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Sample records for vascular permeability electrophysiology

  1. Aminoguanidine effects on nerve blood flow, vascular permeability, electrophysiology, and oxygen free radicals

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    Kihara, Mikihiro; Schmelzer, J.D.; Poduslo, J.F.; Curran, G.L.; Nickander, K.K.; Low, P.A. (Mayo Foundation, Rochester, MN (United States))

    1991-07-15

    Since advanced glycosylation end products have been suggested to mediate hyperglycemia-induced microvascular atherogenesis and because aminoguanidine (AG) prevents their generation, the authors examined whether AG could prevent or ameliorate the physiologic and biochemical indices of streptozotocin (STZ)-induced experimental diabetic neuropathy. Four groups of adult Sprague-Dawley rats were studied: group I received STZ plus AG, group II received STZ plus AG, group III received STZ alone, and group IV was a control. They monitored conduction and action potential amplitudes serially in sciatic-tibial and caudal nerves, nerve blood flow, oxygen free radical activity (conjugated dienes and hydroperoxides), and the product of the permeability coefficient and surface area to {sup 125}I-labeled albumin. STZ-induced diabetes (group III) caused a 57% reduction in nerve blood flow and in abnormal nerve conduction and amplitudes and a 60% increase in conjugated dienes. Nerve blood flow was normalized by 8 weeks with AG (groups I and II) and conduction was significantly improved, in a dose-dependent manner, by 16 and 24 weeks in sciatic-tibial and caudal nerves, respectively. The permeability coefficient was not impaired, suggesting a normal blood-nerve barrier function for albumin, and the oxygen free-radical indices were not ameliorated by AG. They suggest that AG reverses nerve ischemia and more gradually improves their electrophysiology by an action on nerve microvessels. AG may have potential in the treatment of diabetic neuropathy.

  2. Vascular permeability in cerebral cavernous malformations

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    Mikati, Abdul G; Khanna, Omaditya; Zhang, Lingjiao

    2015-01-01

    -controlled observational study investigated whether the brains of human subjects with familial CCM show vascular hyperpermeability by dynamic contrast-enhanced quantitative perfusion magnetic resonance imaging, in comparison with CCM cases without familial disease, and whether lesional or brain vascular permeability...... vascular hyperpermeability in humans with an autosomal dominant disease, as predicted mechanistically. Brain permeability, more than lesion permeability, may serve as a biomarker of CCM disease activity, and help calibrate potential drug therapy....... correlates with CCM disease activity. Permeability in white matter far (WMF) from lesions was significantly greater in familial than in sporadic cases, but was similar in CCM lesions. Permeability in WMF increased with age in sporadic patients, but not in familial cases. Patients with more aggressive...

  3. Vascular permeability alterations induced by arsenic.

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    Chen, Shih-Chieh; Tsai, Ming-Hsien; Wang, Hsiu-Jen; Yu, Hsin-Su; Chang, Louis W

    2004-01-01

    The impact of arsenic on the integrity of blood vessels in vivo via in situ exposure (local injection) of arsenic was investigated. Vascular permeability changes were evaluated by means of the Evans blue assay and the India ink tracer techniques. Rats were intravenously injected with Evans blue followed by intradermal injections of various doses of sodium arsenite on the back skins of the animals. Evans blue at different time points was extracted and assayed as indices of vascular leakage. Skin at various time point injection sites was sampled for arsenic measurement via graphite furnace atomic absorption spectroscopy. Our time course study with Evans blue technique demonstrated a biphasic pattern of vascular permeability change: an early phase of permeability reduction and a later phase of permeability promotion at all dose levels tested. The India ink tracer technique also demonstrated a time-correlated increase in vascular labelling in the tissues examined, signifying an increase in vascular leakage with time. Moreover, we found that despite an early increase in tissue arsenic content at time of injection, tissue arsenic declined rapidly and returned to near control levels after 30-60 min. Thus, an inverse correlation between tissue arsenic content and the extent of vascular permeability was apparent. This study provides the first demonstration that in situ exposure to arsenic will produce vascular dysfunction (vascular leakage) in vivo.

  4. Vascular permeability in cerebral cavernous malformations.

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    Mikati, Abdul G; Khanna, Omaditya; Zhang, Lingjiao; Girard, Romuald; Shenkar, Robert; Guo, Xiaodong; Shah, Akash; Larsson, Henrik B W; Tan, Huan; Li, Luying; Wishnoff, Matthew S; Shi, Changbin; Christoforidis, Gregory A; Awad, Issam A

    2015-10-01

    Patients with the familial form of cerebral cavernous malformations (CCMs) are haploinsufficient for the CCM1, CCM2, or CCM3 gene. Loss of corresponding CCM proteins increases RhoA kinase-mediated endothelial permeability in vitro, and in mouse brains in vivo. A prospective case-controlled observational study investigated whether the brains of human subjects with familial CCM show vascular hyperpermeability by dynamic contrast-enhanced quantitative perfusion magnetic resonance imaging, in comparison with CCM cases without familial disease, and whether lesional or brain vascular permeability correlates with CCM disease activity. Permeability in white matter far (WMF) from lesions was significantly greater in familial than in sporadic cases, but was similar in CCM lesions. Permeability in WMF increased with age in sporadic patients, but not in familial cases. Patients with more aggressive familial CCM disease had greater WMF permeability compared to those with milder disease phenotype, but similar lesion permeability. Subjects receiving statin medications for routine cardiovascular indications had a trend of lower WMF, but not lesion, permeability. This is the first demonstration of brain vascular hyperpermeability in humans with an autosomal dominant disease, as predicted mechanistically. Brain permeability, more than lesion permeability, may serve as a biomarker of CCM disease activity, and help calibrate potential drug therapy.

  5. Vascular permeability in cerebral cavernous malformations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikati, Abdul G; Khanna, Omaditya; Zhang, Lingjiao; Girard, Romuald; Shenkar, Robert; Guo, Xiaodong; Shah, Akash; Larsson, Henrik BW; Tan, Huan; Li, Luying; Wishnoff, Matthew S; Shi, Changbin; Christoforidis, Gregory A; Awad, Issam A

    2015-01-01

    Patients with the familial form of cerebral cavernous malformations (CCMs) are haploinsufficient for the CCM1, CCM2, or CCM3 gene. Loss of corresponding CCM proteins increases RhoA kinase-mediated endothelial permeability in vitro, and in mouse brains in vivo. A prospective case-controlled observational study investigated whether the brains of human subjects with familial CCM show vascular hyperpermeability by dynamic contrast-enhanced quantitative perfusion magnetic resonance imaging, in comparison with CCM cases without familial disease, and whether lesional or brain vascular permeability correlates with CCM disease activity. Permeability in white matter far (WMF) from lesions was significantly greater in familial than in sporadic cases, but was similar in CCM lesions. Permeability in WMF increased with age in sporadic patients, but not in familial cases. Patients with more aggressive familial CCM disease had greater WMF permeability compared to those with milder disease phenotype, but similar lesion permeability. Subjects receiving statin medications for routine cardiovascular indications had a trend of lower WMF, but not lesion, permeability. This is the first demonstration of brain vascular hyperpermeability in humans with an autosomal dominant disease, as predicted mechanistically. Brain permeability, more than lesion permeability, may serve as a biomarker of CCM disease activity, and help calibrate potential drug therapy. PMID:25966944

  6. Gap junction protein connexin43 exacerbates lung vascular permeability.

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    James J O'Donnell

    Full Text Available Increased vascular permeability causes pulmonary edema that impairs arterial oxygenation and thus contributes to morbidity and mortality associated with Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome and sepsis. Although components of intercellular adhesive and tight junctions are critical for maintaining the endothelial barrier, there has been limited study of the roles of gap junctions and their component proteins (connexins. Since connexins can modulate inflammatory signaling in other systems, we hypothesized that connexins may also regulate pulmonary endothelial permeability. The relationships between connexins and the permeability response to inflammatory stimuli were studied in cultured human pulmonary endothelial cells. Prolonged treatment with thrombin, lipopolysaccharide, or pathological cyclic stretch increased levels of mRNA and protein for the major connexin, connexin43 (Cx43. Thrombin and lipopolysaccharide both increased intercellular communication assayed by transfer of microinjected Lucifer yellow. Although thrombin decreased transendothelial resistance in these cells, the response was attenuated by pretreatment with the connexin inhibitor carbenoxolone. Additionally, the decreases of transendothelial resistance produced by either thrombin or lipopolysaccharide were attenuated by reducing Cx43 expression by siRNA knockdown. Both carbenoxolone and Cx43 knockdown also abrogated thrombin-induced phosphorylation of myosin light chain. Taken together, these data suggest that increased lung vascular permeability induced by inflammatory conditions may be amplified via increased expression of Cx43 and intercellular communication among pulmonary endothelial cells.

  7. Non-invasive optical modulation of local vascular permeability

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    Choi, Myunghwan; Choi, Chulhee

    2011-03-01

    For a systemically administered drug to act, it first needs to cross the vascular wall. This step represents a bottleneck for drug development, especially in the brain or retina, where tight junctions between endothelial cells form physiological barriers. Here, we demonstrate that femtosecond pulsed laser irradiation focused on the blood vessel wall induces transient permeabilization of plasma. Nonlinear absorption of the pulsed laser enabled the noninvasive modulation of vascular permeability with high spatial selectivity in three dimensions. By combining this method with systemic injection, we could locally deliver molecular probes in various tissues, such as brain cortex, meninges, ear, striated muscle, and bone. We suggest this method as a novel delivery tool for molecular probes or drugs.

  8. Vascular permeability and iron deposition biomarkers in longitudinal follow-up of cerebral cavernous malformations

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    Girard, Romuald; Fam, Maged D; Zeineddine, Hussein A

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Vascular permeability and iron leakage are central features of cerebral cavernous malformation (CCM) pathogenesis. The authors aimed to correlate prospective clinical behavior of CCM lesions with longitudinal changes in biomarkers of dynamic contrast-enhanced quantitative permeability...

  9. New continuous-flow total artificial heart and vascular permeability.

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    Feng, Jun; Cohn, William E; Parnis, Steven M; Sodha, Neel R; Clements, Richard T; Sellke, Nicholas; Frazier, O Howard; Sellke, Frank W

    2015-12-01

    We tested the short-term effects of completely nonpulsatile versus pulsatile circulation after ventricular excision and replacement with total implantable pumps in an animal model on peripheral vascular permeability. Ten calves underwent cardiac replacement with two HeartMate III continuous-flow rotary pumps. In five calves, the pump speed was rapidly modulated to impart a low-frequency pulse pressure in the physiologic range (10-25 mm Hg) at a rate of 40 pulses per minute (PP). The remaining five calves were supported with a pulseless systemic circulation and no modulation of pump speed (NP). Skeletal muscle biopsies were obtained before cardiac replacement (baseline) and on postoperative days (PODs) 1, 7, and 14. Skeletal muscle-tissue water content was measured, and morphologic alterations of skeletal muscle were assessed. VE-cadherin, phospho-VE-cadherin, and CD31 were analyzed by immunohistochemistry. There were no significant changes in tissue water content and skeletal muscle morphology within group or between groups at baseline, PODs 1, 7, and 14, respectively. There were no significant alterations in the expression and/or distribution of VE-cadherin, phospho-VE-cadherin, and CD31 in skeletal muscle vasculature at baseline, PODs 1, 7, and 14 within each group or between the two groups, respectively. Although continuous-flow total artificial heart (CFTAH) with or without a pulse pressure caused slight increase in tissue water content and histologic damage scores at PODs 7 and 14, it failed to reach statistical significance. There was no significant adherens-junction protein degradation and phosphorylation in calf skeletal muscle microvasculature after CFTAH implantation, suggesting that short term of CFTAH with or without pulse pressure did not cause peripheral endothelial injury and did not increase the peripheral microvascular permeability. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. PLVAP in diabetic retinopathy: A gatekeeper of angiogenesis and vascular permeability

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    Wiśniewska-Kruk, J.

    2014-01-01

    Nowadays, approximately 4 million people worldwide experience blindness or severe vision loss caused by diabetic retinopathy. Diabetic retinopathy is a multifactorial disease that can progress from minor changes in vascular permeability, into a proliferative retinal disorder. The increasing

  11. Leukotriene D4 increases pulmonary vascular permeability and pressure by different mechanisms in the rabbit.

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    Farrukh, I S; Sciuto, A M; Spannhake, E W; Gurtner, G H; Michael, J R

    1986-08-01

    We designed experiments to define the effects of leukotriene D4 (LTD4) in the rabbit lung and to determine whether or not these effects were due to the synthesis of cyclooxygenase products. Infusion of LTD4 (0.01, 0.03, and 0.10 microgram) into the rabbit pulmonary vasculature caused a dose-related increase in pulmonary arterial pressure and tracheal pressure. Pretreatment with FPL 55712 (38 microM), a leukotriene receptor antagonist, or indomethacin (10 micrograms/ml of perfusate) completely prevented the increase in tracheal and pulmonary arterial pressure. We also studied the effect of LTD4 on pulmonary vascular permeability by measuring lung weight gain at 4 levels of left atrial pressures (0, 5, 10, and 15 mmHg). Leukotriene D4 increased lung weight gain at all levels of left atrial pressure compared with that in the control group. Pretreatment with FPL 55712 completely inhibited the increase in vascular permeability caused by LTD4. Although pretreatment with indomethacin blocked the increase in tracheal and vascular pressure caused by LTD4, it did not prevent the increase in vascular permeability. We conclude that in the rabbit, LTD4 increases tracheal pressure, pulmonary arterial pressure, and pulmonary vascular permeability. Leukotriene D4 increases tracheal and pulmonary arterial pressure by stimulating the synthesis of cyclooxygenase products, and it increases vascular permeability through a mechanism that does not require the synthesis of cyclooxygenase products.

  12. Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor-B Induces a Distinct Electrophysiological Phenotype in Mouse Heart

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    Nikolay Naumenko

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Vascular endothelial growth factor B (VEGF-B is a potent mediator of vascular, metabolic, growth, and stress responses in the heart, but the effects on cardiac muscle and cardiomyocyte function are not known. The purpose of this study was to assess the effects of VEGF-B on the energy metabolism, contractile, and electrophysiological properties of mouse cardiac muscle and cardiac muscle cells. In vivo and ex vivo analysis of cardiac-specific VEGF-B TG mice indicated that the contractile function of the TG hearts was normal. Neither the oxidative metabolism of isolated TG cardiomyocytes nor their energy substrate preference showed any difference to WT cardiomyocytes. Similarly, myocyte Ca2+ signaling showed only minor changes compared to WT myocytes. However, VEGF-B overexpression induced a distinct electrophysiological phenotype characterized by ECG changes such as an increase in QRSp time and decreases in S and R amplitudes. At the level of isolated TG cardiomyocytes, these changes were accompanied with decreased action potential upstroke velocity and increased duration (APD60–70. These changes were partly caused by downregulation of sodium current (INa due to reduced expression of Nav1.5. Furthermore, TG myocytes had alterations in voltage-gated K+ currents, namely decreased density of transient outward current (Ito and total K+ current (Ipeak. At the level of transcription, these were accompanied by downregulation of Kv channel-interacting protein 2 (Kcnip2, a known modulatory subunit for Kv4.2/3 channel. Cardiac VEGF-B overexpression induces a distinct electrophysiological phenotype including remodeling of cardiomyocyte ion currents, which in turn induce changes in action potential waveform and ECG.

  13. Role of platelets in maintenance of pulmonary vascular permeability to protein

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    Lo, S.K.; Burhop, K.E.; Kaplan, J.E.; Malik, A.B. (Albany Medical College of Union Univ., NY (USA))

    1988-04-01

    The authors examined the role of platelets in maintenance of pulmonary vascular integrity by inducing thrombocytopenia in sheep using antiplatelet serum (APS). A causal relationship between thrombocytopenia and increase in pulmonary vascular permeability was established by platelet repletion using platelet-rich plasma (PRP). Sheep were chronically instrumented and lung lymph fistulas prepared to monitor pulmonary lymph flow (Q{sub lym}). A balloon catheter was positioned in the left atrium to assess pulmonary vascular permeability to protein after raising the left atrial pressure (P{sub la}). Thrombocytopenia was maintained for 3 days by daily intramuscular APS injections. In studies using cultured bovine pulmonary artery endothelial monolayers, transendothelia permeability of {sup 125}I-labeled albumin was reduced 50 and 95%, respectively, when 2.5 {times} 10{sup 7} or 5 {times} 10{sup 7} platelets were added onto endothelial monolayers. However, addition of 5 {times} 10{sup 6} platelets or 5 {times} 10{sup 7} red blood cells did not reduce endothelial monolayer albumin permeability. Results indicate that platelets are required for the maintenance of pulmonary vascular permeability. Reduction in permeability appears to involve an interaction of platelets with the endothelium.

  14. Early vascular injury and increased vascular permeability in gastric mucosal injury caused by ethanol in the rat.

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    Szabo, S; Trier, J S; Brown, A; Schnoor, J

    1985-01-01

    The hypothesis that vascular injury contributes to the development of hemorrhagic erosions after intragastric administration of ethanol has been examined in the rat using vascular tracers. Extravasation of intravenously injected Evans blue into the gastric wall and into gastric contents was used as an indicator of vascular permeability. India ink and monastral blue, which label damaged blood vessels, were used to demonstrate vascular injury morphologically. Intragastric instillation of 75% and 100% ethanol induced increased vascular permeability within 1-3 min and resulted in monastral blue labeling of vessels in 13% and 17%, respectively, of the glandular mucosa within 1 min. After 1 h of 100% ethanol exposure, the areal density of monastral blue-stained blood vessels did not increase compared with that seen at 1 min, but the areal density of grossly visible hemorrhagic lesions increased strikingly and approximated that of vessel staining. The hemorrhagic erosions consistently occurred in regions of glandular mucosa where vessels were stained with monastral blue. Pretreatment with prostaglandin F2 beta or cysteamine reduced ethanol-induced Evans blue extravasation and monastral blue staining of mucosal blood vessels but did not reduce histologic evidence of gastric surface cell damage in the glandular mucosa. As increased vascular permeability and morphologically detectable vascular lesions consistently preceded the development of grossly visible hemorrhagic erosions in the glandular mucosa, we suggest that vascular injury is an early pathogenetic factor in the development of ethanol-induced gastric hemorrhagic erosions. The data also indicate that the degree of vascular damage, unlike the injury to surface epithelial cells, is reduced by pretreatment with prostaglandin F2 beta or the sulfhydryl cysteamine.

  15. Vascular endothelial growth factor is increased during the first 48 hours of human septic shock and correlates with vascular permeability.

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    Pickkers, P.; Sprong, T.; Eijk, L.T. van; Hoeven, J.G. van der; Smits, P.; Deuren, M. van

    2005-01-01

    Meningococcal septic shock is an important cause of morbidity and mortality in children and young adults worldwide and is the prototypical gram-negative septic shock. One of the key factors in the development of shock is increased microvascular permeability. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)

  16. Vascular permeability and iron deposition biomarkers in longitudinal follow-up of cerebral cavernous malformations.

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    Girard, Romuald; Fam, Maged D; Zeineddine, Hussein A; Tan, Huan; Mikati, Abdul Ghani; Shi, Changbin; Jesselson, Michael; Shenkar, Robert; Wu, Meijing; Cao, Ying; Hobson, Nicholas; Larsson, Henrik B W; Christoforidis, Gregory A; Awad, Issam A

    2017-07-01

    OBJECTIVE Vascular permeability and iron leakage are central features of cerebral cavernous malformation (CCM) pathogenesis. The authors aimed to correlate prospective clinical behavior of CCM lesions with longitudinal changes in biomarkers of dynamic contrast-enhanced quantitative permeability (DCEQP) and quantitative susceptibility mapping (QSM) assessed by MRI. METHODS Forty-six patients with CCMs underwent 2 or more permeability and/or susceptibility studies in conjunction with baseline and follow-up imaging and clinical surveillance during a mean 12.05 months of follow-up (range 2.4-31.27 months). Based on clinical and imaging features, cases/lesions were classified as stable, unstable, or recovering. Associated and predictive changes in quantitative permeability and susceptibility were investigated. RESULTS Lesional mean permeability and QSM values were not significantly different in stable versus unstable lesions at baseline. Mean lesional permeability in unstable CCMs with lesional bleeding or growth increased significantly (+85.9% change; p = 0.005), while mean permeability in stable and recovering lesions did not significantly change. Mean lesional QSM values significantly increased in unstable lesions (+44.1% change; p = 0.01), decreased slightly with statistical significance in stable lesions (-3.2% change; p = 0.003), and did not significantly change in recovering lesions. Familial cases developing new lesions during the follow-up period showed a higher background brain permeability at baseline (p = 0.001), as well as higher regional permeability (p = 0.003) in the area that would later develop a new lesion as compared with the homologous contralateral brain region. CONCLUSIONS In vivo assessment of vascular permeability and iron deposition on MRI can serve as objective and quantifiable biomarkers of disease activity in CCMs. This may be applied in natural history studies and may help calibrate clinical trials. The 2 techniques are likely applicable in

  17. Rhubarb Antagonizes Matrix Metalloproteinase-9-induced Vascular Endothelial Permeability

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    Yun-Liang Cui

    2016-01-01

    Conclusions: The rhubarb mixture of emodin, 3,8-dihydroxy-1-methyl-anthraquinone-2-carboxylic acid, 1-O-caffeoyl-2-(4-hydroxyl-O-cinnamoyl-β-D-glucose, daucosterol linoleate, and rhein, at a low concentration, antagonized the MMP9-induced HUVEC monolayer permeability by promoting HUVEC proliferation and reducing extracellular VE-cadherin concentrations.

  18. Real-time visualization and quantitation of vascular permeability in vivo: implications for drug delivery.

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    Desmond B S Pink

    Full Text Available The leaky, heterogeneous vasculature of human tumors prevents the even distribution of systemic drugs within cancer tissues. However, techniques for studying vascular delivery systems in vivo often require complex mammalian models and time-consuming, surgical protocols. The developing chicken embryo is a well-established model for human cancer that is easily accessible for tumor imaging. To assess this model for the in vivo analysis of tumor permeability, human tumors were grown on the chorioallantoic membrane (CAM, a thin vascular membrane which overlays the growing chick embryo. The real-time movement of small fluorescent dextrans through the tumor vasculature and surrounding tissues were used to measure vascular leak within tumor xenografts. Dextran extravasation within tumor sites was selectively enhanced an interleukin-2 (IL-2 peptide fragment or vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF. VEGF treatment increased vascular leak in the tumor core relative to surrounding normal tissue and increased doxorubicin uptake in human tumor xenografts. This new system easily visualizes vascular permeability changes in vivo and suggests that vascular permeability may be manipulated to improve chemotherapeutic targeting to tumors.

  19. Nicotinamide and its metabolite N-methylnicotinamide increase skin vascular permeability in rats.

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    Pietrzak, L; Mogielnicki, A; Buczko, W

    2009-04-01

    It has been suggested that topically applied nicotinamide and its metabolite N-methylnicotinamide (NMN(+)) might be useful agents for treatment of dermatological disorders such as acne vulgaris and rosacea. This study aimed to find out if the mechanism of these therapeutic effects depends on their vascular effects, by investigating if nicotinamide and NMN(+) are able to influence vascular permeability of the vessels in the skin on the back of Wistar rats. A dose-dependent increase in vascular permeability was seen in rats treated intradermally with nicotinamide and NMN(+). Interestingly, a significantly stronger effect of NMN(+) compared with nicotinamide was evident. Increased vascular permeability in rats treated with 0.5% NMN(+) ointment was seen. Moreover, indomethacin, a cyclo-oxygenase 1 and 2 inhibitor and N(G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME), a nitric oxide (NO) synthase inhibitor, reduced the observed effects of nicotinamide and NMN(+). This study provides direct in vivo evidence that nicotinamide and its metabolite NMN(+) increase skin vascular permeability in rats by a mechanism that may involve NO and prostaglandins.

  20. Suppressions of serotonin-induced increased vascular permeability and leukocyte infiltration by Bixa orellana leaf extract.

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    Yong, Yoke Keong; Sulaiman, NurShahira; Hakim, Muhammad Nazrul; Lian, Gwendoline Ee Cheng; Zakaria, Zainul Amirudin; Othman, Fauziah; Ahmad, Zuraini

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the anti-inflammatory activities of aqueous extract of Bixa orellana (AEBO) leaves and its possible mechanisms in animal models. The anti-inflammatory activity of the extract was evaluated using serotonin-induced rat paw edema, increased peritoneal vascular permeability, and leukocyte infiltrations in an air-pouch model. Nitric oxide (NO), indicated by the sum of nitrites and nitrates, and vascular growth endothelial growth factor (VEGF) were measured in paw tissues of rats to determine their involvement in the regulation of increased permeability. Pretreatments with AEBO (50 and 150 mg kg⁻¹) prior to serotonin inductions resulted in maximum inhibitions of 56.2% of paw volume, 45.7% of Evans blue dye leakage in the peritoneal vascular permeability model, and 83.9% of leukocyte infiltration in the air-pouch model. 57.2% maximum inhibition of NO and 27% of VEGF formations in rats' paws were observed with AEBO at the dose of 150 mg kg⁻¹. Pharmacological screening of the extract showed significant (P < 0.05) anti-inflammatory activity, indicated by the suppressions of increased vascular permeability and leukocyte infiltration. The inhibitions of these inflammatory events are probably mediated via inhibition of NO and VEGF formation and release.

  1. Suppressions of Serotonin-Induced Increased Vascular Permeability and Leukocyte Infiltration by Bixa orellana Leaf Extract

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    Yoke Keong Yong

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to evaluate the anti-inflammatory activities of aqueous extract of Bixa orellana (AEBO leaves and its possible mechanisms in animal models. The anti-inflammatory activity of the extract was evaluated using serotonin-induced rat paw edema, increased peritoneal vascular permeability, and leukocyte infiltrations in an air-pouch model. Nitric oxide (NO, indicated by the sum of nitrites and nitrates, and vascular growth endothelial growth factor (VEGF were measured in paw tissues of rats to determine their involvement in the regulation of increased permeability. Pretreatments with AEBO (50 and 150 mg kg−1 prior to serotonin inductions resulted in maximum inhibitions of 56.2% of paw volume, 45.7% of Evans blue dye leakage in the peritoneal vascular permeability model, and 83.9% of leukocyte infiltration in the air-pouch model. 57.2% maximum inhibition of NO and 27% of VEGF formations in rats’ paws were observed with AEBO at the dose of 150 mg kg−1. Pharmacological screening of the extract showed significant (P<0.05 anti-inflammatory activity, indicated by the suppressions of increased vascular permeability and leukocyte infiltration. The inhibitions of these inflammatory events are probably mediated via inhibition of NO and VEGF formation and release.

  2. Functional and molecular mapping of uncoupling between vascular permeability and loss of vascular maturation in ovarian carcinoma xenografts: the role of stroma cells in tumor angiogenesis.

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    Gilad, Assaf A; Israely, Tomer; Dafni, Hagit; Meir, Gila; Cohen, Batya; Neeman, Michal

    2005-11-01

    Maintaining homogeneous perfusion in tissues undergoing remodeling and vascular expansion requires tight orchestration of the signals leading to endothelial sprouting and subsequent recruitment of perivascular contractile cells and vascular maturation. This regulation, however, is frequently disrupted in tumors. We previously demonstrated the role of tumor-associated myofibroblasts in vascularization and exit from dormancy of human ovarian carcinoma xenografts in nude mice. The aim of this work was to determine the contribution of stroma- and tumor cell-derived angiogenic growth factors to the heterogeneity of vascular permeability and maturation in MLS human ovarian carcinoma tumors. We show by RT-PCR and by in situ hybridization that VEGF was expressed by the tumor cells, while angiopoietin-1 and -2 were expressed only by the infiltrating host stroma cells. Vascular maturation was detected in vivo by vasoreactivity to hypercapnia, measured by BOLD contrast MRI and validated by immunostaining of histologic sections to alpha-smooth muscle actin. Vascular permeability was measured in vivo by dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI using albumin-based contrast material and validated in histologic sections by fluorescent staining of the biotinylated contrast material. MRI as well as histologic correlation maps between vascular maturation and vascular permeability revealed a wide range of vascular phenotypes, in which the distribution of vascular maturation and vasoreactivity did not overlap spatially with reduced permeability. The large heterogeneity in the degree of vascular maturation and permeability is consistent with the differential expression pattern of VEGF and angiopoietins during tumor angiogenesis.

  3. Inhibition of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-induced endothelial proliferation, arterial relaxation, vascular permeability and angiogenesis by dobesilate.

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    Angulo, Javier; Peiró, Concepción; Romacho, Tania; Fernández, Argentina; Cuevas, Begoña; González-Corrochano, Rocío; Giménez-Gallego, Guillermo; de Tejada, Iñigo Sáenz; Sánchez-Ferrer, Carlos F; Cuevas, Pedro

    2011-09-30

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is a key factor in angiogenesis and vascular permeability which is associated with many pathological processes. 2,5-hydroxybenzene sulfonate (DHBS; dobesilate) is a small molecule with anti-angiogenic activity that has been described as an inhibitor of fibroblast growth factors (FGF). The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of DHBS on VEGF-induced actions. The effects of DHBS were evaluated on VEGF-induced proliferation in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) and rat aorta relaxation, as well as on in vivo VEGF-induced skin vascular permeability and neovascularization in rats. DHBS at 50 and 100 μM concentration significantly inhibited the proliferation of HUVEC induced by VEGF (10 ng/ml), without significantly affecting HUVEC proliferation in the absence of VEGF. Rapid VEGF-induced activation of Akt in HUVEC was also prevented by DHBS (100 μM). Additionally, DHBS (2 μM) specifically inhibited the relaxation of rat aorta induced by VEGF (0.1 to 30 ng/ml), but not endothelium-dependent relaxation to acetylcholine (1 nM to 10 μM). The in vivo enhancement of vascular permeability caused by VEGF injection (50 μl at 10 ng/ml) in rat skin was also inhibited by DHBS co-administration (200 μM) (74.8±3.8% inhibition of dye extravasation). Administration of DHBS (200 mg/kg/day; i.p.) also reduced VEGF-induced angiogenesis in vivo. DHBS inhibits main responses elicited in vitro and in vivo by VEGF. As a dual antagonist of VEGF and FGF activities, DHBS could be of therapeutic interest in the treatment of diseases related to VEGF/FGF overproduction and excessive angiogenesis. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Transcatheter arterial infusion with heated saline changes the vascular permeability of rabbit hepatic tumors.

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    Cao, Wei; Lu, Qiang; Li, Jing-Hua; Zhou, Chang-Xi; Zhu, Jia; Wan, Yi; Liu, Yu-Feng

    2011-12-01

    The vascular permeability of tumors can be changed by transarterial infusion heat, but the mechanisms remain unknown. The aim of this study was to analyze the underlying causes of changes in tumor vascular permeability after heated perfusion via two different modes. Thirty rabbits with VX2 hepatic tumors were randomly divided into three groups of 10 rabbits each. The hepatic artery was selectively catheterized via a femoral approach, and unheated saline (control group) or heated saline (60°C) was then injected in either a continuous (transcatheter arterial continuous perfusion [TACP]) or a pulsed (transcatheter arterial pulsed perfusion [TAPP]) manner. Changes in vascular permeability in the tumors were assessed using the following markers and methods: (1) qualitative assessment by visual estimation on digital subtraction angiography performed after the heat infusion procedure on live animals and quantitative assessment by spectrophotometry using Evans blue dye extravasation on tumor and liver tissue after animals were sacrificed and (2) kinase domain receptor or vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), expressed in vascular endothelial cells, assessed by immunohistochemical staining, Western blot analysis, and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. Tumor staining increased in the TAPP group more than in the TACP group, but not in the control group, assessed on digital subtraction angiography. Extracted dye was higher in tumors in the TAPP group than in those in the TACP group; extracted dye in both groups was higher than in the control group. Kinase domain receptor protein and messenger ribonucleic acid expression were both higher in the TAPP group than in the TACP and control groups. VEGF protein expression was lower in the TAPP and TACP groups than in the control group, but VEGF messenger ribonucleic acid expression was higher in the TACP group than in the TAPP and control groups, and VEGF messenger ribonucleic acid expression was lower in the TAPP

  5. Pulmonary epithelial permeability: vascular background effects on whole lung and regional half-time values.

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    Langford, J A; Lewis, C A; Gellert, A R; Tolfree, S E; Rudd, R M

    1986-03-01

    Pulmonary epithelial permeability was first measured by Jones et al. We have adapted their technique for use with a gamma camera. Both regional half-time values and background correction factors vary from apex to base in the lung. Examination of two methods of background correction show: that inter-segmental half-time comparison is possible without applying individual correction factors to regions. the use of a region of interest with similar vascular supply to that of the lung eliminates the need for a background correction technique that relies upon an intravenous injection of radioisotope. The inter-renal area provides such a vascular area.

  6. Inhaled nitric oxide prevents the increase in pulmonary vascular permeability caused by hydrogen peroxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poss, W B; Timmons, O D; Farrukh, I S; Hoidal, J R; Michael, J R

    1995-09-01

    Given the interest in using inhaled nitric oxide (NO.) to treat acute lung injury and the importance of oxygen radicals in its pathogenesis, we studied the effects, in buffer-perfused isolated rabbit lungs, of inhaled NO. (24 ppm) on the injury caused by generating hydrogen peroxide with glucose and glucose oxidase (GOX). Experiments were performed at a constant pulmonary arterial pressure. GOX substantially augmented vascular permeability, as demonstrated by an increase in the lung-to-perfusate 125I-labeled albumin ratio, lavage-to-perfusate 125I-albumin ratio, wet-to-dry lung weight ratio, and pulmonary vascular filtration coefficient. Lungs treated with inhaled NO. before perfusion with GOX had lung-to-perfusate and lavage-to-perfusate 125I-albumin ratios that were not significantly different from control values and intermediate between the control and GOX groups. Inhaled NO. also prevented the increase in wet-to-dry lung weight ratio and pulmonary vascular filtration coefficient caused by GOX.. Thus inhaled NO. substantially reduced in the isolated lung the increase in pulmonary vascular permeability produced by the intravascular generation of hydrogen peroxide.

  7. ACE2 Antagonizes VEGFa to Reduce Vascular Permeability During Acute Lung Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaobo Yu

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Angiotensin converting enzyme 2 (ACE2 treatment suppresses the severity of acute lung injury (ALI, through antagonizing hydrolyzing angiotensin II (AngII and the ALI-induced apoptosis of pulmonary endothelial cells. Nevertheless, the effects of ACE2 on vessel permeability and its relationship with vascular endothelial growth factor a (VEGFa remain ill-defined. In the current study, we examined the relationship between ACE2 and VEGFa in ALI model in mice. Methods: Here, we used a previously published bleomycin method to induce ALI in mice, and treated the mice with ACE2. We analyzed the levels of VEGFa in these mice. The mouse lung vessel permeability was determined by a fluorescence pharmacokinetic assay following i.v. injection of 62.5µg/kg Visudyne. VEGFa pump or SU5416 pump was given to increase or decrease VEGFa effects, respectively. The long-term effects on lung function were determined by measurement of lung resistance using methacholine. Results: ACE2 treatment did not alter VEGFa levels in lung, but antagonized the effects of VEGFa on increases of lung vessel permeability. Ectogenic VEGFa abolished the antagonizing effects of ACE2 on the vessel permeability against VEGFa. On the other hand, suppression of VEGF signaling mimicked the effects of ACE2 on the vessel permeability against VEGFa. The suppression of vessel permeability resulted in improvement of lung function after ALI. Conclusion: ACE2 may antagonize the VEGFa-mediated increases in lung vessel permeability during ALI, resulting in improvement of lung function after ALI.

  8. Vascular endothelial growth factors enhance the permeability of the mouse blood-brain barrier.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shize Jiang

    Full Text Available The blood-brain barrier (BBB impedes entry of many drugs into the brain, limiting clinical efficacy. A safe and efficient method for reversibly increasing BBB permeability would greatly facilitate central nervous system (CNS drug delivery and expand the range of possible therapeutics to include water soluble compounds, proteins, nucleotides, and other large molecules. We examined the effect of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF on BBB permeability in Kunming (KM mice. Human VEGF165 was administered to treatment groups at two concentrations (1.6 or 3.0 µg/mouse, while controls received equal-volume saline. Changes in BBB permeability were measured by parenchymal accumulation of the contrast agent Gd-DTPA as assessed by 7 T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. Mice were then injected with Evans blue, sacrificed 0.5 h later, and perfused transcardially. Brains were removed, fixed, and sectioned for histological study. Both VEGF groups exhibited a significantly greater signal intensity from the cerebral cortex and basal ganglia than controls (P<0.001. Evans blue fluorescence intensity was higher in the parenchyma and lower in the cerebrovasculature of VEGF-treated animals compared to controls. No significant brain edema was observed by diffusion weighted MRI (DWI or histological staining. Exogenous application of VEGF can increase the permeability of the BBB without causing brain edema. Pretreatment with VEGF may be a feasible method to facilitate drug delivery into the CNS.

  9. Plasma from preeclamptic women increases blood-brain barrier permeability: role of vascular endothelial growth factor signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amburgey, Odül A; Chapman, Abbie C; May, Victor; Bernstein, Ira M; Cipolla, Marilyn J

    2010-11-01

    Circulating factors in preeclamptic women are thought to cause endothelial dysfunction and thereby contribute to the progression of this hypertensive condition. Despite the involvement of neurological complications in preeclampsia, there is a paucity of data regarding the effect of circulating factors on cerebrovascular function. Using a rat model of pregnancy, we investigated blood-brain barrier permeability, myogenic activity, and the influence of endothelial vasodilator mechanisms in cerebral vessels exposed intraluminally to plasma from normal pregnant or preeclamptic women. In addition, the role of vascular endothelial growth factor signaling in mediating changes in permeability in response to plasma was investigated. A 3-hour exposure to 20% normal pregnant or preeclamptic plasma increased blood-brain barrier permeability by ≈6.5- and 18.0-fold, respectively, compared with no plasma exposure (Pvascular endothelial growth factor receptor kinase activity prevented the increase in permeability in response to preeclamptic plasma but had no effect on changes in permeability of vessels exposed to normal pregnant plasma. Circulating factors in preeclamptic plasma did not affect myogenic activity or the influence of endothelium on vascular tone. These findings demonstrate that acute exposure to preeclamptic plasma has little effect on reactivity of cerebral arteries but significantly increases blood-brain barrier permeability. Prevention of increased permeability by inhibition of vascular endothelial growth factor signaling suggests that activation of this pathway may be responsible for increased blood-brain barrier permeability after exposure to preeclamptic plasma.

  10. Cierre percutáneo del conducto arterioso permeable utilizando el Amplatzer vascular Plug II

    OpenAIRE

    Parra-Bravo,Rafael; Beirana-Palencia,Luisa; Corona-Rodríguez,Antonio; Alarcón-Elguera,Laura; Tejeda-Hernández,Norma; Aguilar-Segura,Perla; Lazo-Cárdenas,César; Arellano-Llamas,Abril

    2011-01-01

    Amplatzer vascular Plug II (AVP II) es un dispositivo oclusor autoexpandible, indicado para oclusiones arteriales o venosas en la vasculatura periférica. Objetivo: Describir nuestra experiencia clínica inicial con el AVP II, en el cierre percutáneo del conducto arterioso permeable pequeño. Métodos: Analizamos retrospectivamente, siete pacientes sometidos a oclusión percutánea del conducto arterioso. El AVP II se eligió con un diámetro mayor a 50% del diámetro mínimo del conducto arterioso. Re...

  11. Extravascular lung water and the pulmonary vascular permeability index may improve the definition of ARDS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perel, Azriel

    2013-01-24

    The recent Berlin definition has made some improvements in the older definition of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), although the concepts and components of the definition remained largely unchanged. In an effort to improve both predictive and face validity, the Berlin panel has examined a number of additional measures that may reflect increased pulmonary vascular permeability, including extravascular lung water. The panel concluded that although extravascular lung water has improved face validity and higher values are associated with mortality, it is infeasible to mandate on the basis of availability and the fact that it does not distinguish between hydrostatic and inflammatory pulmonary edema. However, the results of a multi-institutional study that appeared in the previous issue of Critical Care show that this latter reservation may not necessarily be true. By using extravascular lung water and the pulmonary vascular permeability index, both of which are derived from transpulmonary thermodilution, the authors could successfully differentiate between patients with ARDS and other patients in respiratory failure due to either cardiogenic edema or pleural effusion with atelectasis. This commentary discusses the merits and limitations of this study in view of the potential improvement that transpulmonary thermodilution may bring to the definition of ARDS.

  12. Vascular endothelial growth factor blockade alters magnetic resonance imaging biomarkers of vascular function and decreases barrier permeability in a rat model of lung cancer brain metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pishko, Gregory L; Muldoon, Leslie L; Pagel, Michael A; Schwartz, Daniel L; Neuwelt, Edward A

    2015-02-17

    Blockade of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) to promote vascular normalization and inhibit angiogenesis has been proposed for the treatment of brain metastases; however, vascular normalization has not been well-characterized in this disease. We investigated the effect of treatment with bevacizumab anti-VEGF antibody on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) biomarkers of brain tumor vascular characteristics in comparison to small molecule delivery in a rat model of human lung cancer brain metastasis. Athymic rats with A549 human lung adenocarcinoma intracerebral xenografts underwent MRI at 11.75 T before and one day after treatment with bevacizumab (n = 8) or saline control (n = 8) to evaluate tumor volume, free water content (edema), blood volume and vascular permeability (Ktrans). One day later, permeability to 14C-aminoisobutyric acid (AIB) was measured in tumor and brain to assess the penetration of a small drug-like molecule. In saline control animals, tumor volume, edema and permeability increased over the two day assessment period. Compared to controls, bevacizumab treatment slowed the rate of tumor growth (P = 0.003) and blocked the increase in edema (P = 0.033), but did not alter tumor blood volume. Bevacizumab also significantly reduced Ktrans (P = 0.033) and AIB passive permeability in tumor (P = 0.04), but not to peritumoral tissue or normal brain. Post-treatment Ktrans correlated with AIB levels in the bevacizumab-treated rats but not in the saline controls. The correlation of an MRI biomarker for decreased vascular permeability with decreased AIB concentration in tumor after antiangiogenic treatment suggests that bevacizumab partially restored the normal low permeability characteristics of the blood-brain barrier in a model of human lung cancer brain metastasis.

  13. Diminution of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 signaling inhibits vascular permeability and anaphylaxis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hox, Valerie; O'Connell, Michael P; Lyons, Jonathan J; Sackstein, Paul; Dimaggio, Thomas; Jones, Nina; Nelson, Celeste; Boehm, Manfred; Holland, Steven M; Freeman, Alexandra F; Tweardy, David J; Olivera, Ana; Metcalfe, Dean D; Milner, Joshua D

    2016-07-01

    During IgE-mediated immediate hypersensitivity reactions, vascular endothelial cells permeabilize in response to mast cell mediators. We have demonstrated previously that patients and mice with signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) mutations (autosomal dominant hyper-IgE syndrome [AD-HIES]) are partially protected from anaphylaxis. We sought to study the mechanism by which STAT3 contributes to anaphylaxis and determine whether small-molecule inhibition of STAT3 can prevent anaphylaxis. Using unaffected and STAT3-inhibited or genetic loss-of-function samples, we performed histamine skin prick tests, investigated the contribution of STAT3 to animal models of anaphylaxis, and measured endothelial cell permeability, gene and protein expression, and histamine receptor-mediated signaling. Although mouse mast cell degranulation was minimally affected by STAT3 blockade, mast cell mediator-induced anaphylaxis was blunted in Stat3 mutant mice with AD-HIES and in wild-type mice subjected to small-molecule STAT3 inhibition. Histamine skin prick test responses were diminished in patients with AD-HIES. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells derived from patients with AD-HIES or treated with a STAT3 inhibitor did not signal properly through Src or cause appropriate dissolution of the adherens junctions made up of the proteins vascular endothelial-cadherin and β-catenin. Furthermore, we found that diminished STAT3 target microRNA17-92 expression in human umbilical vein endothelial cells from patients with AD-HIES is associated with increased phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) expression, which inhibits Src, and increased E2F transcription factor 1 expression, which regulates β-catenin cellular dynamics. These data demonstrate that STAT3-dependent transcriptional activity regulates critical components for the architecture and functional dynamics of endothelial junctions, thus permitting vascular permeability. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  14. Advances in neuroimaging techniques for the evaluation of tumor growth, vascular permeability, and angiogenesis in gliomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerstner, Elizabeth R; Sorensen, A Gregory; Jain, Rakesh K; Batchelor, Tracy T

    2008-12-01

    This review will summarize new neuroimaging techniques, particularly MRI and PET imaging, that can be used to assess brain tumor growth and angiogenesis. Glioma tumor vasculature is abnormal, and advances in MRI now permit visualization of the hemodynamic properties of gliomas including cerebral blood volume and blood flow, vascular permeability, and blood vessel diameter. New radiolabeled PET tracers have allowed more specific interrogation of glioma physiology such as hypoxia assessment or tumor proliferation rate. These two techniques are complementary and will likely yield important information on tumor response to therapy, particularly in the setting of antiangiogenic agents, which confound the interpretation of standard contrast-enhanced MRI scans. These techniques may allow development of patient-specific therapy to improve outcome in patients with gliomas.

  15. Functional implication of Dp71 in osmoregulation and vascular permeability of the retina.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdoulaye Sene

    Full Text Available Functional alterations of Müller cells, the principal glia of the retina, are an early hallmark of most retina diseases and contribute to their further progression. The molecular mechanisms of these reactive Müller cell alterations, resulting in disturbed retinal homeostasis, remain largely unknown. Here we show that experimental detachment of mouse retina induces mislocation of the inwardly rectifying potassium channels (Kir4.1 and a downregulation of the water channel protein (AQP4 in Müller cells. These alterations are associated with a strong decrease of Dp71, a cytoskeleton protein responsible for the localization and the clustering of Kir4.1 and AQP4. Partial (in detached retinas or total depletion of Dp71 in Müller cells (in Dp71-null mice impairs the capability of volume regulation of Müller cells under osmotic stress. The abnormal swelling of Müller cells In Dp71-null mice involves the action of inflammatory mediators. Moreover, we investigated whether the alterations in Müller cells of Dp71-null mice may interfere with their regulatory effect on the blood-retina barrier. In the absence of Dp71, the retinal vascular permeability was increased as compared to the controls. Our results reveal that Dp71 is crucially implicated in the maintenance of potassium homeostasis, in transmembraneous water transport, and in the Müller cell-mediated regulation of retinal vascular permeability. Furthermore, our data provide novel insights into the mechanisms of retinal homeostasis provided by Müller cells under normal and pathological conditions.

  16. Hydrogels with precisely controlled integrin activation dictate vascular patterning and permeability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shuoran; Nih, Lina R.; Bachman, Haylee; Fei, Peng; Li, Yilei; Nam, Eunwoo; Dimatteo, Robert; Carmichael, S. Thomas; Barker, Thomas H.; Segura, Tatiana

    2017-09-01

    Integrin binding to bioengineered hydrogel scaffolds is essential for tissue regrowth and regeneration, yet not all integrin binding can lead to tissue repair. Here, we show that through engineering hydrogel materials to promote α3/α5β1 integrin binding, we can promote the formation of a space-filling and mature vasculature compared with hydrogel materials that promote αvβ3 integrin binding. In vitro, α3/α5β1 scaffolds promoted endothelial cells to sprout and branch, forming organized extensive networks that eventually reached and anastomosed with neighbouring branches. In vivo, α3/α5β1 scaffolds delivering vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) promoted non-tortuous blood vessel formation and non-leaky blood vessels by 10 days post-stroke. In contrast, materials that promote αvβ3 integrin binding promoted endothelial sprout clumping in vitro and leaky vessels in vivo. This work shows that precisely controlled integrin activation from a biomaterial can be harnessed to direct therapeutic vessel regeneration and reduce VEGF-induced vascular permeability in vivo.

  17. Nlrp3 prevents early renal interstitial edema and vascular permeability in unilateral ureteral obstruction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilco P Pulskens

    Full Text Available Progressive renal disease is characterized by tubulo-interstitial injury with ongoing inflammation and fibrosis. The Nlrp3 inflammasome contributes to these pathophysiological processes through its canonical effects in cytokine maturation. Nlrp3 may additionally exert inflammasome-independent effects following tissue injury. Hence, in this study we investigated potential non-canonical effects of Nlrp3 following progressive renal injury by subjecting WT and Nlrp3-deficient (-/- mice to unilateral ureter obstruction (UUO. Our results revealed a progressive increase of renal Nlrp3 mRNA in WT mice following UUO. The absence of Nlrp3 resulted in enhanced tubular injury and dilatation and an elevated expression of injury biomarker NGAL after UUO. Moreover, interstitial edema was significantly elevated in Nlrp3-/- mice. This could be explained by increased intratubular pressure and an enhanced tubular and vascular permeability. In accordance, renal vascular leakage was elevated in Nlrp3-/- mice that associated with reduced mRNA expression of intercellular junction components. The decreased epithelial barrier function in Nlrp3-/- mice was not associated with increased apoptosis and/or proliferation of renal epithelial cells. Nlrp3 deficiency did not affect renal fibrosis or inflammation. Together, our data reveal a novel non-canonical effect of Nlrp3 in preserving renal integrity and protection against early tubular injury and interstitial edema following progressive renal injury.

  18. Isoproterenol attenuates high vascular pressure-induced permeability increases in isolated rat lungs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, J C; Ivey, C L

    1997-12-01

    To separate the contributions of cellular and basement membrane components of the alveolar capillary barrier to the increased microvascular permeability induced by high pulmonary venous pressures (Ppv), we subjected isolated rat lungs to increases in Ppv, which increased capillary filtration coefficient (Kfc) without significant hemorrhage (31 cmH2O) and with obvious extravasation of red blood cells (43 cmH2O). Isoproterenol (20 microM) was infused in one group (Iso) to identify a reversible cellular component of injury, and residual blood volumes were measured to assess extravasation of red blood cells through ruptured basement membranes. In untreated lungs (High Ppv group), Kfc increased 6.2 +/- 1.3 and 38.3 +/- 15.2 times baseline during the 31 and 43 cmH2O Ppv states. In Iso lungs, Kfc was 36.2% (P Kfc increases at moderate Ppv, possibly because of an endothelial effect, but it did not affect red cell extravasation at higher vascular pressures.

  19. Tooth bleaching induces changes in the vascular permeability of rat incisor pulps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Vanessa Guarino; Nabeshima, Cleber Keiti; Marques, Márcia Martins; Paris, Adriana Fraga Costa Samos; Gioso, Marco Antônio; dos Reis, Rodrigo Sant'anna Aguiar; Machado, Manoel Eduardo de Lima

    2013-10-01

    To evaluate the inflammatory response in dental pulps of rat incisors subjected to tooth bleaching protocols with different HP concentrations and application times. 42 incisors from Wistar rats were submitted to tooth bleaching using concentrations of 25% or 35% HP for treatment times of 15, 30 or 45 minutes. Four non-bleached teeth were used as controls. The animals received an intravenous injection of India ink immediately after the bleaching procedure and were sacrificed 1 hour later. Six bleached teeth from each group and three controls were made transparent, and one sample from each group was processed for histological analysis. The data were statistically analyzed using Kruskal Wallis and Dunn's tests (P ink content was significantly higher in the samples that were bleached with 35% HP for 30 minutes and with both HP concentrations (25 and 35%) for 45 minutes than in the controls. For the samples bleached with the same HP concentration, the ink content was higher in samples that were bleached for 45 minutes. These results indicate that HP tooth bleaching can induce an increase in vascular permeability in rat incisors. Importantly, this increase is more dependent on the length of the bleaching procedure than on the concentration of the bleaching agent.

  20. VE-cadherin Y685F knock-in mouse is sensitive to vascular permeability in recurrent angiogenic organs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidibé, Adama; Polena, Helena; Pernet-Gallay, Karin; Razanajatovo, Jeremy; Mannic, Tiphaine; Chaumontel, Nicolas; Bama, Soumalamaya; Maréchal, Irène; Huber, Philippe; Gulino-Debrac, Danielle; Bouillet, Laurence; Vilgrain, Isabelle

    2014-08-01

    Covalent modifications such as tyrosine phosphorylation are associated with the breakdown of endothelial cell junctions and increased vascular permeability. We previously showed that vascular endothelial (VE)-cadherin was tyrosine phosphorylated in vivo in the mouse reproductive tract and that Y685 was a target site for Src in response to vascular endothelial growth factor in vitro. In the present study, we aimed to understand the implication of VE-cadherin phosphorylation at site Y685 in cyclic angiogenic organs. To achieve this aim, we generated a knock-in mouse carrying a tyrosine-to-phenylalanine point mutation of VE-cadherin Y685 (VE-Y685F). Although homozygous VE-Y685F mice were viable and fertile, the nulliparous knock-in female mice exhibited enlarged uteri with edema. This phenotype was observed in 30% of females between 4 to 14 mo old. Histological examination of longitudinal sections of the VE-Y685F uterus showed an extensive disorganization of myometrium and endometrium with highly edematous uterine glands, numerous areas with sparse cells, and increased accumulation of collagen fibers around blood vessels, indicating a fibrotic state. Analysis of cross section of ovaries showed the appearance of spontaneous cysts, which suggested increased vascular hyperpermeability. Electron microscopy analysis of capillaries in the ovary showed a slight but significant increase in the gap size between two adjacent endothelial cell membranes in the junctions of VE-Y685F mice (wild-type, 11.5 ± 0.3, n = 78; and VE-Y685F, 12.48 ± 0.3, n = 65; P = 0.045), as well as collagen fiber accumulation around capillaries. Miles assay revealed that either basal or vascular endothelial growth factor-stimulated permeability in the skin was increased in VE-Y685F mice. Since edema and fibrotic appearance have been identified as hallmarks of initial increased vascular permeability, we conclude that the site Y685 in VE-cadherin is involved in the physiological regulation of capillary

  1. Dynamic Measurement of Tumor Vascular Permeability and Perfusion using a Hybrid System for Simultaneous Magnetic Resonance and Fluorescence Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Wuwei; Elmer, Andreas; Buehlmann, David; Augath, Mark-Aurel; Vats, Divya; Ripoll, Jorge; Rudin, Markus

    2016-04-01

    Assessing tumor vascular features including permeability and perfusion is essential for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes. The aim of this study was to compare fluorescence and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-based vascular readouts in subcutaneously implanted tumors in mice by simultaneous dynamic measurement of tracer uptake using a hybrid fluorescence molecular tomography (FMT)/MRI system. Vascular permeability was measured using a mixture of extravascular imaging agents, GdDOTA and the dye Cy5.5, and perfusion using a mixture of intravascular agents, Endorem and a fluorescent probe (Angiosense). Dynamic fluorescence reflectance imaging (dFRI) was integrated into the hybrid system for high temporal resolution. Excellent correspondence between uptake curves of Cy5.5/GdDOTA and Endorem/Angiosense has been found with correlation coefficients R > 0.98. The two modalities revealed good agreement regarding permeability coefficients and centers-of-gravity of the imaging agent distribution. The FMT/dFRI protocol presented is able to accurately map physiological processes and poses an attractive alternative to MRI for characterizing tumor neoangiogenesis.

  2. Viperid Envenomation Wound Exudate Contributes to Increased Vascular Permeability via a DAMPs/TLR-4 Mediated Pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rucavado, Alexandra; Nicolau, Carolina A.; Escalante, Teresa; Kim, Junho; Herrera, Cristina; Gutiérrez, José María; Fox, Jay W.

    2016-01-01

    Viperid snakebite envenomation is characterized by inflammatory events including increase in vascular permeability. A copious exudate is generated in tissue injected with venom, whose proteomics analysis has provided insights into the mechanisms of venom-induced tissue damage. Hereby it is reported that wound exudate itself has the ability to induce increase in vascular permeability in the skin of mice. Proteomics analysis of exudate revealed the presence of cytokines and chemokines, together with abundant damage associated molecular pattern molecules (DAMPs) resulting from both proteolysis of extracellular matrix and cellular lysis. Moreover, significant differences in the amounts of cytokines/chemokines and DAMPs were detected between exudates collected 1 h and 24 h after envenomation, thus highlighting a complex temporal dynamic in the composition of exudate. Pretreatment of mice with Eritoran, an antagonist of Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4), significantly reduced the exudate-induced increase in vascular permeability, thus suggesting that DAMPs might be acting through this receptor. It is hypothesized that an “Envenomation-induced DAMPs cycle of tissue damage” may be operating in viperid snakebite envenomation through which venom-induced tissue damage generates a variety of DAMPs which may further expand tissue alterations. PMID:27886127

  3. Spray-dried plasma and fresh frozen plasma modulate permeability and inflammation in vitro in vascular endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wataha, K; Menge, T; Deng, X; Shah, A; Bode, A; Holcomb, J B; Potter, D; Kozar, R; Spinella, P C; Pati, S

    2013-01-01

    After major traumatic injury, patients often require multiple transfusions of fresh frozen plasma (FFP) to correct coagulopathy and to reduce bleeding. A spray-dried plasma (SDP) product has several logistical benefits over FFP use in trauma patients with coagulopathy. These benefits include ease of transport, stability at room temperature, and rapid reconstitution for infusion. Our past work suggests that FFP promotes endothelial stability by inhibiting endothelial permeability. The main goal of this project is to determine if solvent-detergent-treated SDP is equivalent to FFP in inhibiting vascular endothelial cell (EC) permeability and inflammation in vitro. Furthermore, this study aimed to determine if solvent-detergent treatment and spray drying of plasma alters the protective effects of FFP on EC function. The five groups tested in our studies are the following: 1) fresh frozen-thawed plasma (FFP); 2) solvent-detergent-treated FFP; 3) solvent-detergent-treated SDP; 4) lactated Ringer's solution; and 5) Hextend. This study demonstrates that in vitro SDP and FFP equivalently inhibit vascular EC permeability, EC adherens junction breakdown, and endothelial white blood cell binding, an effect that is independent of changes in Vascular Cell Adhesion Molecule 1, Intracellular Adhesion Molecule 1, or E-selectin expression on ECs. Solvent-detergent treatment of FFP does not alter the protective effects of FFP on endothelial cell function in vitro. These data suggest the equivalence of FFP and SDP on modulation of endothelial function and inflammation in vitro. © 2013 American Association of Blood Banks.

  4. Effects of exogenous oxygen derived free radicals on myocardial capillary permeability, vascular tone, and incidence of ventricular arrhythmias in the canine heart

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendsen, Jesper Hastrup; Bjerrum, P J

    1992-01-01

    The aim was to examine the effects of exogenous oxygen derived free radicals on myocardial capillary permeability for a small hydrophilic indicator, postischaemic vascular tone, and the occurrence of arrhythmias in the canine heart in vivo.......The aim was to examine the effects of exogenous oxygen derived free radicals on myocardial capillary permeability for a small hydrophilic indicator, postischaemic vascular tone, and the occurrence of arrhythmias in the canine heart in vivo....

  5. Small GTP-Binding Protein Rac Is an Essential Mediator of Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor-Induced Endothelial Fenestrations and Vascular Permeability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksson, A.; Cao, R.; Tritsaris, K.

    2003-01-01

    ), endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), and extracellular regulated kinase (Erk1/2). We further found that phosphatidylinositol-3-OH kinase (PI3K) acted upstream of Rac and Akt-eNOS in VEGF/VEGFR-2 signaling. Conclusions- Our findings indicate that the small GTP-binding protein Rac is a key component...... and vascular permeability but only partially inhibited angiogenesis. Studies on endothelial cell cultures further revealed that VEGF stimulated phosphorylation of VEGF receptor-2 (VEGFR-2), leading to activation of Rac as well as increased phosphorylation of phospholipase C (PLC ), protein kinase B (Akt...

  6. Adult human dental pulp stem cells promote blood-brain barrier permeability through vascular endothelial growth factor-a expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winderlich, Joshua N; Kremer, Karlea L; Koblar, Simon A

    2016-06-01

    Stem cell therapy is a promising new treatment option for stroke. Intravascular administration of stem cells is a valid approach as stem cells have been shown to transmigrate the blood-brain barrier. The mechanism that causes this effect has not yet been elucidated. We hypothesized that stem cells would mediate localized discontinuities in the blood-brain barrier, which would allow passage into the brain parenchyma. Here, we demonstrate that adult human dental pulp stem cells express a soluble factor that increases permeability across an in vitro model of the blood-brain barrier. This effect was shown to be the result of vascular endothelial growth factor-a. The effect could be amplified by exposing dental pulp stem cell to stromal-derived factor 1, which stimulates vascular endothelial growth factor-a expression. These findings support the use of dental pulp stem cell in therapy for stroke. © The Author(s) 2015.

  7. Morphine induces expression of platelet-derived growth factor in human brain microvascular endothelial cells: implication for vascular permeability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongxiu Wen

    Full Text Available Despite the advent of antiretroviral therapy, complications of HIV-1 infection with concurrent drug abuse are an emerging problem. Morphine, often abused by HIV-infected patients, is known to accelerate neuroinflammation associated with HIV-1 infection. Detailed molecular mechanisms of morphine action however, remain poorly understood. Platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF has been implicated in a number of pathological conditions, primarily due to its potent mitogenic and permeability effects. Whether morphine exposure results in enhanced vascular permeability in brain endothelial cells, likely via induction of PDGF, remains to be established. In the present study, we demonstrated morphine-mediated induction of PDGF-BB in human brain microvascular endothelial cells, an effect that was abrogated by the opioid receptor antagonist-naltrexone. Pharmacological blockade (cell signaling and loss-of-function (Egr-1 approaches demonstrated the role of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs, PI3K/Akt and the downstream transcription factor Egr-1 respectively, in morphine-mediated induction of PDGF-BB. Functional significance of increased PDGF-BB manifested as increased breach of the endothelial barrier as evidenced by decreased expression of the tight junction protein ZO-1 in an in vitro model system. Understanding the regulation of PDGF expression may provide insights into the development of potential therapeutic targets for intervention of morphine-mediated neuroinflammation.

  8. A sustained release formulation of novel quininib-hyaluronan microneedles inhibits angiogenesis and retinal vascular permeability in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galvin, Orla; Srivastava, Akshay; Carroll, Oliver; Kulkarni, Rajiv; Dykes, Steve; Vickers, Steven; Dickinson, Keith; Reynolds, Alison L; Kilty, Claire; Redmond, Gareth; Jones, Rob; Cheetham, Sharon; Pandit, Abhay; Kennedy, Breandán N

    2016-07-10

    Pathologic neovascularisation and ocular permeability are hallmarks of proliferative diabetic retinopathy and age-related macular degeneration. Current pharmacologic interventions targeting VEGF are effective in only 30-60% of patients and require multiple intraocular injections associated with iatrogenic infection. Thus, our goal is to develop novel small molecule drugs that are VEGF-independent are amenable to sustained ocular-release, and which reduce retinal angiogenesis and retinal vascular permeability. Here, the anti-angiogenic drug quininib was formulated into hyaluronan (HA) microneedles whose safety and efficacy was evaluated in vivo. Quininib-HA microneedles were formulated via desolvation from quininib-HA solution and subsequent cross-linking with 4-arm-PEG-amine prior to freeze-drying. Scanning electron microscopy revealed hollow needle-shaped particle ultrastructure, with a zeta potential of -35.5mV determined by electrophoretic light scattering. The incorporation efficiency and pharmacokinetic profile of quininib released in vitro from the microneedles was quantified by HPLC. Quininib incorporation into these microneedles was 90%. In vitro, 20% quininib was released over 4months; or in the presence of increasing concentrations of hyaluronidase, 60% incorporated quininib was released over 4months. Zebrafish hyaloid vasculature assays demonstrated quininib released from these microneedles significantly (pmicroneedles allow for sustained release of quininib; are safe in vivo and quininib released from these microneedles effectively inhibits angiogenesis and RVP in vivo. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. H2O2-induced endothelial NO production contributes to vascular cell apoptosis and increased permeability in rat venules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xueping; Yuan, Dong; Wang, Mingxia

    2013-01-01

    Although elevated levels of H2O2 have been implicated to play important roles in the pathogenesis of various cardiovascular diseases, the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. This study aims to examine the effect of H2O2 on endothelial nitric oxide (NO) production in intact venules, and elucidate the role and mechanisms of NO in H2O2-induced increases in microvessel permeability. Experiments were conducted on individually perfused rat mesenteric venules. Microvessel permeability was determined by measuring hydraulic conductivity (Lp), and endothelial [Ca2+]i was measured on fura-2-loaded vessels. Perfusion of H2O2 (10 μM) caused a delayed and progressively increased endothelial [Ca2+]i and Lp, a pattern different from inflammatory mediator-induced immediate and transient response. Under the same experimental conditions, measuring endothelial NO via DAF-2 and the spatial detection of cell apoptosis by fluorescent markers revealed that H2O2 induced two phases of NO production followed by caspase activation, intracellular Ca2+ accumulation, and vascular cell apoptosis. The initial NO production was correlated with increased endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) Ser1177 phosphorylation in the absence of elevated endothelial [Ca2+]i, whereas the second phase of NO depended on increased [Ca2+]i and was associated with Thr495 dephosphorylation without increased Ser1177 phosphorylation. Inhibition of NOS prevented H2O2-induced caspase activation, cell apoptosis, and increases in endothelial [Ca2+]i and Lp. Our results indicate that H2O2 at micromolar concentration is able to induce a large magnitude of NO in intact venules, causing caspase activation-mediated endothelial Ca2+ accumulation, cell apoptosis, and increases in permeability. The mechanisms revealed from intact microvessels may contribute to the pathogenesis of oxidant-related cardiovascular diseases. PMID:23086988

  10. Consequences of increased vascular permeability induced by treatment of mice with 5,6-dimethylxanthenone-4-acetic acid (DMXAA) and thalidomide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Francisco; Liu, Jenny; Ching, Lai-Ming; Baguley, Bruce C

    2008-03-01

    5,6-Dimethylxanthenone-4-acetic acid (DMXAA) (AS1404), a small-molecule vascular disrupting agent currently in clinical trial, increases vascular permeability and decreases blood flow in both murine and human tumours. DMXAA induces tumour necrosis factor (TNF) in mice and the effects on vascular permeability are hypothesised to result from both direct (DMXAA) and indirect (TNF) effects. Skin temperature decreases in mice treated with high doses of DMXAA, raising the question of whether host toxicity is mediated by the induction of increased vascular permeability in normal tissue. Thalidomide is an anti-inflammatory agent that potentiates the anti-tumour activity of DMXAA but decreases induction of TNF in plasma. We wished to determine how it potentiated the effects of DMXAA. Vascular permeability was measured in Colon 38 tumour and liver tissue by uptake of Evans Blue dye. Blood haematocrit and body temperature were also measured. Tumour vascular permeability was increased following administration of DMXAA (25 mg/kg i.p.), minimally affected following thalidomide (100 mg/kg i.p.) but strongly increased following co-administration of both drugs. In contrast, dye uptake into liver tissue was decreased following administration of DMXAA, thalidomide or both drugs. Administration of DMXAA at a potentially toxic dose (35 mg/kg i.p. or 50 mg/kg orally) was found to decrease body temperature and to increase the blood haematocrit, while administration of thalidomide alone (100 mg/kg i.p.) had no effect. Co-administration of thalidomide potentiated the effects of DMXAA on both body temperature and haematocrit but surprisingly did not increase toxicity. The results are consistent with the hypothesis that the host toxicity of high-dose DMXAA is mediated by effects on host vasculature. Co-administration of thalidomide increases the effective dose of DMXAA by reducing clearance but also, by inhibiting production of circulating TNF, reduces the host toxicity of DMXAA.

