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Sample records for vascular parkinsonism study

  1. Comparative study of CT scan findings and intellectual function between Parkinson's disease and vascular Parkinsonism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Indo, Toshikatsu

    1986-01-01

    Comparative study of CT scan findings and intellectual function between 64 cases with Parkinson's disease and 25 cases with vascular Parkinsonism was carried out. The rate of abnormality of CT scan findings, either ventricular dilatation or widening of sulci, in vascular Parkinsonism was strikingly high compared with Parkinson's disease. Patients could be divided into three groups according to the degree of overall abnormalities of CT scan findings (group A: markedly abnormal, group B: mildly abnormal, group C: normal). Incidences of group A were 9.4 % in Parkinson's disease and 52 % in vascular Parkinsonism, whereas those of group C were 56 % in the former and 28 % in the latter. All patients of group A were over 65 years of age in Parkinson's disease, but one-third of patients in group A were under 59 years of age in vascular Parkinsonism. Moreover, in vascular Parkinsonism, the level of disability was directly proportional to the abnormality of CT scan findings. The rate of predementia and dementia classified by Hasegawa's intelligence scale was 12.5 % in Parkinson's disease and 48 % in vascular Parkinsonism. No difference was found between the mean values of intelligence scale and background factors in Parkinson's disease. On the other hand, the mean value was significantly low in proportion to the poverty of L-dopa effect in vascular Parkinsonism. From these results, the abnormality of CT scan findings and intellectual impairment were probably related to the cerebral pathological process in vascular Parkinsonism, but these relationship was absent in Parkinson's disease. (author)

  2. Comparative study of CT scan findings and intellectual function between Parkinson's disease and vascular Parkinsonism

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    Indo, Toshikatsu

    1986-01-01

    Comparative study of CT scan findings and intellectual function between 64 cases with Parkinson's disease and 25 cases with vascular Parkinsonism was carried out. The rate of abnormality of CT scan findings, either ventricular dilatation or widening of sulci, in vascular Parkinsonism was strikingly high compared with Parkinson's disease. Patients could be divided into three groups according to the degree of overall abnormalities of CT scan findings (group A: markedly abnormal, group B: mildly abnormal, group C: normal). Incidences of group A were 9.4 % in Parkinson's disease and 52 % in vascular Parkinsonism, whereas those of group C were 56 % in the former and 28 % in the latter. All patients of group A were over 65 years of age in Parkinson's disease, but one-third of patients in group A were under 59 years of age in vascular Parkinsonism. Moreover, in vascular Parkinsonism, the level of disability was directly proportional to the abnormality of CT scan findings. The rate of predementia and dementia classified by Hasegawa's intelligence scale was 12.5 % in Parkinson's disease and 48 % in vascular Parkinsonism. No difference was found between the mean values of intelligence scale and background factors in Parkinson's disease. On the other hand, the mean value was significantly low in proportion to the poverty of L-dopa effect in vascular Parkinsonism. From these results, the abnormality of CT scan findings and intellectual impairment were probably related to the cerebral pathological process in vascular Parkinsonism, but these relationship was absent in Parkinson's disease.

  3. Study on dopamine D2 binding capacity in vascular parkinsonism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terashi, Hiroo; Nagata, Ken; Hirata, Yutaka; Hatazawa, Jun; Utsumi, Hiroya

    2001-01-01

    To investigate whether the striatal dopamine receptor function is involved in the development of vascular parkinsonism (VP), a positron emission tomography (PET) study was conducted on 9 patients with VP by using [ 11 C] N-methylspiperone as the tracer. The rate of binding availability in the striatal dopamine D 2 receptor (k 3 ) was determined semiquantitatively, and the values were compared to the predicted normal values based on the results from 7 normal volunteers. Of 9 patients with VP, the normalized D 2 receptor binding [%k 3 ] was more than 90% in 5 patients, 89 to 87% in 3, and 75% in one. These values showed no evident correlation with the Hoehn and Yahr stage. The laterality of the striatal %k 3 did not correspond to that of the parkinsonism. Thus, the striatal dopamine D 2 receptor binding was not severely impaired and did not correlate with the neurological status in patients with VP. This may indicate that striatal dopamine D 2 receptor function is not primarily associated with the development of the parkinsonism in VP. (author)

  4. Vascular Parkinsonism and cognitive impairment: literature review, Brazilian studies and case vignettes

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    Thiago Cardoso Vale

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Vascular Parkinsonism (VP is a form of secondary Parkinsonism resulting from cerebrovascular disease. Estimates of the frequency of VP vary greatly worldwide; 3% to 6% of all cases of Parkinsonism are found to have a vascular etiology. In a Brazilian community-based study on Parkinsonism, 15.1% of all cases were classified as VP, the third most common form, with a prevalence of 1.1% in an elderly cohort. Another Brazilian survey found a prevalence of 2.3% of VP in the elderly. VP is usually the result of conventional vascular risk factors, particularly hypertension, leading to strategic infarcts of subcortical gray matter nuclei, diffuse white matter ischaemic lesions and less commonly, large vessel infarcts. Patients with VP tend to be older and present with gait difficulties, symmetrical predominant lower-body involvement, poor levodopa responsiveness, postural instability, falls, cognitive impairment and dementia, corticospinal findings, urinary incontinence and pseudobulbar palsy. This article intends to provide physicians with an insight on the practical issues of VP, a disease potentially confounded with vascular dementia, idiopathic Parkinson's disease, dementia with Lewy bodies and other secondary causes of Parkinsonism.

  5. MRI in Parkinson's disease and vascular Parkinsonism; Study on the lesion of substantia nigra

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    Aotsuka, Akiyo; Shinotoh, Hitoshi; Hirayama, Keizo [Chiba Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine; Ikehira, Hiroo; Fukuda, Hiroshi

    1991-06-01

    We examined the magnetic resonance (MR) image of midbrain and striatum in 30 patients with Parkinson's disease (PD), 10 patients with vascular Parkinsonism (VP) and 10 age-matched control subjects. Studies were performed on a high field strength (1.5 tesla) MRI unit. T2-weighted spin echo pulse sequence (TR 2500 ms/TE 40 ms) was used. Intensity profiles of a straight line perpendicular to the pars compacta through the center of the red nucleus were made on an image of the midbrain. We measured the width of the valley at half-height between the peaks of intensity representing the red nucleus and the crus cerebri-pars reticulata complex and used this as an index of the width of the pars compacta signal. The mean width of the pars compacta signal was 2.7 mm in the PD group and 4.3 mm in controls. The difference between the means was highly significant (p<0.01). While not significant statistically, there was a trend toward narrowing of the width of pars compacta signal of substantia nigra in the PD group as the Yahr's grade or disease duration progressed. In hemiparkinsonism, MRI revealed significant narrowing of the pars compacta signal on the contra-lateral side to the clinical predominant side. The mean width of the pars compacta signal was 3.9 mm in the VP group, but the decrease was not significant. MRI in VP group showed multiple high intensity area in the basal ganglia and the white matter, and periventricular hyperintensity area (PVHIA). There was no statistically significant difference in the frequency of restoration of the signal intensity in the lateral portion of the substantia nigra among PD, VP and control groups. The low signal intensity in the posterolateral putamen was not found in the 3 groups. The narrowing of the pars compacta signal has been attributed either to atrophy of the pars compacta or to increased deposition of iron in this region. The narrowing of the pars compacta signal reflected pathophysiology of PD. (J.P.N.).

  6. Study on dopamine D{sub 2} binding capacity in vascular parkinsonism

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    Terashi, Hiroo; Nagata, Ken; Hirata, Yutaka; Hatazawa, Jun [Research Inst. for Brain and Blood Vessels, Akita (Japan); Utsumi, Hiroya [Tokyo Medical Coll. (Japan)

    2001-10-01

    To investigate whether the striatal dopamine receptor function is involved in the development of vascular parkinsonism (VP), a positron emission tomography (PET) study was conducted on 9 patients with VP by using [{sup 11}C] N-methylspiperone as the tracer. The rate of binding availability in the striatal dopamine D{sub 2} receptor (k{sub 3}) was determined semiquantitatively, and the values were compared to the predicted normal values based on the results from 7 normal volunteers. Of 9 patients with VP, the normalized D{sub 2} receptor binding [%k{sub 3}] was more than 90% in 5 patients, 89 to 87% in 3, and 75% in one. These values showed no evident correlation with the Hoehn and Yahr stage. The laterality of the striatal %k{sub 3} did not correspond to that of the parkinsonism. Thus, the striatal dopamine D{sub 2} receptor binding was not severely impaired and did not correlate with the neurological status in patients with VP. This may indicate that striatal dopamine D{sub 2} receptor function is not primarily associated with the development of the parkinsonism in VP. (author)

  7. MRI in Parkinson's disease and vascular Parkinsonism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aotsuka, Akiyo; Shinotoh, Hitoshi; Hirayama, Keizo; Ikehira, Hiroo; Fukuda, Hiroshi.

    1991-01-01

    We examined the magnetic resonance (MR) image of midbrain and striatum in 30 patients with Parkinson's disease (PD), 10 patients with vascular Parkinsonism (VP) and 10 age-matched control subjects. Studies were performed on a high field strength (1.5 tesla) MRI unit. T2-weighted spin echo pulse sequence (TR 2500 ms/TE 40 ms) was used. Intensity profiles of a straight line perpendicular to the pars compacta through the center of the red nucleus were made on an image of the midbrain. We measured the width of the valley at half-height between the peaks of intensity representing the red nucleus and the crus cerebri-pars reticulata complex and used this as an index of the width of the pars compacta signal. The mean width of the pars compacta signal was 2.7 mm in the PD group and 4.3 mm in controls. The difference between the means was highly significant (p<0.01). While not significant statistically, there was a trend toward narrowing of the width of pars compacta signal of substantia nigra in the PD group as the Yahr's grade or disease duration progressed. In hemiparkinsonism, MRI revealed significant narrowing of the pars compacta signal on the contra-lateral side to the clinical predominant side. The mean width of the pars compacta signal was 3.9 mm in the VP group, but the decrease was not significant. MRI in VP group showed multiple high intensity area in the basal ganglia and the white matter, and periventricular hyperintensity area (PVHIA). There was no statistically significant difference in the frequency of restoration of the signal intensity in the lateral portion of the substantia nigra among PD, VP and control groups. The low signal intensity in the posterolateral putamen was not found in the 3 groups. The narrowing of the pars compacta signal has been attributed either to atrophy of the pars compacta or to increased deposition of iron in this region. The narrowing of the pars compacta signal reflected pathophysiology of PD. (J.P.N.)

  8. Findings of computed tomography in vascular Parkinsonism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomura, Noriaki; Tamakawa, Yoshiharu; Kato, Toshio; Yamada, Shigeru; Hirota, Koichi.

    1985-01-01

    In order to evaluate the ventricular size, we measured the following A-F. A: The ratio of the ventricle-caudate nucleus distance to the maximum transverse inner diameter of skull on 4.0 cm above orbitomeatal plane. B: The ratio of the largest width of the anterior horn of the lateral ventricle to the maximum transverse inner diameter on the same level as A. C: The ratio of the maximum width of the third ventricle to the maximum transverse inner diameter of skull on the same level as A. D: The ratio of the minimal width of both cellae mediae to the maximum transverse inner diameter on 6.0 cm above orbitomeatal plane. E: The ratio of the area of both the anterior horn to the intracranial area on the same level as A. F: The ratio of the area of both the body of the lateral ventricle to the intracranial area on the same level as D. C was only statistically significant compared with controls. The enlargement of cerebral cortical sulci in patients was more prominent than that in controls. The degree of periventricular lucency in patients was more severe than that in controls. The number of small low density area in basal ganglia in patients was more than that in controls. The pathogenesis of periventricular lucency in the patients with vascular Parkinsonism differs from that in the patients with obstructive hydrocephalus. The periventricular area corresponds to border zone in the arterial angioarchitecture in the brain, therefore, the periventricular area undergoes easily ischemic changes than the other area. It is thought that the periventricular lucency in vascular Parkinsonism is due to the infarction, softening, vacuoles etc, and reflects the cerebrovascular arteriosclerosis. Furthermore, in view of the correlation between CT findings and clinical symptoms, the periventricular lucency reflects well the clinical severity. (J.P.N.)

  9. Diffusion tensor imaging differentiates vascular parkinsonism from parkinsonian syndromes of degenerative origin in elderly subjects

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    Deverdun, Jérémy [Department of Neuroradiology, Montpellier University Hospital Center, Gui de Chauliac Hospital, Montpellier (France); Laboratoire Charles Coulomb, CNRS UMR 5221 - Université Montpellier II, Montpellier (France); I2FH, Institut d’Imagerie Fonctionnelle Humaine, Hôpital Gui de Chauliac, CHRU de, Montpellier (France); Menjot de Champfleur, Sophie [Department of Neuroradiology, Montpellier University Hospital Center, Gui de Chauliac Hospital, Montpellier (France); Clinique du Parc, Castelnau-le-Lez (France); Cabello-Aguilar, Simon [Department of Neuroradiology, Montpellier University Hospital Center, Gui de Chauliac Hospital, Montpellier (France); I2FH, Institut d’Imagerie Fonctionnelle Humaine, Hôpital Gui de Chauliac, CHRU de, Montpellier (France); Maury, Florence [Department of Neurology, Montpellier University Hospital Center, Gui de Chauliac Hospital, Montpellier (France); Molino, François [Laboratoire Charles Coulomb, CNRS UMR 5221 - Université Montpellier II, Montpellier (France); Institut de Génomique Fonctionnelle, UMR 5203 - INSERM U661 - Université Montpellier II - Université, Montpellier I (France); Charif, Mahmoud [Department of Neurology, Montpellier University Hospital Center, Gui de Chauliac Hospital, Montpellier (France); Leboucq, Nicolas [Department of Neuroradiology, Montpellier University Hospital Center, Gui de Chauliac Hospital, Montpellier (France); Ayrignac, Xavier; Labauge, Pierre [Department of Neurology, Montpellier University Hospital Center, Gui de Chauliac Hospital, Montpellier (France); and others

    2014-11-15

    Background and Purpose: The etiologic diagnosis of parkinsonian syndromes is of particular importance when considering syndromes of vascular or degenerative origin. The purpose of this study is to find differences in the white-matter architecture between those two groups in elderly patients. Materials and Methods: Thirty-five patients were prospectively included (multiple-system atrophy, n = 5; Parkinson's disease, n = 15; progressive supranuclear palsy, n = 9; vascular parkinsonism, n = 6), with a mean age of 76 years. Patients with multiple-system atrophy, progressive supranuclear palsy and Parkinson's disease were grouped as having parkinsonian syndromes of degenerative origin. Brain MRIs included diffusion tensor imaging. Fractional anisotropy and mean-diffusivity maps were spatially normalized, and group analyses between parkinsonian syndromes of degenerative origin and vascular parkinsonism were performed using a voxel-based approach. Results: Statistical parametric-mapping analysis of diffusion tensor imaging data showed decreased fractional anisotropy value in internal capsules bilaterally in patients with vascular parkinsonism compared to parkinsonian syndromes of degenerative origin (p = 0.001) and showed a lower mean diffusivity in the white matter of the left superior parietal lobule (p = 0.01). Fractional anisotropy values were found decreased in the middle cerebellar peduncles in multiple-system atrophy compared to Parkinson's disease and progressive supranuclear palsy. The mean diffusivity was increased in those regions for these subgroups. Conclusion: Clinically defined vascular parkinsonism was associated with decreased fractional anisotropy in the deep white matter (internal capsules) compared to parkinsonian syndromes of degenerative origin. These findings are consistent with previously published neuropathological data.

  10. Diffusion tensor imaging differentiates vascular parkinsonism from parkinsonian syndromes of degenerative origin in elderly subjects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deverdun, Jérémy; Menjot de Champfleur, Sophie; Cabello-Aguilar, Simon; Maury, Florence; Molino, François; Charif, Mahmoud; Leboucq, Nicolas; Ayrignac, Xavier; Labauge, Pierre

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose: The etiologic diagnosis of parkinsonian syndromes is of particular importance when considering syndromes of vascular or degenerative origin. The purpose of this study is to find differences in the white-matter architecture between those two groups in elderly patients. Materials and Methods: Thirty-five patients were prospectively included (multiple-system atrophy, n = 5; Parkinson's disease, n = 15; progressive supranuclear palsy, n = 9; vascular parkinsonism, n = 6), with a mean age of 76 years. Patients with multiple-system atrophy, progressive supranuclear palsy and Parkinson's disease were grouped as having parkinsonian syndromes of degenerative origin. Brain MRIs included diffusion tensor imaging. Fractional anisotropy and mean-diffusivity maps were spatially normalized, and group analyses between parkinsonian syndromes of degenerative origin and vascular parkinsonism were performed using a voxel-based approach. Results: Statistical parametric-mapping analysis of diffusion tensor imaging data showed decreased fractional anisotropy value in internal capsules bilaterally in patients with vascular parkinsonism compared to parkinsonian syndromes of degenerative origin (p = 0.001) and showed a lower mean diffusivity in the white matter of the left superior parietal lobule (p = 0.01). Fractional anisotropy values were found decreased in the middle cerebellar peduncles in multiple-system atrophy compared to Parkinson's disease and progressive supranuclear palsy. The mean diffusivity was increased in those regions for these subgroups. Conclusion: Clinically defined vascular parkinsonism was associated with decreased fractional anisotropy in the deep white matter (internal capsules) compared to parkinsonian syndromes of degenerative origin. These findings are consistent with previously published neuropathological data

  11. Increased pulsatility index supports diagnosis of vascular parkinsonism versus idiopathic Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caba, L M; Ferrairó, J I T; Torres, I M; Costa, J F V; Muñoz, R B; Martin, A L

    2017-12-29

    The diagnosis of vascular parkinsonism (VP) is based on a series of clinical criteria and neuroimaging findings. An increase in transcranial Doppler ultrasonography pulsatility index (PI) has been described as a frequent finding in patients with VP. We aimed to confirm this association and to determine the PI value with the highest sensitivity and specificity for diagnosis of VP. PI was determined in all patients admitted to Hospital Universitari i Politècnic La Fe due to parkinsonism between January 2012 and June 2016. We assessed the probability of having VP based on PI values in patients with a definite diagnosis of either VP or idiopathic Parkinson's disease (IPD). A ROC curve was created to determine the PI value with the highest sensitivity and specificity. We assessed a total of 146 patients with suspected parkinsonism; 54 (37%) were diagnosed with IPD and 15 (10%) with VP. Patients with VP were significantly older than those with IPD (mean age of 79 vs 68.5, P=.00144) and had a higher PI (median of 1.29 [IQR: 1.09-1.38] vs 0.96 [IQR: 0.89-1.16], P=.01328). In our sample, a PI of 1.09 conferred 84% sensitivity and 70% specificity. In our series, the PI was significantly higher in patients with VP than in those with IPD. We therefore support the use of transcranial Doppler ultrasonography for the initial assessment of elderly patients with akinetic-rigid syndrome. Copyright © 2017 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  12. Patients with advanced Parkinson's disease with and without freezing of gait: a comparative analysis of vascular lesions using brain MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallardo, M J; Cabello, J P; Pastor, C; Muñoz-Torrero, J J; Carrasco, S; Ibañez, R; Vaamonde, J

    2014-05-01

    Freezing of gait (FOG) is one of the most disabling and enigmatic symptoms in Parkinson's disease. Vascular lesions, observed in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans, may produce or exacerbate this symptom. The study includes 22 patients with Parkinson's disease subjects, 12 with freezing of gait and 10 without. All patients underwent an MRI scan and any vascular lesions were analysed using the modified Fazekas scale. Patients with FOG scored higher on the modified Fazekas scale than the rest of the group. Although the two groups contained the same percentage of patients with vascular lesions (50% in both groups), lesion load was higher in the group of patients with FOG. Vascular lesions in the periventricular area and deep white matter seem to be the most involved in the development of FOG. Vascular lesions may contribute to the onset or worsening of FOG in patients with PD. This study suggests that cerebral vascular disease should be considered in patients with FOG. Copyright © 2012 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  13. Machine learning models for the differential diagnosis of vascular parkinsonism and Parkinson's disease using [123I]FP-CIT SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huertas-Fernandez, I.; Benitez-Rivero, S.; Jesus, S.; Caceres-Redondo, M.T.; Martin-Rodriguez, J.F.; Carrillo, F.; Garcia-Gomez, F.J.; Marin-Oyaga, V.A.; Lojo, J.A.; Garcia-Solis, D.; Mir, P.

    2015-01-01

    The study's objective was to develop diagnostic predictive models using data from two commonly used [ 123 I]FP-CIT SPECT assessment methods: region-of-interest (ROI) analysis and whole-brain voxel-based analysis. We included retrospectively 80 patients with vascular parkinsonism (VP) and 164 patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) who underwent [ 123 I]FP-CIT SPECT. Nuclear-medicine specialists evaluated the scans and calculated bilateral caudate and putamen [ 123 I]FP-CIT uptake and asymmetry indices using BRASS software. Statistical parametric mapping (SPM) was used to compare the radioligand uptake between the two diseases at the voxel level. Quantitative data from these two methods, together with potential confounding factors for dopamine transporter availability (sex, age, disease duration and severity), were used to build predictive models following a tenfold cross-validation scheme. The performance of logistic regression (LR), linear discriminant analysis and support vector machine (SVM) algorithms for ROI data, and their penalized versions for SPM data (penalized LR, penalized discriminant analysis and SVM), were assessed. Significant differences were found in the ROI analysis after covariate correction between VP and PD patients in [ 123 I]FP-CIT uptake in the more affected side of the putamen and the ipsilateral caudate. Age, disease duration and severity were also found to be informative in feeding the statistical model. SPM localized significant reductions in [ 123 I]FP-CIT uptake in PD with respect to VP in two specular clusters comprising areas corresponding to the left and right striatum. The diagnostic predictive accuracy of the LR model using ROI data was 90.3 % and of the SVM model using SPM data was 90.4 %. The predictive models built with ROI data and SPM data from [ 123 I]FP-CIT SPECT provide great discrimination accuracy between VP and PD. External validation of these methods is necessary to confirm their applicability across centres. (orig.)

  14. Parkinsonism and tremor disorders: A clinical approach | Benamer ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Differentiation of idiopathic Parkinson's disease from other causes of Parkinsonism, such as Multiple System Atrophy, Progressive Supranuclar Palsy and Vascular Parkinsonism can be difficult. Clinicopathological studies suggest that the clinical diagnosis of idiopathic Parkinson's disease is 76% reliable. Also, clinical ...

  15. Thiazolidinediones and Parkinson Disease: A Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connolly, John G; Bykov, Katsiaryna; Gagne, Joshua J

    2015-12-01

    Thiazolidinediones, a class of medications indicated for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus, reduce inflammation and have been shown to provide a therapeutic benefit in animal models of Parkinson disease. We examined the association between treatment with thiazolidinediones and the onset of Parkinson disease in older individuals. We performed a cohort study of 29,397 Medicare patients enrolled in state pharmaceutical benefits programs who initiated treatment with thiazolidinediones or sulfonylureas during the years 1997 through 2005 and had no prior diagnosis of Parkinson disease. New users of thiazolidinediones were propensity score matched to new users of sulfonylureas and followed to determine whether they were diagnosed with Parkinson disease. We used Cox proportional hazards models to compare time to diagnosis of Parkinson disease in the propensity score-matched populations. To assess the association with duration of use, we performed several analyses that required longer continuous use of medications. In the primary analysis, thiazolidinedione users had a hazard ratio for a diagnosis of Parkinson disease of 1.09 (95% confidence interval: 0.71, 1.66) when compared with sulfonylurea users. Increasing the duration-of-use requirements to 10 months did not substantially change the association; the hazard ratios ranged from 1.00 (95% confidence interval: 0.49, 2.05) to 1.17 (95% confidence interval: 0.60, 2.25). Thiazolidinedione use was not associated with a longer time to diagnosis of Parkinson disease than was sulfonylurea use, regardless of duration of exposure. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. PET-Studies in parkinson's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwarz, J.

    2002-01-01

    Positron-emission-tomography (PET) has enabled to study the metabolism and blood flow in specific brain areas. Besides, there is a variety of radiotracers that allow quantification of the function of distinct molecules. In respect to Parkinson's disease, PET allowed for the first time to assess the number of dopaminergic neurons in vivo. Thus, helping confirming a dopaminergic deficit, measuring disease progression and also help to determine the function of dopaminergic grafts. Current research has shifted to determine the role of related neurotransmitter systems in the pathophysiology of Parkinson's disease. (orig.) [de

  17. Machine learning models for the differential diagnosis of vascular parkinsonism and Parkinson's disease using [{sup 123}I]FP-CIT SPECT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huertas-Fernandez, I.; Benitez-Rivero, S.; Jesus, S.; Caceres-Redondo, M.T.; Martin-Rodriguez, J.F.; Carrillo, F. [Instituto de Biomedicina de Sevilla (IBiS), Hospital Universitario Virgen del Rocio/CSIC/Universidad de Sevilla, Unidad de Trastornos del Movimiento, Servicio de Neurologia y Neurofisiologia Clinica, Seville (Spain); Garcia-Gomez, F.J.; Marin-Oyaga, V.A.; Lojo, J.A. [Hospital Universitario Virgen del Rocio, Servicio de Medicina Nuclear, UDIM, Seville (Spain); Garcia-Solis, D. [Hospital Universitario Virgen del Rocio, Servicio de Medicina Nuclear, UDIM, Seville (Spain); Centro de Investigacion Biomedica en Red sobre Enfermedades Neurodegenerativas (CIBERNED), Seville (Spain); Mir, P. [Instituto de Biomedicina de Sevilla (IBiS), Hospital Universitario Virgen del Rocio/CSIC/Universidad de Sevilla, Unidad de Trastornos del Movimiento, Servicio de Neurologia y Neurofisiologia Clinica, Seville (Spain); Centro de Investigacion Biomedica en Red sobre Enfermedades Neurodegenerativas (CIBERNED), Seville (Spain)

    2015-01-15

    The study's objective was to develop diagnostic predictive models using data from two commonly used [{sup 123}I]FP-CIT SPECT assessment methods: region-of-interest (ROI) analysis and whole-brain voxel-based analysis. We included retrospectively 80 patients with vascular parkinsonism (VP) and 164 patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) who underwent [{sup 123}I]FP-CIT SPECT. Nuclear-medicine specialists evaluated the scans and calculated bilateral caudate and putamen [{sup 123}I]FP-CIT uptake and asymmetry indices using BRASS software. Statistical parametric mapping (SPM) was used to compare the radioligand uptake between the two diseases at the voxel level. Quantitative data from these two methods, together with potential confounding factors for dopamine transporter availability (sex, age, disease duration and severity), were used to build predictive models following a tenfold cross-validation scheme. The performance of logistic regression (LR), linear discriminant analysis and support vector machine (SVM) algorithms for ROI data, and their penalized versions for SPM data (penalized LR, penalized discriminant analysis and SVM), were assessed. Significant differences were found in the ROI analysis after covariate correction between VP and PD patients in [{sup 123}I]FP-CIT uptake in the more affected side of the putamen and the ipsilateral caudate. Age, disease duration and severity were also found to be informative in feeding the statistical model. SPM localized significant reductions in [{sup 123}I]FP-CIT uptake in PD with respect to VP in two specular clusters comprising areas corresponding to the left and right striatum. The diagnostic predictive accuracy of the LR model using ROI data was 90.3 % and of the SVM model using SPM data was 90.4 %. The predictive models built with ROI data and SPM data from [{sup 123}I]FP-CIT SPECT provide great discrimination accuracy between VP and PD. External validation of these methods is necessary to confirm their

  18. Association of Parkinsonism or Parkinson Disease with Polypharmacy in the Year Preceding Diagnosis: A Nested Case-Control Study in South Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hae-Young; Park, Ji-Won; Sohn, Hyun Soon; Kwon, Jin-Won

    2017-11-01

    Published studies on the association between polypharmacy and parkinsonism or Parkinson disease are very limited. The objective of this study was to investigate whether polypharmacy is associated with parkinsonism or Parkinson disease in elderly patients. From a South Korean national health insurance sample cohort database for 2002-2013, we matched parkinsonism cases (defined by diagnosis codes for parkinsonism/Parkinson disease) and Parkinson disease cases (patients who had records for both Parkinson disease diagnosis and anti-Parkinson disease drug prescriptions) with controls. Logistic regression analysis evaluated the associations of parkinsonism/Parkinson disease with polypharmacy (i.e., five or more prescribed daily drugs) during the year preceding parkinsonism/Parkinson disease diagnosis, medications potentially associated with parkinsonism, and comorbidity status (using the Charlson Comorbidity Index score and hospitalization records). The study population included 6209 cases and 24,836 controls for parkinsonism and 1331 cases and 5324 controls for Parkinson disease. In univariate logistic regression, odds ratios for parkinsonism/Parkinson disease increased significantly with increased polypharmacy, medications potentially associated with parkinsonism, Charlson Comorbidity Index score, or prior hospitalizations. In multiple logistic regression, odds ratios for parkinsonism/Parkinson disease (adjusted for medications potentially associated with parkinsonism and comorbidities) also increased with increased polypharmacy. Odds ratios (95% confidence interval) for Parkinson disease were higher than those for parkinsonism with stronger statistical significance: 1.41 (1.28-1.55) and 2.17 (1.84-2.57) for parkinsonism and 2.87 (2.30-3.58) and 4.75 (3.39-6.66) for Parkinson disease for between five and ten prescribed daily drugs and ten or more drugs, respectively. Polypharmacy in the year preceding diagnosis may be associated with an increased risk for parkinsonism/Parkinson

  19. A clinical study in elderly patients with Parkinson's disease using MRI and SPECT; Parkinson's disease and the lacunar state

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Umahara, Takahiko; Iwamoto, Toshihiko; Takasaki, Masaru; Katsunuma, Hideyo [Tokyo Medical Coll. (Japan)

    1991-11-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is often associated with dementia in elderly patients, and sometimes PD coexists with senile dementia of the Alzheimer type (SDAT) or cerebrovascular disease (CVD) in the elderly. However, since there are few previous clinical studies on the coincidence of, or relationship between PD and CVD, the authors evaluated these aspects in 34 elderly patients with PD using MRI and SPECT. All the patients were over 70 years old. The diagnosis of PD was based on the presence of three symptons (resting tremor, cogwheel rigidity and bradikinesia) which are characteristic of PD, and the effectiveness of L-DOPA therapy. We therefore believe that patients with vascular Parkinsonism were excluded from our study. In 34 cases, 24 (71%) had MRI evidence of CVD (mainly the lacunar state). In the 10 cases who had no CVD, 2 (20%) had severe dementia and the decrease of regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) in the temporal and parietal lobes bilaterally correlated with the SPECT findings commonly found in SDAT. A comparison of the rCBF and the results of Hasegawa's dementia score (HDS) (verbal intelligence score) was made between the patients with PD associated with CVD and the patients with PD who had no CVD and no SPECT findings which correlated with SDAT. The rCBF in the frontal lobes and the results of the HDS of the former group were significantly lower than those of the latter. As mentioned above, elderly patients with PD often had CVD, leading to dementia. We also pointed out the difficulty in making a differential diagnosis between PD with CVD and vascular Parkinsonism, and the necessity of whether or not the concept of 'mixed type Parkinsonism' should be considered. (author).

  20. Laughter Yoga, Adults Living With Parkinson׳s Disease, and Caregivers: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeCaro, Debra Swedberg; Constantine Brown, Jodi L

    2016-01-01

    This study explored outcomes of Laughter Yoga in adults with Parkinson׳s disease (PD) and their caregivers. Laughter has been shown to generally improve mood in physically healthy adults, and specifically in adults with heart disease or cancer, but little research exists regarding the impact of laughter in adults with Parkinson׳s disease. Low mood is frequently a co-morbid condition for adults with Parkinson׳s disease, and can negatively affect their caregivers. Pre-experimental (O1 × O2) pretest-posttest design. Data collection occurred at six unique PD support groups in Southern California. Participants (N = 85) comprised a convenience sample of adults diagnosed with Parkinson׳s disease (n = 47) and accompanying caregivers (n = 38). Subjects participated in a 45-min Laughter Yoga (LY) session conducted by a Certified Laughter Yoga Teacher. This study utilized the Laughter Yoga "How Do You Feel?" (HDYF) form. The form consists of a series of 10 scales labeled "well-being" measures including enthusiasm, energy level, mood, optimism, stress level, level of friendship with group members, level of awareness about breathing, level of muscle relaxation, level of mental relaxation, and ability to laugh without a reason. Paired sample t-tests reveal statistically significant improvements in well-being for adults with PD and their caregivers after attending an LY session. Therapists and other clinicians should consider utilizing this unique technique with adults with PD to address co-morbid low-mood conditions and include caregivers in the LY sessions for support and their own benefit. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. A mixed-methods study into ballet for people living with Parkinson's1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houston, Sara; McGill, Ashley

    2012-01-01

    Background: Parkinson's is a neurological disease that is physically debilitating and can be socially isolating. Dance is growing in popularity for people with Parkinson's and claims have been made for its benefits. The paper details a mixed-methods study that examined a 12-week dance project for people with Parkinson's, led by English National Ballet. Methods: The effects on balance, stability and posture were measured through the Fullerton Advanced Balance Scale and a plumb-line analysis. The value of participation and movement quality were interpreted through ethnographic methods, grounded theory and Effort analysis. Results: Triangulation of results indicates that people were highly motivated, with 100% adherence, and valued the classes as an important part of their lives. Additionally, results indicated an improvement in balance and stability, although not in posture. Conclusions: Dancing may offer benefit to people with Parkinson's through its intellectual, artistic, social and physical aspects. The paper suggests that a range of research methods is fundamental to capture the importance of multifaceted activity, such as dance, to those with Parkinson's. PMID:23805165

  2. A clinical study in elderly patients with Parkinson's disease using MRI and SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Umahara, Takahiko; Iwamoto, Toshihiko; Takasaki, Masaru; Katsunuma, Hideyo

    1991-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is often associated with dementia in elderly patients, and sometimes PD coexists with senile dementia of the Alzheimer type (SDAT) or cerebrovascular disease (CVD) in the elderly. However, since there are few previous clinical studies on the coincidence of, or relationship between PD and CVD, the authors evaluated these aspects in 34 elderly patients with PD using MRI and SPECT. All the patients were over 70 years old. The diagnosis of PD was based on the presence of three symptons (resting tremor, cogwheel rigidity and bradikinesia) which are characteristic of PD, and the effectiveness of L-DOPA therapy. We therefore believe that patients with vascular Parkinsonism were excluded from our study. In 34 cases, 24 (71%) had MRI evidence of CVD (mainly the lacunar state). In the 10 cases who had no CVD, 2 (20%) had severe dementia and the decrease of regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) in the temporal and parietal lobes bilaterally correlated with the SPECT findings commonly found in SDAT. A comparison of the rCBF and the results of Hasegawa's dementia score (HDS) (verbal intelligence score) was made between the patients with PD associated with CVD and the patients with PD who had no CVD and no SPECT findings which correlated with SDAT. The rCBF in the frontal lobes and the results of the HDS of the former group were significantly lower than those of the latter. As mentioned above, elderly patients with PD often had CVD, leading to dementia. We also pointed out the difficulty in making a differential diagnosis between PD with CVD and vascular Parkinsonism, and the necessity of whether or not the concept of 'mixed type Parkinsonism' should be considered. (author)

  3. Epidemiology of Parkinson's Disease: The Rotterdam Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.C. de Rijk (Maarten)

    1997-01-01

    textabstractAt present, Parkinson's disease (PO), after Alzheimer's disease, is generally considered to be the most frequent progressive neurodegenerative disease in the elderly. Due to the growing proportion of elderly in many populations, more and more persons will be affected by this disabling

  4. Prospective study of coffee consumption and risk of Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sääksjärvi, K; Knekt, P; Rissanen, H; Laaksonen, M A; Reunanen, A; Männistö, S

    2008-07-01

    To examine the prediction of coffee consumption on the incidence of Parkinson's disease. The study population comprised 6710 men and women, aged 50-79 years and free from Parkinson's disease at the baseline. At baseline, enquiries were made about coffee consumption in a self-administered questionnaire as the average number of cups per day. During a 22-year follow-up, 101 incident cases of Parkinson's disease occurred. Parkinson's disease cases were identified through a nationwide registry of patients receiving medication reimbursement, which is based on certificates from neurologist. After adjustments for age, sex, marital status, education, community density, alcohol consumption, leisure-time physical activity, smoking, body mass index, hypertension and serum cholesterol, the relative risk for subjects drinking 10 or more cups of coffee per day compared with non-drinkers was 0.26 (95% confidence interval 0.07-0.99, P-value for trend=0.18). The association was stronger among overweight persons and among persons with lower serum cholesterol level (P-value for interaction=0.04 and 0.03, respectively). The results support the hypothesis that coffee consumption reduces the risk of Parkinson's disease, but protective effect of coffee may vary by exposure to other factors.

  5. Radiological study of cerebro-vascular accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Misri, H.T.; Kabawe, Bassam

    1991-01-01

    The role of computerized tomography scanner in studying the cerebro-vascular accidents has been discussed. One hundred fifty patients with cerebro-vascular accidents were studied at Aleppo University Hospital between 1989-1990. Clinical history and physical examination were recorded, as well as, computerized tomography scanning in all cases without using the contrast media mostly. Relationship between the density of the lesion (inforctionor hemorrhage) and the time has been found. This relationship can help in forensic medicine. (author). 29 refs., 5 tabs., 2 figs

  6. Predictive Big Data Analytics: A Study of Parkinson?s Disease Using Large, Complex, Heterogeneous, Incongruent, Multi-Source and Incomplete Observations

    OpenAIRE

    Dinov, Ivo D.; Heavner, Ben; Tang, Ming; Glusman, Gustavo; Chard, Kyle; Darcy, Mike; Madduri, Ravi; Pa, Judy; Spino, Cathie; Kesselman, Carl; Foster, Ian; Deutsch, Eric W.; Price, Nathan D.; Van Horn, John D.; Ames, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    Background A unique archive of Big Data on Parkinson?s Disease is collected, managed and disseminated by the Parkinson?s Progression Markers Initiative (PPMI). The integration of such complex and heterogeneous Big Data from multiple sources offers unparalleled opportunities to study the early stages of prevalent neurodegenerative processes, track their progression and quickly identify the efficacies of alternative treatments. Many previous human and animal studies have examined the relationsh...

  7. A biodegradable vascularizing membrane: a feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaushiva, Anchal; Turzhitsky, Vladimir M; Darmoc, Marissa; Backman, Vadim; Ameer, Guillermo A

    2007-09-01

    Regenerative medicine and in vivo biosensor applications require the formation of mature vascular networks for long-term success. This study investigated whether biodegradable porous membranes could induce the formation of a vascularized fibrous capsule and, if so, the effect of degradation kinetics on neovascularization. Poly(l-lactic acid) (PLLA) and poly(dl-lactic-co-glycolic) acid (PLGA) membranes were created by a solvent casting/salt leaching method. Specifically, PLLA, PLGA 75:25 and PLGA 50:50 polymers were used to vary degradation kinetics. The membranes were designed to have an average 60mum pore diameter, as this pore size has been shown to be optimal for inducing blood vessel formation around nondegradable polymer materials. Membrane samples were imaged by scanning electron microscopy at several time points during in vitro degradation to assess any changes in pore structure. The in vivo performance of the membranes was assessed in Sprague-Dawley rats by measuring vascularization within the fibrous capsule that forms adjacent to implants. The vascular density within 100microm of the membranes was compared with that seen in normal tissue, and to that surrounding the commercially available vascularizing membrane TheraCyte. The hemoglobin content of tissue containing the membranes was measured by four-dimensional elastic light scattering as a novel method to assess tissue perfusion. Results from this study show that slow-degrading membranes induce greater amounts of neovascularization and a thinner fibrous capsule relative to fast degrading membranes. These results may be due both to an initially increased number of macrophages surrounding the slower degrading membranes and to the maintenance of their initial pore structure.

  8. Vascularized nerve grafts: an experimental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donzelli, Renato; Capone, Crescenzo; Sgulò, Francesco Giovanni; Mariniello, Giuseppe; Maiuri, Francesco

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study is to define an experimental model in order to promote the functional recovery of the nerves using grafts with vascular support (Vascular Nerve Grafts - VNG). The aim of this study is to define, on an experimental model in normal recipient bed, whether the functional recovery with VNG is superior to that obtained non-vascularized graft (NNG). Twenty male rabbits, which underwent dissection of sciatic nerve, were later treated by reinnervation through an autograft. In 10 animals the reconstruction of sciatic nerve was realized with VNG; in 10 control animals the reconstruction of sciatic nerve was realized with NNG. The VNG group showed a better axonal organization and a significantly higher number of regenerated axons in the early phases (after 30 days) than the NNG group, whereas the difference in the axonal number at day 90 was less significant; besides, the axon diameter and the myelin thickness were not significantly improved by VNG group. Our data suggests that the use of VNG leads to a faster regeneration process and a better functional recovery, although the final results are comparable to those of the NNG. VNG improve the quality of the axonal regeneration (axonal diameter and Schwann cells), although the increase in the axonal number is not significant and does not improve the long-term functional outcome.

  9. Low LDL cholesterol, PCSK9 and HMGCR genetic variation, and risk of Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease: Mendelian randomisation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benn, Marianne; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Frikke-Schmidt, Ruth; Tybjærg-Hansen, Anne

    2017-04-24

    Objective  To test the hypothesis that low density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol due to genetic variation in the genes responsible for LDL cholesterol metabolism and biosynthesis( PCSK9 and 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase ( HMGCR ), respectively) is associated with a high risk of Alzheimer's disease, vascular dementia, any dementia, and Parkinson's disease in the general population. Design  Mendelian randomisation study. Setting  Copenhagen General Population Study and Copenhagen City Heart Study. Participants  111 194 individuals from the Danish general population. Main outcome measures  Risk of Alzheimer's disease, vascular dementia, all dementia, and Parkinson's disease. Results  In observational analyses, the multifactorially adjusted hazard ratio for Parkinson's disease in participants with an LDL cholesterol level LDL cholesterol level. In genetic, causal analyses adjusted for age, sex, and year of birth, the risk ratios for a lifelong 1 mmol/L lower LDL cholesterol level were 0.57 (0.27 to 1.17) for Alzheimer's disease, 0.81 (0.34 to 1.89) for vascular dementia, 0.66 (0.34 to 1.26) for any dementia, and 1.02 (0.26 to 4.00) for Parkinson's disease. Summary level data from the International Genomics of Alzheimer's Project using Egger Mendelian randomisation analysis gave a risk ratio for Alzheimer's disease of 0.24 (0.02 to 2.79) for 26 PCSK9 and HMGCR variants, and of 0.64 (0.52 to 0.79) for 380 variants of LDL cholesterol level lowering. Conclusion  Low LDL cholesterol levels due to PCSK9 and HMGCR variants had no causal effect on high risk of Alzheimer's disease, vascular dementia, any dementia, or Parkinson's disease; however, low LDL cholesterol levels may have a causal effect in reducing the risk of Alzheimer's disease. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  10. Studies of cerebral atrophy and regional cerebral blood flow in patients with Parkinson's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitamura, Shin

    1983-01-01

    Cerebral atrophy and regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) of 25 patients with Parkinson's disease were studied. The rCBF was measured with the intra-arterial Xe-133 injection method. The results obtained were as follows: 1) Sixty four % of Parkinson's disease patients showed ventricular dilation, and 76% of Parkinson's disease patients showed cortical atrophy on the CT scan, but we had to allow for the effects of the natural aging process on these results. 2) No correlation was recognized either between cerebral atrophy and the severity of Parkinson's disease, or between cerebral atrophy and the duration of Parkinson's disease. 3) In Parkinson's disease patients, the mean rCBF was lower than that of normal control subjects. The difference was even more remarkable in older patients. Only 40% of Parkinson's disease patients showed hyperfrontal pattern. 4) There was no correlation either between the mean rCBF and the severity of Parkinson's disease, or between the mean rCBF and the duration of Parkinson's disease. There was no significant difference between the mean rCBF of Parkinson's disease patients receiving levodopa and that of untreated patients. 5) The mean rCBF decreased in patients with cerebral atrophy on the CT scan. 6) Parkinson's disease patients with intellectual impairment showed cerebral atrophy and a remarkable decrease of the mean rCBF. 7) The effect of aging on cerebral atrophy on the CT scan had to be allowed for, but judging from the decrease of the mean rCBF, the cerebral cortex is evidently involved in Parkinson's disease. 8) The rCBF decline in Parkinson's disease patients may be related with the diminished cortical metabolic rate due to a remote effect of striatal dysfunction and a disturbance of mesocortical dopaminergic pathways. (J.P.N.)

  11. Studies of cerebral atrophy and regional cerebral blood flow in patients with Parkinson's disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kitamura, Shin [Nippon Medical School, Tokyo

    1983-04-01

    Cerebral atrophy and regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) of 25 patients with Parkinson's disease were studied. The rCBF was measured with the intra-arterial Xe-133 injection method. The results obtained were as follows: 1) Sixty four % of Parkinson's disease patients showed ventricular dilation, and 76% of Parkinson's disease patients showed cortical atrophy on the CT scan, but we had to allow for the effects of the natural aging process on these results. 2) No correlation was recognized either between cerebral atrophy and the severity of Parkinson's disease, or between cerebral atrophy and the duration of Parkinson's disease. 3) In Parkinson's disease patients, the mean rCBF was lower than that of normal control subjects. The difference was even more remarkable in older patients. Only 40% of Parkinson's disease patients showed hyperfrontal pattern. 4) There was no correlation either between the mean rCBF and the severity of Parkinson's disease, or between the mean rCBF and the duration of Parkinson's disease. There was no significant difference between the mean rCBF of Parkinson's disease patients receiving levodopa and that of untreated patients. 5) The mean rCBF decreased in patients with cerebral atrophy on the CT scan. 6) Parkinson's disease patients with intellectual impairment showed cerebral atrophy and a remarkable decrease of the mean rCBF. 7) The effect of aging on cerebral atrophy on the CT scan had to be allowed for, but judging from the decrease of the mean rCBF, the cerebral cortex is evidently involved in Parkinson's disease. 8) The rCBF decline in Parkinson's disease patients may be related with the diminished cortical metabolic rate due to a remote effect of striatal dysfunction and a disturbance of mesocortical dopaminergic pathways.

  12. N-isopropyl-p-123I iodoamphetamine single photon emission computed tomography study of Parkinson's disease with dementia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsui, Hideaki; Udaka, Fukashi; Miyoshi, Takafumi; Hara, Narihiro; Tamura, Akiko; Oda, Masaya; Kubori, Tamotsu; Nishinaka, Kazuto; Kameyama, Masakuni

    2005-01-01

    Intellectual deterioration occurs in 10-40% of patients with Parkinson's disease. However, there are many conflicting studies on its relation with brain perfusion and the nature of this dementing process remains controversial. The objective of this study was to compare cortical perfusion by SPECT using 123 I-IMP between Parkinson's disease patients with dementia and those without dementia and to investigate the correlation between dementia in Parkinson's disease and brain perfusion in various areas. Fifty-two cases of Parkinson's disease and 10 control cases were studied. The Parkinson's disease with dementia group included 30 cases and the Parkinson's disease without dementia group included 22 cases. By multiple logistic regression method, we demonstrated significant hypoperfusion in the occipital cortex in Parkinson's disease with dementia. The cause of dementia in Parkinson's disease may vary. We demonstrated that occipital hypoperfusion was closely correlated to dementia in Parkinson's disease compared to frontal, parietal and temporal perfusion. (author)

  13. Progress of PET imaging in the study of neural stem cell transplantation treating Parkinson's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tan Haibo; Liu Xingdang

    2004-01-01

    PET imaging has important value in the study of neural stem cell transplantation treating Parkinson's disease, especial in the evaluation of the effect, the study of treating mechanisms and the comparation of effect in different transplantation places. PET imaging as a non-invasive method plays a more and more important role in the study of neural stem cell transplantation treating Parkinson's disease. (authors)

  14. Charcot and vascular Parkinsonism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hélio A. G. Teive

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Jean-Martin Charcot (1825-1893, recognized as the founder of Neurology and the first formal teacher of nervous system diseases, died on August 16, 1893, from acute pulmonary edema secondary to myocardial infarction. In his last years, there were several descriptions of his gait and posture disorders, suggesting the diagnosis of “lower-half parkinsonism” due to cerebrovascular disease.

  15. Occupational pesticide use and Parkinson's disease in the Parkinson Environment Gene (PEG) study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayan, Shilpa; Liew, Zeyan; Bronstein, Jeff M; Ritz, Beate

    2017-10-01

    To study the influence of occupational pesticide use on Parkinson's disease (PD) in a population with information on various occupational, residential, and household sources of pesticide exposure. In a population-based case control study in Central California, we used structured interviews to collect occupational history details including pesticide use in jobs, duration of use, product names, and personal protective equipment use from 360 PD cases and 827 controls. We linked reported products to California's pesticide product label database and identified pesticide active ingredients and occupational use by chemical class including fungicides, insecticides, and herbicides. Employing unconditional logistic regression, we estimated odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals for PD and occupational pesticide use. Ever occupational use of carbamates increased risk of PD by 455%, while organophosphorus (OP) and organochlorine (OC) pesticide use doubled risk. PD risk increased 110-211% with ever occupational use of fungicides, herbicides, and insecticides. Using any pesticide occupationally for >10years doubled the risk of PD compared with no occupational pesticide use. Surprisingly, we estimated higher risks among those reporting use of personal protective equipment (PPE). Our findings provide additional evidence that occupational pesticide exposures increase PD risk. This was the case even after controlling for other sources of pesticide exposure. Specifically, risk increased with occupational use of carbamates, OPs, and OCs, as well as of fungicides, herbicides, or insecticides. Interestingly, some types of PPE use may not provide adequate protection during pesticide applications. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Comparative imaging study on monkeys with hemi-parkinsonism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Wei; Yu Xiaoping; Mao Jun; Liu Sheng; Wang Xiaoyi; Peng Guangchun; Wang Ruiwen

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To study the imaging appearance of experimental Parkinson's disease (PD) and to evaluate the different medical imaging exams on PD. Methods: CT, MRI, SPECT (dopamine transporter imaging and regional cerebral blood flow imaging, DAT imaging and rCBF imaging), and PET (glucose metabolism imaging) were performed on 8 monkeys before and after the infusion of MPTP into unilateral internal carotid artery to develop hemi-Parkinsonism models. Results: Hemi-Parkinsonism models were successfully induced on all 8 monkeys. On DAT imaging, the uptake values of the lesioned striatums decreased obviously after the MPTP treatment and were lower than that of the contralateral ones. The glucose metabolic rates of the lesioned striatums and thalamus in PD models were lower, compared to that of the healthy monkeys and that of the contralateral sides of themselves. Neither DAT nor glucose metabolism abnormalities was found on both the contralateral sides of the healthy and PD monkeys. On MRI images before MPTP treatment, only 4 of 8 PD models showed hypointense in bilateral globus pallidus. No abnormal MRI findings occurred in the first 2 months after injection of MPTP. At tile third month, hypointense appeared in globus pallidus of three monkeys. Enlarged hyposignal region in globus pallidus were found in three models. Of the above 6 monkeys, two appeared hypointense in putamina. Substantia nigra demonstrated no abnormalities before and after MPTP treatment. All rCBF and CT images were normal. Conclusion: The decreased density of DAT and decreased glucose metabolism on experimental PD can be showed early by DAT imaging and glucose metabolism imaging, MRI can show abnormal signal in the basal ganglia of PD but it is later than DAT and glucose metabolism imaging. CT and rCBF find no abnormality on PD

  17. [Rasagiline is not for all Parkinson disease patients: the ADAGIO study].

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laar, T. van; Boon, A.J.; Bloem, B.R.

    2010-01-01

    Rasagiline is a MAO-B inhibitor that is currently registered for the symptomatic treatment of Parkinson disease. The ADAGIO trial studied the potential disease-modifying properties of rasagiline in 1100 patients with Parkinson disease, using an innovative 'delayed start' design. Patients were

  18. Dopamine transporter imaging study in parkinsonism occurring in fragile X premutation carriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceravolo, R; Antonini, A; Volterrani, D; Rossi, C; Goldwurm, S; Di Maria, E; Kiferle, L; Bonuccelli, U; Murri, L

    2005-12-27

    The authors studied four patients with parkinsonism carrying the fragile X premutation using SPECT with ([23)I]FP-CIT. They found evidence of preserved presynaptic nigrostriatal function, suggesting that parkinsonism in the X fragile premutation might be related to postsynaptic dopaminergic changes or different neurotransmitter alterations.

  19. Large-Scale Wearable Sensor Deployment in Parkinson's Patients: The Parkinson@Home Study Protocol

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Silva de Lima, A.L.; Hahn, T.; Vries, N.M. de; Cohen, E.; Bataille, L.; Little, M.A.; Baldus, H.; Bloem, B.R.; Faber, M.J.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Long-term management of Parkinson's disease does not reach its full potential because we lack knowledge about individual variations in clinical presentation and disease progression. Continuous and longitudinal assessments in real-life (ie, within the patients' own home environment) might

  20. Risk and protective factors for Parkinson's disease: a study in Swedish twins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirdefeldt, Karin; Gatz, Margaret; Pawitan, Yudi; Pedersen, Nancy L

    2005-01-01

    Many studies have shown a protective effect of cigarette smoking on Parkinson's disease. However, criticism has been raised concerning confounding by genetic factors. We investigated the associations between Parkinson's disease and smoking, alcohol, coffee, area of living, and education in a co-twin control study. Because twins are matched for genetic and familial environmental factors, this design controls for confounding by these factors. We also examined control subjects unrelated to cases. Exposure information was taken from questionnaires answered in the 1960s and 1970s. Parkinson's disease cases were identified through the Swedish Inpatient Discharge Register (IDR) and the Cause of Death Register. In the unrelated control subject comparison, 476 Parkinson's disease cases and 2,380 control subjects were included. In the co-twin control comparison, 415 same-sex twin pairs were included. There was an inverse association between smoking and Parkinson's disease using unrelated control subjects and co-twin control cases. There was no association between Parkinson's disease and alcohol, coffee, or area of living. High educational level was associated with Parkinson's disease in the unrelated control subject comparison but not in the co-twin control comparison. We confirm the protective effect of smoking on Parkinson's disease and establish that the association is only partially explained by genetic and familial environmental factors.

  1. Inverse Association of Parkinson Disease With Systemic Lupus Erythematosus: A Nationwide Population-based Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Feng-Cheng; Huang, Wen-Yen; Lin, Te-Yu; Shen, Chih-Hao; Chou, Yu-Ching; Lin, Cheng-Li; Lin, Kuen-Tze; Kao, Chia-Hung

    2015-11-01

    The effects of the inflammatory mediators involved in systemic lupus erythematous (SLE) on subsequent Parkinson disease have been reported, but no relevant studies have focused on the association between the 2 diseases. This nationwide population-based study evaluated the risk of Parkinson disease in patients with SLE.We identified 12,817 patients in the Taiwan National Health Insurance database diagnosed with SLE between 2000 and 2010 and compared the incidence rate of Parkinson disease among these patients with that among 51,268 randomly selected age and sex-matched non-SLE patients. A Cox multivariable proportional-hazards model was used to evaluate the risk factors of Parkinson disease in the SLE cohort.We observed an inverse association between a diagnosis of SLE and the risk of subsequent Parkinson disease, with the crude hazard ratio (HR) being 0.60 (95% confidence interval 0.45-0.79) and adjusted HR being 0.68 (95% confidence interval 0.51-0.90). The cumulative incidence of Parkinson disease was 0.83% lower in the SLE cohort than in the non-SLE cohort. The adjusted HR of Parkinson disease decreased as the follow-up duration increased and was decreased among older lupus patients with comorbidity.We determined that patients with SLE had a decreased risk of subsequent Parkinson disease. Further research is required to elucidate the underlying mechanism.

  2. Clear Speech Variants: An Acoustic Study in Parkinson's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Jennifer; Tjaden, Kris

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The authors investigated how different variants of clear speech affect segmental and suprasegmental acoustic measures of speech in speakers with Parkinson's disease and a healthy control group. Method: A total of 14 participants with Parkinson's disease and 14 control participants served as speakers. Each speaker produced 18 different…

  3. Suicide in patients with Parkinson's disease. An epidemiological study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stenager, E N; Wermuth, L; Stenager, Egon

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to estimate the risk of suicide for patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) in Denmark compared with that in the background population. The study involved 458 patients with a PD diagnosis, 226 men and 232 women. The follow-up period to either death or end of follow......-up on December 31, 1990 was 0 to 17 years, mean 5.7 years. Deaths in the follow-up period amounted to 254, 135 men and 119 women. Two women committed suicide. The number of expected suicides was 1.06 for men and 0.55 for women, a total of 1.62. Neither for men nor for women was the difference between expected...... and observed suicides statistically significant....

  4. Longitudinal Study of Gray Matter Changes in Parkinson Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, X; Liang, P; Li, Y; Shi, L; Wang, D; Li, K

    2015-12-01

    The pathology of Parkinson disease leads to morphological brain volume changes. So far, the progressive gray matter volume change across time specific to patients with Parkinson disease compared controls remains unclear. Our aim was to investigate the pattern of gray matter changes in patients with Parkinson disease and to explore the progressive gray matter volume change specific to patients with Parkinson disease with disease progression by using voxel-based morphometry analysis. Longitudinal cognitive assessment and structural MR imaging of 89 patients with Parkinson disease (62 men) and 55 healthy controls (33 men) were from the Parkinson's Progression Markers Initiative data base, including the initial baseline and 12-month follow-up data. Two-way analysis of covariance was performed with covariates of age, sex, years of education, imaging data from multiple centers, and total intracranial volume by using Diffeomorphic Anatomical Registration Through Exponentiated Lie Algebra tool from SPM8 software. Gray matter volume changes for patients with Parkinson disease were detected with decreased gray matter volume in the frontotemporoparietal areas and the bilateral caudate, with increased gray matter volume in the bilateral limbic/paralimbic areas, medial globus pallidus/putamen, and the right occipital cortex compared with healthy controls. Progressive gray matter volume decrease in the bilateral caudate was found for both patients with Parkinson disease and healthy controls, and this caudate volume was positively associated with cognitive ability for both groups. The progressive gray matter volume increase specific to the patients with Parkinson disease was identified close to the left ventral lateral nucleus of thalamus, and a positive relationship was found between the thalamic volume and the tremor scores in a subgroup with tremor-dominant patients with Parkinson disease. The observed progressive changes in gray matter volume in Parkinson disease may provide

  5. Prospective study of caffeine consumption and risk of Parkinson's disease in men and women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ascherio, A; Zhang, S M; Hernán, M A; Kawachi, I; Colditz, G A; Speizer, F E; Willett, W C

    2001-07-01

    Results of case-control studies and of a prospective investigation in men suggest that consumption of coffee could protect against the risk of Parkinson's disease, but the active constituent is not clear. To address the hypothesis that caffeine is protective against Parkinson's disease, we examined the relationship of coffee and caffeine consumption to the risk of this disease among participants in two ongoing cohorts, the Health Professionals' Follow-Up Study (HPFS) and the Nurses' Health Study (NHS). The study population comprised 47,351 men and 88,565 women who were free of Parkinson's disease, stroke, or cancer at baseline. A comprehensive life style and dietary questionnaire was completed by the participants at baseline and updated every two to four years. During the follow-up (10 years in men, 16 years in women), we documented a total of 288 incident cases of Parkinson's disease. Among men, after adjustment for age and smoking, the relative risk of Parkinson's disease was 0.42 (95% CI: 0.23-0.78; p for trend coffee (p for trend = 0.004), caffeine from noncoffee sources (p for trend coffee. Among women, the relationship between caffeine or coffee intake and risk of Parkinson's disease was U-shaped, with the lowest risk observed at moderate intakes (1-3 cups of coffee/day, or the third quintile of caffeine consumption). These results support a possible protective effect of moderate doses of caffeine on risk of Parkinson's disease.

  6. parkin mutation dosage and the phenomenon of anticipation: a molecular genetic study of familial parkinsonism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schellenberg Gerard D

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background parkin mutations are a common cause of parkinsonism. Possessing two parkin mutations leads to early-onset parkinsonism, while having one mutation may predispose to late-onset disease. This dosage pattern suggests that some parkin families should exhibit intergenerational variation in age at onset resembling anticipation. A subset of familial PD exhibits anticipation, the cause of which is unknown. The aim of this study was to determine if anticipation was due to parkin mutation dosage. Methods We studied 19 kindreds that had early-onset parkinsonism in the offspring generation, late-onset parkinsonism in the parent generation, and ≥ 20 years of anticipation. We also studied 28 early-onset parkinsonism cases without anticipation. Patients were diagnosed by neurologists at a movement disorder clinic. parkin analysis included sequencing and dosage analysis of all 12 exons. Results Only one of 19 cases had compound parkin mutations, but contrary to our postulate, the affected relative with late-onset parkinsonism did not have a parkin mutation. In effect, none of the anticipation cases could be attributed to parkin. In contrast, 21% of early-onset parkinsonism patients without anticipation had parkin mutations. Conclusion Anticipation is not linked to parkin, and may signify a distinct disease entity.

  7. Impulse control disorders in advanced Parkinson's disease with dyskinesia: The ALTHEA study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biundo, Roberta; Weis, Luca; Abbruzzese, Giovanni; Calandra-Buonaura, Giovanna; Cortelli, Pietro; Jori, Maria Cristina; Lopiano, Leonardo; Marconi, Roberto; Matinella, Angela; Morgante, Francesca; Nicoletti, Alessandra; Tamburini, Tiziano; Tinazzi, Michele; Zappia, Mario; Vorovenci, Ruxandra Julia; Antonini, Angelo

    2017-11-01

    Impulse control disorders and dyskinesia are common and disabling complications of dopaminergic treatment in Parkinson's disease. They may coexist and are possibly related. The objectives of this study were to assess the frequency and severity of impulse control disorders in Parkinson's disease patients with dyskinesia. The ALTHEA study enrolled 251 Parkinson's disease patients with various degrees of dyskinesia severity from 11 movement disorders centers in Italy. Each patient underwent a comprehensive assessment including Unified Dyskinesia Rating Scale and the Questionnaire for Impulsive Compulsive Disorders in Parkinson Disease-Rating Scale. There was an overall 55% frequency of impulse control disorder and related behaviors (36% were clinically significant). The positive patients were younger at disease diagnosis and onset and had higher Unified Dyskinesia Rating Scale historical and total score (P = 0.001 and P = 0.02, respectively, vs negative). There was an increased frequency of clinically significant impulse control disorders in patients with severe dyskinesia (P = 0.013), a positive correlation between the questionnaire total score and dopamine agonist dose (P = 0.018), and a trend with levodopa dose. More than half of Parkinson's disease patients with dyskinesia have impulse control disorders and related behaviors, which are frequently clinically significant. Dopaminergic therapy total dose is associated with their severity. Clinicians should carefully assess patients with maladaptive behaviors and dyskinesia because they do not properly evaluate their motor and nonmotor status. © 2017 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society. © 2017 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.

  8. Noninvasive studies of peripheral vascular disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yao, J.S.T.

    1987-01-01

    Plethysmography probably is the oldest method for measuring blood flow. In this method, measurements are made of changes in volume of an organ or region of tissue. In the modern practice of vascular surgery, the use of plethysmography has been expanded to include detection of not only arterial occlusive disease but also carotid artery disease and venous problems. Several types of plethysmographs are now available for clinical use in the evaluation of arterial occlusions. These are volume, strain-gauge, and photoelectric plethysmographs. The water-filled volume recorder, popular in the early use of plethysmography, is now obsolete and has been replaced by the air-filled volume plethysmograph, notably, the pulse-volume recorder. For clinical application, the newer plethysmographs, such as the strain-gauge, photopletyhsmograph, and pulse-volume recorder, are now standard equipment in many vascular laboratories. They are discussed in this article

  9. Efficacy of rasagiline and selegiline in Parkinson?s disease: a head-to-head 3-year retrospective case?control study

    OpenAIRE

    Cereda, Emanuele; Cilia, Roberto; Canesi, Margherita; Tesei, Silvana; Mariani, Claudio Bruno; Zecchinelli, Anna Lena; Pezzoli, Gianni

    2017-01-01

    Monoamine oxidase type B (MAO-B) inhibitors, such as selegiline and rasagiline, can be used as monotherapy or adjuvant therapy to levodopa in Parkinson?s disease (PD). Data on long-term efficacy of MAO-B inhibitors are limited with no head-to-head comparison available to date. The aim of this case?control retrospective study was to analyze data from patients with PD attending the Parkinson Institute (Milan, Italy) over a 6-year period (2009?2015) and compare the effects of selegiline and rasa...

