WorldWideScience

Sample records for vascular surgery residency

  1. Canadian vascular surgery residents' perceptions regarding future job opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Joel A; Dubois, Luc; Power, Adam H; DeRose, Guy; MacKenzie, Kent S; Forbes, Thomas L

    2015-06-01

    The objective was to determine the employment environment for graduates of Canadian vascular surgery training programs. A cross-sectional survey of residents and graduates (2011-2012) was used. Thirty-seven residents were invited with a response rate of 57%, and 14 graduates with a response rate of 71%; 70% of graduates felt the job market played an important role in their decision to pursue vascular surgery as a career compared to 43% of trainees. The top three concerns were the lack of surgeons retiring, the overproduction of trainees, and saturation of the job market. The majority (62%) of trainees see themselves extending their training due to lack of employment. All of the graduates obtained employment, with 50% during their second year (of two years) of training and 30% after training was completed. Graduates spent an average of 12 ± 10.6 months seeking a position and applied to 3.3 ± 1.5 positions, with a mean of 1.9 ± 1.3 interviews and 2 ± 1.2 offers. There was a discrepancy between the favorable employment climate experienced by graduates and the pessimistic outlook of trainees. We must be progressive in balancing the employment opportunities with the number of graduates. Number and timing of job offers is a possible future metric of the optimal number of residents. © The Author(s) 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  2. Impact of Integrated Vascular Residencies on Academic Productivity within Vascular Surgery Divisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Bradford J; Valsangkar, Nakul P; Liang, Tiffany W; Murphy, Michael P; Zimmers, Teresa A; Bell, Teresa M; Davies, Mark G; Koniaris, Leonidas G

    2017-02-01

    Changing training paradigms in vascular surgery have been introduced to reduce overall training time. Herein, we sought to examine how shortened training for vascular surgeons may have influenced overall divisional academic productivity. Faculty from the top 55 surgery departments were identified according to National Institutes of Health (NIH) funding. Academic metrics of 315 vascular surgery, 1,132 general surgery, and 2,403 other surgical specialties faculty were examined using institutional Web sites, Scopus, and NIH Research Portfolio Online Reporting Tools from September 1, 2014, to January 31, 2015. Individual-level and aggregate numbers of publications, citations, and NIH funding were determined. The mean size of the vascular divisions was 5 faculty. There was no correlation between department size and academic productivity of individual faculty members (R(2) = 0.68, P = 0.2). Overall percentage of vascular surgery faculty with current or former NIH funding was 20%, of which 10.8% had major NIH grants (R01/U01/P01). Vascular surgery faculty associated with integrated vascular training programs demonstrated significantly greater academic productivity. Publications and citations were higher for vascular surgery faculty from institutions with both integrated and traditional training programs (48 of 1,051) compared to those from programs with integrated training alone (37 of 485) or traditional fellowships alone (26 of 439; P productivity was improved within vascular surgery divisions with integrated training programs or both program types. These data suggest that the earlier specialization of integrated residencies in addition to increasing dedicated vascular training time may actually help promote research within the field of vascular surgery. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Open abdominal surgical training differences experienced by integrated vascular and general surgery residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanious, Adam; Wooster, Mathew; Jung, Andrew; Nelson, Peter R; Armstrong, Paul A; Shames, Murray L

    2017-10-01

    As the integrated vascular residency program reaches almost a decade of maturity, a common area of concern among trainees is the adequacy of open abdominal surgical training. It is our belief that although their overall exposure to open abdominal procedures has decreased, integrated vascular residents have an adequate and focused exposure to open aortic surgery during training. National operative case log data supplied by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education were compiled for both graduating integrated vascular surgery residents (IVSRs) and graduating categorical general surgery residents (GSRs) for the years 2012 to 2014. Mean total and open abdominal case numbers were compared between the IVSRs and GSRs, with more in-depth exploration into open abdominal procedures by organ system. Overall, the mean total 5-year case volume of IVSRs was 1168 compared with 980 for GSRs during the same time frame (P surgery, representing 57% of all open abdominal cases. GSRs completed an average of 116 open alimentary tract surgeries during their training. Open abdominal surgery represented an average of 7.1% of the total vascular case volume for the vascular residents, whereas open abdominal surgery represented 21% of a GSR's total surgical experience. IVSRs reported almost double the number of total cases during their training, with double chief-level cases. Sixty-five percent of open abdominal surgeries performed by IVSRs involved the aorta or its renovisceral branches. Whereas open abdominal surgery represented 7.1% of an IVSR's surgical training, GSRs had a far broader scope of open abdominal procedures, completing nearly double those of IVSRs. The differences in open abdominal procedures pertain to the differing diseases treated by GSRs and IVSRs. Copyright © 2017 Society for Vascular Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. 0 + 5 Vascular Surgery Residents' Operative Experience in General Surgery: An Analysis of Operative Logs from 12 Integrated Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Brigitte K; Kang, P Chulhi; McAninch, Chris; Leverson, Glen; Sullivan, Sarah; Mitchell, Erica L

    2016-01-01

    Integrated (0 + 5) vascular surgery (VS) residency programs must include 24 months of training in core general surgery. The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education currently does not require specific case numbers in general surgery for 0 + 5 trainees; however, program directors have structured this time to optimize operative experience. The aim of this study is to determine the case volume and type of cases that VS residents are exposed to during their core surgery training. Accreditation council for graduate medical education operative logs for current 0 + 5 VS residents were obtained and retrospectively reviewed to determine general surgery case volume and distribution between open and laparoscopic cases performed. Standard statistical methods were applied. A total of 12 integrated VS residency programs provided operative case logs for current residents. A total of 41 integrated VS residents in clinical years 2 through 5. During the postgraduate year-1 training year, residents participated in significantly more open than laparoscopic general surgery cases (p surgery cases are hernia repair (20%), skin and soft tissue (7.4%), and breast (6.3%). Residents in programs with core surgery over 3 years participated in significantly more general surgery operations compared with residents in programs with core surgery spread out over 4 years (p = 0.035). 0 + 5 VS residents perform significantly more open operations than laparoscopic operations during their core surgery training. The majority of these operations are minor, nonabdominal procedures. The 0 + 5 VS residency program general surgery operative training requirements should be reevaluated and case minimums defined. The general surgery training component of 0 + 5 VS residencies may need to be restructured to meet the needs of current and future trainees. Copyright © 2016 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Assessment of open operative vascular surgical experience among general surgery residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krafcik, Brianna M; Sachs, Teviah E; Farber, Alik; Eslami, Mohammad H; Kalish, Jeffrey A; Shah, Nishant K; Peacock, Matthew R; Siracuse, Jeffrey J

    2016-04-01

    General surgeons have traditionally performed open vascular operations. However, endovascular interventions, vascular residencies, and work-hour limitations may have had an impact on open vascular surgery training among general surgery residents. We evaluated the temporal trend of open vascular operations performed by general surgery residents to assess any changes that have occurred. The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education's database was used to evaluate graduating general surgery residents' cases from 1999 to 2013. Mean and median case volumes were analyzed for carotid endarterectomy, open aortoiliac aneurysm repair, and lower extremity bypass. Significance of temporal trends were identified using the R(2) test. The average number of carotid endarterectomies performed by general surgery residents decreased from 23.1 ± 14 (11.6 ± 9 chief, 11.4 + 10 junior) cases per resident in 1999 to 10.7 ± 9 (3.4 ± 5 chief, 7.3 ± 6 junior) in 2012 (R(2) = 0.98). Similarly, elective open aortoiliac aneurysm repairs decreased from 7.4 ± 5 (4 ± 4 chief, 3.4 ± 4 junior) in 1999 to 1.3 ± 2 (0.4 ± 1 chief, 0.8 ± 1 junior) in 2012 (R(2) = 0.98). The number of lower extremity bypasses decreased from 21 ± 12 (9.5 ± 7 chief, 11.8 ± 9 junior) in 1999 to 7.6 ± 2.6 (2.4 ± 1.3 chief, 5.2 + 1.8 junior) in 2012 (R(2) = 0.94). Infrapopliteal bypasses decreased from 8.1 ± 3.8 (3.5 ± 2.2 chief, 4.5 ± 2.9 junior) in 2001 to 3 ± 2.2 (1 ± 1.6 chief, 2 ± 1.6 junior) in 2012 (R(2) = 0.94). General surgery resident exposure to open vascular surgery has significantly decreased. Current and future graduates may not have adequate exposure to open vascular operations to be safely credentialed to perform these procedures in future practice without advanced vascular surgical training. Copyright © 2016 Society for Vascular Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Lean principles optimize on-time vascular surgery operating room starts and decrease resident work hours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warner, Courtney J; Walsh, Daniel B; Horvath, Alexander J; Walsh, Teri R; Herrick, Daniel P; Prentiss, Steven J; Powell, Richard J

    2013-11-01

    Lean process improvement techniques are used in industry to improve efficiency and quality while controlling costs. These techniques are less commonly applied in health care. This study assessed the effectiveness of Lean principles on first case on-time operating room starts and quantified effects on resident work hours. Standard process improvement techniques (DMAIC methodology: define, measure, analyze, improve, control) were used to identify causes of delayed vascular surgery first case starts. Value stream maps and process flow diagrams were created. Process data were analyzed with Pareto and control charts. High-yield changes were identified and simulated in computer and live settings prior to implementation. The primary outcome measure was the proportion of on-time first case starts; secondary outcomes included hospital costs, resident rounding time, and work hours. Data were compared with existing benchmarks. Prior to implementation, 39% of first cases started on time. Process mapping identified late resident arrival in preoperative holding as a cause of delayed first case starts. Resident rounding process inefficiencies were identified and changed through the use of checklists, standardization, and elimination of nonvalue-added activity. Following implementation of process improvements, first case on-time starts improved to 71% at 6 weeks (P = .002). Improvement was sustained with an 86% on-time rate at 1 year (P < .001). Resident rounding time was reduced by 33% (from 70 to 47 minutes). At 9 weeks following implementation, these changes generated an opportunity cost potential of $12,582. Use of Lean principles allowed rapid identification and implementation of perioperative process changes that improved efficiency and resulted in significant cost savings. This improvement was sustained at 1 year. Downstream effects included improved resident efficiency with decreased work hours. Copyright © 2013 Society for Vascular Surgery. Published by Mosby, Inc. All

  7. A Comparison of Training Experience, Training Satisfaction, and Job Search Experiences between Integrated Vascular Surgery Residency and Traditional Vascular Surgery Fellowship Graduates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colvard, Benjamin; Shames, Murray; Schanzer, Andres; Rectenwald, John; Chaer, Rabih; Lee, Jason T

    2015-10-01

    The first 2 integrated vascular residents in the United States graduated in 2012, and in 2013, 11 more entered the job market. The purpose of this study was to compare the job search experiences of the first cohort of integrated 0 + 5 graduates to their counterparts completing traditional 5 + 2 fellowship programs. An anonymous, Web-based, 15-question survey was sent to all 11 graduating integrated residents in 2013 and to the 25 corresponding 5 + 2 graduating fellows within the same institution. Questions focused on the following domains: training experience, job search timelines and outcomes, and overall satisfaction with each training paradigm. Survey response was nearly 81% for the 0 + 5 graduates and 64% for the 5 + 2 graduates. Overall, there was no significant difference between residents and fellows in the operative experience obtained as measured by the number of open and endovascular cases logged. Dedicated research time during the entire training period was similar between residents and fellows. Nearly all graduates were extremely satisfied with their training and had positive experiences during their job searches with respect to starting salaries, numbers of offers, and desired practice type. More 0 + 5 residents chose academic and mixed practices over private practices compared with 5 + 2 fellowship graduates. Although longer term data are needed to understand the impact of the addition of 0 + 5 graduating residents to the vascular surgery work force, preliminary survey results suggest that both training paradigms (0 + 5 and 5 + 2) provide positive training experiences that result in excellent job search experiences. Based on the current and future need for vascular surgeons in the work force, the continued growth and expansion of integrated 0 + 5 vascular surgery residency positions as an alternative to traditional fellowship training is thus far justified. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. VASCULAR SURGERY

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is a complex and serious condition encompassing deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism (PE), usually in the lower extremities.1,2. Thromboses can result from venous stasis, vascular injury or hypercoagulability, and those involving the deep veins proximal to the knee are ...

  9. Critical issues in vascular surgery: Education in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira, Ricardo C R

    2008-12-01

    Vascular surgery practice and education vary widely across the globe. In Brazil, the largest and most populated country of South America, vascular surgery is an independent specialty, with >3000 practicing specialists. Vascular surgery education in Brazil consists of 6 years of medical school, followed by a 4-year residency in vascular surgery. Endovascular surgery training is provided by part-time mini-fellowships after a residency program has been completed. The author of this report, who represents the Sociedade Brasileira de Angiologia e de Cirurgia Vascular (SBACV) or Brazilian Society of Angiology and Vascular Surgery, presents the critical issues in vascular surgery education in Brazil. An informal survey was conducted among residency program directors and members of the SBACV National Board to identify the critical issues in vascular surgical education in Brazil. The 25 responders pointed to two issues as the most critical. The first is funding for vascular surgical education. Currently, 73 vascular residency programs are accredited, with 142 first-year positions and 288 residents in training. Vascular surgery residents are paid a meager stipend, but instructors receive no pay. Endovascular fellows have to pay for their training. This has led to endovascular training being financed by the industry, despite the potential conflicts of interest created by this situation. The second critical issue is endovascular surgery training. The vascular surgical community in Brazil faces the huge task of how to offer training in endovascular techniques to the 140 or so young vascular surgeons coming out of residency programs every year, as well as how to teach endovascular techniques to several hundred certified vascular surgeons already in practice. Funding vascular surgery educational programs and training surgeons in the new endovascular techniques are the critical issues faced by vascular surgical educators in Brazil.

  10. Resident laser refractive surgery training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madu, Assumpta A; Ali, Tofik

    2010-07-01

    The Residency Review Committee Ophthalmology of the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education has recently established guidelines pertaining to the minimum operative requirements for training ophthalmology residents in refractive surgery. Despite being one of the most frequently performed ophthalmic surgical procedures, there is a paucity of literature on residency training in refractive surgery. Moreover, the literature indicates that only half of training programs offer surgical exposure to trainees. The purpose of this article is to review recent research on training ophthalmology residents in refractive surgery and offer an approach to incorporating laser refractive surgery curriculum in residency education. Kwon et al. performed a national survey to evaluate current trends in resident laser in-situ keratomileusis (LASIK) training in the USA. The result shows that 54% of respondents had resident-performed LASIK surgery with 9.1% of surveyed programs not offering any LASIK experience. In addition, residents in the study performed a mean of 4.4 LASIK surgeries (range 1-10) during residency training starting during the second year. The data emerging from the survey show that refractive surgery experience is fundamental to the education of the ophthalmology resident. Although the demand for refractive surgery continues to gain pace with millions of such procedures performed worldwide, only a little over half of ophthalmology residency programs offer residents the opportunity to gain surgical experience. With the current mandate, programs must now look for strategies to provide laser refractive surgical experience to residents.

  11. Social media in vascular surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Indes, Jeffrey E; Gates, Lindsay; Mitchell, Erica L; Muhs, Bart E

    2013-04-01

    There has been a tremendous growth in the use of social media to expand the visibility of various specialties in medicine. The purpose of this paper is to describe the latest updates on some current applications of social media in the practice of vascular surgery as well as existing limitations of use. This investigation demonstrates that the use of social networking sites appears to have a positive impact on vascular practice, as is evident through the incorporation of this technology at the Cleveland Clinic and by the Society for Vascular Surgery into their approach to patient care and physician communication. Overall, integration of social networking technology has current and future potential to be used to promote goals, patient awareness, recruitment for clinical trials, and professionalism within the specialty of vascular surgery. Copyright © 2013 Society for Vascular Surgery. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Hedgehog and Resident Vascular Stem Cell Fate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ciaran J. Mooney

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The Hedgehog pathway is a pivotal morphogenic driver during embryonic development and a key regulator of adult stem cell self-renewal. The discovery of resident multipotent vascular stem cells and adventitial progenitors within the vessel wall has transformed our understanding of the origin of medial and neointimal vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs during vessel repair in response to injury, lesion formation, and overall disease progression. This review highlights the importance of components of the Hh and Notch signalling pathways within the medial and adventitial regions of adult vessels, their recapitulation following vascular injury and disease progression, and their putative role in the maintenance and differentiation of resident vascular stem cells to vascular lineages from discrete niches within the vessel wall.

  13. Vascular complications in orthopedic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chervu, A; Quinones-Baldrich, W J

    1988-10-01

    Vascular complications may be seen secondary to trauma or in the perioperative period following elective surgery. Prompt recognition and correction of these problems are of utmost importance to assure functional viability of the affected extremity. Evaluation may be complicated by the presence of preexisting atherosclerotic occlusive disease in the elderly patient. Relevant points in the history and physical examination include mechanism of injury, preexisting disease, evaluation of motor and sensory function, and presence and character of pulses. Noninvasive vascular studies should be obtained in all patients. Absolute indications for angiography include absent pulses, signs and symptoms of ischemia, a bruit, and a posterior knee dislocation; decreased pulses, a significant hematoma, and proximity of the fracture fragment are relative indications. Controversial issues in the management of combined orthopedic and vascular injuries include the use of internal versus external fixation, the use of prosthetic versus autogenous material, and the need for venous reconstruction. Popliteal artery trauma is still associated with a high limb loss rate, and careful evaluation of knee injuries is necessary. Vascular compromise may also complicate joint replacement surgery. These complications are preventable, and management is greatly simplified by a detailed preoperative evaluation.

  14. Enhanced Recovery after Vascular Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milena D. Stojanovic

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The beginnings of the enhanced recovery after surgery (ERAS program were first developed for patients in colorectal surgery, and after it was established as the standard of care in this surgical field, it began to be applied in many others surgical areas. This is multimodal, evidence-based approach program and includes simultaneous optimization of preoperative status of patients, adequate selection of surgical procedure and postoperative management. The aim of this program is to reduce complications, the length of hospital stay and to improve the patients outcome. Over the past decades, special attention was directed to the postoperative management in vascular surgery, especially after major vascular surgery because of the great risk of multiorgan failure, such as: respiratory failure, myocardial infarction, hemodynamic instability, coagulopathy, renal failure, neurological disorders, and intra-abdominal complications. Although a lot of effort was put into it, there is no unique acceptable program for ERAS in this surgical field, and there is still a need to point out the factors responsible for postoperative outcomes of these patients. So far, it is known that special attention should be paid to already existing diseases, type and the duration of the surgical intervention, hemodynamic and fluid management, nutrition, pain management, and early mobilization of patients.

  15. Recruiting women to vascular surgery and other surgical specialties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dageforde, Leigh Anne; Kibbe, Melina; Jackson, Gretchen Purcell

    2013-01-01

    Vascular surgery is a subspecialty that attracts future surgeons with challenging technical procedures and complex decision making. Despite its appeal, continued promotion of the field is necessary to recruit and retain the best and brightest candidates. Recruitment of medical students and residents may be limited by the lifestyle inherent to vascular surgery and the length of residency training. The young adults of the current applicant and resident pool differ from prior generations in their desire for hands-on mentoring, aspirations to affect change daily, a penchant for technology, and strong emphasis on work-life balance. Furthermore, the percentage of women pursuing careers in vascular surgery is not representative of the eligible workforce. Women are now the majority of graduates in all of higher education, and thus, vascular surgery may need to make a concerted effort to appeal to women in order to attract the most talented young professionals to the field. Recruiting strategies for both men and women of Generation Y should target a diverse group of potential candidates with an awareness of the unique characteristics and needs of this generation of rising surgeons. Copyright © 2013 Society for Vascular Surgery. All rights reserved.

  16. Vascular Trauma Operative Experience is Inadequate in General Surgery Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Huan; Maximus, Steven; Koopmann, Matthew; Keeley, Jessica; Smith, Brian; Virgilio, Christian de; Kim, Dennis Y

    2016-05-01

    Vascular injuries may be challenging, particularly for surgeons who have not received formal vascular surgery fellowship training. Lack of experience and improper technique can result in significant complications. The objective of this study was to examine changes in resident experience with operative vascular trauma over time. A retrospective review was performed using Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) case logs of general surgery residents graduating between 2004 and 2014 at 2 academic, university-affiliated institutions associated with level 1 trauma centers. The primary outcome was number of reported vascular trauma operations, stratified by year of graduation and institution. A total of 112 residents graduated in the study period with a median 7 (interquartile range 4.5-13.5) vascular trauma cases per resident. Fasciotomy and exposure and/or repair of peripheral vessels constituted the bulk of the operative volume. Linear regression showed no significant trend in cases with respect to year of graduation (P = 0.266). Residents from program A (n = 53) reported a significantly higher number of vascular trauma cases when compared with program B (n = 59): 12.0 vs. 5.0 cases, respectively (P < 0.001). Level 1 trauma center verification does not guarantee sufficient exposure to vascular trauma. The operative exposure in program B is reflective of the national average of 4.0 cases per resident as reported by the ACGME, and this trend is unlikely to change in the near future. Fellowship training may be critical for surgeons who plan to work in a trauma setting, particularly in areas lacking vascular surgeons. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Cosmetic Surgery Training in Plastic Surgery Residency Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNichols, Colton H L; Diaconu, Silviu; Alfadil, Sara; Woodall, Jhade; Grant, Michael; Lifchez, Scott; Nam, Arthur; Rasko, Yvonne

    2017-09-01

    Over the past decade, plastic surgery programs have continued to evolve with the addition of 1 year of training, increase in the minimum number of required aesthetic cases, and the gradual replacement of independent positions with integrated ones. To evaluate the impact of these changes on aesthetic training, a survey was sent to residents and program directors. A 37 question survey was sent to plastic surgery residents at all Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education-approved plastic surgery training programs in the United States. A 13 question survey was sent to the program directors at the same institutions. Both surveys were analyzed to determine the duration of training and comfort level with cosmetic procedures. Eighty-three residents (10%) and 11 program directors (11%) completed the survey. Ninety-four percentage of residents had a dedicated cosmetic surgery rotation (an increase from 68% in 2015) in addition to a resident cosmetic clinic. Twenty percentage of senior residents felt they would need an aesthetic surgery fellowship to practice cosmetic surgery compared with 31% in 2015. Integrated chief residents were more comfortable performing cosmetic surgery cases compared with independent chief residents. Senior residents continue to have poor confidence with facial aesthetic and body contouring procedures. There is an increase in dedicated cosmetic surgery rotations and fewer residents believe they need a fellowship to practice cosmetic surgery. However, the comfort level of performing facial aesthetic and body contouring procedures remains low particularly among independent residents.

  18. Near-infraread spectroscopy during peripheral vascular surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schroeder, Torben Veith; Eiberg, Jonas Peter; Vogt, Katja

    1997-01-01

    Original,Near-infraread spectroscopy,Vascular disease,Vascular by-pass surgery,Perioperative oxymetry......Original,Near-infraread spectroscopy,Vascular disease,Vascular by-pass surgery,Perioperative oxymetry...

  19. Bypass materials in vascular surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Willich, Stephan N.

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Arteriosclerotic changes can lead to circulatory disturbances in various areas of the human vascular system. In addition to pharmacological therapy and the management of risk factors (e. g. hypertension, diabetes, lipid metabolism disorders, and lifestyle, surgical interventions also play an important role in the treatment of arteriosclerosis. Long-segment arterial occlusions, in particular, can be treated successfully with bypass sur-gery. A number of different materials are available for this type of operation, such as autologous vein or pros-thetic grafts comprised of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE or Dacron®. Prosthetic materials are used especially in the treatment of peripheral artery disease, such as in aortoiliac or femoropopliteal bypass surgery. The present report will thus focus on this area in order to examine the effectiveness of different bypass materials. Among the efforts being made to refine the newly introduced DRG system in Germany, analysing the different bypass materials used in vascular surgery is particularly important. Indeed, in its current version the German DRG system does not distinguish between bypass materials in terms of reimbursement rates. Differences in cost structures are thus of especial interest to hospitals in their budget calculations, whereas both private and statutory health insurance funds are primarily interested in long-term results and their costs. Objectives: The goal of this HTA is to compare the different bypass materials used in vascular surgery in terms of their medical efficiency and cost-effectiveness, as well as with regard to their ethical, social and legal implications. In addition, this report aims to point out the areas in which further medical, epidemiological and health economic research is still needed. Methods: Relevant publications were identified by means of a structured search of databases accessed through the German Institute of Medical Documentation and Information

  20. Surgery resident learning styles and academic achievement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contessa, Jack; Ciardiello, Kenneth A; Perlman, Stacie

    2005-01-01

    To determine if surgical residents share a preferred learning style as measured by Kolb's Learning Style Inventory (LSI) and if a relationship exists between resident learning style and achievement as measured by a standardized examination (AME). Also, core faculty learning styles were assessed to determine if faculty and residents share a preferred learning style. Kolb's LSI, Version 3, was administered to 16 surgical residents and the residency program's core faculty of 6 attending physicians. To measure academic achievement, the American Medical Education (AME) examination was administered to residents. The Hospital of Saint Raphael, General Surgery Residency Program, New Haven, Connecticut. Both instruments were administered to residents during protected core curriculum time. Core faculty were administered the LSI on an individual basis. Surgical residents of the Hospital of Saint Raphael's General Surgery Residency Program and 6 core faculty members Analysis of resident learning style preference revealed Converging as the most commonly occurring style for residents (7) followed by Accommodating (5), Assimilating (3), and Diverging (1). The predominant learning style for core faculty was also Converging (4) with 2 Divergers. The average score for the Convergers on the AME was 62.6 compared with 42 for the next most frequently occurring learning style, Accommodators. In this surgical residency program, a preferred learning style for residents seems to exist (Converging), which confirms what previous studies have found. Additionally, residents with this learning style attained a higher average achievement score as measured by the AME. Also, core faculty share the same preferential learning style as this subset of residents.

  1. General Surgery Resident Satisfaction on Cardiothoracic Rotations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lussiez, Alisha; Bevins, Jack; Plaska, Andrew; Rosin, Vadim; Reddy, Rishindra M

    2016-01-01

    General surgery residents' exposure to cardiothoracic (CT) surgery rotations has decreased, which may affect resident satisfaction. We surveyed general surgery graduates to assess the relationships among rotation satisfaction, CT disease exposure, rotation length, mentorship, and mistreatment. A survey assessing CT curriculum, exposure, mentorship, and satisfaction was forwarded to general surgery graduates from 17 residency programs. A Wilcoxon rank-sum test was used to assess statistical significance of ordinal level data. Statistical significance was defined as p surgery residency programs who graduated between the years of 1999 to 2014. A total of 94 responses were completed and received. Receiving adequate exposure to CT procedures and disease management was significantly associated with higher satisfaction ratings for all procedures, particularly thoracotomy incisions (p Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. The quality of aesthetic surgery training in plastic surgery residency: a survey among residents in Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Momeni, Arash; Goerke, Sebastian M; Bannasch, Holger; Arkudas, Andreas; Stark, G Björn

    2013-06-01

    The importance of providing high-quality exposure and training in aesthetic and reconstructive surgery during residency has come to the forefront of plastic surgery education. Adequate training in aesthetic surgery, however, has traditionally been challenging. The authors were interested in how these challenges were met abroad. A 17-item online survey was developed to assess the quality of training in aesthetic surgery in Germany. The survey had 3 distinct sections: demographic information, current state of aesthetic surgery training, and residents' opinions about the perceived quality of aesthetic surgery training. Only responses of senior residents were included in the final analysis. A total of 112 residents responded (30% response rate), of which 88 were senior plastic surgery residents. Ninety percent (n = 79) reported that a resident aesthetic surgery clinic was not part of their training experience. Eighty-eight percent (n = 77) reported that they did not have a dedicated aesthetic surgery rotation during their residency training. According to 69.3% (n = 61), no didactic training in aesthetic surgery was provided. Fifty-six percent (n = 49) of senior plastic surgery residents had performed only a maximum of 10 aesthetic surgery procedures at the time of the survey. Although only 43.2% of senior residents claimed to be interested in a predominantly aesthetic surgery practice, 90.9% (n = 80) felt that they require further training in aesthetic surgery (ie, fellowship). Deficiencies exist with respect to aesthetic surgery training among senior plastic surgery residents in Germany. Structural improvements in residency training with formal exposure and teaching in aesthetic surgery are warranted. The German Society of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons is actively addressing deficiencies identified with the goal of improving the quality of training.

  3. Reconstructive vascular surgery below the knee

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, L B; Jelnes, R; Sager, P

    1986-01-01

    In a series of 38 consecutive patients with advanced peripheral vascular disease (i.e. rest pain) reconstructive vascular surgery was performed with the distal anastomosis below the knee. Ankle/arm pressure index (AAI) was 0.28 (0.11-0.47) preoperatively; accumulated graft patency rate was 0.47 (SD...

  4. Update on cardiothoracic surgery resident job opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooke, David T; Kerendi, Faraz; Mettler, Brett A; Boffa, Daniel J; Mehall, John R; Merrill, Walter H; Higgins, Robert S D

    2010-06-01

    Concerns regarding ample employment opportunities for graduating cardiothoracic surgery residents may affect perceptions of the field and recruitment into residency programs. We present the results of the Thoracic Surgery Residents Association/Thoracic Surgery Directors Association (TSRA/TSDA) 2008 Resident Survey, and compare them with the 2007 TSRA/TSDA survey and the 2006 interim report of the Society of Thoracic Surgeons Task Force on Job Opportunities. In April 2008, the TSRA/TSDA conducted an anonymous survey, linked to the cardiothoracic surgery resident online In-training Exam, with questions germane to resident job seeking and perceptions of the specialty. Results were compared with resident surveys from 2007 and 2006. Response rates for the 2008 and 2007 surveys were 100%, and 54.2% for 2006. Of graduating residents looking for employment, 61.6% had one or more job offers, compared with 64.6% and 83.5% from the 2007 and 2006 surveys, respectively. Of the respondents completing their job search, 24.5% entered private practice and 26.3% academia, compared with 12.1% and 30.1%, respectively, in the 2007 survey. Overall, 57.7% of all respondents had more than $50,000 education-related debt, compared with 54.2% of 2007 respondents. However, 71.5% of all 2008 respondents would recommend cardiothoracic surgery to a potential trainee, compared with 63.7% and 46.0% from 2007 and 2006 survey respondents, respectively. The 2008 survey suggests that although the majority of respondents found employment on completing residency, the percentage is less than 65%, reinforcing a need for formal networking programs or changes in residency training. Despite continued limited employment opportunities, resident impressions of cardiothoracic surgery have improved from 2006 to 2008. 2010 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. SAJS 1050 - Vascular surgery.indd

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Vascular Surgery. SAJS. Three randomised controlled trials have shown a significant reduction in peri-operative mortality when comparing endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) with ... surgery poses an unacceptably high risk to them, but unfavourable ... All patients who underwent elective AUI with FFBP for abdominal.

  6. Perioperative smoking cessation in vascular surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kehlet, M.; Heesemann, Sabine; Tonnesen, H.

    2015-01-01

    Background: The effect of intensive smoking cessation programs on postoperative complications has never before been assessed in soft tissue surgery when smoking cessation is initiated on the day of surgery. Methods: A single-blinded randomized clinical trial conducted at two vascular surgery...... departments in Denmark. The intervention group was offered the Gold Standard Program (GSP) for smoking cessation intervention. The control group was offered the departments' standard care. Inclusion criteria were patients with planned open peripheral vascular surgery and who were daily smokers. According...... intervention and 21 as controls. There was no difference in 30-day complication rates or 6-week abstinence rates between the two groups. Conclusions: A trial assessing the effect of smoking cessation on postoperative complications on the day of soft tissue surgery is still needed. If another trial...

  7. Emotional intelligence in orthopedic surgery residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Kevin; Petrisor, Brad; Bhandari, Mohit

    2014-04-01

    Emotional intelligence (EI) is the ability to understand and manage emotions in oneself and others. It was originally popularized in the business literature as a key attribute for success that was distinct from cognitive intelligence. Increasing focus is being placed on EI in medicine to improve clinical and academic performance. Despite the proposed benefits, to our knowledge, there have been no previous studies on the role of EI in orthopedic surgery. We evaluated baseline data on EI in a cohort of orthopedic surgery residents. We asked all orthopedic surgery residents at a single institution to complete an electronic version of the Mayer-Salovey-Caruso Emotional Intelligence Test (MSCEIT). We used completed questionnaires to calculate total EI scores and 4 branch scores. Data were analyzed according to a priori cutoff values to determine the proportion of residents who were considered competent on the test. Data were also analyzed for possible associations with age, sex, race and level of training. Thirty-nine residents (100%) completed the MSCEIT. The mean total EI score was 86 (maximum score 145). Only 4 (10%) respondents demonstrated competence in EI. Junior residents (p = 0.026), Caucasian residents (p = 0.009) and those younger than 30 years (p = 0.008) had significantly higher EI scores. Our findings suggest that orthopedic residents score low on EI based on the MSCEIT. Optimizing resident competency in noncognitive skills may be enhanced by dedicated EI education, training and testing.

  8. [Vascular complications associated with lumbar spinal surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riedemann-Wistuba, M; Alonso-Pérez, M; Llaneza-Coto, J M

    2016-01-01

    Although there are currently less invasive techniques available for the treatment of spinal injuries, open surgery is still required in many cases. Vascular injuries occurring during lumbar spine surgery, although uncommon, are of great importance due to their potential gravity. Clinical manifestations vary from an acute hemorrhagic shock that needs urgent treatment to save the patient's life, to insidious injuries or an asymptomatic evolution, and should be studied to choose the best therapeutic alternative. Four cases are reported that represent this range of possibilities and emphasize the importance of a careful surgical technique during lumbar spine interventions, and the need for high clinical suspicion, essential for the early diagnosis of these vascular complications. The current therapeutic options are also discussed. Copyright © 2014 SECOT. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  9. Desktop Database Management in Vascular Surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Lewis, H. Michael; Wheeler, Jock R.; Gregory, Roger T.

    1980-01-01

    A low-cost patient database management system has been developed using a microcomputer for use in a vascular surgery practice. The system is self-instructional, and is designed for use by physicians and/or clerical personnel without specialized training. Although the program is written in BASIC major modifications in the database as well as user-defined database searches are made in English. The database represents over 4100 operations on 2500 patients over 13 years. Factors influencing the s...

  10. [Vascular injuries in joint replacement surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novotný, K; Pádr, R; Landor, I; Sosna, A

    2011-01-01

    Iatrogenic injuries to blood vessels in joint replacement surgery are rare events that occur as few per thousand. However, their sequelae are serious. The patient may either bleed to death, because vascular injury is not obvious and therefore difficult to diagnose, or lose the limb due to ischaemia. The highest risk of vascular injury is associated with repeat surgery and loosening of the acetabular component. We distinguish sharp and blunt force injuries. The former are caused by implants, sharp instruments, bone fragments or bone cement debris. The latter arise from stretching over a part of implanted material. Bleeding can be inapparent or apparent. Inapparent bleeding is difficult to diagnose and is recognized from the dynamics of blood losses. Haemodynamic instability or, in a worse case, even hypovolaemic shock may be the only signs of bleeding. Occlusion of an artery is manifested by limb ischaemia. The seriousness and progression of ischaemia depends on the rate of arterial occlusion, potential pathways for collateral circulation and the degree of atherosclerotic vascular disease. The patient with conduction anaesthesia does not feel pain and therefore the diagnosis must primarily be based on arterial pulsation in the limb and its skin colour. A pseudoaneurysm can develop due to a partially weakened vascular wall and its rupture is a life-threatening complication. Its presence is recognized as a pulsating mass in the groin. An arterio- venous fistula which arises from traumatic communication between the two vessels may lead to cardiac failure. The diagnosis is based on examination by sonography and digital subtraction angiography. The results of CT angiography and MR angiography are difficult to evaluate because of the presence of metal implants. In apparent bleeding it is sometimes difficult to locate the source. It is recommended to perform digital compression and gain access to the vessels from the extraperitoneal approach. When an expanding haematoma or

  11. Vascular surgery research in the Gulf Cooperation Council countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Jawas

    2014-04-01

    Conclusion: The quality and quantity of vascular surgery research in the GCC countries should be improved to answer important local questions related to vascular diseases. This needs better strategic planning and more collaboration between various institutions.

  12. Urologic surgery laparoscopic access: vascular complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branco, Anibal Wood

    2017-01-01

    Vascular injury in accidental punctures may occur in large abdominal vessels, it is known that 76% of injuries occur during the development of pneumoperitoneum. The aim of this video is to demonstrate two cases of vascular injury occurring during access in laparoscopic urologic surgery. The first case presents a 60-year old female patient with a 3cm tumor in the superior pole of the right kidney who underwent a laparoscopic partial nephrectomy. After the Verres needle insertion, output of blood was verified. During the evaluation of the cavity, a significant hematoma in the inferior vena cava was noticed. After the dissection, a lesion in the inferior vena cava was identified and controlled with a prolene suture, the estimated bloos loss was 300ml. The second case presents a 42-year old female live donor patient who had her right kidney selected to laparoscopic live donor nephrectomy. After the insertion of the first trocar, during the introduction of the 10mm scope, an active bleeding from the mesentery was noticed. The right colon was dissected and an inferior vena cava perforation was identified; a prolene suture was used to control the bleeding, the estimated blood loss was 200mL, in both cases the patients had no previous abdominal surgery. Urologists must be aware of this uncommon, serious, and potentially lethal complication. Once recognized and in the hands of experienced surgeons, some lesions may be repaired laparoscopically. Whenever in doubt, the best alternative is the immediate conversion to open surgery to minimize morbidity and mortality. Copyright® by the International Brazilian Journal of Urology.

  13. Disparities in Aesthetic Procedures Performed by Plastic Surgery Residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvestre, Jason; Serletti, Joseph M; Chang, Benjamin

    2017-05-01

    Operative experience in aesthetic surgery is an important issue affecting plastic surgery residents. This study addresses the variability of aesthetic surgery experience during plastic surgery residency. National operative case logs of chief residents in independent/combined and integrated plastic surgery residency programs were analyzed (2011-2015). Fold differences between the bottom and top 10th percentiles of residents were calculated for each aesthetic procedure category and training model. The number of residents not achieving case minimums was also calculated. Case logs of 818 plastic surgery residents were analyzed. There was marked variability in craniofacial (range, 6.0-15.0), breast (range, 2.4-5.9), trunk/extremity (range, 3.0-16.0), and miscellaneous (range, 2.7-22.0) procedure categories. In 2015, the bottom 10th percentile of integrated and independent/combined residents did not achieve case minimums for botulinum toxin and dermal fillers. Case minimums were achieved for the other aesthetic procedure categories for all graduating years. Significant variability persists for many aesthetic procedure categories during plastic surgery residency training. Greater efforts may be needed to improve the aesthetic surgery experience of plastic surgery residents.

  14. Vascular medicine and surgery in ancient Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barr, Justin

    2014-07-01

    Lauded alike by ancient civilizations and modern society, pharaonic Egyptian medicine remains an object of fascination today. This article discusses its surprisingly sophisticated understanding of a cardiovascular system. The term "cardiovascular system," however, carries assumptions and meanings to a modern audience, especially readers of this journal, which simply do not apply when considering ancient conceptions of the heart and vessels. For lack of better language, this article will use "cardiovascular" and similar terms while recognizing the anachronistic inaccuracy. After briefly summarizing ancient Egyptian medicine generally, it will review the anatomy, pathology, and treatment of the vasculature. The practice of mummification in ancient Egypt provides a unique opportunity for paleopathology, and the conclusion will explore evidence of arterial disease from a modern scientific perspective. Copyright © 2014 Society for Vascular Surgery. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Cosmetic surgery training in Canadian plastic surgery residencies: are we training competent surgeons?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chivers, Quinton J; Ahmad, Jamil; Lista, Frank; Warren, Richard J; Arkoubi, Amr Y; Mahabir, Raman C; Murray, Kenneth A; Islur, Avinash

    2013-01-01

    With the demand for cosmetic surgery continuing to rise, it is necessary to reevaluate the current state of cosmetic surgery training during plastic surgery residency. An evaluation of cosmetic surgery training in US plastic surgery residency programs in 2006 identified several areas for improvement, resulting in changes to both the duration and content of training. The authors assess the current state of cosmetic surgery training in Canadian plastic surgery residency programs. A paper survey of all graduating Canadian plastic surgery residents eligible to complete the 2009 Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada fellowship examinations was performed (N = 29). The survey was conducted primarily at the Canadian Plastic Surgery Review Course in February 2009, with surveys collected from absent residents by e-mail within 1 month after the course. The survey covered 2 broad areas: (1) specifics regarding resident cosmetic surgery training and (2) confidence and satisfaction associated with this experience. Of the 29 residents surveyed, 28 responded (96%). The majority of Canadian plastic surgery residency programs (75%) have a designated cosmetic surgery rotation, but 90% of respondents felt it has become increasingly difficult to gain exposure to cosmetic procedures as most are performed at private surgery centers. Elective rotations at cosmetic surgery practices and resident cosmetic clinics were considered the most beneficial for cosmetic surgery education. Residents considered cosmetic surgery procedures of the face (such as rhinoplasty and facelift) more challenging, but they had more confidence with breast and body contouring procedures. Canadian plastic surgery residency programs need to ensure that residents continue to receive comprehensive exposure to both surgical and nonsurgical cosmetic procedures to ensure our specialty's continued leadership in this evolving and highly competitive field. A multidimensional approach utilizing a variety of

  16. Cell based therapeutic approach in vascular surgery: application and review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rocca Aldo

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Multipotent stem cells - such as mesenchymal stem/stromal cells and stem cells derived from different sources like vascular wall are intensely studied to try to rapidly translate their discovered features from bench to bedside. Vascular wall resident stem cells recruitment, differentiation, survival, proliferation, growth factor production, and signaling pathways transduced were analyzed. We studied biological properties of vascular resident stem cells and explored the relationship from several factors as Matrix Metalloproteinases (MMPs and regulations of biological, translational and clinical features of these cells. In this review we described a translational and clinical approach to Adult Vascular Wall Resident Multipotent Vascular Stem Cells (VW-SCs and reported their involvement in alternative clinical approach as cells based therapy in vascular disease like arterial aneurysms or peripheral arterial obstructive disease.

  17. Perception does not equal reality for resident vascular trauma skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowyer, Mark W; Shackelford, Stacy A; Garofalo, Evan; Pugh, Kristy; Mackenzie, Colin F

    2015-10-01

    Experience with the management of vascular trauma by senior surgical residents is increasingly limited. When queried about their understanding of anatomy and ability to perform specific vascular exposures, residents express a moderately high level of confidence. We hypothesized that this perception does not equal reality. A total of 42 senior surgical residents participating in an ongoing validation study of the Advanced Surgical Skills for Exposures in Trauma course were asked to self-assess their baseline (precourse) confidence of their understanding of the anatomy required to perform and their ability to perform exposure and control of the axillary, brachial, and femoral arteries, as well as lower extremity fasciotomy using a 5-point Likert scale. Residents then performed the four procedures on a fresh cadaver model and were scored in real time by experts using a global assessment of anatomic knowledge and readiness to perform." The Student t-test was used with α set at P Perception clearly does not equal reality in preparing these trainees to perform as advertized. The low global scores for anatomy and performance should be a wake-up call for surgical educators prompting curricular reform and evaluation. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  18. National efforts to reform residency education in surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sachdeva, Ajit K; Bell, Richard H; Britt, L D; Tarpley, John L; Blair, Patrice Gabler; Tarpley, Margaret J

    2007-12-01

    Major changes in surgical practice and myriad external mandates have affected residency education in surgery. The traditional surgery residency education and training model has come under scrutiny, and calls for major reform of this model have been made by a variety of stakeholders. The American Surgical Association appointed a Blue Ribbon Committee in 2002 to consider the recent changes in surgical practice and surgical education and propose solutions that would ensure a well-educated and well-trained surgical workforce for the future. This committee included representatives from the American Surgical Association, the American College of Surgeons, the American Board of Surgery, and the Residency Review Committee for Surgery. The committee made several far-reaching recommendations relating to residency education in surgery. After the Blue Ribbon Committee completed its task in 2004, representatives from the aforementioned four organizations, the Association of Program Directors in Surgery, and the Association for Surgical Education created a national consortium called the Surgical Council on Resident Education (SCORE). This consortium is pursuing efforts to reform residency education in surgery and implement several key recommendations of the Blue Ribbon Committee. The principal area of focus of SCORE is the development of a national curriculum for surgery residency education and training. Other activities of SCORE include the development of a Web site to support surgery residency education and pursuit of international collaboration. SCORE's efforts will be key to offering surgery residents the best educational experiences, preparing residents for future practice, and supporting delivery of surgical care of the highest quality. The authors examine the current state of residency education in surgery and explore efforts underway to reform this educational model.

  19. Implementing a resident acute care surgery service: Improving resident education and patient care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kantor, Olga; Schneider, Andrew B; Rojnica, Marko; Benjamin, Andrew J; Schindler, Nancy; Posner, Mitchell C; Matthews, Jeffrey B; Roggin, Kevin K

    2017-03-01

    To simulate the duties and responsibilities of an attending surgeon and allow senior residents more intraoperative and perioperative autonomy, our program created a new resident acute care surgery consult service. We structured resident acute care surgery as a new admitting and inpatient consult service managed by chief and senior residents with attending supervision. When appropriate, the chief resident served as a teaching assistant in the operation. Outcomes were recorded prospectively and reviewed at weekly quality improvement conferences. The following information was collected: (1) teaching assistant case logs for senior residents preimplentation (n = 10) and postimplementation (n = 5) of the resident acute care surgery service; (2) data on the proportion of each case performed independently by residents; (3) resident evaluations of the resident acute care surgery versus other general operative services; (4) consult time for the first 12 months of the service (June 2014 to June 2015). During the first year after implementation, the number of total teaching assistant cases logged among graduating chief residents increased from a mean of 13.4 ± 13.0 (range 4-44) for preresident acute care surgery residents to 30.8 ± 8.8 (range 27-36) for postresident acute care surgery residents (P surgery (n = 27) in comparison with other general operative services (n = 127). In addition, creation of a 1-team consult service resulted in a more streamlined consult process with average consult time of 22 minutes for operative consults and 25 minutes for nonoperative consults (range 5-90 minutes). The implementation of a resident acute care surgery service has increased resident autonomy, teaching assistant cases, and satisfaction with operative case variety, as well as the efficiency of operative consultation at our institution. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Operative experience of surgery residents: trends and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malangoni, Mark A; Biester, Thomas W; Jones, Andrew T; Klingensmith, Mary E; Lewis, Frank R

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate trends in operative experience and to determine the effect of establishing the Surgical Council on Resident Education (SCORE) operative classification system on changes in operative volume among graduating surgery residents. The general surgery operative logs of graduating surgery residents from 2005 were retrospectively compared with residents who completed training in 2010 and 2011. Nonparametric statistical analyses were used (Mann-Whitney and median test) with significance set at psurgical residents has increased by 21% since 2005; however, the number of operations done 10 times or greater has not changed. Although open cavitary procedures continue to decline, there has been a large increase in endoscopy, complex laparoscopic, and other major operations. Some essential-common operations continue to be performed infrequently. These results suggest that education in the operating room must improve and alternate methods for teaching infrequently performed procedures are needed. © 2013 Published by Association of Program Directors in Surgery on behalf of Association of Program Directors in Surgery.

  1. Residents' Perceptions of Plastic Surgeons as Craniofacial Surgery Specialists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denadai, Rafael; Muraro, Carlos Alberto Salomão; Raposo-Amaral, Cassio Eduardo

    2015-11-01

    To assess residents' perceptions of plastic surgeons as craniofacial surgery specialists in Brazil. Brazilian residents were asked to choose 1 or 2 specialists that they perceived to be an expert for 14 craniofacial surgery-related scenarios. Both an overall analysis (all 14 scenarios) and subanalysis (each scenario separately) were performed. Response patterns were distributed as "plastic surgeons alone," "plastic surgeons combined with other specialists," or "without plastic surgeons." Overall, plastic surgeons were chosen more (all P plastic surgeons were chosen more (all P surgery-related scenarios and also demonstrated that "plastic surgeons alone" and "without plastic surgeons" were selected more (all P surgery residents and male residents chose more (all P plastic surgeons as experts than their peers. Residents' perceptions of plastic surgeons as craniofacial surgery specialists are limited in Brazil.

  2. Plastic surgery chief resident clinics: the current state of affairs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neaman, Keith C; Hill, Brian C; Ebner, Ben; Ford, Ronald D

    2010-08-01

    One of the goals of plastic surgery residency programs is to provide effective training in aesthetic surgery. Recently, programs have adopted the idea of chief clinics to provide senior residents with the opportunity to perform cosmetic surgery with an increased level of autonomy. The goal of this article is to characterize chief clinics currently in place and their usefulness in providing effective training in plastic surgery under the precepts set forth by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education. A survey was created focusing on six broad categories: respondent identifier, clinic structure, clinic monetary earnings, patient demographics, procedures, and educational utility. Surveys were distributed to all plastic surgery residency programs targeting current and recently graduated chief residents, and program directors. A total of 123 surveys were returned. Eighty of the 88 plastic surgery residency programs (91 percent) were represented. Of the programs responding, 71.3 percent (57 programs) had a chief resident clinic. Thirty-two of the respondents (43.8 percent) reported that 100 percent of the procedures performed were cosmetic in nature. Programs differed widely on their frequency of occurrence and support staff available. A majority of respondents felt these clinics enhanced resident understanding of the six Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education core competencies. A majority of plastic surgery training programs use the chief clinic model to enhance resident education. These clinics vary in makeup and case distribution but serve as an effective way of teaching autonomy, surgical maturity, and the six Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education core competencies.

  3. Endovascular Management of Vascular Injury during Transsphenoidal Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cinar, C; Bozkaya, H; Parildar, M; Oran, I

    2013-03-01

    Vascular injury is an unusual and serious complication of transsphenoidal surgery. We aimed to define the role of angiography and endovascular treatment in patients with vascular injuries occurring during transsphenoidal surgery. During the last ten-year period, we retrospectively evaluated nine patients with vascular injury after transsphenoidal surgery. Eight patients were symptomatic due to vascular injury, while one had only suspicion of vascular injury during surgery. Four patients presented with epistaxis, two with subarachnoid hemorrhage, one with exophthalmos, and one with hemiparesia. Emergency angiography revealed a pseudoaneurysm in four patients, contrast extravasation in two, vessel dissection in one, vessel wall irregularity in one, and arteriovenous fistula in one. All patients but one were treated successfully with parent artery occlusion, with one covered stent implantation, one stent-assisted coiling method, while one patient was managed conservatively. One patient died due to complications related to the primary insult without rebleeding. Vascular injuries suspected intra or postoperatively must be investigated rapidly after transsphenoidal surgery. Endovascular treatment with parent artery occlusion is feasible with acceptable morbidity and mortality rates in the treatment of vascular injuries occurring in transsphenoidal surgery.

  4. A National Survey on Teaching and Assessing Technical Proficiency in Vascular Surgery in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drudi, Laura; Hossain, Sajjid; Mackenzie, Kent S; Corriveau, Marc-Michel; Abraham, Cherrie Z; Obrand, Daniel I; Vassiliou, Melina; Gill, Heather; Steinmetz, Oren K

    2016-05-01

    This survey aims to explore trainees' perspectives on how Canadian vascular surgery training programs are using simulation in teaching and assessing technical skills through a cross-sectional national survey. A 10-min online questionnaire was sent to Program Directors of Canada's Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons' of Canada approved training programs in vascular surgery. This survey was distributed among residents and fellows who were studying in the 2013-2014 academic year. Twenty-eight (58%) of the 48 Canadian vascular surgery trainees completed the survey. A total of 68% of the respondents were part of the 0 + 5 integrated vascular surgery training program. The use of simulation in the assessment of technical skills at the beginning of training was reported by only 3 (11%) respondents, whereas 43% reported that simulation was used in their programs in the assessment of technical skills at some time during their training. Training programs most often provided simulation as a method of teaching and learning endovascular abdominal aortic or thoracic aneurysm repair (64%). Furthermore, 96% of trainees reported the most common resource to learn and enhance technical skills was dialog with vascular surgery staff. Surveyed vascular surgery trainees in Canada report that simulation is rarely used as a tool to assess baseline technical skills at the beginning of training. Less than half of surveyed trainees in vascular surgery programs in Canada report that simulation is being used for skills acquisition. Currently, in Canadian training programs, simulation is most commonly used to teach endovascular skills. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. [The da Vinci robot in the field of vascular surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Štádler, P; Dvořáček, L; Vitásek, P; Matouš, P

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical experience with 379 robot-assisted vascular procedures performed from November 2005 to December 2016 at our institution. A total of 366 cases (96.6%) were successfully completed using the robotic surgical systems da Vinci Standard and da Vinci Xi. Conversion was necessary in 13 patients (3.4%). The 30-day mortality was 0.26% and 2 (0.5%) late prosthetic infections occurred. From a practical point of view, the greatest advantage of robot-assisted procedures has been the speed and relative simplicity of vascular anastomosis construction. Our experience with robot-assisted surgery has demonstrated the safety and feasibility of this technique in different areas of vascular surgery.Key words: robotic vascular surgery aortic and non-aortic surgery.

  6. Improving cost efficiency on a vascular surgery service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skillman, J J; Paras, C; Rosen, M; Davis, R B; Kim, D; Kent, K C

    2000-03-01

    A vascular task force (VTF) consisting of two vascular surgeons and other key personnel was established to reduce costs and improve efficiency in the management of patients on a vascular surgery service. The VTF met monthly beginning in 1994 to study and implement changes in the management of patients with (1) abdominal vascular, (2), carotid endarterectomy (3) distal bypass, and (4) other vascular procedures, including amputations. Length of stay, and fixed and variable costs were assessed for change over time using Pearson correlation coefficients. Improvements in efficiency (length of stay) and decreases in costs (fixed and variable costs) from fiscal year 1993 to fiscal year 1996 were significant for the total group of vascular patients (P Management of distal bypass and other vascular surgery patients showed less striking improvement. Vascular surgeons in collaboration with other dedicated personnel involved in the care of vascular patients can improve efficiency and reduce costs. Advances were greatest in patients who required operations for carotid and abdominal vascular disorders and least for patients who required distal bypasses and other vascular procedures.

  7. Does general surgery residency prepare surgeons for community practice in British Columbia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Hamish

    2009-06-01

    Preparing surgeons for clinical practice is a challenging task for postgraduate training programs across Canada. The purpose of this study was to examine whether a single surgeon entering practice was adequately prepared by comparing the type and volume of surgical procedures experienced in the last 3 years of training with that in the first year of clinical practice. During the last 3 years of general surgery training, I logged all procedures. In practice, the Medical Services Plan (MSP) of British Columbia tracks all procedures. Using MSP remittance reports, I compiled the procedures performed in my first year of practice. I totaled the number of procedures and broke them down into categories (general, colorectal, laparoscopic, endoscopic, hepatobiliary, oncologic, pediatric, thoracic, vascular and other). I then compared residency training with community practice. I logged a total of 1170 procedures in the last 3 years of residency. Of these, 452 were performed during community rotations. The procedures during residency could be broken down as follows: 392 general, 18 colorectal, 242 laparoscopic, 103 endoscopic, 85 hepatobiliary, 142 oncologic, 1 pediatric, 78 thoracic, 92 vascular and 17 other. I performed a total of 1440 procedures in the first year of practice. In practice the break down was 398 general, 15 colorectal, 101 laparoscopic, 654 endoscopic, 2 hepatobiliary, 77 oncologic, 10 pediatric, 0 thoracic, 70 vascular and 113 other. On the whole, residency provided excellent preparation for clinical practice based on my experience. Areas of potential improvement included endoscopy, pediatric surgery and "other," which comprised mostly hand surgery.

  8. [Training of residents in abdominal wall surgery in Spain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miguelena Bobadilla, J M; Morales García, D; Serra Aracil, X; Sanz Sánchez, M; Iturburu, I; Docobo Durántez, F; Jover Navalón, J M; López De Cenarruzabeitia, I; Lobo Martínez, E

    2013-02-01

    The training of residents in abdominal wall surgery is a fundamental aspect of surgical training, representing globally 20% of its activity. In this paper, we analyze the current state of resident training in this kind of surgery in Spain, taking into account the broad spectrum it covers: general services, specific functional units, ambulatory surgery programs. To do this, based on the specifications of the specialty program, specific data were used from several different sources of direct information and a review of the results obtained by residents in hernia surgery. In general, our residents agree with their training and the recorded results are in line with objectives outlined in the program. However, it would be important to structure their teaching schedules, a rotation period in any specific unit and their involvement in outpatient surgery programs. Copyright © 2011 AEC. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  9. Iatrogenic Vascular Injuries Due to Spinal Surgeries: Endovascular Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gok, Mustafa; Aydin, Elcin; Guneyli, Serkan; Akay, Ali; Cinar, Celal; Oran, Ismail

    2017-01-17

    Iatrogenic vascular injuries due to spinal surgeries are rare but serious complications. Surgical management of these injuries is challenging with high morbidity rates. In this study we aim to present the results of endovascular management of iatrogenic vascular injuries due to spinal surgeries. We retrospectively reviewed 11 patients (5 male, 6 female) who had vascular injuries due to cervical and lumbar spinal surgeries. Clinical findings were bleeding (n=5), leg edema (n=6) and right heart failure with severe dyspnea (n=1). The age range of the patients were between 42-67 (mean: 57.1). Six patients were reviewed with imaging before the procedures and the rest of the patients (n=5) were directly referred to the angiography unit for diagnosis and possible endovascular treatment. The types of surgeries were; cervical surgery (n=5) and lumbar disc operation (n=6). The type of vascular injuries were; vertebral artery stenosis (n=1), vertebral artery pseudoaneurysm (n=3), vertebral artery occlusion (n=1) and iliac arteriovenous fistula (n=6). The type of endovascular treatments were; parent artery occlusion (PAO) (n=2), covered stent graft implantation (n=6) and intrasaccular coil embolization of pseudoaneurysm (n=1). The remaining 2 patients were managed conservatively. No major complications or mortality occured during endovascular interventions. No bleeding or ischemia occured in the follow-up period. Iatrogenic vascular injuries due to spinal surgeries are rare but serious complications. Endovascular interventions are safe and effective in the diagnosis and treatment of such vascular injuries.

  10. Impact of implementation of a pediatric surgery fellowship on general surgery resident operative volume.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, Rebecca A; Phillips, Sharon E; Terhune, Kyla P

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the impact of the initiation of a pediatric surgery fellowship on general surgery resident operative volume at 1 major academic institution. Retrospective review of operative records obtained from the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) general surgery resident and pediatric surgery fellow case logs. Data collected included number and type of pediatric index cases per year, number of total pediatric surgery cases per year, and number of total cases logged as primary surgeon to date. Vanderbilt University School of Medicine Department of Surgery, which has an accredited general surgery program, finishes 7 chief residents per year during the study period, and instituted a new pediatric surgery fellowship in 2007. Case logs submitted by third and fourth year general surgery residents and first and second year pediatric surgery fellows were studied. The number of pediatric attending surgeons, relative value units (RVUs), and hospital admissions increased from 2003 to 2011. The median number of pediatric index cases performed by a resident decreased after the onset of fellowship from 34 cases to 23.5 cases per year (p pediatric surgery rotation also decreased from 74 to 53 cases per year after onset of the fellowship (p surgery resident index and overall case volume in pediatric surgery. Although operative volume is only 1 measure of surgical educational value, these findings suggest that the addition of surgical fellowships affects the educational experience of general surgery residents. We recommend that residency programs establish goals and calculate any potential impact on general surgery resident case volume before initiating a new surgical fellowship. Copyright © 2012 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Career in vascular surgery - the medical student's perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grobelna, Malwina K; Stępak, Hubert; Kołodziejczak, Barbara; Dzieciuchowicz, Łukasz; Oszkinis, Grzegorz

    2017-02-28

    Under the supervision of the Department of General and Vascular Surgery of Poznan University of Medical Sciences, a questionnaire was distributed online or as a paper version to medical students (MSs) in order to better understand the attitudes towards surgery as a specialty and to determine the reasons why students do and do not choose vascular surgery as their career path. The questionnaire was distributed online or as a paper version to MSs in the 3rd, 5th, and 6th year of the PUMS 6-year M.D. It provided the data on the year of study, grade point average (GPA), sex, age, respondent's specialty choice, 33 questions with responses on a 1-5 Likert scale (1 was the least important reason and 5 was the most important reason), and 2 questions with socres between 0 and 4. A total of 136 Polish MSs of PUMS completed the survey. For MSs who choose vascular surgery as their career path, "endovascular capabilities of vascular surgery" and "higher income possibilities than a general surgeon" were the most important reasons. The "poor availability of work in other places than the vascular surgery department of your choice, few such clinics in the region" was the most important reason not to choose vascular surgery. A role of gender was also noted - 13% of male MSs classified gender as an "important factor", in contrast to 60% of female MSs. The findings of this study might help to develop better strategies to attract future trainees to surgical specialties, particularly vascular surgery, and improve work environment.

  12. Effect of minimally invasive surgery fellowship on residents' operative experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altieri, Maria S; Frenkel, Catherine; Scriven, Richard; Thornton, Deborah; Halbert, Caitlin; Talamini, Mark; Telem, Dana A; Pryor, Aurora D

    2017-01-01

    There is an increased need for surgical trainees to acquire advanced laparoscopic skills as laparoscopy becomes the standard of care in many areas of general surgery. Since the introduction of minimally invasive surgery (MIS) fellowships, there has been a continuing debate as to whether these fellowships adversely affect general surgery resident exposure to laparoscopic cases. The aim of our study was to examine whether the introduction of an MIS fellowship negatively impacts general surgery residents' experience at a single academic center. We describe the changes following establishment of MIS fellowship at an academic center. Resident case log system from the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education was queried to obtain all PGY 1-5 resident operative case logs. Two-year time period preceding and following the institution of an MIS fellowship at our institution in 2012 was compared. P values less than 0.05 were considered statistically significant. Following initiation of the MIS fellowship, an MIS service was established. The service comprised of a fellow, midlevel resident, and intern. Operative experience was examined. From 2010-2012 to 2012-2014, residents logged a total of 272 and 585 complex laparoscopic cases, respectively. There were 43 residents from 2010 to 2013 and 44 residents from 2013 to 2014. When the two time periods were compared, a trend of increased numbers for all procedures was noted, except laparoscopic GYN/genito-urinary procedures. Average percent increase in complex general surgery procedures was 249 ± 179.8 %. Following establishment of a MIS fellowship, reported cases by residents were higher or similar to those reported nationally for laparoscopic procedures. Institution of an MIS fellowship had a favorable effect on general surgery resident operative education at a single academic training center. Residents may benefit from the presence of a fellowship at an academic center because they are able to participate in an

  13. Education on the Business of Plastic Surgery During Training: A Survey of Plastic Surgery Residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ovadia, Steven A; Gishen, Kriya; Desai, Urmen; Garcia, Alejandro M; Thaller, Seth R

    2018-02-14

    Entrepreneurial skills are important for physicians, especially plastic surgeons. Nevertheless, these skills are not typically emphasized during residency training. Evaluate the extent of business training at plastic surgery residency programs as well as means of enhancing business training. A 6-question online survey was sent to plastic surgery program directors for distribution to plastic surgery residents. Responses from residents at the PGY2 level and above were included for analysis. Tables were prepared to present survey results. Hundred and sixty-six residents including 147 PGY2 and above residents responded to our survey. Only 43.5% reported inclusion of business training in their plastic surgery residency. A majority of residents reported they do not expect on graduation to be prepared for the business aspects of plastic surgery. Additionally, a majority of residents feel establishment of a formal lecture series on the business of plastic surgery would be beneficial. Results from our survey indicate limited training at plastic surgery programs in necessary business skills. Plastic surgery residency programs should consider incorporating or enhancing elements of business training in their curriculum. This journal requires that authors assign a level of evidence to each article. For a full description of these Evidence-Based Medicine ratings, please refer to the Table of Contents or the online Instructions to Authors www.springer.com/00266 .

  14. Endoscopy training in Canadian general surgery residency programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Nori L; Bazzerelli, Amy; Lim, Jenny; Wu Chao Ying, Valerie; Steigerwald, Sarah; Strickland, Matt

    2015-06-01

    Currently, general surgeons provide about 50% of endoscopy services across Canada and an even greater proportion outside large urban centres. It is essential that endoscopy remain a core component of general surgery practice and a core competency of general surgery residency training. The Canadian Association of General Surgeons Residents Committee supports the position that quality endoscopy training for all Canadian general surgery residents is in the best interest of the Canadian public. However, the means by which quality endoscopy training is achieved has not been defined at a national level. Endoscopy training in Canadian general surgery residency programs requires standardization across the country and improved measurement to ensure that competency and basic credentialing requirements are met.

  15. Training general surgery residents in pediatric surgery: educational value vs time and cost.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Steven L; Sydorak, Roman M; Applebaum, Harry

    2009-01-01

    This study evaluated the educational value of pediatric surgery rotations, the likelihood of performing pediatric operations upon completing general surgery (GS) residency, and time and cost of training GS residents in pediatric surgery. A survey was administered to GS residents that evaluated the pediatric surgery rotation and anticipated practice intentions. A retrospective analysis (2005-2006) of operative times for unilateral inguinal hernia repair, bilateral inguinal hernia repair, and umbilical hernia repair was also performed. Procedure times were compared for operations performed by a pediatric surgeon with and without GS residents. Cost analysis was based on time differences. General surgery residents (n = 19) considered the pediatric surgery rotation to have high educational value (4.7 +/- 0.6 of 5) with extensive teaching (4.6 +/- 0.7) and operative experience (4.4 +/- 0.8). Residents listed pediatric surgery exposure, operative technique, and observed work ethic as most valuable. Upon graduation, residents expect to perform pediatric operations 2 to 3 times annually. Thirty-seven percent of residents felt competent to perform appendectomy (patients >5 years), 32% appendectomy (3-5 years), 21% gastrostomy (>1 year), and 11% inguinal herniorrhaphy (>1 year). Operative times and costs were significantly higher in operative procedures performed with a GS resident. General surgery residents considered pediatric surgery as a valuable educational experience. Residents anticipate performing pediatric operations a few times annually. Training GS residents in pediatric surgery increased operative time and cost. This information may be useful in determining the appropriate setting for resident education as well as budget planning for pediatric surgical practices.

  16. Renal Transplantation as a Platform for Teaching Residents Open Vascular Surgical Techniques: Effects on Early Graft Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grodstein, Elliot I; Little, Christopher; Molmenti, Ernesto P; Mezrich, Joshua D

    2018-01-17

    Over the past decade, increases in vascular fellowships and the use of endovascular technology have decreased the general surgery residents' exposure to open vascular surgery. We sought to elucidate whether renal transplant is a safe way to teach general surgery residents the essential tenants of vascular surgery without adversely affecting early patient outcomes. All solitary, adult deceased donor kidney transplants performed at the University of Wisconsin from 2011 through 2016 were identified and divided into a resident-assist (RA) and fellow-assist cohorts (FA). DGF, defined by the requirement of dialysis within 1 week of transplant, was the primary outcome. Early graft survival and postoperative complications were considered the secondary endpoints. Of the 774 total cases, there were 228 (29.5%) in the RA cohort and 546 (70.5%) in the FA cohort. The RA and FA cohorts had comparable characteristics, except for a nonclinically significant difference in mean donor creatinine (0.96 vs 0.88mg/dL, p = 0.03). RA cases had a similar DGF rate compared to FA cases (25% vs 26%, p = 0.93). Additionally, there was no difference in 2-year graft survival (93.7% vs 95.5%, p = 0.38), nor the rates of graft thromboses (0.4% vs 0.7%, p = 0.65), incisional hernias (0.9% vs 1.8%, p = 0.35), and ureteral strictures (2.2% vs 1.6%, p = 0.55) between the 2 cohorts. Resident involvement in renal transplantation has no effect on DGF and early allograft function. Though the procedural involvement of each resident in a case is variable, it seems to be a safe way to teach retroperitoneal vascular exposure and anastomotic techniques. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  17. How Useful are Orthopedic Surgery Residency Web Pages?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oladeji, Lasun O; Yu, Jonathan C; Oladeji, Afolayan K; Ponce, Brent A

    2015-01-01

    Medical students interested in orthopedic surgery residency positions frequently use the Internet as a modality to gather information about individual residency programs. Students often invest a painstaking amount of time and effort in determining programs that they are interested in, and the Internet is central to this process. Numerous studies have concluded that program websites are a valuable resource for residency and fellowship applicants. The purpose of the present study was to provide an update on the web pages of academic orthopedic surgery departments in the United States and to rate their utility in providing information on quality of education, faculty and resident information, environment, and applicant information. We reviewed existing websites for the 156 departments or divisions of orthopedic surgery that are currently accredited for resident education by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education. Each website was assessed for quality of information regarding quality of education, faculty and resident information, environment, and applicant information. We noted that 152 of the 156 departments (97%) had functioning websites that could be accessed. There was high variability regarding the comprehensiveness of orthopedic residency websites. Most of the orthopedic websites provided information on conference, didactics, and resident rotations. Less than 50% of programs provided information on resident call schedules, resident or faculty research and publications, resident hometowns, or resident salary. There is a lack of consistency regarding the content presented on orthopedic residency websites. As the competition for orthopedic websites continues to increase, applicants flock to the Internet to learn more about orthopedic websites in greater number. A well-constructed website has the potential to increase the caliber of students applying to a said program. Copyright © 2015 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by

  18. Assessment of Surgery Resident Competency Provided by Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yaxin; Yan, Tingmei; Qu, Bo

    2016-11-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the competency of surgery residents from the patient perspective in the current healthcare environment in China. The authors performed an assessment of 508 surgery residents in Liaoning province. Seven patients were as a group to complete the self-administered questionnaires on the survey for each individual corresponding resident. A 5-point rating scale with an unable-to-evaluate category was used to assess surgery resident competency by patients. Reliability and validity were assessed by Cronbach alpha (α) and exploratory factor analysis, respectively. Statistical analysis was performed using SPSS 13.0. The surveys on 421 residents were valid, and the valid response rate was 82.8%. A total of 2947 questionnaires from patients were analyzed in this study. The Cronbach α coefficient was 0.92. The 4 factors emerging in the exploratory factor analysis reached a cumulative contribution rate of 66.98%. The items of "promotes health maintenance (talks about preventive care)" (206/7.0%), "tells me about any side effects of the medicine" (177/6.0%), "spends enough time with me" (189/6.4%), and "answers my questions thoroughly" (168/5.7%) were scored <4 by higher percentage of patients. The instrument provided an acceptable means for patients to evaluate the competency of Chinese surgery residents. Surgery residents should improve their competencies on preventive care, patient safety, and communication skills.