  11. Anticancer nanomedicine and tumor vascular permeability; Where is the missing link?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taurin, Sebastien; Nehoff, Hayley; Greish, Khaled

    2012-12-28

    Anticancer nanomedicine was coined to describe anticancer delivery systems such as polymer conjugates, liposomes, micelles, and metal nanoparticles. These anticancer delivery platforms have been developed with the enhanced permeability and retention (EPR) effect as a central mechanism for tumor targeting. EPR based nanomedicine has demonstrated, beyond doubt, to selectively target tumor tissues in animal models. However, over the last two decades, only nine anticancer agents utilizing this targeting strategy have been approved for clinical use. In this review, we systematically analyze various aspects that explain the limited clinical progress yet achieved. The influence of nanomedicine physicochemical characteristics, animal tumor models, and variations in tumor biology, on EPR based tumor targeting is closely examined. Furthermore, we reviewed results from over one hundred publications to construct patterns of factors that can influence the transition of EPR based anticancer nanomedicine to the clinic. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. [Correlation of severity classification of acute respiratory distress syndrome by the Berlin definition with extra vascular lung water index and pulmonary vascular permeability index].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jinyuan; Wang, Xiaohong; Yang, Xiaojun; Wang, Xiaoqi; Ma, Xigang

    2015-05-19

    To explore the correlation of severity classification of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) by the Berlin definition with extra vascular lung water index (EVLWI) and pulmonary vascular permeability index (PVPI). A total of 70 cases with ARDS at intensive care unit of our hospital from July 2012 to July 2014 were divided into three groups of mild (n = 20), moderate (n = 30) and severe (n = 20) according to the Berlin definition. The scores of acute physiology and chronic health evaluation (APACHE) II and sequential organ failure assessment (SOFA) within 24 h of admission were recorded. And the values of EVLWI and PVPI of three groups from Day 1-4 were monitored by pulse indicator continuous cardiac output (PiCCO). Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve was drawn for these parameters and the area under curve was compared. Meanwhile blood gas was analyzed and oxygenation index (OI) calculated. And the correlations of EVLWI and PVPI with OI were analyzed. Comparisons of EVLWI, PVPI and OI were made for three groups at different timepoints: As the severity of ARDS aggravated, EVLWI and PVPI of three groups increased significantly at any timepoint while OI decreased sharply (P 0.05). There was no sharp decline of EVLWI or PVPI in severe ARDS group (P > 0.05). And OI increased significantly from Day 1-4 in three groups (P 2.95 at Day 4 of admission was used as the best threshold value for judging prognosis. And the sensitivity was 70% and specificity 92%. OI had negative correlation with EVLWI and PVPI in three groups from Day 1-4 [(r = -0.685, P = 0.000) and (r = -0.631, P = 0.000)]. Both EVLWI and PVPI reflect adequately the severity of ARDS by the Berlin definition. And the dynamic trend of PVPI is superior to that of EVLWI.

  13. Quantitative evaluation of vascular permeability in the gerbil brain after transient ischemia using Evans blue fluorescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uyama, O; Okamura, N; Yanase, M; Narita, M; Kawabata, K; Sugita, M

    1988-04-01

    Mongolian gerbils were used to evaluate brain edema during restoration of flow following bilateral carotid occlusion for 1 h. We have modified the method for fluorometric measurement of Evans blue to monitor vascular protein leakage (vasogenic edema). The extraction of extravasated Evans blue was performed by homogenizing the whole brain in 50% trichloroacetic acid. The supernatant was diluted fourfold with ethanol and the Evans blue fluorescence was measured. The tissue blank was negligible. Evans blue content of the plasma was similarly determined and the ratio of tissue to plasma Evans blue content was calculated. Furthermore, Evans blue fluorescence was used for microscopic investigation. It is suggested that Evans blue fluorescence can be applied for quantification of protein leakage with much more sensitivity and accuracy than the colorimetric absorbance method, as well as for tissue localization of protein leakage.

  14. Effects of beta-hydroxybutyrate on brain vascular permeability in rats with traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orhan, Nurcan; Ugur Yilmaz, Canan; Ekizoglu, Oguzhan; Ahishali, Bulent; Kucuk, Mutlu; Arican, Nadir; Elmas, Imdat; Gürses, Candan; Kaya, Mehmet

    2016-01-15

    This study investigates the effect of beta-hydroxybutyrate (BHB) on blood-brain barrier (BBB) integrity during traumatic brain injury (TBI) in rats. Evans blue (EB) and horseradish peroxidase (HRP) were used as determinants of BBB permeability. Glutathione (GSH) and malondialdehyde (MDA) levels were estimated in the right (injury side) cerebral cortex of animals. The gene expression levels for occludin, glucose transporter (Glut)-1, aquaporin4 (AQP4) and nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-κB) were performed, and Glut-1 and NF-κB activities were analyzed. BHB treatment decreased GSH and MDA levels in intact animals and in those exposed to TBI (P<0.05). Glut-1 protein levels decreased in sham, BHB and TBI plus BHB groups (P<0.05). NF-κB protein levels increased in animals treated with BHB and/or exposed to TBI (P<0.05). The expression levels of occludin and AQP4 did not significantly change among experimental groups. Glut-1 expression levels increased in BHB treated and untreated animals exposed to TBI (P<0.05). While NF-κB expression levels increased in animals in TBI (P<0.01), a decrease was noticed in these animals upon BHB treatment (P<0.01). In animals exposed to TBI, EB extravasation was observed in the ipsilateral cortex regardless of BHB treatment. Ultrastructurally, BHB attenuated but did not prevent the presence of HRP in brain capillary endothelial cells of animals with TBI; moreover, the drug also led to the observation of the tracer when used in intact rats (P<0.01). Altogether, these results showed that BHB not only failed to provide overall protective effects on BBB in TBI but also led to BBB disruption in healthy animals. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Cell Treatment for Stroke in Type Two Diabetic Rats Improves Vascular Permeability Measured by MRI.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guangliang Ding

    Full Text Available Treatment of stroke with bone marrow stromal cells (BMSC significantly enhances brain remodeling and improves neurological function in non-diabetic stroke rats. Diabetes is a major risk factor for stroke and induces neurovascular changes which may impact stroke therapy. Thus, it is necessary to test our hypothesis that the treatment of stroke with BMSC has therapeutic efficacy in the most common form of diabetes, type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM. T2DM was induced in adult male Wistar rats by administration of a high fat diet in combination with a single intraperitoneal injection (35mg/kg of streptozotocin. These rats were then subjected to 2h of middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAo. T2DM rats received BMSC (5x106, n = 8 or an equal volume of phosphate-buffered saline (PBS (n = 8 via tail-vein injection at 3 days after MCAo. MRI was performed one day and then weekly for 5 weeks post MCAo for all rats. Compared with vehicle treated control T2DM rats, BMSC treatment of stroke in T2DM rats significantly (p<0.05 decreased blood-brain barrier disruption starting at 1 week post stroke measured using contrast enhanced T1-weighted imaging with gadopentetate, and reduced cerebral hemorrhagic spots starting at 3 weeks post stroke measured using susceptibility weighted imaging, although BMSC treatment did not reduce the ischemic lesion volumes as demarcated by T2 maps. These MRI measurements were consistent with histological data. Thus, BMSC treatment of stroke in T2DM rats initiated at 3 days after stroke significantly reduced ischemic vascular damage, although BMSC treatment did not change infarction volume in T2DM rats, measured by MRI.

  16. Alteration of Leukocyte Count Correlates With Increased Pulmonary Vascular Permeability and Decreased PaO2:FiO2 Ratio Early After Major Burns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, Joakim; Steinvall, Ingrid; Herwald, Heiko; Lindbom, Lennart; Sjöberg, Folke

    2015-01-01

    Leukocytes are activated systemically and their numbers increase soon after a burn followed by a rapid decline to low normal or subnormal levels, possibly by increased extravasation. Experimental data support that an important target for such extravasation is the lungs and that leukocytes when they adhere to endothelial cells cause an increase in vascular permeability. The authors investigated a possible relation between early increased pulmonary vascular permeability or a decreased PaO2:FiO2 ratio and the dynamic change in concentration of blood leukocytes after a burn. This is a prospective, exploratory, single-center study. The authors measured the dynamic changes of leukocytes in blood starting early after the burn, pulmonary vascular permeability index by thermodilution, and PaO2:FiO2-ratios in 20 patients during the first 21 days after a major burn (>20% TBSA%). Median TBSA was 40% interquartile range (IQR, 25-52) and full thickness burn 28% (IQR, 2-39). There was a correlation between the early (leukocytes and pulmonary failure early after burns.

  17. Effects of exogenous oxygen derived free radicals on myocardial capillary permeability, vascular tone, and incidence of ventricular arrhythmias in the canine heart

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendsen, J H; Bjerrum, P J

    1992-01-01

    washout rate constant were measured by the single injection, residue detection method, and the capillary permeability-surface area product (PS) was calculated. The maximum plasma flow during reactive hyperaemia was measured by the local 133Xe washout method. RESULTS: Hypoxanthine and xanthine oxidase......OBJECTIVE: The aim was to examine the effects of exogenous oxygen derived free radicals on myocardial capillary permeability for a small hydrophilic indicator, postischaemic vascular tone, and the occurrence of arrhythmias in the canine heart in vivo. METHODS: Free radicals were generated...... by simultaneous intracoronary infusion of hypoxanthine and xanthine oxidase into normally perfused myocardium, and at reperfusion following five minutes of coronary occlusion, respectively, in 20 anaesthetised open chest dogs. Myocardial capillary extraction for 99mTc-DTPA, plasma flow rate, and the interstitial...

  18. Assessing the permeability of the rat sciatic nerve epineural sheath against compounds with local anesthetic activity: an ex vivo electrophysiological study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kagiava, Alexia; Theophilidis, George

    2013-10-01

    Abstract Studies have shown that the sciatic nerve epineural sheath acts as a barrier and has a delaying effect on the diffusion of local anesthetics into the nerve fibers and endoneurium. The purpose of this work is to assess and to quantify the permeability of the epineural sheath. For this purpose, we isolated the rat sciatic nerve in a three-chamber recording bath that allowed us to monitor the constant in amplitude evoked nerve compound action potential (nCAP) for over 24 h. For nerves exposed to the compounds under investigation, we estimated the IT50 the time required to inhibit the nCAP to 50% of its initial value. For desheathed nerves, the half-vitality time was denoted as IT50(-) and for the ensheath normal nerves as IT50(+). There was no significant difference between the IT50 of desheathed and ensheathed nerves exposed to normal saline. The IT50(-) for nerves exposed to 40 mM lidocaine was 12.1 ± 0.95 s (n=14) and the IT50(+) was 341.4 ± 2.49 s (n=6). The permeability (P) coefficient of the epineural sheath was defined as the ratio IT50(+)/IT50(-). The P coefficient for 40 mM lidocaine and linalool was 28.2 and 3.48, correspondingly, and for 30 mM 2-heptanone was 4.87. This is an indication that the epineural sheath provided a stronger barrier against lidocaine, compared to natural local anesthetics, linalool and 2-heptanone. The methodology presented here is a useful tool for studying epineural sheath permeability to compounds with local anesthetic properties.

  19. Electrophysiology Studies (EPS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Artery Disease Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Electrophysiology Studies (EPS) Updated:Dec 21,2016 What are electrophysiology studies? Electrophysiology studies (EPS) are tests that help doctors ...

  20. Oxidative Stress and Modification of Renal Vascular Permeability Are Associated with Acute Kidney Injury during P. berghei ANKA Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elias, Rosa Maria; Correa-Costa, Matheus; Barreto, Claudiene Rodrigues; Silva, Reinaldo Correia; Hayashida, Caroline Y.; Castoldi, Ângela; Gonçalves, Giselle Martins; Braga, Tarcio Teodoro; Barboza, Renato; Rios, Francisco José; Keller, Alexandre Castro; Cenedeze, Marcos Antonio; Hyane, Meire Ioshie; D'Império-Lima, Maria Regina; Figueiredo-Neto, Antônio Martins; Reis, Marlene Antônia; Marinho, Cláudio Romero Farias; Pacheco-Silva, Alvaro; Câmara, Niels Olsen Saraiva

    2012-01-01

    Malaria associated-acute kidney injury (AKI) is associated with 45% of mortality in adult patients hospitalized with severe form of the disease. However, the causes that lead to a framework of malaria-associated AKI are still poorly characterized. Some clinical studies speculate that oxidative stress products, a characteristic of Plasmodium infection, as well as proinflammatory response induced by the parasite are involved in its pathophysiology. Therefore, we aimed to investigate the development of malaria-associated AKI during infection by P. berghei ANKA, with special attention to the role played by the inflammatory response and the involvement of oxidative stress. For that, we took advantage of an experimental model of severe malaria that showed significant changes in the renal pathophysiology to investigate the role of malaria infection in the renal microvascular permeability and tissue injury. Therefore, BALB/c mice were infected with P. berghei ANKA. To assess renal function, creatinine, blood urea nitrogen, and ratio of proteinuria and creatininuria were evaluated. The products of oxidative stress, as well as cytokine profile were quantified in plasma and renal tissue. The change of renal microvascular permeability, tissue hypoxia and cellular apoptosis were also evaluated. Parasite infection resulted in renal dysfunction. Furthermore, we observed increased expression of adhesion molecule, proinflammatory cytokines and products of oxidative stress, associated with a decrease mRNA expression of HO-1 in kidney tissue of infected mice. The measurement of lipoprotein oxidizability also showed a significant increase in plasma of infected animals. Together, our findings support the idea that products of oxidative stress, as well as the immune response against the parasite are crucial to changes in kidney architecture and microvascular endothelial permeability of BALB/c mice infected with P. berghei ANKA. PMID:22952850

  1. Protective Effects of N-Acetyl Cysteine against Diesel Exhaust Particles-Induced Intracellular ROS Generates Pro-Inflammatory Cytokines to Mediate the Vascular Permeability of Capillary-Like Endothelial Tubes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chia-Yi Tseng

    Full Text Available Exposure to diesel exhaust particles (DEP is associated with pulmonary and cardiovascular diseases. Previous studies using in vitro endothelial tubes as a simplified model of capillaries have found that DEP-induced ROS increase vascular permeability with rearrangement or internalization of adherens junctional VE-cadherin away from the plasma membrane. This allows DEPs to penetrate into the cell and capillary lumen. In addition, pro-inflammatory cytokines are up-regulated and mediate vascular permeability in response to DEP. However, the mechanisms through which these DEP-induced pro-inflammatory cytokines increase vascular permeability remain unknown. Hence, we examined the ability of DEP to induce permeability of human umbilical vein endothelial cell tube cells to investigate these mechanisms. Furthermore, supplementation with NAC reduces ROS production following exposure to DEP. HUVEC tube cells contributed to a pro-inflammatory response to DEP-induced intracellular ROS generation. Endothelial oxidative stress induced the release of TNF-α and IL-6 from tube cells, subsequently stimulating the secretion of VEGF-A independent of HO-1. Our data suggests that DEP-induced intracellular ROS and release of the pro-inflammatory cytokines TNF- α and IL-6, which would contribute to VEGF-A secretion and disrupt cell-cell borders and increase vasculature permeability. Addition of NAC suppresses DEP-induced ROS efficiently and reduces subsequent damages by increasing endogenous glutathione.

  2. Inhibition of αvβ5 Integrin Attenuates Vascular Permeability and Protects against Renal Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCurley, Amy; Alimperti, Stella; Campos-Bilderback, Silvia B; Sandoval, Ruben M; Calvino, Jenna E; Reynolds, Taylor L; Quigley, Catherine; Mugford, Joshua W; Polacheck, William J; Gomez, Ivan G; Dovey, Jennifer; Marsh, Graham; Huang, Angela; Qian, Fang; Weinreb, Paul H; Dolinski, Brian M; Moore, Shaun; Duffield, Jeremy S; Chen, Christopher S; Molitoris, Bruce A; Violette, Shelia M; Crackower, Michael A

    2017-06-01

    Ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI) is a leading cause of AKI. This common clinical complication lacks effective therapies and can lead to the development of CKD. The αvβ5 integrin may have an important role in acute injury, including septic shock and acute lung injury. To examine its function in AKI, we utilized a specific function-blocking antibody to inhibit αvβ5 in a rat model of renal IRI. Pretreatment with this anti-αvβ5 antibody significantly reduced serum creatinine levels, diminished renal damage detected by histopathologic evaluation, and decreased levels of injury biomarkers. Notably, therapeutic treatment with the αvβ5 antibody 8 hours after IRI also provided protection from injury. Global gene expression profiling of post-ischemic kidneys showed that αvβ5 inhibition affected established injury markers and induced pathway alterations previously shown to be protective. Intravital imaging of post-ischemic kidneys revealed reduced vascular leak with αvβ5 antibody treatment. Immunostaining for αvβ5 in the kidney detected evident expression in perivascular cells, with negligible expression in the endothelium. Studies in a three-dimensional microfluidics system identified a pericyte-dependent role for αvβ5 in modulating vascular leak. Additional studies showed αvβ5 functions in the adhesion and migration of kidney pericytes in vitro Initial studies monitoring renal blood flow after IRI did not find significant effects with αvβ5 inhibition; however, future studies should explore the contribution of vasomotor effects. These studies identify a role for αvβ5 in modulating injury-induced renal vascular leak, possibly through effects on pericyte adhesion and migration, and reveal αvβ5 inhibition as a promising therapeutic strategy for AKI. Copyright © 2017 by the American Society of Nephrology.

  3. Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Increases during Blood-Brain Barrier-Enhanced Permeability Caused by Phoneutria nigriventer Spider Venom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monique C. P. Mendonça

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Phoneutria nigriventer spider accidental envenomation provokes neurotoxic manifestations, which when critical, results in epileptic-like episodes. In rats, P. nigriventer venom (PNV causes blood-brain barrier breakdown (BBBb. The PNV-induced excitotoxicity results from disturbances on Na+, K+ and Ca2+ channels and glutamate handling. The vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF, beyond its angiogenic effect, also, interferes on synaptic physiology by affecting the same ion channels and protects neurons from excitotoxicity. However, it is unknown whether VEGF expression is altered following PNV envenomation. We found that adult and neonates rats injected with PNV showed immediate neurotoxic manifestations which paralleled with endothelial occludin, β-catenin, and laminin downregulation indicative of BBBb. In neonate rats, VEGF, VEGF mRNA, and Flt-1 receptors, glutamate decarboxylase, and calbindin-D28k increased in Purkinje neurons, while, in adult rats, the BBBb paralleled with VEGF mRNA, Flk-1, and calbindin-D28k increases and Flt-1 decreases. Statistically, the variable age had a role in such differences, which might be due to age-related unequal maturation of blood-brain barrier (BBB and thus differential cross-signaling among components of the glial neurovascular unit. The concurrent increases in the VEGF/Flt-1/Flk-1 system in the cerebellar neuron cells and the BBBb following PNV exposure might imply a cytokine modulation of neuronal excitability consequent to homeostatic perturbations induced by ion channels-acting PNV neuropeptides. Whether such modulation represents neuroprotection needs further investigation.

  4. VEGF increases the permeability of sheep pleura ex vivo through VEGFR2 stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peppa, Vasiliki I; Arsenopoulou, Zoi V; Zarogiannis, Sotirios G; Deligiorgi, Triantafyllia; Jagirdar, Rajesh; Makantasis, Ioannis; Stefanidis, Ioannis; Liakopoulos, Vassilios; Molyvdas, Paschalis-Adam; Gourgoulianis, Konstantinos I; Hatzoglou, Chrissi

    2014-10-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), a cytokine that increases vascular permeability to water and proteins and induces angiogenesis, has been implicated in the development of pleural effusions. Inflammatory and malignant pleural effusions are rich in VEGF content while mesothelial cells produce and excrete VEGF. In this report we aimed at investigating by means of electrophysiology the direct effects of VEGF on the parietal and visceral sheep pleura as well as the type of receptors that mediate this effect. Our findings show that VEGF has a direct effect on the pleural mesothelium rendering it more permeable and this effect is mediated through the stimulation of VEGF receptor 2. Our findings shed more light to the role of VEGF in the pathogenesis of pleural effusions and provide functional evidence for a role of VEGFR2 on the pleural mesothelium that has never been studied before. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. The clinical usefulness of extravascular lung water and pulmonary vascular permeability index to diagnose and characterize pulmonary edema: a prospective multicenter study on the quantitative differential diagnostic definition for acute lung injury/acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kushimoto, Shigeki; Taira, Yasuhiko; Kitazawa, Yasuhide; Okuchi, Kazuo; Sakamoto, Teruo; Ishikura, Hiroyasu; Endo, Tomoyuki; Yamanouchi, Satoshi; Tagami, Takashi; Yamaguchi, Junko; Yoshikawa, Kazuhide; Sugita, Manabu; Kase, Yoichi; Kanemura, Takashi; Takahashi, Hiroyuki; Kuroki, Yuichi; Izumino, Hiroo; Rinka, Hiroshi; Seo, Ryutarou; Takatori, Makoto; Kaneko, Tadashi; Nakamura, Toshiaki; Irahara, Takayuki; Saito, Nobuyuki; Watanabe, Akihiro

    2012-12-11

    Acute lung injury (ALI)/acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is characterized by features other than increased pulmonary vascular permeability. Pulmonary vascular permeability combined with increased extravascular lung water content has been considered a quantitative diagnostic criterion of ALI/ARDS. This prospective, multi-institutional, observational study aimed to clarify the clinical pathophysiological features of ALI/ARDS and establish its quantitative diagnostic criteria. The extravascular lung water index (EVLWI) and the pulmonary vascular permeability index (PVPI) were measured using the transpulmonary thermodilution method in 266 patients with PaO2/FiO2 ratio ≤ 300 mmHg and bilateral infiltration on chest radiography, in 23 ICUs of academic tertiary referral hospitals. Pulmonary edema was defined as EVLWI ≥ 10 ml/kg. Three experts retrospectively determined the pathophysiological features of respiratory insufficiency by considering the patients' history, clinical presentation, chest computed tomography and radiography, echocardiography, EVLWI and brain natriuretic peptide level, and the time course of all preceding findings under systemic and respiratory therapy. Patients were divided into the following three categories on the basis of the pathophysiological diagnostic differentiation of respiratory insufficiency: ALI/ARDS, cardiogenic edema, and pleural effusion with atelectasis, which were noted in 207 patients, 26 patients, and 33 patients, respectively. EVLWI was greater in ALI/ARDS and cardiogenic edema patients than in patients with pleural effusion with atelectasis (18.5 ± 6.8, 14.4 ± 4.0, and 8.3 ± 2.1, respectively; P definitive diagnosis of ALI/ARDS (specificity, 0.90 to 0.95), and a value < 1.7 ruled out an ALI/ARDS diagnosis (specificity, 0.95). PVPI may be a useful quantitative diagnostic tool for ARDS in patients with hypoxemic respiratory failure and radiographic infiltrates. UMIN-CTR ID UMIN000003627.

  6. Crustal permeability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gleeson, Tom; Ingebritsen, Steven E.

    2016-01-01

    Permeability is the primary control on fluid flow in the Earth’s crust and is key to a surprisingly wide range of geological processes, because it controls the advection of heat and solutes and the generation of anomalous pore pressures.  The practical importance of permeability – and the potential for large, dynamic changes in permeability – is highlighted by ongoing issues associated with hydraulic fracturing for hydrocarbon production (“fracking”), enhanced geothermal systems, and geologic carbon sequestration.  Although there are thousands of research papers on crustal permeability, this is the first book-length treatment.  This book bridges the historical dichotomy between the hydrogeologic perspective of permeability as a static material property and the perspective of other Earth scientists who have long recognized permeability as a dynamic parameter that changes in response to tectonism, fluid production, and geochemical reactions. 

  7. Notional Permeability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kik, R.; Van den Bos, J.P.; Maertens, J.; Verhagen, H.J.; Van der Meer, J.W.

    2012-01-01

    Different layer design of a rock slope and under layers has a large effect on the strengths on the rock slope itself. In the stability formula developed of VAN DER MEER [1988] this effect is represented by the term Notional Permeability with symbol P. A more open, or permeable, structure underneath

  8. Changes of blood flow, oxygen tension, action potential and vascular permeability induced by arterial ischemia or venous congestion on the spinal cord in canine model

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kobayashi, Shigeru; Yoshizawa, Hidezo; Shimada, Seiichiro; Guerrero, Alexander Rodríguez; Miyachi, Masaya

    2013-01-01

    ... disturbance induced by venous congestion is not fully understood. Since Kadyi's first description of the venous system of the spinal cord, there have been few other studies on the subject. 3 Regarding the intramedullary vascular system, the central part of the spinal cord is supplied unilaterally by branches from the central artery enteri...

  9. Double-echo perfusion-weighted MR imaging: basic concepts and application in brain tumors for the assessment of tumor blood volume and vascular permeability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uematsu, Hidemasa; Maeda, Masayuki

    2006-01-01

    Perfusion-weighted magnetic resonance (MR) imaging using contrast agents plays a key role in characterizing tumors of the brain. We have shown that double-echo perfusion-weighted MR imaging (DEPWI) is potentially useful in assessing brain tumors. Quantitative indices, such as tumor blood volume, are obtained using DEPWI, which allows correction of underestimation of tumor blood volume due to leakage of contrast agents from tumor vessels, in addition to simultaneous acquisition of tumor vessel permeability. This article describes basic concepts of DEPWI and demonstrates clinical applications in brain tumors.

  10. Changes of blood flow, oxygen tension, action potential and vascular permeability induced by arterial ischemia or venous congestion on the spinal cord in canine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Shigeru; Yoshizawa, Hidezo; Shimada, Seiichiro; Guerrero, Alexander Rodríguez; Miyachi, Masaya

    2013-01-01

    It is generally considered that the genesis of myelopathy associated with the degenerative conditions of the spine may result from both mechanical compression and circulatory disturbance. Many references about spinal cord tissue ischemic damage can be found in the literature, but not detailed studies about spinal cord microvasculature damage related to congestion or blood permeability. This study investigates the effect of ischemia and congestion on the spinal cord using an in vivo model. The aorta was clamped as an ischemia model of the spinal cord and the inferior vena cava was clamped as a congestion model at the 6th costal level for 30 min using forceps transpleurally. Measurements of blood flow, partial oxygen pressure, and conduction velocity in the spinal cord were repeated over a period of 1 h after release of clamping. Finally, we examined the status of blood-spinal cord barrier under fluorescence and transmission electron microscope. Immediately after clamping of the inferior vena cava, the central venous pressure increased by about four times. Blood flow, oxygen tension and action potential were more severely affected by the aorta clamping; but this ischemic model did not show any changes of blood permeability in the spinal cord. The intramedullar edema was more easily produced by venous congestion than by arterial ischemia. In conclusions, venous congestion may be a preceding and essential factor of circulatory disturbance in the compressed spinal cord inducing myelopathy. Copyright © 2012 Orthopaedic Research Society.

  11. Application of histogram analysis for the evaluation of vascular permeability in glioma by the K2 parameter obtained with the dynamic susceptibility contrast method: Comparisons with Ktrans obtained with the dynamic contrast enhance method and cerebral blood volume.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taoka, Toshiaki; Kawai, Hisashi; Nakane, Toshiki; Hori, Saeka; Ochi, Tomoko; Miyasaka, Toshiteru; Sakamoto, Masahiko; Kichikawa, Kimihiko; Naganawa, Shinji

    2016-09-01

    The "K2" value is a factor that represents the vascular permeability of tumors and can be calculated from datasets obtained with the dynamic susceptibility contrast (DSC) method. The purpose of the current study was to correlate K2 with Ktrans, which is a well-established permeability parameter obtained with the dynamic contrast enhance (DCE) method, and determine the usefulness of K2 for glioma grading with histogram analysis. The subjects were 22 glioma patients (Grade II: 5, III: 6, IV: 11) who underwent DSC studies, including eight patients in which both DSC and DCE studies were performed on separate days within 10days. We performed histogram analysis of regions of interest of the tumors and acquired 20th percentile values for leakage-corrected cerebral blood volume (rCBV20%ile), K2 (K220%ile), and for patients who underwent a DCE study, Ktrans (Ktrans20%ile). We evaluated the correlation between K220%ile and Ktrans20%ile and the statistical difference between rCBV20%ile and K220%ile. We found a statistically significant correlation between K220%ile and Ktrans20%ile (r=0.717, p<0.05). rCBV20%ile showed a significant difference between Grades II and III and between Grades II and IV, whereas K220%ile showed a statistically significant (p<0.05) difference between Grades II and IV and between Grades III and IV. The K2 value calculated from the DSC dataset, which can be obtained with a short acquisition time, showed a correlation with Ktrans obtained with the DCE method and may be useful for glioma grading when analyzed with histogram analysis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Tumor Vascular Permeability Pattern Is Associated With Complete Response in Immunocompetent Patients With Newly Diagnosed Primary Central Nervous System Lymphoma: Retrospective Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Sae Rom; Choi, Young Jun; Kim, Ho Sung; Park, Ji Eun; Shim, Woo Hyun; Kim, Sang Joon

    2016-02-01

    A dynamic contrast-enhanced MR imaging (DCE-MRI) could provide the information about tumor drug delivery efficacy. We investigated the potential utility of the permeability pattern of DCE-MRI for predicting tumor response to high dose-methotrexate treatment and progression-free survival (PFS) in patients with primary CNS lymphoma (PCNSL). Clinical and conventional imaging parameters were assessed as potential predictors of tumor response in 48 immunocompetent PCNSL patients in a preliminary study. Fifty additional immunocompetent patients (27 men and 23 women; mean age, 60.6 years) with PCNSL underwent DCE-MRI before starting first-line treatment with high dose-methotrexate. The DCE-MRI pattern was categorized as diffuse or nondiffuse. After 4 courses of high dose methotrexate, patients underwent follow-up brain MR imaging to identify their complete response (CR). Predictors of CR and PFS were analyzed using clinical parameters, conventional MRI, and DCE-MRI. CR was noted in 20 (74.1%) of 27 patients with diffuse DCE-MRI pattern and in 4 (17.4%) of 23 patients with nondiffuse DCE-MRI pattern. The diffuse DCE-MRI pattern showed a significantly higher association with CR than the nondiffuse pattern (P pattern (hazard ratio = 0.70; P = 0.045), age (hazard ratio = 1.47; P = 0.041), and adjuvant autologous stem-cell transplantation (hazard ratio = 6.97; P = 0.003) tended to be associated with a PFS. The pretreatment diffuse DCE-MRI pattern can be used as a potential imaging biomarker for predicting CR and a longer PFS in patients with newly diagnosed PCNSLs.

  13. Visual electrophysiology in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jelka Brecelj

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Electrophysiological assessment of vision in children helps to recognise abnormal development of the visual system when it is still susceptible to medication and eventual correction. Visual electrophysiology provides information about the function of the retina (retinal pigment epithelium, cone and rod receptors, bipolar, amacrine, and ganglion cells, optic nerve, chiasmal and postchiasmal visual pathway, and visual cortex.Methods: Electroretinograms (ERG and visual evoked potentials (VEP are recorded non-invasively; in infants are recorded simultaneously ERG with skin electrodes, while in older children separately ERG with HK loop electrode in accordance with ISCEV (International Society for Clinical Electrophysiology of Vision recommendations.Results: Clinical and electrophysiological changes in children with nystagmus, Leber’s congenital amaurosis, achromatopsia, congenital stationary night blindness, progressive retinal dystrophies, optic nerve hypoplasia, albinism, achiasmia, optic neuritis and visual pathway tumours are presented.Conclusions: Electrophysiological tests can help to indicate the nature and the location of dysfunction in unclear ophthalmological and/or neurological cases.

  14. The Ketogenic Diet Alters the Hypoxic Response and Affects Expression of Proteins Associated with Angiogenesis, Invasive Potential and Vascular Permeability in a Mouse Glioma Model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric C Woolf

    Full Text Available The successful treatment of malignant gliomas remains a challenge despite the current standard of care, which consists of surgery, radiation and temozolomide. Advances in the survival of brain cancer patients require the design of new therapeutic approaches that take advantage of common phenotypes such as the altered metabolism found in cancer cells. It has therefore been postulated that the high-fat, low-carbohydrate, adequate protein ketogenic diet (KD may be useful in the treatment of brain tumors. We have demonstrated that the KD enhances survival and potentiates standard therapy in a mouse model of malignant glioma, yet the mechanisms are not fully understood.To explore the effects of the KD on various aspects of tumor growth and progression, we used the immunocompetent, syngeneic GL261-Luc2 mouse model of malignant glioma.Tumors from animals maintained on KD showed reduced expression of the hypoxia marker carbonic anhydrase 9, hypoxia inducible factor 1-alpha, and decreased activation of nuclear factor kappa B. Additionally, tumors from animals maintained on KD had reduced tumor microvasculature and decreased expression of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2, matrix metalloproteinase-2 and vimentin. Peritumoral edema was significantly reduced in animals fed the KD and protein analyses showed altered expression of zona occludens-1 and aquaporin-4.The KD directly or indirectly alters the expression of several proteins involved in malignant progression and may be a useful tool for the treatment of gliomas.

  15. The Ketogenic Diet Alters the Hypoxic Response and Affects Expression of Proteins Associated with Angiogenesis, Invasive Potential and Vascular Permeability in a Mouse Glioma Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woolf, Eric C; Curley, Kara L; Liu, Qingwei; Turner, Gregory H; Charlton, Julie A; Preul, Mark C; Scheck, Adrienne C

    2015-01-01

    The successful treatment of malignant gliomas remains a challenge despite the current standard of care, which consists of surgery, radiation and temozolomide. Advances in the survival of brain cancer patients require the design of new therapeutic approaches that take advantage of common phenotypes such as the altered metabolism found in cancer cells. It has therefore been postulated that the high-fat, low-carbohydrate, adequate protein ketogenic diet (KD) may be useful in the treatment of brain tumors. We have demonstrated that the KD enhances survival and potentiates standard therapy in a mouse model of malignant glioma, yet the mechanisms are not fully understood. To explore the effects of the KD on various aspects of tumor growth and progression, we used the immunocompetent, syngeneic GL261-Luc2 mouse model of malignant glioma. Tumors from animals maintained on KD showed reduced expression of the hypoxia marker carbonic anhydrase 9, hypoxia inducible factor 1-alpha, and decreased activation of nuclear factor kappa B. Additionally, tumors from animals maintained on KD had reduced tumor microvasculature and decreased expression of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2, matrix metalloproteinase-2 and vimentin. Peritumoral edema was significantly reduced in animals fed the KD and protein analyses showed altered expression of zona occludens-1 and aquaporin-4. The KD directly or indirectly alters the expression of several proteins involved in malignant progression and may be a useful tool for the treatment of gliomas.

  16. Electrophysiological Endophenotypes for Schizophrenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owens, Emily; Bachman, Peter; Glahn, David C; Bearden, Carrie E

    2016-01-01

    Endophenotypes are quantitative, heritable traits that may help to elucidate the pathophysiologic mechanisms underlying complex disease syndromes, such as schizophrenia. They can be assessed at numerous levels of analysis; here, we review electrophysiological endophenotypes that have shown promise in helping us understand schizophrenia from a more mechanistic point of view. For each endophenotype, we describe typical experimental procedures, reliability, heritability, and reported gene and neurobiological associations. We discuss recent findings regarding the genetic architecture of specific electrophysiological endophenotypes, as well as converging evidence from EEG studies implicating disrupted balance of glutamatergic signaling and GABA-ergic inhibition in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. We conclude that refining the measurement of electrophysiological endophenotypes, expanding genetic association studies, and integrating datasets are important next steps for understanding the mechanisms that connect identified genetic risk loci for schizophrenia to the disease phenotype. PMID:26954597

  17. Advances in Electrophysiological Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamarajan, Chella; Porjesz, Bernice

    2015-01-01

    Electrophysiological measures of brain function are effective tools to understand neurocognitive phenomena and sensitive indicators of pathophysiological processes associated with various clinical conditions, including alcoholism. Individuals with alcohol use disorder (AUD) and their high-risk offspring have consistently shown dysfunction in several electrophysiological measures in resting state (i.e., electroencephalogram) and during cognitive tasks (i.e., event-related potentials and event-related oscillations). Researchers have recently developed sophisticated signal-processing techniques to characterize different aspects of brain dynamics, which can aid in identifying the neural mechanisms underlying alcoholism and other related complex disorders. These quantitative measures of brain function also have been successfully used as endophenotypes to identify and help understand genes associated with AUD and related disorders. Translational research also is examining how brain electrophysiological measures potentially can be applied to diagnosis, prevention, and treatment. PMID:26259089

  18. Comparison of the effects of letrozole and cabergoline on vascular permeability, ovarian diameter, ovarian tissue VEGF levels, and blood PEDF levels, in a rat model of ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Şahin, Nur; Apaydın, Nesin; Töz, Emrah; Sivrikoz, Oya Nermin; Genç, Mine; Turan, Gülüzar Arzu; Cengiz, Hakan; Eskicioğlu, Fatma

    2016-05-01

    To evaluate the effects of letrozole and cabergoline in a rat model of ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome (OHSS). In this prospective, controlled experimental study, the 28 female Wistar rats were divided into four subgroups (one non-stimulated control and three OHSS-positive groups: placebo, letrozole, and cabergoline). To induce OHSS, rats were injected with 10 IU of pregnant mare serum gonadotropin from day 29 to day 32 of life, followed by subcutaneous injection of 30 IU hCG on day 33. Letrozole rats received with a single dose of 0.1 mg/kg letrozole via oral gavage, on the hCG day. Cabergoline rats received with a single dose of 100 µg/kg cabergoline via oral gavage, on the hCG day. All animals were compared in terms of body weight, vascular permeability (VP), ovarian diameter, ovarian tissue VEGF expression (assessed via immunohistochemical staining), and blood pigment epithelium-derived growth factor (PEDF) levels. The OHSS-positive placebo group (group 2) exhibited the highest VP, ovarian diameter, extent of VEGF staining, and lowest PEDF level, as expected. No significant difference was evident between the letrozole and cabergoline groups in terms of any of body weight; VP; PEDF level; ovarian diameter; or the staining intensity of, or percentage staining for, VEGF in ovarian tissues. Letrozole and cabergoline were equally effective to prevent OHSS, reducing the ovarian diameter, VP, and PEDF and VEGF levels to similar extents.

  19. Imaging for cardiac electrophysiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benoit Desjardins

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Clinical cardiac electrophysiology is the study of the origin and treatment of arrhythmia. There has been considerable recent development in this field, where imaging has had a transformational impact. In this invited review, we offer a global overview of the most important developments in the use of imaging in cardiac electrophysiology. We first describe the radiological imaging modalities involved in cardiac electrophysiology, to assess cardiac anatomy, function and scar. We then introduce an imaging modality with which readers are probably unfamiliar (electroanatomical mapping [EAM], but which is routinely used by electrophysiologists to plan and guide cardiac mapping and cardiac ablation therapy by catheter, a therapy which can reduce or even cure arrhythmia. We identify the limitations of EAM and describe how radiological imaging modalities can complement this technique. We then describe and illustrate how imaging has helped the diagnosis of arrhythmogenic conditions, and how imaging is used to plan and guide clinical cardiac electrophysiologic procedures and assess their results and complications. We focus on the two most common arrhythmias for which imaging has the greatest impact: atrial fibrillation and ventricular tachycardia.

  20. Applying Microfluidics to Electrophysiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eddington, David T.

    2007-01-01

    Microfluidics can be integrated with standard electrophysiology techniques to allow new experimental modalities. Specifically, the motivation for the microfluidic brain slice device is discussed including how the device docks to standard perfusion chambers and the technique of passive pumping which is used to deliver boluses of neuromodulators to the brain slice. By simplifying the device design, we are able to achieve a practical solution to the current unmet electrophysiology need of applying multiple neuromodulators across multiple regions of the brain slice. This is achieved by substituting the standard coverglass substrate of the perfusion chamber with a thin microfluidic device bonded to the coverglass substrate. This was then attached to the perfusion chamber and small holes connect the open-well of the perfusion chamber to the microfluidic channels buried within the microfluidic substrate. These microfluidic channels are interfaced with ports drilled into the edge of the perfusion chamber to access and deliver stimulants. This project represents how the field of microfluidics is transitioning away from proof-of concept device demonstrations and into practical solutions for unmet experimental and clinical needs. PMID:18989410

  1. VASCULAR DEMENTIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Alekseyevna Cherdak

    2010-01-01

    vascular cognitive disorders and vascular dementia (VD. The heterogeneity of vascular cognitive disorders, concurrence of vascular and neurodegenerative diseases are discussed. Data from studies of specific therapy for VD are given.

  2. Electrophysiological studies of malaria parasite-infected erythrocytes: Current status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staines, Henry M.; Alkhalil, Abdulnaser; Allen, Richard J.; De Jonge, Hugo R.; Derbyshire, Elvira; Egée, Stéphane; Ginsburg, Hagai; Hill, David A.; Huber, Stephan M.; Kirk, Kiaran; Lang, Florian; Lisk, Godfrey; Oteng, Eugene; Pillai, Ajay D.; Rayavara, Kempaiah; Rouhani, Sherin; Saliba, Kevin J.; Shen, Crystal; Solomon, Tsione; Thomas, Serge L. Y.; Verloo, Patrick; Desai, Sanjay A.

    2009-01-01

    The altered permeability characteristics of erythrocytes infected with malaria parasites have been a source of interest for over 30 years. Recent electrophysiological studies have provided strong evidence that these changes reflect transmembrane transport through ion channels in the host erythrocyte plasma membrane. However, conflicting results and differing interpretations of the data have led to confusion in this field. In an effort to unravel these issues, the groups involved recently came together for a week of discussion and experimentation. In this article, the various models for altered transport are reviewed, together with the areas of consensus in the field and those that require a better understanding. PMID:17292372

  3. Permeability prediction in chalks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alam, Mohammad Monzurul; Fabricius, Ida Lykke; Prasad, Manika

    2011-01-01

    prediction, so we have investigated the use of velocity data to predict permeability. The compressional velocity fromwireline logs and core plugs of the chalk reservoir in the South Arne field, North Sea, has been used for this study. We compared various methods of permeability prediction from velocities......-permeability relationships were replaced by relationships between velocity of elastic waves and permeability using laboratory data, and the relationships were then applied to well-log data. We found that the permeability prediction in chalk and possibly other sediments with large surface areas could be improved...

  4. Film Permeability Determination Using Static Permeability Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    The permeability of tarps to soil fumigant pesticides varies depending on the active ingredient chemical: dimethyl disulfide (DMDS), methyl bromide, chloropicrin, or other. The diffusion rate can be represented by the mass transfer coefficient (MTC).

  5. Estimation of soil permeability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amr F. Elhakim

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Soils are permeable materials because of the existence of interconnected voids that allow the flow of fluids when a difference in energy head exists. A good knowledge of soil permeability is needed for estimating the quantity of seepage under dams and dewatering to facilitate underground construction. Soil permeability, also termed hydraulic conductivity, is measured using several methods that include constant and falling head laboratory tests on intact or reconstituted specimens. Alternatively, permeability may be measured in the field using insitu borehole permeability testing (e.g. [2], and field pumping tests. A less attractive method is to empirically deduce the coefficient of permeability from the results of simple laboratory tests such as the grain size distribution. Otherwise, soil permeability has been assessed from the cone/piezocone penetration tests (e.g. [13,14]. In this paper, the coefficient of permeability was measured using field falling head at different depths. Furthermore, the field coefficient of permeability was measured using pumping tests at the same site. The measured permeability values are compared to the values empirically deduced from the cone penetration test for the same location. Likewise, the coefficients of permeability are empirically obtained using correlations based on the index soil properties of the tested sand for comparison with the measured values.

  6. CESE: Cell Electrophysiology Simulation Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Missan, Sergey; McDonald, Terence F

    2005-01-01

    Cell electrophysiology simulation environment (CESE) is an integrated environment for performing simulations with a variety of electrophysiological models that have Hodgkin-Huxley and Markovian formulations of ionic currents. CESE is written in Java 2 and is readily portable to a number of operating systems. CESE allows execution of single-cell models and modification and clamping of model parameters, as well as data visualisation and analysis using a consistent interface. Model creation for CESE is facilitated by an object-oriented approach and use of an extensive modelling framework. The Web-based model repository is available. CESE and the Web-based model repository are available at http://cese.sourceforge.net/.

  7. Antioxidants and vascular health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bielli, Alessandra; Scioli, Maria Giovanna; Mazzaglia, Donatella; Doldo, Elena; Orlandi, Augusto

    2015-12-15

    Oxygen free radicals and other reactive oxygen species (ROS) are common products of normal aerobic cellular metabolism, but high levels of ROS lead to oxidative stress and cellular damage. Increased production of ROS favors vascular dysfunction, inducing altered vascular permeability and inflammation, accompanied by the loss of vascular modulatory function, the imbalance between vasorelaxation and vasoconstriction, and the aberrant expression of inflammatory adhesion molecules. Inflammatory stimuli promote oxidative stress generated from the increased activity of mitochondrial nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase, particularly of the Nox4 isoform, with the consequent impairment of mitochondrial β-oxidation. Vascular dysfunction due to the increase in Nox4 activity and ROS overproduction leads to the progression of cardiovascular diseases, diabetes, inflammatory bowel disease, and neurological disorders. Considerable research into the development of effective antioxidant therapies using natural derivatives or new synthetic molecules has been conducted. Antioxidants may prevent cellular damage by reducing ROS overproduction or interfering in reactions that involve ROS. Vitamin E and ascorbic acid are well known as natural antioxidants that counteract lipid peroxidative damage by scavenging oxygen-derived free radicals, thus restoring vascular function. Recently, preliminary studies on natural antioxidants such as goji berries, thymus, rosemary, green tea ginseng, and garlic have been conducted for their efficacy in preventing vascular damage. N-acetyl-cysteine and propionyl-L-carnitine are synthetic compounds that regulate ROS production by replacing endogenous antioxidants in both endothelial and smooth muscle cells. In this review, we consider the molecular mechanisms underlying the generation of oxidative stress-induced vascular dysfunction as well as the beneficial effects of antioxidant therapies.

  8. Vascular Cures

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... is the first national program to bring the power of the patient to vascular research and care. ... Our recent national Vascular Research Summit brought together leaders from 31 institutions to generate collaborative projects for ...

  9. Permeable pavement study (Edison)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — While permeable pavement is increasingly being used to control stormwater runoff, field-based, side-by-side investigations on the effects different pavement types...

  10. Permeability of displaced fractures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kluge, Christian; Milsch, Harald; Blöcher, Guido

    2017-04-01

    Flow along fractures or in fissured systems becomes increasingly important in the context of Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS), shale gas recovery or nuclear waste deposit. Commonly, the permeability of fractures is approximated using the Hagen-Poiseuille solution of Navier Stokes equation. Furthermore, the flow in fractures is assumed to be laminar flow between two parallel plates and the cubic law for calculating the velocity field is applied. It is a well-known fact, that fracture flow is strongly influenced by the fracture surface roughness and the shear displacement along the fracture plane. Therefore, a numerical approach was developed which calculates the flow pattern within a fracture-matrix system. The flow in the fracture is described by a free fluid flow and the flow in the matrix is assumed to be laminar and therefore validates Darcy's law. The presented approach can be applied for artificially generated fractures or real fractures measured by surface scanning. Artificial fracture surfaces are generated using the power spectral density of the surface height random process with a spectral exponent to define roughness. For calculating the permeability of such fracture-matrix systems the mean fracture aperture, the shear displacement and the surface roughness are considered by use of a 3D numerical simulator. By use of this approach correlation between shear displacement and mean aperture, shear displacement and permeability, as well as surface roughness and permeability can be obtained. Furthermore, the intrinsic measured permeability presents a combination of matrix and fracture permeability. The presented approach allows the separation and quantification of the absolute magnitudes of the matrix and the fracture permeability and the permeability of displaced fractures can be calculated. The numerical approach which is a 3D numerical simulation of the fracture-matrix system can be applied for artificial as well as real systems.

  11. Electrophysiological characterization of volume-activated chloride currents in mouse cholangiocyte cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Biyi; Nicol, Grant; Cho, Won Kyoo

    2004-12-01

    Recent electrophysiological and radioisotope efflux studies have demonstrated various Cl(-) channels in cholangiocytes including volume-activated Cl(-) channels (VACC). Because VACCs play prominent roles in many vital cellular functions and physiology in cholangiocytes, we have examined their electrophysiological characteristics in mouse cholangiocytes to provide an important framework for studying in the future. The present study is to characterize VACCs expressed in the mouse bile duct cell (MBDC) line, conditionally immortalized by SV40 virus. Conventional whole cell patch-clamp techniques were used to study the electrophysiological characteristics of VACC in MBDC. When the MBDCs were exposed to hypotonic solution, they exhibited an outwardly rectified current, which was significantly inhibited by replacing chloride in the bath solution with gluconate or glutamate and by administration of classic chloride channel inhibitors 5-nitro-2-(3-phenylpropylamino)-benzoate, glybenclamide, DIDS, and tamoxifen. These inhibitory effects were reversible with washing them out from the bath solution. Moreover, the ion selectivity of the volume-activated channel to different anions indicates that it is more permeable to SCN(-) > I(-) >/= Cl(-) > F(-) >/= acetate >/= glutamate >/= gluconate. These electrophysiological characteristics demonstrate that the volume-activated current observed is a VACC. In addition, the VACC in MBDC has electrophysiological characteristics similar to those of the VACC in human cholangiocarcinoma cell line. The present study is the first to characterize the VACC in mouse cholangiocyte and will provide an important framework for further studies to examine and understand the role of the VACC in biliary secretion and ion-transport physiology.

  12. Insulin alters the permeability of sheep pleura.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouritas, V K; Hatzoglou, C; Ioannou, M; Gourgoulianis, K I; Molyvdas, P A

    2010-05-01

    Insulin promotes ion transportation across epithelia, mainly kidneys, leading to water and electrolyte abnormalities, possibly causing 'insulin oedema syndrome', which rarely presents as pleural effusion. Direct stimulation of sheep pleura by insulin and the possible electrophysiology mechanisms involved were investigated. Sheep visceral and parietal pleural specimens were mounted between Ussing chambers. Insulin solutions (10 (-9) to 10 (-5) M), L-NAME, Nitroprussid sodium, amiloride and ouabain were used. Trans-mesothelial Resistance was determined. Immunohistochemistry for presence of Insulin Receptors was performed. Insulin increased Trans-mesothelial Resistance within 1st minute when added mesothelially of visceral (p=0.008) and parietal pleura (p=0.046) for concentrations higher than 10 (-7) M. L-NAME or Nitroprussid sodium didn't but amiloride and ouabain inhibited insulin's effect. Immunohistochemistry revealed the presence of Insulin Receptors. Insulin changes the permeability of sheep pleura by altering its electrophysiology and may interfere in pleural effusion formation. Involvement of Insulin Receptors may be suggested.

  13. Fundametal Study On Permeability Pavement

    OpenAIRE

    川口, 基広; 建部, 英博

    1997-01-01

    This study aimed at the thing which develops a water permeability pavement which improved a drainage pavement. Then it examined possibility of the permeability pavement which can secure water permeability and strength, which it uses water granulated iron-blast-furnace slag in subgrade roadbed and it makes an asphalt mixture mix a stainless steel fiber, to solve a problem of permeability pavement

  14. Diabetes and Retinal Vascular Dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eui Seok Shin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes predominantly affects the microvascular circulation of the retina resulting in a range of structural changes unique to this tissue. These changes ultimately lead to altered permeability, hyperproliferation of endothelial cells and edema, and abnormal vascularization of the retina with resulting loss of vision. Enhanced production of inflammatory mediators and oxidative stress are primary insults with significant contribution to the pathogenesis of diabetic retinopathy (DR. We have determined the identity of the retinal vascular cells affected by hyperglycemia, and have delineated the cell autonomous impact of high glucose on function of these cells. We discuss some of the high glucose specific changes in retinal vascular cells and their contribution to retinal vascular dysfunction. This knowledge provides novel insight into the molecular and cellular defects contributing to the development and progression of diabetic retinopathy, and will aid in the development of innovative, as well as target specific therapeutic approaches for prevention and treatment of DR.

  15. Radionuclide assessment of pulmonary microvascular permeability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Groeneveld, A.B.J. [Medical Intensive Care Unit, Department of Internal Medicine, Free University Hospital, De Boelelaan 1117, 1081 HV Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    1997-04-01

    The literature has been reviewed to evaluate the technique and clinical value of radionuclide measurements of microvascular permeability and oedema formation in the lungs. Methodology, modelling and interpretation vary widely among studies. Nevertheless, most studies agree on the fact that the measurement of permeability via pulmonary radioactivity measurements of intravenously injected radiolabelled proteins versus that in the blood pool, the so-called pulmonary protein transport rate (PTR), can assist the clinician in discriminating between permeability oedema of the lungs associated with the adult respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and oedema caused by an increased filtration pressure, for instance in the course of cardiac disease, i.e. pressure-induced pulmonary oedema. Some of the techniques used to measure PTR are also able to detect subclinical forms of lung microvascular injury not yet complicated by permeability oedema. This may occur after cardiopulmonary bypass and major vascular surgery, for instance. By paralleling the clinical severity and course of the ARDS, the PTR method may also serve as a tool to evaluate new therapies for the syndrome. Taken together, the currently available radionuclide methods, which are applicable at the bedside in the intensive care unit, may provide a gold standard for detecting minor and major forms of acute microvascular lung injury, and for evaluating the severity, course and response to treatment. (orig.). With 2 tabs.

  16. Permeable pavement study (Edison)

    Science.gov (United States)

    While permeable pavement is increasingly being used to control stormwater runoff, field-based, side-by-side investigations on the effects different pavement types have on nutrient concentrations present in stormwater runoff are limited. In 2009, the U.S. EPA constructed a 0.4-ha parking lot in Edison, New Jersey, that incorporated permeable interlocking concrete pavement (PICP), pervious concrete (PC), and porous asphalt (PA). Each permeable pavement type has four, 54.9-m2, lined sections that direct all infiltrate into 5.7-m3 tanks enabling complete volume collection and sampling. This paper highlights the results from a 12-month period when samples were collected from 13 rainfall/runoff events and analyzed for nitrogen species, orthophosphate, and organic carbon. Differences in infiltrate concentrations among the three permeable pavement types were assessed and compared with concentrations in rainwater samples and impervious asphalt runoff samples, which were collected as controls. Contrary to expectations based on the literature, the PA infiltrate had significantly larger total nitrogen (TN) concentrations than runoff and infiltrate from the other two permeable pavement types, indicating that nitrogen leached from materials in the PA strata. There was no significant difference in TN concentration between runoff and infiltrate from either PICP or PC, but TN in runoff was significantly larger than in the rainwater, suggesting meaningful inter-event dry de

  17. Biostable glucose permeable polymer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2017-01-01

    A new biostable glucose permeable polymer has been developed which is useful, for example, in implantable glucose sensors. This biostable glucose permeable polymer has a number of advantageous characteristics and, for example, does not undergo hydrolytic cleavage and degradation, thereby providing...... a composition that facilitates long term sensor stability in vivo. The versatile characteristics of this polymer allow it to be used in a variety of contexts, for example to form the body of an implantable glucose sensor. The invention includes the polymer composition, sensor systems formed from this polymer...

  18. Antivenom Evaluation by Electrophysiological Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rita Restano-Cassulini

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Scorpion stings on humans are medically relevant because they may contain toxins that specifically target ion channels. During antivenom production, pharmaceutical companies must use a large number of experimental animals to ensure the antivenom’s efficacy according to pharmacopeia methods. Here we present an electrophysiological alternative for the evaluation of horse antivenoms produced against two species of Moroccan scorpions: Buthus mardochei and Androctonus mauretanicus. Human sodium and potassium channels and acetylcholine nicotinic receptors were analyzed by standard patch-clamp techniques. The results showed that the antivenom is capable of reversing ion current disruption caused by the venom application. We propose the use of this in vitro technique for antivenom evaluation as an alternative to using a large number of live animals.

  19. [Vascular dementia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leeuw, H.F. de; Gijn, J. van

    2004-01-01

    Vascular dementia is one of the most frequently occurring dementia syndromes. Its prevalence is about 5% among subjects above 85 years of age. Elevated blood pressure and atherosclerosis are the most important risk factors. According to international criteria, vascular dementia usually occurs within

  20. Comparison of the electrophysiological properties of the sheep isolated costal and diaphragmatic parietal pleura.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarogiannis, Sotirios; Hatzoglou, Chrissi; Stefanidis, Ioannis; Ioannou, Maria; Paraskeva, Efrosini; Gourgoulianis, Konstantinos; Molyvdas, Paschalis-Adam

    2007-01-01

    1. Pleural permeability may contribute to pleural fluid turnover. The transmesothelial resistance (R(TM)), is an established surrogate of mesothelial permeability. The aim of the present study was to compare the electrophysiological properties of costal and diaphragmatic parietal pleura. 2. Specimens of the parietal pleura were isolated from 12 adult sheep from the chest wall and the diaphragm. Electrophysiological measurements were conducted with the Ussing system. Specimens of the parietal pleura of both types (diaphragmatic and costal) were compared histologically and total protein content measurements were also made. 3. The R(TM) of the diaphragmatic parietal pleura was significantly higher than that of the costal parietal pleura throughout the experiment. The diaphragmatic parietal pleura contains more cuboidal cells than the costal parietal pleura and its protein content was higher, however this difference was not statistically significant. 4. The costal parietal pleura consists of a more 'leaky' mesothelium than the diaphragmatic pleura. The morphological differences between the two types of parietal pleura may underline the electrophysiological findings.

  1. Vascular ring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Anne Mette S; Larsen, Signe H; Hjortdal, Vibeke E

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Vascular ring is a rare cause of recurrent respiratory infections, dysphagia and stridor. Surgical repair is considered safe but the long-term outcomes are unclear. The purpose of this study was to investigate the mortality and morbidity following vascular ring surgery in a single...... age of 1.4 years (range 0.008-64 years) were operated for vascular ring. Median follow-up was 6.8 years (range 2.4-34 years). Presenting symptoms were stridor (52%), dysphagia or vomiting (52%) and recurrent respiratory infections (48%). There were no early or late deaths. Three months postoperatively...

  2. Electrophysiologic Study of Exhaustive Exercise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MA Babaee Bigi

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Exhaustive exercise is well known to pose a variety ofhealth hazards, such as sudden cardiac death reported in ultra-marathon runners.Depressed parasympathetic tone is associated with increased risk of suddencardiac death, thus parasympathetic withdrawal in post-exercise phase may be ahigh risk period for sudden death. To date, the effect on cardiacelectrophysiology after exhaustive strenuous exercise has not been described.The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of severe exhaustive exerciseon cardiac electrophysiology.Methods: The subjects in ranger training were invited to participatein this prospective study. The parameters measured consisted of PR interval, QRSduration, and macro T wave alternans as well as corrected QT, QTc dispersion,Tpeak –Tend interval and Tpeak –Tend dispersion.Results: The study group consisted of 40 consecutive male rangers whocompleted training and the control group (22 healthy age and height matched malesubjects. In regard to electrocardiographic criteria, no differences were foundbetween rangers before and after training program. In respect of therepolarization markers, there were no significant differences between therangers before and after training program.

  3. Vascular anomalies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murthy Jyotsna

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Management of vascular anomalies is an emerging multidisciplinary, super-specialisation field involving several surgical, medical and radiological specialties. Over the years, development in this field has been limited because of complex nomenclature and lack of consensus on the best practice for treatment of some of the more complex vascular anomalies. It was only in 1996 that the International Society of the Study of Vascular Anomalies defined nomenclature for the anomalies and gave clear guidelines on management, allowing for improved clinical practices. As in all fields of clinical medicine, the correct diagnosis of the vascular anomalies is essential to choose the appropriate treatment. This paper gives clear guidelines for diagnosis, understanding of the anomalies and discusses their management.

  4. Vascular Dementia

    OpenAIRE

    Maria Alekseyevna Cherdak; O V Uspenskaya

    2015-01-01

    This is the author accepted manuscript. The final version is available from Elsevier via http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S0140-6736(15)00463-8 Vascular dementia is one of the most common causes of dementia after Alzheimer's disease, causing around 15% of cases. However, unlike Alzheimer's disease, there are no licensed treatments for vascular dementia. Progress in the specialty has been difficult because of uncertainties over disease classification and diagnostic criteria, controversy over the e...

  5. Vascular Vertigo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mazyar Hashemilar

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Vertigo is a common complaint in neurology and medicine. The most common causes of vertigo are benign paroxysmal positional vertigo, vestibular neuritis, Meniere’s disease, and vascular disorders. Vertigo of vascular origin is usually limited to migraine, transient ischemic attacks, and ischemic or hemorrhagic stroke. Vascular causes lead to various central or peripheral vestibular syndromes with vertigo. This review provides an overview of epidemiology and clinical syndromes of vascular vertigo. Vertigo is an illusion of movement caused by asymmetrical involvement of the vestibular system by various causes. Migraine is the most frequent vascular disorder that causes vertigo in all age groups. Vertigo may occur in up to 25% of patients with migraine. The lifetime prevalence of migrainous vertigo is almost 1%. Cerebrovascular disorders are estimated to account for 3% to 7% of patients with vertigo. Vestibular paroxysmia has been diagnosed in 1.8% to 4% of cases in various dizziness units. Vasculitic disorders are rare in the general population, but vertigo may be seen in almost up to 50% of patients with different vasculitic syndromes. Conclusions: Migraine, cerebrovascular disorders especially involving the vertebrobasilar territory, cardiocirculatory diseases, neurovascular compression of the eighth nerve, and vasculitis are vascular causes of vertigo syndromes.

  6. Vascular Access Procedures

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Vascular Access Procedures A vascular access procedure inserts a flexible, ... the limitations of Vascular Access Procedures? What are Vascular Access Procedures? A vascular access procedure involves the insertion ...

  7. Vascular Access for Hemodialysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Adequacy Eating & Nutrition for Hemodialysis Vascular Access for Hemodialysis What is a vascular access? A vascular access ... Set Up the Vascular Access Well before Starting Hemodialysis Patients should set up a vascular access well ...

  8. What Is Vascular Disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Policy What Is Vascular Disease? What Is Vascular Disease? Vascular disease is any abnormal condition of the blood ... Privacy Policy × Your ticket for the: What Is Vascular Disease? Title What Is Vascular Disease? USD Close Print

  9. Relative permeability through fractures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diomampo, Gracel, P.

    2001-08-01

    The mechanism of two-phase flow through fractures is of importance in understanding many geologic processes. Currently, two-phase flow through fractures is still poorly understood. In this study, nitrogen-water experiments were done on both smooth and rough parallel plates to determine the governing flow mechanism for fractures and the appropriate methodology for data analysis. The experiments were done using a glass plate to allow visualization of flow. Digital video recording allowed instantaneous measurement of pressure, flow rate and saturation. Saturation was computed using image analysis techniques. The experiments showed that gas and liquid phases flow through fractures in nonuniform separate channels. The localized channels change with time as each phase path undergoes continues breaking and reforming due to invasion of the other phase. The stability of the phase paths is dependent on liquid and gas flow rate ratio. This mechanism holds true for over a range of saturation for both smooth and rough fractures. In imbibition for rough-walled fractures, another mechanism similar to wave-like flow in pipes was also observed. The data from the experiments were analyzed using Darcy's law and using the concept of friction factor and equivalent Reynold's number for two-phase flow. For both smooth- and rough-walled fractures a clear relationship between relative permeability and saturation was seen. The calculated relative permeability curves follow Corey-type behavior and can be modeled using Honarpour expressions. The sum of the relative permeabilities is not equal one, indicating phase interference. The equivalent homogeneous single-phase approach did not give satisfactory representation of flow through fractures. The graphs of experimentally derived friction factor with the modified Reynolds number do not reveal a distinctive linear relationship.

  10. Anti-VEGF Agents for Ocular Angiogenesis and Vascular Permeability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenichi Kimoto

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We review articles describing intravitreal injection of anti-VEGF drug trials, while discussing the mechanisms of the action of anti-VEGF antibodies, and also evaluating their outcomes. Intraocular injections of anti-VEGF drug are considered to be an effective treatment for macular edema after retinal vein occlusion, however, recurrent/persistent edema is common. The recent reports may lead to a shift in treatment paradigm for DME, from laser photocoagulation, to newer approaches using anti-VEGF drugs. There have been several well-publicized prospective, randomized studies that demonstrated the efficacy of intravitreal injection of anti-VEGF drugs for patients with AMD. Adjuvant bevacizumab for neovascular glaucoma may prevent further PAS formation, and it is likely to open up a therapeutic window for a panretinal photocoagulation and trabeculectomy. Intravitreal injection of bevacizumab (IVB results in a substantial decrease in bleeding from the retinal vessels or new vessels during a standard vitrectomy. IVB has also been reported to be effective for inducing the regression of new vessels in proliferative diabetic retinopathy. The use of bevacizumab in stage 4 or 5 retinopahty of permaturity (ROP is to reduce the plus sign to help reduce hemorrhage during the subsequent vitrectomy. Some authors reported cases of resolution of stage 4 A ROP after bevacizumab injection.

  11. Leucocyte depletion attenuates the early increase in myocardial capillary permeability to small hydrophilic solutes following ischaemia and reperfusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendsen, Jesper Hastrup; Hansen, P R; Ali, S

    1993-01-01

    The aim was to assess the significance of polymorphonuclear leucocytes on the myocardial capillary permeability to a small hydrophilic indicator, on the vascular tone of the resistance vessels, and on contractile function following ischaemia and reperfusion....

  12. Permeability measuremens of brazilian Eucalyptus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcio Rogério da Silva

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The permeability of Brazilian Eucalyptus grandis and Eucalyptus citriodora wood was measured in a custom build gas analysis chamber in order to determine which species could be successfully treated with preservatives. Liquid permeability was tested using an emulsion of Neen oil and a control of distillated water. Air was used to test the gas phase permeability. For both Eucalyptus grandis and Eucalyptus citriodora, the longitudinal permeability of gas was shown to be about twice as great as the liquid phase permeability. No radial permeability was observed for either wood. The permeability of air and water through the sapwood of Eucalyptus grandis was greater than that through the sapwood of Eucalyptus citriodora. The permeability of neen oil preservative through the sapwood of Eucalyptus grandis was also greater than through the sapwood of E. Citradora, but the difference was not statistically significant. Scanning Electron Microscopy images showed that the distribution and obstruction in the vessels could be correlated with observed permeability properties. Irrespective of the causes of differences in permeability between the species, the fluid phase flux through the sapwood of both species was significant, indicating that both Eucalyptus grandis and Eucalyptus citriodora could be successfully treated with wood preservative.

