WorldWideScience

Sample records for variant tomographic imaging

  1. Spatially variant tomographic imaging: Estimation, identification, and optimization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baker, J.R.

    1991-11-01

    This thesis is an investigation of methods for processing multidimensional signals acquired using modern tomography systems that have an anisotropic or spatially variant response function. The main result of this research is the discovery of a new method to obtain better estimators of an unknown spatial intensity distribution by incorporating detailed knowledge about the tomograph system response function and statistical properties of the acquired signal into a mathematical model.

  2. Tomographic scanning imager.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hovland, Harald

    2009-07-06

    In tomographic scanning (TOSCA) imaging, light from a scene is focused onto a reticle mask using conical scan optics, and collected on a single element detector. Alternatively, one or several detectors replace the reticle. Tomographic processing techniques are then applied to the one-dimensional signal to reproduce a two-dimensional image. The TOSCA technique is presented in detail, including its mathematical foundations and some of its limitations. It is shown how TOSCA imaging can be used in a multispectral configuration, and compares well with more conventional alternatives both in simplicity and performance. Examples of image reconstruction using TOSCA techniques are shown.

  3. Tomographic Neutron Imaging using SIRT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gregor, Jens [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); FINNEY, Charles E A [ORNL; Toops, Todd J [ORNL

    2013-01-01

    Neutron imaging is complementary to x-ray imaging in that materials such as water and plastic are highly attenuating while material such as metal is nearly transparent. We showcase tomographic imaging of a diesel particulate filter. Reconstruction is done using a modified version of SIRT called PSIRT. We expand on previous work and introduce Tikhonov regularization. We show that near-optimal relaxation can still be achieved. The algorithmic ideas apply to cone beam x-ray CT and other inverse problems.

  4. Caveats on tomographic images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foulger, Gillian R.; Panza, Giuliano F.; Artemieva, Irina

    2014-01-01

    evolution rely essentially on joint interpretations of publishedseismic tomography images and petrological/geochemical data. This approach tends to neglect the fundamentallimitations of, and uncertainties in, seismic tomography and geochemistry. Counter-intuitively, teleseismic tomographycannot image...... encapsulate the true errors, and are insensitiveto critical experimental limitations that invalidate parts of most derived structures. Much of Earth’s mantle isunsampled by crossing seismic waves. One must know what regions are well sampled in order to understand whichparts of published images are reliable...

  5. Tomographic image reconstruction using training images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soltani, Sara; Andersen, Martin Skovgaard; Hansen, Per Christian

    2017-01-01

    We describe and examine an algorithm for tomographic image reconstruction where prior knowledge about the solution is available in the form of training images. We first construct a non-negative dictionary based on prototype elements from the training images; this problem is formulated within...

  6. Caveats on tomographic images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foulger, Gillian R.; Panza, Giuliano F.; Artemieva, Irina

    2013-01-01

    Geological and geodynamic models of the mantle often rely on joint interpretations of published seismic tomography images and petrological/geochemical data. This approach tends to neglect the fundamental limitations of, and uncertainties in, seismic tomography results. These limitations and uncer......Geological and geodynamic models of the mantle often rely on joint interpretations of published seismic tomography images and petrological/geochemical data. This approach tends to neglect the fundamental limitations of, and uncertainties in, seismic tomography results. These limitations...

  7. Generalized Row-Action Methods for Tomographic Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Martin Skovgaard; Hansen, Per Christian

    2014-01-01

    Row-action methods play an important role in tomographic image reconstruction. Many such methods can be viewed as incremental gradient methods for minimizing a sum of a large number of convex functions, and despite their relatively poor global rate of convergence, these methods often exhibit fast...... initial convergence which is desirable in applications where a low-accuracy solution is acceptable. In this paper, we propose relaxed variants of a class of incremental proximal gradient methods, and these variants generalize many existing row-action methods for tomographic imaging. Moreover, they allow...

  8. Spin scan tomographic array-based imager.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hovland, Harald

    2014-12-29

    This work presents a novel imaging device based on tomographic reconstruction. Similar in certain aspects to the earlier presented tomographic scanning (TOSCA) principle, it provides several important enhancements. The device described generates a stream of one-dimensional projections from a linear array of thin stripe detectors onto which the (circular) image of the scene is rotated. A two-dimensional image is then reproduced from the one-dimensional signals using tomographic processing techniques. A demonstrator is presented. Various aspects of the design and construction are discussed, and resulting images and movies are presented.

  9. Tomographic imaging in CWI: Algorithms and applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H.H. Der Sarkissian (Henri)

    2018-01-01

    textabstractTomography is a widely used imaging tool to explore the 3D inner structure of object without having to cut it open using penetrating beams. In this talk, I will present the different aspects of tomographic imaging handled and developed at the Computational Imaging group in CWI,

  10. Total Variation and Tomographic Imaging from Projections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Per Christian; Jørgensen, Jakob Heide

    2011-01-01

    or 3D reconstruction from noisy projections. We demonstrate that for a small signal-to-noise ratio, this new approach allows us to compute better (i.e., more reliable) reconstructions than those obtained by classical methods. This is possible due to the use of the TV reconstruction model, which...... incorporates our prior information about the solution and thus compensates for the loss of accuracy in the data. A consequence is that smaller data acquisition times can be used, thus reducing a patients exposure to X-rays in medical scanning and speeding up non-destructive measurements in materials science.......Total Variation (TV) regularization is a powerful technique for image reconstruction tasks such as denoising, in-painting, and deblurring, because of its ability to produce sharp edges in the images. In this talk we discuss the use of TV regularization for tomographic imaging, where we compute a 2D...

  11. Cone Beam Computed Tomographic imaging in orthodontics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarfe, W C; Azevedo, B; Toghyani, S; Farman, A G

    2017-03-01

    Over the last 15 years, cone beam computed tomographic (CBCT) imaging has emerged as an important supplemental radiographic technique for orthodontic diagnosis and treatment planning, especially in situations which require an understanding of the complex anatomic relationships and surrounding structures of the maxillofacial skeleton. CBCT imaging provides unique features and advantages to enhance orthodontic practice over conventional extraoral radiographic imaging. While it is the responsibility of each practitioner to make a decision, in tandem with the patient/family, consensus-derived, evidence-based clinical guidelines are available to assist the clinician in the decision-making process. Specific recommendations provide selection guidance based on variables such as phase of treatment, clinically-assessed treatment difficulty, the presence of dental and/or skeletal modifying conditions, and pathology. CBCT imaging in orthodontics should always be considered wisely as children have conservatively, on average, a three to five times greater radiation risk compared with adults for the same exposure. The purpose of this paper is to provide an understanding of the operation of CBCT equipment as it relates to image quality and dose, highlight the benefits of the technique in orthodontic practice, and provide guidance on appropriate clinical use with respect to radiation dose and relative risk, particularly for the paediatric patient. © 2017 Australian Dental Association.

  12. Spiral computed tomographic imaging related to computerized ultrasonographic images of carotid plaque morphology and histology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grønholdt, Marie-Louise; Wagner, A; Wiebe, B M

    2001-01-01

    Echolucency of carotid atherosclerotic plaques, as evaluated by computerized B-mode ultrasonographic images, has been associated with an increased incidence of brain infarcts on cerebral computed tomographic scans. We tested the hypotheses that characterization of carotid plaques on spiral computed...... tomographic images correlates with that on computerized B-mode ultrasonographic images and that spiral computed tomographic imaging predicts the histomorphometric plaque content....

  13. System and method for generating motion corrected tomographic images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gleason, Shaun S [Knoxville, TN; Goddard, Jr., James S.

    2012-05-01

    A method and related system for generating motion corrected tomographic images includes the steps of illuminating a region of interest (ROI) to be imaged being part of an unrestrained live subject and having at least three spaced apart optical markers thereon. Simultaneous images are acquired from a first and a second camera of the markers from different angles. Motion data comprising 3D position and orientation of the markers relative to an initial reference position is then calculated. Motion corrected tomographic data obtained from the ROI using the motion data is then obtained, where motion corrected tomographic images obtained therefrom.

  14. Tomographic Particle Image Velocimetry Using Colored Shadow Imaging

    KAUST Repository

    Alarfaj, Meshal K.

    2016-02-01

    Tomographic Particle Image Velocimetry Using Colored Shadow Imaging by Meshal K Alarfaj, Master of Science King Abdullah University of Science & Technology, 2015 Tomographic Particle image velocimetry (PIV) is a recent PIV method capable of reconstructing the full 3D velocity field of complex flows, within a 3-D volume. For nearly the last decade, it has become the most powerful tool for study of turbulent velocity fields and promises great advancements in the study of fluid mechanics. Among the early published studies, a good number of researches have suggested enhancements and optimizations of different aspects of this technique to improve the effectiveness. One major aspect, which is the core of the present work, is related to reducing the cost of the Tomographic PIV setup. In this thesis, we attempt to reduce this cost by using an experimental setup exploiting 4 commercial digital still cameras in combination with low-cost Light emitting diodes (LEDs). We use two different colors to distinguish the two light pulses. By using colored shadows with red and green LEDs, we can identify the particle locations within the measurement volume, at the two different times, thereby allowing calculation of the velocities. The present work tests this technique on the flows patterns of a jet ejected from a tube in a water tank. Results from the images processing are presented and challenges discussed.

  15. Comparative study of the macroscopic finding, conventional tomographic imaging, and computed tomographic imaging in locating the mandibular canal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Hang Moon; You, Dong Soo [Dept. of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, Graduate School, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-08-15

    The purpose of this study was comparison of conventional tomography with reformatted computed tomography for dental implant in locating the mandibular canal. Five dogs were used and after conventional tomographs and fitted computed tomographs were taken, four dentist traced all films. Mandibles were sectioned with 2 mm slice thickness and the sections were then radiographed (contact radiography). Each radiograpic image was traced and linear measurements were made from mandibular canal to alveolar crest, buccal cortex, lingual cortex, and inferior border. The following results were obtained; 1. Reformatted computed tomographs were exacter than conventional tomography by alveolar crest to canal length of -0.6 mm difference between real values and radiographs 2. The average measurements of buccal cortex to mandibular canal width and lingual cortex to mandibular canal width of conventional tomographs were exacter than reformatted computed tomographs, but standard deviations were higher than reformatted computed tomographs. 3. Standard deviations of reformatted computed tomographs were lower than conventional tomographs at all comparing sites 4. At reformatted computed tomography 62.5% of the measurements performed were within {+-}1 mm of the true value, and at conventional tomography 24.1% were. 5. Mandibular canal invisibility was 0.8% at reformatted computed tomography and 9.2% at conventional tomography. Reformatted computed tomography has been shown to be more useful radiographic technique for assessment of the mandibular canal than conventional tomography.

  16. Construction and demonstration of a multispectral tomographic scanning imager (TOSCA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hovland, Harald

    2013-02-25

    This work presents the first experimental demonstrator of an imager based on a tomographic scanning (TOSCA) principle. The device described generates a stream of multispectral images of a scene or target using simple conical scan optics and a simple patterned reticle, followed by collecting optics and one or several single pixel detectors. Tomographic processing techniques are then applied to the one-dimensional signals to reproduce two-dimensional images. Various aspects of the design and construction are described, and resulting images and movies are shown.

  17. Terahertz Imaging for Biomedical Applications Pattern Recognition and Tomographic Reconstruction

    CERN Document Server

    Yin, Xiaoxia; Abbott, Derek

    2012-01-01

    Terahertz Imaging for Biomedical Applications: Pattern Recognition and Tomographic Reconstruction presents the necessary algorithms needed to assist screening, diagnosis, and treatment, and these algorithms will play a critical role in the accurate detection of abnormalities present in biomedical imaging. Terahertz biomedical imaging has become an area of interest due to its ability to simultaneously acquire both image and spectral information. Terahertz imaging systems are being commercialized with an increasing number of trials performed in a biomedical setting. Terahertz tomographic imaging and detection technology contributes to the ability to identify opaque objects with clear boundaries,and would be useful to both in vivo and ex vivo environments. This book also: Introduces terahertz radiation techniques and provides a number of topical examples of signal and image processing, as well as machine learning Presents the most recent developments in an emerging field, terahertz radiation Utilizes new methods...

  18. Progress Update on Iterative Reconstruction of Neutron Tomographic Images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hausladen, Paul [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Gregor, Jens [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)

    2016-09-15

    This report satisfies the fiscal year 2016 technical deliverable to report on progress in development of fast iterative reconstruction algorithms for project OR16-3DTomography-PD2Jb, "3D Tomography and Image Processing Using Fast Neutrons." This project has two overall goals. The first of these goals is to extend associated-particle fast neutron transmission and, particularly, induced-reaction tomographic imaging algorithms to three dimensions. The second of these goals is to automatically segment the resultant tomographic images into constituent parts, and then extract information about the parts, such as the class of shape and potentially shape parameters. This report addresses of the component of the project concerned with three-dimensional (3D) image reconstruction.

  19. Segmentation Toolbox for Tomographic Image Data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Einarsdottir, Hildur

    , techniques to automatically analyze such data becomes ever more important. Most segmentation methods for large datasets, such as CT images, deal with simple thresholding techniques, where intensity values cut offs are predetermined and hard coded. For data where the intensity difference is not sufficient......Motivation: Image acquisition has vastly improved over the past years, introducing techniques such as X-ray computed tomography (CT). CT images provide the means to probe a sample non-invasively to investigate its inner structure. Given the wide usage of this technique and massive data amounts......, and partial volume voxels occur frequently, thresholding methods do not suffice and more advanced methods are required. Contribution: To meet these requirements a toolbox has been developed, combining well known methods within the image analysis field. The toolbox includes cluster-based methods...

  20. Optical tomographic imaging for breast cancer detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cong, Wenxiang; Intes, Xavier; Wang, Ge

    2017-09-01

    Diffuse optical breast imaging utilizes near-infrared (NIR) light propagation through tissues to assess the optical properties of tissues for the identification of abnormal tissue. This optical imaging approach is sensitive, cost-effective, and does not involve any ionizing radiation. However, the image reconstruction of diffuse optical tomography (DOT) is a nonlinear inverse problem and suffers from severe illposedness due to data noise, NIR light scattering, and measurement incompleteness. An image reconstruction method is proposed for the detection of breast cancer. This method splits the image reconstruction problem into the localization of abnormal tissues and quantification of absorption variations. The localization of abnormal tissues is performed based on a well-posed optimization model, which can be solved via a differential evolution optimization method to achieve a stable reconstruction. The quantification of abnormal absorption is then determined in localized regions of relatively small extents, in which a potential tumor might be. Consequently, the number of unknown absorption variables can be greatly reduced to overcome the underdetermined nature of DOT. Numerical simulation experiments are performed to verify merits of the proposed method, and the results show that the image reconstruction method is stable and accurate for the identification of abnormal tissues, and robust against the measurement noise of data.

  1. A computed tomographic imaging system for experimentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yanping; Wang, Jue; Liu, Fenglin; Yu, Honglin

    2008-03-01

    Computed tomography (CT) is a non-invasive imaging technique, which is widely applied in medicine for diagnosis and surgical planning, and in industry for non-destructive testing (NDT) and non-destructive evaluation (NDE). So, it is significant for college students to understand the fundamental of CT. In this work, A CT imaging system named CD-50BG with 50mm field-of-view has been developed for experimental teaching at colleges. With the translate-rotate scanning mode, the system makes use of a 7.4×10 8Bq (20mCi) activity 137Cs radioactive source which is held in a tungsten alloy to shield the radiation and guarantee no harm to human body, and a single plastic scintillator + photomultitude detector which is convenient for counting because of its short-time brightness and good single pulse. At same time, an image processing software with the functions of reconstruction, image processing and 3D visualization has also been developed to process the 16 bits acquired data. The reconstruction time for a 128×128 image is less than 0.1 second. High quality images with 0.8mm spatial resolution and 2% contrast sensitivity can be obtained. So far in China, more than ten institutions of higher education, including Tsinghua University and Peking University, have already applied the system for elementary teaching.

  2. Computer-aided interpretation approach for optical tomographic images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klose, Christian D.; Klose, Alexander D.; Netz, Uwe J.; Scheel, Alexander K.; Beuthan, Jürgen; Hielscher, Andreas H.

    2010-01-01

    A computer-aided interpretation approach is proposed to detect rheumatic arthritis (RA) in human finger joints using optical tomographic images. The image interpretation method employs a classification algorithm that makes use of a so-called self-organizing mapping scheme to classify fingers as either affected or unaffected by RA. Unlike in previous studies, this allows for combining multiple image features, such as minimum and maximum values of the absorption coefficient for identifying affected and not affected joints. Classification performances obtained by the proposed method were evaluated in terms of sensitivity, specificity, Youden index, and mutual information. Different methods (i.e., clinical diagnostics, ultrasound imaging, magnet resonance imaging, and inspection of optical tomographic images), were used to produce ground truth benchmarks to determine the performance of image interpretations. Using data from 100 finger joints, findings suggest that some parameter combinations lead to higher sensitivities, while others to higher specificities when compared to single parameter classifications employed in previous studies. Maximum performances are reached when combining the minimum∕maximum ratio of the absorption coefficient and image variance. In this case, sensitivities and specificities over 0.9 can be achieved. These values are much higher than values obtained when only single parameter classifications were used, where sensitivities and specificities remained well below 0.8. PMID:21198194

  3. [Computer tomographic image of the cranial vault].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klumair, J; Fochem, K

    1983-06-01

    Imaging of the vault of the cranium via CT must be considered as an additional examination. It is possible to assess the CT image already stored during examination of the brain, without additionally exposing the patient, merely by changing position and breadth of the window. In our opinion, primary indication for CT of the vault of the cranium exists only if diagnosis based on survey remains doubtful. However, examination will always be combined with a representation of the individual strata of the brain. Our studies have also shown that in many cases CT assessment of the vault of the cranium necessarily also involves comparison with the surveys.

  4. Soil structure characterized using computed tomographic images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhanqi Cheng; Stephen H. Anderson; Clark J. Gantzer; J. W. Van Sambeek

    2003-01-01

    Fractal analysis of soil structure is a relatively new method for quantifying the effects of management systems on soil properties and quality. The objective of this work was to explore several methods of studying images to describe and quantify structure of soils under forest management. This research uses computed tomography and a topological method called Multiple...

  5. Gas microstrip detectors for X-ray tomographic flow imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Key, M J; Luggar, R D; Kundu, A

    2003-01-01

    A investigation into the suitability of gas microstrip detector technology for a high-speed industrial X-ray tomography system is reported. X-ray energies in the region 20-30 keV are well suited to the application, which involves imaging two-dimensional slices through gas/liquid multiphase pipeline flows for quantitative component fraction measurement. Stable operation over a period representing several hundred individual tomographic scans at gas gains of 500 is demonstrated using a Penning gas mixture of krypton/propylene.

  6. Scanning tomographic particle image velocimetry applied to a turbulent jet

    KAUST Repository

    Casey, T. A.

    2013-02-21

    We introduce a modified tomographic PIV technique using four high-speed video cameras and a scanning pulsed laser-volume. By rapidly illuminating adjacent subvolumes onto separate video frames, we can resolve a larger total volume of velocity vectors, while retaining good spatial resolution. We demonstrate this technique by performing time-resolved measurements of the turbulent structure of a round jet, using up to 9 adjacent volume slices. In essence this technique resolves more velocity planes in the depth direction by maintaining optimal particle image density and limiting the number of ghost particles. The total measurement volumes contain between 1 ×106 and 3 ×106 velocity vectors calculated from up to 1500 reconstructed depthwise image planes, showing time-resolved evolution of the large-scale vortical structures for a turbulent jet of Re up to 10 000.

  7. The development of a compact positron tomograph for prostate imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huber, Jennifer S.; Qi, Jinyi; Derenzo, Stephen E.; Moses, William W.; Huesman, Ronald H.; Budinger, Thomas F.

    2002-12-17

    We give design details and expected image results of a compact positron tomograph designed for prostate imaging that centers a patient between a pair of external curved detector banks (ellipse: 45 cm minor, 70 cm major axis). The bottom bank is fixed below the patient bed, and the top bank moves upward for patient access and downward for maximum sensitivity. Each bank is composed of two rows (axially) of 20 CTI PET Systems HR+ block detectors, forming two arcs that can be tilted to minimize attenuation. Compared to a conventional PET system, our camera uses about one-quarter the number of detectors and has almost two times higher solid angle coverage for a central point source, because the detectors are close to the patient. The detectors are read out by modified CTI HRRT data acquisition electronics. The individual detectors are angled in the plane to point towards the prostate to minimize reso

  8. A maximum entropy reconstruction technique for tomographic particle image velocimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilsky, A. V.; Lozhkin, V. A.; Markovich, D. M.; Tokarev, M. P.

    2013-04-01

    This paper studies a novel approach for reducing tomographic PIV computational complexity. The proposed approach is an algebraic reconstruction technique, termed MENT (maximum entropy). This technique computes the three-dimensional light intensity distribution several times faster than SMART, using at least ten times less memory. Additionally, the reconstruction quality remains nearly the same as with SMART. This paper presents the theoretical computation performance comparison for MENT, SMART and MART, followed by validation using synthetic particle images. Both the theoretical assessment and validation of synthetic images demonstrate significant computational time reduction. The data processing accuracy of MENT was compared to that of SMART in a slot jet experiment. A comparison of the average velocity profiles shows a high level of agreement between the results obtained with MENT and those obtained with SMART.

  9. Tomographic Image Reconstruction Using Training Images with Matrix and Tensor Formulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soltani, Sara

    Reducing X-ray exposure while maintaining the image quality is a major challenge in computed tomography (CT); since the imperfect data produced from the few view and/or low intensity projections results in low-quality images that are suffering from severe artifacts when using conventional...... the image resolution compared to a classical reconstruction method such as Filtered Back Projection (FBP). Some priors for the tomographic reconstruction take the form of cross-section images of similar objects, providing a set of the so-called training images, that hold the key to the structural...... information about the solution. The training images must be reliable and application-specific. This PhD project aims at providing a mathematical and computational framework for the use of training sets as non-parametric priors for the solution in tomographic image reconstruction. Through an unsupervised...

  10. Proposal of fault-tolerant tomographic image reconstruction

    CERN Document Server

    Kudo, Hiroyuki; Yamazaki, Fukashi; Nemoto, Takuya

    2016-01-01

    This paper deals with tomographic image reconstruction under the situation where some of projection data bins are contaminated with abnormal data. Such situations occur in various instances of tomography. We propose a new reconstruction algorithm called the Fault-Tolerant reconstruction outlined as follows. The least-squares (L2-norm) error function ||Ax-b||_2^2 used in ordinary iterative reconstructions is sensitive to the existence of abnormal data. The proposed algorithm utilizes the L1-norm error function ||Ax-b||_1^1 instead of the L2-norm, and we develop a row-action-type iterative algorithm using the proximal splitting framework in convex optimization fields. We also propose an improved version of the L1-norm reconstruction called the L1-TV reconstruction, in which a weak Total Variation (TV) penalty is added to the cost function. Simulation results demonstrate that reconstructed images with the L2-norm were severely damaged by the effect of abnormal bins, whereas images with the L1-norm and L1-TV reco...

  11. Spiral computed tomographic imaging related to computerized ultrasonographic images of carotid plaque morphology and histology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grønholdt, Marie-Louise; Wagner, A; Wiebe, B M

    2001-01-01

    Echolucency of carotid atherosclerotic plaques, as evaluated by computerized B-mode ultrasonographic images, has been associated with an increased incidence of brain infarcts on cerebral computed tomographic scans. We tested the hypotheses that characterization of carotid plaques on spiral comput...

  12. A study of temporomandibular joint osteoarthritis using computed tomographic imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massilla Mani, F; Sivasubramanian, S Satha

    2016-06-01

    This study aimed to determine the various bony changes in osteoarthritis (OA) of elderly patients who are suffering from temporomandibular joint dysfunction (TMD) and to find if all the changes manifesting in generalized OA were presented in temporomandibular joint (TMJ). Thirty TMJs of fifteen elderly patients who were diagnosed with TMD were selected for the study. Patient with TMD were subjected to computerized tomographic (CT) imaging, and the various bony changes in the TMJ were recorded. CT study of TMJ showed that there is a positive evidence of joint involvement in 80% of the cases. In this study, female patients were more commonly affected by OA than the males. The condylar changes (69.93%) are more common than the changes in the articular eminence (6.6%) and condylar fossa (10%). About 56.6% of TMJ in the study was affected by the early manifestations of the OA. CT study showed that there is a positive evidence of TMJ involvement in the elderly patients with TMD. The results show that condylar changes are more common than the changes in the articular eminence and condylar fossa. The study also shows that most of the patients are affected by early TMJ OA; hence, initiating treatment at early stages may prevent the disease progression. Copyright © 2016 Chang Gung University. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Tomographic Particle Image Velocimetry using Smartphones and Colored Shadows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguirre-Pablo, Andres A; Alarfaj, Meshal K; Li, Er Qiang; Hernández-Sánchez, J F; Thoroddsen, Sigurdur T

    2017-06-16

    We demonstrate the viability of using four low-cost smartphone cameras to perform Tomographic PIV. We use colored shadows to imprint two or three different time-steps on the same image. The back-lighting is accomplished with three sets of differently-colored pulsed LEDs. Each set of Red, Green & Blue LEDs is shone on a diffuser screen facing each of the cameras. We thereby record the RGB-colored shadows of opaque suspended particles, rather than the conventionally used scattered light. We subsequently separate the RGB color channels, to represent the separate times, with preprocessing to minimize noise and cross-talk. We use commercially available Tomo-PIV software for the calibration, 3-D particle reconstruction and particle-field correlations, to obtain all three velocity components in a volume. Acceleration estimations can be done thanks to the triple pulse illumination. Our test flow is a vortex ring produced by forcing flow through a circular orifice, using a flexible membrane, which is driven by a pressurized air pulse. Our system is compared to a commercial stereoscopic PIV system for error estimations. We believe this proof of concept experiment will make this technique available for education, industry and scientists for a fraction of the hardware cost needed for traditional Tomo-PIV.

  14. Tomographic Particle Image Velocimetry using Smartphones and Colored Shadows

    KAUST Repository

    Aguirre-Pablo, Andres A.

    2017-06-12

    We demonstrate the viability of using four low-cost smartphone cameras to perform Tomographic PIV. We use colored shadows to imprint two or three different time-steps on the same image. The back-lighting is accomplished with three sets of differently-colored pulsed LEDs. Each set of Red, Green & Blue LEDs is shone on a diffuser screen facing each of the cameras. We thereby record the RGB-colored shadows of opaque suspended particles, rather than the conventionally used scattered light. We subsequently separate the RGB color channels, to represent the separate times, with preprocessing to minimize noise and cross-talk. We use commercially available Tomo-PIV software for the calibration, 3-D particle reconstruction and particle-field correlations, to obtain all three velocity components in a volume. Acceleration estimations can be done thanks to the triple pulse illumination. Our test flow is a vortex ring produced by forcing flow through a circular orifice, using a flexible membrane, which is driven by a pressurized air pulse. Our system is compared to a commercial stereoscopic PIV system for error estimations. We believe this proof of concept experiment will make this technique available for education, industry and scientists for a fraction of the hardware cost needed for traditional Tomo-PIV.

  15. ECAT: A New Computerized Tomographic Imaging System for Position-Emitting Radiopharmaceuticals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phelps, M. E.; Hoffman, E. J.; Huang, S. C.; Kuhl, D. E.

    1977-01-01

    The ECAT was designed and developed as a complete computerized positron radionuclide imaging system capable of providing high contrast, high resolution, quantitative images in 2 dimensional and tomographic formats. Flexibility, in its various image mode options, allows it to be used for a wide variety of imaging problems.

  16. An Image Restoration Method Using Matrix Transform and Gaussian Mixture Model for Radio Tomographic Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fei Gao

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Radio Tomographic Imaging (RTI is an attractive technique for imaging the nonmetallic targets within wireless sensor network. RTI has been used in many challenging environments and situations. Due to the accuracy of Radio Tomographic Imaging system model and the interference between the wireless signals of sensors, the image obtained from the RTI system is a degraded target image, which cannot offer sufficient details to distinguish different targets. In this paper, we treat the RTI system as an image degraded process, and we propose an estimation model based on mixture Gaussian distribution to derive the degradation function from the shadowing-based RTI model. Then we use this degradation function to recover an original image by a method called constrained least squares filtering. So far, many imaging models have been proposed for localization; however, they do not have a satisfied imaging accuracy. Simulated and experimental results show that the imaging accuracy of our proposed method is improved, and the proposed method can be used in the real-time circumstances.

  17. Tomographic Imaging of a Forested Area By Airborne Multi-Baseline P-Band SAR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erich Meier

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, various attempts have been undertaken to obtain information about the structure of forested areas from multi-baseline synthetic aperture radar data. Tomographic processing of such data has been demonstrated for airborne L-band data but the quality of the focused tomographic images is limited by several factors. In particular, the common Fourierbased focusing methods are susceptible to irregular and sparse sampling, two problems, that are unavoidable in case of multi-pass, multi-baseline SAR data acquired by an airborne system. In this paper, a tomographic focusing method based on the time-domain back-projection algorithm is proposed, which maintains the geometric relationship between the original sensor positions and the imaged target and is therefore able to cope with irregular sampling without introducing any approximations with respect to the geometry. The tomographic focusing quality is assessed by analysing the impulse response of simulated point targets and an in-scene corner reflector. And, in particular, several tomographic slices of a volume representing a forested area are given. The respective P-band tomographic data set consisting of eleven flight tracks has been acquired by the airborne E-SAR sensor of the German Aerospace Center (DLR.

  18. Tomographic Imaging of a Forested Area By Airborne Multi-Baseline P-Band SAR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frey, Othmar; Morsdorf, Felix; Meier, Erich

    2008-09-24

    In recent years, various attempts have been undertaken to obtain information about the structure of forested areas from multi-baseline synthetic aperture radar data. Tomographic processing of such data has been demonstrated for airborne L-band data but the quality of the focused tomographic images is limited by several factors. In particular, the common Fourierbased focusing methods are susceptible to irregular and sparse sampling, two problems, that are unavoidable in case of multi-pass, multi-baseline SAR data acquired by an airborne system. In this paper, a tomographic focusing method based on the time-domain back-projection algorithm is proposed, which maintains the geometric relationship between the original sensor positions and the imaged target and is therefore able to cope with irregular sampling without introducing any approximations with respect to the geometry. The tomographic focusing quality is assessed by analysing the impulse response of simulated point targets and an in-scene corner reflector. And, in particular, several tomographic slices of a volume representing a forested area are given. The respective P-band tomographic data set consisting of eleven flight tracks has been acquired by the airborne E-SAR sensor of the German Aerospace Center (DLR).

  19. Temporal bone anomalies in the branchio-oto-renal syndrome: detailed computed tomographic and magnetic resonance imaging findings.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ceruti, S.; Stinckens, C.I.C.; Cremers, C.W.R.J.; Casselman, J.W.

    2002-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To inventory computed tomographic and magnetic resonance imaging findings in the branchio-oto-renal (BOR) syndrome. STUDY DESIGN: A prospective computed tomographic and magnetic resonance imaging study on a family with the BOR syndrome. SETTING: Department of medical imaging and magnetic

  20. Synchrotron tomographic images from human lung adenocarcinoma: Three-dimensional reconstruction and histologic correlations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Eunjue; Han, Sung-Mi; Chang, Ji-Eun; Kim, Hong-Tae; Kim, Jong-Ki; Seo, Seung-Jun; Chung, Jin-Haeng; Jheon, Sanghoon

    2017-10-01

    High-resolution tomographic images using synchrotron X-rays are expected to provide detailed reflection of microstructures, thereby allowing for the examination of histologic structures without destruction of the specimen. This study aims to evaluate the synchrotron tomographic images of mixed ground-glass opacity excised on 5-mm sections in comparison to pathologic examination. The Institutional Review Board of our institute approved this retrospective study, and written informed consent was obtained from each patient whose lung tissue would be used. Obtained lung cancer specimens were brought to the multiple Wiggler 6C beam line at the Pohang Light Source (PLS-II) in Korea, and phase contrast X-ray images were obtained in November 2016. The X-ray emanated from a bending magnet of the electron storage ring with electron energy of 3 GeV, and a typical beam current was 320 mA. Reconstructed tomographic images were compared with images from histologic slides obtained from the same samples. Pulmonary microstructures including terminal bronchioles, alveolar sacs, and vasculature were identified with phase contrast X-ray images. Images from normal lung tissue and mixed ground-glass opacity were clearly distinguishable. Hyperplasia of the interalveolar septum and dysplasia of microstructure were clearly identified. The imaging findings correlated well with hematoxylin-eosin stained specimens. Tomographic images using synchrotron radiation have the potential for clinical applications. With refinement, this technique may become a diagnostic tool for detection of lung cancer. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Preoperative imaging for DIEA perforator flaps: a comparative study of computed tomographic angiography and Doppler ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozen, Warren M; Phillips, Timothy J; Ashton, Mark W; Stella, Damien L; Gibson, Robert N; Taylor, G Ian

    2008-01-01

    Abdominal donor-site flaps, including the transverse rectus abdominis musculocutaneous (TRAM) and deep inferior epigastric artery (DIEA) perforator flaps, are standard in autologous breast reconstruction. With significant variation in the vascular anatomy of the abdominal wall, preoperative imaging is essential for preoperative planning and reducing intraoperative error. Doppler and color duplex sonography have been used with varying results, and the quest continues for optimal preoperative assessment. Computed tomographic angiography has recently been proposed as a noninvasive modality for this purpose. This is the first study to formally compare preoperative Doppler ultrasound with computed tomographic angiography for imaging the DIEA. Eight consecutive patients undergoing DIEA perforator flap surgery for breast reconstruction underwent both computed tomographic angiography and Doppler ultrasound preoperatively. All investigations and procedures were performed at the same institution with the same primary and assisting surgeons and the same radiology team. Computed tomographic angiography was superior to Doppler ultrasound at identifying the course of the DIEA and its branching pattern, and in visualizing its perforators. Preoperative computed tomographic angiography was highly specific (100 percent) and more sensitive in mapping and visualizing perforators (p = 0.0078). It was also proficient at identifying the superficial epigastric arterial system and for effectively displaying the results intraoperatively. It was substantially quicker and removed the interobserver error associated with Doppler ultrasonography. The study was ceased after eight patients because of the overwhelming benefit of computed tomographic angiography over Doppler ultrasonography. Computed tomographic angiography is a valuable imaging modality for the preoperative assessment of the donor-site vascular supply for TRAM and DIEA perforator flaps.

  2. 3D UWB Magnitude-Combined Tomographic Imaging for Biomedical Applications. Algorithm Validation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Capdevila

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Biomedical microwave imaging is a topic of continuous research for its potential in different areas especially in breast cancer detection. In this paper, 3D UWB Magnitude-Combined tomographic algorithm is assessed for this recurrent application, but also for a more challenging one such as brain stroke detection. With the UWB Magnitude-Combined concept, the algorithm can take advantage of both the efficiency of Fourier Diffraction Theorem-based tomographic formulation and the robustness and image quality improvement provided by a multi-frequency combination.

  3. A PC-controlled microwave tomographic scanner for breast imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padhi, Shantanu; Howard, John; Fhager, A.; Bengtsson, Sebastian

    2011-01-01

    This article presents the design and development of a personal computer based controller for a microwave tomographic system for breast cancer detection. The system uses motorized, dual-polarized antennas and a custom-made GUI interface to control stepper motors, a wideband vector network analyzer (VNA) and to coordinate data acquisition and archival in a local MDSPlus database. Both copolar and cross-polar scattered field components can be measured directly. Experimental results are presented to validate the various functionalities of the scanner.

  4. Image derived input functions for dynamic High Resolution Research Tomograph PET brain studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mourik, J.E.M.; van Velden, F.H.P.; Lubberink, J.M.; Kloet, R.W.; van Berckel, B.N.M.; Lammertsma, A.A.; Boellaard, R.

    2008-01-01

    The High Resolution Research Tomograph (HRRT) is a dedicated human brain positron emission tomography (PET) scanner. The aim of the present study was to validate the use of image derived input functions (IDIF) as an alternative for arterial sampling for HRRT human brain studies. To this end, IDIFs

  5. Connections model for tomographic images reconstruction; Modelo conexionista para reconstrucao de imagens tomograficas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodrigues, R.G.S.; Pela, C.A.; Roque, S.F. A.C. [Departamento de Fisica e Matematica (FFCLRP) USP. Av. Bandeirantes, 3900- 14040- 901- Ribeirao Preto, Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    1998-12-31

    This paper shows an artificial neural network with an adequately topology for tomographic image reconstruction. The associated error function is derived and the learning algorithm is make. The simulated results are presented and demonstrate the existence of a generalized solution for nets with linear activation function. (Author)

  6. Lamb-Wave-Based Tomographic Imaging Techniques for Hole-Edge Corrosion Monitoring in Plate Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dengjiang Wang

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available This study presents a novel monitoring method for hole-edge corrosion damage in plate structures based on Lamb wave tomographic imaging techniques. An experimental procedure with a cross-hole layout using 16 piezoelectric transducers (PZTs was designed. The A0 mode of the Lamb wave was selected, which is sensitive to thickness-loss damage. The iterative algebraic reconstruction technique (ART method was used to locate and quantify the corrosion damage at the edge of the hole. Hydrofluoric acid with a concentration of 20% was used to corrode the specimen artificially. To estimate the effectiveness of the proposed method, the real corrosion damage was compared with the predicted corrosion damage based on the tomographic method. The results show that the Lamb-wave-based tomographic method can be used to monitor the hole-edge corrosion damage accurately.

  7. Imaging earth's interior: Tomographic inversions for mantle P-wave velocity structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pulliam, R.J.

    1991-07-01

    A formalism is developed for the tomographic inversion of seismic travel time residuals. The travel time equations are solved both simultaneously, for velocity model terms and corrections to the source locations, and progressively, for each set of terms in succession. The methods differ primarily in their treatment of source mislocation terms. Additionally, the system of equations is solved directly, neglecting source terms. The efficacy of the algorithms is explored with synthetic data as we perform simulations of the general procedure used to produce tomographic images of Earth's mantle from global earthquake data. The patterns of seismic heterogeneity in the mantle that would be returned reliably by a tomographic inversion are investigated. We construct synthetic data sets based on real ray sampling of the mantle by introducing spherical harmonic patterns of velocity heterogeneity and perform inversions of the synthetic data.

  8. Imaging earth`s interior: Tomographic inversions for mantle P-wave velocity structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pulliam, Robert Jay [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1991-07-01

    A formalism is developed for the tomographic inversion of seismic travel time residuals. The travel time equations are solved both simultaneously, for velocity model terms and corrections to the source locations, and progressively, for each set of terms in succession. The methods differ primarily in their treatment of source mislocation terms. Additionally, the system of equations is solved directly, neglecting source terms. The efficacy of the algorithms is explored with synthetic data as we perform simulations of the general procedure used to produce tomographic images of Earth`s mantle from global earthquake data. The patterns of seismic heterogeneity in the mantle that would be returned reliably by a tomographic inversion are investigated. We construct synthetic data sets based on real ray sampling of the mantle by introducing spherical harmonic patterns of velocity heterogeneity and perform inversions of the synthetic data.

  9. DEVELOPMENT OF A DUAL MODALITY TOMOGRAPHIC IMAGING SYSTEM FOR BIOLUMINESCENCE AND PET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    CHATZIIOANNOU, ARION

    2011-12-21

    The goal of this proposal was to develop a new hybrid imaging modality capable to simultaneously image optical bioluminescence signals, as well as radionuclide emissions from the annihilation of positrons originating from molecular imaging probes in preclinical mouse models. This new technology enables the simultaneous in-vivo measurements of both emissions that could be produced from a single or a combination of two different biomarkers. It also facilitates establishing the physical limitations of bioluminescence imaging, its tomographic and spectral image reconstruction potential and the quantification of bioluminescence signals.

  10. String-averaging incremental subgradients for constrained convex optimization with applications to reconstruction of tomographic images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massambone de Oliveira, Rafael; Salomão Helou, Elias; Fontoura Costa, Eduardo

    2016-11-01

    We present a method for non-smooth convex minimization which is based on subgradient directions and string-averaging techniques. In this approach, the set of available data is split into sequences (strings) and a given iterate is processed independently along each string, possibly in parallel, by an incremental subgradient method (ISM). The end-points of all strings are averaged to form the next iterate. The method is useful to solve sparse and large-scale non-smooth convex optimization problems, such as those arising in tomographic imaging. A convergence analysis is provided under realistic, standard conditions. Numerical tests are performed in a tomographic image reconstruction application, showing good performance for the convergence speed when measured as the decrease ratio of the objective function, in comparison to classical ISM.

  11. Optical Coherence Tomographic Imaging and Delivery for Surgical Guidance

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Fujimoto, James G

    2004-01-01

    .... OCT can thus function as a type of "optical biopsy," enabling imaging of tissue with resolution approaching conventional biopsy and histopathology, but without the need to remove and process specimens...

  12. Laparoscopic optical coherence tomographic imaging of human ovarian cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hariri, Lida P.; Bonnema, Garret T.; Schmidt, Kathy; Korde, Vrushali; Winkler, Amy M.; Hatch, Kenneth; Brewer, Molly; Barton, Jennifer K.

    2009-02-01

    Ovarian cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer-related death among women. If diagnosed at early stages, 5-year survival rate is 94%, but drops to 68% for regional disease and 29% for distant metastasis; only 19% of cases are diagnosed at early, localized stages. Optical coherence tomography is a recently emerging non-destructive imaging technology, achieving high axial resolutions (10-20 µm) at imaging depths up to 2 mm. Previously, we studied OCT in normal and diseased human ovary ex vivo. Changes in collagen were suggested with several images that correlated with changes in collagen seen in malignancy. Areas of necrosis and blood vessels were also visualized using OCT, indicative of an underlying tissue abnormality. We recently developed a custom side-firing laparoscopic OCT (LOCT) probe fabricated for in vivo imaging. The LOCT probe, consisting of a 38 mm diameter handpiece terminated in a 280 mm long, 4.6 mm diameter tip for insertion into the laparoscopic trocar, is capable of obtaining up to 9.5 mm image lengths at 10 µm axial resolution. In this pilot study, we utilize the LOCT probe to image one or both ovaries of 17 patients undergoing laparotomy or transabdominal endoscopy and oophorectomy to determine if OCT is capable of differentiating normal and neoplastic ovary. We have laparoscopically imaged the ovaries of seventeen patients with no known complications. Initial data evaluation reveals qualitative distinguishability between the features of undiseased post-menopausal ovary and the cystic, non-homogenous appearance of neoplastic ovary such as serous cystadenoma and endometroid adenocarcinoma.

  13. Parotid lymphomas – clinical and computed tomographic imaging ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Department of Radiology, South infirmary victoria hospital, Cork, Republic of ireland. Summary. Objective. To review the clinical presentation and computed tomography (CT) imaging characteristics of all parotid lymphomas diagnosed at the study institution over a 7-year period. Design. Retrospective chart review of parotid ...

  14. Tomographic imaging of bone composition using coherently scattered x rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batchelar, Deidre L.; Dabrowski, W.; Cunningham, Ian A.

    2000-04-01

    Bone tissue consists primarily of calcium hydroxyapatite crystals (bone mineral) and collagen fibrils. Bone mineral density (BMD) is commonly used as an indicator of bone health. Techniques available at present for assessing bone health provide a measure of BMD, but do not provide information about the degree of mineralization of the bone tissue. This may be adequate for assessing diseases in which the collagen-mineral ratio remains constant, as assumed in osteoporosis, but is insufficient when the mineralization state is known to change, as in osteomalacia. No tool exists for the in situ examination of collagen and hydroxyapatite density distributions independently. Coherent-scatter computed tomography (CSCT) is a technique we are developing that produces images of the low- angle scatter properties of tissue. These depend on the molecular structure of the scatterer making it possible to produce material-specific maps of each component in a conglomerate. After corrections to compensate for exposure fluctuations, self-attenuation of scatter and the temporal response of the image intensifier, material-specific images of mineral, collagen, fat and water distributions are obtained. The gray-level in these images provides the volumetric density of each component independently.

  15. Automated angular and translational tomographic alignment and application to phase-contrast imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cunha Ramos, Tiago Joao; Jørgensen, Jakob Sauer; Andreasen, Jens Wenzel

    2017-01-01

    position and orientation with respect to the detector. As tomographic imaging reaches increasingly better resolution, thermal drifts, mechanical instabilities, and equipment limitations are becoming the main dominant factors contributing to sample positioning uncertainties that will further introduce...... reconstruction artifacts and limit the attained resolution in the final tomographic reconstruction. Alignment algorithms that require manual interaction impede data analysis with ever-increasing data acquisition rates, supplied by more brilliant sources. We present in this paper an iterative reconstruction...... algorithm for wrapped phase projection data and an alignment algorithm that automatically takes 5 degrees of freedom, including the possible linear and angular motion errors, into consideration. The presented concepts are applied to simulated and real measured phase-contrast data, exhibiting a possible...

  16. Image reconstruction for a Positron Emission Tomograph optimized for breast cancer imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Virador, Patrick R.G. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2000-04-01

    The author performs image reconstruction for a novel Positron Emission Tomography camera that is optimized for breast cancer imaging. This work addresses for the first time, the problem of fully-3D, tomographic reconstruction using a septa-less, stationary, (i.e. no rotation or linear motion), and rectangular camera whose Field of View (FOV) encompasses the entire volume enclosed by detector modules capable of measuring Depth of Interaction (DOI) information. The camera is rectangular in shape in order to accommodate breasts of varying sizes while allowing for soft compression of the breast during the scan. This non-standard geometry of the camera exacerbates two problems: (a) radial elongation due to crystal penetration and (b) reconstructing images from irregularly sampled data. Packing considerations also give rise to regions in projection space that are not sampled which lead to missing information. The author presents new Fourier Methods based image reconstruction algorithms that incorporate DOI information and accommodate the irregular sampling of the camera in a consistent manner by defining lines of responses (LORs) between the measured interaction points instead of rebinning the events into predefined crystal face LORs which is the only other method to handle DOI information proposed thus far. The new procedures maximize the use of the increased sampling provided by the DOI while minimizing interpolation in the data. The new algorithms use fixed-width evenly spaced radial bins in order to take advantage of the speed of the Fast Fourier Transform (FFT), which necessitates the use of irregular angular sampling in order to minimize the number of unnormalizable Zero-Efficiency Bins (ZEBs). In order to address the persisting ZEBs and the issue of missing information originating from packing considerations, the algorithms (a) perform nearest neighbor smoothing in 2D in the radial bins (b) employ a semi-iterative procedure in order to estimate the unsampled data

  17. PATHOLOGIC BASIS FOR RIM ENHANCEMENT OBSERVED IN COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHIC IMAGES OF FELINE NASOPHARYNGEAL POLYPS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamb, Christopher R; Sibbing, Kendall; Priestnall, Simon L

    2016-01-01

    In postcontrast computed tomographic (CT) images, feline nasopharyngeal polyps typically demonstrate enhancement of the peripheral rim. Computed tomographic images and histologic specimens of a case series of 22 cats with surgically removed nasopharyngeal polyps were reviewed retrospectively in an attempt to elucidate the origin of rim enhancement. Polyps were present in the tympanic cavity in 15 (68%) cats (three with extension into the nasopharynx), only in the nasopharynx in four (18%) cats, and only in the external ear canal in the remaining three (14%) cats. All polyps had variable degrees of epithelial injury. Hemorrhage and inflammatory infiltration were significantly more marked in the superficial stroma whereas edema was significantly more marked in the core stroma. In noncontrast CT images (n = 22), the tympanic bulla was thickened in all 15 cats with a polyp in the tympanic cavity and enlarged in eight (53%) of these cats. In postcontrast CT images (n = 15), an outer zone of relatively increased attenuation compatible with a rim was observed in 11 (73%) polyps. The magnitude and extent of rim enhancement in CT images was positively correlated with the histologic grade of inflammation in the superficial stroma and negatively correlated with the grade of edema in the superficial stroma. It appears that inflammation is the major determinant of contrast medium accumulation in feline nasopharyngeal polyps, and the tendency for inflammation to affect predominantly the superficial layers explains the frequent observation of a rim in postcontrast CT images. © 2016 American College of Veterinary Radiology.

  18. ESTIMATING FIBRE DIRECTION DISTRIBUTIONS OF REINFORCED COMPOSITES FROM TOMOGRAPHIC IMAGES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliver Wirjadi

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Fibre reinforced composites constitute a relevant class of materials used chiefly in lightweight constructions for example in fuselages or car bodies. The spatial arrangement of the fibres and in particular their direction distribution have huge impact on macroscopic properties and, thus, its determination is an important topic of material characterisation. The fibre direction distribution is defined on the unit sphere, and it is therefore preferable to work with fully three-dimensional images of the microstructure as obtained, e.g., by computed micro-tomography. A number of recent image analysis algorithms exploit local grey value variations to estimate a preferred direction in each fibre point. Averaging these local results leads estimates of the volume-weighted fibre direction distribution. We show how the thus derived fibre direction distribution is related to quantities commonly used in engineering applications. Furthermore, we discuss four algorithms for local orientation analysis, namely those based on the response of anisotropic Gaussian filters, moments and axes of inertia derived from directed distance transforms, the structure tensor, or the Hessian matrix. Finally, the feasibility of these algorithms is demonstrated for application examples and some advantages and disadvantages of the underlying methods are pointed out.

  19. Imaging sensor constellation for tomographic chemical cloud mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosofret, Bogdan R; Konno, Daisei; Faghfouri, Aram; Kindle, Harry S; Gittins, Christopher M; Finson, Michael L; Janov, Tracy E; Levreault, Mark J; Miyashiro, Rex K; Marinelli, William J

    2009-04-01

    A sensor constellation capable of determining the location and detailed concentration distribution of chemical warfare agent simulant clouds has been developed and demonstrated on government test ranges. The constellation is based on the use of standoff passive multispectral infrared imaging sensors to make column density measurements through the chemical cloud from two or more locations around its periphery. A computed tomography inversion method is employed to produce a 3D concentration profile of the cloud from the 2D line density measurements. We discuss the theoretical basis of the approach and present results of recent field experiments where controlled releases of chemical warfare agent simulants were simultaneously viewed by three chemical imaging sensors. Systematic investigations of the algorithm using synthetic data indicate that for complex functions, 3D reconstruction errors are less than 20% even in the case of a limited three-sensor measurement network. Field data results demonstrate the capability of the constellation to determine 3D concentration profiles that account for ~?86%? of the total known mass of material released.

  20. Radio-tomographic images of postmidnight equatorial plasma depletions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hei, Matthew A.; Bernhardt, Paul A.; Siefring, Carl L.; Wilkens, Matthew R.; Huba, Joseph D.; Krall, Jonathan F.; Valladares, Cesar E.; Heelis, Roderick A.; Hairston, Marc R.; Coley, W. Robin; Chau, Jorge L.; De La Jara, Cesar

    2014-01-01

    the first time, equatorial plasma depletions (EPDs) have been imaged in the longitude-altitude plane using radiotomography. High-resolution (~10 km) reconstructions of electron density were derived from total electron content (TEC) measurements provided by a receiver array in Peru. TEC data were obtained from VHF/UHF signals transmitted by the Coherent Electromagnetic Radio Tomography (CERTO) beacon on the C/NOFS satellite. EPDs generated premidnight were observed near dawn. On one night, the bubble densities were highly reduced, 100-1000 km wide, and embedded within a layerlike ionosphere. Three nights later, the EPDs exhibited similar features but were embedded in a locally uplifted ionosphere. The C/NOFS in situ instruments detected a dawn depletion where the reconstruction showed lifted EPDs, implying that the postmidnight electric fields raised sections of ionosphere to altitudes where embedded/reactivated fossil EPDs were detected as dawn depletions. Satellites flying under domelike distortions of the ionosphere may observe these distortions as broad plasma decreases (BPDs).

  1. Tomographic reconstruction of atmospheric volumes from infrared limb-imager measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ungermann, Joern

    2011-08-12

    State-of-the art nadir and limb-sounders, but also in situ measurements, do not offer the capability to highly resolve the atmosphere in all three dimensions. This leaves an observational gap with respect to small-scale structures that arise frequently in the atmosphere and that still lack a quantitative understanding. For instance, filaments and tropopause folds in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere (UTLS) are crucial for its composition and variability. One way to achieve a highly resolved three-dimensional (3-D) picture of the atmosphere is the tomographic evaluation of limb-imager measurements. This thesis presents a methodology for the tomographic reconstruction of atmospheric constituents. To be able to deal with the large increase of observations and unknowns compared to conventional retrievals, great care is taken to reduce memory consumption and processing time. This method is used to evaluate the performance of two upcoming infrared limb-imager instruments and to prepare their missions. The first examined instrument is the infrared limb-imager on board of PREMIER (Process Exploration through Measurements of Infrared and millimetrewave Emitted Radiation), one of three remaining candidates for ESA's 7th Earth Explorer mission. Scientific goals of PREMIER are, among others, the examination of gravity waves and the quantification of processes controlling atmospheric composition in the UTLS, a region of particular importance for climate change. Simulations based on the performance requirements of this instrument deliver a vertical resolution that is slightly better than its vertical field-of-view (about 0.75 km) and a horizontal resolution of {approx}25km x 70 km. Non-linear end-to-end simulations for various gravity wave patterns demonstrate that the high 3-D resolution of PREMIER considerably extends the range of detectable gravity waves in terms of horizontal and vertical wavelength compared to previous observations. The second examined

  2. Tomographic Small-Animal Imaging Using a High-Resolution Semiconductor Camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kastis, GA; Wu, MC; Balzer, SJ; Wilson, DW; Furenlid, LR; Stevenson, G; Barber, HB; Barrett, HH; Woolfenden, JM; Kelly, P; Appleby, M

    2015-01-01

    We have developed a high-resolution, compact semiconductor camera for nuclear medicine applications. The modular unit has been used to obtain tomographic images of phantoms and mice. The system consists of a 64 x 64 CdZnTe detector array and a parallel-hole tungsten collimator mounted inside a 17 cm x 5.3 cm x 3.7 cm tungsten-aluminum housing. The detector is a 2.5 cm x 2.5 cm x 0.15 cm slab of CdZnTe connected to a 64 x 64 multiplexer readout via indium-bump bonding. The collimator is 7 mm thick, with a 0.38 mm pitch that matches the detector pixel pitch. We obtained a series of projections by rotating the object in front of the camera. The axis of rotation was vertical and about 1.5 cm away from the collimator face. Mouse holders were made out of acrylic plastic tubing to facilitate rotation and the administration of gas anesthetic. Acquisition times were varied from 60 sec to 90 sec per image for a total of 60 projections at an equal spacing of 6 degrees between projections. We present tomographic images of a line phantom and mouse bone scan and assess the properties of the system. The reconstructed images demonstrate spatial resolution on the order of 1–2 mm. PMID:26568676

  3. Box Tomography: An efficient tomographic method for imaging localized structures in the deep Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masson, Yder; Romanowicz, Barbara

    2017-04-01

    The accurate imaging of localized geological structures inside the deep Earth is key to understand our planet and its history. Since the introduction of the Preliminary Reference Earth Model, many generations of global tomographic models have been developed and give us access to the 3D structure of the Earth's interior. The latest generation of global tomographic models has emerged with the development of accurate numerical wavefield computations in a 3D earth combined with access to enhanced HPC capabilities. These models have sharpened up mantle images and unveiled relatively small scale structures that were blurred out in previous generation models. Fingerlike structures have been found at the base of the oceanic asthenosphere, and vertically oriented broad low velocity plume conduits [1] extend throughout the lower mantle beneath those major hotspots that are located within the perimeter of the deep mantle large low shear velocity provinces (LLSVPs). While providing new insights into our understanding of mantle dynamics, the detailed morphology of these features requires further efforts to obtain higher resolution images. In recent years, we developed a theoretical framework [2][3] for the tomographic imaging of localised geological structures buried inside the Earth, where no seismic sources nor receivers are necessarily present. We call this "box tomography" [4]. The essential difference between box-tomography and standard tomographic methods is that the numerical modeling (i.e. the raytracing in travel time tomography and the wave propagation in waveform tomography or full waveform inversion) is completely confined within the small box-region imaged. Thus, box tomography is a lot more efficient than global tomography (i.e. where we invert for the velocity in the larger volume that encompasses all the sources and receivers), for imaging localised objects. We present 2D and 3D examples showing that box tomography can be employed for imaging structures present

  4. Archiving and retrieval of sequential images from tomographic databases in PACS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shyu, Chi-Ren; Cai, T. T.; Broderick, Lynn S.

