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Sample records for vascular parkinsonism study

  1. Vascular Parkinsonism and cognitive impairment: literature review, Brazilian studies and case vignettes

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    Thiago Cardoso Vale

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Vascular Parkinsonism (VP is a form of secondary Parkinsonism resulting from cerebrovascular disease. Estimates of the frequency of VP vary greatly worldwide; 3% to 6% of all cases of Parkinsonism are found to have a vascular etiology. In a Brazilian community-based study on Parkinsonism, 15.1% of all cases were classified as VP, the third most common form, with a prevalence of 1.1% in an elderly cohort. Another Brazilian survey found a prevalence of 2.3% of VP in the elderly. VP is usually the result of conventional vascular risk factors, particularly hypertension, leading to strategic infarcts of subcortical gray matter nuclei, diffuse white matter ischaemic lesions and less commonly, large vessel infarcts. Patients with VP tend to be older and present with gait difficulties, symmetrical predominant lower-body involvement, poor levodopa responsiveness, postural instability, falls, cognitive impairment and dementia, corticospinal findings, urinary incontinence and pseudobulbar palsy. This article intends to provide physicians with an insight on the practical issues of VP, a disease potentially confounded with vascular dementia, idiopathic Parkinson's disease, dementia with Lewy bodies and other secondary causes of Parkinsonism.

  2. Vascular parkinsonism: analysis of seven cases

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    Silva Elton Gomes da

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Neuroimaging studies of elderly individuals reveal alterations in the white matter that are incompatible with the patient?s parkinsonism, mistakenly classified as vascular parkinsonism (VP. METHOD: This study was conducted on a population composed of 20 patients with Parkinson?s disease (PD whose neuroimaging exams revealed vascular alterations in the white matter and seven patients with VP in order to compare diagnostic criteria. RESULTS: Age at disease onset of patients with PD was 55±12 years and patients with VP it was 62±13 years. Twelve patients with PD and five patients with VP presented arterial hypertension; three patients with VP and two patients with PD presented gait impairment; all patients with VP presented rigidity and bradykinesia, six of them presented resting tremor; 19 patients with PD presented tremor and 19 of them presented rigidity, while 17 presented bradykinesia. When the symptoms and evolution of both diseases were compared, the vascular alterations in the white matter were considered unspecific. CONCLUSION: Since clinical symptoms are unspecific, a differential diagnosis requires neuroimaging, good response to levodopa and clinical evolution.

  3. Primitive reflexes distinguish vascular parkinsonism from Parkinson's disease.

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    Okuda, Bungo; Kawabata, Keita; Tachibana, Hisao; Kamogawa, Kenji; Okamoto, Kensho

    2008-06-01

    Although vascular parkinsonism (VP) occurs frequently in the elderly, its clinical features have not been investigated in detail, particularly in comparison with Parkinson's disease (PD). The goal of this study is to clarify the diagnostic value of pathological reflexes in differentiating between VP and PD. In 132 patients with PD and 55 with VP, pathological reflexes, including snout reflex (SR), palmomental reflex (PMR), corneomandibular reflex (CMR), jaw reflex (JR), Hoffmann reflex (HR), and extensor plantar response (EPR), were evaluated. The percentage of each pathological reflex elicited in two groups (VP:PD) was as follows: SR (78:30), PMR (53:26), CMR (9:6), JR (33:12), HR (29:11), and EPR (25:8). The prevalence of pathological reflexes, except for CMR, was significantly higher in the VP patients than in the PD patients. In particular, SR and PMR were more frequent than upper motor neuron signs in the VP patients. The sensitivity and specificity of either SR or PMR for VP were 84% and 82%. Snout and palmomental reflexes are useful tools in the differentiation between VP and PD.

  4. Statin usage, vascular diagnosis and vascular risk factors in Parkinson's disease.

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    Cheng, Kelvin Kw; Swallow, Diane Ma; Grosset, Katherine A; Grosset, Donald G

    2017-08-01

    Background and aims Vascular disease is a common comorbidity in Parkinson's disease patients. Statins are potentially neuroprotective for Parkinson's disease through non-vascular mechanisms. We investigated prevailing statin use in a Parkinson's disease cohort. Methods and results Data on diagnostic indication for statins, anti-Parkinson therapy, vascular risk factors, and statin prescription, were obtained from electronic medical record review for consecutive Parkinson's disease patients. The ASsessing cardiac risk using Scottish Intercollegiate Guidelines Network system was used to calculate future cardiovascular risk and identify those warranting statin use. Of 441 patients included, 59.9% were male, with a mean age of 68.9 years (standard deviation 10.3). One hundred and seventy-four (39.5%) patients had at least one diagnostic indication for statin use, of whom 136 (78.2%) were prescribed a statin. In the 267 (60.5%) cases without a diagnostic indication, 54 (20.2%) were excluded owing to age limitations defined in ASsessing cardiac risk using Scottish Intercollegiate Guidelines Network. Of the remaining 213, 62 (29.1%) had an ASsessing cardiac risk using Scottish Intercollegiate Guidelines Network score in the recommended range for statin therapy, of whom 15 (24.1%) were prescribed statins. Conclusion There is suboptimal implementation of statin therapy in Parkinson's disease patients. Given the possible neuroprotective effects of statins in Parkinson's disease in addition to reducing cardiovascular risk, reasons for suboptimal implementation warrant further investigation.

  5. Diffusion tensor imaging differentiates vascular parkinsonism from parkinsonian syndromes of degenerative origin in elderly subjects

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    Deverdun, Jérémy [Department of Neuroradiology, Montpellier University Hospital Center, Gui de Chauliac Hospital, Montpellier (France); Laboratoire Charles Coulomb, CNRS UMR 5221 - Université Montpellier II, Montpellier (France); I2FH, Institut d’Imagerie Fonctionnelle Humaine, Hôpital Gui de Chauliac, CHRU de, Montpellier (France); Menjot de Champfleur, Sophie [Department of Neuroradiology, Montpellier University Hospital Center, Gui de Chauliac Hospital, Montpellier (France); Clinique du Parc, Castelnau-le-Lez (France); Cabello-Aguilar, Simon [Department of Neuroradiology, Montpellier University Hospital Center, Gui de Chauliac Hospital, Montpellier (France); I2FH, Institut d’Imagerie Fonctionnelle Humaine, Hôpital Gui de Chauliac, CHRU de, Montpellier (France); Maury, Florence [Department of Neurology, Montpellier University Hospital Center, Gui de Chauliac Hospital, Montpellier (France); Molino, François [Laboratoire Charles Coulomb, CNRS UMR 5221 - Université Montpellier II, Montpellier (France); Institut de Génomique Fonctionnelle, UMR 5203 - INSERM U661 - Université Montpellier II - Université, Montpellier I (France); Charif, Mahmoud [Department of Neurology, Montpellier University Hospital Center, Gui de Chauliac Hospital, Montpellier (France); Leboucq, Nicolas [Department of Neuroradiology, Montpellier University Hospital Center, Gui de Chauliac Hospital, Montpellier (France); Ayrignac, Xavier; Labauge, Pierre [Department of Neurology, Montpellier University Hospital Center, Gui de Chauliac Hospital, Montpellier (France); and others

    2014-11-15

    Background and Purpose: The etiologic diagnosis of parkinsonian syndromes is of particular importance when considering syndromes of vascular or degenerative origin. The purpose of this study is to find differences in the white-matter architecture between those two groups in elderly patients. Materials and Methods: Thirty-five patients were prospectively included (multiple-system atrophy, n = 5; Parkinson's disease, n = 15; progressive supranuclear palsy, n = 9; vascular parkinsonism, n = 6), with a mean age of 76 years. Patients with multiple-system atrophy, progressive supranuclear palsy and Parkinson's disease were grouped as having parkinsonian syndromes of degenerative origin. Brain MRIs included diffusion tensor imaging. Fractional anisotropy and mean-diffusivity maps were spatially normalized, and group analyses between parkinsonian syndromes of degenerative origin and vascular parkinsonism were performed using a voxel-based approach. Results: Statistical parametric-mapping analysis of diffusion tensor imaging data showed decreased fractional anisotropy value in internal capsules bilaterally in patients with vascular parkinsonism compared to parkinsonian syndromes of degenerative origin (p = 0.001) and showed a lower mean diffusivity in the white matter of the left superior parietal lobule (p = 0.01). Fractional anisotropy values were found decreased in the middle cerebellar peduncles in multiple-system atrophy compared to Parkinson's disease and progressive supranuclear palsy. The mean diffusivity was increased in those regions for these subgroups. Conclusion: Clinically defined vascular parkinsonism was associated with decreased fractional anisotropy in the deep white matter (internal capsules) compared to parkinsonian syndromes of degenerative origin. These findings are consistent with previously published neuropathological data.

  6. Increased pulsatility index supports diagnosis of vascular parkinsonism versus idiopathic Parkinson's disease.

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    Caba, L M; Ferrairó, J I T; Torres, I M; Costa, J F V; Muñoz, R B; Martin, A L

    2017-12-29

    The diagnosis of vascular parkinsonism (VP) is based on a series of clinical criteria and neuroimaging findings. An increase in transcranial Doppler ultrasonography pulsatility index (PI) has been described as a frequent finding in patients with VP. We aimed to confirm this association and to determine the PI value with the highest sensitivity and specificity for diagnosis of VP. PI was determined in all patients admitted to Hospital Universitari i Politècnic La Fe due to parkinsonism between January 2012 and June 2016. We assessed the probability of having VP based on PI values in patients with a definite diagnosis of either VP or idiopathic Parkinson's disease (IPD). A ROC curve was created to determine the PI value with the highest sensitivity and specificity. We assessed a total of 146 patients with suspected parkinsonism; 54 (37%) were diagnosed with IPD and 15 (10%) with VP. Patients with VP were significantly older than those with IPD (mean age of 79 vs 68.5, P=.00144) and had a higher PI (median of 1.29 [IQR: 1.09-1.38] vs 0.96 [IQR: 0.89-1.16], P=.01328). In our sample, a PI of 1.09 conferred 84% sensitivity and 70% specificity. In our series, the PI was significantly higher in patients with VP than in those with IPD. We therefore support the use of transcranial Doppler ultrasonography for the initial assessment of elderly patients with akinetic-rigid syndrome. Copyright © 2017 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  7. Environmental risk factors for Parkinson's disease and parkinsonism: the Geoparkinson study.

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    Dick, F D; De Palma, G; Ahmadi, A; Scott, N W; Prescott, G J; Bennett, J; Semple, S; Dick, S; Counsell, C; Mozzoni, P; Haites, N; Wettinger, S Bezzina; Mutti, A; Otelea, M; Seaton, A; Söderkvist, P; Felice, A

    2007-10-01

    To investigate the associations between Parkinson's disease and other degenerative parkinsonian syndromes and environmental factors in five European countries. A case-control study of 959 prevalent cases of parkinsonism (767 with Parkinson's disease) and 1989 controls in Scotland, Italy, Sweden, Romania and Malta was carried out. Cases were defined using the United Kingdom Parkinson's Disease Society Brain Bank criteria, and those with drug-induced or vascular parkinsonism or dementia were excluded. Subjects completed an interviewer-administered questionnaire about lifetime occupational and hobby exposure to solvents, pesticides, iron, copper and manganese. Lifetime and average annual exposures were estimated blind to disease status using a job-exposure matrix modified by subjective exposure modelling. Results were analysed using multiple logistic regression, adjusting for age, sex, country, tobacco use, ever knocked unconscious and family history of Parkinson's disease. Adjusted logistic regression analyses showed significantly increased odds ratios for Parkinson's disease/parkinsonism with an exposure-response relationship for pesticides (low vs no exposure, odds ratio (OR) = 1.13, 95% CI 0.82 to 1.57, high vs no exposure, OR = 1.41, 95% CI 1.06 to 1.88) and ever knocked unconscious (once vs never, OR = 1.35, 95% CI 1.09 to 1.68, more than once vs never, OR = 2.53, 95% CI 1.78 to 3.59). Hypnotic, anxiolytic or antidepressant drug use for more than 1 year and a family history of Parkinson's disease showed significantly increased odds ratios. Tobacco use was protective (OR = 0.50, 95% CI 0.42 to 0.60). Analyses confined to subjects with Parkinson's disease gave similar results. The association of pesticide exposure with Parkinson's disease suggests a causative role. Repeated traumatic loss of consciousness is associated with increased risk.

  8. Amantadine can Ameliorate Lower Urinary Tract Dysfunction and Nocturnal Polyuria in Patients with Parkinson Disease and Vascular Parkinsonism

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    Hiromi, Tateno; Tomoyuki, Uchiyama; Tatsuya, Yamamoto; Yuka, Watanabe; Kenichi, Hashimoto; Chiharu, Shibata-yamaguchi; Miki, Fuse; Takao, Kamai; Tomonori, Yamanishi; Ryuji, Sakakibara; Satoshi, Kuwabara; Koichi, Hirata; Department Of Neurology, Dokkyo Medical University; Department Of Neurology, Dokkyo Medical University:Neurourology And Continence Center, Dokkyo Medical University:Department Of Neurology, Chiba University Graduate School Of Medicine; Department Of Neurology, Chiba University Graduate School Of Medicine:Neurourology And Continence Center, Dokkyo Medical University:Department Of Neurology, Chiba University Graduate School Of Medicine

    2015-01-01

    Background:Amantadine is a drug used for patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) and vascular parkinsonism (VP). These patients often have lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) and nocturnal polyuria (NP). Thus, we investigated the effect of amantadine on these in parkinsonian patients.Methods:Twenty-two patients with LUTS, including 13 with PD and nine with VP, were recruited. We performed a urinary questionnaire, frequency-volume chart, and residual urine (RU) measurement before and after dail...

  9. Patients with advanced Parkinson's disease with and without freezing of gait: a comparative analysis of vascular lesions using brain MRI.

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    Gallardo, M J; Cabello, J P; Pastor, C; Muñoz-Torrero, J J; Carrasco, S; Ibañez, R; Vaamonde, J

    2014-05-01

    Freezing of gait (FOG) is one of the most disabling and enigmatic symptoms in Parkinson's disease. Vascular lesions, observed in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans, may produce or exacerbate this symptom. The study includes 22 patients with Parkinson's disease subjects, 12 with freezing of gait and 10 without. All patients underwent an MRI scan and any vascular lesions were analysed using the modified Fazekas scale. Patients with FOG scored higher on the modified Fazekas scale than the rest of the group. Although the two groups contained the same percentage of patients with vascular lesions (50% in both groups), lesion load was higher in the group of patients with FOG. Vascular lesions in the periventricular area and deep white matter seem to be the most involved in the development of FOG. Vascular lesions may contribute to the onset or worsening of FOG in patients with PD. This study suggests that cerebral vascular disease should be considered in patients with FOG. Copyright © 2012 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  10. PINK1 and its familial Parkinson's disease-associated mutation regulate brain vascular endothelial inflammation.

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    Yunfu, Wang; Guangjian, Liu; Ping, Zhong; Yanpeng, Sun; Xiaoxia, Fang; Wei, Hu; Jiang, Yuan; Jingquan, Hu; Songlin, Wang; Hongyan, Zhang; Yong, Liu; Shi, Chen

    2014-05-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a debilitating disorder that affects movement. Inflammation-mediated endothelial dysfunction has been found to be involved in neurodegenerative diseases, including PD. More than 40 PTEN-induced putative kinase 1 (PINK1) mutations have been found in PD patients. The effects of PINK1 in vascular inflammation are as yet unknown. In this study, our findings revealed that PINK1 can be increased by the inflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor-α in primary human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMECs). We found that wild-type PINK1 prevents expression of the adhesion molecule vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1), thus inhibiting the attachment of monocytes to brain endothelial cells. However, PINK1G309D, the loss-of-function mutation associated with early-onset familial PD, promotes expression of VCAM-1 and exacerbates attachment of monocytes to brain endothelial cells. Mechanism studies revealed that overexpression of wild-type PINK1 inhibits the VCAM-1 promoter by inhibiting the transcriptional activity of interferon regulatory factor 1 (IRF-1). However, PINK1G309D promotes the VCAM-1 promoter by increasing the transcriptional activity of IRF-1.

  11. Statins are underused in recent-onset Parkinson's disease with increased vascular risk: findings from the UK Tracking Parkinson's and Oxford Parkinson's Disease Centre (OPDC) discovery cohorts.

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    Swallow, Diane M A; Lawton, Michael A; Grosset, Katherine A; Malek, Naveed; Klein, Johannes; Baig, Fahd; Ruffmann, Claudio; Bajaj, Nin P; Barker, Roger A; Ben-Shlomo, Yoav; Burn, David J; Foltynie, Thomas; Morris, Huw R; Williams, Nigel; Wood, Nicholas W; Hu, Michele T M; Grosset, Donald G

    2016-11-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) influences phenotypic variation in Parkinson's disease (PD), and is usually an indication for statin therapy. It is less clear whether cardiovascular risk factors influence PD phenotype, and if statins are prescribed appropriately. To quantify vascular risk and statin use in recent-onset PD, and examine the relationship between vascular risk, PD severity and phenotype. Cardiovascular risk was quantified using the QRISK2 calculator (high ≥20%, medium ≥10 and <20%, low risk <10%). Motor severity and phenotype were assessed using the Movement Disorder Society Unified PD Rating Scale (UPDRS) and cognition by the Montreal cognitive assessment. In 2909 individuals with recent-onset PD, the mean age was 67.5 years (SD 9.3), 63.5% were men and the mean disease duration was 1.3 years (SD 0.9). 33.8% of cases had high vascular risk, 28.7% medium risk, and 22.3% low risk, while 15.2% of cases had established CVD. Increasing vascular risk and CVD were associated with older age (p<0.001), worse motor score (p<0.001), more cognitive impairment (p<0.001) and worse motor phenotype (p=0.021). Statins were prescribed in 37.2% with high vascular risk, 15.1% with medium vascular risk and 6.5% with low vascular risk, which compared with statin usage in 75.3% of those with CVD. Over 60% of recent-onset PD patients have high or medium cardiovascular risk (meriting statin usage), which is associated with a worse motor and cognitive phenotype. Statins are underused in these patients, compared with those with vascular disease, which is a missed opportunity for preventive treatment. GN11NE062, NCT02881099. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  12. Thiazolidinediones and Parkinson Disease: A Cohort Study.

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    Connolly, John G; Bykov, Katsiaryna; Gagne, Joshua J

    2015-12-01

    Thiazolidinediones, a class of medications indicated for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus, reduce inflammation and have been shown to provide a therapeutic benefit in animal models of Parkinson disease. We examined the association between treatment with thiazolidinediones and the onset of Parkinson disease in older individuals. We performed a cohort study of 29,397 Medicare patients enrolled in state pharmaceutical benefits programs who initiated treatment with thiazolidinediones or sulfonylureas during the years 1997 through 2005 and had no prior diagnosis of Parkinson disease. New users of thiazolidinediones were propensity score matched to new users of sulfonylureas and followed to determine whether they were diagnosed with Parkinson disease. We used Cox proportional hazards models to compare time to diagnosis of Parkinson disease in the propensity score-matched populations. To assess the association with duration of use, we performed several analyses that required longer continuous use of medications. In the primary analysis, thiazolidinedione users had a hazard ratio for a diagnosis of Parkinson disease of 1.09 (95% confidence interval: 0.71, 1.66) when compared with sulfonylurea users. Increasing the duration-of-use requirements to 10 months did not substantially change the association; the hazard ratios ranged from 1.00 (95% confidence interval: 0.49, 2.05) to 1.17 (95% confidence interval: 0.60, 2.25). Thiazolidinedione use was not associated with a longer time to diagnosis of Parkinson disease than was sulfonylurea use, regardless of duration of exposure. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Study Hints At Link Between Some Statins, Parkinson's Risk

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    ... html Study Hints at Link Between Some Statins, Parkinson's Risk But the connection was only seen with ... may have a slightly increased risk of developing Parkinson's disease, a new study suggests. Researchers said the ...

  14. Parkinsonism and tremor disorders: A clinical approach | Benamer ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Differentiation of idiopathic Parkinson's disease from other causes of Parkinsonism, such as Multiple System Atrophy, Progressive Supranuclar Palsy and Vascular Parkinsonism can be difficult. Clinicopathological studies suggest that the clinical diagnosis of idiopathic Parkinson's disease is 76% reliable. Also, clinical ...

  15. Study Looks At Parkinson's Effect on Life Span

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    ... gov/news/fullstory_165589.html Study Looks at Parkinson's Effect on Life Span 2-year difference seen ... HealthDay News) -- People with brain diseases such as Parkinson's and dementia with Lewy bodies die about two ...

  16. Parkinson's Disease and Melanoma May Occur Together, Study Finds

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    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_167078.html Parkinson's Disease and Melanoma May Occur Together, Study Finds ... FRIDAY, July 7, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- People with Parkinson's disease are about four times more likely to ...

  17. Vitamin D reduces falls and hip fractures in vascular Parkinsonism but not in Parkinson’s disease

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    Sato Y

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Yoshihiro Sato,1 Jun Iwamoto,2 Yoshiaki Honda,1 Nobuko Amano3 1Department of Neurology, Mitate Hospital, Tagawa, Japan; 2Institute for Integrated Sports Medicine, Keio University School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan; 3Department of Food and Nutrition, Tezukayama University, Nara, Japan Purpose: Vitamin D supplementation is suggested to reduce the risk of falls in older institutionalized or ambulatory individuals by 20%. The present study was undertaken to address the reduced risk, by vitamin D supplementation, of falls and hip fractures in patients with vascular Parkinsonism (VP and Parkinson’s disease (PD. Patients and methods: In the open-label-study, 94 elderly patients with VP and 92 age-matched patients with PD were followed for 2 years. All patients received 1200 IU ergocalciferol daily. The number of falls per person and incidence of hip fractures were compared between the two groups. Results: At baseline, serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25-OHD levels were in the deficient range (<25 nmol/L in all patients, and vitamin D treatment enhanced serum 25-OHD and 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D levels in both groups. Improved muscle strength of lower extremities was observed in both groups. There was significant difference between the two groups in the number of falls per subject during the 2 years (1.9 ± 0.5 in the PD group and 0.8 ± 0.4 in the VP group, P < 0.001. Hip fractures occurred in seven of 88 in the PD group and one in 90 of the VP group during the 2-year study period (P = 0.035. Conclusion: It is suggested that vitamin D decreases falls and hip fractures in VP by increasing muscle strength but not in PD. Keywords: fall, hip fracture, Parkinson’s disease, vascular Parkinsonism, vitamin D

  18. Association of Parkinsonism or Parkinson Disease with Polypharmacy in the Year Preceding Diagnosis: A Nested Case-Control Study in South Korea.

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    Park, Hae-Young; Park, Ji-Won; Sohn, Hyun Soon; Kwon, Jin-Won

    2017-11-01

    Published studies on the association between polypharmacy and parkinsonism or Parkinson disease are very limited. The objective of this study was to investigate whether polypharmacy is associated with parkinsonism or Parkinson disease in elderly patients. From a South Korean national health insurance sample cohort database for 2002-2013, we matched parkinsonism cases (defined by diagnosis codes for parkinsonism/Parkinson disease) and Parkinson disease cases (patients who had records for both Parkinson disease diagnosis and anti-Parkinson disease drug prescriptions) with controls. Logistic regression analysis evaluated the associations of parkinsonism/Parkinson disease with polypharmacy (i.e., five or more prescribed daily drugs) during the year preceding parkinsonism/Parkinson disease diagnosis, medications potentially associated with parkinsonism, and comorbidity status (using the Charlson Comorbidity Index score and hospitalization records). The study population included 6209 cases and 24,836 controls for parkinsonism and 1331 cases and 5324 controls for Parkinson disease. In univariate logistic regression, odds ratios for parkinsonism/Parkinson disease increased significantly with increased polypharmacy, medications potentially associated with parkinsonism, Charlson Comorbidity Index score, or prior hospitalizations. In multiple logistic regression, odds ratios for parkinsonism/Parkinson disease (adjusted for medications potentially associated with parkinsonism and comorbidities) also increased with increased polypharmacy. Odds ratios (95% confidence interval) for Parkinson disease were higher than those for parkinsonism with stronger statistical significance: 1.41 (1.28-1.55) and 2.17 (1.84-2.57) for parkinsonism and 2.87 (2.30-3.58) and 4.75 (3.39-6.66) for Parkinson disease for between five and ten prescribed daily drugs and ten or more drugs, respectively. Polypharmacy in the year preceding diagnosis may be associated with an increased risk for parkinsonism/Parkinson

  19. Machine learning models for the differential diagnosis of vascular parkinsonism and Parkinson's disease using [{sup 123}I]FP-CIT SPECT

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    Huertas-Fernandez, I.; Benitez-Rivero, S.; Jesus, S.; Caceres-Redondo, M.T.; Martin-Rodriguez, J.F.; Carrillo, F. [Instituto de Biomedicina de Sevilla (IBiS), Hospital Universitario Virgen del Rocio/CSIC/Universidad de Sevilla, Unidad de Trastornos del Movimiento, Servicio de Neurologia y Neurofisiologia Clinica, Seville (Spain); Garcia-Gomez, F.J.; Marin-Oyaga, V.A.; Lojo, J.A. [Hospital Universitario Virgen del Rocio, Servicio de Medicina Nuclear, UDIM, Seville (Spain); Garcia-Solis, D. [Hospital Universitario Virgen del Rocio, Servicio de Medicina Nuclear, UDIM, Seville (Spain); Centro de Investigacion Biomedica en Red sobre Enfermedades Neurodegenerativas (CIBERNED), Seville (Spain); Mir, P. [Instituto de Biomedicina de Sevilla (IBiS), Hospital Universitario Virgen del Rocio/CSIC/Universidad de Sevilla, Unidad de Trastornos del Movimiento, Servicio de Neurologia y Neurofisiologia Clinica, Seville (Spain); Centro de Investigacion Biomedica en Red sobre Enfermedades Neurodegenerativas (CIBERNED), Seville (Spain)

    2015-01-15

    The study's objective was to develop diagnostic predictive models using data from two commonly used [{sup 123}I]FP-CIT SPECT assessment methods: region-of-interest (ROI) analysis and whole-brain voxel-based analysis. We included retrospectively 80 patients with vascular parkinsonism (VP) and 164 patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) who underwent [{sup 123}I]FP-CIT SPECT. Nuclear-medicine specialists evaluated the scans and calculated bilateral caudate and putamen [{sup 123}I]FP-CIT uptake and asymmetry indices using BRASS software. Statistical parametric mapping (SPM) was used to compare the radioligand uptake between the two diseases at the voxel level. Quantitative data from these two methods, together with potential confounding factors for dopamine transporter availability (sex, age, disease duration and severity), were used to build predictive models following a tenfold cross-validation scheme. The performance of logistic regression (LR), linear discriminant analysis and support vector machine (SVM) algorithms for ROI data, and their penalized versions for SPM data (penalized LR, penalized discriminant analysis and SVM), were assessed. Significant differences were found in the ROI analysis after covariate correction between VP and PD patients in [{sup 123}I]FP-CIT uptake in the more affected side of the putamen and the ipsilateral caudate. Age, disease duration and severity were also found to be informative in feeding the statistical model. SPM localized significant reductions in [{sup 123}I]FP-CIT uptake in PD with respect to VP in two specular clusters comprising areas corresponding to the left and right striatum. The diagnostic predictive accuracy of the LR model using ROI data was 90.3 % and of the SVM model using SPM data was 90.4 %. The predictive models built with ROI data and SPM data from [{sup 123}I]FP-CIT SPECT provide great discrimination accuracy between VP and PD. External validation of these methods is necessary to confirm their

  20. Therapeutic Interventions for Vascular Parkinsonism: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miguel-Puga, Adán; Villafuerte, Gabriel; Salas-Pacheco, José; Arias-Carrión, Oscar

    2017-01-01

    Vascular parkinsonism (VP) is defined as the presence of parkinsonian syndrome, evidence of cerebrovascular disease, and an established relationship between the two disorders. However, the diagnosis of VP is problematic, particularly for the clinician confronted with moving from diagnosis to treatment. Given the different criteria used in the diagnosis of VP, the effectiveness of available therapeutic interventions for this disease are currently unknown. To assess the clinical response of all published therapeutic interventions for VP that have been reported in the literature, we conducted a systematic review looking for VP subjects treated with any therapeutic intervention. To clarify the prevalence of responsiveness to levodopa among VP subjects, we conducted a meta-analysis of 17 observational studies retrieved with the search criteria of our review. Also, four studies were included in a second analysis to explore if nigrostriatal lesion affected the prevalence of levodopa response in VP subjects. Relevant articles were identified from MEDLINE, Scopus, and Web of Science published until June 2017. 436 non-duplicate citations were identified for screening, 107 articles were assessed for eligibility, and only 23 observational studies were included in this review. No randomized clinical trials were found. Four different therapies were found in the literature; among them, levodopa was the only one repetitively reported. The calculated event rate of levodopa response in VP subjects was of 0.304 [95% confidence interval (CI) of 0.230-0.388]. The overall odds ratio for good response to levodopa in VP with lesion in the nigrostriatal pathway vs. no lesion in the nigrostriatal pathway was 15.15 (95% CI: 5.2-44.17). Despite the lack of randomized controlled trials, results of this systematic review and meta-analysis show that VP subjects, as operationally defined here, have a low response rate to levodopa; nigrostriatal lesion could be used as a proxy predictor of

  1. The Effect of Hyperhomocysteinemia on Motor Symptoms, Cognitive Status, and Vascular Risk in Patients with Parkinson's Disease.

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    Kocer, Bilge; Guven, Hayat; Conkbayir, Isik; Comoglu, Selim Selcuk; Delibas, Sennur

    2016-01-01

    Factors related with hyperhomocysteinemia (HHcy) and the impact of HHcy in Parkinson's disease (PD) are not well understood. We investigated the factors associated with increased levels of homocysteine (Hcy) and the relationship between HHcy and motor symptoms, cognitive status, and vascular risk in patients with Parkinson's disease. Among 60 patients (29 males, 48.3%) with PD, the stage of the disease, the severity of clinical symptoms, and the patients' cognitive status were measured using a modified Hoehn and Yahr Staging Scale (mHY), Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) II and III, and Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE), respectively. Patients were also noted for having dyskinesia and hallucinations. Serum vitamin B12, folic acid, and plasma Hcy levels were measured. Furthermore, the presence of vascular risk factors was recorded. Finally, we investigated carotid artery intima-media thickening and stenosis using colour Doppler ultrasonography as well as the presence of ischemic lesions using brain imaging techniques. Plasma Hcy levels were higher with advanced age and in males. In addition, there was an inverse relationship between Hcy and vitamin B12 levels. There was no correlation between HHcy and the stage of the disease, severity of motor symptoms, cognitive status as assessed by the MMSE, vascular risk factors, carotid artery atherosclerotic findings, and ischemic brain lesions. Plasma Hcy levels may rise due to several factors in PD. However, the resulting HHcy has no significant effect on the clinical picture in terms of motor features, cognitive status, and vascular diseases.

  2. Virtual house calls for Parkinson disease (Connect.Parkinson): study protocol for a randomized, controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achey, Meredith A; Beck, Christopher A; Beran, Denise B; Boyd, Cynthia M; Schmidt, Peter N; Willis, Allison W; Riggare, Sara S; Simone, Richard B; Biglan, Kevin M; Dorsey, E Ray

    2014-11-27

    Interest in improving care for the growing number of individuals with chronic conditions is rising. However, access to care is limited by distance, disability, and distribution of doctors. Small-scale studies in Parkinson disease, a prototypical chronic condition, have suggested that delivering care using video house calls is feasible, offers similar clinical outcomes to in-person care, and reduces travel burden. We are conducting a randomized comparative effectiveness study (Connect.Parkinson) comparing usual care in the community to usual care augmented by virtual house calls with a Parkinson disease specialist. Recruitment is completed centrally using online advertisements and emails and by contacting physicians, support groups, and allied health professionals. Efforts target areas with a high proportion of individuals not receiving care from neurologists. Approximately 200 individuals with Parkinson disease and their care partners will be enrolled at 20 centers throughout the United States and followed for one year. Participants receive educational materials, then are randomized in a 1:1 ratio to continue their usual care (control arm) or usual care and specialty care delivered virtually (intervention arm). Care partners are surveyed about their time and travel burden and their perceived caregiver burden. Participants are evaluated via electronic survey forms and videoconferencing with a blinded independent rater at baseline and at 12 months. All study activities are completed remotely.The primary outcomes are: (1) feasibility, as measured by the proportion of visits completed, and (2) quality of life, as measured by the 39-item Parkinson's Disease Questionnaire. Secondary outcomes include measures of clinical benefit, quality of care, time and travel burden, and caregiver burden. Connect.Parkinson will evaluate the feasibility and effectiveness of using technology to deliver care into the homes of individuals with Parkinson disease. The trial may serve as a

  3. Effects of interactive metronome training on postural stability and upper extremity function in Parkinson?s disease: a case study

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Arim; Lee, Hye-Sun; Song, Chiang-Soon

    2017-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of interactive metronome training on the postural stability and upper extremity function of an individual with Parkinson?s disease. [Subject and Methods] The participant of this case study was a 75-year-old female with Parkinson?s disease diagnosed 7?years prior. This study was a single-subject research with an A-B-A design. She received IM training during the treatment phase (B phase) for 40 minutes per session. She was assessed ...

  4. Proteomic studies associated with Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasap, Murat; Akpinar, Gurler; Kanli, Aylin

    2017-03-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is an insidious disorder affecting more than 1-2% of the population over the age of 65. Understanding the etiology of PD may create opportunities for developing new treatments. Genomic and transcriptomic studies are useful, but do not provide evidence for the actual status of the disease. Conversely, proteomic studies deal with proteins, which are real time players, and can hence provide information on the dynamic nature of the affected cells. The number of publications relating to the proteomics of PD is vast. Therefore, there is a need to evaluate the current proteomics literature and establish the connections between the past and the present to foresee the future. Areas covered: PubMed and Web of Science were used to retrieve the literature associated with PD proteomics. Studies using human samples, model organisms and cell lines were selected and reviewed to highlight their contributions to PD. Expert commentary: The proteomic studies associated with PD achieved only limited success in facilitating disease diagnosis, monitoring and progression. A global system biology approach using new models is needed. Future research should integrate the findings of proteomics with other omics data to facilitate both early diagnosis and the treatment of PD.

  5. Statins are underused in recent-onset Parkinson's disease with increased vascular risk: findings from the UK Tracking Parkinson's and Oxford Parkinson's Disease Centre (OPDC) discovery cohorts.

    OpenAIRE

    Swallow, Diane M A; Lawton,Michael A; Grosset, Katherine A; Malek, Naveed; Klein, Johannes; Baig, Fahd; Ruffmann, Claudio; Bajaj, Nin P.; Barker, Roger A.; Ben-Shlomo, Yoav; Burn, David J.; Foltynie, Thomas; Morris, Huw R.; Williams, Nigel; Wood, Nicholas W.

    2016-01-01

    Background Cardiovascular disease (CVD) influences\\ud phenotypic variation in Parkinson’s disease (PD), and is\\ud usually an indication for statin therapy. It is less clear\\ud whether cardiovascular risk factors influence PD\\ud phenotype, and if statins are prescribed appropriately.\\ud Objectives To quantify vascular risk and statin use in\\ud recent-onset PD, and examine the relationship between\\ud vascular risk, PD severity and phenotype.\\ud Methods Cardiovascular risk was quantified using t...

  6. Lower vascular tone and larger plasma volume in Parkinson's disease with orthostatic hypotension

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groothuis, J.T.; Esselink, R.A.J.; Seeger, J.P.H.; Aalst, M.J. van; Hopman, M.T.E.; Bloem, B.R.

    2011-01-01

    The pathophysiology of orthostatic hypotension in Parkinson's disease (PD) is incompletely understood. The primary focus has thus far been on failure of the baroreflex, a central mediated vasoconstrictor mechanism. Here, we test the role of two other possible factors: 1) a reduced peripheral

  7. [Importance of vascular factors for cognitive rehabilitation in Parkinson's disease patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slobodin, T N

    2012-01-01

    The examination of the Parkinson's disease patients, patients with subcortical encephalopathy and their combination, using neuropsychological testings and definitions of the gait and balance disturbance degree, the dependence of balance impairment and cognitive functions from concomitant cerebrovascular patology has been revealed.

  8. A clinical study in elderly patients with Parkinson's disease using MRI and SPECT; Parkinson's disease and the lacunar state

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Umahara, Takahiko; Iwamoto, Toshihiko; Takasaki, Masaru; Katsunuma, Hideyo (Tokyo Medical Coll. (Japan))

    1991-11-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is often associated with dementia in elderly patients, and sometimes PD coexists with senile dementia of the Alzheimer type (SDAT) or cerebrovascular disease (CVD) in the elderly. However, since there are few previous clinical studies on the coincidence of, or relationship between PD and CVD, the authors evaluated these aspects in 34 elderly patients with PD using MRI and SPECT. All the patients were over 70 years old. The diagnosis of PD was based on the presence of three symptons (resting tremor, cogwheel rigidity and bradikinesia) which are characteristic of PD, and the effectiveness of L-DOPA therapy. We therefore believe that patients with vascular Parkinsonism were excluded from our study. In 34 cases, 24 (71%) had MRI evidence of CVD (mainly the lacunar state). In the 10 cases who had no CVD, 2 (20%) had severe dementia and the decrease of regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) in the temporal and parietal lobes bilaterally correlated with the SPECT findings commonly found in SDAT. A comparison of the rCBF and the results of Hasegawa's dementia score (HDS) (verbal intelligence score) was made between the patients with PD associated with CVD and the patients with PD who had no CVD and no SPECT findings which correlated with SDAT. The rCBF in the frontal lobes and the results of the HDS of the former group were significantly lower than those of the latter. As mentioned above, elderly patients with PD often had CVD, leading to dementia. We also pointed out the difficulty in making a differential diagnosis between PD with CVD and vascular Parkinsonism, and the necessity of whether or not the concept of 'mixed type Parkinsonism' should be considered. (author).

  9. Buccopalpebral reflex in Parkinson disease and blink reflex study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unal, Yasemin; Kutlu, Gulnihal; Erdal, Abidin; Inan, Levent E

    2013-07-01

    To define a new primitive reflex named the buccopalpebral reflex (BPR), and to investigate this reflex clinically and neurophysiologically in patients with Parkinson disease. This prospectively designed study included 17 patients, 9 BPR positive patients, and 8 BPR negative patients in Ankara Research and Training Hospital, Ankara, Turkey, and was carried out between January and December 2008. All patients had Parkinson disease without any medication. Using the blink reflex technique, 3 branches of the trigeminal nerve were stimulated. Additionally, the Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE), the Unified Parkinson`s Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS), the Hoehn and Yahr Score (HYS), the blink frequency, and the duration of Parkinson disease was also matched between the 2 groups. In patients with positive BPR, 5 had tremor and the remaining 4 had bradykinesia as a dominant symptom, while all other patients with negative BPR had only tremor. When blink reflex findings were compared between the 2 groups, R2 and contralateral R2 latencies that were taken by supraorbital stimulus were significantly shorter in the BPR positive patients. There were no statistically significant differences in terms of MMSE, UPDRS, HYS, and frequency of blinking, and duration of illness between the 2 groups. This reflex may be an indicator of sensitivity or decrease of threshold level such as Myerson`s sign, in which there is no inhibition in glabella reflex. The blink reflex findings support this hypothesis.

  10. Disrupted brain network topology in Parkinson's disease: a longitudinal magnetoencephalography study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Olde Dubbelink, K.T.E.; Hillebrand, A.; Stoffers, D.; Deijen, J.B.; Twisk, J.W.R.; Stam, C.J.; Berendse, H.W.

    2014-01-01

    Although alterations in resting-state functional connectivity between brain regions have previously been reported in Parkinson's disease, the spatial organization of these changes remains largely unknown. Here, we longitudinally studied brain network topology in Parkinson's disease in relation to

  11. Skin biopsy and I-123 MIBG scintigraphy findings in idiopathic Parkinson's disease and parkinsonism: a comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannoccaro, Maria Pia; Donadio, Vincenzo; Incensi, Alex; Pizza, Fabio; Cason, Ernesto; Di Stasi, Vitantonio; Martinelli, Paolo; Scaglione, Cesa; Capellari, Sabina; Treglia, Giorgio; Liguori, Rocco

    2015-06-01

    (123) I-meta-iodobenzylguanidine ((123) I-MIBG) myocardial scintigraphy is considered reliable in differentiating idiopathic Parkinson's disease (IPD) from other parkinsonisms, but it is biased by pharmacological treatments. Skin biopsy is not influenced by therapy and has disclosed skin denervation in IPD. Our aims were to compare (123) I-MIBG scintigraphy and skin biopsy findings in IPD and parkinsonisms to (1) verify whether myocardial and skin denervations are linked; (2) explore the simultaneous extent of the autonomic dysfunction. We studied 22 IPD and 11 parkinsonism patients by means of (123) I-MIBG scintigraphy and skin biopsies. In the IPD group, both (123) I-MIBG scintigraphy and skin biopsy results were abnormal in 91% of patients, showing concordance in 82% of cases. In parkinsonisms, results of both tests were normal in all patients. (1) Skin biopsy and (123) I-MIBG scintigraphy provide comparable results; (2) in IPD, autonomic dysfunctions are often simultaneously widespread at cardiac and skin branches. © 2015 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society. © 2015 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.

  12. Suicide in patients with Parkinson's disease. An epidemiological study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stenager, E N; Wermuth, L; Stenager, Egon

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to estimate the risk of suicide for patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) in Denmark compared with that in the background population. The study involved 458 patients with a PD diagnosis, 226 men and 232 women. The follow-up period to either death or end of follow...

  13. Toxoplasma gondii exposure and Parkinson's disease: a case?control study

    OpenAIRE

    Alvarado-Esquivel, Cosme; M?ndez-Hern?ndez, Edna Madai; Salas-Pacheco, Jos? Manuel; Ruano-Calder?n, Luis ?ngel; Hern?ndez-Tinoco, Jes?s; Arias-Carri?n, Oscar; S?nchez-Anguiano, Luis Francisco; Castellanos-Ju?rez, Francisco Xavier; Sandoval-Carrillo, Ada Agustina; Liesenfeld, Oliver; Ramos-Nev?rez, Agar

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: To determine the association between Toxoplasma gondii infection and Parkinson's disease and to investigate whether T. gondii seropositivity is associated with the general characteristics of patients with Parkinson's disease. Design Case–control study. Setting: Cases and controls were enrolled in Durango City, Mexico. Participants: 65 patients with Parkinson's disease and 195 age- and gender-matched control subjects without Parkinson's disease. Primary and secondar...

  14. Safinamide as Add-On Therapy to Levodopa in Mid- to Late-Stage Parkinson?s Disease Fluctuating Patients: Post hoc Analysesof Studies 016 and SETTLE

    OpenAIRE

    Cattaneo, Carlo; Sardina, Marco; Bonizzoni, Ermino

    2016-01-01

    Background: Studies 016 and SETTLE showed that safinamide was safe and effective as adjunct therapy in patients with advanced Parkinson?s disease (PD) and motor fluctuations. The addition of safinamide to a stable dose of levodopa alone or with other antiparkinsonian medications significantly increased ON time with no/non-troublesome dyskinesia, decreased OFF time and improved Parkinson?s symptoms. Objective: To evaluate the clinical effects of safinamide 100?mg/day on motor fluctuations and ...

  15. Prevalence of smell loss in Parkinson's disease - A multicenter study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haehner, A.; Boesveldt, S.; Berendse, H.W.; Mackay-Sim, A.; Fleischman, J.; Silburn, P.A.; Johnston, A.N.; Mellick, G.D.; Herting, B.; Reichmann, H.; Hummel, T.

    2009-01-01

    Previous data on the prevalence of olfactory dysfunction in Parkinson's disease (PD) range from 45% to 90%. The present multicenter study aimed to provide data on the prevalence of smell loss in a large sample of PD patients from three independent populations. Olfactory sensitivity was tested in 400

  16. Vascular determinants of epilepsy: The Rotterdam study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    X. Li (Xinhua); M.M.B. Breteler (Monique); M.C. de Bruyne (Martine); H. Meinardi; W.A. Hauser (W. Allen); A. Hofman (Albert)

    1997-01-01

    textabstractPurpose: To investigate the relation between vascular determinants and epilepsy in an elderly population. Methods: This is a cross-sectional, community-based, case-control study. The total study population was comprised of 4,944 subjects, 65 of whom had epilepsy which conformed to

  17. Can You Have Parkinsonism without Having PD?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home › Can You Have Parkinsonism Without Having PD? Can You Have Parkinsonism Without Having PD? YES . Parkinsonism ... Certain medications, vascular problems, and other neurodegenerative diseases can cause the symptoms similar to Parkinson’s disease. In ...

  18. Family history of neurodegenerative and vascular diseases in ALS: a population-based study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huisman, M.H.; Jong, S.W. de; Verwijs, M.C.; Schelhaas, H.J.; Kooi, A.J. van der; Visser, M. de; Veldink, J.H.; Berg, L.H. van den

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine whether the frequency of Parkinson disease (PD), dementia, and vascular diseases in relatives of patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) differs from the frequency of those diseases in relatives of controls, providing further information about the association

  19. Motor association cortex activity in Parkinson`s disease. A functional MRI study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tada, Yukiko [Yamaguchi Univ., Ube (Japan). School of Medicine

    1998-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the activation of motor association cortex using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in patients with Parkinson`s disease (PD) and control subjects during performed hand movements. There were 26 patients with PD (12 patients with Hoehn and Yahr stage I-II, 14 patients with stage III) and 8 control subjects. Functional imaging was performed using a 1.5 tesla MRI system equipped with a single-shot, echo-planar pulse sequence. The significant signal changes were observed within the primary sensorimotor area, the supplementary motor area (SMA), and the parietal association area in both PD and control subjects. In PD subjects, the SMA was less activated than in control subjects; there were significant differences in the number of pixels activated in SMA between control and Yahr III group (p<0.01), and between Yahr I-II and Yahr III group (p<0.01). Our results demonstrated that movement related cerebral activity in the SMA is reduced in PD subjects, consistent with previously published data using other methods. It is well known from anatomical studies that one of the major cortical outputs of the basal ganglia is the SMA. This may explain the hypoactivation of the SMA in PD. Studies using fMRI provide a promising method not only for localizing cortical activation related to voluntary movements but also for investigating pathophysiology of movement disorders. (author)

  20. Low LDL cholesterol, PCSK9 and HMGCR genetic variation, and risk of Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease: Mendelian randomisation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benn, Marianne; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Frikke-Schmidt, Ruth; Tybjærg-Hansen, Anne

    2017-04-24

    Objective To test the hypothesis that low density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol due to genetic variation in the genes responsible for LDL cholesterol metabolism and biosynthesis(PCSK9 and 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase (HMGCR), respectively) is associated with a high risk of Alzheimer's disease, vascular dementia, any dementia, and Parkinson's disease in the general population.Design Mendelian randomisation study.Setting Copenhagen General Population Study and Copenhagen City Heart Study.Participants 111 194 individuals from the Danish general population.Main outcome measures Risk of Alzheimer's disease, vascular dementia, all dementia, and Parkinson's disease.Results In observational analyses, the multifactorially adjusted hazard ratio for Parkinson's disease in participants with an LDL cholesterol level genetic, causal analyses adjusted for age, sex, and year of birth, the risk ratios for a lifelong 1 mmol/L lower LDL cholesterol level were 0.57 (0.27 to 1.17) for Alzheimer's disease, 0.81 (0.34 to 1.89) for vascular dementia, 0.66 (0.34 to 1.26) for any dementia, and 1.02 (0.26 to 4.00) for Parkinson's disease. Summary level data from the International Genomics of Alzheimer's Project using Egger Mendelian randomisation analysis gave a risk ratio for Alzheimer's disease of 0.24 (0.02 to 2.79) for 26 PCSK9 and HMGCR variants, and of 0.64 (0.52 to 0.79) for 380 variants of LDL cholesterol level lowering.Conclusion Low LDL cholesterol levels due to PCSK9 and HMGCR variants had no causal effect on high risk of Alzheimer's disease, vascular dementia, any dementia, or Parkinson's disease; however, low LDL cholesterol levels may have a causal effect in reducing the risk of Alzheimer's disease. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  1. [Longitudinal study of three families with familial Parkinson's disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baltasar-Rodríguez, Luz Margarita; Millán-Guerrero, Rebeca O; Aceves-Themsel, Roberto; Isais-Millán, Sara; Delgado-Enciso, Iván

    2006-01-01

    Familial Parkinson's is a variant of Parkinson's disease (PD) transmitted generationally with an early onset. Describe the clinical disease characteristics and its 18 year evolution among families in Colima presenting familial PD. We determined disease diagnosis, evolution and hereditary pattern. The UPDRS system was used to follow the longitudinal course of the disease. Descriptive statistics were carried out using means and percentages. Three families were studied, with a total of 51 subjects aged 29 +/- 22 years spanning 4 generations. Thirty-seven percent of studied subjects displayed familial PD, with disease onset at 24 +/- 9 years of age. The highest UPDRS value was 175. Disease transmission with a dominant autosomic heredity pattern was shown. One hundred percent of first and second generation members from family number 1 displayed the disease. The three families displayed early onset PD and rapid progression, coinciding with described characteristics of type 1 familial Parkinsonism (PARK1). This disease is caused by the Ala53Thr mutation of the alpha-synuclein gene.

  2. Gene-environment interactions in parkinsonism and Parkinson's disease: the Geoparkinson study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dick, F D; De Palma, G; Ahmadi, A; Osborne, A; Scott, N W; Prescott, G J; Bennett, J; Semple, S; Dick, S; Mozzoni, P; Haites, N; Wettinger, S Bezzina; Mutti, A; Otelea, M; Seaton, A; Soderkvist, P; Felice, A

    2007-10-01

    To investigate associations of Parkinson's disease (PD) and parkinsonian syndromes with polymorphic genes that influence metabolism of either foreign chemical substances or dopamine and to seek evidence of gene-environment interaction effects that modify risk. A case-control study of 959 prevalent cases of parkinsonism (767 with PD) and 1989 controls across five European centres. Occupational hygienists estimated the average annual intensity of exposure to solvents, pesticides and metals, (iron, copper, manganese), blind to disease status. CYP2D6, PON1, GSTM1, GSTT1, GSTM3, GSTP1, NQO1, CYP1B1, MAO-A, MAO-B, SOD 2, EPHX, DAT1, DRD2 and NAT2 were genotyped. Results were analysed using multiple logistic regression adjusting for key confounders. There was a modest but significant association between MAO-A polymorphism in males and disease risk (G vs T, OR 1.30, 95% CI 1.02 to 1.66, adjusted). The majority of gene-environment analyses did not show significant interaction effects. There were possible interaction effects between GSTM1 null genotype and solvent exposure (which were stronger when limited to PD cases only). Many small studies have reported associations between genetic polymorphisms and PD. Fewer have examined gene-environment interactions. This large study was sufficiently powered to examine these aspects. GSTM1 null subjects heavily exposed to solvents appear to be at increased risk of PD. There was insufficient evidence that the other gene-environment combinations investigated modified disease risk, suggesting they contribute little to the burden of PD.

  3. Effect of vascular burden as measured by vascular indexes upon vascular dementia: a matched case-control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takahashi PY

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Paul Y Takahashi, Casey R Caldwell, Paul V TargonskiPrimary Care Internal Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester MN, USABackground: Vascular dementia (VaD is a challenging illness that affects the lives of older adults and caregivers. It is unclear how multiple vascular risk factor exposures (polyvascular disease affect VaD.Purpose: To determine the relationship between multiple vascular risk exposures, as counted on an index in cases with VaD, compared with healthy age-/gender-matched controls.Methods: This was a matched case-control study of subjects living in Olmsted County, MN with documented VaD. Controls were selected by gender and age within 3 years from those who did not have dementia. The exposures included a total index (eleven exposure factors added together, along with indexes for cerebrovascular disease (two exposures, cardiovascular disease (four exposures, vascular disease (three exposures, and lifestyle (two exposures. Analysis used matched conditional univariable logistic regression for each index.Results: A total of 1736 potential subjects were identified, and 205 subjects were diagnosed with VaD. There was a significant association of the total score index with an odds ratio of 1.45 (95% confidence interval 1.21–1.74. The cerebrovascular index was also associated with VaD with an odds ratio of 12.18 (95% confidence interval 6.29–23.61. The cardiovascular and vascular indexes were also associated with VaD status. The lifestyle index was not associated with VaD.Conclusion: The cumulative role of multiple vascular risk factors or diseases increased the risk of VaD, as noted by the total vascular index. The lifestyle index did not reveal any significant differences. Further work is required for evaluation of these indexes.Keywords: polyvascular disease, elderly, vascular dementia

  4. Rivastigmine: the advantages of dual inhibition of acetylcholinesterase and butyrylcholinesterase and its role in subcortical vascular dementia and Parkinson's disease dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandiah, Nagaendran; Pai, Ming-Chyi; Senanarong, Vorapun; Looi, Irene; Ampil, Encarnita; Park, Kyung Won; Karanam, Ananda Krishna; Christopher, Stephen

    2017-01-01

    Several studies have demonstrated clinical benefits of sustained cholinesterase inhibition with rivastigmine in Alzheimer's disease (AD) and Parkinson's disease dementia (PDD). Unlike donepezil and galantamine that selectively inhibit acetylcholinesterase (AChE; EC 3.1.1.7), rivastigmine is a unique cholinesterase inhibitor with both AChE and butyrylcholinesterase (BuChE; EC 3.1.1.8) inhibitory activity. Rivastigmine is also available as transdermal patch that has been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of mild, moderate, and severe AD as well as mild-to-moderate PDD. In this review, we explore the role of BuChE inhibition in addition to AChE inhibition with rivastigmine in the outcomes of cognition, global function, behavioral symptoms, and activities of daily living. Additionally, we review the evidence supporting the use of dual AChE-BuChE inhibitory activity of rivastigmine as a therapeutic strategy in the treatment of neurological disorders, with a focus on the role of rivastigmine in subcortical dementias such as vascular dementia (VaD) and PDD. Toward this objective, we performed a literature search in PubMed and Ovid with limits to articles published in the English language before June 2016. The available evidence from the literature suggests that the dual inhibition of AChE and BuChE may afford additional therapeutic potential of rivastigmine in subcortical dementias (subcortical VaD and PDD) with benefits on cognition and behavioral symptoms. Rivastigmine was found to specifically benefit executive dysfunction frequently observed in subcortical dementias; however, large randomized clinical studies are warranted to support these observations.

  5. Large-Scale Wearable Sensor Deployment in Parkinson's Patients: The Parkinson@Home Study Protocol

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Silva de Lima, A.L.; Hahn, T.; Vries, N.M. de; Cohen, E.; Bataille, L.; Little, M.A.; Baldus, H.; Bloem, B.R.; Faber, M.J.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Long-term management of Parkinson's disease does not reach its full potential because we lack knowledge about individual variations in clinical presentation and disease progression. Continuous and longitudinal assessments in real-life (ie, within the patients' own home environment) might

  6. Inverse Association of Parkinson Disease With Systemic Lupus Erythematosus: A Nationwide Population-based Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Feng-Cheng; Huang, Wen-Yen; Lin, Te-Yu; Shen, Chih-Hao; Chou, Yu-Ching; Lin, Cheng-Li; Lin, Kuen-Tze; Kao, Chia-Hung

    2015-11-01

    The effects of the inflammatory mediators involved in systemic lupus erythematous (SLE) on subsequent Parkinson disease have been reported, but no relevant studies have focused on the association between the 2 diseases. This nationwide population-based study evaluated the risk of Parkinson disease in patients with SLE.We identified 12,817 patients in the Taiwan National Health Insurance database diagnosed with SLE between 2000 and 2010 and compared the incidence rate of Parkinson disease among these patients with that among 51,268 randomly selected age and sex-matched non-SLE patients. A Cox multivariable proportional-hazards model was used to evaluate the risk factors of Parkinson disease in the SLE cohort.We observed an inverse association between a diagnosis of SLE and the risk of subsequent Parkinson disease, with the crude hazard ratio (HR) being 0.60 (95% confidence interval 0.45-0.79) and adjusted HR being 0.68 (95% confidence interval 0.51-0.90). The cumulative incidence of Parkinson disease was 0.83% lower in the SLE cohort than in the non-SLE cohort. The adjusted HR of Parkinson disease decreased as the follow-up duration increased and was decreased among older lupus patients with comorbidity.We determined that patients with SLE had a decreased risk of subsequent Parkinson disease. Further research is required to elucidate the underlying mechanism.

  7. Impact of Sjogren's syndrome on Parkinson's disease: A nationwide case-control study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Chi Wu

    Full Text Available To investigate whether Sjogren's syndrome would have an influence on the development of Parkinson's disease.A population-based case-control study was conducted. Participants consisted of 7716 subjects with newly diagnosed Parkinson's disease and a population of 75129 matched control subjects between 2000 and 2010. We measured the risk of Parkinson's disease in association with Sjogren's syndrome by using adjusted odds ratios.A total of 143 Parkinson's disease subjects (1.9% and 893 control subjects (1.2% suffered from Sjogren's syndrome (p < 0.001. The crude odds ratio for Parkinson's disease among subjects with Sjogren's syndrome was 1.56 (95% CI 1.30-1.86; p < 0.01. After adjustment for potential confounders which have been proposed that would increase the risk of development of Parkinson's disease, Sjogren's syndrome was found to be significantly associated with the risk of Parkinson's disease with an odds ratio of 1.37 (95% CI 1.15-1.65; p < 0.01.This study preliminarily proposed that Sjogren's syndrome was significant associated with an increased risk of Parkinson's disease.

  8. Vascular Anomalies Classification: Recommendations From the International Society for the Study of Vascular Anomalies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wassef, Michel; Blei, Francine; Adams, Denise; Alomari, Ahmad; Baselga, Eulalia; Berenstein, Alejandro; Burrows, Patricia; Frieden, Ilona J; Garzon, Maria C; Lopez-Gutierrez, Juan-Carlos; Lord, David J E; Mitchel, Sally; Powell, Julie; Prendiville, Julie; Vikkula, Miikka

    2015-07-01

    Vascular anomalies represent a spectrum of disorders from a simple "birthmark" to life- threatening entities. Incorrect nomenclature and misdiagnoses are commonly experienced by patients with these anomalies. Accurate diagnosis is crucial for appropriate evaluation and management, often requiring multidisciplinary specialists. Classification schemes provide a consistent terminology and serve as a guide for pathologists, clinicians, and researchers. One of the goals of the International Society for the Study of Vascular Anomalies (ISSVA) is to achieve a uniform classification. The last classification (1997) stratified vascular lesions into vascular malformations and proliferative vascular lesions (tumors). However, additional disease entities have since been identified that are complex and less easily classified by generic headings, such as capillary malformation, venous malformation, lymphatic malformation, etc. We hereby present the updated official ISSVA classification of vascular anomalies. The general biological scheme of the classification is retained. The section on tumors has been expanded and lists the main recognized vascular tumors, classified as benign, locally aggressive or borderline, and malignant. A list of well-defined diseases is included under each generic heading in the "Simple Vascular Malformations" section. A short definition is added for eponyms. Two new sections were created: one dealing with the malformations of individually named vessels (previously referred to as "truncular" malformations); the second groups lesions of uncertain or debated nature (tumor versus malformation). The known genetic defects underlying vascular anomalies are included in an appendix. This classification is meant to be a framework, acknowledging that it will require modification as new scientific information becomes available. Copyright © 2015 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  9. Perfusion and metabolism imaging studies in Parkinson's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borghammer, Per

    2012-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) are important tools in the evaluation of brain blood flow and glucose metabolism in Parkinson's disease (PD). However, conflicting results are reported in the literature depending on the type of imaging data...... analysis employed. The present review gives a comprehensive summary of the perfusion and metabolism literature in the field of PD research, including quantitative PET studies, normalized PET and SPECT studies, autoradiography studies in animal models of PD, and simulation studies of PD data....... It is concluded that PD most likely is characterized by widespread cortical hypometabolism, probably even at early disease stages. Widespread subcortical hypermetabolism is probably not a feature of PD, although certain small basal ganglia structures, such as the external pallidum, may display true...

  10. Acupuncture points for treating Parkinson's disease based on animal studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Sunoh; Seo, Byung-Kwan; Kim, Seungtae

    2016-10-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a well-known neurodegenerative disease caused by dopaminergic cell death in the nigrostriatal pathway. Recent studies have shown that acupuncture can be a potential therapy for the treatment of PD, but it is not clear which acupuncture points (acupoints) play major roles in reliving symptoms of PD. Yanglingquan (GB 34), Zusanli (ST 36), Fengfu (GV 16), Taichong (LR 3), Baihui (GV 20) and Dazhui (GV 14) acupoints have frequently been to investigate the effectiveness and action mechanism of acupuncture for treating PD, but it is not clear why they were selected. This review summarizes the current understanding of the acupoints for PD treatment based on Oriental medicine theories and on the accumulated findings from previous animal studies. The results of this study will be useful to development of a strategy for future research in this field.

  11. Clear Speech Variants: An Acoustic Study in Parkinson's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Jennifer; Tjaden, Kris

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The authors investigated how different variants of clear speech affect segmental and suprasegmental acoustic measures of speech in speakers with Parkinson's disease and a healthy control group. Method: A total of 14 participants with Parkinson's disease and 14 control participants served as speakers. Each speaker produced 18 different…

  12. Adapted Tango for Adults With Parkinson's Disease: A Qualitative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, Wendy M; Hackney, Madeleine E

    2017-07-01

    The purpose of this qualitative study was to explore the experiences of 16 individuals with Parkinson's disease (PD) partaking in an adapted tango class and the perceived impact on participation and quality of life (QOL). The Ecology of Human Performance and the International Classification of Function were the theoretical frameworks for the study. Data collection involved focus groups conducted during the intervention and at a follow-up six months later. Data analysis followed inductive thematic analysis techniques. The themes addressed living with PD, the class structure and experiences, the participants' expectations for the class, and the multiple effects experienced by participants at both time periods. The results suggest that adapted tango, when offered in a structured environment with skilled instruction, may improve skills for participation in daily activities and contribute to increased QOL for persons with PD.

  13. Clinical features of Parkinson disease when onset of diabetes came first: A case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cereda, E; Barichella, M; Cassani, E; Caccialanza, R; Pezzoli, G

    2012-05-08

    Recent literature suggests that diabetes is a risk factor for Parkinson disease (PD). We investigated the clinical features of patients with idiopathic PD (IPD) in whom the onset of diabetes came first. We designed a case-control study. From the cohort of all new patients with IPD free of vascular disease (n = 783) admitted and evaluated at our institute over a 3-year period (2007-2010), we included all the patients with a diagnosis of diabetes prior to PD onset (n = 89) and a control group (n = 89) matched (1:1) for gender, body mass index (± 1 kg/m(2)), and duration of PD (± 1 year). The Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) motor score was the primary endpoint. At study entry, patients with diabetes were similar to controls in terms of most demographic, lifestyle, and general medical features with exception of statins (18% vs 3.4%; p = 0.003). However, diabetes was associated with higher UPDRS motor (22.3 ± 9.0 vs 19.3 ± 7.9; p = 0.019) and activities of daily living (9.7 ± 5.1 vs 8.3 ± 4.3; p = 0.049) scores, more severe Hoehn & Yahr staging (p = 0.009), and higher treatment doses of levodopa (mg/day, 448 ± 265 vs 300 ± 213; p < 0.0001; mg/kg/day, 5.8 ± 4.0 vs 3.8 ± 2.9; p < 0.0001). Onset of diabetes before the onset of PD appears to be a risk factor for more severe PD symptoms. These findings support the hypothesis that diabetes has a role in the etiopathogenesis of PD. Neurologists should be aware of the potential impact of diabetes on overall PD management.

  14. Longitudinal Study of Gray Matter Changes in Parkinson Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, X; Liang, P; Li, Y; Shi, L; Wang, D; Li, K

    2015-12-01

    The pathology of Parkinson disease leads to morphological brain volume changes. So far, the progressive gray matter volume change across time specific to patients with Parkinson disease compared controls remains unclear. Our aim was to investigate the pattern of gray matter changes in patients with Parkinson disease and to explore the progressive gray matter volume change specific to patients with Parkinson disease with disease progression by using voxel-based morphometry analysis. Longitudinal cognitive assessment and structural MR imaging of 89 patients with Parkinson disease (62 men) and 55 healthy controls (33 men) were from the Parkinson's Progression Markers Initiative data base, including the initial baseline and 12-month follow-up data. Two-way analysis of covariance was performed with covariates of age, sex, years of education, imaging data from multiple centers, and total intracranial volume by using Diffeomorphic Anatomical Registration Through Exponentiated Lie Algebra tool from SPM8 software. Gray matter volume changes for patients with Parkinson disease were detected with decreased gray matter volume in the frontotemporoparietal areas and the bilateral caudate, with increased gray matter volume in the bilateral limbic/paralimbic areas, medial globus pallidus/putamen, and the right occipital cortex compared with healthy controls. Progressive gray matter volume decrease in the bilateral caudate was found for both patients with Parkinson disease and healthy controls, and this caudate volume was positively associated with cognitive ability for both groups. The progressive gray matter volume increase specific to the patients with Parkinson disease was identified close to the left ventral lateral nucleus of thalamus, and a positive relationship was found between the thalamic volume and the tremor scores in a subgroup with tremor-dominant patients with Parkinson disease. The observed progressive changes in gray matter volume in Parkinson disease may provide

  15. Secondary parkinsonism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkinsonism - secondary; Atypical Parkinson disease ... to be less responsive to medical therapy than Parkinson disease. ... Unlike Parkinson disease, some types of secondary parkinsonism may stabilize or even improve if the underlying cause is treated. ...

  16. Application study of medical robots in vascular intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Wang-sheng; Xu, Wu-yi; Zhang, Jing; Liu, Da; Wang, Da-min; Jia, Po; Li, Zhi-cao; Wang, Tian-miao; Zhang, Da-peng; Tian, Zeng-min; Zeng, Yanjun

    2011-09-01

    Based on the background of minimally invasive surgery and applications of medical robots, a vascular interventional robotic system has been developed that can be used in the field of vascular intervention. The robotic system comprises a propulsion system, an image navigation system and a virtual surgery training system. Integration of the three systems constitutes a vascular intervention prototype robotic system used to carry out in vitro vascular intervention and animal experiments. On a transparent glass vascular model, a catheter was shown to enter an arbitrary branch of the vascular model with catheter motion meeting the requirements of clinical vascular intervention surgery (VIS); i.e. error band of catheter motion experiments, 1.33-2.00 mm (4F-6F) diameter catheters were selectively inserted successfully into predefined targets in the animal, such as the renal, cardiovascular and cerebrovascular artery. Compared with conventional manual surgery, the time for robotic surgery is a little longer. There were no operative complications in the animal experiments. These simulation and animal study results demonstrate that this vascular interventional robotic system allows doctors to perform angiography remotely and prevents them from radiation exposure. The system may be the basis for further clinical applications of vascular intervention. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. Study on the correlation between YKL-40 and Parkinson's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin-xin YANG

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective To investigate the value of YKL-40 in diagnosing Parkinson's disease (PD.  Methods Blood samples of 63 PD patients and 60 healthy controls were collected in this study. YKL-40 levels were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA. Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS and Hoehn-Yahr (H-Y stage were used to assess the ability of daily life, motor funciton and disease severity of PD patients. Then the correlation between YKL-40 and motor symptoms of PD was analyzed by Spearman's rank correlation analysis. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC curve was used to investigate the sensitivity and specificity of YKL-40 in diagnosing PD.  Results The YKL-40 levels in PD patients were (3.72 ± 0.10 ng/ml, which was significantly higher than that in healthy controls [(2.92 ± 0.18 ng/ml; t = 4.141, P = 0.000]. Spearman analysis indicated that there was positive correlation between YKL-40 and UPDRS scores (rs = 0.872, P = 0.000, and between YKL-40 and H-Y stage (rs = 0.704, P = 0.000. ROC curve indicated that the sensitivity and specificity of YKL-40 in diagnosing PD was 95.26% and 73.34% , respectively.  Conclusions There was a correlation between YKL-40 and the severity of PD, so YKL-40 can be used as a biomarker in diagnosing PD. doi: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2014.12.014

  18. Impulse control disorders in advanced Parkinson's disease with dyskinesia: The ALTHEA study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biundo, Roberta; Weis, Luca; Abbruzzese, Giovanni; Calandra-Buonaura, Giovanna; Cortelli, Pietro; Jori, Maria Cristina; Lopiano, Leonardo; Marconi, Roberto; Matinella, Angela; Morgante, Francesca; Nicoletti, Alessandra; Tamburini, Tiziano; Tinazzi, Michele; Zappia, Mario; Vorovenci, Ruxandra Julia; Antonini, Angelo

    2017-11-01

    Impulse control disorders and dyskinesia are common and disabling complications of dopaminergic treatment in Parkinson's disease. They may coexist and are possibly related. The objectives of this study were to assess the frequency and severity of impulse control disorders in Parkinson's disease patients with dyskinesia. The ALTHEA study enrolled 251 Parkinson's disease patients with various degrees of dyskinesia severity from 11 movement disorders centers in Italy. Each patient underwent a comprehensive assessment including Unified Dyskinesia Rating Scale and the Questionnaire for Impulsive Compulsive Disorders in Parkinson Disease-Rating Scale. There was an overall 55% frequency of impulse control disorder and related behaviors (36% were clinically significant). The positive patients were younger at disease diagnosis and onset and had higher Unified Dyskinesia Rating Scale historical and total score (P = 0.001 and P = 0.02, respectively, vs negative). There was an increased frequency of clinically significant impulse control disorders in patients with severe dyskinesia (P = 0.013), a positive correlation between the questionnaire total score and dopamine agonist dose (P = 0.018), and a trend with levodopa dose. More than half of Parkinson's disease patients with dyskinesia have impulse control disorders and related behaviors, which are frequently clinically significant. Dopaminergic therapy total dose is associated with their severity. Clinicians should carefully assess patients with maladaptive behaviors and dyskinesia because they do not properly evaluate their motor and nonmotor status. © 2017 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society. © 2017 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.

  19. VASCULAR DEMENTIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Alekseyevna Cherdak

    2010-01-01

    vascular cognitive disorders and vascular dementia (VD. The heterogeneity of vascular cognitive disorders, concurrence of vascular and neurodegenerative diseases are discussed. Data from studies of specific therapy for VD are given.

  20. Family history of neurodegenerative and vascular diseases in ALS: a population-based study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huisman, M. H. B.; de Jong, S. W.; Verwijs, M. C.; Schelhaas, H. J.; van der Kooi, A. J.; de Visser, M.; Veldink, J. H.; van den Berg, L. H.

    2011-01-01

    To determine whether the frequency of Parkinson disease (PD), dementia, and vascular diseases in relatives of patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) differs from the frequency of those diseases in relatives of controls, providing further information about the association between these

  1. Subjective complaints precede Parkinson disease: The Rotterdam study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.M.L. de Lau (Lonneke); P.J. Koudstaal (Peter Jan); A. Hofman (Albert); M.M.B. Breteler (Monique)

    2006-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Neuronal degeneration and dopamine loss in the preclinical phase of Parkinson disease may produce subtle complaints before clinically recognizable symptoms emerge. Objective: To examine whether subjective complaints of stiffness, slowness, tremors, or postural imbalance in

  2. Vascular pattern in enchondroma and chondrosarcoma: clinical and immunohistologic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cintra, Francisco F; Etchebehere, Mauricio; Gonçalves, Jose C B; Cassone, Alejandro E; Amstalden, Eliane M I

    2014-09-01

    Although cartilaginous tumors have low microvascular density, vessels are important for the provision of nutrition so that the tumor can grow and generate metastasis. The aim of this study was to assess the value of the vascular pattern classification as a prognostic tool in chondrosarcomas (CSs) and its relation with vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression. This was a retrospective study of 21 enchondromas and 57 conventional CSs. Clinical data and outcome were retrieved from medical files. CSs histologic grades (on a scale of 1 to 3) were determined according to the World Health Organization classification. The vascular pattern (on a scale of A to C) was assessed through CD34, according to Kalinski. CD105 and VEGF were also evaluated. Poor outcome was significantly associated with vascular pattern groups B and C. Higher vascular pattern were 6.5 times more frequent in moderate-grade and high-grade CSs than in grade 1 CS. On multivariate analysis, a clear correlation was found between VEGF overexpression and B/C vascular patterns. Only 18 (benign and malignant) tumors stained for CD105. The results point to the use of the vascular pattern classification as a prognostic tool in CSs and to differentiate low-grade from moderate-grade/high-grade CSs. Vascular pattern might be also used to complement histologic grade, VEGF immunostaining, and microvascular density, for indicating a patient's prognosis. Low-grade CSs develop under low neoangiogenesis, which conforms to the slow growth rate of these tumors.