  13. Protective effects of Donepezil against endothelial permeability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Xuelu; Di, Xiuhua; Liu, Yilin

    2017-09-15

    The endothelium lines the interior surface of blood vessels, and under pathophysiologic conditions, its integrity can be compromised due to a disturbance in the expression of tight junctions. Donepezil is a licensed drug used in the palliative treatment of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Increasing evidence has reported that donepezil has an anti-inflammatory activity. However, little information is available regarding the role of donepezil in vascular diseases. In this study, we found that pretreatment with donepezil significantly ameliorated endothelial permeability induced by tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α) by restoring the expression of the tight junction proteins vascular endothelial cadherin (VE-cadherin) and zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1) in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). Mechanistically, our results indicate that donepezil regulates the expression and activity of matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases 1 (TIMP-1), but not matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) or tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases 2 (TIMP-2). Importantly, the phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate 3-kinase (PI3K)/ serine-threonine kinase (AKT)/ nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) pathway was found to be involved in this process. These results suggest that donepezil may potentially play an important therapeutic role in vascular diseases. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  14. Vascular dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, John T; Thomas, Alan

    2015-10-24

    Vascular dementia is one of the most common causes of dementia after Alzheimer's disease, causing around 15% of cases. However, unlike Alzheimer's disease, there are no licensed treatments for vascular dementia. Progress in the specialty has been difficult because of uncertainties over disease classification and diagnostic criteria, controversy over the exact nature of the relation between cerebrovascular pathology and cognitive impairment, and the paucity of identifiable tractable treatment targets. Although there is an established relation between vascular and degenerative Alzheimer's pathology, the mechanistic link between the two has not yet been identified. This Series paper critiques some of the key areas and controversies, summarises treatment trials so far, and makes suggestions for what progress is needed to advance our understanding of pathogenesis and thus maximise opportunities for the search for new and effective management approaches. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. [Vascular trauma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furuya, T; Nobori, M; Tanaka, N

    1999-07-01

    Vascular trauma is essentially acute arterial obstruction, often combined with hemorrhage, fracture, and infection. It can be both life-threatening and limb-threatening and needs an emergency operation. In vascular trauma patient, multiple fracture and organ injury, such as brain, lung, liver, spleen, kidney, or gastrointestinal tract should be evaluated to decide treatment priority. When the pulse distal from the injured site is absent or diminished, vascular trauma is most likely and reconstruction should be accomplished within "the golden time (6-8 hours)". Intimal damage followed by platelet aggregation and thrombus formation will necessitate resection and repair of the site instead of simple thrombectomy. Although autogenous vein is the first choice, artificial graft can be implanted for short segment in non-infected field.

  16. Electrophysiologic Evaluation of Psychogenic Movement Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pramod Kumar Pal

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Psychogenic movement disorders (PMD are a group of disorders which are in the border zone between neurology and psychiatry. All necessary laboratory investigations should be done to rule out an underlying organic disorder. While clinical acumen of a trained movement disorder specialist may be sufficient to diagnose most PMD, there are clinical situations where electrophysiological tests are required either to rule out an organic movement disorder or even diagnose a PMD. Current electrophysiological test are most useful for tremor, followed by jerks and least for spasms or dystonia. Commonly used electrophysiologic tests include multichannel surface electromyography (EMG, accelerometry, electroencephalography time locked with EMG, premovement potential (Bereitschaftspotential, and somatosensory evoked potentials. Psychogenic tremor is a low frequency tremor with variable frequency and duration of EMG bursts, entrainable, has a high coherence with voluntary movements, and presence of coactivation sign. Patients with psychogenic jerks have well organized triphasic pattern of activation of agonist and antagonist muscles. The jerks are associated with EMG bursts of long duration (usually > 70 ms, long and variable latencies in stimulus induced jerks, absence of craniocaudal pattern of muscle recruitment in apparent startle response, and often a Breitschaftspotential (premovement potential precedes the jerk. Electrophysiological characterization of psychogenic dystonia is difficult and the tests are usually performed to rule out organic dystonia with characteristic findings. Finally, caution should be exerted in interpreting the electrophysiological tests as both false positive and false negative diagnosis of PMD may still occur.

  17. Low Permeability Polyimide Insulation Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Resodyn Technologies proposes a new technology that enables the application of polyimide based cryogenic insulation with low hydrogen permeability. This effort...

  18. VASCULAR SURGERY

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is a complex and serious condition encompassing deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism (PE), usually in the lower extremities.1,2. Thromboses can result from venous stasis, vascular injury or hypercoagulability, and those involving the deep veins proximal to the knee are ...

  19. Concurrent electrophysiology and TPM/OCT imaging of long-term implanted electrodes (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammer, Daniel X.; Gao, Yu-Rong; Ye, Meijun; Welle, Cristin G.

    2017-02-01

    Microelectrodes implanted in the brain cause mechanical damage to the tissue that mediate neuroinflammation and eventual encapsulation by microglia and astrocytes. Electrophysiological signals recorded from implants used in brain-computer interfaces (BCI) degrade over time, limiting their usefulness, but the precise causes and progression are not fully understood. We are investigating the dynamics of brain morphological changes and neuroinflammation with a multimodal approach to better understand the potential causes of implant failure. We performed weekly optical coherence tomography (OCT)-guided two-photon microscopy (TPM) in the region around microelectrodes inserted under a cranial window concurrent with electrophysiological recordings. Transgenic mouse cohorts studied include Thy1-YFP, Cx3cr1, and GFAP-GFP to image neurons, microglia, and astrocytes, respectively. Single-shank, 16-channel, Michigan-style microelectrodes were inserted under the window at a 15-20° angle with an insertion depth up to cortical layer 5. Single-unit and local field potential (LFP) recordings were collected for 15 minutes while the animals moved freely in their home cages. Cellular and vascular morphology were monitored using TPM and OCT at timepoints matched to the recordings. In preliminary data, we observed a decay of neural firing rates in most of the channels after implantation. The relationship between electrophysiological measures (e.g., neural firing rate, LFP power) and neural/vascular morphological measurements (e.g., cell density, glial migration, blood flow changes) will be quantified. The multimodal approach combining electrophysiology and optical imaging provides a broader picture of the multifactorial nature of the response to implanted electrodes. Understanding and accounting for the response may lead to better BCI designs and approaches.

  20. Transverse permeability of woven fabrics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grouve, Wouter Johannes Bernardus; Akkerman, Remko; Loendersloot, Richard; van den Berg, S.

    2008-01-01

    The transverse permeability is an essential input in describing the consolidation process of CETEX® laminates. A two-dimensional, finite difference based, Stokes flow solver has been developed to determine the mesoscopic permeability of arbitrary fabric structures. The use of a multigrid solver

  1. Electrophysiological Correlates of Observational Learning in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez Buritica, Julia M.; Eppinger, Ben; Schuck, Nicolas W.; Heekeren, Hauke R.; Li, Shu-Chen

    2016-01-01

    Observational learning is an important mechanism for cognitive and social development. However, the neurophysiological mechanisms underlying observational learning in children are not well understood. In this study, we used a probabilistic reward-based observational learning paradigm to compare behavioral and electrophysiological markers of…

  2. Electrophysiological research on conversation and discourse processing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoeks, John; Brouwer, Harm; Holtgraves, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Research into the electrophysiology of language comprehension has essentially been “speakerless.” This has left three vital aspects of communication—it is social, pragmatic, and dynamic—severely underresearched. This chapter makes a case for the investigation of language users involved in active

  3. How Compatible is Clinical Diagnosis with Electrophysiology?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yakup Turkel

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The objective of this study was to investigate the correlation of the clinical diagnosis of patients referred to the electroneuromyography laboratory with the electrophysiological diagnosis. Material and Method: Eight hundred eighty two patients  were enrolled in the study. Their ages, genders, the clinic that referred the patient, the clinical diagnosis, and the electrophysiological results were registered retrospectively and the results were statistically evaluated. Results: Five hundred twenty four of 882 patients enrolled in the study were women, while 358 of them were men. Four hundred hundred ninety nine (56,6% of the patients were consulted by the Neurology department, 222 (25,2% patients were consulted by the Neurosurgery deparment, 59 (6,7%  patients were consulted by the Physical medicine and rehabilitation  deparment while 61 (6,9% patients were referred by the Orthopedy department and 41 (4,6% by other departments. Carpal tunnel syndrome was the most frequent clinical diagnosis (28,7%. Only in a small group of patients symptoms were assessed rather than the clinical diagnosis (2,9%. In 49,1% of the patients, There was correlation between clinical and electrophysiological diagnosis while 44,7% of patients had normal electroneuromyography results. Discussion: The high rate of the normal electroneuromyography tests and the statistically significant discordance of clinical diagnosis of patients with their electrophysiological test results show that, there are inessential electroneuromyography reguests.

  4. Study progress of clinical electrophysiology on amblyopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ao Zhang

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Electrophysiology examination is an important technique in studying amblyopia, which mainly includes electrooculography(EOG, electroretinography(ERG, visual evoked potential(VEP. This study does not only summarizes the definition, the mechanisms and the meaning of these indexes in the relevant research progress in recent years, but also makes a comment on the controversies among the relevant research conclusions.

  5. Permeability of Brain Tumor Vessels Induced by Uniform or Spatially Microfractionated Synchrotron Radiation Therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouchet, Audrey; Potez, Marine; Coquery, Nicolas; Rome, Claire; Lemasson, Benjamin; Bräuer-Krisch, Elke; Rémy, Chantal; Laissue, Jean; Barbier, Emmanuel L; Djonov, Valentin; Serduc, Raphael

    2017-08-01

    To compare the blood-brain barrier permeability changes induced by synchrotron microbeam radiation therapy (MRT, which relies on spatial fractionation of the incident x-ray beam into parallel micron-wide beams) with changes induced by a spatially uniform synchrotron x-ray radiation therapy. Male rats bearing malignant intracranial F98 gliomas were randomized into 3 groups: untreated, exposed to MRT (peak and valley dose: 241 and 10.5 Gy, respectively), or exposed to broad beam irradiation (BB) delivered at comparable doses (ie, equivalent to MRT valley dose); both applied by 2 arrays, intersecting orthogonally the tumor region. Vessel permeability was monitored in vivo by magnetic resonance imaging 1 day before (T-1) and 1, 2, 7, and 14 days after treatment start. To determine whether physiologic parameters influence vascular permeability, we evaluated vessel integrity in the tumor area with different values for cerebral blood flow, blood volume, edema, and tissue oxygenation. Microbeam radiation therapy does not modify the vascular permeability of normal brain tissue. Microbeam radiation therapy-induced increase of tumor vascular permeability was detectable from T2 with a maximum at T7 after exposure, whereas BB enhanced vessel permeability only at T7. At this stage MRT was more efficient at increasing tumor vessel permeability (BB vs untreated: +19.1%; P=.0467; MRT vs untreated: +44.8%; Ptumor than BB. Microbeam radiation therapy-induced increased tumor vascular permeability is: (1) significantly greater; (2) earlier and more prolonged than that induced by BB irradiation, especially in highly proliferative tumor areas; and (3) targets all tumor areas discriminated by physiologic characteristics, including those not damaged by homogeneous irradiation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Permeability testing of biomaterial membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dreesmann, L; Hajosch, R; Nuernberger, J Vaz; Schlosshauer, B [NMI Natural and Medical Sciences Institute at University Tuebingen, Markwiesenstr. 55, D-72770 Reutlingen (Germany); Ahlers, M [GELITA AG, Gammelsbacher Str. 2, D-69412 Eberbach (Germany)], E-mail: schlosshauer@nmi.de

    2008-09-01

    The permeability characteristics of biomaterials are critical parameters for a variety of implants. To analyse the permeability of membranes made from crosslinked ultrathin gelatin membranes and the transmigration of cells across the membranes, we combined three technical approaches: (1) a two-chamber-based permeability assay, (2) cell culturing with cytochemical analysis and (3) biochemical enzyme electrophoresis (zymography). Based on the diffusion of a coloured marker molecule in conjunction with photometric quantification, permeability data for a gelatin membrane were determined in the presence or absence of gelatin degrading fibroblasts. Cytochemical evaluation after cryosectioning of the membranes was used to ascertain whether fibroblasts had infiltrated the membrane inside. Zymography was used to investigate the potential release of proteases from fibroblasts, which are known to degrade collagen derivatives such as gelatin. Our data show that the diffusion equilibrium of a low molecular weight dye across the selected gelatin membrane is approached after about 6-8 h. Fibroblasts increase the permeability due to cavity formation in the membrane inside without penetrating the membrane for an extended time period (>21 days in vitro). Zymography indicates that cavity formation is most likely due to the secretion of matrix metalloproteinases. In summary, the combination of the depicted methods promises to facilitate a more rational development of biomaterials, because it provides a rapid means of determining permeability characteristics and bridges the gap between descriptive methodology and the mechanistic understanding of permeability alterations due to biological degradation.

  7. Vascular Complications During Catheter Ablation of Cardiac Arrhythmias: A Comparison Between Vascular Ultrasound Guided Access and Conventional Vascular Access.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Parikshit S; Padala, Santosh K; Gunda, Sampath; Koneru, Jayanthi N; Ellenbogen, Kenneth A

    2016-10-01

    Vascular access related complications are the most common complications from catheter based EP procedures and have been reported to occur in 1-13% of cases. We prospectively assessed vascular complications in a large series of consecutive patients undergoing catheter based electrophysiologic (EP) procedures with ultrasound (US) guided vascular access versus conventional access. Consecutive patients undergoing catheter ablation procedures at VCU medical center were included. US guided access was obtained in all cases starting June 2015 (US group) while modified Seldinger technique without US guidance (non-US group) was used in cases prior to this date. All vascular complications were recorded for a 30-day period after the procedure. A total of 689 patients underwent 720 procedures. Ablations for ventricular tachyarrhythmias (ventricular tachycardia: VT, premature ventricular contractions: PVCs) accounted for 89 (12%) cases; atrial fibrillation (AF) ablations accounted for 328 procedures (46%) and other catheter based procedures accounted for 42% of cases. A significantly higher incidence of complications was noted in the non-US group compared with the US group (19 [5.3%] vs. 4 [1.1%], respectively, P = 0.002). Major complications were also higher among the non-US group (9 [2.5%] vs. 2 [0.6%], P = 0.03). Increasing age (P = 0.04) and non-US guided vascular access (P = 0.002) were associated with a higher risk of vascular access complications. In a large series of patients undergoing catheter based EP procedures for cardiac arrhythmias, US guided vascular access was associated with a significantly decreased 30-day risk of vascular complications. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Geothermal Permeability Enhancement - Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joe Beall; Mark Walters

    2009-06-30

    The overall objective is to apply known permeability enhancement techniques to reduce the number of wells needed and demonstrate the applicability of the techniques to other undeveloped or under-developed fields. The Enhanced Geothermal System (EGS) concept presented in this project enhances energy extraction from reduced permeability zones in the super-heated, vapor-dominated Aidlin Field of the The Geysers geothermal reservoir. Numerous geothermal reservoirs worldwide, over a wide temperature range, contain zones of low permeability which limit the development potential and the efficient recovery of heat from these reservoirs. Low permeability results from poorly connected fractures or the lack of fractures. The Enhanced Geothermal System concept presented here expands these technologies by applying and evaluating them in a systematic, integrated program.

  9. Permeability of soils in Mississippi

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Hara, Charles G.

    1994-01-01

    The permeability of soils in Mississippi was determined and mapped using a geographic information system (GIS). Soil permeabilities in Mississippi were determined to range in value from nearly 0.0 to values exceeding 5.0 inches per hour. The U.S. Soil Conservation Service's State Soil Geographic Data Base (STATSGO) was used as the primary source of data for the determination of area-weighted soil permeability. STATSGO provides soil layer properties that are spatially referenced to mapped areas. These mapped areas are referred to as polygons in the GIS. The polygons arc boundaries of soils mapped as a group and are given unique Map Unit Identifiers (MUIDs). The data describing the physical characteristics of the soils within each polygon are stored in a tabular data base format and are referred to as attributes. The U.S. Soil Conservation Service developed STATSGO to be primarily used as a guide for regional resource planning, management, and monitoring. STATSGO was designed so that soil information could be extracted from properties tables at the layer level, combined by component, and statistically expanded to cover the entire map unit. The results of this study provide a mapped value for permeability which is representative of the vertical permeability of soils in that area. The resultant permeability map provides a representative vertical soil permeability for a given area sufficient for county, multi- county, and area planning, and will be used as the soil permeability data component in the evaluation of the susceptibility of major aquifers to contami- nation in Mississippi.

  10. Python for large-scale electrophysiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spacek, Martin; Blanche, Tim; Swindale, Nicholas

    2008-01-01

    Electrophysiology is increasingly moving towards highly parallel recording techniques which generate large data sets. We record extracellularly in vivo in cat and rat visual cortex with 54-channel silicon polytrodes, under time-locked visual stimulation, from localized neuronal populations within a cortical column. To help deal with the complexity of generating and analysing these data, we used the Python programming language to develop three software projects: one for temporally precise visual stimulus generation ("dimstim"); one for electrophysiological waveform visualization and spike sorting ("spyke"); and one for spike train and stimulus analysis ("neuropy"). All three are open source and available for download (http://swindale.ecc.ubc.ca/code). The requirements and solutions for these projects differed greatly, yet we found Python to be well suited for all three. Here we present our software as a showcase of the extensive capabilities of Python in neuroscience.

  11. Permeability theory and Palace Athena.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stamps, Arthur E

    2013-06-01

    Permeability theory suggests that safety in environments depends on how far and how easily one can perceive or move through environments. Parts of environments that limit perception or retard locomotion elicit impressions of being enclosed, so properties of environments that influence perceived enclosure are important in permeability theory. One prediction of permeability theory is that the more permeable the boundary, the less enclosed the region within that boundary will seem to be. Another prediction is that boundary depth will have little influence on perceived enclosure. These predictions were tested in the venue of Greek temples. 30 participants were tested (14 men, 16 women; M age = 40 yr.), who rated perceived enclosure for 18 stimuli. The stimuli were constructed using a virtual scene from the Tholos in Delphi with the positions of the columns forming the boundaries. The boundaries were designed to have different levels of permeability and depth. Data were analyzed in terms of effect sizes and focused comparisons. Results indicated that perceived enclosure was most strongly influenced by the visual permeability of the boundary, while depth of boundary had a much smaller effect on perceived enclosure.

  12. The reliability of commonly used electrophysiology measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, K E; Lohse, K R; Mayer, I M S; Strigaro, G; Desikan, M; Casula, E P; Meunier, S; Popa, T; Lamy, J-C; Odish, O; Leavitt, B R; Durr, A; Roos, R A C; Tabrizi, S J; Rothwell, J C; Boyd, L A; Orth, M

    Electrophysiological measures can help understand brain function both in healthy individuals and in the context of a disease. Given the amount of information that can be extracted from these measures and their frequent use, it is essential to know more about their inherent reliability. To understand the reliability of electrophysiology measures in healthy individuals. We hypothesized that measures of threshold and latency would be the most reliable and least susceptible to methodological differences between study sites. Somatosensory evoked potentials from 112 control participants; long-latency reflexes, transcranial magnetic stimulation with resting and active motor thresholds, motor evoked potential latencies, input/output curves, and short-latency sensory afferent inhibition and facilitation from 84 controls were collected at 3 visits over 24 months at 4 Track-On HD study sites. Reliability was assessed using intra-class correlation coefficients for absolute agreement, and the effects of reliability on statistical power are demonstrated for different sample sizes and study designs. Measures quantifying latencies, thresholds, and evoked responses at high stimulator intensities had the highest reliability, and required the smallest sample sizes to adequately power a study. Very few between-site differences were detected. Reliability and susceptibility to between-site differences should be evaluated for electrophysiological measures before including them in study designs. Levels of reliability vary substantially across electrophysiological measures, though there are few between-site differences. To address this, reliability should be used in conjunction with theoretical calculations to inform sample size and ensure studies are adequately powered to detect true change in measures of interest. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. The permeability of heterogeneous rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selvadurai, Patrick

    2017-04-01

    Darcy's original concept of permeability is largely associated with estimation of the hydraulic conductivity characteristics of isotropic and homogeneous porous media where the fluid flow characteristics can be estimated by appeal to a single scalar measure. Naturally occurring geomaterials are heterogeneous and the estimation of the effective permeability characteristics of such geomaterials presents a challenge not only in terms of the experimental procedures that should be used to ensure flow through the porous medium but also in the correct use of the theoretical concepts needed to accurately interpret the data. Relatively widely referred to rocks such as Indiana Limestone can exhibit spatial heterogeneity in the permeability characteristics even though the visual appearance can suggest the absence of such spatial and directional attributes (Selvadurai and Selvadurai, 2010). Argillaceous rocks such as the Cobourg Limestone found in southern Ontario, Canada can display hydraulic heterogeneity that is attributed to the presence of dolomitic and calcite nodular regions separated by calcite rock partings that contain an argillaceous component (Figure 1). Also, these rocks have extremely low permeability that requires the use of transient hydraulic pulse tests for the estimation of permeability. The performance of such pulse tests will be influenced by the bulk compressibility and bulk porosity of the porous skeleton consisting of the identifiable phases and their spatial distributions. The concepts of effective compressibilities and porosities therefore needs to be introduced if convenient procedures are to be developed for the accurate interpretation of even bench scale experiments (Selvadurai and Gɫowacki, 2017). The paper will describe both experimental and theoretical approaches for interpreting the effective Darcy permeability of the heterogeneous rocks using both experimental and computational approaches. In particular, the applicability of the "Geometric

  14. Vascular endothelial growth factor from embryonic status to cardiovascular pathology

    OpenAIRE

    Mohsen Azimi-Nezhad

    2014-01-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is a multifunctional cytokine with distinct functions in angiogenesis, lymphangiogenesis, vascular permeability, and hematopoiesis. VEGF is a highly conserved, disulfide-bonded dimeric glycoprotein of 34 to 45 kDa produced by several cell types including fibroblasts, neutrophils, endothelial cells, and peripheral blood mononuclear cells, particularly T lymphocytes and macrophages. Six VEGF isoforms are generated as a result of alternative splicing fro...

  15. Human uremic plasma increases microvascular permeability to water and proteins in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, Steven J; Tomson, Charles R V; Bates, David O

    2002-04-01

    The risk of cardiovascular disease is significantly higher in patients with long-term uremia than in otherwise healthy adults. This is true even before patients proceed to dialysis, but the reason why cardiovascular risk is increased is unknown. Transvascular transport of lipids and other macromolecules in both large vessels and the microcirculation has been implicated in generation of cardiovascular disease. To determine whether patients with long-term uremia have circulating factors that promote increased vascular permeability, we measured the effect of perfusing microvessels with uremic plasma in a non-mammalian model of vascular permeability measurement. Perfusion of frog mesenteric microvessels with dialyzed normal plasma did not result in an increase in either hydraulic conductivity (Lp, permeability of the vessel wall to water) or oncotic reflection coefficient (sigma, permeability to macromolecules, particularly proteins). Perfusion with dialyzed uremic plasma resulted in a very significant increase in vascular permeability to both water (Lp increased 8.8-fold from 4.1 to 36.4 x 10(-7) cm x s(-1) cm H2O(-1)) and proteins (sigma reduced from 0.93 to 0.53). These results suggest that one or more circulating macromolecules in uremic plasma are able to increase transvascular solute and fluid flux, and may underlie the increased cardiovascular risk found in these patients.

  16. Bentonite Permeability at Elevated Temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine A. Daniels

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Repository designs frequently favour geological disposal of radioactive waste with a backfill material occupying void space around the waste. The backfill material must tolerate the high temperatures produced by decaying radioactive waste to prevent its failure or degradation, leading to increased hydraulic conductivity and reduced sealing performance. The results of four experiments investigating the effect of temperature on the permeability of a bentonite backfill are presented. Bentonite is a clay commonly proposed as the backfill in repository designs because of its high swelling capacity and very low permeability. The experiments were conducted in two sets of purpose-built, temperature controlled apparatus, designed to simulate isotropic pressure and constant volume conditions within the testing range of 4–6 MPa average effective stress. The response of bentonite during thermal loading at temperatures up to 200 °C was investigated, extending the previously considered temperature range. The results provide details of bentonite’s intrinsic permeability, total stress, swelling pressure and porewater pressure during thermal cycles. We find that bentonite’s hydraulic properties are sensitive to thermal loading and the type of imposed boundary condition. However, the permeability change is not large and can mostly be accounted for by water viscosity changes. Thus, under 150 °C, temperature has a minimal impact on bentonite’s hydraulic permeability.

  17. Electrophysiological characteristics according to activity level of myofascial trigger points

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Yu, Seong Hun; Kim, Hyun Jin

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This study compared the differences in electrophysiological characteristics of normal muscles versus muscles with latent or active myofascial trigger points, and identified the neuromuscular...

  18. Obesity, Cardiovascular Fitness, and Inhibition Function: An Electrophysiological Study

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Song, Tai-Fen; Chi, Lin; Chu, Chien-Heng; Chen, Feng-Tzu; Zhou, Chenglin; Chang, Yu-Kai

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to examine how obesity and cardiovascular fitness are associated with the inhibition aspect of executive function from behavioral and electrophysiological perspectives...

  19. PERMEABILITY OF BACTERIAL SPORES I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, S. H.; Gerhardt, Philipp

    1961-01-01

    Black, S. H. (The University of Michigan, Ann Arbor) and Philipp Gerhardt. Permeability of bacterial spores. I. Characterization of glucose uptake. J. Bacteriol. 82:743–749. 1961.—The total uptake of glucose by masses of clean, dormant spores was measured to assess their permeability. After correction for intercellular space, packed spores of Bacillus cereus strain terminalis were found in 87 determinations to be permeated by glucose to 40% of their weight. The glucose uptake was relatively independent of environmental variables, and thus was concluded to occur principally through a process of passive diffusion. PMID:13869665

  20. Cell-specific cardiac electrophysiology models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Willemijn Groenendaal

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The traditional cardiac model-building paradigm involves constructing a composite model using data collected from many cells. Equations are derived for each relevant cellular component (e.g., ion channel, exchanger independently. After the equations for all components are combined to form the composite model, a subset of parameters is tuned, often arbitrarily and by hand, until the model output matches a target objective, such as an action potential. Unfortunately, such models often fail to accurately simulate behavior that is dynamically dissimilar (e.g., arrhythmia to the simple target objective to which the model was fit. In this study, we develop a new approach in which data are collected via a series of complex electrophysiology protocols from single cardiac myocytes and then used to tune model parameters via a parallel fitting method known as a genetic algorithm (GA. The dynamical complexity of the electrophysiological data, which can only be fit by an automated method such as a GA, leads to more accurately parameterized models that can simulate rich cardiac dynamics. The feasibility of the method is first validated computationally, after which it is used to develop models of isolated guinea pig ventricular myocytes that simulate the electrophysiological dynamics significantly better than does a standard guinea pig model. In addition to improving model fidelity generally, this approach can be used to generate a cell-specific model. By so doing, the approach may be useful in applications ranging from studying the implications of cell-to-cell variability to the prediction of intersubject differences in response to pharmacological treatment.

  1. Normal Values for Heart Electrophysiology Parameters of Healthy Swine Determined on Electrophysiology Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noszczyk-Nowak, Agnieszka; Cepiel, Alicja; Janiszewski, Adrian; Pasławski, Robert; Gajek, Jacek; Pasławska, Urszula; Nicpoń, Józef

    2016-01-01

    Swine are a well-recognized animal model for human cardiovascular diseases. Despite the widespread use of porcine model in experimental electrophysiology, still no reference values for intracardiac electrical activity and conduction parameters determined during an invasive electrophysiology study (EPS) have been developed in this species thus far. The aim of the study was to develop a set of normal values for intracardiac electrical activity and conduction parameters determined during an invasive EPS of swine. The study included 36 healthy domestic swine (24-40 kg body weight). EPS was performed under a general anesthesia with midazolam, propofol and isoflurane. The reference values for intracardiac electrical activity and conduction parameters were calculated as arithmetic means ± 2 standard deviations. The reference values were determined for AH, HV and PA intervals, interatrial conduction time at its own and imposed rhythm, sinus node recovery time (SNRT), corrected sinus node recovery time (CSNRT), anterograde and retrograde Wenckebach points, atrial, atrioventricular node and ventricular refractory periods. No significant correlations were found between body weight and heart rate of the examined pigs and their electrophysiological parameters. The hereby presented reference values can be helpful in comparing the results of various studies, as well as in more accurately estimating the values of electrophysiological parameters that can be expected in a given experiment.

  2. Delayed effects of cold atmospheric plasma on vascular cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stoffels, Eva; Roks, Anton J. M.; Deelmm, Leo E.

    2008-01-01

    We investigated the long-term behaviour of vascular cells (endothelial and smooth muscle) after exposure to a cold atmospheric plasma source. The cells were treated through a gas-permeable membrane, in order to simulate intravenous treatment with a gas plasma-filled catheter. Such indirect treatment

  3. The permeability of oral leukoplakia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bánóczy, Jolán; Squier, Christopher A; Kremer, Mary; Wertz, Philip W; Kövesi, György; Szende, Béla; Dombi, Csaba

    2003-08-01

    The significant increase in oral cancer mortality necessitates further research on the mechanisms of tumorigenesis. It was the aim of this study to compare the permeability, lipid composition and histopathological characteristics of oral leukoplakia with non-lesional specimens of the same region in 30 cases as well as 11 specimens originating from healthy control buccal mucosa. The permeability (Kp) of tissue biopsies to tritiated nitrosonornicotine was determined in a continuous through-flow perfusion system, lipids were extracted and identified by thin-layer chromatography, and thickness of epithelium and keratin layer assessed by histopathological methods. Results of the measurements showed that the permeability to the tobacco carcinogen, nitrosonornicotine for leukoplakic tissue was higher than for normal control buccal specimens. Non-lesional areas of buccal mucosa, adjacent to leukoplakias, showed hyperplasia and significantly higher permeability values than both leukoplakic and normal buccal control mucosa. The lipid content of the non-lesional sites was intermediate between the increased values of the leukoplakic lesion and of normal control mucosa. The data strongly suggest that the presence of tobacco in the oral cavity may bring about generalized changes even in regions that do not show leukoplakia.

  4. Intracellular calcium modulates basolateral K(+)-permeability in frog skin epithelium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brodin, Birger; Rytved, K A; Nielsen, R

    1994-01-01

    Cytosolic calcium ([Ca2+]i) has been suggested as a key modulator in the regulation of active sodium transport across electrically "tight" (high resistance) epithelia. In this study we investigated the effects of calcium on cellular electrophysiological parameters in a classical model tissue, the......, the frog skin. [Ca2+]i was measured with fura-2 in an epifluorescence microscope setup. An inhibition of basolateral potassium permeability was observed when cytosolic calcium was increased. This inhibition was reversible upon removal of calcium from the serosal solution....

  5. Design and development of multilayer vascular graft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madhavan, Krishna

    2011-07-01

    Vascular graft is a widely-used medical device for the treatment of vascular diseases such as atherosclerosis and aneurysm as well as for the use of vascular access and pediatric shunt, which are major causes of mortality and morbidity in this world. Dysfunction of vascular grafts often occurs, particularly for grafts with diameter less than 6mm, and is associated with the design of graft materials. Mechanical strength, compliance, permeability, endothelialization and availability are issues of most concern for vascular graft materials. To address these issues, we have designed a biodegradable, compliant graft made of hybrid multilayer by combining an intimal equivalent, electrospun heparin-impregnated poly-epsilon-caprolactone nanofibers, with a medial equivalent, a crosslinked collagen-chitosan-based gel scaffold. The intimal equivalent is designed to build mechanical strength and stability suitable for in vivo grafting and to prevent thrombosis. The medial equivalent is designed to serve as a scaffold for the activity of the smooth muscle cells important for vascular healing and regeneration. Our results have shown that genipin is a biocompatible crosslinker to enhance the mechanical properties of collagen-chitosan based scaffolds, and the degradation time and the activity of smooth muscle cells in the scaffold can be modulated by the crosslinking degree. For vascular grafting and regeneration in vivo, an important design parameter of the hybrid multilayer is the interface adhesion between the intimal and medial equivalents. With diametrically opposite affinities to water, delamination of the two layers occurs. Physical or chemical modification techniques were thus used to enhance the adhesion. Microscopic examination and graft-relevant functional characterizations have been performed to evaluate these techniques. Results from characterization of microstructure and functional properties, including burst strength, compliance, water permeability and suture

  6. Quantifying Evaporation in a Permeable Pavement System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Studies quantifying evaporation from permeable pavement systems are limited to a few laboratory studies and one field application. This research quantifies evaporation for a larger-scale field application by measuring the water balance from lined permeable pavement sections. Th...

  7. The kinetics of denitrification in permeable sediments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Evrard, Victor; Glud, Ronnie N.; Cook, Perran L. M.

    2013-01-01

    Permeable sediments comprise the majority of shelf sediments, yet the rates of denitrification remain highly uncertain in these environments. Computational models are increasingly being used to understand the dynamics of denitrification in permeable sediments, which are complex environments to st...

  8. Permeable Pavement Research - Edison, New Jersey

    Science.gov (United States)

    This presentation provides the background and summary of results collected at the permeable pavement parking lot monitored at the EPA facility in Edison, NJ. This parking lot is surfaced with permeable interlocking concrete pavers (PICP), pervious concrete, and porous asphalt. ...

  9. Plant Vascular Biology 2013: vascular trafficking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ursache, Robertas; Heo, Jung-Ok; Helariutta, Ykä

    2014-04-01

    About 200 researchers from around the world attended the Third International Conference on Plant Vascular Biology (PVB 2013) held in July 2013 at the Rantapuisto Conference Center, in Helsinki, Finland (http://www.pvb2013.org). The plant vascular system, which connects every organ in the mature plant, continues to attract the interest of researchers representing a wide range of disciplines, including development, physiology, systems biology, and computational biology. At the meeting, participants discussed the latest research advances in vascular development, long- and short-distance vascular transport and long-distance signalling in plant defence, in addition to providing a context for how these studies intersect with each other. The meeting provided an opportunity for researchers working across a broad range of fields to share ideas and to discuss future directions in the expanding field of vascular biology. In this report, the latest advances in understanding the mechanism of vascular trafficking presented at the meeting have been summarized.

  10. Bioprinting for vascular and vascularized tissue biofabrication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datta, Pallab; Ayan, Bugra; Ozbolat, Ibrahim T

    2017-03-15

    Bioprinting is a promising technology to fabricate design-specific tissue constructs due to its ability to create complex, heterocellular structures with anatomical precision. Bioprinting enables the deposition of various biologics including growth factors, cells, genes, neo-tissues and extra-cellular matrix-like hydrogels. Benefits of bioprinting have started to make a mark in the fields of tissue engineering, regenerative medicine and pharmaceutics. Specifically, in the field of tissue engineering, the creation of vascularized tissue constructs has remained a principal challenge till date. However, given the myriad advantages over other biofabrication methods, it becomes organic to expect that bioprinting can provide a viable solution for the vascularization problem, and facilitate the clinical translation of tissue engineered constructs. This article provides a comprehensive account of bioprinting of vascular and vascularized tissue constructs. The review is structured as introducing the scope of bioprinting in tissue engineering applications, key vascular anatomical features and then a thorough coverage of 3D bioprinting using extrusion-, droplet- and laser-based bioprinting for fabrication of vascular tissue constructs. The review then provides the reader with the use of bioprinting for obtaining thick vascularized tissues using sacrificial bioink materials. Current challenges are discussed, a comparative evaluation of different bioprinting modalities is presented and future prospects are provided to the reader. Biofabrication of living tissues and organs at the clinically-relevant volumes vitally depends on the integration of vascular network. Despite the great progress in traditional biofabrication approaches, building perfusable hierarchical vascular network is a major challenge. Bioprinting is an emerging technology to fabricate design-specific tissue constructs due to its ability to create complex, heterocellular structures with anatomical precision

  11. Variability of permeability with diameter of conduit

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... creating a permeability profile similar to the velocity profile. An equation was obtained to establish this. We also found that peak values of permeability increase with increasing porosity, and therefore entry length increases with increasing porosity with all other parameters kept constant. A plot of peak permeability versus ...

  12. Xenopus oocyte electrophysiology in GPCR drug discovery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kasper Bø; Bräuner-Osborne, Hans

    2009-01-01

    Deorphanization of the large group of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) for which an endogenous activating ligand has not yet been identified (orphan GPCRs) has become increasingly difficult. A specialized technique that has been successfully applied to deorphanize some of these GPCRs involves...... two-electrode voltage-clamp recordings of currents through ion channels, which are activated by GPCRs heterologously expressed in Xenopus oocytes. The ion channels that couple to GPCR activation in Xenopus oocytes can be endogenous calcium-activated chloride channels (CaCCs) or heterologously...... expressed G protein-coupled inwardly rectifying potassium channels (GIRKs). We will describe a general approach for expression of GPCRs in Xenopus oocytes and characterization of these using electrophysiological recordings. We will focus on the detection of GPCR activation by recordings of currents through...

  13. Oyster Electrophysiology: Electrocardiogram Signal Recognition and Interpretation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frederico M. Batista

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available After 100 years of published recording traces pertaining to the oyster electrocardiogram (ECG, we revisited the original experiments of Eiger (1913, using state-of-the-art electrophysiology recorders. Our aim was to confirm that a recordable ECG, similar to that of higher vertebrates, is present in the oyster heart. Portuguese oysters Crassostrea angulata, collected from the Guadiana estuary, Portugal, were used. The oysters were drilled through the right valve to reveal the pericardium. Gold and silver electrodes were placed through the hole and electrophysiological recordings were obtained. Stimulation of the oyster heart was performed in vivo and in vitro using a constant current power supply. Placement of electrodes around the heart revealed a trace that very closely matched the published ECG of Eiger (1913. However, we were unable to confirm that the recording was an ECG of the oyster heart. Moreover, measurements on isolated oyster hearts revealed a low conductivity (0.10 S m‒1. We did, however, record a depolarization signal from what we believe to be the visceral ganglia, and this preceded contractions of the oyster heart. Our findings indicate that so-called ECGs, previously recorded by [2] in Ostrea edulis, but also the “ECG” recorded by [4] in C. virginica from oyster hearts, are in fact an artifact arising from relative movement of the recording electrodes, giving rise to a baseline shift that mimics in some ways the P and QRS features of a typical ECG. Nevertheless, such recordings provide information pertaining to heart rate and are not without importance.

  14. Cytoskeleton, cytoskeletal interactions, and vascular endothelial function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang J

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Jingli Wang,1 Michael E Widlansky1,21Department of Medicine, Cardiovascular Medicine Division, 2Department of Pharmacology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin, USAAbstract: Far from being inert, the vascular endothelium is a critical regulator of vascular function. While the endothelium participates in autocrine, paracrine, and endocrine signaling, it also transduces mechanical signals from the cell surface involving key cell structural elements. In this review, we discuss the structure of the vascular endothelium and its relationship to traditional cardiovascular risk factors and clinical cardiovascular events. Further, we review the emerging evidence that cell structural elements, including the glycocalyx, intercellular junctions, and cytoskeleton elements, help the endothelium to communicate with its environment to regulate vascular function, including vessel permeability and signal transduction via nitric oxide bioavailability. Further work is necessary to better delineate the regulatory relationships between known key regulators of vascular function and endothelial cell structural elements.Keywords: endothelium, shear stress, eNOS, cardiovascular risk factors, glycocalyx

  15. Nanomedicine for drug targeting: strategies beyond the enhanced permeability and retention effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nehoff, Hayley; Parayath, Neha N; Domanovitch, Laura; Taurin, Sebastien; Greish, Khaled

    2014-01-01

    The growing research interest in nanomedicine for the treatment of cancer and inflammatory-related pathologies is yielding encouraging results. Unfortunately, enthusiasm is tempered by the limited specificity of the enhanced permeability and retention effect. Factors such as lack of cellular specificity, low vascular density, and early release of active agents prior to reaching their target contribute to the limitations of the enhanced permeability and retention effect. However, improved nanomedicine designs are creating opportunities to overcome these problems. In this review, we present examples of the advances made in this field and endeavor to highlight the potential of these emerging technologies to improve targeting of nanomedicine to specific pathological cells and tissues.

  16. Effect of histamine on the electrophysiology of the human parietal pleura.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouritas, V K; Tsantsaridou, A; Tepetes, K; Tsilimingas, N; Gourgoulianis, K I; Molyvdas, P A; Hatzoglou, C

    2011-01-30

    Histamine is involved in the pathogenesis of numerous diseases and regulates the permeability of different tissues. The aim of this study is to investigate the effects of histamine on the electrophysiology of human parietal pleura and the underlying mechanisms involved. Pleural specimens were obtained from patients subjected to thoracic surgery and were mounted in Ussing chambers. Histamine solutions (1μM to 1mM) were applied in native and pretreated specimens with dimetindene maleate, cetirizine, ranitidine, amiloride and ouabain. Trans-mesothelial resistance was determined (R(TM)). Histamine induced a rapid R(TM) increase on the mesothelial (p = 0.008) and a decrease on the interstitial surface (p = 0.029). This effect was dose-dependent and was totally abolished by dimetindene maleate, cetirizine and amiloride and partially by ranitidine and ouabain. Histamine induces acute electrochemical changes in human pleura mainly via interaction with the H(1) and partially with the H(2) histamine receptors. It also interferes with trans-cellular permeability and therefore may participate in pleural fluid recycling. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Effect of aggregate grain size distribution on properties of permeable ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ) ratio on the mechanical properties of permeable concrete is investigated. The aim of this study is to prepare permeable concrete mixture with optimum properties in terms of strength and permeability. For this purpose, five different permeable ...

  18. On the permeability of fractal tube bundles

    CERN Document Server

    Zinovik, I

    2011-01-01

    The permeability of a porous medium is strongly affected by its local geometry and connectivity, the size distribution of the solid inclusions and the pores available for flow. Since direct measurements of the permeability are time consuming and require experiments that are not always possible, the reliable theoretical assessment of the permeability based on the medium structural characteristics alone is of importance. When the porosity approaches unity, the permeability-porosity relationships represented by the Kozeny-Carman equations and Archie's law predict that permeability tends to infinity and thus they yield unrealistic results if specific area of the porous media does not tend to zero. The goal of this paper is an evaluation of the relationships between porosity and permeability for a set of fractal models with porosity approaching unity and a finite permeability. It is shown that the two-dimensional foams generated by finite iterations of the corresponding geometric fractals can be used to model poro...

  19. Collagen vascular disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001223.htm Collagen vascular disease To use the sharing features on this page, ... previously said to have "connective tissue" or "collagen vascular" disease. We now have names for many specific conditions ...

  20. Research on red cell membrane permeability in arterial hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatina, R; Balta, N; Moisin, C; Burtea, C; Botea, S; Ioan, M; Teleianu, C

    1998-01-01

    Arterial hypertension, including the elucidation of hypertension pathogenic mechanisms involving elements in the composition of the blood, continues to represent a topical research area. Recent work, such as nuclear magnetic resonance studies looking into red cell permeability, illustrates the presence of modifications of red cell permeability to water (RCPW) related to the stage of arterial hypertension. The identification of a significant increase of RCPW compared to that present in the population with normal arterial pressure values can be useful both in early diagnosis and in warning about a possible predisposition for this condition. At the same time, the dynamic investigation of protonic relaxation time of both intra- and extra-erythrocytic water, the assessment of proton exchange time across the red cell and the calculation of permeability to water enable one not only to diagnose arterial hypertension but also to ascertain the evolution of the disease, its complications and the effectiveness of anti-hypertensive medication. Our studies have also proven the existence of a correlation between the values of systolic arterial pressure and red cell permeability to water. The curve describing the interdependence of the two values has the shape of a bell, in the case of males. The peak of the curve is reached for a systolic pressure of 160 mmHg and gets below the values of the control group in the case of systolic pressures above 200 mmHg. The RCPW test can also be considered a valuable indicator in evaluating the risk of stroke in hypertensive patients. In the chronic therapy of arterial hypertension with various types of anti-hypertensive drugs, one can note differences in the RCPW values related to the effectiveness of the respective medication, to the clinical form and stage of the disease, the sex of the patient as well as to the existence of cerebro-vascular complications.

  1. Neuroprotective effect of selective DPP-4 inhibitor in experimental vascular dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Swati; Sharma, Bhupesh

    2015-12-01

    Vascular risk factors are associated with a higher incidence of dementia. Diabetes mellitus is considered as a main risk factor for Alzheimer's disease and vascular dementia. Both forms of dementia are posing greater risk to the world population and are increasing at a faster rate. In the past we have reported the induction of vascular dementia by experimental diabetes. This study investigates the role of vildagliptin, a dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitor in the pharmacological interdiction of pancreatectomy diabetes induced vascular endothelial dysfunction and subsequent vascular dementia in rats. Attentional set shifting and Morris water-maze test were used for assessment of learning and memory. Vascular endothelial function, blood brain barrier permeability, serum glucose, serum nitrite/nitrate, oxidative stress (viz. aortic superoxide anion, brain thiobarbituric acid reactive species and brain glutathione), brain calcium and inflammation (myeloperoxidase) were also estimated. Pancreatectomy diabetes rats have shown impairment of endothelial function, blood brain barrier permeability, learning and memory along with increase in brain inflammation, oxidative stress and calcium. Administration of vildagliptin has significantly attenuated pancreatectomy induced impairment of learning, memory, endothelial function, blood brain barrier permeability and biochemical parameters. It may be concluded that vildagliptin, a dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitor may be considered as potential pharmacological agents for the management of pancreatectomy induced endothelial dysfunction and subsequent vascular dementia. The selective modulators of dipeptidyl peptidase-4 may further be explored for their possible benefits in vascular dementia. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Minimum Information about a Cardiac Electrophysiology Experiment (MICEE)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Quinn, T A; Granite, S; Allessie, M A

    2011-01-01

    (MICEE). The ultimate goal is to develop a useful tool for cardiac electrophysiologists which facilitates and improves dissemination of the minimum information necessary for reproduction of cardiac electrophysiology research, allowing for easier comparison and utilisation of findings by others...

  3. Encoding of electrophysiology and other signals in MR images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hanson, Lars G; Lund, Torben E; Hanson, Christian G

    2007-01-01

    : Electrophysiological (EP) eye and heart muscular recording (electrooculography [EOG] and electrocardiography [ECG]) during fast echo planar imaging (EPI) is demonstrated with an expandable, modular 8-channel prototype implementation. The gradient artifacts that would normally be dominating EOG are largely eliminated...

  4. Uncovering phase-coupled oscillatory networks in electrophysiological data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meij, R. van der; Jacobs, J.; Maris, E.G.G.

    2015-01-01

    Phase consistent neuronal oscillations are ubiquitous in electrophysiological recordings, and they may reflect networks of phase-coupled neuronal populations oscillating at different frequencies. Because neuronal oscillations may reflect rhythmic modulations of neuronal excitability, phase-coupled

  5. Autoclave Sterilization of PEDOT:PSS Electrophysiology Devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uguz, Ilke; Ganji, Mehran; Hama, Adel; Tanaka, Atsunori; Inal, Sahika; Youssef, Ahmed; Owens, Roisin M; Quilichini, Pascale P; Ghestem, Antoine; Bernard, Christophe; Dayeh, Shadi A; Malliaras, George G

    2016-12-01

    Autoclaving, the most widely available sterilization method, is applied to poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) doped with polystyrene sulfonate (PEDOT:PSS) electrophysiology devices. The process does not harm morphology or electrical properties, while it effectively kills E. coli intentionally cultured on the devices. This finding paves the way to widespread introduction of PEDOT:PSS electrophysiology devices to the clinic. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Dynamics of intrinsic electrophysiological properties in spinal cord neurones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Russo, R E; Hounsgaard, J

    1999-01-01

    The spinal cord is engaged in a wide variety of functions including generation of motor acts, coding of sensory information and autonomic control. The intrinsic electrophysiological properties of spinal neurones represent a fundamental building block of the spinal circuits executing these tasks. ....... Specialised, cell specific electrophysiological phenotypes gradually differentiate during development and are continuously adjusted in the adult animal by metabotropic synaptic interactions and activity-dependent plasticity to meet a broad range of functional demands....

  7. Stimfit: quantifying electrophysiological data with Python

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Segundo Jose Guzman

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Intracellular electrophysiological recordings provide crucial insights into elementary neuronal signals such as action potentials and synaptic currents. Analyzing and interpreting these signals is essential for a quantitative understanding of neuronal information processing, and requires both fast data visualization and ready access to complex analysis routines. To achieve this goal, we have developed Stimfit, a free software package for cellular neurophysiology with a Python scripting interface and a built-in Python shell. The program supports most standard file formats for cellular neurophysiology and other biomedical signals through the Biosig library. To quantify and interpret the activity of single neurons and communication between neurons, the program includes algorithms to characterize the kinetics of presynaptic action potentials and postsynaptic currents, estimate latencies between pre- and postsynaptic events, and detect spontaneously occurring events. We validate and benchmark these algorithms, give estimation errors, and provide sample use cases, showing that Stimfit represents an efficient, accessible and extensible way to accurately analyze and interpret neuronal signals.

  8. Electrophysiological mapping of novel prefrontal - cerebellar pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Thomas C; Jones, Matthew W; Apps, Richard

    2009-01-01

    Whilst the cerebellum is predominantly considered a sensorimotor control structure, accumulating evidence suggests that it may also subserve non-motor functions during cognition. However, this possibility is not universally accepted, not least because the nature and pattern of links between higher cortical structures and the cerebellum are poorly characterized. We have therefore used in vivo electrophysiological methods in anaesthetized rats to directly investigate connectivity between the medial prefrontal cortex (prelimbic subdivision, PrL) and the cerebellum. Stimulation of deep layers of PrL evoked distinct field potentials in the cerebellar cortex with a mean latency to peak of approximately 35 ms. These responses showed a well-defined topography, and were maximal in lobule VII of the contralateral vermis (a known oculomotor centre); they were not attenuated by local anaesthesia of the overlying M2 motor cortex, though M2 stimulation did evoke field potentials in lobule VII with a shorter latency (approximately 30 ms). Single unit recordings showed that prelimbic cortical stimulation elicits complex spikes in lobule VII Purkinje cells, indicating transmission via a previously undescribed cerebro-olivocerebellar pathway. Our results therefore establish a physiological basis for communication between PrL and the cerebellum. The role(s) of this pathway remain to be resolved, but presumably relate to control of eye movements and/or distributed networks associated with integrated prefrontal cortical functions.

  9. Electrophysiological mapping of novel prefrontal - cerebellar pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas C Watson

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Whilst the cerebellum is predominantly considered a sensorimotor control structure, accumulating evidence suggests that it may also subserve non motor functions during cognition. However, this possibility is not universally accepted, not least because the nature and pattern of links between higher cortical structures and the cerebellum are poorly characterized. We have therefore used in vivo electrophysiological methods in anaesthetized rats to directly investigate connectivity between the medial prefrontal cortex (prelimbic subdivision, PrL and the cerebellum. Stimulation of deep layers of PrL evoked distinct field potentials in the cerebellar cortex with a mean latency to peak of approximately 35ms. These responses showed a well-defined topography, and were maximal in lobule VII of the contralateral vermis (a known oculomotor centre; they were not attenuated by local anesthesia of the overlying M2 motor cortex, though M2 stimulation did evoke field potentials in lobule VII with a shorter latency. Single-unit recordings showed that prelimbic cortical stimulation elicits complex spikes in lobule VII Purkinje cells, indicating transmission via a previously undescribed cerebro-olivocerebellar pathway. Our results therefore establish a physiological basis for communication between PrL and the cerebellum. The role(s of this pathway remain to be resolved, but presumably relate to control of eye movements and/or distributed networks associated with integrated prefrontal cortical functions.

  10. Electrophysiological study in neuromuscular junction disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajith Cherian

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This review is on ultrastructure and subcellular physiology at normal and abnormal neuromuscular junctions. The clinical and electrophysiological findings in myasthenia gravis, Lambert-Eaton myasthenic syndrome (LEMS, congenital myasthenic syndromes, and botulinum intoxication are discussed. Single fiber electromyography (SFEMG helps to explain the basis of testing neuromuscular junction function by repetitive nerve stimulation (RNS. SFEMG requires skill and patience and its availability is limited to a few centers. For RNS supramaximal stimulation is essential and so is display of the whole waveform of each muscle response at maximum amplitude. The amplitudes of the negative phase of the first and fourth responses are measured from baseline to negative peak, and the percent change of the fourth response compared with the first represents the decrement or increment. A decrement greater than 10% is accepted as abnormal and smooth progression of response amplitude train and reproducibility form the crux. In suspected LEMS the effect of fast rates of stimulation should be determined after RNS response to slow rates of stimulation. Caution is required to avoid misinterpretation of potentiation and pseudofacilitation.

  11. Electrophysiological measurements of spectral sensitivities: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.D. DeVoe

    1997-02-01

    Full Text Available Spectral sensitivities of visual systems are specified as the reciprocals of the intensities of light (quantum fluxes needed at each wavelength to elicit the same criterion amplitude of responses. This review primarily considers the methods that have been developed for electrophysiological determinations of criterion amplitudes of slow-wave responses from single retinal cells. Traditional flash methods can require tedious dark adaptations and may yield erroneous spectral sensitivity curves which are not seen in such modifications as ramp methods. Linear response methods involve interferometry, while constant response methods involve manual or automatic adjustments of continuous illumination to keep response amplitudes constant during spectral scans. In DC or AC computerized constant response methods, feedback to determine intensities at each wavelength is derived from the response amplitudes themselves. Although all but traditional flash methods have greater or lesser abilities to provide on-line determinations of spectral sensitivities, computerized constant response methods are the most satisfactory due to flexibility, speed and maintenance of a constant adaptation level

  12. Integrated platform and API for electrophysiological data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrey eSobolev

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Recent advancements in technology and methodology have led to growing amounts of increasingly complex neuroscience data recorded from various species, modalities, and levels of study. The rapid data growth has made efficient data access and flexible, machine-readable data annotation a crucial requisite for neuroscientists. Clear and consistent annotation and organization of data is not only an important ingredient for reproducibility of results and re-use of data, but also essential for collaborative research and data sharing. In particular, efficient data management and interoperability requires a unified approach that integrates data and metadata and provides a common way of accessing this information.In this paper we describe GNData, a data management platform for neurophysiological data. GNData provides a storage system based on a data representation that is suitable to organize data and metadata from any electrophysiological experiment, with a functionality exposed via a common application programming interface (API. Data representation and API structure are compatible with existing approaches for data and metadata representation in neurophysiology. The API implementation is based on the Representational State Transfer (REST pattern, which enables data access integration in software applications and facilitates the development of tools that communicate with the service. Client libraries that interact with the API provide direct data access from computing environments like Matlab or Python, enabling integration of data management into the scientist's experimental or analysis routines.

  13. Electrophysiology of pumpkin seeds: Memristors in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volkov, Alexander G; Nyasani, Eunice K; Tuckett, Clayton; Greeman, Esther A; Markin, Vladislav S

    2016-01-01

    Leon Chua, the discoverer of a memristor, theoretically predicted that voltage gated ion channels can be memristors. We recently found memristors in different plants such as the Venus flytrap, Mimosa pudica, Aloe vera, apple fruits, and in potato tubers. There are no publications in literature about the existence of memristors in seeds. The goal of this work was to discover if pumpkin seeds might have memristors. We selected Cucurbita pepo L., cv. Cinderella, Cucurbita maxima L. cv Warty Goblin, and Cucurbita maxima L., cv. Jarrahdale seeds for this analysis. In these seeds, we found the presence of resistors with memory. The analysis was based on cyclic voltammetry where a memristor should manifest itself as a nonlinear two-terminal electrical element, which exhibits a pinched hysteresis loop on a current-voltage plane for any bipolar cyclic voltage input signal. Dry dormant pumpkin seeds have very high electrical resistance without memristive properties. The electrostimulation by bipolar sinusoidal or triangular periodic waves induces electrical responses in imbibed pumpkin seeds with fingerprints of memristors. Tetraethylammonium chloride, an inhibitor of voltage gated K(+) channels, transforms a memristor to a resistor in pumpkin seeds. NPPB (5-Nitro-2-(3-phenylpropylamino)benzoic acid) inhibits the memristive properties of imbibed pumpkin seeds. The discovery of memristors in pumpkin seeds creates a new direction in the understanding of electrophysiological phenomena in seeds.

  14. Whodunnit? Electrophysiological correlates of agency judgements.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone Kühn

    Full Text Available Sense of agency refers to the feeling that "I" am responsible for those external events that are directly produced by one's own voluntary actions. Recent theories distinguish between a non-conceptual "feeling" of agency linked to changes in the processing of self-generated sensory events, and a higher-order judgement of agency, which attributes sensory events to the self. In the current study we explore the neural correlates of the judgement of agency by means of electrophysiology. We measured event-related potentials to tones that were either perceived or not perceived as triggered by participants' voluntary actions and related these potentials to later judgements of agency over the tones. Replicating earlier findings on predictive sensory attenuation, we found that the N1 component was attenuated for congruent tones that corresponded to the learned action-effect mapping as opposed to incongruent tones that did not correspond to the previously acquired associations between actions and tones. The P3a component, but not the N1, directly reflected the judgement of agency: deflections in this component were greater for tones judged as self-generated than for tones judged as externally produced. The fact that the outcome of the later agency judgement was predictable based on the P3a component demonstrates that agency judgements incorporate early information processing components and are not purely reconstructive, post-hoc evaluations generated at time of judgement.

  15. Integrated platform and API for electrophysiological data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobolev, Andrey; Stoewer, Adrian; Leonhardt, Aljoscha; Rautenberg, Philipp L; Kellner, Christian J; Garbers, Christian; Wachtler, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Recent advancements in technology and methodology have led to growing amounts of increasingly complex neuroscience data recorded from various species, modalities, and levels of study. The rapid data growth has made efficient data access and flexible, machine-readable data annotation a crucial requisite for neuroscientists. Clear and consistent annotation and organization of data is not only an important ingredient for reproducibility of results and re-use of data, but also essential for collaborative research and data sharing. In particular, efficient data management and interoperability requires a unified approach that integrates data and metadata and provides a common way of accessing this information. In this paper we describe GNData, a data management platform for neurophysiological data. GNData provides a storage system based on a data representation that is suitable to organize data and metadata from any electrophysiological experiment, with a functionality exposed via a common application programming interface (API). Data representation and API structure are compatible with existing approaches for data and metadata representation in neurophysiology. The API implementation is based on the Representational State Transfer (REST) pattern, which enables data access integration in software applications and facilitates the development of tools that communicate with the service. Client libraries that interact with the API provide direct data access from computing environments like Matlab or Python, enabling integration of data management into the scientist's experimental or analysis routines.

  16. Steam-water relative permeability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ambusso, W.; Satik, C.; Home, R.N. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States)

    1997-12-31

    A set of relative permeability relations for simultaneous flow of steam and water in porous media have been measured in steady state experiments conducted under the conditions that eliminate most errors associated with saturation and pressure measurements. These relations show that the relative permeabilities for steam-water flow in porous media vary approximately linearly with saturation. This departure from the nitrogen/water behavior indicates that there are fundamental differences between steam/water and nitrogen/water flows. The saturations in these experiments were measured by using a high resolution X-ray computer tomography (CT) scanner. In addition the pressure gradients were obtained from the measurements of liquid phase pressure over the portions with flat saturation profiles. These two aspects constitute a major improvement in the experimental method compared to those used in the past. Comparison of the saturation profiles measured by the X-ray CT scanner during the experiments shows a good agreement with those predicted by numerical simulations. To obtain results that are applicable to general flow of steam and water in porous media similar experiments will be conducted at higher temperature and with porous rocks of different wetting characteristics and porosity distribution.

  17. Macrophage migration inhibitory factor induces vascular leakage via autophagy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong-Ru Chen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Vascular leakage is an important feature of acute inflammatory shock, which currently has no effective treatment. Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF is a pro-inflammatory cytokine that can induce vascular leakage and plays an important role in the pathogenesis of shock. However, the mechanism of MIF-induced vascular leakage is still unclear. In this study, using recombinant MIF (rMIF, we demonstrated that MIF induced disorganization and degradation of junction proteins and increased the permeability of human endothelial cells in vitro. Western blotting analysis showed that rMIF treatment induced LC3 conversion and p62 degradation. Inhibition of autophagy with a PI3K inhibitor (3-MA, a ROS scavenger (NAC or autophagosomal-lysosomal fusion inhibitors (bafilomycin A1 and chloroquine rescued rMIF-induced vascular leakage, suggesting that autophagy mediates MIF-induced vascular leakage. The potential involvement of other signaling pathways was also studied using different inhibitors, and the results suggested that MIF-induced vascular leakage may occur through the ERK pathway. In conclusion, we showed that MIF triggered autophagic degradation of endothelial cells, resulting in vascular leakage. Inhibition of MIF-induced autophagy may provide therapeutic targets against vascular leakage in inflammatory shock.

  18. Experimental Study on Permeability of Concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Honglu; Liu, Rentai; Zheng, Zhuo; Liu, Haojie; Gao, Yan; Liu, Yankai

    2018-01-01

    To study the influencing factors on permeability of pervious concrete, by adding inorganic organic composite materials obtained experimental results show that different aggregate size, aggregate cement ratio of different, different water cement ratio on the permeability performance. The permeability of the concrete was tested by using the self - made permeable device. The experimental results showed that the permeation coefficient of the experiment was obtained and the factors influencing the permeability of the concrete were compared and analyzed. At the same time, the porosity of pervious concrete was measured, the influence of various variables on porosity was studied, and the influence of various factors on the permeability of voids was found. Finally, through comprehensive analysis of a variety of factors, the optimal water cement ratio is 0.28. At this time, the pervious performance of concrete is optimal.

  19. Clogging in permeable concrete: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kia, Alalea; Wong, Hong S; Cheeseman, Christopher R

    2017-05-15

    Permeable concrete (or "pervious concrete" in North America) is used to reduce local flooding in urban areas and is an important sustainable urban drainage system. However, permeable concrete exhibits reduction in permeability due to clogging by particulates, which severely limits service life. This paper reviews the clogging mechanism and current mitigating strategies in order to inform future research needs. The pore structure of permeable concrete and characteristics of flowing particulates influence clogging, which occurs when particles build-up and block connected porosity. Permeable concrete requires regular maintenance by vacuum sweeping and pressure washing, but the effectiveness and viability of these methods is questionable. The potential for clogging is related to the tortuosity of the connected porosity, with greater tortuosity resulting in increased potential for clogging. Research is required to develop permeable concrete that can be poured on-site, which produces a pore structure with significantly reduced tortuosity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Air permeability of polyester nonwoven fabrics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhu Guocheng

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Air permeability is one of the most important properties of non-woven fabrics in many applications. This paper aims to investigate the effects of thickness, porosity and density on the air permeability of needle-punched non-woven fabrics and compare the experimental values with two models which are based on hydraulic radius theory and drag theory, respectively. The air permeability of the samples was measured by an air permeability tester FX3300. The results showed that the air permeability of non-woven fabrics decreased with the increase in thickness and density of samples, increased with the increase of porosity, and the air permeability was not directly proportional to the pressure gradient. Meanwhile, the prediction model based on hydraulic radius theory had a better agreement with experimental values than the model based on drag theory, but the values were much higher than the experimental results, especially for higher porosity and higher pressure gradient.

  1. Direct visualization of the arterial wall water permeability barrier using CARS microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucotte, Bertrand M; Powell, Chloe; Knutson, Jay R; Combs, Christian A; Malide, Daniela; Yu, Zu-Xi; Knepper, Mark; Patel, Keval D; Pielach, Anna; Johnson, Errin; Borysova, Lyudmyla; Dora, Kim A; Balaban, Robert S

    2017-05-02

    The artery wall is equipped with a water permeation barrier that allows blood to flow at high pressure without significant water leak. The precise location of this barrier is unknown despite its importance in vascular function and its contribution to many vascular complications when it is compromised. Herein we map the water permeability in intact arteries, using coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy and isotopic perfusion experiments. Generation of the CARS signal is optimized for water imaging with broadband excitation. We identify the water permeation barrier as the endothelial basolateral membrane and show that the apical membrane is highly permeable. This is confirmed by the distribution of the AQP1 water channel within endothelial membranes. These results indicate that arterial pressure equilibrates within the endothelium and is transmitted to the supporting basement membrane and internal elastic lamina macromolecules with minimal deformation of the sensitive endothelial cell. Disruption of this pressure transmission could contribute to endothelial cell dysfunction in various pathologies.

  2. Towards cavitation-enhanced permeability in blood vessel on a chip

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Luca, R.; Silvani, G.; Scognamiglio, C.; Sinibaldi, G.; Peruzzi, G.; Chinappi, M.; Kiani, M. F.; Casciola, C. M.

    2017-08-01

    The development of targeted delivery systems releasing pharmaceutical agents directly at the desired site of action may improve their therapeutic efficiency while minimizing damage to healthy tissues, toxicity to the patient and drug waste. In this context, we have developed a bio-inspired microdevice mimicking the tumour microvasculature which represents a valuable tool for assessing the enhancement of blood vessel permeability due to cavitation. This novel system allows us to investigate the effects of ultrasound-driven microbubbles that temporarily open the endothelial intercellular junctions allowing drug to extravasate blood vessels into tumour tissues. The blood vessel on a chip consists of a tissue chamber and two independent vascular channels (width 200 µm, height 100 µm, length 2762 µm) cultured with endothelial cells placed side-by-side and separated by a series of 3 µm pores. Its geometry and dimensions mimic the three-dimensional morphology, size and flow characteristics of microvessels in vivo. The early stage of this project had a twofold objective: 1. To define the protocol for culturing of Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells (HUVECs) within the vascular channel; 2. To develop a fluorescence based microscopy technique for measuring permeability. We have developed a reliable and reproducible protocol to culture endothelial cells within the artificial vessels in a realistic manner: HUVECs show the typical elongated shape in the direction of flow, exhibit tight junction formation and form a continuous layer with a central lumen that completely covers the channels wall. As expected, the permeability of cell-free device is higher than the one cultured with HUVECs in the vascular channels. The proposed blood vessel on a chip and the permeability measurement protocol have a significant potential to allow for the study of cavitation-enhanced permeability of the endothelium and improve efficiency in screening drug delivery systems.

  3. Α-Melanocyte-Stimulating Hormone Protects Early Diabetic Retina from Blood-Retinal Barrier Breakdown and Vascular Leakage via MC4R.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Siwei; Yang, Qianhui; Hou, Mengzhu; Han, Qian; Zhang, Hanyu; Wang, Jiantao; Qi, Chen; Bo, Qiyu; Ru, Yusha; Yang, Wei; Gu, Zhongxiu; Wei, Ruihua; Cao, Yunshan; Li, Xiaorong; Zhang, Yan

    2018-01-01

    partial rescue of functional defects by α-MSH in diabetic retinas; and H&E staining revealed significantly increased thickness of all layers in α-MSH-treated diabetic retinas. Mechanistically, α-MSH corrected aberrant transcript and protein expression of pro-inflammatory factor and tight junction genes in the diseased retinas; moreover, it prevented abnormal changes in TEER and permeability in HG-stimulated RF6A cells, and this anti-hyperpermeability was abolished by a universal MCR blocker or an antagonist specific to MC4R. This study showed previously undescribed protective effects of α-MSH on inhibiting BRB breakdown and vascular leakage, improving electrophysiological functions and morphology in early diabetic retinas, which may be due to its down-regulating pro-inflammatory factors and augmenting tight junctions. α-MSH acts predominantly on MC4R to antagonize hyperpermeability in retinal microvessel endothelial cells. © 2018 The Author(s). Published by S. Karger AG, Basel.

  4. The Permeability of Boolean Sets of Cylinders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Willot F.

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Numerical and analytical results on the permeability of Boolean models of randomly-oriented cylinders with circular cross-section are reported. The present work investigates cylinders of prolate (highly-elongated and oblate (nearly flat types. The fluid flows either inside or outside of the cylinders. The Stokes flow is solved using full-fields Fourier-based computations on 3D binarized microstructures. The permeability is given for varying volume fractions of pores. A new upper-bound is derived for the permeability of the Boolean model of oblate cylinders. The behavior of the permeability in the dilute limit is discussed.