    1998-12-01

    In the picture archiving and communication systems (PACS) used in modern hospitals, the current practice is to retrieve images based on keyword search, which returns a complete set of images from the same scan. Both diagnostically useful and negligible images in the image databases are retrieved and browsed by the physicians. In addition to the text-based search query method, queries based on image contents and image examples have been developed and integrated into existing PACS systems. Most of the content-based image retrieval (CBIR) systems for medical image databases are designed to retrieve images individually. However, in a database of tomographic images, it is often diagnostically more useful to simultaneously retrieve multiple images that are closely related for various reasons, such as physiological continguousness, etc. For example, high resolution computed tomography (HRCT) images are taken in a series of cross-sectional slices of human body. Typically, several slices are relevant for making a diagnosis, requiring a PACS system that can retrieve a contiguous sequence of slices. In this paper, we present an extension to our physician-in-the-loop CBIR system, which allows our algorithms to automatically determine the number of adjoining images to retain after certain key images are identified by the physician. Only the key images, so identified by the physician, and the other adjoining images that cohere with the key images are kept on-line for fast retrieval; the rest of the images can be discarded if so desired. This results in large reduction in the amount of storage needed for fast retrieval.

  5. Stature estimation from skull measurements using multidetector computed tomographic images: A Japanese forensic sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torimitsu, Suguru; Makino, Yohsuke; Saitoh, Hisako; Sakuma, Ayaka; Ishii, Namiko; Yajima, Daisuke; Inokuchi, Go; Motomura, Ayumi; Chiba, Fumiko; Yamaguchi, Rutsuko; Hashimoto, Mari; Hoshioka, Yumi; Iwase, Hirotaro

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the correlation between stature and cranial measurements in a contemporary Japanese population, using three-dimensional (3D) computed tomographic (CT) images. A total of 228 cadavers (123 males, 105 females) underwent postmortem CT scanning and subsequent forensic autopsy between May 2011 and April 2015. Five cranial measurements were taken from 3D CT reconstructed images that extracted only cranial data. The correlations between stature and each of the cranial measurements were assessed with Pearson product-moment correlation coefficients. Simple and multiple regression analyses showed significant correlations between stature and cranial measurements. In conclusion, cranial measurements obtained from 3D CT images may be useful for forensic estimation of the stature of Japanese individuals, particularly in cases where better predictors, such as long bones, are not available. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  6. X-ray tomographic image magnification process, system and apparatus therefor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinney, John H.; Bonse, Ulrich K.; Johnson, Quintin C.; Nichols, Monte C.; Saroyan, Ralph A.; Massey, Warren N.; Nusshardt, Rudolph

    1993-01-01

    A computerized three-dimensional x-ray tomographic microscopy system is disclosed, comprising: a) source means for providing a source of parallel x-ray beams, b) staging means for staging and sequentially rotating a sample to be positioned in the path of the c) x-ray image magnifier means positioned in the path of the beams downstream from the sample, d) detecting means for detecting the beams after being passed through and magnified by the image magnifier means, and e) computing means for analyzing values received from the detecting means, and converting the values into three-dimensional representations. Also disclosed is a process for magnifying an x-ray image, and apparatus therefor.

  7. Re-evaluation of Magnetic Resonance and Computerised Tomographic Imaging in Neuro-Ophthalmic Patients in an Academic Centre

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koekoek, Clarence G. J.; Meiners, Linda C.; Pott, Jan Willem R.

    The aim of the study is to report the frequency of missed diagnoses on magnetic resonance and computerised tomographic imaging in neuro-ophthalmic patients who were referred to an academic ophthalmology department, with apparent normal imaging. The authors included all neuro-ophthalmic patients,

  8. Subsurface PpIX imaging in vivo with ultrasound-guided tomographic spectroscopy: reconstruction vs. born-normalized data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, Brendan P.; D'Souza, Alisha V.; Kanick, Stephen C.; Maytin, Edward; Hasan, Tayyaba; Pogue, Brian W.

    2013-03-01

    Aminolevulinic acid (ALA)-induced Protoporphyrin IX (PpIX)-based photodynamic therapy (PDT) is an effective treatment for skin cancers including basal cell carcinoma (BCC). Topically applied ALA promotes PpIX production preferentially in tumors, and many strategies have been developed to increase PpIX distribution and PDT treatment efficacy at depths > 1mm is not fully understood. While surface imaging techniques provide useful diagnosis, dosimetry, and efficacy information for superficial tumors, these methods cannot interrogate deeper tumors to provide in situ insight into spatial PpIX distributions. We have developed an ultrasound-guided, white-light-informed, tomographics spectroscopy system for the spatial measurement of subsurface PpIX. Detailed imaging system specifications, methodology, and optical-phantom-based characterization will be presented separately. Here we evaluate preliminary in vivo results using both full tomographic reconstruction and by plotting individual tomographic source-detector pair data against US images.

  9. In vitro tomographic image of human pulp-dentin complex: optical coherence tomography and histology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braz, Ana K S; Kyotoku, Bernardo B C; Gomes, Anderson S L

    2009-09-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT), a noninvasive imaging method, was used in this work to image the pulp-dentin complex. Pulp and dentin are integrally connected in the sense that physiologic and pathologic reactions in one of the tissues will also affect the other. An OCT system with 6-mum spatial resolution at 800 nm was used to image the pulp-dentin complex of in vitro samples. Five intact human maxillary premolars scheduled for surgical extraction were used in this in vitro study. The occlusal surfaces of teeth were polished with wet 600-, 1,000-, and 1,200-grit aluminum oxide abrasive paper perpendicular to the long axis of teeth, producing a plane on that surface. The images of pulp-dentin complex were taken by scanning the occlusal surface in a mesiodistal direction. The laser penetrated into the teeth structure and a tomographic image of pulp-dentin complex, parallel to the long axis of teeth, was obtained. Histological and OCT images were analyzed and compared. The results showed the capability of the OCT technique to generate images of the boundaries of pulp and its relation to the dentin. It could be clearly seen that the OCT image provided the insight into dentinal substrate about 0.65-mm deep (corrected for the dentin refractive index). OCT can be used in the future to prevent iatrogenic exposures of the pulp, complementing other existing methods, and will permit a more predictive prognosis of treatments.

  10. Image quality with single-heartbeat 320-multidetector computed tomographic coronary angiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Michelle Claire; Weir, Nicholas W; Mirsadraee, Saeed; Scott, Anne E; Uren, Neal G; McKillop, Graham; van Beek, Edwin J R; Reid, John H; Newby, David E

    2014-01-01

    We aimed to establish the feasibility of single-heartbeat 320-multidetector computed tomographic coronary angiography (CTCA) and assess variables affecting image quality. Consecutive patients (n = 249, 38% male) underwent CTCA. Two observers assessed image quality using a 4-point scale (1, excellent; 4, poor). Mean heart rate was 60 beats per minute (95% confidence interval, 59-62); body mass index, 29 kg/m (28-30); and dose-length product, 283 mGy·cm (266-301). During scanning, 133 (51%) received sublingual glyceryl trinitrate (GTN), 9 (4%) had ectopics, and 12 (5%) had atrial fibrillation. Diagnostic image quality was obtained in 99% with mean image quality of 1.4 (1.3, 1.5). Age, sex, atrial fibrillation, ectopics, diabetes mellitus (12%), and obstructive disease were not related to image quality. A lower heart rate and GTN were associated with improved image quality (P ≤ 0.001). Optimal image quality in single-heartbeat 320-multidetector CTCA is achievable in 99% of unselected patients. Image quality is improved by lower heart rate and GTN.

  11. Detection of various anatomic patterns of root canals in mandibular incisors using digital periapical radiography, 3 cone-beam computed tomographic scanners, and micro-computed tomographic imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paes da Silva Ramos Fernandes, Luciana Maria; Rice, Dwight; Ordinola-Zapata, Ronald; Alvares Capelozza, Ana Lucia; Bramante, Clovis Monteiro; Jaramillo, David; Christensen, Heidi

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the accuracy of digital periapical (PA) radiography and 3 cone-beam computed tomographic (CBCT) scanners in the identification of various internal anatomic patterns in mandibular incisors. Forty mandibular incisors were scanned using micro-computed tomographic imaging as the gold standard to establish the internal anatomic pattern. The number of root canals and internal patterns were classified into type I (single canal, n = 12), type Ia (single oval canal, n = 12), and type III (2 canals, n = 16). The teeth were placed in a human mandible, and digital PA radiography and 3 CBCT scans (Kodak 9000 3D [Carestream Health, Rochester, NY], Veraviewepocs 3De [J Morita MFG Corp, Kyoto, Japan], NewTom 5G [QR Srl, Verona, Italy]) were performed. Two blinded examiners classified each tooth's anatomic pattern, which were then compared with the micro-computed tomographic determinations. Considering type I and type Ia, which both presented with 1 root canal, there was a high degree of accuracy for all methods used (P > .05). The same result was found for type III. When identifying the shape of single canals (type I), CBCT imaging was more accurate compared with PA radiography. Concerning oval canals (type Ia), there was a significant difference between PA radiography and NewTom CBCT (PA radiography = 44%, NewTom = 88%). However, there were no significant differences between the 3 CBCT units. Double-exposure digital PA radiography for mandibular incisors is sufficient for the identification of the number of root canals. All CBCT devices showed improved accuracy in the identification of single root canal anatomy when a narrow canal was present. However, the identification of oval canals was improved only with the NewTom CBCT device. Copyright © 2014 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. X-ray tomographic intervention guidance: Towards real-time 4D imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Bartling, Sönke

    2016-01-01

    Implementation of real-time, continuous, and three-dimensional imaging (4D intervention guidance) would be a quantum leap for minimally-invasive medicine. It allows guidance during interventions by assessing the spatial position of instruments continuously in respect to their surroundings. Recent research showed that it is feasible using X-ray and novel tomographic reconstruction approaches. Radiation dose stays within reasonable limits. This article provides abstractions and background information together with an outlook on these prospects. There are explanations of how situational awareness during interventions is generated today and how they will be in future. The differences between fluoroscopically and CT-guided interventions are eluted to within the context of these developments. The exploration of uncharted terrain between these current methods is worth pursuing. Necessary image quality of 4D intervention guidance varies relevantly from that of standard computed tomography. Means to analyze the risk-b...

  13. [Development of a laser-optical tomograph for demonstration of CT imaging without ionizing radiation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellemann, M E; Baier, T; Seitz, B; Walther, H G

    2002-01-01

    Computed X-ray tomography (CT) is one of the most powerful diagnostic procedures in medicine. In this study, we developed a laser-optical CT scanner for the use by students as part of their curriculum in biomedical engineering. Our CT set-up employs a linear-scan technique where the measurement objects (light absorbing phantoms embedded in immersion oil), the light emitter (modulated laserdiode), and the detector (photodiode) are moved by linear-step motors. The spatial resolution is limited by the width of the laser beam (2 mm) and the smallest achievable raster step size (0.02 mm). Optical tomographic images of various objects can be measured within a few minutes and allow the demonstration of imaging principles like extinction, scanning, projection, and reconstruction techniques.

  14. Classification of wet aged related macular degeneration using optical coherence tomographic images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haq, Anam; Mir, Fouwad Jamil; Yasin, Ubaid Ullah; Khan, Shoab A.

    2013-12-01

    Wet Age related macular degeneration (AMD) is a type of age related macular degeneration. In order to detect Wet AMD we look for Pigment Epithelium detachment (PED) and fluid filled region caused by choroidal neovascularization (CNV). This form of AMD can cause vision loss if not treated in time. In this article we have proposed an automated system for detection of Wet AMD in Optical coherence tomographic (OCT) images. The proposed system extracts PED and CNV from OCT images using segmentation and morphological operations and then detailed feature set are extracted. These features are then passed on to the classifier for classification. Finally performance measures like accuracy, sensitivity and specificity are calculated and the classifier delivering the maximum performance is selected as a comparison measure. Our system gives higher performance using SVM as compared to other methods.

  15. Hybrid Photoacoustic/Ultrasound Tomograph for Real-Time Finger Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oeri, Milan; Bost, Wolfgang; Sénégond, Nicolas; Tretbar, Steffen; Fournelle, Marc

    2017-10-01

    We report a target-enclosing, hybrid tomograph with a total of 768 elements based on capacitive micromachined ultrasound transducer technology and providing fast, high-resolution 2-D/3-D photoacoustic and ultrasound tomography tailored to finger imaging. A freely programmable ultrasound beamforming platform sampling data at 80 MHz was developed to realize plane wave transmission under multiple angles. A multiplexing unit enables the connection and control of a large number of elements. Fast image reconstruction is provided by GPU processing. The tomograph is composed of four independent and fully automated movable arc-shaped transducers, allowing imaging of all three finger joints. The system benefits from photoacoustics, yielding high optical contrast and enabling visualization of finger vascularization, and ultrasound provides morphologic information on joints and surrounding tissue. A diode-pumped, Q-switched Nd:YAG laser and an optical parametric oscillator are used to broaden the spectrum of emitted wavelengths to provide multispectral imaging. Custom-made optical fiber bundles enable illumination of the region of interest in the plane of acoustic detection. Precision in positioning of the probe in motion is ensured by use of a motor-driven guide slide. The current position of the probe is encoded by the stage and used to relate ultrasound and photoacoustic signals to the corresponding region of interest of the suspicious finger joint. The system is characterized in phantoms and a healthy human finger in vivo. The results obtained promise to provide new opportunities in finger diagnostics and establish photoacoustic/ultrasound-tomography in medical routine. Copyright © 2017 World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. A digital-signal-processor-based optical tomographic system for dynamic imaging of joint diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasker, Joseph M.

    Over the last decade, optical tomography (OT) has emerged as viable biomedical imaging modality. Various imaging systems have been developed that are employed in preclinical as well as clinical studies, mostly targeting breast imaging, brain imaging, and cancer related studies. Of particular interest are so-called dynamic imaging studies where one attempts to image changes in optical properties and/or physiological parameters as they occur during a system perturbation. To successfully perform dynamic imaging studies, great effort is put towards system development that offers increasingly enhanced signal-to-noise performance at ever shorter data acquisition times, thus capturing high fidelity tomographic data within narrower time periods. Towards this goal, I have developed in this thesis a dynamic optical tomography system that is, unlike currently available analog instrumentation, based on digital data acquisition and filtering techniques. At the core of this instrument is a digital signal processor (DSP) that collects, collates, and processes the digitized data set. Complementary protocols between the DSP and a complex programmable logic device synchronizes the sampling process and organizes data flow. Instrument control is implemented through a comprehensive graphical user interface which integrates automated calibration, data acquisition, and signal post-processing. Real-time data is generated at frame rates as high as 140 Hz. An extensive dynamic range (˜190 dB) accommodates a wide scope of measurement geometries and tissue types. Performance analysis demonstrates very low system noise (˜1 pW rms noise equivalent power), excellent signal precision (˜0.04%--0.2%) and long term system stability (˜1% over 40 min). Experiments on tissue phantoms validate spatial and temporal accuracy of the system. As a potential new application of dynamic optical imaging I present the first application of this method to use vascular hemodynamics as a means of characterizing

  17. Conjugate-gradient preconditioning methods for shift-variant PET image reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fessler, J A; Booth, S D

    1999-01-01

    Gradient-based iterative methods often converge slowly for tomographic image reconstruction and image restoration problems, but can be accelerated by suitable preconditioners. Diagonal preconditioners offer some improvement in convergence rate, but do not incorporate the structure of the Hessian matrices in imaging problems. Circulant preconditioners can provide remarkable acceleration for inverse problems that are approximately shift-invariant, i.e., for those with approximately block-Toeplitz or block-circulant Hessians. However, in applications with nonuniform noise variance, such as arises from Poisson statistics in emission tomography and in quantum-limited optical imaging, the Hessian of the weighted least-squares objective function is quite shift-variant, and circulant preconditioners perform poorly. Additional shift-variance is caused by edge-preserving regularization methods based on nonquadratic penalty functions. This paper describes new preconditioners that approximate more accurately the Hessian matrices of shift-variant imaging problems. Compared to diagonal or circulant preconditioning, the new preconditioners lead to significantly faster convergence rates for the unconstrained conjugate-gradient (CG) iteration. We also propose a new efficient method for the line-search step required by CG methods. Applications to positron emission tomography (PET) illustrate the method.

  18. Towards a 3-D tomographic retrieval for the air-borne limb-imager GLORIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Ungermann

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available GLORIA (Gimballed Limb Observer for Radiance Imaging of the Atmosphere is a new remote sensing instrument essentially combining a Fourier transform infrared spectrometer with a two-dimensional (2-D detector array in combination with a highly flexible gimbal mount. It will be housed in the belly pod of the German research aircraft HALO (High Altitude and Long Range Research Aircraft. It is unique in its combination of high spatial and state-of-the art spectral resolution. Furthermore, the horizontal view angle with respect to the aircraft flight direction can be varied from 45° to 135°. This allows for tomographic measurements of mesoscale events for a wide variety of atmospheric constituents.

    In this paper, a tomographic retrieval scheme is presented, which is able to fully exploit the manifold radiance observations of the GLORIA limb sounder. The algorithm is optimized for massive 3-D retrievals of several hundred thousands of measurements and atmospheric constituents on common hardware. The new scheme is used to explore the capabilities of GLORIA to sound the atmosphere in full 3-D with respect to the choice of the flightpath and to different measurement modes of the instrument using ozone as a test species. It is demonstrated that the achievable resolution should approach 200 m vertically and 20 km–30 km horizontally. Finally, a comparison of the 3-D inversion with conventional 1-D inversions using the assumption of a horizontally homogeneous atmosphere is performed.

  19. Tomographic image of the crust and uppermost mantle of the Ionian and Aegean regions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. N. Stavrakakis

    1997-06-01

    Full Text Available We present a tomographic view of the crust and uppermost mantle beneath the Central Mediterranean area obtained from P-wave arrival times of regional earthquakes selected from the ISC bulletin. The P-wave velocity anomalies are obtained using Thurber's algorithm that jointly relocates earthquakes and computes velocity adjustments with respect to a starting model. A specific algorithm has been applied to achieve a distribution of epicentres as even as possible. A data set of 1009 events and 49072 Pg and Pn phases was selected. We find a low velocity belt in the crust, evident in the map view at 25 km of depth, beneath the Hellenic arc. A low velocity anomaly extends at 40 km of depth under the Aegean back arc basin. High velocities are present at Moho depth beneath the Ionian sea close to the Calabrian and Aegean arcs. The tomographic images suggest a close relationship between P-wave velocity pattern and the subduction systems of the studied area.

  20. COMPARISON OF TRANSVERSE COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHIC EXCRETORY UROGRAPHY IMAGES AND MAXIMUM INTENSITY PROJECTION IMAGES FOR DIAGNOSING ECTOPIC URETERS IN DOGS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Secrest, Scott; Bugbee, Andrew; Waller, Kenneth; Jiménez, David A

    2017-03-01

    Computed tomographic maximum intensity projection (MIP) images have been shown to improve reader confidence in their diagnoses and to improve detection of vascular structures and pulmonary nodules. The objectives of this method comparison study were to compare transverse source computed tomographic excretory urography (CTEU) images to two, five, and 10 slab thick MIP images for diagnosing canine ectopic ureters, compare reader confidence, and evaluate interobserver agreement. Two board-certified veterinary radiologists and a board-certified small animal internist blindly reviewed transverse source CTEU and two, five, and 10 slab thick MIP images of 24 dogs enrolled in the study. Inclusion criteria included a diagnostic CTEU and either cystoscopic or surgical confirmation of the presence or absence of ureteral ectopia. Eleven dogs were confirmed to have 17 ectopic ureters at surgery and/or cystoscopically. There was no significant difference in reader diagnoses between viewing methods or between viewing methods and the surgical/cystoscopic findings (P < 0.001). Reader confidence was significantly greater on two (P = 0.0080) and five (P = 0.0009) slab thick MIP images with significant interobserver agreement between readers for all viewing methods (P values ranging between 0.0363 and <0.001). In addition, the diagnostic accuracy of MIP images was similar to or better than transverse source CTEU images, when assessed by a radiologist. The study results suggest that CTEU is a reliable imaging technique for diagnosing canine ectopic ureters among specialists of varied experience. In addition, thin slice reconstructed MIP images improve reader confidence and potentially diagnostic accuracy, and thus their use should be considered, especially in more challenging cases. © 2016 American College of Veterinary Radiology.

  1. On the impact of neutron beam divergence and scattering on the quality of transmission acquired tomographic images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvani, Maria Ines; Lopes, Ricardo T.; de Almeida, Gevaldo L.; Gonçalves, Marcelo José; Furieri, Rosanne C. A. A.

    2007-10-01

    The impact of the divergence of a thermal neutron beam and the scattered neutrons on the quality of tomographic images acquired by transmission have been evaluated by using a third generation tomographic system incorporating neutron collimators under several different arrangements. The system equipped with a gaseous position sensitive detector has been placed at the main channel outlet of the Argonauta Research Reactor in Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear (CNEN-Brazil) which furnishes a thermal neutron flux of 2.3 × 105 n cm-2 s-1. Experiments have then been conducted using test-objects with well-known inner structure and composition to assess the influence of the collimators arrangement on the quality of the acquired images. Both, beam divergence and scattering - expected to spoil the image quality - have been reduced by using properly positioned collimators between the neutron source and the object, and in the gap between the object and the detector, respectively. The shadow cast by this last collimator on the projections used to reconstruct the tomographic images has been eliminated by a proper software specifically written for this purpose. Improvement of the tomographic images has been observed, demonstrating the effectiveness of the proposed approach to improve their quality by using properly positioned collimators.

  2. Measurement of facial soft tissues thickness using 3D computed tomographic images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Ho Gul; Kim, Kee Deog; Shin, Dong Won; Hu, Kyung Seok; Lee, Jae Bum; Park, Hyok; Park, Chang Seo [Yonsei Univ. Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Han, Seung Ho [Catholic Univ. of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-03-15

    To evaluate accuracy and reliability of program to measure facial soft tissue thickness using 3D computed tomographic images by comparing with direct measurement. One cadaver was scanned with a Helical CT with 3 mm slice thickness and 3 mm/sec table speed. The acquired data was reconstructed with 1.5 mm reconstruction interval and the images were transferred to a personal computer. The facial soft tissue thickness were measured using a program developed newly in 3D image. For direct measurement, the cadaver was cut with a bone cutter and then a ruler was placed above the cut side. The procedure was followed by taking pictures of the facial soft tissues with a high-resolution digital camera. Then the measurements were done in the photographic images and repeated for ten times. A repeated measure analysis of variance was adopted to compare and analyze the measurements resulting from the two different methods. Comparison according to the areas was analyzed by Mann-Whitney test. There were no statistically significant differences between the direct measurements and those using the 3D images(p>0.05). There were statistical differences in the measurements on 17 points but all the points except 2 points showed a mean difference of 0.5 mm or less. The developed software program to measure the facial soft tissue thickness using 3D images was so accurate that it allows to measure facial soft tissue thickness more easily in forensic science and anthropology.

  3. Ultrasonographic imaging of papillary thyroid carcinoma variants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Jung Hee [Dept. of Radiology and Center for Imaging Science, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-04-15

    Ultrasonography (US) is routinely used to evaluate thyroid nodules. The US features of papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC), the most common thyroid malignancy, include hypoechogenicity, spiculated/microlobulated margins, microcalcifications, and a nonparallel orientation. However, many PTC variants have been identified, some of which differ from the classic type of PTC in terms of biological behavior and clinical outcomes. This review describes the US features and clinical implications of the variants of PTC. With the introduction of active surveillance replacing immediate biopsy or surgical treatment of indolent, small PTCs, an understanding of the US characteristics of PTC variants will facilitate the individualized management of patients with PTC.

  4. Interior tomographic imaging for x-ray coherent scattering (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Sean; Zhu, Zheyuan

    2017-05-01

    Conventional computed tomography reconstructs the attenuation only high-dimensional images. Coherent scatter computed tomography, which reconstructs the angular dependent scattering profiles of 3D objects, can provide molecular signatures that improves the accuracy of material identification and classification. Coherent scatter tomography are traditionally acquired by setups similar to x-ray powder diffraction machine; a collimated source in combination with 2D or 1D detector collimation in order to localize the scattering point. In addition, the coherent scatter cross-section is often 3 orders of magnitude lower than that of the absorption cross-section for the same material. Coded aperture and structured illumination approaches has been shown to greatly improve the collection efficiency. In many applications, especially in security imaging and medical diagnosis, fast and accurate identification of the material composition of a small volume within the whole object would lead to an accelerated imaging procedure and reduced radiation dose. Here, we report an imaging method to reconstruct the material coherent scatter profile within a small volume. The reconstruction along one radial direction can reconstruct a scalar coherent scattering tomographic image. Our methods takes advantage of the finite support of the scattering profile in small angle regime. Our system uses a pencil beam setup without using any detector side collimation. Coherent scatter profile of a 10 mm scattering sample embedded in a 30 mm diameter phantom was reconstructed. The setup has small form factor and is suitable for various portable non-destructive detection applications.

  5. Spatially resolved and observer-free experimental quantification of spatial resolution in tomographic images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsekenis, S. A.; Tait, N.; McCann, H.

    2015-03-01

    We present a novel framework and experimental method for the quantification of spatial resolution of a tomography system. The framework adopts the "black box" view of an imaging system, considering only its input and output. The tomography system is locally stimulated with a step input, viz., a sharp edge. The output, viz., the reconstructed images, is analysed by Fourier decomposition of their spatial frequency components, and the local limiting spatial resolution is determined using a cut-off threshold. At no point is an observer involved in the process. The framework also includes a means of translating the quantification region in the imaging space, thus creating a spatially resolved map of objectively quantified spatial resolution. As a case-study, the framework is experimentally applied using a gaseous propane phantom measured by a well-established chemical species tomography system. A spatial resolution map consisting of 28 regions is produced. In isolated regions, the indicated performance is 4-times better than that suggested in the literature and varies by 57% across the imaging space. A mechanism based on adjacent but non-interacting beams is hypothesised to explain the observed behaviour. The mechanism suggests that, as also independently concluded by other methods, a geometrically regular beam array maintains maximum objectivity in reconstructions. We believe that the proposed framework, methodology, and findings will be of value in the design and performance evaluation of tomographic imaging arrays and systems.

  6. Recovery and Visualization of 3D Structure of Chromosomes from Tomographic Reconstruction Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsap Leonid V

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The objectives of this work include automatic recovery and visualization of a 3D chromosome structure from a sequence of 2D tomographic reconstruction images taken through the nucleus of a cell. Structure is very important for biologists as it affects chromosome functions, behavior of the cell, and its state. Analysis of chromosome structure is significant in the detection of diseases, identification of chromosomal abnormalities, study of DNA structural conformation, in-depth study of chromosomal surface morphology, observation of in vivo behavior of the chromosomes over time, and in monitoring environmental gene mutations. The methodology incorporates thresholding based on a histogram analysis with a polyline splitting algorithm, contour extraction via active contours, and detection of the 3D chromosome structure by establishing corresponding regions throughout the slices. Visualization using point cloud meshing generates a 3D surface. The 3D triangular mesh of the chromosomes provides surface detail and allows a user to interactively analyze chromosomes using visualization software.

  7. Recovery and Visualization of 3D Structure of Chromosomes from Tomographic Reconstruction Images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Babu, S; Liao, P; Shin, M C; Tsap, L V

    2004-04-28

    The objectives of this work include automatic recovery and visualization of a 3D chromosome structure from a sequence of 2D tomographic reconstruction images taken through the nucleus of a cell. Structure is very important for biologists as it affects chromosome functions, behavior of the cell and its state. Chromosome analysis is significant in the detection of deceases and in monitoring environmental gene mutations. The algorithm incorporates thresholding based on a histogram analysis with a polyline splitting algorithm, contour extraction via active contours, and detection of the 3D chromosome structure by establishing corresponding regions throughout the slices. Visualization using point cloud meshing generates a 3D surface. The 3D triangular mesh of the chromosomes provides surface detail and allows a user to interactively analyze chromosomes using visualization software.

  8. Comparison between resistography readings and tomographic images for internal assessment in trees trunks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Martins de Almeida Rollo

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Risk assessment of tree falls is essential for urban management and demands reliable methods and criteria capable of providing accurate information on assessed individuals. Among the tools currently used, resistograph stands out since it enables the detection of biomechanical problems through readings of needle penetration resistance. Recently, impulse tomography has been used as advanced technology to detect inner rottenness based on measurements of energy propagation velocity in inner tissues, generating a tomographic image that highlights higher and lower density areas related to lesions and rot processes. We compared these two risk assessment methods of trees to evaluate data reliability generated from impulse tomography, contrasting its results with data from resistograph. We obtained a model with high determination coefficient (R² of 0.9977, showing that data provided by impulse tomography are high quality and reliable.

  9. Landmarking of computed tomographic images to assist in segmentation of abdominal tumors caused by neuroblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banik, Shantanu; Rangayyan, Rangaraj M; Boag, Graham S

    2008-01-01

    Segmentation of the primary tumor mass in neuroblastoma could aid radiologists by facilitating reproducible and objective quantification of the tumor's tissue composition and size. However, due to the heterogeneous nature of the tissue components of the neuroblastic tumor, ranging from low-attenuation necrosis to high-attenuation calcification, some of which possess strong similarities with adjacent nontumoral tissues in computed tomographic (CT) images, segmentation of the tumor is a difficult problem. In this context, landmarking methods are proposed to assist in the segmentation of neuroblastic tumors. Methods are proposed to identify and segment automatically the rib structure, the vertebral column, the spinal canal, the diaphragm, and the pelvic girdle. The use of the landmarks assisted in limiting the scope of the tumor segmentation process to the abdomen, and resulted in the reduction of the false-positive error rates by 26.9%, on the average, over 10 CT exams, and improved the result of segmentation of neuroblastic tumors.

  10. Post-processing methods of rendering and visualizing 3-D reconstructed tomographic images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wong, S.T.C. [Univ. of California, San Francisco, CA (United States)

    1997-02-01

    The purpose of this presentation is to discuss the computer processing techniques of tomographic images, after they have been generated by imaging scanners, for volume visualization. Volume visualization is concerned with the representation, manipulation, and rendering of volumetric data. Since the first digital images were produced from computed tomography (CT) scanners in the mid 1970s, applications of visualization in medicine have expanded dramatically. Today, three-dimensional (3D) medical visualization has expanded from using CT data, the first inherently digital source of 3D medical data, to using data from various medical imaging modalities, including magnetic resonance scanners, positron emission scanners, digital ultrasound, electronic and confocal microscopy, and other medical imaging modalities. We have advanced from rendering anatomy to aid diagnosis and visualize complex anatomic structures to planning and assisting surgery and radiation treatment. New, more accurate and cost-effective procedures for clinical services and biomedical research have become possible by integrating computer graphics technology with medical images. This trend is particularly noticeable in current market-driven health care environment. For example, interventional imaging, image-guided surgery, and stereotactic and visualization techniques are now stemming into surgical practice. In this presentation, we discuss only computer-display-based approaches of volumetric medical visualization. That is, we assume that the display device available is two-dimensional (2D) in nature and all analysis of multidimensional image data is to be carried out via the 2D screen of the device. There are technologies such as holography and virtual reality that do provide a {open_quotes}true 3D screen{close_quotes}. To confine the scope, this presentation will not discuss such approaches.

  11. Tomographic diffractive imaging of monolayer crystals at atomic resolution with onedimensional compact support

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weierstall, U.; Spence, J.; Hembree, G.

    2003-09-01

    A solution to the phase problem for diffraction by two-dimensional crystalline slabs is described, based on the application of a compact support normal to the slab. Specifically we apply the iterative Gerchberg-Saxton-Fienup algorithm to simulated three-dimensional transmission electron diffraction data from monolayer organic crystals. We find that oversampling normal to the monolayer alone does not solve the phase problem in this geometry in general. However, based on simulations for a crystalline monolayer (tetracyanoethylene), we find that convergence is obtained if phases are supplied from a few high-resolution electron microscope images recorded at small tilts to the beam direction. Since current cryomicroscopy methods required a large number of images to phase tomographic diffraction data, this method should greatly reduce the labor involved in data acquisition and analysis in cryo-electron microscopy of organic thin crystals by avoiding the need to record images at high tilt angles. We discuss also the use of laser tweezers as a method of supporting nanoparticles in TEM for diffractive imaging

  12. Fractal analysis of en face tomographic images obtained with full field optical coherence tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, Wanrong; Zhu, Yue [Department of Optical Engineering, Nanjing University of Science and Technology, Jiangsu (China)

    2017-03-15

    The quantitative modeling of the imaging signal of pathological areas and healthy areas is necessary to improve the specificity of diagnosis with tomographic en face images obtained with full field optical coherence tomography (FFOCT). In this work, we propose to use the depth-resolved change in the fractal parameter as a quantitative specific biomarker of the stages of disease. The idea is based on the fact that tissue is a random medium and only statistical parameters that characterize tissue structure are appropriate. We successfully relate the imaging signal in FFOCT to the tissue structure in terms of the scattering function and the coherent transfer function of the system. The formula is then used to analyze the ratio of the Fourier transforms of the cancerous tissue to the normal tissue. We found that when the tissue changes from the normal to cancerous the ratio of the spectrum of the index inhomogeneities takes the form of an inverse power law and the changes in the fractal parameter can be determined by estimating slopes of the spectra of the ratio plotted on a log-log scale. The fresh normal and cancer liver tissues were imaged to demonstrate the potential diagnostic value of the method at early stages when there are no significant changes in tissue microstructures. (copyright 2016 by WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  13. Advances in tomographic PIV

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Novara, M.

    2013-01-01

    This research deals with advanced developments in 3D particle image velocimetry based on the tomographic PIV technique (Tomo-PIV). The latter is a relatively recent measurement technique introduced by Elsinga et al. in 2005, which is based on the tomographic reconstruction of particle tracers in

  14. Image display system for synchronous interpretaion of supine and prone computed tomographic colography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Judd E.; Johnson, C. Daniel

    1998-06-01

    Computed tomographic colography (CTC or virtual colonoscopy) is a new technique for imaging the colon for the detection of colorectal neoplasms. Early clinical assessment of this procedure has shown that the performance of this test is acceptable for colorectal screening examinations. The current version of CTC utilizes an interactive combination of axial, reformatted 2D and 3D images (from an endoluminal perspective) that are generated in real time. Retained fluid in the lumen of the colon is a commonly encountered problem that can obscure lesions. Prone imaging in addition to standard supine views are often required to visualize obscured colonic segments. Although the colorectum is often seen optimally with combined supine and prone views, twice as much interpretation time is required with both acquisitions. The purpose of this study is to describe a novel system of synchronous display of supine and prone images of the colon. Simultaneous display of synchronized (anatomically registered) views of the colon eliminates the need for two separate readings of the colon and shortens interpretation time. This tool has all of the features of the original CTC interpretation system (presented in 1995) and includes recent innovations such as virtual pathology which is present in another paper within this Proceeding. The anatomic levels are indexed to match each other and advanced synchronously as the radiologist interprets the data set. Axial, reformatted 2D and 3D images are displayed and simultaneously updated for both prone and supine images on the same computer screen. The colon only needs to be reviewed once with the diagnostic benefit of both scans. In many cases, the two scans can be interpreted nearly as quickly as one. Conclusion: Synchronous display of prone and supine images of the colon is a new enhancement for CTC that combines with advantages of prone and supine views without the added interpretations time of reviewing two separate scans.

  15. A distribution-based parametrization for improved tomographic imaging of solute plumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pidlisecky, Adam; Singha, K.; Day-Lewis, F. D.

    2011-01-01

    Difference geophysical tomography (e.g. radar, resistivity and seismic) is used increasingly for imaging fluid flow and mass transport associated with natural and engineered hydrologic phenomena, including tracer experiments, in situ remediation and aquifer storage and recovery. Tomographic data are collected over time, inverted and differenced against a background image to produce 'snapshots' revealing changes to the system; these snapshots readily provide qualitative information on the location and morphology of plumes of injected tracer, remedial amendment or stored water. In principle, geometric moments (i.e. total mass, centres of mass, spread, etc.) calculated from difference tomograms can provide further quantitative insight into the rates of advection, dispersion and mass transfer; however, recent work has shown that moments calculated from tomograms are commonly biased, as they are strongly affected by the subjective choice of regularization criteria. Conventional approaches to regularization (Tikhonov) and parametrization (image pixels) result in tomograms which are subject to artefacts such as smearing or pixel estimates taking on the sign opposite to that expected for the plume under study. Here, we demonstrate a novel parametrization for imaging plumes associated with hydrologic phenomena. Capitalizing on the mathematical analogy between moment-based descriptors of plumes and the moment-based parameters of probability distributions, we design an inverse problem that (1) is overdetermined and computationally efficient because the image is described by only a few parameters, (2) produces tomograms consistent with expected plume behaviour (e.g. changes of one sign relative to the background image), (3) yields parameter estimates that are readily interpreted for plume morphology and offer direct insight into hydrologic processes and (4) requires comparatively few data to achieve reasonable model estimates. We demonstrate the approach in a series of

  16. Estimation of the thermal conductivity of hemp based insulation material from 3D tomographic images

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Sawalhi, R.; Lux, J.; Salagnac, P.

    2016-08-01

    In this work, we are interested in the structural and thermal characterization of natural fiber insulation materials. The thermal performance of these materials depends on the arrangement of fibers, which is the consequence of the manufacturing process. In order to optimize these materials, thermal conductivity models can be used to correlate some relevant structural parameters with the effective thermal conductivity. However, only a few models are able to take into account the anisotropy of such material related to the fibers orientation, and these models still need realistic input data (fiber orientation distribution, porosity, etc.). The structural characteristics are here directly measured on a 3D tomographic image using advanced image analysis techniques. Critical structural parameters like porosity, pore and fiber size distribution as well as local fiber orientation distribution are measured. The results of the tested conductivity models are then compared with the conductivity tensor obtained by numerical simulation on the discretized 3D microstructure, as well as available experimental measurements. We show that 1D analytical models are generally not suitable for assessing the thermal conductivity of such anisotropic media. Yet, a few anisotropic models can still be of interest to relate some structural parameters, like the fiber orientation distribution, to the thermal properties. Finally, our results emphasize that numerical simulations on 3D realistic microstructure is a very interesting alternative to experimental measurements.

  17. In vivo molecular imaging of thrombosis and thrombolysis using a fibrin-binding positron emission tomographic probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ay, Ilknur; Blasi, Francesco; Rietz, Tyson A; Rotile, Nicholas J; Kura, Sreekanth; Brownell, Anna Liisa; Day, Helen; Oliveira, Bruno L; Looby, Richard J; Caravan, Peter

    2014-07-01

    Fibrin is a major component of arterial and venous thrombi and represents an ideal candidate for molecular imaging of thrombosis. Here, we describe imaging properties and target uptake of a new fibrin-specific positron emission tomographic probe for thrombus detection and therapy monitoring in 2 rat thrombosis models. The fibrin-binding probe FBP7 was synthesized by conjugation of a known short cyclic peptide to a cross-bridged chelator (CB-TE2A), followed by labeling with copper-64. Adult male Wistar rats (n=26) underwent either carotid crush injury (mural thrombosis model) or embolic stroke (occlusive thrombosis model) followed by recombinant tissue-type plasminogen activator treatment (10 mg/kg, IV). FBP7 detected thrombus location in both animal models with a high positron emission tomographic target-to-background ratio that increased over time (>5-fold at 30-90 minutes, >15-fold at 240-285 minutes). In the carotid crush injury animals, biodistribution analysis confirmed high probe uptake in the thrombotic artery (≈0.5%ID/g; >5-fold greater than blood and other tissues of the head and thorax). Similar results were obtained from ex vivo autoradiography of the ipsilateral versus contralateral carotid arteries. In embolic stroke animals, positron emission tomographic-computed tomographic imaging localized the clot in the internal carotid/middle cerebral artery segment of all rats. Time-dependent reduction of activity at the level of the thrombus was detected in recombinant tissue-type plasminogen activator-treated rats but not in vehicle-injected animals. Brain autoradiography confirmed clot dissolution in recombinant tissue-type plasminogen activator-treated animals, but enduring high thrombus activity in control rats. We demonstrated that FBP7 is suitable for molecular imaging of thrombosis and thrombolysis in vivo and represents a promising candidate for bench-to-bedside translation. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  18. A three-dimensional strain measurement method in elastic transparent materials using tomographic particle image velocimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Sara; Aoyama, Yusuke; Umezu, Mitsuo

    2017-01-01

    Background The mechanical interaction between blood vessels and medical devices can induce strains in these vessels. Measuring and understanding these strains is necessary to identify the causes of vascular complications. This study develops a method to measure the three-dimensional (3D) distribution of strain using tomographic particle image velocimetry (Tomo-PIV) and compares the measurement accuracy with the gauge strain in tensile tests. Methods and findings The test system for measuring 3D strain distribution consists of two cameras, a laser, a universal testing machine, an acrylic chamber with a glycerol water solution for adjusting the refractive index with the silicone, and dumbbell-shaped specimens mixed with fluorescent tracer particles. 3D images of the particles were reconstructed from 2D images using a multiplicative algebraic reconstruction technique (MART) and motion tracking enhancement. Distributions of the 3D displacements were calculated using a digital volume correlation. To evaluate the accuracy of the measurement method in terms of particle density and interrogation voxel size, the gauge strain and one of the two cameras for Tomo-PIV were used as a video-extensometer in the tensile test. The results show that the optimal particle density and interrogation voxel size are 0.014 particles per pixel and 40 × 40 × 40 voxels with a 75% overlap. The maximum measurement error was maintained at less than 2.5% in the 4-mm-wide region of the specimen. Conclusions We successfully developed a method to experimentally measure 3D strain distribution in an elastic silicone material using Tomo-PIV and fluorescent particles. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report that applies Tomo-PIV to investigate 3D strain measurements in elastic materials with large deformation and validates the measurement accuracy. PMID:28910397

  19. Effects of small variations of speed of sound in optoacoustic tomographic imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deán-Ben, X. Luís; Ntziachristos, Vasilis; Razansky, Daniel, E-mail: dr@tum.de [Institute for Biological and Medical Imaging, Technical University of Munich and Helmholtz Center Munich, Ingolstädter Landstraße 1, 85764 Neuherberg (Germany)

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: Speed of sound difference in the imaged object and surrounding coupling medium may reduce the resolution and overall quality of optoacoustic tomographic reconstructions obtained by assuming a uniform acoustic medium. In this work, the authors investigate the effects of acoustic heterogeneities and discuss potential benefits of accounting for those during the reconstruction procedure. Methods: The time shift of optoacoustic signals in an acoustically heterogeneous medium is studied theoretically by comparing different continuous and discrete wave propagation models. A modification of filtered back-projection reconstruction is subsequently implemented by considering a straight acoustic rays model for ultrasound propagation. The results obtained with this reconstruction procedure are compared numerically and experimentally to those obtained assuming a heuristically fitted uniform speed of sound in both full-view and limited-view optoacoustic tomography scenarios. Results: The theoretical analysis showcases that the errors in the time-of-flight of the signals predicted by considering the straight acoustic rays model tend to be generally small. When using this model for reconstructing simulated data, the resulting images accurately represent the theoretical ones. On the other hand, significant deviations in the location of the absorbing structures are found when using a uniform speed of sound assumption. The experimental results obtained with tissue-mimicking phantoms and a mouse postmortem are found to be consistent with the numerical simulations. Conclusions: Accurate analysis of effects of small speed of sound variations demonstrates that accounting for differences in the speed of sound allows improving optoacoustic reconstruction results in realistic imaging scenarios involving acoustic heterogeneities in tissues and surrounding media.

  20. Evidence for gas and magmatic sources beneath the Yellowstone volcanic field from seismic tomographic imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husen, Stephan; Smith, Robert B.; Waite, Gregory P.

    2004-03-01

    The 3-D P-wave velocity and P- to S-wave velocity ratio structure of the Yellowstone volcanic field, Wyoming, has been determined from local earthquake tomography using new data from the permanent Yellowstone seismic network. We selected 3374 local earthquakes between 1995 and 2001 to invert for the 3-D P-wave velocity ( Vp) and P-wave to S-wave velocity ratio ( Vp/ Vs) structure. Vp anomalies of small size (15×15 km) are reliably imaged in the northwestern part of the model outside the Yellowstone caldera; inside the caldera only Vp anomalies of large size extending over several grid nodes are reliably imaged. The Vp/ Vs solution is generally poorer due to the low number of S-P arrival times. Only the northwestern part of the model is resolved with confidence; the Vp/ Vs solution also suffers from strong vertical and horizontal velocity smearing. The tomographic images confirm the existence of a low Vp-body beneath the Yellowstone caldera at depths greater than 8 km, possibly representing hot, crystallizing magma. The most striking result of our study is a volume of anomalously low Vp and Vp/ Vs in the northwestern part of the Yellowstone volcanic field at shallow depths of <2.0 km. Theoretical calculations of changes in P- to S-wave velocity ratios indicate that these anomalies can be interpreted as porous, gas-filled rock. The close spatial correlation of the observed anomalies and the occurrence of the largest earthquake swarm in historic time in Yellowstone, 1985, suggest that the gas may have originated as part of magmatic fluids released by crystallization of magma beneath the Yellowstone caldera.

  1. Two methods of Haustral fold detection from computed tomographic virtual colonoscopy images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhury, Ananda S.; Tan, Sovira; Yao, Jianhua; Linguraru, Marius G.; Summers, Ronald M.

    2009-02-01

    Virtual colonoscopy (VC) has gained popularity as a new colon diagnostic method over the last decade. VC is a new, less invasive alternative to the usually practiced optical colonoscopy for colorectal polyp and cancer screening, the second major cause of cancer related deaths in industrial nations. Haustral (colonic) folds serve as important landmarks for virtual endoscopic navigation in the existing computer-aided-diagnosis (CAD) system. In this paper, we propose and compare two different methods of haustral fold detection from volumetric computed tomographic virtual colonoscopy images. The colon lumen is segmented from the input using modified region growing and fuzzy connectedness. The first method for fold detection uses a level set that evolves on a mesh representation of the colon surface. The colon surface is obtained from the segmented colon lumen using the Marching Cubes algorithm. The second method for fold detection, based on a combination of heat diffusion and fuzzy c-means algorithm, is employed on the segmented colon volume. Folds obtained on the colon volume using this method are then transferred to the corresponding colon surface. After experimentation with different datasets, results are found to be promising. The results also demonstrate that the first method has a tendency of slight under-segmentation while the second method tends to slightly over-segment the folds.

  2. A tomographic particle image velocimetry investigation of the flow development over dual step cylinders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morton, C., E-mail: chris.morton@ucalgary.ca [Department of Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering, University of Calgary, 2500 University Dr NW, Calgary, Alberta T2N 1N4 (Canada); Yarusevych, S. [Department of Mechanical and Mechatronics Engineering, University of Waterloo, 200 University Ave W, Waterloo, Ontario N2L 3G1 (Canada); Scarano, F. [Department of Aerospace Engineering, Delft University of Technology, 2628 Delft (Netherlands)

    2016-02-15

    This experimental study focuses on the near wake development of a dual step cylinder geometry consisting of a long base cylinder of diameter d to which a larger diameter (D) cylinder of length L is attached coaxially at mid-span. The experiments cover a range of Reynolds numbers, 2000 ≤ Re{sub D} ≤ 5000, diameter ratios, 1.33 ≤ D/d ≤ 2.0 and large cylinder aspect ratios, 0.5 ≤ L/D ≤ 5 using Tomographic particle image velocimetry. Distinct changes in wake topology are observed varying the above parameters. Supporting previous experimental studies on the same geometry involving flow visualization and planar measurements, four distinct flow regimes are identified to which a distinct three-dimensional wake topology can be associated. The vortex-dominated wake dynamical behaviour is investigated with Proper Orthogonal Decomposition (POD) and conditional averaging of three-dimensional velocity fields is used to exemplify the different shedding regimes. The conditionally averaged flow fields are shown to quantitatively resolve flow features equivalent to those obtained from a reduced order model consisting of the first ten to twenty POD modes, identifying the dominant vortex shedding cells and their interactions.

  3. Tomographic Imaging of the Peru Subduction Zone beneath the Altiplano and Implications for Andean Tectonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, P. M.; Foote, E. J.; Stubailo, I.; Phillips, K. E.; Clayton, R. W.; Skinner, S.; Audin, L.; Tavera, H.; Dominguez Ramirez, L. A.; Lukac, M. L.

    2010-12-01

    This work describes preliminary tomography results from the Peru Seismic Experiment (PERUSE) a 100 station broadband seismic network installed in Peru. The network consists a linear array of broadband seismic stations that was installed mid-2008 that runs from the Peruvian coast near Mollendo to Lake Titicaca. A second line was added in late 2009 between Lake Titicaca and Cusco. Teleseismic and local earthquake travel time residuals are being combined in the tomographic inversions. The crust under the Andes is found to be 70-80 km thick decreasing to 30 km near the coast. The morphology of the Moho is consistent with the receiver function images (Phillips et al., 2010; this meeting) and also gravity. Ray tracing through the heterogeneous structure is used to locate earthquakes. However the rapid spatial variation in crustal thickness, possibly some of the most rapid in the world, generates shadow zones when using conventional ray tracing for the tomography. We use asymptotic ray theory that approximates effects from finite frequency kernels to model diffracted waves in these regions. The observation of thickened crust suggests that models that attribute the recent acceleration of the Altiplano uplift to crustal delamination are less likely than those that attribute it to crustal compression.

  4. Computer-aided teniae coli detection using height maps from computed tomographic colonography images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Zhuoshi; Yao, Jianhua; Wang, Shijun; Summers, Ronald M.

    2011-03-01

    Computed tomographic colonography (CTC) is a minimally invasive technique for colonic polyps and cancer screening. Teniae coli are three bands of longitudinal smooth muscle on the colon surface. They are parallel, equally distributed on the colon wall, and form a triple helix structure from the appendix to the sigmoid colon. Because of their characteristics, teniae coli are important anatomical meaningful landmarks on human colon. This paper proposes a novel method for teniae coli detection on CT colonography. We first unfold the three-dimensional (3D) colon using a reversible projection technique and compute the two-dimensional (2D) height map of the unfolded colon. The height map records the elevation of colon surface relative to the unfolding plane, where haustral folds corresponding to high elevation points and teniae to low elevation points. The teniae coli are detected on the height map and then projected back to the 3D colon. Since teniae are located where the haustral folds meet, we break down the problem by first detecting haustral folds. We apply 2D Gabor filter banks to extract fold features. The maximum response of the filter banks is then selected as the feature image. The fold centers are then identified based on piecewise thresholding on the feature image. Connecting the fold centers yields a path of the folds. Teniae coli are finally extracted as lines running between the fold paths. Experiments were carried out on 7 cases. The proposed method yielded a promising result with an average normalized RMSE of 5.66% and standard deviation of 4.79% of the circumference of the colon.

  5. Three-dimensional tomographic imaging for dynamic radiation behavior study using infrared imaging video bolometers in large helical device plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sano, Ryuichi; Iwama, Naofumi [National Institute for Fusion Science, 322-6 Oroshi-cho, Toki, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan); Peterson, Byron J.; Kobayashi, Masahiro; Mukai, Kiyofumi [National Institute for Fusion Science, 322-6 Oroshi-cho, Toki, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan); SOKENDAI (The Graduate University for Advanced Studies), Hayama, Kanagawa 240-0193 (Japan); Teranishi, Masaru [Hiroshima Institute of Technology, 2-1-1, Miyake, Saeki-ku, Hiroshima 731-5193 (Japan); Pandya, Shwetang N. [Institute of Plasma Research, Near Indira Bridge, Bhat Village, Gandhinagar, Gujarat 382428 (India)

    2016-05-15

    A three-dimensional (3D) tomography system using four InfraRed imaging Video Bolometers (IRVBs) has been designed with a helical periodicity assumption for the purpose of plasma radiation measurement in the large helical device. For the spatial inversion of large sized arrays, the system has been numerically and experimentally examined using the Tikhonov regularization with the criterion of minimum generalized cross validation, which is the standard solver of inverse problems. The 3D transport code EMC3-EIRENE for impurity behavior and related radiation has been used to produce phantoms for numerical tests, and the relative calibration of the IRVB images has been carried out with a simple function model of the decaying plasma in a radiation collapse. The tomography system can respond to temporal changes in the plasma profile and identify the 3D dynamic behavior of radiation, such as the radiation enhancement that starts from the inboard side of the torus, during the radiation collapse. The reconstruction results are also consistent with the output signals of a resistive bolometer. These results indicate that the designed 3D tomography system is available for the 3D imaging of radiation. The first 3D direct tomographic measurement of a magnetically confined plasma has been achieved.

  6. A solid iodinated phantom material for use in tomographic x-ray imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hill, Melissa L.; Mainprize, James G.; Mawdsley, Gordon E.; Yaffe, Martin J. [Imaging Research, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, S6-35, 2075 Bayview Avenue, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5 (Canada) and Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5 (Canada); Imaging Research, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, S6-31, 2075 Bayview Avenue, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5 (Canada); Imaging Research, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, S6-57, 2075 Bayview Avenue, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5 (Canada) and Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5 (Canada)

    2009-10-15

    estimated that a desired iodine concentration could be produced to within 0.04 mg/ml. Comparison of the measured effective linear iodine attenuation coefficients of eight 1.0 mg/ml samples indicated a manufacturing reproducibility of {+-}0.03 mg/ml iodine. Variations in uniformity across each of the samples were on the order of image intensity fluctuations ({sigma}). No inhomogeneities due to mixing or settling were apparent. An analysis of longitudinal data collected for both calibration sets revealed no perceptible change in radiographic properties over the first 6 months after manufacture, nor over a subsequent 1.5 yr period from 1 yr postmanufacture onward. Conclusions: The uniformity, stability, and precision of this iodinated material suggest that it is suitable for use in accurate calibration tools for contrast tomographic imaging.

  7. Imaging of Anal Fistulas: Comparison of Computed Tomographic Fistulography and Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liang, Changhu [Shandong Medical Imaging Research Institute, Shandong University, Jinan 250021 (China); Lu, Yongchao [Traditional Chinese Medicine Department, Provincial Hospital Affiliated to Shandong University, Jinan 250021 (China); Zhao, Bin [Shandong Medical Imaging Research Institute, Shandong University, Jinan 250021 (China); Du, Yinglin [Shandong Provincial Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Public Health Institute, Jinan 250014 (China); Wang, Cuiyan [Shandong Medical Imaging Research Institute, Shandong University, Jinan 250021 (China); Jiang, Wanli [Department of Radiology, Taishan Medical University, Taian 271000 (China)

    2014-07-01

    The primary importance of magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in evaluating anal fistulas lies in its ability to demonstrate hidden areas of sepsis and secondary extensions in patients with fistula in ano. MR imaging is relatively expensive, so there are many healthcare systems worldwide where access to MR imaging remains restricted. Until recently, computed tomography (CT) has played a limited role in imaging fistula in ano, largely owing to its poor resolution of soft tissue. In this article, the different imaging features of the CT and MRI are compared to demonstrate the relative accuracy of CT fistulography for the preoperative assessment of fistula in ano. CT fistulography and MR imaging have their own advantages for preoperative evaluation of perianal fistula, and can be applied to complement one another when necessary.

