WorldWideScience

Sample records for vasopressin gene suggests

  1. Expression of three different mutations in the arginine vasopressin gene suggests genotype-phenotype correlation in familial neurohypophyseal diabetes insipidus kindreds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Siggaard, Charlotte; Christensen, Jane Hvarregaard; Corydon, Thomas Juhl

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE AND STUDY DESIGN: The autosomal dominant form of familial neurohypophyseal diabetes insipidus (adFNDI) is a rare disease characterized by a severe and progressive deficiency of AVP secondary to mutations in the gene encoding the AVP precursor. Whereas a number of studies have investigated....... CONCLUSION: The study suggests a genotype-phenotype correlation with regard to age of onset of diabetes insipidus symptoms and provides support by expression studies....

  2. Osmotic Stress Induces Transcriptional Changes in Vasopressin and Vasopressin 1b Receptor Gene Expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-08-29

    the extracellular space and into the plasma through fenestrated capillaries surrounding the nerve terminals. The release ofAVP is coupled to vasopressin... vesicles . ~1utations that disrupt membrane localization ofaquaporin were described by Deen and colleagues in 1994 (Deen et al., 1994), and more recently...COIlUS straitus venoms . J. Bioi. Chem. 262: 15821-15824. Dayanithi, G., N. Sabatier, and H. Widmer. 2000. Intracellular calcium signalling in magnocellular

  3. [Mutations in the arginine vasopressin neurophysin-II gene in familial neurohypophyseal diabetes insipidus patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peralta-Leal, Valeria; Durán-González, Jorge; Leal-Ugarte, Evelia

    2008-01-01

    Neurogenic diabetes insipidus (NDI) is a rare condition characterized by polyuria and polydipsia caused by deficient arginine vasopressin hormone production. More than a 50 mutations have been identified for familial autosomic dominant neurogenic diabetes insipidus (FadNDI). These mutations can cause citotoxicity and lead to the degeneration of magnocellular neurons of the hipofisis by aberrant protein accumulation. The NDI diagnosis is based on the water deprivation test, quantification of AVP hormone and Magnetic Resonance Image (MRI), and in families with history of FadNDI has been suggested the molecular analysis of mutation in the arginine vasopressin neurophisin II gene before the signs and symptoms development, with the purpose of offering a suitable diagnosis, clinical follow up and treatment. The treatment with a synthetic analogue of AVP hormone allows the remission of the signs and symptoms in NDI patients and the advances in gene therapy in animal models has been promising, as much for NDI as for other diseases in which the mutant protein production has been involved.

  4. Associations between Vocal Symptoms and Genetic Variants in the Oxytocin Receptor and Arginine Vasopressin 1A Receptor Gene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jämsen, Sofia Holmqvist; Johansson, Ada; Westberg, Lars; Santtila, Pekka; von der Pahlen, Bettina; Simberg, Susanna

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: Oxytocin and arginine vasopressin are associated with different aspects of the stress response. As stress is regarded as a risk factor for vocal symptoms, we wanted to explore the association between the oxytocin receptor gene ("OXTR") and arginine vasopressin 1A receptor gene ("AVPR1A") single-nucleotide polymorphisms…

  5. Number of X-chromosome genes influences social behavior and vasopressin gene expression in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Kimberly H; Quinnies, Kayla M; Eschendroeder, Alex; Didrick, Paula M; Eugster, Erica A; Rissman, Emilie F

    2015-01-01

    Sex differences in behavior are widespread and often caused by hormonal differences between the sexes. In addition to hormones, the composition and numbers of the sex chromosomes also affect a variety of sex differences. In humans, X-chromosome genes are implicated in neurobehavioral disorders (i.e. fragile-X, autism). To investigate the role of X-chromosome genes in social behavior, we used a mouse model that has atypical sex chromosome configurations resembling Turner (45, XO) and Klinefelter syndromes (47, XXY). We examined a number of behaviors in juvenile mice. Mice with only one copy of most X-chromosome genes, regardless of gonadal sex, were less social in dyadic interaction and social preference tasks. In the elevated plus maze, mice with one X-chromosome spent less time in the distal ends of the open arms as compared to mice with two copies of X-chromosome genes. Using qRTPCR, we noted that amygdala from female mice with one X-chromosome had higher expression levels of vasopressin (Avp) as compared to mice in the other groups. Finally, in plasma from girls with Turner syndrome we detected reduced vasopressin (AVP) concentrations as compared to control patients. These novel findings link sex chromosome genes with social behavior via concentrations of AVP in brain, adding to our understanding of sex differences in neurobehavioral disorders. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. The arginine vasopressin V1b receptor gene and prosociality: Mediation role of emotional empathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Nan; Shang, Siyuan; Su, Yanjie

    2015-09-01

    The vasopressin V1b receptor (AVPR1B) gene has been shown to be closely associated with bipolar disorder and depression. However, whether it relates to positive social outcomes, such as empathy and prosocial behavior, remains unknown. This study explored the possible role of the AVPR1B gene rs28373064 in empathy and prosociality. A total of 256 men, who were genetically unrelated, non-clinical ethnic Han Chinese college students, participated in the study. Prosociality was tested by measuring the prosocial tendencies of cognitive and emotional empathy using the Interpersonal Reactivity Index (IRI). The single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP), rs28373064, was genotyped using a polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) analysis. The results suggest that the AVPR1B gene rs28373064 is linked to emotional empathy and prosociality. The mediation analysis indicated that the effect of the AVPR1B gene on prosociality might be mediated by emotional empathy. This study demonstrated the link between the AVPR1B gene and prosociality and provided evidence that emotional empathy might mediate the relation between the AVPR1B gene and prosociality. © 2015 The Institute of Psychology, Chinese Academy of Sciences and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  7. Role of fructose and fructokinase in acute dehydration-induced vasopressin gene expression and secretion in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song 宋志林, Zhilin; Roncal-Jimenez, Carlos A; Lanaspa-Garcia, Miguel A; Oppelt, Sarah A; Kuwabara, Masanari; Jensen, Thomas; Milagres, Tamara; Andres-Hernando, Ana; Ishimoto, Takuji; Garcia, Gabriela E; Johnson, Ginger; MacLean, Paul S; Sanchez-Lozada, Laura-Gabriela; Tolan, Dean R; Johnson, Richard J

    2017-02-01

    mechanisms leading to vasopressin release under conditions of water restriction (acute dehydration). Specifically, these studies suggest that the aldose reductase-fructokinase pathways may be involved in vasopressin synthesis in the hypothalamus and secretion by the pituitary in response to acute dehydration. Nevertheless, mice undergoing water restriction remain capable of maintaining sufficient vasopressin (copeptin) levels to allow normal urinary concentration. Further studies of the aldose reductase-fructokinase system in vasopressin regulation appear indicated. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  8. Clinical and molecular analysis of a Chinese family with autosomal dominant neurohypophyseal diabetes insipidus associated with a novel missense mutation in the vasopressin-neurophysin II gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Yongfeng; Wang, Binbin; Qiu, Yu; Zhang, Chuan; Jin, Chengluo; Zhao, Yakun; Zhu, Qingguo; Ma, Xu

    2012-08-01

    The objective of this study is to identify the genetic defects in a Chinese family with autosomal dominant familial neurohypophyseal diabetes insipidus. Complete physical examination, fluid deprivation, and DDAVP tests were performed in three affected and three healthy members of the family. Genomic DNA was extracted from leukocytes of venous blood of these individuals for polymerase chain reaction amplification and direct sequencing of all three coding exons of arginine vasopressin-neurophysin II (AVP-NPII) gene. Seven members of this family were suspected to have symptomatic vasopressin-deficient diabetes insipidus. The water deprivation test in all the patients confirmed the diagnosis of vasopressin-deficient diabetes insipidus, with the pedigree demonstrating an autosomal dominant inheritance. Direct sequence analysis revealed a novel mutation (c.193T>A) and a synonymous mutation (c.192C>A) in the AVP-NPII gene. The missense mutation resulted in the substitution of cysteine by serine at a highly conserved codon 65 of exon 2 of the AVP-NPII gene in all affected individuals, but not in unaffected members. We concluded that a novel missense mutation in the AVP-NPII gene caused neurohypophyseal diabetes insipidus in this family, due to impaired neurophysin function as a carrier protein for AVP. The Cys65 is essential for NPII in the formation of a salt bridge with AVP. Presence of this mutation suggests that the portion of the neurophysin peptide encoded by this sequence is important for the normal expression of vasopressin.

  9. Immunohistochemical evaluation of vasopressin expression in breast fibrocystic disease and ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    North, William G; Wells, Wendy; Fay, Michael J; Mathew, Rennie S; Donnelly, Edward M; Memoli, Vincent A

    2003-01-01

    We previously found that expression of the vasopressin gene is a common feature of human breast cancer. In the present study we first examined 21 different cases of benign fibrocystic breast disease for vasopressin expression using immunohistochemistry and antibodies directed against vasopressin (anti-VP) and against vasopressin-associated glycopeptide (anti-VAG). All cases examined were negative for vasopressin gene expression using these antibodies. Alternatively, we examined 16 cases of breast ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) using the second of these antibodies (anti-VAG), and all of these cases were positive for vasopressin gene expression. Our results suggest that products of vasopressin gene expression are not markers of cellular proliferation in the breast, and might rather represent an early part of the carcinogenic process in this tissue.

  10. A novel polymorphism in the coding region of the vasopressin type 2 receptor gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.L. Rocha

    1997-04-01

    Full Text Available Nephrogenic diabetes insipidus (NDI is a rare disease characterized by renal inability to respond properly to arginine vasopressin due to mutations in the vasopressin type 2 receptor (V2(R gene in affected kindreds. In most kindreds thus far reported, the mode of inheritance follows an X chromosome-linked recessive pattern although autosomal-dominant and autosomal-recessive modes of inheritance have also been described. Studies demonstrating mutations in the V2(R gene in affected kindreds that modify the receptor structure, resulting in a dys- or nonfunctional receptor have been described, but phenotypically indistinguishable NDI patients with a structurally normal V2(R gene have also been reported. In the present study, we analyzed exon 3 of the V2(R gene in 20 unrelated individuals by direct sequencing. A C®T alteration in the third position of codon 331 (AGC®AGT, which did not alter the encoded amino acid, was found in nine individuals, including two unrelated patients with NDI. Taken together, these observations emphasize the molecular heterogeneity of a phenotypically homogeneous syndrome

  11. Chromosomal localization of the human V3 pituitary vasopressin receptor gene (AVPR3) to 1q32

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rousseau-Merck, M.F.; Derre, J.; Berger, R. [INSERM, Paris (France)] [and others

    1995-11-20

    Vasopressin exerts its physiological effects on liver metabolism, fluid osmolarity, and corticotrophic response to stress through a set of at least three receptors, V1a, V2, and V3 (also called V1b), respectively. These receptors constitute a distinct group of the superfamily of G-protein-coupled cell surface receptors. When bound to vasopressin, they couple to G proteins activating phospholipase C for the V1a and V3 types and adenylate cyclase for the V2. The vasopressin receptor subfamily also includes the receptor for oxytocin, a structurally related hormone that signals through the activation of phospholipase C. The chromosomal position of the V2 receptor gene has been assigned to Xq28-qter by PCR-based screening of somatic cell hybrids, whereas the oxytocin receptor gene has been mapped to chromosome 3q26.2 by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). The chromosomal location of the V1a gene is currently unknown. We recently cloned the cDNA and the gene coding for the human pituitary-specific V3 receptor (HGMW-approved symbol AVPR3). We report here the chromosomal localization of this gene by two distinct in situ hybridization techniques using radioactive and fluorescent probes. 11 refs., 1 fig.

  12. Oxytocin and vasopressin receptor gene polymorphisms: role in social and psychiatric traits.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauricio eAspé Sánchez

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Oxytocin (OXT and arginine-vasopressin (AVP are two phylogenetically conserved neuropeptides that have been implicated in a wide range of social behaviors. Although a large body of research, ranging from rodents to humans, has reported on the effects of OXT and AVP administration on affiliative and trust behaviors, and has highlighted the genetic contributions of OXT and AVP receptor polymorphisms to both social behaviors and to diseases related to social deficits, the consequences of peptide administration on psychiatric symptoms, and the impact of receptor polymorphisms on receptor function, are still unclear. Despite the exciting advances that these reports have brought to social neuroscience, they remain preliminary and suffer from the problems that are inherent to monogenetic linkage and association studies. As an alternative, some studies are using polygenic approaches, and consider the contributions of other genes and pathways, including those involving DA, 5-HT, and reelin, in addition to OXT and AVP; a handful of report are also using genome-wide association studies.This review summarizes findings on the associations between OXT and AVP receptor polymorphism, social behavior, and psychiatric diseases. In addition, we discuss reports on the interactions of OXT and AVP receptor genes and genes involved in other pathways (like those

  13. Personality in Chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes): Exploring the Hierarchical Structure and Associations with the Vasopressin V1A Receptor Gene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latzman, Robert D.; Hopkins, William D.; Keebaugh, Alaine C.; Young, Larry J.

    2014-01-01

    One of the major contributions of recent personality psychology is the finding that traits are related to each other in an organized hierarchy. To date, however, researchers have yet to investigate this hierarchy in nonhuman primates. Such investigations are critical in confirming the cross-species nature of trait personality helping to illuminate personality as neurobiologically-based and evolutionarily-derived dimensions of primate disposition. Investigations of potential genetic polymorphisms associated with hierarchical models of personality among nonhuman primates represent a critical first step. The current study examined the hierarchical structure of chimpanzee personality as well as sex-specific associations with a polymorphism in the promoter region of the vasopressin V1a receptor gene (AVPR1A), a gene associated with dispositional traits, among 174 chimpanzees. Results confirmed a hierarchical structure of personality across species and, despite differences in early rearing experiences, suggest a sexually dimorphic role of AVPR1A polymorphisms on hierarchical personality profiles at a higher-order level. PMID:24752497

  14. Oxytocin and Vasopressin Receptor Gene Polymorphisms: Role in Social and Psychiatric Traits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aspé-Sánchez, Mauricio; Moreno, Macarena; Rivera, Maria Ignacia; Rossi, Alejandra; Ewer, John

    2016-01-01

    Oxytocin (OXT) and arginine-vasopressin (AVP) are two phylogenetically conserved neuropeptides that have been implicated in a wide range of social behaviors. Although a large body of research, ranging from rodents to humans, has reported on the effects of OXT and AVP administration on affiliative and trust behaviors, and has highlighted the genetic contributions of OXT and AVP receptor polymorphisms to both social behaviors and to diseases related to social deficits, the consequences of peptide administration on psychiatric symptoms, and the impact of receptor polymorphisms on receptor function, are still unclear. Despite the exciting advances that these reports have brought to social neuroscience, they remain preliminary and suffer from the problems that are inherent to monogenetic linkage and association studies. As an alternative, some studies are using polygenic approaches, and consider the contributions of other genes and pathways, including those involving DA, 5-HT, and reelin, in addition to OXT and AVP; a handful of report are also using genome-wide association studies. This review summarizes findings on the associations between OXT and AVP receptor polymorphism, social behavior, and psychiatric diseases. In addition, we discuss reports on the interactions of OXT and AVP receptor genes and genes involved in other pathways (such as those of dopamine, serotonin, and reelin), as well as research that has shed some light on the impact of gene polymorphisms on the volume, connectivity, and activation of specific neural structures, differential receptor expression, and plasma levels of the OXT and AVP peptides. We hope that this effort will be helpful for understanding the studies performed so far, and for encouraging the inclusion of other candidate genes not explored to date. PMID:26858594

  15. Triarchic Psychopathy Dimensions in Chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes: Investigating Associations with Genetic Variation in the Vasopressin Receptor 1A Gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert D. Latzman

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Vasopressin is a neuropeptide known to be associated with the development and evolution of complex socio-emotional behaviors including those relevant to psychopathic personality. In both humans and chimpanzees, recent research suggests a strong genetic contribution to individual variation in psychopathic traits. To date, however, little is known concerning specific genes that might explain the observed heritability of psychopathy. In a relatively large sample of captive chimpanzees (N = 164, the current study thus sought to investigate gene-environment associations between triarchic psychopathy dimensions (i.e., disinhibition, meanness, and boldness and (1 early social rearing experiences and (2 polymorphisms in the promoter region of the V1A receptor gene (AVPR1A. Among chimpanzees raised by their biological conspecific mothers, AVPR1A was found to uniquely explain variability in disinhibition and in sex-specific ways for boldness and a total psychopathy score; however, in contrast, no significant associations were found between AVPR1A and any of the triarchic psychopathy dimensions in chimpanzees raised the first 3 years of life in a human nursery. Thus, when considered in its entirety, results suggest an important contributory influence of V1A receptor genotype variation in the explanation of the development of psychopathy under some but not all early rearing conditions. Results of the current study provide additional support for the assertion that psychopathic tendencies are rooted in basic, evolutionarily-meaningful dispositions, and provide support for a primate-translational operationalization of key neurobehavioral constructs relevant both to psychopathy and to broader forms of psychopathology.

  16. Oxytocin and vasopressin receptor gene variation as a proximate base for inter- and intraspecific behavioral differences in bonobos and chimpanzees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staes, Nicky; Stevens, Jeroen M G; Helsen, Philippe; Hillyer, Mia; Korody, Marisa; Eens, Marcel

    2014-01-01

    Recent literature has revealed the importance of variation in neuropeptide receptor gene sequences in the regulation of behavioral phenotypic variation. Here we focus on polymorphisms in the oxytocin receptor gene (OXTR) and vasopressin receptor gene 1a (Avpr1a) in chimpanzees and bonobos. In humans, a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in the third intron of OXTR (rs53576 SNP (A/G)) is linked with social behavior, with the risk allele (A) carriers showing reduced levels of empathy and prosociality. Bonobos and chimpanzees differ in these same traits, therefore we hypothesized that these differences might be reflected in variation at the rs53576 position. We sequenced a 320 bp region surrounding rs53576 but found no indications of this SNP in the genus Pan. However, we identified previously unreported SNP variation in the chimpanzee OXTR sequence that differs from both humans and bonobos. Humans and bonobos have previously been shown to have a more similar 5' promoter region of Avpr1a when compared to chimpanzees, who are polymorphic for the deletion of ∼ 360 bp in this region (+/- DupB) which includes a microsatellite (RS3). RS3 has been linked with variation in levels of social bonding, potentially explaining part of the interspecies behavioral differences found in bonobos, chimpanzees and humans. To date, results for bonobos have been based on small sample sizes. Our results confirmed that there is no DupB deletion in bonobos with a sample size comprising approximately 90% of the captive founder population, whereas in chimpanzees the deletion of DupB had the highest frequency. Because of the higher frequency of DupB alleles in our bonobo population, we suggest that the presence of this microsatellite may partly reflect documented differences in levels of sociability found in bonobos and chimpanzees.

  17. Oxytocin and vasopressin receptor gene variation as a proximate base for inter- and intraspecific behavioral differences in bonobos and chimpanzees.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicky Staes

    Full Text Available Recent literature has revealed the importance of variation in neuropeptide receptor gene sequences in the regulation of behavioral phenotypic variation. Here we focus on polymorphisms in the oxytocin receptor gene (OXTR and vasopressin receptor gene 1a (Avpr1a in chimpanzees and bonobos. In humans, a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP in the third intron of OXTR (rs53576 SNP (A/G is linked with social behavior, with the risk allele (A carriers showing reduced levels of empathy and prosociality. Bonobos and chimpanzees differ in these same traits, therefore we hypothesized that these differences might be reflected in variation at the rs53576 position. We sequenced a 320 bp region surrounding rs53576 but found no indications of this SNP in the genus Pan. However, we identified previously unreported SNP variation in the chimpanzee OXTR sequence that differs from both humans and bonobos. Humans and bonobos have previously been shown to have a more similar 5' promoter region of Avpr1a when compared to chimpanzees, who are polymorphic for the deletion of ∼ 360 bp in this region (+/- DupB which includes a microsatellite (RS3. RS3 has been linked with variation in levels of social bonding, potentially explaining part of the interspecies behavioral differences found in bonobos, chimpanzees and humans. To date, results for bonobos have been based on small sample sizes. Our results confirmed that there is no DupB deletion in bonobos with a sample size comprising approximately 90% of the captive founder population, whereas in chimpanzees the deletion of DupB had the highest frequency. Because of the higher frequency of DupB alleles in our bonobo population, we suggest that the presence of this microsatellite may partly reflect documented differences in levels of sociability found in bonobos and chimpanzees.

  18. Variants in Adjacent Oxytocin/Vasopressin Gene Region and Associations with ASD Diagnosis and Other Autism Related Endophenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francis, Sunday M; Kistner-Griffin, Emily; Yan, Zhongyu; Guter, Stephen; Cook, Edwin H; Jacob, Suma

    2016-01-01

    There has been increasing interest in oxytocin (peptide: OT, gene: OXT) as a treatment pathway for neurodevelopmental disorders such as Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). Neurodevelopmental disorders affect functional, social, and intellectual abilities. With advances in molecular biology, research has connected multiple gene regions to the clinical presentation of ASD. Studies have also shown that the neuropeptide hormones OT and arginine vasopressin (AVP) influence mammalian social and territorial behaviors and may have treatment potential for neurodevelopmental disorders. Published data examining molecular and phenotypic variation in ASD, such as cognitive abilities, are limited. Since most studies have focused on the receptors in the OT-AVP system, we investigated genetic variation within peptide genes for association with phenotypic ASD features that help identify subgroups within the spectrum. In this study, TDT analysis was carried out utilizing FBAT in 207 probands (156 trios) and a European Ancestry (EA) subsample (108 trios).The evolutionarily related and adjacent genes of OXT and AVP were studied for associations between the tagged single nucleotide polymorphisms and ASD diagnosis, social abilities, restrictive and repetitive behaviors, and IQ for cognitive abilities. Additionally, relationships with whole blood serotonin (WB5HT) were explored because of the developmental relationships connecting plasma levels of OT and WB5HT within ASD. RESULTS indicate significant association between OXT rs6084258 (p = 0.001) and ASD. Associations with several endophenotypes were also noted: OXT rs6133010 was associated with IQ (full scale IQ, p = 0.008; nonverbal IQ, p = 0.010, verbal IQ, p = 0.006); and OXT rs4813625 and OXT rs877172 were associated with WB5HT levels (EA, p = 0.027 and p = 0.033, respectively). Additionally, we measured plasma OT (pOT) levels in a subsample (N = 54). RESULTS show the three polymorphisms, OXT rs6084258, OXT rs11697250, and OXT rs877172

  19. Autosomal dominant familial neurohypophyseal diabetes insipidus caused by a mutation in the arginine-vasopressin II gene in four generations of a Korean family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Myo-Jing; Kim, Young-Eun; Ki, Chang-Seok; Yoo, Jae-Ho

    2014-12-01

    Autosomal dominant neurohypophyseal diabetes insipidus is a rare form of central diabetes insipidus that is caused by mutations in the vasopressin-neurophysin II (AVP-NPII) gene. It is characterized by persistent polydipsia and polyuria induced by deficient or absent secretion of arginine vasopressin (AVP). Here we report a case of familial neurohypophyseal diabetes insipidus in four generations of a Korean family, caused by heterozygous missense mutation in exon 2 of the AVP-NPII gene (c.286G>T). This is the first report of such a case in Korea.

  20. Novel mutations in the V2 vasopressin receptor gene in two pedigrees with congenital nephrogenic diabetes insipidus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuasa, Hiromitsu; Ito, Masafumi; Oiso, Yutaka; Kurokawa, Masaei; Saito, Hidehiko [Nagoya Univ. School of Medicine, Aichi (Japan); Watanabe, Tohru; Oda, Yoshihiko; Ishizuka, Toshie; Tani, Nagayuki; Ito, Seiki; Shibata, Akira [Niigata City General Hospital (Japan)

    1994-08-01

    Novel mutations in the V2 vasopressin receptor gene were identified in two Japanese pedigrees with X-linked congenital nephrogenic diabetes insipidus. The V2 receptor belongs to the family of G-protein-coupled receptors that contain seven distinct transmembrane domains, and the V2 receptor gene is encoded by three exons. The coding regions amplified by polymerase chain reaction were directly sequenced. In a pedigree, one of four consecutive guanine sequences (nucleotides 528-531) in the second exon was deleted (528delG). This deletion mutation results in a frame shift beginning at codon 154 in the second intracellular domain and a premature termination at codon 161. In another pedigree, a missense mutation (A{yields}G) was identified at nucleotide position 310 in the second exon. This point mutation, H80R, changes a histidine at codon 80 in the second transmembrane domain to an arginine that is more positively charged than histidine under the neutral environment. Each mutation cosegregated with the phenotype of diabetes insipidus and supposed to be a cause for resistance to arginine vasopressin. 35 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  1. Familial neurohypophyseal diabetes insipidus due to a novel mutation in the arginine vasopressin-neurophysin II gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Fost, M; van Trotsenburg, A S P; van Santen, H M; Endert, E; van den Elzen, C; Kamsteeg, E J; Swaab, D F; Fliers, E

    2011-07-01

    Familial neurohypophyseal (central) diabetes insipidus (DI) is caused by mutations in the arginine vasopressin-neurophysin II (AVP-NPII) gene. The majority of cases is inherited in an autosomal dominant way. In this study, we present the clinical features of a mother and her son with autosomal dominant neurohypophyseal DI caused by a novel mutation. A thirty-four-year-old woman and her three-year-old son were evaluated because of polyuria and polydipsia since the age of 1.5 years onwards. Both patients were subjected to a water deprivation test confirming the diagnosis of central DI. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain of the mother showed a hypothalamus without apparent abnormalities and a relatively small neurohypophysis without a hyperintense signal. Mutation analysis showed a c.322G>T (p.?/p.Glu108X) in Exon 2 of the AVP-NPII gene in both mother and son. This study reports neurohypophyseal DI in a mother and her son due to a novel mutation in Exon 2 of the AVP-NPII gene. Clinical and pathophysiological aspects of this disease are shortly reviewed and discussed.

  2. Vasopressin and Vasopressin Antagonists in Heart Failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vishram-Nielsen, Julie K; Gustafsson, Finn

    2017-01-01

    Despite the introduction of multiple new pharmacological agents over the past three decades in the field of heart failure (HF), overall prognosis remains poor. Hyponatremia is prevalent in HF patients and has been suggested as a contributor to poor response to standard therapy. Elevated levels...... by the V2 receptors in the renal collecting tubules. The optimal use of VRAs is yet to be determined, especially in patients with congestive HF. Although long-term effects on improvement in mortality have not been shown in the Efficacy of Vasopressin Antagonism in Heart Failure Outcome Study with Tolvaptan...

  3. Identification of 13 new mutations in the vasopressin-neurophysin II gene in 17 kindreds with familial autosomal dominant neurohypophyseal diabetes insipidus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rittig, S.; Siggaard, C.; Pedersen, E.B. [Aahus Univ. Hospital and Faculty of Health Sciences (Denmark)] [and others

    1996-01-01

    Familial neurohypophyseal diabetes insipidus (FNDI) is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by progressive postnatal deficiency of arginine vasopressin as a result of mutation in the gene that encodes the hormone. To determine the extent of mutations in the coding region that produce the phenotype, we studied members of 17 unrelated kindreds with the disorder. We sequenced all 3 exons of the gene by using a rapid, direct dye-terminator method and found the causative mutation in each kindred. In four kindreds, the mutations were each identical to mutations described in other affected families. In the other 13 kindreds each mutation was unique. There were two missense mutations that altered the cleavage region of the signal peptide, seven missense mutations in exon 2, which codes for the conserved portion of the protein, one nonsense mutation in exon 2, and three nonsense mutations in exon 3. These findings, together with the clinical features of FNDI, suggest that each of the mutations exerts an effect by directing the production of a pre-prohormone that cannot be folded, processed, or degraded properly and eventually destroys vasopressinergic neurons. 63 refs., 5 figs., 6 tabs.

  4. Functional characterization of novel loss-of-function mutations in the vasopressin type 2 receptor gene causing nephrogenic diabetes insipidus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böselt, Iris; Tramma, Despoina; Kalamitsou, Serafia; Niemeyer, Thomas; Nykänen, Päivi; Gräf, Klaus-Jürgen; Krude, Heiko; Marenzi, Karen Sabrina; Di Candia, Stefania; Schöneberg, Torsten; Schulz, Angela

    2012-04-01

    X-linked nephrogenic diabetes insipidus (NDI) is a rare polyuric disorder caused by inactivating mutations in the arginine vasopressin receptor Type 2 (AVPR2) gene. NDI patients from six unrelated families were subjected to mutational analysis of the AVPR2 gene. In-depth in vitro characterization of novel AVPR2 mutants by a combination of functional and immunological techniques provided further insight into molecular mechanisms causing receptor dysfunction. Mutational analysis revealed four novel (A89P, G107R, Q174R, W208X) and three recurrent (V277A, R337X, ΔR247-G250) mutations within the AVPR2 gene. One family carried the missense mutation R337X and a 12-bp deletion (ΔR247-G250), corresponding to a fragment in the third intracellular loop (ICL3), which was not genetically linked to R337X. The functionally tested missense mutations A89P, G107R and Q174R led to reduced receptor cell surface expression in transfected COS-7 cells, most probably due to misfolding and intracellular retention, and consequently to reduction or loss of agonist-mediated cyclic adenosine monophosphate formation. Deletion of R247-G250 had no effect on receptor function in vitro. Comparison with other mammalian AVPR2 orthologs showed that this part of the ICL3 is structurally not conserved and, therefore, less relevant for receptor function. In contrast, all missense mutations (A89P, G107R, Q174R, V277A) affect receptor positions that were fully preserved during mammalian evolution. Our results provide valuable information about residues critical for AVPR2 folding, trafficking and function and proof that these mutations are responsible for causing NDI in the affected subjects.

  5. Genetic influences on female infidelity and number of sexual partners in humans: a linkage and association study of the role of the vasopressin receptor gene (AVPR1A).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherkas, Lynn F; Oelsner, Elizabeth C; Mak, Y T; Valdes, Anna; Spector, Tim D

    2004-12-01

    In humans, in contrast to animals, the genetic influences on infidelity are unclear. We report here a large study of over 1600 unselected United Kingdom female twin pairs who confidentially reported previous episodes of infidelity and total lifetime number of sexual partners, as well as attitudes towards infidelity. Our findings demonstrate that infidelity and number of sexual partners are both under moderate genetic influence (41% and 38% heritable, respectively) and the genetic correlation between these two traits is strong (47%). Conversely, attitudes towards infidelity are driven by shared and unique environmental, but not genetic, influences. A genome-wide linkage scan identified three suggestive but nonsignificant linkage areas associated with infidelity and number of sexual partners on chromosomes 3, 7 and 20 with a maximum LOD score of 2.46. We were unsuccessful in associating infidelity or number of sexual partners with a locus implicated in other mammals' sexual behavior, the vasopressin receptor gene. Nonetheless, our findings on the heritability of sexual infidelity and number of sexual partners provide support for certain evolutionary theories of human sexual behavior, as well as justifying further genetic and molecular research in this domain.

  6. A novel splice site mutation of the arginine vasopressin-neurophysin II gene identified in a kindred with autosomal dominant familial neurohypophyseal diabetes insipidus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tae, Hyun-Jung; Baek, Ki-Hyun; Shim, Sun-Mi; Yoo, Soon-Jib; Kang, Moo-Il; Cha, Bong-Yun; Lee, Kwang-Woo; Son, Ho-Young; Kang, Sung-Koo

    2005-01-01

    Autosomal dominant familial neurohypophyseal diabetes insipidus is an inherited deficiency of arginine vasopressin (AVP), and this is caused by mutations in the AVP-neurophysin II (AVP-NP II) gene. Most of these mutations have been located in the signal peptide or in the NP II moiety. In the present study, we have analyzed the AVP-NP II gene in a Korean family. Clinical and genetic studies were performed on three members of the family, and on a normal healthy unrelated individual. The diagnosis of neurohypophyseal diabetes insipidus was done by performing a fluid deprivation test and a vasopressin challenge. For genetic analysis, the genomic DNA was extracted and the AVP-NP II gene was amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Clinical assessment of the affected individuals confirmed the diagnosis of neurohypophyseal diabetes insipidus. Genetic analysis of the AVP-NP II gene revealed a novel deletion mutation of a single nucleotide (guanine) within the splice acceptor site of intron 2 (IVS2 +1 delG). The affected individuals were heterozygous for this mutation. We also demonstrated through RT-PCR analysis of the mutant gene that this mutation resulted in the retention of intron 2 during pre-mRNA splicing. We concluded that a novel splicing mutation in the AVP-NP II gene causes neurohypophyseal diabetes insipidus in this family.

  7. Specific expression of optically active reporter gene in arginine vasopressin-secreting neurosecretory cells in the hypothalamic-neurohypophyseal system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueta, Y; Fujihara, H; Dayanithi, G; Kawata, M; Murphy, D

    2008-06-01

    The anti-diuretic hormone arginine vasopressin (AVP) is synthesised in the magnocellular neurosecretory cells (MNCs) in the paraventricular nucleus (PVN) and the supraoptic nucleus (SON) of the hypothalamus. AVP-containing MNCs that project their axon terminals to the posterior pituitary can be identified using immunohistochemical techniques with specific antibodies recognising AVP and neurophysin II, and by virtue of their electrophysiological properties. Recently, we generated transgenic rats expressing an AVP-enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) fusion gene in AVP-containing MNCs. In this transgenic rat, eGFP mRNA was observed in the PVN and the SON, and eGFP fluorescence was seen in the PVN and the SON, and also in the posterior pituitary, indicating transport of transgene protein down MNC axons to storage in nerve terminals. The expression of the AVP-eGFP transgene and eGFP fluorescence in the PVN and the SON was markedly increased after dehydration and chronic salt-loading. On the other hand, AVP-containing parvocellular neurosecretory cells in the PVN that are involved in the activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary adrenal axis exhibit robust AVP-eGFP fluorescence after bilateral adrenalectomy and intraperitoneal administration of lipopolysaccharide. In the median eminence, the internal and external layer showed strong fluorescence for eGFP after osmotic stimuli and stressful conditions, respectively, again indicating appropriate transport of transgene traslation products. Brain slices and acutely-dissociated MNCs and axon terminals also exhibited strong fluorescence, as observed under fluorescence microscopy. The AVP-eGFP transgenic animals are thus unique and provide a useful tool to study AVP-secreting cells in vivo for electrophysiology, imaging analysis such as intracellular Ca(2+) imaging, organ culture and in vivo monitoring of dynamic change in AVP secretion.

  8. Expression patterns of corticotropin-releasing factor, arginine vasopressin, histidine decarboxylase, melanin-concentrating hormone, and orexin genes in the human hypothalamus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krolewski, David M; Medina, Adriana; Kerman, Ilan A; Bernard, Rene; Burke, Sharon; Thompson, Robert C; Bunney, William E; Schatzberg, Alan F; Myers, Richard M; Akil, Huda; Jones, Edward G; Watson, Stanley J

    2010-11-15

    The hypothalamus regulates numerous autonomic responses and behaviors. The neuroactive substances corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF), arginine-vasopressin (AVP), histidine decarboxylase (HDC), melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH), and orexin/hypocretins (ORX) produced in the hypothalamus mediate a subset of these processes. Although the expression patterns of these genes have been well studied in rodents, less is known about them in humans. We combined classical histological techniques with in situ hybridization histochemistry to produce both 2D and 3D images and to visually align and quantify expression of the genes for these substances in nuclei of the human hypothalamus. The hypothalamus was arbitrarily divided into rostral, intermediate, and caudal regions. The rostral region, containing the paraventricular nucleus (PVN), was defined by discrete localization of CRF- and AVP-expressing neurons, whereas distinct relationships between HDC, MCH, and ORX mRNA-expressing neurons delineated specific levels within the intermediate and caudal regions. Quantitative mRNA signal intensity measurements revealed no significant differences in overall CRF or AVP expression at any rostrocaudal level of the PVN. HDC mRNA expression was highest at the level of the premammillary area, which included the dorsomedial and tuberomammillary nuclei as well as the dorsolateral hypothalamic area. In addition, the overall intensity of hybridization signal exhibited by both MCH and ORX mRNA-expressing neurons peaked in distinct intermediate and caudal hypothalamic regions. These results suggest that human hypothalamic neurons involved in the regulation of the HPA axis display distinct neurochemical patterns that may encompass multiple local nuclei. Copyright © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  9. Clinical features and molecular analysis of arginine-vasopressin neurophysin II gene in long-term follow-up patients with idiopathic central diabetes insipidus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batista, Sergio L; Moreira, Ayrton C; Antunes-Rodrigues, Jose; Castro, Margaret de; Elias, Lucila L K; Elias, Paula C L

    2010-03-01

    Central diabetes insipidus (DI) characterized by polyuria, polydipsia and inability to concentrate urine, has different etiologies including genetic, autoimmune, post-traumatic, among other causes. Autosomal dominant central DI presents the clinical feature of a progressive decline of arginine-vasopressin (AVP) secretion. In this study, we characterized the clinical features and sequenced the AVP-NPII gene of seven long-term follow-up patients with idiopathic central DI in an attempt to determine whether a genetic cause would be involved. The diagnosis of central DI was established by fluid deprivation test and hyper-tonic saline infusion. For molecular analysis, genomic DNA was extracted and the AVP-NPII gene was amplified by polymerase chain reaction and sequenced. Sequencing analysis revealed a homozygous guanine insertion in the intron 2 (IVS2 +28 InsG) of the AVP-NPII gene in four patients, which represents an alternative gene assembly. No mutation in the code region of the AVP-NPII gene was found. The homozygous guanine insertion in intron 2 (IVS2 +28 InsG) is unlikely to contribute to the AVP-NPII gene modulation in DI. In addition, the etiology of idiopathic central DI in children may not be apparent even after long-term follow-up, and requires continuous etiological surveillance.

  10. Variation in mothers' arginine vasopressin receptor 1a and dopamine receptor D4 genes predicts maternal sensitivity via social cognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leerkes, E M; Su, J; Calkins, S; Henrich, V C; Smolen, A

    2017-02-01

    We examined the extent to which the arginine vasopressin receptor 1a (AVPR1a) and dopamine receptor D4 (DRD4) were related to sensitive maternal behavior directly or indirectly via maternal social cognition. Participants were 207 (105 European-American and 102 African-American) mothers and their children (52% females). Sensitive maternal behavior was rated and aggregated across a series of tasks when infants were 6 months, 1 year and 2 years old. At 6 months, mothers were interviewed about their empathy, attributions about infant behavior and beliefs about crying to assess their parenting-related social cognition. Mothers with long alleles for AVPR1a and DRD4 engaged in more mother-oriented social cognition (i.e. negative attributions and beliefs about their infants' crying, β = 0.13, P social cognition. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd and International Behavioural and Neural Genetics Society.

  11. DNA-energetics-based analyses suggest additional genes in prokaryotes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khandelwal, Garima; Gupta, Jalaj; Jayaram, B

    2012-07-01

    We present here a novel methodology for predicting new genes in prokaryotic genomes on the basis of inherent energetics of DNA. Regions of higher thermodynamic stability were identified, which were filtered based on already known annotations to yield a set of potentially new genes. These were then processed for their compatibility with the stereo-chemical properties of proteins and tripeptide frequencies of proteins in Swissprot data, which results in a reliable set of new genes in a genome. Quite surprisingly, the methodology identifies new genes even in well-annotated genomes. Also, the methodology can handle genomes of any GC-content, size and number of annotated genes.

  12. Autosomal dominant neurohypophyseal diabetes insipidus in two families. Molecular analysis of the vasopressin-neurophysin II gene and functional studies of three missense mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedrich, C M; Zachurzok-Buczynska, A; Gawlik, A; Russ, S; Hahn, G; Koehler, K; Malecka-Tendera, E; Huebner, A

    2009-01-01

    Autosomal dominant familial neurohypophyseal diabetes insipidus (adFNDI) is a rare disease with symptoms of polydipsia, polyuria and dehydration caused by arginine vasopressin deficiency. Disease onset is within infancy or adolescence. A variety of disease-causing mutations of the arginine vasopressin neurophysin II gene (AVP) on chromosome 20p13 have been described. Two Polish families with adFNDI were screened for mutations. Processing of wild-type (WT) and mutant AVP was monitored using immunocytochemical methods in stably transfected Neuro2A cells. AVP secretion into the cell culture supernatant was investigated with an enzyme immunoassay. In the first family a heterozygous p.G96D mutation was identified. Some patients additionally carried a novel heterozygous mutation p.A159T. The second family presented with a heterozygous mutation p.C98G. Confocal laser microscopy unveiled accumulation of p.G96D and p.C98G prohormones in the cellular bodies, whereas WT and p.A159T prohormones and/or processed products were located in the tips of cellular processes. Reduced levels of AVP in supernatant culture medium of p.G96D and p.C98G transfected cells in comparison to p.A159T and WT cells were found. We conclude that the p.G96D and p.C98G mutations cause adFNDI in the two reported families. The sequence variant p.A159T does not seem to have disease-causing effects. Copyright 2009 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  13. Dilatative uropathy as a manifestation of neurohypophyseal diabetes insipidus due to a novel mutation in the arginine vasopressin-neurophysin-II gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindenthal, V; Mainberger, A; Morris-Rosendahl, D J; Löning, L; Mayer, W; Müller, H L

    2013-12-01

    Polydypsia and polyuria are frequent symptoms in patients with sellar masses caused by neurohypophyseal diabetes insipidus. Autosomal dominant familial neurohypophyseal diabetes insipidus (adFNDI), a disorder caused by mutations in the arginine vasopressin (AVP) -neurophysin II (NPII) gene, should be considered as a rare differential diagnosis. A delayed diagnosis bears the risk of life-threatening electrolyte imbalances and permanent urinary tract damage, leading to impaired quality of life.We present a Caucasian kindred of at least 4 generations with FNDI.Clinical histories, endocrine para-meters, and results of molecular analyses of the AVP gene are presented with a review of the literature on diabetes insipidus (DI) related urinary tract dilatation.Polyuria and polydipsia were only reported based on explicit and thorough interrogation after more than 4 years of clinical follow-up. A novel heterozygous mutation in the AVP gene was found in all examined symptomatic subjects (c.1-33_c.4del37nt). A literature review revealed that non-obstructive hydronephrosis (NOH) is a rare but known complication of DI.Since increased fluid intake is often a typical familial pattern in adFNDI, it is frequently missed as being pathologic in affected patients, therefore a detailed clinical history of drinking volumes is of critical importance. AVP gene testing is an important component in the confirmation of the diagnosis. Otherwise unexplainable NOH should lead to further investigations and evaluation of rare diseases like FNDI. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  14. DNA-energetics-based analyses suggest additional genes in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Permanent link: http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/jbsc/037/03/0433-0444 ... We present here a novel methodology for predicting new genes in prokaryotic genomes on the basis of inherent energetics of DNA. Regions of ... Quite surprisingly, the methodology identifies new genes even in well-annotated genomes. Also, the ...

  15. Early-onset central diabetes insipidus is associated with de novo arginine vasopressin-neurophysin II or Wolfram syndrome 1 gene mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrotta, Silverio; Di Iorgi, Natascia; Ragione, Fulvio Della; Scianguetta, Saverio; Borriello, Adriana; Allegri, Anna Elsa Maria; Ferraro, Marcella; Santoro, Claudia; Napoli, Flavia; Calcagno, Annalisa; Giaccardi, Marta; Cappa, Marco; Salerno, Maria Carolina; Cozzolino, Domenico; Maghnie, Mohamad

    2015-04-01

    Idiopathic early-onset central diabetes insipidus (CDI) might be due to mutations of arginine vasopressin-neurophysin II (AVP-NPII (AVP)) or wolframin (WFS1) genes. Sequencing of AVP and WFS1 genes was performed in nine children with CDI, aged between 9 and 68 months, and negative family history for polyuria and polydipsia. Two patients carried a mutation in the AVP gene: a heterozygous G-to-T transition at nucleotide position 322 of exon 2 (c.322G>T) resulting in a stop codon at position 108 (p.Glu108X), and a novel deletion from nucleotide 52 to 54 (c.52_54delTCC) producing a deletion of a serine at position 18 (p.Ser18del) of the AVP pre-prohormone signal peptide. A third patient carried two heterozygous mutations in the WFS1 gene localized on different alleles. The first change was A-to-G transition at nucleotide 997 in exon 8 (c.997A>G), resulting in a valine residue at position 333 in place of isoleucine (p.Ile333Val). The second novel mutation was a 3 bp insertion in exon 8, c.2392_2393insACG causing the addition of an aspartate residue at position 797 and the maintenance of the correct open reading frame (p. Asp797_Val798insAsp). While similar WFS1 protein levels were detected in fibroblasts from healthy subjects and from the patient and his parents, a major sensitivity to staurosporine-induced apoptosis was observed in the patient fibroblasts as well as in patients with Wolfram syndrome. Early-onset CDI is associated with de novo mutations of the AVP gene and with hereditary WFS1 gene changes. These findings have valuable implications for management and genetic counseling. © 2015 European Society of Endocrinology.

  16. Growth retardation in untreated autosomal dominant familial neurohypophyseal diabetes insipidus caused by one recurring and two novel mutations in the vasopressin-neurophysin II gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brachet, Cécile; Birk, Julia; Christophe, Catherine; Tenoutasse, Sylvie; Velkeniers, Brigitte; Heinrichs, Claudine; Rutishauser, Jonas

    2011-02-01

    Autosomal dominant familial neurohypophyseal diabetes insipidus (adFNDI), a disorder caused by mutations in the vasopressin (AVP)-neurophysin II (NPII) gene, manifests gradually during early childhood with progressive polyuria and polydipsia. Patients are usually treated with synthetic AVP analog. If unlimited access to water is provided, prognosis is usually good even in the absence of specific treatment. In this study, we describe three families with adFNDI, in which growth failure was a prominent complaint, on the clinical and molecular level. Histories from affected and unaffected family members were taken. Height and weight of index patients were recorded longitudinally. Patients underwent water deprivation tests, magnetic resonance imaging, and genetic analysis. One mutant was studied by heterologous expression in cell culture. A total of ten affected individuals were studied. In two of the three pedigrees, a novel mutation in the AVP-NPII gene was found. The index children in each pedigree showed growth retardation, which was the reason for referral in two. In these cases, water intake was tightly restricted by the parents in an attempt to overcome suspected psychogenic polydipsia and to improve appetite. Once the children were treated by hormone replacement, they rapidly caught up to normal weight and height. Genetic testing and appropriate parent counseling should be enforced in adFNDI families to ensure adequate treatment and avoid chronic water deprivation, which causes failure to thrive.

  17. Observations Suggesting Allelism of the Achondroplasia and Hypochondroplasia Genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKusick, Victor A.; Kelly, Thaddeus E.; Dorst, John P.

    1973-01-01

    It is argued that there are at least two alleles at the achondroplasia locus: one responsible for classic achondroplasia and one responsible for hypochondroplasia. Homozygosity for the achondroplasia gene produces a lethal skeletal dysplasia; homozygosity for hypochondroplasia has not been described. We report here a child considered to be a genetic compound for the achondroplasia and hypochondroplasia alleles. Images PMID:4697848

  18. DNA-energetics-based analyses suggest additional genes in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2012-06-25

    Jun 25, 2012 ... We present here a novel methodology for predicting new genes in prokaryotic genomes on the basis of inherent energetics of DNA. Regions of higher thermodynamic stability were identified, which were filtered based on already ...... 2006 EGASP: The human ENCODE genome annotation assess-.

  19. A missense mutation in the arginine-vasopressin neurophysin-II gene causes autosomal dominant neurohypophyseal diabetes insipidus in a Chinese family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Dan; Dong, FengQin; Lu, WeiQin; Zhang, Zhe; Lu, XunLiang; Li, ChengJiang; Liu, YanNing

    2013-06-01

    Familial neurohypophyseal diabetes insipidus, an autosomal dominant disorder, is mostly caused by mutations in the genes that encode AVP or its intracellular binding protein, neurophysin-II. The mutations lead to aberrant preprohormone processing and progressive destruction of AVP-secreting cells, which gradually manifests a progressive polyuria and polydipsia during early childhood, and a disorder of water homeostasis. We characterized the clinical and biochemical features, and sequenced the AVP neurophysin-II(AVP-NPII) gene of the affected individuals with autosomal dominant neurohypophyseal diabetes insipidus(ADNDI)to determine whether this disease was genetically determined. We obtained the histories of eight affected and four unaffected family individuals. The diagnosis of ADNDI was established using a water deprivation test and exogenous AVP administration. For molecular analysis, genomic DNA was extracted and the AVP-NPII gene was amplified using polymerase chain reaction and sequenced. The eight affected individuals showed different spectra of age of onsets (7-15 years) and urine volumes (132-253 ml/kg/24 h). All affected individuals responded to vasopressin administration, with a resolution of symptoms and an increase in urine osmolality by more than 50%. The characteristic hyperintense signal in the posterior pituitary on T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging was absent in six family members and present in one. Sequencing analysis revealed a missense heterozygous mutation 1516G > T (Gly17Val) in exon 2 of the AVP-NPII gene among the ADNDI individuals. We identified a missense mutation in the AVP-NPII gene and the same mutation showed different spectra of age of onsets and urine volumes in a new Chinese family with ADNDI. The mutation may provide a molecular basis for understanding the characteristics of NPII and add to our knowledge of the pathogenesis of ADNDI, which would allow the presymptomatic diagnosis of asymptomatic subjects. © 2012 John Wiley

  20. Bench-to-bedside review: Vasopressin in the management of septic shock

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    This review of vasopressin in septic shock differs from previous reviews by providing more information on the physiology and pathophysiology of vasopressin and vasopressin receptors, particularly because of recent interest in more specific AVPR1a agonists and new information from the Vasopressin and Septic Shock Trial (VASST), a randomized trial of vasopressin versus norepinephrine in septic shock. Relevant literature regarding vasopressin and other AVPR1a agonists was reviewed and synthesized. Vasopressin, a key stress hormone in response to hypotension, stimulates a family of receptors: AVPR1a, AVPR1b, AVPR2, oxytocin receptors and purinergic receptors. Rationales for use of vasopressin in septic shock are as follows: first, a deficiency of vasopressin in septic shock; second, low-dose vasopressin infusion improves blood pressure, decreases requirements for norepinephrine and improves renal function; and third, a recent randomized, controlled, concealed trial of vasopressin versus norepinephrine (VASST) suggests low-dose vasopressin may decrease mortality of less severe septic shock. Previous clinical studies of vasopressin in septic shock were small or not controlled. There was no difference in 28-day mortality between vasopressin-treated versus norepinephrine-treated patients (35% versus 39%, respectively) in VASST. There was potential benefit in the prospectively defined stratum of patients with less severe septic shock (5 to 14 μg/minute norepinephrine at randomization): vasopressin may have lowered mortality compared with norepinephrine (26% versus 36%, respectively, P = 0.04 within stratum). The result was robust: vasopressin also decreased mortality (compared with norepinephrine) if less severe septic shock was defined by the lowest quartile of arterial lactate or by use of one (versus more than one) vasopressor at baseline. Other investigators found greater hemodynamic effects of higher dose of vasopressin (0.06 units/minute) but also unique adverse

  1. Polycystic Kidney Disease and the Vasopressin Pathway

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Gastel, Maatje D. A.; Torres, Vicente E.

    Vasopressin, also known as arginine vasopressin or antidiuretic hormone, plays a pivotal role in maintaining body homeostasis. Increased vasopressin concentrations, measured by its surrogate copeptin, have been associated with disease severity as well as disease progression in polycystic kidney

  2. Candidate genes of anxiety-related behavior in HAB/LAB rats and mice: focus on vasopressin and glyoxalase-I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landgraf, Rainer; Kessler, Melanie S; Bunck, Mirjam; Murgatroyd, Chris; Spengler, Dietmar; Zimbelmann, Marina; Nussbaumer, Markus; Czibere, Ludwig; Turck, Christoph W; Singewald, Nicolas; Rujescu, Dan; Frank, Elisabeth

    2007-01-01

    Two animal models of trait anxiety, HAB/LAB rats and mice, are described, representing inborn extremes in anxiety-related behavior. The comprehensive phenotypical characterization included basal behavioral features, stress-coping strategies and neuroendocrine responses upon stressor exposure with HAB animals being hyper-anxious, preferring passive coping, emitting more stressor-induced ultrasonic vocalization calls and showing typical peculiarities of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical axis and line-specific patterns of Fos expression in the brain indicative of differential neuronal activation. In most cases, unselected Wistar rats and CD1 mice, respectively, displayed intermediate behaviors. In both HAB/LAB rats and mice, the behavioral phenotype has been found to be significantly correlated with the expression of the neuropeptide arginine vasopressin (AVP) at the level of the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN). Additional receptor antagonist approaches in HABs confirmed that intra-PVN release of AVP is likely to contribute to hyper-anxiety and depression-like behavior. As shown exemplarily in HAB rats and LAB mice, single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in regulatory structures of the AVP gene underlie AVP-mediated phenotypic phenomena; in HAB rats, a SNP in the promoter of the AVP gene leads to reduced binding of the transcriptional repressor CBF-A, thus causing AVP overexpression and overrelease. Conversely, in LAB mice, a SNP in the AVP gene seems to cause an amino acid exchange in the signal peptide, presumably leading to a deficit in bioavailable AVP likely to underlie the total hypo-anxiety of LAB mice in combination with signs of central diabetes insipidus. Another feature of LAB mice is overexpression of glyoxalase-I. The functional characterization of this enzyme will determine its involvement in anxiety-related behavior beyond that of a reliable biomarker. The further identification of quantitative trait loci, candidate genes (and their

  3. The challenge of translation in social neuroscience: a review of oxytocin, vasopressin, and affiliative behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Insel, Thomas R

    2010-03-25

    Social neuroscience is rapidly exploring the complex territory between perception and action where recognition, value, and meaning are instantiated. This review follows the trail of research on oxytocin and vasopressin as an exemplar of one path for exploring the "dark matter" of social neuroscience. Studies across vertebrate species suggest that these neuropeptides are important for social cognition, with gender- and steroid-dependent effects. Comparative research in voles yields a model based on interspecies and intraspecies variation of the geography of oxytocin receptors and vasopressin V1a receptors in the forebrain. Highly affiliative species have receptors in brain circuits related to reward or reinforcement. The neuroanatomical distribution of these receptors may be guided by variations in the regulatory regions of their respective genes. This review describes the promises and problems of extrapolating these findings to human social cognition, with specific reference to the social deficits of autism. (c) 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. The Selective Estrogen Receptor Modulator Raloxifene Regulates Arginine-Vasopressin Gene Expression in Human Female Neuroblastoma Cells Through G Protein-Coupled Estrogen Receptor and ERK Signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grassi, Daniela; Ghorbanpoor, Samar; Acaz-Fonseca, Estefania; Ruiz-Palmero, Isabel; Garcia-Segura, Luis M

    2015-10-01

    The selective estrogen receptor modulator raloxifene reduces blood pressure in hypertensive postmenopausal women. In the present study we have explored whether raloxifene regulates gene expression of arginine vasopressin (AVP), which is involved in the pathogenesis of hypertension. The effect of raloxifene was assessed in human female SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells, which have been recently identified as a suitable cellular model to study the estrogenic regulation of AVP. Raloxifene, within a concentration ranging from 10(-10) M to 10(-6) M, decreased the mRNA levels of AVP in SH-SY5Y cells with maximal effect at 10(-7) M. This effect of raloxifene was imitated by an agonist (±)-1-[(3aR*,4S*,9bS*)-4-(6-bromo-1,3-benzodioxol-5-yl)-3a,4,5,9b-tetrahydro-3H-cyclopenta[c]quinolin-8-yl]-ethanone of G protein-coupled estrogen receptor-1 (GPER) and blocked by an antagonist (3aS*,4R*,9bR*)-4-(6-bromo-1,3-benzodioxol-5-yl)-3a,4,5,9b-3H-cyclopenta[c]quinoline of GPER and by GPER silencing. Raloxifene induced a time-dependent increase in the level of phosphorylated ERK1 and ERK2, by a mechanism blocked by the GPER antagonist. The treatment of SH-SY5Y cells with either a MAPK/ERK kinase 1/2-specific inhibitor (1,4-diamino-2, 3-dicyano-1,4-bis(2-aminophenylthio)butadine) or a protein kinase C inhibitor (sotrastaurin) blocked the effects of raloxifene on the phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and the regulation of AVP mRNA levels. These results reveal a mechanism mediating the regulation of AVP expression by raloxifene, involving the activation of GPER, which in turn activates protein kinase C, MAPK/ERK kinase, and ERK. The regulation of AVP by raloxifene and GPER may have implications for the treatment of blood hypertension(.).

  5. Oxytocin and vasopressin: distinct receptors in myometrium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guillon, G.; Balestre, M.N.; Roberts, J.M.; Bottari, S.P.

    1987-06-01

    The binding characteristics of (/sup 3/H)oxytocin (( /sup 3/H)OT) and (/sup 3/H)lysine vasopressin (( /sup 3/H)LVP) to nonpregnant human myometrium were investigated. Binding of both radioligands was saturable, time dependent, and reversible. Whereas (/sup 3/H)OT was found to bind to a single class of sites with high affinity (Kd, 1.5 +/- 0.4 (+/- SEM) nM) and low capacity (maximum binding (Bmax), 34 +/- 6 fmol/mg protein), (/sup 3/H)LVP bound to two classes of sites, one with high affinity (Kd, 2.2 +/- 0.1 nM) and low capacity (Bmax, 198 +/- 7 fmol/mg protein) and another with low affinity (Kd, 655 +/- 209 nM) and high capacity (Bmax, 5794 +/- 1616 fmol/mg protein). The binding of the labeled peptides also displayed a marked difference in sensitivity to Mg2+ and guanine nucleotides. These differences in binding characteristics as well as the differences in potency of analogs in competing for (/sup 3/H)OT and (/sup 3/H)LVP binding indicate the presence of distinct receptors for OT and vasopressin in human myometrium. Pharmacological characterization of the high affinity binding sites for (/sup 3/H)LVP indicated that these are of the V1 subtype. Although, as suggested by others, vasopressin and OT can bind to the same sites, the presence of distinct receptors for both peptides provides an explanation for the previously reported difference in myometrial responsiveness to OT and vasopressin.

  6. Bilateral inferior petrosal sinus sampling using vasopressin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narendra Kotwal

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Anatomical localization of pituitary adenoma can be challenging in adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH-dependent Cushing's syndrome, and bilateral inferior petrosal sinus sampling (BIPSS is considered gold standard in this regard. Stimulation using corticotrophin-releasing hormone (CRH improves the sensitivity of BIPSS, however, same is not easily available in India. Therefore, we undertook this study of BIPPS using vasopressin as agent for stimulation owing to its ability to stimulate V3 receptors present on corticotrophs. Aims: To study the tumor localization and lateralization in difficult to localize cases of ACTH-dependent Cushing's syndrome by bilateral inferior petrosal sinus sampling using vasopressin for corticotroph stimulation. Settings and Design: Prospective observational study. Subjects and Methods: Six patients (5 females meeting inclusion criteria underwent BIPSS using vasopressin for stimulation. Results: All six patients had nonsuppressible overnight and low dose dexamethasone suppression test with elevated plasma ACTH levels suggestive of ACTH-dependent Cushing's syndrome. High dose dexamethasone suppression test showed suppressible cortisol in two cases, and microadenoma was seen in two patients on magnetic resonance imaging pituitary. Contrast enhanced computed tomography of the abdomen showed left adrenal hyperplasia in one case and anterior mediastinal mass with bilateral adrenal hyperplasia another. Using BIPSS four patients were classified as having Cushing's disease that was confirmed histopathologically following surgery. Of the remaining two, one had primary pigmented nodular adrenocortical disease, and another had thymic carcinoid with ectopic ACTH production as the cause of Cushing's syndrome. No serious adverse events were noted. Conclusions: Vasopressin may be used instead of CRH and desmopressin for stimulation in BIPSS.

  7. The vasopressin deficient Brattleboro rats: A natural knockout model used in the search for CNS effects of vasopressin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bohus, B; de Wied, David; Urban, I.J.A.; Burbach, J.P.H.; De Wied, D.

    1999-01-01

    Behavioral neuroscience is using mon and more gene knockout techniques to produce animals with a specific deletion. These studies have their precedent in nature. A mutation may result in a limited genetic defect, as seen in the vasopressin (VP) deficiency in the Brattleboro rat. The mutation is in a

  8. SPAK Differentially Mediates Vasopressin Effects on Sodium Cotransporters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saritas, Turgay; Borschewski, Aljona; McCormick, James A.; Paliege, Alexander; Dathe, Christin; Uchida, Shinichi; Terker, Andrew; Himmerkus, Nina; Bleich, Markus; Demaretz, Sylvie; Laghmani, Kamel; Delpire, Eric; Ellison, David H.

    2013-01-01

    Activation of the Na+-K+-2Cl−-cotransporter (NKCC2) and the Na+-Cl−-cotransporter (NCC) by vasopressin includes their phosphorylation at defined, conserved N-terminal threonine and serine residues, but the kinase pathways that mediate this action of vasopressin are not well understood. Two homologous Ste20-like kinases, SPS-related proline/alanine-rich kinase (SPAK) and oxidative stress responsive kinase (OSR1), can phosphorylate the cotransporters directly. In this process, a full-length SPAK variant and OSR1 interact with a truncated SPAK variant, which has inhibitory effects. Here, we tested whether SPAK is an essential component of the vasopressin stimulatory pathway. We administered desmopressin, a V2 receptor–specific agonist, to wild-type mice, SPAK-deficient mice, and vasopressin-deficient rats. Desmopressin induced regulatory changes in SPAK variants, but not in OSR1 to the same degree, and activated NKCC2 and NCC. Furthermore, desmopressin modulated both the full-length and truncated SPAK variants to interact with and phosphorylate NKCC2, whereas only full-length SPAK promoted the activation of NCC. In summary, these results suggest that SPAK mediates the effect of vasopressin on sodium reabsorption along the distal nephron. PMID:23393317

  9. Altered gene synchrony suggests a combined hormone-mediated dysregulated state in major depression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chris Gaiteri

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Coordinated gene transcript levels across tissues (denoted "gene synchrony" reflect converging influences of genetic, biochemical and environmental factors; hence they are informative of the biological state of an individual. So could brain gene synchrony also integrate the multiple factors engaged in neuropsychiatric disorders and reveal underlying pathologies? Using bootstrapped Pearson correlation for transcript levels for the same genes across distinct brain areas, we report robust gene transcript synchrony between the amygdala and cingulate cortex in the human postmortem brain of normal control subjects (n = 14; Control/Permutated data, p<0.000001. Coordinated expression was confirmed across distinct prefrontal cortex areas in a separate cohort (n = 19 subjects and affected different gene sets, potentially reflecting regional network- and function-dependent transcriptional programs. Genewise regional transcript coordination was independent of age-related changes and array technical parameters. Robust shifts in amygdala-cingulate gene synchrony were observed in subjects with major depressive disorder (MDD, denoted here "depression" (n = 14; MDD/Permutated data, p<0.000001, significantly affecting between 100 and 250 individual genes (10-30% false discovery rate. Biological networks and signal transduction pathways corresponding to the identified gene set suggested putative dysregulated functions for several hormone-type factors previously implicated in depression (insulin, interleukin-1, thyroid hormone, estradiol and glucocorticoids; p<0.01 for association with depression-related networks. In summary, we showed that coordinated gene expression across brain areas may represent a novel molecular probe for brain structure/function that is sensitive to disease condition, suggesting the presence of a distinct and integrated hormone-mediated corticolimbic homeostatic, although maladaptive and pathological, state in major depression.

  10. Bidirectional Anticipation of Future Osmotic Challenges by Vasopressin Neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandelblat-Cerf, Yael; Kim, Angela; Burgess, Christian R; Subramanian, Siva; Tannous, Bakhos A; Lowell, Bradford B; Andermann, Mark L

    2017-01-04

    Ingestion of water and food are major hypo- and hyperosmotic challenges. To protect the body from osmotic stress, posterior pituitary-projecting, vasopressin-secreting neurons (VPpp neurons) counter osmotic perturbations by altering their release of vasopressin, which controls renal water excretion. Vasopressin levels begin to fall within minutes of water consumption, even prior to changes in blood osmolality. To ascertain the precise temporal dynamics by which water or food ingestion affect VPpp neuron activity, we directly recorded the spiking and calcium activity of genetically defined VPpp neurons. In states of elevated osmolality, water availability rapidly decreased VPpp neuron activity within seconds, beginning prior to water ingestion, upon presentation of water-predicting cues. In contrast, food availability following food restriction rapidly increased VPpp neuron activity within seconds, but only following feeding onset. These rapid and distinct changes in activity during drinking and feeding suggest diverse neural mechanisms underlying anticipatory regulation of VPpp neurons. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  11. Suggestive evidence for association of the circadian genes PERIOD3 and ARNTL with bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nievergelt, Caroline M; Kripke, Daniel F; Barrett, Thomas B; Burg, Elyssa; Remick, Ronald A; Sadovnick, A Dessa; McElroy, Susan L; Keck, Paul E; Schork, Nicholas J; Kelsoe, John R

    2006-04-05

    Bipolar affective disorder (BPAD) is suspected to arise in part from malfunctions of the circadian system, a system that enables adaptation to a daily and seasonally cycling environment. Genetic variations altering functions of genes involved with the input to the circadian clock, in the molecular feedback loops constituting the circadian oscillatory mechanism itself, or in the regulatory output systems could influence BPAD as a result. Several human circadian system genes have been identified and localized recently, and a comparison with linkage hotspots for BPAD has revealed some correspondences. We have assessed evidence for linkage and association involving polymorphisms in 10 circadian clock genes (ARNTL, CLOCK, CRY2, CSNK1epsilon, DBP, GSK3beta, NPAS2, PER1, PER2, and PER3) to BPAD. Linkage analysis in 52 affected families showed suggestive evidence for linkage to CSNK1epsilon. This finding was not substantiated in the association study. Fifty-two SNPs in 10 clock genes were genotyped in 185 parent proband triads. Single SNP TDT analyses showed no evidence for association to BPAD. However, more powerful haplotype analyses suggest two candidates deserving further studies. Haplotypes in ARNTL and PER3 were found to be significantly associated with BPAD via single-gene permutation tests (PG = 0.025 and 0.008, respectively). The most suggestive haplotypes in PER3 showed a Bonferroni-corrected P-value of PGC = 0.07. These two genes have previously been implicated in circadian rhythm sleep disorders and affective disorders. With correction for the number of genes considered and tests conducted, these data do not provide statistically significant evidence for association. However, the trends for ARNTL and PER3 are suggestive of their involvement in bipolar disorder and warrant further study in a larger sample. Copyright 2006 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  12. Re-analyses of “Algal” Genes Suggest a Complex Evolutionary History of Oomycetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qia Wang

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The spread of photosynthesis is one of the most important but constantly debated topics in eukaryotic evolution. Various hypotheses have been proposed to explain the plastid distribution in extant eukaryotes. Notably, the chromalveolate hypothesis suggested that multiple eukaryotic lineages were derived from a photosynthetic ancestor that had a red algal endosymbiont. As such, genes of plastid/algal origin in aplastidic chromalveolates, such as oomycetes, were considered to be important supporting evidence. Although the chromalveolate hypothesis has been seriously challenged, some of its supporting evidence has not been carefully investigated. In this study, we re-evaluate the “algal” genes from oomycetes with a larger sampling and careful phylogenetic analyses. Our data provide no conclusive support for a common photosynthetic ancestry of stramenopiles, but show that the initial estimate of “algal” genes in oomycetes was drastically inflated due to limited genome data available then for certain eukaryotic lineages. These findings also suggest that the evolutionary histories of these “algal” genes might be attributed to complex scenarios such as differential gene loss, serial endosymbioses, or horizontal gene transfer.

  13. Functional variation in the arginine vasopressin 2 receptor as a modifier of human plasma von Willebrand factor levels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nossent, Anne Yaël; Robben, J H; Deen, P M T

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY OBJECTIVES: Stimulation of arginine vasopressin 2 receptor (V2R) with arginine vasopressin (AVP) results in a rise in von Willebrand factor (VWF) and factor VIII plasma levels. We hypothesized that gain-of-function variations in the V2R gene (AVPR2) would lead to higher plasma levels of V...

  14. Adipose gene expression patterns of weight gain suggest counteracting steroid hormone synthesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schothorst, van E.M.; Franssen-Hal, van N.L.W.; Schaap, M.M.; Pennings, J.; Hoebee, B.; Keijer, J.

    2005-01-01

    VAN SCHOTHORST, EVERT M., NICOLE FRANSSEN-VAN HAL, MIRJAM M. SCHAAP, JEROEN PENNINGS, BARBARA HOEBEE, AND JAAP KEIJER. Adipose gene expression patterns of weight gain suggest counteracting steroid hormone synthesis. Obes Res. 2005;13:1031-1041. Objective: To identify early molecular changes in

  15. Gene expression suggests decoupled dorsal and ventral segmentation in the millipede Glomeris marginata (Myriapoda: Diplopoda).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssen, Ralf; Prpic, Nikola-Michael; Damen, Wim G M

    2004-04-01

    Diplopods (millipedes) are known for their irregular body segmentation. Most importantly, the number of dorsal segmental cuticular plates (tergites) does not match the number of ventral structures (e.g., sternites). Controversial theories exist to explain the origin of this so-called diplosegmentation. We have studied the embryology of a representative diplopod, Glomeris marginata, and have analyzed the segmentation genes engrailed (en), hedgehog (hh), cubitus-interruptus (ci), and wingless (wg). We show that dorsal segments can be distinguished from ventral segments. They differ not only in number and developmental history, but also in gene expression patterns. engrailed, hedgehog, and cubitus-interruptus are expressed in both ventral and dorsal segments, but at different intrasegmental locations, whereas wingless is expressed only in the ventral segments, but not in the dorsal segments. Ventrally, the patterns are similar to what has been described from Drosophila and other arthropods, consistent with a conserved role of these genes in establishing parasegment boundaries. On the dorsal side, however, the gene expression patterns are different and inconsistent with a role in boundary formation between segments, but they suggest that these genes might function to establish the tergite borders. Our data suggest a profound and rather complete decoupling of dorsal and ventral segmentation leading to the dorsoventral discrepancies in the number of segmental elements. Based on gene expression, we propose a model that may resolve the hitherto controversial issue of the correlation between dorsal tergites and ventral leg pairs in basal diplopods (e.g., Glomeris) and is suggestive also for derived, ring-forming diplopods (e.g., Juliformia).

  16. Blood gene expression profiles suggest altered immune function associated with symptoms of generalized anxiety disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wingo, Aliza P; Gibson, Greg

    2015-01-01

    Prospective epidemiological studies found that generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) can impair immune function and increase risk for cardiovascular disease or events. Mechanisms underlying the physiological reverberations of anxiety, however, are still elusive. Hence, we aimed to investigate molecular processes mediating effects of anxiety on physical health using blood gene expression profiles of 336 community participants (157 anxious and 179 control). We examined genome-wide differential gene expression in anxiety, as well as associations between nine major modules of co-regulated transcripts in blood gene expression and anxiety. No significant differential expression was observed in women, but 631 genes were differentially expressed between anxious and control men at the false discovery rate of 0.1 after controlling for age, body mass index, race, and batch effect. Gene set enrichment analysis (GSEA) revealed that genes with altered expression levels in anxious men were involved in response of various immune cells to vaccination and to acute viral and bacterial infection, and in a metabolic network affecting traits of metabolic syndrome. Further, we found one set of 260 co-regulated genes to be significantly associated with anxiety in men after controlling for the relevant covariates, and demonstrate its equivalence to a component of the stress-related conserved transcriptional response to adversity profile. Taken together, our results suggest potential molecular pathways that can explain negative effects of GAD observed in epidemiological studies. Remarkably, even mild anxiety, which most of our participants had, was associated with observable changes in immune-related gene expression levels. Our findings generate hypotheses and provide incremental insights into molecular mechanisms mediating negative physiological effects of GAD. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  17. Association Analysis Suggests SOD2 as a Newly Identified Candidate Gene Associated With Leprosy Susceptibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Geovana Brotto; Salomão, Heloisa; Francio, Angela Schneider; Fava, Vinícius Medeiros; Werneck, Renata Iani; Mira, Marcelo Távora

    2016-08-01

    Genetic studies have identified several genes and genomic regions contributing to the control of host susceptibility to leprosy. Here, we test variants of the positional and functional candidate gene SOD2 for association with leprosy in 2 independent population samples. Family-based analysis revealed an association between leprosy and allele G of marker rs295340 (P = .042) and borderline evidence of an association between leprosy and alleles C and A of markers rs4880 (P = .077) and rs5746136 (P = .071), respectively. Findings were validated in an independent case-control sample for markers rs295340 (P = .049) and rs4880 (P = .038). These results suggest SOD2 as a newly identified gene conferring susceptibility to leprosy. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. A novel splicing mutation in the V2 vasopressin receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kamperis, Konstantinos; Siggaard, C; Herlin, Troels

    2000-01-01

    of the gene in both the affected male (hemizygous) and his mother (heterozygous). This mutation is likely to cause aberrant splicing of the terminal intron of the gene, leading to a non-functional AVP receptor. The clinical studies were consistent with such a hypothesis, as the affected subject had a severe......In order to elucidate the molecular basis and the clinical characteristics of X-linked recessive nephrogenic diabetes insipidus (CNDI) in a kindred of Danish descent, we performed direct sequencing of the arginine vasopressin receptor 2 (AVPR2) gene in five members of the family, as well...... as clinical investigations comprising a fluid deprivation test and a 1-deamino-8-D-arginine-vasopressin (dDAVP) infusion test in the study subject and his mother. We found a highly unusual, novel, de novo 1447A-->C point mutation (gDNA), involving the invariable splice acceptor of the second intron...