  5. Simultaneous perfusion and permeability measurements using combined spin- and gradient-echo MRI

    OpenAIRE

    Schmiedeskamp, Heiko; Andre, Jalal B; Straka, Matus; Christen, Thomas; Nagpal, Seema; Recht, Lawrence; Thomas, Reena P; Zaharchuk, Greg; Bammer, Roland

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to estimate magnetic resonance imaging-based brain perfusion parameters from combined multiecho spin-echo and gradient-echo acquisitions, to correct them for T1-, T2-, and -related contrast agent (CA) extravasation effects, and to simultaneously determine vascular permeability. Perfusion data were acquired using a combined multiecho spin- and gradient-echo (SAGE) echo-planar imaging sequence, which was corrected for CA extravasation effects using pharmacokinetic ...

  6. [Electrophysiological testing in spinal cord tumors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    André-Obadia, N; Mauguière, F

    2017-11-01

    Evoked potentials (EPs) are useful to evaluate the functional impairment of motor and somatosensory pathways in spinal cord tumors. Conduction through pyramidal tracts is evaluated by motor EPs (MEPs) elicited by transcranial stimulation, magnetic for awake patients or electric in the operating room. Somatosensory EPs (SEPs) and laser EPs (LEPs) are complementary procedures to explore conduction in dorsal columns and spinothalamic tracts, respectively. MEPs as well as SEPs show conduction abnormalities in about 60% of cases with a sensitivity that increases up to 70% when both procedures are carried out. Abnormalities are observed in the absence of any clinical sign in respectively 7% and 15% of cases for MEPs and SEPs. Multilevel stimulations for SEPs recordings permit to detect segmental dysfunction in 70% in case of cervical TIM, even in the absence of clinical signs. LEPs are useful in specific clinical situations: they allow a dermatomal stimulation and are correlated to segmental thermoalgic anaesthesia. Electrophysiological testing plays an important role in the diagnostic and therapeutic strategy: before surgery, MEPs and SEPs objectively evaluate the functional impairment directly related to the lesion. They also help by permitting a follow-up, either before surgery when the surgical decision is delayed because of a good clinical tolerance of the lesion, or after operation to evaluate the functional evolution. Intraoperative monitoring of MEPs and SEPs allows informing the surgeon about the impact on each surgical manipulation. No prospective randomized study has been performed to date to compare clinical evolution after surgery with or without monitoring. Nevertheless, a wide consensus became established in favor of monitoring to limit the risk of postoperative definite deficit and to permit an optimal surgical resection without risk when responses are preserved. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  7. Encoding and Decoding Models in Cognitive Electrophysiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher R. Holdgraf

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Cognitive neuroscience has seen rapid growth in the size and complexity of data recorded from the human brain as well as in the computational tools available to analyze this data. This data explosion has resulted in an increased use of multivariate, model-based methods for asking neuroscience questions, allowing scientists to investigate multiple hypotheses with a single dataset, to use complex, time-varying stimuli, and to study the human brain under more naturalistic conditions. These tools come in the form of “Encoding” models, in which stimulus features are used to model brain activity, and “Decoding” models, in which neural features are used to generated a stimulus output. Here we review the current state of encoding and decoding models in cognitive electrophysiology and provide a practical guide toward conducting experiments and analyses in this emerging field. Our examples focus on using linear models in the study of human language and audition. We show how to calculate auditory receptive fields from natural sounds as well as how to decode neural recordings to predict speech. The paper aims to be a useful tutorial to these approaches, and a practical introduction to using machine learning and applied statistics to build models of neural activity. The data analytic approaches we discuss may also be applied to other sensory modalities, motor systems, and cognitive systems, and we cover some examples in these areas. In addition, a collection of Jupyter notebooks is publicly available as a complement to the material covered in this paper, providing code examples and tutorials for predictive modeling in python. The aim is to provide a practical understanding of predictive modeling of human brain data and to propose best-practices in conducting these analyses.

  8. Encoding and Decoding Models in Cognitive Electrophysiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holdgraf, Christopher R.; Rieger, Jochem W.; Micheli, Cristiano; Martin, Stephanie; Knight, Robert T.; Theunissen, Frederic E.

    2017-01-01

    Cognitive neuroscience has seen rapid growth in the size and complexity of data recorded from the human brain as well as in the computational tools available to analyze this data. This data explosion has resulted in an increased use of multivariate, model-based methods for asking neuroscience questions, allowing scientists to investigate multiple hypotheses with a single dataset, to use complex, time-varying stimuli, and to study the human brain under more naturalistic conditions. These tools come in the form of “Encoding” models, in which stimulus features are used to model brain activity, and “Decoding” models, in which neural features are used to generated a stimulus output. Here we review the current state of encoding and decoding models in cognitive electrophysiology and provide a practical guide toward conducting experiments and analyses in this emerging field. Our examples focus on using linear models in the study of human language and audition. We show how to calculate auditory receptive fields from natural sounds as well as how to decode neural recordings to predict speech. The paper aims to be a useful tutorial to these approaches, and a practical introduction to using machine learning and applied statistics to build models of neural activity. The data analytic approaches we discuss may also be applied to other sensory modalities, motor systems, and cognitive systems, and we cover some examples in these areas. In addition, a collection of Jupyter notebooks is publicly available as a complement to the material covered in this paper, providing code examples and tutorials for predictive modeling in python. The aim is to provide a practical understanding of predictive modeling of human brain data and to propose best-practices in conducting these analyses. PMID:29018336

  9. Histamine Induces Vascular Hyperpermeability by Increasing Blood Flow and Endothelial Barrier Disruption In Vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashina, Kohei; Tsubosaka, Yoshiki; Nakamura, Tatsuro; Omori, Keisuke; Kobayashi, Koji; Hori, Masatoshi; Ozaki, Hiroshi; Murata, Takahisa

    2015-01-01

    Histamine is a mediator of allergic inflammation released mainly from mast cells. Although histamine strongly increases vascular permeability, its precise mechanism under in vivo situation remains unknown. We here attempted to reveal how histamine induces vascular hyperpermeability focusing on the key regulators of vascular permeability, blood flow and endothelial barrier. Degranulation of mast cells by antigen-stimulation or histamine treatment induced vascular hyperpermeability and tissue swelling in mouse ears. These were abolished by histamine H1 receptor antagonism. Intravital imaging showed that histamine dilated vasculature, increased blood flow, while it induced hyperpermeability in venula. Whole-mount staining showed that histamine disrupted endothelial barrier formation of venula indicated by changes in vascular endothelial cadherin (VE-cadherin) localization at endothelial cell junction. Inhibition of nitric oxide synthesis (NOS) by L-NAME or vasoconstriction by phenylephrine strongly inhibited the histamine-induced blood flow increase and hyperpermeability without changing the VE-cadherin localization. In vitro, measurements of trans-endothelial electrical resistance of human dermal microvascular endothelial cells (HDMECs) showed that histamine disrupted endothelial barrier. Inhibition of protein kinase C (PKC) or Rho-associated protein kinase (ROCK), NOS attenuated the histamine-induced barrier disruption. These observations suggested that histamine increases vascular permeability mainly by nitric oxide (NO)-dependent vascular dilation and subsequent blood flow increase and maybe partially by PKC/ROCK/NO-dependent endothelial barrier disruption. PMID:26158531

  10. Vascular grading of angiogenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, S; Grabau, D A; Sørensen, Flemming Brandt

    2000-01-01

    The study aimed to evaluate the prognostic value of angiogenesis by vascular grading of primary breast tumours, and to evaluate the prognostic impact of adding the vascular grade to the Nottingham Prognostic Index (NPI). The investigation included 836 patients. The median follow-up time was 11...... years and 4 months. The microvessels were immunohistochemically stained by antibodies against CD34. Angiogenesis was graded semiquantitatively by subjective scoring into three groups according to the expected number of microvessels in the most vascular tumour area. The vascular grading between observers...... was moderately reproduced (kappa = 0.59). Vascular grade was significantly associated with axillary node involvement, tumour size, malignancy grade, oestrogen receptor status and histological type. In univariate analyses vascular grade significantly predicted recurrence free survival and overall survival for all...

  11. Uterine vascular lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijayakumar, Abhishek; Srinivas, Amruthashree; Chandrashekar, Babitha Moogali; Vijayakumar, Avinash

    2013-01-01

    Vascular lesions of the uterus are rare; most reported in the literature are arteriovenous malformations (AVMs). Uterine AVMs can be congenital or acquired. In recent years, there has been an increasing number of reports of acquired vascular lesions of the uterus following pregnancy, abortion, cesarean delivery, and curettage. It can be seen from these reports that there is confusion concerning the terminology of uterine vascular lesions. There is also a lack of diagnostic criteria and management guidelines, which has led to an increased number of unnecessary invasive procedures (eg, angiography, uterine artery embolization, hysterectomy for abnormal vaginal bleeding). This article familiarizes readers with various vascular lesions of the uterus and their management.

  12. Vascular biology of preeclampsia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myatt, L; Webster, R P

    2009-03-01

    Preeclampsia, a pregnancy-specific syndrome characterized by hypertension, proteinuria and edema, resolves on delivery of the placenta. Normal pregnancy is itself characterized by systemic inflammation, oxidative stress and alterations in levels of angiogenic factors and vascular reactivity. This is exacerbated in preeclampsia with an associated breakdown of compensatory mechanisms, eventually leading to placental and vascular dysfunction. The underlying pathology of preeclampsia is thought to be a relatively hypoxic or ischemic placenta. Both the placenta and maternal vasculatures are major sources of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species which can interact to produce peroxynitrite a powerful prooxidant that covalently modifies proteins by nitration of tyrosine residues, to possibly alter vascular function in preeclampsia. The linkage between placental hypoxia and maternal vascular dysfunction has been proposed to be via placental syncytiotrophoblast basement membranes shed by the placenta or via angiogenic factors which include soluble flt1 and endoglin secreted by the placenta that bind vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and placental growth factor (PIGF) in the maternal circulation. There is also abundant evidence of altered reactivity of the maternal and placental vasculature and of the altered production of autocoids in preeclampsia. The occurrence of preeclampsia is increased in women with preexisting vascular disease and confers a long-term risk for development of cardiovascular disease. The vascular stress test of pregnancy thus identifies those women with a previously unrecognized at risk vascular system and promotes the development of preeclampsia. Preexisting maternal vascular dysfunction intensified by placental factors is possibly responsible for the individual pathologies of preeclampsia.

  13. Gyroid Nanoporous Membranes with Tunable Permeability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Li; Schulte, Lars; Clausen, Lydia D.

    2011-01-01

    Understanding the relevant permeability properties of ultrafiltration membranes is facilitated by using materials and procedures that allow a high degree of control on morphology and chemical composition. Here we present the first study on diffusion permeability through gyroid nanoporous cross-linked...

  14. Alterations in Intestinal Permeability After Thermal Injury,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    Permeability After Burns-LeVoyer et al R wthe Arrihtv.of Su~gy8 4• u’y 1992, Voue 127 Copright 1992. Akn • Med/kaf Awoctahbn Patlenbs Controls 4. (n-=1...may have a role in the tinal tract is enteral nutrition . I was wondering if by any chance development of increased permeability, then we can evaluate

  15. Pressure sensitivity of low permeability sandstones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilmer, N.H.; Morrow, N.R.; Pitman, J.K.

    1987-01-01

    Detailed core analysis has been carried out on 32 tight sandstones with permeabilities ranging over four orders of magnitude (0.0002 to 4.8 mD at 5000 psi confining pressure). Relationships between gas permeability and net confining pressure were measured for cycles of loading and unloading. For some samples, permeabilities were measured both along and across bedding planes. Large variations in stress sensitivity of permeability were observed from one sample to another. The ratio of permeability at a nominal confining pressure of 500 psi to that at 5000 psi was used to define a stress sensitivity ratio. For a given sample, confining pressure vs permeability followed a linear log-log relationship, the slope of which provided an index of pressure sensitivity. This index, as obtained for first unloading data, was used in testing relationships between stress sensitivity and other measured rock properties. Pressure sensitivity tended to increase with increase in carbonate content and depth, and with decrease in porosity, permeability and sodium feldspar. However, scatter in these relationships increased as permeability decreased. Tests for correlations between pressure sensitivity and various linear combinations of variables are reported. Details of pore structure related to diagenetic changes appears to be of much greater significance to pressure sensitivity than mineral composition. ?? 1987.

  16. Intercomparison on measurement of water vapour permeability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kurt Kielsgaard

    Three different materials are tested - hard woodfibre board - damp proof course - underlay for roofing The water vapour permeability has been measured according to EN ISO 12572 (2001).......Three different materials are tested - hard woodfibre board - damp proof course - underlay for roofing The water vapour permeability has been measured according to EN ISO 12572 (2001)....

  17. A Negative Permeability Material at Red Light

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yuan, Hsiao-Kuan; Chettiar, Uday K.; Cai, Wenshan

    2007-01-01

    A negative permeability in a periodic array of pairs of thin silver strips is demonstrated experimentally for two distinct samples. The effect of the strip surface roughness on negative permeability is evaluated. The first sample, Sample A, is fabricated of thinner strips with a root mean square ...

  18. Crustal permeability: Introduction to the special issue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingebritsen, Steven E.; Gleeson, Tom

    2015-01-01

    The topic of crustal permeability is of broad interest in light of the controlling effect of permeability on diverse geologic processes and also timely in light of the practical challenges associated with emerging technologies such as hydraulic fracturing for oil and gas production (‘fracking’), enhanced geothermal systems, and geologic carbon sequestration. This special issue of Geofluids is also motivated by the historical dichotomy between the hydrogeologic concept of permeability as a static material property that exerts control on fluid flow and the perspective of economic geologists, geophysicists, and crustal petrologists who have long recognized permeability as a dynamic parameter that changes in response to tectonism, fluid production, and geochemical reactions. Issues associated with fracking, enhanced geothermal systems, and geologic carbon sequestration have already begun to promote a constructive dialog between the static and dynamic views of permeability, and here we have made a conscious effort to include both viewpoints. This special issue also focuses on the quantification of permeability, encompassing both direct measurement of permeability in the uppermost crust and inferential permeability estimates, mainly for the deeper crust.

  19. Microorganism Removal in Permeable Pavement Parking Lots ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Three types of permeable pavements (pervious concrete, permeable interlocking concrete pavers, and porous asphalt) were monitored at the Edison Environmental Center in Edison, New Jersey for indicator organisms such as fecal coliform, enterococci, and E. coli. Results showed that porous asphalt had much lower concentration in monitored infiltrate compared to pervious concrete and permeable interlocking concrete pavers. Concentrations of monitored organisms in infiltrate from porous asphalt were consistently below the bathing water quality standard. Fecal coliform and enterococci exceeded bathing water quality standards more than 72% and 34% of the time for permeable interlocking concrete pavers and pervious concrete, respectively. Purpose is to evaluate the performance of permeable pavement in removing indicator organisms from infiltrating stormwater runoff.

  20. Modelling of water permeability in cementitious materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guang, Ye; Lura, Pietro; van Breugel, K.

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents a network model to predict the permeability of cement paste from a numerical simulation of its microstructure. Based on a linked list pore network structure, the effective hydraulic conductivity is estimated and the fluid flow is calculated according to the Hagen-Poiseuille law....... The pressure gradient at all nodes is calculated with the Gauss elimination method and the absolute permeability of the pore network is calculated directly from Darcy's law. Finally, the permeability model is validated by comparison with direct water permeability measurements. According to this model...... and by the connectivity of the pore structure, regardless of w/c ratio and curing age. The permeability of cement pastes could be predicted reasonably well when a minimum particle size 1 mu m was chosen for the cement....

  1. Permeability measurement and control for epoxy composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Tsun-Hsu; Tsai, Cheng-Hung; Wong, Wei-Syuan; Chen, Yen-Ren; Chao, Hsien-Wen

    2017-08-01

    The coupling of the electric and magnetic fields leads to a strong interplay in materials' permittivity and permeability. Here, we proposed a specially designed cavity, called the mu cavity. The mu cavity, consisting of a mushroom structure inside a cylindrical resonator, is exclusively sensitive to permeability, but not to permittivity. It decouples materials' electromagnetic properties and allows an accurate measurement of the permeability. With the help of an epsilon cavity, these two cavities jointly determine the complex permeability and permittivity of the materials at microwave frequencies. Homemade epoxy-based composite materials were prepared and tested. Measurement and manipulation of the permeability and permittivity of the epoxy composites will be shown. The results will be compared with the effective medium theories.

  2. A role for calcium-permeable AMPA receptors in synaptic plasticity and learning.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian J Wiltgen

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available A central concept in the field of learning and memory is that NMDARs are essential for synaptic plasticity and memory formation. Surprisingly then, multiple studies have found that behavioral experience can reduce or eliminate the contribution of these receptors to learning. The cellular mechanisms that mediate learning in the absence of NMDAR activation are currently unknown. To address this issue, we examined the contribution of Ca(2+-permeable AMPARs to learning and plasticity in the hippocampus. Mutant mice were engineered with a conditional genetic deletion of GluR2 in the CA1 region of the hippocampus (GluR2-cKO mice. Electrophysiology experiments in these animals revealed a novel form of long-term potentiation (LTP that was independent of NMDARs and mediated by GluR2-lacking Ca(2+-permeable AMPARs. Behavioral analyses found that GluR2-cKO mice were impaired on multiple hippocampus-dependent learning tasks that required NMDAR activation. This suggests that AMPAR-mediated LTP interferes with NMDAR-dependent plasticity. In contrast, NMDAR-independent learning was normal in knockout mice and required the activation of Ca(2+-permeable AMPARs. These results suggest that GluR2-lacking AMPARs play a functional and previously unidentified role in learning; they appear to mediate changes in synaptic strength that occur after plasticity has been established by NMDARs.

  3. Gas and Water Permeability of Concrete

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Villar, M. V.; Martin, P. L.; Romero, F. J.; Gutierrez-Rodirgo, V.; Barcala, J. M.

    2012-11-01

    The gas pressure of concrete samples was measured in an unsteady-state equipment working under low injection pressures and in a newly fine tuned steady-state setup working under different pressures. These measurements allowed the estimation of the intrinsic and relative gas permeability of the concrete and of the effect of boundary conditions on them. Permeability decreased with water content, but it was also greatly affected by the hydraulic history of concrete, i.e. if it had been previously dried or wetted. In particular, and for a given degree of saturation, the gas permeability of concrete previously saturated was lower than if the concrete had been just air dried or saturated after air drying. In any case, the gas permeability was about two orders of magnitude higher than the liquid water permeability (10-16 vs. 10-18 m2), probably due to the chemical reactions taking place during saturation (carbonation). The relative gas permeability of concrete increased sharply for water degrees of saturation smaller than 50%. The boundary conditions also affected the gas permeability, which seemed to be mostly conditioned by the back pressure and the confining pressure, increasing as the former increased and decreasing as the latter increased, i.e. decreasing as the effective pressure increased. Overall the increase of pressure head or injection pressure implied a decrease in gas permeability. External,microcracking during air-drying could not be ruled out as responsible for the decrease of permeability with confining pressure. The apparent permeability obtained applying the Klinkenberg method for a given effective pressure was only slightly smaller than the average of all the values measured for the same confining pressure range. For this reason it is considered that the Klinkenberg effect was not relevant in the range of pressures applied. (Author) 37 refs.

  4. Plasma from patients with HELLP syndrome increases blood-brain barrier permeability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Kedra; Tremble, Sarah M; Owens, Michelle Y; Morris, Rachael; Cipolla, Marilyn J

    2015-03-01

    Circulating inflammatory factors and endothelial dysfunction have been proposed to contribute to the pathophysiology of hemolysis, elevated liver enzymes, and low platelet count (HELLP) syndrome. To date, the occurrence of neurological complications in these women has been reported, but few studies have examined whether impairment in blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability or cerebrovascular reactivity is present in women having HELLP syndrome. We hypothesized that plasma from women with HELLP syndrome causes increased BBB permeability and cerebrovascular dysfunction. Posterior cerebral arteries from female nonpregnant rats were perfused with 20% serum from women with normal pregnancies (n = 5) or women with HELLP syndrome (n = 5), and BBB permeability and vascular reactivity were compared. Plasma from women with HELLP syndrome increased BBB permeability while not changing myogenic tone and reactivity to pressure. Addition of the nitric oxide (NO) synthase inhibitor N(ω)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester caused constriction of arteries that was not different with the different plasmas nor was dilation to the NO donor sodium nitroprusside different between the 2 groups. However, dilation to the small- and intermediate-conductance, calcium-activated potassium channel activator NS309 was decreased in vessels exposed to HELLP plasma. Thus, increased BBB permeability in response to HELLP plasma was associated with selective endothelial dysfunction. © The Author(s) 2014.

  5. Autonomous head-mounted electrophysiology systems for freely behaving primates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilja, Vikash; Chestek, Cindy A; Nuyujukian, Paul; Foster, Justin; Shenoy, Krishna V

    2010-10-01

    Recent technological advances have led to new light-weight battery-operated systems for electrophysiology. Such systems are head mounted, run for days without experimenter intervention, and can record and stimulate from single or multiple electrodes implanted in a freely behaving primate. Here we discuss existing systems, studies that use them, and how they can augment traditional, physically restrained, 'in-rig' electrophysiology. With existing technical capabilities, these systems can acquire multiple signal classes, such as spikes, local field potential, and electromyography signals, and can stimulate based on real-time processing of recorded signals. Moving forward, this class of technologies, along with advances in neural signal processing and behavioral monitoring, have the potential to dramatically expand the scope and scale of electrophysiological studies. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Vascular grading of angiogenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, S; Grabau, D A; Sørensen, Flemming Brandt

    2000-01-01

    years and 4 months. The microvessels were immunohistochemically stained by antibodies against CD34. Angiogenesis was graded semiquantitatively by subjective scoring into three groups according to the expected number of microvessels in the most vascular tumour area. The vascular grading between observers...

  7. Hypertonic saline reduces vascular leakage in a mouse model of severe dengue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Grace Kai Xin; Ng, Jowin Kai Wei; Tan, Kar Wai; Angeli, Veronique; Moochhala, Shabbir; Ooi, Eng Eong; Alonso, Sylvie

    2013-01-01

    Dengue (DEN) is a mosquito-borne viral disease and represents a serious public health threat and an economical burden throughout the tropics. Dengue clinical manifestations range from mild acute febrile illness to severe DEN hemorrhagic fever/DEN shock syndrome (DHF/DSS). Currently, resuscitation with large volumes of isotonic fluid remains the gold standard of care for DEN patients who develop vascular leakage and shock. Here, we investigated the ability of small volume of hypertonic saline (HTS) suspensions to control vascular permeability in a mouse model of severe DEN associated with vascular leakage. Several HTS treatment regimens were considered and our results indicated that a single bolus of 7.5% NaCl at 4 mL per kg of body weight administered at the onset of detectable vascular leakage rapidly and significantly reduced vascular leak for several days after injection. This transient reduction of vascular leakage correlated with reduced intestine and liver damage with restoration of the hepatic functions, and resulted in delayed death of the infected animals. Mechanistically, we showed that HTS did not directly impact on the viral titers but resulted in lower immune cells counts and decreased systemic levels of soluble mediators involved in vascular permeability. In addition, we demonstrated that neutrophils do not play a critical role in DEN-associated vascular leakage and that the therapeutic effect of HTS is not mediated by its impact on the neutrophil counts. Together our data indicate that HTS treatment can transiently but rapidly reduce dengue-associated vascular leakage, and support the findings of a recent clinical trial which evaluated the efficacy of a hypertonic suspension to impact on vascular permeability in DSS children.

  8. Vascular cognitive impairment and vascular dementia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klavdija Ovčar

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available In the developed world, five to ten percent of people older than 65 years have dementia. One fifth of dementia etiologies are due to vascular brain lesions (VaD – vascular dementia. A milder form is called vascular cognitive impairment (VCI. The main clinical criteria for VaD are: 1. cognitive decline verified with standardized cognitive test/scale, 2. evidence of the associated vascular brain lesion, 3. excluded reversible causes of cognitive decline. The main risk factors for VaD are age, atherosclerosis, diabetes and hypertension. They play a key role in pathogenesis of the cognitive impairment. Depending on the damaged brain region, different cognitive domains may be affected with or without other neurological signs. These diversities in the clinical picture challenge the correct diagnosis. Unique feature of VaD is its progression, which can be stopped, if patients receive an appropriate treatment.The treatment of VCI and VaD symptoms is similar to that in Alzheimer’s disease. More importantly, VCI may be slowed down or even stopped with proper secondary stroke prevention and good rehabilitation. The most efficient is primary stroke prevention with healthy lifestyle and treatment of acquired risk factors.

  9. Changes in Permeability Produced By Distant Earthquakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manga, M.; Wang, C. Y.; Shi, Z.

    2014-12-01

    Oscillations in stress, such as those created by earthquakes, can increase permeability and fluid mobility in geologic media. In natural systems, strain amplitudes as small as 10-6 can increase discharge in streams and springs, change the water level of wells, and enhance production from petroleum reservoirs. Enhanced permeability typically recovers to pre-stimulated values over a period of months to years. This presentation will review some of the observations that indicate that dynamic stresses produced by seismic waves change permeability. We use the response of a set of wells distributed throughout China to multiple large earthquakes to probe the relationship between earthquake-generated stresses and water-level changes in wells. We find that dynamic stresses dominate the responses at distances more than 1 fault length from the earthquake and that permeability changes may explain the water level changes. Regions with high deformation rates are most sensitive to seismic waves. We also consider the response of a large alluvial fan in Taiwan to the 1999 M7.5 Chi-Chi earthquake where there were sustained changes in groundwater temperature after the earthquake. Using groundwater flow models, we infer that permeability increased by an order of magnitude over horizontal scales of tens of km, and vertical scales of several km. Permeability returned to the pre-earthquake value over many months. As much as half the total transport in the fan occurs during the short time periods with enhanced permeability.

  10. Vascular disease burden in Indian subjects with vascular dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandra, Mina; Anand, Kuljeet Singh

    2015-01-01

    Vascular disease factors like hypertension, diabetes mellitus, dyslipidaemia, and ischaemic heart disease contribute to the development of vascular dementia. As comorbidity of vascular disease factors in vascular dementia is common, we investigated the vascular disease burden in subjects with vascular dementia. To investigate the vascular disease burden due to four vascular disease factors: hypertension, diabetes mellitus, dyslipidaemia, and ischaemic heart disease in Indian subjects with vascular dementia. In this study, 159 subjects with probable vascular dementia (as per NINDS-AIREN criteria) attending the memory clinic at a tertiary care hospital were assessed for the presence of hypertension, diabetes mellitus, dyslipidaemia, and ischaemic heart disease using standardised operational definitions and for severity of dementia on the Clinical Dementia Rating (CDR) scale. The data obtained was subjected to appropriate statistical analysis. Dyslipidaemia (79.25 per cent) was the most common vascular disease factor followed by hypertension (73.58 per cent), ischaemic heart disease (58.49 per cent), and diabetes mellitus (40.80 per cent). Most subjects (81.1 per cent) had two or more vascular disease factors. Subjects with more severe dementia had more vascular disease factors (sig 0.001). People with moderate to severe dementia have a significantly higher vascular disease burden; therefore, higher vascular disease burden may be considered as a poor prognostic marker in vascular dementia. Subjects with vascular dementia and their caregivers must manage cognitive impairment and ADL alongside managing serious comorbid vascular diseases that may worsen the dementia.

  11. Erectile dysfunction precedes other systemic vascular diseases due to incompetent cavernous endothelial cell-cell junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Ji-Kan; Jin, Hai-Rong; Yin, Guo Nan; Kwon, Mi-Hye; Song, Kang-Moon; Choi, Min Ji; Park, Jin-Mi; Das, Nando Dulal; Kwon, Ki-Dong; Batbold, Dulguun; Lee, Tack; Gao, Zhen Li; Kim, Kyu-Won; Kim, Woo Jean; Suh, Jun-Kyu

    2013-08-01

    Erectile dysfunction is often a harbinger of cardiovascular disease. We sought to gain mechanistic insight at the cellular and molecular levels into why erectile dysfunction precedes the clinical consequences of cardiovascular disease. Diabetes was induced by intraperitoneal streptozotocin injection in 8-week-old C57BL/6J mice. At 8 weeks after diabetes induction, we determined the expression of endothelial cell-cell junction proteins and vascular endothelial permeability in the penis, heart and hind limb by systemic injection of various vascular space markers (350 Da to 2,000 kDa) or by immunohistochemical staining with antibody to oxidized low density lipoprotein. We also investigated the effect of recombinant Ang1 protein on cavernous endothelial permeability. Alterations in the integrity of the endothelial cell-cell junction, including a decrease in endothelial cell-cell junction proteins and an increase in vascular permeability to fluorescent tracers or oxidized low density lipoprotein, were prominent in the cavernous tissue of diabetic mice. In contrast, no significant changes in endothelial cell-cell junction proteins or vascular permeability were noted in heart or hind limb tissue according to the diabetic condition. Intracavernous injection of Ang1 protein, an anti-permeability factor, significantly decreased cavernous endothelial permeability to oxidized low density lipoprotein by restoring endothelial cell-cell junction proteins in diabetic mice. The incompetent cavernous endothelial cell-cell junction in the diabetic condition provides an important clue to why erectile dysfunction is highly prevalent and often precedes other systemic vascular diseases. Copyright © 2013 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Effect of temperature on sandstone permeability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenbrand, Esther; Kjøller, Claus

    with the Kozeny equation and the Klinkenberg procedure. Both methods overestimated the measured brine permeability; this suggests that additional factors, possibly related to clay morphology, contributed to a lower brine permeability. Thermal expansion would have a negligible effect on permeability as estimated...... interaction forces. Quantitative analysis of images, in which mineralogy was mapped based on backscatter electron intensity in combination with energy dispersive X-ray analysis by using the QEMSCAN® system, was used to compare a tested sample to an untested Berea sandstone sample. During the experiment...

  13. Ammonia and urea permeability of mammalian aquaporins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Litman, Thomas; Søgaard, Rikke; Zeuthen, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    The human aquaporins,AQP3,AQP7, AQP8,AQP9, and possibly AQP10, are permeable to ammonia, and AQP7, AQP9, and possibly AQP3, are permeable to urea. In humans, these aquaporins supplement the ammonia transport of the Rhesus (Rh) proteins and the urea transporters (UTs). The mechanism by which...... and 9 are found together with Rh proteins in cells exposed to portal blood coming from the intestine. In the kidney, AQP3 might participate in the excretion of NH(4) (+) in the collecting duct. The interplay between the ammonia-permeable aquaporins and the other types of ammonia- and urea...

  14. Vascular remodelling in asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walters, Eugene Haydn; Soltani, Amir; Reid, David William; Ward, Chris

    2008-02-01

    We review the recent literature, focusing on 2006 and 2007, to produce an update on the patho-biology of angiogenesis and vascular endothelial growth factor in the asthmatic airway. In terms of conceptual development in asthma research, airway inflammation and remodelling have been regarded as separate processes or perhaps as sequential, with early inflammation leading later to remodelling. Recent insights identify a central role for vascular endothelial growth factor in stimulating both inflammation and vascular remodelling coincidentally, with the full panoply of vascular endothelial growth factor mediated events being complex and wide. Both nitric oxide and matrix metalloproteinase-9 induction may be important downstream pathogenic mechanisms. Virus-mediated exacerbations are a prime manifestation of the oscillating trajectory of clinical asthma. The early stimulation of vascular endothelial growth factor production is probably a central aetiological mechanism, with secondary inflammation and angiogenesis. The time scale of the latter, especially, fits with the time scale of clinico-physiological changes after exacerbation. These vascular endothelial growth factor induced changes are potentially modifiable with therapy. Insights into the importance of vascular endothelial growth factor and angiogenesis in asthma pathogenesis now lead to potential new therapeutic possibilities and elucidate why recent advances in asthma therapeutics have been so successful.

  15. Different Methods of Predicting Permeability in Shale

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mbia, Ernest Ncha; Fabricius, Ida Lykke; Krogsbøll, Anette

    Permeability is often very difficult to measure or predict in shale lithology. In this work we are determining shale permeability from consolidation tests data using Wissa et al., (1971) approach and comparing the results with predicted permeability from Kozeny’s model. Core and cuttings materials...... in shale useful in assessing their integrity for CO2 storage, gas shale exploitation and other engineering applications....... were obtained from Fjerritslev shale Formation in Juassic interval of Stenlille and Vedsted on-shore wells of Danish basin. The calculated permeability from specific surface and porosity vary from 0.09 to 48.53 μD while that calculated from consolidation tests data vary from 1000 μD at a low vertical...

  16. Permeability Tests on Silkeborg Sand No. 0000

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Willy; Jakobsen, Kim Parsberg

    The flow through porous media plays an important role in various engineering disciplines, as for example in ground water hydrology and soil mechanics. In the present study the permeability is determined for a fine, saturated sand. As the flow through a porous media strongly depends on the charact......The flow through porous media plays an important role in various engineering disciplines, as for example in ground water hydrology and soil mechanics. In the present study the permeability is determined for a fine, saturated sand. As the flow through a porous media strongly depends...... on the characteristics of the soil matrix, the permeability is determined for different void ratios. All tests are performed on reconstituted specimens of Silkeborg Sand No. 0000. The permeability is determined by use of a falling head apparatus. The apparatus, test procedures and the analysis method are described...

  17. Permeability Tests on Eastern Scheldt Sand

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Kim Parsberg

    The flow through porous media plays an important role in various engineering disciplines, as for example in ground water hydrology and soil mechanics. In the present study the permeability is determined for a fine, saturated sand. As the flow through a porous media strongly depends on the charact......The flow through porous media plays an important role in various engineering disciplines, as for example in ground water hydrology and soil mechanics. In the present study the permeability is determined for a fine, saturated sand. As the flow through a porous media strongly depends...... on the characteristics of the soil matrix, the permeability is determined for different void ratios. All tests are performed on reconstituted specimens of Eastern Scheldt Sand. The permeability is determined by use of a falling head apparatus. Finally the test results are briefly summarised and a relationship between...

  18. Biopartitioning micellar chromatography to predict skin permeability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Pla, J J; Martín-Biosca, Y; Sagrado, S; Villanueva-Camañas, R M; Medina-Hernández, M J

    2003-12-01

    Dermal absorption of chemicals is an area of increasing interest to the pharmaceutical and cosmetic industries, as well as in dermal exposure and risk assessment processes. In this paper the capability of biopartitioning micellar chromatography (BMC) as an in vitro technique to describe compound percutaneous absorption is evaluated. A multivariate study (principal component analysis, partial least squares) is performed in order to evaluate the importance of some physicochemical variables on the skin permeability constant values. From these results, a quantitative retention-activity relationship model for predicting the skin permeability constants that uses the BMC retention data and melting point as descriptor variables was obtained from a heterogeneous set of 43 compounds. The main advantage of the proposed methodology is that it allows the obtention of permeability constants of ionic compound and it can be very useful to predict the effect of pH of vehicle on the skin permeability of xenobiotics. Copyright 2003 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. [Microcirculation and permeability of the pulmonary capillaries in the dynamics of experimental neuritis of the vagus nerve].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolosov, V V

    1983-04-01

    Intravital biomicroscopy was used to study permeability and microcirculation of pulmonary vessels during experimental neuritis of the vagus nerve. The study lasted 14 days. Vascular permeability was evaluated from the changes in adhesion capacity of capillary endothelium with respect to India ink. The microhemodynamics was explored by visual observation and appraisal of the photo and film documents. The most pronounced changes were noticed on the 3d day. In the following days the changes were phasic in nature, repeating on days 6, 9 and 12. All the changes were synchronous.

  20. Electrophysiological Monitoring of Brain Injury and Recovery after Cardiac Arrest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruoxian Deng

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Reliable prognostic methods for cerebral functional outcome of post cardiac-arrest (CA patients are necessary, especially since therapeutic hypothermia (TH as a standard treatment. Traditional neurophysiological prognostic indicators, such as clinical examination and chemical biomarkers, may result in indecisive outcome predictions and do not directly reflect neuronal activity, though they have remained the mainstay of clinical prognosis. The most recent advances in electrophysiological methods—electroencephalography (EEG pattern, evoked potential (EP and cellular electrophysiological measurement—were developed to complement these deficiencies, and will be examined in this review article. EEG pattern (reactivity and continuity provides real-time and accurate information for early-stage (particularly in the first 24 h hypoxic-ischemic (HI brain injury patients with high sensitivity. However, the signal is easily affected by external stimuli, thus the measurements of EP should be combined with EEG background to validate the predicted neurologic functional result. Cellular electrophysiology, such as multi-unit activity (MUA and local field potentials (LFP, has strong potential for improving prognostication and therapy by offering additional neurophysiologic information to understand the underlying mechanisms of therapeutic methods. Electrophysiology provides reliable and precise prognostication on both global and cellular levels secondary to cerebral injury in cardiac arrest patients treated with TH.

  1. Electrophysiological Techniques for Sea Lion Population-Level Audiometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-09-30

    Audiometry James J. Finneran Space and Naval Warfare Systems Center Pacific, Biosciences Division, Code 71510, 53560 Hull Street, San Diego, CA...DATES COVERED 00-00-2009 to 00-00-2009 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Electrophysiological Techniques For Sea Lion Population-Level Audiometry 5a

  2. Electrophysiological Signals of Familiarity and Recency in the Infant Brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, Kelly A.; Garza, John; Zolot, Liza; Kresse, Anna

    2010-01-01

    Electrophysiological work in nonhuman primates has established the existence of multiple types of signals in the temporal lobe that contribute to recognition memory, including information regarding a stimulus's relative novelty, familiarity, and recency of occurrence. We used high-density event-related potentials (ERPs) to examine whether young…

  3. Early electrophysiological findings in Fisher-Bickerstaff syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberti, M A; Povedano, M; Montero, J; Casasnovas, C

    2017-09-06

    The term Fisher-Bickerstaff syndrome (FBS) has been proposed to describe the clinical spectrum encompassing Miller-Fisher syndrome (MFS) and Bickerstaff brainstem encephalitis. The pathophysiology of FBS and the nature of the underlying neuropathy (demyelinating or axonal) are still subject to debate. This study describes the main findings of an early neurophysiological study on 12 patients diagnosed with FBS. Retrospective evaluation of clinical characteristics and electrophysiological findings of 12 patients with FBS seen in our neurology department within 10 days of disease onset. Follow-up electrophysiological studies were also evaluated, where available. The most frequent electrophysiological finding, present in 5 (42%) patients, was reduced sensory nerve action potential (SNAP) amplitude in one or more nerves. Abnormalities were rarely found in motor neurography, with no signs of demyelination. The cranial nerve exam revealed abnormalities in 3 patients (facial neurography and/or blink reflex test). Three patients showed resolution of SNAP amplitude reduction in serial neurophysiological studies, suggesting the presence of reversible sensory nerve conduction block. Results from cranial MRI scans were normal in all patients. An electrophysiological pattern of sensory axonal neuropathy, with no associated signs of demyelination, is an early finding of FBS. Early neurophysiological evaluation and follow-up are essential for diagnosing patients with FBS. Copyright © 2017 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  4. The role of neuro-electrophysiological diagnostic tests in clinical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To summarise and discuss the role of neuro-electrophysiological diagnostic tests in clinical medicine. Data Sources: Published original research and reviews to date. Study Selection: The review was with emphasis on diagnosis of peripheral neuropathic and neuromuscular disorders. Data extraction and ...

  5. Cardiac Electrophysiology: Normal and Ischemic Ionic Currents and the ECG

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klabunde, Richard E.

    2017-01-01

    Basic cardiac electrophysiology is foundational to understanding normal cardiac function in terms of rate and rhythm and initiation of cardiac muscle contraction. The primary clinical tool for assessing cardiac electrical events is the electrocardiogram (ECG), which provides global and regional information on rate, rhythm, and electrical…

  6. Error and reinforcement processing in ADHD : An electrophysiological study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groen, Yvonne

    2011-01-01

    Introduction and Objective(s) Current explanatory models of ADHD suggest abnormal reinforcement sensitivity, but the exact nature of this deficit is unclear. In this study we investigate electrophysiological reactions to positive/negative reinforcement as well as correct/error responses to gain more

  7. Atrioventricular junctional tissue. Discrepancy between histological and electrophysiological characteristics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    McGuire, M. A.; de Bakker, J. M.; Vermeulen, J. T.; Moorman, A. F.; Loh, P.; Thibault, B.; Vermeulen, J. L.; Becker, A. E.; Janse, M. J.

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Previous work has demonstrated that cells with AV nodal-type action potentials are not confined to Koch's triangle but may extend along the AV orifices. The aim of this study was to examine the histological and electrophysiological characteristics of this tissue. METHODS AND RESULTS:

  8. Pneumatic fracturing of low permeability media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schuring, J.R. [New Jersey Institute of Technology, Newark, NJ (United States)

    1996-08-01

    Pneumatic fracturing of soils to enhance the removal and treatment of dense nonaqueous phase liquids is described. The process involves gas injection at a pressure exceeding the natural stresses and at a flow rate exceeding the permeability of the formation. The paper outlines geologic considerations, advantages and disadvantages, general technology considerations, low permeability media considerations, commercial availability, efficiency, and costs. Five case histories of remediation using pneumatic fracturing are briefly summarized. 11 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Surface sedimentation at permeable pavement systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Støvring, Jan; Dam, Torben; Jensen, Marina Bergen

    2018-01-01

    Newly installed permeable pavement (PP) systems provide high surface infiltration capacity, but the accumulation of sediments causes a decrease in capacity over time, eventually leading to surface clogging. With the aim of investigating local sedimentation processes and the importance of restorat......Newly installed permeable pavement (PP) systems provide high surface infiltration capacity, but the accumulation of sediments causes a decrease in capacity over time, eventually leading to surface clogging. With the aim of investigating local sedimentation processes and the importance...

  10. Cysteamine prevents vascular leakage through inhibiting transglutaminase in diabetic retina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yeon-Ju; Jung, Se-Hui; Hwang, JongYun; Jeon, Sohee; Han, Eun-Taek; Park, Won Sun; Hong, Seok-Ho; Kim, Young-Myeong; Ha, Kwon-Soo

    2017-10-01

    Cysteamine (an aminothiol), which is derived from coenzyme A degradation and metabolized into taurine, has beneficial effects against cystinosis and neurodegenerative diseases; however, its role in diabetic complications is unknown. Thus, we sought to determine the preventive effect of cysteamine against hyperglycemia-induced vascular leakage in the retinas of diabetic mice. Cysteamine and ethanolamine, the sulfhydryl group-free cysteamine analogue, inhibited vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-induced stress fiber formation and vascular endothelial (VE)-cadherin disruption in endothelial cells, which play a critical role in modulating endothelial permeability. Intravitreal injection of the amine compounds prevented hyperglycemia-induced vascular leakage in the retinas of streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice. We then investigated the potential roles of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and transglutaminase (TGase) in the cysteamine prevention of VEGF-induced vascular leakage. Cysteamine, but not ethanolamine, inhibited VEGF-induced ROS generation in endothelial cells and diabetic retinas. In contrast, VEGF-induced TGase activation was prevented by both cysteamine and ethanolamine. Our findings suggest that cysteamine protects against vascular leakage through inhibiting VEGF-induced TGase activation rather than ROS generation in diabetic retinas. © 2017 Society for Endocrinology.

  11. Intestinal permeability in patients with atopic eczema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjarnason, I; Goolamali, S K; Levi, A J; Peters, T J

    1985-03-01

    Intestinal permeability was investigated in adult patients with atopic eczema by in vivo and in vitro techniques. Patients with symptoms of 'immediate' food allergy were specifically excluded. A 51Cr-labelled ethylenediaminetetraacetate absorption test was carried out in eighteen patients. Their mean (+/- s.d.) 24-hour urine excretion following oral administration of the test substance (2.1 +/- 0.9%) did not differ significantly from that of thirty-four normal controls (1.9 +/- 0.5%). Small bowel permeability was estimated directly in jejunal mucosal samples in ten patients with three permeability probes of differing molecular weight. Mucosal permeability did not differ significantly from that of fifteen control patients for any of the test substances. Two patients had abnormal results by both tests and in one this was due to coeliac disease. These results suggest that altered intestinal permeability is not important in the pathogenesis of eczema. Patients demonstrating increased intestinal permeability should undergo jejunal biopsy to exclude significant small bowel disease.

  12. Charge Inversion in semi-permeable membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Siddhartha; Sinha, Shayandev; Jing, Haoyuan

    Role of semi-permeable membranes like lipid bilayer is ubiquitous in a myriad of physiological and pathological phenomena. Typically, lipid membranes are impermeable to ions and solutes; however, protein channels embedded in the membrane allow the passage of selective, small ions across the membrane enabling the membrane to adopt a semi-permeable nature. This semi-permeability, in turn, leads to electrostatic potential jump across the membrane, leading to effects such as regulation of intracellular calcium, extracellular-vesicle-membrane interactions, etc. In this study, we theoretically demonstrate that this semi-permeable nature may trigger the most remarkable charge inversion (CI) phenomenon in the cytosol-side of the negatively-charged lipid bilayer membrane that are selectively permeable to only positive ions of a given salt. This CI is manifested as the changing of the sign of the electrostatic potential from negative to positive from the membrane-cytosol interface to deep within the cytosol. We study the impact of the parameters such as the concentration of this salt with selectively permeable ions as well as the concentration of an external salt in the development of this CI phenomenon. We anticipate such CI will profoundly influence the interaction of membrane and intra-cellular moieties (e.g., exosome or multi-cellular vesicles) having implications for a host of biophysical processes.

  13. Frictional stability-permeability relationships for fractures in shales: Friction-Permeability Relationships

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fang, Yi [Department of Energy and Mineral Engineering, EMS Energy Institute, and G3 Center, Pennsylvania State University, University Park Pennsylvania USA; Elsworth, Derek [Department of Energy and Mineral Engineering, EMS Energy Institute, and G3 Center, Pennsylvania State University, University Park Pennsylvania USA; Department of Geosciences, EMS Energy Institute, and G3 Center, Pennsylvania State University, University Park Pennsylvania USA; Wang, Chaoyi [Department of Energy and Mineral Engineering, EMS Energy Institute, and G3 Center, Pennsylvania State University, University Park Pennsylvania USA; Ishibashi, Takuya [Department of Energy and Mineral Engineering, EMS Energy Institute, and G3 Center, Pennsylvania State University, University Park Pennsylvania USA; Fukushima Renewable Energy Institute, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Koriyama Japan; Fitts, Jeffrey P. [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Princeton University, Princeton New Jersey USA

    2017-01-01

    There is wide concern that fluid injection in the subsurface, such as for the stimulation of shale reservoirs or for geological CO2 sequestration (GCS), has the potential to induce seismicity that may change reservoir permeability due to fault slip. However, the impact of induced seismicity on fracture permeability evolution remains unclear due to the spectrum of modes of fault reactivation (e.g., stable versus unstable). As seismicity is controlled by the frictional response of fractures, we explore friction-stability-permeability relationships through the concurrent measurement of frictional and hydraulic properties of artificial fractures in Green River shale (GRS) and Opalinus shale (OPS). We observe that carbonate-rich GRS shows higher frictional strength but weak neutral frictional stability. The GRS fracture permeability declines during shearing while an increased sliding velocity reduces the rate of permeability decline. By comparison, the phyllosilicate-rich OPS has lower friction and strong stability while the fracture permeability is reduced due to the swelling behavior that dominates over the shearing induced permeability reduction. Hence, we conclude that the friction-stability-permeability relationship of a fracture is largely controlled by mineral composition and that shale mineral compositions with strong frictional stability may be particularly subject to permanent permeability reduction during fluid infiltration.

  14. Comparative field permeability measurement of permeable pavements using ASTM C1701 and NCAT permeameter methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hui; Kayhanian, Masoud; Harvey, John T

    2013-03-30

    Fully permeable pavement is gradually gaining support as an alternative best management practice (BMP) for stormwater runoff management. As the use of these pavements increases, a definitive test method is needed to measure hydraulic performance and to evaluate clogging, both for performance studies and for assessment of permeability for construction quality assurance and maintenance needs assessment. Two of the most commonly used permeability measurement tests for porous asphalt and pervious concrete are the National Center for Asphalt Technology (NCAT) permeameter and ASTM C1701, respectively. This study was undertaken to compare measured values for both methods in the field on a variety of permeable pavements used in current practice. The field measurements were performed using six experimental section designs with different permeable pavement surface types including pervious concrete, porous asphalt and permeable interlocking concrete pavers. Multiple measurements were performed at five locations on each pavement test section. The results showed that: (i) silicone gel is a superior sealing material to prevent water leakage compared with conventional plumbing putty; (ii) both methods (NCAT and ASTM) can effectively be used to measure the permeability of all pavement types and the surface material type will not impact the measurement precision; (iii) the permeability values measured with the ASTM method were 50-90% (75% on average) lower than those measured with the NCAT method; (iv) the larger permeameter cylinder diameter used in the ASTM method improved the reliability and reduced the variability of the measured permeability. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Software and hardware infrastructure for research in electrophysiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouček, Roman; Ježek, Petr; Vařeka, Lukáš; Rondík, Tomáš; Brůha, Petr; Papež, Václav; Mautner, Pavel; Novotný, Jiří; Prokop, Tomáš; Stěbeták, Jan

    2014-01-01

    As in other areas of experimental science, operation of electrophysiological laboratory, design and performance of electrophysiological experiments, collection, storage and sharing of experimental data and metadata, analysis and interpretation of these data, and publication of results are time consuming activities. If these activities are well organized and supported by a suitable infrastructure, work efficiency of researchers increases significantly. This article deals with the main concepts, design, and development of software and hardware infrastructure for research in electrophysiology. The described infrastructure has been primarily developed for the needs of neuroinformatics laboratory at the University of West Bohemia, the Czech Republic. However, from the beginning it has been also designed and developed to be open and applicable in laboratories that do similar research. After introducing the laboratory and the whole architectural concept the individual parts of the infrastructure are described. The central element of the software infrastructure is a web-based portal that enables community researchers to store, share, download and search data and metadata from electrophysiological experiments. The data model, domain ontology and usage of semantic web languages and technologies are described. Current data publication policy used in the portal is briefly introduced. The registration of the portal within Neuroscience Information Framework is described. Then the methods used for processing of electrophysiological signals are presented. The specific modifications of these methods introduced by laboratory researches are summarized; the methods are organized into a laboratory workflow. Other parts of the software infrastructure include mobile and offline solutions for data/metadata storing and a hardware stimulator communicating with an EEG amplifier and recording software.

  16. Software and Hardware Infrastructure for Research in Electrophysiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roman eMouček

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available As in other areas of experimental science, operation of electrophysiological laboratory, design and performance of electrophysiological experiments, collection, storage and sharing of experimental data and metadata, analysis and interpretation of these data, and publication of results are time consuming activities. If these activities are well organized and supported by a suitable infrastructure, work efficiency of researchers increases significantly.This article deals with the main concepts, design, and development of software and hardware infrastructure for research in electrophysiology. The described infrastructure has been primarily developed for the needs of neuroinformatics laboratory at the University of West Bohemia, the Czech Republic. However, from the beginning it has been also designed and developed to be open and applicable in laboratories that do similar research.After introducing the laboratory and the whole architectural concept the individual parts of the infrastructure are described. The central element of the software infrastructure is a web-based portal that enables community researchers to store, share, download and search data and metadata from electrophysiological experiments. The data model, domain ontology and usage of semantic web languages and technologies are described. Current data publication policy used in the portal is briefly introduced. The registration of the portal within Neuroscience Information Framework is described. Then the methods used for processing of electrophysiological signals are presented. The specific modifications of these methods introduced by laboratory researches are summarized; the methods are organized into a laboratory workflow. Other parts of the software infrastructure include mobile and offline solutions for data/metadata storing and a hardware stimulator communicating with an EEG amplifier and recording software.

  17. Understanding Vascular Endothelium

    OpenAIRE

    Gimbrone, Michael A.

    2014-01-01

    Understanding Vascular Endothelium : Nature’s Container for Blood The entire cardiovascular system, from the chambers of the heart to the smallest capillaries of peripheral tissues, is lined by a single-cell-thick continuous layer—the vascular endothelium. For many years, this gossamer membrane was thought to function largely as an inert barrier, passively separating the reactive components of the circulating blood from the cells and connective tissue matrix of the various organs of the body....

  18. Hypercholesterolaemia and vascular dementia

    OpenAIRE

    Appleton, Jason P.; Scutt, Polly; Sprigg, Nikola; Bath, Philip M.

    2017-01-01

    Vascular dementia (VaD) is the second commonest cause of dementia. Stroke is the leading cause of disability in adults in developed countries, the second major cause of dementia and the third commonest cause of death. Traditional vascular risk factors–diabetes, hypercholesterolaemia, hypertension and smoking–are implicated as risk factors for VaD. The associations between cholesterol and small vessel disease (SVD), stroke, cognitive impairment and subsequent dementia are complex and as yet no...

  19. Gadolinium prevents high airway pressure-induced permeability increases in isolated rat lungs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, J C; Ivey, C L; Tucker, J A

    1998-04-01

    To determine the initial signaling event in the vascular permeability increase after high airway pressure injury, we compared groups of lungs ventilated at different peak inflation pressures (PIPs) with (gadolinium group) and without (control group) infusion of 20 microM gadolinium chloride, an inhibitor of endothelial stretch-activated cation channels. Microvascular permeability was assessed by using the capillary filtration coefficient (Kfc), a measure of capillary hydraulic conductivity. Kfc was measured after ventilation for 30-min periods with 7, 20, and 30 cmH2O PIP with 3 cmH2O positive end-expiratory pressure and with 35 cmH2O PIP with 8 cmH2O positive end-expiratory pressure. In control lungs, Kfc increased significantly to 1.8 and 3.7 times baseline after 30 and 35 cmH2O PIP, respectively. In the gadolinium group, Kfc was unchanged from baseline (0.060 +/- 0.010 ml . min-1 . cmH2O-1 . 100 g-1) after any PIP ventilation period. Pulmonary vascular resistance increased significantly from baseline in both groups before the last Kfc measurement but was not different between groups. These results suggest that microvascular permeability is actively modulated by a cellular response to mechanical injury and that stretch-activated cation channels may initiate this response through increases in intracellular calcium concentration.

  20. Glioblastoma cell-secreted interleukin-8 induces brain endothelial cell permeability via CXCR2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie Dwyer

    Full Text Available Glioblastoma constitutes the most aggressive and deadly of brain tumors. As yet, both conventional and molecular-based therapies have met with limited success in treatment of this cancer. Among other explanations, the heterogeneity of glioblastoma and the associated microenvironment contribute to its development, as well as resistance and recurrence in response to treatments. Increased vascularity suggests that tumor angiogenesis plays an important role in glioblastoma progression. However, the molecular crosstalk between endothelial and glioblastoma cells requires further investigation. To examine the effects of glioblastoma-derived signals on endothelial homeostasis, glioblastoma cell secretions were collected and used to treat brain endothelial cells. Here, we present evidence that the glioblastoma secretome provides pro-angiogenic signals sufficient to disrupt VE-cadherin-mediated cell-cell junctions and promote endothelial permeability in brain microvascular endothelial cells. An unbiased angiogenesis-specific antibody array screen identified the chemokine, interleukin-8, which was further demonstrated to function as a key factor involved in glioblastoma-induced permeability, mediated through its receptor CXCR2 on brain endothelia. This underappreciated interface between glioblastoma cells and associated endothelium may inspire the development of novel therapeutic strategies to induce tumor regression by preventing vascular permeability and inhibiting angiogenesis.

  1. Vascular endothelial growth factor A protein level and gene expression in intracranial meningiomas with brain edema

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nassehi, Damoun; Dyrbye, Henrik; Andresen, Morten

    2011-01-01

    (VEGF) is an endothelial cell-specific mitogen and angiogen. VEGF-A protein, which is identical to vascular permeability factor, is a regulator of angiogenesis. In this study, 101 patients with meningiomas, and possible co-factors to PTBE, such as meningioma subtypes and tumor location, were examined...

  2. Role of intracellular calcium and reactive oxygen species in microbubble-mediated alterations of endothelial layer permeability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kooiman, Klazina; van der Steen, Antonius F W; de Jong, Nico

    2013-09-01

    Drugs will be delivered to diseased tissue more efficiently if the vascular endothelial permeability is increased. Ultrasound in combination with an ultrasound contrast agent is known to increase the permeability of the endothelial layer, but the mechanism is not known. The goal of this study was to elucidate whether intracellular calcium ions, [Ca(2+)]i, and reactive oxygen species (ROS) are part of the mechanism that leads to an increased endothelial layer permeability following ultrasound and microbubble treatment. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) treated for 2 min with ultrasound-activated microbubbles (1 MHz, 210 kPa, 10 000 cycles, 20 Hz repetition rate) had an increased permeability that lasted up to 12 h. Recovery of permeability after 2 h was only found when HUVECs were preincubated with the [Ca(2+)]i chelator BAPTA-AM or the antioxidant butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT). This suggests that both [Ca(2+)]i and ROS play an important role in the mechanism of increased permeability following ultrasound in combination with microbubble treatment.

  3. Effect of ruthenium red, a ryanodine receptor antagonist in experimental diabetes induced vascular endothelial dysfunction and associated dementia in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Swati; Sharma, Bhupesh

    2016-10-01

    Diabetes mellitus is considered as a main risk factor for vascular dementia. In the past, we have reported the induction of vascular dementia by experimental diabetes. This study investigates the efficacy of a ruthenium red, a ryanodine receptor antagonist and pioglitazone in the pharmacological interdiction of pancreatectomy diabetes (PaD) induced vascular endothelial dysfunction and subsequent vascular dementia in rats. Attentional set shifting and Morris water-maze test were used for assessment of learning and memory. Vascular endothelial function, blood brain barrier permeability, serum glucose, serum nitrite/nitrate, oxidative stress (viz. aortic superoxide anion, brain thiobarbituric acid reactive species and brain glutathione), brain calcium and inflammation (myeloperoxidase) were also estimated. PaD rats have shown impairment of endothelial function, blood brain barrier permeability, learning and memory along with an increase in brain inflammation, oxidative stress and calcium. Administration of ruthenium red and pioglitazone has significantly attenuated PaD induced impairment of learning, memory, blood brain barrier permeability, endothelial function and biochemical parameters. It may be concluded that ruthenium red, a ryanodine receptor antagonist and pioglitazone, a PPAR-γ agonist may be considered as potent pharmacological agent for the management of PaD induced endothelial dysfunction and subsequent vascular dementia. Ryanodine receptor may be explored further for their possible benefits in vascular dementia. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Gastrointestinal permeability in patients with irritable bowel syndrome assessed using a four probe permeability solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Valle-Pinero, Arseima Y.; Van Deventer, Hendrick E.; Fourie, Nicolaas H.; Martino, Angela C.; Patel, Nayan S.; Remaley, Alan T.; Henderson, Wendy A.

    2013-01-01

    Background Abnormal gastrointestinal permeability has been linked to irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). The lactulose-to-mannitol ratio is traditionally used to assess small intestine permeability while sucralose and sucrose are used to assess colonic and gastric permeability respectively. We used a single 4-probe test solution to assess permeability throughout the gastrointestinal tract in IBS patients and healthy controls by measuring the recovery of the probes in urine after ingestion using a modified liquid chromatography mass spectrometry protocol. Methods Fasting participants (N = 59) drank a permeability test solution (100 ml: sucralose, sucrose, mannitol, and lactulose). Urine was collected over a 5-h period and kept frozen until analysis. Urinary sugar concentrations were measured using an liquid chromatography/triple quadruple mass spectrometer. Results Colonic permeability was significantly lower in IBS patients when compared to healthy controls (p = 0.011). Gastric and small intestinal permeability did not significantly differ between the groups. Conclusions The study demonstrates the clinical potential of this non-invasive method for assessing alterations in gastrointestinal permeability in patients with IBS. PMID:23328210

  5. Changes in permeability caused by earthquakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manga, Michael; Wang, Chi-Yuen; Shi, Zheming

    2016-04-01

    Earthquakes induce a range of hydrological responses, including changes in streamflow and changes in the water level in wells. Here we show that many of these responses are caused the changes in permeability produced by the passage of seismic waves. First we analyze streams that were dry or nearly dry before the 2014 M6 Napa, California, earthquake butstarted to flow after the earthquake. We show that the new flows were meteoric in origin and originate in the nearby mountains. Responses are not correlated with the sign of static strains implying seismic waves liberated this water, presumably by changing permeability. We also analyze a large network of wells in China that responded to 4 large earthquakes. We monitor permeability changes through their effect on the water level response to solid Earth tides. We find that when earthquakes produce sustained changes in water level, permeability also changes. Wells with water level changes that last for only days show no evidence for changes in aquifer permeability.

  6. Quantifying Evaporation in a Permeable Pavement System ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Studies quantifying evaporation from permeable pavement systems are limited to a few laboratory studies and one field application. This research quantifies evaporation for a larger-scale field application by measuring the water balance from lined permeable pavement sections. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) constructed a 0.4-ha parking lot in Edison, NJ, that incorporated three different permeable pavement types in the parking lanes – permeable interlocking concrete pavers (PICP), pervious concrete (PC), and porous asphalt (PA). An impermeable liner installed 0.4 m below the driving surface in four 11.6-m by 4.74-m sections per each pavement type captures all infiltrating water and routes it to collection tanks that can contain events up to 38 mm. Each section has a design impervious area to permeable pavement area ratio of 0.66:1. Pressure transducers installed in the underdrain collection tanks measured water level for 24 months. Level was converted to volume using depth-to-volume ratios for individual collection tanks. Using a water balance approach, the measured infiltrate volume was compared to rainfall volume on an event-basis to determine the rainfall retained in the pavement strata and underlying aggregate. Evaporation since the previous event created additional storage in the pavement and aggregate layers. Events were divided into three groups based on antecedent dry period (ADP) and three, four-month categories of potential e

  7. Water permeability and characterization of aquaporin-11.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakata, Kaya; Tani, Kazutoshi; Fujiyoshi, Yoshinori

    2011-05-01

    The water permeability of aquaporin-11 (AQP11), which has a cysteine substituted for an alanine at a highly conserved asparagine-proline-alanine (NPA) motif in the water channel family, is controversial. Our previous study, however, showed that AQP11 is water permeable in proteoliposomes in which AQP11 molecules were reconstituted after purification with Fos-choline 10, which is the most suitable detergent available for stable solubilization of AQP11. In our previous study, we were unable to exclude the effect of the detergent on the water conductance. Therefore, in the present study, we measured the water permeability of AQP11 without detergent using vesicles that directly formed from Sf9 cell membranes expressing AQP11 molecules. The water permeability of AQP11 was 8-fold lower than that of AQP1 and 3-fold higher than that of mock-infected cell membrane, and was reversibly inhibited by mercury ions. Considering the slow but constant water permeable functions of AQP11, we performed homology modeling to search for a common structural feature. When comparing our model with those of other AQP structures, we found that Tyr83 facing the channel pore might be a key amino acid residue that decreases the water permeation of AQP11. Our findings indicate that AQP11 could be involved in slow but constant water movement across the membrane. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Durability Evaluation in Concrete Using Cracked Permeability and Chloride Permeability Tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. M. Sounthararajan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study is to identify the possibilities of utilizing the quarry dust in concrete to obtain an improved strength and durability properties of concrete. In the present study, the addition of quarry dust as alternative for natural sand has been investigated, and the durability properties of concrete were evaluated systematically by means of cracked water permeability and rapid chloride permeability tests. The permeability of concrete was assessed with initial stress applied to the concrete specimen and later checked for water permeability. Concrete mixes were casted using ordinary river sand and compared with 100% quarry dust substituted concrete. The addition of quarry dust significantly improved the concrete matrix properties in terms of strength and permeability resistance. The addition of fine quarry dust in concrete resulted in improved matrix densification compared to conventional concrete. Matrix densification has been studied qualitatively through petrographical examination using digital optical microscopy.

  9. Study of the therapeutic benefit of cationic copolymer administration to vascular endothelium under mechanical stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giantsos-Adams, Kristina; Lopez-Quintero, Veronica; Kopeckova, Pavla; Kopecek, Jindrich; Tarbell, John M.; Dull, Randal

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary edema and the associated increases in vascular permeability continue to represent a significant clinical problem in the intensive care setting, with no current treatment modality other than supportive care and mechanical ventilation. Therapeutic compound(s) capable of attenuating changes in vascular barrier function would represent a significant advance in critical care medicine. We have previously reported the development of HPMA-based copolymers, targeted to endothelial glycocalyx that are able to enhance barrier function. In this work, we report the refinement of copolymer design and extend our physiological studies todemonstrate that the polymers: 1) reduce both shear stress and pressure-mediated increase in hydraulic conductivity, 2) reduce nitric oxide production in response to elevated hydrostatic pressure and, 3) reduce the capillary filtration coefficient (Kfc) in an isolated perfused mouse lung model. These copolymers represent an important tool for use in mechanotransduction research and a novel strategy for developing clinically useful copolymers for the treatment of vascular permeability. PMID:20932573

  10. Vascular leakage induced by exposure to arsenic via increased production of NO, hydroxyl radical and peroxynitrite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shih-Chieh; Chen, Wei-Chi

    2008-04-01

    Previous studies have shown that in situ exposure to arsenic induced increased vascular leakage. However, the underlying mechanism remains unclear. Reactive nitrogen and oxygen species such as nitric oxide (NO) and hydroxyl radical (OH(-)) are known to affect vascular permeability. Therefore, the goal of our present studies is to investigate the functional impact of the generation of NO or OH(-) on arsenic-induced vascular leakage. Vascular permeability changes were evaluated by means of Evans blue (EB) assay. Rats were anesthetized and intravenously injected with EB. Permeability changes were induced in back skin by intradermal injections of sodium arsenite mixed with NOS inhibitor: N(omega)-Nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME) or aminoguanidine (AG) and OH(-) scavenger: 1,3 Dimethyl-2 thiourea (DMTU). Experiments were also performed to determine whether DMTU mixed with L-NAME would further inhibit arsenic-induced vascular leakage as compared with attenuation effects by either DMTU or L-NAME. One hour after administration, EB accumulated in the skin was extracted and quantified. Both L-NAME (0.02, 0.1 and 0.5 micromol/site) and DMTU (0.05, 0.2 and 1.2 micromol/site) inhibited the increase in vascular leakage induced by arsenite. However, only high dose (1 micromol/site) of AG significantly attenuated arsenite-induced vascular leakage. In contrast, neither D-NAME (0.02, 0.1 and 0.5 micromol/site) nor AG (0.04 and 0.2 micromol/site) attenuated increased vascular leakage by arsenic. DMTU mixed with L-NAME caused no further inhibition of arsenic-induced vascular leakage by either DMTU or L-NAME. The techniques of India ink and immunostaining were used to demonstrate both vascular labeling and nitrotyrosine staining in tissue treated with arsenic. L-NAME apparently reduced the density of leaky vessels and the levels of peroxynitrite staining induced by arsenite. These results suggest that NO, OH(-) and peroxynitrite play a role in increased vascular permeability

  11. Small-bowel permeability in collagenous colitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wildt, Signe; Madsen, Jan L; Rumessen, Jüri J

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Collagenous colitis (CC) is a chronic inflammatory bowel disease that affects the colon. However, some patients with CC present with accompanying pathologic small-bowel manifestations such as coeliac disease, defects in bile acid absorption and histopathologic changes in small...... permeability. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Ten patients with CC and chronic diarrhoea participated in the study. Coeliac disease was excluded by small-bowel biopsy and/or serology. Intestinal permeability was assessed as urinary excretion (ratios) 2, 4 and 6 h after ingestion of 14C-labelled mannitol (14C......-intestinal biopsies, indicating that CC is a pan-intestinal disease. In small-intestinal disease, the intestinal barrier function may be impaired, and the permeability of the small intestine altered. The purpose of this research was to study small-bowel function in patients with CC as expressed by intestinal...