  8. Assessment of myocardial viability by dynamic tomographic iodine 123 iodophenylpentadecanoic acid imaging: comparison with rest-redistribution thallium 201 imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iskandrian, A S; Powers, J; Cave, V; Wasserleben, V; Cassell, D; Heo, J

    1995-01-01

    This study examined the ability of dynamic 123I-labeled iodophenylpentadecanoic acid (IPPA) imaging to detect myocardial viability in patients with left ventricular (LV) dysfunction caused by coronary artery disease. Serial 180-degree single-photon emission computed tomographic (SPECT) images (five sets, 8 minutes each) were obtained starting 4 minutes after injection of 2 to 6 mCi 123I at rest in 21 patients with LV dysfunction (ejection fraction [EF] 34% +/- 11%). The segmental uptake was compared with that of rest-redistribution 201Tl images (20 segments/study). The number of perfusion defects (reversible and fixed) was similar by IPPA and thallium (11 +/- 5 vs 10 +/- 5 segments/patient; difference not significant). There was agreement between IPPA and thallium for presence or absence (kappa = 0.78 +/- 0.03) and nature (reversible, mild fixed, or severe fixed) of perfusion defects (kappa = 0.54 +/- 0.04). However, there were more reversible IPPA defects than reversible thallium defects (7 +/- 4 vs 3 +/- 4 segments/patient; p = 0.001). In 14 patients the EF (by gated pool imaging) improved after coronary revascularization from 33% +/- 11% to 39% +/- 12% (p = 0.002). The number of reversible IPPA defects was greater in the seven patients who had improvement in EF than in the patients without such improvement (10 +/- 4 vs 5 +/- 4 segments/patient; p = 0.075). 123I-labeled IPPA SPECT imaging is a promising new technique for assessment of viability. Reversible defects predict recovery of LV dysfunction after coronary revascularization.

  9. A non-tomographic method for imaging the global ionospheric electron density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunini, C.; Meza, A.; Azpilicueta, F.; Schmidt, M.; Nava, B.; Coïson, P.; Radicella, S.

    There are today a variety of approaches for processing dual-frequency GPS observations and to produce global ionospheric maps of TEC. The majority of these researches use ground-based GPS observations from the worldwide tracking network of the International GPS Service. While ground-based ionospheric maps represent a big advance for ionosphere weather, the radial geometry of the ground-based observations limits their capability for providing information on the vertical electron distribution. This limitation can be removed by the introduction of horizontal cuts through the ionosphere, affordable by space-born GPS receivers flying on low-Earth orbiting satellites (e.g. GPS-Met, CHAMP, GRACE, SAC-C). Several empirical models are currently used to describe the electron density distribution in the ionosphere. Among them, the NeQuick model is being used by the ESA EGNOS project for assessment analysis and has been proposed for single-frequency operation in the Galileo project. NeQuick is mostly droved by the two parameters NmF2 and hmF2, whose values are usually computed as function of position and time, using the CCIR climatologic database. Since the CCIR provides monthly averaged values, so significant day-to-day deviations between the actual and predicted TEC can be expected. Therefore, it seems suitable to determine appropriate corrections for the CCIR values in order to better fit the observed TEC. In this contribution we present a non-tomographic method for 3-D imaging of the global electron density distribution that uses the NeQuick model and two-dimensional spherical wavelet expansions for representing the spatial variability of the driving parameters of NeQuick. The coefficients of the wavelet series are computable from TEC observations using parameter estimation methods.

  10. Transconvolution and the virtual positron emission tomograph--a new method for cross calibration in quantitative PET∕CT imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prenosil, George A; Weitzel, Thilo; Hentschel, Michael; Klaeser, Bernd; Krause, Thomas

    2013-06-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET)∕computed tomography (CT) measurements on small lesions are impaired by the partial volume effect, which is intrinsically tied to the point spread function of the actual imaging system, including the reconstruction algorithms. The variability resulting from different point spread functions hinders the assessment of quantitative measurements in clinical routine and especially degrades comparability within multicenter trials. To improve quantitative comparability there is a need for methods to match different PET∕CT systems through elimination of this systemic variability. Consequently, a new method was developed and tested that transforms the image of an object as produced by one tomograph to another image of the same object as it would have been seen by a different tomograph. The proposed new method, termed Transconvolution, compensates for differing imaging properties of different tomographs and particularly aims at quantitative comparability of PET∕CT in the context of multicenter trials. To solve the problem of image normalization, the theory of Transconvolution was mathematically established together with new methods to handle point spread functions of different PET∕CT systems. Knowing the point spread functions of two different imaging systems allows determining a Transconvolution function to convert one image into the other. This function is calculated by convolving one point spread function with the inverse of the other point spread function which, when adhering to certain boundary conditions such as the use of linear acquisition and image reconstruction methods, is a numerically accessible operation. For reliable measurement of such point spread functions characterizing different PET∕CT systems, a dedicated solid-state phantom incorporating (68)Ge∕(68)Ga filled spheres was developed. To iteratively determine and represent such point spread functions, exponential density functions in combination with a Gaussian

  11. 3D "spectracoustic" system: a modular, tomographic, spectroscopic mapping imaging, non-invasive, diagnostic system for detection of small starting developing tumors like melanoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karagiannis, Georgios

    2017-03-01

    This work led to a new method named 3D spectracoustic tomographic mapping imaging. The current and the future work is related to the fabrication of a combined acoustic microscopy transducer and infrared illumination probe permitting the simultaneous acquisition of the spectroscopic and the tomographic information. This probe provides with the capability of high fidelity and precision registered information from the combined modalities named spectracoustic information.

  12. Linear information retrieval method in X-ray grating-based phase contrast imaging and its interchangeability with tomographic reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Z.; Gao, K.; Wang, Z. L.; Shao, Q. G.; Hu, R. F.; Wei, C. X.; Zan, G. B.; Wali, F.; Luo, R. H.; Zhu, P. P.; Tian, Y. C.

    2017-06-01

    In X-ray grating-based phase contrast imaging, information retrieval is necessary for quantitative research, especially for phase tomography. However, numerous and repetitive processes have to be performed for tomographic reconstruction. In this paper, we report a novel information retrieval method, which enables retrieving phase and absorption information by means of a linear combination of two mutually conjugate images. Thanks to the distributive law of the multiplication as well as the commutative law and associative law of the addition, the information retrieval can be performed after tomographic reconstruction, thus simplifying the information retrieval procedure dramatically. The theoretical model of this method is established in both parallel beam geometry for Talbot interferometer and fan beam geometry for Talbot-Lau interferometer. Numerical experiments are also performed to confirm the feasibility and validity of the proposed method. In addition, we discuss its possibility in cone beam geometry and its advantages compared with other methods. Moreover, this method can also be employed in other differential phase contrast imaging methods, such as diffraction enhanced imaging, non-interferometric imaging, and edge illumination.

  13. Analysis of discrete-to-discrete imaging models for iterative tomographic image reconstruction and compressive sensing

    CERN Document Server

    Jørgensen, Jakob H; Pan, Xiaochuan

    2011-01-01

    Discrete-to-discrete imaging models for computed tomography (CT) are becoming increasingly ubiquitous as the interest in iterative image reconstruction algorithms has heightened. Despite this trend, all the intuition for algorithm and system design derives from analysis of continuous-to-continuous models such as the X-ray and Radon transform. While the similarity between these models justifies some crossover, questions such as what are sufficient sampling conditions can be quite different for the two models. This sampling issue is addressed extensively in the first half of the article using singular value decomposition analysis for determining sufficient number of views and detector bins. The question of full sampling for CT is particularly relevant to current attempts to adapt compressive sensing (CS) motivated methods to application in CT image reconstruction. The second half goes in depth on this subject and discusses the link between object sparsity and sufficient sampling for accurate reconstruction. Par...

  14. HDR Image Quality Enhancement Based on Spatially Variant Retinal Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Horiuchi Takahiko

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available There is a growing demand for being able to display high dynamic range (HDR images on low dynamic range (LDR devices. Tone mapping is a process for enhancing HDR image quality on an LDR device by converting the tonal values of the original image from HDR to LDR. This paper proposes a new tone mapping algorithm for enhancing image quality by deriving a spatially-variant operator for imitating S-potential response in human retina, which efficiently improves local contrasts while conserving good global appearance. The proposed tone mapping operator is studied from a system construction point of view. It is found that the operator is regarded as a natural extension of the Retinex algorithm by adding a global adaptation process to the local adaptation. The feasibility of the proposed algorithm is examined in detail on experiments using standard HDR images and real HDR scene images, comparing with conventional tone mapping algorithms.

  15. The impact of reorienting cone-beam computed tomographic images in varied head positions on the coordinates of anatomical landmarks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jae Hun; Jeong, Ho Gul; Hwang, Jae Joon; Lee, Jung Hee; Han, Sang Sun [Dept. of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, Yonsei University, College of Dentistry, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-15

    The aim of this study was to compare the coordinates of anatomical landmarks on cone-beam computed tomographic (CBCT) images in varied head positions before and after reorientation using image analysis software. CBCT images were taken in a normal position and four varied head positions using a dry skull marked with 3 points where gutta percha was fixed. In each of the five radiographic images, reference points were set, 20 anatomical landmarks were identified, and each set of coordinates was calculated. Coordinates in the images from the normally positioned head were compared with those in the images obtained from varied head positions using statistical methods. Post-reorientation coordinates calculated using a three-dimensional image analysis program were also compared to the reference coordinates. In the original images, statistically significant differences were found between coordinates in the normal-position and varied-position images. However, post-reorientation, no statistically significant differences were found between coordinates in the normal-position and varied-position images. The changes in head position impacted the coordinates of the anatomical landmarks in three-dimensional images. However, reorientation using image analysis software allowed accurate superimposition onto the reference positions.

  16. 3D Imaging of Buried Dielectric Targets with a Tomographic Microwave Approach Applied to GPR Synthetic Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Galli

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Effective diagnostics with ground penetrating radar (GPR is strongly dependent on the amount and quality of available data as well as on the efficiency of the adopted imaging procedure. In this frame, the aim of the present work is to investigate the capability of a typical GPR system placed at a ground interface to derive three-dimensional (3D information on the features of buried dielectric targets (location, dimension, and shape. The scatterers can have size comparable to the resolution limits and can be placed in the shallow subsurface in the antenna near field. Referring to canonical multimonostatic configurations, the forward scattering problem is analyzed first, obtaining a variety of synthetic GPR traces and radargrams by means of a customized implementation of an electromagnetic CAD tool. By employing these numerical data, a full 3D frequency-domain microwave tomographic approach, specifically designed for the inversion problem at hand, is applied to tackle the imaging process. The method is tested here by considering various scatterers, with different shapes and dielectric contrasts. The selected tomographic results illustrate the aptitude of the proposed approach to recover the fundamental features of the targets even with critical GPR settings.

  17. Observer Evaluation of a Metal Artifact Reduction Algorithm Applied to Head and Neck Cone Beam Computed Tomographic Images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korpics, Mark; Surucu, Murat; Mescioglu, Ibrahim; Alite, Fiori; Block, Alec M.; Choi, Mehee; Emami, Bahman; Harkenrider, Matthew M.; Solanki, Abhishek A.; Roeske, John C., E-mail: jroeske@lumc.edu

    2016-11-15

    Purpose and Objectives: To quantify, through an observer study, the reduction in metal artifacts on cone beam computed tomographic (CBCT) images using a projection-interpolation algorithm, on images containing metal artifacts from dental fillings and implants in patients treated for head and neck (H&N) cancer. Methods and Materials: An interpolation-substitution algorithm was applied to H&N CBCT images containing metal artifacts from dental fillings and implants. Image quality with respect to metal artifacts was evaluated subjectively and objectively. First, 6 independent radiation oncologists were asked to rank randomly sorted blinded images (before and after metal artifact reduction) using a 5-point rating scale (1 = severe artifacts; 5 = no artifacts). Second, the standard deviation of different regions of interest (ROI) within each image was calculated and compared with the mean rating scores. Results: The interpolation-substitution technique successfully reduced metal artifacts in 70% of the cases. From a total of 60 images from 15 H&N cancer patients undergoing image guided radiation therapy, the mean rating score on the uncorrected images was 2.3 ± 1.1, versus 3.3 ± 1.0 for the corrected images. The mean difference in ranking score between uncorrected and corrected images was 1.0 (95% confidence interval: 0.9-1.2, P<.05). The standard deviation of each ROI significantly decreased after artifact reduction (P<.01). Moreover, a negative correlation between the mean rating score for each image and the standard deviation of the oral cavity and bilateral cheeks was observed. Conclusion: The interpolation-substitution algorithm is efficient and effective for reducing metal artifacts caused by dental fillings and implants on CBCT images, as demonstrated by the statistically significant increase in observer image quality ranking and by the decrease in ROI standard deviation between uncorrected and corrected images.

  18. Quantitative analysis of length-diameter distribution and cross-sectional properties of fibers from three-dimensional tomographic images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miettinen, Arttu; Joffe, Roberts; Madsen, Bo

    2013-01-01

    for estimating the length-diameter distribution of solid or hollow fibers, utilizing three-dimensional X-ray tomographic images, is presented. The method is based on a granulometric approach for fiber length distribution measurement, combined with a novel algorithm that relates cross-sectional fiber properties......A number of rule-of-mixture micromechanical models have been successfully used to predict the mechanical properties of short fiber composites. However, in order to obtain accurate predictions, a detailed description of the internal structure of the material is required. This information is often...... obtained from optical microscopy of polished cross-sections of a composite. This approach gives accurate yet local results, but a rather large number of optical images have to be processed to achieve a representative description of the morphology of the material. In this work a fully automatic algorithm...

  19. Development and application of a tomographic model from CT images for calculating internal dose to a pregnant woman

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Chengyu

    Assessment of radiation dose and possible risk to a pregnant woman and her fetus is an important task in radiation protection. Although stylized models for male and female patients of different ages have been developed, tomographic models for pregnant women have not been developed to date. This dissertation presents an effort to construct a partial-body model of a pregnant woman from a set of CT images. The patient was 30-weeks pregnant, and the CT scan covered the portion of the body between the lower breast and the upper thigh in 70 slices, each 7 mm thick. The image resolution was 512 x 512 pixels in a 48 cm x 48 cm field. The images were carefully segmented to identify 34 organs and tissues, It has been found that the masses are different from the Reference Woman. The characteristics of the resulting model is discussed and compared with one existing stylized mathematical model for pregnant women. Based on this tomographic model, a Monte Carlo code, EGS4-VLSI, was used to derive Specific Absorbed Fractions. Monoenergetic and isotropic photon and electron emitters distributed in different source organs were assumed and the energies ranged from 10 keV to 4 MeV for photons and from 100 keV to 4 MeV for electrons. The results for high energy (>50 keV) photons showed general agreement with previous studies, however, the results for lower energy (<50 keV) photons showed differences of up to several hundreds percent for some source and target organs. For electron results, several tens of percent differences were found. Those differences can be explained by mass differences and the relative geometry differences between source and target organs. In summary, the stylized models for pregnant women are satisfactory for a very large size patient for most of the photon energies (between 50 keV and 4 MeV). However, a tomographic model has to be used to obtain acceptable dose assessments for electrons. The newly calculated SAF data set can provide the nuclear medicine dosimetry

  20. Use of a Diagnostic Score to Prioritize Computed Tomographic (CT) Imaging for Patients Suspected of Ischemic Stroke Who May Benefit from Thrombolytic Therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hwong, Wen Yea; Bots, Michiel L; Selvarajah, Sharmini; Kappelle, L Jaap; Abdul Aziz, Zariah; Sidek, Norsima Nazifah; Vaartjes, Ilonca

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A shortage of computed tomographic (CT) machines in low and middle income countries often results in delayed CT imaging for patients suspected of a stroke. Yet, time constraint is one of the most important aspects for patients with an ischemic stroke to benefit from thrombolytic therapy.

  1. Software development for ACR-approved phantom-based nuclear medicine tomographic image quality control with cross-platform compatibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Jungsu S.; Choi, Jae Min; Nam, Ki Pyo; Chae, Sun Young; Ryu, Jin-Sook; Moon, Dae Hyuk; Kim, Jae Seung

    2015-07-01

    Quality control and quality assurance (QC/QA) have been two of the most important issues in modern nuclear medicine (NM) imaging for both clinical practices and academic research. Whereas quantitative QC analysis software is common to modern positron emission tomography (PET) scanners, the QC of gamma cameras and/or single-photon-emission computed tomography (SPECT) scanners has not been sufficiently addressed. Although a thorough standard operating process (SOP) for mechanical and software maintenance may help the QC/QA of a gamma camera and SPECT-computed tomography (CT), no previous study has addressed a unified platform or process to decipher or analyze SPECT phantom images acquired from various scanners thus far. In addition, a few approaches have established cross-platform software to enable the technologists and physicists to assess the variety of SPECT scanners from different manufacturers. To resolve these issues, we have developed Interactive Data Language (IDL)-based in-house software for crossplatform (in terms of not only operating systems (OS) but also manufacturers) analyses of the QC data on an ACR SPECT phantom, which is essential for assessing and assuring the tomographical image quality of SPECT. We applied our devised software to our routine quarterly QC of ACR SPECT phantom images acquired from a number of platforms (OS/manufacturers). Based on our experience, we suggest that our devised software can offer a unified platform that allows images acquired from various types of scanners to be analyzed with great precision and accuracy.

  2. Estimating the surface relaxivity as a function of pore size from NMR T2 distributions and micro-tomographic images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benavides, Francisco; Leiderman, Ricardo; Souza, Andre; Carneiro, Giovanna; Bagueira, Rodrigo

    2017-09-01

    In the present work, we formulate and solve an inverse problem to recover the surface relaxivity as a function of pore size. The input data for our technique are the T2 distribution measurement and the micro-tomographic image of the rock sample under investigation. We simulate the NMR relaxation signal for a given surface relaxivity function using the random walk method and rank different surface relaxivity functions according to the correlation of the resulting simulated T2 distributions with the measured T2 distribution. The optimization is performed using genetic algorithms and determines the surface relaxivity function whose corresponding simulated T2 distribution best matches the measured T2 distribution. In the proposed methodology, pore size is associated with a number of collisions in the random walk simulations. We illustrate the application of the proposed method by performing inversions from synthetic and laboratory input data and compare the obtained results with those obtained using the uniform relaxivity assumption.

  3. Numerical model of optical coherence tomographic vibrography imaging to estimate corneal biomechanical properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kling, Sabine; Akca, Imran B; Chang, Ernest W; Scarcelli, Giuliano; Bekesi, Nandor; Yun, Seok-Hyun; Marcos, Susana

    2014-12-06

    Most techniques measuring corneal biomechanics in vivo are biased by side factors. We demonstrate the ability of optical coherence tomographic (OCT) vibrography to determine corneal material parameters, while reducing current prevalent restrictions of other techniques (such as intraocular pressure (IOP) and thickness dependency). Modal analysis was performed in a finite-element (FE) model to study the oscillation response in isolated thin corneal flaps/eye globes and to analyse the dependency of the frequency response function on: corneal elasticity, viscoelasticity, geometry (thickness and curvature), IOP and density. The model was verified experimentally in flaps from three bovine corneas and in two enucleated porcine eyes using sound excitation (100-110 dB) together with a phase-sensitive OCT to measure the frequency response function (range 50-510 Hz). Simulations showed that corneal vibration in flaps is sensitive to both, geometrical and biomechanical parameters, whereas in whole globes it is primarily sensitive to corneal biomechanical parameters only. Calculations based on the natural frequency shift revealed that flaps of the posterior cornea were 0.8 times less stiff than flaps from the anterior cornea and cross-linked corneas were 1.6 times stiffer than virgin corneas. Sensitivity analysis showed that natural vibration frequencies of whole globes were nearly independent from corneal thickness and IOP within the physiological range. OCT vibrography is a promising non-invasive technique to measure corneal elasticity without biases from corneal thickness and IOP.

  4. Numerical model of optical coherence tomographic vibrography imaging to estimate corneal biomechanical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kling, Sabine; Akca, Imran B.; Chang, Ernest W.; Scarcelli, Giuliano; Bekesi, Nandor; Yun, Seok-Hyun; Marcos, Susana

    2014-01-01

    Most techniques measuring corneal biomechanics in vivo are biased by side factors. We demonstrate the ability of optical coherence tomographic (OCT) vibrography to determine corneal material parameters, while reducing current prevalent restrictions of other techniques (such as intraocular pressure (IOP) and thickness dependency). Modal analysis was performed in a finite-element (FE) model to study the oscillation response in isolated thin corneal flaps/eye globes and to analyse the dependency of the frequency response function on: corneal elasticity, viscoelasticity, geometry (thickness and curvature), IOP and density. The model was verified experimentally in flaps from three bovine corneas and in two enucleated porcine eyes using sound excitation (100–110 dB) together with a phase-sensitive OCT to measure the frequency response function (range 50–510 Hz). Simulations showed that corneal vibration in flaps is sensitive to both, geometrical and biomechanical parameters, whereas in whole globes it is primarily sensitive to corneal biomechanical parameters only. Calculations based on the natural frequency shift revealed that flaps of the posterior cornea were 0.8 times less stiff than flaps from the anterior cornea and cross-linked corneas were 1.6 times stiffer than virgin corneas. Sensitivity analysis showed that natural vibration frequencies of whole globes were nearly independent from corneal thickness and IOP within the physiological range. OCT vibrography is a promising non-invasive technique to measure corneal elasticity without biases from corneal thickness and IOP. PMID:25320067

  5. High-throughput, image-based screening of pooled genetic-variant libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emanuel, George; Moffitt, Jeffrey R; Zhuang, Xiaowei

    2017-12-01

    We report a high-throughput screening method that allows diverse genotypes and corresponding phenotypes to be imaged in individual cells. We achieve genotyping by introducing barcoded genetic variants into cells as pooled libraries and reading the barcodes out using massively multiplexed fluorescence in situ hybridization. To demonstrate the power of image-based pooled screening, we identified brighter and more photostable variants of the fluorescent protein YFAST among 60,000 variants.

  6. Effective segmentation of fresh post-mortem murine lung parenchyma in phase contrast X-ray tomographic microscopy images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogiatzis Oikonomidis, Ioannis; Cremona, Tiziana P.; Lovric, Goran; Arcadu, Filippo; Stampanoni, Marco; Schittny, Johannes C.

    2017-06-01

    The acinus represents the functional unit of the mammalian lung. It is defined as the small tree of gas-exchanging airways, which is fed by the most distal purely conducting airway. Different hypotheses exist on how the fine structure of the acinus changes during ventilation and development. Since in classical 2-dimensional (2D) sections of the lung the borders of the acini are not detectable, every study of acini requires 3-dimensional (3D) datasets. As a basis for further studies of pulmonary acini we imaged rodent lungs as close to life as possible using phase contrast synchrotron radiation-based X-ray tomographic microscopy (SRXTM), and developed a protocol for the segmentation of the alveolar septa. The method is based on a combined multilevel filtering approach. Seeds are automatically defined for separate regions of tissue and airspace during each 2D filtering level and then given as input to a 3D random walk segmentation. Thus, the different types of artifacts present in the images are treated separately, taking into account the sample’s structural complexity. The proposed procedure yields high-quality 3D segmentations of acinar microstructure that can be used for a reliable morphological analysis.

  7. Functional tomographic fluorescence imaging of pH microenvironments in microbial biofilms by use of silica nanoparticle sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hidalgo, Gabriela; Burns, Andrew; Herz, Erik; Hay, Anthony G; Houston, Paul L; Wiesner, Ulrich; Lion, Leonard W

    2009-12-01

    Attached bacterial communities can generate three-dimensional (3D) physicochemical gradients that create microenvironments where local conditions are substantially different from those in the surrounding solution. Given their ubiquity in nature and their impacts on issues ranging from water quality to human health, better tools for understanding biofilms and the gradients they create are needed. Here we demonstrate the use of functional tomographic imaging via confocal fluorescence microscopy of ratiometric core-shell silica nanoparticle sensors (C dot sensors) to study the morphology and temporal evolution of pH microenvironments in axenic Escherichia coli PHL628 and mixed-culture wastewater biofilms. Testing of 70-, 30-, and 10-nm-diameter sensor particles reveals a critical size for homogeneous biofilm staining, with only the 10-nm-diameter particles capable of successfully generating high-resolution maps of biofilm pH and distinct local heterogeneities. Our measurements revealed pH values that ranged from 5 to >7, confirming the heterogeneity of the pH profiles within these biofilms. pH was also analyzed following glucose addition to both suspended and attached cultures. In both cases, the pH became more acidic, likely due to glucose metabolism causing the release of tricarboxylic acid cycle acids and CO(2). These studies demonstrate that the combination of 3D functional fluorescence imaging with well-designed nanoparticle sensors provides a powerful tool for in situ characterization of chemical microenvironments in complex biofilms.

  8. Imaging of 3-D seismic velocity structure of Southern Sumatra region using double difference tomographic method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lestari, Titik, E-mail: t2klestari@gmail.com [Meteorological Climatological and Geophysical Agency (MCGA), Jalan Angkasa I No.2 Kemayoran, Jakarta Pusat, 10720 (Indonesia); Faculty of Earth Science and Technology, Bandung Institute of Technology, Jalan Ganesa No.10, Bandung 40132 (Indonesia); Nugraha, Andri Dian, E-mail: nugraha@gf.itb.ac.id [Global Geophysical Research Group, Faculty of Mining and Petroleum Engineering, Bandung Institute of Technology, Jalan Ganesa 10 Bandung 40132 (Indonesia)

    2015-04-24

    Southern Sumatra region has a high level of seismicity due to the influence of the subduction system, Sumatra fault, Mentawai fault and stretching zone activities. The seismic activities of Southern Sumatra region are recorded by Meteorological Climatological and Geophysical Agency (MCGA’s) Seismograph network. In this study, we used earthquake data catalog compiled by MCGA for 3013 events from 10 seismic stations around Southern Sumatra region for time periods of April 2009 – April 2014 in order to invert for the 3-D seismic velocities structure (Vp, Vs, and Vp/Vs ratio). We applied double-difference seismic tomography method (tomoDD) to determine Vp, Vs and Vp/Vs ratio with hypocenter adjustment. For the inversion procedure, we started from the initial 1-D seismic velocity model of AK135 and constant Vp/Vs of 1.73. The synthetic travel time from source to receiver was calculated using ray pseudo-bending technique, while the main tomographic inversion was applied using LSQR method. The resolution model was evaluated using checkerboard test and Derivative Weigh Sum (DWS). Our preliminary results show low Vp and Vs anomalies region along Bukit Barisan which is may be associated with weak zone of Sumatran fault and migration of partial melted material. Low velocity anomalies at 30-50 km depth in the fore arc region may indicated the hydrous material circulation because the slab dehydration. We detected low seismic seismicity in the fore arc region that may be indicated as seismic gap. It is coincides contact zone of high and low velocity anomalies. And two large earthquakes (Jambi and Mentawai) also occurred at the contact of contrast velocity.

  9. Tomographic image of prompt gamma ray from boron neutron capture therapy: A Monte Carlo simulation study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Dokun; Suh, Tae Suk [Catholic Univ. of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Hong, Key Jo [Stanford Univ., Stanford (United States)

    2014-05-15

    The resulting neutron captures in {sup 10}B are used for radiation therapy. The occurrence point of the characteristic 478 keV prompt gamma rays agrees with the neutron capture point. If these prompt gamma rays are detected by external instruments such as a gamma camera or single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), the therapy region can be monitored during the treatment using images. A feasibility study and analysis of a reconstructed image using many projections (128) were conducted. The optimization of the detection system and a detailed neutron generator simulation were beyond the scope of this study. The possibility of extracting a 3D BNCT-SPECT image was confirmed using the Monte Carlo simulation and OSEM algorithm. The quality of the prompt gamma ray SPECT image obtained from BNCT was evaluated quantitatively using three different boron uptake regions and was shown to depend on the location and size relations. The prospects for obtaining an actual BNCT-SPECT image were also estimated from the quality of the simulated image and the simulation conditions. When multi tumor regions should be treated using the BNCT method, a reasonable model to determine how many useful images can be obtained from SPECT can be provided to the BNCT facilities based on the preceding imaging research. However, because the scope of this research was limited to checking the feasibility of 3D BNCT-SPECT image reconstruction using multiple projections, along with an evaluation of the image, some simulation conditions were taken from previous studies. In the future, a simulation will be conducted that includes optimized conditions for an actual BNCT facility, along with an imaging process for motion correction in BNCT. Although an excessively long simulation time was required to obtain enough events for image reconstruction, the feasibility of acquiring a 3D BNCT-SPECT image using multiple projections was confirmed using a Monte Carlo simulation, and a quantitative image

  10. X-Ray Tomographic Reconstruction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonnie Schmittberger

    2010-08-25

    Tomographic scans have revolutionized imaging techniques used in medical and biological research by resolving individual sample slices instead of several superimposed images that are obtained from regular x-ray scans. X-Ray fluorescence computed tomography, a more specific tomography technique, bombards the sample with synchrotron x-rays and detects the fluorescent photons emitted from the sample. However, since x-rays are attenuated as they pass through the sample, tomographic scans often produce images with erroneous low densities in areas where the x-rays have already passed through most of the sample. To correct for this and correctly reconstruct the data in order to obtain the most accurate images, a program employing iterative methods based on the inverse Radon transform was written. Applying this reconstruction method to a tomographic image recovered some of the lost densities, providing a more accurate image from which element concentrations and internal structure can be determined.

  11. The use of transport and diffusion equations in the three-dimensional reconstruction of computerized tomographic images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pires, Sandrerley Ramos, E-mail: sandrerley@eee.ufg.br [Escola de Engenharia Eletrica e de Computacao - EEEC, Universidade Federal de Goias - UFG, Goiania, GO (Brazil); Flores, Edna Lucia; Pires, Dulcineia Goncalves F.; Carrijo, Gilberto Arantes; Veiga, Antonio Claudio Paschoarelli [Faculdade de Engenharia Eletrica - FEELT, Universidade Federal de Uberlandia - UFU, Uberlandia, MG (Brazil); Barcelos, Celia Aparecida Z. [Faculdade de Matematica, Universidade Federal de Uberlandia - UFU, Uberlandia, MG (Brazil)

    2012-09-15

    The visualization of a computerized tomographic (TC) exam in 3D increases the quality of the medical diagnosis and, consequently, the success probability in the treatment. To obtain a high quality image it is necessary to obtain slices which are close to one another. Motivated towards the goal of reaching an improved balance between quantity of slices and visualization quality, this research work presents a digital inpainting technique of 3D interpolation for CT slices used in the visualization of human body structures. The inpainting is carried out via non-linear partial differential equations (PDE). The PDE's have been used, in the image-processing context to fill in the damaged regions in a digital 2D image. Inspired by this idea, this article proposes an interpolation method for the filling in of the empty regions between the CT slices. To do it, considering the high similarity between two consecutive real slice, the first step of the proposed method is to create the virtual slices. The virtual slices contain all similarity between the intercalated slices and, when there are not similarities between real slices, the virtual slices will contain indefinite portions. In the second step of the proposed method, the created virtual slices will be used together with the real slices images, in the reconstruction of the structure in three dimensions, mapped onto the exam. The proposed method is capable of reconstructing the curvatures of the patient's internal structures without using slices that are close to one another. The experiments carried out show the proposed method's efficiency. (author)

  12. Diffraction-Enhanced Computed Tomographic Imaging of Growing Piglet Joints by Using a Synchrotron Light Source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhoades, Glendon W; Belev, George S; Chapman, L Dean; Wiebe, Sheldon P; Cooper, David M; Wong, Adelaine Tf; Rosenberg, Alan M

    2015-08-01

    The objective of this project was to develop and test a new technology for imaging growing joints by means of diffraction-enhanced imaging (DEI) combined with CT and using a synchrotron radiation source. DEI-CT images of an explanted 4-wk-old piglet stifle joint were acquired by using a 40-keV beam. The series of scanned slices was later 'stitched' together, forming a 3D dataset. High-resolution DEI-CT images demonstrated fine detail within all joint structures and tissues. Striking detail of vasculature traversing between bone and cartilage, a characteristic of growing but not mature joints, was demonstrated. This report documents for the first time that DEI combined with CT and a synchrotron radiation source can generate more detailed images of intact, growing joints than can currently available conventional imaging modalities.

  13. Tomographic imaging of the cervical spine of horses; Aspectos tomograficos da coluna cervical de equinos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souza, L.P.; Machado, V.M.V.; Santos, R.V.; Evangelista, F.C.; Vulcano, L.C. [Universidade Estadual Paulista, Botucatu, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina Veterinaria e Zootecnia

    2012-09-15

    The anatomy of the cervical spine of mature horses based on images obtained with a helical computed tomography examination performed on anatomic specimens was studied. Computed tomography was the diagnostic imaging method of choice and allowed three-dimensional reconstructions of images and other anatomical planes, such as coronal and sagittal. All images were acquired and evaluated in the filter and window to bone tissue. It was possible to demonstrate the anatomical differences and peculiarities of the normal vertebrae, particularly the occipito-atlantoaxial region, which has a higher incidence of changes to assist in the visualization of any change of the bone pattern on CT studies. (author)

  14. Region-Based 4D Tomographic Image Reconstruction: Application to Cardiac X-ray CT

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G. Van Eyndhoven (Geert); K.J. Batenburg (Joost); J. Sijbers (Jan)

    2015-01-01

    htmlabstractX-ray computed tomography (CT) is a powerful tool for noninvasive cardiac imaging. However, radiation dose is a major issue. In this paper, we propose an iterative reconstruction method that reduces the radiation dose without compromising image quality. This is achieved by exploiting

  15. Intraoperative Imaging of Positron Emission Tomographic Radiotracers Using Cerenkov Luminescence Emissions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason P. Holland

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Imaging the location and extent of cancer provides invaluable information before, during, and after surgery. The majority of “image-guided” methods that use, for example, positron emission tomography (PET involve preoperative imaging and do not provide real-time information during surgery. It is now well established that the inherent optical emissions (Cerenkov radiation from various β-emitting radionuclides can be visualized by Cerenkov luminescence imaging (CLI. Here we report the full characterization of CLI using the positron-emitting radiotracer 89Zr-DFO-trastuzumab for target-specific, quantitative imaging of HER2/neu-positive tumors in vivo. We also provide the first demonstration of the feasibility of using CLI for true image-guided, intraoperative surgical resection of tumors. Analysis of optical CLIs provided accurate, quantitative information on radiotracer biodistribution and tissue uptake that correlated well with the concordant PET images. CLI, PET, and biodistribution studies revealed target-specific uptake of 89Zr-DFO-trastuzumab in BT-474 (HER2/neu positive versus MDA-MB-468 (HER2/neu negative xenografts in the same mice. Competitive inhibition (blocking studies followed by CLI also confirmed the in vivo immunoreactivity and specificity of 89Zr-DFO-trastuzumab for HER2/neu. Overall, these results strongly support the continued development of CLI as a preclinical and possible clinical tool for use in molecular imaging and surgical procedures for accurately defining tumor margins.

  16. Application of the FDK algorithm for multi-slice tomographic image reconstruction; Aplicacao do algoritmo FDK para a reconstrucao de imagens tomograficas multicortes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costa, Paulo Roberto, E-mail: pcosta@if.usp.b [Universidade de Sao Paulo (IFUSP), SP (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica. Dept. de Fisica Nuclear; Araujo, Ericky Caldas de Almeida [Fine Image Technology, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2010-08-15

    This work consisted on the study and application of the FDK (Feldkamp- Davis-Kress) algorithm for tomographic image reconstruction using cone-beam geometry, resulting on the implementation of an adapted multi-slice computed tomography system. For the acquisition of the projections, a rotating platform coupled to a goniometer, an X-ray equipment and a digital image detector charge-coupled device type were used. The FDK algorithm was implemented on a computer with a Pentium{sup R} XEON{sup TM} 3.0 processor, which was used for the reconstruction process. Initially, the original FDK algorithm was applied considering only the ideal physical conditions in the measurement process. Then some artifacts corrections related to the projections measurement process were incorporated. The implemented MSCT system was calibrated. A specially designed and manufactured object with a known linear attenuation coefficient distribution ({mu}(r)) was used for this purpose. Finally, the implemented MSCT system was used for multi-slice tomographic reconstruction of an inhomogeneous object, whose distribution {mu}(r) was unknown. Some aspects of the reconstructed images were analyzed to assess the robustness and reproducibility of the system. During the system calibration, a linear relationship between CT number and linear attenuation coefficients of materials was verified, which validate the application of the implemented multi-slice tomographic system for the characterization of linear attenuation coefficients of distinct several objects. (author)

  17. MRS Symposium on Advanced Tomographic Imaging Methods for the Analysis of Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-08-01

    Abstracts p. 189 (1990). 21. D. .Weitekam, (rivate communication, 1990) 22. U. Haeberlen, Advlaaces in Magnectic Resonanace," Vol. 12, Suppl. 1, ed.J...was Fourier transformed and the 1D magnitude image _i 48 was retained. The first moment of the image was assigned to the origin for the Abel inversion...perhaps, paramagnetic impurities. At the moment , a more detailed understanding requires further studies. To assess the migration of free silicone from the

  18. Computed tomographic imaging of dogs with primary laryngeal or tracheal airway obstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stadler, Krystina; Hartman, Susan; Matheson, Jodi; O'Brien, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Seventeen dogs with clinical signs attributable to nonneoplastic obstruction of the larynx, trachea, or large bronchi underwent computed tomography (CT) imaging. In 16 of the 17 dogs, CT was performed without general anesthesia using a positioning device. Fifteen of these 16 dogs were imaged without sedation or general anesthesia. Three-dimensional (3D) internal rendering was performed on each image set based on lesion localization determined by routine image planes. Visual laryngeal examination, endoscopy, video fluoroscopy, and necropsy were used for achieving the cause of the upper airway obstruction. The CT and 3D internal rendering accurately indicated the presence and cause of upper airway obstruction in all dogs. CT findings indicative of laryngeal paralysis included failure to abduct the arytenoid cartilages, narrowed rima glottis, and air-filled laryngeal ventricles. Laryngeal collapse findings depended on the grade of collapse and included everted laryngeal saccules, collapse of the cuneiform processes and corniculate processes, and narrowed rima glottis. Trachea abnormalities included hypoplasia, stenosis, or collapse syndrome. The CT findings in tracheal hypoplasia consisted of a severely narrowed lumen throughout the entire length. Tracheal stenosis was represented by a circumferential decrease in tracheal lumen size limited to one region. Tracheal collapse syndrome was diagnosed by severe asymmetric narrowing. Lobar bronchi collapse appeared in CT images as a narrowed asymmetric lumen diameter. CT imaging of unanesthetized dogs with upper airway obstruction compares favorably with traditional definitive diagnostic methods. © 2011 Veterinary Radiology & Ultrasound.

  19. Modeling clustered activity increase in amyloid-beta positron emission tomographic images with statistical descriptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shokouhi S

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Sepideh Shokouhi,1 Baxter P Rogers,1 Hakmook Kang,2 Zhaohua Ding,1 Daniel O Claassen,3 John W Mckay,1 William R Riddle1On behalf of the Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative1Department of Radiology and Radiological Sciences, Vanderbilt University Institute of Imaging Science, 2Department of Biostatistics, 3Department of Neurology, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN, USABackground: Amyloid-beta (Aβ imaging with positron emission tomography (PET holds promise for detecting the presence of Aβ plaques in the cortical gray matter. Many image analyses focus on regional average measurements of tracer activity distribution; however, considerable additional information is available in the images. Metrics that describe the statistical properties of images, such as the two-point correlation function (S2, have found wide applications in astronomy and materials science. S2 provides a detailed characterization of spatial patterns in images typically referred to as clustering or flocculence. The objective of this study was to translate the two-point correlation method into Aβ-PET of the human brain using 11C-Pittsburgh compound B (11C-PiB to characterize longitudinal changes in the tracer distribution that may reflect changes in Aβ plaque accumulation.Methods: We modified the conventional S2 metric, which is primarily used for binary images and formulated a weighted two-point correlation function (wS2 to describe nonbinary, real-valued PET images with a single statistical function. Using serial 11C-PiB scans, we calculated wS2 functions from two-dimensional PET images of different cortical regions as well as three-dimensional data from the whole brain. The area under the wS2 functions was calculated and compared with the mean/median of the standardized uptake value ratio (SUVR. For three-dimensional data, we compared the area under the wS2 curves with the subjects’ cerebrospinal fluid measures.Results: Overall, the longitudinal changes in wS2

  20. Advertising, patient decision making, and self-referral for computed tomographic and magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illes, Judy; Kann, Dylan; Karetsky, Kim; Letourneau, Phillip; Raffin, Thomas A; Schraedley-Desmond, Pamela; Koenig, Barbara A; Atlas, Scott W

    Self-referred imaging is one of the latest health care services to be marketed directly to consumers. Most aspects of these services are unregulated, and little is known about the messages in advertising used to attract potential consumers. We conducted a detailed analysis of print advertisements and informational brochures for self-referred imaging with respect to themes, content, accuracy, and emotional valence. Forty print advertisements from US newspapers around the country and 20 informational brochures were analyzed by 2 independent raters according to 7 major themes: health care technology; emotion, empowerment, and assurance; incentives; limited supporting evidence; popular appeal; statistics; and images. The Fisher exact test was used to identify significant differences in information content. Both the advertisements and the brochures emphasized health care and technology information and provided assurances of good health and incentives to self-refer. These materials also encouraged consumers to seek further information from company resources; virtually none referred to noncomplying sources of information or to the risks of having a scan. Images of people commonly portrayed European Americans. We found statistical differences between newspaper advertisements and mailed brochures for references to "prevalence of disease" (Padvertisements (n = 15) and 25% of the brochures (n = 5). Direct-to-consumer marketing of self-referred imaging services, in both print advertisements and informational brochures, fails to provide prospective consumers with comprehensive balanced information vital to informed autonomous decision making. Professional guidelines and oversight for advertising and promotion of these services are needed.

  1. Analysis of stability of tomographic reconstruction of x-ray medical images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Л. А. Булавін

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Slice reconstruction in X-ray computed tomography is reduced to the solution of integral equations, or a system of algebraic equations in discrete case. It is considered to be an ill-posed problem due to the inconsistencies in the number of equations and variables and due to errors in the experimental data. Therefore, determination of the best method of the slice reconstruction is of great interest. Furthermore, all available methods give approximate results. The aim of this article was two-fold: i to compare two methods of image reconstruction, viz. inverse projection and variation, using the numerical experiment; ii to obtain the relationship between image accuracy and experimental error. It appeared that the image obtained by inverse projection is unstable: there was no convergence of the approximate image to the accurate one, when the experimental error reached zero. In turn, the image obtained by variational method was accurate at zero experimental error. Finally, the latter showed better slice reconstruction, despite the low number of projections and the experimental errors.

  2. Computed Tomographic Image Analysis Based on FEM Performance Comparison of Segmentation on Knee Joint Reconstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seong-Wook Jang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The demand for an accurate and accessible image segmentation to generate 3D models from CT scan data has been increasing as such models are required in many areas of orthopedics. In this paper, to find the optimal image segmentation to create a 3D model of the knee CT data, we compared and validated segmentation algorithms based on both objective comparisons and finite element (FE analysis. For comparison purposes, we used 1 model reconstructed in accordance with the instructions of a clinical professional and 3 models reconstructed using image processing algorithms (Sobel operator, Laplacian of Gaussian operator, and Canny edge detection. Comparison was performed by inspecting intermodel morphological deviations with the iterative closest point (ICP algorithm, and FE analysis was performed to examine the effects of the segmentation algorithm on the results of the knee joint movement analysis.

  3. A new tomographic image on the Philippine Sea Slab beneath Tokyo - Implication to seismic hazard in the Tokyo metropolitan region -

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirata, N.; Sakai, S.; Nakagawa, S.; Ishikawa, M.; Sato, H.; Kasahara, K.; Kimura, H.; Honda, R.

    2012-12-01

    region. Based on elastic wave velocities of rocks and minerals, we interpreted the tomographic images as petrologic images. Tomographic images revealed the presence of two stepwise velocity increase of the top layer of the subducting PSP slab. Rock velocity data reveals that subducting PSP crust transforms from blueschists to amphibolites at depth of 30km and amphibolites to eclogites at depth of 50km, which suggest that dehydration reactions occurs in subducting crust of basaltic compositions during prograde metamorphism and water is released from the subducting PSP crust. Tomograms show evidence for a low-velocity zone (LVZ) beneath the area just north of Tokyo bay. We interpret the LVZ as a serpentinized region in the forearc mantle of Honshu arc, resulting from hydration by water derived from subducting PSP crust. The P- and S-wave velocities within the serpentinized zone represent a degree of serpentinization as high as 10-40% for the LVZ with 20-km-long in noth-south and 90-km-long in east-west just above PSP, which is approximately eastern half or less of the previously estimated serpentinized area (Kamiya and Kobayashi, 2000). Because strength of the serpentinized preidotite is not large enough for brittle fracture, if the area is smaller than previously estimated, a possible area of the large thrusting fault on the upper surface of PSP can be larger than previously thought.

  4. Exercise-induced U-wave changes in patients with coronary artery disease. Correlation with tomographic thallium-201 myocardial imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyakoda, Hiroyuki; Endo, Akihiro; Kato, Masahiko; Kato, Tatsuo; Omodani, Hiroki; Osaki, Shuichi; Kinugawa, Toru; Hoshio, Akira [Tottori Univ., Yonago (Japan). School of Medicine; Mashiba, Hiroto

    1996-09-01

    We studied the relation between exercise-induced U-wave changes and the site of a reversible defect in tomographic {sup 201}Tl myocardial imaging. Coronary artery disease and control groups consisted of 116 and 42 patients, respectively. In the anteroapical-ischemia group (n=37), the sensitivity of U-wave inversion in the anterior precordial leads for ischemia was 62% (23/37) and that of prominent U-waves without an increase in the height of the T-wave in the inferior limb leads was 57% (21/37). In this group, 18 patients (49%) met both criteria (18 =78%= of 23 patients with the former; 18 =86%= of 21 patients with the latter). In the posterior-ischemia group (n=59), the sensitivity of prominent U-waves with a decrease in the height of the T-wave in the anterior precordial leads for ischemia was 63% (37/59) and that of U-wave inversion in the inferior limb leads was 20% (12/59). In this group, 12 patients (20%) met both criteria (12 =32%= of 37 patients with the former; all 12 patients with the latter). The specificity of U-wave criteria was 100%. In the anteroapical and posterior-ischemia group (n=20), the sensitivity of U-wave criteria for anteroapical and posterior ischemia was 85% (17/20) and 40% (8/20), respectively. In conclusion, U-wave criteria are not only specific but also sensitive for myocardial ischemia determined by {sup 201}Tl imaging. (author)

  5. Urinary Metabolomic Analysis to Detect Changes After Intravenous, Non-ionic, Low Osmolar Iodinated Radiocontrast for Computerized Tomographic Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deborah B Diercks

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Contrast-induced nephropathy is a result of injury to the proximal tubules caused by oxidative stress and ischemia. Metabolomics is a novel technique that has been used to identify renal damage from drug toxicities. The objective of this study is to analyze the metabolic changes in the urine after dosing with intravenous (IV contrast for computed tomograph (CT of the chest Methods: A convenience sample of patients undergoing a chest CT with IV contrast who had at least one of the following: age ≥50 years, diabetes, heart failure, chronic kidney disease, coronary artery disease, or diastolic blood pressure >90 mmHg -- were eligible for enrollment. Urine samples were collected prior to imaging and 4-6 hours post imaging. Samples underwent gas chromography/mass spectrometry profiling. We measured peak metabolite values and log transformed data. Paired T tests were calculated. We used significance analysis of microarrays (SAM to determine the most significant metabolites. Results: The cohort comprised 14 patients with matched samples; 9 /14 (64.3 were males, and the median age was 61 years (IQR 50-68. A total of 158 metabolites were identified. Using SAM we identified 9 metabolites that were identified as significant using a delta of 1.6. Conclusion: Changes in urinary metabolites are present soon after contrast administration. This change in urinary metabolites may be potential early identifiers of contrast-induced nephropathy and could identify patients at high-risk for developing this condition. [West J Emerg Med. 2014;15(2:152–157.

  6. A tensor-based dictionary learning approach to tomographic image reconstruction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soltani, Sara; Kilmer, Misha E.; Hansen, Per Christian

    2016-01-01

    with sparsity constraints. The reconstruction problem is formulated in a convex optimization framework by looking for a solution with a sparse representation in the tensor dictionary. Numerical results show that our tensor formulation leads to very sparse representations of both the training images...

  7. Tectonic implications of tomographic images of subducted lithosphere beneath northwestern South America

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hilst, R.D. van der; Mann, P.

    1994-01-01

    We used seismic tomography to investigate the complex structure of the upper mantle below northwestern South America. Images of slab structure not delineated by previous seismicity studies help us to refine existing tectonic models of subducted Caribbean-Pacific lithosphere beneath the study area.

  8. Frequency and Relevance of Acute Peritraumatic Pulmonary Thrombus Diagnosed by Computed Tomographic Imaging in Combat Casualties

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-01

    extremity traumatic amputation. Additional study is needed to characterize the natural history of peritraumatic pulmonary thrombus and the indications for...following trauma is typicallydiagnosed after a cardiopulmonary deterioration and may result in hypoxia, myocardial strain, and potentially death...of admission unless patients received resuscitative surgery (14.3%; n = 101) before imaging. Although some patients received treat- ment at a Role II

  9. Three-dimensional segmentation of the tumor in computed tomographic images of neuroblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deglint, Hanford J; Rangayyan, Rangaraj M; Ayres, Fábio J; Boag, Graham S; Zuffo, Marcelo K

    2007-09-01

    Segmentation of the tumor in neuroblastoma is complicated by the fact that the mass is almost always heterogeneous in nature; furthermore, viable tumor, necrosis, and normal tissue are often intermixed. Tumor definition and diagnosis require the analysis of the spatial distribution and Hounsfield unit (HU) values of voxels in computed tomography (CT) images, coupled with a knowledge of normal anatomy. Segmentation and analysis of the tissue composition of the tumor can assist in quantitative assessment of the response to therapy and in the planning of the delayed surgery for resection of the tumor. We propose methods to achieve 3-dimensional segmentation of the neuroblastic tumor. In our scheme, some of the normal structures expected in abdominal CT images are delineated and removed from further consideration; the remaining parts of the image volume are then examined for tumor mass. Mathematical morphology, fuzzy connectivity, and other image processing tools are deployed for this purpose. Expert knowledge provided by a radiologist in the form of the expected structures and their shapes, HU values, and radiological characteristics are incorporated into the segmentation algorithm. In this preliminary study, the methods were tested with 10 CT exams of four cases from the Alberta Children's Hospital. False-negative error rates of less than 12% were obtained in eight of 10 exams; however, seven of the exams had false-positive error rates of more than 20% with respect to manual segmentation of the tumor by a radiologist.

  10. Induced apnea enhances image quality and visualization of cardiopulmonary anatomic during contrastenhanced cardiac computerized tomographic angiography in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murali Chakravarthy

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The purpose of our study was to determine the effect of induced apnea on quality of cardiopulmonary structures during computerized tomographic (CT angiography images in children with congenital heart diseases. Methods: Pediatric patients with congenital heart defects undergoing cardiac CT angiography at our facility in the past 3 years participated in this study. The earlier patients underwent cardiac CT angiography without induced apnea and while, later, apnea was induced in patients, which was followed by electrocardiogram gated cardiac CT angiography. General anesthesia was induced using sleep dose of intravenous propofol. After the initial check CT, on request by the radiologist, apnea was induced by the anesthesiologist by administering 1 mg/kg of intravenous suxamethonium. Soon after apnea ensued, the contrast was injected, and CT angiogram carried out. CT images in the "apnea group" were compared with those in "nonapnea group." After the completion of the procedure, the patients were mask ventilated with 100% oxygen till the spontaneous ventilation was restored. Results: We studied 46 patients, of whom 36 with apnea and yet another 10 without. The quality of the image, visualization of structures such as cardiac wall, outflow tracts, lung field, aortopulmonary shunts, and coronary arteries were analyzed and subjected to statistical analysis (Mann-Whitney U, Fischer′s exact test and Pearson′s Chi-square test. In the induced apnea group, overall image quality was considered excellent in 89% (n = 33 of the studies, while in the "no apnea group," only 30% of studies were excellent. Absent or minimal motion artifacts were seen in a majority of the studies in apnea group (94%. In the nonapnea group, the respiratory and body motion artifacts were severe in 50%, moderate in 30%, and minimal in 20%, but they were significantly lesser in the apnea group. All the studied parameters were statistically significant in the apnea group in

  11. Computed tomographic and magnetic resonance imaging of ameloblastoma: 2 case reports

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oder, P.; Royster, A. [Boston Medical Center, Dept. of Radiology, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Gibbons, D. [Boston Medical Center, Dept. of Pathology, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Mulligan, N.; Kavanagh, P.; Eustace, S. [Boston Medical Center, Dept. of Radiology, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

    1999-12-01

    Cysts of the mandible are uncommon. Most arise from epithelium lining the alveolus or root of the tooth (tooth derivatives), and the rest arise from the cortical and cancellous osseous matrix of the mandible. Of cysts arising from the alveolus (odontogenic epithelium), radicular cysts are the most common, accounting for almost 90% of cases. They are almost always found either in association with a dental cavity or at the base of a devitalized, amalgam-filled tooth. Of the remaining 10% of cases, most are dentigerous cysts, arising from the outer epithelial lining of the developing tooth, which is displaced to the base of the cyst as the lesion grows. Ameloblastoma, which also arises from odontogenic epithelium, accounts for less than 1% of cases. In this case report, we review the imaging appearance, histology and management of this uncommon tumour. In doing so, we highlight signal characteristics on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) that may allow noninvasive characterization of ameloblastoma before surgical resection. (author)

  12. Deep Interior: Radio Reflection Tomographic Imaging of Earth-Crossing Asteroids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asphaug, E.; Belton, M.; Safaeinili, A.; Klaasen, K.; Ostro, S.; Yeomans, D.; Plaut, J.

    2004-12-01

    Near-Earth Objects (NEOs) present an important scientific question and an intriguing space hazard. They are scrutinized by a number of large, dedicated groundbased telescopes, and their diverse compositions are represented by thousands of well-studied meteorites. A successful program of NEO spacecraft exploration has begun, and we are proposing Deep Interior as the next logical step. Our mission objective is to image the deep interior structure of two NEOs using radio reflection tomography (RRT), in order to explore the record of asteroid origin and impact evolution, and to test the fundamental hypothesis that these important members of the solar system are rubble piles rather than consolidated bodies. Asteroid Interiors. Our mission's RRT technique is like a CAT scan from orbit. Closely sampled radar echoes yield volumetric maps of mechanical and compositional boundaries, and measure interior material dielectric properties. Exteriors. We use color imaging to explore the surface expressions of unit boundaries, in order to relate interior radar imaging to what is observable from spacecraft imaging and from Earth. Gravity and high fidelity geodesy are used to explore how interior structure is expressed in shape, density, mass distribution and spin. Diversity. We first visit a common, primitive, S-type asteroid. We next visit an asteroid that was perhaps blasted from the surface of a differentiated asteroid. We attain an up-close and inside look at two taxonomic archetypes spanning an important range of NEO mass and spin rate. Scientific focus is achieved by keeping our payload simple: Radar. A 30-m (tip-to-tip) cross-dipole antenna system operates at 5 and 15-MHz, with electronics heritage from JPL's MARSIS contribution to Mars Express, and antenna heritage from IMAGE and LACE. The 5-MHz channel is designed to penetrate >1 km of basaltic rock, and 15-MHz penetrates a few 100 m or more. They bracket the diversity of solar system materials that we are likely to

  13. A SIMPLE METHODOLOGY TO SEGMENT X-RAY TOMOGRAPHIC IMAGES OF A MULTIPHASIC BUILDING STONE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanuel Le Trong

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Assessment of the weathering of a particular limestone, the tuffeau, used in historical monuments requires an accurate description of its microstructure. An efficient tools to obtain such a description is X-ray microtomography. However the segmentation of the images of this multiphasic material is not trivial. As the identification of pertinent markers of the structural components to extract is difficult, a two steps filtering approach is chosen. Alternate sequential filters are shown to efficiently remove the noise but, as they destroy the structural components smaller than the structuring element used, they cannot be carried out far enough. Hence as a second step in the filtering process, a mosaic operator, relying on a pragmatic yet efficient marker determination, is implemented to simplify further the images.