  3. A functional magnetic resonance imaging study of pathophysiological changes responsible for mirror movements in Parkinson's disease

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Poisson, Alice; Ballanger, Bénédicte; Metereau, Elise; Redouté, Jérome; Ibarolla, Danielle; Comte, Jean-Christophe; Bernard, Hélène Gervais; Vidailhet, Marie; Broussolle, Emmanuel; Thobois, Stéphane

    2013-01-01

    .... They can be observed in Parkinson's disease (PD) but their pathophysiology remains unclear. The present study aims at identifying their neural correlates in PD using functional magnetic resonance imaging...

  4. Subjective Experiences of Speech and Language Therapy in Patients with Parkinson's Disease: A Pilot Study

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Spurgeon, Laura; Clarke, Carl E; Sackley, Cath

    2015-01-01

    .... This was the aim of the present study. Methods. Semistructured interviews, using themes derived from the literature, were conducted with nine Parkinson's disease patients, all of whom had undergone speech-language therapy...

  5. Genetic association study of synphilin-1 in idiopathic Parkinson's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farrer Matthew J

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Post-mortem Lewy body and Lewy neuritic inclusions are a defining feature of Parkinson's disease (PD and dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB. With the discovery of missense and multiplication mutations in the alpha-synuclein gene (SNCA in familial parkinsonism, Lewy inclusions were found to stain intensely with antibodies raised against the protein. Yeast-two-hybrid studies identified synphilin-1 as an interacting partner of alpha-synuclein, and both proteins show co-immunolocalization in a subset of Lewy body inclusions. In the present study, we have investigated whether common variability in synphilin-1, including coding substitutions are genetically associated with disease pathogenesis. Methods We screened the synphilin-1 gene for 11 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in 300 affected subjects with idiopathic Parkinson's disease and 412 healthy controls. Six of these were rare variants including five previously identified amino acid substitutions that were chosen in a direct approach for association of rare disease causing mutations. An additional five highly heterozygous SNPs were chosen for an indirect association approach including haplotype analysis, based on the assumption that any disease causing mutations might be in linkage disequilibrium with the SNPs selected. We also genotyped a microsatellite marker (D5S2950 within intron 6 of the gene and five additional microsatellites clustered downstream of the 5p23.1-23.3 synphilin-1 locus. Genome-wide linkage analysis, in a number of independent studies, has previously highlighted suggestive linkage to PD in this region of chromosome 5. Results Screening of previously known amino acid substitutions in the synphilin-1 gene, identified the C1861>T (R621C substitution in four patients (chromosomes n = 600 and 10 control subjects (chromosomes n = 824, whereas the G2125>C (E706Q substitution was detected in one patient and four control subject, suggesting both these substitutions

  6. Pain processing in atypical Parkinsonisms and Parkinson disease: A comparative neurophysiological study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avenali, Micol; Tassorelli, Cristina; De Icco, Roberto; Perrotta, Armando; Serrao, Mariano; Fresia, Mauro; Pacchetti, Claudio; Sandrini, Giorgio

    2017-10-01

    Pain is a frequent non-motor feature in Parkinsonism but mechanistic data on the alteration of pain processing are insufficient to understand the possible causes and to define specifically-targeted treatments. we investigated spinal nociception through the neurophysiological measure of the threshold (TR) of nociceptive withdrawal reflex (NWR) and its temporal summation threshold (TST) comparatively in 12 Progressive Supranuclear Palsy (PSP) subjects, 11 Multiple System Atrophy (MSA) patients, 15 Parkinson's disease (PD) subjects and 24 healthy controls (HC). We also investigated the modulatory effect of L-Dopa in these three parkinsonian groups. We found a significant reduction in the TR of NWR and in the TST of NWR in PSP, MSA and PD patients compared with HC. L-Dopa induced an increase in the TR of NWR in the PSP group while TST of NWR increased in both PSP and PD. Our neurophysiological findings identify a facilitation of nociceptive processing in PSP that is broadly similar to that observed in MSA and PD. Specific peculiarities have emerged for PSP. Our data advance the knowledge of the neurophysiology of nociception in the advanced phases of parkinsonian syndromes and on the role of dopaminergic pathways in the control on pain processing. Copyright © 2017 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. A cross-study transcriptional analysis of Parkinson's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Greg T Sutherland

    Full Text Available The study of Parkinson's disease (PD, like other complex neurodegenerative disorders, is limited by access to brain tissue from patients with a confirmed diagnosis. Alternatively the study of peripheral tissues may offer some insight into the molecular basis of disease susceptibility and progression, but this approach still relies on brain tissue to benchmark relevant molecular changes against. Several studies have reported whole-genome expression profiling in post-mortem brain but reported concordance between these analyses is lacking. Here we apply a standardised pathway analysis to seven independent case-control studies, and demonstrate increased concordance between data sets. Moreover data convergence increased when the analysis was limited to the five substantia nigra (SN data sets; this highlighted the down regulation of dopamine receptor signaling and insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1 signaling pathways. We also show that case-control comparisons of affected post mortem brain tissue are more likely to reflect terminal cytoarchitectural differences rather than primary pathogenic mechanisms. The implementation of a correction factor for dopaminergic neuronal loss predictably resulted in the loss of significance of the dopamine signaling pathway while axon guidance pathways increased in significance. Interestingly the IGF1 signaling pathway was also over-represented when data from non-SN areas, unaffected or only terminally affected in PD, were considered. Our findings suggest that there is greater concordance in PD whole-genome expression profiling when standardised pathway membership rather than ranked gene list is used for comparison.

  8. A prospective study of freezing of gait with early Parkinson disease in Chinese patients

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Hongbo; Yin, Xifan; Ouyang, Zhiyuan; Chen, Jing; Zhou, Shenghua; Zhang, Changguo; Pan, Xin; Wang, Shiliang; Yang, Junxiang; Feng, Yaoyao; Yu, Ping; Zhang, Qiangchun

    2016-01-01

    Abstract This study investigated the risk factors for freezing of gait (FOG) in the early stage of Parkinson disease in China, using a sample of 248 patients who were followed for 3 years. Part III of the Unified Parkinson Disease Rating Scale and the modified Hoehn-Yahr grading scale were used to evaluate the severity of motor symptoms. Nonmotor symptoms were assessed using the Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale, Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAMD), and Non-Motor Symptoms Scale (NMSS). The en...

  9. Parkinson's disease prevalence in Fabry disease: A survey study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adina H. Wise

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Recent research has suggested a possible link between Parkinson's disease (PD and Fabry disease. To test this relationship, we administered a self-report and family history questionnaire to determine the prevalence of PD in Fabry disease patients and family members with likely pathogenic alpha-galactosidase A (GLA mutations. A total of 90 Fabry patients (77 from the online survey and 13 from the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai (ISMMS were included in the analysis. Two of the Fabry disease patients who completed the online survey were diagnosed with PD (2/90, 2.2%. Among probands older than 60, 8.3% (2/24 were diagnosed with PD. Using Kaplan Meier survival analysis, the age-specific risk of PD by age 70 was 11.1%. Family history was available on 72 Fabry families from the online study and 9 Fabry families from ISMMS. Among these 81 families, 6 (7.4% had one first degree relative who fit the criteria for a conservative diagnosis of PD. The results of this study suggest that there may be an increased risk of developing PD in individuals with GLA mutations, but these findings should be interpreted with caution given the limitations of the study design.

  10. A Polysomnographic Study of Parkinson's Disease Sleep Architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Jesus, Sol; Peng-Chen, Zhongxing; Okun, Michael S.; Alatriste-Booth, Vanessa

    2015-01-01

    Sleep disturbance is a common nonmotor phenomenon in Parkinson's disease (PD) affecting patient's quality of life. In this study, we examined the association between clinical characteristics with sleep disorders and sleep architecture patterns in a PD cohort. Patients underwent a standardized polysomnography study (PSG) in their “on medication” state. We observed that male gender and disease duration were independently associated with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Only lower levodopa equivalent dose (LED) was associated with periodic limb movement disorders (PLMD). REM sleep behavior disorder (RBD) was more common among older patients, with higher MDS-UPDRS III scores, and LED. None of the investigated variables were associated with the awakenings/arousals (A/A). Sleep efficiency was predicted by amantadine usage and age, while sleep stage 1 was predicted by dopamine agonists and Hoehn & Yahr severity. The use of MAO-B inhibitors and MDS-UPDRS part III were predictors of sleep stages 2 and 3. Age was the only predictor of REM sleep stage and gender for total sleep time. We conclude that sleep disorders and architecture are poorly predictable by clinical PD characteristics and other disease related factors must also be contributing to these sleep disturbances. PMID:26504612

  11. Central Pain Processing in Early-Stage Parkinson's Disease: A Laser Pain fMRI Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine Petschow

    Full Text Available Pain is a common non-motor symptom in Parkinson's disease. As dopaminergic dysfunction is suggested to affect intrinsic nociceptive processing, this study was designed to characterize laser-induced pain processing in early-stage Parkinson's disease patients in the dopaminergic OFF state, using a multimodal experimental approach at behavioral, autonomic, imaging levels.13 right-handed early-stage Parkinson's disease patients without cognitive or sensory impairment were investigated OFF medication, along with 13 age-matched healthy control subjects. Measurements included warmth perception thresholds, heat pain thresholds, and central pain processing with event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging (erfMRI during laser-induced pain stimulation at lower (E = 440 mJ and higher (E = 640 mJ target energies. Additionally, electrodermal activity was characterized during delivery of 60 randomized pain stimuli ranging from 440 mJ to 640 mJ, along with evaluation of subjective pain ratings on a visual analogue scale.No significant differences in warmth perception thresholds, heat pain thresholds, electrodermal activity and subjective pain ratings were found between Parkinson's disease patients and controls, and erfMRI revealed a generally comparable activation pattern induced by laser-pain stimuli in brain areas belonging to the central pain matrix. However, relatively reduced deactivation was found in Parkinson's disease patients in posterior regions of the default mode network, notably the precuneus and the posterior cingulate cortex.Our data during pain processing extend previous findings suggesting default mode network dysfunction in Parkinson's disease. On the other hand, they argue against a genuine pain-specific processing abnormality in early-stage Parkinson's disease. Future studies are now required using similar multimodal experimental designs to examine pain processing in more advanced stages of Parkinson's disease.

  12. Unraveling Parkinson's: Three Clues

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Unraveling Parkinson's: Three Clues Past Issues / Summer 2006 Table of ... or prevent disease progression. Studies have shown that Parkinson's patients have lost 60 to 80 percent of ...

  13. Excess burden of constipation in Parkinson's disease: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaye, Julie; Gage, Heather; Kimber, Alan; Storey, Lesley; Trend, Patrick

    2006-08-01

    An analysis was undertaken of clinic-based questionnaires that asked people with Parkinson's disease and a control group of older people without a known neurological condition about their experiences of constipation. People with Parkinson's disease report higher constipation on a validated objective measure, the Rome criterion (59% vs. 20.9%); a behavioral indicator, laxative-taking (38.4% vs. 14.2%); and subjective self-report of being always or often concerned by it (33.4% vs. 6.1%). Many people with Parkinson's disease experience constipation problems but they may not bring these to the attention of their healthcare providers. More research is required to understand the causes and management options. (c) 2006 Movement Disorder Society

  14. Preferences and concerns for care needs in advanced Parkinson's disease: a qualitative study of couples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habermann, Barbara; Shin, Ju Young

    2017-06-01

    To explore how couples with Parkinson's disease discuss their needs, concerns and preferences at the advanced stages of illness. The majority of care for people with Parkinson's disease is provided at home by family members. Parkinson's disease is characterised by a slow progressive decline with care needs often exceeding a decade. A descriptive qualitative study with 14 couples. Data were collected on two occasions over a one-month period using semi-structured interviews, with both individual and couple interviews. Data were analysed thematically by the research team. All participants discussed the strong desire to remain in their homes for as long as possible. For the people with Parkinson's disease, placement to long-term facilities was not an option to be considered. For spouses, there was an acknowledgement there may come a time when they could no longer continue to provide care. Concerns regarding falls, choking, voice production, financial strain and need for prognostic information from providers were influences on what they believed the future would hold and the decisions they would need to make. The need for improved communication between providers and Parkinson's disease couples is evident. Interventions to support the couple in their discussions and decision-making regarding remaining in the home or not, and options to support advanced care needs are required. Nurses can help support decision-making by providing tangible information regarding the advanced stages of Parkinson's disease including adequate prognostic information. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Joint Global War on Terror (GWOT) Vascular Injury Study 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-02-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-13-2-0014 TITLE: Joint Global War on Terror (GWOT) Vascular Injury Study 2 PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: MAJ Zachary...6. AUTHOR(S) Zachary M. Arthurs, MD, Chief of Vascular Surgery 5d. PROJECT NUMBER MAJ , US Armyzachary.m.arthurs.mil@mail.mil 5e. TASK NUMBER...stations and he is now at Fort Detrick in Combat Casualty Care. MAJ Zachary Arthurs was selected to be the incoming PI of this effort by Col Rasmussen

  16. Global, Yet Incomplete Overview of Cohort Studies in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinzel, Sebastian; Lerche, Stefanie; Maetzler, Walter; Berg, Daniela

    2017-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is characterized by heterogeneity and multifactorial longitudinal changes. To identify PD subtypes and factors influencing the disease course, multiple cohort studies have been designed globally. Knowledge about existing cohorts is pivotal to foster collaboration, which may help to advance the understanding of PD. To raise the awareness about PD cohorts and potential global collaboration opportunities. Observational cohort studies in clinical PD were identified by a European working group (JPND BioLoC-PD) and through literature search. Using a structured survey investigators of 44 cohorts provided basic information on cohorts and assessments performed. For the 44 cohorts (32% on early/de-novo PD), 14.666 participants (cohorts' median: 138; range: 23-3.090), a median 1.5-year follow-up interval (0.5-4 years) and a median (planned) observational period of 5 years (1-20 years) were indicated. All studies have assessed motor functions often using rating scales (UPDRS-III; 93% of studies) and less frequently quantitative gait/balance (25%) or fine motor assessments (27%). Cognitive (100%), neuropsychiatric (91%), daily living (78%), sleep (70%), sensory (63%), and gastrointestinal/autonomic (55%) assessments were common and often comparable. Neuroimaging data (82%) and biomaterial (69%) have been collected in many studies. Surprisingly, possible disease modifiers, such as sport/physical activity (11%), have rarely been assessed. Existing data of PD cohorts provide vast collaboration opportunities. We propose to establish a comprehensive, up-to-date, open-access internet platform with easy-to-use search tools of PD cohort descriptions and potentially available data. Bringing researchers together to enable collaborative joint, meta- and replication analyses is timely and necessary to advance PD research ultimately required for an understanding of PD that can be translated into more effective therapies.

  17. Parkinsong: a study of singing in patients with Parkinson's Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Robert Harris; Bauke M. de Jong

    2014-01-01

    Dysarthritic Parkinson speech is characterised by impairment of expressive linguistic prosody, even making it difficult to understand. While rigidity and bradykinesia can be held responsible for a general decline in speaking ability, the origin of prosodic impairment must be seen in the light of

  18. Electrochemical studies of ropinirole, an anti-Parkinson's disease drug

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. The oxidation behaviour of a potent anti-Parkinson's disease drug ropinirole hydrochloride was investigated over a wide pH range in aqueous solution at glassy carbon electrode using cyclic and square-wave voltammetry. The oxidation of drug is a pH dependent irreversible process and occurs in two steps.

  19. Perfusion and metabolism imaging studies in Parkinson's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borghammer, Per

    2012-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) are important tools in the evaluation of brain blood flow and glucose metabolism in Parkinson's disease (PD). However, conflicting results are reported in the literature depending on the type of imaging data...

  20. Electrochemical studies of ropinirole, an anti-Parkinson's disease drug

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The oxidation behaviour of a potent anti-Parkinson's disease drug ropinirole hydrochloride was investigated over a wide pH range in aqueous solution at glassy carbon electrode using cyclic and square-wave voltammetry. The oxidation of drug is a pH dependent irreversible process and occurs in two steps.

  1. Progression marker of Parkinson's disease: a 4-year multi-site imaging study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burciu, Roxana G; Ofori, Edward; Archer, Derek B; Wu, Samuel S; Pasternak, Ofer; McFarland, Nikolaus R; Okun, Michael S; Vaillancourt, David E

    2017-08-01

    Progression markers of Parkinson's disease are crucial for successful therapeutic development. Recently, a diffusion magnetic resonance imaging analysis technique using a bitensor model was introduced allowing the estimation of the fractional volume of free water within a voxel, which is expected to increase in neurodegenerative disorders such as Parkinson's disease. Prior work demonstrated that free water in the posterior substantia nigra was elevated in Parkinson's disease compared to controls across single- and multi-site cohorts, and increased over 1 year in Parkinson's disease but not in controls at a single site. Here, the goal was to validate free water in the posterior substantia nigra as a progression marker in Parkinson's disease, and describe the pattern of progression of free water in patients with a 4-year follow-up tested in a multicentre international longitudinal study of de novo Parkinson's disease (http://www.ppmi-info.org/). The analyses examined: (i) 1-year changes in free water in 103 de novo patients with Parkinson's disease and 49 controls; (ii) 2- and 4-year changes in free water in a subset of 46 patients with Parkinson's disease imaged at baseline, 12, 24, and 48 months; (iii) whether 1- and 2-year changes in free water predict 4-year changes in the Hoehn and Yahr scale; and (iv) the relationship between 4-year changes in free water and striatal binding ratio in a subgroup of Parkinson's disease who had undergone both diffusion and dopamine transporter imaging. Results demonstrated that: (i) free water level in the posterior substantia nigra increased over 1 year in de novo Parkinson's disease but not in controls; (ii) free water kept increasing over 4 years in Parkinson's disease; (iii) sex and baseline free water predicted 4-year changes in free water; (iv) free water increases over 1 and 2 years were related to worsening on the Hoehn and Yahr scale over 4 years; and (v) the 4-year increase in free water was associated with the 4-year

  2. Effect of vascular burden as measured by vascular indexes upon vascular dementia: a matched case-control study

    OpenAIRE

    Takahashi, Paul Y; Caldwell, Casey R; Targonski, Paul V

    2012-01-01

    Paul Y Takahashi, Casey R Caldwell, Paul V TargonskiPrimary Care Internal Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester MN, USABackground: Vascular dementia (VaD) is a challenging illness that affects the lives of older adults and caregivers. It is unclear how multiple vascular risk factor exposures (polyvascular disease) affect VaD.Purpose: To determine the relationship between multiple vascular risk exposures, as counted on an index in cases with VaD, compared with healthy age-/gender-matched controls.M...

  3. Depression in Parkinson's disease: A case-control study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Hsuan Wu

    Full Text Available To evaluate the association between Parkinson's disease (PD prognosis and the patient's onset of depression.A total of 353 patients with newly-diagnosed PD and a history of depression were enrolled. On the basis of the onset of depression before or after PD diagnosis, we divided participants into PD patients with pre- or post-diagnostic depression. Cox's regression analysis was used to detect risks between the onset of depression and outcomes (including death, accidental injury, dementia, and aspiration pneumonia. The association between the onset of depression and levodopa equivalent dosage (LED and cumulative equivalent dosage of antidepressants were assessed.PD patients with post-diagnostic depression were associated with significantly higher risks of dementia (adjusted HR = 2·01, p = 0·015, and were older (58·5 ± 17·7 vs. 53·7 ± 18·6, p = 0·020 at the time of PD diagnosis than PD patients with pre-diagnostic depression. The higher incident rate of accidental injury was also noted in PD patients with post-diagnostic depression (48·1 vs. 31·3/1000 person-years, HR = 1·60, p = 0·041, but no statistical significance was observed in the adjusted hazard ratio (HR (HR = 1·52, p = 0·069. Otherwise, mortality, motor condition and severity of depression revealed no significant difference between PD patients with pre-diagnostic and post-diagnostic depression.PD patients with post-diagnostic depression had higher incidence of dementia, implying different onset time of depression could be associated with different subtypes and spreading routes which should be examined in follow-up studies.

  4. Emotion processing in Parkinson's disease: an EEG spectral power study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuvaraj, R; Murugappan, M; Omar, Mohd Iqbal; Ibrahim, Norlinah Mohamed; Sundaraj, Kenneth; Mohamad, Khairiyah; Satiyan, M

    2014-07-01

    Although an emotional deficit is a common finding in Parkinson's disease (PD), its neurobiological mechanism on emotion recognition is still unknown. This study examined the emotion processing deficits in PD patients using electroencephalogram (EEG) signals in response to multimodal stimuli. EEG signals were investigated on both positive and negative emotions in 14 PD patients and 14 aged-matched normal controls (NCs). The relative power (i.e., ratio of EEG signal power in each frequency band compared to the total EEG power) was computed over three brain regions: the anterior (AF3, F7, F3, F4, F8 and AF4), central (FC5 and FC6) and posterior (T7, P7, O1, O2, P8 and T8) regions for theta (4-8 Hz), alpha (8-13 Hz), beta (13-30 Hz) and gamma (30-60 Hz) frequency sub-bands, respectively. Behaviorally, PD patients showed decreased performance in classifying emotional stimuli as measured by subjective ratings. EEG power at theta, alpha, beta, and gamma bands in all regions were significantly different between the NC and PD groups during both the emotional tasks, with p-values less than 0.05. Furthermore, an increase of relative spectral powers in the theta and gamma bands and a decrease of relative powers in the alpha and beta bands were observed for PD patients compared with NCs during emotional information processing. The results suggest the possibility of the existence of a distinctive neurobiological substrate of PD patients during emotional information processing. Also, these distributed spectral powers in different frequency bands might provide meaningful information about emotional processing in PD patients.

  5. Good-quality social care for people with Parkinson's disease: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tod, Angela Mary; Kennedy, Fiona; Stocks, Amanda-Jayne; McDonnell, Ann; Ramaswamy, Bhanu; Wood, Brendan; Whitfield, Malcolm

    2016-02-16

    The study examines the meaning of good-quality social care for people with Parkinson's disease and their carers. It identifies, from their perspective, the impact of good-quality social care on health and well-being. Qualitative case study methodology, interview and framework analysis techniques were used. community locations in the north and midlands of England. Data were collected from 43 participants including individual interviews with people with Parkinson's disease (n=4), formal and informal social care providers (n=13), 2 focus groups, 1 with people with Parkinson's disease and their carers (n=17), and 1 with professionals (n=8), plus a telephone interview with a former commissioner. Good-quality social care, delivered in a timely fashion, was reported to have a positive impact on health. Furthermore, there is an indication that good-quality social care can prevent untoward events, such as infections, symptom deterioration and deterioration in mental health. The concept of the 'Impact Gap' developed from the findings, illustrates how the costs of care may be reduced by delivering good-quality social care. Control, choice and maintaining independence emerged as indicators of good-quality social care, irrespective of clinical condition. Participants identified characteristics indicative of good-quality social care specific to Parkinson's disease, including understanding Parkinson's disease, appropriate administration of medication, timing of care and reassessment. 'Parkinson's aware' social care was seen to generate psychological, physical and social benefits that were inter-related. The findings indicate how maximising quality in social care delivery for people with Parkinson's disease can impact on health and well-being. Long-term or short-term benefits may result in prevented events and reductions in health and social care resource. Health professionals can be instrumental in early detection of and signposting to social care. Published by the BMJ Publishing

  6. The design and rationale of the Beijing Vascular Disease Patients Evaluation Study (BEST study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huan Liu

    2017-09-01

    Conclusions: 2858 subjects were enrolled into our present study at baseline, and this present study will provide important information on the metabolic related traditional and new risk factors, establish a new vascular disease early detection system and scoring systems based on comprehensive vascular disease risk factors and vascular function and structure evaluation indexes.

  7. Disclosure of research results in genetic studies of Parkinson's disease caused by LRRK2 mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pont-Sunyer, Claustre; Bressman, Susan; Raymond, Deborah; Glickman, Amanda; Tolosa, Eduardo; Saunders-Pullman, Rachel

    2015-06-01

    With the advent of large genetic studies examining both symptomatic and asymptomatic individuals, whether and how to disclose genetic research results have become pressing questions. The need is particularly acute in the case of LRRK2 research: Movement centers worldwide are recruiting cohorts of individuals with Parkinson's disease (PD) and their family members, including asymptomatic carriers. Clinical features and treatment are complex and evolving, and disclosure policies vary at different sites and have been modified during the course of some studies. We present the major ethical principles of autonomy, beneficence, nonmaleficence, and honesty that should guide disclosure policies in studies of families with LRRK2 mutations. We make recommendations regarding genetic counseling, policies of either active or passive disclosure, responsibilities of funders to budget for genetic counseling, clinical genetic testing where locally required for disclosure, and aspects of study design to avoid mandatory disclosure whenever feasible. © 2015 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society. © 2015 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.

  8. Genetic impact on cognition and brain function in newly diagnosed Parkinson's disease: ICICLE-PD study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nombela, Cristina; Rowe, James B; Winder-Rhodes, Sophie E; Hampshire, Adam; Owen, Adrian M; Breen, David P; Duncan, Gordon W; Khoo, Tien K; Yarnall, Alison J; Firbank, Michael J; Chinnery, Patrick F; Robbins, Trevor W; O'Brien, John T; Brooks, David J; Burn, David J; Barker, Roger A

    2014-10-01

    Parkinson's disease is associated with multiple cognitive impairments and increased risk of dementia, but the extent of these deficits varies widely among patients. The ICICLE-PD study was established to define the characteristics and prevalence of cognitive change soon after diagnosis, in a representative cohort of patients, using a multimodal approach. Specifically, we tested the 'Dual Syndrome' hypothesis for cognitive impairment in Parkinson's disease, which distinguishes an executive syndrome (affecting the frontostriatal regions due to dopaminergic deficits) from a posterior cortical syndrome (affecting visuospatial, mnemonic and semantic functions related to Lewy body pathology and secondary cholinergic loss). An incident Parkinson's disease cohort (n = 168, median 8 months from diagnosis to participation) and matched control group (n = 85) were recruited to a neuroimaging study at two sites in the UK. All participants underwent clinical, neuropsychological and functional magnetic resonance imaging assessments. The three neuroimaging tasks (Tower of London, Spatial Rotations and Memory Encoding Tasks) were designed to probe executive, visuospatial and memory encoding domains, respectively. Patients were also genotyped for three polymorphisms associated with cognitive change in Parkinson's disease and related disorders: (i) rs4680 for COMT Val158Met polymorphism; (ii) rs9468 for MAPT H1 versus H2 haplotype; and (iii) rs429358 for APOE-ε2, 3, 4. We identified performance deficits in all three cognitive domains, which were associated with regionally specific changes in cortical activation. Task-specific regional activations in Parkinson's disease were linked with genetic variation: the rs4680 polymorphism modulated the effect of levodopa therapy on planning-related activations in the frontoparietal network; the MAPT haplotype modulated parietal activations associated with spatial rotations; and APOE allelic variation influenced the magnitude of activation

  9. A Multicenter Comparative Study of Impulse Control Disorder in Latin American Patients With Parkinson Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez Gómez, Carolina Candelaria; Serrano Dueñas, Marcos; Bernal, Oscar; Araoz, Natalia; Sáenz Farret, Michel; Aldinio, Victoria; Montilla, Verónica; Micheli, Federico

    Impulse control disorder (ICD) is a common adverse effect in patients with Parkinson disease who receive dopamine agonists; however, other factors are involved in its manifestations. To study the frequency and factors involved in the development of this adverse effect in a Latin American population, we conducted a cross-sectional multicenter study. Two hundred fifty-five patients in 3 Latin American centers were evaluated by examination and application of scales (Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale, Questionnaire for Impulsive-Compulsive Disorders in Parkinson's Disease-Rating Scale, Hoehn and Yahr, Clinical Impression of Severity Index for Parkinson's Disease). Of the patients, 27.4% had ICD, most of whom were on dopamine agonists. Other associated risk factors included a younger age at onset of Parkinson disease, moderate symptoms, a shorter evolution of the clinical manifestations, rapid eye movement (REM) sleep disorder behavior, and the consumption of tea, mate, and alcohol. The frequency of ICD is higher in Latin America than in Anglo-Saxon populations. Consuming tea and mate, in addition to the use of dopamine agonists, is a factor that may demonstrate a genetic link that predisposes patients to the establishment of an ICD.

  10. Short duration, intensive tango dancing for Parkinson disease: an uncontrolled pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hackney, Madeleine E; Earhart, Gammon M

    2009-08-01

    The goal of this pilot study was to determine the effects of short duration, intensive tango lessons on functional mobility in people with Parkinson disease. This study employed a within-subject, prospective, repeated measures design. Fourteen people with idiopathic Parkinson disease participated. All balance and gait assessments were performed in a laboratory, but dance classes took place in a large, open classroom. Participants completed ten 1.5-h long Argentine tango dance lessons within 2 weeks. Their balance, gait and mobility were assessed before and after the training sessions. Measures included the Berg Balance Scale, the Unified Parkinson Disease Rating Scale, gait velocity, functional ambulation profile, step length, stance and single support percent of gait, Timed Up and Go, and the 6 min walk. Participants significantly improved on the Berg Balance Scale (effect size (ES)=0.83, p=0.021), Unified Parkinson Disease Rating Scale Motor Subscale III (ES=-0.64, p=0.029), and percent of time spent in stance during forward walking (ES=0.97, p=0.015). Non-significant improvements were noted on the Timed Up and Go (ES=-0.38, p=0.220) and 6 min walk (ES=0.35, p=0.170). Frequent social dance lessons completed within a short time period appear to be appropriate and effective for these individuals with mild-moderately severe Parkinson disease.

  11. Short Duration, Intensive Tango Dancing for Parkinson Disease: An Uncontrolled Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hackney, Madeleine E.; Earhart, Gammon M.

    2009-01-01

    Objective The goal of this pilot study was to determine the effects of short duration, intensive tango lessons on functional mobility in people with Parkinson disease. Design This study employed a within-subject, prospective, repeated measures design. Subjects/Patients Fourteen people with idiopathic Parkinson disease participated. Setting All balance and gait assessments were performed in a laboratory, but dance classes took place in a large, open classroom. Interventions Participants completed ten 1.5 hour long Argentine tango dance lessons within two weeks. Their balance, gait and mobility were assessed before and after the training sessions. Main Outcome Measures Measures included the Berg Balance Scale, the Unified Parkinson Disease Rating Scale, gait velocity, functional ambulation profile, step length, stance and single support percent of gait, Timed Up and Go, and the six minute walk. Results Participants significantly improved on the Berg Balance Scale (effect size (ES) = 0.83, p = 0.021), Unified Parkinson Disease Rating Scale Motor Subscale III (ES = −0.64, p = 0.029), and percent of time spent in stance during forward walking (ES = 0.97, p = 0.015). Non-significant improvements were noted on the Timed Up and Go (ES = −0.38, p = 0.220) and 6-minute walk (ES = 0.35, p = 0.170). Conclusions Frequent social dance lessons completed within a short time period appear to be appropriate and effective for these individuals with mild-moderately severe Parkinson disease. PMID:19632547

  12. APOE alleles in Parkinson disease and their relationship to cognitive decline: a population-based, longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurz, Martin Wilhelm; Dekomien, Gabriele; Nilsen, Odd Bjarte; Larsen, Jan Petter; Aarsland, Dag; Alves, Guido

    2009-09-01

    Apolipoprotein E gene alleles have been linked to various cardiovascular and neurodegenerative disorders. There have been conflicting reports of associations between Apolipoprotein E alleles and Parkinson disease and Parkinson disease dementia. To investigate the role of Apolipoprotein E alleles in Parkinson disease and Parkinson disease dementia, we have determined Apolipoprotein E genotypes in a group of patients with Parkinson disease (n = 95) and compared them with those of healthy control participants (n = 73). Additionally, in 64 longitudinally followed patients with Parkinson disease, the allele types were correlated to development and progression of dementia and to time from onset of Parkinson disease to dementia using multivariate and survival analyses. The Apolipoprotein E e4e4 genotype was more common in patients with Parkinson disease (7.4%) than in healthy controls (1.4%; P = .03). No significant associations between the Apolipoprotein E genotype and development and progression of dementia or time to dementia were found. More studies with larger Parkinson disease samples are warranted.

  13. Seasonal temperature is associated with Parkinson's disease prescriptions: an ecological study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowell, David; Nghiem, Son; Ramagopalan, Sreeram; Meier, Ute-Christiane

    2017-12-01

    The aim of this study is to test what effect the weather may have on medications prescribed to treat Parkinson's disease. Twenty-three years of monthly time, series data was sourced from the Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme (PBS) and the Bureau of Meteorology (BOM). Data were available for eight states and territories and their corresponding capital cities. The dependent variable was the aggregate levodopa equivalent dose (LED) for 51 Parkinson's medications identified on the PBS. Two explanatory variables of interest, temperature and solar exposure, were identified in the BOM data set. Linear and cosinor models were estimated with fixed and random effects, respectively. The prescribed LED was 4.2% greater in January and 4.5% lower in July. Statistical analysis showed that temperature was associated with the prescription of Parkinson medications. Our results suggest seasonality exists in Parkinson's disease symptoms and this may be related to temperature. Further work is needed to confirm these findings and understand the underlying mechanisms as a better understanding of the causes of any seasonal variation in Parkinson's disease may help clinicians and patients manage the disease more effectively.

  14. Seasonal temperature is associated with Parkinson's disease prescriptions: an ecological study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowell, David; Nghiem, Son; Ramagopalan, Sreeram; Meier, Ute-Christiane

    2017-08-01

    The aim of this study is to test what effect the weather may have on medications prescribed to treat Parkinson's disease. Twenty-three years of monthly time, series data was sourced from the Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme (PBS) and the Bureau of Meteorology (BOM). Data were available for eight states and territories and their corresponding capital cities. The dependent variable was the aggregate levodopa equivalent dose (LED) for 51 Parkinson's medications identified on the PBS. Two explanatory variables of interest, temperature and solar exposure, were identified in the BOM data set. Linear and cosinor models were estimated with fixed and random effects, respectively. The prescribed LED was 4.2% greater in January and 4.5% lower in July. Statistical analysis showed that temperature was associated with the prescription of Parkinson medications. Our results suggest seasonality exists in Parkinson's disease symptoms and this may be related to temperature. Further work is needed to confirm these findings and understand the underlying mechanisms as a better understanding of the causes of any seasonal variation in Parkinson's disease may help clinicians and patients manage the disease more effectively.

  15. Heritability of retinal vascular fractals: a twin study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vergmann, Anna Stage; Broe, Rebecca; Kessel, Line

    Purpose: To determine the genetic contribution to the pattern of retinal vascular branching expressed by its fractal dimension. Methods: This was a cross-sectional study of 50-degree, disc-centred fundus photographs from 59 monozygotic and 55 dizygotic, same-sex twin pairs aged 20-46 years....... The retinal vascular fractal dimension was measured using the box-counting method and compared within monozygotic and dizygotic twin pairs using Pearson correlation coefficents. Falconer´s formula and quantitative genetic models were used to determine the genetic component of variation. Results: The retinal...... vascular fractal dimensions were measurable for both twins in 50 monozygotic and 49 dizygotic twin pairs. The mean fractal dimension did not differ statistically significantly between monozygotic and dizygotic twin pairs (1.505 vs. 1.495, p=0.06), supporting that the study population was suitable...

  16. Back to the basics: regular exercise matters in parkinson's disease: results from the National Parkinson Foundation QII registry study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oguh, O; Eisenstein, A; Kwasny, M; Simuni, T

    2014-11-01

    There is a substantial interest in the impact of exercise on reduction of disability and rate of progression of Parkinson's disease (PD). The primary aim was to describe exercise habits of PD patients and factors associated with greater levels of exercise. The secondary aim was to explore whether regular exercise is associated with a slower decline of function, disease-related quality of life, and caregiver burden. The National Parkinson's Foundation (NPF) QII Registry data was used to analyze variables that correlate with levels of exercise in PD patients across disease severity. Subjects were categorized into three groups: non-exercisers (0 min/week), low exercisers (1-150 min/week), and regular exercisers (>150 min/week). Health related outcomes, disease metrics, and demographic factors associated with exercise were examined using bivariate analyses. Multiple regression models controlled for disease duration, severity, and cognitive function. An exploratory analysis was completed on the association of baseline level of exercise with health outcomes at one year follow up. 4866 subjects were included in the baseline analysis and 2252 subjects who had second visits were included in the longitudinal data. Regular exercisers at baseline were associated with better QOL, mobility, and physical function, less progression of disease, less caregiver burden and less cognitive decline one year later, after controlling for demographic and disease severity variables. This study provides important preliminary evidence of the beneficial effects of regular exercise in a large PD cohort. Longitudinal studies will be essential to confirm findings. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. The neurobiology of glucocerebrosidase-associated parkinsonism: a positron emission tomography study of dopamine synthesis and regional cerebral blood flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goker-Alpan, Ozlem; Masdeu, Joseph C.; Kohn, Philip D.; Ianni, Angela; Lopez, Grisel; Groden, Catherine; Chapman, Molly C.; Cropp, Brett; Eisenberg, Daniel P.; Maniwang, Emerson D.; Davis, Joie; Wiggs, Edythe; Berman, Karen F.

    2012-01-01

    Mutations in GBA, the gene encoding glucocerebrosidase, the enzyme deficient in Gaucher disease, are common risk factors for Parkinson disease, as patients with Parkinson disease are over five times more likely to carry GBA mutations than healthy controls. Patients with GBA mutations generally have an earlier onset of Parkinson disease and more cognitive impairment than those without GBA mutations. We investigated whether GBA mutations alter the neurobiology of Parkinson disease, studying brain dopamine synthesis and resting regional cerebral blood flow in 107 subjects (38 women, 69 men). We measured dopamine synthesis with 18F-fluorodopa positron emission tomography, and resting regional cerebral blood flow with H215O positron emission tomography in the wakeful, resting state in four study groups: (i) patients with Parkinson disease and Gaucher disease (n = 7, average age = 56.6 ± 9.2 years); (ii) patients with Parkinson disease without GBA mutations (n = 11, 62.1 ± 7.1 years); (iii) patients with Gaucher disease without parkinsonism, but with a family history of Parkinson disease (n = 14, 52.6 ± 12.4 years); and (iv) healthy GBA-mutation carriers with a family history of Parkinson disease (n = 7, 50.1 ± 18 years). We compared each study group with a matched control group. Data were analysed with region of interest and voxel-based methods. Disease duration and Parkinson disease functional and staging scores were similar in the two groups with parkinsonism, as was striatal dopamine synthesis: both had greatest loss in the caudal striatum (putamen Ki loss: 44 and 42%, respectively), with less reduction in the caudate (20 and 18% loss). However, the group with both Parkinson and Gaucher diseases showed decreased resting regional cerebral blood flow in the lateral parieto-occipital association cortex and precuneus bilaterally. Furthermore, two subjects with Gaucher disease without parkinsonian manifestations showed diminished striatal dopamine. In conclusion, the

  18. Robot-assisted arm training in patients with Parkinson's disease: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picelli, Alessandro; Tamburin, Stefano; Passuello, Michele; Waldner, Andreas; Smania, Nicola

    2014-03-05

    Despite the growing diffusion of robotic devices in neurorehabilitation, no previous study investigated the effects of robotic training on arm impairment due to Parkinson's disease. The aim of this pilot study was to evaluate whether robot-assisted arm training might improve upper limb function in patients with Parkinson's disease. Ten patients with Parkinson's disease (Hoehn and Yahr stage 2.5-3) received ten, 45-minute, treatment sessions, five days a week, for two consecutive weeks. Robot-assisted arm training was performed with the Bi-Manu-Track (Reha-Stim, Berlin, Germany) that provides a computer-controlled, repetitive, bilateral, mirror-like practice of forearm pronation/supination and wrist extension/flexion. Patients were trained according to the following modalities: passive-passive (both arms moved by the machine) and active-active (both arms actively moving against resistance). The dominant upper limb was evaluated before and immediately after treatment as well as at two weeks of follow-up. Outcomes were the nine-hole peg test, the Fugl-Meyer assessment (upper limb section) and the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale. After treatment, a significant improvement was found in the nine-hole peg test (P = 0.007) as well as in the upper limb section of the Fugl-Meyer assessment (P = 0.012). Findings were confirmed at the 2-week follow-up evaluation only for the nine-hole peg test (P = 0.007). No significant improvement was found in the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale at both post-treatment and follow-up evaluations. Our findings support the hypothesis that robot-assisted arm training might be a promising tool in order to improve upper limb function in patients with Parkinson's disease.

  19. Treatment of Depression and Anxiety in Parkinson's Disease: A Pilot Study Using Group Cognitive Behavioural Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feeney, Farah; Egan, Sarah; Gasson, Natalie

    2005-01-01

    Depression and anxiety affect up to 50% of people with Parkinson's Disease (PD) (Marsh, 2000; Murray, 1996), however, few studies have examined the effectiveness of psychological treatment. This study examined the effectiveness of group cognitive behaviour therapy (CBT) in treating depression and anxiety in PD. Four participants, aged between 56…

  20. Hyposmia and Executive Dysfunction as Predictors of Future Parkinson's Disease: A Prospective Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ponsen, M.M.; Stoffers, D.; Twisk, J.W.R.; Wolters, E.C.M.J.; Berendse, H.W.

    2009-01-01

    Olfactory deficits and executive dysfunction are early and common symptoms in Parkinson's disease (PD). Previous studies have shown that hyposmia can be a first sign of PD. The aim of the present study was to determine which of three olfactory tests and two selected tests of executive function would

  1. Nigrosome-1 on Susceptibility Weighted Imaging to Differentiate Parkinson's Disease From Atypical Parkinsonism: An In Vivo and Ex Vivo Pilot Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, F.J.A.; Steens, S.C.A.; Rumund, A. van; Cappellen van Walsum, A.M. van; Kusters, B.; Esselink, R.A.J.; Verbeek, M.M.; Bloem, B.R.; Góraj, B.M.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Previous case-control studies have suggested that the absence of a swallow-tail appearance in the substantia nigra on high-resolution SWI, representing nigrosome-1, has high accuracy to identify Parkinson's disease (PD). The first goal of our study was to evaluate nigrosome-1 ex vivo

  2. VEGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor II (VRI) induced vascular insufficiency in zebrafish as a model for studying vascular toxicity and vascular preservation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Shang; Dang, Yuan Ye; Oi Lam Che, Ginny [State Key Laboratory of Quality Research in Chinese Medicine and Institute of Chinese Medical Sciences, University of Macau, Avenida da Universidade, Taipa, Macao (China); Kwan, Yiu Wa [School of Biomedical Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin, N.T., Hong Kong (China); Chan, Shun Wan [State Key Laboratory of Chinese Medicine and Molecular Pharmacology, Department of Applied Biology and Chemical Technology, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hong Kong (China); Leung, George Pak Heng [Pharmacology and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong (China); Lee, Simon Ming Yuen, E-mail: simonlee@umac.mo [State Key Laboratory of Quality Research in Chinese Medicine and Institute of Chinese Medical Sciences, University of Macau, Avenida da Universidade, Taipa, Macao (China); Hoi, Maggie Pui Man, E-mail: maghoi@umac.mo [State Key Laboratory of Quality Research in Chinese Medicine and Institute of Chinese Medical Sciences, University of Macau, Avenida da Universidade, Taipa, Macao (China)

    2014-11-01

    In ischemic disorders such as chronic wounds and myocardial ischemia, there is inadequate tissue perfusion due to vascular insufficiency. Besides, it has been observed that prolonged use of anti-angiogenic agents in cancer therapy produces cardiovascular toxicity caused by impaired vessel integrity and regeneration. In the present study, we used VEGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor II (VRI) to chemically induce vascular insufficiency in zebrafish in vivo and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) in vitro to further study the mechanisms of vascular morphogenesis in these pathological conditions. We also explored the possibility of treating vascular insufficiency by enhancing vascular regeneration and repair with pharmacological intervention. We observed that pretreatment of VRI induced blood vessel loss in developing zebrafish by inhibiting angiogenesis and increasing endothelial cell apoptosis, accompanied by down-regulation of kdr, kdrl and flt-1 genes expression. The VRI-induced blood vessel loss in zebrafish could be restored by post-treatment of calycosin, a cardiovascular protective isoflavone. Similarly, VRI induced cytotoxicity and apoptosis in HUVEC which could be rescued by calycosin post-treatment. Further investigation of the underlying mechanisms showed that the PI3K/AKT/Bad cell survival pathway was a main contributor of the vascular regenerative effect of calycosin. These findings indicated that the cardiovascular toxicity in anti-angiogenic therapy was mainly caused by insufficient endothelial cell survival, suggesting its essential role in vascular integrity, repair and regeneration. In addition, we showed that VRI-induced blood vessel loss in zebrafish represented a simple and effective in vivo model for studying vascular insufficiency and evaluating cancer drug vascular toxicities. - Highlights: • In vivo VRI model • Rescue effects of calycosin • Calycosin EC survival pathways.

  3. International study on the psychometric attributes of the non-motor symptoms scale in Parkinson disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Martin, P; Rodriguez-Blazquez, C; Abe, K; Bhattacharyya, K B; Bloem, B R; Carod-Artal, F J; Prakash, R; Esselink, R A J; Falup-Pecurariu, C; Gallardo, M; Mir, P; Naidu, Y; Nicoletti, A; Sethi, K; Tsuboi, Y; van Hilten, J J; Visser, M; Zappia, M; Chaudhuri, K R

    2009-11-10

    Nonmotor symptoms (NMS) have a great impact on patients with Parkinson disease (PD). The Non-Motor Symptoms Scale (NMSS) is an instrument specifically designed for the comprehensive assessment of NMS in patients with PD. NMSS psychometric properties have been tested in this study. Data were collected in 12 centers across 10 countries in America, Asia, and Europe. In addition to the NMSS, the following measures were applied: Scales for Outcomes in Parkinson's Disease (SCOPA)-Motor, SCOPA-Psychiatric Complications (SCOPA-PC), SCOPA-Cognition, Hoehn and Yahr Staging (HY), Clinical Impression of Severity Index for Parkinson's Disease (CISI-PD), SCOPA-Autonomic, Parkinson's Disease Sleep Scale (PDSS), Parkinson's Disease Questionnaire-39 items (PDQ-39), and EuroQol-5 dimensions (EQ-5D). NMSS acceptability, reliability, validity, and precision were analyzed. Four hundred eleven patients with PD, 61.3% men, were recruited. The mean age was 64.5 +/- 9.9 years, and mean disease duration was 8.1 +/- 5.7 years. The NMSS score was 57.1 +/- 44.0 points. The scale was free of floor or ceiling effects. For domains, the Cronbach alpha coefficient ranged from 0.44 to 0.85. The intraclass correlation coefficient (0.90 for the total score, 0.67-0.91 for domains) and Lin concordance coefficient (0.88) suggested satisfactory reproducibility. The NMSS total score correlated significantly with SCOPA-Autonomic, PDQ-39, and EQ-5D (r(S) = 0.57-0.70). Association was close between NMSS domains and the corresponding SCOPA-Autonomic domains (r(S) = 0.51-0.65) and also with scales measuring related constructs (PDSS, SCOPA-PC) (all p Scale is an acceptable, reproducible, valid, and precise assessment instrument for nonmotor symptoms in Parkinson disease.

  4. Parkinson's Foundation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and passion of our global Parkinson's community. About Parkinson's Parkinson’s disease is a neurodegenerative brain disorder. There ... treatment options to manage symptoms. Learn More About Parkinson's Parkinson’s disease is a neurodegenerative brain disorder. There ...

  5. Toxoplasma gondii exposure and Parkinson's disease: a case–control study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarado-Esquivel, Cosme; Méndez-Hernández, Edna Madai; Salas-Pacheco, José Manuel; Ruano-Calderón, Luis Ángel; Hernández-Tinoco, Jesús; Arias-Carrión, Oscar; Sánchez-Anguiano, Luis Francisco; Castellanos-Juárez, Francisco Xavier; Sandoval-Carrillo, Ada Agustina; Liesenfeld, Oliver; Ramos-Nevárez, Agar

    2017-01-01

    Objectives To determine the association between Toxoplasma gondii infection and Parkinson's disease and to investigate whether T. gondii seropositivity is associated with the general characteristics of patients with Parkinson's disease. Design Case–control study. Setting Cases and controls were enrolled in Durango City, Mexico. Participants 65 patients with Parkinson's disease and 195 age- and gender-matched control subjects without Parkinson's disease. Primary and secondary outcome measures Serum samples of participants were analysed for anti-T. gondii IgG and IgM antibodies by commercially available enzyme-linked immunoassays. Prevalence of T. gondii DNA was determined in seropositive subjects using PCR. The association between clinical data and infection was examined by bivariate analysis. Results Anti-T. gondii IgG antibodies were found in 6/65 cases (9.2%) and in 21/195 controls (10.8%) (OR 0.84; 95% CI 0.32 to 2.18; p=0.81). The frequency of high (>150 IU/mL) antibody levels was similar among cases and controls (p=0.34). None of the anti-T. gondii IgG positive cases and four of the anti-T. gondii IgG positive controls had anti-T. gondii IgM antibodies (p=0.54). The prevalence of T. gondii DNA was comparable in seropositive cases and controls (16.7% and 25%, respectively; p=1.0). Seroprevalence of T. gondii infection was associated with a young age onset of disease (p=0.03), high Unified Parkinson Disease Rating Scale scores (p=0.04) and depression (p=0.02). Seropositivity to T. gondii infection was lower in patients treated with pramipexole than in patients without this treatment (p=0.01). However, none of the associations remained significant after Bonferroni correction. Conclusions The results do not support an association between T. gondii infection and Parkinson's disease. However, T. gondii infection might have an influence on certain symptoms of Parkinson's disease. Further research to elucidate the role of T. gondii exposure on Parkinson's disease

  6. Toxoplasma gondii exposure and Parkinson's disease: a case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarado-Esquivel, Cosme; Méndez-Hernández, Edna Madai; Salas-Pacheco, José Manuel; Ruano-Calderón, Luis Ángel; Hernández-Tinoco, Jesús; Arias-Carrión, Oscar; Sánchez-Anguiano, Luis Francisco; Castellanos-Juárez, Francisco Xavier; Sandoval-Carrillo, Ada Agustina; Liesenfeld, Oliver; Ramos-Nevárez, Agar

    2017-02-13

    To determine the association between Toxoplasma gondii infection and Parkinson's disease and to investigate whether T. gondii seropositivity is associated with the general characteristics of patients with Parkinson's disease. Case-control study. Cases and controls were enrolled in Durango City, Mexico. 65 patients with Parkinson's disease and 195 age- and gender-matched control subjects without Parkinson's disease. Serum samples of participants were analysed for anti-T. gondii IgG and IgM antibodies by commercially available enzyme-linked immunoassays. Prevalence of T. gondii DNA was determined in seropositive subjects using PCR. The association between clinical data and infection was examined by bivariate analysis. Anti-T. gondii IgG antibodies were found in 6/65 cases (9.2%) and in 21/195 controls (10.8%) (OR 0.84; 95% CI 0.32 to 2.18; p=0.81). The frequency of high (>150 IU/mL) antibody levels was similar among cases and controls (p=0.34). None of the anti-T. gondii IgG positive cases and four of the anti-T. gondii IgG positive controls had anti-T. gondii IgM antibodies (p=0.54). The prevalence of T. gondii DNA was comparable in seropositive cases and controls (16.7% and 25%, respectively; p=1.0). Seroprevalence of T. gondii infection was associated with a young age onset of disease (p=0.03), high Unified Parkinson Disease Rating Scale scores (p=0.04) and depression (p=0.02). Seropositivity to T. gondii infection was lower in patients treated with pramipexole than in patients without this treatment (p=0.01). However, none of the associations remained significant after Bonferroni correction. The results do not support an association between T. gondii infection and Parkinson's disease. However, T. gondii infection might have an influence on certain symptoms of Parkinson's disease. Further research to elucidate the role of T. gondii exposure on Parkinson's disease is warranted. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not

  7. Risk variants of the α-synuclein locus and REM sleep behavior disorder in Parkinson's disease: a genetic association study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjørnarå, Kari Anne; Pihlstrøm, Lasse; Dietrichs, Espen; Toft, Mathias

    2018-02-21

    Parkinson's disease is a heterogeneous disorder where genetic factors may underlie clinical variability. Rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder (RBD) is a parasomnia strongly linked to synucleinopathies, including Parkinson's disease. We hypothesized that SNCA variants conferring risk of Parkinson's disease would also predispose to an RBD phenotype. We assessed possible RBD (pRBD) status using the RBD screening questionnaire and investigated known susceptibility variants for Parkinson's disease located in the α-synuclein (SNCA) and tau (MAPT) gene loci in 325 Parkinson's disease patients. Associations between genetic risk variants and RBD were investigated by logistic regression, and an independent dataset of 382 patients from the Parkinson's Progression Marker Initiative (PPMI) study was used for replication. pRBD was associated with rs3756063 located in the 5' region of SNCA (two-sided p = 0.018, odds ratio 1.44). We replicated this finding in the PPMI dataset (one-sided p = 0.036, odds ratio 1.35) and meta-analyzed the results (two-sided p = 0.0032, odds ratio 1.40). The Parkinson's disease risk variant in the 3' region of SNCA and the MAPT variant showed no association with pRBD. Our findings provide proof of principle that a largely stable, dichotomous clinical feature of Parkinson's disease can be linked to a specific genetic susceptibility profile. Indirectly, it also supports the hypothesis of RBD as relevant marker for a distinct subtype of the disorder.

  8. A 5-Year Follow-up Study on the Relationship between Obstructive Sleep Apnea and Parkinson Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheu, Jau-Jiuan; Lee, Hsin-Chien; Lin, Herng-Ching; Kao, Li-Ting; Chung, Shiu-Dong

    2015-12-15

    Sleep disturbances are among the most common nonmotor symptoms of Parkinson disease. However, no large epidemiological data regarding the association between obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and Parkinson disease have been reported. The goal of this study was to investigate the risk for Parkinson disease during a 5-y follow-up period after a diagnosis of OSA using a population-based dataset. The data for this retrospective longitudinal cohort study were retrieved from the Taiwan Longitudinal Health Insurance Database 2000. We identified 1,532 patients with OSA as the study cohort and randomly selected 7,660 patients as the comparison cohort. Each subject was individually followed up for a 5-y period to identify those in whom Parkinson disease subsequently developed. Stratified Cox proportional hazard regressions were performed as a means of comparing the 5-y risk of subsequent Parkinson disease between the study cohort and comparison cohort. Of the 9,192 total patients, Parkinson disease developed in 0.73% during the 5-y follow-up period: 1.24% and 0.63% in the OSA and control cohorts, respectively. After censoring patients who died during the follow-up period and adjusting for socio-demographic characteristics, the hazard ratio (HR) of Parkinson disease during the 5-y follow-up period for patients with OSA was 2.26 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.32-3.88) compared with comparison patients. In addition, among females, the adjusted HR of Parkinson disease was 3.54 (95% CI = 1.50-8.34) for patients with OSA compared to patients without OSA. However, among males, there was no significantly increased hazard of Parkinson disease for patients with OSA compared to those without OSA. Female patients with OSA were found to be at a significant risk of subsequent Parkinson disease during a 5-y follow-up period. © 2015 American Academy of Sleep Medicine.

  9. Effectiveness of occupational therapy in Parkinson's disease: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sturkenboom, I.H.W.M.; Graff, M.J.L.; Borm, G.F.; Adang, E.M.M.; Nijhuis-Van der Sanden, M.W.G.; Bloem, B.R.; Munneke, M.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Occupational therapists may have an added value in the care of patients with Parkinson's disease whose daily functioning is compromised, as well as for their immediate caregivers. Evidence for this added value is inconclusive due to a lack of rigorous studies. The aim of this trial is to

  10. Long-term results of a multicenter study on subthalamic and pallidal stimulation in Parkinson's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moro, Elena; Lozano, Andres M.; Pollak, Pierre; Agid, Yves; Rehncrona, Stig; Volkmann, Jens; Kulisevsky, Jaime; Obeso, Jose A.; Albanese, Alberto; Hariz, Marwan I.; Quinn, Niall P.; Speelman, Jans D.; Benabid, Alim L.; Fraix, Valerie; Mendes, Alexandre; Welter, Marie-Laure; Houeto, Jean-Luc; Cornu, Philippe; Dormont, Didier; Tornqvist, Annalena L.; Ekberg, Ron; Schnitzler, Alfons; Timmermann, Lars; Wojtecki, Lars; Gironell, Andres; Rodriguez-Oroz, Maria C.; Guridi, Jorge; Bentivoglio, Anna R.; Contarino, Maria F.; Romito, Luigi; Scerrati, Massimo; Janssens, Marc; Lang, Anthony E.

    2010-01-01

    We report the 5 to 6 year follow-up of a multicenter study of bilateral subthalamic nucleus (STN) and globus pallidus internus (GPi) deep brain stimulation (DBS) in advanced Parkinson's disease (PD) patients. Thirty-five STN patients and 16 GPi patients were assessed at 5 to 6 years after DBS

  11. Familial parkinsonism with synuclein pathology - Clinical and PET studies of A30P mutation carriers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kruger, R; Kuhn, W; Leenders, KL; Sprengelmeyer, R; Muller, T; Woitalla, D; Portman, AT; Maguire, RP; Veenma, L; Schroder, U; Schols, L; Epplen, JT; Riess, O; Przuntek, H

    2001-01-01

    Background: The authors identified the second known mutation in the alpha -synuclein (SNCA) gene, an alanine-to-proline exchange in amino acid position 30 (A30P), that cosegregates with the disease in one German family with autosomal dominantly inherited parkinsonism (ADP). The authors studied

  12. International study on the psychometric attributes of the non-motor symptoms scale in Parkinson disease.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martinez-Martin, P.; Rodriguez-Blazquez, C.; Abe, K.; Bhattacharyya, K.B.; Bloem, B.R.; Carod-Artal, F.J.; Prakash, R.; Esselink, R.A.J.; Falup-Pecurariu, C.; Gallardo, M.; Mir, P.; Naidu, Y.; Nicoletti, A.; Sethi, K.; Tsuboi, Y.; Hilten, J.J. van; Visser, M. de; Zappia, M.; Chaudhuri, K.R.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Nonmotor symptoms (NMS) have a great impact on patients with Parkinson disease (PD). The Non-Motor Symptoms Scale (NMSS) is an instrument specifically designed for the comprehensive assessment of NMS in patients with PD. NMSS psychometric properties have been tested in this study.

  13. Frequency of the apolipoprotein E epsilon 4 allele in a case-control study of early onset Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitehead, A S; Bertrandy, S; Finnan, F; Butler, A; Smith, G D; Ben-Shlomo, Y

    1996-10-01

    It has been suggested that Parkinson's disease and Alzheimer's disease may share a common or at least overlapping aetiology. The prevalence of dementia among cases of Parkinson's disease is known to be greater than expected in the general population. The frequency of the apolipoprotein epsilon 4 allele in a large case-control study of early onset Parkinson's disease has been examined. 215 patients and 212 population based controls were recruited from the Republic of Ireland between 1992 and 1994. Cases had to have disease onset at 55 years or younger and be born after 1925. The frequency of the epsilon 4 allele was almost identical between cases of Parkinson's disease (14.6%) and healthy controls (13.3%). There was no relation between epsilon 4 status and disease onset, disease duration, Hoehn and Yahr score, and disease progression. The frequency of the epsilon 4 allele was not increased among 10 patients with Parkinson's disease with dementia (10.0%) compared with the other patients without dementia (14.8%). There was no association between epsilon 4 allele status and either a history of smoking, family history of dementia, or Parkinson's disease, or being born in a rural area. The odds ratio for the ApoE epsilon 4 allele associated with Parkinson's disease was 1.10 (95% confidence interval (95% CI) 0.68-1.79), adjusting for age group, sex, and residential status. The pooled odds ratio from a meta-analysis of six studies of ApoE epsilon 4 status and Parkinson's disease was 0.94 (95% CI 0.69-1.27). The results from our study as well as the pooled meta-analysis exclude any important role for ApoE epsilon 4 status in the development of Parkinson's disease. Our results similarly do not support its role either in dementia associated with Parkinson's disease or disease prognosis.

  14. Therapeutic issues in vascular dementia: studies, designs and approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Sandra E

    2007-03-01

    Vascular dementia (VaD) is a heterogeneous disorder resulting from various cerebrovascular diseases (CVD) causing cognitive impairment that reflects severity and location of damage. Epidemiological studies suggest VaD is the second commonest cause of dementia, but autopsy series report that pure VaD is infrequent, while combined CVD and Alzheimer's Disease(AD) is likely the commonest pathological-dementia correlate. Both diseases share vascular risk factors and benefit from their treatment. The most widely used diagnostic criteria for VaD are highly specific but not sensitive. Vascular Cognitive Impairment (VCI) is a dynamic, evolving concept that embraces VaD, Vascular Cognitive Impairment No Dementia (VCIND) and mixed AD and CVD. Clinical trials to date have focused on probable and possible VaD with beneficial effects evident for different drug classes, including cholinergic agents and NMDA agonists. Limitations have included use of cognitive tools suitable for AD that are insensitive to executive dysfunction. Disease heterogeneity has not been adequately controlled and subtypes require further study. Diagnostic VaD criteria now 13 years old need updating. More homogeneous subgroups need to be defined and therapeutically targeted to improve cognitive-behavioural outcomes including optimal control of vascular risk factors. More sensitive testing of executive function outlined in recent VCI Harmonization criteria and longer trial duration are needed to discern meaningful effects. Imaging criteria must be well-defined, with centralized review and standardized protocols. Serial scanning with quantification of tissue atrophy and lesion burden is becoming feasible, and cognitive interventions, including rehabilitation pharmacotherapy, with drugs strategically coupled to cognitive -behavioural treatments, hold promise and need further development.

  15. Prospective Belgian study of neurodegenerative and vascular dementia: APOE genotype effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelborghs, S; Dermaut, B; Goeman, J; Saerens, J; Mariën, P; Pickut, B A; Van den Broeck, M; Serneels, S; Cruts, M; Van Broeckhoven, C; De Deyn, P P

    2003-08-01

    The authors conducted a prospective study of neurodegenerative and vascular dementia in Belgium. Strict diagnostic inclusion criteria were used to include well defined patients and controls. The results of apolipoprotein E (APOE) genotype effect on risk and clinical characteristics are presented. APOE genotyping was performed in patients with probable Alzheimer's disease (AD) (n=504), frontotemporal dementia (FTD) (n=47), vascular dementia (VaD) (n=152), mixed dementia (n=132), mild cognitive impairment (MCI) (n=44), Parkinson's disease (PD) (n=30), dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) (n=17), and multisystem atrophy (MSA)/progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) (n=12). The APOE allele frequencies of this Belgian control population (epsilon 2: 6.9%; epsilon 3: 76.2%; epsilon 4: 16.9%) did not differ from those reported for other white populations. AD, MCI, and mixed dementia patients had higher APOE epsilon 4 (32.9%, 38.6%, and 28.4% respectively) and lower APOE epsilon 3 (62.2%, 53.4%, and 66.3%) frequencies compared with controls, whereas only AD and mixed dementia patients had lower APOE epsilon 2 frequencies (4.9% and 5.3%). Apart from a borderline significant different distribution of APOE allele frequencies in VaD patients compared with controls, no other differences were detected. The influence of APOE epsilon 4 on clinical features of dementia was limited to lower age at onset in AD patients and a less pronounced negative correlation between age at onset and number of epsilon 4 alleles in MCI and mixed dementia patients. This study confirmed the risk association between APOE epsilon 4 and AD. The observation that APOE epsilon 4 is associated with mixed dementia reflected the role of AD in the aetiopathogenesis of this condition. Although MCI is an aetiologically heterogeneous syndrome, the increased APOE epsilon 4 frequencies indicated that a large proportion of the MCI patients included in the study might be predisposed to develop AD.

  16. Metabolic topography of Parkinsonism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jae Seung [Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-04-15

    Parkinson's disease is one of the most frequent neurodegenerative diseases, which mainly affects the elderly. Parkinson's disease is often difficult to differentiate from atypical parkinson disorder such as progressive supranuclear palsy, multiple system atrophy, dementia with Lewy body, and corticobasal ganglionic degeneration, based on the clinical findings because of the similarity of phenotypes and lack of diagnostic markers. The accurate diagnosis of Parkinson's disease and atypical Parkinson disorders is not only important for deciding on treatment regimens and providing prognosis, but also it is critical for studies designed to investigate etiology and pathogenesis of parkinsonism and to develop new therapeutic strategies. Although degeneration of the nigrostriatal dopamine system results in marked loss of striatal dopamine content in most of the diseases causing parkinsonism, pathologic studies revealed different topographies of the neuronal cell loss in Parkinsonism. Since the regional cerebral glucose metabolism is a marker of integrated local synaptic activity and as such is sensitive to both direct neuronal/synaptic damage and secondary functional disruption at synapses distant from the primary site of pathology, and assessment of the regional cerebral glucose metabolism with F-18 FDG PET is useful in the differential diagnosis of parkinsonism and evaluating the pathophysiology of Parkinsonism.

  17. Vascular targets for cannabinoids: animal and human studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley, Christopher; O'Sullivan, Saoirse E

    2014-01-01

    Application of cannabinoids and endocannabinoids to perfused vascular beds or individual isolated arteries results in changes in vascular resistance. In most cases, the result is vasorelaxation, although vasoconstrictor responses are also observed. Cannabinoids also modulate the actions of vasoactive compounds including acetylcholine, methoxamine, angiotensin II and U46619 (thromboxane mimetic). Numerous mechanisms of action have been proposed including receptor activation, potassium channel activation, calcium channel inhibition and the production of vasoactive mediators such as calcitonin gene-related peptide, prostanoids, NO, endothelial-derived hyperpolarizing factor and hydrogen peroxide. The purpose of this review is to examine the evidence for the range of receptors now known to be activated by cannabinoids. Direct activation by cannabinoids of CB1, CBe, TRPV1 (and potentially other TRP channels) and PPARs in the vasculature has been observed. A potential role for CB2, GPR55 and 5-HT1A has also been identified in some studies. Indirectly, activation of prostanoid receptors (TP, IP, EP1 and EP4) and the CGRP receptor is involved in the vascular responses to cannabinoids. The majority of this evidence has been obtained through animal research, but recent work has confirmed some of these targets in human arteries. Vascular responses to cannabinoids are enhanced in hypertension and cirrhosis, but are reduced in obesity and diabetes, both due to changes in the target sites of action. Much further work is required to establish the extent of vascular actions of cannabinoids and the application of this research in physiological and pathophysiological situations. Linked ArticlesThis article is part of a themed section on Cannabinoids 2013. To view the other articles in this section visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2014.171.issue-6 PMID:24329566

  18. The Dutch Vascular Factors in Dementia Study: rationale and design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Kooten, F; Bots, M L; Breteler, M M; Haverkate, F; van Swieten, J C; Grobbee, D E; Koudstaal, P J; Kluft, C

    1998-01-01

    Dementia is a rapidly increasing health problem in the industrialized countries. With the ageing of the population the number of demented persons increases both in relative and absolute terms. Obviously, there is a need for prevention and intervention strategies. We describe the methods and baseline findings of a large study aimed at identifying potentially modifiable vascular, thrombogenic, and metabolic determinants of dementia. The study population consists of subjects 55 years of age or older. Since the vascular wall of the cerebral vessels is different from that of the coronary or peripheral vessels, we formed three subgroups in which vascular risk factors for dementia are studied. Subjects with stroke were distinguished from subjects with coronary or peripheral artery disease, and from subjects without stroke or coronary or peripheral artery disease. To obtain a large enough number of subjects with stroke, cases and controls from a stroke registry were combined with cases and controls of a population-based study from the same region. For the diagnosis of dementia the DSM-III-R criteria were used. Extensive information on cardiovascular risk factors was collected, including indicators of atherosclerosis. Blood and urine were sampled to study platelet function and thrombogenic and metabolic factors. The study population consists of 7,466 subjects, of whom 300 were recruited from a hospital-based stroke registry. Coronary or peripheral artery disease was present in 956 subjects and stroke in 617. Dementia was present in 434 (5.8%) of all subjects. The prevalence of dementia was 3.0, 24.0, and 4.4% in subjects with a history of coronary or peripheral artery disease, a history of stroke, and subjects without a history of coronary or peripheral artery disease or stroke, respectively. The study will allow us to investigate the role of vascular factors in dementia, irrespective of its cause.