  12. Magnetic levitation from negative permeability materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coffey, Mark W., E-mail: mcoffey@mines.edu [Department of Physics, Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO 80401 (United States)

    2012-09-03

    As left-handed materials and metamaterials are becoming more prevalent, we examine the effect of negative permeability upon levitation force. We first consider two half spaces of differing permeability and a point magnetic source, so that the method of images may be employed. We determine that the resulting force may be larger than for conventional magnetic materials. We then illustrate the inclusion of a finite sample thickness. -- Highlights: ► The effect of negative permeability upon levitation force is considered. ► Such an effect could be realized with metamaterials. ► The resulting force may be larger than with conventional materials. ► The analysis is extended to allow for a finite sample thickness. ► Representative numerical values are given.

  13. Permeability of Hollow Microspherical Membranes to Helium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zinoviev, V. N.; Kazanin, I. V.; Pak, A. Yu.; Vereshchagin, A. S.; Lebiga, V. A.; Fomin, V. M.

    2016-01-01

    This work is devoted to the study of the sorption characteristics of various hollow microspherical membranes to reveal particles most suitable for application in the membrane-sorption technologies of helium extraction from a natural gas. The permeability of the investigated sorbents to helium and their impermeability to air and methane are shown experimentally. The sorption-desorption dependences of the studied sorbents have been obtained, from which the parameters of their specific permeability to helium are calculated. It has been established that the physicochemical modification of the original particles exerts a great influence on the coefficient of the permeability of a sorbent to helium. Specially treated cenospheres have displayed high efficiency as membranes for selective extraction of helium.

  14. CMOS nanoelectrode array for all-electrical intracellular electrophysiological imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, Jeffrey; Ye, Tianyang; Qin, Ling; Jorgolli, Marsela; Gertner, Rona S.; Ham, Donhee; Park, Hongkun

    2017-05-01

    Developing a new tool capable of high-precision electrophysiological recording of a large network of electrogenic cells has long been an outstanding challenge in neurobiology and cardiology. Here, we combine nanoscale intracellular electrodes with complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) integrated circuits to realize a high-fidelity all-electrical electrophysiological imager for parallel intracellular recording at the network level. Our CMOS nanoelectrode array has 1,024 recording/stimulation 'pixels' equipped with vertical nanoelectrodes, and can simultaneously record intracellular membrane potentials from hundreds of connected in vitro neonatal rat ventricular cardiomyocytes. We demonstrate that this network-level intracellular recording capability can be used to examine the effect of pharmaceuticals on the delicate dynamics of a cardiomyocyte network, thus opening up new opportunities in tissue-based pharmacological screening for cardiac and neuronal diseases as well as fundamental studies of electrogenic cells and their networks.

  15. Reversible electrophysiological abnormalities in acute secondary hyperkalemic paralysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karkal R Naik

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Hyperkalemia manifests clinically with acute neuromuscular paralysis, which can simulate Guillain Barré syndrome (GBS and other causes of acute flaccid paralysis. Primary hyperkalemic paralysis occurs from genetic defects in the sodium channel, and secondary hyperkalemic paralysis (SHP from diverse causes including renal dysfunction, potassium retaining drugs, Addison′s disease, etc. Clinical characteristics of SHP have been addressed in a number of publications. However, electrophysiological evaluations of these patients during neuromuscular paralysis are infrequently reported and have demonstrated features of demyelination. The clinical features and electrophysiological abnormalities in secondary hyperkalemia mimic GBS, and pose diagnostic challenges. We report the findings of nerve conduction studies in a middle-aged man who was admitted with rapidly reversible acute quadriplegia resulting from secondary hyperkalemic paralysis.

  16. Research progress of electrophysiology for the diagnosis of metabolic myopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei ZHAO

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Metabolic myopathies comprise a group of diverse disorders characterized by defects ofn energy metabolism in skeletal muscle cells, including glycogen storage disease (GSD, lipid storage myopathy (LSM and mitochondrial myopathy. The diagnosis of metabolic myopathies is often challenging due to the clinical and etiological heterogeneity between different metabolic myopathies. Generally, the diagnosis of metabolic myopathies is mainly based on the age of onset, family history, clinical manifestation, electrophysiological examinations, serological screening of metabolic markers, muscle biopsy and the DNA testing for specific mutations. The classical electrophysiological diagnostic methods and the corresponding manifestation of metabolic myopathies were reviewed and some new diagnostic techniques, including new motor unit potential (MUP parameters were introduced in this article. doi: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2014.06.002

  17. [Myelopathy associated with HTLV-1: clinical electrophysiologic study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, S C; Nakasato, O; Kataoka, A; Inayoshi, S; Okajima, T

    1993-11-01

    Clinical and electrophysiological studies have been performed in 9 cases of HTLV-I associated myelopathy (7 female, 2 male). Spastic paraparesis and neurogenic bladder were present in 8; sensory disturbances were detected only in 4. The conduction velocities of the posterior tibial and sural nerves were reduced in 2 cases. Median nerve SSEP revealed a delay of N11, N13, N14, N20 peak latencies and an increase of N9-N20, N13-N14 and N13-N20 interpeak latencies. The electrophysiological studies are the most accurate indicators of the diffuse involvement not only of central motor and sensory pathways but also of the peripheral nervous system.

  18. Comparison of electrogenic glucose transport processes and permeability between proximal and distal jejunum of laying hens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metzler-Zebeli, B U; Hollmann, M; Aschenbach, J R; Zebeli, Q

    2017-06-01

    1. The current objective was to assess (1) differences in mucosal transepithelial short-circuit current (Isc) and tissue conductance (GT), (2) the effect of a glucose stimulus and (3) epithelial paracellular permeability in the proximal and distal jejunum of laying hens. 2. Proximal and distal jejunal segments used in the Ussing chambers were collected at 9 ± 0.5 and 73 ± 3.4% (SEM) of jejunal length, respectively. The proximal jejunal mucosa showed a small negative Isc (-1.3 µA/cm(2)), whereas the distal jejunum had a higher Isc (32.9 µA/cm(2)). Similarly, GT was 2.5-fold greater in the distal compared to the proximal jejunum. 3. Increased paracellular permeability in the distal jejunum was displayed as demonstrated by a 5-fold higher mucosal to serosal flux of fluorescein isothiocyanate and horseradish peroxidase, representing molecules of low and high molecular weight, respectively. 4. Addition of glucose to the mucosal side (5 mmol/l, final concentration in the chamber) to stimulate an absorptive effect caused 3-fold greater GT in the distal compared to the proximal jejunum. 5. In conclusion, the present results supported site-specific electrogenic transport processes for the jejunal mucosa of laying hens. Therefore, precise description of the jejunal site may contribute to an improved comparability of electrophysiological data.

  19. The Electrophysiological Underpinnings of Processing Gender Stereotypes in Language

    OpenAIRE

    Anna Siyanova-Chanturia; Francesca Pesciarelli; Cristina Cacciari

    2012-01-01

    Despite the widely documented influence of gender stereotypes on social behaviour, little is known about the electrophysiological substrates engaged in the processing of such information when conveyed by language. Using event-related brain potentials (ERPs), we examined the brain response to third-person pronouns (lei "she" and lui "he") that were implicitly primed by definitional (passeggera(FEM) "passenger", pensionato(MASC) "pensioner"), or stereotypical antecedents (insegnante "teacher", ...

  20. Space Motion Sickness and Stress Training Simulator using Electrophysiological Biofeedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaudeau, C.; Golding, J. F.; Thevot, F.; Lucas, Y.; Bobola, P.; Thouvenot, J.

    2005-06-01

    An important problem in manned spaceflight is the nausea that typically appears during the first 3 days and then disappears after 5 days. Methods of detecting changes in electrophysiological signals are being studied in order to reduce susceptibility to space motion sickness through biofeedback training, and for the early detection of nausea during EVA. A simulator would allow subjects to control their body functions and to use biofeedback to control space motion sickness and stress.

  1. Electrophysiological characteristics according to activity level of myofascial trigger points

    OpenAIRE

    Yu, Seong Hun; Kim, Hyun Jin

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This study compared the differences in electrophysiological characteristics of normal muscles versus muscles with latent or active myofascial trigger points, and identified the neuromuscular physiological characteristics of muscles with active myofascial trigger points, thereby providing a quantitative evaluation of myofascial pain syndrome and clinical foundational data for its diagnosis. [Subjects] Ninety adults in their 20s participated in this study. Subjects were equally divide...

  2. Age-Related Changes in 1/f Neural Electrophysiological Noise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voytek, Bradley; Kramer, Mark A; Case, John; Lepage, Kyle Q; Tempesta, Zechari R; Knight, Robert T; Gazzaley, Adam

    2015-09-23

    Aging is associated with performance decrements across multiple cognitive domains. The neural noise hypothesis, a dominant view of the basis of this decline, posits that aging is accompanied by an increase in spontaneous, noisy baseline neural activity. Here we analyze data from two different groups of human subjects: intracranial electrocorticography from 15 participants over a 38 year age range (15-53 years) and scalp EEG data from healthy younger (20-30 years) and older (60-70 years) adults to test the neural noise hypothesis from a 1/f noise perspective. Many natural phenomena, including electrophysiology, are characterized by 1/f noise. The defining characteristic of 1/f is that the power of the signal frequency content decreases rapidly as a function of the frequency (f) itself. The slope of this decay, the noise exponent (χ), is often noise (defined as χ = 0) with increasing task difficulty. We observed, in both electrophysiological datasets, that aging is associated with a flatter (more noisy) 1/f power spectral density, even at rest, and that visual cortical 1/f noise statistically mediates age-related impairments in visual working memory. These results provide electrophysiological support for the neural noise hypothesis of aging. Significance statement: Understanding the neurobiological origins of age-related cognitive decline is of critical scientific, medical, and public health importance, especially considering the rapid aging of the world's population. We find, in two separate human studies, that 1/f electrophysiological noise increases with aging. In addition, we observe that this age-related 1/f noise statistically mediates age-related working memory decline. These results significantly add to this understanding and contextualize a long-standing problem in cognition by encapsulating age-related cognitive decline within a neurocomputational model of 1/f noise-induced deficits in neural communication. Copyright © 2015 the authors 0270-6474/15/3513257-09$15.00/0.

  3. Wireless Ultrasound Guidance for Femoral Venous Cannulation in Electrophysiology: Impact on Safety, Efficacy, and Procedural Delay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez Muñoz, Daniel; Franco Díez, Eduardo; Moreno, Javier; Lumia, Giuseppe; Carbonell San Román, Alejandra; Segura De La Cal, Teresa; Matía Francés, Roberto; Hernández Madrid, Antonio; Zamorano Gómez, José Luis

    2015-09-01

    Ultrasound (US) guidance increases safety and efficacy in vascular cannulation and is considered the standard of care. However, barriers including workflow interference and the need to be assisted by a second operator limit its adoption in clinical routine. The use of wireless US (WUS) may overcome these barriers. The aim of this study was to assess the impact of a novel WUS probe during its initial implantation in an electrophysiology (EP) laboratory. Thirty-six patients requiring femoral venous cannulation for EP procedures were included in this single center, prospective, observational study, comparing WUS guidance with the anatomical landmark approach. The primary endpoint was time to successful cannulation. Secondary endpoints included rate of unsuccessful punctures, accidental arterial punctures, and workflow interference. Compared with anatomical landmark approach, WUS guidance significantly reduced mean time to successful cannulation (87.3 ± 94.3 vs 238.1 ± 294.7 seconds, P application of wireless technology in this setting contributed to overcoming some of the barriers preventing a more widespread clinical use of US guidance. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Small-bowel permeability in collagenous colitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wildt, Signe; Madsen, Jan L; Rumessen, Jüri J

    2006-01-01

    Collagenous colitis (CC) is a chronic inflammatory bowel disease that affects the colon. However, some patients with CC present with accompanying pathologic small-bowel manifestations such as coeliac disease, defects in bile acid absorption and histopathologic changes in small-intestinal biopsies......, indicating that CC is a pan-intestinal disease. In small-intestinal disease, the intestinal barrier function may be impaired, and the permeability of the small intestine altered. The purpose of this research was to study small-bowel function in patients with CC as expressed by intestinal permeability....

  5. Rough and partially-cemented fracture permeability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landry, C. J.; Eichhubl, P.; Prodanovic, M.

    2016-12-01

    Numerical studies of mass transport in fractured rock, such as discrete fracture network models, use models to assign estimates of permeability to individual fractures. These fracture permeability models typically employ statistical moments of the fracture aperture distribution to estimate permeability. Although it is known that these fracture permeability models are in error, the quantification of this error is limited. We use a digital rock physics workflow to quantify this error in four fracture samples, a barren artificially-induced fracture in sandstone, a calcite-lined fracture sampled from outcrop, and two quartz-bridged fractures sampled from reservoir core. Each of the fracture samples is imaged using three-dimensional x-ray computed microtomography. The images are then processed, segmented and used in a lattice-Boltzmann-method-based flow simulation. We also vary the kinematic apertures of the barren and calcite-lined fractures through digital dilatation and closure in order to investigate sensitivity to the relative fracture roughness. We define the scalar error, F, between the actual permeability determined from simulation, kLB, and that predicted using the fracture permeability model of Zimmerman and Bodvarsson (1996), kZB, as, F±1=kZB/kLB. Although the pore space shape of the fractures appears quite different, the scalar error as a function of relative roughness is found to be similar for all fracture samples investigated, with a maximum of approximately 2. Considering two-dimensional cross-sections of fractures are more readily available than three-dimensional images we then plot the scalar error as a function of relative roughness and the number of observations measured from two-dimensional images (width of fracture analyzed). In general, the rougher the fracture, the greater the number of observations that are required to define the statistical moment inputs for the fracture permeability model. We use these results to approximate the width of the

  6. Vascularized epiphyseal transplant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Innocenti, Marco; Delcroix, Luca; Romano, G Federico; Capanna, Rodolfo

    2007-01-01

    In skeletally immature patients, the transfer of vascularized epiphysis along with a variable amount of adjoining diaphysis may provide the potential for growth of such a graft, preventing future limb length discrepancy. This article describes the authors' experience with the vascularized transfer of the proximal fibular epiphysis in the reconstruction of large bone defects including the epiphysis in a series of 27 patients ranging in age from 2 to 11 years. The follow-up, ranging from 2 to 14 years, has been long enough to allow some evaluation of the validity, indications, and limits of this reconstructive option.

  7. A Wireless Optogenetic Headstage with Multichannel Electrophysiological Recording Capability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagnon-Turcotte, Gabriel; Kisomi, Alireza Avakh; Ameli, Reza; Camaro, Charles-Olivier Dufresne; LeChasseur, Yoan; Néron, Jean-Luc; Bareil, Paul Brule; Fortier, Paul; Bories, Cyril; de Koninck, Yves; Gosselin, Benoit

    2015-09-09

    We present a small and lightweight fully wireless optogenetic headstage capable of optical neural stimulation and electrophysiological recording. The headstage is suitable for conducting experiments with small transgenic rodents, and features two implantable fiber-coupled light-emitting diode (LED) and two electrophysiological recording channels. This system is powered by a small lithium-ion battery and is entirely built using low-cost commercial off-the-shelf components for better flexibility, reduced development time and lower cost. Light stimulation uses customizable stimulation patterns of varying frequency and duty cycle. The optical power that is sourced from the LED is delivered to target light-sensitive neurons using implantable optical fibers, which provide a measured optical power density of 70 mW/mm² at the tip. The headstage is using a novel foldable rigid-flex printed circuit board design, which results into a lightweight and compact device. Recording experiments performed in the cerebral cortex of transgenic ChR2 mice under anesthetized conditions show that the proposed headstage can trigger neuronal activity using optical stimulation, while recording microvolt amplitude electrophysiological signals.

  8. A Wireless Optogenetic Headstage with Multichannel Electrophysiological Recording Capability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel Gagnon-Turcotte

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available We present a small and lightweight fully wireless optogenetic headstage capable of optical neural stimulation and electrophysiological recording. The headstage is suitable for conducting experiments with small transgenic rodents, and features two implantable fiber-coupled light-emitting diode (LED and two electrophysiological recording channels. This system is powered by a small lithium-ion battery and is entirely built using low-cost commercial off-the-shelf components for better flexibility, reduced development time and lower cost. Light stimulation uses customizable stimulation patterns of varying frequency and duty cycle. The optical power that is sourced from the LED is delivered to target light-sensitive neurons using implantable optical fibers, which provide a measured optical power density of 70 mW/mm2 at the tip. The headstage is using a novel foldable rigid-flex printed circuit board design, which results into a lightweight and compact device. Recording experiments performed in the cerebral cortex of transgenic ChR2 mice under anesthetized conditions show that the proposed headstage can trigger neuronal activity using optical stimulation, while recording microvolt amplitude electrophysiological signals.

  9. LongQt: A cardiac electrophysiology simulation platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onal, Birce; Gratz, Daniel; Hund, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Mathematical modeling has been used for over half a century to advance our understanding of cardiac electrophysiology and arrhythmia mechanisms. Notably, computational studies using mathematical models of the cardiac action potential (AP) have provided important insight into the fundamental nature of cell excitability, mechanisms underlying both acquired and inherited arrhythmia, and potential therapies. Ultimately, an approach that tightly integrates mathematical modeling and experimental techniques has great potential to accelerate discovery. Despite the increasing acceptance of mathematical modeling as a powerful tool in cardiac electrophysiology research, there remain significant barriers to its more widespread use in the field, due in part to the increasing complexity of models and growing need for specialization. To help bridge the gap between experimental and theoretical worlds that stands as a barrier to transformational breakthroughs, we present LongQt, which has the following key features: •Cross-platform, threaded application with accessible graphical user interface.•Facilitates advanced computational cardiac electrophysiology and arrhythmia studies.•Does not require advanced programming skills.

  10. Electrophysiological evidence for an early processing of human voices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fillion-Bilodeau Sarah

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous electrophysiological studies have identified a "voice specific response" (VSR peaking around 320 ms after stimulus onset, a latency markedly longer than the 70 ms needed to discriminate living from non-living sound sources and the 150 ms to 200 ms needed for the processing of voice paralinguistic qualities. In the present study, we investigated whether an early electrophysiological difference between voice and non-voice stimuli could be observed. Results ERPs were recorded from 32 healthy volunteers who listened to 200 ms long stimuli from three sound categories - voices, bird songs and environmental sounds - whilst performing a pure-tone detection task. ERP analyses revealed voice/non-voice amplitude differences emerging as early as 164 ms post stimulus onset and peaking around 200 ms on fronto-temporal (positivity and occipital (negativity electrodes. Conclusion Our electrophysiological results suggest a rapid brain discrimination of sounds of voice, termed the "fronto-temporal positivity to voices" (FTPV, at latencies comparable to the well-known face-preferential N170.

  11. Electrophysiological evidence for an early processing of human voices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charest, Ian; Pernet, Cyril R; Rousselet, Guillaume A; Quiñones, Ileana; Latinus, Marianne; Fillion-Bilodeau, Sarah; Chartrand, Jean-Pierre; Belin, Pascal

    2009-10-20

    Previous electrophysiological studies have identified a "voice specific response" (VSR) peaking around 320 ms after stimulus onset, a latency markedly longer than the 70 ms needed to discriminate living from non-living sound sources and the 150 ms to 200 ms needed for the processing of voice paralinguistic qualities. In the present study, we investigated whether an early electrophysiological difference between voice and non-voice stimuli could be observed. ERPs were recorded from 32 healthy volunteers who listened to 200 ms long stimuli from three sound categories - voices, bird songs and environmental sounds - whilst performing a pure-tone detection task. ERP analyses revealed voice/non-voice amplitude differences emerging as early as 164 ms post stimulus onset and peaking around 200 ms on fronto-temporal (positivity) and occipital (negativity) electrodes. Our electrophysiological results suggest a rapid brain discrimination of sounds of voice, termed the "fronto-temporal positivity to voices" (FTPV), at latencies comparable to the well-known face-preferential N170.

  12. Clinical and electrophysiological characteristics of neuropathy associated with Tangier disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zyss, Julie; Béhin, Anthony; Couvert, Philippe; Bouhour, Françoise; Sassolas, Agnès; Kolev, Ivan; Denys, Violaine; Vial, Christophe; Lacour, A; Carrié, Alain; Stojkovic, Tanya

    2012-06-01

    Tangier disease (TD) (OMIM#205400) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder resulting from mutations in the ABCA1 gene, leading to decreased levels of plasma high-density lipoproteins (HDL). Peripheral neuropathy is a common finding in this disease, and may present as relapsing/remitting mono/polyneuropathies or as syringomyelia-like neuropathy. We retrospectively analyzed four patients, and report here their clinical, biological, electrophysiological, imaging, and genetic findings. Three patients had a typical pseudosyringomyelic neuropathy including facial diplegia, but asymmetrical onset was observed in one patient who had first been misdiagnosed with Lewis-Sumner syndrome. Electrophysiological pattern was heterogeneous, showing both signs of demyelination and axonal degeneration. Truncating mutations of the ABCA1 gene, including two previously undescribed mutations, were constantly found. Atypical symptom onset and demyelinating features on electrophysiological examination can be misleading in case of pseudosyringomyelic neuropathy. These reports illustrate two different neurological phenotypes in TD, namely the pseudosyringomyelic type and the Lewis-Sumner-like type, and advocate for a systematic assessment of lipid profile including HDL cholesterol in demyelinating neuropathies.

  13. Vascular diameter determining the magnification for a microvascular anastomosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrades, Patricio; Benítez, Susana; Danilla, Stefan; Erazo, Cristian; Hasbun, Andrea; Fix, Jobe

    2008-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the association between vascular diameters and amount of magnification and to assess the influence of the magnification media on the microanastomosis quality and permeability. Sixty arterial microanostomoses were distributed into three groups: group I (diameter 1.5 mm), group II (1.5 to 2.5 mm), and group III (> 2.5 mm). The models used were carotid artery of Sprague-Dawley rats and carotid and abdominal artery of wild rabbits. In each group, 10 anastomoses were performed with 2.5 x loupes and 10 with 10 x microscope. The total time of anastomosis, the quality of the anastomosis (Gorman scale), and 24-hour permeability rate were measured. The total anastomotic time and quality had statistical differences for the microscope by analyzing the total sample and group I only. The global permeability was 83% for the microscope and 40% for the loupe. The same result was observed in group I but no differences were observed in the other groups. The histology and the survey showed similar results. Microanastomoses performed under a microscope (10 x) were performed in less time, were of better quality, and had higher permeability rates when compared with those performed under a loupe (2.5 x). In vessels 1.5 mm no differences were observed.

  14. Two barriers for sodium in vascular endothelium?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberleithner, Hans

    2012-01-01

    Vascular endothelium plays a key role in blood pressure regulation. Recently, it has been shown that a 5% increase of plasma sodium concentration (sodium excess) stiffens endothelial cells by about 25%, leading to cellular dysfunction. Surface measurements demonstrated that the endothelial glycocalyx (eGC), an anionic biopolymer, deteriorates when sodium is elevated. In view of these results, a two-barrier model for sodium exiting the circulation across the endothelium is suggested. The first sodium barrier is the eGC which selectively buffers sodium ions with its negatively charged prote-oglycans.The second sodium barrier is the endothelial plasma membrane which contains sodium channels. Sodium excess, in the presence of aldosterone, leads to eGC break-down and, in parallel, to an up-regulation of plasma membrane sodium channels. The following hypothesis is postulated: Sodium excess increases vascular sodium permeability. Under such con-ditions (e.g. high-sodium diet), day-by-day ingested sodium, instead of being readily buffered by the eGC and then rapidly excreted by the kidneys, is distributed in the whole body before being finally excreted. Gradually, the sodium overload damages the organism. PMID:22471931

  15. [Negative symptoms of schizophrenia: from electrophysiology to electrotherapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micoulaud Franchi, J-A; Quiles, C; Belzeaux, R; Adida, M; Azorin, J-M

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this review of the literature is to summarize the state of the knowledge concerning the relationship between negative symptoms in schizophrenia, electrophysiology and electrotherapy. The scientific literature search of international articles was performed during August and September 2015 using the PubMed electronic database. We used the following MeSH terms: "Negative symptoms", "Schizophrenia", "Electrophysiology", "Neurophysiology", "EEG power", "Alpha rhythm", "Transcranial magnetic stimulation", "Transcranial direct current stimulation", "Electroconvulsive therapy", "Neurofeedback", "Vagus Nerve Stimulation", "Deep Brain Stimulation", and "State dependent". Negative symptoms in schizophrenia are associated with altered activity in prefrontal cortex in functional neuroimaging studies. This is in line with electrophysiological measurements that found a change in EEG spectral power in the alpha frequency band over prefrontal brain regions. The notion of functional hypofrontality has led to hypotheses that electrotherapy applied to the prefrontal cortex may be an effective treatment of negative symptoms in schizophrenia. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) and transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) were used to increase cortical activity in schizophrenia and achieve a clinical effect on negative symptoms. Three meta-analyses confirmed, with a moderate effect size, that rTMS is an effective treatment option for negative symptoms in schizophrenia. The two subsequently published prospective multicenter studies, however, found opposite results from each other. Two randomized controlled studies suggested that tDCS is an effective treatment option for negative symptoms. There is no study on the efficacy of neurofeedback, vagal nerve stimulation or deep brain stimulation on negative symptoms in schizophrenia. Additional studies are needed to confirm the efficacy of rTMS and tDCS on negative symptoms in schizophrenia. Influencing factors

  16. Hypercholesterolaemia and vascular dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appleton, Jason P; Scutt, Polly; Sprigg, Nikola; Bath, Philip M

    2017-07-15

    Vascular dementia (VaD) is the second commonest cause of dementia. Stroke is the leading cause of disability in adults in developed countries, the second major cause of dementia and the third commonest cause of death. Traditional vascular risk factors-diabetes, hypercholesterolaemia, hypertension and smoking-are implicated as risk factors for VaD. The associations between cholesterol and small vessel disease (SVD), stroke, cognitive impairment and subsequent dementia are complex and as yet not fully understood. Similarly, the effects of lipids and lipid-lowering therapy on preventing or treating dementia remain unclear; the few trials that have assessed lipid-lowering therapy for preventing (two trials) or treating (four trials) dementia found no evidence to support the use of lipid-lowering therapy for these indications. It is appropriate to treat those patients with vascular risk factors that meet criteria for lipid-lowering therapy for the primary and secondary prevention of cardiovascular and cerebrovascular events, and in line with current guidelines. Managing the individual patient in a holistic manner according to his or her own vascular risk profile is recommended. Although the paucity of randomized controlled evidence makes for challenging clinical decision making, it provides multiple opportunities for on-going and future research, as discussed here. © 2017 The Author(s).

  17. Depression in vascular dementia.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Naarding, P.; Koning, I. de; Kooten, F. van; Dippel, D.W.; Janzing, J.G.E.; Mast, R.C. van der; Koudstaal, P.J.

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To study the presence of different dimensions of depression in subjects with vascular dementia. BACKGROUND: After a stroke, cognitive, affective and behavioural disturbances are common. It has been suggested that the nature of affective symptomatology can help to differentiate organic

  18. Vascular management in rotationplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahoney, Craig R; Hartman, Curtis W; Simon, Pamela J; Baxter, B Timothy; Neff, James R

    2008-05-01

    The Van Nes rotationplasty is a useful limb-preserving procedure for skeletally immature patients with distal femoral or proximal tibial malignancy. The vascular supply to the lower limb either must be maintained and rotated or transected and reanastomosed. We asked whether there would be any difference in the ankle brachial index or complication rate for the two methods of vascular management. Vessels were resected with the tumor in seven patients and preserved and rotated in nine patients. One amputation occurred in the group in which the vessels were preserved. Four patients died secondary to metastatic disease diagnosed preoperatively. The most recent ankle brachial indices were 0.96 and 0.82 for the posterior tibial and dorsalis pedis arteries, respectively, in the reconstructed group. The ankle brachial indices were 0.98 and 0.96 for the posterior tibial and dorsalis pedis arteries, respectively, in the rotated group. Outcomes appear similar using both methods of vascular management and one should not hesitate to perform an en bloc resection when there is a question of vascular involvement.

  19. Endothelial monolayer permeability under controlled oxygen tension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funamoto, Kenichi; Yoshino, Daisuke; Matsubara, Kento; Zervantonakis, Ioannis K; Funamoto, Kiyoe; Nakayama, Masafumi; Masamune, Jun; Kimura, Yoshitaka; Kamm, Roger D

    2017-06-19

    Endothelial permeability has been extensively investigated in the context of pathologies such as cancer and also in studies of drug delivery from the circulation. Hypoxia is a critical regulator of endothelial cell (EC) behavior and affects the barrier function of endothelial linings, yet its role has been little studied. This paper reveals the effect of hypoxia on the permeability of an EC monolayer by cellular experiments using a microfluidic device and a conventional cell culture dish. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were seeded into one microfluidic channel, creating an EC monolayer on each vertical surface of a collagen gel confined to a central chamber. Oxygen tension was regulated to produce normoxic (21% O2) or hypoxic (3% O2) conditions by the supply of gas mixtures of oxygen, carbon dioxide, and nitrogen at predefined ratios into channels fabricated into the device. Permeability of the EC monolayer quantified by analyzing diffusion of fluorescence-labelled dextrans into the collagen gel increases with barrier function loss by 6 hour hypoxic exposure, showing 11-fold and 4-fold increases for 70 kDa and 10 kDa dextrans, respectively, on average. Consistent with this, subsequent immunofluorescent staining and separate western blot analysis of HUVECs on a culture dish demonstrate loose cell-cell adhesion resulting from internalization of VE-cadherin under hypoxia. Thus, hypoxic stress increases endothelial permeability by altering cell-cell junction integrity.

  20. Pump and treat in low permeability media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mackay, D.M. [Univ. of Waterloo, Ontario (Canada)

    1996-08-01

    Pump and Treat (P&T) is a commonly applied technology whose primary promise for the low permeability environments of interest to these technology reviews is almost certainly containment of the problem. Conventional P&T would be expected to offer little promise of complete restoration in such environments, unless very long time frames (decades or centuries) are considered. A variety of approaches have been proposed to enhance the efficiency of P&T; some appear to offer little promise in low or mixed permeability environments, while others may offer more promise (e.g. hydro- or pneumatic-fracturing, which are described elsewhere in this document, and application of vacuum to the extraction well(s), which is a proprietary technology whose promise is currently difficult to assess objectively). Understanding the potential advantages and means of optimizing these enhancement approaches requires more understanding of the basic processes limiting P&T performance in low or mixed permeability media. These efforts are probably also necessary to understand the advantages and means of optimizing many of the very different remedial technologies that may be applicable to low or mixed permeability environments. Finally, since a reasonably certain capability of P&T is containment (i.e. prevention of further migration of contaminants), P&T may generally be required as a sort of safety net around sites at which the alternative technologies are being tested or applied. 23 refs.

  1. Variability of permeability with diameter of conduit

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    If the velocity changes followed a parabolic profile across a unit cross-sectional area, it is reasonable to think that the permeability k, of the porous medium should follow the same parabolic profile, i.e. the value should not be linear across the cross- section. If a porous system is conceived to be a bundle of capillary tubes of ...

  2. Magnetic levitation induced by negative permeability

    OpenAIRE

    Rangelov, A. A.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we study the interaction between a point magnetic dipole and a semi-infinite metamaterial using the method of images. We obtain analytical expressions for the levitation force for an arbitrarily oriented dipole. Surprisingly the maximal levitation force for negative permeability is found to be stronger compared to the case when the dipole is above a superconductor.

  3. Cadmium substituted high permeability lithium ferrite

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    action becomes weaker than the B–B interaction. This disturbs the parallel arrangement of spin magnetic moments on B-site paving way for canted spins. Zn2+ and Cd2+ substituted ferrites have showed similar type of canting behaviour above a certain limit of their contents. The compositional variation of initial permeability.

  4. Permeable pavement research – Edison, New Jersey

    Science.gov (United States)

    These are the slides for the New York City Concrete Promotional Council Pervious Concrete Seminar presentation. The basis for the project, the monitoring design and some preliminary monitoring data from the permeable pavement parking lot at the Edison Environmental Center are pre...

  5. Altered membrane permeability in multidrug resistant Escherichia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PRECIOUS

    2009-11-02

    Nov 2, 2009 ... Key words: Outer membrane proteins, porins, Escherichia coli, multidrug resistance, extra-intestinal, extended spectrum β-Lactamase (ESBL). INTRODUCTION. Membrane permeability is the first step involved in resis- tance of bacteria to an antibiotic. The outer membrane proteins that constitute porins play ...

  6. Renal posttransplant's vascular complications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bašić Dragoslav

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION Despite high graft and recipient survival figures worldwide today, a variety of technical complications can threaten the transplant in the postoperative period. Vascular complications are commonly related to technical problems in establishing vascular continuity or to damage that occurs during donor nephrectomy or preservation [13]. AIM The aim of the presenting study is to evaluate counts and rates of vascular complications after renal transplantation and to compare the outcome by donor type. MATERIAL AND METHODS A total of 463 kidneys (319 from living related donor LD and 144 from cadaveric donor - CD were transplanted during the period between June 1975 and December 1998 at the Urology & Nephrology Institute of Clinical Centre of Serbia in Belgrade. Average recipients' age was 33.7 years (15-54 in LD group and 39.8 (19-62 in CD group. Retrospectively, we analyzed medical records of all recipients. Statistical analysis is estimated using Hi-squared test and Fischer's test of exact probability. RESULTS Major vascular complications including vascular anastomosis thrombosis, internal iliac artery stenosis, internal iliac artery rupture obliterant vasculitis and external iliac vein rupture were analyzed. In 25 recipients (5.4% some of major vascular complications were detected. Among these cases, 22 of them were from CD group vs. three from LD group. Relative rate of these complications was higher in CD group vs. LD group (p<0.0001. Among these complications dominant one was vascular anastomosis thrombosis which occurred in 18 recipients (17 from CD vs. one from LD. Of these recipients 16 from CD lost the graft, while the rest of two (one from each group had lethal outcome. DISCUSSION Thrombosis of renal allograft vascular anastomosis site is the most severe complication following renal transplantation. In the literature, renal allograft thrombosis is reported with different incidence rates, from 0.5-4% [14, 15, 16]. Data from the

  7. GHz permeability of sprayed NiZn ferrite films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Acher, O. [CEA Le Ripault, BP 16 F-37260 Monts (France)]. E-mail: olivier.acher@cea.fr; Ledieu, M. [CEA Le Ripault, BP 16 F-37260 Monts (France); Abe, M. [Department of Physical Electronics, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Tokyo 152-8552 (Japan); Tada, M. [Department of Physical Electronics, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Tokyo 152-8552 (Japan); Matsushita, N. [Department of Materials and Structures Laboratory, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 4259 Nagatsuta-cho, Midori-ku, Yokohama 226-8503 (Japan); Yoshimura, M. [Department of Materials and Structures Laboratory, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 4259 Nagatsuta-cho, Midori-ku, Yokohama 226-8503 (Japan); Kondo, K. [NEC-Tokin Corporation, 6-7-1 Koriyama, Taihaku-ku, Sendai 982-8510 (Japan)

    2007-03-15

    The high-frequency permeability of NiZn ferrite films prepared by roll spray ferrite plating is investigated. Significant magnetoelastic effects are observed. The permeability is nearly isotropic in film plane, and Bouchaud-Zerah effective medium model for the permeability seems to give a fair account of the permeability spectra. According to this model, the isotropic in-plane complex permeability is the square root of the hard axis gyromagnetic permeability of a thin film with uniform magnetization, which is easily expressed through Landau-Gilbert formulation.

  8. Vascular manifestations of Behcet's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Regina Georgiyeva Goloeva

    2010-01-01

    Conclusion. Vascular disorders in BD were diagnosed in one fourth of the patients, mainly in young male patients. Severe thromboses with the development of chronic venous insignificance, Budd-Chiari syndrome, pulmonary and iliac artery aneurysms, and arterial thromboses were observed in male patients only. Vascular events were associated with erythema nodosum and epididymitis; in these concomitances, the vascular risk was substantially increased. Vascular death rates were 2,2%.

  9. Engineering vascularized skeletal muscle tissue

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Levenberg, Shulamit; Rouwkema, Jeroen; Macdonald, Mara; Garfein, Evan S.; Kohane, Daniel S.; Darland, Diane C.; Marini, Robert; van Blitterswijk, Clemens; Mulligan, Richard C.; D'Amore, Patricia A.; Langer, Robert

    2005-01-01

    One of the major obstacles in engineering thick, complex tissues such as muscle is the need to vascularize the tissue in vitro. Vascularization in vitro could maintain cell viability during tissue growth, induce structural organization and promote vascularization upon implantation. Here we describe

  10. Iron oxide nanoparticles induce human microvascular endothelial cell permeability through reactive oxygen species production and microtubule remodeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shi Xianglin

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Engineered iron nanoparticles are being explored for the development of biomedical applications and many other industry purposes. However, to date little is known concerning the precise mechanisms of translocation of iron nanoparticles into targeted tissues and organs from blood circulation, as well as the underlying implications of potential harmful health effects in human. Results The confocal microscopy imaging analysis demonstrates that exposure to engineered iron nanoparticles induces an increase in cell permeability in human microvascular endothelial cells. Our studies further reveal iron nanoparticles enhance the permeability through the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS and the stabilization of microtubules. We also showed Akt/GSK-3β signaling pathways are involved in iron nanoparticle-induced cell permeability. The inhibition of ROS demonstrate ROS play a major role in regulating Akt/GSK-3β – mediated cell permeability upon iron nanoparticle exposure. These results provide new insights into the bioreactivity of engineered iron nanoparticles which can inform potential applications in medical imaging or drug delivery. Conclusion Our results indicate that exposure to iron nanoparticles induces an increase in endothelial cell permeability through ROS oxidative stress-modulated microtubule remodeling. The findings from this study provide new understandings on the effects of nanoparticles on vascular transport of macromolecules and drugs.

  11. Possible mechanisms for the inhibitory effect of Ruscus extract on increased microvascular permeability induced by histamine in hamster cheek pouch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouskela, E; Cyrino, F Z; Marcelon, G

    1994-08-01

    Extract of Ruscus aculeatus is used in treatment of venous insufficiency. In the present study, we used the hamster cheek pouch preparation and investigated in vivo the effects of an alpha 1 and alpha 2 adrenoceptor antagonists, a calcium blocker, Ruscus extract, and their combination on increased microvascular permeability induced by histamine. Experiments were performed on male hamsters; 30 min after completion of the cheek pouch preparation, fluorescein-labeled dextran (molecular weight 150,000) was given intravenously (i.v.). Histamine, applied topically, increased the number of fluorescent vascular leakage sites from postcapillary venules, evidence of an increase in macromolecular permeability, which was quantified by ultraviolet light microscopy as the number of leaky sites in the prepared area. Prazosin (alpha 1-adrenoceptor antagonist), diltiazem (calcium blocker), and Ruscus extract applied topically dose-dependently inhibited the macromolecular permeability-increasing effect of histamine. Rauwolscine (alpha 2-adrenoceptor antagonist), also applied topically, had no effect on histamine-induced permeability increase. Inhibition of the histamine-induced permeability increase evoked by Ruscus extract could be blocked by prazosin and by diltiazem but not by rauwolscine. These results indicate that any variation in the transmembrane flux of calcium impairs formation of microvascular leaky sites by histamine. Our results show that Ruscus extract has a protective effect against the leakage of FITC-dextran in hamster cheek pouch after administration of histamine that is modulated by calcium and selectively by alpha 1-adrenoceptors.

  12. Vascular permeability-increasing effect of the leaf essential oil of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Persistent microvascular hyperpermeability to plasma proteins is a characteristic feature of normal wound healing. Does the leaf essential oil of Ocimum gratissimum heal wounds by promoting this feature? Evan\\'s blue dye (20mg/kg body weight) in normal saline was administered intravenously through marginal ear vein of ...

  13. Endothelial glycocalyx shedding and vascular permeability in severely injured trauma patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rahbar, Elaheh; Cardenas, Jessica C; Baimukanova, Gyulnar

    2015-01-01

    of trauma patients. METHODS: Plasma samples were collected from 5 healthy consented volunteers and 22 severely injured trauma patients upon admission to the emergency department. ELISA assays were performed to quantify shed HA, HS, CS and syndecan-1 in plasma. A colloid osmometer and Electric Cell......-parametric statistical tests were used to compare differences between groups. RESULTS: We observed increased shedding of all four proteins in trauma patient plasma compared to healthy controls: 31.7 vs. 21.2 U/L of CS, 175.8 vs. 121.9 ng/ml of HS, 946.7 vs. 618.6 ng/ml of HA and 245.8 vs. 31.6 ng/ml of syndecan-1 (all p...... generation of less than 250 nM on average (ptrauma patients compared to healthy controls in this cohort. However, only syndecan-1 and HA shedding were significantly higher in patients with reduced plasma COP. Thrombin generation was impaired...

  14. Nlrp3 prevents early renal interstitial edema and vascular permeability in unilateral ureteral obstruction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pulskens, Wilco P.; Butter, Loes M.; Teske, Gwendoline J.; Claessen, Nike; Dessing, Mark C.; Flavell, Richard A.; Sutterwala, Fayyaz S.; Florquin, Sandrine; Leemans, Jaklien C.

    2014-01-01

    Progressive renal disease is characterized by tubulo-interstitial injury with ongoing inflammation and fibrosis. The Nlrp3 inflammasome contributes to these pathophysiological processes through its canonical effects in cytokine maturation. Nlrp3 may additionally exert inflammasome-independent

  15. The Vascular Depression Hypothesis: Mechanisms Linking Vascular Disease with Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Warren D.; Aizenstein, Howard J.; Alexopoulos, George S.

    2013-01-01

    The ‘Vascular Depression’ hypothesis posits that cerebrovascular disease may predispose, precipitate, or perpetuate some geriatric depressive syndromes. This hypothesis stimulated much research that has improved our understanding of the complex relationships between late-life depression (LLD), vascular risk factors, and cognition. Succinctly, there are well-established relationships between late-life depression, vascular risk factors, and cerebral hyperintensities, the radiological hallmark of vascular depression. Cognitive dysfunction is common in late-life depression, particularly executive dysfunction, a finding predictive of poor antidepressant response. Over time, progression of hyperintensities and cognitive deficits predicts a poor course of depression and may reflect underlying worsening of vascular disease. This work laid the foundation for examining the mechanisms by which vascular disease influences brain circuits and influences the development and course of depression. We review data testing the vascular depression hypothesis with a focus on identifying potential underlying vascular mechanisms. We propose a disconnection hypothesis, wherein focal vascular damage and white matter lesion location is a crucial factor influencing neural connectivity that contributes to clinical symptomatology. We also propose inflammatory and hypoperfusion hypotheses, concepts that link underlying vascular processes with adverse effects on brain function that influence the development of depression. Testing such hypotheses will not only inform the relationship between vascular disease and depression but also provide guidance on the potential repurposing of pharmacological agents that may improve late-life depression outcomes. PMID:23439482

  16. Investigation clogging dynamic of permeable pavement systems using embedded sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Permeable pavement is a stormwater control measure commonly selected in both new and retrofit applications. However, there is limited information about the clogging mechanism of these systems that effects the infiltration. A permeable pavement site located at the Seitz Elementary...

  17. Permeability-porosity relationships in sedimentary rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Philip H.

    1994-01-01

    In many consolidated sandstone and carbonate formations, plots of core data show that the logarithm of permeability (k) is often linearly proportional to porosity (??). The slope, intercept, and degree of scatter of these log(k)-?? trends vary from formation to formation, and these variations are attributed to differences in initial grain size and sorting, diagenetic history, and compaction history. In unconsolidated sands, better sorting systematically increases both permeability and porosity. In sands and sandstones, an increase in gravel and coarse grain size content causes k to increase even while decreasing ??. Diagenetic minerals in the pore space of sandstones, such as cement and some clay types, tend to decrease log(k) proportionately as ?? decreases. Models to predict permeability from porosity and other measurable rock parameters fall into three classes based on either grain, surface area, or pore dimension considerations. (Models that directly incorporate well log measurements but have no particular theoretical underpinnings from a fourth class.) Grain-based models show permeability proportional to the square of grain size times porosity raised to (roughly) the fifth power, with grain sorting as an additional parameter. Surface-area models show permeability proportional to the inverse square of pore surface area times porosity raised to (roughly) the fourth power; measures of surface area include irreducible water saturation and nuclear magnetic resonance. Pore-dimension models show permeability proportional to the square of a pore dimension times porosity raised to a power of (roughly) two and produce curves of constant pore size that transgress the linear data trends on a log(k)-?? plot. The pore dimension is obtained from mercury injection measurements and is interpreted as the pore opening size of some interconnected fraction of the pore system. The linear log(k)-?? data trends cut the curves of constant pore size from the pore-dimension models

  18. The role of vascular endothelial growth factor in inflammatory processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewa Koczy-Baron

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF is produced by different types of cells and has a major role in both, physiological and pathological angiogenesis. On the one hand VEGF is a strong mitotic and chemotactic factor for the endothelial cells, stimulating thus formation of new vessels, while on the other, it enhances the vascular endothelium permeability of the existing blood vessels which contributes to development and persistence of the inflammatory conditions. In the latter its activity is by 50 000 times higher than that of histamine. VEGF facilitates formation of oedema and leukocyte migration from the circulation to the site of inflammation. VEGF is also important in remodeling of the extracellular matrix. Moreover, it has an important significance in regulation of the immunological response, therefore plays a role in autoaggressive phenomena as well as immediate- and delayed-type hypersensitivity. Its role in the pathogenesis of immunological and inflammatory diseases, including allergy, asthma and different skin disorders has been indicated.

  19. Brain Vascular Imaging Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bàrbara Laviña

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Recent major improvements in a number of imaging techniques now allow for the study of the brain in ways that could not be considered previously. Researchers today have well-developed tools to specifically examine the dynamic nature of the blood vessels in the brain during development and adulthood; as well as to observe the vascular responses in disease situations in vivo. This review offers a concise summary and brief historical reference of different imaging techniques and how these tools can be applied to study the brain vasculature and the blood-brain barrier integrity in both healthy and disease states. Moreover, it offers an overview on available transgenic animal models to study vascular biology and a description of useful online brain atlases.

  20. Plant Vascular Biology 2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ding, Biao

    2014-11-17

    This grant supported the Second International Conference on Plant Vascular Biology (PVB 2010) held July 24-28, 2010 on the campus of Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio. Biao Ding (Ohio State University; OSU) and David Hannapel (Iowa State University; ISU) served as co-chairs of this conference. Biao Ding served as the local organizer. PVB is defined broadly here to include studies on the biogenesis, structure and function of transport systems in plants, under conditions of normal plant growth and development as well as of plant interactions with pathogens. The transport systems cover broadly the xylem, phloem, plasmodesmata and vascular cell membranes. The PVB concept has emerged in recent years to emphasize the integrative nature of the transport systems and approaches to investigate them.

  1. Pathophysiology of vascular dementia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rizzo Claudia

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The concept of Vascular Dementia (VaD has been recognized for over a century, but its definition and diagnostic criteria remain unclear. Conventional definitions identify the patients too late, miss subjects with cognitive impairment short of dementia, and emphasize consequences rather than causes, the true bases for treatment and prevention. We should throw out current diagnostic categories and describe cognitive impairment clinically and according to commonly agreed instruments that document the demographic data in a standardized manner and undertake a systematic effort to identify the underlying aetiology in each case. Increased effort should be targeted towards the concept of and criteria for Vascular Cognitive Impairment and Post-Stroke Dementia as well as for genetic factors involved, especially as these categories hold promise for early prevention and treatment.

  2. Vascular cognitive impairment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.V. Vakhnina

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Vascular pathology of the brain is the second most common cause of cognitive impairment after Alzheimer's disease. The article describes the modern concepts of etiology, pathogenetic mechanisms, clinical features and approaches to diagnosis and therapy of vascular cognitive impairment (VCI. Cerebrovascular accident, chronic cerebral circulatory insufficiency and their combination, sometimes in combination with a concomitant neurodegenerative process, are shown to be the major types of brain lesions leading to VCI. The clinical presentation of VCI is characterized by the neuropsychological status dominated by impairment of the executive frontal functions (planning, control, attention in combination with focal neurological symptoms. The diagnosis is based on comparing of the revealed neuropsychological and neurological features with neuroimaging data. Neurometabolic, acetylcholinergic, glutamatergic, and other vasoactive drugs and non-pharmacological methods are widely used to treat VCI. 

  3. A step towards characterisation of electrophysiological profile of torsadogenic drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Champeroux, Pascal; Ouillé, Aude; Martel, Eric; Fowler, John Sinclair Lawrence; Maurin, Anne; Richard, Serge; Le Guennec, Jean-Yves

    2011-01-01

    In a previous study, two electrophysiological patterns for torsadogenic drugs were characterised in the model of isolated canine Purkinje fibres from their respective effects on action potential. This study was designed to elucidate the possible mechanisms underlying these two electrophysiological profiles. Effects of representative torsadogenic agents and non torsadogenic drugs on I(Kr), I(Ks), I(K1), I(Na) and I(CaL) were studied in transfected HEK 293 cells using the path-clamp method as well as in conscious beagle dogs and cynomolgus monkeys by telemetry. Patch-clamp studies confirmed that torsadogenic molecules could be discriminated into at least two subgroups. The first subgroup can be defined as apparently pure I(Kr) blockers. The second subgroup can be defined as I(Kr) blockers with ancillary properties on sodium and/or calcium channels which counterbalance the I(Kr) prolongation component. This discrimination is transposable to the telemetered cynomolgus monkey model in terms of QT prolongation but not to the telemetered beagle dog model. This latter inter-species difference could be related to the sympathetic/parasympathetic balance and could involve reserve repolarisation dependent mechanisms. The confirmation that torsadogenic drugs might have at least two different electrophysiological profiles should be taken into consideration in preclinical safety pharmacology studies because it increases the value of the cynomolgus monkey model in two particular situations: firstly when an NCE causes sympathetic activation and secondly, when an NCE exhibits a pure I(Kr) blocker pattern independently of its potency to block HERG channels. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Pathophysiology of vascular dementia

    OpenAIRE

    Rizzo Claudia; Duro Giovanni; Iemolo Francesco; Castiglia Laura; Hachinski Vladimir; Caruso Calogero

    2009-01-01

    Abstract The concept of Vascular Dementia (VaD) has been recognized for over a century, but its definition and diagnostic criteria remain unclear. Conventional definitions identify the patients too late, miss subjects with cognitive impairment short of dementia, and emphasize consequences rather than causes, the true bases for treatment and prevention. We should throw out current diagnostic categories and describe cognitive impairment clinically and according to commonly agreed instruments th...

  5. Letters rhyme: electrophysiological evidence from children and adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coch, Donna; Mitra, Priya; George, Elyse; Berger, Natalie

    2011-01-01

    Event-related potentials (ERPs) and behavioral accuracy judgments were recorded in a letter name rhyming paradigm (e.g., A-J versus A-B) with 6- to 8-year-old beginning readers and adults. A typical N450 rhyming effect was evident for both children and adults, with few differences in mean amplitude or peak latency between groups. The size and timing of the electrophysiological effect were not correlated with standardized measures of phonological or reading ability, but accuracy in the ERP task was. Single letters elicit a similar ERP rhyming effect in young children and adults, suggesting the early establishment of neurocognitive systems used in the rhyme task.

  6. High throughput electrophysiology: new perspectives for ion channel drug discovery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willumsen, Niels J; Bech, Morten; Olesen, Søren-Peter

    2003-01-01

    Proper function of ion channels is crucial for all living cells. Ion channel dysfunction may lead to a number of diseases, so-called channelopathies, and a number of common diseases, including epilepsy, arrhythmia, and type II diabetes, are primarily treated by drugs that modulate ion channels...... channel targets accessible for drug screening. Specifically, genuine HTS parallel processing techniques based on arrays of planar silicon chips are being developed, but also lower throughput sequential techniques may be of value in compound screening, lead optimization, and safety screening....... The introduction of new powerful HTS electrophysiological techniques is predicted to cause a revolution in ion channel drug discovery....

  7. Electrophysiological Basis of Fecal Incontinence and Its Implications for Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    The majority of patients with neuropathic incontinence and other pelvic floor conditions associated with straining at stool have damage to the pudendal nerves distal to the ischial spine. Sacral nerve stimulation appears to be a promising innovation and has been widely adopted and currently considered the standard of care for adults with moderate to severe fecal incontinence and following failed sphincter repair. From a decision-to-treat perspective, the short-term efficacy is good (70%–80%), but the long-term efficacy of sacral nerve stimulation is around 50%. Newer electrophysiological tests and improved anal endosonography would more effectively guide clinical decision making. PMID:29159162

  8. Fourier and electrophysiological analyses of acoustic communication in Acheta domesticus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Counter, S A

    1976-01-01

    Waveform and spectral analysis were made on the call song of the cricket, Acheta domesticus.Sounds produced by unrestrained male crickets were led directly to a computer where discrete Fourier transforms were performed on selected segments of the call song. The findings revealed essentially pure tone carrier frequencies which result from the rate at which the individual teeth of the pars stridens are struck by the plectrum. An electrophysiologically determined audiogram showed good agreement with the dominant frequency of the call song, but was less sensitive and more broadly tuned than hearing curves of most field-crickets.

  9. Pulmonary vascular imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fedullo, P.F.; Shure, D.

    1987-03-01

    A wide range of pulmonary vascular imaging techniques are available for the diagnostic evaluation of patients with suspected pulmonary vascular disease. The characteristics of any ideal technique would include high sensitivity and specificity, safety, simplicity, and sequential applicability. To date, no single technique meets these ideal characteristics. Conventional pulmonary angiography remains the gold standard for the diagnosis of acute thromboembolic disease despite the introduction of newer techniques such as digital subtraction angiography and magnetic resonance imaging. Improved noninvasive lower extremity venous testing methods, particularly impedance plethysmography, and ventilation-perfusion scanning can play significant roles in the noninvasive diagnosis of acute pulmonary emboli when properly applied. Ventilation-perfusion scanning may also be useful as a screening test to differentiate possible primary pulmonary hypertension from chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension. And, finally, angioscopy may be a useful adjunctive technique to detect chronic thromboembolic disease and determine operability. Optimal clinical decision-making, however, will continue to require the proper interpretation of adjunctive information obtained from the less-invasive techniques, applied with an understanding of the natural history of the various forms of pulmonary vascular disease and with a knowledge of the capabilities and shortcomings of the individual techniques.

  10. Update on Vascular Dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Ayesha; Kalaria, Raj N; Corbett, Anne; Ballard, Clive

    2016-09-01

    Vascular dementia (VaD) is a major contributor to the dementia syndrome and is described as having problems with reasoning, planning, judgment, and memory caused by impaired blood flow to the brain and damage to the blood vessels resulting from events such as stroke. There are a variety of etiologies that contribute to the development of vascular cognitive impairment and VaD, and these are often associated with other dementia-related pathologies such as Alzheimer disease. The diagnosis of VaD is difficult due to the number and types of lesions and their locations in the brain. Factors that increase the risk of vascular diseases such as stroke, high blood pressure, high cholesterol, and smoking also raise the risk of VaD. Therefore, controlling these risk factors can help lower the chances of developing VaD. This update describes the subtypes of VaD, with details of their complex presentation, associated pathological lesions, and issues with diagnosis, prevention, and treatment. © The Author(s) 2016.

  11. 21 CFR 886.5916 - Rigid gas permeable contact lens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Rigid gas permeable contact lens. 886.5916 Section 886.5916 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 886.5916 Rigid gas permeable contact lens. (a) Identification. A rigid gas permeable...

  12. Long-term Metal Performance of Three Permeable Pavements

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA constructed a 4,000-m2 parking lot surfaced with three permeable pavements (permeable interlocking concrete pavers, pervious concrete, and porous asphalt) on the Edison Environmental Center in Edison, NJ in 2009. Samples from each permeable pavement infiltrate were collected...

  13. Vascular Cognitive Impairment through the Looking Glass of Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Lanza

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In the last years, there has been a significant growth in the literature exploiting transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS with the aim at gaining further insights into the electrophysiological and neurochemical basis underlying vascular cognitive impairment (VCI. Overall, TMS points at enhanced brain cortical excitability and synaptic plasticity in VCI, especially in patients with overt dementia, and neurophysiological changes seem to correlate with disease process and progress. These findings have been interpreted as part of a glutamate-mediated compensatory effect in response to vascular lesions. Although a single TMS parameter owns low specificity, a panel of measures can support the VCI diagnosis, predict progression, and possibly identify early markers of “brain at risk” for future dementia, thus making VCI a potentially preventable cause of both vascular and degenerative dementia in late life. Moreover, TMS can be also exploited to select and evaluate the responders to specific drugs, as well as to become an innovative rehabilitative tool in the attempt to restore impaired neural plasticity. The present review provides a perspective of the different TMS techniques by further understanding the cortical electrophysiology and the role of distinctive neurotransmission pathways and networks involved in the pathogenesis and pathophysiology of VCI and its subtypes.

  14. Permittivity and permeability tensors for cloaking applications

    CERN Document Server

    Choudhury, Balamati; Jha, Rakesh Mohan

    2016-01-01

    This book is focused on derivations of analytical expressions for stealth and cloaking applications. An optimal version of electromagnetic (EM) stealth is the design of invisibility cloak of arbitrary shapes in which the EM waves can be controlled within the cloaking shell by introducing a prescribed spatial variation in the constitutive parameters. The promising challenge in design of invisibility cloaks lies in the determination of permittivity and permeability tensors for all the layers. This book provides the detailed derivation of analytical expressions of the permittivity and permeability tensors for various quadric surfaces within the eleven Eisenhart co-ordinate systems. These include the cylinders and the surfaces of revolutions. The analytical modeling and spatial metric for each of these surfaces are provided along with their tensors. This mathematical formulation will help the EM designers to analyze and design of various quadratics and their hybrids, which can eventually lead to design of cloakin...

  15. Anisotropic permeability in deterministic lateral displacement arrays

    CERN Document Server

    Vernekar, Rohan; Loutherback, Kevin; Morton, Keith; Inglis, David

    2016-01-01

    We investigate anisotropic permeability of microfluidic deterministic lateral displacement (DLD) arrays. A DLD array can achieve high-resolution bimodal size-based separation of micro-particles, including bioparticles such as cells. Correct operation requires that the fluid flow remains at a fixed angle with respect to the periodic obstacle array. We show via experiments and lattice-Boltzmann simulations that subtle array design features cause anisotropic permeability. The anisotropy, which indicates the array's intrinsic tendency to induce an undesired lateral pressure gradient, can lead to off-axis flows and therefore local changes in the critical separation size. Thus, particle trajectories can become unpredictable and the device useless for the desired separation duty. We show that for circular posts the rotated-square layout, unlike the parallelogram layout, does not suffer from anisotropy and is the preferred geometry. Furthermore, anisotropy becomes severe for arrays with unequal axial and lateral gaps...

  16. Sialic acids regulate microvessel permeability, revealed by novel in vivo studies of endothelial glycocalyx structure and function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betteridge, Kai B.; Arkill, Kenton P.; Neal, Christopher R.; Harper, Steven J.; Foster, Rebecca R.; Satchell, Simon C.; Bates, David O.

    2017-01-01

    Key points We have developed novel techniques for paired, direct, real‐time in vivo quantification of endothelial glycocalyx structure and associated microvessel permeability.Commonly used imaging and analysis techniques yield measurements of endothelial glycocalyx depth that vary by over an order of magnitude within the same vessel.The anatomical distance between maximal glycocalyx label and maximal endothelial cell plasma membrane label provides the most sensitive and reliable measure of endothelial glycocalyx depth.Sialic acid residues of the endothelial glycocalyx regulate glycocalyx structure and microvessel permeability to both water and albumin. Abstract The endothelial glycocalyx forms a continuous coat over the luminal surface of all vessels, and regulates multiple vascular functions. The contribution of individual components of the endothelial glycocalyx to one critical vascular function, microvascular permeability, remains unclear. We developed novel, real‐time, paired methodologies to study the contribution of sialic acids within the endothelial glycocalyx to the structural and functional permeability properties of the same microvessel in vivo. Single perfused rat mesenteric microvessels were perfused with fluorescent endothelial cell membrane and glycocalyx labels, and imaged with confocal microscopy. A broad range of glycocalyx depth measurements (0.17–3.02 μm) were obtained with different labels, imaging techniques and analysis methods. The distance between peak cell membrane and peak glycocalyx label provided the most reliable measure of endothelial glycocalyx anatomy, correlating with paired, numerically smaller values of endothelial glycocalyx depth (0.078 ± 0.016 μm) from electron micrographs of the same portion of the same vessel. Disruption of sialic acid residues within the endothelial glycocalyx using neuraminidase perfusion decreased endothelial glycocalyx depth and increased apparent solute permeability to albumin in the same

  17. A Reconciliation of Packed Column Permeability Data: Column Permeability as a Function of Particle Porosity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hubert M. Quinn

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In his textbook teaching of packed bed permeability, Georges Guiochon uses mobile phase velocity as the fluid velocity term in his elaboration of the Darcy permeability equation. Although this velocity frame makes a lot of sense from a thermodynamic point of view, it is valid only with respect to permeability at a single theoretical boundary condition. In his more recent writings, however, Guiochon has departed from his long-standing mode of discussing permeability in terms of the Darcy equation and has embraced the well-known Kozeny-Blake equation. In this paper, his teaching pertaining to the constant in the Kozeny-Blake equation is examined and, as a result, a new correlation coefficient is identified and defined herein based on the velocity frame used in his teaching. This coefficient correlates pressure drop and fluid velocity as a function of particle porosity. We show that in their experimental protocols, Guiochon et al. have not adhered to a strict material balance of permeability which creates a mismatch of particle porosity and leads to erroneous conclusions regarding the value of the permeability coefficient in the Kozeny-Blake equation. By correcting the experimental data to properly reflect particle porosity we reconcile the experimental results of Guiochon and Giddings, resulting in a permeability reference chart which is presented here for the first time. This reference chart demonstrates that Guiochon’s experimental data, when properly normalized for particle porosity and other related discrepancies, corroborates the value of 267 for the constant in the Kozeny-Blake equation which was derived by Giddings in 1965.

  18. Small intestinal permeability in dermatological disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, I; Fairris, G M; Rothwell, J; Cunliffe, W J; Dixon, M F; Axon, A T

    1985-09-01

    Passive small intestinal permeability was investigated in 62 patients with atopic eczema, 29 with psoriasis and 18 with dermatitis herpetiformis, using the cellobiose/mannitol differential sugar absorption test. Urinary recovery of cellobiose and mannitol in patients with both psoriasis and eczema were similar to values in a control population, and were not affected by the extent or activity of skin disease. The cellobiose/mannitol recovery ratio was abnormally high in seven patients with eczema, six of whom underwent jejunal biopsy. Jejunal mucosal morphology was normal in five, and one patient was found to have coeliac disease. Cellobiose/mannitol recovery ratio was also abnormal in seven patients with psoriasis, and in 11 with dermatitis herpetiformis, seven of whom had a normal jejunal biopsy. These findings demonstrate that the passive permeability of the small intestine is normal in the majority of patients with atopic eczema and psoriasis. Increased absorption of macromolecules from the gut lumen cannot be ascribed to defective intestinal integrity, and is unlikely to be relevant to the pathogenesis of eczema. Abnormal intestinal permeability may be a more sensitive manifestation of gluten-sensitive enteropathy than jejunal biopsy in dermatitis herpetiformis.

  19. Permeability of different size waste particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabina Gavelytė

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The world and life style is changing, but the most popular disposal route for waste is landfill globally until now. We have to think about waste prevention and preparing for re-use or recycling firstly, according to the waste disposal hierarchy. Disposed waste to the landfill must be the last opportunity. In a landfill, during waste degradation processes leachate is formed that can potentially cause clogging of bottom drainage layers. To ensure stability of a landfill construction, the physical properties of its components have to be controlled. The hydrology of precipitation, evaporation, runoff and the hydraulic performance of the capping and liner materials are important controls of the moisture content. The water balance depends also on the waste characteristics and waste particle size distribution. The aim of this paper is to determine the hydraulic permeability in a landfill depending on the particle size distribution of municipal solid waste disposed. The lab experiment results were compared with the results calculated with DEGAS model. Samples were taken from a landfill operated for five years. The samples particle sizes are: >100 mm, 80 mm, 60 mm, 40 mm, 20 mm, 0.01 mm and <0.01 mm. The permeability test was conducted using the column test. The paper presents the results of experiment and DEGAS model water permeability with waste particle size.

  20. In vivo human buccal permeability of nicotine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adrian, Charlotte L; Olin, Helle B D; Dalhoff, Kim

    2006-01-01

    -smokers using a buccal perfusion cell. The disappearance of nicotine from perfusion solutions with pH 6.0, 7.4, and 8.1 was studied for 3h. The apparent permeability of nicotine (P(app)) was determined at each pH value. Parotid saliva was collected in an attempt to assess systemic levels of nicotine......(app) values and non-ionised nicotine, which indicates that the nicotine transfer occurred by means of passive diffusion. P(app) values of 0.60 x 10(-4) and 6.18 x 10(-4)cms(-1) were obtained for the mono-protonated and non-ionised species of nicotine, respectively. The analysis of the parotid saliva samples...... indicated that these samples might be useful in the assessment of systemic absorption of nicotine. Previous buccal in vitro models underestimated the in vivo human permeability of nicotine. However, the in vitro models were capable of predicting the effect of pH on the nicotine permeability....

  1. Extra permeability is required to model dynamic oxygen measurements: evidence for functional recruitment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, Matthew J P; Suresh, Vinod

    2013-09-01

    Neural activation triggers a rapid, focal increase in blood flow and thus oxygen delivery. Local oxygen consumption also increases, although not to the same extent as oxygen delivery. This 'uncoupling' enables a number of widely-used functional neuroimaging techniques; however, the physiologic mechanisms that govern oxygen transport under these conditions remain unclear. Here, we explore this dynamic process using a new mathematical model. Motivated by experimental observations and previous modeling, we hypothesized that functional recruitment of capillaries has an important role during neural activation. Using conventional mechanisms alone, the model predictions were inconsistent with in vivo measurements of oxygen partial pressure. However, dynamically increasing net capillary permeability, a simple description of functional recruitment, led to predictions consistent with the data. Increasing permeability in all vessel types had the same effect, but two alternative mechanisms were unable to produce predictions consistent with the data. These results are further evidence that conventional models of oxygen transport are not sufficient to predict dynamic experimental data. The data and modeling suggest that it is necessary to include a mechanism that dynamically increases net vascular permeability. While the model cannot distinguish between the different possibilities, we speculate that functional recruitment could have this effect in vivo.

  2. Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor from Embryonic Status to Cardiovascular Pathology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohsen Azimi-Nezhad

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF is a multifunctional cytokine with distinct functions in angiogenesis, lymphangiogenesis, vascular permeability, and hematopoiesis. VEGF is a highly conserved, disulfide-bonded dimeric glycoprotein of 34 to 45 kDa produced by several cell types including fibroblasts, neutrophils, endothelial cells, and peripheral blood mononuclear cells, particularly T lymphocytes and macrophages. Six VEGF isoforms are generated as a result of alternative splicing from a single VEGF gene, consisting of 121, 145, 165, 183, 189, or 206 amino acids. VEGF121, VEGF145, and VEGF165 are secreted whereas VEGF183, VEGF189, and VEGF206 are cell membrane-bound. VEGF145 has a key role during the vascularization of the human ovarian follicle and corpus luteum, in the placentation and embryonic periods, and in bone and wound healing, while VEGF165 is the most abundant and biologically active isoform. VEGF has been linked with a number of vascular pathologies including cardiovascular diseases such ischemic heart disease, heart failure, stroke, and diabetes and its related complications. In this review we aimed to present some important roles of VEGF in a number of clinical issues and indicate its involvement in several phenomena from the initial steps of the embryonic period to cardiovascular diseases.