  14. Evaluation of Positron Emission Tomographic Tracers for Imaging of Papillomavirus-Induced Tumors in Rabbits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonja Probst

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, simultaneous positron emission tomography (PET/magnetic resonance (MR imaging was employed to evaluate the feasibility of the PET tracers 2-deoxy-2-18F-fluoro-D-glucose (18F-FDG, 11C-choline, and 18F-fluorothymidine (18F-FLT to detect papillomavirus-induced tumors in an established rabbit model system. The combined PET/MR allowed the analysis of tracer uptake of the tumors using the morphologic information acquired by MR. New Zealand White rabbits were infected with cottontail rabbit papillomavirus genomes and were imaged for up to 10 months with a simultaneous PET/MR system during the course of infection. The uptake characteristics of the PET tracers 11C-choline and 18F-FLT of tumors and reference tissues were examined relative to the clinical standard, 18F-FDG. Tracer biodistribution of various organs was measured by gamma-counting after the last PET scan and compared to the in vivo PET/MR 18F-FDG uptake. Increased tracer uptake was found 2 months postinfection in primary tumors with 18F-FDG and 11C-choline, whereas 18F-FLT failed to detect the tumors at all measured time points. Our data show that the PET tracer 18F-FDG is superior for imaging papillomavirus-induced tumors in rabbits compared to 11C-choline and 18F-FLT. However, 11C-choline imaging, which has previously been applied to detect various tumor entities in patients, appears to be an alternative to 18F-FDG.

  15. Anthropomorphic thorax phantom for cardio-respiratory motion simulation in tomographic imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolwin, Konstantin; Czekalla, Björn; Frohwein, Lynn J.; Büther, Florian; Schäfers, Klaus P.

    2018-02-01

    Patient motion during medical imaging using techniques such as computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), positron emission tomography (PET), or single emission computed tomography (SPECT) is well known to degrade images, leading to blurring effects or severe artifacts. Motion correction methods try to overcome these degrading effects. However, they need to be validated under realistic conditions. In this work, a sophisticated anthropomorphic thorax phantom is presented that combines several aspects of a simulator for cardio-respiratory motion. The phantom allows us to simulate various types of cardio-respiratory motions inside a human-like thorax, including features such as inflatable lungs, beating left ventricular myocardium, respiration-induced motion of the left ventricle, moving lung lesions, and moving coronary artery plaques. The phantom is constructed to be MR-compatible. This means that we can not only perform studies in PET, SPECT and CT, but also inside an MRI system. The technical features of the anthropomorphic thorax phantom Wilhelm are presented with regard to simulating motion effects in hybrid emission tomography and radiotherapy. This is supplemented by a study on the detectability of small coronary plaque lesions in PET/CT under the influence of cardio-respiratory motion, and a study on the accuracy of left ventricular blood volumes.

  16. MRT Letter: Contrast-Enhanced Computed Tomographic Imaging of Soft Callus Formation in Fracture Healing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayward, Lauren Nicole Miller; De Bakker, Chantal Marie-Jeanne; Lusic, Hrvoje; Gerstenfeld, Louis Charles; Grinstaff, Mark W.; Morgan, Elise Feng-I

    2012-01-01

    Formation of a cartilaginous soft callus at the site of a bone fracture is a pivotal stage in the healing process. Noninvasive, or even nondestructive, imaging of soft callus formation can be an important tool in experimental and pre-clinical studies of fracture repair. However, the low X-ray attenuation of cartilage renders the soft callus nearly invisible in radiographs. This study utilized a recently developed, cationic, iodinated contrast agent in conjunction with micro-computed tomography to identify cartilage in fracture calluses in the femora of C57BL/6J and C3H/HeJ mice. Fracture calluses were scanned beforeand after incubation in the contrast agent. The set of pre-incubation images was registered against and then subtracted from the set of post-incubation images, resulting in a three-dimensional map of the locations of cartilage in the callus, as labeled by the contrast agent. This map was then compared to histology from a previous study. The results showed that the locations where the contrast agent collected in relatively high concentrationswere similar to those of the cartilage. The contrast agent also identified a significant difference between the two strains of mice in the percentage of the callus occupied by cartilage, indicating that this method of contrast-enhanced computed tomography may be an effective technique for nondestructive, early evaluation of fracture healing. PMID:22038692

  17. Three-dimensional segmentation of the tumor mass in computed tomographic images of neuroblastoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deglint, Hanford J.; Rangayyan, Rangaraj M.; Boag, Graham S.

    2004-05-01

    Tumor definition and diagnosis require the analysis of the spatial distribution and Hounsfield unit (HU) values of voxels in computed tomography (CT) images, coupled with a knowledge of normal anatomy. Segmentation of the tumor in neuroblastoma is complicated by the fact that the mass is almost always heterogeneous in nature; furthermore, viable tumor, necrosis, fibrosis, and normal tissue are often intermixed. Rather than attempt to separate these tissue types into distinct regions, we propose to explore methods to delineate the normal structures expected in abdominal CT images, remove them from further consideration, and examine the remaining parts of the images for the tumor mass. We explore the use of fuzzy connectivity for this purpose. Expert knowledge provided by the radiologist in the form of the expected structures and their shapes, HU values, and radiological characteristics are also incorporated in the segmentation algorithm. Segmentation and analysis of the tissue composition of the tumor can assist in quantitative assessment of the response to chemotherapy and in the planning of delayed surgery for resection of the tumor. The performance of the algorithm is evaluated using cases acquired from the Alberta Children's Hospital.

  18. MRT letter: Contrast-enhanced computed tomographic imaging of soft callus formation in fracture healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayward, Lauren Nicole Miller; de Bakker, Chantal Marie-Jeanne; Lusic, Hrvoje; Gerstenfeld, Louis Charles; Grinstaff, Mark W; Morgan, Elise Feng-I

    2012-01-01

    Formation of a cartilaginous soft callus at the site of a bone fracture is a pivotal stage in the healing process. Noninvasive, or even nondestructive, imaging of soft callus formation can be an important tool in experimental and pre-clinical studies of fracture repair. However, the low X-ray attenuation of cartilage renders the soft callus nearly invisible in radiographs. This study utilized a recently developed, cationic, iodinated contrast agent in conjunction with micro-computed tomography to identify cartilage in fracture calluses in the femora of C57BL/6J and C3H/HeJ mice. Fracture calluses were scanned before and after incubation in the contrast agent. The set of pre-incubation images was registered against and then subtracted from the set of post-incubation images, resulting in a three-dimensional map of the locations of cartilage in the callus, as labeled by the contrast agent. This map was then compared to histology from a previous study. The results showed that the locations where the contrast agent collected in relatively high concentrations were similar to those of the cartilage. The contrast agent also identified a significant difference between the two strains of mice in the percentage of the callus occupied by cartilage, indicating that this method of contrast-enhanced computed tomography may be an effective technique for nondestructive, early evaluation of fracture healing. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Elastic and transport properties of cellular solids derived from three-dimensional tomographic images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knackstedt, Mark A.; Arns, Christoph H.; Saadatfar, Mohammad; et al.

    2006-09-01

    We describe a three-dimensional imaging and analysis study of eight industrial cellular foam morphologies. The foam morphologies were generated by differing industrial processing methods. Tomograms are acquired on an X-ray micro-computed tomography facility at scales of approximately equal to (5mm)3 at resolutions down to 7μm. The image quality is sufficient in all cases to measure local structure and connectivity of the foamed material, and the field of view large enough to calculate a range of material properties. Phase separation into solid and porous components is straightforward.Three-dimensional structural characteristics are measured directly on the porous and solid phases of the images. A number of morphological parameters are obtained, including pore volume-to-surface-area ratio, connectivity, the pore and solid phase size distributions defined by maximal sphere openings and chord length measurements. We further calculate the pore size distribution associated with capillary pressure via simulating of mercury drainage on the digital images.The binarized microstructures are used as a basis for calculations of transport properties (fluid permeability, diffusivity and thermal conductivity) and elastic moduli. From the data, we generate property-porosity relationships for the range of foam morphologies imaged and quantitatively analyse the effects of porosity and microstructure on the resultant properties of the foams.We compare our numerical data to commonly used theoretical and empirical property-porosity relationships. For thermal conductivity, we find that the numerical results agree extremely well with an empirical expression based on experimental data of various foams. The upper Hashin-Shtrikman bound also provides an excellent prediction of the data across all densities. From simulation of the diffusivity, we can define the tortuosity of the pore space within the cellular solid. We find that different processing methods lead to strong variations in the

  20. Induced apnea enhances image quality and visualization of cardiopulmonary anatomic during contrastenhanced cardiac computerized tomographic angiography in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakravarthy, Murali; Sunilkumar, Gubbihalli; Pargaonkar, Sumant; Hosur, Rajathadri; Harivelam, Chidananda; Kavaraganahalli, Deepak; Srinivasan, Pradeep

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of our study was to determine the effect of induced apnea on quality of cardiopulmonary structures during computerized tomographic (CT) angiography images in children with congenital heart diseases. Pediatric patients with congenital heart defects undergoing cardiac CT angiography at our facility in the past 3 years participated in this study. The earlier patients underwent cardiac CT angiography without induced apnea and while, later, apnea was induced in patients, which was followed by electrocardiogram gated cardiac CT angiography. General anesthesia was induced using sleep dose of intravenous propofol. After the initial check CT, on request by the radiologist, apnea was induced by the anesthesiologist by administering 1 mg/kg of intravenous suxamethonium. Soon after apnea ensued, the contrast was injected, and CT angiogram carried out. CT images in the "apnea group" were compared with those in "nonapnea group." After the completion of the procedure, the patients were mask ventilated with 100% oxygen till the spontaneous ventilation was restored. We studied 46 patients, of whom 36 with apnea and yet another 10 without. The quality of the image, visualization of structures such as cardiac wall, outflow tracts, lung field, aortopulmonary shunts, and coronary arteries were analyzed and subjected to statistical analysis (Mann-Whitney U, Fischer's exact test and Pearson's Chi-square test). In the induced apnea group, overall image quality was considered excellent in 89% (n = 33) of the studies, while in the "no apnea group," only 30% of studies were excellent. Absent or minimal motion artifacts were seen in a majority of the studies in apnea group (94%). In the nonapnea group, the respiratory and body motion artifacts were severe in 50%, moderate in 30%, and minimal in 20%, but they were significantly lesser in the apnea group. All the studied parameters were statistically significant in the apnea group in contrast to nonapnea group (P cardiac CT

  1. Experimental study of vorticity-strain rate interaction in turbulent partially premixed jet flames using tomographic particle image velocimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coriton, Bruno; Frank, Jonathan H.

    2016-02-01

    In turbulent flows, the interaction between vorticity, ω, and strain rate, s, is considered a primary mechanism for the transfer of energy from large to small scales through vortex stretching. The ω-s coupling in turbulent jet flames is investigated using tomographic particle image velocimetry (TPIV). TPIV provides a direct measurement of the three-dimensional velocity field from which ω and s are determined. The effects of combustion and mean shear on the ω-s interaction are investigated in turbulent partially premixed methane/air jet flames with high and low probabilities of localized extinction as well as in a non-reacting isothermal air jet with Reynolds number of approximately 13 000. Results show that combustion causes structures of high vorticity and strain rate to agglomerate in highly correlated, elongated layers that span the height of the probe volume. In the non-reacting jet, these structures have a more varied morphology, greater fragmentation, and are not as well correlated. The enhanced spatiotemporal correlation of vorticity and strain rate in the stable flame results in stronger ω-s interaction characterized by increased enstrophy and strain-rate production rates via vortex stretching and straining, respectively. The probability of preferential local alignment between ω and the eigenvector of the intermediate principal strain rate, s2, which is intrinsic to the ω-s coupling in turbulent flows, is larger in the flames and increases with the flame stability. The larger mean shear in the flame imposes a preferential orientation of ω and s2 tangential to the shear layer. The extensive and compressive principal strain rates, s1 and s3, respectively, are preferentially oriented at approximately 45° with respect to the jet axis. The production rates of strain and vorticity tend to be dominated by instances in which ω is parallel to the s1 ¯-s2 ¯ plane and orthogonal to s3 ¯.

  2. Moving image analysis to the cloud: A case study with a genome-scale tomographic study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mader, Kevin [4Quant Ltd., Switzerland & Institute for Biomedical Engineering at University and ETH Zurich (Switzerland); Stampanoni, Marco [Institute for Biomedical Engineering at University and ETH Zurich, Switzerland & Swiss Light Source at Paul Scherrer Institut, Villigen (Switzerland)

    2016-01-28

    Over the last decade, the time required to measure a terabyte of microscopic imaging data has gone from years to minutes. This shift has moved many of the challenges away from experimental design and measurement to scalable storage, organization, and analysis. As many scientists and scientific institutions lack training and competencies in these areas, major bottlenecks have arisen and led to substantial delays and gaps between measurement, understanding, and dissemination. We present in this paper a framework for analyzing large 3D datasets using cloud-based computational and storage resources. We demonstrate its applicability by showing the setup and costs associated with the analysis of a genome-scale study of bone microstructure. We then evaluate the relative advantages and disadvantages associated with local versus cloud infrastructures.

  3. Tomographic imaging of incipient dental-caries using optical coherence tomography and comparison with various modalities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Na, Jihoon; Baek, Jae Ho; Ryu, Seon Young; Lee, Changsu; Lee, Byeong Ha

    2009-07-01

    We present the optical coherence tomography (OCT) made to investigate the early dental caries in human teeth and compare its results with those taken by conventional imaging modalities including light illuminating examination (LIE), digital intra-oral radiography (DIOR), and electron probe micro analyzer (EPMA). Morphological features and caries-involved areas of the dental structure were mainly investigated by LIE, DIOR, and OCT to study the infection of the caries lesion in pits and fissures. The biochemical information acquired with EPMA and the morphological features taken with OCT in the early stage of caries were compared and analyzed to present an objective and practical index for the degree of caries. The experimental results allow us to conclude that OCT could be used to provide quantitative analysis of caries based on the reflectivity difference in the specimen.

  4. Guided-wave tomographic imaging of plate defects by laser-based ultrasonic techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Junpil; Lim, Ju Young; Cho, Youn Ho [School of Mechanical Engineering, Pusan National University, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    Contact-guided-wave tests are impractical for investigating specimens with limited accessibility and rough surfaces or complex geometric features. A non-contact setup with a laser-ultrasonic transmitter and receiver is quite attractive for guided-wave inspection. In the present work, we developed a non-contact guided-wave tomography technique using the laser-ultrasonic technique in a plate. A method for Lamb-wave generation and detection in an aluminum plate with a pulsed laser-ultrasonic transmitter and Michelson-interferometer receiver was developed. The defect shape and area in the images obtained using laser scanning, showed good agreement with the actual defect. The proposed approach can be used as a non-contact online inspection and monitoring technique.

  5. Correlation between computed tomographic and magnetic resonance imaging findings of parenchymal lung diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barreto, Miriam Menna; Rafful, Patricia Piazza [Department of Radiology, Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Rodrigues, Rosana Souza [Department of Radiology, Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); D’Or Institute for Research and Education, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Zanetti, Gláucia [Department of Radiology, Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Hochhegger, Bruno [Complexo Hospitalar Santa Casa de Misericórdia de Porto Alegre, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Souza, Arthur Soares [Department of Radiology, Medical School of Rio Preto (FAMERP) and Ultra X, São José do Rio Preto, SP (Brazil); Guimarães, Marcos Duarte [Department of Imaging, Hospital AC Camargo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Marchiori, Edson, E-mail: edmarchiori@gmail.com [Department of Radiology, Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil)

    2013-09-15

    Computed tomography (CT) is considered to be the gold standard method for the assessment of morphological changes in the pulmonary parenchyma. Although its spatial resolution is lower than that of CT, MRI offers the advantage of characterizing different aspects of tissue based on the degree of contrast on T1-weighted image (WI) and T2-WI. In this article, we describe and correlate the MRI and CT features of several common patterns of parenchymal lung disease (air trapping, atelectasis, bronchiectasis, cavitation, consolidation, emphysema, ground-glass opacities, halo sign, interlobular septal thickening, masses, mycetoma, nodules, progressive massive fibrosis, reverse halo sign and tree-in-bud pattern). MRI may be an alternative modality for the collection of morphological and functional information useful for the management of parenchymal lung disease, which would help reduce the number of chest CT scans and radiation exposure required in patients with a variety of conditions.

  6. Distributed MLEM: an iterative tomographic image reconstruction algorithm for distributed memory architectures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Jingyu; Pratx, Guillem; Meng, Bowen; Levin, Craig S

    2013-05-01

    The processing speed for positron emission tomography (PET) image reconstruction has been greatly improved in recent years by simply dividing the workload to multiple processors of a graphics processing unit (GPU). However, if this strategy is generalized to a multi-GPU cluster, the processing speed does not improve linearly with the number of GPUs. This is because large data transfer is required between the GPUs after each iteration, effectively reducing the parallelism. This paper proposes a novel approach to reformulate the maximum likelihood expectation maximization (MLEM) algorithm so that it can scale up to many GPU nodes with less frequent inter-node communication. While being mathematically different, the new algorithm maximizes the same convex likelihood function as MLEM, thus converges to the same solution. Experiments on a multi-GPU cluster demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed approach.

  7. Volume and Surface Measurements from Tomographic Images: in Vivo Validation of AN Unsupervised Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alyassin, Abdalmajeid Musa

    The maximum unit normal component method (MUNC) used for surface area measurement and the divergence theorem algorithm (DTA) used for volume measurement were evaluated in vitro and validated in vivo. To evaluate these methods in vitro, their accuracy and precision were investigated at varying conditions of signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), sampling, volume averaging, and orientation. These algorithms were also enhanced to provide interactive surface area and volume measurements for regions bounded by orthogonal cut planes. The in vitro evaluations showed that a minimum SNR of 6:1 was necessary to provide accurate surface area and volume measurements. This test also revealed surface area measurements were more sensitive to noise than volume measurement. Sampling tests showed that at least twelve samples across the shortest dimension of simulated objects are necessary to provide accurate surface area and volume measurements. Volume averaging tests, however, revealed that at least seven voxels across the diameter (51.44 mm) of a computed tomography wooden sphere image are necessary for accurate surface area and volume measurements. Orientation tests indicated that the accuracy of the measured surface area and volume was primarily dependent on the number of samples across the shortest dimension of the object. Interactive measurement tests proved that the enhanced algorithms can provide accurate and precise interactive surface area and volume measurements. To validate the investigated algorithms in vivo, an unsupervised method incorporating these algorithms was developed for measuring surface area and volume of the urinary bladder using dual-echo, T2-weighted magnetic resonance images. Accuracy and precision of the unsupervised method in estimating urine volumes in vivo for nine normal subjects were volume measured using the DTA method compares well with the volume measured by a proven voxel counting method. The MUNC method for measuring surface area is shown superior to a

  8. The complex aerodynamic footprint of desert locusts revealed by large-volume tomographic particle image velocimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henningsson, Per; Michaelis, Dirk; Nakata, Toshiyuki; Schanz, Daniel; Geisler, Reinhard; Schröder, Andreas; Bomphrey, Richard J

    2015-07-06

    Particle image velocimetry has been the preferred experimental technique with which to study the aerodynamics of animal flight for over a decade. In that time, hardware has become more accessible and the software has progressed from the acquisition of planes through the flow field to the reconstruction of small volumetric measurements. Until now, it has not been possible to capture large volumes that incorporate the full wavelength of the aerodynamic track left behind during a complete wingbeat cycle. Here, we use a unique apparatus to acquire the first instantaneous wake volume of a flying animal's entire wingbeat. We confirm the presence of wake deformation behind desert locusts and quantify the effect of that deformation on estimates of aerodynamic force and the efficiency of lift generation. We present previously undescribed vortex wake phenomena, including entrainment around the wing-tip vortices of a set of secondary vortices borne of Kelvin-Helmholtz instability in the shear layer behind the flapping wings. © 2015 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  9. Intraretinal hyperreflective foci on spectral-domain optical coherence tomographic images of patients with retinitis pigmentosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuroda, Masako; Hirami, Yasuhiko; Hata, Masayuki; Mandai, Michiko; Takahashi, Masayo; Kurimoto, Yasuo

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to observe the characteristic findings of spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) images in the retinas of patients with retinitis pigmentosa and to evaluate their distribution patterns in the early and advanced stages of the disease. A total of 184 patients (368 eyes) with retinitis pigmentosa were observed using SD-OCT. We studied the presence or absence of continuous inner/outer segment (IS/OS) lines, presence of thinning of the retinal pigment epithelium-Bruch's membrane complex, and distribution patterns of hyperreflective foci in the inner and outer nuclear layers (INL and ONL). The IS/OS junction had partially disappeared in 275 eyes, which were at the early stage of retinitis pigmentosa (group X), whereas the junction had totally disappeared in 93, which were at the advanced stage of retinitis pigmentosa (group Y). Hyperreflective foci in the INL were observed in a significantly larger proportion of the eyes in group X than in group Y (90% versus 61%, Pretinitis pigmentosa and hyperreflective foci in the ONL were more frequently observed in the advanced stage. Hyperreflective foci may be indicative of changes in the retinal structure at each stage of retinitis pigmentosa.

  10. Imaging in blunt cardiac injury: Computed tomographic findings in cardiac contusion and associated injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammer, Mark M; Raptis, Demetrios A; Cummings, Kristopher W; Mellnick, Vincent M; Bhalla, Sanjeev; Schuerer, Douglas J; Raptis, Constantine A

    2016-05-01

    Blunt cardiac injury (BCI) may manifest as cardiac contusion or, more rarely, as pericardial or myocardial rupture. Computed tomography (CT) is performed in the vast majority of blunt trauma patients, but the imaging features of cardiac contusion are not well described. To evaluate CT findings and associated injuries in patients with clinically diagnosed BCI. We identified 42 patients with blunt cardiac injury from our institution's electronic medical record. Clinical parameters, echocardiography results, and laboratory tests were recorded. Two blinded reviewers analyzed chest CTs performed in these patients for myocardial hypoenhancement and associated injuries. CT findings of severe thoracic trauma are commonly present in patients with severe BCI; 82% of patients with ECG, cardiac enzyme, and echocardiographic evidence of BCI had abnormalities of the heart or pericardium on CT; 73% had anterior rib fractures, and 64% had pulmonary contusions. Sternal fractures were only seen in 36% of such patients. However, myocardial hypoenhancement on CT is poorly sensitive for those patients with cardiac contusion: 0% of right ventricular contusions and 22% of left ventricular contusions seen on echocardiography were identified on CT. CT signs of severe thoracic trauma are frequently present in patients with severe BCI and should be regarded as indirect evidence of potential BCI. Direct CT findings of myocardial contusion, i.e. myocardial hypoenhancement, are poorly sensitive and should not be used as a screening tool. However, some left ventricular contusions can be seen on CT, and these patients could undergo echocardiography or cardiac MRI to evaluate for wall motion abnormalities. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Differentiation of constrictive pericarditis from restrictive cardiomyopathy: The case for high-resolution dynamic tomographic imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weiss, R.M.; Otoadese, T.; Oren, R.M.

    1995-12-31

    The syndrome of constrictive pericarditis (CP) presents a diagnostic challenge to the clinician. This study was undertaken to determine whether cine computed tomography (CT), a cardiac imaging technique with excellent temporal and spatial resolution, can reliably demonstrate the unique abnormalities of pericardial anatomy and ventricular physiology present in patients with this condition. A second goal of this study was to determine whether the presence of diseased thickened pericardium, but itself, imparts cardiac impairment due to abnormalities of ventricular diastolic function. Twelve patients with CP suspected clinically, in whom invasive hemodynamic study was consistent with the diagnosis of CP, underwent cine CT. They were subdivided into Group 1 (CP, N = 5) and Group 2 (No CP, N = 7) based on histopathologic evaluation of tissue obtained at the time of surgery or autopsy. A third group consisted of asymptomatic patients with incidentally discovered thickened pericardium at the time of cine CT scanning: Group 3 (ThP, N = 7). Group 4 (Nl, N = 7) consisted of healthy volunteer subjects. Pericardial thickness measurements with cine CT clearly distinguished Group 1 (mean = 10 {+-} 2 mm) from Group 2 (mean = 2 {+-} 1 mm), with diagnostic accuracy of 100% compared to histopathological findings. In addition, patients in Group 1 had significantly more brisk early diastolic filling of both left and right ventricles than those in Group 2, which clearly distinguished all patients with and from all patients without CP. Patients in Group 3 had pericardial thicknesses similar to those in Group 1 (mean = 9 {+-} 1 mm, p = NS), but had patterns of diastolic ventricular filling that were nearly identical to Group 4 (NI).

  12. Radio-Tomographic Images of Post-midnight Equatorial Plasma Depletions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hei, M. A.; Bernhardt, P. A.; Siefring, C. L.; Wilkens, M.; Huba, J. D.; Krall, J.; Valladares, C. E.; Heelis, R. A.; Hairston, M. R.; Coley, W. R.; Chau, J. L.

    2013-12-01

    For the first time, post-midnight equatorial plasma depletions (EPDs) have been imaged in the longitude-altitude plane using radio-tomography. High-resolution (~10 km × 10 km) electron-density reconstructions were created from total electron content (TEC) data using an array of receivers sited in Peru and the Multiplicative Algebraic Reconstruction Technique (MART) inversion algorithm. TEC data were obtained from the 150 and 400 MHz signals transmitted by the CERTO beacon on the C/NOFS satellite. In-situ electron density data from the C/NOFS CINDI instrument and electron density profiles from the UML Jicamarca ionosonde were used to generate an initial guess for the MART inversion, and also to constrain the inversion process. Observed EPDs had widths of 100-1000 km, spacings of 300-900 km, and often appeared 'pinched off' at the bottom. Well-developed EPDs appeared on an evening with a very small (4 m/s) Pre-Reversal-Enhancement (PRE), suggesting that postmidnight enhancements of the vertical plasma drift and/or seeding-induced uplifts (e.g. gravity waves) were responsible for driving the Rayleigh-Taylor Instability into the nonlinear regime on this night. On another night the Jicamarca ISR recorded postmidnight (~0230 LT) Eastward electric fields nearly twice as strong as the PRE fields seven hours earlier. These electric fields lifted the whole ionosphere, including embedded EPDs, over a longitude range ~14° wide. CINDI detected a dawn depletion in exactly the area where the reconstruction showed an uplifted EPD. Strong Equatorial Spread-F observed by the Jicamarca ionosonde during receiver observation times confirmed the presence of ionospheric irregularities.

  13. Self-calibrated correlation imaging with k-space variant correlation functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yu; Edalati, Masoud; Du, Xingfu; Wang, Hui; Cao, Jie J

    2017-07-07

    Correlation imaging is a previously developed high-speed MRI framework that converts parallel imaging reconstruction into the estimate of correlation functions. The presented work aims to demonstrate this framework can provide a speed gain over parallel imaging by estimating k-space variant correlation functions. Because of Fourier encoding with gradients, outer k-space data contain higher spatial-frequency image components arising primarily from tissue boundaries. As a result of tissue-boundary sparsity in the human anatomy, neighboring k-space data correlation varies from the central to the outer k-space. By estimating k-space variant correlation functions with an iterative self-calibration method, correlation imaging can benefit from neighboring k-space data correlation associated with both coil sensitivity encoding and tissue-boundary sparsity, thereby providing a speed gain over parallel imaging that relies only on coil sensitivity encoding. This new approach is investigated in brain imaging and free-breathing neonatal cardiac imaging. Correlation imaging performs better than existing parallel imaging techniques in simulated brain imaging acceleration experiments. The higher speed enables real-time data acquisition for neonatal cardiac imaging in which physiological motion is fast and non-periodic. With k-space variant correlation functions, correlation imaging gives a higher speed than parallel imaging and offers the potential to image physiological motion in real-time. Magn Reson Med, 2017. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  14. Differentiation of constrictive pericarditis from restrictive cardiomyopathy: the case for high-resolution dynamic tomographic imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Robert M.; Otoadese, Eramosele A.; Oren, Ron M.

    1995-05-01

    The syndrome of constrictive pericarditis (CP) presents a diagnostic challenge to the clinician. This study was undertaken to determine whether cine computed tomography (CT), a cardiac imaging technique with excellent temporal and spatial resolution, can reliably demonstrate the unique abnormalities of pericardial anatomy and ventricular physiology present in patients with this condition. A second goal of this study was to determine whether the presence of diseased thickened pericardium, by itself, imparts cardiac impairment due to abnormalities of ventricular diastolic function. Methods: Twelve patients with CP suspected clinically, in whom invasive hemodynamic study was consistent with the diagnosis of CP, underwent cine CT. They were subdivided into Group 1 (CP, N equals 5) and Group 2 (No CP, N equals 7) based on histopathologic evaluation of tissue obtained at the time of surgery or autopsy. A third group consisted of asymptomatic patients with incidentally discovered thickened pericardium at the time of cine CT scanning: Group 3 (ThP, N equals 7). Group 4 (Nl, N equals 7) consisted of healthy volunteer subjects. Results: Pericardial thickness measurements with cine CT clearly distinguished Group 1 (mean equals 10 +/- 2 mm) from Group 2 (mean equals 2 +/- 1 mm), with diagnostic accuracy of 100% compared to histopathological findings. In addition, patients in Group 1 had significantly more brisk early diastolic filling of both left and right ventricles than those in Group 2, which clearly distinguished all patients with, from all patients without CP. Patients in Group 3 had pericardial thicknesses similar to those in Group 1 (mean equals 9 +/- 1 mm, p equals NS), but had patterns of diastolic ventricular filling that were nearly identical to Group 4 (Nl). Conclusions: The abnormalities of anatomy and ventricular function present in the syndrome of constrictive pericarditis are clearly and decisively identified by cine CT. This allows a reliable distinction

  15. Synthesis and preliminary in vivo evaluation of well-dispersed biomimetic nanocrystalline apatites labeled with positron emission tomographic imaging agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandhöfer, Benedikt; Meckel, Marian; Delgado-López, José Manuel; Patrício, Tatiana; Tampieri, Anna; Rösch, Frank; Iafisco, Michele

    2015-05-20

    In recent years, biomimetic synthetic apatite nanoparticles (AP-NPs), having chemical similarity with the mineral phase of bone, have attracted a great interest in nanomedicine as potential drug carriers. To evaluate the therapeutic perspectives of AP-NPs through the mechanisms of action and organs they interact with, the noninvasive monitoring of their in vivo behavior is of paramount importance. To this aim, here the feasibility to radiolabel AP-NPs ("naked" and surface-modified with citrate to reduce their aggregation) with two positron emission tomographic (PET) imaging agents ([(18)F]NaF and (68)Ga-NO2AP(BP)) was investigated. [(18)F]NaF was used for the direct incorporation of the radioisotope into the crystal lattice, while the labeling by surface functionalization was accomplished by using (68)Ga-NO2AP(BP) (a new radio-metal chelating agent). The labeling results with both tracers were fast, straightforward, and reproducible. AP-NPs demonstrated excellent ability to bind relevant quantities of both radiotracers and good in vitro stability in clinically relevant media after the labeling. In vivo PET studies in healthy Wistar rats established that the radiolabeled AP-NPs gave significant PET signals and they were stable over the investigated time (90 min) since any tracer desorption was detected. These preliminary in vivo studies furthermore showed a clear ability of citrated versus naked AP-NPs to accumulate in different organs. Interestingly, contrary to naked AP-NPs, citrated ones, which unveiled higher colloidal stability in aqueous suspensions, were able to escape the first physiological filter, i.e., the lungs, being then accumulated in the liver and, to a lesser extent, in the spleen. The results of this work, along with the fact that AP-NPs can be also functionalized with targeting ligands, with therapeutic agents, and also with metals for a combination of different imaging modalities, make AP-NPs very encouraging materials for further investigations

  16. Scaled Anatomical Model Creation of Biomedical Tomographic Imaging Data and Associated Labels for Subsequent Sub-surface Laser Engraving (SSLE) of Glass Crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betts, Aislinn M; McGoldrick, Matthew T; Dethlefs, Christopher R; Piotrowicz, Justin; Van Avermaete, Tony; Maki, Jeff; Gerstler, Steve; Leevy, W M

    2017-04-25

    Biomedical imaging modalities like computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR) provide excellent platforms for collecting three-dimensional data sets of patient or specimen anatomy in clinical or preclinical settings. However, the use of a virtual, on-screen display limits the ability of these tomographic images to fully convey the anatomical information embedded within. One solution is to interface a biomedical imaging data set with 3D printing technology to generate a physical replica. Here we detail a complementary method to visualize tomographic imaging data with a hand-held model: Sub Surface Laser Engraving (SSLE) of crystal glass. SSLE offers several unique benefits including: the facile ability to include anatomical labels, as well as a scale bar; streamlined multipart assembly of complex structures in one medium; high resolution in the X, Y, and Z planes; and semi-transparent shells for visualization of internal anatomical substructures. Here we demonstrate the process of SSLE with CT data sets derived from pre-clinical and clinical sources. This protocol will serve as a powerful and inexpensive new tool with which to visualize complex anatomical structures for scientists and students in a number of educational and research settings.

  17. Comparison of image quality and radiation dose of coronary computed tomographic angiography between conventional helical scanning and a strategy incorporating sequential scanning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Einstein, Andrew J; Wolff, Steven D; Manheimer, Eric D; Thompson, James; Terry, Sylvia; Uretsky, Seth; Pilip, Adalbert; Peters, M Robert

    2009-11-15

    Radiation dose from coronary computed tomographic angiography may be decreased using a sequential scanning protocol rather than a conventional helical scanning protocol. We compared radiation dose and image quality from coronary computed tomographic angiography in a single center between an initial period during which helical scanning with electrocardiographically controlled tube current modulation was used for all patients (n = 138) and after adoption of a strategy incorporating sequential scanning whenever appropriate (n = 261). Using the sequential-if-appropriate strategy, sequential scanning was employed in 86.2% of patients. Compared to the helical-only strategy, this strategy was associated with a 65.1% dose decrease (mean dose-length product [DLP] 305.2 vs 875.1 and mean effective dose 14.9 vs 5.2 mSv, respectively), with no significant change in overall image quality, step artifacts, motion artifacts, or perceived image noise. For the 225 patients undergoing sequential scanning, the DLP was 201.9 +/- 90.0 mGy x cm; for patients undergoing helical scanning under either strategy, the DLP was 890.9 +/- 293.3 mGy x cm (p strategy. In conclusion, a sequential-if-appropriate diagnostic strategy decreases dose markedly compared to a helical-only strategy, with no significant difference in image quality.

  18. Quantitative strain analysis in analogue modelling experiments: insights from X-ray computed tomography and tomographic image correlation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adam, J.; Klinkmueller, M.; Schreurs, G.; Wieneke, B.

    2009-04-01

    deformation. We have adapted our analogue modelling setups for optimal analysis of complex deformation processes using leading-edge volumetric strain monitoring techniques (3D volume DIC, Tomographic DIC). In this study, we apply DIC on X-ray CT images of analogue models. Our first results indicate that DIC can successfully be applied to quantify the 2D and 3D spatial and temporal patterns of strain accumulation. REFERENCES Adam, J., Urai, J.L, Wieneke, B., Oncken, O., Pfeiffer, K., Kukowski, N., Lohrmann, J., Hoth, S. van der Zee, W., and Schmatz, J.; 2005: Shear localisation and strain distribution during tectonic faulting - new insights from granular-flow experiments and high-resolution optical image correlation techniques. Journal of Structural Geology, 27, 283-301. Lohrmann, J., Kukowski, N., Adam, J. & Oncken, O.; 2003: The control of sand wedges by material properties: sensitivity analyses and application to convergent margin mechanics. - Journal of Structural Geology, 25, 1691-1711 Panien, M., Schreurs, G., and Pfiffner, A.; 2006. Mechanical behaviour of granular materials used in analogue modelling: insights from grain characterisation, ring-shear tests and analogue experiments. Journal of Structural Geology, 28, 1710-1724. Schreurs, G., Hänni, R, and Vock, P.; 2002: Analogue modelling of transfer zones in fold and thrust belts: a 4-D analysis. In: Schellart, W.P. and Passchier, C. (eds). Analogue modelling of large-scale tectonic processes. Journal of the Virtual Explorer, 7, 67-73. Schreurs, G., Hänni, R, Panien, M. and Vock, P.; 2003: Analysis of analogue models by helical X-ray computed tomography. In: Mees, F., Swennen, R., Van Geet, M. and Jacobs, P. (eds). Applications of X-ray Computed Tomogaphy in Earth Sciences. Geological Society, London, Special Publications, 215, 213-223.

  19. Paleoseismologic data and seismic tomographic images of the 1992 Erzincan Earthquake along the North Anatolian Fault Zone, Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caglayan, A.; Kaypak, B.; Isik, V.; Saber, R.; Yasar, I.

    2014-12-01

    The North Anatolian Fault Zone (NAFZ), spanning over 1200 km from Karliova in eastern Turkey to the Aegean Sea, defines complex active fault zone. The zone consists of network of subfaults, each of varying geometry, and associated failure properties. The Erzincan basin, one of a series basins along the NAFZ, is active basin surrounding bedrock which is Mesozoic and Tertiary units. Available geophysical data constrain the total thickness of Pliocene and Quaternary sediments in the Erzincan basin to more than 2 km. The basin was affected by the 1992 March 13 Erzincan earthquake (Ms=6.8) showing weakly developed surface ruptures. We excavated 6 paleoseismic trenches along the southeastern termination of the 1992 rupture in Üzümlü area. A total of trenches is 294 m long and trends N20°-30°E. Exposed lithology in trenches is made up of alluvial fan deposites and fluvial facies with rare flood-plain sediments, which are characterized by stratified and/or lens-shaped pebble gravel to coarse-grained sand, silt, and clay. Our preliminary interpretation of trenches reveals evidence of 1992 earthquake features. Trench logs showing structural elements including normal faults, which are parallel to the strike of the trace of the NAFZ and dipping 40°-75° to the northeast and the southwest, and network of almost vertical fractures with a few centimeters displacement. Some of trenches contain well-developed flame structures, suggesting liquefaction of water-saturated sediments during earthquake. Seismic velocity (VP and VP/VS) images obtained from the 3-D local earthquake tomography using the arrival time data of aftershocks of the 13 March 1992 Erzincan earthquake show several anomalies related to geological features of the Erzincan basin. The tomographic results indicate that (1) the major fault zones control the regional tectonics and the geometry of the Erzincan basin, (2) sediments of the basin show low seismic velocity, and (3) The high velocity units characterized by

  20. Generalized image deconvolution by exploiting spatially variant point spread functions

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Sangyun; Lee, KyeoReh; Shin, Seungwoo; Park, YongKeun

    2017-01-01

    An optical imaging system forms an object image by recollecting light scattered by the object. However, intact optical information of the object delivered through the imaging system is deteriorated by imperfect optical elements and unwanted defects. Image deconvolution, also known as inverse filtering, has been widely exploited as a recovery technique because of its practical feasibility, and operates by assuming the linear shift-invariant property of the imaging system. However, shift invari...

  1. Effect of Donepezil on Wernicke Aphasia After Bilateral Middle Cerebral Artery Infarction: Subtraction Analysis of Brain F-18 Fluorodeoxyglucose Positron Emission Tomographic Images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Seo Yeon; Kim, Je-Kyung; An, Young-Sil; Kim, Yong Wook

    2015-01-01

    Aphasia is one of the most common neurologic deficits occurring after stroke. Although the speech-language therapy is a mainstream option for poststroke aphasia, pharmacotherapy is recently being tried to modulate different neurotransmitter systems. However, the efficacy of those treatments is still controversial. We present a case of a 53-year-old female patient with Wernicke aphasia, after the old infarction in the territory of left middle cerebral artery for 8 years and the recent infarction in the right middle cerebral artery for 4 months. On the initial evaluation, the Aphasia Quotient in Korean version of the Western Aphasia Battery was 25.6 of 100. Baseline brain F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomographic images demonstrated a decreased cerebral metabolism in the left temporoparietal area and right temporal lobe. Donepezil hydrochloride, a reversible acetylcholinesterase inhibitor, was orally administered 5 mg/d for 6 weeks after the initial evaluation and was increased to 10 mg/d for the following 6 weeks. After the donepezil treatment, the patient showed improvement in language function, scoring 51.0 of 100 on Aphasia Quotient. A subtraction analysis of the brain F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomographic images after donepezil medication demonstrated increased uptake in both middle temporal gyri, extended to the occipital area and the left cerebellum. Thus, we suggest that donepezil can be an effective therapeutic choice for the treatment of Wernicke aphasia.

  2. Colour segmentation of multi variants tuberculosis sputum images using self organizing map

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rulaningtyas, Riries; Suksmono, Andriyan B.; Mengko, Tati L. R.; Saptawati, Putri

    2017-05-01

    Lung tuberculosis detection is still identified from Ziehl-Neelsen sputum smear images in low and middle countries. The clinicians decide the grade of this disease by counting manually the amount of tuberculosis bacilli. It is very tedious for clinicians with a lot number of patient and without standardization for sputum staining. The tuberculosis sputum images have multi variant characterizations in colour, because of no standardization in staining. The sputum has more variants colour and they are difficult to be identified. For helping the clinicians, this research examined the Self Organizing Map method for colouring image segmentation in sputum images based on colour clustering. This method has better performance than k-means clustering which also tried in this research. The Self Organizing Map could segment the sputum images with y good result and cluster the colours adaptively.

  3. Color Enhancement in Endoscopic Images Using Adaptive Sigmoid Function and Space Variant Color Reproduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad S. Imtiaz

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Modern endoscopes play an important role in diagnosing various gastrointestinal (GI tract related diseases. The improved visual quality of endoscopic images can provide better diagnosis. This paper presents an efficient color image enhancement method for endoscopic images. It is achieved in two stages: image enhancement at gray level followed by space variant chrominance mapping color reproduction. Image enhancement is achieved by performing adaptive sigmoid function and uniform distribution of sigmoid pixels. Secondly, a space variant chrominance mapping color reproduction is used to generate new chrominance components. The proposed method is used on low contrast color white light images (WLI to enhance and highlight the vascular and mucosa structures of the GI tract. The method is also used to colorize grayscale narrow band images (NBI and video frames. The focus value and color enhancement factor show that the enhancement level in the processed image is greatly increased compared to the original endoscopic image. The overall contrast level of the processed image is higher than the original image. The color similarity test has proved that the proposed method does not add any additional color which is not present in the original image. The algorithm has low complexity with an execution speed faster than other related methods.

  4. Color Enhancement in Endoscopic Images Using Adaptive Sigmoid Function and Space Variant Color Reproduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imtiaz, Mohammad S; Wahid, Khan A

    2015-01-01

    Modern endoscopes play an important role in diagnosing various gastrointestinal (GI) tract related diseases. The improved visual quality of endoscopic images can provide better diagnosis. This paper presents an efficient color image enhancement method for endoscopic images. It is achieved in two stages: image enhancement at gray level followed by space variant chrominance mapping color reproduction. Image enhancement is achieved by performing adaptive sigmoid function and uniform distribution of sigmoid pixels. Secondly, a space variant chrominance mapping color reproduction is used to generate new chrominance components. The proposed method is used on low contrast color white light images (WLI) to enhance and highlight the vascular and mucosa structures of the GI tract. The method is also used to colorize grayscale narrow band images (NBI) and video frames. The focus value and color enhancement factor show that the enhancement level in the processed image is greatly increased compared to the original endoscopic image. The overall contrast level of the processed image is higher than the original image. The color similarity test has proved that the proposed method does not add any additional color which is not present in the original image. The algorithm has low complexity with an execution speed faster than other related methods.

  5. Tomographic bremsstrahlung imaging with yttrium-90 in the context of radioembolisation of liver tumors; Tomografische Bildgebung mit Yttrium-90-Bremsstrahlung im Rahmen der Radioembolisation von Lebertumoren

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grosser, Oliver Stephan

    2013-04-12

    Establish tomographic Bremsstrahlung SPECT imaging (BSPECT) for the clinical validation of Selective Internal Radiotherapy (SIRT) with Yttrium-90 ({sup 90}Y) labelled microspheres. Various energy ranges (75 ± 3.8 keV; 135 ± 6.8 keV; 167 ± 8.4 keV) and the summation window were studied to see if they were suitable for BSPECT. To this end, clinically available reconstruction techniques were analysed for their suitability for BSPECT. The tomographic examinations were performed on a cylindrical phantom filled with spheres of different diameters d = [28; 35; 40; 50; 60] mm in a non-active waterfilled background. The spheres were filled with identical {sup 90}Y activity concentration (AC). Measurements were conducted at AC = [14.58; 5.20; 1.98; 0.66] MBq/cm{sup 3}. The BSPECT were reconstructed with filtered back-projection (FBP), a 2D Ordered-Subset Expectation Maximisation Algorithm (2D-OSEM) and a 3D Geometric Mean Algorithm (3D-GMA). Evaluation was made visually and on the basis of objective performance parameters such as contrast, signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and image noise. While the 75 keV ± 3.8 keV window was identified as suitable for the BSPECT, limitations were revealed as to use of different implementations of the Point Spread Function (PSF). It was found for all reconstruction techniques that, at a given sphere diameter, there existed a linear relationship between the AC in the spheres and the reconstructed pulse rate per volume element. The recovery effect was verified for small spheres. The iterative techniques were found to be suitable for the BSPECT at all AC. At low AC, the 3D-GMA exhibited the least noise and the highest SNR. The FBP turned out to be entirely inappropriate for the BSPECT. The narrow energy window in which the bremsstrahlung interferes with the characteristic X-radiation of lead can be used for BSPECT. In this approach, the tomographic data reconstructed with different algorithms exhibited a varying image quality, with the iterative

  6. Estimation of the Above Ground Biomass of Tropical Forests using Polarimetric and Tomographic SAR Data Acquired at P Band and 3-D Imaging Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferro-Famil, L.; El Hajj Chehade, B.; Ho Tong Minh, D.; Tebaldini, S.; LE Toan, T.

    2016-12-01

    Developing and improving methods to monitor forest biomass in space and time is a timely challenge, especially for tropical forests, for which SAR imaging at larger wavelength presents an interesting potential. Nevertheless, directly estimating tropical forest biomass from classical 2-D SAR images may reveal a very complex and ill-conditioned problem, since a SAR echo is composed of numerous contributions, whose features and importance depend on many geophysical parameters, such has ground humidity, roughness, topography… that are not related to biomass. Recent studies showed that SAR modes of diversity, i.e. polarimetric intensity ratios or interferometric phase centers, do not fully resolve this under-determined problem, whereas Pol-InSAR tree height estimates may be related to biomass through allometric relationships, with, in general over tropical forests, significant levels of uncertainty and lack of robustness. In this context, 3-D imaging using SAR tomography represents an appealing solution at larger wavelengths, for which wave penetration properties ensures a high quality mapping of a tropical forest reflectivity in the vertical direction. This paper presents a series of studies led, in the frame of the preparation of the next ESA mission BIOMASS, on the estimation of biomass over a tropical forest in French Guiana, using Polarimetric SAR Tomographic (Pol-TomSAR) data acquired at P band by ONERA. It is then shown that Pol-TomoSAR significantly improves the retrieval of forest above ground biomass (AGB) in a high biomass forest (200 up to 500 t/ha), with an error of only 10% at 1.5-ha resolution using a reflectivity estimates sampled at a predetermined elevation. The robustness of this technique is tested by applying the same approach over another site, and results show a similar relationship between AGB and tomographic reflectivity over both sites. The excellent ability of Pol-TomSAR to retrieve both canopy top heights and ground topography with an error

  7. Disparity Map Generation from Illumination Variant Stereo Images Using Efficient Hierarchical Dynamic Programming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viral H. Borisagar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel hierarchical stereo matching algorithm is presented which gives disparity map as output from illumination variant stereo pair. Illumination difference between two stereo images can lead to undesirable output. Stereo image pair often experience illumination variations due to many factors like real and practical situation, spatially and temporally separated camera positions, environmental illumination fluctuation, and the change in the strength or position of the light sources. Window matching and dynamic programming techniques are employed for disparity map estimation. Good quality disparity map is obtained with the optimized path. Homomorphic filtering is used as a preprocessing step to lessen illumination variation between the stereo images. Anisotropic diffusion is used to refine disparity map to give high quality disparity map as a final output. The robust performance of the proposed approach is suitable for real life circumstances where there will be always illumination variation between the images. The matching is carried out in a sequence of images representing the same scene, however in different resolutions. The hierarchical approach adopted decreases the computation time of the stereo matching problem. This algorithm can be helpful in applications like robot navigation, extraction of information from aerial surveys, 3D scene reconstruction, and military and security applications. Similarity measure SAD is often sensitive to illumination variation. It produces unacceptable disparity map results for illumination variant left and right images. Experimental results show that our proposed algorithm produces quality disparity maps for both wide range of illumination variant and invariant stereo image pair.

  8. Disparity map generation from illumination variant stereo images using efficient hierarchical dynamic programming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borisagar, Viral H; Zaveri, Mukesh A

    2014-01-01

    A novel hierarchical stereo matching algorithm is presented which gives disparity map as output from illumination variant stereo pair. Illumination difference between two stereo images can lead to undesirable output. Stereo image pair often experience illumination variations due to many factors like real and practical situation, spatially and temporally separated camera positions, environmental illumination fluctuation, and the change in the strength or position of the light sources. Window matching and dynamic programming techniques are employed for disparity map estimation. Good quality disparity map is obtained with the optimized path. Homomorphic filtering is used as a preprocessing step to lessen illumination variation between the stereo images. Anisotropic diffusion is used to refine disparity map to give high quality disparity map as a final output. The robust performance of the proposed approach is suitable for real life circumstances where there will be always illumination variation between the images. The matching is carried out in a sequence of images representing the same scene, however in different resolutions. The hierarchical approach adopted decreases the computation time of the stereo matching problem. This algorithm can be helpful in applications like robot navigation, extraction of information from aerial surveys, 3D scene reconstruction, and military and security applications. Similarity measure SAD is often sensitive to illumination variation. It produces unacceptable disparity map results for illumination variant left and right images. Experimental results show that our proposed algorithm produces quality disparity maps for both wide range of illumination variant and invariant stereo image pair.

  9. Detection of Incomplete Root Fractures in Endodontically Treated Teeth Using Different High-resolution Cone-beam Computed Tomographic Imaging Protocols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanderley, Victor Aquino; Neves, Frederico Sampaio; Nascimento, Monikelly Carmo Chagas; Monteiro, Gabriela Queiroz de Melo; Lobo, Natália Siqueira; Oliveira, Matheus Lima; Nascimento Neto, Joao Batista Sobrinho; Araujo, Luciane Farias

    2017-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare different high-resolution cone-beam computed tomographic (CBCT) imaging protocols in the diagnosis of incomplete root fractures of endodontically treated teeth. Twenty single-rooted human teeth were endodontically treated, and an incomplete root fracture was induced. The teeth were scanned with the CBCT unit PreXion 3D (Teracom, San Mateo, CA) operating at 2 different protocols: high resolution/standard (HI-STD) (19 seconds and 512 basis images) and high resolution/high density (HI-HI) (37 seconds and 1024 basis images). Three oral radiologists evaluated all images using multiplanar reconstructions. The diagnostic tests and the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve were calculated. The HI-STD and HI-HI protocols presented an accuracy of 0.90 and 0.93, respectively, and both protocols had a sensitivity of 0.97. The HI-HI protocol showed a higher positive predictive value and slightly higher areas under the ROC curve. Both high-resolution imaging protocols presented high accuracy in the detection of incomplete root fracture of endodontically teeth. Thus, the HI-STD protocol should be indicated this reduces the radiation dose. Copyright © 2017 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. IMAGING DIAGNOSIS-COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHIC ANGIOGRAPHY CHARACTERISTICS OF MULTIPLE VASCULAR ANOMALIES IN A SENIOR DOG WITH LATE-ONSET REGURGITATION.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Hakyoung; Kim, Jaehwan; Kwon, Gi Bum; Lim, Jin Hyuk; Eom, Kidong

    2017-02-08

    A 10-year-old dog weighing 3.4 kg presented with intermittent regurgitation. Esophagography revealed that the thoracic esophagus was compressed dorsally at the region of the fourth intercostal space and segmentally dilated from the second to third intercostal region. Three-dimensional computed tomographic (CT) angiography confirmed a suspected vascular ring anomaly and also revealed multiple other vascular anomalies. These included aberrant right subclavian artery, absence of bilateral external jugular veins, right-gastric caval shunt, and a completely duplicated caudal vena cava. Findings supported the use of thoracic CT angiography to rule out additional vascular malformations in dogs with suspected vascular ring anomaly. © 2017 American College of Veterinary Radiology.

  11. Uniaxial Compression of Cellular Materials at a 10-1 s-1 Strain Rate Simultaneously with Synchrotron X-ray Computed Tomographic Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patterson, Brian M. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-03-01

    The topic is presented as a series of slides. Motivation for the work included the following: X-ray tomography is a fantastic technique for characterizing a material’s starting structure as well as for non-destructive, in situ experiments to investigate material response; 3D X-ray tomography is needed to fully characterize the morphology of cellular materials; and synchrotron micro-CT can capture 3D images without pausing experiment. Among the conclusions reached are these: High-rate radiographic and tomographic imaging (0.25 s 3D frame rate) using synchrotron CT can capture full 3D images of hyper-elastic materials at a 10-2 strain rate; dynamic true in situ uniaxial loading can be accurately captured; the three stages of compression can be imaged: bending, buckling, and breaking; implementation of linear modeling is completed; meshes have been imported into LANL modeling codes--testing and validation is underway and direct comparison and validation between in situ data and modeled mechanical response is possible.

  12. Use of a Diagnostic Score to Prioritize Computed Tomographic (CT) Imaging for Patients Suspected of Ischemic Stroke Who May Benefit from Thrombolytic Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bots, Michiel L.; Selvarajah, Sharmini; Kappelle, L. Jaap; Abdul Aziz, Zariah; Sidek, Norsima Nazifah; Vaartjes, Ilonca

    2016-01-01

    Background A shortage of computed tomographic (CT) machines in low and middle income countries often results in delayed CT imaging for patients suspected of a stroke. Yet, time constraint is one of the most important aspects for patients with an ischemic stroke to benefit from thrombolytic therapy. We set out to assess whether application of the Siriraj Stroke Score is able to assist physicians in prioritizing patients with a high probability of having an ischemic stroke for urgent CT imaging. Methods From the Malaysian National Neurology Registry, we selected patients aged 18 years and over with clinical features suggesting of a stroke, who arrived in the hospital 4.5 hours or less from ictus. The prioritization of receiving CT imaging was left to the discretion of the treating physician. We applied the Siriraj Stroke Score to all patients, refitted the score and defined a cut-off value to best distinguish an ischemic stroke from a hemorrhagic stroke. Results Of the 2176 patients included, 73% had an ischemic stroke. Only 33% of the ischemic stroke patients had CT imaging within 4.5 hours. The median door-to-scan time for these patients was 4 hours (IQR: 1;16). With the recalibrated score, it would have been possible to prioritize 95% (95% CI: 94%–96%) of patients with an ischemic stroke for urgent CT imaging. Conclusions In settings where CT imaging capacity is limited, we propose the use of the Siriraj Stroke Score to prioritize patients with a probable ischemic stroke for urgent CT imaging. PMID:27768752

  13. Use of a Diagnostic Score to Prioritize Computed Tomographic (CT Imaging for Patients Suspected of Ischemic Stroke Who May Benefit from Thrombolytic Therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen Yea Hwong

    Full Text Available A shortage of computed tomographic (CT machines in low and middle income countries often results in delayed CT imaging for patients suspected of a stroke. Yet, time constraint is one of the most important aspects for patients with an ischemic stroke to benefit from thrombolytic therapy. We set out to assess whether application of the Siriraj Stroke Score is able to assist physicians in prioritizing patients with a high probability of having an ischemic stroke for urgent CT imaging.From the Malaysian National Neurology Registry, we selected patients aged 18 years and over with clinical features suggesting of a stroke, who arrived in the hospital 4.5 hours or less from ictus. The prioritization of receiving CT imaging was left to the discretion of the treating physician. We applied the Siriraj Stroke Score to all patients, refitted the score and defined a cut-off value to best distinguish an ischemic stroke from a hemorrhagic stroke.Of the 2176 patients included, 73% had an ischemic stroke. Only 33% of the ischemic stroke patients had CT imaging within 4.5 hours. The median door-to-scan time for these patients was 4 hours (IQR: 1;16. With the recalibrated score, it would have been possible to prioritize 95% (95% CI: 94%-96% of patients with an ischemic stroke for urgent CT imaging.In settings where CT imaging capacity is limited, we propose the use of the Siriraj Stroke Score to prioritize patients with a probable ischemic stroke for urgent CT imaging.