  19. Dementia is associated with insulin resistance in patients with Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosco, Domenico; Plastino, Massimiliano; Cristiano, Dario; Colica, Carmela; Ermio, Caterina; De Bartolo, Matteo; Mungari, Pasquale; Fonte, Giulia; Consoli, Domenico; Consoli, Arturo; Fava, Antonietta

    2012-04-15

    Parkinson's disease is a neurodegenerative disorder involving the basal ganglia. Type-2 Diabetes Mellitus is an important risk factor for Alzheimer disease and vascular dementia. However, the association between Parkinson's disease and Diabetes Mellitus is controversial. To investigate glucose metabolism abnormalities in 110 Parkinson's disease patients with and without dementia. We evaluated Insulin Resistance, glucose and insulin levels after a 2-h-oral-glucose-tolerance-test in 53 Parkinson's disease with dementia and 57 with Parkinson's disease without dementia, with normal fasting glucose. BMI, waist circumference, fasting glucose and insulin values, HbA1c, triglycerides, blood lipid profile, depression rating, educational levels, levodopa-dosage and antipsychotic use were similar in both groups. Disease duration and motor impairment were higher in patients with Parkinson's disease and dementia group. After 2-h-oral-glucose-tolerance-test, the prevalence of glucose metabolism abnormalities was significantly higher in group with Parkinson's disease and dementia group (p=0.03). The insulin resistance was present in 62% patients with Parkinson's disease with dementia, of whom 30% had also impaired glucose tolerance, 5,6% newly diagnosed Diabetes Mellitus and 26% only Insulin Resistance. These percentages were significantly higher in group with Parkinson's disease and dementia, also after adjustment for disease duration and motor disability. Our study suggests that PD patients with dementia are two times more likely to have insulin resistance than patients with PD. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Active Theater as a Complementary Therapy for Parkinson's Disease Rehabilitation: A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicola Modugno

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Most medical treatments of Parkinson's disease (PD are aimed at the reduction of motor symptoms. However, even when motor improvements are evident, patients often report a deterioration of their daily lives. Thus, to achieve a global improvement in personal well-being, not only drugs, but also complementary therapies, such as physical exercise, occupational and speech therapy, and active music therapy, have been used. We hypothesized that theater could reduce clinical disability and improve the quality of life of PD patients (primary end points more efficiently than other complementary therapies because (1 in order to impersonate a character, patients are forced to regain the control of their bodies; and (2 while being part of a group, patients have a high degree of social interaction. The need to regain the control of their bodies and their social functioning is very likely to deeply motivate patients. To assess this hypothesis, we ran a randomized, controlled, and single-blinded study that lasted 3 years, on 20 subjects affected by a moderate form of idiopathic PD, in stable treatment with L-dopa and L-dopa agonists, and without severe sensory deficits. Ten patients were randomly assigned to an active theater program (in which patients were required to participate, while the others underwent physiotherapy (control group, the most common nonpharmacological treatment for PD rehabilitation. Patients of both groups were evaluated at the beginning of each year, using five clinical rating scales (Unified ParkinsonParkinson'ss Disease Rating Scale [UPDRS], Schwab and England Scale, ParkinsonParkinson'ss Disease Quality of Life [PDQ39] Scale, Epworth Sleepiness Scale, and Hamilton Depression Rating Scale. The theater patients showed progressive improvements and, at the end of the third year, they showed significant improvements in all clinical scales. Conversely, the control patients did not exhibit significant ameliorations with time. Thus, the

  1. An imaging study of parkinsonism among African-Caribbean and Indian London communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Michele T M; Chaudhuri, K Ray; Jarosz, Jozef; Yaguez, Lidia; Brooks, David J

    2002-11-01

    We previously reported on 131 parkinsonian patients of African-Caribbean and Indian origin attending movement disorders clinics in six London Hospitals, of whom approximately 20% manifested atypical parkinsonism with a late-onset, akinetic-rigid predominant syndrome, postural instability and minimal resting tremor refractory to levodopa therapy and dopamine agonists (see Hu et al., Neurology 2000;54[Suppl.3]: A188 and Hu et al., Mov Disord 2000;15[Suppl.3]:S212). To better elucidate the phenotype of these atypical patients (18)FDG/(18)F-dopa positron emission tomography (PET) were performed in a subgroup to look for cortical and striatal metabolic changes suggestive of multiple system atrophy (MSA), progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP), corticobasal degeneration (CBD), or dementia with Lewy bodies. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) rating of cerebral vascular lesion load, putaminal atrophy, and neuropsychological testing were also performed. Discriminant function analysis of (18)F-dopa/(18)FDG striatal metabolism in 43 patients failed to separate atypical ethnic minority from typical Caucasian Parkinson's disease (PD) patients. Additionally, atypical Indian and African-Caribbean patients did not show cortical reductions in glucose metabolism suggestive of PSP, CBD, or DLB. Cerebral vascular lesion load rated in these patients did not differ between atypical and typical PD groups, and none of the atypical patients had MRI changes suggestive of MSA or PSP. Our results suggest the atypical parkinsonian phenotype seen in African-Caribbean and Indian patients represents a levodopa-refractory form of PD separate from MSA or PSP in most patients. Copyright 2002 Movement Disorder Society

  2. Helicobacter pylori infection is associated with an increased risk of Parkinson's disease: A population-based retrospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Huei-Kai; Wang, Jen-Hung; Lei, Wei-Yi; Chen, Chien-Lin; Chang, Chih-Ya; Liou, Li-Syue

    2018-02-01

    Several studies have evaluated the association of Parkinson's disease with Helicobacter pylori (HP) infection, although no cohort studies have evaluated this association among the general population. This study aimed to investigate the risk of Parkinson's disease after HP infection in the general Taiwanese population. This study of Taiwanese health insurance data (2000-2012) evaluated 9105 cases of HP infection and 9105 controls matched with propensity scoring. Univariate and multivariate Cox proportional hazards regression models were used to assess the risk of subsequent Parkinson's disease. We observed 64 cases of Parkinson's disease in the HP infection group (1.7/1000 person-years), and 25 cases in the control group (0.7/1000 person-years). Overall, there was a significantly higher risk of Parkinson's disease in the HP infection group (adjusted hazard ratio [aHR]: 2.29, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.44-3.66). HP infection was significantly associated with an increased risk of Parkinson's disease among individuals who were ≥60 years old (aHR: 2.53, 95% CI: 1.47-4.35), but not among those Parkinson's disease among both men (aHR: 2.14, 95% CI: 1.15-3.96) and women (aHR: 2.84, 95% CI: 1.37-5.89). Nonetheless, eradication therapy was not significantly associated with the risk of Parkinson's disease (aHR: 1.07, 95% CI: 0.63-1.82). Although HP infection was associated with an increased risk of Parkinson's disease, eradication therapy did not ameliorate this association. Further research is needed to explore the underlying biological mechanisms. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Parkinsonism and AIDS: a clinical comparative study before and after HAART

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    Ana Lucia Zuma de Rosso

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available In 2002, after analyzing 28 HIV-positive patients with movement disorders we emphasized the decreasing not only of Parkinsonism but also of other involuntary movements in HIV patients in the last few years. The objective of this study is to compare the clinical results between HIV-positive patients with Parkinsonism before and after HAART. In 14 years (1986-1999 2,460 HIV-positive patients were seen in our Hospital 14 (0.6% of which presented with Parkinsonism. Eight years after (2000-2007 970 HIV positive patients were seen and only two (0.2% had Parkinsonism. We conclude that after the introduction of HAART there was an evident decrease in AIDS-related Parkinsonism.No ano de 2002, após analisarmos 28 pacientes HIV-positivos que apresentavam distúrbios do movimento, enfatizamos o declínio, não só do parkinsonismo, como também de outros movimentos involuntários em pacientes infectados pelo HIV nos últimos anos. O objetivo deste estudo é comparar os resultados clínicos entre pacientes HIV-positivos com parkinsonismo antes e depois da introdução do esquema HAART. Em 14 anos (1986-1999, 2.460 pacientes HIV-positivos foram avaliados em nosso Hospital dos quais 14 (0,6% apresentaram parkinsonismo. Nos oito anos seguintes (2000-2007, 970 pacientes HIV-positivos foram avaliados e somente dois (0,2% tinham parkinsonismo. Concluímos que após a introdução do esquema HAART houve evidente declínio do parkinsonismo secundário à AIDS.

  4. Vascular access surveillance: case study of a false paradigm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulson, William D; Moist, Louise; Lok, Charmaine E

    2013-01-01

    The hemodialysis vascular access surveillance controversy provides a case study of how enthusiasm for a new test or treatment can lead to adoption of a false paradigm. Paradigms are the beliefs and assumptions shared by those in a field of knowledge, and are commonly included in clinical practice guidelines. The guidelines of the National Kidney Foundation Kidney Disease Outcomes Quality Initiative recommend that arteriovenous vascular accesses undergo routine surveillance for detection and correction of stenosis. This recommendation is based on the paradigm that surveillance of access blood flow or dialysis venous pressure combined with correction of stenosis improves access outcomes. However, the quality of evidence that supports this paradigm has been widely criticized. We tested the validity of the surveillance paradigm by applying World Health Organization (WHO) criteria for evaluating screening tests to a literature review of published vascular access studies. These criteria include four components: undesired condition, screening test, intervention, and desired outcome. The WHO criteria show that surveillance as currently practiced fails all four components and provides little or no significant benefit, suggesting that surveillance is a false paradigm. Once a paradigm is established, however, challenges to its validity are usually resisted even as new evidence indicates the paradigm is not valid. Thus, it is paramount to apply rigorous criteria when developing guidelines. Regulators may help promote needed changes in paradigms when cost and safety considerations coincide. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Metal emissions and urban incident Parkinson disease: a community health study of Medicare beneficiaries by using geographic information systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willis, Allison W; Evanoff, Bradley A; Lian, Min; Galarza, Aiden; Wegrzyn, Andrew; Schootman, Mario; Racette, Brad A

    2010-12-15

    Parkinson disease associated with farming and exposure to agricultural chemicals has been reported in numerous studies; little is known about Parkinson disease risk factors for those living in urban areas. The authors investigated the relation between copper, lead, or manganese emissions and Parkinson disease incidence in the urban United States, studying 29 million Medicare beneficiaries in the year 2003. Parkinson disease incidence was determined by using beneficiaries who had not changed residence since 1995. Over 35,000 nonmobile incident Parkinson disease cases, diagnosed by a neurologist, were identified for analysis. Age-, race-, and sex-standardized Parkinson disease incidence was compared between counties with high cumulative industrial release of copper, manganese, or lead (as reported to the Environmental Protection Agency) and counties with no/low reported release of all 3 metals. Parkinson disease incidence (per 100,000) in counties with no/low copper/lead/manganese release was 274.0 (95% confidence interval (CI): 226.8, 353.5). Incidence was greater in counties with high manganese release: 489.4 (95% CI: 368.3, 689.5) (relative risk = 1.78, 95% CI: 1.54, 2.07) and counties with high copper release: 304.2 (95% CI: 276.0, 336.8) (relative risk = 1.1, 95% CI: 0.94, 1.31). Urban Parkinson disease incidence is greater in counties with high reported industrial release of copper or manganese. Environmental exposure to metals may be a risk factor for Parkinson disease in urban areas.

  6. Application study of vascular interventional robotic mechanism for remote steering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Zengmin; Jia, Bo; Lu, Wangsheng; Hui, Rui

    2011-01-01

    Recently, robotic systems have been introduced as a useful method for surgical procedures. But in the field of vascular interventional therapy, the development of robotic system is slower. The purpose of the study is to verify the reliability and safety of vascular interventional robotic system used in angiography, by the way of in vitro preliminary experiments and animal experiments. The approach is to employ a proprietary vascular interventional robot system to complete glass vessel models and animal angiogram experiments. This robot system consists of a console port (remote steering system), an assistant port (propelled and rotation system) and a hydraulic fixing device, upon which surgeons control remotely to make go forward and rotate in the glass vessel models and animal vessels, on the 3D operation interface. Consequently, the operation time and success rate are counted and evaluated. In the glass vessel model experiments, the Catheter can enter various kinds of vessel models with inside diameter length greater than 3mm and angle less than 90(o). In the animal (adult dogs) experiments, surgeons can accomplish smoothly the angiogram of the renal artery, the vertebral renal and the arteria carotis communis, without any complications of surgery. The angiogram by using vascular interventional robot system is safe and reliable. Surgeons can finish the angiogram in part by remote operation, and the result of angiogram can meet a number of simple expectations. However without wire control and force feedback systems, the applicability of this kind of robot system is not flexible enough and need to be improved in the future.

  7. Ultrasound patterning technologies for studying vascular morphogenesis in 3D.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comeau, Eric S; Hocking, Denise C; Dalecki, Diane

    2017-01-01

    Investigations in this report demonstrate the versatility of ultrasound-based patterning and imaging technologies for studying determinants of vascular morphogenesis in 3D environments. Forces associated with ultrasound standing wave fields (USWFs) were employed to non-invasively and volumetrically pattern endothelial cells within 3D collagen hydrogels. Patterned hydrogels were composed of parallel bands of endothelial cells located at nodal regions of the USWF and spaced at intervals equal to one half wavelength of the incident sound field. Acoustic parameters were adjusted to vary the spatial dimensions of the endothelial bands, and effects on microvessel morphogenesis were analyzed. High-frequency ultrasound imaging techniques were used to image and quantify the spacing, width and density of initial planar cell bands. Analysis of resultant microvessel networks showed that vessel width, orientation, density and branching activity were strongly influenced by the initial 3D organization of planar bands and, hence, could be controlled by acoustic parameters used for patterning. In summary, integration of USWF-patterning and high-frequency ultrasound imaging tools enabled fabrication of vascular constructs with defined microvessel size and orientation, providing insight into how spatial cues in 3D influence vascular morphogenesis. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  8. Motor cortex stimulation for Parkinson's disease: a modelling study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwartjes, Daphne G. M.; Heida, Tjitske; Feirabend, Hans K. P.; Janssen, Marcus L. F.; Visser-Vandewalle, Veerle; Martens, Hubert C. F.; Veltink, Peter H.

    2012-10-01

    Chronic motor cortex stimulation (MCS) is currently being investigated as a treatment method for Parkinson's disease (PD). Unfortunately, the underlying mechanisms of this treatment are unclear and there are many uncertainties regarding the most effective stimulation parameters and electrode configuration. In this paper, we present a MCS model with a 3D representation of several axonal populations. The model predicts that the activation of either the basket cell or pyramidal tract (PT) type axons is involved in the clinical effect of MCS. We propose stimulation protocols selectively targeting one of these two axon types. To selectively target the basket cell axons, our simulations suggest using either cathodal or bipolar stimulation with the electrode strip placed perpendicular rather than parallel to the gyrus. Furthermore, selectivity can be increased by using multiple cathodes. PT type axons can be selectively targeted with anodal stimulation using electrodes with large contact sizes. Placing the electrode epidurally is advisable over subdural placement. These selective protocols, when practically implemented, can be used to further test which axon type should be activated for clinically effective MCS and can subsequently be applied to optimize treatment. In conclusion, this paper increases insight into the neuronal population involved in the clinical effect of MCS on PD and proposes strategies to improve this therapy.

  9. Evaluation of the noradrenergic system in Parkinson's disease: an 11C-MeNER PET and neuromelanin MRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommerauer, Michael; Fedorova, Tatyana D; Hansen, Allan K; Knudsen, Karoline; Otto, Marit; Jeppesen, Jesper; Frederiksen, Yoon; Blicher, Jakob U; Geday, Jacob; Nahimi, Adjmal; Damholdt, Malene F; Brooks, David J; Borghammer, Per

    2018-02-01

    Pathological involvement of the noradrenergic locus coeruleus occurs early in Parkinson's disease, and widespread noradrenaline reductions are found at post-mortem. Rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder (RBD) accompanies Parkinson's disease and its presence predicts an unfavourable disease course with a higher propensity to cognitive impairment and orthostatic hypotension. MRI can detect neuromelanin in the locus coeruleus while 11C-MeNER PET is a marker of noradrenaline transporter availability. Here, we use both imaging modalities to study the association of RBD, cognition and autonomic dysfunction in Parkinson's disease with loss of noradrenergic function. Thirty non-demented Parkinson's disease patients [16 patients with RBD and 14 without RBD, comparable across age (66.6 ± 6.7 years), sex (22 males), and disease stage (Hoehn and Yahr, 2.3 ± 0.5)], had imaging of the locus coeruleus with neuromelanin sensitive MRI and brain noradrenaline transporter availability with 11C-MeNER PET. RBD was confirmed with polysomnography; cognitive function was assessed with a neuropsychological test battery, and blood pressure changes on tilting were documented; results were compared to 12 matched control subjects. We found that Parkinson's disease patients with RBD showed decreased locus coeruleus neuromelanin signal on MRI (P Parkinson's disease with RBD was also associated with a higher incidence of cognitive impairment, slowed EEG activity, and orthostatic hypotension. Reduced 11C-MeNER binding correlated with EEG slowing, cognitive performance, and orthostatic hypotension. In conclusion, reduced noradrenergic function in Parkinson's disease was linked to the presence of RBD and associated with cognitive deterioration and orthostatic hypotension. Noradrenergic impairment may contribute to the high prevalence of these non-motor symptoms in Parkinson's disease, and may be of relevance when treating these conditions in Parkinson's disease. © The Author (2017

  10. Nilai Rerata Vascular Pedicle Width, Vascular Pedicle-Cardiac Ratio Vascular Pedicle-Thoracic Ratio Orang Dewasa Normal Indonesia Studi di RS dr. Cipto Mangunkusomo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rommy Zunera

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Vascular pedicle width (VPW adalah jarak tepi luar vena kava superior ke tepi luar arteri subklavia kiri. Pemeriksaan VPW di foto toraks bersifat non-invasif, cepat dan mudah untuk memprediksi hipervolemia.Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk mengetahui rerata nilai VPW orang dewasa normal Indonesia. VPW diukurdengan dua metode: pertama pengukuran VPW tunggal yang akurasinya terbatas di foto toraks digital karenarelatif tidak dipengaruhi faktor magnifikasi. Metode kedua untuk foto toraks nondigital yaitu pengukuranrasio:vascular pedicle-cardiac ratio (VPCR dan vascular pedicle-thoracic ratio (VPTR. Pengukuran serupadilakukan terhadap  topogram CT scan toraks AP terlentang dan CT scan toraks lalu dibandingkan akurasipengukuran di topogram dengan CT scan  toraks sebagai standar baku. Sampel terdiri atas 104 foto toraksPA subyek normal dan 103 CT scan  toraks subyek terpilih. Pada pemeriksaan toraks PA didapatkan rerata VPW 48,0±5,5mm, rerata VPCR 40,3±4,6%, dan rerata VPTR 17,2±1,7%. Pada pemeriksaan topogram CTscan didapatkan rerata VPW 50,3±6,2mm, rerata VPTR 45±5,1%, dan rerata VPTR 19,8±2,5%. Rerata VPWpada CT scan toraks 50,4±6,1mm. Pengukuran di foto toraks AP 10% lebih besar dibandingkan pada fototoraks PA dan pengukuranVPW di foto toraks terbukti memiliki akurasi  tinggi. Kata kunci: fototoraks, vascular pedicle width, vascular pedicle-cardiac ratio, vascular pedicle-thoracic ratio, hipervolemia.   The Mean Value of Vascular Pedicle Width, Vascular Pedicle-Cardiac Ratio,Vascular Pedicle-Thoracic Ratio of Normal Indonesian Adult Study In dr. Cipto Mangunkusomo Hospital Abstract Vascular pedicle width (VPW is the distance, from a perpendicular line at the takeoff point of the left subclavian artery off the aorta to the point at which the superior vena cava. Measurement of VPW on chestx-ray is relatively non-invasive, fast and easy technique as  hypervolemia predictor. The purpose of thisstudy is to know the mean VPW value of normal

  11. Focused ultrasound subthalamotomy in patients with asymmetric Parkinson's disease: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Fernández, Raul; Rodríguez-Rojas, Rafael; Del Álamo, Marta; Hernández-Fernández, Frida; Pineda-Pardo, Jose A; Dileone, Michele; Alonso-Frech, Fernando; Foffani, Guglielmo; Obeso, Ignacio; Gasca-Salas, Carmen; de Luis-Pastor, Esther; Vela, Lydia; Obeso, José A

    2018-01-01

    Ablative neurosurgery has been used to treat Parkinson's disease for many decades. MRI-guided focused ultrasound allows focal lesions to be made in deep brain structures without skull incision. We investigated the safety and preliminary efficacy of unilateral subthalamotomy by focused ultrasound in Parkinson's disease. This prospective, open-label pilot study was done at CINAC (Centro Integral de Neurociencias), University Hospital HM Puerta del Sur in Madrid, Spain. Eligible participants had Parkinson's disease with markedly asymmetric parkinsonism. Patients with severe dyskinesia, history of stereotactic surgery or brain haemorrhage, a diagnosis of an unstable cardiac or psychiatric disease, or a skull density ratio of 0·3 or less were excluded. Enrolled patients underwent focused ultrasound unilateral subthalamotomy. The subthalamic nucleus was targeted by means of brain images acquired with a 3-Tesla MRI apparatus. Several sonications above the definitive ablation temperature of 55°C were delivered and adjusted according to clinical response. The primary outcomes were safety and a change in the motor status of the treated hemibody as assessed with part III of the Movement Disorders Society-Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (MDS-UPDRS III) in both off-medication and on-medication states at 6 months. Adverse events were monitored up to 48 h after treatment and at scheduled clinic visits at 1, 3, and 6 months after treatment. The study is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT02912871. Between April 26 and June 14, 2016, ten patients with markedly asymmetric parkinsonism that was poorly controlled pharmacologically were enrolled for focused ultrasound unilateral subthalamotomy. By 6 months follow-up, 38 incidents of adverse events had been recorded, none of which were serious or severe. Seven adverse events were present at 6 months. Three of these adverse events were directly related to subthalamotomy: off-medication dyskinesia in the treated arm

  12. A prospective study of 137 patients with Parkinson's disease and anosmia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soltanzadeh A

    1997-08-01

    Full Text Available In this research we tried to study frequency of clinical manifestations in Parkinson's disease. Hence, a prospective study was conducted in 317 patients who were affected by Parkinson's disease. In a questionnaire we collected data of patient's age, gender and signs and symptoms and then analyzed them. The most common features in our patients were tremor and muscular rigidity. Olfactory dysfunction was observed in 61% of our patients. Dysarthria, stooped posture, fixed facial expression, intellectual deterioration and the on-off response had various frequency among the patients. A new and important point in our research was considerable frequency of Anosmia or Hyposmia in spite of it's low prevalence among the patients of previous studies.

  13. Neuropathology of dementia in Parkinson's disease: a prospective, community-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aarsland, Dag; Perry, Robert; Brown, Andrew; Larsen, Jan P; Ballard, Clive

    2005-11-01

    Twenty-two patients with Parkinson's disease drawn from a community-based study were followed prospectively until their deaths. Even though 18 patients had dementia, none fulfilled Braak and Braak or The National Institute on Aging and Ronald and Nancy Reagan Institute of the Alzheimer's Association, whereas all patients had limbic or neocortical Lewy body disease. The Lewy body score and Braak and Braak stage were significantly associated with the rate of cognitive decline, but only the Lewy body score was associated with the rate of cognitive decline in the univariate analyses. This study strongly suggests that Lewy body disease is the main substrate driving the progression of cognitive impairment in Parkinson's disease.

  14. Relationship between manual dexterity and the unified parkinson?s disease rating scale-motor exam

    OpenAIRE

    Hwang, Sujin; Song, Chiang-Soon

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to examine the relationships between manual dexterity and the Unified Parkinson?s Disease Rating Scale-Motor Exam as a clinical tool for quantifying upper extremity function in persons with Parkinson?s disease. [Subjects and Methods] Thirty-two persons with idiopathic Parkinson?s disease participated in this study. This study measured two clinical outcomes, the box-and-block test and the Unified Parkinson?s Disease Rating Scale-Motor Exam, to investigat...

  15. Amantadine extended release for levodopa-induced dyskinesia in Parkinson's disease (EASED Study).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pahwa, Rajesh; Tanner, Caroline M; Hauser, Robert A; Sethi, Kapil; Isaacson, Stuart; Truong, Daniel; Struck, Lynn; Ruby, April E; McClure, Natalie L; Went, Gregory T; Stempien, Mary Jean

    2015-05-01

    ADS-5102 is a long-acting, extended-release capsule formulation of amantadine HCl administered once daily at bedtime. This study investigated the safety, efficacy, and tolerability of ADS-5102 in Parkinson's disease (PD) patients with levodopa-induced dyskinesia. This was a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel-group study of 83 PD patients with troublesome dyskinesia assigned to placebo or one of three doses of ADS-5102 (260 mg, 340 mg, 420 mg) administered daily at bedtime for 8 weeks. The primary efficacy analysis compared change from baseline to week 8 in Unified Dyskinesia Rating Scale (UDysRS) total score for 340 mg ADS-5102 versus placebo. Secondary outcome measures included change in UDysRS for 260 mg, 420 mg, Fatigue Severity Scale (FSS), Movement Disorder Society Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (MDS-UPDRS), patient diary, Clinician's Global Impression of Change, and Parkinson's Disease Questionnaire (PDQ-39). ADS-5102 340 mg significantly reduced dyskinesia versus placebo (27% reduction in UDysRS, P = 0.005). In addition, ADS-5102 significantly increased ON time without troublesome dyskinesia, as assessed by PD patient diaries, at 260 mg (P = 0.004), 340 mg (P = 0.008) and 420 mg (P = 0.018). Adverse events (AEs) were reported for 82%, 80%, 95%, and 90% of patients in the placebo, 260-mg, 340-mg, and 420-mg groups, respectively. Constipation, hallucinations, dizziness, and dry mouth were the most frequent AEs. Study withdrawal rates were 9%, 15%, 14%, and 40% for the placebo, 260-mg, 340-mg, and 420-mg groups, respectively. All study withdrawals in the active treatment groups were attributable to AEs. ADS-5102 was generally well tolerated and resulted in significant and dose-dependent improvements in dyskinesia in PD patients. © 2015 Adamas Pharmaceuticals, Inc. Movement Disorders published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.

  16. CHCHD2 mutations in autosomal dominant late-onset Parkinson's disease: a genome-wide linkage and sequencing study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funayama, Manabu; Ohe, Kenji; Amo, Taku; Furuya, Norihiko; Yamaguchi, Junji; Saiki, Shinji; Li, Yuanzhe; Ogaki, Kotaro; Ando, Maya; Yoshino, Hiroyo; Tomiyama, Hiroyuki; Nishioka, Kenya; Hasegawa, Kazuko; Saiki, Hidemoto; Satake, Wataru; Mogushi, Kaoru; Sasaki, Ryogen; Kokubo, Yasumasa; Kuzuhara, Shigeki; Toda, Tatsushi; Mizuno, Yoshikuni; Uchiyama, Yasuo; Ohno, Kinji; Hattori, Nobutaka

    2015-03-01

    Identification of causative genes in mendelian forms of Parkinson's disease is valuable for understanding the cause of the disease. We did genetic studies in a Japanese family with autosomal dominant Parkinson's disease to identify novel causative genes. We did a genome-wide linkage analysis on eight affected and five unaffected individuals from a family with autosomal dominant Parkinson's disease (family A). Subsequently, we did exome sequencing on three patients and whole-genome sequencing on one patient in family A. Variants were validated by Sanger sequencing in samples from patients with autosomal dominant Parkinson's disease, patients with sporadic Parkinson's disease, and controls. Participants were identified from the DNA bank of the Comprehensive Genetic Study on Parkinson's Disease and Related Disorders (Juntendo University School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan) and were classified according to clinical information obtained by neurologists. Splicing abnormalities of CHCHD2 mutants were analysed in SH-SY5Y cells. We used the Fisher's exact test to calculate the significance of allele frequencies between patients with sporadic Parkinson's disease and unaffected controls, and we calculated odds ratios and 95% CIs of minor alleles. We identified a missense mutation (CHCHD2, 182C>T, Thr61Ile) in family A by next-generation sequencing. We obtained samples from a further 340 index patients with autosomal dominant Parkinson's disease, 517 patients with sporadic Parkinson's disease, and 559 controls. Three CHCHD2 mutations in four of 341 index cases from independent families with autosomal dominant Parkinson's disease were detected by CHCHD2 mutation screening: 182C>T (Thr61Ile), 434G>A (Arg145Gln), and 300+5G>A. Two single nucleotide variants (-9T>G and 5C>T) in CHCHD2 were confirmed to have different frequencies between sporadic Parkinson's disease and controls, with odds ratios of 2·51 (95% CI 1·48-4·24; p=0·0004) and 4·69 (1·59-13·83, p=0·0025

  17. Vascular comorbidities in multiple sclerosis: a nationwide study from Denmark.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thormann, Anja; Magyari, Melinda; Koch-Henriksen, Nils; Laursen, Bjarne; Sørensen, Per Soelberg

    2016-12-01

    To investigate the occurrence of vascular comorbidities before and after the clinical onset of multiple sclerosis. In this combined case-control and cohort study, all Danish born citizens with onset of multiple sclerosis 1980-2005 were identified from the Danish Multiple Sclerosis Registry and randomly matched with controls regarding year of birth, gender, and municipality on January 1st in the year of multiple sclerosis (MS) onset (index date). Individual-level information on comorbidities was obtained from several independent nationwide registries and linked to the study population by unique personal identification numbers. To assess the presence of vascular comorbidities before and after MS onset, cases and controls were followed from January 1977 to the index date, and from the index date through December 2012. We used logistic regression to calculate odds ratios (ORs) and Cox regression to calculate hazard ratios (HRs). Before the index date, MS cases had a decreased probability for cerebrovascular comorbidity [OR 0.69 (95 % CI 0.48-0.99, p = 0.043)], and a numerically but not statistically significant decreased probability for cardiovascular comorbidity [OR 0.87 (95 % CI 0.71-1.07, p = 0.188)]. After the index date, MS cases had an increased risk for cerebrovascular comorbidity [HR 1.84 (95 % CI 1.69-2.00, p < 0.0005)], and for cardiovascular comorbidity [HR 1.08 (95 % CI 1.02-1.15, p = 0.013)]. The lower occurrence of cerebrovascular comorbidities in cases prior to MS onset could be due to protective immune mechanisms, while the higher occurrence of vascular comorbidities in cases after MS onset could be because of converging causal pathways of the coexisting diseases. These findings deserve to be studied closer in a broader spectrum of comorbidities in MS.

  18. No clear support for a role for vitamin D in Parkinson's disease: A Mendelian randomization study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsson, Susanna C; Singleton, Andrew B; Nalls, Mike A; Richards, J Brent

    2017-08-01

    Observational studies have found that relative to healthy controls, patients with Parkinson's disease have lower circulating concentrations of 25-hydroxyvitamin D, a clinical biomarker of vitamin D status. However, the causality of this association is uncertain. We undertook a Mendelian randomization study to investigate whether genetically decreased 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentrations are associated with PD to minimize confounding and prevent bias because of reverse causation. As instrumental variables for the Mendelian randomization analysis, we used 4 single-nucleotide polymorphisms that affect 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentrations (rs2282679 in GC, rs12785878 near DHCR7, rs10741657 near CYP2R1, and rs6013897 near CYP24A1). Summary effect size estimates of the 4 single-nucleotide polymorphisms on PD were obtained from the International Parkinson's Disease Genomics Consortium (including 5333 PD cases and 12,019 controls). The estimates of the 4 single-nucleotide polymorphisms were combined using an inverse-variance weighted meta-analysis. Of the 4 single-nucleotide polymorphisms associated with 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentrations, one (rs6013897 in CYP24A1) was associated with PD (odds ratio per 25-hydroxyvitamin D-decreasing allele, 1.09; 95% confidence interval, 1.02-1.16; P = 0.008), whereas no association was observed with the other 3 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (P > 0.23). The odds ratio of PD per genetically predicted 10% lower 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentration, based on the 4 single-nucleotide polymorphisms, was 0.98 (95% confidence interval, 0.93-1.04; P = 0.56). This Mendelian randomization study provides no clear support that lowered 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentration is causally associated with risk of PD. © 2017 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society. © 2017 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.

  19. Pilot safety and feasibility study of treadmill aerobic exercise in Parkinson disease with gait impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skidmore, Frank M; Patterson, Shawnna L; Shulman, Lisa M; Sorkin, John D; Macko, Richard F

    2008-01-01

    This pilot study evaluated the safety and feasibility of a 3-month progressive treadmill aerobic exercise (TM-AEX) program for persons with Parkinson disease with gait impairment. Eight subjects underwent a treadmill stress test to determine eligibility. Of these subjects, three were referred for further cardiac evaluation and five were enrolled. In 136 TM-AEX sessions, 11 falls or near falls and 9 episodes (8 asymptomatic) of systolic blood pressure drops >20 mmHg occurred. Harness supports prevented injury from falls. TM-AEX significantly improved the subjects' total Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale scores and peak ambulatory workload capacities. This study suggests that an aerobic exercise program is feasible for persons who have Parkinson disease with gait impairment; however, precautions must be taken to prevent falls. Systolic blood pressure instability during exercise points to the need for autonomic dysfunction monitoring. Our data indicate that TM-AEX may reduce symptom severity and improve fitness. Further studies are needed for a better understanding of the risks and benefits of TM-AEX in this population.

  20. The health-related, social, and economic consequences of parkinsonism: a controlled national study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jennum, Poul Jørgen; Assenholt, Maria Elizabeth Anna; Korbo, Lise

    2011-01-01

    on income data derived from the Coherent Social Statistics. Patients with PD and AP had significantly higher rates of health-related contact and medication use and a higher socioeconomic cost. Furthermore, they had very low employment rates, and those in employment had a lower income level than employed......Parkinson's disease (PD) and atypical parkinsonism (AP) cause a significant socioeconomic burden, but there is insufficient information about the total disease burden at a national level. Thus, the goal of this study was to estimate the excess direct and indirect costs of PD and AP in a national...... sample. Using records from the Danish National Patient Registry (1997-2007), 13,400 PD and 647 AP patients were identified and compared with, respectively, 53,600 and 2,588 control cases randomly selected with respect to age, gender, civil status, and geographic location. Direct costs including...

  1. Etiology and pathophysiology of frontotemporal dementia, Parkinson disease and Alzheimer disease: lessons from genetic studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wider, Christian; Wszolek, Zbigniew K

    2008-01-01

    Genetic studies have led to major discoveries in the pathogenesis of various neurodegenerative diseases. Ubiquitin-positive familial frontotemporal dementia was recently found to be caused by mutations in the progranulin gene (PGRN), and the major constituent of the inclusions, TDP-43, was subsequently identified. The tau gene (MAPT) causes frontotemporal dementia with parkinsonism linked to chromosome 17. In Parkinson disease, LRRK2 mutations have emerged as a major cause of both familial and sporadic forms, adding to the previously known genes SNCA,PRKN,DJ1 and PINK1. Several genes have been implicated in Alzheimer disease, including the APP gene and the PSEN genes. Recently, variants in the sortilin-related receptor 1 gene, SORL1, were associated with Alzheimer disease. 2008 S. Karger AG, Basel

  2. Etiology and Pathophysiology of Frontotemporal Dementia, Parkinson Disease and Alzheimer Disease: Lessons from Genetic Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wider, Christian; Wszolek, Zbigniew K.

    2008-01-01

    Genetic studies have led to major discoveries in the pathogenesis of various neurodegenerative diseases. Ubiquitin-positive familial frontotemporal dementia was recently found to be caused by mutations in the progranulin gene (PGRN), and the major constituent of the inclusions, TDP-43, was subsequently identified. The tau gene (MAPT) causes frontotemporal dementia with parkinsonism linked to chromosome 17. In Parkinson disease, LRRK2 mutations have emerged as a major cause of both familial and sporadic forms, adding to the previously known genes SNCA, PRKN, DJ1 and PINK1. Several genes have been implicated in Alzheimer disease, including the APP gene and the PSEN genes. Recently, variants in the sortilin-related receptor 1 gene, SORL1, were associated with Alzheimer disease. PMID:18322368

  3. A functional magnetic resonance imaging study of pathophysiological changes responsible for mirror movements in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poisson, Alice; Ballanger, Bénédicte; Metereau, Elise; Redouté, Jérome; Ibarolla, Danielle; Comte, Jean-Christophe; Bernard, Hélène Gervais; Vidailhet, Marie; Broussolle, Emmanuel; Thobois, Stéphane

    2013-01-01

    Mirror movements correspond to involuntary movements observed in the limb contralateral to the one performing voluntary movement. They can be observed in Parkinson's disease (PD) but their pathophysiology remains unclear. The present study aims at identifying their neural correlates in PD using functional magnetic resonance imaging. Ten control subjects and 14-off drug patients with asymmetrical right-sided PD were included (8 with left-sided mirror movements during right-hand movements, and 6 without mirror movements). Between-group comparisons of BOLD signal were performed during right-hand movements and at rest (pParkinson's disease are promoted by: 1- a deactivation of the non-mirroring inhibitory network (dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, pre-supplementary motor area); 2- an overactivation of prokinetic areas (notably the insula). The concomitant overactivation of a proactive inhibitory network (including the posterior cingulate cortex and precuneus) could reflect a compensatory inhibition of mirror movements.

  4. Prevalence and correlates of sleep disorders in Parkinson's disease: a polysomnographic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alatriste-Booth, Vanessa; Rodríguez-Violante, Mayela; Camacho-Ordoñez, Azyadeh; Cervantes-Arriaga, Amin

    2015-03-01

    Sleep disorders in Parkinson's disease are very common. Polysomnography (PSG) is considered the gold standard for diagnosis. The aim of the present study is to assess the prevalence of nocturnal sleep disorders diagnosed by polysomnography and to determine the associated clinical factors. A total of 120 patients with Parkinson's disease were included. All patients underwent a standardized overnight, single night polysomnography. Ninety-four (78.3%) patients had an abnormal PSG. Half of the patients fulfilled criteria for sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome (SAHS); rapid eye movement behavior disorder (RBD) was present in 37.5%. Characteristics associated with SAHS were age (p = 0.049) and body mass index (p = 0.016). Regarding RBD, age (p sleep disorders. Higher levodopa equivalent dose and body mass index appear to be risk factors for RBD and SAHS, respectively.

  5. Back Extensor Strengthening Exercise and Backpack Wearing Treatment for Camptocormia in Parkinson's Disease: A Retrospective Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effect of a conservative treatment regime in Parkinson's disease patients with camptocormia. Methods Nine patients with Parkinson's disease were included in a retrospective pilot study of the value of back extensor strengthening exercise. Six inpatients received a 30-minute treatment, twice daily for 5 weeks, being treated on average for 34 days; while three outpatients visited the clinic and were educated for home exercise and backpack wearing treatment. Outpatients should be scheduled to visit the outpatient department to check physical status every 2–4 weeks for an average of 3 months. Results All patients except one showed statistically significant improvements in activities of daily living (ADL) and motor symptoms, as measured by flexion angle at standing posture, Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) II and III, and modified Hoehn-Yahr staging. Conclusion Conservative treatment is effective in postural correction of camptocormia in Parkinson's disease, as well as improvement in ADL and motor symptoms. PMID:28971053

  6. Diagnosis of Parkinson's disease on the basis of clinical and genetic classification: a population-based modelling study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nalls, Mike A; McLean, Cory Y; Rick, Jacqueline; Eberly, Shirley; Hutten, Samantha J; Gwinn, Katrina; Sutherland, Margaret; Martinez, Maria; Heutink, Peter; Williams, Nigel M; Hardy, John; Gasser, Thomas; Brice, Alexis; Price, T Ryan; Nicolas, Aude; Keller, Margaux F; Molony, Cliona; Gibbs, J Raphael; Chen-Plotkin, Alice; Suh, Eunran; Letson, Christopher; Fiandaca, Massimo S; Mapstone, Mark; Federoff, Howard J; Noyce, Alastair J; Morris, Huw; Van Deerlin, Vivianna M; Weintraub, Daniel; Zabetian, Cyrus; Hernandez, Dena G; Lesage, Suzanne; Mullins, Meghan; Conley, Emily Drabant; Northover, Carrie A M; Frasier, Mark; Marek, Ken; Day-Williams, Aaron G; Stone, David J; Ioannidis, John P A; Singleton, Andrew B

    2015-10-01

    Accurate diagnosis and early detection of complex diseases, such as Parkinson's disease, has the potential to be of great benefit for researchers and clinical practice. We aimed to create a non-invasive, accurate classification model for the diagnosis of Parkinson's disease, which could serve as a basis for future disease prediction studies in longitudinal cohorts. We developed a model for disease classification using data from the Parkinson's Progression Marker Initiative (PPMI) study for 367 patients with Parkinson's disease and phenotypically typical imaging data and 165 controls without neurological disease. Olfactory function, genetic risk, family history of Parkinson's disease, age, and gender were algorithmically selected by stepwise logistic regression as significant contributors to our classifying model. We then tested the model with data from 825 patients with Parkinson's disease and 261 controls from five independent cohorts with varying recruitment strategies and designs: the Parkinson's Disease Biomarkers Program (PDBP), the Parkinson's Associated Risk Study (PARS), 23andMe, the Longitudinal and Biomarker Study in PD (LABS-PD), and the Morris K Udall Parkinson's Disease Research Center of Excellence cohort (Penn-Udall). Additionally, we used our model to investigate patients who had imaging scans without evidence of dopaminergic deficit (SWEDD). In the population from PPMI, our initial model correctly distinguished patients with Parkinson's disease from controls at an area under the curve (AUC) of 0·923 (95% CI 0·900-0·946) with high sensitivity (0·834, 95% CI 0·711-0·883) and specificity (0·903, 95% CI 0·824-0·946) at its optimum AUC threshold (0·655). All Hosmer-Lemeshow simulations suggested that when parsed into random subgroups, the subgroup data matched that of the overall cohort. External validation showed good classification of Parkinson's disease, with AUCs of 0·894 (95% CI 0·867-0·921) in the PDBP cohort, 0·998 (0·992-1·000

  7. Descriptive study comparing routine hospital administrative data with the Vascular Society of Great Britain and Ireland's National Vascular Database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aylin, P; Lees, T; Baker, S; Prytherch, D; Ashley, S

    2007-04-01

    To compare patient volume and outcomes in vascular surgery between an administrative data set (Hospital Episode Statistics) and a clinical database (National Vascular Database). Descriptive study. Volume of cases determined by age, sex, year and procedure and in-hospital mortality by procedure for both datasets for patients undergoing either repair of abdominal aortic aneurysm, carotid endarterectomy or infrainguinal bypass over a three year period between 1st April 2001 and 31st March 2004. There were 32,242 admissions with a mention of the three selected vascular procedures within the administrative data set compared to 8462 within the clinical database. For NHS trusts common to both datasets, there were twice as many procedures (16,923) recorded within the administrative dataset compared to the clinical database. Patient characteristics were similar across both databases. Further analysis limiting the administrative data to records attributed to consultants known to contribute to the clinical database showed much closer agreement with only 11% more repairs of abdominal aortic aneurysm recorded within the administrative dataset compared to the National Vascular Database. There are significant differences in total numbers between HES and the NVD. If the National Vascular Database is to become a credible source of information on activity and outcomes for vascular surgery, there is a clear need to increase the number of contributing surgeons and to increase the completeness of data submitted. Further analysis at individual record level is needed to identify other reasons for discrepancies which could help to enhance data quality, both within Hospital Episode Statistics and within the National Vascular Database.

  8. A pilot study to evaluate multi-dimensional effects of dance for people with Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ventura, Maria I; Barnes, Deborah E; Ross, Jessica M; Lanni, Kimberly E; Sigvardt, Karen A; Disbrow, Elizabeth A

    2016-11-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease associated with deficits in motor, cognitive, and emotion/quality of life (QOL) domains, yet most pharmacologic and behavioral interventions focus only on motor function. Our goal was to perform a pilot study of Dance for Parkinson's-a community-based program that is growing in popularity-in order to compare effect sizes across multiple outcomes and to inform selection of primary and secondary outcomes for a larger trial. Study participants were people with PD who self-enrolled in either Dance for Parkinson's classes (intervention group, N=8) or PD support groups (control group, N=7). Assessments of motor function (Timed-Up-and-Go, Gait Speed, Standing Balance Test), cognitive function (Test of Everyday Attention, Verbal Fluency, Alternate Uses, Digit Span Forward and Backward), and emotion/QOL (Geriatric Depression Scale, Falls Efficacy Scale-International, Parkinson's Disease Questionnaire-39 (total score and Activities of Daily Living subscale)) were performed in both groups at baseline and follow-up. Standardized effect sizes were calculated within each group and between groups for all 12 measures. Effect sizes were positive (suggesting improvement) for all 12 measures within the intervention group and 7 of 12 measures within the control group. The largest between-group differences were observed for the Test of Everyday Attention (a measure of cognitive switching), gait speed and falls efficacy. Our findings suggest that dance has potential to improve multiple outcomes in people with PD. Future trials should consider co-primary outcomes given potential benefits in motor, cognitive and emotion/QOL domains. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Automated Differential Diagnosis of Early Parkinsonism Using Metabolic Brain Networks: A Validation Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathi, Madhavi; Tang, Chris C; Feigin, Andrew; De Lucia, Ivana; Nazem, Amir; Dhawan, Vijay; Eidelberg, David

    2016-01-01

    The differentiation of idiopathic Parkinson disease (IPD) from multiple system atrophy (MSA) and progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP), the most common atypical parkinsonian look-alike syndromes (APS), can be clinically challenging. In these disorders, diagnostic inaccuracy is more frequent early in the clinical course when signs and symptoms are mild. Diagnostic inaccuracy may be particularly relevant in trials of potential disease-modifying agents, which typically involve participants with early clinical manifestations. In an initial study, we developed a probabilistic algorithm to classify subjects with clinical parkinsonism but uncertain diagnosis based on the expression of metabolic covariance patterns for IPD, MSA, and PSP. Classifications based on this algorithm agreed closely with final clinical diagnosis. Nonetheless, blinded prospective validation is required before routine use of the algorithm can be considered. We used metabolic imaging to study an independent cohort of 129 parkinsonian subjects with uncertain diagnosis; 77 (60%) had symptoms for 2 y or less at the time of imaging. After imaging, subjects were followed by blinded movement disorders specialists for an average of 2.2 y before final diagnosis was made. When the algorithm was applied to the individual scan data, the probabilities of IPD, MSA, and PSP were computed and used to classify each of the subjects. The resulting image-based classifications were then compared with the final clinical diagnosis. IPD subjects were distinguished from APS with 94% specificity and 96% positive predictive value (PPV) using the original 2-level logistic classification algorithm. The algorithm achieved 90% specificity and 85% PPV for MSA and 94% specificity and 94% PPV for PSP. The diagnostic accuracy was similarly high (specificity and PPV > 90%) for parkinsonian subjects with short symptom duration. In addition, 25 subjects were classified as level I indeterminate parkinsonism and 4 more subjects as level II

  10. Medication Responsiveness of Motor Symptoms in a Population-Based Study of Parkinson Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yvette M. Bordelon

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We assessed degree of Parkinson disease motor symptom improvement with medication among subjects enrolled in an ongoing, population-based study in Central California. The motor section of the unified Parkinson disease rating scale (UPDRS was performed on subjects in both OFF and ON medication states, and difference between these scores was used as an indicator of symptomatic benefit. Higher OFF minus ON scores correlated with more severe baseline symptoms. There was equivalent improvement on the motor UPDRS scale for subjects divided according to medication classes used: levodopa alone 7.3 points, levodopa plus other medications 8.5 points, and dopamine agonists but not levodopa 6.1 points. In addition, there was no difference in the magnitude of improvement when subjects were divided according to Parkinson disease subtype, defined as tremor dominant, akinetic-rigid, or mixed. In this community-based sample, these values are within the range of a clinically important difference as defined by previous studies.

  11. Motor matters: tackling heterogeneity of Parkinson's disease in functional MRI studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Štefan Holiga

    Full Text Available To tackle the heterogeneity of Parkinson's disease symptoms, most functional imaging studies tend to select a uniform group of subjects. We hypothesize that more profound considerations are needed to account for intra/inter-subject clinical variability and possibly for differing pathophysiological processes. Twelve patients were investigated using functional magnetic resonance imaging during visually-guided finger tapping. To account for disease heterogeneity, the motor score and individual symptom scores from the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS-III were utilized in the group-level model using two approaches either as the explanatory variable or as the effect of interest. Employment of the UPDRS-III score and symptom scores was systematically tested on the resulting group response to the levodopa challenge, which further accentuated the diversity of the diseased state of participants. Statistics revealed a bilateral group response to levodopa in the basal ganglia. Interestingly, systematic incorporation of individual motor aspects of the disease in the modelling amended the resulting activity patterns conspicuously, evidencing a manifold amount of explained variability by the particular score. In conclusion, the severity of clinical symptoms expressed in the UPDRS-III scores should be considered in the analysis to attain unbiased statistics, draw reliable conclusions and allow for comparisons between research groups studying Parkinson's disease using functional magnetic resonance imaging.

  12. Toxic equine parkinsonism: an immunohistochemical study of 10 horses with nigropallidal encephalomalacia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, H T; Rumbeiha, W K; Patterson, J S; Puschner, B; Knight, A P

    2012-03-01

    Chronic ingestion of yellow star thistle (Centaurea solstitialis) or Russian knapweed (Acroptilon repens) causes nigropallidal encephalomalacia (NPE) in horses with an abrupt onset of neurologic signs characterized by dystonia of lips and tongue, inability to prehend food, depression, and locomotor deficits. The objectives of this study were to reexamine the pathologic alterations of NPE and to conduct an immunohistochemistry study using antibodies to tyrosine hydroxylase and α-synuclein, to determine whether NPE brains show histopathologic features resembling those in human Parkinson disease. Results confirm that the NPE lesions are located within the substantia nigra pars reticulata, sparing the cell bodies of the dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta, and in the rostral portion of the globus pallidus, with partial disruption of dopaminergic (tyrosine hydroxylase-positive) fibers passing through the globus pallidus. No abnormal cytoplasmic inclusions like the Lewy bodies of human Parkinson disease were seen in these NPE brains. These findings indicate that equine NPE may serve as a large animal model of environmentally acquired toxic parkinsonism, with clinical phenotype directly attributable to lesions in globus pallidus and substantia nigra pars reticulata rather than to the destruction of dopaminergic neurons.

  13. Core elements to understand and improve coping with Parkinson's disease in patients and family carers: A focus group study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarta-Sánchez, M Victoria; Caparrós, Neus; Riverol Fernández, Mario; Díaz De Cerio Ayesa, Sara; Ursúa Sesma, M Eugenia; Portillo, Mari Carmen

    2017-11-01

    The aim of this study were: (1) To explore the meaning that coping with Parkinson's disease has for patients and family carers; (2) To suggest the components of an intervention focused on enhancing their coping with the disease. Adapting to Parkinson's disease involves going through many difficult changes; however, it may improve quality of life in patients and family carers. One of the key aspects for facilitating the psychosocial adjustment to Parkinson's disease is the strengthening of coping skills. A sequential explanatory mixed methods study was carried out. Findings from the qualitative phase are presented. Data were collected in May 2014 through three focus groups: one of people with Parkinson's disease (n = 9), one of family carers (n = 7) and one of healthcare professionals (n = 5). All focus groups were digitally recorded and transcribed verbatim and content analysis was independently carried out by two researchers. The participants coincided in highlighting that coping with Parkinson's disease helped the patient and the family carer in their search for balance; and it implied a transformation in their lives. To aid the process of coping with Parkinson's disease, a multifaceted intervention is proposed. Coping with Parkinson's disease is a complex process for both patients and family carers and it should therefore be considered a standard service in healthcare policies aimed at this group. The proposed intervention constitutes a nursing tool which has great potential to improve the quality of life in Parkinson's disease and in other long-term conditions. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Glaucoma correlates with increased risk of Parkinson's disease in the elderly: a national-based cohort study in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Shih-Wei; Lin, Cheng-Li; Liao, Kuan-Fu

    2017-08-01

    Very little is known about the association between glaucoma and Parkinson's disease in the elderly. The objective of this study was to determine whether glaucoma is associated with Parkinson's disease in older people in Taiwan. A retrospective cohort study was conducted to analyze the Taiwan National Health Insurance Program database from 2000 to 2010. We included 4330 subjects aged 65 years or older with newly diagnosed glaucoma as the glaucoma group, and 17,000 randomly selected subjects without a glaucoma diagnosis as the non-glaucoma group. Both groups were matched for sex, age, other comorbidities, and index year of glaucoma diagnosis. The incidence of Parkinson's disease at the end of 2011 was measured. A multivariable Cox proportional hazard regression model was used to measure the hazard ratio and 95% confidence intervals for Parkinson's disease associated with glaucoma. The overall incidence of Parkinson's disease was 1.28-fold higher in the glaucoma group than that in the non-glaucoma group (7.73 vs. 6.02 per 1000 person-years; 95% confidence interval 1.18, 1.40). After controlling for potential confounding factors, the adjusted hazard ratio of Parkinson's disease was 1.23 for the glaucoma group (95% confidence interval 1.05, 1.46), compared with the non-glaucoma group. Older people with glaucoma correlate with a small but statistically significant increase in the risk for Parkinson's disease. Whether glaucoma may be a non-motor feature of Parkinson's disease in older people requires further research to confirm.

  15. Falls in Parkinson's disease.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grimbergen, Y.A.M.; Munneke, M.; Bloem, B.R.

    2004-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: To summarize the latest insights into the clinical significance, assessment, pathophysiology and treatment of falls in Parkinson's disease. RECENT FINDINGS: Recent studies have shown that falls are common in Parkinson's disease, even when compared with other fall-prone

  16. Detecting and monitoring the symptoms of Parkinson's disease using smartphones: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arora, S; Venkataraman, V; Zhan, A; Donohue, S; Biglan, K M; Dorsey, E R; Little, M A

    2015-06-01

    Remote, non-invasive and objective tests that can be used to support expert diagnosis for Parkinson's disease (PD) are lacking. Participants underwent baseline in-clinic assessments, including the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS), and were provided smartphones with an Android operating system that contained a smartphone application that assessed voice, posture, gait, finger tapping, and response time. Participants then took the smart phones home to perform the five tasks four times a day for a month. Once a week participants had a remote (telemedicine) visit with a Parkinson disease specialist in which a modified (excluding assessments of rigidity and balance) UPDRS performed. Using statistical analyses of the five tasks recorded using the smartphone from 10 individuals with PD and 10 controls, we sought to: (1) discriminate whether the participant had PD and (2) predict the modified motor portion of the UPDRS. Twenty participants performed an average of 2.7 tests per day (68.9% adherence) for the study duration (average of 34.4 days) in a home and community setting. The analyses of the five tasks differed between those with Parkinson disease and those without. In discriminating participants with PD from controls, the mean sensitivity was 96.2% (SD 2%) and mean specificity was 96.9% (SD 1.9%). The mean error in predicting the modified motor component of the UPDRS (range 11-34) was 1.26 UPDRS points (SD 0.16). Measuring PD symptoms via a smartphone is feasible and has potential value as a diagnostic support tool. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Parkinsonism, dysautonomia, and intranuclear inclusions in a fragile X carrier: a clinical-pathological study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louis, Elan; Moskowitz, Carol; Friez, Michael; Amaya, Maria; Vonsattel, Jean Paul G

    2006-03-01

    A new tremor-ataxia syndrome, fragile X-associated tremor/ataxia syndrome (FXTAS), has been described among carriers of premutation expansions (55-200 CGG repeats) of the fragile X mental retardation 1 (FMR1) gene. The prevalence of FMR1 premutation alleles has been reported to be 1 in 813 among men. Patients with FXTAS may also have features of parkinsonism. Postmortem findings have been described in eight patients with FXTAS and detailed descriptions of the pathological features of this syndrome have been published in two of these. We present a detailed description of the postmortem findings in a third patient. The patient had parkinsonism and was a carrier of a premutation expansion in the FMR1 gene. As in previous reports, the most prominent finding was the presence of eosinophilic nuclear inclusions in neurons and astrocytes, loss of Purkinje cells, and regional vacuolation of the cerebral white matter. As in one previous report, nuclear inclusions were also present in ependymal and choroid plexus cells. A new finding is that of nuclear inclusions in both the adeno- and neurohypophysis. These findings confirm the diffuse nature of this pathology. Further studies of clinical-pathological correlation in a larger sample of brains would provide additional insight into the mechanisms of the tremor, ataxia, and parkinsonism in these patients. (c) 2005 Movement Disorder Society.

  18. Uncertainty and depression in people with Parkinson's disease: A cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Sangwoo; Lee, JuHee; Chu, Sang Hui; Sohn, Young H

    2017-06-01

    Adults with chronic disease may experience uncertainty and depression when coping with their illness. This study identifies degrees of uncertainty and depression, as well as factors associated with depression in people with Parkinson's disease. The 120 participants included patients who visited the neurology outpatient department of a tertiary hospital in Seoul and individuals who attended public events managed by the Korean Parkinson's Disease Association. The mean age of the sample was 65.01 and 50.8% of patients were men. The mean scores of uncertainty and depression, measured using the Mishel Uncertainty in Illness Scale and Short Form Geriatric Depression Scale were 99.03 and 6.73, respectively. Approximately 68% of participants scored above the cut-off score for depression. Multiple regression analyses showed that uncertainty, perceived health status, and fatigue were factors significantly associated with depression. Nurses should be aware of and address these factors and their effects in order to implement interventions to prevent depression in people with Parkinson's disease. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  19. Subjective Experiences of Speech and Language Therapy in Patients with Parkinson's Disease: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spurgeon, Laura; Clarke, Carl E; Sackley, Cath

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. Parkinson's disease can produce a range of speech-language pathologies, which may require intervention. While evaluations of speech-language therapy have been undertaken, no work has been undertaken to capture patients' experiences of therapy. This was the aim of the present study. Methods. Semistructured interviews, using themes derived from the literature, were conducted with nine Parkinson's disease patients, all of whom had undergone speech-language therapy. Participants' responses were analysed in accordance with Thematic Network Analysis. Results. Four themes emerged: emotional reactions (frustration, embarrassment, lack of confidence, disappointment, and anxiety); physical impact (fatigue, breathing and swallowing, and word production); practical aspects (cost of treatment, waiting times, and the actual clinical experience); and expectations about treatment (met versus unmet). Conclusions. While many benefits of speech-language therapy were reported, several negative issues emerged which could impact adversely on rehabilitation. Parkinson's disease is associated with a range of psychological and physical sequelae, such as fatigue and depression; recognising any individual experiences which could exacerbate the existing condition and incorporating these into treatment planning may improve rehabilitation outcomes.

  20. Case studies of food shopping, cooking and eating habits in older women with Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, I; Sidenvall, B

    2001-07-01

    The principal aim of this study was to investigate how married and single-living older women diagnosed with Parkinson's disease managed to shop for food, cook and carry out their meals; and to observe whether their nutritional needs were satisfied. A secondary aim was to identify women with severe motor problems and describe their food-related situation. Parkinson's disease is associated with motor and eating problems, which, combined with age-related declines in physical functioning, may affect activities of daily living and dietary intake. Qualitative interviews and food survey were carried out in the homes of 10 women aged 67-80 years. The sample was recruited from outpatient registers. Decreased sense of smell, appetite and taste in combination with problems transporting food to the mouth and swallowing were risks for nutritional well-being. Food shopping was most difficult to manage, but six cooked even if their cooking style was changed. Married women with healthy husbands received support from their spouses. Single-living women suffering from motor problems had to call for help, which represented a threat to their well-being. Independence was given high priority. The whole situation - including psychosocial and stress factors - must be taken into account when discussing shopping, cooking and eating among old women with Parkinson's disease. A home-helper should not take over but facilitate procedures so that the woman can manage as long as possible. This gave them self-esteem.

  1. Iron in typical and atypical parkinsonism - Mössbauer spectroscopy and MRI studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuliński, R.; Bauminger, E. R.; Friedman, A.; Duda, P.; Gałązka-Friedman, J.

    2016-12-01

    Iron may play important role in neurodegeneration. The results of comparative studies of human brain areas (control and pathological) performed by Mössbauer spectroscopy (MS) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques are presented. Mössbauer spectroscopy demonstrated a higher concentration of iron in atypical parkinsonism (progressive supranuclear palsy PSP) in the brain areas Substantia Nigra (SN) and Globus Pallidus (GP) involved in this pathological process, compared to control, while the concentration of iron in pathological tissues in typical parkinsonism (Parkinson's disease - PD) did not differ from that in control. These results were compared with the changes in 1/T1 and 1/T2 (T1 and T2 being the relaxation times determined by MRI). A good linear correlation curve was found between the concentration of iron as determined by MS in different areas of control human brains and between 1/T1 and 1/T2. Whereas the finding in PSP-GP (the brain area involved in PSP) also fitted to such a correlation, this was not so for the correlation between pathological SN - the brain area involved in both diseases - and 1/T2, indicating a dependence of T2 on other factors than just the concentration of iron.

  2. A study investigating the experience of working for people with Parkinson's and the factors that influence workplace success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullin, Rebecca L; Chaudhuri, K Ray; Andrews, Thomasin C; Martin, Anne; Gay, Stella; White, Claire M

    2017-05-10

    The experience of working for people with Parkinson's disease (PD) is known to vary substantially and affects the length of time in employment after diagnosis. This study aims at exploring the experience of working for people with PD and to create a model detailing the factors that influence their workplace success. A qualitative grounded theoretical approach was used. Seventeen working people with PD were selected for individual interviews which were conducted sequentially. Data were analyzed in an iterative, inductive process of coding to identify common themes and to generate a model that explains the data. Two core themes that influence workplace success for people with PD were identified. 'Feeling in control of Parkinson's' describes the actions that they make to remain in control. 'Being able to control Parkinson's in the workplace' describes external factors that they believe influence their ability to work successfully. The theoretical model demonstrates how a variety of factors interplay to influence workplace success for people with PD. PD is often poorly understood but the ability to explore and devise strategies for oneself and the flexibility to work around a fluctuating daily pattern were regularly identified as strategies that facilitated success. Implications for Rehabilitation The experience of working for people with Parkinson's is variable and is influenced by how in control the person with Parkinson's feels and the strategies they use to manage challenges. There is a need for greater workplace education to enhance employers' understanding of Parkinson's to ensure better support for strategies or reasonable adjustments by employers. People with Parkinson's are able to devise strategies to overcome some of their own specific workplace challenges including through technology but often, they prefer not to use disability aids. Daily fluctuations in Parkinson's symptoms are an important factor influencing workplace success.

  3. Observational study of sleep-related disorders in Italian patients with Parkinson's disease: usefulness of the Italian version of Parkinson's disease sleep scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellecchia, M T; Antonini, A; Bonuccelli, U; Fabbrini, G; Ferini Strambi, L; Stocchi, F; Battaglia, A; Barone, P

    2012-06-01

    Sleep disturbances are common in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). We aimed to evaluate prevalence and severity of nighttime sleep disturbances in Italian PD patients and to validate the Italian version of the Parkinson's disease sleep scale. A total of 221 PD patients and 57 healthy controls participated in a cross-sectional study with retest. PDSS, Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS), Hamilton Depression Rating Scale, Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS), and Hoehn and Yahr staging were applied. PDSS total and individual items scores from patients were significantly lower than those in controls. Internal consistency of PDSS scale was satisfactory and intraclass correlation coefficient for test-retest reliability was 0.96 for total PDSS score. A significant negative correlation was found between total PDSS and ESS scores, and between total PDSS and HDRS scores. PDSS scores were also related to UPDRS sections II, III and IV, and H&Y stage. PDSS and ESS scores were not related to levodopa equivalent dose. Daytime sleepiness, depressive symptoms and disease severity correlate with sleep disturbances in Italian PD patients. The PDSS is a valid and reliable tool to evaluate sleep disturbances in Italian patients.

  4. PET-Studies in parkinson's disease; Untersuchungen mit der Positronen-Emissions-Tomographie (PET) bei Patienten mit Morbus Parkinson

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwarz, J. [Klinik fuer Neurologie, Univ. Leipzig (Germany)

    2002-09-01

    Positron-emission-tomography (PET) has enabled to study the metabolism and blood flow in specific brain areas. Besides, there is a variety of radiotracers that allow quantification of the function of distinct molecules. In respect to Parkinson's disease, PET allowed for the first time to assess the number of dopaminergic neurons in vivo. Thus, helping confirming a dopaminergic deficit, measuring disease progression and also help to determine the function of dopaminergic grafts. Current research has shifted to determine the role of related neurotransmitter systems in the pathophysiology of Parkinson's disease. (orig.) [German] Die positronen-emissions-tomographie (PET) bietet neben der Messung von Metabolismus und Blutfluss die Moeglichkeit der Darstellung von einzelnen Molekuelen. Bei Patienten mit Morbus Parkinson hat es diese Technik erstmals erlaubt, die Anzahl der dopaminergen Neurone zu quantifizieren, wodurch die Diagnose gesichert, die Progression der Erkrankung beurteilt und auch das Anwachsen von Implantaten beurteilt werden kann. Die PET hat einen wesentlichen Beitrag zu unserem heutigen Wissen ueber die Pathophysiologie dieser Erkrankung beigetragen. (orig.)

  5. Parkinson disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000755.htm Parkinson disease To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Parkinson disease causes certain brain cells to die. These ...

  6. Profile characterization of Parkinson's disease in Mexico: ReMePARK study

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Cervantes-Arriaga, Amin; Rodríguez-Violante, Mayela; López-Ruiz, Minerva; Estrada-Bellmann, Ingrid; Zuñiga-Ramírez, Carlos; Otero-Cerdeira, Elisa; Camacho-Ordoñez, Azyadeh; González-Latapi, Paulina; Morales-Briceño, Hugo; Martínez-Ramírez, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    The Mexican Registry of Parkinson´s disease (ReMePARK) is nested within a multicentric cohort aimed to describe motor, non-motor, and genetic determinants of Parkinson's disease in Mexican patients...

  7. Parkinson's disease progression at 30 years: a study of subthalamic deep brain-stimulated patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merola, Aristide; Zibetti, Maurizio; Angrisano, Serena; Rizzi, Laura; Ricchi, Valeria; Artusi, Carlo A; Lanotte, Michele; Rizzone, Mario G; Lopiano, Leonardo

    2011-07-01

    Clinical findings in Parkinson's disease suggest that most patients progressively develop disabling non-levodopa-responsive symptoms during the course of the disease. Nevertheless, several heterogeneous factors, such as clinical phenotype, age at onset and genetic aspects may influence the long-term clinical picture. In order to investigate the main features of long-term Parkinson's disease progression, we studied a cohort of 19 subjects treated with subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation after >20 years of disease, reporting clinical and neuropsychological data up to a mean of 30 years from disease onset. This group of patients was characterized by an early onset of disease, with a mean age of 38.63 years at Parkinson's disease onset, which was significantly lower than in the other long-term subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation follow-up cohorts reported in the literature. All subjects were regularly evaluated by a complete Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale, a battery of neuropsychological tests and a clinical interview, intended to assess the rate of non-levodopa-responsive symptom progression. Clinical data were available for all patients at presurgical baseline and at 1, 3 and 5 years from the subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation surgical procedure, while follow-up data after >7 years were additionally reported in a subgroup of 14 patients. The clinical and neuropsychological performance progressively worsened during the course of follow-up; 64% of patients gradually developed falls, 86% dysphagia, 57% urinary incontinence and 43% dementia. A progressive worsening of motor symptoms was observed both in 'medication-ON' condition and in 'stimulation-ON' condition, with a parallel reduction in the synergistic effect of 'medication-ON/stimulation-ON' condition. Neuropsychological data also showed a gradual decline in the performances of all main cognitive domains, with an initial involvement of executive functions, followed by the impairment

  8. Effectiveness of occupational therapy in Parkinson's disease: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturkenboom, Ingrid H W M; Graff, Maud J; Borm, George F; Adang, Eddy M M; Nijhuis-van der Sanden, Maria W G; Bloem, Bastiaan R; Munneke, Marten

    2013-02-02

    Occupational therapists may have an added value in the care of patients with Parkinson's disease whose daily functioning is compromised, as well as for their immediate caregivers. Evidence for this added value is inconclusive due to a lack of rigorous studies. The aim of this trial is to evaluate the (cost) effectiveness of occupational therapy in improving daily functioning of patients with Parkinson's disease. A multicenter, assessor-blinded, two-armed randomized controlled clinical trial will be conducted, with evaluations at three and six months. One hundred ninety-two home-dwelling patients with Parkinson's disease and with an occupational therapy indication will be assigned to the experimental group or to the control group (2:1). Patients and their caregivers in the experimental group will receive ten weeks of home-based occupational therapy according to recent Dutch guidelines. The intervention will be delivered by occupational therapists who have been specifically trained to treat patients according to these guidelines. Participants in the control group will not receive occupational therapy during the study period. The primary outcome for the patient is self-perceived daily functioning at three months, assessed with the Canadian Occupational Performance Measure. Secondary patient-related outcomes include: objective performance of daily activities, self-perceived satisfaction with performance in daily activities, participation, impact of fatigue, proactive coping skills, health-related quality of life, overall quality of life, health-related costs, and effectiveness at six months. All outcomes at the caregiver level will be secondary and will include self-perceived burden of care, objective burden of care, proactive coping skills, overall quality of life, and care-related costs. Effectiveness will be evaluated using a covariance analysis of the difference in outcome at three months. An economic evaluation from a societal perspective will be conducted, as

  9. Vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 as a marker for malignant vascular tumors and mesothelioma: an immunohistochemical study of 262 vascular endothelial and 1640 nonvascular tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miettinen, Markku; Rikala, Maarit-Sarlomo; Rys, Janusz; Lasota, Jerzy; Wang, Zeng-Feng

    2012-04-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR2) is a primary responder to vascular endothelial growth factor signal and thereby regulates endothelial migration and proliferation. This receptor is expressed in endothelial cells and in some vascular tumors, but many reports also detail its expression in carcinomas and lymphomas. VEGFR2 is a potential cell-type marker, and data on VEGFR2 expression may also have therapeutic significance in view of recent availability of VEGFR2 inhibitors. In this study, we immunohistochemically examined 262 vascular endothelial and 1640 nonvascular tumors and selected non-neoplastic tissues with a VEGFR2-specific rabbit monoclonal antibody 55B11. In early human embryo, VEFGR2 was expressed in endothelia of developing capillaries and in the thoracic duct, great vessels, hepatic sinusoids, epidermis, and mesothelia. In late first trimester fetus peripheral soft tissues, VEGFR2 was restricted to capillary endothelia, chondrocytes, and superficial portion of the epidermis. In normal adult tissues, it was restricted to endothelia and mesothelia. VEGFR2 was consistently expressed in angiosarcomas, Kaposi sarcomas, and retiform hemangioendotheliomas. It was detected in only half of epithelioid hemangioendotheliomas (15/27), usually focally. VEGFR2 was strongly expressed in most capillary hemangiomas and weakly or focally in cavernous, venous, and spindle cell hemangiomas and in lymphangiomas. Malignant epithelial mesothelioma was found to be a unique epithelial neoplasm with a strong and nearly consistent VEGFR2 expression, including membrane staining (35/38). Approximately 10% of squamous cell carcinomas and 23% of pulmonary adenocarcinomas contained focal positivity. The only nonendothelial mesenchymal tumors found to be VEGFR2 positive were biphasic synovial sarcoma (focal epithelial expression) and chordoma. All melanomas and lymphomas were negative. VEGFR2 is a promising marker for malignant vascular tumors and malignant

  10. Vascular function and mortality in haemodialysis patients: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalton, Brad S; Fassett, Robert G; Geraghty, Dominic P; De Ryke, Rex; Coombes, Jeff S

    2011-10-01

    Haemodialysis patients often have impaired vascular function that can contribute to mortality. Endothelial-dependent and -independent vascular function can be assessed using the brachial artery reactivity (BAR) technique that measures flow-mediated dilatation (FMD) and the response to glyceryl trinitrate (GTN), respectively. The aim of this pilot study was to determine whether BAR measurements in haemodialysis patients were associated with mortality. Brachial artery responses to FMD and administration of GTN were assessed in consecutive haemodialysis patients. Patients were then followed up to 18 months after BAR measurements. Seventeen patients were included in the study. After 18 months of follow-up, patients were divided into two groups: survived (n=12) and deceased (n=5). Patients who survived had a significantly greater median percentage vasodilatation to GTN than those who died (19.1% vs 8.8%; P=0.04); and a significantly greater median area under the diameter change-time curve (318 vs 146 mm/s; P=0.03). However, there were no significant differences between survivors and deceased in median percentage vasodilation to FMD (6.0% vs 4.3%; P=0.21), time to peak dilation (45 vs 40s; P=0.66) or area under the diameter change-time curve (35.5 vs 20 mm/s; P=0.29). In this pilot study in a small group of haemodialysis patients, endothelial-independent vasodilatory response to GTN was associated with mortality and was of better prognostic value than the endothelial-dependent response to FMD. This finding needs to be investigated in a larger cohort. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. Descriptive study of relationship between cardio-ankle vascular index and biomarkers in vascular-related diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jinbo; Liu, Huan; Zhao, Hongwei; Shang, Guangyun; Zhou, Yingyan; Li, Lihong; Wang, Hongyu

    2017-01-01

    Cardio-ankle vascular index (CAVI) was supposed to be an independent predictor for vascular-related events. Biomarkers such as homocysteine (Hcy), N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP), and urine albumin(microalbumin) (UAE) have involved the pathophysiological development of arteriosclerosis. The present study was to investigate relationship between CAVI and biomarkers in vascular-related diseases. A total of 656 subjects (M/F 272/384) from department of Vascular Medicine were enrolled into our study. They were divided into four groups according to the numbers of suffered diseases, healthy group (group 0: subjects without diseases of hypertension, diabetes mellitus (DM), coronary heart disease (CHD); n = 186), group 1 (with one of diseases of hypertension, CHD, DM; n = 237), group 2 (with two of diseases of hypertension, CHD, DM; n = 174), and group 3 (with all diseases of hypertension, CHD, DM; n = 59). CAVI was measured by VS-1000 apparatus. CAVI was increasing with increasing numbers of suffered vascular-related diseases. Similar results were found in the parameters of biomarkers such as Hcy, log NT-ProBNP, and log UAE. There were positive correlation between log NT-proBNP, Hcy, log UAE, and CAVI in the entire study group and nonhealthy group. Positive correlation between log UAE and CAVI were found in the entire study group after adjusting for age, body mass index (BMI), blood pressure, uric acid, and lipids. Multivariate analysis showed that log UAE was an independent associating factor of CAVI in all subjects. CAVI was significantly higher in subjects with hypertension, CHD, and DM. There was correlation between arterial stiffness and biomarkers such as NT-proBNP, Hcy, and UAE.

  12. The incidence and risk factors of falls in Parkinson disease: prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudzińska, M; Bukowczan, S; Stożek, J; Zajdel, K; Mirek, E; Chwała, W; Wójcik-Pędziwiatr, M; Banaszkiewicz, K; Szczudlik, A

    2013-01-01

    Although Parkinson disease (PD) patients suffer falls more frequently than other old people, only a few studies have focused on identifying the specific risk factors for falls in PD patients. The aim of this study was to assess the incidence and risk factors of falls in a prospective study in comparison to a control group. One hundred patients with PD were recruited to the study along with 55 gender- and age-matched healthy controls. Both groups were examined twice; the second examination took place one year after the first one. Examination of the PD group included: medical history including falls, neurological examination, assessment of the severity of parkinsonism [Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS), Schwab and England scale (S and E), Hoehn and Yahr scale (H and Y), Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE)], Hamilton scale and quality of life scales (SF-36, EQ-5D) and Freezing of Gait Questionnaire (FOG-Q). In both groups falls were recorded over the 12 months. Frequent fallers are defined as having more than 3 falls a year. Over the year falls occurred in 54% of PD patients and 18% of controls. In a prospective study 28% of PD patients fell more frequently than in retrospective analysis. Frequent fallers were found in 20% of patients and in 7% of controls. Fallers showed higher scores in UPDRS, H and Y, S and E, MMSE, and Hamilton scale than non-fallers. Independent risk factors for falls were: age, previously reported falls and higher score in the FOG-Q. Falls in PD patients occurred three times more frequently than in controls. Independent risk factors for falls were: high score in FOG-Q, older age and presence of falls in medical history.