  10. Imputation of sequence variants for identification of genetic risks for Parkinson's disease: a meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nalls, M.A.; Plagnol, V.; Hernandez, D.G.; Sharma, M.; Sheerin, U.M.; Saad, M.; Simon-Sanchez, J.; Schulte, C.; Lesage, S.; Sveinbjornsdottir, S.; Stefansson, K.; Martinez, M.; Hardy, J.; Heutink, P.; Brice, A.; Gasser, T.; Singleton, A.B.; Wood, N.W.; Bloem, B.R.; Post, B.; Scheffer, H.; Warrenburg, B.P.C. van de; et al.,

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) for Parkinson's disease have linked two loci (MAPT and SNCA) to risk of Parkinson's disease. We aimed to identify novel risk loci for Parkinson's disease. METHODS: We did a meta-analysis of datasets from five Parkinson's disease GWAS from the USA

  11. Imputation of sequence variants for identification of genetic risks for Parkinson's disease: a meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nalls, Michael A.; Plagnol, Vincent; Hernandez, Dena G.; Sharma, Manu; Sheerin, Una-Marie; Saad, Mohamad; Simon-Sanchez, Javier; Schulte, Claudia; Lesage, Suzanne; Sveinbjornsdottir, Sigurlaug; Arepalli, Sampath; Barker, Roger; Ben-Shlomo, Yoav; Berendse, Henk W.; Berg, Daniela; Bhatia, Kailash; de Bie, Rob M. A.; Biffi, Alessandro; Bloem, Bas; Bochdanovits, Zoltan; Bonin, Michael; Bras, Jose M.; Brockmann, Kathrin; Brooks, Janet; Burn, David J.; Charlesworth, Gavin; Chen, Honglei; Chinnery, Patrick F.; Chong, Sean; Clarke, Carl E.; Cookson, Mark R.; Cooper, J. Mark; Corvol, Jean Christophe; Counsell, Carl; Damier, Philippe; Dartigues, Jean-Francois; Deloukas, Panos; Deuschl, Guenther; Dexter, David T.; van Dijk, Karin D.; Dillman, Allissa; Durif, Frank; Duerr, Alexandra; Edkins, Sarah; Evans, Jonathan R.; Foltynie, Thomas; Gao, Jianjun; Gardner, Michelle; Gibbs, J. Raphael; Goate, Alison; Gray, Emma; Guerreiro, Rita; Gustafsson, Omar; Harris, Clare; van Hilten, Jacobus J.; Hofman, Albert; Hollenbeck, Albert; Holton, Janice; Hu, Michele; Huang, Xuemei; Huber, Heiko; Hudson, Gavin; Hunt, Sarah E.; Huttenlocher, Johanna; Illig, Thomas; Jonsson, Palmi V.; Lambert, Jean-Charles; Langford, Cordelia; Lees, Andrew; Lichtner, Peter; Limousin, Patricia; Lopez, Grisel; Lorenz, Delia; McNeill, Alisdair; Moorby, Catriona; Moore, Matthew; Morris, Huw R.; Morrison, Karen E.; Mudanohwo, Ese; O'Sullivan, Sean S.; Pearson, Justin; Perlmutter, Joel S.; Petursson, Hjoervar; Pollak, Pierre; Post, Bart; Potter, Simon; Ravina, Bernard; Revesz, Tamas; Riess, Olaf; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Rizzu, Patrizia; Ryten, Mina; Sawcer, Stephen; Schapira, Anthony; Scheffer, Hans; Shaw, Karen; Shoulson, Ira; Sidransky, Ellen; Smith, Colin; Spencer, Chris C. A.; Stefansson, Hreinn; Stockton, Joanna D.; Strange, Amy; Talbot, Kevin; Tanner, Carlie M.; Tashakkori-Ghanbaria, Avazeh; Tison, Francois; Trabzuni, Daniah; Traynor, Bryan J.; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; Velseboer, Daan; Vidailhet, Marie; Walker, Robert; van de Warrenburg, Bart; Wickremaratchi, Mirdhu; Williams, Nigel; Williams-Gray, Caroline H.; Winder-Rhodes, Sophie; Stefansson, Kari; Martinez, Maria; Hardy, John; Heutink, Peter; Brice, Alexis; Gasser, Thomas; Singleton, Andrew B.; Wood, Nicholas W.

    2011-01-01

    Background Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) for Parkinson's disease have linked two loci (MAPT and SNCA) to risk of Parkinson's disease. We aimed to identify novel risk loci for Parkinson's disease. Methods We did a meta-analysis of datasets from five Parkinson's disease GWAS from the USA and

  12. Magnetic resonance spectroscopic study of parkinsonism related to boxing.

    OpenAIRE

    Davie, C A; Pirtosek, Z; Barker, G J; Kingsley, D P; Miller, P H; Lees, A J

    1995-01-01

    Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy, localised to the lentiform nucleus, was carried out in three ex-professional boxers who developed a parkinsonian syndrome, six patients with idiopathic Parkinson's disease, and six age matched controls. The three ex-boxers all showed a pronounced reduction in the absolute concentration of N-acetylaspartate compared with the patients with idiopathic Parkinson's disease and the control group. This reduction is likely to reflect neuronal loss occurring in ...

  13. Vascular Function at Baseline in the Hemodialysis Fistula Maturation Study

    OpenAIRE

    Dember, Laura M.; Imrey, Peter B.; Duess, Mai?Ann; Hamburg, Naomi M.; Larive, Brett; Radeva, Milena; Himmelfarb, Jonathan; Kraiss, Larry W.; Kusek, John W.; Roy?Chaudhury, Prabir; Terry, Christi M.; Vazquez, Miguel A.; Vongpatanasin, Wanpen; Beck, Gerald J.; Vita, Joseph A.

    2016-01-01

    Background End?stage renal disease is accompanied by functional and structural vascular abnormalities. The objective of this study was to characterize vascular function in a large cohort of patients with end?stage renal disease, using noninvasive physiological measurements, and to correlate function with demographic and clinical factors. Methods and Results We analyzed cross?sectional baseline data from the Hemodialysis Fistula Maturation Study, a multicenter prospective observational cohort ...

  14. A study of the cerebral blood flow pattern and cognitive deficit in Parkinson's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamaru, Fuyuhiko

    1997-01-01

    Cerebral blood flow pattern in Parkinson's disease was examined by 123 I-IMP SPECT to determine whether the deficit in cognitive function is reflected in it. The patient group with Parkinson's disease showed deterioration in intelligence (Minimental state examination, Raven's Colored Progressive Matrices) and frontal lobe test (the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test). Though the uptake ratio of prefrontal area/occipital area in 123 I-IMP SPECT study varied widely in the Parkinson's disease group compared to the normal control group, there was no significant difference in the mean. Selective depletion of frontal lobe blood flow was not confirmed in this study. There was no correlation between cerebral blood flow pattern and cognitive functions including frontal lobe function and intelligence. We concluded that the deficit in cognitive function was not reflected in the cerebral blood flow pattern in Parkinson's disease. (author)

  15. Swallowing in patients with Parkinson's disease: a surface electromyography study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ws Coriolano, Maria das Graças; R Belo, Luciana; Carneiro, Danielle; G Asano, Amdore; Al Oliveira, Paulo José; da Silva, Douglas Monteiro; G Lins, Otávio

    2012-12-01

    Our goal was to study deglutition of Parkinson's disease (PD) patients and normal controls (NC) using surface electromyography (sEMG). The study included 15 patients with idiopathic PD and 15 age-matched normal controls. Surface electromyography was collected over the suprahyoid muscle group. Conditions were the following: swallow at once 10 and 20 ml of water and 5 and 10 ml of yogurt of firm consistency, and freely drink 100 ml of water. During swallowing, durations of sEMG were significantly longer in PD patients than in normal controls but no significant differences of amplitudes were found. Eighty percent of the PD patients and 20 % of the NC needed more than one swallow to consume 20 ml of water, while 70 % of the PD patients and none of the NC needed more than one swallow to consume 5 ml of yogurt. PD patients took significantly more time and needed significantly more swallows to drink 100 ml of water than normal controls. We conclude that sEMG might be a simple and useful tool to study and monitor deglutition in PD patients.

  16. Parkinson's disease prevalence in Fabry disease: A survey study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adina H. Wise

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Recent research has suggested a possible link between Parkinson's disease (PD and Fabry disease. To test this relationship, we administered a self-report and family history questionnaire to determine the prevalence of PD in Fabry disease patients and family members with likely pathogenic alpha-galactosidase A (GLA mutations. A total of 90 Fabry patients (77 from the online survey and 13 from the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai (ISMMS were included in the analysis. Two of the Fabry disease patients who completed the online survey were diagnosed with PD (2/90, 2.2%. Among probands older than 60, 8.3% (2/24 were diagnosed with PD. Using Kaplan Meier survival analysis, the age-specific risk of PD by age 70 was 11.1%. Family history was available on 72 Fabry families from the online study and 9 Fabry families from ISMMS. Among these 81 families, 6 (7.4% had one first degree relative who fit the criteria for a conservative diagnosis of PD. The results of this study suggest that there may be an increased risk of developing PD in individuals with GLA mutations, but these findings should be interpreted with caution given the limitations of the study design.

  17. Arterial vascularization patterns of the splenium: An anatomical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahilogullari, G; Comert, A; Ozdemir, M; Brohi, R A; Ozgural, O; Esmer, A F; Egemen, N; Karahan, S T

    2013-09-01

    The aim of this study was to provide detailed information about the arterial vascularization of the splenium of the corpus callosum (CC). The splenium is unique in that it is part of the largest commissural tract in the brain and a region in which pathologies are seen frequently. An exact description of the arterial vascularization of this part of the CC remains under debate. Thirty adult human brains (60 hemispheres) were obtained from routine autopsies. Cerebral arteries were separately cannulated and injected with colored latex. Then, the brains were fixed in formaldehyde, and dissections were performed using a surgical microscope. The diameter of the arterial branches supplying the splenium of the CC at their origin was investigated, and the vascularization patterns of these branches were observed. Vascular supply to the splenium was provided by the anterior pericallosal artery (40%) from the anterior circulation and by the posterior pericallosal artery (88%) and posterior accessory pericallosal artery (50%) from the posterior circulation. The vascularization pattern of the splenium differs in each hemisphere and is usually supplied by multiple branches. The arterial vascularization of the splenium of the CC was studied comprehensively considering the ongoing debate and the inadequacy of the studies on this issue currently available in the literature. This anatomical knowledge is essential during the treatment of pathologies in this region and especially for splenial arteriovenous malformations.

  18. Central Pain Processing in Early-Stage Parkinson's Disease: A Laser Pain fMRI Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine Petschow

    Full Text Available Pain is a common non-motor symptom in Parkinson's disease. As dopaminergic dysfunction is suggested to affect intrinsic nociceptive processing, this study was designed to characterize laser-induced pain processing in early-stage Parkinson's disease patients in the dopaminergic OFF state, using a multimodal experimental approach at behavioral, autonomic, imaging levels.13 right-handed early-stage Parkinson's disease patients without cognitive or sensory impairment were investigated OFF medication, along with 13 age-matched healthy control subjects. Measurements included warmth perception thresholds, heat pain thresholds, and central pain processing with event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging (erfMRI during laser-induced pain stimulation at lower (E = 440 mJ and higher (E = 640 mJ target energies. Additionally, electrodermal activity was characterized during delivery of 60 randomized pain stimuli ranging from 440 mJ to 640 mJ, along with evaluation of subjective pain ratings on a visual analogue scale.No significant differences in warmth perception thresholds, heat pain thresholds, electrodermal activity and subjective pain ratings were found between Parkinson's disease patients and controls, and erfMRI revealed a generally comparable activation pattern induced by laser-pain stimuli in brain areas belonging to the central pain matrix. However, relatively reduced deactivation was found in Parkinson's disease patients in posterior regions of the default mode network, notably the precuneus and the posterior cingulate cortex.Our data during pain processing extend previous findings suggesting default mode network dysfunction in Parkinson's disease. On the other hand, they argue against a genuine pain-specific processing abnormality in early-stage Parkinson's disease. Future studies are now required using similar multimodal experimental designs to examine pain processing in more advanced stages of Parkinson's disease.

  19. Speech rate in Parkinson's disease: A controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Sánchez, F; Meilán, J J G; Carro, J; Gómez Íñiguez, C; Millian-Morell, L; Pujante Valverde, I M; López-Alburquerque, T; López, D E

    2016-09-01

    Speech disturbances will affect most patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) over the course of the disease. The origin and severity of these symptoms are of clinical and diagnostic interest. To evaluate the clinical pattern of speech impairment in PD patients and identify significant differences in speech rate and articulation compared to control subjects. Speech rate and articulation in a reading task were measured using an automatic analytical method. A total of 39 PD patients in the 'on' state and 45 age-and sex-matched asymptomatic controls participated in the study. None of the patients experienced dyskinesias or motor fluctuations during the test. The patients with PD displayed a significant reduction in speech and articulation rates; there were no significant correlations between the studied speech parameters and patient characteristics such as L-dopa dose, duration of the disorder, age, and UPDRS III scores and Hoehn & Yahr scales. Patients with PD show a characteristic pattern of declining speech rate. These results suggest that in PD, disfluencies are the result of the movement disorder affecting the physiology of speech production systems. Copyright © 2014 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  20. Relational databases for rare disease study: application to vascular anomalies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkins, Jonathan A; Coltrera, Marc D

    2008-01-01

    To design a relational database integrating clinical and basic science data needed for multidisciplinary treatment and research in the field of vascular anomalies. Based on data points agreed on by the American Society of Pediatric Otolaryngology (ASPO) Vascular Anomalies Task Force. The database design enables sharing of data subsets in a Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA)-compliant manner for multisite collaborative trials. Vascular anomalies pose diagnostic and therapeutic challenges. Our understanding of these lesions and treatment improvement is limited by nonstandard terminology, severity assessment, and measures of treatment efficacy. The rarity of these lesions places a premium on coordinated studies among multiple participant sites. The relational database design is conceptually centered on subjects having 1 or more lesions. Each anomaly can be tracked individually along with their treatment outcomes. This design allows for differentiation between treatment responses and untreated lesions' natural course. The relational database design eliminates data entry redundancy and results in extremely flexible search and data export functionality. Vascular anomaly programs in the United States. A relational database correlating clinical findings and photographic, radiologic, histologic, and treatment data for vascular anomalies was created for stand-alone and multiuser networked systems. Proof of concept for independent site data gathering and HIPAA-compliant sharing of data subsets was demonstrated. The collaborative effort by the ASPO Vascular Anomalies Task Force to create the database helped define a common vascular anomaly data set. The resulting relational database software is a powerful tool to further the study of vascular anomalies and the development of evidence-based treatment innovation.

  1. [Risk factors for Parkinson disease: an epidemiologic study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Duarte; Garrett, Carolina

    2010-01-01

    The etiology of Parkinson's disease (PD) remains in a certain part unknown. Both genetic susceptibility and environmental factors are sometimes considered to be putative contributors to its origin. Recent epidemiologic studies have focused on the possible role of environmental risk factors present during adult life or aging, once pure genetic forms of PD are rare. The purpose of this study was to investigate possible environmental and familial risk factors for PD. We performed a hospital based case-control study using 88 PD patients with neurologist confirmed diagnostic, and 176 sex, age, and residence similar controls. Several possible risk factors were evaluated related to life style, past history, family history, occupational history and other exposures to potential neurotoxin agents. Statistical differences, using a 95% confidence interval, were observed in positive family history of PD (p = 0,002), occupation category (p = 0,001), rural living (p = 0,037), living/working near a industry (p = 0,017), exposure to pesticides, herbicides and in-secticides (p coffee consumption (p = 0,036) and tea consumption (p = 0,001). Sex and age adjusted logistic regression showed as potential risk factors, a positive family history of PD (odds ratio [OR] = 9,996; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 2,19-45,597), blue collar occupations (OR = 3,967; 95% CI = 1,670-9,426), exposure to pesticides, herbicides and insecticides (OR = 2,619 ; 95% CI = 1,170-5,862). An inverse relationship was found between tea consumption and the risk of PD (OR = 0,356; 95% CI = 0,174-0,727). The results of the study show that both familial and environmental factors may contribute to the development of PD. Like other studies suggest, PD is of unknown, but presumably multifactorial etiology.

  2. Parkinsong : a study of singing in patients with Parkinson's Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harris, Robert; de Jong, Bauke M.

    2014-01-01

    Dysarthritic Parkinson speech is characterised by impairment of expressive linguistic prosody, even making it difficult to understand. While rigidity and bradykinesia can be held responsible for a general decline in speaking ability, the origin of prosodic impairment must be seen in the light of the

  3. Parkinsong: a study of singing in patients with Parkinson's Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Robert Harris; Bauke M. de Jong

    2014-01-01

    Dysarthritic Parkinson speech is characterised by impairment of expressive linguistic prosody, even making it difficult to understand. While rigidity and bradykinesia can be held responsible for a general decline in speaking ability, the origin of prosodic impairment must be seen in the light of

  4. Electrochemical studies of ropinirole, an anti-Parkinson's disease drug

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The oxidation behaviour of a potent anti-Parkinson's disease drug ropinirole hydrochloride was investigated over a wide pH range in aqueous solution at glassy carbon electrode using cyclic and square-wave voltammetry. The oxidation of drug is a pH dependent irreversible process and occurs in two steps.

  5. Perfusion and metabolism imaging studies in Parkinson's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borghammer, Per

    2012-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) are important tools in the evaluation of brain blood flow and glucose metabolism in Parkinson's disease (PD). However, conflicting results are reported in the literature depending on the type of imaging data...

  6. Prospective cohort study of impulse control disorders in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastiaens, Jesse; Dorfman, Benjamin J; Christos, Paul J; Nirenberg, Melissa J

    2013-03-01

    Impulse control disorders (ICDs) are potentially serious side effects of dopamine agonist therapy in Parkinson's disease (PD), but prospective data are lacking about their incidence, time course, and risk factors. This work was a 4-year, prospective cohort study of outpatients with PD and no previous ICDs (N = 164). All subjects treated with a dopamine agonist during the study were followed longitudinally for new-onset ICDs. Baseline characteristics were compared in groups with (ICD+) and without (ICD-) subsequent ICDs. Forty-six subjects were treated with a dopamine agonist, including 25 who were newly treated and 21 who received ongoing dopamine agonist therapy. Of these 46 subjects, 18 (39.1%) developed new-onset ICDs. The timing of ICD onset varied from 3.0 to 114.0 months (median, 23.0) after initiation of dopamine agonist therapy. Baseline demographic characteristics were similar in ICD+ and ICD- groups. At baseline, ICD+ subjects had a greater prevalence of motor complications (61.1% versus 25.0%; P = 0.01) than ICD- subjects, despite comparable total dopaminergic medication usage in both groups (median, 150.0 versus 150.0 levodopa equivalents; P = 0.61). Compared with ICD- subjects, ICD+ subjects had a greater baseline prevalence of caffeine use (100% versus 66.7%; P = 0.007) and higher lifetime prevalence of cigarette smoking (44.4% versus 14.3%; P = 0.04). Peak dopamine agonist doses were higher in ICD+ than ICD- subjects (median 300.0 versus 165.0 L-dopa equivalents; P = 0.03), but cumulative dopamine agonist exposure was similar in both groups. In summary, the timing of new-onset ICDs in PD is highly variable. Risk factors include cigarette smoking, caffeine use, motor complications, and higher peak dopamine agonist dosage. Copyright © 2013 Movement Disorders Society.

  7. Depression in Parkinson's disease: A case-control study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Hsuan Wu

    Full Text Available To evaluate the association between Parkinson's disease (PD prognosis and the patient's onset of depression.A total of 353 patients with newly-diagnosed PD and a history of depression were enrolled. On the basis of the onset of depression before or after PD diagnosis, we divided participants into PD patients with pre- or post-diagnostic depression. Cox's regression analysis was used to detect risks between the onset of depression and outcomes (including death, accidental injury, dementia, and aspiration pneumonia. The association between the onset of depression and levodopa equivalent dosage (LED and cumulative equivalent dosage of antidepressants were assessed.PD patients with post-diagnostic depression were associated with significantly higher risks of dementia (adjusted HR = 2·01, p = 0·015, and were older (58·5 ± 17·7 vs. 53·7 ± 18·6, p = 0·020 at the time of PD diagnosis than PD patients with pre-diagnostic depression. The higher incident rate of accidental injury was also noted in PD patients with post-diagnostic depression (48·1 vs. 31·3/1000 person-years, HR = 1·60, p = 0·041, but no statistical significance was observed in the adjusted hazard ratio (HR (HR = 1·52, p = 0·069. Otherwise, mortality, motor condition and severity of depression revealed no significant difference between PD patients with pre-diagnostic and post-diagnostic depression.PD patients with post-diagnostic depression had higher incidence of dementia, implying different onset time of depression could be associated with different subtypes and spreading routes which should be examined in follow-up studies.

  8. Electron histochemical and autoradiographic studies of vascular smooth muscle cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kameyama, Kohji; Aida, Takeo; Asano, Goro

    1982-01-01

    The authors have studied the vascular smooth muscle cell in the aorta and the arteries of brain, heart in autopsied cases, cholesterol fed rabbits and canine through electron histochemical and autoradiographic methods, using 3 H-proline and 3 H-thymidine. The vascular changes are variable presumably due to the functional and morphological difference of vessels. Aging, pathological condition and physiological requirement induce the disturbances of vascular functions as contractility. According to various pathological conditions, the smooth muscle cell altered their shape, surface properties and arrangement of subcellular organelles including changes in number. The morphological features of arteries during aging is characterized by the thickening of endothelium and media. Decreasing cellularity and increasing collagen contents in media. The autoradiographic and histochemical observations using periodic acid methenamine silver (PAM) and ruthenium red stains demonstrated that the smooth muscle cell is a connective tissue synthetic cell. The PAM impregnation have proved that the small bundle of microfilaments become associated with small conglomerate of collagen and elastic fibers. Cytochemical examination will provide sufficient evidence to establish the contribution of subcellular structure. The acid phosphatase play an important role in vascular disease and they are directly involved in cellular lipid metabolism in cholesterol fed animals, and the activity of Na-K ATPase on the plasma membrane may contribute to the regulation of vascular blood flow and vasospasms. Direct injury and subsequent abnormal contraction of smooth muscle cell may initiate increased permeability of plasma protein and lipid in the media layer and eventually may developed and enhance arteriosclerosis. (author)

  9. Comparative studies of D2 receptors and cerebral blood flow in hemi-Parkinsonism rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin Yansong; Lin Xiangtong

    2000-01-01

    Objective: To study the relationship between dopamine D 2 receptors and cerebral blood flow in hemi-Parkinsonism rats. Methods: Hemi-Parkinsonism rats were made by stereotaxic 6-hydroxy dopamine (6-OH-DA) lesions in substantia nigra and ventral tegmental area, apomorphine (Apo) which could induce the successful model rat to rotate toward the intact side was used to select the rat models, 125 I-IBZM in vivo autoradiography and 99 Tc m -HMPAO regional cerebral biodistribution analysis were used to study D 2 receptors and cerebral blood flow. The HPLC-ECD was used to measure striatum DA and its metabolite content . Results: the lesioned side striatum DA and its metabolites homovanillic acid (HVA) 3,4-dihyroxy-phenylacetic acid (DOPAC) reduced significantly than that of the intact side and pseudo-operated group, striatum/cerebellum 125 I-IBZM uptake ratio was 8.04 +- 0.71 in lesioned side of hemi-Parkinsonism rats, significantly increased compared with the intact side and the pseudo-operated group (P 0.05). Conclusions: the 6-OH-DA lesioned side DA content decreased significantly and thus induced a compensative up-regulation of striatum D 2 receptor binding sites in hemi-Parkinsonism rats, which show good correlation with rotation behavior induced by Apo. Comparing with cerebral blood flow, D 2 receptor reflected by IBZM seems to be more specific and earlier to detect the cerebral functional impairment in experimental hemi-Parkinsonism

  10. A Multicenter Comparative Study of Impulse Control Disorder in Latin American Patients With Parkinson Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez Gómez, Carolina Candelaria; Serrano Dueñas, Marcos; Bernal, Oscar; Araoz, Natalia; Sáenz Farret, Michel; Aldinio, Victoria; Montilla, Verónica; Micheli, Federico

    Impulse control disorder (ICD) is a common adverse effect in patients with Parkinson disease who receive dopamine agonists; however, other factors are involved in its manifestations. To study the frequency and factors involved in the development of this adverse effect in a Latin American population, we conducted a cross-sectional multicenter study. Two hundred fifty-five patients in 3 Latin American centers were evaluated by examination and application of scales (Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale, Questionnaire for Impulsive-Compulsive Disorders in Parkinson's Disease-Rating Scale, Hoehn and Yahr, Clinical Impression of Severity Index for Parkinson's Disease). Of the patients, 27.4% had ICD, most of whom were on dopamine agonists. Other associated risk factors included a younger age at onset of Parkinson disease, moderate symptoms, a shorter evolution of the clinical manifestations, rapid eye movement (REM) sleep disorder behavior, and the consumption of tea, mate, and alcohol. The frequency of ICD is higher in Latin America than in Anglo-Saxon populations. Consuming tea and mate, in addition to the use of dopamine agonists, is a factor that may demonstrate a genetic link that predisposes patients to the establishment of an ICD.

  11. Specialized mouse embryonic stem cells for studying vascular development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glaser, Drew E; Burns, Andrew B; Hatano, Rachel; Medrzycki, Magdalena; Fan, Yuhong; McCloskey, Kara E

    2014-01-01

    Vascular progenitor cells are desirable in a variety of therapeutic strategies; however, the lineage commitment of endothelial and smooth muscle cell from a common progenitor is not well-understood. Here, we report the generation of the first dual reporter mouse embryonic stem cell (mESC) lines designed to facilitate the study of vascular endothelial and smooth muscle development in vitro. These mESC lines express green fluorescent protein (GFP) under the endothelial promoter, Tie-2, and Discomsoma sp. red fluorescent protein (RFP) under the promoter for alpha-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA). The lines were then characterized for morphology, marker expression, and pluripotency. The mESC colonies were found to exhibit dome-shaped morphology, alkaline phosphotase activity, as well as expression of Oct 3/4 and stage-specific embryonic antigen-1. The mESC colonies were also found to display normal karyotypes and are able to generate cells from all three germ layers, verifying pluripotency. Tissue staining confirmed the coexpression of VE (vascular endothelial)-cadherin with the Tie-2 GFP+ expression on endothelial structures and smooth muscle myosin heavy chain with the α-SMA RFP+ smooth muscle cells. Lastly, it was verified that the developing mESC do express Tie-2 GFP+ and α-SMA RFP+ cells during differentiation and that the GFP+ cells colocalize with the vascular-like structures surrounded by α-SMA-RFP cells. These dual reporter vascular-specific mESC permit visualization and cell tracking of individual endothelial and smooth muscle cells over time and in multiple dimensions, a powerful new tool for studying vascular development in real time.

  12. Current Experimental Studies of Gene Therapy in Parkinson's Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing-ya Lin

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Parkinson's disease (PD was characterized by late-onset, progressive dopamine neuron loss and movement disorders. The progresses of PD affected the neural function and integrity. To date, most researches had largely addressed the dopamine replacement therapies, but the appearance of L-dopa-induced dyskinesia hampered the use of the drug. And the mechanism of PD is so complicated that it's hard to solve the problem by just add drugs. Researchers began to focus on the genetic underpinnings of Parkinson's disease, searching for new method that may affect the neurodegeneration processes in it. In this paper, we reviewed current delivery methods used in gene therapies for PD, we also summarized the primary target of the gene therapy in the treatment of PD, such like neurotrophic factor (for regeneration, the synthesis of neurotransmitter (for prolong the duration of L-dopa, and the potential proteins that might be a target to modulate via gene therapy. Finally, we discussed RNA interference therapies used in Parkinson's disease, it might act as a new class of drug. We mainly focus on the efficiency and tooling features of different gene therapies in the treatment of PD.

  13. VEGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor II (VRI) induced vascular insufficiency in zebrafish as a model for studying vascular toxicity and vascular preservation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Shang; Dang, Yuan Ye; Oi Lam Che, Ginny; Kwan, Yiu Wa; Chan, Shun Wan; Leung, George Pak Heng; Lee, Simon Ming Yuen; Hoi, Maggie Pui Man

    2014-01-01

    In ischemic disorders such as chronic wounds and myocardial ischemia, there is inadequate tissue perfusion due to vascular insufficiency. Besides, it has been observed that prolonged use of anti-angiogenic agents in cancer therapy produces cardiovascular toxicity caused by impaired vessel integrity and regeneration. In the present study, we used VEGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor II (VRI) to chemically induce vascular insufficiency in zebrafish in vivo and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) in vitro to further study the mechanisms of vascular morphogenesis in these pathological conditions. We also explored the possibility of treating vascular insufficiency by enhancing vascular regeneration and repair with pharmacological intervention. We observed that pretreatment of VRI induced blood vessel loss in developing zebrafish by inhibiting angiogenesis and increasing endothelial cell apoptosis, accompanied by down-regulation of kdr, kdrl and flt-1 genes expression. The VRI-induced blood vessel loss in zebrafish could be restored by post-treatment of calycosin, a cardiovascular protective isoflavone. Similarly, VRI induced cytotoxicity and apoptosis in HUVEC which could be rescued by calycosin post-treatment. Further investigation of the underlying mechanisms showed that the PI3K/AKT/Bad cell survival pathway was a main contributor of the vascular regenerative effect of calycosin. These findings indicated that the cardiovascular toxicity in anti-angiogenic therapy was mainly caused by insufficient endothelial cell survival, suggesting its essential role in vascular integrity, repair and regeneration. In addition, we showed that VRI-induced blood vessel loss in zebrafish represented a simple and effective in vivo model for studying vascular insufficiency and evaluating cancer drug vascular toxicities. - Highlights: • In vivo VRI model • Rescue effects of calycosin • Calycosin EC survival pathways

  14. Comparative studies of D2 receptors and brain perfusion in hemi-parkinsonism rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin Yansong; Lin Xiangtong

    2000-01-01

    The relationship between dopamine D 2 receptors and brain perfusion in hemi-parkinsonism rats was studied. Hemi-parkinsonism rats were made by stereotaxic 6-hydroxy dopamine (6-OH-DA) lesions in substantia nigra (SN) and ventral tegmental area (VTA), apomorphine (Apo) which could induced the successful model rat rotates toward the intact side was used to select the rats, 125 I-IBZM ex-vivo autoradiography analysis and 99m Tc-HM-PAO regional cerebral biodistribution were used to evaluate D 2 receptors and cerebral blood flow. The HPLC-ECD were used to measure striatum DA and its metabolites content. The lesioned side striatum DA and its metabolites HVA DOPAC reduced significantly than that of the intact side and pseudo-operated group, striatum/cerebellum 125 I-IBZM uptake ratio was 8.04 +- 0.71 in lesioned side of hemi-parkinsonism rats, significantly increased compared with the intact side and the pseudo-operated group (p 0.05). These results indicated that in the 6-OH-DA lesioned side DA content decreased significantly and an up-regulation of striatum D 2 receptor binding sites was induced in hemi-parkinsonism rats, which showed good correlation with rotation behavior induced by Apo. Comparing with cerebral blood flow, D 2 receptor reflected by IBZM seems to be more specific and earlier to detect the cerebral functional impairment in experimental hemi-parkinsonism

  15. A mixed-methods study into ballet for people living with Parkinson's.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houston, Sara; McGill, Ashley

    2013-06-01

    Background : Parkinson's is a neurological disease that is physically debilitating and can be socially isolating. Dance is growing in popularity for people with Parkinson's and claims have been made for its benefits. The paper details a mixed-methods study that examined a 12-week dance project for people with Parkinson's, led by English National Ballet. Methods : The effects on balance, stability and posture were measured through the Fullerton Advanced Balance Scale and a plumb-line analysis. The value of participation and movement quality were interpreted through ethnographic methods, grounded theory and Effort analysis. Results : Triangulation of results indicates that people were highly motivated, with 100% adherence, and valued the classes as an important part of their lives. Additionally, results indicated an improvement in balance and stability, although not in posture. Conclusions : Dancing may offer benefit to people with Parkinson's through its intellectual, artistic, social and physical aspects. The paper suggests that a range of research methods is fundamental to capture the importance of multifaceted activity, such as dance, to those with Parkinson's.

  16. Seasonal temperature is associated with Parkinson's disease prescriptions: an ecological study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowell, David; Nghiem, Son; Ramagopalan, Sreeram; Meier, Ute-Christiane

    2017-12-01

    The aim of this study is to test what effect the weather may have on medications prescribed to treat Parkinson's disease. Twenty-three years of monthly time, series data was sourced from the Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme (PBS) and the Bureau of Meteorology (BOM). Data were available for eight states and territories and their corresponding capital cities. The dependent variable was the aggregate levodopa equivalent dose (LED) for 51 Parkinson's medications identified on the PBS. Two explanatory variables of interest, temperature and solar exposure, were identified in the BOM data set. Linear and cosinor models were estimated with fixed and random effects, respectively. The prescribed LED was 4.2% greater in January and 4.5% lower in July. Statistical analysis showed that temperature was associated with the prescription of Parkinson medications. Our results suggest seasonality exists in Parkinson's disease symptoms and this may be related to temperature. Further work is needed to confirm these findings and understand the underlying mechanisms as a better understanding of the causes of any seasonal variation in Parkinson's disease may help clinicians and patients manage the disease more effectively.

  17. Significance of frontal cortical atrophy in Parkinson's disease: computed tomographic study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Kyung Sang; Suh, Jung Ho; Chung, Tae Sub; Kim, Dong Ik [College of Medicine, Yonsei University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1987-10-15

    Fifty-five patients with Parkinson's disease were evaluated clinically and with brain computed tomography (CT) in order to determine the incidence of frontal cortical and subcortical atrophy. Twenty cases of age-related healthy control group were also scanned. The CT criteria of frontal cortical atrophy that was used in this study were the maximum width of frontal hemispheric cortical sulci and width of anterior interhemispheric fissure between frontal lobes comparing with maximum width of hemispheric cortical sulci except frontal lobes. And the criteria of frontal subcortical atrophy were bifrontal index bicaudate index, and Evans index. The results are as follows: 1. Cortical atrophic changes in Parkinson's disease were more prominent in frontal lobe rather than other causes of cortical atrophy. 2. Frontal cortical and subcortical atrophic changes were also more prominent in Parkinson's disease rather than age-related control group. 3. Subcortical atrophic changes in frontal lobe were always associated with cortical atrophic changes. 4. Changes of basal ganglia were hardly seen in Parkinson's disease. 5. Cortical atrophic changes in frontal lobe must be the one of significant findings in Parkinson's disease.

  18. Significance of frontal cortical atrophy in Parkinson's disease: computed tomographic study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Kyung Sang; Suh, Jung Ho; Chung, Tae Sub; Kim, Dong Ik

    1987-01-01

    Fifty-five patients with Parkinson's disease were evaluated clinically and with brain computed tomography (CT) in order to determine the incidence of frontal cortical and subcortical atrophy. Twenty cases of age-related healthy control group were also scanned. The CT criteria of frontal cortical atrophy that was used in this study were the maximum width of frontal hemispheric cortical sulci and width of anterior interhemispheric fissure between frontal lobes comparing with maximum width of hemispheric cortical sulci except frontal lobes. And the criteria of frontal subcortical atrophy were bifrontal index bicaudate index, and Evans index. The results are as follows: 1. Cortical atrophic changes in Parkinson's disease were more prominent in frontal lobe rather than other causes of cortical atrophy. 2. Frontal cortical and subcortical atrophic changes were also more prominent in Parkinson's disease rather than age-related control group. 3. Subcortical atrophic changes in frontal lobe were always associated with cortical atrophic changes. 4. Changes of basal ganglia were hardly seen in Parkinson's disease. 5. Cortical atrophic changes in frontal lobe must be the one of significant findings in Parkinson's disease

  19. Ambulatory monitoring of left ventricular function in patients with Parkinson`s disease and postural hypotension

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nappi, A. [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Univ. ``Federico II``, Naples (Italy); Cuocolo, A. [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Univ. ``Federico II``, Naples (Italy); Iazzetta, N. [Inst. of Internal Medicine and Metabolic Diseases, Univ. ``Federico II``, Naples (Italy); Ferrara, L.A. [Inst. of Internal Medicine and Metabolic Diseases, Univ. ``Federico II``, Naples (Italy); Marotta, T. [Inst. of Internal Medicine and Metabolic Diseases, Univ. ``Federico II``, Naples (Italy); Pace, L. [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Univ. ``Federico II``, Naples (Italy); Nicolai, E. [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Univ. ``Federico II``, Naples (Italy); De Michele, G. [Inst. of Neurological Sciences, Univ. ``Federico II``, Naples (Italy); Campanella, G. [Inst. of Neurological Sciences, Univ. ``Federico II``, Naples (Italy); Salvatore, M. [National Cancer Inst., Naples (Italy); Postiglione, A. [Inst. of Internal Medicine and Metabolic Diseases, Univ. ``Federico II``, Naples (Italy)

    1994-12-01

    Left ventricular (LV) function was continuously monitored using a radionuclide detector (VEST) after intravenous injection of 25 mCi technetium-99m labelled red blood cells in nine patients with Parkinson`s disease and postural hypotension (group 1) and ten patients with Parkinson`s disease but without postural hypotension (group 2). LV function and blood pressure were monitored in the supine position for 15 min (period A), upon changing posture from the supine to the upright position for 10 min (period B), and upon returning to the supine position for 10 min (period C). In group 1, the passage from period A to period B induced a significant decrease in end-diastolic volume, end-systolic volume and ejection fraction (all P<0.01). In group 2, ejection fraction increased (P<0.05) upon changing posture from the supine to the upright position. Ejection fraction (F=33, P<0.01), end-diastolic volume (F=9, P<0.05) and end-systolic volume (F=10, P<0.05) were significantly different between the two groups. In group 1, stroke volume, cardiac output and vascular peripheral resistance decreased from period A to period B (all P<0.001). In group 2, no changes in stroke volume, cardiac output and vascular peripheral resistance were observed from period A to period B. All parameters were similar in the two groups during the periods A and C. Upon changing posture from the supine to the upright position, patients with Parkinson`s disease and postural hypotension showed marked changes in parameters of LV function induced by vascular abnormalities. The results of this study may help to clarify the potential risk of sudden postural changes in such patients, which may cause fainting, syncope and increased risk of ischaemic coronary and cerebrovascular attacks and of lower limb fractures. (orig.)

  20. Cerebral blood flow studied by 133Xe inhalation technique in parkinsonism: loss of hyperfrontal pattern

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bes, A.; Gueell, A.; Fabre, N.; Dupui, P.; Victor, G.; Geraud, G.

    1983-01-01

    Cerebral blood flow (grey matter flow) in parkinsonism requires further investigation. The noninvasive method of 133 Xe inhalation permits study of larger numbers of subjects than previously used invasive techniques such as the intracarotid 133 Xe injection method. Measurements were made in this laboratory in 30 subjects having Parkinson's disease. Mean hemispheric blood flow (F1) values were 70.4 +/- 9.3 ml/100 g/min, compared to 76.3 for a group of age-matched normal subjects, which is a decrease of -7.8%. The most striking difference was the loss of the hyperfrontal distribution in parkinsonism. The prefrontal F1 values were only 1.8% greater than the hemisphere grey matter flow, compared with 8.5% in controls of a similar age group

  1. The health-related, social, and economic consequences of parkinsonism: a controlled national study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jennum, Poul Jørgen; Assenholt, Maria Elizabeth Anna; Korbo, Lise

    2011-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) and atypical parkinsonism (AP) cause a significant socioeconomic burden, but there is insufficient information about the total disease burden at a national level. Thus, the goal of this study was to estimate the excess direct and indirect costs of PD and AP in a national...... on income data derived from the Coherent Social Statistics. Patients with PD and AP had significantly higher rates of health-related contact and medication use and a higher socioeconomic cost. Furthermore, they had very low employment rates, and those in employment had a lower income level than employed...

  2. A comparison of Irish set dancing and exercises for people with Parkinson?s disease: A phase II feasibility study

    OpenAIRE

    Volpe, Daniele; Signorini, Matteo; Marchetto, Anna; Lynch, Timothy; Morris, Meg E

    2013-01-01

    Background People with idiopathic Parkinson?s disease (PD) frequently have low activity levels, poor mobility and reduced quality of life. Although increased physical activity may improve mobility, balance and wellbeing, adherence to exercises and activity programs over the longer term can be challenging, particularly for older people with progressive neurological conditions such as PD. Physical activities that are engaging and enjoyable, such as dancing, might enhance adherence over the long...

  3. Comparison study of positron emission tomography, X-ray CT and MRI in Parkinsonism with dementia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okada, Junichi; Peppard, R.; Calne, D.B.

    1989-01-01

    Brain atrophy and local cerebral metabolic rate of glucose (LCMR-glc) in Parkinson's disease with dementia and Parkinsonism-dementia complex (PDC) were studied using positron emission tomography (PET) with F-18-2-deoxy-2-fluoro-D-glucose, X-ray CT and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The group of Parkinson's disease with dementia (n=7) had a significantly decreased LCMR-glc in all regions when compared with the age-matched normal group. In the group of Parkinson's disease without dementia (n=6), LCMR-glc was also significantly lower than the control group, although it was higher than the group with associated dementia. Some of the normal aged persons had cortical atrophy. There was no correlation between LCMR-glc and cortical atrophy. Six Guamnian patients had PDC associated with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), and four patients had it without ALS. LCMR-glc did not differ in the two groups. It was, however, significantly lower than that in 5 Guamanian and 10 Caucasian normal persons. The group of PDC had a noticeable cortical atrophy and ventricular dilatation, regardless of the presence or absence of ALS. There was correlation between decrease of LCMR-glc and cortical atrophy of the frontal, parietal and temporal lobes. Parkinson's disease and PDC were different from Alzheimer's disease in which a decreased LCMR-glc has been reported to be usually confined to the cerebral cortex. Cortical atrophy and ventricular dilatation were depicted on MRI and CT in the PDC group, but did not in the group of Parkinson's disease. PET was useful in the functional examination and both MRI and CT were useful in the anatomical examination of these diseases. (Namekawa, K)

  4. Comparison study of positron emission tomography, X-ray CT and MRI in Parkinsonism with dementia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okada, Junichi; Peppard, R; Calne, D B

    1989-05-01

    Brain atrophy and local cerebral metabolic rate of glucose (LCMR-glc) in Parkinson's disease with dementia and Parkinsonism-dementia complex (PDC) were studied using positron emission tomography (PET) with F-18-2-deoxy-2-fluoro-D-glucose, X-ray CT and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The group of Parkinson's disease with dementia (n=7) had a significantly decreased LCMR-glc in all regions when compared with the age-matched normal group. In the group of Parkinson's disease without dementia (n=6), LCMR-glc was also significantly lower than the control group, although it was higher than the group with associated dementia. Some of the normal aged persons had cortical atrophy. There was no correlation between LCMR-glc and cortical atrophy. Six Guamnian patients had PDC associated with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), and four patients had it without ALS. LCMR-glc did not differ in the two groups. It was, however, significantly lower than that in 5 Guamanian and 10 Caucasian normal persons. The group of PDC had a noticeable cortical atrophy and ventricular dilatation, regardless of the presence or absence of ALS. There was correlation between decrease of LCMR-glc and cortical atrophy of the frontal, parietal and temporal lobes. Parkinson's disease and PDC were different from Alzheimer's disease in which a decreased LCMR-glc has been reported to be usually confined to the cerebral cortex. Cortical atrophy and ventricular dilatation were depicted on MRI and CT in the PDC group, but did not in the group of Parkinson's disease. PET was useful in the functional examination and both MRI and CT were useful in the anatomical examination of these diseases. (Namekawa, K).

  5. Comparison study of positron emission tomography, X-ray CT and MRI in Parkinsonism with dementia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okada, Junichi; Peppard, R.; Calne, D.B.

    1989-05-01

    Brain atrophy and local cerebral metabolic rate of glucose (LCMR-glc) in Parkinson's disease with dementia and Parkinsonism-dementia complex (PDC) were studied using positron emission tomography (PET) with F-18-2-deoxy-2-fluoro-D-glucose, X-ray CT and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The group of Parkinson's disease with dementia (n=7) had a significantly decreased LCMR-glc in all regions when compared with the age-matched normal group. In the group of Parkinson's disease without dementia (n=6), LCMR-glc was also significantly lower than the control group, although it was higher than the group with associated dementia. Some of the normal aged persons had cortical atrophy. There was no correlation between LCMR-glc and cortical atrophy. Six Guamnian patients had PDC associated with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), and four patients had it without ALS. LCMR-glc did not differ in the two groups. It was, however, significantly lower than that in 5 Guamanian and 10 Caucasian normal persons. The group of PDC had a noticeable cortical atrophy and ventricular dilatation, regardless of the presence or absence of ALS. There was correlation between decrease of LCMR-glc and cortical atrophy of the frontal, parietal and temporal lobes. Parkinson's disease and PDC were different from Alzheimer's disease in which a decreased LCMR-glc has been reported to be usually confined to the cerebral cortex. Cortical atrophy and ventricular dilatation were depicted on MRI and CT in the PDC group, but did not in the group of Parkinson's disease. PET was useful in the functional examination and both MRI and CT were useful in the anatomical examination of these diseases. (Namekawa, K).

  6. Perfusion and metabolism imaging studies in Parkinson's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borghammer, Per

    2012-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) are important tools in the evaluation of brain blood flow and glucose metabolism in Parkinson's disease (PD). However, conflicting results are reported in the literature depending on the type of imaging data....... It is concluded that PD most likely is characterized by widespread cortical hypometabolism, probably even at early disease stages. Widespread subcortical hypermetabolism is probably not a feature of PD, although certain small basal ganglia structures, such as the external pallidum, may display true...

  7. Toxoplasma gondii exposure and Parkinson's disease: a case–control study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarado-Esquivel, Cosme; Méndez-Hernández, Edna Madai; Salas-Pacheco, José Manuel; Ruano-Calderón, Luis Ángel; Hernández-Tinoco, Jesús; Arias-Carrión, Oscar; Sánchez-Anguiano, Luis Francisco; Castellanos-Juárez, Francisco Xavier; Sandoval-Carrillo, Ada Agustina; Liesenfeld, Oliver; Ramos-Nevárez, Agar

    2017-01-01

    Objectives To determine the association between Toxoplasma gondii infection and Parkinson's disease and to investigate whether T. gondii seropositivity is associated with the general characteristics of patients with Parkinson's disease. Design Case–control study. Setting Cases and controls were enrolled in Durango City, Mexico. Participants 65 patients with Parkinson's disease and 195 age- and gender-matched control subjects without Parkinson's disease. Primary and secondary outcome measures Serum samples of participants were analysed for anti-T. gondii IgG and IgM antibodies by commercially available enzyme-linked immunoassays. Prevalence of T. gondii DNA was determined in seropositive subjects using PCR. The association between clinical data and infection was examined by bivariate analysis. Results Anti-T. gondii IgG antibodies were found in 6/65 cases (9.2%) and in 21/195 controls (10.8%) (OR 0.84; 95% CI 0.32 to 2.18; p=0.81). The frequency of high (>150 IU/mL) antibody levels was similar among cases and controls (p=0.34). None of the anti-T. gondii IgG positive cases and four of the anti-T. gondii IgG positive controls had anti-T. gondii IgM antibodies (p=0.54). The prevalence of T. gondii DNA was comparable in seropositive cases and controls (16.7% and 25%, respectively; p=1.0). Seroprevalence of T. gondii infection was associated with a young age onset of disease (p=0.03), high Unified Parkinson Disease Rating Scale scores (p=0.04) and depression (p=0.02). Seropositivity to T. gondii infection was lower in patients treated with pramipexole than in patients without this treatment (p=0.01). However, none of the associations remained significant after Bonferroni correction. Conclusions The results do not support an association between T. gondii infection and Parkinson's disease. However, T. gondii infection might have an influence on certain symptoms of Parkinson's disease. Further research to elucidate the role of T. gondii exposure on Parkinson's disease

  8. A 5-Year Follow-up Study on the Relationship between Obstructive Sleep Apnea and Parkinson Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheu, Jau-Jiuan; Lee, Hsin-Chien; Lin, Herng-Ching; Kao, Li-Ting; Chung, Shiu-Dong

    2015-12-15

    Sleep disturbances are among the most common nonmotor symptoms of Parkinson disease. However, no large epidemiological data regarding the association between obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and Parkinson disease have been reported. The goal of this study was to investigate the risk for Parkinson disease during a 5-y follow-up period after a diagnosis of OSA using a population-based dataset. The data for this retrospective longitudinal cohort study were retrieved from the Taiwan Longitudinal Health Insurance Database 2000. We identified 1,532 patients with OSA as the study cohort and randomly selected 7,660 patients as the comparison cohort. Each subject was individually followed up for a 5-y period to identify those in whom Parkinson disease subsequently developed. Stratified Cox proportional hazard regressions were performed as a means of comparing the 5-y risk of subsequent Parkinson disease between the study cohort and comparison cohort. Of the 9,192 total patients, Parkinson disease developed in 0.73% during the 5-y follow-up period: 1.24% and 0.63% in the OSA and control cohorts, respectively. After censoring patients who died during the follow-up period and adjusting for socio-demographic characteristics, the hazard ratio (HR) of Parkinson disease during the 5-y follow-up period for patients with OSA was 2.26 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.32-3.88) compared with comparison patients. In addition, among females, the adjusted HR of Parkinson disease was 3.54 (95% CI = 1.50-8.34) for patients with OSA compared to patients without OSA. However, among males, there was no significantly increased hazard of Parkinson disease for patients with OSA compared to those without OSA. Female patients with OSA were found to be at a significant risk of subsequent Parkinson disease during a 5-y follow-up period. © 2015 American Academy of Sleep Medicine.

  9. Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Technology and Direct Conversion : New Possibilities to Study and Treat Parkinson's Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roessler, Reinhard; Boddeke, Erik; Copray, Sjef

    Recent developments in in vitro disease modeling and regenerative medicine have placed induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) in the center of attention as a unique source to study Parkinson's disease. After only 5 years of intensive research, human iPSCs can be generated without viral integration

  10. Metabolic topography of Parkinsonism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jae Seung [Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-04-15

    Parkinson's disease is one of the most frequent neurodegenerative diseases, which mainly affects the elderly. Parkinson's disease is often difficult to differentiate from atypical parkinson disorder such as progressive supranuclear palsy, multiple system atrophy, dementia with Lewy body, and corticobasal ganglionic degeneration, based on the clinical findings because of the similarity of phenotypes and lack of diagnostic markers. The accurate diagnosis of Parkinson's disease and atypical Parkinson disorders is not only important for deciding on treatment regimens and providing prognosis, but also it is critical for studies designed to investigate etiology and pathogenesis of parkinsonism and to develop new therapeutic strategies. Although degeneration of the nigrostriatal dopamine system results in marked loss of striatal dopamine content in most of the diseases causing parkinsonism, pathologic studies revealed different topographies of the neuronal cell loss in Parkinsonism. Since the regional cerebral glucose metabolism is a marker of integrated local synaptic activity and as such is sensitive to both direct neuronal/synaptic damage and secondary functional disruption at synapses distant from the primary site of pathology, and assessment of the regional cerebral glucose metabolism with F-18 FDG PET is useful in the differential diagnosis of parkinsonism and evaluating the pathophysiology of Parkinsonism.

  11. Metabolic topography of Parkinsonism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jae Seung

    2007-01-01

    Parkinson's disease is one of the most frequent neurodegenerative diseases, which mainly affects the elderly. Parkinson's disease is often difficult to differentiate from atypical parkinson disorder such as progressive supranuclear palsy, multiple system atrophy, dementia with Lewy body, and corticobasal ganglionic degeneration, based on the clinical findings because of the similarity of phenotypes and lack of diagnostic markers. The accurate diagnosis of Parkinson's disease and atypical Parkinson disorders is not only important for deciding on treatment regimens and providing prognosis, but also it is critical for studies designed to investigate etiology and pathogenesis of parkinsonism and to develop new therapeutic strategies. Although degeneration of the nigrostriatal dopamine system results in marked loss of striatal dopamine content in most of the diseases causing parkinsonism, pathologic studies revealed different topographies of the neuronal cell loss in Parkinsonism. Since the regional cerebral glucose metabolism is a marker of integrated local synaptic activity and as such is sensitive to both direct neuronal/synaptic damage and secondary functional disruption at synapses distant from the primary site of pathology, and assessment of the regional cerebral glucose metabolism with F-18 FDG PET is useful in the differential diagnosis of parkinsonism and evaluating the pathophysiology of Parkinsonism

  12. Safety and Efficacy Study of VY-AADC01 for Advanced Parkinson's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-02-27

    Idiopathic Parkinson's Disease; Parkinson's Disease; Basal Ganglia Disease; Brain Diseases; Central Nervous System Diseases; Movement Disorders; Nervous System Diseases; Neurodegenerative Diseases; Parkinsonian Disorders

  13. Vascular access surveillance: case study of a false paradigm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulson, William D; Moist, Louise; Lok, Charmaine E

    2013-01-01

    The hemodialysis vascular access surveillance controversy provides a case study of how enthusiasm for a new test or treatment can lead to adoption of a false paradigm. Paradigms are the beliefs and assumptions shared by those in a field of knowledge, and are commonly included in clinical practice guidelines. The guidelines of the National Kidney Foundation Kidney Disease Outcomes Quality Initiative recommend that arteriovenous vascular accesses undergo routine surveillance for detection and correction of stenosis. This recommendation is based on the paradigm that surveillance of access blood flow or dialysis venous pressure combined with correction of stenosis improves access outcomes. However, the quality of evidence that supports this paradigm has been widely criticized. We tested the validity of the surveillance paradigm by applying World Health Organization (WHO) criteria for evaluating screening tests to a literature review of published vascular access studies. These criteria include four components: undesired condition, screening test, intervention, and desired outcome. The WHO criteria show that surveillance as currently practiced fails all four components and provides little or no significant benefit, suggesting that surveillance is a false paradigm. Once a paradigm is established, however, challenges to its validity are usually resisted even as new evidence indicates the paradigm is not valid. Thus, it is paramount to apply rigorous criteria when developing guidelines. Regulators may help promote needed changes in paradigms when cost and safety considerations coincide. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Nilai Rerata Vascular Pedicle Width, Vascular Pedicle-Cardiac Ratio Vascular Pedicle-Thoracic Ratio Orang Dewasa Normal Indonesia Studi di RS dr. Cipto Mangunkusomo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rommy Zunera

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Vascular pedicle width (VPW adalah jarak tepi luar vena kava superior ke tepi luar arteri subklavia kiri. Pemeriksaan VPW di foto toraks bersifat non-invasif, cepat dan mudah untuk memprediksi hipervolemia.Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk mengetahui rerata nilai VPW orang dewasa normal Indonesia. VPW diukurdengan dua metode: pertama pengukuran VPW tunggal yang akurasinya terbatas di foto toraks digital karenarelatif tidak dipengaruhi faktor magnifikasi. Metode kedua untuk foto toraks nondigital yaitu pengukuranrasio:vascular pedicle-cardiac ratio (VPCR dan vascular pedicle-thoracic ratio (VPTR. Pengukuran serupadilakukan terhadap  topogram CT scan toraks AP terlentang dan CT scan toraks lalu dibandingkan akurasipengukuran di topogram dengan CT scan  toraks sebagai standar baku. Sampel terdiri atas 104 foto toraksPA subyek normal dan 103 CT scan  toraks subyek terpilih. Pada pemeriksaan toraks PA didapatkan rerata VPW 48,0±5,5mm, rerata VPCR 40,3±4,6%, dan rerata VPTR 17,2±1,7%. Pada pemeriksaan topogram CTscan didapatkan rerata VPW 50,3±6,2mm, rerata VPTR 45±5,1%, dan rerata VPTR 19,8±2,5%. Rerata VPWpada CT scan toraks 50,4±6,1mm. Pengukuran di foto toraks AP 10% lebih besar dibandingkan pada fototoraks PA dan pengukuranVPW di foto toraks terbukti memiliki akurasi  tinggi. Kata kunci: fototoraks, vascular pedicle width, vascular pedicle-cardiac ratio, vascular pedicle-thoracic ratio, hipervolemia.   The Mean Value of Vascular Pedicle Width, Vascular Pedicle-Cardiac Ratio,Vascular Pedicle-Thoracic Ratio of Normal Indonesian Adult Study In dr. Cipto Mangunkusomo Hospital Abstract Vascular pedicle width (VPW is the distance, from a perpendicular line at the takeoff point of the left subclavian artery off the aorta to the point at which the superior vena cava. Measurement of VPW on chestx-ray is relatively non-invasive, fast and easy technique as  hypervolemia predictor. The purpose of thisstudy is to know the mean VPW value of normal

  15. Parkinson's: another look.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broxmeyer, L

    2002-10-01

    Recent studies in the Parkinson's literature have cited a tuberculosis-like germ called Nocardia as being responsible for Parkinson's disease. Kohbata seemingly cemented a relationship between Nocardia and Parkinson's by finding serologic evidence in 20 of 20 Parkinson's patients, acknowledging that blood tests for Nocardia and the mycobacteria such as tuberculosis often cross-react, as they belong to the same order of bacteria, the Actinomycetales. Besides this difficulty in differentiation, a well-used medical school textbook of microbiology, Atlas, points out that even among experts, different observers may classify the same strain of bacteria as Nocardia or Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Parkinson's: another look is a theoretical article which presents compelling, well-documented evidence for an infectious cause for Parkinson's disease on historical, epidemiological, pharmacologic, microbiological, and biochemical levels.

  16. Parkinsonism and AIDS: a clinical comparative study before and after HAART

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Lucia Zuma de Rosso

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available In 2002, after analyzing 28 HIV-positive patients with movement disorders we emphasized the decreasing not only of Parkinsonism but also of other involuntary movements in HIV patients in the last few years. The objective of this study is to compare the clinical results between HIV-positive patients with Parkinsonism before and after HAART. In 14 years (1986-1999 2,460 HIV-positive patients were seen in our Hospital 14 (0.6% of which presented with Parkinsonism. Eight years after (2000-2007 970 HIV positive patients were seen and only two (0.2% had Parkinsonism. We conclude that after the introduction of HAART there was an evident decrease in AIDS-related Parkinsonism.No ano de 2002, após analisarmos 28 pacientes HIV-positivos que apresentavam distúrbios do movimento, enfatizamos o declínio, não só do parkinsonismo, como também de outros movimentos involuntários em pacientes infectados pelo HIV nos últimos anos. O objetivo deste estudo é comparar os resultados clínicos entre pacientes HIV-positivos com parkinsonismo antes e depois da introdução do esquema HAART. Em 14 anos (1986-1999, 2.460 pacientes HIV-positivos foram avaliados em nosso Hospital dos quais 14 (0,6% apresentaram parkinsonismo. Nos oito anos seguintes (2000-2007, 970 pacientes HIV-positivos foram avaliados e somente dois (0,2% tinham parkinsonismo. Concluímos que após a introdução do esquema HAART houve evidente declínio do parkinsonismo secundário à AIDS.

  17. Joint Global War on Terror (GWOT) Vascular Injury Study 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-02-01

    acquired in Iraq and Afghanistan, Society for Trauma Nurse, 2-4 April 2014, poster presentation o Vascular discharge education and follow-up care...eventual quality of limb and psychological recovery or well-being. 15. SUBJECT TERMS extremity vascular injury, extremity, vascular injury, vascular... psychological recovery or well-being. Finally, this program aims to characterize and compare the physical and emotional burden in large cohorts of US

  18. Cognitive rehabiliation for Parkinson's disease demantia: a study protocol for a pilot randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hindle, John V; Watermeyer, Tamlyn J; Roberts, Julie; Martyr, Anthony; Lloyd-Williams, Huw; Brand, Andrew; Gutting, Petra; Hoare, Zoe; Edwards, Rhiannon Tudor; Clare, Linda

    2016-03-22

    There is growing interest in developing non-pharmacological treatments to address the cognitive deficits apparent in Parkinson's disease dementia and dementia with Lewy bodies. Cognitive rehabilitation is a goal-oriented behavioural intervention which focuses on improving everyday functioning through management of cognitive difficulties; it has been shown to be effective in Alzheimer's disease. To date, no studies have assessed its potential efficacy for addressing the impact of cognitive impairment in people with Parkinson's disease or dementia with Lewy bodies. Participants (n = 45) will be recruited from movement disorders, care for the elderly and memory clinics. Inclusion criteria include: a diagnosis of Parkinson's disease, Parkinson's disease dementia or dementia with Lewy bodies according to consensus criteria and an Addenbrooke's Cognitive Examination - III score of ≤ 82. Exclusion criteria include: a diagnosis of any other significant neurological condition; major psychiatric disorder, including depression, which is not related to the patient's Parkinson's disease and unstable medication use for their physical or cognitive symptoms. A single-blind pilot randomised controlled trial, with concurrent economic evaluation, will compare the relative efficacy of cognitive rehabilitation with that of two control conditions. Following a goal-setting interview, the participants will be randomised to one of the three study arms: cognitive rehabilitation (eight weekly sessions), relaxation therapy (eight weekly sessions) or treatment as usual. Randomisation and treatment group allocation will be carried out by a clinical trials unit using a dynamic adaptive sequential randomisation algorithm. The primary outcomes are patients' perceived goal attainment at a 2-months post-intervention assessment and a 6-months follow-up. Secondary outcomes include patients' objective cognitive performance (on tests of memory and executive function) and satisfaction with goal

  19. Focused ultrasound subthalamotomy in patients with asymmetric Parkinson's disease: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Fernández, Raul; Rodríguez-Rojas, Rafael; Del Álamo, Marta; Hernández-Fernández, Frida; Pineda-Pardo, Jose A; Dileone, Michele; Alonso-Frech, Fernando; Foffani, Guglielmo; Obeso, Ignacio; Gasca-Salas, Carmen; de Luis-Pastor, Esther; Vela, Lydia; Obeso, José A

    2018-01-01

    Ablative neurosurgery has been used to treat Parkinson's disease for many decades. MRI-guided focused ultrasound allows focal lesions to be made in deep brain structures without skull incision. We investigated the safety and preliminary efficacy of unilateral subthalamotomy by focused ultrasound in Parkinson's disease. This prospective, open-label pilot study was done at CINAC (Centro Integral de Neurociencias), University Hospital HM Puerta del Sur in Madrid, Spain. Eligible participants had Parkinson's disease with markedly asymmetric parkinsonism. Patients with severe dyskinesia, history of stereotactic surgery or brain haemorrhage, a diagnosis of an unstable cardiac or psychiatric disease, or a skull density ratio of 0·3 or less were excluded. Enrolled patients underwent focused ultrasound unilateral subthalamotomy. The subthalamic nucleus was targeted by means of brain images acquired with a 3-Tesla MRI apparatus. Several sonications above the definitive ablation temperature of 55°C were delivered and adjusted according to clinical response. The primary outcomes were safety and a change in the motor status of the treated hemibody as assessed with part III of the Movement Disorders Society-Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (MDS-UPDRS III) in both off-medication and on-medication states at 6 months. Adverse events were monitored up to 48 h after treatment and at scheduled clinic visits at 1, 3, and 6 months after treatment. The study is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT02912871. Between April 26 and June 14, 2016, ten patients with markedly asymmetric parkinsonism that was poorly controlled pharmacologically were enrolled for focused ultrasound unilateral subthalamotomy. By 6 months follow-up, 38 incidents of adverse events had been recorded, none of which were serious or severe. Seven adverse events were present at 6 months. Three of these adverse events were directly related to subthalamotomy: off-medication dyskinesia in the treated arm

  20. A prospective study of 137 patients with Parkinson's disease and anosmia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soltanzadeh A

    1997-08-01

    Full Text Available In this research we tried to study frequency of clinical manifestations in Parkinson's disease. Hence, a prospective study was conducted in 317 patients who were affected by Parkinson's disease. In a questionnaire we collected data of patient's age, gender and signs and symptoms and then analyzed them. The most common features in our patients were tremor and muscular rigidity. Olfactory dysfunction was observed in 61% of our patients. Dysarthria, stooped posture, fixed facial expression, intellectual deterioration and the on-off response had various frequency among the patients. A new and important point in our research was considerable frequency of Anosmia or Hyposmia in spite of it's low prevalence among the patients of previous studies.