  14. Imaging assessment of portal venous system: pictorial essay of normal anatomy, anatomic variants and congenital anomalies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerra, A; De Gaetano, A M; Infante, A; Mele, C; Marini, M G; Rinninella, E; Inchingolo, R; Bonomo, L

    2017-10-01

    The purpose of this pictorial essay is to describe anatomic variants and congenital anomalies of portal venous system and related liver parenchymal alterations. The imaging findings of some of these entities have been previously described in other articles, however this work encompasses all congenital anomalies of portal venous system with attention to their features on various imaging modalities; in particular we illustrated with detailed pictures all the main portal vein variants, congenital extra- and intra-hepatic porto-systemic venous shunts and portal vein aneurysm. Variants of portal branches and intrahepatic portosystemic shunts are quite uncommon, however, when present, they should be recognized before performing surgery or interventional procedures. Congenital absence of the portal vein is an important finding as the complete loss of portal perfusion predisposes the liver to focal or diffuse hyperplastic or dysplastic changes. Portal vein aneurysm is a rare clinical entity that can affect intra- and extra-hepatic portal branches; although usually asymptomatic, thrombosis can occur. Awareness of congenital variants of portal venous system among radiologists should allow a more confident diagnosis and permit an accurate planning of surgical procedures and percutaneous interventions; identification of portal system anomalies also suggest an accurate evaluation of associated hepatic parenchymal anomalies such as nodular regenerative hyperplasia, focal nodular hyperplasia (FNH), and adenomas with high risk of malignant transformation.

  15. Voxel-based model construction from colored tomographic images; Construcao de simuladores baseados em elementos de volume a partir de imagens tomograficas coloridas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loureiro, Eduardo Cesar de Miranda

    2002-07-01

    This work presents a new approach in the construction of voxel-based phantoms that was implemented to simplify the segmentation process of organs and tissues reducing the time used in this procedure. The segmentation process is performed by painting tomographic images and attributing a different color for each organ or tissue. A voxel-based head and neck phantom was built using this new approach. The way as the data are stored allows an increasing in the performance of the radiation transport code. The program that calculates the radiation transport also works with image files. This capability allows image reconstruction showing isodose areas, under several points of view, increasing the information to the user. Virtual X-ray photographs can also be obtained allowing that studies could be accomplished looking for the radiographic techniques optimization assessing, at the same time, the doses in organs and tissues. The accuracy of the program here presented, called MCvoxEL, that implements this new approach, was tested by comparison to results from two modern and well-supported Monte Carlo codes. Dose conversion factors for parallel X-ray exposure were also calculated. (author)

  16. New tomographic images of P- , S- wave velocity and Q on the Philippine Sea Slab beneath Tokyo: Implication to seismotectonics and seismic hazard in the Tokyo metropolitan region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirata, Naoshi; Sakai, Shin'ichi; Nakagawa, Shigeki; Panayotopoulos, Yannis; Ishikawa, Masahiro; Sato, Hiroshi; Kasahara, Keiji; Kimura, Hisanor; Honda, Ryou

    2013-04-01

    The Central Disaster Management Council of Japan estimates the next great M7+ earthquake in the Tokyo metropolitan region will cause 11,000 fatalities and 112 trillion yen (1 trillion US) economic loss at worst case if it occur beneath northern Tokyo bay with M7.3. However, the estimate is based on a source fault model by conventional studies about the PSP geometry. To evaluate seismic hazard due to the great quake we need to clarify the geometry of PSP and also the Pacific palate (PAP) that subducs beneath PSP. We identify those plates with use of seismic tomography and available deep seismic reflection profiling and borehole data in southern Kanto area. We deployed about 300 seismic stations in the greater Tokyo urban region under the Special Project for Earthquake Disaster Mitigation in Tokyo Metropolitan Area. We obtain clear P- and S- wave velocity (Vp and Vs) and Q tomograms which show a clear image of PSP and PAP. A depth to the top of PSP, 20 to 30 kilometer beneath northern part of Tokyo bay, is about 10 km shallower than previous estimates based on the distribution of seismicity (Ishida, 1992). This shallower plate geometry changes estimations of strong ground motion for seismic hazards analysis within the Tokyo region. Based on elastic wave velocities of rocks and minerals, we interpreted the tomographic images as petrologic images. Tomographic images revealed the presence of two stepwise velocity increase of the top layer of the subducting PSP slab. Rock velocity data reveals that subducting PSP crust transforms from blueschists to amphibolites at depth of 30km and amphibolites to eclogites at depth of 50km, which suggest that dehydration reactions occurs in subducting crust of basaltic compositions during prograde metamorphism and water is released from the subducting PSP crust. Tomograms show evidence for a low-velocity zone (LVZ) beneath the area just north of Tokyo bay. A Q tomogram show a low Q zone in PSP slab. We interpret the LVZ as a

  17. A spatially-variant deconvolution method based on total variation for optical coherence tomography images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almasganj, Mohammad; Adabi, Saba; Fatemizadeh, Emad; Xu, Qiuyun; Sadeghi, Hamid; Daveluy, Steven; Nasiriavanaki, Mohammadreza

    2017-03-01

    Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) has a great potential to elicit clinically useful information from tissues due to its high axial and transversal resolution. In practice, an OCT setup cannot reach to its theoretical resolution due to imperfections of its components, which make its images blurry. The blurriness is different alongside regions of image; thus, they cannot be modeled by a unique point spread function (PSF). In this paper, we investigate the use of solid phantoms to estimate the PSF of each sub-region of imaging system. We then utilize Lucy-Richardson, Hybr and total variation (TV) based iterative deconvolution methods for mitigating occurred spatially variant blurriness. It is shown that the TV based method will suppress the so-called speckle noise in OCT images better than the two other approaches. The performance of proposed algorithm is tested on various samples, including several skin tissues besides the test image blurred with synthetic PSF-map, demonstrating qualitatively and quantitatively the advantage of TV based deconvolution method using spatially-variant PSF for enhancing image quality.

  18. Iodine-123 N-methyl-4-iododexetimide: a new radioligand for single-photon emission tomographic imaging of myocardial muscarinic receptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hicks, R.J. [Heidelberg Hospital, Melbourne, VIC (Australia); Kassiou, M. [Biomedicine and Health Div., Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Sydney, NSW (Australia); Eu, P. [Heidelberg Hospital, Melbourne, VIC (Australia); Katsifis, A.G. [Biomedicine and Health Div., Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Sydney, NSW (Australia); Garra, M. [Heidelberg Hospital, Melbourne, VIC (Australia); Power, J. [Heidelberg Hospital, Melbourne, VIC (Australia); Najdovski, L. [Biomedicine and Health Div., Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Sydney, NSW (Australia); Lambrecht, R.M. [Biomedicine and Health Div., Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Sydney, NSW (Australia)

    1995-04-01

    Cardiac muscarinic receptor ligands suitable for positron emission tomography have previously been characterised. Attempts to develop radioligands of these receptors suitable for single-photon emission tomographic (SPET) imaging have not been successful due to high lung retention and high non-specific binding of previously investigated potential tracers. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the biodistribution and in vivo imaging characteristics of a new radiopharmaceutical, [{sup 123}I]N-methyl-4-iododexetimide. Biodistribution studies performed in rats showed high cardiac uptake (2.4% ID/g) 10 min after injection with a heart to lung activity ratio of 5:1. Specificity and stereoselectivity of cardiac binding were demonstrated using blocking experiments in rats. Dynamic imaging studies in anaesthetised greyhounds demonstrated rapid and high myocardial uptake and low lung binding with stable heart to lung activity ratios of >2.5:1 between 10 and 30 min, making SPET imaging feasible. Administration of an excess of an unlabelled muscarinic antagonist, methyl-quinuclidinyl benzylate rapidly displaced myocardial activity to background levels and the pharmacologically inactive enantiomer, [{sup 123}I]N-methyl-4-iodolevetimide, had no detectable cardiac uptake, indicating specific and stereoselective muscarinic receptor binding. SPET revealed higher activity in the inferior than in the anterior wall, this being consistent with previously described regional variation of cardiac parasympathetic innervation. [{sup 123}I]N-methyl-4-iododexetimide shows promise as an imaging agent for muscarinic receptor distribution in the heart and may be helpful in evaluating diverse cardiac diseases associated with altered muscarinic receptor function, including heart failure and diabetic heart disease. (orig.)

  19. Red-Shifted Aequorin Variants Incorporating Non-Canonical Amino Acids: Applications in In Vivo Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grinstead, Kristen M; Rowe, Laura; Ensor, Charles M; Joel, Smita; Daftarian, Pirouz; Dikici, Emre; Zingg, Jean-Marc; Daunert, Sylvia

    2016-01-01

    The increased importance of in vivo diagnostics has posed new demands for imaging technologies. In that regard, there is a need for imaging molecules capable of expanding the applications of current state-of-the-art imaging in vivo diagnostics. To that end, there is a desire for new reporter molecules capable of providing strong signals, are non-toxic, and can be tailored to diagnose or monitor the progression of a number of diseases. Aequorin is a non-toxic photoprotein that can be used as a sensitive marker for bioluminescence in vivo imaging. The sensitivity of aequorin is due to the fact that bioluminescence is a rare phenomenon in nature and, therefore, it does not suffer from autofluorescence, which contributes to background emission. Emission of bioluminescence in the blue-region of the spectrum by aequorin only occurs when calcium, and its luciferin coelenterazine, are bound to the protein and trigger a biochemical reaction that results in light generation. It is this reaction that endows aequorin with unique characteristics, making it ideally suited for a number of applications in bioanalysis and imaging. Herein we report the site-specific incorporation of non-canonical or non-natural amino acids and several coelenterazine analogues, resulting in a catalog of 72 cysteine-free, aequorin variants which expand the potential applications of these photoproteins by providing several red-shifted mutants better suited to use in vivo. In vivo studies in mouse models using the transparent tissue of the eye confirmed the activity of the aequorin variants incorporating L-4-iodophehylalanine and L-4-methoxyphenylalanine after injection into the eye and topical addition of coelenterazine. The signal also remained localized within the eye. This is the first time that aequorin variants incorporating non-canonical amino acids have shown to be active in vivo and useful as reporters in bioluminescence imaging.

  20. Red-Shifted Aequorin Variants Incorporating Non-Canonical Amino Acids: Applications in In Vivo Imaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristen M Grinstead

    Full Text Available The increased importance of in vivo diagnostics has posed new demands for imaging technologies. In that regard, there is a need for imaging molecules capable of expanding the applications of current state-of-the-art imaging in vivo diagnostics. To that end, there is a desire for new reporter molecules capable of providing strong signals, are non-toxic, and can be tailored to diagnose or monitor the progression of a number of diseases. Aequorin is a non-toxic photoprotein that can be used as a sensitive marker for bioluminescence in vivo imaging. The sensitivity of aequorin is due to the fact that bioluminescence is a rare phenomenon in nature and, therefore, it does not suffer from autofluorescence, which contributes to background emission. Emission of bioluminescence in the blue-region of the spectrum by aequorin only occurs when calcium, and its luciferin coelenterazine, are bound to the protein and trigger a biochemical reaction that results in light generation. It is this reaction that endows aequorin with unique characteristics, making it ideally suited for a number of applications in bioanalysis and imaging. Herein we report the site-specific incorporation of non-canonical or non-natural amino acids and several coelenterazine analogues, resulting in a catalog of 72 cysteine-free, aequorin variants which expand the potential applications of these photoproteins by providing several red-shifted mutants better suited to use in vivo. In vivo studies in mouse models using the transparent tissue of the eye confirmed the activity of the aequorin variants incorporating L-4-iodophehylalanine and L-4-methoxyphenylalanine after injection into the eye and topical addition of coelenterazine. The signal also remained localized within the eye. This is the first time that aequorin variants incorporating non-canonical amino acids have shown to be active in vivo and useful as reporters in bioluminescence imaging.

  1. Time-resolved diffuse optical tomographic imaging for the provision of both anatomical and functional information about biological tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Huijuan; Gao, Feng; Tanikawa, Yukari; Homma, Kazuhiro; Yamada, Yukio

    2005-04-01

    We present in vivo images of near-infrared (NIR) diffuse optical tomography (DOT) of human lower legs and forearm to validate the dual functions of a time-resolved (TR) NIR DOT in clinical diagnosis, i.e., to provide anatomical and functional information simultaneously. The NIR DOT system is composed of time-correlated single-photon-counting channels, and the image reconstruction algorithm is based on the modified generalized pulsed spectral technique, which effectively incorporates the TR data with reasonable computation time. The reconstructed scattering images of both the lower legs and the forearm revealed their anatomies, in which the bones were clearly distinguished from the muscles. In the absorption images, some of the blood vessels were observable. In the functional imaging, a subject was requested to do handgripping exercise to stimulate physiological changes in the forearm tissue. The images of oxyhemoglobin, deoxyhemoglobin, and total hemoglobin concentration changes in the forearm were obtained from the differential images of the absorption at three wavelengths between the exercise and the rest states, which were reconstructed with a differential imaging scheme. These images showed increases in both blood volume and oxyhemoglobin concentration in the arteries and simultaneously showed hypoxia in the corresponding muscles. All the results have demonstrated the capability of TR NIR DOT by reconstruction of the absolute images of the scattering and the absorption with a high spatial resolution that finally provided both the anatomical and functional information inside bulky biological tissues.

  2. Analysis of the priority of anatomic structures according to the diagnostic task in cone-beam computed tomographic images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Jin Woo [Dept. of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, Dankook University College of Dentistry, Chunan (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    This study was designed to evaluate differences in the required visibility of anatomic structures according to the diagnostic tasks of implant planning and periapical diagnosis. Images of a real skull phantom were acquired under 24 combinations of different exposure conditions in a cone-beam computed tomography scanner (60, 70, 80, 90, 100, and 110 kV and 4, 6, 8, and 10 mA). Five radiologists evaluated the visibility of anatomic structures and the image quality for diagnostic tasks using a 6-point scale. The visibility of the periodontal ligament space showed the closest association with the ability to use an image for periapical diagnosis in both jaws. The visibility of the sinus floor and canal wall showed the closest association with the ability to use an image for implant planning. Variations in tube voltage were associated with significant differences in image quality for all diagnostic tasks. However, tube current did not show significant associations with the ability to use an image for implant planning. The required visibility of anatomic structures varied depending on the diagnostic task. Tube voltage was a more important exposure parameter for image quality than tube current. Different settings should be used for optimization and image quality evaluation depending on the diagnostic task.

  3. Effect of anatomical region on the formation of metal artefacts produced by dental implants in cone beam computed tomographic images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, Alessiana Helena; Fardim, Karolina Aparecida Castilho; de Souza, Camila Furtado; Sotto-Maior, Bruno Salles; Assis, Neuza Maria Souza Picorelli; Devito, Karina Lopes

    2018-01-10

    To quantitatively compare metal artefacts produced by implants in different maxillomandibular regions on cone beam CT (CBCT) images. A total of 200 implants selected from CBCT examinations were divided into four groups: Group 1 (n = 50)-implants located in the anterior maxilla; Group 2 (n = 50)-implants located in the posterior maxilla; Group 3 (n = 50)-implants located in the anterior mandible and Group 4 (n = 50)-implants located in the posterior mandible. The implants were further classified as isolated or adjacent to other implants. Three axial reconstructions were selected for each sampled implant (apical, middle and cervical). On each slice, the artefacts produced by the implants were counted. The Mann-Whitney test was used to compare the variables between groups. The Kruskal-Wallis and Student-Newman-Keuls tests were used to compare the axial reconstructions. The mandible showed a greater number of artefacts than the maxilla (apical image: p = 0.0024; middle image: p < 0.0001). The anterior region produced more artefacts than the posterior region (apical image: p = 0.0105; middle image: p < 0.0316). There was no significant difference in the number of artefacts between isolated and adjacent implants, and the cervical image was most affected by artefacts. Dental implants always produce metal artefacts in CBCT images, and these artefacts are affected by the anatomical location in the dental arch.

  4. High-density speckle contrast optical tomography (SCOT) for three dimensional tomographic imaging of the small animal brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dragojević, Tanja; Varma, Hari M; Hollmann, Joseph L; Valdes, Claudia P; Culver, Joseph P; Justicia, Carles; Durduran, Turgut

    2017-06-01

    High-density speckle contrast optical tomography (SCOT) utilizing tens of thousands of source-detector pairs, was developed for in vivo imaging of blood flow in small animals. The reduction in cerebral blood flow (CBF) due to local ischemic stroke in a mouse brain was transcanially imaged and reconstructed in three dimensions. The reconstructed volume was then compared with corresponding magnetic resonance images demonstrating that the volume of reduced CBF agrees with the infarct zone at twenty-four hours. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. A Test of the Transdiagnostic Dopamine Hypothesis of Psychosis Using Positron Emission Tomographic Imaging in Bipolar Affective Disorder and Schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jauhar, Sameer; Nour, Matthew M; Veronese, Mattia; Rogdaki, Maria; Bonoldi, Ilaria; Azis, Matilda; Turkheimer, Federico; McGuire, Philip; Young, Allan H; Howes, Oliver D

    2017-12-01

    The dopamine hypothesis suggests that dopamine abnormalities underlie psychosis, irrespective of diagnosis, implicating dopamine dysregulation in bipolar affective disorder and schizophrenia, in line with the research domain criteria approach. However, this hypothesis has not been directly examined in individuals diagnosed with bipolar disorder with psychosis. To test whether dopamine synthesis capacity is elevated in bipolar disorder with psychosis and how this compares with schizophrenia and matched controls and to examine whether dopamine synthesis capacity is associated with psychotic symptom severity, irrespective of diagnostic class. This cross-sectional case-control positron emission tomographic study was performed in the setting of first-episode psychosis services in an inner-city area (London, England). Sixty individuals participated in the study (22 with bipolar psychosis [18 antipsychotic naive or free], 16 with schizophrenia [14 antipsychotic naive or free], and 22 matched controls) and underwent fluorodihydroxyphenyl-l-alanine ([18F]-DOPA) positron emission tomography to examine dopamine synthesis capacity. Standardized clinical measures, including the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale, Young Mania Rating Scale, and Global Assessment of Functioning, were administered. The study dates were March 2013 to November 2016. Dopamine synthesis capacity (Kicer) and clinical measures (Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale, Young Mania Rating Scale, and Global Assessment of Functioning). The mean (SD) ages of participants were 23.6 (3.6) years in 22 individuals with bipolar psychosis (13 male), 26.3 (4.4) years in 16 individuals with schizophrenia (14 male), and 24.5 (4.5) years in controls (14 male). There was a significant group difference in striatal dopamine synthesis capacity (Kicer) (F2,57 = 6.80, P = .002). Kicer was significantly elevated in both the bipolar group (mean [SD], 13.18 [1.08] × 10-3 min-1; P = .002) and the schizophrenia

  6. Imaging of Archaeological Remains at Barcombe Roman Villa using Microwave Tomographic Depictions of Ground Penetrating Radar Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soldovieri, F.; Utsi, E.; Alani, A.; Persico, R.

    2012-04-01

    to 600MHz (the frequency range of the antennas used). The 2-dimensional plots were formed into a 3-dimensional cube and time slices extracted, on the basis of maximum signal return, at 16ns, 25ns and 29ns. In this work, we show the reprocessing of the GPR data via a microwave tomographic approach based on a linear approximation of the inverse scattering problem [4]. In particular, the effectiveness of this approach ensures a reliable and high resolution representation/visualization of the scene very large in terms of probing wavelength. This has been made possible thanks to the adoption of the approach presented in [5] where the 3D representation was achieved by performing 2D reconstruction and after obtaining the 3D Cube from these 2D reconstructed profiles. In particular, the re-examination of GPR data using microwave tomography has allowed to improve definition of the villa outline and to detect earlier prehistoric remains. [1] Rudling, D., & Butler, C. "Roundhouse to Villa" in Sussex Past & Present 95, pp 6 - 7, 2001. [2] Utsi, E., Wortley Villa paper currently in preparation of EAGE special issue. [3] Utsi, E., & Alani, A. "Barcombe Roman Villa: An Exercise in GPR Time Slicingand Comparative Geophysics", in Koppenjan, S., & Hua, L. (eds) Proceedings of the Ninth International Conference on Ground Penetrating Radar, 2002. [4] F. Soldovieri, R. Persico, E. Utsi, V. Utsi, "The application of inverse scattering techniques with ground penetrating radar to the problem of rebar location in concrete", NDT & E International, Vol. 39, Issue 7, October 2006, Pages 602-607. [5] R. Persico, F. Soldovieri, E. Utsi, "Microwave tomography for processing of GPR data at Ballachulish", Journal of Geophysics and Engineering, vol.7, no. 2, pp. 164-173, June 2010

  7. Comparison of Amino Acid Positron Emission Tomographic Radiotracers for Molecular Imaging of Primary and Metastatic Brain Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Csaba Juhász

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Positron emission tomography (PET is an imaging technology that can detect and characterize tumors based on their molecular and biochemical properties, such as altered glucose, nucleoside, or amino acid metabolism. PET plays a significant role in the diagnosis, prognostication, and treatment of various cancers, including brain tumors. In this article, we compare uptake mechanisms and the clinical performance of the amino acid PET radiotracers (L-[methyl-11C]methionine [MET], 18F-fluoroethyl-tyrosine [FET], 18F-fluoro-L- dihydroxy-phenylalanine [FDOPA], and 11C-alpha-methyl-L-tryptophan [AMT] most commonly used for brain tumor imaging. First, we discuss and compare the mechanisms of tumoral transport and accumulation, the basis of differential performance of these radioligands in clinical studies. Then we summarize studies that provided direct comparisons among these amino acid tracers and to clinically used 2-deoxy-2[18F]fluoro-D-glucose [FDG] PET imaging. We also discuss how tracer kinetic analysis can enhance the clinical information obtained from amino acid PET images. We discuss both similarities and differences in potential clinical value for each radioligand. This comparative review can guide which radiotracer to favor in future clinical trials aimed at defining the role of these molecular imaging modalities in the clinical management of brain tumor patients.

  8. Partially coherent lensfree tomographic microscopy⋄

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isikman, Serhan O.; Bishara, Waheb; Ozcan, Aydogan

    2012-01-01

    Optical sectioning of biological specimens provides detailed volumetric information regarding their internal structure. To provide a complementary approach to existing three-dimensional (3D) microscopy modalities, we have recently demonstrated lensfree optical tomography that offers high-throughput imaging within a compact and simple platform. In this approach, in-line holograms of objects at different angles of partially coherent illumination are recorded using a digital sensor-array, which enables computing pixel super-resolved tomographic images of the specimen. This imaging modality, which forms the focus of this review, offers micrometer-scale 3D resolution over large imaging volumes of, for example, 10–15 mm3, and can be assembled in light weight and compact architectures. Therefore, lensfree optical tomography might be particularly useful for lab-on-a-chip applications as well as for microscopy needs in resource-limited settings. PMID:22193016

  9. The extent of the Cratonic keel underneath the Southern African region: A 3D image using Finite-Frequency Tomograph

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soliman, Mohammad Youssof Ahmad; Bezada, Max; Thybo, Hans

    2010-01-01

    We have re-examined the P body wave data from the South Africa Seismic Experiment (Carlson et al, EOS 77, 1996) across the Kaapvaal and Zimbabwe cratons and the Bushveld complex. Using finite-frequency kernels, we inverted the P-wave delay times to obtain 3-D images of compressional velocity pert....... We also image significant positive and negative anomalies (±3.0%) unconnected to the cratons under the cratonic keels and in the transition zone. We are currently inverting the P wave data using different reference models, and examining the S-wave travel times....

  10. Computed Tomography Imaging Appearance of a Unique Variant of Retroiliac Ureter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tawfik, Ahmed M; Younis, M Hisham

    2016-02-01

    Retroiliac ureter is a rare condition where the ureter passes behind the iliac vessels. The diagnosis is usually intraoperative and the reports of preoperative imaging diagnosis are scarce. Herein, we report the computed tomography appearance of a unique variant in which the right ureter partially encircles the right common iliac artery bifurcation; passing first in front of the common iliac artery and then medial to the artery and finally posterior to the external iliac artery, and then regains its normal course in the pelvis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. COMBINATION OF COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHIC IMAGING CHARACTERISTICS OF MEDIAL RETROPHARYNGEAL LYMPH NODES AND NASAL PASSAGES AIDS DISCRIMINATION BETWEEN RHINITIS AND NEOPLASIA IN CATS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemanic, Sarah; Hollars, Katelyn; Nelson, Nathan C; Bobe, Gerd

    2015-01-01

    Feline nasal diseases are a diagnostic challenge. The objective of this retrospective, cross-sectional study was to determine whether computed tomography (CT) imaging characteristics of the medial retropharyngeal lymph nodes (MRPLN), alone or in combination with CT imaging characteristics of the nasal passages, could aid in differentiation between rhinitis and nasal neoplasia. Cats were recruited from record archives at two veterinary facilities during the period of 2008-2012. Selection criteria were presentation for chronic nasal discharge, contrast-enhanced CT of the head that included the MRPLN, and rhinoscopic nasal biopsy resulting in diagnosis of rhinitis or neoplasia. For each CT scan, two board-certified veterinary radiologists recorded MRPLN size, attenuation, heterogeneity, contrast-medium enhancement, margination, shape, presence of a lymph node hilus, perinodal fat, turbinate lysis, paranasal bone lysis, and nasal mass. Both readers were unaware of patient information at the time of CT interpretation. Thirty-four cats with rhinitis and 22 cats with neoplasia were included. Computed tomographic characteristics significantly associated with neoplasia included abnormal MRPLN hilus (OR 5.1), paranasal bone lysis (OR 5.6), turbinate lysis (5.6), mass (OR 26.1), MRPLN height asymmetry (OR 4.5), and decreased MRPLN precontrast heterogeneity (OR 7.0). The combined features predictive of neoplasia were a nasal mass with abnormal hilus (OR 47.7); lysis of turbinates/paranasal bones with abnormal MRPLN hilus (OR 16.2). Findings supported the hypothesis that combining CT features of the nasal passages and MRPLN aided in differentiating rhinitis from neoplasia in cats. © 2015 American College of Veterinary Radiology.

  12. Carbon 11–Labeled Pittsburgh Compound B and Carbon 11–Labeled (R)-PK11195 Positron Emission Tomographic Imaging in Alzheimer Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiley, Clayton A.; Lopresti, Brian J.; Venneti, Sriram; Price, Julie; Klunk, William E.; DeKosky, Steven T.; Mathis, Chester A.

    2009-01-01

    Background Alzheimer disease (AD) is defined neuropathologically by the presence of neurofibrillary tangles and plaques associated with tau and β-amyloid protein deposition. The colocalization of microglia and β-amyloid plaques has been widely reported in pathological examination of AD and suggests that neuroinflammation may play a role in pathogenesis and/or progression. Because postmortem histopathological analyses are limited to single end-stage assessment, the time course and nature of this relationship are not well understood. Objective To image microglial activation and β-amyloid deposition in the brains of subjects with and without AD. Design, Setting, and Participants Using two carbon 11 ([11C])–labeled positron emission tomographic imaging agents, Pittsburgh Compound B (PiB) and (R)-PK11195, we examined the relationship between amyloid deposition and microglial activation in different stages of AD using 5 control subjects, 6 subjects diagnosed with mild cognitive impairment, and 6 patients with mild to moderate AD. Results Consistent with prior reports, subjects with a clinical diagnosis of probable AD showed significantly greater levels of [11C]PiB retention than control subjects, whereas patients with mild cognitive impairment spanned a range from control-like to AD-like levels of [11C]PiB retention. Additionally, 2 asymptomatic control subjects also exhibited evidence of elevated PiB retention in regions associated with the early emergence of plaques in AD and may represent prodromal cases of AD. We observed no differences in brain [11C](R)-PK11195 retention when subjects were grouped by clinical diagnosis or the presence or absence of β-amyloid pathological findings as indicated by analyses of [11C]PiB retention. Conclusions These findings suggest that either microglial activation is limited to later stages of severe AD or [11C](R)-PK11195 is too insensitive to detect the level of microglial activation associated with mild to moderate AD. PMID

  13. Geometrical co-calibration of a tomographic optical system with CT for intrinsically co-registered imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Liji; Breithaupt, Mathies; Peter, Jörg

    2010-03-21

    A mathematical approach for geometric co-calibration of a dual-modal small-animal imaging system is presented. The system comprises an optical imaging setup for in vivo bioluminescence and fluorescence detection, as well as an x-ray CT, both mounted on a common rotatable gantry enabling fully simultaneous imaging at axially overlapping fields-of-view. Geometric co-calibration is performed once by imaging a single cylindrical light-emitting source with both modalities over 360 degrees at two axial positions, respectively. Given the three-dimensional coordinates of the source positions in the reconstructed CT volume data along with their two-dimensional locations projected at the optical detector plane, the following intrinsic system parameters are calculated: (i) the intrinsic geometric parameters of the optical detection system-five parameters for each view and (ii) the relative positional relationship between the optical and CT systems-two parameters for each view. After co-calibration is performed, experimental studies using phantoms demonstrate the high degree of intrinsic positional accuracy between the optical and CT measurements. The most important advantage of this approach is that dual-modal data fusion is accomplished without any post-registration strategies.

  14. Geometrical co-calibration of a tomographic optical system with CT for intrinsically co-registered imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cao Liji; Breithaupt, Mathies; Peter, Joerg [Division of Medical Physics in Radiology, German Cancer Research Center, Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany)], E-mail: l.cao@dkfz.de

    2010-03-21

    A mathematical approach for geometric co-calibration of a dual-modal small-animal imaging system is presented. The system comprises an optical imaging setup for in vivo bioluminescence and fluorescence detection, as well as an x-ray CT, both mounted on a common rotatable gantry enabling fully simultaneous imaging at axially overlapping fields-of-view. Geometric co-calibration is performed once by imaging a single cylindrical light-emitting source with both modalities over 360 deg. at two axial positions, respectively. Given the three-dimensional coordinates of the source positions in the reconstructed CT volume data along with their two-dimensional locations projected at the optical detector plane, the following intrinsic system parameters are calculated: (i) the intrinsic geometric parameters of the optical detection system-five parameters for each view and (ii) the relative positional relationship between the optical and CT systems-two parameters for each view. After co-calibration is performed, experimental studies using phantoms demonstrate the high degree of intrinsic positional accuracy between the optical and CT measurements. The most important advantage of this approach is that dual-modal data fusion is accomplished without any post-registration strategies.

  15. In vivo X-Ray Computed Tomographic Imaging of Soft Tissue with Native, Intravenous, or Oral Contrast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Matthew Leevy

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available X-ray Computed Tomography (CT is one of the most commonly utilized anatomical imaging modalities for both research and clinical purposes. CT combines high-resolution, three-dimensional data with relatively fast acquisition to provide a solid platform for non-invasive human or specimen imaging. The primary limitation of CT is its inability to distinguish many soft tissues based on native contrast. While bone has high contrast within a CT image due to its material density from calcium phosphate, soft tissue is less dense and many are homogenous in density. This presents a challenge in distinguishing one type of soft tissue from another. A couple exceptions include the lungs as well as fat, both of which have unique densities owing to the presence of air or bulk hydrocarbons, respectively. In order to facilitate X-ray CT imaging of other structures, a range of contrast agents have been developed to selectively identify and visualize the anatomical properties of individual tissues. Most agents incorporate atoms like iodine, gold, or barium because of their ability to absorb X-rays, and thus impart contrast to a given organ system. Here we review the strategies available to visualize lung, fat, brain, kidney, liver, spleen, vasculature, gastrointestinal tract, and liver tissues of living mice using either innate contrast, or commercial injectable or ingestible agents with selective perfusion. Further, we demonstrate how each of these approaches will facilitate the non-invasive, longitudinal, in vivo imaging of pre-clinical disease models at each anatomical site.

  16. Resolution of multiple GFP color variants and dyes using two-photon microscopy and imaging spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lansford, Rusty; Bearman, Gregory H.; Fraser, Scott E.

    2001-07-01

    The imaging of living cells and tissues using laser-scanning microscopy is offering dramatic insights into the spatial and temporal controls of biological processes. The availability of genetically encoded labels such as green fluorescent protein (GFP) offers unique opportunities by which to trace cell movements, cell signaling or gene expression dynamically in developing embryos. Two-photon laser scanning microscopy (TPLSM) is ideally suited to imaging cells in vivo due to its deeper tissue penetration and reduced phototoxicity; however, in TPLSM the excitation and emission spectra of GFP and its color variants [e.g., CyanFP (CFP); yellowFP (YFP)] are insufficiently distinct to be uniquely imaged by conventional means. To surmount such difficulties, we have combined the technologies of TPLSM and imaging spectroscopy to unambiguously identify CFP, GFP, YFP, and redFP (RFP) as well as conventional dyes, and have tested the approach in cell lines. In our approach, a liquid crystal tunable filter was used to collect the emission spectrum of each pixel within the TPLSM image. Based on the fluorescent emission spectra, supervised classification and linear unmixing analysis algorithms were used to identify the nature and relative amounts of the fluorescent proteins expressed in the cells. In a most extreme case, we have used the approach to separate GFP and fluorescein, separated by only 7 nm, and appear somewhat indistinguishable by conventional techniques. This approach offers the needed ability to concurrently image multiple colored, spectrally overlapping marker proteins within living cells.

  17. Single-Shot, Volumetrically Illuminated, Three-Dimensional, Tomographic Laser-Induced-Fluorescence Imaging in a Gaseous Free Jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-28

    information that can be gained at each time instant. For example, absorption tomography has been applied to combustion and flow environments to track ...imaging by Elsinga and associates [22], Weinkauff and associates [23], and Klinner and associates [24]. While particle fields can be tracked utilizing...presented in Fig. 8 for ReD = 10,000 at different viewing angles to show the internal structure of the flow. A thick slice of the volume or slab has

  18. Artefact expression associated with several cone-beam computed tomographic machines when imaging root filled teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasconcelos, K F; Nicolielo, L F P; Nascimento, M C; Haiter-Neto, F; Bóscolo, F N; Van Dessel, J; EzEldeen, M; Lambrichts, I; Jacobs, R

    2015-10-01

    To evaluate the characteristic artefact patterns associated with teeth root filled with Gutta-percha when scanned with four cone-beam CT devices. Whilst using soft tissue simulation, ten root filled human premolars were placed in empty sockets in a dry human skull. Subsequently, the skull was scanned using 3D Accuitomo 170(®) , WhiteFox(®) , Cranex 3D(®) and Scanora 3D(®) following clinical protocols with the highest resolution and artefact reduction. After proper image registration in OnDemand3D(®) software (Cybermed, Seoul, Korea), each image slice was evaluated by three trained and calibrated dentomaxillofacial radiologists, which scored absence (0) and presence (1) of cupping artefact, hypodense halos and streak artefacts. Kappa test was performed for intra- and interobserver agreement. A moderate to perfect agreement for each observer (intra-observer κ = 0.5-1.0) was found. Agreement between the different observers was moderate to almost perfect for the different artefact patterns (interobserver κ = 0.55-0.9). Cupping artefact was the most prevalent (70%), followed by a hypodense halo (35%) and streak artefacts (16%). The Chi-squared test revealed significantly more streaks in axial slices (P teeth. Continuous efforts are needed to improve CBCT reconstruction algorithms, with a specific focus on reducing artefacts induced by dense dental materials, whilst striving for enhanced image quality at low-radiation doses. © 2014 International Endodontic Journal. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Tomographic particle image velocimetry of a water-jet for low volume harvesting of fat tissue for regenerative medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Drobek Christoph

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV measurements of a water-jet for water-assisted liposuction (WAL are carried out to investigate the distribution of velocity and therefore momentum and acting force on the human sub-cutaneous fat tissue. These results shall validate CFD simulations and force sensor measurements of the water-jet and support the development of a new WAL device that is able to harvest low volumes of fat tissue for regenerative medicine even gentler than regular WAL devices.

  20. Comparison of clinical, radiographic, computed tomographic, and magnetic resonance imaging methods for early prediction of canine hip laxity and dysplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginja, Mário M D; Ferreira, António J; Jesus, Sandra S; Melo-Pinto, Pedro; Bulas-Cruz, José; Orden, Maria A; San-Roman, Fidel; Llorens-Pena, Maria P; Gonzalo-Orden, José M

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to use two palpation methods (Bardens and Ortolani), a radiographic distraction view, three computed tomography (CT) measurements (dorsolateral subluxation score, the lateral center-edge angle, and acetabular ventroversion angle) and two magnetic resonance (MR) imaging hip studies (synovial fluid and acetabular depth indices) in the early monitoring of hip morphology and laxity in 7-9 week old puppies; and in a follow-up study to compare their accuracy in predicting later hip laxity and dysplasia. The MR imaging study was performed with the dog in dorsal recumbency and the CT study with the animal in a weight-bearing position. There was no association between clinical laxity with later hip laxity or dysplasia. The dorsolateral subluxation score and the lateral center-edge angle were characterized by a weak negative correlation with later radiographic passive hip laxity (-0.26 hip dysplasia was not significant. There was an association between early radiographic passive hip laxity and synovial fluid index with later passive hip laxity (0.41 hips (P hip laxity or dysplasia. The overlapping ranges of early passive hip laxity and synovial fluid index for hip dysplasia grades and the moderate correlations with the later passive hip laxity make the results of these variables unreliable for use in predicting hip laxity and dysplasia susceptibility.

  1. Clavicle-induced narrowing of the thoracic outlet during shoulder abduction as imaged by computed tomographic angiography and enhanced by three-dimensional reformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaBan, Myron M; Zierenberg, Adam T; Yadavalli, Sailaja; Zaidan, Sultan

    2011-07-01

    This study aimed to confirm the location and degree of compromise of the subclavian vessels within the thoracic outlet during ipsilateral arm abduction in patients with clinical evidence of thoracic outlet syndrome and to identify both the physical and physiologic source of neurovascular compromise that induces the symptoms of thoracic outlet syndrome. After a neuromuscular and vascular examination, all of the subjects underwent a two-part high-resolution computed tomographic angiography with three-dimensional reformation. The initial study was performed with the arm held at the side in an anatomical neutral position. Subsequently, the arm was abducted to 90 degrees with external rotation (ABER). In each position, 60 ml of iodinated nonionic contrast medium was injected in the opposite arm at 4 ml/sec. Three-dimensional volume-rendered images were obtained. Each image was subsequently reviewed by a musculoskeletal radiologist (S. Yadavalli). Patients were initially evaluated in the physiatrist's private office (M.M. LaBan). The computed tomographic scans were obtained from the participants as outpatients in an academic community-based medical center (William Beaumont Hospital). Seventeen outpatients with clinical signs and symptoms of thoracic outlet syndrome were evaluated, including seven men and ten women. This group has an average age of 48 yrs (range, 17-73 yrs). The level of vessel occlusion varied in the costoclavicular space as well as in demonstrating the alterations in the diameter of both the subclavian artery and vein both in the neutral and ABER positions. The possible levels of occlusions included the costoclavicular space, the interscalene triangle, and the retropectoralis minor space. The narrowing of the subclavian vessel was considered significant if the percentage change of the vessel's diameter between the neutral and the ABER positions was 30% or greater for the subclavian artery and 50% or greater for the subclavian vein. The average change in

  2. Intra-aneurysmal flow rates are reduced by two flow diverters: an experiment using tomographic particle image velocimetry in an aneurysm model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennis, Kendall D; Rossman, Timothy L; Kallmes, David F; Dragomir-Daescu, Dan

    2015-12-01

    Limitations on treating large, giant, and wide-necked aneurysms with coiling have made flow diverters a promising alternative to current practice by supporting reconstruction of the parent artery. To assess the changes to fluid dynamics within an aneurysm by studying two different endoluminal flow diverters on a simple aneurysm model, using tomographic particle image velocimetry to determine which device would better minimize fluid flow into an aneurysm and observe any significant changes in aneurysm fluid structures. Steady velocity fields of the model's aneurysm dome and neck were measured at three inlet velocities (18, 39, and 59 cm/s) for two flow diverter diameters with different porosities and compared against a baseline case with no flow diverter. In the baseline case a large vortex was present inside the dome for all flow rates. However, both devices eliminated this main vortex at all flow rates and reduced the peak aneurysmal velocities by about 90%. A strong correlation between flow diverter porosity and flow reduction was found. In each case the inflow to the aneurysm shifted from the distal neck to the mid- or proximal neck after flow diverter placement. Even with this relatively simple experimental setup, we were able to observe the major flow field changes, which occurred immediately after the deployment of each flow diverter. Limitations of the study included a simplified geometry and steady-state flow. Constraints included model making and limited availability of flow diverters. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  3. Quantification of normative ranges and baseline predictors of aortoventricular interface dimensions using multi-detector computed tomographic imaging in patients without aortic valve disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gooley, Robert P., E-mail: robert.gooley@monashhealth.org [MonashHeart, Monash Health, Melbourne 3168 (Australia); Monash Cardiovascular Research Centre, Department of Medicine (MMC), Monash University, Melbourne 3168 (Australia); Cameron, James D., E-mail: james.cameron@monash.edu [MonashHeart, Monash Health, Melbourne 3168 (Australia); Monash Cardiovascular Research Centre, Department of Medicine (MMC), Monash University, Melbourne 3168 (Australia); Soon, Jennifer, E-mail: jenn.sa@gmail.com [MonashHeart, Monash Health, Melbourne 3168 (Australia); Monash Cardiovascular Research Centre, Department of Medicine (MMC), Monash University, Melbourne 3168 (Australia); Loi, Duncan, E-mail: dloi2@student.monash.edu [Monash Cardiovascular Research Centre, Department of Medicine (MMC), Monash University, Melbourne 3168 (Australia); Chitale, Gauri, E-mail: gchi21@student.monash.edu [Monash Cardiovascular Research Centre, Department of Medicine (MMC), Monash University, Melbourne 3168 (Australia); Syeda, Rifath, E-mail: rssye1@student.monash.edu [Monash Cardiovascular Research Centre, Department of Medicine (MMC), Monash University, Melbourne 3168 (Australia); Meredith, Ian T., E-mail: ian.meredith@myheart.id.au [MonashHeart, Monash Health, Melbourne 3168 (Australia); Monash Cardiovascular Research Centre, Department of Medicine (MMC), Monash University, Melbourne 3168 (Australia)

    2015-09-15

    Highlights: • MDCT imaging of the aortoventricular interface is increasingly common. • We present normative ranges for aortoventricular interface dimensions. • Such techniques and ranges should be used to standardise reporting and research. - Abstract: Background: Multidetector computed tomographic (MDCT) assessment of the aortoventricular interface has gained increased importance with the advent of minimally invasive treatment modalities for aortic and mitral valve disease. This has included a standardised technique of identifying a plane through the nadir of each coronary cusp, the basal plane, and taking further measurements in relation to this plane. Despite this there is no published data defining normal ranges for these aortoventricular metrics in a healthy cohort. This study seeks to quantify normative ranges for MDCT derived aortoventricular dimensions and evaluate baseline demographic and anthropomorphic associates of these measurements in a normal cohort. Methods: 250 consecutive patients undergoing MDCT coronary angiography were included. Aortoventricular dimensions at multiple levels of the aortoventricular interface were assessed and normative ranges quantified. Multivariate linear regression was performed to identify baseline predictors of each metric. Results: The mean age was 59 ± 12 years. The basal plane was eccentric (EI = 0.22 ± 0.06) while the left ventricular outflow tract was more eccentric (EI = 0.32 ±0.06), with no correlation to gender, age or hypertension. Male gender, height and body mass index were consistent independent predictors of larger aortoventricular dimensions at all anatomical levels, while age was predictive of supra-annular measurements. Conclusions: Male gender, height and BMI are independent predictors of all aortoventricular dimensions while age predicts only supra-annular dimensions. Use of defined metrics such as the basal plane and formation of normative ranges for these metrics allows reference for clinical

  4. X-ray tomographic imaging of Al/SiC p functionally graded composites fabricated by centrifugal casting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velhinho, A.; Sequeira, P. D.; Martins, Rui; Vignoles, G.; Braz Fernandes, F.; Botas, J. D.; Rocha, L. A.

    2003-01-01

    The present work refers to an X-ray microtomography experiment aiming at the elucidation of some aspects regarding particle distribution in SiC-particle-reinforced functionally graded aluminium composites. Precursor composites were produced by rheocasting. These were then molten and centrifugally cast to obtain the functionally graded composites. From these, cylindrical samples, around 1 mm in diameter, were extracted, which were then irradiated with a X-ray beam produced at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility. The 3-D images were obtained in edge-detection mode. A segmentation procedure has been adapted in order to separate the pores and SiC particles from the Al matrix. Preliminary results on the particle and pore distributions are presented.

  5. Does the prevalence of levator ani muscle avulsion differ when assessed using tomographic ultrasound imaging at rest vs on maximum pelvic floor muscle contraction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Delft, K; Thakar, R; Sultan, A H; Kluivers, K B

    2015-07-01

    It has been suggested that transperineal ultrasound images obtained during maximum pelvic floor muscle contraction improve the diagnosis of levator ani muscle (LAM) avulsion by comparison with those obtained at rest. The objective of this study was to establish, using transperineal tomographic ultrasound imaging (TUI), the correlation between LAM avulsion diagnosed at rest and that on contraction. Primiparous women were examined 3 months postpartum by Pelvic Organ Prolapse Quantification (POP-Q) assessment and for LAM avulsion clinically by digital palpation and by transperineal TUI performed at rest and on pelvic floor muscle contraction. LAM avulsion was diagnosed on TUI when the three central slices were abnormal. A comparison was made between LAM avulsion diagnosed at rest and on maximum contraction. Two independent blinded investigators performed the analyses and a third investigator resolved discrepancies. One hundred and ninety primiparae were analyzed providing 380 results for comparison, as right and left LAM were analyzed independently. LAM avulsion was found in 36 (9.5%) images obtained at rest and in 35 (9.2%) on contraction, revealing moderate correlation between the two (ICC, 0.58 (95% CI, 0.51-0.64)). Twenty-two cases of LAM avulsion were identified both at rest and on contraction. One woman had LAM avulsion on palpation, which was seen on TUI as LAM avulsion on contraction, but not at rest. More cases of anterior and posterior compartment prolapse were found in women with LAM avulsion diagnosed on contraction only compared to LAM avulsion observed at rest only (POP-Q assessment point Ba, -1.8 vs -2.5 (P = 0.075) and point Bp, -2.5 vs -2.8 (P = 0.072)). Findings on transperineal TUI performed in women at rest and on contraction correlate reasonably well. However, given the trend towards an association with signs of pelvic floor dysfunction, diagnosis of LAM avulsion on contraction seems to be more reliable. Consistency in technique and

  6. Radiation exposure from musculoskeletal computerized tomographic scans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, Debdut; Bible, Jesse E; Bohan, Michael; Simpson, Andrew K; Whang, Peter G; Grauer, Jonathan N

    2009-08-01

    Computerized tomographic scans are routinely obtained to evaluate a number of musculoskeletal conditions. However, since computerized tomographic scans expose patients to the greatest amounts of radiation of all imaging modalities, the physician must be cognizant of the effective doses of radiation that are administered. This investigation was performed to quantify the effective doses of computerized tomographic scans that are performed for various musculoskeletal applications. The digital imaging archive of a single institution was retrospectively reviewed to identify helical computerized tomographic scans that were completed to visualize the extremities or spine. Imaging parameters were recorded for each examination, and dosimetry calculator software was used to calculate the effective dose values according to a modified protocol derived from publication SR250 of the National Radiological Protection Board of the United Kingdom. Computerized tomographic scans of the chest, abdomen, and pelvis were also collected, and the effective doses were compared with those reported by prior groups in order to validate the results of the current study. The mean effective doses for computerized tomographic scans of the chest, abdomen, and pelvis (5.27, 4.95, and 4.85 mSv, respectively) were consistent with those of previous investigations. The highest mean effective doses were recorded for studies evaluating the spine (4.36, 17.99, and 19.15 mSv for the cervical, thoracic, and lumbar spines, respectively). In the upper extremity, the effective dose of a computerized tomographic scan of the shoulder (2.06 mSv) was higher than those of the elbow (0.14 mSv) and wrist (0.03 mSv). Similarly, the effective dose of a hip scan (3.09 mSv) was significantly higher than those observed with knee (0.16 mSv) and ankle (0.07 mSv) scans. Computerized tomographic scans of the axial and appendicular skeleton are associated with substantially elevated radiation exposures, but the effective dose

  7. Motion tracking-enhanced MART for tomographic PIV

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Novara, M.; Batenburg, K.J.; Scarano, F.

    A novel technique to increase the accuracy of multiplicative algebraic reconstruction technique (MART) reconstruction from tomographic particle image velocimetry (PIV) recordings at higher seeding density than currently possible is presented. The motion tracking enhancement (MTE) method is based on

  8. Stature estimation in Japanese cadavers based on pelvic measurements in three-dimensional multidetector computed tomographic images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torimitsu, Suguru; Makino, Yohsuke; Saitoh, Hisako; Sakuma, Ayaka; Ishii, Namiko; Hayakawa, Mutsumi; Yajima, Daisuke; Inokuchi, Go; Motomura, Ayumi; Chiba, Fumiko; Iwase, Hirotaro

    2015-05-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the feasibility of stature estimation by measuring the pelvic bones of Japanese cadavers using three-dimensional (3D) computed tomography (CT). We assessed 3D reconstructed images of 210 Japanese subjects (108 males, 102 females) who had undergone postmortem CT between May 2011 and November 2013. We defined the linear distance from the anterosuperior margin of the left and right anterior superior iliac spines (ASIS) to the posterior margin of the left and right ischial spines as the LSS and RSS, respectively. We also defined the linear distance from the anterosuperior margin of the left and right ASIS to the anteroinferior margin of the left and right ischial tuberosities as the LST and RST, respectively. The correlation between the cadaver stature (CS) and each parameter (LSS, LST, RSS, and RST) was evaluated using Pearson product-moment correlation coefficients and regression analysis was performed for stature estimation. All four parameters correlated significantly with stature independent of sex, suggesting that they can be used as a tool for stature estimation. The LST had the closest correlation with stature in both sexes.

  9. Diagnostic yield of conventional radiographic and cone-beam computed tomographic images in patients with atypical odontalgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pigg, M; List, T; Petersson, K; Lindh, C; Petersson, A

    2011-12-01

    To investigate whether the additional diagnostic yield of a cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) examination over conventional radiographs in patients primarily suspected of having atypical odontalgia (AO) improves differentiation between AO and symptomatic apical periodontitis (SAP) in patients with severe chronic intraoral pain. In this clinical study, 25 patients (mean age 54 ± 11 years, range 34-72) participated; 20 were diagnosed with AO and 5 with SAP. All patients were recruited from the clinics of the Faculty of Odontology, Malmö University. AO inclusion criteria were chronic pain (>6 months) in a region where a tooth had been endodontically or surgically treated, with no pathological cause detectable in clinical or radiologic examinations. SAP inclusion criteria were recurrent pain from a tooth diagnosed with apical periodontitis in clinical and radiographic examinations. Assessments comprised a self-report questionnaire on pain characteristics, a comprehensive clinical examination and a radiographic examination including panoramic and intraoral radiographs and CBCT images. The main outcome measure was periapical bone destruction. Sixty per cent of patients with AO had no periapical bone destructions detectable with any radiographic method. Overall, CBCT rendered 17% more periapical bone destructions than conventional radiography. Average pain intensity in patients with AO was 5.6 (± 1.8) on a 0-10 numerical rating scale, and average pain duration was 4.3 (± 5.2) years. Cone-beam computed tomography improves identification of patients without periapical bone destruction, which may facilitate differentiation between AO and SAP. © 2011 International Endodontic Journal.

  10. Clinical, computed tomographic, magnetic resonance imaging, and histologic findings associated with myxomatous neoplasia of the temporomandibular joint in two dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parslow, Arana; Taylor, David P; Simpson, David J

    2016-12-01

    CASE DESCRIPTION A 15-year-old neutered female mixed-breed dog (dog 1) and an 11-year-old neutered female Labrador Retriever (dog 2) were examined because of unilateral exophthalmus, third eyelid protrusion, and periorbital swelling that failed to respond to antimicrobial treatment. CLINICAL FINDINGS Both dogs underwent ultrasonographic, CT, and MRI examination of the head. In both dogs, advanced imaging revealed a poorly defined, peripherally contrast-enhancing, mucous-filled cystic mass that radiated from the temporomandibular joint and infiltrated the periorbital tissues and retrobulbar space. Both dogs underwent surgical biopsy of the periorbital mass. A viscous, straw-colored fluid was aspirated from the retrobulbar region in both dogs. The initial histologic diagnosis for dog 1 was zygomatic sialadenitis and sialocele. However, the clinical signs recurred, and histologic examination of specimens obtained during a second surgical biopsy resulted in a diagnosis of myxoma. The histologic diagnosis was myxosarcoma for dog 2. TREATMENT AND OUTCOME In both dogs, clinical signs recurred within 2 weeks after surgery and persisted for the duration of their lives. Dog 1 received no further treatment after the second surgery and was euthanized 34 months after initial examination because of multicentric lymphoma. Dog 2 was treated with various chemotherapy agents and was euthanized 11 months after initial examination because of a dramatic increase in periocular swelling and respiratory stertor. CLINICAL RELEVANCE Temporomandibular myxomatous neoplasia can be confused with zygomatic sialocele on the basis of clinical signs but has characteristic MRI features. Representative biopsy specimens should be obtained from areas close to the temporomandibular joint to avoid misdiagnosis.

  11. High resolution tomographic instrument development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-01-01

    Our recent work has concentrated on the development of high-resolution PET instrumentation reflecting in part the growing importance of PET in nuclear medicine imaging. We have developed a number of positron imaging instruments and have the distinction that every instrument has been placed in operation and has had an extensive history of application for basic research and clinical study. The present program is a logical continuation of these earlier successes. PCR-I, a single ring positron tomograph was the first demonstration of analog coding using BGO. It employed 4 mm detectors and is currently being used for a wide range of biological studies. These are of immense importance in guiding the direction for future instruments. In particular, PCR-II, a volume sensitive positron tomograph with 3 mm spatial resolution has benefited greatly from the studies using PCR-I. PCR-II is currently in the final stages of assembly and testing and will shortly be placed in operation for imaging phantoms, animals and ultimately humans. Perhaps the most important finding resulting from our previous study is that resolution and sensitivity must be carefully balanced to achieve a practical high resolution system. PCR-II has been designed to have the detection characteristics required to achieve 3 mm resolution in human brain under practical imaging situations. The development of algorithms by the group headed by Dr. Chesler is based on a long history of prior study including his joint work with Drs. Pelc and Reiderer and Stearns. This body of expertise will be applied to the processing of data from PCR-II when it becomes operational.

  12. High resolution tomographic instrument development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-08-01

    Our recent work has concentrated on the development of high-resolution PET instrumentation reflecting in part the growing importance of PET in nuclear medicine imaging. We have developed a number of positron imaging instruments and have the distinction that every instrument has been placed in operation and has had an extensive history of application for basic research and clinical study. The present program is a logical continuation of these earlier successes. PCR-I, a single ring positron tomograph was the first demonstration of analog coding using BGO. It employed 4 mm detectors and is currently being used for a wide range of biological studies. These are of immense importance in guiding the direction for future instruments. In particular, PCR-II, a volume sensitive positron tomograph with 3 mm spatial resolution has benefited greatly from the studies using PCR-I. PCR-II is currently in the final stages of assembly and testing and will shortly be placed in operation for imaging phantoms, animals and ultimately humans. Perhaps the most important finding resulting from our previous study is that resolution and sensitivity must be carefully balanced to achieve a practical high resolution system. PCR-II has been designed to have the detection characteristics required to achieve 3 mm resolution in human brain under practical imaging situations. The development of algorithms by the group headed by Dr. Chesler is based on a long history of prior study including his joint work with Drs. Pelc and Reiderer and Stearns. This body of expertise will be applied to the processing of data from PCR-II when it becomes operational.