  13. Case-control study of blink rate in Parkinson's disease under different conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzpatrick, Emily; Hohl, Norman; Silburn, Peter; O'Gorman, Cullen; Broadley, Simon A

    2012-04-01

    Standard neurology texts list a reduced blink rate as one of the clinical features of Parkinson's disease. However, there are few clinical studies which have quantified this clinical sign. Here we present the results of a quantified study in a cohort of cases and controls using a standard protocol. Cases meeting standard criteria for a diagnosis of Parkinson's disease were studied together with age- and sex-matched controls. Baseline data included age, sex, duration of disease, Hoehn and Yahr stage, mini-mental state examination and treatment. Subjects were videoed undertaking three different tasks: being interviewed, watching a video, and reading from a book. Blink rates were calculated as a mean 'per minute' figure for each of the three tasks. A meta-analysis of previous studies of blink rate was undertaken. A total of 20 cases and 41 controls were studied. A decline in blink rate with increasing age was seen for cases but not controls. A significant reduction in blink rate was seen in cases when compared with controls for each of the test conditions. Blink rates were highest in subjects when being interviewed and were lowest whilst reading a passage in both cases and controls. No effect of disease duration, severity or treatment was observed. We have quantified the reduction in blink rate which has long been recognised as a feature of Parkinson's disease. We have identified factors which determine blink rate within individuals. We have also been able to define normal and abnormal levels for blink rate which may be of value clinically and for future research.

  14. Striatal dopamine in Parkinson disease: A meta-analysis of imaging studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaasinen, Valtteri; Vahlberg, Tero

    2017-12-01

    A meta-analysis of 142 positron emission tomography and single photon emission computed tomography studies that have investigated striatal presynaptic dopamine function in Parkinson disease (PD) was performed. Subregional estimates of striatal dopamine metabolism are presented. The aromatic L-amino-acid decarboxylase (AADC) defect appears to be consistently smaller than the dopamine transporter and vesicular monoamine transporter 2 defects, suggesting upregulation of AADC function in PD. The correlation between disease severity and dopamine loss appears linear, but the majority of longitudinal studies point to a negative exponential progression pattern of dopamine loss in PD. Ann Neurol 2017;82:873-882. © 2017 American Neurological Association.

  15. Mood stability in Parkinson disease following deep brain stimulation: a 6-month prospective follow-up study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chopra, Amit; Abulseoud, Osama A; Sampson, Shirlene; Lee, Kendall H; Klassen, Bryan T; Fields, Julie A; Matsumoto, Joseph Y; Adams, Andrea C; Stoppel, Cynthia J; Geske, Jennifer R; Frye, Mark A

    2014-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation for Parkinson disease has been associated with psychiatric adverse effects including anxiety, depression, mania, psychosis, and suicide. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the safety of deep brain stimulation in a large Parkinson disease clinical practice. Patients approved for surgery by the Mayo Clinic deep brain stimulation clinical committee participated in a 6-month prospective naturalistic follow-up study. In addition to the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale, stability and psychiatric safety were measured using the Beck Depression Inventory, Hamilton Depression Rating Scale, and Young Mania Rating scale. Outcomes were compared in patients with Parkinson disease who had a psychiatric history to those with no co-morbid psychiatric history. The study was completed by 49 of 54 patients. Statistically significant 6-month baseline to end-point improvement was found in motor and mood scales. No significant differences were found in psychiatric outcomes based on the presence or absence of psychiatric comorbidity. Our study suggests that patients with Parkinson disease who have a history of psychiatric co-morbidity can safely respond to deep brain stimulation with no greater risk of psychiatric adverse effect occurrence. A multidisciplinary team approach, including careful psychiatric screening ensuring mood stabilization and psychiatric follow-up, should be viewed as standard of care to optimize the psychiatric outcome in the course of deep brain stimulation treatment. © 2013 Published by The Academy of Psychosomatic Medicine on behalf of The Academy of Psychosomatic Medicine.

  16. Mavoglurant in Parkinson's patients with l-Dopa-induced dyskinesias: Two randomized phase 2 studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trenkwalder, Claudia; Stocchi, Fabrizio; Poewe, Werner; Dronamraju, Nalina; Kenney, Chris; Shah, Amy; von Raison, Florian; Graf, Ana

    2016-07-01

    Two phase 2 randomized, double-blind studies were designed to evaluate efficacy and safety of immediate-release (study 1) and modified-release (study 2) mavoglurant formulations in PD l-dopa-induced dyskinesia. Patients were randomized to mavoglurant 100-mg or placebo (4:3) groups (study 1) and mavoglurant 200-mg, mavoglurant 150-mg, or placebo (2:1:1) groups (study 2). Primary outcome was antidyskinetic efficacy, as measured by change from baseline to week 12 in modified Abnormal Involuntary Movement Scale total score. Differences in least-squares mean (standard error) change in modified Abnormal Involuntary Movement Scale total score in week 12 did not reach statistical significance in either study (study 1: mavoglurant 100 mg twice a day versus placebo, 1.7 [1.31]; study 2: mavoglurant 150 mg twice a day (-1.3 [1.16]) and 200 mg twice a day (-0.2 [1.03]) versus placebo). Adverse events incidence was higher with mavoglurant than with placebo. Both studies failed to meet the primary objective of demonstrating improvement of dyskinesia with mavoglurant treatment. © 2016 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society. © 2016 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.

  17. Living with Parkinson's

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... are here Home › Living With Parkinson's Living With Parkinson's While living with Parkinson's can be challenging, there ... life and live well with Parkinson's disease. Managing Parkinson's Read More In Your Area Read More Resources & ...

  18. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Late Stage Parkinson's Expert Briefings: Impulsive and Compulsive Behaviors in Parkinson's Expert Briefings: Complementary Approaches to Parkinson's Expert Briefings: Understanding Pain in Parkinson's Expert Briefings: The Parkinson's Pipeline 2011: ...

  19. Consensus on the Definition of Advanced Parkinson's Disease: A Neurologists-Based Delphi Study (CEPA Study)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulisevsky, Jaime; Tolosa, Eduardo S.

    2017-01-01

    To date, no consensus exists on the key factors for diagnosing advanced Parkinson disease (APD). To obtain consensus on the definition of APD, we performed a prospective, multicenter, Spanish nationwide, 3-round Delphi study (CEPA study). An ad hoc questionnaire was designed with 33 questions concerning the relevance of several clinical features for APD diagnosis. In the first-round, 240 neurologists of the Spanish Movement Disorders Group participated in the study. The results obtained were incorporated into the questionnaire and both, results and questionnaire, were sent out to and fulfilled by 26 experts in Movement Disorders. Review of results from the second-round led to a classification of symptoms as indicative of “definitive,” “probable,” and “possible” APD. This classification was confirmed by 149 previous participating neurologists in a third-round, where 92% completely or very much agreed with the classification. Definitive symptoms of APD included disability requiring help for the activities of daily living, presence of motor fluctuations with limitations to perform basic activities of daily living without help, severe dysphagia, recurrent falls, and dementia. These results will help neurologists to identify some key factors in APD diagnosis, thus allowing users to categorize the patients for a homogeneous recognition of this condition. PMID:28239501

  20. Effects of movement imitation training in Parkinson's disease: A virtual reality pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robles-García, Verónica; Corral-Bergantiños, Yoanna; Espinosa, Nelson; García-Sancho, Carlos; Sanmartín, Gabriel; Flores, Julián; Cudeiro, Javier; Arias, Pablo

    2016-05-01

    Hypometria is a clinical motor sign in Parkinson's disease. Its origin likely emerges from basal ganglia dysfunction, leading to an impaired control of inhibitory intracortical motor circuits. Some neurorehabilitation approaches include movement imitation training; besides the effects of motor practice, there might be a benefit due to observation and imitation of un-altered movement patterns. In this sense, virtual reality facilitates the process by customizing motor-patterns to be observed and imitated. To evaluate the effect of a motor-imitation therapy focused on hypometria in Parkinson's disease using virtual reality. We carried out a randomized controlled pilot-study. Sixteen patients were randomly assigned in experimental and control groups. Groups underwent 4-weeks of training based on finger-tapping with the dominant hand, in which imitation was the differential factor (only the experimental group imitated). We evaluated self-paced movement features and cortico-spinal excitability (recruitment curves and silent periods in both hemispheres) before, immediately after, and two weeks after the training period. Movement amplitude increased significantly after the therapy in the experimental group for the trained and un-trained hands. Motor thresholds and silent periods evaluated with transcranial magnetic stimulation were differently modified by training in the two groups; although the changes in the input-output recruitment were similar. This pilot study suggests that movement imitation therapy enhances the effect of motor practice in patients with Parkinson's disease; imitation-training might be helpful for reducing hypometria in these patients. These results must be clarified in future larger trials. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Contribution of language studies to the understanding of cognitive impairment and its progression over time in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auclair-Ouellet, Noémie; Lieberman, Philip; Monchi, Oury

    2017-09-01

    Parkinson's disease is a frequent neurodegenerative disease that is mostly known for its motor symptoms. However, cognitive impairment is now recognised as an important part of the disease. Studies of cognitive impairment in Parkinson's disease reveal considerable heterogeneity in terms of which cognitive domains are impaired, and of how cognitive impairment progresses over time. In parallel, a growing body of research reports language difficulties in Parkinson's disease, more specifically in the domains of sentence processing and lexical-semantic processing. In this review, the performance of patients with Parkinson's disease in these domains of language will be reviewed with a focus on the links that they have with the rest of cognition and on how they could contribute to the earlier and more precise characterization and prediction of cognitive impairment in Parkinson's disease. More specifically, the potential for modulation of complexity and sensitivity of language tasks to mild deficits and difficulties that are predictive of further decline will be emphasized. Other motivations for studying language difficulties in this disease will also be discussed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. The range and nature of sleep dysfunction in untreated Parkinson's disease (PD). A comparative controlled clinical study using the Parkinson's disease sleep scale and selective polysomnography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhawan, V; Dhoat, S; Williams, A J; Dimarco, A; Pal, S; Forbes, A; Tobías, A; Martinez-Martin, P; Chaudhuri, K Ray

    2006-10-25

    In this study we have explored the nature and range of sleep dysfunction that occurs in untreated Parkinson's disease (PD) comparing data obtained from the use of the Parkinson's disease sleep scale (PDSS) in an untreated PD patient group compared to advanced PD and healthy controls. 25 untreated (drug-naive, DNPD) PD patients (mean age 66.9 years, range 53-80, 18 males) completed the validated Parkinson's disease sleep scale (PDSS), mean duration of PD was 2.1 years (1-10, up to 4 years in all except one patient with tremulous PD reporting tremor duration of 10 years) and mean Hoehn and Yahr score 1.9 (1-3). Data were compared to 34 advanced PD (mean age 70.2 years, range 51-88, 23 male), mean duration of PD 11 years (range 4-22), mean Hoehn and Yahr score 3.4 (3-5) and PDSS data obtained from 131 healthy controls (mean age 66.6 years, range 50-93, 56 males). Total PDSS scores and PDSS sub-items, except PDSS item 2, were highly significantly different (pHoehn and Yahr score 2.5, range=1-3) with high Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS) scores (mean 14.5), low item 15 PDSS score (mean 4.7) and complaints of severe daytime sleepiness, underwent detailed overnight polysomnography (PSG) studies, all showing abnormal sleep patterns. We conclude that nocturia, nighttime cramps, dystonia, tremor and daytime somnolence seem to be the important nocturnal disabilities in DNPD and some of these symptoms may be reminiscent of "off" period related symptoms even though patients are untreated. Furthermore, polysomnography in "sleepy" PD patients may help diagnose unrecognised conditions such as periodic limb movement of sleep (PLMS), obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) and REM Sleep Behaviour Disorder.

  3. Methods for the correction of vascular artifacts in PET O-15 water brain-mapping studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, K.; Reiman, E.M. [Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States)]|[Good Samaritan Regional Medical Center, Phoenix, AZ (United States). PET Center; Lawson, M.; Yun, L.S.; Bandy, D. [Good Samaritan Regional Medical Center, Phoenix, AZ (United States). PET Center

    1996-12-01

    While positron emission tomographic (PET) measurements of regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) can be used to map brain regions that are involved in normal and pathological human behaviors, measurements in the anteromedial temporal lobe can be confounded by the combined effects of radiotracer activity in neighboring arteries and partial-volume averaging. The authors now describe two simple methods to address this vascular artifact. One method utilizes the early frames of a dynamic PET study, while the other method utilizes a coregistered magnetic resonance image (MRI) to characterize the vascular region of interest (VROI). Both methods subsequently assign a common value to each pixel in the VROI for the control scan and the activation scan. To study the vascular artifact and to demonstrate the ability of the proposed methods correcting the vascular artifact, four dynamic PET scans were performed in a single subject during the same behavioral state. For each of the four scans, a vascular scan containing vascular activity was computed as the summation of the images acquired 0--60 s after radiotracer administrations, and a control scan containing minimal vascular activity was computed as the summation of the images acquired 20--80 s after radiotracer administration. t-score maps calculated from the four pairs of vascular and control scans were used to characterize regional blood flow differences related to vascular activity before and after the applications of each vascular artifact correction method. Both methods eliminated the observed differences in vascular activity, as well as the vascular artifact observed in the anteromedial temporal lobes. Using PET data from a study of normal human emotion, these methods permitted us to identify rCBF increases in the anteromedial temporal lobe free from the potentially confounding, combined effects of vascular activity and partial-volume averaging.

  4. Changes in postural control in patients with Parkinson's disease: a posturographic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doná, F; Aquino, C C; Gazzola, J M; Borges, V; Silva, S M C A; Ganança, F F; Caovilla, H H; Ferraz, H B

    2016-09-01

    Postural instability is one of the most disabling features in Parkinson's disease (PD), and often leads to falls that reduce mobility and functional capacity. The objectives of this study were to analyse the limit of stability (LOS) and influence of the manipulation of visual, somatosensorial and visual-vestibular information on postural control in patients with PD and healthy subjects. Cross-sectional. Movement Disorders Unit, university setting. Eighty-two subjects aged between 37 and 83 years: 41 with Parkinson's disease in the 'on' state and 41 healthy subjects with no neurological disorders. Both groups were matched in terms of sex and age. Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS)-motor score, modified Hoehn and Yahr staging, Dynamic Gait Index (DGI) and posturography with integrated virtual reality. The parameters analysed by posturography were LOS area, area of body centre of pressure excursion and balance functional reserve in the standing position in 10 conditions (open and closed eyes, unstable surface with eyes closed, saccadic and optokinetic stimuli, and visual-vestibular interaction). The mean UPDRS motor score and DGI score were 27 [standard deviation (SD) 14] and 21 (SD 3), respectively. Thirteen participants scored between 0 and 19 points, indicating major risk of falls. Posturographic assessment showed that patients with PD had significantly lower LOS area and balance functional reserve values, and greater body sway area in all posturographic conditions compared with healthy subjects. Patients with PD have reduced LOS area and greater postural sway compared with healthy subjects. The deterioration in postural control was significantly associated with major risk of falls. Copyright © 2015 Chartered Society of Physiotherapy. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. A prospective study of freezing of gait with early Parkinson disease in Chinese patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hongbo; Yin, Xifan; Ouyang, Zhiyuan; Chen, Jing; Zhou, Shenghua; Zhang, Changguo; Pan, Xin; Wang, Shiliang; Yang, Junxiang; Feng, Yaoyao; Yu, Ping; Zhang, Qiangchun

    2016-06-01

    This study investigated the risk factors for freezing of gait (FOG) in the early stage of Parkinson disease in China, using a sample of 248 patients who were followed for 3 years. Part III of the Unified Parkinson Disease Rating Scale and the modified Hoehn-Yahr grading scale were used to evaluate the severity of motor symptoms. Nonmotor symptoms were assessed using the Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale, Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAMD), and Non-Motor Symptoms Scale (NMSS). The end-point was the presence of FOG at the end of follow-up; patients with FOG were classified as freezers. The risk factors for FOG were analyzed at the end of the first, second, and third years after baseline. There were 40 freezers (16.13%) 1 year later, 98 (39.52%) 2 years later, and 128 (51.61%) 3 years later. FOG 3 years later was associated with the following variables: depression (P = 0.003), older age, living in the countryside, lower education, akinetic-rigid style, lower limbs as site of onset, early use of levodopa, higher daily dose of levodopa, and not using amantadine or selegiline and dopamine receptor agonists (P amantadine, selegiline, and dopamine receptor agonists was negatively related to FOG (P Parkinson disease were more likely to experience FOG if: they were older, or from the countryside; had an akinetic-rigid style, anxiety, or higher NMSS scores; they used levodopa early or did not use amantadine or selegiline; their lower limbs were the site of onset; or they had more severe motor disability or higher HAMD scores at baseline.

  6. Carotid body autotransplantation in Parkinson disease: a clinical and positron emission tomography study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mínguez‐Castellanos, Adolfo; Escamilla‐Sevilla, Francisco; Hotton, Gary R; Toledo‐Aral, Juan J; Ortega‐Moreno, Ángel; Méndez‐Ferrer, Simón; Martín‐Linares, José M; Katati, Majed J; Mir, Pablo; Villadiego, Javier; Meersmans, Miguel; Pérez‐García, Miguel; Brooks, David J; Arjona, Ventura; López‐Barneo, José

    2007-01-01

    Background Carotid body (CB) glomus cells are highly dopaminergic and express the glial cell line derived neurotrophic factor. The intrastriatal grafting of CB cell aggregates exerts neurotrophic actions on nigrostriatal neurons in animal models of Parkinson disease (PD). Objective We conducted a phase I–II clinical study to assess the feasibility, long term safety, clinical and neurochemical effects of intrastriatal CB autotransplantation in patients with PD. Methods Thirteen patients with advanced PD underwent bilateral stereotactic implantation of CB cell aggregates into the striatum. They were assessed before surgery and up to 1–3 years after surgery according to CAPIT (Core Assessment Programme for Intracerebral Transplantation) and CAPSIT‐PD (Core Assessment Programme for Surgical Interventional Therapies in Parkinson's Disease) protocols. The primary outcome measure was the change in video blinded Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale III score in the off‐medication state. Seven patients had 18F‐dopa positron emission tomography scans before and 1 year after transplantation. Results Clinical amelioration in the primary outcome measure was observed in 10 of 12 blindly analysed patients, which was maximal at 6–12 months after transplantation (5–74%). Overall, mean improvement at 6 months was 23%. In the long term (3 years), 3 of 6 patients still maintained improvement (15–48%). None of the patients developed off‐period dyskinesias. The main predictive factors for motor improvement were the histological integrity of the CB and a milder disease severity. We observed a non‐significant 5% increase in mean putaminal 18F‐dopa uptake but there was an inverse relationship between clinical amelioration and annual decline in putaminal 18F‐dopa uptake (r = −0.829; p = 0.042). Conclusions CB autotransplantation may induce clinical effects in patients with advanced PD which seem partly related to the biological properties of

  7. Electrospun vascular scaffold for cellularized small diameter blood vessels: A preclinical large animal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ju, Young Min; Ahn, Hyunhee; Arenas-Herrera, Juan; Kim, Cheil; Abolbashari, Mehran; Atala, Anthony; Yoo, James J; Lee, Sang Jin

    2017-09-01

    The strategy of vascular tissue engineering is to create a vascular substitute by combining autologous vascular cells with a tubular-shaped biodegradable scaffold. We have previously developed a novel electrospun bilayered vascular scaffold that provides proper biological and biomechanical properties as well as structural configuration. In this study, we investigated the clinical feasibility of a cellularized vascular scaffold in a preclinical large animal model. We fabricated the cellularized vascular construct with autologous endothelial progenitor cell (EPC)-derived endothelial cells (ECs) and smooth muscle cells (SMCs) followed by a pulsatile bioreactor preconditioning. This fully cellularized vascular construct was tested in a sheep carotid arterial interposition model. After preconditioning, confluent and mature EC and SMC layers in the scaffold were achieved. The cellularized constructs sustained the structural integrity with a high degree of graft patency without eliciting an inflammatory response over the course of the 6-month period in sheep. Moreover, the matured EC coverage on the lumen and a thick smooth muscle layer were formed at 6months after transplantation. We demonstrated that electrospun bilayered vascular scaffolds in conjunction with autologous vascular cells may be a clinically applicable alternative to traditional prosthetic vascular graft substitutes. This study demonstrates the utility of tissue engineering to provide platform technologies for rehabilitation of patients recovering from severe, devastating cardiovascular diseases. The long-term goal is to provide alternatives to vascular grafting using bioengineered blood vessels derived from an autologous cell source with a functionalized vascular scaffold. This novel bilayered vascular construct for engineering blood vessels is designed to offer "off-the-shelf" availability for clinical translation. Copyright © 2017 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. [Psychometric attributes of the Parkinson's Disease-Cognitive Rating Scale. An independent validation study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Martín, P; Prieto-Jurczynska, C; Frades-Payo, B

    To perform an independent evaluation of the psychometric attributes of the Parkinson's Disease-Cognitive Rating Scale (PD-CRS). The study involved patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) free of any impediments preventing them from participating in the required evaluation. Sociodemographic and historical data were collected for use in this observational, cross-sectional study and the following evaluations were employed: Scales for Outcomes in Parkinson's Disease-Motor Scale (SCOPA-Motor), Hoehn and Yahr staging (HY), Clinical Impression of Severity Index for Parkinson's Disease (CISI-PD), Minimental State Examination (MMSE), SCOPA-Cognitive (SCOPA-Cog), Non-Motor Symptoms Questionnaire and PD-CRS. Acceptability, internal consistence, construct validity and precision of the PD-CRS were analysed. The sample consisted of 50 patients, with a mean age of 63.6 +/- 9.3 years. In all, 66% were males, with a history of 9 +/- 5.7 years with PD, in HY stages 1 to 4. Twelve patients (24%) presented data suggestive of dementia. The PD-CRS score was: sub-cortical sub-scale: 60.9 +/- 16.5; cortical sub-scale: 27.9 +/- 4.4; and total PD-CRS: 88.7 +/- 19.8. The mean-median difference was < 10% of the maximum scores and the total score showed no ceiling or floor effect. Cronbach's alpha was 0.85; the item-total correlations ranged from 0.57 (naming) to 0.73 (working memory), and the homogeneity index of the items was 0.36. Correlation with the MMSE and the SCOPA-Cog was high (rS = 0.53 and 0.77). The PD-CRS score was significantly lower in patients with a low level of schooling and more severe PD according to levels on the CISI-PD and distinguished between patients with and without dementia (70.3 +/- 26.2 versus 94.5 +/- 13; p < 0.001. The standard error of the measurement was 1.98. The levels of acceptability, internal consistence, construct validity and precision displayed by the PD-CRS were satisfactory.

  9. The Vascular Impairment of Cognition Classification Consensus Study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Skrobot, O.A.; O'Brien, J.; Black, S.; Chen, C; DeCarli, C.; Erkinjuntti, T.; Ford, G.A.; Kalaria, R.N.; Pantoni, L.; Pasquier, F.; Roman, G.C.; Wallin, A.; Sachdev, P.; Skoog, I.; Ben-Shlomo, Y.; Passmore, A.P.; Leeuw, F.E. de; Richard, E.; Love, S.; Kehoe, P.G.

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Numerous diagnostic criteria have tried to tackle the variability in clinical manifestations and problematic diagnosis of vascular cognitive impairment (VCI) but none have been universally accepted. These criteria have not been readily comparable, impacting on clinical diagnosis rates

  10. Resting state cortical oscillations of patients with Parkinson disease and with and without subthalamic deep brain stimulation: a magnetoencephalography study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Chunyan; Li, Dianyou; Jiang, Tianxiao; Ince, Nuri Firat; Zhan, Shikun; Zhang, Jing; Sha, Zhiyi; Sun, Bomin

    2015-04-01

    In this study, we investigate the modification to cortical oscillations of patients with Parkinson disease (PD) by subthalamic deep brain stimulation (STN-DBS). Spontaneous cortical oscillations of patients with PD were recorded with magnetoencephalography during on and off subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation states. Several features such as average frequency, average power, and relative subband power in regions of interest were extracted in the frequency domain, and these features were correlated with Unified Parkinson Disease Rating Scale III evaluation. The same features were also investigated in patients with PD without surgery and healthy controls. Patients with Parkinson disease without surgery compared with healthy controls had a significantly lower average frequency and an increased average power in 1 to 48 Hz range in whole cortex. Higher relative power in theta and simultaneous decrease in beta and gamma over temporal and occipital were also observed in patients with PD. The Unified Parkinson Disease Rating Scale III rigidity score correlated with the average frequency and with the relative power of beta and gamma in frontal areas. During subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation, the average frequency increased significantly when stimulation was on compared with off state. In addition, the relative power dropped in delta, whereas it rose in beta over the whole cortex. Through the course of stimulation, the Unified Parkinson Disease Rating Scale III rigidity and tremor scores correlated with the relative power of alpha over left parietal. Subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation improves the symptoms of PD by suppressing the synchronization of alpha rhythm in somatomotor region.

  11. A Clinical and Molecular Genetic Study of 50 Families with Autosomal Recessive Parkinsonism Revealed Known and Novel Gene Mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taghavi, Shaghayegh; Chaouni, Rita; Tafakhori, Abbas; Azcona, Luis J; Firouzabadi, Saghar Ghasemi; Omrani, Mir Davood; Jamshidi, Javad; Emamalizadeh, Babak; Shahidi, Gholam Ali; Ahmadi, Mona; Habibi, Seyed Amir Hassan; Ahmadifard, Azadeh; Fazeli, Atena; Motallebi, Marzieh; Petramfar, Peyman; Askarpour, Saeed; Askarpour, Shiva; Shahmohammadibeni, Hossein Ali; Shahmohammadibeni, Neda; Eftekhari, Hajar; Shafiei Zarneh, Amir Ehtesham; Mohammadihosseinabad, Saeed; Khorrami, Mehdi; Najmi, Safa; Chitsaz, Ahmad; Shokraeian, Parasto; Ehsanbakhsh, Hossein; Rezaeidian, Jalal; Ebrahimi Rad, Reza; Madadi, Faranak; Andarva, Monavvar; Alehabib, Elham; Atakhorrami, Minoo; Mortazavi, Seyed Erfan; Azimzadeh, Zahra; Bayat, Mahdis; Besharati, Amir Mohammad; Harati-Ghavi, Mohammad Ali; Omidvari, Samareh; Dehghani-Tafti, Zahra; Mohammadi, Faraz; Mohammad Hossein Pour, Banafsheh; Noorollahi Moghaddam, Hamid; Esmaili Shandiz, Ehsan; Habibi, Arman; Taherian-Esfahani, Zahra; Darvish, Hossein; Paisán-Ruiz, Coro

    2017-05-13

    In this study, the role of known Parkinson's disease (PD) genes was examined in families with autosomal recessive (AR) parkinsonism to assist with the differential diagnosis of PD. Some families without mutations in known genes were also subject to whole genome sequencing with the objective to identify novel parkinsonism-related genes. Families were selected from 4000 clinical files of patients with PD or parkinsonism. AR inheritance pattern, consanguinity, and a minimum of two affected individuals per family were used as inclusion criteria. For disease gene/mutation identification, multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification, quantitative PCR, linkage, and Sanger and whole genome sequencing assays were carried out. A total of 116 patients (50 families) were examined. Fifty-four patients (46.55%; 22 families) were found to carry pathogenic mutations in known genes while a novel gene, not previously associated with parkinsonism, was found mutated in a single family (2 patients). Pathogenic mutations, including missense, nonsense, frameshift, and exon rearrangements, were found in Parkin, PINK1, DJ-1, SYNJ1, and VAC14 genes. In conclusion, variable phenotypic expressivity was seen across all families.

  12. The discriminating nature of dopamine transporter image in parkinsonism: the competency of dopaminergic transporter imaging in differential diagnosis of parkinsonism {sup 123}I-FP-CIT SPECT study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Bom Sahn; Jang, Sung June; Eo, Jae Seon; Park, Eun Kyung; Kim, Yu Kyeong; Kim, Jong Min; Lee, Won Woo; Kim, Sang Eun [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-08-15

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the discriminating nature of {sup 123}I-FP-CIT SPECT in patients with parkinsonism. {sup 123}I-FP-CIT SPECT images acquired from the 18 normal controls; NC (60.4 {+-} 10.0 yr) and 237 patients with parkinsonism (65.9 {+-} 9.2 yr) were analyzed. From spatially normalized images, regional counts of the caudate, putamen, and occipital lobe were obtained using region of interest method. Binding potential (BP) was calculated with the ratio of specific to nonspecific binding activity at equilibrium. Additionally, the BP ratio of putamen to caudate (PCR) and asymmetric index (ASI) were measured. BPs of NC (3.37 {+-} 0.57, 3.10{+-} 0.41, 3.23 {+-} 0.48 for caudate, putamen, whole striatum, respectively) had no significant difference with those of essential tremor; ET (3.31 {+-} 0.64, 3.06 {+-} 0.61, 3.14 {+-} 0.63) and Alzheimer's disease; AD (3.33 {+-} 0.60, 3.29 {+-} 0.79, 3.31 {+-} 0.70), but were higher than those of Parkinson's disease; PD (1.92 {+-} 0.74, 1.39 {+-}0.68, 1.64 {+-} 0.68), multiple system atrophy; MSA (2.36 {+-} 1.07, 2.16 {+-} 0.91, 2.26 {+-} 0.96), and dementia with Lewy body; DLB (1.95{+-} 0.72, 1.64 {+-} 0.65, 1.79 {+-} 0.66)({rho} < 0.005). PD had statistically lower values of PCR and higher values of ASI than those of NC ({rho} < 0.005). And PD had significantly lower value of PCR, higher ASI and lower BP in the putamen and whole striatum than MSA ({rho} < 0.05). Dopamine transporter image of {sup 123}I-FP-CIT SPECT was a good value in differential diagnosis of parkinsonism.

  13. Medium-to-high prevalence of screening-detected parkinsonism in the urban area of Tehran, Iran: data from a community-based door-to-door study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fereshtehnejad, Seyed-Mohammad; Shafieesabet, Mahdiyeh; Rahmani, Arash; Delbari, Ahmad; Lökk, Johan

    2015-01-01

    Parkinsonism occurs in all ethnic groups worldwide; however, there are wide variations in the prevalence rates reported from different countries, even for neighboring regions. The huge socioeconomic burden of parkinsonism necessitates the need for prevalence studies in each country. So far, there is neither data registry nor prevalence information on parkinsonism in the Iranian population. The aim of our study was to estimate the prevalence rate of probable parkinsonism in a huge urban area in Iran, Tehran using a community-based door-to-door survey. We used a random multistage sampling of the households within the network of health centers consisting of 374 subunits in all 22 districts throughout the entire urban area of Tehran. Overall, 20,621 individuals answered the baseline checklist and screening questionnaire and data from 19,500 persons aged ≥30 years were entered in the final analysis. Health care professionals used a new six-item screening questionnaire for parkinsonism, which has been previously shown to have a high validity and diagnostic value in the same population. A total of 157 cases were screened for parkinsonism using the validated six-item questionnaire. After age and sex adjustment based on the Tehran population, the prevalence of parkinsonism was calculated as 222.9 per 100,000. Using the World Health Organization's World Standard Population, the standardized prevalence rate of parkinsonism was 285 per 100,000 (95% confidence interval 240-329). The male:female ratio of probable parkinsonism was calculated as 1.62, and there was a significant increase in the screening rate by advancing age. The calculated rates for the prevalence of parkinsonism in our study are closer to reports from some European and Middle Eastern countries, higher than reports from Eastern Asian and African populations, and lower than Australia. The prevalence rate of >200 in 100,000 for parkinsonism in Tehran, Iran could be considered a medium-to-high rate.

  14. The Parkinsons Registry Investigation of Diagnosis and Etiology (PRIDE) Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-01

    information to determine the relationship between toxicant exposure and PD incidence, morbidity and mortality using Cox proportional hazards regression with...California and extensive state toxicants databases to investigate the causes of PD and PD-related morbidity and mortality. Study Design: Phase 1...Exposure modeling . CEHTP will link residential and toxicant data; cumulative exposures for each subject will be determined. (Methods under

  15. Divergent Thinking in Parkinsonism: A Case–Control Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margherita Canesi

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundCreativity is a multidimensional phenomenon and an important component of human capacities. This ability is characterized by the involvement of several cognitive functions particularly linked to the prefrontal cortex. We compared divergent thinking, a measure of creativity, in patients affected by progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP, other parkinsonian syndromes, and healthy controls (HCs.MethodsCreativity features were evaluated using the Abbreviated Torrance Test for Adults (ATTA. Consecutive PSP outpatients were screened for inclusion. Then, patients with multiple system atrophy (MSA and Parkinson’s disease (PD and a group of HC were studied. All groups have preserved cognitive functions and were matched for gender, education, disease duration, and age at onset with exception of PD patients who were matched by disease severity rather than disease duration.ResultsPSP patients were characterized by lower values in total ATTA and all subscales than HC and both MSA and PD patients. No differences were found comparing HC versus both MSA and PD patients. PSP patients were characterized by more impaired frontal functioning [assessed by means of Frontal Assessment Battery (FAB] than HC and both PD and MSA patients.ConclusionIn the present study, ATTA was significantly lower in PSP patients than in the other study groups. The worst performance in ATTA-total score and the lower score in FAB in PSP patients support the role of frontal function in creative processes.

  16. Insecticide Exposure in Parkinsonism

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bloomquist, Jeffrey

    2003-01-01

    Behavioral, neurochemical, and immunocytochemical studies are characterizing the possible role of insecticide exposure in the etiology of Parkinson's disease as it may relate to Gulf War Syndrome. Chlorpyrifos (CP) and/or permethrin (PM...

  17. Insecticide Exposure in Parkinsonism

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bloomquist, Jeffrey

    2001-01-01

    Behavioral, neurochemical, and immunocytochemical studies characterized the possible role of insecticide exposure in the etiology of Parkinson's disease as it may relate to Gulf War Syndrome. Chlorpyrifos (CP) and permethrin (PM...

  18. Insecticide Exposure in Parkinsonism

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bloomquist, Jeffrey

    2002-01-01

    Behavioral, neurochemical, and immunocytochemical studies characterized the possible role of insecticide exposure in the etiology of Parkinson's disease as it may relate to Gulf War Syndrome. Chlorpyrifos (CP) and permethrin (PM...

  19. Risk of falls in Parkinson's disease: a cross-sectional study of 160 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contreras, Ana; Grandas, Francisco

    2012-01-01

    Falls are a major source of disability in Parkinson's disease. Risk factors for falling in Parkinson's disease remain unclear. To determine the relevant risk factors for falling in Parkinson's disease, we screened 160 consecutive patients with Parkinson's disease for falls and assessed 40 variables. A comparison between fallers and nonfallers was performed using statistical univariate analyses, followed by bivariate and multivariate logistic regression, receiver-operating characteristics analysis, and Kaplan-Meier curves. 38.8% of patients experienced falls since the onset of Parkinson's disease (recurrent in 67%). Tinetti Balance score and Hoehn and Yahr staging were the best independent variables associated with falls. The Tinetti Balance test predicted falls with 71% sensitivity and 79% specificity and Hoehn and Yahr staging with 77% sensitivity and 71% specificity. The risk of falls increased exponentially with age, especially from 70 years onward. Patients aged >70 years at the onset of Parkinson's disease experienced falls significantly earlier than younger patients.

  20. A Comprehensive Study of Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation in Parkinson's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Hideki; Kurimura, Masayuki; Kurokawa, Katsurou; Nagaoka, Utako; Arawaka, Shigeki; Wada, Manabu; Kawanami, Toru; Kurita, Keiji; Kato, Takeo

    2011-01-01

    The clinical benefits of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) for Parkinson's disease (PD) remain controversial. We performed a comprehensive study to examine whether rTMS is a safe and effective treatment for PD. Twelve PD patients received rTMS once a week. The crossover study design consisted of 4-week sham rTMS followed by 4-week real rTMS. The Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS), Modified Hoehn and Yahr Stage, Schwab and England ADL Scale, Actigraph, Mini-Mental State Examination, Hamilton Depression Scale, Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-revised, and cerebral blood flow (CBF) and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) examinations were used to evaluate the rTMS effects. Under both drug-on and drug-off conditions, the real rTMS improved the UPDRS scores significantly, while the sham rTMS did not. There were no significant changes in the results of the neuropsychological tests, CBF and CSF. rTMS seems to be a safe and effective therapeutic option for PD patients, especially in a wearing-off state. PMID:22389830

  1. Effects of tango on functional mobility in Parkinson's disease: a preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hackney, Madeleine E; Kantorovich, Svetlana; Levin, Rebecca; Earhart, Gammon M

    2007-12-01

    Recent research has shown that dance, specifically tango, may be an appropriate and effective strategy for ameliorating functional mobility deficits in people who are frail and elderly. Individuals with Parkinson's disease (PD) experience declines in functional mobility that may be even more pronounced than those experienced by frail elderly individuals without PD. The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of two movement programs: tango classes or exercise classes. Nineteen subjects with PD were randomly assigned to a tango group or a group exercise class representative of the current classes offered in our geographical area for individuals with PD. Subjects completed a total of 20 tango or exercise classes and were evaluated the week before and the week following the intervention. Both groups showed significant improvements in overall Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) score and nonsignificant improvements in self-reported Freezing of Gait. In addition, the tango group showed significant improvements on the Berg Balance Scale. The exercise group did not improve on this measure. Finally, the tango group showed a trend toward improvement on the Timed Up and Go test that was not observed in the exercise group. Future studies with a larger sample are needed to confirm and extend our observation that tango may be an effective intervention to target functional mobility deficits in individuals with PD.

  2. Early-onset vs. Late-onset Parkinson's disease: A Clinical-pathological Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Leslie Wayne; Rajput, Ali H; Rajput, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Several studies have compared early-onset Parkinson disease (EOPD) and late-onset Parkinson disease (LOPD) but most are not based on autopsy confirmed cases. We compared clinical and pharmacological profiles, time to reach irreversible Hoehn and Yahr (H&Y) Stage 3 and levodopa motor complications in autopsy confirmed EOPD and LOPD cases. At first clinic visit EOPD cases were younger but had longer disease duration and they died at a younger age (all pamantadine (p<0.05) and dopamine agonists (p<0.01) were higher in EOPD. While lifetime use of levodopa was similar in the two groups, levodopa was used for a significantly longer period by EOPD (p< 0.0001). EOPD had a higher cumulative incidence of dyskinesias (p<0.01), wearing-off (p<0.01), and on-off (p<0.01). However, the time to dyskinesia onset was similar in the two groups. The threshold to wearing-off was much longer in EOPD (p<0.01). H&Y stage profile at first visit was similar in the two groups. The duration from disease onset to reach irreversible H&Y stage 3 was significantly longer in EOPD. Our observations indicate that progression of PD is slower in EOPD and suggest that the pre-clinical interval in this group is longer. These findings can be used for case selection for drug trials and studies of the pathogenesis of PD.

  3. Palliative care for patients with Parkinson's disease: study protocol for a mixed methods study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lennaerts, Herma; Groot, Marieke; Steppe, Maxime; van der Steen, Jenny T; Van den Brand, Marieke; van Amelsvoort, Dorian; Vissers, Kris; Munneke, Marten; Bloem, Bastiaan R

    2017-11-25

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a chronic, progressive neurological disorder with many intractable consequences for patients and their family caregivers. Little is known about the possibilities that palliative care could offer to patients and their proxies. Guidelines strongly recommend palliative care to improve the quality of life and - if needed - the quality of dying. However, providing palliative care to persons with PD involves specific challenges. For example, a timely initiation of palliative interventions is difficult because due to the gradually progressive nature of PD, there is often no clear marker for the transition from curative towards palliative care. Furthermore, there is little evidence to indicate which palliative care interventions are effective. Here, we describe the contours of a study that aims to examine the experiences of patients, (bereaved) family caregivers and professionals, with the aim of improving our knowledge about palliative care needs in PD. We will perform a mixed methods study to evaluate the experiences of patients, (bereaved) family caregivers and palliative care professionals. In this study, we focus on Quality of Life, Quality of Care, perceived symptoms, caregiver burden and collaboration between professionals. In phase 1, we will retrospectively explore the views of bereaved family caregivers and professionals by conducting individual interviews and focus group interviews. In phase 2, 5-15 patients with PD and their family caregiver will be followed prospectively for 8-12 months. Data collection will involve semi-structured interviews and questionnaires at three consecutive contact moments. Qualitative data will be audio recorded, transcribed and analyzed using CAQDAS. If patients pass away during the study period, a bereavement interview will be done with the closest family caregiver. This study will offer a broad perspective on palliative care, and the results can be used to inform a palliative care protocol for patients

  4. Emergence and evolution of social self-management of Parkinson's disease: study protocol for a 3-year prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tickle-Degnen, Linda; Saint-Hilaire, Marie; Thomas, Cathi A; Habermann, Barbara; Martinez, Linda S Sprague; Terrin, Norma; Noubary, Farzad; Naumova, Elena N

    2014-05-02

    Parkinson's disease affects facial, vocal and trunk muscles. As symptoms progress, facial expression becomes masked, limiting the person's ability to communicate emotions and intentions to others. As people with the disease live and reside in their homes longer, the burden of caregiving is unmitigated by social and emotional rewards provided by an expressive individual. Little is known about how adults living with Parkinson's disease manage their social lives and how an inability to be emotionally expressive can affect social connections and health. Because social networks have been shown to be crucial to the overall well-being of people living with chronic diseases, research is needed on how expressive capacity affects life trajectories and health. The overall objective is to understand the emergence and evolution of the trajectories of the self-management of the social lives of people living with Parkinson's disease. The central hypothesis is that expressive capacity predicts systematic change in the pattern of social self-management and quality of life outcomes. The specific aims of this 3-year longitudinal study of 120 people with the disease and a maximum of 120 care partners are: 1) characterize social self-management trajectories over a 3-year period; 2) estimate the degree to which expressive nonverbal capacity predicts the trajectory; and 3) determine the moderating effect of gender on the association between expressive capacity and change in social self-management. Each participant will be assessed 14 times to detect rapid and non-linear changes in social participation and management of social activities; social network; and social comfort, general health and well-being. This project will provide evidence to guide the development of interventions for supporting social integration of those living with Parkinson's disease, thus leading to improved overall health. It focuses on the novel construct of social self-management and known factors

  5. Prognostic significance of vascularity in cutaneous melanoma: pilot study using in vivo confocal scanning laser microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphrey, Shannon; Walsh, Noreen M; Delaney, Laura; Propperova, Iva; Langley, Richard G B

    2006-01-01

    Tumor vascularity may be of strong prognostic significance in cutaneous melanoma. We are the first to use a novel, noninvasive, in vivo confocal scanning laser microscope (CSLM) to evaluate vascularity in cutaneous melanoma. Our purpose was to apply a CSLM to assess vascularity in melanoma and to evaluate the prognostic significance of these findings. Patients with a suspicious pigmented lesion were prospectively recruited to undergo CSLM prior to skin biopsy, and those diagnosed with melanoma were included in this study. A blinded observer graded tumor vascularity from still digital CSLM images. The CSLM vascularity grading was correlated to tumor thickness and ulceration as a proxy for clinical prognosis. Sixty-six patients and 67 lesions underwent imaging with CSLM. Eleven patients were diagnosed with melanoma, including six in situ and five invasive melanomas. Prominent vascularity was observed in all advanced melanomas. There was an overall increase in mean tumor thickness between the absent (x = 0.315 mm) to prominent (x = 1.51 mm) categories. In this pilot study, vascularity was readily detected in cutaneous melanomas using CSLM. Prominent vascularity was observed in patients with advanced cutaneous melanomas. Our preliminary results are encouraging and indicate potential for the use of CSLM to assess vascularity in cutaneous melanoma, with potential prognostic and therapeutic implications.

  6. Accelerometer based analysis of gait initiation failure in advanced juvenile parkinsonism: a single subject study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishii, Mitsuaki; Mashimo, Hideaki

    2016-11-01

    [Purpose] This study used an accelerometer placed close to the center of gravity to quantitatively investigate whether unexpected gait initiation aggravates start hesitation (freezing of gait in gait initiation). [Subject and Methods] The subject was a 53-year-old female who had been suffering from juvenile parkinsonism since she was aged 21 years. An alternating-treatment design was used to compare acceleration characteristics under two gait initiation conditions, which were 1) deliberate gait initiation and 2) gait initiation on a sudden "go" verbal command (sudden gait initiation), in the "on" state of the medication cycle. [Results] In six out of eight sessions, a combination of reduced peak positive anterior accelerations and large power percentage in the high frequency band was consistently observed in the sudden gait initiation compared with deliberate gait initiation. In the other two sessions, although a large acceleration just after the "go" signal was observed, subsequent acceleration signals were blocked by sudden gait initiation. [Conclusion] The results suggest that, even in the "on" state, start hesitation is apparent without increased reliance on frontal cortical attentional mechanisms to compensate for impaired automaticity. In advanced juvenile parkinsonism, sudden gait initiation may be an effective paradigm as a provoking test for start hesitation.

  7. Change in fear of falling in Parkinson's disease: a two-year prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gazibara, Tatjana; Tepavcevic, Darija Kisic; Svetel, Marina; Tomic, Aleksandra; Stankovic, Iva; Kostic, Vladimir S; Pekmezovic, Tatjana

    2017-11-17

    Fear of falling in Parkinson's disease (PD) has been suggested as predictor of future falling. The purpose of this study was to compare fear of falling score after two years of follow-up with those observed at baseline and to assess factors associated with change in fear of falling over time. A total of 120 consecutive persons with PD were recruited and followed for two years. Fear of falling was assessed by using the 10-item Falls Efficacy Scale (FES). Occurrence of falling was registered during the first year of follow-up. After two years, the average FES score statistically significantly changed (p = 0.003) from 30.5 to 37.5 out of 100 (increase of 22.9%). We observed that median scores of all FES items, except for "Preparing a meal, not requiring carrying of heavy or hot objects" and "Personal grooming," significantly increased after two-year follow-up. After accounting for age, gender, PD duration, levodopa dosage, Hoehn and Yayhr stage, Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale score three, depression, anxiety, and falling, we observed that sustaining greater number of falls in the first year of follow-up was associated with higher increase in FES score after two years (odds ratio 3.08, 95% confidence interval 1.30-4.87). After two years of follow-up, we observed a decrease in confidence at performing nearly all basic daily activities. Fall prevention programs should be prioritized in management of PD.

  8. White matter involvement in idiopathic Parkinson disease: a diffusion tensor imaging study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gattellaro, G; Minati, L; Grisoli, M; Mariani, C; Carella, F; Osio, M; Ciceri, E; Albanese, A; Bruzzone, M G

    2009-06-01

    Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) offers a unique window on the connectivity changes, extending beyond the basal ganglia, which accompany the cognitive symptoms of Parkinson disease (PD). The primary purpose of this study was to assess the microstructural damage to cerebral white matter occurring in idiopathic PD. Our sample included patients with PD without dementia (n = 10; Hoehn and Yahr stages I and II; Unified Parkinson Disease Rating Scale, 20.5 +/- 8.3; and Mini-Mental State Examination, 28.3 +/- 1.5) and age-matched healthy control subjects (n = 10). DTI was performed on a 1.5T scanner, and mean diffusivity (MD) and fractional anisotropy (FA) maps were obtained. Regions of interest (ROIs) were drawn on the major fiber bundles as well as on gray matter nuclei. In patients, the MD was increased at borderline significance in the substantia nigra but was unaltered in the thalamus, globus pallidus, putamen, and in the head of the caudate nucleus. The FA and MD were unaltered in the corticospinal tract in the midbrain and at the level of the internal capsule, and in the splenium of the corpus callosum. By contrast, the MD was increased and the FA was decreased in the genu of the corpus callosum and in the superior longitudinal fasciculus; in the cingulum, only the MD was altered. The observed changes were not significantly lateralized. Widespread microstructural damage to frontal and parietal white matter occurs already in the early stages of PD.

  9. Iron in typical and atypical parkinsonism – Mössbauer spectroscopy and MRI studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuliński, R. [Bródno Hospital, MRI Lab (Poland); Bauminger, E. R. [Hebrew University, Racah Institute of Physics (Israel); Friedman, A. [Medical University of Warsaw, Department of Neurology (Poland); Duda, P.; Gałązka-Friedman, J., E-mail: jgfrie@if.pw.edu.pl [Warsaw University of Technology, Faculty of Physics (Poland)

    2016-12-15

    Iron may play important role in neurodegeneration. The results of comparative studies of human brain areas (control and pathological) performed by Mössbauer spectroscopy (MS) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques are presented. Mössbauer spectroscopy demonstrated a higher concentration of iron in atypical parkinsonism (progressive supranuclear palsy PSP) in the brain areas Substantia Nigra (SN) and Globus Pallidus (GP) involved in this pathological process, compared to control, while the concentration of iron in pathological tissues in typical parkinsonism (Parkinson’s disease - PD) did not differ from that in control. These results were compared with the changes in 1/T1 and 1/T2 (T1 and T2 being the relaxation times determined by MRI). A good linear correlation curve was found between the concentration of iron as determined by MS in different areas of control human brains and between 1/T1 and 1/T2. Whereas the finding in PSP-GP (the brain area involved in PSP) also fitted to such a correlation, this was not so for the correlation between pathological SN – the brain area involved in both diseases – and 1/T2, indicating a dependence of T2 on other factors than just the concentration of iron.

  10. Depression and care-dependency in Parkinson's disease: results from a nationwide study of 1449 outpatients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riedel, O; Dodel, R; Deuschl, G; Klotsche, J; Förstl, H; Heuser, I; Oertel, W; Reichmann, H; Riederer, P; Trenkwalder, C; Wittchen, H-U

    2012-06-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is frequently compounded by neuropsychiatric complications, increasing disability. The combined effect of motor and mental status on care-dependency in PD outpatients is not well characterized. We conducted a cross-sectional study of 1449 PD outpatients. The assessment comprised the Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS) and the diagnostic criteria for dementia. PD severity and treatment complications were rated using Hoehn and Yahr staging and the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) IV. The acknowledged level of care-dependency was documented. Care-dependency was present in 18.3% of all patients. A total of 13.9% had dementia, 18.8% had depression, and 14.3% had both. Regression analyses revealed increasing effects of age, PD duration, and PD severity on care-dependency in all three mental-disorder subgroups with the strongest effects in patients with depression only. Depressed patients with antidepressive treatment still had significantly higher PD severity, higher MADRS and UPDRS-IV scores but were not more likely to be care-dependent than non-depressed patients. Older age, longer duration and increased severity of PD contribute to care-dependency in patients with untreated depression. Treatment of depression is associated with lower rates of care-dependency. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Activities of daily living questionnaire from patients' perspectives in Parkinson's disease: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Su-Yun; Kim, Sung Kwan; Cheon, Sang-Myung; Seo, Jung-Wook; Kim, Min Ah; Kim, Jae Woo

    2016-05-21

    The aim of this study was to develop an assessment tool for activities of daily living (ADL) from the perspective of patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) and examine the validity and reliability of the assessment. A preliminary 45-item questionnaire was developed through intensive interviews with 54 patients with PD and administered to another group of 248 patients with PD. Based on clinical and statistical analyses, 20 ADL-items were selected. The final 20-item questionnaire was examined in the other group of 59 patients with PD. The new ADL questionnaire showed high internal consistency (Cronbach's α, 0.962-0.966) and acceptable test-retest reliability (0.632-0.984). Concurrent validity was shown as a significant positive correlation between the new ADL questionnaire and other ADL or clinical instruments. The Hoehn and Yahr stage showed the highest degree of correlation with the new ADL questionnaire, followed by the other ADL scales (Schwab and England ADL and the ADL subscore of the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale). Additionally, a regression analysis was conducted with the disease-specific quality of life questionnaire, and the new ADL questionnaire was the most powerful predictor of quality of life among the clinical instruments. The new ADL questionnaire is a valid tool for assessing ADL from the perspectives of patients with PD.

  12. A functional magnetic resonance imaging study of pathophysiological changes responsible for mirror movements in Parkinson's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alice Poisson

    Full Text Available Mirror movements correspond to involuntary movements observed in the limb contralateral to the one performing voluntary movement. They can be observed in Parkinson's disease (PD but their pathophysiology remains unclear. The present study aims at identifying their neural correlates in PD using functional magnetic resonance imaging. Ten control subjects and 14-off drug patients with asymmetrical right-sided PD were included (8 with left-sided mirror movements during right-hand movements, and 6 without mirror movements. Between-group comparisons of BOLD signal were performed during right-hand movements and at rest (p<0.005 uncorrected. The comparison between PD patients with and without mirror movements showed that mirror movements were associated with an overactivation of the insula, precuneus/posterior cingulate cortex bilaterally and of the left inferior frontal cortex and with a deactivation of the right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, medial prefrontal cortex, and pre-supplementary motor area and occipital cortex. These data suggest that mirror movements in Parkinson's disease are promoted by: 1- a deactivation of the non-mirroring inhibitory network (dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, pre-supplementary motor area; 2- an overactivation of prokinetic areas (notably the insula. The concomitant overactivation of a proactive inhibitory network (including the posterior cingulate cortex and precuneus could reflect a compensatory inhibition of mirror movements.

  13. Multiple adjustable vascular clamp prototype: feasibility study on an experimental model of end-to-side microsurgical vascular anastomosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, A; Ichihara, S; Collon, S; Bodin, F; Gay, A; Facca, S; Liverneaux, P

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this study was to establish the feasibility of microsurgical end-to-side vascular anastomosis with a multiclamp adjustable vascular clamp prototype in an inert experimental model. Our method consisted of performing an end-to-side microsurgical anastomosis with 10/0 suture on a 2-mm diameter segment. In group 1, the end-to-side segment was held in place by a double clamp and a single end clamp. In group 2, the segment was held in place with a single multiclamp adjustable clamp. The average time for performing the anastomosis was shorter in group 2. The average number of sutures was the same in both groups. No leak was found and permeability was always positive in both groups. Our results show that performing end-to-side anastomosis with a multiclamp adjustable vascular clamp is feasible in an inert experimental model. Feasibility in a live animal model has to be demonstrated before clinical use. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. Late and early onset dementia: what is the role of vascular factors? A retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carotenuto, Anna; Rea, Raffaele; Colucci, Luisa; Ziello, Antonio Rosario; Molino, Ivana; Carpi, Sabrina; Traini, Enea; Amenta, Francesco; Fasanaro, Angiola Maria

    2012-11-15

    Neuropathology of Alzheimer's disease (AD) demonstrates that the common occurrence of vascular lesions and vascular factors is suggested to contribute significantly to the clinical progression of the disease. This study has assessed the presence of vascular brain lesions and risk factors in subjects with diagnosis of AD and their influence on the disease course both in Late Onset Dementia (LOD) and in Early Onset Dementia (EOD). MRI scans of 374 LOD and of 67 EOD patients were evaluated for the presence of vascular associated lesions and rated according to the age-related white matter changes (ARWMC) scale as "pure degenerative", "mixed" and "vascular" cases of dementia. Vascular risk factors burden (hypertension, diabetes, dyslipidemia, myocardial infarction) and disease progression were also assessed. 44% of LOD cases and 46% of EOD were classified as "mixed dementia cases". The vascular risk factors burden showed an increase from the pure degenerative to the pure vascular forms. Disease progression, calculated in two years using the Mini Mental State Evaluation (MMSE), Activities of Daily Living (ADL) and Instrumental Activities of Daily Living (IADL) scores, did not reveal differences among the three different classes of dementias. Vascular lesions are found in the majority of LOD cases and in about one half of EOD. This observation is consistent with the hypothesis of a synergistic effect of the degenerative and vascular factors on the development of cognitive dysfunction. The linear increase of the vascular burden supports the idea of a continuum spectrum between the pure degenerative and the pure vascular forms of adult-onset dementia disorders. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. The effects of transdermal rotigotine on non-motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease: a multicentre, observational, retrospective, post-marketing study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valldeoriola, Francesc; Salvador, Antonio; Gómez-Arguelles, José Maria; Marey, José; Moya, Miguel; Ayuga, Ángel; Ramírez, Francisco

    2018-04-01

    This study evaluated the effect of ≥6 months of transdermal rotigotine on non-motor and motor symptoms of patients with advanced Parkinson's disease. The study was conducted in Spain between September 2011 and December 2012 (ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01504529). The primary efficacy variable was the change from baseline in non-motor symptoms, as assessed by changes in Parkinson's Disease Non-Motor Symptoms Questionnaire total scores at 6 months. Secondary endpoints included the assessment of motor symptoms by Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale III scores. Data from 378 patients (mean age: 70.2 years; 56.9% male) with Parkinson's disease receiving rotigotine from were collected. Mean disease duration was 6.1 years, and mean rotigotine treatment duration was 45.6 months. Rotigotine reduced non-motor symptoms by 14.6% (mean change from baseline in Parkinson's Disease Non-Motor Symptoms Questionnaire: -1.5 ± 3.4; p Parkinson's Disease Non-Motor Symptoms Questionnaire. Mean motor symptoms were reduced from baseline by 8.0% (mean change from baseline in Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale III: -2.6 ± 8.0; p Parkinson's disease.

  16. Fe and Cu do not differ in Parkinson's disease: a replication study plus meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariani, Stefania; Ventriglia, Mariacarla; Simonelli, Ilaria; Donno, Silvia; Bucossi, Serena; Vernieri, Fabrizio; Melgari, Jean-Marc; Pasqualetti, Patrizio; Rossini, Paolo M; Squitti, Rosanna

    2013-02-01

    To evaluate whether iron and copper levels in serum, plasma, and cerebrospinal fluid are disarranged in Parkinson's disease (PD), we performed meta-analyses of 33 studies on the topic published from 1987 to 2011 and contextually carried out a replication study in serum by ourselves as well. We found no variation in metals between PD patients and healthy controls, according to our replication study. The metaregression for sex revealed that serum copper differences found in some studies could be referred to the different percentage of women in the PD sample. Transferrin and transferrin saturation levels found increased in PD subjects underline the concept to extend the iron study in PD to iron master proteins. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Concordance analysis of microarray studies identifies representative gene expression changes in Parkinson's disease: a comparison of 33 human and animal studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oerton, Erin; Bender, Andreas

    2017-03-23

    As the popularity of transcriptomic analysis has grown, the reported lack of concordance between different studies of the same condition has become a growing concern, raising questions as to the representativeness of different study types, such as non-human disease models or studies of surrogate tissues, to gene expression in the human condition. In a comparison of 33 microarray studies of Parkinson's disease, correlation and clustering analyses were used to determine the factors influencing concordance between studies, including agreement between different tissue types, different microarray platforms, and between neurotoxic and genetic disease models and human Parkinson's disease. Concordance over all studies is low, with correlation of only 0.05 between differential gene expression signatures on average, but increases within human patients and studies of the same tissue type, rising to 0.38 for studies of human substantia nigra. Agreement of animal models, however, is dependent on model type. Studies of brain tissue from Parkinson's disease patients (specifically the substantia nigra) form a distinct group, showing patterns of differential gene expression noticeably different from that in non-brain tissues and animal models of Parkinson's disease; while comparison with other brain diseases (Alzheimer's disease and brain cancer) suggests that the mixed study types display a general signal of neurodegenerative disease. A meta-analysis of these 33 microarray studies demonstrates the greater ability of studies in humans and highly-affected tissues to identify genes previously known to be associated with Parkinson's disease. The observed clustering and concordance results suggest the existence of a 'characteristic' signal of Parkinson's disease found in significantly affected human tissues in humans. These results help to account for the consistency (or lack thereof) so far observed in microarray studies of Parkinson's disease, and act as a guide to the selection of

  18. Familial hyperhomocysteinemia, age and peripheral vascular diseases - an Italian study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandro Michelini

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Hyperhomocysteinemia is a widely recognized, although not yet entirely understood, risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Particularly, the complex relationships between age, hyperhomocysteinemia, predisposing genetic factors and peripheral vascular diseases have not been fully evaluated. Our contribution to this issue is a retrospective analysis of a large series of patients with peripheral arterial, venous and lymphatic disease, and of their blood relatives, with special reference to homocysteine plasma levels, age and methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR polymorphisms. Serum homocysteine was measured in 477 patients (286 males, 191 females, age range 19-78 years with various vascular clinical conditions: postphlebitic syndrome (46 recurrent venous ulcers (78, arterial diseases (101 primary lymphoedema (87, secondary lymphoedema (161 and outlet thoracic syndrome (4, and in 50 normal controls. A MTHFR study for polymorphisms was carried on in the subjects with homocysteine values exceeding 15 mol/L. Serum homocysteine determination and MTHFR polymorphism studies were performed also in 1430 healthy blood related relatives (mainly siblings, descendents and sibling descendents of the subjects with hyperhomocysteinemia and MTHFR polymorphisms. We found MTHFR polymorphisms in 20% of controls and in 69.3%, 69.5% and 53.8% of hyperhomocysteinemic subjects with arterial diseases, postphlebitic syndrome and venous ulcers, respectively. As expected, the percentage of hyperhomocysteinemia in patients with secondary lymphoedema and with thoracic outlet syndrome did not show significant differences compared to the control group. A MTHFR polymorphism was found in 116 out of the 214 hyperhomocysteinemic patients, i.e., in the 54% of the overall patient population with hyperhomocysteinemia (214 patients. Interestingly 750 (52% out of the 1430 blood relatives of the 116 patients with hyperhomocysteinemia and MTHFR polymorphisms showed at least one

  19. Somatization in Parkinson's Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carrozzino, Danilo; Bech, Per; Patierno, Chiara

    2017-01-01

    The current systematic review study is aimed at critically analyzing from a clinimetric viewpoint the clinical consequence of somatization in Parkinson's Disease (PD). By focusing on the International Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guidelines, we...... consequence of such psychiatric symptom should be further evaluated by replacing the clinically inadequate diagnostic label of psychogenic parkinsonism with the psychosomatic concept of persistent somatization as conceived by the Diagnostic Criteria for Psychosomatic Research (DCPR)....

  20. Effects of interactive metronome training on postural stability and upper extremity function in Parkinson's disease: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Arim; Lee, Hye-Sun; Song, Chiang-Soon

    2017-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of interactive metronome training on the postural stability and upper extremity function of an individual with Parkinson's disease. [Subject and Methods] The participant of this case study was a 75-year-old female with Parkinson's disease diagnosed 7 years prior. This study was a single-subject research with an A-B-A design. She received IM training during the treatment phase (B phase) for 40 minutes per session. She was assessed pretest and posttest using the Berg balance scale and Wolf motor function test, and at baseline and the treatment phase using the measured box-and-block test and a Tetrax system. [Results] After training, the patient's static and dynamic balance, functional activity, and performance time of the upper extremity improved. Interactive metronome therapy improved the manual dexterity of both hands. Interactive metronome therapy also improved the limit of stability of the Parkinson's disease. [Conclusion] Though a case study, the results of this study suggest that IM therapy is effective at restoring the postural stability and upper extremity function of patients with Parkinson's disease.

  1. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Anxiety in Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Cognitive Issues: Advice for Parkinson's Care Partners Expert Briefings: Nutrition and Parkinson's Disease NY Nightly News with Chuck ...

  2. Shear stress is not sufficient to control growth of vascular networks: a model study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hacking, W. J.; VanBavel, E.; Spaan, J. A.

    1996-01-01

    Local vessel wall shear stress is considered to be important for vessel growth. This study is a theoretical investigation of how this mechanism contributes to the structure of a vascular network. The analyses and simulations were performed on vascular networks of increasing complexity, ranging from

  3. Rabbit tibial periosteum and saphenous arteriovenous vascular bundle as an in vivo bioreactor to construct vascularized tissue-engineered bone: a feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Dong; Guan, Xiaoyi; Wang, Jian; Wei, Jiao; Li, Qingfeng

    2014-02-01

    The aim of this project was to construct vascularized tissue-engineered living bone with an autologous vascular network by means of a rabbit bioreactor in vivo. The key components of the in vivo bioreactor for bone formation were the vascularized tibial periosteum and the saphenous vascular bundle. Beta-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) scaffolds were implanted into the in vivo bioreactor (vascular pedicle implantation and vascularized periosteum encapsulation). At 4 weeks postsurgery, new bone formation was mainly "cartilage-bone inducing" in the inner periosteum, and was primarily seen in the outer aspects of the scaffold with some amount in the middle part as well. Microvascular infusion showed that direct revascularization of β-TCP was obtained by means of vascular implantation. Triple staining results showed a large amount of blue collagen fibers. Vascular endothelial growth factor immunohistochemical staining displayed endothelial cells of new blood vessels in bone tissue. The bioreactor established in this study can be used to prepare tissue-engineered bone with a vascular network. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and International Center for Artificial Organs and Transplantation.

  4. A Cross-Language Study of Acoustic Predictors of Speech Intelligibility in Individuals with Parkinson's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yunjung; Choi, Yaelin

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The present study aimed to compare acoustic models of speech intelligibility in individuals with the same disease (Parkinson's disease [PD]) and presumably similar underlying neuropathologies but with different native languages (American English [AE] and Korean). Method: A total of 48 speakers from the 4 speaker groups (AE speakers with…

  5. Noradrenergic and dopaminergic therapy in Parkinson's disease : preclinical studies on L-threo-DOPS, decarboxylase inhibitors and transdermal lisuride

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhagen-Kamerbeek, Wilma Dianne Johanna

    1994-01-01

    Bij de palliatieve behandeling van de ziekte van Parkinson (PD) blijken nog veel symptomen niet op de gebruikelijke therapie met dopamine (DA) suppleterende of dopaminomimetische farmaka te reageren. De studies bijeen gebracht in dit proefschrift beschrijven twee alternatieve benaderingen in de

  6. Failure of stop and go in de novo Parkinson's disease-a functional magnetic resonance imaging study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vriend, Chris; Gerrits, Niels J H M; Berendse, Henk W; Veltman, Dick J; van den Heuvel, Odile A; van der Werf, Ysbrand D

    Behavioral impairments in response inhibition and initiation are common in Parkinson's disease (PD) and are associated with reduced impulse control. No prior study, however, has investigated the functional correlates of response inhibition in de novo PD. Twenty-one de novo PD patients and 37 matched

  7. General Anesthesia versus Local Anesthesia in StereotaXY (GALAXY) for Parkinson's disease: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holewijn, R. A.; Verbaan, D.; de Bie, R. M. A.; Schuurman, P. R.

    2017-01-01

    Background: The aim of the study is to investigate if deep brain stimulation (DBS) in the subthalamic nucleus (STN) for Parkinson's disease (PD) under general anesthesia further improves outcome by lessening postoperative cognitive, mood, and behavioral adverse effects; shorten surgical time and

  8. Complementary PET studies of striatal neuronal function in the differential diagnosis between multiple system atrophy and Parkinson's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Antonini, A; Leenders, KL; Vontobel, P; Maguire, RP; Missimer, J; Psylla, M; Gunther, [No Value

    1997-01-01

    We used PET with the tracers [F-18]fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG), [F-18]fluorodopa (FDOPA) and [C-11]raclopride (RACLO) to study striatal glucose and dopa metabolism, and dopamine D-2 receptor binding, respectively, in nine patients with multiple system atrophy. Ten patients with classical Parkinson's

  9. Striatal FDOPA uptake and cognition in advanced non-demented Parkinson's disease : A clinical and FDOPA-PET study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Beilen, Marije; Portman, Axel T.; Kiers, Henk A. L.; Maguire, Ralph P.; Kaasinen, Valtteri; Koning, Marthe; Pruim, Jan; Leenders, Klaus L.

    2008-01-01

    This study sought to determine the nature of the relationship between cognition and striatal dopaminergic functioning in 28 patients with advanced Parkinson's disease (PD) using fluorodopa Positron emission tomography (FDOPA-PET) and neuropsychological test scores. Mental flexibility was related to

  10. Diabetes Drug Shows Promise Against Parkinson's

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... fullstory_167612.html Diabetes Drug Shows Promise Against Parkinson's Byetta improved symptoms of motor disease in small, ... may do double duty as a treatment for Parkinson's disease, a new study suggests. "This is a ...

  11. Medidas vocais acústicas na doença de Parkinson: estudo de casos Vocal acoustic measures in Parkinson disease: case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Vargas Ferreira

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available TEMA: características vocais acústicas de indivíduos com Doença de Parkinson (DP. PROCEDIMENTOS: estudo de casos, estatística descritiva; cinco pares de parkinsonianos e controle, três masculinos e dois femininos, entre 36 e 63 anos. Avaliação otorrinolaringológica, fonoaudiológica, voz analisada pelo Multi-Dimensional Voice Program Advanced Model 5105 da Kay Pentax®. RESULTADOS: a f0 das mulheres adultas de meia-idade com DP ficou na faixa masculina e a f0 dos controles no limite inferior da faixa feminina. Nos demais sujeitos, que eram homens de diferentes idades, a f0 foi normal; houve aumento de todas as medidas acústicas principalmente nos sujeitos com DP de todas as faixas etárias estudadas. CONCLUSÃO: o processo de envelhecimento e suas consequências parecem atuar como fator interferente nas modificações acústicas da voz, mas, aparentemente, a DP e a idade precoce de seu aparecimento podem acentuar tais alterações, repercutindo de forma negativa na fonação.BACKGROUND: vocal acoustic measures in individuals with Parkinson Disease (PD. PROCEDURES: case studies, descriptive statistics; five pairs of Parkinson patients and control group, three male and two female subjects, between 36 and 63-year old. Evaluations on otorhinolaryngology, speech therapy, voice analyzed by the Multi-Dimensional Voice Program Advanced Model 5105 by Kay Pentax®. RESULTS: f0 in women adults of middle age with PD, was in full male and f0 of the controls on the bottom of the band of women. In other subjects, who were men of different ages, f0 was normal; there was an increase for all acoustic measures, mainly, in the subjects with PD of all studied age groups. CONCLUSION: aging process and its consequences seem to act as an interference factor in the changes of acoustic voice, but apparently, PD and the early age of its appearance may come to enhance these changes, reflecting a negative impact on phonation.

  12. Self-Perceived Pre-Motor Symptoms Load in Patients with Parkinson's Disease: A Retrospective Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Violante, Mayela; de Saráchaga, Adib Jorge; Cervantes-Arriaga, Amin; Millán-Cepeda, Roxanna; Leal-Ortega, Roberto; Estrada-Bellmann, Ingrid; Zuñiga-Ramírez, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson's disease is characterized by motor and non-motor clinical features. The latter may present as pre-motor symptoms several years before the motor onset. To analyze the association between pre-motor symptoms load and its lead-time in relation to the motor onset and time to diagnosis. A cross-sectional study was carried including subjects with Parkinson's disease from five different movement disorders clinics in Mexico. A structured questionnaire was applied to assess the presence of six self-perceived pre-motor symptoms (hyposmia, depression, anxiety, constipation, pain and sleep disorders). Overall frequency of pre-motor symptoms was 76.2% . Among the most prevalent symptoms were depression (38%), sleep disorders (37%) and anxiety (36.6%). The lead time to motor onset was greater for constipation (9.2 ± 17.89 years) and pain (8.66 ± 13.36 years). Patients with more than two pre-motor symptoms had a later age at motor onset when compared to patients without pre-motor symptoms (52.04 ± 13.11 vs 56.55 ± 12.97 years, p = 0.037). Late onset patients had a higher frequency of pre-motor symptoms (79% vs 65% in early onset, p = 0.002) and a higher load (1.75 ± 1.37 vs 1.44 ± 1.38, p = 0.033) in comparison to those with early onset. Female subjects reported a higher number of pre-motor symptoms (1.91 ± 1.43 versus 1.48 ± 1.29, p ≤ 0.001). PIGD patients reported a greater frequency of pain (8%) compared to tremor (1%, p = 0.0064) and bradykinetic-rigid (0.61%, p = 0.0061). Anxiety lead-time was greater in tremor-dominant (10.83 ± 15.77 years) compared to bradykinetic-rigid patients (3.48 ± 12.56, p = 0.014). Pre-motor symptoms load is associated to a later motor onset of PD. Pre-motor symptoms are more frequent in subjects with late onset Parkinson's disease. Female subjects report a higher number of pre-motor symptoms, depression and anxiety being the most common.