  19. Is your graduating general surgery resident qualified to take trauma call? A 15-year appraisal of the changes in general surgery education for trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strumwasser, Aaron; Grabo, Daniel; Inaba, Kenji; Matsushima, Kazuhide; Clark, Damon; Benjamin, Elizabeth; Lam, Lydia; Demetriades, Demetrios

    2017-03-01

    Trauma training in general surgery residency is undergoing an evolution. Hour restrictions, the growth of subspecialty care, and the trend toward nonoperative management have altered resident exposure to operative trauma. We sought to identify trends in resident trauma training since the inception of the 80-hour workweek. The Accreditation Council for General Medical Education Case Log Statistical Reports for Surgery was abstracted for general surgery resident trauma operative volume for the years 1999-2014. Resident trauma experience (operative caseload [OC]) was compared before inception of the 80-hour workweek (1999-2002) to after the 80-hour workweek began (2003 to current). A trend toward decreased operative trauma for general surgery residents was observed (mean OC [before 80-hour workweek vs. 80-hour workweek], 39,252 ± 1,065.2 cases vs. 36,065 ± 1,291.8; p = 0.06). Trauma laparotomies increased (range, 5,446-9,364 cases) with corresponding decreases in vascular trauma (4,704 to 799 cases), neck explorations (1,876 to 1,370 cases), and thoracotomies (2,507 to 2,284 cases). By comparison, an increase in vascular/integrated cases was noted (mean OC [before 80-hour workweek vs. 80-hour workweek], 845 ± 44.2 vs. 1,465 ± 88.4 cases; p surgery (p surgery.

  20. Learning preferences of surgery residents: a multi-institutional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Roger H; Viscusi, Rebecca K; Collier, Ashley N; Hunsinger, Marie A; Shabahang, Mohsen M; Fuhrman, George M; Korndorffer, James R

    2018-01-22

    The VARK model categorizes learners by preferences for 4 modalities: visual, aural, read/write, and kinesthetic. Previous single-institution studies found that VARK preferences are associated with academic performance. This multi-institutional study was conducted to test the hypothesis that the VARK learning preferences of residents differ from the general population and that they are associated with performance on the American Board of Surgery In-Training Examination (ABSITE). The VARK inventory was administered to residents at 5 general surgery programs. The distribution of the VARK preferences of residents was compared with the general population. ABSITE results were analyzed for associations with VARK preferences. χ2, Analysis of variance, and multiple linear regression were used for statistical analysis. A total of 132 residents completed the VARK inventory. The distribution of the VARK preferences of residents was different than the general population (P VARK inventory was an independent predictor of ABSITE percentile rank (P = .03), percent of questions correct (P = .01), and standard score (P = .01). This study represents the first multi-institutional study to examine VARK preferences among surgery residents. The distribution of preferences among residents was different than that of the general population. Residents with a greater number of aural responses on VARK had greater ABSITE scores. The VARK model may have potential to improve learning efficiency among residents. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Social problems in plastic surgery residents: a management perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verheyden, Charles N; McGrath, Mary H; Simpson, Peggy; Havens, Lisa

    2015-04-01

    It is presumed that plastic surgery residents experience various social problems, just as do their peers in other specialty training programs and in the general public. These issues can occasionally disrupt the resident's personal training experience and sometimes the program as a whole. A survey was performed to assess the magnitude of the problem, and the issues revealed were assessed to assist the program director and the resident in reaching successful completion of the residency. A survey was designed by the executive committee and staff of the American Council of Academic Plastic Surgeons and sent to all plastic surgery training programs in the United States. A response rate of 66 percent was achieved. The programs reported on the social issues occurring in their residents over the preceding 5 years. The results were presented at a business meeting of the Council. Thirty-seven percent of programs reported that at least one resident had left their program during the study period. Twenty percent reported that a resident had been asked to leave the program. The frequency of social problems resulting in disruption of the training program was tabulated in the following areas: divorce; pregnancy/parturition; financial, legal, or family issues; drug or alcohol abuse; illness/injury; and interpersonal conflicts. Plastic surgery residents experience social problems that can affect the timely completion of their training. Attention to these issues requires patience, creativity, sensitivity, and a commitment to the residents' ultimate success, and adherence to institutional, legal, and accreditation body mandates.

  2. Resident operative experience in general surgery, plastic surgery, and urology 5 years after implementation of the ACGME duty hour policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simien, Christopher; Holt, Kathleen D; Richter, Thomas H; Whalen, Thomas V; Coburn, Michael; Havlik, Robert J; Miller, Rebecca S

    2010-08-01

    Resident duty hour restrictions were implemented in 2002-2003. This study examines changes in resident surgical experience since these restrictions were put into place. Operative log data for 3 specialties were examined: general surgery, urology, and plastic surgery. The academic year immediately preceding the duty hour restrictions, 2002-2003, was used as a baseline for comparison to subsequent academic years. Operative log data for graduating residents through 2007-2008 were the primary focus of the analysis. Examination of associated variables that may moderate the relationship between fewer duty hours and surgical volume was also included. Plastic surgery showed no changes in operative volume following duty hour restrictions. Operative volume increased in urology programs. General surgery showed a decrease in volume in some operative categories but an increase in others. Specifically the procedures in vascular, plastic, and thoracic areas showed a consistent decrease. There was no increase in the percentage of programs' graduates falling below minimum requirements. Procedures in pancreas, endocrine, and laparoscopic areas demonstrated an increase in volume. Graduates in larger surgical programs performed fewer procedures than graduates in smaller programs; this was not the case for urology or plastic surgery programs. The reduction of duty hours has not resulted in an across the board decrease in operative volume. Factors other than duty hour reforms may be responsible for some of the observed findings.

  3. Evolving attitudes toward robotic surgery among Canadian urology residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Locke, Jennifer; Robinson, Michael; MacNeily, Andrew; Goldenberg, S Larry; Black, Peter C

    2017-07-01

    Robotic-assisted laparoscopic surgery (RAS) has not been adopted as rapidly or widely in Canada as in the U.S. In 2011, Canadian urology residents felt that RAS represented an expanding field that could potentially negatively impact their training. We re-evaluate trainee exposure and attitudes to RAS in Canadian residency training five years later. All Canadian urology residents were asked to participate in an online survey designed to assess current resident exposure to and perception of RAS. The response rate was 39% (61/157). Seventy-seven percent of residents reported being involved in at least one RAS procedure (52% in 2011), and the majority had exposure to <10 cases. For those in hospitals with access to RAS, 96% desired more console time, while only 50% of those without access wanted more console experience. Of all residents, 50% felt that RAS will become the gold standard in certain urological surgeries (34% in 2011), but only 28% felt that RAS would play an increasingly important role in urology (59% in 2011). Despite an increase in exposure to RAS in residency programs over the past five years, console experience remains limited. Although these residents desire more access to RAS, many voice uncertainty of the role of RAS in Canada. We cannot conclude whether RAS is perceived by residents to be beneficial or detrimental to their training nationwide. Moving forward in the robotic era, it will be important to either modify residency curricula to address RAS experience or to limit RAS to fellowship training.

  4. History of Argentine surgery, abaut general surgery residents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Jankilevich

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This work, as its title indicates, is targeted to young general surgery residents, who have been kind enough to open their journal for this collaboration. A gesture that I appreciate and I’ll try to give back narrating some facts of the first century of our independence. The story starts a few decades before 1810, especially with the institution of the Viceroyalty of Rio de la Plata, and ends at 1880, when indigenous peoples are submited, traditional estate, the gaucho gerrillas and the last caudillos (the pattern and the National Guards pawns are extinguished, agriculture and industry develops, the railroad replaces the wagons, is mass immigration and techniques of exploitation of natural resources strengthens social and economic structure, policy that starts the National Organization bequeathed to us Eighty generation. Two figures are presented as conclusion and synthesis of this period and serve as a bridge that starts from 1880: Francisco Javier Muñiz and Manuel Augusto Montes de Oca. The first such example of a surgeon in the wars of independence, internal frontier garrisons, the vicissitudes of the early university studies and creative work in the solitude of the peoples of campaign not only providing a commendable assistance but researching and discovering the first indigenous smallpox vaccine, rectifying errors jennerianos concept of cows pox disease of horses were infected, combating epidemics and initiating scientific research, natural sciences and producing valued communications throughout the world, as in the case of Darwin himself, who makes the research Muñiz as one of the foundations of his theory of evolution of species. The second: Montes de Oca, is the archetype and the teacher of those surgeons of the eighties generation. He gather in his person a more advanced knowledge and understanding of their subject, son of exile and disagreements before the national organization, contact to Europe, but attached to the reality of

  5. Workplace bullying of general surgery residents by nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlitzkus, Lisa L; Vogt, Kelly N; Sullivan, Maura E; Schenarts, Kimberly D

    2014-01-01

    Workplace bullying is at the forefront of social behavior research, garnering significant media attention. Most of the medical research has addressed bullying of nurses by physicians and demonstrates that patient care and outcomes may suffer. The intent of this study was to determine if general surgery residents are bullied by nurses. A survey instrument previously validated (Negative Acts Questionnaire-Revised) to evaluate for workplace bullying was modified to reflect the resident-nurse relationship. After institutional review board approval, the piloted online survey was sent to general surgery program directors to forward to general surgery residents. Demographic data are presented as percentages, and for negative acts, percentages of daily, weekly, and monthly frequencies are combined. Allopathic general surgery residencies in the United States. General surgery residents. The response rate was 22.1% (n = 452). Most respondents were men (55%) and had a mean age of 29 years (standard deviation = 7). Although 27.0% of the respondents were interns, the remaining classes were equally represented (12%-18% of responses/class). The respondents were primarily from medium-sized residency programs (45%), in the Midwest (28%), training in university programs (72%), and rotating primarily in a combined private and county hospital that serves both insured and indigent patients (59%). The residents had experienced each of the 22 negative acts (11.5%-82.5%). Work-related bullying occurs more than person-related bullying and physical intimidation. Ignoring of recommendations or orders by nurses occurs on a daily, weekly, or monthly basis for 30.2% of residents (work-related bullying). The most frequent person-related bullying act is ignoring the resident when they approach or reacting in a hostile manner (18.0%), followed by ignoring or excluding the resident (17.1%). Workplace bullying of general surgery residents by nurses is prominent. Future research is needed to determine

  6. Can robotic surgery be done efficiently while training residents?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honaker, Michael Drew; Paton, Beverly L; Stefanidis, Dimitrios; Schiffern, Lynnette M

    2015-01-01

    Robotic surgery is a rapidly growing area in surgery. In an era of emphasis on cost reduction, the question becomes how do you train residents in robotic surgery? The aim of this study was to determine if there was a difference in operative time and complications when comparing general surgery residents learning robotic cholecystectomies to those learning standard laparoscopic cholecystectomies. A retrospective analysis of adult patients undergoing robotic and laparoscopic cholecystectomy by surgical residents between March 2013 and February 2014 was conducted. Demographic data, operative factors, length of stay (LOS), and complications were examined. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed. The significance was set at p robotic cholecystectomy group and 40 in the laparoscopic group). Age, diagnosis, and American Society of Anesthesiologists score were not significantly different between groups. There was only 1 complication in the standard laparoscopic group in which a patient had to be taken back to surgery because of an incarcerated port site. LOS was significantly higher in the standard laparoscopic group (mean = 2.28) than in the robotic group (mean = 0.56; p robotic group (mean = 97.00 minutes; p = 0.4455). When intraoperative cholangiogram was evaluated, OR time was shorter in the robotic group. Robotic training in general surgery residency does not amount to extra OR time. LOS in our study was significantly longer in the standard laparoscopic group. Copyright © 2015 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Vascular surgery reduces the frequency of lower limb major amputations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindholt, Jes Sanddal; Bøvling, Søren; Fasting, H

    1994-01-01

    In June 1988 a Department of Vascular Surgery was established in the county of Viborg, Denmark. In this retrospective study of the periods 1986-87 and 1989-90, we have observed a significant rise in the number of patients evaluated by a vascular surgeon before amputation, from 19 to 49%. At the s......In June 1988 a Department of Vascular Surgery was established in the county of Viborg, Denmark. In this retrospective study of the periods 1986-87 and 1989-90, we have observed a significant rise in the number of patients evaluated by a vascular surgeon before amputation, from 19 to 49......%. At the same time the number of major lower limb amputations significantly decreased. This reduction was most marked in 1990 probably due to a rise of 43% in the number of distal reconstructions. The distribution between below knee, through knee and mid-thigh amputation was unaffected by the increased vascular...... surgical activity. The frequency of major amputations in the county in 1986-87 of 40.9 per 100,000 per year declined by 25% to 30.9 per 100,000 per year in 1989-90. We conclude that vascular surgery reduces the number of major lower limb amputations and consequently all patients threatened with amputation...

  8. Education on, Exposure to, and Management of Vascular Anomalies During Otolaryngology Residency and Pediatric Otolaryngology Fellowship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chun, Robert; Jabbour, Noel; Balakrishnan, Karthik; Bauman, Nancy; Darrow, David H; Elluru, Ravindhra; Grimmer, J Fredrik; Perkins, Jonathan; Richter, Gresham; Shin, Jennifer

    2016-07-01

    The field of vascular anomalies presents diverse challenges in diagnosis and management. Although many lesions involve the head and neck, training in vascular anomalies is not universally included in otolaryngology residencies and pediatric otolaryngology (POTO) fellowships. To explore the education in, exposure to, and comfort level of otolaryngology trainees with vascular anomalies. A survey was distributed to 39 POTO fellows and 44 residents in postgraduate year 5 who matched into POTO fellowships from April 22 through June 16, 2014. Survey responses from trainees on exposure to, education on, and comfort with vascular anomalies. Forty-four residents in postgraduate year 5 who applied to POTO fellowships and 39 POTO fellows were emailed the survey. Fourteen respondents were unable to be contacted owing to lack of a current email address. Thirty-six of 69 residents and fellows (18 fellows and 18 residents [52%]) responded to the survey. Twenty-seven trainees (75%) reported no participation in a vascular anomalies clinic during residency; 6 of these 27 individuals (22%) trained at institutions with a vascular anomalies clinic but did not participate in the clinic, and 28 of the 36 respondents (78%) reported that they had less than adequate or no exposure to vascular anomalies in residency. Among POTO fellows, 11 of 17 (65%) did not participate in a vascular anomalies clinic during fellowship, even though 8 of the 11 had a vascular anomalies clinic at their fellowship program. During fellowship training, 12 of 18 fellows (67%) reported that they had adequate exposure to vascular anomalies. Only 20 respondents (56%) felt comfortable distinguishing among diagnoses of vascular anomalies, and only 4 residents (22%) and 9 fellows (50%) felt comfortable treating patients with vascular anomalies. All fellows believed that training in vascular anomalies was important in fellowship, and 100% of respondents indicated that increased exposure to diagnosis and management of

  9. Assessment of resident training and preparedness for cataract surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puri, Sidharth; Srikumaran, Divya; Prescott, Christina; Tian, Jing; Sikder, Shameema

    2017-03-01

    To assess which surgical teaching methods are used for residency surgical training and which methods residents find most useful. Wilmer Eye Institute, Baltimore, Maryland, USA. Retrospective observational cross-sectional study. A survey was developed and sent to residents at accredited ophthalmology training programs in the United States. The survey asked about demographics, program characteristics, surgical training methods, perceived initial preparedness, eventual competence, and difficulty with the steps of cataract surgery. The correlation between surgical training methods was compared with perceived preparedness, competence, and difficulty. One hundred sixteen residents completed the survey. Discussing surgical procedures with senior surgeons or using surgical simulators preoperatively improved resident-perceived surgical competency in several areas, such as paracentesis. Residents who had preoperative discussions with senior surgeons were statistically less likely to report difficulty with surgical procedures, such as performing a clear corneal incision. The presence of a supervised wet lab or surgical simulator in a residency was also associated with improved resident-perceived surgical competency. Educational resources, such as surgical simulators and supervised wet labs, tended to be associated with greater resident-perceived competency for steps in cataract surgery. Copyright © 2017 ASCRS and ESCRS. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Reconstructive surgery training: increased operative volume in plastic surgery residency programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanna, Neil; Boyd, J Brian; Kawamoto, Henry K; Miller, Timothy A; Da Lio, Andrew L; Azhar, Hamdan; Bradley, James P

    2012-03-01

    Practitioners in other surgical specialties have increasingly advanced their volume of reconstructive procedures traditionally served by plastic surgeons. Because there has not been a previous specialty training comparison, the average operative reconstructive volume of graduating plastic surgery residents was formally compared with that of other specialties. The authors review the case log statistical reports of the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education. For each specialty, this annual report highlights the average number of cases performed for all graduating residents. The national case log reports were reviewed for orthopedic surgery, otolaryngology, and plastic surgery. Six procedures were compared for residents graduating in the 2006 to 2010 academic years and are reviewed. A two-sample Welch-Satterthwaite t test for independent samples with heterogeneous variance was conducted to compare the average number of procedures performed per graduating resident. Graduates of plastic surgery residencies compared with graduates of other specialties performed more cleft lip and palate repairs, hand amputation, hand fracture, and nasal fracture procedures. This difference showed statistical significance for all years examined (2006 to 2010). For repair of mandible fractures, plastic surgery trainees had significantly more cases for 2006 to 2009 but not 2010. The quantitative operative experience of graduating plastic surgery residents for selected reconstructive cases is above that of the average graduating trainee outside of plastic surgery. Given the exposure and strength of plastic surgery training, plastic surgeons should remain at the forefront of reconstructive surgery.

  11. Variability in Trauma Case Volume in Orthopedic Surgery Residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blood, Travis D; Gil, Joseph A; Born, Christopher T; Daniels, Alan H

    2017-02-20

    Orthopedic trauma surgery is a critical component of resident education. Surgical case logs obtained from the Accreditation Council of Graduate Medical Students from 2009 to 2013 for orthopedic surgery residents were examined for variability between the 90th and 10th percentiles in regards to the volume of cases performed. There was an upward trend in the mean number of cases performed by senior residents from 484.4 in 2009 to 534.5 in 2013, representing a 10.3% increase. There was a statistically significant increase in the number of cases performed for humerus/elbow, forearm/wrist, and pelvis/hip during this period (Ppercentile case volumes narrowed over the study period, the difference between these groups remained significant in 2013 (P=0.02). In 2013, all categories of trauma cases had a greater than 2.2-fold difference between the 10th and 90th percentile of residents for numbers of trauma cases performed. Although case volume is not the sole determinant of residency education and competency, evidence suggests that case volume plays a crucial role in surgeon confidence and efficiency in performing surgery. Further studies are needed to better understand the effect of this variability seen among residents performing orthopedic trauma surgery.

  12. Variability in trauma case volume in orthopedic surgery residents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Travis D. Blood

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Orthopedic trauma surgery is a critical component of resident education. Surgical case logs obtained from the Accreditation Council of Graduate Medical Students from 2009 to 2013 for orthopedic surgery residents were examined for variability between the 90th and 10th percentiles in regards to the volume of cases performed. There was an upward trend in the mean number of cases performed by senior residents from 484.4 in 2009 to 534.5 in 2013, representing a 10.3% increase. There was a statistically significant increase in the number of cases performed for humerus/elbow, forearm/wrist, and pelvis/hip during this period (Pth and 90th percentile case volumes narrowed over the study period, the difference between these groups remained significant in 2013 (P=0.02. In 2013, all categories of trauma cases had a greater than 2.2-fold difference between the 10th and 90th percentile of residents for numbers of trauma cases performed. Although case volume is not the sole determinant of residency education and competency, evidence suggests that case volume plays a crucial role in surgeon confidence and efficiency in performing surgery. Further studies are needed to better understand the effect of this variability seen among residents performing orthopedic trauma surgery.

  13. Low vs. high haemoglobin trigger for transfusion in vascular surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, A; Nielsen, H B; Wetterslev, J

    2017-01-01

    for Vascular Surgery. Restricting RBC transfusion may affect blood O2 transport with a risk for development of tissue ischaemia and postoperative complications. METHODS: In a single-centre, open-label, assessor blinded trial, 58 vascular surgical patients (> 40 years of age) awaiting open surgery...... of the infrarenal aorta or infrainguinal arterial bypass surgery undergo a web-based randomisation to one of two groups: perioperative RBC transfusion triggered by hb ...-infrared spectroscopy determines tissue oxygenation. Serious adverse event rates are: myocardial injury (troponin-I ≥ 45 ng/l or ischaemic electrocardiographic findings at day 30), acute kidney injury, death, stroke and severe transfusion reactions. A follow-up visit takes place 30 days after surgery and a follow...

  14. Thoughts of Quitting General Surgery Residency: Factors in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginther, David Nathan; Dattani, Sheev; Miller, Sarah; Hayes, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Attrition rates in general surgery training are higher than other surgical disciplines. We sought to determine the prevalence with which Canadian general surgery residents consider leaving their training and the contributing factors. An anonymous survey was administered to all general surgery residents in Canada. Responses from residents who considered leaving their training were assessed for importance of contributing factors. The study was conducted at the Royal University Hospital, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada, a tertiary academic center. The response rate was approximately 34.0%. A minority (32.0%) reported very seriously or somewhat seriously considering leaving their training, whereas 35.2% casually considered doing so. Poor work-life balance in residency (38.9%) was the single-most important factor, whereas concern about future unemployment (16.7%) and poor future quality of life (15.7%) were next. Enjoyment of work (41.7%) was the most frequent mitigating factor. Harassment and intimidation were reported factors in 16.7%. On analysis, only intention to practice in a nonacademic setting approached significant association with thoughts of leaving (odds ratio = 1.92, CI = 0.99-3.74, p = 0.052). There was no association with sex, program, postgraduate year, relationship status, or subspecialty interest. There was a nonsignificant trend toward more thoughts of leaving with older age. Canadian general surgery residents appear less likely to seriously consider quitting than their American counterparts. Poor work-life balance in residency, fear of future unemployment, and anticipated poor future quality of life are significant contributors to thoughts of quitting. Efforts to educate prospective residents about the reality of the surgical lifestyle, and to assist residents in securing employment, may improve completion rates. Copyright © 2016 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Global opportunities on 239 general surgery residency Web sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wackerbarth, Joel J; Campbell, Timothy D; Wren, Sherry; Price, Raymond R; Maier, Ronald V; Numann, Patricia; Kushner, Adam L

    2015-09-01

    Many general surgical residency programs lack a formal international component. We hypothesized that most surgery programs do not have international training or do not provide the information to prospective applicants regarding electives or programs in an easily accessible manner via Web-based resources. Individual general surgery program Web sites and the American College of Surgeons residency tool were used to identify 239 residencies. The homepages were examined for specific mention of international or global health programs. Ease of access was also considered. Global surgery specific pages or centers were noted. Programs were assessed for length of rotation, presence of research component, and mention of benefits to residents and respective institution. Of 239 programs, 24 (10%) mentioned international experiences on their home page and 42 (18%) contained information about global surgery. Of those with information available, 69% were easily accessible. Academic programs were more likely than independent programs to have information about international opportunities on their home page (13.7% versus 4.0%, P = 0.006) and more likely to have a dedicated program or pathway Web site (18.8% versus 2.0%, P Web sites. Benefits to high-income country residents were discussed more than benefits to low- and middle-income country residents (57% versus 17%). General surgery residency programs do not effectively communicate international opportunities for prospective residents through Web-based resources and should seriously consider integrating international options into their curriculum and better present them on department Web sites. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Readiness of US General Surgery Residents for Independent Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Brian C; Bohnen, Jordan D; Williams, Reed G; Meyerson, Shari L; Schuller, Mary C; Clark, Michael J; Meier, Andreas H; Torbeck, Laura; Mandell, Samuel P; Mullen, John T; Smink, Douglas S; Scully, Rebecca E; Chipman, Jeffrey G; Auyang, Edward D; Terhune, Kyla P; Wise, Paul E; Choi, Jennifer N; Foley, Eugene F; Dimick, Justin B; Choti, Michael A; Soper, Nathaniel J; Lillemoe, Keith D; Zwischenberger, Joseph B; Dunnington, Gary L; DaRosa, Debra A; Fryer, Jonathan P

    2017-10-01

    This study evaluates the current state of the General Surgery (GS) residency training model by investigating resident operative performance and autonomy. The American Board of Surgery has designated 132 procedures as being "Core" to the practice of GS. GS residents are expected to be able to safely and independently perform those procedures by the time they graduate. There is growing concern that not all residents achieve that standard. Lack of operative autonomy may play a role. Attendings in 14 General Surgery programs were trained to use a) the 5-level System for Improving and Measuring Procedural Learning (SIMPL) Performance scale to assess resident readiness for independent practice and b) the 4-level Zwisch scale to assess the level of guidance (ie, autonomy) they provided to residents during specific procedures. Ratings were collected immediately after cases that involved a categorical GS resident. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics and supplemented with Bayesian ordinal model-based estimation. A total of 444 attending surgeons rated 536 categorical residents after 10,130 procedures. Performance: from the first to the last year of training, the proportion of Performance ratings for Core procedures (n = 6931) at "Practice Ready" or above increased from 12.3% to 77.1%. The predicted probability that a typical trainee would be rated as Competent after performing an average Core procedure on an average complexity patient during the last week of residency training is 90.5% (95% CI: 85.7%-94%). This falls to 84.6% for more complex patients and to less than 80% for more difficult Core procedures. Autonomy: for all procedures, the proportion of Zwisch ratings indicating meaningful autonomy ("Passive Help" or "Supervision Only") increased from 15.1% to 65.7% from the first to the last year of training. For the Core procedures performed by residents in their final 6 months of training (cholecystectomy, inguinal/femoral hernia repair, appendectomy, ventral

  17. Self-Appraised Readiness of Senior and Graduating General Surgery Residents to Perform Thoracic Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeBoard, Zachary M; Paisley, Michael; Thomas, Donald D

    2017-12-19

    General surgeons perform up to 50% of noncardiac thoracic surgery (TS). Although data show consistent TS case volume during general surgery (GS) residency it is unknown whether this operative trend will persist given potentially limited subspecialty exposure. We sought to determine if certain aspects of residency programs and resident characteristics were associated with trainees' perceived comfort in performing certain basic TS procedures. An anonymous survey was distributed to GS residents regarding program characteristics, presence of a TS residency, and intent to pursue thoracic surgical training, and estimated case volumes of individual procedures. Comfort levels for performing video-assisted thoracoscopic surgical (VATS) procedures, open lobectomy, elective thoracotomy, and sternotomy were attained through a 5-point Likert-type scale. This survey was administered at 50 training programs with responses recorded via an online form. Fourth- and fifth-year GS residents in the United States. Of 272 respondents 58% were fourth-year residents, 62% of residents trained at university-affiliated programs, and 64% reported a TS residency program at their institution and 16% stated intent to pursue TS. Fifth-year residents performed significantly more cases than fourth-year residents despite no difference in median comfort levels. Residents intending to pursue TS performed significantly more cases and were more comfortable performing a thoracotomy, sternotomy, VATS wedge resection/biopsy, and VATS decortication/pleurodesis (p = 0.044, Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Are there enough jobs in cardiothoracic surgery? The thoracic surgery residents association job placement survey for finishing residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salazar, Jorge D; Lee, Richard; Wheatley, Grayson H; Doty, John R

    2004-11-01

    Applications to cardiothoracic surgery training programs have declined. Anecdotal evidence suggests limited job availability for residents completing cardiothoracic training, which may contribute to this decline. This survey sought to document the experience of current, graduating residents. In June 2003, the Thoracic Surgery Residents Association surveyed residents completing accredited cardiothoracic training or additional subspecialization, utilizing a web-based survey hosted by CTSNet. Resident participation was voluntary and anonymous. Of the estimated 140 graduates, 89 responded. The majority were male (91.0%, n = 81), married (80.0%, n = 71), and had children (61.0%, n = 54). Average age was 36.2 years old, and mean educational debt was less than 50K dollars. Of the 89 respondents, 77 initially sought jobs and 12 sought additional training. For residents seeking jobs, 19.5% (n = 15) received no offers and 13 of these ultimately pursued additional training. Acquired jobs were in private (53.0%, n = 34) or academic practice (47.0%, n = 30), with 73.4% (n = 47) involving general thoracic surgery. Most would again choose cardiothoracic surgery as a career (75.5%, n = 67), and 62.0% (n = 55) would again submit the same match list. However, 87.0% (n = 77) believed that the number of trainees should be decreased, 81.0% (n = 72) believed that reimbursement for cardiothoracic surgery is inadequate, and 77.5% (n = 69) believed that excessively low reimbursement will result in restricted access or decreased quality for patients. Most cardiothoracic residents were successful in finding employment after training. A substantial percentage, however, pursued additional training due to lack of job opportunities. Although most finishing residents were satisfied with training and career choice, significant concerns exist regarding job opportunities and compensation. These conditions may lead to difficulty in recruitment to the specialty.

  19. Near-infrared spectroscopy during peripheral vascular surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eiberg, J P; Schroeder, T V; Vogt, K C

    1997-01-01

    Near-infrared spectroscopy was performed perioperatively on the dorsum of the foot in 14 patients who underwent infrainguinal bypass surgery using a prosthesis or the greater saphenous vein. Dual-wavelength continuous light spectroscopy was used to assess changes in tissue saturation before, during...... that near-infrared spectroscopy is appropriate for perioperative monitoring during vascular grafting....

  20. Non-invasive vascular imaging in perforator flap surgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saba, Luca; Piga, Mario [Dept. of Radiology, Azienda Ospedaliero Univ. (AOU), di Cagliari-Polo di Monserrato, Cagliari (Italy)], e-mail: lucasaba@tiscali.it; Atzeni, Matteo; Ribuffo, Diego [Dept. of Surgery, Section of Plastic Surgery, Azienda Ospedaliero Univ. (AOU), di Cagliari-Polo di Monserrato, Cagliari (Italy); Rozen, Warren Matthew [Jack Brockhov Reconstructive Plastic Surgery Research Unit, Dept. of Anatomy and Cell Biology, The Univ. of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria (Australia); Alonso-Burgos, Alberto [Dept. of Radiology, Clinica Univ., Univ. de Navarra, Pamplona (Spain); Bura, Raffaella [Dept. of Surgery, Section of Vascular Surgery, Azienda Ospedaliero Univ. (AOU), di Cagliari-Polo di Monserrato, Cagliari (Italy)

    2013-02-15

    Preoperative imaging using a range of imaging modalities has become increasingly popular for preoperative planning in plastic surgery, in particular in perforator flap surgery. Modalities in this role include ultrasound (US), magnetic resonance angiography (MRA), and computed tomographic angiography (CTA). The evidence for the use of these techniques has been reported in only a handful of studies. In this paper we conducted a non-systematic review of the literature to establish the role for each of these modalities. The role of state-of-the-art vascular imaging as an application in perforator flap surgery is thus offered.

  1. General surgery training and robotics: Are residents improving their skills?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finnerty, Brendan M; Afaneh, Cheguevara; Aronova, Anna; Fahey, Thomas J; Zarnegar, Rasa

    2016-02-01

    While robotic-assisted operations have become more prevalent, many general surgery residencies do not have a formal robotic training curriculum. We sought to ascertain how well current general surgery training permits acquisition of robotic skills by comparing robotic simulation performance across various training levels. Thirty-six participants were categorized by level of surgical training: eight medical students (MS), ten junior residents (JR), ten mid-level residents (MLR), and eight senior residents (SR). Participants performed three simulation tasks on the da Vinci (®) Skills Simulator (MatchBoard, EnergyDissection, SutureSponge). Each task's scores (0-100) and cumulative scores (0-300) were compared between groups. There were no differences in sex, hand dominance, video gaming history, or prior robotic experience between groups; however, SR was the oldest (p surgery residency show minimal improvement during the course of training, although laparoscopic experience is correlated with advanced robotic task performance. Changes in residency curricula or pursuit of fellowship training may be warranted for surgeons seeking proficiency.

  2. Does general surgery residency prepare surgeons for community practice in British Columbia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Hamish

    2009-01-01

    Background Preparing surgeons for clinical practice is a challenging task for postgraduate training programs across Canada. The purpose of this study was to examine whether a single surgeon entering practice was adequately prepared by comparing the type and volume of surgical procedures experienced in the last 3 years of training with that in the first year of clinical practice. Methods During the last 3 years of general surgery training, I logged all procedures. In practice, the Medical Services Plan (MSP) of British Columbia tracks all procedures. Using MSP remittance reports, I compiled the procedures performed in my first year of practice. I totaled the number of procedures and broke them down into categories (general, colorectal, laparoscopic, endoscopic, hepatobiliary, oncologic, pediatric, thoracic, vascular and other). I then compared residency training with community practice. Results I logged a total of 1170 procedures in the last 3 years of residency. Of these, 452 were performed during community rotations. The procedures during residency could be broken down as follows: 392 general, 18 colorectal, 242 laparoscopic, 103 endoscopic, 85 hepatobiliary, 142 oncologic, 1 pediatric, 78 thoracic, 92 vascular and 17 other. I performed a total of 1440 procedures in the first year of practice. In practice the break down was 398 general, 15 colorectal, 101 laparoscopic, 654 endoscopic, 2 hepatobiliary, 77 oncologic, 10 pediatric, 0 thoracic, 70 vascular and 113 other. Conclusion On the whole, residency provided excellent preparation for clinical practice based on my experience. Areas of potential improvement included endoscopy, pediatric surgery and “other,” which comprised mostly hand surgery. PMID:19503663

  3. Trends in open vascular surgery for trauma: implications for the future of acute care surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forrester, Joseph D; Weiser, Thomas G; Maggio, Paul; Browder, Timothy; Tennakoon, Lakshika; Spain, David; Staudenmayer, Kristan

    2016-09-01

    Trauma patients with vascular injuries have historically been within a general surgeon's operative ability. Changes in training and decline in operative trauma have decreased trainees' exposure to these injuries. We sought to determine how frequently vascular procedures are performed at US trauma centers to quantify the need for general surgeons trained to manage vascular injuries. We conducted a retrospective analysis of the National Trauma Data Base (NTDB) from 2012 compared with 2002. Patients with general surgical and vascular procedures were identified using International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, procedure codes 38.0-39.99, excluding 38.9-38.99. General surgery or vascular operations were performed on 12,099 (24%) of 50,248 severely injured adult patients in 2002 and 21,854 (16%) of 138,009 injured patients in 2012. Nineteen percent to 26% of all patients underwent vascular procedures. Patients with combined general surgery and vascular procedures were less likely to be discharged home and more likely to die. In 2002, 6% of severely injured adult trauma patients underwent open vascular procedures at level III/IV trauma centers; by 2012, only 1% of vascular surgery procedures were performed at level III/IV centers (P surgery remains common for severely injured patients. Future trauma systems and surgical training programs will need to account for the need for open vascular skills. The findings suggest that there is already a trend away from open vascular procedures at level III/IV trauma centers, which may be a sign of system compensation for changes in the workforce. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Clinical characteristics associated with readmission among patients undergoing vascular surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelbert, Travis L; Fernandes-Taylor, Sara; Gupta, Prateek K; Kent, K Craig; Matsumura, Jon

    2014-05-01

    Readmission after a vascular surgery intervention is frequent, costly, and often considered preventable. Vascular surgery outcomes have recently been scrutinized by Medicare because of the high rates of readmission. We determined patient and clinical characteristics associated with readmission in a cohort of vascular surgery patients. From 2009 to 2013, the medical records of all patients (n = 2505) undergoing interventions by the vascular surgery service at a single tertiary care institution were retrospectively reviewed. Sociodemographic and clinical characteristics were examined for association with 30-day readmission to the same institution. The 30-day readmission rate to the same institution was 9.7 % (n = 244). Procedures most likely to result in readmission were below-knee (25%), foot (22%), and toe amputations (19%), as well as lower extremity revascularization (22%). Patients covered by Medicaid (16.8%) and Medicare (10.0%) were most likely to be readmitted, followed by fee-for-service (9.5%), self-pay (8.0%), and health maintenance organizations (5.5%; P vs 6.2% low severity; P vs 6.1 days, respectively; P vs 9.5% without intensive care unit stay; P institutions must identify high-risk patients. Efforts should focus on subgroups undergoing selected interventions (amputations, lower extremity revascularization), those with urgent admissions, and patients with extended hospital stays. Patients in need of postacute care upon discharge are especially prone to readmission, requiring special attention to discharge planning and coordination of postdischarge care. By focusing on subgroups at risk for readmission, preventative resources can be efficiently targeted. Copyright © 2014 Society for Vascular Surgery. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Author disclosure of conflict of interest in vascular surgery journals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forbes, Thomas L

    2011-09-01

    Advances in vascular surgery are increasingly technology-driven, and the relationships between surgeons and the medical device industry can be complex. This study reviewed conflict of interest (COI) disclosure in the vascular surgery journals regarding several selected technology-driven topics, including endovascular stent grafts (EV), carotid artery stenting (CAS), and peripheral arterial interventions (PI), to suggest further directions. Authors' COI disclosures were reviewed from all clinical papers published in 2008 and 2009 in each of six vascular surgery journals, and pertaining to three selected topics (EV, CAS, and PI). Rate of COI disclosure was evaluated as a function of journal, topic, article type (randomized trial, case series, case report, review, or meta-analysis), and authors' region of origin. Secondarily, consistency of authors' disclosure was evaluated by reviewing papers by the same author and of the same topic. Six hundred thirty-five papers were reviewed from the six journals. A COI was declared in 125 (19.7%) of these papers. This rate differed between journals (range, 3.2%-34.1%; P author writing papers describing the same general topic. COI disclosure was consistent in the majority of these instances (72.4%), but inconsistent in 32 cases (27.6%). The most common (P = .006) inconsistencies involved the same type of article in different journals (46.9%), or in the same journal (25%). Rates of disclosure of COI, and inconsistencies in disclosure in the vascular surgery literature are at least partially due to differences in journals' reporting policies, while a smaller proportion of these inconsistencies are due to individual author behavior. Journals should adopt a consistent requirement for a separate COI declaration where all relevant financial arrangements are disclosed. Copyright © 2011 Society for Vascular Surgery. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Single-specialty versus multispecialty vascular surgery group model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wixon, Christopher L; Jain, Krishna M; Satiani, Bhagwan

    2013-06-01

    The shift in employment options for vascular surgeons in the current era of major health care reform is being widely debated. After the decision to seek hospital employment or independent practice, the choice of then practicing in a single-specialty or a multispecialty practice remains a difficult decision. Although the trend is toward medium-sized to large-sized groups, only 1.2% of medical practices currently have >11 physicians. Barring the large multispecialty groups, such as Kaiser Permanente, Cleveland Clinic, or Mayo Clinic, most vascular practices are constituted as small groups. Which format prospers will depend on adroit management of financial and intellectual capital and nimbleness in adapting to rapidly changing market conditions. In this report, two practicing vascular surgeons debate the merits of single or multispecialty practice, with a commentary to follow. Copyright © 2013 Society for Vascular Surgery. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. PREGNANCY IN CARDIO-VASCULAR SURGERY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Kazemi

    1968-01-01

    Full Text Available The Evol uulan 0 f pregnancy in Cardia V modern. Pertaining Literatu' - asculare Surgery discussed and re revlsed ?4 pe I C thought that any Pregnant . - . rsona ases arc analysed and it was f f . woman suffering fro M' I o allure in the pregnancy sho Id h . III itra stenosis with a history Meanwhilie the causes of our utwo dave hMitral C. omml.ssurotcmy as soon as possible minwhile the causes of our two deaths are discussed.

  8. An Informed Consent Program Enhances Surgery Resident Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koller, Sarah E; Moore, Ryan F; Goldberg, Michael B; Zhang, Jeanette; Yu, Daohai; Conklin, Charles B; Milner, Richard E; Goldberg, Amy J

    First-year residents often obtain informed consent from patients. However, they typically receive no formal training in this area before residency. We wished to determine whether an educational program would improve residents' comfort with this process. Our institution created an informed consent educational program, which included a didactic component, a role-play about informed consent, and a simulation exercise using standardized patients. Residents completed surveys before and after the intervention, and responses to survey questions were compared using the signed-rank test. This study took place at Temple University Hospital, a tertiary care institution in Philadelphia, PA. First-year surgery and emergency medicine residents at Temple University Hospital in 2014 participated in this study. Thirty-two residents completed the preintervention survey and 27 residents completed the educational program and postintervention survey. Only 37.5% had ever received formal training in informed consent before residency. After participating in the educational program, residents were significantly more confident that they could correctly describe the process of informed consent, properly fill out a procedure consent form, and properly obtain informed consent from a patient. Their comfort level in obtaining informed consent significantly increased. They found the educational program to be very effective in improving their knowledge and comfort level in obtaining informed consent. In all, 100% (N = 27) of residents said they would recommend the use of the program with other first-year residents. Residents became more confident in their ability to obtain informed consent after participating in an educational program that included didactic, role-play, and patient simulation elements. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  9. Vena cava filter practices of a regional vascular surgery society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedell, Mark L; Nelson, Peter R; Cheatham, Michael L

    2012-07-01

    Vena cava filter (VCF) use in the United States has increased dramatically with prophylactic indications for placement and the availability of low-profile retrievable devices, which are overtaking the filter market. We surveyed the practice patterns of a large group of vascular surgeons from a regional vascular surgery society to see whether they mirrored current national trends. A 17-question online VCF survey was offered to all members of the Southern Association of Vascular Surgery. The responses were analyzed using the χ(2) goodness of fit tests. Of the 276 members surveyed, 126 (46%) responded, with 118 (93%) indicating that they placed filters during their practice. Highly significant differences were identified with each question (at least P biconical and certain retrievable filters. Given the low removal rate and lack of long-term experience with retrievable filters, routine use of these devices as permanent filters should be questioned. If used on a temporary basis, there should be a plan for filter removal at the time of implantation. Copyright © 2012 Annals of Vascular Surgery Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Beta-blocker use and clinical outcomes after primary vascular surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høgh, A.; Lindholt, J.S.; Nielsen, Henrik

    2013-01-01

    To explore the associations between beta-blocker use and clinical outcomes (death, hospitalisation with myocardial infarction (MI) or stroke, major amputation and recurrent vascular surgery) after primary vascular reconstruction.......To explore the associations between beta-blocker use and clinical outcomes (death, hospitalisation with myocardial infarction (MI) or stroke, major amputation and recurrent vascular surgery) after primary vascular reconstruction....

  11. Teaching the Surgical Craft: Surgery Residents Perception of the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    These include concerns about time management (e.g., patient cancellation), availability of resources (e.g., equipment allocation), roles (e.g., responsibilities), patient safety and sterility (e.g., aseptic. Teaching the Surgical Craft: Surgery Residents. Perception of the Operating Theater Educational. Environment in a Tertiary ...

  12. Raising the issue of DNAR orders in vascular surgery patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIntosh, Rachel; Webb, Hannah; Hartley, Matthew; Brooks, Marcus

    2016-01-01

    The Tracey Report has recently raised the status of Do Not Attempt Cardio Pulmonary Resuscitation (DNACPR) orders in the hospital setting.[1] Guidelines are in place both nationally and locally to provide advice to clinicians on when to discuss DNACPR, and the approach to be taken. There was concern that on a busy regional vascular surgery unit, discussion of resuscitation status was not regular practice. Consequently, some patients were at risk of being inappropriately resuscitated, particularly out of hours. The North Bristol Somerset and Gloucester DNAR decision tree[2] was the tool used to decide whether a patient should have a documented discussion and/or a DNACPR form completed. We correlated the outcome of the decision tree with the presence of a DNACPR form or documented resuscitation discussion. Baseline measurements from all vascular inpatients on the vascular surgery unit demonstrated that only 27% had a DNACPR form or documented discussion in concordance with the DNACPR Decision Tree outcome. The aim of this project was to increase the proportion of patients with concordance of the DNACPR decision tree outcome with documented discussion or DNACPR form. The following three simple interventions raised concordance from 27% to 64% of patients on the vascular surgery unit. 1. Including resuscitation status of each patient as a column in the doctors daily handover. 2. Posters in staff only areas to highlight the meaning of DNACPR and raise awareness of the DNACPR decision tree. 3. Educational meeting surrounding DNACPR with the vascular surgery consultants, led by a care of the elderly consultant . This project has highlighted how raising awareness around DNACPR increases discussion amongst the clinical team surrounding resuscitation status of a patient. Consequently, this enables discussion to be had with patient and their family.

  13. Association of General Surgery Resident Remediation and Program Director Attitudes With Resident Attrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwed, Alexander C; Lee, Steven L; Salcedo, Edgardo S; Reeves, Mark E; Inaba, Kenji; Sidwell, Richard A; Amersi, Farin; Are, Chandrakanth; Arnell, Tracey D; Damewood, Richard B; Dent, Daniel L; Donahue, Timothy; Gauvin, Jeffrey; Hartranft, Thomas; Jacobsen, Garth R; Jarman, Benjamin T; Melcher, Marc L; Mellinger, John D; Morris, Jon B; Nehler, Mark; Smith, Brian R; Wolfe, Mary; Kaji, Amy H; de Virgilio, Christian

    2017-12-01

    Previous studies of resident attrition have variably included preliminary residents and likely overestimated categorical resident attrition. Whether program director attitudes affect attrition has been unclear. To determine whether program director attitudes are associated with resident attrition and to measure the categorical resident attrition rate. This multicenter study surveyed 21 US program directors in general surgery about their opinions regarding resident education and attrition. Data on total resident complement, demographic information, and annual attrition were collected from the program directors for the study period of July 1, 2010, to June 30, 2015. The general surgery programs were chosen on the basis of their geographic location, previous collaboration with some coauthors, prior work in surgical education and research, or a program director willing to participate. Only categorical surgical residents were included in the study; thus, program directors were specifically instructed to exclude any preliminary residents in their responses. Five-year attrition rates (2010-2011 to 2014-2015 academic years) as well as first-time pass rates on the General Surgery Qualifying Examination and General Surgery Certifying Examination of the American Board of Surgery (ABS) were collected. High- and low-attrition programs were compared. The 21 programs represented different geographic locations and 12 university-based, 3 university-affiliated, and 6 independent program types. Programs had a median (interquartile range [IQR]) number of 30 (20-48) categorical residents, and few of those residents were women (median [IQR], 12 [5-17]). Overall, 85 of 966 residents (8.8%) left training during the study period: 15 (17.6%) left after postgraduate year 1, 34 (40.0%) after postgraduate year 2, and 36 (42.4%) after postgraduate year 3 or later. Forty-four residents (51.8%) left general surgery for another surgical discipline, 21 (24.7%) transferred to a different surgery

  14. National Survey of Burnout among US General Surgery Residents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elmore, Leisha C; Jeffe, Donna B; Jin, Linda; Awad, Michael M; Turnbull, Isaiah R

    2017-01-01

    Background Burnout is a complex syndrome of emotional distress that can disproportionately affect individuals who work in healthcare professions. Study Design For a national survey of burnout in US general surgery residents, we asked all Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education-accredited general surgery program directors to email their general surgery residents an invitation to complete an anonymous, online survey. Burnout was assessed with the Maslach Burnout Inventory; total scores for Emotional Exhaustion (EE), Depersonalization (DP), and Personal Accomplishment (PA) subscales were calculated. Burnout was defined as having a score in the highest tertile for EE or DP or lowest tertile for PA. Chi-square tests and one-way analyses of variance were used to test associations between burnout tertiles for each subscale and various resident and training-program characteristics as appropriate. Results From April–December, 2014, 665 residents actively engaged in clinical training had data for analysis; 69% met the criterion for burnout on at least one subscale. Higher burnout on each subscale was reported by residents planning private practice compared with academic careers. A greater proportion of women than men reported burnout on EE and PA. Higher burnout on EE and DP was associated with greater work hours per week. Having a structured mentoring program was associated with lower burnout on each subscale. Conclusions The high rates of burnout among general surgery residents are concerning given the potential impact of burnout on the quality of patient care. Efforts to identify at-risk populations and to design targeted interventions to mitigate burnout in surgical trainees are warranted. PMID:27238875

  15. Contrast-Enhanced Ultrasound in Vascular Surgery: Review and Update

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bredahl, Kim; Mestre, Xavier Marti; Coll, Ramon Vila

    2017-01-01

    are easy to use, manageable, and safe. This topical review attempts to summarize and highlight the current evidence and future prospects for contrast-enhanced ultrasound in vascular surgery, with a particular focus on opportunities in carotid and lower limb arteriosclerotic disease and surveillance after......Accurate imaging methods associated with minimum patient risk are important tools for clinical decision-making in vascular surgery. Today, traditional imaging methods, such as computed tomography angiography, magnetic resonance angiography, and digital subtraction angiography are the preferred...... modalities. Ultrasound has only challenged these methods in assessment of carotid disease, aortic aneurysms, venous insufficiency, and thromboembolism and in surveillance of in situ bypasses. These practice patterns may change with the introduction of second-generation ultrasound contrast agents which...

  16. General surgery training without laparoscopic surgery fellows: the impact on residents and patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linn, John G; Hungness, Eric S; Clark, Sara; Nagle, Alexander P; Wang, Edward; Soper, Nathaniel J

    2011-10-01

    To evaluate resident case volume after discontinuation of a laparoscopic surgery fellowship, and to examine disparities in patient care over the same time period. Resident case logs were compared for a 2-year period before and 1 year after discontinuing the fellowship, using a 2-sample t test. Databases for bariatric and esophageal surgery were reviewed to compare operative time, length of stay (LOS), and complication rate by resident or fellow over the same time period using a 2-sample t test. Increases were seen in senior resident advanced laparoscopic (Mean Fellow Year = 21 operations vs Non Fellow Year = 61, P surgery. Operative time for complex operations may increase in the absence of a fellow. Other patient outcomes are not affected by this change. Copyright © 2011 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. [What do general, abdominal and vascular surgeons need to know on plastic surgery - aspects of plastic surgery in the field of general, abdominal and vascular surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damert, H G; Altmann, S; Stübs, P; Infanger, M; Meyer, F

    2015-02-01

    There is overlap between general, abdominal and vascular surgery on one hand and plastic surgery on the other hand, e.g., in hernia surgery, in particular, recurrent hernia, reconstruction of the abdominal wall or defect closure after abdominal or vascular surgery. Bariatric operations involve both special fields too. Plastic surgeons sometimes use skin and muscle compartments of the abdominal wall for reconstruction at other regions of the body. This article aims to i) give an overview about functional, anatomic and clinical aspects as well as the potential of surgical interventions in plastic surgery. General/abdominal/vascular surgeons can benefit from this in their surgical planning and competent execution of their own surgical interventions with limited morbidity/lethality and an optimal, in particular, functional as well as aesthetic outcome, ii) support the interdisciplinary work of general/abdominal/vascular and plastic surgery, and iii) provide a better understanding of plastic surgery and its profile of surgical interventions and options. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  18. Residents' response to bleeding during a simulated robotic surgery task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Jessica L; Nathwani, Jay N; Mohamadipanah, Hossein; Laufer, Shlomi; Jocewicz, Frank F; Gwillim, Eran; Pugh, Carla M

    2017-12-01

    The aim of this study was to assess performance measurement validity of our newly developed robotic surgery task trainer. We hypothesized that residents would exhibit wide variations in their intercohort performance as well as a measurable difference compared to surgeons in fellowship training. Our laboratory synthesized a model of a pelvic tumor that simulates unexpected bleeding. Surgical residents and fellows of varying specialties completed a demographic survey and were allowed 20 minutes to resect the tumor using the da Vinci robot and achieve hemostasis. At a standardized event in the simulation, venous bleeding began, and participants attempted hemostasis using suture ligation. A motion tracking system, using electromagnetic sensors, recorded participants' hand movements. A postparticipation Likert scale survey evaluated participants' assessment of the model's realism and usefulness. Three of the seven residents (postgraduate year 2-5), and the fellow successfully resected the tumor in the allotted time. Residents showed high variability in performance and blood loss (125-700 mL) both within their cohort and compared to the fellow (150 mL blood). All participants rated the model as having high realism and utility for trainees. The results support that our bleeding pelvic tumor simulator has the ability to discriminate resident performance in robotic surgery. The combination of motion, decision-making, and blood loss metrics offers a multilevel performance assessment, analyzing both technical and decision-making abilities. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Resident surgeon efficiency in femtosecond laser-assisted cataract surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pittner AC

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Andrew C Pittner,1 Brian R Sullivan2 1Department of Ophthalmology, Stritch School of Medicine, Loyola University Chicago, Maywood, 2Edward Hines Jr VA Hospital, Ophthalmology Section, Hines, IL, USA Purpose: Comparison of resident surgeon performance efficiencies in femtosecond laser-assisted cataract surgery (FLACS versus conventional phacoemulsification.Patients and methods: A retrospective cohort study was conducted on consecutive patients undergoing phacoemulsification cataract surgery performed by senior ophthalmology residents under the supervision of 1 attending physician during a 9-month period in a large Veterans Affairs medical center. Medical records were reviewed for demographic information, preoperative nucleus grade, femtosecond laser pretreatment, operative procedure times, total operating room times, and surgical complications. Review of digital video records provided quantitative interval measurements of core steps of the procedures, including completion of incisions, anterior capsulotomy, nucleus removal, cortical removal, and intraocular lens implantation.Results: Total room time, operation time, and corneal incision completion time were found to be significantly longer in the femtosecond laser group versus the traditional phacoemulsification group (each P<0.05. Mean duration for manual completion of anterior capsulotomy was shorter in the laser group (P<0.001. There were no statistically significant differences in the individual steps of nucleus removal, cortical removal, or intraocular lens placement. Surgical complication rates were not significantly different between the groups.Conclusion: In early cases, resident completion of femtosecond cataract surgery is generally less efficient when trainees have more experience with traditional phacoemulsification. FLACS was found to have a significant advantage in completion of capsulotomy, but subsequent surgical steps were not shorter or longer. Resident learning curve for the

  20. Progressive Surgical Autonomy in a Plastic Surgery Resident Clinic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Jillian K.; Gao, Lani; Lee, Tara M.; Waldrop, Jimmy L.; Sargent, Larry A.; Kennedy, J. Woody; Rehm, Jason P.; Brzezienski, Mark A.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Resident clinics are thought to catalyze educational milestone achievement through opportunities for progressively autonomous surgical care, but studies are lacking for general plastic surgery resident clinics (PSRCs). We demonstrate the achievement of increased surgical autonomy and continuity of care in a PSRC. Methods: A retrospective review of all patients seen in a PSRC from October 1, 2010, to October 1, 2015, was conducted. Our PSRC is supervised by faculty plastic surgery attendings, though primarily run by chief residents in an accredited independent plastic surgery training program. Surgical autonomy was scored on a 5-point scale based on dictated operative reports. Graduated chief residents were additionally surveyed by anonymous online survey. Results: Thousand one hundred forty-four patients were seen in 3,390 clinic visits. Six hundred fifty-three operations were performed by 23 total residents, including 10 graduating chiefs. Senior resident autonomy averaged 3.5/5 (SD = 1.5), 3.6/5 (SD = 1.5), to 3.8/5 (SD = 1.3) in postgraduate years 6, 7, and 8, respectively. A linear mixed model analysis demonstrated that training level had a significant impact on operative autonomy when comparing postgraduate years 6 and 8 (P = 0.026). Graduated residents’ survey responses (N = 10; 100% response rate) regarded PSRC as valuable for surgical experience (4.1/5), operative autonomy (4.4/5), medical knowledge development (4.7/5), and the practice of Accreditation Council of Graduate Medical Education core competencies (4.3/5). Preoperative or postoperative continuity of care was maintained in 93.5% of cases. Conclusion: The achievement of progressive surgical autonomy may be demonstrated within a PSRC model. PMID:28607848

  1. Objective Assessment of General Surgery Residents Followed by Remediation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gas, Becca L; Buckarma, EeeLN H; Mohan, Monali; Pandian, T K; Farley, David R

    Surgical training programs often lack objective assessment strategies. Complicated scheduling characteristics frequently make it difficult for surgical residents to undergo formal assessment; actually having the time and opportunity to remediate poor performance is an even greater problem. We developed a novel methodology of assessment for residents and created an efficient remediation system using a combination of simulation, online learning, and self-assessment options. Postgraduate year (PGY) 2 to 5 general surgery (GS) residents were tested in a 5 station, objective structured clinical examination style event called the Surgical X-Games. Stations were 15 minutes in length and tested both surgical knowledge and technical skills. Stations were scored on a scale of 1 to 5 (1 = Fail, 2 = Mediocre, 3 = Pass, 4 = Good, and 5 = Stellar). Station scores ≤ 2 were considered subpar and required remediation to a score ≥ 4. Five remediation sessions allowed residents the opportunity to practice the stations with staff surgeons. Videos of each skill or test of knowledge with clear instructions on how to perform at a stellar level were offered. Trainees also had the opportunity to checkout take-home task trainers to practice specific skills. Residents requiring remediation were then tested again in-person or sent in self-made videos of their performance. Academic medical center. PGY2, 3, 4, and 5 GS residents at Mayo Clinic in Rochester, MN. A total of, 35 residents participated in the Surgical X-Games in the spring of 2015. Among all, 31 (89%) had scores that were deemed subpar on at least 1 station. Overall, 18 (58%) residents attempted remediation. All 18 (100%) achieved a score ≥ 4 on the respective stations during a makeup attempt. Overall X-Games scores and those of PGY2s, 3s, and 4s were higher after remediation (p < 0.05). No PGY5s attempted remediation. Despite difficulties with training logistics and busy resident schedules, it is feasible to objectively

  2. Surgical Residents are Excluded From Robot-assisted Surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Broholm, Malene; Rosenberg, Jacob

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: Implementation of a robotic system may influence surgical training. The aim was to report the charge of the operating surgeon and the bedside assistant at robot-assisted procedures in urology, gynecology, and colorectal surgery. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A review of hospital charts from...... surgical procedures during a 1-year period from October 2013 to October 2014. All robot-assisted urologic, gynecologic, and colorectal procedures were identified. Charge of both operating surgeon in the console and bedside assistant were registered. RESULTS: A total of 774 robot-assisted procedures were...... performed. In 10 (1.3%) of these procedures, a resident attended as bedside assistant and never as operating surgeon in the console. CONCLUSIONS: Our results demonstrate a severe problem with surgical education. Robot-assisted surgery is increasingly used; however, robotic surgical training during residency...

  3. Surgery resident selection and evaluation. A critical incident study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, J C; Currie, M L; Wade, T P; Kaminski, D L

    1993-03-01

    This article reports a study of the process of selecting and evaluating general surgery residents. In personnel psychology terms, a job analysis of general surgery was conducted using the Critical Incident Technique (CIT). The researchers collected 235 critical incidents through structured interviews with 10 general surgery faculty members and four senior residents. The researchers then directed the surgeons in a two-step process of sorting the incidents into categories and naming the categories. The final essential categories of behavior to define surgical competence were derived through discussion among the surgeons until a consensus was formed. Those categories are knowledge/self-education, clinical performance, diagnostic skills, surgical skills, communication skills, reliability, integrity, compassion, organization skills, motivation, emotional control, and personal appearance. These categories were then used to develop an interview evaluation form for selection purposes and a performance evaluation form to be used throughout residency training. Thus a continuum of evaluation was established. The categories and critical incidents were also used to structure the interview process, which has demonstrated increased interview validity and reliability in many other studies. A handbook for structuring the interviews faculty members conduct with applicants was written, and an interview training session was held with the faculty. The process of implementation of the structured selection interviews is being documented currently through qualitative research.

  4. Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) Surgery Resident Operative Logs: The Last Quarter Century.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drake, Frederick Thurston; Aarabi, Shahram; Garland, Brandon T; Huntington, Ciara R; McAteer, Jarod P; Richards, Morgan K; Zern, Nicole Kansier; Gow, Kenneth W

    2017-05-01

    To describe secular trends in operative experience for surgical trainees across an extended period using the most comprehensive data available, the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) case logs. Some experts have expressed concern that current trainees are inadequately prepared for independent practice. One frequently mentioned factor is whether duty hours' restrictions (DHR) implemented in 2003 and 2004 contributed by reducing time spent in the operating room. A dataset was generated from annual ACGME reports. Operative volume for total major cases (TMC), defined categories, and four index laparoscopic procedures was evaluated. TMC dropped after implementation of DHR but rebounded after a transition period (949 vs 946 cases, P = nonsignificance). Abdominal cases increased from 22% of overall cases to 31%. Alimentary cases increased from 21% to 26%. Trauma and vascular surgery substantially decreased. For trauma, this drop took place well before DHR. The decrease in vascular surgery also began before DHR but continued afterward as well: 148 cases/resident in the late 1990s to 107 currently. Although total operative volume rebounded after implementation of DHR, diversity of operative experienced narrowed. The combined increase in alimentary and abdominal cases is nearly 13%, over a half-year's worth of operating in 5-year training programs. Bedrock general surgery cases-trauma, vascular, pediatrics, and breast-decreased. Laparoscopic operations have steadily increased. If the competence of current graduates has, in fact, diminished. Our analysis suggests that operative volume is not the problem. Rather, changing disease processes, subspecialization, reductions in resident autonomy, and technical innovation challenge how today's general surgeons are trained.

  5. The Current State of Global Surgery Training in Plastic Surgery Residency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayar, Harry S; Salyapongse, A Neil; Mount, Delora L; Bentz, Michael L

    2015-12-01

    The current state of global surgery training in U.S. plastic surgery residency programs remains largely undefined. An electronic survey was distributed to Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education-certified plastic surgery residency programs. Programs with global health curricula were queried regarding classification, collaboration details, regions visited, conditions/procedures encountered, costs, accreditation, and personal sentiment. Residencies without global health curricula were asked to select barriers. Sixty-four of 81 residency programs returned questionnaires (response rate, 79 percent). Twenty-six programs (41 percent) reported including a formal global health curriculum; 38 did not (59 percent). When asked to classify this curriculum, most selected clinical care experience [n = 24 (92 percent)], followed by educational experience [n = 19 (73 percent)]. Personal reference was the most common means of establishing the international collaboration [n = 19 (73 percent)]. The most commonly encountered conditions were cleft lip-cleft palate [n = 26 (100 percent)], thermal injury [n = 17 (65 percent)], and posttraumatic reconstruction [n = 15 (57 percent)]. Dominant funding sources were primarily nonprofit organizations [n = 14 (53 percent)]. Although the majority of programs had not applied for residency review committee accreditation [n = 23 (88 percent)], many considered applying [n = 16 (62 percent)]. Overall, 96 percent of programs (n = 25) supported global health training in residency, choosing exposure to different health systems [n = 22 (88 percent)] and surgical education [n = 17 (68 percent)] as reasons. Programs not offering a global health experience most commonly reported lack of residency review committee/plastic surgery operative log recognition of cases performed abroad [n = 27 (71 percent)], funding for trip expenses [n = 25 (66 percent)], and salary support [n = 24 (63 percent)] as barriers. Residencies incorporating global health

  6. A national review of the frequency of minimally invasive surgery among general surgery residents: assessment of ACGME case logs during 2 decades of general surgery resident training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Morgan K; McAteer, Jarod P; Drake, F Thurston; Goldin, Adam B; Khandelwal, Saurabh; Gow, Kenneth W

    2015-02-01

    Minimally invasive surgery (MIS) has created a shift in how many surgical diseases are treated. Examining the effect on resident operative experience provides valuable insight into trends that may be useful for restructuring the requirements of resident training. To evaluate changes in general surgery resident operative experience regarding MIS. Retrospective review of the frequency of MIS relative to open operations among general surgery residents using the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education case logs for academic years 1993-1994 through 2011-2012. General surgery residency training among accredited programs in the United States. We analyzed the difference in the mean number of MIS techniques and corresponding open procedures across training periods using 2-tailed t tests with statistical significance set at P technique throughout the study period (P enterectomy (5.2% MIS), vagotomy (1.8% MIS), and pediatric antireflux procedures (35.9% MIS); P surgical therapy for many common diseases. The open approach, however, still predominates in all but 5 procedures. Residents today must become efficient at performing multiple techniques for a single procedure, which demands a broader skill set than in the past.

  7. An evaluation of plastic surgery resident selection factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Fan; Rudnicki, Pamela A; Prince, Noah H; Lipsitz, Stuart; May, James W; Guo, Lifei

    2015-01-01

    article provides a framework for plastic surgery resident selection and a guide for applicants to ascertain which qualities are highly regarded by programs. Although these attributes are highly desirable, future studies could identify if they are predictive of successful and productive plastic surgery residencies and careers. Copyright © 2014 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Self-evaluation: how well do surgery residents judge performance on a rotation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gow, Kenneth W

    2013-05-01

    Surgical trainees are evaluated based on the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education 6 core competencies. The ability for a learner to recognize strengths and weaknesses in these areas allows for critical self-improvement. Surgery residents rotating on a pediatric surgery rotation for 1 academic year were asked at an exit interview to provide a self-evaluation within the 6 core competencies on a Likert scale from 1 to 5. Self-evaluation scores were compared with a final group consensus attending evaluation. Further analyses included comparing residents as follows: less than R3 (junior residents) versus R3 (senior residents) residents, general surgery versus non-general surgery residents, university versus community residents, residents in the first half of the academic year versus residents in the second half, and top one third- and lowest one third-performing residents. Statistical analysis was performed using Student t tests with significance at P surgery residents, and highest one third-performing residents compared with junior residents, non-general surgery residents, and lowest one third-performing residents. There were no differences between self-evaluations and attending evaluations when comparing university with community residents and residents in the first half of the academic year with residents in the second half of the academic year. Residents appear to have a more critical self-analysis than attending surgeons, with senior residents, general surgery residents, and highest one third-performing residents being the most critical of their own performance. Poorly performing residents appeared to lack insight into their abilities. This method of self-evaluation helps trainees reflect on their performance and highlights trainees who lack self-awareness and need counseling for improvement. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Analysis of clinical bioethics teaching in pediatric surgery residency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robin, M L; Caniano, D A

    1998-02-01

    Although clinical bioethics teaching (CBT) is not a required component of the essential curriculum for pediatric surgery residency, ethical considerations often accompany surgical decision making for infants and children. This study was designed to quantitate CBT during pediatric surgery residency (PSR) and to determine preferences about formal bioethics instruction. An 80-item questionnaire was mailed to 140 graduates of accredited PSR in the United States and Canada. Questions included demographic data, experience in CBT during and after PSR, preferred topics and teaching methods, and self-assessed and objective competency in bioethics. The response rate was 78% (n = 109); 72% completed PSR between 1990 and 1995 (mean, 1991). Formal CBT within the curriculum of PSR was reported by 9% of respondents; lecture and consultation with an ethicist were the most frequent teaching methods. Informal CBT was noted by 88% of pediatric surgeons; observation of patient cases with ethical dilemmas was the primary mode of instruction. Quality of life, withholding/withdrawal of care, informed consent, child abuse, and economics ranked highest for most important CBT topics, while euthanasia, clinical research trials, and cultural diversity were given low priority. The preferred teaching methods were case-based discussions and consultation with an ethicist. Although 97% favored additional CBT in all postgraduate training, respondents who completed advanced study in medical ethics (P < .05), were women (P < .05), or were members of a hospital ethics committee (P < .05) were more likely to advocate a standardized bioethics curriculum during PSR. A majority (86%) expressed competency in handling ethical problems in clinical practice, however, 47% gave incorrect responses or were unsure about routine bioethics questions. Formal instruction in clinical bioethics is not included in the curriculum of most residencies in pediatric surgery. Recent graduates of PSR favor case-based and

  10. Barriers to efficiency in robotic surgery: the resident effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Monica; Fry, Brian T; Hess, Luke W; Anger, Jennifer T; Gewertz, Bruce L; Catchpole, Ken

    2016-10-01

    Robotic surgery offers advantages over conventional operative approaches but may also be associated with higher costs and additional risks. Analyzing surgical flow disruptions (FDs), defined as "deviations from the natural progression of an operation," can help target training techniques and identify opportunities for improvement. Thirty-two robotic surgery operations were observed over a 6-wk period at one 900-bed surgical center. FDs were recorded in detail and classified into one of 11 different categories. Procedure type, robot model, and resident involvement were also recorded. Linear regression analyses were used to evaluate the effects of these parameters on FDs and operative duration. Twenty-one prostatectomies, eight sacrocolpopexies, and three nephrectomies were observed. The mean number of FDs was 48.2 (95% confidence interval [CI] 38.6-54.8 FDs), and mean operative duration was 163 min (95% CI 148-179 min). Each FD added 2.4 min (P = 0.025) to a case's total operative duration. The number and rate of FDs were significantly affected by resident involvement (P = 0.008 and P = 0.006, respectively). Resident cases demonstrated mostly training, equipment, and robot switch FDs, whereas nonresident cases demonstrated mostly equipment, instrument changes, and external factor FDs. Although the FDs encountered in resident training are more frequent, they may not significantly increase operative duration. Other FDs, such as equipment or external factors, may be more impactful. Limiting these specific FDs should be the focus of performance improvement efforts. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Emotional intelligence in surgery is associated with resident job satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollis, Robert H; Theiss, Lauren M; Gullick, Allison A; Richman, Joshua S; Morris, Melanie S; Grams, Jayleen M; Porterfield, John R; Chu, Daniel I

    2017-03-01

    Emotional intelligence (EI) has been associated with improved work performance and job satisfaction in several industries. We evaluated whether EI was associated with higher measures of work performance and job satisfaction in surgical residents. We distributed the validated Trait EI Questionnaire and job satisfaction survey to all general surgery residents at a single institution in 2015. EI and job satisfaction scores were compared with resident performance using faculty evaluations of clinical competency-based surgical milestones and standardized test scores including the United States Medical Licensing Examination (USMLE) and American Board of Surgery In-Training Examination (ABSITE). Statistical comparison was made using Pearson correlation and simple linear regression adjusting for postgraduate year level. The survey response rate was 68.9% with 31 resident participants. Global EI was associated with scores on USMLE Step 2 (r = 0.46, P = 0.01) and Step 3 (r = 0.54, P = 0.01) but not ABSITE percentile scores (r = 0.06, P = 0.77). None of the 16 surgical milestone scores were significantly associated with global EI or EI factors before or after adjustment for postgraduate level. Global EI was associated with overall job satisfaction (r = 0.37, P = 0.04). Of the facets of job satisfaction, global EI was significantly associated with views of supervision (r = 0.42, P = 0.02) and nature of work (r = 0.41, P = 0.02). EI was associated with job satisfaction and USMLE performance but not ACGME competency-based milestones or ABSITE scores. EI may be an important factor for fulfillment in surgical training that is not currently captured with traditional in-training performance measures. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  12. Role of the Vasa Vasorum and Vascular Resident Stem Cells in Atherosclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun-ichi Kawabe

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Atherosclerosis is considered an “inside-out” response, that begins with the dysfunction of intimal endothelial cells and leads to neointimal plaque formation. The adventitia of large blood vessels has been recognized as an active part of the vessel wall that is involved in the process of atherosclerosis. There are characteristic changes in the adventitial vasa vasorum that are associated with the development of atheromatous plaques. However, whether vasa vasorum plays a causative or merely reactive role in the atherosclerotic process is not completely clear. Recent studies report that the vascular wall contains a number of stem/progenitor cells that may contribute to vascular remodeling. Microvessels serve as the vascular niche that maintains the resident stem/progenitor cells of the tissue. Therefore, the vasa vasorum may contribute to vascular remodeling through not only its conventional function as a blood conducting tube, but also its new conceptual function as a stem cell reservoir. This brief review highlights the recent advances contributing to our understanding of the role of the adventitial vasa vasorum in the atherosclerosis and discusses new concept that involves vascular-resident factors, the vasa vasorum and its associated vascular-resident stem cells, in the atherosclerotic process.