  1. Aberrant learning in Parkinson's disease: A neurocomputational study on bradykinesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ursino, Mauro; Baston, Chiara

    2018-05-22

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by a progressive decline in motor functions, such as bradykinesia, caused by the pathological denervation of nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurons within the basal ganglia (BG). It is acknowledged that dopamine (DA) directly affects the modulatory role of BG towards the cortex. However, a growing body of literature is suggesting that DA-induced aberrant synaptic plasticity could play a role in the core symptoms of PD, thus recalling for a "reconceptualization" of the pathophysiology. The aim of this work was to investigate DA-driven aberrant learning as a concurrent cause of bradykinesia, using a comprehensive, biologically inspired neurocomputational model of action selection in the BG. The model includes the three main pathways operating in the BG circuitry, that is the direct, indirect and hyperdirect pathways, and use a two-term Hebb rule to train synapses in the striatum, based on previous history of rewards and punishments. Levodopa pharmacodynamics is also incorporated. Through model simulations of the Alternate Finger Tapping motor task, we assessed the role of aberrant learning on bradykinesia. The results show that training under drug medication (levodopa) provides not only immediate but also delayed benefit lasting in time. Conversely, if performed in conditions of vanishing levodopa efficacy, training may result in dysfunctional corticostriatal synaptic plasticity, further worsening motor performances in PD subjects. This suggests that bradykinesia may result from the concurrent effects of low DA levels and dysfunctional plasticity and that training can be exploited in medicated subjects to improve levodopa treatment. © 2018 Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Bletilla colloid as a vascular embolization agent: experimental studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng Chuansheng; Feng Gansheng; Zhang Yanfang

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: To study the efficacy, safety and related characteristics of bletilla colloid as a vascular embolization agent. Materials and methods: The authors prepared bletilla colloid as a vascular embolization agent from the stem tubers of bletilla of Chinese medicinal herb. Related characteristics of bletilla colloid were studied. In four pigs hepatic arterial embolization was performed with the bletilla colloid. Results: The bletilla colloid was a homogenous viscous colloid whose relative viscosity was 2324.6 mm 2 /s. It was easily injected through 4-F catheter and hyperattenuating under fluoroscopy, meanwhile, with good histocompatibility and hemo-compatibility, without pyrogenetic response and toxicity. In vitro, the mixture of bletilla colloid and MMC did not produce separation and suspension phenomena but released 50% of MMC at 1.8h and 100% at 3.4h. The bletilla colloid mainly embolized peripheral arteries, maintaining occlusion for 5 weeks and without formation of collateral circulation. The injuries of normal hepatic tissues were slight, without hepatic cytonecrosis. Conclusions: Bletilla colloid, safe and effective in use with angioembolic function and characteristics of carrier and slow-release, is a potential peripheral embolization agent

  3. Comparative studies of D2 receptors and cerebral blood flow in hemi-parkinsonism rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Y.; Lin, X.

    2000-01-01

    To study the relationship between dopamine (DA) D 2 receptors and cerebral blood flow in hemiparkinsonism rats. Hemi-parkinsonism rats were made by stereotaxic 6-hydroxy dopamine (6-OH-DA) lesions in substantia nigra and ventral tegmental area, apomorphine (Apo) which could induce the successful model rat rotates toward the intact side was used to screen that rats, 125 I-IBZM in vivo autoradiography and 99m Tc-HM-PAO regional brain biodistribution were used to study D 2 receptors and cerebral blood flow. The HPLC-ECD were used to measure the concentration of DA and it metabolites homovanillic acid (HVA), 3,4-dehydroxyphenyl acetic acid (DOPAC) in bilateral striatum (ST). The lesioned side ST DA and its metabolites HVA DOPAC reduced significantly than that of the intact side and pseudo-operated control group, ST/cerebellum (CB) 125 I-IBZM uptake ratio was 8.04 ±0.71 in lesioned side of hemi-parkinsonism rats, significantly increased compared with the intact side and the pseudo-operated group (p 99m Tc 30.1±4.53% enhancement as compared to the intact side, and also show good correlation with 30 min Apo induced rotation numbers (r=0.98), the regional cerebral blood flow study didn't show significant difference between bilateral brain cortex area (p>0.05). The DA content decreased significantly and induced an up-regulation of ST D 2 receptor binding sites in 6-OH-DA lesioned side in hemi-parkinsonism rats, the increased percentage of lesioned-intact side ST/CB 125 I-IBZM uptake ratio showed good correlation with rotation behavior induced by Apo. Compare with cerebral blood flow, D 2 receptor reflected by IBZM seems to be more specific and earlier to detect the cerebral functional impairment in experimental hemi-parkinsonism

  4. Gum chewing improves swallow frequency and latency in Parkinson patients: a preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    South, Angela R; Somers, Stephanie M; Jog, Mandar S

    2010-04-13

    Reduced swallowing frequency affects secretion management in Parkinson disease (PD). Gum chewing increases saliva flow and swallow frequency. This study uses chewing gum to modify swallow frequency and latency between swallows in patients with PD. 1) Assess the frequency and latency of swallow at baseline (BL), during gum chewing (GC), and post gum chewing (PGC) for participants with PD (stage 2-4) nonsymptomatic for prandial dysphagia; and 2) assess carryover after gum is expectorated. Twenty participants were studied across 3 tasks, each of 5 minutes in duration: BL, GC, and PGC. Respiratory and laryngeal signals were continuously recorded using PowerLab (version 5.5.5; ADI Instruments, Castle Hill, Australia). Frequency and latency of swallow events were calculated. Differences (analysis of variance) are reported for frequency (p Parkinson disease. This study provides Class III evidence that chewing gum increases swallow frequency and decreases latency of swallowing in an experiment in patients with stage 2 to 4 Parkinson disease who are nonsymptomatic for significant prandial dysphagia.

  5. Study of an integrated non-motor symptoms questionnaire for Parkinson's disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU Bo; XIAO Zhi-ying; LI Jia-zhen; YUAN Jing; LIU Yi-ming

    2010-01-01

    Background Although the validity of non-motor symptoms screening questionnaire (NMSQuest) for Parkinson's disease has been verified in several recent researches, the specificity of the questionnaire is still in doubt. This study aimed to compare the non-motor symptoms (NMS) in Parkinson's disease (PD) with a medically ill control group.Methods In this study, the first comprehensive clinic-based NMS screening questionnaire for PD developed by the Parkinson's Disease Non-Motor Group (PDNMG) was used. Data from 90 PD patients and 270 sex-and age-matched control subjects, including stroke (n=90), heart disease (n=90) and diabetes (n=90) were analyzed.Results Compared with control group, NMS was more common in PD; on an average, most PD patients reported more than 12 non-motor items. There was a correlation of total NMS score in PD patients with Hoehn & Yahr Staging, but not with age, sex distribution, disease duration, or age at disease onset. Additionally, depression, constipation and impaired olfaction which occurred prior to the motor symptoms of PD were reported in this study.Conclusions NMS are more common in PD patients. There are some NMS that occurred at the preclinical stage of PD and might predict the onset of motor symptoms of PD patients.

  6. Falls in Parkinson's disease.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grimbergen, Y.A.M.; Munneke, M.; Bloem, B.R.

    2004-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: To summarize the latest insights into the clinical significance, assessment, pathophysiology and treatment of falls in Parkinson's disease. RECENT FINDINGS: Recent studies have shown that falls are common in Parkinson's disease, even when compared with other fall-prone

  7. Ongoing challenges to finding people with Parkinson's disease for epidemiological studies: a comparison of population-level case ascertainment methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, M Anne; Koehoorn, Mieke; Teschke, Kay

    2011-07-01

    Locating Parkinson's disease cases for epidemiological studies has long been challenging. Self reports, secondary records of physician diagnosis and drug tracer methods each exhibit known disadvantages but have rarely been compared directly. Prescriptions of levodopa have in some studies been considered to comprise a reasonable proxy for Parkinson's disease diagnosis. We tested this assumption by comparing three methods of population-level case ascertainment. We compared the number of Parkinson's disease cases in British Columbia derived from self-reports in the 2001 Canadian Community Health Survey to those obtained from administrative records of filled levodopa prescriptions and to Parkinson's disease diagnoses from physician visit billing and hospital discharge records in 1996 and 2005. We directly compared a case definition based on levodopa prescriptions with a definition based on records of physician diagnosis by calculating positive predictive value and sensitivity. Crude prevalence estimates ranged from approximately 100 to 200 per 100,000. Levodopa-based case definitions overestimated prevalence, while physician- and hospital-record-based case definitions provided lower prevalence estimates compared to survey derived estimates. The proportion of levodopa users with a diagnosis of Parkinson's disease declined from 62% to 52% between 1996 and 2005. This decrease was most dramatic among women (64%-44%) and those under age 65 (54%-39%). Sex and age trends suggest increasing use of levodopa among patients with conditions other than Parkinson's disease, such as restless legs syndrome. Increased non-Parkinson's levodopa use decreases the efficiency of levodopa as a Parkinson's disease case tracer. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Glaucoma correlates with increased risk of Parkinson's disease in the elderly: a national-based cohort study in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Shih-Wei; Lin, Cheng-Li; Liao, Kuan-Fu

    2017-08-01

    Very little is known about the association between glaucoma and Parkinson's disease in the elderly. The objective of this study was to determine whether glaucoma is associated with Parkinson's disease in older people in Taiwan. A retrospective cohort study was conducted to analyze the Taiwan National Health Insurance Program database from 2000 to 2010. We included 4330 subjects aged 65 years or older with newly diagnosed glaucoma as the glaucoma group, and 17,000 randomly selected subjects without a glaucoma diagnosis as the non-glaucoma group. Both groups were matched for sex, age, other comorbidities, and index year of glaucoma diagnosis. The incidence of Parkinson's disease at the end of 2011 was measured. A multivariable Cox proportional hazard regression model was used to measure the hazard ratio and 95% confidence intervals for Parkinson's disease associated with glaucoma. The overall incidence of Parkinson's disease was 1.28-fold higher in the glaucoma group than that in the non-glaucoma group (7.73 vs. 6.02 per 1000 person-years; 95% confidence interval 1.18, 1.40). After controlling for potential confounding factors, the adjusted hazard ratio of Parkinson's disease was 1.23 for the glaucoma group (95% confidence interval 1.05, 1.46), compared with the non-glaucoma group. Older people with glaucoma correlate with a small but statistically significant increase in the risk for Parkinson's disease. Whether glaucoma may be a non-motor feature of Parkinson's disease in older people requires further research to confirm.

  9. A controlled trial of rasagiline in early Parkinson disease: the TEMPO Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-12-01

    Monotherapy with rasagiline mesylate may be useful in early Parkinson disease (PD). To evaluate the safety and efficacy of the selective monoamine oxidase type B inhibitor rasagiline. Multicenter, 26-week, parallel-group, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial. Academically based movement disorders clinics. Patients with early PD not requiring dopaminergic therapy (n = 404). Research participants were randomized to rasagiline mesylate at dosages of 1 mg or 2 mg per day or matching placebo. A 1-week escalation period was followed by a 25-week maintenance period. The primary prespecified measure of efficacy was the change in the total Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scal score between baseline and 26 weeks of treatment, comparing each active treatment group with the placebo group. Monotherapy with rasagiline was effective in this 26-week study. The adjusted effect size for the total Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale was -4.20 units comparing 1 mg of rasagiline and placebo (95% confidence interval, -5.66 to -2.73 units; PRasagiline is effective as monotherapy for patients with early PD. The 2 dosages in this trial were both effective relative to placebo. Further study is warranted to evaluate the longer-term effects of rasagiline in PD.

  10. Motor matters: tackling heterogeneity of Parkinson's disease in functional MRI studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Štefan Holiga

    Full Text Available To tackle the heterogeneity of Parkinson's disease symptoms, most functional imaging studies tend to select a uniform group of subjects. We hypothesize that more profound considerations are needed to account for intra/inter-subject clinical variability and possibly for differing pathophysiological processes. Twelve patients were investigated using functional magnetic resonance imaging during visually-guided finger tapping. To account for disease heterogeneity, the motor score and individual symptom scores from the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS-III were utilized in the group-level model using two approaches either as the explanatory variable or as the effect of interest. Employment of the UPDRS-III score and symptom scores was systematically tested on the resulting group response to the levodopa challenge, which further accentuated the diversity of the diseased state of participants. Statistics revealed a bilateral group response to levodopa in the basal ganglia. Interestingly, systematic incorporation of individual motor aspects of the disease in the modelling amended the resulting activity patterns conspicuously, evidencing a manifold amount of explained variability by the particular score. In conclusion, the severity of clinical symptoms expressed in the UPDRS-III scores should be considered in the analysis to attain unbiased statistics, draw reliable conclusions and allow for comparisons between research groups studying Parkinson's disease using functional magnetic resonance imaging.

  11. Medication Responsiveness of Motor Symptoms in a Population-Based Study of Parkinson Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yvette M. Bordelon

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We assessed degree of Parkinson disease motor symptom improvement with medication among subjects enrolled in an ongoing, population-based study in Central California. The motor section of the unified Parkinson disease rating scale (UPDRS was performed on subjects in both OFF and ON medication states, and difference between these scores was used as an indicator of symptomatic benefit. Higher OFF minus ON scores correlated with more severe baseline symptoms. There was equivalent improvement on the motor UPDRS scale for subjects divided according to medication classes used: levodopa alone 7.3 points, levodopa plus other medications 8.5 points, and dopamine agonists but not levodopa 6.1 points. In addition, there was no difference in the magnitude of improvement when subjects were divided according to Parkinson disease subtype, defined as tremor dominant, akinetic-rigid, or mixed. In this community-based sample, these values are within the range of a clinically important difference as defined by previous studies.

  12. The discriminating nature of dopamine transporter image in parkinsonism: the competency of dopaminergic transporter imaging in differential diagnosis of parkinsonism 123I-FP-CIT SPECT study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Bom Sahn; Jang, Sung June; Eo, Jae Seon; Park, Eun Kyung; Kim, Yu Kyeong; Kim, Jong Min; Lee, Won Woo; Kim, Sang Eun

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the discriminating nature of 123 I-FP-CIT SPECT in patients with parkinsonism. 123 I-FP-CIT SPECT images acquired from the 18 normal controls; NC (60.4 ± 10.0 yr) and 237 patients with parkinsonism (65.9 ± 9.2 yr) were analyzed. From spatially normalized images, regional counts of the caudate, putamen, and occipital lobe were obtained using region of interest method. Binding potential (BP) was calculated with the ratio of specific to nonspecific binding activity at equilibrium. Additionally, the BP ratio of putamen to caudate (PCR) and asymmetric index (ASI) were measured. BPs of NC (3.37 ± 0.57, 3.10± 0.41, 3.23 ± 0.48 for caudate, putamen, whole striatum, respectively) had no significant difference with those of essential tremor; ET (3.31 ± 0.64, 3.06 ± 0.61, 3.14 ± 0.63) and Alzheimer's disease; AD (3.33 ± 0.60, 3.29 ± 0.79, 3.31 ± 0.70), but were higher than those of Parkinson's disease; PD (1.92 ± 0.74, 1.39 ±0.68, 1.64 ± 0.68), multiple system atrophy; MSA (2.36 ± 1.07, 2.16 ± 0.91, 2.26 ± 0.96), and dementia with Lewy body; DLB (1.95± 0.72, 1.64 ± 0.65, 1.79 ± 0.66)(ρ 123 I-FP-CIT SPECT was a good value in differential diagnosis of parkinsonism

  13. A controlled, randomized, delayed-start study of rasagiline in early Parkinson disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-04-01

    Treatment with rasagiline mesylate, an irreversible monoamine oxidase type B inhibitor, improves symptoms of early Parkinson disease (PD). Preclinical studies suggest that this compound may also modify the progression of PD. To compare the effects of early and later initiation of rasagiline on progression of disability in patients with PD. Double-blind, parallel-group, randomized, delayed-start clinical trial. Four hundred four subjects with early PD, not requiring dopaminergic therapy, enrolled at 32 sites in the United States and Canada. Subjects were randomized to receive rasagiline, 1 or 2 mg/d, for 1 year or placebo for 6 months followed by rasagiline, 2 mg/d, for 6 months. Change in total Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale score from baseline to 12 months. Three hundred seventy-one subjects were included in the 1-year efficacy analysis. Subjects treated with rasagiline, 2 mg/d, for 1 year had a 2.29-unit smaller increase in mean adjusted total Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale score compared with subjects treated with placebo for 6 months followed by rasagiline, 2 mg/d, for 6 months (P =.01). The mean adjusted difference between the placebo/rasagiline, 2 mg/d, group and those receiving rasagiline, 1 mg/d, for 1 year was -1.82 unit on the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale score (P =.05). Subjects treated with rasagiline, 2 and 1 mg/d, for 12 months showed less functional decline than subjects whose treatment was delayed for 6 months.

  14. Asymmetric Drug-Induced Parkinsonism and Psychopathology: A Prospective Naturalistic Study in Long-Stay Psychiatric Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lydia E. Pieters

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundDrug-induced parkinsonism (DIP is the most common movement disorder induced by antipsychotics. Although DIP is mostly symmetric, asymmetric DIP is reported in a substantial part of the patients. We investigated the frequency of motor asymmetry in DIP and its relationship to the severity of psychopathology in long-stay psychiatric patients.MethodsWe obtained data from a cohort study of 207 long-stay psychiatric patients on the frequency and risk factors of tardive dyskinesia, akathisia, tardive dystonia, and DIP. From July 2003 to May 2007 (mean follow-up, 1.1 year drug-induced movement disorders were assessed at least two times in each patient, with a frequency of persistent DIP of 56.2%. All patients who had at least one time parkinsonism in the upper/lower limb(s were included for analyses (190 patients, 79 women; mean age, 48.0 ± 12.9 years. The Unified Parkinson Disease Rating Scale motor scale was used to calculate the frequency of asymmetric parkinsonism. Multilevel mixed models were built to explore the relationship between asymmetry in parkinsonism and the severity of psychopathology, measured on the Clinical Global Impression-Schizophrenia scale severity index (CGI-SCH SI.ResultsThe frequency of asymmetric parkinsonism was 20.8%. Asymmetry in parkinsonism was associated with symptom severity on all CGI-SCH SI scales (β range, 0.37–3.74 and significantly associated with the positive symptom scale (β, 3.74; 95% CI, 0.35–7.31.ConclusionDIP is asymmetric in a substantial part of patients. Asymmetric presentation of DIP is of clinical relevance as it is related to the severity of psychopathology and may alert the clinician of more severe psychopathology. Future research is recommended to provide insight into the neuropsychopathology and clinical value of asymmetric parkinsonism for psychiatric patients.

  15. A study investigating the experience of working for people with Parkinson's and the factors that influence workplace success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullin, Rebecca L; Chaudhuri, K Ray; Andrews, Thomasin C; Martin, Anne; Gay, Stella; White, Claire M

    2017-05-10

    The experience of working for people with Parkinson's disease (PD) is known to vary substantially and affects the length of time in employment after diagnosis. This study aims at exploring the experience of working for people with PD and to create a model detailing the factors that influence their workplace success. A qualitative grounded theoretical approach was used. Seventeen working people with PD were selected for individual interviews which were conducted sequentially. Data were analyzed in an iterative, inductive process of coding to identify common themes and to generate a model that explains the data. Two core themes that influence workplace success for people with PD were identified. 'Feeling in control of Parkinson's' describes the actions that they make to remain in control. 'Being able to control Parkinson's in the workplace' describes external factors that they believe influence their ability to work successfully. The theoretical model demonstrates how a variety of factors interplay to influence workplace success for people with PD. PD is often poorly understood but the ability to explore and devise strategies for oneself and the flexibility to work around a fluctuating daily pattern were regularly identified as strategies that facilitated success. Implications for Rehabilitation The experience of working for people with Parkinson's is variable and is influenced by how in control the person with Parkinson's feels and the strategies they use to manage challenges. There is a need for greater workplace education to enhance employers' understanding of Parkinson's to ensure better support for strategies or reasonable adjustments by employers. People with Parkinson's are able to devise strategies to overcome some of their own specific workplace challenges including through technology but often, they prefer not to use disability aids. Daily fluctuations in Parkinson's symptoms are an important factor influencing workplace success.

  16. PET-Studies in parkinson's disease; Untersuchungen mit der Positronen-Emissions-Tomographie (PET) bei Patienten mit Morbus Parkinson

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwarz, J. [Klinik fuer Neurologie, Univ. Leipzig (Germany)

    2002-09-01

    Positron-emission-tomography (PET) has enabled to study the metabolism and blood flow in specific brain areas. Besides, there is a variety of radiotracers that allow quantification of the function of distinct molecules. In respect to Parkinson's disease, PET allowed for the first time to assess the number of dopaminergic neurons in vivo. Thus, helping confirming a dopaminergic deficit, measuring disease progression and also help to determine the function of dopaminergic grafts. Current research has shifted to determine the role of related neurotransmitter systems in the pathophysiology of Parkinson's disease. (orig.) [German] Die positronen-emissions-tomographie (PET) bietet neben der Messung von Metabolismus und Blutfluss die Moeglichkeit der Darstellung von einzelnen Molekuelen. Bei Patienten mit Morbus Parkinson hat es diese Technik erstmals erlaubt, die Anzahl der dopaminergen Neurone zu quantifizieren, wodurch die Diagnose gesichert, die Progression der Erkrankung beurteilt und auch das Anwachsen von Implantaten beurteilt werden kann. Die PET hat einen wesentlichen Beitrag zu unserem heutigen Wissen ueber die Pathophysiologie dieser Erkrankung beigetragen. (orig.)

  17. Effectiveness of occupational therapy in Parkinson's disease: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturkenboom, Ingrid H W M; Graff, Maud J; Borm, George F; Adang, Eddy M M; Nijhuis-van der Sanden, Maria W G; Bloem, Bastiaan R; Munneke, Marten

    2013-02-02

    Occupational therapists may have an added value in the care of patients with Parkinson's disease whose daily functioning is compromised, as well as for their immediate caregivers. Evidence for this added value is inconclusive due to a lack of rigorous studies. The aim of this trial is to evaluate the (cost) effectiveness of occupational therapy in improving daily functioning of patients with Parkinson's disease. A multicenter, assessor-blinded, two-armed randomized controlled clinical trial will be conducted, with evaluations at three and six months. One hundred ninety-two home-dwelling patients with Parkinson's disease and with an occupational therapy indication will be assigned to the experimental group or to the control group (2:1). Patients and their caregivers in the experimental group will receive ten weeks of home-based occupational therapy according to recent Dutch guidelines. The intervention will be delivered by occupational therapists who have been specifically trained to treat patients according to these guidelines. Participants in the control group will not receive occupational therapy during the study period. The primary outcome for the patient is self-perceived daily functioning at three months, assessed with the Canadian Occupational Performance Measure. Secondary patient-related outcomes include: objective performance of daily activities, self-perceived satisfaction with performance in daily activities, participation, impact of fatigue, proactive coping skills, health-related quality of life, overall quality of life, health-related costs, and effectiveness at six months. All outcomes at the caregiver level will be secondary and will include self-perceived burden of care, objective burden of care, proactive coping skills, overall quality of life, and care-related costs. Effectiveness will be evaluated using a covariance analysis of the difference in outcome at three months. An economic evaluation from a societal perspective will be conducted, as

  18. Placental vascular complications in HIV-infected pregnant women: a case-control study

    OpenAIRE

    CANLORBE, Geoffroy

    2012-01-01

    Background: Data from international literature suggest a link between HIV infection and placental vascular complications during pregnancy. Current studies on the subject are conflicting.Objective: The aim of the study was to evaluate the incidence of placental vascular complications during pregnancy among HIV+ and HIV- patients.Study Design: It is a single-center case-control study comparing the rates of gestational hypertension, preeclampsia, eclampsia and vascular intrauterine growth retard...

  19. Clinical and imaging characteristics of the vascular dementia. Preliminary studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomez Viera, Nelson; Rivero Arias, Edmundo; Perez Nellar, Jesus; Begueria Santos, Ramon; Arias Sifontes, William; Raiteris Flores, Juan

    1997-01-01

    A descriptive prospective study was carried out in 41 patients presenting with vascular dementia from Habana Vieja municipality, Havana City, in order to know some of the clinical and imaging characteristics of this disease. The main risk factors observed were the history of cerebrovascular disease and arterial hypertension. Depression, sleeping disorders and focal and pseudo bulbar neurologic signs were the most frequent clinical findings. Folstein neuropsychological test evidenced an important disorder of attention, calculation, the evocation memory and orientation. According to this test, 29 % of the patients had a severe dementia and nearly 50 % showed a severe handicap. The most frequent imaging findings observed in the computerized axial tomography of the cranium were cerebral atrophy, and single or multiple infarctions. Multiple cerebral infarctions, the lacunar status, subcortical encephalopathy of Binswanger, and single infarction located in cerebral areas related to cognition were considered as possible psychopathological mechanisms associated with the disease

  20. Methods for the correction of vascular artifacts in PET O-15 water brain-mapping studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Kewei; Reiman, E. M.; Lawson, M.; Yun, Lang-sheng; Bandy, D.; Palant, A.

    1996-12-01

    While positron emission tomographic (PET) measurements of regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) can be used to map brain regions that are involved in normal and pathological human behaviors, measurements in the anteromedial temporal lobe can be confounded by the combined effects of radiotracer activity in neighboring arteries and partial-volume averaging. The authors now describe two simple methods to address this vascular artifact. One method utilizes the early frames of a dynamic PET study, while the other method utilizes a coregistered magnetic resonance image (MRI) to characterize the vascular region of interest (VROI). Both methods subsequently assign a common value to each pixel in the VROI for the control (baseline) scan and the activation scan. To study the vascular artifact and to demonstrate the ability of the proposed methods correcting the vascular artifact, four dynamic PET scans were performed in a single subject during the same behavioral state. For each of the four scans, a vascular scan containing vascular activity was computed as the summation of the images acquired 0-60 s after radiotracer administration, and a control scan containing minimal vascular activity was computed as the summation of the images acquired 20-80 s after radiotracer administration. t-score maps calculated from the four pairs of vascular and control scans were used to characterize regional blood flow differences related to vascular activity before and after the application of each vascular artifact correction method. Both methods eliminated the observed differences in vascular activity, as well as the vascular artifact observed in the anteromedial temporal lobes. Using PET data from a study of normal human emotion, these methods permitted the authors to identify rCBF increases in the anteromedial temporal lobe free from the potentially confounding, combined effects of vascular activity and partial-volume averaging.

  1. Methods for the correction of vascular artifacts in PET O-15 water brain-mapping studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, K.; Reiman, E.M.; Good Samaritan Regional Medical Center, Phoenix, AZ; Lawson, M.; Yun, L.S.; Bandy, D.

    1996-01-01

    While positron emission tomographic (PET) measurements of regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) can be used to map brain regions that are involved in normal and pathological human behaviors, measurements in the anteromedial temporal lobe can be confounded by the combined effects of radiotracer activity in neighboring arteries and partial-volume averaging. The authors now describe two simple methods to address this vascular artifact. One method utilizes the early frames of a dynamic PET study, while the other method utilizes a coregistered magnetic resonance image (MRI) to characterize the vascular region of interest (VROI). Both methods subsequently assign a common value to each pixel in the VROI for the control scan and the activation scan. To study the vascular artifact and to demonstrate the ability of the proposed methods correcting the vascular artifact, four dynamic PET scans were performed in a single subject during the same behavioral state. For each of the four scans, a vascular scan containing vascular activity was computed as the summation of the images acquired 0--60 s after radiotracer administrations, and a control scan containing minimal vascular activity was computed as the summation of the images acquired 20--80 s after radiotracer administration. t-score maps calculated from the four pairs of vascular and control scans were used to characterize regional blood flow differences related to vascular activity before and after the applications of each vascular artifact correction method. Both methods eliminated the observed differences in vascular activity, as well as the vascular artifact observed in the anteromedial temporal lobes. Using PET data from a study of normal human emotion, these methods permitted us to identify rCBF increases in the anteromedial temporal lobe free from the potentially confounding, combined effects of vascular activity and partial-volume averaging

  2. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the First Few Years with Parkinson's Expert Briefings: Pain in PD Expert Briefings: Parkinson's Disease: Financial, Legal ... Briefings: Complementary Approaches to Parkinson's Expert Briefings: Understanding Pain in Parkinson's Expert Briefings: The Parkinson's Pipeline 2011: ...

  3. Striatal dopamine in Parkinson disease: A meta-analysis of imaging studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaasinen, Valtteri; Vahlberg, Tero

    2017-12-01

    A meta-analysis of 142 positron emission tomography and single photon emission computed tomography studies that have investigated striatal presynaptic dopamine function in Parkinson disease (PD) was performed. Subregional estimates of striatal dopamine metabolism are presented. The aromatic L-amino-acid decarboxylase (AADC) defect appears to be consistently smaller than the dopamine transporter and vesicular monoamine transporter 2 defects, suggesting upregulation of AADC function in PD. The correlation between disease severity and dopamine loss appears linear, but the majority of longitudinal studies point to a negative exponential progression pattern of dopamine loss in PD. Ann Neurol 2017;82:873-882. © 2017 American Neurological Association.

  4. The Vascular Impairment of Cognition Classification Consensus Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Skrobot, Olivia A.; Love, Seth; Kehoe, Patrick G.; O'Brien, John; Black, Sandra E.; Chen, Christopher; DeCarli, Charles; Erkinjuntti, Timo; Ford, Gary A.; Kalaria, Rajesh N.; Pantoni, Leonardo; Pasquier, Florence; Roman, Gustavo C.; Wallin, Anders; Sachdev, Perminder S.; Sachdev, Perminder S.; Skoog, Ingmar; Ben-Shlomo, Yoav; Passmore, Anthony P.; Engelborghs, S.; Lafosse, C.; Bertolucci, P. H.; Brucki, S.; Caramelli, P.; de Toledo Ferraz Alves, T. C.; Bocti, C.; Fulop, T.; Hogan, D. B.; Hsiung, G. R.; Kirk, A.; Leach, L.; Robillard, A.; Sahlas, D. J.; Guo, Q.; Tian, J.; Hokkanen, L.; Jokinen, H.; Benisty, S.; Deramecourt, V.; Hauw, J-J.; Lenoir, H.; Tsatali, M.; Tsolaki, Magda; Sundar, U.; Coen, R. F.; Korczyn, A.D.; Altieri, M.; Baldereschi, M.; Caltagirone, C.; Caravaglios, G.; Di Carlo, A.; DI Piero, V.; Gainotti, G.; Galluzzi, S.; Logroscino, G.; Mecocci, Patrizia; Moretti, D. V.; Padovani, Alessandro; Fukui, T.; Ihara, Masafumi; Mizuno, T.; Kim, Y.S.; Akinyemi, R.; Baiyewu, O.; Ogunniyi, Adesola; Szczudlik, A.; Bastos-Leite, António J.; Firmino, H.; Massano, J.; Verdelho, A.; Kruglov, L. S.; Ikram, M. K.; Kandiah, N.; Arana, E.; Barroso-Ribal, J.; Calatayud, T.; Cruz-Jentoft, A. J.; López-Pousa, S.; Martinez-Lage, P.; Mataro, M.; Börjesson-Hanson, A.; Englund, E.; Laukka, E. J.; Qiu, C.; Viitanen, M.; Biessels, G. J.; de Leeuw, F.E.; den Heijer, T.; Exalto, L. G.; Kappelle, L. J.; Prins, Niels D.; Richard, E.; Schmand, B.; van den Berg, E.; van der Flier, Wiesje M.; Bilgic, B.; Allan, L. M.; Archer, John A.; Attems, J.; Bayer, Thomas A.; Blackburn, D.; Brayne, C.; Bullock, M Ross; Connelly, P. J.; Farrant, A.; Fish, Margaret; Harkness, K.; Ince, Paul G; Langhorne, P.; Mann, J.J.; Matthews, F. E.; Mayer, P.; Pendlebury, S.T.; Perneczky, R.; Peters, R.; Smithard, D.; Stephan, B. C.; Swartz, J. E.; Todd, S.; Werring, D.J.; Wijayasiri, S. N.; Wilcock, G.; Zamboni, G.; Au, R.; Borson, S.; Bozoki, A.; Browndyke, J. N.; Corrada, M. M.; Crane, Paul K.; Diniz, B. S.; Etcher, L.; Fillit, H.; Greenberg, Steven M.; Grinberg, Lea T; Hurt, S. W.; Lamar, M.; Mielke, Martin; Ott, B. R.; Perry, G.; Powers, W. J.; Ramos-Estebanez, C.; Reed, B.; Roberts, R. O.; Romero Roldán, Javier; Saykin, Andrew J.; Seshadri, S.; Silbert, L.; Stern, Y.; Zarow, C.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Numerous diagnostic criteria have tried to tackle the variability in clinical manifestations and problematic diagnosis of vascular cognitive impairment (VCI) but none have been universally accepted. These criteria have not been readily comparable, impacting on clinical diagnosis rates

  5. The Vascular Impairment of Cognition Classification Consensus Study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Skrobot, O.A.; O'Brien, J.; Black, S.; Chen, C; DeCarli, C.; Erkinjuntti, T.; Ford, G.A.; Kalaria, R.N.; Pantoni, L.; Pasquier, F.; Roman, G.C.; Wallin, A.; Sachdev, P.; Skoog, I.; Ben-Shlomo, Y.; Passmore, A.P.; Leeuw, F.E. de; Richard, E.; Love, S.; Kehoe, P.G.

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Numerous diagnostic criteria have tried to tackle the variability in clinical manifestations and problematic diagnosis of vascular cognitive impairment (VCI) but none have been universally accepted. These criteria have not been readily comparable, impacting on clinical diagnosis rates

  6. Endothelial dysfunction, vascular disease and stroke: the ARTICO study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roquer, J; Segura, T; Serena, J; Castillo, J

    2009-01-01

    Endothelial dysfunction is a fundamental step in the atherosclerotic disease process. Its presence is a risk factor for the development of clinical events, and may represent a marker of atherothrombotic burden. Also, endothelial dysfunction contributes to enhanced plaque vulnerability, may trigger plaque rupture, and favors thrombus formation. The assessment of endothelial vasomotion is a useful marker of atherosclerotic vascular disease. There are different methods to assess endothelial function: endothelium-dependent vasodilatation brachial flow-mediated dilation, cerebrovascular reactivity to L-arginine, and the determination of some biomarkers such as microalbuminuria, platelet function, and C-reactive protein. Endothelial dysfunction has been observed in stroke patients and has been related to stroke physiopathology, stroke subtypes, clinical severity and outcome. Resting ankle-brachial index (ABI) is also considered an indicator of generalized atherosclerosis, and a low ABI is associated with an increase in stroke incidence in the elderly. Despite all these data, there are no studies analyzing the predictive value of ABI for new cardiovascular events in patients after suffering an acute ischemic stroke. ARTICO is an ongoing prospective, observational, multicenter study being performed in 50 Spanish hospitals. The aim of the ARTICO study is to evaluate the prognostic value of a pathological ABI (ARTICO study will increase the knowledge of patient outcome after ischemic stroke and may help to improve our ability to detect patients at high risk of stroke recurrence or major cardiovascular events. (c) 2009 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  7. Prevalence and clinical correlation of dysphagia in Parkinson disease: a study on Chinese patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, X; Gao, J; Xie, C; Xiong, B; Wu, S; Cen, Z; Lou, Y; Lou, D; Xie, F; Luo, W

    2018-01-01

    Dysphagia is relatively common in patients with Parkinson disease (PD) and can have a negative impact on their quality of life; therefore, it is imperative that its prevalence in PD patients is studied. The aim of this study was to explore the prevalence and clinical correlation of dysphagia in Chinese PD patients. We recruited 116 Chinese PD patients. A videofluoroscopic study of swallowing (VFSS) was used to identify dysphagia. Assessments, including water drinking test, relative motor symptoms, non-motor symptoms (NMS) and quality of life, were performed to analyze the risks of dysphagia. The prevalence of dysphagia was 87.1%. The comparison of demographic and clinical features between patients with and without dysphagia included sex, education level, disease course, Mini-mental State Examination (MMSE), Hamilton Depression Scale (HAMD), Hamilton Anxiety Scale (HAMA), Question 6, 7 of the Unified Parkinson Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS Part II), Hoehn-Yahr stage (H&Y), water drinking test, 39-item Parkinson Disease Questionnaire (PDQ-39) and Non-Motor Symptoms Quest (NMSQ). We found significant correlations between dysphagia and age. Using age, disease course, and H&Y stage as the independent variable in our regression analysis for assessing the risk factors of dysphagia in PD patients, age and H&Y stage displayed a strong correlation as the risk factors. The risk of dysphagia in elderly PD patients is 1.078 times greater than that of younger PD patients. Also, the risk of dysphagia in PD patients of a greater H&Y staging is 3.260 times greater than that of lower staging PD patients. Our results suggest that dysphagia is common in Chinese PD patients. Older patients or those in higher H&Y stages are more likely to experience dysphagia. There is no correlation between dysphagia and PD duration.

  8. Effects of movement imitation training in Parkinson's disease: A virtual reality pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robles-García, Verónica; Corral-Bergantiños, Yoanna; Espinosa, Nelson; García-Sancho, Carlos; Sanmartín, Gabriel; Flores, Julián; Cudeiro, Javier; Arias, Pablo

    2016-05-01

    Hypometria is a clinical motor sign in Parkinson's disease. Its origin likely emerges from basal ganglia dysfunction, leading to an impaired control of inhibitory intracortical motor circuits. Some neurorehabilitation approaches include movement imitation training; besides the effects of motor practice, there might be a benefit due to observation and imitation of un-altered movement patterns. In this sense, virtual reality facilitates the process by customizing motor-patterns to be observed and imitated. To evaluate the effect of a motor-imitation therapy focused on hypometria in Parkinson's disease using virtual reality. We carried out a randomized controlled pilot-study. Sixteen patients were randomly assigned in experimental and control groups. Groups underwent 4-weeks of training based on finger-tapping with the dominant hand, in which imitation was the differential factor (only the experimental group imitated). We evaluated self-paced movement features and cortico-spinal excitability (recruitment curves and silent periods in both hemispheres) before, immediately after, and two weeks after the training period. Movement amplitude increased significantly after the therapy in the experimental group for the trained and un-trained hands. Motor thresholds and silent periods evaluated with transcranial magnetic stimulation were differently modified by training in the two groups; although the changes in the input-output recruitment were similar. This pilot study suggests that movement imitation therapy enhances the effect of motor practice in patients with Parkinson's disease; imitation-training might be helpful for reducing hypometria in these patients. These results must be clarified in future larger trials. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Acute Modulation of Brain Connectivity in Parkinson Disease after Automatic Mechanical Peripheral Stimulation: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quattrocchi, Carlo Cosimo; de Pandis, Maria Francesca; Piervincenzi, Claudia; Galli, Manuela; Melgari, Jean Marc; Salomone, Gaetano; Sale, Patrizio; Mallio, Carlo Augusto; Carducci, Filippo; Stocchi, Fabrizio

    2015-01-01

    The present study shows the results of a double-blind sham-controlled pilot trial to test whether measurable stimulus-specific functional connectivity changes exist after Automatic Mechanical Peripheral Stimulation (AMPS) in patients with idiopathic Parkinson Disease. Eleven patients (6 women and 5 men) with idiopathic Parkinson Disease underwent brain fMRI immediately before and after sham or effective AMPS. Resting state Functional Connectivity (RSFC) was assessed using the seed-ROI based analysis. Seed ROIs were positioned on basal ganglia, on primary sensory-motor cortices, on the supplementary motor areas and on the cerebellum. Individual differences for pre- and post-effective AMPS and pre- and post-sham condition were obtained and first entered in respective one-sample t-test analyses, to evaluate the mean effect of condition. Effective AMPS, but not sham stimulation, induced increase of RSFC of the sensory motor cortex, nucleus striatum and cerebellum. Secondly, individual differences for both conditions were entered into paired group t-test analysis to rule out sub-threshold effects of sham stimulation, which showed stronger connectivity of the striatum nucleus with the right lateral occipital cortex and the cuneal cortex (max Z score 3.12) and with the right anterior temporal lobe (max Z score 3.42) and of the cerebellum with the right lateral occipital cortex and the right cerebellar cortex (max Z score 3.79). Our results suggest that effective AMPS acutely increases RSFC of brain regions involved in visuo-spatial and sensory-motor integration. This study provides Class II evidence that automatic mechanical peripheral stimulation is effective in modulating brain functional connectivity of patients with Parkinson Disease at rest. Clinical Trials.gov NCT01815281.

  10. Acute Modulation of Brain Connectivity in Parkinson Disease after Automatic Mechanical Peripheral Stimulation: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piervincenzi, Claudia; Galli, Manuela; Melgari, Jean Marc; Salomone, Gaetano; Sale, Patrizio; Mallio, Carlo Augusto; Carducci, Filippo; Stocchi, Fabrizio

    2015-01-01

    Objective The present study shows the results of a double-blind sham-controlled pilot trial to test whether measurable stimulus-specific functional connectivity changes exist after Automatic Mechanical Peripheral Stimulation (AMPS) in patients with idiopathic Parkinson Disease. Methods Eleven patients (6 women and 5 men) with idiopathic Parkinson Disease underwent brain fMRI immediately before and after sham or effective AMPS. Resting state Functional Connectivity (RSFC) was assessed using the seed-ROI based analysis. Seed ROIs were positioned on basal ganglia, on primary sensory-motor cortices, on the supplementary motor areas and on the cerebellum. Individual differences for pre- and post-effective AMPS and pre- and post-sham condition were obtained and first entered in respective one-sample t-test analyses, to evaluate the mean effect of condition. Results Effective AMPS, but not sham stimulation, induced increase of RSFC of the sensory motor cortex, nucleus striatum and cerebellum. Secondly, individual differences for both conditions were entered into paired group t-test analysis to rule out sub-threshold effects of sham stimulation, which showed stronger connectivity of the striatum nucleus with the right lateral occipital cortex and the cuneal cortex (max Z score 3.12) and with the right anterior temporal lobe (max Z score 3.42) and of the cerebellum with the right lateral occipital cortex and the right cerebellar cortex (max Z score 3.79). Conclusions Our results suggest that effective AMPS acutely increases RSFC of brain regions involved in visuo-spatial and sensory-motor integration. Classification of Evidence This study provides Class II evidence that automatic mechanical peripheral stimulation is effective in modulating brain functional connectivity of patients with Parkinson Disease at rest. Trial Registration Clinical Trials.gov NCT01815281 PMID:26469868

  11. The BioFIND study: Characteristics of a clinically typical Parkinson's disease biomarker cohort

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldman, Jennifer G.; Alcalay, Roy N.; Xie, Tao; Tuite, Paul; Henchcliffe, Claire; Hogarth, Penelope; Amara, Amy W.; Frank, Samuel; Rudolph, Alice; Casaceli, Cynthia; Andrews, Howard; Gwinn, Katrina; Sutherland, Margaret; Kopil, Catherine; Vincent, Lona; Frasier, Mark

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background Identifying PD‐specific biomarkers in biofluids will greatly aid in diagnosis, monitoring progression, and therapeutic interventions. PD biomarkers have been limited by poor discriminatory power, partly driven by heterogeneity of the disease, variability of collection protocols, and focus on de novo, unmedicated patients. Thus, a platform for biomarker discovery and validation in well‐characterized, clinically typical, moderate to advanced PD cohorts is critically needed. Methods BioFIND (Fox Investigation for New Discovery of Biomarkers in Parkinson's Disease) is a cross‐sectional, multicenter biomarker study that established a repository of clinical data, blood, DNA, RNA, CSF, saliva, and urine samples from 118 moderate to advanced PD and 88 healthy control subjects. Inclusion criteria were designed to maximize diagnostic specificity by selecting participants with clinically typical PD symptoms, and clinical data and biospecimen collection utilized standardized procedures to minimize variability across sites. Results We present the study methodology and data on the cohort's clinical characteristics. Motor scores and biospecimen samples including plasma are available for practically defined off and on states and thus enable testing the effects of PD medications on biomarkers. Other biospecimens are available from off state PD assessments and from controls. Conclusion Our cohort provides a valuable resource for biomarker discovery and validation in PD. Clinical data and biospecimens, available through The Michael J. Fox Foundation for Parkinson's Research and the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, can serve as a platform for discovering biomarkers in clinically typical PD and comparisons across PD's broad and heterogeneous spectrum. © 2016 The Authors. Movement Disorders published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society PMID:27113479

  12. Monte Carlo Simulations Validation Study: Vascular Brachytherapy Beta Sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orion, I.; Koren, K.

    2004-01-01

    During the last decade many versions of angioplasty irradiation treatments have been proposed. The purpose of this unique brachytherapy is to administer a sufficient radiation dose into the vein walls in order to prevent restonosis, a clinical sequel to balloon angioplasty. The most suitable sources for this vascular brachytherapy are the β - emitters such as Re-188, P-32, and Sr-90/Y-90, with a maximum energy range of up to 2.1 MeV [1,2,3]. The radioactive catheters configurations offered for these treatments can be a simple wire [4], a fluid filled balloon or a coated stent. Each source is differently positioned inside the blood vessel, and the emitted electrons ranges therefore vary. Many types of sources and configurations were studied either experimentally or with the use of the Monte Carlo calculation technique, while most of the Monte Carlo simulations were carried out using EGS4 [5] or MCNP [6]. In this study we compared the beta-source absorbed-dose versus radial-distance of two treatment configurations using MCNP and EGS4 simulations. This comparison was aimed to discover the differences between the MCNP and the EGS4 simulation code systems in intermediate energies electron transport

  13. Vascular anatomy of the pig kidney glomerulus: a qualitative study of corrosion casts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, B J; Holmes, K R; Xu, L X

    1992-09-01

    Pig kidney glomerular vascular anatomy was studied by scanning electron microscopy of vascular corrosion casts. A generalized vascular architecture is presented to describe the pig kidney glomerulus based upon the observation of 3,800 vascular cast glomeruli. The relative simplicity of the pig glomerular vascular architecture has allowed the characterization of different vascular segments more completely than has been possible in other mammals. Based upon relationships to the afferent arteriole, a nomenclature and definition of primary, secondary, tertiary and anastomotic vessels is proposed for the distributing vessels comprising the glomerular tuft. The existence and formation of a large central hemispheric vessel deep within the confines of a glomerular hemisphere is micrographically documented. Micrographic evidence is presented supporting the formation of the single efferent arteriole by the merging of two central hemispheric vessels within the confines of the glomerular tuft. Failure of the merging of these two vessels may result in multiple efferent arterioles.

  14. Parkinson's disease as community health problem: study in Norwegian nursing homes. The Norwegian Study Group of Parkinson's Disease in the Elderly.

    OpenAIRE

    Larsen, J P

    1991-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To examine the extent of under-diagnosis and overdiagnosis of Parkinson's disease and to determine quality of treatment in a defined population. DESIGN--Clinical evaluation of an elderly population. SETTING--40 Norwegian nursing homes. SUBJECTS--3322 residents of nursing homes, of whom 500 were selected by nursing staff for evaluation on the basis of a structured information programme on Parkinson's disease and 269 were examined in detail by neurologists. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Pat...

  15. Resting state cortical oscillations of patients with Parkinson disease and with and without subthalamic deep brain stimulation: a magnetoencephalography study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Chunyan; Li, Dianyou; Jiang, Tianxiao; Ince, Nuri Firat; Zhan, Shikun; Zhang, Jing; Sha, Zhiyi; Sun, Bomin

    2015-04-01

    In this study, we investigate the modification to cortical oscillations of patients with Parkinson disease (PD) by subthalamic deep brain stimulation (STN-DBS). Spontaneous cortical oscillations of patients with PD were recorded with magnetoencephalography during on and off subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation states. Several features such as average frequency, average power, and relative subband power in regions of interest were extracted in the frequency domain, and these features were correlated with Unified Parkinson Disease Rating Scale III evaluation. The same features were also investigated in patients with PD without surgery and healthy controls. Patients with Parkinson disease without surgery compared with healthy controls had a significantly lower average frequency and an increased average power in 1 to 48 Hz range in whole cortex. Higher relative power in theta and simultaneous decrease in beta and gamma over temporal and occipital were also observed in patients with PD. The Unified Parkinson Disease Rating Scale III rigidity score correlated with the average frequency and with the relative power of beta and gamma in frontal areas. During subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation, the average frequency increased significantly when stimulation was on compared with off state. In addition, the relative power dropped in delta, whereas it rose in beta over the whole cortex. Through the course of stimulation, the Unified Parkinson Disease Rating Scale III rigidity and tremor scores correlated with the relative power of alpha over left parietal. Subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation improves the symptoms of PD by suppressing the synchronization of alpha rhythm in somatomotor region.

  16. A Clinical and Molecular Genetic Study of 50 Families with Autosomal Recessive Parkinsonism Revealed Known and Novel Gene Mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taghavi, Shaghayegh; Chaouni, Rita; Tafakhori, Abbas; Azcona, Luis J; Firouzabadi, Saghar Ghasemi; Omrani, Mir Davood; Jamshidi, Javad; Emamalizadeh, Babak; Shahidi, Gholam Ali; Ahmadi, Mona; Habibi, Seyed Amir Hassan; Ahmadifard, Azadeh; Fazeli, Atena; Motallebi, Marzieh; Petramfar, Peyman; Askarpour, Saeed; Askarpour, Shiva; Shahmohammadibeni, Hossein Ali; Shahmohammadibeni, Neda; Eftekhari, Hajar; Shafiei Zarneh, Amir Ehtesham; Mohammadihosseinabad, Saeed; Khorrami, Mehdi; Najmi, Safa; Chitsaz, Ahmad; Shokraeian, Parasto; Ehsanbakhsh, Hossein; Rezaeidian, Jalal; Ebrahimi Rad, Reza; Madadi, Faranak; Andarva, Monavvar; Alehabib, Elham; Atakhorrami, Minoo; Mortazavi, Seyed Erfan; Azimzadeh, Zahra; Bayat, Mahdis; Besharati, Amir Mohammad; Harati-Ghavi, Mohammad Ali; Omidvari, Samareh; Dehghani-Tafti, Zahra; Mohammadi, Faraz; Mohammad Hossein Pour, Banafsheh; Noorollahi Moghaddam, Hamid; Esmaili Shandiz, Ehsan; Habibi, Arman; Taherian-Esfahani, Zahra; Darvish, Hossein; Paisán-Ruiz, Coro

    2018-04-01

    In this study, the role of known Parkinson's disease (PD) genes was examined in families with autosomal recessive (AR) parkinsonism to assist with the differential diagnosis of PD. Some families without mutations in known genes were also subject to whole genome sequencing with the objective to identify novel parkinsonism-related genes. Families were selected from 4000 clinical files of patients with PD or parkinsonism. AR inheritance pattern, consanguinity, and a minimum of two affected individuals per family were used as inclusion criteria. For disease gene/mutation identification, multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification, quantitative PCR, linkage, and Sanger and whole genome sequencing assays were carried out. A total of 116 patients (50 families) were examined. Fifty-four patients (46.55%; 22 families) were found to carry pathogenic mutations in known genes while a novel gene, not previously associated with parkinsonism, was found mutated in a single family (2 patients). Pathogenic mutations, including missense, nonsense, frameshift, and exon rearrangements, were found in Parkin, PINK1, DJ-1, SYNJ1, and VAC14 genes. In conclusion, variable phenotypic expressivity was seen across all families.

  17. Coffee consumption, gender, and Parkinson's disease mortality in the cancer prevention study II cohort: the modifying effects of estrogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ascherio, Alberto; Weisskopf, Marc G; O'Reilly, Eilis J; McCullough, Marjorie L; Calle, Eugenia E; Rodriguez, Carmen; Thun, Michael J

    2004-11-15

    Caffeine consumption is associated with a reduced risk of Parkinson's disease in men but not in women. This gender difference may be due to an interaction between caffeine and use of postmenopausal estrogens. The authors prospectively assessed the relation between coffee consumption and Parkinson's disease mortality among participants in the Cancer Prevention Study II, a cohort of over 1 million people enrolled in 1982. Causes of deaths were ascertained through death certificates from January 1, 1989, through 1998. Parkinson's disease was listed as a cause of death in 909 men and 340 women. After adjustment for age, smoking, and alcohol intake, coffee consumption was inversely associated with Parkinson's disease mortality in men (p(trend) = 0.01) but not in women (p = 0.6). In women, this association was dependent on postmenopausal estrogen use; the relative risk for women drinking 4 or more cups (600 ml) of coffee per day compared with nondrinkers was 0.47 (95% confidence interval: 0.27, 0.80; p = 0.006) among never users and 1.31 (95% confidence interval: 0.75, 2.30; p = 0.34) among users. These results suggest that caffeine reduces the risk of Parkinson's disease but that this hypothetical beneficial effect may be prevented by use of estrogen replacement therapy.

  18. Mucuna pruriens in Parkinson's disease: a double blind clinical and pharmacological study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katzenschlager, R; Evans, A; Manson, A; Patsalos, P; Ratnaraj, N; Watt, H; Timmermann, L; Van der Giessen, R; Lees, A

    2004-01-01

    Background: The seed powder of the leguminous plant, Mucuna pruriens has long been used in traditional Ayurvedic Indian medicine for diseases including parkinsonism. We have assessed the clinical effects and levodopa (L-dopa) pharmacokinetics following two different doses of mucuna preparation and compared them with standard L-dopa/carbidopa (LD/CD). Methods: Eight Parkinson's disease patients with a short duration L-dopa response and on period dyskinesias completed a randomised, controlled, double blind crossover trial. Patients were challenged with single doses of 200/50 mg LD/CD, and 15 and 30 g of mucuna preparation in randomised order at weekly intervals. L-Dopa pharmacokinetics were determined, and Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale and tapping speed were obtained at baseline and repeatedly during the 4 h following drug ingestion. Dyskinesias were assessed using modified AIMS and Goetz scales. Results: Compared with standard LD/CD, the 30 g mucuna preparation led to a considerably faster onset of effect (34.6 v 68.5 min; p = 0.021), reflected in shorter latencies to peak L-dopa plasma concentrations. Mean on time was 21.9% (37 min) longer with 30 g mucuna than with LD/CD (p = 0.021); peak L-dopa plasma concentrations were 110% higher and the area under the plasma concentration v time curve (area under curve) was 165.3% larger (p = 0.012). No significant differences in dyskinesias or tolerability occurred. Conclusions: The rapid onset of action and longer on time without concomitant increase in dyskinesias on mucuna seed powder formulation suggest that this natural source of L-dopa might possess advantages over conventional L-dopa preparations in the long term management of PD. Assessment of long term efficacy and tolerability in a randomised, controlled study is warranted. PMID:15548480

  19. Changes in postural control in patients with Parkinson's disease: a posturographic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doná, F; Aquino, C C; Gazzola, J M; Borges, V; Silva, S M C A; Ganança, F F; Caovilla, H H; Ferraz, H B

    2016-09-01

    Postural instability is one of the most disabling features in Parkinson's disease (PD), and often leads to falls that reduce mobility and functional capacity. The objectives of this study were to analyse the limit of stability (LOS) and influence of the manipulation of visual, somatosensorial and visual-vestibular information on postural control in patients with PD and healthy subjects. Cross-sectional. Movement Disorders Unit, university setting. Eighty-two subjects aged between 37 and 83 years: 41 with Parkinson's disease in the 'on' state and 41 healthy subjects with no neurological disorders. Both groups were matched in terms of sex and age. Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS)-motor score, modified Hoehn and Yahr staging, Dynamic Gait Index (DGI) and posturography with integrated virtual reality. The parameters analysed by posturography were LOS area, area of body centre of pressure excursion and balance functional reserve in the standing position in 10 conditions (open and closed eyes, unstable surface with eyes closed, saccadic and optokinetic stimuli, and visual-vestibular interaction). The mean UPDRS motor score and DGI score were 27 [standard deviation (SD) 14] and 21 (SD 3), respectively. Thirteen participants scored between 0 and 19 points, indicating major risk of falls. Posturographic assessment showed that patients with PD had significantly lower LOS area and balance functional reserve values, and greater body sway area in all posturographic conditions compared with healthy subjects. Patients with PD have reduced LOS area and greater postural sway compared with healthy subjects. The deterioration in postural control was significantly associated with major risk of falls. Copyright © 2015 Chartered Society of Physiotherapy. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Insecticide Exposure in Parkinsonism

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bloomquist, Jeffrey

    2002-01-01

    Behavioral, neurochemical, and immunocytochemical studies characterized the possible role of insecticide exposure in the etiology of Parkinson's disease as it may relate to Gulf War Syndrome. Chlorpyrifos (CP) and permethrin (PM...

  1. Insecticide Exposure in Parkinsonism

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bloomquist, Jeffrey

    2001-01-01

    Behavioral, neurochemical, and immunocytochemical studies characterized the possible role of insecticide exposure in the etiology of Parkinson's disease as it may relate to Gulf War Syndrome. Chlorpyrifos (CP) and permethrin (PM...

  2. Insecticide Exposure in Parkinsonism

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bloomquist, Jeffrey

    2003-01-01

    Behavioral, neurochemical, and immunocytochemical studies are characterizing the possible role of insecticide exposure in the etiology of Parkinson's disease as it may relate to Gulf War Syndrome. Chlorpyrifos (CP) and/or permethrin (PM...

  3. Medium-to-high prevalence of screening-detected parkinsonism in the urban area of Tehran, Iran: data from a community-based door-to-door study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fereshtehnejad, Seyed-Mohammad; Shafieesabet, Mahdiyeh; Rahmani, Arash; Delbari, Ahmad; Lökk, Johan

    2015-01-01

    Parkinsonism occurs in all ethnic groups worldwide; however, there are wide variations in the prevalence rates reported from different countries, even for neighboring regions. The huge socioeconomic burden of parkinsonism necessitates the need for prevalence studies in each country. So far, there is neither data registry nor prevalence information on parkinsonism in the Iranian population. The aim of our study was to estimate the prevalence rate of probable parkinsonism in a huge urban area in Iran, Tehran using a community-based door-to-door survey. We used a random multistage sampling of the households within the network of health centers consisting of 374 subunits in all 22 districts throughout the entire urban area of Tehran. Overall, 20,621 individuals answered the baseline checklist and screening questionnaire and data from 19,500 persons aged ≥30 years were entered in the final analysis. Health care professionals used a new six-item screening questionnaire for parkinsonism, which has been previously shown to have a high validity and diagnostic value in the same population. A total of 157 cases were screened for parkinsonism using the validated six-item questionnaire. After age and sex adjustment based on the Tehran population, the prevalence of parkinsonism was calculated as 222.9 per 100,000. Using the World Health Organization's World Standard Population, the standardized prevalence rate of parkinsonism was 285 per 100,000 (95% confidence interval 240-329). The male:female ratio of probable parkinsonism was calculated as 1.62, and there was a significant increase in the screening rate by advancing age. The calculated rates for the prevalence of parkinsonism in our study are closer to reports from some European and Middle Eastern countries, higher than reports from Eastern Asian and African populations, and lower than Australia. The prevalence rate of >200 in 100,000 for parkinsonism in Tehran, Iran could be considered a medium-to-high rate.

  4. The discriminating nature of dopamine transporter image in parkinsonism: the competency of dopaminergic transporter imaging in differential diagnosis of parkinsonism {sup 123}I-FP-CIT SPECT study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Bom Sahn; Jang, Sung June; Eo, Jae Seon; Park, Eun Kyung; Kim, Yu Kyeong; Kim, Jong Min; Lee, Won Woo; Kim, Sang Eun [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-08-15

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the discriminating nature of {sup 123}I-FP-CIT SPECT in patients with parkinsonism. {sup 123}I-FP-CIT SPECT images acquired from the 18 normal controls; NC (60.4 {+-} 10.0 yr) and 237 patients with parkinsonism (65.9 {+-} 9.2 yr) were analyzed. From spatially normalized images, regional counts of the caudate, putamen, and occipital lobe were obtained using region of interest method. Binding potential (BP) was calculated with the ratio of specific to nonspecific binding activity at equilibrium. Additionally, the BP ratio of putamen to caudate (PCR) and asymmetric index (ASI) were measured. BPs of NC (3.37 {+-} 0.57, 3.10{+-} 0.41, 3.23 {+-} 0.48 for caudate, putamen, whole striatum, respectively) had no significant difference with those of essential tremor; ET (3.31 {+-} 0.64, 3.06 {+-} 0.61, 3.14 {+-} 0.63) and Alzheimer's disease; AD (3.33 {+-} 0.60, 3.29 {+-} 0.79, 3.31 {+-} 0.70), but were higher than those of Parkinson's disease; PD (1.92 {+-} 0.74, 1.39 {+-}0.68, 1.64 {+-} 0.68), multiple system atrophy; MSA (2.36 {+-} 1.07, 2.16 {+-} 0.91, 2.26 {+-} 0.96), and dementia with Lewy body; DLB (1.95{+-} 0.72, 1.64 {+-} 0.65, 1.79 {+-} 0.66)({rho} < 0.005). PD had statistically lower values of PCR and higher values of ASI than those of NC ({rho} < 0.005). And PD had significantly lower value of PCR, higher ASI and lower BP in the putamen and whole striatum than MSA ({rho} < 0.05). Dopamine transporter image of {sup 123}I-FP-CIT SPECT was a good value in differential diagnosis of parkinsonism.

  5. A double-blind study of the efficacy of apomorphine and its assessment in "off-periods in Parkinson's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Laar, T.; Jansen, E.N.H.; Essink, A.W.G.; Neef, C.; Oosterloo, Sebe J.

    1993-01-01

    Five patients with idiopathic Parkinson's disease with severe response fluctuations were selected for a randomized double-blind placebo-controlled study, concerning the clinical effects of subcutaneous apomorphine and its assessment in `off¿-periods. The study was designed as five n = 1 studies, in

  6. Pilot study of a three-step diagnostic pathway for young and old patients with Parkinson's disease dementia: screen, test and then diagnose.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Robben, S.H.M.; Sleegers, M.J.; Dautzenberg, P.LJ.; Bergen, F.S. van; Bruggen, J.P.; Olde Rikkert, M.G.M.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To pilot a three-step diagnostic model for young and old patients with Parkinson's disease dementia (PDD). METHODS: Prospective investigator-blinded study. We developed a screening questionnaire for patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) and their caregivers. Further, patients were

  7. Social and clinical determinants of quality of life in Parkinson's disease in a Russian cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winter, Yaroslav; von Campenhausen, Sonja; Popov, Georgy; Reese, Jens P; Balzer-Geldsetzer, Monika; Kukshina, Anastasia; Zhukova, Tatyana V; Bertschi, Natalia; Bötzel, Kai; Gusev, Eugene; Oertel, Wolfgang H; Dodel, Richard; Guekht, Alla

    2010-05-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a chronic neurodegenerative disorder that has a major impact on health and longevity in Eastern countries. Studies investigating health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in Eastern European and Asian countries are scarce. The objective of this cross-sectional survey was to assess HRQoL in Russian patients with PD and identify its social and clinical determinants. The study included 100 outpatients with idiopathic PD and 100 controls. Patients were consecutively recruited from the neurological department of the Russian Medical State University in Moscow between October 2004 and December 2005. Regional healthy controls were matched for age and sex. The evaluation of HRQoL was performed using the EuroQol instrument (EQ-5D and EQ VAS). Disease severity was assessed using the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS). Multivariate regression analyses were used to identify independent determinants of HRQoL. HRQoL was more notably decreased in PD patients than in controls (98% versus 74% of individuals with moderate or severe problems in at least one dimension of the EQ-5D (p Western countries is predominately affected by clinical parameters, social factors play an important role in Eastern countries. Our data should be considered in the development of national healthcare programs that seek to provide better social services support for patients with PD. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. A comparative study of vascular injection fluids in fresh-frozen and embalmed human cadaver forearms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Doomernik, D.E.; Kruse, R.R.; Reijnen, M.M.; Kozicz, T.; Kooloos, J.G.M.