  13. Estudio vascular renal por TC multidetector de 64 canales 64-Multidetector row CT for the Renal Vascular Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Stoisa

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo: Mostrar las diversas variantes anatómicas vasculares tanto arteriales como venosas en el estudio angiográfico renal por tomografìa computada multidetector (TCMD de 64 canales, dada su implicancia en un eventual planeamiento quirúrgico. Material y métodos: Evaluamos retrospectivamente 26 estudios realizados con tomógrafo Philips Brilliance de 64 canales. Se obtuvieron secuencias sin contraste y postcontraste e.v. en fases arterial y venosa, administrado con bomba inyectora doble cabezal. Para una fase arterial apropiada se utilizó técnica de bolus track. Las imágenes fueron posteriormente procesadas en Workstation Philips Brilliance 190P en un tiempo promedio de 30 minutos y reconstruidas con técnicas MIP y volumétrica. Resultados: Dentro de las variantes anatómicas arteriales, encontramos: bifurcaciones prehiliares (n=3, arterias accesorias (n=4 y arterias polares (n=9. Dentro de las variantes venosas fueron halladas: venas renales múltiples (n=5, venas circumaórticas (n=2, retroaórticas (n=2 y vena tributaria lumbar prominente (n=1. Conclusión: El estudio vascular renal adquiere importancia en el planeamiento quirúrgico en casos de nefrectomías parciales, laparoscópicas y en el transplante renal. Esto otorga suma utilidad al estudio de TCMD de 64 canales por su eficacia diagnóstica, dada la alta calidad de las reconstrucciones obtenidas, llegando a igualar a la angiografía digital, sin ser un método invasivo.Purpose: To show the wide range of anatomical vascular variants, arterial and venous, that can be seen in the angiographic renal study using 64-multidetector-row computed tomography (64-MDCT, due to its importance in an eventual surgical planning. Material and Methods: We have evaluated retrospectively 26 studies that have been done using a 64 channels Philips Brilliance CT scanner. We have obtained non enhanced and both in arterial and venous enhanced sequences. For the injection of the contrast material we

  14. ICARUS study: prevalence and clinical features of impulse control disorders in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonini, Angelo; Barone, Paolo; Bonuccelli, Ubaldo; Annoni, Karin; Asgharnejad, Mahnaz; Stanzione, Paolo

    2017-04-01

    Impulse control disorders/other compulsive behaviours ('ICD behaviours') occur in Parkinson's disease (PD), but prospective studies are scarce, and prevalence and clinical characteristics of patients are insufficiently defined. To assess the presence of ICD behaviours over a 2-year period, and evaluate patients' clinical characteristics. A prospective, non-interventional, multicentre study (ICARUS (Impulse Control disorders And the association of neuRopsychiatric symptoms, cognition and qUality of life in ParkinSon disease); SP0990) in treated Italian PD outpatients. Study visits: baseline, year 1, year 2. Surrogate primary variable: presence of ICD behaviours and five ICD subtypes assessed by modified Minnesota Impulsive Disorder Interview (mMIDI). 1069/1095 (97.6%) patients comprised the Full Analysis Set. Point prevalence of ICD behaviours (mMIDI; primary analysis) was stable across visits: 28.6% (306/1069) at baseline, 29.3% (292/995) at year 1, 26.5% (245/925) at year 2. The most prevalent subtype was compulsive eating, followed by punding, compulsive sexual behaviour, gambling and buying disorder. Patients who were ICD positive at baseline were more likely to be male, younger, younger at PD onset, have longer disease duration, more severe non-motor symptoms (including mood and sexual function), depressive symptoms, sleep impairment and poorer PD-related quality of life. However, they did not differ from the ICD-negative patients in their severity of PD functional disability, motor performance and cognitive function. Prevalence of ICD behaviours was relatively stable across the 2-year observational period. ICD-positive patients had more severe depression, poorer sleep quality and reduced quality of life. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  15. Satisfaction with Life Scale (SLS-6): First validation study in Parkinson's disease population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambrosio, Leire; Portillo, Mari Carmen; Rodriguez-Blazquez, Carmen; Martínez-Castrillo, Juan Carlos; Rodriguez-Violante, Mayela; Serrano-Dueñas, Marcos; Campos-Arillo, Víctor; Garretto, Nelida Susana; Arakaki, Tomoko; Álvarez, Mario; Pedroso-Ibáñez, Ivonne; Carvajal, Ana; Martinez-Martin, Pablo

    2016-04-01

    To explore the psychometric attributes of a new Satisfaction with Life Scale (SLS-6) in a wide Spanish-speaking population with Parkinson's disease (PD). This was an international, cross-sectional study. Several rater-based and patient-reported outcomes measures for evaluation of PD (e.g., Scales for Outcomes in Parkinson's Disease-Motor) and other constructs (e.g., Duke-UNC Functional Social Support Questionnaire, Scale for Living with Chronic Illness) were applied together with the SLS-6. Acceptability, scaling assumptions, reliability, precision, and construct validity were tested. The study included 324 patients from five countries, with age (mean ± standard deviation) 66.67 ± 10.68 years. None of the SLS-6 items had missing values and all acceptability parameters fulfilled the standard criteria. Scaling assumptions allowed the calculation of a summary index from items 2 to 6, complementary to the global evaluation (item 1). For these five items, Cronbach's alpha was 0.85; the corrected item-total correlation 0.53-0.73; inter-item correlation, 0.45-0.70, with an item homogeneity index of 0.55. The standard error of measurement, based on Cronbach's alpha for a single observation, was 3.48. SLS-6 correlations were moderate to strong (rs ≥ 0.35) with the patient-reported outcomes and weak to moderate with the rater-based assessments used in the study. The SLS-6 total score was significantly different according to PD severity levels established according to Hoehn and Yahr staging, Clinical Impression of Severity Index, and Patient-Based Global Impression of Severity scale. The results suggest that SLS-6 is an easy, feasible, acceptable, consistent, precise and valid measure to evaluate satisfaction with life in PD patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. A clinical study of integrating acupuncture and Western medicine in treating patients with Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Fang-Pey; Chang, Ching-Mao; Shiu, Jing-Huei; Chiu, Jen-Hwey; Wu, Ta-Peng; Yang, Jen-Lin; Kung, Yen-Ying; Chen, Fun-Jou; Chern, Chang-Ming; Hwang, Shinn-Jang

    2015-01-01

    Complementary therapy with acupuncture for Parkinson's disease (PD) has been studied for quite a long time, but the effectiveness of the treatment still remains unclear. The aim of this study is to evaluate the integrated effects of acupuncture treatment in PD patients who received western medicine. In the short-term acupuncture treatment study, 20 patients received acupuncture therapy twice a week in acupoints DU 20, GB 20, LI 11, LI 10, LI 4, GB 31, ST 32, GB 34 and GB 38 along with western medicine for 18 weeks, and 20 controlled patients received western medicine only. In the long-term acupuncture treatment, 13 patients received acupuncture treatment twice a week for 36 weeks. The outcome parameters include Unified Parkinson's disease rating scale (UPDRS), Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI), Beck Depression Inventory-Version 2 (BDI-II), and WHO quality of life (WHOQOL). In the short-term clinical trial, a higher percentage of patients in the acupuncture group had score improvement in UPDRS total scores (55% vs. 15%, p = 0.019), sub-score of mind, behavior and mood (85% vs. 25%, p vs. 15%, p = 0.003), mobility (40% vs. 15%, p = 0.155) and complication of treatment (75% vs. 15%, p vs. 35%, p = 0.003), and WHOQOL score (65% vs. 15%, p = 0.003) when compared to control group at the end of the 18 weeks' follow up. After 36 weeks of long-term acupuncture treatment, the mean UPDRS total scores and sub-score of mentation, behavior and mood, sub-score of complications of therapy and BDI-II score decreased significantly when compared to the pretreatment baseline. In conclusion, acupuncture treatment had integrated effects in reducing symptoms and signs of mind, behavior, mood, complications of therapy and depression in PD patients who received Western medicine.

  17. Artefactual subcortical hyperperfusion in PET studies normalized to global mean: lessons from Parkinson's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borghammer, Per; Cumming, Paul; Aanerud, Joel

    2008-01-01

    AIM: Recent studies of Parkinson's disease (PD) report subcortical increases of cerebral blood flow (CBF) or cerebral metabolic rate of glucose (CMRglc), after conventional normalization to the global mean. However, if the global mean CBF or CMRglc is decreased in the PD group, this normalization...... necessarily generates artificial relative increases in regions unaffected by the disease. This potential bias may explain the reported subcortical increases in PD. To test this hypothesis, we performed simulations with manipulation and subsequently analysis of sets of quantitative CBF maps by voxel...... the global mean or to the white matter mean. RESULTS: In Simulation I, global normalization robustly created artefactual subcortical increases, irrespective of analysis methodology. Simulation II demonstrated that an increased signal from the small subcortical structures involved in PD can probably...

  18. Joint Global War on Terror (GWOT) Vascular Injury Study 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-01

    changed duty stations and he is now at Fort Detrick in Combat Casualty Care. MAJ Zachary Arthurs was selected to be the incoming PI of this...principal discipline(s) of the project? Vascular injury represents a common cause of morbidity and mortality in not only wartime but also the civilian...Detrick in Combat Casualty Care. MAJ Zachary Arthurs was selected to be the incoming PI of this effort by Col Rasmussen and took leadership of the

  19. Erectile mechanism studied using penile vascular casts in the dog

    OpenAIRE

    狩野, 健一; 羽入, 修吾; 佐藤, 昭太郎; 岩永, 敏彦; 金澤, 寛明

    1987-01-01

    The possible mechanism of penile erection was discussed based on the findings obtained by the scanning electron microscope observations of the penile vascular casts in the dog. Polsters protruding into the lumen of the distal helicine arteries regulate blood flow into the cavernous spaces. The drainage veins from the corpus cavernosum penis arose on the dorsal surface and crept on the corpus until changing direction perpendicularly. This suggested that these veins were efficiently compressed ...

  20. Young-Onset Parkinson's

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... What Is Parkinson's? › Young Onset Parkinson's Young-Onset Parkinson's 1. Symptoms 2. How Is Young-Onset PD ... of the foot Why Is Distinguishing Young-Onset Parkinson's Important? Socially, people who are affected by PD ...

  1. Parkinson's Disease Dementia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Find your local chapter Join our online community Parkinson's Disease Dementia Parkinson's disease dementia is an impairment ... disease. About Symptoms Diagnosis Causes & risks Treatments About Parkinson's disease dementia The brain changes caused by Parkinson's ...

  2. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Issues: Advice for Parkinson's Care Partners Expert Briefings: Nutrition and Parkinson's Disease NY Nightly News with Chuck ... Briefings: What's in the Parkinson's Pipeline? Expert Briefings: Nutrition and Parkinson's Disease 2010 Expert Briefings: Legal Issues: ...

  3. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the Helpline: What Is the Helpline? How Does Speech Therapy Help Parkinson's Patients? CareMAP: El Vestirse Caregiver ... Parkinson's Mid-Stride: A Treatment Guide to Parkinson's Speech and Swallowing Psychosis: A Mind Guide to Parkinson's ...

  4. Subtypes of mild cognitive impairment in patients with Parkinson's disease: evidence from the LANDSCAPE study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalbe, Elke; Rehberg, Sarah Petra; Heber, Ines; Kronenbuerger, Martin; Schulz, Jörg B; Storch, Alexander; Linse, Katharina; Schneider, Christine; Gräber, Susanne; Liepelt-Scarfone, Inga; Berg, Daniela; Dams, Judith; Balzer-Geldsetzer, Monika; Hilker, Rüdiger; Oberschmidt, Carola; Witt, Karsten; Schmidt, Nele; Mollenhauer, Brit; Trenkwalder, Claudia; Spottke, Annika; Roeske, Sandra; Wittchen, Hans-Ulrich; Riedel, Oliver; Dodel, Richard

    2016-10-01

    Inconsistent results exist regarding the cognitive profile in patients with Parkinson's disease with mild cognitive impairment (PD-MCI). We aimed at providing data on this topic from a large cohort of patients with PD-MCI. Sociodemographic, clinical and neuropsychological baseline data from patients with PD-MCI recruited in the multicentre, prospective, observational DEMPARK/LANDSCAPE study were analysed. 269 patients with PD-MCI (age 67.8±7.4, Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS-III) scores 23.2±11.6) were included. PD-MCI subtypes were 39.4% non-amnestic single domain, 30.5% amnestic multiple domain, 23.4% non-amnestic multiple domain and 6.7% amnestic single domain. Executive functions were most frequently impaired. The most sensitive tests to detect cognitive dysfunctions were the Modified Card Sorting Test, digit span backwards and word list learning direct recall. Multiple stepwise regression analyses showed that global cognition, gender and age, but not education or disease-related parameters predicted PD-MCI subtypes. This study with the so far largest number of prospectively recruited patients with PD-MCI indicates that non-amnestic PD-MCI is more frequent than amnestic PD-MCI; executive dysfunctions are the most typical cognitive symptom in PD-MCI; and age, gender and global cognition predict the PD-MCI subtype. Longitudinal data are needed to test the hypothesis that patients with PD-MCI with specific cognitive profiles have different risks to develop dementia. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  5. Validity and Reliability Study of the Korean Tinetti Mobility Test for Parkinson's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jinse; Koh, Seong-Beom; Kim, Hee Jin; Oh, Eungseok; Kim, Joong-Seok; Yun, Ji Young; Kwon, Do-Young; Kim, Younsoo; Kim, Ji Seon; Kwon, Kyum-Yil; Park, Jeong-Ho; Youn, Jinyoung; Jang, Wooyoung

    2018-01-01

    Postural instability and gait disturbance are the cardinal symptoms associated with falling among patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). The Tinetti mobility test (TMT) is a well-established measurement tool used to predict falls among elderly people. However, the TMT has not been established or widely used among PD patients in Korea. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the reliability and validity of the Korean version of the TMT for PD patients. Twenty-four patients diagnosed with PD were enrolled in this study. For the interrater reliability test, thirteen clinicians scored the TMT after watching a video clip. We also used the test-retest method to determine intrarater reliability. For concurrent validation, the unified Parkinson's disease rating scale, Hoehn and Yahr staging, Berg Balance Scale, Timed-Up and Go test, 10-m walk test, and gait analysis by three-dimensional motion capture were also used. We analyzed receiver operating characteristic curve to predict falling. The interrater reliability and intrarater reliability of the Korean Tinetti balance scale were 0.97 and 0.98, respectively. The interrater reliability and intra-rater reliability of the Korean Tinetti gait scale were 0.94 and 0.96, respectively. The Korean TMT scores were significantly correlated with the other clinical scales and three-dimensional motion capture. The cutoff values for predicting falling were 14 points (balance subscale) and 10 points (gait subscale). We found that the Korean version of the TMT showed excellent validity and reliability for gait and balance and had high sensitivity and specificity for predicting falls among patients with PD.

  6. Structural and functional imaging study in dementia with Lewy bodies and Parkinson's disease dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borroni, Barbara; Premi, Enrico; Formenti, Anna; Turrone, Rosanna; Alberici, Antonella; Cottini, Elisabetta; Rizzetti, Cristina; Gasparotti, Roberto; Padovani, Alessandro

    2015-09-01

    Dementia with Lewy Bodies (DLB) and Parkinson's disease with Dementia (PDD) are neurodegenerative disorders with complex clinical picture (parkinsonism, cognitive decline and neuropsychiatric disturbances). The conundrum of whether DLB and PDD represent the same or different entities is still under debate. Advanced neuroimaging techniques may represent a point of view to assess brain correlates in DLB and PDD. The study aimed at evaluating whether DLB and PDD may be labelled under the same disease entity or be considered distinctive pathologies. We compared DLB and PDD patients by assessing structural and functional brain imaging and including PD patients. Patients with diagnosis of PD, PDD, DLB and a group of healthy controls for neuroimaging comparisons were recruited and changes in structural and resting-state functional MR (Regional Homogeneity, ReHo) were studied. No significant atrophy in VBM analysis was evident in PD. Conversely, PDD showed a significant bilateral frontal atrophy, whereas DLB was characterized by a predominant parietal, occipital atrophy; a similar involvement of subcortical regions in PDD and DLB was observed. ReHo demonstrated reduced local coherence of frontal regions in PD and in PDD, whereas DLB patients presented a reduced local connectivity in posterior regions. Different brain areas are specifically involved in PDD and DLB. In the former group, greater atrophy of frontal regions with concomitant functional connectivity impairment was evident; conversely, structural and functional damage in the posterior regions characterized DLB. Despite an overlapping clinical spectrum, DLB and PDD have different networks involved and different underlying pathogenic pathways. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Prospective study on cost-effectiveness of home-based motor assessment in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cubo, E; Mariscal, N; Solano, B; Becerra, V; Armesto, D; Calvo, S; Arribas, J; Seco, J; Martinez, A; Zorrilla, L; Heldman, D

    2017-02-01

    Introduction Treatment adjustments in Parkinson's disease (PD) are in part dependent on motor assessments. The aim of this study was to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of home-based motor monitoring plus standard in-office visits versus in-office visits alone in patients with advanced PD. Methods The procedures consisted of a prospective, one-year follow-up, randomized, case-control study. A total of 40 patients with advanced PD were randomized into two groups: 20 patients underwent home-based motor monitoring by using wireless motion sensor technology, while the other 20 patients had in-office visits. Motor and non-motor symptom severities, quality of life, neuropsychiatric symptoms, and comorbidities were assessed every four months. Direct costs were assessed using a standardized questionnaire. Cost-effectiveness was assessed using the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER). Results Both groups of PD patients were largely comparable in their clinical and demographic variables at baseline; however, there were more participants using levodopa-carbidopa intestinal gel in the home-based motor monitoring group. There was a trend for lower Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale functional status (UPDRS II) scores in the patients monitored at home compared to the standard clinical follow-up ( p = 0.06). However, UPDRS parts I, III, IV and quality-adjusted life-years scores were similar between both groups. Home-based motor monitoring was cost-effective in terms of improvement of functional status, motor severity, and motor complications (UPDRS II, III; IV subscales), with an ICER/UPDRS ranging from €126.72 to €701.31, respectively. Discussion Home-based motor monitoring is a tool which collects cost-effective clinical information and helps augment health care for patients with advanced PD.

  8. The hTH-GFP reporter rat model for the study of Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iacovitti, Lorraine; Wei, Xiaotao; Cai, Jingli; Kostuk, Eric W; Lin, Ruihe; Gorodinsky, Alexander; Roman, Philip; Kusek, Gretchen; Das, Sonal S; Dufour, Audrey; Martinez, Terina N; Dave, Kuldip D

    2014-01-01

    Parkinson disease (PD) is the second leading neurodegenerative disease in the US. As there is no known cause or cure for PD, researchers continue to investigate disease mechanisms and potential new therapies in cell culture and in animal models of PD. In PD, one of the most profoundly affected neuronal populations is the tyrosine hydroxylase (TH)-expressing dopaminergic (DA) neurons of the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc). These DA-producing neurons undergo degeneration while neighboring DA-producing cells of the ventral tegmental area (VTA) are largely spared. To aid in these studies, The Michael J. Fox Foundation (MJFF) partnered with Thomas Jefferson University and Taconic Inc. to generate new transgenic rat lines carrying the human TH gene promoter driving EGFP using a 11 kb construct used previously to create a hTH-GFP mouse reporter line. Of the five rat founder lines that were generated, three exhibited high level specific GFP fluorescence in DA brain structures (ie. SN, VTA, striatum, olfactory bulb, hypothalamus). As with the hTH-GFP mouse, none of the rat lines exhibit reporter expression in adrenergic structures like the adrenal gland. Line 12141, with its high levels of GFP in adult DA brain structures and minimal ectopic GFP expression in non-DA structures, was characterized in detail. We show here that this line allows for anatomical visualization and microdissection of the rat midbrain into SNpc and/or VTA, enabling detailed analysis of midbrain DA neurons and axonal projections after toxin treatment in vivo. Moreover, we further show that embryonic SNpc and/or VTA neurons, enriched by microdissection or FACS, can be used in culture or transplant studies of PD. Thus, the hTH-GFP reporter rat should be a valuable tool for Parkinson's disease research.

  9. The hTH-GFP reporter rat model for the study of Parkinson's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorraine Iacovitti

    Full Text Available Parkinson disease (PD is the second leading neurodegenerative disease in the US. As there is no known cause or cure for PD, researchers continue to investigate disease mechanisms and potential new therapies in cell culture and in animal models of PD. In PD, one of the most profoundly affected neuronal populations is the tyrosine hydroxylase (TH-expressing dopaminergic (DA neurons of the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc. These DA-producing neurons undergo degeneration while neighboring DA-producing cells of the ventral tegmental area (VTA are largely spared. To aid in these studies, The Michael J. Fox Foundation (MJFF partnered with Thomas Jefferson University and Taconic Inc. to generate new transgenic rat lines carrying the human TH gene promoter driving EGFP using a 11 kb construct used previously to create a hTH-GFP mouse reporter line. Of the five rat founder lines that were generated, three exhibited high level specific GFP fluorescence in DA brain structures (ie. SN, VTA, striatum, olfactory bulb, hypothalamus. As with the hTH-GFP mouse, none of the rat lines exhibit reporter expression in adrenergic structures like the adrenal gland. Line 12141, with its high levels of GFP in adult DA brain structures and minimal ectopic GFP expression in non-DA structures, was characterized in detail. We show here that this line allows for anatomical visualization and microdissection of the rat midbrain into SNpc and/or VTA, enabling detailed analysis of midbrain DA neurons and axonal projections after toxin treatment in vivo. Moreover, we further show that embryonic SNpc and/or VTA neurons, enriched by microdissection or FACS, can be used in culture or transplant studies of PD. Thus, the hTH-GFP reporter rat should be a valuable tool for Parkinson's disease research.

  10. Nano- and microstructured materials for in vitro studies of the physiology of vascular cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greiner, Alexandra M; Sales, Adria; Chen, Hao; Biela, Sarah A; Kaufmann, Dieter; Kemkemer, Ralf

    2016-01-01

    The extracellular environment of vascular cells in vivo is complex in its chemical composition, physical properties, and architecture. Consequently, it has been a great challenge to study vascular cell responses in vitro, either to understand their interaction with their native environment or to investigate their interaction with artificial structures such as implant surfaces. New procedures and techniques from materials science to fabricate bio-scaffolds and surfaces have enabled novel studies of vascular cell responses under well-defined, controllable culture conditions. These advancements are paving the way for a deeper understanding of vascular cell biology and materials-cell interaction. Here, we review previous work focusing on the interaction of vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs) and endothelial cells (ECs) with materials having micro- and nanostructured surfaces. We summarize fabrication techniques for surface topographies, materials, geometries, biochemical functionalization, and mechanical properties of such materials. Furthermore, various studies on vascular cell behavior and their biological responses to micro- and nanostructured surfaces are reviewed. Emphasis is given to studies of cell morphology and motility, cell proliferation, the cytoskeleton and cell-matrix adhesions, and signal transduction pathways of vascular cells. We finalize with a short outlook on potential interesting future studies.

  11. Do physical exercise and reading reduce the risk of Parkinson's disease? a cross-sectional study on factors associated with Parkinson's disease in elderly Chinese veterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Y M; Tan, J P; Li, N; Yang, J S; Yu, B C; Yu, J M; Zhao, Y M; Wang, L N

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate risk factors for and factors protecting against Parkinson's disease (PD) in elderly Chinese veterans. Using a database containing detailed information on the health status of the nervous system in elderly Chinese veterans, univariate and multivariate analyses of factors that may be associated with PD were performed. Univariate analysis of qualitative data was done using the Pearson Chi-square and Fisher's exact tests, and the Mann-Whitney U nonparametric test was used for univariate analysis of quantitative data. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to identify independent risk factors for and factors protecting against PD in elderly Chinese veterans. A total of 9,676 elderly Chinese veterans were enrolled, including 228 cases with PD and 183 cases with Parkinson's syndrome, with 9,265 non-PD subjects serving as controls. Age (odds ratio [OR] 1.343, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.028-1.755) and medical history of essential tremor (OR 1.228, 95% CI 1.081-1.396) were identified as independent risk factors for PD, with age being the most important risk factor. Physical exercise (OR 0.478, 95% CI 0.355-0.643) and reading (OR 0.513, 95% CI 0.357-0.735) were identified as independent factors protecting against PD, and physical exercise showed better protection against PD relative to reading. Smoking, alcohol use, anemia, cerebral trauma, education level, and electromagnetic field exposure showed no association with PD. Physical exercise and reading may be independent factors that protect against PD among elderly Chinese veterans, while advancing age and medical history of essential tremor may be independent risk factors for PD. This study was cross-sectional, so further research is needed to confirm its results.

  12. Pilot Study Assessing the Feasibility of Applying Bilateral Subthalamic Nucleus Deep Brain Stimulation in Very Early Stage Parkinson's Disease: Study design and rationale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles, David; Tolleson, Christopher; Davis, Thomas L.; Gill, Chandler E.; Molinari, Anna L.; Bliton, Mark J.; Tramontana, Michael G.; Salomon, Ronald M.; Kao, Chris; Wang, Lily; Hedera, Peter; Phibbs, Fenna T.; Neimat, Joseph S.; Konrad, Peter E.

    2014-01-01

    Background Deep brain stimulation provides significant symptomatic benefit for people with advanced Parkinson's disease whose symptoms are no longer adequately controlled with medication. Preliminary evidence suggests that subthalamic nucleus stimulation may also be efficacious in early Parkinson's disease, and results of animal studies suggest that it may spare dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra. Objective We report the methodology and design of a novel Phase I clinical trial testing the safety and tolerability of deep brain stimulation in early Parkinson's disease and discuss previous failed attempts at neuroprotection. Methods We recently conducted a prospective, randomized, parallel-group, single-blind pilot clinical trial of deep brain stimulation in early Parkinson's disease. Subjects were randomized to receive either optimal drug therapy or deep brain stimulation plus optimal drug therapy. Follow-up visits occurred every six months for a period of two years and included week-long therapy washouts. Results Thirty subjects with Hoehn & Yahr Stage II idiopathic Parkinson's disease were enrolled over a period of 32 months. Twenty-nine subjects completed all follow-up visits; one patient in the optimal drug therapy group withdrew from the study after baseline. Baseline characteristics for all thirty patients were not significantly different. Conclusions This study demonstrates that it is possible to recruit and retain subjects in a clinical trial testing deep brain stimulation in early Parkinson's disease. The results of this trial will be used to support the design of a Phase III, multicenter trial investigating the efficacy of deep brain stimulation in early Parkinson's disease. PMID:23938229

  13. Study in Parkinson disease of exercise (SPARX): translating high-intensity exercise from animals to humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Charity G; Schenkman, Margaret; Kohrt, Wendy M; Delitto, Anthony; Hall, Deborah A; Corcos, Daniel

    2013-09-01

    A burgeoning literature suggests that exercise has a therapeutic benefit in persons with Parkinson disease (PD) and in animal models of PD, especially when animals exercise at high intensity. If exercise is to be prescribed as "first-line" or "add-on" therapy in patients with PD, we must demonstrate its efficacy and dose-response effects through testing phases similar to those used in the testing of pharmacologic agents. The SPARX Trial is a multicenter, randomized, controlled, single-blinded, Phase II study that we designed to test the feasibility of using high-intensity exercise to modify symptoms of PD and to simultaneously test the nonfutility of achieving a prespecified change in patients' motor scores on the Unified Parkinson Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS). The trial began in May 2102 and is in the process of screening, enrolling, and randomly assigning 126 patients with early-stage PD to 1 of 3 groups: usual care (wait-listed controls), moderate-intensity exercise (4 days/week at 60%-65% maximal heart rate [HRmax]), or high-intensity exercise (4 days/week at 80%-85% HRmax). At 6-month follow-up, the trial is randomly reassigning usual care participants to a moderate-intensity or high-intensity exercise group for the remaining 6 months. The goals of the Phase II trial are to determine if participants can exercise at moderate and high intensities; to determine if either exercise yields benefits consistent with meaningful clinical change (nonfutility); and to document safety and attrition. The advantage of using a non-futility approach allows us to efficiently determine if moderate- or high-intensity exercise warrants further large-scale investigation in PD. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Apathy in untreated, de novo patients with Parkinson's disease: validation study of Apathy Evaluation Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santangelo, Gabriella; Barone, Paolo; Cuoco, Sofia; Raimo, Simona; Pezzella, Domenica; Picillo, Marina; Erro, Roberto; Moccia, Marcello; Pellecchia, Maria Teresa; Amboni, Marianna; Santangelo, Franco; Franco, Santangelo; Grossi, Dario; Trojano, Luigi; Vitale, Carmine

    2014-12-01

    Apathy is a behavioural disturbance occurring alone or in concomitance with depression in Parkinson's disease (PD). Here we present a validation study for the self-report version of the Apathy Evaluation Scale (AES-S), carried out in a sample of 60 non-demented, non-depressed untreated, drug-naïve, de novo PD patients; 20 patients of the sample (33.3%) were classified as apathetic according to current clinical criteria. All enrolled patients completed the AES-S and a neurological and cognitive assessment. Mean AES-S score was 34.43. AES-S did not show floor or ceiling effect. Cronbach's alpha was 0.872. Principal component analysis revealed three factors: the first (34.4% of the variance) represented constitutive aspects of the construct of apathy; the second (8.5% of the variance) represented a social dimension; the third factor (7.9% of the variance) represented a dimension related to insight. With respect to clinical criteria for apathy considered as the gold standard, receiver operating characteristics curve analysis showed that a cut-off of 36/37 has the maximum discrimination power. High sensitivity and negative predictive values were obtained with cut-off scores of 33/34 or lower; high specificity and positive predictive values were obtained with cut-off scores of 38/39 or higher. AES-S score correlated with scores on frontal tasks, but not on Beck Depression Inventory, Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale, Hoehn and Yahr scale. The AES-S is a reliable and valid questionnaire for detecting apathy in PD. For screening purposes a 33/34 cut-off score is indicated, but a 38/39 cut-off score is necessary when a high specificity is desired.

  15. Therapeutic Argentine Tango Dancing for People with Mild Parkinson's Disease: A Feasibility Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blandy, Laura M; Beevers, Winifred A; Fitzmaurice, Kerry; Morris, Meg E

    2015-01-01

    Individuals living with Parkinson's disease (PD) can experience a range of movement disorders that affect mobility and balance and increase the risk of falls. Low health-related quality of life, depression, and anxiety are more common in people with PD than age-matched comparisons. Therapeutic dance is a form of physical activity believed to facilitate movement and therapy uptake. As well as being enjoyable, dancing is thought to improve mobility, balance, and well-being in some people living with PD. The primary objective of this study was to evaluate the feasibility and safety of a 4-week Argentine tango dance program for people with PD. Six community dwelling individuals with mild to moderate PD were recruited from Parkinson's support groups, movement disorder clinics, and the PD association in Australia. To minimize falls risk, participants were required to be tango dance classes. Physiotherapists were present to assist participants during the class and served as dance partners as necessary. The primary outcome was feasibility, which was determined by measures of recruitment, adherence, attrition, safety (falls, near misses and adverse events), and resource requirements. Secondary measures included the Beck Depression Inventory and the Euroqol-5D, administered at baseline and post intervention. Therapy outcomes pre- and post-intervention were analyzed descriptively as medians and interquartile ranges and using Wilcoxon matched pair signed-rank tests. The Argentine tango dance intervention was shown to be safe, with no adverse events. Adherence to the dance program was 89%. Depression scores improved after intervention (p = 0.04). Some challenges were associated with the need to quickly recruit participants and physiotherapists to act as dance partners during classes and to monitor participants. The 4-week, twice weekly Argentine tango dancing program was shown to be feasible and safe for people with mild-to-moderately severe PD.

  16. Neural substrates of motor and non-motor symptoms in Parkinson's disease: a resting FMRI study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwangsun Yoo

    Full Text Available Recently, non-motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease (PD have been considered crucial factors in determining a patient's quality of life and have been proposed as the predominant features of the premotor phase. Researchers have investigated the relationship between non-motor symptoms and the motor laterality; however, this relationship remains disputed. This study investigated the neural connectivity correlates of non-motor and motor symptoms of PD with respect to motor laterality.Eight-seven patients with PD were recruited and classified into left-more-affected PD (n = 44 and right-more affected PD (n = 37 based on their MDS-UPDRS (Movement Disorder Society-sponsored revision of the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale motor examination scores. The patients underwent MRI scanning, which included resting fMRI. Brain regions were labeled as ipsilateral and contralateral to the more-affected body side. Correlation analysis between the functional connectivity across brain regions and the scores of various symptoms was performed to identify the neural connectivity correlates of each symptom.The resting functional connectivity centered on the ipsilateral inferior orbito-frontal area was negatively correlated with the severity of non-motor symptoms, and the connectivity of the contralateral inferior parietal area was positively correlated with the severity of motor symptoms (p 0.3.These results suggest that the inferior orbito-frontal area may play a crucial role in non-motor dysfunctions, and that the connectivity information may be utilized as a neuroimaging biomarker for the early diagnosis of PD.

  17. The Parkinson’s Registry Investigation of Diagnosis and Etiology (PRIDE) Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-04-01

    as genotype-environment interactions related to LRRK2 parkinsonism . Role: Co-Investigator W81XWH-04-1-0490 (PI: Tanner) 4/1/2004 – 5/1/2014...Registry of Parkinsonism Cases among Alaska Native People living in Alaska The purpose of this project is to establish a prospective, statewide...population-based Alaska Native Parkinson Registry among Alaska native people living in Alaska. W81XWH-07-1-0261 (PI: Tanner) 3/1/2007 – 3/31/2013

  18. Autoimmune disease and risk for Parkinson disease A population-based case-control study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rugbjerg, K.; Friis, S.; Ritz, B.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: Inflammatory mediators are increased in autoimmune diseases and may activate microglia and might cause an inflammatory state and degeneration of dopaminergic neurons in the brain. Thus, we evaluated whether having an autoimmune disease increases the risk for developing Parkinson disease...... do not support the hypothesis that autoimmune diseases increase the risk for Parkinson disease. The decreased risk observed among patients with rheumatoid arthritis might be explained by underdiagnosis of movement disorders such as Parkinson disease in this patient group or by a protective effect...

  19. Sleep disorders and an increased risk of Parkinson's disease in individuals with non-apnea sleep disorders: a population-based cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsiao, Yi-Han; Chen, Yung-Tai; Tseng, Ching-Ming; Wu, Li-An; Perng, Diahn-Warng; Chen, Yuh-Min; Chen, Tzeng-Ji; Chang, Shi-Chuan; Chou, Kun-Ta

    2017-10-01

    Sleep disorders are common non-motor symptoms in patients with Parkinson's disease. Our study aims to explore the relationship between non-apnea sleep disorders and future Parkinson's disease. This is a cohort study using a nationwide database. The participants were recruited from the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database between 2000 and 2003. A total of 91 273 adult patients who had non-apnea sleep disorders without pre-existing Parkinson's disease were enrolled. An age-, gender-, income-, urbanization- and Charlson comorbidity index score-matched control cohort consisting of 91 273 participants was selected for comparison. The two cohorts were followed for the occurrence of Parkinson's disease, death or until the end of 2010, whichever came first. The Kaplan-Meier analyses revealed patients with non-apnea sleep disorders tended to develop Parkinson's disease (log-rank test, P Parkinson's disease [crude hazard ratio: 1.63, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.54-1.73, P Parkinson's disease. © 2017 European Sleep Research Society.

  20. Stimulus Timing by People with Parkinson's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wearden, J. H.; Smith-Spark, J. H.; Cousins, Rosanna; Edelstyn, N. M. J.; Cody, F. W. J.; O'Boyle, D. J.

    2008-01-01

    Previous literature suggests that Parkinson's disease is marked by deficits in timed behaviour. However, the majority of studies of central timing mechanisms in patients with Parkinson's disease have used timing tasks with a motor component. Since the motor abnormalities are a defining feature of the condition, the status of timing in Parkinson's…

  1. Parkinson's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a type of movement disorder. It happens when nerve cells in the brain don't ... coordination As symptoms get worse, people with the disease may have trouble walking, talking, or doing simple ...

  2. Parkinson's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a loss of neurons that produce a chemical messenger in your brain called dopamine. When dopamine levels ... Diagnosis & treatment July 07, 2015 Print Share on: Facebook Twitter References Longo DL, et al. Parkinson's disease ...

  3. Blood-based neurochemical diagnosis of vascular dementia: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bibl, Mirko; Esselmann, Hermann; Mollenhauer, Brit; Weniger, Godehard; Welge, Volker; Liess, Michael; Lewczuk, Piotr; Otto, Markus; Schulz, Jörg B; Trenkwalder, Claudia; Kornhuber, Johannes; Wiltfang, Jens

    2007-10-01

    Blood-based tests for the differential diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) are under intensive investigation and have shown promising results with regard to Abeta40 and Abeta42 peptide species in incipient AD. Moreover, plasma Abeta40 was suggested as an independent cerebrovascular risk factor candidate. These considerations prompted us to analyse a total of 72 plasma samples in vascular dementias (VAD, n = 15), AD with cerebrovascular disease (AD with CVD, n = 7), AD (n = 15), Parkinson's disease and Parkinson's disease dementia (PD/PDD, n = 20) and 15 patients with depression that served as controls (DC) for distinct plasma amyloid-beta (Abeta) peptide patterns. For the analysis of plasma we used immunoprecipitation followed by the quantitative Abeta-SDS-PAGE/immunoblot. For comparison, CSF tau and Abeta1-42 analyses were performed. The major outcome was an increase in Abeta1-40 in plasma of VAD paralleled by a decrease in the ratio of Abeta1-38/Abeta1-40. The ratio Abeta1-38/Abeta1-40 in plasma enabled contrasts of beyond 85% and 80% for discriminating VAD from DC and all other patients, respectively. In CSF, we confirmed the typical CSF biomarker constellation of increased tau and diminished Abeta1-42 levels for AD. The diagnostic accuracy of plasma Abeta1-38/Abeta1-40 for VAD resembled the accuracy of CSF biomarkers for AD. From the presented results, we consider the ratio of plasma Abeta1-38/Abeta1-40 peptides to be a blood-based biomarker candidate for VAD.

  4. Organophosphate Pesticide Exposures, Nitric Oxide Synthase Gene Variants, and Gene?Pesticide Interactions in a Case?Control Study of Parkinson?s Disease, California (USA)

    OpenAIRE

    Paul, KC; Sinsheimer, JS; Rhodes, SL; Cockburn, M; Bronstein, J; Ritz, B

    2015-01-01

    Background: Nitric oxide synthase (NOS) genes are candidates for Parkinson?s disease (PD) because NOS enzymes produce nitric oxide (NO), a pro-oxidant that can damage neurons. Widely used organophosphate (OP) pesticides can induce oxidative stress and are reported to increase PD risk. Additionally, two single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) from the PON1 (paraoxonase 1) gene influence the ability to metabolize OPs. Objective: Here, we investigated contributions of NOS genes and OP pesticides ...

  5. The effects of brain stimulation of subthalamic nucleus surgery on gait and balance performance in Parkinson disease. A pilot study

    OpenAIRE

    Altuğ, Filiz; Acar, Feridun; ACAR, Göksemin; Cavlak, Uğur

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Parkinson's disease (PD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder characterized by tremor, rigidity and bradykinesia. Gait and postural difficulties supersede tremor, rigidity and bradykinesia as drivers of disease burden in patients with advanced PD. The aim of this study was to describe the effects of deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus on gait ability and balance performance in patients with PD. Material and methods We studied 19 consecutive patients who under...

  6. [Clinicopathologic study of pediatric vascular anomalies: a report of 117 cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, H L; Zhou, S Y; Lin, Q Q; Yi, P; Wang, F H; Gao, Q; Chen, Z R; Xia, J Q; Zheng, H C; Zeng, R X

    2016-04-08

    To study the clinicopathologic features of pediatric vascular anomalies and application of ISSVA classification. The clinical features, histopathologic findings and immunohistochemical results were analyzed in 117 cases of pediatric vascular anomalies encountered during the period from May 2014 to May 2015. A total of 117 cases of vascular anomalies were studied. The age of patients ranged from 18 hours after birth to 11 years (mean age =34 months and median age =27 months). There were 73 male patients and 44 female patients, with the male-to-female ratio being 1.7∶1.0. Congenital skin lesions were found in 37 cases (31.6%). The common sites of involvement included head and neck region (46 cases, 39.3%), trunk (28 cases, 23.9%), extremities (14 cases, 12.0%) and internal viscera (31 cases, 26.5%). According to the new ISSVA classification, there were 74 cases of vascular malformations and 43 cases of vascular neoplasms (ratio=1.7∶1.0). The commonest vascular tumor encountered was infantile hemangioma (21 cases, 48.8%), including 17 cases in proliferative phase and 4 cases in involutive phase. Thirteen cases (23.3%) of congenital hemangioma were found, with 8 cases of rapidly involuting congenital hemangioma and 5 cases of non-involutive congenital hemangioma. Three of the congenital hemangioma occurred in liver. There were 5 cases (11.6%) of pyogenic granuloma, 3 cases (7.0%) of tufted angioma and 1 case (2.3%) of Kaposiform hemangioendothelioma. Amongst the 74 cases of vascular malformations encountered, lymphatic malformation was found in 47 cases (63.5%), venous malformation in 15 cases (20.2%), lymphatic-venous malformation in 11 cases (14.9%) and arteriovenous malformation in 1 case (1.4%). All cases of vascular anomalies were all positive for CD31 on immunostaining. Glut1 and CD15 were positive both in proliferative and involutive phases of the 21 cases of infantile hemangioma, while other vascular tumors and vascular malformations were negative. Forty

  7. Naltrexone for impulse control disorders in Parkinson disease: a placebo-controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papay, Kimberly; Xie, Sharon X; Stern, Matthew; Hurtig, Howard; Siderowf, Andrew; Duda, John E; Minger, James; Weintraub, Daniel

    2014-08-26

    Impulse control disorders (ICDs) in Parkinson disease (PD) are common and can be difficult to manage. The objective of this study was to determine the efficacy and tolerability of naltrexone, an opioid antagonist, for the treatment of ICDs in PD. Patients with PD (n = 50) and an ICD were enrolled in an 8-week, randomized (1:1), double-blind, placebo-controlled study of naltrexone 50-100 mg/d (flexible dosing). The primary outcome measure was response based on the Clinical Global Impression-Change score, and the secondary outcome measure was change in symptom severity using the Questionnaire for Impulsive-Compulsive Disorders in Parkinson's Disease-Rating Scale (QUIP-RS) ICD score. Forty-five patients (90%) completed the study. The Clinical Global Impression-Change response rate difference favoring naltrexone in completers was 19.8% (95% confidence interval [CI] -8.7% to 44.2%). While this difference was not significant (odds ratio=1.6, 95% CI 0.5-5.2, Wald χ2 [df]=0.5 [1], p=0.5), naltrexone treatment led to a significantly greater decrease in QUIP-RS ICD score over time compared with placebo (regression coefficient for interaction term in linear mixed-effects model=-7.37, F[df]=4.3 [1, 49], p=0.04). The estimated changes in QUIP-RS ICD scores from baseline to week 8 were 14.9 points (95% CI 9.9-19.9) for naltrexone and 7.5 points (95% CI 2.5-12.6) for placebo. Naltrexone treatment was not efficacious for the treatment of ICDs in PD using a global assessment of response, but findings using a PD-specific ICD rating scale support further evaluation of opioid antagonists for the treatment of ICD symptoms in PD. This study provides Class I evidence that in patients with PD and an ICD, naltrexone does not significantly increase the probability of achieving response. However, the study lacked the precision to exclude an important difference in response rates. © 2014 American Academy of Neurology.

  8. Cerebral Microbleeds in Patients with Dementia with Lewy Bodies and Parkinson Disease Dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, S W; Chung, S J; Oh, Y-S; Yoon, J H; Sunwoo, M K; Hong, J Y; Kim, J-S; Lee, P H

    2015-09-01

    The burden of amyloid β is greater in patients with dementia with Lewy bodies than in those with Parkinson disease dementia, and an increased amyloid β load is closely related to a higher incidence of cerebral microbleeds. Here, we investigated the prevalence and topography of cerebral microbleeds in patients with dementia with Lewy bodies and those with Parkinson disease dementia to examine whether cerebral microbleeds are more prevalent in patients with dementia with Lewy bodies than in those with Parkinson disease dementia. The study population consisted of 42 patients with dementia with Lewy bodies, 88 patients with Parkinson disease dementia, and 35 controls who underwent brain MR imaging with gradient recalled-echo. Cerebral microbleeds were classified as deep, lobar, or infratentorial. The frequency of cerebral microbleeds was significantly greater in patients with dementia with Lewy bodies (45.2%) than in those with Parkinson disease dementia (26.1%) or in healthy controls (17.1%; P = .017). Lobar cerebral microbleeds were observed more frequently in the dementia with Lewy bodies group (40.5%) than in the Parkinson disease dementia (17%; P = .004) or healthy control (8.6%; P = .001) group, whereas the frequencies of deep and infratentorial cerebral microbleeds did not differ among the 3 groups. Logistic regression analyses revealed that, compared with the healthy control group, the dementia with Lewy bodies group was significantly associated with the presence of lobar cerebral microbleeds after adjusting for age, sex, nonlobar cerebral microbleeds, white matter hyperintensities, and other vascular risk factors (odds ratio, 4.39 [95% CI, 1.27-15.25]). However, compared with the healthy control group, the Parkinson disease dementia group was not significantly associated with lobar cerebral microbleeds. This study showed that patients with dementia with Lewy bodies had a greater burden of cerebral microbleeds and exhibited a lobar predominance of cerebral

  9. The effect of LRRK2 mutations on the cholinergic system in manifest and premanifest stages of Parkinson's disease: a cross-sectional PET study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shu-Ying; Wile, Daryl J; Fu, Jessie Fanglu; Valerio, Jason; Shahinfard, Elham; McCormick, Siobhan; Mabrouk, Rostom; Vafai, Nasim; McKenzie, Jess; Neilson, Nicole; Perez-Soriano, Alexandra; Arena, Julieta E; Cherkasova, Mariya; Chan, Piu; Zhang, Jing; Zabetian, Cyrus P; Aasly, Jan O; Wszolek, Zbigniew K; McKeown, Martin J; Adam, Michael J; Ruth, Thomas J; Schulzer, Michael; Sossi, Vesna; Stoessl, A Jon

    2018-02-15

    Markers of neuroinflammation are increased in some patients with LRRK2 Parkinson's disease compared with individuals with idiopathic Parkinson's disease, suggesting possible differences in disease pathogenesis. Previous PET studies have suggested amplified dopamine turnover and preserved serotonergic innervation in LRRK2 mutation carriers. We postulated that patients with LRRK2 mutations might show abnormalities of central cholinergic activity, even before the diagnosis of Parkinson's disease. Between June, 2009, and December, 2015, we recruited participants from four movement disorder clinics in Canada, Norway, and the USA. Patients with Parkinson's disease were diagnosed by movement disorder neurologists on the basis of the UK Parkinson's Disease Society Brain Bank criteria. LRRK2 carrier status was confirmed by bidirectional Sanger sequencing. We used the PET tracer N- 11 C-methyl-piperidin-4-yl propionate to scan for acetylcholinesterase activity. The primary outcome measure was rate of acetylcholinesterase hydrolysis, calculated using the striatal input method. We compared acetylcholinesterase hydrolysis rates between groups using ANCOVA, with adjustment for age based on the results of linear regression analysis. We recruited 14 patients with LRRK2 Parkinson's disease, 16 LRRK2 mutation carriers without Parkinson's disease, eight patients with idiopathic Parkinson's disease, and 11 healthy controls. We noted significant between-group differences in rates of acetylcholinesterase hydrolysis in cortical regions (average cortex p=0·009, default mode network-related regions p=0·006, limbic network-related regions p=0·020) and the thalamus (p=0·008). LRRK2 mutation carriers without Parkinson's disease had increased acetylcholinesterase hydrolysis rates compared with healthy controls in the cortex (average cortex, p=0·046). Patients with LRRK2 Parkinson's disease had significantly higher acetylcholinesterase activity in some cortical regions (average cortex p=0

  10. 4D.02: ACCELERATED VASCULAR AGING: RESULTS FROM THE CARDIOVASCULAR RISK FACTORS AFFECTING VASCULAR AGE (CRAVE) STUDY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlachopoulos, C; Terentes-Printzios, D; Xaplanteris, P; Ioakeimidis, N; Aznaouridis, K; Pietri, P; Stefanadis, C; Tousoulis, D

    2015-06-01

    Vascular aging, as assessed by structural and functional properties of the arteries, is an independent indicator of cardiovascular risk. We investigated the effect of cardiovascular risk factors (RFs) on the progression of vascular aging. One hundred and forty-two subjects (mean age 51.9 ± 10.8 years, 94 men) attending the Peripheral Vessels Unit with no established cardiovascular disease were investigated in two examinations over a 2-year period (mean follow-up visit 1.84 years). Subjects were classified at baseline according to their number of cardiovascular RFs (from zero to two and more). The RFs were hypertension, dyslipidemia, smoking and diabetes. Subjects had at the beginning and end of the study determinations of carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (cfPWV), aortic augmentation index corrected for heart rate (AIx75), brachial flow-mediated dilatation (FMD) and carotid intima-media thickness (cIMT). Based on these measurements the annual absolute changes were calculated. Subjects with more RFs had a gradual higher annual progression of cfPWV (0.092 m/s for no RF, 0.153 m/s for 1 RF and 0.316 for more than 2 RFs; p = 0.03) after adjusting for age, gender, baseline waist circumference and annual change of mean blood pressure heart rate and renal function. (Figure) Subjects with more RFs had a trend for a gradual higher annual deterioration of FMD (-0.04% for no RF, -0.14% for 1 RF and -0.51% for more than 2 RFs; p = 0.11) after adjusting for age, gender and baseline FMD. Annual progression of AIx75 between groups was not statistically significant. However, when only subjects <55 years where considered the progression rate was significantly higher in subjects with more RFs (1.04% vs. 1.52% vs. 3.15%, respectively, p = 0.02). Subjects with more RFs did not show an association with a gradual higher annual deterioration of cIMT. There was also a trend for a statistical association between the annual rate of PWV and FMD (P = 0.07).(Figure

  11. Lingual vascular canal assessment by dental computed tomography: A retrospective study

    OpenAIRE

    Prashant Jaju; Sushma Jaju

    2011-01-01

    Background: Lingual vascular canal (LVC) is an important anatomical structure in mandibular anterior region. Trauma to this structure during implant placement has been reported in this study. Dental computed tomography (DCT) provides a three-dimensional visualization of lingual vascular canal. Aim: To assess the frequency, location, and size of LVC using dental CT. Materials and Methods: A retrospective analysis of 75 mandibular DCT was done. Evaluation was done to detect the frequency,...

  12. Respiratory dysfunction in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torsney, K M; Forsyth, D

    2017-03-01

    Respiratory dysfunction has been associated with Parkinson's disease since it was first described in 1817. The respiratory symptoms observed in Parkinson's disease patients vary greatly. Most patients remain asymptomatic, whereas others present with acute shortness of breath and even stridor. In August 2016, an electronic literature search was conducted using PubMed and Google Scholar. Results were screened and studies reporting on respiratory dysfunction associated with Parkinson's disease were included. Respiratory dysfunction is due to a combination of factors including restrictive changes, upper airway obstruction, abnormal ventilatory drive and response to medications. Much debate surrounds the mechanism underlying respiratory dysfunction in Parkinson's disease, its prevalence and the effect of levodopa on respiration. It is clear from this review that larger studies, comparing patients of similar disease duration and severity using the same pulmonary function parameters, are required to provide a better understanding of the pathophysiology underlying respiratory dysfunction in Parkinson's disease.

  13. Biochemical and clinical effects of Whey protein supplementation in Parkinson's disease: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tosukhowong, Piyaratana; Boonla, Chanchai; Dissayabutra, Thasinas; Kaewwilai, Lalita; Muensri, Sasipa; Chotipanich, Chanisa; Joutsa, Juho; Rinne, Juha; Bhidayasiri, Roongroj

    2016-08-15

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is an oxidative stress-mediated degenerative disorder. Elevated plasma homocysteine (Hcy) is frequently found in the levodopa-treated PD patients, is associated with disease progression and is a marker of oxidative stress. Whey protein is a rich source of cysteine, and branched-chain amino acids (BCAA). It has been shown that supplementation with Whey protein increases glutathione synthesis and muscle strength. In this study, we conducted a placebo-controlled, double-blind study (NCT01662414) to investigate the effects of undenatured Whey protein isolate supplementation for 6months on plasma glutathione, plasma amino acids, and plasma Hcy in PD patients. Clinical outcome assessments included the unified Parkinson's disease rating scale (UPDRS) and striatal L-3,4-dihydroxy-6-(18)F-fluorophenylalanine (FDOPA) uptake were determined before and after supplementation. 15 patients received Whey protein, and 17 received Soy protein, served as a control group. Significant increases in plasma concentration of reduced glutathione and the ratio of reduced to oxidized glutathione were found in the Whey-supplemented patients but not in a control group. This was associated with a significant decrease of plasma levels of Hcy. The plasma levels of total glutathione were not significantly changed in either group. Plasma BCAA and essential amino acids (EAA) were significantly increased in the Whey-supplemented group only. The UPDRS and striatal FDOPA uptake in PD patients were not significantly ameliorated in either group. However, significant negative correlation was observed between the UPDRS and plasma BCAA and EAA in the pre-supplemented PD patients. This study is the first to report that Whey protein supplementation significantly increases plasma reduced glutathione, the reduced to oxidized glutathione ratio, BCAAs and EAAs in patients with PD, together with a concomitant significant reduction of plasma Hcy. However, there were no significant changes in

  14. Prodromal symptoms of Parkinson's disease: Implications for epidemiological studies of disease etiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elbaz, A

    In recent years, there has been a major shift in our understanding of the course of Parkinson's disease (PD) from a disease of the brain to a disease of long latency, characterized by the progressive emergence of multiple non-motor symptoms, including hyposmia, constipation, depression, anxiety, rapid eye movement (REM) sleep behavior disorder and excessive daytime sleepiness, as well as subtle motor signs, before the typical motor signs appear. Epidemiological studies have made major contributions by allowing better characterization of subsequent PD risk in relation to non-motor symptoms. Such findings have profound implications for the conduct of epidemiological studies examining risk and protective factors in PD, and the interpretation of their findings. Given the length of the prodromal period, reverse causation in particular is a major concern with many reported associations. One striking feature of PD etiology, compared with other diseases, is the presence of numerous inverse associations. If these associations are truly causal, they would have major implications for disease prevention and for slowing disease progression. However, whether these associations are truly causal remains to be demonstrated in future studies. Experimental studies play an important role by offering a better understanding of the underlying mechanisms. Well-designed epidemiological studies using innovative approaches will also be key in elucidating whether these intriguing associations are causal or a consequence of reverse causation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. Longitudinal study of vascular structure and function during normal pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iacobaeus, C; Andolf, E; Thorsell, M; Bremme, K; Jörneskog, G; Östlund, E; Kahan, T

    2017-01-01

    To examine alterations in maternal vascular structure and function during normal pregnancy. We assessed brachial and central blood pressure, pulse-wave velocity and augmentation index (by pulse-wave analysis and applanation tonometry), common carotid artery structure (by ultrasonography) and endothelial function in the brachial artery (by postischemic hyperemia-induced flow-mediated vasodilatation by glyceryl trinitrate) and in the forearm skin microcirculation (by laser Doppler perfusion imaging during iontophoretic administration of acetylcholine and sodium nitroprusside) in 52 healthy nulliparous women at 14, 24 and 34 weeks' gestation, and at 9 months postpartum. During pregnancy, brachial and central systolic and diastolic blood pressures initially decreased but subsequently increased (all P pregnancy (P pregnancy (0.30 ± 0.18 in the non-pregnant state at 9 months postpartum and 0.51 ± 0.19, 0.61 ± 0.39 and 0.49 ± 0.30 in the first, second and third trimesters, respectively) (P reactivity to acetylcholine also increased (P pregnancy (5.88 ± 0.91 m/s in the non-pregnant state and 5.55 ± 0.67, 5.12 ± 0.66 and 5.62 ± 0.74 m/s in the first, second and third trimesters, respectively) (P pregnancy, the blood volume expansion necessary for sufficient fetal growth is accommodated by early and marked changes in the matvascular system. This seems to be dependent on normal adaptive endothelial and vascular function. Copyright © 2016 ISUOG. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. Copyright © 2016 ISUOG. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Controlled pilot study of the effects of neuromuscular therapy in patients with Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craig, Lauren H; Svircev, Anna; Haber, Michael; Juncos, Jorge L

    2006-12-01

    The objectives of this study is to examine the effects of neuromuscular therapy (NMT) on motor and nonmotor symptoms in Parkinson's disease (PD). Thirty-six subjects with PD were randomly assigned to NMT or music relaxation (MR, or active control). Subjects received treatment twice a week for 4 weeks. Testing was conducted at baseline, after final treatment, and 8 days after final treatment. Primary outcome measures were the Motor subscale of the United Parkinson Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) and the Clinical Global Impression scale (CGI-Change). Secondary outcome measures included a PD-specific quality of life scale (PDQ-39), quantitative measures of motor function, and severity scales for anxiety and depression symptoms. NMT resulted in a significant and sustained improvement in the Motor subscale of the UPDRS (P < or = 0.0001), most notable in the tremor scores. Also improved 1 week after the last treatment were the CGI scores (P = 0.007) and the finger-tapping speed (P = 0.001). The MR active control group had a slight improvement in tremor but evidenced no other change in motor function. Both groups exhibited a modest improvement in quality of life immediately after the last treatment. This effect was sustained for 8 days only in the MR group. In the nonmotor domains, the MR group evidenced improvements in mood (P = 0.001) and anxiety (P = 0.002), whereas NMT had no effect on mood (P = 0.09), and its initial effect on anxiety (P = 0.0009) dissipated after 8 days (P = 0.40). Group differences for UPDRS motor score and patient CGI-Change were superior in the NMT compared to the MR group. There was no group difference in PDQ-39 scores or in nonmotor measures. The findings suggest that NMT can improve motor and selected nonmotor symptoms in PD and that this effect is more durable for the motor symptoms. The results of this pilot study warrant larger controlled studies to examine dose range, durability, and mechanisms of NMT in PD function. Copyright 2006 Movement

  17. Low clinical diagnostic accuracy of early vs advanced Parkinson disease: clinicopathologic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adler, Charles H; Beach, Thomas G; Hentz, Joseph G; Shill, Holly A; Caviness, John N; Driver-Dunckley, Erika; Sabbagh, Marwan N; Sue, Lucia I; Jacobson, Sandra A; Belden, Christine M; Dugger, Brittany N

    2014-07-29

    Determine diagnostic accuracy of a clinical diagnosis of Parkinson disease (PD) using neuropathologic diagnosis as the gold standard. Data from the Arizona Study of Aging and Neurodegenerative Disorders were used to determine the predictive value of a clinical PD diagnosis, using 2 clinical diagnostic confidence levels, PossPD (never treated or not clearly responsive) and ProbPD (responsive to medications). Neuropathologic diagnosis was the gold standard. Based on first visit, 9 of 34 (26%) PossPD cases had neuropathologically confirmed PD while 80 of 97 (82%) ProbPD cases had confirmed PD. PD was confirmed in 8 of 15 (53%) ProbPD cases with 85% diagnostic accuracy of longer duration, medication-responsive PD. Caution is needed when interpreting clinical studies of PD, especially studies of early disease that do not have autopsy confirmation. The need for a tissue or other diagnostic biomarker is reinforced. This study provides Class II evidence that a clinical diagnosis of PD identifies patients who will have pathologically confirmed PD with a sensitivity of 88% and specificity of 68%. © 2014 American Academy of Neurology.

  18. Noradrenergic and dopaminergic therapy in Parkinson's disease: preclinical studies on L-threo-DOPS, decarboxylase inhibitors and transdermal lisuride

    OpenAIRE

    Verhagen-Kamerbeek, Wilma Dianne Johanna

    1994-01-01

    Bij de palliatieve behandeling van de ziekte van Parkinson (PD) blijken nog veel symptomen niet op de gebruikelijke therapie met dopamine (DA) suppleterende of dopaminomimetische farmaka te reageren. De studies bijeen gebracht in dit proefschrift beschrijven twee alternatieve benaderingen in de farmacotherapeutische behandeliig van PD: versterking van de noradrenerge neurotransrnissie met behulp van een precursor van noradrenaline (NA), en het ontwikkelen van een eenvoudig transdermaal toedie...

  19. Serotonin transporters in Parkinson's disease studied with [I-123]{beta}-CIT SPECT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sang Eun; Choi, Joon Young; Choe, Yearn Seong; Lee, Won Yong; Choi, Yong; Lee, Kyung Han; Kim, Byung Tae [Samsung Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-07-01

    In Parkinson's disease (PD), both neuropathological and biochemical studies suggest that serotonin (5-HT) neurons are affected by the disease process. The purpose of this study was to assess the integrity of 5-HT transporters in PD using [I-123]{beta}-CIT (2{beta}-carbomethoxy-3{beta}-(4-iodophenyl)tropane], which binds to both 5-HT and dopamine transporters, and SPECT. Forty-five patients with PD at relatively early stages (Hoehn-Yahr stages I-3) and seven agematched healthy controls were injected with 185-370 MBq(I-123]{beta}-CIT. A total of 15 SPECT scans were acquired over a 24 hr period in each subject using a three-headed system. Time activity curves were obtained in the hypothalamic/midbrain region, where the binding of [I-123] {beta}-CIT is associated primarily with 5-HT transporters, and cerebellum, which was assumed to include only nondisplaceable activity. The parameter k3/k4 (forward/dissociation rate), which is a measure of 5-HT transporter density, was estimated by four noninvasive methods: peak equilibrium ratio (PER) [the ratio of specific binding (hypothalamic/midbrain region-cerebellar activity) to nondisplaceable (cerebella) activity when specific binding reaches a peak], area ratio (the ratio of the areas under the specific binding and nondisplaceable activity curves), k3/k4 obtained using a kinetic two-compartment model [R(2C)], and k3/k4 from a modified graphic method [R(DV)] (Ichise et al., 1996). In the healthy controls, the activity in the hypothalamic/midbrain area generally peaked by 3 hr after tracer injection, then decreased slowly; similar patterns were observed in the PD patients. The k3/k4 values estimated by four different methods in the PD patients did not differ significanlty from those in the healthy controls. In the PD patients, the k3/k4 estimates were not significantly correlated with either Hoehn-Yahr scale or UPDRS (Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale) scores, including total, motor, activities of daily living

  20. Transforaminal Percutaneous Endoscopic Discectomy for Lumbar Disc Herniation in Parkinson's Disease: A Case-Control Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giovannopoulou, Eirini; Charitoudis, George; Kazakos, Konstantinos

    2016-01-01

    Study Design A case-control study. Purpose To investigate the effectiveness of transforaminal percutaneous endoscopic discectomy (TPED) in Parkinson's disease (PD). Overview of Literature Patients with PD frequently suffer from radiculopathy and low back pain. Additionally, they demonstrate higher complication rates after open spine surgery. However, the clinical outcome of minimally invasive techniques for lumbar discectomy, such as TPED, have not been established for this population. Methods Patients diagnosed with lumbar disc hernia were divided into Group A (11 patients diagnosed with PD), and Group B (10 patients as the control, non-PD group). All patients underwent TPED. Indexes of visual analogue scale (VAS) for leg pain and Oswestry disability index (ODI) were assessed right before surgery and at six weeks, three months, six months and one year post-surgery. Results At the baseline visit, groups did not differ significantly with age (p=0.724), gender (p=0.835), level of operation (p=0.407), ODI (p=0.497) and VAS (p=0.772). Parkinson's patients had higher scores in ODI at every visit, but the outcome was statistically significant only at 3 months (p=0.004) and one year (p=0.007). Similarly, VAS measurements were higher at each time point, with the difference being significant at 3 (p<0.001), 6 (0.021), and 12 (p<0.001) months after surgery. At the end of a year of follow up, ODI was reduced by 49.6% (±16.7) in Group A and 59.2% (±8.0) in Group B (p=0.111), translating to a 79.5% (±13.0) and 91.5% (±4.1) average improvement in daily functionality (p=0.024). VAS was reduced by 59.1 mm (±11.8) in Group A and 62.2 mm (±7.4) in Group B (p=0.485), leading to an 85.3 % (±4.0) and 91.9% (±2.6) general improvement in leg pain (p<0.001). Conclusions Our data indicate that TPED led to satisfactory improvement in leg pain and daily living in PD patients a year after surgery. PMID:27559446

  1. Retinal vascular caliber is associated with cardiovascular biomarkers of oxidative stress and inflammation: the POLA study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincent Daien

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Retinal vascular caliber has been linked with increased cardiovascular risk and is predictive of cardiovascular pathology, including stroke and coronary heart disease. Oxidative stress, as well as inflammatory mechanisms, plays a major role in the pathogenesis and progression of atherosclerosis, plaque rupture and vascular thrombotic propensity. The purpose of this study is to explore the relationship between retinal vascular calibers and biomarkers of oxidative stress and inflammation, in subjects free of cardiovascular pathology. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Cross-sectional analysis from a community-dwelling cohort comprising 1224 individuals aged 60 years and over, without a history of coronary or peripheral artery disease or stroke. Retinal vascular caliber was measured from fundus photographs using semi-automated standardized imaging software. Oxidative stress was evaluated using plasma superoxide dismutase 2 and glutathione peroxidase (GPx-3 activities, and inflammatory state was assessed using plasma high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP and orosomucoid. RESULTS: In a multivariate model controlling for cardiovascular risk factors, larger retinal arteriolar caliber was independently related to higher level of GPx-3 activity (p = 0.003 whereas larger venular caliber was associated with higher levels of hsCRP (p = 0.0001 and orosomucoid (p = 0.01. CONCLUSION: In the present study, biomarkers of oxidative stress regulation and inflammation were independently associated with retinal vascular calibers. This suggests that an assessment of retinal vessels may offer early and non-invasive detection of subclinical vascular pathology.

  2. Aerobic Exercise Improves Mood, Cognition, and Language Function in Parkinson's Disease: Results of a Controlled Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altmann, Lori J P; Stegemöller, Elizabeth; Hazamy, Audrey A; Wilson, Jonathan P; Bowers, Dawn; Okun, Michael S; Hass, Chris J

    2016-10-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) results in a range of non-motor deficits that can affect mood, cognition, and language, and many of these issues are unresponsive to pharmacological intervention. Aerobic exercise can improve mood and cognition in healthy older adults, although only a few studies have examined exercise effects on these domains in PD. The current study assesses the effects of aerobic exercise on aspects of cognition, mood, and language production in people with PD. This study compares the effects of aerobic exercise to stretch-balance training and a no-contact control group in participants with idiopathic PD. The aerobic and stretch-balance groups trained three times a week for 16 weeks, while controls continued normal activities. Outcome measures included disease severity, mood, cognition (speed of processing, memory, and executive function), and language production (picture descriptions). Cognition and language were assessed in single and dual task conditions. Depressive symptoms increased only in the control group (pexercise group only in the single task (p=.007) and declined in controls in the dual task. Completeness of picture descriptions improved significantly more in the aerobic group than in the stretch-balance group (pexercise is a viable intervention for PD that can be protective against increased depressive symptoms, and can improve several non-motor domains, including executive dysfunction and related aspects of language production. (JINS, 2016, 22, 878-889).

  3. Synaptotagmin XI in Parkinson's disease: New evidence from an association study in Spain and Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sesar, Angel; Cacheiro, Pilar; López-López, Marisol; Camiña-Tato, Montserrat; Quintáns, Beatriz; Monroy-Jaramillo, Nancy; Alonso-Vilatela, María-Elisa; Cebrián, Ernesto; Yescas-Gómez, Petra; Ares, Begoña; Rivas, María-Teresa; Castro, Alfonso; Carracedo, Angel; Sobrido, María-Jesús

    2016-03-15

    The pathophysiology of PD (Parkinson's disease) has been related to the ubiquitin proteasome system and oxidative stress. Parkin acts as ubiquitin ligase on several substrates. Because genetic variants often have different frequencies across populations, population specific analyses are necessary to complement and validate results from genome-wide association studies. We carried out an association study with genes coding for parkin substrates and cellular stress components in the Galician population (Northern Spain). SNCA and MAPT SNPs were also analyzed. We studied 75 SNPs in a discovery sample of 268 PD patients and 265 controls from Galicia. A replication sample of 271 patients and 260 controls was recruited from Mexico City. We observed significant association between PD and SNPs in MAPT. Nominal p-values<0.05 were obtained in the Galician cohort for SNPs in SYT11, coding for synaptotagmin XI. These results were replicated in the Mexican sample. The associated markers lie within a ~140kb strong linkage disequilibrium segment that harbors several candidate genes, including SYT11. SNPs from the GBA-SYT11-RAB25 region have been previously associated with PD, however the functionally relevant variants remain unknown. Our data support a likely role of genetic factors within 1q22 in PD susceptibility. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Baseline predictors of worsening apathy in Parkinson's disease: A prospective longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wee, Natalie; Kandiah, Nagaendran; Acharyya, Sanchalika; Chander, Russell J; Ng, Aloysius; Au, Wing Lok; Tan, Louis C S

    2016-02-01

    Apathy is one of the most common behavioural disorders in Parkinson's disease (PD) and contributes significantly to a reduced quality of life in PD patients. We conducted a prospective longitudinal study of 89 mild PD patients over 18 months, measuring apathy symptoms at 6-monthly intervals using the Starkstein Apathy Scale, as well as measures of motor and non-motor symptoms, cognitive function, and functional disability at baseline. Mixed-effects models were used to characterise the individual trajectories of apathy symptom severity, and linear regression with stepwise elimination procedure was used to select significant baseline predictors. Clinically significant levels of apathy were present in 42.7% of our sample at baseline, with symptom severity remaining relatively stable on average over the course of 18 months. Male gender, lower educational attainment, higher depression symptom severity, more severe functional disability, and the presence of dyskinesias at study entry predicted increasing apathy over the subsequent 18 months. Patients with these factors are at risk for progression of apathy, which may be prevented by treating depression and functional disability. Further studies are needed to address both the specific neurobiological pathways and psychosocial factors underpinning apathy in PD. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  5. Impaired topological architecture of brain structural networks in idiopathic Parkinson's disease: a DTI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Changhong; Huang, Biao; Zhang, Ruibin; Ma, Qing; Yang, Wanqun; Wang, Lijuan; Wang, Limin; Xu, Qin; Feng, Jieying; Liu, Liqing; Zhang, Yuhu; Huang, Ruiwang

    2017-02-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is considered as a neurodegenerative disorder of the brain central nervous system. But, to date, few studies adopted the network model to reveal topological changes in brain structural networks in PD patients. Additionally, although the concept of rich club organization has been widely used to study brain networks in various brain disorders, there is no study to report the changed rich club organization of brain networks in PD patients. Thus, we collected diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) data from 35 PD patients and 26 healthy controls and adopted deterministic tractography to construct brain structural networks. During the network analysis, we calculated their topological properties, and built the rich club organization of brain structural networks for both subject groups. By comparing the between-group differences in topological properties and rich club organizations, we found that the connectivity strength of the feeder and local connections are lower in PD patients compared to those of the healthy controls. Furthermore, using a network-based statistic (NBS) approach, we identified uniformly significantly decreased connections in two modules, the limbic/paralimbic/subcortical module and the cognitive control/attention module, in patients compared to controls. In addition, for the topological properties of brain network topology in the PD patients, we found statistically increased shortest path length and decreased global efficiency. Statistical comparisons of nodal properties were also widespread in the frontal and parietal regions for the PD patients. These findings may provide useful information to better understand the abnormalities of brain structural networks in PD patients.

  6. The Ronnie Gardiner Rhythm and Music Method - a feasibility study in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohl, Petra; Dizdar, Nil; Hallert, Eva

    2013-01-01

    To assess the feasibility of the novel intervention, Ronnie Gardiner Rhythm and Music (RGRM™) Method compared to a control group for patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). Eighteen patients, mean age 68, participating in a disability study within a neurological rehabilitation centre, were randomly allocated to intervention group (n = 12) or control group (n = 6). Feasibility was assessed by comparing effects of the intervention on clinical outcome measures (primary outcome: mobility as assessed by two-dimensional motion analysis, secondary outcomes: mobility, cognition, quality of life, adherence, adverse events and eligibility). Univariable analyses showed no significant differences between groups following intervention. However, analyses suggested that patients in the intervention group improved more on mobility (p = 0.006), cognition and quality of life than patients in the control group. There were no adverse events and a high level of adherence to therapy was observed. In this disability study, the use of the RGRM™ Method showed promising results in the intervention group and the adherence level was high. Our results suggest that most assessments chosen are eligible to use in a larger randomized controlled study for patients with PD. The RGRM™ Method appeared to be a useful and safe method that showed promising results in both motor and cognitive functions as well as quality of life in patients with moderate PD. The RGRM™ Method can be used by physiotherapists, occupational, speech and music therapists in neurological rehabilitation. Most measurements were feasible except for Timed-Up-and-Go.