  19. Relaxation of human isolated mesenteric arteries by vasopressin and desmopressin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez, M C; Vila, J M; Aldasoro, M; Medina, P; Flor, B; Lluch, S

    1994-01-01

    1. The effects of vasopressin and deamino-8-D-arginine vasopressin (DDAVP, desmopressin) were studied in artery rings (0.8-1 mm in external diameter) obtained from portions of human omentum during the course of abdominal operations (27 patients). 2. In arterial rings under resting tension, vasopressin produced concentration-dependent, endothelium-independent contractions with an EC50 of 0.59 +/- 0.12 nM. The V1 antagonist d(CH2)5Tyr(Me)AVP (1 microM) and the mixed V1-V2 antagonist desGly-d(CH2)5D-Tyr(Et)ValAVP (0.01 microM) displaced the control curve to vasopressin to the right in a parallel manner without differences in the maximal responses. In the presence of indomethacin (1 microM) the contractile response to vasopressin was significantly increased (P < 0.01). 3. In precontracted arterial rings, previously treated with the V1 antagonist, d(CH2)5Tyr(Me)AVP (1 microM), vasopressin produced endothelium-dependent relaxation. This relaxation was reduced significantly (P < 0.05) by indomethacin (1 microM) and unaffected by the V1-V2 receptor antagonist desGly-d(CH2)5D-Tyr(Et)ValAVP (1 microM) or by NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME, 0.1 mM). 4. The selective V2 receptor agonist, DDAVP, caused endothelium-independent, concentration-dependent relaxations in precontracted arterial rings that were inhibited by the mixed V1-V2 receptor antagonist, but not by the V1 receptor antagonist or by pretreatment with indomethacin or L-NAME. 5. Results from this study suggest that vasopressin is primarily a constrictor of human mesenteric arteries by V1 receptor stimulation; vasopressin causes dilatation only during V1 receptor blockade. The relaxation appears to be mediated by the release of vasodilator prostaglandins from the endothelial cell layer and is independent of V2 receptor stimulation or release of nitric oxide.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7834191

  20. A novel point mutation in the translation initiation codon of the pre-pro-vasopressin-neurophysin II gene: Cosegregation with morphological abnormalities and clinical symptoms in autosomal dominant neurohypophyseal diabetes insipidus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rutishauser, J.; Boeni-Schnetzler, M.; Froesch, E.R.; Wichmann, W.; Huisman, T. [Univ. of Zuerich (Switzerland)] [and others

    1996-01-01

    Autosomal dominant neurohypophyseal diabetes insipidus (ADNDI) is a rare variant of idiopathic central diabetes insipidus. Several different mutations in the human vasopressin-neurophysin II (AVP-NP II) gene have been described. We studied nine family members from three generations of an ADNDI pedigree at the clinical, morphological, and molecular levels. AVP concentrations were measured during diagnostic fluid restriction tests. Coronal and sagittal high resolution T1-weighted images of the pituitary were obtained from affected and healthy family members. PCR was used to amplify the AVP-NP II precursor gene, and PCR products were directly sequenced. Under maximal osmotic stimulation, AVP serum levels were close to or below the detection limit in affected individuals. Magnetic resonance imaging studies revealed the characteristic hyperintense ({open_quotes}bright spot{close_quotes}) appearance of the posterior pituitary in two healthy family members. This signal was absent in all four ADNDI patients examined. The coding sequences of AVP and its carrier protein, neurophysin II, were normal in all family members examined. Affected individuals showed a novel single base deletion (G 227) in the translation initiation codon of the AVP-NP II signal peptide on one allele. The mutation in the AVP-NP II leader sequence appears to be responsible for the disease in this kindred, possibly by interfering with protein translocation. The absence of the hyperintense posterior pituitary signal in affected individuals could reflect deficient posterior pituitary function. 56 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  1. Initial characterization of shade avoidance response suggests functional diversity between Populus phytochrome B genes.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karve, Abhijit A [ORNL; Weston, David [ORNL; Jawdy, Sara [ORNL; Gunter, Lee E [ORNL; Allen, Sara M [ORNL; Yang, Xiaohan [ORNL; Wullschleger, Stan D [ORNL; Tuskan, Gerald A [ORNL

    2012-01-01

    Shade avoidance signaling in higher plants involves perception of the incident red/far-red (R/FR) light by phytochromes and the modulation of downstream transcriptional networks to regulate developmental plasticity in relation to heterogeneous light environments. In this study, we characterized the expression and functional features of Populus phytochrome (PHY) gene family as well as the transcriptional responses of Populus to the changes in R/FR light. Expression data indicated that PHYA is the predominant PHY in the dark grown Populus seedling whereas PHYBs are most abundant in mature tissue types. Out of three Populus PHYs, PHYA is light labile and localized to cytosol in dark whereas both PHYB1 and PHYB2 are light stable and are localized to nucleus in mesophyll protoplasts. When expressed in Arabidopsis, PHYB1 rescued Arabidopsis phyB mutant phenotype whereas PHYB2 did not, suggesting functional diversification between these two gene family members. However, phenotypes of transgenic Populus lines with altered expression of PHYB1, PHYB2 or both and the expression of candidate shade response genes in these transgenic lines suggest that PHYB1 and PHYB2 may have distinct yet overlapping functions. The RNAseq results and analysis of Populus exposed to enriched-FR light indicate that genes associated in cell wall modification and brassinosteroid signaling were induced under far red light. Overall our data indicate that Populus transcriptional responses are at least partially conserved with Arabidopsis.

  2. Molecular Network Analysis Suggests Aberrant CREB-Mediated Gene Regulation in the Alzheimer Disease Hippocampus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun-ichi Satoh

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The pathogenesis of Alzheimer disease (AD involves the complex interaction between genetic and environmental factors affecting multiple cellular pathways. Recent advances in systems biology provide a system-level understanding of AD by elucidating the genome-wide molecular interactions. By using KeyMolnet, a bioinformatics tool for analyzing molecular interactions on the curated knowledgebase, we characterized molecular network of 2,883 all stages of AD-related genes (ADGs and 559 incipient AD-related genes (IADGs identified by global gene expression profiling of the hippocampal CA1 region of AD brains in terms of significant clinical and pathological correlations (Blalock et al., Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 101: 2173-2178, 2004. By the common upstream search, KeyMolnet identified cAMP-response element-binding protein (CREB as the principal transcription factor exhibiting the most significant relevance to molecular networks of both ADGs and IADGs. The CREB-regulated transcriptional network included upregulated and downregulated sets of ADGs and IADGs, suggesting an involvement of generalized deregulation of the CREB signaling pathway in the pathophysiology of AD, beginning at the early stage of the disease. To verify the in silico observations in vivo, we conducted immunohistochemical studies of 11 AD and 13 age-matched control brains by using anti-phoshorylated CREB (pCREB antibody. An abnormal accumulation of pCREB imunoreactivity was identified in granules of granulovacuolar degeneration (GVD in the hippocampal neurons of AD brains. These observations suggest that aberrant CREB-mediated gene regulation serves as a molecular biomarker of AD-related pathological processes, and support the hypothesis that sequestration of pCREB in GVD granules is in part responsible for deregulation of CREB-mediated gene expression in AD hippocampus.

  3. A switch from GABA inhibition to excitation of vasopressin neurons exacerbates the development angiotensin II-dependent hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korpal, Aaron K; Han, Su Young; Schwenke, Daryl O; Brown, Colin H

    2017-12-09

    Hypothalamic magnocellular neurons secrete vasopressin into the systemic circulation to maintain blood pressure by increasing renal water reabsorption and by vasoconstriction. When blood pressure rises, baroreflex activation normally inhibits vasopressin neurons via activation of GABAergic inputs. However, plasma vasopressin levels are paradoxically elevated in several models of hypertension and in some patients with essential hypertension, despite increased blood pressure. We have previously shown that vasopressin neuron activity is increased early in the development of moderate angiotensin II-dependent hypertension via blunted baroreflex inhibition of vasopressin neurons. Here, we show that antagonism of vasopressin-induced vasoconstriction slows the development of hypertension and that local administration of a GABAA receptor antagonist inhibits vasopressin neurons during, but not before, the onset of hypertension. Taken together, our data suggest that vasopressin exacerbates the increase in blood pressure evident early in the development hypertension and that blunted baroreflex inhibition of vasopressin neurons is underpinned by an excitatory shift in their response to endogenous GABA signalling. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  4. Individual differences in gene expression of vasopressin, D2 receptor, POMC and orexin: vulnerability to relapse to heroin-seeking in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yan; Leri, Francesco; Cummins, Erin; Kreek, Mary Jeanne

    2015-02-01

    Individual vulnerability to stress-induced relapse during abstinence from chronic heroin exposure is a key feature of opiate addiction, with limited studies on this topic. Arginine vasopressin (AVP) and its V1b receptor, components of the brain stress responsive systems, play a role in heroin-seeking behavior triggered by foot shock (FS) stress in rats. In this study, we tested whether individual differences in the FS-induced heroin-seeking were associated with alterations of AVP and V1b, as well as other stress responsive systems, including pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC), orexin, plasma ACTH and corticosterone, as well as dopamine D2 receptor (D2) and plasma prolactin. Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to 3-hour intravenous heroin self-administration (SA) and then tested in extinction, and FS-induced and heroin priming-induced reinstatements. The rats that self-administered heroin were divided into high and low reinstatement responders induced by FS (H-RI; L-RI). Over SA sessions, both the H-RI and L-RI displayed similar active lever responding, heroin infusion and total heroin intake. Compared to the L-RI, however, the H-RI showed greater active lever responses during stress-induced reinstatement, with higher AVP mRNA levels in medial/basolateral amygdala and lower D2 mRNA levels in caudate putamen. However, heroin priming resulted in similar reinstatement in both groups and produced similarly low POMC and high orexin mRNA levels in hypothalamus. Our results indicate that: 1) enhanced amygdalar AVP and reduced striatal D2 expression may be related to individual vulnerability to stress-induced reinstatement of heroin- seeking; and 2) heroin abstinence-associated alterations of hypothalamic orexin and POMC expression may be involved in drug priming-induced heroin-seeking. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. [Vasopressin for treatment of hemodynamic disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adukauskiene, Dalia; Sirvinskas, Edmundas; Kevelaitis, Egidijus

    2008-01-01

    Vasopressin is a 9-amino acid peptide synthesized by magnocellular neurons of the hypothalamus and released from posterior pituitary gland. The primary physiological role of vasopressin is the maintenance of fluid homeostasis. In this review, the classification of vasopressin receptors, namely V1 vascular, V2 renal, V3 pituitary, oxytocin receptors, and purinergic receptors, and the effects of vasopressin on vascular smooth muscles, the heart, and the kidneys are discussed. Mortality rates of vasodilatory (or distributive), for example septic shock, are high. The use of vasopressin is an alternative therapy for vasodilatory shock with better outcome. Vasopressin is effective in resuscitation of adults after ventricular fibrillation or pulseless tachycardia, when epinephrine is not effective.

  6. In vivo somatostatin, vasopressin, and oxytocin synthesis in diabetic rat hypothalamus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernstrom, J.D.; Fernstrom, M.H.; Kwok, R.P. (Univ. of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, PA (USA))

    1990-04-01

    The in vivo labeling of somatostatin-14, somatostatin-28, arginine vasopressin, and oxytocin was studied in rat hypothalamus after third ventricular administration of (35S)cysteine to streptozotocin-diabetic and normal rats. Immunoreactive somatostatin levels in hypothalamus were unaffected by diabetes, as was the incorporation of (35S)cysteine into hypothalamic somatostatin-14 and somatostatin-28. In contrast, immunoreactive vasopressin levels in hypothalamus and posterior pituitary (and oxytocin levels in posterior pituitary) were below normal in diabetic rats. Moreover, (35S)cysteine incorporation into hypothalamic vasopressin and oxytocin (probably mainly in the paraventricular nucleus because of its proximity to the third ventricular site of label injection) was significantly above normal. The increments in vasopressin and oxytocin labeling were reversed by insulin administration. In vivo cysteine specific activity and the labeling of acid-precipitable protein did not differ between normal and diabetic animals; effects of diabetes on vasopressin and oxytocin labeling were therefore not caused by simple differences in cysteine specific activity. These results suggest that diabetes (1) does not influence the production of somatostatin peptides in hypothalamus but (2) stimulates the synthesis of vasopressin and oxytocin. For vasopressin at least, the increase in synthesis may be a compensatory response to the known increase in its secretion that occurs in uncontrolled diabetes.

  7. Vasopressin differentially modulates aggression and anxiety in adolescent hamsters administered anabolic steroids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Thomas R; Ricci, Lesley A; Melloni, Richard H

    2016-11-01

    Adolescent Syrian hamsters (Mesocricetus auratus) treated with anabolic/androgenic steroids display increased offensive aggression and decreased anxiety correlated with an increase in vasopressin afferent development, synthesis, and neural signaling within the anterior hypothalamus. Upon withdrawal from anabolic/androgenic steroids, this neurobehavioral relationship shifts as hamsters display decreased offensive aggression and increased anxiety correlated with a decrease in anterior hypothalamic vasopressin. This study investigated the hypothesis that alterations in anterior hypothalamic vasopressin neural signaling modulate behavioral shifting between adolescent anabolic/androgenic steroid-induced offensive aggression and anxiety. To test this, adolescent male hamsters were administered anabolic/androgenic steroids and tested for offensive aggression or anxiety following direct pharmacological manipulation of vasopressin V1A receptor signaling within the anterior hypothalamus. Blockade of anterior hypothalamic vasopressin V1A receptor signaling suppressed offensive aggression and enhanced general and social anxiety in hamsters administered anabolic/androgenic steroids during adolescence, effectively reversing the pattern of behavioral response pattern normally observed during the adolescent exposure period. Conversely, activation of anterior hypothalamic vasopressin V1A receptor signaling enhanced offensive aggression in hamsters exposed to anabolic/androgenic steroids during adolescence. Together, these findings suggest that the state of vasopressin neural development and signaling in the anterior hypothalamus plays an important role in behavioral shifting between aggression and anxiety following adolescent exposure to anabolic/androgenic steroids. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Widespread divergence of the CEACAM/PSG genes in vertebrates and humans suggests sensitivity to selection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chia Lin Chang

    Full Text Available In mammals, carcinoembryonic antigen cell adhesion molecules (CEACAMs and pregnancy-specific glycoproteins (PSGs play important roles in the regulation of pathogen transmission, tumorigenesis, insulin signaling turnover, and fetal-maternal interactions. However, how these genes evolved and to what extent they diverged in humans remain to be investigated specifically. Based on syntenic mapping of chordate genomes, we reveal that diverging homologs with a prototypic CEACAM architecture-including an extracellular domain with immunoglobulin variable and constant domain-like regions, and an intracellular domain containing ITAM motif-are present from cartilaginous fish to humans, but are absent in sea lamprey, cephalochordate or urochordate. Interestingly, the CEACAM/PSG gene inventory underwent radical divergence in various vertebrate lineages: from zero in avian species to dozens in therian mammals. In addition, analyses of genetic variations in human populations showed the presence of various types of copy number variations (CNVs at the CEACAM/PSG locus. These copy number polymorphisms have 3-80% frequency in select populations, and encompass single to more than six PSG genes. Furthermore, we found that CEACAM/PSG genes contain a significantly higher density of nonsynonymous single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP compared to the chromosome average, and many CEACAM/PSG SNPs exhibit high population differentiation. Taken together, our study suggested that CEACAM/PSG genes have had a more dynamic evolutionary history in vertebrates than previously thought. Given that CEACAM/PSGs play important roles in maternal-fetal interaction and pathogen recognition, these data have laid the groundwork for future analysis of adaptive CEACAM/PSG genotype-phenotypic relationships in normal and complicated pregnancies as well as other etiologies.

  9. Multiple Origins of Eukaryotic cox15 Suggest Horizontal Gene Transfer from Bacteria to Jakobid Mitochondrial DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Ding; Fu, Cheng-Jie; Baldauf, Sandra L

    2016-01-01

    The most gene-rich and bacterial-like mitochondrial genomes known are those of Jakobida (Excavata). Of these, the most extreme example to date is the Andalucia godoyi mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), including a cox15 gene encoding the respiratory enzyme heme A synthase (HAS), which is nuclear-encoded in nearly all other mitochondriate eukaryotes. Thus cox15 in eukaryotes appears to be a classic example of mitochondrion-to-nucleus (endosymbiotic) gene transfer, with A. godoyi uniquely retaining the ancestral state. However, our analyses reveal two highly distinct HAS types (encoded by cox15-1 and cox15-2 genes) and identify A. godoyi mitochondrial cox15-encoded HAS as type-1 and all other eukaryotic cox15-encoded HAS as type-2. Molecular phylogeny places the two HAS types in widely separated clades with eukaryotic type-2 HAS clustering with the bulk of α-proteobacteria (>670 sequences), whereas A. godoyi type-1 HAS clusters with an eclectic set of bacteria and archaea including two α-proteobacteria missing from the type-2 clade. This wide phylogenetic separation of the two HAS types is reinforced by unique features of their predicted protein structures. Meanwhile, RNA-sequencing and genomic analyses fail to detect either cox15 type in the nuclear genome of any jakobid including A. godoyi. This suggests that not only is cox15-1 a relatively recent acquisition unique to the Andalucia lineage but also the jakobid last common ancestor probably lacked both cox15 types. These results indicate that uptake of foreign genes by mtDNA is more taxonomically widespread than previously thought. They also caution against the assumption that all α-proteobacterial-like features of eukaryotes are ancient remnants of endosymbiosis. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. Oxytocin and vasopressin neural networks: Implications for social behavioral diversity and translational neuroscience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Zachary V; Young, Larry J

    2017-05-01

    Oxytocin- and vasopressin-related systems are present in invertebrate and vertebrate bilaterian animals, including humans, and exhibit conserved neuroanatomical and functional properties. In vertebrates, these systems innervate conserved neural networks that regulate social learning and behavior, including conspecific recognition, social attachment, and parental behavior. Individual and species-level variation in central organization of oxytocin and vasopressin systems has been linked to individual and species variation in social learning and behavior. In humans, genetic polymorphisms in the genes encoding oxytocin and vasopressin peptides and/or their respective target receptors have been associated with individual variation in social recognition, social attachment phenotypes, parental behavior, and psychiatric phenotypes such as autism. Here we describe both conserved and variable features of central oxytocin and vasopressin systems in the context of social behavioral diversity, with a particular focus on neural networks that modulate social learning, behavior, and salience of sociosensory stimuli during species-typical social contexts. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  11. Transcription factor CREB3L1 mediates cAMP and glucocorticoid regulation of arginine vasopressin gene transcription in the rat hypothalamus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenwood, Mingkwan; Greenwood, Michael P; Mecawi, Andre S; Loh, Su Yi; Rodrigues, José Antunes; Paton, Julian F R; Murphy, David

    2015-10-26

    Arginine vasopressin (AVP), a neuropeptide hormone that functions in the regulation of water homeostasis by controlling water re-absorption at kidneys, is synthesised in supraoptic nucleus and paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus. An increase in plasma osmolality stimulates secretion of AVP to blood circulation and induces AVP synthesis in these nuclei. Although studies on mechanism of AVP transcriptional regulation in hypothalamus proposed that cAMP and glucocorticoids positively and negatively regulate Avp expression, respectively, the molecular mechanisms have remained elusive. Recently, we identified CREB3L1 (cAMP-responsive element binding protein 3 like 1) as a putative transcription factor of Avp transcription in the rat hypothalamus. However the mechanism of how CREB3L1 is regulated in response of hyperosmotic stress in the neurons of hypothalamus has never been reported. This study aims to investigate effect of previously reported regulators (cAMP and glucocorticoid) of Avp transcription on transcription factor CREB3L1 in order to establish a molecular explanation for cAMP and glucocorticoids effect on AVP expression. The effect of cAMP and glucocorticoid treatment on Creb3l1 was investigated in both AtT20 cells and hypothalamic organotypic cultures. The expression of Creb3l1 was increased in both mRNA and protein level by treatment with forskolin, which raises intracellular cAMP levels. Activation of cAMP by forskolin also increased Avp promoter activity in AtT20 cells and this effect was blunted by shRNA mediated silencing of Creb3l1. The forskolin induced increase in Creb3l1 expression was diminished by combined treatment with dexamethasone, and, in vivo, intraperitoneal dexamethasone injection blunted the increase in Creb3l1 and Avp expression induced by hyperosmotic stress. Here we shows that cAMP and glucocorticoid positively and negatively regulate Creb3l1 expression in the rat hypothalamus, respectively, and regulation of cAMP on AVP

  12. Risk of Hyponatremia in Patients with Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage Treated with Exogenous Vasopressin Infusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marr, Nancy; Yu, Jessica; Kutsogiannis, Demetrios J; Mahmoud, Sherif Hanafy

    2017-04-01

    Vasopressin is one of the vasopressors used to augment blood pressure in subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) patients with clinically significant vasospasm. The purpose of the present study was to determine whether the administration of vasopressin to a population of SAH patients was an independent predictor of developing hyponatremia. A retrospective review on the health records of 106 patients admitted to the University of Alberta Hospital Neurosciences ICU, Edmonton AB, Canada, with SAH from June 2013 to December 2015 was conducted. Serum sodium changes in patients receiving vasoactive drugs were compared. In addition, independent predictors for hyponatremia (Na < 135 mmol/L) were determined using a multivariate logistic regression model. Patients treated with vasopressin in addition to other vasoactive drugs had significantly higher sodium changes compared to those treated with other vasoactive drugs (-4.7 ± 6 vs -0.1 ± 2.4 mmol/L, respectively, p value 0.001). Hyponatremia occurred in 14 patients (70 %) treated with vasopressin, 10 patients (44 %) treated with vasoactive drugs other than vasopressin (p value 0.081), and 24 patients (38 %) who did not receive any vasoactive drug (p value 0.013). In multivariate logistic regression analysis, when adjusting for disease severity, age, sex, aneurysm location, and treatment, vasopressin was associated with hyponatremia (OR 3.58, 95 % CI, 1.02-12.5, p value 0.046). The results of the present study suggest that hyponatremia may be more common in SAH patients treated with exogenous vasopressin compared to those who did not receive it. Serum sodium should be monitored closely when vasopressin is being used in the SAH population. Further studies are needed to confirm the effect of exogenous vasopressin on serum sodium levels in SAH populations.

  13. Human PTCHD3 nulls: rare copy number and sequence variants suggest a non-essential gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lionel Anath C

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Copy number variations (CNVs can contribute to variable degrees of fitness and/or disease predisposition. Recent studies show that at least 1% of any given genome is copy number variable when compared to the human reference sequence assembly. Homozygous deletions (or CNV nulls that are found in the normal population are of particular interest because they may serve to define non-essential genes in human biology. Results In a genomic screen investigating CNV in Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASDs we detected a heterozygous deletion on chromosome 10p12.1, spanning the Patched-domain containing 3 (PTCHD3 gene, at a frequency of ~1.4% (6/427. This finding seemed interesting, given recent discoveries on the role of another Patched-domain containing gene (PTCHD1 in ASD. Screening of another 177 ASD probands yielded two additional heterozygous deletions bringing the frequency to 1.3% (8/604. The deletion was found at a frequency of ~0.73% (27/3,695 in combined control population from North America and Northern Europe predominately of European ancestry. Screening of the human genome diversity panel (HGDP-CEPH covering worldwide populations yielded deletions in 7/1,043 unrelated individuals and those detected were confined to individuals of European/Mediterranean/Middle Eastern ancestry. Breakpoint mapping yielded an identical 102,624 bp deletion in all cases and controls tested, suggesting a common ancestral event. Interestingly, this CNV occurs at a break of synteny between humans and mouse. Considering all data, however, no significant association of these rare PTCHD3 deletions with ASD was observed. Notwithstanding, our RNA expression studies detected PTCHD3 in several tissues, and a novel shorter isoform for PTCHD3 was characterized. Expression in transfected COS-7 cells showed PTCHD3 isoforms colocalize with calnexin in the endoplasmic reticulum. The presence of a patched (Ptc domain suggested a role for PTCHD3 in various biological

  14. Candidate Gene Analysis Suggests Untapped Genetic Complexity in Melanin-Based Pigmentation in Birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourgeois, Yann X C; Bertrand, Joris A M; Delahaie, Boris; Cornuault, Josselin; Duval, Thomas; Milá, Borja; Thébaud, Christophe

    2016-07-01

    Studies on melanin-based color variation in a context of natural selection have provided a wealth of information on the link between phenotypic and genetic variation. Here, we evaluated associations between melanic plumage patterns and genetic polymorphism in the Réunion grey white-eye (Zosterops borbonicus), a species in which mutations on MC1R do not seem to play any role in explaining melanic variation. This species exhibits 5 plumage color variants that can be grouped into 3 color forms which occupy discrete geographic regions in the lowlands of Réunion, and a fourth high-elevation form which comprises 2 color morphs (grey and brown) and represents a true color polymorphism. We conducted a comprehensive survey of sequence variation in 96 individuals at a series of 7 candidate genes other than MC1R that have been previously shown to influence melanin-based color patterns in vertebrates, including genes that have rarely been studied in a wild bird species before: POMC, Agouti, TYR, TYRP1, DCT, Corin, and SLC24A5 Of these 7 genes, 2 (Corin and TYRP1) displayed an interesting shift in allele frequencies between lowland and highland forms and a departure from mutation-drift equilibrium consistent with balancing selection in the polymorphic highland form only. Sequence variation at Agouti, a gene frequently involved in melanin-based pigmentation patterning, was not associated with color forms or morphs. Thus, we suggest that functionally important changes in loci other than those classically studied are involved in the color polymorphism exhibited by the Réunion grey white-eye and possibly many other nonmodel species. © The American Genetic Association. 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Patterns of evolution of MHC class II genes of crows (Corvus suggest trans-species polymorphism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John A. Eimes

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available A distinguishing characteristic of genes that code for the major histocompatibility complex (MHC is that alleles often share more similarity between, rather than within species. There are two likely mechanisms that can explain this pattern: convergent evolution and trans-species polymorphism (TSP, in which ancient allelic lineages are maintained by balancing selection and retained by descendant species. Distinguishing between these two mechanisms has major implications in how we view adaptation of immune genes. In this study we analyzed exon 2 of the MHC class IIB in three passerine bird species in the genus Corvus: jungle crows (Corvus macrorhynchos japonensis American crows (C. brachyrhynchos and carrion crows (C. corone orientalis. Carrion crows and American crows are recently diverged, but allopatric, sister species, whereas carrion crows and jungle crows are more distantly related but sympatric species, and possibly share pathogens linked to MHC IIB polymorphisms. These patterns of evolutionary divergence and current geographic ranges enabled us to test for trans-species polymorphism and convergent evolution of the MHC IIB in crows. Phylogenetic reconstructions of MHC IIB sequences revealed several well supported interspecific clusters containing all three species, and there was no biased clustering of variants among the sympatric carrion crows and jungle crows. The topologies of phylogenetic trees constructed from putatively selected sites were remarkably different than those constructed from putatively neutral sites. In addition, trees constructed using non-synonymous substitutions from a continuous fragment of exon 2 had more, and generally more inclusive, supported interspecific MHC IIB variant clusters than those constructed from the same fragment using synonymous substitutions. These phylogenetic patterns suggest that recombination, especially gene conversion, has partially erased the signal of allelic ancestry in these species. While

  16. Vasopressin – Emerging Importance in Sepsis

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    QuickSilver

    currently being used in CPR, Septic shock, Post CPB shock and in other areas requiring a vasopressor. Vasopressin and Sepsis. Vasopressin's use in sepsis stemmed originally from Landry's observation in 1994 that patients in vasodilatory septic shock were very sensitive to the vasopressor action of infused Vaso- pressin.

  17. The V1a and V1b, but not V2, vasopressin receptor genes are expressed in the supraoptic nucleus of the rat hypothalamus, and the transcripts are essentially colocalized in the vasopressinergic magnocellular neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurbin, A; Boissin-Agasse, L; Orcel, H; Rabié, A; Joux, N; Desarménien, M G; Richard, P; Moos, F C

    1998-11-01

    We have identified and visualized the vasopressin (VP) receptors expressed by hypothalamic magnocellular neurons in supraoptic and paraventricular nuclei. To do this, we used RT-PCR on total RNA extracts from supraoptic nuclei or on single freshly dissociated supraoptic neurons, and in situ hybridization on frontal sections of hypothalamus of Wistar rats. The RT-PCR on supraoptic RNA extracts revealed that mainly V1a, but also V1b, subtypes of VP receptors are expressed from birth to adulthood. No V2 receptor messenger RNA (mRNA) was detected. Furthermore, the single-cell RT-nested PCR indicated that the V1a receptor mRNA is present in vasopressinergic magnocellular neurons. In light of these results, in situ hybridization was performed to visualize the V1a and V1b receptor mRNAs in supraoptic and paraventricular nuclei. Simultaneously, we coupled this approach to: 1) in situ hybridization detection of oxytocin or VP mRNAs; or 2) immunocytochemistry to detect the neuropeptides. This provided a way of identifying the neurons expressing perceptible amounts of V1a or V1b receptor mRNAs as vasopressinergic neurons. Here, we suggest that the autocontrol exerted specifically by VP on vasopressinergic neurons is mediated through, at least, V1a and V1b subtype receptors.

  18. Initial characterization of shade avoidance response suggests functional diversity between Populus phytochrome B genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karve, Abhijit A; Jawdy, Sara S; Gunter, Lee E; Allen, Sara M; Yang, Xiaohan; Tuskan, Gerald A; Wullschleger, Stan D; Weston, David J

    2012-11-01

    Shade avoidance signaling involves perception of incident red/far-red (R/FR) light by phytochromes (PHYs) and modulation of downstream transcriptional networks. Although these responses are well studied in Arabidopsis, little is known about the role of PHYs and the transcriptional responses to shade in the woody perennial Populus. Tissue expression and subcellular localization of Populus PHYs was studied by quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) and protoplast transient assay. Transgenic lines with altered PHYB1 and/or PHYB2 expression were used in phenotypic assays and transcript profiling with qRT-PCR. RNA-Seq was used to identify transcriptional responses to enriched FR light. All three PHYs were differentially expressed among tissue types and PHYBs were targeted to the nucleus under white light. Populus PHYB1 rescued Arabidopsis phyB mutant phenotypes. Phenotypes of Populus transgenic lines and the expression of candidate shade response genes suggested that PHYB1 and PHYB2 have distinct yet overlapping functions. RNA-Seq analysis indicated that genes associated with cell wall modification and brassinosteroid signaling were induced under enriched FR light in Populus. This study is an initial attempt at deciphering the role of Populus PHYs by evaluating transcriptional reprogramming to enriched FR and demonstrates functional diversity and overlap of the Populus PHYB1 and PHYB2 in regulating shade responses. © 2012 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2012 New Phytologist Trust.

  19. Meta-analysis suggests choosy females get sexy sons more than "good genes".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prokop, Zofia M; Michalczyk, Łukasz; Drobniak, Szymon M; Herdegen, Magdalena; Radwan, Jacek

    2012-09-01

    Female preferences for specific male phenotypes have been documented across a wide range of animal taxa, including numerous species where males contribute only gametes to offspring production. Yet, selective pressures maintaining such preferences are among the major unknowns of evolutionary biology. Theoretical studies suggest that preferences can evolve if they confer genetic benefits in terms of increased attractiveness of sons ("Fisherian" models) or overall fitness of offspring ("good genes" models). These two types of models predict, respectively, that male attractiveness is heritable and genetically correlated with fitness. In this meta-analysis, we draw general conclusions from over two decades worth of empirical studies testing these predictions (90 studies on 55 species in total). We found evidence for heritability of male attractiveness. However, attractiveness showed no association with traits directly associated with fitness (life-history traits). Interestingly, it did show a positive correlation with physiological traits, which include immunocompetence and condition. In conclusion, our results support "Fisherian" models of preference evolution, while providing equivocal evidence for "good genes." We pinpoint research directions that should stimulate progress in our understanding of the evolution of female choice. © 2012 The Author(s). Evolution© 2012 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  20. Expression patterns of neural genes in Euperipatoides kanangrensis suggest divergent evolution of onychophoran and euarthropod neurogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eriksson, Bo Joakim; Stollewerk, Angelika

    2010-12-28

    One of the controversial debates on euarthropod relationships centers on the question as to whether insects, crustaceans, and myriapods (Mandibulata) share a common ancestor or whether myriapods group with the chelicerates (Myriochelata). The debate was stimulated recently by studies in chelicerates and myriapods that show that neural precursor groups (NPGs) segregate from the neuroectoderm generating the nervous system, whereas in insects and crustaceans the nervous tissue is produced by stem cells. Do the shared neural characters of myriapods and chelicerates represent derived characters that support the Myriochelata grouping? Or do they rather reflect the ancestral pattern? Analyses of neurogenesis in a group closely related to euarthropods, the onychophorans, show that, similar to insects and crustaceans, single neural precursors are formed in the neuroectoderm, potentially supporting the Myriochelata hypothesis. Here we show that the nature and the selection of onychophoran neural precursors are distinct from euarthropods. The onychophoran nervous system is generated by the massive irregular segregation of single neural precursors, contrasting with the limited number and stereotyped arrangement of NPGs/stem cells in euarthropods. Furthermore, neural genes do not show the spatiotemporal pattern that sets up the precise position of neural precursors as in euarthropods. We conclude that neurogenesis in onychophorans largely does not reflect the ancestral pattern of euarthropod neurogenesis, but shows a mixture of derived characters and ancestral characters that have been modified in the euarthropod lineage. Based on these data and additional evidence, we suggest an evolutionary sequence of arthropod neurogenesis that is in line with the Mandibulata hypothesis.

  1. Genome-wide analysis suggests divergent evolution of lipid phosphotases/phosphotransferase genes in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Peng; Chen, Zhenxi; Kasimu, Rena; Chen, Yinhua; Zhang, Xiaoxiao; Gai, Jiangtao

    2016-08-01

    Genes of the LPPT (lipid phosphatase/phosphotransferase) family play important roles in lipid phosphorous transfer and triacylglycerol accumulation in plants. To provide overviews of the plant LPPT family and their overall relationships, here we carried out genome-wide identifications and analyses of plant LPPT family members. A total of 643 putative LPPT genes were identified from 48 sequenced plant genomes, among which 205 genes from 14 plants were chosen for further analyses. Plant LPPT genes belonged to three distinctive groups, namely the LPT (lipid phosphotransfease), LPP (lipid phosphatase), and pLPP (plastidic lipid phosphotransfease) groups. Genes of the LPT group could be further partitioned into three groups, two of which were only identified in terrestrial plants. Genes in the LPP and pLPP groups experienced duplications in early stages of plant evolution. Among 17 Zea mays LPPT genes, divergence of temporal-spatial expression patterns was revealed based on microarray data analysis. Peptide sequences of plant LPPT genes harbored different conserved motifs. A test of Branch Model versus One-ratio Model did not support significant selective pressures acting on different groups of LPPT genes, although quite different nonsynonymous evolutionary rates and selective pressures were observed. The complete picture of the plant LPPT family provided here should facilitate further investigations of plant LPPT genes and offer a better understanding of lipid biosynthesis in plants.

  2. Diabetes insipidus: celebrating a century of vasopressin therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qureshi, Sana; Galiveeti, Sneha; Bichet, Daniel G; Roth, Jesse

    2014-12-01

    Diabetes mellitus, widely known to the ancients for polyuria and glycosuria, budded off diabetes insipidus (DI) about 200 years ago, based on the glucose-free polyuria that characterized a subset of patients. In the late 19th century, clinicians identified the posterior pituitary as the site of pathology, and pharmacologists found multiple bioactivities there. Early in the 20th century, the amelioration of the polyuria with extracts of the posterior pituitary inaugurated a new era in therapy and advanced the hypothesis that DI was due to a hormone deficiency. Decades later, a subset of patients with polyuria unresponsive to therapy were recognized, leading to the distinction between central DI and nephrogenic DI, an early example of a hormone-resistant condition. Recognition that the posterior pituitary had 2 hormones was followed by du Vigneaud's Nobel Prize winning isolation, sequencing, and chemical synthesis of oxytocin and vasopressin. The pure hormones accelerated the development of bioassays and immunoassays that confirmed the hormone deficiency in vasopressin-sensitive DI and abundant levels of hormone in patients with the nephrogenic disorder. With both forms of the disease, acquired and inborn defects were recognized. Emerging concepts of receptors and of genetic analysis led to the recognition of patients with mutations in the genes for 1) arginine vasopressin (AVP), 2) the AVP receptor 2 (AVPR2), and 3) the aquaporin 2 water channel (AQP2). We recount here the multiple skeins of clinical and laboratory research that intersected frequently over the centuries since the first recognition of DI.

  3. Graphical modeling of gene expression in monocytes suggests molecular mechanisms explaining increased atherosclerosis in smokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verdugo, Ricardo A; Zeller, Tanja; Rotival, Maxime; Wild, Philipp S; Münzel, Thomas; Lackner, Karl J; Weidmann, Henri; Ninio, Ewa; Trégouët, David-Alexandre; Cambien, François; Blankenberg, Stefan; Tiret, Laurence

    2013-01-01

    Smoking is a risk factor for atherosclerosis with reported widespread effects on gene expression in circulating blood cells. We hypothesized that a molecular signature mediating the relation between smoking and atherosclerosis may be found in the transcriptome of circulating monocytes. Genome-wide expression profiles and counts of atherosclerotic plaques in carotid arteries were collected in 248 smokers and 688 non-smokers from the general population. Patterns of co-expressed genes were identified by Independent Component Analysis (ICA) and network structure of the pattern-specific gene modules was inferred by the PC-algorithm. A likelihood-based causality test was implemented to select patterns that fit models containing a path "smoking→gene expression→plaques". Robustness of the causal inference was assessed by bootstrapping. At a FDR ≤0.10, 3,368 genes were associated to smoking or plaques, of which 93% were associated to smoking only. SASH1 showed the strongest association to smoking and PPARG the strongest association to plaques. Twenty-nine gene patterns were identified by ICA. Modules containing SASH1 and PPARG did not show evidence for the "smoking→gene expression→plaques" causality model. Conversely, three modules had good support for causal effects and exhibited a network topology consistent with gene expression mediating the relation between smoking and plaques. The network with the strongest support for causal effects was connected to plaques through SLC39A8, a gene with known association to HDL-cholesterol and cellular uptake of cadmium from tobacco, while smoking was directly connected to GAS6, a gene reported to have anti-inflammatory effects in atherosclerosis and to be up-regulated in the placenta of women smoking during pregnancy. Our analysis of the transcriptome of monocytes recovered genes relevant for association to smoking and atherosclerosis, and connected genes that before, were only studied in separate contexts. Inspection of

  4. Burden analysis of rare microdeletions suggests a strong impact of neurodevelopmental genes in genetic generalised epilepsies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lal, Dennis; Ruppert, Ann-Kathrin; Trucks, Holger

    2015-01-01

    -18, OR = 4.6) or an evolutionarily conserved brain-expressed gene related to autism spectrum disorder (P = 1.3 x 10-12, OR = 4.1) were significantly enriched in the GGE patients. Microdeletions found only in GGE patients harboured a high proportion of genes previously associated with epilepsy...

  5. A third approach to gene prediction suggests thousands of additional human transcribed regions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo Glusman

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available The identification and characterization of the complete ensemble of genes is a main goal of deciphering the digital information stored in the human genome. Many algorithms for computational gene prediction have been described, ultimately derived from two basic concepts: (1 modeling gene structure and (2 recognizing sequence similarity. Successful hybrid methods combining these two concepts have also been developed. We present a third orthogonal approach to gene prediction, based on detecting the genomic signatures of transcription, accumulated over evolutionary time. We discuss four algorithms based on this third concept: Greens and CHOWDER, which quantify mutational strand biases caused by transcription-coupled DNA repair, and ROAST and PASTA, which are based on strand-specific selection against polyadenylation signals. We combined these algorithms into an integrated method called FEAST, which we used to predict the location and orientation of thousands of putative transcription units not overlapping known genes. Many of the newly predicted transcriptional units do not appear to code for proteins. The new algorithms are particularly apt at detecting genes with long introns and lacking sequence conservation. They therefore complement existing gene prediction methods and will help identify functional transcripts within many apparent "genomic deserts."

  6. Gene expression suggests conserved aspects of Hox gene regulation in arthropods and provides additional support for monophyletic Myriapoda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssen, Ralf; Budd, Graham E

    2010-07-05

    Antisense transcripts of Ultrabithorax (aUbx) in the millipede Glomeris and the centipede Lithobius are expressed in patterns complementary to that of the Ubx sense transcripts. A similar complementary expression pattern has been described for non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) of the bithoraxoid (bxd) locus in Drosophila, in which the transcription of bxd ncRNAs represses Ubx via transcriptional interference. We discuss our findings in the context of possibly conserved mechanisms of Ubx regulation in myriapods and the fly.Bicistronic transcription of Ubx and Antennapedia (Antp) has been reported previously for a myriapod and a number of crustaceans. In this paper, we show that Ubx/Antp bicistronic transcripts also occur in Glomeris and an onychophoran, suggesting further conserved mechanisms of Hox gene regulation in arthropods.Myriapod monophyly is supported by the expression of aUbx in all investigated myriapods, whereas in other arthropod classes, including the Onychophora, aUbx is not expressed. Of the two splice variants of Ubx/Antp only one could be isolated from myriapods, representing a possible further synapomorphy of the Myriapoda.

  7. Gene expression suggests conserved aspects of Hox gene regulation in arthropods and provides additional support for monophyletic Myriapoda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janssen Ralf

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Antisense transcripts of Ultrabithorax (aUbx in the millipede Glomeris and the centipede Lithobius are expressed in patterns complementary to that of the Ubx sense transcripts. A similar complementary expression pattern has been described for non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs of the bithoraxoid (bxd locus in Drosophila, in which the transcription of bxd ncRNAs represses Ubx via transcriptional interference. We discuss our findings in the context of possibly conserved mechanisms of Ubx regulation in myriapods and the fly. Bicistronic transcription of Ubx and Antennapedia (Antp has been reported previously for a myriapod and a number of crustaceans. In this paper, we show that Ubx/Antp bicistronic transcripts also occur in Glomeris and an onychophoran, suggesting further conserved mechanisms of Hox gene regulation in arthropods. Myriapod monophyly is supported by the expression of aUbx in all investigated myriapods, whereas in other arthropod classes, including the Onychophora, aUbx is not expressed. Of the two splice variants of Ubx/Antp only one could be isolated from myriapods, representing a possible further synapomorphy of the Myriapoda.

  8. Therapeutic applications of vasopressin in pediatric patients

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Agrawal, Amit; Singh, Vishal K; Varma, Amit; Sharma, Rajesh

    2012-01-01

    ...”, “shock”, “septic shock”, “vasodilatory shock”, “cardiac arrest”, and “resuscitation” for reports on vasopressin/terlipressin use in children and manual review of article bibliographies...

  9. Phylogenomic study indicates widespread lateral gene transfer in Entamoeba and suggests a past intimate relationship with parabasalids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Jessica R; Katz, Laura A

    2014-09-01

    Lateral gene transfer (LGT) has impacted the evolutionary history of eukaryotes, though to a lesser extent than in bacteria and archaea. Detecting LGT and distinguishing it from single gene tree artifacts is difficult, particularly when considering very ancient events (i.e., over hundreds of millions of years). Here, we use two independent lines of evidence--a taxon-rich phylogenetic approach and an assessment of the patterns of gene presence/absence--to evaluate the extent of LGT in the parasitic amoebozoan genus Entamoeba. Previous work has suggested that a number of genes in the genome of Entamoeba spp. were acquired by LGT. Our approach, using an automated phylogenomic pipeline to build taxon-rich gene trees, suggests that LGT is more extensive than previously thought. Our analyses reveal that genes have frequently entered the Entamoeba genome via nonvertical events, including at least 116 genes acquired directly from bacteria or archaea, plus an additional 22 genes in which Entamoeba plus one other eukaryote are nested among bacteria and/or archaea. These genes may make good candidates for novel therapeutics, as drugs targeting these genes are less likely to impact the human host. Although we recognize the challenges of inferring intradomain transfers given systematic errors in gene trees, we find 109 genes supporting LGT from a eukaryote to Entamoeba spp., and 178 genes unique to Entamoeba spp. and one other eukaryotic taxon (i.e., presence/absence data). Inspection of these intradomain LGTs provide evidence of a common sister relationship between genes of Entamoeba (Amoebozoa) and parabasalids (Excavata). We speculate that this indicates a past close relationship (e.g., symbiosis) between ancestors of these extant lineages. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  10. Rapid genome reshaping by multiple-gene loss after whole-genome duplication in teleost fish suggested by mathematical modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Jun; Sato, Yukuto; Sinclair, Robert; Tsukamoto, Katsumi; Nishida, Mutsumi

    2015-12-01

    Whole-genome duplication (WGD) is believed to be a significant source of major evolutionary innovation. Redundant genes resulting from WGD are thought to be lost or acquire new functions. However, the rates of gene loss and thus temporal process of genome reshaping after WGD remain unclear. The WGD shared by all teleost fish, one-half of all jawed vertebrates, was more recent than the two ancient WGDs that occurred before the origin of jawed vertebrates, and thus lends itself to analysis of gene loss and genome reshaping. Using a newly developed orthology identification pipeline, we inferred the post-teleost-specific WGD evolutionary histories of 6,892 protein-coding genes from nine phylogenetically representative teleost genomes on a time-calibrated tree. We found that rapid gene loss did occur in the first 60 My, with a loss of more than 70-80% of duplicated genes, and produced similar genomic gene arrangements within teleosts in that relatively short time. Mathematical modeling suggests that rapid gene loss occurred mainly by events involving simultaneous loss of multiple genes. We found that the subsequent 250 My were characterized by slow and steady loss of individual genes. Our pipeline also identified about 1,100 shared single-copy genes that are inferred to have become singletons before the divergence of clupeocephalan teleosts. Therefore, our comparative genome analysis suggests that rapid gene loss just after the WGD reshaped teleost genomes before the major divergence, and provides a useful set of marker genes for future phylogenetic analysis.

  11. Modeling suggests that gene circuit architecture controls phenotypic variability in a bacterial persistence network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koh, Rachel S; Dunlop, Mary J

    2012-05-20

    Bacterial persistence is a non-inherited bet-hedging mechanism where a subpopulation of cells enters a dormant state, allowing those cells to survive environmental stress such as treatment with antibiotics. Persister cells are not mutants; they are formed by natural stochastic variation in gene expression. Understanding how regulatory architecture influences the level of phenotypic variability can help us explain how the frequency of persistence events can be tuned. We present a model of the regulatory network controlling the HipBA toxin-antitoxin system from Escherichia coli. Using a biologically realistic model we first determine that the persistence phenotype is not the result of bistability within the network. Next, we develop a stochastic model and show that cells can enter persistence due to random fluctuations in transcription, translation, degradation, and complex formation. We then examine alternative gene circuit architectures for controlling hipBA expression and show that networks with more noise (more persisters) and less noise (fewer persisters) are straightforward to achieve. Thus, we propose that the gene circuit architecture can be used to tune the frequency of persistence, a trait that can be selected for by evolution. We develop deterministic and stochastic models describing how the regulation of toxin and antitoxin expression influences phenotypic variation within a population. Persistence events are the result of stochastic fluctuations in toxin levels that cross a threshold, and their frequency is controlled by the regulatory topology governing gene expression.

  12. Modeling suggests that gene circuit architecture controls phenotypic variability in a bacterial persistence network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koh Rachel S

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bacterial persistence is a non-inherited bet-hedging mechanism where a subpopulation of cells enters a dormant state, allowing those cells to survive environmental stress such as treatment with antibiotics. Persister cells are not mutants; they are formed by natural stochastic variation in gene expression. Understanding how regulatory architecture influences the level of phenotypic variability can help us explain how the frequency of persistence events can be tuned. Results We present a model of the regulatory network controlling the HipBA toxin-antitoxin system from Escherichia coli. Using a biologically realistic model we first determine that the persistence phenotype is not the result of bistability within the network. Next, we develop a stochastic model and show that cells can enter persistence due to random fluctuations in transcription, translation, degradation, and complex formation. We then examine alternative gene circuit architectures for controlling hipBA expression and show that networks with more noise (more persisters and less noise (fewer persisters are straightforward to achieve. Thus, we propose that the gene circuit architecture can be used to tune the frequency of persistence, a trait that can be selected for by evolution. Conclusions We develop deterministic and stochastic models describing how the regulation of toxin and antitoxin expression influences phenotypic variation within a population. Persistence events are the result of stochastic fluctuations in toxin levels that cross a threshold, and their frequency is controlled by the regulatory topology governing gene expression.

  13. Mating type gene analysis in apparently asexual Cercospora species is suggestive of cryptic sex

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groenewald, M.; Groenewald, J.Z.; Harrington, T.C.; Abeln, E.C.A.; Crous, P.W.

    2006-01-01

    The genus Cercospora consists of numerous important, apparently asexual plant pathogens. We designed degenerate primers from homologous sequences in related species to amplify part of the C. apii, C. apiicola, C. beticola, C. zeae-maydis and C. zeina mating type genes. Chromosome walking was used to

  14. Chimpanzee Personality and the Arginine Vasopressin Receptor 1A Genotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, V A D; Weiss, A; Humle, T; Morimura, N; Udono, T; Idani, G; Matsuzawa, T; Hirata, S; Inoue-Murayama, M

    2017-03-01

    Polymorphisms of the arginine vasopressin receptor 1a (AVPR1a) gene have been linked to various measures related to human social behavior, including sibling conflict and agreeableness. In chimpanzees, AVPR1a polymorphisms have been associated with traits important for social interactions, including sociability, joint attention, dominance, conscientiousness, and hierarchical personality dimensions named low alpha/stability, disinhibition, and negative emotionality/low dominance. We examined associations between AVPR1a and six personality domains and hierarchical personality dimensions in 129 chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes) living in Japan or in a sanctuary in Guinea. We fit three linear and three animal models. The first model included genotype, the second included sex and genotype, and the third included genotype, sex, and sex × genotype. All personality phenotypes were heritable. Chimpanzees possessing the long form of the allele were higher in conscientiousness, but only in models that did not include the other predictors; however, additional analyses suggested that this may have been a consequence of study design. In animal models that included sex and sex × genotype, chimpanzees homozygous for the short form of the allele were higher in extraversion. Taken with the findings of previous studies of chimpanzees and humans, the findings related to conscientiousness suggest that AVPR1a may be related to lower levels of impulsive aggression. The direction of the association between AVPR1a genotype and extraversion ran counter to what one would expect if AVPR1a was related to social behaviors. These results help us further understand the genetic basis of personality in chimpanzees.

  15. Sexual arousal and rhythmic synchronization: A possible effect of vasopressin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miani, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    Music is ubiquitous. Yet, its biological relevance is still an ongoing debate. Supporting the view that music had an ancestral role in courtship displays, a pilot study presented here provides preliminary evidence on the link between music and sexual selection. The underlying hypothesis is based...... by vasopressin and its genes. Hence, to test this hypothesis, a rhythmic synchronization task was employed here on one male subject during sexual arousal. Results revealed a significant effect of sexual arousal on rhythm synchronization. This is the first report that empirically supports the hypothesis...

  16. Sequence and expression variations suggest an adaptive role for the DA1-like gene family in the evolution of soybeans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Man; Gu, Yongzhe; He, Lingli; Chen, Qingshan; He, Chaoying

    2015-05-15

    The DA1 gene family is plant-specific and Arabidopsis DA1 regulates seed and organ size, but the functions in soybeans are unknown. The cultivated soybean (Glycine max) is believed to be domesticated from the annual wild soybeans (Glycine soja). To evaluate whether DA1-like genes were involved in the evolution of soybeans, we compared variation at both sequence and expression levels of DA1-like genes from G. max (GmaDA1) and G. soja (GsoDA1). Sequence identities were extremely high between the orthologous pairs between soybeans, while the paralogous copies in a soybean species showed a relatively high divergence. Moreover, the expression variation of DA1-like paralogous genes in soybean was much greater than the orthologous gene pairs between the wild and cultivated soybeans during development and challenging abiotic stresses such as salinity. We further found that overexpressing GsoDA1 genes did not affect seed size. Nevertheless, overexpressing them reduced transgenic Arabidopsis seed germination sensitivity to salt stress. Moreover, most of these genes could improve salt tolerance of the transgenic Arabidopsis plants, corroborated by a detection of expression variation of several key genes in the salt-tolerance pathways. Our work suggested that expression diversification of DA1-like genes is functionally associated with adaptive radiation of soybeans, reinforcing that the plant-specific DA1 gene family might have contributed to the successful adaption to complex environments and radiation of the plants.

  17. Association analyses suggest GPR24 as a shared susceptibility gene for bipolar affective disorder and schizophrenia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Severinsen, J E; Als, T D; Binderup, H

    2006-01-01

    M segment on 22q13. The present study investigated three candidate genes located in this segment: GPR24, ADSL, and ST13. Nine SNPs located in these genes and one microsatellite marker (D22S279) were applied in an association analysis of two samples: an extension of the previously analyzed Faeroese sample...... comprising 28 distantly related cases (17 BPD, 11 SZ subjects) and 44 controls, and a Scottish sample including 162 patients with BPD, 103 with SZ, and 200 controls. In both samples significant associations were observed in both disorders with predominantly GPR24 SNPs and haplotypes. In the Faeroese sample......(-5) and 0.0006 in the combined group of cases from the Faeroe Islands and Scotland, respectively. The G protein-coupled receptor 24 encoded by GPR24 binds melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH) and has been implicated with feeding behavior, energy metabolism, and regulation of stress and mood. To our knowledge...

  18. Multiple genes of apparent algal origin suggest ciliates may once have been photosynthetic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes-Prieto, Adrian; Moustafa, Ahmed; Bhattacharya, Debashish

    2008-07-08

    Plantae (as defined by Cavalier-Smith, 1981) plastids evolved via primary endosymbiosis whereby a heterotrophic protist enslaved a photosynthetic cyanobacterium. This "primary" plastid spread into other eukaryotes via secondary endosymbiosis. An important but contentious theory in algal evolution is the chromalveolate hypothesis that posits chromists (cryptophytes, haptophytes, and stramenopiles) and alveolates (ciliates, apicomplexans, and dinoflagellates) share a common ancestor that contained a red-algal-derived "secondary" plastid. Under this view, the existence of several later-diverging plastid-lacking chromalveolates such as ciliates and oomycetes would be explained by plastid loss in these lineages. To test the idea of a photosynthetic ancestry for ciliates, we used the 27,446 predicted proteins from the macronuclear genome of Tetrahymena thermophila to query prokaryotic and eukaryotic genomes. We identified 16 proteins of possible algal origin in the ciliates Tetrahymena and Paramecium tetraurelia. Fourteen of these are present in other chromalveolates. Here we compare and contrast the likely scenarios for algal-gene origin in ciliates either via multiple rounds of horizontal gene transfer (HGT) from algal prey or symbionts, or through endosymbiotic gene transfer (EGT) during a putative photosynthetic phase in their evolution.

  19. Cloning and identification of an oxytocin/vasopressin-like receptor and its ligand from insects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stafflinger, Elisabeth; Hansen, Karina K; Hauser, Frank

    2008-01-01

    to the locust peptide, which we named inotocin (for insect oxytocin/vasopressin-like peptide) and a gene coding for an inotocin G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR). We cloned the Tribolium inotocin preprohormone and the inotocin GPCR and expressed the GPCR in CHO cells. This GPCR is strongly activated by low...

  20. Characterization of vasopressin V2 receptor mutants in nephrogenic diabetes insipidus in a polarized cell model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Robben, J.H.; Knoers, N.V.A.M.; Deen, P.M.T.

    2005-01-01

    X-linked nephrogenic diabetes insipidus (NDI) is caused by mutations in the gene encoding the vasopressin V2 receptor (V2R). For the development of a tailored therapy for NDI, knowledge of the cellular fate of V2R mutants is needed. It would be useful when this fate could be predicted from the

  1. Modeling the zebrafish segmentation clock's gene regulatory network constrained by expression data suggests evolutionary transitions between oscillating and nonoscillating transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwendinger-Schreck, Jamie; Kang, Yuan; Holley, Scott A

    2014-06-01

    During segmentation of vertebrate embryos, somites form in accordance with a periodic pattern established by the segmentation clock. In the zebrafish (Danio rerio), the segmentation clock includes six hairy/enhancer of split-related (her/hes) genes, five of which oscillate due to negative autofeedback. The nonoscillating gene hes6 forms the hub of a network of 10 Her/Hes protein dimers, which includes 7 DNA-binding dimers and 4 weak or non-DNA-binding dimers. The balance of dimer species is critical for segmentation clock function, and loss-of-function studies suggest that the her genes have both unique and redundant functions within the clock. However, the precise regulatory interactions underlying the negative feedback loop are unknown. Here, we combine quantitative experimental data, in silico modeling, and a global optimization algorithm to identify a gene regulatory network (GRN) designed to fit measured transcriptional responses to gene knockdown. Surprisingly, we find that hes6, the clock gene that does not oscillate, responds to negative feedback. Consistent with prior in silico analyses, we find that variation in transcription, translation, and degradation rates can mediate the gain and loss of oscillatory behavior for genes regulated by negative feedback. Extending our study, we found that transcription of the nonoscillating Fgf pathway gene sef responds to her/hes perturbation similarly to oscillating her genes. These observations suggest a more extensive underlying regulatory similarity between the zebrafish segmentation clock and the mouse and chick segmentation clocks, which exhibit oscillations of her/hes genes as well as numerous other Notch, Fgf, and Wnt pathway genes. Copyright © 2014 by the Genetics Society of America.

  2. Combining Shigella Tn-seq data with gold-standard E. coli gene deletion data suggests rare transitions between essential and non-essential gene functionality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freed, Nikki E; Bumann, Dirk; Silander, Olin K

    2016-09-06

    Gene essentiality - whether or not a gene is necessary for cell growth - is a fundamental component of gene function. It is not well established how quickly gene essentiality can change, as few studies have compared empirical measures of essentiality between closely related organisms. Here we present the results of a Tn-seq experiment designed to detect essential protein coding genes in the bacterial pathogen Shigella flexneri 2a 2457T on a genome-wide scale. Superficial analysis of this data suggested that 481 protein-coding genes in this Shigella strain are critical for robust cellular growth on rich media. Comparison of this set of genes with a gold-standard data set of essential genes in the closely related Escherichia coli K12 BW25113 revealed that an excessive number of genes appeared essential in Shigella but non-essential in E. coli. Importantly, and in converse to this comparison, we found no genes that were essential in E. coli and non-essential in Shigella, implying that many genes were artefactually inferred as essential in Shigella. Controlling for such artefacts resulted in a much smaller set of discrepant genes. Among these, we identified three sets of functionally related genes, two of which have previously been implicated as critical for Shigella growth, but which are dispensable for E. coli growth. The data presented here highlight the small number of protein coding genes for which we have strong evidence that their essentiality status differs between the closely related bacterial taxa E. coli and Shigella. A set of genes involved in acetate utilization provides a canonical example. These results leave open the possibility of developing strain-specific antibiotic treatments targeting such differentially essential genes, but suggest that such opportunities may be rare in closely related bacteria.

  3. A novel domain suggests a ciliary function for ASPM, a brain size determining gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponting, Chris P

    2006-05-01

    The N-terminal domain of abnormal spindle-like microcephaly-associated protein (ASPM) is identified as a member of a novel family of ASH (ASPM, SPD-2, Hydin) domains. These domains are present in proteins associated with cilia, flagella, the centrosome and the Golgi complex, and in Hydin and OCRL whose deficiencies are associated with hydrocephalus and Lowe oculocerebrorenal syndrome, respectively. Genes encoding ASH domains thus represent good candidates for primary ciliary dyskinesias. ASPM has been proposed to function in neurogenesis and to be a major determinant of cerebral cortical size in humans. Support for this hypothesis stems from associations between mutations in ASPM and primary microcephaly, and from the rapid evolution of ASPM during recent hominid evolution. The identification of the ASH domain family instead indicates possible roles for ASPM in sperm flagellar or in ependymal cells' cilia. ASPM's rapid evolution may thus reflect selective pressures on ciliary function, rather than pressures on mitosis during neurogenesis.

  4. Comparison of ex vivo stability of copeptin and vasopressin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heida, Judith E; Boesten, Lianne S M; Ettema, Esmée M; Muller Kobold, Anneke C.; Franssen, Casper F M; Gansevoort, Ron T; Zittema, Debbie

    BACKGROUND: Copeptin, part of the vasopressin precursor, is increasingly used as marker for vasopressin and is claimed to have better ex vivo stability. However, no study has directly compared the ex vivo stability of copeptin and vasopressin. METHODS: Blood of ten healthy volunteers was collected

  5. A 7-bp insertion in the 3' untranslated region suggests the duplication and concerted evolution of the rabbit SRY gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferrand Nuno

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In this work we report the genetic polymorphism of a 7-bp insertion in the 3' untranslated region of the rabbit SRY gene. The polymorphic GAATTAA motif was found exclusively in one of the two divergent rabbit Y-chromosomal lineages, suggesting that its origin is more recent than the separation of the O. c. algirus and O. c. cuniculus Y-chromosomes. In addition, the remarkable observation of haplotypes exhibiting 0, 1 and 2 7-bp inserts in essentially all algirus populations suggests that the rabbit SRY gene is duplicated and evolving under concerted evolution.

  6. Phylogenomics and Analysis of Shared Genes Suggest a Single Transition to Mutualism in Wolbachia of Nematodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comandatore, Francesco; Sassera, Davide; Montagna, Matteo; Kumar, Sujai; Koutsovoulos, Georgios; Thomas, Graham; Repton, Charlotte; Babayan, Simon A.; Gray, Nick; Cordaux, Richard; Darby, Alistair; Makepeace, Benjamin; Blaxter, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Wolbachia, endosymbiotic bacteria of the order Rickettsiales, are widespread in arthropods but also present in nematodes. In arthropods, A and B supergroup Wolbachia are generally associated with distortion of host reproduction. In filarial nematodes, including some human parasites, multiple lines of experimental evidence indicate that C and D supergroup Wolbachia are essential for the survival of the host, and here the symbiotic relationship is considered mutualistic. The origin of this mutualistic endosymbiosis is of interest for both basic and applied reasons: How does a parasite become a mutualist? Could intervention in the mutualism aid in treatment of human disease? Correct rooting and high-quality resolution of Wolbachia relationships are required to resolve this question. However, because of the large genetic distance between Wolbachia and the nearest outgroups, and the limited number of genomes so far available for large-scale analyses, current phylogenies do not provide robust answers. We therefore sequenced the genome of the D supergroup Wolbachia endosymbiont of Litomosoides sigmodontis, revisited the selection of loci for phylogenomic analyses, and performed a phylogenomic analysis including available complete genomes (from isolates in supergroups A, B, C, and D). Using 90 orthologous genes with reliable phylogenetic signals, we obtained a robust phylogenetic reconstruction, including a highly supported root to the Wolbachia phylogeny between a (A + B) clade and a (C + D) clade. Although we currently lack data from several Wolbachia supergroups, notably F, our analysis supports a model wherein the putatively mutualist endosymbiotic relationship between Wolbachia and nematodes originated from a single transition event. PMID:23960254

  7. Phylogenetic analysis of bacterial and archaeal arsC gene sequences suggests an ancient, common origin for arsenate reductase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dugas Sandra L

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The ars gene system provides arsenic resistance for a variety of microorganisms and can be chromosomal or plasmid-borne. The arsC gene, which codes for an arsenate reductase is essential for arsenate resistance and transforms arsenate into arsenite, which is extruded from the cell. A survey of GenBank shows that arsC appears to be phylogenetically widespread both in organisms with known arsenic resistance and those organisms that have been sequenced as part of whole genome projects. Results Phylogenetic analysis of aligned arsC sequences shows broad similarities to the established 16S rRNA phylogeny, with separation of bacterial, archaeal, and subsequently eukaryotic arsC genes. However, inconsistencies between arsC and 16S rRNA are apparent for some taxa. Cyanobacteria and some of the γ-Proteobacteria appear to possess arsC genes that are similar to those of Low GC Gram-positive Bacteria, and other isolated taxa possess arsC genes that would not be expected based on known evolutionary relationships. There is no clear separation of plasmid-borne and chromosomal arsC genes, although a number of the Enterobacteriales (γ-Proteobacteria possess similar plasmid-encoded arsC sequences. Conclusion The overall phylogeny of the arsenate reductases suggests a single, early origin of the arsC gene and subsequent sequence divergence to give the distinct arsC classes that exist today. Discrepancies between 16S rRNA and arsC phylogenies support the role of horizontal gene transfer (HGT in the evolution of arsenate reductases, with a number of instances of HGT early in bacterial arsC evolution. Plasmid-borne arsC genes are not monophyletic suggesting multiple cases of chromosomal-plasmid exchange and subsequent HGT. Overall, arsC phylogeny is complex and is likely the result of a number of evolutionary mechanisms.

  8. Age-Related Gene Expression in the Frontal Cortex Suggests Synaptic Function Changes in Specific Inhibitory Neuron Subtypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leon French

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Genome-wide expression profiling of the human brain has revealed genes that are differentially expressed across the lifespan. Characterizing these genes adds to our understanding of both normal functions and pathological conditions. Additionally, the specific cell-types that contribute to the motor, sensory and cognitive declines during aging are unclear. Here we test if age-related genes show higher expression in specific neural cell types. Our study leverages data from two sources of murine single-cell expression data and two sources of age-associations from large gene expression studies of postmortem human brain. We used nonparametric gene set analysis to test for age-related enrichment of genes associated with specific cell-types; we also restricted our analyses to specific gene ontology groups. Our analyses focused on a primary pair of single-cell expression data from the mouse visual cortex and age-related human post-mortem gene expression information from the orbitofrontal cortex. Additional pairings that used data from the hippocampus, prefrontal cortex, somatosensory cortex and blood were used to validate and test specificity of our findings. We found robust age-related up-regulation of genes that are highly expressed in oligodendrocytes and astrocytes, while genes highly expressed in layer 2/3 glutamatergic neurons were down-regulated across age. Genes not specific to any neural cell type were also down-regulated, possibly due to the bulk tissue source of the age-related genes. A gene ontology-driven dissection of the cell-type enriched genes highlighted the strong down-regulation of genes involved in synaptic transmission and cell-cell signaling in the Somatostatin (Sst neuron subtype that expresses the cyclin dependent kinase 6 (Cdk6 and in the vasoactive intestinal peptide (Vip neuron subtype expressing myosin binding protein C, slow type (Mybpc1. These findings provide new insights into cell specific susceptibility to normal aging

  9. Cholinergic regulation of the vasopressin neuroendocrine system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michels, K.M.

    1987-01-01

    To clarify the physical and functional relationship between the cholinergic system, and the neurodocrine cells of the supraoptic nucleus, a combination of experiments on receptor binding, localization and function were carried out. The putative nicotinic receptor probe (/sup 125/I)alpha bungarotoxin ((/sup 125/I)alpha BTX) bound with high affinity and specificity to the vasopressin and oxytocin magnocellular neurons of the supraoptic nucleus, nucleus circularis, and paraventricular nucleus. Binding of (/sup 125/I)alpha BTX within the neural lobe was very low. In contrast, the muscarinic cholinergic receptor probe (/sup 3/H)quinuclidinylbenzilate ((/sup 3/H)QNB) did not bind to magnocellular vasopressin and oxytocin cell groups. The median eminence, which contains the neurosecretory axons, and the neural lobe of the pituitary contain low levels of (/sup 3/H)QNB binding. The physiological significance of these cholinergic receptors in regulation of vasopressin release was tested using an in vitro preparation of the supraoptic - neural lobe system.

  10. Toxicogenomic analysis suggests chemical-induced sexual dimorphism in the expression of metabolic genes in zebrafish liver.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xun Zhang

    Full Text Available Differential gene expression in two sexes is widespread throughout the animal kingdom, giving rise to sex-dimorphic gene activities and sex-dependent adaptability to environmental cues, diets, growth and development as well as susceptibility to diseases. Here, we present a study using a toxicogenomic approach to investigate metabolic genes that show sex-dimorphic expression in the zebrafish liver triggered by several chemicals. Our analysis revealed that, besides the known genes for xenobiotic metabolism, many functionally diverse metabolic genes, such as ELOVL fatty acid elongase, DNA-directed RNA polymerase, and hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase, were also sex-dimorphic in their response to chemical treatments. Moreover, sex-dimorphic responses were also observed at the pathway level. Pathways belonging to xenobiotic metabolism, lipid metabolism, and nucleotide metabolism were enriched with sex-dimorphically expressed genes. We also observed temporal differences of the sex-dimorphic responses, suggesting that both genes and pathways are differently correlated during different periods of chemical perturbation. The ubiquity of sex-dimorphic activities at different biological hierarchies indicate the importance and the need of considering the sex factor in many areas of biological researches, especially in toxicology and pathology.

  11. Widespread distribution of archaeal reverse gyrase in thermophilic bacteria suggests a complex history of vertical inheritance and lateral gene transfers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Céline Brochier-Armanet

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Reverse gyrase, an enzyme of uncertain funtion, is present in all hyperthermophilic archaea and bacteria. Previous phylogenetic studies have suggested that the gene for reverse gyrase has an archaeal origin and was transferred laterally (LGT to the ancestors of the two bacterial hyperthermophilic phyla, Thermotogales and Aquificales. Here, we performed an in-depth analysis of the evolutionary history of reverse gyrase in light of genomic progress. We found genes coding for reverse gyrase in the genomes of several thermophilic bacteria that belong to phyla other than Aquificales and Thermotogales. Several of these bacteria are not, strictly speaking, hyperthermophiles because their reported optimal growth temperatures are below 80 °C. Furthermore, we detected a reverse gyrase gene in the sequence of the large plasmid of Thermus thermophilus strain HB8, suggesting a possible mechanism of transfer to the T. thermophilus strain HB8 involving plasmids and transposases. The archaeal part of the reverse gyrase tree is congruent with recent phylogenies of the archaeal domain based on ribosomal proteins or RNA polymerase subunits. Although poorly resolved, the complete reverse gyrase phylogeny suggests an ancient acquisition of the gene by bacteria via one or two LGT events, followed by its secondary distribution by LGT within bacteria. Finally, several genes of archaeal origin located in proximity to the reverse gyrase gene in bacterial genomes have bacterial homologues mostly in thermophiles or hyperthermophiles, raising the possibility that they were co-transferred with the reverse gyrase gene. Our new analysis of the reverse gyrase history strengthens the hypothesis that the acquisition of reverse gyrase may have been a crucial evolutionary step in the adaptation of bacteria to high-temperature environments. However, it also questions the role of this enzyme in thermophilic bacteria and the selective advantage its presence could provide.

  12. The Level of Vasopressin is not solely resulted from the Concentration of Endotoxin but Proportional to Creatinine in Dogs with Pyometra

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Y. Shia1, K. C. Tung1, 2, S. C. Chang1, 2, C. H. Yang1, 2, C. H. Lee2, C. C. Chou1 and W. M. Lee1, 2*

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Pyometra is one of the most common reproductive disorder characterized as fluid accumulation mainly pus and Gram-negative bacteria isolated from uterus in bitches. Impaired function of vasopressin is found in the disease. The impact of the circulating endotoxin concentration on vasopressin involved water regulation is still unclear. To document the effect of endotoxin on vasopressin-involved water regulation in dogs with pyometra, blood samples were collected for examination of circulating endotoxin concentration, osmolarity values, vasopressin concentrations, blood urea nitrogen (BUN, and creatinine. The results indicated that the concentration change of endotoxin was contrary to BUN and creatinine in dogs with pyometra. The trends of concentrations change of BUN and creatinine were similar with osmolarity and vasopressin. Pyometric dogs with high level of circulating endotoxin had significantly lower (P 20 mg/dL and creatinine (> 1.5 mg/dL also had plasma vasopressin significantly higher (P<0.05 than those with low levels of BUN and creatinine and control dogs. The overall results suggested that elevated vasopressin was not mainly associated with the circulating endotoxin concentration and some other factors may collaborate with endotoxin causing impaired function of vasopressin.

  13. Efects of plasma corticosteroid concentration on the osmotic threshold for vasopressin releasing in Chagas' disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatsuto Kimachi

    1983-09-01

    Full Text Available The osmotic threshold for vasopressin release was studied in normal patients (n = 7 and in patients with the chronic form of Chagas'disease (n = 11. Positive correlation between osmotic threshold and plasma cortisol concentration was obtained for the Controls (y1 = 273,30 + 0,75x i; r = 0,78;P < 0,05, suggesting a modulating effect of cortisol on vasopressin release. The lack of correlation between the two parameters for the chronic chagasic patients was interpreted, on the basis of the general denervation associated with Chagas ' disease, to be the result of neuronal destruction in hypothalamic and/or extrahypothalamic centers related to the secretory control of vasopressin.

  14. Gene Expression Profiles Suggest Iron Transport Pathway in the Lactating Human Epithelial Cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Chenxi; Eck, Peter; Friel, James K

    2017-03-01

    The molecular background of iron excretion into breast milk has not been determined in humans. We determined the expression of known iron transporters in mRNA extracted from human milk fat globules to deduce which known transporters are responsible for iron excretion into human milk. The expression of iron transporters in mRNA from human milk fat globules and mouse mammary epithelial cell lines was determined by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. The expression of the transferrin receptor 1 (TFRC), divalent metal transporter 1 (SLC11A2), transferrin (TF), and lactoferrin (LTF) was confirmed in RNA isolated from the human milk fat globule. Similar expression was observed in the mouse mammary epithelial cell line HC11 in resting and lactating phenotypes. No iron export protein could be determined in the RNA isolated from fat globules in human breast milk and a human mammary epithelial cell line. The lack of iron exporters in the human mammary epithelia, in conjunction with the presence of lactoferrin suggests that transmembrane transport is not a major route of iron excretion into human milk.

  15. Epigenetic control of vasopressin expression is maintained by steroid hormones in the adult male rat brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auger, Catherine J.; Coss, Dylan; Auger, Anthony P.; Forbes-Lorman, Robin M.

    2011-01-01

    Although some DNA methylation patterns are altered by steroid hormone exposure in the developing brain, less is known about how changes in steroid hormone levels influence DNA methylation patterns in the adult brain. Steroid hormones act in the adult brain to regulate gene expression. Specifically, the expression of the socially relevant peptide vasopressin (AVP) within the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BST) of adult brain is dependent upon testosterone exposure. Castration dramatically reduces and testosterone replacement restores AVP expression within the BST. As decreases in mRNA expression are associated with increases in DNA promoter methylation, we explored the hypothesis that AVP expression in the adult brain is maintained through sustained epigenetic modifications of the AVP gene promoter. We find that castration of adult male rats resulted in decreased AVP mRNA expression and increased methylation of specific CpG sites within the AVP promoter in the BST. Similarly, castration significantly increased estrogen receptor α (ERα) mRNA expression and decreased ERα promoter methylation within the BST. These changes were prevented by testosterone replacement. This suggests that the DNA promoter methylation status of some steroid responsive genes in the adult brain is actively maintained by the presence of circulating steroid hormones. The maintenance of methylated or demethylated states of some genes in the adult brain by the presence of steroid hormones may play a role in the homeostatic regulation of behaviorally relevant systems. PMID:21368111

  16. Comprehensive expression analysis suggests overlapping and specific roles of rice glutathione S-transferase genes during development and stress responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhattacharjee Annapurna

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Glutathione S-transferases (GSTs are the ubiquitous enzymes that play a key role in cellular detoxification. Although several GSTs have been identified and characterized in various plant species, the knowledge about their role in developmental processes and response to various stimuli is still very limited. In this study, we report genome-wide identification, characterization and comprehensive expression analysis of members of GST gene family in crop plant rice, to reveal their function(s. Results A systematic analysis revealed the presence of at least 79 GST genes in the rice genome. Phylogenetic analysis grouped GST proteins into seven classes. Sequence analysis together with the organization of putative motifs indicated the potential diverse functions of GST gene family members in rice. The tandem gene duplications have contributed a major role in expansion of this gene family. Microarray data analysis revealed tissue-/organ- and developmental stage-specific expression patterns of several rice GST genes. At least 31 GST genes showed response to plant hormones auxin and cytokinin. Furthermore, expression analysis showed the differential expression of quite a large number of GST genes during various abiotic stress (20, arsenate stress (32 and biotic stress (48 conditions. Many of the GST genes were commonly regulated by developmental processes, hormones, abiotic and biotic stresses. Conclusion The transcript profiling suggests overlapping and specific role(s of GSTs during various stages of development in rice. Further, the study provides evidence for the role of GSTs in mediating crosstalk between various stress and hormone response pathways and represents a very useful resource for functional analysis of selected members of this family in rice.