    2016-01-01

    Over the years, various vascular injection products have been developed to facilitate anatomical dissections. This study aimed to compare the most commonly used vascular injection products in fresh-frozen and formalin-embalmed cadaver specimens. An overview of the properties, advantages and

  9. STEREOLOGICAL STUDIES ON FETAL VASCULAR DEVELOPMENT IN HUMAN PLACENTAL VILLI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Terry M Mayhew

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available In human pregnancy, fetal well-being depends on the development of placental villi and the creation and maintenance of fetal microvessels within them. The aim of this study was to define stereological measures of the growth, capillarization and maturation of villi and of fetoplacental angiogenesis and capillary remodelling. Placentas were collected at 12-41 weeks of gestation and assigned to six age groups spanning equal age ranges. Tissue samples were randomised for position and orientation. Overall growth of peripheral (intermediate and terminal villi and their capillaries was evaluated using total volumes, surface areas and lengths. Measures of villous capillarization comprised capillary volume, surface and length densities and capillary:villus surface and length ratios. Size and shape remodelling of villi and capillaries was assessed using mean cross-sectional areas, perimeters and shape coefficients (perimeter2/area. Group comparisons were drawn by analysis of variance. Villous and capillary volumes, surfaces and lengths increased significantly throughout gestation. Villous maturation involved phasic (capillary:villus surface and length ratios or progressive (volume, surface and length densities increases in indices of villous capillarization. It also involved isomorphic thinning (cross-sectional areas and perimeters declined but shape coefficients did not alter. In contrast, growth of capillaries did not involve changes in luminal areas or perimeters. The results show that villous growth and fetal angiogenesis involve increases in overall length rather than calibre and that villous differentiation involves increased capillarization. Although they do not distinguish between increases in the lengths versus numbers of capillary segments, other studies have shown that capillaries switch from branching to non-branching angiogenesis during gestation. Combined with maintenance of capillary calibres, these processes will contribute to the reduced

  10. Emergence and evolution of social self-management of Parkinson's disease: study protocol for a 3-year prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tickle-Degnen, Linda; Saint-Hilaire, Marie; Thomas, Cathi A; Habermann, Barbara; Martinez, Linda S Sprague; Terrin, Norma; Noubary, Farzad; Naumova, Elena N

    2014-05-02

    Parkinson's disease affects facial, vocal and trunk muscles. As symptoms progress, facial expression becomes masked, limiting the person's ability to communicate emotions and intentions to others. As people with the disease live and reside in their homes longer, the burden of caregiving is unmitigated by social and emotional rewards provided by an expressive individual. Little is known about how adults living with Parkinson's disease manage their social lives and how an inability to be emotionally expressive can affect social connections and health. Because social networks have been shown to be crucial to the overall well-being of people living with chronic diseases, research is needed on how expressive capacity affects life trajectories and health. The overall objective is to understand the emergence and evolution of the trajectories of the self-management of the social lives of people living with Parkinson's disease. The central hypothesis is that expressive capacity predicts systematic change in the pattern of social self-management and quality of life outcomes. The specific aims of this 3-year longitudinal study of 120 people with the disease and a maximum of 120 care partners are: 1) characterize social self-management trajectories over a 3-year period; 2) estimate the degree to which expressive nonverbal capacity predicts the trajectory; and 3) determine the moderating effect of gender on the association between expressive capacity and change in social self-management. Each participant will be assessed 14 times to detect rapid and non-linear changes in social participation and management of social activities; social network; and social comfort, general health and well-being. This project will provide evidence to guide the development of interventions for supporting social integration of those living with Parkinson's disease, thus leading to improved overall health. It focuses on the novel construct of social self-management and known factors

  11. Iron in typical and atypical parkinsonism – Mössbauer spectroscopy and MRI studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuliński, R. [Bródno Hospital, MRI Lab (Poland); Bauminger, E. R. [Hebrew University, Racah Institute of Physics (Israel); Friedman, A. [Medical University of Warsaw, Department of Neurology (Poland); Duda, P.; Gałązka-Friedman, J., E-mail: jgfrie@if.pw.edu.pl [Warsaw University of Technology, Faculty of Physics (Poland)

    2016-12-15

    Iron may play important role in neurodegeneration. The results of comparative studies of human brain areas (control and pathological) performed by Mössbauer spectroscopy (MS) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques are presented. Mössbauer spectroscopy demonstrated a higher concentration of iron in atypical parkinsonism (progressive supranuclear palsy PSP) in the brain areas Substantia Nigra (SN) and Globus Pallidus (GP) involved in this pathological process, compared to control, while the concentration of iron in pathological tissues in typical parkinsonism (Parkinson’s disease - PD) did not differ from that in control. These results were compared with the changes in 1/T1 and 1/T2 (T1 and T2 being the relaxation times determined by MRI). A good linear correlation curve was found between the concentration of iron as determined by MS in different areas of control human brains and between 1/T1 and 1/T2. Whereas the finding in PSP-GP (the brain area involved in PSP) also fitted to such a correlation, this was not so for the correlation between pathological SN – the brain area involved in both diseases – and 1/T2, indicating a dependence of T2 on other factors than just the concentration of iron.

  12. 123I-β-CIT SPECT imaging study in early Parkinson's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Peiyong

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the loss of dopamine transporters in hemi-Parkinson's disease (PD) using 123 I-β-CIT/SPECT. Methods: Seven patients with hemi-Parkinson's disease and 7 age- and sex- matched healthy subjects were studied by 123 I-β-CIT/SPECT. Striatal specific uptake of 123 I-β-CIT was calculated in the ratio of striatal uptake to cerebellar uptake. Results: Mean striatal specific uptake of 123 I-β-CIT in healthy subjects was 3.0 +- 0.5 and 5.5 +- 0.6 at 3h and 18h after injection. Striatal specific uptake in contralateral to the clinical symptom side was 2.0 +- 0.8 and 3.1 +- 0.4; in ipsilateral striatum was 2.3 +- 0.4 and 4.0 +- 0.5. There was a significant reduction of striatal tracer uptake in PD patients compared to the controls. Patient age correlated with the reduction in contralateral striatum but did not correlate with that in ipsilateral striatum. Conclusions: Striatal dopamine transporters bilaterally lost in early PD patients. 123 I-β-CIT uptake in contralateral striatum was reduced more severely than in ipsilateral striatum

  13. Education and occupations preceding Parkinson disease: a population-based case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frigerio, R; Elbaz, A; Sanft, K R; Peterson, B J; Bower, J H; Ahlskog, J E; Grossardt, B R; de Andrade, M; Maraganore, D M; Rocca, W A

    2005-11-22

    To investigate the association of Parkinson disease (PD) with education and occupations using a case-control study design. The authors used the medical records-linkage system of the Rochester Epidemiology Project to identify all subjects who developed PD in Olmsted County, MN, from 1976 through 1995. Each incident case was matched by age (+/-1 year) and sex to a general population control. The authors collected information about education and occupations using two independent sources of data: a review of the complete medical records in the system and a telephone interview. Occupations were coded using the 1980 Standard Occupational Classification. Subjects with 9 or more years of education were at increased risk of PD (OR = 2.0; 95% CI = 1.1 to 3.6; p = 0.02), and there was a trend of increasing risk with increasing education (test for linear trend, p = 0.02; medical records data). Physicians were at significantly increased risk of PD using both sources of occupational data. By contrast, four occupational groups showed a significantly decreased risk of PD using one source of data: construction and extractive workers (e.g., miners, oil well drillers), production workers (e.g., machine operators, fabricators), metal workers, and engineers. These associations with increased or decreased risk did not change noticeably after adjustment for education. Subjects with higher education and physicians have an increased risk of Parkinson disease (PD), while subjects with some occupations presumed to involve high physical activity have a decreased risk of PD.

  14. Depression and care-dependency in Parkinson's disease: results from a nationwide study of 1449 outpatients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riedel, O; Dodel, R; Deuschl, G; Klotsche, J; Förstl, H; Heuser, I; Oertel, W; Reichmann, H; Riederer, P; Trenkwalder, C; Wittchen, H-U

    2012-06-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is frequently compounded by neuropsychiatric complications, increasing disability. The combined effect of motor and mental status on care-dependency in PD outpatients is not well characterized. We conducted a cross-sectional study of 1449 PD outpatients. The assessment comprised the Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS) and the diagnostic criteria for dementia. PD severity and treatment complications were rated using Hoehn and Yahr staging and the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) IV. The acknowledged level of care-dependency was documented. Care-dependency was present in 18.3% of all patients. A total of 13.9% had dementia, 18.8% had depression, and 14.3% had both. Regression analyses revealed increasing effects of age, PD duration, and PD severity on care-dependency in all three mental-disorder subgroups with the strongest effects in patients with depression only. Depressed patients with antidepressive treatment still had significantly higher PD severity, higher MADRS and UPDRS-IV scores but were not more likely to be care-dependent than non-depressed patients. Older age, longer duration and increased severity of PD contribute to care-dependency in patients with untreated depression. Treatment of depression is associated with lower rates of care-dependency. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Nondipping in Parkinson's Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Sita Sommer; Billur Aral-Becher; Wolfgang Jost

    2011-01-01

    Objective. The aim of this study was to identify patients with Parkinson's disease who showed loss or decrease of nocturnal blood pressure fall (nondipper patients) as a marker of autonomic dysfunction. Presence or absence of orthostatic hypotension was considered to investigate whether alterations in circadian blood pressure pattern are associated with posture-related dysregulation of blood pressure. Methods. 40 patients with Parkinson's disease underwent 24-hour blood pressure monitoring. 2...

  16. Somatization in Parkinson's Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carrozzino, Danilo; Bech, Per; Patierno, Chiara

    2017-01-01

    The current systematic review study is aimed at critically analyzing from a clinimetric viewpoint the clinical consequence of somatization in Parkinson's Disease (PD). By focusing on the International Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guidelines, we...... consequence of such psychiatric symptom should be further evaluated by replacing the clinically inadequate diagnostic label of psychogenic parkinsonism with the psychosomatic concept of persistent somatization as conceived by the Diagnostic Criteria for Psychosomatic Research (DCPR)....

  17. Parkinson's Foundation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the entire Parkinson's community. Learn more Get Involved Moving Day Walk Parkinson's Champions Create Your Own Fundraiser Advocate With ... one of our signature fundraising programs. Whether you walk with us at Moving Day®, run in a marathon or fundraise your ...

  18. Effects of interactive metronome training on postural stability and upper extremity function in Parkinson's disease: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Arim; Lee, Hye-Sun; Song, Chiang-Soon

    2017-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of interactive metronome training on the postural stability and upper extremity function of an individual with Parkinson's disease. [Subject and Methods] The participant of this case study was a 75-year-old female with Parkinson's disease diagnosed 7 years prior. This study was a single-subject research with an A-B-A design. She received IM training during the treatment phase (B phase) for 40 minutes per session. She was assessed pretest and posttest using the Berg balance scale and Wolf motor function test, and at baseline and the treatment phase using the measured box-and-block test and a Tetrax system. [Results] After training, the patient's static and dynamic balance, functional activity, and performance time of the upper extremity improved. Interactive metronome therapy improved the manual dexterity of both hands. Interactive metronome therapy also improved the limit of stability of the Parkinson's disease. [Conclusion] Though a case study, the results of this study suggest that IM therapy is effective at restoring the postural stability and upper extremity function of patients with Parkinson's disease.

  19. Complementary PET studies of striatal neuronal function in the differential diagnosis between multiple system atrophy and Parkinson's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Antonini, A; Leenders, KL; Vontobel, P; Maguire, RP; Missimer, J; Psylla, M; Gunther, [No Value

    1997-01-01

    We used PET with the tracers [F-18]fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG), [F-18]fluorodopa (FDOPA) and [C-11]raclopride (RACLO) to study striatal glucose and dopa metabolism, and dopamine D-2 receptor binding, respectively, in nine patients with multiple system atrophy. Ten patients with classical Parkinson's

  20. Frequency-selectivity of a thalamocortical relay neuron during Parkinson's disease and deep brain stimulation: a computational study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cagnan, Hayriye; Cagnan, H.; Meijer, Hil Gaétan Ellart; van Gils, Stephanus A.; Krupa, M.; Heida, Tjitske; Rudolph, Michelle; Wadman, Wyse J.; Martens, Hubert C.F.

    2009-01-01

    In this computational study, we investigated (i) the functional importance of correlated basal ganglia (BG) activity associated with Parkinson's disease (PD) motor symptoms by analysing the effects of globus pallidus internum (GPi) bursting frequency and synchrony on a thalamocortical (TC) relay

  1. Temporal dynamics of cortical and subcortical responses to apomorphine in Parkinson disease: an H2(15)O PET study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hosey, Lara A.; Thompson, Jennifer L. W.; Metman, Leonard Verhagen; van den Munckhof, Pepyn; Braun, Allen R.

    2005-01-01

    H2(15)O positron emission tomography (PET) was used to study the temporal course of central nervous system (CNS) responses to apomorphine in patients with idiopathic Parkinson disease (PD). Agonist-induced changes in regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) were evaluated within

  2. The Effects of Apomorphine on Visual Perception in Patients With Parkinson Disease and Visual Hallucinations : A Pilot Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geerligs, Linda; Meppelink, Anne Marthe; Brouwer, Wiebo H.; van Laar, Teus

    2009-01-01

    Visual hallucinations (VHs) often occur in patients with advanced Parkinson disease (PD). Overstimulation of dopamine receptors has been considered as one of the causes for VHs in PD. However, several clinical studies suggested that apomorphine infusion did not worsen existing VHs in PD, but could

  3. A Cross-Language Study of Acoustic Predictors of Speech Intelligibility in Individuals with Parkinson's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yunjung; Choi, Yaelin

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The present study aimed to compare acoustic models of speech intelligibility in individuals with the same disease (Parkinson's disease [PD]) and presumably similar underlying neuropathologies but with different native languages (American English [AE] and Korean). Method: A total of 48 speakers from the 4 speaker groups (AE speakers with…

  4. General Anesthesia versus Local Anesthesia in StereotaXY (GALAXY) for Parkinson's disease: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holewijn, R. A.; Verbaan, D.; de Bie, R. M. A.; Schuurman, P. R.

    2017-01-01

    Background: The aim of the study is to investigate if deep brain stimulation (DBS) in the subthalamic nucleus (STN) for Parkinson's disease (PD) under general anesthesia further improves outcome by lessening postoperative cognitive, mood, and behavioral adverse effects; shorten surgical time and

  5. Nano- and microstructured materials for in vitro studies of the physiology of vascular cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra M. Greiner

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The extracellular environment of vascular cells in vivo is complex in its chemical composition, physical properties, and architecture. Consequently, it has been a great challenge to study vascular cell responses in vitro, either to understand their interaction with their native environment or to investigate their interaction with artificial structures such as implant surfaces. New procedures and techniques from materials science to fabricate bio-scaffolds and surfaces have enabled novel studies of vascular cell responses under well-defined, controllable culture conditions. These advancements are paving the way for a deeper understanding of vascular cell biology and materials–cell interaction. Here, we review previous work focusing on the interaction of vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs and endothelial cells (ECs with materials having micro- and nanostructured surfaces. We summarize fabrication techniques for surface topographies, materials, geometries, biochemical functionalization, and mechanical properties of such materials. Furthermore, various studies on vascular cell behavior and their biological responses to micro- and nanostructured surfaces are reviewed. Emphasis is given to studies of cell morphology and motility, cell proliferation, the cytoskeleton and cell-matrix adhesions, and signal transduction pathways of vascular cells. We finalize with a short outlook on potential interesting future studies.

  6. Artefactual subcortical hyperperfusion in PET studies normalized to global mean: lessons from Parkinson's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borghammer, Per; Cumming, Paul; Aanerud, Joel

    2008-01-01

    not be detected with present instrumentation and typically-used sample sizes. CONCLUSION: Imposing focal decreases on cortical CBF in conjunction with global mean normalization gives rise to spurious relative CBF increases in all of the regions reported to be hyperactive in PD. Since no PET study has reported......AIM: Recent studies of Parkinson's disease (PD) report subcortical increases of cerebral blood flow (CBF) or cerebral metabolic rate of glucose (CMRglc), after conventional normalization to the global mean. However, if the global mean CBF or CMRglc is decreased in the PD group, this normalization...... necessarily generates artificial relative increases in regions unaffected by the disease. This potential bias may explain the reported subcortical increases in PD. To test this hypothesis, we performed simulations with manipulation and subsequently analysis of sets of quantitative CBF maps by voxel...

  7. A deformation-based morphometry study of patients with early-stage Parkinson's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borghammer, P; Østergaard, Karen; Cumming, P

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Previous volumetric magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies of Parkinson's disease (PD) utilized primarily voxel-based morphometry (VBM), and investigated mostly patients with moderate- to late-stage disease. We now use deformation-based morphometry (DBM), a method...... purported to be more sensitive than VBM, to test for atrophy in patients with early-stage PD. METHODS: T1-weighted MRI images from 24 early-stage PD patients and 26 age-matched normal control subjects were compared using DBM. Two separate studies were conducted, where two minimally-biased nonlinear...... intensity-average were created; one for all subjects and another for just the PD patients. The DBM technique creates an average population-based MRI-average in an iterative hierarchical fashion. The nonlinear transformations estimated to match each subject to the MRI-average were then analysed. RESULTS...

  8. Is isoproterenol really required during electrophysiological study in patients with Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauriah, Maheshwar; Cismaru, Gabriel; Sellal, Jean-Marc; De Chillou, Christian; Brembilla-Perrot, Béatrice

    2013-01-01

    We have studied the results of electrophysiological study (EPS) in patients with Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome (WPW) and spontaneous adverse clinical presentation and determined whether isoproterenol added incremental value. EPS was performed in 63 patients with WPW and adverse clinical presentation at baseline. EPS was repeated after infusion of isoproterenol in 37 patients, including 25 without criteria for a malignant form at baseline. Atrioventricular orthodromic tachycardia was induced 44%, antidromic tachycardia in 11%, atrial fibrillation (AF) in 68% at baseline. At baseline EPS, criteria for a malignant form (AF induction and shortest CL <250 ms) were noted in 60%; tachycardia was not inducible in 16%. All the patients met the criteria for a malignant form after isoproterenol. EPS at baseline missed 16% of patients at risk of life-threatening arrhythmias who had no inducible tachyarrhythmia and 40% without classical criteria for malignant form. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Sleep dysfunctions influence decision making in undemented Parkinson's disease patients: a study in a virtual supermarket.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albani, Giovanni; Raspelli, Simona; Carelli, Laura; Priano, Lorenzo; Pignatti, Riccardo; Morganti, Francesca; Gaggioli, Andrea; Weiss, Patrice L; Kizony, Rachel; Katz, Noomi; Mauro, Alessandro; Riva, Giuseppe

    2011-01-01

    In the early-middle stages of Parkinson's disease (PD), polysomnographic studies show early alterations of the structure of the sleep, which may explain frequent symptoms reported by patients, such as daytime drowsiness, loss of attention and concentration, feeling of tiredness. The aim of this study was to verify if there is a correlation between the sleep dysfunction and decision making ability. We used a Virtual Reality version of the Multiple Errand Test (VMET), developed using the NeuroVR free software (http://www.neurovr2.org), to evaluate decision-making ability in 12 PD not-demented patients and 14 controls. Five of our not-demented 12 PD patients showed abnormalities in the polysomnographic recordings associated to significant differences in the VMET performance.

  10. Natural History of Parkinson's Disease in the Province of Segovia: Disability in a 20 Years Longitudinal Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duarte, Jacinto; García Olmos, Luis Miguel; Mendoza, Amelia; Martínez Pueyo, Ángel; Clavería, Luis Erik

    2015-01-01

    Parkinson's disease mainly affects the elderly population causing a progressive functional disability with motor, psychic, and cognitive deterioration. This study was carried out to evaluate disability caused by Parkinson's disease by analyzing the median time to reach Hoehn and Yahr stage III and to investigate predictor variables based on a 20-year longitudinal follow-up study. We examined 273 patients with Parkinson's disease recruited between 1978 and 1998. We performed a survival analysis using the Kaplan-Meier method to determine the time to disability and we used a Cox regression model to adjust prognosis factors. The median time to reach Hoehn and Yahr stage III was 7.73 years (95% CI: 5.95-8.05). Independent predictors of disability were: age at onset, the hazard ratio (HR) = 1.10, 95% CI: 1.08-1.12; UPDRS II (activities of daily living) HR = 1.08, 95% CI: 1.03-1.14; and akinesia and rigidity at onset HR = 1.55, 95% CI: 1.07-2.24. Patients with Parkinson's disease evolve gradually toward disability, and prognostic factors of this evolution were identified. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  11. Parkinson's Disease Videos

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    Full Text Available ... Expert Briefings: Anxiety in Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Nutrition and Parkinson's Disease NY Nightly News with Chuck ... Briefings: What's in the Parkinson's Pipeline? Expert Briefings: Nutrition and Parkinson's Disease 2010 Expert Briefings: Legal Issues: ...

  12. Parkinson's Disease Dementia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Find your local chapter Join our online community Parkinson's Disease Dementia Parkinson's disease dementia is an impairment ... disease. About Symptoms Diagnosis Causes & risks Treatments About Parkinson's disease dementia The brain changes caused by Parkinson's ...

  13. Parkinson's Disease Videos

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    Full Text Available ... What Is the Helpline? Unconditional Love How Does Speech Therapy Help Parkinson's Patients? CareMAP: Rest and Sleep: ... Parkinson's Mid-Stride: A Treatment Guide to Parkinson's Speech and Swallowing Psychosis: A Mind Guide to Parkinson's ...

  14. Parkinson's Disease Videos

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    Full Text Available ... Care Partners CareMAP: Preparing Paid Caregivers How Does Speech Therapy Help Parkinson's Patients? What Are Some Tips ... Parkinson's Mid-Stride: A Treatment Guide to Parkinson's Speech and Swallowing Psychosis: A Mind Guide to Parkinson's ...

  15. Parkinson's Disease Videos

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    Full Text Available ... Moving Day Walker Support a Parkinson's Champion Bequests & Planned Giving Shop More Ways to Give Ways to ... Late Stage Parkinson's Expert Briefings: Impulsive and Compulsive Behaviors in Parkinson's Expert Briefings: Complementary Approaches to Parkinson's ...

  16. Parkinson's Disease Videos

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    Full Text Available ... Fatigue, Sleep Disorders and Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: What's in the Parkinson's Pipeline? Expert Briefings: Nutrition and Parkinson's Disease 2010 Expert Briefings: Legal Issues: Planning Ahead When You are Living with Parkinson's Expert ...

  17. Parkinson's Disease Videos

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    Full Text Available ... Parkinson's Disease: One Voice, Many Listeners Expert Briefings: Medical Therapies: What's in the Parkinson's Pipeline? Expert Briefings: Under-recognized Nonmotor Symptoms of Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Gait, Balance and Falls in Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Coping ...

  18. Parkinson's Disease Videos

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    Full Text Available ... a Fundraiser Understanding Parkinson's What Is Parkinson's? Causes & Statistics Early Signs Movement Symptoms Non-Movement Symptoms Diagnosis ... Solutions: Innovations in PD Nurse Education CareMAP: Managing Advanced Parkinson's Website Nurse Webinars: Nursing Solutions: Improving Parkinson's ...

  19. History of Bioelectrical Study and the Electrophysiology of the Primo Vascular System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sang Hyun Park

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Primo vascular system is a new anatomical structure whose research results have reported the possibility of a new circulatory system similar to the blood vascular system and cells. Electrophysiology, which measures and analyzes bioelectrical signals tissues and cells, is an important research area for investigating the function of tissues and cells. The bioelectrical study of the primo vascular system has been reported by using modern techniques since the early 1960s by Bonghan Kim. This paper reviews the research result of the electrophysiological study of the primo vascular system for the discussion of the circulatory function. We hope it would help to study the electrophysiology of the primo vascular system for researchers. This paper will use the following exchangeable expressions: Kyungrak system = Bonghan system = Bonghan circulatory system = primo vascular system = primo system; Bonghan corpuscle = primo node; Bonghan duct = primo vessel. We think that objective descriptions of reviewed papers are more important than unified expressions when citing the papers. That said, this paper will unify the expressions of the primo vascular system.

  20. ICARUS study: prevalence and clinical features of impulse control disorders in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonini, Angelo; Barone, Paolo; Bonuccelli, Ubaldo; Annoni, Karin; Asgharnejad, Mahnaz; Stanzione, Paolo

    2017-04-01

    Impulse control disorders/other compulsive behaviours ('ICD behaviours') occur in Parkinson's disease (PD), but prospective studies are scarce, and prevalence and clinical characteristics of patients are insufficiently defined. To assess the presence of ICD behaviours over a 2-year period, and evaluate patients' clinical characteristics. A prospective, non-interventional, multicentre study (ICARUS (Impulse Control disorders And the association of neuRopsychiatric symptoms, cognition and qUality of life in ParkinSon disease); SP0990) in treated Italian PD outpatients. Study visits: baseline, year 1, year 2. Surrogate primary variable: presence of ICD behaviours and five ICD subtypes assessed by modified Minnesota Impulsive Disorder Interview (mMIDI). 1069/1095 (97.6%) patients comprised the Full Analysis Set. Point prevalence of ICD behaviours (mMIDI; primary analysis) was stable across visits: 28.6% (306/1069) at baseline, 29.3% (292/995) at year 1, 26.5% (245/925) at year 2. The most prevalent subtype was compulsive eating, followed by punding, compulsive sexual behaviour, gambling and buying disorder. Patients who were ICD positive at baseline were more likely to be male, younger, younger at PD onset, have longer disease duration, more severe non-motor symptoms (including mood and sexual function), depressive symptoms, sleep impairment and poorer PD-related quality of life. However, they did not differ from the ICD-negative patients in their severity of PD functional disability, motor performance and cognitive function. Prevalence of ICD behaviours was relatively stable across the 2-year observational period. ICD-positive patients had more severe depression, poorer sleep quality and reduced quality of life. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  1. Unrecognized vitamin D3 deficiency is common in Parkinson disease: Harvard Biomarker Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Hongliu; Dhima, Kaltra; Lockhart, Kaitlin C; Locascio, Joseph J; Hoesing, Ashley N; Duong, Karen; Trisini-Lipsanopoulos, Ana; Hayes, Michael T; Sohur, U Shivraj; Wills, Anne-Marie; Mollenhauer, Brit; Flaherty, Alice W; Hung, Albert Y; Mejia, Nicte; Khurana, Vikram; Gomperts, Stephen N; Selkoe, Dennis J; Schwarzschild, Michael A; Schlossmacher, Michael G; Hyman, Bradley T; Sudarsky, Lewis R; Growdon, John H; Scherzer, Clemens R

    2013-10-22

    To conclusively test for a specific association between the biological marker 25-hydroxy-vitamin D3, a transcriptionally active hormone produced in human skin and liver, and the prevalence and severity of Parkinson disease (PD). We used liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry to establish an association specifically between deficiency of 25-hydroxy-vitamin D3 and PD in a cross-sectional and longitudinal case-control study of 388 patients (mean Hoehn and Yahr stage of 2.1 ± 0.6) and 283 control subjects free of neurologic disease nested in the Harvard Biomarker Study. Plasma levels of 25-hydroxy-vitamin D3 were associated with PD in both univariate and multivariate analyses with p values = 0.0034 and 0.047, respectively. Total 25-hydroxy-vitamin D levels, the traditional composite measure of endogenous and exogenous vitamin D, were deficient in 17.6% of patients with PD compared with 9.3% of controls. Low 25-hydroxy-vitamin D3 as well as total 25-hydroxy-vitamin D levels were correlated with higher total Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale scores at baseline and during follow-up. Our study reveals an association between 25-hydroxy-vitamin D3 and PD and suggests that thousands of patients with PD in North America alone may be vitamin D-deficient. This finding has immediate relevance for individual patients at risk of falls as well as public health, and warrants further investigation into the mechanism underlying this association.

  2. Satisfaction with Life Scale (SLS-6): First validation study in Parkinson's disease population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambrosio, Leire; Portillo, Mari Carmen; Rodriguez-Blazquez, Carmen; Martínez-Castrillo, Juan Carlos; Rodriguez-Violante, Mayela; Serrano-Dueñas, Marcos; Campos-Arillo, Víctor; Garretto, Nelida Susana; Arakaki, Tomoko; Álvarez, Mario; Pedroso-Ibáñez, Ivonne; Carvajal, Ana; Martinez-Martin, Pablo

    2016-04-01

    To explore the psychometric attributes of a new Satisfaction with Life Scale (SLS-6) in a wide Spanish-speaking population with Parkinson's disease (PD). This was an international, cross-sectional study. Several rater-based and patient-reported outcomes measures for evaluation of PD (e.g., Scales for Outcomes in Parkinson's Disease-Motor) and other constructs (e.g., Duke-UNC Functional Social Support Questionnaire, Scale for Living with Chronic Illness) were applied together with the SLS-6. Acceptability, scaling assumptions, reliability, precision, and construct validity were tested. The study included 324 patients from five countries, with age (mean ± standard deviation) 66.67 ± 10.68 years. None of the SLS-6 items had missing values and all acceptability parameters fulfilled the standard criteria. Scaling assumptions allowed the calculation of a summary index from items 2 to 6, complementary to the global evaluation (item 1). For these five items, Cronbach's alpha was 0.85; the corrected item-total correlation 0.53-0.73; inter-item correlation, 0.45-0.70, with an item homogeneity index of 0.55. The standard error of measurement, based on Cronbach's alpha for a single observation, was 3.48. SLS-6 correlations were moderate to strong (rs ≥ 0.35) with the patient-reported outcomes and weak to moderate with the rater-based assessments used in the study. The SLS-6 total score was significantly different according to PD severity levels established according to Hoehn and Yahr staging, Clinical Impression of Severity Index, and Patient-Based Global Impression of Severity scale. The results suggest that SLS-6 is an easy, feasible, acceptable, consistent, precise and valid measure to evaluate satisfaction with life in PD patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Impact of gender and genetics on emotion processing in Parkinson's disease - A multimodal study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Heller

    Full Text Available Background: Parkinson's disease (PD has been suggested to affect males and females differently. Neuropsychiatric symptoms are common and disabling in PD. However, previous studies focusing on emotion recognition in PD have neglected the confounder of gender and lack evidence on the underlying endocrinal and genetic mechanisms. Moreover, while there are many imaging studies on emotion processing in PD, gender-related analyses of neural data are scarce. We therefore aimed at exploring the interplay of the named factors on emotion recognition and processing in PD. Methods: 51 non-demented PD patients (26 male and 44 age- and gender-matched healthy controls (HC; 25 male were examined clinically and neuropsychologically including an emotion recognition task (Ekman 60faces test. A subsample of 25 patients and 31 HC underwent task-based functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI comprised of videos of emotional facial expressions. To examine the impact of hormones and genetics on emotion processing, blood samples were taken for endocrinal (testosterone, estradiol, progesterone and genetic testing (5-HTTLPR, Val158Met COMT polymorphisms. Results: No group or gender differences emerged regarding cognitive abilities. Male but not female PD patients exhibited confined impairments in recognizing the emotion anger accompanied by diminished neural response to facial expressions (e.g. in the putamen and insula. Endocrinologically, fear recognition was positively correlated with estrogen levels in female patients, while on the genetic level we found an effect of Val158Met COMT genotype on the recognition of fear in PD patients. Conclusions: Our study provides evidence that impaired emotion processing in PD specifically affects male patients, and that hormones and genetics contribute to emotion recognition performance. Further research on the underlying neural, endocrinological and genetic mechanisms of specific symptoms in PD is of clinical relevance, as it

  4. Home-based balance training programme using Wii Fit with balance board for Parkinsons's disease: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esculier, Jean-Francois; Vaudrin, Joanie; Bériault, Patrick; Gagnon, Karine; Tremblay, Louis E

    2012-02-01

    To evaluate the effects of a home-based balance training programme using visual feedback (Nintendo Wii Fit game with balance board) on balance and functional abilities in subjects with Parkinson's disease, and to compare the effects with a group of paired healthy subjects. Ten subjects with moderate Parkinson's disease and 8 healthy elderly subjects. Subjects participated in a 6-week home-based balance training programme using Nintendo Wii Fit and balance board. Baseline measures were taken before training for the Sit-to-Stand test (STST), Timed-Up-and-Go (TUG), Tinetti Performance Oriented Mobility Assessment (POMA), 10-m walk test, Community Balance and Mobility assessment (CBM), Activities-specific Balance and Confidence scale (ABC), unipodal stance duration, and a force platform. All measurements were taken again after 3 and 6 weeks of training. The Parkinson's disease group significantly improved their results in TUG, STST, unipodal stance, 10-m walk test, CBM, POMA and force platform at the end of the 6-week training programme. The healthy subjects group significantly improved in TUG, STST, unipodal stance and CBM. This pilot study suggests that a home-based balance programme using Wii Fit with balance board could improve static and dynamic balance, mobility and functional abilities of people affected by Parkinson's disease.

  5. Challenges and strategies of medication adherence in Parkinson's disease: A qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Ju Young; Habermann, Barbara; Pretzer-Aboff, Ingrid

    2015-01-01

    Little is known about strategies used by people with Parkinson's disease (PD) to facilitate medication adherence in the U.S. The purpose of this study was to describe challenges in adherence to medication regimens and to identify strategies used to facilitate adherence to medication regimens. A qualitative research design was used to interview sixteen community-dwelling people with PD and five caregivers. Data analysis was performed using content analysis. The majority of the participants (81.3%) reported decreased adherence to medication regimens. Seven themes emerged from the data. The main challenges of medication adherence included medication responses, cost of medications, and forgetfulness. Strategies used to facilitate adherence to medication regimens included seeking knowledge about antiparkinsonian medications, seeking advice from family and friends, use of devices, and use of reminders. These findings may be important in formulating interventions to improve adherence to medication regimens for people living with PD. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. The hTH-GFP reporter rat model for the study of Parkinson's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorraine Iacovitti

    Full Text Available Parkinson disease (PD is the second leading neurodegenerative disease in the US. As there is no known cause or cure for PD, researchers continue to investigate disease mechanisms and potential new therapies in cell culture and in animal models of PD. In PD, one of the most profoundly affected neuronal populations is the tyrosine hydroxylase (TH-expressing dopaminergic (DA neurons of the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc. These DA-producing neurons undergo degeneration while neighboring DA-producing cells of the ventral tegmental area (VTA are largely spared. To aid in these studies, The Michael J. Fox Foundation (MJFF partnered with Thomas Jefferson University and Taconic Inc. to generate new transgenic rat lines carrying the human TH gene promoter driving EGFP using a 11 kb construct used previously to create a hTH-GFP mouse reporter line. Of the five rat founder lines that were generated, three exhibited high level specific GFP fluorescence in DA brain structures (ie. SN, VTA, striatum, olfactory bulb, hypothalamus. As with the hTH-GFP mouse, none of the rat lines exhibit reporter expression in adrenergic structures like the adrenal gland. Line 12141, with its high levels of GFP in adult DA brain structures and minimal ectopic GFP expression in non-DA structures, was characterized in detail. We show here that this line allows for anatomical visualization and microdissection of the rat midbrain into SNpc and/or VTA, enabling detailed analysis of midbrain DA neurons and axonal projections after toxin treatment in vivo. Moreover, we further show that embryonic SNpc and/or VTA neurons, enriched by microdissection or FACS, can be used in culture or transplant studies of PD. Thus, the hTH-GFP reporter rat should be a valuable tool for Parkinson's disease research.

  7. Impulse control disorder in patients with Parkinson's disease under dopamine agonist therapy: a multicentre study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Ruiz, Pedro J; Martinez Castrillo, Juan Carlos; Alonso-Canovas, Araceli; Herranz Barcenas, Antonio; Vela, Lydia; Sanchez Alonso, Pilar; Mata, Marina; Olmedilla Gonzalez, Nuria; Mahillo Fernandez, Ignacio

    2014-08-01

    Impulse control disorders (ICDs) encompass a wide spectrum of abnormal behaviour frequently found in cases of Parkinson's disease (PD) treated with dopamine agonists (DAs). The main aim of this study was to analyse ICD prevalence with different DAs. We carried out a multicentre transversal study to evaluate the presence of ICDs in patients with PD chronically treated (>6 months) with a single non-ergolinic DA (pramipexole, ropinirole, or rotigotine). Clinical assessment of ICD was performed using the Questionnaire for Impulsive-Compulsive Disorders in Parkinson's disease. Thirty-nine per cent of patients (91/233) fulfilled the clinical criteria for ICD. The group of patients with ICD symptoms (ICD+) differed from those without ICD symptoms (ICD-) in younger age and type of DA intake. Oral DA treatment (pramipexole and ropinirole) was associated with higher risk of ICDs compared with transdermal DA (rotigotine): 84/197 (42%) patients treated with oral DA developed ICD, versus 7/36 (19%) patients treated with transdermal DA (Fisher's exact text <0.01). In univariate analysis, a younger age (p<0.01), treatment with rasagiline (p<0.05), and especially treatment with an oral DA (pramipexole or ropinirole) (p<0.01) were significantly associated with ICD. Multivariate analysis confirmed that oral DA remained significantly associated with ICD (p: 0.014, OR: 3.14; 1.26-7.83). ICD was significantly associated with the use of the non-ergolinic oral DA (pramipexole and ropinirole) when compared with transdermal non-ergolinic DA (rotigotine). Since pramipexole, ropinirole and rotigotine are non-ergolinic DAs with very similar pharmacodynamic profiles, it is likely that other factors including route of administration (transdermal vs oral) explain the difference in risk of ICD development. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  8. Effects of rasagiline on freezing of gait in Parkinson's disease - an open-label, multicenter study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cibulcik, Frantisek; Benetin, Jan; Kurca, Egon; Grofik, Milan; Dvorak, Miloslav; Richter, Denis; Donath, Vladimir; Kothaj, Jan; Minar, Michal; Valkovic, Peter

    2016-12-01

    Freezing of gait is a disabling symptom in advanced Parkinson's disease. Positive effects have been suggested with MAO-B inhibitors. We report on an open label clinical study on the efficacy of rasagiline as add-on therapy on freezing of gait and quality of life in patients with Parkinson's disease. Forty two patients with freezing of gait were treated with 1 mg rasagiline daily as an add-on therapy. Patients were assessed at baseline and after 1, 2 and 3 months of treatment. Freezing of gait severity was assessed using the Freezing of Gait Questionnaire, motor impairment by the modified MDS UPDRS part III, and quality of life using the PDQ-39 questionnaire. Patients treated with rasagiline had a statistically significant decrease in FoG-Q score and modified MDS UPDRS score after 1, 2 and 3 months of therapy. A moderately strong (r = 0.686, P = 0.002) correlation between the effects on mobility and freezing of gait was found. We also observed a statistically significant improvement in global QoL and in the subscales mobility, ADL, stigma and bodily discomfort in patients after 3 months of rasagiline therapy. A significant correlation (r = 0.570, P = 0.02) between baseline FoG-Q score and the baseline score for the PDQ Mobility subscale was found. In our study rasagiline as add-on antiparkinsonian therapy significantly improved mobility, freezing of gait and quality of life. The positive effect on freezing of gait appears to be related to improvement of mobility.

  9. Validity and Reliability Study of the Korean Tinetti Mobility Test for Parkinson's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jinse; Koh, Seong-Beom; Kim, Hee Jin; Oh, Eungseok; Kim, Joong-Seok; Yun, Ji Young; Kwon, Do-Young; Kim, Younsoo; Kim, Ji Seon; Kwon, Kyum-Yil; Park, Jeong-Ho; Youn, Jinyoung; Jang, Wooyoung

    2018-01-01

    Postural instability and gait disturbance are the cardinal symptoms associated with falling among patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). The Tinetti mobility test (TMT) is a well-established measurement tool used to predict falls among elderly people. However, the TMT has not been established or widely used among PD patients in Korea. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the reliability and validity of the Korean version of the TMT for PD patients. Twenty-four patients diagnosed with PD were enrolled in this study. For the interrater reliability test, thirteen clinicians scored the TMT after watching a video clip. We also used the test-retest method to determine intrarater reliability. For concurrent validation, the unified Parkinson's disease rating scale, Hoehn and Yahr staging, Berg Balance Scale, Timed-Up and Go test, 10-m walk test, and gait analysis by three-dimensional motion capture were also used. We analyzed receiver operating characteristic curve to predict falling. The interrater reliability and intrarater reliability of the Korean Tinetti balance scale were 0.97 and 0.98, respectively. The interrater reliability and intra-rater reliability of the Korean Tinetti gait scale were 0.94 and 0.96, respectively. The Korean TMT scores were significantly correlated with the other clinical scales and three-dimensional motion capture. The cutoff values for predicting falling were 14 points (balance subscale) and 10 points (gait subscale). We found that the Korean version of the TMT showed excellent validity and reliability for gait and balance and had high sensitivity and specificity for predicting falls among patients with PD.

  10. Prospective study on cost-effectiveness of home-based motor assessment in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cubo, E; Mariscal, N; Solano, B; Becerra, V; Armesto, D; Calvo, S; Arribas, J; Seco, J; Martinez, A; Zorrilla, L; Heldman, D

    2017-02-01

    Introduction Treatment adjustments in Parkinson's disease (PD) are in part dependent on motor assessments. The aim of this study was to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of home-based motor monitoring plus standard in-office visits versus in-office visits alone in patients with advanced PD. Methods The procedures consisted of a prospective, one-year follow-up, randomized, case-control study. A total of 40 patients with advanced PD were randomized into two groups: 20 patients underwent home-based motor monitoring by using wireless motion sensor technology, while the other 20 patients had in-office visits. Motor and non-motor symptom severities, quality of life, neuropsychiatric symptoms, and comorbidities were assessed every four months. Direct costs were assessed using a standardized questionnaire. Cost-effectiveness was assessed using the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER). Results Both groups of PD patients were largely comparable in their clinical and demographic variables at baseline; however, there were more participants using levodopa-carbidopa intestinal gel in the home-based motor monitoring group. There was a trend for lower Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale functional status (UPDRS II) scores in the patients monitored at home compared to the standard clinical follow-up ( p = 0.06). However, UPDRS parts I, III, IV and quality-adjusted life-years scores were similar between both groups. Home-based motor monitoring was cost-effective in terms of improvement of functional status, motor severity, and motor complications (UPDRS II, III; IV subscales), with an ICER/UPDRS ranging from €126.72 to €701.31, respectively. Discussion Home-based motor monitoring is a tool which collects cost-effective clinical information and helps augment health care for patients with advanced PD.

  11. Laterality Influences Brain Atrophy in Parkinson's Disease - a Voxel-based Morphometry Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Cristina Arci Santos

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Several neuroimaging studies revealed widespread neurodegeneration in Parkinson's disease but only few considered the asymmetrical clinical presentation. Objective: To investigate gray matter (GM atrophy in Parkinson Disease considering the side of motor symptom onset. Methods: Sixty patients (57.87± 10.27 years diagnosed according to the Brain Bank criteria, 26 with right-sided disease onset (RDO and 34 with left-sided disease onset (LDO, were compared to 80 healthy controls (HC (57.1± 9.47 years. T1-weighted images were acquired on a 3T scanner. VBM8 (SPM8/Dartel on Matlab R2012b platform processed and analyzed the images. Statistics included a two-sample test (FWE p<0.05 with extent threshold of 20 voxels. In a secondary analysis, we used MRIcro software to flip the images right/left of 25 patients, which had a RDO, so that all images had the contralateral side of disease onset at the right hemisphere. Thirty-five HC images were flipped, as the hemispheres are not completely equivalent. Results: Compared to HC, GM atrophy in LDO was identified in the insula, putamen, anterior cingulate, frontotemporal cortex and right caudate. For the RDO group, anterior cingulate, insula, frontotemporal and occipital cortex. VBM of total brain-flipped images showed GM loss mainly in the left putamen, left olfactory cortex, amygdala, parahipocampal gyrus and in the rectus gyrus, insula, frontotemporal cortex, cuneus, precuneus and calcarine fissure bilaterally. (p<0.05 FWE corrected. Conclusions: The study revealed widespread GM atrophy in PD, predominantly in the left hemisphere. Future investigations should also consider handedness and side of onset to better characterize cerebral involvement and its progression in PD.

  12. Medical records documentation of constipation preceding Parkinson disease: A case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savica, R; Carlin, J M; Grossardt, B R; Bower, J H; Ahlskog, J E; Maraganore, D M; Bharucha, A E; Rocca, W A

    2009-11-24

    Parkinson disease (PD) may affect the autonomic nervous system and may cause constipation; however, few studies have explored constipation preceding the motor onset of PD. We investigated constipation preceding PD using a case-control study design in a population-based sample. Using the medical records-linkage system of the Rochester Epidemiology Project, we identified 196 subjects who developed PD in Olmsted County, MN, from 1976 through 1995. Each incident case was matched by age (+/-1 year) and sex to a general population control. We reviewed the complete medical records of cases and controls in the medical records-linkage system to ascertain the occurrence of constipation preceding the onset of PD (or index year). Constipation preceding PD or the index year was more common in cases than in controls (odds ratio [OR] 2.48; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.49 to 4.11; p = 0.0005). This association remained significant after adjusting for smoking and coffee consumption (ever vs never), and after excluding constipation possibly induced by drugs. In addition, the association remained significant in analyses restricted to constipation documented 20 or more years before the onset of motor symptoms of PD. Although the association was stronger in women than in men and in patients with PD with rest tremor compared with patients with PD without rest tremor, these differences were not significant. Our findings suggest that constipation occurring as early as 20 or more years before the onset of motor symptoms is associated with an increased risk of Parkinson disease.

  13. Heritability of retinal vascular fractals: a twin study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vergmann, Anna Stage; Broe, Rebecca; Kessel, Line

    . The retinal vascular fractal dimension was measured using the box-counting method and compared within monozygotic and dizygotic twin pairs using Pearson correlation coefficents. Falconer´s formula and quantitative genetic models were used to determine the genetic component of variation. Results: The retinal...... for quantitative analysis of heritability. The intrapair correlation was markedly higher (0.505, p=0.0002) in monozygotic twins than in dizygotic twins (0.108, p=0.46), corresponding to a heritability h2 for the fractal dimension of 0.79. In quantitative genetic models, 54% of the variation was explained...

  14. Nano- and microstructured materials for in vitro studies of the physiology of vascular cells

    OpenAIRE

    Alexandra M. Greiner; Adria Sales; Hao Chen; Sarah A. Biela; Dieter Kaufmann; Ralf Kemkemer

    2016-01-01

    The extracellular environment of vascular cells in vivo is complex in its chemical composition, physical properties, and architecture. Consequently, it has been a great challenge to study vascular cell responses in vitro, either to understand their interaction with their native environment or to investigate their interaction with artificial structures such as implant surfaces. New procedures and techniques from materials science to fabricate bio-scaffolds and surfaces have enabled novel studi...

  15. Sleep disorders and an increased risk of Parkinson's disease in individuals with non-apnea sleep disorders: a population-based cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsiao, Yi-Han; Chen, Yung-Tai; Tseng, Ching-Ming; Wu, Li-An; Perng, Diahn-Warng; Chen, Yuh-Min; Chen, Tzeng-Ji; Chang, Shi-Chuan; Chou, Kun-Ta

    2017-10-01

    Sleep disorders are common non-motor symptoms in patients with Parkinson's disease. Our study aims to explore the relationship between non-apnea sleep disorders and future Parkinson's disease. This is a cohort study using a nationwide database. The participants were recruited from the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database between 2000 and 2003. A total of 91 273 adult patients who had non-apnea sleep disorders without pre-existing Parkinson's disease were enrolled. An age-, gender-, income-, urbanization- and Charlson comorbidity index score-matched control cohort consisting of 91 273 participants was selected for comparison. The two cohorts were followed for the occurrence of Parkinson's disease, death or until the end of 2010, whichever came first. The Kaplan-Meier analyses revealed patients with non-apnea sleep disorders tended to develop Parkinson's disease (log-rank test, P sleep disorders was an independent risk factor for the development of Parkinson's disease [crude hazard ratio: 1.63, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.54-1.73, P sleep disorders, especially chronic insomnia, are associated with a higher risk for future Parkinson's disease. © 2017 European Sleep Research Society.

  16. Autoimmune disease and risk for Parkinson disease A population-based case-control study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rugbjerg, K.; Friis, S.; Ritz, B.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: Inflammatory mediators are increased in autoimmune diseases and may activate microglia and might cause an inflammatory state and degeneration of dopaminergic neurons in the brain. Thus, we evaluated whether having an autoimmune disease increases the risk for developing Parkinson disease...... do not support the hypothesis that autoimmune diseases increase the risk for Parkinson disease. The decreased risk observed among patients with rheumatoid arthritis might be explained by underdiagnosis of movement disorders such as Parkinson disease in this patient group or by a protective effect...

  17. SPECT imaging of dopaminergic system: a preliminary study of nine patients with clinically uncertain Parkinsonism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dey, S. K.; Gopinath, G.; Buscombe, J. R.

    2004-01-01

    Parkinsonism is the result of various neuro degenerative disorders, the common and related causes are Parkinson's disease (PD), multiple system atrophy (MSA) and progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP). In each of these three causes, there is degeneration of presynaptic neurons in corpus striatum. Nine patients having clinically uncertain parkinsonian symptoms undergone brain SPECT imaging using the tracer (I-123 Ioflupane) that binds to dopamine transporter (DaT) in the pre-synaptic nerve terminals in basal ganglia. There was significantly decreased tracer uptake in the tail (putamen) portion of basal ganglia in five patients confirming presence of presynaptic neuro degeneration and reported as parkinsonism. Three patients revealed normal tracer uptake with one equivocal result. DaT imaging can effectively confirm parkinsonism and discriminate from normal subjects as well as other clinical simulators like essential tremor and dopa-responsive dystonia where no neuro degeneration occur.(author)

  18. Revascularization of femoral head ischemic necrosis with vascularized bone graft: A CT scan experimental study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez del Pino, J.; Knapp, K.; Gomez Castresana, F.; Benito, M.

    1990-01-01

    An ischemic necrosis of the femoral head was induced in 15 mongrel adult dogs using the technique described by Gartsman et al. Five weeks later, a free vascularized rib graft was transferred into the previously induced ischemic femoral head. High resolution computed tomographic scanning was used to evaluate revascularization 4, 8 and 12 weeks after grafting. The femoral head exhibited new vessel formation throughout the study. Arterial terminal branches arising from the rib graft medullary and periosteal circulations extended beyond the rib graft, entered the head, and reached the subchondral plate. Even where the rib graft did not replenish the central core of the head, there was vascular supply from the grafted bone's vascular tree. These results suggest that a free vascularized bone graft is able to revascularize an experimentally induced ischemic femoral head necrosis. (orig.)

  19. From miracle to reconciliation: a hermeneutic phenomenological study exploring the experience of living with Parkinson's disease following deep brain stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haahr, Anita; Kirkevold, Marit; Hall, Elisabeth O C; Ostergaard, Karen

    2010-10-01

    Deep Brain Stimulation for Parkinson's disease is a promising treatment for patients who can no longer be treated satisfactorily with L-dopa. Deep Brain Stimulation is known to relieve motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease and improve quality of life. Focusing on how patients experience life when treated with Deep Brain Stimulation can provide essential information on the process patients go through when receiving a treatment that alters the body and changes the illness trajectory. The aim of this study was to explore and describe the experience of living with Parkinson's disease when treated with Deep Brain Stimulation. The study was designed as a longitudinal study and data were gathered through qualitative in-depth interviews three times during the first year of treatment. Nine patients participated in the study. They were included when they had accepted treatment with Deep Brain Stimulation for Parkinson's disease. Data collection and data analysis were inspired by the hermeneutic phenomenological methodology of Van Manen. The treatment had a major impact on the body. Participants experienced great bodily changes and went through a process of adjustment in three phases during the first year of treatment with Deep Brain Stimulation. These stages were; being liberated: a kind of miracle, changes as a challenge: decline or opportunity and reconciliation: re-defining life with Parkinson's disease. The course of the process was unique for each participant, but dominant was that difficulties during the adjustment of stimulation and medication did affect the re-defining process. Patients go through a dramatic process of change following Deep Brain Stimulation. A changing body affects their entire lifeworld. Some adjust smoothly to changes while others are affected by loss of control, uncertainty and loss of everyday life as they knew it. These experiences affect the process of adjusting to life with Deep Brain Stimulation and re-define life with Parkinson's disease

  20. Therapies in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jankovic, Joseph; Poewe, Werner

    2012-08-01

    This review examines currently available therapeutic strategies for Parkinson's disease, emphasizing evidence-based data as well as a patient-centered approach to the treatment of motor and nonmotor symptoms. Although clinical trials of disease-modifying approaches have been thus far disappointing, steady advances are being made in the symptomatic treatment of Parkinson's disease. In this review, we focus on recent studies with monoamine oxidase type B inhibitors (selegiline and rasagiline), coenzyme Q10, creatine, and exercise in early Parkinson's disease. We also discuss the relative merits and disadvantages of delaying the initiation of levodopa therapy, the role of dopamine agonists, particularly ropinirole and pramipexole, and management of motor and behavioral complications, such as fluctuations, dyskinesias and impulse-control disorders. Novel formulations and delivery approaches for conventional and new drugs are also discussed. Finally, we review recent studies of surgical treatments of Parkinson's disease, such as deep brain stimulation. Numerous clinical trials have provided evidence that health-related quality of life can be substantially improved with early diagnosis and institution of exercise and other physical measures, appropriate timing of dopaminergic therapy, and strategies to delay and treat levodopa-related motor complications and nonmotor Parkinson's disease-related symptoms.

  1. Vitamin K status and vascular calcification: evidence from observational and clinical studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shea, M Kyla; Holden, Rachel M

    2012-03-01

    Vascular calcification occurs when calcium accumulates in the intima (associated with atherosclerosis) and/or media layers of the vessel wall. Coronary artery calcification (CAC) reflects the calcium burden within the intima and media of the coronary arteries. In population-based studies, CAC independently predicts cardiovascular disease (CVD) and mortality. A preventive role for vitamin K in vascular calcification has been proposed based on its role in activating matrix Gla protein (MGP), a calcification inhibitor that is expressed in vascular tissue. Although animal and in vitro data support this role of vitamin K, overall data from human studies are inconsistent. The majority of population-based studies have relied on vitamin K intake to measure status. Phylloquinone is the primary dietary form of vitamin K and available supplementation trials, albeit limited, suggest phylloquinone supplementation is relevant to CAC. Yet observational studies have found higher dietary menaquinone, but not phylloquinone, to be associated with less calcification. Vascular calcification is highly prevalent in certain patient populations, especially in those with chronic kidney disease (CKD), and it is plausible vitamin K may contribute to reducing vascular calcification in patients at higher risk. Subclinical vitamin K deficiency has been reported in CKD patients, but studies linking vitamin K status to calcification outcomes in CKD are needed to clarify whether or not improving vitamin K status is associated with improved vascular health in CKD. This review summarizes the available evidence of vitamin K and vascular calcification in population-based studies and clinic-based studies, with a specific focus on CKD patients.

  2. Mechanistic insights into the vascular effects of blueberries: Evidence from recent studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutler, Brett Ronald; Petersen, Chrissa; Anandh Babu, Pon Velayutham

    2017-06-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death in the United States. Dietary habits influence a variety of cardiovascular complications such as peripheral artery disease, heart failure, and kidney disease. We along with others have previously reported the cardiovascular beneficial effects of dietary flavonoids. Anthocyanins, one class of flavonoids widely available in berries, have recently drawn wide scientific attention because of their diverse health benefits. Epidemiological, clinical, and animal studies indicate that blueberry anthocyanins exert protection against cardiovascular complications by acting on multiple targets in the vascular system. These include activating endothelial nitric oxide synthase signaling, reducing oxidative stress, improving inflammatory pathways, and ameliorating dyslipidemia. Anthocyanins are extensively metabolized in humans suggesting that their vascular benefits are likely mediated by their circulating metabolites. However, the bioactivities of blueberry metabolites are unknown. Evaluating the bioactivities of metabolites, analyzing their structure-activity relationship, and well-designed human trials are needed to understand the potential vascular effects of blueberries and their metabolites. Understanding the vascular effects will provide a solid scientific foundation to recommend blueberries to improve vascular health. This review highlights the recent developments in the understanding of the vascular effects of blueberries with special emphasis on the molecular mechanisms involved. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Biochemical and clinical effects of Whey protein supplementation in Parkinson's disease: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tosukhowong, Piyaratana; Boonla, Chanchai; Dissayabutra, Thasinas; Kaewwilai, Lalita; Muensri, Sasipa; Chotipanich, Chanisa; Joutsa, Juho; Rinne, Juha; Bhidayasiri, Roongroj

    2016-08-15

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is an oxidative stress-mediated degenerative disorder. Elevated plasma homocysteine (Hcy) is frequently found in the levodopa-treated PD patients, is associated with disease progression and is a marker of oxidative stress. Whey protein is a rich source of cysteine, and branched-chain amino acids (BCAA). It has been shown that supplementation with Whey protein increases glutathione synthesis and muscle strength. In this study, we conducted a placebo-controlled, double-blind study (NCT01662414) to investigate the effects of undenatured Whey protein isolate supplementation for 6months on plasma glutathione, plasma amino acids, and plasma Hcy in PD patients. Clinical outcome assessments included the unified Parkinson's disease rating scale (UPDRS) and striatal L-3,4-dihydroxy-6-(18)F-fluorophenylalanine (FDOPA) uptake were determined before and after supplementation. 15 patients received Whey protein, and 17 received Soy protein, served as a control group. Significant increases in plasma concentration of reduced glutathione and the ratio of reduced to oxidized glutathione were found in the Whey-supplemented patients but not in a control group. This was associated with a significant decrease of plasma levels of Hcy. The plasma levels of total glutathione were not significantly changed in either group. Plasma BCAA and essential amino acids (EAA) were significantly increased in the Whey-supplemented group only. The UPDRS and striatal FDOPA uptake in PD patients were not significantly ameliorated in either group. However, significant negative correlation was observed between the UPDRS and plasma BCAA and EAA in the pre-supplemented PD patients. This study is the first to report that Whey protein supplementation significantly increases plasma reduced glutathione, the reduced to oxidized glutathione ratio, BCAAs and EAAs in patients with PD, together with a concomitant significant reduction of plasma Hcy. However, there were no significant changes in

  4. Noradrenergic Dysfunction in Alzheimer's and Parkinson's Diseases—An Overview of Imaging Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew C. Peterson

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Noradrenergic dysfunction contributes to cognitive impairment in Alzheimer's Disease (AD and Parkinson's Disease (PD. Conventional therapeutic strategies seek to enhance cholinergic and dopaminergic neurotransmission in AD and PD, respectively, and few studies have examined noradrenergic dysfunction as a target for medication development. We review the literature of noradrenergic dysfunction in AD and PD with a focus on human imaging studies that implicate the locus coeruleus (LC circuit. The LC sends noradrenergic projections diffusely throughout the cerebral cortex and plays a critical role in attention, learning, working memory, and cognitive control. The LC undergoes considerable degeneration in both AD and PD. Advances in magnetic resonance imaging have facilitated greater understanding of how structural and functional alteration of the LC may contribute to cognitive decline in AD and PD. We discuss the potential roles of the noradrenergic system in the pathogenesis of AD and PD with an emphasis on postmortem anatomical studies, structural MRI studies, and functional MRI studies, where we highlight changes in LC connectivity with the default mode network (DMN. LC degeneration may accompany deficient capacity in suppressing DMN activity and increasing saliency and task control network activities to meet behavioral challenges. We finish by proposing potential and new directions of research to address noradrenergic dysfunction in AD and PD.

  5. Particulate air pollution and vascular reactivity: the bus stop study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dales, Robert; Liu, Ling; Szyszkowicz, Mietek; Dalipaj, Mary; Willey, Jeff; Kulka, Ryan; Ruddy, Terrence D

    2007-11-01

    Particulate air pollution is associated with cardiovascular morbidity but mechanisms are not well understood. We tested the effects on vascular reactivity of exposure to fine particulates matter mass (PM(2.5)), number of particles bus stops. Flow-mediated vasodilation (FMD) of the brachial artery was then measured by ultrasound and expressed as: (maximum artery diameter after release of a blood pressure cuff inflated above systolic pressure-baseline resting diameter)/baseline resting diameter. A 30 microg/m(3) increase in PM(2.5) exposure corresponded to a 0.48% reduction in FMD, P=0.05 representing a 5% relative change in the maximum ability to dilate. Results were consistent between the two bus stops and not sensitive to type of analysis. No significant association was found between FMD and NO(2), PM(1.0) or traffic density. PM(2.5) may reduce the capacity to vasodilate, a potential explanation for the documented association with cardiovascular morbidity.

  6. Phenotype, genotype, and worldwide genetic penetrance of LRRK2-associated Parkinson's disease: a case-control study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Healy, Daniel G; Falchi, Mario; O'Sullivan, Sean S; Bonifati, Vincenzo; Durr, Alexandra; Bressman, Susan; Brice, Alexis; Aasly, Jan; Zabetian, Cyrus P; Goldwurm, Stefano; Ferreira, Joaquim J; Tolosa, Eduardo; Kay, Denise M; Klein, Christine; Williams, David R; Marras, Connie; Lang, Anthony E; Wszolek, Zbigniew K; Berciano, Jose; Schapira, Anthony HV; Lynch, Timothy; Bhatia, Kailash P; Gasser, Thomas; Lees, Andrew J; Wood, Nicholas W

    2008-01-01

    Summary Background Mutations in LRRK2, the gene that encodes leucine-rich repeat kinase 2, are a cause of Parkinson's disease (PD). The International LRRK2 Consortium was established to answer three key clinical questions: can LRRK2-associated PD be distinguished from idiopathic PD; which mutations in LRRK2 are pathogenic; and what is the age-specific cumulative risk of PD for individuals who inherit or are at risk of inheriting a deleterious mutation in LRRK2? Methods Researchers from 21 centres across the world collaborated on this study. The frequency of the common LRRK2 Gly2019Ser mutation was estimated on the basis of data from 24 populations worldwide, and the penetrance of the mutation was defined in 1045 people with mutations in LRRK2 from 133 families. The LRRK2 phenotype was defined on the basis of 59 motor and non-motor symptoms in 356 patients with LRRK2-associated PD and compared with the symptoms of 543 patients with pathologically proven idiopathic PD. Findings Six mutations met the consortium's criteria for being proven pathogenic. The frequency of the common LRRK2 Gly2019Ser mutation was 1% of patients with sporadic PD and 4% of patients with hereditary PD; the frequency was highest in the middle east and higher in southern Europe than in northern Europe. The risk of PD for a person who inherits the LRRK2 Gly2019Ser mutation was 28% at age 59 years, 51% at 69 years, and 74% at 79 years. The motor symptoms (eg, disease severity, rate of progression, occurrence of falls, and dyskinesia) and non-motor symptoms (eg, cognition and olfaction) of LRRK2-associated PD were more benign than those of idiopathic PD. Interpretation Mutations in LRRK2 are a clinically relevant cause of PD that merit testing in patients with hereditary PD and in subgroups of patients with PD. However, this knowledge should be applied with caution in the diagnosis and counselling of patients. Funding UK Medical Research Council; UK Parkinson's Disease Society; UK Brain Research

  7. Vascular care in patients with Alzheimer disease with cerebrovascular lesions slows progression of white matter lesions on MRI: the evaluation of vascular care in Alzheimer's disease (EVA) study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard, Edo; Gouw, Alida A; Scheltens, Philip; van Gool, Willem A

    2010-03-01

    White matter lesions (WMLs) and cerebral infarcts are common findings in Alzheimer disease and may contribute to dementia severity. WMLs and lacunar infarcts may provide a potential target for intervention strategies. This study assessed whether multicomponent vascular care in patients with Alzheimer disease with cerebrovascular lesions slows progression of WMLs and prevents occurrence of new infarcts. A randomized controlled clinical trial, including 123 subjects, compared vascular care with standard care in patients with Alzheimer disease with cerebrovascular lesions on MRI. Progression of WMLs, lacunes, medial temporal lobe atrophy, and global cortical atrophy were semiquantitatively scored after 2-year follow-up. Sixty-five subjects (36 vascular care, 29 standard care) had a baseline and a follow-up MRI and in 58 subjects, a follow-up scan could not be obtained due to advanced dementia or death. Subjects in the vascular care group had less progression of WMLs as measured with the WML change score (1.4 versus 2.3, P=0.03). There was no difference in the number of new lacunes or change in global cortical atrophy or medial temporal lobe atrophy between the 2 groups. Vascular care in patients with Alzheimer disease with cerebrovascular lesions slows progression of WMLs. Treatment aimed at vascular risk factors in patients with early Alzheimer disease may be beneficial, possibly in an even earlier stage of the disease.

  8. Mini-Mental Parkinson: First Validation Study of a New Bedside Test Constructed for Parkinson’s Disease

    OpenAIRE

    F. Mahieux; D. Michelet; M.-J. Manifacier; F. Boller; J. Fermanian; A. Guillard

    1995-01-01

    We have developed a brief screening test aimed at identifying cognitive disorders in Parkinson’s disease. The Mini-Mental Parkinson derives from the Mini-Mental State Examination of Folstein. It includes seven ordered subsections, with a total score of 32. A pilot study was conducted in 50 community-dwelling parkinsonian patients, in order to establish its metrological qualities. Comparisons were made with a neuropsychological battery including several tests widely used in the assessment of s...

  9. Risk of Parkinson's disease following zolpidem use: a retrospective, population-based cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Hui-Chun; Tsai, Chon-Haw; Muo, Chih-Hsin; Lin, Kang-Hsu; Lu, Ming-Kuei; Sung, Fung-Chang; Kao, Chia-Hung

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the influence of long-term zolpidem use on the incidence of developing Parkinson's disease. 2,961 subjects who used zolpidem for the first time longer than 3 months between 1998 and 2000 were identified in the National Health Insurance system of Taiwan. Subjects without a history of zolpidem use were randomly selected as a comparison cohort and frequency matched to zolpidem users based on age, sex, and index date. The diagnosis of Parkinson's disease was based on the criteria of the International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification. Its incidence until the end of 2009 was calculated and its hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% CIs were estimated using Cox proportional hazards regression models and Kaplan-Meier analysis. The overall incidence of Parkinson's disease was greater among zolpidem users than in the comparison cohort (HR = 1.88; 95% CI, 1.45-2.45). However, there was no difference in Parkinson's disease incidence between these 2 cohorts after 5 years of observation. The risk of Parkinson's disease increased with increasing zolpidem dose, with an HR of 0.70 for low-dose users (zolpidem only (HR = 2.35; 95% CI, 1.66-3.33) compared to those using benzodiazepines only (HR = 1.31; 95% CI, 0.91-1.90). By stratified analysis, zolpidem use with concurrent depression (HR = 4.79) increased the risk of Parkinson's disease compared to that of zolpidem users without concurrent depression. Zolpidem use might unmask preclinical Parkinson's disease, especially in patients with depression. However, large population-based, unbiased, randomized trials are warranted to confirm this finding. © Copyright 2015 Physicians Postgraduate Press, Inc.