  3. Modern Electrophysiological Methods for Brain-Computer Interfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rolando Grave de Peralta Menendez

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Modern electrophysiological studies in animals show that the spectrum of neural oscillations encoding relevant information is broader than previously thought and that many diverse areas are engaged for very simple tasks. However, EEG-based brain-computer interfaces (BCI still employ as control modality relatively slow brain rhythms or features derived from preselected frequencies and scalp locations. Here, we describe the strategy and the algorithms we have developed for the analysis of electrophysiological data and demonstrate their capacity to lead to faster accurate decisions based on linear classifiers. To illustrate this strategy, we analyzed two typical BCI tasks. (1 Mu-rhythm control of a cursor movement by a paraplegic patient. For this data, we show that although the patient received extensive training in mu-rhythm control, valuable information about movement imagination is present on the untrained high-frequency rhythms. This is the first demonstration of the importance of high-frequency rhythms in imagined limb movements. (2 Self-paced finger tapping task in three healthy subjects including the data set used in the BCI-2003 competition. We show that by selecting electrodes and frequency ranges based on their discriminative power, the classification rates can be systematically improved with respect to results published thus far.

  4. Electrophysiological Correlates of Reading the Single- and Interactive-Mind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yi-Wen; Zheng, Yu-Wei; Lin, Chong-De; Wu, Jie; Shen, De-Li

    2011-01-01

    Understanding minds is the cognitive basis of successful social interaction. In everyday life, human mental activity often happens at the moment of social interaction among two or multiple persons instead of only one-person. Understanding the interactive mind of two- or multi-person is more complex and higher than understanding the single-person mind in the hierarchical structure of theory of mind. Understanding the interactive mind maybe differentiate from understanding the single mind. In order to examine the dissociative electrophysiological correlates of reading the single mind and reading the interactive mind, the 64 channels event-related potentials were recorded while 16 normal adults were observing three kinds of Chinese idioms depicted physical scenes, one-person with mental activity, and two- or multi-person with mental interaction. After the equivalent N400, in the 500- to 700-ms epoch, the mean amplitudes of late positive component (LPC) over frontal for reading the single mind and reading the interactive mind were significantly more positive than for physical representation, while there was no difference between the former two. In the 700- to 800-ms epoch, the mean amplitudes of LPC over frontal–central for reading the interactive mind were more positive than for reading the single mind and physical representation, while there was no difference between the latter two. The present study provides electrophysiological signature of the dissociations between reading the single mind and reading the interactive mind. PMID:21845178

  5. Shared electrophysiology mechanisms of body ownership and motor imagery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Nathan; Blanke, Olaf

    2013-01-01

    Although we feel, see, and experience our hands as our own (body or hand ownership), recent research has shown that illusory hand ownership can be induced for fake or virtual hands and may be useful for neuroprosthetics and brain-computer interfaces. Despite the vast amount of behavioral data on illusory hand ownership, neuroimaging studies are rare, in particular electrophysiological studies. Thus, while the neural systems underlying hand ownership are relatively well described, the spectral signatures of body ownership as measured by electroencephalography (EEG) remain elusive. Here we induced illusory hand ownership in an automated, computer-controlled manner using virtual reality while recording 64-channel EEG and found that illusory hand ownership is reflected by a body-specific modulation in the mu-band over fronto-parietal cortex. In a second experiment in the same subjects, we then show that mu as well as beta-band activity in highly similar fronto-parietal regions was also modulated during a motor imagery task often used in paradigms employing non-invasive brain-computer interface technology. These data provide insights into the electrophysiological brain mechanisms of illusory hand ownership and their strongly overlapping mechanisms with motor imagery in fronto-parietal cortex. They also highlight the potential of combining high-resolution EEG with virtual reality setups and automatized stimulation protocols for systematic, reproducible stimulus presentation in cognitive neuroscience, and may inform the design of non-invasive brain-computer interfaces. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Subjective stress, salivary cortisol and electrophysiological responses to psychological stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingming eQi

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The present study aimed to investigate the subjective stress, salivary cortisol, and electrophysiological responses to psychological stress induced by a modified version of a mental arithmetic task. Fifteen participants were asked to estimate whether the multiplication product of two-decimal numbers was above 10 or not either with a time limit (the stress condition or without a time limit (the control condition. The results showed that participants reported higher levels of stress, anxiety, and negative affect in the stress condition than they did in the control condition. Moreover, the salivary cortisol level continued to increase after the stress condition but exhibited a sharp decrease after the control condition. In addition, the electrophysiological data showed that the amplitude of the frontal-central N1 component was larger for the stress condition than it was for the control condition, while the amplitude of the frontal-central P2 component was larger for the control condition than it was for the stress condition. Our study suggests that the psychological stress characteristics of time pressure and social-evaluative threat caused dissociable effects on perception and on the subsequent attentional resource allocation of visual information.

  7. Electrophysiological characteristics according to activity level of myofascial trigger points.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Seong Hun; Kim, Hyun Jin

    2015-09-01

    [Purpose] This study compared the differences in electrophysiological characteristics of normal muscles versus muscles with latent or active myofascial trigger points, and identified the neuromuscular physiological characteristics of muscles with active myofascial trigger points, thereby providing a quantitative evaluation of myofascial pain syndrome and clinical foundational data for its diagnosis. [Subjects] Ninety adults in their 20s participated in this study. Subjects were equally divided into three groups: the active myofascial trigger point group, the latent myofascial trigger point group, and the control group. [Methods] Maximum voluntary isometric contraction (MVIC), endurance, median frequency (MDF), and muscle fatigue index were measured in all subjects. [Results] No significant differences in MVIC or endurance were revealed among the three groups. However, the active trigger point group had significantly different MDF and muscle fatigue index compared with the control group. [Conclusion] Given that muscles with active myofascial trigger points had an increased MDF and suffered muscle fatigue more easily, increased recruitment of motor unit action potential of type II fibers was evident. Therefore, electrophysiological analysis of these myofascial trigger points can be applied to evaluate the effect of physical therapy and provide a quantitative diagnosis of myofascial pain syndrome.

  8. Electrophysiological ON and OFF Responses in Autosomal Dominant Optic Atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morny, Enyam Komla A; Margrain, Tom H; Binns, Alison M; Votruba, Marcela

    2015-12-01

    To assess the effect of autosomal dominant optic atrophy (ADOA) on ON and OFF retinal ganglion cell (RGC) function by evaluating the ON and OFF components of the photopic negative response (PhNR). Twelve participants from six families with OPA1 ADOA and 16 age-matched controls were recruited. Electrophysiological assessment involved pattern ERGs (PERGs), focal (20°) and full-field long-duration (250 ms) flash ERGs using a red light-emitting diode flash on a rod-saturating blue background, and full-field brief (300 μs) xenon flash ERGs using a red filter over a continuous rod saturating blue background. Amplitudes and implicit times of the ERG components were analyzed and the diagnostic potential of each electrophysiological technique was determined by generating receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves. Mean amplitudes of the N95 and all PhNRs, except the full-field PhNRON, were significantly reduced in participants with ADOA (P curve (AUC) for the focal PhNRON (0.92), focal PhNROFF (0.95), and full-field PhNROFF (0.83), were not significantly different from that of the PERG N95 (0.99). In patients with ADOA, the PhNRON and PhNROFF components are nearly symmetrically reduced in the long-duration ERG, suggesting that ON- and OFF-RGC pathways may be equally affected.

  9. Electrophysiological features and multimodal imaging in ritonavir-related maculopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faure, Céline; Paques, Michel; Audo, Isabelle

    2017-12-01

    The purpose of this study is to report a case of ritonavir-related retinal toxicity followed over a year. Electrophysiological features and multimodal imaging, including adaptive optics, are provided and discussed. Electrophysiological recordings and multimodal imaging were performed and repeated over 1 year. Fundus examination revealed crystalline maculopathy in conjunction with pigment disruption. Spectral domain optical coherence tomography displayed thinning of the macula without cysts. Autofluorescence imaging revealed a mixed pattern of complete loss of the autofluorescence in the area of retinal pigment deposit and an increased transmission of the autofluorescence in the area of retinal thinning. Fluorescein angiography ruled out parafoveal telangiectasia. Indocyanine green angiography was not contributive. Increased spacing of the macular cone mosaic, crystal deposits and pigment migrations were seen with adaptive optics. Full-field electroretinogram was slightly reduced for both eyes, especially in the light-adapted responses, and mfERG confirmed bilateral maculopathy. Functional and structural abnormalities did not change with follow-up besides constant pigmentary changes monitored with adaptive optics. Ritonavir-related retinal toxicity is a maculopathy with peculiar features including crystalline and pigment migration associated with central or temporofoveolar thinning and inconstant macular telangiectasia. Despite drug cessation, retinal remodelling continues to progress.

  10. Haemodynamic and electrophysiological markers of pragmatic language comprehension in schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Sabrina; Wagels, Lisa; Haeussinger, Florian B; Fallgatter, Andreas J; Ehlis, Ann-Christine; Rapp, Alexander M

    2015-03-30

    The present study aimed at investigating neurophysiological markers of language perception in schizophrenia using simultaneous near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) and event-related potentials (ERPs), which have been proven to be useful for studying language processing abilities in psychiatric patients. The study shall help to integrate previous findings from ERP and fMRI studies on figurative language comprehension in schizophrenia and elucidate how electrophysiological and haemodynamic markers of language processing are related. Twenty-two healthy subjects and 22 schizophrenia patients judged 120 sentences regarding their meaningfulness. Phrases were literal, metaphoric, or meaningless. EEG-fNIRS signals were recorded throughout the entire experiment. Schizophrenia patients showed deficient and delayed sentence comprehension. Both the early N400 and left-hemispheric activation during language comprehension were altered in patients. Correlation analyses showed that metaphor-related ERPs were strongly linked to haemodynamic cortical activity in healthy subjects, but not in patients. Our results indicate group differences in cortical electrophysiological and haemodynamic activation that represent rather general impairments in the processing of complex language. Simultaneous EEG/NIRS applications are useful to depict these neural markers and to investigate their relationship. Future studies are needed to clarify the nature of respective anomalies and their potential as putative neural markers in schizophrenia research.

  11. How do astrocytes shape synaptic transmission? Insights from electrophysiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glenn eDallérac

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available A major breakthrough in neuroscience has been the realization in the last decades that the dogmatic view of astroglial cells as being merely fostering and buffering elements of the nervous system is simplistic. A wealth of investigations now shows that astrocytes actually participate in the control of synaptic transmission in an active manner. This was first hinted by the intimate contacts glial processes make with neurons, particularly at the synaptic level, and evidenced using electrophysiological and calcium imaging techniques. Calcium imaging has provided critical evidence demonstrating that astrocytic regulation of synaptic efficacy is not a passive phenomenon. However, given that cellular activation is not only represented by calcium signaling, it is also crucial to assess concomitant mechanisms. We and others have used electrophysiological techniques to simultaneously record neuronal and astrocytic activity, thus enabling the study of multiple ionic currents and in depth investigation of neuro-glial dialogues. In the current review, we focus on the input such approach has provided in the understanding of astrocyte-neuron interactions underlying control of synaptic efficacy.

  12. Electrophysiologic Assessments of Involuntary Movements: Tremor and Myoclonus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyun-Dong Park

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Tremor is defined as a rhythmical, involuntary oscillatory movement of a body part. Although neurological examination reveals information regarding its frequency, regularity, amplitude, and activation conditions, the electrophysiological investigations help in confirming the tremor, in differentiating it from other hyperkinetic disorders like myoclonus, and may provide etiological clues. Accelerometer with surface electromyogram (EMG can be used to document the dominant frequency of a tremor, which may be useful as certain frequencies are more characteristic of specific etiologies than others hyperkinetic disorders. It may show rhythmic bursts, duration and activation pattern (alternating or synchronous. Myoclonus is a quick, involuntary movement. Electrophysiological studies may helpful in the evaluation of myoclonus, not only for confirming the clinical diagnosis but also for understanding the underlying physiological mechanisms. Electroencephalogram (EEG-EMG correlates can give us important information about myoclonus. Jerk-locked back-averaging and evoked potentials with recording of the long-latency, long-loop reflexes are currently available to study the pathophysiology of myoclonus.

  13. Verification of computational models of cardiac electro-physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathmanathan, Pras; Gray, Richard A

    2014-05-01

    For computational models of cardiac activity to be used in safety-critical clinical decision-making, thorough and rigorous testing of the accuracy of predictions is required. The field of 'verification, validation and uncertainty quantification' has been developed to evaluate the credibility of computational predictions. The first stage, verification, is the evaluation of how well computational software correctly solves the underlying mathematical equations. The aim of this paper is to introduce novel methods for verifying multi-cellular electro-physiological solvers, a crucial first stage for solvers to be used with confidence in clinical applications. We define 1D-3D model problems with exact solutions for each of the monodomain, bidomain, and bidomain-with-perfusing-bath formulations of cardiac electro-physiology, which allow for the first time the testing of cardiac solvers against exact errors on fully coupled problems in all dimensions. These problems are carefully constructed so that they can be easily run using a general solver and can be used to greatly increase confidence that an implementation is correct, which we illustrate by testing one major solver, 'Chaste', on the problems. We then perform case studies on calculation verification (also known as solution verification) for two specific applications. We conclude by making several recommendations regarding verification in cardiac modelling. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. Stroop interference effect in schizophrenic patients: an electrophysiological approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markela-Lerenc, Jaana; Schmidt-Kraepelin, Christian; Roesch-Ely, Daniela; Mundt, Christoph; Weisbrod, Matthias; Kaiser, Stefan

    2009-03-01

    Schizophrenic patients present deficits in executive control functions. The Stroop test requires executive control functions, in particular response inhibition. So far only one study has employed the high temporal resolution of electrophysiological methods to investigate the neural correlates of the Stroop effect in schizophrenia. This study investigated medicated patients with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder (n=15) and healthy controls (n=15) using event-related potentials. The analyses of the P1 and N1 components revealed no differences between the groups indicating intact sensory processing in schizophrenia during the Stroop test. We found greater negativity in the incongruent as compared to the congruent and neutral conditions between 350 and 450 ms over prefrontal scalp areas in healthy subjects but not in schizophrenic patients. Later on, a sustained positivity was observed over parietal scalp regions in healthy subjects. This later sustained potential was attenuated in patients but only in the first block. This suggests that following practice patients show similar parietal effects as healthy subjects. The total errors in the incongruent condition in patients correlated negatively with the difference in mean activity between incongruent and congruent conditions over the left parietal area (time window 600-1000 ms). In other words the more errors were made by patients, the more attenuated was the Stroop related electrophysiological effect. This suggests that the parietal activity is related to successful resolution of the Stroop conflict in schizophrenic patients. Furthermore, the absence of the frontal deflection in patients reflects dysfunctional neural processes associated with executive control.

  15. Automatic fitting of spiking neuron models to electrophysiological recordings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cyrille Rossant

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Spiking models can accurately predict the spike trains produced by cortical neurons in response to somatically injected currents. Since the specific characteristics of the model depend on the neuron, a computational method is required to fit models to electrophysiological recordings. The fitting procedure can be very time consuming both in terms of computer simulations and in terms of code writing. We present algorithms to fit spiking models to electrophysiological data (time-varying input and spike trains that can run in parallel on graphics processing units (GPUs. The model fitting library is interfaced with Brian, a neural network simulator in Python. If a GPU is present it uses just-in-time compilation to translate model equations into optimized code. Arbitrary models can then be defined at script level and run on the graphics card. This tool can be used to obtain empirically validated spiking models of neurons in various systems. We demonstrate its use on public data from the INCF Quantitative Single-Neuron Modeling 2009 competition by comparing the performance of a number of neuron spiking models.

  16. [How Treatable is Vascular Dementia?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Etsuro

    2016-04-01

    Vascular dementia is an umbrella term, encompassing the pathological changes in the brain due to cerebrovascular disease that result in dementia. Vascular dementia is the second most common form of dementia, after Alzheimer's disease. In this paper, I outline the concept of vascular dementia, the key aspects of the disease that are yet to be clarified, and the current status of clinical trials. Assessing these factors, I discuss how treatable vascular dementia presently is. Use of the term'vascular dementia'is riddled with uncertainties regarding disease classification, and non-standardized diagnostic criteria. There are difficulties in determining the exact relationship between cerebrovascular pathology and cognitive impairment. The comorbid effects of Alzheimer's pathology in some individuals also present an obstacle to reliable clinical diagnosis, and hinder research into effective management approaches. Vascular dementia is preventable and treatable, as there are established primary and secondary prevention measures for the causative cerebrovascular diseases, such as vascular risk factor intervention, antiplatelet therapy, and anticoagulation, amongst others. However, unlike Alzheimer's disease, there are no established symptomatic treatments for vascular dementia. Clinical trials of cholinesterase inhibitors and memantine indicate that they produce small cognitive benefits in patients with vascular dementia, though the exact clinical significance of these is uncertain. Data are insufficient to support the widespread use of these drugs in vascular dementia. Rehabilitation and physical and cognitive exercise may be beneficial, but evidence of cognitive benefit and relief of neuropsychiatric symptoms due to exercise is lacking.

  17. Permeability and permeability anisotropy in Crab Orchard sandstone: Experimental insights into spatio-temporal effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehne, Stephan; Benson, Philip M.

    2017-08-01

    Permeability in tight crustal rocks is primarily controlled by the connected porosity, shape and orientation of microcracks, the preferred orientation of cross-bedding, and sedimentary features such as layering. This leads to a significant permeability anisotropy. Less well studied, however, are the effects of time and stress recovery on the evolution of the permeability hysteresis which is becoming increasingly important in areas ranging from fluid migration in ore-forming processes to enhanced resource extraction. Here, we report new data simulating spatio-temporal permeability changes induced using effective pressure, simulating burial depth, on a tight sandstone (Crab Orchard). We find an initially (measured at 5 MPa) anisotropy of 2.5% in P-wave velocity and 180% in permeability anisotropy is significantly affected by the direction of the effective pressure change and cyclicity; anisotropy values decrease to 1% and 10% respectively after 3 cycles to 90 MPa and back. Furthermore, we measure a steadily increasing recovery time (10-20 min) for flow parallel to cross-bedding, and a far slower recovery time (20-50 min) for flow normal to cross-bedding. These data are interpreted via strain anisotropy and accommodation models, similar to the ;seasoning; process often used in dynamic reservoir extraction.

  18. Evaluating Permeability Enchancement Using Electrical Techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John W. Pritchett

    2008-09-01

    Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) development projects involve the artificial stimulation of relatively impermeable high-temperature underground regions (at depths of 2-4 kilometers or more) to create sufficient permeability to permit underground fluid circulation, so that hot water can be withdrawn from production wells and used to generate electric power. Several major research projects of this general type have been undertaken in the past in New Mexico (Fenton Hill), Europe, Japan and Australia. Recent U.S. activities along these lines focus mainly on stimulating peripheral areas of existing operating hydrothermal fields rather than on fresh 'greenfield' sites, but the long-term objective of the Department of Energy's EGS program is the development of large-scale power projects based on EGS technology (MIT, 2006; NREL, 2008). Usually, stimulation is accomplished by injecting water into a well at high pressure, enhancing permeability by the creation and propagation of fractures in the surrounding rock (a process known as 'hydrofracturing'). Beyond just a motivation, low initial system permeability is also an essential prerequisite to hydrofracturing. If the formation permeability is too high, excessive fluid losses will preclude the buildup of sufficient pressure to fracture rock. In practical situations, the actual result of injection is frequently to re-open pre-existing hydrothermally-mineralized fractures, rather than to create completely new fractures by rupturing intact rock. Pre-existing fractures can often be opened using injection pressures in the range 5-20 MPa. Creation of completely new fractures will usually require pressures that are several times higher. It is preferable to undertake development projects of this type in regions where tectonic conditions are conducive to shear failure, so that when pre-existing fractures are pressurized they will fail by shearing laterally. If this happens, the fracture will often stay open

  19. Detection of semi-volatile organic compounds in permeable pavement infiltrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abstract The Edison Environmental Center (EEC) has a research and demonstration permeable parking lot comprised of three different permeable systems: permeable asphalt, porous concrete and interlocking concrete permeable pavers. Water quality and quantity analysis has been ongoin...

  20. [Estrogens and vascular thrombosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colmou, A

    1982-09-01

    The incidence of thromboses among young women has increased with widespread use of oral contraceptives (OCs) due to the significant thromboembolic risk of estrogen. Estrogens intervene at the vascular, platelet, and plasma levels as a function of hormonal variations in the menstrual cycle, increasing the aggregability of the platelets and thrombocytes, accelerating the formation of clots, and decreasing the amount of antithrombin III. Estrogens are used in medicine to treat breast and prostate cancers and in gynecology to treat dysmenorrhea, during the menopause, and in contraception. Smoking, cardiovascular disease and hypertension, hypercholesterolemia, and diabetes are contraindicators to estrogen use. Thrombosis refers to blockage of a blood vessel by a clot or thrombus. Before estrogens are prescribed, a history of phlebitis, obesity, hyperlipidemia, or significant varicosities should be ruled out. A history of venous thrombosis, hyperlipoproteinemia, breast nodules, serious liver condition, allergies to progesterone, and some ocular diseases of vascular origin definitively rule out treatment with estrogens. A family history of infarct, embolism, diabetes, cancer, or vascular accidents at a young age signals a need for greater patient surveillance. All patients receiving estrogens should be carefully observed for signs of hypertension, hypercholesterolemia, hypercoagulability, or diabetes. Nurses have a role to play in carefully eliciting the patient's history of smoking, personal and family medical problems, and previous and current laboratory results, as well as in informing the patients of the risks and possible side effects of OCs, especially for those who smoke. Nurses should educate patients receiving estrogens, especially those with histories of circulatory problems, to avoid standing in 1 position for prolonged periods, avoid heat which is a vasodilator, avoid obesity, excercise regularly, wear appropriate footgear, and follow other good health

  1. Upscaling of permeability field of fractured rock system: Numerical examples

    KAUST Repository

    Bao, K.

    2012-01-01

    When the permeability field of a given porous medium domain is heterogeneous by the existence of randomly distributed fractures such that numerical investigation becomes cumbersome, another level of upscaling may be required. That is such complex permeability field could be relaxed (i.e., smoothed) by constructing an effective permeability field. The effective permeability field is an approximation to the real permeability field that preserves certain quantities and provides an overall acceptable description of the flow field. In this work, the effective permeability for a fractured rock system is obtained for different coarsening scenarios starting from very coarse mesh all the way towards the fine mesh simulation. In all these scenarios, the effective permeability as well as the pressure at each cell is obtained. The total flux at the exit boundary is calculated in all these cases, and very good agreement is obtained.

  2. Vigabatrin : longterm follow-up of electrophysiology and visual field examinations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hardus, P; Verduin, W; Berendschot, T; Postma, G; Stilma, J; van Veelen, C

    2003-01-01

    Background: To report the results of repeated electrophysiological and visual field examinations in patients with vigabatrin-associated visual field loss (VGB-VFL) and the relationship between these electrophysiological findings, the cumulative dose of vigabatrin and the extent of visual field loss.

  3. The pathobiology of vascular dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iadecola, Costantino

    2013-11-20

    Vascular cognitive impairment defines alterations in cognition, ranging from subtle deficits to full-blown dementia, attributable to cerebrovascular causes. Often coexisting with Alzheimer's disease, mixed vascular and neurodegenerative dementia has emerged as the leading cause of age-related cognitive impairment. Central to the disease mechanism is the crucial role that cerebral blood vessels play in brain health, not only for the delivery of oxygen and nutrients, but also for the trophic signaling that inextricably links the well-being of neurons and glia to that of cerebrovascular cells. This review will examine how vascular damage disrupts these vital homeostatic interactions, focusing on the hemispheric white matter, a region at heightened risk for vascular damage, and on the interplay between vascular factors and Alzheimer's disease. Finally, preventative and therapeutic prospects will be examined, highlighting the importance of midlife vascular risk factor control in the prevention of late-life dementia. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. The assessment of visually impaired persons working capacities using electrophysiological and ophthalmic ergonomics methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. I. Razumovsky

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Aim was to analyze working capacities of visually impaired persons by means of complex electrophysiological and ophthalmic ergonomics eye examination.Materials and methods. Standard clinical ophthalmologic examination (visual acuity measurement, refractometry, biomicroscopy, ophthalmoscopy as well as electrophysiological (electrooculography, electrical sensitivity of the eye, critical flicker fusion frequency and ophthalmic ergonomics tests (accommodation measurement, professional testing using automated system «Proftest-1» were performed.Results. Complex electrophysiological and ophthalmic ergonomics tests were performed in 20 visually impaired persons. Their results revealed direct correlation between electrophysiological and ophthalmic ergonomics indices.Conclusion. Working capacities of visually impaired persons can be assessed reliably using complex electrophysiological and ophthalmic ergonomics eye examination only.

  5. The assessment of visually impaired persons working capacities using electrophysiological and ophthalmic ergonomics methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. I. Razumovsky

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim was to analyze working capacities of visually impaired persons by means of complex electrophysiological and ophthalmic ergonomics eye examination.Materials and methods. Standard clinical ophthalmologic examination (visual acuity measurement, refractometry, biomicroscopy, ophthalmoscopy as well as electrophysiological (electrooculography, electrical sensitivity of the eye, critical flicker fusion frequency and ophthalmic ergonomics tests (accommodation measurement, professional testing using automated system «Proftest-1» were performed.Results. Complex electrophysiological and ophthalmic ergonomics tests were performed in 20 visually impaired persons. Their results revealed direct correlation between electrophysiological and ophthalmic ergonomics indices.Conclusion. Working capacities of visually impaired persons can be assessed reliably using complex electrophysiological and ophthalmic ergonomics eye examination only.

  6. CO2 breakthrough pressure and permeability for unsaturated low-permeability sandstone of the Ordos Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yan; Yu, Qingchun

    2017-07-01

    With rising threats from greenhouse gases, capture and injection of CO2 into suitable underground formations is being considered as a method to reduce anthropogenic emissions of CO2 to the atmosphere. As the injected CO2 will remain in storage for hundreds of years, the safety of CO2 geologic sequestration is a major concern. The low-permeability sandstone of the Ordos Basin in China is regarded as both caprock and reservoir rock, so understanding the breakthrough pressure and permeability of the rock is necessary. Because part of the pore volume experiences a non-wetting phase during the CO2 injection and migration process, the rock may be in an unsaturated condition. And if accidental leakage occurs, CO2 will migrate up into the unsaturated zone. In this study, breakthrough experiments were performed at various degrees of water saturation with five core samples of low-permeability sandstone obtained from the Ordos Basin. The experiments were conducted at 40 °C and pressures of >8 MPa to simulate the geological conditions for CO2 sequestration. The results indicate that the degree of water saturation and the pore structure are the main factors affecting the rock breakthrough pressure and permeability, since the influence of calcite dissolution and clay mineral swelling during the saturation process is excluded. Increasing the average pore radius or most probable pore radius leads to a reduction in the breakthrough pressure and an increase by several orders of magnitude in scCO2 effective permeability. In addition, the breakthrough pressure rises and the scCO2 effective permeability decreases when the water saturation increases. However, when the average pore radius is greater than 0.151 μm, the degree of water saturation will has a little effect on the breakthrough pressure. On this foundation, if the most probable pore radius of the core sample reaches 1.760 μm, the breakthrough pressure will not be impacted by the increasing water saturation. We establish

  7. Anaesthesia for vascular emergencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellard, L; Djaiani, G

    2013-01-01

    Patients presenting with vascular emergencies including acute aortic syndrome, ruptured thoracic or abdominal aortic aneurysms, thoracic aortic trauma and acute lower limb ischaemia have a high risk of peri-operative morbidity and mortality. Although anatomical suitability is not universal, endovascular surgery may improve mortality and the results of ongoing randomised controlled trials are awaited. Permissive hypotension pre-operatively should be the standard of care with the systolic blood pressure kept to 50-100 mmHg as long as consciousness is maintained. The benefit of local anaesthesia over general anaesthesia is not definitive and this decision should be tailored for a given patient and circumstance. Cerebrospinal fluid drainage for prevention of paraplegia is often impractical in the emergency setting and is not backed by strong evidence; however, it should be considered postoperatively if symptoms develop. We discuss the pertinent anaesthetic issues when a patient presents with a vascular emergency and the impact that endovascular repair has on anaesthetic management. Anaesthesia © 2012 The Association of Anaesthetists of Great Britain and Ireland.

  8. Pediatric vascularized composite allotransplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doumit, Gaby; Gharb, Bahar Bassiri; Rampazzo, Antonio; Papay, Francis; Siemionow, Maria Z; Zins, James E

    2014-10-01

    Vascularized composite allotransplantation (VCA) has experienced a growing acceptance, which has led to a debate centered on extending the indications of the procedure to include pediatric patients. The aim of this article was to discuss such indications based on the evidence in pediatric solid organ transplantation, reconstructive surgery in children, and VCA in adult patients. Papers published on the outcomes of pediatric solid organ transplantation, growth after replantation of extremities, vascularized autologous tissue transfer, craniofacial surgery, orthognathic procedures, facial fractures, and outcomes after repair of peripheral nerves in children were reviewed. Although the outcomes of solid organ transplantation in children have improved, the transplanted organs continue to have a limited lifespan. Long-term immunosuppressive therapy exposes the patients to an increased lifetime risk of infections, diabetes, hypertension, dyslipidemia, cardiovascular disease, and malignancy. Growth impairment and learning disabilities are other relevant drawbacks, which affect the pediatric recipients. Nonadherence to medication is a common cause of graft dysfunction and loss among the adolescent transplant recipients. Rejection episodes, hospitalizations, and medication adverse effects contribute negatively to the quality of life of the patients. Although normal growth after limb transplantation could be expected, pediatric facial transplant recipients may present with arrest of growth of transplanted midfacial skeleton. Considering the non-life-threatening nature of the conditions that lead to eligibility for VCA, it is suggested that it is premature to extend the indications of VCA to include pediatric patients under the currently available immunosuppressive protocols.

  9. Clinical and electrophysiological aspects of tics in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safiullina, G I; Safiullina, A A

    2015-01-01

    Tics are diverse in nature inappropriate movements or vocalizations. They significantly degrade patients' quality of life, lead to social difficulties, and disturbance of learning especially during exacerbations. The prevalence of tics among children ranges from 4% to 24%, thus emphasizing the relevance of the problem. To study clinical and electrophysiological features of tics in children with development of new treatment methods. We conducted a comprehensive clinical and electrophysiological examination of 50 patients with tics, aged 5 to 15 years. The control group consisted of 20 healthy children. The research included a thorough study of the history, neurological examination, manual testing of skeletal muscles, psychological testing. Electrophysiological examination included a review of the functional state of corticospinal tract (CST) by the method of magnetic stimulation (MS), study of polysynaptic reflex excitability (PRE) according to a late component of the blink reflex (BR). Statistical analysis included parametric and nonparametric methods of data processing. All children of the study group showed signs of minimal brain dysfunction (MBD), they had complicated antenatal and postnatal history (trauma, disease, occurring with intoxication). There was a trend towards the increase of MBD signs with worsening of tics. Manual diagnosis in patients identified functional blockade at different levels of the vertebral column, sacroiliac joints, we identified latent myofascial trigger points (MFTP) mainly in the cervical-collar zone, in the area of the paravertebral muscles, periosteal triggers in the area of the sacroiliac joints.The research allowed determining decrease in propagation velocity of excitation (PVE) throughout CST in patients with tics. Correlation analysis revealed a negative correlation between the severity of tics and PVE (r = -0.38; p tics: I - low and moderate type of reflex responses; and II - high type of reflex responses. Collation of data

  10. Spinal Cord Vascular Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdoreza Ghoreishi

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The spinal cord is subject to many of the same vascular diseases that involve the brain, but its anatomy and embryology render it susceptible to some syndromes that do not have intracranial counterparts.The embryonic arterial supply to the spinal cord derives from intradural vessels that enter at each spinal level and divide to follow the dorsal and ventral roots. SPINAL CORD ISCHEMIA: The midthoracic levels of the spinal cord are traditionally considered to be the most vulnerable to compromise from hypoperfusion, but more recent evidence suggests that the lower thoracic cord is at greater risk . The actual prevalence of spinal cord infarction is unknown, but is generally cited as representing 1% to 2% of all central neurovascular events and 5% to 8% of all acute myelopathies. Weakness (100%, sensory loss (89%, back pain at onset (82%, and urinary complaints requiring catheterization (75% were the most common symptoms of cord ischemia at the time of presentation . Weakness most commonly affects both legs. Examination typically reveals flaccid paresis accompanied by diminished superficial and tendon reflexes below the level of the lesion. Preservation of strength and reflexes suggests the rare syndrome of posterior spinal artery territory infarction. Weakness most commonly affects both legs. Examination typically reveals flaccid paresis accompanied by diminished superficial and tendon reflexes below the level of the lesion. Preservation of strength and reflexes suggests the rare syndrome of posterior spinal artery territory infarction.   Aortic pathologies with regional hemodynamic compromise are the most common cause of spinal cord infarction, accounting for 30% to 40% of cases.                                                                                 The medical management of spinal cord ischemia is generally supportive and focused on reducing risk for

  11. Clamshell excavation of a permeable reactive barrier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molfetta, Antonio Di; Sethi, Rajandrea

    2006-06-01

    Nowadays, permeable reactive barriers (PRB) are one of the most widespread techniques for the remediation of contaminated aquifers. Over the past 10 years, the use of iron-based PRBs has evolved from innovative to accepted standard practice for the treatment of a variety of groundwater contaminants (ITRC in: Permeable reactive barriers: lessons learned/new directions. The Interstate Technology and Regulatory Council, Permeable Reactive Barriers Team 2005). Although, a variety of excavation methods have been developed, backhoe excavators are often used for the construction of PRBs. The aim of this study is to describe the emplacement of a full-scale PRB and the benefits deriving from the use of a crawler crane equipped with a hydraulic grab (also known as clamshell excavator) in the excavation phases. The studied PRB was designed to remediate a chlorinated hydrocarbons plume at an old industrial landfill site, in Avigliana, near the city of Torino, in Italy. The continuous reactive barrier was designed to be 120 m long, 13 m deep, and 0.6 m thick. The installation of the barrier was accomplished using a clamshell for the excavation of the trench and a guar-gum slurry to support the walls. The performance of this technique was outstanding and allowed the installation of the PRB in 7 days. The degree of precision of the excavation was very high because of the intrinsic characteristics of this excavation tool and of the use of a concrete curb to guide the hydraulic grab. Moreover, the adopted technique permitted a saving of bioslurry thus minimizing the amount of biocide required.

  12. Spironolactone increases permeability of visceral sheep peritoneum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karioti, Aggeliki; Hatzoglou, Chrissi; Zarogiannis, Sotirios; Deligiorgi, Triantafyllia; Kourti, Panagiota; Giannopoulou, Myrto; Arampatzis, Spyros; Liakopoulos, Vassilios; Gourgoulianis, Konstantinos; Molyvdas, Paschalis-Adam; Stefanidis, Ioannis

    2009-01-01

    Aldosterone is a key component of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system, and spironolactone, an aldosterone receptor blocker, shows beneficial effects in patients with end-stage renal disease and heart failure. The aim of the present study was to investigate by means of Ussing chamber technique the effect of spironolactone on the transmesothelial permeability of visceral sheep peritoneum in vitro. Peritoneal samples from the omentum of adult sheep were collected immediately after slaughter in a cooled and oxygenated Krebs-Ringer bicarbonate (KRB) solution. Isolated intact sheets of peritoneum were mounted in an Ussing-type chamber. Spironolactone (10(-5) mol/L) was added apically and basolaterally to the KRB solution. The transmesothelial resistance (R) was measured before and serially for 30 minutes after the addition of the substances. Data present the mean +/- standard error of 6 experiments in each case. The control R was 19.8 +/- 0.36 omega x cm2. The addition of spironolactone resulted in a reduction in the R, which became significant on both sides of the membrane within 10 minutes and remained significantly different thereafter. The maximum reduction of R (deltaR%) reached 24.8% +/- 2.3% (p < 0.01) apically and 26.3% +/- 3.2% (p < 0.01) basolaterally. Our data clearly show that spironolactone increases the permeability of visceral sheep peritoneum in a lasting manner. Increased peritoneal permeability could result in increased sodium removal, which has acknowledged beneficial effects both in patients undergoing peritoneal dialysis and in patients with heart failure. Further clinical studies investigating the effect of spironolactone on sodium removal in peritoneal dialysis are justified.

  13. Engineered Trehalose Permeable to Mammalian Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza Abazari

    Full Text Available Trehalose is a naturally occurring disaccharide which is associated with extraordinary stress-tolerance capacity in certain species of unicellular and multicellular organisms. In mammalian cells, presence of intra- and extracellular trehalose has been shown to confer improved tolerance against freezing and desiccation. Since mammalian cells do not synthesize nor import trehalose, the development of novel methods for efficient intracellular delivery of trehalose has been an ongoing investigation. Herein, we studied the membrane permeability of engineered lipophilic derivatives of trehalose. Trehalose conjugated with 6 acetyl groups (trehalose hexaacetate or 6-O-Ac-Tre demonstrated superior permeability in rat hepatocytes compared with regular trehalose, trehalose diacetate (2-O-Ac-Tre and trehalose tetraacetate (4-O-Ac-Tre. Once in the cell, intracellular esterases hydrolyzed the 6-O-Ac-Tre molecules, releasing free trehalose into the cytoplasm. The total concentration of intracellular trehalose (plus acetylated variants reached as high as 10 fold the extracellular concentration of 6-O-Ac-Tre, attaining concentrations suitable for applications in biopreservation. To describe this accumulation phenomenon, a diffusion-reaction model was proposed and the permeability and reaction kinetics of 6-O-Ac-Tre were determined by fitting to experimental data. Further studies suggested that the impact of the loading and the presence of intracellular trehalose on cellular viability and function were negligible. Engineering of trehalose chemical structure rather than manipulating the cell, is an innocuous, cell-friendly method for trehalose delivery, with demonstrated potential for trehalose loading in different types of cells and cell lines, and can facilitate the wide-spread application of trehalose as an intracellular protective agent in biopreservation studies.

  14. Nitric oxide turnover in permeable river sediment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schreiber, Frank; Stief, Peter; Kuypers, Marcel M M

    2014-01-01

    We measured nitric oxide (NO) microprofiles in relation to oxygen (O2) and all major dissolved N-species (ammonium, nitrate, nitrite, and nitrous oxide [N2O]) in a permeable, freshwater sediment (River Weser, Germany). NO reaches peak concentrations of 0.13 μmol L-1 in the oxic zone and is consumed...... in the oxic-anoxic transition zone. Apparently, NO is produced by ammonia oxidizers under oxic conditions and consumed by denitrification under microoxic conditions. Experimental percolation of sediment cores with aerated surface water resulted in an initial rate of NO production that was 12 times higher than...

  15. Rigid gas permeable lenses and patient management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terry, R; Schnider, C; Holden, B A

    1989-01-01

    The introduction of new rigid gas permeable (RGP) contact lens materials provides the practitioner with a number of alternatives for patient management. But whatever the lens materials used, problems related to the lenses, care and maintenance solutions, and patients may arise. This paper examines concerns such as parameter instability, durability of lenses, compatibility of materials and solutions, patient education and compliance, 3 and 9 o'clock staining, corneal distortion, and lid changes. Suggestions are made on ways to avoid or minimize problems related to RGP lens wear.

  16. Permeability of MDT chambers to water vapor

    CERN Document Server

    Palestini, S

    2003-01-01

    Tests of MDT chambers performed at the GIF facility and in the H8 test-beam area have shown relative high levels of water vapor contamination in the gas-mixture at the detector output. This effects significantly the drift properties of the MDTs. This note shows that amount of water observed is compatible with approximate estimates based on the permeability of Noryl, used in the tube end-plugs, and of EPDM, used in the O-rings of the on-chamber gas distribution.

  17. Water permeability in human airway epithelium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Peter Steen; Procida, Kristina; Larsen, Per Leganger

    2005-01-01

    Osmotic water permeability (P(f)) was studied in spheroid-shaped human airway epithelia explants derived from nasal polyps by the use of a new improved tissue collection and isolation procedure. The fluid-filled spheroids were lined with a single cell layer with the ciliated apical cell membrane...... facing the outside. They were capable of surviving hours of experiment involving continuous superfusion of the bathing medium and changes of osmolarity. A new image analysis technique was developed for measuring the spheroid diameters, giving high time and measurement resolutions. The transepithelial P...

  18. Transforming growth factor-beta1 effects on endothelial monolayer permeability involve focal adhesion kinase/Src.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Young H; Kayyali, Usamah S; Sousa, Anne Marie; Rajan, Thomas; Lechleider, Robert J; Day, Regina M

    2007-10-01

    Transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta1 activity has been shown to increase vascular endothelial barrier permeability, which is believed to precede several pathologic conditions, including pulmonary edema and vessel inflammation. In endothelial monolayers, TGF-beta1 increases permeability, and a number of studies have demonstrated the alteration of cell-cell contacts by TGF-beta1. We hypothesized that focal adhesion complexes also likely contribute to alterations in endothelial permeability. We examined early signal transduction events associated with rapid changes in monolayer permeability and the focal adhesion complex of bovine pulmonary artery endothelial cells. Western blotting revealed rapid tyrosine phosphorylation of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and Src kinase in response to TGF-beta1; inhibition of both of these kinases using pp2 (4-amino-5-(4-chlorophenyl)-7-(t-butyl)pyrazolo[3,4-d]pyrimidine), ameliorates TGF-beta1-induced monolayer permeability. Activation of FAK/Src requires activation of the epidermal growth factor receptor downstream of the TGF-beta receptors, and is blocked by the epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitor AG1478. Immunohistochemistry showed that actin and the focal adhesion proteins paxillin, vinculin, and hydrogen peroxide-inducible clone-5 (Hic-5) are rearranged in response to TGF-beta1; these proteins are released from focal adhesion complexes. Rearrangement of paxillin and vinculin by TGF-beta1 is not blocked by the FAK/Src inhibitor, pp2, or by SB431542 inhibition of the TGF-beta type I receptor, anaplastic lymphoma kinase 5; however, pp1 (4-Amino-5-(4-methylphenyl)-7-(t-butyl)pyrazolo[3,4-d]pyrimidine), which inhibits both type I and type II TGF-beta receptors, does block paxillin and vinculin rearrangement. Hic-5 protein rearrangement requires FAK/Src activity. Together, these results suggest that TGF-beta1-induced monolayer permeability involves focal adhesion and cytoskeletal rearrangement through both FAK/Src-dependent and

  19. Temporary vascular shunting in vascular trauma: A 10-year review ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Five patients with non-viable limbs had the vessel ligated. Conclusions. A TIVS in the damage control setting is both life- and limb-saving. These shunts can be inserted safely in a facility without access to a surgeon with vascular surgery experience if there is uncontrollable bleeding or the delay to definitive vascular surgery ...

  20. Temporary vascular shunting in vascular trauma: A 10-year review ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    part of a damage control procedure, 7 patients were referred from a hospital without access to vascular surgical facilities with the TIVS in situ, and in the remaining 6 patients the TIVS was inserted during repair of a lower limb fracture with an associated vascular injury. Damage control procedure. Twenty-two patients had a ...

  1. Additive Manufacturing of Vascular Grafts and Vascularized Tissue Constructs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elomaa, Laura; Yang, Yunzhi Peter

    2017-10-01

    There is a great need for engineered vascular grafts among patients with cardiovascular diseases who are in need of bypass therapy and lack autologous healthy blood vessels. In addition, because of the severe worldwide shortage of organ donors, there is an increasing need for engineered vascularized tissue constructs as an alternative to organ transplants. Additive manufacturing (AM) offers great advantages and flexibility of fabrication of cell-laden, multimaterial, and anatomically shaped vascular grafts and vascularized tissue constructs. Various inkjet-, extrusion-, and photocrosslinking-based AM techniques have been applied to the fabrication of both self-standing vascular grafts and porous, vascularized tissue constructs. This review discusses the state-of-the-art research on the use of AM for vascular applications and the key criteria for biomaterials in the AM of both acellular and cellular constructs. We envision that new smart printing materials that can adapt to their environment and encourage rapid endothelialization and remodeling will be the key factor in the future for the successful AM of personalized and dynamic vascular tissue applications.

  2. Extracellular Electrophysiological Measurements of Cooperative Signals in Astrocytes Populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mestre, Ana L. G.; Inácio, Pedro M. C.; Elamine, Youssef; Asgarifar, Sanaz; Lourenço, Ana S.; Cristiano, Maria L. S.; Aguiar, Paulo; Medeiros, Maria C. R.; Araújo, Inês M.; Ventura, João; Gomes, Henrique L.

    2017-01-01

    Astrocytes are neuroglial cells that exhibit functional electrical properties sensitive to neuronal activity and capable of modulating neurotransmission. Thus, electrophysiological recordings of astroglial activity are very attractive to study the dynamics of glial signaling. This contribution reports on the use of ultra-sensitive planar electrodes combined with low noise and low frequency amplifiers that enable the detection of extracellular signals produced by primary cultures of astrocytes isolated from mouse cerebral cortex. Recorded activity is characterized by spontaneous bursts comprised of discrete signals with pronounced changes on the signal rate and amplitude. Weak and sporadic signals become synchronized and evolve with time to higher amplitude signals with a quasi-periodic behavior, revealing a cooperative signaling process. The methodology presented herewith enables the study of ionic fluctuations of population of cells, complementing the single cells observation by calcium imaging as well as by patch-clamp techniques. PMID:29109679

  3. Action intentions modulate allocation of visual attention: electrophysiological evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka eWykowska

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available In line with the Theory of Event Coding (Hommel et al., 2001, action planning has been shown to affect perceptual processing—an effect that has been attributed to a so-called intentional weighting mechanism (Hommel, 2010; Wykowska, Schubö, & Hommel, 2009. This paper investigates the electrophysiological correlates of action-related modulations of selection mechanisms in visual perception. A paradigm combining a visual search task for size and luminance targets with a movement task (grasping or pointing was introduced, and the EEG was recorded while participants were performing the tasks. The results showed that the behavioural congruency effects, i.e., better performance in congruent (relative to incongruent action-perception trials have been reflected by a modulation of the P1 component as well as the N2pc (an ERP marker of spatial attention. These results support the argumentation that action planning modulates already early perceptual processing and attention mechanisms.

  4. An electrophysiological signature for proactive interference resolution in working memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Yingchun; Xiao, Zhuangwei; Song, Yan; Fan, Silu; Wu, Renhua; Zhang, John X

    2008-08-01

    We used event-related potentials (ERPs) to study the temporal dynamics of proactive interference in working memory. Participants performed a Sternberg item-recognition task to determine whether a probe was in a target memory set. Familiar negative probes were found to be more difficult to reject than less familiar ones. A fronto-central N2 component peaking around 300 ms post-probe-onset differentiated among target probes, familiar and less familiar non-target probes. The study identifies N2 as the ERP signature for proactive interference resolution. It also indicates that the resolution process occurs in the same time window as target/non-target discrimination and provides the first piece of electrophysiological evidence supporting a recent interference resolution model based on localization data [Jonides, J., Nee, D.E., 2006. Brain mechanisms of proactive interference in working memory. Neuroscience 139, 181-193].

  5. Electrophysiological evidence of different interpretative strategies in irony comprehension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornejol, Carlos; Simonetti, Franco; Aldunate, Nerea; Ibáñez, Agustín; López, Vladimir; Melloni, Lucía

    2007-11-01

    We explore the hypothesis that induction of holistic or analytic strategies influences comprehension and processing of highly contextualized expressions of ordinary language, such as irony. Twenty undergraduate students were asked to categorize as coherent or incoherent a group of sentences. Each sentence completed a previous story, so that they could be ironical, literal or nonsensical endings. Participants were asked to evaluate whether each sentence was coherent or incoherent. Half of them were initially instructed to consider whether the sentences made sense (holistic condition); the other half were instructed to consider whether the sentences were congruent or incongruent (analytic condition). Behavioral responses and Event Related Potentials were registered during the experiment. Both behavioral and electrophysiological results allow clearly distinguishing between the holistic and the analytic strategies. The fact that the same set of stimuli elicits different ERP waveforms, depending on the strategy with which they are analyzed, suggests that different cognitive processes and different areas of the brain are operating in each case.

  6. Alternans promotion in cardiac electrophysiology models by delay differential equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Johnny M.; dos Santos, Rodrigo Weber; Cherry, Elizabeth M.

    2017-09-01

    Cardiac electrical alternans is a state of alternation between long and short action potentials and is frequently associated with harmful cardiac conditions. Different dynamic mechanisms can give rise to alternans; however, many cardiac models based on ordinary differential equations are not able to reproduce this phenomenon. A previous study showed that alternans can be induced by the introduction of delay differential equations (DDEs) in the formulations of the ion channel gating variables of a canine myocyte model. The present work demonstrates that this technique is not model-specific by successfully promoting alternans using DDEs for five cardiac electrophysiology models that describe different types of myocytes, with varying degrees of complexity. By analyzing results across the different models, we observe two potential requirements for alternans promotion via DDEs for ionic gates: (i) the gate must have a significant influence on the action potential duration and (ii) a delay must significantly impair the gate's recovery between consecutive action potentials.

  7. Alternans promotion in cardiac electrophysiology models by delay differential equations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Johnny M; Dos Santos, Rodrigo Weber; Cherry, Elizabeth M

    2017-09-01

    Cardiac electrical alternans is a state of alternation between long and short action potentials and is frequently associated with harmful cardiac conditions. Different dynamic mechanisms can give rise to alternans; however, many cardiac models based on ordinary differential equations are not able to reproduce this phenomenon. A previous study showed that alternans can be induced by the introduction of delay differential equations (DDEs) in the formulations of the ion channel gating variables of a canine myocyte model. The present work demonstrates that this technique is not model-specific by successfully promoting alternans using DDEs for five cardiac electrophysiology models that describe different types of myocytes, with varying degrees of complexity. By analyzing results across the different models, we observe two potential requirements for alternans promotion via DDEs for ionic gates: (i) the gate must have a significant influence on the action potential duration and (ii) a delay must significantly impair the gate's recovery between consecutive action potentials.

  8. Electrophysiology of the electrocardiographic changes of atrial fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Childers, Rory

    2006-10-01

    The history of atrial fibrillation is described in terms of its electrocardiographic delineation, characteristics and clinical associations. The variant configurations are described and their relationship to rhythm duration and cardioversion success. The inter-relationship of fibrillation with flutter and their diagnostic differences are reviewed. The electrophysiologic basis of atrial remodeling is exemplified, together with its relationship to failure of rate adaptation of the atrial refractory period. Electric countershock causes an acute abbreviation of the atrial refractory period as does the induction of hyperthyroidism in the experimental animal. Current theories of the mechanism of fibrillation and the issue of originating pulmonary venous foci are reviewed. The lack of protection from ventricular fibrillation that exists with preexcitation via an accessory pathway is discussed in terms of the teleological role of orthograde downstream refractory periods.

  9. The effects of metabolism improving agents: an electrophysiological study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasuhara, M; Naito, H

    1980-01-01

    The effects of ATP, cytochrome C, meclofenoxate and CDP-choline on the central nervous system were studied electrophysiologically in rabbits. The threshold of arousal reaction and evoked muscular discharges following stimulation of the brainstem reticular formation, evoked muscular discharges in the fore- and hindlimbs on stimulation of the cerebral cortex and the hippocampus, afferent average evoked potential due to stimulation of the sciatic nerve and unit discharges of nerve cells in the brainstem reticular formation were examined. The results indicate that ATP facilitated the sensory system, cytochrome C facilitated the motor system and meclofenoxate and CDP-choline acted on both systems, but meclofenoxate had activity more like ATP, and CDP-choline had activity more closely allied to that of cytochrome C.

  10. Electrophysiological prognostication and brain injury from cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, Peter W

    2006-09-01

    Anoxic coma after cardiorespiratory arrest warrants precocious investigation to establish probable outcome. Electroencephalogram (EEG) may uncover subclinical seizures; EEG grades have provided accurate prognosis of poor and favorable outcomes, but are weakest in those patients in between. Somatosensory evoked potentials now have proven benefit in accurately establishing a poor outcome (death or persistent vegetative state) when cortical responses (N20) are absent. These studies are particularly helpful when clinical examination of coma, early on, might yield uncertain prognosis (i.e., when brain stem reflexes are present). Combining clinical examination with electrophysiology has increasingly yielded multimodality approaches to early prognostication of coma after cardiorespiratory arrest, with more recent studies using event-related and middle-latency potentials showing promise for distinguishing good outcome (to consciousness), from awake but vegetative states. Further studies are warranted for this multimodality approach which, hopefully, may yield more widespread practical use of these testing modalities.

  11. Conceptual fluency increases recollection: behavioral and electrophysiological evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Li, Bingbing; Gao, Chuanji; Xu, Huifang; Guo, Chunyan

    2015-01-01

    It is widely established that fluency can contribute to recognition memory. Previous studies have found that enhanced fluency increases familiarity, but not recollection. The present study was motivated by a previous finding that conceptual priming affected recollection. We used event-related potentials to investigate the electrophysiological correlates of these effects with conceptually related two-character Chinese words. We found that previous conceptual priming effects on conceptual fluency only increased the incidence of recollection responses. We also found that enhanced conceptual fluency was associated with N400 attenuation, which was also correlated with the behavioral indicator of recollection. These results suggest that the N400 effect might be related to the impact of conceptual fluency on recollection recognition. These study findings provide further evidence for the relationship between fluency and recollection.

  12. Data base management in interventional electrophysiology--the relational advantage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, M A; Siebels, J; Schmitt, C

    1998-12-01

    A relational database was designed to facilitate patient management and storage of complex electrophysiologic data of patients undergoing radiofrequency catheter ablation. The database has to deal with multiple data entries per patient record like radiofrequency current applications and catheters. Due to the complexity of catheter mapping and ablation therapy, the investigators have to handle various data types. Contradictory to a flat-file database, a relational structured database is not limited to a "single record structure". The designed database is built on the relational database programming environment 4th Dimension (ACI). It is implemented on an Apple Macintosh computer system. The relational structure consists of 13 data files and enables an unlimited data entry of multiple items per data field: In 1288 patients 10308 radiofrequency current applications were applied for ablation therapy and 4798 diagnostic or therapeutic catheters were used.

  13. Frontal negativity: An electrophysiological index of interpersonal guilt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leng, Bingbing; Wang, Xiangling; Cao, Bihua; Li, Fuhong

    2017-12-01

    The present study aimed to reveal the temporal course and electrophysiological correlates of interpersonal guilt. Human participants were asked to perform multiple rounds of a dot-estimation task with their partners, while event-related potential being recorded. The paired participants were informed that they would win money if both responded correctly; otherwise, both of them would lose money. The feeling of guilt in Self-Wrong condition (SW) was significantly higher than that in Both-Wrong and Partner-Wrong conditions. At approximately 350 ms after the onset of feedback presentation, greater negativities were observed in the frontal regions in the guilt condition (i.e., SW) than those in the non-guilt condition. The guilt-modulated frontal negativity might reflect the interactions of self-reflection, condemnation, and negative emotion.

  14. Electrophysiological responses of the mouse retina to 12C ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sannita, Walter G; Peachey, Neal S; Strettoi, Enrica; Ball, Sherry L; Belli, Francesco; Bidoli, Vittorio; Carozzo, Simone; Casolino, Marco; Di Fino, Luca; Picozza, Piergiorgio; Pignatelli, Vincenzo; Rinaldi, Adele; Saturno, Moreno; Schardt, Dieter; Vazquez, Marcelo; Zaconte, Veronica; Narici, Livio

    2007-04-18

    Phosphenes ("light flashes") have been reported by most astronauts on space missions and by healthy subjects whose eyes were exposed to ionizing radiation in early experiments in particle accelerators. The conditions of occurrence suggested retinal effects of heavy ions. To develop an in vivo animal model, we irradiated the eyes of anesthetized wild-type mice with repeated bursts of 12C ions delivered under controlled conditions in accelerator. 12C ions evoked electrophysiological retinal mass responses and activated the visual system as indicated by responses recorded from the visual cortex. No retinal immunohistological damage was detected. Mice proved a suitable animal model to study radiation-induced phosphenes in vivo and our findings are consistent with an origin of phosphenes in radiation activating the retina.

  15. Looplure efficacy and electrophysiological responses in three plusiinae species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alford, A R; Hammond, A M

    1982-12-01

    Source concentration differences of (Z)-7-dodecen-1-ol acetate, or looplure, were evaluated for field trapping efficiency and electrophysiological responses with malePseudoplusia includens (Walker),Trichoplusia ni (Hubner) andRachiplusia ou (Guenné) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae). Sticky traps baited with 1000 μg of the lure captured a significantly greater (P includens andT. ni than any other concentration;R. ou males were caught at a greater rate in traps baited with 100 μg of looplure, significantly more (P includens have a lower response threshold to looplure than eitherT. ni orR. ou antennae, the latter demonstrating the highest significant threshold of response. No differences in the stimulus-response functions of the three species were detected.

  16. Cellular cardiac electrophysiology modeling with Chaste and CellML

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Jonathan; Spiteri, Raymond J.; Mirams, Gary R.

    2014-01-01

    Chaste is an open-source C++ library for computational biology that has well-developed cardiac electrophysiology tissue simulation support. In this paper, we introduce the features available for performing cardiac electrophysiology action potential simulations using a wide range of models from the Physiome repository. The mathematics of the models are described in CellML, with units for all quantities. The primary idea is that the model is defined in one place (the CellML file), and all model code is auto-generated at compile or run time; it never has to be manually edited. We use ontological annotation to identify model variables describing certain biological quantities (membrane voltage, capacitance, etc.) to allow us to import any relevant CellML models into the Chaste framework in consistent units and to interact with them via consistent interfaces. This approach provides a great deal of flexibility for analysing different models of the same system. Chaste provides a wide choice of numerical methods for solving the ordinary differential equations that describe the models. Fixed-timestep explicit and implicit solvers are provided, as discussed in previous work. Here we introduce the Rush–Larsen and Generalized Rush–Larsen integration techniques, made available via symbolic manipulation of the model equations, which are automatically rearranged into the forms required by these approaches. We have also integrated the CVODE solvers, a ‘gold standard’ for stiff systems, and we have developed support for symbolic computation of the Jacobian matrix, yielding further increases in the performance and accuracy of CVODE. We discuss some of the technical details of this work and compare the performance of the available numerical methods. Finally, we discuss how this is generalized in our functional curation framework, which uses a domain-specific language for defining complex experiments as a basis for comparison of model behavior. PMID:25610400

  17. Analysis of multiple sclerosis patients with electrophysiological and structural tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamurcu, Mualla; Orhan, Gürdal; Sarıcaoğlu, Murat Sinan; Mungan, Semra; Duru, Zeynep

    2017-06-01

    We aimed to analyze the effects of progressive myelin loss and neurodegeneration seen in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) on visual tract with electrophysiological and structural tests. Fifty-one patients diagnosed with MS in the Neurology Department were followed up in neuro-ophthalmology outpatient clinic irrespective of their visual symptoms, and were included in our study. The patients were classified as the ones with the history of optic neuritis (group II) and ones without the history (group I) of optic neuritis. The data, including clinical presentation, retinal nerve fiber layer thickness (RNFLT) measurements, pattern visual evoked potential (pVEP) and flash electro retino grams (ERG) test results, were recorded. In our study, comparison of pVEP test latencies of groups I and II with each other, and with those of healthy subjects revealed statistically significant differences (p  0.05). However, both groups showed significantly decreased cone b-wave amplitudes, elongation of latencies, and decreased flicker amplitudes on cone and flicker potentials obtained after light adaptation (p < 0.05). There was significant thinning in RNFLT of the both groups when compared to the normal standards. The difference between two groups was statistically significant (p < 0.05). Axon loss is seen in the optic nerve with subclinical or acute optic neuritis in patients with MS. RNFLT analysis and electrophysiological tests are of great importance in diagnosis of MS, as well as to determine progression and to direct neuroprotective therapy in patients diagnosed with MS. Objective analysis methods gain more importance in the diagnosis and follow-up of MS patients, parallel to technological advancements.

  18. Ganzfeld-induced hallucinatory experience, its phenomenology and cerebral electrophysiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wackermann, Jirí; Pütz, Peter; Allefeld, Carsten

    2008-01-01

    Ganzfeld, i.e., exposure to an unstructured, uniform stimulation field, elicits in most observers pseudo-hallucinatory percepts, and may even induce global functional state changes ('altered states of consciousness'). The present paper gives a comprehensive overview of the phenomenology of subjective experience in the ganzfeld and its electrophysiological correlates. Laboratory techniques for visual or multi-modal ganzfeld induction are explained. The spectrum of ganzfeld-induced phenomena, ranging from elementary percepts to complex, vivid, dream-like imagery is described, and the latter illustrated by transcripts of subjects' reports. Similarities and differences to related sensory/perceptual phenomena are also discussed. Earlier findings on electrophysiological correlates of the ganzfeld are reviewed. Our own studies of electroencephalographic (EEG) activity in the ganzfeld are presented in some detail, and a re-analysis of data on EEG correlates of hallucinatory percepts in statu nascendi is reported. The results do not support the hypothesis of the hypnagogic origin of the percepts; the ganzfeld-induced steady-state is an activated state, and the spectral EEG dynamics in the alpha frequency range reveals processes of attention shifts and percept formation. The final section is devoted to the controversial topic of allegedly anomalous communication between human subjects ('ganzfeld telepathy'). It is shown that the use of ganzfeld in this research field relies partly on unsupported hypotheses concerning ganzfeld-induced states, partly on a weak conceptual background of the experimental procedure. The rôle of a particular belief system shared by the participants and experimenters is critically discussed.

  19. Incorporating inductances in tissue-scale models of cardiac electrophysiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Simone; Griffith, Boyce E.

    2017-09-01

    In standard models of cardiac electrophysiology, including the bidomain and monodomain models, local perturbations can propagate at infinite speed. We address this unrealistic property by developing a hyperbolic bidomain model that is based on a generalization of Ohm's law with a Cattaneo-type model for the fluxes. Further, we obtain a hyperbolic monodomain model in the case that the intracellular and extracellular conductivity tensors have the same anisotropy ratio. In one spatial dimension, the hyperbolic monodomain model is equivalent to a cable model that includes axial inductances, and the relaxation times of the Cattaneo fluxes are strictly related to these inductances. A purely linear analysis shows that the inductances are negligible, but models of cardiac electrophysiology are highly nonlinear, and linear predictions may not capture the fully nonlinear dynamics. In fact, contrary to the linear analysis, we show that for simple nonlinear ionic models, an increase in conduction velocity is obtained for small and moderate values of the relaxation time. A similar behavior is also demonstrated with biophysically detailed ionic models. Using the Fenton-Karma model along with a low-order finite element spatial discretization, we numerically analyze differences between the standard monodomain model and the hyperbolic monodomain model. In a simple benchmark test, we show that the propagation of the action potential is strongly influenced by the alignment of the fibers with respect to the mesh in both the parabolic and hyperbolic models when using relatively coarse spatial discretizations. Accurate predictions of the conduction velocity require computational mesh spacings on the order of a single cardiac cell. We also compare the two formulations in the case of spiral break up and atrial fibrillation in an anatomically detailed model of the left atrium, and we examine the effect of intracellular and extracellular inductances on the virtual electrode phenomenon.

  20. Chronic flecainide therapy selected by electrophysiology testing of intravenous flecainide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somberg, J C; Tepper, D; Sacher, H; Schwarz, J

    1987-07-01

    The utility of flecainide acetate was evaluated in 93 patients by means of electrophysiologic studies before and after intravenous flecainide administration to determine long-term efficacy. Twenty patients had a prior history of at least one cardiac arrest and 73 patients had sustained ventricular tachycardia (VT). The mean radionuclear ejection fraction was 32 +/- 5%. Flecainide was evaluated in 93 patients, with 44 patients no longer having VT following flecainide (47% efficacy). Procainamide was evaluated in 69 patients; 24 patients had an adverse reaction to reaction to procainamide and 28 of the 69 patients were protected on procainamide (40% efficacy). The mean serum concentration of flecainide achieved in the protected group was 298 +/- 36 ng/ml and 4.3 micrograms/ml for procainamide. Both flecainide and procainamide significantly prolonged refractoriness, lengthened QRS duration, while only procainamide increased the QT interval. All 93 patients were discharged on antiarrhythmic therapy, 42 on flecainide, 27 on other antiarrhythmic therapy guided by electrophysiologic testing, and 24 on amiodarone (when all other agents failed). Six of the 42 patients on flecainide complained of adverse side effects, but none were severe enough to warrant stopping therapy. Of the 42 patients on flecainide, four (9%) died suddenly over 18 +/- 4 months. Twenty-seven patients were on other therapy; eight of these have died, three suddenly (11%), four with myocardial infarctions, and one due to congestive heart failure. Twenty-four patients started amiodarone; 11 have died, five (21%) suddenly, four of congestive heart failure, one of pulmonary fibrosis, and one with myocardial infarction.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  1. Scn3b knockout mice exhibit abnormal ventricular electrophysiological properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakim, Parvez; Gurung, Iman S; Pedersen, Thomas H; Thresher, Rosemary; Brice, Nicola; Lawrence, Jason; Grace, Andrew A; Huang, Christopher L-H

    2008-01-01

    We report for the first time abnormalities in cardiac ventricular electrophysiology in a genetically modified murine model lacking the Scn3b gene (Scn3b(-/-)). Scn3b(-/-) mice were created by homologous recombination in embryonic stem (ES) cells. RT-PCR analysis confirmed that Scn3b mRNA was expressed in the ventricles of wild-type (WT) hearts but was absent in the Scn3b(-/-) hearts. These hearts also showed increased expression levels of Scn1b mRNA in both ventricles and Scn5a mRNA in the right ventricles compared to findings in WT hearts. Scn1b and Scn5a mRNA was expressed at higher levels in the left than in the right ventricles of both Scn3b(-/-) and WT hearts. Bipolar electrogram and monophasic action potential recordings from the ventricles of Langendorff-perfused Scn3b(-/-) hearts demonstrated significantly shorter ventricular effective refractory periods (VERPs), larger ratios of electrogram duration obtained at the shortest and longest S(1)-S(2) intervals, and ventricular tachycardias (VTs) induced by programmed electrical stimulation. Such arrhythmogenesis took the form of either monomorphic or polymorphic VT. Despite shorter action potential durations (APDs) in both the endocardium and epicardium, Scn3b(-/-) hearts showed DeltaAPD(90) values that remained similar to those shown in WT hearts. The whole-cell patch-clamp technique applied to ventricular myocytes isolated from Scn3b(-/-) hearts demonstrated reduced peak Na(+) current densities and inactivation curves that were shifted in the negative direction, relative to those shown in WT myocytes. Together, these findings associate the lack of the Scn3b gene with arrhythmic tendencies in intact perfused hearts and electrophysiological features similar to those in Scn5a(+/-) hearts.