  17. Colon cancer and gene alterations: their immunological implications and suggestions for prognostic indices and improvements in biotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contasta, Ida; Pellegrini, Patrizia; Berghella, Anna Maria; Del Beato, Tiziana; Adorno, Domenico

    2006-10-01

    Studies have shown that changes occur in c-Ki-ras, p53, and Bcl2 gene structure and function during the various stages of human colon carcinogenesis. Alterations of these genes are responsible for the establishment of a state of continuous stimulus for cell division and apoptotic inhibition at physiological and pharmacological levels. This paper focuses on the results of our research aimed at investigating how these gene alterations influence tumoral mechanisms on an immunological level and how immunological parameters can be used as prognostic markers for the passage of normal tissue to adenoma and adenoma to carcinoma. Overall, our data suggest that an alteration in the c-Ki-ras gene results in a switch to a suppressive type of immune response, determining an impairment of immune cell activation at both antigen- presenting-cell and T-cell levels. c-Ki-ras gene mutations, p53 deletions, and Bc12 expression, on the other hand, can be used as prognostic markers for the passage of normal tissue to adenoma and adenoma to carcinoma. The p53 oncogene does not appear to impair patients' immunological response further. In conclusion, an evaluation of c-Ki-ras, rather than p53 gene alterations, would seem to be more relevant in colon cancer prevention programs and biotherapy improvement.

  18. Gene Expression Profiles from Disease Discordant Twins Suggest Shared Antiviral Pathways and Viral Exposures among Multiple Systemic Autoimmune Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, Lu; O'Hanlon, Terrance P; Lai, Zhennan; Fannin, Rick; Weller, Melodie L; Rider, Lisa G; Chiorini, John A; Miller, Frederick W

    2015-01-01

    Viral agents are of interest as possible autoimmune triggers due to prior reported associations and widely studied molecular mechanisms of antiviral immune responses in autoimmunity. Here we examined new viral candidates for the initiation and/or promotion of systemic autoimmune diseases (SAID), as well as possible related signaling pathways shared in the pathogenesis of those disorders. RNA isolated from peripheral blood samples from 33 twins discordant for SAID and 33 matched, unrelated healthy controls was analyzed using a custom viral-human gene microarray. Paired comparisons were made among three study groups-probands with SAID, their unaffected twins, and matched, unrelated healthy controls-using statistical and molecular pathway analyses. Probands and unaffected twins differed significantly in the expression of 537 human genes, and 107 of those were associated with viral infections. These 537 differentially expressed human genes participate in overlapping networks of several canonical, biologic pathways relating to antiviral responses and inflammation. Moreover, certain viral genes were expressed at higher levels in probands compared to either unaffected twins or unrelated, healthy controls. Interestingly, viral gene expression levels in unaffected twins appeared intermediate between those of probands and the matched, unrelated healthy controls. Of the viruses with overexpressed viral genes, herpes simplex virus-2 (HSV-2) was the only human viral pathogen identified using four distinct oligonucleotide probes corresponding to three HSV-2 genes associated with different stages of viral infection. Although the effects from immunosuppressive therapy on viral gene expression remain unclear, this exploratory study suggests a new approach to evaluate shared viral agents and antiviral immune responses that may be involved in the development of SAID.

  19. Comparison of ex vivo stability of copeptin and vasopressin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heida, Judith E; Boesten, Lianne S M; Ettema, Esmée M; Muller Kobold, Anneke C; Franssen, Casper F M; Gansevoort, Ron T; Zittema, Debbie

    2017-06-27

    Copeptin, part of the vasopressin precursor, is increasingly used as marker for vasopressin and is claimed to have better ex vivo stability. However, no study has directly compared the ex vivo stability of copeptin and vasopressin. Blood of ten healthy volunteers was collected in EDTA tubes. Next, we studied the effect of various pre-analytical conditions on measured vasopressin and copeptin levels: centrifugation speed, short-term storage temperature and differences between whole blood and plasma, long-term storage temperature and repeated freezing and thawing. The acceptable change limit (ACL), indicating the maximal percentage change that can be explained by assay variability, was used as cut-off to determine changes in vasopressin and copeptin. The ACL was 25% for vasopressin and 19% for copeptin. Higher centrifugation speed resulted in lower vasopressin levels, whereas copeptin concentration was unaffected. In whole blood, vasopressin was stable up to 2 h at 25°C and 6 h at 4°C. In plasma, vasopressin was stable up to 6 h at 25°C and 24 h at 4°C. In contrast, copeptin was stable in whole blood and plasma for at least 24h at both temperatures. At -20°C, vasopressin was stable up to 1 month and copeptin for at least 4 months. Both vasopressin and copeptin were stable after 4 months when stored at -80°C and -150°C. Vasopressin concentration decreased after four freeze-thaw cycles, whereas copeptin concentration was unaffected. Vasopressin levels were considerably affected by pre-analytical conditions, while copeptin levels were stable. Therefore, a strict sample handling protocol for measurement of vasopressin is recommended.

  20. Platypus globin genes and flanking loci suggest a new insertional model for beta-globin evolution in birds and mammals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Warren Wesley C

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Vertebrate alpha (α- and beta (β-globin gene families exemplify the way in which genomes evolve to produce functional complexity. From tandem duplication of a single globin locus, the α- and β-globin clusters expanded, and then were separated onto different chromosomes. The previous finding of a fossil β-globin gene (ω in the marsupial α-cluster, however, suggested that duplication of the α-β cluster onto two chromosomes, followed by lineage-specific gene loss and duplication, produced paralogous α- and β-globin clusters in birds and mammals. Here we analyse genomic data from an egg-laying monotreme mammal, the platypus (Ornithorhynchus anatinus, to explore haemoglobin evolution at the stem of the mammalian radiation. Results The platypus α-globin cluster (chromosome 21 contains embryonic and adult α- globin genes, a β-like ω-globin gene, and the GBY globin gene with homology to cytoglobin, arranged as 5'-ζ-ζ'-αD-α3-α2-α1-ω-GBY-3'. The platypus β-globin cluster (chromosome 2 contains single embryonic and adult globin genes arranged as 5'-ε-β-3'. Surprisingly, all of these globin genes were expressed in some adult tissues. Comparison of flanking sequences revealed that all jawed vertebrate α-globin clusters are flanked by MPG-C16orf35 and LUC7L, whereas all bird and mammal β-globin clusters are embedded in olfactory genes. Thus, the mammalian α- and β-globin clusters are orthologous to the bird α- and β-globin clusters respectively. Conclusion We propose that α- and β-globin clusters evolved from an ancient MPG-C16orf35-α-β-GBY-LUC7L arrangement 410 million years ago. A copy of the original β (represented by ω in marsupials and monotremes was inserted into an array of olfactory genes before the amniote radiation (>315 million years ago, then duplicated and diverged to form orthologous clusters of β-globin genes with different expression profiles in different lineages.

  1. Estimation of Plasma Arginine Vasopressin Concentration Using ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    olayemitoyin

    increase in plasma osmolality and increase in ADH and thirst. The purpose of this study was to estimate plasma arginine vasopressin (PAVP) using thirst perception (TP) and plasma osmolality (POSM) values before and at 60 minutes in control or euhydrate (group A, 0.0 ml/kg body weight of distilled water), hydrated (group ...

  2. Vasopressin in perioperative management of congenital ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Perioperative care of infants with diaphragmatic hernias can be a challenge because of pulmonary hypertension and systemic hypotension. The objective of this study was to report the usefulness of vasopressin infusion in improving pulmonary and systemic haemodynamics in an infant with congenital diaphragmatic hernia.

  3. Inappropriate Vasopressin Secretion (SIADH) in Burned Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-03-01

    et al.: Role of vasopressin in his colleagues have once again set a very high standard for us the impaired water excretion of glucocorticoid ...were unable to define, that set in motion this persistent anti- diuresis . Subsequently, Leaf, Bartter, Santos, and Wrong DR. KHAN Z. SHIRANI

  4. Site-Specific Insertion Polymorphism of the MITE Alex-1 in the Genus Coffea Suggests Interspecific Gene Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubreuil-Tranchant, Christine; Guyot, Romain; Guellim, Amira; Duret, Caroline; de la Mare, Marion; Razafinarivo, Norosoa; Poncet, Valérie; Hamon, Serge; Hamon, Perla; de Kochko, Alexandre

    2011-01-01

    Miniature Inverted-repeat Transposable Elements (MITEs) are small nonautonomous class-II transposable elements distributed throughout eukaryotic genomes. We identified a novel family of MITEs (named Alex) in the Coffea canephora genome often associated with expressed sequences. The Alex-1 element is inserted in an intron of a gene at the CcEIN4 locus. Its mobility was demonstrated by sequencing the insertion site in C. canephora accessions and Coffea species. Analysis of the insertion polymorphism of Alex-1 at this locus in Coffea species and in C. canephora showed that there was no relationship between the geographical distribution of the species, their phylogenetic relationships, and insertion polymorphism. The intraspecific distribution of C. canephora revealed an original situation within the E diversity group. These results suggest possibly greater gene flow between species than previously thought. This MITE family will enable the study of the C. canephora genome evolution, phylogenetic relationships, and possible gene flows within the Coffea genus. PMID:21961075

  5. Site-Specific Insertion Polymorphism of the MITE Alex-1 in the Genus Coffea Suggests Interspecific Gene Flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine Dubreuil-Tranchant

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Miniature Inverted-repeat Transposable Elements (MITEs are small nonautonomous class-II transposable elements distributed throughout eukaryotic genomes. We identified a novel family of MITEs (named Alex in the Coffea canephora genome often associated with expressed sequences. The Alex-1 element is inserted in an intron of a gene at the CcEIN4 locus. Its mobility was demonstrated by sequencing the insertion site in C. canephora accessions and Coffea species. Analysis of the insertion polymorphism of Alex-1 at this locus in Coffea species and in C. canephora showed that there was no relationship between the geographical distribution of the species, their phylogenetic relationships, and insertion polymorphism. The intraspecific distribution of C. canephora revealed an original situation within the E diversity group. These results suggest possibly greater gene flow between species than previously thought. This MITE family will enable the study of the C. canephora genome evolution, phylogenetic relationships, and possible gene flows within the Coffea genus.

  6. Site-Specific Insertion Polymorphism of the MITE Alex-1 in the Genus Coffea Suggests Interspecific Gene Flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubreuil-Tranchant, Christine; Guyot, Romain; Guellim, Amira; Duret, Caroline; de la Mare, Marion; Razafinarivo, Norosoa; Poncet, Valérie; Hamon, Serge; Hamon, Perla; de Kochko, Alexandre

    2011-01-01

    Miniature Inverted-repeat Transposable Elements (MITEs) are small nonautonomous class-II transposable elements distributed throughout eukaryotic genomes. We identified a novel family of MITEs (named Alex) in the Coffea canephora genome often associated with expressed sequences. The Alex-1 element is inserted in an intron of a gene at the CcEIN4 locus. Its mobility was demonstrated by sequencing the insertion site in C. canephora accessions and Coffea species. Analysis of the insertion polymorphism of Alex-1 at this locus in Coffea species and in C. canephora showed that there was no relationship between the geographical distribution of the species, their phylogenetic relationships, and insertion polymorphism. The intraspecific distribution of C. canephora revealed an original situation within the E diversity group. These results suggest possibly greater gene flow between species than previously thought. This MITE family will enable the study of the C. canephora genome evolution, phylogenetic relationships, and possible gene flows within the Coffea genus.

  7. Effects of arginine vasopressin on musical working memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granot, Roni Y; Uzefovsky, Florina; Bogopolsky, Helena; Ebstein, Richard P

    2013-01-01

    Previous genetic studies showed an association between variations in the gene coding for the 1a receptor of the neuro-hormone arginine vasopressin (AVP) and musical working memory (WM). The current study set out to test the influence of intranasal administration (INA) of AVP on musical as compared to verbal WM using a double blind crossover (AVP-placebo) design. Two groups of 25 males were exposed to 20 IU of AVP in one session, and 20 IU of saline water (placebo) in a second session, 1 week apart. In each session subjects completed the tonal subtest from Gordon's "Musical Aptitude Profile," the interval subtest from the "Montreal Battery for Evaluation of Amusias (MBEA)," and the forward and backward digit span tests. Scores in the digit span tests were not influenced by AVP. In contrast, in the music tests there was an AVP effect. In the MBEA test, scores for the group receiving placebo in the first session (PV) were higher than for the group receiving vasopressin in the first session (VP) (p music test these scores were significantly correlated with memory scores. Together the results reflect a complex interaction between AVP, musical memory, arousal, and contextual effects such as session, and base levels of memory. The results are interpreted in light of music's universal use as a means to modulate arousal on the one hand, and AVP's influence on mood, arousal, and social interactions on the other.

  8. Phylogenetic distribution of intron positions in alpha-amylase genes of bilateria suggests numerous gains and losses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Luc Da Lage

    Full Text Available Most eukaryotes have at least some genes interrupted by introns. While it is well accepted that introns were already present at moderate density in the last eukaryote common ancestor, the conspicuous diversity of intron density among genomes suggests a complex evolutionary history, with marked differences between phyla. The question of the rates of intron gains and loss in the course of evolution and factors influencing them remains controversial. We have investigated a single gene family, alpha-amylase, in 55 species covering a variety of animal phyla. Comparison of intron positions across phyla suggests a complex history, with a likely ancestral intronless gene undergoing frequent intron loss and gain, leading to extant intron/exon structures that are highly variable, even among species from the same phylum. Because introns are known to play no regulatory role in this gene and there is no alternative splicing, the structural differences may be interpreted more easily: intron positions, sizes, losses or gains may be more likely related to factors linked to splicing mechanisms and requirements, and to recognition of introns and exons, or to more extrinsic factors, such as life cycle and population size. We have shown that intron losses outnumbered gains in recent periods, but that "resets" of intron positions occurred at the origin of several phyla, including vertebrates. Rates of gain and loss appear to be positively correlated. No phase preference was found. We also found evidence for parallel gains and for intron sliding. Presence of introns at given positions was correlated to a strong protosplice consensus sequence AG/G, which was much weaker in the absence of intron. In contrast, recent intron insertions were not associated with a specific sequence. In animal Amy genes, population size and generation time seem to have played only minor roles in shaping gene structures.

  9. Powerful bivariate genome-wide association analyses suggest the SOX6 gene influencing both obesity and osteoporosis phenotypes in males.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yao-Zhong; Pei, Yu-Fang; Liu, Jian-Feng; Yang, Fang; Guo, Yan; Zhang, Lei; Liu, Xiao-Gang; Yan, Han; Wang, Liang; Zhang, Yin-Ping; Levy, Shawn; Recker, Robert R; Deng, Hong-Wen

    2009-08-28

    Current genome-wide association studies (GWAS) are normally implemented in a univariate framework and analyze different phenotypes in isolation. This univariate approach ignores the potential genetic correlation between important disease traits. Hence this approach is difficult to detect pleiotropic genes, which may exist for obesity and osteoporosis, two common diseases of major public health importance that are closely correlated genetically. To identify such pleiotropic genes and the key mechanistic links between the two diseases, we here performed the first bivariate GWAS of obesity and osteoporosis. We searched for genes underlying co-variation of the obesity phenotype, body mass index (BMI), with the osteoporosis risk phenotype, hip bone mineral density (BMD), scanning approximately 380,000 SNPs in 1,000 unrelated homogeneous Caucasians, including 499 males and 501 females. We identified in the male subjects two SNPs in intron 1 of the SOX6 (SRY-box 6) gene, rs297325 and rs4756846, which were bivariately associated with both BMI and hip BMD, achieving p values of 6.82x10(-7) and 1.47x10(-6), respectively. The two SNPs ranked at the top in significance for bivariate association with BMI and hip BMD in the male subjects among all the approximately 380,000 SNPs examined genome-wide. The two SNPs were replicated in a Framingham Heart Study (FHS) cohort containing 3,355 Caucasians (1,370 males and 1,985 females) from 975 families. In the FHS male subjects, the two SNPs achieved p values of 0.03 and 0.02, respectively, for bivariate association with BMI and femoral neck BMD. Interestingly, SOX6 was previously found to be essential to both cartilage formation/chondrogenesis and obesity-related insulin resistance, suggesting the gene's dual role in both bone and fat. Our findings, together with the prior biological evidence, suggest the SOX6 gene's importance in co-regulation of obesity and osteoporosis.

  10. Activation of vasopressin neurons in the human supraoptic and paraventricular nucleus in senescence and senile dementia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoogendijk, J. E.; Fliers, E.; Swaab, D. F.; Verwer, R. W.

    1985-01-01

    A recent study has shown that vasopressin (AVP) cells in the human supraoptic (SON) and paraventricular (PVN) nuclei increase in size after 60 years of age, suggesting that AVP production is increased in senescence. In the present study, the same brain material was used for the determination of

  11. Expression of the KNOTTED HOMEOBOX Genes in the Cactaceae Cambial Zone Suggests Their Involvement in Wood Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes-Rivera, Jorge; Rodríguez-Alonso, Gustavo; Petrone, Emilio; Vasco, Alejandra; Vergara-Silva, Francisco; Shishkova, Svetlana; Terrazas, Teresa

    2017-01-01

    The vascular cambium is a lateral meristem that produces secondary xylem (i.e., wood) and phloem. Different Cactaceae species develop different types of secondary xylem; however, little is known about the mechanisms underlying wood formation in the Cactaceae. The KNOTTED HOMEOBOX (KNOX) gene family encodes transcription factors that regulate plant development. The role of class I KNOX genes in the regulation of the shoot apical meristem, inflorescence architecture, and secondary growth is established in a few model species, while the functions of class II KNOX genes are less well understood, although the Arabidopsis thaliana class II KNOX protein KNAT7 is known to regulate secondary cell wall biosynthesis. To explore the involvement of the KNOX genes in the enormous variability of wood in Cactaceae, we identified orthologous genes expressed in species with fibrous (Pereskia lychnidiflora and Pilosocereus alensis), non-fibrous (Ariocarpus retusus), and dimorphic (Ferocactus pilosus) wood. Both class I and class II KNOX genes were expressed in the cactus cambial zone, including one or two class I paralogs of KNAT1, as well as one or two class II paralogs of KNAT3-KNAT4-KNAT5. While the KNOX gene SHOOTMERISTEMLESS (STM) and its ortholog ARK1 are expressed during secondary growth in the Arabidopsis and Populus stem, respectively, we did not find STM orthologs in the Cactaceae cambial zone, which suggests possible differences in the vascular cambium genetic regulatory network in these species. Importantly, while two class II KNOX paralogs from the KNAT7 clade were expressed in the cambial zone of A. retusus and F. pilosus, we did not detect KNAT7 ortholog expression in the cambial zone of P. lychnidiflora. Differences in the transcriptional repressor activity of secondary cell wall biosynthesis by the KNAT7 orthologs could therefore explain the differences in wood development in the cactus species. PMID:28316604

  12. Analysis of Copy Number Variation in the Abp Gene Regions of Two House Mouse Subspecies Suggests Divergence during the Gene Family Expansions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pezer, Željka; Chung, Amanda G; Karn, Robert C; Laukaitis, Christina M

    2017-06-01

    The Androgen-binding protein ( Abp ) gene region of the mouse genome contains 64 genes, some encoding pheromones that influence assortative mating between mice from different subspecies. Using CNVnator and quantitative PCR, we explored copy number variation in this gene family in natural populations of Mus musculus domesticus ( Mmd ) and Mus musculus musculus ( Mmm ), two subspecies of house mice that form a narrow hybrid zone in Central Europe. We found that copy number variation in the center of the Abp gene region is very common in wild Mmd , primarily representing the presence/absence of the final duplications described for the mouse genome. Clustering of Mmd individuals based on this variation did not reflect their geographical origin, suggesting no population divergence in the Abp gene cluster. However, copy number variation patterns differ substantially between Mmd and other mouse taxa. Large blocks of Abp genes are absent in Mmm , Mus musculus castaneus and an outgroup, Mus spretus , although with differences in variation and breakpoint locations. Our analysis calls into question the reliance on a reference genome for interpreting the detailed organization of genes in taxa more distant from the Mmd reference genome. The polymorphic nature of the gene family expansion in all four taxa suggests that the number of Abp genes, especially in the central gene region, is not critical to the survival and reproduction of the mouse. However, Abp haplotypes of variable length may serve as a source of raw genetic material for new signals influencing reproductive communication and thus speciation of mice. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  13. Association of the arginine vasopressin receptor 1A (AVPR1A) haplotypes with listening to music.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ukkola-Vuoti, Liisa; Oikkonen, Jaana; Onkamo, Päivi; Karma, Kai; Raijas, Pirre; Järvelä, Irma

    2011-04-01

    Music is listened in all cultures. We hypothesize that willingness to produce and perceive sound and music is social communication that needs musical aptitude. Here, listening to music was surveyed using a web-based questionnaire and musical aptitude using the auditory structuring ability test (Karma Music test) and Carl Seashores tests for pitch and for time. Three highly polymorphic microsatellite markers (RS3, RS1 and AVR) of the arginine vasopressin receptor 1A (AVPR1A) gene, previously associated with social communication and attachment, were genotyped and analyzed in 31 Finnish families (n=437 members) using family-based association analysis. A positive association between the AVPR1A haplotype (RS1 and AVR) and active current listening to music (permuted P=0.0019) was observed. Other AVPR1A haplotype (RS3 and AVR) showed association with lifelong active listening to music (permuted P=0.0022). In addition to AVPR1A, two polymorphisms (5-HTTLPR and variable number of tandem repeat) of human serotonin transporter gene (SLC6A4), a candidate gene for many neuropsychiatric disorders and previously associated with emotional processing, were analyzed. No association between listening to music and the polymorphisms of SLC6A4 were detected. The results suggest that willingness to listen to music is related to neurobiological pathways affecting social affiliation and communication.

  14. Comprehensive analysis of cystatin family genes suggests their putative functions in sexual reproduction, embryogenesis, and seed formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Peng; Zhou, Xue-mei; Zou, Jie; Wang, Wei; Wang, Lu; Peng, Xiong-bo; Sun, Meng-xiang

    2014-09-01

    Cystatins are tightly bound and reversible inhibitors of cysteine proteases in C1A and C13 peptidase families, which have been identified in several species and shown to function in vegetative development and response to biotic/abiotic stresses in plants. Recent work revealed their critical role in regulating programmed cell death during embryogenesis in tobacco and suggested their more comprehensive roles in the process of sexual plant reproduction, although little is known about cystatin family genes in the processes. Here, 10 cystatin family genes in Nicotiana tabacum were identified using an expressed sequence tag (EST)-based gene clone strategy. Analysis of their biochemical properties showed that nine of them have the potency to inhibit the activities of both commercial cathepsin L-like proteases and extracted cysteine proteases from seeds, but with different K i values depending on the types of proteases and the developmental stages of the seed tested. This suggests that cystatin-dependent cathepsin L-like proteolytic pathways are probably important for early seed development. Comprehensive expression profile analysis revealed that cystatin family genes showed manifold variations in their transcription levels in different plant cell types, including the sperm, egg, and zygote, especially in the embryo and seed at different developmental stages. More interestingly, intracellular localization analysis of each cystatin revealed that most members of cystatin families are recognized as secretory proteins with signal peptides that direct them to the endoplasmic reticulum. These results suggest their widespread roles in cell fate determination and cell-cell communication in the process of sexual reproduction, especially in gamete and embryo development, as well as in seed formation. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology.

  15. Sex differences in vasopressin V2 receptor expression and vasopressin-induced antidiuresis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Nikhil; Zheng, Wei; Ji, Hong; Tam, Helen; Wu, Xie; Manigrasso, Michaele B.; Sandberg, Kathryn; Verbalis, Joseph G.

    2011-01-01

    The renal vasopressin V2 receptor (V2R) plays a critical role in physiological and pathophysiological processes associated with arginine vasopressin (AVP)-induced antidiuresis. Because clinical data suggests that females may be more prone to hyponatremia from AVP-mediated antidiuresis, we investigated whether there are sex differences in the expression and function of the renal V2R. In normal Sprague-Dawley rat kidneys, V2R mRNA and protein expression was 2.6- and 1.7-fold higher, respectively, in females compared with males. To investigate the potential physiological implications of this sex difference, we studied changes in urine osmolality induced by the AVP V2R agonist desmopressin. In response to different doses of desmopressin, there was a graded increase in urine osmolality and decrease in urine volume during a 24-h infusion. Females showed greater mean increases in urine osmolality and greater mean decreases in urine volume at 0.5 and 5.0 ng/h infusion rates. We also studied renal escape from antidiuresis produced by water loading in rats infused with desmopressin (5.0 ng/h). After 5 days of water loading, urine osmolality of both female and male rats escaped to the same degree physiologically, but V2R mRNA and protein in female kidneys was reduced to a greater degree (−63% and −73%, respectively) than in males (−32% and −48%, respectively). By the end of the 5-day escape period, renal V2R mRNA and protein expression were reduced to the same relative levels in males and females, thereby abolishing the sex differences in V2R expression seen in the basal state. Our results demonstrate that female rats express significantly more V2R mRNA and protein in kidneys than males, and that this results physiologically in a greater sensitivity to V2R agonist administration. The potential pathophysiological implications of these results are that females may be more susceptible to the development of dilutional hyponatremia because of a greater sensitivity to

  16. Absence of KIF1B mutation in a large Turkish CMT2A family suggests involvement of a second gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bissar-Tadmouri, N; Nelis, E; Züchner, S; Parman, Y; Deymeer, F; Serdaroglu, P; De Jonghe, P; Van Gerwen, V; Timmerman, V; Schröder, J M; Battaloglu, E

    2004-05-11

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 2A (CMT2A) was assigned to a 19.3-cM region on chromosome 1p35-36. A missense mutation in the kinesin family member 1B gene (KIF1B) was reported in a single CMT2A family. To report the clinical and genetic data of a Turkish family with CMT2A. Linkage to CMT2 loci was investigated in the family. Haplotype analysis of the CMT2A region was completed using additional single-nucleotide polymorphism and short tandem repeat markers. The KIF1B gene was sequenced on genomic DNA and cDNA in two patients. A recombination event narrowed the CMT2A locus to a 9.3-cM region flanked by D1S160 and D1S434. No mutation in KIF1B was found. The exclusion of KIF1B gene mutations in this family suggests the involvement of another CMT2A gene in the linked region.

  17. Whole-genome sequencing suggests a chemokine gene cluster that modifies age at onset in familial Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lalli, M A; Bettcher, B M; Arcila, M L; Garcia, G; Guzman, C; Madrigal, L; Ramirez, L; Acosta-Uribe, J; Baena, A; Wojta, K J; Coppola, G; Fitch, R; de Both, M D; Huentelman, M J; Reiman, E M; Brunkow, M E; Glusman, G; Roach, J C; Kao, A W; Lopera, F; Kosik, K S

    2015-11-01

    We have sequenced the complete genomes of 72 individuals affected with early-onset familial Alzheimer's disease caused by an autosomal dominant, highly penetrant mutation in the presenilin-1 (PSEN1) gene, and performed genome-wide association testing to identify variants that modify age at onset (AAO) of Alzheimer's disease. Our analysis identified a haplotype of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) on chromosome 17 within a chemokine gene cluster associated with delayed onset of mild-cognitive impairment and dementia. Individuals carrying this haplotype had a mean AAO of mild-cognitive impairment at 51.0 ± 5.2 years compared with 41.1 ± 7.4 years for those without these SNPs. This haplotype thus appears to modify Alzheimer's AAO, conferring a large (~10 years) protective effect. The associated locus harbors several chemokines including eotaxin-1 encoded by CCL11, and the haplotype includes a missense polymorphism in this gene. Validating this association, we found plasma eotaxin-1 levels were correlated with disease AAO in an independent cohort from the University of California San Francisco Memory and Aging Center. In this second cohort, the associated haplotype disrupted the typical age-associated increase of eotaxin-1 levels, suggesting a complex regulatory role for this haplotype in the general population. Altogether, these results suggest eotaxin-1 as a novel modifier of Alzheimer's disease AAO and open potential avenues for therapy.

  18. Vasopressin regularizes the phasic firing pattern of rat hypothalamic magnocellular vasopressin neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gouzènes, L; Desarménien, M G; Hussy, N; Richard, P; Moos, F C

    1998-03-01

    Vasopressin (AVP) magnocellular neurons of hypothalamic nuclei express specific phasic firing (successive periods of activity and silence), which conditions the mode of neurohypophyseal vasopression release. In situations favoring plasmatic secretion of AVP, the hormone is also released at the somatodendritic level, at which it is believed to modulate the activity of AVP neurons. We investigated the nature of this autocontrol by testing the effects of juxtamembrane applications of AVP on the extracellular activity of presumed AVP neurons in paraventricular and supraoptic nuclei of anesthetized rats. AVP had three effects depending on the initial firing pattern: (1) excitation of faintly active neurons (periods of activity of <10 sec), which acquired or reinforced their phasic pattern; (2) inhibition of quasi-continuously active neurons (periods of silences of <10 sec), which became clearly phasic; and (3) no effect on neurons already showing an intermediate phasic pattern (active and silent periods of 10-30 sec). Consequently, AVP application resulted in a narrower range of activity patterns of the population of AVP neurons, with a Gaussian distribution centered around a mode of 57% of time in activity, indicating a homogenization of the firing pattern. The resulting phasic pattern had characteristics close to those established previously for optimal release of AVP from neurohypophyseal endings. These results suggest a new role for AVP as an optimizing factor that would foster the population of AVP neurons to discharge with a phasic pattern known to be most efficient for hormone release.

  19. Powerful bivariate genome-wide association analyses suggest the SOX6 gene influencing both obesity and osteoporosis phenotypes in males.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yao-Zhong Liu

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Current genome-wide association studies (GWAS are normally implemented in a univariate framework and analyze different phenotypes in isolation. This univariate approach ignores the potential genetic correlation between important disease traits. Hence this approach is difficult to detect pleiotropic genes, which may exist for obesity and osteoporosis, two common diseases of major public health importance that are closely correlated genetically.To identify such pleiotropic genes and the key mechanistic links between the two diseases, we here performed the first bivariate GWAS of obesity and osteoporosis. We searched for genes underlying co-variation of the obesity phenotype, body mass index (BMI, with the osteoporosis risk phenotype, hip bone mineral density (BMD, scanning approximately 380,000 SNPs in 1,000 unrelated homogeneous Caucasians, including 499 males and 501 females. We identified in the male subjects two SNPs in intron 1 of the SOX6 (SRY-box 6 gene, rs297325 and rs4756846, which were bivariately associated with both BMI and hip BMD, achieving p values of 6.82x10(-7 and 1.47x10(-6, respectively. The two SNPs ranked at the top in significance for bivariate association with BMI and hip BMD in the male subjects among all the approximately 380,000 SNPs examined genome-wide. The two SNPs were replicated in a Framingham Heart Study (FHS cohort containing 3,355 Caucasians (1,370 males and 1,985 females from 975 families. In the FHS male subjects, the two SNPs achieved p values of 0.03 and 0.02, respectively, for bivariate association with BMI and femoral neck BMD. Interestingly, SOX6 was previously found to be essential to both cartilage formation/chondrogenesis and obesity-related insulin resistance, suggesting the gene's dual role in both bone and fat.Our findings, together with the prior biological evidence, suggest the SOX6 gene's importance in co-regulation of obesity and osteoporosis.

  20. Interaction of a vasopressin antagonist with vasopressin receptors in the septum of the rat brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dorsa, D.M.; Brot, M.D.; Shewey, L.M.; Meyers, K.M.; Szot, P.; Miller, M.A.

    1988-01-01

    The ability of d(CH2)5-Tyr(Me)-arginine-8-vasopressin, an antagonist of peripheral pressoric (V1-type) vasopressin receptors, to label vasopressin binding sites in the septum of the rat brain was evaluated. Using crude membrane preparations from the septum, /sup 3/H-arginine-8-vasopressin (AVP) specifically labels a single class of binding sites with a Kd of 2.9 nM and maximum binding site concentration of 19.8 fmole/mg protein. /sup 3/H-Antag also labels a single class of membrane sites but with higher affinity (Kd = 0.47 nM) and lower capacity (10.1 fmole/mg protein) than /sup 3/H-AVP. The rank order of potency of various competitor peptides for /sup 3/H-AVP and /sup 3/H-Antag binding was similar. Oxytocin was 100-1,000 fold less potent than AVP in competing for binding with both ligands. /sup 3/H-AVP and /sup 3/H-Antag showed similar labeling patterns when incubated with septal tissue slices. Unlabeled Antag also effectively antagonized vasopressin-stimulated phosphatidylinositol hydrolysis in septal tissue slices.

  1. Arginine Vasopressin and Copeptin in Perinatology

    OpenAIRE

    Evers, Katrina Suzanne; Wellmann, Sven

    2016-01-01

    Arginine vasopressin (AVP) plays a major role in the homeostasis of fluid balance, vascular tonus, and the regulation of the endocrine stress response. The measurement of AVP levels is difficult due to its short half-life and laborious method of detection. Copeptin is a more stable peptide derived from the same precursor molecule, is released in an equimolar ratio to AVP, and has a very similar response to osmotic, hemodynamic, and stress-related stimuli. In fact, copeptin has been propagated...

  2. A Population Model of Vasopressin Secretion

    OpenAIRE

    Durie, Ruth Frances

    2008-01-01

    Computer modelling is a powerful tool for clarifying and testing theory. In neuroscience, this often means replicating firing patterns. Models need evaluation functions to quantify the significance of features in the firing patterns, but usually the effect of firing is insufficiently understood. The magnocellular vasopressin neurons of the hypothalamus do have an output that is both well understood and quantifiable: they secrete a hormone into the bloodstream in proportion to blood osmol...

  3. Low-Dose Vasopressin and Analogues to Treat Intraoperative Refractory Hypotension in Patients Prescribed Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors Undergoing General Anesthesia: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedman, Kara F; Mann, Carrie L; Spulecki, Cheryl; Castner, Jessica

    2016-12-01

    This review assessed the utility of vasopressin and vasopressin analogues for the treatment of refractory hypotension associated with angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors in the perioperative setting. A systematic review of the literature was conducted using MEDLINE, Embase, and ProQuest. Six randomized controlled trials met eligibility criteria. In the perioperative setting, continued use of ACE inhibitors within 24 hours before surgery remains controversial. Authors of the reviewed studies suggested that the morning dose of the ACE inhibitor be held, and those patients experienced decreased catecholamine use postoperatively and shorter duration of decreased mean arterial pressure. No incidence of refractory hypertension from withholding the morning dose of the ACE inhibitor was mentioned. All of the patients receiving vasopressin demonstrated improved hemodynamic stability with small, intermittent doses, without profound ischemic changes. For management (prevention and treatment) of ACE inhibitor-associated hypotension in the perioperative setting, all studies showed statistically significant success with vasopressin or vasopressin analogues for improvement of systemic blood pressures. Before vasopressin is widely accepted as a standard of care, further studies are needed to confirm these findings and assess the general utility of vasopressin in surgical populations for management of ACE inhibitor-associated refractory hypotension. Copyright© by the American Association of Nurse Anesthetists.

  4. Virulence-related genes, adhesion and invasion of some Yersinia enterocolitica-like strains suggests its pathogenic potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imori, Priscilla F M; Passaglia, Jaqueline; Souza, Roberto A; Rocha, Lenaldo B; Falcão, Juliana P

    2017-03-01

    Yersina enterocolitica-like species have not been extensively studied regarding its pathogenic potential. This work aimed to assess the pathogenic potential of some Y. enterocolitica-like strains by evaluating the presence of virulence-related genes by PCR and their ability to adhere to and invade Caco-2 and HEp-2 cells. A total of 50 Y. frederiksenii, 55 Y. intermedia and 13 Y. kristensenii strains were studied. The strains contained the following genes: Y. frederiksenii, fepA(44%), fes(44%) and ystB(18%); Y. intermedia, ail(53%), fepA (35%), fepD(2%), fes(97%), hreP(2%), ystB(2%) and tccC(35%); Y. kristensenii, ail(62%), ystB(23%), fepA(77%), fepD(54%), fes(54%) and hreP(77%). Generally, the Y. enterocolitica-like strains had a reduced ability to adhere to and invade mammalian cells compared to the highly pathogenic Y. enterocolitica 8081. However, Y. kristensenii FCF410 and Y. frederiksenii FCF461 presented high invasion potentials in Caco-2 cells after five days of pre-incubation increased by 45- and 7.2-fold compared to Y. enterocolitica 8081, respectively; but, the ail gene was not detected in these strains. The presence of virulence-related genes in some of the Y. enterocolitica-like strains indicated their possible pathogenic potential. Moreover, the results suggest the existence of alternative virulence mechanisms and that the pathogenicity of Y. kristensenii and Y. frederiksenii may be strain-dependent. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Convergent evidence from mouse and human studies suggests the involvement of zinc finger protein 326 gene in antidepressant treatment response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying-Jay Liou

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: The forced swim test (FST is a commonly used model to predict antidepressant efficacy. Uncovering the genetic basis of the model may unravel the mechanism of antidepressant treatment. METHODS: FVB/NJ (FVB and C57BL/6J (B6 were first identified as the response and non-response strains to fluoxetine (a serotonin-specific reuptake inhibitor antidepressant treatment in the mouse FST. Simple-interval (SIM and composite-interval (CIM mappings were applied to map the quantitative trait loci (QTLs of the anti-immobility effect of fluoxetine in FST (FST(FLX in 865 male B6×FVB-F2 mice. The brain mRNA expressions of the gene with the maximum QTL-linkage signal for FST(FLX after the FST were compared between B6 and FVB mice and also compared between fluoxetine and saline treatment. The association of the variants in the human homologue of the mouse FST(FLX-QTL gene with major depressive disorder (MDD and antidepressant response were investigated in 1080 human subjects (MDD/control = 582/498. RESULTS: One linkage signal for FST(FLX-QTL was detected at an intronic SNP (rs6215396 of the mouse Zfp326 gene (maximal CIM-LOD = 9.36. The Zfp326 mRNA expression in the FVB thalamus was significantly down-regulated by fluoxetine in the FST, and the higher FVB-to-B6 Zfp326 mRNA expressions in the frontal cortex, striatum and hypothalamus diminished after fluoxetine treatment. Two coding-synonymous SNPs (rs2816881 and rs10922744 in the human homologue of Zfp326, ZNF326, were significantly associated with the 8-week antidepressant treatment response in the MDD patients (Bonferroni-corrected p = 0.004-0.028. CONCLUSIONS: The findings suggest the involvement of the Zfp326 and ZNF326 genes in antidepressant treatment response.

  6. Oxytocin/vasopressin and gonadotropin-releasing hormone from cephalopods to vertebrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minakata, Hiroyuki

    2010-07-01

    Recent advances in peptide search methods have revealed two peptide systems that have been conserved through metazoan evolution. Members of the oxytocin/vasopressin-superfamily have been identified from protostomian and deuterostomian animals, indicating that the oxytocin/vasopressin hormonal system represents one of the most ancient systems. In most protostomian animals, a single member of the superfamily shares oxytocin-like and vasopressin-like actions. Co-occurrence of two members has been discovered in modern cephalopods, octopus, and cuttlefish. We propose that cephalopods have developed two peptides in the molluscan evolutionary lineage like vertebrates have established two lineages in the oxytocin/vasopressin superfamily. The existence of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) in protostomian animals was initially suggested by immunohistochemical analysis using chordate GnRH antibodies. A peptide with structural features similar to those of chordate GnRHs was originally isolated from octopus, and an identical peptide has been characterized from squid and cuttlefish. Novel forms of GnRH-like molecules from other molluscs, an annelid, arthropods, and nematodes demonstrate somewhat conserved structures at the N-terminal regions; but structures of the C-terminal regions critical to gonadotropin-releasing activity are diverse. These findings may be important for the study of the molecular evolution of GnRH in protostomian animals.

  7. Imidafenacin exerts the antidiuretic effect by enhancing vasopressin-related responses in orally water-loaded rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamazaki, Takanobu; Fukata, Ayako; Muraki, Yukiko

    2016-11-15

    Imidafenacin, an antimuscarinic agent for treating overactive bladder, has an antidiuretic effect, but the detailed mechanisms of action remain unclear. The cholinergic and vasopressin systems are known to interact, for example, in the suppression of vasopressin-induced water reabsorption through muscarinic stimulation in the renal collecting duct. We, therefore, investigated whether vasopressin signaling pathway would participate in the antidiuretic effect of imidafenacin. In female Sprague-Dawley rats, urine production was measured by collecting urine from cystostomy chatheter using a Bollman restraining cage for 2h after drug i.v. injection and water load (25ml/kg p.o.). Both imidafenacin and a vasopressin V2 receptor agonist desmopressin acetate (desmopressin) dose-dependently suppressed urine production. The combination of imidafenacin and desmopressin at the minimum effective doses suppressed the urine production more strongly than each alone. Mozavaptan hydrochloride (mozavaptan, 3mg/kg), a vasopressin V2 receptor antagonist, completely inhibited the antidiuretic effects of imidafenacin and desmopressin at their respective minimum effective doses. The antidiuretic effect of desmopressin emerged at the maximum antidiuretic dose level (0.1µg/kg) even under mozavaptan-treatment, whereas that of imidafenacin (300µg/kg) was still kept suppressed by mozavaptan. When 300µg/kg imidafenacin was added to the combination of mozavaptan 3mg/kg and desmopressin 0.1µg/kg, the antidiuretic effect was further enhanced. The present study suggests that vasopressin signaling pathway participates in the antidiuretic effect of imidafenacin, and that imidafenacin exerts its antidiuretic effects by enhancing some part of the vasopressin signaling pathway in orally water-loaded rats. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Dissecting the effects of antibiotics on horizontal gene transfer: Analysis suggests a critical role of selection dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopatkin, Allison J; Sysoeva, Tatyana A; You, Lingchong

    2016-12-01

    Horizontal gene transfer (HGT) is a major mechanism responsible for the spread of antibiotic resistance. Conversely, it is often assumed that antibiotics promote HGT. Careful dissection of the literature, however, suggests a lack of conclusive evidence supporting this notion in general. This is largely due to the lack of well-defined quantitative experiments to address this question in an unambiguous manner. In this review, we discuss the extent to which HGT is responsible for the spread of antibiotic resistance and examine what is known about the effect of antibiotics on the HGT dynamics. We focus on conjugation, which is the dominant mode of HGT responsible for spreading antibiotic resistance on the global scale. Our analysis reveals a need to design experiments to quantify HGT in such a way to facilitate rigorous data interpretation. Such measurements are critical for developing novel strategies to combat resistance spread through HGT. © 2016 WILEY Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Molecular characterization of the her-1 gene suggests a direct role in cell signaling during Caenorhabditis elegans sex determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, M D; Li, W; Trent, C; Robertson, B; Fire, A; Hageman, J M; Wood, W B

    1993-02-01

    We have characterized two transcripts from the male-determining her-1 locus in Caenorhabditis elegans. The larger transcript, which appears more important for male development, is predicted to encode a novel 175-amino-acid, cysteine-rich polypeptide with an apparent amino-terminal signal sequence and potential cleavage and glycosylation sites. Expression of a full-length cDNA construct for the larger transcript driven by a body-wall-myosin promoter causes extensive masculinization of all sexually dimorphic tissues in XX (normally hermaphrodite) animals. This activity is dependent on the presence of the her-1 signal sequence or a substitute synthetic signal sequence in the encoded polypeptide. These results suggest that a secreted product of the her-1 gene dictates male development.

  10. Tyrosinase-positive oculocutaneous albinism in Southern African blacks: P gene-associated haplotypes suggest a major mutation in the 5{prime} region of the gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramsay, M.; Stevens, G.; Beukering, J. van [Univ. of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg (South Africa)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Tyrosinase-positive oculocutaneous albinism (ty-pos OCA) occurs with a prevalence of 1 in 3900 among Southern African (SA) blacks. The major contributors to morbidity and mortality are skin cancer and decreased visual acuity. Two distinct phenotypes occur, namely individuals with ephelides (darkly pigmented patches) and those without. There is complete concordance with regard to ephelus status among siblings. The disorder is linked to markers on chromosome 15q11.2-q12, and no obligatory cross-overs were observed with polymophic markers at the human homolog, P, of the mouse pink eyed dilute gene, p. Contrary to what has been shown for Caucasoid ty-pos OCA, this condition shows locus homogeneity among SA blacks. The P gene is an excellent candidate for ty-pos OCA and mutations in this gene will confirm its role in causing the common form of albinism in SA. Numerous P gene mutations have been described in other populations. In an attempt to detect mutations, the P gene cDNA was used to search for structural rearrangements or polymorphisms. Six polymorphisms (plR10/Scal, 912/Xbal, 912/HincII, 912/TaqI, 1412/TaqI [two systems] and 1412/HindIII) were detected with subclones of the P cDNA and haplotypes were determined in each family. None were clearly associated with an albinism-related rearrangement. However, strong linkage disequilibrium was observed with alleles at loci toward the 5{prime} region of the gene ({triangle}=0.65, 0.57 and 0.80 for the three polymorphisms detected with the 912 subclone), suggesting a major ty-pos OCA mutation in this region. Haplotype analysis provides evidence for a major mutation associated with the same haplotype in individuals with ephelides (8/12 OCA chromosomes) and those without ephelides (24:30). The presence of other ty-pos OCA associated haplotypes indicates several other less common mutations.

  11. Hyponatremia and V2 vasopressin receptor upregulation: a result of HSP90 inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Qiong; Puhm, Florian; Freissmuth, Michael; Nanoff, Christian

    2017-10-01

    Small-molecule inhibitors of heat-shock protein 90 (HSP90) have been under development as chemotherapeutic agents. The adverse events reported from early clinical trials included hyponatremia. Given the limited number of patients enrolled, the number of hyponatremia incidents was remarkable and repeatedly, the event was judged as severe. Inappropriate V2 vasopressin receptor stimulation is an established cause of hyponatremia. We explored the hypothesis that HSP90 inhibition produces hypersensitivity to vasopressin by upregulating V2-receptors. Experiments were carried out in cell culture using HEK293 cells with heterologous expression of the human V2-receptor and HELA cells with an endogenous V2-receptor complement. We tested the effect of HSP90 inhibition by three structurally unrelated compounds (alvespimycin, luminespib, radicicol) and asserted its specificity in cells depleted of cytosolic HSP90 (by RNA interference). Assays encompassed surface V2-receptor density and vasopressin-stimulated formation of cyclic AMP (cAMP). The results demonstrate a twofold increase in cell-surface receptor density following pre-incubation with each of the HSP90 inhibitors. The effect had a concentration-dependence consistent with the individual potencies to inhibit HSP90. Similarly, depletion of cytosolic HSP90 increased surface-receptor density and at the same time, reduced the inhibitor effect. Upregulated V2-receptors were fully functional; hence, in culture treated with an HSP90 inhibitor, addition of vasopressin resulted in higher levels of cAMP than in controls. Since formation of cAMP is the first signalling step in raising water permeability of the collecting duct epithelia, we suggest that V2-receptor upregulation generates hypersensitivity to vasopressin linking HSP90 inhibition to the development of hyponatremia.

  12. Effects of Arginine Vasopressin on musical short-term memory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roni Y. Granot

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Previous genetic studies showed an association between variations in the gene coding for the 1a receptor of the neuro-hormone arginine vasopressin (AVP and musical working memory (WM. The current study set out to test the influence of intranasal administration (INA of AVP on musical as compared to verbal WM using a double blind crossover (AVP – placebo design. Two groups of 25 males were exposed to 20 IU of AVP in one session, and 20 IU of saline water (placebo in a second session, one week apart. In each session subjects completed the tonal subtest from Gordon's Musical Aptitude Profile, the interval subtest from the Montreal Battery for Evaluation of Amusias (MBEA, and the forward and backward digit span tests. Scores in the digit span tests were not influenced by AVP. In contrast, in the music tests there was an AVP effect. In the MBEA test, scores for the group receiving placebo in the first session (PV were higher than for the group receiving vasopressin in the first session (VP (p < .05 with no main Session effect nor Group * Session interaction. In the Gordon test there was a main Session effect (p < .05 with scores higher in the second as compared to the first session, a marginal main Group effect (p = .093 and a marginal Group X Session interaction (p = 0.88. In addition we found that the group that received AVP in the first session scored higher on scales indicative of happiness, and alertness on the Positive and Negative Affect Scale, (PANAS. Only in this group and only in the music test these scores were significantly correlated with memory scores. Together the results reflect a complex interaction between AVP, musical memory, arousal, and contextual effects such as session, and base levels of memory. The results are interpreted in light of music's universal use as a means to modulate arousal on the one hand, and AVP's influence on mood, arousal, and social interactions on the other.

  13. Vasopressin and the Output of the Hypothalamic Biological Clock

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kalsbeek, A.; Fliers, E.; Hofman, M. A.; Swaab, D. F.; Buijs, R. M.

    2010-01-01

    The physiological effects of vasopressin as a peripheral hormone were first reported more than 100 years ago. However, it was not until the first immunocytochemical studies were carried out in the early 1970s, using vasopressin antibodies, and the discovery of an extensive distribution of

  14. Endocrine Disruption of Vasopressin Systems and Related Behaviors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heather B. Patisaul

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs are chemicals that interfere with the organizational or activational effects of hormones. Although the vast majority of the EDC literature focuses on steroid hormone signaling related impacts, growing evidence from a myriad of species reveals that the nonapeptide hormones vasopressin (AVP and oxytocin (OT may also be EDC targets. EDCs shown to alter pathways and behaviors coordinated by AVP and/or OT include the plastics component bisphenol A (BPA, the soy phytoestrogen genistein (GEN, and various flame retardants. Many effects are sex specific and likely involve action at nuclear estrogen receptors. Effects include the elimination or reversal of well-characterized sexually dimorphic aspects of the AVP system, including innervation of the lateral septum and other brain regions critical for social and other non-reproductive behaviors. Disruption of magnocellular AVP function has also been reported in rats, suggesting possible effects on hemodynamics and cardiovascular function.

  15. Reliability of basal plasma vasopressin concentrations in healthy male adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quintana, Daniel S; Westlye, Lars T; Smerud, Knut T; Mahmoud, Ramy A; Djupesland, Per G; Andreassen, Ole A

    2017-10-01

    The neuropeptides oxytocin (OT) and arginine vasopressin (AVP) play important and interrelated roles in modulating mammalian social behaviour. While the OT system has received considerable research attention for its potential to treat psychiatric symptoms, comparatively little is known about the role of the AVP system in human social behaviour. To better understand the intraindividual stability of basal AVP, the present study assessed the reproducibility of basal plasma AVP concentrations. Basal plasma AVP was assessed at four sampling points separated by 8 days, on average, in 16 healthy adult males. Only one out of six comparisons revealed strong evidence for reproducibility of basal AVP concentrations (visit 2 vs. visit 4: r=0.8, p0.1). The concordance correlation coefficient [0.15, 95% CI (-0.55, 0.73)] also revealed poor overall reproducibility. Poor reliability of basal AVP concentrations suggests future work covarying AVP with trait markers should proceed with careful consideration of intraindividual fluctuations.

  16. Tissue specific haemoglobin gene expression suggests adaptation to local marine conditions in North Sea flounder (Platichthys flesus L.)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, P.F.; Eg Nielsen, Einar; Hansen, M.M.

    2013-01-01

    of the haemoglobin alpha and beta subunit genes was studied in reciprocally transplanted European flounder Platichthys flesus from the highly saline North Sea and the brackish Baltic Sea. Clear differences in expression patterns of haemoglobin alpha and beta subunit genes were found among different types of tissue....... Finally, for kidney tissue a stress response was observed in one population, with gene up-regulation when North Sea flounders were transplanted to low salinity. This study underlines the importance of tissue specific gene expression and the significance of gene expression for evolution of local adaptation...... in high gene flow marine fishes. © 2013 The Genetics Society of Korea...

  17. Human Neuroimaging of Oxytocin and Vasopressin in Social Cognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zink, Caroline F; Meyer-Lindenberg, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    The neuropeptides oxytocin and vasopressin have increasingly been identified as modulators of human social behaviors and associated with neuropsychiatric disorders characterized by social dysfunction, such as autism. Identifying the human brain regions that are impacted by oxytocin and vasopressin in a social context is essential to fully characterize the role of oxytocin and vasopressin in complex human social cognition. Advances in human non-invasive neuroimaging techniques and genetics have enabled scientists to begin to elucidate the neurobiological basis of the influence of oxytocin and vasopressin on human social behaviors. Here we review the findings to-date from investigations of the acute and chronic effects of oxytocin and vasopressin on neural activity underlying social cognitive processes using “pharmacological fMRI” and “imaging genetics”, respectively. PMID:22326707

  18. Genome-Wide Association Studies Suggest Limited Immune Gene Enrichment in Schizophrenia Compared to 5 Autoimmune Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pouget, Jennie G; Gonçalves, Vanessa F; Spain, Sarah L; Finucane, Hilary K; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; Kennedy, James L; Knight, Jo

    2016-09-01

    There has been intense debate over the immunological basis of schizophrenia, and the potential utility of adjunct immunotherapies. The major histocompatibility complex is consistently the most powerful region of association in genome-wide association studies (GWASs) of schizophrenia and has been interpreted as strong genetic evidence supporting the immune hypothesis. However, global pathway analyses provide inconsistent evidence of immune involvement in schizophrenia, and it remains unclear whether genetic data support an immune etiology per se. Here we empirically test the hypothesis that variation in immune genes contributes to schizophrenia. We show that there is no enrichment of immune loci outside of the MHC region in the largest genetic study of schizophrenia conducted to date, in contrast to 5 diseases of known immune origin. Among 108 regions of the genome previously associated with schizophrenia, we identify 6 immune candidates (DPP4, HSPD1, EGR1, CLU, ESAM, NFATC3) encoding proteins with alternative, nonimmune roles in the brain. While our findings do not refute evidence that has accumulated in support of the immune hypothesis, they suggest that genetically mediated alterations in immune function may not play a major role in schizophrenia susceptibility. Instead, there may be a role for pleiotropic effects of a small number of immune genes that also regulate brain development and plasticity. Whether immune alterations drive schizophrenia progression is an important question to be addressed by future research, especially in light of the growing interest in applying immunotherapies in schizophrenia. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Maryland Psychiatric Research Center.

  19. New Findings in eNOS gene and Thalidomide Embryopathy Suggest pre-transcriptional effect variants as susceptibility factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalski, Thayne Woycinck; Fraga, Lucas Rosa; Tovo-Rodrigues, Luciana; Sanseverino, Maria Teresa Vieira; Hutz, Mara Helena; Schuler-Faccini, Lavínia; Vianna, Fernanda Sales Luiz

    2016-03-23

    Antiangiogenic properties of thalidomide have created an interest in the use of the drug in treatment of cancer. However, thalidomide is responsible for thalidomide embryopathy (TE). A lack of knowledge regarding the mechanisms of thalidomide teratogenesis acts as a barrier in the aim to synthesize a safer analogue of thalidomide. Recently, our group detected a higher frequency of alleles that impair the pro-angiogenic mechanisms of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), coded by the NOS3 gene. In this study we evaluated variable number tandem repeats (VNTR) functional polymorphism in intron 4 of NOS3 in individuals with TE (38) and Brazilians without congenital anomalies (136). Haplotypes were estimated for this VNTR with previously analyzed polymorphisms, rs2070744 (-786C > T) and rs1799983 (894T > G), in promoter region and exon 7, respectively. Haplotypic distribution was different between the groups (p = 0.007). Alleles -786C (rs2070744) and 4b (VNTR), associated with decreased NOS3 expression, presented in higher frequency in TE individuals (p = 0.018; OR = 2.57; IC = 1.2-5.8). This association was not identified with polymorphism 894T > G (p = 0.079), which influences eNOS enzymatic activity. These results suggest variants in NOS3, with pre-transcriptional effects as susceptibility factors, influencing the risk TE development. This finding generates insight for a new approach to research that pursues a safer analogue.

  20. Gene Interaction Network Suggests Dioxin Induces a Significant Linkage between Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor and Retinoic Acid Receptor Beta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyoshiba, Hiroyoshi; Yamanaka, Takeharu; Sone, Hideko; Parham, Frederick M.; Walker, Nigel J.; Martinez, Jeanelle; Portier, Christopher J.

    2004-01-01

    Gene expression arrays (gene chips) have enabled researchers to roughly quantify the level of mRNA expression for a large number of genes in a single sample. Several methods have been developed for the analysis of gene array data including clustering, outlier detection, and correlation studies. Most of these analyses are aimed at a qualitative identification of what is different between two samples and/or the relationship between two genes. We propose a quantitative, statistically sound methodology for the analysis of gene regulatory networks using gene expression data sets. The method is based on Bayesian networks for direct quantification of gene expression networks. Using the gene expression changes in HPL1A lung airway epithelial cells after exposure to 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin at levels of 0.1, 1.0, and 10.0 nM for 24 hr, a gene expression network was hypothesized and analyzed. The method clearly demonstrates support for the assumed network and the hypothesis linking the usual dioxin expression changes to the retinoic acid receptor system. Simulation studies demonstrated the method works well, even for small samples. PMID:15345368

  1. Expression of venom gene homologs in diverse python tissues suggests a new model for the evolution of snake venom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes-Velasco, Jacobo; Card, Daren C; Andrew, Audra L; Shaney, Kyle J; Adams, Richard H; Schield, Drew R; Casewell, Nicholas R; Mackessy, Stephen P; Castoe, Todd A

    2015-01-01

    Snake venom gene evolution has been studied intensively over the past several decades, yet most previous studies have lacked the context of complete snake genomes and the full context of gene expression across diverse snake tissues. We took a novel approach to studying snake venom evolution by leveraging the complete genome of the Burmese python, including information from tissue-specific patterns of gene expression. We identified the orthologs of snake venom genes in the python genome, and conducted detailed analysis of gene expression of these venom homologs to identify patterns that differ between snake venom gene families and all other genes. We found that venom gene homologs in the python are expressed in many different tissues outside of oral glands, which illustrates the pitfalls of using transcriptomic data alone to define "venom toxins." We hypothesize that the python may represent an ancestral state prior to major venom development, which is supported by our finding that the expansion of venom gene families is largely restricted to highly venomous caenophidian snakes. Therefore, the python provides insight into biases in which genes were recruited for snake venom systems. Python venom homologs are generally expressed at lower levels, have higher variance among tissues, and are expressed in fewer organs compared with all other python genes. We propose a model for the evolution of snake venoms in which venom genes are recruited preferentially from genes with particular expression profile characteristics, which facilitate a nearly neutral transition toward specialized venom system expression. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Developmental Perspectives on Oxytocin and Vasopressin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammock, Elizabeth A D

    2015-01-01

    The related neuropeptides oxytocin and vasopressin are involved in species-typical behavior, including social recognition behavior, maternal behavior, social bonding, communication, and aggression. A wealth of evidence from animal models demonstrates significant modulation of adult social behavior by both of these neuropeptides and their receptors. Over the last decade, there has been a flood of studies in humans also implicating a role for these neuropeptides in human social behavior. Despite popular assumptions that oxytocin is a molecule of social bonding in the infant brain, less mechanistic research emphasis has been placed on the potential role of these neuropeptides in the developmental emergence of the neural substrates of behavior. This review summarizes what is known and assumed about the developmental influence of these neuropeptides and outlines the important unanswered questions and testable hypotheses. There is tremendous translational need to understand the functions of these neuropeptides in mammalian experience-dependent development of the social brain. The activity of oxytocin and vasopressin during development should inform our understanding of individual, sex, and species differences in social behavior later in life. PMID:24863032

  3. Evidence for a vasopressin receptor-GTP binding protein complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fitzgerald, T.J.; Uhing, R.J.; Exton, J.H.

    1986-05-01

    Plasma membranes from the livers of rats were able to hydrolyze the ..gamma..-phosphate from guanosine-5'-triphosphate (GTP). The rate of GTP hydrolysis could be decreased to 10% of its initial rate by the addition of adenosine-5'-triphosphate with a concomitant decrease in the K/sub m/ for GTP from approx. 10/sup -3/ M to 10/sup -6/ M. The low K/sub m/ GTPase activity was inhibited by the addition of nonhydrolyzable analogs of GTP. In addition, the GTPase activity was stimulated from 10 to 30% over basal by the addition of vasopressin. A dose dependency curve showed that the maximum stimulation was obtained with 10/sup -8/ M vasopressin. Identical results were obtained from plasma membranes that had been solubilized with 1% digitonin. When membranes that had been solubilized in the presence of (Phenylalanyl-3,4,5-/sup 3/H(N))vasopressin were subjected to sucrose gradient centrifugation, the majority of bound (/sup 3/H)vasopressin migrated with an approximate molecular weight of 300,000. Moreover, there was a GTPase activity that migrated with the bound (/sup 3/H)vasopressin. This peak of bound (/sup 3/H)vasopressin was decreased by 90% when the sucrose gradient centrifugation was run in the presence of 10/sup -5/ M guanosine-5'-O-(3-thiotriphosphate). These results support the conclusion that liver plasma membranes contain a GTP-binding protein that can complex with the vasopressin receptor.

  4. A randomised, double-blind, multi-centre trial comparing vasopressin and adrenaline in patients with cardiac arrest presenting to or in the Emergency Department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, Marcus Eng Hock; Tiah, Ling; Leong, Benjamin Sieu-Hon; Tan, Elaine Ching Ching; Ong, Victor Yeok Kein; Tan, Elizabeth Ai Theng; Poh, Bee Yen; Pek, Pin Pin; Chen, Yuming

    2012-08-01

    To compare vasopressin and adrenaline in the treatment of patients with cardiac arrest presenting to or in the Emergency Department (ED). A randomised, double-blind, multi-centre, parallel-design clinical trial in four adult hospitals. Eligible cardiac arrest patients (confirmed by the absence of pulse, unresponsiveness and apnea) aged >16 (aged>21 for one hospital) were randomly assigned to intravenous adrenaline (1mg) or vasopressin (40 IU) at ED. Patients with traumatic cardiac arrest or contraindication for cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) were excluded. Patients received additional open label doses of adrenaline as per current guidelines. Primary outcome was survival to hospital discharge (defined as participant discharged alive or survival to 30 days post-arrest). The study recruited 727 participants (adrenaline = 353; vasopressin = 374). Baseline characteristics of the two groups were comparable. Eight participants (2.3%) from adrenaline and 11 (2.9%) from vasopressin group survived to hospital discharge with no significant difference between groups (p = 0.27, RR = 1.72, 95% CI = 0.65-4.51). After adjustment for race, medical history, bystander CPR and prior adrenaline given, more participants survived to hospital admission with vasopressin (22.2%) than with adrenaline (16.7%) (p = 0.05, RR = 1.43, 95% CI = 1.02-2.04). Sub-group analysis suggested improved outcomes for vasopressin in participants with prolonged arrest times. Combination of vasopressin and adrenaline did not improve long term survival but seemed to improve survival to admission in patients with prolonged cardiac arrest. Further studies on the effect of vasopressin combined with therapeutic hypothermia on patients with prolonged cardiac arrest are needed. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Oxytocin and vasopressin are dysregulated in Williams Syndrome, a genetic disorder affecting social behavior.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Dai

    Full Text Available The molecular and neural mechanisms regulating human social-emotional behaviors are fundamentally important but largely unknown; unraveling these requires a genetic systems neuroscience analysis of human models. Williams Syndrome (WS, a condition caused by deletion of ~28 genes, is associated with a gregarious personality, strong drive to approach strangers, difficult peer interactions, and attraction to music. WS provides a unique opportunity to identify endogenous human gene-behavior mechanisms. Social neuropeptides including oxytocin (OT and arginine vasopressin (AVP regulate reproductive and social behaviors in mammals, and we reasoned that these might mediate the features of WS. Here we established blood levels of OT and AVP in WS and controls at baseline, and at multiple timepoints following a positive emotional intervention (music, and a negative physical stressor (cold. We also related these levels to standardized indices of social behavior. Results revealed significantly higher median levels of OT in WS versus controls at baseline, with a less marked increase in AVP. Further, in WS, OT and AVP increased in response to music and to cold, with greater variability and an amplified peak release compared to controls. In WS, baseline OT but not AVP, was correlated positively with approach, but negatively with adaptive social behaviors. These results indicate that WS deleted genes perturb hypothalamic-pituitary release not only of OT but also of AVP, implicating more complex neuropeptide circuitry for WS features and providing evidence for their roles in endogenous regulation of human social behavior. The data suggest a possible biological basis for amygdalar involvement, for increased anxiety, and for the paradox of increased approach but poor social relationships in WS. They also offer insight for translating genetic and neuroendocrine knowledge into treatments for disorders of social behavior.

  6. Vasopressin-dependent flank marking in golden hamsters is suppressed by drugs used in the treatment of obsessive-compulsive disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Messenger Tara

    2001-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Alterations in arginine vasopressin regulation and secretion have been proposed as one possible biochemical abnormality in patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder. In golden hamsters, arginine vasopressin microinjections into the anterior hypothalamus trigger robust grooming and flank marking, a stereotyped scent marking behaviors. The intensity and repetition of the behaviors induced by arginine vasopressin is somewhat reminiscent of Obsessive Compulsive Disorder in humans. The present experiments were carried out to test whether pharmacological agents used to alleviate obsessive compulsive disorder could inhibit arginine vasopressin-induced flank marking and grooming. Results Male golden hamsters were treated daily for two weeks with either vehicle, fluoxetine, clomipramine, or desipramine (an ineffective drug, before being tested for arginine vasopressin-induced flank marking and grooming. Flank marking was significantly inhibited in animals treated with fluoxetine or clomipramine but unaffected by treatment with desipramine. Grooming behavior was not affected by any treatment. Conclusion These data suggest that arginine vasopressin-induced flank marking may serve as an animal model for screening drugs used in the control of Obsessive Compulsive Disorder.

  7. Screening the dystrophin gene suggests a high rate of polymorphism in general but no exonic deletions in schizophrenics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindor, N.M.; Sobell, J.L.; Thibodeau, S.N. [Mayo Clinic/Foundation, Rochester, MN (United States)] [and others

    1994-03-15

    The dystrophin gene, located at chromosome Xp21, was evaluated as a candidate gene in chronic schizophrenia in response to the report of a large family in which schizophrenia cosegregated with Becker muscular dystrophy. Genomic DNA from 94 men with chronic schizophrenia was evaluated by Southern blot analysis using cDNA probes that span exons 1-59. No exonic deletions were identified. An unexpectedly high rate of polymorphism was calculated in this study and two novel polymorphisms were found, demonstrating the usefulness of the candidate gene approach even when results of the original study are negative. 41 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

  8. Powerful bivariate genome-wide association analyses suggest the SOX6 gene influencing both obesity and osteoporosis phenotypes in males

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Liu, Yao-Zhong; Pei, Yu-Fang; Liu, Jian-Feng; Yang, Fang; Guo, Yan; Zhang, Lei; Liu, Xiao-Gang; Yan, Han; Wang, Liang; Zhang, Yin-Ping; Levy, Shawn; Recker, Robert R; Deng, Hong-Wen

    2009-01-01

    .... Hence this approach is difficult to detect pleiotropic genes, which may exist for obesity and osteoporosis, two common diseases of major public health importance that are closely correlated genetically...

  9. Comparative promoter analysis of doxorubicin resistance-associated genes suggests E47 as a key regulatory element.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gyorffy, András; Vásárhelyi, Barna; Szöke, Dominika; Dietel, Manfred; Tulassay, Tivadar; Györffy, Balázs

    2006-01-01

    Working under the assumption that up- or downregulation of genes implicated in chemoresistance may be the result of altered function of regulatory transcription factors (TF), over-represented TF-binding sites of gene lists previously associated with doxorubicin resistance were the target of our search. First, a data warehouse was set up containing 52 genes which were present in at least two gene lists; of those, proximal promoter sequences (1 kb upstream and 0.05 kb downstream of the transcriptional start sites) could be retrieved from genomic databases for 45 genes using the EZ-Retrieve. The TOUCAN tool MotifScanner, which searches the TRANSFAC database, was used to detect TF-binding sites (TFBSs) in our set of sequences. The statistics tool of the Java program TOUCAN was applied to the data with the appropriate expected frequencies file to compare the measured prevalence to a background model. The most significantly over-represented TFBS was that of E47 (p=0.00024, prevalence: 0.2 vs. background: 8.19E-6). In summary, based on the results of our analysis it is hypothesized that the E47 transcription factor may contribute to doxorubicin resistance.

  10. Candidate gene analysis of tooth agenesis identifies novel mutations in six genes and suggests significant role for WNT and EDA signaling and allele combinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arte, Sirpa; Parmanen, Satu; Pirinen, Sinikka; Alaluusua, Satu; Nieminen, Pekka

    2013-01-01

    Failure to develop complete dentition, tooth agenesis, is a common developmental anomaly manifested most often as isolated but also as associated with many developmental syndromes. It typically affects third molars or one or few other permanent teeth but severe agenesis is also relatively prevalent. Here we report mutational analyses of seven candidate genes in a cohort of 127 probands with non-syndromic tooth agenesis. 82 lacked more than five permanent teeth excluding third molars, called as oligodontia. We identified 28 mutations, 17 of which were novel. Together with our previous reports, we have identified two mutations in MSX1, AXIN2 and EDARADD, five in PAX9, four in EDA and EDAR, and nine in WNT10A. They were observed in 58 probands (44%), with a mean number of missing teeth of 11.7 (range 4 to 34). Almost all of these probands had severe agenesis. Only few of the probands but several relatives with heterozygous genotypes of WNT10A or EDAR conformed to the common type of non-syndromic tooth agenesis, incisor-premolar hypodontia. Mutations in MSX1 and PAX9 affected predominantly posterior teeth, whereas both deciduous and permanent incisors were especially sensitive to mutations in EDA and EDAR. Many mutations in EDAR, EDARADD and WNT10A were present in several families. Biallelic or heterozygous genotypes of WNT10A were observed in 32 and hemizygous or heterozygous genotypes of EDA, EDAR or EDARADD in 22 probands. An EDARADD variant were in seven probands present together with variants in EDAR or WNT10A, suggesting combined phenotypic effects of alleles in distinct genes.

  11. Candidate Gene Analysis of Tooth Agenesis Identifies Novel Mutations in Six Genes and Suggests Significant Role for WNT and EDA Signaling and Allele Combinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arte, Sirpa; Parmanen, Satu; Pirinen, Sinikka; Alaluusua, Satu; Nieminen, Pekka

    2013-01-01

    Failure to develop complete dentition, tooth agenesis, is a common developmental anomaly manifested most often as isolated but also as associated with many developmental syndromes. It typically affects third molars or one or few other permanent teeth but severe agenesis is also relatively prevalent. Here we report mutational analyses of seven candidate genes in a cohort of 127 probands with non-syndromic tooth agenesis. 82 lacked more than five permanent teeth excluding third molars, called as oligodontia. We identified 28 mutations, 17 of which were novel. Together with our previous reports, we have identified two mutations in MSX1, AXIN2 and EDARADD, five in PAX9, four in EDA and EDAR, and nine in WNT10A. They were observed in 58 probands (44%), with a mean number of missing teeth of 11.7 (range 4 to 34). Almost all of these probands had severe agenesis. Only few of the probands but several relatives with heterozygous genotypes of WNT10A or EDAR conformed to the common type of non-syndromic tooth agenesis, incisor-premolar hypodontia. Mutations in MSX1 and PAX9 affected predominantly posterior teeth, whereas both deciduous and permanent incisors were especially sensitive to mutations in EDA and EDAR. Many mutations in EDAR, EDARADD and WNT10A were present in several families. Biallelic or heterozygous genotypes of WNT10A were observed in 32 and hemizygous or heterozygous genotypes of EDA, EDAR or EDARADD in 22 probands. An EDARADD variant were in seven probands present together with variants in EDAR or WNT10A, suggesting combined phenotypic effects of alleles in distinct genes. PMID:23991204

  12. Mutation profiling of 19 candidate genes in acute myeloid leukemia suggests significance of DNMT3A mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Sang-Yong; Lee, Seung-Tae; Kim, Hee-Jin; Cho, Eun Hae; Kim, Jong-Won; Park, Silvia; Jung, Chul Won; Kim, Sun-Hee

    2016-08-23

    We selected 19 significantly-mutated genes in AMLs, including FLT3, DNMT3A, NPM1, TET2, RUNX1, CEBPA, WT1, IDH1, IDH2, NRAS, ASXL1, SETD2, PTPN11, TP53, KIT, JAK2, KRAS, BRAF and CBL, and performed massively parallel sequencing for 114 patients with acute myeloid leukemias, mainly including those with normal karyotypes (CN-AML). More than 80% of patients had at least one mutation in the genes tested. DNMT3A mutation was significantly associated with adverse outcome in addition to conventional risk stratification such as the European LeukemiaNet (ELN) classification. We observed clinical usefulness of mutation testing on multiple target genes and the association with disease subgroups, clinical features and prognosis in AMLs.

  13. Combined gene expression and proteomic analysis of EGF induced apoptosis in A431 cells suggests multiple pathways trigger apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alanazi, Ibrahim; Ebrahimie, Esmaeil; Hoffmann, Peter; Adelson, David L

    2013-11-01

    A431 cells, derived from epidermoid carcinoma, overexpress the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and when treated with a high dose of EGF will undergo apoptosis. We exploited microarray and proteomics techniques and network prediction to study the regulatory mechanisms of EGF-induced apoptosis in A431 cells. We observed significant changes in gene expression in 162 genes, approximately evenly split between pro-apoptotic and anti-apoptotic genes and identified 30 proteins from the proteomic data that had either pro or anti-apoptotic annotation. Our correlation analysis of gene expression and proteome modeled a number of distinct sub-networks that are associated with the onset of apoptosis, allowing us to identify specific pathways and components. These include components of the interferon signalling pathway, and down stream components, including cytokines and suppressors of cytokine signalling. A central component of almost all gene expression sub-networks identified was TP53, which is mutated in A431 cells, and was down regulated. This down regulation of TP53 appeared to be correlated with proteomic sub-networks of cytoskeletal or cell adhesion components that might induce apoptosis by triggering cytochrome C release. Of the only three genes also differentially expressed as proteins, only serpinb1 had a known association with apoptosis. We confirmed that up regulation and cleavage of serpinb1 into L-DNAaseII was correlated with the induction of apoptosis. It is unlikely that a single pathway, but more likely a combination of pathways is needed to trigger EGF induced apoptosis in A431cells.

  14. Complete mtDNA sequences of two millipedes suggest a new model for mitochondrial gene rearrangements: Duplication and non-random loss

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lavrov, Dennis V.; Boore, Jeffrey L.; Brown, Wesley M.

    2001-11-08

    We determined the complete mtDNA sequences of the millipedes Narceus annularus and Thyropygus sp. (Arthropoda: Diplopoda) and identified in both genomes all 37 genes typical for metazoan mtDNA. The arrangement of these genes is identical in the two millipedes, but differs from that inferred to be ancestral for arthropods by the location of four genes/gene clusters. This novel gene arrangement is unusual for animal mtDNA, in that genes with opposite transcriptional polarities are clustered in the genome and the two clusters are separated by two non-coding regions. The only exception to this pattern is the gene for cysteine tRNA, which is located in the part of the genome that otherwise contains all genes with the opposite transcriptional polarity. We suggest that a mechanism involving complete mtDNA duplication followed by the loss of genes, predetermined by their transcriptional polarity and location in the genome, could generate this gene arrangement from the one ancestral for arthropods. The proposed mechanism has important implications for phylogenetic inferences that are drawn on the basis of gene arrangement comparisons.