  13. Variability in Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education Resident Case Log System practices among orthopaedic surgery residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salazar, Dane; Schiff, Adam; Mitchell, Erika; Hopkinson, William

    2014-02-05

    The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) Resident Case Log System is designed to be a reflection of residents' operative volume and an objective measure of their surgical experience. All operative procedures and manipulations in the operating room, Emergency Department, and outpatient clinic are to be logged into the Resident Case Log System. Discrepancies in the log volumes between residents and residency programs often prompt scrutiny. However, it remains unclear if such disparities truly represent differences in operative experiences or if they are reflections of inconsistent logging practices. The purpose of this study was to investigate individual recording practices among orthopaedic surgery residents prior to August 1, 2011. Orthopaedic surgery residents received a questionnaire on case log practices that was distributed through the Council of Orthopaedic Residency Directors list server. Respondents were asked to respond anonymously about recording practices in different clinical settings as well as types of cases routinely logged. Hypothetical scenarios of common orthopaedic procedures were presented to investigate the differences in the Current Procedural Terminology codes utilized. Two hundred and ninety-eight orthopaedic surgery residents completed the questionnaire; 37% were fifth-year residents, 22% were fourth-year residents, 18% were third-year residents, 15% were second-year residents, and 8% were first-year residents. Fifty-six percent of respondents reported routinely logging procedures performed in the Emergency Department or urgent care setting. Twenty-two percent of participants routinely logged procedures in the clinic or outpatient setting, 20% logged joint injections, and only 13% logged casts or splints applied in the office setting. There was substantial variability in the Current Procedural Terminology codes selected for the seven clinical scenarios. There has been a lack of standardization in case

  14. Opportunities to Create New General Surgery Residency Programs to Alleviate the Shortage of General Surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meagher, Ashley D; Beadles, Christopher A; Sheldon, George F; Charles, Anthony G

    2016-06-01

    To estimate the capacity for supporting new general surgery residency programs among U.S. hospitals that currently do not have such programs. The authors compiled 2011 American Hospital Association data regarding the characteristics of hospitals with and without a general surgery residency program and 2012 Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education data regarding existing general surgery residencies. They performed an ordinary least squares regression to model the number of residents who could be trained at existing programs on the basis of residency program-level variables. They identified candidate hospitals on the basis of a priori defined criteria for new general surgery residency programs and an out-of-sample prediction of resident capacity among the candidate hospitals. The authors found that 153 hospitals in 39 states could support a general surgery residency program. The characteristics of these hospitals closely resembled the characteristics of hospitals with existing programs. They identified 435 new residency positions: 40 hospitals could support 2 residents per year, 99 hospitals could support 3 residents, 12 hospitals could support 4 residents, and 2 hospitals could support 5 residents. Accounting for progressive specialization, new residency programs could add 287 additional general surgeons to the workforce annually (after an initial five- to seven-year lead time). By creating new general surgery residency programs, hospitals could increase the number of general surgeons entering the workforce each year by 25%. A challenge to achieving this growth remains finding new funding mechanisms within and outside Medicare. Such changes are needed to mitigate projected workforce shortages.

  15. Near infrared spectroscopy for frontal lobe oxygenation during non-vascular abdominal surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Henrik; Grocott, Hilary P; Secher, Niels H

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: Cerebral deoxygenation, as determined by near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS), seems to predict postoperative complications following cardiac surgery. We identify the type of non-vascular abdominal surgery associated with cerebral deoxygenation and/or hyperoxygenation, how such deviations a...

  16. The social media: its impact on a vascular surgery practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turnipseed, William D

    2013-04-01

    Social media has revolutionized interpersonal communication and has become a commonly used public informational resource. This study evaluates the impact of intranet informatics on a specialty practice of vascular surgery. Referral patterns for patients with chronic compartment syndrome (CCS) and popliteal entrapment syndrome (PAES) between 2008 and 2011 were analyzed. Demographics included referral source (physicians, nonphysicians), media resource, and case volume change. Prior to 2008, referrals came from local or regional sports medicine practices (100%). Since 2008 this pattern has changed; local/regional (80%), national (15%), and international (5%). Physician referrals dropped from 97% to 70%, and nonphysician referrals increased from 3% to 30%. Both CCS procedures and PAES procedures increased as remote geographic and public referrals increased. Referral change was associated with social media searches using applications such as PubMed and Google. Social media is an evolving source of medical information and patient referrals which physicians should cautiously embrace.

  17. Non-cardiogenic pulmonary oedema in vascular surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pararajasingam, R; Nicholson, M L; Bell, P R; Sayers, R D

    1999-02-01

    Non-cardiogenic pulmonary oedema, an early manifestation of the adult respiratory disease syndrome, is a serious complication following major vascular surgery. Hypovolaemia, ischaemia-reperfusion injury, massive blood transfusion, transient sepsis and transient endotoxaemia are insults responsible for initiating the process in vascular surgical patients. Free radicals, cytokines and humoral factors released secondary to the above insults activate neutrophils and facilitate their interaction with the endothelium. Activated neutrophils marginate through the endothelium where they are responsible for tissue injury by the release of free-radicals and proteases. The lungs are a large reservoir of neutrophils and bear a significant part of the injury. Conventional therapy includes treating the underlying condition and providing respiratory support. A better understanding of the pathophysiology of this process has led to new experimental treatment options. Novel therapeutic interventions have included the use of compounds to scavenge free radicals, anti-cytokine antibodies, extracorporeal lung support, nitric oxide and artificial surfactant therapy. The multifactorial nature of this process makes it unlikely that a single "magic bullet" will solve this problem. It is more likely that a combination of preventative, prophylactic and therapeutic modalities may reduce the mortality of this condition.

  18. Risk stratification for the development of respiratory adverse events following vascular surgery using the Society of Vascular Surgery's Vascular Quality Initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genovese, Elizabeth A; Fish, Larry; Chaer, Rabih A; Makaroun, Michel S; Baril, Donald T

    2017-02-01

    Postoperative respiratory adverse events (RAEs) are associated with high rates of morbidity and mortality in general surgery, however, little is known about these complications in the vascular surgery population, a frail subset with multiple comorbidities. The objective of this study was to describe the contemporary incidence of RAEs in vascular surgery patients, the risk factors for this complication, and the overall impact of RAEs on patient outcomes. The Vascular Quality Initiative was queried (2003-2014) for patients who underwent endovascular abdominal aortic repair, open abdominal aortic aneurysm repair, thoracic endovascular aortic repair, suprainguinal bypass, or infrainguinal bypass. A mixed-effects logistic regression model determined the independent risk factors for RAEs. Using a random 85% of the cohort, a risk prediction score for RAEs was created, and the score was validated using the remaining 15% of the cohort, comparing the predicted to the actual incidence of RAE and determining the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve. The independent risk of in-hospital mortality and discharge to a nursing facility associated with RAEs was determined using a mixed-effects logistic regression to control for baseline patient characteristics, operative variables, and other postoperative adverse events. The cohort consisted of 52,562 patients, with a 5.4% incidence of RAEs. The highest rates of RAEs were seen in current smokers (6.1%), recent acute myocardial infarction (10.1%), symptomatic congestive heart failure (9.9%), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease requiring oxygen therapy (11.0%), urgent and emergent procedures (6.4% and 25.9%, respectively), open abdominal aortic aneurysm repairs (17.6%), in situ suprainguinal bypasses (9.68%), and thoracic endovascular aortic repairs (9.6%). The variables included in the risk prediction score were age, body mass index, smoking status, congestive heart failure severity, chronic obstructive pulmonary

  19. The impact of an acute care surgery team on general surgery residency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatch, Quinton; McVay, Derek; Johnson, Eric K; Maykel, Justin A; Champagne, Bradley J; Steele, Scott R

    2014-11-01

    Acute care surgical teams (ACSTs) have limited data in residency. We sought to determine the impact of an ACST on the depth and breadth of general surgery resident training. One year prior to and after implementation of an ACST, Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education case logs spanning multiple postgraduate year levels were compared for numbers, case types, and complexity. We identified 6,009 cases, including 2,783 after ACST implementation. ACSTs accounted for 752 cases (27%), with 39.2% performed laparoscopically. ACST cases included biliary (19.4%), skin/soft tissue (10%), hernia (9.8%), and appendix (6.5%). Second-year residents performed a lower percentage of laparoscopic cases after the creation of the ACST (20.4% vs 26.3%; P = .003), while chief residents performed a higher percentage (42.1 vs 37.4; P = .04). Case numbers and complexity following ACST development were unchanged within all year groups (P > .1). ACST in a residency program does not sacrifice resident case complexity, diversity, or volume. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  20. Innovation in Pediatric Surgical Education for General Surgery Residents: A Mobile Web Resource.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouch, Joshua D; Wagner, Justin P; Scott, Andrew; Sullins, Veronica F; Chen, David C; DeUgarte, Daniel A; Shew, Stephen B; Tillou, Areti; Dunn, James C Y; Lee, Steven L

    2015-01-01

    General surgery residents lack a standardized educational experience in pediatric surgery. We hypothesized that the development of a mobile educational interface would provide general surgery residents broader access to pediatric surgical education materials. We created an educational mobile website for general surgery residents rotating on pediatric surgery, which included a curriculum, multimedia resources, the Operative Performance Rating Scale (OPRS), and Twitter functionality. Residents were instructed to consult the curriculum. Residents and faculty posted media using the Twitter hashtag, #UCLAPedSurg, and following each surgical procedure reviewed performance via the OPRS. Site visits, Twitter posts, and OPRS submissions were quantified from September 2013 to July 2014. The pediatric surgery mobile website received 257 hits; 108 to the homepage, 107 to multimedia, 28 to the syllabus, and 19 to the OPRS. All eligible residents accessed the content. The Twitter hashtag, #UCLAPedSurg, was assigned to 20 posts; the overall audience reach was 85 individuals. Participants in the mobile OPRS included 11 general surgery residents and 4 pediatric surgery faculty. Pediatric surgical education resources and operative performance evaluations are effectively administered to general surgery residents via a structured mobile platform. Copyright © 2015 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. General surgery resident rotations in surgical critical care, trauma, and burns: what is optimal for residency training?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Napolitano, Lena M; Biester, Thomas W; Jurkovich, Gregory J; Buyske, Jo; Malangoni, Mark A; Lewis, Frank R

    2016-10-01

    There are no specific Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education General Surgery Residency Program Requirements for rotations in surgical critical care (SCC), trauma, and burn. We sought to determine the experience of general surgery residents in SCC, trauma, and burn rotations. Data analysis of surgical rotations of American Board of Surgery general surgery resident applicants (n = 7,299) for the last 8 years (2006 to 2013, inclusive) was performed through electronic applications to the American Board of Surgery Qualifying Examination. Duration (months) spent in SCC, trauma, and burn rotations, and postgraduate year (PGY) level were examined. The total months in SCC, trauma and burn rotations was mean 10.2 and median 10.0 (SD 3.9 months), representing approximately 16.7% (10 of 60 months) of a general surgery resident's training. However, there was great variability (range 0 to 29 months). SCC rotation duration was mean 3.1 and median 3.0 months (SD 2, min to max: 0 to 15), trauma rotation duration was mean 6.3 and median 6.0 months (SD 3.5, min to max: 0 to 24), and burn rotation duration was mean 0.8 and median 1.0 months (SD 1.0, min to max: 0 to 6). Of the total mean 10.2 months duration, the longest exposure was 2 months as PGY-1, 3.4 months as PGY-2, 1.9 months as PGY-3, 2.2 months as PGY-4 and 1.1 months as PGY-5. PGY-5 residents spent a mean of 1 month in SCC, trauma, and burn rotations. PGY-4/5 residents spent the majority of this total time in trauma rotations, whereas junior residents (PGY-1 to 3) in SCC and trauma rotations. There is significant variability in total duration of SCC, trauma, and burn rotations and PGY level in US general surgery residency programs, which may result in significant variability in the fund of knowledge and clinical experience of the trainee completing general surgery residency training. As acute care surgery programs have begun to integrate emergency general surgery with SCC, trauma, and burn rotations

  2. Does intentional support of degree programs in general surgery residency affect research productivity or pursuit of academic surgery?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshua Smith, Jesse; Patel, Ravi K; Chen, Xi; Tarpley, Margaret J; Terhune, Kyla P

    2014-01-01

    Many residents supplement general surgery training with years of dedicated research, and an increasing number at our institution pursue additional degrees. We sought to determine whether it was worth the financial cost for residency programs to support degrees. We reviewed graduating chief residents (n = 69) in general surgery at Vanderbilt University from 2001 to 2010 and collected the data including research time and additional degrees obtained. We then compared this information with the following parameters: (1) total papers, (2) first-author papers, (3) Journal Citation Reports impact factors of journals in which papers were published, and (4) first job after residency or fellowship training. The general surgery resident training program at Vanderbilt University is an academic program, approved to finish training 7 chief residents yearly during the time period studied. Chief residents in general surgery at Vanderbilt who finished their training 2001 through 2010. We found that completion of a degree during residency was significantly associated with more total and first-author publications as compared with those by residents with only dedicated research time (p = 0.001 and p = 0.017). Residents completing a degree also produced publications of a higher caliber and level of authorship as determined by an adjusted resident impact factor score as compared with those by residents with laboratory research time only (p = 0.005). Degree completion also was significantly correlated with a first job in academia if compared to those with dedicated research time only (p = 0.046). Our data support the utility of degree completion when economically feasible and use of dedicated research time as an effective way to significantly increase research productivity and retain graduates in academic surgery. Aggregating data from other academic surgery programs would allow us to further determine association of funding of additional degrees as a means to encourage academic

  3. Pediatric Vascular Surgery Review with a 30-Year-Experience in a Tertiary Referral Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Seung-Kee; Cho, Sungsin; Kim, Hyun-Young; Kim, Sang Joon

    2017-01-01

    Pediatric vascular disease is rare, and remains a big challenge to vascular surgeons. In contrast to adults, surgery for pediatric vascular disease is complicated by issues related to small size, future growth, and availability of suitable vascular conduit. During the last 30 years, 131 major vascular operations were performed in a tertiary referral center, Seoul National University Hospital, including aortoiliac aneurysm, acute or chronic arterial occlusion, renovascular hypertension, portal venous hypertension, trauma, tumor invasion to major abdominal vessels, and others. Herein we review on the important pediatric vascular diseases and share our clinical experiences on these rare diseases. PMID:28690995

  4. Society for Vascular Surgery Vascular Registry evaluation of stent cell design on carotid artery stenting outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jim, Jeffrey; Rubin, Brian G; Landis, Gregg S; Kenwood, Christopher T; Siami, Flora S; Sicard, Gregorio A

    2011-07-01

    The Society for Vascular Surgery (SVS) Vascular Registry (VR) collects data on outcomes of carotid endarterectomy and carotid artery stenting (CAS). The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of open vs closed cell stent design on the in-hospital and 30-day outcome of CAS. The VR collects provider-reported data on patients using a Web-based database. Data were analyzed both in-hospital and at 30 days postprocedure. The primary outcome is combined death/stroke/myocardial infarction (MI). As of October 14, 2009, there were 4337 CAS with discharge data and 2397 with 30-day data. Open cell stents (OPEN) were used in 3451 patients (79.6%), and closed cell stents (CLOSED) were used in 866 patients (20.4%). Baseline demographics showed no differences in age, gender, race, and ethnicity. However, the OPEN group had more patients with atherosclerosis (74.5% vs 67.4%; P = .0003) as the etiology of carotid artery disease. The OPEN group also had a higher prevalence of preprocedural stroke (25.8% vs 21.4%; P = .0079), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD; 21.0% vs 17.6%; P = .0277), cardiac arrhythmia (14.7% vs 11.4%; P = .0108), valvular heart disease (7.4% vs 3.7%; P differences in the in-hospital or 30-day outcomes between the OPEN and CLOSED patients. Further subgroup analyses demonstrated symptomatic patients had a higher event rate than the asymptomatic cohort in both the OPEN and CLOSED groups. Among symptomatic patients, the OPEN patients had a lower (0.43% vs 1.41%; P = .0349) rate of in-hospital mortality with no difference in stroke or transient ischemic attack (TIA). There were no differences in 30-day event rates. In asymptomatic patients, there were also no statistically significant differences between the OPEN and CLOSED groups. After risk adjustment, there remained no statistically significant differences between groups of the primary endpoint (death/stroke/MI) during in-hospital or 30 days. In-hospital and 30-day outcomes after CAS were not

  5. Analysis and implications of changing hepatopancreatobiliary (HPB) case loads in general surgery residency training for HPB surgery accreditation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daee, Sally Sayeh; Flynn, Jeffrey C; Jacobs, Michael J; Mittal, Vijay K

    2013-01-01

    Objective This study was conducted to determine whether residents are receiving enough hepatopancreatobiliary (HPB) training during general surgery residencies to exclude the necessity of pursuing formal fellowships in HPB surgery. Methods Trends in HPB surgery training were examined using Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) operative log data for the academic years 1999/2000 to 2009/2010. Results Of 800 000 HPB operations performed annually in the USA, the proportion of HPB procedures performed by general surgery residents increased from 15% (122 007) to 18% (143 000) between the periods under study. Numbers of pancreatic, liver and biliary procedures performed by graduating general surgery residents increased by 47% (from 8185 to 12 006), 31% (from 7468 to 9765), and 14% (from 106 354 to 121 239), respectively. The mean number of operations undertaken by a graduating resident increased from 8.3 to 11.5 (38% increase) for pancreatic surgeries, from 7.6 to 9.4 (24% increase) for liver surgeries, and from 107.5 to 116.6 (8% increase) for biliary surgeries. Total numbers of complex pancreatic, liver and biliary procedures increased by 91% (from 4768 to 9129) and 24% (from 6649 to 8233), and decreased by 29% (from 6581 to 4648), respectively. Conclusions The overall trend shows an increase in the number of HPB procedures undertaken by graduating general surgery residents. The mean number of procedures exceeds ACGME requirements, but falls short of association guidelines. However, certain residents exceed International Hepato-Pancreato-Biliary Association (IHPBA) fellowship requirements for total and complex procedures during residency. Consideration should be given to those residents to allow them to bypass fellowship training provided that they meet other IHPBA standards. PMID:23521184

  6. Association of the 2011 ACGME resident duty hour reform with general surgery patient outcomes and with resident examination performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajaram, Ravi; Chung, Jeanette W; Jones, Andrew T; Cohen, Mark E; Dahlke, Allison R; Ko, Clifford Y; Tarpley, John L; Lewis, Frank R; Hoyt, David B; Bilimoria, Karl Y

    2014-12-10

    In 2011, the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) restricted resident duty hour requirements beyond those established in 2003, leading to concerns about the effects on patient care and resident training. To determine if the 2011 ACGME duty hour reform was associated with a change in general surgery patient outcomes or in resident examination performance. Quasi-experimental study of general surgery patient outcomes 2 years before (academic years 2009-2010) and after (academic years 2012-2013) the 2011 duty hour reform. Teaching and nonteaching hospitals were compared using a difference-in-differences approach adjusted for procedural mix, patient comorbidities, and time trends. Teaching hospitals were defined based on the proportion of cases at which residents were present intraoperatively. Patients were those undergoing surgery at hospitals participating in the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (ACS NSQIP). General surgery resident performance on the annual in-training, written board, and oral board examinations was assessed for this same period. National implementation of revised resident duty hour requirements on July 1, 2011, in all ACGME accredited residency programs. Primary outcome was a composite of death or serious morbidity; secondary outcomes were other postoperative complications and resident examination performance. In the main analysis, 204,641 patients were identified from 23 teaching (n = 102,525) and 31 nonteaching (n = 102,116) hospitals. The unadjusted rate of death or serious morbidity improved during the study period in both teaching (11.6% [95% CI, 11.3%-12.0%] to 9.4% [95% CI, 9.1%-9.8%], P oral board examinations during this period. Implementation of the 2011 ACGME duty hour reform was not associated with a change in general surgery patient outcomes or differences in resident examination performance. The implications of these findings should be considered when

  7. Bariatric surgery and the changing current scope of general surgery practice: implications for general surgery residency training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mostaedi, Rouzbeh; Ali, Mohamed R; Pierce, Jonathan L; Scherer, Lynette A; Galante, Joseph M

    2015-02-01

    The scope of general surgery practice has evolved tremendously in the last 20 years. However, clinical experience in general surgery residency training has undergone relatively little change. To evaluate the current scope of academic general surgery and its implications on surgical residency. The University HealthSystem Consortium and Association of American Medical Colleges established the Faculty Practice Solution Center (FPSC) to characterize physician productivity. The FPSC is a benchmarking tool for academic medical centers created from revenue data collected from more than 90,000 physicians who practice at 95 institutions across the United States. The FPSC database was queried to evaluate the annual mean procedure frequency per surgeon (PFS) in each calendar year from 2006 through 2011. The associated work relative value units (wRVUs) were also examined to measure physician effort and skill. During the 6-year period, 146 distinct Current Procedural Terminology codes were among the top 100 procedures, and 16 of these procedures ranked in the top 10 procedures in at least 1 year. The top 10 procedures accounted for more than half (range, 52.5%-57.2%) of the total 100 PFS evaluated for each year. Laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass was consistently among the top 10 procedures in each year (PFS, 18.2-24.6). The other most frequently performed procedures included laparoscopic cholecystectomy (PFS, 30.3-43.5), upper gastrointestinal tract endoscopy (PFS, 26.5-34.3), mastectomy (PFS, 16.5-35.0), inguinal hernia repair (PFS, 15.5-22.1), and abdominal wall hernia repair (PFS, 21.6-26.1). In all years, laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass generated the highest number of wRVUs (wRVUs, 491.0-618.2), and laparoscopic cholecystectomy was regularly the next highest (wRVUs, 335.8-498.7). A significant proportion of academic general surgery is composed of bariatric surgery, yet surgical training does not sufficiently emphasize the necessary exposure to technical expertise

  8. Defining the burden, scope, and future of vascular acute care surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Donald G; Herrera, Anthony; Drucker, Charles B; Kalsi, Richa; Menon, Nandakumar; Toursavadkohi, Shahab; Diaz, Jose J; Crawford, Robert S

    2017-11-01

    The paradigm of acute care surgery has revolutionized nonelective general surgery. Similarly, nonelective vascular surgery may benefit from specific management and resource capabilities. To establish the burden and scope of vascular acute care surgery, we analyzed the characteristics and outcomes of patients hospitalized for vascular surgical procedures in Maryland. A retrospective analysis of a statewide inpatient database was performed to identify patients undergoing noncardiac vascular procedures in Maryland from 2009 to 2013. Patients were stratified by admission acuity as elective, urgent, or emergent, with the last two groups defined as acute. The primary outcome was inpatient mortality, and secondary outcomes were critical care and hospital resource requirements. Groups were compared by univariate analyses, with multivariable analysis of mortality based on acuity level and other potential risk factors for death. Of 3,157,499 adult hospital admissions, 154,004 (5%) patients underwent a vascular procedure; most were acute (54% emergent, 13% urgent), whereas 33% were elective. Acute patients had higher rates of critical care morbidity and required more hospital resource utilization. Admission for acute vascular surgery was independently associated with mortality (urgent odds ratio, 2.1; emergent odds ratio, 3.0). The majority of inpatient vascular care in Maryland is for acute vascular surgery, which is an independent risk factor for mortality. Acute vascular surgical care entails greater critical care and hospital resource utilization and-similar to emergency general surgery-may benefit from dedicated training and practice models. Copyright © 2017 Society for Vascular Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Determining preferred educational methods for neurological surgery residents regarding organ donation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, G; McGaw, J

    1998-03-01

    Design and implementation of professional education, especially physician education, continues to challenge procurement professionals. At the request of the American Association of Neurological Surgeons and the Congress of Neurological Surgeons, the United Network for Organ Sharing undertook a project to develop educational materials for neurological surgery residents. A survey tool was developed and administered on site at 11 neurological surgery residency programs in the United States. The survey explored the types of learning environments, teaching methods, educational resources, and audiovisual aids that neurological surgery residents typically experience during their residency programs. In addition, the survey sought to uncover the residents' informational needs regarding organ and tissue donation presentations as well as their educational program preferences. Based on our findings, neurological surgery residents prefer presentations that are brief and to the point, that are easily understood, that require no reading, that contain limited important information, and that always include food.

  10. Comparative Assessment of Grit, Conscientiousness, and Self-Control in Applicants Interviewing for Residency Positions and Current Orthopaedic Surgery Residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Anne M; Townsend, Kimberly W; Davis, Shauna; Nouryan, Lola; Bostrom, Mathias P G; Felix, Karla J

    2017-09-27

    The purpose of this study was to quantify grit, conscientiousness, and self-control in orthopaedic residency applicants and current orthopaedic surgery residents. As part of a continual reassessment of the selection process, this study will help to improve this process by assessing the introduction of these non-cognitive assessments. This is the first study to both evaluate and compare the applicants' scores to those of current residents. This introduction will allow selection of not only the current top performers but those who have the wherewithal (read grit) to sustain their efforts throughout their residency. A cross-sectional study composed of a confidential electronic survey consisting of a 17-item Grit scale, 10-item Self-control scale, and 9-item Conscientiousness scale was completed by medical school applicants and orthopaedic residents. Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Hospital for Special Surgery. Fifty-six (100%) medical student applicants (mean age = 27) were invited to participate in our study following a full day of interviews. Forty-five residents (mean age = 31) were asked and 32 (72%) completed the same surveys 4 months later. There was a significant difference in grit for medical students (M = 4.19, SD = 0.34) and residents (M =3.86, SD = 0.48); t(86) = 3.76, p = 0.000. All grit subscales were also significantly different for medical students versus residents. Medical students (conscientiousness M = 4.60, SD = 0.41; self-control M = 3.51, SD = 0.30) and residents (conscientiousness M = 4.42, SD = 0.53; self-control M = 3.31, SD = 0.73) scored similarly in the conscientiousness t(86) = 1.75, p = 0.084 and self-control scales t(86) = 1.74, p = 0.086. Academic performance indicators such as the USMLE scores and residency ranking were also compared among medical student applicants. The similar and above average levels of conscientiousness and self-control demonstrate the persevering nature of the individual who elects to pursue an orthopaedic

  11. The ACGME case log: General surgery resident experience in pediatric surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gow, Kenneth W.; Drake, F. Thurston; Aarabi, Shahram; Waldhausen, John H.

    2014-01-01

    Background General surgery (GS) residents in ACGME programs log cases performed during their residency. We reviewed designated pediatric surgery (PS) cases to assess for changes in performed cases over time. Methods The ACGME case logs for graduating GS residents were reviewed from academic year (AY) 1989–1990 to 2010–2011 for designated pediatric cases. Overall and designated PS cases were analyzed. Data were combined into five blocks: Period I (AY1989–90 to AY1993–94), Period II (AY1994–95 to AY1998–99), Period III (AY1999–00 to AY2002–03), Period IV (AY2003–04 to AY2006–07), and Period V (AY2007–08 to AY2010–11). Periods IV and V were delineated by implementation of duty hour restrictions. Student t-tests compared averages among the time periods with significance at P < .05. Results Overall GS case load remained relatively stable. Of total cases, PS cases accounted for 5.4% in Period I and 3.7% in Period V. Designated pediatric cases declined for each period from an average of 47.7 in Period I to 33.8 in Period V. These changes are due to a decline in hernia repairs, which account for half of cases. All other cases contributed only minimally to the pediatric cases. The only laparoscopic cases in the database were anti-reflux procedures, which increased over time. Conclusions GS residents perform a diminishing number of designated PS cases. This decline occurred before the onset of work-hour restrictions. These changes have implications on the capabilities of the current graduating workforce. However, the case log does not reflect all cases trainees may be exposed to, so revision of this list is recommended. PMID:23932601

  12. The ACGME case log: general surgery resident experience in pediatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gow, Kenneth W; Drake, F Thurston; Aarabi, Shahram; Waldhausen, John H

    2013-08-01

    General surgery (GS) residents in ACGME programs log cases performed during their residency. We reviewed designated pediatric surgery (PS) cases to assess for changes in performed cases over time. The ACGME case logs for graduating GS residents were reviewed from academic year (AY) 1989-1990 to 2010-2011 for designated pediatric cases. Overall and designated PS cases were analyzed. Data were combined into five blocks: Period I (AY1989-90 to AY1993-94), Period II (AY1994-95 to AY1998-99), Period III (AY1999-00 to AY2002-03), Period IV (AY2003-04 to AY2006-07), and Period V (AY2007-08 to AY2010-11). Periods IV and V were delineated by implementation of duty hour restrictions. Student t-tests compared averages among the time periods with significance at P pediatric cases declined for each period from an average of 47.7 in Period I to 33.8 in Period V. These changes are due to a decline in hernia repairs, which account for half of cases. All other cases contributed only minimally to the pediatric cases. The only laparoscopic cases in the database were anti-reflux procedures, which increased over time. GS residents perform a diminishing number of designated PS cases. This decline occurred before the onset of work-hour restrictions. These changes have implications on the capabilities of the current graduating workforce. However, the case log does not reflect all cases trainees may be exposed to, so revision of this list is recommended. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Gender Distribution of General Surgery Residents at the University of Puerto Rico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, Norma I; Rivera, Fernando; Santiago, Elvis

    2016-03-01

    To determine whether the number of women accepted to the University of Puerto Rico (UPR) general surgery residency program has increased in recent years. We examined the gender distribution of residents accepted in their first postgraduate year (PGY-1) by the UPR Surgery Department from 1958 to 2014. This information was obtained from the database of graduate residents, which collects information on gender, medical school from which they graduated, the years in which they were in the residency program, and, their specialty. We evaluated all the residents admitted to PGY-1 positions in surgery (1958-2014) and of those admitted to PGY-1 categorical general surgery positions (1983-2014). The study was IRB approved. Since 1958 the number of female residents admitted as PGY-1s to the UPR Surgery Department has augmented, starting with 2% in the 1960s and rising to 36% in 2014. The percentage of categorical female residents was 11% in the 1983 to 1990 period, 14% in the 1991 to 2000 period, 18% in the 2001 to 2010 period, and 35% in the 2011 to 2014 period. We found an increase in the number of women admitted to the general surgery program over the last several years. However, despite this increase some degree of gender inequality remains in most surgery programs. Currently, 60% of undergraduate students and 50% of medical students are women, but only 36% of surgical residents are women. Future studies need to address the reasons for the small number of women in surgical programs.

  14. Application of a Penrose drain guide for vascular stapling during hepatic surgery: how I do it.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks, Caitlin W; Choti, Michael A

    2014-02-01

    The use of stapling devices to manage vascular pedicles during hepatic surgery has been a significant advance in the field. However, insertion and application of the stapler in vascular dissection planes can be associated with injury to adjacent structures. We describe a five-step technique using a silicone Penrose drain to aid in the positioning of an endovascular stapling device to obtain vascular control during hepatectomy. The use is described here for hepatic vein management during right hepatectomy. The technique can be also used for other applications when transecting major vessels during major liver surgery. The use of this silicone Penrose-guided endovascular stapler technique is a simple, cost-effective maneuver that can be used to improve control and prevent vascular injury during the division of major vascular structures when performing hepatic surgery.

  15. Measuring general surgery residents' communication skills from the patient's perspective using the Communication Assessment Tool (CAT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stausmire, Julie M; Cashen, Constance P; Myerholtz, Linda; Buderer, Nancy

    2015-01-01

    The Communication Assessment Tool (CAT) has been used and validated to assess Family and Emergency Medicine resident communication skills from the patient's perspective. However, it has not been previously reported as an outcome measure for general surgery residents. The purpose of this study is to establish initial benchmarking data for the use of the CAT as an evaluation tool in an osteopathic general surgery residency program. Results are analyzed quarterly and used by the program director to provide meaningful feedback and targeted goal setting for residents to demonstrate progressive achievement of interpersonal and communication skills with patients. The 14-item paper version of the CAT (developed by Makoul et al. for residency programs) asks patients to anonymously rate surgery residents on discrete communication skills using a 5-point rating scale immediately after the clinical encounter. Results are reported as the percentage of items rated as "excellent" (5) by the patient. The setting is a hospital-affiliated ambulatory urban surgery office staffed by the residency program. Participants are representative of adult patients of both sexes across all ages with diverse ethnic backgrounds. They include preoperative and postoperative patients, as well as those needing diagnostic testing and follow-up. Data have been collected on 17 general surgery residents from a single residency program representing 5 postgraduate year levels and 448 patient encounters since March 2012. The reliability (Cronbach α) of the tool for surgery residents was 0.98. The overall mean percentage of items rated as excellent was 70% (standard deviations = 42%), with a median of 100%. The CAT is a useful tool for measuring 1 facet of resident communication skills-the patient's perception of the physician-patient encounter. The tool provides a unique and personalized outcome measure for identifying communication strengths and improvement opportunities, allowing residents to receive

  16. Variability in 2-year training programs in vascular surgery based on results of an Association of Program Directors in Vascular Surgery survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calligaro, Keith D; Pineda, Danielle M; Tyagi, Sam; Zheng, Hong; Troutman, Douglas A; Dougherty, Matthew J

    2017-06-01

    Although a great deal of attention has recently focused on 5-year integrated (0+5) training programs in vascular surgery, a paucity of data exists concerning variability of daily assignments in 2-year (5+2) vascular fellowships. We polled Association of Program Directors in Vascular Surgery members with 2-year vascular fellowships to determine the number of days in a 5-day work week that first- and second-year fellows were assigned to open vascular operations, endovascular procedures (hospital vs nonhospital facility), arterial clinic, venous clinic, noninvasive vascular laboratory (NIVL), and research. Of the 103 program directors from 5+2 vascular training programs, 102 (99%) responded. The most common schedule for both first- and second-year fellows was performing both open and endovascular procedures in the hospital on the same day 4 days of the week and spending time in combined artery and vein clinic 1 day of the week. Program directors developed different schedules for each year of the 2-year fellowship in about half (55% [56]) of the programs. A small minority of programs devoted days to only open surgical cases (13% [13]), a separate venous clinic (17% [17]), or a separate arterial clinic (11% [11]) and performed endovascular procedures in a nonhospital facility (15% [15]). All but three programs had mandatory time in clinic both years. Approximately one-third (30% [31]) of programs designated time devoted to research, whereas the others expected fellows to find time on their own. Although passing the Registered Physician in Vascular Interpretation examination is required, there was devoted time in the NIVL in only 60% (61) of programs. Training assignments in terms of time spent performing open and endovascular procedures and participating in clinic, the NIVL, and research varied widely among Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education-accredited 5+2 vascular fellowships and did not always fulfill Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical

  17. Progressive Entrustment to Achieve Resident Autonomy in the Operating Room: A National Qualitative Study With General Surgery Faculty and Residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandhu, Gurjit; Magas, Christopher P; Robinson, Adina B; Scally, Christopher P; Minter, Rebecca M

    2017-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify behaviors that faculty and residents exhibit during intraoperative interactions, which support or inhibit progressive entrustment leading to operative autonomy. In the operating room, a critical balance is sought between direct faculty supervision and appropriate increase in resident autonomy with indirect faculty supervision. Little is known regarding perspectives of faculty and residents about how attendings increasingly step back and safely delegate autonomy to trainees. Understanding the context in which these decisions are made is critical to achieving a safe strategy for imparting progressive responsibility. A qualitative study was undertaken from January 2014 to February 2015. Semistructured interviews were conducted with 37 faculty and 59 residents from 14 and 41 institutions, respectively. Participants were selected using stratified random sampling from general surgery residency programs across the United States to represent a range of university, university-affiliated, and community programs, and geographic regions. Audio recordings of interviews were transcribed, iteratively analyzed, and emergent themes identified. Six themes were identified as influencing progressive entrustment in the operating room: optimizing faculty intraoperative feedback; policies and regulations affecting role of resident in the operating room; flexible faculty teaching strategies; context-specific variables; leadership opportunities for resident in the case; and safe struggle for resident when appropriate. Perspectives of faculty and residents while overlapping were different in emphasis. Better understanding faculty-resident interactions, individual behaviors, contextual influences, and national regulations that influence intraoperative education have the potential to significantly affect progressive entrustment in training paradigms.

  18. External Mechanical Devices and Vascular Surgery for Erectile Dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trost, Landon W; Munarriz, Ricardo; Wang, Run; Morey, Allen; Levine, Laurence

    2016-11-01

    The field of sexual medicine is continuously advancing, with novel outcomes reported on a regular basis. Given the rapid evolution, updated guidelines are essential to inform practicing clinicians on best practices. To summarize the current literature and provide clinical guidelines on penile traction therapy, vacuum erection devices, and penile revascularization. A consensus panel was held with leading sexual medicine experts during the 2015 International Consultation on Sexual Medicine (ICSM). Relevant literature was reviewed and graded based on Oxford criteria to develop evidence-based guideline and consensus statements. The development of clinically relevant guidelines. Penile traction therapy is a viable therapy to modestly improve penile length as a primary therapy, before penile prosthesis placement in men with decreased penile length or after surgery for Peyronie's disease. It also might have a role in the acute phase of Peyronie's disease but has inconsistent outcomes in the long-term phase. Vacuum erection devices are effective in creating an erection satisfactory for intercourse, even in difficult-to-treat populations. They also might be used in the post-prostatectomy setting to maintain penile length but have insufficient evidence as a penile rehabilitation therapy. For vasculogenic erectile dysfunction, men with suspected arterial insufficiency can be evaluated with penile Duplex Doppler ultrasonography and confirmatory angiography. Penile revascularization procedures have consistently demonstrated benefits in very select patient populations; however, inadequate data exists to suggest the superiority of one technique. Men with vascular risk factors are likely poor candidates for penile revascularization, although veno-occlusive dysfunction and age are less significant. Therapies for treating primary veno-occlusive dysfunction are not recommended and should be reserved for clinical trials. Since the prior ICSM meeting, multiple developments have

  19. Mycoplasma in urine and blood following catheterisation of patients undergoing vascular surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Levi, N; Eiberg, J; Skov Jensen, J

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to determine if mycoplasmas enter the bloodstream after urinary tract catheterisation in patients undergoing vascular surgery in order to evaluate the efficiency of the routine prophylactic antibiotic treatment.......The purpose of this investigation was to determine if mycoplasmas enter the bloodstream after urinary tract catheterisation in patients undergoing vascular surgery in order to evaluate the efficiency of the routine prophylactic antibiotic treatment....

  20. Experimental autologous substitute vascular graft for transplantation surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kobori, L; Dallos, G; Gouw, ASH; Nemeth, T; Nemes, B; Fehervari, I; Tegzess, Adam; Slooff, MJH; Perner, F; De Jong, KP

    2000-01-01

    Vascular complications in fiver transplantation are a major cause of graft failure and mortality. The aim of the study was to create autologous vascular graft without risk of rejection. Posterior rectus fascia sheath lined with peritoneum was used for iliac artery replacement in seven mongrel dogs.

  1. Resident Cosmetic Clinic: Practice Patterns, Safety, and Outcomes at an Academic Plastic Surgery Institution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qureshi, Ali A; Parikh, Rajiv P; Myckatyn, Terence M; Tenenbaum, Marissa M

    2016-10-01

    Comprehensive aesthetic surgery education is an integral part of plastic surgery residency training. Recently, the ACGME increased minimum requirements for aesthetic procedures in residency. To expand aesthetic education and prepare residents for independent practice, our institution has supported a resident cosmetic clinic for over 25 years. To evaluate the safety of procedures performed through a resident clinic by comparing outcomes to benchmarked national aesthetic surgery outcomes and to provide a model for resident clinics in academic plastic surgery institutions. We identified a consecutive cohort of patients who underwent procedures through our resident cosmetic clinic between 2010 and 2015. Major complications, as defined by CosmetAssure database, were recorded and compared to published aesthetic surgery complication rates from the CosmetAssure database for outcomes benchmarking. Fisher's exact test was used to compare sample proportions. Two hundred and seventy-one new patients were evaluated and 112 patients (41.3%) booked surgery for 175 different aesthetic procedures. There were 55 breast, 19 head and neck, and 101 trunk or extremity aesthetic procedures performed. The median number of preoperative and postoperative visits was 2 and 4 respectively with a mean follow-up time of 35 weeks. There were 3 major complications (2 hematomas and 1 infection requiring IV antibiotics) with an overall complication rate of 1.7% compared to 2.0% for patients in the CosmetAssure database (P = .45). Surgical outcomes for procedures performed through a resident cosmetic clinic are comparable to national outcomes for aesthetic surgery procedures, suggesting this experience can enhance comprehensive aesthetic surgery education without compromising patient safety or quality of care. 4 Risk. © 2016 The American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery, Inc. Reprints and permission: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Cyanoacrylate Skin Microsealant for Preventing Surgical Site Infection after Vascular Surgery : A Discontinued Randomized Clinical Trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vierhout, Bastiaan P.; Ott, Alewijn; Reijnen, Michel M. P. J.; Oskam, Jacques; Ott, Alewijn; van den Dungen, Jan J. A. M.; Zeebregts, Clark J.

    Background: Surgical site infections (SSI) after vascular surgery are related to substantial morbidity. Restriction of bacterial access to the site of surgery with a cyanoacrylate sealant is a new concept. We performed a randomized clinical trial to assess the effect of the sealing of skin with a

  3. Association of Program Directors in Vascular Surgery (APDVS) survey of program selection, knowledge acquisition, and education provided as viewed by vascular trainees from two different training paradigms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalsing, Michael C; Makaroun, Michel S; Harris, Linda M; Mills, Joseph L; Eidt, John; Eckert, George J

    2012-02-01

    Methods of learning may differ between generations and even the level of training or the training paradigm, or both. To optimize education, it is important to optimize training designs, and the perspective of those being trained can aid in this quest. The Association of Program Directors in Vascular Surgery leadership sent a survey to all vascular surgical trainees (integrated [0/5], independent current and new graduates [5 + 2]) addressing various aspects of the educational experience. Of 412 surveys sent, 163 (∼40%) responded: 46 integrated, 96 fellows, and 21 graduates. The survey was completed by 52% of the integrated residents, 59% of the independent residents, and 20% of the graduates. When choosing a program for training, the integrated residents are most concerned with program atmosphere and the independent residents with total clinical volume. Concerns after training were thoracic and thoracoabdominal aneurysm procedures and business aspects: 40% to 50% integrated, and 60% fellows/graduates. Integrated trainees found periprocedural discussion the best feedback (79%), with 9% favoring written test review. Surgical training and vascular laboratory and venous training were judged "just right" by 87% and ∼71%, whereas business aspects needed more emphasis (65%-70%). Regarding the 80-hour workweek, 82% felt it prevented fatigue, and 24% thought it was detrimental to patient care. Independent program trainees also found periprocedural discussion the best feedback (71%), with 12% favoring written test review. Surgical training and vascular laboratory/venous training were "just right" by 87% and 60% to 70%, respectively, whereas business aspects needed more emphasis (∼65%-70%). Regarding the 80-hour workweek, 62% felt it was detrimental to patient care, and 42% felt it prevented fatigue. A supportive environment and adequate clinical volume will attract trainees to a program. For "an urgent need to know," the integrated trainees are especially turning to

  4. Resident continuity of care experience in a Canadian general surgery training program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidhu, Ravindar S.; Walker, G. Ross

    Objectives To provide baseline data on resident continuity of care experience, to describe the effect of ambulatory centre surgery on continuity of care, to analyse continuity of care by level of resident training and to assess a resident-run preadmission clinic’s effect on continuity of care. Design Data were prospectively collected for 4 weeks. All patients who underwent a general surgical procedure were included if a resident was present at operation. Setting The Division of General Surgery, Queen’s University, Kingston, Ont. Outcome measures Preoperative, operative and inhospital postoperative involvement of each resident with each case was recorded. Results Residents assessed preoperatively (before entering the operating room) 52% of patients overall, 20% of patients at the ambulatory centre and 83% of patients who required emergency surgery. Of patients assessed by the chief resident, 94% were assessed preoperatively compared with 32% of patients assessed by other residents ( p 0.1). Conclusions This study serves as a reference for the continuity of care experience in Canadian surgical programs. Residents assessed only 52% of patients preoperatively, and only 40% of patients had complete continuity of care. Factors such as ambulatory surgery and junior level of training negatively affected continuity experience. Such factors must be taken into account in planning surgical education. PMID:10526519

  5. Performance of Vascular Exposure and Fasciotomy Among Surgical Residents Before and After Training Compared With Experts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackenzie, Colin F; Garofalo, Evan; Puche, Adam; Chen, Hegang; Pugh, Kristy; Shackelford, Stacy; Tisherman, Samuel; Henry, Sharon; Bowyer, Mark W

    2017-06-01

    Surgical patient outcomes are related to surgeon skills. To measure resident surgeon technical and nontechnical skills for trauma core competencies before and after training and up to 18 months later and to compare resident performance with the performance of expert traumatologists. This longitudinal study performed from May 1, 2013, through February 29, 2016, at Maryland State Anatomy Board cadaver laboratories included 40 surgical residents and 10 expert traumatologists. Performance was measured during extremity vascular exposures and lower extremity fasciotomy in fresh cadavers before and after taking the Advanced Surgical Skills for Exposure in Trauma (ASSET) course. The primary outcome variable was individual procedure score (IPS), with secondary outcomes of IPSs on 5 components of technical and nontechnical skills, Global Rating Scale scores, errors, and time to complete the procedure. Two trained evaluators located in the same laboratory evaluated performance with a standardized script and mobile touch-screen data collection. Thirty-eight (95%) of 40 surgical residents (mean [SD] age, 31 [2.9] years) who were evaluated before and within 4 weeks of ASSET training completed follow-up evaluations 12 to 18 months later (mean [SD], 14 [2.7] months). The experts (mean [SD] age, 52 [10.0] years) were significantly older and had a longer (mean [SD], 46 [16.3] months) interval since taking the ASSET course (both P performance improved with increased anatomy knowledge, correct procedural steps, and decreased errors from 60% to 19% after the ASSET course regardless of clinical year of training (P performance was within 1 nearest-neighbor classifier of experts after ASSET training. Five residents had no improvement with training. The Trauma Readiness Index for experts (mean [SD], 74 [4]) was significantly different compared with the trained residents (mean [SD], 48 [7] before training vs 63 [7] after training [P = .004] and vs 64 [6] 14 months later [P

  6. Relationship of procedural numbers with meaningful procedural autonomy in general surgery residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stride, Herbert P; George, Brian C; Williams, Reed G; Bohnen, Jordan D; Eaton, Megan J; Schuller, Mary C; Zhao, Lihui; Yang, Amy; Meyerson, Shari L; Scully, Rebecca; Dunnington, Gary L; Torbeck, Laura; Mullen, John T; Mandell, Samuel P; Choti, Michael; Foley, Eugene; Are, Chandrakanth; Auyang, Edward; Chipman, Jeffrey; Choi, Jennifer; Meier, Andreas; Smink, Douglas; Terhune, Kyla P; Wise, Paul; DaRosa, Debra; Soper, Nathaniel; Zwischenberger, Jay B; Lillemoe, Keith; Fryer, Jonathan P

    2017-12-23

    Concerns exist regarding the competency of general surgery graduates with performing core general surgery procedures. Current competence assessment incorporates minimal procedural numbers requirements. Based on the Zwisch scale we evaluated the level of autonomy achieved by categorical PGY1-5 general surgery residents at 14 U.S. general surgery resident training programs between September 1, 2015 and December 31, 2016. With 5 of the most commonly performed core general surgery procedures, we correlated the level of autonomy achieved by each resident with the number of procedures they had performed before the evaluation period, with the intent of identifying specific target numbers that would correlate with the achievement of meaningful autonomy for each procedure with most residents. Whereas a definitive target number was identified for laparoscopic appendectomy (i.e. 25), for the other 4 procedures studied (i.e. laparoscopic cholecystectomy, 52; open inguinal hernia repair, 42; ventral hernia repair, 35; and partial colectomy, 60), target numbers identified were less definitive and/or were higher than many residents will experience during their surgical residency training. We conclude that procedural target numbers are generally not effective in predicting procedural competence and should not be used as the basis for determining residents' readiness for independent practice. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  7. Impact of a Strabismus Surgery Suture Course for First- and Second-Year Ophthalmology Residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vagge, Aldo; Gunton, Kammi; Schnall, Bruce

    2017-11-01

    To investigate the effectiveness of an eye muscle surgery course on first- and second-year postgraduate ophthalmology residents. This prospective cohort pilot study invited first- and second-year ophthalmology residents to participate in a 2-hour strabismus surgery course at Wills Eye Hospital. The course consisted of a didactic session followed by a wet laboratory session. The wet laboratory session simulated strabismus surgery using a model constructed of chicken breast followed by partial-thickness scleral suture passes in pig eyes. A structured self-assessment evaluation form and a questionnaire in the validated Ophthalmology Surgical Competency Assessment Rubric approved by the International Council of Ophthalmology (ICO-OSCAR:strabismus) were used to assess the effectiveness of the course. A total of 12 residents, 8 (67%) first-year and 4 (33%) second-year, were enrolled for this survey. Following the course, most residents felt less anxious (73%). All residents responded that the course was helpful or somewhat helpful in preparation for strabismus surgery. Regarding the distribution of ratings on questions of subjective experience, knowledge of steps, and understanding of potential complications, the residents gave significantly higher ratings after the course (P < .029). The change in the modified ICO-OSCAR:strabismus assessment's mean score was statistically significant before and after training (P = .038). A strabismus course can play an important role in preparing residents for strabismus surgery. [J Pediatr Ophthalmol Strabismus. 2017;54(6):339-345.]. Copyright 2017, SLACK Incorporated.

  8. Learning styles of medical students, general surgery residents, and general surgeons: implications for surgical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engels, Paul T; de Gara, Chris

    2010-06-30

    Surgical education is evolving under the dual pressures of an enlarging body of knowledge required during residency and mounting work-hour restrictions. Changes in surgical residency training need to be based on available educational models and research to ensure successful training of surgeons. Experiential learning theory, developed by David Kolb, demonstrates the importance of individual learning styles in improving learning. This study helps elucidate the way in which medical students, surgical residents, and surgical faculty learn. The Kolb Learning Style Inventory, which divides individual learning styles into Accommodating, Diverging, Converging, and Assimilating categories, was administered to the second year undergraduate medical students, general surgery resident body, and general surgery faculty at the University of Alberta. A total of 241 faculty, residents, and students were surveyed with an overall response rate of 73%. The predominant learning style of the medical students was assimilating and this was statistically significant (p learning style found in the residents and faculty. The predominant learning styles of the residents and faculty were convergent and accommodative, with no statistically significant differences between the residents and the faculty. We conclude that medical students have a significantly different learning style from general surgical trainees and general surgeons. This has important implications in the education of general surgery residents.

  9. Our vascular surgery experiences in Syrian civil war

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    İyad Fansa

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Due to the ongoing civil war in Syria, numerous vascular injured patients are admitted to our hospital with gunshot wounds. In this study, patients who admitted our hospital, diagnosed with vascular trauma due to gunshot were evaluated with the respect of injury site, additional injuries, surgical interventions and outcomes. Methods: The study included 58 patients wounded in Syrian war and admitted to our hospital between 01.01.2012 and 01.09.2014. Results= There were 5.1% (n=3 female and 94.9% (n=55 male patients. Age range is 5-75 years and the average of age was identified as 28.61. In 12.1% (n=7 of patients with extensive tissue defects of the muscle-nerve-bone injury has been identified, despite the vascular interventions in these patients, 8.6% (n=5 of patients, the limb has been amputated. Totally 15.5% (n=9 of 58 operated patients died. Two patients died because of major vascular injury with intra-abdominal organ injuries. In one patient; infection induced sepsis and multi organ failure was detected. Six patients were lost due to hypovolemic shock as a result of late arriving. Conclusion: In patients admitted with gunshot vascular injury arrival time, the presence of additional injuries and the location of injury affect mortality rates.

  10. Psychological Effect of a Mass Casualty Event on General Surgery Residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havron, William S; Safcsak, Karen; Corsa, Joshua; Loudon, Andrew; Cheatham, Michael L

    To evaluate the psychological effect of a mass casualty shooting event on general surgery residents. Three and 7 months following the Pulse nightclub mass casualty shooting, the mental well-being of general surgery residents employed at the receiving institution was evaluated. A voluntary and anonymous screening questionnaire for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and major depression (MD) was administered. Responses were stratified into 2 groups; residents who worked (ON-CALL) and residents who did not work (OFF-CALL) the night of the event. Data were analyzed using Mann-Whitney U and Fisher's exact tests and are reported as median with interquartile range (IQR) or percentage. Level I trauma center. Thirty-one general surgery residents. Twenty-four residents (77%) returned the 3-month questionnaire: 10 ON-CALL and 14 OFF-CALL. There was no difference in PTSD and MD between the 2 groups (30% vs. 14%; p = 0.61) and (30% vs. 7%; p = 0.27), respectively. Twenty-three of the 24 residents responded to the 7-month questionnaire. Over time, the incidence of PTSD did not resolve in the ON-CALL group, but did resolve in the OFF-CALL group (30% vs. 0%; p = 0.07). There was no significant change in the incidence of MD in either group (30% vs. 8%; p = 0.28). At 7 months postevent, more residents in both groups stated that they had sought counseling (30% vs. 44%; p = 0.65) and (0% vs. 15%; p = 0.22). The emotional toll associated with this mass casualty event had a substantial effect upon the general surgery residents involved. With the incidence of PTSD and MD identified, we believe that all residents should be provided with counseling following such events. Copyright © 2017 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Are Nursing Students Appropriate Partners for the Interdisciplinary Training of Surgery Residents?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefanidis, Dimitrios; Ingram, Katherine M; Williams, Kristy H; Bencken, Crystal L; Swiderski, Dawn

    2015-01-01

    Interdisciplinary team training in a simulation center recreates clinical team interactions and holds promise in improving teamwork of clinicians by breaking down educational silos. The objective of our study was to assess the appropriateness of interdisciplinary training with general surgery residents and nursing students. Over 2 consecutive academic years (2012-2013 and 2013-2014), general surgery residents participated in interdisciplinary team-training simulation-based sessions with senior nursing students. Scenario objectives included demonstration of appropriate teamwork and communication, and clinical decision making; sessions incorporated interdisciplinary debriefing of the scenarios. Participants were asked to assess their team-training experience and the appropriateness of their team-training partner. Responses were compared. A total of 16 team-training sessions were conducted during the study period. Overall, 12 surgery residents (67%) and 44 nursing students (63%) who had participated in at least 1 session responded to the survey. Although both residents and nursing students indicated that the knowledge and team skills acquired during these sessions were useful to them in clinical practice (73% vs 86%, respectively; p = not significant), residents rated their educational value lower (3.3 vs 4.3 on a 5-point scale, respectively; p students (p students, debriefing (91%), observation of others (68%), and interaction with resident physicians (66%) ranked highest; 48% of student nurses preferred residents as team-training partners whereas 100% residents preferred practicing nurses and 0% with nursing students owing to their limited clinical experience. Interdisciplinary team training and debriefing of surgery residents with nursing students is feasible and highly valued by nursing students. Nevertheless, our experience indicates that residents do not prefer nursing students as team-training partners owing to their limited clinical experience and would rather

  12. Training our future endocrine surgeons: a look at the endocrine surgery operative experience of U.S. surgical residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarebczan, Barbara; McDonald, Robert; Rajamanickam, Victoria; Leverson, Glen; Chen, Herbert; Sippel, Rebecca S

    2010-12-01

    During the last 10 years, the number of endocrine procedures performed in the United States has increased significantly. We sought to determine whether this has translated into an increase in operative volume for general surgery and otolaryngology residents. We evaluated records from the Resident Statistic Summaries of the Residency Review Committee (RRC) for U.S. general surgery and otolaryngology residents for the years 2004-2008, specifically examining data on thyroidectomies and parathyroidectomies. Between 2004 and 2008, the average endocrine case volume of U.S. general surgery and otolaryngology residents increased by approximately 15%, but otolaryngology residents performed more than twice as many operations as U.S. general surgery residents. The growth in case volume was mostly from increases in the number of thyroidectomies performed by U.S. general surgery and otolaryngology residents (17.9 to 21.8, P = .007 and 46.5 to 54.4, P = .04). Overall, otolaryngology residents also performed more parathyroidectomies than their general surgery counterparts (11.6 vs 8.8, P = .007). Although there has been an increase in the number of endocrine cases performed by graduating U.S. general surgery residents, this is significantly smaller than that of otolaryngology residents. To remain competitive, general surgery residents wishing to practice endocrine surgery may need to pursue additional fellowship training. Copyright © 2010 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Are 2 Years Enough? Exploring Technical Skills Acquisition Among General Surgery Residents in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Elizabeth G; Salles, Gil F

    2016-01-01

    Phenomenon: Recent studies have shown that up to 40% of the General Surgery (GS) residents are not confident with their surgical skills. There is concern that residents are at risk of receiving inadequate training due to the low number of operations they perform. In Brazil, although all GS residents receive by law the Board Certification at the end of their programs, the assessment of their technical skills is not mandatory in Medical Residency programs' training. Consequently, our concern was that current GS medical residency format might be insufficient to create competent and autonomous general surgery residents after 2 years of regular training. Hence, the aim was to assess GS residents' surgical skills in their final months of training to evaluate the present format of GS residency programs in Brazil. Trained surgical faculty members directly observed 11 operations of varying difficulty performed by 2nd-year regular GS residents and by 4th-year residents in the optional Advanced Program in General Surgery. Participants were located at 3 university and 3 nonuniversity hospitals in Rio de Janeiro and Sao Paulo (Brazil's largest cities). Surgical skills were assessed using an internally developed observation checklist reviewed by subject matter experts. Sixty residents (46 regular 2nd-year trainees and 14 advanced 4th-year trainees) were assessed on performing 499 operations. Only 10 residents (17%), all advanced 4th-year residents, satisfactorily performed all operations and were considered eligible for the Board Certification. Even after excluding the 2 operations of greatest difficulty, only 24 regular 2nd-year residents (52%) satisfactorily performed the other 9 operations. Residents from hospitals with open Emergency Departments performed better than those from hospitals without Emergency Departments. Insights: The results of this pilot study suggest that residents with 2 years of training are not prepared for independent high-level surgical practice. The

  14. A survey of current state of training of plastic surgery residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashmi, Asra; Khan, Faraz A; Herman, Floyd; Narasimhan, Nathan; Khan, Shaher; Kubiak, Carrie; Gursel, Eti; Edelman, David A

    2017-06-27

    Plastic surgery training is undergoing major changes however there is paucity of data detailing the current state of training as perceived by plastic surgical trainees. Our aim was to determine the quality of training as perceived by the current trainee pool and their future plans. A 25-item anonymous survey with three discrete sections (demographics, quality of training, and post-graduate career plans) was developed and distributed to plastic surgery residents during the academic year 2013. With the confidence interval of 95% and margin of error of 10%, our target response rate was 87 responders. We received a total of 114 respondents with all levels of Post Graduate Year in training represented. Upon comparison of residents with debt of 250,000, those with higher debt were significantly less interested in fellowship training (p value 0.05) and were more likely to pursue private practice (p value plastic surgery least offered as a separate rotation were microsurgery (45%) followed by aesthetic surgery (33%). 53.7% of the residents felt that they were least trained in aesthetic surgery followed by burn surgery 45.4%. Of note 56.4% intended to seek additional training after residency. Moreover residents with an average of 6.4 months of experience in an individual subspecialty were more likely to feel comfortable with that specialty. This survey highlights the areas and subspecialties that deserve attention as perceived by the current trainee pool.

  15. Intraoperative flap complications in lasik surgery performed by ophthalmology residents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorena Romero-Diaz-de-Leon

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: Flap-related complications are common intraoperative event during LASIK surgery performed by in-training ophthalmologists. Keratometries and surgeon's first procedure represent a higher probability for flap related complications than some other biometric parameters of patient's eye.

  16. Risk Factors for Complications after Peripheral Vascular Surgery in 3,202 Patient Procedures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kehlet, Mette; Jensen, Leif Panduro; Schroeder, Torben V.

    2016-01-01

    with postoperative complications after open vascular surgery for infrainguinal occlusive disease in an 8-year cohort using the Danish National Vascular Registry (Karbase), which gathers information on all vascular procedures in Denmark. Methods This study is a retrospective cohort study. The Karbase was searched...... for the predefined procedures from January 1, 2005 through December 31, 2012 at our 2 vascular departments. Both elective and urgent surgeries were included. Complications were defined as wound, surgical, or general complication according to Karbase. Results Three thousand two hundred two procedures were identified......, high American Society of Anesthesiologists score, and general anesthetics. The 30-day mortality was 5% (1% for claudicants and 8% for acute ischemia) and the 30-day amputation rate was 7% (0.5% for claudicants and 21% for gangrene). Conclusions There is a high risk of complication in peripheral...

  17. Optimizing Personalized Management and Cost-Effectiveness in Vascular Surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hogendoorn, W.

    2014-01-01

    The general aim of the studies described in this thesis is to evaluate the cost-effectiveness and to select the preferred treatment for different clinical patient groups for several vascular surgical diseases by means of decision analysis. This thesis consists of 2 parts. In PART 1, several new

  18. Trainee satisfaction in surgery residency programs: modern management tools ensure trainee motivation and success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Websky, Martin W; Oberkofler, Christian E; Rufibach, Kaspar; Raptis, Dimitri A; Lehmann, Kuno; Hahnloser, Dieter; Clavien, Pierre-Alain

    2012-11-01

    To assess trainee satisfaction in their surgery residency with a validated instrument and identify the contributing factors. Currently, surgery is deemed unattractive by medical students and ignored by many candidates planning to enter an academic career. New insights on the rational for such lack of interest are needed. Job satisfaction is a central concept in organizational and behavioral research that is well understood by large companies such as Google, IBM, and Toyota. Similar assessment can likewise be used to improve trainee satisfaction in surgery residency. A survey among 2039 surgery residents was conducted in three European countries analyzing satisfaction at work using the Global Job Satisfaction Instrument (validated in Emergency Room physicians). Crucial factors covering different aspects of surgery residency where identified using the GJS instrument combined with multiple logistic regression analysis. With an overall response rate of 23%, we identified trainee dissatisfaction in one third of residents. Factors affecting satisfaction related almost exclusively to training issues, such as assignment of surgery procedures according to skills (OR 4.2), training courses (OR 2.7), availability of a structured training curriculum (OR 2.4), bedside teaching, and availability of morbidity-mortality conferences (OR 2.3). A good working climate among residents (OR 3.7) and the option for part time work (OR 2.1) were also significant factors for trainee satisfaction. Increased working hours had a modest (OR 0.98)-though cumulative- negative effect. The sex of the trainee was not related to trainee satisfaction. Validated measurement of job satisfaction as used in the industry appears to be an efficient tool to assess trainee satisfaction in surgery residency and thereby identify the key contributing factors. Improvement of conceptual training structures and working conditions might facilitate recruitment, decrease drop-out, and attract motivated candidates with

  19. Teaching the Surgical Craft: Surgery Residents Perception of the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The transformation of a surgical trainee into a surgeon is strongly influenced by the quality of teaching in the operating theater. This study investigates the perceptions of residents about the educational environment of the operating theater and identifies variables that may improve the operating theater ...

  20. Open tracheostomy training: a nationwide survey among Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muallem-Kalmovich, Limor; Pitaro, Jacob; Asaly, Ayman; Kessler, Alex; Eviatar, Ephraim; Shteiner, Moran; Marom, Tal

    2017-11-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the training methods and needs of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery (OTO-HNS) residents to independently perform open tracheostomy (OT). An anonymous 26-items questionnaire pertaining to OT teaching aspects was distributed to all 93 Israeli OTO-HNS residents during March-June 2016. Residents were categorized as 'juniors,' if they were in their post-graduate year (PGY)-1 and PGY-2; 'mid-residency' (PGY-3 and PGY-4); or 'seniors' (PGY-5 and PGY-6). Response rate was 74% (n = 69). There were 25 'juniors' (36%), 24 'mid-residency' (35%) and 20 'seniors' (29%). Overall, the responses of the 3 groups were similar. Forty-seven (68%) residents estimated that there are ≥ 50 tracheostomies/year in their hospital, which roughly corresponds to an exposure of ~ 8 tracheostomies/year/resident. There was an inconsistency between the number of teaching hours given and the number of hours requested for OT training (23% received ≥ 5 h, but 82% declared they needed ≥ 5 h). Eighty-two percentage reported that their main training was conducted during surgery with peer residents or senior physicians. Forty-five (65%) feel competent to perform OT, including juniors. Due to the need to perform OT in urgent scenarios, the competency of OTO-HNS resident is crucial. Training for OT in Israeli OTO-HNS residency programs is not well structured. Yet, residents reported they feel confident to perform OT, already in the beginning of their residency. Planned educational programs to improve OT training should be done in the beginning of the residency and may include designated 'hands-on' platforms; objective periodic surgical competence assessments; and specialist's feedback, using structured assessment forms.

  1. Adoption of robotics in a general surgery residency program: at what cost?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehaffey, J Hunter; Michaels, Alex D; Mullen, Matthew G; Yount, Kenan W; Meneveau, Max O; Smith, Philip W; Friel, Charles M; Schirmer, Bruce D

    2017-06-01

    Robotic technology is increasingly being utilized by general surgeons. However, the impact of introducing robotics to surgical residency has not been examined. This study aims to assess the financial costs and training impact of introducing robotics at an academic general surgery residency program. All patients who underwent laparoscopic or robotic cholecystectomy, ventral hernia repair (VHR), and inguinal hernia repair (IHR) at our institution from 2011-2015 were identified. The effect of robotic surgery on laparoscopic case volume was assessed with linear regression analysis. Resident participation, operative time, hospital costs, and patient charges were also evaluated. We identified 2260 laparoscopic and 139 robotic operations. As the volume of robotic cases increased, the number of laparoscopic cases steadily decreased. Residents participated in all laparoscopic cases and 70% of robotic cases but operated from the robot console in only 21% of cases. Mean operative time was increased for robotic cholecystectomy (+22%), IHR (+55%), and VHR (+61%). Financial analysis revealed higher median hospital costs per case for robotic cholecystectomy (+$411), IHR (+$887), and VHR (+$1124) as well as substantial associated fixed costs. Introduction of robotic surgery had considerable negative impact on laparoscopic case volume and significantly decreased resident participation. Increased operative time and hospital costs are substantial. An institution must be cognizant of these effects when considering implementing robotics in departments with a general surgery residency program. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Plastic surgery training: evaluating patient satisfaction with facial fillers in a resident clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iorio, Matthew L; Stolle, Ellen; Brown, Benjamin J; Christian, Cathalene Blake; Baker, Stephen B

    2012-12-01

    Resident cosmetic surgery clinics, or "chief clinics," are arguably the most effective way to provide cosmetic surgery training. Approximately 70 % of plastic surgery training programs utilize a "chief resident clinic" to augment their cosmetic surgery experience, even though a quantitative outcome scale is lacking to guide education. We report the use of the FACE-Q, a novel patient outcome tool, to evaluate patients' satisfaction with nonsurgical facial rejuvenation performed by residents. The FACE-Q "Satisfaction with Facial Appearance Overall Scale" was administered to patients prior to and 1 week after undergoing nonsurgical facial rejuvenation performed by plastic surgery residents. All patients received nonsurgical facial rejuvenation with botulinum toxin A and hyaluronic acid as part of resident facial aesthetics training. Eleven patients completed the pre- and postinjection FACE-Q survey. Average overall facial appearance satisfaction scores of 47.6 pre- and 51.1 postinjection were found (p < 0.037), with a total possible score of 68. Ten patients (91 %) reported feeling satisfied or very satisfied with the overall appearance of their face following injection. Despite resident inexperience and patient awareness that novices were performing the procedures, our experience supports use of the FACE-Q to optimize and endorse resident cosmetic surgery clinics. The learning curve for facial cosmetic procedures can be adversely affected by limited time available or exposure to improvement variables when initially performing the procedure. It is imperative to any technique that direct, and preferably quantitative, feedback is given so that an immediate modification can be generated and successive patient outcomes improved. This journal requires that authors assign a level of evidence to each article. For a full description of these Evidence-Based Medicine ratings, please refer to the Table of Contents or the online Instructions to Authors www.springer.com/00266 .