  7. Use of electroconvulsive therapy in Parkinson disease with residual axial symptoms partially unresponsive to L-dopa: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pintor, Luis Pérez; Valldeoriola, Francesc; Fernández-Egea, Emilio; Sánchez, Roberto; Rami, Lorena; Tolosa, Eduardo; Muñiz, Armando; Martí, María José; Bernardo, Miguel

    2012-06-01

    Mental dysfunction and especially gait disorders, such as freezing and postural instability in "on phase," are partially unresponsive to dopaminergic therapy late in the course of Parkinson disease (PD). Some of them have been related to decreased sensitivity of postsynaptic dopaminergic receptors, and it is known that electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) enhances the sensitivity of these receptors. The aim of this study was to determine the efficacy and safety of ECT in patients with advanced Parkinson disease with symptoms partially unresponsive to L-dopa. Neurologic (Parkinson's Disease Questionnaire, Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale, Tinetti Scale, and the Sit-to-Stand test), psychiatric (structured interview for the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition, and Hamilton Depression Rating Scale) and neuropsychological (Mini Mental State Examination, executive functions, declarative and procedural memory, visual processing, and reaction time) evaluation was performed on 9 patients with a diagnosis of L-dopa-resistant PD by the Movement Disorders Working Group. This evaluation was done before and after 8 sessions of bitemporal ECT. Six patients completed the study. Statistically significant differences were found in the number of steps and freezing episodes in the on phase when they were compared before and after the ECT administration. However, no statistically significant differences were found in the "off" phenomena, motor fluctuations, or dyskinesias before and after ECT administration. No patient showed psychiatric symptoms before, during, or after the ECT. No statistically significant differences were observed in the neuropsychological results between the pretreatment and posttreatment evaluations. All patients showed transient amnesia after the ECT administration, which lasted for 48 hours. Electroconvulsive therapy could be a safe and effective therapeutic option in L-dopa-resistant patients with PD with predominantly axial

  8. Cannabis (medical marijuana) treatment for motor and non-motor symptoms of Parkinson disease: an open-label observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lotan, Itay; Treves, Therese A; Roditi, Yaniv; Djaldetti, Ruth

    2014-01-01

    The use of cannabis as a therapeutic agent for various medical conditions has been well documented. However, clinical trials in patients with Parkinson disease (PD) have yielded conflicting results. The aim of the present open-label observational study was to assess the clinical effect of cannabis on motor and non-motor symptoms of PD. Twenty-two patients with PD attending the motor disorder clinic of a tertiary medical center in 2011 to 2012 were evaluated at baseline and 30 minutes after smoking cannabis using the following battery: Unified Parkinson Disease Rating Scale, visual analog scale, present pain intensity scale, Short-Form McGill Pain Questionnaire, as well as Medical Cannabis Survey National Drug and Alcohol Research Center Questionnaire. Mean (SD) total score on the motor Unified Parkinson Disease Rating Scale score improved significantly from 33.1 (13.8) at baseline to 23.2 (10.5) after cannabis consumption (t = 5.9; P < 0.001). Analysis of specific motor symptoms revealed significant improvement after treatment in tremor (P < 0.001), rigidity (P = 0.004), and bradykinesia (P < 0.001). There was also significant improvement of sleep and pain scores. No significant adverse effects of the drug were observed. The study suggests that cannabis might have a place in the therapeutic armamentarium of PD. Larger, controlled studies are needed to verify the results.

  9. Training conversation partners of persons with communication disorders related to Parkinson's disease--a protocol and a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forsgren, Emma; Antonsson, Malin; Saldert, Charlotta

    2013-07-01

    This paper reports on the adaptation of a training programme for conversation partners of persons with Parkinson's disease, and a protocol for assessment of possible changes in conversational interaction as a result of intervention. We present data from an explorative multiple case study with three individuals with Parkinson's disease and their spouses. Repeated analysis of natural conversational interaction and measures of the participants' perception of communication as well as measures of different cognitive abilities were obtained. The results show that the communication in all three dyads was affected by both speech and language problems and that the conversation training model and the assessment protocol may work well after minor adjustments. Influence of different aspects of cognition on communication is discussed.

  10. Vitamin K status and vascular calcification: evidence from observational and clinical studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shea, M Kyla; Holden, Rachel M

    2012-03-01

    Vascular calcification occurs when calcium accumulates in the intima (associated with atherosclerosis) and/or media layers of the vessel wall. Coronary artery calcification (CAC) reflects the calcium burden within the intima and media of the coronary arteries. In population-based studies, CAC independently predicts cardiovascular disease (CVD) and mortality. A preventive role for vitamin K in vascular calcification has been proposed based on its role in activating matrix Gla protein (MGP), a calcification inhibitor that is expressed in vascular tissue. Although animal and in vitro data support this role of vitamin K, overall data from human studies are inconsistent. The majority of population-based studies have relied on vitamin K intake to measure status. Phylloquinone is the primary dietary form of vitamin K and available supplementation trials, albeit limited, suggest phylloquinone supplementation is relevant to CAC. Yet observational studies have found higher dietary menaquinone, but not phylloquinone, to be associated with less calcification. Vascular calcification is highly prevalent in certain patient populations, especially in those with chronic kidney disease (CKD), and it is plausible vitamin K may contribute to reducing vascular calcification in patients at higher risk. Subclinical vitamin K deficiency has been reported in CKD patients, but studies linking vitamin K status to calcification outcomes in CKD are needed to clarify whether or not improving vitamin K status is associated with improved vascular health in CKD. This review summarizes the available evidence of vitamin K and vascular calcification in population-based studies and clinic-based studies, with a specific focus on CKD patients.

  11. Parkinson's and Alzheimer's diseases in Costa Rica: a feasibility study toward a national screening program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catharina Wesseling

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: The integration of mental and neurologic services in healthcare is a global priority. The universal Social Security of Costa Rica aspires to develop national screening of neurodegenerative disorders among the elderly, as part of the non-communicable disease agenda. Objective: This study assessed the feasibility of routine screening for Parkinson's disease (PD and Alzheimer's disease (AD within the public healthcare system of Costa Rica. Design: The population (aged ≥65 in the catchment areas of two primary healthcare clinics was targeted for motor and cognitive screening during routine annual health check-ups. The screening followed a tiered three-step approach, with increasing specificity. Step 1 involved a two-symptom questionnaire (tremor-at-rest; balance and a spiral drawing test for motor assessment, as well as a three-word recall and animal category fluency test for cognitive assessment. Step 2 (for those failing Step 1 was a 10-item version of the Unified Parkinson Disease Rating Scale and the Mini-Mental State Examination. Step 3 (for those failing Step 2 was a comprehensive neurologic exam with definitive diagnosis of PD, AD, mild cognitive impairment (MCI, other disorders, or subjects who were healthy. Screening parameters and disease prevalence were calculated. Results: Of the 401 screened subjects (80% of target population, 370 (92%, 163 (45%, and 81 (56% failed in Step 1, Step 2, and Step 3, respectively. Thirty-three, 20, and 35 patients were diagnosed with PD, AD, and MCI, respectively (7 were PD with MCI/AD; 90% were new cases. Step 1 sensitivities of motor and cognitive assessments regarding Step 2 were both 93%, and Step 2 sensitivities regarding definitive diagnosis 100 and 96%, respectively. Specificities for Step 1 motor and cognitive tests were low (23% and 29%, respectively and for Step 2 tests acceptable (76%, 94%. Based on international data, PD prevalence was 3.7 times higher than expected; AD prevalence

  12. Parkinson's and Alzheimer's diseases in Costa Rica: a feasibility study toward a national screening program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wesseling, Catharina; Román, Norbel; Quirós, Indiana; Páez, Laura; García, Vilma; Mora, Ana María; Juncos, Jorge L; Steenland, Kyle N

    2013-12-27

    The integration of mental and neurologic services in healthcare is a global priority. The universal Social Security of Costa Rica aspires to develop national screening of neurodegenerative disorders among the elderly, as part of the non-communicable disease agenda. This study assessed the feasibility of routine screening for Parkinson's disease (PD) and Alzheimer's disease (AD) within the public healthcare system of Costa Rica. The population (aged ≥65) in the catchment areas of two primary healthcare clinics was targeted for motor and cognitive screening during routine annual health check-ups. The screening followed a tiered three-step approach, with increasing specificity. Step 1 involved a two-symptom questionnaire (tremor-at-rest; balance) and a spiral drawing test for motor assessment, as well as a three-word recall and animal category fluency test for cognitive assessment. Step 2 (for those failing Step 1) was a 10-item version of the Unified Parkinson Disease Rating Scale and the Mini-Mental State Examination. Step 3 (for those failing Step 2) was a comprehensive neurologic exam with definitive diagnosis of PD, AD, mild cognitive impairment (MCI), other disorders, or subjects who were healthy. Screening parameters and disease prevalence were calculated. Of the 401 screened subjects (80% of target population), 370 (92%), 163 (45%), and 81 (56%) failed in Step 1, Step 2, and Step 3, respectively. Thirty-three, 20, and 35 patients were diagnosed with PD, AD, and MCI, respectively (7 were PD with MCI/AD); 90% were new cases. Step 1 sensitivities of motor and cognitive assessments regarding Step 2 were both 93%, and Step 2 sensitivities regarding definitive diagnosis 100 and 96%, respectively. Specificities for Step 1 motor and cognitive tests were low (23% and 29%, respectively) and for Step 2 tests acceptable (76%, 94%). Based on international data, PD prevalence was 3.7 times higher than expected; AD prevalence was as expected. Proposed protocol adjustments

  13. Vascular ring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Anne Mette S; Larsen, Signe H; Hjortdal, Vibeke E

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Vascular ring is a rare cause of recurrent respiratory infections, dysphagia and stridor. Surgical repair is considered safe but the long-term outcomes are unclear. The purpose of this study was to investigate the mortality and morbidity following vascular ring surgery in a single...... age of 1.4 years (range 0.008-64 years) were operated for vascular ring. Median follow-up was 6.8 years (range 2.4-34 years). Presenting symptoms were stridor (52%), dysphagia or vomiting (52%) and recurrent respiratory infections (48%). There were no early or late deaths. Three months postoperatively...

  14. Introducing a multifaceted exercise intervention particular to older adults diagnosed with Parkinson's disease: a preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peacock, Corey A; Sanders, Gabriel J; Wilson, Kayla A; Fickes-Ryan, Emily J; Corbett, Duane B; von Carlowitz, Kyle-Patrick A; Ridgel, Angela L

    2014-08-01

    With a substantial increase in diagnosed Parkinson's disease, it is of great importance to examine tolerance and physical measures of evolving exercise interventions. Of particular importance, a multifaceted exercise intervention combining active-assisted cycling and resistance training to older adults diagnosed with Parkinson's disease is being assessed. Fourteen older adults diagnosed with Parkinson's disease and ten healthy older adults (67.5 ± 7.9 years of age) engaged in an 8-week, 24-session, multifaceted exercise protocol. The protocol consisted of both active-assisted cycling and resistance training. Tolerance was measured, as well as multiple indicators of health-related physical fitness. These indicators examined improvements in cardiovascular performance, muscular strength, muscular endurance, and flexibility. Twenty-two older adults and older adults diagnosed with Parkinson's disease tolerated the intervention by completing all 24 sessions. Repeated-measures analysis of variance demonstrated significant (P ≤ 0.003) improvements in cardiovascular performance, muscular strength, muscular endurance, and flexibility for both groups of individuals. The multifaceted intervention is the first to combine both active-assisted cycling and resistance training. The older adult and the older adult diagnosed with Parkinson's disease exhibited both tolerance and health-related improvements in physical fitness following the intervention.

  15. [Profile characterization of Parkinson's disease in Mexico: ReMePARK study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervantes-Arriaga, Amin; Rodríguez-Violante, Mayela; López-Ruiz, Minerva; Estrada-Bellmann, Ingrid; Zuñiga-Ramírez, Carlos; Otero-Cerdeira, Elisa; Camacho-Ordoñez, Azyadeh; González-Latapi, Paulina; Morales-Briceño, Hugo; Martínez-Ramírez, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    The Mexican Registry of Parkinson´s disease (ReMePARK) is nested within a multicentric cohort aimed to describe motor, non-motor, and genetic determinants of Parkinson's disease in Mexican patients. To date, clinical and demographic data from 1,083 subjects has been obtained. Here we present the demographic and clinical data of the current sample along with its comparison with international reports. A total of 607 male and 476 female subjects with Parkinson's disease were included. The mean age of the patients was 64.7 ± 12.9 years. The time from onset of symptoms to diagnosis was 2.4 ± 2.6 years. About 34% of subjects had only elementary education. Of the subjects, 54.4% were under treatment with dopamine agonists. Subjects with Parkinson's disease incorporated into ReMePARK are comparable with other international registries, with the exception of the years of formal education, time to diagnosis, and the use of dopamine agonists. The characterization of the Mexican population with Parkinson's disease will improve diagnosis and therapeutic management as well as define research efforts in this area. Finally, registry future directions are presented.

  16. Neuroimaging in Parkinsonism: a study with magnetic resonance and spectroscopy as tools in the differential diagnosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vasconcellos, Luiz Felipe Rocha [1Hospital dos Servidores do Estado, Rio de Janeiro RJ (Brazil)], e-mail: luizneurol@terra.com.br; Novis, Sergio A. Pereira; Rosso, Ana Lucia Z. [Hospital Universitario Clementino Fraga Filho (HUCFF), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Moreira, Denise Madeira [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Neurologia Deolindo Couto; Leite, Ana Claudia C.B. [Fundacao Oswaldo Cruz (FIOCRUZ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2009-03-15

    The differential diagnosis of Parkinsonism based on clinical features, sometimes may be difficult. Diagnostic tests in these cases might be useful, especially magnetic resonance imaging, a noninvasive exam, not as expensive as positron emission tomography, and provides a good basis for anatomical analysis. The magnetic resonance spectroscopy analyzes cerebral metabolism, yielding inconsistent results in parkinsonian disorders. We selected 40 individuals for magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy analysis, 12 with Parkinson's disease, 11 with progressive supranuclear palsy, 7 with multiple system atrophy (parkinsonian type), and 10 individuals without any psychiatric or neurological disorders (controls). Clinical scales included Hoenh and Yahr, unified Parkinson's disease rating scale and mini mental status examination. The results showed that patients with Parkinson's disease and controls presented the same aspects on neuroimaging, with few or absence of abnormalities, and supranuclear progressive palsy and multiple system atrophy showed abnormalities, some of which statistically significant. Thus, magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy could be useful as a tool in differential diagnosis of Parkinsonism. (author)

  17. A novel conceptual framework for balance training in Parkinson's disease-study protocol for a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conradsson, David; Löfgren, Niklas; Ståhle, Agneta; Hagströmer, Maria; Franzén, Erika

    2012-09-27

    There is increasing scientific knowledge about the interaction between physiological (musculoskeletal, neuromuscular, cognitive and sensory) systems and their influence on balance and walking impairments in Parkinson's disease. We have developed a new conceptual framework for balance training, emphasising specific components of balance control related to Parkinson's disease symptoms by using highly challenging, progressive and varying training conditions. The primary aim of this proposed randomised controlled trial will be to investigate the short-term and long-term effects of a 10-week balance training regime in elderly with Parkinson's disease. Eighty participants with mild to moderate idiopathic Parkinson's disease will be recruited and randomly allocated to an intervention group receiving balance training or a control group whose participants will continue to receive their usual care. The intervention will consist of a 10-week group training regime (1-hour training, three times per week), which will be led by two physiotherapists to ensure training progression and safety. The conceptual framework will be applied by addressing specific balance components (sensory integration, anticipatory postural adjustments, motor agility, stability limits) through varying training conditions and structured progression. Assessment will be conducted through a multi-dimensional battery of outcomes, prior to and immediately after the 10-week intervention, and at 9 and 15 months' follow-up after entering the study. Primary outcome measures will be balance performance (assessed using the Mini Balance Evaluation Systems Test), change in gait velocity (m/s) between single and dual task walking, and fear of falling (evaluated using the Fall Efficacy Scale International). This study has the potential to provide new insight and knowledge of the effects of specific, varied and challenging balance training on a wide health spectrum in elderly with PD. If found to be effective, this

  18. Fall frequency and risk factors in patients with Parkinson's disease in Belgrade, Serbia: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gazibara, Tatjana; Pekmezovic, Tatjana; Kisic Tepavcevic, Darija; Tomic, Aleksandra; Stankovic, Iva; Kostic, Vladimir S; Svetel, Marina

    2015-04-01

    The aim of the present study was to estimate fall frequency as well as demographic and clinical factors related to falling in a cohort of Serbian patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). The cross-sectional study comprised 300 consecutive patients recruited at the Neurology Clinic in Belgrade, Serbia, from August 2011 to December 2012. Data were acquired though detailed interviews, while a history of falling referred to the period of 6 months before testing. After a interview related to the circumstances of the last fall sustained by PD patients, the participants were evaluated with the Mini-Mental State Examination, the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale, the Hoehn and Yahr scale, the Falls Efficacy Scale and the Self-Assessment Disability Scale, New Freezing of Gait questionnaire for frequency and impact of freezing, and the Hamilton Depression and the Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale. A total of 60% of individuals reported a fall in the 6-month period before testing. Multivariate regression showed that patients with PD who had a Self-Assessment Disability Scale score of ≥56 and Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale total score of ≥69 were 2.04 and 3.32 times more likely to fall, respectively (95% CI 1.10-3.79, P = 0.023 for Self-Assessment Disability Scale and 95% CI 1.83-6.00, P = 0.001 for Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale). In contrast, a decrease of risk for falling by 57% was observed among those who practiced regular physical activity before the onset of PD (95% CI 0.23-0.80, P = 0.008). There is a strong relationship between falling and self-perceived disability, whereas previous physical exercise had a protective effect. © 2014 Japan Geriatrics Society.

  19. Neuropsychiatric Predictors of Cognitive Decline in Parkinson Disease: A Longitudinal Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirogovsky-Turk, Eva; Moore, Raeanne C; Filoteo, J Vincent; Litvan, Irene; Song, David D; Lessig, Stephanie L; Schiehser, Dawn M

    2017-03-01

    To examine the relationship between anxiety, depression, apathy, and cognitive decline in Parkinson disease (PD). Longitudinal study design to assess whether specific neuropsychiatric, demographic, and clinical features predict future cognitive decline. Veterans Affairs San Diego Medical Center and the University of California, San Diego. PD patients (N = 68) and healthy controls (N = 30). Participants were administered self-report measures of depression (Geriatric Depression Scale), anxiety (State Trait Anxiety Scale), and apathy (Apathy Scale), and a comprehensive neuropsychological battery assessing attention, language, visuospatial function, verbal and visual learning and memory, and executive function. Participants were tested at baseline and after an approximate 2-year period. Anxiety and depression at baseline were the strongest predictors of longitudinal decline on measures of verbal and visual learning, over and above other clinical and demographic characteristics. However, baseline neuropsychiatric symptoms did not significantly correlate with decline in other cognitive domains. No significant correlations were detected between neuropsychiatric symptoms and cognition in the healthy control group. These results suggest that anxiety and depression in PD may be risk factors for subsequent declines in learning. Emerging evidence suggests nonmotor symptoms are critical determinants of PD prognosis, and the results of this study highlight the importance of assessment of depression and anxiety early in PD. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  20. A pilot study evaluating the association between physical activity and cognition among individuals with Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loprinzi, Paul D; Danzl, Megan M; Ulanowski, Elizabeth; Paydo, Calli

    2017-06-01

    Few studies have examined the association between daily physical activity and cognitive function among older adults with Parkinson's disease (PD). Here we evaluate the association between accelerometer-assessed physical activity and cognition among older patients with PD. Cognition assessed via the Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA). Moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) was assessed via accelerometry over a 1-2 week monitoring period. After adjusting for motor impairment severity, for every 1 min/day increase in MVPA, participants had a 0.09 unit increase in MoCA-determined cognitive function (β = 0.09; 95% CI: -0.003-0.19; P = 0.05). When further adjusting for motor impairment, age and gender, results were unchanged (β = 0.09; 95% CI: 0.004-0.19; P = 0.04). The present study provides suggestive evidence of a favorable association between daily physical activity behavior and cognitive function among adults with PD. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Studies on sensitivity of zebrafish as a model organism for Parkinson's disease: Comparison with rat model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makhija, Dinesh T.; Jagtap, Aarti G.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To determine the utility of zebra fish as an animal model for Parkinson's disease (PD) in comparison with rat model. Materials and Methods: MTT assay was performed on rat and zebrafish brain synaptosomal fractions using rotenone as a neurotoxic agent. Quercetin and resveratrol were used as standards to compare anti-apoptotic activity in both organisms. Catalepsy was induced in zebrafish by exposing them to haloperidol (9 μM) solution. Drug-treated groups were exposed to bromocriptine and pramipexole, 30 min prior to haloperidol exposure at the dose of 2, 5, and 10 μg/mL. Swimming speed, time spent in the bottom of the tank, and complete cataleptic time were evaluated to assess behavioral changes. In rats, catalepsy was induced using haloperidol (1.25 mg/kg i.p.). Drug-treated groups received bromocriptine (2.5 mg/kg.) and pramipexole (1 mg/kg) orally. Bar test, block test, and locomotor activity were carried out to assess behavioral changes. Results: Resveratrol and quercetin showed comparable inhibition of apoptosis in rats and zebrafish. In anti-cataleptic study, bromocriptine and pramipexole-treated groups showed significant difference (P behavioral parameters as compared to haloperidol control group in both the experimental organisms. Results obtained from fish model were in correlation with rat model. Conclusion: Findings of the present study revealed that zebrafish model is highly sensitive and can be used for basic screening of drugs against PD. PMID:24554909

  2. [A study of personality in Parkinson's disease: the influence of motor and non-motor factors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leiva-Santana, C; Monge-Argilés, J A; Galván-Berenguer, B

    The literature on Parkinson's disease (PD) has acknowledged the existence of certain characteristic features in the personality and moods of patients which could be caused by the disease or may be a consequence of the functional disability produced by the condition. To compare the variables personality, depression, anxiety and cognitive functions between a group of patients with PD and a control group with a similar functional disability. The study involved a sample made up of 55 patients with PD and 55 patients with rheumatologic or orthopaedic diseases, who were paired by age, sex and functional disability according to the Schwab and England scale. Personality tests (personality questionnaire for adults adapted to the Spanish population, sensation-seeking questionnaire, rigidity questionnaire, coping strategies questionnaire), Hamilton Depression Scale, State-Trait Anxiety Inventory and tests for cognitive functions (Minimental and Progressive Matrixes Test). Patients with PD score significantly higher than control subjects on the Hamilton Depression Scale. No significant differences were found in any of the variables in the three personality tests that were used, on the anxiety scale or in the cognitive functioning tests. No differential personality traits were found between our patients and the control subjects, which would therefore not support the existence of a characteristic personality in PD. Our patients with PD show more symptoms of depression than is to be expected in relation to their functional disability, and this could influence the results obtained by other authors in studies on this subject.

  3. Rasagiline for sleep disorders in patients with Parkinson's disease: a prospective observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schettino, Carla; Dato, Clemente; Capaldo, Guglielmo; Sampaolo, Simone; Di Iorio, Giuseppe; Melone, Mariarosa Ab

    2016-01-01

    Rasagiline is a selective, irreversible monoamine oxidase B inhibitor that ameliorates the symptoms of Parkinson's disease (PD) by inhibiting striatal dopamine metabolism. There is also evidence that monoamine oxidase B inhibitors increase melatonin levels in the pineal gland and may have a beneficial effect on sleep disorders, which are a common feature in patients with PD. This single-center, prospective, observational, 12-week study compared the effect of combination therapy with levodopa 200-300 mg/d + rasagiline 1 mg/d (n=19) with levodopa 200-300 mg/d alone (n=19) in the treatment of sleep disorders in patients with idiopathic PD. After 12 weeks' treatment, mean sleep latency was significantly (Psleep latency from baseline was significantly (P=0.001) greater in patients receiving levodopa + rasagiline than in patients receiving levodopa alone. Similarly, at the end of the study, the mean total sleep time was significantly (P=0.002) longer and the improvement from baseline in mean total sleep time was significantly (P=0.026) greater in patients receiving levodopa + rasagiline than levodopa alone. There were no significant differences between treatment groups for the mean number of awakenings reported at week 12 nor the change from baseline to week 12 in mean number of awakenings. Adding rasagiline to levodopa improved sleep outcomes and may be an appropriate option for patients with PD experiencing sleep disorders.

  4. Does Facial Amimia Impact the Recognition of Facial Emotions? An EMG Study in Parkinson's Disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soizic Argaud

    Full Text Available According to embodied simulation theory, understanding other people's emotions is fostered by facial mimicry. However, studies assessing the effect of facial mimicry on the recognition of emotion are still controversial. In Parkinson's disease (PD, one of the most distinctive clinical features is facial amimia, a reduction in facial expressiveness, but patients also show emotional disturbances. The present study used the pathological model of PD to examine the role of facial mimicry on emotion recognition by investigating EMG responses in PD patients during a facial emotion recognition task (anger, joy, neutral. Our results evidenced a significant decrease in facial mimicry for joy in PD, essentially linked to the absence of reaction of the zygomaticus major and the orbicularis oculi muscles in response to happy avatars, whereas facial mimicry for expressions of anger was relatively preserved. We also confirmed that PD patients were less accurate in recognizing positive and neutral facial expressions and highlighted a beneficial effect of facial mimicry on the recognition of emotion. We thus provide additional arguments for embodied simulation theory suggesting that facial mimicry is a potential lever for therapeutic actions in PD even if it seems not to be necessarily required in recognizing emotion as such.

  5. Genome-wide association study of Parkinson's disease in East Asians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foo, Jia Nee; Tan, Louis C; Irwan, Ishak D; Au, Wing-Lok; Low, Hui Qi; Prakash, Kumar-M; Ahmad-Annuar, Azlina; Bei, Jinxin; Chan, Anne Yy; Chen, Chiung Mei; Chen, Yi-Chun; Chung, Sun Ju; Deng, Hao; Lim, Shen-Yang; Mok, Vincent; Pang, Hao; Pei, Zhong; Peng, Rong; Shang, Hui-Fang; Song, Kyuyoung; Tan, Ai Huey; Wu, Yih-Ru; Aung, Tin; Cheng, Ching-Yu; Chew, Fook Tim; Chew, Soo-Hong; Chong, Siow-Ann; Ebstein, Richard P; Lee, Jimmy; Saw, Seang-Mei; Seow, Adeline; Subramaniam, Mythily; Tai, E-Shyong; Vithana, Eranga N; Wong, Tien-Yin; Heng, Khai Koon; Meah, Wee-Yang; Khor, Chiea Chuen; Liu, Hong; Zhang, Furen; Liu, Jianjun; Tan, Eng-King

    2017-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) on Parkinson's disease (PD) have mostly been done in Europeans and Japanese. No study has been done in Han Chinese, which make up nearly a fifth of the world population. We conducted the first Han Chinese GWAS analysing a total of 22,729 subjects (5,125 PD cases and 17,604 controls) from Singapore, Hong Kong, Malaysia, Korea, mainland China and Taiwan. We performed imputation, merging and logistic regression analyses of 2,402,394 SNPs passing quality control filters in 779 PD cases, 13,227 controls, adjusted for the first three principal components. 90 SNPs with association P Asian PD. We also identified significant (P Asian-specific loci with large effects (OR > 1.45) on PD risk. Our results also demonstrate some differences in the genetic contribution to PD between Europeans and Asians. Further pan-ethnic meta-analysis with European GWAS cohorts may unravel new PD loci. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. Impaired Early Attentional Processes in Parkinson's Disease: A High-Resolution Event-Related Potentials Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perrine Bocquillon

    Full Text Available The selection of task-relevant information requires both the focalization of attention on the task and resistance to interference from irrelevant stimuli. A previous study using the P3 component of the event-related potentials suggested that a reduced ability to resist interference could be responsible for attention disorders at early stages of Parkinson's disease (PD, with a possible role of the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC.Our objective was to better determine the origin of this impairment, by studying an earlier ERP component, the N2, and its subcomponents, as they reflect early inhibition processes and as they are known to have sources in the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC, which is involved together with the DLPFC in inhibition processes. Fifteen early-stage PD patients and 15 healthy controls (HCs performed a three-stimulus visual oddball paradigm, consisting in detecting target inputs amongst standard stimuli, while resisting interference from distracter ones. A 128-channel electroencephalogram was recorded during this task and the generators of the N2 subcomponents were identified using standardized weighted low-resolution electromagnetic tomography (swLORETA.PD patients displayed fewer N2 generators than HCs in both the DLPFC and the ACC, for all types of stimuli. In contrast to controls, PD patients did not show any differences between their generators for different N2 subcomponents.Our data suggest that impaired inhibition in PD results from dysfunction of the DLPFC and the ACC during the early stages of attentional processes.

  7. MTR and In-vivo 1H-MRS studies on mouse brain with parkinson's disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Moon-Hyun; Kim, Hyeon-Jin; Chung, Jin-Yeung; Doo, Ah-Reum; Park, Hi-Joon; Kim, Seung-Nam; Choe, Bo-Young

    2012-12-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether the changes in the magnetization transfer ratio (MTR) histogram are related to specific characteristics of Parkinson's disease (PD) and to investigate whether the MTR histogram parameters are associated with neurochemical dysfunction by performing in vivo proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-MRS). MTR and in vivo 1H-MRS studies were performed on control mice (n = 10) and 1-methyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine intoxicated mice (n = 10). All the MTR and in vivo 1H-MRS experiments were performed on a 9.4 T MRI/MRS system (Bruker Biospin, Germany) using a standard head coil. The protondensity fast spin echo (FSE) images and the T2-weighted spin echo (SE) images were acquired with no gap. Outer volume suppression (OVS), combined with the ultra-short echo-time stimulated echo acquisition mode (STEAM), was used for the localized in-vivo 1H-MRS. The quantitative analysis of metabolites was performed from the 1H spectra obtained in vivo on the striatum (ST) by using jMRUI (Lyon, France). The peak height of the MTR histograms in the PD model group was significantly lower than that in the control group (p early phase of neuronal dysfunction of neurotransmitters.

  8. The effects of brain stimulation of subthalamic nucleus surgery on gait and balance performance in Parkinson disease. A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altuğ, Filiz; Acar, Feridun; Acar, Göksemin; Cavlak, Uğur

    2014-08-29

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder characterized by tremor, rigidity and bradykinesia. Gait and postural difficulties supersede tremor, rigidity and bradykinesia as drivers of disease burden in patients with advanced PD. The aim of this study was to describe the effects of deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus on gait ability and balance performance in patients with PD. We studied 19 consecutive patients who underwent bilateral stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus. Patients were evaluated preoperatively and at the 5(th) day and 6(th) month after surgery. Timed Up and Go Test, 12 m Walking Test, Chair Stand Test and Berg Balance Scale (BBS) were used to assess mobility and balance performance. Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS III) and Hoehn and Yahr Scale were also used. All the patients' mobility ability and balance performance improved after surgery (p Hoehn and Yahr Scale score was significantly decreased after surgery (p < 0.05). Surgical therapy is an effective treatment to improve gait ability and balance performance in Parkinson's patients.

  9. A single-center, cross-sectional prevalence study of impulse control disorders in Parkinson disease: association with dopaminergic drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poletti, Michele; Logi, Chiara; Lucetti, Claudio; Del Dotto, Paolo; Baldacci, Filippo; Vergallo, Andrea; Ulivi, Martina; Del Sarto, Simone; Rossi, Giuseppe; Ceravolo, Roberto; Bonuccelli, Ubaldo

    2013-10-01

    The current study aimed at establishing the prevalence of impulse control disorders (ICDs) in patients with Parkinson disease (PD) and their association with demographic, drug-related, and disease-related characteristics. We performed a single-center cross-sectional study of 805 PD patients. Impulse control disorders were investigated with the Questionnaire for Impulsive Compulsive Disorders in Parkinson's Disease; also comorbid neuropsychiatric complications (dementia, delusions, visual hallucinations) were investigated with clinical interviews and ad hoc instruments (Parkinson Psychosis Questionnaire and Neuropsychiatry Inventory). Impulse control disorders were identified in 65 patients (prevalence, 8.1%), with pathological gambling and hypersexuality the most frequent. Impulse control disorders were present in 57 of 593 cognitively preserved patients (prevalence, 9.6%) and in 8 of 212 demented patients (prevalence, 3.8%). Impulse control disorders were significantly associated with dopamine agonists (odds ratio [OR], 5.50; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.60-12.46; P Impulse control disorders frequency was similar for pramipexole and ropinirole (16.6% vs 12.5%; OR, 1.45; 95% CI, 0.79-2.74; P = 0.227). Additional variables associated with ICDs were male sex and younger age. These findings suggested that dopaminergic treatments in PD are associated with increased odds of having an ICD, but also other demographic and clinical variables are associated with ICDs, suggesting the multifactorial nature of the ICD phenomenon in PD.

  10. Linking a genome-wide association study signal to a LRRK2 coding variant in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foo, Jia Nee; Chung, Sun Ju; Tan, Louis C; Liany, Herty; Ryu, Ho-Sung; Hong, Myunghee; Koh, Tat Hung; Irwan, Ishak D; Au, Wing-Lok; Prakash, Kumar-M; Aung, Tin; Cheng, Ching-Yu; Chong, Siow-Ann; Khor, Chiea Chuen; Lee, Jimmy; Tai, E-Shyong; Vithana, Eranga N; Wong, Tien-Yin; Song, Kyuyoung; Liu, Jianjun; Tan, Eng-King

    2016-04-01

    Genome-wide association studies have identified several loci associated with Parkinson's disease (PD). Whole-exome sequencing detects rare coding variants, but their links with PD genome-wide association study loci are unknown. Our objective was to investigate whether nonsynonymous variants in LRRK2 can explain associations at the PD-associated locus tagged by rs1994090. We sequenced all coding exons of LRRK2 in 453 East Asian samples and evaluated linkage disequilibrium between each nonsynonymous variant and rs1994090. We then tested selected variants and haplotypes for association with PD in 13,581 East Asian samples. Of all the nonsynonymous variants, only p.Gly2385Arg was in moderate linkage disequilibrium with rs1994090 and was observed on haplotypes tagged by the rs1994090-C risk allele. Conditional analyses showed that associations at these 2 variants are not independent. LRRK2 p.Gly2385Arg can explain most if not all of the PD association at rs1994090 in East Asians, but other nonsynonymous variants are independent. © 2015 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society. © 2015 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.

  11. Tamoxifen usage correlates with increased risk of Parkinson's disease in older women with breast cancer: a case-control study in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Hsien-Feng; Liao, Kuan-Fu; Chang, Ching-Mei; Lin, Cheng-Li; Lai, Shih-Wei

    2018-01-01

    Little is known about the association between tamoxifen usage and risk of Parkinson's disease in women with breast cancer. The present study aimed to evaluate the association between tamoxifen usage and Parkinson's disease in older women with breast cancer in Taiwan. We conducted a retrospective nationwide case-control study using the database of the Taiwan National Health Insurance Program. In total, 293 female subjects with breast cancer, aged 65 years and above, who were newly diagnosed with Parkinson's disease between 2000 and 2011 were included. Additionally, 1053 female subjects with breast cancer aged 65 years and above without Parkinson's disease were randomly selected as controls. Both cases and controls were matched for age and comorbidities. Ever use of tamoxifen was defined as subjects who had at least a prescription for tamoxifen before the index date, whereas never use of tamoxifen was defined as those who never had a prescription for tamoxifen before the index date. We used the unconditional logistic regression model to calculate the odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) for the association between tamoxifen usage and risk of Parkinson's disease. After adjusting for confounding variables, the adjusted OR of Parkinson's disease was 3.32 for subjects with ever use of tamoxifen (95% CI, 2.50-4.43), compared with nonusers. Further analysis showed that the adjusted ORs of Parkinson's disease were 3.21 (95% CI, 2.29-4.49), 3.95 (95% CI, 2.77-5.64), and 11.4 (95% CI, 2.63-49.7) for subjects with Parkinson's disease among older women with breast cancer in Taiwan.

  12. Blood Flow in Idealized Vascular Access for Hemodialysis: A Review of Computational Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ene-Iordache, Bogdan; Remuzzi, Andrea

    2017-09-01

    Although our understanding of the failure mechanism of vascular access for hemodialysis has increased substantially, this knowledge has not translated into successful therapies. Despite advances in technology, it is recognized that vascular access is difficult to maintain, due to complications such as intimal hyperplasia. Computational studies have been used to estimate hemodynamic changes induced by vascular access creation. Due to the heterogeneity of patient-specific geometries, and difficulties with obtaining reliable models of access vessels, idealized models were often employed. In this review we analyze the knowledge gained with the use of computational such simplified models. A review of the literature was conducted, considering studies employing a computational fluid dynamics approach to gain insights into the flow field phenotype that develops in idealized models of vascular access. Several important discoveries have originated from idealized model studies, including the detrimental role of disturbed flow and turbulent flow, and the beneficial role of spiral flow in intimal hyperplasia. The general flow phenotype was consistent among studies, but findings were not treated homogeneously since they paralleled achievements in cardiovascular biomechanics which spanned over the last two decades. Computational studies in idealized models are important for studying local blood flow features and evaluating new concepts that may improve the patency of vascular access for hemodialysis. For future studies we strongly recommend numerical modelling targeted at accurately characterizing turbulent flows and multidirectional wall shear disturbances.

  13. Hitler's parkinsonism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boettcher, Lillian B; Bonney, Phillip A; Smitherman, Adam D; Sughrue, Michael E

    2015-07-01

    Of the multitude of medical and psychiatric conditions ascribed to Hitler both in his lifetime and since his suicide in April 1945, few are more substantiated than parkinsonism. While the timeline of the development of this condition, as well as its etiology, are debated, there is clear evidence for classic manifestations of the disease, most prominently a resting tremor but also stooped posture, bradykinesia, micrographia, and masked facial expressions, with progression steadily seen over his final years. Though ultimately speculation, some have suggested that Hitler suffered from progressive cognitive and mood disturbances, possibly due to parkinsonism, that affected the course of events in the war. Here, the authors discuss Hitler's parkinsonism in the context of the Third Reich and its eventual destruction, maintaining that ultimately his disease had little effect on the end result.

  14. Enhanced Exercise Therapy in Parkinson?s disease: A comparative effectiveness trial

    OpenAIRE

    Ridgel, Angela L.; Walter, Benjamin L.; Tatsuoka, Curtis; Walter, Ellen M.; Col?n-Zimmermann, Kari; Welter, Elisabeth; Sajatovic, Martha

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Exercise can improve motor function in people with Parkinson?s disease but depression reduces the motivation to participate in regular exercise. The aim of this study was to develop a novel Enhanced Exercise Therapy program that uses manual-driven guided exercise and peer-facilitated psychoeducation for individuals with Parkinson?s disease and depression. Design 24 week randomized controlled design. Methods Thirty individuals were randomized to Enhanced Exercise Therapy or self-gui...

  15. Critical Dysphagia is Common in Parkinson Disease and Occurs Even in Early Stages: A Prospective Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pflug, Christina; Bihler, Moritz; Emich, Katharina; Niessen, Almut; Nienstedt, Julie Cläre; Flügel, Till; Koseki, Jana-Christiane; Plaetke, Rosemarie; Hidding, Ute; Gerloff, Christian; Buhmann, Carsten

    2018-02-01

    To assess the prevalence of dysphagia and its typical findings in unselected "real-world" Parkinson patients using an objective gold-standard method. This was a prospective, controlled, cross-sectional study conducted in 119 consecutive Parkinson patients of all stages independent of subjective dysphagia. Patients and 32 controls were clinically and endoscopically examined by flexible endoscopic evaluation of swallowing (FEES) to evaluate the deglutition with regard to three consistencies (water, biscuit, and bread). Typical findings of dysphagia like penetration and aspiration, residues, and leakage were assessed. Dysphagia was common in Parkinson patients and occurred in all, even early, disease stages. Only 5% (6/119) of patients showed a completely unremarkable deglutition. Aspiration was seen in 25% (30/119) of patients and always related to water. Residues occurred in 93% (111/119), most commonly for bread. Leakage was much less frequent and was found in only 3-18%, depending on consistency. In a significant fraction of patients, objective dysphagia was not subjectively perceived. A total of 16% of asymptomatic patients suffered from critical aspiration. Significant swallowing deficiencies already occurred in early disease. Aspiration was found in 4 of 20 (20%) patients with disease duration of less than 2 years. Seven of 57 patients (12%) with Hoehn and Yahr stage 2 suffered from severe aspiration. Given the high frequency of critical aspiration in Parkinson disease, these patients should be evaluated early for dysphagia to avoid complications and recommend an adequate therapy. FEES is a simple, cost efficient, minimally invasive method that is ideally suited for this purpose.

  16. The impact of non-motor symptoms on the quality of life of Parkinson's disease patients: a longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prakash, K M; Nadkarni, N V; Lye, W-K; Yong, M-H; Tan, E-K

    2016-05-01

    Non-motor symptoms (NMSs) are common amongst patients with Parkinson's disease (PD); however, little is known about their influence on the health-related quality of life (QoL) over a defined follow-up period. The study was aimed to establish the impact of NMSs on the QoL of patients with PD over a 2-year follow-up period. A total of 227 newly referred PD patients were prospectively recruited between 2013 and 2014. The Non-Motor Symptoms Scale was used to evaluate NMSs burden whilst QoL was assessed with the Parkinson's Disease Questionnaire-39 items. Motor disabilities were assessed using the Part III (motor) Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRSm). The mean age was 64.37 (10.18) years; 59.9% were males and a majority (89.0%) were ethnic Chinese. Almost 65% were unemployed and 84.6% had attained no more than secondary level of education. In the univariate analysis, total NMSs burden, age, gender, subsequent visit, Hoehn and Yahr staging, disease duration and UPDRSm score were individually predictive of change in the Parkinson's Disease Questionnaire Summary Index score from baseline to follow-up visit. However, in the multivariate analysis, total NMSs burden significantly predicted the QoL scores whilst motor scores did not. Specifically, NMS domains 2 (sleep/fatigue), 3 (mood/apathy) and 5 (attention/memory) were most significantly predictive of QoL change. Unlike motor disabilities, NMSs burden, in particular sleep, mood and attention, have a significant impact on the QoL of PD patients over a 2-year follow-up period. © 2016 EAN.

  17. Rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder in Parkinson's disease: magnetic resonance imaging study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Andrew H; Duncan, Gordon W; Firbank, Michael J; Yarnall, Alison J; Khoo, Tien K; Burn, David J; O'Brien, John T

    2013-06-01

    Rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder has poor prognostic implications for Parkinson's disease. The authors recruited 124 patients with early Parkinson's disease to compare clinical and neuroimaging findings based on the presence of this sleep disorder. The presence of rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder was assessed with the Mayo Sleep Questionnaire. Magnetic resonance imaging sequences were obtained for voxel-based morphometry and diffusion tensor imaging. Patients with sleep disorder had more advanced disease, but groups had similar clinical characteristics and cognitive performance. Those with sleep disorder had areas of reduced cortical grey matter volume and white matter changes compared with those who did not have sleep disorder. However, differences were slight and were not significant when the analyses were adjusted for multiple comparisons. Rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder was associated with subtle changes in white matter integrity and grey matter volume in patients with early Parkinson's disease. Copyright © 2013 Movement Disorder Society.

  18. Ameliorative effects of baicalein in MPTP-induced mouse model of Parkinson's disease: A microarray study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Li; Li, Chao; Yang, Ran-Yao; Lian, Wen-Wen; Fang, Jian-Song; Pang, Xiao-Cong; Qin, Xue-Mei; Liu, Ai-Lin; Du, Guan-Hua

    2015-06-01

    Baicalein, a flavonoid from Scutellaria baicalensis Georgi, has been shown to possess neuroprotective properties. The purpose of this study was to explore the effects of baicalein on motor behavioral deficits and gene expression in N-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP)-induced mice model of Parkinson's disease (PD). The behavioral results showed that baicalein significantly improves the abnormal behaviors in MPTP-induced mice model of PD, as manifested by shortening the total time for climbing down the pole, prolonging the latent periods of rotarod, and increasing the vertical movements. Using cDNA microarray and subsequent bioinformatic analyses, it was found that baicalein significantly promotes the biological processes including neurogenesis, neuroblast proliferation, neurotrophin signaling pathway, walking and locomotor behaviors, and inhibits dopamine metabolic process through regulation of gene expressions. Based on analysis of gene co-expression networks, the results indicated that the regulation of genes such as LIMK1, SNCA and GLRA1 by baicalein might play central roles in the network. Our results provide experimental evidence for the potential use of baicalein in the treatment of PD, and revealed gene expression profiles, biological processes and pathways influenced by baicalein in MPTP-treated mice. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Pesticide use in agriculture and Parkinson's disease in the AGRICAN cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pouchieu, Camille; Piel, Clément; Carles, Camille; Gruber, Anne; Helmer, Catherine; Tual, Séverine; Marcotullio, Elisabeth; Lebailly, Pierre; Baldi, Isabelle

    2017-11-09

    Epidemiological studies have reported an increased risk of Parkinson's disease (PD) in farmers exposed to pesticides, but no clear conclusion can be drawn on the type of pesticide and duration of use associated with an effect. In the French agricultural cohort AGRICAN, we assessed associations between PD and pesticide use according to the types of livestock and crops grown, including exposure to some active ingredients with duration of use. Self-reported PD and history of lifetime exposure to 13 crops and 5 types of animals and pesticide use were collected at enrolment (2005-07) among 181 842 participants. Exposure to selected active ingredients and duration of use lifelong were assessed with the crop-exposure matrix PESTIMAT. Associations between pesticide use and PD were estimated by logistic regression according to crops and livestock, adjusted for sex, age, educational level, smoking status and alcohol consumption. PD was reported by 1732 subjects (1.2%) at enrolment in the cohort. Pesticide use lifelong was associated with an increased risk of PD in all types of activities [odds ratio (OR) = 1.31 (cattle) to 1.79 (peas), P supports additional evidence of an association of PD with dithiocarbamate fungicides, rotenone and the herbicides diquat and paraquat.

  20. A preliminary diffusional kurtosis imaging study of Parkinson disease: comparison with conventional diffusion tensor imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamagata, Koji; Kamiya, Kouhei; Suzuki, Michimasa; Hori, Masaaki; Yoshida, Mariko; Aoki, Shigeki [Juntendo University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo (Japan); Tomiyama, Hiroyuki; Hatano, Taku; Motoi, Yumiko; Hattori, Nobutaka [Juntendo University School of Medicine, Department of Neurology, Tokyo (Japan); Abe, Osamu [Nihon University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Tokyo (Japan); Shimoji, Keigo [National Center of Neurology and Psychiatry Hospital, Department of Radiology, Tokyo (Japan)

    2014-03-15

    Diffusional kurtosis imaging (DKI) is a more sensitive technique than conventional diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) for assessing tissue microstructure. In particular, it quantifies the microstructural integrity of white matter, even in the presence of crossing fibers. The aim of this preliminary study was to compare how DKI and DTI show white matter alterations in Parkinson disease (PD). DKI scans were obtained with a 3-T magnetic resonance imager from 12 patients with PD and 10 healthy controls matched by age and sex. Tract-based spatial statistics were used to compare the mean kurtosis (MK), mean diffusivity (MD), and fractional anisotropy (FA) maps of the PD patient group and the control group. In addition, a region-of-interest analysis was performed for the area of the posterior corona radiata and superior longitudinal fasciculus (SLF) fiber crossing. FA values in the frontal white matter were significantly lower in PD patients than in healthy controls. Reductions in MK occurred more extensively throughout the brain: in addition to frontal white matter, MK was lower in the parietal, occipital, and right temporal white matter. The MK value of the area of the posterior corona radiata and SLF fiber crossing was also lower in the PD group. DKI detects changes in the cerebral white matter of PD patients more sensitively than conventional DTI. In addition, DKI is useful for evaluating crossing fibers. By providing a sensitive index of brain pathology in PD, DKI may enable improved monitoring of disease progression. (orig.)

  1. Ethical safety of deep brain stimulation: A study on moral decision-making in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fumagalli, Manuela; Marceglia, Sara; Cogiamanian, Filippo; Ardolino, Gianluca; Picascia, Marta; Barbieri, Sergio; Pravettoni, Gabriella; Pacchetti, Claudio; Priori, Alberto

    2015-07-01

    The possibility that deep brain stimulation (DBS) in Parkinson's disease (PD) alters patients' decisions and actions, even temporarily, raises important clinical, ethical and legal questions. Abnormal moral decision-making can lead to ethical rules violations. Previous experiments demonstrated the subthalamic (STN) activation during moral decision-making. Here we aim to study whether STN DBS can affect moral decision-making in PD patients. Eleven patients with PD and bilateral STN DBS implant performed a computerized moral task in ON and OFF stimulation conditions. A control group of PD patients without DBS implant performed the same experimental protocol. All patients underwent motor, cognitive and psychological assessments. STN stimulation was not able to modify neither reaction times nor responses to moral task both when we compared the ON and the OFF state in the same patient (reaction times, p = .416) and when we compared DBS patients with those treated only with the best medical treatment (reaction times: p = .408, responses: p = .776). Moral judgment is the result of a complex process, requiring cognitive executive functions, problem-solving, anticipations of consequences of an action, conflict processing, emotional evaluation of context and of possible outcomes, and involving different brain areas and neural circuits. Our data show that STN DBS leaves unaffected moral decisions thus implying relevant clinical and ethical implications for DBS consequences on patients' behavior, on decision-making and on judgment ability. In conclusion, the technique can be considered safe on moral behavior. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Post-traumatic Stress Disorder and Risk of Parkinson Disease: A Nationwide Longitudinal Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Yee-Lam E; Bai, Ya-Mei; Hsu, Ju-Wei; Huang, Kai-Lin; Su, Tung-Ping; Li, Cheng-Ta; Lin, Wei-Chen; Pan, Tai-Long; Chen, Tzeng-Ji; Tsai, Shih-Jen; Chen, Mu-Hong

    2017-08-01

    Increasing evidence has suggested a relationship between post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and neurodegenerative disorder, such as Alzheimer disease. The association between PTSD and Parkinson disease (PD), however, remains unclear. Using the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database, 7,280 subjects (1,456 patients aged ≥45 years with PTSD and 5,824 age-/sex-matched individuals without PTSD) were enrolled between 2002 and 2009 and followed to the end of 2011. Subjects who developed PD during the follow-up period were identified. An increased risk of developing PD was found in patients with PTSD (Wald χ(2) = 12.061, hazard ratio [HR]: 3.46, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.72-6.96) compared with individuals without PTSD, after adjusting for demographic data and medical and psychiatric comorbidities. The sensitivity tests after excluding the first year observation (Wald χ(2) = 7.948, HR: 3.01, 95% CI: 1.40-6.46) and the first 3-year observation (Wald χ(2) = 5.099, HR: 3.07, 95% CI: 1.16-8.15) were consistent. Patients with PTSD had an elevated risk of developing PD in later life. Further studies would be required to clarify the exact pathophysiology between PTSD and PD and to investigate whether the prompt intervention for PTSD may reduce this risk. Copyright © 2017 American Association for Geriatric Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Comparison of gait training versus cranial osteopathy in patients with Parkinson's disease: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Thomas; Pietsch, Angela

    2013-01-01

    A physiotherapy subtype is gait training (GT), which aims on correction of posture and gait re-education in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). Osteopathy in the cranial field (OCF) is a gentle manual method to treat dysfunctions of the central nervous system. Therapists may employ GT and OCF to bypass deficient basal ganglia dysfunction, which causes gait disturbances in PD. Objectives of this pilot study were to demonstrate the efficacy of both procedures on gait and to compare their effects within a cross over design. 18 PD patients received on two subsequent days one GT- and one OCF session each. The ten meter walking test (WT) was performed before and after each therapeutic intervention. GT reduced the number of steps but not the interval in the WT. OCF declined the period but not the step frequency in the WT. The computed differences of WT outcomes before and after each intervention did not vary between both methods. Both sessions together shortened the interval but not number of steps in the WT. GT improves walking behaviour with a specific focus on an optimised performance of the necessary movement sequences regarding their accuracy and amplitude. As OCF decreased the interval, it ameliorates speed of motion execution during gait. GT and OCF enhance different aspects of gait in PD.

  4. [Digital EEG with brain mapping in Alzheimer's dementia and Parkinson's disease. A prospective controlled study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandmann, M C; Piana, E R; Sousa, D S; De Bittencourt, P R

    1996-03-01

    In order to evaluate the EEG activity during wakefulness in senile dementia of the Alzheimer type (AD) and Parkinson's disease (PD), a prospective controlled study was performed. We compared 6 AD and 11 PD patients with a control group of 12 patients with mild to moderate major chronic depression (DSM-III-R, 1987). The median of the frequencies and the power of the posterior dominant activity was obtained in the three groups using spectral analysis. The posterior activity had a frequency of 8.79 +/- 0.52 (mean +/- sd) in the control group, 6.65 +/- 0.80 (mean +/- sd) in the AD group and 7.69 +/- 1.39 (mean +/- sd) in the PD group. The experimental hypothesis that patients with AD and PD differ from controls in relation to the background activity (defined as abnormal < 8) was confirmed by the chi square test (p = 0.01) and the t test showed that the mean of the frequency of the posterior power was significantly lower in AD (p = 0.01) and PD (p = 0.05) patients, compared with the controls. The results indicate that this abnormality could be correlated with the degree of cortical damage and natural history of these disorders.

  5. Dietary intake of metals and risk of Parkinson's disease: a case-control study in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyake, Yoshihiro; Tanaka, Keiko; Fukushima, Wakaba; Sasaki, Satoshi; Kiyohara, Chikako; Tsuboi, Yoshio; Yamada, Tatsuo; Oeda, Tomoko; Miki, Takami; Kawamura, Nobutoshi; Sakae, Nobutaka; Fukuyama, Hidenao; Hirota, Yoshio; Nagai, Masaki

    2011-07-15

    Metals are involved in several important functions in the nervous system. Zinc and iron are increased and copper is decreased in the substantia nigra in Parkinson's disease (PD). However, epidemiological evidence for the association of dietary intake of metals with the risk of PD is limited. We investigated the relationship between metal consumption and the risk of PD in Japan using data from a multicenter hospital-based case-control study. Included were 249 cases within 6 years of onset of PD based on the UK PD Society Brain Bank clinical diagnostic criteria. Controls were 368 inpatients and outpatients without a neurodegenerative disease. Information on dietary factors was collected using a self-administered diet history questionnaire. Higher intake of iron, magnesium, and zinc was independently associated with a reduced risk of PD: the adjusted OR in the highest quartile was 0.24 (95% CI: 0.10-0.57, P for trend=0.0003) for iron, 0.33 (95% CI: 0.13-0.81, P for trend=0.007) for magnesium and 0.50 (95% CI: 0.26-0.95, P for trend=0.055) for zinc. There were no relationships between the intake of copper or manganese and the risk of PD. Higher intake of iron, magnesium, and zinc may be protective against PD. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Reduced thalamic volume in Parkinson disease with REM sleep behavior disorder: volumetric study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salsone, M; Cerasa, A; Arabia, G; Morelli, M; Gambardella, A; Mumoli, L; Nisticò, R; Vescio, B; Quattrone, A

    2014-09-01

    REM sleep behavior disorder (RBD) is a common non motor feature of Parkinson's Disease (PD) affecting about half the patients with this disease. Distinct structural brain tissue abnormalities have been reported in several regions modulating REM sleep of the patients with idiopathic RBD. At the present time, there are no conventional MRI studies investigating patients with PD associated with RBD. Herein, we used voxel-based morphometry (VBM) to detect the neuroanatomical profile of PD patients with and without RBD. Optimized VBM was applied to the MRI brain images in 11 PD patients with RBD (PD-RBD), 11 PD patients without RBD (PD) and 18 age-and sex-matched controls. To corroborate VBM findings we used automated volumetric method (FreeSurfer) to quantify subcortical brain regions volumes. Patients and controls also underwent DAT-SPECT and cardiac MIBG scintigraphies. The VBM analysis showed markedly reduced gray matter volume in the right thalamus of PD-RBD patients in comparison with PD patients and controls. Automatic thalamic segmentation in PD-RBD patients showed a bilaterally reduced thalamic volume as compared with PD patients or controls. All PD patients (with and without RBD) showed a reduced tracer uptake on DAT-SPECT and cardiac MIBG scintigraphies as compared to controls. Our findings suggest that the presence of RBD symptoms in PD patients is associated with a reduced thalamic volume suggesting a pathophysiologic role of the thalamus in the complex circuit causing RBD. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  7. Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome in the era of catheter ablation: insights from a registry study of 2169 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pappone, Carlo; Vicedomini, Gabriele; Manguso, Francesco; Saviano, Massimo; Baldi, Mario; Pappone, Alessia; Ciaccio, Cristiano; Giannelli, Luigi; Ionescu, Bogdan; Petretta, Andrea; Vitale, Raffaele; Cuko, Amarild; Calovic, Zarko; Fundaliotis, Angelica; Moscatiello, Mario; Tavazzi, Luigi; Santinelli, Vincenzo

    2014-09-02

    The management of Wolff-Parkinson-White is based on the distinction between asymptomatic and symptomatic presentations, but evidence is limited in the asymptomatic population. The Wolff-Parkinson-White registry was an 8-year prospective study of either symptomatic or asymptomatic Wolff-Parkinson-White patients referred to our Arrhythmology Department for evaluation or ablation. Inclusion criteria were a baseline electrophysiological testing with or without radiofrequency catheter ablation (RFA). Primary end points were the percentage of patients who experienced ventricular fibrillation (VF) or potentially malignant arrhythmias and risk factors. Among 2169 enrolled patients, 1001 (550 asymptomatic) did not undergo RFA (no-RFA group) and 1168 (206 asymptomatic) underwent ablation (RFA group). There were no differences in clinical and electrophysiological characteristics between the 2 groups except for symptoms. In the no-RFA group, VF occurred in 1.5% of patients, virtually exclusively (13 of 15) in children (median age, 11 years), and was associated with a short accessory pathway antegrade refractory period (PParkinson-White syndrome essentially depends on intrinsic electrophysiological properties of AP rather than on symptoms. RFA performed during the same procedure after electrophysiological testing is of benefit in improving the long-term outcomes. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  8. Reliability and validity study of a Brazilian-Portuguese version of the fatigue severity scale in Parkinson's disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valderramas, Silvia; Feres, Ana Cristina; Melo, Ailton

    2012-07-01

    The Fatigue Severity Scale (FSS) is one of the most frequently used self-rating scales for fatigue in Parkinson's disease (PD) and it lacks a validated Brazilian-Portuguese version. To determine the construct validity and reproducibility of a Brazilian-Portuguese version of the FSS in patients with PD. In a cross-sectional study, a Portuguese-language version of the FSS was applied to 30 patients with PD (62±11 years-old). The Parkinson's disease questionnaire (PDQ-39) was used as the validation criterion, while the Hoehn and Yahr scale, the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS), and the Beck Depression Inventory were employed to analyze the correlations with the FSS score. The test-retest intraclass correlation coefficient was 0.91 (pHoehn and Yahr scale (r=0.40; p=0.02), and with the UPDRS as well (r=0.45, p=0.01). The Brazilian-Portuguese version of the FSS is valid and reproducible for using in Brazilian patients with PD.

  9. Parkinson's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Astradsson, Arnar; Aziz, Tipu Z

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The mean age of onset of Parkinson's disease is about 65 years, with a median time of 9 years between diagnosis and death. METHODS AND OUTCOMES: We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical question: What are the effects of fetal cell or stem cell......-derived therapy in people with Parkinson's disease? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library and other important databases up to September 2014 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from...

  10. Vascular care in patients with Alzheimer disease with cerebrovascular lesions slows progression of white matter lesions on MRI: the evaluation of vascular care in Alzheimer's disease (EVA) study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard, Edo; Gouw, Alida A; Scheltens, Philip; van Gool, Willem A

    2010-03-01

    White matter lesions (WMLs) and cerebral infarcts are common findings in Alzheimer disease and may contribute to dementia severity. WMLs and lacunar infarcts may provide a potential target for intervention strategies. This study assessed whether multicomponent vascular care in patients with Alzheimer disease with cerebrovascular lesions slows progression of WMLs and prevents occurrence of new infarcts. A randomized controlled clinical trial, including 123 subjects, compared vascular care with standard care in patients with Alzheimer disease with cerebrovascular lesions on MRI. Progression of WMLs, lacunes, medial temporal lobe atrophy, and global cortical atrophy were semiquantitatively scored after 2-year follow-up. Sixty-five subjects (36 vascular care, 29 standard care) had a baseline and a follow-up MRI and in 58 subjects, a follow-up scan could not be obtained due to advanced dementia or death. Subjects in the vascular care group had less progression of WMLs as measured with the WML change score (1.4 versus 2.3, P=0.03). There was no difference in the number of new lacunes or change in global cortical atrophy or medial temporal lobe atrophy between the 2 groups. Vascular care in patients with Alzheimer disease with cerebrovascular lesions slows progression of WMLs. Treatment aimed at vascular risk factors in patients with early Alzheimer disease may be beneficial, possibly in an even earlier stage of the disease.

  11. Prevalence, Correlates, and Prognosis of Healthy Vascular Aging in a Western Community-Dwelling Cohort: The Framingham Heart Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niiranen, Teemu J; Lyass, Asya; Larson, Martin G; Hamburg, Naomi M; Benjamin, Emelia J; Mitchell, Gary F; Vasan, Ramachandran S

    2017-08-01

    Hypertension and increased vascular stiffness are viewed as inevitable parts of aging. To elucidate whether the age-related decrease in vascular function is avoidable, we assessed the prevalence, correlates, and prognosis of healthy vascular aging (HVA) in 3196 Framingham Study participants aged ≥50 years. We defined HVA as absence of hypertension and pulse wave velocity lifestyle, maintaining normal vascular function beyond 70 years of age is challenging. Although our data are observational, our findings support prevention strategies targeting modifiable factors and behaviors and obesity, in particular, to prevent or delay vascular aging and the associated risk of CVD. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  12. Qualidade de Vida em Voz: estudo na doença de Parkinson idiopática e na disfonia espasmódica adutora Quality of life in voice: a study in Parkinson's disease and in adductor spasmodic dysphonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bárbara Pereira Lopes

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: avaliar o impacto causado pela alteração vocal na qualidade de vida (QV dos pacientes com doença de Parkinson (DP idiopática e com disfonia espasmódica adutora (DEA. MÉTODO: o estudo foi realizado com 56 indivíduos do sexo feminino, dos quais 28 compunham o grupo controle; 14, o grupo de DEA, no período anterior ao tratamento com toxina botulínica; e 14, o grupo de DP idiopática. Os participantes preencheram o questionário de Qualidade de Vida em Voz (QVV validado para o português brasileiro. Para verificar a diferença entre as médias dos grupos foi utilizado o método de análise de variância por postos de Kruskal-Wallis e o teste de Tamhane para comparações múltiplas, com significância PURPOSE: to evaluate the impact of voice disorders on quality of life of patients with idiopathic Parkinson's disease and with adductor spasmodic dysphonia. METHOD: the study consisted of 56 females, 28 in the control group; 14, the adductor spasmodic dysphonia group in the period prior to treatment with botulinum toxin; and 14, the group of idiopathic Parkinson's disease. The participants filled in the Voice-Related Quality of life (V-RQOL questionnaire validated for Brazilian Portuguese. To check the difference between averages of the groups it was used the method of analysis of variance by Kruskal-Wallis and Tamhane test for multiple comparisons, with significance <0.05. RESULTS: the average age of the groups were 66.18 for the control group, 67.21 for the Parkinson's disease group and 59.7 for the adductor spasmodic dysphonia group, with no statistical difference between the groups. In the V-RQOL protocol the mean domain social-emotional, physical functioning and total score were higher in the control group, followed by group of Parkinson's disease and, finally, the group of adductor spasmodic dysphonia with statistically significant difference between them. In addition, there was statistical difference for each pair of groups

  13. Qualidade de Vida em Voz: estudo na doença de Parkinson idiopática e na Disfonia Espasmódica Adutora Quality of life in voice: a study in Parkinson's disease and in adductor spasmodic dysphonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bárbara Pereira Lopes

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: avaliar o impacto causado pela alteração vocal na qualidade de vida (QV dos pacientes com doença de Parkinson (DP idiopática e com disfonia espasmódica adutora (DEA. MÉTODO: o estudo foi realizado com 56 indivíduos do sexo feminino, dos quais 28 compunham o grupo controle; 14, o grupo de DEA, no período anterior ao tratamento com toxina botulínica; e 14, o grupo de DP idiopática. Os participantes preencheram o questionário de Qualidade de Vida em Voz (QVV validado para o português brasileiro. Para verificar a diferença entre as médias dos grupos foi utilizado o método de análise de variância por postos de Kruskal-Wallis e o teste de Tamhane para comparações múltiplas, com significância PURPOSE: to evaluate the impact of voice disorders on quality of life of patients with idiopathic Parkinson's disease and with adductor spasmodic dysphonia. METHOD: the study consisted of 56 females, 28 in the control group; 14, the adductor spasmodic dysphonia group in the period prior to treatment with botulinum toxin; and 14, the group of idiopathic Parkinson's disease. The participants filled in the Voice-Related Quality of life (V-RQOL questionnaire validated for Brazilian Portuguese. To check the difference between averages of the groups it was used the method of analysis of variance by Kruskal-Wallis and Tamhane test for multiple comparisons, with significance <0.05. RESULTS: the average age of the groups were 66.18 for the control group, 67.21 for the Parkinson's disease group and 59.7 for the adductor spasmodic dysphonia group, with no statistical difference between the groups. In the V-RQOL protocol the mean domain social-emotional, physical functioning and total score were higher in the control group, followed by group of Parkinson's disease and, finally, the group of adductor spasmodic dysphonia with statistically significant difference between them. In addition, there was statistical difference for each pair of groups

  14. Anatomic variability of the vascularized composite osteomyocutaneous flap from the medial femoral condyle: an anatomical study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trung-Hau Le Thua

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The anatomical study and clinical application for the vascularized corticoperiosteal flap from the medial femoral condyle have been performed and described previously. Although prior studies have described the composite osteomyocutaneous flap from the medial femoral condyle, a detailed analysis of the vascularity of this region has not yet been fully evaluated. Methods: This anatomical study described the variability of the arteries from the medial femoral condyle in 40 cadaveric specimens. Results: The descending genicular artery (DGA was found in 33 of 40 cases (82.5%. The  superomedial genicular artery (SGA was present in 10 cases (25%. All 33 cases (100% of the DGA had articular branches to the periosteum of the medial femoral condyle. Muscular branches and saphenous branches of the DGA were present in 25 cases (62.5% and 26 cases (70.3%, respectively. Conclusion: The current study demonstrates that the size and length of the vessels to the medial femoral condyle are sufficient for a vascularized bone flap. A careful preoperative vascular assessment is essential prior to use of the vascularized composite osteomyocutaneous flap from the medial femoral condyle, because of the considerable anatomical variations in different branches of the DGA.

  15. Effect of alcohol and tobacco use on vascular dementia: a matched case control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Paul Y; Caldwell, Casey R; Targonski, Paul V

    2011-01-01

    Vascular dementia is the second most common type of dementia in the United States. The underlying association of tobacco and alcohol with vascular dementia is not completely understood. Determine the relationship of tobacco and alcohol use with the development of vascular dementia (VaD). This was a matched case-control study of subjects living in Olmsted County, MN. Cases of VaD were identified through medical record abstraction using conventionally accepted definitions of VaD, using the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke and the Association Internationale pour la Recherche et l'Ensignement en Neurosicences ( NINDS-AIRENS) criteria and were matched to controls by gender and age within 3 years among persons free of dementia on the index date. Exposure data for alcohol and tobacco use were abstracted by trained nurses, along with demographic, lifestyle, cerebrovascular, cardiovascular, and vascular comorbid disease characteristics. Matched conditional logistic regression for univariate and multivariate evaluation of the association of tobacco and alcohol use with VaD was utilized. Current alcohol exposure was associated with a decreased risk of VaD with an odds ratio of 0.48 (95% confidence interval: 0.31-0.74). This protective effect of alcohol was seen in men, women, and subjects under 80 years of age. Tobacco use was not associated with VaD in univariate and multivariate analysis, and stratified analysis did not reveal any subgroup-specific associations between tobacco use and VaD in the study population. Current alcohol use appears to have protective effects against the development of vascular dementia. The effects are more pronounced in subjects under age 80. This may reflect the direct vascular effects of alcohol on the vascular system or may represent a surrogate for better social or functional status. Previous alcohol use was not protective. Tobacco use was not a risk factor for VaD status, which was possibly an indication of survivorship

  16. Asymptomatic cervicocerebral atherosclerosis, intracranial vascular resistance and cognition: the AsIA-neuropsychology study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Olóriz, Jorge; López-Cancio, Elena; Arenillas, Juan F; Hernández, María; Jiménez, Marta; Dorado, Laura; Barrios, Maite; Soriano-Raya, Juan José; Miralbell, Júlia; Cáceres, Cynthia; Forés, Rosa; Pera, Guillem; Dávalos, Antoni; Mataró, Maria

    2013-10-01

    Carotid atherosclerosis has emerged as a relevant contributor to cognitive impairment and dementia whereas the role of intracranial stenosis and vascular resistance in cognition remains unknown. This study aims to assess the association of asymptomatic cervicocerebral atherosclerosis and intracranial vascular resistance with cognitive performance in a large dementia-free population. The Barcelona-AsIA (Asymptomatic Intracranial Atherosclerosis) Neuropsychology Study included 747 Caucasian subjects older than 50 with a moderate-high vascular risk (assessed by REGICOR score) and without history of neither symptomatic vascular disease nor dementia. Extracranial and transcranial color-coded duplex ultrasound examination was performed to assess carotid intima-media thickness (IMT), presence of carotid plaques (ECAD group), intracranial stenosis (ICAD group), and middle cerebral artery pulsatility index (MCA-PI) as a measure of intracranial vascular resistance. Neuropsychological assessment included tests in three cognitive domains: visuospatial skills and speed, verbal memory and verbal fluency. In univariate analyses, carotid IMT, ECAD and MCA-PI were associated with lower performance in almost all cognitive domains, and ICAD was associated with poor performance in some visuospatial and verbal cognitive tests. After adjustment for age, sex, vascular risk score, years of education and depressive symptoms, ECAD remained associated with poor performance in the three cognitive domains and elevated MCA-PI with worse performance in visuospatial skills and speed. Carotid plaques and increased intracranial vascular resistance are independently associated with low cognitive functioning in Caucasian stroke and dementia-free subjects. We failed to find an independent association of intracranial large vessel stenosis with cognitive performance. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Vascular anomalies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murthy Jyotsna

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Management of vascular anomalies is an emerging multidisciplinary, super-specialisation field involving several surgical, medical and radiological specialties. Over the years, development in this field has been limited because of complex nomenclature and lack of consensus on the best practice for treatment of some of the more complex vascular anomalies. It was only in 1996 that the International Society of the Study of Vascular Anomalies defined nomenclature for the anomalies and gave clear guidelines on management, allowing for improved clinical practices. As in all fields of clinical medicine, the correct diagnosis of the vascular anomalies is essential to choose the appropriate treatment. This paper gives clear guidelines for diagnosis, understanding of the anomalies and discusses their management.