  15. Genome-wide identification of physically clustered genes suggests chromatin-level co-regulation in male reproductive development in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reimegård, Johan; Kundu, Snehangshu; Pendle, Ali; Irish, Vivian F; Shaw, Peter; Nakayama, Naomi; Sundström, Jens F; Emanuelsson, Olof

    2017-04-07

    Co-expression of physically linked genes occurs surprisingly frequently in eukaryotes. Such chromosomal clustering may confer a selective advantage as it enables coordinated gene regulation at the chromatin level. We studied the chromosomal organization of genes involved in male reproductive development in Arabidopsis thaliana. We developed an in-silico tool to identify physical clusters of co-regulated genes from gene expression data. We identified 17 clusters (96 genes) involved in stamen development and acting downstream of the transcriptional activator MS1 (MALE STERILITY 1), which contains a PHD domain associated with chromatin re-organization. The clusters exhibited little gene homology or promoter element similarity, and largely overlapped with reported repressive histone marks. Experiments on a subset of the clusters suggested a link between expression activation and chromatin conformation: qRT-PCR and mRNA in situ hybridization showed that the clustered genes were up-regulated within 48 h after MS1 induction; out of 14 chromatin-remodeling mutants studied, expression of clustered genes was consistently down-regulated only in hta9/hta11, previously associated with metabolic cluster activation; DNA fluorescence in situ hybridization confirmed that transcriptional activation of the clustered genes was correlated with open chromatin conformation. Stamen development thus appears to involve transcriptional activation of physically clustered genes through chromatin de-condensation. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  16. Genome-Wide Association Studies Suggest Limited Immune Gene Enrichment in Schizophrenia Compared to 5 Autoimmune Diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pouget, Jennie G; Gonçalves, Vanessa F; Spain, Sarah L

    2016-01-01

    in immune genes contributes to schizophrenia. We show that there is no enrichment of immune loci outside of the MHC region in the largest genetic study of schizophrenia conducted to date, in contrast to 5 diseases of known immune origin. Among 108 regions of the genome previously associated...

  17. Similar gene expression profiles of sporadic, PGL2-, and SDHD-linked paragangliomas suggest a common pathway to tumorigenesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hensen, E.F.; Goeman, J.J.; Oosting, J.; Mey, A.G. van der; Hogendoorn, P.C.; Cremers, C.W.R.J.; Devilee, P.; Cornelisse, C.J.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Paragangliomas of the head and neck are highly vascular and usually clinically benign tumors arising in the paraganglia of the autonomic nervous system. A significant number of cases (10-50%) are proven to be familial. Multiple genes encoding subunits of the mitochondrial

  18. Multivariate analysis of maize disease resistances suggests a pleiotropic genetic basis and implicates a glutathione S-transferase gene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plants are attacked by pathogens representing diverse taxonomic groups, such that genes providing multiple disease resistance (MDR) would likely be under positive selection pressure. We examined the novel proposition that naturally occurring allelic variants may confer MDR. To do so, we applied a ...

  19. Negative feedback from CaSR signaling to aquaporin-2 sensitizes vasopressin to extracellular Ca2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranieri, Marianna; Tamma, Grazia; Di Mise, Annarita; Russo, Annamaria; Centrone, Mariangela; Svelto, Maria; Calamita, Giuseppe; Valenti, Giovanna

    2015-07-01

    We previously described that high luminal Ca(2+) in the renal collecting duct attenuates short-term vasopressin-induced aquaporin-2 (AQP2) trafficking through activation of the Ca(2+)-sensing receptor (CaSR). Here, we evaluated AQP2 phosphorylation and permeability, in both renal HEK-293 cells and in the dissected inner medullary collecting duct, in response to specific activation of CaSR with NPS-R568. In CaSR-transfected cells, CaSR activation drastically reduced the basal levels of AQP2 phosphorylation at S256 (AQP2-pS256), thus having an opposite effect to vasopressin action. When forskolin stimulation was performed in the presence of NPS-R568, the increase in AQP2-pS256 and in the osmotic water permeability were prevented. In the freshly isolated inner mouse medullar collecting duct, stimulation with forskolin in the presence of NPS-R568 prevented the increase in AQP2-pS256 and osmotic water permeability. Our data demonstrate that the activation of CaSR in the collecting duct prevents the cAMP-dependent increase in AQP2-pS256 and water permeability, counteracting the short-term vasopressin response. By extension, our results suggest the attractive concept that CaSR expressed in distinct nephron segments exerts a negative feedback on hormones acting through cAMP, conferring high sensitivity of hormone to extracellular Ca(2+). © 2015. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  20. Effect of stimulation of afferent renal nerves on plasma levels of vasopressin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caverson, M.M.; Ciriello, J.

    1987-04-01

    Experiments were done in ..cap alpha..-chloralose-anesthetized, paralyzed and artificially ventilated cats with vagus, cervical sympathetic, aortic depressor, and carotid sinus nerves cut bilaterally to investigate the effect of afferent renal nerve (ARN) stimulation on circulating levels of vasopressin (AVP). Electrical stimulation of ARN elicited a pressor response that had two components, a primary (1/sup 0/) component locked in time with the stimulus and a secondary (2/sup 0/) component that had a long onset latency and that outlasted the stimulation period. The 1/sup 0/ and 2/sup 0/ components of the pressor response were largest at stimulation frequencies of 30 and 40 Hz, respectively. Autonomic blockage with hexamethonium bromide and atropine methylbromide abolished the 1/sup 0/ component. Administration of the vasopressin V/sub 1/-vascular receptor antagonist d(CH/sub 2/)/sub 5/ VAVP during autonomic blockade abolished the 2/sup 0/C component. Plasma concentrations of AVP measured by radioimmunoassay increased from control levels of 5.2 +/- 0.9 to 53.6 +/- 18.6 pg/ml during a 5-min period of stimulation of ARN. Plasma AVP levels measured 20-40 min after simulation were not significantly different from control values. These data demonstrate that sensory information originating in the kidney alters the release of vasopressin from the neurohypophysis and suggest that ARN are an important component of the neural circuitry involved in homeostatic mechanisms controlling arterial pressure.

  1. Nucleotide sequence analyses of the MRP1 gene in four populations suggest negative selection on its coding region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan Stephen

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The MRP1 gene encodes the 190 kDa multidrug resistance-associated protein 1 (MRP1/ABCC1 and effluxes diverse drugs and xenobiotics. Sequence variations within this gene might account for differences in drug response in different individuals. To facilitate association studies of this gene with diseases and/or drug response, exons and flanking introns of MRP1 were screened for polymorphisms in 142 DNA samples from four different populations. Results Seventy-one polymorphisms, including 60 biallelic single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs, ten insertions/deletions (indel and one short tandem repeat (STR were identified. Thirty-four of these polymorphisms have not been previously reported. Interestingly, the STR polymorphism at the 5' untranslated region (5'UTR occurs at high but different frequencies in the different populations. Frequencies of common polymorphisms in our populations were comparable to those of similar populations in HAPMAP or Perlegen. Nucleotide diversity indices indicated that the coding region of MRP1 may have undergone negative selection or recent population expansion. SNPs E10/1299 G>T (R433S and E16/2012 G>T (G671V which occur at low frequency in only one or two of four populations examined were predicted to be functionally deleterious and hence are likely to be under negative selection. Conclusion Through in silico approaches, we identified two rare SNPs that are potentially negatively selected. These SNPs may be useful for studies associating this gene with rare events including adverse drug reactions.

  2. Dose-Dependent and Lasting Influences of Intranasal Vasopressin on Face Processing in Men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Price

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Arginine vasopressin (AVP and related peptides have diverse effects on social behaviors in vertebrates, sometimes promoting affiliative interactions and sometimes aggressive or antisocial responses. The type of influence, in at least some species, depends on social contexts, including the sex of the individuals in the interaction and/or on the levels of peptide within brain circuits that control the behaviors. To determine if AVP promotes different responses to same- and other-sex faces in men, and if those effects are dose dependent, we measured the effects of two doses of AVP on subjective ratings of male and female faces. We also tested if any influences persist beyond the time of drug delivery. When AVP was administered intranasally on an initial test day, 20 IU was associated with decreased social assessments relative to placebo and 40 IU, and some of the effects persisted beyond the initial drug delivery and appeared to generalize to novel faces on subsequent test days. In single men, those influences were most pronounced, but not exclusive, for male faces, whereas in coupled men they were primarily associated with responses to female faces. Similar influences were not observed if AVP was delivered after placebo on a second test day. In a preliminary analysis, the differences in social assessments observed between men who received 20 and 40 IU, which we suggest primarily reflect lowered social assessments induced by the lower dose, appeared most pronounced in subjects who carry what has been identified as a risk allele for the V1a receptor gene. Together, these results suggest that AVP’s effects on face processing, and possibly other social responses, differ according to dose, depend on relationship status, and may be more prolonged than previously recognized.

  3. Dose-Dependent and Lasting Influences of Intranasal Vasopressin on Face Processing in Men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Daniel; Burris, Debra; Cloutier, Anna; Thompson, Carol B; Rilling, James K; Thompson, Richmond R

    2017-01-01

    Arginine vasopressin (AVP) and related peptides have diverse effects on social behaviors in vertebrates, sometimes promoting affiliative interactions and sometimes aggressive or antisocial responses. The type of influence, in at least some species, depends on social contexts, including the sex of the individuals in the interaction and/or on the levels of peptide within brain circuits that control the behaviors. To determine if AVP promotes different responses to same- and other-sex faces in men, and if those effects are dose dependent, we measured the effects of two doses of AVP on subjective ratings of male and female faces. We also tested if any influences persist beyond the time of drug delivery. When AVP was administered intranasally on an initial test day, 20 IU was associated with decreased social assessments relative to placebo and 40 IU, and some of the effects persisted beyond the initial drug delivery and appeared to generalize to novel faces on subsequent test days. In single men, those influences were most pronounced, but not exclusive, for male faces, whereas in coupled men they were primarily associated with responses to female faces. Similar influences were not observed if AVP was delivered after placebo on a second test day. In a preliminary analysis, the differences in social assessments observed between men who received 20 and 40 IU, which we suggest primarily reflect lowered social assessments induced by the lower dose, appeared most pronounced in subjects who carry what has been identified as a risk allele for the V1a receptor gene. Together, these results suggest that AVP's effects on face processing, and possibly other social responses, differ according to dose, depend on relationship status, and may be more prolonged than previously recognized.

  4. A Gene Expression Signature Associated With Overall Survival in Patients With Hepatocellular Carcinoma Suggests a New Treatment Strategy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gillet, Jean-Pierre; Andersen, Jesper B; Madigan, James P

    2015-01-01

    Despite improvements in the management of liver cancer, the survival rate for individuals with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) remains dismal. The survival benefit of systemic chemotherapy for the treatment of liver cancer is only marginal. Although the reasons for treatment failure...... are multifactorial, intrinsic resistance to chemotherapy plays a primary role. Here, we analyzed the expression of 377 multidrug resistance-associated genes in two independent cohorts of patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma, with the aim of finding ways to improve survival in this poor-prognosis cancer...

  5. The vasopressin receptor of the blood-brain barrier in the rat hippocampus is linked to calcium signalling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hess, J.; Jensen, Claus V.; Diemer, Nils Henrik

    1991-01-01

    Neuropathology, vasopressin receptor, VI subtype, blood-brain barrier, cerebral endothelium, hippocampus, Fura-2......Neuropathology, vasopressin receptor, VI subtype, blood-brain barrier, cerebral endothelium, hippocampus, Fura-2...

  6. Allergic rhinitis - a total genome-scan for susceptibility genes suggests a locus on chromosome 4q24-q27

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haagerup, A; Bjerke, T; Schøitz, P O

    2001-01-01

    definition of both clinical allergic rhinitis and confirmed specific allergy were chosen. Thirty-three affected sib-pair families qualified for the scan that was undertaken using 446 microsatellite markers. Non-parametric linkage results were obtained from MAPMAKER/SIBS computer program. The study revealed...... one major candidate region on chromosome 4q24-q27 (LOD=2.83) and eight minor candidate regions 2q12-q33, 3q13, 4p15-q12, 5q13-q15, 6p24-p23, 12p13, 22q13, and Xp21 (LOD=1.04-1.63) likely to contain susceptibility genes for allergic rhinitis. Our findings did not support a previous report of linkage...... of allergic rhinitis to chromosome 12q14-q24 but they added positive evidence to the asthma and atopy candidate regions 2q33 and 6p23. Further identification of the specific genes involved in allergic rhinitis will give opportunities for improved diagnosis and treatment....

  7. Potential of nonpeptide (ant)agonists to rescue vasopressin V2 receptor mutants for the treatment of X-linked nephrogenic diabetes insipidus.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Los, E.L.; Deen, P.M.T.; Robben, J.H.

    2010-01-01

    According to the body's need, water is reabsorbed from the pro-urine that is formed by ultrafiltration in the kidney. This process is regulated by the antidiuretic hormone arginine-vasopressin (AVP), which binds to its type 2 receptor (V2R) in the kidney. Mutations in the gene encoding the V2R often

  8. Genome-wide gene expression analysis suggests an important role of hypoxia in the pathogenesis of endemic osteochondropathy Kashin-Beck disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Zhang

    Full Text Available Kashin-Beck Disease (KBD is an endemic osteochondropathy, the pathogenesis of which remains unclear now. In this study, we compared gene expression profiles of articular cartilage derived respectively from KBD patients and normal controls. Total RNA were isolated, amplified, labeled and hybridized to Agilent human 1A 22 k whole genome microarray chip. qRT-PCR was conducted to validate our microarray data. We detected 57 up-regulated genes (ratios ≥2.0 and 24 down-regulated genes (ratios ≤0.5 in KBD cartilage. To further identify the key genes involved in the pathogenesis of KBD, Bayesian analysis of variance for microarrays (BAM software was applied and identified 12 potential key genes with an average ratio 6.64, involved in apoptosis, metabolism, cytokine & growth factor and cytoskeleton & cell movement. Gene Set Enrichment Analysis (GSEA software was used to identify differently expressed gene ontology categories and pathways. GSEA found that a set of apoptosis, hypoxia and mitochondrial function related gene ontology categories and pathways were significantly up-regulated in KBD compared to normal controls. Based on the results of this study, we suggest that chronic hypoxia-induced mitochondrial damage and apoptosis might play an important role in the pathogenesis of KBD. Our efforts may help to understand the pathogenesis of KBD as well as other osteoarthrosis with similar articular cartilage lesions.

  9. Arginine vasopressin and copeptin in perinatology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katrina Suzanne Evers

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Arginine vasopressin (AVP plays a major role in the homeostasis of fluid balance, vascular tonus and the regulation of the endocrine stress response. The measurement of AVP levels is difficult due to its short half-life and laborious method of detection. Copeptin is a more stable peptide derived from the same precursor molecule, is released in an equimolar ratio to AVP and has a very similar response to osmotic, hemodynamic and stress-related stimuli. In fact, copeptin has been propagated as surrogate marker to indirectly determine circulating AVP concentrations in various conditions. Here, we present an overview of the current knowledge on AVP and copeptin in perinatology with a particular focus on the baby’s transition from placenta to lung breathing. We performed a systematic review of the literature on fetal stress hormone levels, including norepinephrine, cortisol, AVP and copeptin, in regard to birth stress. Finally, diagnostic and therapeutic options for copeptin measurement and AVP functions are discussed.

  10. Genome-wide association of bipolar disorder suggests an enrichment of replicable associations in regions near genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erin N Smith

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Although a highly heritable and disabling disease, bipolar disorder's (BD genetic variants have been challenging to identify. We present new genotype data for 1,190 cases and 401 controls and perform a genome-wide association study including additional samples for a total of 2,191 cases and 1,434 controls. We do not detect genome-wide significant associations for individual loci; however, across all SNPs, we show an association between the power to detect effects calculated from a previous genome-wide association study and evidence for replication (P = 1.5×10(-7. To demonstrate that this result is not likely to be a false positive, we analyze replication rates in a large meta-analysis of height and show that, in a large enough study, associations replicate as a function of power, approaching a linear relationship. Within BD, SNPs near exons exhibit a greater probability of replication, supporting an enrichment of reproducible associations near functional regions of genes. These results indicate that there is likely common genetic variation associated with BD near exons (±10 kb that could be identified in larger studies and, further, provide a framework for assessing the potential for replication when combining results from multiple studies.

  11. Plasma arginine vasopressin response to water load during labour

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singhi, S. (West Indies Univ., Mona (Jamaica). Dept. of Child Health); Parshad, O. (West Indies Univ., Mona (Jamaica). Dept. of Physiology)

    1985-02-01

    To find out whether plasma vasopressin (Psub(AVP)) response to a water load during pregnancy is inappropriately high, as had been speculated, we measured Psub(AVP)by radioimmunoassay in 30 women at the time of delivery. Ten women had received infusion of aqueous glucose solution during labour for hydration (GW group); another ten received infusion of glucose solution as a vehicle for oxytocin (IOT group), and ten women did not receive any intrapartum intravenous fluid therapy (controls). Serum sodium and osmolality were also determined in all the subjects. Psub(AVP) levels were significantly lower in GW (0.70 +- 0.4 pg/ml) and OT groups (0.7 +- 0.6 pg/ml) (P < 0.05). Significant negative correlation was seen between the amount of glucose solution infused and levels of Psub(AVP) (r = -0.66; P < 0.01), while a significant positive correlation was seen between Psub(AVP) and serum sodium (r = 0.61; P < 0.01). These findings suggest that during labour, the physiological relationship between serum osmolality and Psub(AVP) in intact, and the infusion of a water load in the form of aqueous glucose solution is attended by an expected lowering of Psub(AVP). We infer that inappropriate ADH response is not the cause of water retention and hyponatremia often seen in women receiving aqueous glucose solution during labor.

  12. Hyponatraemia in imported malaria: the pathophysiological role of vasopressin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoorn Ewout J

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the pathophysiology of hyponatraemia in malaria, the relative contribution of appropriate and inappropriate arginine vasopressin (AVP release is unknown; the trigger for inappropriate AVP release is also unknown. Methods Serum copeptin, a stable and sensitive marker for AVP release, was analysed in a large cohort of patients with imported malaria (204 patients and in a small prospective substudy (23 patients in which urine sodium and osmolality were also available. Hyponatraemia was classified as mild (serum sodium 131-134 mmol/l and moderate-to-severe ( Results Serum copeptin on admission was higher in patients with moderate-to-severe hyponatraemia (median 18.5 pmol/L compared with normonatraemic patients (12.7 pmol/L, p p s = -0.17, p = 0.017. Stronger correlations were identified between serum C-reactive protein and copeptin (rs = -0.36, p s = 0.33, p Conclusions In hyponatraemic patients with imported malaria, AVP release was uniformly increased and was either appropriate or inappropriate. Although the exact trigger for inappropriate AVP release remains unknown, the higher body temperatures, correlations with C-reactive protein and long normalization times of serum sodium, suggest an important role of the host inflammatory response to the invading malaria parasite.

  13. Extreme MHC class I diversity in the sedge warbler (Acrocephalus schoenobaenus); selection patterns and allelic divergence suggest that different genes have different functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biedrzycka, Aleksandra; O'Connor, Emily; Sebastian, Alvaro; Migalska, Magdalena; Radwan, Jacek; Zając, Tadeusz; Bielański, Wojciech; Solarz, Wojciech; Ćmiel, Adam; Westerdahl, Helena

    2017-07-05

    Recent work suggests that gene duplications may play an important role in the evolution of immunity genes. Passerine birds, and in particular Sylvioidea warblers, have highly duplicated major histocompatibility complex (MHC) genes, which are key in immunity, compared to other vertebrates. However, reasons for this high MHC gene copy number are yet unclear. High-throughput sequencing (HTS) allows MHC genotyping even in individuals with extremely duplicated genes. This HTS data can reveal evidence of selection, which may help to unravel the putative functions of different gene copies, i.e. neofunctionalization. We performed exhaustive genotyping of MHC class I in a Sylvioidea warbler, the sedge warbler, Acrocephalus schoenobaenus, using the Illumina MiSeq technique on individuals from a wild study population. The MHC diversity in 863 genotyped individuals by far exceeds that of any other bird species described to date. A single individual could carry up to 65 different alleles, a large proportion of which are expressed (transcribed). The MHC alleles were of three different lengths differing in evidence of selection, diversity and divergence within our study population. Alleles without any deletions and alleles containing a 6 bp deletion showed characteristics of classical MHC genes, with evidence of multiple sites subject to positive selection and high sequence divergence. In contrast, alleles containing a 3 bp deletion had no sites subject to positive selection and had low divergence. Our results suggest that sedge warbler MHC alleles that either have no deletion, or contain a 6 bp deletion, encode classical antigen presenting MHC molecules. In contrast, MHC alleles containing a 3 bp deletion may encode molecules with a different function. This study demonstrates that highly duplicated MHC genes can be characterised with HTS and that selection patterns can be useful for revealing neofunctionalization. Importantly, our results highlight the need to consider the

  14. The Transcriptomes of Xiphinema index and Longidorus elongatus Suggest Independent Acquisition of Some Plant Parasitism Genes by Horizontal Gene Transfer in Early-Branching Nematodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danchin, Etienne G J; Perfus-Barbeoch, Laetitia; Rancurel, Corinne; Thorpe, Peter; Da Rocha, Martine; Bajew, Simon; Neilson, Roy; Guzeeva, Elena Sokolova; Da Silva, Corinne; Guy, Julie; Labadie, Karine; Esmenjaud, Daniel; Helder, Johannes; Jones, John T; den Akker, Sebastian Eves-van

    2017-10-23

    Nematodes have evolved the ability to parasitize plants on at least four independent occasions, with plant parasites present in Clades 1, 2, 10 and 12 of the phylum. In the case of Clades 10 and 12, horizontal gene transfer of plant cell wall degrading enzymes from bacteria and fungi has been implicated in the evolution of plant parasitism. We have used ribonucleic acid sequencing (RNAseq) to generate reference transcriptomes for two economically important nematode species, Xiphinema index and Longidorus elongatus , representative of two genera within the early-branching Clade 2 of the phylum Nematoda. We used a transcriptome-wide analysis to identify putative horizontal gene transfer events. This represents the first in-depth transcriptome analysis from any plant-parasitic nematode of this clade. For each species, we assembled ~30 million Illumina reads into a reference transcriptome. We identified 62 and 104 transcripts, from X. index and L. elongatus , respectively, that were putatively acquired via horizontal gene transfer. By cross-referencing horizontal gene transfer prediction with a phylum-wide analysis of Pfam domains, we identified Clade 2-specific events. Of these, a GH12 cellulase from X. index was analysed phylogenetically and biochemically, revealing a likely bacterial origin and canonical enzymatic function. Horizontal gene transfer was previously shown to be a phenomenon that has contributed to the evolution of plant parasitism among nematodes. Our findings underline the importance and the extensiveness of this phenomenon in the evolution of plant-parasitic life styles in this speciose and widespread animal phylum.

  15. The Effect of Renal Function and Hemodialysis Treatment on Plasma Vasopressin and Copeptin Levels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ettema, Esmée M; Heida, Judith; Casteleijn, Niek F; Boesten, Lianne; Westerhuis, Ralf; Gaillard, Carlo A J M; Gansevoort, Ron T; Franssen, Casper F M; Zittema, Debbie

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Copeptin is increasingly used in epidemiological studies as a substitute for vasopressin. The effect of renal function per se on copeptin and vasopressin concentrations as well as their ratio have, however, not been well described. Methods: Copeptin and vasopressin levels were measured

  16. Copeptin, a surrogate marker of vasopressin, is associated with microalbuminuria in a large population cohort

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, Esther; Bakker, Stephan J. L.; Halbesma, Nynke; de Jong, Paul E.; Struck, Joachim; Gansevoort, Ron T.

    Urinary albumin excretion is a powerful predictor of progressive cardiovascular and renal disease. In rats and humans, administration of a synthetic vasopressin analogue, 1-desamino-8-D-arginine-vasopressin, increases urinary albumin excretion; however, it is unknown if endogenous vasopressin levels

  17. Potential Deleterious Effects of Vasopressin in Chronic Kidney Disease and Particularly Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, E.; Boertien, W. E.; Zietse, R.; Gansevoort, R. T.

    2011-01-01

    The antidiuretic hormone vasopressin is crucial for regulating free water clearance in normal physiology. However, it has also been hypothesized that vasopressin has deleterious effects on the kidney. Vasopressin is elevated in animals and patients with chronic kidney disease. Suppression of

  18. D-subgenome bias of Xcm resistance genes in tetraploid Gossypium (cotton) suggests that polyploid formation has created novel avenues for evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, R J; Thaxton, P M; El-Zik, K M; Paterson, A H

    1998-08-01

    A detailed RFLP map was used to determine the chromosomal locations and subgenomic distributions of cotton (Gossypium) genes/QTLs that confer resistance to the bacterial blight pathogen, Xanthomonas campestris pv. malvacearum (Xcm). Genetic mapping generally corroborated classic predictions regarding the number and dosage effects of genes conferring Xcm resistance. One recessive allele (b6) was a noteworthy exception to the genetic dominance of most plant resistance alleles. This recessive allele appeared to uncover additional QTLs from both resistant and ostensibly susceptible genotypes, some of which corresponded in location to resistance (R)-genes effective against other Xcm races. One putatively "defeated" resistance allele (B3) reduced severity of Xcm damage by "virulent" races. Among the six resistance genes derived from tetraploid cottons, five (83%) mapped to D-subgenome chromosomes-if each subgenome were equally likely to evolve new R-gene alleles, this level of bias would occur in only about 1.6% of cases. Possible explanations of this bias include biogeographic factors, differences in evolutionary rates between subgenomes, gene conversion or other intergenomic exchanges that escaped detection by genetic mapping, or other factors. A significant D-subgenome bias of Xcm resistance genes may suggest that polyploid formation has offered novel avenues for phenotypic response to selection.

  19. Network-based differential gene expression analysis suggests cell cycle related genes regulated by E2F1 underlie the molecular difference between smoker and non-smoker lung adenocarcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Differential gene expression (DGE) analysis is commonly used to reveal the deregulated molecular mechanisms of complex diseases. However, traditional DGE analysis (e.g., the t test or the rank sum test) tests each gene independently without considering interactions between them. Top-ranked differentially regulated genes prioritized by the analysis may not directly relate to the coherent molecular changes underlying complex diseases. Joint analyses of co-expression and DGE have been applied to reveal the deregulated molecular modules underlying complex diseases. Most of these methods consist of separate steps: first to identify gene-gene relationships under the studied phenotype then to integrate them with gene expression changes for prioritizing signature genes, or vice versa. It is warrant a method that can simultaneously consider gene-gene co-expression strength and corresponding expression level changes so that both types of information can be leveraged optimally. Results In this paper, we develop a gene module based method for differential gene expression analysis, named network-based differential gene expression (nDGE) analysis, a one-step integrative process for prioritizing deregulated genes and grouping them into gene modules. We demonstrate that nDGE outperforms existing methods in prioritizing deregulated genes and discovering deregulated gene modules using simulated data sets. When tested on a series of smoker and non-smoker lung adenocarcinoma data sets, we show that top differentially regulated genes identified by the rank sum test in different sets are not consistent while top ranked genes defined by nDGE in different data sets significantly overlap. nDGE results suggest that a differentially regulated gene module, which is enriched for cell cycle related genes and E2F1 targeted genes, plays a role in the molecular differences between smoker and non-smoker lung adenocarcinoma. Conclusions In this paper, we develop nDGE to prioritize

  20. Two new cases with microdeletion of 17q23.2 suggest presence of a candidate gene for sensorineural hearing loss within this region

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schönewolf-Greulich, Bitten; Ronan, Anne; Ravn, Kristine

    2011-01-01

    . In this report, we describe two new 17q23.2 deletion patients with mild intellectual disability and sensorineural hearing loss. They both had submicroscopic deletions smaller than the common deleted region for the 8 previously described 17q23.2 microdeletion cases. TBX4 was previously suggested...... as the responsible gene for the heart or limb defects observed in 17q23.2 deletion patients, but the present cases do not have these features despite deletion of this gene. The finding of sensorineural hearing loss in 5 of the 10 cases, including the present cases, with a microdeletion at17q23.2, strongly suggests...... the presence of a candidate gene for hearing loss within this region. We screened 41 patients with profound sensorineural hearing loss for mutations of TBX2 and detected no mutations....

  1. The Transcriptomes of Xiphinema index and Longidorus elongatus Suggest Independent Acquisition of Some Plant Parasitism Genes by Horizontal Gene Transfer in Early-Branching Nematodes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Danchin, Etienne G.J.; Perfus-Barbeoch, Laetitia; Rancurel, Corinne; Thorpe, Peter; Rocha, Da Martine; Bajew, Simon; Neilson, Roy; Sokolova, Elena; Silva, Da Corinne; Guy, Julie; Labadie, Karine; Esmenjaud, Daniel; Helder, Hans; Jones, John T.; Eves-van den Akker, Sebastian

    2017-01-01

    Nematodes have evolved the ability to parasitize plants on at least four independent occasions, with plant parasites present in Clades 1, 2, 10 and 12 of the phylum. In the case of Clades 10 and 12, horizontal gene transfer of plant cell wall degrading enzymes from bacteria and fungi has been

  2. The Transcriptomes of Xiphinema index and Longidorus elongatus Suggest Independent Acquisition of Some Plant Parasitism Genes by Horizontal Gene Transfer in Early-Branching Nematodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Etienne G.J. Danchin

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Nematodes have evolved the ability to parasitize plants on at least four independent occasions, with plant parasites present in Clades 1, 2, 10 and 12 of the phylum. In the case of Clades 10 and 12, horizontal gene transfer of plant cell wall degrading enzymes from bacteria and fungi has been implicated in the evolution of plant parasitism. We have used ribonucleic acid sequencing (RNAseq to generate reference transcriptomes for two economically important nematode species, Xiphinema index and Longidorus elongatus, representative of two genera within the early-branching Clade 2 of the phylum Nematoda. We used a transcriptome-wide analysis to identify putative horizontal gene transfer events. This represents the first in-depth transcriptome analysis from any plant-parasitic nematode of this clade. For each species, we assembled ~30 million Illumina reads into a reference transcriptome. We identified 62 and 104 transcripts, from X. index and L. elongatus, respectively, that were putatively acquired via horizontal gene transfer. By cross-referencing horizontal gene transfer prediction with a phylum-wide analysis of Pfam domains, we identified Clade 2-specific events. Of these, a GH12 cellulase from X. index was analysed phylogenetically and biochemically, revealing a likely bacterial origin and canonical enzymatic function. Horizontal gene transfer was previously shown to be a phenomenon that has contributed to the evolution of plant parasitism among nematodes. Our findings underline the importance and the extensiveness of this phenomenon in the evolution of plant-parasitic life styles in this speciose and widespread animal phylum.

  3. The Transcriptomes of Xiphinema index and Longidorus elongatus Suggest Independent Acquisition of Some Plant Parasitism Genes by Horizontal Gene Transfer in Early-Branching Nematodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danchin, Etienne G.J.; Perfus-Barbeoch, Laetitia; Rancurel, Corinne; Thorpe, Peter; Da Rocha, Martine; Bajew, Simon; Neilson, Roy; Sokolova (Guzeeva), Elena; Da Silva, Corinne; Guy, Julie; Labadie, Karine; Esmenjaud, Daniel; Helder, Johannes; Jones, John T.

    2017-01-01

    Nematodes have evolved the ability to parasitize plants on at least four independent occasions, with plant parasites present in Clades 1, 2, 10 and 12 of the phylum. In the case of Clades 10 and 12, horizontal gene transfer of plant cell wall degrading enzymes from bacteria and fungi has been implicated in the evolution of plant parasitism. We have used ribonucleic acid sequencing (RNAseq) to generate reference transcriptomes for two economically important nematode species, Xiphinema index and Longidorus elongatus, representative of two genera within the early-branching Clade 2 of the phylum Nematoda. We used a transcriptome-wide analysis to identify putative horizontal gene transfer events. This represents the first in-depth transcriptome analysis from any plant-parasitic nematode of this clade. For each species, we assembled ~30 million Illumina reads into a reference transcriptome. We identified 62 and 104 transcripts, from X. index and L. elongatus, respectively, that were putatively acquired via horizontal gene transfer. By cross-referencing horizontal gene transfer prediction with a phylum-wide analysis of Pfam domains, we identified Clade 2-specific events. Of these, a GH12 cellulase from X. index was analysed phylogenetically and biochemically, revealing a likely bacterial origin and canonical enzymatic function. Horizontal gene transfer was previously shown to be a phenomenon that has contributed to the evolution of plant parasitism among nematodes. Our findings underline the importance and the extensiveness of this phenomenon in the evolution of plant-parasitic life styles in this speciose and widespread animal phylum. PMID:29065523

  4. Heritability and demographic analyses in the large isolated population of Val Borbera suggest advantages in mapping complex traits genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michela Traglia

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Isolated populations are a useful resource for mapping complex traits due to shared stable environment, reduced genetic complexity and extended Linkage Disequilibrium (LD compared to the general population. Here we describe a large genetic isolate from the North West Apennines, the mountain range that runs through Italy from the North West Alps to the South.The study involved 1,803 people living in 7 villages of the upper Borbera Valley. For this large population cohort, data from genealogy reconstruction, medical questionnaires, blood, anthropometric and bone status QUS parameters were evaluated. Demographic and epidemiological analyses indicated a substantial genetic component contributing to each trait variation as well as overlapping genetic determinants and family clustering for some traits.The data provide evidence for significant heritability of medical relevant traits that will be important in mapping quantitative traits. We suggest that this population isolate is suitable to identify rare variants associated with complex phenotypes that may be difficult to study in larger but more heterogeneous populations.

  5. A non-sense mutation in the putative anti-mutator gene ada/alkA of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and M. bovis isolates suggests convergent evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gicquel Brigitte

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous studies have suggested that variations in DNA repair genes of W-Beijing strains may have led to transient mutator phenotypes which in turn may have contributed to host adaptation of this strain family. Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP in the DNA repair gene mutT1 was identified in MDR-prone strains from the Central African Republic. A Mycobacteriumtuberculosis H37Rv mutant inactivated in two DNA repair genes, namely ada/alkA and ogt, was shown to display a hypermutator phenotype. We then looked for polymorphisms in these genes in Central African Republic strains (CAR. Results In this study, 55 MDR and 194 non-MDR strains were analyzed. Variations in DNA repair genes ada/alkA and ogt were identified. Among them, by comparison to M. tuberculosis published sequences, we found a non-sense variation in ada/alkA gene which was also observed in M. bovis AF2122 strain. SNPs that are present in the adjacent regions to the amber variation are different in M. bovis and in M. tuberculosis strain. Conclusion An Amber codon was found in the ada/alkA locus of clustered M. tuberculosis isolates and in M. bovis strain AF2122. This is likely due to convergent evolution because SNP differences between strains are incompatible with horizontal transfer of an entire gene. This suggests that such a variation may confer a selective advantage and be implicated in hypermutator phenotype expression, which in turn contributes to adaptation to environmental changes.

  6. [Vasopressin V2 receptor-related pathologies: congenital nephrogenic diabetes insipidus and nephrogenic syndrome of inappropiate antidiuresis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morin, Denis

    2014-12-01

    Congenital nephrogenic diabetes insipidus is a rare hereditary disease with mainly an X-linked inheritance (90% of the cases) but there are also autosomal recessive and dominant forms. Congenital nephrogenic diabetes insipidus is characterized by a resistance of the renal collecting duct to the action of the arginine vasopressin hormone responsible for the inability of the kidney to concentrate urine. The X-linked form is due to inactivating mutations of the vasopressin 2 receptor gene leading to a loss of function of the mutated receptors. Affected males are often symptomatic in the neonatal period with a lack of weight gain, dehydration and hypernatremia but mild phenotypes may also occur. Females carrying the mutation may be asymptomatic but, sometimes, severe polyuria is found due to the random X chromosome inactivation. The autosomal recessive and dominant forms, occurring in both genders, are linked to mutations in the aquaporin-2 gene. The treatment remains difficult, especially in infants, and is based on a low osmotic diet with increased water intake and the use of thiazides and indomethacin. The main goal is to avoid hypernatremic episodes and maintain a good hydration state. Potentially, specific treatment, in some cases of X-linked congenital nephrogenic diabetes insipidus, with pharmacological chaperones such as non-peptide vasopressin-2 receptor antagonists will be available in the future. Conversely, the nephrogenic syndrome of inappropriate antidiuresis (NSIAD) is linked to a constitutive activation of the V(2)-receptor due to activating mutations with clinical and biological features of inappropriate antidiuresis but with low or undetectable plasma arginine vasopressin hormone levels. Copyright © 2014 Association Société de néphrologie. Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  7. A genomewide exploration suggests a new candidate gene at chromosome 11q23 as the major determinant of plasma homocysteine levels: results from the GAIT project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souto, Juan Carlos; Blanco-Vaca, Francisco; Soria, José Manuel; Buil, Alfonso; Almasy, Laura; Ordoñez-Llanos, Jordi; Martín-Campos, Jesús Ma; Lathrop, Mark; Stone, William; Blangero, John; Fontcuberta, Jordi

    2005-06-01

    Homocysteine (Hcy) plasma level is an independent risk marker for venous thrombosis, myocardial infarction, stroke, congestive heart failure, osteoporotic fractures, and Alzheimer disease. Hcy levels are determined by the interaction of genetic and environmental factors. The genetic basis is still poorly understood, since only the MTHFR 677 C-->T polymorphism has been consistently associated with plasma Hcy levels. We conducted a genomewide linkage scan for genes affecting variation in plasma Hcy levels in 398 subjects from 21 extended Spanish families. A variance-components linkage method was used to analyze the data. The strongest linkage signal (LOD score of 3.01; genomewide P = .035) was found on chromosome 11q23, near marker D11S908, where a candidate gene involved in the metabolism of Hcy (the nicotinamide N-methyltransferase gene [NNMT]) is mapped. Haplotype analyses of 10 single-nucleotide polymorphisms within this gene found one haplotype associated with plasma Hcy levels (P = .0003). Our results, to our knowledge, represent the first genomic scan for quantitative variation in Hcy plasma levels. They strongly suggest that the NNMT gene could be a major genetic determinant of plasma Hcy levels in Spanish families. Since this gene encodes an enzyme involved in Hcy synthesis, this finding would be consistent with known biochemical pathways. These data could be relevant in determining the relationships between Hcy level, cardiovascular disease, osteoporosis, and Alzheimer disease.

  8. Combination decongestion therapy in hospitalized heart failure: loop diuretics, mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists and vasopressin antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaduganathan, Muthiah; Mentz, Robert J; Greene, Stephen J; Senni, Michele; Sato, Naoki; Nodari, Savina; Butler, Javed; Gheorghiade, Mihai

    2015-01-01

    Congestion is the most common reason for admissions and readmissions for heart failure (HF). The vast majority of hospitalized HF patients appear to respond readily to loop diuretics, but available data suggest that a significant proportion are being discharged with persistent evidence of congestion. Although novel therapies targeting congestion should continue to be developed, currently available agents may be utilized more optimally to facilitate complete decongestion. The combination of loop diuretics, natriuretic doses of mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists and vasopressin antagonists represents a regimen of currently available therapies that affects early and persistent decongestion, while limiting the associated risks of electrolyte disturbances, hemodynamic fluctuations, renal dysfunction and mortality.

  9. Electrophysiological identification of the functional presynaptic nerve terminals on an isolated single vasopressin neurone of the rat supraoptic nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohbuchi, T; Yokoyama, T; Fujihara, H; Suzuki, H; Ueta, Y

    2010-05-01

    Release of arginine vasopressin (AVP) and oxytocin from magnocellular neurosecretory cells (MNCs) of the supraoptic nucleus (SON) is under the control of glutamate-dependent excitation and GABA-dependent inhibition. The possible role of the synaptic terminals attached to SON neurones has been investigated using whole-cell patch-clamp recording in in vitro rat brain slice preparations. Recent evidence has provided new insights into the repercussions of glial environment modifications on the physiology of MNCs at the synaptic level in the SON. In the present study, excitatory glutamatergic and inhibitory GABAergic synaptic inputs were recorded from an isolated single SON neurone cultured for 12 h, using the whole-cell patch clamp technique. Neurones expressed an AVP-enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) fusion gene in MNCs. In addition, native synaptic terminals attached to a dissociated AVP-eGFP neurone were visualised with synaptic vesicle markers. These results suggest that the function of presynaptic nerve terminals may be evaluated directly in a single AVP-eGFP neurone. These preparations would be helpful in future studies aiming to electrophysiologically distinguish between the functions of synaptic terminals and glial modifications in the SON neurones.

  10. Gene expression analysis of parthenogenetic embryonic development of the pea aphid, Acyrthosiphon pisum, suggests that aphid parthenogenesis evolved from meiotic oogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan, Dayalan G; Abdelhady, Ahmed; Stern, David L

    2014-01-01

    Aphids exhibit a form of phenotypic plasticity, called polyphenism, in which genetically identical females reproduce sexually during one part of the life cycle and asexually (via parthenogenesis) during the remainder of the life cycle. The molecular basis for aphid parthenogenesis is unknown. Cytological observations of aphid parthenogenesis suggest that asexual oogenesis evolved either through a modification of meiosis or from a mitotic process. As a test of these alternatives, we assessed the expression levels and expression patterns of canonical meiotic recombination and germline genes in the sexual and asexual ovaries of the pea aphid, Acyrthosiphon pisum. We observed expression of all meiosis genes in similar patterns in asexual and sexual ovaries, with the exception that some genes encoding Argonaute-family members were not expressed in sexual ovaries. In addition, we observed that asexual aphid tissues accumulated unspliced transcripts of Spo11, whereas sexual aphid tissues accumulated primarily spliced transcripts. In situ hybridization revealed Spo11 transcript in sexual germ cells and undetectable levels of Spo11 transcript in asexual germ cells. We also found that an obligately asexual strain of pea aphid produced little spliced Spo11 transcript. Together, these results suggest that parthenogenetic oogenesis evolved from a meiosis-like, and not a mitosis-like, process and that the aphid reproductive polyphenism may involve a modification of Spo11 gene activity.

  11. Gene expression in bryozoan larvae suggest a fundamental importance of pre-patterned blastemic cells in the bryozoan life-cycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fuchs Judith

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bryozoa is a clade of aquatic protostomes. The bryozoan life cycle typically comprises a larval stage, which metamorphoses into a sessile adult that proliferates by asexual budding to form colonies. The homology of bryozoan larvae with other protostome larvae is enigmatic. Bryozoan larvae exhibit blastemic tissues that contribute to build the adult during morphogenesis. However, it remains unclear if the cells of these tissues are pre-determined according to their future fate or if the cells are undifferentiated, pluripotent stem cells. Gene expression studies can help to identify molecular patterning of larval and adult tissues and enlighten the evolution of bryozoan life cycle stages. Results We investigated the spatial expression of 13 developmental genes in the larval stage of the gymnolaemate bryozoan Bugula neritina. We found most genes expressed in discrete regions in larval blastemic tissues that form definitive components of the adult body plan. Only two of the 13 genes, BnTropomyosin and BnFoxAB, were exclusively expressed in larval tissues that are discarded during metamorphosis. Conclusions Our results suggest that the larval blastemas in Bugula are pre-patterned according to their future fate in the adult. The gene expression patterns indicate that some of the bryozoan blastemas can be interpreted to correspond to homologous adult tissues of other animals. This study challenges an earlier proposed view that metazoan larvae share homologous undifferentiated "set-aside cells", and instead points to an independent origin of the bryozoan larval stage with respect to other lophotrochozoans.

  12. Isolation and functional analysis of CONSTANS-LIKE genes suggests that a central role for CONSTANS in flowering time control is not evolutionarily conserved in Medicago truncatula

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albert eWong

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The zinc finger transcription factor CONSTANS has a well-established central role in the mechanism for photoperiod sensing in Arabidopsis, integrating light and circadian clock signals to upregulate the florigen gene FT under long-day but not short-day conditions. Although CONSTANS-like (COL genes in other species have also been shown to regulate flowering time, it is not clear how widely this central role in photoperiod sensing is conserved.Legumes are a major plant group and various legume species show significant natural variation for photoperiod responsive flowering. Orthologs of several Arabidopsis genes have been shown to participate in photoperiodic flowering in legumes, but the possible function of COL genes as integrators of the photoperiod response has not yet been examined in detail. Here we characterize the COL family in the temperate long-day legume Medicago truncatula, using expression analyses, reverse genetics, transient activation assays and Arabidopsis transformation. Our results provide several lines of evidence suggesting that COL genes are unlikely to have a central role in the photoperiod response mechanism in this species.

  13. Gene transcript accumulation and enzyme activity of β-amylases suggest involvement in the starch depletion during the ripening of cherry tomatoes

    OpenAIRE

    Maria, Thanou; Tsaniklidis, Georgios; Delis, Costas; Nikolopoulou, Aimilia-Eleni; Nikoloudakis, Nikolaos; Karapanos, Ioannis; Aivalakis, Georgios

    2016-01-01

    The flavor of tomato fruits is mostly influenced by the accumulation of sugars and organic acids. During fruit ripening a conversion of starch to sugars occurs, which modulates significantly the taste and consequently the quality of the ripe tomato fruits. β-Amylases, a group of major starch hydrolytic enzymes involved in starch degradation were examined in developing cherry tomatoes. Our results suggest that the enzyme activity and the gene transcript accumulation of plastidial β-amylase iso...

  14. Serotonergic involvement in stress-induced vasopressin and oxytocin secretion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Henrik; Knigge, Ulrich; Kjaer, Andreas

    2002-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the involvement of serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine - 5-HT) receptors in mediation of stress-induced arginine vasopressin (AVP) and oxytocin (OT) secretion in male rats. DESIGN: Experiments on laboratory rats with control groups. METHODS: Different stress paradigms were...

  15. Vasopressin – Emerging Importance in Sepsis | Skowno | Southern ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Southern African Journal of Anaesthesia and Analgesia. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 9, No 1 (2003) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register. Vasopressin – Emerging ...

  16. Serotonergic involvement in stress-induced vasopressin and oxytocin secretion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Henrik; Knigge, Ulrich; Kjaer, Andreas

    2002-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the involvement of serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine - 5-HT) receptors in mediation of stress-induced arginine vasopressin (AVP) and oxytocin (OT) secretion in male rats. DESIGN: Experiments on laboratory rats with control groups. METHODS: Different stress paradigms were ap...

  17. Hyponatraemia in imported malaria: The pathophysiological role of vasopressin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.J. Hoorn (Ewout); M.E. van Wolfswinkel (Marlies); D.A. Hesselink (Dennis); Y.B. de Rijke (Yolanda); R. Koelewijn (Rob); J.J. van Hellemond (Jaap); P.J.J. van Genderen (Perry)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractBackground. In the pathophysiology of hyponatraemia in malaria, the relative contribution of appropriate and inappropriate arginine vasopressin (AVP) release is unknown; the trigger for inappropriate AVP release is also unknown. Methods. Serum copeptin, a stable and sensitive marker for

  18. Experimental cardiac arrest treatment with adrenaline, vasopressin, or placebo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palácio, Manoel Ângelo Gomes; Paiva, Edison Ferreira de; Azevedo, Luciano Cesar Pontes de; Timerman, Ari

    2013-12-01

    The effect of vasoconstrictors in prolonged cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) has not been fully clarified. To evaluate adrenaline and vasopressin pressure effect, and observe the return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC). A prospective, randomized, blinded, and placebo-controlled study. After seven minutes of untreated ventricular fibrillation, pigs received two minutes cycles of CPR. Defibrillation was attempted (4 J/kg) once at 9 minutes, and after every cycle if a shockable rhythm was present, after what CPR was immediately resumed. At 9 minutes and every five minutes intervals, 0.02 mg/kg (n = 12 pigs) adrenaline, or 0.4 U/kg (n = 12) vasopressin, or 0.2 mL/kg (n = 8) 0.9% saline solution was administered. CPR continued for 30 minutes or until the ROSC. Coronary perfusion pressure increased to about 20 mmHg in the three groups. Following vasoconstrictors doses, pressure level reached 35 mmHg versus 15 mmHg with placebo (p adrenaline or placebo. ROSC rate differed (p = 0.031) among adrenaline (10/12), vasopressin (6/12), and placebo (2/8). Time-to-ROSC did not differ (16 minutes), nor the number of doses previously received (one or two). There was no difference between vasoconstrictors, but against placebo, only adrenaline significantly increased the ROSC rate (p = 0.019). The vasoconstrictors initial pressure effect was equivalent and vasopressin maintained a late effect at prolonged resuscitation. Nevertheless, when compared with placebo, only adrenaline significantly increased the ROSC rate.

  19. Testosterone supplementation restores vasopressin innervation in the senescent rat brain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goudsmit, E.; Fliers, E.; Swaab, D. F.

    1988-01-01

    The vasopressin (AVP) innervation in the male rat brain is decreased in senescence. This decrease is particularly pronounced in brain regions where AVP fiber density is dependent on plasma levels of sex steroids. Since plasma testosterone levels decrease progressively with age in the rat, the

  20. Mitochondrial and nuclear genes suggest that stony corals are monophyletic but most families of stony corals are not (Order Scleractinia, Class Anthozoa, Phylum Cnidaria).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukami, Hironobu; Chen, Chaolun Allen; Budd, Ann F; Collins, Allen; Wallace, Carden; Chuang, Yao-Yang; Chen, Chienhsun; Dai, Chang-Feng; Iwao, Kenji; Sheppard, Charles; Knowlton, Nancy

    2008-09-16

    Modern hard corals (Class Hexacorallia; Order Scleractinia) are widely studied because of their fundamental role in reef building and their superb fossil record extending back to the Triassic. Nevertheless, interpretations of their evolutionary relationships have been in flux for over a decade. Recent analyses undermine the legitimacy of traditional suborders, families and genera, and suggest that a non-skeletal sister clade (Order Corallimorpharia) might be imbedded within the stony corals. However, these studies either sampled a relatively limited array of taxa or assembled trees from heterogeneous data sets. Here we provide a more comprehensive analysis of Scleractinia (127 species, 75 genera, 17 families) and various outgroups, based on two mitochondrial genes (cytochrome oxidase I, cytochrome b), with analyses of nuclear genes (ss-tubulin, ribosomal DNA) of a subset of taxa to test unexpected relationships. Eleven of 16 families were found to be polyphyletic. Strikingly, over one third of all families as conventionally defined contain representatives from the highly divergent "robust" and "complex" clades. However, the recent suggestion that corallimorpharians are true corals that have lost their skeletons was not upheld. Relationships were supported not only by mitochondrial and nuclear genes, but also often by morphological characters which had been ignored or never noted previously. The concordance of molecular characters and more carefully examined morphological characters suggests a future of greater taxonomic stability, as well as the potential to trace the evolutionary history of this ecologically important group using fossils.

  1. Mitochondrial and nuclear genes suggest that stony corals are monophyletic but most families of stony corals are not (Order Scleractinia, Class Anthozoa, Phylum Cnidaria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hironobu Fukami

    Full Text Available Modern hard corals (Class Hexacorallia; Order Scleractinia are widely studied because of their fundamental role in reef building and their superb fossil record extending back to the Triassic. Nevertheless, interpretations of their evolutionary relationships have been in flux for over a decade. Recent analyses undermine the legitimacy of traditional suborders, families and genera, and suggest that a non-skeletal sister clade (Order Corallimorpharia might be imbedded within the stony corals. However, these studies either sampled a relatively limited array of taxa or assembled trees from heterogeneous data sets. Here we provide a more comprehensive analysis of Scleractinia (127 species, 75 genera, 17 families and various outgroups, based on two mitochondrial genes (cytochrome oxidase I, cytochrome b, with analyses of nuclear genes (ss-tubulin, ribosomal DNA of a subset of taxa to test unexpected relationships. Eleven of 16 families were found to be polyphyletic. Strikingly, over one third of all families as conventionally defined contain representatives from the highly divergent "robust" and "complex" clades. However, the recent suggestion that corallimorpharians are true corals that have lost their skeletons was not upheld. Relationships were supported not only by mitochondrial and nuclear genes, but also often by morphological characters which had been ignored or never noted previously. The concordance of molecular characters and more carefully examined morphological characters suggests a future of greater taxonomic stability, as well as the potential to trace the evolutionary history of this ecologically important group using fossils.

  2. [The role of oxytocin and vasopressin in central nervous system activity and mental disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wójciak, Paweł; Remlinger-Molenda, Agnieszka; Rybakowski, Janusz

    2012-01-01

    Oxytocin and vasopressin, "peptides of love and fear", except for their classic role in control of labor and breastfeeding and blood pressure regulation, are also implicated in various processes like sexual behaviours, social recognition and stress response. These hormones seems to be essential for appropriate and beneficial social interactions, play a very important role in maternal care and closeness, promote general trust and cooperation and prolong social memory. They also play a very important role in modulating fear and anxiety response, especially by regulating the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis and amygdala activity by its projections to the brain stem and hypothalamic structures. Both hormones, particularly oxytocin, appears to be activating sexual behaviour or is responsible for increased sexual arousal. Evidence from clinical trials suggests their potential role in pathogenesis of schizophrenia, depression, autism and addiction together with possible therapeutic use in the above conditions. In schizophrenia, patients with higher peripheral oxytocin levels showed less severe positive, general and social symptoms and better prosocial behaviours. Literature suggests that exogenous oxytocin may be effective as an adjunctive therapy for that illness. Some data suggest that naturally occurring autoantibodies reacting with oxytocin and vasopressin are involved in depression, eating disorders and conduct disorder genesis.

  3. The vasopressin V1b receptor modulates plasma corticosterone responses to dehydration-induced stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, E M; Pope, G R; Newson, M J F; Lolait, S J; O'Carroll, A-M

    2011-01-01

    Vasopressin V1b receptor knockout (V1b⁻/⁻) mice were used to investigate a putative role for the V1b receptor (V1bR) in fluid regulation and in the hypothalamic-neurohypophysial system (HNS) and hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis responses to osmotic stress induced by water deprivation (WD). Male wild-type and V1b⁻/⁻ mice were housed in metabolic cages to allow determination of water intake and urine volume and osmolality. When provided with food and water ad lib., spontaneous urine volume and urine osmolality did not differ between genotypes. Similarly, WD for 24 h caused comparable decreases in urine volume and increases in urine osmolality irrespective of genotype. WD resulted in an increase in plasma corticosterone concentration in wild-type animals; however, this WD-induced increase in plasma corticosterone was significantly attenuated in V1b⁻/⁻ mice. Comparable increases in neuronal activation, indicated by increased c-fos mRNA expression, and in vasopressin mRNA expression occurred in both the supraoptic nucleus and paraventricular nucleus (PVN) of wild-type and V1b⁻/⁻ mice following WD; however, the WD-induced decrease in corticotrophin-releasing hormone mRNA expression seen in the PVN of wild-type mice was not observed in the PVN of V1b⁻/⁻ mice. These data suggest that, although the vasopressin V1bR is not required for normal HNS function, it is necessary for a full HPA-axis response to the osmotic stress of WD. © 2010 The Authors. Journal of Neuroendocrinology © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  4. Expression of aquaporins and vasopressin type 2 receptor in the stria vascularis of the cochlea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishioka, R; Takeda, T; Kakigi, A; Okada, T; Takebayashi, S; Taguchi, D; Nishimura, M; Hyodo, M

    2010-02-01

    Recently, considerable evidence has been accumulated to support the novel view that water homeostasis in the inner ear is regulated via the vasopressin-aquaporin 2 (VP-AQP2) system in the same fashion as in the kidney. Indeed, multiple subtypes of AQPs including AQP-2 are reported to be expressed in the cochlea. However, the mechanism that underlies VP-AQP-2 mediated water homeostasis remains to be elucidated. In the present study, the localizations of AQP-1, -2, -3, -4, -5, -7, -8, -9, and vasopressin type 2 receptor (V2-R) in the stria vascularis (SV) were molecular biologically and immunohistochemically examined to evaluate the role of the AQP water channel system in water homeostasis of the SV. A RT-PCR study revealed that AQPs and V2-R mRNA are expressed in the cochlea. As for their immunohistochemical localization, the AQP-2 protein is expressed on the basal side of the basal cells of the SV, and proteins of AQP-3 and V2-R are expressed on the apical side of the basal cells. AQP-7 and -9 proteins are expressed on the apical side of marginal cells. AQP-4, -5, and -8 protein expressions could not be detected in the lateral wall of the cochlea. From the present results, water flux in the SV is thought to be regulated at the level of the basal cells by vasopressin. Furthermore, such a distribution of AQP-2, -3, and V2-R suggests that VP-AQP-2 mediated water transport might work actively in the basal cells from perilymph towards endolymph containing AQP-1, -7 and -9. Copyright 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Endogenous Oxytocin, Vasopressin, and Aggression in Domestic Dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacLean, Evan L; Gesquiere, Laurence R; Gruen, Margaret E; Sherman, Barbara L; Martin, W Lance; Carter, C Sue

    2017-01-01

    Aggressive behavior in dogs poses public health and animal welfare concerns, however the biological mechanisms regulating dog aggression are not well understood. We investigated the relationships between endogenous plasma oxytocin (OT) and vasopressin (AVP)-neuropeptides that have been linked to affiliative and aggressive behavior in other mammalian species-and aggression in domestic dogs. We first validated enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) for the measurement of free (unbound) and total (free + bound) OT and AVP in dog plasma. In Experiment 1 we evaluated behavioral and neuroendocrine differences between a population of pet dogs with a history of chronic aggression toward conspecifics and a matched control group. Dogs with a history of aggression exhibited more aggressive behavior during simulated encounters with conspecifics, and had lower free, but higher total plasma AVP than matched controls, but there were no group differences for OT. In Experiment 2 we compared OT and AVP concentrations between pet dogs and a population of assistance dogs that have been bred for affiliative and non-aggressive temperaments, and investigated neuroendocrine predictors of individual differences in social behavior within the assistance dog population. Compared to pet dogs, assistance dogs had higher free and total OT, but there were no differences in either measure for AVP. Within the assistance dog population, dogs who behaved more aggressively toward a threatening stranger had higher total AVP than dogs who did not. Collectively these data suggest that endogenous OT and AVP may play critical roles in shaping dog social behavior, including aspects of both affiliation and aggression.

  6. Endogenous Oxytocin, Vasopressin, and Aggression in Domestic Dogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evan L. MacLean

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Aggressive behavior in dogs poses public health and animal welfare concerns, however the biological mechanisms regulating dog aggression are not well understood. We investigated the relationships between endogenous plasma oxytocin (OT and vasopressin (AVP—neuropeptides that have been linked to affiliative and aggressive behavior in other mammalian species—and aggression in domestic dogs. We first validated enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs for the measurement of free (unbound and total (free + bound OT and AVP in dog plasma. In Experiment 1 we evaluated behavioral and neuroendocrine differences between a population of pet dogs with a history of chronic aggression toward conspecifics and a matched control group. Dogs with a history of aggression exhibited more aggressive behavior during simulated encounters with conspecifics, and had lower free, but higher total plasma AVP than matched controls, but there were no group differences for OT. In Experiment 2 we compared OT and AVP concentrations between pet dogs and a population of assistance dogs that have been bred for affiliative and non-aggressive temperaments, and investigated neuroendocrine predictors of individual differences in social behavior within the assistance dog population. Compared to pet dogs, assistance dogs had higher free and total OT, but there were no differences in either measure for AVP. Within the assistance dog population, dogs who behaved more aggressively toward a threatening stranger had higher total AVP than dogs who did not. Collectively these data suggest that endogenous OT and AVP may play critical roles in shaping dog social behavior, including aspects of both affiliation and aggression.

  7. Age-dependent brain gene expression and copy number anomalies in autism suggest distinct pathological processes at young versus mature ages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maggie L Chow

    Full Text Available Autism is a highly heritable neurodevelopmental disorder, yet the genetic underpinnings of the disorder are largely unknown. Aberrant brain overgrowth is a well-replicated observation in the autism literature; but association, linkage, and expression studies have not identified genetic factors that explain this trajectory. Few studies have had sufficient statistical power to investigate whole-genome gene expression and genotypic variation in the autistic brain, especially in regions that display the greatest growth abnormality. Previous functional genomic studies have identified possible alterations in transcript levels of genes related to neurodevelopment and immune function. Thus, there is a need for genetic studies involving key brain regions to replicate these findings and solidify the role of particular functional pathways in autism pathogenesis. We therefore sought to identify abnormal brain gene expression patterns via whole-genome analysis of mRNA levels and copy number variations (CNVs in autistic and control postmortem brain samples. We focused on prefrontal cortex tissue where excess neuron numbers and cortical overgrowth are pronounced in the majority of autism cases. We found evidence for dysregulation in pathways governing cell number, cortical patterning, and differentiation in young autistic prefrontal cortex. In contrast, adult autistic prefrontal cortex showed dysregulation of signaling and repair pathways. Genes regulating cell cycle also exhibited autism-specific CNVs in DNA derived from prefrontal cortex, and these genes were significantly associated with autism in genome-wide association study datasets. Our results suggest that CNVs and age-dependent gene expression changes in autism may reflect distinct pathological processes in the developing versus the mature autistic prefrontal cortex. Our results raise the hypothesis that genetic dysregulation in the developing brain leads to abnormal regional patterning, excess

  8. Age-dependent brain gene expression and copy number anomalies in autism suggest distinct pathological processes at young versus mature ages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, Maggie L; Pramparo, Tiziano; Winn, Mary E; Barnes, Cynthia Carter; Li, Hai-Ri; Weiss, Lauren; Fan, Jian-Bing; Murray, Sarah; April, Craig; Belinson, Haim; Fu, Xiang-Dong; Wynshaw-Boris, Anthony; Schork, Nicholas J; Courchesne, Eric

    2012-01-01

    Autism is a highly heritable neurodevelopmental disorder, yet the genetic underpinnings of the disorder are largely unknown. Aberrant brain overgrowth is a well-replicated observation in the autism literature; but association, linkage, and expression studies have not identified genetic factors that explain this trajectory. Few studies have had sufficient statistical power to investigate whole-genome gene expression and genotypic variation in the autistic brain, especially in regions that display the greatest growth abnormality. Previous functional genomic studies have identified possible alterations in transcript levels of genes related to neurodevelopment and immune function. Thus, there is a need for genetic studies involving key brain regions to replicate these findings and solidify the role of particular functional pathways in autism pathogenesis. We therefore sought to identify abnormal brain gene expression patterns via whole-genome analysis of mRNA levels and copy number variations (CNVs) in autistic and control postmortem brain samples. We focused on prefrontal cortex tissue where excess neuron numbers and cortical overgrowth are pronounced in the majority of autism cases. We found evidence for dysregulation in pathways governing cell number, cortical patterning, and differentiation in young autistic prefrontal cortex. In contrast, adult autistic prefrontal cortex showed dysregulation of signaling and repair pathways. Genes regulating cell cycle also exhibited autism-specific CNVs in DNA derived from prefrontal cortex, and these genes were significantly associated with autism in genome-wide association study datasets. Our results suggest that CNVs and age-dependent gene expression changes in autism may reflect distinct pathological processes in the developing versus the mature autistic prefrontal cortex. Our results raise the hypothesis that genetic dysregulation in the developing brain leads to abnormal regional patterning, excess prefrontal neurons

  9. Conditional testing of multiple variants associated with bone mineral density in the FLNB gene region suggests that they represent a single association signal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullin, Benjamin H; Mamotte, Cyril; Prince, Richard L; Spector, Tim D; Dudbridge, Frank; Wilson, Scott G

    2013-10-31

    Low bone mineral density (BMD) is a primary risk factor for osteoporosis and is a highly heritable trait, but appears to be influenced by many genes. Genome-wide linkage studies have highlighted the chromosomal region 3p14-p22 as a quantitative trait locus for BMD (LOD 1.1 - 3.5). The FLNB gene, which is thought to have a role in cytoskeletal actin dynamics, is located within this chromosomal region and presents as a strong candidate for BMD regulation. We have previously identified significant associations between four SNPs in the FLNB gene and BMD in women. We have also previously identified associations between five SNPs located 5' of the transcription start site (TSS) and in intron 1 of the FLNB gene and expression of FLNB mRNA in osteoblasts in vitro. The latter five SNPs were genotyped in this study to test for association with BMD parameters in a family-based population of 769 Caucasian women. Using FBAT, significant associations were seen for femoral neck BMD Z-score with the SNPs rs11720285, rs11130605 and rs9809315 (P = 0.004 - 0.043). These three SNPs were also found to be significantly associated with total hip BMD Z-score (P = 0.014 - 0.026). We then combined the genotype data for these three SNPs with the four SNPs we previously identified as associated with BMD and performed a conditional analysis to determine whether they represent multiple independent associations with BMD. The results from this analysis suggested that these variants represent a single association signal. The SNPs identified in our studies as associated with BMD appear to be part of a single association signal between the FLNB gene and BMD in our data. FLNB is one of several genes located in 3p14-p22 that has been identified as significantly associated with BMD in Caucasian women.

  10. Experimental Cardiac Arrest Treatment with Adrenaline, Vasopressin, or Placebo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palácio, Manoel Ângelo Gomes; de Paiva, Edison Ferreira; de Azevedo, Luciano Cesar Pontes; Timerman, Ari

    2013-01-01

    Background The effect of vasoconstrictors in prolonged cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) has not been fully clarified. Objectives To evaluate adrenaline and vasopressin pressure effect, and observe the return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC). Methods A prospective, randomized, blinded, and placebo-controlled study. After seven minutes of untreated ventricular fibrillation, pigs received two minutes cycles of CPR. Defibrillation was attempted (4 J/kg) once at 9 minutes, and after every cycle if a shockable rhythm was present, after what CPR was immediately resumed. At 9 minutes and every five minutes intervals, 0.02 mg/kg (n = 12 pigs) adrenaline, or 0.4 U/kg (n = 12) vasopressin, or 0.2 mL/kg (n = 8) 0.9% saline solution was administered. CPR continued for 30 minutes or until the ROSC. Results Coronary perfusion pressure increased to about 20 mmHg in the three groups. Following vasoconstrictors doses, pressure level reached 35 mmHg versus 15 mmHg with placebo (p < 0.001). Vasopressin effect remained at 15-20 mmHg after three doses versus zero with adrenaline or placebo. ROSC rate differed (p = 0.031) among adrenaline (10/12), vasopressin (6/12), and placebo (2/8). Time-to-ROSC did not differ (16 minutes), nor the number of doses previously received (one or two). There was no difference between vasoconstrictors, but against placebo, only adrenaline significantly increased the ROSC rate (p = 0.019). Conclusion The vasoconstrictors initial pressure effect was equivalent and vasopressin maintained a late effect at prolonged resuscitation. Nevertheless, when compared with placebo, only adrenaline significantly increased the ROSC rate. PMID:24173134

  11. Changes in vasopressin-converting aminopeptidase activity in the rat pineal gland during summer : Relationship to vasopressin contents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, B.; Burbach, J.P.H.

    Vasopressin (VP)-converting aminopeptidase (VP-AP) activity and VP contents were measured in single rat pineal glands during the summer of two successive years. The peptidase activity decreased significantly in August. The lowest activity (±SEM) of 0.18±0.02 pmol·hour−1 was recorded on August 14,

  12. Changes in vasopressin-converting aminopeptidase activity in the rat pineal gland during summer : Relationship to vasopressin contents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, B.; Burbach, J.P.H.

    1988-01-01

    Vasopressin (VP)-converting aminopeptidase (VP-AP) activity and VP contents were measured in single rat pineal glands during the summer of two successive years. The peptidase activity decreased significantly in August. The lowest activity (±SEM) of 0.18±0.02 pmol·hour−1 was recorded on August 14,

  13. The high frequency of GJB2 gene mutation c.313_326del14 suggests its possible origin in ancestors of Lithuanian population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikstiene, Violeta; Jakaitiene, Audrone; Byckova, Jekaterina; Gradauskiene, Egle; Preiksaitiene, Egle; Burnyte, Birute; Tumiene, Birute; Matuleviciene, Ausra; Ambrozaityte, Laima; Uktveryte, Ingrida; Domarkiene, Ingrida; Rancelis, Tautvydas; Cimbalistiene, Loreta; Lesinskas, Eugenijus; Kucinskas, Vaidutis; Utkus, Algirdas

    2016-02-19

    HL. The allele frequency of c.35delG mutation (64.7 %) is consistent with many previously published studies in groups of affected individuals of Caucasian populations. The high frequency of the c.313_326del14 (28.3 % of pathogenic alleles) mutation in affected group of participants was an unexpected finding in our study suggesting not only a high frequency of carriers of this mutation in our population but also its possible origin in Lithuanian ancestors. The high frequency of carriers of the c.313_326del14 mutation in the entire Lithuanian population is supported by it being identified twice in the ethnic Lithuanian group of healthy participants (a frequency 2.0 % of carriers in the study group). Analysis of the allele frequency of GJB2 gene mutations revealed a high proportion of c. 313_326del14 (rs111033253) mutations in the GJB2-positive group suggesting its possible origin in Lithuanian forebears. The high frequency of carriers of GJB2 gene mutations in the group of healthy participants corresponds to the substantial frequency of GJB2-associated HL in Lithuania. The observations of the study indicate the significant contribution of GJB2 gene mutations to the pathogenesis of the disorder in the Lithuanian population and will contribute to introducing principles to predict the characteristics of the disease in patients.

  14. Analysis of genome-wide RNA-sequencing data suggests age of the CEPH/Utah (CEU) lymphoblastoid cell lines systematically biases gene expression profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Yuan; Tian, Lei; Lu, Dongsheng; Xu, Shuhua

    2015-01-22

    In human, Lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) from the CEPH/CEU (Centre d'Etude du Polymorphisme Humain - Utah) family resource have been extensively used for examining the genetics of gene expression levels. However, we noted that CEU/CEPH cell lines were collected and transformed approximately thirty years ago, much earlier than the other cell lines from the pertaining individuals, which we suspected could potentially affect gene expression, data analysis and results interpretation. In this study, by analyzing RNA sequencing data of CEU and the other three European populations as well as an African population, we systematically examined and evaluated the potential confounding effect of LCL age on gene expression levels and patterns. Our results indicated that gene expression profiles of CEU samples have been biased by the older age of CEU cell lines. Interestingly, most of CEU-specific expressions are associated with functions related to cell proliferation, which are more likely due to older age of cell lines than intrinsic characters of the population. We suggested the results be carefully explained when CEU LCLs are used for transcriptomic data analysis in future studies.

  15. Diversity of Phototrophic Genes Suggests Multiple Bacteria May Be Able to Exploit Sunlight in Exposed Soils from the Sør Rondane Mountains, East Antarctica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillaume Tahon

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Microbial life in exposed terrestrial surface layers in continental Antarctica is faced with extreme environmental conditions, including scarcity of organic matter. Bacteria in these exposed settings can therefore be expected to use alternative energy sources such as solar energy, abundant during the austral summer. Using Illumina MiSeq sequencing, we assessed the diversity and abundance of four conserved protein encoding genes involved in different key steps of light-harvesting pathways dependent on (bacteriochlorophyll (pufM, bchL/chlL and bchX genes and rhodopsins (actinorhodopsin genes, in exposed soils from the Sør Rondane Mountains, East Antarctica. Analysis of pufM genes, encoding a subunit of the type 2 photochemical reaction center found in anoxygenic phototrophic bacteria, revealed a very broad diversity, dominated by Roseobacter- and Loktanella-like sequences. The bchL and chlL, involved in (bacteriochlorophyll synthesis, on the other hand, showed a high abundance of either cyanobacterial or green algal trebouxiophyceael chlL reads, depending on the sample, while most bchX sequences belonged mostly to previously unidentified phylotypes. Rhodopsin-containing phototrophic bacteria could not be detected in the samples. Our results, while suggesting that Cyanobacteria and green algae are the main phototrophic groups, show that light-harvesting bacteria are nevertheless very diverse in microbial communities in Antarctic soils.

  16. Comparative mapping on the mouse and human X chromosomes of a human cDNA clone encoding the vasopressin renal-type receptor (AVP2R)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faust, C.J.; Gonzales, J.C.; Seibold, A.; Birnbaumer, M.; Herman, G.E. (Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX (United States))

    1993-02-01

    Mutation in the gene for the human renal-type vasopressin receptor (V2R) have recently been identified in patients with nephrogenic diabetes insipidus (NDI). Both V2R and NDI have been independently mapped to Xq28. Using a combination of genetic and physical mapping, we have localized the murine V2r locus to within 100 kb of L1Cam on the mouse X chromosome in a region syntenic with human Xq28. Based on conserved gene order of mouse and human loci in this region, physical mapping using DNA derived form human lymphoblasts has established that the corresponding human loci V2R and L1CAM are linked within 210 kb. The efficiency and precision of genetic mapping of V2r and other loci in the mouse suggest that it might be easier to map additional human genes in the mouse first and infer the corresponding human location. More precise physical mapping in man could then be performed using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and/or yeast artificial chromosomes. 16 refs., 1 fig. 1 tab.

  17. Vasopressin in Hemorrhagic Shock: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Randomized Animal Trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Pasquale Cossu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The latest European guidelines for the management of hemorrhagic shock suggest the use of vasopressors (norepinephrine in order to restore an adequate mean arterial pressure when fluid resuscitation therapy fails to restore blood pressure. The administration of arginine vasopressin (AVP, or its analogue terlipressin, has been proposed as an alternative treatment in the early stages of hypovolemic shock. Design. A meta-analysis of randomized controlled animal trials. Participants. A total of 433 animals from 15 studies were included. Interventions. The ability of AVP and terlipressin to reduce mortality when compared with fluid resuscitation therapy, other vasopressors (norepinephrine or epinephrine, or placebo was investigated. Measurements and Main Results. Pooled estimates showed that AVP and terlipressin consistently and significantly improve survival in hemorrhagic shock (mortality: 26/174 (15% in the AVP group versus 164/259 (63% in the control arms; OR=0.09; 95% CI 0.05 to 0.15; P for effect < 0.001; P for heterogeneity = 0.30; I2=14%. Conclusions. Results suggest that AVP and terlipressin improve survival in the early phases of animal models of hemorrhagic shock. Vasopressin seems to be more effective than all other treatments, including other vasopressor drugs. These results need to be confirmed by human clinical trials.

  18. Molecular analysis of endo-β-mannanase genes upon seed imbibition suggest a cross-talk between radicle and micropylar endosperm during germination of Arabidopsis thaliana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iglesias-Fernández, Raquel; del Carmen Rodríguez-Gacio, María; Barrero-Sicilia, Cristina; Carbonero, Pilar

    2011-01-01

    The endo-β-mannanase (MAN) family is represented in the Arabidopsis genome by eight members, all with canonical signal peptides and only half of them being expressed in germinating seeds. The transcripts of these genes were localized in the radicle and micropylar endosperm (ME) before radicle protrusion and this expression disappears as soon as the endosperm is broken by the emerging radicle tip. However, only three of these MAN genes, AtMAN5, AtMAN7 and especially AtMAN6 influence the germination time (t50) as assessed by the analysis of the corresponding knock-out lines. The data suggest a possible interaction between embryo and ME regarding the role of MAN during the Arabidopsis germination process. PMID:21301215

  19. Phylogenetically diverse ureC genes and their expression suggest the urea utilization by bacterial symbionts in marine sponge Xestospongia testudinaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Jing; Jin, Liling; Jiang, Qun; Sun, Wei; Zhang, Fengli; Li, Zhiyong

    2013-01-01

    Urea is one of the dominant organic nitrogenous compounds in the oligotrophic oceans. Compared to the knowledge of nitrogen transformation of nitrogen fixation, ammonia oxidization, nitrate and nitrite reduction mediated by sponge-associated microbes, our knowledge of urea utilization in sponges and the phylogenetic diversity of sponge-associated microbes with urea utilization potential is very limited. In this study, Marinobacter litoralis isolated from the marine sponge Xestospongia testudinaria and the slurry of X. testudinaria were found to have urease activity. Subsequently, phylogenetically diverse bacterial ureC genes were detected in the total genomic DNA and RNA of sponge X. testudinaria, i.e., 19 operative taxonomic units (OTUs) in genomic DNA library and 8 OTUs in cDNA library at 90% stringency. Particularly, 6 OTUs were common to both the genomic DNA library and the cDNA library, which suggested that some ureC genes were expressed in this sponge. BLAST and phylogenetic analysis showed that most of the ureC sequences were similar with the urease alpha subunit of members from Proteobacteria, which were the predominant component in sponge X. testudinaria, and the remaining ureC sequences were related to those from Magnetococcus, Cyanobacteria, and Actinobacteria. This study is the first assessment of the role of sponge bacterial symbionts in the regenerated utilization of urea by the detection of transcriptional activity of ureC gene, as well as the phylogenetic diversity of ureC gene of sponge bacterial symbionts. The results suggested the urea utilization by bacterial symbionts in marine sponge X. testudinaria, extending our understanding of nitrogen cycling mediated by sponge-associated microbiota.