  10. Parkinsons Disease-related Circulating microRNA Biomarkers——a Validation Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Petillo

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Parkinson's disease (PD is the second most common neurodegenerative disease. One of the major challenges in studying this progressive neurological disorder is to identify and develop biomarkers for early detection. Recently, several blood-based microRNA (miRNA biomarkers for PD have been reported. However, follow-up studies with new, independent cohorts have been rare. Previously, we identified a panel of four circulating miRNA biomarkers for PD (miR-1826, miR-450b-3p, miR-505, and miR-626 with biomarker performance of 91% sensitivity and 100% specificity. However, the expression of miR-450b-3p could not be detected in a new, independent validation set. In our current study, we improved the detection power by including a non-biased pre-amplification step in quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR and reevaluated the biomarker performance. We found the panel of four PD-related miRNAs achieved the predictive power of 83% sensitivity and 75% specificity in our validation set. This is the first biomarker validation study of PD which showed reproducibility and robustness of plasma-based circulating miRNAs as molecular biomarkers and qRT-PCR as potential diagnostic assay.

  11. Coffee, caffeine-related genes, and Parkinson's disease: a case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Facheris, Maurizio F; Schneider, Nicole K; Lesnick, Timothy G; de Andrade, Mariza; Cunningham, Julie M; Rocca, Walter A; Maraganore, Demetrius M

    2008-10-30

    An inverse association between coffee and Parkinson's disease (PD) has been reported. However, it remains uncertain why some but not all coffee drinkers are less susceptible to PD. We considered the possibility of a pharmacogenetic effect. In our study, we included 1,208 subjects (446 case-unaffected sibling pairs and 158 case-unrelated control pairs) recruited from an ongoing study of the molecular epidemiology of PD in the Upper Midwest (USA). We collected information on lifetime coffee drinking and we studied two genes: ADORA2A, which encodes the major receptor activity of caffeine in the brain (variants rs5751876 and rs3032740), and CYP1A2, which encodes the major rate-limiting step of caffeine metabolism (variants rs35694136 and rs762551). We did not observe significant associations of coffee drinking or of the genetic variants with PD susceptibility, either independently or jointly, in the sample overall and in most strata. Our study neither supports the hypothesis that coffee protects against PD nor provides evidence for a pharmacogenetic effect. (c) 2008 Movement Disorder Society.

  12. Coffee, Caffeine-Related Genes, and Parkinson's Disease: A Case–Control Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Facheris, Maurizio F.; Schneider, Nicole K.; Lesnick, Timothy G.; de Andrade, Mariza; Cunningham, Julie M.; Rocca, Walter A.; Maraganore, Demetrius M.

    2015-01-01

    An inverse association between coffee and Parkinson's disease (PD) has been reported. However, it remains uncertain why some but not all coffee drinkers are less susceptible to PD. We considered the possibility of a pharmaco-genetic effect. In our study, we included 1,208 subjects (446 case-unaffected sibling pairs and 158 case-unrelated control pairs) recruited from an ongoing study of the molecular epidemiology of PD in the Upper Midwest (USA). We collected information on lifetime coffee drinking and we studied two genes: ADORA2A, which encodes the major receptor activity of caffeine in the brain (variants rs5751876 and rs3032740), and CYP1A2, which encodes the major rate-limiting step of caffeine metabolism (variants rs35694136 and rs762551). We did not observe significant associations of coffee drinking or of the genetic variants with PD susceptibility, either independently or jointly, in the sample overall and in most strata. Our study neither supports the hypothesis that coffee protects against PD nor provides evidence for a pharmacogenetic effect. PMID:18759349

  13. Cannabis (medical marijuana) treatment for motor and non-motor symptoms of Parkinson disease: an open-label observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lotan, Itay; Treves, Therese A; Roditi, Yaniv; Djaldetti, Ruth

    2014-01-01

    The use of cannabis as a therapeutic agent for various medical conditions has been well documented. However, clinical trials in patients with Parkinson disease (PD) have yielded conflicting results. The aim of the present open-label observational study was to assess the clinical effect of cannabis on motor and non-motor symptoms of PD. Twenty-two patients with PD attending the motor disorder clinic of a tertiary medical center in 2011 to 2012 were evaluated at baseline and 30 minutes after smoking cannabis using the following battery: Unified Parkinson Disease Rating Scale, visual analog scale, present pain intensity scale, Short-Form McGill Pain Questionnaire, as well as Medical Cannabis Survey National Drug and Alcohol Research Center Questionnaire. Mean (SD) total score on the motor Unified Parkinson Disease Rating Scale score improved significantly from 33.1 (13.8) at baseline to 23.2 (10.5) after cannabis consumption (t = 5.9; P effects of the drug were observed. The study suggests that cannabis might have a place in the therapeutic armamentarium of PD. Larger, controlled studies are needed to verify the results.

  14. The effects of transdermal rotigotine on non-motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease: a multicentre, observational, retrospective, post-marketing study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valldeoriola, Francesc; Salvador, Antonio; Gómez-Arguelles, José Maria; Marey, José; Moya, Miguel; Ayuga, Ángel; Ramírez, Francisco

    2018-04-01

    This study evaluated the effect of ≥6 months of transdermal rotigotine on non-motor and motor symptoms of patients with advanced Parkinson's disease. The study was conducted in Spain between September 2011 and December 2012 (ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01504529). The primary efficacy variable was the change from baseline in non-motor symptoms, as assessed by changes in Parkinson's Disease Non-Motor Symptoms Questionnaire total scores at 6 months. Secondary endpoints included the assessment of motor symptoms by Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale III scores. Data from 378 patients (mean age: 70.2 years; 56.9% male) with Parkinson's disease receiving rotigotine from were collected. Mean disease duration was 6.1 years, and mean rotigotine treatment duration was 45.6 months. Rotigotine reduced non-motor symptoms by 14.6% (mean change from baseline in Parkinson's Disease Non-Motor Symptoms Questionnaire: -1.5 ± 3.4; p < 0.0001). The majority of patients (58.2%) had improved non-motor symptoms at 6 months. Comparing the baseline versus study end, fewer patients experienced events in the urinary (78.6% vs. 73.3%; p = 0.0066), sleep (82.8% vs. 72.8%; p < 0.0001) and mood/cognition (77.3% vs. 66.4%; p < 0.0001) domains of the Parkinson's Disease Non-Motor Symptoms Questionnaire. Mean motor symptoms were reduced from baseline by 8.0% (mean change from baseline in Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale III: -2.6 ± 8.0; p < 0.0001). In clinical practice in Spain, rotigotine may be an effective treatment to reduce the non-motor and motor symptoms in patients with advanced Parkinson's disease.

  15. The resting state fMRI study of patients with Parkinson's disease associated with cognitive dysfunction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng Jieying; Huang Biao

    2013-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is the most common neurodegenerative cause of Parkinsonism, but the high morbidity of PD accompanied cognitive dysfunction hasn't drawn enough attention by the clinicians. With the rapid development of the resting state functional MRI (fMRI) technique, the cause of PD patients with cognitive dysfunction may be associated with the damage of functional connectivity of the motor networks and the cognitive networks. The relationship between neuropathologic mechanism of PD patients with cognitive dysfunction and impaired cognitive circuits will be disclosed by building the changes of brain topological structure in patients. The resting state fMRI study can provide the rationale for prevention, diagnosis and treatment of PD. (authors)

  16. Training conversation partners of persons with communication disorders related to Parkinson's disease--a protocol and a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forsgren, Emma; Antonsson, Malin; Saldert, Charlotta

    2013-07-01

    This paper reports on the adaptation of a training programme for conversation partners of persons with Parkinson's disease, and a protocol for assessment of possible changes in conversational interaction as a result of intervention. We present data from an explorative multiple case study with three individuals with Parkinson's disease and their spouses. Repeated analysis of natural conversational interaction and measures of the participants' perception of communication as well as measures of different cognitive abilities were obtained. The results show that the communication in all three dyads was affected by both speech and language problems and that the conversation training model and the assessment protocol may work well after minor adjustments. Influence of different aspects of cognition on communication is discussed.

  17. Hitler's parkinsonism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boettcher, Lillian B; Bonney, Phillip A; Smitherman, Adam D; Sughrue, Michael E

    2015-07-01

    Of the multitude of medical and psychiatric conditions ascribed to Hitler both in his lifetime and since his suicide in April 1945, few are more substantiated than parkinsonism. While the timeline of the development of this condition, as well as its etiology, are debated, there is clear evidence for classic manifestations of the disease, most prominently a resting tremor but also stooped posture, bradykinesia, micrographia, and masked facial expressions, with progression steadily seen over his final years. Though ultimately speculation, some have suggested that Hitler suffered from progressive cognitive and mood disturbances, possibly due to parkinsonism, that affected the course of events in the war. Here, the authors discuss Hitler's parkinsonism in the context of the Third Reich and its eventual destruction, maintaining that ultimately his disease had little effect on the end result.

  18. Genetic variations of GAK in two Chinese Parkinson's disease populations: a case-control study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-En Johnny Tseng

    Full Text Available Cyclin G-associated kinase (GAK modifies α-synuclein expression levels and affects the susceptibility of Parkinson's disease (PD. The single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP rs1564282 of GAK gene has a significant association to the risk of PD among Caucasian populations. To date there is only one data with regards to ethnic Chinese from Mainland China. Here, we conducted a case-control study in two independent cohorts of Han Chinese populations from Taiwan and Singapore to validate this association. A total of 1,755 subjects (871 PD patients and 884 controls were recruited. The results showed that neither the CT, TT genotypes nor the minor allele T of SNP rs1564282 were associated with PD among the subjects from Taiwan and Singapore as well as in the pooled analysis. Differences in our study population with regards to published literature may be due to epigenetic factors and gene-gene or gene-environmental interactions. Further studies in other Chinese populations will be of interest to validate these findings.

  19. The Clinical Impression of Severity Index for Parkinson's Disease: international validation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Martín, Pablo; Rodríguez-Blázquez, Carmen; Forjaz, Maria João; de Pedro, Jesús

    2009-01-30

    This study sought to provide further information about the psychometric properties of the Clinical Impression of Severity Index for Parkinson's Disease (CISI-PD), in a large, international, cross-culturally diverse sample. Six hundred and fourteen patients with PD participated in the study. Apart from the CISI-PD, assessments were based on Hoehn & Yahr (HY) staging, the Scales for Outcomes in PD-Motor (SCOPA-M), -Cognition (SCOPA-COG) and -Psychosocial (SCOPA-PS), the Cumulative Illness Rating Scale-Geriatrics, and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale. The total CISI-PD score displayed no floor or ceiling effects. Internal consistency was 0.81, the test-retest intraclass correlation coefficient was 0.84, and item homogeneity was 0.52. Exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis (CFI = 0.99, RMSEA = 0.07) confirmed CISI-PD's unifactorial structure. The CISI-PD showed adequate convergent validity with SCOPA-COG and SCOPA-M (r(S) = 0.46-0.85, respectively) and discriminative validity for HY stages and disease duration (P validation study, thus showing that the CISI-PD is a valid instrument to measure clinical impression of severity in PD. Its simplicity and easy application make it an attractive and useful tool for clinical practice and research.

  20. Traffic-related air pollution increased the risk of Parkinson's disease in Taiwan: A nationwide study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Pei-Chen; Liu, Li-Ling; Sun, Yu; Chen, Yu-An; Liu, Chih-Ching; Li, Chung-Yi; Yu, Hwa-Lung; Ritz, Beate

    2016-11-01

    Ambient air pollution has been associated with many health conditions, but little is known about its effects on neurodegenerative diseases, such as Parkinson's disease (PD). In this study, we investigated the influence of ambient air pollution on PD in a nationwide population-based case-control study in Taiwan. We identified 11,117 incident PD patients between 2007 and 2009 from the Taiwanese National Health Insurance Research Database and selected 44,468 age- and gender-matched population controls from the longitudinal health insurance database. The average ambient pollutant exposure concentrations from 1998 through the onset of PD were estimated using quantile-based Bayesian Maximum Entropy models. Basing from logistic regression models, we estimated the odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) of ambient pollutant exposures and PD risk. We observed positive associations between NO x , CO exposures, and PD. In multi-pollutant models, for NO x and CO above the 75th percentile exposure compared with the lowest percentile, the ORs of PD were 1.37 (95% CI=1.23-1.52) and 1.17 (95% CI=1.07-1.27), respectively. This study suggests that ambient air pollution exposure, especially from traffic-related pollutants such as NO x and CO, increases PD risk in the Taiwanese population. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Motor association cortex activity in Parkinson's disease. A functional MRI study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tada, Yukiko

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the activation of motor association cortex using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) and control subjects during performed hand movements. There were 26 patients with PD (12 patients with Hoehn and Yahr stage I-II, 14 patients with stage III) and 8 control subjects. Functional imaging was performed using a 1.5 tesla MRI system equipped with a single-shot, echo-planar pulse sequence. The significant signal changes were observed within the primary sensorimotor area, the supplementary motor area (SMA), and the parietal association area in both PD and control subjects. In PD subjects, the SMA was less activated than in control subjects; there were significant differences in the number of pixels activated in SMA between control and Yahr III group (p<0.01), and between Yahr I-II and Yahr III group (p<0.01). Our results demonstrated that movement related cerebral activity in the SMA is reduced in PD subjects, consistent with previously published data using other methods. It is well known from anatomical studies that one of the major cortical outputs of the basal ganglia is the SMA. This may explain the hypoactivation of the SMA in PD. Studies using fMRI provide a promising method not only for localizing cortical activation related to voluntary movements but also for investigating pathophysiology of movement disorders. (author)

  2. Voluptuary habits and clinical subtypes of Parkinson's disease: the FRAGAMP case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicoletti, Alessandra; Pugliese, Pierfrancesco; Nicoletti, Giuseppe; Arabia, Gennarina; Annesi, Grazia; Mari, Michele De; Lamberti, Paolo; Grasso, Lucia; Marconi, Roberto; Epifanio, Antonio; Morgante, Letterio; Cozzolino, Autilia; Barone, Paolo; Torchia, Giusi; Quattrone, Aldo; Zappia, Mario

    2010-10-30

    We evaluated the possible association between smoking, coffee drinking, and alcohol consumption and Parkinson's disease (PD). The FRAGAMP study is a large Italian multicenter case-control study carried out to evaluate the possible role of environmental and genetic factors in PD. Adjusted ORs were estimated using unconditional logistic regression. Smoking, coffee, and alcohol consumption were also considered as surrogate markers of lifestyle and analysis was carried out considering the presence of at least one, two, or three factors. This latter analysis was separately performed considering Tremor-Dominant (TD) and Akinetic-Rigid (AR) patients. Four hundred ninety-two PD patients (292 men and 200 women) and 459 controls (160 men and 299 women) were enrolled in the study. Multivariate analysis showed a significant negative association between PD and cigarette smoking (OR 0.51; 95%CI 0.36-0.72), coffee drinking (OR 0.61; 95%CI 0.43-0.87) and wine consumption (OR 0.62; 95%CI 0.44-0.86); a significant trend dose-effect (P coffee, and alcohol consumption. When analysis was carried out considering the association of these factors as possible surrogate markers of a peculiar lifestyle the association was stronger for the AR phenotype.

  3. Aerobic Exercise Improves Mood, Cognition, and Language Function in Parkinson's Disease: Results of a Controlled Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altmann, Lori J P; Stegemöller, Elizabeth; Hazamy, Audrey A; Wilson, Jonathan P; Bowers, Dawn; Okun, Michael S; Hass, Chris J

    2016-10-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) results in a range of non-motor deficits that can affect mood, cognition, and language, and many of these issues are unresponsive to pharmacological intervention. Aerobic exercise can improve mood and cognition in healthy older adults, although only a few studies have examined exercise effects on these domains in PD. The current study assesses the effects of aerobic exercise on aspects of cognition, mood, and language production in people with PD. This study compares the effects of aerobic exercise to stretch-balance training and a no-contact control group in participants with idiopathic PD. The aerobic and stretch-balance groups trained three times a week for 16 weeks, while controls continued normal activities. Outcome measures included disease severity, mood, cognition (speed of processing, memory, and executive function), and language production (picture descriptions). Cognition and language were assessed in single and dual task conditions. Depressive symptoms increased only in the control group (pimproved in the aerobic exercise group only in the single task (p=.007) and declined in controls in the dual task. Completeness of picture descriptions improved significantly more in the aerobic group than in the stretch-balance group (pexercise is a viable intervention for PD that can be protective against increased depressive symptoms, and can improve several non-motor domains, including executive dysfunction and related aspects of language production. (JINS, 2016, 22, 878-889).

  4. The Ronnie Gardiner Rhythm and Music Method - a feasibility study in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohl, Petra; Dizdar, Nil; Hallert, Eva

    2013-01-01

    To assess the feasibility of the novel intervention, Ronnie Gardiner Rhythm and Music (RGRM™) Method compared to a control group for patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). Eighteen patients, mean age 68, participating in a disability study within a neurological rehabilitation centre, were randomly allocated to intervention group (n = 12) or control group (n = 6). Feasibility was assessed by comparing effects of the intervention on clinical outcome measures (primary outcome: mobility as assessed by two-dimensional motion analysis, secondary outcomes: mobility, cognition, quality of life, adherence, adverse events and eligibility). Univariable analyses showed no significant differences between groups following intervention. However, analyses suggested that patients in the intervention group improved more on mobility (p = 0.006), cognition and quality of life than patients in the control group. There were no adverse events and a high level of adherence to therapy was observed. In this disability study, the use of the RGRM™ Method showed promising results in the intervention group and the adherence level was high. Our results suggest that most assessments chosen are eligible to use in a larger randomized controlled study for patients with PD. The RGRM™ Method appeared to be a useful and safe method that showed promising results in both motor and cognitive functions as well as quality of life in patients with moderate PD. The RGRM™ Method can be used by physiotherapists, occupational, speech and music therapists in neurological rehabilitation. Most measurements were feasible except for Timed-Up-and-Go.

  5. Neurological manifestations and PET studies of the thalamic vascular lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsuda, Shinji; Kawamura, Mitsuru; Hirayama, Keizo [Chiba Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine

    1995-02-01

    We divided 38 patients with cerebrovascular disease of the thalamus into 5 groups according to the site of the thalamic lesions as confirmed by X-ray CT and/or MRI. In 16 patients, we examined the cerebral blood flow (CBF) and cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO{sub 2}) by positron emission tomography (PET). In the anteromedial thalamic lesion group, patients displayed disturbances of spontaneity, memory, reading and writing. CBF and CMRO{sub 2} were decreased in the frontal, parietal and temporal lobes on the side of the lesion. In the dorsolateral thalamic lesion group, ataxic hemiparesis was a characteristic symptom. CBF and CMRO{sub 2} were decreased in frontoparietal lobes on the side of the lesion. In the group with lesions confined to the nucleus ventralis posterioris thalami, the main symptoms were sensory disturbance, with cheiro-oral sensory syndrome being particularly evident. CBF and CMRO{sub 2} were decreased in the parietal lobe on the side of the lesion. In the group with posterolateral thalamic lesions without pulvinar involvement, patients exhibited thalamic syndrome without thalamic pain. CBF and CMRO{sub 2} were decreased in the frontoparietal and temporal lobes on the side of the lesion. In contrast, in the group with posterolateral thalamic lesions with pulvinar involvement, all patients showed thalamic pain. The decrease in CBF and CMRO{sub 2} extended to the inferomedial region of the temporal lobe in addition to the area of decreased CBF and CMRO{sub 2} observed in the group with posterolateral thalamic lesions without pulvinar involvement. Based on these results, we speculate that the neurological manifestations of thalamic vascular disease are associated with a decrease in cortical CBF and CMRO{sub 2} secondary to the thalamic lesions. (author).

  6. Neurological manifestations and PET studies of the thalamic vascular lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuda, Shinji; Kawamura, Mitsuru; Hirayama, Keizo

    1995-01-01

    We divided 38 patients with cerebrovascular disease of the thalamus into 5 groups according to the site of the thalamic lesions as confirmed by X-ray CT and/or MRI. In 16 patients, we examined the cerebral blood flow (CBF) and cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO 2 ) by positron emission tomography (PET). In the anteromedial thalamic lesion group, patients displayed disturbances of spontaneity, memory, reading and writing. CBF and CMRO 2 were decreased in the frontal, parietal and temporal lobes on the side of the lesion. In the dorsolateral thalamic lesion group, ataxic hemiparesis was a characteristic symptom. CBF and CMRO 2 were decreased in frontoparietal lobes on the side of the lesion. In the group with lesions confined to the nucleus ventralis posterioris thalami, the main symptoms were sensory disturbance, with cheiro-oral sensory syndrome being particularly evident. CBF and CMRO 2 were decreased in the parietal lobe on the side of the lesion. In the group with posterolateral thalamic lesions without pulvinar involvement, patients exhibited thalamic syndrome without thalamic pain. CBF and CMRO 2 were decreased in the frontoparietal and temporal lobes on the side of the lesion. In contrast, in the group with posterolateral thalamic lesions with pulvinar involvement, all patients showed thalamic pain. The decrease in CBF and CMRO 2 extended to the inferomedial region of the temporal lobe in addition to the area of decreased CBF and CMRO 2 observed in the group with posterolateral thalamic lesions without pulvinar involvement. Based on these results, we speculate that the neurological manifestations of thalamic vascular disease are associated with a decrease in cortical CBF and CMRO 2 secondary to the thalamic lesions. (author)

  7. Anatomic variability of the vascularized composite osteomyocutaneous flap from the medial femoral condyle: an anatomical study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trung-Hau Le Thua

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The anatomical study and clinical application for the vascularized corticoperiosteal flap from the medial femoral condyle have been performed and described previously. Although prior studies have described the composite osteomyocutaneous flap from the medial femoral condyle, a detailed analysis of the vascularity of this region has not yet been fully evaluated. Methods: This anatomical study described the variability of the arteries from the medial femoral condyle in 40 cadaveric specimens. Results: The descending genicular artery (DGA was found in 33 of 40 cases (82.5%. The  superomedial genicular artery (SGA was present in 10 cases (25%. All 33 cases (100% of the DGA had articular branches to the periosteum of the medial femoral condyle. Muscular branches and saphenous branches of the DGA were present in 25 cases (62.5% and 26 cases (70.3%, respectively. Conclusion: The current study demonstrates that the size and length of the vessels to the medial femoral condyle are sufficient for a vascularized bone flap. A careful preoperative vascular assessment is essential prior to use of the vascularized composite osteomyocutaneous flap from the medial femoral condyle, because of the considerable anatomical variations in different branches of the DGA.

  8. Parkinson's and Alzheimer's diseases in Costa Rica: a feasibility study toward a national screening program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wesseling, Catharina; Román, Norbel; Quirós, Indiana; Páez, Laura; García, Vilma; Mora, Ana María; Juncos, Jorge L; Steenland, Kyle N

    2013-12-27

    The integration of mental and neurologic services in healthcare is a global priority. The universal Social Security of Costa Rica aspires to develop national screening of neurodegenerative disorders among the elderly, as part of the non-communicable disease agenda. This study assessed the feasibility of routine screening for Parkinson's disease (PD) and Alzheimer's disease (AD) within the public healthcare system of Costa Rica. The population (aged ≥65) in the catchment areas of two primary healthcare clinics was targeted for motor and cognitive screening during routine annual health check-ups. The screening followed a tiered three-step approach, with increasing specificity. Step 1 involved a two-symptom questionnaire (tremor-at-rest; balance) and a spiral drawing test for motor assessment, as well as a three-word recall and animal category fluency test for cognitive assessment. Step 2 (for those failing Step 1) was a 10-item version of the Unified Parkinson Disease Rating Scale and the Mini-Mental State Examination. Step 3 (for those failing Step 2) was a comprehensive neurologic exam with definitive diagnosis of PD, AD, mild cognitive impairment (MCI), other disorders, or subjects who were healthy. Screening parameters and disease prevalence were calculated. Of the 401 screened subjects (80% of target population), 370 (92%), 163 (45%), and 81 (56%) failed in Step 1, Step 2, and Step 3, respectively. Thirty-three, 20, and 35 patients were diagnosed with PD, AD, and MCI, respectively (7 were PD with MCI/AD); 90% were new cases. Step 1 sensitivities of motor and cognitive assessments regarding Step 2 were both 93%, and Step 2 sensitivities regarding definitive diagnosis 100 and 96%, respectively. Specificities for Step 1 motor and cognitive tests were low (23% and 29%, respectively) and for Step 2 tests acceptable (76%, 94%). Based on international data, PD prevalence was 3.7 times higher than expected; AD prevalence was as expected. Proposed protocol adjustments

  9. Transforaminal Percutaneous Endoscopic Discectomy for Lumbar Disc Herniation in Parkinson's Disease: A Case-Control Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapetanakis, Stylianos; Giovannopoulou, Eirini; Charitoudis, George; Kazakos, Konstantinos

    2016-08-01

    A case-control study. To investigate the effectiveness of transforaminal percutaneous endoscopic discectomy (TPED) in Parkinson's disease (PD). Patients with PD frequently suffer from radiculopathy and low back pain. Additionally, they demonstrate higher complication rates after open spine surgery. However, the clinical outcome of minimally invasive techniques for lumbar discectomy, such as TPED, have not been established for this population. Patients diagnosed with lumbar disc hernia were divided into Group A (11 patients diagnosed with PD), and Group B (10 patients as the control, non-PD group). All patients underwent TPED. Indexes of visual analogue scale (VAS) for leg pain and Oswestry disability index (ODI) were assessed right before surgery and at six weeks, three months, six months and one year post-surgery. At the baseline visit, groups did not differ significantly with age (p=0.724), gender (p=0.835), level of operation (p=0.407), ODI (p=0.497) and VAS (p=0.772). Parkinson's patients had higher scores in ODI at every visit, but the outcome was statistically significant only at 3 months (p=0.004) and one year (p=0.007). Similarly, VAS measurements were higher at each time point, with the difference being significant at 3 (p<0.001), 6 (0.021), and 12 (p<0.001) months after surgery. At the end of a year of follow up, ODI was reduced by 49.6% (±16.7) in Group A and 59.2% (±8.0) in Group B (p=0.111), translating to a 79.5% (±13.0) and 91.5% (±4.1) average improvement in daily functionality (p=0.024). VAS was reduced by 59.1 mm (±11.8) in Group A and 62.2 mm (±7.4) in Group B (p=0.485), leading to an 85.3 % (±4.0) and 91.9% (±2.6) general improvement in leg pain (p<0.001). Our data indicate that TPED led to satisfactory improvement in leg pain and daily living in PD patients a year after surgery.

  10. Psychosocial therapy for Parkinson's-related dementia: study protocol for the INVEST randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCormick, Sheree A; McDonald, Kathryn R; Vatter, Sabina; Orgeta, Vasiliki; Poliakoff, Ellen; Smith, Sarah; Silverdale, Monty A; Fu, Bo; Leroi, Iracema

    2017-06-19

    Parkinson's disease (PD) with mild cognitive impairment (MCI-PD) or dementia (PDD) and dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) are characterised by motor and 'non-motor' symptoms which impact on quality of life. Treatment options are generally limited to pharmacological approaches. We developed a psychosocial intervention to improve cognition, quality of life and companion burden for people with MCI-PD, PDD or DLB. Here, we describe the protocol for a single-blind randomised controlled trial to assess feasibility, acceptability and tolerability of the intervention and to evaluate treatment implementation. The interaction among the intervention and selected outcome measures and the efficacy of this intervention in improving cognition for people with MCI-PD, PDD or DLB will also be explored. Dyads will be randomised into two treatment arms to receive either 'treatment as usual' (TAU) or cognitive stimulation therapy specifically adapted for Parkinson's-related dementias (CST-PD), involving 30 min sessions delivered at home by the study companion three times per week over 10 weeks. A mixed-methods approach will be used to collect data on the operational aspects of the trial and treatment implementation. This will involve diary keeping, telephone follow-ups, dyad checklists and researcher ratings. Analysis will include descriptive statistics summarising recruitment, acceptability and tolerance of the intervention, and treatment implementation. To pilot an outcome measure of efficacy, we will undertake an inferential analysis to test our hypothesis that compared with TAU, CST-PD improves cognition. Qualitative approaches using thematic analysis will also be applied. Our findings will inform a larger definitive trial. Ethical opinion was granted (REC reference: 15/YH/0531). Findings will be published in peer-reviewed journals and at conferences. We will prepare reports for dissemination by organisations involved with PD and dementia. ISRCTN (ISRCTN11455062). © Article author

  11. Neuroimaging in Parkinsonism: a study with magnetic resonance and spectroscopy as tools in the differential diagnosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vasconcellos, Luiz Felipe Rocha [1Hospital dos Servidores do Estado, Rio de Janeiro RJ (Brazil)], e-mail: luizneurol@terra.com.br; Novis, Sergio A. Pereira; Rosso, Ana Lucia Z. [Hospital Universitario Clementino Fraga Filho (HUCFF), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Moreira, Denise Madeira [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Neurologia Deolindo Couto; Leite, Ana Claudia C.B. [Fundacao Oswaldo Cruz (FIOCRUZ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2009-03-15

    The differential diagnosis of Parkinsonism based on clinical features, sometimes may be difficult. Diagnostic tests in these cases might be useful, especially magnetic resonance imaging, a noninvasive exam, not as expensive as positron emission tomography, and provides a good basis for anatomical analysis. The magnetic resonance spectroscopy analyzes cerebral metabolism, yielding inconsistent results in parkinsonian disorders. We selected 40 individuals for magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy analysis, 12 with Parkinson's disease, 11 with progressive supranuclear palsy, 7 with multiple system atrophy (parkinsonian type), and 10 individuals without any psychiatric or neurological disorders (controls). Clinical scales included Hoenh and Yahr, unified Parkinson's disease rating scale and mini mental status examination. The results showed that patients with Parkinson's disease and controls presented the same aspects on neuroimaging, with few or absence of abnormalities, and supranuclear progressive palsy and multiple system atrophy showed abnormalities, some of which statistically significant. Thus, magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy could be useful as a tool in differential diagnosis of Parkinsonism. (author)

  12. Neuroimaging in Parkinsonism: a study with magnetic resonance and spectroscopy as tools in the differential diagnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasconcellos, Luiz Felipe Rocha; Novis, Sergio A. Pereira; Rosso, Ana Lucia Z.; Moreira, Denise Madeira

    2009-01-01

    The differential diagnosis of Parkinsonism based on clinical features, sometimes may be difficult. Diagnostic tests in these cases might be useful, especially magnetic resonance imaging, a noninvasive exam, not as expensive as positron emission tomography, and provides a good basis for anatomical analysis. The magnetic resonance spectroscopy analyzes cerebral metabolism, yielding inconsistent results in parkinsonian disorders. We selected 40 individuals for magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy analysis, 12 with Parkinson's disease, 11 with progressive supranuclear palsy, 7 with multiple system atrophy (parkinsonian type), and 10 individuals without any psychiatric or neurological disorders (controls). Clinical scales included Hoenh and Yahr, unified Parkinson's disease rating scale and mini mental status examination. The results showed that patients with Parkinson's disease and controls presented the same aspects on neuroimaging, with few or absence of abnormalities, and supranuclear progressive palsy and multiple system atrophy showed abnormalities, some of which statistically significant. Thus, magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy could be useful as a tool in differential diagnosis of Parkinsonism. (author)

  13. Introducing a multifaceted exercise intervention particular to older adults diagnosed with Parkinson's disease: a preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peacock, Corey A; Sanders, Gabriel J; Wilson, Kayla A; Fickes-Ryan, Emily J; Corbett, Duane B; von Carlowitz, Kyle-Patrick A; Ridgel, Angela L

    2014-08-01

    With a substantial increase in diagnosed Parkinson's disease, it is of great importance to examine tolerance and physical measures of evolving exercise interventions. Of particular importance, a multifaceted exercise intervention combining active-assisted cycling and resistance training to older adults diagnosed with Parkinson's disease is being assessed. Fourteen older adults diagnosed with Parkinson's disease and ten healthy older adults (67.5 ± 7.9 years of age) engaged in an 8-week, 24-session, multifaceted exercise protocol. The protocol consisted of both active-assisted cycling and resistance training. Tolerance was measured, as well as multiple indicators of health-related physical fitness. These indicators examined improvements in cardiovascular performance, muscular strength, muscular endurance, and flexibility. Twenty-two older adults and older adults diagnosed with Parkinson's disease tolerated the intervention by completing all 24 sessions. Repeated-measures analysis of variance demonstrated significant (P ≤ 0.003) improvements in cardiovascular performance, muscular strength, muscular endurance, and flexibility for both groups of individuals. The multifaceted intervention is the first to combine both active-assisted cycling and resistance training. The older adult and the older adult diagnosed with Parkinson's disease exhibited both tolerance and health-related improvements in physical fitness following the intervention.

  14. Effect of Low Concentrations of Apomorphine on Parkinsonism in a Randomized, Placebo-Controlled, Crossover Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunzler, Steven A.; Koudelka, Caroline; Carlson, Nichole E.; Pavel, Misha; Nutt, John G.

    2011-01-01

    Objective To determine whether low concentrations of a dopamine agonist worsen parkinsonism, which would suggest that activation of presynaptic dopamine autoreceptors causes a super-off state. Design Randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover clinical trial. Setting Academic movement disorders center. Patients Patients with Parkinson disease and motor fluctuations. Intervention Fourteen patients with Parkinson disease and motor fluctuations were randomized to receive 1 of 6 possible sequences of placebo, low-dose (sub-threshold) apomorphine hydrochloride, and high-dose (threshold to suprathreshold) apomorphine hydrochloride infusions. Subthreshold doses of apomorphine hydrochloride (12.5 μg/kg/h every 2 hours and 25 μg/kg/h every 2 hours), threshold to suprathreshold doses of apomorphine hydrochloride (50 μg/kg/h every 2 hours and 100 μg/kg/h every 2 hours), and placebo were infused for 4 hours daily for 3 consecutive days. Main Outcome Measures Finger and foot tapping rates. Results There was no decline in finger or foot tapping rates during the low-dose apomorphine hydrochloride infusions relative to placebo. The high-dose infusions increased foot tapping (P<.001) and trended toward increasing finger tapping compared with placebo infusions. Conclusions Subthreshold concentrations of apomorphine did not worsen parkinsonism, suggesting that pre-synaptic dopamine autoreceptors are not important to the motor response in moderate to advanced Parkinson disease. PMID:18268187

  15. Asymptomatic cervicocerebral atherosclerosis, intracranial vascular resistance and cognition: the AsIA-neuropsychology study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Olóriz, Jorge; López-Cancio, Elena; Arenillas, Juan F; Hernández, María; Jiménez, Marta; Dorado, Laura; Barrios, Maite; Soriano-Raya, Juan José; Miralbell, Júlia; Cáceres, Cynthia; Forés, Rosa; Pera, Guillem; Dávalos, Antoni; Mataró, Maria

    2013-10-01

    Carotid atherosclerosis has emerged as a relevant contributor to cognitive impairment and dementia whereas the role of intracranial stenosis and vascular resistance in cognition remains unknown. This study aims to assess the association of asymptomatic cervicocerebral atherosclerosis and intracranial vascular resistance with cognitive performance in a large dementia-free population. The Barcelona-AsIA (Asymptomatic Intracranial Atherosclerosis) Neuropsychology Study included 747 Caucasian subjects older than 50 with a moderate-high vascular risk (assessed by REGICOR score) and without history of neither symptomatic vascular disease nor dementia. Extracranial and transcranial color-coded duplex ultrasound examination was performed to assess carotid intima-media thickness (IMT), presence of carotid plaques (ECAD group), intracranial stenosis (ICAD group), and middle cerebral artery pulsatility index (MCA-PI) as a measure of intracranial vascular resistance. Neuropsychological assessment included tests in three cognitive domains: visuospatial skills and speed, verbal memory and verbal fluency. In univariate analyses, carotid IMT, ECAD and MCA-PI were associated with lower performance in almost all cognitive domains, and ICAD was associated with poor performance in some visuospatial and verbal cognitive tests. After adjustment for age, sex, vascular risk score, years of education and depressive symptoms, ECAD remained associated with poor performance in the three cognitive domains and elevated MCA-PI with worse performance in visuospatial skills and speed. Carotid plaques and increased intracranial vascular resistance are independently associated with low cognitive functioning in Caucasian stroke and dementia-free subjects. We failed to find an independent association of intracranial large vessel stenosis with cognitive performance. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Reduction of freezing of gait in Parkinson's disease by repetitive robot-assisted treadmill training: a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Friedman Joseph H

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Parkinson's disease is a chronic, neurodegenerative disease characterized by gait abnormalities. Freezing of gait (FOG, an episodic inability to generate effective stepping, is reported as one of the most disabling and distressing parkinsonian symptoms. While there are no specific therapies to treat FOG, some external physical cues may alleviate these types of motor disruptions. The purpose of this study was to examine the potential effect of continuous physical cueing using robot-assisted sensorimotor gait training on reducing FOG episodes and improving gait. Methods Four individuals with Parkinson's disease and FOG symptoms received ten 30-minute sessions of robot-assisted gait training (Lokomat to facilitate repetitive, rhythmic, and alternating bilateral lower extremity movements. Outcomes included the FOG-Questionnaire, a clinician-rated video FOG score, spatiotemporal measures of gait, and the Parkinson's Disease Questionnaire-39 quality of life measure. Results All participants showed a reduction in FOG both by self-report and clinician-rated scoring upon completion of training. Improvements were also observed in gait velocity, stride length, rhythmicity, and coordination. Conclusions This pilot study suggests that robot-assisted gait training may be a feasible and effective method of reducing FOG and improving gait. Videotaped scoring of FOG has the potential advantage of providing additional data to complement FOG self-report.

  17. A single-center, cross-sectional prevalence study of impulse control disorders in Parkinson disease: association with dopaminergic drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poletti, Michele; Logi, Chiara; Lucetti, Claudio; Del Dotto, Paolo; Baldacci, Filippo; Vergallo, Andrea; Ulivi, Martina; Del Sarto, Simone; Rossi, Giuseppe; Ceravolo, Roberto; Bonuccelli, Ubaldo

    2013-10-01

    The current study aimed at establishing the prevalence of impulse control disorders (ICDs) in patients with Parkinson disease (PD) and their association with demographic, drug-related, and disease-related characteristics. We performed a single-center cross-sectional study of 805 PD patients. Impulse control disorders were investigated with the Questionnaire for Impulsive Compulsive Disorders in Parkinson's Disease; also comorbid neuropsychiatric complications (dementia, delusions, visual hallucinations) were investigated with clinical interviews and ad hoc instruments (Parkinson Psychosis Questionnaire and Neuropsychiatry Inventory). Impulse control disorders were identified in 65 patients (prevalence, 8.1%), with pathological gambling and hypersexuality the most frequent. Impulse control disorders were present in 57 of 593 cognitively preserved patients (prevalence, 9.6%) and in 8 of 212 demented patients (prevalence, 3.8%). Impulse control disorders were significantly associated with dopamine agonists (odds ratio [OR], 5.50; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.60-12.46; P Impulse control disorders frequency was similar for pramipexole and ropinirole (16.6% vs 12.5%; OR, 1.45; 95% CI, 0.79-2.74; P = 0.227). Additional variables associated with ICDs were male sex and younger age. These findings suggested that dopaminergic treatments in PD are associated with increased odds of having an ICD, but also other demographic and clinical variables are associated with ICDs, suggesting the multifactorial nature of the ICD phenomenon in PD.

  18. Parkinson's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Astradsson, Arnar; Aziz, Tipu Z

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The mean age of onset of Parkinson's disease is about 65 years, with a median time of 9 years between diagnosis and death. METHODS AND OUTCOMES: We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical question: What are the effects of fetal cell or stem cell......-derived therapy in people with Parkinson's disease? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library and other important databases up to September 2014 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from...

  19. Effect of cognitive and motor tasks on postural stability in Parkinson's disease: a posturographic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchese, Roberta; Bove, Marco; Abbruzzese, Giovanni

    2003-06-01

    To analyse the effect of concomitant cognitive or motor task performance on balance control in Parkinson's disease (PD), we performed a posturographic study in 24 PD patients and in 20 sex- and age-matched control subjects. Postural sway was measured with eyes open (EO) and eyes closed (EC) during quiet stance and during performance of calculation or motor sequence of thumb opposition to the other fingers. No difference of centre of foot pressure (COP) parameters was observed during quiet standing (either EO or EC) between patients and controls, but visual deprivation induced in both groups a worsening of postural stability. COP area was significantly increased in PD patients during dual task performance, whereas no difference of COP path and x-y axes was observed. The effects induced by the performance of cognitive or motor task were significantly more evident in PD patients with clinical evidence of postural instability (presence of prior falls in the history). This study demonstrates that dual task interference on postural control can be observed in PD patients during performance of cognitive as well as motor tasks. The balance deterioration during dual task performance was significantly enhanced in patients with history of prior falls. These findings have some implications for the strategies to be used in reducing the risk of fall in PD. Copyright 2003 Movement Disorder Society

  20. Pilot study of atomoxetine in patients with Parkinson's disease and dopa-unresponsive Freezing of Gait.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Revuelta, Gonzalo J; Embry, Aaron; Elm, Jordan J; Gregory, Chris; Delambo, Amy; Kautz, Steve; Hinson, Vanessa K

    2015-01-01

    Freezing of gait (FoG) is a common and debilitating condition in Parkinson's disease (PD) associated with executive dysfunction. A subtype of FoG does not respond to dopaminergic therapy and may be related to noradrenergic deficiency. This pilot study explores the effects of atomoxetine on gait in PD patients with dopa-unresponsive FoG using a novel paradigm for objective gait assessment. Ten patients with PD and dopa-unresponsive FoG were enrolled in this eight-week open label pilot study. Assessments included an exploratory gait analysis protocol that quantified spatiotemporal parameters during straight-away walking and turning, while performing a dual task. Clinical, and subjective assessments of gait, quality of life, and safety were also administered. The primary outcome was a validated subjective assessment for FoG (FOG-Q). Atomoxetine was well tolerated, however, no significant change was observed in the primary outcome. The gait analysis protocol correlated well with clinical scales, but not with subjective assessments. DBS patients were more likely to increase gait velocity (p = 0.033), and improved in other clinical assessments. Objective gait analysis protocols assessing gait while dual tasking are feasible and useful for this patient population, and may be superior correlates of FoG severity than subjective measures. These findings can inform future trials in this population.

  1. VA Vascular Injury Study (VAVIS): VA-DoD extremity injury outcomes collaboration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shireman, Paula K; Rasmussen, Todd E; Jaramillo, Carlos A; Pugh, Mary Jo

    2015-02-03

    Limb injuries comprise 50-60% of U.S. Service member's casualties of wars in Afghanistan and Iraq. Combat-related vascular injuries are present in 12% of this cohort, a rate 5 times higher than in prior wars. Improvements in medical and surgical trauma care, including initial in-theatre limb salvage approaches (IILS) have resulted in improved survival and fewer amputations, however, the long-term outcomes such as morbidity, functional decline, and risk for late amputation of salvaged limbs using current process of care have not been studied. The long-term care of these injured warfighters poses a significant challenge to the Department of Defense (DoD) and Department of Veterans Affairs (VA). The VA Vascular Injury Study (VAVIS): VA-DoD Extremity Injury Outcomes Collaborative, funded by the VA, Health Services Research and Development Service, is a longitudinal cohort study of Veterans with vascular extremity injuries. Enrollment will begin April, 2015 and continue for 3 years. Individuals with a validated extremity vascular injury in the Department of Defense Trauma Registry will be contacted and will complete a set of validated demographic, social, behavioral, and functional status measures during interview and online/ mailed survey. Primary outcome measures will: 1) Compare injury, demographic and geospatial characteristics of patients with IILS and identify late vascular surgery related limb complications and health care utilization in Veterans receiving VA vs. non-VA care, 2) Characterize the preventive services received by individuals with vascular repair and related outcomes, and 3) Describe patient-reported functional outcomes in Veterans with traumatic vascular limb injuries. This study will provide key information about the current process of care for Active Duty Service members and Veterans with polytrauma/vascular injuries at risk for persistent morbidity and late amputation. The results of this study will be the first step for clinicians in VA and

  2. Chronic Stress Improves NO- and Ca2+ Flux-Dependent Vascular Function: A Pharmacological Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruder-Nascimento, Thiago, E-mail: bruderthiago@usp.br [Departamento de Farmacologia - Instituto de Biociências de Botucatu - Universidade do Estado de São Paulo (UNESP), Botucatu, São Paulo (Brazil); Departamento de Clínica Médica - Faculdade de Medicina de Botucatu - Universidade do Estado de São Paulo (UNESP), Botucatu, São Paulo (Brazil); Campos, Dijon Henrique Salome [Departamento de Clínica Médica - Faculdade de Medicina de Botucatu - Universidade do Estado de São Paulo (UNESP), Botucatu, São Paulo (Brazil)

    2015-03-15

    Stress is associated with cardiovascular diseases. This study aimed at assessing whether chronic stress induces vascular alterations, and whether these modulations are nitric oxide (NO) and Ca2+ dependent. Wistar rats, 30 days of age, were separated into 2 groups: control (C) and Stress (St). Chronic stress consisted of immobilization for 1 hour/day, 5 days/week, 15 weeks. Systolic blood pressure was assessed. Vascular studies on aortic rings were performed. Concentration-effect curves were built for noradrenaline, in the presence of L-NAME or prazosin, acetylcholine, sodium nitroprusside and KCl. In addition, Ca{sup 2+} flux was also evaluated. Chronic stress induced hypertension, decreased the vascular response to KCl and to noradrenaline, and increased the vascular response to acetylcholine. L-NAME blunted the difference observed in noradrenaline curves. Furthermore, contractile response to Ca{sup 2+} was decreased in the aorta of stressed rats. Our data suggest that the vascular response to chronic stress is an adaptation to its deleterious effects, such as hypertension. In addition, this adaptation is NO- and Ca{sup 2+}-dependent. These data help to clarify the contribution of stress to cardiovascular abnormalities. However, further studies are necessary to better elucidate the mechanisms involved in the cardiovascular dysfunction associated with stressors. (Arq Bras Cardiol. 2014; [online].ahead print, PP.0-0)

  3. Perceptions of balance and falls following a supervised training intervention - a qualitative study of people with Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leavy, Breiffni; Berntsson, Johan; Franzén, Erika; Skavberg Roaldsen, Kirsti

    2017-12-21

    To explore perceptions of balance and falls among people with mild to moderate Parkinson's disease 3 - 12 months following participation in supervised balance training. This qualitative study used in-depth individual interviews for data collection among 13 people with Parkinson's disease. Interviews were systematically analyzed using qualitative content analysis with an inductive approach. Three main themes arose: Falls - avoided and intended highlights the wide spectrum of fall perceptions, ranging from worse-case scenario to undramatized events; Balance identity incorporates how gradual deterioration in balance served as a reminder of disease progression and how identifying themselves as "aware not afraid" helped certain participants to maintain balance confidence despite everyday activity restriction; Training as treatment recounts how participants used exercise as disease self-management with the aim to maintain independence in daily life. Interpretation of the underlying patterns of these main themes resulted in the overarching theme Training as treatment when battling problems with balance and falls. Whereas certain participants expressed a fear of falling which they managed by activity restriction, others described being confident in their balance despite avoidance of balance-challenging activities. Training was used as treatment to self-manage disease-related balance impairments in order to maintain independence in daily life. Implication for Rehabilitation People with Parkinson's disease require early advice about the positive effects of physical activity as well as strategies for self-management in order to ease the psychological and physical burden of progressive balance impairment. Fear of falling should be investigated alongside activity avoidance in this group in order to provide a more accurate insight into the scope of psychological concerns regarding balance and falls in everyday life. Certain people with Parkinson's disease define their

  4. Critical Dysphagia is Common in Parkinson Disease and Occurs Even in Early Stages: A Prospective Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pflug, Christina; Bihler, Moritz; Emich, Katharina; Niessen, Almut; Nienstedt, Julie Cläre; Flügel, Till; Koseki, Jana-Christiane; Plaetke, Rosemarie; Hidding, Ute; Gerloff, Christian; Buhmann, Carsten

    2018-02-01

    To assess the prevalence of dysphagia and its typical findings in unselected "real-world" Parkinson patients using an objective gold-standard method. This was a prospective, controlled, cross-sectional study conducted in 119 consecutive Parkinson patients of all stages independent of subjective dysphagia. Patients and 32 controls were clinically and endoscopically examined by flexible endoscopic evaluation of swallowing (FEES) to evaluate the deglutition with regard to three consistencies (water, biscuit, and bread). Typical findings of dysphagia like penetration and aspiration, residues, and leakage were assessed. Dysphagia was common in Parkinson patients and occurred in all, even early, disease stages. Only 5% (6/119) of patients showed a completely unremarkable deglutition. Aspiration was seen in 25% (30/119) of patients and always related to water. Residues occurred in 93% (111/119), most commonly for bread. Leakage was much less frequent and was found in only 3-18%, depending on consistency. In a significant fraction of patients, objective dysphagia was not subjectively perceived. A total of 16% of asymptomatic patients suffered from critical aspiration. Significant swallowing deficiencies already occurred in early disease. Aspiration was found in 4 of 20 (20%) patients with disease duration of less than 2 years. Seven of 57 patients (12%) with Hoehn and Yahr stage 2 suffered from severe aspiration. Given the high frequency of critical aspiration in Parkinson disease, these patients should be evaluated early for dysphagia to avoid complications and recommend an adequate therapy. FEES is a simple, cost efficient, minimally invasive method that is ideally suited for this purpose.

  5. Risk for Parkinson's disease among patients with osteoarthritis: a Danish cohort study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rugbjerg, Kathrine; Friis, Søren; Jørgensen, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    prevalence of NSAID use among cohort members, and lung cancer (0.77; 95% CI, 0.73-0.80), indicating a lower prevalence of smoking than usual. Our results do not support the hypothesis that patients with prolonged use of NSAID and other analgesics are at reduced risk for Parkinson's disease. A possible lower......It has been suggested that use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID) protects against Parkinson's disease, although the results are not consistent. We investigated the risk for Parkinson's disease in patients with osteoarthritis, who are typically intensive users of NSAID. By using......-2007 was compared with that expected from the age-, gender- and period-specific hospital contact rates of the general Danish population, and standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) and associated 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were derived. Cohort members were also linked to the Danish Cancer Register to estimate...

  6. Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome in the era of catheter ablation: insights from a registry study of 2169 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pappone, Carlo; Vicedomini, Gabriele; Manguso, Francesco; Saviano, Massimo; Baldi, Mario; Pappone, Alessia; Ciaccio, Cristiano; Giannelli, Luigi; Ionescu, Bogdan; Petretta, Andrea; Vitale, Raffaele; Cuko, Amarild; Calovic, Zarko; Fundaliotis, Angelica; Moscatiello, Mario; Tavazzi, Luigi; Santinelli, Vincenzo

    2014-09-02

    The management of Wolff-Parkinson-White is based on the distinction between asymptomatic and symptomatic presentations, but evidence is limited in the asymptomatic population. The Wolff-Parkinson-White registry was an 8-year prospective study of either symptomatic or asymptomatic Wolff-Parkinson-White patients referred to our Arrhythmology Department for evaluation or ablation. Inclusion criteria were a baseline electrophysiological testing with or without radiofrequency catheter ablation (RFA). Primary end points were the percentage of patients who experienced ventricular fibrillation (VF) or potentially malignant arrhythmias and risk factors. Among 2169 enrolled patients, 1001 (550 asymptomatic) did not undergo RFA (no-RFA group) and 1168 (206 asymptomatic) underwent ablation (RFA group). There were no differences in clinical and electrophysiological characteristics between the 2 groups except for symptoms. In the no-RFA group, VF occurred in 1.5% of patients, virtually exclusively (13 of 15) in children (median age, 11 years), and was associated with a short accessory pathway antegrade refractory period (PParkinson-White syndrome essentially depends on intrinsic electrophysiological properties of AP rather than on symptoms. RFA performed during the same procedure after electrophysiological testing is of benefit in improving the long-term outcomes. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  7. Mini-Mental Parkinson: First Validation Study of a New Bedside Test Constructed for Parkinson’s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Mahieux

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available We have developed a brief screening test aimed at identifying cognitive disorders in Parkinson’s disease. The Mini-Mental Parkinson derives from the Mini-Mental State Examination of Folstein. It includes seven ordered subsections, with a total score of 32. A pilot study was conducted in 50 community-dwelling parkinsonian patients, in order to establish its metrological qualities. Comparisons were made with a neuropsychological battery including several tests widely used in the assessment of specific cognitive disorders in Parkinson’s disease. The correlations between the Mini-Mental Parkinson and each component of this battery were substantial, especially for the performance subtests of the WAIS-R (r = 0.62 to 0.72, the Stroop test (r = 0.65 the 15-objects test (r = 0.64, the word fluency (r = 0.63 and the Odd Man Out test (r = 0.61. The validity of each subtest of the Mini-Mental Parkinson was adequate except for one, based on a word choice, which requires a modification in French before definitive use. The test-retest reliability was high (r = 0.84. There was a significant difference in the mean scores in cases with confusional event (22.4, even without current signs of dementia, compared with patients with no such history (27.2. In conclusion, this brief test is suitable for assessment of parkinsonian patients.

  8. Qualidade de Vida em Voz: estudo na doença de Parkinson idiopática e na Disfonia Espasmódica Adutora Quality of life in voice: a study in Parkinson's disease and in adductor spasmodic dysphonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bárbara Pereira Lopes

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: avaliar o impacto causado pela alteração vocal na qualidade de vida (QV dos pacientes com doença de Parkinson (DP idiopática e com disfonia espasmódica adutora (DEA. MÉTODO: o estudo foi realizado com 56 indivíduos do sexo feminino, dos quais 28 compunham o grupo controle; 14, o grupo de DEA, no período anterior ao tratamento com toxina botulínica; e 14, o grupo de DP idiopática. Os participantes preencheram o questionário de Qualidade de Vida em Voz (QVV validado para o português brasileiro. Para verificar a diferença entre as médias dos grupos foi utilizado o método de análise de variância por postos de Kruskal-Wallis e o teste de Tamhane para comparações múltiplas, com significância PURPOSE: to evaluate the impact of voice disorders on quality of life of patients with idiopathic Parkinson's disease and with adductor spasmodic dysphonia. METHOD: the study consisted of 56 females, 28 in the control group; 14, the adductor spasmodic dysphonia group in the period prior to treatment with botulinum toxin; and 14, the group of idiopathic Parkinson's disease. The participants filled in the Voice-Related Quality of life (V-RQOL questionnaire validated for Brazilian Portuguese. To check the difference between averages of the groups it was used the method of analysis of variance by Kruskal-Wallis and Tamhane test for multiple comparisons, with significance <0.05. RESULTS: the average age of the groups were 66.18 for the control group, 67.21 for the Parkinson's disease group and 59.7 for the adductor spasmodic dysphonia group, with no statistical difference between the groups. In the V-RQOL protocol the mean domain social-emotional, physical functioning and total score were higher in the control group, followed by group of Parkinson's disease and, finally, the group of adductor spasmodic dysphonia with statistically significant difference between them. In addition, there was statistical difference for each pair of groups

  9. Qualidade de Vida em Voz: estudo na doença de Parkinson idiopática e na disfonia espasmódica adutora Quality of life in voice: a study in Parkinson's disease and in adductor spasmodic dysphonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bárbara Pereira Lopes

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: avaliar o impacto causado pela alteração vocal na qualidade de vida (QV dos pacientes com doença de Parkinson (DP idiopática e com disfonia espasmódica adutora (DEA. MÉTODO: o estudo foi realizado com 56 indivíduos do sexo feminino, dos quais 28 compunham o grupo controle; 14, o grupo de DEA, no período anterior ao tratamento com toxina botulínica; e 14, o grupo de DP idiopática. Os participantes preencheram o questionário de Qualidade de Vida em Voz (QVV validado para o português brasileiro. Para verificar a diferença entre as médias dos grupos foi utilizado o método de análise de variância por postos de Kruskal-Wallis e o teste de Tamhane para comparações múltiplas, com significância PURPOSE: to evaluate the impact of voice disorders on quality of life of patients with idiopathic Parkinson's disease and with adductor spasmodic dysphonia. METHOD: the study consisted of 56 females, 28 in the control group; 14, the adductor spasmodic dysphonia group in the period prior to treatment with botulinum toxin; and 14, the group of idiopathic Parkinson's disease. The participants filled in the Voice-Related Quality of life (V-RQOL questionnaire validated for Brazilian Portuguese. To check the difference between averages of the groups it was used the method of analysis of variance by Kruskal-Wallis and Tamhane test for multiple comparisons, with significance <0.05. RESULTS: the average age of the groups were 66.18 for the control group, 67.21 for the Parkinson's disease group and 59.7 for the adductor spasmodic dysphonia group, with no statistical difference between the groups. In the V-RQOL protocol the mean domain social-emotional, physical functioning and total score were higher in the control group, followed by group of Parkinson's disease and, finally, the group of adductor spasmodic dysphonia with statistically significant difference between them. In addition, there was statistical difference for each pair of groups

  10. Post-traumatic Stress Disorder and Risk of Parkinson Disease: A Nationwide Longitudinal Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Yee-Lam E; Bai, Ya-Mei; Hsu, Ju-Wei; Huang, Kai-Lin; Su, Tung-Ping; Li, Cheng-Ta; Lin, Wei-Chen; Pan, Tai-Long; Chen, Tzeng-Ji; Tsai, Shih-Jen; Chen, Mu-Hong

    2017-08-01

    Increasing evidence has suggested a relationship between post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and neurodegenerative disorder, such as Alzheimer disease. The association between PTSD and Parkinson disease (PD), however, remains unclear. Using the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database, 7,280 subjects (1,456 patients aged ≥45 years with PTSD and 5,824 age-/sex-matched individuals without PTSD) were enrolled between 2002 and 2009 and followed to the end of 2011. Subjects who developed PD during the follow-up period were identified. An increased risk of developing PD was found in patients with PTSD (Wald χ 2  = 12.061, hazard ratio [HR]: 3.46, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.72-6.96) compared with individuals without PTSD, after adjusting for demographic data and medical and psychiatric comorbidities. The sensitivity tests after excluding the first year observation (Wald χ 2  = 7.948, HR: 3.01, 95% CI: 1.40-6.46) and the first 3-year observation (Wald χ 2  = 5.099, HR: 3.07, 95% CI: 1.16-8.15) were consistent. Patients with PTSD had an elevated risk of developing PD in later life. Further studies would be required to clarify the exact pathophysiology between PTSD and PD and to investigate whether the prompt intervention for PTSD may reduce this risk. Copyright © 2017 American Association for Geriatric Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Brain PET substrate of impulse control disorders in Parkinson's disease: A metabolic connectivity study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verger, Antoine; Klesse, Elsa; Chawki, Mohammad B; Witjas, Tatiana; Azulay, Jean-Philippe; Eusebio, Alexandre; Guedj, Eric

    2018-04-10

    Impulse control disorders (ICDs) have received increased attention in Parkinson's disease (PD) because of potentially dramatic consequences. Their physiopathology, however, remains incompletely understood. An overstimulation of the mesocorticolimbic system has been reported, while a larger network has recently been suggested. The aim of this study is to specifically describe the metabolic PET substrate and related connectivity changes in PD patients with ICDs. Eighteen PD patients with ICDs and 18 PD patients without ICDs were evaluated using cerebral 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography. SPM-T maps comparisons were performed between groups and metabolic connectivity was evaluated by interregional correlation analysis (IRCA; p  130) and by graph theory (p < .05). PD patients with ICDs had relative increased metabolism in the right middle and inferior temporal gyri compared to those without ICDs. The connectivity of this area was increased mostly with the mesocorticolimbic system, positively with the orbitofrontal region, and negatively with both the right parahippocampus and the left caudate (IRCA). Moreover, the betweenness centrality of this area with the mesocorticolimbic system was lost in patients with ICDs (graph analysis). ICDs are associated in PD with the dysfunction of a network exceeding the mesocorticolimbic system, and especially the caudate, the parahippocampus, and the orbitofrontal cortex, remotely including the right middle and inferior temporal gyri. This latest area loses its central place with the mesocorticolimbic system through a connectivity dysregulation. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Dysphagia progression and swallowing management in Parkinson's disease: an observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luchesi, Karen Fontes; Kitamura, Satoshi; Mourão, Lucia Figueiredo

    2015-01-01

    Dysphagia is relatively common in individuals with neurological disorders. To describe the swallowing management and investigate associated factors with swallowing in a case series of patients with Parkinson's disease. It is a long-term study with 24 patients. The patients were observed in a five-year period (2006-2011). They underwent Fiberoptic Endoscopic Evaluation of Swallowing, Functional Oral Intake Scale and therapeutic intervention every three months. In the therapeutic intervention they received orientation about exercises to improve swallowing. The Chi-square, Kruskal-Wallis and Fisher's tests were used. The period of time for improvement or worsening of swallowing was described by Kaplan-Meier analysis. During the follow-up, ten patients improved, five stayed the same and nine worsened their swallowing functionality. The median time for improvement was ten months. Prior to the worsening there was a median time of 33 months of follow-up. There was no associated factor with improvement or worsening of swallowing. The maneuvers frequently indicated in therapeutic intervention were: chin-tuck, bolus consistency, bolus effect, strengthening-tongue, multiple swallows and vocal exercises. The swallowing management was characterized by swallowing assessment every three months with indication of compensatory and rehabilitation maneuvers, aiming to maintain the oral feeding without risks. There was no associated factor with swallowing functionality in this case series. Copyright © 2014 Associação Brasileira de Otorrinolaringologia e Cirurgia Cérvico-Facial. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  13. Dysphagia progression and swallowing management in Parkinson's disease: an observational study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen Fontes Luchesi

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Dysphagia is relatively common in individuals with neurological disorders. Objective: To describe the swallowing management and investigate associated factors with swallowing in a case series of patients with Parkinson's disease. Methods: It is a long-term study with 24 patients. The patients were observed in a five-year period (2006-2011. They underwent Fiberoptic Endoscopic Evaluation of Swallowing, Functional Oral Intake Scale and therapeutic intervention every three months. In the therapeutic intervention they received orientation about exercises to improve swallowing. The Chi-square, Kruskal-Wallis and Fisher's tests were used. The period of time for improvement or worsening of swallowing was described by Kaplan-Meier analysis. Results: During the follow-up, ten patients improved, five stayed the same and nine worsened their swallowing functionality. The median time for improvement was ten months. Prior to the worsening there was a median time of 33 months of follow-up. There was no associated factor with improvement or worsening of swallowing. The maneuvers frequently indicated in therapeutic intervention were: chin-tuck, bolus consistency, bolus effect, strengthening-tongue, multiple swallows and vocal exercises. Conclusion: The swallowing management was characterized by swallowing assessment every three months with indication of compensatory and rehabilitation maneuvers, aiming to maintain the oral feeding without risks. There was no associated factor with swallowing functionality in this case series.