  3. A survey of the pediatric surgery program directors: optimizing resident research to make pediatric surgery training more efficient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markel, Troy A; Rescorla, Frederick J

    2015-06-01

    Resident Research (RR) has been a presumed requirement for pediatric surgery fellowship candidates. We hypothesized that: 1) pediatric surgery leaders would no longer feel that RR was necessary for fellowship candidates, 2) the type of study performed would not impact a program's opinion of candidates, and 3) the timing of RR could be altered for those interested in a research career. An anonymous survey was sent to pediatric surgery fellowship program directors (PDs). Sixty-three percent responded, and answers were compared via Chi square analysis with ppediatric surgery fellowship candidates. Seventy-five percent had no preference between one or two years of research (p=0.0005), 79% placed no heavier weight on basic or clinical research (psurgery may not be necessary. Pediatric surgery candidates who partake in RR are not penalized for their choice of study. Increasing efficiency of training is important in today's era of medical training. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Randomized clinical trial of comprehensive geriatric assessment and optimization in vascular surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Partridge, J S L; Harari, D; Martin, Finbarr; Peacock, J L; Bell, R; Mohammed, A.; Dhesi, J K

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Increasing numbers of older patients are undergoing vascular surgery. Inadequate preoperative assessment and optimization may contribute to increased postoperative morbidity and mortality.METHODS: Patients aged at least 65 years scheduled for elective aortic aneurysm repair or lower-limb arterial surgery were enrolled in an RCT of standard preoperative assessment or preoperative comprehensive geriatric assessment and optimization. Randomization was stratified by sex and surgical s...

  5. Novel Zero-Heat-Flux Deep Body Temperature Measurement in Lower Extremity Vascular and Cardiac Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mäkinen, Marja-Tellervo; Pesonen, Anne; Jousela, Irma; Päivärinta, Janne; Poikajärvi, Satu; Albäck, Anders; Salminen, Ulla-Stina; Pesonen, Eero

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study was to compare deep body temperature obtained using a novel noninvasive continuous zero-heat-flux temperature measurement system with core temperatures obtained using conventional methods. A prospective, observational study. Operating room of a university hospital. The study comprised 15 patients undergoing vascular surgery of the lower extremities and 15 patients undergoing cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass. Zero-heat-flux thermometry on the forehead and standard core temperature measurements. Body temperature was measured using a new thermometry system (SpotOn; 3M, St. Paul, MN) on the forehead and with conventional methods in the esophagus during vascular surgery (n = 15), and in the nasopharynx and pulmonary artery during cardiac surgery (n = 15). The agreement between SpotOn and the conventional methods was assessed using the Bland-Altman random-effects approach for repeated measures. The mean difference between SpotOn and the esophageal temperature during vascular surgery was+0.08°C (95% limit of agreement -0.25 to+0.40°C). During cardiac surgery, during off CPB, the mean difference between SpotOn and the pulmonary arterial temperature was -0.05°C (95% limits of agreement -0.56 to+0.47°C). Throughout cardiac surgery (on and off CPB), the mean difference between SpotOn and the nasopharyngeal temperature was -0.12°C (95% limits of agreement -0.94 to+0.71°C). Poor agreement between the SpotOn and nasopharyngeal temperatures was detected in hypothermia below approximately 32°C. According to this preliminary study, the deep body temperature measured using the zero-heat-flux system was in good agreement with standard core temperatures during lower extremity vascular and cardiac surgery. However, agreement was questionable during hypothermia below 32°C. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. The effect of a focused instructional session on knowledge of surgical staplers in general surgery residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McColl, Ryan J; Karmali, Shahzeer; Reso, Artan; Paolucci, Elizabeth; Sherman, Vadim

    2009-01-01

    Surgical stapling devices have been used for a variety of purposes in both laparoscopic and open surgery. Nevertheless, trainees rarely receive any focused instruction on their application and use. This study attempts to determine the baseline knowledge of surgical stapling devices possessed by surgical residents. Furthermore, we attempt to evaluate the effectiveness of a short didactic session in improving the trainee's knowledge of the use and function of surgical staplers. A 20-question multiple-choice test was created to evaluate a general surgery resident's knowledge on the design and use of circular, linear, and laparoscopic surgical staplers. The test was administered before and after attending a 40-minute instructional session on surgical stapling devices. The tests were then scored by a data analyst. A total of 26 residents of 39 in the residency program (26/39, 67%) participated. The pretest mean was 10.62/20 (53%), whereas the posttest mean was 15.38/20 (77%). These results were significantly different on paired samples t-test analysis (t((25)) = -10.3; p 0.05). There is a deficiency of knowledge of surgical staplers in general surgery residents, more so in junior residents. Didactic instruction is effective in raising the level of knowledge of surgical staplers in all residents, up to a similar level. Surgical educators should consider implementing programs like these for staplers and other types of surgical equipment.

  7. Orthopedic Surgery Resident Debt Load and Its Effect on Career Choice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Joey P; Cassidy, Dale B; Tofte, Josef N; Bariteau, Jason T; Daniels, Alan H

    2016-05-01

    Student loan debt has become a topic of discussion and debate among physicians and legislators. This study seeks to assess the level of debt of orthopedic surgery residents and to determine whether debt burden affects the career choice of orthopedic trainees. A 26-question, anonymous survey was distributed via email to resident trainees enrolled in different medical and surgical specialty training programs across the United States. Orthopedic trainees were compared with trainees in other specialties using comparative statistics. Of the approximately 13,503 residents who were sent the survey, a total of 3076 responded, including 167 of an estimated 580 orthopedic residents, for approximate response rates of 22.8% and 28.8%, respectively. On average, orthopedic surgery residents were at a later post-graduate year than overall respondents (Porthopedic surgery residents (57.21% vs 49.08%, respectively; P=.041). More than 50% of all respondents agreed that student loan debt would affect their type or location of practice. The majority of orthopedic residents take student loan debt into consideration when determining their final location and type of practice, although less so for orthopedic trainees compared with other specialties. As medical education continues to become more expensive and the threat of dropping physician reimbursement looms on the horizon, student debt may become a primary driving factor for young American physicians' career plans. [Orthopedics. 2016; 39(3):e438-e443.]. Copyright 2016, SLACK Incorporated.

  8. Expert consensus of general surgery residents' proficiency with common endocrine operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phitayakorn, Roy; Kelz, Rachel R; Petrusa, Emil; Sippel, Rebecca S; Sturgeon, Cord; Patel, Kepal N; Perrier, Nancy D

    2017-01-01

    Proficiency with common endocrine operations is expected of graduating, general surgery residents. However, no expert consensus guidelines exist about these expectations. Members of the American Association of Endocrine Surgeons were surveyed about their opinions on resident proficiency with common endocrine operations. Overall response rate was 38%. A total of 92% of the respondents operate with residents. On average, they believed that the steps of a total thyroidectomy for benign disease and a well-localized parathyroidectomy could be performed by a postgraduate year 4 surgery resident. Specific steps that they thought might require more training included decisions to divide the strap muscles or leaving a drain. Approximately 66% of respondents thought that a postgraduate year 5 surgery resident could independently perform a total thyroidectomy for benign disease, but only 45% felt similarly for malignant thyroid disease; 79% thought that a postgraduate year 5 surgery resident could independently perform a parathyroidectomy. Respondents' years of experience correlated with their opinions about resident autonomy for total thyroidectomy (benign r = 0.38, P < .001; malignant r = 0.29, P = .001) but not parathyroidectomy. On multivariate analysis, sex and years of experience of the respondents were independently associated with opinions on autonomy but only for total thyroidectomy for benign disease (P = .001). Annual endocrine volume of the respondents did not correlate with beliefs in autonomy. There was general agreement among responding members of the AAES about resident proficiency and autonomy with common endocrine operations. As postgraduate year 5 residents may not be proficient in advanced endocrine operations, opportunities exist to improve training prior to the transition to independent practice for graduates that anticipate performing endocrine operations routinely. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Validity of ophthalmology surgical competency assessment rubric for strabismus surgery in resident training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motley, W Walker; Golnik, Karl C; Anteby, Irene; Atilla, Huban; Gole, Glen A; Murillo, Claudia; Olitsky, Scott E; Pilling, Rachel F; Reddy, Aravind R; Sharma, Pradeep; Siatkowski, R Michael; Yadarola, Maria B

    2016-04-01

    The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) requires US residency programs to assess ophthalmology residents for competency in 6 core areas. Ophthalmic surgical skills are currently part of the ACGME "Patient Care" competency, although some have advocated for a seventh competency, "Surgical Skills." The Ophthalmology Surgical Competency Assessment Rubric for Strabismus Surgery in Resident Training ( Strabismus) tool was designed to aid in the assessment of surgical skills using procedure specific behavioral anchors. The present study evaluated inter-rater agreement of the Strabismus tool in the assessment of resident performance. Strabismus evaluations of resident surgical strabismus cases were performed by a multinational group of faculty strabismus surgeons. Cronbach α statistical analysis of the completed evaluations revealed high inter-rater agreement, indicating the Strabismus is a reliable tool to facilitate assessment of resident strabismus surgical skills. Copyright © 2016 American Association for Pediatric Ophthalmology and Strabismus. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. [Major vascular complications following surgery for a herniated lumbar disk].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abad, C; Martel, D; Feijóo, J J; Carreira, L

    1993-01-01

    Two cases of arterial injury of the iliac arteries during surgery of the lumbar disc are presented. Both patients were successfully operated, in the first case a primary repair was accomplished, the second patient was treated by means of an ileo-femoral bypass graft. A comment of the pathophysiology, diagnostic and surgical management of this unusual complication is presented.

  11. Incidence and hospital mortality of vascular surgery patients with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    early sepsis or postoperative inotropic requirements may, however, result in early troponin release, .... failure. Emergency surgery was performed in 17.8% of the patients and this was associated with a ... septic shock.17 There were four patients (11.4%) in our MINS group that had coexisting sepsis during the first three days ...

  12. Preoperative antihypertensive medication intake and acute kidney injury after major vascular surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duceppe, Emmanuelle; Lussier, Anne-Renee; Beaulieu-Dore, Roxane; LeManach, Yannick; Laskine, Mikhael; Fafard, Josee; Durand, Madeleine

    2018-01-27

    Postoperative acute kidney injury (AKI) is frequent after major vascular surgery and is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. It remains unclear whether the administration of combined oral antihypertensive medications on the day of surgery can increase the risk of postoperative AKI. We performed a retrospective cohort study of hypertensive patients undergoing elective major vascular surgery to determine the association between the number of antihypertensive medications continued on the morning of surgery and AKI at 48 hours postoperatively. A total of 406 patients who had undergone suprainguinal vascular surgery were included, and 10.3% suffered postoperative AKI. In multivariable analysis, the number of antihypertensive medications taken on the morning of surgery was independently associated with AKI (P = .026). Compared with patients who took no medication, taking one medication (adjusted odds ratio [aOR], 1.58; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.68-3.75) and taking two or more medications (aOR, 2.70; 95% CI, 1.13-6.44) were associated with a 1.6-fold and 2.7-fold increased risk of postoperative AKI, respectively. Other predictors of AKI were suprarenal surgery (aOR, 3.37; 95% CI, 1.53-7.44), age (aOR, 2.29 per 10 years; 95% CI, 1.40-3.74), length of surgery (aOR, 1.40 per 1 hour; 95% CI, 1.10-1.76), hemoglobin drop (aOR, 1.37 per 10 g/L; 95% CI, 1.10-1.74), and history of coronary artery disease (aOR, 2.33; 95% CI, 1.08-5.00). In patients undergoing major vascular surgery who are treated with chronic antihypertensive therapy, the administration of antihypertensive drugs on the morning of surgery is independently associated with an increased risk of postoperative AKI. Further prospective studies are needed to confirm this finding. Copyright © 2017 Society for Vascular Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Early Reoperation Rate, Complication, and Outcomes in Resident-performed Glaucoma Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsia, Yen C; Lee, Jun Hui; Cui, Qi N; Stewart, Jay M; Naseri, Ayman; Porco, Travis; Stamper, Robert L; Han, Ying

    2017-02-01

    The purpose of the study was to examine reoperation rate and complications of resident-performed glaucoma surgeries within the first 90 postoperative days. A retrospective study of resident-performed glaucoma filtering surgeries at the San Francisco Veterans Affairs Medical Center between 2002 and 2014 was performed. Patients requiring reoperation within 90 days of the initial surgery were included in our study. Combined surgeries were excluded. Complications and the rates of reoperation within the first 90 days were evaluated. Clinical outcomes for those who needed reoperations were evaluated at the 1-year follow-up. Total of 180 cases were reviewed [34 trabeculectomy, 85 Ex-PRESS shunt, and 61 Ahmed glaucoma valve (AGV)]. One hundred and four eyes developed complications, most commonly choroidal effusion (65.3%), followed by hypotony (45.2%) and wound leak (32.7%). Complications were comparable among the 3 groups, except that filtering surgery had significantly more wound leak than AGV (Pglaucoma surgery (Pglaucoma medications and stable visual acuity. Glaucoma incisional surgeries performed by third-year ophthalmology residents had acceptable and comparable reoperation rates and complication rates for patients with trabeculectomy, Ex-PRESS, and AGV. Clinical outcomes for the patients requiring reoperation were favorable.

  14. Implementation of an objective structured clinical exam (OSCE) into orthopedic surgery residency training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griesser, Michael J; Beran, Matthew C; Flanigan, David C; Quackenbush, Michael; Van Hoff, Corey; Bishop, Julie Y

    2012-01-01

    While the musculoskeletal (MSK) physical examination (PE) is an essential part of a patient encounter, we believe it is an underemphasized component of orthopedic residency education and that resident PE skills may be lacking. The purpose of this investigation was to (1) assess the attitudes regarding PE teaching in orthopedic residencies today; (2) develop an MSK objective structured clinical examination (OSCE) to assess the MSK PE knowledge and skills of our orthopedic residents. Prospective, uncontrolled, observational. A major Midwestern tertiary referral center and academic medical center. The orthopedic surgery residents in our program. Twenty-two of 24 completed the OSCE. Surveys showed that residents agreed that although learning the PE is important, there is not enough time in clinic to actually observe and critique a resident examining a patient. For the 22 residents (postgraduate year [PGY] 2-5) who participated in the OSCE, the overall score was 66%. Scores were significantly better for the trauma scenario (78%; p training. We hope that our efforts will encourage other programs to assess their PE curriculum and perhaps prompt change. Copyright © 2012 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. The predictive value of general surgery application data for future resident performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alterman, Daniel Mark; Jones, Thomas M; Heidel, Robert E; Daley, Brian J; Goldman, Mitchell H

    2011-01-01

    The predictive value of application data for future general surgery resident performance and attrition are poorly understood. We sought to determine what variables obtained in the application process might predict future resident success. We performed an 18-year review (1990-2008) of all matched residents (n = 101) to a university program. Both categorical graduates (CG) and nongraduates (CNG) and nondesignated preliminaries matching (PM) and preliminaries nonmatching (PNM) were evaluated. We also screened for previous high-performance accomplishments outside of the medical field such as in the performing arts or collegiate athletics (SKILL). Outcome data include graduation or match status, American Board of Surgery In-service Training Examination (ABSITE), and faculty Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) core competency evaluations. Background data from the Electronic Residency Application Service (ERAS) application between the various groups was compared with univariate analysis and logistic regression. There were significant differences between the groups on the measures of USMLE step 1 (STEP1) (p = 0.001), medical school grade point average (GPA) (p = 0.023), interview data (INTERVIEW) (p SKILL predict successful completion of a general surgery residency. In contrast to prior reports, female sex, ethnicity, medical school grades, or Alpha Omega Alpha Honor Society (AOA) status were not significant. The variable SKILL is novel and highlights the importance of nonacademic background data. Our data indicate STEP1 is an independent predictor of resident success in general surgery and should maintain an important role in general surgery applicant screening. The ideal screening threshold is likely > 215. Copyright © 2011 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. The Teaching of Ethics and Professionalism in Plastic Surgery Residency: A Cross-Sectional Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Katelyn G; Ingraham, John M; Schneider, Lisa F; Saadeh, Pierre B; Vercler, Christian J

    2017-05-01

    The ethical practice of medicine has always been of utmost importance, and plastic surgery is no exception. The literature is devoid of information on the teaching of ethics and professionalism in plastic surgery. In light of this, a survey was sent to ascertain the status of ethics training in plastic surgery residencies. A 21-question survey was sent from the American Council of Academic Plastic Surgeons meeting to 180 plastic surgery program directors and coordinators via email. Survey questions inquired about practice environment, number of residents, presence of a formal ethics training program, among others. Binary regression was used to determine if any relationships existed between categorical variables, and Poisson linear regression was used to assess relationships between continuous variables. Statistical significance was set at a P value of 0.05. A total of 104 members responded to the survey (58% response rate). Sixty-three percent were program directors, and most (89%) practiced in academic settings. Sixty-two percent in academics reported having a formal training program, and 60% in private practice reported having one. Only 40% of programs with fewer than 10 residents had ethics training, whereas 78% of programs with more than 20 residents did. The odds of having a training program were slightly higher (odds ratio, 1.1) with more residents (P = 0.17). Despite the lack of information in the literature, formal ethics and professionalism training does exist in many plastic surgery residencies, although barriers to implementation do exist. Plastic surgery leadership should be involved in the development of standardized curricula to help overcome these barriers.

  17. Perspective: carotid stenting and the history of disruptive technology in vascular surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veith, Frank J

    2008-06-01

    This article defines disruptive technology and discusses such technologies in Vascular Surgery. It considers the question: Is carotid artery stenting (CAS) a disruptive technology? Although CAS will impact positively on the treatment of carotid bifurcation disease, it will probably never displace carotid endarterectomy in the majority of patients. The precise role of CAS remains to be determined.

  18. Concise Review: Tissue-Engineered Vascular Grafts for Cardiac Surgery: Past, Present, and Future

    OpenAIRE

    Kurobe, Hirotsugu; Maxfield, Mark W.; Breuer, Christopher K.; Shinoka, Toshiharu

    2012-01-01

    Developing a durable material with the potential to function with child growth will eliminate the need for reoperation and significantly reduce morbidity and mortality in some types of congenital heart defects. Tissue-engineered vascular grafts offer the ability to drastically improve morbidity and mortality and drastically improve the quality of life of patients after congenital heart defect surgery.

  19. Quality of provided care in vascular surgery : outcome assessment & improvement strategies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Flu, Hans Christiaan

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this thesis was to evaluate the quality of care in vascular surgery in end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and peripheral arterial occlusive disease (PAOD): intermittent claudication (IC) and critical lower limb ischaemia (CLI) patients. Therefore firstly it focused on the improvement of the

  20. [Indications, method and results of autotransfusion in trauma and vascular surgery (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vereecken, L; de Mol, J; Derom, F; de Roose, J

    1975-03-01

    The authors have used the Bentley Ats 100 system, a disposable autotransfusion unit, in 31 cases of trauma and major vascular surgery. An original method of anticoagulation consisting in heparine (1 mg/kg bodyweight) and priming and flushing of the succion unit with ACD is described. The effect of the autotransfusion on the coagulation and the recent problems and advances are discussed.

  1. Urology residents training in laparoscopic surgery. Development of a virtual reality model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez-Baños, J L; Ballestero-Diego, R; Truan-Cacho, D; Aguilera-Tubet, C; Villanueva-Peña, A; Manuel-Palazuelos, J C

    2015-11-01

    The training and learning of residents in laparoscopic surgery has legal, financial and technological limitations. Simulation is an essential tool in the training of residents as a supplement to their training in laparoscopic surgery. The training should be structured in an appropriate environment, with previously established and clear objectives, taught by professionals with clinical and teaching experience in simulation. The training should be conducted with realistic models using animals and ex-vivo tissue from animals. It is essential to incorporate mechanisms to assess the objectives during the residents' training progress. We present the training model for laparoscopic surgery for urology residents at the University Hospital Valdecilla. The training is conducted at the Virtual Hospital Valdecilla, which is associated with the Center for Medical Simulation in Boston and is accredited by the American College of Surgeons. The model is designed in 3 blocks, basic for R1, intermediate for R2-3 and advanced for R4-5, with 9 training modules. The training is conducted in 4-hour sessions for 4 afternoons, for 3 weeks per year of residence. Residents therefore perform 240 hours of simulated laparoscopic training by the end of the course. For each module, we use structured objective assessments to measure each resident's training progress. Since 2003, 9 urology residents have been trained, in addition to the 5 who are currently in training. The model has undergone changes according to the needs expressed in the student feedback. The acquisition of skills in a virtual reality model has enabled the safe transfer of those skills to actual practice. A laparoscopic surgery training program designed in structured blocks and with progressive complexity provides appropriate training for transferring the skills acquired using this model to an actual scenario while maintaining patient safety. Copyright © 2015 AEU. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  2. Data for the Oxford Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Study international survey of vascular surgery professionals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Regent Lee

    2017-10-01

    This Data-in-Brief article contains a detailed method for the conduct of this survey and additional original data. In this survey, we also provided vascular surgery colleagues with contemporary epidemiologic and surgical outcome data. This was followed by a hypothetical scenario whereby a patient had just been diagnosed with a small (40 mm AAA and a novel biomarker predicted it to be fast growing in the coming years. We assessed the vascular professionals' perception of the patient's preference for management in this scenario, and their willingness to refer patients for a surgical trial that investigates the outcome of early versus late surgery in this setting. The survey then asked the vascular professionals to assume the role of the patient, and provided their own preferences in such a scenario.

  3. Targeted needs assessment for a transitional "boot camp" curriculum for pediatric surgery residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackmore, Christopher; Lopushinsky, Steve; Lockyer, Jocelyn; Paolucci, Elizabeth Oddone

    2015-05-01

    Transition periods in medical education are associated with increased risk for learners and patients. For pediatric surgery residents, the transition to training is especially difficult as learners must adjust to new patient populations. In this study we perform a targeted needs assessment to determine the ideal content and format of a pediatric surgery boot camp to facilitate the transition to residency. A needs assessment survey was developed and distributed to pediatric surgery residents and staff across North America. The survey asked participants to rank 30 pediatric surgical diagnoses, 20 skills, and 11 physiological topics on "frequency" and "importance". Items were then ranked using empirical methods. The survey also evaluated the preferred boot camp format. In total, 12 residents and 23 staff completed the survey. No significant differences were identified between staff and residents in survey responses. The top 5 topics identified for inclusion in a boot camp were: (1) fluid and electrolyte management, (2) appendicitis, (3) pediatric hernias, (4) nutrition and (5) pain management. The preferred format for a boot camp was 3-4days in duration applying a blend of educational methods. Based on the results of the needs assessment survey, a novel pediatric surgery boot camp curriculum can be developed. Crown Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. The refinement of a cultural standardized patient examination for a general surgery residency program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chun, Maria B J; Deptula, Peter; Morihara, Sarah; Jackson, David S

    2014-01-01

    Recent articles have documented the importance of cultural competency in surgery. Surgical residency programs have used the Objective Structured Clinical Examinations or cultural standardized patient examinations as a training tool. Past studies evaluating cultural competency have noted the importance of including an observational (control) arm, which would allow for a more objective assessment of a resident's competency in this area. The purpose of our article is to present the results of a follow-up study to a pilot cultural standardized patient examination for surgery residents. All first-year surgery residents were required to participate in the videotaped cultural SP examination as part of the general surgery residency curriculum. Two measures were used to assess resident performance. On the day of the examination, the Cross-Cultural Care Survey was administered. The examination was assessed by the residents themselves, faculty observers, and standardized patients, using a written checklist that was developed to evaluate residents on all 6 Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education competencies. The current study includes 20 first-year surgery residents from academic years 2011 to 2012 and 2012 to 2013. The examination of pretest differences in groups found that students born outside of the United States had significantly higher scores on attitude (t = -2.68, df = 18, p = 0.02), but no statistically significant differences were found in skillfulness or knowledge or in the overall rating scale. For the overall rating scale, change from pretest to posttest was statistically significant (t = -2.25, df = 18, p = 0.04). Further analysis revealed that students who were born in the United States demonstrated a significant increase in ratings (t = -3.08, df = 10, p = 0.01) whereas students who were not born in the United States showed little change (t = -0.35, df = 7, p = 0.74). These results show that the means in attitude scales changed little for all

  5. IOP Elevation After Cataract Surgery: Results for Residents and Senior Staff at Henry Ford Health System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elfersy, Adrian J; Prinzi, Robert A; Peracha, Zuhair H; Kim, Daniel D; Crandall, David A; Darnley-Fisch, Deborah A; Imami, Nauman R

    2016-10-01

    To determine the incidence of intraocular pressure (IOP) elevation on postoperative day 1 (POD1) after cataract surgery performed by resident surgeons compared with attending surgeons and to examine the influence of associated variables on the incidence of postoperative IOP elevation. Retrospective review of 2472 consecutive 2.2 to 2.8 mm temporal clear corneal cataract extractions by phacoemulsification performed by either residents or attending surgeons at Henry Ford Health System. Fellow eyes were excluded, resulting in 1847 eyes. IOP measurements of >40, >30, and >23 mm Hg were noted along with incremental IOP elevations of ≥10 and 20 mm Hg over preoperative/baseline IOP. Associated variables included: age, sex, diabetes mellitus, hypertension, glaucoma, glaucoma suspect, uveitis, prior ocular trauma, and vitreous loss at surgery. Resident-performed cataract surgery was associated with statistically significant higher rates of IOP elevation in all categories and in all clinical situations known to be associated with postoperative IOP spike, that is, vitreous loss at surgery, prior ocular trauma, and preexisting glaucoma. The incidence of postoperative day 1 IOP elevation after phacoemulsification performed by resident surgeons was 2 to 5 times that of experienced cataract surgeons. Variables including vitreous loss at surgery, prior ocular trauma, preexisting glaucoma, glaucoma suspect status, and male sex were significant contributors. Consideration for prophylactic IOP lowering is advised in high-risk patients.

  6. Learning styles of medical students, general surgery residents, and general surgeons: implications for surgical education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Gara Chris

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Surgical education is evolving under the dual pressures of an enlarging body of knowledge required during residency and mounting work-hour restrictions. Changes in surgical residency training need to be based on available educational models and research to ensure successful training of surgeons. Experiential learning theory, developed by David Kolb, demonstrates the importance of individual learning styles in improving learning. This study helps elucidate the way in which medical students, surgical residents, and surgical faculty learn. Methods The Kolb Learning Style Inventory, which divides individual learning styles into Accommodating, Diverging, Converging, and Assimilating categories, was administered to the second year undergraduate medical students, general surgery resident body, and general surgery faculty at the University of Alberta. Results A total of 241 faculty, residents, and students were surveyed with an overall response rate of 73%. The predominant learning style of the medical students was assimilating and this was statistically significant (p Conclusions We conclude that medical students have a significantly different learning style from general surgical trainees and general surgeons. This has important implications in the education of general surgery residents.

  7. Trends and Predictors of National Institutes of Health Funding to Plastic Surgery Residency Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvestre, Jason; Abbatematteo, Joseph M; Chang, Benjamin; Serletti, Joseph M

    2017-12-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated low levels of National Institutes of Health funding for surgical research. The authors compared the funding in plastic surgery with the funding for other surgical specialties. A query of National Institutes of Health grants awarded to departments of surgical specialties was performed using the National Institutes of Health RePORTER database (2008 to 2016). Trends in funding were compared by specialty and adjusted for the number of active physicians in each specialty. Plastic surgery residency program characteristics were correlated with funding procurement. Eight hundred eighty-nine faculty at 94 plastic surgery residency programs were queried. Forty-eight investigators (5.4 percent) at 23 programs (24.4 percent) had National Institutes of Health funding. From 2008 to 2016, a total of $84,142,138 was awarded through 81 grants. Funding supported translational (44.6 percent), clinical (26.4 percent), basic science (27.2 percent), and educational (1.7 percent) research. In 2016, plastic surgery received the least amount of National Institutes of Health funding per active physician ($1,530) relative to orthopedic surgery ($3124), obstetrics and gynecology ($3885), urology ($5943), otolaryngology ($9999), general surgery ($11,649), ophthalmology ($11,933), and neurologic surgery ($20,874). Plastic surgery residency program characteristics associated with National Institutes of Health funding were high ranking and had more than 10 clinical faculty (p Plastic surgery receives the least National Institutes of Health funding among the surgical specialties. Departments and divisions of plastic surgery should support investigators applying for research grants to increase future National Institutes of Health funding.

  8. Identifying and Eliminating Deficiencies in the General Surgery Resident Core Competency Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tapia, Nicole M; Milewicz, Allen; Whitney, Stephen E; Liang, Michael K; Braxton, Carla C

    2014-06-01

    Although the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education has defined 6 core competencies required of resident education, no consensus exists on best practices for reaching resident proficiency. Surgery programs must develop resourceful methods to incorporate learning. While patient care and medical knowledge are approached with formal didactics and traditional Halstedian educational formats, other core competencies are presumed to be learned on the job or emphasized in conferences. To test the hypothesis that our residents lack a foundation in several of the nonclinical core competencies and to seek to develop a formal curriculum that can be integrated into our current didactic time, with minimal effect on resident work hours and rest hours. Anonymous Likert-type scale needs assessment survey requesting residents within a large single general surgery residency program to rate their understanding, working knowledge, or level of comfort on the following 10 topics: negotiation and conflict resolution; leadership styles; health care legislation; principles of quality delivery of care, patient safety, and performance improvement; business of medicine; clinical practice models; role of advocacy in health care policy and government; personal finance management; team building; and roles of innovation and technology in health care delivery. Proportions of resident responses scored as positive (agree or strongly agree) or negative (disagree or strongly disagree). In total, 48 surgery residents (70%) responded to the survey. Only 3 topics (leadership styles, team building, and roles of innovation and technology in health care delivery) had greater than 70% positive responses, while 2 topics (negotiation and conflict resolution and principles of quality delivery of care, patient safety, and performance improvement) had greater than 60% positive responses. The remaining topics had less than 40% positive responses, with the least positive responses on the topics

  9. Cardiac safety in vascular access surgery and maintenance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, Jan; Kudlicka, Jaroslav; Tesar, Vladimir; Linhart, Ales

    2015-01-01

    More than 50% of all end-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients die from cardiovascular complications. Among them, heart failure and pulmonary hypertension play a major role, and published studies document significantly higher mortality rates in patients with these two states. Arteriovenous fistulas (AVF) and arteriovenous grafts (AVG) are the preferred types of vascular access (VA). However, both AVF and AVG increase cardiac output and in turn could contribute to (the decompensation of) heart failure or pulmonary hypertension. No really safe access flow volume exists, and the ESRD patients' reactions to it vary considerably. We review the mechanisms involved in the cardiovascular consequences of increased cardiac output and available literary data. The link between access flow volume and increased mortality due to pulmonary hypertension or heart failure probably exists, but still has not been directly evidenced. Regular echocardiography is advisable especially in patients with symptoms or with high VA flow (>1,500 ml/min). © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  10. The Clinical Impact of Cardiology Consultation Prior to Major Vascular Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Frank M; Park, Yeo June; Grey, Scott F; Boniakowski, Anna E; Mansour, M Ashraf; Jain, Krishna M; Nypaver, Timothy; Grossman, Michael; Gurm, Hitinder; Henke, Peter K

    2018-01-01

    To understand statewide variation in preoperative cardiology consultation prior to major vascular surgery and to determine whether consultation was associated with differences in perioperative myocardial infarction (poMI). Medical consultation prior to major vascular surgery is obtained to reduce perioperative risk. Despite perceived benefit of preoperative consultation, evidence is lacking specifically for major vascular surgery on the effect of preoperative cardiac consultation. Patient and clinical data were obtained from a statewide vascular surgery registry between January 2012 and December 2014. Patients were risk stratified by revised cardiac risk index category and compared poMI between patients who did or did not receive a preoperative cardiology consultation. We then used logistic regression analysis to compare the rate of poMI across hospitals grouped into quartiles by rate of preoperative cardiology consultation. Our study population comprised 5191 patients undergoing open peripheral arterial bypass (n = 3037), open abdominal aortic aneurysm repair (n = 332), or endovascular aneurysm repair (n = 1822) at 29 hospitals. At the patient level, after risk-stratification by revised cardiac risk index category, there was no association between cardiac consultation and poMI. At the hospital level, preoperative cardiac consultation varied substantially between hospitals (6.9%-87.5%, P 66%) had a reduction in poMI (OR, 0.52; confidence interval: 0.28-0.98; P cardiology consultation for vascular surgery varies greatly between institutions, and does not appear to impact poMI at the patient level. However, reduction of poMI was noted at the hospitals with the highest rate of preoperative cardiology consultation as well as a variety of medical services, suggesting that other hospital culture effects play a role.

  11. Effect of protected research time on ABSITE scores during general surgery residency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orkin, Bruce A; Poirier, Jennifer; Kowal-Vern, Areta; Chan, Edie; Ohara, Karen; Mendoza, Brian

    2017-11-03

    Objective - To determine whether residents with one or more years of dedicated research time (Research Residents, RR) improved their ABSITE scores compared to those without (Non-Research Residents, N-RR). A retrospective review of general surgery residents' ABSITE scores from 1995 to 2016 was performed. RR were compared to N-RR. Additional analysis of At Risk (AR) v Not At Risk residents (NAR) (35th percentile as PGY1-2) was also performed. Cohort - 147 residents (34 RR and 113 N-RR). There were no differences in initial ABSITE scores (p = 0.47). By definition, the AR group had lower scores than NAR. Overall, post-research RR v PGY-4 N-RR scores did not differ (p = 0.84). Only the AR residents improved their scores (p = 0.0009 v NAR p = 0.42), regardless of research group (p = 0.70). Protected research time did not improve residents' ABSITE scores, regardless of initial scores. At Risk residents improved regardless of research group status. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. A comparison of surgery and family medicine residents' perceptions of cross-cultural care training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chun, Maria B J; Jackson, David S; Lin, Susan Y; Park, Elyse R

    2010-12-01

    The need for physicians formally trained to deliver care to diverse patient populations has been widely advocated. Utilizing a validated tool, Weissman and Betancourt's Cross-Cultural Care Survey, the aim of this current study was to compare surgery and family medicine residents' perceptions of their preparedness and skillfulness to provide high quality cross-cultural care. Past research has documented differences between the two groups' reported impressions of importance and level of instruction received in cross-cultural care. Twenty surgery and 15 family medicine residents participated in the study. Significant differences were found between surgery and family medicine residents on most ratings of the amount of training they received in cross-cultural skills. Specifically, family medicine residents reported having received more training on: 1) determining how patients want to be addressed, 2) taking a social history, 3) assessing their understanding of the cause of illness, 4) negotiating their treatment plan, 5) assessing whether they are mistrustful of the health care system and÷or doctor, 6) identifying cultural customs, 7) identifying how patients make decisions within the family, and 8) delivering services through a medical interpreter. One unexpected finding was that surgery residents, who reported not receiving much formal cultural training, reported higher mean scores on perceived skillfulness (i.e. ability) than family medicine residents. The disconnect may be linked to the family medicine residents' training in cultural humility - more knowledge and understanding of cross-cultural care can paradoxically lead to perceptions of being less prepared or skillful in this area. Hawaii Medical Journal Copyright 2010.

  13. Significance of Objective Structured Clinical Examinations to Plastic Surgery Residency Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, Brian J; Zoghbi, Yasmina; Askari, Morad; Birnbach, David J; Shekhter, Ilya; Thaller, Seth R

    2017-09-01

    Objective structured clinical examinations (OSCEs) have proven to be a powerful tool. They possess more than a 30-year track record in assessing the competency of medical students, residents, and fellows. Objective structured clinical examinations have been used successfully in a variety of medical specialties, including surgery. They have recently found their way into the subspecialty of plastic surgery. This article uses a systematic review of the available literature on OSCEs and their recent use in plastic surgery. It incorporates survey results assessing program directors' views on the use of OSCEs. Approximately 40% of programs surveyed use OSCEs to assess the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education core competencies. We found that 40% use OSCEs to evaluate specific plastic surgery milestones. Objective structured clinical examinations are usually performed annually. They cost anywhere between $100 and more than $1000 per resident. Four milestones giving residents the most difficulties on OSCEs were congenital anomalies, noncancer breast surgery, breast reconstruction, and practice-based learning and improvement. It was determined that challenges with milestones were due to lack of adequate general knowledge and surgical ward patient care, as well as deficits in professionalism and system-based problems. Programs were able to remediate weakness found by OSCEs using a variety of methods. Objective structured clinical examinations offer a unique tool to objectively assess the proficiency of residents in key areas of the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education core competencies. In addition, they can be used to assess the specific milestones that plastic surgery residents must meet. This allows programs to identify and improve identified areas of weakness.

  14. The utility of endovascular simulation to improve technical performance and stimulate continued interest of preclinical medical students in vascular surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jason T; Qiu, Mary; Teshome, Mediget; Raghavan, Shyam S; Tedesco, Maureen M; Dalman, Ronald L

    2009-01-01

    New training paradigms in vascular surgery allow for early specialization out of medical school. Surgical simulation has emerged as an educational tool for trainees to practice procedures in a controlled environment allowing interested medical students to perform procedures without compromising patient safety. The purpose of this study is to assess the ability of a simulation-based curriculum to improve the technical performance and interest level of medical students in vascular surgery. Prospective observational cohort study of medical student performance. Academic medical center. Forty-one medical students (23 first year, 15 second year, 3 other) enrolled in a vascular surgery elective course. Students completed a survey of their interests and performed a renal stent procedure on an endovascular simulator (pretest). The curriculum consisted of didactic teaching and weekly mentored simulator sessions and concluded with a final renal stent procedure on the simulator (posttest). Objective procedural measures were determined during the pre- and posttest by the simulator, and subjective performance was graded by expert observers utilizing a structured global assessment scale. After the course, the students were surveyed as to their opinions about vascular surgery as a career option. Finally, 1 year after the course, all students were again surveyed to determine continued interest in vascular surgery. The objective and subjective criteria measured on the simulator and structured global assessment scale significantly improved from pre- to posttest in terms of performer technical skill, patient safety measures, and structured global assessments. Before beginning the course, 8.5% of the students expressed high interest in vascular surgery, and after completing the course 70% were seriously considering vascular surgery as a career option (p = 0.0001). More than 95% of the students responded that endovascular simulation increased their knowledge and interest in vascular

  15. Data for the Oxford Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Study international survey of vascular surgery professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Regent; Jones, Amy; Woodgate, Felicity; Killough, Nicholas; Bellamkonda, Kirthi; Williams, Matthew; Hurst, Katherine; Fulford-Smith, Lucy; Cassimjee, Ismail; Handa, Ashok

    2017-10-01

    As part of the Oxford Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm (OxAAA) Study, we conducted an international survey of vascular surgery professionals. One aspect of the survey is as published in the International Journal of Cardiology: "International Opinion on Priorities in Research for Small Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms and the Potential Path for Research to Impact Clinical Management". This Data-in-Brief article contains a detailed method for the conduct of this survey and additional original data. In this survey, we also provided vascular surgery colleagues with contemporary epidemiologic and surgical outcome data. This was followed by a hypothetical scenario whereby a patient had just been diagnosed with a small (40 mm) AAA and a novel biomarker predicted it to be fast growing in the coming years. We assessed the vascular professionals' perception of the patient's preference for management in this scenario, and their willingness to refer patients for a surgical trial that investigates the outcome of early versus late surgery in this setting. The survey then asked the vascular professionals to assume the role of the patient, and provided their own preferences in such a scenario.

  16. Confidence Crisis Among General Surgery Residents: A Systematic Review and Qualitative Discourse Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elfenbein, Dawn M

    2016-12-01

    In the surgical community, there is concern that general surgery residents are choosing subspecialty training in large numbers because of a crisis in confidence at the end of training. Confidence is an essential quality of surgeons, and recent studies have attempted to quantify and measure it in graduating general surgery residents. To systematically review the quality of evidence provided and to critically analyze the language used to describe the findings using quantitative methods. A systematic review of the PubMed indexed literature on general surgery resident confidence was performed in March 2015. A summative table of each study's hypothesis, definition of confidence, quality using the Medical Education Research Study Quality Instrument, influence using Web of Science citations, results, and conclusions was created, and qualitative coding was applied to identify emerging themes. No date restrictions were used in the search. Fifteen survey studies have been performed that measure confidence or readiness to practice. Although 5 studies had neutral or positive conclusions, most studies reported low confidence in general surgery graduates. There are conflicting data about definitions of confidence. The relationships between confidence, autonomy, and competence are varied and complex. Comparisons with the past are frequent. Confidence is difficult to define and measure. Despite limitations, survey studies are used to shape discourse and influence policies. Social and cultural factors influence self-efficacy, and focusing on operative volume and autonomy alone may not address all of the reasons that some residents express concerns about readiness to practice.

  17. [Chances and risks of a new residency program for orthopedics and trauma surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-01

    The residency program for a specialist in orthopedics and trauma surgery is facing fundamental changes based on an initiative originating from the working group "medical training" of the German Medical Association (GMA). A survey indicated that 50 % of all trainees are dissatisfied with their current situation. It appears important to integrate the ideas and wishes of current orthopedic residents in a novel training concept. To assess this a survey was performed by the Young Forum of the German Society for Orthopedics und Trauma Surgery. The internet-based short survey was conducted in January 2013 among members of the professional societies (DGU, DGOU and DGOOC). 408 physicians participated. The majority of the participating physicians is interested in a career in orthopedics and trauma surgery with primarily operative contents. Accordingly the majority (62 %, n = 253) voted against a reduction of numbers of surgical interventions with 86 % (n = 351) confirming the necessity that these operations must be carried out by the trainee himself. The upcoming changes in residency program for orthopedics and trauma surgery offer the opportunity for a well structured and practical oriented residency program. It could be a further step in increasing satisfaction in this profession. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  18. The University of Pennsylvania curriculum for training otorhinolaryngology residents in transoral robotic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sperry, Steven M; O'Malley, Bert W; Weinstein, Gregory S

    2014-01-01

    To define a curriculum for the development of robotic surgical skills in otorhinolaryngology residency training. A systematic review of the current literature on robotic surgery training was performed. Based on prior reports in other specialties, a curriculum for otorhinolaryngology residents was created that progresses through several modules, including didactics, inanimate skills laboratory, and operative experience. The curriculum for residents in otorhinolaryngology was designed as follows: didactics include an overview of the robotic device and instruments, a tutorial in basic controls and function, and a room setup and positioning. The anatomy and steps of transoral procedures are taught through books, videos, operative observations, and cadaver dissections. Skills are developed with a virtual reality robotic simulator and robotics labs. The operative experience progresses from case observation to bedside assistant to console surgeon. The role of the console surgeon progresses in a stepwise fashion, and the procedures of radical tonsillectomy, supraglottic partial laryngectomy, and base of tongue resection have been organized as a series of steps. A structured curriculum for training residents in transoral robotic surgery was developed. This training is important for otorhinolaryngology residents to acquire the knowledge and skills to perform robotic surgery safely. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  19. Penile vascular surgery for treating erectile dysfunction: Current role and future direction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molodysky, Eugen; Liu, Shi-Ping; Huang, Sheng-Jean; Hsu, Geng-Long

    2013-01-01

    Penile vascular surgery for treating erectile dysfunction (ED) is still regarded cautiously. Thus we reviewed relevant publications from the last decade, summarising evidence-based reports consistent with the pessimistic consensus and, by contrast, the optimistically viable options for vascular reconstruction for ED published after 2003. Recent studies support a revised model of the tunica albuginea of the corpora cavernosa as a bi-layered structure with a 360° complete inner circular layer and a 300° incomplete outer longitudinal coat. Additional studies show a more sophisticated venous drainage system than previously understood, and most significantly, that the emissary veins can be easily occluded by the shearing action elicited by the inner and outer layers of the tunica albuginea. Pascal’s law has been shown to be a significant, if not the major, factor in erectile mechanics, with recent haemodynamic studies on fresh and defrosted human cadavers showing rigid erections despite the lack of endothelial activity. Reports on revascularisation surgery support its utility in treating arterial trauma in young males, and with localised arterial occlusive disease in the older man. Penile venous stripping surgery has been shown to be beneficial in correcting veno-occlusive dysfunction, with outstanding results. The traditional complications of irreversible penile numbness and deformity have been virtually eliminated, with the venous ligation technique superseding venous cautery. Penile vascular reconstructive surgery is viable if, and only if, the surgical handling is appropriate using a sound method. It should be a promising option in the near future. PMID:26558090

  20. Study of the Dynamics of Transcephalic Cerebral Impedance Data during Cardio-Vascular Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atefi, S. R.; Seoane, F.; Lindecrantz, K.

    2013-04-01

    Postoperative neurological deficits are one of the risks associated with cardio vascular surgery, necessitating development of new techniques for cerebral monitoring. In this study an experimental observation regarding the dynamics of transcephalic Electrical Bioimpedance (EBI) in patients undergoing cardiac surgery with and without extracorporeal circulation (ECC) was conducted to investigate the potential use of electrical Bioimpedance for cerebral monitoring in cardio vascular surgery. Tetrapolar transcephalic EBI measurements at single frequency of 50 kHz were recorded prior to and during cardio vascular surgery. The obtained results show that the transcephalic impedance decreases in both groups of patients as operation starts, however slight differences in these two groups were also observed with the cerebral impedance reduction in patients having no ECC being less common and not as pronounced as in the ECC group. Changes in the cerebral impedance were in agreement with changes of haematocrit and temperature. The origin of EBI changes is still unexplained however these results encourage us to continue investigating the application of electrical bioimpedance cerebral monitoring clinically.

  1. Prospective evaluation of surgical palliative care immersion training for general surgery residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raoof, Mustafa; O'Neill, Lisa; Neumayer, Leigh; Fain, Mindy; Krouse, Robert

    2017-08-01

    Palliative care competencies in surgical training are recognized to improve the care of surgical patients with advanced or life-threatening illnesses. Formal programs to teach these competencies are lacking. The study aims to assess the feasibility and utility of a unique surgical palliative care immersion training program. A half-day Surgical Palliative Care Immersion Training (SPCIT) was developed using the American College of Surgeon's manual titled "Surgical Palliative Care: A Resident's Guide" as a framework. The training format was modeled after the highly successful University of Arizona Center on Aging's Interprofessional Chief Resident Immersion Training (IP-CRIT) Program to teach palliative care competencies to general surgery residents. Objective and self-assessments were performed at baseline, immediately post training and 5-months after training. For all pre-test, post-test comparisons on Likert scale, Wilcoxon Signed Rank Test was used. For aggregate scores a repeated-measures analysis of variance was used. Forty of the forty-eight residents (83%) completed the learner's needs assessment survey. Thirty-four (71%) of the forty-eight residents in the residency program participated in the SPCIT. Significant improvement was noted in objective assessment of post-test aggregate scores (Mean difference 2.15, 95% CI 0.52-3.77, p = 0.0083). There was a significant increase in proportion of residents who felt confident in discussing palliative care options (96.5% vs. 27.5%, p support (79.2% vs. 45%, p = 0.0059) with patient/families after the SPCIT. The newly developed SPCIT program drastically improves knowledge, attitudes and perceived skills of general surgery residents. Similar training can be implemented in other surgical residency programs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Reducing oral and maxillofacial surgery resident risk exposure: lessons from graduate medical education reform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buhrow, Suzanne Morse; Buhrow, Jack A

    2013-12-01

    It is estimated that, in the United States, more than 40,000 patients are injured each day because of preventable medical errors. Although numerous studies examine the causes of medical trainee errors and efforts to mitigate patient injuries in this population, little research exists on adverse events experienced by oral and maxillofacial surgery (OMFS) residents or strategies to improve patient safety awareness in OMFS residency programs. The authors conducted a retrospective literature review of contemporary studies on medical trainees' reported risk exposure and the impact of integrating evidence-based patient safety training into residency curricula. A review of the literature suggests that OMFS residents face similar risks as medical trainees in medical, surgical, and anesthesia residency programs and may benefit from integrating competency-based safety training in the OMFS residency curriculum. OMFS trainees face particular challenges when transitioning from dental student to surgical resident, particularly related to their limited clinical exposure to high-reliability organizations, which may place them at higher risk than other medical trainees. OMFS educators should establish resident competence in patient safety principles and system improvement strategies throughout the training period.

  3. Weekly e-mailed teaching tips and reading material influence teaching among general surgery residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watkins, Ammara A; Gondek, Stephen P; Lagisetty, Kiran H; Castillo-Angeles, Manuel; Gangadharan, Sidharta P; Cahalane, Michael J; Kent, Tara S

    2017-01-01

    A nonintrusive e-mail reminder incorporating teaching tips and manuscripts was developed to supplement resident-as-teacher curricula. Ten high-yield manuscripts and 10 teaching tips exemplifying the themes of mentorship or role modeling, teaching methods, adult learning theory, feedback, and the resident role of teaching were distributed to general surgery house staff through a weekly e-mail series. House staff completed surveys before and after the 20-week e-mail series. Thirty (43%) and 28 (40%) respondents completed the pre-e-mail and post-e-mail survey, respectively. Residents found teaching tips to be more helpful than manuscripts. Weekly e-mail reminders were "just right" in frequency according to 74% of respondents. Forty percent of residents felt the weekly e-mails helped them teach more often and 50% of residents changed their teaching style. Weekly reminders are an easy way to encourage resident teaching without a significant resident time commitment. Residents typically find teaching tips to be more useful than manuscripts. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Does operative experience during residency correlate with reported competency of recent general surgery graduates?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safavi, Arash; Lai, Sarah; Butterworth, Sonia; Hameed, Morad; Schiller, Dan; Skarsgard, Erik

    2012-01-01

    Background Identification of attributes of residency training that predict competency would improve surgical education. We hypothesized that case experience during residency would correlate with self-reported competency of recent graduates. Methods Aggregate case log data of residents enrolled in 2 general surgery programs were collected over a 12-month period and stratified into Surgical Council on Resident Education (SCORE) categories. We surveyed recent (plastic surgery (4, 0.04%), and the least common EU procedure was abdomen–spleen (1, 0.1%). The questionnaire response rate was 45%. For EC procedures, self-reported competency was highest in skin and soft tissue, thoracic and head and neck (each 100%) and lowest in vascular–venous (54%), whereas for EU procedures it was highest in abdomen–general (100%) and lowest in vascular–arterial (62%). The correlation between case volume and self-reported competency was poor (R = 0.2 for EC procedures). Conclusion Self-reported competency correlates poorly with operative case experience during residency. Other curriculum factors, including specific rotations and timing, balance between inpatient and outpatient surgical experience and competition for cases, may contribute to procedural competency acquisition during residency. PMID:22854144

  5. Assessing Interest and Barriers for Resident and Faculty Involvement in Global Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Maija; Healy, James M; Hall, Michael R; Ozgediz, Doruk

    2017-07-17

    Multiple institutions have developed international electives and sustainable global surgery initiatives to facilitate clinical, research, and outreach opportunities with hospitals in resource-poor areas. Despite increasing interest among programs, many institutions have not successfully reached potential involvement. This study evaluates the experiences of Yale residents and faculty, measures interest in the development of an international surgical elective, and enumerates barriers to developing or participating in these opportunities. This was performed to develop a formalized elective and assess interest and capacity for surgical global health initiatives, as a seemingly increasing number of trainee applicants and residents were expressing interest in working in resource-poor settings. Electronic survey of Yale Surgery residents and faculty analyzed using SPSS and Graphpad Prism. Among residents, previous global experience correlates with current interest in international opportunities, with 100% remaining interested, and 78% of those without prior experience also expressing interest (p = 0.018). Barriers to pursuing these activities included the use of vacation time, funding, scheduling, family obligations, and concern for personal safety. Among faculty, 28% of respondents have been involved internationally, and most (86%) expressed interest in additional opportunities and all were willing to take residents. Barriers to faculty participation included funding, relative value unit target reduction, protected time, and the desire for institutional support for such activities. A substantial proportion of residents and faculty have experience in global health and motivation to pursue additional opportunities. The main barriers to participation are not a lack of interest, but rather needs for funding support, protected time, and institutional recognition of academic contributions. These findings are being used to develop a global surgery elective and establish long

  6. Personality Factors Associated With Resident Performance: Results From 12 Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education Accredited Orthopaedic Surgery Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Donna; Egol, Kenneth A; Maculatis, Martine C; Roloff, Kathryn S; Friedman, Alan M; Levine, Brett; Garfin, Steven; Schwartz, Alexandra; Sterling, Robert; Kuivila, Thomas; Paragioudakis, Steve J; Zuckerman, Joseph D

    2017-07-05

    To understand the personality factors associated with orthopedic surgery resident performance. A prospective, cross-sectional survey of orthopedic surgery faculty that assessed their perceptions of the personality traits most highly associated with resident performance. Residents also completed a survey to determine their specific personality characteristics. A subset of faculty members rated the performance of those residents within their respective program on 5 dimensions. Multiple regression models tested the relationship between the set of resident personality measures and each aspect of performance; relative weights analyses were then performed to quantify the contribution of the individual personality measures to the total variance explained in each performance domain. Independent samples t-tests were conducted to examine differences between the personality characteristics of residents and those faculty identified as relevant to successful resident performance. Data were collected from 12 orthopedic surgery residency programs1 throughout the United States. The level of clinical care provided by participating institutions varied. Data from 175 faculty members and 266 residents across 12 programs were analyzed. The personality features of residents were related to faculty evaluations of resident performance (for all, p performance. Particularly, the characteristics of agreeableness, neuroticism, and learning approach were found to be most important for explaining resident performance. Additionally, there were significant differences between the personality features that faculty members identified as important for resident performance and the personality features that residents possessed. Personality assessments can predict orthopedic surgery resident performance. However, results suggest the traits that faculty members value or reward among residents could be different from the traits associated with improved resident performance. Copyright © 2017 Association

  7. Relationships between study habits, burnout, and general surgery resident performance on the American Board of Surgery In-Training Examination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smeds, Matthew R; Thrush, Carol R; McDaniel, Faith K; Gill, Roop; Kimbrough, Mary K; Shames, Brian D; Sussman, Jeffrey J; Galante, Joseph M; Wittgen, Catherine M; Ansari, Parswa; Allen, Steven R; Nussbaum, Michael S; Hess, Donald T; Knight, David C; Bentley, Frederick R

    2017-09-01

    The American Board of Surgery In-Training Examination (ABSITE) is used by programs to evaluate the knowledge and readiness of trainees to sit for the general surgery qualifying examination. It is often used as a tool for resident promotion and may be used by fellowship programs to evaluate candidates. Burnout has been associated with job performance and satisfaction; however, its presence and effects on surgical trainees' performance are not well studied. We sought to understand factors including burnout and study habits that may contribute to performance on the ABSITE examination. Anonymous electronic surveys were distributed to all residents at 10 surgical residency programs (n = 326). Questions included demographics as well as study habits, career interests, residency characteristics, and burnout scores using the Oldenburg Burnout Inventory, which assesses burnout because of both exhaustion and disengagement. These surveys were then linked to the individual's 2016 ABSITE and United States Medical Licensing Examination (USMLE) step 1 and 2 scores provided by the programs to determine factors associated with successful ABSITE performance. In total, 48% (n = 157) of the residents completed the survey. Of those completing the survey, 48 (31%) scored in the highest ABSITE quartile (≥75th percentile) and 109 (69%) scored less than the 75th percentile. In univariate analyses, those in the highest ABSITE quartile had significantly higher USMLE step 1 and step 2 scores (P burnout scores (disengagement, P Burnout Inventory exhaustion (P = 0.02), and USMLE step 1 and 2 scores (P = 0.007 and 0.0001, respectively). Residents who perform higher on the ABSITE have a regular study schedule throughout the year, report less burnout because of exhaustion, study away from home, and have shown success in prior standardized tests. Further study is needed to determine the effects of burnout on clinical duties, career advancement, and satisfaction. Copyright © 2017

  8. Insta-grated Plastic Surgery Residencies: The Rise of Social Media Use by Trainees and Responsible Guidelines for Use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandawarkar, Akash A; Gould, Daniel J; Stevens, W Grant

    2018-02-21

    Ethical guidelines for appropriate use of social media are beginning to be delineated. As social media becomes ingrained in plastic surgery culture, education of residents on appropriate use of social media is increasingly important. Recently, plastic surgery residency programs have begun to utilize social media. This study characterizes the trends and content of plastic surgery residency-associated Instagram accounts. Active individual residency program Instagram accounts were identified for integrated plastic surgery programs. Metrics for each account were retrieved on September 16, 2017, including date of first post, number of posts, and followers. Individual posts were analyzed for content of post. Fourteen of 67 (21%) integrated plastic surgery programs were found to have active Instagram accounts. There has been an exponential growth of programs adopting Instagram since August 2015. A total of 806 posts were created. Thirty-two (3.97%) posts had intraoperative photos and only one (0.12%) showed a patient image. There were 4466 followers of plastic surgery residency programs. A linear correlation was found between number of posts and number of followers, while there was no correlation of number of followers and time since account start. Instagram use by plastic surgery integrated programs continues to grow exponentially, and programs are appropriately using the platform. Active use of the resident social media results in increased influence. Resident use of social media has many benefits. We propose social media guidelines for plastic surgery trainees and advocate for continued appropriate use and auto-regulation by plastic surgery trainees.

  9. [Selected pages of history of vascular surgery in Russia (contribution of Russian surgeons to world vascular surgery)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pokrovskiĭ, A V; Gliantsev, S P

    2014-01-01

    The article describes the most significant for Russian surgery personalities, facts, and events of the last 180years. An emphasis is placed upon those works, discoveries or operations made by Russians for the first timein the world's practice. To such we refer N.J. Pirogov's topographical anatomy of vessels (1837), N. V. Ekk's portocaval anastomosis (1877), A.A. Yanovsky's lateral arterial suture (1889), S.S. Bryukhonenko's artificial circulation unit (1923-1924), Yu. Yu. Voronoy's renal replantation onto femoral vessels (1933), V.P. Demikhov'stransplantation of vital organs (1946-1959), V.I. Kolesov's mammary-coronary anastomosis (1964),F.A. Serbinenko's endovascular neurosurgery ( 1979), E. I. Chasov's intracoronary thrombolysis by E.I. Chazov( 1974), endovascular prosthetic repair of the thoracic aorta by N.L. Volodos ( 1985) and a series of other facts.

  10. Increased Academic Productivity of Orthopaedic Surgery Residents Following 2011 Duty Hour Reform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Joey P; Savage, Kevin; Gil, Joseph A; Eberson, Craig P; Mulcahey, Mary K

    2017-12-19

    In 2003 and again in 2011, the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) mandated increasingly stringent resident duty hour restrictions. With less time required at the hospital, residents theoretically have more time for other academic activities, such as research. Our study seeks to examine whether the number of research publications by orthopaedic residents increased following implementation of the 2011 ACGME duty hour restrictions. Pubmed was queried using publicly available alumni lists from programs across the United States. The years 2008 to 2011 were included to assess pre-2011 productivity. The years 2012 to 2015 were included in the post 2011 group. Paired t tests were used to assess differences between groups. Statistical significance was set to p < 0.05 a priori. A total of 10 orthopedic surgery residency programs across the United States. The study group was composed of 5 of the 2015 top 20 National Institutes of Health (NIH) funded programs and 5 programs without NIH funding. When corrected for number of residents per year, there were 0.290 publications per resident/year from 2008 to 2011 increasing to 0.528 publications per resident/year from 2012 to 2015 following implementation of the 2011 work hour restrictions (p = 0.033). When corrected for number of residents per year, there remained no difference in publications per resident from 2008 to 2011 (p = 0.81) or from 2012 to 2015 (p = 0.10) between NIH and non-NIH funded programs. There has been little data to support the theory that resident work hour restrictions have improved education or patient care in any meaningful way. In our study, there was a statistically significant increase in publications after 2011; however, the number of publications between NIH funded and non-NIH funded programs did not differ. Our study is the first to demonstrate that with increasing duty hour restrictions, orthopaedic surgery residents may be using more of their free time to conduct research

  11. Attitudes and practices of surgery residency program directors toward the use of social networking profiles to select residency candidates: a nationwide survey analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Go, Pauline H; Klaassen, Zachary; Chamberlain, Ronald S

    2012-01-01

    To determine whether residency program directors (PDs) of general surgery and surgical subspecialties review social networking (SN) websites during resident selection. A 16-question survey was distributed via e-mail (Survey Monkey, Palo Alto, California) to 641 PDs of general surgery and surgical subspecialty residency programs accredited by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME). Institutions with ACGME-accredited general surgery and surgical subspecialty residency programs. PDs of ACGME-accredited general surgery and surgical subspecialty residency programs. Two hundred fifty (39%) PDs completed the survey. Seventeen percent (n = 43) of respondents reported visiting SN websites to gain more information about an applicant during the selection process, leading 14 PDs (33.3%) to rank an applicant lower after a review of their SN profile. PDs who use SN websites currently are likely to continue (69%), whereas those who do not use SN currently might do so in the future (yes 5.4%, undecided 44.6%). Online profiles displayed on SN websites provide surgery PDs with an additional avenue with which to evaluate highly competitive residency applicants. Applicants should be aware of the expansion of social media into the professional arena and the increasing use of these tools by PDs. SN profiles should reflect the professional standards to which physicians are held while highlighting an applicant's strengths and academic achievements. Copyright © 2012 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Should general surgery residents be taught laparoscopic pyloromyotomies? An ethical perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escobar, Mauricio A; Hartin, Charles W; McCullough, Laurence B

    2014-01-01

    The authors examine the ethical implications of teaching general surgery residents laparoscopic pyloromyotomy. Using the authors' previously presented ethical framework, and examining survey data of pediatric surgeons in the United States and Canada, a rigorous ethical argument is constructed to examine the question: should general surgery residents be taught laparoscopic pyloromyotomies? A survey was constructed that contained 24 multiple-choice questions. The survey included questions pertaining to surgeon demographics, if pyloromyotomy was taught to general surgery and pediatric surgery residents, and management of complications encountered during pyloromyotomy. A total of 889 members of the American Pediatric Surgical Association and Canadian Association of Paediatric Surgeons were asked to participate. The response rate was 45% (401/889). The data were analyzed within the ethical model to address the question of whether general surgery residents should be taught laparoscopic pyloromyotomies. From an ethical perspective, appealing to the ethical model of a physician as a fiduciary, the answer is no. We previously proposed an ethical model based on 2 fundamental ethical principles: the ethical concept of the physician as a fiduciary and the contractarian model of ethics. The fiduciary physician practices medicine competently with the patient’s best interests in mind. The role of a fiduciary professional imposes ethical standards on all physicians, at the core of which is the virtue of integrity, which requires the physician to practice medicine to standards of intellectual and moral excellence. The American College of Surgeons recognizes the need for current and future surgeons to understand professionalism, which is one of the 6 core competencies specified by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education. Contracts are models of negotiation and ethically permissible compromise. Negotiated assent or consent is the core concept of contractarian

  13. Vascular Surgery in World War II: The Shift to Repairing Arteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barr, Justin; Cherry, Kenneth J; Rich, Norman M

    2016-03-01

    Vascular surgery in World War II has long been defined by DeBakey and Simeone's classic 1946 article describing arterial repair as exceedingly rare. They argued ligation was and should be the standard surgical response to arterial trauma in war. We returned to and analyzed the original records of World War II military medical units housed in the National Archives and other repositories in addition to consulting published accounts to determine the American practice of vascular surgery in World War II. This research demonstrates a clear shift from ligation to arterial repair occurring among American military surgeons in the last 6 months of the war in the European Theater of Operations. These conclusions not only highlight the role of war as a catalyst for surgical change but also point to the dangers of inaccurate history in stymieing such advances.

  14. A National Needs Assessment to Identify Technical Procedures in Vascular Surgery for Simulation Based Training

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nayahangan, Leizl Joy; Konge, Lars; Schroeder, T V

    2017-01-01

    a national needs assessment to identify the technical procedures that should be integrated in a simulation based curriculum. DESIGN AND METHODS: A national needs assessment using a Delphi process was initiated by engaging 33 predefined key persons in vascular surgery. Round 1 was a brainstorming phase...... to identify technical procedures that vascular surgeons should learn. Round 2 was a survey that used a needs assessment formula to explore the frequency of procedures, the number of surgeons performing each procedure, risk and/or discomfort, and feasibility for simulation based training. Round 3 involved...... eliminated, resulting in a final prioritised list of 19 technical procedures. CONCLUSION: A national needs assessment using a standardised Delphi method identified a list of procedures that are highly suitable and may provide the basis for future simulation based training programs for vascular surgeons...

  15. Smoking Cessation Rates among Patients Undergoing Vascular Surgery in a Canadian Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McHugh, Seamus Mark; Eisenberg, Naomi; Montbriand, Janice; Roche-Nagle, Graham

    2017-11-01

    Smoking is the single most important modifiable risk factor for patients with vascular disease. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of smoking and cessation rates among patients undergoing vascular surgery in a Canadian center. As part of the Vascular Quality Initiative, a prospectively maintained database was used to identify the patients undergoing vascular surgery between 2010 and 2013. Smoking prevalence data were collated preprocedure, postprocedure, and at year follow-up after intervention at a median of 13 months (mean = 14.4 ± 7.8 months). Cessation rates at 13-month follow-up were assessed to determine any statistically significant univariate factors. These factors were then used to build a model through backwards logistic regression. Multicollinearity was tested by assessing both variance inflation factors and tolerance. Overall, 624 patients had complete follow-up data. Of these, 209 (33.5%) were smokers presurgically. At 1-year follow-up, of those 209 patients who were smokers preoperatively, 87 (41.6%) had stopped smoking while 122 (58.4%) had not. Patients who were male and aged >70 years were more likely to be smokers preoperatively (P = 0.001 and P 70 years (P = 0.005) and in those with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (P = 0.016). Gender was also statistically associated, with cessation rates higher in females (P = 0.011). More than one-third of patients who underwent surgery in a Canadian vascular center continue to smoke. Uniquely, we report a statistically significant association between gender and postoperative cessation rates. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. A National Needs Assessment to Identify Technical Procedures in Vascular Surgery for Simulation Based Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayahangan, L J; Konge, L; Schroeder, T V; Paltved, C; Lindorff-Larsen, K G; Nielsen, B U; Eiberg, J P

    2017-04-01

    Practical skills training in vascular surgery is facing challenges because of an increased number of endovascular procedures and fewer open procedures, as well as a move away from the traditional principle of "learning by doing." This change has established simulation as a cornerstone in providing trainees with the necessary skills and competences. However, the development of simulation based programs often evolves based on available resources and equipment, reflecting convenience rather than a systematic educational plan. The objective of the present study was to perform a national needs assessment to identify the technical procedures that should be integrated in a simulation based curriculum. A national needs assessment using a Delphi process was initiated by engaging 33 predefined key persons in vascular surgery. Round 1 was a brainstorming phase to identify technical procedures that vascular surgeons should learn. Round 2 was a survey that used a needs assessment formula to explore the frequency of procedures, the number of surgeons performing each procedure, risk and/or discomfort, and feasibility for simulation based training. Round 3 involved elimination and ranking of procedures. The response rate for round 1 was 70%, with 36 procedures identified. Round 2 had a 76% response rate and resulted in a preliminary prioritised list after exploring the need for simulation based training. Round 3 had an 85% response rate; 17 procedures were eliminated, resulting in a final prioritised list of 19 technical procedures. A national needs assessment using a standardised Delphi method identified a list of procedures that are highly suitable and may provide the basis for future simulation based training programs for vascular surgeons in training. Copyright © 2017 European Society for Vascular Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Incidence of deep venous thrombosis and stratification of risk groups in a university hospital vascular surgery unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Okuhara

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: There is a knowledge gap with relation to the true incidence of deep vein thrombosis among patients undergoing vascular surgery procedures in Brazil. This study is designed to support the implementation of a surveillance system to control the quality of venous thromboembolism prophylaxis in our country. Investigations in specific institutions have determined the true incidence of deep vein thrombosis and identified risk groups, to enable measures to be taken to ensure adequate prophylaxis and treatment to prevent the condition.OBJECTIVE: To study the incidence of deep venous thrombosis in patients admitted to hospital for non-venous vascular surgery procedures and stratify them into risk groups.METHOD: This was a cross-sectional observational study that evaluated 202 patients from a university hospital vascular surgery clinic between March 2011 and July 2012. The incidence of deep venous thrombosis was determined using vascular ultrasound examinations and the Caprini scale.RESULTS: The mean incidence of deep venous thrombosis in vascular surgery patients was 8.5%. The frequency distribution of patients by venous thromboembolism risk groups was as follows: 8.4% were considered low risk, 17.3% moderate risk, 29.7% high risk and 44.6% were classified as very high risk.CONCLUSION: The incidence of deep venous thrombosis in vascular surgery patients was 8.5%, which is similar to figures reported in the international literature. Most vascular surgery patients were stratified into the high and very high risk for deep venous thrombosis groups.