  20. Phylogenetically diverse ureC genes and their expression suggest the urea utilization by bacterial symbionts in marine sponge Xestospongia testudinaria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Su

    Full Text Available Urea is one of the dominant organic nitrogenous compounds in the oligotrophic oceans. Compared to the knowledge of nitrogen transformation of nitrogen fixation, ammonia oxidization, nitrate and nitrite reduction mediated by sponge-associated microbes, our knowledge of urea utilization in sponges and the phylogenetic diversity of sponge-associated microbes with urea utilization potential is very limited. In this study, Marinobacter litoralis isolated from the marine sponge Xestospongia testudinaria and the slurry of X. testudinaria were found to have urease activity. Subsequently, phylogenetically diverse bacterial ureC genes were detected in the total genomic DNA and RNA of sponge X. testudinaria, i.e., 19 operative taxonomic units (OTUs in genomic DNA library and 8 OTUs in cDNA library at 90% stringency. Particularly, 6 OTUs were common to both the genomic DNA library and the cDNA library, which suggested that some ureC genes were expressed in this sponge. BLAST and phylogenetic analysis showed that most of the ureC sequences were similar with the urease alpha subunit of members from Proteobacteria, which were the predominant component in sponge X. testudinaria, and the remaining ureC sequences were related to those from Magnetococcus, Cyanobacteria, and Actinobacteria. This study is the first assessment of the role of sponge bacterial symbionts in the regenerated utilization of urea by the detection of transcriptional activity of ureC gene, as well as the phylogenetic diversity of ureC gene of sponge bacterial symbionts. The results suggested the urea utilization by bacterial symbionts in marine sponge X. testudinaria, extending our understanding of nitrogen cycling mediated by sponge-associated microbiota.

  1. Positive selection and multiple losses of the LINE-1-derived L1TD1 gene in mammals suggest a dual role in genome defense and pluripotency.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard N McLaughlin

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Mammalian genomes comprise many active and fossilized retroelements. The obligate requirement for retroelement integration affords host genomes an opportunity to 'domesticate' retroelement genes for their own purpose, leading to important innovations in genome defense and placentation. While many such exaptations involve retroviruses, the L1TD1 gene is the only known domesticated gene whose protein-coding sequence is almost entirely derived from a LINE-1 (L1 retroelement. Human L1TD1 has been shown to play an important role in pluripotency maintenance. To investigate how this role was acquired, we traced the origin and evolution of L1TD1. We find that L1TD1 originated in the common ancestor of eutherian mammals, but was lost or pseudogenized multiple times during mammalian evolution. We also find that L1TD1 has evolved under positive selection during primate and mouse evolution, and that one prosimian L1TD1 has 'replenished' itself with a more recent L1 ORF1 from the prosimian genome. These data suggest that L1TD1 has been recurrently selected for functional novelty, perhaps for a role in genome defense. L1TD1 loss is associated with L1 extinction in several megabat lineages, but not in sigmodontine rodents. We hypothesize that L1TD1 could have originally evolved for genome defense against L1 elements. Later, L1TD1 may have become incorporated into pluripotency maintenance in some lineages. Our study highlights the role of retroelement gene domestication in fundamental aspects of mammalian biology, and that such domesticated genes can adopt different functions in different lineages.

  2. Mitochondrial-related gene expression profiles suggest an important role of PGC-1alpha in the compensatory mechanism of endemic dilated cardiomyopathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Shu-Lan [Key Laboratory of Environment and Gene Related Diseases, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Ministry Education, No. 76 Yanta West Road, Xi' an, Shaanxi 710061 (China); Key Laboratory of Trace Elements and Endemic Diseases, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Ministry of Health, No. 76 Yanta West Road, Xi' an, Shaanxi 710061 (China); Tan, Wu-Hong, E-mail: tanwh@mail.xjtu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Environment and Gene Related Diseases, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Ministry Education, No. 76 Yanta West Road, Xi' an, Shaanxi 710061 (China); Key Laboratory of Trace Elements and Endemic Diseases, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Ministry of Health, No. 76 Yanta West Road, Xi' an, Shaanxi 710061 (China); Zhang, Zeng-Tie; Zhang, Feng [Key Laboratory of Environment and Gene Related Diseases, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Ministry Education, No. 76 Yanta West Road, Xi' an, Shaanxi 710061 (China); Key Laboratory of Trace Elements and Endemic Diseases, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Ministry of Health, No. 76 Yanta West Road, Xi' an, Shaanxi 710061 (China); Qu, Cheng-Juan [Institute of Biomedicine, University of Eastern Finland, Kuopio (Finland); Lei, Yan-Xia; Zhu, Yan-He [Key Laboratory of Environment and Gene Related Diseases, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Ministry Education, No. 76 Yanta West Road, Xi' an, Shaanxi 710061 (China); Key Laboratory of Trace Elements and Endemic Diseases, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Ministry of Health, No. 76 Yanta West Road, Xi' an, Shaanxi 710061 (China); Yu, Han-Jie [Department of Biotechnology, Northwest University, Xi' an, Shaanxi 710069 (China); Xiang, You-Zhang [Shandong Institute for prevention and Treatment of Endemic Disease, Jinan, Shandong 250014 (China); and others

    2013-10-15

    Keshan disease (KD) is an endemic dilated cardiomyopathy with unclear etiology. In this study, we compared mitochondrial-related gene expression profiles of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) derived from 16 KD patients and 16 normal controls in KD areas. Total RNA was isolated, amplified, labeled and hybridized to Agilent human 4×44k whole genome microarrays. Mitochondrial-related genes were screened out by the Third-Generation Human Mitochondria-Focused cDNA Microarray (hMitChip3). Quantitative real-time PCR, immunohistochemical and biochemical parameters related mitochondrial metabolism were conducted to validate our microarray results. In KD samples, 34 up-regulated genes (ratios≥2.0) were detected by significance analysis of microarrays and ingenuity systems pathway analysis (IPA). The highest ranked molecular and cellular functions of the differentially regulated genes were closely related to amino acid metabolism, free radical scavenging, carbohydrate metabolism, and energy production. Using IPA, 40 significant pathways and four significant networks, involved mainly in apoptosis, mitochondrion dysfunction, and nuclear receptor signaling were identified. Based on our results, we suggest that PGC-1alpha regulated energy metabolism and anti-apoptosis might play an important role in the compensatory mechanism of KD. Our results may lead to the identification of potential diagnostic biomarkers for KD in PBMCs, and may help to understand the pathogenesis of KD. Highlights: • Thirty-four up-regulated genes were detected in KD versus health controls. • Forty pathways and four networks were detected in KD. • PGC-1alpha regulated energy metabolism and anti-apoptosis in KD.

  3. Whole blood gene expression in adolescent chronic fatigue syndrome: an exploratory cross-sectional study suggesting altered B cell differentiation and survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Chinh Bkrong; Alsøe, Lene; Lindvall, Jessica M; Sulheim, Dag; Fagermoen, Even; Winger, Anette; Kaarbø, Mari; Nilsen, Hilde; Wyller, Vegard Bruun

    2017-05-11

    Chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) is a prevalent and disabling condition affecting adolescents. The pathophysiology is poorly understood, but immune alterations might be an important component. This study compared whole blood gene expression in adolescent CFS patients and healthy controls, and explored associations between gene expression and neuroendocrine markers, immune markers and clinical markers within the CFS group. CFS patients (12-18 years old) were recruited nation-wide to a single referral center as part of the NorCAPITAL project. A broad case definition of CFS was applied, requiring 3 months of unexplained, disabling chronic/relapsing fatigue of new onset, whereas no accompanying symptoms were necessary. Healthy controls having comparable distribution of gender and age were recruited from local schools. Whole blood samples were subjected to RNA sequencing. Immune markers were blood leukocyte counts, plasma cytokines, serum C-reactive protein and immunoglobulins. Neuroendocrine markers encompassed plasma and urine levels of catecholamines and cortisol, as well as heart rate variability indices. Clinical markers consisted of questionnaire scores for symptoms of post-exertional malaise, inflammation, fatigue, depression and trait anxiety, as well as activity recordings. A total of 29 CFS patients and 18 healthy controls were included. We identified 176 genes as differentially expressed in patients compared to controls, adjusting for age and gender factors. Gene set enrichment analyses suggested impairment of B cell differentiation and survival, as well as enhancement of innate antiviral responses and inflammation in the CFS group. A pattern of co-expression could be identified, and this pattern, as well as single gene transcripts, was significantly associated with indices of autonomic nervous activity, plasma cortisol, and blood monocyte and eosinophil counts. Also, an association with symptoms of post-exertional malaise was demonstrated. Adolescent CFS is

  4. Functionality of promoter microsatellites of arginine vasopressin receptor 1A (AVPR1A): implications for autism

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Tansey, Katherine E

    2011-03-31

    Abstract Background Arginine vasopressin (AVP) has been hypothesized to play a role in aetiology of autism based on a demonstrated involvement in the regulation of social behaviours. The arginine vasopressin receptor 1A gene (AVPR1A) is widely expressed in the brain and is considered to be a key receptor for regulation of social behaviour. Moreover, genetic variation at AVPR1A has been reported to be associated with autism. Evidence from non-human mammals implicates variation in the 5\\'-flanking region of AVPR1A in variable gene expression and social behaviour. Methods We examined four tagging single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) (rs3803107, rs1042615, rs3741865, rs11174815) and three microsatellites (RS3, RS1 and AVR) at the AVPR1A gene for association in an autism cohort from Ireland. Two 5\\'-flanking region polymorphisms in the human AVPR1A, RS3 and RS1, were also tested for their effect on relative promoter activity. Results The short alleles of RS1 and the SNP rs11174815 show weak association with autism in the Irish population (P = 0.036 and P = 0.008, respectively). Both RS1 and RS3 showed differences in relative promoter activity by length. Shorter repeat alleles of RS1 and RS3 decreased relative promoter activity in the human neuroblastoma cell line SH-SY5Y. Conclusions These aligning results can be interpreted as a functional route for this association, namely that shorter alleles of RS1 lead to decreased AVPR1A transcription, which may proffer increased susceptibility to the autism phenotype.

  5. Arginine vasopressin neuronal loss results from autophagy-associated cell death in a mouse model for familial neurohypophysial diabetes insipidus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagiwara, D; Arima, H; Morishita, Y; Wenjun, L; Azuma, Y; Ito, Y; Suga, H; Goto, M; Banno, R; Sugimura, Y; Shiota, A; Asai, N; Takahashi, M; Oiso, Y

    2014-01-01

    Familial neurohypophysial diabetes insipidus (FNDI) characterized by progressive polyuria is mostly caused by mutations in the gene encoding neurophysin II (NPII), which is the carrier protein of the antidiuretic hormone, arginine vasopressin (AVP). Although accumulation of mutant NPII in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) could be toxic for AVP neurons, the precise mechanisms of cell death of AVP neurons, reported in autopsy studies, remain unclear. Here, we subjected FNDI model mice to intermittent water deprivation (WD) in order to promote the phenotypes. Electron microscopic analyses demonstrated that, while aggregates are confined to a certain compartment of the ER in the AVP neurons of FNDI mice with water access ad libitum, they were scattered throughout the dilated ER lumen in the FNDI mice subjected to WD for 4 weeks. It is also demonstrated that phagophores, the autophagosome precursors, emerged in the vicinity of aggregates and engulfed the ER containing scattered aggregates. Immunohistochemical analyses revealed that expression of p62, an adapter protein between ubiquitin and autophagosome, was elicited on autophagosomal membranes in the AVP neurons, suggesting selective autophagy induction at this time point. Treatment of hypothalamic explants of green fluorescent protein (GFP)-microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 (LC3) transgenic mice with an ER stressor thapsigargin increased the number of GFP-LC3 puncta, suggesting that ER stress could induce autophagosome formation in the hypothalamus of wild-type mice as well. The cytoplasm of AVP neurons in FNDI mice was occupied with vacuoles in the mice subjected to WD for 12 weeks, when 30–40% of AVP neurons are lost. Our data thus demonstrated that autophagy was induced in the AVP neurons subjected to ER stress in FNDI mice. Although autophagy should primarily be protective for neurons, it is suggested that the organelles including ER were lost over time through autophagy, leading to autophagy

  6. Glucocorticoids suppress vasopressin gene expression in human suprachiasmatic nucleus.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, R.-Y.; Unmehopa, U.A.; Zhou, J.-N.; Swaab, D.F.

    2006-01-01

    Sleep impairment is one of the major side effects of glucocorticoid therapy. The mechanism responsible for this circadian disorder is unknown, but alterations in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), the biological clock of the human brain, are presumed to play a major role. In the present study, the

  7. Glucocorticoids suppress vasopressin gene expression in human suprachiasmatic nucleus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, Rong-Yu; Unmehopa, Unga A.; Zhou, Jiang-Ning; Swaab, Dick F.

    2006-01-01

    Sleep impairment is one of the major side effects of glucocorticoid therapy. The mechanism responsible for this circadian disorder is unknown, but alterations in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), the biological clock of the human brain, are presumed to play a major role. In the present study, the

  8. Novel evolutionary lineages of the invertebrate oxytocin/vasopressin superfamily peptides and their receptors in the common octopus (Octopus vulgaris)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanda, Atsuhiro; Satake, Honoo; Kawada, Tsuyoshi; Minakata, Hiroyuki

    2004-01-01

    The common octopus, Octopus vulgaris, is the first invertebrate species that was shown to possess two oxytocin/vasopressin (OT/VP) superfamily peptides, octopressin (OP) and cephalotocin (CT). Previously, we cloned a GPCR (G-protein-coupled receptor) specific to CT [CTR1 (CT receptor 1)]. In the present study, we have identified an additional CTR, CTR2, and a novel OP receptor, OPR. Both CTR2 and OPR include domains and motifs typical of GPCRs, and the intron– exon structures are in accord with those of OT/VP receptor genes. CTR2 and OPR expressed in Xenopus oocytes induced calcium-mediated inward chloride current in a CT- and OP-specific manner respectively. Several regions and residues, which are requisite for binding of the vertebrate OT/VP receptor family with their ligands, are highly conserved in CTRs, but not in OPR. These different sequences between CTRs and OPR, as well as the amino acid residues of OP and CT at positions 2–5, were presumed to play crucial roles in the binding selectivity to their receptors, whereas the difference in the polarity of OT/VP family peptide residues at position 8 confers OT and VP with the binding specificity in vertebrates. CTR2 mRNA was present in various peripheral tissues, and OPR mRNA was detected in both the nervous system and peripheral tissues. Our findings suggest that the CT and OP genes, similar to the OT/VP family, evolved through duplication, but the ligand–receptor selectivity were established through different evolutionary lineages from those of their vertebrate counterparts. PMID:15504101

  9. A homozygous balanced reciprocal translocation suggests LINC00237 as a candidate gene for MOMO (macrosomia, obesity, macrocephaly, and ocular abnormalities) syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vu, Phi Yen; Toutain, Jérôme; Cappellen, David; Delrue, Marie-Ange; Daoud, Hussein; El Moneim, Azza Abd; Barat, Pascal; Montaubin, Orianne; Bonnet, Françoise; Dai, Zong Qi; Philippe, Christophe; Tran, Cong Toai; Rooryck, Caroline; Arveiler, Benoît; Saura, Robert; Briault, Sylvain; Lacombe, Didier; Taine, Laurence

    2012-11-01

    Macrosomia, obesity, macrocephaly, and ocular abnormalities syndrome (MOMO syndrome) has been reported in only four patients to date. In these sporadic cases, no chromosomal or molecular abnormality has been identified thus far. Here, we report on the clinical, cytogenetic, and molecular findings in a child of healthy consanguineous parents suffering from MOMO syndrome. Conventional karyotyping revealed an inherited homozygous balanced reciprocal translocation (16;20)(q21;p11.2). Uniparental disomy testing showed bi-parental inheritance for both derivative chromosomes 16 and 20. The patient's oligonucleotide array-comparative genomic hybridization profile revealed no abnormality. From the homozygous balanced reciprocal translocation (16;20)(q21;p11.2), a positional cloning strategy, designed to narrow 16q21 and 20p11.2 breakpoints, revealed the disruption of a novel gene located at 20p11.23. This gene is now named LINC00237, according to the HUGO (Human Genome Organization) nomenclature. The gene apparently leads to the production of a non-coding RNA. We established that LINC00237 was expressed in lymphocytes of control individuals while normal transcripts were absent in lymphocytes of our MOMO patient. LINC00237 was not ubiquitously expressed in control tissues, but it was notably highly expressed in the brain. Our results suggested autosomal recessive inheritance of MOMO syndrome. LINC00237 could play a role in the pathogenesis of this syndrome and could provide new insights into hyperphagia-related obesity and intellectual disability. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Oxytocin and Vasopressin: Linking Pituitary Neuropeptides and their Receptors to Social Neurocircuits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danielle Andrea Baribeau

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Oxytocin and vasopressin are pituitary neuropeptides that have been shown to affect social processes in mammals. There is growing interest in these molecules and their receptors as potential precipitants of, and/or treatments for, social deficits in neurodevelopmental disorders, including autism spectrum disorder. Numerous behavioral-genetic studies suggest that there is an association between these peptides and individual social abilities; however, an explanatory model that links hormonal activity at the receptor level to complex human behavior remains elusive. The following review summarizes the known associations between the oxytocin and vasopressin neuropeptide systems and social neurocircuits in the brain. Following a micro- to macro- level trajectory, current literature on the synthesis and secretion of these peptides, and the structure, function and distribution of their respective receptors is first surveyed. Next, current models regarding the mechanism of action of these peptides on microcircuitry and other neurotransmitter systems are discussed. Functional neuroimaging evidence on the acute effects of exogenous administration of these peptides on brain activity is then reviewed. Overall, a model in which the local neuromodulatory effects of pituitary neuropeptides on brainstem and basal forebrain regions strengthen signaling within social neurocircuits proves appealing. However, these findings are derived from animal models; more research is needed to clarify the relevance of these mechanisms to human behavior and treatment of social deficits in neuropsychiatric disorders.

  11. The regulation of social recognition, social communication and aggression: vasopressin in the social behavior neural network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albers, H Elliott

    2012-03-01

    Neuropeptides in the arginine vasotocin/arginine vasopressin (AVT/AVP) family play a major role in the regulation of social behavior by their actions in the brain. In mammals, AVP is found within a circuit of recriprocally connected limbic structures that form the social behavior neural network. This review examines the role played by AVP within this network in controlling social processes that are critical for the formation and maintenance of social relationships: social recognition, social communication and aggression. Studies in a number of mammalian species indicate that AVP and AVP V1a receptors are ideally suited to regulate the expression of social processes because of their plasticity in response to factors that influence social behavior. The pattern of AVP innervation and V1a receptors across the social behavior neural network may determine the potential range and intensity of social responses that individuals display in different social situations. Although fundamental information on how social behavior is wired in the brain is still lacking, it is clear that different social behaviors can be influenced by the actions of AVP in the same region of the network and that AVP can act within multiple regions of this network to regulate the expression of individual social behaviors. The existing data suggest that AVP can influence social behavior by modulating the interpretation of sensory information, by influencing decision making and by triggering complex motor outputs. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Oxytocin, Vasopressin, and Social Behavior. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Vasopressin vs Dopamine for Treatment of Hypotension in ELBW Infants: A Randomized, Blinded Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rios, Danielle R.; Kaiser, Jeffrey R.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate vasopressin vs dopamine as initial therapy in ELBW infants with hypotension during the first 24 hours of life. Study design Hypotensive ELBW infants ≤ 30 weeks’ gestation and ≤ 24 hours old randomly received treatment with vasopressin or dopamine in a blinded fashion. Normotensive infants not receiving vasopressor support served as a comparison group. Results Twenty hypotensive ELBW infants received vasopressin (n=10) or dopamine (n=10), and 50 were enrolled for comparison. Mean gestational age was 25.6 ± 1.4 weeks and birth weight 705 ± 154 g. Response to vasopressin paralleled that of dopamine in time to adequate mean BP (Kaplan-Meier curve, p=0.986); 90% of infants in each treatment group responded with adequate BP. The vasopressin group received fewer doses of surfactant (phypotension appeared safe. This pilot study supports a larger randomized controlled trial of vasopressin vs dopamine therapy in ELBW infants with hypotension. PMID:25641242

  13. Incomplete complementation of the DNA repair defect in cockayne syndrome cells by the denV gene from bacteriophage T4 suggests a deficiency in base excision repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francis, M A; Bagga, P S; Athwal, R S; Rainbow, A J

    1997-10-01

    Endonuclease V (denV) from bacteriophage T4 has been examined for its ability to complement the repair defect in Cockayne syndrome (CS) cells of complementation groups A and B. CS is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by hypersensitivity to UV light and a defect in the preferential repair of UV-induced lesions in transcriptionally active DNA by the nucleotide excision repair (NER) pathway. The denV gene was introduced into non-transformed normal and CS fibroblasts transiently via a recombinant adenovirus (Ad) vector and into SV40-transformed normal and CS cells via a retroviral vector. Expression of denV in CS-A cells resulted in partial correction of the UV-sensitive phenotype in assays of gene-specific repair and cell viability, while correction of CS-B cells by expression of denV in the same assays was minimal or non-existent. In contrast, denV expression led to enhanced host cell reactivation (HCR) of viral DNA synthesis in both CS complementation groups to near normal levels. DenV is a glycosylase which is specific for cyclobutane-pyrimidine dimers (CPDs) but does not recognize other UV-induced lesions. Previous work has indicated that CS cells can efficiently repair all non-CPD UV-induced transcription blocking lesions (S.F. Barrett et al.. Mutation Res. 255 (1991) 281-291 [1]) and that denV incised lesions are believed to be processed via the base excision repair (BER) pathway. The inability of denV to complement the NER defect in CS cells to normal levels implies an impaired ability to process denV incised lesions by the BER pathway, and suggests a role for the CS genes, particularly the CS-B gene, in BER.

  14. Different patterns of codon usage in the overlapping polymerase and surface genes of hepatitis B virus suggest a de novo origin by modular evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavesi, Angelo

    2015-12-01

    The polymerase (P) and surface (S) genes of hepatitis B virus (HBV) show the longest gene overlap in animal viruses. Gene overlaps originate by the overprinting of a novel frame onto an ancestral pre-existing frame. Identifying which frame is ancestral and which frame is de novo (the genealogy of the overlap) is an appealing topic. However, the P/S overlap of HBV is an intriguing paradox, because both genes are indispensable for virus survival. Thus, the hypothesis of a primordial virus without the surface protein or without the polymerase makes no biological sense. With the aim to determine the genealogy of the overlap, the codon usage of the overlapping frames P and S was compared to that of the non-overlapping region. It was found that the overlap of human HBV had two patterns of codon usage. One was localized in the 59 one-third of the overlap and the other in the 39 two-thirds. By extending the analysis to non-human HBVs, it was found that this feature occurred in all hepadnaviruses. Under the assumption that the ancestral frame has a codon usage significantly closer to that of the non-overlapping region than the de novo frame, the ancestral frames in the 59 and 39 region of the overlap could be predicted. They were, respectively, frame S and frame P. These results suggest that the spacer domain of the polymerase and the S domain of the surface protein originated de novo by overprinting. They support a modular evolution hypothesis for the origin of the overlap.

  15. The Jumonji gene family in Crassostrea gigas suggests evolutionary conservation of Jmj-C histone demethylases orthologues in the oyster gametogenesis and development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fellous, Alexandre; Favrel, Pascal; Guo, Ximing; Riviere, Guillaume

    2014-03-15

    Jumonji (Jmj) proteins are histone demethylases, which control the identity of stem cells. Jmj genes were characterized from plants to mammals where they have been implicated in the epigenetic regulation of development. Despite the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas representing one of the most important aquaculture resources worldwide, the molecular mechanisms governing the embryogenesis and reproduction of this lophotrochozoan species remain poorly understood. However, annotations in the C. gigas EST library suggested the presence of putative Jumonji genes, raising the question of the conservation of this family of histone demethylases in the oyster. Using Primer walking, 5'-RACE PCR and in silico analyses, we characterized nine Jumonji orthologues in the oyster, called Cg-Jmj, bearing conserved domains critical for putative histone demethylase activity. Phylogenic analyses revealed that oyster Jumonji cluster into two distinct groups: 'single-domain Jmj' and 'multi-domain Jmj', and define 8 subgroups corresponding to each cognate orthologues in metazoans. RT-qPCR investigations showed specific regulations of Cg-Jmj mRNAs during the early development and along the reproduction cycle. Furthermore, in situ and in toto hybridizations indicate that oyster Jumonji genes are transcribed mostly within the gonad in adult oysters whereas they display a ubiquitous expression during embryonic and larval development. Our study demonstrates the presence of nine Jumonji orthologues in the oyster C. gigas. Their domain conservation and their expression profile suggest an implication during reproduction and development, questioning about the epigenetic regulation by histone methylation in lophotrochozoans. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Analysis of the V2 Vasopressin Receptor (V2R) Mutations Causing Partial Nephrogenic Diabetes Insipidus Highlights a Sustainable Signaling by a Non-peptide V2R Agonist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makita, Noriko; Sato, Tomohiko; Yajima-Shoji, Yuki; Sato, Junichiro; Manaka, Katsunori; Eda-Hashimoto, Makiko; Ootaki, Masanori; Matsumoto, Naoki; Nangaku, Masaomi; Iiri, Taroh

    2016-10-21

    Disease-causing mutations in G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) genes, including the V2 vasopressin receptor (V2R) gene, often cause misfolded receptors, leading to a defect in plasma membrane trafficking. A novel V2R mutation, T273M, identified in a boy with partial nephrogenic diabetes insipidus (NDI), shows intracellular localization and partial defects similar to the two mutants we described previously (10). Although non-peptide V2R antagonists have been shown to rescue the membrane localization of V2R mutants, their level of functional rescue is weak. Interestingly, it has been reported that a non-peptide agonist, OPC51803, activates misfolded V2R mutants intracellularly without degradation, thus potentially serving as a therapeutic agent against NDI (14). In our current experiments, however, a peptide antagonist blocked arginine vasopressin (AVP)- or OPC51803-stimulated cAMP accumulation both in COS-7 and MDCK cells, suggesting that OPC51803 mainly stimulates cell surface V2R mutants. In addition, our analyses revealed that OPC51803 works not only as a non-peptide agonist that causes activation/β-arrestin-dependent desensitization of V2R mutants expressed at the plasma membrane but also as a pharmacochaperone that promotes the endoplasmic reticulum-retained mutant maturation and trafficking to the plasma membrane. The ratio of the pharmacochaperone effect to the desensitization effect likely correlates negatively with the residual function of the tested mutants, suggesting that OPC5 has a more favorable effect on the V2R mutants with a less residual function. We speculated that the canceling of the desensitization effect of OPC51803 by the pharmacochaperone effect after long-term treatment may produce sustainable signaling, and thus pharmacochaperone agonists such as OPC51803 may serve as promising therapeutics for NDI caused by misfolded V2R mutants. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  17. Correlation of plasma copeptin and vasopressin concentrations in hypo-, iso-, and hyperosmolar states

    OpenAIRE

    Balanescu, Sandrina; Kopp, Peter; Gaskill, Mary Beth; Morgenthaler, Nils G.; Schindler, Christian; Rutishauser, Jonas

    2011-01-01

    Background: Copeptin, the C-terminal moiety of provasopressin, is cosecreted with vasopressin. Copeptin may be a useful parameter to characterize disorders of water homeostasis and can be readily measured in plasma or serum. However, it is unknown to date how circulating copeptin and vasopressin levels correlate at different plasma osmolalites. Objective: To correlate plasma copeptin with plasma osmolality and vasopressin concentrations in healthy subjects during iso-, hypo-, and hyperosmolar...

  18. The Effect of Renal Function and Hemodialysis Treatment on Plasma Vasopressin and Copeptin Levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ettema, Esmée M; Heida, Judith; Casteleijn, Niek F; Boesten, Lianne; Westerhuis, Ralf; Gaillard, Carlo A J M; Gansevoort, Ron T; Franssen, Casper F M; Zittema, Debbie

    2017-05-01

    Copeptin is increasingly used in epidemiological studies as a substitute for vasopressin. The effect of renal function per se on copeptin and vasopressin concentrations as well as their ratio have, however, not been well described. Copeptin and vasopressin levels were measured in 127 patients with various stages of chronic kidney disease, including 42 hemodialysis patients and 16 healthy participants in this observational study. Linear (segmental) regression analyses were performed to assess the association between renal function and copeptin, vasopressin and the C/V ratio. In addition, clearance of copeptin and vasopressin by hemodialysis was calculated. Both copeptin and vasopressin levels were higher when renal function was lower, and both showed associations with plasma osmolality. The C/V ratio was stable across renal function in subjects with an eGFR >28 ml/min per 1.73 m2. In contrast, the C/V ratio increased with worsening renal function in patients with eGFR ≤28 ml/min per 1.73 m2. During hemodialysis, the initial decrease in vasopressin levels was greater compared with copeptin and, consequently, the C/V ratio increased. This was, at least in part, explained by a greater dialytic clearance of vasopressin compared with copeptin. Our data indicate that copeptin is a reliable substitute for vasopressin in subjects with an eGFR >28 ml/min per 1.73 m2, whereas at an eGFR ≤28 ml/min per 1.73 m2, that is, CKD stages 4 and 5, a correction for renal function is required in epidemiological studies that use copeptin as a marker for vasopressin. Intradialytic copeptin levels do not adequately reflect vasopressin levels because vasopressin clearance by hemodialysis is higher than that of copeptin.

  19. Lack of responsiveness to 1-desamino-D arginin vasopressin (desmopressin) in male patients with nephrogenic syndrome of inappropriate antidiuresis: from bench to bedside.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandergheynst, Frederic; Pradier, Olivier; Beukinga, Ingrid; Kornreich, Anne; Vassart, Gilbert; Decaux, Guy

    2012-03-01

    Nephrogenic syndrome of inappropriate antidiuresis (NSIAD) is a recently described entity, linked to gain-of-function mutations (R137C and R137L) in arginine vasopressin (AVP) gene leading to chronic activation of tubular V2 AVP receptor (V2R) and thus free water reabsorption. In addition to collecting duct cells, the V2R is also expressed in endothelial cells, where it mediates the rise in circulating levels of von Willebrand factor (vWF) and coagulation factor VIII (fVIII). Recent in vitro data showed that these mutant receptors are resistant to vasopressin-stimulated cAMP production. We aimed to explore by clinical observations the sensitivity to vasopressin of the R137C-V2R mutant in vivo. We performed a stimulation test with 1-desamino-D arginin vasopressin (dDAVP) 0·3 μg/kg of bodyweight in three patients (two hemizygous male and one heterozygous female) with NSIAD with R137C mutation and measured on the one hand the levels of vWF and fVIII and the other hand urine osmolality and albumin excretion (UAE). Whereas the female heterozygous patient displayed normal response to simulation by dDAVP (except for UAE), no increase in vWF, fVIII, urinary osmolality and UAE was observed among hemizygous male patients. Coherent with in vitro observation in transfected cells, our clinical observations demonstrate that the R137C-V2R mutant is resistant to vasopressin stimulation in its physiological sites of expression. © 2011 The Authors. European Journal of Clinical Investigation © 2011 Stichting European Society for Clinical Investigation Journal Foundation.

  20. The Effect of Renal Function and Hemodialysis Treatment on Plasma Vasopressin and Copeptin Levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esmée M. Ettema

    2017-05-01

    Discussion: Our data indicate that copeptin is a reliable substitute for vasopressin in subjects with an eGFR >28 ml/min per 1.73 m2, whereas at an eGFR ≤28 ml/min per 1.73 m2, that is, CKD stages 4 and 5, a correction for renal function is required in epidemiological studies that use copeptin as a marker for vasopressin. Intradialytic copeptin levels do not adequately reflect vasopressin levels because vasopressin clearance by hemodialysis is higher than that of copeptin.

  1. Selective V₂-Agonist of Vasopressin Desmopressin Stimulates Activity of Serum Hyaluronidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzgoev, S G

    2015-08-01

    Effects of desmopressin (arginine vasopressin V2 receptor agonist) were studied for elucidation of the possible role of the kidneys in the regulation of blood hyaluronidase activity. Similar to vasopressin, intraperitoneal administration of desmopressin to Wistar rats increased blood hyaluronidase activity by 30%. Against the background of water load, nether desmopressin nor vasopressin increased blood hyaluronidase activity. The possibility of renal secretion of hyaluronidase into the blood as a mechanism of antidiuretic activity of vasopressin and its role in the regulation of water metabolism are discussed.

  2. Autoradiographic localization of peripheral benzodiazepine, dihydroalprenolol and arginine vasopressin binding sites in the pituitaries of control, stalk transected and Brattleboro rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunn, S J; Hanley, M R; Wilkin, G P

    1986-01-01

    The autoradiographic distribution of [3H]arginine vasopressin, [3H]spiperone, [3H]GABA, [3H]dihydroalprenolol and the peripheral-type benzodiazepine ligand [3H]Ro5-4864 were examined in the rat pituitary before and after pituitary stalk transection. Stalk transection produced dramatic changes in the cellular architecture of the pars nervosa. Glial fibrillary acidic protein, an astrocyte marker reported in pituicytes, increased after stalk transection, whereas neurofilament, a marker for neuronal innervation, was lost. These structural changes demonstrated a successful stalk transection, permitting interpretation of changes in the densities of several [3H]-ligands over the three lobes. [3H]Ro5-4864 binding was markedly increased, suggesting that this site was located on the pituicytes. Conversely [3H]spiperone and [3H]arginine vasopressin binding density over the pars nervosa decreased. In the mutant diabetes insipidus rat (Brattleboro), which lacks pituitary vasopressin, [3H]arginine vasopressin binding was undetectable in the pars nervosa. [3H]dihydroalprenolol and [3H]GABA binding sites were unchanged by the lesion. These results are discussed in terms of the occurrence of functional acceptors on pituicytes and their possible role in neurohydrophyseal secretions.

  3. Efficacy of vasopressin-epinephrine compared to epinephrine alone for out of hospital cardiac arrest patients: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qiang; Liu, Bo; Zhao, Lianxing; Qi, Zhijiang; Shao, Huan; An, Le; Li, Chunsheng

    2017-10-01

    The aim of this study was to conduct a meta-analysis to evaluate the efficacy of vasopressin-epinephrine compared to epinephrine alone in patients who suffered out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA). Relevant studies up to February 2017 were identified by searching in PubMed, EMBASE, the Cochrane Library, Wanfang for randomized controlled trials(RCTs) assigning adults with cardiac arrest to treatment with vasopressin-epinephrine (VEgroup) vs adrenaline (epinephrine) alone (E group). The outcome point was return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) for patients suffering from OHCA. Heterogeneity, subgroup analysis, sensitivity analysis and publication bias were explored. Individual patient data were obtained from 5047 participants who experienced OHCA in nine studies. Odds ratios (ORs) were calculated using a random-effects model and results suggested that vasopressin-epinephrine was associated with higher rate of ROSC (OR=1.67, 95% CI=1.13-2.49, Padrenaline can improve ROSC of OHCA from Asia, but patients from other regions who suffered from OHCA cannot benefit from combination of vasopressin and epinephrine. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Gene expression and immunohistochemical analyses of mKast suggest its late pupal and adult-specific functions in the honeybee brain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atsuhiro Yamane

    Full Text Available In insect brains, the mushroom bodies (MBs, a higher center comprise intrinsic neurons, termed Kenyon cells (KCs. We previously showed that the honeybee (Apis mellifera L. MBs comprise four types of KCs, in addition to the previously known three types of KCs: class I large-type KCs (lKCs, class I small-type KCs (sKCs and class II KCs, novel class I 'middle-type' KCs (mKCs, which are characterized by the preferential expression of a gene, termed mKast. Although mKast was originally discovered during the search for genes whose expression is enriched in the optic lobes (OLs in the worker brain, subsequent analysis revealed that the gene is expressed in an mKC-preferential manner in the MBs. To gain more insights into the function of mKast in the honeybee brain, we here performed expression analysis of mKast and immunohistochemistry of the mKast protein. Prominent mKast expression was first detected in the brain after the P7 pupal stage. In addition, mKast was expressed almost selectively in the brain, suggesting its late pupal and adult specific functions in the brain. Immunohistochemistry revealed that mKast-like immunoreactivity is detected in several regions in the worker brain: inside and around the MB calyces, at the outer edges of the OL lobula, at the outer surface of and posterior to the antennal lobes (ALs, along the dorsal midline of the anterior brain and at the outer surface of the subesophageal ganglions (SOG. mKast-like immunoreactivities in the MBs, OLs, ALs and SOG were due to the corresponding neurons, while mKast-like immunoreactivities beneath/between the MB calyces were assumed to most likely correspond to the lateral/medial neurosecretory cells.

  5. Characterization of the Bacteroides fragilis bfr gene product identifies a bacterial DPS-like protein and suggests evolutionary links in the ferritin superfamily.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauss, George H; Reott, Michael A; Rocha, Edson R; Young, Mark J; Douglas, Trevor; Smith, C Jeffrey; Lawrence, C Martin

    2012-01-01

    A factor contributing to the pathogenicity of Bacteroides fragilis, the most common anaerobic species isolated from clinical infections, is the bacterium's extreme aerotolerance, which allows survival in oxygenated tissues prior to anaerobic abscess formation. We investigated the role of the bacterioferritin-related (bfr) gene in the B. fragilis oxidative stress response. The bfr mRNA levels are increased in stationary phase or in response to O(2) or iron. In addition, bfr null mutants exhibit reduced aerotolerance, and the bfr gene product protects DNA from hydroxyl radical cleavage in vitro. Crystallographic studies revealed a protein with a dodecameric structure and greater similarity to an archaeal DNA protection in starved cells (DPS)-like protein than to the 24-subunit bacterioferritins. Similarity to the DPS-like (DPSL) protein extends to the subunit and includes a pair of conserved cysteine residues juxtaposed to a buried dimetal binding site within the four-helix bundle. Compared to archaeal DPSLs, however, this bacterial DPSL protein contains several unique features, including a significantly different conformation in the C-terminal tail that alters the number and location of pores leading to the central cavity and a conserved metal binding site on the interior surface of the dodecamer. Combined, these characteristics confirm this new class of miniferritin in the bacterial domain, delineate the similarities and differences between bacterial DPSL proteins and their archaeal homologs, allow corrected annotations for B. fragilis bfr and other dpsl genes within the bacterial domain, and suggest an evolutionary link within the ferritin superfamily that connects dodecameric DPS to the (bacterio)ferritin 24-mer.

  6. amoA Gene abundances and nitrification potential rates suggest that benthic ammonia-oxidizing bacteria and not Archaea dominate N cycling in the Colne Estuary, United Kingdom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jialin; Nedwell, David B; Beddow, Jessica; Dumbrell, Alex J; McKew, Boyd A; Thorpe, Emma L; Whitby, Corinne

    2015-01-01

    Nitrification, mediated by ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA), is important in global nitrogen cycling. In estuaries where gradients of salinity and ammonia concentrations occur, there may be differential selections for ammonia-oxidizer populations. The aim of this study was to examine the activity, abundance, and diversity of AOA and AOB in surface oxic sediments of a highly nutrified estuary that exhibits gradients of salinity and ammonium. AOB and AOA communities were investigated by measuring ammonia monooxygenase (amoA) gene abundance and nitrification potentials both spatially and temporally. Nitrification potentials differed along the estuary and over time, with the greatest nitrification potentials occurring mid-estuary (8.2 μmol N grams dry weight [gdw](-1) day(-1) in June, increasing to 37.4 μmol N gdw(-1) day(-1) in January). At the estuary head, the nitrification potential was 4.3 μmol N gdw(-1) day(-1) in June, increasing to 11.7 μmol N gdw(-1) day(-1) in January. At the estuary head and mouth, nitrification potentials fluctuated throughout the year. AOB amoA gene abundances were significantly greater (by 100-fold) than those of AOA both spatially and temporally. Nitrosomonas spp. were detected along the estuary by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) band sequence analysis. In conclusion, AOB dominated over AOA in the estuarine sediments, with the ratio of AOB/AOA amoA gene abundance increasing from the upper (freshwater) to lower (marine) regions of the Colne estuary. These findings suggest that in this nutrified estuary, AOB (possibly Nitrosomonas spp.) were of major significance in nitrification. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  7. Gene expression and immunohistochemical analyses of mKast suggest its late pupal and adult-specific functions in the honeybee brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamane, Atsuhiro; Kohno, Hiroki; Ikeda, Tsubomi; Kaneko, Kumi; Ugajin, Atsushi; Fujita, Toshiyuki; Kunieda, Takekazu; Kubo, Takeo

    2017-01-01

    In insect brains, the mushroom bodies (MBs, a higher center) comprise intrinsic neurons, termed Kenyon cells (KCs). We previously showed that the honeybee (Apis mellifera L.) MBs comprise four types of KCs, in addition to the previously known three types of KCs: class I large-type KCs (lKCs), class I small-type KCs (sKCs) and class II KCs, novel class I 'middle-type' KCs (mKCs), which are characterized by the preferential expression of a gene, termed mKast. Although mKast was originally discovered during the search for genes whose expression is enriched in the optic lobes (OLs) in the worker brain, subsequent analysis revealed that the gene is expressed in an mKC-preferential manner in the MBs. To gain more insights into the function of mKast in the honeybee brain, we here performed expression analysis of mKast and immunohistochemistry of the mKast protein. Prominent mKast expression was first detected in the brain after the P7 pupal stage. In addition, mKast was expressed almost selectively in the brain, suggesting its late pupal and adult specific functions in the brain. Immunohistochemistry revealed that mKast-like immunoreactivity is detected in several regions in the worker brain: inside and around the MB calyces, at the outer edges of the OL lobula, at the outer surface of and posterior to the antennal lobes (ALs), along the dorsal midline of the anterior brain and at the outer surface of the subesophageal ganglions (SOG). mKast-like immunoreactivities in the MBs, OLs, ALs and SOG were due to the corresponding neurons, while mKast-like immunoreactivities beneath/between the MB calyces were assumed to most likely correspond to the lateral/medial neurosecretory cells.

  8. Biomphalaria glabrata Metallothionein: Lacking Metal Specificity of the Protein and Missing Gene Upregulation Suggest Metal Sequestration by Exchange Instead of through Selective Binding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Niederwanger

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The wild-type metallothionein (MT of the freshwater snail Biomphalaria glabrata and a natural allelic mutant of it in which a lysine residue was replaced by an asparagine residue, were recombinantly expressed and analyzed for their metal-binding features with respect to Cd2+, Zn2+ and Cu+, applying spectroscopic and mass-spectrometric methods. In addition, the upregulation of the Biomphalaria glabrata MT gene was assessed by quantitative real-time detection PCR. The two recombinant proteins revealed to be very similar in most of their metal binding features. They lacked a clear metal-binding preference for any of the three metal ions assayed—which, to this degree, is clearly unprecedented in the world of Gastropoda MTs. There were, however, slight differences in copper-binding abilities between the two allelic variants. Overall, the missing metal specificity of the two recombinant MTs goes hand in hand with lacking upregulation of the respective MT gene. This suggests that in vivo, the Biomphalaria glabrata MT may be more important for metal replacement reactions through a constitutively abundant form, rather than for metal sequestration by high binding specificity. There are indications that the MT of Biomphalaria glabrata may share its unspecific features with MTs from other freshwater snails of the Hygrophila family.

  9. The association of AKNA gene polymorphisms with knee osteoarthritis suggests the relevance of this immune response regulator in the disease genetic susceptibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Nava, Gabriela Angélica; Fernández-Torres, Javier; Martínez-Flores, Karina; Zamudio-Cuevas, Yessica; Clavijo-Cornejo, Denise; Espinosa-Morales, Rolando; Lozada, Carlos A; Gutierrez, Marwin; Granados, Julio; Pineda, Carlos; Madrid-Marina, Vicente; López-Reyes, Alberto

    2018-01-24

    Recent studies have identified AKNA as a potential susceptibility gene for several inflammatory diseases. Here, we aimed to assess the potential association of AKNA polymorphisms with knee osteoarthritis (KOA) susceptibility in a Mexican population, following STREGA recommendations. From a DNA bank of 181 KOA patients and 140 healthy controls, two AKNA SNPs were genotyped using TaqMan probes. The association between KOA susceptibility and AKNA polymorphisms genotypes was evaluated by multivariated logistic regression analysis. Information regarding patients' inflammatory biomarkers levels was obtained and their association with AKNA polymorphisms genotypes was assessed by lineal regression. We found a positive association with the recessive inheritance model of both AKNA polymorphisms (A/A genotype for both) and KOA susceptibility adjusting by age, body mass index (BMI), gender and place of birth (OR = 2.48, 95% CI 1.09-5.65 for rs10817595 polymorphism; and OR = 4.96; 95% CI 2.421-10.2 for rs3748176 polymorphism). Additionally these associations were also seen after stratifying patients by KOA severity and age. Furthermore the total leukocyte count was positively associated with rs10817595 AKNA polymorphism (β = 1.39; 95% CI 0.44-2.34) adjusting by age, BMI, gender, place of birth and disease severity. We suggest that regulatory and coding polymorphisms of the inflammatory modulator gene AKNA can influence the development of KOA. Further structural and functional studies might reveal the role of AKNA in OA and other rheumatic diseases.

  10. Genome-wide Gene Expression Analysis of Mucosal Colonic Biopsies and Isolated Colonocytes Suggests a Continuous Inflammatory State in the Lamina Propria of Patients with Quiescent Ulcerative Colitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerrum, Jacob Tveiten; Hansen, Morten; Olsen, Jørgen

    2010-01-01

    colonocytes from UC patients and controls in order to identify the cell types responsible for the continuous inflammatory state. Methods: Adjacent mucosal colonic biopsies were obtained endoscopically from the descending colon in patients with active UC (n = 8), quiescent UC (n = 9), and with irritable bowel......Background: Genome-wide gene expression (GWGE) profiles of mucosal colonic biopsies have suggested the existence of a continuous inflammatory state in quiescent ulcerative colitis (UC). The aim of this study was to use DNA microarray-based GWGE profiling of mucosal colonic biopsies and isolated......-discriminant analysis using the SIMCA-P 11 software (Umetrics, Umea, Sweden). Results: A clear separation between active UC, quiescent UC, and control biopsies were found, whereas the model for the colonocytes was unable to distinguish between quiescent UC and controls. The differentiation between quiescent UC...

  11. A comprehensive, genome-wide analysis of autophagy-related genes identified in tobacco suggests a central role of autophagy in plant response to various environmental cues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xue-mei; Zhao, Peng; Wang, Wei; Zou, Jie; Cheng, Tian-he; Peng, Xiong-bo; Sun, Meng-xiang

    2015-08-01

    Autophagy is an evolutionarily conserved mechanism in both animals and plants, which has been shown to be involved in various essential developmental processes in plants. Nicotiana tabacum is considered to be an ideal model plant and has been widely used for the study of the roles of autophagy in the processes of plant development and in the response to various stresses. However, only a few autophagy-related genes (ATGs) have been identified in tobacco up to now. Here, we identified 30 ATGs belonging to 16 different groups in tobacco through a genome-wide survey. Comprehensive expression profile analysis reveals an abroad expression pattern of these ATGs, which could be detected in all tissues tested under normal growth conditions. Our series tests further reveal that majority of ATGs are sensitive and responsive to different stresses including nutrient starvation, plant hormones, heavy metal and other abiotic stresses, suggesting a central role of autophagy, likely as an effector, in plant response to various environmental cues. This work offers a detailed survey of all ATGs in tobacco and also suggests manifold functions of autophagy in both normal plant growth and plant response to environmental stresses. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Kazusa DNA Research Institute.

  12. Suggested Involvement of PP1/PP2A Activity and De Novo Gene Expression in Anhydrobiotic Survival in a Tardigrade, Hypsibius dujardini, by Chemical Genetic Approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koyuki Kondo

    Full Text Available Upon desiccation, some tardigrades enter an ametabolic dehydrated state called anhydrobiosis and can survive a desiccated environment in this state. For successful transition to anhydrobiosis, some anhydrobiotic tardigrades require pre-incubation under high humidity conditions, a process called preconditioning, prior to exposure to severe desiccation. Although tardigrades are thought to prepare for transition to anhydrobiosis during preconditioning, the molecular mechanisms governing such processes remain unknown. In this study, we used chemical genetic approaches to elucidate the regulatory mechanisms of anhydrobiosis in the anhydrobiotic tardigrade, Hypsibius dujardini. We first demonstrated that inhibition of transcription or translation drastically impaired anhydrobiotic survival, suggesting that de novo gene expression is required for successful transition to anhydrobiosis in this tardigrade. We then screened 81 chemicals and identified 5 chemicals that significantly impaired anhydrobiotic survival after severe desiccation, in contrast to little or no effect on survival after high humidity exposure only. In particular, cantharidic acid, a selective inhibitor of protein phosphatase (PP 1 and PP2A, exhibited the most profound inhibitory effects. Another PP1/PP2A inhibitor, okadaic acid, also significantly and specifically impaired anhydrobiotic survival, suggesting that PP1/PP2A activity plays an important role for anhydrobiosis in this species. This is, to our knowledge, the first report of the required activities of signaling molecules for desiccation tolerance in tardigrades. The identified inhibitory chemicals could provide novel clues to elucidate the regulatory mechanisms underlying anhydrobiosis in tardigrades.

  13. A Two-Year Randomized Trial of Interventions to Decrease Stress Hormone Vasopressin Production in Patients with Meniere's Disease-A Pilot Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tadashi Kitahara

    Full Text Available Meniere's disease, a common inner ear condition, has an incidence of 15-50 per 100,000. Because mental/physical stress and subsequent increase in the stress hormone vasopressin supposedly trigger Meniere's disease, we set a pilot study to seek new therapeutic interventions, namely management of vasopressin secretion, to treat this disease. We enrolled 297 definite Meniere's patients from 2010 to 2012 in a randomized-controlled and open-label trial, assigning Group-I (control traditional oral medication, Group-II abundant water intake, Group-III tympanic ventilation tubes and Group-IV sleeping in darkness. Two hundred sixty-three patients completed the planned 2-year-follow-up, which included assessment of vertigo, hearing, plasma vasopressin concentrations and changes in stress/psychological factors. At 2 years, vertigo was completely controlled in 54.3% of patients in Group-I, 81.4% in Group-II, 84.1% in Group-III, and 80.0% in Group-IV (statistically I < II = III = IV. Hearing was improved in 7.1% of patients in Group-I, 35.7% in Group-II, 34.9% in Group-III, and 31.7% in Group-IV (statistically I < II = III = IV. Plasma vasopressin concentrations decreased more in Groups-II, -III, and -IV than in Groups-I (statistically I < II = III = IV, although patients' stress/psychological factors had not changed. Physicians have focused on stress management for Meniere's disease. However, avoidance of stress is unrealistic for patients who live in demanding social environments. Our findings in this pilot study suggest that interventions to decrease vasopressin secretion by abundant water intake, tympanic ventilation tubes and sleeping in darkness is feasible in treating Meniere's disease, even though these therapies did not alter reported mental/physical stress levels.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01099046.

  14. Proteome analysis of a Lactococcus lactis strain overexpressing gapA suggests that the gene product is an auxiliary glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willemoës, Martin; Kilstrup, Mogens; Roepstorff, Peter; Hammer, Karin

    2002-08-01

    The sequence of the genome from the Lactococcus lactis subspecies lactis strain IL1403 shows the presence of two reading frames, gapA and gapB, putatively encoding glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH). Previous proteomic analysis of the L. lactis subspecies cremoris strain MG1363 has revealed two neighbouring protein spots, GapBI and GapBII, with amino terminal sequences identical to the product of gapA from the L. lactis subspecies cremoris strain LM0230 and that of the two IL1403 sequences. In order to assign the two protein spots to their respective genes we constructed an L. lactis strain that overexpessed the gapA gene derived from MG1363 upon nisin induction. Compared to the wild-type, the overexpressing strain had a 3.4-fold elevated level of specific GAPDH activity when grown in the presence of nisin. In both MG1363 and the gapA overexpressing strain the GAPDH activity was specific for NAD. No NADP dependent activity was detected. Proteome analysis of the gapA overexpressing strain revealed two new protein spots, GapAI and GapAII, not previously detected in proteome analysis of MG1363. Results from mass spectrometry analysis of GapA and GapB and comparison with the deduced protein sequences for the GAPDH isozymes from the genome sequence of strain IL1403 allowed us to assign GapA and GapB to their apparent IL1403 homologues encoded by gapA and gapB, respectively. Furthermore, we suggest that a homologue of a gapB product, represented by GapB, is the main source of GAPDH activity in L. lactis during normal growth.

  15. Differential transcription of Barhl1 homeobox gene in restricted functional domains of the central nervous system suggests a role in brain patterning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rachidi, Mohammed; Lopes, Carmela

    2006-02-01

    The mouse Barhl1 homeogene, member of the BarH subfamily, play a crucial role in the cerebellum development and its human ortholog BARHL1 has been proposed as a positional and functional candidate gene for the Joubert syndrome, a form of cerebellar ataxia. The Barhl1 expression has been demonstrated to be induced by the transcription factor Math1 involved in BMP responses. We isolated the mouse Barhl1 by screening of a cDNA library with the Xenopus Xvent-2, member of the BarH subfamily, which acts in the BMP4 pathway during embryonic patterning and neural plate differentiation. We studied the detailed Barhl1 expression pattern and showed its transcription in spatio-temporally and functionally restricted domains of the developing central nervous system (CNS). Using our new optical microscopy technology, we compare the transcript steady state level and cell density in the Barhl1-expressing regions. We found that Barhl1 was transcribed in superior and inferior colliculi in the dorsal mesencephalon at a relatively low transcriptional level. In the diencephalon, Barhl1 was found higher expressed first within the basal plate and later in the mammillary region. In the cerebellum, Barhl1 showed the highest transcriptional level restricted to the anterior and posterior rhombic lips giving rise to the external and internal cerebellar granular cells and to the deep nuclei. In the spinal cord, Barhl1 showed similar expression level than in the cerebellum and is delimited to a subset of dorsal interneurons. Therefore, our results indicated that Barhl1 homeodomain gene is exclusively transcribed in restricted CNS domain at differential transcription levels which suggest a highly regulated transcriptional mechanism. In addition, these regional and cellular specificities indicated that Barhl1 may be involved in the differentiation of the specific subsets of neuronal progenitors.

  16. Ultra-deep pyrosequencing of partial surface protein genes from infectious Salmon Anaemia virus (ISAV suggest novel mechanisms involved in transition to virulence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Turhan Markussen

    Full Text Available Uncultivable HPR0 strains of infectious salmon anaemia viruses (ISAVs infecting gills are non-virulent putative precursors of virulent ISAVs (vISAVs causing systemic disease in farmed Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar. The transition to virulence involves two molecular events, a deletion in the highly polymorphic region (HPR of the hemagglutinin-esterase (HE gene and a Q266→L266 substitution or insertion next to the putative cleavage site (R267 in the fusion protein (F. We have performed ultra-deep pyrosequencing (UDPS of these gene regions from healthy fish positive for HPR0 virus carrying full-length HPR sampled in a screening program, and a vISAV strain from an ISA outbreak at the same farming site three weeks later, and compared the mutant spectra. As the UDPS data shows the presence of both HE genotypes at both sampling times, and the outbreak strain was unlikely to be directly related to the HPR0 strain, this is the first report of a double infection with HPR0s and vISAVs. For F amplicon reads, mutation frequencies generating L266 codons in screening samples and Q266 codons in outbreak samples were not higher than at any random site. We suggest quasispecies heterogeneity as well as RNA structural properties are linked to transition to virulence. More specifically, a mechanism where selected single point mutations in the full-length HPR alter the RNA structure facilitating single- or sequential deletions in this region is proposed. The data provides stronger support for the deletion hypothesis, as opposed to recombination, as the responsible mechanism for generating the sequence deletions in HE.

  17. Radioimmunoassay measurement of plasma oxytocin and vasopressin in cows during machine milking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Landgraf, R.; Wehowsky, G.; Schulz, J.; Schulze, H.; Bothur, D. (Forschungsinstitut fuer Koerperkultur und Sport, Leipzig (German Democratic Republic); Karl-Marx-Universitaet, Leipzig (German Democratic Republic). Sektion Tierproduktion und Veterinaermedizin)

    1982-07-01

    The response of plasma oxytocin and vasopressin to machine milking in cows was studied by radioimmunoassay. Depending on the method of machine milking used, plasma oxytocin increased to a greater or lesser degree after teat cup application. Plasma vasopressin was not affected by the milking procedures.

  18. Radioimmunoassay of vasopressin during pregnancy. Use and removal of cystylaminopeptidase inhibitors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Post, J. A.; van Heerikhuize, J. J.; Boer, K.; van Boxtel, C. E.; Swaab, D. F.

    1994-01-01

    This paper describes a radioimmunoassay (RIA) for arginine-vasopressin in which o-phenanthroline effectively inhibits cystyl-amino-peptidase activity in whole blood and plasma from pregnant women but in which o-phenanthroline is removed during the extraction of vasopressin from plasma to prevent

  19. Mechanisms involved in dual vasopressin/apelin neuron dysfunction during aging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie Sauvant

    Full Text Available Normal aging is associated with vasopressin neuron adaptation, but little is known about its effects on the release of apelin, an aquaretic peptide colocalized with vasopressin. We found that plasma vasopressin concentrations were higher and plasma apelin concentrations lower in aged rats than in younger adults. The response of AVP/apelin neurons to osmotic challenge was impaired in aged rats. The overactivity of vasopressin neurons was sustained partly by the increased expression of Transient receptor potential vanilloid2 (Trpv2, because central Trpv blocker injection reversed the age-induced increase in plasma vasopressin concentration without modifying plasma apelin concentration. The morphofunctional plasticity of the supraoptic nucleus neuron-astrocyte network normally observed during chronic dehydration in adults appeared to be impaired in aged rats as well. IL-6 overproduction by astrocytes and low-grade microglial neuroinflammation may contribute to the modification of neuronal functioning during aging. Indeed, central treatment with antibodies against IL-6 decreased plasma vasopressin levels and increased plasma apelin concentration toward the values observed in younger adults. Conversely, minocycline treatment (inhibiting microglial metabolism did not affect plasma vasopressin concentration, but increased plasma apelin concentration toward control values for younger adults. This study is the first to demonstrate dual vasopressin/apelin adaptation mediated by inflammatory molecules and neuronal Trpv2, during aging.

  20. Modified forms of vasopressin and oxytocin in a bovine pineal preparation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noteborn, H.P.J.M.; Burbach, J.P.H.; Ebels, I.

    1987-01-01

    A bovine pineal acid extract displays a vasotocin-like bioactivity in several bioassays, and is recognized by antibodies against the Pro-Arg-Gly-amide ending common to vasopressin and vasotocin. By using molecular sieve filtration and reversed-phase HPLC, a vasopressin- and oxytocin-like peptide was

  1. The pituitary hormones arginine vasopressin-neurophysin II and oxytocin-neurophysin I show close linkage with interleukin-1 on mouse chromosome 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marini, J.C.; Nelson, K.K.; Siracusa, L.D. (Jefferson Cancer Institute, Philadelphia, PA (United States)); Battey, J. (National Institutes of Health/National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD (United States))

    1993-01-01

    Arginine vasopressin (AVP) and oxytocin (OXT) are posterior pituitary hormones. AVP is involved in fluid homeostasis, while OXT is involved in lactation and parturition. AVP is derived from a larger precursor, prepro-arginine-vasopressin-neurophysin II (prepro-AVP-NP II; AVP), and is physically linked to prepro-oxytocin-neurophysin I (prepro-OXT-NPI1; OXT). The genes for AVP and OXT are separated by only 12 kb of DNA in humans, whereas in the mouse 3.5 kb of intergenic sequence lies between Avp and Oxt. Interspecific backcross analysis has now been used to map the Avp/Oxt complex to chromosome 2 in the mouse. This map position confirms and extends the known region of linkage conservation between mouse chromosome 2 and human chromosome 20. 16 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Association of Variants of Arginine Vasopressin and Arginine Vasopressin Receptor 1A With Severe Acetaminophen Liver InjurySummary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew Randesi

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Background & Aims: Acetaminophen-related acute liver injury and liver failure (ALF result from ingestion of supratherapeutic quantities of this analgesic, frequently in association with other forms of substance abuse including alcohol, opioids, and cocaine. Thus, overdosing represents a unique high-risk behavior associated with other forms of drug use disorder. Methods: We examined a series of 21 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in 9 genes related to impulsivity and/or stress responsivity that may modify response to stress. Study subjects were 229 white patients admitted to tertiary care liver centers for ALF that was determined to be due to acetaminophen toxicity after careful review of historical and biochemical data. Identification of relevant SNPs used Sanger sequencing, TaqMan, or custom microarray. Association tests were carried out to compare genotype frequencies between patients and healthy white controls. Results: The mean age was 37 years, and 75.6% were female, with similar numbers classified as intentional overdose or unintentional (without suicidal intent, occurring for a period of several days, usually due to pain. There was concomitant alcohol abuse in 30%, opioid use in 33.6%, and use of other drugs of abuse in 30.6%. The genotype frequencies of 2 SNPs were found to be significantly different between the cases and controls, specifically SNP rs2282018 in the arginine vasopressin gene (AVP, odds ratio 1.64 and SNP rs11174811 in the AVP receptor 1A gene (AVPR1A, odds ratio 1.89, both of which have been previously linked to a drug use disorder diagnosis. Conclusions: Patients who develop acetaminophen-related ALF have increased frequency of gene variants that may cause altered stress responsivity, which has been shown to be associated with other unrelated substance use disorders. Keywords: Impulsivity, Stress Responsivity, Pituitary-Adrenal Axis, Overdose

  3. The evolutionary host switches of Polychromophilus: a multi-gene phylogeny of the bat malaria genus suggests a second invasion of mammals by a haemosporidian parasite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Witsenburg Fardo

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The majority of Haemosporida species infect birds or reptiles, but many important genera, including Plasmodium, infect mammals. Dipteran vectors shared by avian, reptilian and mammalian Haemosporida, suggest multiple invasions of Mammalia during haemosporidian evolution; yet, phylogenetic analyses have detected only a single invasion event. Until now, several important mammal-infecting genera have been absent in these analyses. This study focuses on the evolutionary origin of Polychromophilus, a unique malaria genus that only infects bats (Microchiroptera and is transmitted by bat flies (Nycteribiidae. Methods Two species of Polychromophilus were obtained from wild bats caught in Switzerland. These were molecularly characterized using four genes (asl, clpc, coI, cytb from the three different genomes (nucleus, apicoplast, mitochondrion. These data were then combined with data of 60 taxa of Haemosporida available in GenBank. Bayesian inference, maximum likelihood and a range of rooting methods were used to test specific hypotheses concerning the phylogenetic relationships between Polychromophilus and the other haemosporidian genera. Results The Polychromophilus melanipherus and Polychromophilus murinus samples show genetically distinct patterns and group according to species. The Bayesian tree topology suggests that the monophyletic clade of Polychromophilus falls within the avian/saurian clade of Plasmodium and directed hypothesis testing confirms the Plasmodium origin. Conclusion Polychromophilus' ancestor was most likely a bird- or reptile-infecting Plasmodium before it switched to bats. The invasion of mammals as hosts has, therefore, not been a unique event in the evolutionary history of Haemosporida, despite the suspected costs of adapting to a new host. This was, moreover, accompanied by a switch in dipteran host.

  4. submitter Metabolomic Profile of Low–Copy Number Carriers at the Salivary α-Amylase Gene Suggests a Metabolic Shift Toward Lipid-Based Energy Production

    CERN Document Server

    Arredouani, Abdelilah; Culeddu, Nicola; Moustafa, Julia El-Sayed; Tichet, Jean; Balkau, Beverley; Brousseau, Thierry; Manca, Marco; Falchi, Mario

    2016-01-01

    Low serum salivary amylase levels have been associated with a range of metabolic abnormalities, including obesity and insulin resistance. We recently suggested that a low copy number at the AMY1 gene, associated with lower enzyme levels, also increases susceptibility to obesity. To advance our understanding of the effect of AMY1 copy number variation on metabolism, we compared the metabolomic signatures of high– and low–copy number carriers. We analyzed, using mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), the sera of healthy normal-weight women carrying either low–AMY1 copies (LAs: four or fewer copies; n = 50) or high–AMY1 copies (HAs: eight or more copies; n = 50). Best-fitting multivariate models (empirical P < 1 × $10^{−3})$ of mass spectrometry and NMR data were concordant in showing differences in lipid metabolism between the two groups. In particular, LA carriers showed lower levels of long- and medium-chain fatty acids, and higher levels of dicarboxylic fatty acids and 2-hydrox...

  5. Dehydration-induced modulation of kappa-opioid inhibition of vasopressin neurone activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Victoria; Bishop, Valerie R; Leng, Gareth; Brown, Colin H

    2009-12-01

    Dehydration increases vasopressin (antidiuretic hormone) secretion from the posterior pituitary gland to reduce water loss in the urine. Vasopressin secretion is determined by action potential firing in vasopressin neurones, which can exhibit continuous, phasic (alternating periods of activity and silence), or irregular activity. Autocrine kappa-opioid inhibition contributes to the generation of activity patterning of vasopressin neurones under basal conditions and so we used in vivo extracellular single unit recording to test the hypothesis that changes in autocrine kappa-opioid inhibition drive changes in activity patterning of vasopressin neurones during dehydration. Dehydration increased the firing rate of rat vasopressin neurones displaying continuous activity (from 7.1 +/- 0.5 to 9.0 +/- 0.6 spikes s(1)) and phasic activity (from 4.2 +/- 0.7 to 7.8 +/- 0.9 spikes s(1)), but not those displaying irregular activity. The dehydration-induced increase in phasic activity was via an increase in intraburst firing rate. The selective -opioid receptor antagonist nor-binaltorphimine increased the firing rate of phasic neurones in non-dehydrated rats (from 3.4 +/- 0.8 to 5.3 +/- 0.6 spikes s(1)) and dehydrated rats (from 6.4 +/- 0.5 to 9.1 +/- 1.2 spikes s(1)), indicating that kappa-opioid feedback inhibition of phasic bursts is maintained during dehydration. In a separate series of experiments, prodynorphin mRNA expression was increased in vasopressin neurones of hyperosmotic rats, compared to hypo-osmotic rats. Hence, it appears that dynorphin expression in vasopressin neurones undergoes dynamic changes in proportion to the required secretion of vasopressin so that, even under stimulated conditions, autocrine feedback inhibition of vasopressin neurones prevents over-excitation.

  6. Serotonergic involvement in stress-induced vasopressin and oxytocin secretion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Henrik; Knigge, Ulrich; Kjaer, Andreas

    2002-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the involvement of serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine - 5-HT) receptors in mediation of stress-induced arginine vasopressin (AVP) and oxytocin (OT) secretion in male rats. DESIGN: Experiments on laboratory rats with control groups. METHODS: Different stress paradigms were...... applied after pretreatment with intracerebroventricular infusion of saline or different 5-HT antagonists. RESULTS: Restraint stress (5 min), hypotensive hemorrhage or dehydration for 24 h increased AVP secretion fivefold and OT secretion threefold. Swim stress for 3 min had no effect on AVP secretion...

  7. Glu-47, which forms a salt bridge between neurophysin-II and arginine vasopressin, is deleted in patients with familial central diabetes insipidus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuasa, Hiromitsu; Ito, Masafumi; Nagasaki, Hiroshi; Oiso, Yutaka; Saito, Hidehiko (Nagoya Univ. School of Medicine, Chiba (Japan)); Miyamoto, S.; Sasaki, N. (Chiba Children' s Hospital, Chiba (Japan))

    1993-09-01

    The arginine vasopressin (AVP) gene was sequenced in a pedigree with familial central diabetes insipidus (DI). When polymerase chain reaction-amplified DNAs from affected subjects were subjected to polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, fragments including exon 2 displayed two additional, slower migrating bands. These extra bands represented DNA heteroduplexes, indicating that there was a deletion or insertion mutation in exon 2. As the region with such a mutation was identified by direct sequence analysis, polymerase chain reaction-amplified fragments including the region were subcloned and sequenced. A 3-basepair deletion (AGG) out of two consecutive AGG sequences (nucleotides 1824-1829) was identified in one of two alleles. The cosegregation of the mutation with the DI phenotype in the family was confirmed by restriction enzyme analyses. This mutation should yield an abnormal AVP precursor lacking Glu[sup 47] in its neurophysin-II (NP) moiety. Since Glu[sup 47] is essential for NP molecules to form a salt bridge with AVP, it is very likely that the function of NP as a carrier protein for AVP would be impaired. The authors suggest that AVP would undergo accelerated proteolytic degradation, and this mechanism would be involved in the pathogenesis of DI in this pedigree. 34 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  8. Endoplasmic reticulum stress in vasopressin neurons of familial diabetes insipidus model mice: aggregate formation and mRNA poly(A) tail shortening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arima, Hiroshi; Morishita, Yoshiaki; Hagiwara, Daisuke; Hayashi, Masayuki; Oiso, Yutaka

    2014-01-01

    The immunoglobulin heavy chain binding protein (BiP) is an endoplasmic reticulum (ER) chaperone, which binds to newly synthesized secretory and transmembrane proteins to facilitate protein folding. BiP mRNA is expressed in the arginine vasopressin (AVP) neurons in the supraoptic nucleus of wild-type mice even in basal conditions, and the expression levels increase in response to dehydration. These data suggest that AVP neurons are subjected to ER stress. Familial neurohypophysial diabetes insipidus (FNDI) is caused by mutations in the gene locus of AVP. The mutant proteins could accumulate in the ER and possibly increase ER stress in the AVP neurons. We bred mice possessing a mutation causing FNDI, which manifested progressive polyuria, as do the patients with FNDI. Electron microscopic analyses demonstrated that aggregates accumulated in the ER of AVP neurons in FNDI mice. Despite polyuria, which could potentially induce dehydration, AVP mRNA expression was decreased in the supraoptic nucleus, and the AVP mRNA poly(A) tail length was shortened in FNDI mice compared with wild-type mice. Incubation of hypothalamic explants of wild-type mice with ER stressors caused shortening of the poly(A) tail length of AVP mRNA, accompanied by decreases in the expression. These data revealed a mechanism by which ER stress decreases poly(A) tail length of AVP mRNA, and this reduces the load of unfolded proteins that form the aggregates in ER of the AVP neurons in FNDI mice.

  9. Expression Profiling of FLOWERING LOCUS T-Like Gene in Alternate Bearing ‘Hass' Avocado Trees Suggests a Role for PaFT in Avocado Flower Induction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziv, Dafna; Zviran, Tali; Zezak, Oshrat; Samach, Alon; Irihimovitch, Vered

    2014-01-01

    In many perennials, heavy fruit load on a shoot decreases the ability of the plant to undergo floral induction in the following spring, resulting in a pattern of crop production known as alternate bearing. Here, we studied the effects of fruit load on floral determination in ‘Hass' avocado (Persea americana). De-fruiting experiments initially confirmed the negative effects of fruit load on return to flowering. Next, we isolated a FLOWERING LOCUS T-like gene, PaFT, hypothesized to act as a phloem-mobile florigen signal and examined its expression profile in shoot tissues of on (fully loaded) and off (fruit-lacking) trees. Expression analyses revealed a strong peak in PaFT transcript levels in leaves of off trees from the end of October through November, followed by a return to starting levels. Moreover and concomitant with inflorescence development, only off buds displayed up-regulation of the floral identity transcripts PaAP1 and PaLFY, with significant variation being detected from October and November, respectively. Furthermore, a parallel microscopic study of off apical buds revealed the presence of secondary inflorescence axis structures that only appeared towards the end of November. Finally, ectopic expression of PaFT in Arabidopsis resulted in early flowering transition. Together, our data suggests a link between increased PaFT expression observed during late autumn and avocado flower induction. Furthermore, our results also imply that, as in the case of other crop trees, fruit-load might affect flowering by repressing the expression of PaFT in the leaves. Possible mechanism(s) by which fruit crop might repress PaFT expression, are discussed. PMID:25330324

  10. Expression profiling of FLOWERING LOCUS T-like gene in alternate bearing 'Hass' avocado trees suggests a role for PaFT in avocado flower induction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziv, Dafna; Zviran, Tali; Zezak, Oshrat; Samach, Alon; Irihimovitch, Vered

    2014-01-01

    In many perennials, heavy fruit load on a shoot decreases the ability of the plant to undergo floral induction in the following spring, resulting in a pattern of crop production known as alternate bearing. Here, we studied the effects of fruit load on floral determination in 'Hass' avocado (Persea americana). De-fruiting experiments initially confirmed the negative effects of fruit load on return to flowering. Next, we isolated a FLOWERING LOCUS T-like gene, PaFT, hypothesized to act as a phloem-mobile florigen signal and examined its expression profile in shoot tissues of on (fully loaded) and off (fruit-lacking) trees. Expression analyses revealed a strong peak in PaFT transcript levels in leaves of off trees from the end of October through November, followed by a return to starting levels. Moreover and concomitant with inflorescence development, only off buds displayed up-regulation of the floral identity transcripts PaAP1 and PaLFY, with significant variation being detected from October and November, respectively. Furthermore, a parallel microscopic study of off apical buds revealed the presence of secondary inflorescence axis structures that only appeared towards the end of November. Finally, ectopic expression of PaFT in Arabidopsis resulted in early flowering transition. Together, our data suggests a link between increased PaFT expression observed during late autumn and avocado flower induction. Furthermore, our results also imply that, as in the case of other crop trees, fruit-load might affect flowering by repressing the expression of PaFT in the leaves. Possible mechanism(s) by which fruit crop might repress PaFT expression, are discussed.

  11. Expression profiling of FLOWERING LOCUS T-like gene in alternate bearing 'Hass' avocado trees suggests a role for PaFT in avocado flower induction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dafna Ziv

    Full Text Available In many perennials, heavy fruit load on a shoot decreases the ability of the plant to undergo floral induction in the following spring, resulting in a pattern of crop production known as alternate bearing. Here, we studied the effects of fruit load on floral determination in 'Hass' avocado (Persea americana. De-fruiting experiments initially confirmed the negative effects of fruit load on return to flowering. Next, we isolated a FLOWERING LOCUS T-like gene, PaFT, hypothesized to act as a phloem-mobile florigen signal and examined its expression profile in shoot tissues of on (fully loaded and off (fruit-lacking trees. Expression analyses revealed a strong peak in PaFT transcript levels in leaves of off trees from the end of October through November, followed by a return to starting levels. Moreover and concomitant with inflorescence development, only off buds displayed up-regulation of the floral identity transcripts PaAP1 and PaLFY, with significant variation being detected from October and November, respectively. Furthermore, a parallel microscopic study of off apical buds revealed the presence of secondary inflorescence axis structures that only appeared towards the end of November. Finally, ectopic expression of PaFT in Arabidopsis resulted in early flowering transition. Together, our data suggests a link between increased PaFT expression observed during late autumn and avocado flower induction. Furthermore, our results also imply that, as in the case of other crop trees, fruit-load might affect flowering by repressing the expression of PaFT in the leaves. Possible mechanism(s by which fruit crop might repress PaFT expression, are discussed.