  14. Pareidolia in Parkinson's disease without dementia: A positron emission tomography study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchiyama, Makoto; Nishio, Yoshiyuki; Yokoi, Kayoko; Hosokai, Yoshiyuki; Takeda, Atsushi; Mori, Etsuro

    2015-06-01

    Pareidolia, which is a particular type of complex visual illusion, has been reported to be a phenomenon analogous to visual hallucinations in patients with dementia with Lewy bodies. However, whether pareidolia is observed in Parkinson's disease (PD) or whether there are common underlying mechanisms of these two types of visual misperceptions remains to be elucidated. A test to evoke pareidolia, the Pareidolia test, was administered to 53 patients with PD without dementia and 24 healthy controls. The regional cerebral metabolic rate of glucose was measured using 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography in the PD patients. PD patients without dementia produced a greater number of pareidolic illusions compared with the controls. Pareidolia was observed in all of the patients having visual hallucinations as well as a subset of those without visual hallucinations. The number of pareidolic illusions was correlated with hypometabolism in the bilateral temporal, parietal and occipital cortices. The index of visual hallucinations was correlated with hypometabolism in the left parietal cortex. A region associated with both pareidolia and visual hallucinations was found in the left parietal lobe. Our study suggests that PD patients without dementia experience pareidolia more frequently than healthy controls and that posterior cortical dysfunction could be a common neural mechanism of pareidolia and visual hallucinations. Pareidolia could represent subclinical hallucinations or a predisposition to visual hallucinations in Lewy body disease. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Ethical safety of deep brain stimulation: A study on moral decision-making in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fumagalli, Manuela; Marceglia, Sara; Cogiamanian, Filippo; Ardolino, Gianluca; Picascia, Marta; Barbieri, Sergio; Pravettoni, Gabriella; Pacchetti, Claudio; Priori, Alberto

    2015-07-01

    The possibility that deep brain stimulation (DBS) in Parkinson's disease (PD) alters patients' decisions and actions, even temporarily, raises important clinical, ethical and legal questions. Abnormal moral decision-making can lead to ethical rules violations. Previous experiments demonstrated the subthalamic (STN) activation during moral decision-making. Here we aim to study whether STN DBS can affect moral decision-making in PD patients. Eleven patients with PD and bilateral STN DBS implant performed a computerized moral task in ON and OFF stimulation conditions. A control group of PD patients without DBS implant performed the same experimental protocol. All patients underwent motor, cognitive and psychological assessments. STN stimulation was not able to modify neither reaction times nor responses to moral task both when we compared the ON and the OFF state in the same patient (reaction times, p = .416) and when we compared DBS patients with those treated only with the best medical treatment (reaction times: p = .408, responses: p = .776). Moral judgment is the result of a complex process, requiring cognitive executive functions, problem-solving, anticipations of consequences of an action, conflict processing, emotional evaluation of context and of possible outcomes, and involving different brain areas and neural circuits. Our data show that STN DBS leaves unaffected moral decisions thus implying relevant clinical and ethical implications for DBS consequences on patients' behavior, on decision-making and on judgment ability. In conclusion, the technique can be considered safe on moral behavior. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Dopamine agonists and delusional jealousy in Parkinson's disease: a cross-sectional prevalence study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poletti, Michele; Perugi, Giulio; Logi, Chiara; Romano, Anna; Del Dotto, Paolo; Ceravolo, Roberto; Rossi, Giuseppe; Pepe, Pasquale; Dell'Osso, Liliana; Bonuccelli, Ubaldo

    2012-11-01

    Delusional jealousy (DJ) has been described in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) on dopaminergic therapy, but a role for dopaminergic therapy in DJ has not been established. The current cross-sectional study on DJ investigated its association with dopaminergic therapies compared with their associations with hallucinations and its prevalence in PD patients. Eight hundred five consecutive patients with PD were enrolled between January 2009 and June 2010. DJ was identified in 20 patients (2.48%) and hallucinations in 193 patients (23.98%). In the multivariate logistic regression analyses, dopamine agonists were significantly associated with DJ (odds ratio, 18.1; 95% CI, 3.0-infinity; P = .0002) but not with hallucinations (odds ratio, 0.73; 95% CI, 0.49-1.10; P = .133). These findings suggest that dopamine agonist treatment represents a risk factor for DJ in PD independent of the presence of a dementing disorder, and the presence of this additional nonmotor side effect should be investigated in this clinical population. Copyright © 2012 Movement Disorder Society.

  17. Serum metabolomics of slow vs. rapid motor progression Parkinson's disease: a pilot study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James R Roede

    Full Text Available Progression of Parkinson's disease (PD is highly variable, indicating that differences between slow and rapid progression forms could provide valuable information for improved early detection and management. Unfortunately, this represents a complex problem due to the heterogeneous nature of humans in regards to demographic characteristics, genetics, diet, environmental exposures and health behaviors. In this pilot study, we employed high resolution mass spectrometry-based metabolic profiling to investigate the metabolic signatures of slow versus rapidly progressing PD present in human serum. Archival serum samples from PD patients obtained within 3 years of disease onset were analyzed via dual chromatography-high resolution mass spectrometry, with data extraction by xMSanalyzer and used to predict rapid or slow motor progression of these patients during follow-up. Statistical analyses, such as false discovery rate analysis and partial least squares discriminant analysis, yielded a list of statistically significant metabolic features and further investigation revealed potential biomarkers. In particular, N8-acetyl spermidine was found to be significantly elevated in the rapid progressors compared to both control subjects and slow progressors. Our exploratory data indicate that a fast motor progression disease phenotype can be distinguished early in disease using high resolution mass spectrometry-based metabolic profiling and that altered polyamine metabolism may be a predictive marker of rapidly progressing PD.

  18. Serum metabolomics of slow vs. rapid motor progression Parkinson's disease: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roede, James R; Uppal, Karan; Park, Youngja; Lee, Kichun; Tran, Vilinh; Walker, Douglas; Strobel, Frederick H; Rhodes, Shannon L; Ritz, Beate; Jones, Dean P

    2013-01-01

    Progression of Parkinson's disease (PD) is highly variable, indicating that differences between slow and rapid progression forms could provide valuable information for improved early detection and management. Unfortunately, this represents a complex problem due to the heterogeneous nature of humans in regards to demographic characteristics, genetics, diet, environmental exposures and health behaviors. In this pilot study, we employed high resolution mass spectrometry-based metabolic profiling to investigate the metabolic signatures of slow versus rapidly progressing PD present in human serum. Archival serum samples from PD patients obtained within 3 years of disease onset were analyzed via dual chromatography-high resolution mass spectrometry, with data extraction by xMSanalyzer and used to predict rapid or slow motor progression of these patients during follow-up. Statistical analyses, such as false discovery rate analysis and partial least squares discriminant analysis, yielded a list of statistically significant metabolic features and further investigation revealed potential biomarkers. In particular, N8-acetyl spermidine was found to be significantly elevated in the rapid progressors compared to both control subjects and slow progressors. Our exploratory data indicate that a fast motor progression disease phenotype can be distinguished early in disease using high resolution mass spectrometry-based metabolic profiling and that altered polyamine metabolism may be a predictive marker of rapidly progressing PD.

  19. Inverse association between yerba mate consumption and idiopathic Parkinson's disease. A case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatto, Emilia Mabel; Melcon, Carlos; Parisi, Virginia L; Bartoloni, Leonardo; Gonzalez, Claudio D

    2015-09-15

    Yerba mate tea is a very common beverage in some countries of South America. We conducted a case-control study on an individual basis using hospital records to investigate the association between Parkinson's disease (PD) and yerba mate intake. A case was defined as an age of ≥ 40 years with ≥ 1 year of PD. Each case was individually matched by two controls. Exposure was measured by yerba mate consumption, coffee, tea, and alcohol intake and smoking status. The sample consisted of 223 PD patients (mean age 68 years and mean disease duration 7.3 years) and 406 controls. There was an inverse association between yerba mate "bombilla" consumption and PD (OR 0.64, 95% CI: 0.54-0.76, p=0.00001). A multivariate analysis with a logistic regression adjusted by sex, alcohol intake and smoking provided the following results: yerba mate (OR 0.63, 95% CI: 0.53-0.76), tea (OR 0.60, 95% CI: 0.42-0.86), coffee (OR 0.51, 95% CI: 0.35-0.73). We found an inverse association between yerba mate consumption and PD. These results led us to hypothesize that yerba mate may have a potential protective role in the development of PD. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. A longitudinal study of neuromelanin-sensitive magnetic resonance imaging in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuura, Keita; Maeda, Masayuki; Tabei, Ken-Ichi; Umino, Maki; Kajikawa, Hiroyuki; Satoh, Masayuki; Kida, Hirotaka; Tomimoto, Hidekazu

    2016-10-28

    Neuromelanin-sensitive MR imaging (NMI) is an increasingly powerful tool for the diagnosis of Parkinson's disease (PD). This study was undertaken to evaluate longitudinal changes on NMI in PD patients. We examined longitudinal changes on NMI in 14 PD patients. The area and contrast ratio (CR) of the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNc) were comparatively analyzed. The total area and CR of the SNc upon follow-up NMI were significantly smaller than those on initial NMI (from 33.5±18.9 pixels and 6.35±2.86% to 21.5±16.7 pixels and 4.19±2.11%; Wilcoxon signed-rank test, pWilcoxon signed-rank test, p=0.002 and p=0.007, respectively). On a case-by-case basis, the area of the SNc invariably decreased upon follow-up NMI in all patients. We further demonstrated that the total area and CR of the SNc negatively correlated with disease duration (Pearson correlation coefficient, r=-0.63, p<0.001 and r=-0.41, p=0.031, respectively). In area analyses, our results demonstrated very high intraclass correlation coefficients for both intra- and inter-rater reliability. NMI is a useful and reliable tool for detecting neuropathological changes over time in PD patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. A preliminary diffusional kurtosis imaging study of Parkinson disease: comparison with conventional diffusion tensor imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamagata, Koji; Kamiya, Kouhei; Suzuki, Michimasa; Hori, Masaaki; Yoshida, Mariko; Aoki, Shigeki [Juntendo University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo (Japan); Tomiyama, Hiroyuki; Hatano, Taku; Motoi, Yumiko; Hattori, Nobutaka [Juntendo University School of Medicine, Department of Neurology, Tokyo (Japan); Abe, Osamu [Nihon University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Tokyo (Japan); Shimoji, Keigo [National Center of Neurology and Psychiatry Hospital, Department of Radiology, Tokyo (Japan)

    2014-03-15

    Diffusional kurtosis imaging (DKI) is a more sensitive technique than conventional diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) for assessing tissue microstructure. In particular, it quantifies the microstructural integrity of white matter, even in the presence of crossing fibers. The aim of this preliminary study was to compare how DKI and DTI show white matter alterations in Parkinson disease (PD). DKI scans were obtained with a 3-T magnetic resonance imager from 12 patients with PD and 10 healthy controls matched by age and sex. Tract-based spatial statistics were used to compare the mean kurtosis (MK), mean diffusivity (MD), and fractional anisotropy (FA) maps of the PD patient group and the control group. In addition, a region-of-interest analysis was performed for the area of the posterior corona radiata and superior longitudinal fasciculus (SLF) fiber crossing. FA values in the frontal white matter were significantly lower in PD patients than in healthy controls. Reductions in MK occurred more extensively throughout the brain: in addition to frontal white matter, MK was lower in the parietal, occipital, and right temporal white matter. The MK value of the area of the posterior corona radiata and SLF fiber crossing was also lower in the PD group. DKI detects changes in the cerebral white matter of PD patients more sensitively than conventional DTI. In addition, DKI is useful for evaluating crossing fibers. By providing a sensitive index of brain pathology in PD, DKI may enable improved monitoring of disease progression. (orig.)

  2. Combined rasagiline and antidepressant use in Parkinson disease in the ADAGIO study: effects on nonmotor symptoms and tolerability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Kara M; Eyal, Eli; Weintraub, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Depression, cognitive impairment, and other nonmotor symptoms (NMSs) are common early in Parkinson disease (PD) and may be in part due to disease-related dopamine deficiency. Many patients with PD are treated with antidepressants for NMSs, and the effect of the combination of PD medications that enhance dopamine neurotransmission and antidepressants on NMSs has not been studied. We report the effects of the addition of a monoamine oxidase B inhibitor, rasagiline, to antidepressant treatment in PD. To evaluate the effect of rasagiline on depression, cognition, and other PD NMSs in patients taking an antidepressant in the Attenuation of Disease Progression With Azilect Given Once Daily (ADAGIO) study. The ADAGIO study was a double-blind, placebo-controlled, delayed-start trial of rasagiline in de novo PD. In this exploratory post hoc analysis, we analyzed patients taking an antidepressant during the 36-week phase 1 period, in which patients were randomized to rasagiline (1 or 2 mg/d) or placebo. We evaluated the change in NMSs in patients taking an antidepressant and rasagiline compared with those taking placebo. The NMSs were assessed by Movement Disorder Society-sponsored revision of the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale Nonmotor Experiences of Daily Living, the original Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale, and the Parkinson Fatigue Scale. A total of 191 of the 1174 patients (16.3%) were treated with antidepressants during phase 1 and provided efficacy data. Depression and cognition scores revealed significantly less worsening in the rasagiline group compared with the placebo group (differences in Movement Disorder Society-sponsored revision of the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale item-adjusted means [SEs], -0.19 [0.10], P = .048, and -0.20 [0.05], P rasagiline group compared with placebo. There was a nonsignificant trend toward less worsening in apathy and no significant between-group differences in anxiety or sleep. The effect on

  3. Parkinson disease and positron tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baron, J.C.

    1984-10-01

    Physiopathologic investigations of Parkinson disease and parkinsonian syndrome using positron tomography are briefly reviewed: study of cerebral blood flow and metabolism; effects of L-DOPA; study of dopaminergic receptors and of 18 F-Fluoro-L-DOPA incorporation [fr

  4. Vascular complications following 1500 consecutive living and cadaveric donor renal transplantations: A single center study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salehipour, Mehdi; Salahi, Heshmatollah; Jalaeian, Hamed; Bahador, Ali; Nikeghbalian, Saman; Barzideh, Ehsan; Ariafar, Ali; Malek-Hosseini, Seyed Ali

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to document vascular complications that occurred following cadaveric and living donor kidney transplants in order to assess the overall incidence of these complications at our center as well as to identify possible risk factors. In a retrospective cohort study, 1500 consecutive renal transplant recipients who received a living or cadaveric donor kidney between December 1988 and July 2006 were evaluated. The study was performed at the Nemazee Hospital, Shiraz, Iran. The assessment of the anatomy and number of renal arteries as well as the incidence of vascular complications was made by color doppler ultrasonography, angiography, and/or surgical exploration. Clinically apparent vascular complications were seen in 8.86% of all study patients (n = 133) with the most frequent being hemorrhage (n = 91; 6.1%) followed by allograft renal artery stenosis (n = 26; 1.7%), renal artery thrombosis (n = 9; 0.6%), and renal vein thrombosis (n = 7; 0.5%). Vascular complications were more frequent in recipients of cadaveric organs than recipients of allografts from living donors (12.5% vs. 7.97%; P0.017). The occurrence of vascular complications was significantly more frequent among recipients of renal allografts with multiple arteries when compared with recipients of kidneys with single artery (12.3% vs. 8.2%; P0.033). The same was true to venous complications as well (25.4% vs. 8.2%; P< 0.001). Our study shows that vascular complications were more frequent in allografts with multiple renal blood vessels. Also, the complications were much less frequent in recipients of living donor transplants. (author)

  5. Parkinson's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a long and relatively healthy life. What Causes Parkinson's Disease? In the very deep parts of the brain, there is a collection of nerve cells that help control movement, known as the basal ganglia (say: BAY-sul GAN-glee-ah). In a ...

  6. Presymptomatic detection of Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenner, P

    1993-01-01

    Presymptomatic detection of Parkinson's disease is necessary if neuroprotective therapies are to be utilized in its treatment. Various methods (PET, electrophysiology, enzyme assays, olfactory function) may be applicable but none has been rigorously evaluated. Other possible approaches are now considered. Plasma HVA levels (pHVA) in the presence of debrisoquine may reflect cerebral dopamine function. However, there are no detectable differences in pHVA between newly diagnosed and untreated parkinsonian patients and control subjects. Compensatory increases in dopamine turnover may mask a decrease in pHVA in the early stages of the disease. So, at present this technique could not be used as a diagnostic tool. Post-mortem studies of brain in Parkinson's disease may provide clues to biochemical markers indicative of nigral pathology. Mitochondrial complex I activity is reduced in substantia nigra in Parkinson's disease and it was reported also to be markedly reduced in blood platelets. However, subsequent studies suggest that the difference in platelet complex I activity is too small to be diagnostic of Parkinson's disease. There are also selective reductions in brain glutathione levels in Parkinson's disease restricted to substantia nigra, which do not occur in other neurodegenerative disorders and are not due to drug treatment. Importantly, in incidental Lewy body disease (preclinical Parkinson's disease) nigral glutathione levels are reduced to the same degree as in advanced Parkinson's disease. So, some peripheral index of altered glutathione function may be valuable in the early detection of the disease process.

  7. Parkinson's Disease Videos

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    Full Text Available ... HELPLINE 1-800-4PD-INFO (473-4636) helpline@parkinson.org Search Our Site General Gift Tribute Gift Moving Day Support a Fundraiser Understanding Parkinson's What Is Parkinson's? Causes & Statistics Early Signs Movement ...

  8. Parkinson's Disease Videos

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    Full Text Available ... Motor Symptoms in PD Expert Briefings: Swallowing and Dental Challenges Expert Briefings: Caregiving and Parkinson's: Laying the ... Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Coping Skills for Parkinson's Care Partners Expert Briefings: What's New in Genetics and ...

  9. Parkinson's Disease Videos

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    Full Text Available ... Tips for Care Partners Nurse Webinars: Nursing Solutions: Innovations in PD Nurse Education CareMAP: Managing Advanced Parkinson's ... Progression of the Disease? OHSU - Parkinson's Disease: Pharmacological Management of Depression, Anxiety & Psychosis How Is Parkinson's Disease ...

  10. Parkinson's Disease Videos

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    Full Text Available ... Nutrition and Parkinson's Disease 2010 Expert Briefings: Legal Issues: Planning Ahead When You are Living with Parkinson's ... for Following a Medication Schedule? Expert Briefings: Cognitive Issues: Advice for Parkinson's Care Partners CareMAP: Medications and ...

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    Full Text Available ... Late Stage Parkinson's Expert Briefings: Impulsive and Compulsive Behaviors in Parkinson's Expert Briefings: Complementary Approaches to Parkinson's ... What Do I Do if I Suspect Compulsive Behavior in a Loved One with PD? CareMAP: Planear ...

  12. Parkinson's Disease Videos

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    Full Text Available ... Nonmotor Symptoms of Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Gait, Balance and Falls in Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Coping ... Conference: Lessons Learned How Does the DBS Device Work? OHSU - Parkinson's Disease: Managing Depression, Anxiety & Psychosis CareMAP: ...

  13. Parkinson's Disease Videos

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    Full Text Available ... Nutrition and Parkinson's Disease 2010 Expert Briefings: Legal Issues: Planning Ahead When You are Living with Parkinson's ... Care or Team Approach Important? Expert Briefings: Cognitive Issues: Advice for Parkinson's Care Partners Jose Maria Lobo: ...

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    Full Text Available ... Nonmotor Symptoms of Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Gait, Balance and Falls in Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Coping ... with Advanced Parkinson's How Does the DBS Device Work? What Are the Strategies for Managing Problems with ...

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    Full Text Available ... of Exercise on PD Expert Briefings: Parkinson's and Parenting Expert Briefings: Occupational Therapy and Parkinson's: Tips for ... Briefings: Nutrition and Parkinson's CareMAP: When Is It Time to Get Help? Ask the Helpline: Why Does ...

  16. Parkinson's Disease Videos

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    Full Text Available ... Skills for Parkinson's Care Partners Expert Briefings: What's New in Genetics and Parkinson's? Expert Briefings: Understanding the ... Miami, FL 33131 NY: 1359 Broadway, Suite 1509, New York, NY 10018 contact@parkinson.org Press Room ...

  17. Parkinson's Disease Videos

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    Full Text Available ... PD Expert Briefings: Parkinson's Disease: Financial, Legal and Medical Planning Tips for Care Partners Nurse Webinars: Nursing ... Parkinson's Disease: One Voice, Many Listeners Expert Briefings: Medical Therapies: What's in the Parkinson's Pipeline? Expert Briefings: ...

  18. Parkinson's Disease Videos

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    Full Text Available ... options are available. Learn More Living with Parkinson's Managing Parkinson's In Your Area Resources & Support PD Library ... otra canción” Expert Briefings: Diagnosis PD, Now What? Managing the First Few Years with Parkinson's Expert Briefings: ...

  19. Parkinson's Disease Videos

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    Full Text Available ... Learn More Research Research We Fund Parkinson's Outcomes Project Grant Opportunities Science News & Progress Patient Engagement Research ... Is Parkinson's Disease Diagnosed? OHSU - Parkinson's Disease: Pharmacological Management of Depression, Anxiety & Psychosis CareMAP: Getting Dressed What ...

  20. Parkinson's Disease Videos

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    Full Text Available ... and Apathy in Parkinson's Disease Nurse Webinars: Interdisciplinary Education on Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Getting Around: Transportation and Travel with PD Expert Briefings: Sleep and Parkinson's Nurse: ...

  1. Parkinson's Disease Videos

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    Full Text Available ... Expert Briefings: Parkinson's Disease: Financial, Legal and Medical Planning Tips for Care Partners Nurse Webinars: Nursing Solutions: ... and Parkinson's Disease 2010 Expert Briefings: Legal Issues: Planning Ahead When You are Living with Parkinson's Expert ...

  2. Parkinson's Disease Videos

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    Full Text Available ... Parkinson's There is a lot to know about Parkinson's disease. Learn about symptoms, how it is diagnosed and ... your quality of life and live well with Parkinson's disease. Learn More Expert Care Patient Centered Care Centers ...

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  4. Parkinson's Disease Videos

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  5. Parkinson's Disease Videos

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    Full Text Available ... Parkinson's Pipeline 2011: Treating Your Parkinson's Expert Briefings: Cognition and PD: What You've Always Wanted to ... Swallowing: Part 1 How Does Parkinson's Disease Affect Memory? What Do I Do if I Suspect Compulsive ...

  6. Parkinson's Disease Videos

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    Full Text Available ... Late Stage Parkinson's Expert Briefings: Impulsive and Compulsive Behaviors in Parkinson's Expert Briefings: Complementary Approaches to Parkinson's ... Prioritizing Health Needs of the Caregiver Is Compulsive Behavior a Side Effect of PD Medications? CareMAP: Preparing ...

  7. Parkinson's Disease Videos

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    Full Text Available ... PD Expert Briefings: Parkinson's and Parenting Expert Briefings: Occupational Therapy and Parkinson's: Tips for Healthy Living Expert ... Expert Briefings: Driving and Parkinson's: Balancing Independence and Safety Expert Briefings: Caring for a Person with Late ...

  8. Parkinson's Disease Videos

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    Full Text Available ... Learn More Research Research We Fund Parkinson's Outcomes Project Grant Opportunities Science News & Progress Patient Engagement Research ... Help with Freezing Episodes? OHSU - Parkinson's Disease: Pharmacological Management of Depression, Anxiety & Psychosis Overview of Parkinson's Disease ...

  9. Parkinson's Disease Videos

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    Full Text Available ... Nutrition and Parkinson's Disease 2010 Expert Briefings: Legal Issues: Planning Ahead When You are Living with Parkinson's ... 2016: Coping Strategy: Yoga & Stretching Expert Briefings: Cognitive Issues: Advice for Parkinson's Care Partners Expert Briefings: Nutrition ...

  10. Living with Parkinson's

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the entire Parkinson's community. Learn more Get Involved Moving Day Walk Parkinson's Champions Create Your Own Fundraiser Advocate With Us Local Resources Find an Event My PD Story Volunteer ... Support a Moving Day Walker Support a Parkinson's Champion Bequests & Planned ...

  11. Conditions Related to Parkinson's

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    ... the entire Parkinson's community. Learn more Get Involved Moving Day Walk Parkinson's Champions Create Your Own Fundraiser Advocate With Us Local Resources Find an Event My PD Story Volunteer ... Support a Moving Day Walker Support a Parkinson's Champion Bequests & Planned ...

  12. Diagnosis (Parkinson's Disease)

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    ... the entire Parkinson's community. Learn more Get Involved Moving Day Walk Parkinson's Champions Create Your Own Fundraiser Advocate With Us Local Resources Find an Event My PD Story Volunteer ... Support a Moving Day Walker Support a Parkinson's Champion Bequests & Planned ...

  13. Symptoms of Parkinson's

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    ... the entire Parkinson's community. Learn more Get Involved Moving Day Walk Parkinson's Champions Create Your Own Fundraiser Advocate With ... Balance & Falls) Rigidity (Stiffness) Stooped Posture Tremor Trouble Moving or Walking ‹ 10 Early Signs of Parkinson's Disease up Bradykinesia ( ...

  14. What Is Parkinson's Disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the entire Parkinson's community. Learn more Get Involved Moving Day Walk Parkinson's Champions Create Your Own Fundraiser Advocate With Us Local Resources Find an Event My PD Story Volunteer ... Support a Moving Day Walker Support a Parkinson's Champion Bequests & Planned ...

  15. Parkinson's Disease Foundation News

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    ... the entire Parkinson's community. Learn more Get Involved Moving Day Walk Parkinson's Champions Create Your Own Fundraiser Advocate With Us Local Resources Find an Event My PD Story Volunteer ... Support a Moving Day Walker Support a Parkinson's Champion Bequests & Planned ...

  16. Parkinson's Foundation: For Caregivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the entire Parkinson's community. Learn more Get Involved Moving Day Walk Parkinson's Champions Create Your Own Fundraiser Advocate With Us Local Resources Find an Event My PD Story Volunteer ... Support a Moving Day Walker Support a Parkinson's Champion Bequests & Planned ...

  17. Stages of Parkinson's

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    ... the entire Parkinson's community. Learn more Get Involved Moving Day Walk Parkinson's Champions Create Your Own Fundraiser Advocate With Us Local Resources Find an Event My PD Story Volunteer ... Support a Moving Day Walker Support a Parkinson's Champion Bequests & Planned ...

  18. Young-Onset Parkinson's

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    ... the entire Parkinson's community. Learn more Get Involved Moving Day Walk Parkinson's Champions Create Your Own Fundraiser Advocate With Us Local Resources Find an Event My PD Story Volunteer ... Support a Moving Day Walker Support a Parkinson's Champion Bequests & Planned ...

  19. Parkinson's Disease Videos

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    Full Text Available ... Improving Parkinson's Care Everywhere Expert Briefings: Apathy or Depression: Which One Is It? CareMAP: El Descanso y ... Expert Briefings: A Closer Look at Anxiety and Depression in Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Driving and Parkinson's: ...

  1. Parkinson's Disease Videos

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    Full Text Available ... Nutrition and Parkinson's Disease 2010 Expert Briefings: Legal Issues: Planning Ahead When You are Living with Parkinson's ... Prevented? Why Dance for PD? Expert Briefings: Cognitive Issues: Advice for Parkinson's Care Partners Who Is a ...

  2. Parkinson's Disease Videos

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    Full Text Available ... Late Stage Parkinson's Expert Briefings: Impulsive and Compulsive Behaviors in Parkinson's Expert Briefings: Complementary Approaches to Parkinson's ... What Do I Do if I Suspect Compulsive Behavior in a Loved One with PD? How Do ...

  3. Parkinson's Disease Videos

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    Full Text Available ... Briefings: Dealing with Dementia in PD Expert Briefings: Anxiety in Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Nutrition and Parkinson's ... and Tomorrow Expert Briefings: A Closer Look at Anxiety and Depression in Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Driving ...

  4. Parkinson's Disease Videos

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    Full Text Available ... Late Stage Parkinson's Expert Briefings: Impulsive and Compulsive Behaviors in Parkinson's Expert Briefings: Complementary Approaches to Parkinson's ... y Respuestas con todos los presentadores Is Compulsive Behavior a Side Effect of PD Medications? ¿Cómo Se ...

  5. A comparative study of vascular injection fluids in fresh-frozen and embalmed human cadaver forearms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doomernik, D E; Kruse, R R; Reijnen, M M P J; Kozicz, T L; Kooloos, J G M

    2016-10-01

    Over the years, various vascular injection products have been developed to facilitate anatomical dissections. This study aimed to compare the most commonly used vascular injection products in fresh-frozen and formalin-embalmed cadaver specimens. An overview of the properties, advantages and limitations of each substance was given, and a comparison of vascular infusion procedures in both preservation methods was made. A literature search was performed in order to identify the most commonly used vascular injection products. Acrylic paint, latex, gelatin, silicone, Araldite F and Batson's No. 17 were selected for the study. One fresh-frozen and one embalmed cadaver forearm were infused with each injection product according to a uniform protocol. The curing time, skin- and subcutaneous tissue penetration, degree of filling of the arterial tree, extravasations, consistency of the injected vessels during dissection, and the costs of each injection fluid were noted. There was a large variation between the injection fluids in processing- and curing time, colour intensity, flexibility, fragility, elasticity, strength, toxicity and costs. All fluids were suitable for infusion. The penetration of injection fluid into the skin and subcutaneous tissue was significantly better in fresh-frozen specimens (P = 0.002 and P = 0.009, respectively), with significantly smaller branches casted (P = 0.004). Vascular infusion of fresh-frozen cadaver specimens results in a significantly better filled coloured arterial tree, enabling more detail to be achieved and smaller branches casted. The biomechanical properties of fresh-frozen soft tissues are less affected compared with formalin fixation. All the injection fluids studied are suitable for vascular infusion, but their different properties ensure that certain products and procedures are more suitable for specific study purposes. © 2016 Anatomical Society.

  6. Transient monocular blindness and the risk of vascular complications according to subtype : a prospective cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Volkers, Eline J; Donders, Richard C J M; Koudstaal, Peter J; van Gijn, Jan; Algra, Ale; Jaap Kappelle, L

    Patients with transient monocular blindness (TMB) can present with many different symptoms, and diagnosis is usually based on the history alone. In this study, we assessed the risk of vascular complications according to different characteristics of TMB. We prospectively studied 341 consecutive

  7. Transient monocular blindness and the risk of vascular complications according to subtype: a prospective cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Volkers, E.J. (Eline J.); R. Donders (Rogier); P.J. Koudstaal (Peter Jan); van Gijn, J. (Jan); A. Algra (Ale); L. Jaap Kappelle

    2016-01-01

    textabstractPatients with transient monocular blindness (TMB) can present with many different symptoms, and diagnosis is usually based on the history alone. In this study, we assessed the risk of vascular complications according to different characteristics of TMB. We prospectively studied 341

  8. [Efficacy of rasagiline in patients with advanced Parkinson's disease with motor fluctuation (azimut study)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, O S; Boĭko, A N; Ivanov, A K

    2010-01-01

    An open observational 3-month study of efficacy and safety of selective MAO B inhibitor rasagiline (АZIlect) in advanced Parkinson's disease (PD) patients with mоtor fluctuations on the long-term levodopa therapy (the "АZIMUT" study) has been conducted. Forty five non-demented patients with PD (mean age 64,7±8,4 years, mean duration of disease 9,5±4,0 years, mean Hoehn-Yahr stage 3,0±0,4, mean levodopa dose 673,9 mg/d) have been included in the study. All patients received rasagiline at a dose of 1 mg once daily as an adjunct to a stable anti-parkinsonian therapy. Patient's clinical state has been assessed at baseline and after 1 and 3 months of therapy. Forty two (93%) patients have completed the study. At the end of the third month of therapy, the daily off-time was decreased by 1,7 h. The ADL score (off-state) decreased by 22%, and the UPDRS-III score (on-state) decreased by 10%. The Global Clinical Improvement Scale revealed the marked improvement in 12% patients and moderate improvement in 43% patients. The severity of freezing of gait declined by 15%. Moreover, the initial severity of freezing seems to be a predictor of rasagiline clinical efficacy. The clinical effect of rasagiline steadily increased over 3 months. The fair tolerability of the drug and low rate of dyskinesias and other complications were demonstrated. In conclusion, the study has shown that rasagiline effectively reduces the off-time duration as well as the disability in off- and on-time and optimizes levodopa efficacy at the routine clinical practice setting.

  9. Serum iron levels and the risk of Parkinson disease: a Mendelian randomization study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irene Pichler

    Full Text Available Although levels of iron are known to be increased in the brains of patients with Parkinson disease (PD, epidemiological evidence on a possible effect of iron blood levels on PD risk is inconclusive, with effects reported in opposite directions. Epidemiological studies suffer from problems of confounding and reverse causation, and mendelian randomization (MR represents an alternative approach to provide unconfounded estimates of the effects of biomarkers on disease. We performed a MR study where genes known to modify iron levels were used as instruments to estimate the effect of iron on PD risk, based on estimates of the genetic effects on both iron and PD obtained from the largest sample meta-analyzed to date.We used as instrumental variables three genetic variants influencing iron levels, HFE rs1800562, HFE rs1799945, and TMPRSS6 rs855791. Estimates of their effect on serum iron were based on a recent genome-wide meta-analysis of 21,567 individuals, while estimates of their effect on PD risk were obtained through meta-analysis of genome-wide and candidate gene studies with 20,809 PD cases and 88,892 controls. Separate MR estimates of the effect of iron on PD were obtained for each variant and pooled by meta-analysis. We investigated heterogeneity across the three estimates as an indication of possible pleiotropy and found no evidence of it. The combined MR estimate showed a statistically significant protective effect of iron, with a relative risk reduction for PD of 3% (95% CI 1%-6%; p = 0.001 per 10 µg/dl increase in serum iron.Our study suggests that increased iron levels are causally associated with a decreased risk of developing PD. Further studies are needed to understand the pathophysiological mechanism of action of serum iron on PD risk before recommendations can be made.

  10. Study of the therapeutic benefit of cationic copolymer administration to vascular endothelium under mechanical stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giantsos-Adams, Kristina; Lopez-Quintero, Veronica; Kopeckova, Pavla; Kopecek, Jindrich; Tarbell, John M.; Dull, Randal

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary edema and the associated increases in vascular permeability continue to represent a significant clinical problem in the intensive care setting, with no current treatment modality other than supportive care and mechanical ventilation. Therapeutic compound(s) capable of attenuating changes in vascular barrier function would represent a significant advance in critical care medicine. We have previously reported the development of HPMA-based copolymers, targeted to endothelial glycocalyx that are able to enhance barrier function. In this work, we report the refinement of copolymer design and extend our physiological studies todemonstrate that the polymers: 1) reduce both shear stress and pressure-mediated increase in hydraulic conductivity, 2) reduce nitric oxide production in response to elevated hydrostatic pressure and, 3) reduce the capillary filtration coefficient (Kfc) in an isolated perfused mouse lung model. These copolymers represent an important tool for use in mechanotransduction research and a novel strategy for developing clinically useful copolymers for the treatment of vascular permeability. PMID:20932573

  11. Prediction of Parkinson's disease subsequent to severe depression: a ten-year follow-up study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter, Uwe; Heilmann, Robert; Kaulitz, Lara; Just, Tino; Krause, Bernd Joachim; Benecke, Reiner; Höppner, Jacqueline

    2015-06-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) has been associated with an increased risk of subsequent Parkinson's disease (PD) in case-control and cohort studies. However, depression alone is unlikely to be a useful marker of prodromal PD due to its low specificity. In this longitudinal observational study, we assessed whether the presence of other potential markers of prodromal PD predicts the subsequent development of PD in MDD patients. Of 57 patients with severe MDD but no diagnosis of PD who underwent a structured interview, olfactory and motor investigation and transcranial sonography at baseline, 46 (36 women; mean age 54.9 ± 11.7 years) could be followed for up to 11 (median, 10) years. Three patients (2 women; age 64, 65 and 70 years) developed definite PD after 1, 7, and 9 years, respectively. The combined finding of mild asymmetric motor slowing, idiopathic hyposmia, and substantia nigra hyperechogenicity predicted subsequent PD in all patients who could be followed for longer than 1 year. Out of the whole study cohort, only the subjects with subsequent PD presented with the triad of asymmetric motor slowing, idiopathic hyposmia, and substantia nigra hyperechogenicity in combination with at least two out of four reportable risk factors (family history of PD, current non-smoker, non-coffee drinker, constipation) at baseline investigation. Post-hoc analysis revealed that additional rating of eye and eye-lid motor abnormalities might further improve the prediction of PD in larger cohorts. Findings of this pilot-study suggest that MDD patients at risk of subsequent PD can be identified using an inexpensive non-invasive diagnostic battery.

  12. Neuropsychological effects of bilateral STN stimulation in Parkinson disease - A controlled study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smeding, HMM; Koning-Haanstra, M; Schuurman, PR; Nijssen, P; van Laar, T; Schmand, B; Speelman, J.D.

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the cognitive and behavioral effects of bilateral subthalamic nucleus (STN) stimulation in patients with Parkinson disease (PD). Methods: The authors included 103 patients; 99 patients were evaluated 6 months after surgery. A control group of 39 patients with PD was formed and

  13. A multicentre study on suicide outcomes following subthalamic stimulation for Parkinson's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voon, Valerie; Krack, Paul; Lang, Anthony E.; Lozano, Andres M.; Dujardin, Kathy; Schüpbach, Michael; D'Ambrosia, James; Thobois, Stephane; Tamma, Filippo; Herzog, Jan; Speelman, Johannes D.; Samanta, Johan; Kubu, Cynthia; Rossignol, Helene; Poon, Yu-Yan; Saint-Cyr, Jean A.; Ardouin, Claire; Moro, Elena

    2008-01-01

    Subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation improves motor symptoms and quality of life in advanced Parkinson's disease. As after other life-altering surgeries, suicides have been reported following deep brain stimulation for movement disorders. We sought to determine the suicide rate following

  14. Coordination disorders in patients with Parkinson's disease: a study of paced rythmic forearm movements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Berg, C.; Beek, P.J.; Wagenaar, R.C.; van Wieringen, P.C.W.

    2000-01-01

    Whereas the consequences of Parkinson's disease (PD) for the performance of single-limb movements are well documented (i.e., bradykinesia, akinesia, rigidity, and tremor), fairly little is known about its implications for the coordination between limb movements. To help resolve this situation an

  15. Blood cholesterol and vascular mortality by age, sex, and blood pressure: a meta-analysis of individual data from 61 prospective studies with 55,000 vascular deaths

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    NN, NN; Jensen, Gorm Boje

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Age, sex, and blood pressure could modify the associations of total cholesterol (and its main two fractions, HDL and LDL cholesterol) with vascular mortality. This meta-analysis combined prospective studies of vascular mortality that recorded both blood pressure and total cholesterol...... pressures, is unexplained, and invites further research. Nevertheless, there is conclusive evidence from randomised trials that statins substantially reduce not only coronary event rates but also total stroke rates in patients with a wide range of ages and blood pressures....... and blood pressure. During nearly 12 million person years at risk between the ages of 40 and 89 years, there were more than 55,000 vascular deaths (34,000 ischaemic heart disease [IHD], 12,000 stroke, 10,000 other). Information about HDL cholesterol was available for 150,000 participants, among whom...

  16. Personality traits and the risk for Parkinson disease: a prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sieurin, Johanna; Gustavsson, Petter; Weibull, Caroline Elise; Feldman, Adina Leiah; Petzinger, Giselle Maria; Gatz, Margaret; Pedersen, Nancy Lee; Wirdefeldt, Karin

    2016-02-01

    In this study, we explored the association between the personality traits, neuroticism and introversion, and risk of Parkinson disease (PD). A population-based cohort study was conducted using questionnaire data from the Swedish Twin Registry for twins born 1926-1958 (n > 29,000). Personality traits were assessed in 1973 by a short form of Eysenck's Personality Inventory. The cohort was followed from 1974 to 2012 through Swedish patient and cause of death registers for PD ascertainment. Cox proportional hazards regression was used to estimate subsequent risk of PD, adjusting for attained age, sex and smoking. A mediation analysis was performed to further explore the role of smoking in the relationship between personality trait and PD. Confounding by familial factors was explored using a within-pair analysis. During a mean follow-up time of 36.8 years, 197 incident PD cases were identified. Both neuroticism and introversion were associated with an increased risk of PD after adjustment. Smoking was a significant mediator in the relationship between personality traits and PD that partly accounted for the effect of introversion, whereas it acted as a suppressor for the effect of neuroticism on PD risk. In the within-pair analyses, associations for neuroticism and introversion were attenuated. In conclusion, our study provides evidence that neuroticism is associated with an increased risk of PD that is in part suppressed by smoking. There was a weak association between introversion and PD and this effect was at least partly mediated through smoking. The observed effects may partly be explained by familial factors shared by twins.

  17. Laserlight cues for gait freezing in Parkinson's disease: an open-label study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donovan, S; Lim, C; Diaz, N; Browner, N; Rose, P; Sudarsky, L R; Tarsy, D; Fahn, S; Simon, D K

    2011-05-01

    Freezing of gait (FOG) and falls are major sources of disability for Parkinson's disease (PD) patients, and show limited responsiveness to medications. We assessed the efficacy of visual cues for overcoming FOG in an open-label study of 26 patients with PD. The change in the frequency of falls was a secondary outcome measure. Subjects underwent a 1-2 month baseline period of use of a cane or walker without visual cues, followed by 1 month using the same device with the laserlight visual cue. The laserlight visual cue was associated with a modest but significant mean reduction in FOG Questionnaire (FOGQ) scores of 1.25 ± 0.48 (p = 0.0152, two-tailed paired t-test), representing a 6.6% improvement compared to the mean baseline FOGQ scores of 18.8. The mean reduction in fall frequency was 39.5 ± 9.3% with the laserlight visual cue among subjects experiencing at least one fall during the baseline and subsequent study periods (p = 0.002; two-tailed one-sample t-test with hypothesized mean of 0). Though some individual subjects may have benefited, the overall mean performance on the timed gait test (TGT) across all subjects did not significantly change. However, among the 4 subjects who underwent repeated testing of the TGT, one showed a 50% mean improvement in TGT performance with the laserlight visual cue (p = 0.005; two-tailed paired t-test). This open-label study provides evidence for modest efficacy of a laserlight visual cue in overcoming FOG and reducing falls in PD patients. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Feasibility of virtual therapy in rehabilitation of Parkinson's disease patients: pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Paula Cunha Loureiro

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Among Parkinson's disease (PD motor disabilities, postural and balance alterations are important parameters to physical therapists who need to choose specific, targeted therapies for their patients. Among many therapy options, virtual therapy is studied as to whether it can be a viable rehabilitation method. OBJECTIVE: To verify the applicability of virtual rehabilitation in PD patients for the improvement of their balance and quality of life. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Six volunteers, diagnosed to be in Stages II and III of PD (Hoehn and Yahr Scale, were recruited for this study. Patients (65 ± 13 years old participated in activities involving Wii Fit, for a total of twelve interventions, twice per week. Clinical and qualitative methods were used for the data collection for the initial and final evaluations: Borg's Scale, Berg Functional Balance Scale, Time Up and Go, anterior and lateral functional reach and Nottingham's Scale were performed during the study. Penguin Slide, Ski Slalom, Soccer Heading and Table Tilt were the Wii games selected as a form of virtual therapy. RESULTS: The collected data were analyzed using the Wilcoxon test. Motor skill, functional capacities and quality of life were analyzed as variables of the patients' balance. Statistically significant differences were found in the following tests: Borg's Scale (p = 0.0464, Berg Functional Balance Scale (p = 0.0277, lateral functional reach to the right (p = 0.0431* and lateral functional reach to the left (p = 0.0277. CONCLUSION: It is believed that exercises with virtual reality therapy can be a useful tool to improve the balance in PD patients.

  19. Gender differences in Parkinson's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haaxma, Charlotte A.; Bloem, Bastiaan R.; Borm, George F.; Oyen, Wim J. G.; Leenders, Klaus L.; Eshuis, Silvia; Booij, Jan; Dluzen, Dean E.; Horstink, Martin W. I. M.

    Objective: To investigate gender differences in basic disease characteristics, motor deterioration and nigrostriatal degeneration in Parkinson's disease (PD). Methods: We studied 253 consecutive PD patients who were not receiving levodopa or dopamine agonists ( disease duration Results: Age at onset

  20. Gender differences in Parkinson's disease.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haaxma, C.A.; Bloem, B.R.; Borm, G.F.; Oyen, W.J.G.; Leenders, K.L.; Eshuis, S.; Booij, J.; Dluzen, D.E.; Horstink, M.W.I.M.

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate gender differences in basic disease characteristics, motor deterioration and nigrostriatal degeneration in Parkinson's disease (PD). METHODS: We studied 253 consecutive PD patients who were not receiving levodopa or dopamine agonists (disease duration < or = 10 years). We

  1. Gender differences in Parkinson's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haaxma, Charlotte A.; Bloem, Bastiaan R.; Borm, George F.; Oyen, Wim J. G.; Leenders, Klaus L.; Eshuis, Silvia; Booij, Jan; Dluzen, Dean E.; Horstink, Martin W. I. M.

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate gender differences in basic disease characteristics, motor deterioration and nigrostriatal degeneration in Parkinson's disease (PD). METHODS: We studied 253 consecutive PD patients who were not receiving levodopa or dopamine agonists (disease duration < or = 10 years). We

  2. Prevalence and risk factors of Parkinson's disease in retired Thai traditional boxers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lolekha, Praween; Phanthumchinda, Kammant; Bhidayasiri, Roongroj

    2010-09-15

    Boxing is often believed to be a frequent cause for parkinsonism caused by chronic repetitive head injury, with Muhammad Ali frequently cited as an example. The purpose of this study is to determine the prevalence of Parkinson's disease (PD) in retired Thai traditional boxers. Two standardized screening questionnaires were sent to all registered Thai traditional boxers. Subjects who screened positive for parkinsonism were invited for clinical examinations by two independent neurologists. Among 704 boxers (70%) who completed the questionnaires, 8 boxers (1.14%) had parkinsonism: 5 with PD, 1 with progressive supranuclear palsy and 2 with vascular parkinsonism. Boxers with PD were found to have an older mean age than those without PD (P = 0.003). The analysis of probable risk factors disclosed an association between the number of professional bouts (>100 times) and PD (P = 0.01). The crude prevalence of PD in Thai boxers was 0.71% (95% CI: 0.09-1.33), with a significant increase with age. The prevalence rate of PD in those aged 50 and above was 0.17% (95% CI: 0.15-0.20), age-adjusted to the USA 1970 census, which is comparable to that of the general populations. The analysis determined that the number of professional bouts is a risk factor among these boxers, supporting the notion that repetitive head trauma may pose an additional risk to certain individuals who are already susceptible to PD. © 2010 Movement Disorder Society.

  3. Association of Parkinson's disease with industry sectors: a French nationwide incidence study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlaar, Tim; Kab, Sofiane; Schwaab, Yannick; Fréry, Nadine; Elbaz, Alexis; Moisan, Frédéric

    2018-05-05

    In order to identify working environments at risk for Parkinson's disease (PD), we investigated the relation between the importance of industry sectors, used as a surrogate for occupational exposures, and PD incidence in French cantons. The number of incident PD cases (2010-2014) in 3689 cantons of metropolitan France was determined using drug claims from French National Health Insurance databases. The proportions of workers in 38 industry sectors in 2006 were calculated for each canton. Associations between the proportions of workers in industry sectors and PD age/sex-standardized incidence ratios were examined using incidence rate ratios (IRR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) estimated with multilevel negative binomial regressions with a random intercept at the canton-level and adjusted for smoking, deprivation index, and density of neurologists. We then used two-step semi-Bayes hierarchical regression (HR) to include prior information about exposure to pesticides, metals, and solvents in each industry sector. We identified 112,625 incident cases. PD incidence was higher in areas characterized by high proportions of workers in "Agriculture, forestry and fishing" (IRR HR  = 1.042; CI 95% = 1.014-1.070; p-Trend HR  = 0.004), "Manufacture of textiles, wearing apparel, leather and related products" (IRR HR  = 1.024; CI 95% = 1.005-1.044; p-Trend HR  = 0.010), and "Manufacture of basic metals and fabricated metal products, except machinery and equipment" (IRR HR  = 1.024; CI 95% = 1.003-1.046; p-Trend HR  = 0.071). This nationwide study, based on a comprehensive analysis of industry sectors, shows significant associations between high proportions of workers in specific industry sectors (agriculture, metallurgy, textile) and PD incidence that may be targeted in further epidemiological studies to replicate and better understand these associations.

  4. Digitomotography in Parkinson's disease: a cross-sectional and longitudinal study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walter Maetzler

    Full Text Available Motor symptoms in Parkinson's disease (PD are usually assessed with semi-quantitative tests such as the Unified PD Rating Scale (UPDRS which are limited by subjectivity, categorical design, and low sensitivity. Particularly bradykinesia as assessed e.g. with speeded index finger tapping exhibits low validity measures. This exploratory study set out to (i assess whether force transducer-based objective and quantitative analysis of motor coordination in index finger tapping is able to distinguish between PD patients and controls, and (ii assess longitudinal changes. Sixteen early-stage and 17 mid-stage PD patients as well as 18 controls were included in the cross-sectional part of the study; thirteen, 16 and 16 individuals of the respective groups agreed in a reassessment 12 months later. Frequency, force, rhythmicity, regularity and laterality of speeded and metronome paced tapping were recorded by digitomotography using a quantitative motor system ("Q-Motor". Analysis of cross-sectional data revealed most consistent differences between PD patients and controls in variability of tap performance across modalities assessed. Among PD patients, variability of taps and the ability to keep a given rhythm were associated with UPDRS motor and finger tapping scores. After 12 months, laterality parameters were reduced but no other parameters changed significantly. This data suggests that digitomotography provides quantitative and objective measures capable to differentiate PD from non-PD in a small cohort, however, the value of the assessment to track PD progression has to be further evaluated in larger cohorts of patients.

  5. Pesticide exposure and risk of Parkinson's disease: A family-based case-control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott Burton L

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pesticides and correlated lifestyle factors (e.g., exposure to well-water and farming are repeatedly reported risk factors for Parkinson's disease (PD, but few family-based studies have examined these relationships. Methods Using 319 cases and 296 relative and other controls, associations of direct pesticide application, well-water consumption, and farming residences/occupations with PD were examined using generalized estimating equations while controlling for age-at-examination, sex, cigarette smoking, and caffeine consumption. Results Overall, individuals with PD were significantly more likely to report direct pesticide application than their unaffected relatives (odds ratio = 1.61; 95% confidence interval, 1.13–2.29. Frequency, duration, and cumulative exposure were also significantly associated with PD in a dose-response pattern (p ≤ 0.013. Associations of direct pesticide application did not vary by sex but were modified by family history of PD, as significant associations were restricted to individuals with no family history. When classifying pesticides by functional type, both insecticides and herbicides were found to significantly increase risk of PD. Two specific insecticide classes, organochlorines and organophosphorus compounds, were significantly associated with PD. Consuming well-water and living/working on a farm were not associated with PD. Conclusion These data corroborate positive associations of broadly defined pesticide exposure with PD in families, particularly for sporadic PD. These data also implicate a few specific classes of pesticides in PD and thus emphasize the need to consider a more narrow definition of pesticides in future studies.

  6. Impulse control disorders in Parkinson disease: a cross-sectional study of 3090 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weintraub, Daniel; Koester, Juergen; Potenza, Marc N; Siderowf, Andrew D; Stacy, Mark; Voon, Valerie; Whetteckey, Jacqueline; Wunderlich, Glen R; Lang, Anthony E

    2010-05-01

    An association between dopamine-replacement therapies and impulse control disorders (ICDs) in Parkinson disease (PD) has been suggested in preliminary studies. To ascertain point prevalence estimates of 4 ICDs in PD and examine their associations with dopamine-replacement therapies and other clinical characteristics. Cross-sectional study using an a priori established sampling procedure for subject recruitment and raters blinded to PD medication status. Three thousand ninety patients with treated idiopathic PD receiving routine clinical care at 46 movement disorder centers in the United States and Canada. The Massachusetts Gambling Screen score for current problem/pathological gambling, the Minnesota Impulsive Disorders Interview score for compulsive sexual behavior and buying, and Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders research criteria for binge-eating disorder. An ICD was identified in 13.6% of patients (gambling in 5.0%, compulsive sexual behavior in 3.5%, compulsive buying in 5.7%, and binge-eating disorder in 4.3%), and 3.9% had 2 or more ICDs. Impulse control disorders were more common in patients treated with a dopamine agonist than in patients not taking a dopamine agonist (17.1% vs 6.9%; odds ratio [OR], 2.72; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.08-3.54; P disorder frequency was similar for pramipexole and ropinirole (17.7% vs 15.5%; OR, 1.22; 95% CI, 0.94-1.57; P = .14). Additional variables independently associated with ICDs were levodopa use, living in the United States, younger age, being unmarried, current cigarette smoking, and a family history of gambling problems. Dopamine agonist treatment in PD is associated with 2- to 3.5-fold increased odds of having an ICD. This association represents a drug class relationship across ICDs. The association of other demographic and clinical variables with ICDs suggests a complex relationship that requires additional investigation to optimize prevention and treatment strategies. clinicaltrials

  7. Electrophysiological effects of desflurane in children with Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome: a randomized crossover study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hino, H; Oda, Y; Yoshida, Y; Suzuki, T; Shimada, M; Nishikawa, K

    2018-02-01

    We hypothesized that, compared with propofol, desflurane prolongs the antegrade accessory pathway effective refractory period (APERP) in children undergoing radiofrequency catheter ablation for Wolff-Parkinson-White (WPW) syndrome. In this randomized crossover study, children aged 4.1-16.1 years undergoing radiofrequency catheter ablation for WPW syndrome were randomly divided into four groups according to the concentration of desflurane and anesthetics used in the first and the second electrophysiological studies (EPS). After induction of general anesthesia with propofol and tracheal intubation, they received one of the following regimens: 0.5 minimum alveolar concentration (MAC) desflurane (first EPS) and propofol (second EPS) (Des0.5-Prop group, n = 8); propofol (first EPS) and 0.5 MAC desflurane (second EPS) (Prop-Des0.5 group, n = 9); 1 MAC desflurane (first EPS) and propofol (second EPS) (Des1.0-Prop group, n = 10); propofol (first EPS) and 1 MAC desflurane (second EPS) (Prop-Des1.0 group, n = 9). Radiofrequency catheter ablation was performed upon completion of EPS. Sample size was determined to detect a difference in the APERP. Desflurane at 1.0 MAC significantly prolonged the APERP compared with propofol, but did not affect the sinoatrial conduction time, atrio-His interval or atrioventricular node effective refractory period. Supraventricular tachycardia was induced in all children receiving propofol, but not induced in 1 and 4 children receiving 0.5 MAC and 1.0 MAC desflurane, respectively. Desflurane enhances the refractoriness and may block the electrical conduction of the atrioventricular accessory pathway, and is therefore not suitable for use in children undergoing radiofrequency catheter ablation for WPW syndrome. © 2017 The Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica Foundation. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Pupillary Response to Cognitive Demand in Parkinson's Disease: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahya, Melike; Moon, Sanghee; Lyons, Kelly E; Pahwa, Rajesh; Akinwuntan, Abiodun E; Devos, Hannes

    2018-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that pupillary response, a physiological measure of cognitive workload, reflects cognitive demand in healthy younger and older adults. However, the relationship between cognitive workload and cognitive demand in Parkinson's disease (PD) remains unclear. The aim of this pilot study was to examine the pupillary response to cognitive demand in a letter-number sequencing (LNS) task between 16 non-demented individuals with PD (age, median (Q1-Q3): 68 (62-72); 10 males) and 10 control participants (age: 63 (59-67); 2 males), matched for age, education, and Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MOCA) scores. A mixed model analysis was employed to investigate cognitive workload changes as a result of incremental cognitive demand for both groups. As expected, no differences were found in cognitive scores on the LNS between groups. Cognitive workload, exemplified by greater pupil dilation, increased with incremental cognitive demand in both groups ( p = 0.003). No significant between-group ( p = 0.23) or interaction effects were found ( p = 0.45). In addition, individuals who achieved to complete the task at higher letter-number (LN) load responded differently to increased cognitive demand compared with those who completed at lower LN load ( p demand in non-demented people with PD and healthy controls. Further research is needed to investigate the pupillary response to incremental cognitive demand of PD patients with dementia compared to non-demented PD and healthy controls. Highlights -Pupillary response reflects cognitive demand in both non-demented people with PD and healthy controls-Although not significant due to insufficient power, non-demented individuals with PD had increased cognitive workload compared to the healthy controls throughout the testing-Pupillary response may be a valid measure of cognitive demand in non-demented individuals with PD-In future, pupillary response might be used to detect cognitive impairment in individuals with PD.

  9. Socioeconomic status in relation to Parkinson's disease risk and mortality: A population-based prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Fei; Johansson, Anna L V; Pedersen, Nancy L; Fang, Fang; Gatz, Margaret; Wirdefeldt, Karin

    2016-07-01

    Little is known about the role of socioeconomic status in relation to Parkinson's disease (PD) risk, and no study has investigated whether the impact of socioeconomic status on all-cause mortality differs between individuals with and without PD.In this population-based prospective study, over 4.6 million Swedish inhabitants who participated in the Swedish census in 1980 were followed from 1981 to 2010. The incidence rate of PD and incidence rate ratio were estimated for the association between socioeconomic status and PD risk. Age-standardized mortality rate and hazard ratio (HR) were estimated for the association between socioeconomic status and all-cause mortality for individuals with and without PD.During follow-up, 66,332 incident PD cases at a mean age of 76.0 years were recorded. Compared to individuals with the highest socioeconomic status (high nonmanual workers), all other socioeconomic groups (manual or nonmanual and self-employed workers) had a lower PD risk. All-cause mortality rates were higher in individuals with lower socioeconomic status compared with high nonmanual workers, but relative risks for all-cause mortality were lower in PD patients than in non-PD individuals (e.g., for low manual workers, HR: 1.12, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.09-1.15 for PD patients; HR: 1.36, 95% CI: 1.35-1.36 for non-PD individuals).Individuals with lower socioeconomic status had a lower PD incidence compared to the highest socioeconomic group. Lower socioeconomic status was associated with higher all-cause mortality among individuals with and without PD, but such impact was weaker among PD patients.

  10. Abnormal regional homogeneity in Parkinson's disease: a resting state fMRI study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Y.; Liang, P.; Jia, X.; Li, K.

    2016-01-01

    Aim: To examine the functional brain alterations in Parkinson's disease (PD) by measuring blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) functional MRI (fMRI) signals at rest while controlling for the structural atrophy. Materials and methods: Twenty-three PD patients and 20 age, gender, and education level matched normal controls (NC) were included in this study. Resting state fMRI and structural MRI data were acquired. The resting state brain activity was measured by the regional homogeneity (ReHo) method and the grey matter (GM) volume was attained by the voxel-based morphology (VBM) analysis. Two-sample t-test was then performed to detect the group differences with structural atrophy as a covariate. Results: VBM analysis showed GM volume reductions in the left superior frontal gyrus, left paracentral lobule, and left middle frontal gyrus in PD patients as compared to NC. There were widespread ReHo differences between NC and PD patients. Compared to NC, PD patients showed significant alterations in the motor network, including decreased ReHo in the right primary sensory cortex (S1), while increased ReHo in the left premotor area (PMA) and left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC). In addition, a cluster in the left superior occipital gyrus (SOG) also showed increased ReHo in PD patients. Conclusion: The current findings indicate that significant changes of ReHo in the motor and non-motor cortices have been detected in PD patients, independent of age, gender, education level, and structural atrophy. The present study thus suggests ReHo abnormalities as a potential biomarker for the diagnosis of PD and further provides insights into the biological mechanism of the disease. - Highlights: • Functional changes were found in PD patients independent of structural atrophy. • Both increased and decreased ReHo were observed in motor network regions in PD. • Increased ReHo was detected in visual association cortex for PD patients.

  11. Cerebral metabonomics study on Parkinson's disease mice treated with extract of Acanthopanax senticosus harms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xu-zhao; Zhang, Shuai-nan; Lu, Fang; Liu, Chang-feng; Wang, Yu; Bai, Yu; Wang, Na; Liu, Shu-min

    2013-10-15

    Extract of Acanthopanax senticosus harms (EAS) has neuroprotective effect on Parkinson's disease (PD) mice against dopaminergic neuronal damage. However, studies of its anti-PD mechanism are challenging, owing to the complex pathophysiology of PD, and complexity of EAS with multiple constituents acting on different metabolic pathways. Here, we have investigated the metabolic profiles and potential biomarkers in a mice model of MPTP-induced PD after treatment of EAS. Metabonomics based on ultra-performance liquid chromatography coupled with quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UPLC-QTOF-MS) was used to profile the metabolic fingerprints of mesencephalon obtained from 1-Methyl-4-phenyl-1, 2, 3, 6-tetrahydropyridine Hydrochloride (MPTP-HCl)-induced PD mice model with and without EAS treatment. Through partial least squares-discriminate analysis (PLS-DA), it was observed that metabolic perturbations induced by MPTP were restored after treatment with EAS. Metabolites with significant changes induced by MPTP, including L-dopa, 5'-methylthioadenosine, tetradecanoylcarnitine, phytosphingosine-1-P, Cer(d18:0/18:0), LysoPC(20:4(5Z,8Z,11Z,14Z)), L-palmitoyl -carnitine, tetracosanoylglycine, morphiceptin and stearoylcarnitine, were characterized as potential biomarkers involved in the pathogenesis of PD. The derivations of all those biomarkers can be regulated by EAS treatment except Cer(d18:0/18:0), LysoPC(20:4(5Z,8Z,11Z,14Z)), morphiceptin. The therapeutic effect of EAS on PD may involve in regulating the tyrosine metabolism, mitochondrial beta-oxidation of long chain saturated fatty acids, fatty acid metabolism, methionine metabolism, and sphingolipid metabolism. This study indicated that changed metabolites can be certainly recovered by EAS, and the treatment of EAS can be connected with the regulation of related metabolic pathways. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  12. Retinal vascular diameters in relation to physical activity in Danish children - The CHAMPS Eye Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundberg, Kristian; Tarp, Jakob; Vestergaard, Anders Højslet

    2018-01-01

    Our objective was to determine associations between retinal vascular caliber and physical activity (PA) in a school-based child cohort. In a prospective study we created a childhood cumulative average PA-index using objectively measured PA (accelerometry) assessed at four periods between 2009...

  13. Does epicatechin contribute to the acute vascular function effects of dark chocolate? A randomized, crossover study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dower, James I.; Geleijnse, Marianne; Kroon, Paul A.; Philo, Mark; Mensink, Marco; Kromhout, Daan; Hollman, Peter C.H.

    2016-01-01

    Scope: Cocoa, rich in flavan-3-ols, improves vascular function, but the contribution of specific flavan-3-ols is unknown. We compared the effects of pure epicatechin, a major cocoa flavan-3-ol, and chocolate. Methods and results: In a randomized crossover study, twenty healthy men (40-80 years)

  14. The inferior medial genicular artery and its vascularization of the pes anserinus superficialis: A cadaveric study

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    Lena Hirtler

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: Although intratendinous vascularization of the tendons of the PAS via the IMGA was not proven, this study indicates a new possibility of ACL reconstruction. The described operation technique can be conducive to shorten the vulnerable phase of the graft-ligamentization after ACL reconstruction.

  15. Nondipping in Parkinson's Disease

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    Sita Sommer

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The aim of this study was to identify patients with Parkinson's disease who showed loss or decrease of nocturnal blood pressure fall (nondipper patients as a marker of autonomic dysfunction. Presence or absence of orthostatic hypotension was considered to investigate whether alterations in circadian blood pressure pattern are associated with posture-related dysregulation of blood pressure. Methods. 40 patients with Parkinson's disease underwent 24-hour blood pressure monitoring. 21 patients were diagnosed with arterial hypertension and received anti-hypertensive drugs. Nondipper patients were defined as having nocturnal decrease of mean systolic and diastolic blood pressure less than 10%. Presence or absence of orthostatic hypotension was determined by Schellong's test. Results. We identified 35 nondipper patients (88%. Nondipping was detected in 20 patients with orthostatic hypotension (95% and in 15 patients without orthostatic hypotension (79%. 18 patients with hypertensive and 22 patients with normal blood pressure values were detected. Conclusions. In conclusion 24-hour blood pressure monitoring showed a high prevalence of nondipping in 40 patients with Parkinson's disease with and without orthostatic hypotension independent of coexisting arterial hypertension and antihypertensive treatment. 24-hour blood pressure monitoring may be useful to identify non-dipping as a marker of autonomic dysfunction in patients with Parkinson's disease.

  16. The study of subjective and objective evaluation of sleep disturbances in Parkinson's disease

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    LIU Chun-feng

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Background Sleep disorder is one of the most common non-motor symptoms in Parkinson's disease (PD patients. At present, there are subjective and objective tools to evaluate sleepdisorders. Nevertheless, previous studies commonly used single subjective questionnaires or objective examinations. Therefore, we used the combinations of subjective and objective tools to analyze clinical characteristics of sleep disturbances in PD and investigated differences and consistence between subjective and objective tools. Methods One hundred and sixteen PD patients were eligible to participate into this study. All participants were evaluated by Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI, Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS in "on" condition, Hoehn-Yahr (H-Y stage, Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAMD 24 items, Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA, Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS, and underwent a video-polysomnography (Video-PSG. Results According to PSQI score of 116 PD patients, the proportion of PD patients with sleep disturbances (PSQI ≥ 7 was 50% (N = 58. Compared to PD patients without sleep disturbances, PD patients with sleep disturbances had lower score of MoCA (23.34 ± 3.50 vs 24.89 ± 3.52; t = 2.377, P = 0.019, higher score of UPDRSⅠ[4.00 (2.00, 5.00 vs 3.00 (2.00, 5.00; U = - 2.306, P = 0.021], UPDRSⅡ[12.00 (9.00, 16.00 vs 10.00 (6.00, 13.00; U = - 1.995, P = 0.046], higher levodopa equivalent daily dose [LED, (508.14 ± 335.85 vs (394.06 ± 236.40 mg/d; t = - 2.115, P = 0.037]. Although PD patients with sleep disturbances had more score of UPDSR Ⅲ and higher H-Y stage, the differences were not significant (P > 0.05. On the other hand, decreased total sleep time (TST, reduced sleep efficiency (SE, increased sleep latency (SL, decreased non-rapid eye movement (NREM sleep stage Ⅱ time were found for PD patients with sleep disturbances (P 0.05, for all. The score of PSQI was positively correlated with the score of ESS (r = 0.200, P = 0

  17. A Ten Year Analysis of Fatal Peripheral Vascular Injuries Autopsy Study

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    Salim Tuncer

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Peripheral vascular injuries are usually associated with fatal injuries. Early diagnosis and intervention are so vital for improving a favorable outcome for traumatic vascular injuries. As a preventable cause of death, we aimed to evaluate peripheral vascular injuries in overall deaths in ten year period, 2003-2012. Material and Method: A retrospective evaluation was made of 2845 death cases which had post-mortem examination and autopsy from the 10-year period of 2003-2012 in Eskisehir, Turkey. The mean age of the cases included in the study was 32.5±7.9 years with the highest rate of cases occurring in the 30-39 years age group. Males constituted 89.2% of the victims. The most frequent manner of death was homicide 83.8%.The femoral artery was the most commonly injured vessel 29 cases (78.4%. In this study it was identified that, 33 patients (89.3% died before any medical intervention could be performed. Discussion: Our study shows that, peripheral vascular injuries most commonly caused by sharp objects. The injuries have a low mortality rate when early intervention is made. Autopsies are conducted is very important to explain not only the cause of death but also the treatment process, which would clear the cases of any potential malpractice or negligence claims.