  18. Toward a pathological definition of vascular dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grinberg, Lea Tenenholz; Heinsen, Helmut

    2010-12-15

    To date, there are no widely accepted neuropathological criteria for vascular dementia, although creating such a standard is ranked high on the wish list of all the researchers in this field. Such criteria would make it possible to perform large multicentre clinicopathological studies and, consequently, to better understand which, how, and where vascular brain lesions lead to cognitive decline, as it is possible to do in Alzheimer's disease or Parkinson's disease. However, a major obstacle in the standardization of diagnosis is the fact that vascular brain lesions are a large group comprising heterogeneous changes that have different pathogeneses. Although it is accepted that some kinds of vascular changes cause cognitive impairment, it is not uncommon to find reports of the assumed same histological changes in control subjects. An indispensable first step in the unequivocal establishment of neuropathological criteria is to uniform the definitions used for each one of the lesions, preferably based on its pathogenesis. In the present, non-standardized state of ambiguity, a given lesion is designated by different names between and within the clinical, radiological, and pathological settings, and several definitions simply overlap. Before attempting to create new criteria, a multidisciplinary group-task is urged to identify and minimize the uncontrolled proliferation of definitions. Only then, it will be possible to advance the understanding of how vascular brain changes affect cognition. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Chronic Stress Improves NO- and Ca2+ Flux-Dependent Vascular Function: A Pharmacological Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thiago Bruder-Nascimento

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Stress is associated with cardiovascular diseases. Objective: This study aimed at assessing whether chronic stress induces vascular alterations, and whether these modulations are nitric oxide (NO and Ca2+ dependent. Methods: Wistar rats, 30 days of age, were separated into 2 groups: control (C and Stress (St. Chronic stress consisted of immobilization for 1 hour/day, 5 days/week, 15 weeks. Systolic blood pressure was assessed. Vascular studies on aortic rings were performed. Concentration-effect curves were built for noradrenaline, in the presence of L-NAME or prazosin, acetylcholine, sodium nitroprusside and KCl. In addition, Ca2+ flux was also evaluated. Results: Chronic stress induced hypertension, decreased the vascular response to KCl and to noradrenaline, and increased the vascular response to acetylcholine. L-NAME blunted the difference observed in noradrenaline curves. Furthermore, contractile response to Ca2+ was decreased in the aorta of stressed rats. Conclusion: Our data suggest that the vascular response to chronic stress is an adaptation to its deleterious effects, such as hypertension. In addition, this adaptation is NO- and Ca2+-dependent. These data help to clarify the contribution of stress to cardiovascular abnormalities. However, further studies are necessary to better elucidate the mechanisms involved in the cardiovascular dysfunction associated with stressors. (Arq Bras Cardiol. 2014; [online].ahead print, PP.0-0

  20. Chronic Stress Improves NO- and Ca2+ Flux-Dependent Vascular Function: A Pharmacological Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruder-Nascimento, Thiago, E-mail: bruderthiago@usp.br [Departamento de Farmacologia - Instituto de Biociências de Botucatu - Universidade do Estado de São Paulo (UNESP), Botucatu, São Paulo (Brazil); Departamento de Clínica Médica - Faculdade de Medicina de Botucatu - Universidade do Estado de São Paulo (UNESP), Botucatu, São Paulo (Brazil); Campos, Dijon Henrique Salome [Departamento de Clínica Médica - Faculdade de Medicina de Botucatu - Universidade do Estado de São Paulo (UNESP), Botucatu, São Paulo (Brazil)

    2015-03-15

    Stress is associated with cardiovascular diseases. This study aimed at assessing whether chronic stress induces vascular alterations, and whether these modulations are nitric oxide (NO) and Ca2+ dependent. Wistar rats, 30 days of age, were separated into 2 groups: control (C) and Stress (St). Chronic stress consisted of immobilization for 1 hour/day, 5 days/week, 15 weeks. Systolic blood pressure was assessed. Vascular studies on aortic rings were performed. Concentration-effect curves were built for noradrenaline, in the presence of L-NAME or prazosin, acetylcholine, sodium nitroprusside and KCl. In addition, Ca{sup 2+} flux was also evaluated. Chronic stress induced hypertension, decreased the vascular response to KCl and to noradrenaline, and increased the vascular response to acetylcholine. L-NAME blunted the difference observed in noradrenaline curves. Furthermore, contractile response to Ca{sup 2+} was decreased in the aorta of stressed rats. Our data suggest that the vascular response to chronic stress is an adaptation to its deleterious effects, such as hypertension. In addition, this adaptation is NO- and Ca{sup 2+}-dependent. These data help to clarify the contribution of stress to cardiovascular abnormalities. However, further studies are necessary to better elucidate the mechanisms involved in the cardiovascular dysfunction associated with stressors. (Arq Bras Cardiol. 2014; [online].ahead print, PP.0-0)

  1. Argentine tango in Parkinson disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-28

    This article reports on a meta-analysis of 13 studies of the effects of Argentine tango (AT) as a music-based movement therapy for people with Parkinson's disease (PD). Nine studies involved randomised controlled trials.

  2. Parkinson's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z Clinical Trials Clinical Trials ... 981-8001; 800-223-2732; 877-223-3801 (Young Onset Center) Bachmann-Strauss Dystonia & Parkinson Foundation P.O. Box 38016 Albany NY Albany, NY 12203 ...

  3. Managing Parkinson's

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... part of a network of support. 0 Diet & Nutrition Emotional Well-Being Advice for the Newly Diagnosed Activities of Daily Living ... of Item (also a link) Managing Parkinson's Diet & Nutrition Emotional Well-Being Advice for the Newly Diagnosed Activities of Daily Living ...

  4. Cognition in non-demented Parkinson's disease vs essential tremor: A population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Ferro, Á; Benito-León, J; Louis, E D; Contador, I; Hernández-Gallego, J; Puertas-Martín, V; Bermejo-Pareja, F

    2017-11-01

    Patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) and essential tremor (ET) have a higher risk of cognitive impairment than age-matched controls. Only a few small studies (11-18 subjects per group) have directly compared the cognitive profile of these conditions. Our aim was to compare the cognitive profile of patients with these two conditions to each other and to healthy individuals in a population-based study of non-demented participants. This investigation was part of the NEDICES study, a survey of the elderly in which 2438 dementia-free participants underwent a short neuropsychological battery. We used nonparametric techniques to evaluate whether there are differences and/or a gradient of impairment across the groups (PD, ET, and controls). Also, we performed a head-to-head comparison of ET and PD, adjusting for age and education. Patients with PD (N=46) and ET (N=180) had poorer cognition than controls (N=2212). An impaired gradient of performance was evident. PD scored lower than ET, and then each of these lower than controls, in memory (P<.05) and verbal fluency (P<.001) tasks. When we compared PD and ET, the former had lower scores in verbal fluency (P<.05), whereas the later had a poorer cognitive processing speed (P<.05). This large population-based study demonstrates that both conditions influence cognitive performance, that a continuum exists from normal controls to ET to PD (most severe), and that although deficits are in many of the same cognitive domains, the affected cognitive domains do not overlap completely. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Parkinson's Disease: Exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Parkinson's There is a lot to know about Parkinson's disease. Learn about symptoms, how it is diagnosed and ... your quality of life and live well with Parkinson's disease. Learn More Expert Care Patient Centered Care Centers ...

  6. What Is Parkinson's Disease?

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  8. Parkinson's Disease Foundation News

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    ... Parkinson's There is a lot to know about Parkinson's disease. Learn about symptoms, how it is diagnosed and ... your quality of life and live well with Parkinson's disease. Learn More Expert Care Patient Centered Care Centers ...

  9. Mobility (Parkinson's Disease)

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    ... Parkinson's There is a lot to know about Parkinson's disease. Learn about symptoms, how it is diagnosed and ... your quality of life and live well with Parkinson's disease. Learn More Expert Care Patient Centered Care Centers ...

  10. Diagnosis (Parkinson's Disease)

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    ... Parkinson's There is a lot to know about Parkinson's disease. Learn about symptoms, how it is diagnosed and ... your quality of life and live well with Parkinson's disease. Learn More Expert Care Patient Centered Care Centers ...

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  14. Parkinson's Disease Videos

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  18. Parkinson's Disease Videos

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    Full Text Available ... Managing Advanced Parkinson's Website Expert Briefings: Apathy or Depression: Which One Is It? CareMAP: El Descanso y ... Expert Briefings: A Closer Look at Anxiety and Depression in Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Driving and Parkinson's: ...

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  1. Parkinson's Disease Videos

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    Full Text Available ... Expert Briefings: Anxiety in Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Cognitive Issues: Advice for Parkinson's Care Partners Expert Briefings: Nutrition and Parkinson's Disease NY Nightly News with Chuck ...

  2. Acute and chronic metal exposure impairs locomotion activity in Drosophila melanogaster: a model to study Parkinsonism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonilla-Ramirez, Leonardo; Jimenez-Del-Rio, Marlene; Velez-Pardo, Carlos

    2011-12-01

    The biometals iron (Fe), manganese (Mn) and copper (Cu) have been associated to Parkinson's disease (PD) and Parkinsonism. In this work, we report for the first time that acute (15 mM for up to 5 days) or chronic (0.5 mM for up to 15 days) Fe, Mn and Cu exposure significantly reduced life span and locomotor activity (i.e. climbing capabilities) in Drosophila melanogaster. It is shown that the concentration of those biometals dramatically increase in Drosophila's brain acutely or chronically fed with metal. We demonstrate that the metal accumulation in the fly's head is associated with the neurodegeneration of several dopaminergic neuronal clusters. Interestingly, it is found that the PPL2ab DAergic neuronal cluster was erode by the three metals in acute and chronic metal exposure and the PPL3 DAergic cluster was also erode by the three metals but in acute metal exposure only. Furthermore, we found that the chelator desferoxamine, ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid, and D: -penicillamine were able to protect but not rescue D. melanogaster against metal intoxication. Taken together these data suggest that iron, manganese and copper are capable to destroy DAergic neurons in the fly's brain, thereby impairing their movement capabilities. This work provides for the first time metal-induced Parkinson-like symptoms in D. melanogaster. Understanding therefore the effects of biometals in the Drosophila model may provide insights into the toxic effect of metal ions and more effective therapeutic approaches to Parkinsonism.

  3. Abnormal metabolic pattern associated with cognitive impairment in Parkinson's disease : a validation study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meles, Sanne K.; Tang, Chris C.; Teune, Laura K.; Dierckx, Rudi A.; Dhawan, Vijay; Mattis, Paul J.; Leenders, Klaus L.; Eidelberg, David

    Cognitive deficits in Parkinson's disease (PD) have been associated with a specific metabolic covariance pattern. Although the expression of this PD cognition-related pattern (PDCP) correlates with neuropsychological performance, it is not known whether the PDCP topography is reproducible across PD

  4. The impact of occupational therapy in Parkinson's disease: a randomized controlled feasibility study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sturkenboom, I.H.W.M.; Graff, M.J.L.; Borm, G.F.; Veenhuizen, Y.; Bloem, B.R.; Munneke, M.; Nijhuis-Van der Sanden, M.W.G.

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the feasibility of a randomized controlled trial including process and potential impact of occupational therapy in Parkinson's disease. DESIGN: Process and outcome were quantitatively and qualitatively evaluated in an exploratory multicentre, two-armed randomized controlled trial at

  5. Cognitive behavioral therapy for depression in Japanese Parkinson's disease patients: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinmei, Issei; Kobayashi, Kei; Oe, Yuki; Takagishi, Yuriko; Kanie, Ayako; Ito, Masaya; Takebayashi, Yoshitake; Murata, Miho; Horikoshi, Masaru; Dobkin, Roseanne D

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated the feasibility of cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) for Japanese Parkinson's disease (PD) patients with depression. To increase cultural acceptability, we developed the CBT program using manga, a type of Japanese comic novel. Participants included 19 non-demented PD patients who had depressive symptoms (GRID-Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression score ≥8). A CBT program comprising six sessions was individually administered. We evaluated the feasibility and safety of the CBT program in terms of the dropout rate and occurrence of adverse events. The primary outcome was depressive symptom reduction in the GRID-Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression upon completion of CBT. Secondary outcomes included changes in the self-report measures of depression (Beck Depression Inventory-II, Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale-Depression), anxiety (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale-Anxiety, State and Trait Anxiety Inventory, Overall Anxiety Severity and Impairment Scale), functional impairment, and quality of life (Medical Outcomes Study 36-Item Short-Form Health Survey). Of the 19 participants (mean age =63.8 years, standard deviation [SD] =9.9 years; mean Hohen-Yahr score =1.7, SD =0.8), one patient (5%) withdrew. No severe adverse event was observed. The patients reported significant improvements in depression (Hedges' g =-1.02, 95% confidence interval =-1.62 to -0.39). The effects were maintained over a 3-month follow-up period. Most of the secondary outcome measurements showed a small-to-moderate but nonsignificant effect size from baseline to post-intervention. This study provides preliminary evidence that CBT is feasible among Japanese PD patients with depression. Similar approaches may be effective for people with PD from other cultural backgrounds. The results warrant replication in a randomized controlled trial.

  6. Alcohol drinking and risk of Parkinson's disease: a case-control study in Japan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kawamura Nobutoshi

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although some epidemiologic studies found inverse associations between alcohol drinking and Parkinson's disease (PD, the majority of studies found no such significant associations. Additionally, there is only limited research into the possible interactions of alcohol intake with aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH 2 activity with respect to PD risk. We examined the relationship between alcohol intake and PD among Japanese subjects using data from a case-control study. Methods From 214 cases within 6 years of PD onset and 327 controls without neurodegenerative disease, we collected information on "peak", as opposed to average, alcohol drinking frequency and peak drinking amounts during a subject's lifetime. Alcohol flushing status was evaluated via questions, as a means of detecting inactive ALHD2. The multivariate model included adjustments for sex, age, region of residence, smoking, years of education, body mass index, alcohol flushing status, presence of selected medication histories, and several dietary factors. Results Alcohol intake during peak drinking periods, regardless of frequency or amount, was not associated with PD. However, when we assessed daily ethanol intake separately for each type of alcohol, only Japanese sake (rice wine was significantly associated with PD (adjusted odds ratio of ≥66.0 g ethanol per day: 3.39, 95% confidence interval: 1.10-11.0, P for trend = 0.001. There was no significant interaction of alcohol intake with flushing status in relation to PD risk. Conclusions We did not find significant associations between alcohol intake and PD, except for the daily amount of Japanese sake. Effect modifications by alcohol flushing status were not observed.

  7. Association of blood pressure and hypertension with the risk of Parkinson disease: the National FINRISK Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Chengxuan; Hu, Gang; Kivipelto, Miia; Laatikainen, Tiina; Antikainen, Riitta; Fratiglioni, Laura; Jousilahti, Pekka; Tuomilehto, Jaakko

    2011-06-01

    Cardiovascular risk factors, such as diabetes mellitus and central obesity, have been associated with Parkinson disease (PD), but data on blood pressure and PD are lacking. We sought to examine the association of blood pressure and hypertension with the risk of PD among men and women. This study consisted of 7 surveys (1972-2002) on representative samples of the general population in Finland (National FINRISK Study). A total number of 59 540 participants (age 25 to 74 years; 51.8% women) who were free of PD and stroke at baseline were prospectively followed until December 31, 2006, to identify incident PD cases using the National Social Insurance Register database. Cox proportional hazards models were constructed to estimate the hazard ratio of PD associated with blood pressure. During a mean follow-up period of 18.8 years (SD: 10.2 years), 423 men and 371 women were ascertained to have developed PD. In women, compared with normotensive subjects (blood pressure (130 to 139/80 to 89 mm Hg) and hypertension (≥140/90 mm Hg or use of antihypertensive agents) were 1.63 (95% CI: 1.07 to 2.47) and 1.62 (95% CI: 1.09 to 2.42). There was no significant association between blood pressure and PD risk in men. The multivariable-adjusted hazard ratios of PD associated with use of antihypertensive agents were 1.08 (95% CI: 0.79 to 1.48) in men and 1.03 (95% CI: 0.76 to 1.38) in women. This study suggests that, in women, above-optimal blood pressure, including high-normal blood pressure and hypertension, is associated with an increased risk of PD. Optimal control of blood pressure in women may reduce the incidence of PD.

  8. Feasibility of virtual therapy in rehabilitation of Parkinson's disease patients: pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Paula Cunha Loureiro

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Among Parkinson's disease (PD motor disabilities, postural and balance alterations are important parameters to physical therapists who need to choose specific, targeted therapies for their patients. Among many therapy options, virtual therapy is studied as to whether it can be a viable rehabilitation method. OBJECTIVE: To verify the applicability of virtual rehabilitation in PD patients for the improvement of their balance and quality of life. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Six volunteers, diagnosed to be in Stages II and III of PD (Hoehn and Yahr Scale, were recruited for this study. Patients (65 ± 13 years old participated in activities involving Wii Fit, for a total of twelve interventions, twice per week. Clinical and qualitative methods were used for the data collection for the initial and final evaluations: Borg's Scale, Berg Functional Balance Scale, Time Up and Go, anterior and lateral functional reach and Nottingham's Scale were performed during the study. Penguin Slide, Ski Slalom, Soccer Heading and Table Tilt were the Wii games selected as a form of virtual therapy. RESULTS: The collected data were analyzed using the Wilcoxon test. Motor skill, functional capacities and quality of life were analyzed as variables of the patients' balance. Statistically significant differences were found in the following tests: Borg's Scale (p = 0.0464, Berg Functional Balance Scale (p = 0.0277, lateral functional reach to the right (p = 0.0431* and lateral functional reach to the left (p = 0.0277. CONCLUSION: It is believed that exercises with virtual reality therapy can be a useful tool to improve the balance in PD patients.

  9. Emotion processing in Parkinson's disease: a three-level study on recognition, representation, and regulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Enrici

    Full Text Available Parkinson's disease (PD is characterised by well-known motor symptoms, whereas the presence of cognitive non-motor symptoms, such as emotional disturbances, is still underestimated. One of the major problems in studying emotion deficits in PD is an atomising approach that does not take into account different levels of emotion elaboration. Our study addressed the question of whether people with PD exhibit difficulties in one or more specific dimensions of emotion processing, investigating three different levels of analyses, that is, recognition, representation, and regulation.Thirty-two consecutive medicated patients with PD and 25 healthy controls were enrolled in the study. Participants performed a three-level analysis assessment of emotional processing using quantitative standardised emotional tasks: the Ekman 60-Faces for emotion recognition, the full 36-item version of the Reading the Mind in the Eyes (RME for emotion representation, and the 20-item Toronto Alexithymia Scale (TAS-20 for emotion regulation.Regarding emotion recognition, patients obtained significantly worse scores than controls in the total score of Ekman 60-Faces but not in any other basic emotions. For emotion representation, patients obtained significantly worse scores than controls in the RME experimental score but no in the RME gender control task. Finally, on emotion regulation, PD and controls did not perform differently at TAS-20 and no specific differences were found on TAS-20 subscales. The PD impairments on emotion recognition and representation do not correlate with dopamine therapy, disease severity, or with the duration of illness. These results are independent from other cognitive processes, such as global cognitive status and executive function, or from psychiatric status, such as depression, anxiety or apathy.These results may contribute to better understanding of the emotional problems that are often seen in patients with PD and the measures used to test

  10. 3. Parkinson paper

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Patients with Parkinson's disease. (PD) show a dramatic increase in their brain iron content has suggested the role of iron in degeneration of dopaminergic nigrostriatal neurons in PD. Several studies have described the association of high dietary iron and PD. However, the role of iron the pathogenesis of PD is ...

  11. Comparison between Alzheimer's disease and subcortical vascular dementia: attentional cortex study in functional magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, C; Zheng, J; Wang, J; Gui, L

    2011-01-01

    Blood oxygen level dependent functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and the Stroop test were used to assess attentional cortex activation in patients with Alzheimer's disease, subcortical vascular dementia, and normal control subjects. Patients with Alzheimer's disease and subcortical vascular dementia demonstrated similar locations of cortical activation, including the bilateral middle and inferior frontal gyri, anterior cingulate and inferior parietal lobule in response to Stroop colour word stimuli. This activation was distinctly decreased in patients with dementia compared with normal control subjects. Different regions of the brain were activated in patients with Alzheimer's disease and subcortical vascular dementia compared with normal controls. fMRI is a useful tool for the study of dementia in humans and has some potential diagnostic value. Further studies with larger numbers of participants are required.

  12. Measurement of costs and scales for outcome evaluation in health economic studies of Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodel, Richard; Jönsson, Bengt; Reese, Jens Peter; Winter, Yaroslav; Martinez-Martin, Pablo; Holloway, Robert; Sampaio, Cristina; Růžička, Evžen; Hawthorne, Graeme; Oertel, Wolfgang; Poewe, Werner; Stebbins, Glenn; Rascol, Oliver; Goetz, Christopher G; Schrag, Anette

    2014-02-01

    Health economic studies in Parkinson's disease (PD) have become increasingly common in recent years. Because several methodologies and instruments have been used to assess cost and outcomes in PD, the Movement Disorder Society (MDS) commissioned a Task Force to assess their properties and make recommendations regarding their use. A systematic literature review was conducted to explore the use of those instruments in PD and to determine which should be selected for this review. We assessed approaches to evaluate cost of illness (COI), cost effectiveness, and cost utilities, which include the use of direct (standard gamble, time trade-off. and visual analogue scales) and indirect instruments to measure health status and utilities. No validated instruments/models were identified for the evaluation of COI or cost-effectiveness in patients with PD; therefore, no instruments in this group are recommended. Among utility instruments, only a few of these outcome instruments have been used in the PD population, and only limited psychometric data are available for these instruments with respect to PD. Because psychometric data for further utility instruments in conditions other than PD already exist, the standard gamble and time trade-off methods and the EQ-5D (a European quality-of-life health states instrument) and Health Utility Index instruments met the criteria for scales that are "recommended (with limitations)," but only the EQ-5D has been assessed in detail in PD patients. The MDS Task Force recommends further study of these instruments in the PD population to establish core psychometric properties. For the assessment of COI, the Task Force considers the development of a COI instrument specifically for PD, like that available for Alzheimer's disease. © 2013 Movement Disorder Society.

  13. Pesticide exposure and risk of Parkinson's disease: A family-based case-control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott Burton L

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pesticides and correlated lifestyle factors (e.g., exposure to well-water and farming are repeatedly reported risk factors for Parkinson's disease (PD, but few family-based studies have examined these relationships. Methods Using 319 cases and 296 relative and other controls, associations of direct pesticide application, well-water consumption, and farming residences/occupations with PD were examined using generalized estimating equations while controlling for age-at-examination, sex, cigarette smoking, and caffeine consumption. Results Overall, individuals with PD were significantly more likely to report direct pesticide application than their unaffected relatives (odds ratio = 1.61; 95% confidence interval, 1.13–2.29. Frequency, duration, and cumulative exposure were also significantly associated with PD in a dose-response pattern (p ≤ 0.013. Associations of direct pesticide application did not vary by sex but were modified by family history of PD, as significant associations were restricted to individuals with no family history. When classifying pesticides by functional type, both insecticides and herbicides were found to significantly increase risk of PD. Two specific insecticide classes, organochlorines and organophosphorus compounds, were significantly associated with PD. Consuming well-water and living/working on a farm were not associated with PD. Conclusion These data corroborate positive associations of broadly defined pesticide exposure with PD in families, particularly for sporadic PD. These data also implicate a few specific classes of pesticides in PD and thus emphasize the need to consider a more narrow definition of pesticides in future studies.

  14. Impulse control disorders in Parkinson disease: a cross-sectional study of 3090 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weintraub, Daniel; Koester, Juergen; Potenza, Marc N; Siderowf, Andrew D; Stacy, Mark; Voon, Valerie; Whetteckey, Jacqueline; Wunderlich, Glen R; Lang, Anthony E

    2010-05-01

    An association between dopamine-replacement therapies and impulse control disorders (ICDs) in Parkinson disease (PD) has been suggested in preliminary studies. To ascertain point prevalence estimates of 4 ICDs in PD and examine their associations with dopamine-replacement therapies and other clinical characteristics. Cross-sectional study using an a priori established sampling procedure for subject recruitment and raters blinded to PD medication status. Three thousand ninety patients with treated idiopathic PD receiving routine clinical care at 46 movement disorder centers in the United States and Canada. The Massachusetts Gambling Screen score for current problem/pathological gambling, the Minnesota Impulsive Disorders Interview score for compulsive sexual behavior and buying, and Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders research criteria for binge-eating disorder. An ICD was identified in 13.6% of patients (gambling in 5.0%, compulsive sexual behavior in 3.5%, compulsive buying in 5.7%, and binge-eating disorder in 4.3%), and 3.9% had 2 or more ICDs. Impulse control disorders were more common in patients treated with a dopamine agonist than in patients not taking a dopamine agonist (17.1% vs 6.9%; odds ratio [OR], 2.72; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.08-3.54; P Impulse control disorder frequency was similar for pramipexole and ropinirole (17.7% vs 15.5%; OR, 1.22; 95% CI, 0.94-1.57; P = .14). Additional variables independently associated with ICDs were levodopa use, living in the United States, younger age, being unmarried, current cigarette smoking, and a family history of gambling problems. Dopamine agonist treatment in PD is associated with 2- to 3.5-fold increased odds of having an ICD. This association represents a drug class relationship across ICDs. The association of other demographic and clinical variables with ICDs suggests a complex relationship that requires additional investigation to optimize prevention and treatment strategies

  15. Parkinson's disease and brain mitochondrial dysfunction: a functional phosphorus magnetic resonance spectroscopy study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rango, Mario; Bonifati, Cristiana; Bresolin, Nereo

    2006-02-01

    In spite of several evidences for a mitochondrial impairment in Parkinson's disease (PD), so far it has not been possible to show in vivo mitochondrial dysfunction in the human brain of PD patients. The authors used the high temporal and spatial resolution 31 phosphorus magnetic resonance spectroscopy (31P MRS) technique, which they have previously developed in normal subjects and in patients with mitochondrial diseases to study mitochondrial function by observing high-energy phosphates (HEPs) and intracellular pH (pH) in the visual cortex of 20 patients with PD and 20 normal subjects at rest, during, and after visual activation. In normal subjects, HEPs remained unchanged during activation, but rose significantly (by 16%) during recovery, and pH increased during visual activation with a slow return to rest values. In PD patients, HEPs were within the normal range at rest and did not change during activation, but fell significantly (by 36%) in the recovery period; pH did not reveal a homogeneous pattern with a wide spread of values. Energy unbalance under increased oxidative metabolism requirements, that is, the postactivation phase, discloses a mitochondrial dysfunction that is present in the brain of patients with PD even in the absence of overt clinical manifestations, as in the visual cortex. This is in agreement with our previous findings in patients with mitochondrial disease without clinical central nervous system (CNS) involvement. The heterogeneity of the physicochemical environment (i.e., pH) suggests various degrees of subclinical brain involvement in PD. The combined use of MRS and brain activation is fundamental for the study of brain energetics in patients with PD and may prove an important tool for diagnostic purposes and, possibly, to monitor therapeutic interventions.

  16. Parkinson's Disease and Cognitive Impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yang; Tang, Bei-Sha; Guo, Ji-Feng

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease primarily characterized by the hallmarks of motor symptoms, such as tremor, bradykinesia, rigidity, and postural instability. However, through clinical investigations in patients and experimental findings in animal models of Parkinson's disease for years, it is now well recognized that Parkinson's disease is more than just a motor-deficit disorder. The majority of Parkinson's disease patients suffer from nonmotor disabilities, for instance, cognitive impairment, autonomic dysfunction, sensory dysfunction, and sleep disorder. So far, anti-PD prescriptions and surgical treatments have been mainly focusing on motor dysfunctions, leaving cognitive impairment a marginal clinical field. Within the nonmotor symptoms, cognitive impairment is one of the most common and significant aspects of Parkinson's disease, and cognitive deficits such as dysexecutive syndrome and visuospatial disturbances could seriously affect the quality of life, reduce life expectancy, prolong the duration of hospitalization, and therefore increase burdens of caregiver and medical costs. In this review, we have done a retrospective study of the recent related researches on epidemiology, clinical manifestation and diagnosis, genetics, and potential treatment of cognitive deficits in Parkinson's disease, aiming to provide a summary of cognitive impairment in Parkinson's disease and make it easy for clinicians to tackle this challenging issue in their future practice.

  17. Association of mitochondrial DNA haplogroups and vascular complications of diabetes mellitus: A population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martikainen, Mika H; Rönnemaa, Tapani; Majamaa, Kari

    2015-07-01

    We investigated whether mitochondrial (mtDNA) haplogroups and maternal family history of diabetes mellitus were associated with vascular diabetes mellitus complications in a population-based cohort of 299 Finnish diabetes mellitus patients with disease onset in young adult age. We found that haplogroup U was more prevalent among patients with no vascular diabetes mellitus complications than among those with at least one complication (p = 0.038). Haplogroup U was also more prevalent among the patients who reported maternal family history of diabetes mellitus than among those who did not (p = 0.0013). Furthermore, haplogroup U was more prevalent among patients with maternal family history of diabetes mellitus but no vascular diabetes mellitus complications than among those with at least one vascular diabetes mellitus complication but no maternal family history of diabetes mellitus (p = 0.0003 for difference). These findings suggest that different mtDNA-related factors may influence the risk of diabetes mellitus per se and the risk of vascular diabetes mellitus complications. Further studies are, however, warranted to replicate and elaborate on these results. © The Author(s) 2015.

  18. Depressive symptoms, vascular disease, and mild cognitive impairment: findings from the Cardiovascular Health Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Deborah E; Alexopoulos, George S; Lopez, Oscar L; Williamson, Jeff D; Yaffe, Kristine

    2006-03-01

    Depressive symptoms are common in patients with dementia and may be associated with increased risk of developing dementia. It has been hypothesized that depressive symptoms and dementia may be attributable to underlying vascular disease in some older persons. To test the hypotheses (1) that depressive symptoms are associated with increased risk of developing mild cognitive impairment (MCI), a preclinical state that often precedes dementia, and (2) that the association between depressive symptoms and MCI is attributable to underlying vascular disease. Prospective, population-based, longitudinal study. Random sample of adults 65 years or older recruited from 4 US communities. Subjects were 2220 participants in the Cardiovascular Health Study Cognition Study with high cognitive function at baseline. Depressive symptoms were measured at baseline using the 10-item Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale and were classified as none (0-2 points), low (3-7 points), and moderate or high (>/=8 points). Vascular disease measures at baseline included confirmed history of stroke, transient ischemic attack, diabetes mellitus, or hypertension; carotid artery stenosis; ankle-arm blood pressure index; and small or large infarcts or white matter disease on cerebral magnetic resonance imaging. Mild cognitive impairment was diagnosed after 6 years of follow-up based on the consensus of a team of dementia experts using standard clinical criteria. Diagnosis of MCI. Depressive symptoms at baseline were associated with increased risk of MCI (10.0%, 13.3%, and 19.7% for those with no, low, and moderate or high depressive symptoms, respectively). This association was diminished only slightly by adjustment for vascular disease measures and demographics. Vascular disease measures also were associated with increased risk of MCI, and these associations were not diminished by adjustment for depressive symptoms or demographics. Depressive symptoms were associated with increased risk

  19. Vascular events after liver transplantation : a long-term follow-up study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borg, Maarten A. J. P.; van der Wouden, Egbert-Jan; Sluiter, Wim J.; Slooff, Maarten J. H.; Haagsma, Elizabeth B.; van den Berg, Arie P.

    Long-term follow-up studies on the impact of vascular events (VE) and risk factors of liver transplant recipients are scarce. In this study, 311 recipients of a first isolated liver transplant who survived at least 1 year were followed up from 1979 to 2002. The median follow-up duration was 6.2

  20. The study of subjective and objective evaluation of sleep disturbances in Parkinson's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LIU Chun-feng

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Background Sleep disorder is one of the most common non-motor symptoms in Parkinson's disease (PD patients. At present, there are subjective and objective tools to evaluate sleepdisorders. Nevertheless, previous studies commonly used single subjective questionnaires or objective examinations. Therefore, we used the combinations of subjective and objective tools to analyze clinical characteristics of sleep disturbances in PD and investigated differences and consistence between subjective and objective tools. Methods One hundred and sixteen PD patients were eligible to participate into this study. All participants were evaluated by Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI, Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS in "on" condition, Hoehn-Yahr (H-Y stage, Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAMD 24 items, Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA, Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS, and underwent a video-polysomnography (Video-PSG. Results According to PSQI score of 116 PD patients, the proportion of PD patients with sleep disturbances (PSQI ≥ 7 was 50% (N = 58. Compared to PD patients without sleep disturbances, PD patients with sleep disturbances had lower score of MoCA (23.34 ± 3.50 vs 24.89 ± 3.52; t = 2.377, P = 0.019, higher score of UPDRSⅠ[4.00 (2.00, 5.00 vs 3.00 (2.00, 5.00; U = - 2.306, P = 0.021], UPDRSⅡ[12.00 (9.00, 16.00 vs 10.00 (6.00, 13.00; U = - 1.995, P = 0.046], higher levodopa equivalent daily dose [LED, (508.14 ± 335.85 vs (394.06 ± 236.40 mg/d; t = - 2.115, P = 0.037]. Although PD patients with sleep disturbances had more score of UPDSR Ⅲ and higher H-Y stage, the differences were not significant (P > 0.05. On the other hand, decreased total sleep time (TST, reduced sleep efficiency (SE, increased sleep latency (SL, decreased non-rapid eye movement (NREM sleep stage Ⅱ time were found for PD patients with sleep disturbances (P 0.05, for all. The score of PSQI was positively correlated with the score of ESS (r = 0.200, P = 0

  1. Vision, visuo-cognition and postural control in Parkinson's disease: An associative pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, E; Stuart, S; Lord, S; Del Din, S; Rochester, L

    2016-07-01

    Impaired postural control (PC) is common in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) and is a major contributor to falls, with significant consequences. Mechanisms underpinning PC are complex and include motor and non-motor features. Research has focused predominantly on motor and sensory inputs. Vision and visuo-cognitive function are also integral to PC but have largely been ignored to date. The aim of this observational cross-sectional pilot study was to explore the relationship of vision and visuo-cognition with PC in PD. Twelve people with PD and ten age-matched healthy controls (HC) underwent detailed assessments for vision, visuo-cognition and postural control. Vision assessments included visual acuity and contrast sensitivity. Visuo-cognition was measured by visuo-perception (object identification), visuo-construction (ability to copy a figure) and visuo-spatial ability (judge distances and location of object within environment). PC was measured by an accelerometer for a range of outcomes during a 2-min static stance. Spearman's correlations identified significant associations. Contrast sensitivity, visuo-spatial ability and postural control (ellipsis) were significantly impaired in PD (p=0.017; p=0.001; and p=0.017, respectively). For PD only, significant correlations were found for higher visuo-spatial function and larger ellipsis (r=0.64; p=0.024) and impaired attention and reduced visuo-spatial function (r=-0.62; p=0.028). Visuo-spatial ability is associated with PC deficit in PD, but in an unexpected direction. This suggests a non-linear pattern of response. Further research is required to examine this novel and important finding. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Relationship between apathy and cognitive dysfunctions in de novo untreated Parkinson's disease: a prospective longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santangelo, G; Vitale, C; Trojano, L; Picillo, M; Moccia, M; Pisano, G; Pezzella, D; Cuoco, S; Erro, R; Longo, K; Pellecchia, M T; Amboni, M; De Rosa, A; De Michele, G; Barone, P

    2015-02-01

    Apathy may be either a symptom of major depression or a behavioral disturbance occurring in concomitance with depression or alone in Parkinson's disease (PD). The aim of the present study was to determine the progression of cognitive impairment in drug-naïve untreated PD patients with or without clinically significant apathy. Sixty-two PD patients with a disease duration Apathy Evaluation Scale (S-AES), a clinical interview based on diagnostic criteria for apathy and a comprehensive neuropsychological battery to assess memory, frontal functions and visuospatial functions. Two years after the first assessment, all patients were re-evaluated on the S-AES, a clinical interview and neuropsychological tests. According to the cut-off value of the S-AES and diagnostic criteria for apathy, eight patients experienced apathy at both baseline and follow-up (A+A+), nine patients had apathy only at follow-up (A-A+), 37 patients never experienced apathy (A-A-) and eight patients showed apathy at the baseline only (A+A-). Cognitive performance significantly declined in all four groups. At both baseline and follow-up A+A+ performed worse than A-A- on visuospatial and frontal tests; A-A+ had lower scores than A-A- on the interference task of the Stroop test (IT-ST). Regression analysis showed that poor performance on the IT-ST at baseline was the only independent predictor of onset of apathy at follow-up. The results indicated a relationship between apathy and dysexecutive syndrome in early PD. Reduced scores on the IT-ST may predict development of apathy in PD patients. © 2014 The Author(s) European Journal of Neurology © 2014 EAN.

  3. Discontinuation of statin therapy associates with Parkinson disease: a population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yen-Chieh; Lin, Chin-Hsien; Wu, Ruey-Meei; Lin, Min-Shung; Lin, Jou-Wei; Chang, Chia-Hsuin; Lai, Mei-Shu

    2013-07-30

    To evaluate the effect of discontinuing statin therapy on incidence of Parkinson disease (PD) in statin users. Participants who were free of PD and initiated statin therapy were recruited between 2001 and 2008. We examined the association between discontinuing use of statins with different lipophilicity and the incidence of PD using the Cox regression model with time-varying statin use. Among the 43,810 statin initiators, the incidence rate for PD was 1.68 and 3.52 per 1,000,000 person-days for lipophilic and hydrophilic statins, respectively. Continuation of lipophilic statins was associated with a decreased risk of PD (hazard ratio [HR] 0.42 [95% confidence interval 0.27-0.64]) as compared with statin discontinuation, which was not modified by comorbidities or medications. There was no association between hydrophilic statins and occurrence of PD. Among lipophilic statins, a significant association was observed for simvastatin (HR 0.23 [0.07-0.73]) and atorvastatin (HR 0.33 [0.17-0.65]), especially in female users (HR 0.11 [0.02-0.80] for simvastatin; HR 0.24 [0.09-0.64] for atorvastatin). As for atorvastatin users, the beneficial effect was seen in the elderly subgroup (HR 0.42 [0.21-0.87]). However, long-term use of statins, either lipophilic or hydrophilic, was not significantly associated with PD in a dose/duration-response relation. Continuation of lipophilic statin therapy was associated with a decreased incidence of PD as compared to discontinuation in statin users, especially in subgroups of women and elderly. Long-term follow-up study is needed to clarify the potential beneficial role of lipophilic statins in PD.

  4. A questionnaire-based (UM-PDHQ study of hallucinations in Parkinson's disease

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    Nation Daniel

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hallucinations occur in 20–40% of PD patients and have been associated with unfavorable clinical outcomes (i.e., nursing home placement, increased mortality. Hallucinations, like other non-motor features of PD, are not well recognized in routine primary/secondary clinical practice. So far, there has been no instrument for uniform characterization of hallucinations in PD. To this end, we developed the University of Miami Parkinson's disease Hallucinations Questionnaire (UM-PDHQ that allows comprehensive assessment of hallucinations in clinical or research settings. Methods The UM-PDHQ is composed of 6 quantitative and 14 qualitative items. For our study PD patients of all ages and in all stages of the disease were recruited over an 18-month period. The UPDRS, MMSE, and Beck Depression and Anxiety Inventories were used for comparisons. Results and Discussion Seventy consecutive PD patients were included in the analyses. Thirty-one (44.3% were classified as hallucinators and 39 as non-hallucinators. No significant group differences were observed in terms of demographics, disease characteristics, stage, education, depressive/anxiety scores or cognitive functioning (MMSE between hallucinators and non-hallucinators. Single mode hallucinations were reported in 20/31 (visual/14, auditory/4, olfactory/2 whereas multiple modalities were reported in 11/31 patients. The most common hallucinatory experience was a whole person followed by small animals, insects and reptiles. Conclusion Using the UM-PDHQ, we were able to define the key characteristics of hallucinations in PD in our cohort. Future directions include the validation of the quantitative part of the questionnaire than will serve as a rating scale for severity of hallucinations.

  5. Levodopa effects on hand and speech movements in patients with Parkinson's disease: a FMRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maillet, Audrey; Krainik, Alexandre; Debû, Bettina; Troprès, Irène; Lagrange, Christelle; Thobois, Stéphane; Pollak, Pierre; Pinto, Serge

    2012-01-01

    Levodopa (L-dopa) effects on the cardinal and axial symptoms of Parkinson's disease (PD) differ greatly, leading to therapeutic challenges for managing the disabilities in this patient's population. In this context, we studied the cerebral networks associated with the production of a unilateral hand movement, speech production, and a task combining both tasks in 12 individuals with PD, both off and on levodopa (L-dopa). Unilateral hand movements in the off medication state elicited brain activations in motor regions (primary motor cortex, supplementary motor area, premotor cortex, cerebellum), as well as additional areas (anterior cingulate, putamen, associative parietal areas); following L-dopa administration, the brain activation profile was globally reduced, highlighting activations in the parietal and posterior cingulate cortices. For the speech production task, brain activation patterns were similar with and without medication, including the orofacial primary motor cortex (M1), the primary somatosensory cortex and the cerebellar hemispheres bilaterally, as well as the left- premotor, anterior cingulate and supramarginal cortices. For the combined task off L-dopa, the cerebral activation profile was restricted to the right cerebellum (hand movement), reflecting the difficulty in performing two movements simultaneously in PD. Under L-dopa, the brain activation profile of the combined task involved a larger pattern, including additional fronto-parietal activations, without reaching the sum of the areas activated during the simple hand and speech tasks separately. Our results question both the role of the basal ganglia system in speech production and the modulation of task-dependent cerebral networks by dopaminergic treatment.

  6. Occupational risk factors for Parkinson's disease: a case-control study in Japan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kawamura Nobutoshi

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The evidence for associations between occupational factors and the risk of Parkinson's disease (PD is inconsistent. We assessed the risk of PD associated with various occupational factors in Japan. Methods We examined 249 cases within 6 years of onset of PD. Control subjects were 369 inpatients and outpatients without neurodegenerative disease. Information on occupational factors was obtained from a self-administered questionnaire. Relative risks of PD were estimated using odds ratios (ORs and 95% confidence intervals (CIs based on logistic regression. Adjustments were made for gender, age, region of residence, educational level, and pack-years of smoking. Results Working in a professional or technical occupation tended to be inversely related to the risk of PD: adjusted OR was 0.59 (95% CI: 0.32-1.06, P = 0.08. According to a stratified analysis by gender, the decreased risk of PD for persons in professional or technical occupations was statistically significant only for men. Adjusted ORs for a professional or technical occupation among men and women were 0.22 (95% CI: 0.06-0.67 and 0.99 (0.47-2.07, respectively, and significant interaction was observed (P = 0.048 for homogeneity of OR. In contrast, risk estimates for protective service occupations and transport or communications were increased, although the results were not statistically significant: adjusted ORs were 2.73 (95% CI: 0.56-14.86 and 1.74 (95% CI: 0.65-4.74, respectively. No statistical significance was seen in data concerning exposure to occupational agents and the risk of PD, although roughly a 2-fold increase in OR was observed for workers exposed to stone or sand. Conclusion The results of our study suggest that occupational factors do not play a substantial etiologic role in this population. However, among men, professional or technical occupations may decrease the risk of PD.

  7. Postural Sway as a Marker of Progression in Parkinson's disease: a Pilot Longitudinal Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson-Kuhta, Patricia; Zampieri, Cris; Nutt, John G.; Chiari, Lorenzo; Horak, Fay B.

    2013-01-01

    Objective measures of postural control that are sensitive to Parkinson's Disease (PD) progression would improve patient care and accelerate clinical trials. Although measures of postural sway during quiet stance in untreated PD have been shown to differ from age-matched control subjects, it is not known if sway measures change with disease progression in early PD. In this pilot study, we asked whether accelerometer-based metrics of sway could provide a practical tool for monitoring progression of postural dyscontrol in people with untreated or newly treated PD. We examined 13 subjects with PD and 12 healthy, age-matched control subjects. The PD subjects had been recently diagnosed and had not started any antiparkinsonian medications at the baseline session. All subjects were tested 3-to-6 months and 12 months after the baseline session. Subjects were asked to stand quietly for two minutes while wearing an inertial sensor on their posterior trunk that measured trunk linear acceleration. Our results suggested that objective sway measures deteriorated over one year despite minimal changes in UPDRS motor scores. Medio-lateral (ML) sway measures were more sensitive than antero-posterior sway measures in detecting progression. The ML JERK was larger in the PD group than the control group across all three testing sessions. The ML sway dispersion and ML sway velocity were also significantly higher in PD compared to control subjects by the 12-month evaluation. It is feasible to measure progression of PD prior to onset of treatment using accelerometer-based measures of quiet standing. PMID:22750016

  8. Study of the therapeutic benefit of cationic copolymer administration to vascular endothelium under mechanical stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giantsos-Adams, Kristina; Lopez-Quintero, Veronica; Kopeckova, Pavla; Kopecek, Jindrich; Tarbell, John M.; Dull, Randal

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary edema and the associated increases in vascular permeability continue to represent a significant clinical problem in the intensive care setting, with no current treatment modality other than supportive care and mechanical ventilation. Therapeutic compound(s) capable of attenuating changes in vascular barrier function would represent a significant advance in critical care medicine. We have previously reported the development of HPMA-based copolymers, targeted to endothelial glycocalyx that are able to enhance barrier function. In this work, we report the refinement of copolymer design and extend our physiological studies todemonstrate that the polymers: 1) reduce both shear stress and pressure-mediated increase in hydraulic conductivity, 2) reduce nitric oxide production in response to elevated hydrostatic pressure and, 3) reduce the capillary filtration coefficient (Kfc) in an isolated perfused mouse lung model. These copolymers represent an important tool for use in mechanotransduction research and a novel strategy for developing clinically useful copolymers for the treatment of vascular permeability. PMID:20932573

  9. Pre- and postsynaptic dopamine SPECT in the early phase of idiopathic parkinsonism: a population-based study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jakobson, Mo Susanna; Riklund, Katrine [Umeaa University, Department of Radiation Sciences, Diagnostic Radiology, Umeaa (Sweden); Linder, Jan; Forsgren, Lars [Umeaa University, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Neurology, Umeaa (Sweden); Larsson, Anne; Johansson, Lennart [Umeaa University, Department of Radiation Sciences, Radiation Physics, Umeaa (Sweden)

    2010-11-15

    The aim of this study was to assess the diagnostic contribution of pre- and postsynaptic dopamine SPECT in drug-naive patients with early idiopathic parkinsonism and to investigate possible differences between idiopathic Parkinson's disease (PD) and atypical parkinsonian syndromes (APS) and possible differences in motor subtypes of parkinsonism. A group of 128 newly diagnosed idiopathic parkinsonian patients and 48 healthy controls was studied. Presynaptic baseline SPECT with {sup 123}I-FP-CIT was performed in all patients and in 120 patients also a baseline postsynaptic SPECT with {sup 123}I-IBZM. Clinical diagnoses were reassessed after 12 months. Presynaptic uptake in the putamen and caudate was significantly reduced in patients compared to controls. Presynaptic uptake ratios were not different between PD patients and patients with APS, and postsynaptic uptake in APS was not significantly reduced compared to PD or controls. In half of the APS patients both pre- and postsynaptic uptake ratios were reduced on the same side in the striatum. Impaired motor performance was associated with decreased presynaptic uptake in the putamen in PD. The postural instability and gait difficulty (PIGD) subtype of PD had lower presynaptic uptake ratios than patients with tremor-dominated (TD) symptoms. Not only presynaptic putamen uptake ratios, but also caudate ratios were reduced in a majority of the patients in our study. At baseline scan, i.e. in an early stage of the disease, the accuracy of excluding APS in the whole study population was 85% using a combination of pre- and postsynaptic SPECT. Already at baseline, lower presynaptic SPECT ratios were seen in PD with PIGD at onset compared to those with TD subtype. (orig.)

  10. Nondipping in Parkinson's Disease

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    Sita Sommer

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The aim of this study was to identify patients with Parkinson's disease who showed loss or decrease of nocturnal blood pressure fall (nondipper patients as a marker of autonomic dysfunction. Presence or absence of orthostatic hypotension was considered to investigate whether alterations in circadian blood pressure pattern are associated with posture-related dysregulation of blood pressure. Methods. 40 patients with Parkinson's disease underwent 24-hour blood pressure monitoring. 21 patients were diagnosed with arterial hypertension and received anti-hypertensive drugs. Nondipper patients were defined as having nocturnal decrease of mean systolic and diastolic blood pressure less than 10%. Presence or absence of orthostatic hypotension was determined by Schellong's test. Results. We identified 35 nondipper patients (88%. Nondipping was detected in 20 patients with orthostatic hypotension (95% and in 15 patients without orthostatic hypotension (79%. 18 patients with hypertensive and 22 patients with normal blood pressure values were detected. Conclusions. In conclusion 24-hour blood pressure monitoring showed a high prevalence of nondipping in 40 patients with Parkinson's disease with and without orthostatic hypotension independent of coexisting arterial hypertension and antihypertensive treatment. 24-hour blood pressure monitoring may be useful to identify non-dipping as a marker of autonomic dysfunction in patients with Parkinson's disease.

  11. Association Between Change in Body Mass Index, Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale Scores, and Survival Among Persons With Parkinson Disease: Secondary Analysis of Longitudinal Data From NINDS Exploratory Trials in Parkinson Disease Long-term Study 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wills, Anne-Marie A; Pérez, Adriana; Wang, Jue; Su, Xiao; Morgan, John; Rajan, Suja S; Leehey, Maureen A; Pontone, Gregory M; Chou, Kelvin L; Umeh, Chizoba; Mari, Zoltan; Boyd, James

    2016-03-01

    Greater body mass index (BMI, calculated as weight in kilograms divided by height in meters squared) is associated with improved survival among persons with Huntington disease or amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Weight loss is common among persons with Parkinson disease (PD) and is associated with worse quality of life. To explore the association between change in BMI, Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) motor and total scores, and survival among persons with PD and to test whether there is a positive association between BMI at randomization and survival. Secondary analysis (from May 27, 2014, to October 13, 2015) of longitudinal data (3-6 years) from 1673 participants who started the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke Exploratory Trials in PD Long-term Study-1 (NET-PD LS-1). This was a double-blind randomized placebo-controlled clinical trial of creatine monohydrate (10 g/d) that was performed at 45 sites throughout the United States and Canada. Participants with early (within 5 years of diagnosis) and treated (receiving dopaminergic therapy) PD were enrolled from March 2007 to May 2010 and followed up until September 2013. Change across time in motor UPDRS score, change across time in total UPDRS score, and time to death. Generalized linear mixed models were used to estimate the effect of BMI on the change in motor and total UPDRS scores after controlling for covariates. Survival was analyzed using Cox proportional hazards models of time to death. A participant's BMI was measured at randomization, and BMI trajectory groups were classified according to whether participants experienced weight loss ("decreasing BMI"), weight stability ("stable BMI"), or weight gain ("increasing BMI") during the study. Of the 1673 participants (mean [SD] age, 61.7 [9.6] years; 1074 [64.2%] were male), 158 (9.4%) experienced weight loss (decreasing BMI), whereas 233 (13.9%) experienced weight gain (increasing BMI). After adjusting for covariates, we

  12. Blood cholesterol and vascular mortality by age, sex, and blood pressure: a meta-analysis of individual data from 61 prospective studies with 55,000 vascular deaths

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    NN, NN; Jensen, Gorm Boje

    2007-01-01

    and blood pressure. During nearly 12 million person years at risk between the ages of 40 and 89 years, there were more than 55,000 vascular deaths (34,000 ischaemic heart disease [IHD], 12,000 stroke, 10,000 other). Information about HDL cholesterol was available for 150,000 participants, among whom...... pressures, is unexplained, and invites further research. Nevertheless, there is conclusive evidence from randomised trials that statins substantially reduce not only coronary event rates but also total stroke rates in patients with a wide range of ages and blood pressures.......BACKGROUND: Age, sex, and blood pressure could modify the associations of total cholesterol (and its main two fractions, HDL and LDL cholesterol) with vascular mortality. This meta-analysis combined prospective studies of vascular mortality that recorded both blood pressure and total cholesterol...

  13. Effect of alcohol and tobacco use on vascular dementia: a matched case control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takahashi P

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Paul Y Takahashi, Casey R Caldwell, Paul V TargonskiPrimary Care Internal Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USABackground: Vascular dementia is the second most common type of dementia in the United States. The underlying association of tobacco and alcohol with vascular dementia is not completely understood.Purpose: Determine the relationship of tobacco and alcohol use with the development of vascular dementia (VaD.Methods: This was a matched case-control study of subjects living in Olmsted County, MN. Cases of VaD were identified through medical record abstraction using conventionally accepted definitions of VaD, using the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke and the Association Internationale pour la Recherche et l'Ensignement en Neurosicences (NINDS-AIRENS criteria and were matched to controls by gender and age within 3 years among persons free of dementia on the index date. Exposure data for alcohol and tobacco use were abstracted by trained nurses, along with demographic, lifestyle, cerebrovascular, cardiovascular, and vascular comorbid disease characteristics. Matched conditional logistic regression for univariate and multivariate evaluation of the association of tobacco and alcohol use with VaD was utilized.Results: Current alcohol exposure was associated with a decreased risk of VaD with an odds ratio of 0.48 (95% confidence interval: 0.31–0.74. This protective effect of alcohol was seen in men, women, and subjects under 80 years of age. Tobacco use was not associated with VaD in univariate and multivariate analysis, and stratified analysis did not reveal any subgroup-specific associations between tobacco use and VaD in the study population.Conclusion: Current alcohol use appears to have protective effects against the development of vascular dementia. The effects are more pronounced in subjects under age 80. This may reflect the direct vascular effects of alcohol on the vascular system or may represent a surrogate

  14. Periosteal vascularization of the distal femur in relation to distal femoral osteotomies : a cadaveric study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Woude, J A D; van Heerwaarden, R J; Bleys, R L A W

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The purpose of this study was to investigate periosteal vessels location as intra-operative landmarks in distal femoral osteotomies and focused on the branching pattern of the vascular supply of the medial and lateral femoral condyle, its constancy, and the relationship to the height of

  15. Does epicatechin contribute to the acute vascular function effects of dark chocolate? A randomized, crossover study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dower, James I.; Geleijnse, Marianne; Kroon, Paul A.; Philo, Mark; Mensink, Marco; Kromhout, Daan; Hollman, Peter C.H.

    2016-01-01

    Scope: Cocoa, rich in flavan-3-ols, improves vascular function, but the contribution of specific flavan-3-ols is unknown. We compared the effects of pure epicatechin, a major cocoa flavan-3-ol, and chocolate. Methods and results: In a randomized crossover study, twenty healthy men (40-80 years)

  16. The inferior medial genicular artery and its vascularization of the pes anserinus superficialis: A cadaveric study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lena Hirtler

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: Although intratendinous vascularization of the tendons of the PAS via the IMGA was not proven, this study indicates a new possibility of ACL reconstruction. The described operation technique can be conducive to shorten the vulnerable phase of the graft-ligamentization after ACL reconstruction.

  17. Therapeutic Dancing for Parkinson's Disease

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    Lorenna Pryscia Carvalho Aguiar

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Therapeutic dancing has been advocated as an effective adjunct to conventional physical therapies for people living with Parkinson's disease (PD. This systematic review evaluates studies on the outcomes of different dance genres on mobility and quality of life in PD. We searched databases including CINHAL (1982–2015, Medline (1922–2015, Scopus (1996–2015, Web of Science (2002–2015, Embase (2007–2015, PEDro (1999–2015 and the Cochrane Library (1996–2015. The key words were: Parkinson's disease, Parkinson*, Parkinsonism, dance, dance therapy, dance genres, safety, feasibility, and quality of life. Two independent investigators reviewed the texts. Only randomized controlled trials, quasirandomized controlled trials, and case series studies were included. There was emerging evidence that therapeutic dance can be safe and feasible for people with mild to moderately severe PD, with beneficial effects on walking, freezing of gait, and health related quality of life.

  18. The study on a real-time remote monitoring system for Parkinson's disease patients with deep brain stimulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yue; Hao, Hongwei; Chen, Hao; Tian, Ye; Li, Luming

    2014-01-01

    The Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS) has become a well-accepted treatment for Parkinson's disease patients around the world. However, postoperative care of the stimulators usually puts a heavy burden on the patients' families, especially in China. To solve the problem, this study developed a real-time remote monitoring system for deep brain stimulators. Based on Internet technologies, the system offers remote adjustment service so that in vivo stimulators could be programmed at patients' home by clinic caregivers. We tested the system on an experimental condition and the results have proved that this early exploration of remote monitoring deep brain stimulators was successful.

  19. Nocturnal hypokinesia and sleep quality in Parkinson's disease.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Louter, M.; Munneke, M.; Bloem, B.R.; Overeem, S.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To study the relationship between nocturnal hypokinesia and sleep quality in Parkinson's disease (PD). DESIGN: Questionnaire study using intergroup analysis. SETTING: Parkinson Centre Nijmegen, a tertiary university referral center. PARTICIPANTS: Two hundred forty individuals with

  20. Does a Low-Fat Dairy Habit Boost Parkinson's Risk?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... html Does a Low-Fat Dairy Habit Boost Parkinson's Risk? Study showed 3 or more servings daily ... a slight rise in the risk of developing Parkinson's disease. Experts who reviewed the study stressed that ...

  1. Predictive Big Data Analytics: A Study of Parkinson's Disease Using Large, Complex, Heterogeneous, Incongruent, Multi-Source and Incomplete Observations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivo D Dinov

    Full Text Available A unique archive of Big Data on Parkinson's Disease is collected, managed and disseminated by the Parkinson's Progression Markers Initiative (PPMI. The integration of such complex and heterogeneous Big Data from multiple sources offers unparalleled opportunities to study the early stages of prevalent neurodegenerative processes, track their progression and quickly identify the efficacies of alternative treatments. Many previous human and animal studies have examined the relationship of Parkinson's disease (PD risk to trauma, genetics, environment, co-morbidities, or life style. The defining characteristics of Big Data-large size, incongruency, incompleteness, complexity, multiplicity of scales, and heterogeneity of information-generating sources-all pose challenges to the classical techniques for data management, processing, visualization and interpretation. We propose, implement, test and validate complementary model-based and model-free approaches for PD classification and prediction. To explore PD risk using Big Data methodology, we jointly processed complex PPMI imaging, genetics, clinical and demographic data.Collective representation of the multi-source data facilitates the aggregation and harmonization of complex data elements. This enables joint modeling of the complete data, leading to the development of Big Data analytics, predictive synthesis, and statistical validation. Using heterogeneous PPMI data, we developed a comprehensive protocol for end-to-end data characterization, manipulation, processing, cleaning, analysis and validation. Specifically, we (i introduce methods for rebalancing imbalanced cohorts, (ii utilize a wide spectrum of classification methods to generate consistent and powerful phenotypic predictions, and (iii generate reproducible machine-learning based classification that enables the reporting of model parameters and diagnostic forecasting based on new data. We evaluated several complementary model

  2. Predictive Big Data Analytics: A Study of Parkinson's Disease Using Large, Complex, Heterogeneous, Incongruent, Multi-Source and Incomplete Observations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinov, Ivo D; Heavner, Ben; Tang, Ming; Glusman, Gustavo; Chard, Kyle; Darcy, Mike; Madduri, Ravi; Pa, Judy; Spino, Cathie; Kesselman, Carl; Foster, Ian; Deutsch, Eric W; Price, Nathan D; Van Horn, John D; Ames, Joseph; Clark, Kristi; Hood, Leroy; Hampstead, Benjamin M; Dauer, William; Toga, Arthur W

    2016-01-01

    A unique archive of Big Data on Parkinson's Disease is collected, managed and disseminated by the Parkinson's Progression Markers Initiative (PPMI). The integration of such complex and heterogeneous Big Data from multiple sources offers unparalleled opportunities to study the early stages of prevalent neurodegenerative processes, track their progression and quickly identify the efficacies of alternative treatments. Many previous human and animal studies have examined the relationship of Parkinson's disease (PD) risk to trauma, genetics, environment, co-morbidities, or life style. The defining characteristics of Big Data-large size, incongruency, incompleteness, complexity, multiplicity of scales, and heterogeneity of information-generating sources-all pose challenges to the classical techniques for data management, processing, visualization and interpretation. We propose, implement, test and validate complementary model-based and model-free approaches for PD classification and prediction. To explore PD risk using Big Data methodology, we jointly processed complex PPMI imaging, genetics, clinical and demographic data. Collective representation of the multi-source data facilitates the aggregation and harmonization of complex data elements. This enables joint modeling of the complete data, leading to the development of Big Data analytics, predictive synthesis, and statistical validation. Using heterogeneous PPMI data, we developed a comprehensive protocol for end-to-end data characterization, manipulation, processing, cleaning, analysis and validation. Specifically, we (i) introduce methods for rebalancing imbalanced cohorts, (ii) utilize a wide spectrum of classification methods to generate consistent and powerful phenotypic predictions, and (iii) generate reproducible machine-learning based classification that enables the reporting of model parameters and diagnostic forecasting based on new data. We evaluated several complementary model-based predictive approaches

  3. The Impact of Subthalamic Deep Brain Stimulation on Sleep-Wake Behavior: A Prospective Electrophysiological Study in 50 Parkinson Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumann-Vogel, Heide; Imbach, Lukas L; Sürücü, Oguzkan; Stieglitz, Lennart; Waldvogel, Daniel; Baumann, Christian R; Werth, Esther

    2017-05-01

    This prospective observational study was designed to systematically examine the effect of subthalamic deep brain stimulation (DBS) on subjective and objective sleep-wake parameters in Parkinson patients. In 50 consecutive Parkinson patients undergoing subthalamic DBS, we assessed motor symptoms, medication, the position of DBS electrodes within the subthalamic nucleus (STN), subjective sleep-wake parameters, 2-week actigraphy, video-polysomnography studies, and sleep electroencepahalogram frequency and dynamics analyses before and 6 months after surgery. Subthalamic DBS improved not only motor symptoms and reduced daily intake of dopaminergic agents but also enhanced subjective sleep quality and reduced sleepiness (Epworth Sleepiness Scale: -2.1 ± 3.8, p sleep efficiency (+5.2 ± 17.6%, p = .005) and deep sleep (+11.2 ± 32.2 min, p = .017) and increased accumulation of slow-wave activity over the night (+41.0 ± 80.0%, p = .005). Rapid eye movement sleep features were refractory to subthalamic DBS, and the dynamics of sleep as assessed by state space analyses did not normalize. Increased sleep efficiency was associated with active electrode contact localization more distant from the ventral margin of the left subthalamic nucleus. Subthalamic DBS deepens and consolidates nocturnal sleep and improves daytime wakefulness in Parkinson patients, but several outcomes suggest that it does not normalize sleep. It remains elusive whether modulated activity in the STN directly contributes to changes in sleep-wake behavior, but dorsal positioning of electrodes within the STN is linked to improved sleep-wake outcomes.

  4. Evaluation of the valvular and biventricular functions in Parkinson patients using ergotamine-derived dopamine agonist: an observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozer, Necla; Yorgun, Hikmet; Canpolat, Uğur; Elibol, Bülent

    2014-03-01

    In this study, we aimed to evaluate the impact of cabergoline use in patients with Parkinson's disease on valvular and biventricular functions. In this observational cohort study, patients with Parkinson disease were divided into 2 groups as 34 patients (41.2% female, age; 57.4±15.3 years) using cabergoline (Group 1) and 42 patients (61.9% female, age; 53.7±7.1 years) not using cabergoline (Group 2). In addition to conventional echocardiography and diastolic functions, tissue Doppler imaging was used to evaluate both global and regional systolic - diastolic functions. Correlations were assessed using Pearson correlation coefficient for normally distributed variables. In group 1 patients cabergoline was used for 7.7±5.1 years and mean and cumulative cabergoline dose were 3.3±1.1 mg and 9.8±7.0 g respectively. Left ventricular systolic functions and tissue Doppler measurements of septal and lateral mitral annulus and right ventricular systolic and diastolic velocities were similar between groups. Mitral valve tenting area was significantly higher in patients using cabergoline (p=0.007). The association between cumulative cabergoline dose and diastolic functions was also evaluated which revealed that among diastolic function parameters, Epeak (r=0.253, p=0.042), E/A (r=0.256, p=0.026) and DT (r=-0.382, p=0.001) were correlated with cumulative cabergoline dose. There was a positive correlation between cumulative cabergoline dose and duration of cabergoline therapy with composite regurgitation score (r=0.435, pfunctions, we did not observe any alteration in systolic functions, but diastolic functions which was associated with cumulative cabergoline dose in patients with Parkinson's disease.

  5. Effects of donepezil dose escalation in Parkinson's patients with dementia receiving long-term donepezil treatment: an exploratory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Kei-Ichi; Motoi, Yumiko; Mizuno, Yoshikuni; Kubo, Shin-Ichiro; Hattori, Nobutaka

    2014-06-01

    The benefits of escalating the dose of donepezil in patients who are already receiving long-term treatment with it have not been well evaluated. Therefore, an exploratory study to assess the effects of donepezil dose escalation in patients with Parkinson's disease with dementia, and specifically on patients receiving long-term treatment with donepezil, was performed. Patients treated with 5-mg/day donepezil for at least 3 months and having a Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) score between 10 and 26 were included in this study. Donepezil dosage was then increased to 10 mg/day for 12 weeks. The outcome measures were a modified form of the Neuropsychiatric Inventory (NPI) with an extra domain for additional evaluation of fluctuation in cognitive functions (NPI-11) and the MMSE. Of the nine patients enrolled, two withdrew because of nausea and inability to be assessed on the predetermined date; this left seven participants (four men and three women) with a mean age of 74.6 ± 6.9 years, a mean period of Parkinson's disease of 11.7 ± 7.5 years, and median donepezil use of 7 months (range: 3-56 months). At baseline, the mean total NPI-11 and mean MMSE scores were 18.3 ± 5.6 points and 21.3 ± 5.3 points, respectively. At week 12, they improved by 8.3 points (P donepezil from 5 mg/day to 10 mg/day may be therapeutically useful for patients with Parkinson's disease with dementia who have taken donepezil 5 mg/day in the long term. © 2014 The Authors. Psychogeriatrics © 2014 Japanese Psychogeriatric Society.

  6. Effects of a formal exercise program on Parkinson's disease: a pilot study using a delayed start design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, A; Zid, D; Russell, J; Malone, A; Rendon, A; Wehr, A; Li, X

    2014-01-01

    Parkinson's Disease (PD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease. Increasing evidence shows that physical exercise is beneficial for motor and non-motor symptoms of PD, and animal models suggest that it may help slow progression of disease. Using a randomized delayed-start design, 31 patients were randomized to an early start group (ESG) or a delayed start group (DSG) exercise program. The ESG underwent a rigorous formal group exercise program for 1 h, three days/week, for 48 weeks (November 2011-October 2012). The DSG participated in this identical exercise program from weeks 24-48. Outcome measures included the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS), Walking Test (get-up-and-go), Tinetti Mobility Test, PDQ-39 Questionnaire, and the Beck Depression Inventory. There was minimal attrition in this study, with only one patient dropping out. Results did not show improvement in total UPDRS scores with early exercise. At week 48, the mean change from baseline total UPDRS score was 6.33 in the ESG versus 5.13 in the DSG (p = 0.58). However, patients randomized to the ESG scored significantly better on the Beck Depression Inventory, with a mean improvement of 1.07 points relative to those in the DSG (p = 0.04). The findings demonstrate that long-term, group exercise programs are feasible in the Parkinson's disease population, with excellent adherence and minimal drop out. While the outcome measures used in our study did not provide strong evidence that exercise has a neuroprotective effect on motor function, earlier participation in a group exercise program had a significant effect on symptoms of depression. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. A Ten Year Analysis of Fatal Peripheral Vascular Injuries Autopsy Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salim Tuncer

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Peripheral vascular injuries are usually associated with fatal injuries. Early diagnosis and intervention are so vital for improving a favorable outcome for traumatic vascular injuries. As a preventable cause of death, we aimed to evaluate peripheral vascular injuries in overall deaths in ten year period, 2003-2012. Material and Method: A retrospective evaluation was made of 2845 death cases which had post-mortem examination and autopsy from the 10-year period of 2003-2012 in Eskisehir, Turkey. The mean age of the cases included in the study was 32.5±7.9 years with the highest rate of cases occurring in the 30-39 years age group. Males constituted 89.2% of the victims. The most frequent manner of death was homicide 83.8%.The femoral artery was the most commonly injured vessel 29 cases (78.4%. In this study it was identified that, 33 patients (89.3% died before any medical intervention could be performed. Discussion: Our study shows that, peripheral vascular injuries most commonly caused by sharp objects. The injuries have a low mortality rate when early intervention is made. Autopsies are conducted is very important to explain not only the cause of death but also the treatment process, which would clear the cases of any potential malpractice or negligence claims.

  8. Anatomic study of gastric vascularization and its relationship to cervical gastroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, Flavio Roberto; Cecconello, Ivan; Szachnowicz, Sergio; Tacconi, Marcos Roberto; Gama-Rodrigues, Joaquim

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this study was to perform an anatomic study of the stomach and its vascularization, evaluating the frequency of communication between the right gastroepiploic artery (RGEA) and the left gastroepiploic artery (LGEA), as well as their relationship to the length of the stomach without extramural (direct) vascularization in cervical gastroplasty. Forty-two fresh human cadaveric specimens were studied, and the presence of communication between the RGEA and the LGEA was observed in 26 of the dissected stomachs (61.9%). When communication was present (group 1), to a total length of 49.60 cm of greater curvature length, it was verified that approximately 16.48 cm of this curvature lacked direct extramural vascularization (33.20%). When there was non-communication (group 2), to a greater curvature length of approximately 45.41 cm, it was found that 18.96 cm of this curvature (gastric fundus) lacked direct extramural vascular perfusion (41.76%). Results obtained in both groups were tested for statistically significant differences by the Pearson correlation test (Pgastric curvature.

  9. Pramipexole in patients with Parkinson's disease and marked drug resistant tremor: a randomised, double blind, placebo controlled multicentre study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pogarell, O; Gasser, T; van Hilten, J J; Spieker, S; Pollentier, S; Meier, D; Oertel, W H

    2002-06-01

    To compare the tremorlytic properties of pramipexole, a non-ergoline dopamine agonist to those of placebo as add on medication in patients with Parkinson's disease. Eighty four patients with early or advanced Parkinson's disease and marked, drug resistant tremor under a stable and optimised antiparkinsonian medication were included in a double blind, randomised, placebo controlled, multicentre study and assigned to add on treatment (7 week dose titration interval, 4 week maintenance period) with either pramipexole (n=44) or placebo (n=40) as adjunct. The primary end point was the absolute change in tremor score, defined as the sum of tremor related items (16, 20, 21) of the unified Parkinson's disease rating scale (UPDRS) in "on" periods. Secondary end points included the percentage change in tremor score, the absolute and percentage changes in long term EMG tremor registration, and the change in tremor self rating scales. Safety and tolerability were assessed on the basis of adverse events, laboratory tests, ECG, and vital signs. Pramipexole was significantly superior to placebo with a difference between treatment groups in the mean absolute change in tremor score of -4.4 (95% confidence interval (95% CI) -6.2 to -2.5) (p<0.0001), corresponding to a difference in the mean percentage change of -34.7% in favour of pramipexole. The secondary end points were consistent with the significant change in tremor score and provided further evidence for the benefit of pramipexole compared with placebo. Long term EMG registration as an objective measure showed a difference in mean absolute change in tremor occurrence of -15.2% (95%CI -21.4 to -9.0) (p<0.0001), and a difference in the mean percentage change of -45.7% in favour of pramipexole. The treatment effects increased during dose titration and remained stable during the 4 week maintenance dose period until the end of the study. The average daily pramipexole dose during maintenance was 4.1 (SD 0.9) mg. Safety analysis

  10. Beneficial anti-Parkinson effects of camel milk in Chlorpromazineinduced animal model: Behavioural and histopathological study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khatoon, Humera; Najam, Rahela; Mirza, Talat; Sikandar, Bushra

    2016-09-01

    Potential roles of natural products have been identified for preventing or treating various diseases. Our aim was to investigate the effectiveness of camel milk in an animal model of Parkinson's disease and compare it with standard treatment (levodopa + carbidopa combination). 40 Wistar albino rats weighing 200-250 gram were divided into four groups of 10 animals each. Group I was kept on water and served as normal control, group II served as negative control, treated with chlorpromazine (5mg/kg i.p.), group III was given camel milk (33ml/kg p.o) and group IV the standard combination of levodopa + carbidopa (100+10mg/kg) respectively, 30 minutes after chlorpromazine treatment. All animals were subjected to the drugs treatment for 30 days. Catalepsy was assessed by Bar test on day 21 and day 30 at 30, 60, 90 and 120 minutes interval. On 30th day animals were sacrificed and whole brains were examined for histopathological changes. The results revealed highly significant (pcamel milk on day 21 and 30 in comparison to chlorpromazine. When compared with standard therapy, the results showed that anti-Parkinson's activity of camel milk was significant (pcamel milk reveals intact architecture with mild degenerative changes than chlorpromazine and levodopa + carbidopa treated animals. In conclusion, camel milk possesses anti-Parkinson's activity. However, its long term efficacy and safety needs to be evaluated clinically.

  11. Assessment of Parkinson Disease Manifestations

    OpenAIRE

    Perlmutter, Joel S.

    2009-01-01

    Parkinson disease (PD) is a progressive neurologic condition that causes motor and non-motor manifestations. Treatment provides symptomatic benefit but no current treatment has been proven to slow disease progression. Research studies of PD require a means of rating the severity of disease by measurement of motor manifestations, assessment of ability to perform daily functional activities, and symptomatic response to medication. The most common rating scales are the Unified Parkinson Disease ...

  12. Vascular Care in Patients With Alzheimer Disease With Cerebrovascular Lesions Slows Progression of White Matter Lesions on MRI The Evaluation of Vascular Care in Alzheimer's Disease (EVA) Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Richard, E.; Gouw, A.A.; Scheltens, P.; van Gool, W.A.