  2. Adenosine prevents isoprenaline-induced cardiac contractile and electrophysiological dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Yangzhen; Redfors, Björn; Mattson-Hultén, Lillemor; Scharing Täng, Margareta; Daryoni, Elma; Said, Mohammed; Omerovic, Elmir

    2013-10-15

    Excessive levels of catecholamines are believed to contribute to cardiac dysfunction in a variety of disease states, including myocardial infarction and heart failure, and are particularly implicated in stress-induced cardiomyopathy, an increasingly recognized cardiomyopathy associated with significant morbidity and mortality. We have previously shown that a high dose of isoprenaline induces reversible regional dysfunction of the left ventricle in mice. We now hypothesize that adenosine can prevent cardiac dysfunction in this mouse model of stress-induced cardiomyopathy. Hundred male C57BL/6 mice were injected with 400mg/kg isoprenaline and then randomized to either 400mg/kg adenosine or saline. Cardiac function was evaluated by echocardiography at baseline and 2, 24, 48, 72, 96 and 120 min post isoprenaline. Myocardial fibrosis was quantified after 10 days. Intracellular lipid accumulation was quantified after 2 and 24h. Electrophysiological parameters and degree of lipid accumulation were evaluated in cultured HL1 cardiomyocytes. Two hours post isoprenaline treatment, echocardiographic parameters of global and posterior wall regional function were significantly better in adenosine-treated mice (P<0.05). This difference persisted at 24h, but saline-treated mice gradually recovered over the next 96 h. Intracellular lipid accumulation was also significantly lower in adenosine mice. We found no sign of fibrosis in the adenosine mice, whereas the extent of fibrosis in isoprenaline mice was 1.3% (P<0.05). Furthermore, adenosine-treated HL1 cells showed preserved electrophysiological function and displayed less severe intracellular lipid accumulation in response to isoprenaline. In conclusion, adenosine attenuates isoprenaline-induced cardiac dysfunction in mice and cells. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Nutrition and vascular dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, L; Heim, L; Sherzai, A; Jaceldo-Siegl, K; Sherzai, A

    2012-04-01

    The objective of this review was to elucidate the relationship between VaD and various nutritional factors based on epidemiological studies. Vascular dementia (VaD) is the second most common type of dementia. The prevalence of VaD continues to increase as the US population continues to grow and age. Currently, control of potential risk factors is believed to be the most effective means of preventing VaD. Thus, identification of modifiable risk factors for VaD is crucial for development of effective treatment modalities. Nutrition is one of the main modifiable variables that may influence the development of VaD. A systematic review of literature was conducted using the PubMed, Web of Science, and CINAHL Plus databases with search parameters inclusive of vascular dementia, nutrition, and vascular cognitive impairment (VCI). Fourteen articles were found that proposed a potential role of specific nutritional components in VaD. These components included antioxidants, lipids, homocysteine, folate, vitamin B12, and fish consumption. Antioxidants, specifically Vitamin E and C, and fatty fish intake were found to be protective against VaD risk. Fried fish, elevated homocysteine, and lower levels of folate and vitamin B12 were associated with increased VaD. Evidence for dietary lipids was inconsistent, although elevated midlife serum cholesterol may increase risk, while late-life elevated serum cholesterol may be associated with decreased risk of VaD. Currently, the most convincing evidence as to the relationship between VaD and nutrition exists for micronutrients, particularly Vitamin E and C. Exploration of nutrition at the macronutrient level and additional long term prospective cohort studies are warranted to better understand the role of nutrition in VaD disease development and progression. At present, challenges in this research include limitations in sample size, which was commonly cited. Also, a variety of diagnostic criteria for VaD were employed in the studies

  4. The Danish Vascular Registry, Karbase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eldrup N

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Nikolaj Eldrup,1,2 Charlotte Cerqueira,3 Louise de la Motte,2,4 Lisbet Knudsen Rathenborg,2,4 Allan K Hansen2,5 1Department of Cardiothoracic and Vascular Surgery, Aarhus University Hospital, 2Karbase, The Danish Vascular Registry, Aarhus, 3Registry Support Centre (East – Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Research Centre for Prevention and Health, Capital Region of Denmark, 4Department of Vascular Surgery, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen University Hospital, Copenhagen, 5Department of Vascular Surgery, Aalborg University Hospital, Aalborg, Denmark Aim: The Danish Vascular Registry (DVR, Karbase, is monitoring arterial and advanced vein interventions conducted at all vascular departments in Denmark. The main aim of the DVR is to improve the quality of treatment for patients undergoing vascular surgery in Denmark by using the registry for quality assessment and research. Study population: All patients undergoing vascular interventions (surgical and endovascular at any vascular department in Denmark are registered in the DVR. The DVR was initiated in 1989, and each year, ~9,000 procedures are added. By January 2016, .180,000 procedures have been recorded. Since 2001, data completeness has been .90% (compared to the Danish National Patient Register. Main variables: Variables include information on descriptive patient data (ie, age, sex, height, and weight and comorbidity (ie, previous cardiovascular disease and diabetes. Process variable includes waiting time (time from event to medical contact and treatment and the type of procedures conducted. Outcome variables for in-hospital complications (ie, wound complications, myocardial infarction, stroke, amputation, respiratory complications, and renal insufficiency and 30-day patency are submitted. Variables for medical treatment (antithrombotic and statin treatment, amputation, and survival are extracted from nationwide, administrative registers. Conclusion: The DVR reports outcome on key indicators for

  5. Clinical and electrophysiological efficacy of leaf extract of Gingko ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    histological features of injured sciatic nerve in a rat model [14,15]. Oxidative stress leads to vascular, microvascular and specific tissue complications in diabetes, therefore oxidative stress modifiers play a pivotal role in therapy of. DSP [16]. However, there is a dearth of knowledge about the potential use of Ginkgo biloba in ...

  6. Estimation of permeability and permeability anisotropy in horizontal wells through numerical simulation of mud filtrate invasion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pereira, Nelson [PETROBRAS S.A., Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Exploracao e Producao; Altman, Raphael; Rasmus, John; Oliveira, Jansen [Schlumberger Servicos de Petroleo Ltda., Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2008-07-01

    This paper describes how permeability and permeability anisotropy is estimated in horizontal wells using LWD (logging-while-drilling) laterolog resistivity data. Laterolog-while-drilling resistivity passes of while-drilling and timelapse (while reaming) were used to capture the invasion process. Radial positions of water based mud invasion fronts were calculated from while-drilling and reaming resistivity data. The invasion process was then recreated by constructing forward models with a fully implicit, near-wellbore numerical simulation such that the invasion front at a given time was consistent with the position of the front predicted by resistivity inversions. The radial position of the invasion front was shown to be sensitive to formation permeability. The while-drilling environment provides a fertile scenario to investigate reservoir dynamic properties because mud cake integrity and growth is not fully developed which means that the position of the invasion front at a particular point in time is more sensitive to formation permeability. The estimation of dynamic formation properties in horizontal wells is of particular value in marginal fields and deep-water offshore developments where running wireline and obtaining core is not always feasible, and where the accuracy of reservoir models can reduce the risk in field development decisions. (author)

  7. GAS PERMEABILITY OF GEOSYNTHETIC CLAY LINERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helena Vučenović

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Geosynthetic clay liners (GCL are manufactured hydraulic barriers consisting of mineral and geosynthetic components. They belong to a group of geosynthetic products whose primary purpose is to seal and they have been used in many geotechnical and hydrotechnical applications, landfi lls and liquid waste lagoons for quite a while. They are used in landfill final cover systems to prevent the infi ltration of precipitation into the landfi ll body and the penetration of gases and liquids from the landfill into the atmosphere and environment. Laboratory and fi eld research and observations on regulated landfi lls have proven the eff ectiveness of GCL as a barrier for the infi ltration of precipitation into the landfi ll body as well as the drainage of fl uid beneath the landfill. Due to the presence of high concentrations of gases in the landfill body, there is a growing interest in determining the efficiency of GCL as a gas barrier. It was not until the last twenty years that the importance of this topic was recognized. In this article, current GCL gas permeability studies, the testing methods and test results of gas permeability in laboratory conditions are described.

  8. Gas permeable-membrane for hydrogenotrophic denitrification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hasar, Halil [Center for Biotechnology Research, Firat University, Elazig (Turkey); Ipek, Ubeyde [Department of Environmental Engineering, Firat University, Elazig (Turkey)

    2010-01-15

    The membrane biofilm reactor (MBfR) involves a process in which the membrane provides effective H{sub 2}utilization as an electron donor. MBfRs overcome the problems caused from the particularly low solubility of the gas delivered into a liquid by means of a gas-permeable membrane. The study demonstrates that the MBfR is successful in the effective removal of nitrate from drinking water or nitrified water, involving a hydraulic retention time of 25 min for a maximum nitrate removal of 98%. The H{sub 2} flux reaches a level of 1.24 g H{sub 2}/m {sup 2} d when the denitrification rate achieves 3.5 g N/m {sup 2} d at 0.2 atm H{sub 2} pressure. The results indicate that the biofilm on outer walls of the gas permeable membrane utilizes all of the H{sub 2} gas effectively as an electron donor since the H{sub 2} is not detectable in the bulk liquid. In the future, the MBfR could be an attractive process for water and wastewater engineers due to its applicability for treatment of secondary effluent from industrial and municipal wastewater and drinking water. (Abstract Copyright [2010], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  9. Haemophilia, AIDS and lung epithelial permeability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Doherty, M.J.; Page, C.J.; Harrington, C.; Nunan, T.; Savidge, G. (Haemophilia Centre and Coagulation Research Unit, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Rayne Institute, St. Thomas' Hospital, London (United Kingdom))

    1990-01-01

    Lung {sup 99m}Tc DTPA transfer was measured in HIV antibodypositive haemophiliacs (11 smokers, 26 nonsmokers, 5 patients with Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia (PCP)). Lung {sup 99m}Tc DTPA transfer as a marker of lung epithelial permeability was measured as the half time of transfer (from airspace into blood). This half time was faster in smokers compred to nonsmokers and the transfer curve was monoexponential. In nonsmokers no difference was observed between asymptomatic HIV-positive haemophiliacs and normal subjects, with the exception of the lung bases. At the lung basis in HIV-positive haemophiliac nonsmokers the transfer was faster than in normal individuals, implying increased alveolar permeability. Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia resulted in a rapid transfer of {sup 99m}Tc DTPA (mean T50 of 2 minutes) and the transfer curve was biphasic, confirming previous observations in homosexual HIV antibody-positive patients with PCP. These changes returned to a monoexponential profile by 6 weeks following successful treatment. The DTPA lung transfer study may enable clinicians to instigate therapy for PCP without the need for initial bronchoscopy and provide a noninvasive method for the reassessment of patients should further respiratory signs or symptoms develop. This method is considered to be highly cost-effective in that it obviates the use of factor VIII concentrates required to cover bronchoscopic procedures and, with its early application and ease of use as a follow-up investigation, permits the evaluation of patients on an outpatient basis, thus reducing hospital costs. (au).

  10. Air sparging in low permeability soils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marley, M.C. [Envirogen, Inc., Canton, MA (United States)

    1996-08-01

    Sparging technology is rapidly growing as a preferred, low cost remediation technique of choice at sites across the United States. The technology is considered to be commercially available and relatively mature. However, the maturity is based on the number of applications of the technology as opposed to the degree of understanding of the mechanisms governing the sparging process. Few well documented case studies exist on the long term operation of the technology. Sparging has generally been applied using modified monitoring well designs in uniform, coarse grained soils. The applicability of sparging for the remediation of DNAPLs in low permeability media has not been significantly explored. Models for projecting the performance of sparging systems in either soils condition are generally simplistic but can be used to provide general insight into the effects of significant changes in soil and fluid properties. The most promising sparging approaches for the remediation of DNAPLs in low permeability media are variations or enhancements to the core technology. Recirculatory sparging systems, sparging/biosparging trenches or curtains and heating or induced fracturing techniques appear to be the most promising technology variants for this type of soil. 21 refs., 9 figs.

  11. Role of sulfhydryls and early vascular lesions in gastric mucosal injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szabó, S

    1984-01-01

    This paper reviews the recently discovered role of sulfhydryls and early vascular injury in the pathogenesis of acute gastric mucosal injury. In the rat ethanol caused a dose-dependent decrease in nonprotein sulfhydryl concentration in the gastric mucosa within 1-5 min following an intragastric dose. These biochemical changes were accompanied by increased vascular permeability in the glandular stomach as revealed by the measurement of extravasated Evans blue injected i.v. prior to the administration of ethanol. Morphologic evidence of vascular injury was provided by labelling of damaged blood vessels in the stomach following the i.v. administration of colloidal particles in the form of india ink or monastral blue. The functional and structural damage to capillaries and venules in the glandular stomach was also maximal within 1-6 min after 1 ml of 75 or 100% ethanol given orally. Pretreatment with sulfhydryl (SH) containing drugs (e.g., L-cysteine, N-acetyl-L-cysteine, cysteamine, dimercaprol) or prostaglandin (PG) F2 beta prevented the ethanol-induced increase in vascular permeability, the labelling of blood vessels with vascular tracers, and the subsequent haemorrhagic erosions. The desquamation of superficial epithelial cells, however, was not markedly modified by either SH or PG compounds. This organoprotective effect of SH and PG drugs was virtually counteracted in adrenalectomized rats that exhibited "vascular fragility". Glucocorticoid treatment restored the response of adrenalectomized animals. Thus, a SH- and glucocorticoid-sensitive early vascular injury seems to be of major significance in the pathogenesis of haemorrhagic gastric erosions and SH-containing compounds represent a new group of cytoprotective or organoprotective agents.

  12. Diagnostic criteria for vascular dementia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scheltens, P.; Hijdra, A. H.

    1998-01-01

    The term vascular dementia implies the presence of a clinical syndrome (dementia) caused by, or at least assumed to be caused by, a specific disorder (cerebrovascular disease). In this review, the various sets of criteria used to define vascular dementia are outlined. The various sets of criteria

  13. Dynamic adaption of vascular morphology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Okkels, Fridolin; Jacobsen, Jens Christian Brings

    2012-01-01

    The structure of vascular networks adapts continuously to meet changes in demand of the surrounding tissue. Most of the known vascular adaptation mechanisms are based on local reactions to local stimuli such as pressure and flow, which in turn reflects influence from the surrounding tissue. Here ...

  14. Calculation of large scale relative permeabilities from stochastic properties of the permeability field and fluid properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lenormand, R.; Thiele, M.R. [Institut Francais du Petrole, Rueil Malmaison (France)

    1997-08-01

    The paper describes the method and presents preliminary results for the calculation of homogenized relative permeabilities using stochastic properties of the permeability field. In heterogeneous media, the spreading of an injected fluid is mainly sue to the permeability heterogeneity and viscosity fingering. At large scale, when the heterogeneous medium is replaced by a homogeneous one, we need to introduce a homogenized (or pseudo) relative permeability to obtain the same spreading. Generally, is derived by using fine-grid numerical simulations (Kyte and Berry). However, this operation is time consuming and cannot be performed for all the meshes of the reservoir. We propose an alternate method which uses the information given by the stochastic properties of the field without any numerical simulation. The method is based on recent developments on homogenized transport equations (the {open_quotes}MHD{close_quotes} equation, Lenormand SPE 30797). The MHD equation accounts for the three basic mechanisms of spreading of the injected fluid: (1) Dispersive spreading due to small scale randomness, characterized by a macrodispersion coefficient D. (2) Convective spreading due to large scale heterogeneities (layers) characterized by a heterogeneity factor H. (3) Viscous fingering characterized by an apparent viscosity ration M. In the paper, we first derive the parameters D and H as functions of variance and correlation length of the permeability field. The results are shown to be in good agreement with fine-grid simulations. The are then derived a function of D, H and M. The main result is that this approach lead to a time dependent . Finally, the calculated are compared to the values derived by history matching using fine-grid numerical simulations.

  15. Effect of Nesting on the Permeability of Multilayer Unidirectional Fabrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Jianjun; Su, Yang; Zhou, Linchao; Guo, Qiang; Xu, Chumeng; Deng, Guoli; Chen, Xing; Yao, Xuming; Fang, Liangchao

    2017-06-01

    Nesting of layers is the main source of the variations in permeability values in liquid composite molding (LCM) processes. In this paper, the permeability of unidirectional fabrics was modeled as a function of layer shift and geometrical yarn parameters to study the effect of nesting. Firstly, three different unit cells of two layers were modeled based on the range of layer shift and decomposed into zones of characteristic yarn arrangement, respectively. The overall permeability of each unit cell was then modeled as a mixture of local permeabilities of different zones with the electrical resistance analogy. Secondly, every two adjacent layers were regarded as porous media with different permeabilities. The permeability of multilayer unidirectional fabrics was then modeled with electrical resistance analogy. As the unpredictability of layer shifting in actual process, the statistical characteristics were analyzed theoretically and validated with experimental measurements. Excellent agreement was found between predictions and experiment data.

  16. Variational calculation of the effective fluid permeability of heterogeneous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hristopulos, Dionissios T.; Christakos, George

    1997-06-01

    We evaluate the effective permeability of heterogeneous media with Gaussian local permeability disorder using the replica-variational approach. We obtain integral equations that determine the effective permeability kernel, and we study specific cases that admit analytical solutions. Specifically, in the case of homogeneous disorder we obtain a variational estimate for the uniform effective permeability. We compare the results of our analytical calculations with experimental and numerical data. Finally, we model the behavior of the effective permeability in the preasymptotic regime by means of momentum filters. Explicit finite-size expressions are obtained in terms of a support function that increases monotonically with the ratio of the support scale over the correlation length of the disorder. It is found that the asymptotic effective permeability is approached at a slower rate than expected.

  17. Herbal medicines that benefit epidermal permeability barrier function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lizhi Hu

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Epidermal permeability barrier function plays a critical role in regulating cutaneous functions. Hence, researchers have been searching for effective and affordable regimens to enhance epidermal permeability barrier function. In addition to topical stratum corneum lipids, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor, and liver X receptor ligands, herbal medicines have been proven to benefit epidermal permeability barrier function in both normal and diseased skin, including atopic dermatitis, glucocorticoid-induced skin damage, and UVB-damaged skin. The potential mechanisms by which herbal medicines improve the permeability barrier include stimulation of epidermal differentiation, lipid production, antimicrobial peptide expression, and antioxidation. Therefore, utilization of herbal medicines could be a valuable alternative approach to enhance epidermal permeability barrier function in order to prevent and/or treat skin disorders associated with permeability barrier abnormalities.

  18. Therapeutic benefits of enhancing permeability barrier for atopic eczema

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Man

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The regulatory role of epidermal permeability barrier function in cutaneous inflammation has been well appreciated. While barrier disruption induces cutaneous inflammation, improvement of permeability barrier function alleviates inflammation. Studies have demonstrated that improvement of epidermal permeability barrier function not only prevents the development of atopic eczema, but also delays the relapse of these diseases. Moreover, enhancing the epidermal permeability barrier also alleviates atopic eczema. Furthermore, co-applications of barrier enhancing products with glucocorticoids can increase the therapeutic efficacy and reduce the adverse effects of glucocorticoids in the treatment of atopic eczema. Therefore, utilization of permeability barrier enhancing products alone or in combination with glucocorticoids could be a valuable approach in the treatment of atopic eczema. In this review, we discuss the benefits of improving the epidermal permeability barrier in the management of atopic eczema.

  19. Negative permeability in magnetostatics and its experimental demonstration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mach-Batlle, Rosa; Parra, Albert; Prat-Camps, Jordi; Laut, Sergi; Navau, Carles; Sanchez, Alvaro

    2017-09-01

    The control of magnetic fields, essential for our science and technology, is currently achieved by magnetic materials with positive permeability, including ferromagnetic, paramagnetic, and diamagnetic types. Here we introduce materials with negative static permeability as a new paradigm for manipulating magnetic fields. As a first step, we extend the solutions of Maxwell magnetostatic equations to include negative-permeability values. The understanding of these new solutions allow us to devise a negative-permeability material as a suitably tailored set of currents arranged in space, overcoming the fact that passive materials with negative permeability do no exist in magnetostatics. We confirm the theory by experimentally creating a spherical shell that emulates a negative-permeability material in a uniform magnetic field. Our results open new possibilities for creating and manipulating magnetic fields, which can be useful for practical applications.

  20. Quantifying the evolution of vascular barrier disruption in advanced atherosclerosis with semipermeant nanoparticle contrast agents.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huiying Zhang

    Full Text Available Acute atherothrombotic occlusion in heart attack and stroke implies disruption of the vascular endothelial barrier that exposes a highly procoagulant intimal milieu. However, the evolution, severity, and pathophysiological consequences of vascular barrier damage in atherosclerotic plaque remain unknown, in part because quantifiable methods and experimental models are lacking for its in vivo assessment.To develop quantitative nondestructive methodologies and models for detecting vascular barrier disruption in advanced plaques.Sustained hypercholesterolemia in New Zealand White (NZW rabbits for >7-14 months engendered endothelial barrier disruption that was evident from massive and rapid passive penetration and intimal trapping of perfluorocarbon-core nanoparticles (PFC-NP: ∼250 nm diameter after in vivo circulation for as little as 1 hour. Only older plaques (>7 mo, but not younger plaques (<3 mo demonstrated the marked enhancement of endothelial permeability to these particles. Electron microscopy revealed a complex of subintimal spongiform channels associated with endothelial apoptosis, superficial erosions, and surface-penetrating cholesterol crystals. Fluorine ((19F magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy (MRI/MRS enabled absolute quantification (in nanoMolar of the passive permeation of PFC-NP into the disrupted vascular lesions by sensing the unique spectral signatures from the fluorine core of plaque-bound PFC-NP.The application of semipermeant nanoparticles reveals the presence of profound barrier disruption in later stage plaques and focuses attention on the disrupted endothelium as a potential contributor to plaque vulnerability. The response to sustained high cholesterol levels yields a progressive deterioration of the vascular barrier that can be quantified with fluorine MRI/MRS of passively permeable nanostructures. The possibility of plaque classification based on the metric of endothelial permeability to nanoparticles is

  1. Caffeine's Vascular Mechanisms of Action

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darío Echeverri

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Caffeine is the most widely consumed stimulating substance in the world. It is found in coffee, tea, soft drinks, chocolate, and many medications. Caffeine is a xanthine with various effects and mechanisms of action in vascular tissue. In endothelial cells, it increases intracellular calcium stimulating the production of nitric oxide through the expression of the endothelial nitric oxide synthase enzyme. Nitric oxide is diffused to the vascular smooth muscle cell to produce vasodilation. In vascular smooth muscle cells its effect is predominantly a competitive inhibition of phosphodiesterase, producing an accumulation of cAMP and vasodilation. In addition, it blocks the adenosine receptors present in the vascular tissue to produce vasoconstriction. In this paper the main mechanisms of action of caffeine on the vascular tissue are described, in which it is shown that caffeine has some cardiovascular properties and effects which could be considered beneficial.

  2. The Danish Vascular Registry, Karbase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eldrup, Nikolaj; Cerqueira, Charlotte; de la Motte, Louise

    2016-01-01

    AIM: The Danish Vascular Registry (DVR), Karbase, is monitoring arterial and advanced vein interventions conducted at all vascular departments in Denmark. The main aim of the DVR is to improve the quality of treatment for patients undergoing vascular surgery in Denmark by using the registry...... for quality assessment and research. STUDY POPULATION: All patients undergoing vascular interventions (surgical and endovascular) at any vascular department in Denmark are registered in the DVR. The DVR was initiated in 1989, and each year, ∼9,000 procedures are added. By January 2016, >180,000 procedures...... have been recorded. Since 2001, data completeness has been >90% (compared to the Danish National Patient Register). MAIN VARIABLES: Variables include information on descriptive patient data (ie, age, sex, height, and weight) and comorbidity (ie, previous cardiovascular disease and diabetes). Process...

  3. Social media in vascular surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Indes, Jeffrey E; Gates, Lindsay; Mitchell, Erica L; Muhs, Bart E

    2013-04-01

    There has been a tremendous growth in the use of social media to expand the visibility of various specialties in medicine. The purpose of this paper is to describe the latest updates on some current applications of social media in the practice of vascular surgery as well as existing limitations of use. This investigation demonstrates that the use of social networking sites appears to have a positive impact on vascular practice, as is evident through the incorporation of this technology at the Cleveland Clinic and by the Society for Vascular Surgery into their approach to patient care and physician communication. Overall, integration of social networking technology has current and future potential to be used to promote goals, patient awareness, recruitment for clinical trials, and professionalism within the specialty of vascular surgery. Copyright © 2013 Society for Vascular Surgery. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Noninfarct vascular dementia and Alzheimer dementia spectrum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emery, V Olga; Gillie, Edward X; Smith, Joseph A

    2005-03-15

    Vascular dementia is an overarching superordinate category of which multiinfarct vascular dementia is only one subtype. To contribute to the definition of vascular dementia, method involved investigation of mental status, oral language and comprehension in 81 consecutive vascular patients comprising two vascular samples: cerebral infarct sample (n=43) and cerebral noninfarct sample (n=38). To determine baseline, method also involved investigation of 36 demographically equivalent normal elderly. Results indicate both vascular samples performed significantly worse than normal elderly. Results further indicate there were no robust, reliable, significant differences between cerebral infarct and cerebral noninfarct patients. The lack of significant differences between cerebral infarct and cerebral noninfarct vascular samples brings into focus the ambiguous transition between diffuse, generalized disease and the multifocality underlying the vascular dementia-Alzheimer dementia spectrum. Cross-cutting infarct and noninfarct vascular populations were vascular factors of arteriosclerosis, abnormal blood pressure, diabetes mellitus, abnormal electrocardiogram, peripheral vascular disease, and other variables implicated in the distal causality of both infarct and noninfarct vascular dementias. Results indicate cerebral infarction is not the only path to the final common phenotype of vascular dementia. Vascular dementia is reconceptualized so as to include noninfarct vascular dementia: vascular dementia caused by underlying vascular factors other than cerebral infarction. It is suggested that one form of the subtype of noninfarct vascular dementia is Alzheimer-type vascular dementia.

  5. The role of CB1 in intestinal permeability and inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karwad, Mustafa A; Couch, Daniel G; Theophilidou, Elena; Sarmad, Sarir; Barrett, David A; Larvin, Michael; Wright, Karen L; Lund, Jonathan N; O'Sullivan, Saoirse E

    2017-08-01

    The endocannabinoid system has previously been shown to play a role in the permeability and inflammatory response of the human gut. The goal of our study was to determine the effects of endogenous anandamide (AEA) and 2-arachidonoyl glycerol (2-AG) on the permeability and inflammatory response of intestinal epithelium under normal, inflammatory, and hypoxic conditions. Human intestinal mucosa was modeled using Caco-2 cells. Human tissue was collected from planned colorectal resections. Accumulation of AEA and 2-AG was achieved by inhibiting their metabolizing enzymes URB597 (a fatty acid amide hydrolase inhibitor) and JZL184 (a monoacylglycerol lipase inhibitor). Inflammation and ischemia were simulated with TNF-α and IFN-γ and oxygen deprivation. Permeability changes were measured by transepithelial electrical resistance. The role of the CB1 receptor was explored using CB1-knockdown (CB1Kd) intestinal epithelial cells. Endocannabinoid levels were measured using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. Cytokine secretion was measured using multiplex and ELISA. URB597 and JZL184 caused a concentration-dependent increase in permeability via CB1 (P permeability via CB1 (P permeability caused by inflammation and hypoxia (P permeability response to inflammation (P permeability and in inflammatory and hypoxic conditions.-Karwad, M. A., Couch, D. G., Theophilidou, E., Sarmad, S., Barrett, D. A., Larvin, M., Wright, K. L., Lund, J. N., O'Sullivan, S. E. The role of CB1 in intestinal permeability and inflammation. © FASEB.

  6. A Permeability-Porosity Relationship for Surface Deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weir, G.J.; White, S.P.

    1995-01-01

    The changes to porosity and permeability resulting from surface deposition and early dissolution in an initial rhombohedral array of uniform spheres are calculated. Very rapid decreases of permeability result from early deposition, with 48% reduction predicted in permeability from 8% reduction in porosity. After deposition has caused about a 1% increase in the radii of the spherical array, relative permeability reductions vary approximately as the square of relative changes in porosity. These theoretical results are matched with experimental data of Ioti et al. and shown to be satisfactory in some cases, but for others, a more complex model of the porous medium is needed.

  7. Partial epineural burying of nerve grafts with different sizes next to or distant from neurorrhaphy?s site: histological and electrophysiological studies in rat sciatic nerves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cunha Marco Túlio Rodrigues da

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to compare and correlate histologically and electromyographically the effects of partial epineural burying of sural nerve segments in sectioned and sutured rat sciatic nerves. Sixty adult male Wistar rats were operated on 3 groups: Group 1, sural nerve graft, 9mm long, placed next to neurorrhaphy; Group 2, sural nerve graft, 9mm long, buryied 10mm distant from neurorrhaphy; Group 3, sural nerve graft, 18mm long, set next to neurorrhaphy. The morphological features were examined at light microscope after 3 months in 45 rats. The elements observed were: vascularization, vacuoles in nerve fibers, mastocytes and inflammatory infiltrate. The morphometry was made after 6 months in 15 rats from Group 1, 2 and 3, measuring external nerve fiber diameters and counting myelinated nerve fibers/mm². The electrophysiological study was perfomed after 6 months, registering maximum amplitude and frequency of EMG pontentials, at rest, in extensor digitorum longus muscle. Group 3 rats presented sciatic nerves better conserved morphologically and mean external nerve fiber diameters greater than those from Groups 1 and 2. There were no significant differences in density of nerve fibers/mm², and in the electrophysiological study in rats from Group 1, 2 and 3. The epineural burying of sural nerve grafts with greater length and placed next to the neurorrhaphy?s site had a significantly better regeneration of the histological features than the smaller ones distant from neurorrhaphy.

  8. Composite binders for concrete with reduced permeability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fediuk, R.; Yushin, A.

    2016-02-01

    Composite binder consisting of cement (55%), acid fly ash (40%) and limestone (5%) has been designed. It is obtained by co-milling to a specific surface of 550 kg/m2, it has an activity of 77.3 MPa and can produce a more dense cement stone structure. Integrated study revealed that the concrete on the composite binder basis provides an effective diffusion coefficient D. So we can conclude that the concrete layer protects buildings from toxic effects of expanded polystyrene. Low water absorption of the material (2.5% by weight) is due to the structure of its cement stone pore space. Besides lime powder prevents the penetration of moisture, reduces water saturation of the coverage that has a positive effect on useful life period. It also explains rather low water vapor permeability of the material - 0.021 mg/(m- hour-Pa).

  9. Permeability of Dental Adhesives - A SEM Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malacarne-Zanon, Juliana; de Andrade E Silva, Safira M; Wang, Linda; de Goes, Mario F; Martins, Adriano Luis; Narvaes-Romani, Eliene O; Anido-Anido, Andrea; Carrilho, Marcela R O

    2010-10-01

    To morphologically evaluate the permeability of different commercial dental adhesives using scanning electron microscopy. SEVEN ADHESIVE SYSTEMS WERE EVALUATED: one three-step system (Scotchbond Multi-Purpose - MP); one two-step self-etching primer system (Clearfil SE Bond - SE); three two-step etch-and-rinse systems (Single Bond 2 - SB; Excite - EX; One-Step - OS); and two single-step self-etching adhesives (Adper Prompt - AP; One-Up Bond F - OU). The mixture of primer and bond agents of the Clearfil SE Bond system (SE-PB) was also tested. The adhesives were poured into a brass mold (5.8 mm x 0.8 mm) and light-cured for 80 s at 650 mW/cm2. After a 24 h desiccation process, the specimens were immersed in a 50% ammoniac silver nitrate solution for tracer permeation. Afterwards, they were sectioned in ultra-fine slices, carbon-coated, and analyzed under backscattered electrons in a scanning electron microscopy. MP and SE showed slight and superficial tracer permeation. In EX, SB, and OS, permeation extended beyond the inner superficies of the specimens. SE-PB did not mix well, and most of the tracer was precipitated into the primer agent. In AP and OU, "water-trees" were observed all over the specimens. Different materials showed distinct permeability in aqueous solution. The extent of tracer permeation varied according to the composition of each material and it was more evident in the more hydrophilic and solvated ones.

  10. Colloid transport in dual-permeability media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leij, Feike J; Bradford, Scott A

    2013-07-01

    It has been widely reported that colloids can travel faster and over longer distances in natural structured porous media than in uniform structureless media used in laboratory studies. The presence of preferential pathways for colloids in the subsurface environment is of concern because of the increased risks for disease caused by microorganisms and colloid-associated contaminants. This study presents a model for colloid transport in dual-permeability media that includes reversible and irreversible retention of colloids and first-order exchange between the aqueous phases of the two regions. The model may also be used to describe transport of other reactive solutes in dual-permeability media. Analytical solutions for colloid concentrations in aqueous and solid phases were obtained using Laplace transformation and matrix decomposition. The solutions proved convenient to assess the effect of model parameters on the colloid distribution. The analytical model was used to describe effluent concentrations for a bromide tracer and 3.2- or 1-μm-colloids that were observed after transport through a composite 10-cm long porous medium made up of a cylindrical lens or core of sand and a surrounding matrix with sand of a different grain size. The tracer data were described very well and realistic estimates were obtained for the pore-water velocity in the two flow domains. An accurate description was also achieved for most colloid breakthrough curves. Dispersivity and retention parameters were typically greater for the larger 3.2-μm-colloids while both reversible and irreversible retention rates tended to be higher for the finer sands than the coarser sand. The relatively small sample size and the complex flow pattern in the composite medium made it difficult to reach definitive conclusions regarding transport parameters for colloid transport. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Contemporary vascular smartphone medical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Thomas; O'Neill, Stephen; Johns, Neil; Brady, Richard R W

    2013-08-01

    Use of smartphones and medical mHealth applications (apps) within the clinical environment provides a potential means for delivering elements of vascular care. This article reviews the contemporary availability of apps specifically themed to major vascular diseases and the opportunities and concerns regarding their integration into practice. Smartphone apps relating to major vascular diseases were identified from the app stores for the 6 most popular smartphone platforms, including iPhone, Android, Blackberry, Nokia, Windows, and Samsung. Search terms included peripheral artery (arterial) disease, varicose veins, aortic aneurysm, carotid artery disease, amputation, ulcers, hyperhydrosis, thoracic outlet syndrome, vascular malformation, and lymphatic disorders. Forty-nine vascular-themed apps were identified. Sixteen (33%) were free of charge. Fifteen apps (31%) had customer satisfaction ratings, but only 3 (6%) had greater than 100. Only 13 apps (27%) had documented medical professional involvement in their design or content. The integration of apps into the delivery of care has the potential to benefit vascular health care workers and patients. However, high-quality apps designed by clinicians with vascular expertise are currently lacking and represent an area of concern in the mHealth market. Improvement in the quality and reliability of these apps will require the development of robust regulation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Hydraulic Permeability of Resorcinol-Formaldehyde Resin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, Paul Allen [ORNL

    2010-01-01

    An ion exchange process using spherical resorcinol-formaldehyde (RF) resin is the baseline process for removing cesium from the dissolved salt solution in the high-level waste tanks at the Hanford Site, using large scale columns as part of the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP). The RF resin is also being evaluated for use in the proposed small column ion exchange (SCIX) system, which is an alternative treatment option at Hanford and at the Savannah River Site (SRS). A recirculating test loop with a small ion exchange column was used to measure the effect of oxygen uptake and radiation exposure on the permeability of a packed bed of the RF resin. The lab-scale column was designed to be prototypic of the proposed Hanford columns at the WTP. Although the test equipment was designed to model the Hanford ion exchange columns, the data on changes in the hydraulic permeability of the resin will also be valuable for determining potential pressure drops through the proposed SCIX system. The superficial fluid velocity in the lab-scale test (3.4-5.7 cm/s) was much higher than is planned for the full-scale Hanford columns to generate the maximum pressure drop expected in those columns (9.7 psig). The frictional drag from this high velocity produced forces on the resin in the lab-scale tests that matched the design basis of the full-scale Hanford column. Any changes in the resin caused by the radiation exposure and oxygen uptake were monitored by measuring the pressure drop through the lab-scale column and the physical properties of the resin. Three hydraulic test runs were completed, the first using fresh RF resin at 25 C, the second using irradiated resin at 25 C, and the third using irradiated resin at 45 C. A Hanford AP-101 simulant solution was recirculated through a test column containing 500 mL of Na-form RF resin. Known amounts of oxygen were introduced into the primary recirculation loop by saturating measured volumes of the simulant solution with oxygen and reintroducing

  13. Permeability of alkaline magmas: a study from Campi Flegrei, Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polacci, M.; Bouvet de Maissoneuve, C.; Giordano, D.; Piochi, M.; Degruyter, W.; Bachmann, O.; Mancini, L.

    2012-04-01

    Knowledge of permeability is of paramount importance for understanding the evolution of magma degassing during pre-, syn- and post-eruptive volcanic processes. Most permeability estimates existing to date refer to magmas of calc-alkaline compositions. We report here the preliminary results of permeability measurements performed on alkali-trachyte products erupted from the Campanian Ignimbrite (CI) and Monte Nuovo (MTN), two explosive eruptions from Campi Flegrei (CF), an active, hazardous caldera west of Naples, Southern Italy. Darcian (viscous) permeability spans a wide range between 10^-11 and 10^-14 m^2. We observe that the most permeable samples are the scoria clasts from the upper units of MTN; pumice samples from the Breccia Museo facies of CI are instead the least permeable. Non-Darcian (inertial) permeability follows the same trend as Darcian permeability. The first implication of this study is that porosity in alkaline as well as calc-alkaline magmas does not exert a first order control on permeability (e.g. the MTN samples are the most permeable but not the most porous). Second, sample geometry exhibits permeability anisotropy (higher permeability in the direction of vesicle elongation), suggesting stronger degassing in the vertical direction in the conduit. In addition, inertial effects are higher across the sample. As inertial effects are potentially generated by tortuosity (or tortuous vesicle paths), tortuosity is likely higher horizontally than vertically in the conduit. Finally, the measured CF permeability values overlap with those of rhyolitic pumice clasts from the Kos Plateau Tuff (Bouvet de Maisonneuve et al., 2009), together with CI one of the major Quaternary explosive eruptions of the Mediterranean region. This indicates that gas flow is strongly controlled by the geometry of the porous media, which is generated by the bubble dynamics during magma ascent. Therefore, permeability will depend on composition through the rheological properties

  14. Multiple adjustable vascular clamp prototype: feasibility study on an experimental model of end-to-side microsurgical vascular anastomosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, A; Ichihara, S; Collon, S; Bodin, F; Gay, A; Facca, S; Liverneaux, P

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this study was to establish the feasibility of microsurgical end-to-side vascular anastomosis with a multiclamp adjustable vascular clamp prototype in an inert experimental model. Our method consisted of performing an end-to-side microsurgical anastomosis with 10/0 suture on a 2-mm diameter segment. In group 1, the end-to-side segment was held in place by a double clamp and a single end clamp. In group 2, the segment was held in place with a single multiclamp adjustable clamp. The average time for performing the anastomosis was shorter in group 2. The average number of sutures was the same in both groups. No leak was found and permeability was always positive in both groups. Our results show that performing end-to-side anastomosis with a multiclamp adjustable vascular clamp is feasible in an inert experimental model. Feasibility in a live animal model has to be demonstrated before clinical use. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. Depression in vascular dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naarding, Paul; de Koning, Inge; dan Kooten, Fop; Dippel, Diederik W J; Janzing, Joost G E; van der Mast, Rose C; Koudstaal, Peter J

    2003-04-01

    To study the presence of different dimensions of depression in subjects with vascular dementia. After a stroke, cognitive, affective and behavioural disturbances are common. It has been suggested that the nature of affective symptomatology can help to differentiate organic from psychological depression. Cognitive and affective symptoms were assessed in 78 stroke patients and a principal component analysis was performed on these symptoms. Also, a discriminant analysis was carried out to establish the contribution of different symptoms on the diagnosis 'depressive disorder' and 'dementia'. (1) Principal component analysis revealed three distinct sub-syndromes: one with predominantly mood symptoms, one with essentially psychomotor symptoms, and one with vegetative symptoms; (2) mood, psychomotor and vegetative symptoms were all independently and strongly related to a diagnosis of major depressive disorder according to DSM-III-R criteria; (3) the psychomotor factor was also firmly associated with dementia; and (4) discriminant analysis gave further support for our conclusion that some of the depressive features, in particular the psychomotor factor, are at least partly related to the organic brain damage from stroke. The results indicate that different dimensions of depression could be discerned in a group of stroke patients and that the symptom profile of depression in these patients can be affected by the presence of dementia. Copyright 2003 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. Epigenetic Diabetic Vascular Complications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Ahmadzadeh-Amiri

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic vascular complications (DVC influence several vital organ systems including cardiovascular, renal, ocular and nervous systems making it a major public health problem. Although extensive researches were performed in this field, the exact mechanisms responsible for these organ damages in diabetes remain obscure. Several metabolic disturbances have been involved in its complication and change in genes associated with these pathways occurred. Gene expression to produce a biologically active protein can be controlled by transcriptional and translational alteration on the head of genes without change in nucleotide composition. These epigenetic adjustments are steady, but possibly reversible and can be transmitted to future generation. Gene expression can be regulated by three epigenetic mechanisms including DNA methylation, histone modifications and noncoding microRNAs (miRNAs activity. Epigenetic studies must be directed to better realize the role of epigenetic changes to the etiology of DVC and knowledge of epigenetic would play a pivotal role in the application of individualized medicine. Application and development of high technology sequencing combined with more sensitive and advanced methodologies for epigenome studying help to determine specific epigenetic events that stimulate gene responses in patients with diabetes mellitus.

  17. [Extremity vascular traumas].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelini, Romeo; Rutolo, Ferdinando; Cozzolino, Giuseppe; D'Amario, Vanessa; Spigonardo, Francesca

    2005-01-01

    The Authors report on a series of 61 vascular traumas treated over a 7 years, separated in two groups. The first one includes 35 cases, that are street accidents, on the work and gunshot wounds. The second group includes 26 iatrogenic causes due to arterial catheterism. All patients underwent ecocolor Doppler directly in the operating theatre and, when this diagnostic procedure was not enough, pre-operating angiography was used (10 cases of complex traumas of the lower limb). One death was reported far each groups (3.27%). In 55 cases (90.1%), limb savage was achieved. In the others 4 (6.93%) of the first group, limb demolition was necessary for different causes. In the first group, severe neurological sequelaes were observed in 2 cases and motor deficits caused by tendon lesions in 1 case. The good results obtained are the result of the short ischemic interval between the acute event and treatment, thanks to a multidisciplinary approach of a specific equipe, that is rapid as possible.

  18. Effect of Endotoxin from Serratia marcescens on the Permeability of Vessels in Hepatomas and Carrageenin Granulomas of Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oswald, N. T. A.; Cater, D. B.

    1969-01-01

    Serratia marcescens polysaccharide (endotoxin) was injected i.v. into rats bearing carrageenin-induced granulomas and transplanted hepatomas, and the vascular-permeability changes were studied by injecting Pelikan ink i.v. at various times after the endotoxin (or saline in the controls). When the ink was given at 0 or 1 hr. there was little difference between the treated rats and the controls. But when the ink was given 2 or more hr. after the endotoxin there was a marked increase of the carbon-lined capillaries and venules, compared with controls, in tumour, granuloma, glomeruli, adrenal cortex, lung, lymph-nodes and sometimes heart. The significance of these changes is discussed in relation to the Shwartzman phenomenon, Arthus reaction, and adrenaline-induced vascular spasm producing anoxia. ImagesFigs. 2-5Figs. 6-9 PMID:4304259

  19. Tumor MMP-1 Activates Endothelial PAR1 to Facilitate Vascular Intravasation and Metastatic Dissemination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juncker-Jensen, Anna; Deryugina, Elena I; Rimann, Ivo

    2013-01-01

    that contribute directly to tumor cell vascular penetration have not been identified. In this study, the in vivo role of the collagenolytic protease, MMP-1, in cancer cell intravasation and metastasis was analyzed by employing a highly-disseminating variant of human HEp3 epidermoid carcinoma, HEp3-hi....../diss. Whereas naturally-acquired or experimentally-induced MMP-1 deficiency substantially suppressed HEp3-hi/diss intravasation, supplementation of recombinant MMP-1 to MMP-1-silenced primary tumors, restored their impaired vascular dissemination. Surprisingly, abrogation of MMP-1 production and activity did...... vasculature in a novel microtumor model. Concomitantly, MMP-1 deficiency led to decreased levels of intratumoral vascular permeability, tumor cell intravasation and metastatic dissemination. Taking advantage of PAR1 deficiency of HEp3-hi/diss cells, we further demonstrate that endothelial PAR1 is a putative...

  20. Neuroplasticity of language in left-hemisphere stroke: Evidence linking subsecond electrophysiology and structural connections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Piai, V.; Meyer, L.; Dronkers, N.F.; Knight, R.T.

    2017-01-01

    The understanding of neuroplasticity following stroke is predominantly based on neuroimaging measures that cannot address the subsecond neurodynamics of impaired language processing. We combined behavioral and electrophysiological measures and structural-connectivity estimates to characterize

  1. The assessment of visually impaired persons working capacities using electrophysiological and ophthalmic ergonomics methods

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    M. I. Razumovsky; O. E. Kolyuka; A. M. Razumovskaya

    2014-01-01

    ... (accommodation measurement, professional testing using automated system «Proftest-1») were performed. Results. Complex electrophysiological and ophthalmic ergonomics tests were performed in 20 visually impaired...

  2. Can Pediatric Electrophysiologists Safely Perform Electrophysiology Studies on Adults with Congenital Heart Disease?

    OpenAIRE

    Snyder, Christopher S.; Cannon, Bryan; Rosenthal, Geoffrey L.; Moltedo, Jose; Fenrich, Arnold L.

    2007-01-01

    Introduction: Adults with congenital heart disease (ACHD) are known to have arrhythmias. The purpose of this study was to review the safety and efficacy of a pediatric electrophysiologist performing electrophysiology studies (EPS) on ACHD.

  3. Neuregulin 1 expression and electrophysiological abnormalities in the Neuregulin 1 transmembrane domain heterozygous mutant mouse

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Long, Leonora E; Anderson, Paul; Frank, Elisabeth; Shaw, Alex; Liu, Shijie; Huang, Xu-Feng; Pinault, Didier; Karl, Tim; O'Brien, Terence J; Shannon Weickert, Cynthia; Jones, Nigel C

    2015-01-01

    .... In addition, we investigate the regulation of high-frequency (gamma) electrophysiological oscillations in this mutant mouse to associate molecular changes in Nrg1 with a schizophrenia-relevant neurophysiological profile...

  4. Vascular injuries during gynecological laparoscopy: the vascular surgeon's advice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcello Barbosa Barros

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Iatrogenic vascular problems due to laparoscopy are a well recognized problem and lead to significant repercussions. In this context, a ten-year review of cases topic is presented, based on experience gained while heading two important vascular surgery services. CASES: Five patients with vascular injuries during elective laparoscopy are described. These patients presented with seven lesions of iliac vessels. All cases were evaluated immediately and required laparotomy, provisional hemostasis and urgent attendance by a vascular surgeon. Direct suturing was performed in three cases. One aortoiliac bypass and one ilioiliac reversed venous graft were made. Venous lesions were sutured. One case of a point-like perforation of the small bowel was found. There were no deaths and no complications during the postoperative period. DISCUSSION: Important points on this subject are made, and advice is given. There needs to be immediate recognition of the vascular injury, and expert repair by a vascular surgeon is recommended, in order to significantly reduce the degree of complications.

  5. Trauma vascular, visión del cirujano vascular

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr. D. Cristián Salas

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available El 3% de todas las lesiones en trauma tiene un componente vascular. Con los conflictos armados del siglo pasado se lograron grandes avances en este campo. A partir de la Guerra de Vietnam gracias a las mejoras en el manejo prehospitalario, traslado de pacientes, y avances en técnica quirúrgica se lograron tasas de sobrevida y de amputaciones que se han mantenido estables hasta la fecha. El diagnóstico de lesiones vasculares en extremidades se realiza con el examen físico, sin embargo las lesiones de vasos torácicos y abdominales requieren de imágenes de apoyo, siempre que el paciente se encuentre estabilizado, generalmente tomografía axial computada. La mayoría de las lesiones vasculares son por trauma penetrante, comprometiendo principalmente las extremidades. Con el desarrollo de los procedimientos invasivos vasculares en los últimos años se ha observado un aumento de lesiones vasculares iatrogénicas. Hoy en día muchos pacientes con trauma vascular son manejados por vía endovascular.

  6. Role of preoperative vascular ultrasonography in hemodialysis vascular access operation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siribumrungwong, Boonying; Tomtitchong, Prakitpunthu; Kanpirom, Kitti

    2010-12-01

    Preoperative vascular mapping increase rate of successful hemodialysis vascular access operation. Several studies recommend using this procedure routinely. But some studies recommend using this procedure in selected patients. So this study aims to determine the impacts of preoperative vascular mapping in unfavorable-examined patients. 55 patients were studied retrospectively from August 2006 to October 2009. Before April 2008, the operative plans were based on physical examination (group 1). After April 2008, the surgeon did preoperative vascular mapping prior to the operation in unfavorable-examined patients (group 2). The results were compared. There were high maturation rates in favorable-examined patients. In unfavorable-examined patients, preoperative vascular mapping can identified nonpalpable favorable vein which successful maturation of 18.75%. Complementary duplex scan decrease rate of unsuccessful operation significantly (p = 0.037) but does not increase maturation rate. Careful physical examination is important part before operation. Preoperative vascular mapping has benefit only in patients with unfavorable-examined patients. It finds some nonpalpable favorable vein and decrease unsuccessful exploration.

  7. The effect of permeability on the flow past permeable disks at low Reynolds numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cummins, Cathal; Viola, Ignazio Maria; Mastropaolo, Enrico; Nakayama, Naomi

    2017-09-01

    The viscous flow over a thick permeable circular disk in the Reynolds number (Re) range of 10 to 130 and in the Darcy number (Da) range of 10-9 to 1 is examined. Direct numerical simulations are performed on a 2D grid with axisymmetric boundary conditions. Three flow regimes are observed: I, II, and III. In regime I (effectively impervious; D a 1 0-3) is the highly permeable regime, in which there is no recirculation. In I, good agreement with existing experimental data for impervious disks is found. In III, an analytical expression for the drag force on the disk is derived, showing good agreement with the numerical results. A global upper limit of D ac=D amax above which the disk is unable to maintain a recirculating wake for any Re is identified. Finally, in regime II, it is demonstrated that increasing the permeability can lead to large variations in the length of the recirculating wake but with minimal effect on the drag coefficient even when D a >D amax. This has important implications in our understanding of the locomotive strategies adopted by organisms that use porous bodies for movement.

  8. Modeling the Hydrologic Processes of a Permeable Pavement System

    Science.gov (United States)

    A permeable pavement system can capture stormwater to reduce runoff volume and flow rate, improve onsite groundwater recharge, and enhance pollutant controls within the site. A new unit process model for evaluating the hydrologic performance of a permeable pavement system has be...

  9. Update to Permeable Pavement Research at the Edison ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    The EPA’s Urban Watershed Management Branch (UWMB) has been monitoring the permeable pavement demonstration site at the Edison Environmental Center, NJ since 2010. This site has three different types of permeable pavements including interlocking concrete permeable pavers, pervious concrete, and porous asphalt. The permeable pavements are limited to parking spaces while adjacent driving lanes are impermeable and drain to the permeable surfaces. The parking lot is instrumented for continuous monitoring with thermistors and water content reflectometers that measure moisture as infiltrate passes through the storage gallery beneath the permeable pavements into the underlying native soil. Each permeable surface of the parking lot has four lined sections that capture infiltrate in tanks for water quality analyses; these tanks are capable of holding volumes up to 4.1 m3, which represents up to 38 mm (1.5 in.) for direct rainfall on the porous pavement and runoff from adjacent driving lanes that drain into the permeable surface.Previous technical releases concerning the demonstration site focused on monitoring techniques, observed chloride and nutrient concentrations, surface hydrology, and infiltration and evaporation rates. This presentation summarizes these past findings and addresses current water quality efforts including pH, solids analysis, total organic carbon, and chemical oxygen demand. Stormwater runoff continues to be a major cause of water pollution in

  10. Plasma oxygen permeability may be a factor in atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heppner, Bradley T; Morgan, Louis Wm

    2004-01-01

    Plasma oxygen permeability measures how easily oxygen dissolves in and diffuses through blood plasma. There has long been evidence that artery wall hypoxia plays a role in atherogenesis. This paper reviews the influence that plasma oxygen permeability has on artery wall oxygenation and presents experimental evidence for a relationship between plasma oxygen permeability and clinically significant obstructive coronary artery disease. Thirty-eight inpatients referred for diagnostic cardiac catheterization were scored for active coronary artery disease, and their plasma oxygen permeabilities were measured. There was a statistically significant (p = 0.04) correlation between active coronary artery disease and plasma oxygen permeability. There were also statistically significant differences in mean plasma oxygen permeability both between patients who did and did not have actively progressing coronary artery disease (p = 0.01) and between patients who did and did not have clinically significant obstructive coronary artery disease, whether it was actively progressing or not (p = 0.02). These findings suggest that a decline in plasma oxygen permeability may be one of the many factors associated with progression of atherosclerosis and that substances which increase oxygen permeability might offer a useful adjunct to current therapeutic measures.

  11. Permeability dependence of streaming potential coefficient in porous media

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thanh, L.D.; Sprik, R.

    2015-01-01

    In theory, the streaming potential coefficient depends not only on the zeta potential but also on the permeability of the rocks that partially determines the surface conductivity of the rocks. However, in practice, it is hard to show the permeability dependence of streaming potential coefficients

  12. 21 CFR 876.5860 - High permeability hemodialysis system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false High permeability hemodialysis system. 876.5860... hemodialysis system. (a) Identification. A high permeability hemodialysis system is a device intended for use... toxemic conditions by performing such therapies as hemodialysis, hemofiltration, hemoconcentration, and...

  13. Transverse permeability of woven fabrics (CD-rom)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grouve, Wouter Johannes Bernardus; Akkerman, Remko; Loendersloot, Richard; van den Berg, S.; Boisse, P.

    2008-01-01

    transverse permeability is an essential input in describing the consolidation process of CETEX® laminates. A two-dimensional, finite difference based, Stokes flow solver has been developed to determine the mesoscopic permeability of arbitrary fabric structures. The use of a multigrid solver

  14. Control of crust permeability and crispness retention in crispy breads

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hirte, A.; Hamer, R.J.; Meinders, M.B.J.; Hoek, van der K.; Primo Martin, C.

    2012-01-01

    Crispness of bread crust is rapidly lost after baking. It is known that the speed of this loss is influenced by the water vapor permeability of the crust. A high water vapor permeability benefits crispness retention but could lead to crumb dryness. In this paper we aimed to determine the water vapor

  15. Nitrogen Transformations in Three Types of Permeable Pavement

    Science.gov (United States)

    In 2009, USEPA constructed a 0.4-ha (1-ac) parking lot at the Edison Environmental Center in Edison, NJ, that incorporated three different permeable pavement types - permeable interlocking concrete pavers (PICP), pervious concrete (PC), and porous asphalt (PA). The driving lanes...

  16. Gas transport in highly permeable, dry porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levintal, Elad; Dragila, Maria I.; Kamai, Tamir; Weisbrod, Noam

    2017-04-01

    Gas exchange between soil and atmosphere is far more efficient via advective than diffusive mechanisms. Whereas advection requires media permeability be sufficiently high and an advecting driving mechanism, diffusion transport occurs in all permeabilities. Traditionally, diffusion models generally have focused only on low permeability media (sand particles and smaller, k transport in higher permeability media when climatic conditions do not favor advection. A permeability cutoff is quantified, such that above it traditional diffusion models become inaccurate. Results are based on experiments using large columns filled with different homogeneous spherical particles, conducted inside a climate-controlled laboratory especially designed for quantifying soil-gas diffusivity under isothermal and windless conditions. The results indicate that traditional diffusion models are accurate for permeability values below 2.7×10-3 cm2. Above this threshold, gas transport could not be explained by diffusion alone. Our measurements indicate that for permeability values above this threshold gas flux is higher than can be explained by diffusion, even under stable environmental conditions where advection is not expected. The findings of this research can contribute to better understanding of gas transport in high-permeability porous media such as: aggregated soils, snowpacks and mines stockpiles.

  17. A Novel Vascular Homing Peptide Strategy to Selectively Enhance Pulmonary Drug Efficacy in Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toba, Michie; Alzoubi, Abdallah; O’Neill, Kealan; Abe, Kohtaro; Urakami, Takeo; Komatsu, Masanobu; Alvarez, Diego; Järvinen, Tero A.H.; Mann, David; Ruoslahti, Erkki; McMurtry, Ivan F.; Oka, Masahiko

    2015-01-01

    A major limitation in the pharmacological treatment of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is the lack of pulmonary vascular selectivity. Recent studies have identified a tissue-penetrating homing peptide, CARSKNKDC (CAR), which specifically homes to hypertensive pulmonary arteries but not to normal pulmonary vessels or other tissues. Some tissue-penetrating vascular homing peptides have a unique ability to facilitate transport of co-administered drugs into the targeted cells/tissues without requiring physical conjugation of the drug to the peptide (bystander effect). We tested the hypothesis that co-administered CAR would selectively enhance the pulmonary vascular effects of i.v. vasodilators in Sugen5416/hypoxia/normoxia-exposed PAH rats. Systemically administered CAR was predominantly detected in cells of remodeled pulmonary arteries. Intravenously co-administered CAR enhanced pulmonary, but not systemic, effects of the vasodilators, fasudil and imatinib, in PAH rats. CAR increased lung tissue imatinib concentration in isolated PAH lungs without increasing pulmonary vascular permeability. Sublingual CAR was also effective in selectively enhancing the pulmonary vasodilation by imatinib and sildenafil. Our results suggest a new paradigm in the treatment of PAH, using an i.v./sublingual tissue-penetrating homing peptide to selectively augment pulmonary vascular effects of nonselective drugs without the potentially problematic conjugation process. CAR may be particularly useful as an add-on therapy to selectively enhance the pulmonary vascular efficacy of any ongoing drug treatment in patients with PAH. PMID:24401613

  18. Experimental Branch Retinal Vein Occlusion Induces Upstream Pericyte Loss and Vascular Destabilization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisa Dominguez

    Full Text Available Branch retinal vein occlusion (BRVO leads to extensive vascular remodeling and is important cause of visual impairment. Although the vascular morphological changes following experimental vein occlusion have been described in a variety of models using angiography, the underlying cellular events are ill defined.We here show that laser-induced experimental BRVO in mice leads to a wave of TUNEL-positive endothelial cell (EC apoptosis in the upstream vascular network associated with a transient edema and hemorrhages. Subsequently, we observe an induction of EC proliferation within the dilated vein and capillaries, detected by EdU incorporation, and the edema resolves. However, the pericytes of the upstream capillaries are severely reduced, which was associated with continuing EC apoptosis and proliferation. The vascular remodeling was associated with increased expression of TGFβ, TSP-1, but also FGF2 expression. Exposure of the experimental animals to hypoxia, when pericyte (PC dropout had occurred, led to a dramatic increase in endothelial cell proliferation, confirming the vascular instability induced by the experimental BRVO.Experimental BRVO leads to acute endothelial cells apoptosis and increased permeability. Subsequently the upstream vascular network remains destabilized, characterized by pericyte dropout, un-physiologically high endothelial cells turnover and sensitivity to hypoxia. These early changes might pave the way for capillary loss and subsequent chronic ischemia and edema that characterize the late stage disease.

  19. Autonomous Head-mounted Electrophysiology Systems for Freely-Behaving Primates

    OpenAIRE

    Gilja, Vikash; Chestek, Cindy A.; Nuyujukian, Paul; Foster, Justin; Shenoy, Krishna V.

    2010-01-01

    Recent technological advances have led to new lightweight battery-operated systems for electrophysiology. Such systems are head mounted, run for days without experimenter intervention, and can record and stimulate from single or multiple electrodes implanted in a freely-behaving primates. Here we discuss existing systems, studies that use them, and how they can augment traditional, physically restrained, “in-rig” electrophysiology. With existing technical capabilities these systems can acquir...

  20. The assessment of visually impaired persons working capacities using electrophysiological and ophthalmic ergonomics methods

    OpenAIRE

    M. I. Razumovsky; O. E. Kolyuka; A. M. Razumovskaya

    2014-01-01

    Aim was to analyze working capacities of visually impaired persons by means of complex electrophysiological and ophthalmic ergonomics eye examination.Materials and methods. Standard clinical ophthalmologic examination (visual acuity measurement, refractometry, biomicroscopy, ophthalmoscopy) as well as electrophysiological (electrooculography, electrical sensitivity of the eye, critical flicker fusion frequency) and ophthalmic ergonomics tests (accommodation measurement, professional testing u...

  1. Integration of Organic Electrochemical and Field-Effect Transistors for Ultraflexible, High Temporal Resolution Electrophysiology Arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Wonryung; Kim, Dongmin; Rivnay, Jonathan; Matsuhisa, Naoji; Lonjaret, Thomas; Yokota, Tomoyuki; Yawo, Hiromu; Sekino, Masaki; Malliaras, George G; Someya, Takao

    2016-11-01

    Integration of organic electrochemical transistors and organic field-effect transistors is successfully realized on a 600 nm thick parylene film toward an electrophysiology array. A single cell of an integrated device and a 2 × 2 electrophysiology array succeed in detecting electromyogram with local stimulation of the motor nerve bundle of a transgenic rat by a laser pulse. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Application of Parallel Factor Analysis (PARAFAC to Electrophysiological Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Katharina eSchmitz

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The identification of important features in multi-electrode recordings requires the decomposition of data in order to disclose relevant features and to offer a clear graphical representation. This can be a demanding task. Parallel Factor Analysis (PARAFAC; Hitchcock, 1927; Carrol & Chang, 1970; Harshman, 1970 is a method to decompose multi-dimensional arrays in order to focus on the features of interest, and provides a distinct illustration of the results. We applied PARAFAC to analyse spatio-temporal patterns in the functional connectivity between neurons, as revealed in their spike trains recorded in cat primary visual cortex (area 18. During these recordings we reversibly deactivated feedback connections from higher visual areas in the pMS (posterior middle suprasylvian cortex in order to study the impact of these top-down signals. Cross correlation was computed for every possible pair of the electrodes in the electrode array. PARAFAC was then used to reveal the effects of time, stimulus, and deactivation condition on the correlation patterns. Our results show that PARAFAC is able to reliably extract changes in correlation strength for different experimental conditions and display the relevant features. Thus, PARAFAC proves to be well-suited for the use in the context of electrophysiological (action potential recordings.

  3. Electrophysiological Mapping of Novel Prefrontal – Cerebellar Pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Thomas C.; Jones, Matthew W.; Apps, Richard

    2009-01-01

    Whilst the cerebellum is predominantly considered a sensorimotor control structure, accumulating evidence suggests that it may also subserve non-motor functions during cognition. However, this possibility is not universally accepted, not least because the nature and pattern of links between higher cortical structures and the cerebellum are poorly characterized. We have therefore used in vivo electrophysiological methods in anaesthetized rats to directly investigate connectivity between the medial prefrontal cortex (prelimbic subdivision, PrL) and the cerebellum. Stimulation of deep layers of PrL evoked distinct field potentials in the cerebellar cortex with a mean latency to peak of approximately 35 ms. These responses showed a well-defined topography, and were maximal in lobule VII of the contralateral vermis (a known oculomotor centre); they were not attenuated by local anaesthesia of the overlying M2 motor cortex, though M2 stimulation did evoke field potentials in lobule VII with a shorter latency (approximately 30 ms). Single unit recordings showed that prelimbic cortical stimulation elicits complex spikes in lobule VII Purkinje cells, indicating transmission via a previously undescribed cerebro-olivocerebellar pathway. Our results therefore establish a physiological basis for communication between PrL and the cerebellum. The role(s) of this pathway remain to be resolved, but presumably relate to control of eye movements and/or distributed networks associated with integrated prefrontal cortical functions. PMID:19738932

  4. Optical coherence tomography and electrophysiological findings in torpedo maculopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buzzonetti, Luca; Petroni, Sergio; Catena, Gino; Iarossi, Giancarlo

    2015-02-01

    To describe the morphofunctional findings in a 6-year-old child with a unilateral lesion of the temporal macula called "torpedo maculopathy" throughout a 1-year follow-up. Evaluation of retinal morphology and function was assessed by means of spectral-domain OCT scans, best-corrected visual acuity, full-field flash electroretinogram (ERG), multifocal electroretinogram (mfERG) and pattern visual evoked potentials (VEP). Patient was examined every 4 months for a 1-year follow-up time. Torpedo maculopathy consisted in a sharply demarcated hypopigmented oval iuxta-macular lesion (1.5 DD wide × 0.7 DD high). The baseline visual acuity of the affected eye was 20/25. OCT showed a sensorial retinal detachment in correspondence with the torpedo lesion. Pattern VEPs revealed a reduced response in left eye, as compared to contralateral eye. Full-field flash ERGs amplitude was normal in both eyes. Multifocal ERG response was reduced at all sites, more significantly at the site of the lesion in the eye with torpedo maculopathy and normal in fellow eye. Visual acuity, fundoscopic evaluation, OCT scans and electrophysiological tests showed no changes from baseline throughout the follow-up time. Torpedo maculopathy, although known as benign, may affect visual function if macular involvement is associated with neuroretinal detachment.

  5. Multiplexed, high density electrophysiology with nanofabricated neural probes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiangang Du

    Full Text Available Extracellular electrode arrays can reveal the neuronal network correlates of behavior with single-cell, single-spike, and sub-millisecond resolution. However, implantable electrodes are inherently invasive, and efforts to scale up the number and density of recording sites must compromise on device size in order to connect the electrodes. Here, we report on silicon-based neural probes employing nanofabricated, high-density electrical leads. Furthermore, we address the challenge of reading out multichannel data with an application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC performing signal amplification, band-pass filtering, and multiplexing functions. We demonstrate high spatial resolution extracellular measurements with a fully integrated, low noise 64-channel system weighing just 330 mg. The on-chip multiplexers make possible recordings with substantially fewer external wires than the number of input channels. By combining nanofabricated probes with ASICs we have implemented a system for performing large-scale, high-density electrophysiology in small, freely behaving animals that is both minimally invasive and highly scalable.

  6. Multiplexed, high density electrophysiology with nanofabricated neural probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Jiangang; Blanche, Timothy J; Harrison, Reid R; Lester, Henry A; Masmanidis, Sotiris C

    2011-01-01

    Extracellular electrode arrays can reveal the neuronal network correlates of behavior with single-cell, single-spike, and sub-millisecond resolution. However, implantable electrodes are inherently invasive, and efforts to scale up the number and density of recording sites must compromise on device size in order to connect the electrodes. Here, we report on silicon-based neural probes employing nanofabricated, high-density electrical leads. Furthermore, we address the challenge of reading out multichannel data with an application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC) performing signal amplification, band-pass filtering, and multiplexing functions. We demonstrate high spatial resolution extracellular measurements with a fully integrated, low noise 64-channel system weighing just 330 mg. The on-chip multiplexers make possible recordings with substantially fewer external wires than the number of input channels. By combining nanofabricated probes with ASICs we have implemented a system for performing large-scale, high-density electrophysiology in small, freely behaving animals that is both minimally invasive and highly scalable.