  12. Copeptin, a Marker of Vasopressin, Predicts Vascular Dementia but not Alzheimer's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, Erik D; Melander, Olle; Elmståhl, Sölve; Lethagen, Eva; Minthon, Lennart; Pihlsgård, Mats; Nägga, Katarina

    2016-04-12

    Copeptin is a reliable surrogate marker for the neurohypophyseal hormone vasopressin. Elevated plasma level of copeptin has been associated with cardiovascular and metabolic disease risk. To investigate the association between copeptin and risk of dementia. In all, 18,240 individuals from Malmö, Sweden, were examined between 2002 and 2006 (mean age 69.3 years, 69.8% men). Incident cases of dementia until 31 December 2009 were identified by linkage with the Swedish National Patient Register. To validate the dementia diagnoses, medical records as well as laboratory and neuroimaging data were carefully reviewed. Baseline level of copeptin was measured in frozen plasma in: (1) all participants who were diagnosed with dementia during follow-up, (2) a random sample of 5100 individuals of the cohort. During a median follow-up of 4.2 years, there were 374 incident dementia cases (age range 60-83 years at baseline): 120 were classified as Alzheimer's disease (AD), 84 as vascular dementia (VaD), and 102 as mixed dementia. In logistic regressions adjusted for cardiovascular risk factors, baseline level of copeptin predicted incident VaD (Odds ratio (OR) 1.30 per 1 SD increase in log copeptin, 95% CI 1.03-1.64). Copeptin did not predict incidence of all-cause dementia (OR 1.05, 95% CI 0.94-1.18), AD (OR 0.97, 95% CI 0.79-1.18), or mixed dementia (OR 0.85, 95% CI 0.68-1.05). Elevated plasma level of copeptin is a risk marker for incident VaD, but not for incident AD. This suggests that the vasopressin hormonal system might be involved in the development of VaD.

  13. Vasopressin receptor antagonists and their role in clinical medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Girish Narayen

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Hyponatremia is the most common electrolyte abnormality in hospitalized patients. Its treatment is based not only on extracellular fluid volume status of patients but also on its pathogenetic mechanisms. Conventional treatment of hyponatremia like fluid restriction, which is useful in euvolemic and hypervolemic hyponatremia, has very poor patient compliance over long term. Vasopressin receptor antagonists (Vaptans are a new group of nonpeptide drugs which have been used in various clinical conditions with limited success. Whereas conivaptan is to be administered intravenously, the other vaptans like tolvaptan, lixivaptan, and satavaptan are effective as oral medication. They produce aquaresis by their action on vasopressin type 2 (V2R receptors in the collecting duct and thus increase solute free water excretion. Vaptans are being used as an alternative to fluid restriction in euvolemic and hypervolemic hyponatremic patients. Efficacy of vaptans is now well accepted for management of correction of hyponatremia over a short period. However, its efficacy in improving the long-term morbidity and mortality in patients with chronic hyponatremia due to cirrhosis and heart failure is yet to be established. Vaptans have not become the mainstay treatment of hyponatremia yet.

  14. Inhibition of Ectopic Arginine Vasopressin Production by Phenytoin in the Small Cell Lung Cancer Cell Line Lu-165

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masaru Shoji

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Phenytoin, a voltage-gated sodium channel (NaV channel antagonist, reportedly inhibits arginine vasopressin (AVP release from an isolated rat neurohypophysis. So far, it is uncertain whether phenytoin has a direct action on ectopic AVP-producing neuroendocrine tumors. We studied the effect of phenytoin on the release of copeptin, the C-terminal fragment of pro-AVP, and expression of AVP gene in the human small cell lung cancer cell line Lu-165. Cells were maintained in RPMI1640 medium with 10% fetal bovine serum and were used within the fifth passage. Copeptin was detected using a new sandwich immunoassay, and AVP mRNA levels were measured using real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. Treatment with phenytoin at a concentration of 25 µg/mL, but not at 5 or 10 µg/mL, had an inhibitory effect on copeptin levels in the medium at 48 h. At the same concentration, AVP mRNA levels in Lu-165 cells also decreased. Although a sodium challenge with added sodium at 20 mEq/L increased copeptin levels in the medium, a sodium challenge with added sodium at 10 and 20 mEq/L had no effect on AVP mRNA levels. Phenytoin at a concentration of 25 µg/mL suppressed copeptin levels in the medium under the sodium challenge with added sodium at 10 and 20 mEq/L. Phenytoin at a concentration of 25 µg/mL also decreased AVP mRNA levels in Lu-165 cells under the sodium challenge with added sodium at 10 mEq/L, but not at 20 mEq/L. Among five tested NaV channel subunits, NaV1.3 was highly expressed in Lu-165 cells. However, phenytoin significantly decreased NaV1.3 mRNA levels under the sodium challenge with added sodium at 10 and 20 mEq/L. These results suggest that Lu-165 cells are sensitive to phenytoin and sodium to control of AVP release and its gene expression. Phenytoin might have a direct action on ectopic AVP-producing tumors, suggesting the importance of NaV channels in AVP-producing neuroendocrine tumors.

  15. Effects of the vasopressin agonist terlipressin on plasma cAMP and ENaC excretion in the urine in patients with cirrhosis and water retention

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krag, Aleksander; Pedersen, Erling Bjerregaard; Møller, Søren

    2011-01-01

    Terlipressin is a vasopressin analogue used for its potent V1a effects in cirrhotic patients. Recent data suggest that terlipressin has affinity to renal V2 receptors and modulates Aquaporin 2 (AQP2) expression and free water clearance. Stimulation of renal V2 receptors may also affect sodium tra...... transport via the Epithelial Sodium Channel (ENaC). Furthermore, endothelial V2 receptors may indirectly affect proximal sodium handling by increasing plasma cAMP....

  16. ASD and genetic associations with receptors for oxytocin and vasopressin – AVPR1A, AVPR1B, and OXTR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunday M Francis

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: There are limited treatments available for autism spectrum disorder (ASD. Studies have reported significant associations between the receptor genes of oxytocin (OT and vasopressin (AVP and ASD diagnosis, as well as, ASD-related phenotypes. Researchers have also found the manipulation of these systems affect social and repetitive behaviors, core characteristics of ASD. Consequently, research involving the oxytocin/vasopressin pathways as intervention targets has increased. Therefore, further examination into the relationship between these neuropeptides and ASD was undertaken. In this study, we examined associations between variants in the receptor genes of vasopressin (AVPR1A, AVPR1B, oxytocin (OXTR and ASD diagnosis along with related subphenotypes.Methods: Probands were assessed using Autism Diagnostic Interview-Revised, Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule, and clinical DSM-IV-TR criteria. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in AVPR1B and OXTR, and microsatellites in AVPR1A were genotyped in ~200 families with a proband with ASD. Family-based association testing (FBAT was utilized to determine associations between variants and ASD. Haplotypes composed of OXTR SNPs (i.e. rs53576-rs2254298-rs2268493 were also analyzed due to previously published associations.Results: Using the additive inheritance model in FBAT we found associations between AVPR1B SNPs (rs28632197, p=0.005, rs35369693, p=0.025 and diagnosis. As in other studies, OXTR rs2268493 (p=0.050 was associated with diagnosis. rs2268493 was also associated with ASD subphenotypes of social withdrawal (p=0.013 and insistence on sameness (p=0.039. Further analyses demonstrated that the haplotype, rs2254298-rs2268493 was found to be significantly associated with diagnosis (A-T; p=0.026. FBAT was also used to analyze AVPR1A microsatellites (RS1 and RS3. Both length variants were found to be associated with restrictive, repetitive behaviors, but not overall diagnosis. Correction

  17. ASD and Genetic Associations with Receptors for Oxytocin and Vasopressin-AVPR1A, AVPR1B, and OXTR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francis, Sunday M; Kim, Soo-Jeong; Kistner-Griffin, Emily; Guter, Stephen; Cook, Edwin H; Jacob, Suma

    2016-01-01

    Background: There are limited treatments available for autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Studies have reported significant associations between the receptor genes of oxytocin (OT) and vasopressin (AVP) and ASD diagnosis, as well as ASD-related phenotypes. Researchers have also found the manipulation of these systems affects social and repetitive behaviors, core characteristics of ASD. Consequently, research involving the oxytocin/vasopressin pathways as intervention targets has increased. Therefore, further examination into the relationship between these neuropeptides and ASD was undertaken. In this study, we examined associations between variants in the receptor genes of vasopressin (AVPR1A, AVPR1B), oxytocin (OXTR), and ASD diagnosis along with related subphenotypes. Methods: Probands were assessed using Autism Diagnostic Interview-Revised, Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule, and clinical DSM-IV-TR criteria. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in AVPR1B and OXTR, and microsatellites in AVPR1A were genotyped in ~200 families with a proband with ASD. Family-based association testing (FBAT) was utilized to determine associations between variants and ASD. Haplotypes composed of OXTR SNPs (i.e., rs53576-rs2254298-rs2268493) were also analyzed due to previously published associations. Results: Using the additive inheritance model in FBAT we found associations between AVPR1B SNPs (rs28632197, p = 0.005, rs35369693, p = 0.025) and diagnosis. As in other studies, OXTR rs2268493 (p = 0.050) was associated with diagnosis. rs2268493 was also associated with ASD subphenotypes of social withdrawal (p = 0.013) and Insistence on Sameness (p = 0.039). Further analyses demonstrated that the haplotype, rs2254298-rs2268493 was found to be significantly associated with diagnosis (A-T; p = 0.026). FBAT was also used to analyze AVPR1A microsatellites (RS1 and RS3). Both length variants were found to be associated with restrictive, repetitive behaviors, but not overall diagnosis

  18. Genome-Wide Analysis of Genes Encoding Methionine-Rich Proteins in Arabidopsis and Soybean Suggesting Their Roles in the Adaptation of Plants to Abiotic Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ha Duc Chu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Oxidation and reduction of methionine (Met play important roles in scavenging reactive oxygen species (ROS and signaling in living organisms. To understand the impacts of Met oxidation and reduction in plants during stress, we surveyed the genomes of Arabidopsis and soybean (Glycine max L. for genes encoding Met-rich proteins (MRPs. We found 121 and 213 genes encoding MRPs in Arabidopsis and soybean, respectively. Gene annotation indicated that those with known function are involved in vital cellular processes such as transcriptional control, calcium signaling, protein modification, and metal transport. Next, we analyzed the transcript levels of MRP-coding genes under normal and stress conditions. We found that 57 AtMRPs were responsive either to drought or to high salinity stress in Arabidopsis; 35 GmMRPs were responsive to drought in the leaf of late vegetative or early reproductive stages of soybean. Among the MRP genes with a known function, the majority of the abiotic stress-responsive genes are involved in transcription control and calcium signaling. Finally, Arabidopsis plant which overexpressed an MRP-coding gene, whose transcripts were downregulated by abiotic stress, was more sensitive to paraquat than the control. Taken together, our report indicates that MRPs participate in various vital processes of plants under normal and stress conditions.

  19. Genome-Wide Analysis Suggests the Relaxed Purifying Selection Affect the Evolution of WOX Genes in Pyrus bretschneideri, Prunus persica, Prunus mume, and Fragaria vesca.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Yunpeng; Han, Yahui; Meng, Dandan; Li, Guohui; Li, Dahui; Abdullah, Muhammad; Jin, Qing; Lin, Yi; Cai, Yongping

    2017-01-01

    WUSCHEL-related homeobox (WOX) family is one of the largest group of transcription factors (TFs) specifically found in plant kingdom. WOX TFs play an important role in plant development processes and evolutionary novelties. Although the roles of WOXs in Arabidopsis and rice have been well-studied, however, little are known about the relationships among the main clades in the molecular evolution of these genes in Rosaceae. Here, we carried out a genome-wide analysis and identified 14, 10, 10, and 9 of WOX genes from four Rosaceae species (Fragaria vesca, Prunus persica, Prunus mume, and Pyrus bretschneideri, respectively). According to evolutionary analysis, as well as amino acid sequences of their homodomains, these genes were divided into three clades with nine subgroups. Furthermore, due to the conserved structural patterns among these WOX genes, it was proposed that there should exist some highly conserved regions of microsynteny in the four Rosaceae species. Moreover, most of WOX gene pairs were presented with the conserved orientation among syntenic genome regions. In addition, according to substitution models analysis using PMAL software, no significant positive selection was detected, but type I functional divergence was identified among certain amino acids in WOX protein. These results revealed that the relaxed purifying selection might be the main driving force during the evolution of WOX genes in the tested Rosaceae species. Our result will be useful for further precise research on evolution of the WOX genes in family Rosaceae.

  20. Genome-Wide Analysis Suggests the Relaxed Purifying Selection Affect the Evolution of WOX Genes in Pyrus bretschneideri, Prunus persica, Prunus mume, and Fragaria vesca

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunpeng Cao

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available WUSCHEL-related homeobox (WOX family is one of the largest group of transcription factors (TFs specifically found in plant kingdom. WOX TFs play an important role in plant development processes and evolutionary novelties. Although the roles of WOXs in Arabidopsis and rice have been well-studied, however, little are known about the relationships among the main clades in the molecular evolution of these genes in Rosaceae. Here, we carried out a genome-wide analysis and identified 14, 10, 10, and 9 of WOX genes from four Rosaceae species (Fragaria vesca, Prunus persica, Prunus mume, and Pyrus bretschneideri, respectively. According to evolutionary analysis, as well as amino acid sequences of their homodomains, these genes were divided into three clades with nine subgroups. Furthermore, due to the conserved structural patterns among these WOX genes, it was proposed that there should exist some highly conserved regions of microsynteny in the four Rosaceae species. Moreover, most of WOX gene pairs were presented with the conserved orientation among syntenic genome regions. In addition, according to substitution models analysis using PMAL software, no significant positive selection was detected, but type I functional divergence was identified among certain amino acids in WOX protein. These results revealed that the relaxed purifying selection might be the main driving force during the evolution of WOX genes in the tested Rosaceae species. Our result will be useful for further precise research on evolution of the WOX genes in family Rosaceae.

  1. Ghrelin-Induced Enhancement of Vasopressin and Oxytocin Secretion in Rat Neurohypophyseal Cell Cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gálfi, M; Radács, M; Molnár, Zs; Budai, I; Tóth, G; Pósa, A; Kupai, K; Szalai, Z; Szabó, R; Molnár, H A; Gardi, J; László, Ferenc A; Varga, Cs

    2016-12-01

    The effects of ghrelin on vasopressin and oxytocin secretion were studied in 13-14-day cell cultures of isolated rat neurohypophyseal tissue. The vasopressin and oxytocin contents of the supernatant were determined by radioimmunoassay after a 1- or 2-h incubation. Significantly increased levels of vasopressin and oxytocin production were detected in the cell culture media following ghrelin administration, depending on the ghrelin doses. The oxytocin level proved to be more elevated than that of vasopressin. The increase of vasopressin and oxytocin secretion could be totally blocked by previous administration of the ghrelin receptor antagonist ([D-Lys 3 ]-growth hormone-releasing peptide-6). Application of the ghrelin receptor antagonist after ghrelin administration proved ineffective. The results indicate that vasopressin and oxytocin release is influenced directly by the ghrelin system, and the effects of ghrelin on vasopressin and oxytocin secretion from the neurohypophyseal tissue in rats can occur at the level of the posterior pituitary. Our observations lend support to the view that neurohypophysis contains ghrelin receptors.

  2. Complete plastid genome sequences suggest strong selection for retention of photosynthetic genes in the parasitic plant genus Cuscuta

    OpenAIRE

    Kuehl Jennifer V; Boore Jeffrey L; McNeal Joel R; de Pamphilis Claude W

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Background Plastid genome content and protein sequence are highly conserved across land plants and their closest algal relatives. Parasitic plants, which obtain some or all of their nutrition through an attachment to a host plant, are often a striking exception. Heterotrophy can lead to relaxed constraint on some plastid genes or even total gene loss. We sequenced plastid genomes of two species in the parasitic genus Cuscuta along with a non-parasitic relative, Ipomoea purpurea, to i...

  3. Identification of multipath genes differentially expressed in pathway-targeted microarrays in zebrafish infected and surviving spring viremia carp virus (SVCV suggest preventive drug candidates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paloma Encinas

    Full Text Available Spring viremia carp virus (SVCV is a rhabdovirus seasonally affecting warm-water cyprinid fish farming causing high impacts in worldwide economy. Because of the lack of effective preventive treatments, the identification of multipath genes involved in SVCV infection might be an alternative to explore the possibilities of using drugs for seasonal prevention of this fish disease. Because the zebrafish (Danio rerio is a cyprinid susceptible to SVCV and their genetics and genome sequence are well advanced, it has been chosen as a model for SVCV infections. We have used newly designed pathway-targeted microarrays 3-4-fold enriched for immune/infection functional-relevant probes by using zebrafish orthologous to human genes from selected pathways of the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG. The comparative analysis of differential expression of genes through 20 pathways in 2-day exposed or 30-day survivors of SVCV infection allowed the identification of 16 multipath genes common to more than 6 pathways. In addition, receptors (Toll-like, B-cell, T-cell, RIG1-like as well as viral RNA infection pathways were identified as the most important human-like pathways targeted by SVCV infection. Furthermore, by using bioinformatic tools to compare the promoter sequences corresponding to up and downregulated multipath gene groups, we identified putative common transcription factors which might be controlling such responses in a coordinated manner. Possible drug candidates to be tested in fish, can be identified now through search of data bases among those associated with the human orthologous to the zebrafish multipath genes. With the use of pathway-targeted microarrays, we identified some of the most important genes and transcription factors which might be implicated in viral shutoff and/or host survival responses after SVCV infection. These results could contribute to develop novel drug-based prevention methods and consolidate the zebrafish/SVCV as a

  4. The involvement of Opaque 2 on beta-prolamin gene regulation in maize and Coix suggests a more general role for this transcriptional activator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cord Neto, G; Yunes, J A; da Silva, M J; Vettore, A L; Arruda, P; Leite, A

    1995-03-01

    The maize opaque 2 (o2) mutation is known to have numerous pleiotropic effects. Some polypeptides have their expression depressed while others are enhanced. The best characterized effects of the o2 mutation are those exerted on endosperm genes encoding the storage protein class of the 22 kDa alpha-zeins and the ribosome inactivating protein b-32. The Opaque 2 (O2) locus encodes a basic domain-leucine zipper DNA-binding factor, O2, which transcriptionally regulates these genes. In the maize-related grass Coix lacryma-jobi, an O2-homologous protein regulates the 25 kDa alpha-coixin family. We show in this paper that O2 transcriptionally regulates the structurally and developmentally different class of the beta-prolamins. A new O2-binding box was identified in beta-prolamin genes from maize and Coix that, together with the boxes previously identified in other endosperm expressed genes, forms a curious collection of O2 cis elements. This may have regulatory implications on the role of O2 in the mechanism that controls coordinated gene expression in the developing endosperm. Considering that the O2 locus controls at least three distinct classes of genes in maize endosperm, we propose that the O2 protein may play a more general role in maize endosperm development than previously conceived.

  5. Binding of oxytocin and 8-arginine-vasopressin to neurophysin studied by /sup 15/N NMR using magnetization transfer and indirect detection via protons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Live, D.H.; Cowburn, D.

    1987-10-06

    NMR was used to monitor the binding to neurophysin of oxytocin and 8-arginine-vasopressin, /sup 15/N labeling being used to identify specific backbone /sup 15/N and /sup 1/H signals. The most significant effects of binding were large downfield shifts in the amino nitrogen resonance of Phe-3 of vasopressin and in its associated proton, providing evidence that the peptide bond between residues 2 and 3 of the hormones is hydrogen-bonded to the protein within hormone-neurophysin complexes. Suggestive evidence for hydrogen bonding of the amino nitrogen of Tyr-2 was also obtained in the form of decreased proton exchange rates on binding; however, the chemical shift changes of this nitrogen and its associated proton indicated that such hydrogen bonding, if present, is probably weak. Shifts in the amino nitrogen of Asn-5 and in the -NH protons of both Asn-5 and Cys-6 demonstrated that these residues are significantly perturbed by binding, suggesting conformational changes of the ring on binding and/or the presence of binding sites on the hormone outside the 1-3 region. No support was obtained for the thesis that there is a significant second binding site for vasopressin on each neutrophysin chain. The behavior of both oxytocin and vasopressin on binding was consistent with formation of 1:1 complexes in slow exchange with the free state under most pH conditions. At low pH there was evidence of an increased exchange rate. Additionally, broadening of /sup 15/N resonances in the bound state at low pH occurred without a corresponding change in the resonances of equilibrating free hormone. The results suggest significant conformational alteration in neurophysin-hormone complexes at low pH possibly associated with protonation of the carboxyl group of the hormone-protein salt bridge.

  6. Activation of endogenous arginine vasopressin neurons inhibit food intake: by using a novel transgenic rat line with DREADDs system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshimura, Mitsuhiro; Nishimura, Kazuaki; Nishimura, Haruki; Sonoda, Satomi; Ueno, Hiromichi; Motojima, Yasuhito; Saito, Reiko; Maruyama, Takashi; Nonaka, Yuki; Ueta, Yoichi

    2017-11-16

    Various studies contributed to discover novel mechanisms of central arginine vasopressin (AVP) system responsible for the behaviour albeit endogenous vasopressin activation. We established a novel transgenic rat line which expresses both human muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (hM3Dq), of which ligand is clozapine-N-oxide (CNO), and mCherry fluorescence specifically in AVP neurons. The mCherry neurons that indicate the expression of the hM3Dq gene were observed in the suprachiasmatic (SCN), supraoptic (SON), and paraventricular nuclei (PVN). hM3Dq-mCherry fluorescence was localized mainly in the membrane of the neurons. The mCherry neurons were co-localized with AVP-like immunoreactive (LI) neurons, but not with oxytocin-LI neurons. The induction of Fos, which is the indicator for neuronal activity, was observed in approximately 90% of the AVP-LI neurons in the SON and PVN 90 min after intraperitoneal (i.p.) administration of CNO. Plasma AVP was significantly increased and food intake, water intake, and urine volume were significantly attenuated after i.p. administration of CNO. Although the detailed mechanism has unveiled, we demonstrated, for the first time, that activation of endogenous AVP neurons decreased food intake. This novel transgenic rat line may provide a revolutionary insight into the neuronal mechanism regarding central AVP system responsible for various kind of behaviours.

  7. Urinary concentration does not exclusively rely on plasma vasopressin. A study between genders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Graugaard-Jensen, Charlotte; Hvistendahl, Gitte M; Frøkiaer, Jørgen

    2014-01-01

    AimWe investigated the influence of gender on the diurnal regulation of urine production with special focus on vasopressin, oxytocin and prostaglandin E2. MethodsFifteen young women in mid-follicular phase and 22 young men (20-33years) were included. All participants underwent a 24-h circadian...... inpatient study under standardized conditions for measurements of plasma vasopressin, oxytocin, sodium and osmolality. Urine was fractionally collected for measurements of electrolytes, aquaporin-2 and prostaglandin E2. ResultsPlasma vasopressin expressed a diurnal rhythm with a night-time increase in both...

  8. Analysis of the Salmonella regulatory network suggests involvement of SsrB and H-NS in σE-regulated SPI-2 gene expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie eLi

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The extracytoplasmic functioning sigma factor σE is known to play an essential role for Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium to survive and proliferate in macrophages and mice. However, its regulatory network is not well characterized, especially during infection. Here we used microarray to identify genes regulated by σE in Salmonella grown in three conditions: a nutrient-rich condition and two others that mimic early and late intracellular infection. We found that in each condition σE regulated different sets of genes, and notably, several global regulators. When comparing nutrient-rich and infection-like conditions, large changes were observed in the expression of genes involved in Salmonella pathogenesis island (SPI-1 type-three secretion system (TTSS, SPI-2 TTSS, protein synthesis, and stress responses. In total, the expression of 58% of Salmonella genes was affected by σE in at least one of the three conditions. An important finding is that σE up-regulates SPI-2 genes, which are essential for Salmonella intracellular survival, by up-regulating SPI-2 activator ssrB expression at the early stage of infection and down-regulating SPI-2 repressor hns expression at a later stage. Moreover, σE is capable of countering the silencing of H-NS, releasing the expression of SPI-2 genes. This connection between E and SPI-2 genes, combined with the global regulatory effect of σE, may account for the lethality of rpoE-deficient Salmonella in murine infection.

  9. Selepressin, a novel selective vasopressin V1A agonist, is an effective substitute for norepinephrine in a phase IIa randomized, placebo-controlled trial in septic shock patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Russell, James A; Vincent, Jean-Louis; Kjølbye, Anne Louise

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Vasopressin is widely used for vasopressor support in septic shock patients, but experimental evidence suggests that selective V1A agonists are superior. The initial pharmacodynamic effects, pharmacokinetics, and safety of selepressin, a novel V1A-selective vasopressin analogue......, was examined in a phase IIa trial in septic shock patients. METHODS: This was a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled multicenter trial in 53 patients in early septic shock (aged ≥18 years, fluid resuscitation, requiring vasopressor support) who received selepressin 1.25 ng/kg/minute (n = 10), 2.5 ng...... for selepressin 2.5 ng/kg/minute and placebo. Two patients were infused at 3.75 ng/kg/minute, one of whom had the study drug infusion discontinued for possible safety reasons, with subsequent discontinuation of this dose group. CONCLUSIONS: In septic shock patients, selepressin 2.5 ng/kg/minute was able...

  10. Evolutionary reversion of editing sites of ndh genes suggests their origin in the Permian-Triassic, before the increase of atmospheric CO2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mercedes eMartin

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The plastid ndh genes have hovered frequently on the edge of dispensability. They are absent in the plastid DNA of many algae and certain higher plants and present editing sites requiring C-to-U corrections of primary transcripts. The evolutionary origin of editing sites and their loss due to C-to-T reversions at the DNA level are unknown and must be related to the dispensability of the ndh genes in specific environments. In order to better understand the evolution of ndh gene editing sites, we have created expandable data banks with the 12 editing sites of the ndhB gene (600 GenBank sequences and both editing sites of the ndhF gene (1,600 GenBank sequences. Since their origin via T-to-C mutations that probably occurred between 300 and 200 Myr BP (Permian-Triassic, ndh editing sites have undergone independent and random C-to-T reversions in the different angiosperm lineages. Some of these reversions appear early in angiosperm diversification. Old C-to-T reversions can be traced back to radiation steps that gave origin to main classes, orders and some families.

  11. A gene expression signature classifying telomerase and ALT immortalization reveals an hTERT regulatory network and suggests a mesenchymal stem cell origin for ALT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lafferty-Whyte, K; Cairney, C J; Will, M B

    2009-01-01

    Telomere length is maintained by two known mechanisms, the activation of telomerase or alternative lengthening of telomeres (ALT). The molecular mechanisms regulating the ALT phenotype are poorly understood and it is unknown how the decision of which pathway to activate is made at the cellular...... level. We have shown earlier that active repression of telomerase gene expression by chromatin remodelling of the promoters is one mechanism of regulation; however, other genes and signalling networks are likely to be required to regulate telomerase and maintain the ALT phenotype. Using gene expression...... this signature revealed a regulatory signalling network consistent with a model of human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) repression in ALT cell lines and liposarcomas. This network expands on our existing knowledge of hTERT regulation and provides a platform to understand differential regulation of h...

  12. A high-throughput data mining of single nucleotide polymorphisms in Coffea species expressed sequence tags suggests differential homeologous gene expression in the allotetraploid Coffea arabica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidal, Ramon Oliveira; Mondego, Jorge Maurício Costa; Pot, David; Ambrósio, Alinne Batista; Andrade, Alan Carvalho; Pereira, Luiz Filipe Protasio; Colombo, Carlos Augusto; Vieira, Luiz Gonzaga Esteves; Carazzolle, Marcelo Falsarella; Pereira, Gonçalo Amarante Guimarães

    2010-11-01

    Polyploidization constitutes a common mode of evolution in flowering plants. This event provides the raw material for the divergence of function in homeologous genes, leading to phenotypic novelty that can contribute to the success of polyploids in nature or their selection for use in agriculture. Mounting evidence underlined the existence of homeologous expression biases in polyploid genomes; however, strategies to analyze such transcriptome regulation remained scarce. Important factors regarding homeologous expression biases remain to be explored, such as whether this phenomenon influences specific genes, how paralogs are affected by genome doubling, and what is the importance of the variability of homeologous expression bias to genotype differences. This study reports the expressed sequence tag assembly of the allopolyploid Coffea arabica and one of its direct ancestors, Coffea canephora. The assembly was used for the discovery of single nucleotide polymorphisms through the identification of high-quality discrepancies in overlapped expressed sequence tags and for gene expression information indirectly estimated by the transcript redundancy. Sequence diversity profiles were evaluated within C. arabica (Ca) and C. canephora (Cc) and used to deduce the transcript contribution of the Coffea eugenioides (Ce) ancestor. The assignment of the C. arabica haplotypes to the C. canephora (CaCc) or C. eugenioides (CaCe) ancestral genomes allowed us to analyze gene expression contributions of each subgenome in C. arabica. In silico data were validated by the quantitative polymerase chain reaction and allele-specific combination TaqMAMA-based method. The presence of differential expression of C. arabica homeologous genes and its implications in coffee gene expression, ontology, and physiology are discussed.

  13. A High-Throughput Data Mining of Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms in Coffea Species Expressed Sequence Tags Suggests Differential Homeologous Gene Expression in the Allotetraploid Coffea arabica1[W

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidal, Ramon Oliveira; Mondego, Jorge Maurício Costa; Pot, David; Ambrósio, Alinne Batista; Andrade, Alan Carvalho; Pereira, Luiz Filipe Protasio; Colombo, Carlos Augusto; Vieira, Luiz Gonzaga Esteves; Carazzolle, Marcelo Falsarella; Pereira, Gonçalo Amarante Guimarães

    2010-01-01

    Polyploidization constitutes a common mode of evolution in flowering plants. This event provides the raw material for the divergence of function in homeologous genes, leading to phenotypic novelty that can contribute to the success of polyploids in nature or their selection for use in agriculture. Mounting evidence underlined the existence of homeologous expression biases in polyploid genomes; however, strategies to analyze such transcriptome regulation remained scarce. Important factors regarding homeologous expression biases remain to be explored, such as whether this phenomenon influences specific genes, how paralogs are affected by genome doubling, and what is the importance of the variability of homeologous expression bias to genotype differences. This study reports the expressed sequence tag assembly of the allopolyploid Coffea arabica and one of its direct ancestors, Coffea canephora. The assembly was used for the discovery of single nucleotide polymorphisms through the identification of high-quality discrepancies in overlapped expressed sequence tags and for gene expression information indirectly estimated by the transcript redundancy. Sequence diversity profiles were evaluated within C. arabica (Ca) and C. canephora (Cc) and used to deduce the transcript contribution of the Coffea eugenioides (Ce) ancestor. The assignment of the C. arabica haplotypes to the C. canephora (CaCc) or C. eugenioides (CaCe) ancestral genomes allowed us to analyze gene expression contributions of each subgenome in C. arabica. In silico data were validated by the quantitative polymerase chain reaction and allele-specific combination TaqMAMA-based method. The presence of differential expression of C. arabica homeologous genes and its implications in coffee gene expression, ontology, and physiology are discussed. PMID:20864545

  14. Multi-environment QTL studies suggest a role for cysteine-rich protein kinase genes in quantitative resistance to blackleg disease in Brassica napus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larkan, Nicholas J; Raman, Harsh; Lydiate, Derek J; Robinson, Stephen J; Yu, Fengqun; Barbulescu, Denise M; Raman, Rosy; Luckett, David J; Burton, Wayne; Wratten, Neil; Salisbury, Philip A; Rimmer, S Roger; Borhan, M Hossein

    2016-08-24

    Resistance to the blackleg disease of Brassica napus (canola/oilseed rape), caused by the hemibiotrophic fungal pathogen Leptosphaeria maculans, is determined by both race-specific resistance (R) genes and quantitative resistance loci (QTL), or adult-plant resistance (APR). While the introgression of R genes into breeding material is relatively simple, QTL are often detected sporadically, making them harder to capture in breeding programs. For the effective deployment of APR in crop varieties, resistance QTL need to have a reliable influence on phenotype in multiple environments and be well defined genetically to enable marker-assisted selection (MAS). Doubled-haploid populations produced from the susceptible B. napus variety Topas and APR varieties AG-Castle and AV-Sapphire were analysed for resistance to blackleg in two locations over 3 and 4 years, respectively. Three stable QTL were detected in each population, with two loci appearing to be common to both APR varieties. Physical delineation of three QTL regions was sufficient to identify candidate defense-related genes, including a cluster of cysteine-rich receptor-like kinases contained within a 49 gene QTL interval on chromosome A01. Individual L. maculans isolates were used to define the physical intervals for the race-specific R genes Rlm3 and Rlm4 and to identify QTL common to both field studies and the cotyledon resistance response. Through multi-environment QTL analysis we have identified and delineated four significant and stable QTL suitable for MAS of quantitative blackleg resistance in B. napus, and identified candidate genes which potentially play a role in quantitative defense responses to L. maculans.

  15. Functional genomic analysis supports conservation of function among cellulose synthase-like a gene family members and suggests diverse roles of mannans in plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liepman, Aaron H; Nairn, C Joseph; Willats, William G T

    2007-01-01

    from Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), guar (Cyamopsis tetragonolobus), and Populus trichocarpa catalyze beta-1,4-mannan and glucomannan synthase reactions in vitro. Mannan polysaccharides and homologs of CslA genes appear to be present in all lineages of land plants analyzed to date. In many plants...... in insect cells, and each CslA protein catalyzed mannan and glucomannan synthase reactions in vitro. Microarray mining and quantitative real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analysis demonstrated that transcripts of Arabidopsis and loblolly pine (Pinus taeda) CslA genes display tissue...

  16. Simvastatin enhances aquaporin-2 surface expression and urinary concentration in vasopressin-deficient Brattleboro rats through modulation of Rho GTPase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wei; Zhang, Yan; Bouley, Richard; Chen, Ying; Matsuzaki, Toshiyuki; Nunes, Paula; Hasler, Udo; Brown, Dennis

    2011-01-01

    Statins are 3-hydroxyl-3-methyglutaryl-CoA reductase inhibitors that are commonly used to inhibit cholesterol biosynthesis. Emerging data have suggested that they also have “pleotropic effects,” including modulating actin cytoskeleton reorganization. Here, we report an effect of simvastatin on the trafficking of aquaporin-2 (AQP2). Specifically, simvastatin induced the membrane accumulation of AQP2 in cell cultures and kidneys in situ. The effect of simvastatin was independent of protein kinase A activation and phosphorylation at AQP2-Ser256, a critical event involved in vasopressin (VP)-regulated AQP2 trafficking. Further investigation showed that simvastatin inhibited endocytosis in parallel with downregulation of RhoA activity. Overexpression of active RhoA attenuated simvastatin's effect, suggesting the involvement of this small GTPase in simvastatin-mediated AQP2 trafficking. Finally, the effect of simvastatin on urinary concentration was investigated in VP-deficient Brattleboro rats. Simvastatin acutely (3–6 h) increased urinary concentration and decreased urine output in these animals. In summary, simvastatin regulates AQP2 trafficking in vitro and urinary concentration in vivo via events involving downregulation of Rho GTPase activity and inhibition of endocytosis. Our study provides an alternative mechanism to regulate AQP2 trafficking, bypassing the VP-vasopressin receptor signaling pathway. PMID:21511701

  17. Unusual scarcity of restriction site polymorphism in the human thyroglobulin gene. A linkage study suggesting autosomal dominance of a defective thyroglobulin allele

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baas, F.; Bikker, H.; van Ommen, G. J.; de Vijlder, J. J.

    1984-01-01

    Chromosomal DNA prepared from 90 unrelated individuals, mainly of Caucasian origin, was screened for restriction fragment length polymorphisms in the 3' 220 kilobase pairs (kb) of the human thyroglobulin (Tg) gene. The probes used were Tg cDNA fragments and subcloned single-copy genomic segments,

  18. A large candidate-gene association study suggests genetic variants at IRF5 and PRDM1 to be associated with aggressive periodontitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaefer, Arne S.; Jochens, Arne; Dommisch, Henrik; Graetz, Christian; Jockel-Schneider, Yvonne; Harks, Inga; Staufenbiel, Ingmar; Meyle, Joerg; Eickholz, Peter; Folwaczny, Mathias; Laine, Marja; Noack, Barbara; Wijmenga, Cisca; Lieb, Wolfgang; Bruckmann, Corinna; Schreiber, Stefan; Jepsen, Soren; Loos, Bruno G.

    2014-01-01

    Aim: Epidemiological and clinical studies indicated a relationship of periodontitis with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). We aimed to identify shared genetic susceptibility loci of RA and periodontitis. Materials and Methods: Forty-seven risk genes of genome-wide significance of RA and SLE were genotyped

  19. A large candidate-gene association study suggests genetic variants at IRF5 and PRDM1 to be associated with aggressive periodontitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaefer, A.S.; Jochens, A.; Dommisch, H.; Graetz, C.; Jockel-Schneider, Y.; Harks, I.; Staufenbiel, I.; Meyle, J.; Eickholz, P.; Folwaczny, M.; Laine, M.; Noack, B.; Wijmenga, C.; Lieb, W.; Bruckmann, C.; Schreiber, S.; Jepsen, S.; Loos, B.G.

    2014-01-01

    Aim Epidemiological and clinical studies indicated a relationship of periodontitis with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). We aimed to identify shared genetic susceptibility loci of RA and periodontitis. Materials and Methods Forty-seven risk genes of genome-wide significance of RA and SLE were genotyped in

  20. Expression of ABA Metabolism-Related Genes Suggests Similarities and Differences Between Seed Dormancy and Bud Dormancy of Peach (Prunus persica).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dongling; Gao, Zhenzhen; Du, Peiyong; Xiao, Wei; Tan, Qiuping; Chen, Xiude; Li, Ling; Gao, Dongsheng

    2015-01-01

    Dormancy inhibits seed and bud growth of perennial plants until the environmental conditions are optimal for survival. Previous studies indicated that certain co-regulation pathways exist in seed and bud dormancy. In our study, we found that seed and bud dormancy are similar to some extent but show different reactions to chemical treatments that induce breaking of dormancy. Whether the abscisic acid (ABA) regulatory networks are similar in dormant peach seeds and buds is not well known; however, ABA is generally believed to play a critical role in seed and bud dormancy. In peach, some genes putatively involved in ABA synthesis and catabolism were identified and their expression patterns were studied to learn more about ABA homeostasis and the possible crosstalk between bud dormancy and seed dormancy mechanisms. The analysis demonstrated that two 9-cis-epoxycarotenoid dioxygenase-encoding genes seem to be key in regulating ABA biosynthesis to induce seed and bud dormancy. Three CYP707As play an overlapping role in controlling ABA inactivation, resulting in dormancy-release. In addition, Transcript analysis of ABA metabolism-related genes was much similar demonstrated that ABA pathways was similar in the regulation of vegetative and flower bud dormancy, whereas, expression patterns of ABA metabolism-related genes were different in seed dormancy showed that ABA pathway maybe different in regulating seed dormancy in peach.

  1. Gene expression profiling of peri-implant healing of PLGA-Li+ implants suggests an activated Wnt signaling pathway in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Thorfve

    Full Text Available Bone development and regeneration is associated with the Wnt signaling pathway that, according to literature, can be modulated by lithium ions (Li+. The aim of this study was to evaluate the gene expression profile during peri-implant healing of poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA implants with incorporated Li+, while PLGA without Li+ was used as control, and a special attention was then paid to the Wnt signaling pathway. The implants were inserted in rat tibia for 7 or 28 days and the gene expression profile was investigated using a genome-wide microarray analysis. The results were verified by qPCR and immunohistochemistry. Histomorphometry was used to evaluate the possible effect of Li+ on bone regeneration. The microarray analysis revealed a large number of significantly differentially regulated genes over time within the two implant groups. The Wnt signaling pathway was significantly affected by Li+, with approximately 34% of all Wnt-related markers regulated over time, compared to 22% for non-Li+ containing (control; Ctrl implants. Functional cluster analysis indicated skeletal system morphogenesis, cartilage development and condensation as related to Li+. The downstream Wnt target gene, FOSL1, and the extracellular protein-encoding gene, ASPN, were significantly upregulated by Li+ compared with Ctrl. The presence of β-catenin, FOSL1 and ASPN positive cells was confirmed around implants of both groups. Interestingly, a significantly reduced bone area was observed over time around both implant groups. The presence of periostin and calcitonin receptor-positive cells was observed at both time points. This study is to the best of the authors' knowledge the first report evaluating the effect of a local release of Li+ from PLGA at the fracture site. The present study shows that during the current time frame and with the present dose of Li+ in PLGA implants, Li+ is not an enhancer of early bone growth, although it affects the Wnt signaling pathway.

  2. Analysis of tomato plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase gene family suggests a mycorrhiza-mediated regulatory mechanism conserved in diverse plant species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Junli; Liu, Jianjian; Chen, Aiqun; Ji, Minjie; Chen, Jiadong; Yang, Xiaofeng; Gu, Mian; Qu, Hongye; Xu, Guohua

    2016-10-01

    In plants, the plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase (HA) is considered to play a crucial role in regulating plant growth and respoding to environment stresses. Multiple paralogous genes encoding different isozymes of HA have been identified and characterized in several model plants, while limited information of the HA gene family is available to date for tomato. Here, we describe the molecular and expression features of eight HA-encoding genes (SlHA1-8) from tomato. All these genes are interrupted by multiple introns with conserved positions. SlHA1, 2, and 4 were widely expressed in all tissues, while SlHA5, 6, and 7 were almost only expressed in flowers. SlHA8, the transcripts of which were barely detectable under normal or nutrient-/salt-stress growth conditions, was strongly activated in arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungal-colonized roots. Extreme lack of SlHA8 expression in M161, a mutant defective to AM fungal colonization, provided genetic evidence towards the dependence of its expression on AM symbiosis. A 1521-bp SlHA8 promoter could direct the GUS reporter expression specifically in colonized cells of transgenic tobacco, soybean, and rice mycorrhizal roots. Promoter deletion assay revealed a 223-bp promoter fragment of SlHA8 containing a variant of AM-specific cis-element MYCS (vMYCS) sufficient to confer the AM-induced activity. Targeted deletion of this motif in the corresponding promoter region causes complete abolishment of GUS staining in mycorrhizal roots. Together, these results lend cogent evidence towards the evolutionary conservation of a potential regulatory mechanism mediating the activation of AM-responsive HA genes in diverse mycorrhizal plant species.

  3. Structures of an unliganded neurophysin and its vasopressin complex: Implications for binding and allosteric mechanisms

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wu, Chia Kuei; Hu, Bing; Rose, John P; Liu, Zhi‐Jie; Nguyen, Tam L; Zheng, Changsheng; Breslow, Esther; Wang, Bi‐Cheng

    2001-01-01

    The structures of des 1–6 bovine neurophysin‐II in the unliganded state and as its complex with lysine vasopressin were determined crystallographically at resolutions of 2.4 Å and 2.3 Å, respectively...

  4. Vasopressin/oxytocin-related signaling regulates gustatory associative learning in C. elegans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    I. Beets (Isabel); T.W.J. Janssen (Tom); E. Meelkop (Ellen); L. Temmerman (Liesbeth); N. Suetens (Nick); S. Rademakers (Suzanne); G. Jansen (Gert); L. Schoofs (Liliane)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractVasopressin- and oxytocin-related neuropeptides are key regulators of animal physiology, including water balance and reproduction. Although these neuropeptides also modulate social behavior and cognition in mammals, the mechanism for influencing behavioral plasticity and the evolutionary

  5. Effect of vasopressin on sublingual microcirculation in a patient with distributive shock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubois, Marc J; De Backer, Daniel; Creteur, Jacques; Anane, Sami; Vincent, Jean-Louis

    2003-06-01

    To assess the sublingual microcirculation in a patient during vasopressin administration for a distributive shock after cardiopulmonary bypass. Case-report in the Department of Intensive Care of a university hospital. A 53 year-old man developed severe distributive shock after cardiac transplant, requiring massive doses of vasopressor agents. Vasopressin administered twice at a dose of 0.02 U/min increased mean blood pressure and allowed partial weaning of other vasopressor drugs. Microcirculatory alterations were assessed by orthogonal polarization spectral technique: 50% and 60% of capillaries were perfused at baseline, and these proportions did not worsen when vasopressin was administered. Despite its strong vasopressor effects vasopressin infusion did not worsen microcirculatory alterations in this patient with distributive shock following cardiac surgery.

  6. Increased interleukin-10 and interferon-γ levels in Plasmodium vivax malaria suggest a reciprocal regulation which is not altered by IL-10 gene promoter polymorphism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina, Tiago S; Costa, Sheyla P T; Oliveira, Maria D; Ventura, Ana M; Souza, José M; Gomes, Tassia F; Vallinoto, Antonio C R; Póvoa, Marinete M; Silva, João S; Cunha, Maristela G

    2011-09-14

    In human malaria, the naturally-acquired immune response can result in either the elimination of the parasite or a persistent response mediated by cytokines that leads to immunopathology. The cytokines are responsible for all the symptoms, pathological alterations and the outcome of the infection depends on the reciprocal regulation of the pro and anti-inflammatory cytokines. IL-10 and IFN-gamma are able to mediate this process and their production can be affected by single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) on gene of these cytokines. In this study, the relationship between cytokine IL-10/IFN-gamma levels, parasitaemia, and their gene polymorphisms was examined and the participation of pro-inflammatory and regulatory balance during a natural immune response in Plasmodium vivax-infected individuals was observed. The serum levels of the cytokines IL-4, IL-12, IFN-gamma and IL-10 from 132 patients were evaluated by indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA). The polymorphism at position +874 of the IFN-gamma gene was identified by allele-specific polymerase chain reaction (ASO-PCR) method, and the polymorphism at position -1082 of the IL-10 gene was analysed by PCR-RFLP (PCR-Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism). The levels of a pro- (IFN-gamma) and an anti-inflammatory cytokine (IL-10) were significantly higher in P. vivax-infected individuals as compared to healthy controls. The IFN-gamma levels in primoinfected patients were significantly higher than in patients who had suffered only one and more than one previous episode. The mutant alleles of both IFN-gamma and IL-10 genes were more frequent than the wild allele. In the case of the IFNG+874 polymorphism (IFN-gamma) the frequencies of the mutant (A) and wild (T) alleles were 70.13% and 29.87%, respectively. Similar frequencies were recorded in IL-10-1082, with the mutant (A) allele returning a frequency of 70.78%, and the wild (G) allele a frequency of 29.22%. The frequencies of the alleles associated

  7. Proteome analysis of a Lactococcus lactis strain overexpressing gapA suggests that the gene product is an auxiliary glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willemoes, Martin; Kilstrup, Mogens; Roepstorff, P.

    2002-01-01

    The sequence of the genome from the Lactococcus lactis subspecies lactis strain IL1403 shows the presence of two reading frames, gapA and gapB, putatively encoding glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH). Previous proteomic analysis of the L. lactis subspecies cremoris strain MG1363 has...... revealed two neighbouring protein spots, GapBI and GapBII, with amino terminal sequences identical to the product of gapA from the L. lactis subspecies cremoris strain LM0230 and that of the two IL1403 sequences. In order to assign the two protein spots to their respective genes we constructed an L. lactis...... strain that overexpessed the gapA gene derived from MG1363 upon nisin induction. Compared to the wild-type, the overexpressing strain had a 3.4-fold elevated level of specific GAPDH activity when grown in the presence of nisin. In both MG 1363 and the gapA overexpressing strain the GAPDH activity...

  8. Proteome analysis of a Lactococcus lactis strain overexpressing gapA suggests that the gene product is an auxiliary glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willemoës, Martin; Kilstrup, Mogens; Roepstorff, Peter

    2002-01-01

    revealed two neighbouring protein spots, GapBI and GapBII, with amino terminal sequences identical to the product of gapA from the L. lactis subspecies cremoris strain LM0230 and that of the two IL1403 sequences. In order to assign the two protein spots to their respective genes we constructed an L. lactis...... strain that overexpessed the gapA gene derived from MG1363 upon nisin induction. Compared to the wild-type, the overexpressing strain had a 3.4-fold elevated level of specific GAPDH activity when grown in the presence of nisin. In both MG1363 and the gapA overexpressing strain the GAPDH activity...

  9. Pattern triggered immunity (PTI in tobacco: isolation of activated genes suggests role of the phenylpropanoid pathway in inhibition of bacterial pathogens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ágnes Szatmári

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Pattern Triggered Immunity (PTI or Basal Resistance (BR is a potent, symptomless form of plant resistance. Upon inoculation of a plant with non-pathogens or pathogenicity-mutant bacteria, the induced PTI will prevent bacterial proliferation. Developed PTI is also able to protect the plant from disease or HR (Hypersensitive Response after a challenging infection with pathogenic bacteria. Our aim was to reveal those PTI-related genes of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum that could possibly play a role in the protection of the plant from disease. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Leaves were infiltrated with Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae hrcC- mutant bacteria to induce PTI, and samples were taken 6 and 48 hours later. Subtraction Suppressive Hybridization (SSH resulted in 156 PTI-activated genes. A cDNA microarray was generated from the SSH clone library. Analysis of hybridization data showed that in the early (6 hpi phase of PTI, among others, genes of peroxidases, signalling elements, heat shock proteins and secondary metabolites were upregulated, while at the late phase (48 hpi the group of proteolysis genes was newly activated. Microarray data were verified by real time RT-PCR analysis. Almost all members of the phenyl-propanoid pathway (PPP possibly leading to lignin biosynthesis were activated. Specific inhibition of cinnamic-acid-4-hydroxylase (C4H, rate limiting enzyme of the PPP, decreased the strength of PTI--as shown by the HR-inhibition and electrolyte leakage tests. Quantification of cinnamate and p-coumarate by thin-layer chromatography (TLC-densitometry supported specific changes in the levels of these metabolites upon elicitation of PTI. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We believe to provide first report on PTI-related changes in the levels of these PPP metabolites. Results implicated an actual role of the upregulation of the phenylpropanoid pathway in the inhibition of bacterial pathogenic activity during PTI.

  10. Vasopressin in Vasodilatory Shock for Both Left and Right Heart Anomalous Pediatric Patients after Cardiac Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Zhongyuan; Wang, Xu; Yang, Juxian; Li, Shoujun; Yan, Jun

    2017-11-03

    Although the use of vasopressin has become common place in pediatric patients with vasodilatory shock after cardiac surgery, its efficacy and hemodynamic effects have not been systematically documented. Furthermore, previous studies were mainly limited patients with left heart anomalies. To date, the use of vasopressin in patients with right heart anomalies hasn't yet been reported. To clarify the hemodynamic effects of vasopressin on pediatric patients with vasodilatory shock after cardiopulmonary bypass, 70 consecutive patients, most of whom with right heart anomalies were retrospectively analyzed in Fuwai Hospital from October 2013 to September 2015. Vasopressin was administered continuously at a dose of 0.0002-0.002 u/kg/min. Hemodynamics, urine output and catecholamine vasopressor doses were compared before and after vasopressin initiation. showed that besides of the significant increase in blood pressure at 2 hours after vasopressin administration, the systemic vascular resistance index also prominently elevated from 894.3 ± 190.8 to 1138.2 ± 161.4 dyn/s per cm per m, while the heart rate, right atrial pressure, pulmonary artery pressure had a trend of decline. Subsequently the fluid requirement, the catecholamine vasopressor requirement both decreased and urine output increased. Lactate concentration showed a later remarkable decline at 12 hours since vasopressin administration. All the 70 patients survived to hospital discharge. low dose of vasopressin administration was associated with great and timely hemodynamic improvement for pediatric patients with vasodilatory shock after cardiac surgery without any significant adverse effects.

  11. Do vasopressin V2 receptor antagonists benefit cirrhotics with refractory ascites?

    OpenAIRE

    Fukui, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Hyponatremia is a frequent complication of advanced cirrhosis with ascites associated with increased morbidity and mortality. It is caused by an impairment in the renal capacity to eliminate solute-free water and is considered to be related to persistent secretion of vasopressin despite low serum osmolality. This nonosmotic release of vasopressin is mediated by the autonomic nervous system, which senses the underfilling of arterial vascular component. This reduction of effective arterial bloo...

  12. Increase in Alzheimer's related markers preceeds memory disturbances: studies in vasopressin-deficient Brattleboro rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varga, János; Klausz, Barbara; Domokos, Ágnes; Kálmán, Sára; Pákáski, Magdolna; Szűcs, Szabina; Garab, Dénes; Zvara, Ágnes; Puskás, László; Kálmán, János; Tímár, Júlia; Bagdy, György; Zelena, Dóra

    2014-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common form of dementia in the elderly. For more effective therapy early diagnostic markers could be beneficial. Therefore we compared one year old rats with adults and examined if changes in possible brain markers of AD preceeded memory decline. We also tested if vasopressin-deficient animals were useful model of AD as vasopressin has well known positive effect on memory and AD patient has decreased vasopressin production. We compared adult (3 month) and old (12 month), normal and vasopressin-deficient Brattleboro rats. To receive a comprehensive picture about their memory we examined their social discrimination, object discrimination and conditioned learning abilities (shuttle box). Amyloid precursor protein (APP), mitogen-activated protein kinase 1 (MAPK1), β-actin and tryptophan 2,3-dioxygenase 2 (TDO2) mRNA levels was measured by quantitative PCR. There was no difference between the memory of adult and aged groups. The vasopressin-deficient rats at both ages showed a weaker performance in the course of social and object discrimination tests and a higher escape failure during the shuttle box experiment. The brain marker mRNAs of the elder animals were higher than the levels of the adults, but the absence of vasopressin had no influence on them. Thus, the one year old rats showed elevated levels of AD-related markers, but memory deficits were observable only in vasopressin deficient animals. Vasopressin does not seem to have pathogenic role in AD. Changes in the studied markers might predict later symptoms, although further studies are required for confirmation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. ANKS3 Co-Localises with ANKS6 in Mouse Renal Cilia and Is Associated with Vasopressin Signaling and Apoptosis In Vivo in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delestré, Laure; Bakey, Zeineb; Prado, Cécilia; Hoffmann, Sigrid; Bihoreau, Marie-Thérèse; Lelongt, Brigitte; Gauguier, Dominique

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in Ankyrin repeat and sterile alpha motif domain containing 6 (ANKS6) play a causative role in renal cyst formation in the PKD/Mhm(cy/+) rat model of polycystic kidney disease and in nephronophthisis in humans. A network of protein partners of ANKS6 is emerging and their functional characterization provides important clues to understand the role of ANKS6 in renal biology and in mechanisms involved in the formation of renal cysts. Following experimental confirmation of interaction between ANKS6and ANKS3 using a Yeast two hybrid system, we demonstrated that binding between the two proteins occurs through their sterile alpha motif (SAM) and that the amino acid 823 in rat ANSK6 is key for this interaction. We further showed their interaction by co-immunoprecipitation and showed in vivo in mice that ANKS3 is present in renal cilia. Downregulated expression of Anks3 in vivo in mice by Locked Nucleic Acid (LNA) modified antisense oligonucleotides was associated with increased transcription of vasopressin-induced genes, suggesting changes in renal water permeability, and altered transcription of genes encoding proteins involved in cilium structure, apoptosis and cell proliferation. These data provide experimental evidence of ANKS3-ANKS6 direct interaction through their SAM domain and co-localisation in mouse renal cilia, and shed light on molecular mechanisms indirectly mediated by ANKS6 in the mouse kidney, that may be affected by altered ANKS3-ANKS6 interaction. Our results contribute to improved knowledge of the structure and function of the network of proteins interacting with ANKS6, which may represent therapeutic targets in cystic diseases.

  14. ANKS3 Co-Localises with ANKS6 in Mouse Renal Cilia and Is Associated with Vasopressin Signaling and Apoptosis In Vivo in Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laure Delestré

    Full Text Available Mutations in Ankyrin repeat and sterile alpha motif domain containing 6 (ANKS6 play a causative role in renal cyst formation in the PKD/Mhm(cy/+ rat model of polycystic kidney disease and in nephronophthisis in humans. A network of protein partners of ANKS6 is emerging and their functional characterization provides important clues to understand the role of ANKS6 in renal biology and in mechanisms involved in the formation of renal cysts. Following experimental confirmation of interaction between ANKS6and ANKS3 using a Yeast two hybrid system, we demonstrated that binding between the two proteins occurs through their sterile alpha motif (SAM and that the amino acid 823 in rat ANSK6 is key for this interaction. We further showed their interaction by co-immunoprecipitation and showed in vivo in mice that ANKS3 is present in renal cilia. Downregulated expression of Anks3 in vivo in mice by Locked Nucleic Acid (LNA modified antisense oligonucleotides was associated with increased transcription of vasopressin-induced genes, suggesting changes in renal water permeability, and altered transcription of genes encoding proteins involved in cilium structure, apoptosis and cell proliferation. These data provide experimental evidence of ANKS3-ANKS6 direct interaction through their SAM domain and co-localisation in mouse renal cilia, and shed light on molecular mechanisms indirectly mediated by ANKS6 in the mouse kidney, that may be affected by altered ANKS3-ANKS6 interaction. Our results contribute to improved knowledge of the structure and function of the network of proteins interacting with ANKS6, which may represent therapeutic targets in cystic diseases.

  15. Central vasopressin infusion prevents hibernation in the European hamster (Cricetus cricetus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermes, M L; Buijs, R M; Masson-Pévet, M; van der Woude, T P; Pévet, P; Brenklé, R; Kirsch, R

    1989-01-01

    The amount of immunocytochemically detectable vasopressin in the brain of the European hamster (Cricetus cricetus) shows a seasonal variation; i.e., dense vasopressin immunoreactivity is present in the lateral septum during summer but is absent in autumn and winter [Buijs, R. M., Pévet, P., Masson-Pévet, M., Pool, C. W., De Vries, G. J., Canguilhem, B. & Vivien-Roels, B. (1986) Brain Res. 371, 193-196]. In the winter period the European hamster hibernates. Since vasopressin in the lateral septum is known to be involved in the control of body temperature, we investigated whether infusion of vasopressin in the lateral septum during autumn-winter could influence hypothermic patterns normally seen in hibernating animals. Hamsters whose lateral septum was infused with vasopressin showed almost no periods of hypothermia, whereas hamsters treated with control infusions displayed a normal hibernation pattern. The results indicate that persistence of vasopressin release in the lateral septum of the European hamster during winter can prevent hibernation. Images PMID:2762331

  16. Preliminary Analysis of the Nonsynonymous Polymorphism rs17563 in BMP4 Gene in Brazilian Population Suggests Protection for Nonsyndromic Cleft Lip and Palate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tânia Kawasaki Araújo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cleft lip with or without palate (CL±P is common congenital anomalies in humans. Experimental evidence has demonstrated that bone morphogenetic protein 4 gene (Bmp4 is involved in the etiology of CL±P in animal models. The nonsynonymous polymorphism rs17563 T>C (p.V152A in the BMP4 gene has been associated to the risk of nonsyndromic CL±P in Chinese population and microforms from different ethnic backgrounds. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of BMP4 gene in CL±P in Brazilian sample using genetic association approach. Our sample was composed by 123 patients with nonsyndromic CL±P and 246 controls, in which absence of CL±P was confirmed in 3 generations. The rs17563 polymorphism was genotyped by PCR-RFLP technique. Logistic regression was performed to evaluate allele and genotype association. Our data showed statistical power to detect association (86.83% in this sample. Logistic regression results showed significant association between C allele and CL±P (P=0.00018, OR =0.40, and 95% CI = 0.25–0.65, as well as CC genotype and CL±P (P=0.00018, OR =0.35, and 95% CI = 0.19–0.66. So, there is a strong association between nonsyndromic CL±P and BMP4 rs17563 polymorphism in our sample and the C allele had a protective effect against the occurrence of nonsyndromic CL±P.

  17. A genome-wide association study in Caucasian women suggests the involvement of HLA genes in the severity of facial solar lentigines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laville, Vincent; Clerc, Sigrid Le; Ezzedine, Khaled; Jdid, Randa; Taing, Lieng; Labib, Taoufik; Coulonges, Cedric; Ulveling, Damien; Carpentier, Wassila; Galan, Pilar; Hercberg, Serge; Morizot, Frederique; Latreille, Julie; Malvy, Denis; Tschachler, Erwin; Zagury, Jean-François

    2016-09-01

    Solar lentigines are a common feature of sun-induced skin ageing. Little is known, however, about the genetic factors contributing to their development. In this genome-wide association study, we aimed to identify genetic loci associated with solar lentigines on the face in 502 middle-aged French women. Nine SNPs, gathered in two independent blocks on chromosome 6, exhibited a false discovery rate below 25% when looking for associations with the facial lentigine score. The first block, in the 6p22 region, corresponded to intergenic SNPs and also exhibited a significant association with forehead lentigines (P = 1.37 × 10(-8) ). The second block, within the 6p21 HLA region, was associated with decreased HLA-C expression according to several eQTL databases. Interestingly, these SNPs were also in high linkage disequilibrium with the HLA-C*0701 allele (r(2)  = 0.95). We replicated an association recently found by GWAS in the IRF4 gene. Finally, a complementary study on 44 selected candidate SNPs revealed novel associations in the MITF gene. Overall, our results point to several mechanisms involved in the severity of facial lentigines, including HLA/immunity and the melanogenesis pathway. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Cloning of 16S rRNA genes amplified from normal and disturbed vaginal microflora suggests a strong association between Atopobium vaginae, Gardnerella vaginalis and bacterial vaginosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De Ganck Catharine

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The pathogenesis of bacterial vaginosis remains largely elusive, although some microorganisms, including Gardnerella vaginalis, are suspected of playing a role in the etiology of this disorder. Recently culture-independent analysis of microbial ecosystems has proven its efficacy in characterizing the diversity of bacterial populations. Here, we report on the results obtained by combining culture and PCR-based methods to characterize the normal and disturbed vaginal microflora. Results A total of 150 vaginal swab samples from healthy women (115 pregnant and 35 non-pregnant were categorized on the basis of Gram stain of direct smear as grade I (n = 112, grade II (n = 26, grade III (n = 9 or grade IV (n = 3. The composition of the vaginal microbial community of eight of these vaginal swabs (three grade I, two grade II and three grade III, all from non-pregnant women, were studied by culture and by cloning of the 16S rRNA genes obtained after direct amplification. Forty-six cultured isolates were identified by tDNA-PCR, 854 cloned 16S rRNA gene fragments were analysed of which 156 by sequencing, yielding a total of 38 species, including 9 presumptively novel species with at least five species that have not been isolated previously from vaginal samples. Interestingly, cloning revealed that Atopobium vaginae was abundant in four out of the five non-grade I specimens. Finally, species specific PCR for A. vaginae and Gardnerella vaginalis pointed to a statistically significant co-occurrence of both species in the bacterial vaginosis samples. Conclusions Although historically the literature regarding bacterial vaginosis has largely focused on G. vaginalis in particular, several findings of this study – like the abundance of A. vaginae in disturbed vaginal microflora and the presence of several novel species – indicate that much is to be learned about the composition of the vaginal microflora and its relation to the etiology of BV.

  19. Cloning of 16S rRNA genes amplified from normal and disturbed vaginal microflora suggests a strong association between Atopobium vaginae, Gardnerella vaginalis and bacterial vaginosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verhelst, Rita; Verstraelen, Hans; Claeys, Geert; Verschraegen, Gerda; Delanghe, Joris; Van Simaey, Leen; De Ganck, Catharine; Temmerman, Marleen; Vaneechoutte, Mario

    2004-04-21

    The pathogenesis of bacterial vaginosis remains largely elusive, although some microorganisms, including Gardnerella vaginalis, are suspected of playing a role in the etiology of this disorder. Recently culture-independent analysis of microbial ecosystems has proven its efficacy in characterizing the diversity of bacterial populations. Here, we report on the results obtained by combining culture and PCR-based methods to characterize the normal and disturbed vaginal microflora. A total of 150 vaginal swab samples from healthy women (115 pregnant and 35 non-pregnant) were categorized on the basis of Gram stain of direct smear as grade I (n = 112), grade II (n = 26), grade III (n = 9) or grade IV (n = 3). The composition of the vaginal microbial community of eight of these vaginal swabs (three grade I, two grade II and three grade III), all from non-pregnant women, were studied by culture and by cloning of the 16S rRNA genes obtained after direct amplification. Forty-six cultured isolates were identified by tDNA-PCR, 854 cloned 16S rRNA gene fragments were analysed of which 156 by sequencing, yielding a total of 38 species, including 9 presumptively novel species with at least five species that have not been isolated previously from vaginal samples. Interestingly, cloning revealed that Atopobium vaginae was abundant in four out of the five non-grade I specimens. Finally, species specific PCR for A. vaginae and Gardnerella vaginalis pointed to a statistically significant co-occurrence of both species in the bacterial vaginosis samples. Although historically the literature regarding bacterial vaginosis has largely focused on G. vaginalis in particular, several findings of this study--like the abundance of A. vaginae in disturbed vaginal microflora and the presence of several novel species--indicate that much is to be learned about the composition of the vaginal microflora and its relation to the etiology of BV.

  20. Development of a human vasopressin V1a-receptor antagonist from an evolutionary-related insect neuropeptide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Di Giglio, Maria Giulia; Muttenthaler, Markus; Harpsøe, Kasper

    2017-01-01

    conservation of the 600-million-year-old oxytocin/vasopressin signalling system. We isolated the insect oxytocin/vasopressin orthologue inotocin from the black garden ant (Lasius niger), identified and cloned its cognate receptor and determined its pharmacological properties on the insect and human oxytocin....../vasopressin receptors. Subsequently, we identified a functional dichotomy: inotocin activated the insect inotocin and the human vasopressin V1b receptors, but inhibited the human V1aR. Replacement of Arg8 of inotocin by D-Arg8 led to a potent, stable and competitive V1aR-antagonist ([D-Arg8]-inotocin) with a 3,000-fold...

  1. Recent Male-Mediated Gene Flow over a Linguistic Barrier in Iberia, Suggested by Analysis of a Y-Chromosomal DNA Polymorphism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurles, Matthew E.; Veitia, Reiner; Arroyo, Eduardo; Armenteros, Manuel; Bertranpetit, Jaume; Pérez-Lezaun, Anna; Bosch, Elena; Shlumukova, Maria; Cambon-Thomsen, Anne; McElreavey, Ken; López de Munain, Adolfo; Röhl, Arne; Wilson, Ian J.; Singh, Lalji; Pandya, Arpita; Santos, Fabrício R.; Tyler-Smith, Chris; Jobling, Mark A.

    1999-01-01

    Summary We have examined the worldwide distribution of a Y-chromosomal base-substitution polymorphism, the T/C transition at SRY-2627, where the T allele defines haplogroup 22; sequencing of primate homologues shows that the ancestral state cannot be determined unambiguously but is probably the C allele. Of 1,191 human Y chromosomes analyzed, 33 belong to haplogroup 22. Twenty-nine come from Iberia, and the highest frequencies are in Basques (11%; n=117) and Catalans (22%; n=32). Microsatellite and minisatellite (MSY1) diversity analysis shows that non-Iberian haplogroup-22 chromosomes are not significantly different from Iberian ones. The simplest interpretation of these data is that haplogroup 22 arose in Iberia and that non-Iberian cases reflect Iberian emigrants. Several different methods were used to date the origin of the polymorphism: microsatellite data gave ages of 1,650, 2,700, 3,100, or 3,450 years, and MSY1 gave ages of 1,000, 2,300, or 2,650 years, although 95% confidence intervals on all of these figures are wide. The age of the split between Basque and Catalan haplogroup-22 chromosomes was calculated as only 20% of the age of the lineage as a whole. This study thus provides evidence for direct or indirect gene flow over the substantial linguistic barrier between the Indo-European and non–Indo-European–speaking populations of the Catalans and the Basques, during the past few thousand years. PMID:10521311

  2. Coordinated Regulation of Vasopressin Inactivation and Glucose Uptake by Action of TUG Protein in Muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habtemichael, Estifanos N; Alcázar-Román, Abel; Rubin, Bradley R; Grossi, Laura R; Belman, Jonathan P; Julca, Omar; Löffler, Michael G; Li, Hongjie; Chi, Nai-Wen; Samuel, Varman T; Bogan, Jonathan S

    2015-06-05

    In adipose and muscle cells, insulin stimulates the exocytic translocation of vesicles containing GLUT4, a glucose transporter, and insulin-regulated aminopeptidase (IRAP), a transmembrane aminopeptidase. A substrate of IRAP is vasopressin, which controls water homeostasis. The physiological importance of IRAP translocation to inactivate vasopressin remains uncertain. We previously showed that in skeletal muscle, insulin stimulates proteolytic processing of the GLUT4 retention protein, TUG, to promote GLUT4 translocation and glucose uptake. Here we show that TUG proteolysis also controls IRAP targeting and regulates vasopressin action in vivo. Transgenic mice with constitutive TUG proteolysis in muscle consumed much more water than wild-type control mice. The transgenic mice lost more body weight during water restriction, and the abundance of renal AQP2 water channels was reduced, implying that vasopressin activity is decreased. To compensate for accelerated vasopressin degradation, vasopressin secretion was increased, as assessed by the cosecreted protein copeptin. IRAP abundance was increased in T-tubule fractions of fasting transgenic mice, when compared with controls. Recombinant IRAP bound to TUG, and this interaction was mapped to a short peptide in IRAP that was previously shown to be critical for GLUT4 intracellular retention. In cultured 3T3-L1 adipocytes, IRAP was present in TUG-bound membranes and was released by insulin stimulation. Together with previous results, these data support a model in which TUG controls vesicle translocation by interacting with IRAP as well as GLUT4. Furthermore, the effect of IRAP to reduce vasopressin activity is a physiologically important consequence of vesicle translocation, which is coordinated with the stimulation of glucose uptake. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  3. Structural characterization of arginine-vasopressin and lysine-vasopressin by Fourier- transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry and infrared multiphoton dissociation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianco, Giuliana; Battista, Fabio; Buchicchio, Alessandro; Amarena, Concetta G; Schmitt-Kopplin, Philippe; Guerrieri, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Arginine-vasopressin (AVP) and lysine-vasopressin (LVP) were analyzed by reversed-phase liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC-MS) using Fourier-transform ion cyclotron resonance (FT-ICR) mass spectrometry (MS) electrospray ionization (ESI) in the positive ion mode. LVP and AVP exhibited the protonated adduct [M+H](+) as the predominant ion at m/z 1056.43965 and at m/z 1084.44561, respectively. Infrared multiphoton dissociation (IRMPD), using a CO(2) laser source at a wavelength of 10.6 μm, was applied to protonated vasopressin molecules. The IRMPD mass spectra presented abundant mass fragments essential for a complete structural information. Several fragment ions, shared between two target molecules, are discussed in detail. Some previously unpublished fragments were identified unambiguously utilizing the high resolution and accurate mass information provided by the FT-ICR mass spectrometer. The opening of the disulfide loop and the cleavage of the peptide bonds within the ring were observed even under low-energy fragmentation conditions. Coupling the high-performance FT-ICR mass spectrometer with IRMPD as a contemporary fragmentation technique proved to be very promising for the structural characterization of vasopressin.

  4. Oral hypertonic saline causes transient fall of vasopressin in humans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seckl, J.R.; Williams, D.M.; Lightman, S.L.

    1986-08-01

    After dehydration, oral rehydration causes a fall in plasma arginine vasopressin (AVP) that precedes changes in plasma osmolality. To investigate further the stimulus for this effect, its specificity, and association with thirst, six volunteers were deprived of water for 24 h and given a salt load on two separate occasions. On each study day they then drank rapidly 10 ml/kg of either tap water or hypertonic saline (360 mosmol/kg). There was a significant fall in plasma AVP from 2.0 +/- 0.3 to 1.2 +/- 0.4 pmol/l 5 min after drinking water and from 1.8 +/- 0.3 to 0.9 +/- 0.2 pmol/l after hypertonic saline. Plasma osmolality fell 30-60 min after water and was unchanged after saline. Plasma renin activity, oxytocin, and total protein all remained unchanged. All subjects reported diminished thirst after hypertonic saline. Gargling with water reduced thirst but did not affect plasma AVP. There appears to be a drinking-mediated neuroendocrine reflex that decreases plasma AVP irrespective of the osmolality of the liquid consumed. The sensation of thirst did not correlate with plasma osmolality and was not always related to plasma AVP concentration. AVP was measured by radioimmunoassay.

  5. Vasopressin inhibits LTP in the CA2 mouse hippocampal area.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magda Chafai

    Full Text Available Growing evidence points to vasopressin (AVP as a social behavior regulator modulating various memory processes and involved in pathologies such as mood disorders, anxiety and depression. Accordingly, AVP antagonists are actually envisaged as putative treatments. However, the underlying mechanisms are poorly characterized, in particular the influence of AVP on cellular or synaptic activities in limbic brain areas involved in social behavior. In the present study, we investigated AVP action on the synapse between the entorhinal cortex and CA2 hippocampal pyramidal neurons, by using both field potential and whole-cell recordings in mice brain acute slices. Short application (1 min of AVP transiently reduced the synaptic response, only following induction of long-term potentiation (LTP by high frequency stimulation (HFS of afferent fibers. The basal synaptic response, measured in the absence of HFS, was not affected. The Schaffer collateral-CA1 synapse was not affected by AVP, even after LTP, while the Schaffer collateral-CA2 synapse was inhibited. Although investigated only recently, this CA2 hippocampal area appears to have a distinctive circuitry and a peculiar role in controlling episodic memory. Accordingly, AVP action on LTP-increased synaptic responses in this limbic structure may contribute to the role of this neuropeptide in controlling memory and social behavior.

  6. Gene expression analysis suggests bone development-related genes GDF5 and DIO2 are involved in the development of Kashin-Beck disease in children rather than adults.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Wen

    Full Text Available To investigate the differences in gene expression between children and adults with Kashin-Beck disease (KBD.12 children with KBD and 12 healthy children were selected and divided into 4 KBD vs. control pairs matched according to age and gender, with each pair having 3 KBD children and 3 healthy children. Additionally, 15 adults with KBD and 15 healthy adults were selected and divided into 5 KBD vs. control pairs matched according to age and gender, with each pair having 3 KBD adults and 3 healthy adults. Total RNA was isolated from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs respectively. A total of 367 target genes were selected based on previous genome-wide gene expression profile analysis. Expression levels of the 367 genes were evaluated by customized oligonucleotide microarray and the differentially expressed genes were identified. Quantitative real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR was conducted to validate the microarray data.A total of 95 (25.9% genes in KBD children and 158 (43.1% genes in KBD adults were found to exhibit more than two-fold change in gene expression level relative to healthy controls. By comparing differentially expressed genes identified in KBD children to those of KBD adults, 42 genes were found to be differentially expressed only in KBD children. And 105 genes were found to be differentially expressed only in KBD adults. Further, 16 differentially expressed genes common to both KBD children and adults were found to be asynchronously expressed in KBD children compared to KBD adults.Significant differences in gene expression pattern were identified between KBD children and KBD adults, indicating different molecular mechanisms underlying cartilage lesions of KBD children and KBD adults. In addition, bone development-related genes GDF5 (expression ratio = 2.14±0.02 and DIO2 (expression ratio = 0.11±0.05 may contribute to the development of KBD in children rather than in adults.