  18. Vascular Care in Patients With Alzheimer Disease With Cerebrovascular Lesions Slows Progression of White Matter Lesions on MRI The Evaluation of Vascular Care in Alzheimer's Disease (EVA) Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Richard, Edo; Gouw, Alida A.; Scheltens, Philip; van Gool, Willem A.

    2010-01-01

    Background and Purpose-White matter lesions (WMLs) and cerebral infarcts are common findings in Alzheimer disease and may contribute to dementia severity. WMLs and lacunar infarcts may provide a potential target for intervention strategies. This study assessed whether multicomponent vascular care in

  19. Early Corneal Innervation and Trigeminal Alterations in Parkinson Disease: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrigo, Alessandro; Rania, Laura; Calamuneri, Alessandro; Postorino, Elisa Imelde; Mormina, Enricomaria; Gaeta, Michele; Marino, Silvia; Di Lorenzo, Giuseppe; Quartarone, Angelo; Anastasi, Giuseppe; Puzzolo, Domenico; Aragona, Pasquale

    2018-04-01

    To describe corneal innervation and trigeminal alterations in drug-naive patients with Parkinson disease (PD). A case series study was conducted by recruiting 3 early drug-naive patients with PD, 2 men and 1 woman (age: 72, 68, and 66, respectively). Ophthalmologic assessment included Ocular Surface Disease Index questionnaire, visual acuity by the logarithm of the minimum angle of resolution score, pupillary light reflexes, extrinsic ocular movements, corneal sensitivity, and slit-lamp examination. Corneal innervation parameter changes were evaluated in vivo using the Confoscan 4 confocal microscope, and they were compared with a control data set. The Heidelberg Retina Tomograph 3 (HRT3) has been used to assess retinal alterations in our patients, if compared with normal range values provided by the HRT3. Moreover, 3T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) analysis of water diffusion property changes of trigeminal nerves was performed. All data were analyzed and compared with 2 control data sets made by 14 age-matched controls. Patients with PD showed profound alterations of corneal innervation and of trigeminal diffusion MRI parameters, compared with controls. Strong differences (PD vs. controls) were found for deep nerve tortuosity (Kallinikos mean 19.94 vs. 2.13) and the number of beadings (mean 34.2 vs. 15.5). HRT3 retinal evaluation revealed less structural changes compared with the normal range. Diffusion MRI showed profound changes of white matter diffusion properties (PD vs. controls), with fractional anisotropy decrement (mean 0.3029 vs. 0.3329) and mean diffusivity increment (mean 0.00127 vs. 0.00106). Corneal innervation changes might occur earlier in patients with PD than in retinal ones. Confocal corneal innervation analysis might provide possible early biomarkers for a better PD evaluation and for its earlier diagnosis.

  20. Dopaminergic system and dream recall: An MRI study in Parkinson's disease patients.

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    De Gennaro, Luigi; Lanteri, Olimpia; Piras, Fabrizio; Scarpelli, Serena; Assogna, Francesca; Ferrara, Michele; Caltagirone, Carlo; Spalletta, Gianfranco

    2016-03-01

    We investigated the role of the dopamine system [i.e., subcortical-medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) network] in dreaming, by studying patients with Parkinson's Disease (PD) as a model of altered dopaminergic transmission. Subcortical volumes and cortical thickness were extracted by 3T-MR images of 27 PD patients and 27 age-matched controls, who were asked to fill out a dream diary upon morning awakening for one week. PD patients do not substantially differ from healthy controls with respect to the sleep, dream, and neuroanatomical measures. Multivariate correlational analyses in PD patients show that dopamine agonist dosage is associated to qualitatively impoverished dreams, as expressed by lower bizarreness and lower emotional load values. Visual vividness (VV) of their dream reports positively correlates with volumes of both the amygdalae and with thickness of the left mPFC. Emotional load also positively correlates with hippocampal volume. Beside the replication of our previous finding on the role of subcortical nuclei in dreaming experience of healthy subjects, this represents the first evidence of a specific role of the amygdala-mPFC dopaminergic network system in dream recall. The association in PD patients between higher dopamine agonist dosages and impoverished dream reports, however, and the significant correlations between VV and mesolimbic regions, however, provide an empirical support to the hypothesis that a dopamine network plays a key role in dream generation. The causal relation is however precluded by the intrinsic limitation of assuming the dopamine agonist dosage as a measure of the hypodopaminergic state in PD. Periodicals, Inc. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. A questionnaire-based (UM-PDHQ study of hallucinations in Parkinson's disease

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    Nation Daniel

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hallucinations occur in 20–40% of PD patients and have been associated with unfavorable clinical outcomes (i.e., nursing home placement, increased mortality. Hallucinations, like other non-motor features of PD, are not well recognized in routine primary/secondary clinical practice. So far, there has been no instrument for uniform characterization of hallucinations in PD. To this end, we developed the University of Miami Parkinson's disease Hallucinations Questionnaire (UM-PDHQ that allows comprehensive assessment of hallucinations in clinical or research settings. Methods The UM-PDHQ is composed of 6 quantitative and 14 qualitative items. For our study PD patients of all ages and in all stages of the disease were recruited over an 18-month period. The UPDRS, MMSE, and Beck Depression and Anxiety Inventories were used for comparisons. Results and Discussion Seventy consecutive PD patients were included in the analyses. Thirty-one (44.3% were classified as hallucinators and 39 as non-hallucinators. No significant group differences were observed in terms of demographics, disease characteristics, stage, education, depressive/anxiety scores or cognitive functioning (MMSE between hallucinators and non-hallucinators. Single mode hallucinations were reported in 20/31 (visual/14, auditory/4, olfactory/2 whereas multiple modalities were reported in 11/31 patients. The most common hallucinatory experience was a whole person followed by small animals, insects and reptiles. Conclusion Using the UM-PDHQ, we were able to define the key characteristics of hallucinations in PD in our cohort. Future directions include the validation of the quantitative part of the questionnaire than will serve as a rating scale for severity of hallucinations.

  2. Levodopa effects on hand and speech movements in patients with Parkinson's disease: a FMRI study.

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    Audrey Maillet

    Full Text Available Levodopa (L-dopa effects on the cardinal and axial symptoms of Parkinson's disease (PD differ greatly, leading to therapeutic challenges for managing the disabilities in this patient's population. In this context, we studied the cerebral networks associated with the production of a unilateral hand movement, speech production, and a task combining both tasks in 12 individuals with PD, both off and on levodopa (L-dopa. Unilateral hand movements in the off medication state elicited brain activations in motor regions (primary motor cortex, supplementary motor area, premotor cortex, cerebellum, as well as additional areas (anterior cingulate, putamen, associative parietal areas; following L-dopa administration, the brain activation profile was globally reduced, highlighting activations in the parietal and posterior cingulate cortices. For the speech production task, brain activation patterns were similar with and without medication, including the orofacial primary motor cortex (M1, the primary somatosensory cortex and the cerebellar hemispheres bilaterally, as well as the left- premotor, anterior cingulate and supramarginal cortices. For the combined task off L-dopa, the cerebral activation profile was restricted to the right cerebellum (hand movement, reflecting the difficulty in performing two movements simultaneously in PD. Under L-dopa, the brain activation profile of the combined task involved a larger pattern, including additional fronto-parietal activations, without reaching the sum of the areas activated during the simple hand and speech tasks separately. Our results question both the role of the basal ganglia system in speech production and the modulation of task-dependent cerebral networks by dopaminergic treatment.

  3. Pilot cohort study of endoscopic botulinum neurotoxin injection in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triadafilopoulos, George; Gandhy, Rita; Barlow, Carrolee

    2017-11-01

    Gastrointestinal symptoms, such as dysphagia, postprandial bloating, and defecatory straining are common in Parkinson's Disease (PD) and they impact quality of life. Endoscopic botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) injection has been used in the treatment of dysphagia, gastroparesis and chronic anismus. To examine the feasibility, safety and efficacy of endoscopically delivered BoNT injection to distal esophagus, pylorus or anal canal aiming at relieving regional gastrointestinal symptoms in patients with PD. This is a retrospective open cohort pilot study to assess the clinical response to endoscopic BoNT injection on selected PD patients with symptoms and identifiable abnormalities on high-resolution manometry and wireless motility capsule, to generate early uncontrolled data on feasibility, tolerability, safety and efficacy. Baseline symptoms and response to therapy were assessed by questionnaires. Fourteen PD patients (10 M:4 F), mean age 73 (range: 62-93) were treated. Three patients had esophageal Botox for ineffective esophageal motility (IEM) (n = 1), esophago-gastric junction outlet obstruction (EGJOO) & IEM (n = 1), and diffuse esophageal spasm (DES) (n = 1). Nine patients were treated with pyloric BoNT injection for gastroparesis with mean gastric transit time of 21.2 h; range 5.2-44.2 h. Two patients received anal Botox for defecatory dyssynergia ((Type I) (n = 1) and overlap (slow-transit and dyssynergic) constipation (n = 1). Endoscopic BoNT injection (100-200 units) was well tolerated and there were no significant adverse events. Endoscopic BoNT injection to esophagus, pylorus or anal canal is safe, well-tolerated and leads to symptomatic improvement that lasts up to several months. The procedure can be repeated as needed and combined with other therapies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. H MR spectroscopy in Parkinson's disease and progressive supranuclear palsy : preliminary study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Kee Hyun; Jeon, Beom Seok; Song, In Chan; Kim, Dong Sung; Min, Kwan Hong; Han, Moon Hee; Kang, Sa Ouk; Min, Byoung Goo; Han, Man Chung

    1996-01-01

    To determine whether h magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) is useful in differentiating idiopathic Parkinson's disease (IPD) from progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP), based on metabolite ratios. Using a 1.5 T MR Unit, single voxel H MRS using STEAM with a TR of 2000 ms and a TE of 135ms was performed in seven PD and eight PSP patients. Five age-matched volunteers(mean age, 63 years) and another five younger healthy volunteers(mean age, 30 tears) were studied as normal controls. The regions of interest were the putamen and pallidum, with a size of 2X2X2 cm. After measuring the spectral intensities of each metabolite (N-acetylaspartate=NAA, choline=Cho, creatine=Cr and lactate), relative peak height ratios of NAA/Cr, Cho/Cr and NAA/ Cho, and lactate levels among four groups were compared. NAA/ Cho and NAA/ Cr ratios were statistically lower in the PSP group than the IPD group (1.21 ± 0.26 versus 1.45 ± 0.20, and 1.26 ± 0.23 versus 1.38 ± 0.19, respectively : p 0.05). Cho/Cr ratios were not different among four groups. Lactate was not detected in any patients. NAA/Cho and NAA/Cr ratios in the corpus stratum were significantly lower in the PSP group than in the age-matched control and IPD groups. These results suggest that loss of neuron cells in the corpus stratum is more prominent in PSP than in IPD, and that NAA/Cho and NAA/Cr ratios may help in differential diagnosis of IPD and PSP

  5. 125I-β-CIT imaging study of striatal dopamine transporters in mice model of parkinsonism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Zhenguo; Sun Wenshan; Weng Zhongfang; Chen Shengdi; Shen Minghua; Zhu Chengmo

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To detect the activity of striatal dopamine transporters (DAT) in lesions of different order of severity of MPTP-induced mice model of parkinsonism by autoradiography with 125 I-β-CIT and to evaluate the clinical use of the β-CIT imaging for DAT detection. Methods: With regard to the different duration (days) of MPTP treatment, the C57BL mice were randomly divided into 5 groups, that is MPTP 1, 3, 5 and 7 day groups and control group treated with normal saline instead of MPTP. Two hours after intravenous administration with 125 I-β-CIT of 148 kBq, the brain tissue sections were imaged by autoradiography. The levels of dopamine (DA) and its metabolites were measured by high performance liquid chromatography and electrochemical detection (HPLC-ECD). The tyrosine hydroxylase (TH)-positive cells and fibres in the substantia nigra and striatum of the mice were observed by means of immunohistochemical technique. Results: As compared with control group, the radioactivity ratios of striatum to cortex (ST/CX) in 4 MPTP-treated groups were significantly reduced, by 20%, 42%, 45% and 52%, respectively. The concentrations of DA in the striatum of 4 MPTP-treated groups were remarkably decreased, by 47%, 75%, 95% and 95%, respectively. The gradual loss of DA neurons and fibres in the substantia nigra and striatum in 4 MPTP-treated groups was observed under microscopy. Conclusions: The functional abnormality of DAT paralleled the changes observed in neurochemistry and neuropathology studies in the lesions of different order of injury of the MPTP-treated mice. The β-CIT scanning for the activity of DAT may be useful for diagnosing PD at earlier phase and for monitoring the progression of the disease

  6. Subthalamic nucleus stimulation affects theory of mind network: a PET study in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Péron, Julie; Le Jeune, Florence; Haegelen, Claire; Dondaine, Thibaut; Drapier, Dominique; Sauleau, Paul; Reymann, Jean-Michel; Drapier, Sophie; Rouaud, Tiphaine; Millet, Bruno; Vérin, Marc

    2010-03-29

    There appears to be an overlap between the limbic system, which is modulated by subthalamic nucleus (STN) deep brain stimulation (DBS) in Parkinson's disease (PD), and the brain network that mediates theory of mind (ToM). Accordingly, the aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of STN DBS on ToM of PD patients and to correlate ToM modifications with changes in glucose metabolism. To this end, we conducted (18)FDG-PET scans in 13 PD patients in pre- and post-STN DBS conditions and correlated changes in their glucose metabolism with modified performances on the Eyes test, a visual ToM task requiring them to describe thoughts or feelings conveyed by photographs of the eye region. Postoperative PD performances on this emotion recognition task were significantly worse than either preoperative PD performances or those of healthy controls (HC), whereas there was no significant difference between preoperative PD and HC. Conversely, PD patients in the postoperative condition performed within the normal range on the gender attribution task included in the Eyes test. As far as the metabolic results are concerned, there were correlations between decreased cerebral glucose metabolism and impaired ToM in several cortical areas: the bilateral cingulate gyrus (BA 31), right middle frontal gyrus (BA 8, 9 and 10), left middle frontal gyrus (BA 6), temporal lobe (fusiform gyrus, BA 20), bilateral parietal lobe (right BA 3 and right and left BA 7) and bilateral occipital lobe (BA 19). There were also correlations between increased cerebral glucose metabolism and impaired ToM in the left superior temporal gyrus (BA 22), left inferior frontal gyrus (BA 13 and BA 47) and right inferior frontal gyrus (BA 47). All these structures overlap with the brain network that mediates ToM. These results seem to confirm that STN DBS hinders the ability to infer the mental states of others and modulates a distributed network known to subtend ToM.

  7. Occupational risk factors for Parkinson's disease: a case-control study in Japan

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    Kawamura Nobutoshi

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The evidence for associations between occupational factors and the risk of Parkinson's disease (PD is inconsistent. We assessed the risk of PD associated with various occupational factors in Japan. Methods We examined 249 cases within 6 years of onset of PD. Control subjects were 369 inpatients and outpatients without neurodegenerative disease. Information on occupational factors was obtained from a self-administered questionnaire. Relative risks of PD were estimated using odds ratios (ORs and 95% confidence intervals (CIs based on logistic regression. Adjustments were made for gender, age, region of residence, educational level, and pack-years of smoking. Results Working in a professional or technical occupation tended to be inversely related to the risk of PD: adjusted OR was 0.59 (95% CI: 0.32-1.06, P = 0.08. According to a stratified analysis by gender, the decreased risk of PD for persons in professional or technical occupations was statistically significant only for men. Adjusted ORs for a professional or technical occupation among men and women were 0.22 (95% CI: 0.06-0.67 and 0.99 (0.47-2.07, respectively, and significant interaction was observed (P = 0.048 for homogeneity of OR. In contrast, risk estimates for protective service occupations and transport or communications were increased, although the results were not statistically significant: adjusted ORs were 2.73 (95% CI: 0.56-14.86 and 1.74 (95% CI: 0.65-4.74, respectively. No statistical significance was seen in data concerning exposure to occupational agents and the risk of PD, although roughly a 2-fold increase in OR was observed for workers exposed to stone or sand. Conclusion The results of our study suggest that occupational factors do not play a substantial etiologic role in this population. However, among men, professional or technical occupations may decrease the risk of PD.

  8. Genetics and Treatment Response in Parkinson's Disease: An Update on Pharmacogenetic Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Politi, Cristina; Ciccacci, Cinzia; Novelli, Giuseppe; Borgiani, Paola

    2018-03-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a complex neurodegenerative disorder characterized by a progressive loss of dopamine neurons of the central nervous system. The disease determines a significant disability due to a combination of motor symptoms such as bradykinesia, rigidity and rest tremor and non-motor symptoms such as sleep disorders, hallucinations, psychosis and compulsive behaviors. The current therapies consist in combination of drugs acting to control only the symptoms of the illness by the replacement of the dopamine lost. Although patients generally receive benefits from this symptomatic pharmacological management, they also show great variability in drug response in terms of both efficacy and adverse effects. Pharmacogenetic studies highlighted that genetic factors play a relevant influence in this drug response variability. In this review, we tried to give an overview of the recent progresses in the pharmacogenetics of PD, reporting the major genetic factors identified as involved in the response to drugs and highlighting the potential use of some of these genomic variants in the clinical practice. Many genes have been investigated and several associations have been reported especially with adverse drug reactions. However, only polymorphisms in few genes, including DRD2, COMT and SLC6A3, have been confirmed as associated in different populations and in large cohorts. The identification of genomic biomarkers involved in drug response variability represents an important step in PD treatment, opening the prospective of more personalized therapies in order to identify, for each person, the better therapy in terms of efficacy and toxicity and to improve the PD patients' quality of life.

  9. Therapeutic Dancing for Parkinson's Disease

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    Lorenna Pryscia Carvalho Aguiar

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Therapeutic dancing has been advocated as an effective adjunct to conventional physical therapies for people living with Parkinson's disease (PD. This systematic review evaluates studies on the outcomes of different dance genres on mobility and quality of life in PD. We searched databases including CINHAL (1982–2015, Medline (1922–2015, Scopus (1996–2015, Web of Science (2002–2015, Embase (2007–2015, PEDro (1999–2015 and the Cochrane Library (1996–2015. The key words were: Parkinson's disease, Parkinson*, Parkinsonism, dance, dance therapy, dance genres, safety, feasibility, and quality of life. Two independent investigators reviewed the texts. Only randomized controlled trials, quasirandomized controlled trials, and case series studies were included. There was emerging evidence that therapeutic dance can be safe and feasible for people with mild to moderately severe PD, with beneficial effects on walking, freezing of gait, and health related quality of life.

  10. Pre- and postsynaptic dopamine SPECT in the early phase of idiopathic parkinsonism: a population-based study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jakobson, Mo Susanna; Riklund, Katrine [Umeaa University, Department of Radiation Sciences, Diagnostic Radiology, Umeaa (Sweden); Linder, Jan; Forsgren, Lars [Umeaa University, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Neurology, Umeaa (Sweden); Larsson, Anne; Johansson, Lennart [Umeaa University, Department of Radiation Sciences, Radiation Physics, Umeaa (Sweden)

    2010-11-15

    The aim of this study was to assess the diagnostic contribution of pre- and postsynaptic dopamine SPECT in drug-naive patients with early idiopathic parkinsonism and to investigate possible differences between idiopathic Parkinson's disease (PD) and atypical parkinsonian syndromes (APS) and possible differences in motor subtypes of parkinsonism. A group of 128 newly diagnosed idiopathic parkinsonian patients and 48 healthy controls was studied. Presynaptic baseline SPECT with {sup 123}I-FP-CIT was performed in all patients and in 120 patients also a baseline postsynaptic SPECT with {sup 123}I-IBZM. Clinical diagnoses were reassessed after 12 months. Presynaptic uptake in the putamen and caudate was significantly reduced in patients compared to controls. Presynaptic uptake ratios were not different between PD patients and patients with APS, and postsynaptic uptake in APS was not significantly reduced compared to PD or controls. In half of the APS patients both pre- and postsynaptic uptake ratios were reduced on the same side in the striatum. Impaired motor performance was associated with decreased presynaptic uptake in the putamen in PD. The postural instability and gait difficulty (PIGD) subtype of PD had lower presynaptic uptake ratios than patients with tremor-dominated (TD) symptoms. Not only presynaptic putamen uptake ratios, but also caudate ratios were reduced in a majority of the patients in our study. At baseline scan, i.e. in an early stage of the disease, the accuracy of excluding APS in the whole study population was 85% using a combination of pre- and postsynaptic SPECT. Already at baseline, lower presynaptic SPECT ratios were seen in PD with PIGD at onset compared to those with TD subtype. (orig.)

  11. Association Between Change in Body Mass Index, Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale Scores, and Survival Among Persons With Parkinson Disease: Secondary Analysis of Longitudinal Data From NINDS Exploratory Trials in Parkinson Disease Long-term Study 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wills, Anne-Marie A; Pérez, Adriana; Wang, Jue; Su, Xiao; Morgan, John; Rajan, Suja S; Leehey, Maureen A; Pontone, Gregory M; Chou, Kelvin L; Umeh, Chizoba; Mari, Zoltan; Boyd, James

    2016-03-01

    Greater body mass index (BMI, calculated as weight in kilograms divided by height in meters squared) is associated with improved survival among persons with Huntington disease or amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Weight loss is common among persons with Parkinson disease (PD) and is associated with worse quality of life. To explore the association between change in BMI, Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) motor and total scores, and survival among persons with PD and to test whether there is a positive association between BMI at randomization and survival. Secondary analysis (from May 27, 2014, to October 13, 2015) of longitudinal data (3-6 years) from 1673 participants who started the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke Exploratory Trials in PD Long-term Study-1 (NET-PD LS-1). This was a double-blind randomized placebo-controlled clinical trial of creatine monohydrate (10 g/d) that was performed at 45 sites throughout the United States and Canada. Participants with early (within 5 years of diagnosis) and treated (receiving dopaminergic therapy) PD were enrolled from March 2007 to May 2010 and followed up until September 2013. Change across time in motor UPDRS score, change across time in total UPDRS score, and time to death. Generalized linear mixed models were used to estimate the effect of BMI on the change in motor and total UPDRS scores after controlling for covariates. Survival was analyzed using Cox proportional hazards models of time to death. A participant's BMI was measured at randomization, and BMI trajectory groups were classified according to whether participants experienced weight loss ("decreasing BMI"), weight stability ("stable BMI"), or weight gain ("increasing BMI") during the study. Of the 1673 participants (mean [SD] age, 61.7 [9.6] years; 1074 [64.2%] were male), 158 (9.4%) experienced weight loss (decreasing BMI), whereas 233 (13.9%) experienced weight gain (increasing BMI). After adjusting for covariates, we

  12. Two-year, randomized, controlled study of safinamide as add-on to levodopa in mid to late Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borgohain, Rupam; Szasz, Jozsef; Stanzione, Paolo; Meshram, Chandrashekhar; Bhatt, Mohit H; Chirilineau, Dana; Stocchi, Fabrizio; Lucini, Valentina; Giuliani, Rodolfo; Forrest, Emma; Rice, Patricia; Anand, Ravi

    2014-09-01

    In a 6-month double-blind, placebo-controlled study of Parkinson's disease patients with motor fluctuations, safinamide 50 and 100 mg/d significantly increased ON-time without increasing dyskinesia. Further long-term safinamide use in these patients was evaluated over an additional 18 months. Patients continued on their randomized placebo, 50, or 100 mg/d safinamide. The primary endpoint was change in Dyskinesia Rating Scale total score during ON-time over 24 months. Other efficacy endpoints included change in ON-time without troublesome dyskinesia, changes in individual diary categories, depressive symptoms, and quality of life measures. Change in Dyskinesia Rating Scale was not significantly different in safinamide versus placebo groups, despite decreased mean total Dyskinesia Rating Scale with safinamide compared with an almost unchanged score in placebo. Ad hoc subgroup analysis of moderate to severe dyskinetic patients at baseline (36% of patients) showed a decrease with safinamide 100 mg/d compared with placebo (P = 0.0317). Improvements in motor function, activities of daily living, depressive symptoms, clinical status, and quality of life at 6 months remained significant at 24 months. Adverse events and discontinuation rates were similar with safinamide and placebo. This 2-year, controlled study of add-on safinamide in mid-to-late Parkinson's disease with motor fluctuations, although not demonstrating an overall difference in dyskinesias between patients and controls, showed improvement in dyskinesia in patients at least moderately dyskinetic at baseline. The study additionally demonstrated significant clinical benefits in ON-time (without troublesome dyskinesia), OFF-time, activities of daily living, motor symptoms, quality of life, and symptoms of depression. © 2014 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.

  13. Brain Perivascular Spaces as Biomarkers of Vascular Risk: Results from the Northern Manhattan Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutierrez, J; Elkind, M S V; Dong, C; Di Tullio, M; Rundek, T; Sacco, R L; Wright, C B

    2017-05-01

    Dilated perivascular spaces in the brain are associated with greater arterial pulsatility. We hypothesized that perivascular spaces identify individuals at higher risk for systemic and cerebral vascular events. Stroke-free participants in the population-based Northern Manhattan Study had brain MR imaging performed and were followed for myocardial infarction, any stroke, and death. Imaging analyses distinguished perivascular spaces from lesions presumably ischemic. Perivascular spaces were further subdivided into lesions with diameters of ≤3 mm (small perivascular spaces) and >3 mm (large perivascular spaces). We calculated relative rates of events with Poisson models and hazard ratios with Cox proportional models. The Northern Manhattan Study participants who had MR imaging data available for review ( n = 1228; 59% women, 65% Hispanic; mean age, 71 ± 9 years) were followed for an average of 9 ± 2 years. Participants in the highest tertile of the small perivascular space score had a higher relative rate of all deaths (relative rate, 1.38; 95% CI, 1.01-1.91), vascular death (relative rate, 1.87; 95% CI, 1.12-3.14), myocardial infarction (relative rate, 2.08; 95% CI, 1.01-4.31), any stroke (relative rate, 1.79; 95% CI, 1.03-3.11), and any vascular event (relative rate, 1.74; 95% CI, 1.18-2.56). After we adjusted for confounders, there was a higher risk of vascular death (hazard ratio, 1.06; 95% CI, 1.01-1.11), myocardial infarction (hazard ratio, 2.22; 95% CI, 1.12-4.42), and any vascular event (hazard ratio, 1.04; 95% CI, 1.01-1.08) with higher small perivascular space scores. In this multiethnic, population-based study, participants with a high burden of small perivascular spaces had increased risk of vascular events. By gaining pathophysiologic insight into the mechanism of perivascular space dilation, we may be able to propose novel therapies to better prevent vascular disorders in the population. © 2017 by American Journal of Neuroradiology.

  14. Therapeutic study of proton beam in vascular disease animal models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Y. M.; Jang, K. H.; Kim, M. J.; Choi, J. H.

    2010-04-01

    We previously reported that proton beam inhibited angiogenic vessels in zebrafish and that proton induced cancer cell apoptosis via p53 induction as well as caspase-3 activity. In this study, we performed to identity the effect of candidate chemicals on the angiogenic inhibition in vitro and in vivo (zebrafish Flk1:EGFP transgenic fish). And we treated small cell lung adenocarcinoma cell line, A549 cells with proton beam in combination with angiogenic inhibitors we found in this study. By the MTT assay, we performed cell viability assay with cancer cells and we investigated that HIF-1α induction by proton beam by the western blot analysis. We found novel anti-angiogenic chemicals from traditional herb. That is decursin, and glyceollins from the Angelica gigas, and soy bean. Decrusin and glyceollins inhibited VEGF- or bFGF-induced endothelial cell proliferation, migration and zebrafish microvessel development. Moreover, glyceollins inhibited hypoxia-induced HIF-1α in a dose dependent manner. However, proton beam itself did not induce HIF-1α whereas it increased HIF-1α stability under hypoxia. Even proton beam induced cell death of A549 small cell lung carcinoma cells but the combination of decrusin or glyceollins did not increase the cancer cell death

  15. Therapeutic study of proton beam in vascular disease animal models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Y. M.; Jang, K. H.; Kim, M. J.; Choi, J. H. [Kyungpook National University, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-04-15

    We previously reported that proton beam inhibited angiogenic vessels in zebrafish and that proton induced cancer cell apoptosis via p53 induction as well as caspase-3 activity. In this study, we performed to identity the effect of candidate chemicals on the angiogenic inhibition in vitro and in vivo (zebrafish Flk1:EGFP transgenic fish). And we treated small cell lung adenocarcinoma cell line, A549 cells with proton beam in combination with angiogenic inhibitors we found in this study. By the MTT assay, we performed cell viability assay with cancer cells and we investigated that HIF-1{alpha} induction by proton beam by the western blot analysis. We found novel anti-angiogenic chemicals from traditional herb. That is decursin, and glyceollins from the Angelica gigas, and soy bean. Decrusin and glyceollins inhibited VEGF- or bFGF-induced endothelial cell proliferation, migration and zebrafish microvessel development. Moreover, glyceollins inhibited hypoxia-induced HIF-1{alpha} in a dose dependent manner. However, proton beam itself did not induce HIF-1{alpha} whereas it increased HIF-1{alpha} stability under hypoxia. Even proton beam induced cell death of A549 small cell lung carcinoma cells but the combination of decrusin or glyceollins did not increase the cancer cell death

  16. Effects of dual-task training on balance and executive functions in Parkinson's disease: a pilot study

    OpenAIRE

    Ângela Fernandes; Nuno Rocha; Rubim Santos; João Manuel R. S. Tavares

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the efficacy of cognitive-motor dual-task training compared with single-task training on balance and executive functions in individuals with Parkinson's disease. Fifteen subjects, aged between 39 and 75 years old, were randomly assigned to the dual-task training group (n = 8) and single-task training group (n = 7). The training was run twice a week for 6 weeks. The single-task group received balance training and the dual-task group performed cognitive task...

  17. Predictive Big Data Analytics: A Study of Parkinson's Disease Using Large, Complex, Heterogeneous, Incongruent, Multi-Source and Incomplete Observations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinov, Ivo D; Heavner, Ben; Tang, Ming; Glusman, Gustavo; Chard, Kyle; Darcy, Mike; Madduri, Ravi; Pa, Judy; Spino, Cathie; Kesselman, Carl; Foster, Ian; Deutsch, Eric W; Price, Nathan D; Van Horn, John D; Ames, Joseph; Clark, Kristi; Hood, Leroy; Hampstead, Benjamin M; Dauer, William; Toga, Arthur W

    2016-01-01

    A unique archive of Big Data on Parkinson's Disease is collected, managed and disseminated by the Parkinson's Progression Markers Initiative (PPMI). The integration of such complex and heterogeneous Big Data from multiple sources offers unparalleled opportunities to study the early stages of prevalent neurodegenerative processes, track their progression and quickly identify the efficacies of alternative treatments. Many previous human and animal studies have examined the relationship of Parkinson's disease (PD) risk to trauma, genetics, environment, co-morbidities, or life style. The defining characteristics of Big Data-large size, incongruency, incompleteness, complexity, multiplicity of scales, and heterogeneity of information-generating sources-all pose challenges to the classical techniques for data management, processing, visualization and interpretation. We propose, implement, test and validate complementary model-based and model-free approaches for PD classification and prediction. To explore PD risk using Big Data methodology, we jointly processed complex PPMI imaging, genetics, clinical and demographic data. Collective representation of the multi-source data facilitates the aggregation and harmonization of complex data elements. This enables joint modeling of the complete data, leading to the development of Big Data analytics, predictive synthesis, and statistical validation. Using heterogeneous PPMI data, we developed a comprehensive protocol for end-to-end data characterization, manipulation, processing, cleaning, analysis and validation. Specifically, we (i) introduce methods for rebalancing imbalanced cohorts, (ii) utilize a wide spectrum of classification methods to generate consistent and powerful phenotypic predictions, and (iii) generate reproducible machine-learning based classification that enables the reporting of model parameters and diagnostic forecasting based on new data. We evaluated several complementary model-based predictive approaches

  18. Predictive Big Data Analytics: A Study of Parkinson's Disease Using Large, Complex, Heterogeneous, Incongruent, Multi-Source and Incomplete Observations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivo D Dinov

    Full Text Available A unique archive of Big Data on Parkinson's Disease is collected, managed and disseminated by the Parkinson's Progression Markers Initiative (PPMI. The integration of such complex and heterogeneous Big Data from multiple sources offers unparalleled opportunities to study the early stages of prevalent neurodegenerative processes, track their progression and quickly identify the efficacies of alternative treatments. Many previous human and animal studies have examined the relationship of Parkinson's disease (PD risk to trauma, genetics, environment, co-morbidities, or life style. The defining characteristics of Big Data-large size, incongruency, incompleteness, complexity, multiplicity of scales, and heterogeneity of information-generating sources-all pose challenges to the classical techniques for data management, processing, visualization and interpretation. We propose, implement, test and validate complementary model-based and model-free approaches for PD classification and prediction. To explore PD risk using Big Data methodology, we jointly processed complex PPMI imaging, genetics, clinical and demographic data.Collective representation of the multi-source data facilitates the aggregation and harmonization of complex data elements. This enables joint modeling of the complete data, leading to the development of Big Data analytics, predictive synthesis, and statistical validation. Using heterogeneous PPMI data, we developed a comprehensive protocol for end-to-end data characterization, manipulation, processing, cleaning, analysis and validation. Specifically, we (i introduce methods for rebalancing imbalanced cohorts, (ii utilize a wide spectrum of classification methods to generate consistent and powerful phenotypic predictions, and (iii generate reproducible machine-learning based classification that enables the reporting of model parameters and diagnostic forecasting based on new data. We evaluated several complementary model

  19. Prevalence and associated features of self-reported freezing of gait in Parkinson disease: The DEEP FOG study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amboni, M; Stocchi, F; Abbruzzese, G; Morgante, L; Onofrj, M; Ruggieri, S; Tinazzi, M; Zappia, M; Attar, M; Colombo, D; Simoni, L; Ori, A; Barone, P; Antonini, A

    2015-06-01

    Freezing of Gait (FOG) is a common and disabling symptom in patients with Parkinson disease (PD). The relationship between FOG and dopaminergic medication is complex. The aim of the present study was to estimate the prevalence of self-reported FOG, its associated clinical features, and its relationship with wearing-off in a wide PD population. This is an observational multicenter study of 634 consecutive non-demented PD patients. Patients were identified either as freezers or non-freezers based on item-3 of the Freezing of Gait-Questionnaire. FOG was then classified as on, off and onoff freezing based on its relationship with wearing-off. Patients were assessed with Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale, Hoehn and Yahr scale, 8-item Parkinson's disease Questionnaire, Mini-Mental State Examination. Data from 593 patients were analyzed, 325 (54.3%) were freezers of whom 200 (61.6%) experienced FOG only during off state (off-freezers), 6 (1.8%) only during on state and 119 (36.6%) either in on and off states or independently of dopaminergic response-related symptoms (onoff-freezers). Overall, freezers vs non-freezers had longer disease duration, more advanced disease and greater disability. Moreover, freezers more frequently reported wearing-off and experienced worse quality of life. Onoff-freezers vs off-freezers were older, more severely disabled, less likely to experience wearing-off, treated with lower levodopa equivalent daily dose and with poorer cognitive performance. Self-reported FOG is mainly recognizable in advanced PD and is associated with more disability and worse quality of life. Onoff-FOG may represent the result of under-treatment or rather interpretable as a distinct clinical entity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. The Impact of Subthalamic Deep Brain Stimulation on Sleep-Wake Behavior: A Prospective Electrophysiological Study in 50 Parkinson Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumann-Vogel, Heide; Imbach, Lukas L; Sürücü, Oguzkan; Stieglitz, Lennart; Waldvogel, Daniel; Baumann, Christian R; Werth, Esther

    2017-05-01

    This prospective observational study was designed to systematically examine the effect of subthalamic deep brain stimulation (DBS) on subjective and objective sleep-wake parameters in Parkinson patients. In 50 consecutive Parkinson patients undergoing subthalamic DBS, we assessed motor symptoms, medication, the position of DBS electrodes within the subthalamic nucleus (STN), subjective sleep-wake parameters, 2-week actigraphy, video-polysomnography studies, and sleep electroencepahalogram frequency and dynamics analyses before and 6 months after surgery. Subthalamic DBS improved not only motor symptoms and reduced daily intake of dopaminergic agents but also enhanced subjective sleep quality and reduced sleepiness (Epworth Sleepiness Scale: -2.1 ± 3.8, p sleep efficiency (+5.2 ± 17.6%, p = .005) and deep sleep (+11.2 ± 32.2 min, p = .017) and increased accumulation of slow-wave activity over the night (+41.0 ± 80.0%, p = .005). Rapid eye movement sleep features were refractory to subthalamic DBS, and the dynamics of sleep as assessed by state space analyses did not normalize. Increased sleep efficiency was associated with active electrode contact localization more distant from the ventral margin of the left subthalamic nucleus. Subthalamic DBS deepens and consolidates nocturnal sleep and improves daytime wakefulness in Parkinson patients, but several outcomes suggest that it does not normalize sleep. It remains elusive whether modulated activity in the STN directly contributes to changes in sleep-wake behavior, but dorsal positioning of electrodes within the STN is linked to improved sleep-wake outcomes. © Sleep Research Society 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Sleep Research Society. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. Rasagiline for dysexecutive symptoms during wearing-off in Parkinson's disease: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinaldi, Domiziana; Assogna, Francesca; Sforza, Michela; Tagliente, Stefania; Pontieri, Francesco E

    2018-01-01

    Wearing-off refers to the predictable worsening of motor and sometimes non-motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease occurring at the end of levodopa dose that improves with the next drug dose. Here, we investigated the efficacy of rasagiline on executive functions at the end of levodopa dose in patients displaying symptoms of wearing-off. Rasagiline was well-tolerated and produced a significant improvement at the Frontal Assessment Battery, together with improvement of motor symptoms at the end of levodopa dose. These results suggest that treatment of motor symptoms of wearing-off with rasagiline may be accompanied by improvement of executive functions, and further support the need for optimizing dopamine replacement therapy in fluctuating Parkinson's disease patients.

  2. Association of UV radiation with Parkinson disease incidence: A nationwide French ecologic study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kravietz, Adam; Kab, Sofiane; Wald, Lucien; Dugravot, Aline; Singh-Manoux, Archana; Moisan, Frédéric; Elbaz, Alexis

    2017-01-01

    Background: Vitamin D is thought to contribute to brain health, but it is unclear whether low vitamin D levels are associated with increased incidence of Parkinson's disease (PD). Using ultraviolet B (UV-B) as a surrogate for vitamin D levels, we conducted a nationwide ecologic study in France in order to examine the association of UV-B with PD incidence. Methods: We used French national drug claims databases to identify PD cases using a validated algorithm. UV-B data from the solar radiation database were derived from satellite images. We estimated PD incidence (2010–2012) at the canton level (small administrative French unit) and used multilevel Poisson regression to examine its association with UV-B (2005 annual average), after adjustment for age, sex, deprivation index, density of neurologists, smoking, proportion of agricultural land, and vitamin D supplementation. Results: Analyses are based on 69,010 incident PD patients. The association between UV-B and PD incidence was quadratic (P<0.001) and modified by age (P<0.001). Below 70y, incidence was higher in the bottom quintile (relative risk, RR Q1:45-49y =1.18, 95% CI=1.08–1.29) compared with the middle UV-B quintile, and lower in the top quintile (RR Q5:45-49y =0.85 [0.77–0.94]). An opposite pattern was observed in older subjects (RR Q1:85-89y =0.92 [0.89–0.96]; RR Q5:85-89y =1.06 [1.02–1.11]). Analysis based on continuous UV-B yielded similar conclusions. Conclusions: In this nationwide study, there was an age-dependent quadratic association between UV-B and PD incidence. This study suggests that reasonable UV-B exposure is associated with lower PD risk in younger persons and that future studies should examine dose-response relations and take age into account. - Highlights: • There is an age-dependent quadratic association between UV-B and PD incidence. • Reasonable UV-B exposure is beneficial in younger persons for the risk of PD. • Our findings are consistent with a role of vitamin D

  3. Association of UV radiation with Parkinson disease incidence: A nationwide French ecologic study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kravietz, Adam [University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, Florida (United States); Kab, Sofiane [Santé publique France, Direction santé travail, F-94415 Saint-Maurice (France); CESP, Fac. de médecine - Univ. Paris-Sud, Fac. de médecine - UVSQ, INSERM, Université Paris-Saclay, 94805 Villejuif (France); Wald, Lucien [MINES ParisTech, PSL Research University, Sophia Antipolis (France); Dugravot, Aline [CESP, Fac. de médecine - Univ. Paris-Sud, Fac. de médecine - UVSQ, INSERM, Université Paris-Saclay, 94805 Villejuif (France); Singh-Manoux, Archana [CESP, Fac. de médecine - Univ. Paris-Sud, Fac. de médecine - UVSQ, INSERM, Université Paris-Saclay, 94805 Villejuif (France); Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, University College London, London (United Kingdom); Moisan, Frédéric [Santé publique France, Direction santé travail, F-94415 Saint-Maurice (France); Elbaz, Alexis, E-mail: alexis.elbaz@inserm.fr [Santé publique France, Direction santé travail, F-94415 Saint-Maurice (France); CESP, Fac. de médecine - Univ. Paris-Sud, Fac. de médecine - UVSQ, INSERM, Université Paris-Saclay, 94805 Villejuif (France)

    2017-04-15

    Background: Vitamin D is thought to contribute to brain health, but it is unclear whether low vitamin D levels are associated with increased incidence of Parkinson's disease (PD). Using ultraviolet B (UV-B) as a surrogate for vitamin D levels, we conducted a nationwide ecologic study in France in order to examine the association of UV-B with PD incidence. Methods: We used French national drug claims databases to identify PD cases using a validated algorithm. UV-B data from the solar radiation database were derived from satellite images. We estimated PD incidence (2010–2012) at the canton level (small administrative French unit) and used multilevel Poisson regression to examine its association with UV-B (2005 annual average), after adjustment for age, sex, deprivation index, density of neurologists, smoking, proportion of agricultural land, and vitamin D supplementation. Results: Analyses are based on 69,010 incident PD patients. The association between UV-B and PD incidence was quadratic (P<0.001) and modified by age (P<0.001). Below 70y, incidence was higher in the bottom quintile (relative risk, RR{sub Q1:45-49y}=1.18, 95% CI=1.08–1.29) compared with the middle UV-B quintile, and lower in the top quintile (RR{sub Q5:45-49y}=0.85 [0.77–0.94]). An opposite pattern was observed in older subjects (RR{sub Q1:85-89y}=0.92 [0.89–0.96]; RR{sub Q5:85-89y}=1.06 [1.02–1.11]). Analysis based on continuous UV-B yielded similar conclusions. Conclusions: In this nationwide study, there was an age-dependent quadratic association between UV-B and PD incidence. This study suggests that reasonable UV-B exposure is associated with lower PD risk in younger persons and that future studies should examine dose-response relations and take age into account. - Highlights: • There is an age-dependent quadratic association between UV-B and PD incidence. • Reasonable UV-B exposure is beneficial in younger persons for the risk of PD. • Our findings are consistent with a

  4. Flow regulation in coronary vascular tree: a model study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinzhou Xie

    Full Text Available Coronary blood flow can always be matched to the metabolic demand of the myocardium due to the regulation of vasoactive segments. Myocardial compressive forces play an important role in determining coronary blood flow but its impact on flow regulation is still unknown. The purpose of this study was to develop a coronary specified flow regulation model, which can integrate myocardial compressive forces and other identified regulation factors, to further investigate the coronary blood flow regulation behavior.A theoretical coronary flow regulation model including the myogenic, shear-dependent and metabolic responses was developed. Myocardial compressive forces were included in the modified wall tension model. Shear-dependent response was estimated by using the experimental data from coronary circulation. Capillary density and basal oxygen consumption were specified to corresponding to those in coronary circulation. Zero flow pressure was also modeled by using a simplified capillary model.Pressure-flow relations predicted by the proposed model are consistent with previous experimental data. The predicted diameter changes in small arteries are in good agreement with experiment observations in adenosine infusion and inhibition of NO synthesis conditions. Results demonstrate that the myocardial compressive forces acting on the vessel wall would extend the auto-regulatory range by decreasing the myogenic tone at the given perfusion pressure.Myocardial compressive forces had great impact on coronary auto-regulation effect. The proposed model was proved to be consistent with experiment observations and can be employed to investigate the coronary blood flow regulation effect in physiological and pathophysiological conditions.

  5. Estudio vascular renal por TC multidetector de 64 canales 64-Multidetector row CT for the Renal Vascular Study

    OpenAIRE

    Daniela Stoisa; Fabrizzio E. Galiano; Andrés Quaranta; Roberto L. Villavicencio

    2009-01-01

    Objetivo: Mostrar las diversas variantes anatómicas vasculares tanto arteriales como venosas en el estudio angiográfico renal por tomografìa computada multidetector (TCMD) de 64 canales, dada su implicancia en un eventual planeamiento quirúrgico. Material y métodos: Evaluamos retrospectivamente 26 estudios realizados con tomógrafo Philips Brilliance de 64 canales. Se obtuvieron secuencias sin contraste y postcontraste e.v. en fases arterial y venosa, administrado con bomba inyectora doble cab...

  6. Screening for impulse control symptoms in patients with de novo Parkinson disease: a case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weintraub, Daniel; Papay, Kimberly; Siderowf, Andrew

    2013-01-08

    To determine the frequency and correlates of impulse control and related behavior symptoms in patients with de novo, untreated Parkinson disease (PD) and healthy controls (HCs). The Parkinson's Progression Markers Initiative is an international, multisite, case-control clinical study conducted at 21 academic movement disorders centers. Participants were recently diagnosed, untreated PD patients (n = 168) and HCs (n = 143). The outcome measures were presence of current impulse control and related behavior symptoms based on recommended cutoff points for the Questionnaire for Impulsive-Compulsive Disorders in Parkinson's Disease (QUIP)-Short Form. There were 311 participants with complete QUIP data. Frequencies of impulse control and related behavior symptoms for patients with PD vs HCs were as follows: gambling (1.2% vs. 0.7%), buying (3.0% vs. 2.1%), sexual behavior (4.2% vs. 3.5%), eating (7.1% vs. 10.5%), punding (4.8% vs. 2.1%), hobbyism (5.4% vs. 11.9%), walkabout (0.6% vs. 0.7%), and any impulse control or related behavior (18.5% vs. 20.3%). In multivariable models, a diagnosis of PD was not associated with symptoms of any impulse control or related behavior (p ≥ 0.10 in all cases). PD itself does not seem to confer an increased risk for development of impulse control or related behavior symptoms, which further reinforces the reported association between PD medications and impulse control disorders in PD. Given that approximately 20% of patients with newly diagnosed PD report some impulse control or related behavior symptoms, long-term follow-up is needed to determine whether such patients are at increased risk for impulse control disorder development once PD medications are initiated.

  7. The Efficiency of Vascular Embolization Using Alginate Gel : An Experimental Study in Rabbit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Woo Baek; Kang, Yeong Han [Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, Daegu Catholic University Hospital, Daegu (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jong Ki [Dept. of Biomedical Engineering, Daegu Catholic University, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-03-15

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the applicability of poly-L-guluronic alginate (PGA) gel in vascular embolization with angiography simulation. To prepare a gel-forming PGA from no guluronate-rich Laminaria japonica, a new acid hydrolysis method was employed with a lower HCL concentration (0.03 M) and a shorter treatment time (5 min). The obtained PGAs were selected based on gel stability and viscosity. Glass aneurysm model was used to simulate gel embolization in vitro. Then, finally, the PGA was used to embolize the renal vascular system by using a rabbit model and angiography. Glass aneurysm model was made to simulate gel embolization procedure. PGA solution was injected from pump through 2-way catheter. Subsequent injection of CaCl{sub 2} successfully formed gels inside aneurysm model that conforming to its inner contour. In rabbit model, first, renal artery and aorta leading to the right kidney were ligated to block blood flow, then conventional contrast agent was injected through aorta to check the arterial patency to the left kidney. In sequential artery injection method, PGA and CaCl{sub 2} were injected through renal artery sequentially via a single catheter. Re-injection of contrast agent after removing ligated aorta showed blood flow to the right kidney but no flow in the left kidney. This result demonstrated a complete blocking of blood flow due to gel formation in vascular bed of the left kidney. Instillation of calcium alginate into aneurysm model and arterial system in vivo produced an embolization that better fills and conforms to the contour of aneurysms or blocking vascular bed completely. Therefore, PGA was effective endovascular occlusion materials and provide an efficiency of vascular angiography.

  8. Menstrual Cycle, Vocal Performance, and Laryngeal Vascular Appearance: An Observational Study on 17 Subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoffel-Havakuk, Hagit; Carmel-Neiderman, Narin N; Halperin, Doron; Shapira Galitz, Yael; Levin, Dan; Haimovich, Yaara; Cohen, Oded; Abitbol, Jean; Lahav, Yonatan

    2018-03-01

    To assess the anatomical and functional features of the vocal folds during different phases of the female menstrual cycle. An observational study of 17 healthy fertile female volunteers not using hormonal contraception was carried out. Each volunteer underwent two examinations: first, during the early days of the menstrual cycle when progesterone levels are low (p-depletion), and second, during premenstruation when progesterone levels are high (p-peak). The workup included blood hormone levels, Voice Handicap Index, acoustic analysis, rigid telescopy, stroboscopy, and narrow band imaging. The videos were evaluated by blinded observers. The participants' mean age was 31.7 ± 5.6 (range 23-43). Progesterone levels were 13- to 45-fold higher in p-peak relative to p-depletion. No significant differences were detected in Voice Handicap Index scores, stroboscopic reports, or acoustic analysis between p-peak and p-depletion examinations. Analyzing the rigid telescopy and narrow band imaging videos, the observers tended to estimate the different laryngeal subsites more vascularized during the p-peak examination. Moreover, this tendency was significantly correlated with blood progesterone levels during the p-depletion examinations; the lower the blood progesterone levels were during p-depletion, the higher the probability for the observers to estimate the p-peak examinations more vascularized (P value = 0.024). Alterations in laryngeal vascular characteristics are evident throughout the menstrual cycle and may suggest increased congestion during premenstrual days. Variations in progesterone levels during the menstrual cycle correlate with laryngeal vascular changes. Hormone-related alterations in vocal folds' vascularity may have a role in the variability of vocal performance in certain women. Copyright © 2018 The Voice Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Differential vascular dysfunction in response to diets of differing macronutrient composition: a phenomenonological study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cassidy Roslyn

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Vascular dysfunction can develop from consumption of an energy-rich diet, even prior to the onset of obesity. However, the roles played by different dietary components remain uncertain. While attempting to develop models of obesity in a separate study, we observed that two high-energy diets of differing macronutrient compositions affected vascular function differently in overweight rats. Methods Male Wistar rats (n = 6/group were fed diets providing varying percentages of energy from fat and carbohydrate (CHO. For 10 weeks, they were fed either chow, as control diet (10% of energy from fat; 63% from CHO, chow supplemented with chocolate biscuit (30% fat; 56% CHO or a high-fat diet (45% fat; 35% CHO. Blood concentrations of biochemical markers of obesity were measured, and epididymal fat pads weighed as a measure of adiposity. Mesenteric arteries were dissected and their contractile and relaxant properties analysed myographically. Data were tested by analysis of variance (ANOVA. Results Weight gain and plasma concentrations of glucose, insulin and leptin were similar in all groups. However, biscuit-fed animals showed increased food intake (+27%; p p p p p Conclusion Vascular dysfunction resulting from consumption of a high-fat or combined relatively high-fat/high-CHO diet occurs through different physiological processes, which may be attributable to their differing macronutrient compositions. Combining potentially atherogenic macronutrients induces more extensive vascular impairment than that of high-fat alone, and may be attributable to the more marked dyslipidaemia observed with such a diet. Thus, these findings help clarify the role of dietary components in vascular impairment, which has implications for clinical approaches to preventing cardiovascular disease.

  10. The Efficiency of Vascular Embolization Using Alginate Gel : An Experimental Study in Rabbit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Woo Baek; Kang, Yeong Han; Kim, Jong Ki

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the applicability of poly-L-guluronic alginate (PGA) gel in vascular embolization with angiography simulation. To prepare a gel-forming PGA from no guluronate-rich Laminaria japonica, a new acid hydrolysis method was employed with a lower HCL concentration (0.03 M) and a shorter treatment time (5 min). The obtained PGAs were selected based on gel stability and viscosity. Glass aneurysm model was used to simulate gel embolization in vitro. Then, finally, the PGA was used to embolize the renal vascular system by using a rabbit model and angiography. Glass aneurysm model was made to simulate gel embolization procedure. PGA solution was injected from pump through 2-way catheter. Subsequent injection of CaCl 2 successfully formed gels inside aneurysm model that conforming to its inner contour. In rabbit model, first, renal artery and aorta leading to the right kidney were ligated to block blood flow, then conventional contrast agent was injected through aorta to check the arterial patency to the left kidney. In sequential artery injection method, PGA and CaCl 2 were injected through renal artery sequentially via a single catheter. Re-injection of contrast agent after removing ligated aorta showed blood flow to the right kidney but no flow in the left kidney. This result demonstrated a complete blocking of blood flow due to gel formation in vascular bed of the left kidney. Instillation of calcium alginate into aneurysm model and arterial system in vivo produced an embolization that better fills and conforms to the contour of aneurysms or blocking vascular bed completely. Therefore, PGA was effective endovascular occlusion materials and provide an efficiency of vascular angiography.

  11. Neurologic Music Therapy Training for Mobility and Stability Rehabilitation with Parkinson's Disease - A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bukowska, Anna A; Krężałek, Piotr; Mirek, Elżbieta; Bujas, Przemysław; Marchewka, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Idiopathic Parkinson's Disease (PD) is a progressive condition with gait disturbance and balance disorder as the main symptoms. Previous research studies focused on the application of Rhythmic Auditory Stimulation (RAS) in PD gait rehabilitation. The key hypothesis of this pilot study, however, assumes the major role of the combination of all three Neurologic Music Therapy (NMT) sensorimotor techniques in improving spatio-temporal gait parameters, and postural stability in the course of PD. The 55 PD-diagnosed subjects invited to the study were divided into two groups: 30 in the experimental and 25 in the control group. Inclusion criteria included Hoehn and Yahr stages 2 or 3, the ability to walk independently without any aid and stable pharmacological treatment for the duration of the experiment. In order to evaluate the efficacy of the chosen therapy procedure the following measures were applied: Optoelectrical 3D Movement Analysis, System BTS Smart for gait, and Computerized Dynamic Posturography CQ Stab for stability and balance. All measures were conducted both before and after the therapy cycle. The subjects from the experimental group attended music therapy sessions four times a week for 4 weeks. Therapeutic Instrumental Music Performance (TIMP), Pattern Sensory Enhancement (PSE) and RAS were used in every 45-min session for practicing daily life activities, balance, pre-gait, and gait pattern. Percussion instruments, the metronome and rhythmic music were the basis for each session. The subjects from the control group were asked to stay active and perform daily life activities between the measures. The research showed that the combination of the three NMT sensorimotor techniques can be used to improve gait and other rhythmical activities in PD rehabilitation. The results demonstrated significant improvement in the majority of the spatiotemporal gait parameters in the experimental group in comparison to the control group. In the stability tests with eyes

  12. Glitazone Treatment and Incidence of Parkinson's Disease among People with Diabetes: A Retrospective Cohort Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruth Brauer

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Recent in vitro and animal experiments suggest that peroxisome proliferation-activated receptor gamma (PPARɣ agonist medications, such as antidiabetic glitazone (GTZ drugs, are neuroprotective in models of Parkinson's disease (PD. These findings have not been tested in humans. We hypothesized that individuals prescribed GTZ drugs would have a lower incidence of PD compared to individuals prescribed other treatments for diabetes.Using primary care data from the United Kingdom Clinical Practice Research Datalink (CPRD, we conducted a retrospective cohort study in which individuals with diabetes who were newly prescribed GTZ (GTZ-exposed group were matched by age, sex, practice, and diabetes treatment stage with up to five individuals prescribed other diabetes treatments (other antidiabetic drug-exposed group. Patients were followed up from 1999 until the first recording of a PD diagnosis, end of observation in the database, or end of the study (1 August 2013. An incidence rate ratio (IRR was calculated using conditional Poisson regression, adjusted for possible confounders. 44,597 GTZ exposed individuals were matched to 120,373 other antidiabetic users. 175 GTZ-exposed individuals were diagnosed with PD compared to 517 individuals in the other antidiabetic drug-exposed group. The incidence rate (IR of PD in the GTZ-exposed group was 6.4 per 10,000 patient years compared with 8.8 per 10,000 patient years in those prescribed other antidiabetic treatments (IRR 0.72, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.60-0.87. Adjustments for potential confounding variables, including smoking, other medications, head injury, and disease severity, had no material impact (fully adjusted IRR 0.75, 0.59-0.94. The risk was reduced in those with current GTZ prescriptions (current GTZ-exposed IRR 0.59, 0.46-0.77 but not reduced among those with past prescriptions (past GTZ-exposed IRR 0.85, 0.65-1.10. Our study only included patients with diabetes who did not have a PD

  13. Kinesiotherapy of Parkinson`s disease and Parkinson`s syndrom

    OpenAIRE

    Zechovská, Lenka

    2013-01-01

    Author: Lenka Zechovská Institution: Rehabilitation Clinic, Faculty of Medicine in Hradec Králové Title: Kinesiotherapy of Parkinson's disease and Parkinson's syndrome Supervisor: Mgr. Ivana Vondráková Number of pages: 115 Number of attachments: 8 Year of defence: 2013 Keywords: Parkinson's disease, basal ganglia, tremor, rigidity, hypokinesia Bachelor thesis deals with the problems of Parkinson's disease and Parkinson's syndrome. The theoretical part includes the basal ganglia pathophysiolog...

  14. Complement activation in the Parkinson's disease substantia nigra: an immunocytochemical study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Conant Stephanie B

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Inflammatory processes are increased in the Parkinson's disease (PD brain. The long-term use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs has been associated, in retrospective studies, with decreased risk for PD, suggesting that inflammation may contribute to development of this disorder. The objective of this study was to determine the extent of complement activation, a major inflammatory mechanism, in PD. Methods Substantia nigra specimens from young normal subjects (n = 11–13, aged normal subjects (n = 24–28, and subjects with PD (n = 19–20, Alzheimer's disease (AD; n = 12–13, and dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB; n = 9 were stained for iC3b and C9, representing early- and late-stage complement activation, respectively. Numbers of iC3b+, C9+, and total melanized neurons in each section were counted in a blinded fashion. Nonparametric analyses were used to evaluate differences between groups and to evaluate correlations between complement staining, numbers of melanized neurons, and the duration of PD. Results Lewy bodies in both PD and DLB specimens stained for iC3b and C9. Staining was also prominent on melanized neurons. The percentage of iC3b+ neurons was significantly increased in PD vs. aged normal and AD specimens, and in young normal vs. aged normal specimens. C9 immunoreactivity was significantly increased in PD vs. AD specimens, but unlike iC3b, the increased C9 staining in PD and young normal specimens did not achieve statistical significance vs. aged normal specimens. iC3b and C9 staining in PD specimens was not correlated with the numbers of remaining melanized neurons, nor with the duration of PD. Conclusion Complement activation occurs on Lewy bodies and melanized neurons in the PD substantia nigra. Early complement activation (iC3b is increased on melanized neurons in PD vs. aged normal specimens, and late-stage complement activation (C9 also tends to increase. This latter finding suggests that complement

  15. Statin adherence and the risk of Parkinson's disease: A population-based cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozani, Violetta; Giladi, Nir; El-Ad, Baruch; Gurevich, Tanya; Tsamir, Judith; Hemo, Beatriz; Peretz, Chava

    2017-01-01

    While experimental data provided some compelling evidence on the benefits of statins on dopaminergic neurons, observational studies reported conflicting results regarding the potential of statins to effect the risk of Parkinson's disease (PD). To evaluate the association between changes in statin adherence over time and PD risk. A population-based cohort of new statin users (ages 40-79, years 1999-2012) was derived from a large Israeli healthcare services organization. Data included history of statin purchases and low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) levels. Personal statin adherence was measured annually by the proportion of days covered (PDC). PD was detected employing a drug-tracer approach. Stratified (by sex, LDL-C levels at baseline and age) Cox proportional hazards models with time-dependent covariates were used to compute adjusted Hazard Ratio (HR) with 95%CI. The cohort included 232,877 individuals, 49.3% men. Mean age at first statin purchase was 56.5 (±9.8) years for men and 58.7 (±9.2) years for women. PDC distribution for the whole follow up period differed between men and women: medians 58.3% and 54.1% respectively. During a mean follow up of 7.6 (±3.4) years, 2,550 (1.1%) PD cases were identified. In a 1-year lagged analysis, we found no association between annual statin adherence and PD risk in all age-groups regardless of statin type and potency. Age-pooled HR (95%CI) for men and women with LDL-C levels at baseline ≤160mg/dL were: 0.99 (0.99-1.01), 1.01 (1.00-1.02); and for men and women with LDL-C >160mg/dL levels: 0.99 (0.98-1.01), 0.97 (0.98-1.01). Our findings suggest that statin adherence over time does not affect PD risk. Future studies should use large-scale cohorts and refining assessments of long-term profiles in statin adherence.

  16. Genetic susceptibility loci, environmental exposures, and Parkinson's disease: a case-control study of gene-environment interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Sun Ju; Armasu, Sebastian M; Anderson, Kari J; Biernacka, Joanna M; Lesnick, Timothy G; Rider, David N; Cunningham, Julie M; Ahlskog, J Eric; Frigerio, Roberta; Maraganore, Demetrius M

    2013-06-01

    Prior studies causally linked mutations in SNCA, MAPT, and LRRK2 genes with familial Parkinsonism. Genome-wide association studies have demonstrated association of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in those three genes with sporadic Parkinson's disease (PD) susceptibility worldwide. Here we investigated the interactions between SNPs in those three susceptibility genes and environmental exposures (pesticides application, tobacco smoking, coffee drinking, and alcohol drinking) also associated with PD susceptibility. Pairwise interactions between environmental exposures and 18 variants (16 SNPs and two variable number tandem repeats, or "VNTRs") in SNCA, MAPT and LRRK2, were investigated using data from 1098 PD cases from the upper Midwest, USA and 1098 matched controls. Environmental exposures were assessed using a validated telephone interview script. Five pairwise interactions had uncorrected P-values coffee drinking × MAPT H1/H2 haplotype or MAPT rs16940806, and alcohol drinking × MAPT rs2435211. None of these interactions remained significant after Bonferroni correction. Secondary analyses in strata defined by type of control (sibling or unrelated), sex, or age at onset of the case also did not identify significant interactions after Bonferroni correction. This study documented limited pairwise interactions between established genetic and environmental risk factors for PD; however, the associations were not significant after correction for multiple testing. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Prevalence and incidence of Parkinson's disease in The Faroe Islands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wermuth, Lene; Bech, Sara Brynhild Winther; Petersen, Maria Skaalum

    2008-01-01

    A study in The Faroe Islands in 1995 suggested a high prevalence of idiopathic Parkinson's disease (IPD) and total parkinsonism of 187.6 and 233.4 per 100,000 inhabitants respectively.......A study in The Faroe Islands in 1995 suggested a high prevalence of idiopathic Parkinson's disease (IPD) and total parkinsonism of 187.6 and 233.4 per 100,000 inhabitants respectively....

