556: Dry Wells and Surface Release Points, Nevada Test Site, Nevada (NNSA/NSO, 2007). The purpose of the CAI was to fulfill the following data needs as defined during the data quality objective (DQO) process: • Determine whether contaminants of concern (COCs) are present. • If COCs are present, determine their nature and extent. • Provide sufficient information and data to complete appropriate corrective actions. The CAU 556 data were evaluated based on the data quality assessment process, which demonstrated the quality and acceptability of the data for use in fulfilling the DQO data needs. Analytes detected during the CAI were evaluated against appropriate final action levels (FALs) to identify the COCs for each CAS. The results of the CAI identified COCs at one of the four CASs in CAU 556 that required the completion of a corrective action. Assessment of the data generated from investigation activities conducted at CAU 556 revealed the following: • Corrective Action Sites 06-20-04, 06-99-09, and 25-64-01 do not contain contamination at

  20. PREFACE: The 15th International Conference on X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (XAFS15)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Z. Y.

    2013-04-01

    Committees and Staff Chair of the Conference Ziyu Wu International Advisory Committee Adam Hitchcock, Canada Adriano Filipponi, Italy Alain Manceau, France Alexander Soldatov, Russia Andrea Di Cicco, Italy Britt Hedman, USA Bruce Bunker, USA Calogero R. Natoli, Italy Christopher T. Chantler, Australia Frank M. F. De Groot, Netherlands Hiroyuki Oyanagi, Japan Ingolf Lindau, USA J. Mustre de Leon, México James E Penner-Hahn, USA Joaquin Garcia Ruiz, Spain John Evans, UK John J. Rehr, USA Kiyotaka Asakura, Japan Majed Chergui, Switzerland Mark Newton, UK Shiqiang Wei, P. R. China Tsun-Kong Sham, Canada Ziyu Wu, P. R. China International Program Committee Antonio Bianconi, Italy Augusto Marcelli, Italy Emad Flear Aziz, Germany Jinghua Guo, USA Joly Yves, France Masaharu Nomura, Japan Maurizio Benfatto, Italy Pieter Glatzel, France Shiqiang Wei, China Tiandou Hu, China Toshihiko Yokoyama, Japan Way-Faung Pong, Taiwan Xinyi Zhang, China Yi Xie, China Yuying Huang, China Zhonghua Wu, China Ziyu Wu, China Local Organizing Committee Bo He Fengchun Hu Haifeng Zhao Jing Zhang Meijuan Yu Qin Yu Shuo Zhang Wangsheng Chu Wei He Wei Xu Wensheng Yan Xiaomei Gong Xing Chen Yang Zou Yi Xia Zheng Jiang Zhi Xie Zhihu Sun Zhiyun Pan Additional Staff Chengxun Liu