    2010-01-01

    Background and Purpose:White matter lesions (WMLs) and cerebral infarcts are common findings in Alzheimer disease and may contribute to dementia severity. WMLs and lacunar infarcts may provide a potential target for intervention strategies. This study assessed whether multicomponent vascular care in

  13. Vascular Care in Patients With Alzheimer Disease With Cerebrovascular Lesions Slows Progression of White Matter Lesions on MRI The Evaluation of Vascular Care in Alzheimer's Disease (EVA) Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Richard, Edo; Gouw, Alida A.; Scheltens, Philip; van Gool, Willem A.

    2010-01-01

    Background and Purpose-White matter lesions (WMLs) and cerebral infarcts are common findings in Alzheimer disease and may contribute to dementia severity. WMLs and lacunar infarcts may provide a potential target for intervention strategies. This study assessed whether multicomponent vascular care in

  14. The prodromal phase of leucine-rich repeat kinase 2-associated Parkinson disease: Clinical and imaging Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pont-Sunyer, Claustre; Tolosa, Eduardo; Caspell-Garcia, Chelsea; Coffey, Christopher; Alcalay, Roy N; Chan, Piu; Duda, John E; Facheris, Maurizio; Fernández-Santiago, Rubén; Marek, Kenneth; Lomeña, Francisco; Marras, Connie; Mondragon, Elisabet; Saunders-Pullman, Rachel; Waro, Bjorg

    2017-05-01

    Asymptomatic, nonmanifesting carriers of leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 mutations are at increased risk of developing PD. Clinical and neuroimaging features may be associated with gene carriage and/or may demarcate individuals at greater risk for phenoconversion to PD. To investigate clinical and dopamine transporter single-photon emission computed tomography imaging characteristics of leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 asymptomatic carriers. A total of 342 carriers' and 259 noncarriers' relatives of G2019S leucine-rich repeat kinase 2/PD patients and 39 carriers' and 31 noncarriers' relatives of R1441G leucine-rich repeat kinase 2/PD patients were evaluated. Motor and nonmotor symptoms were assessed using specific scales and questionnaires. Neuroimaging quantitative data were obtained in 81 carriers and compared with 41 noncarriers. G2019S carriers scored higher in motor scores and had lower radioligand uptake compared to noncarriers, but no differences in nonmotor symptoms scores were observed. R1441G carriers scored higher in motor scores, had lower radioligand uptake, and had higher scores in depression, dysautonomia, and Rapid Eye Movements Sleep Behavior Disorder Screening Questionnaire scores, but had better cognition scores than noncarriers. Among G2019S carriers, a group with "mild motor signs" was identified, and was significantly older, with worse olfaction and lower radioligand uptake. G2019S and R1441G carriers differ from their noncarriers' relatives in higher motor scores and slightly lower radioligand uptake. Nonmotor symptoms were mild, and different nonmotor profiles were observed in G2019S carriers compared to R1441G carriers. A group of G2019S carriers with known prodromal features was identified. Longitudinal studies are required to determine whether such individuals are at short-term risk of developing overt parkinsonism. © 2017 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society. © 2017 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.

  15. Screening for impulse control symptoms in patients with de novo Parkinson disease: a case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weintraub, Daniel; Papay, Kimberly; Siderowf, Andrew

    2013-01-08

    To determine the frequency and correlates of impulse control and related behavior symptoms in patients with de novo, untreated Parkinson disease (PD) and healthy controls (HCs). The Parkinson's Progression Markers Initiative is an international, multisite, case-control clinical study conducted at 21 academic movement disorders centers. Participants were recently diagnosed, untreated PD patients (n = 168) and HCs (n = 143). The outcome measures were presence of current impulse control and related behavior symptoms based on recommended cutoff points for the Questionnaire for Impulsive-Compulsive Disorders in Parkinson's Disease (QUIP)-Short Form. There were 311 participants with complete QUIP data. Frequencies of impulse control and related behavior symptoms for patients with PD vs HCs were as follows: gambling (1.2% vs. 0.7%), buying (3.0% vs. 2.1%), sexual behavior (4.2% vs. 3.5%), eating (7.1% vs. 10.5%), punding (4.8% vs. 2.1%), hobbyism (5.4% vs. 11.9%), walkabout (0.6% vs. 0.7%), and any impulse control or related behavior (18.5% vs. 20.3%). In multivariable models, a diagnosis of PD was not associated with symptoms of any impulse control or related behavior (p ≥ 0.10 in all cases). PD itself does not seem to confer an increased risk for development of impulse control or related behavior symptoms, which further reinforces the reported association between PD medications and impulse control disorders in PD. Given that approximately 20% of patients with newly diagnosed PD report some impulse control or related behavior symptoms, long-term follow-up is needed to determine whether such patients are at increased risk for impulse control disorder development once PD medications are initiated.

  16. Depression, vascular factors, and risk of dementia in primary care: a retrospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köhler, Sebastian; Buntinx, Frank; Palmer, Katie; van den Akker, Marjan

    2015-04-01

    To study the interaction between and timing effects of depression and vascular disorders on dementia risk. Retrospective cohort study. Primary care practices in the south of the Netherlands. Individuals in primary care aged 50 to 100 followed for 13 years (N = 35,791). Medical diagnoses of incident depression, hypertension, obesity, type 2 diabetes mellitus, stroke, and dementia were extracted from a research database. Cox proportional hazards regression was used to test whether incident depression predicted dementia and its putative interactions with vascular factors. In total, 1,680 participants developed dementia. Individuals with depression (n = 978) had a higher risk of dementia (adjusted hazard ratio (HR) = 2.03, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.56-2.64). Depression exerted most effect in participants with incident stroke (HR = 5.29, 95% CI = 2.52-11.14) or newly diagnosed hypertension (HR = 3.09, 95% CI = 1.54-6.20). Depression in later life increases the risk of dementia. The effect is particularly high in individuals with depression and vascular disorders. Targeting late-onset depression in individuals with vascular disorders might lower dementia risk by preventing cerebrovascular changes. © 2015, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2015, The American Geriatrics Society.

  17. Experimental study of sutureless vascular anastomosis with use of glued prosthesis in rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vokrri, Lulzim; Qavdarbasha, Arsim; Rudari, Hajriz; Ahmetaj, Halil; Manxhuka-Kërliu, Suzana; Hyseni, Nexhmi; Porcu, Paolo; Cinquin, Philippe; Sessa, Carmine

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study is to explore the feasibility and efficacy of a new technique for sutureless vascular anastomosis, using glued prosthesis, as a sole anastomosis fixation method in rabbits. Ten rabbits were randomly selected to conduct the experiment. Five rabbits underwent direct anastomosis of infrarenal abdominal aorta, with glued prosthesis. In five other rabbits, reconstruction was done by sutured anastomosis. All animals were immediately examined by echo-Doppler for patency of anastomosis. The burst pressure of the glued anastomosis was measured and compared with that of a sutured artery. The animals were euthanized, and tissue samples were taken for histological examination immediately after the experiment. Compared to conventional anastomoses, sutureless vascular anastomoses required shorter time of creation and significantly reduced blood loss (Pprosthesis, examined by echo-Doppler, were patent at the anastomotic site, except one, which was stenosed immediately after surgery. In the control group, except one with stenosis, all conventional anastomoses were patent. Mean burst pressure at the anastomotic site for sutureless anastomoses was lower than in control group. Macroscopically, the BioGlue did not demonstrate any adhesion to the surrounding tissue as it was covered by the vascular prosthesis. Histological examination showed low-grade inflammatory reaction in glued anastomoses versus no inflammatory reaction at the sutured anastomoses. This technique may provide a feasible and successful alternative in vascular surgery. However, further long-term studies are necessary to elucidate the break pressure and degree of inflammation at the anastomotic site.

  18. Retinal vascular caliber and brachial flow-mediated dilation: the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Thanh T; Islam, F M Amirul; Farouque, H M Omar; Klein, Ronald; Klein, Barbara E K; Cotch, Mary Frances; Herrington, David M; Wong, Tien Yin

    2010-07-01

    Retinal vascular caliber changes have been shown to predict stroke, but the underlying mechanism of this association is unknown. We examined the relationship between retinal vascular caliber with brachial flow-mediated dilation (FMD), a measure of systemic endothelial function. The Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA) is a population-based study of persons 45 to 84 years of age residing in 6 US communities free of clinical cardiovascular disease at baseline. Brachial FMD data were collected at baseline (July 2000 to June 2002), and retinal vascular caliber was measured from digital retinal photographs at the second examination, immediately after the first (August 2002 to January 2004). Data were available for 2851 participants for analysis. The mean brachial FMD was 4.39+/-2.79%. After adjusting for age and gender, brachial FMD was reduced in persons with wider retinal venular caliber (changes in FMD -0.25, 95% CI, -0.36, - 0.13; PhemoglobinA(1C) (-0.18; 95% CI -0.30, - 0.06; P=0.004, per SD increase in venular caliber). Brachial FMD was not associated with retinal arteriolar caliber. Persons with wider retinal venules have reduced brachial FMD, independent of other vascular risk factors. This suggests that retinal venular caliber, previously shown to predict stroke, may be a marker of underlying systemic endothelial dysfunction.

  19. Subthalamic nucleus versus globus pallidus bilateral deep brain stimulation for advanced Parkinson's disease (NSTAPS study): a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odekerken, Vincent J J; van Laar, Teus; Staal, Michiel J; Mosch, Arne; Hoffmann, Carel F E; Nijssen, Peter C G; Beute, Guus N; van Vugt, Jeroen P P; Lenders, Mathieu W P M; Contarino, M Fiorella; Mink, Marieke S J; Bour, Lo J; van den Munckhof, Pepijn; Schmand, Ben A; de Haan, Rob J; Schuurman, P Richard; de Bie, Rob M A

    2013-01-01

    Patients with advanced Parkinson's disease often have rapid swings between mobility and immobility, and many respond unsatisfactorily to adjustments in pharmacological treatment. We assessed whether globus pallidus pars interna (GPi) deep brain stimulation (DBS) gives greater functional improvement than does subthalamic nucleus (STN) DBS. We recruited patients from five centres in the Netherlands who were aged 18 years or older, had idiopathic Parkinson's disease, and had, despite optimum pharmacological treatment, at least one of the following symptoms: severe response fluctuations, dyskinesias, painful dystonias, or bradykinesia. By use of a computer-generated randomisation sequence, we randomly assigned patients to receive either GPi DBS or STN DBS (1:1), applying a minimisation procedure according to drug use (levodopa equivalent dose treatment centre. Patients and study assessors (but not those who assessed adverse events) were masked to treatment allocation. We had two primary outcomes: functional health as measured by the weighted Academic Medical Center Linear Disability Scale (ALDS; weighted by time spent in the off phase and on phase) and a composite score for cognitive, mood, and behavioural effects up to 1 year after surgery. Secondary outcomes were symptom scales, activities of daily living scales, a quality-of-life questionnaire, the occurrence of adverse events, and drug use. We used the intention-to-treat principle for all analyses. This trial is registered with www.controlled-trials.com, number ISRCTN85542074. Between Feb 1, 2007, and March 29, 2011, we enrolled 128 patients, assigning 65 to GPi DBS and 63 to STN DBS. We found no statistically significant difference in either of our primary outcomes: mean change in weighted ALDS (3·0 [SD 14·5] in the GPi group vs 7·7 [23·2] in the STN group; p=0·28) and the number of patients with cognitive, mood, and behavioural side-effects (36 [58%] of 62 patients in the GPi group vs 35 [56%] of 63 patients

  20. Thin-slice T2 MRI imaging predicts vascular pathology in hemifacial spasm: a case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekula, Raymond F; Frederickson, Andrew M; Branstetter, Barton F; Oskin, James E; Stevens, Dale R; Zwagerman, Nathan T; Grandhi, Ramesh; Hughes, Marion A

    2014-09-01

    Hemifacial spasm (HFS) is a condition that may severely reduce patients' quality of life. We sought to determine the sensitivity and specificity of thin-slice T2 magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for detecting vascular compression in HFS patients. Prospective information was collected on 28 patients with HFS who presented to our center between March 2011 and March 2012 with thin-slice T2 MR imaging. The sensitivity and specificity for differentiating patients from controls were calculated. Sensitivities were 78.6% and 92.9% for the blinded radiologists and 75% for the partially blinded neurosurgeon. Specificities were 42.9% and 28.6% for the blinded radiologists and 75% for the partially blinded neurosurgeon. Magnetic resonance imaging of the facial nerve can guide clinicians in selecting patients who are good surgical candidates. Thin-slice T2 MRI should be viewed as supportive rather than diagnostic. © 2014 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.

  1. Statin adherence and the risk of Parkinson's disease: A population-based cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozani, Violetta; Giladi, Nir; El-Ad, Baruch; Gurevich, Tanya; Tsamir, Judith; Hemo, Beatriz; Peretz, Chava

    2017-01-01

    While experimental data provided some compelling evidence on the benefits of statins on dopaminergic neurons, observational studies reported conflicting results regarding the potential of statins to effect the risk of Parkinson's disease (PD). To evaluate the association between changes in statin adherence over time and PD risk. A population-based cohort of new statin users (ages 40-79, years 1999-2012) was derived from a large Israeli healthcare services organization. Data included history of statin purchases and low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) levels. Personal statin adherence was measured annually by the proportion of days covered (PDC). PD was detected employing a drug-tracer approach. Stratified (by sex, LDL-C levels at baseline and age) Cox proportional hazards models with time-dependent covariates were used to compute adjusted Hazard Ratio (HR) with 95%CI. The cohort included 232,877 individuals, 49.3% men. Mean age at first statin purchase was 56.5 (±9.8) years for men and 58.7 (±9.2) years for women. PDC distribution for the whole follow up period differed between men and women: medians 58.3% and 54.1% respectively. During a mean follow up of 7.6 (±3.4) years, 2,550 (1.1%) PD cases were identified. In a 1-year lagged analysis, we found no association between annual statin adherence and PD risk in all age-groups regardless of statin type and potency. Age-pooled HR (95%CI) for men and women with LDL-C levels at baseline ≤160mg/dL were: 0.99 (0.99-1.01), 1.01 (1.00-1.02); and for men and women with LDL-C >160mg/dL levels: 0.99 (0.98-1.01), 0.97 (0.98-1.01). Our findings suggest that statin adherence over time does not affect PD risk. Future studies should use large-scale cohorts and refining assessments of long-term profiles in statin adherence.

  2. Vastus lateralis vascularized nerve graft in facial nerve reconstruction: an anatomical cadaveric study and clinical implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrogiannis, Nikolaos; Rozen, Shai; Reddy, Gangadasu; Audolfsson, Thorir; Rodriguez-Lorenzo, Andres

    2015-02-01

    The present study investigates the vascular anatomy of the vastus lateralis motor nerve (VLMN) to be used as a vascularized nerve graft in facial nerve reconstruction. We evaluated the maximum length of the nerve that can be included in the flap and its vascular pedicle. In addition, we discuss its adequacy for use in early reconstruction of the facial nerve both as ipsilateral facial nerve reconstruction and as cross-facial nerve graft. Five fresh cadavers were used in this study. In all specimens, the VLMN and its vascular pedicle were dissected, photodocumented and measured using calipers. In addition, two vascularized VLMN were injected with a radiopaque contrast and underwent CT angiography and three dimensional reconstructions were scanned to illustrate the vascular supply of the nerve using OsiriX Software. The VLMN was divided into two divisions, an oblique proximal and a descending distal, in 70% of the dissections with a mean maximal length of 8.4 ± 4.5 cm for the oblique division and 15.03 ± 3.87 cm for the descending division. The length of the oblique division, when present, was shorter than the length of the descending branch in all specimens. The mean length of the pedicle was 2.93 ± 1.69 cm, and 3.27 ± 1.49 cm until crossing the oblique and the descending division of the nerve respectively. The mean caliber of the nerve was 2.4 ± 0.62 mm. Three-dimensional computed tomography angiography demonstrated perfusion throughout the entire VLMN by branches from the descending branch of the lateral femoral circumflex artery which ran parallel to the descending division of the VLMN. Additionally, we observed that technically it was possible to preserve the oblique branch of the VLMN. This study confirms that VLMN presents adequate anatomic features to be used as a vascularized nerve graft for facial nerve reconstruction in terms of length, pedicle, and caliber. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Vascular Epiphytes in Doshke and Kurpaye: A Comparative Study, Gamo Gofa, Ethiopia

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    Zeleke Assefa Getaneh

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Epiphytes comprise about 10% of the world’s total flora. However, the survival of these important elements of the global vegetation is recognized to be increasingly threatened, and surveys made to study them remain far from being complete. This study has focused on investigating the vascular epiphytes (true epiphytes, hemiepiphytes, and accidental epiphytes in Doshke and Kurpaye forests of Gamo Gofa zone, southwest Ethiopia. A total of 40 (20 in each 25 m × 25 m quadrats were established along four line transects for vegetation data collection. A total of 35 species of vascular epiphytes were recorded in the two sites (22 and 14 species from Doshke and Kurpaye, resp.. Drynaria volkensii was the only species to be recorded from the two sites. Doshke and Kurpaye forests also varied in the number of phorophytes (17 and 10 phorophytes species, resp.. The richest epiphyte family of Doshke is Orchidaceae (5 species and that of Kurpaye is Polypodiaceae (3 species while Orchidaceae dominate the combined flora being represented by 7 species. In terms of vertical distribution, most species were located at the canopy area. Most vascular epiphytes showed no preference for host trees except for a few species which exhibited higher occurrence rates on the host plant species Syzygium guineense, Schrebera alata, and Acacia tortilis. Vascular epiphyte abundance and species richness were both significantly positively correlated with host tree size. Vascular epiphytes of the studied forests are under a serious pressure, mainly due to anthropogenic activities, and this may lead to their local extinction.

  4. Data for the Oxford Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Study international survey of vascular surgery professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Regent; Jones, Amy; Woodgate, Felicity; Killough, Nicholas; Bellamkonda, Kirthi; Williams, Matthew; Hurst, Katherine; Fulford-Smith, Lucy; Cassimjee, Ismail; Handa, Ashok

    2017-10-01

    As part of the Oxford Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm (OxAAA) Study, we conducted an international survey of vascular surgery professionals. One aspect of the survey is as published in the International Journal of Cardiology: "International Opinion on Priorities in Research for Small Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms and the Potential Path for Research to Impact Clinical Management". This Data-in-Brief article contains a detailed method for the conduct of this survey and additional original data. In this survey, we also provided vascular surgery colleagues with contemporary epidemiologic and surgical outcome data. This was followed by a hypothetical scenario whereby a patient had just been diagnosed with a small (40 mm) AAA and a novel biomarker predicted it to be fast growing in the coming years. We assessed the vascular professionals' perception of the patient's preference for management in this scenario, and their willingness to refer patients for a surgical trial that investigates the outcome of early versus late surgery in this setting. The survey then asked the vascular professionals to assume the role of the patient, and provided their own preferences in such a scenario.

  5. Prevalence and type of cervical deformities among adults with Parkinson's disease: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Bong Ju; Smith, Justin S; Ames, Christopher P; Shaffrey, Christopher I; Lafage, Virginie; Schwab, Frank; Matsumoto, Morio; Baik, Jong Sam; Ha, Yoon

    2016-04-01

    To identify the characteristics of cervical deformities in Parkinson's disease (PD) and the role of severity of PD in the development of cervical spine deformities, the authors investigated the prevalence of the cervical deformities, cervical kyphosis (CK), and cervical positive sagittal malalignment (CPSM) in patients with PD. They also analyzed the association of severity of cervical deformities with the stage of PD in the context of global sagittal spinopelvic alignment. This study was a prospective assessment of consecutively treated patients (n = 89) with PD. A control group of the age- and sex-matched patients was selected from patients with degenerative cervical spine disease but without PD. Clinical and demographic parameters including age, sex, duration of PD, and Hoehn and Yahr (H&Y) stage were collected. Full-length standing radiographs were used to assess spinopelvic parameters. CK was defined as a C2-7 Cobb angle 4 cm. A significantly higher prevalence of CPSM (28% vs. 1.1%, p < 0.001), but not CK (12% vs. 10.1%, p = 0.635), was found in PD patients compared with control patients. Among patients with PD, those with CK were younger (62.1 vs. 69.0 years, p = 0.013) and had longer duration of PD (56.4 vs. 36.2 months, p = 0.034), but the severity of PD was not significantly different. Logistic regression analysis revealed that the presence of CK was associated with younger age, higher mismatch between pelvic incidence and lumbar lordosis, and lower C7-S1 SVA. The patients with CPSM had significantly greater thoracic kyphosis (TK) (p < 0.001) and a trend toward more advanced H&Y stage (p = 0.05). Logistic regression analysis revealed that CPSM was associated with male sex, greater TK, and more advanced H&Y stage. Patients with PD have a significantly higher prevalence of CPSM compared with age- and sex-matched control patients with cervical degenerative disease but without PD. Among patients with PD, CK is not associated with the severity of PD but is

  6. Speech and communication in Parkinson's disease: a cross-sectional exploratory study in the UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnish, Maxwell S; Horton, Simon M C; Butterfint, Zoe R; Clark, Allan B; Atkinson, Rachel A; Deane, Katherine H O

    2017-05-29

    To assess associations between cognitive status, intelligibility, acoustics and functional communication in PD. Cross-sectional exploratory study of functional communication, including a within-participants experimental design for listener assessment. A major academic medical centre in the East of England, UK. Questionnaire data were assessed for 45 people with Parkinson's disease (PD), who had self-reported speech or communication difficulties and did not have clinical dementia. Acoustic and listener analyses were conducted on read and conversational speech for 20 people with PD and 20 familiar conversation partner controls without speech, language or cognitive difficulties. Functional communication assessed by the Communicative Participation Item Bank (CPIB) and Communicative Effectiveness Survey (CES). People with PD had lower intelligibility than controls for both the read (mean difference 13.7%, p=0.009) and conversational (mean difference 16.2%, p=0.04) sentences. Intensity and pause were statistically significant predictors of intelligibility in read sentences. Listeners were less accurate identifying the intended emotion in the speech of people with PD (14.8% point difference across conditions, p=0.02) and this was associated with worse speaker cognitive status (16.7% point difference, p=0.04). Cognitive status was a significant predictor of functional communication using CPIB (F=8.99, p=0.005, η2 = 0.15) but not CES. Intelligibility in conversation sentences was a statistically significant predictor of CPIB (F=4.96, p=0.04, η2 = 0.19) and CES (F=13.65, p=0.002, η2 = 0.43). Read sentence intelligibility was not a significant predictor of either outcome. Cognitive status was an important predictor of functional communication-the role of intelligibility was modest and limited to conversational and not read speech. Our results highlight the importance of focusing on functional communication as well as physical speech impairment in speech and language

  7. Chronic Stress Improves NO- and Ca2+ Flux-Dependent Vascular Function: A Pharmacological Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruder-Nascimento, Thiago; Campos, Dijon Henrique Salome

    2015-01-23

    Background: Stress is associated with cardiovascular diseases. Objective: This study aimed at assessing whether chronic stress induces vascular alterations, and whether these modulations are nitric oxide (NO) and Ca2+ dependent. Methods: Wistar rats, 30 days of age, were separated into 2 groups: control (C) and Stress (St). Chronic stress consisted of immobilization for 1 hour/day, 5 days/week, 15 weeks. Systolic blood pressure was assessed. Vascular studies on aortic rings were performed. Concentration-effect curves were built for noradrenaline, in the presence of L-NAME or prazosin, acetylcholine, sodium nitroprusside and KCl. In addition, Ca2+ flux was also evaluated. Results: Chronic stress induced hypertension, decreased the vascular response to KCl and to noradrenaline, and increased the vascular response to acetylcholine. L-NAME blunted the difference observed in noradrenaline curves. Furthermore, contractile response to Ca2+ was decreased in the aorta of stressed rats. Conclusion: Our data suggest that the vascular response to chronic stress is an adaptation to its deleterious effects, such as hypertension. In addition, this adaptation is NO- and Ca2+-dependent. These data help to clarify the contribution of stress to cardiovascular abnormalities. However, further studies are necessary to better elucidate the mechanisms involved in the cardiovascular dysfunction associated with stressors. (Arq Bras Cardiol. 2014; [online].ahead print, PP.0-0)Fundamento: Estresse está associado com complicações cardiovasculares. Objetivos: O objetivo do presente estudo foi avaliar se o estresse crônico induz alterações vasculares, e se essas alterações são dependentes de óxido nítrico (NO) e Ca2+. Métodos: Ratos machos Wistar com 30 dias de idade foram separados em 2 grupos: controle (C) e Estresse (St). Utilizou-se estresse crônico de imobilização por 1 hora/dia, 5 dias/semana, 15 semanas. Pressão arterial sistólica foi avaliada. A função vascular foi

  8. Cerebrovascular hemodynamics in Alzheimer's disease and vascular dementia: a meta-analysis of transcranial Doppler studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabayan, Behnam; Jansen, Steffy; Oleksik, Anna M; van Osch, Matthias J P; van Buchem, Mark A; van Vliet, Peter; de Craen, Anton J M; Westendorp, Rudi G J

    2012-04-01

    Alteration in cerebrovascular hemodynamics has reported in both ageing and dementia. However, it is still unclear whether this alteration follows similar pattern in ageing and in different dementia pathologies. The aim of this meta-analysis was to investigate changes in cerebral blood flow velocity and pulsatility index in two most common forms of dementia; Alzheimer's disease and vascular dementia, using transcranial Doppler studies. A literature search was conducted in Pubmed, EMBASE and Web of Science. After initial screening of 304 articles and removing duplicates, a total of 53 articles, published between 1980 and 2010, were reviewed. Finally 12 articles were included in the meta-analysis. For each study, effect sizes (ES) indicating the standardized mean differences of the hemodynamic measures between two groups were calculated. Using random effect models, pooled estimates of ES were measured. Patients with Alzheimer's disease (ES=-1.09, 95% CI -1.77 to -0.44, p=0.004) and vascular dementia (ES=-1.62, 95% CI -2.26 to -0.98, pAlzheimer's disease (ES=0.5, 95% CI 0.28-0.72, pdementia patients (ES=2.34, 95% CI 1.39-3.29, pAlzheimer's disease had lower pulsatility index (ES=-1.22, 95% CI -1.98 to -0.46, p=0.002) compared to subjects with vascular type of dementia. Patients with Alzheimer's disease and vascular dementia have a pronounced disturbance in their cerebrovascular hemodynamics. The severity of disturbances in cerebral hemodynamics is significantly lower in Alzheimer's disease compared to vascular dementia. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Flow regulation in coronary vascular tree: a model study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinzhou Xie

    Full Text Available Coronary blood flow can always be matched to the metabolic demand of the myocardium due to the regulation of vasoactive segments. Myocardial compressive forces play an important role in determining coronary blood flow but its impact on flow regulation is still unknown. The purpose of this study was to develop a coronary specified flow regulation model, which can integrate myocardial compressive forces and other identified regulation factors, to further investigate the coronary blood flow regulation behavior.A theoretical coronary flow regulation model including the myogenic, shear-dependent and metabolic responses was developed. Myocardial compressive forces were included in the modified wall tension model. Shear-dependent response was estimated by using the experimental data from coronary circulation. Capillary density and basal oxygen consumption were specified to corresponding to those in coronary circulation. Zero flow pressure was also modeled by using a simplified capillary model.Pressure-flow relations predicted by the proposed model are consistent with previous experimental data. The predicted diameter changes in small arteries are in good agreement with experiment observations in adenosine infusion and inhibition of NO synthesis conditions. Results demonstrate that the myocardial compressive forces acting on the vessel wall would extend the auto-regulatory range by decreasing the myogenic tone at the given perfusion pressure.Myocardial compressive forces had great impact on coronary auto-regulation effect. The proposed model was proved to be consistent with experiment observations and can be employed to investigate the coronary blood flow regulation effect in physiological and pathophysiological conditions.

  10. Large-scale identification of clinical and genetic predictors of motor progression in patients with newly diagnosed Parkinson's disease: a longitudinal cohort study and validation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latourelle, Jeanne C; Beste, Michael T; Hadzi, Tiffany C; Miller, Robert E; Oppenheim, Jacob N; Valko, Matthew P; Wuest, Diane M; Church, Bruce W; Khalil, Iya G; Hayete, Boris; Venuto, Charles S

    2017-11-01

    Better understanding and prediction of progression of Parkinson's disease could improve disease management and clinical trial design. We aimed to use longitudinal clinical, molecular, and genetic data to develop predictive models, compare potential biomarkers, and identify novel predictors for motor progression in Parkinson's disease. We also sought to assess the use of these models in the design of treatment trials in Parkinson's disease. A Bayesian multivariate predictive inference platform was applied to data from the Parkinson's Progression Markers Initiative (PPMI) study (NCT01141023). We used genetic data and baseline molecular and clinical variables from patients with Parkinson's disease and healthy controls to construct an ensemble of models to predict the annual rate of change in combined scores from the Movement Disorder Society-Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (MDS-UPDRS) parts II and III. We tested our overall explanatory power, as assessed by the coefficient of determination (R 2 ), and replicated novel findings in an independent clinical cohort from the Longitudinal and Biomarker Study in Parkinson's disease (LABS-PD; NCT00605163). The potential utility of these models for clinical trial design was quantified by comparing simulated randomised placebo-controlled trials within the out-of-sample LABS-PD cohort. 117 healthy controls and 312 patients with Parkinson's disease from the PPMI study were available for analysis, and 317 patients with Parkinson's disease from LABS-PD were available for validation. Our model ensemble showed strong performance within the PPMI cohort (five-fold cross-validated R 2 41%, 95% CI 35-47) and significant-albeit reduced-performance in the LABS-PD cohort (R 2 9%, 95% CI 4-16). Individual predictive features identified from PPMI data were confirmed in the LABS-PD cohort. These included significant replication of higher baseline MDS-UPDRS motor score, male sex, and increased age, as well as a novel Parkinson's disease

  11. Medium-to-high prevalence of screening-detected parkinsonism in the urban area of Tehran, Iran: data from a community-based door-to-door study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fereshtehnejad SM

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Seyed-Mohammad Fereshtehnejad,1,2 Mahdiyeh Shafieesabet,3 Arash Rahmani,4 Ahmad Delbari,1,5 Johan Lökk1,6 1Division of Clinical Geriatrics, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences, and Society (NVS, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; 2Firoozgar Clinical Research Development Center (FCRDC, Firoozgar Hospital, 3Medical Student Research Committee (MSRC, Faculty of Medicine, 4Mental Health Research Center, Tehran Institute of Psychiatry, School of Behavioral Sciences and Mental Health, Iran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran; 5Iranian Research Center on Aging, University of Social Welfare and Rehabilitation, Tehran, Iran; 6Department of Geriatric Medicine, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden Introduction: Parkinsonism occurs in all ethnic groups worldwide; however, there are wide variations in the prevalence rates reported from different countries, even for neighboring regions. The huge socioeconomic burden of parkinsonism necessitates the need for prevalence studies in each country. So far, there is neither data registry nor prevalence information on parkinsonism in the Iranian population. The aim of our study was to estimate the prevalence rate of probable parkinsonism in a huge urban area in Iran, Tehran using a community-based door-to-door survey.Materials and methods: We used a random multistage sampling of the households within the network of health centers consisting of 374 subunits in all 22 districts throughout the entire urban area of Tehran. Overall, 20,621 individuals answered the baseline checklist and screening questionnaire and data from 19,500 persons aged ≥30 years were entered in the final analysis. Health care professionals used a new six-item screening questionnaire for parkinsonism, which has been previously shown to have a high validity and diagnostic value in the same population.Results: A total of 157 cases were screened for parkinsonism using the validated six-item questionnaire. After

  12. Differential vascular dysfunction in response to diets of differing macronutrient composition: a phenomenonological study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cassidy Roslyn

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Vascular dysfunction can develop from consumption of an energy-rich diet, even prior to the onset of obesity. However, the roles played by different dietary components remain uncertain. While attempting to develop models of obesity in a separate study, we observed that two high-energy diets of differing macronutrient compositions affected vascular function differently in overweight rats. Methods Male Wistar rats (n = 6/group were fed diets providing varying percentages of energy from fat and carbohydrate (CHO. For 10 weeks, they were fed either chow, as control diet (10% of energy from fat; 63% from CHO, chow supplemented with chocolate biscuit (30% fat; 56% CHO or a high-fat diet (45% fat; 35% CHO. Blood concentrations of biochemical markers of obesity were measured, and epididymal fat pads weighed as a measure of adiposity. Mesenteric arteries were dissected and their contractile and relaxant properties analysed myographically. Data were tested by analysis of variance (ANOVA. Results Weight gain and plasma concentrations of glucose, insulin and leptin were similar in all groups. However, biscuit-fed animals showed increased food intake (+27%; p p p p p Conclusion Vascular dysfunction resulting from consumption of a high-fat or combined relatively high-fat/high-CHO diet occurs through different physiological processes, which may be attributable to their differing macronutrient compositions. Combining potentially atherogenic macronutrients induces more extensive vascular impairment than that of high-fat alone, and may be attributable to the more marked dyslipidaemia observed with such a diet. Thus, these findings help clarify the role of dietary components in vascular impairment, which has implications for clinical approaches to preventing cardiovascular disease.

  13. The Efficiency of Vascular Embolization Using Alginate Gel : An Experimental Study in Rabbit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Woo Baek; Kang, Yeong Han [Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, Daegu Catholic University Hospital, Daegu (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jong Ki [Dept. of Biomedical Engineering, Daegu Catholic University, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-03-15

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the applicability of poly-L-guluronic alginate (PGA) gel in vascular embolization with angiography simulation. To prepare a gel-forming PGA from no guluronate-rich Laminaria japonica, a new acid hydrolysis method was employed with a lower HCL concentration (0.03 M) and a shorter treatment time (5 min). The obtained PGAs were selected based on gel stability and viscosity. Glass aneurysm model was used to simulate gel embolization in vitro. Then, finally, the PGA was used to embolize the renal vascular system by using a rabbit model and angiography. Glass aneurysm model was made to simulate gel embolization procedure. PGA solution was injected from pump through 2-way catheter. Subsequent injection of CaCl{sub 2} successfully formed gels inside aneurysm model that conforming to its inner contour. In rabbit model, first, renal artery and aorta leading to the right kidney were ligated to block blood flow, then conventional contrast agent was injected through aorta to check the arterial patency to the left kidney. In sequential artery injection method, PGA and CaCl{sub 2} were injected through renal artery sequentially via a single catheter. Re-injection of contrast agent after removing ligated aorta showed blood flow to the right kidney but no flow in the left kidney. This result demonstrated a complete blocking of blood flow due to gel formation in vascular bed of the left kidney. Instillation of calcium alginate into aneurysm model and arterial system in vivo produced an embolization that better fills and conforms to the contour of aneurysms or blocking vascular bed completely. Therefore, PGA was effective endovascular occlusion materials and provide an efficiency of vascular angiography.

  14. Factors Associated With Low Levels of Subclinical Vascular Disease in Older Adults: Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis

    OpenAIRE

    Michos, Erin D.; Rice, Kenneth M.; Szklo, Moyses; Burke, Gregory L.; Siscovick, David S; Tracy, Russell P.; Barr, R. Graham; Nettleton, Jennifer A.; Greenland, Philip; David R Jacobs; Post, Wendy

    2009-01-01

    Coronary artery calcium (CAC), carotid intimal medial thickness (cIMT), and reduced ankle brachial indices (ABI) are markers of subclinical vascular disease strongly associated with aging. We identified factors associated with low levels of subclinical vascular disease in 1824 participants ≥70 years in the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis. 452 had low CAC (

  15. Resistance versus Balance Training to Improve Postural Control in Parkinson's Disease: A Randomized Rater Blinded Controlled Study

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Schlenstedt, Christian; Paschen, Steffen; Kruse, Annika; Raethjen, Jan; Weisser, Burkhard; Deuschl, Günther

    2015-01-01

    .... The ability of resistance training to improve postural control still remains unclear. To compare resistance training with balance training to improve postural control in people with Parkinson's disease...

  16. Prevalence and incidence of Parkinson's disease in The Faroe Islands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wermuth, Lene; Bech, Sara Brynhild Winther; Petersen, Maria Skaalum

    2008-01-01

    A study in The Faroe Islands in 1995 suggested a high prevalence of idiopathic Parkinson's disease (IPD) and total parkinsonism of 187.6 and 233.4 per 100,000 inhabitants respectively.......A study in The Faroe Islands in 1995 suggested a high prevalence of idiopathic Parkinson's disease (IPD) and total parkinsonism of 187.6 and 233.4 per 100,000 inhabitants respectively....

  17. An observational clinical and video-polysomnographic study of the effects of rotigotine in sleep disorder in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yan; Yang, Yue-Chang; Lan, Dan-Mei; Wu, Hui -Juan; Zhao, Zhong-Xin

    2017-05-01

    Sleep disturbance is common in Parkinson's disease (PD) and negatively impacts quality of life. There is little data on how dopamine agonists influence nocturnal sleep in PD, particularly in sleep laboratory data to measure sleep parameters and their changes objectively. The goal of this open-label study was to objectively evaluate the effect of rotigotine on sleep in PD patients by video-polysomnographic methods. A total of 25 PD patients with complaints of nocturnal sleep impairment were enrolled. The sleep quality before and after stable rotigotine therapy was evaluated subjectively through questionnaire assessments and objectively measured by video-polysomnographic methods. The Parkinsonism, depression, anxiety, and quality of life of PD patients were also evaluated through questionnaire assessments. At the end of rotigotine treatment, the PD daytime functioning, motor performance, depression, subjective quality of sleep, and the quality of life improved. Video-polysomnographic analysis showed that the sleep efficiency and stage N1% were increased, while the sleep latency, wake after sleep onset, and the periodic leg movements in sleep index were decreased after rotigotine treatment. Video-polysomnographic analysis confirmed the subjective improvement of sleep after rotigotine treatment. This observation suggests that in PD rotigotine is a treatment option for patients complaining from sleep disturbances.

  18. Quantitative measurement of motor symptoms in Parkinson's disease: a study with full-body motion capture data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Samarjit; Trutoiu, Laura; Murai, Akihiko; Alcindor, Dunbar; Oh, Michael; De la Torre, Fernando; Hodgins, Jessica

    2011-01-01

    Recent advancements in the portability and affordability of optical motion capture systems have opened the doors to various clinical applications. In this paper, we look into the potential use of motion capture data for the quantitative analysis of motor symptoms in Parkinson's Disease (PD). The standard of care, human observer-based assessments of the motor symptoms, can be very subjective and are often inadequate for tracking mild symptoms. Motion capture systems, on the other hand, can potentially provide more objective and quantitative assessments. In this pilot study, we perform full-body motion capture of Parkinson's patients with deep brain stimulator off-drugs and with stimulators on and off. Our experimental results indicate that the quantitative measure on spatio-temporal statistics learnt from the motion capture data reveal distinctive differences between mild and severe symptoms. We used a Support Vector Machine (SVM) classifier for discriminating mild vs. severe symptoms with an average accuracy of approximately 90%. Finally, we conclude that motion capture technology could potentially be an accurate, reliable and effective tool for statistical data mining on motor symptoms related to PD. This would enable us to devise more effective ways to track the progression of neurodegenerative movement disorders.

  19. Place of death, and its relation with underlying cause of death, in Parkinson's disease, motor neurone disease, and multiple sclerosis: a population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sleeman, Katherine E; Ho, Yuen K; Verne, Julia; Glickman, Myer; Silber, Eli; Gao, Wei; Higginson, Irene J

    2013-10-01

    Little is known about place of death in chronic neurological diseases. Mortality statistics are ideal for examining trends in place of death, but analyses are limited by coding rule changes. To examine the relationship between place of death and underlying cause of death in Parkinson's disease, multiple sclerosis and motor neurone disease and the impact of coding rule changes on analysis of place of death. Population-based study. Proportion ratios for death in hospice, home, care home and hospital were calculated according to underlying cause of death, using multivariable Poisson regression. Deaths in England (1993-2010) with any mention of Parkinson's disease, multiple sclerosis or motor neurone disease as a cause of death, identified from national mortality data. In this study, 125,242 patients with Parkinson's disease, 23,501 with multiple sclerosis, and 27,030 with motor neurone disease were included. Home deaths ranged from 9.7% (Parkinson's disease) to 27.1% (motor neurone disease), hospice deaths ranged from 0.6% (Parkinson's disease) to 11.2% (motor neurone disease) and hospital deaths ranged from 43.4% (Parkinson's disease) to 55.8% (multiple sclerosis). In Parkinson's disease and multiple sclerosis, cancer as underlying cause of death increased likelihood of hospice death (proportion ratio (PR): 18.8, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 16.1-22.0; 8.88, 95% CI = 7.49-10.5) and home death (PR: 1.91, 95% CI = 1.80-2.04; 1.71, 95% CI = 1.56-1.88). Dementia as underlying cause of death increased likelihood of care home death in Parkinson's disease (PR: 1.25, 95% CI = 1.19-1.32), multiple sclerosis (PR: 1.73, 95% CI = 1.22-2.45) and motor neurone disease (PR: 2.36, 95% CI = 1.31-4.27). Underlying cause of death has a marked effect on place of death. The effects of coding rule changes are an essential consideration for all research using underlying cause of death to study place of death.

  20. Analysis of genome-wide association studies of Alzheimer disease and of Parkinson disease to determine if these 2 diseases share a common genetic risk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moskvina, Valentina; Harold, Denise; Russo, GianCarlo; Vedernikov, Alexey; Sharma, Manu; Saad, Mohamed; Holmans, Peter; Bras, Jose M.; Bettella, Francesco; Keller, Margaux F.; Nicolaou, Nayia; Simón-Sánchez, Javier; Gibbs, J. Raphael; Schulte, Claudia; Durr, Alexandra; Guerreiro, Rita; Hernandez, Dena; Brice, Alexis; Stefánsson, Hreinn; Majamaa, Kari; Gasser, Thomas; Heutink, Peter; Wood, Nick; Martinez, Maria; Singleton, Andrew B.; Nalls, Michael A.; Hardy, John; Owen, Michael J.; O'Donovan, Michael C.; Williams, Julie; Morris, Huw R.; Williams, Nigel M.; Dillman, Allissa; Hernandez, Dena G.; Brooks, Janet; Chong, Sean; Cookson, Mark R.; Moore, Matthew; Traynor, Bryan J.; Arepalli, Sampath; Charlesworth, Gavin; Plagnol, Vincent; Ryten, Mina; Trabzuni, Daniah; Berg, Daniela; Brockmann, Kathrin; Huber, Heiko; Sheerin, Una-Marie; Bhatia, Kailash; Saad, Mohamad; Bochdanovits, Zoltan; Rizzu, Patrizia; Lesage, Suzanne; Vidailhet, Marie; Corvol, Jen-Christophe; Curie, Pierre et Marie; Barker, Roger; Hunt, Sarah E.; Gray, Emma; Edkins, Sarah; Tashakkori-Ghanbaria, Avazeh; Barrett, Jeffrey; Deloukasm, Panagiotis; Potter, Simon; Ben-Shlomo, Yoav; van Dijk, Karin D.; Berendse, Henk W.; Velseboer, Daan; de Bie, Rob M. A.; Biffi, Alessandro; Bloem, Bas; van deWarrenburg, Bart; Post, Bart; Riess, Olaf; Bonin, Michael; Burn, David J.

    2013-01-01

    Despite Alzheimer disease (AD) and Parkinson disease (PD) being clinically distinct entities, there is a possibility of a pathological overlap, with some genome-wide association (GWA) studies suggesting that the 2 diseases represent a biological continuum. The application of GWA studies to

  1. Use of smell test identification in Parkinson's disease in Mexico: a matched case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Violante, Mayela; Lees, Andrew J; Cervantes-Arriaga, Amin; Corona, Teresa; Silveira-Moriyama, Laura

    2011-01-01

    Smell tests can be useful in the differential diagnosis of Parkinson's disease (PD) but are affected by cultural factors. Currently there is no smell test tailored for the Mexican population but the brief smell identification test (B-SIT) was created as a cross-cultural SIT. We have created a translation of this test into Spanish adapted to the Mexican population and have applied it to 70 PD patients and 70 age- and gender-matched controls. The B-SIT differentiated PD and controls with 71.4% sensitivity and 85.7% specificity, when subjects were divided into two age groups. Copyright © 2010 Movement Disorder Society.

  2. Fast vergence eye movements are disrupted in Parkinson's disease: A video-oculography study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanuška, Jaromír; Bonnet, Cecilia; Rusz, Jan; Sieger, Tomáš; Jech, Robert; Rivaud-Péchoux, Sophie; Vidailhet, Marie; Gaymard, Bertrand; Růžička, Evžen

    2015-07-01

    Blurred near vision is a common non-motor symptom in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD), however detailed characterization of vergence eye movements (VEM) is lacking. Convergence and divergence were examined in 18 patients with PD and 18 control subjects using infrared video-oculography. VEM metrics analyzed included latency, velocity and accuracy, in vertical and horizontal planes. The latency of convergence and divergence was significantly increased in PD subjects. Additionally, divergence was slow and hypometric, while other convergence metrics were similar to controls. We provide evidence in favor of disrupted VEM in PD. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Myoclonic attacks induced by L-dopa and bromocryptin in Parkinson patients: a sleep EEG study.

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    Vardi, J; Glaubman, H; Rabey, J M; Streifler, M

    1978-04-14

    Six patients with Parkinson's disease developed nocturnal myoclonic attacks after prolongued treatment with L-Dopa which were electroencephalographically recorded. These symptoms persisted after treatment with 2 bromo-alpha-ergocryptin (Bromocryptin), a dopamine receptor agonist, which was substituted for L-Dopa. Bromocryptin is known to have no pre- or postsynaptic effect on serotonin metabolism. It is proposed that these myoclonic phenomena are the expression of the hypersensitivity of denervated catecholamine receptors in the brainstem to the stimulation of L-Dopa and Bromocryptin. This thesis differs with previous suggestions that serotonin plays a major role in the genesis of myoclonic seizures in Parkinsonian patients treated with L-Dopa.

  4. Study on the correlation between two common sleep disorders in Parkinson's disease

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    Li-jing MA

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background Obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome (OSAHS and rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder (RBD are two common sleep disorders in Parkinson's disease (PD. This paper aims to explore the changes of clinical features and sleep parameters, as well as the mutual effect in PD patients with concurrent OSAHS and RBD. Methods Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS, Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE, Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA Chinese Version, Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS, Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI, Non-Motor Symptoms Questionnaire (NMSQuest, Scales for Outcomes in Parkinson's Disease-Autonomic (SCOPA-AUT, 39-Item Parkinson's Disease Questionnaire (PDQ-39 and Hoehn-Yahr stage were used to assess the motor symptoms, non-motor symptoms (cognitive function, sleep quality, autonomic function, and the severity of disease of 190 PD patients. Polysomnography (PSG monitoring was done to record sleep parameters. Results Among those patients, 73 patients were accompanied by OSAHS, among whom 22 patients also suffered from RBD (PD + OSAHS + RBD, and 51 patients did not present RBD (PD + OSAHS - RBD. The scores of UPDRSⅠ (P = 0.015, UPDRSⅡ (P = 0.023, ESS (P = 0.002, PSQI (P = 0.048, NMSQuest (P = 0.001 and SCOPA - AUT (P = 0.026 in PD + OSAHS + RBD group were significantly higher than those in PD + OSAHS - RBD group, while MoCA score was significantly lower (P = 0.013. PSG monitoring showed mean artery oxygen saturation (SaO2, P = 0.029, mini SaO2 (P = 0.001, mini SaO2 in REM (P = 0.000, tonic EMG activity (P = 0.000 and phasic EMG activity (P = 0.000 in REM in PD + OSAHS + RBD group were significantly higher than those in PD + OSAHS - RBD group. Correlation analysis showed that apnea hypopnea index (AHI and oxygen desaturation index (ODI were positively correlated with the scores of NMSQuest (rs = 0.252, P = 0.032; rs = 0.229, P = 0.010, SCOPA-AUT (rs = 0.322, P = 0.005; rs = 0.247, P = 0.037 and PDQ-39 (rs = 0

  5. Studies on the association between Alzheimer's disease and vascular risk factors: reports from China

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    Ya LI

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer's disease (AD is the most common cause of dementia, accounting for 60% to 80% of all types of dementia. Both genetic and non-genetic factors may take part in the etiopathogenesis of AD. Among them, genetic factors play a decisive role in the development of AD. Gene mutations associated with AD include amyloid β-protein precursor (APP, presenilin-1 (PS-1, presenilin-2 (PS-2 and apolipoprotein Eε4 (ApoEε4 allele gene. Vascular risk factors are the most common causes in non-genetic factors, such as hypertension, diabetes, hypercholesterolemia, smoking, drinking, obesity, intracranial arteriosclerosis, atrial fibrillation and cerebrovascular diseases. We selected three high-quality prospective cohort studies regarding the association of AD with vascular risk factors in Chinese population which were published in foreign journals during the past 5 years, and focused on study methods and results. DOI: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2015.07.004

  6. A study of the vascularization of the auricle by dissection and diaphanization.

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    Tilotta, Françoise; Lazaroo, Bernard; Laujac, Marie-Hélène; Gaudy, Jean-François

    2009-04-01

    The vascularization of the auricle is poorly documented, despite the developments in auriculotherapy and reconstructive surgery. The aim of this study was to describe its arterial distribution using two techniques: diaphanization and anatomical dissection. The study was conducted after intravascular injection of eight diaphanized auricles and ten that were dissected. Dissection showed that the auricle is vascularized by an anterior flow arising in the superficial temporal artery and also by a posterior flow arising in the posterior auricular artery in eight cases out of ten, and in the occipital artery in the remaining two. Diaphanization revealed the three-dimensional arterial distribution of preserved specimens. This technique has a didactic use to complement to standard anatomical dissection.

  7. The association between vascular factors and subjective memory impairment in older people: The HUNT Study, Norway

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    Ellen Melbye Langballe

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Subjective memory impairment (SMI is often considered an early sign of dementia. This study investigates the relationship between SMI and dementia-related vascular factors in older people.Method: This study was based on data from 12,255 individuals, 65 years and older, participating in the Nord-Trøndelag health study, third survey 2006-08 (HUNT3. SMI, vascular diseases, exercise, smoking, and alcohol consumption were self-reported. Blood pressure, cholesterol and body mass index (BMI were clinically measured. SMI were predicted using linear regression analysis.Results: Stroke and heart disease were associated with SMI. High exercise intensity was associated with less SMI. Respondents with high systolic blood pressure (SBP reported less SMI than those with moderate SBP. In men, low SBP was associated with significantly more SMI compared to those with moderate SBP. In women, moderate alcohol consumption compared to low alcohol consumption was associated with significantly more SMI.Conclusion: SMI was positively associated with stroke and heart disease in this study. For the other investigated vascular factors, we did not find strong relationships with SMI. However, for preventive and treatment purposes, it is noteworthy that high exercise intensity and high systolic blood pressure was associated with less SMI in both genders.

  8. [Variations in the parathyroid glands. Number, situation and arterial vascularization. Anatomical study and surgical application].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delattre, J F; Flament, J B; Palot, J P; Pluot, M

    1982-11-01

    The authors have made a study of the variations in the parathyroid glands, basing their report on 100 block dissections of the neck injected with latex. The results allow a better understanding of certain types of parathyroid insufficiency following surgery to the thyroid gland. In almost half the cases the vascular arrangement was sufficient to explain how hypoparathyroidism might come about following surgery to the thyroid gland.

  9. Effectiveness of ultrasonography in detecting intraosseous vascularization: an in-vitro study

    OpenAIRE

    Baladi, Marina Gazzano; Tucunduva, Maria Jose Albuquerque Pereira de Souza e; Tucunduva Neto, Renato; Cortes, Arthur Rodriguez Gonzalez; Aoki, Eduardo Massaharu; Arita, Emiko Saito; de Freitas, Claudio Fróes

    2014-01-01

    Ultrasonography is useful to diagnose lesions, insofar as it detects the type of injury, and to assess the degree of vascularization of tumors. However, intraosseous lesions may represent a challenge, since the surrounding bone thickness could prevent ultrasound signal capture. The aim of this study was to evaluate the infl uence of surrounding bone thickness on the ability of ultrasonography in capturing the echo signal of blood vessels. Macerated porcine hemimandibles (n = 20) with differen...

  10. Apathy in patients with Parkinson disease without dementia or depression: a PET study.

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    Robert, Gabriel; Le Jeune, Florence; Lozachmeur, Clément; Drapier, Sophie; Dondaine, Thibault; Péron, Julie; Travers, David; Sauleau, Paul; Millet, Bruno; Vérin, Marc; Drapier, Dominique

    2012-09-11

    We sought to identify apathy metabolic bases in Parkinson disease (PD). A total of 45 patients with PD who were not clinically depressed (Montgomery-Åsberg Depression Rating Scale [MADRS] dementia (Mattis Dementia Rating Scale [MDRS] >130) were assessed with the Apathy Evaluation Scale (AES) and underwent a resting-state F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose PET (FDG-PET) scan. A motor assessment comprising the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale Part III (UPDRS-III) was conducted and total levodopa equivalent daily dose (LEDD) was calculated. Imaging data were analyzed with statistical parametric mapping. Age, LEDD, and MDRS scores were introduced as covariates. Positive correlations were observed between the AES score and cerebral metabolism in the right inferior frontal gyrus (Brodmann area [BA] 47), right middle frontal gyrus (BA 10), right cuneus (BA 18), and right anterior insula (BA 13). Negative correlations were observed between the AES score and cerebellar metabolism in the semilunar lobules bilaterally, within the posterior lobe. Using an AES score equal to or above 42 to define clinical apathy, prevalence in our patient group was 17.8%. The AES score was negatively correlated with the MDRS score and positively correlated with the "retardation" subscore of the MADRS. It was not correlated with either UPDRS III or LEDD. Results indicate that the frontal, temporal, and cerebellar areas known to be involved in reward, emotion, and cognition are also implicated in apathy in patients with PD without dementia or depression. Their roles in the etiopathology of apathy are discussed.

  11. Stigma Experienced by Parkinson's Disease Patients: A Descriptive Review of Qualitative Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maffoni, Marina; Pierobon, Antonia; Ferrazzoli, Davide

    2017-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disease characterized by motor and nonmotor symptoms. Both of them imply a negative impact on Health-Related Quality of Life. A significant one is the stigma experienced by the parkinsonian patients and their caregivers. Moreover, stigma may affect everyday life and patient's subjective and relational perception and it may lead to frustration and isolation. Aim of the present work is to qualitatively describe the stigma of PD patients stemming from literature review, in order to catch the subjective experience and the meaning of the stigma construct. Literature review was performed on PubMed database and Google Scholar (keywords: Parkinson Disease, qualitative, stigma, social problem, isolation, discrimination) and was restricted to qualitative data: 14 articles were identified to be suitable to the aim of the present overview. Results are divided into four core constructs: stigma arising from symptoms, stigma linked to relational and communication problems, social stigma arising from sharing perceptions, and caregiver's stigma. The principal relations to these constructs are deeply analyzed and described subjectively through patients' and caregiver's point of view. The qualitative research may allow a better understanding of a subjective symptom such as stigma in parkinsonian patients from an intercultural and a social point of view. PMID:28243481

  12. Different patterns of cortical excitability in major depression and vascular depression: a transcranial magnetic stimulation study.

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    Concerto, Carmen; Lanza, Giuseppe; Cantone, Mariagiovanna; Pennisi, Manuela; Giordano, Daniela; Spampinato, Concetto; Ricceri, Riccardo; Pennisi, Giovanni; Aguglia, Eugenio; Bella, Rita

    2013-11-09

    Clinical and functional studies consider major depression (MD) and vascular depression (VD) as different neurobiological processes. Hypoexcitability of the left frontal cortex to transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) is frequently reported in MD, whereas little is known about the effects of TMS in VD. Thus, we aimed to assess and compare motor cortex excitability in patients with VD and MD. Eleven VD patients, 11 recurrent drug-resistant MD patients, and 11 healthy controls underwent clinical, neuropsychological and neuroimaging evaluations in addition to bilateral resting motor threshold, cortical silent period, and paired-pulse TMS curves of intracortical excitability. All patients continued on psychotropic drugs, which were unchanged throughout the study. Scores on one of the tests evaluating frontal lobe abilities (Stroop Color-Word interference test) were worse in patients compared with controls. The resting motor threshold in patients with MD was significantly higher in the left hemisphere compared with the right (p depression with subcortical vascular disease and early-onset recurrent drug resistant MD. The data provide a TMS model of the different processes underlying VD and MD. Additionally, our results support the "Vascular depression hypothesis" at the neurophysiological level, and confirm the inter-hemispheric asymmetry to TMS in patients with MD. We were unable to support previous findings of impaired intracortical inhibitory mechanisms to TMS in patients with MD, although a drug-induced effect on our results cannot be excluded. This study may aid the understanding of the pathogenetic differences underlying the clinical spectrum of depressive disorders.

  13. Vascular sclerosing effects of bleomycin on cutaneous veins: a pharmacopathologic study on experimental animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    AlGhamdi, Khalid M; Kumar, Ashok; Ashour, Abdelkader E; Al-Rikabi, Ammar C; AlOmrani, Abdullah Hasan; Ahamed, Shaik Shaffi

    2017-01-01

    Varicose veins and the complications of venous disease are common disorders in humans. To study the effects of bleomycin as a potential new sclerosing agent and its adverse events in treating varicose veins. Bleomycin-loaded liposomes 0.1ml was injected in the dorsal ear veins of white New Zealand rabbits. Sodium tetradecyl sulfate was used as a positive control. Normal saline was used as negative control. The blood vessels of the treated ears were photographed before and at one hour and two, eight and 45 days after treatment. Biopsies from the treated areas were obtained for histological examination. Blood samples were collected to determine any possible toxicity. Bleomycin by itself was ineffective; therefore, liposomes were used as a vector to deliver bleomycin to the vein lumen. Subsequently, bleomycin started showing its sclerosing effects. Toxicity monitoring showed no apparent hematologic, pulmonary, hepatic or renal toxicities. This study revealed that bleomycin induced vasculitis, which led to vascular occlusion, which was observed on day 1 and day 8. No bleomycin-related injury was noted by histopathological examination of lung sections. The calculation of the lung/body weight coefficient indicated that edema was present in the experimental groups compared with the negative and positive controls. Relatively small number of experimental animals used. This study showed that bleomycin-loaded liposomes were able to induce vasculitis and vascular occlusion without any toxicity or complications. It might be useful, hence, to treat patients suffering from Varicose veins and other ectatic vascular diseases with this agent.

  14. Lack of association between vascular dementia and Chlamydia pneumoniae infection: a case-control study

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    Chernesky Max

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic inflammation appears to play a role in the pathogenesis of vascular dementia. Given the association between Chlamydia pneumoniae and stroke, the possibility exists that previous exposure to C. pneumoniae may play a role in vascular dementia. The objective of this study was to determine if there was an association between serological evidence of C. pneumoniae infection or inflammatory markers with vascular dementia. Methods 28 case-patients with vascular dementia at a geriatric clinic and 24 caregiver-controls were tested for C. pneumoniae IgG and IgA antibodies. The association between vascular dementia and C. pneumoniae titres as well as inflammatory markers was estimated by using both conditional logistic regression and stratified logistic regression. Results When matched cases were compared to controls, there was no significant difference in elevated C. pneumoniae specific IgG antibodies (titre ≥ 1:32, odds ratio [OR] 1.3 (95% confidence intervals [CI] 0.3 to 6.0, p = 0.71, or in elevated C. pneumoniae specific IgA antibodies (titre ≥ 1:16, OR 2.0 (95%CI 0.5 to 8.0, p = 0.33 indicative of past or persistent C. pneumoniae infection. Similarly, no difference in high IgG or IgA antibody levels (IgG titre ≥ 1:512 or IgA titre ≥ 1:64 between the two groups, indicative of recent C. pneumoniae infection, was found, OR 0.4 (95%CI 0.1 to 2.1, p = 0.27. For C-reactive protein (CRP, the mean difference between 18 matched pairs (case – control was – 3.33 mg/L. There was no significant difference between cases and controls when comparing log transformed values, OR 0.03 (95%CI 0.00 to 2.89, p = 0.13 or comparing CRP values above or below the median, OR 0.8 (95%CI 0.2 to 3.4, p = 0.71. For fibrinogen, the mean difference between pairs (case – control was -0.07 g/L. There was no statistical difference between cases and controls when comparing log transformed values, OR 0.6 (95%CI 0.0 to 31.2, p = 0.79 or between

  15. A case with Parkinsonism secondary to bilateral subdural hematoma

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    Adalet Arıkanoğlu

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Subdural hematoma is a rare cause of secondary Parkinsonism. In this study, we presented a case of Parkinsonian syndrome caused by a bilateral subdural hematoma. The patient’s Parkinsonism completely healed following successful surgical removal of the hematomas without any anti-parkinson drug.

  16. Effects of Medication and Subthalamic Nucleus Deep Brain Stimulation on Tongue Movements in Speakers with Parkinson's Disease Using Electropalatography: A Pilot Study

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    Hartinger, Mariam; Tripoliti, Elina; Hardcastle, William J.; Limousin, Patricia

    2011-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) affects speech in the majority of patients. Subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation (STN-DBS) is particularly effective in reducing tremor and rigidity. However, its effect on speech is variable. The aim of this pilot study was to quantify the effects of bilateral STN-DBS and medication on articulation, using…

  17. Ropinirole in the treatment of early Parkinson's disease : A 6-month interim report of a 5-year levodopa-controlled study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poewe, WH; Rascol, O; Brooks, DJ; Brunt, ER; Korczyn, AD; Stocchi, F

    The efficacies of ropinirole and levodopa were compared after 6 months of treatment in a planned interim analysis of a 5-year, double-blind, randomized, multicenter study of patients with early Parkinson's disease requiring dopaminergic therapy. The percentage of improvement in the Unified

  18. Diagnostic value of asymmetric striatal D2 receptor upregulation in Parkinson's disease: an [123I]IBZM and [123I]FP-CIT SPECT study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verstappen, C.C.P.; Bloem, B.R.; Haaxma, C.A.; Oyen, W.J.G.; Horstink, M.W.I.M.

    2007-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Striatal postsynaptic D2 receptors in Parkinson's disease (PD) are thought to be upregulated in the first years of the disease, especially contralateral to the clinically most affected side. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether the highest striatal D2 binding is found

  19. Effects of a short duration, high dose contact improvisation dance workshop on Parkinson disease: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchant, David; Sylvester, Jennifer L; Earhart, Gammon M

    2010-10-01

    This study explored the feasibility and possible benefits of contact improvisation (CI) as an exercise intervention for individuals with PD. This was an uncontrolled pilot study. Eleven people with PD (H&Y=2.4 ± 0.4) participated in a workshop of 10 1.5-h CI classes over 2 weeks, dancing with previously trained student CI dancers. Measures of disease severity, balance, functional mobility, and gait were compared 1 week before and after the workshop. Participants demonstrated improvements on the Unified Parkinson Disease Rating Scale-Motor Subsection and Berg balance scores, along with increased swing and decreased stance percentages during walking. Backward step length also increased. Participants expressed a high level of enjoyment and interest in taking future CI classes. This pilot study supports the feasibility of CI as an intervention to address mobility limitations associated with PD. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Contribution of routine brain MRI to the differential diagnosis of parkinsonism: a 3-year prospective follow-up study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, F.J.A.; Aerts, M.B.; Abdo, W.F.; Prokop, M.; Borm, G.F.; Esselink, R.A.J.; Goraj, B.M.; Bloem, B.R.

    2012-01-01

    Various signs on routine brain MRI can help differentiate between Parkinson's disease (PD) and the various forms of atypical parkinsonism (AP). Here, we evaluate what routine brain MRI contributes to the clinical diagnosis, in both early and advanced disease stages. We performed a prospective

  1. Depressive symptoms, vascular risk factors and mild cognitive impairment. The Italian longitudinal study on aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panza, Francesco; D'Introno, Alessia; Colacicco, Anna M; Capurso, Cristiano; Del Parigi, Angelo; Caselli, Richard J; Todarello, Orlando; Pellicani, Vincenza; Santamato, Andrea; Scapicchio, Pierluigi; Maggi, Stefania; Scafato, Emanuele; Gandin, Claudia; Capurso, Antonio; Solfrizzi, Vincenzo

    2008-01-01

    We evaluated the impact of depressive symptoms on the rate of incident mild cognitive impairment (MCI) after a 3.5-year follow-up, and we assessed the interaction between depressive symptoms and vascular risk factors for incident MCI. A total of 2,963 individuals from a sample of 5,632 65- to 84-year-old subjects were cognitively and functionally evaluated at the 1st and 2nd surveys of the Italian Longitudinal Study on Aging, a prospective cohort study with a 3.5-year follow-up. MCI and dementia were classified using current clinical criteria. Depressive symptoms were measured with the Geriatric Depression Scale. Among the 2,963 participants, 139 prevalent MCI cases were diagnosed at the 1st survey. During the 3.5-year follow-up, 105 new events of MCI were diagnosed. We did not observe any significant association between depressive symptoms and incident MCI (RR = 1.25, 95% CI = 0.85-1.84, chi(2) = 1.30, p vascular risk factors modified the relationship between depressive symptoms and incident MCI. In our population, depressive symptoms were not associated with the rate of incident MCI. Our findings did not support a role of sociodemographic variables or vascular risk factors in the link between depressive symptoms and incident MCI. (c) 2008 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  2. Nimodipine-loaded mixed micelles: formulation, compatibility, pharmacokinetics, and vascular irritability study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Xu; Jiang, Yu; Ren, Chunjuan; Sun, Xun; Zhang, Qiang; Gong, Tao; Zhang, Zhirong

    2012-01-01

    The clinical application of nimodipine (NIM) is limited by several unfavorable properties, which are induced by its low aqueous solubility. In the present study, nimodipine-loaded egg phosphatidylcholine-sodium glycocholate mixed micelles (NIM-EPC-SGC-MMs) were prepared to improve the water solubility of NIM, thus allowing it to be more applicable for clinical use. NIM-EPC-SGC-MMs were prepared using the coprecipitation method and the factors influencing formulation quality were optimized. After formulation, water solubility, solubilizing efficiency, drug loading, particle size, physical compatibility, pharmacokinetics, and vascular irritability were determined. The mean size of the NIM-EPC-SGC-MMs was 6.099 ± 0.048 nm under optimized conditions. The water solubility of NIM in EPC-SGC-MMs was enhanced 250-fold compared with free NIM. The physical compatibility, pharmacokinetic, and vascular irritability studies showed that, in comparison to the commercially available NIM injections, NIM-EPC-SGC-MMs presented better physical compatibility, the same pharmacokinetic profile, and less risk of local vascular irritation and phlebitis. EPC-SGC-MMs represent a promising new formulation suitable for the intravenous delivery of NIM.

  3. Adipose derived stromal vascular fraction improves early tendon healing: an experimental study in rabbits

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    Mehdi Behfar

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Tendon never restores the complete biological and mechanical properties after healing. Bone marrow and recently adipose tissue have been used as the sources of mesenchymal stem cells, which have been proven to enhance tendon healing. Stromal vascular fraction (SVF, derived from adipose tissue by an enzymatic digestion, represents an alternative source of multipotent cells, which undergo differentiation into multiple lineages to be used in regenerative medicine. In the present study, we investigated potentials of this source on tendon healing. Twenty rabbits were divided into control and treatment groups. Five rabbits were used as donors of adipose tissue. The injury model was unilateral complete transection through the middle one third of deep digital flexor tendon. Immediately after suture repair, either fresh stromal vascular fraction from enzymatic digestion of adipose tissue or placebo was intratendinously injected into the suture site in treatments and controls, respectively. Cast immobilization was continued for two weeks after surgery. Animals were sacrificed at the third week and tendons underwent histological, immunohistochemical, and mechanical evaluations. By histology, improved fibrillar organization and remodeling of neotendon were observed in treatment group. Immunohistochemistry revealed an insignificant increase in collagen type III and I expression in treatments over controls. Mechanical testing showed significant increase in maximum load and energy absorption in SVF treated tendons. The present study showed that intratendinous injection of uncultured adipose derived stromal vascular fraction improved structural and mechanical properties of repaired tendon and it could be an effective modality for treating tendon laceration.

  4. Bisphosphonates, atherosclerosis and vascular calcification: update and systematic review of clinical studies

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    Caffarelli C

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Carla Caffarelli,1 Andrea Montagnani,2 Ranuccio Nuti,1 Stefano Gonnelli1 1Department of Medicine, Surgery and Neuroscience, University of Siena, Italy; 2Division of Internal Medicine, General Hospital Misericordia, Grosseto, Italy Background: Epidemiologic and clinical data have suggested the existence of a biologic linkage between the bone system and the vascular system. Bisphosphonates (BPs are effective inhibitors of bone resorption and are currently considered the drugs of choice for the prevention and treatment of osteoporosis and related fractures. Data from several publications have suggested that BPs may also be effective in reducing the atherosclerotic process and vascular calcification, but the results of these studies are contrasting. This review aimed to allow a better understanding of the relationships between BPs and atherosclerosis in humans.Materials and methods: Electronic databases of Pubmed-Medline, Cochrane Library and SCOPUS from inception to June 30, 2016 were searched. The full texts of the articles potentially eligible were carefully assessed and reviewed. Finally, 20 studies were found to be eligible and were included in the systematic review. All included studies were published between 2000 and 2014.Results: In several studies, etidronate limited the progression of aortic and coronary calcification in hemodialysis patients, whereas the nitrogen-containing-BPs given orally did not significantly reduce vascular calcifications in patients with chronic kidney disease, kidney trasplant or in those with osteoporosis. Nitrogen-containing-BPs present favorable effects both on vessel wall thickness and on arterial elasticity due to both a reduction in serum lipids and the interaction of BPs with the bone tissue, with the consequent release of bone turnover markers and cytokines into the bloodstream.Conclusion: To sum up, the BPs seem to have the potential of influencing atherosclerosis and calcium homeostasis at the level of

  5. Dysphagia and sialorrhea: the relationship to Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicaretta, Denise Hack; Rosso, Ana Lucia; Mattos, James Pitágoras de; Maliska, Carmelindo; Costa, Milton M B

    2013-01-01

    Dysphagia and sialorrhea in patients with Parkinson's disease are both automatically accepted as dependent on this neurological disease. The aim were to establish if these two complaints are a consequence or associated manifestations of Parkinson's disease. Two Parkinson's diseases groups from the same outpatients' population were studied. Patients in the first group, with dysphagia, were studied by videofluoroscopy. The second, with sialorrhea, were studied by the scintigraphic method, Videofluoroscopic examination of the oral, pharyngeal and esophageal phases of swallowing showed that 94% of Parkinson's diseases patients present, structural causes, not related to Parkinson's diseases, able to produce or intensify the observed disphagia. The scintigraphic examination of Parkinson's diseases patients with sialorrhea showed that there is no increase of serous saliva production. Nevertheless, showed a significantly higher velocity of saliva excretion in the Parkinson's diseases patients. Dysphagia can be due to the muscular rigidity often present in the Parkinson's diseases patient, or more usually by non Parkinson's disease associated causes. In Parkinson's diseases patients, sialorrhea is produced by saliva retention. Nevertheless, sialorrhea can produce discomfort in swallowing, although without a formal complaint of dysphagia. In this case, subclinical dysphagia must be considered. Sialorrhea is indicative of dysphagia or at least of subclinical dysphagia. As final conclusion, Parkinson's diseases can be an isolated cause of dysphagia and/or sialorrhea, but frequently, a factor unrelated to Parkinson's diseases is the main cause of or at least aggravates the dysphagia.

  6. Reliability of environmental and occupational exposure data provided by surrogate respondents in a case-control study of Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, F L; Semchuk, K M; Love, E J

    1994-07-01

    This study used data provided by 40 non-demented Parkinson's disease patients and 101 community controls, and by their 110 spouses and 31 adult children to assess the reliability of surrogate-provided rural environmental and occupational exposure information on the index subjects. The level of overall raw agreement between the index subjects and the spouse or adult child surrogates varied from 50.0 to 100.0% for the case-surrogate group and from 80.6 to 96.0% for the control-surrogate group. We did not detect significant differences in overall raw agreement between the case-surrogate and control-surrogate groups or between the spouse-surrogate and adult child-surrogate groups, for any of the variables studied. Considering all index subjects and their surrogates, the level of overall raw agreement was 80.3% for well water consumption, 82.3% for farm living, 85.8% for agricultural work, 87.1% for use of pesticides, 87.9% for fie