  18. Declining Operative Experience for Junior-Level Residents: Is This an Unintended Consequence of Minimally Invasive Surgery?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullen, Matthew G; Salerno, Elise P; Michaels, Alex D; Hedrick, Traci L; Sohn, Min-Woong; Smith, Philip W; Schirmer, Bruce D; Friel, Charles M

    2016-01-01

    Our group has previously demonstrated an upward shift from junior to senior resident participation in common general surgery operations, traditionally performed by junior-level residents. The objective of this study was to evaluate if this trend would correct over time. We hypothesized that junior resident case volume would improve. A sample of essential laparoscopic and open general surgery procedures (appendectomy, inguinal herniorrhaphy, cholecystectomy, and partial colectomy) was chosen for analysis. The American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program Participant Use Files were queried for these procedures between 2005 and 2012. Cases were stratified by participating resident post-graduate year with "junior resident" defined as post-graduate year1-3. Logistic regression was performed to determine change in junior resident participation for each type of procedure over time. A total of 185,335 cases were included in the study. For 3 of the operations we considered, the prevalence of laparoscopic surgery increased from 2005-2012 (all p surgeries performed by junior-level residents decreased for appendectomy by 2.6%/y (p surgeries, with appendectomy decreasing by 9.4%/y (p surgery resident education. Copyright © 2016 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Indications and outcomes of resident-performed cataract surgery requiring return to the operating room.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Caroline M; Sundararajan, Miel; Biggerstaff, Kristin S; Orengo-Nania, Silvia; Coffee, Robert E; Khandelwal, Sumitra S

    2016-03-01

    To identify the clinical and operative factors predicting reoperation within 30 days of resident-performed cataract surgery and correlate them with 1-year visual outcomes. Michael E. DeBakey Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Houston, Texas, USA. Retrospective cohort study. The study assessed patients who had resident-performed cataract surgery between 2005 and 2013 and required return to the operating room for a second surgery on the same eye within 30 days. Preoperative and intraoperative risk factors were assessed. Outcome measures included corrected distance visual acuity (CDVA) at 1 year. A review of 6644 resident-performed cataract surgeries showed that 54 eyes (0.85%) of 54 patients required a return to the operating room within 30 days. The reoperation rate was higher in the first half of the academic year (1.18%) than in the second half (0.55%) (P = .004). The mean CDVA 1 year postoperatively was 20/40, with a loss of lines of vision in 4 eyes. The mean operative time was 59.23 minutes ± 35.05 (SD). A longer intraoperative time was predictive of a worse visual outcome (P < .01). Despite the need for reoperation within 30 days, most patients achieved improved visual acuity. The reoperation rate was significantly lower in the second half of the academic year. Increased operation times correlated with worse visual acuity independent of other variables. Copyright © 2016 ASCRS and ESCRS. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Burnout and Stress Among US Surgery Residents: Psychological Distress and Resilience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebares, Carter C; Guvva, Ekaterina V; Ascher, Nancy L; O'Sullivan, Patricia S; Harris, Hobart W; Epel, Elissa S

    2017-10-26

    Burnout among physicians affects mental health, performance, and patient outcomes. Surgery residency is a high-risk time for burnout. We examined burnout and the psychological characteristics that can contribute to burnout vulnerability and resilience in a group of surgical trainees. An online survey was distributed in September 2016 to all ACGME-accredited general surgery programs. Burnout was assessed with an abbreviated Maslach Burnout Inventory. Stress, anxiety, depression, resilience, mindfulness, and alcohol use were assessed and analyzed for prevalence. Odds ratios (ORs) were used to determine the magnitude of presumed risk and resilience factors. Among 566 surgical residents who participated in the survey, prevalence of burnout was 69%, equally driven by emotional exhaustion and depersonalization. Perceived stress and distress symptoms (depression, suicidal ideation, and anxiety) were notably high across training levels, but improved during lab years. Higher burnout was associated with high stress (OR 7.8; p burnout (OR 0.24; p stress (OR 0.15; p burnout, severe stress, and distress symptoms are experienced throughout general surgery training, with some improvement during lab years. In this cross-sectional study, trainees with burnout and high stress were at increased risk for depression and suicidal ideation. Higher dispositional mindfulness was associated with lower risk of burnout, severe stress, and distress symptoms, supporting the potential of mindfulness training to promote resilience during surgery residency. Copyright © 2017 American College of Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Laparoscopic skill laboratory in urological surgery: tools and methods for resident training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio C. M. Torricelli

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Laparoscopy has certainly brought considerable benefits to patients, but laparoscopic surgery requires a set of skills different from open surgery, and learning in the operating room may increase surgical time, and even may be harmful to patients. Several training programs have been developed to decrease these potential prejudices. PURPOSES: to describe the laparoscopic training program for urological residents of the "Hospital das Clinicas" of the Sao Paulo Medical School, to report urological procedures that are feasible in dry and wet labs, and to perform a critical analysis of the cost-benefit relation of advanced laparoscopic skills laboratory. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The laparoscopic skill lab has two virtual simulators, three manual simulators, and four laparoscopic sets for study with a porcine model. The urology residents during their first year attend classes in the virtual and manual simulator and helps the senior urological resident in activities carried out with the laparoscopic sets. During the second year, the urological resident has six periods per week, each period lasting four hours, to perform laparoscopic procedures with a porcine model. Results: In a training program of ten weeks, one urological resident performs an average of 120 urological procedures. The most common procedures are total nephrectomy (30%, bladder suture (30%, partial nephrectomy (10%, pyeloplasty (10%, ureteral replacement or transuretero anastomosis (10%, and others like adrenalectomy, prostatectomy, and retroperitoneoscopy. These procedures are much quicker and caused less morbidity. CONCLUSION: Laparoscopic skills laboratory is a good method for achieving technical ability.

  2. Assessing residents' operative skills for external ventricular drain placement and shunt surgery in pediatric neurosurgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldave, Guillermo; Hansen, Daniel; Briceño, Valentina; Luerssen, Thomas G; Jea, Andrew

    2017-04-01

    OBJECTIVE The authors previously demonstrated the use of a validated Objective Structured Assessment of Technical Skills (OSATS) tool for evaluating residents' operative skills in pediatric neurosurgery. However, no benchmarks have been established for specific pediatric procedures despite an increased need for meaningful assessments that can either allow for early intervention for underperforming trainees or allow for proficient residents to progress to conducting operations independently with more passive supervision. This validated methodology and tool for assessment of operative skills for common pediatric neurosurgical procedures-external ventricular drain (EVD) placement and shunt surgery- was applied to establish its procedure-based feasibility and reliability, and to document the effect of repetition on achieving surgical skill proficiency in pediatric EVD placement and shunt surgery. METHODS A procedure-based technical skills assessment for EVD placements and shunt surgeries in pediatric neurosurgery was established through the use of task analysis. The authors enrolled all residents from 3 training programs (Baylor College of Medicine, Houston Methodist Hospital, and University of Texas-Medical Branch) who rotated through pediatric neurosurgery at Texas Children's Hospital over a 26-month period. For each EVD placement or shunt procedure performed with a resident, the faculty and resident (for self-assessment) completed an evaluation form (OSATS) based on a 5-point Likert scale with 7 categories. Data forms were then grouped according to faculty versus resident (self) assessment, length of pediatric neurosurgery rotation, postgraduate year level, and date of evaluation ("beginning of rotation," within 1 month of start date; "end of rotation," within 1 month of completion date; or "middle of rotation"). Descriptive statistical analyses were performed with the commercially available SPSS statistical software package. A p value pediatric procedures. The

  3. Early post-operative glucose levels are an independent risk factor for infection after peripheral vascular surgery. A retrospective study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vriesendorp, T. M.; Morélis, Q. J.; DeVries, J. H.; Legemate, D. A.; Hoekstra, J. B. L.

    2004-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate whether hyperglycaemia in the first 48 h after infrainguinal vascular surgery is a risk factor for postoperative infection, independent from factors associated with insulin resistance and surgical stress. Design. Retrospective cohort study. Patients and methods. Patients who

  4. Are oral and maxillofacial surgery residents being adequately trained to care for pediatric patients?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abramowicz, Shelly; Kaban, Leonard B; Wurtzel, Andrew S; Roser, Steven M

    2017-09-01

    To evaluate whether current oral and maxillofacial surgery (OMS) residents are receiving adequate training and experience to perform specific surgical procedures and anesthesia for pediatric patients. A 17-question survey was sent electronically to fellows of the American Academy of Craniomaxillofacial Surgeons. Descriptive data for individual surgeons, their associated residency programs, and the quantity of specific pediatric procedures they performed were collected. Resident case load for inpatient and outpatient procedures and overall experience in medical, surgical, and anesthetic management of pediatric OMS patients were explored. Surveys were sent to 110 active fellows; 64 completed the questionnaire (58%). There were 59 male fellows and 5 female fellows, with a mean age of 50.4 years. Of those, 68.8% practice in an academic setting. Specifically, 93.8% take after-hours emergency calls covering adult and pediatric patients and 98.4% have admitting privileges at a children's hospital or a pediatric unit in an adult hospital. Their affiliated residency programs include required rotations in pediatrics or pediatric subspecialties. In their opinion, >90% of graduating OMS residents have the appropriate skill set to perform dentoalveolar procedures, outpatient anesthesia, orthognathic procedures, and alveolar bone grafts. However, residents have limited ability to reconstruct pediatric ramus-condyle unit with a costochondral graft. Results of this study indicate that, in the opinion of the respondents, graduates of OMS residency programs have adequate training to perform dentoalveolar procedures, outpatient anesthesia, orthognathic surgery, and alveolar bone grafts in pediatric procedures, but have limited experience with reconstruction of pediatric ramus-condyle unit via costochondral graft. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. [Vascular Complications and Emergencies within Oncologic Abdominal Surgery - What Knowledge and Skills Are Essential for the Visceral Surgeon].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthaei, Hanno; Schmidt, Valeri; Branchi, Vittorio; Verrel, Frauke; Kalff, Jörg C; Koscielny, Arne

    2017-08-01

    Background Continuous improvements in perioperative and neoadjuvant therapy concepts nowadays permit more extensive tumor resections with curative intention. In patients with arterial or venous tumour involvement in preoperative imaging, physicians with expertise in vascular surgery should be involved in the planning phase of the operation. Unexpected vascular complications during abdominal surgery demand prompt management by the oncological surgeon. However, skills in vascular surgery are still not obligatory for the visceral surgeon in training. This topic is controversial and is therefore the focus of the present study. Patients and Methods From 2010 - 2015, a total of 126 patients underwent visceral operations involving vascular surgical interventions. Of these, 30 operations were performed as radical tumour resections. Retrospective data acquisition was performed with a minimum follow-up of 12 months. Aside from comprehensive characterisation of patients and their diseases, an outcome analysis was conducted. Furthermore, visceral surgery training programs in accordance with all 17 German federal medical associations were analysed and compared with respect to vascular surgery teaching. Results Vascular surgery was necessary in most patients, due to lesions of the mesentericoportal venous system (n = 11; 37%) and visceral arteries (n = 14; 47%). Techniques involved were mostly vascular sutures, reanastomosis or patch plastic surgery (n = 19; 63%) and venous thrombectomy/arterial embolectomy (n = 18; 60%). Hospital mortality was 3%. During follow-up, 33% of oncological patients died, whereas solely venous injury was an independent adverse prognostic variable (arterial vs. venous complications: HR 0.028; 95%-CI 0.002 - 0.442; p = 0.01). Skills in vascular surgery are optional for up to 12 months within visceral surgery training. Conclusions Intraoperative vascular complications in visceral surgical oncology are rare but pose severe

  6. Effect of the Veterans Affairs Medical System on plastic surgery residency training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravin, Adam G; Gottlieb, Neil B; Wang, Howard T; Meade, Ricardo A; Humphrey, J Stewart; Schwarz, Karl W; Levin, L Scott; Tyler, Douglas S; Erdmann, Detlev

    2006-02-01

    Teaching hospitals within the Veterans Affairs Health System perform the majority of complex and high-risk surgical procedures in the veteran patient population. Residency positions in the Veterans Affairs Medical System are usually part of a rotational educational system within a university-based residency, and plastic surgeons in training are a major work force and health care provider. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the current effect of the Veterans Affairs Medical System on plastic surgery residency training. A 6-year (January of 1998 to December of 2003) review was performed of procedures completed at the Durham Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Section of Plastic Surgery. Procedures were divided into the following categories: extremities and trunk; breast and cosmetic; head and neck, including excision of skin lesions; hand surgery; craniomaxillofacial surgery; and other. Only procedures performed in the main operating room were reviewed and analyzed. In addition, a detailed review was performed of major head and neck reconstructions with free tissue transfer. A total of 1655 operative procedures were performed in 1290 patients. The ratio of men to women was 6:1 (1112 men and 178 women). Patients ranged in age from 26 to 97 years (average age, 62.7 years). Procedures in the extremities and trunk (n = 193, 11.7 percent), breast and cosmetic (n = 228, 13.8 percent), hand surgery (n = 155, 9.4 percent), and other (n = 275, 16.6 percent) categories were comparably distributed. Although the head and neck category accounted for the highest number of procedures (n = 766, 46.3 percent), the majority of these procedures were simple excisions of skin tumors (n = 612). There were significantly fewer major craniomaxillofacial cases (n = 38, 2.3 percent). Data from the retrospective analysis reveal that a broad spectrum of plastic surgical procedures is performed within the Veterans Affairs Health System, serving as a tremendous resource for resident training

  7. Portuguese Society of Cardiothoracic and Vascular Surgery/Portuguese Society of Cardiology recommendations for waiting times for cardiac surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neves, José; Pereira, Hélder; Sousa Uva, Miguel; Gavina, Cristina; Leite Moreira, Adelino; Loureiro, Maria José

    2015-11-01

    Appointed jointly by the Portuguese Society of Cardiothoracic and Vascular Surgery (SPCCTV) and the Portuguese Society of Cardiology (SPC), the Working Group on Waiting Times for Cardiac Surgery was established with the aim of developing practical recommendations for clinically acceptable waiting times for the three critical phases of the care of adults with heart disease who require surgery or other cardiological intervention: cardiology appointments; the diagnostic process; and invasive treatment. Cardiac surgery has specific characteristics that are not comparable to other surgical specialties. It is important to reduce maximum waiting times and to increase the efficacy of systems for patient monitoring and tracking. The information in this document is mainly based on available clinical information. The methodology used to establish the criteria was based on studies on the natural history of heart disease, clinical studies comparing medical treatment with intervention, retrospective and prospective analyses of patients on waiting lists, and the opinions of experts and working groups. Following the first step, represented by publication of this document, the SPCCTV and SPC, as the bodies best suited to oversee this process, are committed to working together to define operational strategies that will reconcile the clinical evidence with the actual situation and with available resources. Copyright © 2015 Sociedade Portuguesa de Cardiologia. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  8. Outpatient surgery centers draw cases away from hospitals, impact resident training volume.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunning, Kyle; Liedtke, Eric; Toedter, Lori; Rohatgi, Chand

    2008-01-01

    Across the United States, ambulatory surgery centers (ASCs) are increasing in both number and surgical volume. This trend has been the focus of debate regarding reimbursement and patient safety, as well as surgical productivity and efficiency. However, the impact on surgical resident training caused by this shift toward outpatient surgery in nonhospital settings has not been studied. We reviewed data reported by our hospital and by local surgery centers as well as the case logs of the surgical residents at our institution to determine whether a negative effect on resident case volume has occurred. We conducted a retrospective review of our PGY-1 through PGY-3 level surgical residents' case logs for 3 consecutive academic years, from July 2004 through June 2007. We evaluated a group of common outpatient procedures that are now also being performed in stand-alone surgical centers in our area, such as breast biopsies, incision and drainage, hernia repair, colonoscopy, and esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD). The data were tallied by academic year and compared over time. In addition, we analyzed data reported to state agencies by our hospital and local surgery centers over the last 6 calendar years for any trends in case volume. By evaluating 2 different independent data sets for the same endpoint, we could evaluate our hypothesis twice. When evaluating state-reported data for the defined cases, a significant decrease was observed in the total number of cases performed at Easton Hospital, Easton, Pennsylvania, each year between 2003 and 2006 (p hernia (p = 0.04), excision of skin lesion (p = 0.0022), and incision/drainage (p outpatient surgery experience from procedures performed at our home institution. With the recent surge of stand-alone surgical centers, many outpatient procedures are being performed outside of the hospital in centers where our residents do not rotate. Although current residents in our program are performing enough cases to fulfill the ACGME required

  9. General surgery morning report: a competency-based conference that enhances patient care and resident education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stiles, Brendon M; Reece, T Brett; Hedrick, Traci L; Garwood, Robert A; Hughes, Michael G; Dubose, Joseph J; Adams, Reid B; Schirmer, Bruce D; Sanfey, Hilary A; Sawyer, Robert G

    2006-01-01

    After adopting a night float system, the residency program at the University of Virginia Health System Department of Surgery initiated a daily morning report (MR). The conference was originated to sign out new admissions and consults from the previous day to the services that would assume care. Although initially oriented toward transfer of patient information, MR is also hypothesized to serve as a competency-based resident education tool. An anonymous survey was distributed to on-service residents (n = 25). Questions were asked on a 5-point Likert scale. Respondents also ranked the weekly conferences, including MR, in terms of educational benefit derived. Most residents agreed that MR is an efficient method to sign-out patient care [84% stongly agree (SA) or agree (A)] and that it provides an excellent educational experience (88% SA or A). They agreed that it is presented in an evidence-based format (88% SA or A). Regarding the core competencies, residents all asserted that MR addresses "patient care" (100% SA or A) and "medical knowledge" (100% SA or A). Most agreed that it addresses "professionalism" (60% SA or A), "interpersonal skills and communication" (76% SA or A), and "practice-based learning and improvement" (92% SA or A). The 4 most important components identified with respect to continuing to improve both patient care and resident education were the presence of the on-call attending, a review of relevant radiology, provision of follow-up on select cases, and critical review of the literature. On average, MR was seen as the most educational conference, with 52% of residents ranking it first. Although MR is ubiquitous in most primary care residency programs, such a conference has not typically been held on surgical services. The MR was developed at the University of Virginia Health System Department of Surgery as a necessity for patient sign-out. As this conference has continued to evolve, it has become an excellent tool for resident education. It now

  10. Observation, reflection, and reinforcement: surgery faculty members' and residents' perceptions of how they learned professionalism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jason; Woodrow, Sarah I; Reznick, Richard K; Beales, Jennifer; MacRae, Helen M

    2010-01-01

    To explore perceptions of how professionalism is learned in the current academic environment. Professionalism is a core competency in surgery (as in all of medical practice), and its presence or absence affects all aspects of clinical education and practice, but the ways in which professional values and attitudes are best transmitted to developing generations of surgeons have not been well defined. The authors conducted 34 semistructured interviews of individual surgery residents and faculty members at two academic institutions from 2004 to 2006. Interviews consisted of open-ended questions on how the participants learned professionalism and what they perceived as challenges to learning professionalism. Two researchers analyzed the interview transcripts for emergent themes by using a grounded-theory approach. Faculty members' and residents' perceptions of how they learned professionalism reflected four major themes: (1) personal values and upbringing, including premedical education experiences, (2) learning by example from professional role models, (3) the structure of the surgery residency, and (4) formal instruction on professionalism. Of these, role modeling was the dominant theme: Participants identified observation, reflection, and reinforcement as playing key roles in their learning from role models and in distinguishing the sometimes blurred boundary between positive and negative role models. The theoretical framework generated out of this study proposes a focus on specific activities to improve professional education, including an active approach to role modeling through the intentional and explicit demonstration of professional behavior during the course of everyday work; structured, reflective self-examination; and timely and meaningful evaluation and feedback for reinforcement.

  11. Validation of a Web-Based Curriculum for Resident Education in Orthopedic Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boody, Barrett; Johnson, Patrick; Pugely, Andrew; Miller, Daniel; Geller, Jeffrey; Payne, William; Boegener, James; Schafer, Michael; Beal, Matthew

    The Orthopedic In-Training Examination is an annual standardized examination with multiple-choice questions focused on application of orthopedic surgery core knowledge and principles. The outcome of this test can be used to both predict how residents are progressing in their orthopedic knowledge as well as assess their likelihood to pass the Orthopedic Board Examinations, that is the American Boards of Orthopedic Surgery Part 1, following completion of residency. Preparation for the examination can be difficult, as residents commonly have limited study time to review the vast amounts of available published literature. The objective of our study is to evaluate the effectiveness of the Orthopaedic In Training Examination (OITE) scores and the participants' perceived utility of the curriculum for OITE preparation. Residents from 5 US Orthopedic residencies (4 M.D. and 1 D.O.) were included in a pilot program of the Orthobullets PASS curriculum in the academic year 2013 to 2014. Only residents enrolled in the PASS curriculum who completed both the 2013 and 2014 OITEs were included in the final analysis (n = 71). We used the OITE 2013 and 2014 rank postgraduate year (RPGY) reported scores to assess for efficacy of the PASS curriculum, as the RPGY score provides postgraduate year-of-training matched analysis to control for expected increased levels of knowledge with subsequent retesting. While OITE scores incrementally increased for the group as a whole (n = 71, RPGY mean improvement = +2.5%, p = 0.406), the junior resident subgroup (postgraduate year 1-2) produced a statistically significant increase in scores (n = 28, RPGY mean increase = 10.1%, p = 0.0260). Nearly 90% (38/42) of curriculum participants surveyed reported a preference to complete a similar review curriculum for future OITE preparation. The participants completing greater than 150 PASS questions (n = 57) were analyzed for OITE predictive capacity of the PASS curriculum. Pearson analysis with PASS

  12. Exercise blood pressure response and perioperative complications after major vascular surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Liefde, Inge I; Welten, Gijs M J M; Verhagen, Hence J M; van Domburg, Ron T; Stolker, Robert Jan; Poldermans, Don

    2011-06-01

    Earlier studies have shown that hypertensive or hypotensive blood pressure (BP) response during a preoperative treadmill exercise test in patients with peripheral arterial disease is associated with a two-fold increased risk of cardiovascular events and mortality. However, it is unknown if these patients also experience an increased perioperative complication risk at major vascular surgery. In total 665 consecutive patients with peripheral arterial disease underwent elective major vascular surgery (carotid endarterectomy, abdominal aorta repair, or lower extremity revascularization). Perioperative complications (infection, myocardial infarction, angina pectoris, cardiac arrhythmia, heart failure, cerebrovascular accident or spinal cord ischemia, dialyses, amputation, thrombectomy, reoperation or death) were defined as occurring within 30 days after surgery and were collected using medical records. Hypertensive BP response was defined as a difference between exercise systolic BP and resting systolic BP of more than 55 mmHg. Hypotensive BP response was defined as a drop in exercise systolic BP below resting systolic BP. Patients with a hypertensive BP response during a preoperative exercise test (n = 66) showed a higher risk of early perioperative thrombectomy [hazard ratio (HR) 2.80 95% CI (1.24-6.33)] compared with patients with a normal BP response (n = 582). Patients with a hypotensive BP response (n = 18) showed an increased risk of perioperative myocardial infarction [HR 3.69 95% CI (1.08-12.64)] and cardiac complications [HR 2.90 95% CI (1.02-8.19)] compared with patients with a normal BP response. Patients with an abnormal BP response have more cardiovascular complications at elective major vascular surgery.

  13. Reliability of Casting Indices Among Members of an Orthopaedic Surgery Residency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Nathan D; Rush, Jeremy K; Schmitz, Matthew R; Johnson, Anthony E

    2017-06-01

    Multiple casting indices have been described to evaluate the adequacy of cast placement in pediatric distal forearm fractures. The aim of this study was to determine the intrarater and interrater reliability of the measurements of 5 common casting indices among members of an orthopaedic surgery residency program. The cast index, 3-point index, gap index, padding index, and Canterbury index were evaluated. This was a single-center prospective cohort reliability study that included 12 members of an orthopaedic surgery residency. Participants were placed into 1 of 4 groups by level of training: physician assistants, junior residents, senior residents, and attending orthopaedic surgeons. Twelve radiographs of casted pediatric distal forearm fractures were measured by each participant on 2 separate occasions. Statistical analysis using the intraclass correlation coefficient was used to determine the intrarater and interrater reliability. The cast index was the only casting index to meet our criteria for good intrarater and interrater reliability. Continued use of the cast index as a tool to assess pediatric distal forearm cast application is supported by this study. Level 2.

  14. Microsurgery Case Volume During Orthopedic Surgery Residency: A 7-Year Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinds, Richard M; Klifto, Christopher S; Guss, Michael S; Capo, John T

    2017-11-01

    Microsurgery is a specialized surgical technique with wide clinical application. The purpose of this study was to analyze case logs of graduating orthopedic surgery residents to assess trends in case volume for microsurgery procedures. Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education case log reports were analyzed for microsurgery experience from 2007 to 2013. The mean number of adult, pediatric, and total microsurgery cases was noted. In addition, the median number of microsurgery procedures performed by the 90th, 50th, and 10th percentiles of residents (by case volume) was recorded. Temporal changes in case volume were calculated utilizing linear regression analyses. The proportion of microsurgery procedures increased significantly (1.3% to 2%; P = .024). The mean number of adult (24.5 to 41.9; P = .01), pediatric (1.9 to 3.4; P = .011), and total (26.3 to 45.3; P = .01) microsurgery procedures also increased significantly. Similarly, residents in both the 90th (63 to 109; P = .01) and 50th (10 to 21; P = .036) percentiles sustained significant increases in the median number of microsurgery procedures. No change was noted for residents in 10th percentile (0 to 0; P > .999). Graduating residents in the 90th percentile performed over 6 times more microsurgery procedures than residents in the 50th percentile. Microsurgical caseload is increasing among graduating orthopedic residents. However, there is substantial variability in resident microsurgery case volume. Future investigations are needed to explore the educational implications of these findings and should seek to correlate microsurgical caseload with competency.

  15. VASCULAR SURGERY

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2016-06-02

    Jun 2, 2016 ... Aortic arch injuries. (2) were repaired operatively with cardiopulmonary bypass, descending aortic injuries (2) were treated by stent graft, and common carotid (1) and subclavian artery injuries (2) were treated by open repair at the quaternary centre. Of the 20 venous injuries that were managed operatively,.

  16. Age, gender, lateral dominance, and prediction of operative skill among general surgery residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schueneman, A L; Pickleman, J; Freeark, R J

    1985-09-01

    Ability patterns and surgical proficiency were examined in matched groups of general surgery residents selected on the basis of age, gender, or hand preference from a population of 141 residents who had completed neuropsychologic tests of visuospatial, psychomotor, and stress tolerance abilities and had been rated on 12 aspects of technical skill exhibited during 1480 operative procedures. Older residents (ages 28 to 42 years) exhibited less motor speed (p less than 0.05) and coordination (p less than 0.005) and more caution in avoiding psychomotor errors (p less than 0.05) than did their younger counterparts. No differences were found for visuospatial abilities, stress tolerance, or rated surgical skill. These findings indicate that although age does appear to adversely affect pure motor skills, these are not important components of operative proficiency. Female residents exhibited superior (p less than 0.05) academic achievement (MCAT, Verbal and National Boards Part II) as compared with their male counterparts. They also excelled on a signal detection task requiring identification of visual patterns. However, the women scored less well (p less than 0.05) than men on a visuomotor task demonstrated to be a significant predictor of operative skill. Greater cautiousness in avoiding errors may be a contributing factor to their reduced efficiency on this task. In comparison to male controls, female residents received consistently lower surgical skills ratings, particularly on items measuring confidence and task organization. Left-handed residents were more reactive to stress (p less than 0.03), more cautious (p less than 0.04), and more proficient on a neuropsychologic test of tactile-spatial abilities (p less than 0.03) than right-handed counterparts. Although these traits correlated positively (p less than 0.05) with rated operative skill within the left-handed group, the group received consistently lower ratings than did right-handed residents. The inconvenience of

  17. The Learning Preferences of Applicants Who Interview for General Surgery Residency: A Multiinstitutional Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Roger H; Kurtzman, Scott H; Collier, Ashley N; Shabahang, Mohsen M

    Learning styles theory posits that learners have distinct preferences for how they assimilate new information. The VARK model categorizes learners based on combinations of 4 learning preferences: visual (V), aural (A), read/write (R), and kinesthetic (K). A previous single institution study demonstrated that the VARK preferences of applicants who interview for general surgery residency are different from that of the general population and that learning preferences were associated with performance on standardized tests. This multiinstitutional study was conducted to determine the distribution of VARK preferences among interviewees for general surgery residency and the effect of those preferences on United States Medical Licensing Examination (USMLE) scores. The VARK learning inventory was administered to applicants who interviewed at 3 general surgery programs during the 2014 to 2015 academic year. The distribution of VARK learning preferences among interviewees was compared with that of the general population of VARK respondents. Performance on USMLE Step 1 and Step 2 Clinical Knowledge was analyzed for associations with VARK learning preferences. Chi-square, analysis of variance, and Dunnett's test were used for statistical analysis, with p VARK inventory was completed by a total of 140 residency interviewees. Sixty-four percent of participants were male, and 41% were unimodal, having a preference for a single learning modality. The distribution of VARK preferences of interviewees was different than that of the general population (p = 0.02). By analysis of variance, there were no overall differences in USMLE Step 1 and Step 2 Clinical Knowledge scores by VARK preference (p = 0.06 and 0.21, respectively). However, multiple comparison analysis using Dunnett's test revealed that interviewees with R preferences had significantly higher scores than those with multimodal preferences on USMLE Step 1 (239 vs. 222, p = 0.02). Applicants who interview for general surgery

  18. Comparison of Internal Medicine and General Surgery Residents' Assessments of Risk of Postsurgical Complications in Surgically Complex Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Healy, James M; Davis, Kimberly A; Pei, Kevin Y

    2017-10-11

    Anticipating postsurgical complications is a vital physician skill, particularly when counseling surgically complex patients on their risks of intervention. Although internists and surgeons both counsel patients on surgical risks, it is uncertain who is better equipped to accurately anticipate surgical complications. To examine how internal medicine and general surgery trainees compare in their assessment of risk of surgically complex patients. General surgery and internal medicine residents (urban, tertiary, and academic medical center) answered an anonymous, online assessment of 7 real-life, complex clinical scenarios. Participants estimated the chance of any morbidity, mortality, surgical site infection, pneumonia, and cardiac complications. Scenarios represented a diverse general surgery practice, including colectomy, duodenal ulcer repair, inguinal hernia repair, perforated viscus exploration, small-bowel resection, cholecystectomy, and mastectomy in surgically complex patients likely to be comanaged by surgical and internal medicine services. Responses were compared with risk-adjusted outcomes reported by the American College of Surgeons' National Surgical Quality Improvement Project (NSQIP) online calculator. A total of 76 general surgery residents (50 [65.8%] male and 26 [34.2%] female) and 76 internal medicine residents (36 [47.4%] male and 40 [52.6%] female) participated (64% overall response rate). General surgery residents were significantly more confident with their responses (general surgery residents' mean response, 3.6 [95% CI, 3.4-2.8]; internal medicine residents' mean response, 2.8 [95% CI, 2.6-3.0]; P surgery residents' mean response, 4.3 [95% CI, 4.1-4.4]; internal medicine residents' mean response, 3.7 [95% CI, 3.4-3.9]; P = .006) but less likely to discuss code status (general surgery residents' mean response, 3.2 [95% CI, 2.9-3.4]; internal medicine residents' mean response, 3.8 [95% CI, 3.5-4.1]; P surgery residents' mean response

  19. Impact of family and gender on career goals: results of a national survey of 4586 surgery residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viola, Kate V; Bucholz, Emily; Yeo, Heather; Piper, Crystal L; Piper, Crystal; Bell, Richard H; Sosa, Julie Ann

    2010-05-01

    To determine how marriage, children, and gender influence US categorical general surgery residents' perceptions of their profession and motivations for specialty training. Cross-sectional national survey administered after the January 2008 American Board of Surgery In-service Training Examination. Two hundred forty-eight US general surgery residency programs. All US categorical general surgery residents. We evaluated demographic characteristics with respect to survey responses using the chi(2) test, analysis of variance, and multivariate logistic regression. Interaction terms between variables were assessed. Perceptions of respondents regarding the future of general surgery and the role of specialty training in relation to anticipated income and lifestyle. The survey response rate was 75.0% (4586 respondents). Mean age was 30.6 years; 31.7% were women, 51.3% were married, and 25.4% had children. Of the respondents, 28.7% believed general surgery is becoming obsolete (30.1% of men and 25.9% of women; P = .004), and 55.1% believed specialty training is necessary for success (56.4% of men and 52.7% of women; P = .02). Single residents and residents without children were more likely to plan for fellowship (59.1% single vs 51.9% married, P single or had no children tended to identify lifestyle rather than income as a motivator for specialty training. Marital status, children, and gender appear to have a powerful effect on general surgery residents' career planning.

  20. Improving Communication Skills: A Course for Academic Medical Center Surgery Residents and Faculty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raper, Steven E; Gupta, Meera; Okusanya, Olugbenga; Morris, Jon B

    2015-01-01

    To improve physician/patient communication and familiarize surgeons with contemporary skills for and metrics assessing communication, courses were developed to provide academic general surgery residents and faculty with a toolkit of information, behaviors, and specific techniques. If academic faculty are expected to mentor residents in communication and residents are expected to learn good communication skills, then both should have the necessary education to accomplish such a goal. Didactic lectures introduced current concepts of physician-patient communication including information on better patient care, fewer malpractice suits, and the move toward transparency of communication metrics. Next, course participants viewed and critiqued "Surgi-Drama" videos, with actors simulating "before" and "after" physician-patient communication scenarios. Finally, participants were provided with a "toolkit" of techniques for improving physician-patient communication including "2-3-4"-a semiscripted short communication tool residents and other physicians can use in patient encounters-and a number of other acronymic approaches. Each participant was asked to complete an anonymous evaluation to assess course content satisfaction. Overall, 86% of residents participated (68/79), with a 52% response rate (35/68) for the evaluation tool. Overall, 88% of faculty participated (84/96), with an 84% response rate (71/84). Residents voiced satisfaction with all domains. For faculty, satisfaction was quantitatively confirmed (Likert score 4 or 5) in 4 of 7 domains, with the highest satisfaction in "communication of goals" and "understanding of the HCAHPS metric." The percentage of "top box" Doctor Communication Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (HCAHPS) scores and national percentile ranking showed a sustained increase more than 1 and 2 years from the dates of the courses. The assessment of communication skills is increasing in importance in the practice of

  1. Preoperative and intraoperative predictors of cardiac adverse events after general, vascular, and urological surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kheterpal, Sachin; O'Reilly, Michael; Englesbe, Michael J; Rosenberg, Andrew L; Shanks, Amy M; Zhang, Lingling; Rothman, Edward D; Campbell, Darrell A; Tremper, Kevin K

    2009-01-01

    The authors sought to determine the incidence and risk factors for perioperative cardiac adverse events (CAEs) after noncardiac surgery using detailed preoperative and intraoperative hemodynamic data. The authors conducted a prospective observational study at a single university hospital from 2002 to 2006. All American College of Surgeons-National Surgical Quality Improvement Program patients undergoing general, vascular, and urological surgery were included. The CAE outcome definition included cardiac arrest, non-ST elevation myocardial infarction, Q-wave myocardial infarction, and new clinically significant cardiac dysrhythmia within the first 30 postoperative days. Four years of data demonstrated that of 7,740 noncardiac operations, 83 patients (1.1%) experienced a CAE within 30 days. Nine independent predictors were identified (P or = 68, body mass index > or = 30, emergent surgery, previous coronary intervention or cardiac surgery, active congestive heart failure, cerebrovascular disease, hypertension, operative duration > or = 3.8 h, and the administration of 1 or more units of packed red blood cells intraoperatively. The c-statistic of this model was 0.81 +/- 0.02. Univariate analysis demonstrated that high-risk patients experiencing a CAE were more likely to experience an episode of mean arterial pressure 100 (22% vs. 34%, P = 0.05). In comparison with current risk stratification indices, the inclusion of intraoperative elements improves the ability to predict a perioperative CAE after noncardiac surgery.

  2. Uncooled infrared camera for the noninvasive visualization of the vascular flow in an anastomotic vessel during neurological surgery: technical note.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otani, Naoki; Ishihara, Miya; Nakai, Kanji; Fujita, Masanori; Wada, Kojiro; Mori, Kentaro

    2014-06-17

    We herein present our experience to assess intraoperative confirmation of vascular patency with an uncooled infrared camera in extracranial-intracranial (EC-IC) bypass surgery. This camera had distinguishing characteristics, including its small size, light weight, and adequate temperature resolution (camera to assess the vascular flow of the end-to-side anastomosis model in rats. In addition, we evaluated the vascular flow in continuous clinical series using this infrared camera during EC-IC bypass in 14 patients (17 sides). This infrared camera offers real-time information on the vascular patency of end-to-side anastomosis vessels of all relevant diameters. The spatial resolution and image quality are satisfactory, and the procedure can be safely repeatable. We have shown that the infrared camera could be a new and feasible technology for intraoperative imaging of the vascular flow and is considered to be clinically useful during cerebrovascular surgery.

  3. Impact of podiatry resident experience level in hallux valgus surgery on postoperative outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleischer, Adam E; Yorath, Martin C; Joseph, Robert M; Baron, Adam; Nordquist, Thomas; Moore, Braden J; Robinson, Richmond C O; Reilly, Charles H

    2014-06-15

    Despite modern advancements in transosseous fixation and operative technique, hallux valgus (i.e., bunion) surgery is still associated with a higher than usual amount of patient dissatisfaction and is generally recognized as a complex and nuanced procedure requiring precise osseous and capsulotendon balancing. It stands to reason then that familiarity and skill level of trainee surgeons might impact surgical outcomes in this surgery. The aim of this study was to determine whether podiatry resident experience level influences midterm outcomes in hallux valgus surgery (HVS). Consecutive adults who underwent isolated HVS via distal metatarsal osteotomy at a single US metropolitan teaching hospital from January 2004 to January 2009 were contacted and asked to complete a validated outcome measure of foot health (Manchester-Oxford Foot Questionnaire) regarding their operated foot. Resident experience level was quantified using the surgical logs for the primary resident of record at the time of each case. Associations were assessed using linear and logistic regression analyses. A total of 102 adult patients (n = 102 feet) agreed to participate with a mean age of 46.8 years (standard deviation 13.1, range 18-71) and average length of follow-up 6.2 y (standard deviation 1.4, range 3.6-8.6). Level of trainee experience was not associated with postoperative outcomes in either the univariate (odds ratio 0.99 [95% confidence interval, 0.98-1.01], P = 0.827) or multivariate analyses (odds ratio 1.00 [95% confidence interval, 0.97-1.02], P = 0.907). We conclude that podiatry resident level of experience in HVS does not contribute appreciably to postoperative clinical outcomes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. National trends in minimally invasive and open operative experience of graduating general surgery residents: implications for surgical skills curricula development?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carson, Jeffrey S; Smith, Lynette; Are, Madhuri; Edney, James; Azarow, Kenneth; Mercer, David W; Thompson, Jon S; Are, Chandrakanth

    2011-12-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze national trends in minimally invasive and open cases of all graduating residents in general surgery. A retrospective analysis was performed on data obtained from Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education logs (1999-2008) of graduating residents from all US general surgery residency programs. Data were analyzed using Mantel-Haenszel χ(2) tests and the Bonferroni adjustment to detect trends in the number of minimally invasive and open cases. Minimally invasive procedures accounted for an increasing proportion of cases performed (3.7% to 11.1%, P pediatric surgery (P surgery residents in the United States are performing a greater number of minimally invasive and fewer open procedures for common surgical conditions. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Comparison of Epidural Bupivacaine, Levobupivacaine and Dexmedetomidine in Patients Undergoing Vascular Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sathyanarayana, Lakshmi Adalagere; Heggeri, Vijayakumar M; Simha, Parimala Prasanna; Narasimaiah, Satish; Narasimaiah, Manjunath; Subbarao, Bharathi Katheraguppa

    2016-01-01

    Levobupivacaine is the s-isomer of racemic Bupivacaine. It is less cardio, neurotoxic and equally potent local anaesthetic compared to its racemate. It is known to cause less Depression of myocardial contractility. Dexmeditomidine when used via epidural route has synergistic effect with local anaesthetics. Majority of patients presenting for vascular surgery are elderly and have associated co-morbidities like diabetes, hypertension, and coronary artery disease. We intend to study safety and efficacy of epidural Levoupivacaine and Dexmedetomidine in this group of patients. Sixty adult patients undergoing lower limb vascular surgery under lumbar epidural anaesthesia were randomly allocated to three groups. All groups were preloaded with 10ml/kg of crystalloid solution. B group was scheduled to receive 15 ml of racemic Bupivacaine, L-group was scheduled to receive 15ml of Levobupivacaine and LD-group received 15ml of Levobupivacaine with 0.5 mics/kg Dexmeditomedine. Time to onset of sensory block to T-10, maximum sensory level achieved, Bromage scale, time to two segment regression, time to total regression, sedation level achieved and patients assessment of quality of anaesthesia were assessed. Haemodynamic parameters were monitored throughout study period. Adverse effects were noted and treated appropriately. Baseline parameters were comparable among all the groups. Time to onset of sensory block to T-10 and maximum level of block achieved, was comparable among the groups. Time to two segment regression and time to total regression was significantly prolonged in LD group compared to other two groups. There was significant bradycardia noted in LD group which required treatment. Levobupivacaine can be safely used in elderly high risk patients undergoing vascular surgery. Addition of dexmedetomidine prolongs the duration of anaesthesia and postoperative analgesia.

  6. Heart rate variables in the Vascular Quality Initiative are not reliable predictors of adverse cardiac outcomes or mortality after major elective vascular surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scali, Salvatore; Bertges, Daniel; Neal, Daniel; Patel, Virendra; Eldrup-Jorgensen, Jens; Cronenwett, Jack; Beck, Adam

    2015-09-01

    Heart rate (HR) parameters are known indicators of cardiovascular complications after cardiac surgery, but there is little evidence of their role in predicting outcome after major vascular surgery. The purpose of this study was to determine whether arrival HR (AHR) and highest intraoperative HR are associated with mortality or major adverse cardiac events (MACEs) after elective vascular surgery in the Vascular Quality Initiative (VQI). Patients undergoing elective lower extremity bypass (LEB), aortofemoral bypass (AFB), and open abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) repair in the VQI were analyzed. MACE was defined as any postoperative myocardial infarction, dysrhythmia, or congestive heart failure. Controlled HR was defined as AHR 90 or 100 beats/min) were analyzed among all three operations, and no consistent associations with MACE or 30-day mortality were detected. The VQI AHR and highest intraoperative HR variables are highly confounded by patient presentation, operative variables, and beta-blocker therapy. The discordance between cardiac risk and HR as well as the lack of consistent correlation to outcome makes them unreliable predictors. The VQI has elected to discontinue collecting AHR and highest intraoperative HR data, given insufficient evidence to suggest their importance as an outcome measure. Copyright © 2015 Society for Vascular Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. History of the Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Residency Program at Universidad el Bosque, Bogotá, Colombia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro-Núñez, Jaime

    2012-01-01

    The formal training of oral and maxillofacial surgeons in Colombia started in 1958 at Hospital Sanjos6, thanks to the titanic work of Waldemar Wilhelm, a German-born surgeon who settled in BogotA in 1950. Today there are seven institutions in Colombia that offer residency programs in oral and maxillofacial surgery. The aim of this article is to describe the history of the Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Residency Program at Universidad El Bosque in Bogota.

  8. Vacuum-assisted wound closure in vascular surgery - clinical and cost benefits in a developing country

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Končar Igor

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Surgical and chronic wounds in vascular patients might contribute to limb loss and death. Vacuum-assisted closure (VAC - Kinetic Concepts, Inc. (KCI, has been increasingly used in Western Europe and the USA clinical practice for 15 years. Advantages of this method are faster wound healing, wound approximation, lower wound related treatment costs and improved quality of life during treatment. Evidence related to the usage of VAC therapy in vascular patients and cost effectiveness of VAC therapy in a developing country are lacking. The aim of this study was to explore results of VAC therapy in vascular surgery comparing to conventional methods and to test cost effects in a developing country like Serbia. Methods. All patients with wound infection or dehiscence operated at the tertiary vascular university clinic in the period from January 2011 - January 2012, were treated with VAC therapy. The primary endpoint was wound closure, while secondary endpoints were hospital stay, the number of weekly dressings, costs of wound care, working time of medical personnel. The patients were divided into groups according to the wound type and location: wound with exposed synthetic vascular implant (25%, laparotomy (13%, foot amputation (29%, major limb amputation (21%, fasciotomy (13%. The results of primary and secondary endpoint were compared with the results of conventional treatment during the previous year. Results. There was one death (1/42, 2.38% and one limb loss (1/12, 2.38% in the VAC group, and 8 deaths (8/38, 21.05% and 5 (5/38, 13.15% limb losses in the patients treated with conventional therapy. In the VAC group there was one groin bleeding (1/12, 2.38%, one groin reinfection (1/12, 2.38% and one resistance to therapy with a consequent limb loss. Costs of hospital stay (p < 0.001 and nursing time (p < 0.001 were reduced with VAC therapy in the group with exposed graft. Conclusion. VAC therapy is the effective method for care of

  9. Experience of General Surgery Residents in the Creation of Small Bowel and Colon Anastomoses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemeth, Zoltan H; Lazar, Eric L; Paglinco, Samantha R; Hicks, Addison S; Lei, Jason; Barratt-Stopper, Patricia A; Rolandelli, Rolando H

    2016-01-01

    With the introduction of stapling devices (SDs), the proportion of hand-sewn (HS) intestinal anastomoses (IAs) has declined. As more IAs are constructed with SDs, there are fewer opportunities for general surgery residents (GSRs) to acquire the skills for HS techniques during their training. Data for this study were extracted from an existing database of all IAs performed at the Department of Surgery of the Morristown Medical Center since 2003. For the purposes of this study, a 5.5-year timeframe was used between July 2006 and 2011, which contained 1659 IA operations on adult patients with resident involvement. GSRs of the 5-year general surgery residency program were grouped by postgraduate year (PGY) for further analysis. The number of all IAs created by each resident during the 5-year training was 67.2 on average. Most of these operations were done in the last 2 years of the training: 45.1% of all IAs in PGY5 and 37.3% of all IAs in PGY4. Of all, 1659 IAs performed in the study period, 711 (42.9% of total) were done laparoscopically and 948 (57.1% of all IAs) were done as open operations. Laparoscopic operations had a proportionally higher rate of SD use when compared to open cases (90.9% vs 82.4%). On average, each resident constructed 9.4 HS IAs (13.98% of all IAs) and 57.8 SD IAs (86.02% of total). Out of all anastomoses, ostomy reversals (30.7%) had the highest percentage of HS suturing followed by right colectomies (27.5%), ileal pouch-anal anastomoses and total colectomies and proctocolectomies (23.3%), small bowel resection (17.0%), and left colectomies (5.5%). Regardless of the location of the operation, stapled and sutured anastomoses had similar outcomes measured by the rate of anastomotic leaks. Residents used significantly more SDs in the creation of anastomoses than HS suturing in the PGY3, PGY4, and PGY5 years. We also documented that attending surgeons who are older more often used HS suturing than their younger colleagues when creating IAs. The

  10. Cardiovascular Surgery Residency Program: Training Coronary Anastomosis Using the Arroyo Simulator and UNIFESP Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Angel Maluf

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE: Engage the UNIFESP Cardiovascular Surgery residents in coronary anastomosis, assess their skills and certify results, using the Arroyo Anastomosis Simulator and UNIFESP surgical models. METHODS: First to 6th year residents attended a weekly program of technical training in coronary anastomosis, using 4 simulation models: 1. Arroyo simulator; 2. Dummy with a plastic heart; 3. Dummy with a bovine heart; and 4. Dummy with a beating pig heart. The assessment test was comprised of 10 items, using a scale from 1 to 5 points in each of them, creating a global score of 50 points maximum. RESULTS: The technical performance of the candidate showed improvement in all items, especially manual skill and technical progress, critical sense of the work performed, confidence in the procedure and reduction of the time needed to perform the anastomosis after 12 weeks practice. In response to the multiplicity of factors that currently influence the cardiovascular surgeon training, there have been combined efforts to reform the practices of surgical medical training. CONCLUSION: 1 - The four models of simulators offer a considerable contribution to the field of cardiovascular surgery, improving the skill and dexterity of the surgeon in training. 2 - Residents have shown interest in training and cooperate in the development of innovative procedures for surgical medical training in the art.

  11. Vascular map combined with CT colonography for evaluating candidates for laparoscopic colorectal surgery

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    Flor, Nicola; Ceretti, Andrea Pisani; Maroni, Nirvana; Opocher, Enrico; Cornalba, Gianpaolo [Azienda Ospedaliera San Paolo, Milan (Italy); Campari, Alessandro; Ravelli, Anna; Lombardi, Maria Antonietta [University degli Studi di Milano, Milan (Italy)

    2015-08-15

    Contrast-enhanced computed tomography colonography (CE-CTC) is a useful guide for the laparoscopic surgeon to avoid incorrectly removing the colonic segment and the failure to diagnose of synchronous colonic and extra-colonic lesions. Lymph node dissection and vessel ligation under a laparoscopic approach can be time-consuming and can damage vessels and organs. Moreover, mesenteric vessels have extreme variations in terms of their courses and numbers. We describe the benefit of using an abdominal vascular map created by CE-CTC in laparoscopic colorectal surgery candidates. We describe patients with different diseases (colorectal cancer, diverticular disease, and inflammatory bowel disease) who underwent CE-CTC just prior to laparoscopic surgery.

  12. Interim Analysis of a Prospective Multi-Institutional Study of Surgery Resident Experience with Flexibility in Surgical Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cullinan, Darren R; Wise, Paul E; Delman, Keith A; Potts, John R; Awad, Michael M; Eberlein, Timothy J; Klingensmith, Mary E

    2018-01-05

    The Flexibility in Surgical Training (FIST) consortium project was designed to evaluate the feasibility and resident outcomes of optional subspecialty-focused training within general surgery residency training. After approval by the American Board of Surgery, R4 and R5 residents were permitted to customize up to 12 of the final 24 months of residency for early tracking into 1 of 9 subspecialty tracks. A prospective IRB-approved study was designed across 7 institutions to evaluate the impact of this option on operative experience, in-service exam (American Board of Surgery In-Training Examination [ABSITE]) and ACGME milestone performance, and resident and program director (PD) perceptions. The FIST residents were compared with chief residents before FIST initiation (controls) as well as residents during the study period who did not participate in FIST (no specialization track, NonS). From 2013 to 2017, 122 of 214 chief residents (57%) completed a FIST subspecialty track. There were no differences in median ABSITE scores between FIST, NonS residents, and controls. The ACGME milestones at the end of the R5 year favored the FIST residents in 13 of 16 milestones compared with NonS. Case logs demonstrated an increase in track-specific cases compared with NonS residents. Resident and PD surveys reported a generally favorable experience with FIST. In this prospective study, FIST is a feasible option in participating institutions. All FIST residents, regardless of track, met requirements for ABS Board eligibility, despite modifications to rotations and case experience. Future studies will assess the impact of FIST on ABS exam results and fellowship success. Copyright © 2018 American College of Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Does implementing a general surgery residency program and resident involvement affect patient outcomes and increase care-associated charges?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wexner, Trevor; Rosales-Velderrain, Armando; Wexner, Steven D; Rosenthal, Raul J

    2017-07-01

    Variable results regarding general surgery residency program (GSRP) impact on patient outcomes and charges are reported. The aim of this study was to determine any significant differences in patient outcomes and cost with a new GSRP. We analyzed all laparoscopic appendectomies (lap-ap), cholecystectomies (lap-chole), and inguinal hernia repairs (IHR) performed before and after implementing a GRSP. Operative time significantly increased for lap-ap (p < 0.0001), lap-chole (p < 0.0001) and IHR (p = 0.03). Time to close the incision significantly increased for lap-ap (p < 0.0001), lap-chole (p = 0.006) and IHR (p = 0.03). Length of stay only increased for lap-ap (p = 0.04). Complication rates did not increase for any procedure. However, charges significantly increased for lap-ap (p < 0.0001), lap-chole (p < 0.0001), and IHR (p = 0.03). Although a newly implemented GSRP caused increases in overall operative times, times to close incisions, and charges, it did not negatively impact patient outcomes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Application of Porter’s Five Forces Model and generic strategies for vascular surgery: should be stuck in the middle?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumpio, Bauer E

    2013-06-01

    There are many stakeholders in the vascular marketplace from clinicians to hospitals, third party payers, medical device manufacturers and the government. Economic stress, threats of policy reform and changing health-care delivery are adding to the challenges faced by vascular surgeons. Use of Porter's Five Forces analysis to identify the sources of competition, the strength and likelihood of that competition existing, and barriers to competition that affect vascular surgery will help our specialty understand both the strength of our current competition and the strength of a position that our specialty will need to move to. By understanding the nature of the Porter's Five Forces as it applies to vascular surgery, and by appreciating their relative importance, our society would be in a stronger position to defend itself against threats and perhaps influence the forces with a long-term strategy. Porter's generic strategies attempt to create effective links for business with customers and suppliers and create barriers to new entrants and substitute products. It brings an initial perspective that is convenient to adapt to vascular surgery in order to reveal opportunities.Vascular surgery is uniquely situated to pursue both a differentiation and high value leadership strategy.

  15. Increasing functional modularity with residence time in the co-distribution of native and introduced vascular plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hui, Cang; Richardson, David M; Pyšek, Petr; Le Roux, Johannes J; Kučera, Tomáš; Jarošík, Vojtěch

    2013-01-01

    Species gain membership of regional assemblages by passing through multiple ecological and environmental filters. To capture the potential trajectory of structural changes in regional meta-communities driven by biological invasions, one can categorize species pools into assemblages of different residence times. Older assemblages, having passed through more environmental filters, should become more functionally ordered and structured. Here we calculate the level of compartmentalization (modularity) for three different-aged assemblages (neophytes, introduced after 1500 AD; archaeophytes, introduced before 1500 AD, and natives), including 2,054 species of vascular plants in 302 reserves in central Europe. Older assemblages are more compartmentalized than younger ones, with species composition, phylogenetic structure and habitat characteristics of the modules becoming increasingly distinctive. This sheds light on two mechanisms of how alien species are functionally incorporated into regional species pools: the settling-down hypothesis of diminishing stochasticity with residence time, and the niche-mosaic hypothesis of inlaid neutral modules in regional meta-communities.

  16. Trends in urology resident exposure to minimally invasive surgery for index procedures: a tale of two countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoag, Nathan A; Mamut, Adiel; Afshar, Kourosh; Amling, Christopher; Mickelson, Jennifer J; Macneily, Andrew E

    2012-01-01

    To interrogate case-log data for American and Canadian urology residents to define trends in minimally invasive surgery (MIS) and open surgery and compare operative experiences between these 2 groups. Case-log data from 2004 to 2009 for American urology residents was compared with Canadian residents for 8 index cases, which are routinely performed in both an MIS and open approach. These included nephrectomy (donor, radical, simple, partial), prostatectomy (radical), adrenalectomy, pyeloplasty, and nephroureterectomy. Linear regression analysis demonstrated a significant increase in the percentage of MIS radical prostatectomies performed by American residents (11.2%-52%), compared with Canadian residents (0.74%-11.2%). There was also a significant increase in the percentage of MIS donor nephrectomies by Canadian residents (5.6%-68.7%), compared with American residents (70.1%-89.1%). For Canadian residents, exposure to the following 3 MIS procedures increased significantly over open approaches: adrenalectomy, radical prostatectomy, and donor nephrectomy. For American residents, all index procedures with the exception of adrenalectomy underwent a significant increasing trend (all p < 0.05). Trends for 8 index procedures confirm a continuing shift towards MIS for the majority of procedures in both countries. Differences may be only temporal and relate to dissimilar health care delivery models with a resultant lag in the adoption of laparoscopy and robotics in Canada. The impact of these trends upon ultimate surgical competence of graduates remains to be seen. Copyright © 2012 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Residency characteristics that matter most to plastic surgery applicants: a multi-institutional analysis and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinno, Sammy; Mehta, Karan; Squitieri, Lee; Ranganathan, Kavitha; Koeckert, Michael S; Patel, Ashit; Saadeh, Pierre B; Thanik, Vishal

    2015-06-01

    The National Residency Matching Program Match is a very unique process in which applicants and programs are coupled to each other based on a ranking system. Although several studies have assessed features plastic surgery programs look for in applicants, no study in the present plastic surgery literature identifies which residency characteristics are most important to plastic surgery applicants. Therefore, we sought to perform a multi-institutional assessment as to which factors plastic surgery residency applicants consider most important when applying for residency. A validated and anonymous questionnaire containing 37 items regarding various program characteristics was e-mailed to 226 applicants to New York University, Albany, University of Michigan, and University of Southern California plastic surgery residency programs. Applicants were asked to rate each feature on a scale from 1 to 10, with 10 being the most important. The 37 variables were ranked by the sum of the responses. The median rating and interquartile range as well as the mean for each factor was then calculated. A Wilcoxon signed rank test was used to compare medians in rank order. A total of 137 completed questionnaires were returned, yielding a 61% response rate. The characteristics candidates considered most important were impressions during the interview, experiences during away rotations, importance placed on resident training/support/mentoring by faculty, personal experiences with residents, and the amount of time spent in general surgery. The characteristics candidates considered least important were second-look experiences, compensation/benefits, program reputation from Internet forums, accessibility of program coordinator, opportunity for laboratory research, and fellowship positions available at the program. Applicants value personal contact and time spent in general surgery when selecting residency programs. As the number of integrated programs continues to grow, programs will benefit

  18. Improving Resident Performance in Oculoplastic Surgery: A New Curriculum Using Surgical Wet Laboratory Videos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Kapil; Mathai, Mariam; Della Rocca, Robert C; Reddy, Harsha S

    To develop a new oculoplastic curriculum that incorporates learning theory of skill acquisition. To develop and evaluate the effectiveness of instructional videos for an oculoplastic surgical wet laboratory. Proof of concept, randomized controlled trial. New York Eye and Ear Infirmary of Mount Sinai-tertiary care academic institution. In total, 16 ophthalmology residents were randomly assigned to 1 of 2 groups and given either video and text or text instructions alone for the following 2 procedures: blepharoplasty and eyelid laceration repair. Operating time and esthetic result were measured, and the groups were statistically compared. A brief survey was administered. We developed a new 6 component oculoplastics curriculum that incorporates concepts of the Fitts and Posner skill acquisition model and mental imagery. In the wet laboratory pilot study, the group that watched the video of the laceration repair showed better esthetic grades than the group that received text alone (p = 0.038). This difference was not found for the blepharoplasty (p = 0.492). There was no difference between groups in operating time for the laceration repair (p = 0.722), but the group that watched the blepharoplasty video required more time to complete the task than those that reviewed text only (p = 0.023). In total, 100% of residents reported the videos augmented their learning. Methods to optimize surgical education are important given limited operating room time in oculoplastics, a subspecialty in which the number of surgeries performed during residency is relatively low. We developed a curriculum based on learning theory and sought to formally test one important aspect, surgical video for wet laboratories. Our pilot study, despite its limitations, showed that wet laboratory surgical videos can be effective tools in improving motor skill acquisition for oculoplastic surgery. Copyright © 2017 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Limb-saving surgery by intraoperative radiation and vascularized fibular graft for osteosarcoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inoue, Osamu; Arakaki, Akira; Asato, Jun; Shimabukuro, Hiroyuki; Shingaki, Yoshisada; Asato, Hideki; Ibaraki, Kunio; Nakano, Masao (University of the Ryukyus, Okinawa (Japan))

    1992-03-01

    Various limb-saving surgeries for osteosarcomas have been performed owing to the high survival rate achieved by chemotherapy. However, reconstruction by endoprosthesis after radical resection of the tumor in the distal femur or proximal tibia was often complicated by early or late severe problems. The radicality of intraoperative radiation by Lineac 50 Gy for osteosarcoma has been proved clinically by Yamamuro et al, while radiation therapy often ensued pathological fractures. Therefore, for osteosarcomas in four distal femurs and one proximal tibia, we have adopted a vascularized fibular graft to reinforce the irradiated bone and to prevent the collapse of the joint surface. Resected osseous parts were irradiated in four cases with resultant infections in two cases. Intraoperative irradiation without resection was performed on one case with an uneventful short course. Although the ranges of motion in three survivous were limited, the prospect of limb-saving surgery by intraoperative irradiation and incorporated vascularized fibular grafts seem favorable as they promise longer durability. (author).

  20. Kinetics of plasma SPB and RAGE during mechanical ventilation in patients undergoing major vascular surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agostoni, Piergiuseppe; Banfi, Cristina; Magrì, Damiano; Vignati, Carlo; Doria, Elisabetta; Salvioni, Elisabetta; Moliterni, Paola; Marenzi, Giancarlo; Tremoli, Elena; Sisillo, Erminio

    2011-09-15

    Receptor-of-Advanced-Glycation-End-products (RAGE) and Surfactant-Protein-type-B (SPB) are reported as lung injury markers. Unlike SPB, RAGE is secreted by several tissues, so that RAGE specificity as lung injury marker is questionable. We measured SPB and RAGE in 19 patients undergoing major vascular abdominal surgery. SPB and RAGE were measured before mechanical ventilation (T0), at 1st (T1), 2nd (T2) and, when present, 3rd (T3) hour of mechanical ventilation, and 1h after extubation (T(POST)). Last data during mechanical ventilation, either T2 or T3, are reported as T(END). SPB and RAGE values were normalized for total protein (SPB(N) and RAGE(N)). SPB(N) and RAGE(N) increments from T0 to T(END) were 56.2 [39.1] ng/mg (mean [75-25 percentile]) and 10.6[7.1] pg/mg, respectively. SPB values increased progressively during mechanical ventilation, whereas RAGE values increased at T(1) but not thereafter. SPB(N) increase (T(END)-T0), but not RAGE(N), was related to ΔPaO(2)/FiO2 changes during mechanical ventilation (r=0.575, p=0.01). Plasma RAGE(N) and SPB(N) kinetics in patients undergoing major vascular surgery are different. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. 41. The myocardial protective effect of dexmedetomidine in high risk patients undergoing aortic vascular surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Soliman

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Dexmedetomidine provides perioperative cardiac protection in high risk patients assessment the effect of dexmedetomidine in high risk patients undergoing aortic vascular surgery. Arandomized study included 150 patients classified into two groups(n = 75. Group D: The patients received a loading dose of 1 μg/kg dexmedetomidine over 15 min before induction and maintained as an infusion of 0.3 μg/kg/hr to the end of the procedure. Group C: The patients received an equal volume of normalsaline. The dexmedetomidine decreased heart rate and minimized the changes in blood pressure compared to control group (p < 0.05. Also, it decreased the incidence of myocardial is chemia reflected by troponin I level and ECG changes(p < 0.05. Dexmedetomidine decreased the requirement for nitroglycerine and norepinephrine compared to control group (p < 0.05. The incidence of hypotension and bradycardia were significantly higher with dexmedetomidine (p < 0.05.The dexmedetomidine is safe and effective in patients undergoing aortic vascular surgery. It decreases the changes in heart rate and blood pressure during the procedures. It provide scardiac protection in high risk patients reflected by decreasing the incidence of myocardial ischemia and serum level of troponin. The main side effects of dexmedetomidine were hypotension and bradycardia.

  2. Improving the productivity and efficiency of vascular surgery and radiology multidisciplinary meetings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobson, Gary; Neeson, Declan

    2015-01-01

    Multidisciplinary team meetings are recognized as an important factor in driving quality of care. The Vascular Society of Great Britain and Northern Ireland recommend that all aspects of vascular surgery are suitable for discussion at multidisciplinary team (MDT) meetings, including carotid, peripheral, and aortic disease. The juniors doctors were tasked with preparing the patient list in our unit. This had become time consuming and somewhat unrewarding. The methods of preparation and information required on the patient list were reviewed. It was felt that typing a clinical summary for each patient on the list was the most time consuming factor. This was removed and patients were instead simply categorized into subgroups such as aneurysms, critical limb ischemia, and others. The information removed was substituted with the use on an electronic care record during the meeting to answer questions regarding comorbidities and previous interventions. Time spent preparing the meeting by the junior doctors was recorded before and after cycles of intervention. Prior to intervention this was found be a mean of 140 minutes (2.3 hours), and improved to a mean of 45 minutes (0.45 hours) with consequent cycles. The overall proportion of patients receiving definitive outcomes in each meeting after changes were implemented increased from 35 to 55%. This was not a primary outcome, but an unintended consequence of careful consideration of each cycle. In conclusion, the changes implemented have allowed junior doctors to spend more of their time with other activities such as the outpatient department (OPD) and theatre during their vascular surgery rotation. The proportion of cases discussed has increased due to more focused discussions during the MDT meeting, resulting in improved patient care. All stakeholders gave a largely positive reaction to the changes implemented.

  3. Uniting Evidence-Based Evaluation with the ACGME Plastic Surgery Milestones: A Simple and Reliable Assessment of Resident Operative Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobraei, Edward M; Bohnen, Jordan D; George, Brian C; Mullen, John T; Lillemoe, Keith D; Austen, William G; Liao, Eric C

    2016-08-01

    Milestones evaluations in plastic surgery reflect a shift toward competency-based training but have created a number of challenges. The authors have incorporated the smartphone application evaluation tool, System for Improving and Measuring Procedural Learning (SIMPL), that was recently developed by a multi-institutional research collaborative. In this pilot study, the authors hypothesize that SIMPL can improve resident evaluation and also collect granular performance data to simplify compliance with the plastic surgery Milestones. SIMPL was prospectively piloted with a plastic surgery resident and faculty surgeon at Massachusetts General Hospital in this institutional review board-approved study. The study period was a 2-month interval corresponding to the resident's rotation. The resident-faculty combination performed 20 cases together. All cases were evaluated with SIMPL. SIMPL evaluations uniformly took under 1 minute to submit. The average time to completed evaluation from surgery completion was 5 hours (plastic surgery resident participates. SIMPL's competency-based framework can be easily scaled to facilitate data collection and reporting of mandatory Milestones evaluations at the program and national levels. This technology will support a shared vocabulary between residents and faculty to enhance intraoperative education.