  7. [Effects of infrasound on visual electrophysiology in mice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Li; Zhang, Zuo-ming; Chen, Jing-zao; Liu, Jing

    2003-04-01

    To investigate the possible effects of infrasound on visual functions. One hundred and fifty mature male Kunming-mice were divided into 5 groups, in which one was control and the other four were exposed to infrasound of 8 Hz, 90 dB; 8 Hz, 130 dB; 16 Hz, 90 dB and 16 Hz, 130 dB 2 h/d respectively. The exposure time for them were 0, 1, 4, 7, 14 and 21 d respectively, each group was divided into 6 sub-groups. Electroretinogram (ERG), oscillatory potentials (OPs), and visual evoked potential (VEP) were recorded after exposure. The visual electrophysiological indices after 8 Hz, 90 dB and 16 Hz, 90 dB exposures were similar except for a little difference at some temporal points (P<0.05). Most of the indices in 8 Hz, 130 dB group changed after 7 d exposure, and the longer the exposure, the more obvious changes were observed (P<0.01). The indices in 16 Hz, 130 dB group changed obviously after 1 d and reversed with increase of exposure time (P<0.01). The effect of infrasound on visual functions are related to its frequency and intensity. Infrasound of different frequencies causes different levels of retinal resonance, which leads to different degrees of cellular lesion and produces different electrical potentials.

  8. Electrophysiological evaluation in myotonic dystrophy: correlation with CTG length expansion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pfeilsticker Beatriz Helena Miranda

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available In myotonic dystrophy (MD, disease severity has been correlated with expansion of CTG repeats in chromosome 19. The aims of this study were to evaluate efficacy of electromyography in the diagnosis of MD, access the frequency and the characteristics of peripheral involvement in the disease and to verify whether the CTG repeats correlated with the electrophysiological abnormalities. Twenty-five patients and six relatives at risk of carrying the MD gene were examined. Electrical myotonia (EM was scored. Sensory and motor conduction velocity (CV were studied in five nerves. Leukocyte DNA analysis was done in 26 subjects. Myopathy and myotonia were found in 27 cases. EM was most frequent in muscles of hand and in tibialis anterior. No significant correlation was found between EM scores and length of CTG expansions. EM scores correlated significantly with the degree of clinical myopathy, expressed by a muscular disability scale. Peripheral neuropathy was found in eight subjects and was not restricted to those who were diabetics.

  9. The sense of smell in Odonata: an electrophysiological screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piersanti, Silvana; Frati, Francesca; Conti, Eric; Rebora, Manuela; Salerno, Gianandrea

    2014-11-01

    Volatile chemicals mediate a great range of intra- and interspecific signalling and information in insects. Olfaction has been widely investigated mostly in Neoptera while the knowledge of this sense in most basal insects such as Paleoptera (Odonata and Ephemeroptera) is still poor. In the present study we show the results of an electrophysiological screening on two model species, Libellula depressa (Libellulidae) and Ischnura elegans (Coenagrionidae), representatives of the two Odonata suborders Anisoptera and Zygoptera, with the aim to deep the knowledge on the sense of smell of this insect order. The antennal olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs) of these two species responded to the same 22 compounds (out of 48 chemicals belonging to different functional groups) encompassing mostly amines, carboxylic acids or aldehydes and belonging to green leaf volatiles, vertebrate related volatiles and volatiles emitted by standing waters bacteria. The properties of Odonata OSNs are very similar to those of ionotropic receptors (IRs) expressing OSNs in other insects. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. The electrophysiological underpinnings of processing gender stereotypes in language.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Siyanova-Chanturia

    Full Text Available Despite the widely documented influence of gender stereotypes on social behaviour, little is known about the electrophysiological substrates engaged in the processing of such information when conveyed by language. Using event-related brain potentials (ERPs, we examined the brain response to third-person pronouns (lei "she" and lui "he" that were implicitly primed by definitional (passeggera(FEM "passenger", pensionato(MASC "pensioner", or stereotypical antecedents (insegnante "teacher", conducente "driver". An N400-like effect on the pronoun emerged when it was preceded by a definitionally incongruent prime (passeggera(FEM--lui; pensionato(MASC--lei, and a stereotypically incongruent prime for masculine pronouns only (insegnante--lui. In addition, a P300-like effect was found when the pronoun was preceded by definitionally incongruent primes. However, this effect was observed for female, but not male participants. Overall, these results provide further evidence for on-line effects of stereotypical gender in language comprehension. Importantly, our results also suggest a gender stereotype asymmetry in that male and female stereotypes affected the processing of pronouns differently.

  11. The electrophysiological underpinnings of processing gender stereotypes in language.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siyanova-Chanturia, Anna; Pesciarelli, Francesca; Cacciari, Cristina

    2012-01-01

    Despite the widely documented influence of gender stereotypes on social behaviour, little is known about the electrophysiological substrates engaged in the processing of such information when conveyed by language. Using event-related brain potentials (ERPs), we examined the brain response to third-person pronouns (lei "she" and lui "he") that were implicitly primed by definitional (passeggera(FEM) "passenger", pensionato(MASC) "pensioner"), or stereotypical antecedents (insegnante "teacher", conducente "driver"). An N400-like effect on the pronoun emerged when it was preceded by a definitionally incongruent prime (passeggera(FEM)--lui; pensionato(MASC)--lei), and a stereotypically incongruent prime for masculine pronouns only (insegnante--lui). In addition, a P300-like effect was found when the pronoun was preceded by definitionally incongruent primes. However, this effect was observed for female, but not male participants. Overall, these results provide further evidence for on-line effects of stereotypical gender in language comprehension. Importantly, our results also suggest a gender stereotype asymmetry in that male and female stereotypes affected the processing of pronouns differently.

  12. Processing fluency hinders subsequent recollection: An electrophysiological study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bingbing eLi

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Although many behavioural studies have investigated the effect of processing fluency on subsequent recognition memory, little research has examined the neural mechanism of this phenomenon. The present study aimed to explore the electrophysiological correlates of the effects of processing fluency on subsequent recognition memory by using an event-related potential (ERP approach. The masked repetition priming paradigm was used to manipulate processing fluency in the study phase, and the R/K paradigm was utilised to investigate which recognition memory process (familiarity or recollection was affected by processing fluency in the test phase. Converging behavioural and ERP results indicated that increased processing fluency impaired subsequent recollection. Results from the analysis of ERP priming effects in the study phase indicated that increased perceptual processing fluency of object features, reflected by the N/P 190 priming effect, can hinder encoding activities, reflected by the LPC priming effect, which leads to worse subsequent recollection based recognition memory. These results support the idea that processing fluency can influence subsequent recognition memory and provide a potential neural mechanism underlying this effect. However, further studies are needed to examine whether processing fluency can affect subsequent familiarity.

  13. Non-auditory, electrophysiological potentials preceding dolphin biosonar click production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finneran, James J; Mulsow, Jason; Jones, Ryan; Houser, Dorian S; Accomando, Alyssa W; Ridgway, Sam H

    2018-03-01

    The auditory brainstem response to a dolphin's own emitted biosonar click can be measured by averaging epochs of the instantaneous electroencephalogram (EEG) that are time-locked to the emitted click. In this study, averaged EEGs were measured using surface electrodes placed on the head in six different configurations while dolphins performed an echolocation task. Simultaneously, biosonar click emissions were measured using contact hydrophones on the melon and a hydrophone in the farfield. The averaged EEGs revealed an electrophysiological potential (the pre-auditory wave, PAW) that preceded the production of each biosonar click. The largest PAW amplitudes occurred with the non-inverting electrode just right of the midline-the apparent side of biosonar click generation-and posterior of the blowhole. Although the source of the PAW is unknown, the temporal and spatial properties rule out an auditory source. The PAW may be a neural or myogenic potential associated with click production; however, it is not known if muscles within the dolphin nasal system can be actuated at the high rates reported for dolphin click production, or if sufficiently coordinated and fast motor endplates of nasal muscles exist to produce a PAW detectable with surface electrodes.

  14. Electrophysiological Correlates of Long-Term Soto Zen Meditation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henrique Adam Pasquini

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to verify the electrophysiological correlates of the changes in long-term regular meditators. We use modern techniques of high-resolution electroencephalography applied to slow potentials, power spectra, and potencies related to the events. To obtain encephalographic records, we use an assembly of 128 channels in 31 subjects (17 Soto Zen Buddhist meditators. The motivation of this study was to determine whether the induced beta power would present an increase in meditators as well as a decrease in induced theta/beta ratio in absolute and relative values. However, opposite to what we expected, no significant change was found in the beta frequency. In contrast, the main findings of the study were correlations between the frequency of weekly meditation practice and the increased theta induced relative power, increase of induced power ratio (ratio theta/beta, and increase of the ratio of induced relative powers (theta/beta ratio during our task that featured an “adapted meditation,” suggesting that the meditative state of “mindfulness” is much more related to the permittivity of “distractions” by the meditators, with a deliberate reduction of attention.

  15. [Electrophysiologic studies in Guillain-Barré syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norris Cummings, B; González Sandoval, C; Suárez Guglielmi, H; Contreras Muñoz, G; Concha Barahona, J

    1979-01-01

    A preliminary investigation into electrodiagnostic methods in healthy children and in children with the Guillain-Barré syndrome (polyradiculoneuritis) was carried out in order to assess the validity of these procedures in the management of the disease. Studies of the strength-duration curves, the rheobase, the chronaxyie, the accommodation index curves, motor nerve conduction and electromyography were made in 30 healthy children and in 15 children suffering from polyradiculoneuritis. The strength-duration curves plotted on the rectus femoris muscles of the 15 sick children showed a steeply rising hyperbola and no response was elicited at the shorter pulse durations (less than 0.3 ms). The chronaxyie was long in very clinically involved muscle. The accommodation index curve showed a notably decreased slope in the left gastrocnemius muscles of the 15 patients. Conduction velocity of the anterior tibial nerve was either absent or low in all the patients during the first month of the disease. Electromyographic records showed disappearance of the interference pattern on maximal contraction of the diseased muscles; only a few isolated motor units could be recorded in the first month of the disease. The duration and amplitude of these units was markedly reduced, there was an increase in infrequency of polyphasic potentials and the presence of fibrillation potentials was noted in some cases. Serial electrophysiological studies should therefore be of interest and of value in the management of polyradiculoneuritis.

  16. Electrophysiological Correlates of Language Processing in Schizotypal Personality Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niznikiewicz, Margaret A.; Voglmaier, Martina; Shenton, Martha E.; Seidman, Larry J.; Dickey, Chandlee C.; Rhoads, Richard; Teh, Enkeat; McCarley, Robert W.

    2010-01-01

    Objective This study examined whether the electrophysiological correlates of language processing found previously to be abnormal in schizophrenia are also abnormal in schizotypal individuals. The authors used the N400 component to evaluate language dysfunction in schizotypal individuals. Method Event-related potentials were recorded in 16 comparison subjects and 17 schizotypal individuals (who met full DSM-III-R criteria) to sentences presented both visually and aurally; half of the sentences ended with an expected word completion (congruent condition), and the other half ended with an unexpected word completion (incongruent condition). Results In the congruent condition, the N400 amplitude was more negative in individuals with schizotypal personality disorder than in comparison subjects in both the visual and auditory modalities. In addition, in the visual modality, the N400 latency was prolonged in the individuals with schizotypal personality disorder. Conclusions The N400 was found to be abnormal in the individuals with schizotypal personality disorder relative to comparison subjects. The abnormality was similar to the abnormality the authors’ laboratory reported earlier in schizophrenic subjects, in which the N400 amplitude was found to be more negative in both congruent and incongruent sentence completions. The N400 abnormality is consistent with the inefficient use of context. PMID:10401451

  17. Electrophysiological measurement of interest during walking in a simulated environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, Yuji; Okuma, Takashi; Kimura, Motohiro; Kurata, Takeshi; Takenaka, Takeshi; Iwaki, Sunao

    2014-09-01

    A reliable neuroscientific technique for objectively estimating the degree of interest in a real environment is currently required in the research fields of neuroergonomics and neuroeconomics. Toward the development of such a technique, the present study explored electrophysiological measures that reflect an observer's interest in a nearly-real visual environment. Participants were asked to walk through a simulated shopping mall and the attractiveness of the shopping mall was manipulated by opening and closing the shutters of stores. During the walking task, participants were exposed to task-irrelevant auditory probes (two-stimulus oddball sequence). The results showed a smaller P2/early P3a component of task-irrelevant auditory event-related potentials and a larger lambda response of eye-fixation-related potentials in an interesting environment (i.e., open-shutter condition) than in a boring environment (i.e., closed-shutter condition); these findings can be reasonably explained by supposing that participants allocated more attentional resources to visual information in an interesting environment than in a boring environment, and thus residual attentional resources that could be allocated to task-irrelevant auditory probes were reduced. The P2/early P3a component and the lambda response may be useful measures of interest in a real visual environment. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Audiological and electrophysiological assessment of professional pop/rock musicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samelli, Alessandra G; Matas, Carla G; Carvallo, Renata M M; Gomes, Raquel F; de Beija, Carolina S; Magliaro, Fernanda C L; Rabelo, Camila M

    2012-01-01

    In the present study, we evaluated peripheral and central auditory pathways in professional musicians (with and without hearing loss) compared to non-musicians. The goal was to verify if music exposure could affect auditory pathways as a whole. This is a prospective study that compared the results obtained between three groups (musicians with and without hearing loss and non-musicians). Thirty-two male individuals participated and they were assessed by: Immittance measurements, pure-tone air conduction thresholds at all frequencies from 0.25 to 20 kHz, Transient Evoked Otoacoustic Emissions, Auditory Brainstem Response (ABR), and Cognitive Potential. The musicians showed worse hearing thresholds in both conventional and high frequency audiometry when compared to the non-musicians; the mean amplitude of Transient Evoked Otoacoustic Emissions was smaller in the musicians group, but the mean latencies of Auditory Brainstem Response and Cognitive Potential were diminished in the musicians when compared to the non-musicians. Our findings suggest that the population of musicians is at risk for developing music-induced hearing loss. However, the electrophysiological evaluation showed that latency waves of ABR and P300 were diminished in musicians, which may suggest that the auditory training to which these musicians are exposed acts as a facilitator of the acoustic signal transmission to the cortex.

  19. Processing fluency hinders subsequent recollection: an electrophysiological study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bingbing; Gao, Chuanji; Wang, Wei; Guo, Chunyan

    2015-01-01

    Although many behavioral studies have investigated the effect of processing fluency on subsequent recognition memory, little research has examined the neural mechanism of this phenomenon. The present study aimed to explore the electrophysiological correlates of the effects of processing fluency on subsequent recognition memory by using an event-related potential (ERP) approach. The masked repetition priming paradigm was used to manipulate processing fluency in the study phase, and the R/K paradigm was utilized to investigate which recognition memory process (familiarity or recollection) was affected by processing fluency in the test phase. Converging behavioral and ERP results indicated that increased processing fluency impaired subsequent recollection. Results from the analysis of ERP priming effects in the study phase indicated that increased perceptual processing fluency of object features, reflected by the N/P 190 priming effect, can hinder encoding activities, reflected by the LPC priming effect, which leads to worse subsequent recollection based recognition memory. These results support the idea that processing fluency can influence subsequent recognition memory and provide a potential neural mechanism underlying this effect. However, further studies are needed to examine whether processing fluency can affect subsequent familiarity.

  20. Canonical Wnt Signaling Regulates Atrioventricular Junction Programming and Electrophysiological Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillers, Benjamin S; Chiplunkar, Aditi; Aly, Haytham; Valenta, Tomas; Basler, Konrad; Christoffels, Vincent M.; Efimov, Igor R; Boukens, Bastiaan J; Rentschler, Stacey

    2014-01-01

    Rationale Proper patterning of the atrioventricular canal (AVC) is essential for delay of electrical impulses between atria and ventricles, and defects in AVC maturation can result in congenital heart disease. Objective To determine the role of canonical Wnt signaling in the myocardium during AVC development. Methods and Results We utilized a novel allele of β-catenin that preserves β-catenin’s cell adhesive functions but disrupts canonical Wnt signaling, allowing us to probe the effects of Wnt loss of function independently. We show that loss of canonical Wnt signaling in the myocardium results in tricuspid atresia with hypoplastic right ventricle associated with loss of AVC myocardium. In contrast, ectopic activation of Wnt signaling was sufficient to induce formation of ectopic AV junction-like tissue as assessed by morphology, gene expression, and electrophysiologic criteria. Aberrant AVC development can lead to ventricular preexcitation, a characteristic feature of Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome. We demonstrate that postnatal activation of Notch signaling downregulates canonical Wnt targets within the AV junction. Stabilization of β-catenin protein levels can rescue Notch-mediated ventricular preexcitation and dysregulated ion channel gene expression. Conclusions Our data demonstrate that myocardial canonical Wnt signaling is an important regulator of AVC maturation and electrical programming upstream of Tbx3. Our data further suggests that ventricular preexcitation may require both morphologic patterning defects, as well as myocardial lineage reprogramming, to allow robust conduction across accessory pathway tissue. PMID:25599332

  1. [Clinical, immunological, and electrophysiological matching in Raynaud's syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerasimova, M M; Cherdyntsev, M G

    2005-01-01

    Detailed description of Raynaud's syndrome (RS) dates back to the 19th century; nevertheless, this problem is still topical because of high prevalence of the syndrome (4 to 5% of population), and the fact that different specialists have to deal with it. The authors of the article studied clinical, immunological, and electrophysiological peculiarities of 103 patients with RS, both primary and secondary one. The examination included measurement of the level of antibodies to nerve growth factor (NGF) and myeline basic protein (MBP) and electroneuromyography. All the subjects displayed significant elevation of serum titer of MBP and NGF antibodies, and lowered peripheral nerve impulse conduction velocity (ICV). There was a direct correlation between antibody titer and the severity of the disease, and inverse correlation between ICV of sensory nervous fibers and the severity of the disease. Thus, RS is almost always associated with peripheral sensory fiber pathology, whose clinical manifestation consists in demyelinating polyneuropathy of autoimmune origin; the more prominent demyelinization, the higher the degree of disease severity.

  2. Emotional context during encoding modulates recognition electrophysiological activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Galindo, Joyce Graciela; Cansino, Selene

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the study was to determine whether experiencing a non-emotional event in a positive or negative emotional context affected recognition of the event and the related electrophysiological activity. Twenty-eight adults participated in a betting-game task in which they could win (positive emotional context) or lose (negative emotional context) money. The participants also completed a non-betting task (non-emotional context). Afterward, the participants completed an old/new recognition task for faces with neutral expressions that were encoded during the betting and non-betting game. Event-related potentials and autonomic responses were recorded. The stimuli learned in the positive emotional context were better recognized than those learned in the non-emotional context. The FN400, the parietal old/new effect and the late frontal old/new effect were modulated by positive valence. Learning information under a positive emotional condition enhances its later recognition and the brain activity that underlies this process.

  3. Myokit: A simple interface to cardiac cellular electrophysiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clerx, Michael; Collins, Pieter; de Lange, Enno; Volders, Paul G A

    2016-01-01

    Myokit is a new powerful and versatile software tool for modeling and simulation of cardiac cellular electrophysiology. Myokit consists of an easy-to-read modeling language, a graphical user interface, single and multi-cell simulation engines and a library of advanced analysis tools accessible through a Python interface. Models can be loaded from Myokit's native file format or imported from CellML. Model export is provided to C, MATLAB, CellML, CUDA and OpenCL. Patch-clamp data can be imported and used to estimate model parameters. In this paper, we review existing tools to simulate the cardiac cellular action potential to find that current tools do not cater specifically to model development and that there is a gap between easy-to-use but limited software and powerful tools that require strong programming skills from their users. We then describe Myokit's capabilities, focusing on its model description language, simulation engines and import/export facilities in detail. Using three examples, we show how Myokit can be used for clinically relevant investigations, multi-model testing and parameter estimation in Markov models, all with minimal programming effort from the user. This way, Myokit bridges a gap between performance, versatility and user-friendliness. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Electrophysiological properties of embryonic stem cell-derived neurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica R Risner-Janiczek

    Full Text Available In vitro generation of functional neurons from embryonic stem (ES cells and induced pluripotent stem cells offers exciting opportunities for dissecting gene function, disease modelling, and therapeutic drug screening. To realize the potential of stem cells in these biomedical applications, a complete understanding of the cell models of interest is required. While rapid advances have been made in developing the technologies for directed induction of defined neuronal subtypes, most published works focus on the molecular characterization of the derived neural cultures. To characterize the functional properties of these neural cultures, we utilized an ES cell model that gave rise to neurons expressing the green fluorescent protein (GFP and conducted targeted whole-cell electrophysiological recordings from ES cell-derived neurons. Current-clamp recordings revealed that most neurons could fire single overshooting action potentials; in some cases multiple action potentials could be evoked by depolarization, or occurred spontaneously. Voltage-clamp recordings revealed that neurons exhibited neuronal-like currents, including an outward current typical of a delayed rectifier potassium conductance and a fast-activating, fast-inactivating inward current, typical of a sodium conductance. Taken together, these results indicate that ES cell-derived GFP(+ neurons in culture display functional neuronal properties even at early stages of differentiation.

  5. First steps towards initial registration for electrophysiology procedures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brost, Alexander; Bourier, Felix; Yatziv, Liron; Koch, Martin; Hornegger, Joachim; Strobel, Norbert; Kurzidim, Klaus

    2011-03-01

    Atrial fibrillation is the most common heart arrhythmia and a leading cause of stroke. The treatment option of choice is radio-frequency catheter ablation, which is performed in electrophysiology labs using C-Arm X-ray systems for navigation and guidance. The goal is to electrically isolate the pulmonary vein-left atrial junction thereby rendering myocardial fibers responsible for induction and maintenance of AF inactive. The use of overlay images for fluoroscopic guidance may improve the quality of the ablation procedure, and can reduce procedure time. Overlay images, acquired using CT, MRI, or C-arm CT, can add soft-tissue information, otherwise not visible under X-ray. MRI can be used to image a wide variety of anatomical details without ionizing radiation. In this paper, we present a method to register a 3-D MRI volume to 2-D biplane X-ray images using the coronary sinus. Current approaches require registration of the overlay images to the fluoroscopic images to be performed after the trans-septal puncture, when contast agent can be administered. We present a new approach for registration to align overlay images before the trans-septal puncture. To this end, we manually extract the coronary sinus from pre-operative MRI and register it to a multi-electorde catheter placed in the coronary sinus.

  6. Audiological and electrophysiological assessment of professional pop/rock musicians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra G Samelli

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, we evaluated peripheral and central auditory pathways in professional musicians (with and without hearing loss compared to non-musicians. The goal was to verify if music exposure could affect auditory pathways as a whole. This is a prospective study that compared the results obtained between three groups (musicians with and without hearing loss and non-musicians. Thirty-two male individuals participated and they were assessed by: Immittance measurements, pure-tone air conduction thresholds at all frequencies from 0.25 to 20 kHz, Transient Evoked Otoacoustic Emissions, Auditory Brainstem Response (ABR, and Cognitive Potential. The musicians showed worse hearing thresholds in both conventional and high frequency audiometry when compared to the non-musicians; the mean amplitude of Transient Evoked Otoacoustic Emissions was smaller in the musicians group, but the mean latencies of Auditory Brainstem Response and Cognitive Potential were diminished in the musicians when compared to the non-musicians. Our findings suggest that the population of musicians is at risk for developing music-induced hearing loss. However, the electrophysiological evaluation showed that latency waves of ABR and P300 were diminished in musicians, which may suggest that the auditory training to which these musicians are exposed acts as a facilitator of the acoustic signal transmission to the cortex.

  7. Cellular electrophysiological principles that modulate secretion from synovial fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, R B; Schmidt, T A; Sachse, F B; Boyle, D; Firestein, G S; Giles, W R

    2017-02-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a progressive disease that affects both pediatric and adult populations. The cellular basis for RA has been investigated extensively using animal models, human tissues and isolated cells in culture. However, many aspects of its aetiology and molecular mechanisms remain unknown. Some of the electrophysiological principles that regulate secretion of essential lubricants (hyaluronan and lubricin) and cytokines from synovial fibroblasts have been identified. Data sets describing the main types of ion channels that are expressed in human synovial fibroblast preparations have begun to provide important new insights into the interplay among: (i) ion fluxes, (ii) Ca2+ release from the endoplasmic reticulum, (iii) intercellular coupling, and (iv) both transient and longer duration changes in synovial fibroblast membrane potential. A combination of this information, knowledge of similar patterns of responses in cells that regulate the immune system, and the availability of adult human synovial fibroblasts are likely to provide new pathophysiological insights. © 2016 University of Calgary. The Journal of Physiology © 2016 The Physiological Society.

  8. Filial versus romantic love: contributions from peripheral and central electrophysiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerra, Pedro; Campagnoli, Rafaela R; Vico, Cynthia; Volchan, Eliane; Anllo-Vento, Lourdes; Vila, Jaime

    2011-12-01

    A major problem in recent neuroscience research on the processing of loved familiar faces is the absence of evidence concerning the elicitation of a genuine positive emotional response (love). These studies have two confounds: familiarity and arousal. The present investigation controlled for both factors in female university students. Two categories of loved faces were chosen: one with higher familiarity but lower emotionality (fathers) and the other with higher emotionality but lower familiarity (romantic partners). Unfamiliar and baby faces were used as control faces. Central and peripheral electrophysiological measures as well as subjective indices of valence, arousal, and dominance were recorded. Results support the conclusion that viewing loved familiar faces elicits an intense positive emotional reaction that cannot be explained either by familiarity or arousal. The differences between romantic and filial love appeared in the magnitude of some peripheral and subjective indices of emotionality (zygomatic activity, valence, arousal, and dominance), that were higher for images of the romantic partners, and one central index of familiarity (the P3 amplitude), that was higher for images of the fathers. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Electrophysiological correlates of morphological processing in Chinese compound word recognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yingchun eDu

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The present study investigated the electrophysiological correlates of morphological processing in Chinese compound word reading using a delayed repetition priming paradigm. Participants were asked to passively view lists of two-character compound words containing prime-target pairs separated by a few items. In a Whole Word repetition condition, the prime and target were the same real words (e.g., 经理-经理, manager-manager. In a Constituent repetition condition, the prime and target were swapped in terms of their constituent position (e.g., 士护-护士, the former is a pseudo-word and the later means nurse. Two ERP components including N200 and N400 showed repetition effects. The N200 showed a negative shift upon repetition in the Whole Word condition but this effect was delayed for the Constituent condition. The N400 showed comparable amplitude reduction across the two priming conditions. The results reveal different aspects of morphological processing with an early stage associated with N200 and a late stage with N400. There was also a possibility that the N200 effect reflect general cognitive processing, i.e., the detection of low-probability stimuli.

  10. Silver nanoparticles interact with the cell membrane and increase endothelial permeability by promoting VE-cadherin internalization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Xia; Shi, Junpeng; Zou, Xiaoyan; Wang, Chengcheng; Yang, Yi; Zhang, Hongwu, E-mail: hwzhang@iue.ac.cn

    2016-11-05

    Highlights: • Short-term exposure to AgNPs at low doses induces increase HUVECs monolayer permeability. • AgNPs interact with the cell membrane and increase endothelial permeability by promoting VE-Cadherin internalization. • Particle effect is a major factor leading to endothelial dysfunction. - Abstract: The toxicological risks of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) have attracted widespread attention, and many studies have been published that have contributed to understanding AgNPs-induced toxicity. However, little attention has been paid to the low-dose effects of AgNPs and the related toxicological mechanism is still unclear. Here, we show that short-term exposure to AgNPs at low doses induces a substantial increase in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) monolayer permeability, whereas Ag ions at low doses do not induce an observable increase in monolayer permeability. This effect is independent of oxidative stress and apoptosis. Scanning electron microscopy confirms that AgNPs adhere to the cell membrane after 1 h exposure. Furthermore, adhesion of AgNPs to the cell membrane can trigger vascular endothelial (VE)-cadherin phosphorylation at Y658 followed by VE-cadherin internalization, which lead to the increase in endothelial monolayer permeability. Our data show that surface interactions of AgNPs with the cell membrane, in other words, the particle effect, is a major factor leading to endothelial dysfunction following low-dose and short-term exposure. Our findings will contribute to understanding the health effects and the toxicological mechanisms of AgNPs.

  11. ( Elaeis guineensis Jacq ) vascular wilt

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effet de la jachére sur l'expérimentation de la fusariose vasculaire du palmier à huile ( Elaeis guineensis Jacq ) : Effects of the fallow in the expression of oil-palm ( Elaeis guineensis Jacq ) vascular wilt.

  12. Pharmacological modification of pulmonary vascular injury: possible role of cAMP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrukh, I S; Gurtner, G H; Michael, J R

    1987-01-01

    Experiments were designed to test the hypothesis that drugs which increase adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP) in the lung would prevent the pulmonary hypertension and the increase in vascular permeability caused by the infusion of the oxidant lipid peroxide, tert-butyl hydroperoxide (t-bu-OOH), in isolated rabbit lungs perfused with Krebs-Henseleit buffer. Pretreatment with indomethacin or verapamil was also studied, since these drugs block the increase in pulmonary arterial pressure caused by t-bu-OOH. Indomethacin or verapamil prevented the pulmonary hypertension but did not prevent the increase in permeability caused by t-bu-OOH. Consequently, indomethacin or verapamil treatment partially reduced the gain in lung weight caused by t-bu-OOH. In contrast, pretreatment with isoproterenol, prostaglandin E1, or a cAMP analogue not only prevented the pulmonary hypertension but also inhibited the increase in vascular permeability caused by t-bu-OOH. Consequently, these drugs completely blocked the gain in lung weight caused by t-bu-OOH. Posttreatment with aminophylline or the cAMP analogue also significantly reduced the gain in lung weight caused by t-bu-OOH. These results indicate that pharmacological therapy can reduce the pulmonary hypertension and the increase in vascular permeability caused by the infusion of a lipid hydroperoxide. Since isoproterenol, aminophylline, prostaglandin E1, and a cAMP analogue all had similar effects, the results suggest that the likely common mechanism for their protective effect is an increase in cAMP.

  13. In silico vs. in vivo human intestinal permeability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idkaidek, N M; Najib, N

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this research is to calculate human intestinal permeability in silico and correlate results with those measured in vivo. Optimized human intestinal permeability values were calculated for 16 drugs by de-convolution of human plasma profiles using Parameter Estimation module of SimCYP program V13. Results showed high in silico-in vivo correlation coefficient of 0.89 for drugs with high/low permeability values. In silico permeability, if properly optimized, can be used as surrogate for in vivo permeability for BCS class I drugs and hence is suggested that such methodology could be employed as a support for waiver of in vivo studies. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  14. Electrophysiological characterisation of motor and sensory tracts in patients with hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Hereditary spastic paraplegias (HSPs) are characterised by lower limb spasticity due to degeneration of the corticospinal tract. We set out for an electrophysiological characterisation of motor and sensory tracts in patients with HSP. Methods We clinically and electrophysiologically examined a cohort of 128 patients with genetically confirmed or clinically probable HSP. Motor evoked potentials (MEPs) to arms and legs, somato-sensory evoked potentials of median and tibial nerves, and nerve conduction studies of tibial, ulnar, sural, and radial nerves were assessed. Results Whereas all patients showed clinical signs of spastic paraparesis, MEPs were normal in 27% of patients and revealed a broad spectrum with axonal or demyelinating features in the others. This heterogeneity can at least in part be explained by different underlying genotypes, hinting for distinct pathomechanisms in HSP subtypes. In the largest subgroup, SPG4, an axonal type of damage was evident. Comprehensive electrophysiological testing disclosed a more widespread affection of long fibre tracts involving peripheral nerves and the sensory system in 40%, respectively. Electrophysiological abnormalities correlated with the severity of clinical symptoms. Conclusions Whereas HSP is primarily considered as an upper motoneuron disorder, our data suggest a more widespread affection of motor and sensory tracts in the central and peripheral nervous system as a common finding in HSP. The distribution patterns of electrophysiological abnormalities were associated with distinct HSP genotypes and could reflect different underlying pathomechanisms. Electrophysiological measures are independent of symptomatic treatment and may therefore serve as a reliable biomarker in upcoming HSP trials. PMID:24107482

  15. Heritability of Retinal Vascular Fractals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vergmann, Anna Stage; Broe, Rebecca; Kessel, Line

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the genetic contribution to the pattern of retinal vascular branching expressed by its fractal dimension. Methods: This was a cross-sectional study of 50 monozygotic and 49 dizygotic, same-sex twin pairs aged 20 to 46 years. In 50°, disc-centered fundus photographs, the reti...... vasculature may affect the retinal response to potential vascular disease in later life....

  16. Simultaneous perfusion and permeability measurements using combined spin- and gradient-echo MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmiedeskamp, Heiko; Andre, Jalal B; Straka, Matus; Christen, Thomas; Nagpal, Seema; Recht, Lawrence; Thomas, Reena P; Zaharchuk, Greg; Bammer, Roland

    2013-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to estimate magnetic resonance imaging-based brain perfusion parameters from combined multiecho spin-echo and gradient-echo acquisitions, to correct them for T₁₋, T₂₋, and T₂₋*-related contrast agent (CA) extravasation effects, and to simultaneously determine vascular permeability. Perfusion data were acquired using a combined multiecho spin- and gradient-echo (SAGE) echo-planar imaging sequence, which was corrected for CA extravasation effects using pharmacokinetic modeling. The presented method was validated in simulations and brain tumor patients, and compared with uncorrected single-echo and multiecho data. In the presence of CA extravasation, uncorrected single-echo data resulted in underestimated CA concentrations, leading to underestimated single-echo cerebral blood volume (CBV) and mean transit time (MTT). In contrast, uncorrected multiecho data resulted in overestimations of CA concentrations, CBV, and MTT. The correction of CA extravasation effects resulted in CBV and MTT estimates that were more consistent with the underlying tissue characteristics. Spin-echo perfusion data showed reduced large-vessel blooming effects, facilitating better distinction between increased CBV due to active tumor progression and elevated CBV due to the presence of cortical vessels in tumor proximity. Furthermore, extracted permeability parameters were in good agreement with elevated T1-weighted postcontrast signal values.

  17. [The meaning of oxygen permeability in different materials for optimalization of contact lenses function].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grzech, Adam; Misiuk-Hojło, Marta

    2007-01-01

    Contact lenses are a modern method of refraction defects correction. Polymers of different kind are a basic material for contact lenses. Only with such a sophisticated material can a functional, yet safe for the eye, contact lens be made. Contact lens must be oxygen-permeable to provide nutrition for cornea which has no own vascular net. In the past decade hydrogel lenses are being replaced with silicone-hydrogels. A new generation of contact lenses does not disturb the physiology of a cornea as much as the old one. Since the introduction of silicone-hydrogel lenses much less side effects have been reported. They can also be used continuously with less risk, over longer period of time. Traditional measures such as oxygen permeability and transmissibility seem inadequate with silicone-hydrogel lenses. Therefore a new measure, an oxygen flux, has been introduced. It is more physiological and more suitable in higher oxygen transfer range. It refers to quantity of oxygen reaching the surface of a cornea.

  18. Endothelial Permeability and Hemostasis in Septic Shock: Results From the ProCESS Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Peter C; Filbin, Michael R; Wang, Henry; Ngo, Long; Huang, David T; Aird, William C; Yealy, Donald M; Angus, Derek C; Kellum, John A; Shapiro, Nathan I

    2017-07-01

    We studied patients from the Protocolized Care in Early Septic Shock (ProCESS) trial to determine the effects of alternative resuscitation strategies on circulating markers of endothelial cell permeability and hemostasis and the association between biomarkers and mortality. This was a prospective study of biomarkers of endothelial cell permeability (vascular endothelial growth factor [VEGF], soluble fms-like tyrosine kinase 1 [sFLT-1], angiopoietin 2 [Ang-2]) and biomarkers of hemostasis (von Willebrand factor [vWF], thrombomodulin [TM], tissue plasminogen activator [tPA] in 605 of the 1,341 ProCESS participants in a derivation cohort and 305 participants in a validation cohort. Analyses assessed (1) the impact of varying resuscitation strategies on biomarker profiles and (2) the association of endothelial biomarkers with 60-day in-hospital mortality. The study was conducted in 31 US EDs in adult patients with septic shock. Patients were randomly assigned to one of three resuscitation strategies. Blood samples were collected at enrollment, at 6 h, and at 24 h. There were 116 (19.2%) and 52 (17.0%) deaths in the derivation and validation cohorts, respectively. There was no significant association between treatment strategy and any biomarker levels. Permeability (Ang-2 and sFLT-1) and hemostasis (vWF, TM, tPA) biomarkers were higher and VEGF levels were lower in nonsurvivors (P hemostasis were associated with increased mortality. ClinicalTrials.gov; No.: NCT00510835 and NCT00793442; URL: www.clinicaltrials.gov. Copyright © 2017 American College of Chest Physicians. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Permeability, storage and hydraulic diffusivity controlled by earthquakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodsky, E. E.; Fulton, P. M.; Xue, L.

    2016-12-01

    Earthquakes can increase permeability in fractured rocks. In the farfield, such permeability increases are attributed to seismic waves and can last for months after the initial earthquake. Laboratory studies suggest that unclogging of fractures by the transient flow driven by seismic waves is a viable mechanism. These dynamic permeability increases may contribute to permeability enhancement in the seismic clouds accompanying hydraulic fracking. Permeability enhancement by seismic waves could potentially be engineered and the experiments suggest the process will be most effective at a preferred frequency. We have recently observed similar processes inside active fault zones after major earthquakes. A borehole observatory in the fault that generated the M9.0 2011 Tohoku earthquake reveals a sequence of temperature pulses during the secondary aftershock sequence of an M7.3 aftershock. The pulses are attributed to fluid advection by a flow through a zone of transiently increased permeability. Directly after the M7.3 earthquake, the newly damaged fault zone is highly susceptible to further permeability enhancement, but ultimately heals within a month and becomes no longer as sensitive. The observation suggests that the newly damaged fault zone is more prone to fluid pulsing than would be expected based on the long-term permeability structure. Even longer term healing is seen inside the fault zone of the 2008 M7.9 Wenchuan earthquake. The competition between damage and healing (or clogging and unclogging) results in dynamically controlled permeability, storage and hydraulic diffusivity. Recent measurements of in situ fault zone architecture at the 1-10 meter scale suggest that active fault zones often have hydraulic diffusivities near 10-2 m2/s. This uniformity is true even within the damage zone of the San Andreas fault where permeability and storage increases balance each other to achieve this value of diffusivity over a 400 m wide region. We speculate that fault zones

  20. The Danish Vascular Registry, Karbase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eldrup, Nikolaj; Cerqueira, Charlotte; de la Motte, Louise; Rathenborg, Lisbet Knudsen; Hansen, Allan K

    2016-01-01

    Aim The Danish Vascular Registry (DVR), Karbase, is monitoring arterial and advanced vein interventions conducted at all vascular departments in Denmark. The main aim of the DVR is to improve the quality of treatment for patients undergoing vascular surgery in Denmark by using the registry for quality assessment and research. Study population All patients undergoing vascular interventions (surgical and endovascular) at any vascular department in Denmark are registered in the DVR. The DVR was initiated in 1989, and each year, ∼9,000 procedures are added. By January 2016, >180,000 procedures have been recorded. Since 2001, data completeness has been >90% (compared to the Danish National Patient Register). Main variables Variables include information on descriptive patient data (ie, age, sex, height, and weight) and comorbidity (ie, previous cardiovascular disease and diabetes). Process variable includes waiting time (time from event to medical contact and treatment) and the type of procedures conducted. Outcome variables for in-hospital complications (ie, wound complications, myocardial infarction, stroke, amputation, respiratory complications, and renal insufficiency) and 30-day patency are submitted. Variables for medical treatment (antithrombotic and statin treatment), amputation, and survival are extracted from nationwide, administrative registers. Conclusion The DVR reports outcome on key indicators for monitoring the quality at all vascular departments in Denmark for the purpose of quality improvement. Furthermore, data are available for research and are being used in international collaborations on changes in clinical practices. PMID:27822118

  1. [Cutaneous vascular anomalies in children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmaz, L; Kacenelenbogen, N

    2015-09-01

    Vascular anomalies, which are erroneously categorized under the term angiomas, are a highly heterogeneous group of lesions that are poorly understood and affect a mean of 5 to 10 % of children. The fortuitous discovery of propranolol's efficacy in one of these entities has made them a topical issue. The paper's main objective is to inform family doctors of the various types of vascular anomalies, clarify their classification, and provide a common terminology. Its secondary objective is to provide a decision tree that enables primary care doctors to avoid diagnostic pitfalls, successfully detect cases, and optimize management. Systematic review. According to a recent study, 71,3 % of publications use the term hemangioma erroneously, regardless of the authors' field. The key for family doctors is to use one international classification only, that of the International Society for the Study of Vascular Anomalies (ISSVA), in order to facilitate management and comprehension between the different healthcare levels. The diagnosis of vascular anomalies is clinical in 90 % of cases, so all family doctors can, whilst using a decision tree, diagnose a vascular anomaly and refer only those that are complex for specialist care. The most common vascular anomaly is infantile hemangioma in infants, which spontaneously regresses around the age of 5-7 years in 90 % of cases. Watchful waiting and regular follow-up suffice, therefore, in such settings.

  2. Ontogeny of rabbit proximal tubule urea permeability

    Science.gov (United States)

    QUIGLEY, RAYMOND; LISEC, AMBER; BAUM, MICHEL

    2014-01-01

    Urea transport in the proximal tubule is passive and is dependent on the epithelial permeability. The present study examined the maturation of urea permeability (Purea) in in vitro perfused proximal convoluted tubules (PCT) and basolateral membrane vesicles (BLMV) from rabbit renal cortex. Urea transport was lower in neonatal than adult PCT at both 37 and 25°C. The PCT Purea was also lower in the neonates than the adults (37°C: 45.4 ± 10.8 vs. 88.5 ± 15.2 × 10−6 cm/s, P 0.05). The activation energy for PCT Purea was not different between the neonatal and adult groups. BLMV Purea was determined by measuring vesicle shrinkage, due to efflux of urea, using a stop-flow instrument. Neonatal BLMV Purea was not different from adult BLMV Purea at 37°C [1.14 ± 0.05 × 10−6 vs. 1.25 ± 0.05 × 10−6 cm/s; P = not significant (NS)] or 25°C (0.94 ± 0.06 vs. 1.05 ± 0.10 × 10−6 cm/s; P = NS). There was no effect of 250 μM phloretin, an inhibitor of the urea transporter, on Purea in either adult or neonatal BLMV. The activation energy for urea diffusion was also identical in the neonatal and adult BLMV. These findings in the BLMV are in contrast to the brush-border membrane vesicles (BBMV) where we have previously demonstrated that urea transport is lower in the neonate than the adult. Urea transport is lower in the neonatal proximal tubule than the adult. This is due to a lower rate of apical membrane urea transport, whereas basolateral urea transport is the same in neonates and adults. The lower Purea in neonatal proximal tubules may play a role in overall urea excretion and in developing and maintaining a high medullary urea concentration and thus in the ability to concentrate the urine during renal maturation. PMID:11353675

  3. The phenotype of the human materno-fetal endothelial barrier: molecular occupancy of paracellular junctions dictate permeability and angiogenic plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leach, Lopa

    2002-06-01

    In vitro models predict that molecular occupancy of endothelial junctions may regulate both barrier function and angiogenesis. Whether this is true in human vascular beds undergoing physiological angiogenesis has not been shown. This review presents data which demonstrate there are two distinct junctional phenotypes, 'activated' and 'stable', present in the vascular tree of the human placenta taken from two distinct highly angiogenic gestational periods (first and last trimester). Stability is conferred by the presence of occludin in tight junctions and plakoglobin in adherens junctions. Their localization may be influenced by vascular endothelial growth factor and angiopoietins 1 and 2 that have a similar temporal and site-specific differential expression. The junctional phenotypes are reversible, as shown in studies with endothelial cells isolated from placental microvessels and grown in the presence/absence of cAMP-enhancing agents. Reductions in protein levels and loss of junctional localization of adhesion molecules result in increased permeability to macromolecules, whilst up-regulation and re-targeting of these molecules inhibit cell proliferation and increase transendothelial resistance. These studies suggest junctional adhesion molecules can regulate physiological angiogenesis and vascular re-modelling. Moreover, the activated junctional phenotype of placental microvessels allows them to participate in increased growth and proliferation. This junctional immaturity appears to be at the expense of barrier function resulting in sites of maximal materno-fetal solute exchange.

  4. Inhibitory effect of the Ruscus extract and of the flavonoid hesperidine methylchalcone on increased microvascular permeability induced by various agents in the hamster cheek pouch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouskela, E; Cyrino, F Z; Marcelon, G

    1993-08-01

    The Ruscus extract and the flavonoid hesperidine methylchalcone (HMC) are used in treatment of venous insufficiency. In the present study, we used the hamster cheek pouch preparation and investigated the effects of these substances on increased microvascular permeability induced by bradykinin, histamine, and leukotriene B4 (LTB4) applied topically. Experiments were performed on male hamsters; 30 min after completion of the cheek pouch preparation, fluorescein-labeled dextran [molecular weight (mol wt) 150,000] was given intravenously (i.v.). Bradykinin, histamine, and LTB4 increased the number of fluorescent vascular leakage sites from postcapillary venules, evidence for an increase in macromolecular permeability, which was quantified in ultraviolet (UV)-light microscope as the number of leaky sites in the prepared area. Ruscus extract and HMC, given i.v., significantly inhibited the macromolecular permeability-increasing effect of bradykinin, LTB4, and histamine. Ruscus extract, applied topically, dose dependently inhibited the macromolecular permeability-increasing effect of histamine. Our results show that Ruscus extract and HMC have a protective effect against leakage of FITC-dextran in the cheek pouch after administration of various permeability-increasing substances, which further supports data previously reported on patients with venous insufficiency.

  5. Multiscale electrophysiology format: an open-source electrophysiology format using data compression, encryption, and cyclic redundancy check.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinkmann, Benjamin H; Bower, Mark R; Stengel, Keith A; Worrell, Gregory A; Stead, Matt

    2009-01-01

    Continuous, long-term (up to 10 days) electrophysiological monitoring using hybrid intracranial electrodes is an emerging tool for presurgical epilepsy evaluation and fundamental investigations of seizure generation. Detection of high-frequency oscillations and microseizures could provide valuable insights into causes and therapies for the treatment of epilepsy, but requires high spatial and temporal resolution. Our group is currently using hybrid arrays composed of up to 320 micro- and clinical macroelectrode arrays sampled at 32 kHz per channel with 18-bits of A/D resolution. Such recordings produce approximately 3 terabytes of data per day. Existing file formats have limited data compression capabilities, and do not offer mechanisms for protecting patient identifying information or detecting data corruption during transmission or storage. We present a novel file format that employs range encoding to provide a high degree of data compression, a three-tiered 128-bit encryption system for patient information and data security, and a 32-bit cyclic redundancy check to verify the integrity of compressed data blocks. Open-source software to read, write, and process these files are provided.

  6. Using artificial intelligence to predict permeability from petrographic data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Maqsood; Chawathé, Adwait

    2000-10-01

    Petrographic data collected during thin section analysis can be invaluable for understanding the factors that control permeability distribution. Reliable prediction of permeability is important for reservoir characterization. The petrographic elements (mineralogy, porosity types, cements and clays, and pore morphology) interact with each other uniquely to generate a specific permeability distribution. It is difficult to quantify accurately this interaction and its consequent effect on permeability, emphasizing the non-linear nature of the process. To capture these non-linear interactions, neural networks were used to predict permeability from petrographic data. The neural net was used as a multivariate correlative tool because of its ability to learn the non-linear relationships between multiple input and output variables. The study was conducted on the upper Queen formation called the Shattuck Member (Permian age). The Shattuck Member is composed of very fine-grained arkosic sandstone. The core samples were available from the Sulimar Queen and South Lucky Lake fields located in Chaves County, New Mexico. Nineteen petrographic elements were collected for each permeability value using a combined minipermeameter-petrographic technique. In order to reduce noise and overfitting the permeability model, these petrographic elements were screened, and their control (ranking) with respect to permeability was determined using fuzzy logic. Since the fuzzy logic algorithm provides unbiased ranking, it was used to reduce the dimensionality of the input variables. Based on the fuzzy logic ranking, only the most influential petrographic elements were selected as inputs for permeability prediction. The neural net was trained and tested using data from Well 1-16 in the Sulimar Queen field. Relying on the ranking obtained from the fuzzy logic analysis, the net was trained using the most influential three, five, and ten petrographic elements. A fast algorithm (the scaled conjugate

  7. Drainage hydraulics of permeable friction courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charbeneau, Randall J.; Barrett, Michael E.

    2008-04-01

    This paper describes solutions to the hydraulic equations that govern flow in permeable friction courses (PFC). PFC is a layer of porous asphalt approximately 50 mm thick that is placed as an overlay on top of an existing conventional concrete or asphalt road surface to help control splash and hydroplaning, reduce noise, and enhance quality of storm water runoff. The primary objective of this manuscript is to present an analytical system of equations that can be used in design and analysis of PFC systems. The primary assumptions used in this analysis are that the flow can be modeled as one-dimensional, steady state Darcy-type flow and that slopes are sufficiently small so that the Dupuit-Forchheimer assumptions apply. Solutions are derived for cases where storm water drainage is confined to the PFC bed and for conditions where the PFC drainage capacity is exceeded and ponded sheet flow occurs across the pavement surface. The mathematical solutions provide the drainage characteristics (depth and residence time) as a function of rainfall intensity, PFC hydraulic conductivity, pavement slope, and maximum drainage path length.

  8. Electrically Driven Ion Separations in Permeable Membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruening, Merlin [Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States)

    2017-04-21

    Membranes are attractive for a wide range of separations due to their low energy costs and continuous operation. To achieve practical fluxes, most membranes consist of a thin, selective skin on a highly permeable substrate that provides mechanical strength. Thus, this project focused on creating new methods for forming highly selective ultrathin skins as well as modeling transport through these coatings to better understand their unprecedented selectivities. The research explored both gas and ion separations, and the latter included transport due to concentration, pressure and electrical potential gradients. This report describes a series of highlights of the research and then provides a complete list of publications supported by the grant. These publications have been cited more than 4000 times. Perhaps the most stunning finding is the recent discovery of monovalent/divalent cation and anion selectivities around 1000 when modifying cation- and anion-exchange membranes with polyelectrolyte multilayers (PEMs). This discovery builds on many years of exciting research. (Citation numbers refer to the journal articles in the bibliography.)

  9. Factors Influencing Stormwater Mitigation in Permeable Pavement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun Yan Liu

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Permeable pavement (PP is used worldwide to mitigate surface runoff in urban areas. Various studies have examined the factors governing the hydrologic performance of PP. However, relatively little is known about the relative importance of these governing factors and the long-term hydrologic performance of PP. This study applied numerical models—calibrated and validated using existing experimental results—to simulate hundreds of event-based and two long-term rainfall scenarios for two designs of PP. Based on the event-based simulation results, rainfall intensity, rainfall volume, thickness of the storage layer and the hydraulic conductivity of the subgrade were identified as the most influential factors in PP runoff reduction. Over the long term, PP performed significantly better in a relatively drier climate (e.g., New York, reducing nearly 90% of runoff volume compared to 70% in a relatively wetter climate (e.g., Hong Kong. The two designs of PP examined performed differently, and the difference was more apparent in the relatively wetter climate. This study generated insights that will help the design and implementation of PP to mitigate stormwater worldwide.

  10. Biopharmaceutics permeability classification of lorcaserin, a selective 5-hydroxytryptamine 2C agonist: method suitability and permeability class membership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chuan; Ma, Michael G; Fullenwider, Cody L; Chen, Weichao G; Sadeque, Abu J M

    2013-12-02

    The objectives of the study were (1) to demonstrate that a Caco-2 cell-based permeability assay, developed in our laboratory, is suitable to identify the permeability classification according to the US Food and Drug Administration Biopharmaceutics Classification System guidance, and (2) to use the validated Caco-2 method to determine permeability class membership of lorcaserin. Lorcaserin, marketed in United States as Belviq, is a selective human 5-hydroxytryptamine 2C agonist used for weight management. First, the permeability of twenty commercially available drugs was determined in the apical-to-basolateral direction at a final concentration of 10 μM, with the pH of transporter buffer in the apical and basolateral compartments being 6.8 and 7.4, respectively. A rank-order relationship between in vitro permeability results and the extent of human intestinal absorption for the drugs tested was observed. Second, the apparent permeability coefficient values of lorcaserin at 2, 20, and 200 μM and apical pH values of 6.8 and 7.4 in the apical-to-basolateral direction were determined using the validated method and found to be comparable to those of the high-permeability internal standard metoprolol. Lorcaserin permeability across Caco-2 cell monolayers was not dependent on the variation of apical pH. Furthermore, lorcaserin was not a substrate for efflux transporters such as P-glycoprotein. In conclusion, using the validated Caco-2 permeability assay, it was shown that lorcaserin is a highly permeable compound.

  11. Vascular endothelial growth factor coordinates islet innervation via vascular scaffolding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinert, Rachel B.; Cai, Qing; Hong, Ji-Young; Plank, Jennifer L.; Aamodt, Kristie; Prasad, Nripesh; Aramandla, Radhika; Dai, Chunhua; Levy, Shawn E.; Pozzi, Ambra; Labosky, Patricia A.; Wright, Christopher V. E.; Brissova, Marcela; Powers, Alvin C.

    2014-01-01

    Neurovascular alignment is a common anatomical feature of organs, but the mechanisms leading to this arrangement are incompletely understood. Here, we show that vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) signaling profoundly affects both vascularization and innervation of the pancreatic islet. In mature islets, nerves are closely associated with capillaries, but the islet vascularization process during embryonic organogenesis significantly precedes islet innervation. Although a simple neuronal meshwork interconnects the developing islet clusters as they begin to form at E14.5, the substantial ingrowth of nerve fibers into islets occurs postnatally, when islet vascularization is already complete. Using genetic mouse models, we demonstrate that VEGF regulates islet innervation indirectly through its effects on intra-islet endothelial cells. Our data indicate that formation of a VEGF-directed, intra-islet vascular plexus is required for development of islet innervation, and that VEGF-induced islet hypervascularization leads to increased nerve fiber ingrowth. Transcriptome analysis of hypervascularized islets revealed an increased expression of extracellular matrix components and axon guidance molecules, with these transcripts being enriched in the islet-derived endothelial cell population. We propose a mechanism for coordinated neurovascular development within pancreatic islets, in which endocrine cell-derived VEGF directs the patterning of intra-islet capillaries during embryogenesis, forming a scaffold for the postnatal ingrowth of essential autonomic nerve fibers. PMID:24574008

  12. Electrophysiological signatures of atypical intrinsic brain connectivity networks in autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shou, Guofa; Mosconi, Matthew W.; Wang, Jun; Ethridge, Lauren E.; Sweeney, John A.; Ding, Lei

    2017-08-01

    Objective. Abnormal local and long-range brain connectivity have been widely reported in autism spectrum disorder (ASD), yet the nature of these abnormalities and their functional relevance at distinct cortical rhythms remains unknown. Investigations of intrinsic connectivity networks (ICNs) and their coherence across whole brain networks hold promise for determining whether patterns of functional connectivity abnormalities vary across frequencies and networks in ASD. In the present study, we aimed to probe atypical intrinsic brain connectivity networks in ASD from resting-state electroencephalography (EEG) data via characterizing the whole brain network. Approach. Connectivity within individual ICNs (measured by spectral power) and between ICNs (measured by coherence) were examined at four canonical frequency bands via a time-frequency independent component analysis on high-density EEG, which were recorded from 20 ASD and 20 typical developing (TD) subjects during an eyes-closed resting state. Main results. Among twelve identified electrophysiological ICNs, individuals with ASD showed hyper-connectivity in individual ICNs and hypo-connectivity between ICNs. Functional connectivity alterations in ASD were more severe in the frontal lobe and the default mode network (DMN) and at low frequency bands. These functional connectivity measures also showed abnormal age-related associations in ICNs related to frontal, temporal and motor regions in ASD. Significance. Our findings suggest that ASD is characterized by the opposite directions of abnormalities (i.e. hypo- and hyper-connectivity) in the hierarchical structure of the whole brain network, with more impairments in the frontal lobe and the DMN at low frequency bands, which are critical for top-down control of sensory systems, as well as for both cognition and social skills.

  13. Electrophysiological assessment of the brain function in term SGA infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozdemir, Ozmert M A; Ergin, Hacer; Sahiner, Türker

    2009-05-13

    Small for gestational age (SGA) infants are defined as babies having a birth weight below the 10th percentile for gestational age. A great number of studies have shown that children with SGA have an increased risk of impaired neurodevelopment. Electroencephalography (EEG) is an excellent method for measuring brain maturation in newborns. In this study, the effect of SGA on the maturation of cerebrocortical electrographic activity was investigated by the EEG and also analyzed with power spectral analysis. Serial EEGs were performed in 40 term SGAs, and 20 term appropriate for gestational age (AGA) infants in 1st week, 1st and 3rd month. Power spectral analysis was performed quantitatively in five channels (Fp1-C3, C3-O1, Fp2-C4, C4-O2, and Cz-C4 channels). Amplitude levels of the SGA group were significantly lower than the AGA group in all records. Delta frequency was the major frequency component in the groups. Delta frequency activities in the midline vertex region were decreased in the AGA group with increasing postconceptual age while the activities of the SGA group were increased. Contrarily, beta frequency activities in the midline vertex region were increased in the AGA group with increasing postconceptual age while these activities of the SGA group were decreased. Theta frequency activities in the fronto-central regions were lower in the SGA group. In terms of the vertex, k-complex, and sleep spindle, there was no difference between the two groups. We conclude that cerebrocortical electrophysiological maturation has been delayed in term SGA infants during the first three months of postnatal life.

  14. Electrophysiological effects of trace amines on mesencephalic dopaminergic neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ada eLedonne

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Trace amines (TAs are a class of endogenous compounds strictly related to classic monoamine neurotransmitters with regard to their structure, metabolism and tissue distribution. Although the presence of TAs in mammalian brain has been recognized for decades, until recently they were considered to be by-products of amino acid metabolism or as ‘false’ neurotransmitters. The discovery in 2001 of a new family of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs, namely trace amines receptors, has re-ignited interest in TAs. In particular, two members of the family, trace amine receptor 1 (TA1 and trace amine receptor 2 (TA2, were shown to be highly sensitive to these endogenous compounds. Experimental evidence suggests that TAs modulate the activity of catecholaminergic neurons and that TA dysregulation may contribute to neuropsychiatric disorders, including schizophrenia, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, depression and Parkinson’s disease, all of which are characterised by altered monoaminergic networks. Here we review recent data concerning the electrophysiological effects of TAs on the activity of mesencephalic dopaminergic neurons. In the context of recent data obtained with TA1 receptor knockout mice, we also discuss the mechanisms by which the activation of these receptors modulates the activity of these neurons. Three important new aspects of TAs action have recently emerged: (a inhibition of firing due to increased release of dopamine; (b reduction of D2 and GABAB receptor-mediated inhibitory responses (excitatory effects due to dysinhibition; and (c a direct TA1 receptor-mediated activation of GIRK channels which produce cell membrane hyperpolarization. While the first two effects have been well documented in our laboratory, the direct activation of GIRK channels by TA1 receptors has been reported by others, but has not been seen in our laboratory (Geracitano et al., 2004. Further research is needed to address this point, and to further

  15. Electrophysiological evidence for parts and wholes in visual face memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Towler, John; Eimer, Martin

    2016-10-01

    It is often assumed that upright faces are represented in a holistic fashion, while representations of inverted faces are essentially part-based. To assess this hypothesis, we recorded event-related potentials (ERPs) during a sequential face identity matching task where successively presented pairs of upright or inverted faces were either identical or differed with respect to their internal features, their external features, or both. Participants' task was to report on each trial whether the face pair was identical or different. To track the activation of visual face memory representations, we measured N250r components that emerge over posterior face-selective regions during the activation of visual face memory representations by a successful identity match. N250r components to full identity repetitions were smaller and emerged later for inverted as compared to upright faces, demonstrating that image inversion impairs face identity matching processes. For upright faces, N250r components were also elicited by partial repetitions of external or internal features, which suggest that the underlying identity matching processes are not exclusively based on non-decomposable holistic representations. However, the N250r to full identity repetitions was super-additive (i.e., larger than the sum of the two N250r components to partial repetitions of external or internal features) for upright faces, demonstrating that holistic representations were involved in identity matching processes. For inverted faces, N250r components to full and partial identity repetitions were strictly additive, indicating that the identity matching of external and internal features operated in an entirely part-based fashion. These results provide new electrophysiological evidence for qualitative differences between representations of upright and inverted faces in the occipital-temporal face processing system. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. StimDuino: an Arduino-based electrophysiological stimulus isolator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheinin, Anton; Lavi, Ayal; Michaelevski, Izhak

    2015-03-30

    Electrical stimulus isolator is a widely used device in electrophysiology. The timing of the stimulus application is usually automated and controlled by the external device or acquisition software; however, the intensity of the stimulus is adjusted manually. Inaccuracy, lack of reproducibility and no automation of the experimental protocol are disadvantages of the manual adjustment. To overcome these shortcomings, we developed StimDuino, an inexpensive Arduino-controlled stimulus isolator allowing highly accurate, reproducible automated setting of the stimulation current. The intensity of the stimulation current delivered by StimDuino is controlled by Arduino, an open-source microcontroller development platform. The automatic stimulation patterns are software-controlled and the parameters are set from Matlab-coded simple, intuitive and user-friendly graphical user interface. The software also allows remote control of the device over the network. Electrical current measurements showed that StimDuino produces the requested current output with high accuracy. In both hippocampal slice and in vivo recordings, the fEPSP measurements obtained with StimDuino and the commercial stimulus isolators showed high correlation. Commercial stimulus isolators are manually managed, while StimDuino generates automatic stimulation patterns with increasing current intensity. The pattern is utilized for the input-output relationship analysis, necessary for assessment of excitability. In contrast to StimuDuino, not all commercial devices are capable for remote control of the parameters and stimulation process. StimDuino-generated automation of the input-output relationship assessment eliminates need for the current intensity manually adjusting, improves stimulation reproducibility, accuracy and allows on-site and remote control of the stimulation parameters. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Vascularization of the dorsal root ganglia and peripheral nerve of the mouse: Implications for chemical-induced peripheral sensory neuropathies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melemedjian Ohannes K

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Although a variety of industrial chemicals, as well as several chemotherapeutic agents used to treat cancer or HIV, preferentially induce a peripheral sensory neuropathy what remains unclear is why these agents induce a sensory vs. a motor or mixed neuropathy. Previous studies have shown that the endothelial cells that vascularize the dorsal root ganglion (DRG, which houses the primary afferent sensory neurons, are unique in that they have large fenestrations and are permeable to a variety of low and high molecular weight agents. In the present report we used whole-mount preparations, immunohistochemistry, and confocal laser scanning microscopy to show that the cell body-rich area of the L4 mouse DRG has a 7 fold higher density of CD31+ capillaries than cell fiber rich area of the DRG or the distal or proximal aspect of the sciatic nerve. This dense vascularization, coupled with the high permeability of these capillaries, may synergistically contribute, and in part explain, why many potentially neurotoxic agents preferentially accumulate and injure cells within the DRG. Currently, cancer survivors and HIV patients constitute the largest and most rapidly expanding groups that have chemically induced peripheral sensory neuropathy. Understanding the unique aspects of the vascularization of the DRG and closing the endothelial fenestrations of the rich vascular bed of capillaries that vascularize the DRG before intravenous administration of anti-neoplastic or anti-HIV therapies, may offer a mechanism based approach to attenuate these chemically induced peripheral neuropathies in these patients.

  18. Characterization and estimation of permeability correlation structure from performance data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ershaghi, I.; Al-Qahtani, M. [Univ. of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    1997-08-01

    In this study, the influence of permeability structure and correlation length on the system effective permeability and recovery factors of 2-D cross-sectional reservoir models, under waterflood, is investigated. Reservoirs with identical statistical representation of permeability attributes are shown to exhibit different system effective permeability and production characteristics which can be expressed by a mean and variance. The mean and variance are shown to be significantly influenced by the correlation length. Detailed quantification of the influence of horizontal and vertical correlation lengths for different permeability distributions is presented. The effect of capillary pressure, P{sub c1} on the production characteristics and saturation profiles at different correlation lengths is also investigated. It is observed that neglecting P{sub c} causes considerable error at large horizontal and short vertical correlation lengths. The effect of using constant as opposed to variable relative permeability attributes is also investigated at different correlation lengths. Next we studied the influence of correlation anisotropy in 2-D reservoir models. For a reservoir under five-spot waterflood pattern, it is shown that the ratios of breakthrough times and recovery factors of the wells in each direction of correlation are greatly influenced by the degree of anisotropy. In fully developed fields, performance data can aid in the recognition of reservoir anisotropy. Finally, a procedure for estimating the spatial correlation length from performance data is presented. Both the production performance data and the system`s effective permeability are required in estimating the correlation length.

  19. Dabigatran abrogates brain endothelial cell permeability in response to thrombin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkins, Brian Thomas; Gu, Yu-Huan; Izawa, Yoshikane; del Zoppo, Gregory John

    2015-06-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) increases the risk and severity of thromboembolic stroke. Generally, antithrombotic agents increase the hemorrhagic risk of thromboembolic stroke. However, significant reductions in thromboembolism and intracerebral hemorrhage have been shown with the antithrombin dabigatran compared with warfarin. As thrombin has been implicated in microvessel injury during cerebral ischemia, we hypothesized that dabigatran decreases the risk of intracerebral hemorrhage by direct inhibition of the thrombin-mediated increase in cerebral endothelial cell permeability. Primary murine brain endothelial cells (mBECs) were exposed to murine thrombin before measuring permeability to 4-kDa fluorescein isothiocyanate-dextran. Thrombin increased mBEC permeability in a concentration-dependent manner, without significant endothelial cell death. Pretreatment of mBECs with dabigatran completely abrogated the effect of thrombin on permeability. Neither the expressions of the endothelial cell β1-integrins nor the tight junction protein claudin-5 were affected by thrombin exposure. Oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD) also increased permeability; this effect was abrogated by treatment with dabigatran, as was the additive effect of thrombin and OGD on permeability. Taken together, these results indicate that dabigatran could contribute to a lower risk of intracerebral hemorrhage during embolism-associated ischemia from AF by protection of the microvessel permeability barrier from local thrombin challenge.

  20. An apparent permeability model of shale gas under formation conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Peng; Jiang, Shan; Chen, Yan; Wang, Shanshan

    2017-08-01

    There are various types of pores in shale, mainly consisting of nanopores and micropores, causing flow regime variations and apparent permeability changes during the development of the reservoir. In this paper, a Knudsen number calculation model is proposed with the actual conditions of gas in a shale reservoir. Then, based on the distribution of pores in shale, an apparent permeability model is established using hydrodynamics, and a calculation method is put forward for the actual permeability of a reservoir. Finally, the Knudsen number model and the permeability correction coefficient model are used to analyze the flow regime and permeability correction coefficients in pores during the development of the shale gas reservoir. Results show that with a decreasing of pressure, the Knudsen number increases, the flow regime changes from continuous flow and slip flow to transition flow or free molecular flow. When the Knudsen number is Kn > 0.1, and with a further increasing of Kn, gas molecule slippage greatly intensifies and the permeability correction coefficient K app/Kd significantly increases. While the Knudsen number increases, the permeability correction coefficient significantly increases in the micropores and the small pores, but this does not appear in the macropores and the mesopores. These results can be used to guide flow regime analysis and production forecasting in shale gas reservoirs.