  18. Large-scale identification of clinical and genetic predictors of motor progression in patients with newly diagnosed Parkinson's disease: a longitudinal cohort study and validation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latourelle, Jeanne C; Beste, Michael T; Hadzi, Tiffany C; Miller, Robert E; Oppenheim, Jacob N; Valko, Matthew P; Wuest, Diane M; Church, Bruce W; Khalil, Iya G; Hayete, Boris; Venuto, Charles S

    2017-11-01

    Better understanding and prediction of progression of Parkinson's disease could improve disease management and clinical trial design. We aimed to use longitudinal clinical, molecular, and genetic data to develop predictive models, compare potential biomarkers, and identify novel predictors for motor progression in Parkinson's disease. We also sought to assess the use of these models in the design of treatment trials in Parkinson's disease. A Bayesian multivariate predictive inference platform was applied to data from the Parkinson's Progression Markers Initiative (PPMI) study (NCT01141023). We used genetic data and baseline molecular and clinical variables from patients with Parkinson's disease and healthy controls to construct an ensemble of models to predict the annual rate of change in combined scores from the Movement Disorder Society-Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (MDS-UPDRS) parts II and III. We tested our overall explanatory power, as assessed by the coefficient of determination (R 2 ), and replicated novel findings in an independent clinical cohort from the Longitudinal and Biomarker Study in Parkinson's disease (LABS-PD; NCT00605163). The potential utility of these models for clinical trial design was quantified by comparing simulated randomised placebo-controlled trials within the out-of-sample LABS-PD cohort. 117 healthy controls and 312 patients with Parkinson's disease from the PPMI study were available for analysis, and 317 patients with Parkinson's disease from LABS-PD were available for validation. Our model ensemble showed strong performance within the PPMI cohort (five-fold cross-validated R 2 41%, 95% CI 35-47) and significant-albeit reduced-performance in the LABS-PD cohort (R 2 9%, 95% CI 4-16). Individual predictive features identified from PPMI data were confirmed in the LABS-PD cohort. These included significant replication of higher baseline MDS-UPDRS motor score, male sex, and increased age, as well as a novel Parkinson's disease

  19. Subthalamic nucleus stimulation affects theory of mind network: a PET study in Parkinson's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie Péron

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: There appears to be an overlap between the limbic system, which is modulated by subthalamic nucleus (STN deep brain stimulation (DBS in Parkinson's disease (PD, and the brain network that mediates theory of mind (ToM. Accordingly, the aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of STN DBS on ToM of PD patients and to correlate ToM modifications with changes in glucose metabolism. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To this end, we conducted (18FDG-PET scans in 13 PD patients in pre- and post-STN DBS conditions and correlated changes in their glucose metabolism with modified performances on the Eyes test, a visual ToM task requiring them to describe thoughts or feelings conveyed by photographs of the eye region. Postoperative PD performances on this emotion recognition task were significantly worse than either preoperative PD performances or those of healthy controls (HC, whereas there was no significant difference between preoperative PD and HC. Conversely, PD patients in the postoperative condition performed within the normal range on the gender attribution task included in the Eyes test. As far as the metabolic results are concerned, there were correlations between decreased cerebral glucose metabolism and impaired ToM in several cortical areas: the bilateral cingulate gyrus (BA 31, right middle frontal gyrus (BA 8, 9 and 10, left middle frontal gyrus (BA 6, temporal lobe (fusiform gyrus, BA 20, bilateral parietal lobe (right BA 3 and right and left BA 7 and bilateral occipital lobe (BA 19. There were also correlations between increased cerebral glucose metabolism and impaired ToM in the left superior temporal gyrus (BA 22, left inferior frontal gyrus (BA 13 and BA 47 and right inferior frontal gyrus (BA 47. All these structures overlap with the brain network that mediates ToM. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: These results seem to confirm that STN DBS hinders the ability to infer the mental states of others and modulates a

  20. The experimental studies of Chinese herbs as a vascular embolization agent for the hepatic arteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Ziqian; Yang Xizhang; Shen Junjie; Wang Shudong; Zheng Xiaogang; Cao Jianmin

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To study the efficacy, safety and correlative characteristics of Chinese herb as a vascular embolization agent. Methods: Vascular embolization agent combined from several kinds of Chinese herb was manufactured and served as anticarcinogen and coagulant according to the chinese Pharmacopoeia. The characteristics of the combination embolization agent through embolizing the hepatic arteries in eight pigs were studied. Results: The combination agent was a non-homogenous suspension, easily to be injected through 5-F catheter with hyper attenuation under fluoroscopy; simultaneously with good histocompatibility and hemo-compatibility and without feverish response and toxicity. The combination agent mainly embolized the peripheral arteries with maintaining occlusion for 5 weeks and without formation of collateral circulation. Slight injuries of normal hepatic tissues with hepatic cytonecrosis and endochyloma focal necrosis were found through optical and electronic microscopy. Conclusions: The Chinese herb combination agent is safe and effective in experimental application with good angioembolic function and a potential peripheral embolization agent. (authors)

  1. Medium-to-high prevalence of screening-detected parkinsonism in the urban area of Tehran, Iran: data from a community-based door-to-door study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fereshtehnejad SM

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Seyed-Mohammad Fereshtehnejad,1,2 Mahdiyeh Shafieesabet,3 Arash Rahmani,4 Ahmad Delbari,1,5 Johan Lökk1,6 1Division of Clinical Geriatrics, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences, and Society (NVS, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; 2Firoozgar Clinical Research Development Center (FCRDC, Firoozgar Hospital, 3Medical Student Research Committee (MSRC, Faculty of Medicine, 4Mental Health Research Center, Tehran Institute of Psychiatry, School of Behavioral Sciences and Mental Health, Iran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran; 5Iranian Research Center on Aging, University of Social Welfare and Rehabilitation, Tehran, Iran; 6Department of Geriatric Medicine, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden Introduction: Parkinsonism occurs in all ethnic groups worldwide; however, there are wide variations in the prevalence rates reported from different countries, even for neighboring regions. The huge socioeconomic burden of parkinsonism necessitates the need for prevalence studies in each country. So far, there is neither data registry nor prevalence information on parkinsonism in the Iranian population. The aim of our study was to estimate the prevalence rate of probable parkinsonism in a huge urban area in Iran, Tehran using a community-based door-to-door survey.Materials and methods: We used a random multistage sampling of the households within the network of health centers consisting of 374 subunits in all 22 districts throughout the entire urban area of Tehran. Overall, 20,621 individuals answered the baseline checklist and screening questionnaire and data from 19,500 persons aged ≥30 years were entered in the final analysis. Health care professionals used a new six-item screening questionnaire for parkinsonism, which has been previously shown to have a high validity and diagnostic value in the same population.Results: A total of 157 cases were screened for parkinsonism using the validated six-item questionnaire. After

  2. Quantification of vascular function changes under different emotion states: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Yirong; Yang, Licai; Mao, Xueqin; Zheng, Dingchang; Liu, Chengyu

    2017-01-01

    Recent studies have indicated that physiological parameters change with different emotion states. This study aimed to quantify the changes of vascular function at different emotion and sub-emotion states. Twenty young subjects were studied with their finger photoplethysmographic (PPG) pulses recorded at three distinct emotion states: natural (1 minute), happiness and sadness (10 minutes for each). Within the period of happiness and sadness emotion states, two sub-emotion states (calmness and outburst) were identified with the synchronously recorded videos. Reflection index (RI) and stiffness index (SI), two widely used indices of vascular function, were derived from the PPG pulses to quantify their differences between three emotion states, as well as between two sub-emotion states. The results showed that, when compared with the natural emotion, RI and SI decreased in both happiness and sadness emotions. The decreases in RI were significant for both happiness and sadness emotions (both Pemotion (Pemotions, there was significant difference in RI (Pemotion in comparison with the calmness one for both happiness and sadness emotions (both Pemotion only in sadness emotion (Pemotion measurements. This pilot study confirmed that vascular function changes with diffenrt emotion states could be quantified by the simple PPG measurement.

  3. Repair of bile duct injuries with Gore-Tex vascular grafts: experimental study in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez, Néstor A; Alvarez, Ludwig R; Mite, Alfredo; Andrade, Jean P; Alvarez, José R; Vargas, Paola E; Tomalá, Nancy E; Vivas, Alex F; Zapatier, Jorge A

    2002-01-01

    Bile duct injury is the most feared complication related to biliary tract operations. The goal of this investigation was to offer an alternative treatment that might prevent this complication. Twelve mongrel dogs, thin-walled FEP-ringed Gore-Tex vascular grafts, and Gore-Tex sutures were used in this study. The dogs were randomized into three groups of four according to the length of time of graft implantation: group 1 = 1 month; group 2 = 2 months; and group 3 = 3 months. During the first part of the study, a biliary injury was induced by ligating the middle choledocus after performing a conventional cholecystectomy. During the second part of the study, biliodigestive and biliobiliary anastomosis were performed using Gore-Tex vascular grafts prior to resection of the stenotic area. Initially, an increase in serum bilirubin and alkaline phosphatase levels was noted. Two weeks later, after implantation of the grafts, these values returned to normal. Thin-walled FEP-ringed Gore-Tex vascular grafts were found to be useful in the repair of bile duct injuries, especially in complete transections of the common bile duct. The ductility and flexibility of the material allows any type of anastomosis to be performed, especially when bile duct-gut anastomosis is technically difficult.

  4. [Deep brain stimulation - expectations and doubts. A nationwide questionnaire study of patients with Parkinson's disease and their family members].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Südmeyer, M; Volkmann, J; Wojtecki, L; Deuschl, G; Schnitzler, A; Möller, B

    2012-04-01

    The aim of this questionnaire-based study was to determine the decision-making motives from Parkinson's patients and their family members for deep brain stimulation (DBS), which are crucial for the attitude towards this therapy and which should be considered during the clinical interview. The questionnaire was sent out nationwide to members of the German Parkinson Association. Patient and family specific data as well as information sources, doubts and expectations with respect to DBS were assessed. A total of 582 patients and 476 family members answered the questionnaire, revealing that 96% of the patients and 91% of the family members already possessed information regarding DBS. While a large proportion of interviewees had specific expectations concerning DBS, more than two thirds expressed concerns regarding DBS; the most frequent with respect to intraoperative complications and stimulation-induced worsening of symptoms. The quantity of realistic patients and family expectations significantly correlated with a positive evaluation of DBS and doubts as well as unrealistic expectations of family members correlated with a negative attitude towards the operation. The findings suggest that patients and their relatives organized in support groups indeed possess detailed information regarding DBS. However, for the acceptance of the treatment a timely elucidation about DBS as well as responding to the individual concerns by the consulting physician is essential.

  5. An observational clinical and video-polysomnographic study of the effects of rotigotine in sleep disorder in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yan; Yang, Yue-Chang; Lan, Dan-Mei; Wu, Hui -Juan; Zhao, Zhong-Xin

    2017-05-01

    Sleep disturbance is common in Parkinson's disease (PD) and negatively impacts quality of life. There is little data on how dopamine agonists influence nocturnal sleep in PD, particularly in sleep laboratory data to measure sleep parameters and their changes objectively. The goal of this open-label study was to objectively evaluate the effect of rotigotine on sleep in PD patients by video-polysomnographic methods. A total of 25 PD patients with complaints of nocturnal sleep impairment were enrolled. The sleep quality before and after stable rotigotine therapy was evaluated subjectively through questionnaire assessments and objectively measured by video-polysomnographic methods. The Parkinsonism, depression, anxiety, and quality of life of PD patients were also evaluated through questionnaire assessments. At the end of rotigotine treatment, the PD daytime functioning, motor performance, depression, subjective quality of sleep, and the quality of life improved. Video-polysomnographic analysis showed that the sleep efficiency and stage N1% were increased, while the sleep latency, wake after sleep onset, and the periodic leg movements in sleep index were decreased after rotigotine treatment. Video-polysomnographic analysis confirmed the subjective improvement of sleep after rotigotine treatment. This observation suggests that in PD rotigotine is a treatment option for patients complaining from sleep disturbances.

  6. Reduced topological efficiency in cortical-basal Ganglia motor network of Parkinson's disease: a resting state fMRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Luqing; Zhang, Jiuquan; Long, Zhiliang; Wu, Guo-Rong; Hu, Xiaofei; Zhang, Yanling; Wang, Jian

    2014-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is mainly characterized by dopamine depletion of the cortico-basal ganglia (CBG) motor circuit. Given that dopamine dysfunction could affect functional brain network efficiency, the present study utilized resting-state fMRI (rs-fMRI) and graph theoretical approach to investigate the topological efficiency changes of the CBG motor network in patients with PD during a relatively hypodopaminergic state (12 hours after a last dose of dopamimetic treatment). We found that PD compared with controls had remarkable decreased efficiency in the CBG motor network, with the most pronounced changes observed in rostral supplementary motor area (pre-SMA), caudal SMA (SMA-proper), primary motor cortex (M1), primary somatosensory cortex (S1), thalamus (THA), globus pallidus (GP), and putamen (PUT). Furthermore, reduced efficiency in pre-SMA, M1, THA and GP was significantly correlated with Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) motor scores in PD patients. Together, our results demonstrate that individuals with PD appear to be less effective at information transfer within the CBG motor pathway, which provides a novel perspective on neurobiological explanation for the motor symptoms in patients. These findings are in line with the pathophysiology of PD, suggesting that network efficiency metrics may be used to identify and track the pathology of PD.

  7. Imaging of the dopaminergic neurotransmission system using single-photon emission tomography and positron emission tomography in patients with parkinsonism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Booij, J.; Tissingh, G.; Winogrodzka, A.; van Royen, E. A.

    1999-01-01

    Parkinsonism is a feature of a number of neurodegenerative diseases, including Parkinson's disease, multiple system atrophy and progressive supranuclear palsy. The results of post-mortem studies point to dysfunction of the dopaminergic neurotransmitter system in patients with parkinsonism. Nowadays,

  8. StarClose Vascular Closure Device: Prospective Study on 222 Deployments in an Interventional Radiology Practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imam, Atique; Carter, Ranjana M. S.; Phillips-Hughes, Jane; Boardman, Philip; Uberoi, Raman

    2007-01-01

    The StarClose device (Abbott Vascular Devices; Abbott Laboratories, Redwood City, CA) utilizes an externally placed Nitinol clip to achieve arterial closure following femoral artery puncture. The objectives of this study were to assess the efficacy and complications of the StarClose device in patients undergoing interventional radiological procedures. Preprocedural clotting status, pulse and blood pressure, severity of vessel calcification, sheath size, and time to deployment were recorded. Postdeployment complications immediately postprocedure, at 1 h, at 2 h, and at 1 week were recorded. A duplex scan was performed in the first 10 patients to assess any immediate vascular complications. Deployments were successful in 96% achieving immediate hemostasis. Mean deployment time was 48 s. There were no major complications. The StarClose device was found to have a high technical and clinical efficacy

  9. The impact of occupational therapy in Parkinson's disease: a randomized controlled feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturkenboom, Ingrid H; Graff, Maud J; Borm, George F; Veenhuizen, Yvonne; Bloem, Bastiaan R; Munneke, Marten; Nijhuis-van der Sanden, Maria W

    2013-02-01

    To evaluate the feasibility of a randomized controlled trial including process and potential impact of occupational therapy in Parkinson's disease. Process and outcome were quantitatively and qualitatively evaluated in an exploratory multicentre, two-armed randomized controlled trial at three months. Forty-three community-dwelling patients with Parkinson's disease and difficulties in daily activities, their primary caregivers and seven occupational therapists. Ten weeks of home-based occupational therapy according to the Dutch guidelines of occupational therapy in Parkinson's disease versus no occupational therapy in the control group. Process evaluation measured accrual, drop-out, intervention delivery and protocol adherence. Primary outcome measures of patients assessed daily functioning: Canadian Occupational Performance Measure (COPM) and Assessment of Motor and Process Skills. Primary outcome for caregivers was caregiver burden: Zarit Burden Inventory. Participants' perspectives of the intervention were explored using questionnaires and in-depth interviews. Inclusion was 23% (43/189), drop-out 7% (3/43) and unblinding of assessors 33% (13/40). Full intervention protocol adherence was 74% (20/27), but only 60% (71/119) of baseline Canadian Occupational Performance Measure priorities were addressed in the intervention. The outcome measures revealed negligible to small effects in favour of the intervention group. Almost all patients and caregivers of the intervention group were satisfied with the results. They perceived: 'more grip on the situation' and used 'practical advices that make life easier'. Therapists were satisfied, but wished for a longer intervention period. The positive perceived impact of occupational therapy warrants a large-scale trial. Adaptations in instructions and training are needed to use the Canadian Occupational Performance Measure as primary outcome measure.

  10. Water-based vs. non-water-based physiotherapy for rehabilitation of postural deformities in Parkinson's disease: a randomized controlled pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volpe, Daniele; Giantin, Maria Giulia; Manuela, Pilleri; Filippetto, Consuelo; Pelosin, Elisa; Abbruzzese, Giovanni; Antonini, Angelo

    2017-08-01

    To compare the efficacy of two physiotherapy protocols (water-based vs. non-water-based) on postural deformities of patients with Parkinson's disease. A single blind, randomized controlled pilot study. Inpatient (Rehabilitative Department). A total of 30 patients with idiopathic Parkinson's disease. Participants were randomly assigned to one of two eight-week treatment groups: Water-based ( n = 15) or non-water-based physiotherapy exercises ( n = 15). Changes in the degree of cervical and dorsal flexion and in the angle of lateral inclination of the trunk (evaluated by means of a posturographic system) were used as primary outcomes. Unified Parkinson Disease Rating Scale section III, Time Up and Go Test, Berg Balance Scale, Activities-specific Balance Confidence, Falls Efficacy Scale and the Parkinson's disease quality of life questionnaire (39 items) were the secondary outcomes. All outcomes were assessed at baseline, at the end of training and eight weeks after treatment. Patients were always tested at the time of their optimal antiparkinsonian medication ('on' phase). After the treatment, only Parkinson's disease subjects randomized to water-based treatment showed a significant improvement of trunk posture with a significant reduction of cervical flexion (water-based group: -65.2°; non-water-based group: +1.7°) and dorsal flexion (water-based group: -22.5°; non-water-based group: -6.5°) and lateral inclination of the trunk (water-based group: -2.3°; non-water-based group: +0.3°). Both groups presented significant improvements in the secondary clinical outcomes without between-group differences. Our results show that water-based physiotherapy was effective for improving postural deformities in patients with Parkinson's disease.

  11. A study of 99mTc-HM-PAO brain SPECT in the senile parkinson's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Wenxin; Lin Xiangtong; Song Wenzhong; Liu Yongchang

    1996-01-01

    Thirty-three cases of senile Parkinson's disease (PD) imaged by 99m Tc-HM-PAO brain SPECT were reported. 66.7% of the patients had cortical hypoperfusion and 18.2% showed asymmetrical hypoperfusion in the basal ganglia. Such a finding was not related with the Hoehn-Yahr stage and the laterality of motor symptoms. If complicated with dementia, the SPECT brain imaging showed similar pattern in Alzheimer's disease with diffuse hypoperfusion in cortical area reflecting widespread pathological changes in tremor paralysis

  12. Adipose derived stromal vascular fraction improves early tendon healing: an experimental study in rabbits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Behfar

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Tendon never restores the complete biological and mechanical properties after healing. Bone marrow and recently adipose tissue have been used as the sources of mesenchymal stem cells, which have been proven to enhance tendon healing. Stromal vascular fraction (SVF, derived from adipose tissue by an enzymatic digestion, represents an alternative source of multipotent cells, which undergo differentiation into multiple lineages to be used in regenerative medicine. In the present study, we investigated potentials of this source on tendon healing. Twenty rabbits were divided into control and treatment groups. Five rabbits were used as donors of adipose tissue. The injury model was unilateral complete transection through the middle one third of deep digital flexor tendon. Immediately after suture repair, either fresh stromal vascular fraction from enzymatic digestion of adipose tissue or placebo was intratendinously injected into the suture site in treatments and controls, respectively. Cast immobilization was continued for two weeks after surgery. Animals were sacrificed at the third week and tendons underwent histological, immunohistochemical, and mechanical evaluations. By histology, improved fibrillar organization and remodeling of neotendon were observed in treatment group. Immunohistochemistry revealed an insignificant increase in collagen type III and I expression in treatments over controls. Mechanical testing showed significant increase in maximum load and energy absorption in SVF treated tendons. The present study showed that intratendinous injection of uncultured adipose derived stromal vascular fraction improved structural and mechanical properties of repaired tendon and it could be an effective modality for treating tendon laceration.

  13. Study of arsenic trioxide-induced vascular shutdown and enhancement with radiation in solid tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monzen, Hajime; Griffin, R.J.; Williams, B.W.; Amamo, Morikazu; Ando, Satoshi; Hasegawa, Takeo

    2004-01-01

    Arsenic trioxide (ATO) has been reported to be an effective chemotherapeutic agent for acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL), and, recently, anti-tumor effect has been demonstrated in solid tumors. However, little is known about the mechanism of action of the ATO effect on solid tumor. We investigated the anti-vascular effect of ATO and the potential of combining ATO with radiation therapy. We studied the anti-vascular effect of ATO and radiosensitization of squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) VII murine tumors of C3H mice. The anti-vascular effect was examined using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and radiosensitivity was studied by clonogenic assay and tumor growth delay. Histopathological changes of the tumors after various treatments were also observed with hematoxylin and eosin (H and E) staining. Necrosis and blood flow changes in the central region of tumors in the hind limbs of the animals were observed on T2-weighted imaging after an intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of 8 mg/kg of ATO alone. ATO exposure followed by radiation decreased the clonogenic survival of SCC VII cells compared with either treatment alone. Tumor growth delay after 10-20 Gy of radiation alone was increased slightly compared with control tumors, but the combination of ATO injection 2 hours before exposure to 20 Gy of radiation significantly prolonged tumor growth delay by almost 20 days. The results suggest that ATO and radiation can enhance the radiosensitivity of solid tumor. (author)

  14. Feasibility study on retinal vascular bypass surgery in isolated arterially perfused caprine eye model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Y; Wu, W; Zhang, X; Fan, W; Shen, L

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the feasibility of bypassing occluded segments of retinal venous main vessels in isolated, arterially perfused caprine eyes via the closed-sky vitrectomy approach using keratoprosthesis. Methods Isolated caprine eyes were used in this study. For each eye, the retinal vessel was perfused by Krebs solution via ophthalmic artery, and pars plana vitrectomy was performed using temporary keratoprosthesis. All retinal micro-vascular maneuvers were performed in a closed-sky eyeball. The main retinal vein was blocked by endodiathermy at the site of the vessel's first branching. Two openings, several millimeters apart, were created by vascular punctures in both the main vein and its branch vein wall straddling the induced occluded segment. Catheterization was achieved using a flexible polyimide tube, with each end inserted into the vessel wall opening. A sealed connection between the vessel and the tube was obtained by endodiathermy. Bypass of the occluded retinal vein segment was thus achieved, and the patency of this vascular bypass was confirmed by intravascular staining. Results Puncturing, catheterization, and endodiathermy were viable by closed-sky approach using keratoprosthesis. Bypassing of the occluded retinal main vein segment was accomplished with the combination of these maneuvers. Good results were obtained in 23 of 38 (60%) caprine eyes. Conclusions This study demonstrated that bypassing the occluded segment of retinal main vein can be successfully performed in a closed-sky eyeball model of isolated, arterially perfused caprine eye. This early work indicated that the more advanced retinal vascular bypass surgery in in vivo eye may be feasible in the future. PMID:21921946

  15. Bisphosphonates, atherosclerosis and vascular calcification: update and systematic review of clinical studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caffarelli C

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Carla Caffarelli,1 Andrea Montagnani,2 Ranuccio Nuti,1 Stefano Gonnelli1 1Department of Medicine, Surgery and Neuroscience, University of Siena, Italy; 2Division of Internal Medicine, General Hospital Misericordia, Grosseto, Italy Background: Epidemiologic and clinical data have suggested the existence of a biologic linkage between the bone system and the vascular system. Bisphosphonates (BPs are effective inhibitors of bone resorption and are currently considered the drugs of choice for the prevention and treatment of osteoporosis and related fractures. Data from several publications have suggested that BPs may also be effective in reducing the atherosclerotic process and vascular calcification, but the results of these studies are contrasting. This review aimed to allow a better understanding of the relationships between BPs and atherosclerosis in humans.Materials and methods: Electronic databases of Pubmed-Medline, Cochrane Library and SCOPUS from inception to June 30, 2016 were searched. The full texts of the articles potentially eligible were carefully assessed and reviewed. Finally, 20 studies were found to be eligible and were included in the systematic review. All included studies were published between 2000 and 2014.Results: In several studies, etidronate limited the progression of aortic and coronary calcification in hemodialysis patients, whereas the nitrogen-containing-BPs given orally did not significantly reduce vascular calcifications in patients with chronic kidney disease, kidney trasplant or in those with osteoporosis. Nitrogen-containing-BPs present favorable effects both on vessel wall thickness and on arterial elasticity due to both a reduction in serum lipids and the interaction of BPs with the bone tissue, with the consequent release of bone turnover markers and cytokines into the bloodstream.Conclusion: To sum up, the BPs seem to have the potential of influencing atherosclerosis and calcium homeostasis at the level of

  16. Quantitative motor performance and sleep benefit in Parkinson disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Gilst, Merel; van Mierlo, P.; Bloem, B.R.; Overeem, S.

    2015-01-01

    STUDY OBJECTIVES: Many people with Parkinson disease experience "sleep benefit": temporarily improved mobility upon awakening. Here we used quantitative motor tasks to assess the influence of sleep on motor functioning in Parkinson disease. DESIGN: Eighteen Parkinson patients with and 20 without

  17. A case with Parkinsonism secondary to bilateral subdural hematoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adalet Arıkanoğlu

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Subdural hematoma is a rare cause of secondary Parkinsonism. In this study, we presented a case of Parkinsonian syndrome caused by a bilateral subdural hematoma. The patient’s Parkinsonism completely healed following successful surgical removal of the hematomas without any anti-parkinson drug.

  18. Blood cholesterol and vascular mortality by age, sex, and blood pressure: a meta-analysis of individual data from 61 prospective studies with 55,000 vascular deaths

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    NN, NN; Jensen, Gorm Boje

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Age, sex, and blood pressure could modify the associations of total cholesterol (and its main two fractions, HDL and LDL cholesterol) with vascular mortality. This meta-analysis combined prospective studies of vascular mortality that recorded both blood pressure and total cholesterol.......65-0.68]), and a sixth (0.83 [0.81-0.85]) lower IHD mortality in both sexes at ages 40-49, 50-69, and 70-89 years, respectively, throughout the main range of cholesterol in most developed countries, with no apparent threshold. The proportional risk reduction decreased with increasing blood pressure, since the absolute......). Total cholesterol was weakly positively related to ischaemic and total stroke mortality in early middle age (40-59 years), but this finding could be largely or wholly accounted for by the association of cholesterol with blood pressure. Moreover, a positive relation was seen only in middle age and only...

  19. Age-specific association between blood pressure and vascular and non-vascular chronic diseases in 0·5 million adults in China: a prospective cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ben Lacey, FFPH

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Background: The age-specific association between blood pressure and vascular disease has been studied mostly in high-income countries, and before the widespread use of brain imaging for diagnosis of the main stroke types (ischaemic stroke and intracerebral haemorrhage. We aimed to investigate this relationship among adults in China. Methods: 512 891 adults (59% women aged 30–79 years were recruited into a prospective study from ten areas of China between June 25, 2004, and July 15, 2008. Participants attended assessment centres where they were interviewed about demographic and lifestyle characteristics, and their blood pressure, height, and weight were measured. Incident disease was identified through linkage to local mortality records, chronic disease registries, and claims to the national health insurance system. We used Cox regression analysis to produce adjusted hazard ratios (HRs relating systolic blood pressure to disease incidence. HRs were corrected for regression dilution to estimate associations with long-term average (usual systolic blood pressure. Findings: During a median follow-up of 9 years (IQR 8–10, there were 88 105 incident vascular and non-vascular chronic disease events (about 90% of strokes events were diagnosed using brain imaging. At ages 40–79 years (mean age at event 64 years [SD 9], usual systolic blood pressure was continuously and positively associated with incident major vascular disease throughout the range 120–180 mm Hg: each 10 mm Hg higher usual systolic blood pressure was associated with an approximately 30% higher risk of ischaemic heart disease (HR 1·31 [95% CI 1·28–1·34] and ischaemic stroke (1·30 [1·29–1·31], but the association with intracerebral haemorrhage was about twice as steep (1·68 [1·65–1·71]. HRs for vascular disease were twice as steep at ages 40–49 years than at ages 70–79 years. Usual systolic blood pressure was also positively associated with incident

  20. Dysphagia and sialorrhea: the relationship to Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicaretta, Denise Hack; Rosso, Ana Lucia; Mattos, James Pitágoras de; Maliska, Carmelindo; Costa, Milton M B

    2013-01-01

    Dysphagia and sialorrhea in patients with Parkinson's disease are both automatically accepted as dependent on this neurological disease. The aim were to establish if these two complaints are a consequence or associated manifestations of Parkinson's disease. Two Parkinson's diseases groups from the same outpatients' population were studied. Patients in the first group, with dysphagia, were studied by videofluoroscopy. The second, with sialorrhea, were studied by the scintigraphic method, Videofluoroscopic examination of the oral, pharyngeal and esophageal phases of swallowing showed that 94% of Parkinson's diseases patients present, structural causes, not related to Parkinson's diseases, able to produce or intensify the observed disphagia. The scintigraphic examination of Parkinson's diseases patients with sialorrhea showed that there is no increase of serous saliva production. Nevertheless, showed a significantly higher velocity of saliva excretion in the Parkinson's diseases patients. Dysphagia can be due to the muscular rigidity often present in the Parkinson's diseases patient, or more usually by non Parkinson's disease associated causes. In Parkinson's diseases patients, sialorrhea is produced by saliva retention. Nevertheless, sialorrhea can produce discomfort in swallowing, although without a formal complaint of dysphagia. In this case, subclinical dysphagia must be considered. Sialorrhea is indicative of dysphagia or at least of subclinical dysphagia. As final conclusion, Parkinson's diseases can be an isolated cause of dysphagia and/or sialorrhea, but frequently, a factor unrelated to Parkinson's diseases is the main cause of or at least aggravates the dysphagia.

  1. Does epicatechin contribute to the acute vascular function effects of dark chocolate? A randomized, crossover study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dower, James I; Geleijnse, Johanna M; Kroon, Paul A; Philo, Mark; Mensink, Marco; Kromhout, Daan; Hollman, Peter C H

    2016-11-01

    Cocoa, rich in flavan-3-ols, improves vascular function, but the contribution of specific flavan-3-ols is unknown. We compared the effects of pure epicatechin, a major cocoa flavan-3-ol, and chocolate. In a randomized crossover study, twenty healthy men (40-80 years) were supplemented with: (1) 70g dark chocolate (150 mg epicatechin) with placebo capsules; (2) pure epicatechin capsules (2 × 50 mg epicatechin) with 75g white chocolate; and (3) placebo capsules with 75 g white chocolate (0 mg epicatechin). Vascular function (flow-mediated dilation (FMD) and augmentation index (AIx)) were measured before and 2 hours after interventions. Epicatechin metabolites time-profiles were measured in blood to calculate the bioavailability. Pure epicatechin did not significantly improve FMD (+0.75%; p = 0.10) or AIx (-2.2%; p = 0.23) compared to placebo. Dark chocolate significantly improved FMD (+0.96%; p = 0.04) and AIx (-4.6%; p = 0.02). Differences in improvements in FMD (+ 0.21%; p = 0.65) or Aix (-2.4%; p = 0.20) between pure epicatechin and dark chocolate were not significant. The bioavailability of epicatechin did not differ between pure epicatechin and dark chocolate (p = 0.14). Despite differences in epicatechin dose, improvements in vascular function after pure epicatechin and chocolate were similar and the bioavailability did not differ, suggesting a role for epicatechin. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Studies of vascular acting photosensitizer Tookad for the photodynamic therapy of prostate cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Zheng; Chen, Qun; Blanc, Dominique; Hetzel, Fred W.

    2005-01-01

    In this pre-clinical study, photodynamic therapy (PDT) mediated with a vascular acting photosensitizer Tookad (palladium-bacteriopheophorbide) is investigated as an alternative treatment modality for the ablation of prostate cancer. Canine prostate was used as the animal model. PDT was performed by interstitially irradiating the surgically exposed prostates with a diode laser (763 nm) to activate the IV infused photosensitizer. The effects of drug dose, drug-light interval, and light fluence rate on PDT efficacy were evaluated. The prostates and adjacent tissues were harvested at one-week post PDT and subjected to histopathological examination. The dogs recovered well with little or no urethral complications. Urinalysis showed trace blood. Histological examination showed minimal damage to the prostatic urethra. These indicated that the urethra was well preserved. PDT induced prostate lesions were characterized by marked hemorrhagic necrosis with a clear demarcation. Maximum lesion volume of ~3 cm3 could be achieved with a single 1-cm diffuser fiber at a dose level of 1 mg/kg and 200 J/cm, suggesting the therapy is very effective in ablating prostatic tissue. PDT induced lesion could reach the capsule layers but adjacent tissues were well preserved. The novel photosensitizer is a vascular drug and cleared rapidly from the circulation. Light irradiation can be performed during drug infusion thereby eliminating waiting time. The novel vascular acting photosensitizer Tookad-mediated PDT could provide an effective alternative to treat prostate cancer.

  3. Peer Coaching Through mHealth Targeting Physical Activity in People With Parkinson Disease: Feasibility Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latham, Nancy K; Quintiliani, Lisa M

    2018-01-01

    Background Long-term engagement in exercise and physical activity mitigates the progression of disability and increases quality of life in people with Parkinson disease (PD). Despite this, the vast majority of individuals with PD are sedentary. There is a critical need for a feasible, safe, acceptable, and effective method to assist those with PD to engage in active lifestyles. Peer coaching through mobile health (mHealth) may be a viable approach. Objective The purpose of this study was to develop a PD-specific peer coach training program and a remote peer-mentored walking program using mHealth technology with the goal of increasing physical activity in persons with PD. We set out to examine the feasibility, safety, and acceptability of the programs along with preliminary evidence of individual-level changes in walking activity, self-efficacy, and disability in the peer mentees. Methods A peer coach training program and a remote peer-mentored walking program using mHealth was developed and tested in 10 individuals with PD. We matched physically active persons with PD (peer coaches) with sedentary persons with PD (peer mentees), resulting in 5 dyads. Using both Web-based and in-person delivery methods, we trained the peer coaches in basic knowledge of PD, exercise, active listening, and motivational interviewing. Peer coaches and mentees wore FitBit Zip activity trackers and participated in daily walking over 8 weeks. Peer dyads interacted daily via the FitBit friends mobile app and weekly via telephone calls. Feasibility was determined by examining recruitment, participation, and retention rates. Safety was assessed by monitoring adverse events during the study period. Acceptability was assessed via satisfaction surveys. Individual-level changes in physical activity were examined relative to clinically important differences. Results Four out of the 5 peer pairs used the FitBit activity tracker and friends function without difficulty. A total of 4 of the 5 pairs

  4. Peer Coaching Through mHealth Targeting Physical Activity in People With Parkinson Disease: Feasibility Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colón-Semenza, Cristina; Latham, Nancy K; Quintiliani, Lisa M; Ellis, Terry D

    2018-02-15

    Long-term engagement in exercise and physical activity mitigates the progression of disability and increases quality of life in people with Parkinson disease (PD). Despite this, the vast majority of individuals with PD are sedentary. There is a critical need for a feasible, safe, acceptable, and effective method to assist those with PD to engage in active lifestyles. Peer coaching through mobile health (mHealth) may be a viable approach. The purpose of this study was to develop a PD-specific peer coach training program and a remote peer-mentored walking program using mHealth technology with the goal of increasing physical activity in persons with PD. We set out to examine the feasibility, safety, and acceptability of the programs along with preliminary evidence of individual-level changes in walking activity, self-efficacy, and disability in the peer mentees. A peer coach training program and a remote peer-mentored walking program using mHealth was developed and tested in 10 individuals with PD. We matched physically active persons with PD (peer coaches) with sedentary persons with PD (peer mentees), resulting in 5 dyads. Using both Web-based and in-person delivery methods, we trained the peer coaches in basic knowledge of PD, exercise, active listening, and motivational interviewing. Peer coaches and mentees wore FitBit Zip activity trackers and participated in daily walking over 8 weeks. Peer dyads interacted daily via the FitBit friends mobile app and weekly via telephone calls. Feasibility was determined by examining recruitment, participation, and retention rates. Safety was assessed by monitoring adverse events during the study period. Acceptability was assessed via satisfaction surveys. Individual-level changes in physical activity were examined relative to clinically important differences. Four out of the 5 peer pairs used the FitBit activity tracker and friends function without difficulty. A total of 4 of the 5 pairs completed the 8 weekly phone

  5. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI to study striatal iron accumulation in a rat model of Parkinson's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Virel

    Full Text Available Abnormal accumulation of iron is observed in neurodegenerative disorders. In Parkinson's disease, an excess of iron has been demonstrated in different structures of the basal ganglia and is suggested to be involved in the pathogenesis of the disease. Using the 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA rat model of Parkinson's disease, the edematous effect of 6-OHDA and its relation with striatal iron accumulation was examined utilizing in vivo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. The results revealed that in comparison with control animals, injection of 6-OHDA into the rat striatum provoked an edematous process, visible in T2-weighted images that was accompanied by an accumulation of iron clearly detectable in T2*-weighted images. Furthermore, Prussian blue staining to detect iron in sectioned brains confirmed the existence of accumulated iron in the areas of T2* hypointensities. The presence of ED1-positive microglia in the lesioned striatum overlapped with this accumulation of iron, indicating areas of toxicity and loss of dopamine nerve fibers. Correlation analyses demonstrated a direct relation between the hyperintensities caused by the edema and the hypointensities caused by the accumulation of iron.

  6. Apathy in patients with Parkinson disease without dementia or depression: a PET study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert, Gabriel; Le Jeune, Florence; Lozachmeur, Clément; Drapier, Sophie; Dondaine, Thibault; Péron, Julie; Travers, David; Sauleau, Paul; Millet, Bruno; Vérin, Marc; Drapier, Dominique

    2012-09-11

    We sought to identify apathy metabolic bases in Parkinson disease (PD). A total of 45 patients with PD who were not clinically depressed (Montgomery-Åsberg Depression Rating Scale [MADRS] dementia (Mattis Dementia Rating Scale [MDRS] >130) were assessed with the Apathy Evaluation Scale (AES) and underwent a resting-state F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose PET (FDG-PET) scan. A motor assessment comprising the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale Part III (UPDRS-III) was conducted and total levodopa equivalent daily dose (LEDD) was calculated. Imaging data were analyzed with statistical parametric mapping. Age, LEDD, and MDRS scores were introduced as covariates. Positive correlations were observed between the AES score and cerebral metabolism in the right inferior frontal gyrus (Brodmann area [BA] 47), right middle frontal gyrus (BA 10), right cuneus (BA 18), and right anterior insula (BA 13). Negative correlations were observed between the AES score and cerebellar metabolism in the semilunar lobules bilaterally, within the posterior lobe. Using an AES score equal to or above 42 to define clinical apathy, prevalence in our patient group was 17.8%. The AES score was negatively correlated with the MDRS score and positively correlated with the "retardation" subscore of the MADRS. It was not correlated with either UPDRS III or LEDD. Results indicate that the frontal, temporal, and cerebellar areas known to be involved in reward, emotion, and cognition are also implicated in apathy in patients with PD without dementia or depression. Their roles in the etiopathology of apathy are discussed.

  7. Risk factors for Parkinson's disease may differ in men and women: an exploratory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savica, Rodolfo; Grossardt, Brandon R; Bower, James H; Ahlskog, J Eric; Rocca, Walter A

    2013-02-01

    Although several environmental and genetic risk or protective factors have been associated with Parkinson's disease (PD), their interactions overall and in men and women separately remain unknown. We used the medical records-linkage system of the Rochester Epidemiology Project to identify 196 subjects who developed PD in Olmsted County, MN, from 1976 through 1995. Each incident case was matched by age (±1 year) and sex to a general population control. We considered the following 12 risk or protective factors: personal history of head trauma, pesticide use, immunologic diseases, anemia, hysterectomy (in women only), cigarette smoking, coffee consumption, and education; and family history of parkinsonism, essential tremor, dementia, or psychiatric disorders. We used recursive partitioning analyses to explore interactions overall and in men and women separately and used logistic regression analyses to test for interactions. In the overall group, we observed the independent effects of anemia, lack of coffee consumption (never vs. ever), and head trauma; however, the findings were different in men and women. In men, we observed the independent effects of lack of coffee consumption (never vs. ever), head trauma, and pesticide use, and a suggestive synergistic interaction between immunologic diseases and family history of dementia. By contrast, in women, anemia was the most important factor and we observed a suggestive synergistic interaction between anemia and higher education. Risk factors for PD and their interactions may differ in men and women. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Stigma Experienced by Parkinson's Disease Patients: A Descriptive Review of Qualitative Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maffoni, Marina; Giardini, Anna; Pierobon, Antonia; Ferrazzoli, Davide; Frazzitta, Giuseppe

    2017-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disease characterized by motor and nonmotor symptoms. Both of them imply a negative impact on Health-Related Quality of Life. A significant one is the stigma experienced by the parkinsonian patients and their caregivers. Moreover, stigma may affect everyday life and patient's subjective and relational perception and it may lead to frustration and isolation. Aim of the present work is to qualitatively describe the stigma of PD patients stemming from literature review, in order to catch the subjective experience and the meaning of the stigma construct. Literature review was performed on PubMed database and Google Scholar (keywords: Parkinson Disease, qualitative, stigma, social problem, isolation, discrimination) and was restricted to qualitative data: 14 articles were identified to be suitable to the aim of the present overview. Results are divided into four core constructs: stigma arising from symptoms, stigma linked to relational and communication problems, social stigma arising from sharing perceptions, and caregiver's stigma. The principal relations to these constructs are deeply analyzed and described subjectively through patients' and caregiver's point of view. The qualitative research may allow a better understanding of a subjective symptom such as stigma in parkinsonian patients from an intercultural and a social point of view.

  9. A comparative study of LRRK2, PINK1 and genetically undefined familial Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishioka, Kenya; Kefi, Mounir; Jasinska-Myga, Barbara; Wider, Christian; Vilariño-Güell, Carles; Ross, Owen A; Heckman, Michael G; Middleton, Lefkos T; Ishihara-Paul, Lianna; Gibson, Rachel A; Amouri, Rim; Ben Yahmed, Samia; Ben Sassi, Samia; Zouari, Mourad; El Euch, Ghada; Farrer, Matthew J; Hentati, Faycal

    2010-04-01

    Genetic classification of Parkinson's disease (PD) subtypes may become the preferred diagnostic tool for neurologists. Herein we compare clinical features from a large cohort of patients with familial PD of unknown aetiology or attributable to distinct genetic forms. Comprehensive neurological examinations were performed in 231 familial PD patients from Tunisia. Analysis was previously performed to screen for mutations in leucine rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2), PTEN induced kinase 1 (PINK1) and parkin (PRKN). Clinical features were compared between patients with genetically undefined PD (n=107) and those with LRRK2 (n=73) and PINK1 (n=42) mutations using regression analyses adjusted for gender, age of onset and disease duration. PRKN cases (n=9) were too few for meaningful statistical analysis. In comparison with genetically undefined patients, LRRK2 mutation carriers had more severe motor symptoms (median Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale scores approximately 1.6 times higher, pundefined patients. As expected, PINK1 patients had younger ages and ages at disease onset, and a longer disease duration compared with LRRK2 mutation carriers and genetically undefined patients. Clinical differences between LRRK2, PINK1 and genetically undefined familial PD appear more pronounced than previously appreciated, and may prove useful in clinical practice. As future therapies are targeted to specific protein abnormalities, identifying the genetic causes and associated clinical and pathological features will determine diagnosis, preventative medicine and drug intervention strategies.

  10. Vascular burden and brain aging in a senior volunteer cohort: A pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raymond Y Lo

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To test the feasibility of establishing a senior volunteer cohort and describe vascular risks, cognitive function, and brain aging indices in a pilot study. Materials and Methods: We enrolled 40 senior volunteers from the Tzu Chi Foundation and other organizations in Hualien in 2014–2015. We conducted in-person interviews to collect information on demographic features, physical fitness, dietary habits, comorbidities, and narratives of aging. Vascular risks including blood pressure, body mass index (BMI, serum glucose level, and lipid profile were examined. Each participant underwent a comprehensive battery of neuropsychological tests and structural brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. Descriptive statistics and tabulation were applied to characterize this pilot cohort. Results: There were more volunteers from the Tzu Chi Foundation (n = 25 than other organizations. The mean age was 66.7 years (standard deviation = 5.1 and there was a female predominance (M:F = 13:27. The mean number of comorbid chronic diseases was 2.1 and the mean BMI was 24.5. Most participants (77.5% engaged in outdoor walking activities every week. Nutrient intake in vegetarians (n = 18 did not differ from nonvegetarians except for lower Vitamin B12 levels (mean = 0.9 μg. All participants but one scored 26 or above in the Mini–Mental State Examination (mean = 28.4. Among the other cognitive tests, only one task related to inhibition and switching abilities was at the low average level. The mean values of vascular risk markers were within the normal ranges. The most common genotype of apolipoprotein E was μ3/μ3 (n = 32. The quality of MRI was sufficient for volumetric analysis. Conclusion: It is feasible to establish a volunteer-based cohort to study brain aging in Taiwan. The senior volunteers were physically active and cognitively healthy. Vascular risks were well distributed among these participants. Future longitudinal study will allow us to observe

  11. Long-term changes of striatal dopamine D-2 receptors in patients with Parkinson's disease : A study with positron emission tomography and [C-11]Raclopride

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Antonini, A; Schwarz, J; Oertel, WH; Pogarell, O; Leenders, KL

    We used [C-11]raclopride (RACLO) and positron emission tomography (PET) to study longitudinally striatal dopamine D-2 receptor binding in nine patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) at an early drug-naive stage and 3-5 years later, when motor fluctuations had appeared in seven of them. Patients were

  12. A three dimensional anatomical view of oscillatory resting-state activity and functional connectivity in Parkinson's disease related dementia: An MEG study using atlas-based beamforming

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ponsen, M.M.; Stam, C.J.; Bosboom, J.L.W.; Berendse, H.W.; Hillebrand, A.

    2013-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) related dementia (PDD) develops in up to 80% of PD patients. The present study was performed to further unravel the underlying pathophysiological mechanisms by applying a new analysis approach that uses an atlas-based MEG beamformer to provide a detailed anatomical mapping

  13. Effects of Medication and Subthalamic Nucleus Deep Brain Stimulation on Tongue Movements in Speakers with Parkinson's Disease Using Electropalatography: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartinger, Mariam; Tripoliti, Elina; Hardcastle, William J.; Limousin, Patricia

    2011-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) affects speech in the majority of patients. Subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation (STN-DBS) is particularly effective in reducing tremor and rigidity. However, its effect on speech is variable. The aim of this pilot study was to quantify the effects of bilateral STN-DBS and medication on articulation, using…

  14. Effects of a short duration, high dose contact improvisation dance workshop on Parkinson disease: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchant, David; Sylvester, Jennifer L; Earhart, Gammon M

    2010-10-01

    This study explored the feasibility and possible benefits of contact improvisation (CI) as an exercise intervention for individuals with PD. This was an uncontrolled pilot study. Eleven people with PD (H&Y=2.4 ± 0.4) participated in a workshop of 10 1.5-h CI classes over 2 weeks, dancing with previously trained student CI dancers. Measures of disease severity, balance, functional mobility, and gait were compared 1 week before and after the workshop. Participants demonstrated improvements on the Unified Parkinson Disease Rating Scale-Motor Subsection and Berg balance scores, along with increased swing and decreased stance percentages during walking. Backward step length also increased. Participants expressed a high level of enjoyment and interest in taking future CI classes. This pilot study supports the feasibility of CI as an intervention to address mobility limitations associated with PD. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Pathophysiology of diurnal drooling in Parkinson's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kalf, J.G.; Munneke, M.; Engel-Hoek, L. van den; Swart, B.J.M. de; Borm, G.F.; Bloem, B.R.; Zwarts, M.J.

    2011-01-01

    Drooling is an incapacitating feature of Parkinson's disease. Better pathophysiological insights are needed to improve treatment. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that the cause of drooling is multifactorial. We examined 15 patients with Parkinson's disease with distinct diurnal saliva loss

  16. Orofaryngeale slikstoornissen bij de ziekte van Parkinson

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kalf, J.G.

    2014-01-01

    OROPHARYNGEAL SWALLOWING DISORDERS IN PARKINSON'S DISEASE: Parkinson's disease is one of the most common and best studied neurodegenerative diseases. The typical motor features, like hypokinesia and rigidity are also seen in chewing and swallowing, but this 'hypokinetic dysphagia' is a complaint

  17. 23Na+- and 39K+-NMR studies of cation-polyanion interactions in vascular connective tissue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siegel, G.; Walter, A.; Bostanjoglo, M.

    1987-01-01

    The ion binding properties of vascular connective tissue as well as of substances derived therefrom were studied in dependence on cation concentration by NMR and atomic absorption techniques. 16 refs.; 8 figs

  18. [Experimental study on vascular bundle implantation combined with cellular transplantation in treating rabbit femoral head necrosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shuang-Tao; Zhang, Wei-Ping; Liu, Chang-An; Wang, Jun-Jiang; Song, Heng-Yi; Chai, Zhi-wen

    2013-03-01

    To discuss the feasibility of vascular bundle implantation combined with allogeneic bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) transplantation in treating rabbit femoral head osteonecrosis and bone defect, in order to explore a new method for the treatment of femoral head necrosis. Thirty-six New Zealand rabbits were randomly divided into three groups,with 12 rabbits in each group. Bilateral femoral heads of the rabbits were studied in the experiment. The models were made by liquid nitrogen frozen, and the femoral heads were drilled to cause bone defect. Group A was the control group,group B was stem cells transplantaion group of allograft marrow stromal,and group C was stem cells transplantation group of allograft marrow stromal combined with vascular bundle implantation. Three rabbits of each group were sacrificed respectively at 2, 4, 8, 12 weeks after operation. All specimens of the femoral heads were sliced for HE staining. Furthermore ,vascular density and the percentage of new bone trabecula of femoral head coronary section in defect area were measured and analyzed statistically. In group C,new bone trabecula and original micrangium formed at the 2nd week after operation; new bone trabecula was lamellar and interlaced with abundant micrangium at the 8th week;at the 12th week,the broadened,coarsened bone trabecula lined up regularly,and the mature bone trabecula and new marrow were visible. At the 2nd week after operation,there was no statistical significance in the percentage of new bone trabecula of femoral head coronary section in defect area between group B and C. While at 4, 8, 12 week after operation, vascular density and the percentage of new bone trabecula of femoral head coronary section in defect area of group C was higher than that of group B. Allogeneic bone marrow stromal cells cultured in vivo can form new bone trabecula, and can be applied to allotransplant. Vascular bundle implanted into the bone defect area of femoral head necrosis could improve blood

  19. Laser light visual cueing for freezing of gait in Parkinson disease: A pilot study with male participants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunting-Perry, Lisette; Spindler, Meredith; Robinson, Keith M; Noorigian, Joseph; Cianci, Heather J; Duda, John E

    2013-01-01

    Freezing of gait (FOG) is a debilitating feature of Parkinson disease (PD). In this pilot study, we sought to assess the efficacy of a rolling walker with a laser beam visual cue to treat FOG in PD patients. We recruited 22 subjects with idiopathic PD who experienced on- and off-medication FOG. Subjects performed three walking tasks both with and without the laser beam while on medications. Outcome measures included time to complete tasks, number of steps, and number of FOG episodes. A crossover design allowed within-group comparisons between the two conditions. No significant differences were observed between the two walking conditions across the three tasks. The laser beam, when applied as a visual cue on a rolling walker, did not diminish FOG in this study.

  20. A relação da postura corporal com a prosódia na doença de parkinson: estudo de caso The relations between body posture and prosody in Parkinson's disease: case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Vargas Ferreira

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: investigar a associação entre a postura corporal e a prosódia em indivíduos com Doença de Parkinson. MÉTODOS: estudo de corte transversal realizado com cinco sujeitos com Doença de Parkinson da cidade de Santa Maria, Estado do Rio Grande do Sul, em 2006. Utilizaram-se avaliações da prosódia lingüística e emocional bem como da postura corporal. A análise estatística utilizada foi descritiva. RESULTADOS: foram estudados quatro sujeitos do sexo masculino e um sujeito do sexo feminino com idades entre 37 e 53 anos. Três sujeitos encontravam-se no estágio I, um sujeito no estágio III e um sujeito no estágio IV da doença conforme a escala de classificação da função motora Hohen &Yahr, todos sob o uso de medicação e apresentando os sinais da tríade característica da patologia (rigidez, tremor, bradicinesia bem como as alterações posturais típicas. Na comparação entre prosódia emocional e prosódia lingüística, encontrou-se melhor desempenho na prosódia emocional e não se evidenciou associação entre os estágios da patologia e alterações na postura corporal e prosódia. CONCLUSÃO: as alterações posturais são sinais característicos da Doença de Parkinson, assim como alterações na prosódia lingüística e emocional. A ocorrência de alterações posturais foi elevada entre os parkinsonianos. Os sujeitos apresentaram melhor performance na prosódia emocional. Não houve evidências de que os estágios da doença estivessem associados às alterações da prosódia e da postura corporal.PORPOSE: to investigate the relationship between body posture and prosody in patients with Parkinson Disease. METHODS: the study was carried out with five patients (four males and one female from Santa Maria, Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil, by means of cross-section study, in 2006. Evaluations of linguistic and emotional prosody as well as analysis of body posture were carried out. The statistical analysis was descriptive

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  11. Studies on distribution pattern of 14C-assimilates in relation to vascular pattern derived from phyllotaxis of tomato plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shishido, Y.; Seyama, N.; Hori, Y.

    1988-01-01

    The association of distribution of photosynthetic assimilates in tomato with phyllotaxis and arrangement of the vascular system was studied. To ascertain the phyllotaxis of tomato plants, which was alternate with four orthostichies with devergence of 90° (270°) and 180°, the vascular system was revealed by methylene blue (0.5%), eothine (1.0%) and fuchsin (1.0%) from leaf petioles and the distribution of photosynthetic assmilates was measured by 14 C. The vascular system of tomato basically consisted of four orthostichies with two vascular bundles from each leaf. The arrangement of the vascular systems evidently affected the movement of 14 C-assimilates to sinks. Such movement from each leaf was affected by the degree of connection of the vascular bundles. Since tomato has a sympodial branching system, the leaf which is apparently situated just above the inflorescence differentiated before the inflorescence. The vascular bundles of the leaf of the sympodial branch around the inflorescence developed between the inflorescence and the leaf just above it. This results in a comparatively small proportion of distribution to the inflorescence from the leaf just above it

  12. Mutation analysis for DJ-1 in sporadic and familial parkinsonism: screening strategy in parkinsonism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomiyama, Hiroyuki; Li, Yuanzhe; Yoshino, Hiroyo; Mizuno, Yoshikuni; Kubo, Shin-Ichiro; Toda, Tatsushi; Hattori, Nobutaka

    2009-05-22

    DJ-1 mutations cause autosomal recessive parkinsonism (ARP). Although some reports of DJ-1 mutations have been published, there is lack of information on the prevalence of these mutations in large-scale studies of both familial and sporadic parkinsonism. In this genetic screening study, we analyzed the distribution and frequency of DJ-1 mutations by direct nucleotide sequencing of coding exons and exon-intron boundaries of DJ-1, in 386 parkin-negative parkinsonism patients (371 index cases: 67 probands of autosomal recessive parkinsonism families, 90 probands of autosomal dominant parkinsonism families, 201 patients with sporadic parkinsonism, and 13 with unknown family histories) from 12 countries (Japan 283, China 27, Taiwan 22, Korea 22, Israel 16, Turkey 5, Philippines 2, Bulgaria 2, Greece 2, Tunisia 1, USA 2, Ukraine 1, unknown 1). None had causative mutation in DJ-1, suggesting DJ-1 mutation is very rare among patients with familial and sporadic parkinsonism from Asian countries and those with other ethnic background. This is in contrast to the higher frequencies and worldwide distribution of parkin- and PINK1-related parkinsonism in ARP and sporadic parkinsonism. Thus, after obtaining clinical information, screening for mutations in (1) parkin, (2) PINK1, (3) DJ-1, (4) ATP13A2 should be conducted in that order, in ARP and sporadic parkinsonism, based on their reported frequencies. In addition, haplotype analysis should be employed to check for homozygosity of 1p36, which harbors a cluster of causative genes for ARP such as DJ-1, PINK1 and ATP13A2 in ARP and sporadic parkinsonism, especially in parkinsonism with consanguinity.

  13. Enfermedad de Parkinson

    OpenAIRE

    Orozco V., Jorge Luis; Fundación Valle de Lili

    2002-01-01

    ¿Qué tan frecuente es la enfermedad de Parkinson?/ ¿Qué ocasiona la enfermedad?/ ¿Existen otras formas de Parkinsonismo?/ ¿Quién desarrolla la enfermedad de Parkinson?/ ¿Cuales son los síntomas principales?/ ¿Cómo se diagnostica la enfermedad de Parkinson?/ ¿Cómo se trata la enfermedad?/Tratamiento quirúrgico/Aspectos prácticos del tratamiento/Verdades sobre la enfermedad de Parkinson.

  14. Web-based genome-wide association study identifies two novel loci and a substantial genetic component for Parkinson's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuong B Do

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Although the causes of Parkinson's disease (PD are thought to be primarily environmental, recent studies suggest that a number of genes influence susceptibility. Using targeted case recruitment and online survey instruments, we conducted the largest case-control genome-wide association study (GWAS of PD based on a single collection of individuals to date (3,426 cases and 29,624 controls. We discovered two novel, genome-wide significant associations with PD-rs6812193 near SCARB2 (p = 7.6 × 10(-10, OR = 0.84 and rs11868035 near SREBF1/RAI1 (p = 5.6 × 10(-8, OR = 0.85-both replicated in an independent cohort. We also replicated 20 previously discovered genetic associations (including LRRK2, GBA, SNCA, MAPT, GAK, and the HLA region, providing support for our novel study design. Relying on a recently proposed method based on genome-wide sharing estimates between distantly related individuals, we estimated the heritability of PD to be at least 0.27. Finally, using sparse regression techniques, we constructed predictive models that account for 6%-7% of the total variance in liability and that suggest the presence of true associations just beyond genome-wide significance, as confirmed through both internal and external cross-validation. These results indicate a substantial, but by no means total, contribution of genetics underlying susceptibility to both early-onset and late-onset PD, suggesting that, despite the novel associations discovered here and elsewhere, the majority of the genetic component for Parkinson's disease remains to be discovered.

  15. Efficacy of rasagiline in early Parkinson's disease: a meta-analysis of data from the TEMPO and ADAGIO studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauser, Robert A; Abler, Victor; Eyal, Eli; Eliaz, Rom E

    2016-10-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of rasagiline versus placebo in a pooled population of patients with early Parkinson's disease (PD). TEMPO and ADAGIO were Phase III studies that evaluated the symptomatic efficacy of rasagiline versus placebo in patients with early PD. This meta-analysis included Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) observations from weeks 12, 24 and 36 in ADAGIO and from weeks 14 and 26 in TEMPO; TEMPO visits were recoded to weeks 12 and 24, respectively. The present analysis includes all patients who received rasagiline 1 mg/day, 2 mg/day or placebo, and had ≥1 post-baseline observations and a subgroup of patients whose baseline UPDRS Total scores were ≥27 (Upper Quartile population). Change from baseline in UPDRS scores were evaluated using mixed models repeated measures analyses. Of the 1578 patients randomized to the two studies, 1546 patients met criteria for inclusion in the meta-analysis. Effects on UPDRS Total, motor and activities of daily living scores were significantly better for both doses of rasagiline compared with placebo at all time periods. The Upper Quartile population included 402 patients with a UPDRS Total score ≥27 at baseline. These patients generally demonstrated a larger magnitude of treatment effect than was seen in the full population. This meta-analysis confirms the efficacy of rasagiline monotherapy over 36 weeks. Although TEMPO and ADAGIO are considered studies of "very early" PD, both contained a sizeable pool of patients with more severe disease. In addition, the meta-analysis showed a larger magnitude of effect in patients with more severe baseline disease.

  16. Biometric Digital Health Technology for Measuring Motor Function in Parkinson's Disease: Results from a Feasibility and Patient Satisfaction Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitsi, Georgia; Mendoza, Enrique Urrea; Wissel, Benjamin D; Barbopoulou, Elena; Dwivedi, Alok K; Tsoulos, Ioannis; Stavrakoudis, Athanassios; Espay, Alberto J; Papapetropoulos, Spyros

    2017-01-01

    To assess the feasibility, predictive value, and user satisfaction of objectively quantifying motor function in Parkinson's disease (PD) through a tablet-based application (iMotor) using self-administered tests. PD and healthy controls (HCs) performed finger tapping, hand pronation-supination and reaction time tasks using the iMotor application. Thirty-eight participants (19 with PD and 17 HCs) were recruited in the study. PD subjects were 53% male, with a mean age of 67.8 years (±8.8), mean disease duration of 6.5 years (±4.6), Movement Disorders Society version of the Unified Parkinson Disease Rating Scale III score 26.3 (±6.7), and Hoehn & Yahr stage 2. In the univariate analysis, most tapping variables were significantly different in PD compared to HC. Tap interval provided the highest predictive ability (90%). In the multivariable logistic regression model reaction time (reaction time test) ( p  = 0.021) and total taps (two-target test) ( p  = 0.026) were associated with PD. A combined model with two-target (total taps and accuracy) and reaction time produced maximum discriminatory performance between HC and PD. The overall accuracy of the combined model was 0.98 (95% confidence interval: 0.93-1). iMotor use achieved high rates of patients' satisfaction as evaluated by a patient satisfaction survey. iMotor differentiated PD subjects from HCs using simple alternating tasks of motor function. Results of this feasibility study should be replicated in larger, longitudinal, appropriately designed, controlled studies. The impact on patient care of at-home iMotor-assisted remote monitoring also deserves further evaluation.

  17. Phase 2 clinical study of 123I-IBF, a dopamine D2 receptor imaging agent, to evaluate clinical efficacy and safety in Parkinson's disease and Parkinson syndromes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torizuka, Kanji; Mizuno, Yoshikuni; Kubo, Atsushi

    1999-01-01

    A Phase 2 multicenter trial of 123 I-IBF, (S)-5-iodo-7-N-[(1-ethyl-2-pyrrolidinyl)methyl] carboxamido-2,3-dihydrobenzofuran, was conducted to evaluate its clinical efficacy and safety in 158 patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) or Parkinson syndromes (PS). SPECT data were acquired at two hours (2H-SPECT), after intravenous injection of 123 I-IBF (167 MBq). Additional SPECT scan at three hours (3H-SPECT) and dynamic SPECT scan at most until one hour were performed when possible. No severe side effects due to 123 I-IBF injection were observed. The sensitivity, specificity and accuracy for discriminating PS from PD using the striatal specific binding count-to-frontal cortex count ratio (St/Fc-1) in 3H-SPECT were 72.7%, 81.0% and 78.1% in 64 clinically definite cases (i.e., typical cases), respectively. The putamen-to-caudate ratios were significantly lower in striatonigral degeneration compared with those in PD. The contralateral-to-ipsilateral ratios against the symptomatic side of tremor and/or rigidity in the patients with PD (Hoehn and Yahr I) were significantly higher than the left-to-right ratios in the normal controls. St/Fc-1 in 3H-SPECT was significantly lower in the patients showing a poor response to levodopa than in those showing a good response. The dopamine D 2 receptor binding potential (k 3 /k 4 ), obtained by dynamic SPECT based on compartment model analysis, correlated well with the striatal specific binding count-to-occipital cortex count ratio. These results suggest that 123 I-IBF is a promising agent for differential diagnosis and pathophysiological evaluation of PD and PS. (author)

  18. Healthcare Data Analytics for Parkinson's Disease Patients: A Study of Hospital Cost and Utilization in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Sunanda; Wu, Huanmei; Jones, Josette

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson's Disease (PD), a prevalent problem, especially for the aged populations, is a progressive but non-fatal nervous system disorder. PD patients have special motor as well as non-motor symptoms over time. There are several limitations in the study of PD such as unavailability of data, proper diagnosis and treatment methods. These limitations significantly reduce the quality of PD patient life quality, either directly or indirectly. PD also imposes great financial burdens to PD patients and their family. This project aims to analyze the most common reasons for PD patient hospitalization, review complications that occur during inpatient stays, and measure the costs associated with PD patient characteristics. Using the HCUP NIS data, comprehensive data analysis has been performed. The results are customized visualized using Tableau and other software systems. The preliminary findings sheds light into how to improve the life quality of PD patients.