  4. Academic productivity of directors of ACGME-accredited residency programs in surgery and anesthesiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culley, Deborah J; Fahy, Brenda G; Xie, Zhongcong; Lekowski, Robert; Buetler, Sascha; Liu, Xiaoxia; Cohen, Neal H; Crosby, Gregory

    2014-01-01

    Scholarly activity is expected of program directors of Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME)-accredited residency training programs. Anesthesiology residency programs are cited more often than surgical programs for deficiencies in academic productivity. We hypothesized that this may in part reflect differences in scholarly activity between program directors of anesthesiology and surgical trainings programs. To test the hypothesis, we examined the career track record of current program directors of ACGME-accredited anesthesiology and surgical residency programs at the same institutions using PubMed citations and funding from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) as metrics of scholarly activity. Between November 1, 2011 and December 31, 2011, we obtained data from publicly available Web sites on program directors at 127 institutions that had ACGME-accredited programs in both anesthesiology and surgery. Information gathered on each individual included year of board certification, year first appointed program director, academic rank, history of NIH grant funding, and number of PubMed citations. We also calculated the h-index for a randomly selected subset of 25 institution-matched program directors. There were no differences between the groups in number of years since board certification (P = 0.42), academic rank (P = 0.38), or years as a program director (P = 0.22). However, program directors in anesthesiology had less prior or current NIH funding (P = 0.002), fewer total and education-related PubMed citations (both P < 0.001), and a lower h-index (P = 0.001) than surgery program directors. Multivariate analysis revealed that the publication rate for anesthesiology program directors was 43% (95% confidence interval, 0.31-0.58) that of the corresponding program directors of surgical residency programs, holding other variables constant. Program directors of anesthesiology residency programs have considerably less scholarly activity in terms of

  5. Operative variables are better predictors of postdischarge infections and unplanned readmissions in vascular surgery patients than patient characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks, Caitlin W; Bronsert, Michael; Hammermeister, Karl E; Henderson, William G; Gibula, Douglas R; Black, James H; Glebova, Natalia O

    2017-04-01

    Although postoperative readmissions are frequent in vascular surgery patients, the reasons for these readmissions are not well characterized, and effective approaches to their reduction are unknown. Our aim was to analyze the reasons for vascular surgery readmissions and to report potential areas for focused efforts aimed at readmission reduction. The 2012 to 2013 American College of Surgeons National Quality Improvement Program (ACS NSQIP) data set was queried for vascular surgery patients. Multivariable models were developed to analyze risk factors for postdischarge infections, the major drivers of unplanned 30-day readmissions. We identified 86,403 vascular surgery patients for analysis. Thirty-day readmission occurred in 8827 (10%), of which 8054 (91%) were unplanned. Of the unplanned readmissions, 61% (n = 4951) were related to the index vascular surgery procedure. Infectious complications were the most common reason for a surgery-related readmission (1940 [39%]), with surgical site infection being the most common type of infection related to unplanned readmission. Multivariable analysis showed the top five preoperative risk factors for postdischarge infections were the presence of a preoperative open wound, inpatient operation, obesity, work relative value unit, and insulin-dependent diabetes (but not diabetes managed with oral medications). Cigarette smoking was a weak predictor and came in tenth in the mode (overall C index, 0.657). When operative and postoperative factors were included in the model, total operative time was the strongest predictor of postdischarge infectious complications (odds ratio [OR] 1.2 for each 1-hour increase in operative time), followed by presence of a preoperative open wound (OR, 1.5), inpatient operation (OR, 2), obesity (OR, 1.8), and discharge to rehabilitation facility (OR, 1.7; P complications dominate the reasons for unplanned 30-day readmissions in vascular surgery patients. We have identified preoperative, operative

  6. Randomized clinical trial of comprehensive geriatric assessment and optimization in vascular surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Partridge, J S L; Harari, D; Martin, F C; Peacock, J L; Bell, R; Mohammed, A; Dhesi, J K

    2017-05-01

    Increasing numbers of older patients are undergoing vascular surgery. Inadequate preoperative assessment and optimization may contribute to increased postoperative morbidity and mortality. Patients aged at least 65 years scheduled for elective aortic aneurysm repair or lower-limb arterial surgery were enrolled in an RCT of standard preoperative assessment or preoperative comprehensive geriatric assessment and optimization. Randomization was stratified by sex and surgical site (aorta/lower limb). Primary outcome was length of hospital stay. Secondary outcome measures included new medical co-morbidities, postoperative medical or surgical complications, discharge to a higher level of dependency and 30-day readmission rate. A total of 176 patients were included in the final analysis (control 91, intervention 85). Geometric mean length of stay was 5·53 days in the control group and 3·32 days in the intervention group (ratio of geometric means 0·60, 95 per cent c.i. 0·46 to 0·79; P < 0·001). There was a lower incidence of delirium (11 versus 24 per cent; P = 0·018), cardiac complications (8 versus 27 per cent; P = 0·001) and bladder/bowel complications (33 versus 55 per cent; P = 0·003) in the intervention group compared with the control group. Patients in the intervention group were less likely to require discharge to a higher level of dependency (4 of 85 versus 12 of 91; P = 0·051). In this study of patients aged 65 years or older undergoing vascular surgery, preoperative comprehensive geriatric assessment was associated with a shorter length of hospital stay. Patients undergoing assessment and optimization had a lower incidence of complications and were less likely to be discharged to a higher level of dependency. Registration number: ISRCTN23142588 (http://www.controlled-trials.com). © 2017 BJS Society Ltd Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Does resident participation influence otolaryngology-head and neck surgery morbidity and mortality?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abt, Nicholas B; Reh, Douglas D; Eisele, David W; Francis, Howard W; Gourin, Christine G

    2016-10-01

    Patients may perceive resident procedural participation as detrimental to their outcome. Our objective is to investigate whether otolaryngology-head and neck surgery (OHNS) housestaff participation is associated with surgical morbidity and mortality. Case-control study. OHNS patients were analyzed from the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program 2006 to 2013 databases. We compared the incidence of 30-day postoperative morbidity, mortality, readmissions, and reoperations in patients operated on by resident surgeons with attending supervision (AR) with patients operated on by an attending surgeon alone (AO) using cross-tabulations and multivariable regression. There were 27,018 cases with primary surgeon data available, with 9,511 AR cases and 17,507 AO cases. Overall, 3.62% of patients experienced at least one postoperative complication. The AR cohort had a higher complication rate of 5.73% than the AO cohort at 2.48% (P < .001). After controlling for all other variables, there was no significant difference in morbidity (odds ratio [OR] = 1.05 [0.89 to 1.24]), mortality (OR = 0.91 [0.49 to 1.70]), readmission (OR = 1.29 [0.92 to 1.81]), or reoperation (OR = 1.28 [0.91 to 1.80]) for AR compared to AO cases. There was no difference between postgraduate year levels for adjusted 30-day morbidity or mortality. There is an increased incidence of morbidity, mortality, readmission, and reoperation in OHNS surgical cases with resident participation, which appears related to increased comorbidity with AR patients. After controlling for other variables, resident participation was not associated with an increase in 30-day morbidity, mortality, readmission, or reoperation odds. These data suggest that OHNS resident participation in surgical cases is not associated with poorer short-term outcomes. 3b Laryngoscope, 126:2263-2269, 2016. © 2016 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  8. Beta-blocker use and clinical outcomes after primary vascular surgery: a nationwide propensity score-matched study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Høgh, A; Lindholt, J S; Nielsen, H; Jensen, L P; Johnsen, S P

    2013-07-01

    To explore the associations between beta-blocker use and clinical outcomes (death, hospitalisation with myocardial infarction (MI) or stroke, major amputation and recurrent vascular surgery) after primary vascular reconstruction. Patients who had primary vascular surgical or endovascular reconstruction due to symptomatic peripheral arterial disease, in Denmark between 1996 and 2007 were included. We obtained data on filled prescriptions, clinical outcomes and confounding factors from population-based healthcare registries. Beta-blocker users were matched to non-users by propensity score, and Cox-regression was performed. All medications were included as time-dependent variables. We studied 16,945 matched patients (7828 beta-blocker users and 9117 non-users) with a median follow-up period of 582 days (range, 30-4379 days). The cumulative risks were as follows: all-cause mortality, 17.9%; MI, 5.3%; stroke, 5.6%; major amputation, 9.1%; and recurrent vascular surgery, 23.1%. When comparing beta-blocker users with non-users: adjusted hazard ratio: MI, 1.52 (95% CI, 1.31-1.78); stroke, 1.21 (95% CI, 1.03-1.43); and major amputation, 0.80 (95% CI, 0.70-0.93). Beta-blocker use after primary vascular surgery was associated with a lower risk of major amputation but an increased risk of hospitalisation with MI and stroke. No associations were found between beta-blocker use and all-cause mortality or the risk of recurrent vascular surgery. However, our results are not sufficient to alter the indication for beta-blocker use among symptomatic peripheral arterial disease patients. Copyright © 2013 European Society for Vascular Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. The surgical experience of general surgery residents: an analysis of the applicability of the specialty program in General and Digestive Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Targarona Soler, Eduardo Ma; Jover Navalon, Jose Ma; Gutierrez Saiz, Javier; Turrado Rodríguez, Víctor; Parrilla Paricio, Pascual

    2015-03-01

    Residents in our country have achieved a homogenous surgical training by following a structured residency program. This is due to the existence of specific training programs for each specialty. The current program, approved in 2007, has a detailed list of procedures that a surgeon should have performed in order to complete training. The aim of this study is to analyze the applicability of the program with regard to the number of procedures performed during the residency period. A data collection form was designed that included the list of procedures from the program of the specialty; it was sent in April 2014 to all hospitals with accredited residency programs. In September 2014 the forms were analysed, and a general descriptive study was performed; a subanalysis according to the resident's sex and Autonomous region was also performed. The number of procedures performed according to the number of residents in the different centers was also analyzed. The survey was sent to 117 hospitals with accredited programs, which included 190 resident places. A total of 91 hospitals responded (53%). The training offered adapts in general to the specialty program. The total number of procedures performed in the different sub-areas, in laparoscopic and emergency surgery is correct or above the number recommended by the program, with the exception of esophageal-gastric and hepatobiliary surgery. The sub-analysis according to Autonomous region did not show any significant differences in the total number of procedures, however, there were significant differences in endocrine surgery (P=.001) and breast surgery (P=.042). A total of 55% of residents are female, with no significant differences in distribution in Autonomous regions. However, female surgeons operate more than their male counterparts during the residency period (512±226 vs. 625±244; P<.01). The number of residents in the hospital correlates with the number of procedures performed; the residents with more procedures

  10. Construction and validation of a surgical skills assessment tool for general surgery residency program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth Gomes dos Santos

    Full Text Available Objective: To develop and validate an instrument for measuring the acquisition of technical skills in conducting operations of increasing difficulty for use in General Surgery Residency (GSR programs. Methods: we built a surgical skills assessment tool containing 11 operations in increasing levels of difficulty. For instrument validation we used the face validaity method. Through an electronic survey tool (Survey MonKey(r we sent a questionnaire to Full and Emeritus members of the Brazilian College of Surgeons - CBC - all bearers of the CBC Specialist Title. Results: Of the 307 questionnaires sent we received 100 responses. For the analysis of the data collected we used the Cronbach's alpha test. We observed that, in general, the overall alpha presented with values near or greater than 0.70, meaning good consistency to assess their points of interest. Conclusion: The evaluation instrument built was validated and can be used as a method of assessment of technical skill acquisition in the General Surgery Residency programs in Brazil.

  11. The general surgery chief resident operative experience: 23 years of national ACGME case logs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drake, Frederick Thurston; Horvath, Karen D; Goldin, Adam B; Gow, Kenneth W

    2013-09-01

    The chief resident (CR) year is a pivotal experience in surgical training. Changes in case volume and diversity may impact the educational quality of this important year. To evaluate changes in operative experience for general surgery CRs. Review of Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education case logs from 1989-1990 through 2011-2012 divided into 5 periods. Graduates in period 3 were the last to train with unrestricted work hours; those in period 4 were part of a transition period and trained under both systems; and those in period 5 trained fully under the 80-hour work week. Diversity of cases was assessed based on Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education defined categories. Total cases and defined categories were evaluated for changes over time. The average total CR case numbers have fallen (271 in period 1 vs 242 in period 5, P surgery training may be jeopardized by reduced case diversity. Chief resident cases are crucial in surgical training and educators should consider these findings as surgical training evolves.

  12. Trends in Pediatric Surgery Operative Volume among Residents and Fellows: Improving the Experience for All.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talutis, Stephanie; McAneny, David; Chen, Catherine; Doherty, Gerard; Sachs, Teviah

    2016-06-01

    The ACGME requires general surgery residents (GSR) to perform 20 pediatric surgery cases as part of the total 750 cases before graduation. We queried the ACGME General Surgery (1999 to 2014) and Pediatric Surgery (2003 to 2014) Case Logs for all pediatric operations performed during training. Means (±SD) and medians (10(th):90(th) percentiles) were compared, and R(2) was calculated for all trends. The number of pediatric surgery fellows (PSF) increased 63% (23 to 39; R(2) = 0.82), while GSR numbers increased 12% (989 to 1,105; R(2) = 0.77). Total and average pediatric surgery case volume for GSR decreased from 39,309 to 32,156 (R(2) = 0.90) and 39.7 ± 13 to 29.1 ± 10 (R(2) = 0.91), respectively. Meanwhile, average PSF case volume increased from 980 ± 208 to 1,137 ± 202 (R(2) = 0.83). These trends persisted for inguinal/umbilical hernia (GSR 22.1 ± 13 to 15.6 ± 10; R(2) = 0.93; PSF 90.5 ± 17.6 to 104.4 ± 20.7; R(2) = 0.34), pyloric stenosis (GSR 3.9 ± 3 to 2.8 ± 3; R(2) = 0.60; PSF 29.6 ± 15 to 39.7 ± 16.8; R(2) = 0.69), and intestinal atresia (GSR 1.3 ± 2 to 1.1 ± 2; R(2) = 0.34; PSF 4.3 ± 4 to 11.8 ± 8; R(2) = 0.21). The mean number of GSR pediatric operations diminished for both junior (37.1 ± 20 to 27.3 ± 16; R(2) = 0.88) and chief (2.6 ± 5 to 1.7 ± 5; R(2) = 0.75) years. Teaching cases in pediatric surgery decreased at all levels. Although the percentage of GSR teaching cases performed during chief years fell modestly (6.6% to 4.7%; R(2) = 0.53), median teaching cases dropped from 2 (0:11 [10(th):90(th) percentiles]) to zero (0:0 [10(th):90(th) percentiles]). Mean PSF teaching cases declined (100.7 ± 396 to 44.5 ± 42; R(2) = 0.72), while the percentage of operations that were teaching cases decreased more sharply (10.3% to 3.5%; R(2) = 0.82). Total pediatric surgery cases and PSF operative volume have increased, while GSR operative volume has decreased. Opportunities may exist to increase resident participation while

  13. Just say no to intensive care unit starvation: a nutrition education program for surgery residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spear, Shawn; Sim, Vasiliy; Moore, Frederick A; Todd, S Rob

    2013-06-01

    In 2009, the Society of Critical Care Medicine (SCCM)/American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition (A.S.P.E.N.) published "Guidelines for the Provision and Assessment of Nutrition Support Therapy in the Adult Critically Ill Patient." To improve our surgery residents' understanding of intensive care unit (ICU) nutrition, we developed a nutrition education program based on these guidelines. The purpose of this pilot study was to assess its effectiveness. We hypothesized that our nutrition education program would improve our residents' knowledge of ICU nutrition. This was a prospective observational pilot study performed in the surgical ICU of an academic medical center. Based on the SCCM/A.S.P.E.N. nutrition guidelines, we developed a nutrition education program (lectures covering selected guidelines and interactive case studies). Pre- and posttesting were performed to assess short-term comprehension. Long-term retention was assessed 3 months after the initial education program. The primary outcome measure was the change in ICU nutrition knowledge. Significance was set at P nutrition education program. Their mean age was 27.8 ± 1.2 years, and 50% were male. The mean test scores were as follows: pretest, 45% ± 9%; posttest, 81% ± 5%; and 3-month test, 65% ± 8%. The differences between the pretest and both posttest scores were significant (P nutrition. This is confirmed by the pretest results of the current study. Our nutrition education program improved both short-term and long-term ICU nutrition knowledge of our surgery residents. Future studies should evaluate the effect such education has on the clinical outcomes of ICU patients.

  14. Initial experiences in embedding core competency education in entry-level surgery residents through a nonclinical rotation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahol, Kanav; Huston, Carrie; Hamann, Jessica; Ferrara, John J

    2011-03-01

    Health care continues to expand in scope and in complexity. In this changing environment, residents are challenged with understanding its intricacies and the impact it will have on their professional activities and careers. Embedding each of the competency elements in residents in a meaningful way remains a challenge for many surgery residency program directors. We established a nonclinical rotation to provide surgery postgraduate year-1 (PGY-1) residents with a structured, multifaceted, largely self-directed curriculum into which each of the 6 core competencies are woven. Posttesting strategies were established for most curricular experiences to ensure to the greatest possible extent that each resident will have achieved an acceptable level of understanding of each of the competency areas before being given credit for the rotation. By uniformly exceeding satisfactory scores on respective objective analyses, residents demonstrated an increased (at least short-term) understanding of each of the assessed competency areas. Our project sought to address a prior lack of opportunity for our residents to develop a sound foundation for our residents in systems-based practice. Our new rotation addresses systems-based practice in several different learning environments, including emergency medical service ride-along, sentinel event participation, and hospice visits. Several research projects have enhanced the overall learning program. Our experience shows that a rotation dedicated to competency training can provide an innovative and engaging means of teaching residents the value of each element.

  15. Working and training conditions of residents in pediatric surgery: a nationwide survey in Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reismann, M; Ellerkamp, V; Dingemann, J

    2010-09-01

    As in other surgical specialties, increasing concern has been expressed worldwide about the shortage of trainees in pediatric surgery training programs. We performed a nationwide survey to investigate the current situation in Germany. An internet-based nationwide survey comprising 36 questions on training conditions in pediatric surgery was linked to the homepage of the German Society of Pediatric Surgery from June to September 2008. Statements on the following aspects were evaluated by responding residents using a scale from 1 (I do not agree at all) to 5 (I fully agree): workplace, cooperation with colleagues, head of the department, cooperation with other specialties, training and research conditions. A median value of 3 indicated an unsatisfactory assessment, with at least 50% of respondents giving an indifferent or negative response. 70 questionnaires were completed. Some of the evaluations revealed problematic areas. In particular, statements regarding working hours revealed dissatisfaction among the responding doctors. The median value accorded the statement "I am satisfied with the current working time regulation" was 2.9. With regard to departmental heads, some criticisms were directed against a perceived lack of soft skills. According to the respondents, their involvement in decision-making processes was insufficient ("We are involved in decision-making processes affecting our working conditions" - median value 2.4). Residents were also dissatisfied with the feedback they received for their work ("I get enough feedback regarding my achievement" - median value 2.6). Another problem area was career development ("I will finish my specialist training in time" - median value 2.9). However, these points did not affect overall satisfaction. Trainee satisfaction with regulations on working hours is low. Despite a general satisfaction with all fields appraised, improvements in various individual areas, e. g., the attitude of departmental heads and strategies of

  16. Comparison of Appendectomy Outcomes Between Senior General Surgeons and General Surgery Residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siam, Baha; Al-Kurd, Abbas; Simanovsky, Natalia; Awesat, Haitham; Cohn, Yahav; Helou, Brigitte; Eid, Ahmed; Mazeh, Haggi

    2017-07-01

    In some centers, the presence of a senior general surgeon (SGS) is obligatory in every procedure, including appendectomy, while in others it is not. There is a relative paucity in the literature of reports comparing the outcomes of appendectomies performed by unsupervised general surgery residents (GSRs) with those performed in the presence of an SGS. To compare the outcomes of appendectomies performed by SGSs with those performed by GSRs. A retrospective analysis was performed of all patients 16 years or older operated on for assumed acute appendicitis between January 1, 2008, and December 31, 2015. The cohort study compared appendectomies performed by SGSs and GSRs in the general surgical department of a teaching hospital. The primary outcome measured was the postoperative early and late complication rates. Secondary outcomes included time from emergency department to operating room, length of surgery, surgical technique (open or laparoscopic), use of laparoscopic staplers, and overall duration of postoperative antibiotic treatment. Among 1649 appendectomy procedures (mean [SD] patient age, 33.7 [13.3] years; 612 female [37.1%]), 1101 were performed by SGSs and 548 by GSRs. Analysis demonstrated no significant difference between the SGS group and the GSR group in overall postoperative early and late complication rates, the use of imaging techniques, time from emergency department to operating room, percentage of complicated appendicitis, postoperative length of hospital stay, and overall duration of postoperative antibiotic treatment. However, length of surgery was significantly shorter in the SGS group than in the GSR group (mean [SD], 39.9 [20.9] vs 48.6 [20.2] minutes; P < .001). This study demonstrates that unsupervised surgical residents may safely perform appendectomies, with no difference in postoperative early and late complication rates compared with those performed in the presence of an SGS.

  17. Return of the cadaver: Key role of anatomic dissection for plastic surgery resident training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krähenbühl, Swenn Maxence; Čvančara, Paul; Stieglitz, Thomas; Bonvin, Raphaël; Michetti, Murielle; Flahaut, Marjorie; Durand, Sébastien; Deghayli, Lina; Applegate, Lee Ann; Raffoul, Wassim

    2017-07-01

    Successful Plastic Surgery Residency training is subjected to evolving society pressure of lower hourly work weeks imposed by external committees, labor laws, and increased public awareness of patient care quality. Although innovative measures for simulation training of surgery are appearing, there is also the realization that basic anatomy training should be re-enforced and cadaver dissection is of utmost importance for surgical techniques.In the development of new technology for implantable neurostimulatory electrodes for the management of phantom limb pain in amputee patients, a design of a cadaveric model has been developed with detailed steps for innovative transfascicular insertion of electrodes. Overall design for electrode and cable implantation transcutaneous was established and an operating protocol devised.Microsurgery of the nerves of the upper extremities for interfascicular electrode implantation is described for the first time. Design of electrode implantation in cadaver specimens was adapted with a trocar delivery of cables and electrodes transcutaneous and stabilization of the electrode by suturing along the nerve. In addition, the overall operating arena environment with specific positions of the multidisciplinary team necessary for implantable electrodes was elaborated to assure optimal operating conditions and procedures during the organization of a first-in-man implantation study.Overall importance of plastic surgery training for new and highly technical procedures is of importance and particularly there is a real need to continue actual cadaveric training due to patient variability for nerve anatomic structures.

  18. How safe is it to train residents to perform mitral valve surgery?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabriel, Joseph; Göbölös, László; Miskolczi, Szabolcs; Barlow, Clifford

    2016-11-01

    A best evidence topic was constructed according to a structured protocol. The enquiry: In [patients undergoing mitral valve surgery] are [postoperative morbidity and mortality outcomes] acceptable when patients are operated on by [residents]? Four hundred and twenty-three were identified from the search strategy. Six articles selected as best evidence were tabulated. All current published evidence, encompassing open and minimally invasive mitral valve repair in addition to mitral valve replacement, supports the involvement of trainees in mitral procedures. Although trainees may experience longer aortic cross-clamp and cardiopulmonary bypass times than specialist surgeons, they are not associated with significantly worse perioperative or postoperative outcomes in comparable mitral procedures. Important factors in the viability of mitral valve training and its quality include the volume of cases per institution and the expertise of the supervising surgeon, and these remain largely unexplored. Overall, mitral valve surgery remains a valuable potential training opportunity, one which is perhaps underexploited. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. All rights reserved.

  19. A new instrument for hemostatic vascular management in endoscopic surgery: diode laser (STATLase-SDL) and its handpiece (dual hook).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morita, T; Okamura, Y; Ookubo, K; Tanaka, K; Hirayama, R; Daikuzono, N

    1999-04-01

    The authors described experimental data in hemostatic vascular transection using a STATLase-SDL with a 780-865 nm GaA/As diode wavelength and its handpiece, Dual Hook (DH). The STATLase-SDL and DH are newly developed devices for endoscopic surgery. It seems that the device has improved hemostatic cutting ability. The DH was applied to the abdominal aorta (SDL and DH have good hemostatic cutting ability and might be suitable for endoscopic surgery.

  20. Robotic Surgery Training in an OB/GYN Residency Program: A Survey Investigating the Optimal Training and Credentialing of OB/GYN Residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Shannon; Mayer, Allan; Nelson, Beth; Roland, Phillip

    2015-08-01

    Many community hospital gynecologic surgery training programs now include robotics.At St. Francis Hospital and Medical Center, we have integrated robotic surgical training since 2006. This study is designed to assess the success in training gynecology residents in robotic surgery. An anonymous web-based survey tool (www. survey monkey. com) was sent to all Ob/Gyn residency graduates from 2007-2010 (n = 17). From 2011-2014, we emailed three reevaluation questions to all 2007-2014 graduates (N = 32). Design Classification: II-3. The response rate was 95%, and 11 of 17 initial graduates (65%) indicated that they had received adequate robotic training. Currently, 24 of 32 (75%) graduates practice in hospitals with robotic availability. Twenty of the 32 graduates (63%) are using robotics in their surgical practices. Nine of these 20 graduates (45%) were fully credentialed following their residency. The other 11 graduates (55%)required further proctoring to obtain full robotic credentials. Robotic surgical training is a component of modern gynecologic surgical training. Postresidency robotic credentialing is a realistic graduation goal for residents who plan to practice gynecologic surgery.

  1. A Comparison of Matched and Unmatched Orthopaedic Surgery Residency Applicants from 2006 to 2014: Data from the National Resident Matching Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrock, John B; Kraeutler, Matthew J; Dayton, Michael R; McCarty, Eric C

    2017-01-04

    The Association of American Medical Colleges publishes residency match data and reports through the National Resident Matching Program (NRMP) every year. The purpose of this study was to analyze trends in orthopaedic surgery residency matching data and characteristics of successful applicants to counsel medical students with regard to their chances of matching. The annual reports of the NRMP were searched annually from 2006 to 2014 to determine the number of orthopaedic surgery residency positions available, the number of applicants, and the match rate among applicants. Comparisons were performed between matched applicants and unmatched applicants with regard to the number of contiguous ranks and distinct specialties, United States Medical Licensing Examination (USMLE) scores, number of research experiences and research products (abstracts, presentations, posters, publications), and proportion of Alpha Omega Alpha (AOA) Honor Medical Society members and students at a top-40, National Institutes of Health (NIH)-funded medical school. The number of orthopaedic surgery positions available and number of applicants increased at a mean rate of 9 positions and 65 applicants per year (p = 0.11). The mean number of contiguous ranks for U.S. senior medical students was 11.5 for those who matched and 5.5 for those who did not match (p students at a top-40, NIH-funded medical school (both p experiences and research products, and contiguous ranks. A higher proportion of successful applicants are AOA members and students at a top-40, NIH-funded medical school.

  2. The effect of surgical resident learning style preferences on American Board of Surgery In-training Examination scores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Roger H; Gilbert, Timothy; Ristig, Kyle

    2015-01-01

    There is a growing body of literature that suggests that learners assimilate information differently, depending on their preferred learning style. The VARK model categorizes learners as visual (V), aural (A), read/write (R), kinesthetic (K), or multimodal (MM). We hypothesized that resident VARK learning style preferences and American Board of Surgery In-Training Examination (ABSITE) performance are associated. The Fleming VARK learning styles inventory was administered to all general surgery residents at a university hospital-based program each year to determine their preferred learning style. Resident scores from the 2012 and 2013 ABSITE were examined to identify any correlation with learning style preferences. Over a 2-year period, residents completed 53 VARK inventory assessments. Most (51%) had a multimodal preference. Dominant aural and read/write learners had the lowest and highest mean ABSITE scores, respectively (p = 0.03). Residents with dominant read/write learning preferences perform better on the ABSITE than their peers did, whereas residents with dominant aural learning preferences underperform on the ABSITE. This may reflect an inherent and inadvertent bias of the examination against residents who prefer to learn via aural modalities. Copyright © 2015 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Gamified Twitter Microblogging to Support Resident Preparation for the American Board of Surgery In-Service Training Examination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamb, Laura C; DiFiori, Monica M; Jayaraman, Vijay; Shames, Brian D; Feeney, James M

    We sought to determine if a daily gamified microblogging project improves American Board of Surgery In-Service Training Examination (ABSITE) scores for participants. In July 2016, we instituted a gamified microblogging project using Twitter as the platform and modified questions from one of several available question banks. A question of the day was posted at 7-o׳clock each morning, Monday through Friday. Respondents were awarded points for speed, accuracy, and contribution to discussion topics. The moderator challenged respondents by asking additional questions and prompted them to find evidence for their claims to fuel further discussion. Since 4 months into the microblogging program, a survey was administered to all residents. Responses were collected and analyzed. After 6 months of tweeting, residents took the ABSITE examination. We compared participating residents׳ ABSITE percentile rank to those of their nonparticipating peers. We also compared residents׳ percentile rank from 2016 to those in 2017 after their participation in the microblogging project. The University of Connecticut general surgery residency is an integrated program that is decentralized across 5 hospitals in the central Connecticut region, including Saint Francis Hospital and Medical Center, located in Hartford. We advertised our account to the University of Connecticut general surgery residents. Out of 45 residents, 11 participated in Twitter microblogging (24.4%) and 17 responded to the questionnaire (37.8%). In all, 100% of the residents who were participating in Twitter reported that daily microblogging prompted them to engage in academic reading. Twitter participants significantly increased their ABSITE percentile rank from 2016 to 2017 by an average of 13.7% (±14.1%) while nonparticipants on average decreased their ABSITE percentile rank by 10.0% (±16.6) (p = 0.003). Microblogging via Twitter with gamification is a feasible strategy to facilitate improving performance on the ABSITE

  4. "Top Gun" competition: motivation and practice narrows the technical skill gap among new cardiothoracic surgery residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enter, Daniel H; Lee, Richard; Fann, James I; Hicks, George L; Verrier, Edward D; Mark, Rebecca; Lou, Xiaoying; Mokadam, Nahush A

    2015-03-01

    Adoption of simulation skills training in cardiothoracic (CT) surgery remains a challenge. This study sought to determine whether a "Top Gun" competition would encourage simulator use and improve technical skills among first-year CT residents. A coronary anastomosis simulation module with instructional video was sent to 96 first-year CT residents in traditional programs who were then invited to participate in a Top Gun competition. Residents uploaded a video recording of their baseline anastomosis using the simulator. After 6 weeks of practice under faculty supervision, each trainee uploaded a final video. All submissions were rated in blinded fashion by three CT surgeons. Twelve components were scored on a 5-point Likert scale (1 = poor; 5 = excellent); also, an overall pass-fail grade was given. Five trainees with the highest final scores were invited to compete at a live Top Gun competition. Seventeen trainees submitted a baseline anastomosis video for evaluation; 15 submitted a final video. Overall average scores improved from 3.24 ± 0.61 to 4.01 ± 0.33 (p average time (minutes:seconds) decreased from 11:10 (range, 5:56 to 18:58) to 9:04 (range, 5:52 to 16:23; p average of 23 anastomoses (range, 10 to 40). The majority (10 of 13) agreed or strongly agreed that practicing on simulators will improve a trainee's technical skill acquisition. Focused training results in improved technical skills in vessel anastomosis, especially for residents with lower baseline skills. Simulation, as with any educational endeavor, requires the motivation of the trainee, commitment of the faculty educator, and a defined training curriculum. Copyright © 2015 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Twenty-four hour blood flow in the forefoot after reconstructive vascular surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jelnes, R

    1986-01-01

    during day activities. During sleep, however, SBF increased by 80% (p less than 0.001). The relative changes in SBF from day to night at the postoperative examination did not differ from that of the control group, i.e., the normal 24-hour blood flow pattern had been obtained. These changes in SBF......Local blood flow in the forefoot (SBF) was measured continuously during 24 hours by 133xenon clearance technique in 10 patients prior to and at least 1 year after successful reconstructive vascular surgery for severe arterial insufficiency (mean: 18 months, range: 12-36). A group of 10 patients...... that the long-term postreconstructive hyperemia merely is a reflection of the normal 24-hour blood flow pattern....

  6. Systematic identification and management of barriers to vascular surgery patient discharge time of day.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Gaurav; Wong, Danny; Arnaoutakis, Dean J; Shah, Samir K; O'Brien, Alice; Ashley, Stanley W; Ozaki, C Keith

    2017-01-01

    Length of stay fails to completely capture the clinical and economic effects of patient progression through the phases of inpatient care, such as admission, room placement, procedures, and discharge. Delayed hospital throughput has been linked to increased time spent in the emergency department and postanesthesia care unit, delayed time to treatment, increased in-hospital mortality, decreased patient satisfaction, and lost hospital revenue. We identified barriers to vascular surgery inpatient care progression and instituted defined measures to positively impact standardized metrics. The study was divided into three periods: preintervention, "wash-in," and postintervention. During the preintervention phase, barriers to patient flow were quantified by an interdisciplinary team. Suboptimal provider communication emerged as the key barrier. An enhanced communication intervention consisting of face-to-face and mobile application-based education on key patient flow metrics, explicit discussion of individual patient barriers to progression at rounds and interdisciplinary huddles, and communication of projected discharge and potential barriers via e-mail was developed with input from all stakeholders. Following a 4-week wash-in implementation phase, data collection was repeated. The pre- and postintervention patient cohorts accounted for 244.3 and 238.1 inpatient days, respectively. Both groups had similar baseline demographic, clinical characteristics, and procedures performed during hospitalization. The postintervention group was discharged 78 minutes earlier (14:00:32 vs 15:18:37; P = .03) with a trend toward increased discharge by noon (94% vs 88%; P = .09). Readmission rates did not differ (P = .44). Implementation of a focused, interdisciplinary, frontline provider-driven, enhanced communication program can be feasibly incorporated into existing specialty surgical workflow. The program resulted in improved timeliness of discharge and projected cost savings

  7. Fibrin sealant improves hemostasis in peripheral vascular surgery: a randomized prospective trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schenk, Worthington G; Burks, Sandra G; Gagne, Paul J; Kagan, Steven A; Lawson, Jeffrey H; Spotnitz, William D

    2003-06-01

    To evaluate the efficacy and safety of an investigational fibrin sealant (FS) in a randomized prospective, partially blinded, controlled, multicenter trial. Upper extremity vascular access surgery using polytetrafluorethylene (PTFE) graft placement for dialysis was chosen as a reproducible, clinically relevant model for evaluating the usefulness of FS. The FS consisted of pooled human fibrinogen (60 mg/mL) and thrombin (500 NIH U/mL). Time to hemostasis was measured, and adverse events were monitored. Consenting adult patients (n = 48) undergoing placement of a standard PTFE graft were randomized in a 2:1:1 ratio to the treatment group using FS (ZLB Bioplasma AG, Bern, Switzerland), oxidized regenerated cellulose (Surgicel, Johnson & Johnson, New Brunswick, NJ), or pressure. Patients received heparin (3,000 IU IVP) before placement of vascular clamps. If the treatment was FS, clamps were left in place for 120 seconds after the application of study material to permit polymerization. If treatment was Surgicel, clamps were left in place until the agent had been applied according to manufacturer's instructions. If the treatment was pressure, clamps were released as soon as the investigator was ready to apply compression. Immediately after release of the last clamp, the arterial and venous suture lines were evaluated for bleeding. The time to hemostasis at both the venous and arterial sites was recorded. Significant (P < or =.005) reduction in time to hemostasis was achieved in the FS group. Thirteen (54.2%) patients randomized to FS experienced immediate hemostasis at both suture lines following clamp removal compared to no patients using Surgicel or pressure. Only one patient (7.1%) in the Surgicel group and no patients in the pressure group experienced hemostasis at 120 seconds from clamp removal, compared to 13 (54.2%) patients for FS. Adverse events were comparable in all groups. There were no seroconversions. FS achieved more rapid hemostasis than traditional

  8. Incidence, prognostic factors and impact of postoperative delirium after major vascular surgery: A meta-analysis and systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aitken, Sarah Joy; Blyth, Fiona M; Naganathan, Vasi

    2017-10-01

    Although postoperative delirium is a common complication and increases patient care needs, little is known about the predictors and outcomes of delirium in patients having vascular surgery. This review aimed to determine the incidence, prognostic factors and impact of postoperative delirium in vascular surgical patients. MEDLINE and EMBASE were systematically searched for articles published between January 2000 and January 2016 on delirium after vascular surgery. The primary outcome was the incidence of delirium. Secondary outcomes were contributing prognostic factors and impact of delirium. Study quality and risk of bias was assessed using the QUIPS tool for systematic reviews of prognostic studies, and MOOSE guidelines for reviews of observational studies. Quantitative analyses of extracted data were conducted using meta-analysis where possible to determine incidence of delirium and prognostic factors. A qualitative review of outcomes was performed. Fifteen articles were eligible for inclusion. Delirium incidence ranged between 5% and 39%. Meta-analysis found that patients with delirium were older than those without delirium (OR 3.6, pdelirium included increased age (OR 1.04, pdelirium. Data were limited on the impact of procedure complexity, endovascular compared to open surgery or type of anaesthetic. Postoperative delirium occurs frequently, resulting in major morbidity for vascular patients. Improved quality of prognostic studies may identify modifiable peri-operative factors to improve quality of care for vascular surgical patients.

  9. The importance of basic science and clinical research as a selection criterion for general surgery residency programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melendez, Mark M; Xu, Xiaoti; Sexton, Thomas R; Shapiro, Marc J; Mohan, Eugene P

    2008-01-01

    The selection criteria for surgical residents applying for residency differ among programs nationwide. Factors influencing this selection process have not been well defined, and research in particular has not been evaluated fully. This study aimed to evaluate the relative importance of basic science and clinical research in the selection criteria used by program directors (PDs). A web-based survey consisting of 11 questions was sent to PDs using the list server of the Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Respondents were asked to rank selection factors using a 1-to-5 scoring system, with 5 as most important. Their responses were recorded and tabulated. University-based teaching hospital. The survey went to 251 accredited general surgery residency programs in the United States. Overall, 134 (53.3%) of the surveys were returned, representing 61 university-based programs, 57 community-based programs with university affiliation, and 16 community-based programs without university affiliation. In total, 120 PDs (89.5%) considered basic or clinical research almost always or all the time when evaluating applicants to their general surgery program. Another 73 PDs (54.5%) gave basic science and clinical research equal importance. Another 40 PDs (29.9%) rarely or never credited research unless it had been published as an abstract or paper. In ranking research, 11 (8.2%) respondents gave it the 5 score. Most respondents (n = 93; 69.4%) gave it the 3 score. An applicant's interview and interest in surgery were the factors considered most important by 93 (69.4%) and 78 (58.2%), respectively, of the PDs. Basic science and clinical research constituted an important but secondary criterion for resident selection by PDs into general surgery residency programs. PDs perceived the primary factors for residency selection to be the interview, demonstrated interest in surgery, AOA membership, letters of recommendation, and USMLE Step I scores.

  10. Regional cerebral blood flow before and after vascular surgery in patients with transient ischemic attacks with 133-xenon inhalation tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vorstrup, S; Hemmingsen, Ralf; Lindewald, H

    1982-01-01

    with no abnormality on the CT-scan. The abnormal blood flow pattern was found to be unchanged after clinically successful reconstructive vascular surgery. This suggests the presence of irreversible ischemic tissue damage without gross emollition (incomplete infarction). It is concluded, that TIAs are often harmful...

  11. A Regional Quality Improvement Effort to Increase Beta Blocker Administration Before Vascular Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodney, Philip P.; Eldrup-Jorgensen, Jens; Nolan, Brian W.; Bertges, Daniel J.; Likosky, Donald S.; Cronenwett, Jack L.

    2011-01-01

    Objective To determine if a regional quality improvement effort can increase beta-blocker utilization prior to vascular surgery and decrease the incidence of post-op myocardial infarction (POMI). Methods A quality improvement effort to increase peri-operative beta blocker utilization was implemented in 2003 at centers participating in the Vascular Study Group of New England (VSGNE). A 90% target was set and feedback given at bi-annual meetings. Beta blocker utilization (beta blocker administration and POMI were analyzed over time, and across strata of patient risk based on a multivariate model. Results Peri-operative beta blocker treatment increased from 68% of patients in the first three months of 2005 to 88% by the last 3 months of 2008 (pbeta blockers were treated with pre-operative beta blockers; by 2008, 78% of patients not on chronic beta blockers were started peri-operatively on these medications (pBeta blocker utilization increased across all centers and surgeons participating during the study period, and increased in patients of low, medium, and high cardiac risk. However, the rate of POMI did not change over time (5.2% in 2003, 5.5% in 2008, p=0.876), although a trend towards lower POMI rate was seen in patients on pre-operative beta blockers (4.4% in 2003-2005, 2.6% in 2006-2008, p=0.43). In multivariable modeling we found that age >70 (OR 2.1), positive stress test (OR 2.2), CHF (OR 1.7), chronic beta blocker administration (OR 1.7), resting heart rate (HR) beta blockers (70) (p=0.521). Conclusions Our regional quality improvement effort successfully increased peri-operative beta blocker utilization. However, this was not associated with reduced rates of POMI or resting heart rate. While this demonstrates the effectiveness of regional quality improvement efforts in changing practice patterns, further work is necessary to more precisely identify those patients who will benefit from beta blockade at the time of vascular surgery. PMID:21334166

  12. The Colorado Humanitarian Surgical Skills Workshop: A Cadaver-Based Workshop to Prepare Residents for Surgery in Austere Settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yihan; Mukhopadhyay, Swagoto; Meguid, Robert A; Kuwayama, David P

    2017-08-29

    Interest in humanitarian surgery is high among surgical and obstetric residents. The Colorado Humanitarian Surgical Skills Workshop is an annual 2-day course exposing senior residents to surgical techniques essential in low- and middle-income countries but not traditionally taught in US residencies. We evaluated the course's ability to foster resident comfort, knowledge, and competence in these skills. The cohort of course participants was studied prospectively. Participants attended didactic sessions followed by skills sessions using cadavers. Sample areas of focus included general surgery (mesh-free hernia repair), orthopedics (powerless external fixation), and neurosurgery (powerless craniotomy). Before and after the course, participants answered a questionnaire assessing confidence with taught skills; took a knowledge-based test composed of multiple choice and open-ended questions; and participated in a manual skills test of tibial external fixation. The Center for Surgical Innovation, University of Colorado School of Medicine. A total of 12 residents (11 general surgical and 1 obstetric) from ten US institutions. After the course, participants perceived increased confidence in performing all 27 taught procedures and ability to practice in low- and middle-income countries. In knowledge-based testing, 10 of 12 residents demonstrated improvement on multiple choice questioning and 9 of 12 residents demonstrated improvement on open-ended questioning with structured scoring. In manual skills testing, all external fixator constructs demonstrated objective improvement on structured scoring and subjective improvement on stability assessment. For senior residents interested in humanitarian surgery, a combination of skills-focused teaching and manual practice led to self-perceived and objective improvement in relevant surgical knowledge and skills. The Colorado Humanitarian Surgical Skills Workshop represents an effective model for transmitting essential surgical

  13. A new mild hyperthermia device to treat vascular involvement in cancer surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ware, Matthew J; Nguyen, Lam P; Law, Justin J; Krzykawska-Serda, Martyna; Taylor, Kimberly M; Cao, Hop S Tran; Anderson, Andrew O; Pulikkathara, Merlyn; Newton, Jared M; Ho, Jason C; Hwang, Rosa; Rajapakshe, Kimal; Coarfa, Cristian; Huang, Shixia; Edwards, Dean; Curley, Steven A; Corr, Stuart J

    2017-09-12

    Surgical margin status in cancer surgery represents an important oncologic parameter affecting overall prognosis. The risk of disease recurrence is minimized and survival often prolonged if margin-negative resection can be accomplished during cancer surgery. Unfortunately, negative margins are not always surgically achievable due to tumor invasion into adjacent tissues or involvement of critical vasculature. Herein, we present a novel intra-operative device created to facilitate a uniform and mild heating profile to cause hyperthermic destruction of vessel-encasing tumors while safeguarding the encased vessel. We use pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma as an in vitro and an in vivo cancer model for these studies as it is a representative model of a tumor that commonly involves major mesenteric vessels. In vitro data suggests that mild hyperthermia (41-46 °C for ten minutes) is an optimal thermal dose to induce high levels of cancer cell death, alter cancer cell's proteomic profiles and eliminate cancer stem cells while preserving non-malignant cells. In vivo and in silico data supports the well-known phenomena of a vascular heat sink effect that causes high temperature differentials through tissues undergoing hyperthermia, however temperatures can be predicted and used as a tool for the surgeon to adjust thermal doses delivered for various tumor margins.

  14. Instituting Ultrasound-Guided FNA for Thyroid Nodules into a General Surgery Residency Program: What We Learned.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, James R; Hale, Allyson L; Ewing, Joseph A; Lokey, Jonathan S

    2017-11-22

    Evaluation of a thyroid nodule is a common referral seen by surgeons and frequently requires ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration (US-guided FNA). While surgical residents may have sufficient exposure to thyroid surgery, many lack exposure to office-based procedures, such as US-guided FNA. General surgery residents should be provided with knowledge and practical skills in the application of diagnostic and interventional neck ultrasound to manage the common workup of a thyroid nodule. This study sought to instruct and measure surgical residents' performance in thyroid US-guided FNA and evaluate their views regarding instituting such a formal curriculum. Twelve (n = 12) senior residents completed a written pretest and questionnaire, then watched an instructional video and practiced a simulated thyroid US-guided FNA on our created model. Then residents were evaluated while performing actual thyroid US-guided FNAs on patients in our clinic. Residents then completed the same written exam and questionnaire for objective measure. Eight of the chief residents (62%) felt "not comfortable" with the procedure on the pre-course survey; this was reduced to 0% on the post-course survey. Moderate comfort level increased from 15% to 50% and extreme comfort increased from 0% to 8%. From the 11 residents who completed the pre- and post-test exam, 82% (n = 9) significantly improved their score through the curriculum (pre-test: 40.9 vs. post-test: 61.8; p = 0.05). With focused instruction, residents are able to learn ultrasound-guided thyroid biopsy with improvement in subjective confidence level and objective measures. Resident feedback was positive and emphasized the importance of such training in surgical residency curriculum. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  15. Renal Function Interferes with Copeptin in Prediction of Major Adverse Cardiac Events in Patients Undergoing Vascular Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahlmann, Bianca; Meinders, Antje; Larmann, Jan; Wilhelmi, Mathias; Aper, Thomas; Rustum, Saad; Lichtinghagen, Ralf; Theilmeier, Gregor; Teebken, Omke E.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Precise perioperative risk stratification is important in vascular surgery patients who are at high risk for major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE) peri- and postoperatively. In clinical practice, the patient’s perioperative risk is predicted by various indicators, e.g. revised cardiac index (RCRI) or modifications thereof. Patients suffering from chronic kidney disease (CKD) are stratified into a higher risk category. We hypothesized that Copeptin as a novel biomarker for hemodynamic stress could help to improve the prediction of perioperative cardiovascular events in patients undergoing vascular surgery including patients with chronic kidney disease. Methods 477 consecutive patients undergoing abdominal aortic, peripheral arterial or carotid surgery from June 2007 to October 2012 were prospectively enrolled. Primary endpoint was 30-day postoperative major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE). Results 41 patients reached the primary endpoint, including 63.4% aortic, 26.8% carotid, and 9.8% peripheral surgeries. Linear regression analysis showed that RCRI (PCopeptin (PCopeptin level change (P= .001) were associated with perioperative MACE, but CKD remained independently associated with MACE and Copeptin levels. Multivariate regression showed that increased Copeptin levels added risk predictive information to the RCRI (P= .003). Especially in the intermediate RCRI categories was Copeptin significantly associated with the occurrence of MACE. (PCopeptin was significantly associated with CKD stages (PCopeptin measurements could not predict MACE in patients with more severe CKD stages. Conclusion Preoperative Copeptin loses its risk predictive potential for perioperative MACE in patients with chronic kidney disease undergoing vascular surgery. PMID:25875814

  16. Male Sex Associated with Increased Long-term Cardiovascular Mortality after Peripheral Vascular Surgery for Atherosclerosis Despite Optimal Medical Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budtz-Lilly, J W; Petersen, C N; Pedersen, T F; Eldrup, N

    2015-12-01

    The cardiovascular burden and consequences of peripheral atherosclerosis appear to differ between men and women. Data regarding long-term outcomes, including the impact of medical prophylactic treatment, are insufficient. This study examined long-term outcomes according to sex following primary vascular surgery, adjusted for multiple variables as well as recommended medical prophylaxis. All Danish patients who underwent peripheral vascular surgery from January 2000 to December 2007 were stratified into five procedural groups: (a) aorto-iliac bypass or thromboendarterectomy, (b) femoro-femoral crossover, (c) thromboendarterectomy of the femoral arteries, (d) infrainguinal bypass, or (e) axillo- uni-, and bifemoral bypass. Data were analyzed according to sex for differences in myocardial infarction, stroke, and death, individually and combined, after surgery. A total of 11,234 patients were included: 6,289 males and 4,945 females. The overall adjusted hazard ratio for male patients compared with female patients for death was 1.11 (95% CI 1.06-1.17), for MI was 1.16 (95% CI 1.04-1.29), for stroke was 0.99 (95% CI 0.89-1.11), and for any major adverse cardiovascular event was 1.10 (95% CI 1.05-1.16). These findings show that, despite indication, severity, and concomitant medical treatment of peripheral artery disease, men have a higher risk of mortality and adverse cardiovascular events following surgery for peripheral arterial disease. Copyright © 2015 European Society for Vascular Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Do Plastic Surgery Programs with Integrated Residencies or Subspecialty Fellowships Have Increased Academic Productivity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duquette, Stephen P.; Valsangkar, Nakul P.; Sood, Rajiv; Socas, Juan; Zimmers, Teresa A.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of different surgical training pathways on the academic performance of plastic surgical divisions. Methods: Eighty-two academic parameters for 338 plastic surgeons (PS), 1737 general surgeons (GS), and 1689 specialist surgeons (SS) from the top 55 National Institutes of Health (NIH)-funded academic departments of surgery were examined using data gathered from websites, SCOPUS, and NIH Research Portfolio Online Reporting Tools. Results: The median size of a PS division was 7 faculty members. PS faculty had lower median publications (P)/citations (C) (ie, P/C) than GS and SS (PS: 25/328, GS: 35/607, and SS: 40/713, P < 0.05). Publication and citation differences were observed at all ranks: assistant professor (PS: 11/101, GS: 13/169, and SS: 19/249), associate professor (PS: 33/342, GS: 40/691, and SS: 44/780), and professor (PS: 57/968, GS: 97/2451, and SS: 101/2376). PS had a lower percentage of faculty with current/former NIH funding (PS: 13.5%, GS: 22.8%, and SS: 25.1%, P < 0.05). Academic productivity for PS faculty was improved in integrated programs. P/C for PS faculty from divisions with traditional 3-year fellowships was 19/153, integrated 6-year residency was 25/329, and both traditional and 6-year programs were 27/344, P < 0.05. Craniofacial and hand fellowships increased productivity within the integrated residency programs. P/C for programs with a craniofacial fellowship were 32/364 and for those that additionally had a hand fellowship were 45/536. PS faculty at divisions with integrated training programs also had a higher frequency of NIH funding. Conclusions: PS divisions vary in degree of academic productivity. Dramatically improved scholarly output is observed with integrated residency training programs and advanced specialty fellowships. PMID:27014543

  18. Career and Professional Satisfaction of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Residents, Academic Surgeons, and Private Practitioners: Does Gender Matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marti, Kyriaki C; Lanzon, Jesse; Edwards, Sean P; Inglehart, Marita R

    2017-01-01

    The aims of this study were to determine whether male vs. female oral and maxillofacial surgery (OMS) residents, academic surgeons (i.e., faculty members), and private practitioners in the U.S. differed in their general career satisfaction and job/professional satisfaction. Survey data were collected in 2011-12 from 267 OMS residents (response rate 55%), 271 OMS academic surgeons (response rate 31%), and 417 OMS private practitioners (response rates 13% web-based survey and 29% postal mail survey). The results showed that while the male vs. female OMS private practitioners and academic surgeons did not differ in their career satisfaction, the female residents had a lower career satisfaction than the male residents (on four-point scale with 4=most satisfied: 3.03 vs. 3.65; pmaxillofacial surgeon, were less satisfied with their career, and were more likely to consider a career change in the next five years than the male residents. While these male and female oral and maxillofacial surgeons in private practice and academia did not differ in their career and job satisfaction, the male and female residents differed significantly, with female residents reporting a significantly poorer career and job satisfaction than male residents. Future research needs to explore ways to improve career and professional satisfaction of female OMS residents.

  19. Gender-specific 30-day outcomes after carotid endarterectomy and carotid artery stenting in the Society for Vascular Surgery Vascular Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jim, Jeffrey; Dillavou, Ellen D; Upchurch, Gilbert R; Osborne, Nicholas H; Kenwood, Christopher T; Siami, Flora S; White, Rodney A; Ricotta, Joseph J

    2014-03-01

    Although the optimal treatment of carotid stenosis remains unclear, available data suggest that women have higher risk of adverse events after carotid revascularization. We used data from the Society for Vascular Surgery Vascular Registry to determine the effect of gender on outcomes after carotid endarterectomy (CEA) and carotid artery stenting (CAS). There were 9865 patients (40.6% women) who underwent CEA (n = 6492) and CAS (n = 3373). The primary end point was a composite of death, stroke, and myocardial infarction at 30 days. There was no difference in age and ethnicity between genders, but men were more likely to be symptomatic (41.6% vs 38.6%; P gender, there were no statistically significant differences in the primary end point for CEA (women, 4.07%; men, 4.06%) or CAS (women, 6.69%; men, 6.80%). There remains no difference after stratification by symptomatology and multivariate risk adjustment. In this large, real-world analysis, women and men demonstrated similar results after CEA or CAS. These data suggest that, contrary to previous reports, women do not have a higher risk of adverse events after carotid revascularization. Copyright © 2014 Society for Vascular Surgery. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Dedicated Research Time During Surgery Residency Leads to a Significant Decline In Self-Assessed Clinical Aptitude and Surgical Skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grova, Monica M; Yang, Anthony D; Humphries, Misty D; Galante, Joseph M; Salcedo, Edgardo S

    The surgical community commonly perceives a decline in surgical and patient care skills among residents who take dedicated time away from clinical activity to engage in research. We hypothesize that residents perceive a decline in their skills because of dedicated research time. UC Davis Medical Center, Sacramento, CA, an institutional tertiary care center. General surgery residents and graduates from UC Davis general surgery residency training program, who had completed at least 1 year of research during their training. A total of 35 people were asked to complete the survey, and 19 people submitted a completed survey. Participants were invited to complete an online survey. Factors associated with the decline in skills following their research years were examined. All statistical analyses were performed with IBM SPSS Statistics software. A total of 19 current or former general surgery residents responded to the survey (54% response rate). Overall, 42% described their research as "basic science." Thirteen residents (68%) dedicated 1 year to research, while the remainder spent 2 or more years. Basic science researchers were significantly more likely to report a decrease in clinical judgment (75% vs. 22%, p = 0.013) as well as a decrease in patient care skills (63% vs. 0%, p = 0.002). Residents who dedicated at least 2 years to research were more likely to perceive a decline in overall aptitude and surgical skills (100% vs. 46%, p = 0.02), and a decline in patient care skills (67% vs. 8%, p = 0.007). Most residents who dedicate time for research perceive a decline in their overall clinical aptitude and surgical skills. This can have a dramatic effect on the confidence of these residents in caring for patients and leading a care team once they re-enter clinical training. Residents who engaged in 2 or more years of research were significantly more likely to perceive these problems. Further research should determine how to keep residents who are interested in academics

  1. Presence of anesthesia resident trainees in day surgery unit has mixed effects on operating room efficiency measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urman, Richard D; Sarin, Pankaj; Mitani, Aya; Philip, Beverly; Eappen, Sunil

    2012-01-01

    Three competing goals at academic medical centers are to increase efficiency, to optimize clinical care, and to train residents. The goal of this project was to compare day surgery operating room (OR) efficiency measures for anesthesiologists working alone, working with residents, and working with certified nurse anesthetists in a tertiary multisubspecialty teaching hospital to determine if trainees significantly impact OR efficiency. We retrospectively evaluated operating room times data for 2,427 day surgery cases, comparing first case on-time starts, anesthesia-controlled times, induction times, emergence times, and turnover times for the 3 anesthesiologist groups. Compared to the solo anesthesiologist group, anesthesiologists working with residents had significantly longer induction, emergence, and total anesthesia-controlled times (20.2 ± 8.0 vs 18.4 ± 7.0 minutes). However, the anesthesiologists working with residents had more on-time starts (65% vs 53%) and lower turnover times 47.3 ± 13.6 vs 50.8 ± 14.5 minutes) than the solo anesthesiologist group. The pairing of anesthesiology residents with anesthesia staff has mixed effects on OR efficiency measures in a day surgery unit.

  2. Self-reported attitudes and behaviors of general surgery residents about ethical academic practices in test taking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grignol, Valerie P; Gans, Alyssa; Booth, Branyan A; Markert, Ronald; Termuhlen, Paula M

    2010-08-01

    A correlation exists between people who engage in academic dishonesty as students and unethical behaviors later as professionals. Academic dishonesty has been assessed among medical students, but not among general surgery residents. We sought to describe the attitudes of general surgery residents with regard to ethical practices in test taking. A survey with 4 scenarios describing activities related to examination taking that may or may not be considered unethical was administered. Participants were asked about participation in the activities-either personally or any knowledge of others-and whether the activities were unethical. Fifty-seven of 62 residents (92%) participated. For each scenario, >70% indicated that neither they nor anyone else they knew had participated in the activities. Behaviors deemed unethical included memorizing or using memorized questions to prepare for future tests (52%), selling questions for financial gain (90%), and purchasing previously used questions (57%). No difference in attitudes was seen among incoming interns, junior-level (postgraduate year [PGY]1-3), or senior-level (PGY4-6) residents. Overall, general surgery residents indicated that they had not participated in activities they felt to be unethical. Defining what is unethical was less clear. This represents an area for further education. Copyright 2010 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. The registration of surgical site infections: a comparison of two different methods in vascular surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donker, Jeroen M W; Kluytmans, Jan A J W; Veen, Eelco J; Ho, Gwan H; Hendriks, Yvonne J A M; van der Laan, Lijckle

    2013-08-01

    Registration of complications of treatment is an important instrument for measuring the quality of health care. Reliable registration depends on definitions, the case-finding method that is used, and the registration method itself. We conducted a comparative study of two different methods of registration for the surveillance of surgical site infections (SSIs) in a single hospital. The study included all patients in both the surgical database and the microbiology and infection-prevention database of the hospital who underwent surgery on the abdominal aorta or peripheral vascular procedures from March 1, 2009 to March 1, 2010. The surgical database included positive scores for SSI in cases of positive wound swabs, the need for incision drainage, or the need for antibiotic treatment. The microbiology and infection-prevention database used criteria from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), and based positive scores on redness, heat, swelling, or pain in the area of a surgical incision within 30 d after a procedure, and on a positive swab, drainage from an incision, or the presence of pus following a diagnostic puncture. The surgical complication database included 218 patients, of whom 20 (9.2%) had a SSI. The microbiology and infection-prevention database included 236 patients, of whom 33 (14%) had a SSI. The databases were merged and all infections were ascertained by an expert team. The surgical database had a sensitivity of 57% for SSIs, whereas the microbiology and infection-prevention database had a sensitivity of 93% (pcare.

  4. Bacterial antigen induced release of soluble vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and VEGFR1 before and after surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendsen, Mads N; Lykke, J; Werther, Kim

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The influence of surgery on release of soluble vascular endothelial growth factor (sVEGF) and the soluble inhibitory receptor (sVEGFR1) is unknown. The effect of major and minor surgery on variations in sVEGF and sVEGFR1 concentrations in vivo was studied, and on bacterial antigen...... concentrations in plasma changed during surgery. In vitro stimulation of blood samples with bacteria-derived antigens resulted in a significant increase in sVEGF (p Bacterial antigen-induced release of sVEGF correlated...... significantly with neutrophil cell counts (0.53 Bacterial antigen-induced sVEGFR1 release did not correlate with cell counts. CONCLUSIONS: Plasma sVEGF and sVEGFR1 concentrations did not change during surgery. In vitro bacterial stimulation led to increased release of sVEGF, which...

  5. Comparison of pediatric appendectomy outcomes between pediatric surgeons and general surgery residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizrahi, Ido; Mazeh, Haggi; Levy, Yair; Karavani, Gilad; Ghanem, Muhammad; Armon, Yaron; Vromen, Amos; Eid, Ahmed; Udassin, Raphael

    2013-04-01

    Appendectomy is the most common urgent procedure in children, and surgical outcomes may be affected by the surgeon's experience. This study's aim is to compare appendectomy outcomes performed by pediatric surgeons (PSs) and general surgery residents (GSRs). A retrospective review of all patients younger than 16y treated for appendicitis at two different campuses of the same institution during the years 2008-2009 was performed. Appendectomies were performed by PS in one campus and GSR in the other. Primary end points included postoperative morbidity and hospital length of stay. During the study period, 246 (61%) patients were operated by senior GSR (postgraduate year 5-7) versus 157 (39%) patients by PS. There was no significant difference in patients' characteristics at presentation to the emergency room and the rate of appendeceal perforation (11% versus 15%, P=0.32), and noninfectious appendicitis (5% versus 5% P=0.78) also was similar. Laparoscopic surgery was performed more commonly by GSR (16% versus 9%, P=0.02) with shorter operating time (54±1.5 versus 60±2.1, P=0.01). Interestingly, the emergency room to operating room time was shorter for GSR group (419±14 versus 529±24min, P<0.001). The hospital length of stay was shorter for the GSR group (4.0±0.2 versus 4.5±0.2, P=0.03), and broad-spectrum antibiotics were used less commonly (20% versus 53%, P<0.0001) and so was home antibiotics continuation (13% versus 30%, P<0.0001). Nevertheless, postoperative complication rate was similar (5% versus 7%, P=0.29) and so was the rate of readmissions (2% versus 5%, P=0.52). The results of this study suggest that the presence of a PS does not affect the outcomes of appendectomies. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Comparing resident cataract surgery outcomes under novice versus experienced attending supervision

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Puri S

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Sidharth Puri,1 Amanda E Kiely,2 Jiangxia Wang,3 Alonzo S Woodfield,4 Saras Ramanathan,5 Shameema Sikder21Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, 2Wilmer Eye Institute, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, 3Bloomberg School of Public Health, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD, 4Kaiser Permanente South Sacramento Medical Center, Sacramento, 5San Francisco School of Medicine, University of California, San Francisco, CA, USAPurpose: To determine whether supervision by an attending new to surgical teaching or an experienced attending measurably influences intraoperative complications rates or outcomes in phacoemulsification performed by ophthalmology residents.Setting: Single tertiary hospital.Design: Retrospective cohort study. Methods: Resident-performed phacoemulsification cases supervised by one novice attending (N=189 and experienced attending (N=172 over 1 year were included. Data included: resident year, patient age, sex, preoperative risk factors (4+ dense/white/brunescent cataracts, Flomax, zonular dialysis, pseudoexfoliation, glaucoma risk, post-vitrectomy, intraoperative risk factors (Trypan blue, iris hooks, and intraoperative complications (capsule tears, vitreous loss, zonular dialysis, zonular dehiscence, burns, nuclear fragment loss, Descemet’s tear. Experienced attending data were compared against those of the novice attending.Results: Regarding preoperative risks, experienced attending cases more likely involved 4+ cataract (P=0.005, Flomax (P<0.001, or glaucoma risk (P=0.001. For intraoperative risks, novice attending cases more likely involved Trypan blue (P<0.001. Regarding complications, novice attending cases were associated with vitreous loss (P=0.002 and anterior capsule tears (P<0.001. When comparing total complications, the novice attending was more likely to have both increased number of cases with complications and total complications than the experienced attending. The novice

  7. NOTES: issues and technical details with introduction of NOTES into a small general surgery residency program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavic, Michael S; Mirza, Brian; Horne, Walter; Moskowitz, Jesse B

    2008-01-01

    Natural orifice translumenal endoscopic surgery (NOTES) is a development of recent origin. In 2004, Kalloo et al first described NOTES investigation in an animal model. Since then, several investigators have pursued NOTES study in animal survival and nonsurvival models. Our objectives for this project included studying NOTES intervention in a laboratory environment using large animal (swine) models and learning to do so in a safe, controlled manner. Ultimately, we intend to introduce NOTES methodology into our surgical residency training program. The expertise of an experienced laparoscopic surgeon, fellowship-trained laparoendoscopic surgeon, and veterinarian along with a senior surgical resident was utilized to bring the input of several disciplines to this study. The Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee (IACUC) of Northeastern Ohio Universities College of Medicine and Pharmacy (NEOUCOM/COP) approved this study. A series of 5 laboratory sessions using mixed breed farm swine varying in weight from 37 kg to 43.1 kg was planned for the initial phase of NOTES introduction into our residency program. Animals were not kept alive in this investigation. All animals were anesthetized using a standard swine protocol and euthanized following guidelines issued by the American Veterinary Medical Association Panel on Euthanasia. Equipment included a Fujinon EVE endoscope 0.8 cm in diameter with a suction/irrigation channel and one working channel. Initially, a US Endoscopy gastric overtube, 19.5 mm OD and 50 cm in length, was used to facilitate passage of the endoscope. However, this device was found to have insufficient length. Subsequently, commercially available 5/8" diameter clear plastic tubing, 70 cm to 80 cm in length, was adapted for use as an overtube. Standard endoscopic instruments included Boston Scientific biopsy forceps, needle-knife, papillotome, endoscopic clip applier, and Valley Lab electrosurgical unit. A Karl Storz laparoscope and tower were used for

  8. Effects of weight loss after bariatric surgery for morbid obesity on vascular endothelial growth factor-A, adipocytokines, and insulin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García de la Torre, Nuria; Rubio, Miguel A; Bordiú, Elena; Cabrerizo, Lucio; Aparicio, Eugenio; Hernández, Carmen; Sánchez-Pernaute, Andrés; Díez-Valladares, Luis; Torres, Antonio J; Puente, Montserrat; Charro, Aniceto L

    2008-11-01

    Adipocytes regulate blood vessel formation, and in turn endothelial cells promote preadipocyte differentiation through the expression of proangiogenic factors, such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-A. Some adipocytokines and hormones also have an effect on vascular development. Our objectives were to analyze the relationship between weight and circulating VEGF-A in morbidly obese subjects before and after bariatric surgery, and investigate the relationship between circulating VEGF-A and certain adipocytokines and hormones regulating adipocytes. A total of 45 morbidly obese women and nine lean females were included in the study. Patients underwent bariatric surgery: vertical banded gastroplasty (n=17), gastric bypass (n=17), and biliopancreatic diversion (n=11). Serum samples for VEGF-A, adiponectin, leptin, ghrelin, and insulin were obtained preoperatively and 9-12 months after surgery. Obese patients showed significantly higher VEGF-A levels than controls (306.3+/-170.3 vs. 187.6+/-91.9 pg/ml; P=0.04), decreasing to 246.1+/-160.4 after surgery (Pghrelin (r=-0.85; PGhrelin was higher in controls than obese patients, decreasing after gastric bypass and biliopancreatic diversion, but not after vertical banded gastroplasty. Serum VEGF-A levels are significantly higher in obese patients than in lean controls, decreasing after weight loss with bariatric surgery, behaving similarly to other hormones related to adipose mass like leptin and insulin.

  9. Vascular Endothelial-Targeted Therapy Combined with Cytotoxic Chemotherapy Induces Inflammatory Intratumoral Infiltrates and Inhibits Tumor Relapses after Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brendan F. Judy

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Surgery is the most effective therapy for cancer in the United States, but disease still recurs in more than 40% of patients within 5 years after resection. Chemotherapy is given postoperatively to prevent relapses; however, this approach has had marginal success. After surgery, recurrent tumors depend on rapid neovascular proliferation to deliver nutrients and oxygen. Phosphatidylserine (PS is exposed on the vascular endothelial cells in the tumor microenvironment but is notably absent on blood vessels in normal tissues. Thus, PS is an attractive target for cancer therapy after surgery. Syngeneic mice bearing TC1 lung cancer tumors were treated with mch1N11 (a novel mouse chimeric monoclonal antibody that targets PS, cisplatin (cis, or combination after surgery. Tumor relapses and disease progression were decreased 90% by combination therapy compared with a 50% response rate for cis alone (P = .02. Mice receiving postoperative mch1N11 had no wound-related complications or added systemic toxicity in comparison to control animals. Mechanistic studies demonstrated that the effects of mch1N11 were associated with a dense infiltration of inflammatory cells, particularly granulocytes. This strategy was independent of the adaptive immune system. Together, these data suggest that vascular-targeted strategies directed against exposed PS may be a powerful adjunct to postoperative chemotherapy in preventing relapses after cancer surgery.

  10. Objective assessment in residency-based training for transoral robotic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curry, Martin; Malpani, Anand; Li, Ryan; Tantillo, Thomas; Jog, Amod; Blanco, Ray; Ha, Patrick K; Califano, Joseph; Kumar, Rajesh; Richmon, Jeremy

    2012-10-01

    To develop a robotic surgery training regimen integrating objective skill assessment for otolaryngology and head and neck surgery trainees consisting of training modules of increasing complexity leading up to procedure-specific training. In particular, we investigated applications of such a training approach for surgical extirpation of oropharyngeal tumors via a transoral approach using the da Vinci robotic system. Prospective blinded data collection and objective evaluation (Objective Structured Assessment of Technical Skills [OSATS]) of three distinct phases using the da Vinci robotic surgical system in an academic university medical engineering/computer science laboratory setting. Between September 2010 and July 2011, eight otolaryngology-head and neck surgery residents and four staff experts from an academic hospital participated in three distinct phases of robotic surgery training involving 1) robotic platform operational skills, 2) set up of the patient side system, and 3) a complete ex vivo surgical extirpation of an oropharyngeal tumor located in the base of tongue. Trainees performed multiple (four) approximately equally spaced training sessions in each stage of the training. In addition to trainees, baseline performance data were obtained for the experts. Each surgical stage was documented with motion and event data captured from the application programming interfaces of the da Vinci system, as well as separate video cameras as appropriate. All data were assessed using automated skill measures of task efficiency and correlated with structured assessment (OSATS and similar Likert scale) from three experts to assess expert and trainee differences and compute automated and expert assessed learning curves. Our data show that such training results in an improved didactic robotic knowledge base and improved clinical efficiency with respect to the set up and console manipulation. Experts (e.g., average OSATS, 25; standard deviation [SD], 3.1; module 1, suturing

  11. Can teenage novel users perform as well as General Surgery residents upon initial exposure to a robotic surgical system simulator?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, A; Patel, S; Robison, W; Senkowski, T; Allen, J; Shaw, E; Senkowski, C

    2017-06-05

    New techniques in minimally invasive and robotic surgical platforms require staged curricula to insure proficiency. Scant literature exists as to how much simulation should play a role in training those who have skills in advanced surgical technology. The abilities of novel users may help discriminate if surgically experienced users should start at a higher simulation level or if the tasks are too rudimentary. The study's purpose is to explore the ability of General Surgery residents to gain proficiency on the dVSS as compared to novel users. The hypothesis is that Surgery residents will have increased proficiency in skills acquisition as compared to naive users. Six General Surgery residents at a single institution were compared with six teenagers using metrics measured by the dVSS. Participants were given two 1-h sessions to achieve an MScoreTM in the 90th percentile on each of the five simulations. MScoreTM software compiles a variety of metrics including total time, number of attempts, and high score. Statistical analysis was run using Student's t test. Significance was set at p value Surgery residents took significantly less Total Time to complete Pegboard 1 (PB1) (p = 0.043). No significant difference was evident between the two groups in the other four simulations across the same MScoreTM metrics. A focused look at the energy dissection task revealed that overall score might not be discriminant enough. Our findings indicate that prior medical knowledge or surgical experience does not significantly impact one's ability to acquire new skills on the dVSS. It is recommended that residency-training programs begin to include exposure to robotic technology.

  12. Statins decrease perioperative cardiac complications in patients undergoing noncardiac vascular surgery: the Statins for Risk Reduction in Surgery (StaRRS) study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neil-Callahan, Kristin; Katsimaglis, George; Tepper, Micah R; Ryan, Jason; Mosby, Carla; Ioannidis, John P A; Danias, Peter G

    2005-02-01

    We sought to assess whether statins may decrease cardiac complications in patients undergoing noncardiac vascular surgery. Cardiovascular complications account for considerable morbidity in patients undergoing noncardiac surgery. Statins decrease cardiac morbidity and mortality in patients with coronary disease, and the beneficial treatment effect is seen early, before any measurable increase in coronary artery diameter. A retrospective study recorded patient characteristics, past medical history, and admission medications on all patients undergoing carotid endarterectomy, aortic surgery, or lower extremity revascularization over a two-year period (January 1999 to December 2000) at a tertiary referral center. Recorded perioperative complication outcomes included death, myocardial infarction, ischemia, congestive heart failure, and ventricular tachyarrhythmias occurring during the index hospitalization. Univariate and multivariate logistic regressions identified predictors of perioperative cardiac complications and medications that might confer a protective effect. Complications occurred in 157 of 1,163 eligible hospitalizations and were significantly fewer in patients receiving statins (9.9%) than in those not receiving statins (16.5%, p = 0.001). The difference was mostly accounted by myocardial ischemia and congestive heart failure. After adjusting for other significant predictors of perioperative complications (age, gender, type of surgery, emergent surgery, left ventricular dysfunction, and diabetes mellitus), statins still conferred a highly significant protective effect (odds ratio 0.52, p = 0.001). The protective effect was similar across diverse patient subgroups and persisted after accounting for the likelihood of patients to have hypercholesterolemia by considering their propensity to use statins. Use of statins was highly protective against perioperative cardiac complications in patients undergoing vascular surgery in this retrospective study.