  7. Characterization of a novel nonpeptide vasopressin V2-agonist, OPC-51803, in cells transfected human vasopressin receptor subtypes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Shigeki; Yamamura, Yoshitaka; Itoh, Shuji; Hirano, Takahiro; Tsujimae, Kenji; Aoyama, Masashi; Kondo, Kazumi; Ogawa, Hidenori; Shinohara, Tomoichi; Kan, Keizo; Tanada, Yoshihisa; Teramoto, Shuji; Sumida, Takumi; Nakayama, Sunao; Sekiguchi, Kazuo; Kambe, Toshimi; Tsujimoto, Gozoh; Mori, Toyoki; Tominaga, Michiaki

    2000-01-01

    We discovered the first nonpeptide arginine-vasopressin (AVP) V2-receptor agonist, OPC-51803. Pharmacological properties of OPC-51803 were elucidated using HeLa cells expressing human AVP receptor subtypes (V2, V1a and V1b) and compared with those of 1-desamino-8-D-arginine vasopressin (dDAVP), a peptide V2-receptor agonist.OPC-51803 and dDAVP displaced [3H]-AVP binding to human V2- and V1a-receptors with Ki values of 91.9±10.8 nM (n=6) and 3.12±0.38 nM (n=6) for V2-receptors, and 819±39 nM (n=6) and 41.5±9.9 nM (n=6) for V1a-receptors, indicating that OPC-51803 was about nine times more selective for V2-receptors, similar to the selectivity of dDAVP. OPC-51803 scarcely displaced [3H]-AVP binding to human V1b-receptors even at 10−4 M, while dDAVP showed potent affinity to human V1b-receptors with the Ki value of 13.7±3.2 nM (n=4).OPC-51803 concentration-dependently increased cyclic adenosine 3′, 5′-monophosphate (cyclic AMP) production in HeLa cells expressing human V2-receptors with an EC50 value of 189±14 nM (n=6). The concentration-response curve for cyclic AMP production induced by OPC-51803 was shifted to the right in the presence of a V2-antagonist, OPC-31260.At 10−5 M, OPC-51803 did not increase the intracellular Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) in HeLa cells expressing human V1a-receptors. On the other hand, dDAVP increased [Ca2+]i in HeLa cells expressing human V1a- and V1b-receptors in a concentration-dependent fashion.From these results, OPC-51803 has been confirmed to be the first nonpeptide agonist for human AVP V2-receptors without agonistic activities for V1a- and V1b-receptors. OPC-51803 may be useful for the treatment of AVP-deficient pathophysiological states and as a tool for AVP researches. PMID:10780976

  8. The study of consistent properties of the vasopressin nasal dosage form

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al Nukarii Abdulkarim

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Evaluation of consistent properties is an important and integral part of investigations on the creation of semisolid nasal pharmacotherapeutic agents. The aim of this work is the study of consistent properties of developed nasal semisolid dosage form with synthetic analogue of vasopressin – arginine-vasopressin for the treatment of cognitive consequences of cerebral-vascular pathology. Materials and methods. The study of structural-mechanical characteristics of nasal ointment with 0.000005% arginine-vasopressin on the vaseline-lanolin-paraffin base was carried out by a rotary viscosimeter «Reotest-2» with cylindrical arrangement. It was established that consistent properties of arginine-vasopressin semisolid dosage form and «mechanical stability» (2.56 describe composition as a thixotropic system which provides with restorability after applying tension and allow to predict stability of consistent properties during a long-term storage. Calculated factors of dynamical flowing of arginine- vasopressin dosage form on the vaseline-lanolin-paraffin base (Кd1=28.7%; Kd2=53.84% quantitatively confirm satisfactory spreading degree of the system during application on the mucous membranes or in manufacturing process. Conclusions. The studies of consistent properties of nasal ointment with synthetic analogue of vasopressin – arginine-vasopressin 0.000005% on lipophilic basis for treatment of cognitive effects of cerebrovascular disease have been conducted by rotary viscometer «Reotest 2». It has been established that consistent properties of studied soft nasal dosage form of arginine-vasopressin and «mechanical stability» value of the system (2.56 characterize it as a thixotropic, that assure recovery from mechanical stress, that allows to predict the stability of consistent properties of the composition during prolonged storage. The calculated values of coefficients of dynamic flow of intranasal dosage form of arginine-vasopressin on vaseline

  9. The Effects of Acute Arginine Vasopressin Administration on Social Cognition in Healthy Males

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda R. Kenyon

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The structurally similar neuropeptides and hormones oxytocin (OT and arginine vasopressin (AVP play significant and complex roles in modulating a range of social behaviours, including social recognition and bond formation. Although OT has well-known roles in facilitating prosocial behaviors and enhancing emotion recognition, AVP has received increasing interest for diverging effects on social cognition behaviour most notably in males. The current study aimed to determine whether AVP also modulates the ability to understand emotion. Using a randomised double blind procedure, 45 healthy young males received either an AVP or placebo nasal spray and completed the Reading the Mind in the Eyes Test (RMET. In contrast to previous findings, there were no significant differences observed in performance on the RMET between AVP and placebo groups, even after examining items separated by task difficulty, emotional valence, and gender. This study provides diverging evidence from previous findings and adds to the growing body of research exploring the influence of neuropeptide hormones in social behaviour. It demonstrates that in this sample of participants, AVP does not enhance the ability to understand higher order emotion from others. Implications and suggestions for future AVP administration studies are discussed.

  10. Social Context, Stress, Neuropsychiatric Disorders, and the Vasopressin 1b Receptor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heather K. Caldwell

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The arginine vasopressin 1b receptor (Avpr1b is involved in the modulation of a variety of behaviors and is an important part of the mammalian hormonal stress axis. The Avpr1b is prominent in hippocampal CA2 pyramidal cells and in the anterior pituitary corticotrophs. Decades of research on this receptor has demonstrated its importance to the modulation of social recognition memory, social forms of aggression, and modulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis, particularly under conditions of acute stress. Further, work in humans suggests that the Avpr1b may play a role in human neuropsychiatric disorders and its modulation may have therapeutic potential. This paper reviews what is known about the role of the Avpr1b in the context of social behaviors, the stress axis, and human neuropsychiatric disorders. Further, possible mechanisms for how Avpr1b activation within the hippocampus vs. Avpr1b activation within anterior pituitary may interact with one another to affect behavioral output are proposed.

  11. The effect of acute heat exposure on rat pituitary corticotroph activation: the role of vasopressin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sinisa Djurasevic

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The increased ambient temperature affects the function of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA axis. Since the correlation among vasopressin (VP, adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH and corticosterone (CORT responses to various stressors have been long recognized, the aim of this study was to reveal the aforementioned hormones production and morphology of the pituitary gland after exposure to acute heat. Rats were exposed to high ambient temperature (38 °C for 20 or 60 minutes. The circulating hormones were determined by an ELISA test or chemiluminescence's method. The results obtained show the elevation in ACTH and CORT secretion depending on the duration of heat exposure. The VP concentration increased only after prolonged exposure to heat (60 min. The pituitary morphology was examined by routine and fluorescent immunohistochemistry as well as electron microscopy. Observed changes in the anterior and posterior pituitary well corresponded to circulating hormones, regarding the volume density of ACTH-immunopositive cells, percentage of ACTH immunopositive area v. total area and number of VP-immunopositive containing varicose fibers per total area. Acute heat exposure also induced changes in shapes of ACTH-immunopositive cells. Cells appeared stellate with numerous slender cytoplasmic processes and degranulated, which is the most obvious after 20 min. In addition, immunopositivity of endothelial and anterior pituitary cells for VP suggests its influence on ACTH secretion.

  12. Vasopressin activates Akt/mTOR pathway in smooth muscle cells cultured in high glucose concentration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montes, Daniela K.; Brenet, Marianne; Muñoz, Vanessa C.; Burgos, Patricia V.; Villanueva, Carolina I. [Department of Physiology, Universidad Austral de Chile, Valdivia 509-9200 (Chile); Figueroa, Carlos D. [Department of Anatomy, Histology and Pathology, Universidad Austral de Chile, Valdivia 509-9200 (Chile); González, Carlos B., E-mail: cbgonzal@uach.cl [Department of Physiology, Universidad Austral de Chile, Valdivia 509-9200 (Chile); Department of Neuroscience and Cell Biology, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX 77555 (United States)

    2013-11-29

    Highlights: •AVP induces mTOR phosphorylation in A-10 cells cultured in high glucose concentration. •The mTOR phosphorylation is mediated by the PI3K/Akt pathway activation. •The AVP-induced mTOR phosphorylation inhibited autophagy and stimulated cell proliferation. -- Abstract: Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) complex is a key regulator of autophagy, cell growth and proliferation. Here, we studied the effects of arginine vasopressin (AVP) on mTOR activation in vascular smooth muscle cells cultured in high glucose concentration. AVP induced the mTOR phosphorylation in A-10 cells grown in high glucose, in contrast to cells cultured in normal glucose; wherein, only basal phosphorylation was observed. The AVP-induced mTOR phosphorylation was inhibited by a PI3K inhibitor. Moreover, the AVP-induced mTOR activation inhibited autophagy and increased thymidine incorporation in cells grown in high glucose. This increase was abolished by rapamycin which inhibits the mTORC1 complex formation. Our results suggest that AVP stimulates mTOR phosphorylation by activating the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway and, subsequently, inhibits autophagy and raises cell proliferation in A-10 cells maintained in high glucose concentration.

  13. Individual Differences in Social Behavior and Cortical Vasopressin Receptor: Genetics, Epigenetics, and Evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phelps, Steven M; Okhovat, Mariam; Berrio, Alejandro

    2017-01-01

    Social behavior is among the most complex and variable of traits. Despite its diversity, we know little about how genetic and developmental factors interact to shape natural variation in social behavior. This review surveys recent work on individual differences in the expression of the vasopressin 1a receptor (V1aR), a major regulator of social behavior, in the neocortex of the socially monogamous prairie vole. V1aR exhibits profound variation in the retrosplenial cortex (RSC), a region critical to spatial and contextual memory. RSC-V1aR abundance is associated with patterns of male space-use and sexual fidelity in the field: males with high RSC-V1aR show high spatial and sexual fidelity to partners, while low RSC-V1aR males are significantly more likely to mate outside the pair-bond. Individual differences in RSC-V1aR are predicted by a set of linked single nucleotide polymorphisms within the avpr1a locus. These alternative alleles have been actively maintained by selection, suggesting that the brain differences represent a balanced polymorphism. Lastly, the alleles occur within regulatory sequences, and result in differential sensitivity to environmental perturbation. Together the data provide insight into how genetic, epigenetic and evolutionary forces interact to shape the social brain.

  14. Individual Differences in Social Behavior and Cortical Vasopressin Receptor: Genetics, Epigenetics, and Evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven M. Phelps

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Social behavior is among the most complex and variable of traits. Despite its diversity, we know little about how genetic and developmental factors interact to shape natural variation in social behavior. This review surveys recent work on individual differences in the expression of the vasopressin 1a receptor (V1aR, a major regulator of social behavior, in the neocortex of the socially monogamous prairie vole. V1aR exhibits profound variation in the retrosplenial cortex (RSC, a region critical to spatial and contextual memory. RSC-V1aR abundance is associated with patterns of male space-use and sexual fidelity in the field: males with high RSC-V1aR show high spatial and sexual fidelity to partners, while low RSC-V1aR males are significantly more likely to mate outside the pair-bond. Individual differences in RSC-V1aR are predicted by a set of linked single nucleotide polymorphisms within the avpr1a locus. These alternative alleles have been actively maintained by selection, suggesting that the brain differences represent a balanced polymorphism. Lastly, the alleles occur within regulatory sequences, and result in differential sensitivity to environmental perturbation. Together the data provide insight into how genetic, epigenetic and evolutionary forces interact to shape the social brain.

  15. Examining the role of vasopressin in the modulation of parental and sexual behaviors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josi Maria eZimmermann-Peruzatto

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Vasopressin (VP and VP-like neuropeptides are evolutionarily stable peptides found in all vertebrate species. In non-mammalian vertebrates, vasotocin (VT plays a role similar to mammalian VP, whereas mesotocin and isotocin are functionally similar to mammalian oxytocin (OT. Here, we review the involvement of VP in brain circuits, synaptic plasticity, evolution, and function, highlighting the role of VP in social behavior. In all studied species, VP is encoded on chromosome 20p13, and in mammals, VP is produced in specific hypothalamic nuclei and released by the posterior pituitary. The role of VP is mediated by the stimulation of the V1a, V2, and V1b receptors, as well as the oxytocinergic and purinergic receptors. VT and VP functions are usually related to osmotic and cardiovascular homeostasis when acting peripherally. However, these neuropeptides are also critically involved in the central modulation of social behavior displays, such as pairing recognition, pair-bonding, social memory, sexual behavior, parental care, maternal and aggressive behavior. Evidence suggests that these effects are primarily mediated by V1a receptor in specific brain circuits that provide important information for the onset and control of social behaviors in normal and pathological conditions.

  16. Vasopressin as a target for antidepressant development: an assessment of the available evidence.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Scott, Lucinda V

    2012-02-03

    Hyperactivity of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis is one of the key biological abnormalities described in major depressive disorder, occurring in 30-50% of depressed subjects. Corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) and vasopressin (AVP) are the main regulators of this stress system, with the two neuropeptides acting synergistically in bringing about adrenocorticotropin (ACTH) release from the anterior pituitary and cortisol from the adrenal gland. Based on the demonstration of elevated cerebrospinal fluid levels of CRH in depressives, and other evidence, it has been postulated that excess CRH and the resultant increased HPA forward drive form the basis of neuroendocrine dysregulation in depression. However, there is an accumulating body of evidence to support a significant role for AVP in the regulation of pituitary-adrenal activity in health and also in depressive disorder. This review, based on a Medline search from 1980 to 2001, focuses on the functional neuroanatomy, receptor pharmacology, VP synergism with CRH, and the data from clinical and pre-clinical studies that support an important role for AVP in the pathophysiology of major depression. We suggest that future antidepressants may target the vasopressinergic system.

  17. Successful treatment of severe anaphylactic shock with vasopressin. Two case reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kill, Clemens; Wranze, Erich; Wulf, Hinnerk

    2004-07-01

    Severe anaphylactic shock is a life-threatening situation that needs immediate treatment of progressive hemodynamic failure. We report two cases of severe anaphylactic shock treated with arginine-vasopressin (AVP): In a 42-year-old male patient anaphylactic shock was caused by the sting of a hornet. At the scene, he was found unconscious, cyanotic, with a heart rate of 130/min without measurable blood pressure. The patient was intubated and ventilated with 100% oxygen, intravenous epinephrine (1 mg over 2 min) had no effect on blood pressure. After injection of 10 IU vasopressin, followed by infusion of 40 IU vasopressin, hemodynamics could be stabilized at once. In the second case, a 47-year-old male patient was stung by a wasp. At the scene he was unconscious, blood pressure was not measurable, heart rate was 140/min. The patient was treated with 40 IU vasopressin followed by rapid infusion of 500 ml NaCl 0.9%. After injection of vasopressin, blood pressure raised to 80/50 mm Hg and heart rate decreased to 90/min. Both patients needed ventilator therapy for several days and recovered fully. Copyright 2004 S. Karger AG, Basel

  18. Age-dependent regulation of renal vasopressin V(1A) and V₂ receptors in rats with genetic hypertension: implications for the treatment of hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burrell, Louise M; Risvanis, John; Dean, Rachael G; Patel, Sheila K; Velkoska, Elena; Johnston, Colin I

    2013-01-01

    The role of arginine vasopressin (AVP) as a hypertensive hormone remains controversial. We have previously reported that intervention with a V(1A) receptor antagonist in 6-week-old prehypertensive spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) for 4 weeks attenuated the subsequent development of hypertension in adult SHR. This study assessed the age-dependent regulation of plasma AVP levels and kidney V(1A) and V₂ receptor expression during the development of hypertension in SHR and in normotensive Sprague Dawley rats. Systolic blood pressure (SBP), plasma AVP, and plasma renin activity (PRA) and kidney V(1A) and V₂ receptor expression were assessed. SHR were studied at three ages: prehypertensive (6 weeks), developed hypertension (10 weeks), and established hypertension (16 weeks). SBP increased with age in SHR (P P P V(1A) receptor gene expression decreased in 10-week and 16-week-old SHR (P V(1A) receptor protein in the inner medulla of 16-week-old SHR (P young SHR. There was no change in V₂ receptor expression during the development of hypertension. In normotensive rats, plasma AVP, PRA, and kidney V(1A) and V₂ receptor expression were unchanged over time. These data suggest that in SHR, activation of plasma AVP and the renal V(1A) receptor occurs during developing hypertension, with downregulation when hypertension is established. The use of V(1A) receptor antagonists in prehypertension may provide a unique opportunity for the prevention of hypertension in high-risk individuals. Crown Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Hypnosis, suggestion, and suggestibility: an integrative model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynn, Steven Jay; Laurence, Jean-Roch; Kirsch, Irving

    2015-01-01

    This article elucidates an integrative model of hypnosis that integrates social, cultural, cognitive, and neurophysiological variables at play both in and out of hypnosis and considers their dynamic interaction as determinants of the multifaceted experience of hypnosis. The roles of these variables are examined in the induction and suggestion stages of hypnosis, including how they are related to the experience of involuntariness, one of the hallmarks of hypnosis. It is suggested that studies of the modification of hypnotic suggestibility; cognitive flexibility; response sets and expectancies; the default-mode network; and the search for the neurophysiological correlates of hypnosis, more broadly, in conjunction with research on social psychological variables, hold much promise to further understanding of hypnosis.

  20. The expression of the proximodistal axis patterning genes Distal-less and dachshund in the appendages of Glomeris marginata (Myriapoda: Diplopoda) suggests a special role of these genes in patterning the head appendages

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Prpic, Nikola-Michael; Tautz, Diethard

    2003-01-01

    ...) axis of the developing legs. In order to study PD axis formation in the appendages of the pill millipede Glomeris marginata, we have isolated homologues of these four genes and have studied their expression patterns...

  1. Pituitary content of oxytocin, vasopressin and alpha-melanocyte-stimulating hormone in the fetus of the rat during labour

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boer, K.; Dogterom, J.; Pronker, H. F.

    1980-01-01

    The pituitary contents of oxytocin, vasopressin and alpha-MSH were measured in fetal and newborn rats to assess possible changes in their release during the process of labour. In the 24 h period during which delivery is likely to occur in the Wistar rat, both the oxytocin and vasopressin content of

  2. Hyper-responsiveness of adrenal gland to vasopressin resulting in enhanced plasma cortisol in patients with adrenal nodule(s).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Sawako; Uchida, Daigaku; Koide, Hisashi; Tanaka, Tomoaki; Noguchi, Yoshihiko; Saito, Yasushi; Tatsuno, Ichiro

    2008-10-01

    Hyper-responsiveness of plasma cortisol to vasopressin has been demonstrated in ACTH-independent bilateral macronodular adrenocortical hyperplasia (AIMAH) and some adrenal adenomas with Cushing's syndrome (CS). However, the clinical significance of hyper-responsiveness of plasma cortisol to vasopressin has not been investigated systematically in adrenal nodule(s). The aim of this study was to clarify the prevalence of hyper-responsiveness of plasma cortisol to vasopressin (vasopressin responder) and their clinical characteristics in terms of hormonal secretion using vasopressin-loading test in the patients with adrenal nodule(s) except pheochromocytomas. A vasopressin-loading test was performed on 61 consecutive patients with adrenal nodules (CS: 33, aldosterone-producing adenoma: 10, non-functional tumor: 18). Vasopressin responders were observed in 36.1% of adrenal nodule(s), 42.4% of CS and 28.5% of non-CS. In responders with CS, eight patients had bilateral nodules that were diagnosed as AIMAH, and the remaining six patients had a unilateral nodule. These patients had lower plasma cortisol than non-responders at both morning (Pcortisol was frequently observed among patients with adrenal nodule(s). The vasopressin responders among the patients with adrenal nodule(s) frequently had CS with low autonomous cortisol secretion.

  3. An attempt to identify single nucleotide polymorphisms contributing to possible relationships between personality traits and oxytocin-related genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haram, Marit; Tesli, Martin; Dieset, Ingrid; Steen, Nils Eiel; Røssberg, Jan Ivar; Djurovic, Srdjan; Andreassen, Ole A; Melle, Ingrid

    2014-01-01

    The neuropeptides oxytocin and vasopressin play a central role in social behavior. Trials with intranasal oxytocin have been conducted and many indicate that the hormone facilitates affiliative behavior and trust. Intranasal oxytocin administration is suggested as a treatment option for psychiatric illnesses with altered sociability as a core symptom and the effects may be due to differences in variants of oxytocin- and vasopressin-related genes. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the endogenous oxytocin system by exploring the relationship between variants in the oxytocin gene factors and personality traits closely related to trust, anxiety and social behavior. 72 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the genes coding for oxytocin (OXT), vasopressin (AVP), the oxytocin receptor (OXTR) and CD38 (CD38), including polymorphisms reported earlier to be related to social phenotypes and novel SNPs, were investigated in 196 healthy subjects. Association analysis between these variants and 3 personality traits (agreeableness, neuroticism and extraversion) measured by the Neuroticism-Extraversion-Openness Five-Factor Inventory was performed. We found 7 nominally significant associations for personality traits: agreeableness [rs857240 (AVP, p = 0.0075), rs2270463 (OXTR, p = 0.047)], neuroticism [rs3756242 (CD38, p = 0.024), rs13104011 (CD38, p = 0.024), rs6816486 (CD38, p = 0.024), rs7655635 (CD38, p = 0.034)] and extraversion [rs237878 (OXTR, p = 0.019)]. None of these associations remained significant after the Bonferroni correction (p threshold = 2.31 × 10(-4)). Our results do not contradict the hypothesis of associations between personality traits and oxytocin-related gene variants; however, there are no statistically significant associations after correcting for multiple testing, warranting replication in larger samples.

  4. Influence of renal impairment on aldosterone status, calcium metabolism, and vasopressin activity in outpatients with systolic heart failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bosselmann, Helle; Tonder, Niels; Sölétormos, György

    2017-01-01

    in the study. Median age was 69 [interquartile range (IQR): 64-73] and 26% were female; LVEF was 33% (IQR: 27-39), 78% were in functional class II-III, median eGFR was 74 (54-89) mL/min/1.73 m2 , and median N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide was 1303 pg/mL (IQR: 441-2740). RD was associated...... with increased aldosterone, parathyroid hormone (PTH), and copeptin concentrations (P ... underscore the importance of treatment with mineralocorticoid receptor antagonist in systolic HF in particular in patients with RD and suggest that vasopressin and parathyroid receptor antagonism are potential treatment options in HF patients with known RD....

  5. Bradykinin and vasopressin activate phospholipase D in rat Leydig cells by a protein kinase C-dependent mechanism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vinggaard, Anne Marie; Hansen, Harald S.

    1993-01-01

    In the present study we report that bradykinin stimulated phospholipase D activity in rat Leydig cells. Bradykinin added for 8 min stimulated choline formation in a dose-dependent manner and, in the presence of ethanol, bradykinin (100 nmol/l) stimulated transphosphatidylation by phospholipase D...... resulting in the formation of phosphatidylethanol. This stimulation was abolished after down-regulation of protein kinase C by long-term pretreatment for 22 h with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA). The stimulation of phospholipase D by the simultaneous addition for 8 min of maximum concentrations...... of PMA and vasopressin (AVP), PMA and bradykinin, or AVP and bradykinin produced no additive phosphatidylethanol or choline response, suggesting that AVP, bradykinin and PMA stimulated phospholipase D catalysed phosphatidylcholine hydrolysis by a similar protein kinase C-dependent mechanism. Furthermore...

  6. Neural injury after use of vasopressin and adrenaline during porcine cardiopulmonary resuscitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halvorsen, Peter; Sharma, Hari Shanker; Basu, Samar

    2015-01-01

    Background Our aim was to investigate cerebral and cardiac tissue injury subsequent to use of vasopressin and adrenaline in combination compared with vasopressin alone during cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). Methods In a randomized, prospective, laboratory animal study 28 anesthetized piglets were subject to a 12-min untreated cardiac arrest and subsequent CPR. After 1 min of CPR, 10 of the piglets received 0.4 U/kg of arg8-vasopressin (V group), and 10 piglets received 0.4 U/kg of arg8-vasopressin, 1 min later followed by 20 µg/kg body weight of adrenaline, and another 1 min later continuous administration (10 µg/kg/min) of adrenaline (VA group). After 8 min of CPR, the piglets were defibrillated and monitored for another 3 h. Then they were killed and the brain immediately removed pending histological analysis. Results During CPR, the VA group had higher mean blood pressure and cerebral cortical blood flow (CCBF) but similar coronary perfusion pressure. After restoration of spontaneous circulation there was no difference in the pressure variables, but CCBF tended to be (36% ± 16%) higher in the V group. Neuronal injury and signs of a disrupted blood–brain barrier (BBB) were greater, 20% ± 4% and 21% ± 4%, respectively, in the VA group. In a background study of repeated single doses of adrenaline every third minute after 5 min arrest but otherwise the same protocol, histological measurements showed even worse neural injury and disruption of the BBB. Conclusion Combined use of vasopressin and adrenaline caused greater signs of cerebral and cardiac injury than use of vasopressin alone during experimental cardiopulmonary resuscitation. PMID:25645317

  7. Neural injury after use of vasopressin and adrenaline during porcine cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halvorsen, Peter; Sharma, Hari Shanker; Basu, Samar; Wiklund, Lars

    2015-03-01

    Our aim was to investigate cerebral and cardiac tissue injury subsequent to use of vasopressin and adrenaline in combination compared with vasopressin alone during cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). In a randomized, prospective, laboratory animal study 28 anesthetized piglets were subject to a 12-min untreated cardiac arrest and subsequent CPR. After 1 min of CPR, 10 of the piglets received 0.4 U/kg of arg(8)-vasopressin (V group), and 10 piglets received 0.4 U/kg of arg(8)-vasopressin, 1 min later followed by 20 µg/kg body weight of adrenaline, and another 1 min later continuous administration (10 µg/kg/min) of adrenaline (VA group). After 8 min of CPR, the piglets were defibrillated and monitored for another 3 h. Then they were killed and the brain immediately removed pending histological analysis. During CPR, the VA group had higher mean blood pressure and cerebral cortical blood flow (CCBF) but similar coronary perfusion pressure. After restoration of spontaneous circulation there was no difference in the pressure variables, but CCBF tended to be (36% ± 16%) higher in the V group. Neuronal injury and signs of a disrupted blood-brain barrier (BBB) were greater, 20% ± 4% and 21% ± 4%, respectively, in the VA group. In a background study of repeated single doses of adrenaline every third minute after 5 min arrest but otherwise the same protocol, histological measurements showed even worse neural injury and disruption of the BBB. Combined use of vasopressin and adrenaline caused greater signs of cerebral and cardiac injury than use of vasopressin alone during experimental cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

  8. Role of central and peripheral chemoreceptors in vasopressin secretion control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iovino, Michele; Guastamacchia, Edoardo; Giagulli, Vito Angelo; Fiore, Giorgio; Licchelli, Brunella; Iovino, Emanuela; Triggiani, Vincenzo

    2013-09-01

    In this review, we analyzed the role played by central and peripheral chemoreceptors (CHRs) in vasopressin (AVP) secretion control. Central neural pathways subserving osmotic and non-osmotic control of AVP secretion are strictly correlated to brain areas participating in chemoreception mechanisms. Among the different brain areas involved in central chemoreception, the most important site has been localized in the retrotrapezoid nucleus of the rostral ventrolateral medulla. These central CHRs are able to detect very small pH/CO2 fluctuations, participating in brain blood flow regulation, acid-base balance and blood pressure control. Decreases in arterial pH and increases in arterial pCO2 stimulate AVP release by the Supraoptic and Paraventricular Nuclei. Carotid CHRs transduce low arterial O2 tension into increased action potential activity, leading to bradycardia and coronary vasodilatation via vagal stimulation, and systemic vasoconstriction via catecholaminergic stimulation. Stimulation of carotid CHRs by hypoxia increases neurohypophyseal blood flow and AVP release, an effect inhibited by CHRs denervation. Two renal CHRs have been identified: Type R1 CHRs do not have a resting discharge but are activated by renal ischemia and hypotension; Type R2 CHRs have a resting discharge and respond to backflow of urine into the renal pelvis. Signals arising from renal CHRs modulate the activity of hypothalamic AVPergic neurons: activation of R1 and R2 CHRs, following increased intrapelvic pressure with solutions of mannitol, NaCl and KCl, produces a significant increase of AVP secretion and the same effect has been obtained by the intrarenal infusion of bradykinin, which excites afferent renal nerves, as well as by the electrical stimulation of these nerves.

  9. Vasopressin-induced changes in splanchnic blood flow and hepatic and portal venous pressures in liver resection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bown, L Sand; Ricksten, S-E; Houltz, E; Einarsson, H; Söndergaard, S; Rizell, M; Lundin, S

    2016-05-01

    To minimize blood loss during hepatic surgery, various methods are used to reduce pressure and flow within the hepato-splanchnic circulation. In this study, the effect of low- to moderate doses of vasopressin, a potent splanchnic vasoconstrictor, on changes in portal and hepatic venous pressures and splanchnic and hepato-splanchnic blood flows were assessed in elective liver resection surgery. Twelve patients were studied. Cardiac output (CO), stroke volume (SV), mean arterial (MAP), central venous (CVP), portal venous (PVP) and hepatic venous pressures (HVP) were measured, intraoperatively, at baseline and during vasopressin infusion at two infusion rates (2.4 and 4.8 U/h). From arterial and venous blood gases, the portal (splanchnic) and hepato-splanchnic blood flow changes were calculated, using Fick's equation. CO, SV, MAP and CVP increased slightly, but significantly, while systemic vascular resistance and heart rate remained unchanged at the highest infusion rate of vasopressin. PVP was not affected by vasopressin, while HVP increased slightly. Vasopressin infusion at 2.4 and 4.8 U/h reduced portal blood flow (-26% and -37%, respectively) and to a lesser extent hepato-splanchnic blood flow (-9% and -14%, respectively). The arterial-portal vein lactate gradient was not significantly affected by vasopressin. Postoperative serum creatinine was not affected by vasopressin. Short-term low to moderate infusion rates of vasopressin induced a splanchnic vasoconstriction without metabolic signs of splanchnic hypoperfusion or subsequent renal impairment. Vasopressin caused a centralization of blood volume and increased cardiac output. Vasopressin does not lower portal or hepatic venous pressures in this clinical setting. © 2016 The Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica Foundation. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Gene regulatory networks reused to build novel traits: co-option of an eye-related gene regulatory network in eye-like organs and red wing patches on insect wings is suggested by optix expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monteiro, Antónia

    2012-03-01

    Co-option of the eye developmental gene regulatory network may have led to the appearance of novel functional traits on the wings of flies and butterflies. The first trait is a recently described wing organ in a species of extinct midge resembling the outer layers of the midge's own compound eye. The second trait is red pigment patches on Heliconius butterfly wings connected to the expression of an eye selector gene, optix. These examples, as well as others, are discussed regarding the type of empirical evidence and burden of proof that have been used to infer gene network co-option underlying the origin of novel traits. A conceptual framework describing increasing confidence in inference of network co-option is proposed. Novel research directions to facilitate inference of network co-option are also highlighted, especially in cases where the pre-existent and novel traits do not resemble each other. Copyright © 2012 WILEY Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Phylogenetic analysis of the genera Proteus, Morganella and Providencia by comparison of rpoB gene sequences of type and clinical strains suggests the reclassification of Proteus myxofaciens in a new genus, Cosenzaea gen. nov., as Cosenzaea myxofaciens comb. nov.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giammanco, Giovanni M; Grimont, Patrick A D; Grimont, Francine; Lefevre, Martine; Giammanco, Giuseppe; Pignato, Sarina

    2011-07-01

    Phylogenetic analysis of partial rpoB gene sequences of type and clinical strains belonging to different 16S rRNA gene-fingerprinting ribogroups within 11 species of enterobacteria of the genera Proteus, Morganella and Providencia was performed and allowed the definition of rpoB clades, supported by high bootstrap values and confirmed by ≥2.5 % nucleotide divergence. None of the resulting clades included strains belonging to different species and the majority of the species were confirmed as discrete and homogeneous. However, more than one distinct rpoB clade could be defined among strains belonging to the species Proteus vulgaris (two clades), Providencia alcalifaciens (two clades) and Providencia rettgeri (three clades), suggesting that some strains represent novel species according to the genotypes outlined by rpoB gene sequence analysis. Percentage differences between the rpoB gene sequence of the type strain of Proteus myxofaciens and other members of the same genus (17.3-18.9 %) were similar to those calculated amongst strains of the genus Providencia (16.4-18.7 %), suggesting a genetic distance at the genus-level between Proteus myxofaciens and the rest of the Proteus-Providencia group. Proteus myxofaciens therefore represents a member of a new genus, for which the name Cosenzaea gen. nov., is proposed.

  12. Open to Suggestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Journal of Reading, 1987

    1987-01-01

    Offers (1) suggestions for improving college students' study skills; (2) a system for keeping track of parent, teacher, and community contacts; (3) suggestions for motivating students using tic tac toe; (4) suggestions for using etymology to improve word retention; (5) a word search grid; and (6) suggestions for using postcards in remedial reading…

  13. Dietary exposure to the PCB mixture aroclor 1254 may compromise osmoregulation by altering central vasopressin release

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coburn, C.G. [Environmental Toxicology, Univ. of California at Riverside, CA (United States); Gillard, E.; Curras-Collazo, M. [Cell Biology and Neuroscience, Univ. of California at Riverside, CA (United States)

    2004-09-15

    Despite the importance of systemic osmoregulation, the potential deleterious effects of persistent organochlorines, such as polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), on body fluid regulation has not been thoroughly investigated. In an effort to ameliorate this deficit, the current study explores the toxic effects of PCBs on osmoregulation, and in particular, on the activity of the magnocellular neuroendocrine cell (MNC) system of the hypothalamus. MNCs of the supraoptic nucleus (SON) release oxytocin (OXY) and vasopressin (VP) from terminals in the neurohypophysis in response to dehydration. The latter is released to effect water conservation in response to dehydration via its action upon the kidney and through extra-renal actions. MNCs also secrete VP from their cell bodies and dendrites locally i.e., into the extracellular space of the SON. Although it has been shown that both intranuclear and systemic release rise in response to dehydration the physiological significance of intranuclear release has not been fully elucidated. We chose to use voluntary ingestion as the route of PCB exposure since it is more reflective of natural exposure compared to ip injection. One unexpected observation that resulted from pilot studies using ip injection of PCBs was the deleterious effects of the vehicle (corn oil) resulting in pooling of lipid within the abdominal cavity, mottling of the liver, fatty liver and general discoloration of all abdominal viscera at time of sacrifice. Therefore, all work described in this series of experiments have employed voluntary ingestion of the toxin. Work described in this paper suggests that PCBs in concentrations reflecting realistic lifetime exposure levels may negatively impact homeostatic mechanisms responsible for body water balance by altering somatodendritic (intranuclear) VP secretion in response to dehydration in vivo. The downstream consequences of such influence is currently under investigation, and preliminary evidence suggests that the

  14. Hypernatremia-induced vasopressin secretion is not altered in TRPV1-/- rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Andrew Blake; Stocker, Sean D

    2016-09-01

    Changes in osmolality or extracellular NaCl concentrations are detected by specialized neurons in the hypothalamus to increase vasopressin (VP) and stimulate thirst. Recent in vitro evidence suggests this process is mediated by an NH2-terminal variant of the transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) channel expressed by osmosensitive neurons of the lamina terminalis and vasopressinergic neurons of the supraoptic nucleus. The present study tested this hypothesis in vivo by analysis of plasma VP levels during acute hypernatremia in awake control and TRPV1(-/-) rats. TRPV1(-/-) rats were produced by a Zinc-finger-nuclease 2-bp deletion in exon 13. Intravenous injection of the TRPV1 agonist capsaicin produced hypotension and bradycardia in control rats, but this response was absent in TRPV1(-/-) rats. Infusion of 2 M NaCl (1 ml/h iv) increased plasma osmolality, electrolytes, and VP levels in both control and TRPV1(-/-) rats. However, plasma VP levels did not differ between strains at any time. Furthermore, a linear regression between plasma VP versus osmolality revealed a significant correlation in both control and TRPV1(-/-) rats, but the slope of the regression lines was not attenuated in TRPV1(-/-) versus control rats. Hypotension produced by intravenous injection of minoxidil decreased blood pressure and increased plasma VP levels similarly in both groups. Finally, both treatments stimulated thirst; however, cumulative water intakes in response to hypernatremia or hypotension were not different between control and TRPV1(-/-) rats. These findings suggest that TRPV1 channels are not necessary for VP secretion and thirst stimulated by hypernatremia. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  15. Arginine Vasopressin and Arginine Vasopressin Receptor 1b Involved in Electroacupuncture‐Attenuated Hypothalamic‐Pituitary‐Adrenal Axis Hyperactivity in Hepatectomy Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jing; Chen, Zhejun; Zhu, LiTing; Meng, ZeHui; Wu, GenCheng

    2015-01-01

    Objective The study aims to know the effect of electroacupuncture (EA) in maintenance of the homeostasis of the neuroendocrine system in hepatectomy rats and the involvement of arginine vasopressin (AVP) signaling in hypothalamus after EA was observed. Materials and Methods Rats were randomly assigned to four groups, including the intact group, model group, sham‐EA group, and EA group. EA was given during the perioperative period at the Zusanli (ST36) and Sanyinjiao (SP6) points after hepatectomy. The serum adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) and corticosterone (CORT) levels were detected via radioimmunoassay. The expression of AVP, arginine vasopressin receptor 1a (AVPR1a), arginine vasopressin receptor 1b (AVPR1b), and glucocorticoid receptor (GR) was detected by Western blot after surgery. Results Compared with the intact group, the ACTH and CORT levels in the serum of model group were increased, whereas the ACTH and CORT levels were decreased in the EA group compared with the model group. Moreover, AVP and AVPR1b protein levels in the pituitary gland were increased in the model group and decreased in the EA group. Further, a distinct increase in the AVP and AVPR1a protein levels was observed in the model group, whereas they were significantly decreased in the EA group. Blockade of AVPR1b by nelivaptan reduced the increase of ACTH and CORT. D [Leu4, Lys8] vasopressin can inhibit the effect of EA in rectification of the hyperactivity of the hypothalamic‐pituitary‐adrenal (HPA) axis. Conclusions EA application at ST36 and SP6 can ameliorate the hyperactivity of the HPA axis via AVP signaling during the perioperative period. PMID:26573696

  16. The expression of the proximodistal axis patterning genes Distal-less and dachshund in the appendages of Glomeris marginata (Myriapoda: Diplopoda) suggests a special role of these genes in patterning the head appendages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prpic, Nikola-Michael; Tautz, Diethard

    2003-08-01

    The genes Distal-less, dachshund, extradenticle, and homothorax have been shown in Drosophila to be among the earliest genes that define positional values along the proximal-distal (PD) axis of the developing legs. In order to study PD axis formation in the appendages of the pill millipede Glomeris marginata, we have isolated homologues of these four genes and have studied their expression patterns. In the trunk legs, there are several differences to Drosophila, but the patterns are nevertheless compatible with a conserved role in defining positional values along the PD axis. However, their role in the head appendages is apparently more complex. Distal-less in the mandible and maxilla is expressed in the forming sensory organs and, thus, does not seem to be involved in PD axis patterning. We could not identify in the mouthparts components that are homologous to the distal parts of the trunk legs and antennnae. Interestingly, there is also a transient premorphogenetic expression of Distal-less in the second antennal and second maxillary segment, although no appendages are eventually formed in these segments. The dachshund gene is apparently involved both in PD patterning as well as in sensory organ development in the antenna, maxilla, and mandible. Strong dachshund expression is specifically correlated with the tooth-like part of the mandible, a feature that is shared with other mandibulate arthropods. homothorax is expressed in the proximal and medial parts of the legs, while extradenticle RNA is only seen in the proximal region. This overlap of expression corresponds to the functional overlap between extradenticle and homothorax in Drosophila.

  17. Investigation of Genetic Variants, Birthweight and Hypothalamic-Pituitary-Adrenal Axis Function Suggests a Genetic Variant in the SERPINA6 Gene Is Associated with Corticosteroid Binding Globulin in the Western Australia Pregnancy Cohort (Raine) Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Laura N.; Briollais, Laurent; Atkinson, Helen C.; Marsh, Julie A.; Xu, Jingxiong; Connor, Kristin L.; Matthews, Stephen G.; Pennell, Craig E.; Lye, Stephen J.

    2014-01-01

    Our study suggests that genetic variation in the SERPINA6 gene may be associated with altered CBG levels during adolescence. Replication of these findings is required. PMID:24691024

  18. Decrease of extracellular taurine in the rat dorsal hippocampus after central nervous administration of vasopressin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brust, P; Christensen, Thomas; Diemer, Nils Henrik

    1992-01-01

    of the composition of the extracellular fluid. The concentrations of 16 amino acids were measured by HPLC in the perfusate samples. The level of taurine declined 20% in the right hippocampus during perfusion with vasopressin, whereas o-phosphoethanolamine decreased in both sides, the left 20% and the right 24...

  19. Mechanisms of inhibition of vasopressin release during moderate antiorthostatic posture change in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pump, B; Gabrielsen, A; Christensen, N J

    1999-01-01

    The hypothesis was tested that the carotid baroreceptor stimulation caused by a posture change from upright seated with legs horizontal (Seat) to supine (Sup) participates in the suppression of arginine vasopressin (AVP) release. Ten healthy males underwent this posture change for 30 min without ...

  20. Atrial distension, arterial pulsation, and vasopressin release during negative pressure breathing in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pump, B; Damgaard, M; Gabrielsen, A

    2001-01-01

    During an antiorthostatic posture change, left atrial (LA) diameter and arterial pulse pressure (PP) increase, and plasma arginine vasopressin (AVP) is suppressed. By comparing the effects of a 15-min posture change from seated to supine with those of 15-min seated negative pressure breathing in ...

  1. Physiology and pathophysiology of the vasopressin-regulated renal water reabsorption.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boone, M.; Deen, P.M.T.

    2008-01-01

    To prevent dehydration, terrestrial animals and humans have developed a sensitive and versatile system to maintain their water homeostasis. In states of hypernatremia or hypovolemia, the antidiuretic hormone vasopressin (AVP) is released from the pituitary and binds its type-2 receptor in renal

  2. Oxytocin/vasopressin-like immunoreactivity is present in the nervous system of hydra

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grimmelikhuijzen, C J; Dierickx, K; Boer, G J

    1982-01-01

    Nerve cells have been found in hydra, which react with antisera to oxytocin, vasopressin and mesotocin. These nerve cells have a high density in the ectoderm of basal disk and tentacles and lower density in the ectoderm of peduncle, gastric region and hypostome. A very small number of nerve cells...

  3. Post-training vasopressin injections may facilitate or delay shuttle-box avoidance extinction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hagan, J.J.; Bohus, B.; Wied, D. de

    1982-01-01

    After training to avoid footshock in a two-way shuttle box rats were injected with lysine vasopressin (LVP) and returned to the shuttle box 24 hr later for 10 extinction trials. Experiment 1 shows that when injected 30 min after training subsequent extinction responding varied as an inverted

  4. Use of Arginine Vasopressin in the Management of Vasodilatory Shock After CABG - A Clinical Tria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjay O

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Vasodilatory shock requiring treatment with catecholamines occurs in some patients following cardiopulmonary bypass. We investigated the use of vasopressin in the treatment of this syndrome. Forty patients with a left main coronary artery disease and a poor left ventricular function (ejection fraction <30% were studied. Only those patients (n=12, 30% in whom difficulty was experienced in maintaining a mean arterial pressure of > 60 mm Hg and a systemic vascular resistance of greater than 900 dynes.sec.cm5 on maximal doses of pharmacological and mechanical support were selected. Patients underwent a standard cardiac anaesthesia protocol. All patients had a Swan-ganz catheter inserted pre-operatively. Arginine vasopressin was administered as a bolus of 0.015 units/kg intravenously followed by an infusion of 0.03 units/kg/hour. This dose increased the mean arterial pressure from 67+/-7 to 95+/-5 mm Hg and the systemic vascular resistance from 860+/-55 to 1502+/-71 dynes.sec.cm-5. It was also associated with a decrease in pharmacological support. All subjects responded to vasopressin administration. Vasopressin is an effective pressor in vasodilatory shock after cardiopulmonary bypass.

  5. Mechanisms of inhibition of vasopressin release during moderate antiorthostatic posture change in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pump, B.; Gabrielsen, A.; Christensen, N.J.

    1999-01-01

    The hypothesis was tested that the carotid baroreceptor stimulation caused by a posture change from upright seated with legs horizontal (Seat) to supine (Sup) participates in the suppression of arginine vasopressin (AVP) release. Ten healthy males underwent this posture change for 30 min without...... decreased from 0.9 +/- 0.2 to 0.5 +/- 0.1 pg/ml (P posture...

  6. Relief of nocturnal enuresis by desmopressin is kidney and vasopressin type 2 receptor independent.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Robben, J.H.; Sze, M.; Knoers, N.V.A.M.; Eggert, P.; Deen, P.M.T.; Muller, D.

    2007-01-01

    Primary nocturnal enuresis (PNE) is a common problem in childhood and adolescence. Although various treatments are highly effective, a common underlying hypothesis on the pathogenesis is lacking. The success of desmopressin, a synthetic analogue of the antidiuretic hormone vasopressin, has been

  7. Amniotic oxytocin and vasopressin in relation to human fetal development and labour

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oosterbaan, H. P.; Swaab, D. F.

    1989-01-01

    Previous experiments in rats revealed increased amniotic oxytocin (OXT) levels in the course of normal development and increased vasopressin (AVP) levels in retarded fetal growth. In order to see whether similar changes would also occur in human, OXT and AVP levels were determined in amniotic fluid,

  8. Vasopressin receptors V1a and V2 are not osmosensors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Kasper Lykke; Assentoft, Mette; Fenton, Robert A

    2015-01-01

    that was, however, independent of hyperosmotic challenges. Similarly, the cAMP production by the V2R was unaffected by hyperosmotic challenges although, in contrast to the V1aR, the V2R displayed an ability to support alternative signaling (IP production) at higher concentration of vasopressin. V1aR and V2...

  9. Neuroendocrine adaptation to stress in pigs, CRH and vasopressin in the paraventricular nucleus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Karman, A.G.

    2003-01-01

    Differences in coping strategy present at birth as well as housing conditions may influence autonomic and endocrine stress responses.In rodents,corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) and vasopressin (VP) signaling in the

  10. The role of arginine vasopressin in electroacupuncture treatment of primary sciatica in human.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xue-Yan; Zhang, Qi-Shun; Yang, Jun; Sun, Fang-Jie; Wang, Da-Xin; Wang, Chang-Hong; He, Wei-Ya

    2015-08-01

    It has been implicated that electroacupuncture can relieve the symptoms of sciatica with the increase of pain threshold in human, and arginine vasopressin (AVP) in the brain rather than the spinal cord and blood circulation participates in antinociception. Our previous study has proven that AVP in the brain played a role in the process of electroacupuncture analgesia in rat. The goal of the present study was to investigate the role of AVP in electroacupuncture in treating primary sciatica in human. The results showed that (1) AVP concentration of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) (7.5 ± 2.5 pg/ml), not plasma (13.2 ± 4.2 pg/ml) in primary sciatica patients was lower than that in health volunteers (16.1 ± 3.8 pg/ml and 12.3 ± 3.4 pg/ml), although the osmotic pressure in CSF and plasma did not change; (2) electroacupuncture of the bilateral "Zusanli" points (St. 36) for 60 min relieved the pain sensation in primary sciatica patients; (3) electroacupuncture increased the AVP level of CSF, not plasma in primary sciatica patients; and (4) there was the positive correlation between the effect of electroacupuncture relieving the pain and the AVP level of CSF in the primary sciatica patients. The data suggested that central AVP, not peripheral AVP might improve the effect of electroacupuncture treatment of primary sciatica in human, i.e., central AVP might take part in the electroacupuncture relieving the pain sensation in primary sciatica patients. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Hyaluronan Production by Renomedullary Interstitial Cells: Influence of Endothelin, Angiotensin II and Vasopressin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Stridh

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The content of hyaluronan (HA in the interstitium of the renal medulla changes in relation to body hydration status. We investigated if hormones of central importance for body fluid homeostasis affect HA production by renomedullary interstitial cells in culture (RMICs. Simultaneous treatment with vasopressin and angiotensin II (Ang II reduced HA by 69%. No change occurred in the mRNA expressions of hyaluronan synthase 2 (HAS2 or hyaluronidases (Hyals, while Hyal activity in the supernatant increased by 67% and CD44 expression reduced by 42%. The autocoid endothelin (ET-1 at low concentrations (10−10 and 10−8 M increased HA 3-fold. On the contrary, at a high concentration (10−6 M ET-1 reduced HA by 47%. The ET-A receptor antagonist BQ123 not only reversed the reducing effect of high ET-1 on HA, but elevated it to the same level as low concentration ET-1, suggesting separate regulating roles for ET-A and ET-B receptors. This was corroborated by the addition of ET-B receptor antagonist BQ788 to low concentration ET-1, which abolished the HA increase. HAS2 and Hyal2 mRNA did not alter, while Hyal1 mRNA was increased at all ET-1 concentrations tested. Hyal activity was elevated the most by high ET-1 concentration, and blockade of ET-A receptors by BQ123 prevented about 30% of this response. The present study demonstrates an important regulatory influence of hormones involved in body fluid balance on HA handling by RMICs, thereby supporting the concept of a dynamic involvement of interstitial HA in renal fluid handling.

  12. Arginine Vasopressin Is a Blood-Based Biomarker of Social Functioning in Children with Autism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dean S Carson

    Full Text Available Brain arginine vasopressin (AVP critically regulates normative social behavior in mammals, and experimental disruption of the AVP signaling pathway produces social impairments in rodent models. We therefore hypothesized that AVP signaling deficits may contribute to social impairments in children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD. Since blood measures (which are far easier to obtain than brain measures of AVP are most meaningful if they are related to brain AVP activity, Study 1 tested the relationship between AVP concentrations in concomitantly collected blood and CSF samples from children and adults (N = 28 undergoing clinical procedures. Study 2 tested whether blood AVP concentrations: 1 differed between children with ASD (N = 57, their ASD discordant siblings (N = 47, and neurotypical controls (N = 55; and 2 predicted social functioning (using the NEPSY-II Theory of Mind and Affect Recognition tasks and the Social Responsiveness Scale in this large, well-characterized child cohort. Blood AVP concentrations significantly and positively predicted CSF AVP concentrations (F1,26 = 7.17, r = 0.46, p = 0.0127 in Study 1. In Study 2, blood AVP concentrations did not differ between groups or by sex, but significantly and positively predicted Theory of Mind performance, specifically in children with ASD, but not in non-ASD children (F1,144 = 5.83, p = 0.017. Blood AVP concentrations can be used: 1 as a surrogate for brain AVP activity in humans; and 2 as a robust biomarker of theory of mind ability in children with ASD. These findings also suggest that AVP biology may be a promising therapeutic target by which to improve social cognition in individuals with ASD.

  13. Effect of arginine vasopressin on the behavioral activity in the behavior despair depression rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jun; Pan, Yan-Juan; Yin, Zhi-Kui; Hai, Guang-Fan; Lu, Lu; Zhao, Ying; Wang, Da-Xin; Wang, Huan; Wang, Gen

    2012-06-01

    Arginine vasopressin (AVP), a nonapeptide posterior hormone of the pituitary, is mainly synthesized and secreted in the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN) and supraoptic nucleus (SON). Large numbers of studies have reported that AVP plays a role in depression. The present study was to investigate by which level, brain or periphery, AVP affects the behavioral activity in the behavior despair depression rat model. The results showed that (1) either forced swimming or tail suspension significantly increased AVP concentration not only in the brain (PVN, SON, frontal of cortex, hippocampus, amygdala, lumber spinal cord) but also in the periphery (posterior pituitary and serum); (2) intraventricular injection (icv) of AVP decreased the animal immobility time, whereas V₁ receptor antagonist d(CH₂)₅Tyr(Me)AVP (icv) increased the animal immobility time in a dose-dependent manner not only in FST but also in TST, but the V₂ receptor antagonist d(CH₂)₅[D-Ile, Ile, Ala-NH₉]AVP did not change the animal immobility time in FST or TST; (3) V₁, not V₂ receptor antagonist could inhibit the animal immobility time decrease induced by AVP (icv); (4) neither AVP nor its receptor antagonist (including V₁ and V₂ receptor antagonist) influenced the animal immobility time in both FST and TST. The data suggested that AVP in the brain rather than the periphery played a role in the behavior despair depression by V₁, not V₂ receptors, which behavior despair might have a positive feedback effect on central AVP and blood AVP might have a negative feedback on central AVP in the depressive process. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Vasopressin-stimulated Ca2+ spiking in vascular smooth muscle cells involves phospholipase D.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Y; Shiels, A J; Maszak, G; Byron, K L

    2001-06-01

    Physiological concentrations of [Arg(8)]vasopressin (AVP; 10-500 pM) stimulate oscillations of cytosolic free Ca2+ concentration (Ca2+ spikes) in A7r5 vascular smooth muscle cells. We previously reported that this effect of AVP was blocked by a putative phospholipase A2 (PLA2) inhibitor, ONO-RS-082 (5 microM). In the present study, the products of PLA2, arachidonic acid (AA), and lysophospholipids were found to be ineffective in stimulating Ca2+ spiking, and inhibitors of AA metabolism did not prevent AVP-stimulated Ca2+ spiking. Thin layer chromatography was used to monitor the release of AA and phosphatidic acid (PA), which are the products of PLA2 and phospholipase D (PLD), respectively. AVP (100 pM) stimulated both AA and PA formation, but only PA formation was inhibited by ONO-RS-082 (5 microM). Exogenous PLD (type VII; 2.5 U/ml) stimulated Ca2+ spiking equivalent to the effect of 100 pM AVP. AVP stimulated transphosphatidylation of 1-butanol (a PLD-catalyzed reaction) but not 2-butanol, and 1-butanol (but not 2-butanol) completely prevented AVP-stimulated Ca2+ spiking. Protein kinase C (PKC) inhibition, which completely prevents AVP-stimulated Ca2+ spiking, did not inhibit AVP-stimulated phosphatidylbutanol formation. These results suggest that AVP-stimulated Ca2+ spiking depends on activation of PLD rather than PLA2 and that PKC activation may be downstream of PLD in the signaling cascade.

  15. Intergenerational transmission of alloparental behavior and oxytocin and vasopressin receptor distribution in the prairie vole

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allison M Perkeybile

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Variation in the early environment has the potential to permanently alter offspring behavior and development. We have previously shown that naturally occurring variation in biparental care of offspring in the prairie vole is related to differences in social behavior of the offspring. It was not, however, clear whether the behavioral differences seen between offspring receiving high compared to low amounts of parental care were the result of different care experiences or were due to shared genetics with their high-contact or low-contact parents. Here we use cross-fostering methods to determine the mode of transmission of alloparental behavior and oxytocin receptor (OTR and vasopressin V1a receptor (V1aR binding from parent to offspring. Offspring were cross-fostered or in-fostered on postnatal day 1 and parental care received was quantified in the first week postpartum. At weaning, offspring underwent an alloparental care test and brains were then collected from all parents and offspring to examine OTR and V1aR binding. Results indicate that alloparental behavior of offspring was predicted by the parental behavior of their rearing parents. Receptor binding for both OTR and V1aR tended to be predicted by the genetic mothers for female offspring and by the genetic fathers for male offspring. These findings suggest a different role of early experience and genetics in shaping behavior compared to receptor distribution and support the notion of sex-dependent outcomes, particularly in the transmission of receptor binding patterns.

  16. Changes in Copeptin and Bioactive Vasopressin in Runners With and Without Hyponatremia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hew-Butler, Tamara; Hoffman, Martin D.; Stuempfle, Kristin J.; Rogers, Ian R.; Morgenthaler, Nils G.; Verbalis, Joseph G.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To evaluate changes in both the N-terminal (arginine vasopressin; AVP) and C-terminal (copeptin) fragments of the vasopressin prohormone before, during, and after an ultramarathon race and to assess vasopressin and copeptin concentrations in runners with and without hyponatremia. Design Observational study. Setting Three trials (2 sodium balance and 1 hyponatremia treatment) in 2 separate approximately 160-km footraces [Western States Endurance Run (WSER) and Javelina Jundred Mile Race (JJ100)]. Participants Six hyponatremic and 20 normonatremic runners; 19 finishers with 7 completing 100 km. Main Outcome Measures Plasma AVP ([AVP]p), copeptin ([copeptin]p), sodium ([Na+]p), and protein (%plasma volume change; %PV) concentrations. Results In the WSER Sodium Trial, a 3-fold prerace to postrace increase in both [AVP]p (0.7 ± 0.4 to 2.7 ± 1.9 pg/mL; P copeptin]p (10.3 ± 12.5 to 28.2 ± 16.3 pmol/L; nonsignificant) occurred, despite a 2 mEq/L decrease in [Na+]p (138.7 ± 2.3 to 136.7 ± 1.6 mEq/L; NS). A significant correlation was noted between [AVP]p and [copeptin]p postrace (r = 0.82; P copeptin]p (22.5 vs 24.9 pmol/L) were well above the detectable levels. A significant correlation was noted between [AVP]p and [copeptin]p 60 minutes after treatment (r = 0.94; P copeptin]p change and %PV change (r = −0.34; P Copeptin]p seems to be a reliable surrogate of stimulated [AVP]p during exercise. Nonosmotic vasopressin stimulation occurs during ultradistance running. [Copeptin]p may better reflect chronic (%PV) vasopressin secretion under conditions of endurance exercise. PMID:21519298

  17. Evaluation of Vasopressin for Septic Shock in Patients on Chronic Renin-Angiotensin-Aldosterone System Inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erwin, Beth L; Denaburg, Michael A; Barker, Andrew B; McArdle, Philip J; Windham, Samuel T; Morgan, Charity J

    2017-12-01

    To compare the hemodynamic response in septic shock patients receiving vasopressin who were on chronic renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system inhibitor therapy with those who were not. Single-center, retrospective cohort study. Medical and surgical ICUs at a 1,100-bed academic medical center. Medical and surgical ICU patients with septic shock who received vasopressin infusion added to at least one concomitant vasopressor agent between January 2014 and December 2015, then divided into two cohorts: 1) patients who were on chronic renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system inhibitor therapy as outpatients and 2) patients who were not on chronic renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system inhibitor therapy as outpatients. None. Mean arterial pressure at 6 hours was 72.2 mm Hg in the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system inhibitor group versus 69.7 mm Hg in the non-renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system inhibitor group (p = 0.298). There was no difference in mean arterial pressure at 1, 24, or 48 hours between groups. Total concomitant vasopressor requirements, based on norepinephrine equivalents excluding vasopressin, were significantly lower at 24 hours in the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system inhibitor group versus the non-renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system inhibitor group (10.7 vs 18.1 µg/min, respectively; p = 0.007), but no significant differences were seen at the other time points assessed. There were no significant differences in ICU or hospital length of stay or mortality. There was no significant difference in the primary outcome of 6-hour mean arterial pressure in septic shock patients receiving vasopressin who were on chronic renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system inhibitor therapy versus those receiving vasopressin who were not on chronic renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system inhibitor therapy. Renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system inhibitor patients had lower total concomitant vasopressor requirements at 24 hours compared with non-renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system

  18. Arginine vasopressin, fluid balance and exercise: is exercise-associated hyponatraemia a disorder of arginine vasopressin secretion?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hew-Butler, Tamara

    2010-06-01

    The ability of the human body to regulate plasma osmolality (POsm) within a very narrow and well defined physiological range underscores the vital importance of preserving water and sodium balance at rest and during exercise. The principle endocrine regulator of whole body fluid homeostasis is the posterior pituitary hormone, arginine vasopressin (AVP). Inappropriate AVP secretion may perpetuate either slow or rapid violation of these biological boundaries, thereby promoting pathophysiology, morbidity and occasional mortality. In the resting state, AVP secretion is primarily regulated by changes in POsm (osmotic regulation). The osmotic regulation of AVP secretion during exercise, however, may possibly be enhanced or overridden by many potential non-osmotic factors concurrently stimulated during physical activity, particularly during competition. The prevalence of these highly volatile non-osmotic AVP stimuli during strenuous or prolonged physical activity may reflect a teleological mechanism to promote water conservation during exercise. However, non-osmotic AVP secretion, combined with high fluid availability plus sustained fluid intake (exceeding fluid output), has been hypothesized to lead to an increase in both the incidence and related deaths from exercise-associated hyponatraemia (EAH) in lay and military populations. Inappropriately, high plasma AVP concentrations ([AVP](p)) associated with low blood sodium concentrations facilitate fluid retention and sodium loss, thereby possibly reconciling both the water intoxication and sodium loss theories of hyponatraemia that are currently under debate. Therefore, given the potential for a variety of exercise-induced non-osmotic stimuli for AVP secretion, hydration strategies must be flexible, individualized and open to change during competitive events to prevent the occurrence of rare, but life-threatening, EAH. This review focuses on the potential osmotic and non-osmotic stimuli to AVP secretion that may affect

  19. Identification of Methyl Halide-Utilizing Genes in the Methyl Bromide-Utilizing Bacterial Strain IMB-1 Suggests a High Degree of Conservation of Methyl Halide-Specific Genes in Gram-Negative Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodall, C.A.; Warner, K.L.; Oremland, R.S.; Murrell, J.C.; McDonald, I.R.

    2001-01-01

    Strain IMB-1, an aerobic methylotrophic member of the alpha subgroup of the Proteobacteria, can grow with methyl bromide as a sole carbon and energy source. A single cmu gene cluster was identified in IMB-1 that contained six open reading frames: cmuC, cmuA, orf146, paaE, hutI, and partial metF. CmuA from IMB-1 has high sequence homology to the methyltransferase CmuA from Methylobacterium chloromethanicum and Hyphomicrobium chloromethanicum and contains a C-terminal corrinoid-binding motif and an N-terminal methyl-transferase motif. However, cmuB, identified in M. chloromethanicum and H. chloromethanicum, was not detected in IMB-1.

  20. Manufacturer's Suggested Retail Prices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rosenkranz, S.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/157222241

    2003-01-01

    Based on arguments of the `reference- dependent' theory of consumer choice we assume that a retailer's discount of a manufacturer's suggested retail price changes consumers' demand. We can show that the producer benefits from suggesting a retail price. If consumers are additionally sufficiently

  1. Suggestive Objects at Work

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ratner, Helene Gad

    2009-01-01

    In Western secular societies, spiritual life is no longer limited to classical religious institutions but can also be found at workplace organizations. While spirituality is conventionally understood as a subjective and internal process, this paper proposes the concept of ‘suggestive objects’, co...... scaffolding. This has deep implications for our understanding of the sacred, including a better appreciation of the way that suggestive objects make the sacred durable, the way they organize it....

  2. Suggestive techniques in advertising

    OpenAIRE

    Sora, Olena

    2011-01-01

    In my thesis I focused on a detailed analysis of suggestive techniques that appear in contemporary advertising. The issue of the effects of advertising has existed for many years and still staying timely. On the one side there are entrepreneurs and advertising agencies that are trying to influence opinions and suggest motivation for consuming. On the other side there is a potential customer, who is trying to obtain information about the product he needs and at the same time not letting anybod...

  3. Urinary concentration does not exclusively rely on plasma vasopressin. A study between genders. Gender and diurnal urine regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graugaard-Jensen, C; Hvistendahl, G M; Frøkiaer, J; Bie, P; Djurhuus, J C

    2014-09-01

    We investigated the influence of gender on the diurnal regulation of urine production with special focus on vasopressin, oxytocin and prostaglandin E2. Fifteen young women in mid-follicular phase and 22 young men (20-33 years) were included. All participants underwent a 24-h circadian inpatient study under standardized conditions for measurements of plasma vasopressin, oxytocin, sodium and osmolality. Urine was fractionally collected for measurements of electrolytes, aquaporin-2 and prostaglandin E2. Plasma vasopressin expressed a diurnal rhythm with a night-time increase in both genders (P genders. We found a trend towards a higher reabsorption of free water in males (P = 0.07). The excretion of prostaglandin E2 was higher in males (P gender difference, not only as a mediator of the vasopressin response, but also as an independent factor. These findings need further elucidation. © 2014 Scandinavian Physiological Society. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. [Influence of preventive use of vasopressin tannate on diabetes insipidus and serum sodium at the early postoperation of craniopharyngioma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Tao; Wanggou, Siyi; Li, Xuejun; Liu, Qing; Jiang, Xingjun; Peng, Zefeng; Yuan, Xianrui

    2016-10-28

    To explore the influence of preventive use of vasopressin tannate on diabetes insipidus and serum sodium at the early postoperation of craniopharyngioma.
 Methods: The data of 83 patients, who underwent unilateral sub-frontal approach resection of craniopharyngioma between 2010 and 2014 by the same senior neurosurgeon, were retrospectively analyzed. The patients were divided into a vasopressin tannate group (used group) and a control group. The diabetes insipidus and serum sodium changes were compared between the two groups.
 Results: Compared with the control group, the incidence of diabetes insipidus decreased at the early postoperation in the vasopressin tannate group (Pdiabetes insipidus in patients with pituitary stalk excision and tumor close adhesion to the third ventricle floor at the early postoperation (Pdiabetes insipidus in the vasopressin tannate group was decreased compared with the control group (Pdiabetes insipidus and hypernatremia incidence at the early postoperative stage after microsurgery for craniopharyngioma.

  5. [Psychoanalysis and suggestion].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomä, H

    1977-01-01

    In the history of psychoanalysis the problem of suggestion has been a central one. At first it involved the necessity to establish the psychoanalytic technique as independent scientific paradigm in contrast to persuasion and hypnosis. However, it was not only the symptom-oriented suggestion that had to be given up for scientific reasons and reasons of treatment technique. Since professional and human factors as well could have influenced the psychoanalytic situation to revert to the traditional "suggestion", Freud has given some technical considerations (e.g. the mirror-analogy), that were meant to counteract the confusion of the psychoanalytic technique with the persuasive one that had to come up to late. The discovery of the transference phenomena has further complicated the problem. It became obvious that the capacity of the analyst to exert an influence and to have impact, originated in very basic human categories and their specific psychogenetic developments and distortions. This understanding contributed to the development of psychoanalytic theories of suggestibility. Until the present day the discovery of the transference phenomena has determined the discussions of psychoanalytic technique in term of the relationship between the special and general therapeutic factors (i.e. interpretation versus relationship). The departure from the therapeutic mode of persuasive suggestion and the introduction of psychoanalytic technique signaled the revolutionary paradigm of Sigmund Freud, i.e. the active participation of the patient and the process of observation. Often scientific problems related to this pradigm and suggestion are discussed concurrently.

  6. Genome investigation suggests MdSHN3, an APETALA2-domain transcription factor gene, to be a positive regulator of apple fruit cuticle formation and an inhibitor of russet development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lashbrooke, Justin; Aharoni, Asaph; Costa, Fabrizio

    2015-11-01

    The outer epidermal layer of apple fruit is covered by a protective cuticle. Composed of a polymerized cutin matrix embedded with waxes, the cuticle is a natural waterproof barrier and protects against several abiotic and biotic stresses. In terms of apple production, the cuticle is essential to maintain long post-harvest storage, while severe failure of the cuticle can result in the formation of a disorder known as russet. Apple russet results from micro-cracking of the cuticle and the formation of a corky suberized layer. This is typically an undesirable consumer trait, and negatively impacts the post-harvest storage of apples. In order to identify genetic factors controlling cuticle biosynthesis (and thus preventing russet) in apple, a quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping survey was performed on a full-sib population. Two genomic regions located on chromosomes 2 and 15 that could be associated with russeting were identified. Apples with compromised cuticles were identified through a novel and high-throughput tensile analysis of the skin, while histological analysis confirmed cuticle failure in a subset of the progeny. Additional genomic investigation of the determined QTL regions identified a set of underlying genes involved in cuticle biosynthesis. Candidate gene expression profiling by quantitative real-time PCR on a subset of the progeny highlighted the specific expression pattern of a SHN1/WIN1 transcription factor gene (termed MdSHN3) on chromosome 15. Orthologues of SHN1/WIN1 have been previously shown to regulate cuticle formation in Arabidopsis, tomato, and barley. The MdSHN3 transcription factor gene displayed extremely low expression in lines with improper cuticle formation, suggesting it to be a fundamental regulator of cuticle biosynthesis in apple fruit. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology.

  7. Electrophysiological and autoradiographical evidence of V1 vasopressin receptors in the lateral septum of the rat brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raggenbass, M.; Tribollet, E.; Dreifuss, J.J.

    1987-11-01

    Extracellular recordings were obtained from single neurons located in the lateral septum, an area known to receive a vasopressinergic innervation in the rat brain. Approximately half of the neurons tested responded to 8-L-arginine vasopressin (AVP) by a marked increase in firing rate at concentrations greater than 1 nM. The effect of vasopressin was blocked by synthetic structural analogues possessing antagonistic properties on peripheral vasopressin and oxytocin receptors. Oxytocin was much less potent than vasopressin in firing septal neurons, and a selective oxytocic agonist was totally ineffective. The action of vasopressin on neuronal firing was mimicked by the vasopressor agonist (2-phenylalanine,8-ornithine)vasotocin but not by the selective antidiuretic agonist 1-deamino(8-D-arginine)vasopressin. In a parallel study, sites that bind (/sup 3/H)AVP at low concentration (1.5 nM) were found by in vitro autoradiography in the lateral septum. Adjacent sections were also incubated with 1.5 mM (/sup 3/H)AVP and, in addition, with 100 nM (2-phenylalanine,8-ornithine)vasotocin or 1-deamino(8-D-arginine)vasopressin--i.e., the same compounds as those used for the electrophysiological study. Results showed that the vasopressor agonist, but not the antidiuretic agonist, displaced (/sup 3/H)AVP, thus indicating that the vasopressin binding sites detected by autoradiography in the septum were V1 (vasopressor type) rather than V2 (antidiuretic type) receptors. Based on the electrophysiological evidence, we conclude that these receptors, when occupied, lead to increased firing of lateral septal neurons.

  8. Hemodynamic Effects of Phenylephrine, Vasopressin, and Epinephrine in Children With Pulmonary Hypertension: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siehr, Stephanie L; Feinstein, Jeffrey A; Yang, Weiguang; Peng, Lynn F; Ogawa, Michelle T; Ramamoorthy, Chandra

    2016-05-01

    During a pulmonary hypertensive crisis, the marked increase in pulmonary vascular resistance can result in acute right ventricular failure and death. Currently, there are no therapeutic guidelines for managing an acute crisis. This pilot study examined the hemodynamic effects of phenylephrine, arginine vasopressin, and epinephrine in pediatric patients with pulmonary hypertension. In this prospective, open-label, nonrandomized pilot study, we enrolled pediatric patients previously diagnosed with pulmonary hypertensive who were scheduled electively for cardiac catheterization. Primary outcome was a change in the ratio of pulmonary-to-systemic vascular resistance. Baseline hemodynamic data were collected before and after the study drug was administered. Eleven of 15 participants were women, median age was 9.2 years (range, 1.7-14.9 yr), and median weight was 26.8 kg (range, 8.5-55.2 kg). Baseline mean pulmonary artery pressure was 49 ± 19 mm Hg, and mean indexed pulmonary vascular resistance was 10 ± 5.4 Wood units. Etiology of pulmonary hypertensive varied, and all were on systemic pulmonary hypertensive medications. Patients 1-5 received phenylephrine 1 μg/kg; patients 6-10 received arginine vasopressin 0.03 U/kg; and patients 11-15 received epinephrine 1 μg/kg. Hemodynamics was measured continuously for up to 10 minutes following study drug administration. After study drug administration, the ratio of pulmonary-to-systemic vascular resistance decreased in three of five patients receiving phenylephrine, five of five patients receiving arginine vasopressin, and three of five patients receiving epinephrine. Although all three medications resulted in an increase in aortic pressure, only arginine vasopressin consistently resulted in a decrease in the ratio of systolic pulmonary artery-to-aortic pressure. This prospective pilot study of phenylephrine, arginine vasopressin, and epinephrine in pediatric patients with pulmonary hypertensive showed an increase in aortic

  9. Biological half-lives and organ distribution of tritiated 8-lysine-vasopressin and 1-deamino-8-D-arginine-vasopressin in Brattleboro rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janaky, T.; Laczi, F.; Laszlo, F.A.

    1982-01-01

    The biological half-lives and organ distribution of tritiated 8-lysine-vasopressin and 1-deamino-8-D-arginine-vasopressin were determined in R-Amsterdam rats and in homozygous and heterozygous Brattleboro rats with hereditary central diabetes insipidus. It was found that the biological half-lives of (/sup 3/H)LVP and (/sup 3/H)dDAVP in the Brattleboro rats did not differ significantly from that found in the control R-Amsterdam rats. The half-life of (/sup 3/H)dDAVP proved longer than that of (/sup 3/H)LVP in all three groups of animals. In the case of (/sup 3/H)LVP the highest radioactivities were observed in the neurohypophyses, adenohypophyses, and kidneys of both the R-Amsterdam and Brattleboro rats. The accumulation of tritiated material was higher in the small intestine of the Brattleboro rats than in that of the R-Amsterdam animals. In all three groups of rats, (/sup 3/H)dDAVP was accumulated to the greatest extent in the kidney and the small intestine. The kidney and small intestine contained less radioactivity in homozygous Brattleboro rats than in the controls. There was only a slight radioactivity accumulation in the adenohypophysis and neurohypophysis. From the results it was concluded that the decrease in the rate of enzymatic decomposition may play a role in the increased duration of antidiuretic action of dDAVP. The results have led to the conclusion that the accelerated elimination of vasopressin and its pathologic organ accumulation are probably not involved in the water metabolism disturbance of Brattleboro rats with hereditary diabetes insipidus.

  10. Vasopressin versus dopamine for treatment of hypotension in extremely low birth weight infants: a randomized, blinded pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rios, Danielle R; Kaiser, Jeffrey R

    2015-04-01

    To evaluate vasopressin vs dopamine as initial therapy in extremely low birth weight (ELBW) infants with hypotension during the first 24 hours of life. ELBW infants with hypertension ≤ 30 weeks' gestation and ≤ 24 hours old randomly received treatment with vasopressin or dopamine in a blinded fashion. Normotensive infants not receiving vasopressor support served as a comparison group. Twenty ELBW infants with hypertension received vasopressin (n = 10) or dopamine (n = 10), and 50 were enrolled for comparison. Mean gestational age was 25.6 ± 1.4 weeks and birth weight 705 ± 154 g. Response to vasopressin paralleled that of dopamine in time to adequate mean blood pressure (Kaplan-Meier curve, P = .986); 90% of infants in each treatment group responded with adequate blood pressure. The vasopressin group received fewer doses of surfactant (P hypotension appeared safe. This pilot study supports a larger randomized controlled trial of vasopressin vs dopamine therapy in ELBW infants with hypotension. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Angiotensin II AT1 receptor blockade decreases vasopressin-induced water reabsorption and AQP2 levels in NaCl-restricted rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kwon, Tae-Hwan; Nielsen, Jakob; Knepper, M.A.