  13. The optimal monochromatic spectral computed tomographic imaging plus adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction algorithm can improve the superior mesenteric vessel image quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Xiao-Ping; Zuo, Zi-Wei; Xu, Ying-Jin; Wang, Jia-Ning; Liu, Huai-Jun; Liang, Guang-Lu; Gao, Bu-Lang

    2017-04-01

    To investigate the effect of the optimal monochromatic spectral computed tomography (CT) plus adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction on the improvement of the image quality of the superior mesenteric artery and vein. The gemstone spectral CT angiographic data of 25 patients were reconstructed in the following three groups: 70KeV, the optimal monochromatic imaging, and the optimal monochromatic plus 40%iterative reconstruction mode. The CT value, image noises (IN), background CT value and noises, contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR), signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and image scores of the vessels and surrounding tissues were analyzed. In the 70KeV, the optimal monochromatic and the optimal monochromatic images plus 40% iterative reconstruction group, the mean scores of image quality were 3.86, 4.24 and 4.25 for the superior mesenteric artery and 3.46, 3.78 and 3.81 for the superior mesenteric vein, respectively. The image quality scores for the optimal monochromatic and the optimal monochromatic plus 40% iterative reconstruction groups were significantly greater than for the 70KeV group (Piterative reconstruction group than in the 70KeV group. The optimal monochromatic plus 40% iterative reconstruction group had significantly (Piterative reconstruction using low-contrast agent dosage and low injection rate can significantly improve the image quality of the superior mesenteric artery and vein. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Computed Tomographic Perfusion Improves Diagnostic Power of Coronary Computed Tomographic Angiography in Women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Penagaluri, Ashritha; Higgins, Angela Y.; Vavere, Andrea L

    2016-01-01

    Background-Coronary computed tomographic angiography (CTA) and myocardial perfusion imaging (CTP) is a validated approach for detection and exclusion of flow-limiting coronary artery disease (CAD), but little data are available on gender-specific performance of these modalities. In this study, we...

  15. A system dedicated to the viewing and handling of tomographic images obtained by magnetic resonance; Um sistema dedicado a visualizacao e manipulacao de imagens tomograficas obtidas por ressonancia magnetica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slaets, Joan F.W.; Almeida, Lirio O.B. [Sao Paulo Univ., Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica e Quimica; Traina, Agma J.M. [Sao Paulo Univ., Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil). Inst. de Ciencias Matematicas

    1992-12-31

    The present work describes the development of a dedicated system to be used in visualization and manipulation of a MR images. The graphics environment as well as the tool kit were developed for the dedicated TMS34010 based hardware. The developed software offers a compact kernel with primitives to support the creation and manipulation windows and menus directly in `C` language. This work is fundamental for the implementation of a user friendly interface build to operate and visualize tomographic images. This tools are essential for the selection an archiving of images planes as used in clinical applications. (author) 9 refs., 2 figs., 1 photo; e-mail: jan, agma and lirio at uspfsc.ifqsc..usp.ansp.br

  16. Field-portable lensfree tomographic microscope†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isikman, Serhan O.; Bishara, Waheb; Sikora, Uzair; Yaglidere, Oguzhan; Yeah, John; Ozcan, Aydogan

    2011-01-01

    We present a field-portable lensfree tomographic microscope, which can achieve sectional imaging of a large volume (~20 mm3) on a chip with an axial resolution of optic waveguide are controlled through a cost-effective micro-processor to sequentially illuminate the sample from different angles to record lensfree holograms of the sample that is placed on the top of a digital sensor array. In order to generate pixel super-resolved (SR) lensfree holograms and hence digitally improve the achievable lateral resolution, multiple sub-pixel shifted holograms are recorded at each illumination angle by electromagnetically actuating the fibre-optic waveguides using compact coils and magnets. These SR projection holograms obtained over an angular range of ~50° are rapidly reconstructed to yield projection images of the sample, which can then be back-projected to compute tomograms of the objects on the sensor-chip. The performance of this compact and light-weight lensfree tomographic microscope is validated by imaging micro-beads of different dimensions as well as a Hymenolepis nana egg, which is an infectious parasitic flatworm. Achieving a decent three-dimensional spatial resolution, this field-portable on-chip optical tomographic microscope might provide a useful toolset for telemedicine and high-throughput imaging applications in resource-poor settings. PMID:21573311

  17. Field-portable lensfree tomographic microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isikman, Serhan O; Bishara, Waheb; Sikora, Uzair; Yaglidere, Oguzhan; Yeah, John; Ozcan, Aydogan

    2011-07-07

    We present a field-portable lensfree tomographic microscope, which can achieve sectional imaging of a large volume (∼20 mm(3)) on a chip with an axial resolution of optic waveguide are controlled through a cost-effective micro-processor to sequentially illuminate the sample from different angles to record lensfree holograms of the sample that is placed on the top of a digital sensor array. In order to generate pixel super-resolved (SR) lensfree holograms and hence digitally improve the achievable lateral resolution, multiple sub-pixel shifted holograms are recorded at each illumination angle by electromagnetically actuating the fibre-optic waveguides using compact coils and magnets. These SR projection holograms obtained over an angular range of ±50° are rapidly reconstructed to yield projection images of the sample, which can then be back-projected to compute tomograms of the objects on the sensor-chip. The performance of this compact and light-weight lensfree tomographic microscope is validated by imaging micro-beads of different dimensions as well as a Hymenolepis nana egg, which is an infectious parasitic flatworm. Achieving a decent three-dimensional spatial resolution, this field-portable on-chip optical tomographic microscope might provide a useful toolset for telemedicine and high-throughput imaging applications in resource-poor settings. This journal is © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2011

  18. Lymphomatosis cerebri: a rare variant of primary central nervous system lymphoma and MR imaging features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Hui; Gao, Bo; Liu, Jing; Yu, Yong-Cheng; Shiroishi, Mark S; Huang, Ming-Ming; Yang, Wen-Xiu; Guan, Zhi-Zhong

    2017-10-05

    Lymphomatosis cerebri (LC) is a rare variant of primary central nervous system lymphoma (PCNSL), characterized by diffuse infiltration without the formation of a discrete mass. The diagnosis of LC is a challenge because the imaging findings are atypical for lymphoma. The purpose of present study is to investigate MRI characteristics and clinical features of LC and potentially facilitate an early and accurate diagnosis of this often-missed disease. Seven patients (average 44 years, 19-58 years) with LC proved basing on MRI and histology were retrospectively reviewed the clinical data and cerebral MR imaging findings. The common presenting symptoms were cognitive decline, behavioral disturbance, gait disturbance. All patients had both deep and lobar lesion distribution, and two of them had infratentorial involvement. Lack of contrast enhancement and subtle patchy enhanced pattern were observed in two and three patients, respectively. The remaining two patients presented multiple patchy enhancement. Most of the lesions were slightly hyperintense to normal brain on DWI as well as hyperintense on ADC maps. Three patients presented a pattern of marked decrease of NAA/Cr, increase of Cho/Cr, and two of the three cases showed increased Lip/Cr and Lac/Cr on MRS. We conclude that diffuse bilateral lesions especially in deep and lobar region including white and gray matter, without enhancement or with patchy enhancement, marked decrease of NAA/Cr and increase of Cho/Cr, and increased Lip/Cr and Lac/Cr are suggestive of LC. Prompt recognition of these imaging patterns may lead to early diagnosis of LC and brain biopsy with improved prognosis.

  19. Automatic identification of regions of interest on renal tomographic images;Identification automatique des regions d'interets sur des images tomographiques renales

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boukerroui, D.; Cocquerez, J.P. [Universite de Technologie de Compiegne, CNRS UMR 6599 Heudiasyc, 60 (France); Touhami, W. [Ecole Nationale d' ingenieurs de Tunis (Tunisia)

    2009-07-01

    We propose in this paper, an original approach in a statistical framework, for fully automatic delineation of kidneys (healthy and pathological) in 2 dimension CT images. Our approach has 2 main steps: a localisation step followed by a delineation step. The localisation step is guided by a statistically learned prior spatial model in one hand and a grey level prior model in a second hand. The second step, utilizes the localization results in order to precisely delineate the kidney's regions using a set of learned IF-THEN rues. The proposed approach is tested on clinically acquired images and promising results are obtained. (authors)

  20. Tomographic PIV: particles versus blobs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Champagnat, Frédéric; Cornic, Philippe; Cheminet, Adam; Leclaire, Benjamin; Le Besnerais, Guy; Plyer, Aurélien

    2014-08-01

    We present an alternative approach to tomographic particle image velocimetry (tomo-PIV) that seeks to recover nearly single voxel particles rather than blobs of extended size. The baseline of our approach is a particle-based representation of image data. An appropriate discretization of this representation yields an original linear forward model with a weight matrix built with specific samples of the system’s point spread function (PSF). Such an approach requires only a few voxels to explain the image appearance, therefore it favors much more sparsely reconstructed volumes than classic tomo-PIV. The proposed forward model is general and flexible and can be embedded in a classical multiplicative algebraic reconstruction technique (MART) or a simultaneous multiplicative algebraic reconstruction technique (SMART) inversion procedure. We show, using synthetic PIV images and by way of a large exploration of the generating conditions and a variety of performance metrics, that the model leads to better results than the classical tomo-PIV approach, in particular in the case of seeding densities greater than 0.06 particles per pixel and of PSFs characterized by a standard deviation larger than 0.8 pixels.

  1. Multidetector CT angiography of renal vasculature: normal anatomy and variants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tuerkvatan, Aysel; Oezdemir, Mustafa; Cumhur, Turhan; Oelcer, Tuelay [Tuerkiye Yueksek ihtisas Hospital, Department of Radiology, Sihhiye, Ankara (Turkey)

    2009-01-15

    Knowledge of the variations in renal vascular anatomy is important before laparoscopic donor or partial nephrectomy and vascular reconstruction for renal artery stenosis or abdominal aortic aneurysm. Recently, multidetector computed tomographic (MDCT) angiography has become a principal imaging investigation for assessment of the renal vasculature and has challenged the role of conventional angiography. It is an excellent imaging technique because it is a fast and non-invasive tool that provides highly accurate and detailed evaluation of normal renal vascular anatomy and variants. The number, size and course of the renal arteries and veins are easily identified by MDCT angiography. The purpose of this pictorial essay is to illustrate MDCT angiographic appearance of normal anatomy and common variants of the renal vasculature. (orig.)

  2. Tomographic reconstruction of quantum metrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laudato, Marco; Marmo, Giuseppe; Mele, Fabio M.; Ventriglia, Franco; Vitale, Patrizia

    2018-02-01

    In the framework of quantum information geometry we investigate the relationship between monotone metric tensors uniquely defined on the space of quantum tomograms, once the tomographic scheme is chosen, and monotone quantum metrics on the space of quantum states, classified by operator monotone functions, according to the Petz classification theorem. We show that different metrics can be related through a change in the tomographic map and prove that there exists a bijective relation between monotone quantum metrics associated with different operator monotone functions. Such a bijective relation is uniquely defined in terms of solutions of a first order second degree differential equation for the parameters of the involved tomographic maps. We first exhibit an example of a non-linear tomographic map that connects a monotone metric with a new one, which is not monotone. Then we provide a second example where two monotone metrics are uniquely related through their tomographic parameters.

  3. Does Motion Assessment With 4-Dimensional Computed Tomographic Imaging for Non–Small Cell Lung Cancer Radiotherapy Improve Target Volume Coverage?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naseer Ahmed

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Modern radiotherapy with 4-dimensional computed tomographic (4D-CT image acquisition for non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC captures respiratory-mediated tumor motion to provide more accurate target delineation. This study compares conventional 3-dimensional (3D conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT plans generated with standard helical free-breathing CT (FBCT with plans generated on 4D-CT contoured volumes to determine whether target volume coverage is affected. Materials and methods: Fifteen patients with stage I to IV NSCLC were enrolled in the study. Free-breathing CT and 4D-CT data sets were acquired at the same simulation session and with the same immobilization. Gross tumor volume (GTV for primary and/or nodal disease was contoured on FBCT (GTV_3D. The 3DCRT plans were obtained, and the patients were treated according to our institution’s standard protocol using FBCT imaging. Gross tumor volume was contoured on 4D-CT for primary and/or nodal disease on all 10 respiratory phases and merged to create internal gross tumor volume (IGTV_4D. Clinical target volume margin was 5 mm in both plans, whereas planning tumor volume (PTV expansion was 1 cm axially and 1.5 cm superior/inferior for FBCT-based plans to incorporate setup errors and an estimate of respiratory-mediated tumor motion vs 8 mm isotropic margin for setup error only in all 4D-CT plans. The 3DCRT plans generated from the FBCT scan were copied on the 4D-CT data set with the same beam parameters. GTV_3D, IGTV_4D, PTV, and dose volume histogram from both data sets were analyzed and compared. Dice coefficient evaluated PTV similarity between FBCT and 4D-CT data sets. Results: In total, 14 of the 15 patients were analyzed. One patient was excluded as there was no measurable GTV. Mean GTV_3D was 115.3 cm 3 and mean IGTV_4D was 152.5 cm 3 ( P = .001. Mean PTV_3D was 530.0 cm 3 and PTV_4D was 499.8 cm 3 ( P = .40. Both gross primary and nodal disease analyzed separately were larger

  4. Neuroendocrine tumor imaging with 68Ga-DOTA-NOC: physiologic and benign variants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kagna, Olga; Pirmisashvili, Natalia; Tshori, Sagi; Freedman, Nanette; Israel, Ora; Krausz, Yodphat

    2014-12-01

    Imaging with (68)Ga-labeled 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid (DOTA)-octreotide analogs has become an important modality in patients with neuroendocrine tumors (NETs). In addition to high uptake in NET lesions, prominent physiologic radiotracer activity has been reported in the pituitary gland, pancreas, adrenal glands, liver, and spleen, and faint activity has been reported in the thyroid and gastrointestinal tract. This article describes previously unknown sites of 68Ga-DOTA-1-NaI3-octreotide (NOC) uptake unrelated to NETs. One hundred eighty-two patients (96 female and 86 male patients; age range, 4-89 years) with documented (n=156) or suspected (n=26) NETs underwent 207 68Ga-DOTA-NOC PET/CT studies. Studies were retrospectively reviewed for the presence, intensity, and localization of foci of increased uptake that were further correlated with findings on additional imaging studies and clinical follow-up for a period of 4-32 months. Uptake of 68Ga-DOTA-NOC not identified as NET or known physiologic activity was detected in 297 sites with confirmation in 149 of 207 studies (72%). The most common location of non-NET-related 68Ga-DOTA-NOC-avid sites was in small lymph nodes, followed by prostate, uterus, breasts, lungs, brown fat, musculoskeletal system, and other sites, including oropharynx, pineal body, thymus, aortic plaque, genitalia, surgical bed, and subcutaneous granuloma. Intensity of uptake in non-NET-related 68Ga-DOTA-NOC-avid sites ranged in maximum standardized uptake value from 0.8 to 10.5. Previously unreported benign sites of 68Ga-DOTA-NOC uptake were found in the majority of studies, suggesting the presence of somatostatin receptors in physiologic variants or processes with no evidence of tumor. Knowledge of increased tracer uptake in non-NET-related sites is important for accurate interpretation and for avoiding potential pitfalls of 68Ga-DOTA-NOC PET/CT.

  5. Imaging-Genetics in Dyslexia: Connecting risk genetic variants to brain neuroimaging and ultimately to reading impairments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eicher, John D.; Gruen, Jeffrey R.

    2013-01-01

    Dyslexia is a common pediatric disorder that affects 5-17% of schoolchildren in the United States. It is marked by unexpected difficulties in fluent reading despite adequate intelligence, opportunity, and instruction. Classically, neuropsychologists have studied dyslexia using a variety of neurocognitive batteries to gain insight into the specific deficits and impairments in affected children. Since dyslexia is a complex genetic trait with high heritability, analyses conditioned on performance on these neurocognitive batteries have been used to try to identify associated genes. This has led to some successes in identifying contributing genes, although much of the heritability remains unexplained. Additionally, the lack of relevant human brain tissue for analysis and the challenges of modeling a uniquely human trait in animals are barriers to advancing our knowledge of the underlying pathophysiology. In vivo imaging technologies, however, present new opportunities to examine dyslexia and reading skills in a clearly relevant context in human subjects. Recent investigations have started to integrate these imaging data with genetic data in attempts to gain a more complete and complex understanding of reading processes. In addition to bridging the gap from genetic risk variant to a discernible neuroimaging phenotype and ultimately to the clinical impairments in reading performance, the use of neuroimaging phenotypes will reveal novel risk genes and variants. In this article, we briefly discuss the genetic and imaging investigations and take an in-depth look at the recent imaging-genetics investigations of dyslexia. PMID:23916419

  6. The accuracy of computed tomographic angiography for mapping the perforators of the DIEA: a cadaveric study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozen, Warren M; Ashton, Mark W; Stella, Damien L; Phillips, Timothy J; Taylor, G Ian

    2008-08-01

    The deep inferior epigastric artery (DIEA) perforator flap is increasingly used for breast reconstruction, with preoperative imaging sought as a means of improving operative outcome. Computed tomographic angiography has been recently described as the preferred imaging modality; however, formal evaluation of computed tomographic angiography has not been described. A cadaveric study was undertaken to evaluate the accuracy of computed tomographic angiography for perforator mapping. Ten cadaveric hemiabdominal walls from five fresh cadavers underwent contrast injection of each DIEA and subsequent computed tomographic scanning, with each DIEA and all perforating branches documented. Dissection was then performed, with the recording of the course of the DIEA and the course of all perforators in each specimen. The concordance of computed tomographic angiography with dissection findings was evaluated. Cadaveric computed tomographic angiography identified 154 perforators in 10 hemiabdominal walls. Computed tomographic angiography was highly accurate, with eight false-positives and six false-negatives on cadaveric computed tomographic angiography, establishing an overall sensitivity of 96 percent and a positive predictive value of 95 percent for mapping perforators. For perforators greater than 1 mm in diameter, the sensitivity was 100 percent and the positive predictive value was 100 percent. Computed tomographic angiography is a highly accurate tool for identifying the perforators of the DIEA before DIEA perforator flaps for breast reconstruction. Preoperative identification of these vessels can aid planning for the preferred hemiabdomen for dissection, and may save operative time, angst, and potentially complications.

  7. Tomographic image reconstruction using training images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soltani, Sara; Andersen, Martin Skovgaard; Hansen, Per Christian

    2017-01-01

    , which reduces the computational complexity compared to previous formulations. Computational experiments clarify the choice and interplay of the model parameters and the regularization parameters, and we show that in few-projection low-dose settings our algorithm is competitive with total variation...

  8. Expediting model-based optoacoustic reconstructions with tomographic symmetries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lutzweiler, Christian; Deán-Ben, Xosé Luís; Razansky, Daniel, E-mail: dr@tum.de [Institute for Biological and Medical Imaging (IBMI), Helmholtz Center Munich, Ingolstädter Landstrasse 1, 85764 Neuherberg (Germany); Faculty of Medicine, Technical University of Munich, Ismaninger Strasse 22, 81675 Munich (Germany)

    2014-01-15

    Purpose: Image quantification in optoacoustic tomography implies the use of accurate forward models of excitation, propagation, and detection of optoacoustic signals while inversions with high spatial resolution usually involve very large matrices, leading to unreasonably long computation times. The development of fast and memory efficient model-based approaches represents then an important challenge to advance on the quantitative and dynamic imaging capabilities of tomographic optoacoustic imaging. Methods: Herein, a method for simplification and acceleration of model-based inversions, relying on inherent symmetries present in common tomographic acquisition geometries, has been introduced. The method is showcased for the case of cylindrical symmetries by using polar image discretization of the time-domain optoacoustic forward model combined with efficient storage and inversion strategies. Results: The suggested methodology is shown to render fast and accurate model-based inversions in both numerical simulations andpost mortem small animal experiments. In case of a full-view detection scheme, the memory requirements are reduced by one order of magnitude while high-resolution reconstructions are achieved at video rate. Conclusions: By considering the rotational symmetry present in many tomographic optoacoustic imaging systems, the proposed methodology allows exploiting the advantages of model-based algorithms with feasible computational requirements and fast reconstruction times, so that its convenience and general applicability in optoacoustic imaging systems with tomographic symmetries is anticipated.

  9. Endodontic Working Length Measurement Using Cone-beam Computed Tomographic Images Obtained at Different Voxel Sizes and Field of Views, Periapical Radiography, and Apex Locator: A Comparative Ex Vivo Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yılmaz, Funda; Kamburoğlu, Kıvanç; Şenel, Buğra

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of working length determination by using an electronic apex locator, periapical radiography, and cone-beam computed tomographic (CBCT) imaging obtained at different voxel sizes and field of views (FOVs) in extracted human teeth. Thirty extracted human mandibular premolar teeth were used. The electronic working length measurements were performed by using an electronic apex locator (Root ZX; J Morita Corp, Kyoto, Japan). Five different image sets were obtained as follows: (1) CBCT imaging: 40 × 40 mm FOV, 0.080 mm3 (FOV40); (2) CBCT imaging: 60 × 60 mm FOV, 0.125 mm3 (FOV60); (3) CBCT imaging: 80 × 80 mm FOV, 0.160 mm3 (FOV80); (4) CBCT imaging: 100 × 100 mm FOV, 0.250 mm3 (FOV100); and (5) periapical digital radiography. Direct measurements performed with an electronic digital caliper were considered as the gold standard and compared with the electronic apex locator, CBCT, and periapical image measurements. Data were analyzed using a 2-way analysis of variance test. Significance level was set at P intraoral radiographs (P > .05 and the Gage R&R value was 30%). There were significant differences in the methods in terms of mean differences from the gold standard (P < .05). This study showed that available CBCT scans with different FOVs can be used for working length measurement. Copyright © 2016 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Simultaneous tomographic reconstruction and segmentation with class priors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Romanov, Mikhail; Dahl, Anders Bjorholm; Dong, Yiqiu

    2015-01-01

    We consider tomographic imaging problems where the goal is to obtain both a reconstructed image and a corresponding segmentation. A classical approach is to first reconstruct and then segment the image; more recent approaches use a discrete tomography approach where reconstruction and segmentatio...... approach can produce better results than the classical two-step approach.......We consider tomographic imaging problems where the goal is to obtain both a reconstructed image and a corresponding segmentation. A classical approach is to first reconstruct and then segment the image; more recent approaches use a discrete tomography approach where reconstruction and segmentation...... are combined to produce a reconstruction that is identical to the segmentation. We consider instead a hybrid approach that simultaneously produces both a reconstructed image and segmentation. We incorporate priors about the desired classes of the segmentation through a Hidden Markov Measure Field Model, and we...

  11. Cheap Auroral Tomographical System (CATS)

    OpenAIRE

    Garlick, Dean; Goldfinger, Andrew

    1990-01-01

    The Cheap Auroral Tomographical System (CATS) consists of a large constellation of small, disposable satellites in a near polar orbit. CATS is designed to collect stereoscopic views of the earth environment that will be used for tomographical and earth environmental research. Each satellite will be identical and constructed of high-grade commercial parts, thus significantly reducing the cost of design, fabrication and components. The CATS constellation will be a significant step toward the de...

  12. Computed tomographic coronary angiography for patients with heart failure (CTA-HF): a randomized controlled trial (IMAGE HF Project 1-C).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, Benjamin J W; Green, Rachel E; Coyle, Doug; Laine, Mika; Hanninen, Helena; Leskinen, Hanna; Rajda, Miroslav; Larose, Eric; Hartikainen, Juha; Hedman, Marja; Mielniczuk, Lisa; O'Meara, Eileen; deKemp, Robert A; Klein, Ran; Paterson, Ian; White, James A; Yla-Herttuala, Seppo; Leber, Alex; Tandon, Vikas; Lee, Ting; Al-Hesayen, Abdul; Hessian, Renee; Dowsley, Taylor; Kass, Malek; Kelly, Cathy; Garrard, Linda; Tardif, Jean-Claude; Knuuti, Juhani; Beanlands, Rob S; Wells, George A

    2013-12-26

    The prevalence of heart failure (HF) is rising in industrialized and developing countries. Though invasive coronary angiography (ICA) remains the gold standard for anatomical assessment of coronary artery disease in HF patients, alternatives are being sought. Computed tomographic coronary angiography (CTA) has emerged as an accurate non-invasive diagnostic tool for coronary artery disease (CAD) and has been demonstrated to have prognostic value. Whether or not CTA can be used in HF patients is unknown. Acknowledging the aging population, the growing prevalence of HF and the increasing financial burden of healthcare, we need to identify non-invasive diagnostic tests that are available, safe, accurate and cost-effective. The proposed study aims to provide insight into the efficacy of CTA in HF patients. A multicenter randomized controlled trial will enroll 250 HF patients requiring coronary anatomical definition. Enrolled patients will be randomized to either CTA or ICA (n = 125 per group) as the first test to define coronary anatomy. The primary outcomes will be collected to determine downstream resource utilization. Secondary outcomes will include the composite clinical events and major adverse cardiac events. In addition, the accuracy of CTA for detecting coronary anatomy and obstruction will be assessed in patients who subsequently undergo both CTA and ICA. It is expected that CTA will be a more cost-effective strategy for diagnosis: yielding similar outcomes with fewer procedural risks and improved resource utilization. ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT01283659. Team grant #CIF 99470.

  13. Tomographic 3D-PIV and Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsinga, Gerrit E.; Wieneke, Bernhard; Scarano, Fulvio; Schröder, Andreas

    Tomographic particle image velocimetry is a 3D PIV technique based on the illumination, recording, reconstruction and analysis of tracer-particle motion within a three-dimensional measurement volume. The recently developed technique makes use of several simultaneous views of the illuminated particles, typically 4, and their three-dimensional reconstruction as a light-intensity distribution by means of optical tomography. The reconstruction is performed with the MART algorithm (multiplicative algebraic reconstruction technique), yielding a 3D distribution of light intensity discretized over an array of voxels. The reconstructed tomogram pair is then analyzed by means of 3D crosscorrelation with an iterative multigrid volume-deformation technique, returning the three-component velocity vector distribution over the measurement volume. The implementation of the tomographic technique in time-resolved mode by means of high repetition rate PIV hardware has the capability to yield 4D velocity information. The first part of the chapter describes the operation principles and gives a detailed assessment of the tomographic reconstruction algorithm performance based upon a computer-simulated experiment. The second part of the chapter proposes four applications on two flow cases: 1. the transitional wake behind a circular cylinder; 2. the turbulent boundary layer developing over a flat plate. For the first case, experiments in air at ReD = 2700 are described together with the experimental assessment of the tomographic reconstruction accuracy. In this experiment a direct comparison is made between the results obtained by tomographic PIV and stereo-PIV. Experiments conducted in a water facility on the cylinder wake shows the extension of the technique to time-resolved measurements in water at ReD = 540 by means of a low repetition rate PIV system. A high data yield is obtained using high-resolution cameras (2k × 2k pixels) returning 650k vectors per volume. Measurements of the

  14. Tomographic multiphase flow measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sætre, C; Johansen, G A; Tjugum, S A

    2012-07-01

    Measurement of multiphase flow of gas, oil and water is not at all trivial and in spite of considerable achievements over the past two decades, important challenges remain (Corneliussen et al., 2005). These are related to reducing measurement uncertainties arising from variations in the flow regime, improving long term stability and developing new means for calibration, adjustment and verification of the multiphase flow meters. This work focuses on the first two issues using multi gamma beam (MGB) measurements for identification of the type of flow regime. Further gamma ray tomographic measurements are used for reference of the gas/liquid distribution. For the MGB method one Am-241 source with principal emission at 59.5 keV is used because this relatively low energy enables efficient collimation and thereby shaping of the beams, as well as compact detectors. One detector is placed diametrically opposite the source whereas the second is positioned to the side so that this beam is close to the pipe wall. The principle is then straight forward to compare the measured intensities of these detectors and through that identify the flow pattern, i.e. the instantaneous cross-sectional gas-liquid distribution. The measurement setup also includes Compton scattering measurements, which can provide information about the changes in the water salinity for flow segments with high water liquid ratio and low gas fractions. By measuring the transmitted intensity in short time slots (<100 ms), rapid regime variations are revealed. From this we can select the time sections suitable for salinity measurements. Since the salinity variations change at the time scale of hours, a running average can be performed to increase the accuracy of the measurements. Recent results of this work will be presented here. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Rhinosinusitis in north-eastern Nigeria: computerized tomographic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Computed tomographic scan (CT) is a useful imaging modality for infection of the paranasal sinuses. Method: Retrospective study of 52 patients seen with evidence of rhinosinusitis on CT scan of the paranasal sinuses. Results: There was a male preponderance with a M: F ratio of 1.7:1 ad age range 9 – 63 ...

  16. Preoperative vascular mapping for facial allotransplantation: four-dimensional computed tomographic angiography versus magnetic resonance angiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soga, Shigeyoshi; Pomahac, Bohdan; Mitsouras, Dimitrios; Kumamaru, Kanako; Powers, Sara L; Prior, Richard F; Signorelli, Jason; Bueno, Ericka M; Steigner, Michael L; Rybicki, Frank J

    2011-10-01

    Facial allotransplantation requires a detailed arterial and venous assessment for surgical planning. Target vessels are often depleted by multiple reconstructive attempts or the severe facial injury itself. The purpose of this study was to retrospectively compare the diagnostic performance of computed tomography and magnetic resonance angiography in the preoperative assessment. Four-dimensional (three spatial planes plus time) computed tomographic and magnetic resonance images including 126 potential vessels (76 arteries and 50 veins) from five candidates were analyzed independently by two radiologists using a four-point image quality scale. Computed tomographic versus magnetic resonance image quality was compared directly, using a computed tomographic angiography consensus read as reference standard. Vessels with metal artifact on magnetic resonance imaging, computed tomography, or both underwent separate analyses to determine the impact of metal implants on image quality. Considering all 126 vessels, the mean computed tomographic image quality was superior to that of magnetic resonance angiography. When considering individual vessels, all except for major neck vessels were better visualized by computed tomography. Images of 26 vessels were degraded by metal artifact; magnetic resonance image quality was inferior for those vessels. Considering images of major vessels with no metal artifact, there was no significant mean image quality difference between computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. Computed tomographic angiography should be used as the first-choice modality for preoperative imaging of facial transplant patients because, when compared with magnetic resonance imaging, the visualization of small vessels is far superior and images have fewer artifacts. Diagnostic, II.

  17. A SPICE synthetic dataset to benchmark global tomographic methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Y.; Capdeville, Y.; Maupin, V.; Montagner, J.

    2005-12-01

    The different existing global tomographic methods result in different models of the Earth. Within SPICE (Seismic wave Propagation and Imaging in Complex media: a European network), we have decided to perform a benchmark experiment of global tomographic techniques. A global model has been constructed. It includes 3D heterogeneities in velocity, anisotropy and attenuation, as well as topography of discontinuities. Simplified versions of the model will also be used. Synthetic seismograms will be generated at low frequency by the Spectral Element Method, for a realistic distribution of sources and stations. The synthetic seismograms will be made available to the scientific community at the SPICE website www.spice-rtn.org. Any group wishing to test his tomographic algorithm is encouraged to download the synthetic data.

  18. Computed tomographic features of canine nonparenchymal hemangiosarcoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuda, Shoko; Kobayashi, Tetsuya; Robertson, Ian D; Oshima, Fukiko; Fukazawa, Eri; Nakano, Yuko; Ono, Shin; Thrall, Donald E

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this retrospective study was to describe pre- and postcontrast computed tomographic (CT) characteristics of confirmed nonparenchymal hemangiosarcoma in a group of dogs. Medical records were searched during the period of July 2003 and October 2011 and dogs with histologically confirmed nonparenchymal hemangiosarcoma and pre- and postcontrast CT images were recruited. Two observers recorded a consensus opinion for the following CT characteristics for each dog: largest transverse tumor diameter, number of masses, general tumor shape, character of the tumor margin, precontrast appearance, presence of dystrophic calcification, presence of postcontrast enhancement, pattern of postcontrast enhancement, presence of regional lymphadenopathy, and presence of associated cavitary fluid. A total of 17 dogs met inclusion criteria. Tumors were located in the nasal cavity, muscle, mandible, mesentery, subcutaneous tissue, and retroperitoneal space. Computed tomographic features of nonparenchymal hemangiosarcoma were similar to those of other soft tissue sarcomas, with most tumors being heterogeneous in precontrast images, invasive into adjacent tissue, and heterogeneously contrast enhancing. One unexpected finding was the presence of intense foci of contrast enhancement in 13 of the 17 tumors (76%). This appearance, which is not typical of other soft tissue sarcomas, was consistent with contrast medium residing in vascular channels. Findings indicated that there were no unique distinguishing CT characteristics for nonparenchymal hemangiosarcoma in dogs; however, the presence of highly attenuating foci of contrast enhancement may warrant further investigation in prospective diagnostic sensitivity and treatment outcome studies. © 2014 American College of Veterinary Radiology.

  19. Comparison between different tomographic reconstruction algorithms in nuclear medicine imaging; Comparacion entre distintos algoritmos de reconstruccion tomografica en imagenes de medicina nuclear

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Llacer Martos, S.; Herraiz Lablanca, M. D.; Puchal Ane, R.

    2011-07-01

    This paper compares the image quality obtained with each of the algorithms is evaluated and its running time, to optimize the choice of algorithm to use taking into account both the quality of the reconstructed image as the time spent on the reconstruction.

  20. Synthetic Dataset To Benchmark Global Tomographic Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Yilong; Capdeville, Yann; Maupin, Valerie; Montagner, Jean-Paul

    2006-11-01

    A new set of global synthetic seismograms calculated in a three-dimensional (3-D), heterogeneous, anisotropic, anelastic model of the Earth using the spectral element method has been released by the European network SPICE (Seismic Wave Propagation and Imaging in Complex Media: a European Network). The set consists of 7424 three-component records with a minimum period of 32 seconds, a sampling rate of one second, and a duration of 10,500 seconds. The aim of this synthetic data set is to conduct a blind test of existing global tomographic methods based on long-period data, in order to test how current imaging techniques are limited by approximations in theory and by the inadequacy of data quality and coverage.

  1. Rapid volumetric photoacoustic tomographic imaging with a Fabry-Perot ultrasound sensor depicts peripheral arteries and microvascular vasomotor responses to thermal stimuli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plumb, Andrew A; Huynh, Nam Trung; Guggenheim, Jamie; Zhang, Edward; Beard, Paul

    2017-10-10

    To determine if a new photoacoustic imaging (PAI) system successfully depicts (1) peripheral arteries and (2) microvascular circulatory changes in response to thermal stimuli. Following ethical permission, 8 consenting subjects underwent PAI of the dorsalis pedis (DP) artery, and 13 completed PAI of the index fingertip. Finger images were obtained after immersion in warm (30-35 °C) or cold (10-15 °C) water to promote vasodilation or vasoconstriction. The PAI instrument used a Fabry-Perot interferometeric ultrasound sensor and a 30-Hz 750-nm pulsed excitation laser. Volumetric images were acquired through a 14 × 14 × 14-mm volume over 90 s. Images were evaluated subjectively and quantitatively to determine if PAI could depict cold-induced vasoconstriction. The full width at half maximum (FWHM) of resolvable vessels was measured. Fingertip vessels were visible in all participants, with mean FWHM of 125 μm. Two radiologists used PAI to correctly identify vasoconstricted fingertip capillary beds with 100% accuracy (95% CI 77.2-100.0%, p thermal stimuli. • Fabry-Perot interferometer-based photoacoustic imaging (PAI) generates volumetric, high-resolution images of the peripheral vasculature. • The system reliably detects thermally induced peripheral vasoconstriction (100% correct identification rate, p < 0.001). • Vessels measuring less than 100 μm in diameter can be depicted in vivo.

  2. NMR images of non-communicating hydrocephalus associated with Dandy-Walker variant and achondroplasia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sato, Masaharu; Kuroda, Ryotaro; Watanabe, Masaru; Nakatani, Jiro; Ioku, Masahiko; Irisawa, Minoru; Hamada, Tatsumi; Ishida, Osamu

    1988-06-01

    Two cases of non-communicating hydrocephalus caused by a relatively rare etiology were reported. They were both diagnosed by means of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). The first patient, a 4-month-old boy, had Dandy-Walker variant, showing hypoplasia of the corpus callosum and the inferior vermis, and a large cyst behind the vermis, communicating with the subarachnoid space, as well as hydrocephalus; the fourth ventricle was partially reserved. The second patient, also a 4-month-old boy, had achondroplasia, resulting in a narrow foramen magnum; the disturbance of the outflow of the cerebro-spinal fluid around the cisterna magna was thought to be the cause of hydrocephalus in his case. The validity of NMR was demonstrated in the diagnoses of these conditions, for a high resolution was needed in examining the complicated structure of the posterior fossa.

  3. Ultra-low-dose computed tomographic angiography with model-based iterative reconstruction compared with standard-dose imaging after endovascular aneurysm repair: a prospective pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naidu, Sailen G; Kriegshauser, J Scott; Paden, Robert G; He, Miao; Wu, Qing; Hara, Amy K

    2014-12-01

    An ultra-low-dose radiation protocol reconstructed with model-based iterative reconstruction was compared with our standard-dose protocol. This prospective study evaluated 20 men undergoing surveillance-enhanced computed tomography after endovascular aneurysm repair. All patients underwent standard-dose and ultra-low-dose venous phase imaging; images were compared after reconstruction with filtered back projection, adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction, and model-based iterative reconstruction. Objective measures of aortic contrast attenuation and image noise were averaged. Images were subjectively assessed (1 = worst, 5 = best) for diagnostic confidence, image noise, and vessel sharpness. Aneurysm sac diameter and endoleak detection were compared. Quantitative image noise was 26% less with ultra-low-dose model-based iterative reconstruction than with standard-dose adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction and 58% less than with ultra-low-dose adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction. Average subjective noise scores were not different between ultra-low-dose model-based iterative reconstruction and standard-dose adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (3.8 vs. 4.0, P = .25). Subjective scores for diagnostic confidence were better with standard-dose adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction than with ultra-low-dose model-based iterative reconstruction (4.4 vs. 4.0, P = .002). Vessel sharpness was decreased with ultra-low-dose model-based iterative reconstruction compared with standard-dose adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (3.3 vs. 4.1, P model-based iterative reconstruction and standard-dose adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction aneurysm sac diameters were not significantly different (4.9 vs. 4.9 cm); concordance for the presence of endoleak was 100% (P standard-dose technique, an ultra-low-dose model-based iterative reconstruction protocol provides comparable image quality and diagnostic assessment at a 73

  4. Positron Emission Tomographic Imaging of Iodine 124 Anti–Prostate Stem Cell Antigen–Engineered Antibody Fragments in LAPC-9 Tumor–Bearing Severe Combined Immunodeficiency Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey V. Leyton

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The humanized antibody (hu1G8 has been shown to localize to prostate stem cell antigen (PSCA and image PSCA-positive xenografts. We previously constructed hu1G8 anti-PSCA antibody fragments and tested them for tumor targeting and the ability to image prostate cancer at early and late time points postinjection by positron emission tomography (PET. We now then compare the PET imaging and the radioactivity accumulation properties in prostate cancer tumors and nontarget tissues to determine the superior 124I-labeled hu1G8 antibody format. 124I-labeled diabody, minibody, scFv-Fc, scFv-Fc double mutant (DM, and parental IgG were administered into severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID mice bearing LAPC-9 xenografts and followed by whole-body PET imaging of mice at preselected time points. Regions of interest were manually drawn around tumor and nontarget tissues and evaluated for radioactivity accumulation. The 124I-hu1G8 IgG has its best time point for tumor high-contrast imaging at 168 hours postinjection. The 124I-hu1G8 minibody at 44 hours postinjection results in superior tumor high-contrast imaging compared to the other antibody formats. The 124I-hu1G8 minibody at 44 hours postinjection also has comparable percent tumor radioactivity compared to 124I-hu1G8 IgG at 168 hours postinjection. The 124I-hu1G8 minibody is the best engineered hu1G8 antibody format for imaging prostate cancer.

  5. Beyond the Black Box: Coupling x-ray tomographic imaging of multi-phase flow processes to numerical models and traditional laboratory measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wildenschild, Dorthe; Porter, M.L.; Schaap, M.G.

    advances in x-ray microtomography techniques that can generate high-resolution image-based data for (1) validation of pore-scale multi-phase flow models such as the lattice-Boltzmann technique and pore network models (with respect to fluid saturations, fluid distribution, and relationships among capillary......Quantitative non-invasive imaging has evolved rapidly in the last decade, and is now being used to assess a variety of problems in vadose zone research, including unsaturated flow and transport of water and contaminants, macropore-dominated processes, soil-water-root interactions, more recent work...

  6. Magnetic resonance imaging features of complex Chiari malformation variant of Chiari 1 malformation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moore, Hannah E. [Primary Children' s Medical Center, Department of Medical Imaging, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Moore, Kevin R. [University of Utah School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Primary Children' s Medical Center, Department of Medical Imaging, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)

    2014-11-15

    Complex Chiari malformation is a subgroup of Chiari 1 malformation with distinct imaging features. Children with complex Chiari malformation are reported to have a more severe clinical phenotype and sometimes require more extensive surgical treatment than those with uncomplicated Chiari 1 malformation. We describe reported MR imaging features of complex Chiari malformation and evaluate the utility of craniometric parameters and qualitative anatomical observations for distinguishing complex Chiari malformation from uncomplicated Chiari 1 malformation. We conducted a retrospective search of the institutional imaging database using the keywords ''Chiari'' and ''Chiari 1'' to identify children imaged during the 2006-2011 time period. Children with Chiari 2 malformation were excluded after imaging review. We used the first available diagnostic brain or cervical spine MR study for data measurement. Standard measurements and observations were made of obex level (mm), cerebellar tonsillar descent (mm), perpendicular distance to basion-C2 line (pB-C2, mm), craniocervical angle (degrees), clivus length, and presence or absence of syringohydromyelia, basilar invagination and congenital craniovertebral junction osseous anomalies. After imaging review, we accessed the institutional health care clinical database to determine whether each subject clinically met criteria for Chiari 1 malformation or complex Chiari malformation. Obex level and craniocervical angle measurements showed statistically significant differences between the populations with complex Chiari malformation and uncomplicated Chiari 1 malformation. Cerebellar tonsillar descent and perpendicular distance to basion-C2 line measurements trended toward but did not meet statistical significance. Odontoid retroflexion, craniovertebral junction osseous anomalies, and syringohydromyelia were all observed proportionally more often in children with complex Chiari malformation than in

  7. Relics in medieval altarpieces? Combining X-ray tomographic, laminographic and phase-contrast imaging to visualize thin organic objects in paintings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krug, K.; Porra, L.; Coan, P.; Wallert, A.; Dik, J.; Coerdt, A.; Bravin, A.; Elyyan, M.; Reischig, P.; Helfen, L.; Baumbach, T.

    2007-01-01

    X-ray radiography is a common tool in the study of old master paintings. Transmission imaging can visualize hidden paint layers as well as the structure of the panel or canvas. In some medieval altarpieces, relics seem to have been imbedded in the wooden carrier of paintings. These are most probably

  8. Proposal of a New Index Based on Signal-to-Noise Ratio for Low-contrast Detectability in Computed Tomographic Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, Junichi; Abe, Shinji; Ishimori, Yoshiyuki; Monma, Masahiko; Tsumuraya, Akio; Miyauchi, Kaneyoshi

    2017-01-01

    The low-contrast detectability of computed tomography (CT) images is commonly evaluated by the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) because of its convenience to measure. However, the correlation between CNR and visual detectability is poor because the CNR is a simple index determined by both the contrast of the object and the standard deviation of the image noise. On the other hand, the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), especially SNR based on the statistical decision theory model (SNRS, D) and SNR based on the matched-filter model (SNRM) are considered superior to CNR. In this study, we investigated a new physical image quality index for evaluating low-contrast detectability (SNRA), which is approximately derived from SNRS, D and SNRM. The new index, which was calculated using the object size, contrast of the object and the noise power spectrum, provided good approximations when the diameter of the rod object was equal and >5 mm. The diameter dependency of the SNRA was also found to provide better sensitivity than the sensitivities of CNR and object-specific CNR, similar to SNRS, D and SNRM. The results suggested that the proposed convenient index should be useful for evaluating the low-contrast detectability of CT images.

  9. Does the prevalence of levator ani muscle avulsion differ when assessed using tomographic ultrasound imaging at rest vs on maximum pelvic floor muscle contraction?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Delft, K. van; Thakar, R.; Sultan, A.H.; Kluivers, K.B.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: It has been suggested that transperineal ultrasound images obtained during maximum pelvic floor muscle contraction improve the diagnosis of levator ani muscle (LAM) avulsion by comparison with those obtained at rest. The objective of this study was to establish, using transperineal

  10. Striatal adenosine A{sub 2A} receptor-mediated positron emission tomographic imaging in 6-hydroxydopamine-lesioned rats using [{sup 18}F]-MRS5425

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhattacharjee, Abesh Kumar; Lang Lixin; Jacobson, Orit [Laboratory of Molecular Imaging and Nanomedicine, National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States); Shinkre, Bidhan [Chemical Biology Unit, Laboratory of Cell Biochemistry and Biology, National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States); Ma Ying [Laboratory of Molecular Imaging and Nanomedicine, National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States); Niu Gang [Laboratory of Molecular Imaging and Nanomedicine, National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States); Department of Radiology and Imaging Sciences, Warren Grant Magnuson Clinical Center, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States); Trenkle, William C. [Chemical Biology Unit, Laboratory of Cell Biochemistry and Biology, National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States); Jacobson, Kenneth A. [Molecular Recognition Section, Laboratory of Bioorganic Chemistry, National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States); Chen Xiaoyuan [Laboratory of Molecular Imaging and Nanomedicine, National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States); Kiesewetter, Dale O., E-mail: dk7k@nih.gov [Laboratory of Molecular Imaging and Nanomedicine, National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States)

    2011-08-15

    Introduction: A{sub 2A} receptors are expressed in the basal ganglia, specifically in striatopallidal GABAergic neurons in the striatum (caudate-putamen). This brain region undergoes degeneration of presynaptic dopamine projections and depletion of dopamine in Parkinson's disease. We developed an {sup 18}F-labeled A{sub 2A} analog radiotracer ([{sup 18}F]-MRS5425) for A{sub 2A} receptor imaging using positron emission tomography (PET). We hypothesized that this tracer could image A{sub 2A} receptor changes in the rat model for Parkinson's disease, which is created following unilateral injection of the monoaminergic toxin 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) into the substantia nigra. Methods: [{sup 18}F]-MRS5425 was injected intravenously in anesthetized rats, and PET imaging data were collected. Image-derived percentage injected doses per gram (%ID/g) in regions of interest was measured in the striatum of normal rats and in rats unilaterally lesioned with 6-OHDA after intravenous administration of saline (baseline), D{sub 2} agonist quinpirole (1.0 mg/kg) or D{sub 2} antagonist raclopride (6.0 mg/kg). Results: Baseline %ID/g reached a maximum at 90 s and maintained plateau for 3.5 min, and then declined slowly thereafter. In 6-OHDA-lesioned rats, %ID/g was significantly higher in the lesioned side compared to the intact side, and the baseline total %ID/g (data from both hemispheres were combined) was significantly higher compared to quinpirole stimulation starting from 4.5 min until the end of acquisition at 30 min. Raclopride did not produce any change in uptake compared to baseline or between the hemispheres. Conclusion: Thus, increase of A{sub 2A} receptor-mediated uptake of radioactive MRS5425 could be a superior molecular target for Parkinson's imaging.

  11. SPICE benchmark for global tomographic methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Yilong; Capdeville, Yann; Maupin, Valerie; Montagner, Jean-Paul; Lebedev, Sergei; Beucler, Eric

    2008-11-01

    The existing global tomographic methods result in different models due to different parametrization, scale resolution and theoretical approach. To test how current imaging techniques are limited by approximations in theory and by the inadequacy of data quality and coverage, it is necessary to perform a global-scale benchmark to understand the resolving properties of each specific imaging algorithm. In the framework of the Seismic wave Propagation and Imaging in Complex media: a European network (SPICE) project, it was decided to perform a benchmark experiment of global inversion algorithms. First, a preliminary benchmark with a simple isotropic model is carried out to check the feasibility in terms of acquisition geometry and numerical accuracy. Then, to fully validate tomographic schemes with a challenging synthetic data set, we constructed one complex anisotropic global model, which is characterized by 21 elastic constants and includes 3-D heterogeneities in velocity, anisotropy (radial and azimuthal anisotropy), attenuation, density, as well as surface topography and bathymetry. The intermediate-period (>32 s), high fidelity anisotropic modelling was performed by using state-of-the-art anisotropic anelastic modelling code, that is, coupled spectral element method (CSEM), on modern massively parallel computing resources. The benchmark data set consists of 29 events and three-component seismograms are recorded by 256 stations. Because of the limitation of the available computing power, synthetic seismograms have a minimum period of 32 s and a length of 10 500 s. The inversion of the benchmark data set demonstrates several well-known problems of classical surface wave tomography, such as the importance of crustal correction to recover the shallow structures, the loss of resolution with depth, the smearing effect, both horizontal and vertical, the inaccuracy of amplitude of isotropic S-wave velocity variation, the difficulty of retrieving the magnitude of azimuthal

  12. Imaging evaluation of several diseases of the salivary glands and surrounding structures. A preliminary report on sialographic, computed tomographic, ultrasonographic, and scintigraphic findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshimura, Yasuro; Oka, Masafumi; Harada, Toshio; Sugihara, Takahide; Kishimoto, Hirofumi; Matsuura, Ryozi; Santho, Eri; Tanaka, Masahiko; Matsumoto, Ken

    1987-12-01

    This clinical study presents 15 patients with lesions of the major salivary glands and surrounding tissues, and describes the importance of imaging diagnosis of their diseases. The availability of imaging diagnosis was intended to, 1) demonstrate the pathological conditions as either an extrinsic or an intrinsic lesion of the salivary gland, 2) depict the important structures such as facial nerve, and blood vessels, and to clarify the relationship between them and the lesion, 3) provide a clearer grasp of the extent of the lesion, especially when the lesion is a tumor, 4) help to discriminate between inflammation from a tumor which is malignant and from a lesion which is benign, 5) facilitate discussion and detection of metastases in the regional lymph nodes and remote organs, 6) help with early and precise detection of recurrence after primary treatment and/or in the follow-up period.

  13. Ultrahigh resolution and brilliance laser wakefield accelerator betatron x-ray source for rapid in vivo tomographic microvasculature imaging in small animal models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fourmaux, Sylvain; Kieffer, Jean-Claude; Krol, Andrzej

    2017-03-01

    We are developing ultrahigh spatial resolution (FWHM microvasculature imaging micro-CT angiography (μCTA) in small animal models using optimized contrast agent. It exploits Laser Wakefield Accelerator (LWFA) betatron x-ray emission phenomenon. Ultrashort high-intensity laser pulse interacting with a supersonic gas jet produces an ion cavity ("bubble") in the plasma in the wake of the laser pulse. Electrons that are injected into this bubble gain energy, perform wiggler-like oscillations and generate burst of incoherent x-rays with characteristic duration time comparable to the laser pulse duration, continuous synchrotron-like spectral distribution that might extend to hundreds keV, very high brilliance, very small focal spot and highly directional emission in the cone-beam geometry. Such LWFA betatron x-ray source created in our lab produced 1021 -1023 photonsṡ shot-1ṡmrad-2ṡmm-2/0.1%bw with mean critical energy in the12-30 keV range. X-ray source size for a single laser shot was FWHM=1.7 μm x-ray beam divergence 20-30 mrad, and effective focal spot size for multiple shots FWHM= 2 μm. Projection images of simple phantoms and complex biological objects including insects and mice were obtained in single laser shots. We conclude that ultrahigh spatial resolution μCTA (FWHM 2 μm) requiring thousands of projection images could be accomplished using LWFA betatron x-ray radiation in approximately 40 s with our existing 220 TW laser and sub seconds with next generation of ultrafast lasers and x-ray detectors, as opposed to several hours required using conventional microfocal x-ray tubes. Thus, sub second ultrahigh resolution in vivo microtomographic microvasculature imaging (in both absorption and phase contrast mode) in small animal models of cancer and vascular diseases will be feasible with LWFA betatron x-ray source.

  14. Prostatic ductal adenocarcinoma: an aggressive tumour variant unrecognized on T2 weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schieda, Nicola; Coffey, Niamh; Al-Dandan, Omran; Shabana, Wael [The University of Ottawa, Department of Medical Imaging, The Ottawa Hospital, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada); Gulavita, Previn; Flood, Trevor A. [The University of Ottawa, Department of Anatomical Pathology, The Ottawa Hospital, Ottawa (Canada)

    2014-06-15

    Prostatic ductal adenocarcinoma (DCa) is an aggressive variant. The purpose of this study was to determine if T2 signal intensity (SI) differs from conventional adenocarcinoma (CCa). A retrospective study of patients who underwent preoperative MRI and prostatectomy between 2009 and 2012 was performed. T2 SI ratios (SIR) for tumour (T) to obturator internus muscle (M) and normal peripheral zone (PZ) were compared. Two radiologists evaluated the central gland/PZ to detect tumours and compared diagnostic accuracy. T2 SIR for DCa were 3.60 (T/M), 0.66 (T/PZ); 2.68 (T/M), 0.47 (T/PZ) for Gleason 9; 2.50 (T/M), 0.47 (T/PZ) for Gleason 7/8 and 3.95 (T/M), 0.73 (T/PZ) for Gleason 6 tumours. There was a difference in T2 T/M and T/PZ SIR between DCa and Gleason 9 (p = 0.003, p = 0.004) and Gleason 7/8 (p = 0.006, p = 0.002), but no difference in SIR between DCa and Gleason 6 tumours. The sensitivity for tumour detection was 0-27 % for DCa, 64-82 % for Gleason 9, 44-88 % for Gleason 7-8 and 0-20 % for Gleason 6. There was a difference in the sensitivity of detecting Gleason 9 and 7/8 tumours when compared to DCa (p = 0.004, p = 0.001). DCa resembles Gleason score 6 tumour at T2-weighted MRI, which underestimates tumour grade and renders the tumour occult. (orig.)

  15. Decomposition of time-resolved tomographic PIV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmid, Peter J. [Ecole Polytechnique, Laboratoire d' Hydrodynamique (LadHyX), Palaiseau (France); Violato, Daniele; Scarano, Fulvio [Delft University of Technology, Department of Aerospace Engineering, Delft (Netherlands)

    2012-06-15

    An experimental study has been conducted on a transitional water jet at a Reynolds number of Re = 5,000. Flow fields have been obtained by means of time-resolved tomographic particle image velocimetry capturing all relevant spatial and temporal scales. The measured three-dimensional flow fields have then been postprocessed by the dynamic mode decomposition which identifies coherent structures that contribute significantly to the dynamics of the jet. Both temporal and spatial analyses have been performed. Where the jet exhibits a primary axisymmetric instability followed by a pairing of the vortex rings, dominant dynamic modes have been extracted together with their amplitude distribution. These modes represent a basis for the low-dimensional description of the dominant flow features. (orig.)