  13. Renal function interferes with copeptin in prediction of major adverse cardiac events in patients undergoing vascular surgery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Schrimpf

    Full Text Available Precise perioperative risk stratification is important in vascular surgery patients who are at high risk for major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE peri- and postoperatively. In clinical practice, the patient's perioperative risk is predicted by various indicators, e.g. revised cardiac index (RCRI or modifications thereof. Patients suffering from chronic kidney disease (CKD are stratified into a higher risk category. We hypothesized that Copeptin as a novel biomarker for hemodynamic stress could help to improve the prediction of perioperative cardiovascular events in patients undergoing vascular surgery including patients with chronic kidney disease.477 consecutive patients undergoing abdominal aortic, peripheral arterial or carotid surgery from June 2007 to October 2012 were prospectively enrolled. Primary endpoint was 30-day postoperative major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE.41 patients reached the primary endpoint, including 63.4% aortic, 26.8% carotid, and 9.8% peripheral surgeries. Linear regression analysis showed that RCRI (P< .001, pre- (P< .001, postoperative Copeptin (P< .001 and Copeptin level change (P= .001 were associated with perioperative MACE, but CKD remained independently associated with MACE and Copeptin levels. Multivariate regression showed that increased Copeptin levels added risk predictive information to the RCRI (P= .003. Especially in the intermediate RCRI categories was Copeptin significantly associated with the occurrence of MACE. (P< .05 Kruskal Wallis test. Subdivision of the study cohort into CKD stages revealed that preoperative Copeptin was significantly associated with CKD stages (P< .0001 and preoperative Copeptin measurements could not predict MACE in patients with more severe CKD stages.Preoperative Copeptin loses its risk predictive potential for perioperative MACE in patients with chronic kidney disease undergoing vascular surgery.

  14. Assessment of Surgery Residents' Interpersonal Communication Skills: Validation Evidence for the Communication Assessment Tool in a Simulation Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trickey, Amber W; Newcomb, Anna B; Porrey, Melissa; Wright, Jeffrey; Bayless, Jordan; Piscitani, Franco; Graling, Paula; Dort, Jonathan

    Although development of trainees' competency in interpersonal communication is essential to high-quality patient-centered surgical care, nontechnical skills present assessment challenges for residency program directors. The Communication Assessment Tool (CAT) demonstrated internal reliability and content validity for general surgery residents, though the tool has not yet been applied in simulation. The study provides validation evidence for using the CAT to assess surgical residents' interpersonal communication skills in simulation scenarios. Simulations of delivering bad news were completed by 21 general surgery residents during a mandatory communication curriculum. Upon completion of the 10-minute scenario, standardized participants (SPs) assessed performance using the 14-item CAT rating scale and individually provided feedback to residents. Discrete communication behaviors were recorded on video review by a trained blinded observer. The traits emotional intelligence questionnaire short form (TEIQue-SF) was completed by the residents 6 months later. SP-CAT ratings are evaluated with respect to learner characteristics, observed behaviors, and TEIQue results. Surgical simulation center in a 900-bed tertiary care hospital. General surgery residents were targeted learners. Trauma survivors network volunteers served as SPs, acting as a family member of a patient who developed an intracerebral hemorrhage following a small bowel procedure. Discrete communication behaviors were reliably assessed by the observer (interrater reliability with trainer: 89% agreement, κ = 0.77). SP-CAT ratings ranged from 34 to 61. Higher SP-CAT ratings were correlated with positive communication behaviors (Spearman ρ = 0.42, p = 0.056). Total TEIQue was positively related to SP-CAT ratings (ρ = 0.42, p = 0.061). The TEIQue emotionality factor was strongly correlated with SP-CAT ratings (ρ = 0.52, p = 0.016). The CAT demonstrates content validity in a simulation environment with former

  15. Fondaparinux for intra and perioperative anticoagulation in patients with heparin-induced thrombocytopenia candidates for peripheral vascular surgery: Report of 4 cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giulio Illuminati, MD

    2016-01-01

    Conclusions: These preliminary results seem to justify the off-label use of fondaparinux for intra and perioperative anticoagulation in patients with HIT, candidates for peripheral vascular surgery interventions.

  16. Using GoPro to Give Video-Assisted Operative Feedback for Surgery Residents: A Feasibility and Utility Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Maureen D; Abelson, Jonathan S; O'Mahoney, Paul; Bagautdinov, Iskander; Yeo, Heather; Watkins, Anthony C

    2017-08-21

    As an adjunct to simulation-based teaching, laparoscopic video-based surgical coaching has been an effective tool to augment surgical education. However, the wide use of video review in open surgery has been limited primarily due to technological and logistical challenges. The aims of our study were to (1) evaluate perceptions of general surgery (GS) residents on video-assisted operative instruction and (2) conduct a pilot study using a head-mounted GoPro in conjunction with the operative performance rating system to assess feasibility of providing video review to enhance operative feedback during open procedures. GS residents were anonymously surveyed to evaluate their perceptions of oral and written operative feedback and use of video-based operative resources. We then conducted a pilot study of 10 GS residents to assess the utility and feasibility of using a GoPro to record resident performance of an arteriovenous fistula creation with an attending surgeon. Categorical variables were analyzed using the chi-square test. Academic, tertiary medical center. GS residents and faculty. A total of 59 GS residents were anonymously surveyed (response rate = 65.5%). A total of 40% (n = 24) of residents reported that structured evaluations rarely or never provided meaningful feedback. When feedback was received, 55% (n = 32) residents reported that it was only rarely or sometimes in regard to their operative skills. There was no significant difference in surveyed responses among junior postgraduate year (PGY 1-2), senior (PGY 3-4), or chief residents (PGY-5). A total of 80% (n = 8) of residents found the use of GoPro video review very or extremely useful for education; they also deemed video review more useful for operative feedback than written or communicative feedback. An overwhelming majority (90%, n = 9) felt that video review would lead to improved technical skills, wanted to review the video with the attending surgeon for further feedback, and desired expansion of

  17. Emergency Endoscopy and the Importance of Endoscopy Training in General Surgery Residency: A Survey-Based Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yıldız, İhsan; Koca, Yavuz Savaş; Bülbül, Mustafa Tevfik; Musri, Özgür Cem

    2017-10-31

    BACKGROUND Emergency endoscopy is a life-saving technique of great significance. The aim of our study was to draw attention to endoscopy training activities of general surgeons and their opinions on this issue. MATERIAL AND METHODS We asked general surgery specialists where they received their general surgery training, the institution where they currently worked, how many years they had been practicing, if they had endoscopy training during or after residency, if a gastroenterologist was available in their hospital, and whether they used endoscopy. We also asked some questions, including 'Should general surgeons perform emergency or elective endoscopy?', 'Is endoscopy training required in general surgery', and 'What is your opinion regarding this issue?', and we assessed the answers. RESULTS Of the 138 general surgeons undertaking surveys, 63% of participants received their general surgery training in university hospitals and 37% in training and research hospitals. The duration of practicing as a general surgeon was 5 years for 23.9%, 5-15 years for 38.4%, 15-20 years for 20.3%, and over 20 years for 17.4% of participants. The rate of receiving endoscopy training at residency was 51.4%, 25.4% did not have endoscopy training, and 23.2% had postgraduate training. All participants replied affirmatively to the question 'Should general surgeons perform emergency or elective endoscopy?'. CONCLUSIONS Although endoscopy has been widely used recently, gastroenterologists are not available in every hospital. Consequently, it is evident that endoscopy should be part of general surgery training.

  18. Efficacy of a hyperglycemia treatment program in a Vascular Surgery Department supervised by Endocrinology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caimari, Francisca; González, Cintia; Ramos, Analía; Chico, Ana; Cubero, José M; Pérez, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the strategy and efficacy of a hyperglycemia treatment program supervised by Endocrinology. All patients with type 2 diabetes hospitalized at the vascular surgery department over a 12 month period were retrospectively reviewed. Clinical characteristics and hyperglycemia treatment during hospitalization, at discharge and 2-6 month after discharge were collected. Glycemic control was assessed using capillary blood glucose profiles and HbA1c at admission and 2-6 months post-discharge. A total of 140 hospitalizations of 123 patients were included. The protocol to choose the insulin regimen was applied in 96.4% of patients (22.8% correction dose, 23.6% basal-correction dose and 50% basal-bolus-correction dose [BBC]). Patients with BBC had higher HbA1c (7.7±1.5% vs. 6.7 ±0.8%; P<.001) and mean glycemia on the first day of hospitalization (184.4±59.2 vs. 140.5±31.4mg/dl; P<.001). Mean blood glucose was reduced to 162.1±41.8mg/dl in the middle and 160.8±43.3mg/dl in the last 24h of hospitalization in patients with BBC (P=.007), but did not change in the remaining patients. In 22.1% patients with treatment changes performed at discharge, HbA1c decreased from 8.2±1.6 to 6.8±1.6% at 2-6 months post-discharge (P=.019). The hyperglycemia treatment protocol applied by an endocrinologist in the hospital, allows the identification of the appropriate therapy and the improvement of the glycemic control during hospitalization and discharge, supporting its efficacy in clinical practice. Copyright © 2014 AEC. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  19. General versus vascular surgeon: impact of a vascular fellowship on clinical practice, surgical case load, and lifestyle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franz, Randall W

    2010-02-01

    An applicant shortage for vascular surgery (VS) residencies exists despite an increase in available training positions created to meet the growing demands for vascular surgeons. After 3 years of practice as an American Board of Surgery (ABS)-certified/board-eligible general surgeon, the author of this study attended an accredited 1-year VS training fellowship and received an ABS certificate of Added Qualifications in VS. The purpose of this review was to investigate the implications completing a vascular fellowship has had on VS procedure patterns, vascular procedure competency, clinical practice, career, and lifestyle with the aim of attracting trainees to the field of VS. The author's operative logs were reviewed retrospectively to summarize vascular procedures performed before and after the vascular fellowship. Statistical analysis was performed comparing the types and volume of vascular procedures before and after the vascular fellowship. Changes in professional career and personal life also were examined. The author performed 401 vascular procedures during 2.8 years as a general surgeon. In the first 3.4 years after the vascular fellowship, vascular procedure volume increased to 1563. The mean number of vascular procedures performed per year increased from 143.2 as a general surgeon to 459.7 as a vascular surgeon. The three major differences in vascular procedures occurring after the vascular fellowship were (1) a threefold increase in the number of vascular procedures performed, (2) a shift from major open to venous and endovascular procedures, and (3) an increase in case complexity. Specializing in VS also has resulted in increased career opportunities, more career satisfaction, a direct financial benefit, and more flexibility for lifestyle and family. Because of these positive changes, the author encourages medical students and residents interested in VS to explore the specialty early, seek vascular surgeons to serve as mentors, and enter one of the new VS

  20. Faculty and resident perspectives on ambulatory care education: A collective case study of family medicine, psychiatry, and surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veinot, Paula; Lin, William; Woods, Nicole; Ng, Stella

    2017-01-01

    Background Ambulatory care (AC) experiences within medical education are garnering increasing attention. We sought to understand how faculty and residents’ describe their experiences of AC and ambulatory care education (ACEduc) within, between, and across disciplinary contexts. Methods We designed a Stakian collective case study, applying constructivist grounded theory analytic methods. Using purposive and snowball sampling, we interviewed 17 faculty and residents across three instrumental cases: family medicine, psychiatry, surgery. Through constant comparative analysis, we identified patterns within, between, and across cases. Results Family medicine and psychiatry saw AC as an inherent part of continuous, longitudinal care; surgery equated AC with episodic experiences in clinic, differentiating it from operating. Across cases, faculty and residents cautiously valued ACEduc, and in particular, considered it important to develop non-medical expert competencies (e.g., communication). However, surgery residents described AC and ACEduc as less interesting and a lower priority than operating. Educational structures mediated these views. Conclusion Differences between cases highlight a need for further study, as universal assumptions about ACEduc’s purposes and approaches may need to be tempered by situated, contextually-rich perspectives. How disciplinary culture, program structure, and systemic structure influence ACEduc warrant further consideration as does the educational potential for explicitly framing learners’ perspectives. PMID:29098047

  1. Surgery resident participation in short-term humanitarian international surgical missions can supplement exposure where program case volumes are low.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bale, Asha G; Sifri, Ziad C

    2016-01-01

    General surgery training programs face declining case volume and diversity. We wanted to determine if resident participation in international surgical missions would increase exposure to cases underrepresented in our program case mix. Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education program data from 2008 to 2011 (University of Medicine and Dentistry-New Jersey Medical School, Newark, NJ) were analyzed to identify categories where volume was below national average. This was compared with case logs from 3 missions conducted by International Surgical Health Initiatives between 2011 and 2012. All chief residents completed more than minimum required index cases. Categories head and neck, alimentary tract, abdomen, and endocrine showed percentile below national average. Seven residents participated in 3 missions to Philippines and Sierra Leone. Sixty-five percent of the operations performed were in the 4 low-volume categories. International surgery missions expose residents to a high volume and variety of cases. Participation can be one way to increase case volume and diversity during training. Cases completed on missions with board certified surgeons should be considered for Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education credit. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. What are the decision-making preferences of patients in vascular surgery? A mixed-methods study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santema, T B Katrien; Stoffer, E Anniek; Kunneman, Marleen; Koelemay, Mark J W; Ubbink, Dirk T

    2017-02-10

    Shared decision-making (SDM) has been advocated as the preferred method of choosing a suitable treatment option. However, patient involvement in treatment decision-making is not yet common practice in the field of vascular surgery. The aim of this mixed-methods study was to explore patients' decision-making preferences and to investigate which facilitators and barriers patients perceive as important for the application of SDM in vascular surgery. Patients were invited to participate after visiting the vascular surgical outpatient clinic of an Academic Medical Center in the Netherlands. A treatment decision was made during the consultation for an abdominal aortic aneurysm or peripheral arterial occlusive disease. Patients filled in a number of questionnaires (quantitative part) and a random subgroup of patients participated in an in-depth interview (qualitative part). A total of 67 patients participated in this study. 58 per cent of them (n=39) indicated that they preferred a shared role in decision-making. In more than half of the patients (55%; n=37) their preferred role was in disagreement with what they had experienced. 31 per cent of the patients (n=21) preferred a more active role in the decision-making process than they had experienced. Patients indicated a good patient-doctor relationship as an important facilitator for the application of SDM. The vast majority of vascular surgical patients preferred, but did not experience a shared role in the decision-making process, although the concept of SDM was insufficiently clear to some patients. This emphasises the importance of explaining the concept of SDM and implementing it in the clinical encounter. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  3. Effect of Endovascular Interventions on General Surgery Trainee Operative Experience; a Comparison of Case Log Reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, Rose C; Li, Yiping; Chang, Jason S; Lew, Wesley K; Patel, Kaushal Kevin

    2016-05-01

    Vascular surgery fellowship training has evolved with the widespread adoption of endovascular interventions. The purpose of this study is to examine how general surgery trainee exposure to vascular surgery has changed over time. Review of the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education national case log reports for graduating Vascular Surgery Fellows (VF), and general surgery residents (GSR) from 2001 to 2012 was performed. The number of GSR increased from 1021 to 1098, and the number of VF increased from 96 to 121 from 2001 to 2012. The total number of vascular cases done by VF increased by 1161 since 2001 (298-762), whereas the total number of vascular cases done by GSR has decreased by 40% during this time period (186-116). Vascular fellows increase was due primarily to an increase in endovascular experience; a finding not noted in general surgery residents. Vascular fellow case log changes are due primarily to an increase in endovascular experience that has not been mirrored by general surgery trainees. Open surgery experience has decreased overall for general surgery residents in all major categories, a change not seen in vascular surgery fellows. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Patients experiences of negative pressure wound therapy at home for the treatment of deep perivascular groin infection after vascular surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monsen, Christina; Acosta, Stefan; Kumlien, Christine

    2017-05-01

    To explore experiences of negative pressure wound therapy at home, in patients with deep perivascular groin infection after vascular surgery and management in daily life. Deep surgical site infection after vascular surgery with exposed vessels often requires long-term treatment with negative pressure wound therapy, and continued therapy at home has become routine. An explorative qualitative study. Nine men and six women with a deep surgical site infection in the groin after vascular surgery, treated in their home with negative pressure wound therapy, were interviewed. The interviews were analysed using manifest and latent content analysis. Undergoing negative pressure wound therapy at home meant a transition from being a dependent patient to a person who must have self-care competence and be involved in their own care. A need to feel prepared for this before discharge from hospital was expressed. Lack of information and feelings of uncertainty prolonged the time before feeling confident in managing the treatment. The informants gradually accepted the need to be tied up to a machine, became competent in its management and found solutions to perform everyday tasks. Overall, it was a relief to be treated at home. Several benefits of negative pressure wound therapy at home were expressed. However, unnecessary stress and anxiety were experienced due to a lack of information on the treatment and instruction concerning the equipment. Adequate information and education must therefore be provided to facilitate the transition from a patient to a person with self-care competence and ability to manage this treatment at home. The findings revealed a need for more support and knowledge in their transition from hospital care to home care with negative pressure wound therapy. Routines must be established that ensure patient safety and security in treatment at home. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Incidence of new cardiovascular events in patients with and without peripheral arterial disease seen in a vascular surgery clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chhabra, Amit; Aronow, Wilbert S; Ahn, Chul; Duncan, Kurt; Patel, Jay D; Papolos, Alexander I; Sateesh, Babu

    2012-03-01

    To investigate the incidence of death and of new cardiovascular events at long-term follow-up of patients with and without PAD seen in a vascular surgery clinic. We investigated the incidence of death, new stroke/transient ischemic attack, new myocardial infarction, new coronary revascularization, new carotid endarterectomy, new peripheral arterial disease (PAD) revascularization, or at least one of the above outcomes at long-term follow-up of patients with and without PAD followed in a vascular surgery clinic. At least one of the above outcomes occurred in 259 of 414 patients (63%) with PAD at 33-month follow-up and in 21 of 89 patients (24%) without PAD at 48-month follow-up (pPAD and in 10 of 89 patients (11%) without PAD (p=0.002). Stepwise Cox regression analysis for the time to at least one of the 6 outcomes showed that significant independent risk factors were men (hazard ratio =1.394; 95% CI, 1.072-1.813; p=0.013), estimated glomerular filtration rate (hazard ratio =0.992; 95% CI, 0.987-0.997; p=0.003), and PAD (hazard ratio =3.520; 95% CI, 2.196-5.641; ptime to death showed that significant independent risk factors were age (hazard ratio =1.024; 95% CI, 1.000-1.049; p=0.048), estimated glomerular filtration rate (hazard ratio =0.985; 95% CI, 0.974-0.996; p=0.007), and PAD (hazard ratio =2.157; 95% CI, 1.118-4.160; p=0.022). Patients with PAD have a significantly higher incidence of cardiovascular outcomes, especially death, new PAD revascularization, and new carotid endarterectomy, than patients without PAD followed in a vascular surgery clinic.

  6. The Effect of Two Different Hand Exercises on Grip Strength, Forearm Circumference, and Vascular Maturation in Patients Who Underwent Arteriovenous Fistula Surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Kong, Sangwon; Lee, Kyung Soo; Kim, Junho; Jang, Seong Ho

    2014-01-01

    Objective To compare the effect of two different hand exercises on hand strength and vascular maturation in patients who underwent arteriovenous fistula surgery. Methods We recruited 18 patients who had chronic kidney disease and had undergone arteriovenous fistula surgery for hemodialysis. After the surgery, 10 subjects performed hand-squeezing exercise with GD Grip, and other 8 subjects used Soft Ball. The subjects continued the exercises for 4 weeks. The hand grip strength, pinch strength ...

  7. Orthopedic surgery fellowships: the effects of interviewing and how residents establish a rank list.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niesen, Matthew C; Wong, Jeffrey; Ebramzadeh, Edward; Sangiorgio, Sophia; SooHoo, Nelson Fong; Luck, James V; Eckardt, Jeffrey

    2015-03-01

    The Orthopaedic Fellowship Match was established in 2008 to streamline and improve the process of matching residents and fellowships. The purpose of this study was to quantify the factors that affect the application process and to determine how residents establish a rank list. The Orthopaedic Fellowship Match has improved the ability of residents and programs to consider their options more carefully and to focus on finding the best match. However, this process introduces new factors for all parties involved to consider. The costs of the interview process and time away from service for residents may be larger than anticipated. Ultimately, residents value operative experience and staff members at a fellowship more than all other factors when selecting a fellowship. Copyright 2015, SLACK Incorporated.

  8. How Admission to a Vascular Surgery Department Improves Medical Treatment in Patients with Lower Extremity Peripheral Arterial Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiney, Martina; Della Schiava, Nellie; Feugier, Patrick; Lermusiaux, Patrick; Ninet, Jacques; Millon, Antoine; Long, Anne

    2017-04-01

    All patients with lower extremity peripheral arterial disease (LE-PAD) should benefit from recommended pharmacologic therapies including antiplatelet agents, angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors, or angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs), and hydroxy-methyl-glutaryl-coenzyme A reductase inhibitors (statins). In the present study, this triple therapy was defined as the best medical treatment. This study was designed to determine the number of patients who received best medical treatment at admission and at discharge from a vascular surgery department. We also examined the number of patients who received adapted medical treatment and every pharmacologic class separately. Finally, we investigated whether there were differences in prescribing rates according to patient characteristics and cardiovascular history, clinical grade of LE-PAD, and the type of surgery practiced. This study is a retrospective chart analysis of 140 consecutive patients admitted to the vascular surgery department of our university hospital, between January 1, 2013, and June 30, 2013. To be included, patients required a vascular surgery for peripheral arterial disease with atherosclerosis. Data from guideline-recommended classes of medications (antiplatelet agents, ACE, ARBs, and statins) at the time of admission and discharge were collected and compared. Best medical treatment was prescribed in 44% patients before hospital admission and in 50% at discharge (P = 0.10). Before hospital admission, 84% of patients had antiplatelet therapy compared with 96% at discharge (P = 0.0004); 73% had a statin, compared with 83% at discharge (P = 0.001); 64% had an ACE inhibitor or ARB, compared with 63% at the time of discharge (P = 1).The proportion of patients receiving best medical treatment at admission and discharge increased in case of coronary artery disease (P = 0.004). There was no difference in prescriptions of best medical treatment and best or adapted treatments at admission and

  9. Senior general surgery residents can be trained to perform focused assessment with sonography for trauma patients accurately.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Sheng-Der; Chen, Cheng-Jueng; Chan, De-Chuan; Yu, Jyh-Cherng

    2017-12-01

    Researchers studying trauma have found that physicians are able to perform a focused assessment with sonography for trauma (FAST) with minimal training and achieve ideal accuracy. However, there are currently no consensus or standard guidelines regarding the performance of this assessment. The aim of our study was to clarify the value of FAST performed by well-qualified senior general surgery residents in cases of suspected blunt abdominal trauma, which presents an important diagnostic problem in emergency departments. This was a retrospective study in the emergency department (ED) of our hospital performed from January 2011 to September 2013. Patients were included if they (1) had undergone a FAST examination performed by qualified residents and (2) had received subsequent formal radiographic or surgical evaluations. The results were compared against subsequent surgical findings or formal Department of Radiology reference standards. Among the 438 patients enrolled, false-negative results were obtained in 8 and false-positive results in 5. Only one patient was missed and required laparotomy to repair a small intestine perforation. The sensitivity and specificity were 87 and 99%, respectively; the accuracy was 97%. Senior general surgery residents can be trained to perform accurate FAST examinations on trauma patients.

  10. Editor's Choice - Delays to Surgery and Procedural Risks Following Carotid Endarterectomy in the UK National Vascular Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loftus, I M; Paraskevas, K I; Johal, A; Waton, S; Heikkila, K; Naylor, A R; Cromwell, D A

    2016-10-01

    Guidelines recommend that patients suffering an ischaemic transient ischaemic attack (TIA) or stroke caused by carotid artery stenosis should undergo carotid endarterectomy (CEA) within 14 days. The degree to which UK vascular units met this standard was examined and whether rapid interventions were associated with procedural risks. The study analysed patients undergoing CEA between January 2009 and December 2014 from 100 UK NHS hospitals. Data were collected on patient characteristics, intervals of time from symptoms to surgery, and 30-day postoperative outcomes. The relationship between outcomes and time from symptom to surgery was evaluated using multilevel multivariable logistic regression. In 23,235 patients, the median time from TIA/stroke to CEA decreased over time, from 22 days (IQR 10-56) in 2009 to 12 days (IQR 7-26) in 2014. The proportion of patients treated within 14 days increased from 37% to 58%. This improvement was produced by shorter times across the care pathway: symptoms to referral, from medical review to being seen by a vascular surgeon, and then to surgery. The spread of the median time from symptom to surgery among NHS hospitals shrank between 2009 and 2013 but then grew slightly. Low-, medium-, and high-volume NHS hospitals all improved their performance similarly. Performing CEA within 48 h of symptom onset was associated with a small increase in the 30-day stroke and death rate: 3.1% (0-2 days) compared with 2.0% (3-7 days); adjusted odds ratio 1.64 (95% CI 1.04-2.59) but not with longer delays. The delay from symptom to CEA in symptomatic patients with ipsilateral 50-99% carotid stenoses has reduced substantially, although 42% of patients underwent CEA after the recommended 14 days. The risk of stroke after CEA was low, but there may be a small increase in risk during the first 48 h after symptoms. Copyright © 2016 European Society for Vascular Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Release of soluble vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-1 (sFlt-1 during coronary artery bypass surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orsel Isabelle

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study was conducted to follow plasma concentrations of sFlt-1 and sKDR, two soluble forms of the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF receptor in patients undergoing coronary artery bypass graft (CABG surgery with extracorporeal circulation (ECC. Methods Plasma samples were obtained before, during and after surgery in 15 patients scheduled to undergo CABG. Levels of sFlt-1 and KDR levels were investigated using specific ELISA. Results A 75-fold increase of sFlt-1 was found during cardiac surgery, sFlt-1 levels returning to pre-operative values at the 6th post-operative hour. In contrast sKDR levels did not change during surgery. The ECC-derived sFlt-1 was functional as judge by its inhibitory effect on the VEGF mitogenic response in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs. Kinetic experiments revealed sFlt-1 release immediately after the beginning of ECC suggesting a proteolysis of its membrane form (mFlt-1 rather than an elevated transcription/translation process. Flow cytometry analysis highlighted no effect of ECC on the shedding of mFlt-1 on platelets and leukocytes suggesting vascular endothelial cell as a putative cell source for the ECC-derived sFlt-1. Conclusion sFlt-1 is released during CABG with ECC. It might be suggested that sFlt-1 production, by neutralizing VEGF and/or by inactivating membrane-bound Flt-1 and KDR receptors, might play a role in the occurrence of post-CABG complication.

  12. Cleft Lip Standardized Patient Examinations: The Role in Plastic Surgery Resident Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Eric J; Khosla, Rohit K; Howell, Lori; Luan, Anna; Lee, Gordon K

    2016-11-01

      Our institution has incorporated the use of objective structured clinical examinations (OSCE) in our residency curriculum. The OSCE provides trainee education and evaluation while addressing the six Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) core competencies required within training programs. We report our program's experience with the first cleft OSCE ever conducted.   A validated method for administration of OSCEs currently used at our medical school was utilized for residents in postgraduate years (PGYs) 3 through 6. The video-recorded patient encounter involved a 1-month-old newborn with a unilateral cleft lip and palate and used standardized patient actors as parents. A post-encounter written exam assessed medical knowledge. A questionnaire regarding the utility of the exercise was administered to residents after the OSCE. Results were evaluated using analysis of variance (P < .05).   There was a positive correlation with increasing level of training in terms of medical knowledge (P < .04). Residents in PGY-3 and PGY-4 demonstrated lower understanding of the surgical markings and details of the lip repair compared with those in PGY-5 and PGY-6 (P < .03). All residents performed similarly on evaluation of the remaining ACGME core competencies. All residents agreed that this was a realistic and useful encounter.   Results of our cleft OSCE demonstrate that medical knowledge regarding the evaluation, management, and surgical repair of patients is less in midlevel residents. All residents expressed an interest in earlier exposure to pediatric patients in the training period. Although a cleft OSCE does not replace clinical rotations, it is a valuable adjunct to training and evaluation of trainees, particularly for junior residents.

  13. Impact of integrated programs on general surgery operative volume.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Amanda R; Nickel, Brianne L; Dolejs, Scott C; Canal, David F; Torbeck, Laura; Choi, Jennifer N

    2017-03-01

    Integrated residencies are now commonplace, co-existing with categorical general surgery residencies. The purpose of this study was to define the impact of integrated programs on categorical general surgery operative volume. Case logs from categorical general, integrated plastics, vascular, and thoracic surgery residents from a single institution from 2008 to 2016 were collected and analyzed. Integrated residents have increased the number of cases they perform that would have previously been general surgery resident cases from 11 in 2009-2010 to 1392 in 2015-2016. Despite this, there was no detrimental effect on total major cases of graduating chief residents. Multiple integrated programs can co-exist with a general surgery program through careful collaboration and thoughtful consideration to longitudinal needs of individual trainees. As additional programs continue to be created, both integrated and categorical program directors must continue to collaborate to insure the integrity of training for all residents. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. "I've never asked one question." Understanding the barriers among orthopedic surgery residents to screening female patients for intimate partner violence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gotlib Conn, Lesley; Young, Aynsely; Rotstein, Ori D; Schemitsch, Emil

    2014-12-01

    Intimate partner violence (IPV) is a global public health problem. Orthopedic surgery residents may identify IPV among injured patients treated in fracture clinics. Yet, these residents face a number of barriers to recognizing and discussing IPV with patients. We sought to explore orthopedic surgery residents' knowledge of IPV and their preparedness to screen patients for IPV in academic fracture clinic settings with a view to developing targeted IPV education and training. We conducted focus groups with junior and intermediate residents. Discussions explored residents' knowledge of and experiences with IPV screening and preparedness for screening and responding to IPV among orthopedic patients. Data were analyzed iteratively using an inductive approach. Residents were aware of the issue of abuse generally, but had received no specific information or training on IPV in orthopedics. Residents did not see orthopedics faculty screen patients for IPV or advocate for screening. They did not view IPV screening or intervention as part of the orthopedic surgeon's role. Residents' clinical experiences emphasized time management and surgical intervention by effectively "getting through clinic" and "dealing with the surgical problem." Communication with patients about other health issues was minimal or nonexistent. Orthopedic surgery residents are entering a career path where IPV is well documented. They encounter cultural and structural barriers preventing the incorporation of IPV screening into their clinical and educational experiences. Hospitals and academic programs must collaborate in efforts to build capacity for sustainable IPV screening programs among these trainees.

  15. Letters of recommendation to an otolaryngology/head and neck surgery residency program: their function and the role of gender.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messner, Anna H; Shimahara, Erika

    2008-08-01

    To ascertain common features and gender differences in letters of recommendation (LORs) for applicants to an otolaryngology/head and neck surgery (OHNS) residency program. Retrospective review. Seven hundred sixty-three LORs submitted to one OHNS residency program in 2006 were reviewed. All 763 letters "recommended" the applicant for OHNS residency. Ninety-one percent of letters were written by men, 68.4% by male otolaryngologists (OTOs), 4.2% by female OTOs, and 33% by OHNS department chairs or division chiefs (100% men). A comparison of female and male letter writers revealed five categories with significant differences: female letter writers were more likely to call an applicant a "team player" (P = .000), "compassionate," (P = .001) and use strings of adjectives (P = .024). In contrast, they were less likely when compared with male letter writers, to mention an applicant's personal life (P = .003), or write "letters of minimal assurance" (P = .035). Evaluation of the letters by applicant gender revealed two findings: letter writers were more likely to use a gender term in letters for male applicants (P = .004), and male letter writers were more likely to make reference to a female candidate's physical appearance (P = .040). LORs for OHNS residency universally advocate for the applicant. The letters are written predominately by the highest-ranking male OTOs in academic medicine. In the LORs, male and female applicants are described similarly. Male and female letter writers, however, often describe applicants in different ways regardless of applicant gender.

  16. Learning styles of medical students, general surgery residents, and general surgeons: implications for surgical education

    OpenAIRE

    de Gara Chris; Engels Paul T

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Surgical education is evolving under the dual pressures of an enlarging body of knowledge required during residency and mounting work-hour restrictions. Changes in surgical residency training need to be based on available educational models and research to ensure successful training of surgeons. Experiential learning theory, developed by David Kolb, demonstrates the importance of individual learning styles in improving learning. This study helps elucidate the way in which ...

  17. Effect of statin withdrawal on frequency of cardiac events after vascular surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schouten, Olaf; Hoeks, Sanne E.; Welten, Gijs M. J. M.; Davignon, Jean; Kastelein, John J. P.; Vidakovic, Radosav; Feringa, Harm H. H.; Dunkelgrun, Martin; van Domburg, Ron T.; Bax, Jeroen J.; Poldermans, Don

    2007-01-01

    The discontinuation of statin therapy in patients with acute coronary syndromes has been associated with an increase of adverse coronary events. Patients who undergo major surgery frequently are not able to take oral medication shortly after surgery. Because there is no intravenous formula for

  18. Utility of melatonin to treat surgical stress after major vascular surgery - a safety study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kücükakin, Bülent; Lykkesfeldt, Jens; Nielsen, Hans Jørgen

    2008-01-01

    Surgery for abdominal aortic aneurysm is associated with elevated oxidative stress. As an antioxidant in animal and human studies, melatonin has the potential of ameliorating some of this oxidative stress, but melatonin has never been administered to adults during surgery for the purpose of reduc...

  19. Utility of melatonin to treat surgical stress after major vascular surgery--a safety study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kücükakin, Bülent; Lykkesfeldt, Jens; Nielsen, Hans Jørgen

    2008-01-01

    Surgery for abdominal aortic aneurysm is associated with elevated oxidative stress. As an antioxidant in animal and human studies, melatonin has the potential of ameliorating some of this oxidative stress, but melatonin has never been administered to adults during surgery for the purpose of reduc...

  20. Psychometric characteristics of the 360° feedback scales in professionalism and interpersonal and communication skills assessment of surgery residents in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yuhong; Zhang, Xiangsu; Chang, Qing; Sun, Baozhi

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the study was to test the psychometric characteristics of the 360° evaluation instrument for assessing residents' competency in professionalism, interpersonal and communication skills, and develop a feasible, valid, and reliable multisource feedback (MSF) program for surgery residents to address this gap. We carried out an MSF assessment of 149 surgery residents at 19 hospitals all over China. MSF assessment includes 6 surveys with 21, 21, 21, 26, 14, and 15 items and these surveys were developed to assess surgery residents by attending doctor, resident self, peer, nurse, patient, and office staff, respectively, using a 5-point agreement scale with an "unable-to-evaluate" category. Reliability was assessed by Cronbach alpha. Exploratory factor analysis was used to assess validity and determine which items grouped together into scales. A total of 2384 questionnaires were analyzed in this study. The internal consistency reliability of the instruments was a Cronbach alpha of 0.932, 0.936, 0.914, 0.916, 0.939, and 0.903 for attending doctor, resident self, nurse, patient, resident peer, and office staff surveys, respectively. On the attending, resident self, resident peer, nurse, office staff, and patient surveys, the factor analysis identified 2 factors of professionalism and interpersonal and communication skills accounting for 75.62%, 74.81%, 72.65%, 73.38%, 76.11%, and 63.89% of the variance, respectively. Some items, such as Demonstrates respect for my "Sexual Orientation," "Religion," and "Disability," in different surveys had high unable-to-evaluate rates (more than 10%). The data suggest that these instruments developed to assess surgery residents are feasible to administer and provide valid and reliable evidence. Some items in survey need to be adjusted keeping in mind the Chinese culture. Copyright © 2013 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. All rights reserved.

  1. Therapeutic efficacy of vacuum-assisted-closure therapy in the treatment of lymphatic complications following peripheral vascular interventions and surgeries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydin, Ufuk; Gorur, Alper; Findik, Orhan; Yildirim, Abdullah; Kocogullari, Cevdet Ugur

    2015-02-01

    Lymphatic complications, lymphocele and lymphorrhea being the leading, are generally encountered after vascular interventions and surgeries. The present study aimed to evaluate the outcomes of vacuum-assisted-closure (VAC) therapy, which we frequently prefer as the first-choice treatment for such complications. Among patients undergoing peripheral vascular intervention or surgery between January 2008 and February 2012, the medical files of 21 patients who received VAC therapy or other treatment due to symptomatic lymphatic complications were retrospectively analyzed and the results were discussed. Group I consisted of 10 patients (three with lymphocele and seven with lymphorrhea) who underwent VAC therapy as the first-choice treatment, Group II consisted of 11 patients of which 7 patients received various therapies before VAC therapy and 4 patients received other treatments alone. The patients who received VAC therapy as the primary therapy demonstrated more rapid wound healing, early drainage control, and shorter hospital stay. The mean hospital medical cost was €1038 (range, €739-1826) for the patients who primarily underwent VAC therapy; it was calculated to be €2137 (range, €1610-3130) for the other patients (p=0.001). In addition to its safety and good clinical outcomes, VAC therapy also has economic advantages and should be the primary method for the treatment of lymphatic complications. © The Author(s) 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  2. A comparison of the quality of the information available on the internet on interventional radiology, vascular surgery, and cardiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsafi, A; Kaya, G; Patel, H; Hamady, M S

    2013-01-01

    Internet use is rapidly expanding and increasingly plays a substantial role in patient education. We sought to evaluate and compare the quality of information available to patients online on three closely linked specialties: Interventional radiology (IR), cardiology, and vascular surgery. We searched the leading three search engines for the terms: "Interventional Radiology", "cardiology," and "vascular surgery," collating the top 50 hits from each search. After excluding duplicates and irrelevant sites, 43, 25, and 36 sites remained, respectively. Sites were analyzed using the LIDA instrument (an online tool for assessing health-related websites) and Fleisch Reading Ease Scores (FRES) were compared across the different search terms and correlated with the country of origin and certification by the Health on the Net (HON) Foundation. There was no significant difference ( P>0.05) in the total LIDA, accessibility, usability or reliability scores between the three specialties. HONCode certification was associated with higher LIDA (83.1±1.6 vs. 71.53±0.8 ( Pinformation, there is a disparity in knowledge of IR; this may be due to low web-traffic figures of IR sites. Wikipedia's user-generated content, ranks highly in major search engines, as such; this could serve as means of disseminating reliable health information to patients.

  3. Thirty-day readmission and mortality among Medicare beneficiaries discharged to skilled nursing facilities after vascular surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes-Taylor, Sara; Berg, Stephen; Gunter, Rebecca; Bennett, Kyla; Smith, Maureen A; Rathouz, Paul J; Greenberg, Caprice C; Kent, K Craig

    2018-01-01

    Readmission within 30 d of an acute hospital stay is frequent, costly, and increasingly subject to penalties. Early readmission is most common after vascular surgery; these patients are often discharged to skilled nursing facilities (SNFs), making postacute care an essential partner in reducing readmissions. We characterize 30-day readmissions among vascular surgery patients discharged to SNF to provide evidence for this understudied segment of readmission after specialty surgery. We utilize the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services Chronic Conditions Warehouse, a longitudinal 5% national random sample of Medicare beneficiaries to study 30-day readmission or death after discharge to SNF following abdominal aortic aneurysm repair or lower extremity revascularization from 2005-2009. Descriptive statistics and logistic regression with Least Adaptive Shrinkage and Selection Operator were used for analysis. Two thousand one hundred ninety-seven patients underwent an abdominal aortic aneurysm procedure or lower extremity revascularization at 686 hospitals and discharged to 1714 SNFs. Eight hundred (36%) were readmitted or had died at 30 d. In adjusted analysis, predictors of readmission or death at 30 d included SNF for-profit status (OR [odds ratio] = 1.2; P = 0.032), number of hospitalizations in the previous year (OR = 1.06; P = 0.011), number of comorbidities (OR = 1.06; P = 0.004), emergent procedure (OR = 1.69; P < 0.001), renal complication (OR = 1.38; P = 0.003), respiratory complication (OR = 1.45; P < 0.001), thromboembolic complication (OR = 1.57; P = 0.019), and wound complication (OR = 0.70; P = 0.017). Patients discharged to SNF following vascular surgery have exceptionally high rates of readmission or death at 30 d. Many factors predicting readmission or death potentially modify decision-making around discharge, making early detection, discharge planning, and matching patient needs to SNF capabilities essential to

  4. Emergency Endoscopy and the Importance of Endoscopy Training in General Surgery Residency: A Survey-Based Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yıldız, İhsan; Koca, Yavuz Savaş; Bülbül, Mustafa Tevfik; Musri, Özgür Cem

    2017-01-01

    Background Emergency endoscopy is a life-saving technique of great significance. The aim of our study was to draw attention to endoscopy training activities of general surgeons and their opinions on this issue. Material/Methods We asked general surgery specialists where they received their general surgery training, the institution where they currently worked, how many years they had been practicing, if they had endoscopy training during or after residency, if a gastroenterologist was available in their hospital, and whether they used endoscopy. We also asked some questions, including ‘Should general surgeons perform emergency or elective endoscopy?’, ‘Is endoscopy training required in general surgery’, and ‘What is your opinion regarding this issue?’, and we assessed the answers. Results Of the 138 general surgeons undertaking surveys, 63% of participants received their general surgery training in university hospitals and 37% in training and research hospitals. The duration of practicing as a general surgeon was 5 years for 23.9%, 5–15 years for 38.4%, 15–20 years for 20.3%, and over 20 years for 17.4% of participants. The rate of receiving endoscopy training at residency was 51.4%, 25.4% did not have endoscopy training, and 23.2% had postgraduate training. All participants replied affirmatively to the question ‘Should general surgeons perform emergency or elective endoscopy?’. Conclusions Although endoscopy has been widely used recently, gastroenterologists are not available in every hospital. Consequently, it is evident that endoscopy should be part of general surgery training. PMID:29084936

  5. Improving the quality of operative reports for transurethral resection of bladder tumor surgery in resident education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haddad, Joseph; Anderson, Christopher; Heinlen, Jonathan; Stratton, Kelly; Mellis, Adamantios; Herr, Harry; Cookson, Michael; Patel, Sanjay

    2017-10-01

    To assess the quality of resident dictations for transurethral resection of bladder tumor (TURBT). One indicator of surgical quality is the completeness of the operative report. Surprisingly, there is a paucity of standardized operative templates for TURBT and little formalized instruction for learners. The quality of TURBT dictations was assessed and areas of improvement were determined after implementation of a 10 item TURBT checklist. A retrospective review of the last 50 TURBT operative reports dictated by residents was performed. A 'TURBT checklist' was used assessing 10 key factors in documentation. A formal training session regarding TURBT dictations was given with TURBT checklists handed out to each trainee. Fifty TURBT dictations were subsequently analyzed. TURBT dictations improved across the board following checklist implementation. Total number of checklist items dictated increased to 7.0 from 2.6 prior (p improved across different resident years (p improved in every checklist item (p improved in almost every category but only two reached statistical significance. A regression model demonstrated checklist implantation to be a significant predictor of improvement in mean number of checklist items dictated independent of PGY level. Our study demonstrates that prior to implementation, TURBT operative dictations performed by residents lacked many of the critical components required for a quality TURBT. However, once properly instructed, a relatively simple 'checklist' can be easily implemented and serve as a teaching tool for residents in training to ensure critical procedural elements are documented.

  6. Predictive model for 5-year mortality after breast cancer surgery in Taiwan residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Su-Hsin; Loh, Joon-Khim; Tsai, Jinn-Tsong; Houg, Ming-Feng; Shi, Hon-Yi

    2017-02-27

    Few studies of breast cancer surgery outcomes have used longitudinal data for more than 2 years. This study aimed to validate the use of the artificial neural network (ANN) model to predict the 5-year mortality of breast cancer patients after surgery and compare predictive accuracy between the ANN model, multiple logistic regression (MLR) model, and Cox regression model. This study compared the MLR, Cox, and ANN models based on clinical data of 3632 breast cancer patients who underwent surgery between 1996 and 2010. An estimation dataset was used to train the model, and a validation dataset was used to evaluate model performance. The sensitivity analysis was also used to assess the relative significance of input variables in the prediction model. The ANN model significantly outperformed the MLR and Cox models in predicting 5-year mortality, with higher overall performance indices. The results indicated that the 5-year postoperative mortality of breast cancer patients was significantly associated with age, Charlson comorbidity index (CCI), chemotherapy, radiotherapy, hormone therapy, and breast cancer surgery volumes of hospital and surgeon (all P < 0.05). Breast cancer surgery volume of surgeon was the most influential (sensitive) variable affecting 5-year mortality, followed by breast cancer surgery volume of hospital, age, and CCI. Compared with the conventional MLR and Cox models, the ANN model was more accurate in predicting 5-year mortality of breast cancer patients who underwent surgery. The mortality predictors identified in this study can also be used to educate candidates for breast cancer surgery with respect to the course of recovery and health outcomes.

  7. Reoperations after first lumbar disc herniation surgery; a special interest on residives during a 5-year follow-up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kautiainen Hannu

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The overall rate of operations after recurrent lumbar disc herniation has been shown to be 3–11%. However, little is known about the rate of residives. Thus the aim of this study was to explore the cumulative rates of re-operations and especially residive disc herniations at the same side and level as the primary disc herniation after first lumbar disc herniation surgery and the factors that influence the risk of re-operations over a five year follow-up study. Methods 166 virgin lumbar disc herniation patients (mean age 42 years, 57% males were studied. Data on patients' initial disc operations and type and timing of re-operations during the follow-up were collected from patient files. Back and leg pain on visual analog scale and employment status were collected by questionnaires. Results The cumulative rate of re-operations for lumbar disc herniation was 10.2% (95% Cl 6.0 to 15.1. The rate of residives at initial site was 7.4% (95% Cl 3.7 to 11.3 and rate of lumbar disc herniations at other sites was 3.1% (95% Cl 0.6 to 6.2. The occurrence of residive lumbar disc herniations was evenly distributed across the 5 years. Neither age, gender, preoperative symptoms, physical activity nor employment had effect on the probability of re-operation. Conclusion Seven percent of the lumbar disc patients had a residive lumbar disc operation within five years of their first operation. No specific factors influencing the risk for re-operation were found.

  8. Teaching the surgical craft: Surgery residents perception of the operating theater educational environment in a tertiary institution in Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulrasheed Ibrahim

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The transformation of a surgical trainee into a surgeon is strongly influenced by the quality of teaching in the operating theater. This study investigates the perceptions of residents about the educational environment of the operating theater and identifies variables that may improve the operating theater education of our trainees. Materials and Methods: Residents in the department of surgery anonymously evaluated teaching in the operating room using the operating theater education environment measure. The residents evaluated 33 variables that might have an impact on their surgical skills within the operating theater. The variables were grouped into four subscales; teaching and training, learning opportunities, operating theater atmosphere and workload/supervision/support. Differences between male and female residents and junior and senior registrars were assessed using Mann-Whitney test. Statistical analysis was completed with the statistics package for the social sciences version 17. Results: A total of 33 residents were participated in this study. Twenty nine (88% males and 4 (12% females. 30 (90% were junior registrars. The mean total score was 67.5%. Operating theater atmosphere subscale had the highest score of 79.2% while workload/supervision/support subscale had the least score of 48.3%. There were significant differences between male and female resident′s perception of workload/supervision/support P 0.05. Conclusion: This study has shown a satisfactory teaching environment based on the existing local realities of means, resources and tools and highlighted the need for improvement in workload/supervision/support in our institution. An acceptable learning environment in the operating theatre will produce surgeons that are technically competent to bridge the gap in the enormous unmet need for surgical care in Nigeria.

  9. Postoperative vascular complications in unrecognised Obstructive Sleep apnoea (POSA) study protocol: an observational cohort study in moderate-to-high risk patients undergoing non-cardiac surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Chan, Matthew T. V.; Wang, Chew-Yin; Seet, Edwin; Tam, Stanley; Lai, Hou-Yee; Walker, Stuart; Short, Timothy G; Halliwell, Richard; Chung, Frances

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Emerging epidemiological data suggest that obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) is common in the general surgical population. Unfortunately, the majority of these patients are unrecognised and untreated at the time of surgery. There is substantial biological rationale to indicate that patients with unrecognised OSA are at a higher risk of postoperative vascular events. However, the extent of this morbidity is currently unknown. We have initated the postoperative vascular complications ...

  10. Lead, Follow, or Get out of the Way-How Bold Young Surgeons Brought Vascular Surgery into Clinical Practice from the Korean War Battlefield.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Michael S

    2016-05-01

    The maturation of vascular surgery into widespread clinical practice was accelerated by events that took place in Korea during the conflict of 1950-1953. Early research and anecdotal clinical trials were just then resulting in publication of cases of the successful vascular repairs and replacements. Noncrushing vascular clamps were being developed and limited manufacture begun. The stage was set for a major advance in the treatment of arterial injury, just as war commenced in Korea, which provided a clinical laboratory. When the war on the Korean Peninsula erupted in June 1950, the policy of the Army Medical department was to ligate all arterial injuries unless a simple transverse or end-to-end anastomosis could be performed, and repair was "contrary to policy and orders." Despite pressure and threats of "courts martial for vascular repairs" from the senior military medicine leaders-clinical experiments in arterial repair were carried out at Mobile Army Surgical Hospital facilities at battlefield locations across Korea. The young surgeons, mostly draftees and reservists, resisted rigid doctrine and orders to desist, and in the face of threatened punishment, were committed to do the right thing, and ultimately went on to change military medicine and vascular surgery. The "on-the-job" training in vascular surgery that was carried out in Korea by military surgeons who demonstrated substantially higher limb salvage rates energized the field from the battlefield laboratory. Many wounded soldiers had limbs saved by the new techniques in vascular repair pioneered by surgeons in the Korean War, and countless thousands who entered civilian hospitals for emergency vascular surgery in subsequent years also ultimately benefited from their work. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Informed consent training improves surgery resident performance in simulated encounters with standardized patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Britta M; Sparks, Rhonda A; Seavey, Jonathan; Wallace, Michelle D; Irvan, Jeremy; Raines, Alexander R; McClure, Heather; Nihira, Mikio A; Lees, Jason S

    2015-09-01

    Although informed consent is vital to patient-physician communication, little training is provided to surgical trainees. We hypothesized that highlighting critical aspects of informed consent would improve resident performance. Eighty (out of 88) surgical postgraduate year 1 surgical residents were randomly assigned to one of the 2 cases (laparoscopic cholecystectomy or ventral herniorrhaphy) and instructed to obtain and document informed consent with a standardized patient (SP) followed by a didactic training session. The residents then obtained and documented informed consent with the other case with the other SP. SPs graded encounters ("Checklist"); trained raters graded notes. Repeated measures multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA) was used to determine differences between pre- and post-training and Checklist versus "Note" scores. Statistically significant pre- to post differences for Note (P informed consent. Despite this improvement, significant differences between discussion and documentation persisted. Documentation training is a future area for improvement. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Antibiotic Prophylaxis With Trimethoprim/Sulfamethoxazole Instead of Cloxacillin Fails to Improve Inguinal Surgical Site Infection Rate After Vascular Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasselmann, Julien; Kühme, Tobias; Acosta, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Surgical site infections (SSIs) and their prevention continue to be a major point of focus in all surgical specialties today. Antibiotic prophylaxis is one of the mainstays in their prevention. Due to the consistently high proportion of infections caused by intestinal flora from the start of our wound surveillance registry in 2005, we conducted a change in prophylactic antibiotic therapy from cloxacillin in 2012 to trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole (TMP-SMX) in 2013. The study included all patients undergoing vascular surgery with groin incisions between March 1 and June 30 in 2012 and 2013, respectively, whereby the antibiotic regime was changed in between the 2 sampling periods. The diagnosis of SSI was based on clinical examination and microbiological results. Two hundred nineteen patients with inguinal incisions were included in the analysis: 105 in the cloxacillin group of which 19% had SSI and 114 in the TMP-SMX group with an SSI rate of 18% (P = .77), without differences between the 2 groups regarding age, gender, proportion of emergency surgery, type of surgery, or frequency of concomitant foot ulcers. The high proportion of infections caused by intestinal flora between time periods was unchanged (67% vs 81%, P = .34). There was no difference between the 2 groups, suggesting that the choice of antibiotic prophylaxis had a limited role in preventing SSI at our center. Despite this, the lower cost and ease of the administration of TMP-SMX can be seen as convincing advantages. © The Author(s) 2015.

  13. The importance of complete follow-up for results after femoro-infrapopliteal vascular surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, L P; Nielsen, O M; Schroeder, T V

    1996-01-01

    postoperatively and 100% follow-up was obtained. After completion of the trial we calculated the patency and survival rates using life-table methods and compared the results based on the vascular registry with those achieved in the clinical trial. RESULTS: Comparing the results from the two databases revealed...... to follow-up according to the vascular registry database and the fact that these patients turned out to have a significantly increased rate of graft thrombosis, limb amputation and death, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Life-table statistics may inadvertently become unreliable if a large proportion of patients...... is lost to follow-up, since failure to examine the patient for any reason may be related to the patients health. In addition to the number of patients at risk, it is suggested, that life-table plots should be supplemented with information on the number of patients lost to follow-up....

  14. Reconstruction with vascularized composite tissue in patients with excessive injury following surgery and irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serafin, D.; DeLand, M.; Lesesne, C.B.; Smith, P.J.; Noell, K.T.; Georgiade, N.

    1982-01-01

    The biological effects of a single high dose of radiation are examined. Both cellular injury and repair are reviewed during early, intermediate, and late phases. Anticipated composite tissue morbidity is detailed for therapeutic radiation doses administered to the head and neck, breast and thorax, and perineum. Patients who demonstrated excessive time-dose fractionation values were irradiated with lower x-ray energies. Those in whom there was an overlap of treatment fields presented a serious challenge to the reconstructive surgeon. Judicious selection of well-vascularized composite tissue outside the portals of irradiation, preferably with a long vascular pedicle, facilitated reconstruction. When possible, both donor and recipient vasculature should be outside the irradiated area to ensure uninterrupted blood flow to the transferred or transplanted tissue.

  15. The effect of junior residents on surgical quality: a study of surgical outcomes in breast surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar, Brenda; Sheikh, Fariha; Pockaj, Barbara; Wasif, Nabil; Gray, Richard

    2011-12-01

    Patients are often concerned about the participation of junior trainees in their operative treatment. Breast-conserving therapy (BCT) for nonpalpable breast lesions requires the use of localization devices and carries a significant risk for positive margins of excision. It was therefore hypothesized that the participation of junior residents in BCT operations for nonpalpable breast lesions could result in an increased rate of positive margins of excision. Retrospective analysis of a prospective database of all patients with nonpalpable tumors who underwent BCT from August 1999 to August 2009 was performed. Patient and tumor characteristics and factors involved in resection were analyzed. A ≥2-mm margin of normal breast tissue beyond tumor was considered an adequate margin. Chi-square analysis and Student's t test were performed to determine relationships between independent variables and margin status. Of 308 BCT procedures for nonpalpable tumors, 241 (78%) were performed by attending surgeons and junior residents (group 1) and 67 (22%) by attending surgeons without resident assistance (group 2). The operations for group 1 took significantly longer than the operations for group 2 (mean, 130 vs 116 min, P = .006). Intraoperative reexcision of margins was performed for 37% of group 1 patients and 31% of group 2 patients (P = .249), and reoperation for inadequate margins was performed in 11% of group 1 patients and 13% of group 2 patients (P = .361). Junior resident participation in BCT procedures was not associated with higher rates of inadequate margins of excision. Patients can be reassured that junior resident involvement in their BCT operations is safe and effective. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. An analysis of vascular surgery in elderly patients to determine whether age affects treatment strategy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Brien, G

    2012-03-01

    The incidence of arterial disease increases with age. Increasing life expectancy in the western world will intensify demands on vascular surgeons with regard to increasing caseload, expanding patient selection criteria, and more complex and minimally-invasive treatment options. We analysed our arterial cases over the past 31 years (n = 6,144) and compared our methods of intervention and complication rates in the elderly population (>75) with the younger cohort, in order to determine whether age should influence our management strategies.

  17. Association Between Flexible Duty Hour Policies and General Surgery Resident Examination Performance: A Flexibility in Duty Hour Requirements for Surgical Trainees (FIRST) Trial Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blay, Eddie; Hewitt, D Brock; Chung, Jeanette W; Biester, Thomas; Fiore, James F; Dahlke, Allison R; Quinn, Christopher M; Lewis, Frank R; Bilimoria, Karl Y

    2017-02-01

    Concerns persist about the effect of current duty hour reforms on resident educational outcomes. We investigated whether a flexible, less-restrictive duty hour policy (Flexible Policy) was associated with differential general surgery examination performance compared with current ACGME duty hour policy (Standard Policy). We obtained examination scores on the American Board of Surgery In-Training Examination, Qualifying Examination (written boards), and Certifying Examination (oral boards) for residents in 117 general surgery residency programs that participated in the Flexibility in Duty Hour Requirements for Surgical Trainees (FIRST) Trial. Using bivariate analyses and regression models, we compared resident examination performance across study arms (Flexible Policy vs Standard Policy) for 2015 and 2016, and 1 year of the Qualifying Examination and Certifying Examination. Adjusted analyses accounted for program-level factors, including the stratification variable for randomization. In 2016, FIRST trial participants were 4,363 general surgery residents. Mean American Board of Surgery In-Training Examination scores for residents were not significantly different between study groups (Flexible Policy vs Standard Policy) overall (Flexible Policy: mean [SD] 502.6 [100.9] vs Standard Policy: 502.7 [98.6]; p = 0.98) or for any individual postgraduate year level. There was no difference in pass rates between study arms for either the Qualifying Examination (Flexible Policy: 90.4% vs Standard Policy: 90.5%; p = 0.99) or Certifying Examination (Flexible Policy: 86.3% vs Standard Policy: 88.6%; p = 0.24). Results from adjusted analyses were consistent with these findings. Flexible, less-restrictive duty hour policies were not associated with differences in general surgery resident performance on examinations during the FIRST Trial. However, more years under flexible duty hour policies might be needed to observe an effect. Copyright © 2016 American College of Surgeons

  18. Resident Training in Bariatric Surgery-A National Survey in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ramshorst, Gabrielle H. van; Kaijser, Mirjam A.; Pierie, Jean-Pierre E. N.; van Wagensveld, Bart A.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: Surgical procedures for morbid obesity, including laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (LRYGB), are considered standardized laparoscopic procedures. Our goal was to determine how bariatric surgery is trained in the Netherlands. Materials and Methods: Questionnaires were sent to lead

  19. The benefit of non contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography for predicting vascular access surgery outcome: a computer model perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merkx, Maarten A G; Huberts, Wouter; Bosboom, E Mariëlle H; Bode, Aron S; Bescós, Javier Oliván; Tordoir, Jan H M; Breeuwer, Marcel; van de Vosse, Frans N

    2013-01-01

    Vascular access (VA) surgery, a prerequisite for hemodialysis treatment of end-stage renal-disease (ESRD) patients, is hampered by complication rates, which are frequently related to flow enhancement. To assist in VA surgery planning, a patient-specific computer model for postoperative flow enhancement was developed. The purpose of this study is to assess the benefit of non contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (NCE-MRA) data as patient-specific geometrical input for the model-based prediction of surgery outcome. 25 ESRD patients were included in this study. All patients received a NCE-MRA examination of the upper extremity blood vessels in addition to routine ultrasound (US). Local arterial radii were assessed from NCE-MRA and converted to model input using a linear fit per artery. Venous radii were determined with US. The effect of radius measurement uncertainty on model predictions was accounted for by performing Monte-Carlo simulations. The resulting flow prediction interval of the computer model was compared with the postoperative flow obtained from US. Patients with no overlap between model-based prediction and postoperative measurement were further analyzed to determine whether an increase in geometrical detail improved computer model prediction. Overlap between postoperative flows and model-based predictions was obtained for 71% of patients. Detailed inspection of non-overlapping cases revealed that the geometrical details that could be assessed from NCE-MRA explained most of the differences, and moreover, upon addition of these details in the computer model the flow predictions improved. The results demonstrate clearly that NCE-MRA does provide valuable geometrical information for VA surgery planning. Therefore, it is recommended to use this modality, at least for patients at risk for local or global narrowing of the blood vessels as well as for patients for whom an US-based model prediction would not overlap with surgical choice, as the

  20. How safe is it to train residents to perform off-pump coronary artery bypass surgery?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Tanya A; Asimakopoulos, George

    2015-05-01

    A best evidence topic in cardiac surgery was written according to a structured protocol. The question addressed was, in [patients undergoing off-pump CABG] are [postoperative mortality and morbidity outcomes] acceptable when performed by [trainees]? Altogether more than 597 papers were found using the reported search, of which 8 represented the best evidence to answer the clinical question. Six retrospective cohort studies directly compared the performance of trainees and experienced surgeons in off-pump coronary artery bypass graft surgery. Of the remaining papers, one recorded the performance of trainees in on- and off-pump operations and finally one paper evaluated a single trainee's performance in off-pump coronary artery bypass graft surgery, both supervised and unsupervised, over a 1-year period. It is important to note that the two respective cohort studies included in our analysis compared similar cohorts of patients. However, both studies were included in our paper as they provide additional information regarding trainee performance. The authors, journal, date and country of publication, patient group studied, study type, relevant outcomes and results of these papers are tabulated. Although a heterogeneous range of postoperative complications were recorded in the identified studies, we were able to determine that, overall, there was no significant difference in the 30-day mortality seen in operations performed by trainees or experienced surgeons. The incidence of myocardial infarction and stroke were also similar among cases performed by both groups. However, senior surgeons were more likely to operate on patients with more complex or severe disease, or those requiring more urgent operations. Therefore, it was not possible to directly compare outcomes between trainees and experienced surgeons in operations of similar complexity. However, we conclude that despite the absence of randomized controlled trials comparing the performance of trainees and

  1. Plasma N‐terminal pro‐B‐type natriuretic peptide as long‐term prognostic marker after major vascular surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feringa, Harm H H; Schouten, Olaf; Dunkelgrun, Martin; Bax, Jeroen J; Boersma, Eric; Elhendy, Abdou; de Jonge, Robert; Karagiannis, Stefanos E; Vidakovic, Radosav; Poldermans, Don

    2007-01-01

    Objective To assess the long‐term prognostic value of plasma N‐terminal pro‐B‐type natriuretic peptide (NT‐proBNP) after major vascular surgery. Design A single‐centre prospective cohort study. Patients 335 patients who underwent abdominal aortic aneurysm repair or lower extremity bypass surgery. Interventions Prior to surgery, baseline NT‐proBNP level was measured. Patients were also evaluated for cardiac risk factors according to the Revised Cardiac Risk Index. Dobutamine stress echocardiography (DSE) was performed to detect stress‐induced myocardial ischaemia. Main outcome measures The prognostic value of NT‐proBNP was evaluated for the endpoints all‐cause mortality and major adverse cardiac events (MACE) during long‐term follow‐up. Results In this patient cohort (mean age: 62 years, 76% male), median NT‐proBNP level was 186 ng/l (interquartile range: 65–444 ng/l). During a mean follow‐up of 14 (SD 6) months, 49 patients (15%) died and 50 (15%) experienced a MACE. Using receiver operating characteristic curve analysis for 6‐month mortality and MACE, NT‐proBNP had the greatest area under the curve compared with cardiac risk score and DSE. In addition, an NT‐proBNP level of 319 ng/l was identified as the optimal cut‐off value to predict 6‐month mortality and MACE. After adjustment for age, cardiac risk score, DSE results and cardioprotective medication, NT‐proBNP ⩾319 ng/l was associated with a hazard ratio of 4.0 for all‐cause mortality (95% CI: 1.8 to 8.9) and with a hazard ratio of 10.9 for MACE (95% CI: 4.1 to 27.9). Conclusion Preoperative NT‐proBNP level is a strong predictor of long‐term mortality and major adverse cardiac events after major non‐cardiac vascular surgery. PMID:16914484

  2. Vascular wall-resident CD44+ multipotent stem cells give rise to pericytes and smooth muscle cells and contribute to new vessel maturation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Klein

    Full Text Available Here, we identify CD44(+CD90(+CD73(+CD34(-CD45(- cells within the adult human arterial adventitia with properties of multipotency which were named vascular wall-resident multipotent stem cells (VW-MPSCs. VW-MPSCs exhibit typical mesenchymal stem cell characteristics including cell surface markers in immunostaining and flow cytometric analyses, and differentiation into adipocytes, chondrocytes and osteocytes under culture conditions. Particularly, TGFß1 stimulation up-regulates smooth muscle cell markers in VW-MPSCs. Using fluorescent cell labelling and co-localisation studies we show that VW-MPSCs differentiate to pericytes/smooth muscle cells which cover the wall of newly formed endothelial capillary-like structures in vitro. Co-implantation of EGFP-labelled VW-MPSCs and human umbilical vein endothelial cells into SCID mice subcutaneously via Matrigel results in new vessels formation which were covered by pericyte- or smooth muscle-like cells generated from implanted VW-MPSCs. Our results suggest that VW-MPSCs are of relevance for vascular morphogenesis, repair and self-renewal of vascular wall cells and for local capacity of neovascularization in disease processes.

  3. Application of artificial palpation in vascular surgeries for detection of peripheral arterial stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abouei Mehrizi, A; Moini, M; Afshari, E; Kadkhodapour, J; Sadjadian, A; Najarian, S

    2014-05-01

    Palpation is one of the applied methods that surgeons usually use during surgery in order to verify the health condition of a tissue/organ. In fact, most of surgical assessments are based on analysis of the force feedback received from tissue/organ via palpation. Although palpation has a key role in efficient progress of surgery operations, it depends very much on the experience and skill of the surgeons. This limits the application of this technique in some cases to a large extent. In this regard, an artificial tactile sensing approach is an innovative technology that tries to make tactile data more available for surgeons, especially in situations where doing the palpation is not possible or is too difficult. In this paper, having considered the present problems of artery bypass surgery in peripheral arterial occlusive disease (PAOD), applicability of a new tactile sensory system capable of detecting arterial stenosis during surgery was evaluated. Presenting the modelling and numerical solution of the problem, it was demonstrated that the artificial tactile sensing approach is not only capable of detecting the presence of an arterial stenosis in an artery, but also its type. Furthermore, it was shown that the new tactile sensory system (previously designed, fabricated and tested in laboratory) is efficiently capable of detecting the simulated artery in the simulated biological tissue as well as diagnosis of the stenosis occurred inside it.

  4. Dacron® vs. PTFE as bypass materials in peripheral vascular surgery – systematic review and meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eidt Daniela

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In peripheral vascular bypass surgery different synthetic materials are available for bypass grafting. It is unclear which of the two commonly used materials, polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE or polyester (Dacron® grafts, is to be preferred. Thus, the aim of this meta-analysis and systematic review was to compare the effectiveness of these two prosthetic bypass materials (Dacron® and PTFE. Methods We performed a systematic literature search in MEDLINE, Cochrane-Library – CENTRAL, EMBASE and other databases for relevant publications in English and German published between 1999 and 2008. Only randomized controlled trials were considered for inclusion. We assessed the methodological quality by means of standardized checklists. Primary patency was used as the main endpoint. Random-effect meta-analysis as well as pooling data in life table format was performed to combine study results. Results Nine randomized controlled trials (RCT were included. Two trials showed statistically significant differences in primary patency, one favouring Dacron® and one favouring PTFE grafts, while 7 trials did not show statistically significant differences between the two materials. Meta-analysis on the comparison of PTFE vs. Dacron® grafts yielded no differences with regard to primary patency rates (hazard ratio 1.04 (95% confidence interval [0.85;1.28], no significant heterogeneity (p = 0.32, I2 = 14%. Similarly, there were no significant differences with regard to secondary patency rates. Conclusion Systematic evaluation and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials comparing Dacron® and PTFE as bypass materials for peripheral vascular surgery showed no evidence of an advantage of one synthetic material over the other.

  5. Feasibility study on robot-assisted retinal vascular bypass surgery in an ex vivo porcine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yi Qi; Tao, Ji Wei; Li, Liang; Mao, Jian Bo; Zhu, Chen Ting; Lao, Ji Meng; Yang, Yang; Shen, Li-Jun

    2017-09-01

    To describe a new robot-assisted surgical system for retinal vascular bypass surgery (RVBS) and to compare the success rate with freehand RVBS. A robot-assisted system for retinal microsurgery was constructed to include two independent robotic arms. A 23-gauge light probe and an intraocular forceps were affixed to the arm end effectors to perform the intraocular manipulation. Harvested porcine eyes were introduced to be established animal models of closed-sky eyeballs after that pars plana vitrectomy using temporary keratoprosthesis was performed by a skilful surgeon. Retinal vascular bypass surgery (RVBS) was performed by an inexperienced ophthalmologist to test the ease of use. A stainless steel wire (45-μm pipe diameter) was used as an artificial vessel. Before RVBS, the wires were prepositioned at the retinal surface of the eyes. The Control group (n = 20) underwent freehand RVBS, and the Experimental group (n = 20) underwent robot-assisted RVBS. To create the simulated bypass, the distal end of the wire was inserted into the selected vessel and advanced ~4 mm away from the optic disc. If successful, then the proximal wire end was inserted and advanced ~2 mm towards the optic disc. The difference in the success rate for the freehand and robot-assisted procedures was analysed by the chi-square test. The success rate for the freehand RVBS was 5% (1/20 eyes). In contrast, the robot-assisted success rate was 35% (7/20) of eyes (p robot-assisted RVBS in ex vivo porcine eyes. The robotic system increased the accuracy and stability of manipulation by eliminating freehand tremor, leading to a higher surgical success rate. © 2017 Acta Ophthalmologica Scandinavica Foundation. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. A comparison of the quality of the information available on the internet on interventional radiology, vascular surgery, and cardiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Alsafi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Context and Aims: Internet use is rapidly expanding and increasingly plays a substantial role in patient education. We sought to evaluate and compare the quality of information available to patients online on three closely linked specialties: Interventional radiology (IR, cardiology, and vascular surgery. Materials and Methods: We searched the leading three search engines for the terms: "Interventional Radiology", "cardiology," and "vascular surgery," collating the top 50 hits from each search. After excluding duplicates and irrelevant sites, 43, 25, and 36 sites remained, respectively. Sites were analyzed using the LIDA instrument (an online tool for assessing health-related websites and Fleisch Reading Ease Scores (FRES were compared across the different search terms and correlated with the country of origin and certification by the Health on the Net (HON Foundation. Results: There was no significant difference ( P>0.05 in the total LIDA, accessibility, usability or reliability scores between the three specialties. HONCode certification was associated with higher LIDA (83.1±1.6 vs. 71.53±0.8 ( P<0.0001, reliability (75.7±3.6 vs. 49.0±1.6 ( P<0.0001 and FRES (37.4±4.0 vs. 29.7±1.4 ( P=0.0441. Conclusion: Websites are generally well designed and easy to use; the majority however, lacks currency and reliability. Despite similarity in quality of online information, there is a disparity in knowledge of IR; this may be due to low web-traffic figures of IR sites. Wikipedia′s user-generated content, ranks highly in major search engines, as such; this could serve as means of disseminating reliable health information to patients.