    2005-01-01

    Vasopressin and ANG II, which are known to play a major role in renal water and sodium reabsorption, are mainly coupled to the cAMP/PKA and phosphoinositide pathways, respectively. There is evidence for cross talk between these intracellular signaling pathways. We therefore hypothesized...... that vasopressin-induced water reabsorption could be attenuated by ANG II AT1 receptor blockade in rats. To address this, three protocols were used: 1) DDAVP treatment (20 ng/h sc for 7 days, n = 8); 2) DDAVP (20 ng/h sc for 7 days) and candesartan (1 mg·kg−1·day−1 sc for 7 days) cotreatment (n = 8); and 3...... receptor blockade in DDAVP-treated rats was associated with decreased urine concentration and decreased AQP2 and AQP1 expression. Moreover, FENa was increased in parallel with decreased expression of NHE3, NCC, and Na-K-ATPase. These results suggest that ANG II AT1 receptor activation plays a significant...

  12. Insight into the effect of the vasopressin analog desmopressin on lung colonization by mammary carcinoma cells in BALB/c mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garona, Juan; Pifano, Marina; Scursoni, Alejandra M; Gomez, Daniel E; Alonso, Daniel F; Ripoll, Giselle V

    2014-09-01

    Desmopressin (dDAVP) is a synthetic peptide analog of vasopressin with antidiuretic and hemostatic properties. Recent experimental evidence have suggested that dDAVP can inhibit metastasis formation by agonist action on V2 vasopressin receptors present in both tumor and endothelial cells. We have examined the kinetics of dDAVP effect during metastatic colonization and its potential association with hemostasis. The experimental metastasis assay was performed by injecting F3II mammary carcinoma cells into the lateral tail vein of syngeneic female BALB/c mice. Clinically relevant doses of dDAVP (0.3 to 2 μg/kg intravenously (i.v.)) produced a dose-dependent inhibition in the formation of lung nodules when administered during the first 24 hours after F3II tumor cell injection. The hemostatic agent tranexamic acid (10 mg/kg, i.v.) had no effect on metastasis formation in the same experimental conditions, while the anticoagulant enoxaparin (1 mg/kg, subcutaneously (s.c.)) did not modify the antimetastatic action of dDAVP. In vitro, dDAVP had a strong inhibitory effect on F3II cell colony formation. dDAVP interferes with early metastatic disease, and direct association of this effect with hemostatic mechanisms is unlikely. Copyright© 2014 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  13. Open to Suggestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Journal of Reading, 1986

    1986-01-01

    Offers (1) suggestions on how to teach students the importance of regular study habits for learning to spell, (2) story ideas to help students get started with creative writing, and (3) a model of a daily record assignment book to help students organize and remember their homework assignments. (SRT)

  14. Anatomy of melancholia: focus on hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis overactivity and the role of vasopressin.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Dinan, Timothy G

    2012-02-03

    Overactivity of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis characterized by hypercortisolism, adrenal hyperplasia and abnormalities in negative feedback is the most consistently described biological abnormality in melancholic depression. Corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) and arginine vasopressin (AVP) are the main secretagogues of the HPA\\/stress system. Produced in the parvicellular division of the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus the release of these peptides is influenced by inputs from monoaminergic neurones. In depression, anterior pituitary CRH1 receptors are down-regulated and response to CRH infusion is blunted. By contrast, vasopressin V3 receptors on the anterior pituitary show enhanced response to AVP stimulation and this enhancement plays a key role in maintaining HPA overactivity.

  15. Arginine vasopressin stimulates phosphoinositide turnover in an enriched rat Leydig cell preparation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, J.R.; Hansen, Harald S.; Jensen, B.

    1989-01-01

    An enriched rat Leydig cell preparation was preincubated with [C]arachidonic acid. Stimulation of the cells with arginine vasopressin (AVP) (1 µM) for 2 min caused a significant increase in labelled phosphatidic acid and a significant fall in radioactivity in phosphatidylinositol and phosphatidyl......An enriched rat Leydig cell preparation was preincubated with [C]arachidonic acid. Stimulation of the cells with arginine vasopressin (AVP) (1 µM) for 2 min caused a significant increase in labelled phosphatidic acid and a significant fall in radioactivity in phosphatidylinositol......-dependent feedback inhibition of the stimulation. Other agonists that might have a regulatory function in the testis were tested for possible effects on phosphoinositide metabolism. Of prostaglandin E (10 µm), angiotensin II (0.1 µM), and bradykinin (0.9 µM), only the latter induced a significant increase...

  16. [Vasoplegic syndrome and its treatment with vasopressin during cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Macarena; Lema, Guillermo

    2011-03-01

    Cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass is associated with systemic inflammatory response. In some cases this clinical condition is characterized by severe hypotension due to low systemic vascular resistance during and after cardiopulmonary bypass. A few of these cases do not respond to volume or catecholamines. This condition is known as vasoplegic syndrome. Its etiology is not fully understood today and carries associated morbidity and mortality In this syndrome, vasopressin levels are reduced, as in septic and hypovolemic shock. Supplementary vasopressin improves blood pressure and might be considered as an alternative treatment. Several reports have shown benefits when used alone or in combination with catecholamines. However, further studies are necessary to find the most appropriate use of the drug for vasoplegic syndrome.

  17. Effects of Affiliative Human–Animal Interaction on Dog Salivary and Plasma Oxytocin and Vasopressin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evan L. MacLean

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Oxytocin (OT and vasopressin (AVP are neuropeptides with diverse effects on social behavior, cognition and stress responses. Recent studies suggest that OT facilitates and responds to affiliative forms of human–animal interaction (HAI. However, previous studies measuring OT and AVP in dogs have been limited to measures from blood or urine, which present concerns related to the invasiveness of sample collection, the potential for matrix interference in immunoassays, and whether samples can be collected at precise time points to assess event-linked endocrine responses. Previous studies from our laboratory validated salivary measures of OT and AVP in dogs, however, it is currently unknown whether these measures respond dynamically to aspects of HAI. Here, we investigated the effects of affiliative forms of HAI on both plasma and salivary OT and AVP in dogs. We employed a within- and between-subjects design with a group of Labrador retrievers and Labrador retriever × golden retriever crosses (23 females, 15 males. Half of the dogs engaged in 10 min of free-form friendly interaction with a human experimenter (HAI condition, and the other half rested quietly in the same environment, without human interaction (control condition. We collected blood and saliva samples before, and immediately following both experimental conditions, and all samples were analyzed using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs following previously validated protocols. Dogs participating in HAI exhibited a significant increase in both salivary OT (+39% and plasma OT (+5.7% whereas dogs in the control group did not. Salivary AVP showed no change in the HAI group but increased significantly (+33% in the control group. Plasma AVP decreased significantly following HAI (-13% but did not change across time in the control condition. Within the dogs exposed to HAI, increases in salivary OT, and decreases in plasma AVP, were predicted by the extent of affiliative behavior between

  18. Effects of Affiliative Human–Animal Interaction on Dog Salivary and Plasma Oxytocin and Vasopressin

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacLean, Evan L.; Gesquiere, Laurence R.; Gee, Nancy R.; Levy, Kerinne; Martin, W. Lance; Carter, C. Sue

    2017-01-01

    Oxytocin (OT) and vasopressin (AVP) are neuropeptides with diverse effects on social behavior, cognition and stress responses. Recent studies suggest that OT facilitates and responds to affiliative forms of human–animal interaction (HAI). However, previous studies measuring OT and AVP in dogs have been limited to measures from blood or urine, which present concerns related to the invasiveness of sample collection, the potential for matrix interference in immunoassays, and whether samples can be collected at precise time points to assess event-linked endocrine responses. Previous studies from our laboratory validated salivary measures of OT and AVP in dogs, however, it is currently unknown whether these measures respond dynamically to aspects of HAI. Here, we investigated the effects of affiliative forms of HAI on both plasma and salivary OT and AVP in dogs. We employed a within- and between-subjects design with a group of Labrador retrievers and Labrador retriever × golden retriever crosses (23 females, 15 males). Half of the dogs engaged in 10 min of free-form friendly interaction with a human experimenter (HAI condition), and the other half rested quietly in the same environment, without human interaction (control condition). We collected blood and saliva samples before, and immediately following both experimental conditions, and all samples were analyzed using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) following previously validated protocols. Dogs participating in HAI exhibited a significant increase in both salivary OT (+39%) and plasma OT (+5.7%) whereas dogs in the control group did not. Salivary AVP showed no change in the HAI group but increased significantly (+33%) in the control group. Plasma AVP decreased significantly following HAI (-13%) but did not change across time in the control condition. Within the dogs exposed to HAI, increases in salivary OT, and decreases in plasma AVP, were predicted by the extent of affiliative behavior between the dog

  19. A {open_quotes}balanced{close_quotes} Y:16 translocation with the Y breakpoint just proximal to the Yq heterochromatin boundary associated with Turner-like neonatal lymphedema suggests the location of a potential anti-Turner gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erickson, R.P.; Hudgins, L. [Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States); Stone, J.F. [Southwest Biomedical Research Institute, Scottsdale, AZ (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    A male patient with Turner-like hydrops in the newborn period (Bonnevie-Ullrich syndrome) was studied. The extensive nucchal cystic hygroma and hydrops resolved over several weeks. The karyotype was 46,X,t(Y;16)(q11.2;q24). The paternal karyotype was normal. Chromosome painting with the heterochromatic long arm repeat DYZ2 disclosed that all the hybridization was on the derivative 16. This was confirmed by chromosome painting with DYZ1, the other major Y long arm heterochromatic repeat, and DYZ3, the Y alphoid, centromeric repeat, which showed chromosomal separation of the 2 stained regions. A {open_quotes}FISHing trip{close_quotes} was performed using the Y YAC contig created in Dr. David Page`s laboratory. This disclosed 2 YACs located just proximal to the Y heterochromatin which {open_quotes}jumped{close_quotes} the translocation. The recent discovery of a candidate gene for the azoospermia factor (AZF) in this region suggests the possibility that there are several Y-expressed genes adjacent to the heterochromatin boundary as there are near the pseudoautosomal boundary.

  20. Local injection of diluted vasopressin followed by suction curettage for cervical ectopic pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Hiroshi; Unno, Youichi; Omoto, Akiko; Shozu, Makio

    2016-12-01

    To report the results of local injection of diluted vasopressin followed by suction curettage as a conservative treatment for women with cervical ectopic pregnancy, who wish to preserve their future fertility. This was a retrospective chart review in a university hospital and a municipal hospital. We injected diluted vasopressin (Pitressin R, total amount of 4-10 units) transvaginally into the cervix surrounding the gestational sac, but not directly into the gestational sac, and/or the lower segment of the uterine body under transvaginal ultrasonographic guidance. After cessation of fetal heartbeats, we aspirated the conceptus by performing suction curettage. We injected additional vasopressin into the gestational sac in cases with a viable fetus after the initial injection. Forced contraction of the cervical smooth muscle facilitated removal of the conceptus with minimal blood loss during curettage. We measured operative time, total blood loss, complications, and the need for additional treatment. We included 11 women. Mean patient age, gestational age, and serum human chorionic gonadotrophin (hCG) at the intervention were 31.2±6.4years, 6.0±0.6 weeks, and 18,370±21,570 IU/L, respectively. Mean size of the gestational sac was 19.6±9.5mm. The uterus was successfully preserved without any complications in all patients. All procedures were completed within 15min except for the first case (range: 5-33min). In 4 cases, the conceptus containing a gestational sac was spontaneously extruded en bloc from the external os after the injection. Additional systematic methotrexate administration was required in one case because of remaining villi at the implantation site with persistence of serum hCG levels after the procedure. Local injection of diluted vasopressin and subsequent suction curettage is a feasible conservative treatment for cervical ectopic pregnancy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Delayed nootropic effects of arginine vasopressin after early postnatal chronic administration to albino rat pups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, P A; Voskresenskaya, O G; Kamensky, A A

    2009-06-01

    Intranasal administration of arginine vasopressin (10 microg/kg) to albino rat pups had a strong nootropic effect during training with positive and negative reinforcement. This effect was different in animals of various age groups: training with positive reinforcement was improved in "adolescent" rats and pubertal animals, while during training with negative reinforcement, the nootropic effect of the peptide was more prolonged and persisted also in adult animals.

  2. Vasopressin and epinephrine in the treatment of cardiac arrest: an experimental study

    OpenAIRE

    Stroumpoulis, Konstantinos; Xanthos, Theodoros; Rokas, Georgios; Kitsou, Vassiliki; Papadimitriou, Dimitrios; Serpetinis, Ioannis; Perrea, Despina; Papadimitriou, Lila; Kouskouni, Evangelia

    2008-01-01

    Background Epinephrine remains the drug of choice for cardiopulmonary resuscitation. The aim of the present study is to assess whether the combination of vasopressin and epinephrine, given their different mechanisms of action, provides better results than epinephrine alone in cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Methods Ventricular fibrillation was induced in 22 Landrace/Large-White piglets, which were left untreated for 8 minutes before attempted resuscitation with precordial compression, mechanic...

  3. [Effect of vasopressin on changes in the behavioral reactions of rats induced by psychotropic substances].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Titov, S A; Usenko, A B; Ashmarin, I P

    1989-01-01

    The effect was studied of arginyl-8-vasopressin (AVP) on changes in rats behavioural reactions, elicited by reserpine, haloperidol, aminazine, amitriptyline or nialamide. It has been shown that AVP administered intraperitoneally in a dose of 0.001 mg/kg, eliminates the deficit of elaboration of conditioned reaction of active avoidance produced by psychotropic drugs, without influencing the motor activity reduction developed after administration of these substances.

  4. Arteriolar vasoconstrictive response: comparing the effects of arginine vasopressin and norepinephrine

    OpenAIRE

    Friesenecker, Barbara E; Tsai, Amy G; Martini, Judith; Ulmer, Hanno; Wenzel, Volker; Hasibeder, Walter R; Intaglietta, Marcos; D?nser, Martin W

    2006-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: This study was designed to examine differences in the arteriolar vasoconstrictive response between arginine vasopressin (AVP) and norepinephrine (NE) on the microcirculatory level in the hamster window chamber model in unanesthetized, normotonic hamsters using intravital microscopy. It is known from patients with advanced vasodilatory shock that AVP exerts strong additional vasoconstriction when incremental dosage increases of NE have no further effect on mean arterial blood pre...

  5. Controlled long-term release of small peptide hormones using a new microporous polypropylene polymer: its application for vasopressin in the Brattleboro rat and potential perinatal use

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kruisbrink, J.; Boer, G.J.

    1984-12-01

    Based on drug release by microporous hollow fibers and the recent introduction of microporous polymers, a new technique was developed for controlled delivery of peptides. Small-diameter microporous polypropylene tubing, lumen-loaded with microgram quantities of vasopressin, and coated with collodion, releases vasopressin after in vitro immersion slowly (1-100 ng/d) and constantly for months. The mechanism of pseudo-zero-order delivery is based on high adsorption of vasopressin, keeping the void volume concentration of dissolved vasopressin constant, which is consequently a constant driving force of outward diffusion. The collodion coating prevents the entry of proteinaceous compounds which would result in rapid desorption of vasopressin. The present delivery module provides a lasting release for other peptides as well (lysine-vasopressin, oxytocin, alpha-melanocyte-stimulating hormone and, to a lesser extent, Met-enkephalin). The microporous polymer-collodion device is biocompatible and, loaded with vasopressin, successfully alleviates the diabetes insipidus of Brattleboro rats deficient for vasopressin. Subcutaneous implantation normalized diuresis for a period of 60 d and constant urine vasopressin excretion is observed. When the commercially available osmotic minipump is too large for implantation, the small size of the present controlled-delivery system allows peptide treatment of young and immature laboratory rats, even if located in utero.

  6. A Two-Year Randomized Trial of Interventions to Decrease Stress Hormone Vasopressin Production in Patients with Meniere's Disease-A Pilot Study

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kitahara, Tadashi; Okamoto, Hidehiko; Fukushima, Munehisa; Sakagami, Masaharu; Ito, Taeko; Yamashita, Akinori; Ota, Ichiro; Yamanaka, Toshiaki

    2016-01-01

    .... Because mental/physical stress and subsequent increase in the stress hormone vasopressin supposedly trigger Meniere's disease, we set a pilot study to seek new therapeutic interventions, namely...

  7. The Effect of Drinking on Plasma Vasopressin and Renin in Dehydrated Human Subjects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geelen, G.; Keil, L. C.; Kravik, S. E.; Wade, C. E.; Thrasher, T. N.; Barnes, P. R.; Pyka, G.; Nesvig, C.; Greenleaf, J. E.

    1996-01-01

    Oropharyngeal mechanisms activated by drinking have been shown to induce a rapid decline in plasma vasopressin which preceeds postabsorptive changes in plasma composition in the dehydrated dog. The present study was undertaken to determine what factor(s) inhibit(s) vasopressin secretion after rehydration in water deprived human subjects. Hematocrit (Hct) and hemoglobin (Hb) were determined on the day of the experiment, together with electrolytes and osmolalities which were measured on freshly separated serum. Plasma was immediately frozen and further analyzed by radioimmunoassay for renin activity (PRA), vasopressin (AVP), and aldosterone. The data were analyzed using an analysis of variance for repeated measurements and significant differences between the dehydrated control period and various time points after the start of rehydration were determined using a multiple-range test. began and reached water replete levels 15 minutes after drinking in the absence of any detectable decline in serum sodium or osmolality, we conclude that 427 oropharyngeal factors, alone or combined with gastric distension account for the extremely rapid inhibition of AVP secretion after drinking in the water-deprived human, as has been shown to be the case in dogs. Our findings are also in agreement wiht the recent demonstration that at the onset of drinking in the dehydrated monkey, there is an abrupt fall in plasma AVP concentration associated with a considerable decrease in the firing rate of the supraoptic neurosecretory neurons.

  8. Noncanonical Control of Vasopressin Receptor Type 2 Signaling by Retromer and Arrestin*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feinstein, Timothy N.; Yui, Naofumi; Webber, Matthew J.; Wehbi, Vanessa L.; Stevenson, Hilary P.; King, J. Darwin; Hallows, Kenneth R.; Brown, Dennis; Bouley, Richard; Vilardaga, Jean-Pierre

    2013-01-01

    The vasopressin type 2 receptor (V2R) is a critical G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) for vertebrate physiology, including the balance of water and sodium ions. It is unclear how its two native hormones, vasopressin (VP) and oxytocin (OT), both stimulate the same cAMP/PKA pathway yet produce divergent antinatriuretic and antidiuretic effects that are either strong (VP) or weak (OT). Here, we present a new mechanism that differentiates the action of VP and OT on V2R signaling. We found that vasopressin, as opposed to OT, continued to generate cAMP and promote PKA activation for prolonged periods after ligand washout and receptor internalization in endosomes. Contrary to the classical model of arrestin-mediated GPCR desensitization, arrestins bind the VP-V2R complex yet extend rather than shorten the generation of cAMP. Signaling is instead turned off by the endosomal retromer complex. We propose that this mechanism explains how VP sustains water and Na+ transport in renal collecting duct cells. Together with recent work on the parathyroid hormone receptor, these data support the existence of a novel “noncanonical” regulatory pathway for GPCR activation and response termination, via the sequential action of β-arrestin and the retromer complex. PMID:23935101

  9. Oxytocin and vasopressin in rat hypophysial portal blood: experimental studies in normal and Brattleboro rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horn, A M; Robinson, I C; Fink, G

    1985-02-01

    Oxytocin (OT) and vasopressin (VP) were measured by radioimmunoassay in hypophysial portal and peripheral blood from male Wistar rats and heterozygous and homozygous Brattleboro rats anaesthetized with urethane. In Wistar rats the concentrations of OT and VP were about 50 times greater than the concentrations in peripheral blood, whether or not the pituitary gland was left in situ during collection, and also considerably greater than the reported concentrations of the peptides in the cerebrospinal fluid. The release of both peptides was increased significantly by a lesion of the supraoptico-hypophysial tract that led to diabetes insipidus, but which left intact the external layer of the median eminence (ME). Concentrations of VP were undetectable in plasma from homozygous Brattleboro rats, but the portal plasma concentrations of VP in heterozygous Brattleboro rats were not significantly lower than in Wistar rats. The concentrations of OT in portal plasma from both types of Brattleboro rat were significantly higher than in Wistar rats. The output of VP and OT into hypophysial portal blood of Wistar rats was not significantly affected by electrical stimulation of the suprachiasmatic, supraoptic or paraventricular nuclei or the ME using two types of stimuli, one of which produced an increase in peripheral plasma concentrations of VP and OT in intact rats and a significant increase in the release of LH-releasing hormone into hypophysial portal blood. The output of VP and OT into portal blood was also not significantly affected by either adrenalectomy with or without injection of dexamethasone or the injection of either the 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) synthesis blocker, parachlorophenylalanine, or the 5-HT uptake blockers, alaproclate or zimelidine. These results show that large amounts of OT as well as VP are released into hypophysial portal blood from fibres of the hypothalamo-neurohypophysial system that terminate in the external layer of the ME. Although distinct

  10. Vasopressin and its analogues for the treatment of refractory hypotension in neonates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shivanna, Binoy; Rios, Danielle; Rossano, Joseph; Fernandes, Caraciolo J; Pammi, Mohan

    2013-03-28

    Neonatal hypotension that is refractory to volume expansion, catecholamines, or corticosteroids has a mortality of about 50%. Optimization of blood pressure and tissue perfusion in refractory hypotension may be crucial to improve clinical outcomes. Vasopressin, a neuropeptide hormone, or its analogue terlipressin has been used to treat refractory hypotension in neonates and may be effective. Our primary objective was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of vasopressin and its synthetic analogues (e.g. terlipressin) in decreasing mortality and adverse neurodevelopmental outcomes, and improving survival in neonates with refractory hypotension. Our secondary objectives were to determine the effects of vasopressin and its analogues (terlipressin) on improvement in blood pressure, increase in urine output, decrease in inotrope score, necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC), periventricular leukomalacia, intraventricular hemorrhage, chronic lung disease, and retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) in neonates with refractory hypotension. We searched the literature in January 2012, using the search strategy recommended by the Cochrane Neonatal Group. We searched electronic databases (CENTRAL (The Cochrane Library), MEDLINE, CINAHL, EMBASE), abstracts of the Pediatric Academic Societies, web sites for registered trials at www.clinicaltrials.gov and www.controlled-trials.com and in the reference list of identified articles. Randomized or quasi-randomized trials evaluating vasopressin or its analogues, at any dosage or duration used as an adjunct to standard therapy (any combination of volume expansion, inotropic agents and corticosteroids) to treat refractory hypotension in neonates. We followed the standard methods of The Cochrane Collaboration for conducting a systematic review. Two review authors (BS and MP) independently assessed the titles and abstracts of studies identified by the search strategy for eligibility for inclusion. We obtained the full text version if eligibility could

  11. Regulation of cation transporter genes by the arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis in rice plants subjected to salinity suggests improved salt tolerance due to reduced Na(+) root-to-shoot distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porcel, Rosa; Aroca, Ricardo; Azcon, Rosario; Ruiz-Lozano, Juan Manuel

    2016-10-01

    Rice is a salt-sensitive crop whose productivity is strongly reduced by salinity around the world. Plants growing in saline soils are subjected to the toxicity of specific ions such as sodium, which damage cell organelles and disrupt metabolism. Plants have evolved biochemical and molecular mechanisms to cope with the negative effects of salinity. These include the regulation of genes with a role in the uptake, transport or compartmentation of Na(+) and/or K(+). Studies have shown that the arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) symbiosis alleviates salt stress in several host plant species. However, despite the abundant literature showing mitigation of ionic imbalance by the AM symbiosis, the molecular mechanisms involved are barely explored. The objective of this study was to elucidate the effects of the AM symbiosis on the expression of several well-known rice transporters involved in Na(+)/K(+) homeostasis and measure Na(+) and K(+) contents and their ratios in different plant tissues. Results showed that OsNHX3, OsSOS1, OsHKT2;1 and OsHKT1;5 genes were considerably upregulated in AM plants under saline conditions as compared to non-AM plants. Results suggest that the AM symbiosis favours Na(+) extrusion from the cytoplasm, its sequestration into the vacuole, the unloading of Na(+) from the xylem and its recirculation from photosynthetic organs to roots. As a result, there is a decrease of Na(+) root-to-shoot distribution and an increase of Na(+) accumulation in rice roots which seems to enhance the plant tolerance to salinity and allows AM rice plants to maintain their growing processes under salt conditions.

  12. Functional study of the Hap4-like genes suggests that the key regulators of carbon metabolism HAP4 and oxidative stress response YAP1 in yeast diverged from a common ancestor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nataliya Petryk

    Full Text Available The transcriptional regulator HAP4, induced by respiratory substrates, is involved in the balance between fermentation and respiration in S. cerevisiae. We identified putative orthologues of the Hap4 protein in all ascomycetes, based only on a conserved sixteen amino acid-long motif. In addition to this motif, some of these proteins contain a DNA-binding motif of the bZIP type, while being nonetheless globally highly divergent. The genome of the yeast Hansenula polymorpha contains two HAP4-like genes encoding the protein HpHap4-A which, like ScHap4, is devoid of a bZIP motif, and HpHap4-B which contains it. This species has been chosen for a detailed examination of their respective properties. Based mostly on global gene expression studies performed in the S. cerevisiae HAP4 disruption mutant (ScΔhap4, we show here that HpHap4-A is functionally equivalent to ScHap4, whereas HpHap4-B is not. Moreover HpHAP4-B is able to complement the H2O2 hypersensitivity of the ScYap1 deletant, YAP1 being, in S. cerevisiae, the main regulator of oxidative stress. Finally, a transcriptomic analysis performed in the ScΔyap1 strain overexpressing HpHAP4-B shows that HpHap4-B acts both on oxidative stress response and carbohydrate metabolism in a manner different from both ScYap1 and ScHap4. Deletion of these two genes in their natural host, H. polymorpha, confirms that HpHAP4-A participates in the control of the fermentation/respiration balance, while HpHAP4-B is involved in oxidative stress since its deletion leads to hypersensitivity to H2O2. These data, placed in an evolutionary context, raise new questions concerning the evolution of the HAP4 transcriptional regulation function and suggest that Yap1 and Hap4 have diverged from a unique regulatory protein in the fungal ancestor.

  13. Reduced vasopressin receptors activation mediates the anti-depressant effects of fluoxetine and venlafaxine in bulbectomy model of depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poretti, María Belén; Sawant, Rahul S; Rask-Andersen, Mathias; de Cuneo, Marta Fiol; Schiöth, Helgi B; Perez, Mariela F; Carlini, Valeria Paola

    2016-03-01

    In response to stress, corticotropin releasing hormone (CRH) and vasopressin (AVP) are released from the hypothalamus, activate their receptors (CRHR1, CRHR2 or AVPr1b), and synergistically act to induce adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) release from the anterior pituitary. Overstimulation of this system has been frequently associated with major depression states. The objective of the study is to assess the role of AVP and CRH receptors in fluoxetine and venlafaxine effects on the expression of depression-related behavior. In an animal model of depression (olfactory bulbectomy in mice, OB), we evaluated the effects of fluoxetine or venlafaxine (both 10 mg/kg/day) chronic administration on depression-related behavior in the tail suspension test. Plasma levels of AVP, CRH, and ACTH were determined as well as participation of their receptors in the expression of depression related-behavior and gene expression of AVP and CRH receptors (AVPr1b, CRHR1, and CRHR2) in the pituitary gland. The expression of depressive-like behavior in OB animals was reversed by treatment with both antidepressants. Surprisingly, OB-saline mice exhibited increased AVP and ACTH plasma levels, with no alterations in CRH levels when compared to sham mice. Chronic fluoxetine or venlafaxine reversed these effects. In addition, a significant increase only in AVPr1b gene expression was found in OB-saline. The antidepressant therapy used seems to be more likely related to a reduced activation of AVP rather than CRH receptors, since a positive correlation between AVP levels and depressive-like behavior was observed in OB animals. Furthermore, a full restoration of depressive behavior was observed in OB-fluoxetine- or venlafaxine-treated mice only when AVP was centrally administered but not CRH.

  14. Social housing conditions and oxytocin and vasopressin receptors contribute to ethanol conditioned social preference in female mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Ruth I; Knoll, Allison T; Levitt, Pat

    2015-11-01

    Social behavior modulates response to alcohol. Because oxytocin (OXT) and vasopressin (AVP) contribute to rewarding social behavior, the present study utilized a genetic strategy to determine whether OXT and AVP receptors (OXTR, AVPR1a) are essential for female mice to demonstrate a conditioned social preference for ethanol. The study compared wild-type (WT) and knock-out (KO) females lacking either Oxtr or Avpr1a in a conditioned social preference (CSP) test. KO females and WT females from Het-Het crosses were pair-housed: KO and WT(ko). WT females from Het-WT crosses were pair-housed: WT(wt). Test mice received 2g/kg ethanol or saline ip, and were paired four times each with one stimulus female (CS-) after saline, and with another female (CS+) following ethanol. After pairing, the time spent with CS+ and CS- females was measured. WT(wt) females showed conditioned preference for the CS+ female paired with ethanol, demonstrated by greater interaction time (psocial stimulus. The lack of CSP in WT(ko) females suggests that the quality of social interactions during postnatal and postweaning life may modulate development and expression of normal social responses. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Mothers of autistic children: lower plasma levels of oxytocin and Arg-vasopressin and a higher level of testosterone.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin-Jie Xu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Autism is a pervasive neurodevelopmental disorder,thought to be caused by a combination of genetic heritability and environmental risk factors. Some autistic-like traits have been reported in mothers of autistic children. We hypothesized that dysregulation of oxytocin (OXT, Arg-vasopressin (AVP and sex hormones, found in autistic children, may also exist in their mothers. METHODS: We determined plasma levels of OXT (40 in autism vs. 26 in control group, AVP (40 vs. 17 and sex hormones (61 vs. 47 in mothers of autistic and normal children by enzyme immunoassay and radioimmunoassay, respectively and investigated their relationships with the children's autistic behavior scores (Childhood Autism Rating Scale (CARS and Autism Behavior Checklist (ABC. RESULTS: Significantly lower plasma concentrations of OXT (p<0.001 and AVP (p<0.001, as well as a higher level of plasma testosterone (p<0.05, were found in mothers of autistic children vs. those of control. The children's autistic behavior scores were negatively associated with maternal plasma levels of OXT and AVP. CONCLUSIONS: These results suggest that dysregulation of OXT, AVP and/or testosterone systems exist in mothers of autistic children, which may impact children's susceptibility to autism.

  16. GRK2 Mediates Arginine Vasopressin-Induced Interleukin-6 Production via Nuclear Factor-κB Signaling Neonatal Rat Cardiac Fibroblast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Feifei; Sun, Shuzhen; Wang, Xiaojun; Ni, Eran; Zhao, Lingling; Zhu, Weizhong

    2017-09-01

    Interleukin 6 (IL-6), which is elevated in patients with congestive heart failure and acts as both a chronic marker of inflammation and an acute-phase reactant, is associated with myocardial damage. Circulating levels of arginine vasopressin (AVP) are elevated during cardiac stress and could be a factor for cardiac inflammation and fibrosis. Our previous study has shown that AVP promotes the proliferation of neonatal rat cardiac fibroblasts (NRCFs) throughV 1A vasopressin receptor-mediated G protein-coupled receptor kinase 2 (GRK2) signaling. In the present study, we investigated the impact of the GRK2-dependent signaling. Using quantitative polymerase chain reaction and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, we measured the levels of interleukin-6 (IL-6) mRNA and protein in NRCFs, respectively. Manipulation of GRK2 activation either pharmacologically or through overexpression of GRK2-ct was used to determine the role of GRK2 in regulating the effects of AVP on IL-6 production. Phosphorylation and activation of nuclear factor κ-B (NF- κ B) evoked by AVP stimulation were measured by immunoblot and NF-kB luciferase reporter gene transfected in NRCFs, respectively. Present studies have found that: 1) AVP increased the level of IL-6 protein and mRNA in a dose- and time-dependent manner in NRCFs; 2) inhibition of GRK2 abolished the AVP-induced IL-6 production and NF- κ B activation; and 3) blocking NF- κ B signaling using the pharmacologic approach diminished AVP-induced IL-6 production. In summary, AVP induces IL-6 production of NRCFs by activating V 1A receptor signaling via a GRK2/NF- κ B pathway. These findings provide a possible molecular mechanism for inflammation that occurs in heart failure and other types of cardiac stress. Copyright © 2017 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  17. Early, but not late therapy with a vasopressin V1a-antagonist ameliorates the development of renal damage after 5/6 nephrectomy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Windt, Willemijn A K M; Tahara, Atsua; Kluppel, Alex C A; de Zeeuw, Dick; Henning, Robert H; van Dokkum, Richard P E

    2006-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Vasopressin, mainly through the V1a-receptor, is thought to be a major player in the maintenance of hyperfiltration. Its inhibition could therefore lead to a decrease in progression of chronic renal failure. To this end, the effect of the vasopressin V1a-receptor-selective antagonist,

  18. Early, but not late therapy with a vasopressin V-1a-antagonist ameliorates the development of renal damage after 5/6 nephrectomy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Windt, Willemijn A. K. M.; Tahara, Atsua; Kluppel, Alex C. A.; de Zeeuw, Dick; Henning, Robert H.; van Dokkum, Richard P. E.

    2006-01-01

    Introduction. Vasopressin, mainly through the VIA-receptor, is thought to be a major player in the maintenance of hyperfiltration. Its inhibition could therefore lead to a decrease in progression of chronic renal failure. To this end, the effect of the vasopressin V-1a-receptor-selective antagonist,

  19. Oxytocin and vasopressin modulation of the neural correlates of motivation and emotion: results from functional MRI studies in awake rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Febo, Marcelo; Ferris, Craig F

    2014-09-11

    Oxytocin and vasopressin modulate a range of species typical behavioral functions that include social recognition, maternal-infant attachment, and modulation of memory, offensive aggression, defensive fear reactions, and reward seeking. We have employed novel functional magnetic resonance mapping techniques in awake rats to explore the roles of these neuropeptides in the maternal and non-maternal brain. Results from the functional neuroimaging studies that are summarized here have directly and indirectly confirmed and supported previous findings. Oxytocin is released within the lactating rat brain during suckling stimulation and activates specific subcortical networks in the maternal brain. Both vasopressin and oxytocin modulate brain regions involved unconditioned fear, processing of social stimuli and the expression of agonistic behaviors. Across studies there are relatively consistent brain networks associated with internal motivational drives and emotional states that are modulated by oxytocin and vasopressin. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Oxytocin and Social Behav. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Norepinephrine content in discrete brain areas and neurohypophysial vasopressin in rats after a 9-d spaceflight (SLS-1)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fareh, Jeannette; Cottet-Emard, Jean-Marie; Pequignot, Jean-Marc; Jahns, Gary; Meylor, John; Viso, Michel; Vassaux, Didier; Gauquelin, Guillemette; Gharib, Claude

    1993-01-01

    The norepinephrine (NE) content in discrete brain areas and the vasopressin content in the neurohypophysial system were assessed in rats after a 9-d spaceflight and after a recovery period. The NE content in the locus coeruleus decreased significantly in spaceflight rats, but showed no difference between control and flight animals after a 9-d recovery. These findings were probably due to an acute stress undergone during landing. The NE content was unchanged in the A2 and A5 cell groups. In rats flown aboard SLS-1, the vasopressin content was increased in the posterior pituitary, and was significantly decreased in the hypothalamus. We conclude that the NE depletion in the locus coeruleus and the alteration in vasopressin release were consistent with an acute stress, likely occurring during and/or after landing. These changes tend to mask the actual neuroendocrine modifications caused by microgravity.

  1. Alix (AIP1) is a vasopressin receptor (V2R)-interacting protein that increases lysosomal degradation of the V2R.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Xianhua; Bouley, Richard; Lin, Herbert Y; Bechoua, Shaliha; Sun, Tian-Xiao; Del Re, Elisabetta; Shioda, Toshi; Raychowdhury, Malay K; Lu, Hua A J; Abou-Samra, Abdul B; Brown, Dennis; Ausiello, Dennis A

    2007-05-01

    The vasopressin type 2 receptor (V2R) is a G protein-coupled receptor that plays a central role in renal water reabsorption. Termination of ligand (vasopressin) stimulation is an important physiological regulatory event, but few proteins that interact with the V2R during downregulation after vasopressin (VP) binding have been identified. Using yeast two-hybrid screening of a human kidney cDNA library, we show that a 100-kDa protein called ALG-2-interacting protein X (Alix) interacts with the last 29 amino acids of the V2R COOH terminus. This was confirmed by pull-down assays using a GST-V2R-COOH-tail fusion protein. Alix was immunolocalized in principal cells of the kidney, which also express the V2R. The function of the Alix-V2R interaction was studied by transfecting Alix into LLC-PK(1) epithelial cells expressing V2R-green fluorescent protein (GFP). Under basal conditions, V2R-GFP localized mainly at the plasma membrane. On VP treatment, V2R-GFP was internalized into perinuclear vesicles in the nontransfected cells. In contrast, V2R-GFP fluorescence was virtually undetectable 2 h after exposure to VP in cells that coexpressed Alix. Western blotting using an anti-GFP antibody showed marked degradation of the V2R after 2 h in the presence of VP and Alix, a time point at which little or no degradation was detected in the absence of Alix. In contrast, little or no degradation of the parathyroid hormone receptor was detectable in the presence or absence of Alix and/or the PTH ligand. The VP-induced disappearance of V2R-GFP was abolished by chloroquine, a lysosomal degradation inhibitor, but not by MG132, a proteosome inhibitor. These data suggest that Alix increases the rate of lysosomal degradation of V2R and may play an important regulatory role in the VP response by modulating V2R downregulation.

  2. WAY 267,464, a non-peptide oxytocin receptor agonist, impairs social recognition memory in rats through a vasopressin 1A receptor antagonist action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks, Callum; Ramos, Linnet; Reekie, Tristan A; Narlawar, Rajeshwar; Kassiou, Michael; McGregor, Iain S

    2015-08-01

    Recent in vitro studies suggest that the oxytocin receptor (OTR) agonist WAY 267,464 has vasopressin 1A receptor (V1AR) antagonist effects. This might limit its therapeutic potential due to the positive involvement of the V1AR in social behavior. The objective of this study was to assess functional V1AR antagonist-like effects of WAY 267,464 in vivo using a test of social recognition memory. Adult experimental rats were tested for their recognition of a juvenile conspecific rat that they had briefly met 30 or 120 min previously. The modulatory effects of vasopressin (AVP), the selective V1AR antagonist SR49059, and WAY 267,464 were examined together with those of the selective OTR antagonist Compound 25 (C25). Drugs were administered immediately after the first meeting. Control rats showed recognition of juveniles at a 30 min, but not a 120 min retention interval. AVP (0.005, but not 0.001 mg/kg intraperitoneal (i.p.)) improved memory such that recognition was evident after 120 min. This was prevented by pretreatment with SR49059 (1 mg/kg) and WAY 267,464 (10, 30, and 100 mg/kg). Given alone, SR49059 (1 mg/kg) and WAY 267,464 (30 and 100 mg/kg) impaired memory at a 30 min retention interval. The impairment with WAY 267,464 was not prevented by C25 (5 mg/kg), suggesting V1AR rather than OTR mediation of the effect. Given alone, C25 also impaired memory. These results highlight a tonic role for endogenous AVP (and oxytocin) in social recognition memory and indicate that WAY 267,464 functions in vivo as a V1AR antagonist to prevent the memory-enhancing effects of AVP.

  3. Employment of vasopressin receptor antagonists in management of hyponatraemia and volume overload in some clinical conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urso, C; Brucculeri, S; Caimi, G

    2015-08-01

    Hyponatraemia, the most common electrolyte imbalance occurring in hospitalized subjects, is usually classified as hypovolaemic, euvolaemic or hypervolaemic. Hyponatraemia is a predictor of death among subjects with chronic heart failure and cirrhosis. The inappropriate secretion of the antidiuretic hormone (AVP) seems to be of pivotal importance in the decline of serum sodium concentration in these clinical conditions. The objective of this review was to summarize recent progress in management of hyponatraemia in SIADH, cirrhosis and heart failure. Literature searches were conducted on the topics of hyponatraemia and vasopressin receptor antagonists, using PubMed, pharmaceutical company websites and news reports. The information was evaluated for relevance and quality, critically assessed and summarized. The initial treatment of severe hyponatraemia is directed towards the prevention or management of neurological manifestations and consists of an intravenous infusion of hypertonic saline. Fluid restriction is indicated in oedematous states. Diuretics alone or in combination with other specific drugs remain the main strategy in the management of volume overload in heart failure. In resistant cases, ultrafiltration can lead to effective removal of isotonic fluid preventing new episodes of decompensation; however, aquapheresis is associated with increased costs and other limits. In several trials, the efficacy of vasopressin receptor antagonists in euvolaemic patients (inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion) or in hypervolaemic hyponatraemia (chronic heart failure, cirrhosis) has been evaluated. It was found that vaptans, which promote aquaresis, were superior to a placebo in raising and maintaining serum sodium concentrations in these subjects. Combined with conventional therapy, vasopressin receptor antagonists (AVP-R antagonists) are able to increase the excretion of electrolyte-free water and the sodium concentration. Further studies are needed to assess

  4. Phasic firing in vasopressin cells: understanding its functional significance through computational models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacGregor, Duncan J; Leng, Gareth

    2012-01-01

    Vasopressin neurons, responding to input generated by osmotic pressure, use an intrinsic mechanism to shift from slow irregular firing to a distinct phasic pattern, consisting of long bursts and silences lasting tens of seconds. With increased input, bursts lengthen, eventually shifting to continuous firing. The phasic activity remains asynchronous across the cells and is not reflected in the population output signal. Here we have used a computational vasopressin neuron model to investigate the functional significance of the phasic firing pattern. We generated a concise model of the synaptic input driven spike firing mechanism that gives a close quantitative match to vasopressin neuron spike activity recorded in vivo, tested against endogenous activity and experimental interventions. The integrate-and-fire based model provides a simple physiological explanation of the phasic firing mechanism involving an activity-dependent slow depolarising afterpotential (DAP) generated by a calcium-inactivated potassium leak current. This is modulated by the slower, opposing, action of activity-dependent dendritic dynorphin release, which inactivates the DAP, the opposing effects generating successive periods of bursting and silence. Model cells are not spontaneously active, but fire when perturbed by random perturbations mimicking synaptic input. We constructed one population of such phasic neurons, and another population of similar cells but which lacked the ability to fire phasically. We then studied how these two populations differed in the way that they encoded changes in afferent inputs. By comparison with the non-phasic population, the phasic population responds linearly to increases in tonic synaptic input. Non-phasic cells respond to transient elevations in synaptic input in a way that strongly depends on background activity levels, phasic cells in a way that is independent of background levels, and show a similar strong linearization of the response. These findings show

  5. Phasic firing in vasopressin cells: understanding its functional significance through computational models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duncan J MacGregor

    Full Text Available Vasopressin neurons, responding to input generated by osmotic pressure, use an intrinsic mechanism to shift from slow irregular firing to a distinct phasic pattern, consisting of long bursts and silences lasting tens of seconds. With increased input, bursts lengthen, eventually shifting to continuous firing. The phasic activity remains asynchronous across the cells and is not reflected in the population output signal. Here we have used a computational vasopressin neuron model to investigate the functional significance of the phasic firing pattern. We generated a concise model of the synaptic input driven spike firing mechanism that gives a close quantitative match to vasopressin neuron spike activity recorded in vivo, tested against endogenous activity and experimental interventions. The integrate-and-fire based model provides a simple physiological explanation of the phasic firing mechanism involving an activity-dependent slow depolarising afterpotential (DAP generated by a calcium-inactivated potassium leak current. This is modulated by the slower, opposing, action of activity-dependent dendritic dynorphin release, which inactivates the DAP, the opposing effects generating successive periods of bursting and silence. Model cells are not spontaneously active, but fire when perturbed by random perturbations mimicking synaptic input. We constructed one population of such phasic neurons, and another population of similar cells but which lacked the ability to fire phasically. We then studied how these two populations differed in the way that they encoded changes in afferent inputs. By comparison with the non-phasic population, the phasic population responds linearly to increases in tonic synaptic input. Non-phasic cells respond to transient elevations in synaptic input in a way that strongly depends on background activity levels, phasic cells in a way that is independent of background levels, and show a similar strong linearization of the response

  6. Subcellular localization and internalization of the vasopressin V1B receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashiwazaki, Aki; Fujiwara, Yoko; Tsuchiya, Hiroyoshi; Sakai, Nobuya; Shibata, Katsushi; Koshimizu, Taka-aki

    2015-10-15

    Only limited information is available on agonist-dependent changes in the subcellular localization of vasopressin V1B receptors. Our radioligand binding study of membrane preparations and intact cells revealed that a large fraction of the V1B receptor is located in the cytoplasm in unstimulated CHO cells, which is in contrast to the plasma membrane localization of the V1A and V2 receptors. Moreover, when the affinity of radiolabeled arginine-vasopressin ([3H]AVP) was compared between membrane preparations and intact cells, the affinity of [3H]AVP to the cell surface V1B receptors, but not the V1A receptors, was significantly reduced. Although the number and affinity of cell surface V1B receptors decreased, they became extensively internalized upon binding with [3H]AVP. Approximately 87% of cell surface-bound [3H]AVP was internalized and became resistant to acid wash during incubation with 1 nM [3H]AVP. By contrast, less ligand (35%) was internalized in the cells expressing the V1A receptor. Extensive internalization of the V1B receptors was partially attenuated by inhibitors of cytoskeletal proteins, siRNA against β-arrestin 2, or the removal of sodium chloride from the extracellular buffer, indicating that this internalization involves clathrin-coated pits. Together, these results indicate that the mechanism that regulates the number and affinity of V1B receptors in the plasma membrane is markedly distinct from the corresponding mechanisms for the V1A and V2 receptors and plays a critical role under stress conditions, when vasopressin release is augmented. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Development of a human vasopressin V1a-receptor antagonist from an evolutionary-related insect neuropeptide

    Science.gov (United States)

    di Giglio, Maria Giulia; Muttenthaler, Markus; Harpsøe, Kasper; Liutkeviciute, Zita; Keov, Peter; Eder, Thomas; Rattei, Thomas; Arrowsmith, Sarah; Wray, Susan; Marek, Ales; Elbert, Tomas; Alewood, Paul F.; Gloriam, David E.; Gruber, Christian W.

    2017-02-01

    Characterisation of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCR) relies on the availability of a toolbox of ligands that selectively modulate different functional states of the receptors. To uncover such molecules, we explored a unique strategy for ligand discovery that takes advantage of the evolutionary conservation of the 600-million-year-old oxytocin/vasopressin signalling system. We isolated the insect oxytocin/vasopressin orthologue inotocin from the black garden ant (Lasius niger), identified and cloned its cognate receptor and determined its pharmacological properties on the insect and human oxytocin/vasopressin receptors. Subsequently, we identified a functional dichotomy: inotocin activated the insect inotocin and the human vasopressin V1b receptors, but inhibited the human V1aR. Replacement of Arg8 of inotocin by D-Arg8 led to a potent, stable and competitive V1aR-antagonist ([D-Arg8]-inotocin) with a 3,000-fold binding selectivity for the human V1aR over the other three subtypes, OTR, V1bR and V2R. The Arg8/D-Arg8 ligand-pair was further investigated to gain novel insights into the oxytocin/vasopressin peptide-receptor interaction, which led to the identification of key residues of the receptors that are important for ligand functionality and selectivity. These observations could play an important role for development of oxytocin/vasopressin receptor modulators that would enable clear distinction of the physiological and pathological responses of the individual receptor subtypes.

  8. Endothelin and vasopressin influence splanchnic blood flow distribution during and after cardiopulmonary bypass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bomberg, Hagen; Bierbach, Benjamin; Flache, Stephan; Wagner, Isabell; Gläser, Lena; Groesdonk, Heinrich V; Menger, Michael D; Schäfers, Hans-Joachim

    2013-02-01

    Gastrointestinal blood flow can be compromised during and after cardiopulmonary bypass. Endothelin has been shown to be involved in the intestinal microcirculatory disturbance of sepsis. The aim of the present study was to analyze the involvement of the endothelin system on intestinal blood flow regulation during cardiopulmonary bypass and the effect of vasopressin given during cardiopulmonary bypass. A total of 24 pigs were studied in 4 groups (n = 6): group I, sham; group II, ischemia/reperfusion with 1 hour of superior mesenteric artery occlusion; group III, cardiopulmonary bypass for 1 hour; and group IV, 1 hour of cardiopulmonary bypass plus vasopressin administration, maintaining the baseline arterial pressure. All the pigs were reperfused for 90 minutes. During the experiment, the hemodynamics and jejunal microcirculation were measured continuously. The jejunal mucosal expression of endothelin-1 and its receptor subtypes A and B were determined using polymerase chain reaction. During cardiopulmonary bypass, superior mesenteric artery flow was preserved but marked jejunal microvascular impairment occurred compared with baseline (mucosal capillary density, 192.2 ± 5.4 vs 150.8 ± 5.1 cm/cm(2); P = .005; tissue blood flow, 501.7 ± 39.3 vs 332.3 ± 27.9 AU; P = .025). The expression of endothelin-1 after cardiopulmonary bypass (3.2 ± 0.4 vs 12.2 ± 0.8 RQ, P = .006) and endothelin subtype A (0.7 ± 0.2 vs 2.4 ± 0.6 RQ; P = .01) was significantly increased compared to the sham group. Vasopressin administration during cardiopulmonary bypass led to normal capillary density (189.9 ± 3.9 vs 178.0 ± 6.3; P = .1) and tissue blood flow (501.7 ± 39.3 vs 494.7 ± 44.4 AU; P = .4) compared with baseline. The expression of endothelin-1 (3.2 ± 0.4 vs 1.8 ± 0.3 RQ; P = .3) and endothelin subtype A (0.7 ± 0.2 vs 0.9 ± 0.2 RQ; P = .5) was not different from the sham group. Cardiopulmonary bypass leads to microvascular impairment of jejunal microcirculation, which is

  9. Effect of the selective vasopressin V2 receptor antagonists in hepatic cirrhosis patients with ascites: a meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shao-hui TANG

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective To evaluate the efficacy and safety of selective vasopressin V2 receptor antagonists in the treatment of hepatic cirrhosis patients with ascites. Methods PubMed, EMBASE, Web of Science, The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Database for Chinese Technical Periodical (VIP, Chinese Journal Full-Text Database (CNKI, and Wan Fang Digital Journal Full-text Database were retrieved to collect clinical randomized controlled trials of hepatic cirrhosis with ascites treated by selective vasopressin V2 receptor antagonists. Meta analysis was performed by using Review Manager 5.0. Results Nine randomized controlled trials including 1884 patients met the inclusion criteria. Meta-analysis showed that: 1 The selective vasopressin V2 receptor antagonists were associated with a significant reduction in body weight compared with placebo (WMD=–1.98kg, 95%CI:–3.24-–0.72kg, P=0.002. Treatment with selective vasopressin V2 receptor antagonists was associated with an improvement of low serum sodium concentration compared to placebo (WMD=3.74mmol/L, 95%CI: 0.91-6.58mmol/L, P=0.01. The percentage of patients with worsening ascites was higher in the group of patients treated with placebo (RR=0.51, 95%CI: 0.34-0.77, P=0.001. 2 The amplitude of increased urine volume was obviously higher in selective vasopressin V2 receptor antagonists group than in placebo group (WMD=1437.65ml, 95%CI: 649.01-2226.30ml, P=0.0004. The difference of serum creatinine in the selective vasopressin V2 receptor antagonists group was not statistically significant compared with the control group (WMD=–3.49μmol/L, 95%CI: –12.54¬5.56μmol/L, P=0.45. 3 There was no statistical significance between the two groups in the heart rate, systolic pressure, diastolic pressure and mortality (P>0.05. The rate of other adverse reactions was higher in the selective vasopressin V2 receptor antagonists group compared with that of placebo group (P=0.003. Conclusion

  10. Cardiovascular effects of the intracerebroventricular injection of adrenomedullin: roles of the peripheral vasopressin and central cholinergic systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Cam-Etoz

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Our objective was to investigate in conscious Sprague-Dawley (6-8 weeks, 250-300 g female rats (N = 7 in each group the effects of intracerebroventricularly (icv injected adrenomedullin (ADM on blood pressure and heart rate (HR, and to determine if ADM and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP receptors, peripheral V1 receptors or the central cholinergic system play roles in these cardiovascular effects. Blood pressure and HR were observed before and for 30 min following drug injections. The following results were obtained: 1 icv ADM (750 ng/10 µL caused an increase in both blood pressure and HR (DMAP = 11.8 ± 2.3 mmHg and ΔHR = 39.7 ± 4.8 bpm. 2 Pretreatment with a CGRP receptor antagonist (CGRP8-37 and ADM receptor antagonist (ADM22-52 blocked the effect of central ADM on blood pressure and HR. 3 The nicotinic receptor antagonist mecamylamine (25 µg/10 µL, icv and the muscarinic receptor antagonist atropine (5 µg/10 µL, icv prevented the stimulating effect of ADM on blood pressure. The effect of ADM on HR was blocked only by atropine (5 µg/10 µL, icv. 4 The V1 receptor antagonist [β-mercapto-β-β-cyclopentamethylenepropionyl¹, O-me-Tyr²,Arg8]-vasopressin (V2255; 10 µg/kg, that was applied intravenously, prevented the effect of ADM on blood pressure and HR. This is the first study reporting the role of specific ADM and CGRP receptors, especially the role of nicotinic and muscarinic central cholinergic receptors and the role of peripheral V1 receptors in the increasing effects of icv ADM on blood pressure and HR.

  11. Cardiovascular effects of the intracerebroventricular injection of adrenomedullin: roles of the peripheral vasopressin and central cholinergic systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cam-Etoz, B.; Isbil-Buyukcoskun, N.; Ozluk, K. [Department of Physiology, Uludag University Medical Faculty, Gorukle/Bursa (Turkey)

    2012-03-02

    Our objective was to investigate in conscious Sprague-Dawley (6-8 weeks, 250-300 g) female rats (N = 7 in each group) the effects of intracerebroventricularly (icv) injected adrenomedullin (ADM) on blood pressure and heart rate (HR), and to determine if ADM and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) receptors, peripheral V{sub 1} receptors or the central cholinergic system play roles in these cardiovascular effects. Blood pressure and HR were observed before and for 30 min following drug injections. The following results were obtained: 1) icv ADM (750 ng/10 µL) caused an increase in both blood pressure and HR (ΔMAP = 11.8 ± 2.3 mmHg and ΔHR = 39.7 ± 4.8 bpm). 2) Pretreatment with a CGRP receptor antagonist (CGRP{sub 8-37}) and ADM receptor antagonist (ADM{sub 22-52}) blocked the effect of central ADM on blood pressure and HR. 3) The nicotinic receptor antagonist mecamylamine (25 µg/10 µL, icv) and the muscarinic receptor antagonist atropine (5 µg/10 µL, icv) prevented the stimulating effect of ADM on blood pressure. The effect of ADM on HR was blocked only by atropine (5 µg/10 µL, icv). 4) The V{sub 1} receptor antagonist [β-mercapto-β-β-cyclopentamethylenepropionyl{sup 1}, O-me-Tyr{sup 2},Arg{sup 8}]-vasopressin (V2255; 10 µg/kg), that was applied intravenously, prevented the effect of ADM on blood pressure and HR. This is the first study reporting the role of specific ADM and CGRP receptors, especially the role of nicotinic and muscarinic central cholinergic receptors and the role of peripheral V{sub 1} receptors in the increasing effects of icv ADM on blood pressure and HR.

  12. Association of arginine vasopressin surrogate marker urinary copeptin with severity of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakajima, Akiko; Lu, Yan; Kawano, Haruna; Horie, Shigeo; Muto, Satoru

    2015-12-01

    Experimental studies suggest a detrimental role for cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) and vasopressin in the pathogenesis of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD). It is unknown, however, whether urinary cAMP and copeptin concentration are associated with disease severity in patients with ADPKD. Urinary cAMP (u-cAMP) and copeptin concentration (u-copeptin) were measured by immunoassay in ADPKD patients with CKD stage ≤4. We compared our measurements with clinical parameters including estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), total kidney volume (TKV), and height-adjusted TKV (htTKV). Logarithmic transformation of all variables was performed to fulfill the requirement of equal distribution of the residuals. We included 50 patients in this study (24 females and 26 males; mean age: 49.3 years). The median eGFR and TKV were 53.2 ml/min/1.73 m(2) (interquartile range: IQR; 29.4-68.45) and 1138.1 ml (IQR; 814.7-2065.0), respectively. The median u-copeptin level was 12.19 (IQR; 6.91-22.32) ng/ml. Although u-cAMP/u-Cr was not significantly correlated with TKV (R = -0.006, p = 0.967) and eGFR (R = 0.077, p = 0.602), urinary copeptin/u-Cr was statistically associated with the various markers of disease severity in ADPKD [positively with TKV (R = 0.351, p = 0.014), htTKV (R = 0.383, p = 0.008) and negatively with eGFR (R = -0.304, p = 0.036)]. In ADPKD subjects, a higher u-copeptin is associated with disease progression, suggesting that u-copeptin may be a new surrogate marker to predict renal prognosis in ADPKD.

  13. Prediction of perinatal brain damage by cord plasma vasopressin, erythropoietin, and hypoxanthine values.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruth, V; Autti-Rämö, I; Granström, M L; Korkman, M; Raivio, K O

    1988-11-01

    For an assessment of whether cord plasma arginine vasopressin, erythropoietin, and hypoxanthine concentrations are predictors of perinatal brain damage, these concentrations were measured in 62 infants born after preeclampsia of pregnancy, 31 acutely asphyxiated infants, and 38 control infants. Follow-up at 2 years included neurologic examination and the determination of a Bayley mental score. Clear abnormality (death, cerebral palsy, or developmental delay) was found in four infants in the preeclampsia group and five in the asphyxia group; slight abnormality was found in 12 and 6 infants, respectively; and no abnormality was found in the remainder. Neither arginine vasopressin values nor hypoxanthine values predicted adverse outcome in either study group. A high erythropoietin level was found in infants born after preeclampsia regardless of outcome: normal outcome (geometric mean (GM), 102; 95% confidence interval [CI], 69 to 153 mU/ml), slightly abnormal outcome (GM, 100; 95% CI, 37 to 270 mU/ml) or clearly abnormal outcome (GM, 84; 95% CI, 19 to 378 mU/ml). However, asphyxiated infants with clearly abnormal outcome had higher erythropoietin values (GM, 67; 95% CI, 33 to 137 mU/ml; p less than 0.05) than the normal infants (GM, 37; 95% CI, 23 to 59 mU/ml). We conclude that a high erythropoietin level after normal pregnancy, but not after preeclampsia, indicates an increased risk for cerebral palsy or death.

  14. Modulation of mouse Leydig cell steroidogenesis through a specific arginine-vasopressin receptor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tahri-Joutei, A.; Pointis, G.

    1988-01-01

    Characterization of specific vasopressin binding sites was investigated in purified mouse Leydig cells using tritiated arginine-vasopressin. Binding of radioligand was saturable, time- and temperature-dependent and reversible. (/sup 3/H)-AVP was found to bind to a single class of sites with high affinity and low capacity. Binding displacements with specific selection analogs of AVP indicated the presence of V/sub 1/ subtype receptors on Leydig cells. The ability of AVP to displace (/sup 3/H)-AVP binding was greater than LVP and oxytocin. The unrelated peptides, somatostatin and substance P, were less potent, while neurotensin and LHRH did not displace (/sup 3/H)-AVP binding. The time-course effects of AVP-pretreatment on basal and hCG-stimulated testosterone and cAMP accumulations were studied in primary culture of Leydig cells. Basal testosterone accumulation was significantly increased by a 24 h AVP-pretreatment of Leydig cells. This effect was potentiated by the phosphodiesterase inhibitor (MIX) and was concomitantly accompanied by a slight but significant increase in cAMP accumulation. AVP-pretreatment of the cells for 72 h had no effect on basal testosterone accumulation, but exerted a marked inhibitory effect on the hCG-stimulated testosterone accumulation. This reduction of testosterone accumulation occurred even in the presence of MIX and was not accompanied by any significant change of cAMP levels.

  15. Endogenous vasopressin and the central control of heart rate during dynamic exercise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.C. Michelini

    1998-09-01

    Full Text Available The present article contains a brief review on the role of vasopressinergic projections to the nucleus tractus solitarii in the genesis of reflex bradycardia and in the modulation of heart rate control during exercise. The effects of vasopressin on exercise tachycardia are discussed on the basis of both the endogenous peptide content changes and the heart rate response changes observed during running in sedentary and trained rats. Dynamic exercise caused a specific vasopressin content increase in dorsal and ventral brainstem areas. In accordance, rats pretreated with the peptide or the V1 blocker into the nucleus tractus solitarii showed a significant potentiation or a marked blunting of the exercise tachycardia, respectively, without any change in the pressure response to exercise. It is proposed that the long-descending vasopressinergic pathway to the nucleus tractus solitarii serves as one link between the two main neural controllers of circulation, i.e., the central command and feedback control mechanisms driven by the peripheral receptors. Therefore, vasopressinergic input could contribute to the adjustment of heart rate response (and cardiac output to the circulatory demand during exercise.

  16. Further neuroendocrine evidence of enhanced vasopressin V3 receptor responses in melancholic depression.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Dinan, T G

    2012-02-03

    BACKGROUND: In situations of chronic stress vasopressin plays an important role in regulating the hypothalamic-pituitary adrenal axis. The aim of the current study was to investigate the role of anterior pituitary vasopressin V3 receptors in maintaining the hypercortisolism seen in melancholic depression. METHOD: Fourteen patients with major depression and 14 age- and sex-matched healthy comparison subjects were recruited. Desmopressin (ddAVP) 10 microg was given intravenously and ACTH and cortisol release was monitored for 120 min. RESULTS: The mean +\\/- S.E.M. ACTH response in the depressives was 28.4 +\\/- 4.3 ng\\/l and in the healthy subjects was 18.8 +\\/- 4.9 ng\\/l (P = 0.04). The mean +\\/- S.E.M. cortisol response in the depressives was 261.8 +\\/- 46.5 nmol\\/l and in the healthy subjects was 107.3 +\\/- 26.1 nmol\\/l (P < 0.01). CONCLUSIONS: Patients with major depression have augmented ACTH and cortisol responses to desmopressin indicating enhanced V3 responsivity.

  17. The vasopressin system: new insights for patients with kidney diseases: Epidemiological evidence and therapeutic perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, W F; Devuyst, O; Roussel, R

    2017-10-01

    People with chronic kidney disease (CKD) are at risk of severe outcomes, such as end-stage renal disease or cardiovascular disease, and CKD is a globally increasing health burden with a high personal and economic cost. Despite major progresses in prevention and therapeutics in last decades, research is still needed to reverse this epidemic trend. The regulation of water balance and the state of activation of the vasopressin system have emerged as factors tightly associated with kidney health, in the general population but also in specific conditions; among them, various stages of CKD, diabetes and autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD). Basic science findings and also epidemiological evidence have justified important efforts towards interventional studies supporting causality, and opening therapeutic avenues. On the basis of recent clinical data, the blockade of V2 vasopressin receptors using tolvaptan in patients with rapidly progressing ADPKD has been granted in several countries, and a long-term randomized trial evaluating the effect of an increase in water intake in patients with CKD is on-going. © 2017 The Association for the Publication of the Journal of Internal Medicine.

  18. Spinal vasopressin alleviates formalin-induced nociception by enhancing GABAA receptor function in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Fang; Qu, Zu-Wei; Qiu, Chun-Yu; Liao, Min; Hu, Wang-Ping

    2015-04-23

    Arginine vasopressin (AVP) plays a regulatory role in nociception. Intrathecal administration of AVP displays an antinociceptive effect. However, little is understood about the mechanism underlying spinal AVP analgesia. Here, we have found that spinal AVP dose dependently reduced the second, but not first, phase of formalin-induced spontaneous nociception in mice. The AVP analgesia was completely blocked by intrathecal injected SR 49059, a vasopressin-1A (V1A) receptor antagonist. However, spinal AVP failed to exert its antinociceptive effect on the second phase formalin-induced spontaneous nociception in V1A receptor knock-out (V1A-/-) mice. The AVP analgesia was also reversed by bicuculline, a GABAA receptor antagonist. Moreover, AVP potentiated GABA-activated currents in dorsal root ganglion neurons from wild-type littermates, but not from V1A-/- mice. Our results may reveal a novel spinal mechanism of AVP analgesia by enhancing the GABAA receptor function in the spinal cord through V1A receptors. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Personality is Tightly Coupled to Vasopressin-Oxytocin Neuron Activity in a Gregarious Finch

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aubrey M Kelly

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Nonapeptides of the vasopressin-oxytocin family modulate social processes differentially in relation to sex, species, behavioral phenotype, and human personality. However, the mechanistic bases for these differences are not well understood, in part because multidimensional personality structures remain to be described for common laboratory animals. Based upon principal components (PC analysis of extensive behavioral measures in social and nonsocial contexts, we now describe three complex dimensions of phenotype (personality for the zebra finch, a species that exhibits a human-like social organization that is based upon biparental nuclear families embedded within larger social groups. These dimensions can be characterized as Social competence/dominance, Gregariousness, and Anxiety. We further demonstrate that the phasic Fos response of nonapeptide neurons in the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus and medial bed nucleus of the stria terminalis are significantly predicted by personality, sex, social context, and their interactions. Furthermore the behavioral PCs are each associated with a distinct suite of neural PCs that incorporate both peptide cell numbers and their phasic Fos responses, indicating that personality is reflected in complex patterns of neuromodulation arising from multiple peptide cell groups. These findings provide novel insights into the mechanisms underlying sex- and phenotype-specific modulation of behavior, and should be broadly relevant, given that vasopressin-oxytocin systems are strongly conserved across vertebrates.

  20. Antiproliferative effect of 1-deamino-8-D-arginine vasopressin analogs on human breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iannucci, Nancy B; Ripoll, Giselle V; Garona, Juan; Cascone, Osvaldo; Ciccia, Graciela N; Gomez, Daniel E; Alonso, Daniel F

    2011-12-01

    Desmopressin (dDAVP), a synthetic nonapeptide derivative of arginine vasopressin, is a safe antidiuretic and hemostatic compound that acts as a selective agonist for the vasopressin V2 membrane receptor (V2R). It is known that dDAVP can inhibit progression of residual metastatic cells in preclinical models. Among other mechanisms, the compound induces an agonist effect on V2R present in tumor cells. Looking for novel analogs with improved anti-tumor activity, positions 4 and 5, at the conformational peptide loop, were substituted. The analog [V(4)Q(5)]dDAVP ([4-valine 5-glutamine] desmopressin) exhibited a significantly higher antiproliferative effect than dDAVP in cultures of MCF-7, a V2R-expressing human breast carcinoma cell line. The chiral isomer of this analog and tetrapeptide fragments corresponding to the loop region were also assessed. Preclinical evaluation of the anti-tumor activity of [V(4)Q(5)]dDAVP in animal models is warranted.

  1. The Effect of Maternal Stress Activation on the Offspring during Lactation in Light of Vasopressin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Fodor

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Although it is obvious that preconceptional effects as well as stressors during pregnancy profoundly influence the progeny, the lactation period seems to be at least as important. Here we summarize how maternal stressors during the lactation period affect the offspring. As vasopressin is one of the crucial components both for stress adaptation and social behavior, special emphasis was given to this neuropeptide. We can conclude that stressing the mother does not have the same acute effect on the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenocortical axis (as the main target of stress adaptation of the pups as stressing the pups, but later endocrine and behavioral consequences can be similar. Vasopressin plays a role in acute and later consequences of perinatal stressor applied either to the mother or to the offspring, thereby contributing to transmitting the mothers’ stress to the progeny. This mother-infant interaction does not necessarily mean a direct transmission of molecules, but rather is the result of programming the brain development through changes in maternal behavior. Thus, there is a time lag between maternal stress and stress-related changes in the offspring. The interactions are bidirectional as not only stress in the dam but also stress in the progeny has an effect on nursing.

  2. Reduction in plasma vasopressin levels of dehydrated rats following acute stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keil, L. C.; Severs, W. B.

    1977-01-01

    Results are presented for an investigation directed to substantiate and extend preliminary findings of stress-induced reduction in plasma arginine vasopressin (pAVP). Since normally hydrated rats have very low levels of pAVP, it is difficult to measure reliably any decrease in pAVP that may result from stress. To overcome this problem, the pAVP levels of the tested rats were raised by dehydration prior to application of stress. A radioimmunoassay for pAVP is described and used to determine the levels of vasopressin in the plasma of nondehydrated and dehydrated rats after exposure to ether or acceleration stress. Plasma pAVP is also determined in rats following nicotine administration. It is shown that exposure of nondehydrated rats to ether or acceleration stress does not elicit any significant alterations in circulating pAVP levels while nicotine injections stimulate a marked increase. In particular, ether and acceleration stress produce a rapid reduction in the pAVP level of dehydrated rats, the decrease being observed in both large and small animals. The mechanism for this reduction in pAVP level following stress is yet unknown.

  3. Cardiorenal Syndrome: Role of Arginine Vasopressin and Vaptans in Heart Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinod, Poornima; Krishnappa, Vinod; Chauvin, Abigail M; Khare, Anshika; Raina, Rupesh

    2017-06-01

    Heart and kidney failure continued to be of increasing prevalence in today's society, and their comorbidity has synergistic effect on the morbidity and mortality of patients. Cardiorenal syndrome (CRS) is a complex disease with multifactorial pathophysiology. Better understanding of this pathophysiological network is crucial for the successful intervention to prevent advancement of the disease process. One of the major factors in this process is neurohormonal activation, predominantly involving renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) and arginine vasopressin (AVP). Heart failure causes reduced cardiac output/cardiac index (CO/CI) and fall in renal perfusion pressures resulting in activation of baroreceptors and RAAS, respectively. Activated baroreceptors and RAAS stimulate the release of AVP (non-osmotic pathway), which acts on V2 receptors located in the renal collecting ducts, causing fluid retention and deterioration of heart failure. Effective blockade of AVP action on V2 receptors has emerged as a potential treatment option in volume overload conditions especially in the setting of hyponatremia. Vasopressin receptor antagonists (VRAs), such as vaptans, are potent aquaretics causing electrolyte-free water diuresis without significant electrolyte abnormalities. Vaptans are useful in hypervolemic hyponatremic conditions like heart failure and liver cirrhosis, and euvolemic hyponatremic conditions like syndrome of inappropriate anti-diuretic hormone secretion. Tolvaptan and conivaptan are pharmaceutical agents that are available for the treatment of these conditions.

  4. Selective localization of oxytocin receptors and vasopressin 1a receptors in the human brainstem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Sara M; Smith, Aaron L; Goodman, Mark M; Bales, Karen L

    2017-04-01

    Intranasal oxytocin (OT) affects a suite of human social behaviors, including trust, eye contact, and emotion recognition. However, it is unclear where oxytocin receptors (OXTR) and the structurally related vasopressin 1a receptors (AVPR1a) are expressed in the human brain. We have previously described a reliable, pharmacologically informed receptor autoradiography protocol for visualizing these receptors in postmortem primate brain tissue. We used this technique in human brainstem tissue to identify the neural targets of OT and vasopressin. To determine binding selectivity of the OXTR radioligand and AVPR1a radioligand, sections were incubated in four conditions: radioligand alone, radioligand with the selective AVPR1a competitor SR49059, and radioligand with a low or high concentration of the selective OXTR competitor ALS-II-69. We found selective OXTR binding in the spinal trigeminal nucleus, a conserved region of OXTR expression in all primate species investigated to date. We found selective AVPR1a binding in the nucleus prepositus, an area implicated in eye gaze stabilization. The tissue's postmortem interval (PMI) was not correlated with either the specific or nonspecific binding of either radioligand, indicating that it will not likely be a factor in similar postmortem studies. This study provides critical data for future studies of OXTR and AVPR1a in human brain tissue.

  5. Characterization of the neurohypophysial hormone gene loci in elephant shark and the Japanese lamprey: origin of the vertebrate neurohypophysial hormone genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brenner Sydney

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Vasopressin and oxytocin are mammalian neurohypophysial hormones with distinct functions. Vasopressin is involved mainly in osmoregulation and oxytocin is involved primarily in parturition and lactation. Jawed vertebrates contain at least one homolog each of vasopressin and oxytocin, whereas only a vasopressin-family hormone, vasotocin, has been identified in jawless vertebrates. The genes encoding vasopressin and oxytocin are closely linked tail-to-tail in eutherian mammals whereas their homologs in chicken, Xenopus and coelacanth (vasotocin and mesotocin are linked tail-to-head. In contrast, their pufferfish homologs, vasotocin and isotocin, are located on the same strand of DNA with isotocin located upstream of vasotocin and separated by five genes. These differences in the arrangement of the two genes in different bony vertebrate lineages raise questions about their origin and ancestral arrangement. To trace the origin of these genes, we have sequenced BAC clones from the neurohypophysial gene loci in a cartilaginous fish, the elephant shark (Callorhinchus milii, and in a jawless vertebrate, the Japanese lamprey (Lethenteron japonicum. We have also analyzed the neurohypophysial hormone gene locus in an invertebrate chordate, the amphioxus (Branchiostoma floridae. Results The elephant shark neurohypophysial hormone genes encode vasotocin and oxytocin, and are linked tail-to-head like their homologs in coelacanth and non-eutherian tetrapods. Besides the hypothalamus, the two genes are also expressed in the ovary. In addition, the vasotocin gene is expressed in the kidney, rectal gland and intestine. These expression profiles indicate a paracrine role for the two hormones. The lamprey locus contains a single neurohypophysial hormone gene, the vasotocin. The synteny of genes in the lamprey locus is conserved in elephant shark, coelacanth and tetrapods but disrupted in teleost fishes. The amphioxus locus encodes a single

  6. Sociality and oxytocin and vasopressin in the brain of male and female dominant and subordinate mandarin voles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Xufeng; Yan, Yating; Wu, Ruiyong; Tai, Fadao; Hao, Ping; Cao, Yan; Wang, Jianli

    2014-02-01

    The dominant-subordinate hierarchy in animals often needs to be established via agonistic encounters and consequently affects reproduction and survival. Differences in brain neuropeptides and sociality among dominant and subordinate males and females remain poorly understood. Here we explore neuropeptide levels and sociality during agonistic encounter tests in mandarin voles. We found that dominant mandarin voles engaged in higher levels of approaching, investigating, self-grooming and exploring behavior than subordinates. Dominant males habituated better to a stimulus vole than dominant females. Dominant males displayed significantly less oxytocin-immunoreactive neurons in the paraventricular nuclei and more vasopressin-immunoreactive neurons in the paraventricular nuclei, supraoptic nuclei, and the lateral and anterior hypothalamus than subordinates. Dominant females displayed significantly more vasopressin-immunoreactive neurons in the lateral hypothalamus and anterior hypothalamus than subordinates. Sex differences were found