  16. Parallelism as a novel marker for structural integrity of retinal layers in optical coherence tomographic images in eyes with epiretinal membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uji, Akihito; Murakami, Tomoaki; Unoki, Noriyuki; Ogino, Ken; Nishijima, Kazuaki; Yoshitake, Shin; Dodo, Yoko; Yoshimura, Nagahisa

    2014-01-01

    To propose a new parameter, "Parallelism," to evaluate retinal layer integrity on spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SDOCT), and to investigate the association between parallelism and visual function in eyes with idiopathic epiretinal membrane (ERM). Retrospective, observational evaluation of a diagnostic test. We evaluated a consecutive series of 57 eyes of 57 patients with ERM and 30 healthy eyes of 30 volunteers for whom M-CHARTS testing and SDOCT were performed on the same day. OCT images were skeletonized, and the orientation of segmented lines in the image was termed "Parallelism" and was expressed as a value ranging from 0-1 and increasing as the retinal layers ran more parallel with each other. The relationships between parallelism and visual acuity and between parallelism and metamorphopsia score were evaluated. In normal eyes, parallelism was nearly homogeneous and varied slightly with the location. Parallelism in eyes with ERM was significantly lower than that in normal eyes. In the horizontal and vertical scans, parallelism was significantly correlated with visual acuity, horizontal metamorphopsia score, and vertical metamorphopsia score. Parallelism of the center (1 mm) in the horizontal scan was strongly correlated with horizontal metamorphopsia score (R = -0.632; P parallelism and retinal thickness both in horizontal and vertical scans. Parallelism was significantly lower in eyes with ERM than in normal eyes, and correlated strongly with metamorphopsia and visual acuity in eyes with ERM. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Differentiation of Glioblastomas from Metastatic Brain Tumors by Tryptophan Uptake and Kinetic Analysis: A Positron Emission Tomographic Study with Magnetic Resonance Imaging Comparison

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David O. Kamson

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Differentiating high-grade gliomas from solitary brain metastases is often difficult by conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI; molecular imaging may facilitate such discrimination. We tested the accuracy of α[11C]methyl-L-tryptophan (AMT–positron emission tomography (PET to differentiate newly diagnosed glioblastomas from brain metastases. AMT-PET was performed in 36 adults with suspected brain malignancy. Tumoral AMT accumulation was measured by standardized uptake values (SUVs. Tracer kinetic analysis was also performed to separate tumoral net tryptophan transport (by AMT volume of distribution [VD] from unidirectional uptake rates using dynamic PET and blood input function. Differentiating the accuracy of these PET variables was evaluated and compared to conventional MRI. For glioblastoma/metastasis differentiation, tumoral AMT SUV showed the highest accuracy (74% and the tumor/cortex VD ratio had the highest positive predictive value (82%. The combined accuracy of MRI (size of contrast-enhancing lesion and AMT-PET reached up to 93%. For ring-enhancing lesions, tumor/cortex SUV ratios were higher in glioblastomas than in metastatic tumors and could differentiate these two tumor types with > 90% accuracy. These results demonstrate that evaluation of tryptophan accumulation by PET can enhance pretreatment differentiation of glioblastomas and metastatic brain tumors. This approach may be particularly useful in patients with a newly diagnosed solitary ring-enhancing mass.

  18. Quantitative Magnetic Resonance Diffusion-Weighted Imaging Evaluation of the Supratentorial Brain Regions in Patients Diagnosed with Brainstem Variant of Posterior Reversible Encephalopathy Syndrome: A Preliminary Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Tai-Yuan; Wu, Te-Chang; Ko, Ching-Chung; Feng, I-Jung; Tsui, Yu-Kun; Lin, Chien-Jen; Chen, Jeon-Hor; Lin, Ching-Po

    2017-07-01

    Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) is a clinicoradiologic entity with several causes, characterized by rapid onset of symptoms and typical neuroimaging features, which usually resolve if promptly recognized and treated. Brainstem variant of PRES presents with vasogenic edema in brainstem regions on magnetic resonance (MR) images and there is sparing of the supratentorial regions. Because PRES is usually caused by a hypertensive crisis, which would likely have a systemic effect and global manifestations on the brain tissue, we thus proposed that some microscopic abnormalities of the supratentorial regions could be detected with diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) using apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) analysis in brainstem variant of PRES and hypothesized that "normal-looking" supratentorial regions will increase water diffusion. We retrospectively identified patients with PRES who underwent brain magnetic resonance imaging studies. We identified 11 brainstem variants of PRES patients, who formed the study cohort, and 11 typical PRES patients and 20 normal control subjects as the comparison cohorts for this study. Nineteen regions of interest were drawn and systematically placed. The mean ADC values were measured and compared among these 3 groups. ADC values of the typical PRES group were consistently elevated compared with those in normal control subjects. ADC values of the brainstem variant group were consistently elevated compared with those in normal control subjects. ADC values of the typical PRES group and brainstem variant group did not differ significantly, except for the pons area. Quantitative MR DWI may aid in the evaluation of supratentorial microscopic abnormalities in brainstem variant of PRES patients. Copyright © 2017 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Computer tomographic findings in neurosyphilis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavithran K

    1993-01-01

    Full Text Available Computer tomographic features of the brain in 2 cases of neurosyphilis are described. Less prominence of the cortical sulci suggesting cortical atrophy was the predominant feature in a case of general paralysis of insane. Diffuse, irregular, non-enhancing, low-attenuated area in the cortical and subcortical region of the right temporoparietal lobe of a patient with vascular syphilis, suggested infarction of the brain.

  20. Computed tomographic appearances of cherubism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bianchi, S.D.; Boccardi, A.; Mela, F.; Romagnoli, R.

    1987-01-01

    The computed tomographic (CT) aspects of six cases of cherubism are described. Through its optimal representation of the lesions, CT enabled certain characteristics of this disease to be substantiated, namely, limitation of the process to the bones of the jaw and primarily superficial development of the mandibular lesions, coupled with an unusual mandibular condylar impairment. Moreover, the composition of this series permitted investigation of the condition in its several stages of progression.

  1. A novel method for correction of temporally- and spatially-variant optical distortion in planar particle image velocimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zha, Kan; Busch, Stephen; Park, Cheolwoong; Miles, Paul C.

    2016-08-01

    In-cylinder flow measurements are necessary to gain a fundamental understanding of swirl-supported, light-duty Diesel engine processes for high thermal efficiency and low emissions. Planar particle image velocimetry (PIV) can be used for non-intrusive, in situ measurement of swirl-plane velocity fields through a transparent piston. In order to keep the flow unchanged from all-metal engine operation, the geometry of the transparent piston must adapt the production-intent metal piston geometry. As a result, a temporally- and spatially-variant optical distortion is introduced to the particle images. To ensure reliable measurement of particle displacements, this work documents a systematic exploration of optical distortion quantification and a hybrid back-projection procedure that combines ray-tracing-based geometric and in situ manual back-projection approaches. The proposed hybrid back-projection method for the first time provides a time-efficient and robust way to process planar PIV measurements conducted in an optical research engine with temporally- and spatially-varying optical distortion. This method is based upon geometric ray tracing and serves as a universal tool for the correction of optical distortion with an arbitrary but axisymmetric piston crown window geometry. Analytical analysis demonstrates that the ignorance of optical distortion change during the PIV laser temporal interval may induce a significant error in instantaneous velocity measurements. With the proposed digital dewarping method, this piston-motion-induced error can be eliminated. Uncertainty analysis with simulated particle images provides guidance on whether to back-project particle images or back-project velocity fields in order to minimize dewarping-induced uncertainties. The optimal implementation is piston-geometry-dependent. For regions with significant change in nominal magnification factor, it is recommended to apply the proposed back-projection approach to particle images prior to

  2. Change over time in brain computed tomographic and magnetic resonance imaging findings in healthy elderly persons. A 10 year prospective study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kasahara, Hiroo [Jikei Univ., Tokyo (Japan). School of Medicine

    1998-09-01

    Early detection, treatment and prevention of dementia have become increasingly important as the population ages. I have performed a follow-up study of changes in the brains of healthy elderly persons with computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) since 1982. One hundred thirty-three healthy elderly volunteers were first examined in 1982 with CT or MRI, electroencephalography, the Benton Visual Retention Test (BVRT), blood pressure measurement, and interview. Subsequent examinations were done in 1986, 1989, and 1992. On CT, microinfarctions were found in 15.0% of subjects in 1982 and in 13.0% in 1986, and periventricular lucency (PVL) was found in 6.0% and 8.3%. The most frequent findings were vascular changes, which were observed in six persons (5.6%), followed by PVL, which was found in four persons (3.7%). Thus, vascular changes became more pronounced during the follow-up period. Lesions with high signal intensity on T{sub 2}-weighted images (T{sub 2}HSI) were found in 69.5% of subjects and increased in prevalence with age in the 1989 study. Such T{sub 2}HSI lesions were found most frequently in the basal ganglia (61.9%), followed by the thalamus (39.0%), parietal lobe (37.0%), temporal lobe (12.7%), and the pons (8.5%). Of these lesions, lacunar infarctions showed low signal intensity on T{sub 1}-weighted images and were found in 24.6% of subjects; their prevalence also increased with age. Results of BVRT were closely correlated with T{sub 2}HSI lesions, suggesting that T{sub 2}HSIs lesions may affect cognitive function. By 1992, 10 years after the start of the study, 34 (25.6%) of subjects had died and 19 (14.3%) had become demented. Subjects were divided into surviving and dead groups and dementia and non-dementia groups. Findings on CT and BVRT in this study have provided clear clinical indices of death and dementia, especially maximal width of third ventricule in impairment of the diagnosis of dementia. (author)

  3. Medulloblastoma with extensive nodularity - imaging findings of a rare variant: a case report; Meduloblastoma nodular - achados de imagem de uma rara variante: relato de caso

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santa Anna, Tatiana Kelly Brasileiro de; Zuppani, Aguinaldo Cunha [Hospital Santa Marcelina, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Setor de Radiologia e Diagnostico por Imagem], e-mail: tatianakelly@hotmail.com; Neves, Izanne Martins; Trad, Clovis Simao [Clinica CEDIRP, Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil); Rigueiro, Moacyr Pezati

    2009-01-15

    Medulloblastoma is the most common malignant central nervous system tumor in pediatric patients and the most common primary tumor in the posterior fossa in children, most manifest in patients 5-12 years of age. Clinical features are mainly characterized by intracranial hypertension and ataxia. The authors present a case of medulloblastoma with extensive nodularity, a rare variant which affects younger age usually under three years, with more favorable prognosis. It is typically a cystic lesion in the posterior fossa with solid nodular components that enhance after contrast, like 'bunch of grapes' clusters. Preoperative diagnosis could be suggested by this finding. (author)

  4. Single scan parameterization of space-variant point spread functions in image space via a printed array: the impact for two PET/CT scanners

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kotasidis, F A; Matthews, J C; Angelis, G I; Noonan, P J; Jackson, A [Imaging, Genomics and Proteomics, Wolfson Molecular Imaging Centre, MAHSC, University of Manchester, Manchester (United Kingdom); Price, P [Academic Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Manchester, Manchester (United Kingdom); Lionheart, W R [School of Mathematics, Alan Turing Building, University of Manchester, Manchester (United Kingdom); Reader, A J, E-mail: fotis.kotasidis@mmic.man.ac.uk [Brain Imaging Centre, Montreal Neurological Institute, McGill University, Montreal, QC (Canada)

    2011-05-21

    Incorporation of a resolution model during statistical image reconstruction often produces images of improved resolution and signal-to-noise ratio. A novel and practical methodology to rapidly and accurately determine the overall emission and detection blurring component of the system matrix using a printed point source array within a custom-made Perspex phantom is presented. The array was scanned at different positions and orientations within the field of view (FOV) to examine the feasibility of extrapolating the measured point source blurring to other locations in the FOV and the robustness of measurements from a single point source array scan. We measured the spatially-variant image-based blurring on two PET/CT scanners, the B-Hi-Rez and the TruePoint TrueV. These measured spatially-variant kernels and the spatially-invariant kernel at the FOV centre were then incorporated within an ordinary Poisson ordered subset expectation maximization (OP-OSEM) algorithm and compared to the manufacturer's implementation using projection space resolution modelling (RM). Comparisons were based on a point source array, the NEMA IEC image quality phantom, the Cologne resolution phantom and two clinical studies (carbon-11 labelled anti-sense oligonucleotide [{sup 11}C]-ASO and fluorine-18 labelled fluoro-l-thymidine [{sup 18}F]-FLT). Robust and accurate measurements of spatially-variant image blurring were successfully obtained from a single scan. Spatially-variant resolution modelling resulted in notable resolution improvements away from the centre of the FOV. Comparison between spatially-variant image-space methods and the projection-space approach (the first such report, using a range of studies) demonstrated very similar performance with our image-based implementation producing slightly better contrast recovery (CR) for the same level of image roughness (IR). These results demonstrate that image-based resolution modelling within reconstruction is a valid alternative to

  5. Tomographic patient registration and conformal avoidance tomotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldridge, Jennifer Stacy

    Development of tomotherapy has led to the emergence of several processes, providing the basis for many unique investigative opportunities. These processes include setup verification, tomographic verification, megavoltage dose reconstruction, and conformal avoidance tomotherapy. Setup verification and conformal avoidance tomotherapy, in particular, are two closely intertwined matters. In order to avoid critical structures located within or adjacent to indistinct tumor regions, accurate patient positioning from fraction to fraction must be ensured. With tomographic patient registration, a higher level of assurance is offered than with traditional positioning methods. Translational and rotational offsets are calculated directly from projection data using cross- correlation or fast Fourier transforms. Experiments assessing the algorithm's ability to calculate individual offsets were conducted using the University of Wisconsin's Tomotherapy Benchtop. These experiments indicate statistical errors within +/-1 mm for offsets up to approximately 20 mm, with maximum offset errors of about +/-2 mm for displacements up to 35 mm. The angular offset component is within +/-2°. To evaluate the registration process as a whole, experimental results from a few multi-parameter examples are also analyzed. With the development of tomographic patient registration in projection space, efforts to promote further sparing of critical structures are justified. Conformal avoidance tomotherapy has as its objective to treat an indistinct tumor region while conformally avoiding any normal critical structures in that region. To demonstrate the advantages of conformal avoidance tomotherapy, conventional and tomotherapy treatments are contrasted for both nasopharyngeal and breast carcinoma cases. For initial research efforts, computed tomography data sets of a human male and female were obtained via the ``Visible Human Project''. Since these data sets are on the order of hundreds of megabytes, both

  6. A Low Affinity GCaMP3 Variant (GCaMPer for Imaging the Endoplasmic Reticulum Calcium Store.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark J Henderson

    Full Text Available Endoplasmic reticulum calcium homeostasis is critical for cellular functions and is disrupted in diverse pathologies including neurodegeneration and cardiovascular disease. Owing to the high concentration of calcium within the ER, studying this subcellular compartment requires tools that are optimized for these conditions. To develop a single-fluorophore genetically encoded calcium indicator for this organelle, we targeted a low affinity variant of GCaMP3 to the ER lumen (GCaMPer (10.19. A set of viral vectors was constructed to express GCaMPer in human neuroblastoma cells, rat primary cortical neurons, and human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes. We observed dynamic changes in GCaMPer (10.19 fluorescence in response to pharmacologic manipulations of the ER calcium store. Additionally, periodic calcium efflux from the ER was observed during spontaneous beating of cardiomyocytes. GCaMPer (10.19 has utility in imaging ER calcium in living cells and providing insight into luminal calcium dynamics under physiologic and pathologic states.

  7. New Tomographic Images of the Yellowstone Plume and its Interaction with the Farallon Plate From the Integrated Analysis of Body and Surface Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obrebski, M. J.; Allen, R. M.; Pollitz, F. F.; Porritt, R. W.; Hung, S.

    2010-12-01

    Recent seismic studies have consistently shown that the complex Neogene-Quaternary hot spot track in the Yellowstone-Snake River Plain is underlain by slow, potentially hot material not only in the lithosphere but also deeper into the mantle. The nature of this large region of low velocities, the depth at which it originates, and its possible relation with the Columbia River Basalts and the subduction of the Juan De Fuca-Farallon oceanic plate are still a theme of debate. In an effort to answer these questions, we take advantage of the growing amount of seismic data collected over the Western US to image the velocity structure of the crust and mantle beneath the Pacific Northwest. The compressional (DNA10-P) and shear (DNA10-S) velocity models we present here use seismic data from the Earthscope Transportable Array, regional seismic networks and two Flexible Array experiments (Mendocino and FACES experiments) deployed on the west coast. DNA10-P is a multi-frequency model obtained using finite-frequency sensitivity kernels calculated in 4 frequency bands (0.5-1.25s, 1.25-2.5s, 2.5-10s and 10-50s). Owing to its broad range of periods, this model is characterized by a high resolution below a depth of 50km where the seismic ray paths start crossing each other. DNA10-S is a multi-phase model that includes constraints from teleseismic body waves, ballistic surface waves (periods from 18 to 100s) and Green’s functions extracted from noise correlation (8 to 40s). By inverting jointly these different types of data, we obtain a model with good resolution from the surface down to the lower mantle. Both models show the Yellowstone anomaly as a continuous feature composed of a) and horizontal “head” that spreads in the upper 200km beneath the YSRP, parallel to the direction of the North American Plate and b) a “S”-shaped vertically elongated body that extends continuously from beneath the Yellowstone Caldera down to 1000km depth, the two feature being connected. The

  8. Benchmarking Various Green Fluorescent Protein Variants in Bacillus subtilis, Streptococcus pneumoniae, and Lactococcus lactis for Live Cell Imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Overkamp, Wout; Beilharz, Katrin; Weme, Ruud Detert Oude; Solopova, Ana; Karsens, Harma; Kovacs, Akos T.; Kok, Jan; Kuipers, Oscar P.; Veening, Jan-Willem

    2013-01-01

    Green fluorescent protein (GFP) offers efficient ways of visualizing promoter activity and protein localization in vivo, and many different variants are currently available to study bacterial cell biology. Which of these variants is best suited for a certain bacterial strain, goal, or experimental

  9. Industrial dynamic tomographic reconstruction; Reconstrucao tomografica dinamica industrial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, Eric Ferreira de

    2016-07-01

    The state of the art methods applied to industrial processes is currently based on the principles of classical tomographic reconstructions developed for tomographic patterns of static distributions, or is limited to cases of low variability of the density distribution function of the tomographed object. Noise and motion artifacts are the main problems caused by a mismatch in the data from views acquired in different instants. All of these add to the known fact that using a limited amount of data can result in the presence of noise, artifacts and some inconsistencies with the distribution under study. One of the objectives of the present work is to discuss the difficulties that arise from implementing reconstruction algorithms in dynamic tomography that were originally developed for static distributions. Another objective is to propose solutions that aim at reducing a temporal type of information loss caused by employing regular acquisition systems to dynamic processes. With respect to dynamic image reconstruction it was conducted a comparison between different static reconstruction methods, like MART and FBP, when used for dynamic scenarios. This comparison was based on a MCNPx simulation as well as an analytical setup of an aluminum cylinder that moves along the section of a riser during the process of acquisition, and also based on cross section images from CFD techniques. As for the adaptation of current tomographic acquisition systems for dynamic processes, this work established a sequence of tomographic views in a just-in-time fashion for visualization purposes, a form of visually disposing density information as soon as it becomes amenable to image reconstruction. A third contribution was to take advantage of the triple color channel necessary to display colored images in most displays, so that, by appropriately scaling the acquired values of each view in the linear system of the reconstruction, it was possible to imprint a temporal trace into the regularly

  10. MR imaging of acute disseminated encephalomyelitis, cerebellitis and myelitis in infancy: likely topographic variant of a single process; Imagen en RM de encefalomielitis aguda diseminada, cerebelitis y mielitis en la infancia: probables variantes topograficas de un mismo proceso

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fortuno, J. R.; Menor, F.; Esteban, M. J.; Pamies, J. [Hospital Universitario Infantil La Fe (Spain); Gomez-Gosalvez, F. A. [Hospital Verge dels Liris de Alcoi (Spain); Jover, J. [Hospital General de Elda (Spain)

    2003-07-01

    To describe MR images of acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADE) in a paediatric group, particularly focused on its likely topographic variants, cerebellitis and myelitis, its evolution, and the differential diagnosis between it an an initial outbreak of multiple sclerosis. Initial and follow-up cranial MR images were retrospectively reviewed for 14 paediatric patients diagnosed with either ADE, cerebellitis or myelitis. In 9 patients, a spinal cord monitoring was included. Three topographic variants have been considered: ADE (7 patients). In the case of ADE, the supratentorial white matter was always affected, the brain stem in five (71%) and the cerebellum in two (28,5%). Basal ganglionic lesions were detected in 5 patients (71%) and cortical lesions in one (14%). Associated spinal cord abnormality was found in five of the six cases in which this study was included (83%). ADE lesions tended to be nodular and poorly differentiated whereas in cerebellitis and myelitis the predominant pattern was one of diffuse damage. Evolution of the lesions was toward reduction/resolution. Follow-up using MR in the medium-term in 6 patients (four ADE and two cerebellitis) did not detect any new lesions. Clinical follow-up of the patients did not show any neurological recurrences in any of them. ADE, cerebillits and myelitis could be topographic variants of a single process with a common pathogeny. As the spinal cord often seems to play a role in ADE, spinal cord monitoring would be recommended, even in the absence of the above-mentioned symptoms. This spinal cord abnormality, which is usually diffuse, plus deep gray matter damage, as well as the disease of monophase course, corroborated by a sequential MR follow-up, is all helpful in the differential diagnosis with multiple sclerosis. Nonetheless, the differential diagnosis between a recurring form of ADE and an encephalomyelitis is practically impossible to make. (Author) 33 refs.

  11. Combined tomographic forward and inverse modeling of active seismic refraction profiling data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koulakov, I.; Kopp, H.

    2008-12-01

    We present a new code for combined forward and inverse tomographic modeling based on first-arrival travel times of active seismic refraction profiling data (PROFIT - Profile Forward and Inverse Tomographic modeling). The main features of the algorithm involve the original version of bending ray tracing, parameterization based on nodes, variable grid size definition determined by the ray density, and regularization of the inversion. The key purpose of applying the PROFIT code is rather not in solely producing the tomographic image of a continuous velocity field, but in creating a geologically reasonable synthetic model. This model then includes first-order velocity changes representing petrophysical boundaries and is thus better suited for a geological-tectonic interpretation than its smoothed tomographic counterpart. After performing forward and inverse modeling, the synthetic model will reproduce a congeneric model to the tomographic inversion result of the observed data. We demonstrate the working ability of the code using two marine datasets acquired in the Musicians Seamount Province (Pacific Ocean). The results of the tomographic inversion clearly resolve the dominating extrusive volcanism. In addition, the combined forward and inverse approach tests a large variety of synthetic models to fit the observed data tomography. Along both profiles, the preferred structural model includes a strong positive velocity anomaly extending into the seamount edifice. We suggest that this anomaly pattern represents secondary intrusive processes, which are only revealed by the combined tomographic forward and inverse modeling and could not be resolved by exclusively applying a tomographic inversion. In addition, we present examples of imaging salt domes in the Precaspian oil province as well as a higher-resolution field study that was conducted as a preinvestigative study for tunnel construction to demonstrate the capability of the code in different regimes and on different

  12. Comparison among tomographic reconstruction with limited data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, Eric F.; Dantas, Carlos C.; Vasconcelos, Daniel A.A.; Cadiz, Luis F., E-mail: ccd@ufpe.br [Department of Nuclear Energy (DEN). Federal University of Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil); Melo, Silvio B., E-mail: sbm@cin.ufpe.br [Informatic Center (CIN), Federal University of Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    Nowadays there is a continuing interest in applying computed tomography (CT) techniques in non-destructive testing and inspection of many industrial products. These applications of CT usually require a differentiated analysis when there are strong limitations in acquiring a sufficiently large amount of projection data. The use of a low number of tomographic data normally degrades the quality of the reconstructed image, highlighting the formation of artifacts and noise. This work investigates the reconstruction methods most commonly used (FBP, ART, SIRT, MART, SMART) and shows the performance of each one in this limited scenario. For this purpose, all methods were implemented and tested with a phantom of uniform density with well-known distribution, with measures of transmission of gamma radiation in a first generation CT scanner. The phantom is a concentric stainless steel tube coupled with a half - cylinder of aluminum. The measurements were made with an highest root mean square error, with the formation of visible artifacts. The artifacts are diminished but still visible in the ART and SIRT techniques, and the best performance was observed with the techniques MART and SMART. The technical superiority of these multiplicative methods is clearly seen in the reconstructed image quality, endorsing their application to situations of limited input data. (author)

  13. Comparison of planar and tomographic thallium scintigraphy in patients with coronary artery disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stone, D.L.; Weiss, A.T.; Snyder, S.H.; Yaffe, S.; Gotsman, M.S.; Atlan, H.

    1989-05-01

    Planar and tomographic scans from 57 patients are compared and related to coronary arteriographic results. Tomography identified inferior and septal defects not seen on planar imaging. Planar imaging better identified apical defects. Lesions of the left circumflex were poorly defined by both techniques.

  14. Comparative validation of the radiographic and tomographic measurement of patellar height

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Antonio Schueda

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To evaluate and validate the radiographic measurement of patellar height with computerized tomography scans. METHODS: Measured the patellar height through the lateral radiographic image supported by one foot and sagittal tomographic view of the knee in extension, flexion of 20°, and quadriceps contraction of 40 patients (80 knees, asymptomatic and no history of knee injuries using Insall-Salvati index. There were 20 adult females and 20 adult males. RESULTS: The height patellar index was higher in women of all images taken, in proportion. There was no statistical difference of patellar height index between the radiographics and tomographics images. CONCLUSION: The Insall-Salvati index in females was higher in all cases evaluated. Furthermore, it is possible to measure the patellar height index during tomographic study without distorting the results obtained, using to define the presence of patella alta or patella baja.

  15. Spiral computed tomographic evaluation and endodontic management of a mandibular first molar with three distal canals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mushtaq, Mubashir; Farooq, Riyaz; Rashid, Aamir; Robbani, Irfan

    2011-01-01

    The use of spiral computed tomography serves as a boon in endodontic diagnosis of complex anatomic variations. The present case demonstrates the spiral tomographic evaluation and endodontic management of a mandibular first molar with 5 canals (2 mesial and 3 distal canals), which is a very rare anatomic variant. Such anatomic variations should be taken into account in day to day endodontic practice to ensure a high degree of clinical success. PMID:21814366

  16. Experimental evaluation and basis function optimization of the spatially variant image-space PSF on the Ingenuity PET/MR scanner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotasidis, Fotis A; Zaidi, Habib

    2014-06-01

    The Ingenuity time-of-flight (TF) PET/MR is a recently developed hybrid scanner combining the molecular imaging capabilities of PET with the excellent soft tissue contrast of MRI. It is becoming common practice to characterize the system's point spread function (PSF) and understand its variation under spatial transformations to guide clinical studies and potentially use it within resolution recovery image reconstruction algorithms. Furthermore, due to the system's utilization of overlapping and spherical symmetric Kaiser-Bessel basis functions during image reconstruction, its image space PSF and reconstructed spatial resolution could be affected by the selection of the basis function parameters. Hence, a detailed investigation into the multidimensional basis function parameter space is needed to evaluate the impact of these parameters on spatial resolution. Using an array of 12 × 7 printed point sources, along with a custom made phantom, and with the MR magnet on, the system's spatially variant image-based PSF was characterized in detail. Moreover, basis function parameters were systematically varied during reconstruction (list-mode TF OSEM) to evaluate their impact on the reconstructed resolution and the image space PSF. Following the spatial resolution optimization, phantom, and clinical studies were subsequently reconstructed using representative basis function parameters. Based on the analysis and under standard basis function parameters, the axial and tangential components of the PSF were found to be almost invariant under spatial transformations (~4 mm) while the radial component varied modestly from 4 to 6.7 mm. Using a systematic investigation into the basis function parameter space, the spatial resolution was found to degrade for basis functions with a large radius and small shape parameter. However, it was found that optimizing the spatial resolution in the reconstructed PET images, while having a good basis function superposition and keeping the image

  17. Anatomical variants of lister's tubercle; A new morphological classification based on magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chan, Wan Ying; Chong, Le Roy [Dept. of Radiology, Changi General Hospital, Singapore (Singapore)

    2017-11-15

    Lister's tubercle is used as a standard anatomical landmark in hand surgery and arthroscopy procedures. In this study, we aimed to evaluate and propose a classification for anatomical variants of Lister's tubercle. Between September 2011 and July 2014, 360 MRI examinations for wrists performed using 1.5T scanners in a single institution were retrospectively evaluated. The prevalence of anatomical variants of Lister's tubercle based on the heights and morphology of its radial and ulnar peaks was assessed. These were classified into three distinct types: radial peak larger than ulnar peak (Type 1), similar radial and ulnar peaks (Type 2) and ulnar peak larger than radial peak (Type 3). Each type was further divided into 2 subtypes (A and B) based on the morphology of the peaks. The proportions of Type 1, Type 2, and Type 3 variants in the study population were 69.2, 21.4, and 9.5%, respectively. For the subtypes, the Type 1A variant was the most common (41.4%) and conformed to the classical appearance of Lister's tubercle; whereas, Type 3A and 3B variants were rare configurations (6.4% and 3.1%, respectively) wherein the extensor pollicis longus tendon coursed along the radial aspect of Lister's tubercle. Anatomical variations of Lister's tubercle have potential clinical implications for certain pathological conditions and pre-procedural planning. The proposed classification system facilitates a better understanding of these anatomical variations and easier identification of at-risk and rare variants.

  18. Computed Tomographic Artifacts in Maxillofacial Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jun Ho; Arita, Emiko Saito; Pinheiro, Lucas Rodrigues; Yoshimoto, Marcelo; Watanabe, Plauto Christopher Aranha; Cortes, Arthur Rodriguez Gonzalez

    2018-01-01

    The present study aimed to present 4 cases and to undertake a systematic review on the current knowledge of the impact of cone beam computed tomographic (CBCT) artifacts on oral and maxillofacial surgical planning and follow-up. The MEDLINE (PubMed) database was searched for the period from February 2004 to February 2017, for studies on the impact of CBCT artifacts on surgical planning of oral and maxillofacial surgeries. The PRISMA statement was followed during data assessment and extraction. As a result, data extraction included information regarding: the use of CBCT to plan or follow-up oral and maxillofacial surgeries, presence and type identification of a CBCT artifact, and details on the impact of artifacts on image quality and/or surgical planning. Four cases were selected to illustrate the topic. The search strategy yielded 408 publications in MEDLINE (PubMed). An initial screening of the publications was performed using abstracts and key words. After application of exclusion criteria, a total of 11 studies were finally identified as eligible to be discussed. Studies revealed 3 main types of artifact: beam hardening, streak, and motion artifacts. Most of the studies suggest that artifacts significantly affect oral and maxillofacial surgical planning and follow-up, despite of allowing for identification of metal projectiles in cases of maxillofacial trauma. CBCT artifacts have a significant impact on oral and maxillofacial surgical planning and follow-up.

  19. Computed Tomographic Evaluation of Mandibular Ameloblastoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N Eswar

    2003-01-01

    Five interesting cases of mandibular ameloblastoma are presented here, each case showing different histological pattern and corresponding computer tomographic appearance. Also an attempt is made to establish CT pattern in these histological varieties of ameloblastoma.

  20. Validation of the sensitivity of the National Emergency X-Radiography Utilization Study (NEXUS Head computed tomographic (CT decision instrument for selective imaging of blunt head injury patients: An observational study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William R Mower

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Clinicians, afraid of missing intracranial injuries, liberally obtain computed tomographic (CT head imaging in blunt trauma patients. Prior work suggests that clinical criteria (National Emergency X-Radiography Utilization Study [NEXUS] Head CT decision instrument [DI] can reliably identify patients with important injuries, while excluding injury, and the need for imaging in many patients. Validating this DI requires confirmation of the hypothesis that the lower 95% confidence limit for its sensitivity in detecting serious injury exceeds 99.0%. A secondary goal of the study was to complete an independent validation and comparison of the Canadian and NEXUS Head CT rules among the subgroup of patients meeting the inclusion and exclusion criteria.We conducted a prospective observational study of the NEXUS Head CT DI in 4 hospital emergency departments between April 2006 and December 2015. Implementation of the rule requires that patients satisfy 8 criteria to achieve "low-risk" classification. Patients are excluded from "low-risk" classification and assigned "high-risk" status if they fail to meet 1 or more criteria. We examined the instrument's performance in assigning "high-risk" status to patients requiring neurosurgical intervention among a cohort of 11,770 blunt head injury patients. The NEXUS Head CT DI assigned high-risk status to 420 of 420 patients requiring neurosurgical intervention (sensitivity, 100.0% [95% confidence interval [CI]: 99.1%-100.0%]. The instrument assigned low-risk status to 2,823 of 11,350 patients who did not require neurosurgical intervention (specificity, 24.9% [95% CI: 24.1%-25.7%]. None of the 2,823 low-risk patients required neurosurgical intervention (negative predictive value [NPV], 100.0% [95% CI: 99.9%-100.0%]. The DI assigned high-risk status to 759 of 767 patients with significant intracranial injuries (sensitivity, 99.0% [95% CI: 98.0%-99.6%]. The instrument assigned low-risk status to 2,815 of 11

  1. Positron Emission Tomographic Imaging of the Cannabinoid Type 1 Receptor System with [11C]OMAR ([11C]JHU75528: Improvements in Image Quantification Using Wild-Type and Knockout Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raúl Herance

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we assessed the feasibility of using positron emission tomography (PET and the tracer [11C]OMAR ([11C]JHU75528, an analogue of rimonabant, to study the brain cannabinoid type 1 (CB1 receptor system. Wild-type (WT andCB1 knockout (KO animals were imaged at baseline and after pretreatment with blocking doses of rimonabant. Brain uptake in WT animals was higher (50% than in KO animals in baseline conditions. After pretreatment with rimonabant, WT uptake lowered to the level of KO animals. The results of this study support the feasibility of using PET with the radiotracer [11C]JHU75528 to image the brain CB1 receptor system in mice. In addition, this methodology can be used to assess the effect of new drugs in preclinical studies using genetically manipulated animals.

  2. Evaluation of a multicore-optimized implementation for tomographic reconstruction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose-Ignacio Agulleiro

    Full Text Available Tomography allows elucidation of the three-dimensional structure of an object from a set of projection images. In life sciences, electron microscope tomography is providing invaluable information about the cell structure at a resolution of a few nanometres. Here, large images are required to combine wide fields of view with high resolution requirements. The computational complexity of the algorithms along with the large image size then turns tomographic reconstruction into a computationally demanding problem. Traditionally, high-performance computing techniques have been applied to cope with such demands on supercomputers, distributed systems and computer clusters. In the last few years, the trend has turned towards graphics processing units (GPUs. Here we present a detailed description and a thorough evaluation of an alternative approach that relies on exploitation of the power available in modern multicore computers. The combination of single-core code optimization, vector processing, multithreading and efficient disk I/O operations succeeds in providing fast tomographic reconstructions on standard computers. The approach turns out to be competitive with the fastest GPU-based solutions thus far.

  3. Natural Environment Characterization Using Hybrid Tomographic Aproaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yue; Ferro-Famil, Laurent; Reigber, Andreas

    2011-03-01

    SAR tomography (SARTOM) is the extension of conventional two-dimensional SAR imaging principle to three dimensions [1]. A real 3D imaging of a scene is achieved by the formation of an additional synthetic aperture in elevation and the coherent combination of images acquired from several parallel flight tracks. This imaging technique allows a direct localization of multiple scattering contributions in a same resolution cell, leading to a refined analysis of volume structures, like forests or dense urban areas. In order to improve the vertical resolution with respect to classical Fourier-based methods, High-Resolution (HR) approaches are used in this paper to perform SAR tomography. Both nonparametric spectral estimators, like Beamforming and Capon and parametric ones, like MUSIC, Maximum Likelihood, are applied to real data sets and compared in terms of scatterer location accuracy and resolution. It is known that nonparametric approaches are in general more robust to focusing artefacts, whereas parametric approaches are characterized by a better vertical resolution. It has been shown [2], [3] that the performance of these spectral analysis approaches is conditioned by the nature of the scattering response of the observed objects. In the scenario of hybrid environments where objects with a deterministic response are embedded in a speckle affected environment, the parameter estimation for this type of scatterers becomes a problem of mixed-spectrum estimation. The impenetrable medium like the ground or object, possesses an isolated localized phase center in the vertical direction, leading to a discrete (line) spectrum. This type of scatterers can be considered as 'h-localized', named 'Isolated Scatterers' (IS). Whereas natural environments consist of a large number of elementary scatterers successively distributed in the vertical direction. This type of scatterers can be described as 'h-distributed' scatterers and characterized by a continuous spectrum. Therefore, the

  4. Computerized Tomographic Study on the Paranasal Sinusitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Sun Kyung; Lim, Sug Young; Koh, Kwang Joon [Dept. of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology and Institute of Oral Bio Science, College of Dentistry, Chonbuk National University, Chonju (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-08-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the computed tomographic (CT) images of the paranasal sinusitis(PNS). The author examined the extent and the recurring patterns of the paranasal sinusitis and some important anatomic landmarks. The author analyzed PNS images retrospectively in 500 patients who visited Chonbuk National University Hospital between January 1996 and December 1997. The most frequently affected sinus was maxillary sinus (82.9%), followed by anterior ethmoid sinus (67.9%), posterior ethmoid sinus (48.9%), frontal sinus (42.0%) and sphenoid sinus (41.4%). The characteristic features of CT images of the sinusitis were sinus opacification (22.4%), mucoperiosteal thickening (34.3%), and polyposis (2.0%). Sinonasal inflammatory diseases were categorized into 5 patterns according to Babbel's classification. They were 1) infundibular (13.0%), 2) ostiomeatal unit (67.4%), 3)sphenoethmoidal recess (13.0%), 4) sinonasal polyposis (9.6%) and 5) unclassifiable patterns (18.0%). The incidences of contact between sinus and optic nerve were as follows ; the incidences of contact with posterior ethmoid sinus, sphenoid sinus, both posterior sinuses were 11.4%, 66.8%, 6.3%, respectively. The incidences of contact between sphenoid sinus and maxillary nerve, vidian nerve, internal carotid artery were 74.5%, 79.2%, 45.1% respectively. The incidences of pneumatization of the posterior ethmoid sinus were as follows; normal 70.6% and overriding type 29.4%. The incidences of sphenoid sinus pneumatization were as follows; normal 56.9% , rudimentary 12.5%, pterygoid recess 22.7%, anterior clinoid recess 2.7%, and both pterygoid and anterior clinoid recess 5.2%. The inflammatory sinonasal diseases were classified into five patterns using the CT of PNS, which was proven to be an excellent imaging modality providing detailed information about mucosal abnormality, pathologic patterns and the proximity of the important structures to the posterior paranasal sinuses. This

  5. Material Derivative Measurements in High-Speed Flows by Four-Pulse Tomographic PIV

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lynch, K.; Scarano, F.

    2013-01-01

    A tomographic PIV system is introduced for the instantaneous measurement of the material derivative of velocity (VMD). The system is able to operate with very short temporal separation and is therefore suitable for applications in high-speed flows. The method of operation consists of the imaging of

  6. HFSB-seeding for large-scale tomographic PIV in wind tunnels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Caridi, Giuseppe Carlo Alp; Ragni, D.; Sciacchitano, A.; Scarano, F.

    2016-01-01

    A new system for large-scale tomographic particle image velocimetry in low-speed wind tunnels is presented. The system relies upon the use of sub-millimetre helium-filled soap bubbles as flow tracers, which scatter light with intensity several orders of magnitude higher than micron-sized

  7. Real-time tomographic holography for augmented reality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galeotti, John M; Siegel, Mel; Stetten, George

    2010-07-15

    The concept and instantiation of real-time tomographic holography (RTTH) for augmented reality is presented. RTTH enables natural hand-eye coordination to guide invasive medical procedures without requiring tracking or a head-mounted device. It places a real-time virtual image of an object's cross section into its actual location, without noticeable viewpoint dependence (e.g., parallax error). The virtual image is viewed through a flat narrowband holographic optical element (HOE) with optical power that generates an in-situ virtual image (within 1 m of the HOE) from a small spatial light modulator display without obscuring a direct view of the physical world. Rigidly fixed upon a medical ultrasound probe, an RTTH device could show the scan in its actual location inside the patient, even as the probe was moved relative to the patient.

  8. Evaluation of a computer aided neutron tomographic system incorporating a gaseous position sensitive detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvani, M. I.; Lopes, R. T.; de Jesus, E. F. O.; de Almeida, G. L.; Barbosa, A. F.

    2003-06-01

    A position sensitive gaseous detector, formerly designed to operate with X-rays, has been modified to equip a third generation tomographic system working with a parallel thermal neutron beam. For this purpose, the original filling-gas has been replaced by 3He-enriched helium, which plays simultaneously the role of filling-gas for the ionization process and converter of neutrons into charged particles. This paper describes the modifications done to the detector, the measurements carried out to evaluate its own performance and that of the tomographic system attached to it. Some tomographic images acquired using that system are presented as well. Tomographic systems equipped with this kind of detector should require substantially much less time than those conventional ones, where a sample translation is required. The Argonauta reactor operating at the Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear (IEN/CNEN-Brazil) has been utilized as the source of neutrons, furnishing a flux of 4.5×10 5 n cm -2 s -1 at its main irradiation channel where the tomographic system has been placed.

  9. A SPICE Blind Test to Benchmark Global Tomographic Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Y.; Capdeville, Y.; Maupin, V.; Montagner, J.

    2006-12-01

    The different existing global tomographic methods result in different models of the Earth. In order to test how current imaging techniques are limited by approximations in theory and the inadequacy of data quality and coverage, we are undertaking a blind test of global inversion algorithms using complete 3D synthetic seismograms within SPICE (Seismic wave Propagation and Imaging in Complex media: a European network). First, a complex global anisotropic anelastic model has been constructed by summing the 1D reference model, deterministic and random anomalies and anisotropic crystal. This model includes 3D heterogeneities in velocity, anisotropy and attenuation at different scales in the whole mantle, as well as topography and crustal structure. In addition, the rotation and ellipticity are also included. Synthetic seismograms were generated using the Coupling Spectral Element Method with a minimum period of 32s, for a realistic distribution of 29 events and 256 stations. The synthetic seismograms have been made available to the scientific community worldwide at the IPGP website http://www.ipgp.jussieu.fr/~qyl/. Any group willing to test his tomographic technique is encouraged to download the synthetic dataset.g

  10. EBSD imaging of orientation relationships and variant groupings in different martensitic alloys and Widmanstätten iron meteorites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cayron, Cyril, E-mail: cyril.cayron@cea.fr

    2014-08-15

    An automatic method to colorize and quantify the classical Pitsch, Kurdjumov–Sachs, Greninger–Troiano and Nishiyama–Wasserman orientation relationships in the electron backscatter diffraction maps of martensitic/bainitic steels is detailed. Automatic analysis of variant grouping is also presented. The method was applied to low and high carbon steels, and to iron–nickel Widmanstätten meteorites. Many results of recent literature are confirmed. In low carbon steels the individual laths exhibit continuous orientation gradients between the classical orientation relationships, and the laths tend to be grouped by close-packed plane (morphological) packets. A crystallographic scenario describing the formation of the packets is proposed on the base of the one-step model. When the carbon content increases, the orientation spreading is reduced; and martensite tends to form plate groups and burst configurations. In iron–nickel meteorites, the centimeter long Widmanstätten laths do not exhibit continuous orientation gradients but are constituted of subgrains with uniform orientation relationship; the kamacite grains in the plessite regions are grouped into Bain zones, probably due to a recrystallization during the slow cooling of the meteorites. - Highlights: • Analysis of different low and high carbon steels and Widmanstätten meteorites • Automatic color mapping of the classical orientation relationships in EBSD maps • Quantification of variant pairing and grouping tendencies • Crystallographic scenario for the formation of morphological packets.

  11. Experimental evaluation and basis function optimization of the spatially variant image-space PSF on the Ingenuity PET/MR scanner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kotasidis, Fotis A., E-mail: Fotis.Kotasidis@unige.ch [Division of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Geneva University Hospital, CH-1211 Geneva, Switzerland and Wolfson Molecular Imaging Centre, MAHSC, University of Manchester, Manchester M20 3LJ (United Kingdom); Zaidi, Habib [Division of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Geneva University Hospital, CH-1211 Geneva (Switzerland); Geneva Neuroscience Centre, Geneva University, CH-1205 Geneva (Switzerland); Department of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen, 9700 RB (Netherlands)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: The Ingenuity time-of-flight (TF) PET/MR is a recently developed hybrid scanner combining the molecular imaging capabilities of PET with the excellent soft tissue contrast of MRI. It is becoming common practice to characterize the system's point spread function (PSF) and understand its variation under spatial transformations to guide clinical studies and potentially use it within resolution recovery image reconstruction algorithms. Furthermore, due to the system's utilization of overlapping and spherical symmetric Kaiser-Bessel basis functions during image reconstruction, its image space PSF and reconstructed spatial resolution could be affected by the selection of the basis function parameters. Hence, a detailed investigation into the multidimensional basis function parameter space is needed to evaluate the impact of these parameters on spatial resolution. Methods: Using an array of 12 × 7 printed point sources, along with a custom made phantom, and with the MR magnet on, the system's spatially variant image-based PSF was characterized in detail. Moreover, basis function parameters were systematically varied during reconstruction (list-mode TF OSEM) to evaluate their impact on the reconstructed resolution and the image space PSF. Following the spatial resolution optimization, phantom, and clinical studies were subsequently reconstructed using representative basis function parameters. Results: Based on the analysis and under standard basis function parameters, the axial and tangential components of the PSF were found to be almost invariant under spatial transformations (∼4 mm) while the radial component varied modestly from 4 to 6.7 mm. Using a systematic investigation into the basis function parameter space, the spatial resolution was found to degrade for basis functions with a large radius and small shape parameter. However, it was found that optimizing the spatial resolution in the reconstructed PET images, while having a good basis

  12. Tomographic causal analysis of two-qubit states and tomographic discord

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiktenko, Evgeny [Bauman Moscow State Technical University, 2nd Baumanskaya St., 5, Moscow 105005 (Russian Federation); Geoelectromagnetic Research Center of Schmidt Institute of Physics of the Earth, Russian Academy of Sciences, PO Box 30, Troitsk, Moscow Region 142190 (Russian Federation); Fedorov, Aleksey, E-mail: akf@rqc.ru [Bauman Moscow State Technical University, 2nd Baumanskaya St., 5, Moscow 105005 (Russian Federation); Russian Quantum Center, Novaya St. 100, Skolkovo, Moscow 143025 (Russian Federation)

    2014-05-01

    We study a behavior of two-qubit states subject to tomographic measurement. In this Letter we propose a novel approach to definition of asymmetry in quantum bipartite state based on its tomographic Shannon entropies. We consider two types of measurement bases: the first is one that diagonalizes density matrices of subsystems and is used in a definition of tomographic discord, and the second is one that maximizes Shannon mutual information and relates to symmetrical form quantum discord. We show how these approaches relate to each other and then implement them to the different classes of two-qubit states. Consequently, new subclasses of X-states are revealed.

  13. Dense velocity reconstruction from tomographic PTV with material derivatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneiders, Jan F. G.; Scarano, Fulvio

    2016-09-01

    A method is proposed to reconstruct the instantaneous velocity field from time-resolved volumetric particle tracking velocimetry (PTV, e.g., 3D-PTV, tomographic PTV and Shake-the-Box), employing both the instantaneous velocity and the velocity material derivative of the sparse tracer particles. The constraint to the measured temporal derivative of the PTV particle tracks improves the consistency of the reconstructed velocity field. The method is christened as pouring time into space, as it leverages temporal information to increase the spatial resolution of volumetric PTV measurements. This approach becomes relevant in cases where the spatial resolution is limited by the seeding concentration. The method solves an optimization problem to find the vorticity and velocity fields that minimize a cost function, which includes next to instantaneous velocity, also the velocity material derivative. The velocity and its material derivative are related through the vorticity transport equation, and the cost function is minimized using the limited-memory Broyden-Fletcher-Goldfarb-Shanno (L-BFGS) algorithm. The procedure is assessed numerically with a simulated PTV experiment in a turbulent boundary layer from a direct numerical simulation (DNS). The experimental validation considers a tomographic particle image velocimetry (PIV) experiment in a similar turbulent boundary layer and the additional case of a jet flow. The proposed technique (`vortex-in-cell plus', VIC+) is compared to tomographic PIV analysis (3D iterative cross-correlation), PTV interpolation methods (linear and adaptive Gaussian windowing) and to vortex-in-cell (VIC) interpolation without the material derivative. A visible increase in resolved details in the turbulent structures is obtained with the VIC+ approach, both in numerical simulations and experiments. This results in a more accurate determination of the turbulent stresses distribution in turbulent boundary layer investigations. Data from a jet

  14. Tomographic techniques for the study of exceptionally preserved fossils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutton, Mark D

    2008-01-01

    Three-dimensional fossils, especially those preserving soft-part anatomy, are a rich source of palaeontological information; they can, however, be difficult to work with. Imaging of serial planes through an object (tomography) allows study of both the inside and outside of three-dimensional fossils. Tomography may be performed using physical grinding or sawing coupled with photography, through optical techniques of serial focusing, or using a variety of scanning technologies such as neutron tomography, magnetic resonance imaging and most usefully X-ray computed tomography. This latter technique is applicable at a variety of scales, and when combined with a synchrotron X-ray source can produce very high-quality data that may be augmented by phase-contrast information to enhance contrast. Tomographic data can be visualized in several ways, the most effective of which is the production of isosurface-based ‘virtual fossils’ that can be manipulated and dissected interactively. PMID:18426749

  15. Computed Tomographic Blend Sign Is Associated With Computed Tomographic Angiography Spot Sign and Predicts Secondary Neurological Deterioration After Intracerebral Hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sporns, Peter B; Schwake, Michael; Schmidt, Rene; Kemmling, André; Minnerup, Jens; Schwindt, Wolfram; Cnyrim, Christian; Zoubi, Tarek; Heindel, Walter; Niederstadt, Thomas; Hanning, Uta

    2017-01-01

    Significant early hematoma growth in patients with intracerebral hemorrhage is an independent predictor of poor functional outcome. Recently, the novel blend sign (BS) has been introduced as a new imaging sign for predicting hematoma growth in noncontrast computed tomography. Another parameter predicting increasing hematoma size is the well-established spot sign (SS) visible in computed tomographic angiography. We, therefore, aimed to clarify the association between established SS and novel BS and their values predicting a secondary neurological deterioration. Retrospective study inclusion criteria were (1) spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage confirmed on noncontrast computed tomography and (2) noncontrast computed tomography and computed tomographic angiography performed on admission within 6 hours after onset of symptoms. We defined a binary outcome (secondary neurological deterioration versus no secondary deterioration). As secondary neurological deterioration, we defined (1) early hemicraniectomy under standardized criteria or (2) secondary decrease of Glasgow Coma Scale of >3 points, both within the first 48 hours after symptom onset. Of 182 patients with spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage, 37 (20.3%) presented with BS and 39 (21.4%) with SS. Of the 81 patients with secondary deterioration, 31 (38.3%) had BS and SS on admission. Multivariable logistic regression analysis identified hematoma volume (odds ratio, 1.07 per mL; P≤0.001), intraventricular hemorrhage (odds ratio, 3.08; P=0.008), and the presence of BS (odds ratio, 11.47; P≤0.001) as independent predictors of neurological deterioration. The BS, which is obtainable in noncontrast computed tomography, shows a high correlation with the computed tomographic angiography SS and is a reliable predictor of secondary neurological deterioration after spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  16. Hue-shifted monomeric variants of Clavularia cyan fluorescent protein: identification of the molecular determinants of color and applications in fluorescence imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davidson Michael W

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the 15 years that have passed since the cloning of Aequorea victoria green fluorescent protein (avGFP, the expanding set of fluorescent protein (FP variants has become entrenched as an indispensable toolkit for cell biology research. One of the latest additions to the toolkit is monomeric teal FP (mTFP1, a bright and photostable FP derived from Clavularia cyan FP. To gain insight into the molecular basis for the blue-shifted fluorescence emission we undertook a mutagenesis-based study of residues in the immediate environment of the chromophore. We also employed site-directed and random mutagenesis in combination with library screening to create new hues of mTFP1-derived variants with wavelength-shifted excitation and emission spectra. Results Our results demonstrate that the protein-chromophore interactions responsible for blue-shifting the absorbance and emission maxima of mTFP1 operate independently of the chromophore structure. This conclusion is supported by the observation that the Tyr67Trp and Tyr67His mutants of mTFP1 retain a blue-shifted fluorescence emission relative to their avGFP counterparts (that is, Tyr66Trp and Tyr66His. Based on previous work with close homologs, His197 and His163 are likely to be the residues with the greatest contribution towards blue-shifting the fluorescence emission. Indeed we have identified the substitutions His163Met and Thr73Ala that abolish or disrupt the interactions of these residues with the chromophore. The mTFP1-Thr73Ala/His163Met double mutant has an emission peak that is 23 nm red-shifted from that of mTFP1 itself. Directed evolution of this double mutant resulted in the development of mWasabi, a new green fluorescing protein that offers certain advantages over enhanced avGFP (EGFP. To assess the usefulness of mTFP1 and mWasabi in live cell imaging applications, we constructed and imaged more than 20 different fusion proteins. Conclusion Based on the results of our

  17. Case Report: Unusual computed tomographic features of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A case report of a 57-year old woman who presented with signs and symptoms of intracranial mass. Computed tomographic (CT) and clinical features were unusual and suggestive of a parasaggital Meningioma. However an accurate diagnosis of a tuberculoma was made at surgery and histopathological examination.

  18. Quantum probability measures and tomographic probability densities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amosov, GG; Man'ko, [No Value

    2004-01-01

    Using a simple relation of the Dirac delta-function to generalized the theta-function, the relationship between the tomographic probability approach and the quantum probability measure approach with the description of quantum states is discussed. The quantum state tomogram expressed in terms of the

  19. Tomographic Heating Holder for In Situ TEM

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gontard, Lionel C.; Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E.; Fernández, Asunción

    2014-01-01

    A tomographic heating holder for transmission electron microscopy that can be used to study supported catalysts at temperatures of up to ~1,500°C is described. The specimen is placed in direct thermal contact with a tungsten filament that is oriented perpendicular to the axis of the holder withou...

  20. Computed tomographic appearances of sternocostoclavicular hyperostosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chigira, Masaki; Shimizu, Toru (Gunma Univ. (Japan). Dept. of Orthopaedic Surgery)

    1989-08-01

    Computed tomographical analysis of sternocostoclavicular hyperostosis was performed in 27 patients. In the earliest stage hyperostosis occurred around the cartilaginous portion of the first ribs. The sternoclavicular joint space was preserved even in the late stage III of the disorder. It is also suggested that perichondritis and periostitis play important roles in the etiology of this disorder. (orig./GDG).

  1. ASSESSMENT OF COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHIC UROGRAPHY IN ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    FOBUR

    ASSESSMENT OF COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHIC UROGRAPHY IN THE DIAGNOSIS OF. URINARY TRACT ABNORMALITIES IN A TERTIARY .... By improvement of the computer technique, 3D CT urography reformatted from ... manifestations of urinary tract disorders that had. CTU, there were more women than men. This.

  2. The Mathematical Foundations of 3D Compton Scatter Emission Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. T. Truong

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The mathematical principles of tomographic imaging using detected (unscattered X- or gamma-rays are based on the two-dimensional Radon transform and many of its variants. In this paper, we show that two new generalizations, called conical Radon transforms, are related to three-dimensional imaging processes based on detected Compton scattered radiation. The first class of conical Radon transform has been introduced recently to support imaging principles of collimated detector systems. The second class is new and is closely related to the Compton camera imaging principles and invertible under special conditions. As they are poised to play a major role in future designs of biomedical imaging systems, we present an account of their most important properties which may be relevant for active researchers in the field.

  3. Novel Variants of a Histogram Shift-Based Reversible Watermarking Technique for Medical Images to Improve Hiding Capacity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vishakha Kelkar

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In telemedicine systems, critical medical data is shared on a public communication channel. This increases the risk of unauthorised access to patient’s information. This underlines the importance of secrecy and authentication for the medical data. This paper presents two innovative variations of classical histogram shift methods to increase the hiding capacity. The first technique divides the image into nonoverlapping blocks and embeds the watermark individually using the histogram method. The second method separates the region of interest and embeds the watermark only in the region of noninterest. This approach preserves the medical information intact. This method finds its use in critical medical cases. The high PSNR (above 45 dB obtained for both techniques indicates imperceptibility of the approaches. Experimental results illustrate superiority of the proposed approaches when compared with other methods based on histogram shifting techniques. These techniques improve embedding capacity by 5–15% depending on the image type, without affecting the quality of the watermarked image. Both techniques also enable lossless reconstruction of the watermark and the host medical image. A higher embedding capacity makes the proposed approaches attractive for medical image watermarking applications without compromising the quality of the image.