  7. Post-operative acute kidney injury in non-suprainguinal vascular surgery patients with a pre-operative history of hypertension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moodley, Yoshan; Biccard, Bruce M.

    2015-01-01

    Hypertension is an independent predictor of acute kidney injury (AKI) in non-cardiac surgery patients. There are a few published studies which report AKI following non-suprainguinal vascular procedures, but these studies have not investigated predictors of AKI, including anti-hypertensive medications and other comorbidities, in the hypertensive population alone. We sought to identify independent predictors of post-operative AKI in non-suprainguinal vascular surgery patients with a pre-operative history of hypertension. We performed univariate (chi-squared, or Fisher's exact testing) and multivariate (binary logistic regression) statistical analysis of prospectively collected data from 243 adult hypertensive patients who underwent non-suprainguinal vascular surgery (lower limb amputation or peripheral artery bypass surgery) at a tertiary hospital between 2008 and 2011 in an attempt to identify possible associations between comorbidity, acute pre-operative antihypertensive medication administration, and post-operative AKI (a post-operative increase in serum creatinine of ≥ 25 % above the pre-operative measurement) in these patients. The incidence of post-operative AKI in this study was 5.3 % (95 % Confidence Interval: 3.2-8.9 %). Acute pre-operative β-blocker administration was independently associated with post-operative AKI in non-suprainguinal vascular surgery patients with a pre-operative history of hypertension (Odds Ratio: 3.24; 95 % Confidence Interval: 1.03-10.25). The acute pre-operative administration of β-blockers should be carefully considered in non-suprainguinal vascular surgery patients with a pre-operative history of hypertension, in lieu of an increased risk of potentially poor post-operative renal outcomes. PMID:26966428

  8. Use of a glucose management service improves glycemic control following vascular surgery: an interrupted time-series study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallaert, Jessica B; Chaidarun, Sushela S; Basta, Danielle; King, Kathryn; Comi, Richard; Ogrinc, Greg; Nolan, Brian W; Goodney, Philip P

    2015-05-01

    The optimal method for obtaining good blood glucose control in noncritically ill patients undergoing peripheral vascular surgery remains a topic of debate for surgeons, endocrinologists, and others involved in the care of patients with peripheral arterial disease and diabetes. A prospective trial was performed to evaluate the impact of routine use of a glucose management service (GMS) on glycemic control within 24 hours of lower-extremity revascularization (LER). In an interrupted time-series design (May 1, 2011-April 30, 2012), surgeon-directed diabetic care (Baseline phase) to routine GMS involvement (Intervention phase) was compared following LER. GMS assumed responsibility for glucose management through discharge. The main outcome measure was glycemic control, assessed by (1) mean hospitalization glucose and (2) the percentage of recorded glucose values within target range. Statistical process control charts were used to assess the impact of the intervention. Clinically important differences in patient demographics were noted between groups; the 19 patients in the Intervention arm had worse peripheral vascular disease than the 19 patients in the Baseline arm (74% critical limb ischemia versus 58%; p = .63). Routine use of GMS significantly reduced mean hospitalization glucose (191 mg/dL Baseline versus 150 mg/dL Intervention, p control did not significantly decrease for the 19 postintervention patients. Routine involvement of GMS improved glycemic control in patients undergoing LER. Future work is needed to examine the impact of improved glycemic control on clinical outcomes following LER.

  9. [Electronic data processing data bank for vascular surgery as a multiple site system with network connection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauer, J; Fraunhofer, S; von Sommoggy, S

    1991-01-01

    A clinical database, using FileMaker Pro and a network of APPLE Macintosh computers, were created for a vascular surgical unit. The databank presented here is based on proven, routine working procedures of the department. An easily learnable entry facility with hands-on, screen-oriented users' guide and help data file provide easy operability and highly efficient databank capability, along with great flexibility. This criterial and user-friendly features make staff acceptance and compliance readily achievable, thus assuring comprehensive data entry.

  10. Vascular anatomy of canine hepatic venous system: a basis for liver surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mari, L; Acocella, F

    2015-06-01

    Detailed knowledge of the vascular anatomy is important for improving surgical approaches to the liver. Twelve canine livers were skeletonized to describe the anatomy of their portal and hepatic veins in details. Our data suggest that the liver can be divided into two sections, three divisions, seven lobes and two to four sub-lobes. This differs from the classic division into four lobes, four sub-lobes and two processes. The right section was perfused by the right portal branch and drained by independent hepatic veins, while most of the left section, perfused by the left portal branch, was drained by the main hepatic vein deriving from the middle and the left hepatic vein confluence. Part of the right medial lobe, and in some cases the papillary process of the caudate lobe, drained directly into the caudal vena cava. A proper right hepatic vein draining blood from more than one lobe was never observed. Portal connections between the quadrate and the left medial lobe were frequently recorded. Two sub-lobes with different portal blood supply and venous drainage could be identified in the right lateral (33.3% of cases) and the left lateral (100% of cases) lobes. From our results, the classic nomenclature of the liver lobes does not reflect their vascularization. Based on similarities between canine lobes and human segments, a new nomenclature is possible and may be less confounding in surgical settings. © 2014 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  11. Reconstructive vascular surgery in rotationplasty for malignant tumors of the femur.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidiropoulos, A; Tjan, T D; Soeparwata, R; Wuismann, P; Winkelmann, W; Scheld, H H

    1994-12-01

    The rotationplasty procedure of the femur, as first described by Borrgreve, is the functional improvement of an abnormally shortened lower limb. In the last 15 years this procedure has been used in its original form and as modification for tumors of the femur and proximal tibia. The reconstruction of the femoral vessels as an important part of the operation has not enough been accentuated. Principally two types of reconstructions can be performed: the vessels are dissected in the adductor canal or a segmental resection and reanastomosis are performed. Between January 1990 and April 1993 classical and modified rotationplasties were performed for malignant tumors in 34 patients in our institution. In all cases a segmental femoral vessel resection with end-to-end anastomosis were performed. No intra- and postoperative vascular related complications occurred. The authors emphasize the advantage of this method: reanastomosing resected femoral vessels by experienced vascular surgeons is a save, time-saving method. In addition, the radicality of the operation increases in order to obtain excellent long term results.

  12. Predictive ability of the Society for Vascular Surgery Wound, Ischemia, and foot Infection (WIfI) classification system after first-time lower extremity revascularizations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Darling (Jeremy); J.C. McCallum (John C.); P.A. Soden (Peter A.); Guzman, R.J. (Raul J.); Wyers, M.C. (Mark C.); Hamdan, A.D. (Allen D.); H.J.M. Verhagen (Hence); M.L. Schermerhorn (Marc)

    2017-01-01

    markdownabstract__Objective:__ The Society for Vascular Surgery (SVS) Wound, Ischemia and foot Infection (WIfI) classification system was proposed to predict 1-year amputation risk and potential benefit from revascularization. Our goal was to evaluate the predictive ability of this scale in a

  13. Predictive ability of the Society for Vascular Surgery Wound, Ischemia, and foot Infection (WIfI) classification system following infrapopliteal endovascular interventions for critical limb ischemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Darling (Jeremy); J.C. McCallum (John C.); P.A. Soden (Peter A.); Meng, Y. (Yifan); Wyers, M.C. (Mark C.); Hamdan, A.D. (Allen D.); H.J.M. Verhagen (Hence); M.L. Schermerhorn (Marc)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractObjective The Society for Vascular Surgery (SVS) Lower Extremity Guidelines Committee has composed a new threatened lower extremity classification system that reflects the three major factors that impact amputation risk and clinical management: Wound, Ischemia, and foot Infection (WIfI).

  14. A comparison of results of carotid endarterectomy in octogenarians and nonagenarians to younger patients from the Mid-America Vascular Study Group and the Society for Vascular Surgery Vascular Quality Initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Joseph R; Jackson, Cheryl R; Helenowski, Irene B; Verta, Michael J; Wilkinson, Julia B; Kim, Stanley; Hoel, Andrew W

    2017-06-01

    Carotid endarterectomy (CEA) reduces stroke risk in selected patients. However, CEA risk profile may be different in older patients. We compared characteristics and outcomes of octogenarians and nonagenarians with those of younger patients. Deidentified data from CEA patients were obtained from the Society for Vascular Surgery Vascular Quality Initiative (VQI) database. Prior CEA, carotid artery stent, or combined CEA and coronary artery bypass were excluded, yielding 7390 CEAs in octogenarians and nonagenarians (≥80 years of age) and 35,303 CEAs in younger patients (<80 years of age). We compared post-CEA outcomes, including periprocedural cerebral ischemic events and death, and details such as operative time, bleeding, and return to surgery. Octogenarians and nonagenarians were more likely to have pre-CEA neurologic symptoms (51.4% vs 45.6%; P < .001) and to have never smoked (37.8% vs 22.0%; P < .001), and they were slightly more likely to have required urgent CEA (16.1% vs 13.4%; P < .001). Stenosis ≥70% was similar (octogenarians and nonagenarians, 94.2%; younger patients, 94.4%; P = .45). Perioperative ipsilateral neurologic events and ipsilateral stroke were slightly more common among octogenarians and nonagenarians (1.6% vs 1.1% [P < .001] and 1.2% vs 0.8% [P = .002]). Multivariate modeling (logistic regression) showed that pre-CEA neurologic symptoms (odds ratios, 1.35 [P = .005] and 1.42 [P = .007]), pre-CEA ipsilateral cortical ischemic event (odds ratios, 1.18 [P < .001] and 1.20 [P < .001]), and urgency (odds ratios, 1.75 [P < .001] and 1.67 [P < .001]) remained strong predictors of any ipsilateral neurologic event and any ipsilateral stroke, respectively. However, age ≥80 years remained a significant predictor of these outcomes (odds ratios, 1.37 [P = .003] and 1.44 [P = .004]). Kaplan-Meier estimated survival was lower for octogenarians and nonagenarians at 30 days and 1 year (98.6% vs 99.4% and 93.7% vs 97.0%; log-rank, P

  15. Society for Vascular Surgery limb stage and patient risk correlate with outcomes in an amputation prevention program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Causey, Marlin W; Ahmed, Ayman; Wu, Bian; Gasper, Warren J; Reyzelman, Alex; Vartanian, Shant M; Hiramoto, Jade S; Conte, Michael S

    2016-06-01

    Clinical decision making and accurate outcomes comparisons in advanced limb ischemia require improved staging systems. The Society for Vascular Surgery Lower Extremity Threatened Limb Classification System (Wound extent, Ischemia, and foot Infection [WIfI]) was designed to stratify limb outcomes based on three major factors-wound extent, ischemia, and foot infection. The Project or Ex-Vivo vein graft Engineering via Transfection III (PREVENT) III (PIII) risk score was developed to stratify patients by expected amputation-free survival (AFS) after surgical revascularization. This study was designed to prospectively assess limb and patient-based staging for predicting outcomes of hospitalized patients in an amputation prevention program. This study undertook a retrospective analysis of prospectively gathered registry data of consecutive patients with limb-threatening conditions admitted to a fully integrated vascular/podiatry service over a 16-month period. Upon admission, limb risk was stratified using the WIfI system and patient risk was categorized using PIII classification. Patients were assessed for perioperative and postdischarge outcomes, and their relationship to staging at admission was analyzed. There were 174 threatened limbs (143 hospitalized patients) stratified by WIfI stage (1%-12%, 2%-28%, 3%-24%, 4%-28%, 5%-3%, unstaged-5%) and PIII risk (34% low, 49% moderate, and 17% high risk). Diabetes and end-stage renal disease were associated with WIfI stage (P = .006 and P = .018) and PIII risk (P = .003 and P amputation. There were 119 limbs (71%) that underwent revascularization, including 108 infrainguinal reconstructions (endovascular or open revascularization). Rate of revascularization increased with WIfI stage (P procedures, minor amputations, and initial hospital duration of stay (all P procedures, there was a similar distribution of endovascular (46%) and surgical (54%) interventions. Freedom from major adverse limb events was best for

  16. A new ethical and medico-legal issue: vascular surgery and the postoperative cognitive dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setacci, C; Sirignano, A; Ricci, G; Spagnolo, A G; Pugliese, F; Speziale, F

    2015-08-01

    Patients undergoing major surgery are at risk for postoperative cognitive dysfunction (POCD). The consciousness of the POCD arises new ethical and medico-legal issues that should be identified, managed and, if possible, prevented. Elderly patients still represent a real challenge for physicians and medical science. This challenge can be surmounted not only through technical progress but also by safeguarding the correct ethical behavior at the base of each relationship between a patient and his physician. Effective communication with the elderly patient is a prerequisite for clear and complete information, involving family members and caregivers when necessary. In every case, the identification of patients with pre-existing risk factors of POCD, shortening the period of time preceding the surgery and a proper technique of the procedure as well as physical and intellectual exercises, nutrition and medication play an important role in decreasing the incidence of neurocognitive deficits in the elderly.

  17. Effect of robotic surgery on hysterectomy trends: implications for resident education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamasato, Kelly; Casey, Duffy; Kaneshiro, Bliss; Hiraoka, Mark

    2014-01-01

    To compare the surgical approach used for hysterectomy at 2 teaching hospitals before and after introduction of the robotic surgical system. Retrospective cohort study (Canadian Task Force classification II-3). Two gynecologic training sites at the University of Hawaii. Women who underwent hysterectomy between January 1, 2005, and December 31, 2011. ICD-9 procedural codes were used to identify hysterectomies performed between January 1, 2005, and December 31, 2011. Hysterectomies were categorized according to surgical approach: abdominal, vaginal, laparoscopic-assisted vaginal/total laparoscopic, and robotic. Each hysterectomy was also categorized according to primary preoperative diagnosis as general gynecology, gynecologic oncology, and urogynecology. The rates and numbers of hysterectomies performed during 2005-2006 (2 years before acquisition of the robot), 2007-2008 (first 2 years with the robot), and 2009-2011 (3-5 years after acquiring the robot) were compared using χ(2) tests and analysis of variance. The numbers of hysterectomies reported in resident case logs were also collected and compared. A total of 5894 hysterectomies were performed between 2005 and 2011. The total number of hysterectomies performed at Hospital A, which acquired the robotic surgical system, increased over time (p = .04) but remained stable at Hospital B, which did not acquire the robotic surgical system. At Hospital A, the number of robotic hysterectomies increased as the number of abdominal hysterectomies decreased (p robotic hysterectomies (p robotic surgical system was associated with significant changes in the numbers and types of hysterectomies performed in both general and subspecialty gynecology. Although abdominal hysterectomies decreased as robotic hysterectomies increased, other hysterectomies did not. These trends mirror reported resident surgical experience and have implications for resident education. Copyright © 2014 AAGL. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights

  18. Comparing resident cataract surgery outcomes under novice versus experienced attending supervision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puri, Sidharth; Kiely, Amanda E; Wang, Jiangxia; Woodfield, Alonzo S; Ramanathan, Saras; Sikder, Shameema

    2015-01-01

    To determine whether supervision by an attending who is new to surgical teaching, or an experienced attending measurably influences intraoperative complications rates or outcomes in phacoemulsification performed by ophthalmology residents. Single tertiary hospital. Retrospective cohort study. Resident-performed phacoemulsification cases supervised by one novice attending (N=189) and experienced attending (N=172) over 1 year were included. Data included: resident year, patient age, sex, preoperative risk factors (4+ on the four point scale for dense/white/brunescent cataracts, Flomax, zonular dialysis, pseudoexfoliation, glaucoma risk, post-vitrectomy), intraoperative risk factors (Trypan blue, iris hooks), and intraoperative complications (capsule tears, vitreous loss, zonular dialysis, zonular dehiscence, burns, nuclear fragment loss, Descemet's tear). Experienced attending data were compared against those of the novice attending. Regarding preoperative risks, experienced attending cases more likely involved 4+ cataract (P=0.005), Flomax (P<0.001), or glaucoma risk (P=0.001). For intraoperative risks, novice attending cases more likely involved Trypan blue (P<0.001). Regarding complications, novice attending cases were associated with vitreous loss (P=0.002) and anterior capsule tears (P<0.001). When comparing total complications, the novice attending was more likely to have both increased number of cases with complications and total complications than the experienced attending. The novice attending's overall complication rate trended downward (rate from 28% in first 25 cases to 6.67% in last 15). Early cases for the novice attending were accompanied by greater complications (vitreous loss and anterior capsule tear), likely due to a learning curve. Surgical judgment in the operating room likely develops with experience. Training programs may focus on these specific areas to aid new instructors.

  19. Improving surgical resident's performance in the American Board of Surgery in Training Examination (ABSITE)--do review courses help? The program directors' perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taggarshe, Deepa; Mittal, Vijay

    2011-01-01

    The implementation of the 80-hour week compounded by the need for the current trainee to be well versed technically with the newer developments in surgery has resulted in limited time for didactic education. Commercial American Board of Surgery in Training examination (ABSITE) review courses are flourishing and may seem to be filling the gap in didactic education. This study ascertained the opinion of the general surgery program directors across the country on the role of the review courses in the ABSITE performance of a surgical resident. A questionnaire was designed and sent out to all program directors using online survey. Sixty-five of 242 program directors completed the questionnaire. Fifty-seven percent belonged to university-based surgical residency programs. Seventy-two percent used ABSITE performance as a measure while evaluating the resident for promotion. Although 60% agreed that review courses help the performance of the residents, 80% did not have any institutional or regional review courses. Ninety percent allowed their residents to attend commercial review courses but 60% did not reimburse them. Program directors do feel that ABSITE by itself is important in evaluating the progression of surgical residents and has a correlation with the boards' pass percentile. Due to the limited hours available for didactics in current surgical residency, intensive review course over a 2- to 3-day period may help the surgical residents to perform better. In the current economy, review courses offered by a consortium of programs geared toward improving ABSITE performance and conducted by the surgical faculty may be of essence. Copyright © 2011 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Impact of aspirin and clopidogrel interruption on platelet function in patients undergoing major vascular surgery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yannick Le Manach

    Full Text Available AIMS: To investigate functional platelet recovery after preoperative withdrawal of aspirin and clopidogrel and platelet function 5 days after treatment resumption. METHODS/RESULTS: We conducted an observational study, which prospectively included consecutive patients taking aspirin, taking clopidogrel, and untreated controls (15 patients in each group. The antiplatelet drugs were withdrawn five days before surgery (baseline and were reintroduced two days after surgery. Platelet function was evaluated by optical aggregation in the presence of collagen, arachidonic acid (aspirin and ADP (clopidogrel and by VASP assay (clopidogrel. Platelet-leukocyte complex (PLC level was quantified at each time-point. At baseline, platelet function was efficiently inhibited by aspirin and had recovered fully in most patients 5 days after drug withdrawal. PLC levels five days after aspirin reintroduction were similar to baseline (+4±10%; p = 0.16, in line with an effective platelet inhibition. Chronic clopidogrel treatment was associated with variable platelet inhibition and its withdrawal led to variable functional recovery. PLC levels were significantly increased five days after clopidogrel reintroduction (+10±15%; p = 0.02, compared to baseline. CONCLUSIONS: Aspirin withdrawal 5 days before high-bleeding-risk procedures was associated with functional platelet recovery, and its reintroduction two days after surgery restored antiplaletet efficacy five days later. This was not the case of clopidogrel, and further work is therefore needed to define its optimal perioperative management.

  1. An anaesthetic pre-operative assessment clinic reduces pre-operative inpatient stay in patients requiring major vascular surgery.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Connor, D B

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND: Patients undergoing major vascular surgery (MVS) require extensive anaesthetic assessment. This can require extended pre-operative stays. AIMS: We investigated whether a newly established anaesthetic pre-operative assessment clinic (PAC) would reduce the pre-operative inpatient stay, avoid unnecessary investigations and facilitate day before surgery (DBS) admissions for patients undergoing MVS. PATIENT AND METHODS: One year following and preceding the establishment of the PAC the records of patients undergoing open or endovascular aortic aneurysm repair, carotid endarterectomy and infra-inguinal bypass were reviewed to measure pre-operative length of stay (LoS). RESULTS: Pre-operative LoS was significantly reduced in the study period (1.85 vs. 4.2 days, respectively, P < 0.0001). Only 12 out of 61 patients in 2007 were admitted on the DBS and this increased to 33 out of 63 patients (P = 0.0002). No procedure was cancelled for medical reasons. CONCLUSION: The PAC has facilitated accurate outpatient anaesthetic assessment for patients requiring MVS. The pre-operative in-patient stay has been significantly reduced.

  2. The importance of residency program size and location on American Osteopathic Board of Surgery In-Training Examination outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falcone, John L; Rosen, Marc E

    2013-09-01

    The American Osteopathic Board of Surgery In-Training Examination (AOBSITE) is administered to general surgery residency training programs. Based on findings in allopathic training, we hypothesize that larger programs will outperform smaller programs and that Southern programs will perform lower than other geographic regions. In this retrospective study, the performance on the AOBSITE was obtained for all of the osteopathic general surgery programs from 2008 to 2012. To test if program size was related to AOBSITE performance, simple linear regression was performed. Geographic differences in median performance between states and US Census Bureau regions were evaluated using Kruskal-Wallis tests. Nonparametric statistics were performed using an α = 0.05. From 2008 to 2012, there were 49 general surgery residency training programs and 2278 examinees evaluated. The median raw performance by general surgery residency training program was 168.0 (IQR [161.8-177.7]). The weighted median standardized performance by general surgery residency training program was 487.8 (IQR [462.8-528.0]). Simple linear regression analyses showed that the slope of the least-square regression line was greater than zero for raw performance (P = 0.048) and standardized performance (P = 0.005). A Kruskal-Wallis test showed that there were no differences in raw performance or standardized performance by US Census Bureau Region or by state (all P > 0.05). Overall, larger general surgery residency training programs outperform smaller programs on the AOBSITE and that there are no geographical differences in performance by state or region. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Residents at the University of Maryland Medical System provide insight to learning infrapubic approach for IPP surgery: relative benefits but novel challenges exposed in first 15 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, Andrew; Chason, Judd

    2010-03-01

    Emphasis should be placed on assessing resident education. At our institution, the trans-scrotal (TS) approach for inflatable penile prosthesis (IPP) surgery has been widely taught, with infrapubic (IP) approach recently introduced. Feedback and trends on learning a new implant technique is assessed. Aim. The aim is to understand the advantages and pitfalls of a surgical approach through residents in training. This will provide insight into resident education for teaching physicians and a framework for understanding how to teach the two approaches. The outcomes measured will be the residents' reflection on the ease of different steps of the infrapubic procedure upon finishing 15 sequential cases as well as feeling about the end result and time it took to complete the operation. Two senior residents with experience of over 100 TS implants recorded impressions on their first 15 infrapubic IPP cases via questionnaire. IPP was compared with TS with regard to reservoir, cylinder, pump placement, surgical exposure, and resident involvement. Scores of 1-5 were given, with 1 implying harder or more difficult, 3 the same, and 5 better or easier. Proximal dilatation and cylinder placement remained superior for the IP approach, but distal cylinder placement posed major challenges for the IP surgery. Pump placement was more difficult and remained so for the IP approach, yet reservoir placement was similar. Residents' sense of involvement was superior early on for the IP procedure. Operating room time improved steadily for the IP approach and ultimately was faster than implants placed trans-scrotally. The IP approach is quickly learned by residents. Resident placement with the IP approach offers no advantage for the experienced resident. Pump placement and distal dilatation began and remain challenging. Location of corporotomy is the most challenging component and dictates difficulty of dilatation. Residents gain early confidence with the IP approach.

  4. “I’ve never asked one question.” Understanding the barriers among orthopedic surgery residents to screening female patients for intimate partner violence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conn, Lesley Gotlib; Young, Aynsely; Rotstein, Ori D.; Schemitsch, Emil

    2014-01-01

    Background Intimate partner violence (IPV) is a global public health problem. Orthopedic surgery residents may identify IPV among injured patients treated in fracture clinics. Yet, these residents face a number of barriers to recognizing and discussing IPV with patients. We sought to explore orthopedic surgery residents’ knowledge of IPV and their preparedness to screen patients for IPV in academic fracture clinic settings with a view to developing targeted IPV education and training. Methods We conducted focus groups with junior and intermediate residents. Discussions explored residents’ knowledge of and experiences with IPV screening and preparedness for screening and responding to IPV among orthopedic patients. Data were analyzed iteratively using an inductive approach. Results Residents were aware of the issue of abuse generally, but had received no specific information or training on IPV in orthopedics. Residents did not see orthopedics faculty screen patients for IPV or advocate for screening. They did not view IPV screening or intervention as part of the orthopedic surgeon’s role. Residents’ clinical experiences emphasized time management and surgical intervention by effectively “getting through clinic” and “dealing with the surgical problem.” Communication with patients about other health issues was minimal or nonexistent. Conclusion Orthopedic surgery residents are entering a career path where IPV is well documented. They encounter cultural and structural barriers preventing the incorporation of IPV screening into their clinical and educational experiences. Hospitals and academic programs must collaborate in efforts to build capacity for sustainable IPV screening programs among these trainees. PMID:25421078

  5. Urology residents experience comparable workload profiles when performing live porcine nephrectomies and robotic surgery virtual reality training modules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouraviev, Vladimir; Klein, Martina; Schommer, Eric; Thiel, David D; Samavedi, Srinivas; Kumar, Anup; Leveillee, Raymond J; Thomas, Raju; Pow-Sang, Julio M; Su, Li-Ming; Mui, Engy; Smith, Roger; Patel, Vipul

    2016-03-01

    In pursuit of improving the quality of residents' education, the Southeastern Section of the American Urological Association (SES AUA) hosts an annual robotic training course for its residents. The workshop involves performing a robotic live porcine nephrectomy as well as virtual reality robotic training modules. The aim of this study was to evaluate workload levels of urology residents when performing a live porcine nephrectomy and the virtual reality robotic surgery training modules employed during this workshop. Twenty-one residents from 14 SES AUA programs participated in 2015. On the first-day residents were taught with didactic lectures by faculty. On the second day, trainees were divided into two groups. Half were asked to perform training modules of the Mimic da Vinci-Trainer (MdVT, Mimic Technologies, Inc., Seattle, WA, USA) for 4 h, while the other half performed nephrectomy procedures on a live porcine model using the da Vinci Si robot (Intuitive Surgical Inc., Sunnyvale, CA, USA). After the first 4 h the groups changed places for another 4-h session. All trainees were asked to complete the NASA-TLX 1-page questionnaire following both the MdVT simulation and live animal model sessions. A significant interface and TLX interaction was observed. The interface by TLX interaction was further analyzed to determine whether the scores of each of the six TLX scales varied across the two interfaces. The means of the TLX scores observed at the two interfaces were similar. The only significant difference was observed for frustration, which was significantly higher at the simulation than the animal model, t (20) = 4.12, p = 0.001. This could be due to trainees' familiarity with live anatomical structures over skill set simulations which remain a real challenge to novice surgeons. Another reason might be that the simulator provides performance metrics for specific performance traits as well as composite scores for entire exercises. Novice trainees experienced

  6. Graduating Students' and Surgery Program Directors' Views of the Association of American Medical Colleges Core Entrustable Professional Activities for Entering Residency: Where are the Gaps?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindeman, Brenessa M; Sacks, Bethany C; Lipsett, Pamela A

    2015-01-01

    Residency program directors have increasingly expressed concern about the preparedness of some medical school graduates for residency training. The Association of American Medical Colleges recently defined 13 core entrustable professional activities (EPAs) for entering residency that residents should be able to perform without direct supervision on the first day of training. It is not known how students' perception of their competency with these activities compares with that of surgery program directors'. Cross-sectional survey. All surgery training programs in the United States. All program directors (PDs) in the Association of Program Directors in Surgery (APDS) database (n = 222) were invited to participate in an electronic survey, and 119 complete responses were received (53.6%). Among the respondents, 83% were men and 35.2% represented community hospital programs. PDs' responses were compared with questions asking students to rate their confidence in performance of each EPA from the Association of American Medical Colleges Graduation Questionnaire (95% response). PDs rated their confidence in residents' performance without direct supervision for every EPA significantly lower when compared with the rating by graduating students. Although PDs' ratings continued to be lower than students' ratings, PDs from academic programs (those associated with a medical school) gave higher ratings than those from community programs. PDs generally ranked all 13 EPAs as important to being a trustworthy physician. PDs from programs without preliminary residents gave higher ratings for confidence with EPA performance as compared with PDs with preliminary residents. Among PDs with preliminary residents, there were equal numbers of those who agreed and those who disagreed that there are no identifiable differences between categorical and preliminary residents (42.7% and 41.8%, respectively). A large gap exists between confidence in performance of the 13 core EPAs for entering

  7. Multi-institutional study of self-reported attitudes and behaviors of general surgery residents about ethical academic practices in test taking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grignol, Valerie P; Grannan, Kevin; Sabra, John; Cromer, Robert M; Jarman, Benjamin; Dent, Daniel; Sticca, Robert P; Nelson, Timothy M; Kukora, John S; Daley, Brian J; Treat, Robert W; Termuhlen, Paula M

    2013-01-01

    Correlation exists between people who engage in academic dishonesty as students and unethical behavior once in practice. Previously, we assessed the attitudes of general surgery residents and ethical practices in test taking at a single institution. Most residents had not participated in activities they felt were unethical, yet what constituted unethical behavior was unclear. We sought to verify these results in a multi-institutional study. A scenario-based survey describing potentially unethical activities related to the American Board of Surgery In-training Examination (ABSITE) was administered. Participants were asked about their knowledge of or participation in the activities and whether the activity was unethical. Program directors were surveyed about the use of ABSITE results for resident evaluation and promotion. Ten programs participated in the study. The resident response rate was 67% (186/277). Of the respondents, 43% felt that memorizing questions to study for future examinations was unethical and 50% felt that using questions another resident memorized was unethical. Most felt that buying (86%) or selling (79%) questions was unethical. Significantly more senior than junior residents have memorized (30% vs 16%; p = 0.04) or used questions others memorized (33% vs 12%; p = 0.002) to study for future ABSITE examinations and know of other residents who have done so (42% vs 20%; p = 0.004). Most programs used results of the ABSITE in promotion (80%) and set minimum score expectations and consequences (70%). Similar to our single-institution study, residents had not participated in activities they felt to be unethical; however the definition of what constitutes cheating remains unclear. Differences were identified between senior and junior residents with regard to memorizing questions for study. Cheating and unethical behavior is not always clear to the learner and represents an area for further education. © 2013 Association of Program Directors in Surgery

  8. A six year head-to-head comparison of osteopathic and allopathic applicants to a university-based, allopathic general surgery residency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlitzkus, Lisa L; Clark, Christopher J; Agle, Steven C; Schenarts, Paul J

    2012-01-01

    The number of osteopathic physicians is increasing as is the number applying to allopathic general surgery residency programs. A lack of knowledge of osteopathic schooling leads to a potential applicant bias in favor of allopathic applicants, but the 2 groups have not been compared head to head. Applications over a 6-year period to an allopathic general surgery residency program were reviewed. Demographics, examination scores, employment, education, and research experience were catalogued into a database. Allopathic applicants were compared with osteopathic applicants utilizing statistical analysis. A university teaching hospital. Allopathic and osteopathic applicants to an allopathic general surgery residency program. A total of 1290 applications were reviewed; 1155 allopathic and 135 osteopathic applications. Other than race, the 2 cohorts are similar in age, gender, and citizenship. The groups are not significantly different with regard to the number of letter of recommendations, volunteer activities, scholarly works, and advanced degrees. Graduates of both proceed directly to residency. A significantly higher percentage of allopathic graduates reported their United States medical licensing examination (USMLE) scores, yet when osteopaths released their USMLE transcript, they scored significantly higher on the USMLE Step 1 examination and required fewer attempts to pass. These differences do not apply to the USMLE Step 2 examination. No single screening tool exists for selecting a successful general surgery resident. We are seeing increased numbers of osteopathic applicants. Many criteria used to evaluate applicants do not apply to osteopathic applicants, but our comparison of common selection variables on the Electronic Residency Application Service (ERAS) application did not demonstrate an overall difference. While our analysis demonstrated a statistically higher USMLE Step 1 score by osteopathic applicants, they may only self-report favorable data. Copyright

  9. A Comparison of Surgery and Family Medicine Residents' Perceptions of Cross-Cultural Care Training of Cross-Cultural Care Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, David S; Lin, Susan Y; Park, Elyse R

    2010-01-01

    The need for physicians formally trained to deliver care to diverse patient populations has been widely advocated. Utilizing a validated tool, Weissman and Betancourt's Cross-Cultural Care Survey, the aim of this current study was to compare surgery and family medicine residents' perceptions of their preparedness and skillfulness to provide high quality cross-cultural care. Past research has documented differences between the two groups' reported impressions of importance and level of instruction received in cross-cultural care. Twenty surgery and 15 family medicine residents participated in the study. Significant differences were found between surgery and family medicine residents on most ratings of the amount of training they received in cross-cultural skills. Specifically, family medicine residents reported having received more training on: 1) determining how patients want to be addressed, 2) taking a social history, 3) assessing their understanding of the cause of illness, 4) negotiating their treatment plan, 5) assessing whether they are mistrustful of the health care system and/or doctor, 6) identifying cultural customs, 7) identifying how patients make decisions within the family, and 8) delivering services through a medical interpreter. One unexpected finding was that surgery residents, who reported not receiving much formal cultural training, reported higher mean scores on perceived skillfulness (i.e. ability) than family medicine residents. The disconnect may be linked to the family medicine residents' training in cultural humility — more knowledge and understanding of cross-cultural care can paradoxically lead to perceptions of being less prepared or skillful in this area. PMID:21225585

  10. Can fatigue affect acquisition of new surgical skills? A prospective trial of pre- and post-call general surgery residents using the da Vinci surgical skills simulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robison, Weston; Patel, Sonya K; Mehta, Akshat; Senkowski, Tristan; Allen, John; Shaw, Eric; Senkowski, Christopher K

    2017-08-24

    To study the effects of fatigue on general surgery residents' performance on the da Vinci Skills Simulator (dVSS). 15 General Surgery residents from various postgraduate training years (PGY2, PGY3, PGY4, and PGY5) performed 5 simulation tasks on the dVSS as recommended by the Robotic Training Network (RTN). The General Surgery residents had no prior experience with the dVSS. Participants were assigned to either the Pre-call group or Post-call group based on call schedule. As a measure of subjective fatigue, residents were given the Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS) prior to their dVSS testing. The dVSS MScore™ software recorded various metrics (Objective Structured Assessment of Technical Skills, OSATS) that were used to evaluate the performance of each resident to compare the robotic simulation proficiency between the Pre-call and Post-call groups. Six general surgery residents were stratified into the Pre-call group and nine into the Post-call group. These residents were also stratified into Fatigued (10) or Nonfatigued (5) groups, as determined by their reported ESS scores. A statistically significant difference was found between the Pre-call and Post-call reported sleep hours (p = 0.036). There was no statistically significant difference between the Pre-call and Post-call groups or between the Fatigued and Nonfatigued groups in time to complete exercise, number of attempts, and high MScore™ score. Despite variation in fatigue levels, there was no effect on the acquisition of robotic simulator skills.

  11. Can a laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass be safely performed by surgical residents in a bariatric center-of-excellence? The learning curve of surgical residents in bariatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Rijswijk, Anne-Sophie; Moes, Daan E; Geubbels, Noëlle; Hutten, Barbara A; Acherman, Yair I Z; van de Laar, Arnold W; de Brauw, Maurits; Bruin, Sjoerd C

    2017-09-21

    A learning curve (LC) is a graphic display of the number of consecutive procedures performed necessary to reach competence and is defined by complications and duration of surgery (DOS). There is little evidence on the LC of surgical residents in bariatric surgery. Aim of the study is to evaluate whether the laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (LRYGB) can be safely performed by surgical residents, to evaluate the LC of surgical residents for LRYGB and to assess whether surgical residents fit in the LC of the bariatric center which has been established by their proctors. Records of all 3389 consecutive primary LRYGB patients, operated between December 2007 and January 2016 in a bariatric center-of-excellence in Amsterdam, were reviewed. Differences in DOS were assessed by means of a linear regression model. Differences in complications (classified as Clavien-Dindo ≥ 2) were evaluated with the χ 2 or the Fisher exact test. Cases were clustered in groups of 70 for comparison and reported for residents with ≥70 cases as primary surgeon. Four surgeons (S1-4) and three residents (R1-3) performed 2690 (88.2%) and 361 (11.8%) of 3051 LRYGBs, respectively. Median (IQR) DOS was 52.0 (42.0-65.0) min for S1-4 versus 53.0 (46.0-63.0) min for R1-3 (p = 0.52). The LC of R1-3 in their first 70 cases (n = 210) differs significantly from the individual (n = 70) LCs of surgeon 1, 2, and 3, with remarkably shorter DOS for the residents (adjusted p bariatric surgeons. Surgical residents benefit from the experience of their proctors and they fit faultlessly in the LC of the surgical team, as set out by their proctors in a large bariatric center-of-excellence.

  12. Tailored Double-Barrel Bypass Surgery Using an Occipital Artery Graft for Unstable Intracranial Vascular Occlusive Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Yeongu; Lee, Sung Ho; Ryu, Jiwook; Kim, Johnho; Chung, Sang Bong; Choi, Seok Keun

    2017-05-01

    This report describes the need for a tailored approach for intracranial vascular occlusive disease and introduces the usefulness of the OA as a donor artery for interposition graft. A 65-year-old male patient suffered from repeated transient ischemic attack (TIA). Imaging studies revealed complete occlusion of the proximal left side of the internal carotid artery (ICA) and multiple infarction in the watershed zone. We planned superficial temporal artery-middle cerebral artery (STA-MCA) bypass to restore cerebral blood flow and to prevent the progression of infarction. However, the parietal branch of the STA was too small in diameter and not suitable as a single donor for the bypass in order to supply sufficient blood flow. Moreover, the frontal branch of the STA had collateral channels through the periorbital anastomosis into the cerebral cortex that could result in infarction during clamping for anastomosis. We determined that tailored treatment planning was necessary for successful revascularization under these conditions. Thus, we performed a bypass between the parietal branch of the STA and a cortical branch of the MCA as an "insurance bypass." Then we performed another bypass between the frontal branch of the STA and a cortical branch of the MCA using an ipsilateral occipital artery (OA) interposition graft. The patient had no perioperative complications, and postoperative imaging confirmed the restoration of cerebral blood flow. When end-to-side anastomosis in single-branch bypass is not appropriate for cerebral revascularization, a tailored double-barrel "insurance bypass" with an OA interposed graft could be a good alternative treatment modality. In addition, an OA interposition graft is a useful option for double-barrel bypass surgery in such cases of intracranial vascular occlusive disease. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. The effects of vasoactive agents on flow through saphenous vein grafts during lower-extremity peripheral vascular surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maslow, Andrew D; Bert, Arthur; Slaiby, Jeffrey; Carney, William; Marcaccio, Edward

    2007-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the effects of hemodynamic alterations on vein graft flow during peripheral vascular surgery. It was hypothesized that vasopressors can be administered without compromising flow through the vein grafts. Tertiary care center, university medical center. Randomized placebo-controlled double-blinded study. The effects of phenylephrine, epinephrine, milrinone, intravenous fluid, and placebo on newly constructed peripheral vein grafts were assessed in 60 patients (12 patients in each of 5 groups). Systemic and central hemodynamics were measured by using intra-arterial and pulmonary artery catheters. Vein graft flow was measured by using a transultrasonic flow probe (Transultrasonic Inc, Ithaca, NY). Phenylephrine increased systemic mean blood pressure (mBP) (68.2-94.0 mmHg, p < 0.01), systemic vascular resistance (SVR) (1,091-1,696 dynes x sec x cm(-5), p < 0.001), and vein graft flow (39.5-58.9 mL/min, p < 0.01), whereas cardiac output remained unchanged. Epinephrine resulted in increased cardiac output (4.4-6.9 L/min, p < 0.01) and mBP (72.7-89.1 mmHg, p < 0.01), whereas vein graft flow was reduced in 6 of 12 patients. Intravenous fluid administration resulted in a relatively smaller increase in graft flow (37.6-46.0 mL/min, p < 0.05), an increase in cardiac output, and an insignificant decrease in SVR. Other treatments had either little or no effect on vein graft flow. The study hypothesis was partly supported. Although both phenylephrine and epinephrine increased blood pressure, only the former increased vein graft flow in all patients. In conjunction with increases in graft flow after fluid administration, these data suggest that factors affecting vein graft flow are not just simply related to systemic hemodynamics.

  14. Endovascular repair of postoperative vascular graft related complications after aorto-iliac surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duvnjak, Stevo; Andersen, P E; Larsen, K E

    2014-01-01

    AIM: Para-anastomotic aneurysms, leakage due to anastomotic failure, aorto- and arterioenteric fistulas are some of the serious complications after aorto-iliac surgical reconstructions. Treatment of these complications is challenging and is either done by open surgery or by endovascular therapy...... endoprosthesis was implanted in one case and in two cases aortic cuff was used. Fluency periphery stent grafts were used in four cases. There was a 100% technical success. Intervention related early mortality was 8%. One patient with pseudoaneurysm died 28 months after endovascular treatment because of cardiac...... infarct and one patient with previously infected arterio-enteric fistula and advanced malignancy died 7 months after second endovascular treatment. Overall the mortality was 25%. There was no procedure related morbidity or complications during hospitalization and follow-up of mean 12, 3 months (range 1...

  15. Telemedicine in vascular surgery: feasibility of digital imaging for remote management of wounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirthlin, D J; Buradagunta, S; Edwards, R A; Brewster, D C; Cambria, R P; Gertler, J P; LaMuraglia, G M; Jordan, D E; Kvedar, J C; Abbott, W M

    1998-06-01

    promise for improving outpatient vascular wound care.

  16. Magnetic resonance angiographic assessment of upper extremity vessels prior to vascular access surgery: feasibility and accuracy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Planken, Nils R. [Maastricht University Hospital, Department of Vascular Surgery, Maastricht (Netherlands); Maastricht University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Maastricht (Netherlands); Maastricht University Medical School, Cardiovascular Research Institute Maastricht, Maastricht (Netherlands); Tordoir, Jan H. [Maastricht University Hospital, Department of Vascular Surgery, Maastricht (Netherlands); Maastricht University Medical School, Cardiovascular Research Institute Maastricht, Maastricht (Netherlands); Duijm, Lucien E.; Bosch, Harrie C. van den [Catharina Hospital, Department of Radiology, Eindhoven (Netherlands); Sande, Frank M. van der; Kooman, Jeroen P. [Maastricht University Hospital, Department of Nephrology, Maastricht (Netherlands); Maastricht University Medical School, Cardiovascular Research Institute Maastricht, Maastricht (Netherlands); Haan, Michiel W. de; Leiner, Tim [Maastricht University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Maastricht (Netherlands); Maastricht University Medical School, Cardiovascular Research Institute Maastricht, Maastricht (Netherlands)

    2008-01-15

    A contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (CE-MRA) protocol for selective imaging of the entire upper extremity arterial and venous tree in a single exam has been developed. Twenty-five end-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients underwent CE-MRA and duplex ultrasonography (DUS) of the upper extremity prior to hemodialysis vascular access creation. Accuracy of CE-MRA arterial and venous diameter measurements were compared with DUS and intraoperative (IO) diameter measurements, the standard of reference. Upper extremity vasculature depiction was feasible with CE-MRA. CE-MRA forearm and upper arm arterial diameters were 2.94 {+-} 0.67 mm and 4.05 {+-} 0.84 mm, respectively. DUS arterial diameters were 2.80 {+-} 0.48 mm and 4.38 {+-} 1.24 mm; IO diameters were 3.00 {+-} 0.35 mm and 3.55 {+-} 0.51 mm. Forearm arterial diameters were accurately determined with both techniques. Both techniques overestimated upper arm arterial diameters significantly. Venous diameters were accurately determined with CE-MRA but not with DUS (forearm: CE-MRA: 2.64 {+-} 0.61 mm; DUS: 2.50 {+-} 0.44 mm, and IO: 3.40 {+-} 0.22 mm; upper arm: CE-MRA: 4.09 {+-} 0.71 mm; DUS: 3.02 {+-} 1.65 mm, and IO: 4.30 {+-} 0.78 mm). CE-MRA enables selective imaging of upper extremity vasculature in patients requiring hemodialysis access. Forearm arterial diameters can be assessed accurately by CE-MRA. Both CE-MRA and DUS slightly overestimate upper arm arterial diameters. In comparison to DUS, CE-MRA enables a more accurate determination of upper extremity venous diameters. (orig.)

  17. Facial reanimation surgery with micro-vascular gracilis free flap for unilateral facial palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doménech Juan, Ivan; Tornero, Jordi; Cruz Toro, Paula; Ortiz Laredo, Nuria; Vega Celiz, Jorge; Junyent, Josefina; Maños Pujol, Manel

    2014-01-01

    Micro-neurovascular free muscle flap transfer is currently the procedure of choice for long-standing facial paralysis. We present a case series of patients treated with gracilis muscle free flap with motor innervation by the masseteric nerve. We discuss the surgical technique and quantify the movement granted by the muscle, the improvement in quality of life and aesthetic results. We report ten patients with unilateral facial paralysis who underwent free gracilis muscle flap, between the years 2010 and 2012 in two tertiary hospitals. It is not reported any failure of the microsuture with survival of all flaps. The muscle movement was quantified by vectors at rest and contraction with an average of 1.7 cm that initiated around the fourth month after surgery. Patients also reported a significant improvement in symmetry at rest as well as oral and ocular competition. As currently presented in literature, microvascular free flaps are the technique of choice for facial reanimation. In our experience, we believe that gracilis muscle flap innervated by the masseteric nerve is a reliable and secure technique that provides adequate functional and aesthetic results. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  18. Vascular quality of care pilot study: how admission to a vascular surgery service affects evidence-based pharmacologic risk factor modification in patients with lower extremity peripheral arterial disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steenhof N

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Naomi Steenhof,1,2 Francesca Le Piane,1 Kori Leblanc,1–3 Naomi R Eisenberg,4 Yvonne Kwan,1 Christine Malmberg,1,6 Alexandra Papadopoulos,5,7 Graham Roche-Nagle4,7,8 1Department of Pharmacy, University Health Network, 2Leslie Dan Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Toronto, 3Centre for Innovation in Complex Care, University Health Network, 4Division of Vascular Surgery, University Health Network, 5Faculty of Nursing, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, 6Victoria General Hospital, Vancouver Island Health Authority, Victoria, BC, 7Peter Munk Cardiac Centre, University Health Network, 8Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada Background: Peripheral arterial disease (PAD guidelines recommend aggressive risk factor modification to improve cardiovascular outcomes. Recommended pharmacologic therapies include antiplatelets, angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE inhibitors, and HMG-CoA-reductase inhibitors (statins. Purpose: We studied the degree to which patient admission to a vascular surgery service increased the use of these therapies. Patients and methods: The authors conducted a retrospective chart review of 150 patients with PAD admitted to the vascular surgery service at a large Canadian tertiary care hospital. The use of recommended pharmacologic therapies at the time of admission and discharge were compared. A multidisciplinary clinical team established criteria by which patients were deemed ineligible to receive any of the recommended therapies. Angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs were considered an alternative to ACE inhibitors. Results: Prior to hospital admission, 64% of patients were on antiplatelet therapy, 67% were on an ACE inhibitor or ARB, and 71% were on a statin. At the time of discharge, 91% of patients were on an antiplatelet (or not, with an acceptable reason, 77% were on an ACE inhibitor or an ARB (or not, with an acceptable reason, and 85% were on a statin (or not, with an acceptable reason. While new

  19. Teaching evidence based medicine to surgery residents-is journal club the best format? A systematic review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadi, Negar; McKenzie, Margaret E; Maclean, Anthony; Brown, Carl J; Mastracci, Tara; McLeod, Robin S

    2012-01-01

    Systematic reviews were performed to assess methods of teaching the evidence-based medicine (EBM) process and determine which format or what components of journal club appear to be most effective in teaching critical appraisal skills to surgical residents and have the highest user satisfaction. MEDLINE, Embase, Web of Science, AMED, PsychINFO, PubMed, Cochrane Library, and Google scholar were searched to identify relevant articles. To be included, studies had to provide details about the format of their EBM curriculum or journal club and report on the effectiveness or participant satisfaction. Potentially relevant articles were independently reviewed by 2 authors and data were extracted on separate data forms. Seven studies met the inclusion criteria for assessment of teaching EBM and 8 studies (including 3 in the EBM systematic review) met criteria for assessment of journal club format. Overall, study quality was poor. Only 2 studies were randomized controlled trials. Five were before-after studies, which showed significant improvement in critical appraisal skills or statistical knowledge following an EBM course or journal club. The 2 randomized controlled trials (RCTs) compared teaching EBM or critical appraisal skills in lecture format or journal club to online learning. There was no significant difference in mean scores in 1 study whereas the other reported significantly better scores in the journal club format. Four studies reported high participant satisfaction with the EBM course or journal club format. There is some evidence that courses with or without the addition of journal clubs lead to improved knowledge of the EBM process although the impact on patient care is unknown. Journal clubs seem to be the preferred way of teaching critical appraisal skills but while some components of journal clubs are favored by participants, it remains unclear which elements are most important for resident learning. Copyright © 2012 Association of Program Directors in

  20. A multidisciplinary approach to vascular surgery procedure coding improves coding accuracy, work relative value unit assignment, and reimbursement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aiello, Francesco A; Judelson, Dejah R; Messina, Louis M; Indes, Jeffrey; FitzGerald, Gordon; Doucet, Danielle R; Simons, Jessica P; Schanzer, Andres

    2016-08-01

    Vascular surgery procedural reimbursement depends on accurate procedural coding and documentation. Despite the critical importance of correct coding, there has been a paucity of research focused on the effect of direct physician involvement. We hypothesize that direct physician involvement in procedural coding will lead to improved coding accuracy, increased work relative value unit (wRVU) assignment, and increased physician reimbursement. This prospective observational cohort study evaluated procedural coding accuracy of fistulograms at an academic medical institution (January-June 2014). All fistulograms were coded by institutional coders (traditional coding) and by a single vascular surgeon whose codes were verified by two institution coders (multidisciplinary coding). The coding methods were compared, and differences were translated into revenue and wRVUs using the Medicare Physician Fee Schedule. Comparison between traditional and multidisciplinary coding was performed for three discrete study periods: baseline (period 1), after a coding education session for physicians and coders (period 2), and after a coding education session with implementation of an operative dictation template (period 3). The accuracy of surgeon operative dictations during each study period was also assessed. An external validation at a second academic institution was performed during period 1 to assess and compare coding accuracy. During period 1, traditional coding resulted in a 4.4% (P = .004) loss in reimbursement and a 5.4% (P = .01) loss in wRVUs compared with multidisciplinary coding. During period 2, no significant difference was found between traditional and multidisciplinary coding in reimbursement (1.3% loss; P = .24) or wRVUs (1.8% loss; P = .20). During period 3, traditional coding yielded a higher overall reimbursement (1.3% gain; P = .26) than multidisciplinary coding. This increase, however, was due to errors by institution coders, with six inappropriately used codes

  1. Usefulness of repeated N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide measurements as incremental predictor for long-term cardiovascular outcome after vascular surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goei, Dustin; van Kuijk, Jan-Peter; Flu, Willem-Jan; Hoeks, Sanne E; Chonchol, Michel; Verhagen, Hence J M; Bax, Jeroen J; Poldermans, Don

    2011-02-15

    Plasma N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-pro-BNP) levels improve preoperative cardiac risk stratification in vascular surgery patients. However, single preoperative measurements of NT-pro-BNP cannot take into account the hemodynamic stress caused by anesthesia and surgery. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to assess the incremental predictive value of changes in NT-pro-BNP during the perioperative period for long-term cardiac mortality. Detailed cardiac histories, rest left ventricular echocardiography, and NT-pro-BNP levels were obtained in 144 patients before vascular surgery and before discharge. The study end point was the occurrence of cardiovascular death during a median follow-up period of 13 months (interquartile range 5 to 20). Preoperatively, the median NT-pro-BNP level in the study population was 314 pg/ml (interquartile range 136 to 1,351), which increased to a median level of 1,505 pg/ml (interquartile range 404 to 6,453) before discharge. During the follow-up period, 29 patients (20%) died, 27 (93%) from cardiovascular causes. The median difference in NT-pro-BNP in the survivors was 665 pg/ml, compared to 5,336 pg/ml in the patients who died (p = 0.01). Multivariate Cox regression analyses, adjusted for cardiac history and cardiovascular risk factors (age, angina pectoris, myocardial infarction, stroke, diabetes mellitus, renal dysfunction, body mass index, type of surgery and the left ventricular ejection fraction), demonstrated that the difference in NT-pro-BNP level between pre- and postoperative measurement was the strongest independent predictor of cardiac outcome (hazard ratio 3.06, 95% confidence interval 1.36 to 6.91). In conclusion, the change in NT-pro-BNP, indicated by repeated measurements before surgery and before discharge is the strongest predictor of cardiac outcomes in patients who undergo vascular surgery. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Vascular ring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Anne Mette S; Larsen, Signe H; Hjortdal, Vibeke E

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Vascular ring is a rare cause of recurrent respiratory infections, dysphagia and stridor. Surgical repair is considered safe but the long-term outcomes are unclear. The purpose of this study was to investigate the mortality and morbidity following vascular ring surgery in a single...... age of 1.4 years (range 0.008-64 years) were operated for vascular ring. Median follow-up was 6.8 years (range 2.4-34 years). Presenting symptoms were stridor (52%), dysphagia or vomiting (52%) and recurrent respiratory infections (48%). There were no early or late deaths. Three months postoperatively...

  3. Validating the use of the Mimic dV-trainer for robotic surgery skill acquisition among urology residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korets, Ruslan; Mues, Adam C; Graversen, Joseph A; Gupta, Mantu; Benson, Mitchell C; Cooper, Kimberly L; Landman, Jaime; Badani, Ketan K

    2011-12-01

    To compare robotic surgery skill acquisition of residents trained with Mimic dVTrainer (MdVT) and da Vinci Surgical System (dVSS) console. No standardized curriculum currently exists for robotic surgical education. The MdVT is a compact hardware platform that closely reproduces the experience of the dVSS. Sixteen urology trainees were randomized into 3 groups. A baseline evaluation using dVSS was performed and consisted of 2 exercises requiring endowrist manipulation (EM), camera movement and clutching (CC), needle control (NC), and knot-tying (KT). Groups 1 and 2 completed a standardized training curriculum on MdVT and dVSS, respectively. Group 3 received no additional training. After completion of the training phase, all trainees completed a secondary evaluation on dVSS consisting of the same exercises performed during baseline evaluation. There was no difference in baseline performance scores across the 3 groups. Although Group 3 showed no significant improvement in EM/CC domain (P = .15), Groups 1 and 2 had statistically significant improvement in EM/CC domain (P = .039 and P = .007, respectively). The difference in improvement between Groups 1 and group 2 was not statistically different (P = .21). Only Group 2 trainees showed significant improvement in the NC and KT domains during secondary evaluation (P = .02). Curriculum-based training with MdVT or dVSS significantly improves robotic surgery aptitude. Similar improvements are seen for exercise domains shared between MdVT and dVSS groups. Follow-up studies are necessary to assess the efficacy of MdVT over a wider spectrum of domains. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Technology-Enabled Remote Monitoring and Self-Management ? Vision for Patient Empowerment Following Cardiac and Vascular Surgery: User Testing and Randomized Controlled Trial Protocol

    OpenAIRE

    McGillion, Michael; Yost, Jennifer; Turner, Andrew; Bender, Duane; Scott, Ted; Carroll, Sandra; Ritvo, Paul; Peter,Elizabeth; Lamy, Andre; Furze, Gill; Krull, Kirsten; Dunlop, Valerie; Good, Amber; Dvirnik, Nazari; Bedini, Debbie

    2016-01-01

    Background Tens of thousands of cardiac and vascular surgeries (CaVS) are performed on seniors in Canada and the United Kingdom each year to improve survival, relieve disease symptoms, and improve health-related quality of life (HRQL). However, chronic postsurgical pain (CPSP), undetected or delayed detection of hemodynamic compromise, complications, and related poor functional status are major problems for substantial numbers of patients during the recovery process. To tackle this problem, w...

  5. Surgical Training and Education in Promoting Professionalism: a comparative assessment of virtue-based leadership development in otolaryngology-head and neck surgery residents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, Kristine; Puscas, Liana; Tucci, Debara; Woodard, Charles; Witsell, David; Esclamado, Ramon M.; Lee, Walter T.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Surgical Training and Education in Promoting Professionalism (STEPP) was developed in 2011 to train tomorrow's leaders during residency. It is based on virtue ethics and takes an approach similar to West Point military academy. The purpose of this research was: (i) to compare the virtue profiles of our residents with that of the military cohort using a standardized virtue assessment tool; and (ii) to assess the value of virtue education on residents. Methods As part of STEPP, otolaryngology residents participated in a virtue-based validated assessment tool called Virtue in Action (VIA) Inventory. This was completed at the initiation of STEPP in July 2011 as well as 1 year later in June 2012. Comparison of the VIA to a military cohort was performed. Leadership ‘Basic Training’ is a series of forums focused on virtues of initiative, integrity, responsibility, self-discipline, and accountability. A pre- and post-test was administered assessing resident perceptions of the value of this ‘Basic Training’. Results Virtues are shared between otolaryngology residents (n=9) and military personnel (n=2,433) as there were no significant differences in strength scores between two military comparison groups and otolaryngology-head and neck surgery (OHNS) residents. There was a significant improvement (p<0.001) in the understanding of components of the leadership vision and a significant improvement in the understanding of key leadership concepts based on ‘Basic Training’. All residents responded in the post-test that the STEPP program was valuable, up from 56%. Conclusions A virtue-based approach is valued by residents as a part of leadership training during residency. PMID:24172053

  6. Surgical Training and Education in Promoting Professionalism: a comparative assessment of virtue-based leadership development in otolaryngology-head and neck surgery residents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristine Schulz

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Surgical Training and Education in Promoting Professionalism (STEPP was developed in 2011 to train tomorrow's leaders during residency. It is based on virtue ethics and takes an approach similar to West Point military academy. The purpose of this research was: (i to compare the virtue profiles of our residents with that of the military cohort using a standardized virtue assessment tool; and (ii to assess the value of virtue education on residents. Methods: As part of STEPP, otolaryngology residents participated in a virtue-based validated assessment tool called Virtue in Action (VIA Inventory. This was completed at the initiation of STEPP in July 2011 as well as 1 year later in June 2012. Comparison of the VIA to a military cohort was performed. Leadership ‘Basic Training’ is a series of forums focused on virtues of initiative, integrity, responsibility, self-discipline, and accountability. A pre- and post-test was administered assessing resident perceptions of the value of this ‘Basic Training’. Results: Virtues are shared between otolaryngology residents (n=9 and military personnel (n=2,433 as there were no significant differences in strength scores between two military comparison groups and otolaryngology-head and neck surgery (OHNS residents. There was a significant improvement (p<0.001 in the understanding of components of the leadership vision and a significant improvement in the understanding of key leadership concepts based on ‘Basic Training’. All residents responded in the post-test that the STEPP program was valuable, up from 56%. Conclusions: A virtue-based approach is valued by residents as a part of leadership training during residency.

  7. Surgical Training and Education in Promoting Professionalism: a comparative assessment of virtue-based leadership development in otolaryngology-head and neck surgery residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, Kristine; Puscas, Liana; Tucci, Debara; Woodard, Charles; Witsell, David; Esclamado, Ramon M; Lee, Walter T

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Surgical Training and Education in Promoting Professionalism (STEPP) was developed in 2011 to train tomorrow's leaders during residency. It is based on virtue ethics and takes an approach similar to West Point military academy. The purpose of this research was: (i) to compare the virtue profiles of our residents with that of the military cohort using a standardized virtue assessment tool; and (ii) to assess the value of virtue education on residents. Methods As part of STEPP, otolaryngology residents participated in a virtue-based validated assessment tool called Virtue in Action (VIA) Inventory. This was completed at the initiation of STEPP in July 2011 as well as 1 year later in June 2012. Comparison of the VIA to a military cohort was performed. Leadership 'Basic Training' is a series of forums focused on virtues of initiative, integrity, responsibility, self-discipline, and accountability. A pre- and post-test was administered assessing resident perceptions of the value of this 'Basic Training'. Results Virtues are shared between otolaryngology residents (n=9) and military personnel (n=2,433) as there were no significant differences in strength scores between two military comparison groups and otolaryngology-head and neck surgery (OHNS) residents. There was a significant improvement (pleadership vision and a significant improvement in the understanding of key leadership concepts based on 'Basic Training'. All residents responded in the post-test that the STEPP program was valuable, up from 56%. Conclusions A virtue-based approach is valued by residents as a part of leadership training during residency.

  8. Association of Otolaryngology Resident Duty Hour Restrictions With Procedure-Specific Outcomes in Head and Neck Endocrine Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Aaron; Braden, Lauren; Wan, Jim; Sebelik, Merry

    2017-06-01

    Graduate medical education has undergone a transformation from traditional long work hours to a restricted plan to allow adequate rest for residents. The initial goal of this restriction is to improve patient outcomes. To determine whether duty hour restrictions had any impact on surgery-specific outcomes by analyzing complications following thyroid and parathyroid procedures performed before and after duty hour reform. Retrospective cross-sectional analysis of the National Inpatient Sample (NIS).The NIS was queried for procedure codes associated with thyroid and parathyroid procedures for the years 2000 to 2002 and 2006 to 2008. Hospitals were divided based on teaching status into 3 groups: nonteaching hospitals (NTHs), teaching hospitals without otolaryngology programs (THs), and teaching hospitals with otolaryngology programs (THs-OTO). Procedure-specific complication rates, length of stay, and mortality rates were collected. SAS statistical software (version 9.4) was used for analysis with adjustment using Charlson comorbidity index. Total numbers of head and neck endocrine procedures were 34 685 and 39 770 (a 14.7% increase), for 2000 to 2002 and 2006 to 2008, respectively. THs-OTO contributed a greater share of procedures in 2006 to 2008 (from 18% to 25%). With the earlier period serving as the reference, length of stay remained constant (2.1 days); however, total hospital charges increased (from $12 978 to $23 708; P otolaryngology programs.

  9. An improvement of cerebral hemodynamics in a newly developed perfusion area evaluated by intra-arterial SPECT following vascular reconstructive surgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nochide, Ichiro [Ehime Univ., Shigenobu (Japan). School of Medicine

    1999-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the changes in regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) and vascular reserve ({Delta}CBF) responding to acetazolamide loading by {sup 133}Xe SPECT. In combination, this study assessed the newly developed region of cerebral perfusion via bypass arteries after surgical vascular reconstruction in 11 hemispheres of 11 patients with atherosclerotic arterial occlusive disease and adult onset moyamoya disease. In patients with atherosclerotic occlusive disease, the cerebral perfusion from bypass arteries mainly developed in the preoperatively low {Delta}CBF territory. Although rCBF did not significantly alter after vascular reconstruction, preoperatively low {Delta}CBF was significantly improved to the normal range in the promotion of postoperatively newly born perfusion from bypass arteries. In 21 hemispheres of 13 patients with adult onset moyamoya disease, the postoperatively newly born perfusion from bypass arteries was significantly developed in the regions with either preoperative low rCBF or low {Delta}CBF. Although both rCBF and {Delta}CBF were significantly improved after the operation, {Delta}CBF was not restored satisfactorily up to the normal range in contrast to the sufficient increase of rCBF, even where the perfusion from the bypass artery was observed after the reconstructive surgeries. Vascular reconstructive surgeries were beneficial for the improvement of {Delta}CBF in the atherosclerotic arterial occlusive disease and rCBF in the adult-onset moyamoya disease, respectively. (author)

  10. Development of a new valid, reliable, and internationally applicable assessment tool of residents' competence in ophthalmic surgery (an American Ophthalmological Society thesis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golnik, C; Beaver, Hilary; Gauba, Vinod; Lee, Andrew G; Mayorga, Eduardo; Palis, Gabriela; Saleh, George M

    2013-09-01

    To test the validity and reliability of a new tool for assessing residents' competence in ophthalmic surgery. Changing paradigms of ophthalmic education in the United States have influenced worldwide ophthalmic education and necessitated new methods of assessing resident competence. Accordingly, a new tool for assessing residents' competence in ophthalmic surgery (phacoemulsification) that could be applicable internationally was developed. We hypothesize that this instrument is valid and reliable. A panel of six international content experts adapted a previously published tool for assessing phacoemulsification. The tool (called the International Council of Ophthalmology's Ophthalmology Surgical Competency Assessment Rubric, or ICO-OSCAR:phaco) was reviewed by 12 international content experts for their constructive comments, which were incorporated to ensure content validity. Ten expert cataract surgery teachers then graded six recorded phacoemulsification surgeries with the ICO-OSCAR:phaco to investigate inter-rater reliability. The coefficient alpha statistic (a measure of reliability/internal consistency) for the ICO-OSCAR:phaco as a whole was 0.92, and 17 of its 20 dimensions had alpha coefficients greater than 0.70. The ICO-OSCAR:phaco is a valid and reliable assessment tool that could be applied internationally to satisfy the global need of new instruments to comply with emerging trends in ophthalmic education. A toolbox of similar surgical competency assessment tools is being developed.

  11. Fondaparinux for intra and perioperative anticoagulation in patients with heparin-induced thrombocytopenia candidates for peripheral vascular surgery: Report of 4 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illuminati, Giulio; Calio', Francesco G; Pizzardi, Giulia; Amatucci, Chiara; Masci, Federica; Palumbo, Piergaspare

    2016-01-01

    Intra and perioperative anticoagulation in patients with heparin induced thrombocytopenia (HIT), candidates for peripheral vascular surgery remains a challenge, as the best alternative to heparin has not yet been established. We evaluated the off-label use of fondaparinux in four patients with HIT, undergoing peripheral vascular surgery procedures. Four patients of whom 3 men of a mean age of 66 years, with proven heparin induced thrombocytopenia (HIT) underwent two axillo-femoral bypasses, one femoro-popliteal bypass and one resection of a splenic artery aneurysm under fondaparinux. No intra or perioperative bleeding or thrombosis of new onset was observed. In the absence of a valid alternative to heparin for intra and perioperative anticoagulation in HIT, several other anticoagulants can be used in an off-label setting. However, no general consensus exist on which should be the one of choice. In this small series fondaparinux appeared to be both safe and effective. These preliminary results seem to justify the off-label use of fondaparinux for intra and perioperative anticoagulation in patients with HIT, candidates for peripheral vascular surgery interventions. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  12. Evaluation of computer-assisted mandibular reconstruction with vascularized iliac crest bone graft compared to conventional surgery: a randomized prospective clinical trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Computer-assisted surgery plays an increasingly important role in mandibular reconstruction, ensuring the best possible masticatory function and aesthetic outcome. Methods Twenty patients were randomly assigned to computer-assisted or conventional mandibular reconstruction with vascularized iliac crest bone graft in a prospective study design. Virtual surgical planning was based on preoperative CT-data using specific surgical planning software. A rapid prototyping guide transferred the virtual surgery plan to the operation site. During surgery the transplant ischemic time, reconstruction time, time for shaping the transplant and amount of bone removed were measured. Additionally, the difference in the intercondylar distance before and after surgery was calculated. Results Computer-assisted surgery shortened the time of transplant ischemia (P < 0.005) and defect reconstruction (P < 0.001) compared to conventional surgery. The time to saw and shape the transplant at the donor site was shorter using conventional surgery (P < 0.005); therefore, the overall time for surgery didn’t change (P = 0.527). In the computer-assisted group, the amount of bone harvested equaled the defect size, whereas the transplant size in the conventional group exceeded the defect site by 16.8 ± 5.6 mm (P < 0.001) on average. The intercondylar distance before compared to after surgery was less affected in the computer-assisted than in the conventional group (P < 0.001). Conclusions The presented study shows that computer-assisted surgery can help reduce the time for mandibular defect reconstruction and consequently the transplant ischemic time. In the computer-assisted group, the iliac crest donor site defect was downsized and the postoperative condyle position was less altered, reducing possible risks of postoperative complications and donor site morbidity. Trial Registration DRKS00005181. PMID:24716651

  13. Evaluation of protocol-guided scheduled basal-nutritional-correction insulin over standard care for vascular surgery patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harbin, Megan; Dossa, Anar; de Lemos, Jane; Drummond, Isla; Paty, Breay; Taylor, Bobby

    2015-06-01

    Practice guidelines have recommended scheduled basal, nutritional and correction insulin to manage hyperglycemia in the hospital setting. For many decades, however, the primary practice has been sliding scale insulin. To evaluate the efficacy and safety of an institution-specific basal-nutritional-correction insulin preprinted order (BNC-PPO). A retrospective, single-centre chart review was conducted on patients admitted to a vascular surgery service to compare inpatient glycemia control before and after implementation of the BNC-PPO. Patients were included if they were aged 19 years or more, admitted between June 2009 and December 2010 (for pre-BNC-PPO) or between April 2011 and August 2012 (for