  4. Tomographical process monitoring of laser transmission welding with OCT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackermann, Philippe; Schmitt, Robert

    2017-06-01

    Process control of laser processes still encounters many obstacles. Although these processes are stable, a narrow process parameter window during the process or process deviations have led to an increase on the requirements for the process itself and on monitoring devices. Laser transmission welding as a contactless and locally limited joining technique is well-established in a variety of demanding production areas. For example, sensitive parts demand a particle-free joining technique which does not affect the inner components. Inline integrated non-destructive optical measurement systems capable of providing non-invasive tomographical images of the transparent material, the weld seam and its surrounding areas with micron resolution would improve the overall process. Obtained measurement data enable qualitative feedback into the system to adapt parameters for a more robust process. Within this paper we present the inline monitoring device based on Fourier-domain optical coherence tomography developed within the European-funded research project "Manunet Weldable". This device, after adaptation to the laser transmission welding process is optically and mechanically integrated into the existing laser system. The main target lies within the inline process control destined to extract tomographical geometrical measurement data from the weld seam forming process. Usage of this technology makes offline destructive testing of produced parts obsolete. 1,2,3,4

  5. Computed tomographic features of fibrous dysplasia of maxillofacial region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sontakke, Subodh Arun; Karjodka, Freny R [Nair Hospital Dental College, Mumba (India); Umarji, Hemant R [Government Dental College and Hospital, Mumbai (India)

    2011-03-15

    This study was to find the computed tomographic features of fibrous dysplasia of the maxillofacial region. All eight cases included in the study reported either to Government Dental College and Hospital or Nair Hospital Dental College, Mumbai between 2003 and 2009. The patients were prescribed computed tomogram in addition to conventional radiographs of maxillofacial region which were studied for characteristic features of fibrous dysplasia. The diagnosis of fibrous dysplasia was confirmed by histopathological report. All cases showed the ill-defined margins of lesions except in the region where the lesions were extending to cortex of the involved bone. Internal structure of all cases showed ground glass appearance. Four cases of maxillary lesion showed the displacement of maxillary sinus maintaining the shape of maxillary sinus. Two cases showed complete obliteration of maxillary sinus. Displacement of inferior alveolar canal did not follow any typical pattern in any of the cases but was displaced in different directions. The craniofacial type of fibrous dysplasia is as common as fibrous dysplasia of jaw. The margins, extent, internal structure and effect on surrounding structure are well detected on computed tomographic images.

  6. Clinical, radiographic, ultrasonographic and computed tomographic features of nonseptic osteitis of the axial border of the proximal sesamoid bones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanderperren, K; Bergman, H J; Spoormakers, T J P; Pille, F; Duchateau, L; Puchalski, S M; Saunders, J H

    2014-07-01

    Lysis of the axial aspect of equine proximal sesamoid bones (PSBs) is a rare condition reported to have septic or traumatic origins. Limited information exists regarding imaging of nonseptic axial osteitis of a PSB. To report the clinical, radiographic, ultrasonographic, computed tomographic and intra-arterial contrast-enhanced computed tomographic abnormalities in horses with axial nonseptic osteitis of a PSB. Retrospective clinical study. Eighteen horses diagnosed with nonseptic osteitis of the axial border of a PSB between 2007 and 2012 were reviewed retrospectively. Case details, clinical examination, radiographic, ultrasonographic, computed tomographic and intra-arterial/intra-articular contrast-enhanced computed tomographic features were recorded, when available. Radiographic, ultrasonographic and computed tomographic evaluations of the fetlock region had been performed on 18, 15 and 9 horses, respectively. The effect of the degree of lysis on the grade and duration of lameness was determined. All horses had chronic unilateral lameness, 4 with forelimb and 14 with hindlimb signs. On radiographs, lysis was identified in both PSBs in 14 horses, one PSB in 3 horses and in one horse no lysis was identified. The degree of osteolysis was variable. Ultrasonography identified variably sized irregularities of the bone surface and alteration in echogenicity of the palmar/plantar ligament (PL). All horses undergoing computed tomographic examination (n = 9) had biaxial lysis. The lesions were significantly longer and deeper on computed tomographic images compared with radiographic images. Intra-arterial contrast-enhanced computed tomography may reveal moderate to marked contrast enhancement of the PL. There was no significant effect of the degree of lysis on the grade and duration of lameness. Lesions of nonseptic axial osteitis of a PSB can be identified using a combination of radiography and ultrasonography. Computed tomography provides additional information regarding

  7. Spectrometry and emission tomographic image reconstruction stimulated by neutrons via EM algorithm and Monte Carlo Method; Espectrometria e reconstrucao de imagens tomograficas de emissao estimulada por neutrons via algoritmo EM e metodo de Monte Carlo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Viana, Rodrigo Sartorelo Salemi

    2014-07-01

    The NSECT (Neutron Stimulated Emission Computed Tomography) figures as a new spectrographic technique able to evaluate in vivo the concentration of elements using the inelastic scattering reaction (n,n'). Since its introduction, several improvements have been proposed with the aim of investigating applications for clinical diagnosis and reduction of absorbed dose associated with CT acquisition. In this context, two new diagnostic applications are presented using spectroscopic and tomographic approaches from NSECT. A new methodology has also been proposed to optimize the sinogram sampling that is directly related to the quality of the reconstruction by the irradiation protocol. The studies were developed based on simulations with MCNP5 code. Diagnosis of Renal Cell Carcinoma (RCC) and the detection of breast microcalcifications were evaluated in studies conducted using a human phantom. The obtained results demonstrate the ability of the NSECT technique to detect changes in the composition of the modeled tissues as a function of the development of evaluated pathologies. The proposed method for optimizing sinograms was able to analytically simulate the composition of the irradiated medium allowing the assessment of quality of reconstruction and effective dose in terms of the sampling rate. However, future research must be conducted to quantify the sensitivity of detection according to the selected elements. (author)

  8. Addition of Tomographic Capabilities to NMIS

    CERN Document Server

    Mullens, J A

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes tomographic capabilities for the Nuclear Materials Identification System (NMIS). The tomographic capabilities add weapons component spatial and material properties information that result in a more detailed item signature (template) and provide more information for physical attributes analyses. The Nuclear Materials Identification System (NMIS) is used routinely to confirm the identity of HEU components in sealed containers. It does this through a radiation signature acquired by shining a sup 2 sup 5 sup 2 Cf source through the container and measuring the radiation at four detectors stacked vertically on the other side. This measurement gives a gamma and neutron radiation transmission profile of the weapons component, mixed with the radiation production due to the induced fissions in the fissile materials. This information is sufficient to match an ''unknown'' weapons component signature to a template signature from a reference item when measuring under controlled conditions. Tomography m...

  9. Tomographic Techniques for Radar Ice Sounding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Ulrik

    AbstractLow frequency radars, also known as sounders, can be used for subsurfacemeasurements of Earth’s massive ice sheets. Radar data are essential toimproving ice sheet models for better prediction of the response of theseice sheets to global climate change. While airborne sounders are neededfor...... challenge. This dissertation deals with tomographic techniques based on multiphase-center radars that represent state-of-the-art technology within thefield of ice sounding. The use of advanced tomographic processing forclutter suppression is investigated, which up to this point has beenlargely unexplored...... acquired withthe POLarimetric Airborne Radar Ice Sounder (POLARIS), single-passtomographic surface clutter suppression capabilities are demonstratedfor the system. Using repeat-pass POLARIS data, a method based ondata-driven DOA estimation is used to show an along-track variation ofthe effective scattering...

  10. Point spread function based image reconstruction in optical projection tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trull, Anna K.; van der Horst, Jelle; Palenstijn, Willem Jan; van Vliet, Lucas J.; van Leeuwen, Tristan; Kalkman, Jeroen

    2017-10-01

    As a result of the shallow depth of focus of the optical imaging system, the use of standard filtered back projection in optical projection tomography causes space-variant tangential blurring that increases with the distance to the rotation axis. We present a novel optical tomographic image reconstruction technique that incorporates the point spread function of the imaging lens in an iterative reconstruction. The technique is demonstrated using numerical simulations, tested on experimental optical projection tomography data of single fluorescent beads, and applied to high-resolution emission optical projection tomography imaging of an entire zebrafish larva. Compared to filtered back projection our results show greatly reduced radial and tangential blurring over the entire 5.2×5.2 mm2 field of view, and a significantly improved signal to noise ratio.

  11. Soil physical and X-ray computed tomographic measurements to investigate small-scale structural differences under strip tillage compared to mulch till and no-till

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pöhlitz, Julia; Rücknagel, Jan; Schlüter, Steffen; Vogel, Hans-Jörg

    2017-04-01

    . Mechanical precompression stress was significantly higher for STBS (141 kPa) than STWS (38 kPa). In addition, the CT image cross sections and the computed tomographic parameters confirmed the mechanically more stable soil structure observed under STBS with a higher initial average pore size but lower porosity and connectivity values compared to STWS. The reason for this is the lack of tillage. On the other hand, tillage at STWS created a loosened, porous and connective substrate. For all variants, the increasing load application led to progressive homogenization processes of the soil structure. At the same time, as stress application increased in all variants, the increase in dry bulk density led to a decrease in average pore size, porosity, and connectivity, while anisotropy increased. It was possible to confirm that strip tillage combines the advantages of no-till and a deeper conservation primary tillage, since on the one hand MT and STWS and on the other hand STBS and NT showed very similar soil structures. The computed tomographic parameters therefore provide valuable information about the impact of tillage on microscopic pore space attributes that improve our understanding about soil functional behavior at much larger scales.

  12. Constraining fault interpretation through tomographic velocity gradients: application to northern Cascadia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Ramachandran

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Spatial gradients of tomographic velocities are seldom used in interpretation of subsurface fault structures. This study shows that spatial velocity gradients can be used effectively in identifying subsurface discontinuities in the horizontal and vertical directions. Three-dimensional velocity models constructed through tomographic inversion of active source and/or earthquake traveltime data are generally built from an initial 1-D velocity model that varies only with depth. Regularized tomographic inversion algorithms impose constraints on the roughness of the model that help to stabilize the inversion process. Final velocity models obtained from regularized tomographic inversions have smooth three-dimensional structures that are required by the data. Final velocity models are usually analyzed and interpreted either as a perturbation velocity model or as an absolute velocity model. Compared to perturbation velocity model, absolute velocity models have an advantage of providing constraints on lithology. Both velocity models lack the ability to provide sharp constraints on subsurface faults. An interpretational approach utilizing spatial velocity gradients applied to northern Cascadia shows that subsurface faults that are not clearly interpretable from velocity model plots can be identified by sharp contrasts in velocity gradient plots. This interpretation resulted in inferring the locations of the Tacoma, Seattle, Southern Whidbey Island, and Darrington Devil's Mountain faults much more clearly. The Coast Range Boundary fault, previously hypothesized on the basis of sedimentological and tectonic observations, is inferred clearly from the gradient plots. Many of the fault locations imaged from gradient data correlate with earthquake hypocenters, indicating their seismogenic nature.

  13. A Fast Variant of 1H Spectroscopic U-FLARE Imaging Using Adjusted Chemical Shift Phase Encoding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebel, Andreas; Dreher, Wolfgang; Leibfritz, Dieter

    2000-02-01

    So far, fast spectroscopic imaging (SI) using the U-FLARE sequence has provided metabolic maps indirectly via Fourier transformation (FT) along the chemical shift (CS) dimension and subsequent peak integration. However, a large number of CS encoding steps Nω is needed to cover the spectral bandwidth and to achieve sufficient spectral resolution for peak integration even if the number of resonance lines is small compared to Nω and even if only metabolic images are of interest and not the spectra in each voxel. Other reconstruction algorithms require extensive prior knowledge, starting values, and/or model functions. An adjusted CS phase encoding scheme (APE) can be used to overcome these drawbacks. It incorporates prior knowledge only about the resonance frequencies present in the sample. Thus, Nω can be reduced by a factor of 4 for many 1H in vivo studies while no spectra have to be reconstructed, and no additional user interaction, prior knowledge, starting values, or model function are required. Phantom measurements and in vivo experiments on rat brain have been performed at 4.7 T to test the feasibility of the method for proton SI.

  14. Experiments on a Ground-Based Tomographic Synthetic Aperture Radar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoonyol Lee

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the development and experiment of three-dimensional image formation by using a ground-based tomographic synthetic aperture radar (GB-TomoSAR system. GB-TomoSAR formulates two-dimensional synthetic aperture by the motion of antennae, both in azimuth and vertical directions. After range compression, three-dimensional image focusing is performed by applying Deramp-FFT (Fast Fourier Transform algorithms, both in azimuth and vertical directions. Geometric and radiometric calibrations were applied to make an image cube, which is then projected into range-azimuth and range-vertical cross-sections for visualization. An experiment with a C-band GB-TomoSAR system with a scan length of 2.49 m and 1.86 m in azimuth and vertical-direction, respectively, shows distinctive three-dimensional radar backscattering of stable buildings and roads with resolutions similar to the theoretical values. Unstable objects such as trees and moving cars generate severe noise due to decorrelation during the eight-hour image-acquisition time.

  15. Lagrangian and Eulerian pressure field evaluation of rod-airfoil flow from time-resolved tomographic PIV

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Violato, D.; Moore, P.; Scarano, F.

    2010-01-01

    This work investigates the rod-airfoil air flow by time-resolved Tomographic Particle Image Velocimetry (TR-TOMO PIV) in thin-light volume configuration. Experiments are performed at the region close to the leading edge of a NACA0012 airfoil embedded in the von Karman wake of a cylindrical rod. The

  16. Double Colorectal Cancer Only Diagnosed by Computed Tomographic Colonography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koichi Nagata

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available A 58-year-old woman presented to her physician with rectal bleeding and intermittent diarrhea. Optical colonoscopy revealed a bulky tumor which was diagnosed as rectal cancer. She was referred to our institution for further evaluation and treatment. Slim optical colonoscopy showed an obstructive cancer in the rectosigmoid junction and no information of the proximal side of the obstruction. The patient then underwent computed tomographic (CT colonography for further evaluation of the proximal side. Three-dimensional endoluminal ‘fly-through’ images revealed another protruded lesion in the proximal side of the obstruction. Diagnosis of synchronous double cancer was made by CT colonography. This CT data was not only used to create three-dimensional images but also to decide on a preoperative clinical staging. Laparoscopy-assisted high anterior resection was performed and T3 rectal cancer and T1 sigmoid colon cancer were confirmed in the resected specimen. Follow-up optical colonoscopy revealed no other tumors. CT colonography has recently become a popular preoperative examination tool with significant improvement in quality of image due to a rapid progress in computer technology. CT colonography correctly showed synchronous double cancer in our case and provided crucial information for planning surgery. We recommend that CT colonography should be used for evaluating the proximal side of obstructive colorectal cancer.

  17. Computed tomographic enterography and enteroclysis: pearls and pitfalls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dave-Verma, Hetal; Moore, Scott; Singh, Ajay; Martins, Noel; Zawacki, John

    2008-01-01

    Computed tomographic (CT) enterography and enteroclysis improve visualization of the small bowel mucosa and wall in comparison with traditional CT and fluoroscopic studies by distending the small bowel through enteric hyperhydration with a negative contrast agent. Although CT enterography is performed with oral hyperhydration, CT enteroclysis requires the placement of an enteroclysis tube, often in patients who are unable to orally consume the amount of liquid. When tolerated, CT enterography is often preferred due to its lack of invasiveness. Magnetic resonance enterography and enteroclysis are other modalities that are still being studied and show promise in the imaging of small bowel. Unlike small bowel follow-through, conventional enteroclysis, or capsule endoscopy, extraenteric findings are best assessed on CT enterography. These include findings in the surrounding mesentery, perienteric fat, and the adjacent solid organs that may be associated with the small bowel process and include fistulas or abscesses, mural hyperenhancement, prominent vasa recta, and other inflammatory changes. CT enterography has developed into the first-line modality in the imaging of Crohn's disease and is considered the most appropriate imaging modality in patients with suspected Crohn's disease. It is also increasingly being used in the assessment of small bowel infections, neoplasms, adhesions, and polyps.

  18. Computed tomographic findings in acute infantile hemiplegia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hisanaga, M.; Utsumi, S.; Kyoi, K.; Gega, A.; Tanikake, T. (Nara Medical Univ., Kashihara (Japan))

    1981-06-01

    The clinical and computed tomographic findings in four cases of acute infantile hemiplegia that were followed for over ten years are described. The most impressive and common findings in four cases are as follows: 1) Unilateral loss of cerebral volume with displacement of the midline structures to the affected side. 2) Unilateral thicked calvarium and dilated frontal and ethmoid sinus and mastoid air cells on affected side. 3) A dilated lateral ventricle in the affected hemisphere. The recognition of these calvarial changes should indicate that the cerebral abnormalities are the result of an atrophic and hypoplastic process that began in early life.

  19. E-learn Computed Tomographic Angiography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Havsteen, Inger; Christensen, Anders; Nielsen, Jens K

    2012-01-01

    occlusion and "spot sign" in acute intracerebral hemorrhage. We hypothesized that an e-learning program enhances reading skills in physicians of varying experience. METHODS: We developed an HTML-based program with a teaching segment and 2 matching test segments. Tests were taken before and after......BACKGROUND: Computed tomographic angiography (CTA) is widely available in emergency rooms to assess acute stroke patients. To standardize readings and educate new readers, we developed a 3-step e-learning tool based on the test-teach-retest methodology in 2 acute stroke scenarios: vascular...

  20. Improving analytical tomographic reconstructions through consistency conditions

    CERN Document Server

    Arcadu, Filippo; Stampanoni, Marco; Marone, Federica

    2016-01-01

    This work introduces and characterizes a fast parameterless filter based on the Helgason-Ludwig consistency conditions, used to improve the accuracy of analytical reconstructions of tomographic undersampled datasets. The filter, acting in the Radon domain, extrapolates intermediate projections between those existing. The resulting sinogram, doubled in views, is then reconstructed by a standard analytical method. Experiments with simulated data prove that the peak-signal-to-noise ratio of the results computed by filtered backprojection is improved up to 5-6 dB, if the filter is used prior to reconstruction.

  1. Regional Comparison of Multiphase Computed Tomographic Angiography and Computed Tomographic Perfusion for Prediction of Tissue Fate in Ischemic Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    d'Esterre, Christopher D; Trivedi, Anurag; Pordeli, Pooneh; Boesen, Mari; Patil, Shivanand; Hwan Ahn, Seong; Najm, Mohamed; Fainardi, Enrico; Shankar, Jai Jai Shiva; Rubiera, Marta; Almekhlafi, Mohammed A; Mandzia, Jennifer; Khaw, Alexander V; Barber, Philip; Coutts, Shelagh; Hill, Michael D; Demchuk, Andrew M; Sajobi, Tolulope; Forkert, Nils D; Goyal, Mayank; Lee, Ting-Yim; Menon, Bijoy K

    2017-04-01

    Within different brain regions, we determine the comparative value of multiphase computed tomographic angiography (mCTA) and computed tomographic perfusion (CTP) in predicting follow-up infarction. Patients with M1-middle cerebral artery occlusions were prospectively included in this multicenter study. Regional analysis was performed for each patient within Alberta Stroke Program Early CT Score regions M2 to M6. Regional pial vessel filling was assessed on mCTA in 3 ways: (1) Washout of contrast within pial vessels; (2) Extent of maximal pial vessel enhancement compared with contralateral hemisphere; (3) Delay in maximal pial vessel enhancement compared with contralateral hemisphere. Cerebral blood flow, cerebral blood volume, and Tmax data were extracted within these Alberta Stroke Program Early CT Score regions. Twenty-four- to 36-hour magnetic resonance imaging/CT was assessed for infarct in each Alberta Stroke Program Early CT Score region (defined as >20% infarction within that region). Mixed effects logistic regression models were used to compare mCTA and CTP parameters when predicting brain infarction. Area under the receiver operating characteristics was used to assess discriminative value of statistical models. Seventy-seven patients were included. mCTA parameter washout and CTP parameter Tmax were significantly associated with follow-up infarction in all models ( P 0.05). Mean Tmax and cerebral blood volume values were significantly different between each washout score ( P flow, and cerebral blood volume values were significantly different between each extent score category ( P multiphase CTA can be used to predict tissue fate regionally in acute ischemic stroke patients. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  2. RTOG Sarcoma Radiation Oncologists Reach Consensus on Gross Tumor Volume and Clinical Target Volume on Computed Tomographic Images for Preoperative Radiotherapy of Primary Soft Tissue Sarcoma of Extremity in Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Dian, E-mail: dwang@mcw.edu [Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States); Bosch, Walter [Washington University, St. Louis, MO (United States); Roberge, David [McGill University, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Finkelstein, Steven E. [Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, FL (United States); Petersen, Ivy; Haddock, Michael [Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States); Chen, Yen-Lin E.; Saito, Naoyuki G. [Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, NY (United States); Kirsch, David G. [Duke University, Durham, NC (United States); Hitchcock, Ying J. [University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Wolfson, Aaron H. [University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, FL (United States); DeLaney, Thomas F. [Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States)

    2011-11-15

    Objective: To develop a Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) atlas delineating gross tumor volume (GTV) and clinical target volume (CTV) to be used for preoperative radiotherapy of primary extremity soft tissue sarcoma (STS). Methods and Materials: A consensus meeting was held during the RTOG meeting in January 2010 to reach agreement about GTV and CTV delineation on computed tomography (CT) images for preoperative radiotherapy of high-grade large extremity STS. Data were presented to address the local extension of STS. Extensive discussion ensued to develop optimal criteria for GTV and CTV delineation on CT images. Results: A consensus was reached on appropriate CT-based GTV and CTV. The GTV is gross tumor defined by T1 contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance images. Fusion of magnetic resonance and images is recommended to delineate the GTV. The CTV for high-grade large STS typically includes the GTV plus 3-cm margins in the longitudinal directions. If this causes the field to extend beyond the compartment, the field can be shortened to include the end of a compartment. The radial margin from the lesion should be 1.5 cm, including any portion of the tumor not confined by an intact fascial barrier, bone, or skin surface. Conclusion: The consensus on GTV and CTV for preoperative radiotherapy of high-grade large extremity STS is available as web-based images and in a descriptive format through the RTOG. This is expected to improve target volume consistency and allow for rigorous evaluation of the benefits and risks of such treatment.

  3. Complete removal of ghost particles in Tomographic-PIV

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elsinga, G.E.

    2013-01-01

    This paper discusses and compares several methods, which aim to remove spurious peaks, i.e. ghost particles, from the volume intensity reconstruction in Tomographic-PIV. The assessment is based on numerical simulations of timeresolved tomographic-PIV experiments in linear shear flows. Within the

  4. Three-dimensional (3D) microarchitecture correlations with 2D projection image gray-level variations assessed by trabecular bone score using high-resolution computed tomographic acquisitions: effects of resolution and noise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winzenrieth, Renaud; Michelet, Franck; Hans, Didier

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the present study is to determine the level of correlation between the 3-dimensional (3D) characteristics of trabecular bone microarchitecture, as evaluated using microcomputed tomography (μCT) reconstruction, and trabecular bone score (TBS), as evaluated using 2D projection images directly derived from 3D μCT reconstruction (TBSμCT). Moreover, we have evaluated the effects of image degradation (resolution and noise) and X-ray energy of projection on these correlations. Thirty human cadaveric vertebrae were acquired on a microscanner at an isotropic resolution of 93 μm. The 3D microarchitecture parameters were obtained using MicroView (GE Healthcare, Wauwatosa, MI). The 2D projections of these 3D models were generated using the Beer-Lambert law at different X-ray energies. Degradation of image resolution was simulated (from 93 to 1488 μm). Relationships between 3D microarchitecture parameters and TBSμCT at different resolutions were evaluated using linear regression analysis. Significant correlations were observed between TBSμCT and 3D microarchitecture parameters, regardless of the resolution. Correlations were detected that were strongly to intermediately positive for connectivity density (0.711 ≤ r² ≤ 0.752) and trabecular number (0.584 ≤ r² ≤ 0.648) and negative for trabecular space (-0.407 ≤ r² ≤ -0.491), up to a pixel size of 1023 μm. In addition, TBSμCT values were strongly correlated between each other (0.77 ≤ r² ≤ 0.96). Study results show that the correlations between TBSμCT at 93 μm and 3D microarchitecture parameters are weakly impacted by the degradation of image resolution and the presence of noise. Copyright © 2013 The International Society for Clinical Densitometry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Investigation of turbulent boundary layer structures using Tomographic PIV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saikrishnan, Neelakantan; Longmire, Ellen; Wieneke, Bernd

    2008-11-01

    Tomographic particle image velocimetry (TPIV) data were acquired in the logarithmic region of a zero pressure gradient turbulent boundary layer flow at friction Reynolds number Reτ = 1160. Experiments were conducted in a suction type wind tunnel seeded with olive oil particles of diameter ˜ 1μm. The volume of interest was illuminated by two Nd:YAG laser beams expanded with appropriate optics into sheets of 8mm thickness in the wall-normal direction (z). Images were acquired by four 2k x 2k pixel cameras, and correlation of reconstructed fields provided the full velocity gradient tensor in a volume of 0.7δ x 0.7δ x 0.07δ, which resolved the region z^+ = 70-150 in the log layer. Various vortex identification techniques, such as Galilean decomposition and iso-surfaces of two- and three-dimensional swirl, were utilized to visualize and analyze the eddy structures present in instantaneous fields. The results of the present study will be compared to results from earlier experimental studies that relied on planar PIV data only to identify vortices and vortex packets as well as from a direct numerical simulation of fully developed channel flow at comparable Reτ.

  6. Computed tomographic determination of tibial torsion in the dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aper, Rhonda; Kowaleski, Michael P; Apelt, Detlef; Drost, W Tod; Dyce, Jonathan

    2005-01-01

    The goal of this study was to develop a method for computed tomographic (CT) measurement of tibial torsion, and to compare this technique with direct anatomic measurement of tibial torsion in cadaveric canine tibiae. Paired hind limbs of 10 cadaveric dogs were mounted on a custom-designed limb holding apparatus. One-millimeter thick, contiguous, transverse CT slices were obtained from the distal femur to the proximal tibia and 2 mm CT slices were obtained from the distal tibia to the proximal tarsus. The tibiae were freed of soft tissues and digital photographic images of the proximal and distal articular surfaces were obtained with the camera lens aligned perpendicular to the long axis of the tibia. Multiple proximal and distal tibial axes were identified on the images; two proximal and two distal axes were found to be repeatable in all specimens in both the direct and CT methods. The torsion angle was calculated by determining the difference between the axis angles for each pair of proximal and distal axes. There was no significant difference in torsion angle identified between the direct photographic and CT method for any pair of proximal and distal axes. CT determination of tibial torsion is a rapid and accurate method, and warrants investigation in clinical patients.

  7. Accelerating Popular Tomographic Reconstruction Algorithms on Commodity PC Graphics Hardware

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Fang; Mueller, K.

    2005-06-01

    The task of reconstructing an object from its projections via tomographic methods is a time-consuming process due to the vast complexity of the data. For this reason, manufacturers of equipment for medical computed tomography (CT) rely mostly on special application specified integrated circuits (ASICs) to obtain the fast reconstruction times required in clinical settings. Although modern CPUs have gained sufficient power in recent years to be competitive for two-dimensional (2D) reconstruction, this is not the case for three-dimensional (3D) reconstructions, especially not when iterative algorithms must be applied. The recent evolution of commodity PC computer graphics boards (GPUs) has the potential to change this picture in a very dramatic way. In this paper we will show how the new floating point GPUs can be exploited to perform both analytical and iterative reconstruction from X-ray and functional imaging data. For this purpose, we decompose three popular three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction algorithms (Feldkamp filtered backprojection, the simultaneous algebraic reconstruction technique, and expectation maximization) into a common set of base modules, which all can be executed on the GPU and their output linked internally. Visualization of the reconstructed object is easily achieved since the object already resides in the graphics hardware, allowing one to run a visualization module at any time to view the reconstruction results. Our implementation allows speedups of over an order of magnitude with respect to CPU implementations, at comparable image quality.

  8. Computed tomographic imaging of subchondral fatigue cracks in the distal end of the third metacarpal bone in the thoroughbred racehorse can predict crack micromotion in an ex-vivo model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie-Soleil Dubois

    Full Text Available Articular stress fracture arising from the distal end of the third metacarpal bone (MC3 is a common serious injury in Thoroughbred racehorses. Currently, there is no method for predicting fracture risk clinically. We describe an ex-vivo biomechanical model in which we measured subchondral crack micromotion under compressive loading that modeled high speed running. Using this model, we determined the relationship between subchondral crack dimensions measured using computed tomography (CT and crack micromotion. Thoracic limbs from 40 Thoroughbred racehorses that had sustained a catastrophic injury were studied. Limbs were radiographed and examined using CT. Parasagittal subchondral fatigue crack dimensions were measured on CT images using image analysis software. MC3 bones with fatigue cracks were tested using five cycles of compressive loading at -7,500N (38 condyles, 18 horses. Crack motion was recorded using an extensometer. Mechanical testing was validated using bones with 3 mm and 5 mm deep parasagittal subchondral slots that modeled naturally occurring fatigue cracks. After testing, subchondral crack density was determined histologically. Creation of parasagittal subchondral slots induced significant micromotion during loading (p<0.001. In our biomechanical model, we found a significant positive correlation between extensometer micromotion and parasagittal crack area derived from reconstructed CT images (SR = 0.32, p<0.05. Correlations with transverse and frontal plane crack lengths were not significant. Histologic fatigue damage was not significantly correlated with crack dimensions determined by CT or extensometer micromotion. Bones with parasagittal crack area measurements above 30 mm2 may have a high risk of crack propagation and condylar fracture in vivo because of crack micromotion. In conclusion, our results suggest that CT could be used to quantify subchondral fatigue crack dimensions in racing Thoroughbred horses in-vivo to

  9. Automatic method detection of artifacts for control of tomographic uniformity on SPECT; Metodo automatico de dteccion de artefactos para el control de la uniformidad tomografica en SPECT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reynes Llompart, G.; Puchal, R.

    2013-07-01

    The objective of this work is the find an automatic method for the detection and classification of artifacts produced in tomographic uniformity, extracting the characteristics necessary to apply a classification algorithm using pattern recognition techniques. The method has been trained and validated with synthetic images and tested with real images. (Author)

  10. Assessment in dogs tympanic bulla, through virtual tomographic endoscopy; Avaliacao de bulas timpanicas em caes, por meio da endoscopia tomografica virtual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Luciana Carandina da; Sabino, Emanuelle Guidugli, E-mail: lucianacarandina@uol.com.br [Universidade Estadual Paulista Julio de Mesquita Filho (UNESP), Botucatu, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina Veterinaria. Dept. de Reproducao Animal e Radiologia Veterinaria; Vulcano, Luiz Carlos; Machado, Vania Maria de Vasconcelos [Universidade Estadual Paulista Julio de Mesquita Filho (UNESP), Botucatu, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina Veterinaria

    2012-07-01

    Dogs usually have problems related to the auditory canal. For the diagnosis of these pathologies, it is necessary a physical examination and, in some cases radiographic examination and computed tomography. The tympanic bulla is not easily visualized radiographically, since there is many structures of the brain overlaying the image obtained. The computed tomography has been the technique of choice to assess this structure faithfully. A new alternative assessment of the tympanic bulla is tomographic virtual endoscopy, which allows an improvement of the image obtained through the virtual tomographic technique. This paper provides information on the use of computed tomography, and a new technique, tomographic virtual endoscopy, in order to make the improvement of these techniques, and prove the reliability of these changes in the diagnosis of ear canals of dogs. Therefore, we performed the computed tomography of the tympanic bulla on healthy animals, and later performed image reconstruction in three-dimensional (3D) mode for virtual endoscopy. (author)

  11. A high-throughput system for high-quality tomographic reconstruction of large datasets at Diamond Light Source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atwood, Robert C; Bodey, Andrew J; Price, Stephen W T; Basham, Mark; Drakopoulos, Michael

    2015-06-13

    Tomographic datasets collected at synchrotrons are becoming very large and complex, and, therefore, need to be managed efficiently. Raw images may have high pixel counts, and each pixel can be multidimensional and associated with additional data such as those derived from spectroscopy. In time-resolved studies, hundreds of tomographic datasets can be collected in sequence, yielding terabytes of data. Users of tomographic beamlines are drawn from various scientific disciplines, and many are keen to use tomographic reconstruction software that does not require a deep understanding of reconstruction principles. We have developed Savu, a reconstruction pipeline that enables users to rapidly reconstruct data to consistently create high-quality results. Savu is designed to work in an 'orthogonal' fashion, meaning that data can be converted between projection and sinogram space throughout the processing workflow as required. The Savu pipeline is modular and allows processing strategies to be optimized for users' purposes. In addition to the reconstruction algorithms themselves, it can include modules for identification of experimental problems, artefact correction, general image processing and data quality assessment. Savu is open source, open licensed and 'facility-independent': it can run on standard cluster infrastructure at any institution.

  12. Local tomographic phase microscopy from differential projections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vishnyakov, G. N.; Levin, G. G.; Minaev, V. L.; Nekrasov, N. A.

    2016-12-01

    It is proposed to use local tomography for optical studies of the internal structure of transparent phase microscopic objects, for example, living cells. From among the many local tomography methods that exist, the algorithms of back projection summation (in which partial derivatives of projections are used as projection data) are chosen. The application of local tomography to living cells is reasonable because, using optical phase microscopy, one can easily obtain projection data in the form of first-order derivatives of projections applying the methods of differential interference contrast and shear interferometry. The mathematical fundamentals of local tomography in differential projections are considered, and a computer simulation of different local tomography methods is performed. A tomographic phase microscope and the results of reconstructing a local tomogram of an erythrocyte from a set of experimental differential projections are described.

  13. Computed tomographic findings of intracranial acute leukemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Dong Woo; Ryu, Weon Don; Kim, Jong Sung; Koh, Byung Hee; Jeon, Seok Chol; Lee, Seung Ro; Hahm, Chang Kok [Hanyang University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1990-07-15

    Computed tomographic (CT) abnormalities in the brain were retrospectively analyzed in 16 of 103 patients with acute leukemia confirmed by CSF cytology or combined surgery at Hanyang University Hospital, from August 1980 to August 1989. The results were as follows : 1. With FAB classification, the most frequent pathologic type was L1 : 8 cases (50%) 2. The range of age distribution showed typical pattern that ALL occurred below the 15 years old, and AML, over 15 years old. 3. Abnormal CT findings were ; Meningitis(2 cases), Mass(3), Thrombosis(1), Infarction(2), Edema(1), Hemorrhage(7), Hydrocephalus(2), Atrophy(2). 4. Most of infracranial hemorrhage were seen in M{sub 2} and M{sub 3} type.

  14. Computer tomographic and sonographic diagnosis of echinococcus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schulze, K.; Huebener, K.H.; Klott, K.; Jenss, H.; Baehr, R. (Tuebingen Univ. (Germany, F.R.). Medizinisches Strahleninstitut und Roentgenabteilung; Tuebingen Univ. (Germany, F.R.). Medizinische Klinik; Tuebingen Univ. (Germany, F.R.). Chirurgische Klinik und Poliklinik)

    1980-05-01

    In 33 patients (18 cystic echinococci, 15 alveolar) both methods produced the following findings which could be correlated with the pathological results: single or multi-centric lesions, sharp or indefinite demarkation and abnormalities in the shape and size of the liver. The sonographic findings were analysed with respect to the echo characteristics, whereas the computer tomographically demonstrated lesions were examined densitometrically in order to show calcification. Both methods demonstrate the pathological changes satisfactorily. Computer tomography is more effective in alveolar echinococcus lesions by showing the different types of calcification, whereas sonography provides a more accurate picture of the internal structure of the cysts in cystic echinococcus. Comparison of the methods in 19 patients examined by both showed a high accuracy in each method, but sonography was relatively poor in demonstrating lesions in the spleen.

  15. Understanding the Correlation between Tomographic and Biomechanical Severity of Keratoconic Corneas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rohit Shetty

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To evaluate correlation between tomographic gradation of keratoconus (KC and its corresponding air-puff induced biomechanical response. Methods. Corneal tomography and biomechanics were measured with Scheimpflug imaging in 44 normal and 92 KC corneas. Deformation waveform was also analyzed with Fourier series. A custom KC severity scale was used from 1 to 3 with 3 as the most severe grade. Tomographic and biomechanical variables were assessed among the grades. Sensitivity and specificity of the variables were assessed using receiver operating characteristics (ROC. Results. Curvature variables were significantly different between normal and disease (P0.05. All variables had an area under the ROC curve greater than 0.5. The root mean square of the Fourier cosine coefficients had the best ROC (0.92, cut-off: 0.027, sensitivity: 83%, specificity: 88.6%. Spearman correlation coefficient was significant between most variables (P<0.05. However, tomographic segregation of keratoconus did not result in concomitant biomechanical segregation of the grades. Conclusions. There was lack of significant biomechanical difference between mild disease grades, despite progressive corneal thinning. Mathematical models that estimate corneal modulus from air-puff deformation may be more useful.

  16. The CDD system in computed tomographic diagnosis of diverticular disease; Das CDD-System in der computertomografischen Diagnostik der Divertikelkrankheit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pustelnik, Daniel; Elsholtz, Fabian Henry Juergen; Hamm, Bernd; Niehues, Stefan Markus [Charite - Universitaetsmedizin, Berlin (Germany). Inst. of Radiology; Bojarski, Christian [Charite - Universitaetsmedizin, Berlin (Germany). Div. of Gastroenterology, Infectiology and Rheumatology

    2017-08-15

    Purpose cation in computed tomographic diagnosis and briefly recapitulates its targeted advantages over preliminary systems. Primarily, application of the CDD in computed tomography diagnostics is described. Differences with respect to the categories of the older systems are pointed out on the level of each CDD type using imaging examples. The presented images are derived from our institute according to the S2k criteria. Literature was researched on PubMed. Results The CDD constitutes an improvement compared to older systems for categorizing the stages of diverticular disease. It provides more discriminatory power on the descriptive-morphological level and defines as well as differentiates more courses of the disease. Furthermore, the categories translate more directly into state-of-the-art decision-making concerning hospitalization and therapy. The CDD should be applied routinely in the computed tomographic diagnosis of diverticular disease. Typical imaging patterns are presented.

  17. Computed tomographic appearance of primary lung tumors in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marolf, Angela J; Gibbons, Debra S; Podell, Brendan K; Park, Richard D

    2011-01-01

    Canine primary lung tumors typically appear radiographically as a well-circumscribed solitary mass in the periphery of a caudal lung lobe. Consolidated and diffuse forms of primary lung tumors have also been described. Nineteen dogs with computed tomographic (CT) images of the thorax and a histological diagnosis of primary lung tumor (17 primary carcinomas and two primary sarcomas) were evaluated retrospectively to characterize the CT findings. All primary lung tumors were bronchocentric in origin with internal air bronchograms. The bronchi were typically narrowed, displaced, and often obstructed by the tumor. Eighteen of 19 (95%) of the tumors were solitary and there was one pneumonic/alveolar form. Most solitary tumors were well circumscribed (17/18), located in the central to periphery of the lung (14/18), and in a cranial or caudal lobe (16/19). Most primary lung tumors (11/17) had mild to moderate heterogeneous contrast enhancement. Five of 19 dogs (26%) had evidence of pulmonary metastasis. Internal mineralization (3/19) and tracheobronchial lymphadenopathy (4/19) were also identified. On CT examination, solitary, well circumscribed, bronchocentric masses with internal air bronchograms are consistent with a primary pulmonary tumor in dogs. © 2010 Veterinary Radiology & Ultrasound.

  18. Conceptual design of a compact positron tomograph for prostateimaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huber, J.S.; Derenzo, S.E.; Qi, J.; Moses, W.W.; Huesman, R.H.; Budinger, T.F.

    2000-11-04

    We present a conceptual design of a compact positron tomograph for prostate imaging using a pair of external curved detector banks, one placed above and one below the patient. The lower detector bank is fixed below the patient bed, and the top bank adjusts vertically for maximum sensitivity and patient access. Each bank is composed of 40conventional block detectors, forming two arcs (44 cm minor, 60 cm major axis) that are tilted to minimize attenuation and positioned as close as possible to the patient to improve sensitivity. The individual detectors are angled to point towards the prostate to minimize resolution degradation in that region. Inter-plane septa extend 5 cm beyond the scintillator crystals to reduce random and scatter backgrounds. A patient is not fully encircled by detector rings in order to minimize cost,causing incomplete sampling due to the side gaps. Monte Carlo simulation (including random and scatter) demonstrates the feasibility of detecting a spherical tumor of 2.5 cm diameter with a tumor to background ratio of2:1, utilizing the number of events that should be achievable with a6-minute scan after a 10 mCi injection (e.g., carbon-11 choline or fluorine-18 fluorocholine).

  19. Florid computed tomographic appearance of acute Campylobacter enterocolitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, G; Bui, A; Vrazas, J

    2000-05-01

    A 28-year-old male presented with severe abdominal pain and bloody diarrhoea. Computed tomographic scan showed marked swelling of the distal ileum and entire colorectum. The patient recovered and Campylobacter jejuni was subsequently grown from his faeces.

  20. Radiographic and computed tomographic determination of femoral varus and torsion in the dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudley, Robert M; Kowaleski, Michael P; Drost, Wm Tod; Dyce, Jonathan

    2006-01-01

    Diagnosis and quantification of femoral varus and femoral torsion using radiographs is technically challenging due to the difficulty in determining proper positioning. The purpose of this study is to describe a computed tomographic technique for determination of femoral varus and femoral torsion and to compare this technique, and standard radiography, to anatomic preparation, for the measurement of femoral varus and femoral torsion in normal dogs. Nine canine cadavers, visually and radiographically free of orthopedic disease of the hip and stifle joints, were utilized for analysis. Femoral varus was determined using a craniocaudal radiograph, a craniocaudal radiograph obtained after confirming accurate positioning using horizontal beam fluoroscopy, and computed tomography (CT). Femoral torsion (expressed as angle of version) was determined using an axial radiographic projection obtained from distal to proximal and CT. Each femur was dissected free of soft tissues, and direct determination of femoral varus and femoral torsion was performed using digital photographic images. All radiologic and photographic images were digitally measured to quantify the magnitude of femoral varus and femoral torsion. For femoral varus, no difference (P = 0.149) between the three different imaging techniques and the anatomic preparation was identified. For femoral torsion, no difference (P = 0.059) between the two imaging techniques and the anatomic preparation was identified. Well positioned radiographs and the described computed tomographic method are both as accurate as anatomic preparation for the measurement of both femoral varus and femoral torsion in normal dogs.

  1. Variants of windmill nystagmus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Kwang-Dong; Shin, Hae Kyung; Kim, Ji-Soo; Kim, Sung-Hee; Choi, Jae-Hwan; Kim, Hyo-Jung; Zee, David S

    2016-07-01

    Windmill nystagmus is characterized by a clock-like rotation of the beating direction of a jerk nystagmus suggesting separate horizontal and vertical oscillators, usually 90° out of phase. We report oculographic characteristics in three patients with variants of windmill nystagmus in whom the common denominator was profound visual loss due to retinal diseases. Two patients showed a clock-like pattern, while in the third, the nystagmus was largely diagonal (in phase or 180° out of phase) but also periodically changed direction by 180°. We hypothesize that windmill nystagmus is a unique manifestation of "eye movements of the blind." It emerges when the central structures, including the cerebellum, that normally keep eye movements calibrated and gaze steady can no longer perform their task, because they are deprived of the retinal image motion that signals a need for adaptive recalibration.

  2. Computed tomographic study of 50 patients with hypodense hepatic injuries in childhood; Estudo de 50 casos por tomografia computadorizada de lesoes hipodensas hepaticas fundamentais na infancia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pereira, Ines Minniti Rodrigues; Alvares, Beatriz Regina; Baracat, Jamal; Martins, Daniel Lahan [Universidade Estadual de Campinas, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Ciencias Medicas. Dept. de Radiologia]. E-mail: iminniti@fcm.unicamp.br; Pereira, Ricardo Minniti Rodrigues [Universidade Estadual de Campinas, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Ciencias Medicas

    2006-03-15

    Objective: To describe the different tomographic findings in hypodense hepatic lesions in children and its differential diagnosis. Materials and methods: computed tomographic studies were obtained from 50 patients (age range: 0-16 years) with low-density liver lesions previously diagnosed by ultrasound. Images were made before and after administration of intravenous contrast medium. Image findings were analyzed and afterwards correlated with anatomopathological diagnosis. Results: forty-seven of 50 cases were confirmed, 30 by anatomopathological diagnosis. Most of then were benign lesions, hemangioma in 20%. Such lesions presented a homogeneous contrast absorption, mainly at the delayed phase, differing from malignant lesions. Metastasis was the most frequently found malignant lesion (18%). Conclusion: computed tomographic study is of great value in complementing the diagnosis of hypodense hepatic lesions in children, and must follow ultrasound diagnosis as a routine procedure. (author)

  3. Optical tomographic detection of rheumatoid arthritis with computer-aided classification schemes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klose, Christian D.; Klose, Alexander D.; Netz, Uwe; Beuthan, Jürgen; Hielscher, Andreas H.

    2009-02-01

    A recent research study has shown that combining multiple parameters, drawn from optical tomographic images, leads to better classification results to identifying human finger joints that are affected or not affected by rheumatic arthritis RA. Building up on the research findings of the previous study, this article presents an advanced computer-aided classification approach for interpreting optical image data to detect RA in finger joints. Additional data are used including, for example, maximum and minimum values of the absorption coefficient as well as their ratios and image variances. Classification performances obtained by the proposed method were evaluated in terms of sensitivity, specificity, Youden index and area under the curve AUC. Results were compared to different benchmarks ("gold standard"): magnet resonance, ultrasound and clinical evaluation. Maximum accuracies (AUC=0.88) were reached when combining minimum/maximum-ratios and image variances and using ultrasound as gold standard.

  4. Tomographic Site Characterization Using CPT, ERT, and GPR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rexford M. Morey

    1997-05-23

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is responsible for the cleanup of inactive DOE sites and for bringing DOE sites and facilities into compliance with federal, state and local laws and regulations. The DOE's Office of Environmental Management (EM) needs advanced technologies that can make environmental restoration and waste management operations more efficient and less costly. These techniques are required to better characterize the physical, hydrogeological, and chemical properties of the subsurface while minimizing and optimizing the use of boreholes and monitoring wells. Today the cone penetrometer technique (CPT) is demonstrating the value of a minimally invasive deployment system fix site characterization. Applied Research Associates is developing two new sensor packages for site characterization and monitoring. The two new methods are: . Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT) and . Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) Tomography. These sensor systems are now integrated with the Cone Penetrometer Technique (CPT). The results of this program now make it possible to install ERT and GPR units by CPT methods and thereby reduce installation costs and total costs for ERT and GPR surveys. These two techniques can complement each other in regions of low resistivity where ERT is more effective and regions of high resistivity where GPR is more effective. The results show that CPT-installed GeoWells can be used in both ERT and GPR borehole tomographic subsurface imaging. These two imaging techniques can be used for environmental site characterization and environmental remediation monitoring. Technologies used for site characterization and monitoring have numerous and diverse applications within site clean-up and waste management operations.

  5. Computed tomographic study of maxillofacial gunshot injuries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, In Woo [Dept. of Dentistry, Capital Armed Forces General Hospital, Sungnam (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-08-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the clinical and computed tomographic features of 7 cases of maxillofacial al gunshot injuries in the suicidal patients visited the emergency room, Capital Armed Forces General Hospital. The obtained results were as follows: 1. The gunshot wounds were directed from submental area to dorsum of nose (3 cases), frontal area (1 case), orbit (1 case), infraorbital area (1 case), and lateral to nasal wing (1 case), The shape of inlet in gunshot wounds were round (diameter : 13cm) and that of outlet were oval shape (size : inlet

  6. Computed tomographic findings of intracerebral cysticercosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Jin Kyo; Lee, Sun Wha; Kim, Ho Kyun; Ahn, Chi Yul [School of Medicine, Kyung-Hee University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1980-12-15

    Cysticercosis is a parasitic disease in which man serves as the intermediate host of Taenia Solium, the pork tapeworm. The computed tomographic findings of 25 cases of intracerebral cysticercosis proven by pathologic and/or clinical findings during past 2 years were analysed. The results were as follows; 1. The sex was 19 males and 6 females, and 56 percent of the patients were seen in fourth and fifth decades. The most common symptom was epilepsy (72%). 2. The C. T. findings in precontrast study were varied; such as ill defined low density (48%), cystic low density (20%), dilated ventricles (20%), ill defined low density with isodense nodule (18%), cystic low density with isodense mural nodule (12%) and calcification (8%). 3. The areas of involvement were 20 cases (80%) of parenchymal form, 3 cases (12%) of ventricular form and 2 cases (8%) of mixed form. 4. The contrast-enhanced 13 cases were 5 nodular, 5 ring or rim-like and 3 mixed type enhancements, while 12 cases were not enhanced. 5. C.T. scan demonstrated more precise location and extents of cerebral cysticercosis, especially in parenchymal form. It was considered to be important in determination of surgical feasibility and its approach.

  7. Computed tomographic findings of cerebral paragonimiasis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sung, Nak Kwan; Nam, Kyung Jin; Park, Churl Min; Eun, Chung Kie; Lee, Sun Wha [Kyung Hee Unversity Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1983-03-15

    Paragonimiasis is widely distributed in Far East and Southeast Asia, particularly in Korea. The central nervous system is the most frequent location for paragonimiasis outside the lungs. We analyzed the computed tomographic findings of 17 cases which were diagnosed pathologically and clinically as cerebral paragonimiasis. The results were as follows: 1. The ratio of male to female was 10 : 7 and about 88% of cases were under the age of 40 years. 2. The common locations of cerebral paragonimiasis were the occipital (12 cases) and temporal (11 cases) lobes. 3. Precontrast CT findings of cerebral paragonimiasis were low density with calcifications in 6 cases, low and isodensities in 4 cases, mixed densities in 3 cases, only low density in 2 cases and only calcification in 2 cases. Hydrocephalus (7 cases), mass effect (6 cases), atrophic change (6 cases) and cyst formation (3 cases) were associated. 4. The shape of calcifications in CT scan were soap-bubble or ring in 6 cases, nodular or oval in 6 cases, stipple in 4 cases and amorphous conglomerated in 2 cases. 5. The contrast -enhanced 8 cases were 5 ring or rim like, 2 nodular and 1 irregular enhancements, while 9 cases were not enhanced.

  8. Molecular-Frame 3D Photoelectron Momentum Distributions by Tomographic Reconstruction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maurer, Jochen; Dimitrovski, Darko; Christensen, Lauge

    2012-01-01

    momentum distribution is obtained by tomographic reconstruction from all 90 projections. It reveals an anisotropic electron distribution, angularly shifted in the polarization plane, that is not accessible by the 2D momentum images. Our theoretical analysis shows that the magnitude of the angular shift......Naphthalene molecules are fixed in space by a laser field and rotated, in 2° steps, over 180°. For each orientation, they are ionized by an intense, circularly polarized femtosecond laser pulse, and the 2D projection of the photoelectron momentum distribution is recorded. The molecular-frame 3D...

  9. Complications After Stent Placement for Aortic Coarctation: A Pictorial Essay of Computed Tomographic Angiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boccalini, Sara; den Harder, Annemarie M; Witsenburg, Maarten; Breur, Johannes M P J; Krestin, Gabriel P; van Beynum, Ingrid M; Stagnaro, Nicola; Marasini, Maurizio; de Jong, Pim A; Leiner, Tim; Budde, Ricardo P J

    2017-11-01

    Stent placement is commonly used to treat aortic coarctation. Although invasive angiography remains the gold standard, follow-up is often performed using computed tomography, which allows rapid, noninvasive assessment of the aorta and surrounding tissues. The goal of this pictorial essay is to provide a guide to the interpretation of these examinations. Normal and abnormal computed tomographic appearance of different stent types is shown along with reconstructions that can help assess stent integrity and the stent position in relation to the aortic wall and branches. Furthermore, imaging findings of complications including aortic wall injuries, restenosis, and intimal hyperplasia are depicted.

  10. Three-dimensional multislice spiral computed tomographic angiography: a potentially useful tool for safer free tissue transfer to complicated regions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Demirtas, Yener; Cifci, Mehmet; Kelahmetoglu, Osman

    2009-01-01

    Three-dimensional multislice spiral computed tomographic angiography (3D-MSCTA) is a minimally invasive method of vascular mapping. The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical usefulness of this imaging technique in delineating the recipient vessels for safer free tissue transfer to compli......Three-dimensional multislice spiral computed tomographic angiography (3D-MSCTA) is a minimally invasive method of vascular mapping. The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical usefulness of this imaging technique in delineating the recipient vessels for safer free tissue transfer...... be kept in mind, especially inthe patients with peripheral vascular disease. 3D-MSCTA has the potential to replace digital subtraction angiography for planning of microvascular reconstructions and newer devices with higher resolutions will probably increase the reliability of this technique. (c) 2009...

  11. Initial studies using the RatCAP conscious animal PET tomograph

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woody, C. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY (United States)]. E-mail: woody@bnl.gov; Vaska, P. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY (United States); Schlyer, D. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY (United States); Pratte, J.-F. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY (United States); Junnarkar, S. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY (United States); Park, S.-J. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY (United States); Stoll, S. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY (United States); Purschke, M. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY (United States); Southekal, S. [Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY (United States); Kriplani, A. [Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY (United States); Krishnamoorthy, S. [Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY (United States); Maramraju, S. [Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY (United States); Lee, D. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY (United States); Schiffer, W. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY (United States); Dewey, S. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY (United States); Neill, J. [Long Island University, Brookville, NY (United States); Kandasamy, A. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY (United States); O' Connor, P. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY (United States); Radeka, V. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY (United States); Fontaine, R. [Sherbrooke University, Sherbrooke, Que. (Canada); Lecomte, R. [Sherbrooke University, Sherbrooke, Que. (Canada)

    2007-02-01

    The RatCAP is a small, head-mounted PET tomograph designed to image the brain of a conscious rat without the use of anesthesia. The detector is a complete, high-performance 3D tomograph consisting of a 3.8 cm inside-diameter ring containing 12 block detectors, each of which is comprised of a 4x8 array of 2.2x2.2x5 mm{sup 3} LSO crystals readout with a matching APD array and custom ASIC, and has a 1.8 cm axial field of view. Construction of the first working prototype detector has been completed and its performance characteristics have been measured. The results show an intrinsic spatial resolution of 2.1 mm, a time resolution of {approx}14 ns FWHM, and a sensitivity of 0.7% at an energy threshold of 150 keV. First preliminary images have been obtained using {sup 18}F-FDG and {sup 11}C-methamphetamine, which show comparable image quality to those obtained from a commercial MicroPET R4 scanner. Initial studies have also been carried out to study stress levels in rats wearing the RatCAP.

  12. Advanced Tomographic Imaging Methods for the Analysis of Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-08-01

    IEEE 62 1319 (1974). 4. C C. Jaffee American Scientist, 72. 576 (1982). 5. W. Swindell , H. H. Barrete Physics Today & 32 (1977). 6. L A. Feldkamp, L C...A. Proctor, and M. Roberts of the LLNL Center for Accelerator Mass Spectrometry, and D. Ciarlo of LLNL who provided the silicon specimen. RffERENCES 1...R Hawkeaworti, ibid Ref 14, 183 22 Robert W Hlamm, ibid Ref. 17, 231. 23 A DeVolpi and E, A. Rhodes, Matd Eval 49, 1273 (1982) 25 CHARACTERIZATION OF

  13. A study of temporomandibular joint osteoarthritis using computed tomographic imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Massilla Mani

    2016-06-01

    Conclusion: CT study showed that there is a positive evidence of TMJ involvement in the elderly patients with TMD. The results show that condylar changes are more common than the changes in the articular eminence and condylar fossa. The study also shows that most of the patients are affected by early TMJ OA; hence, initiating treatment at early stages may prevent the disease progression.

  14. Investigation of drop coalescence using tomographic PIV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz-Duenas, Cecilia; Kim, Jungyong; Longmire, Ellen

    2008-11-01

    High-speed tomographic PIV was used to obtain evolving volumetric velocity fields of the coalescence of single drops and two side-by-side drops through liquid/liquid interfaces. Reynolds numbers (Re=ρsUσD/μs) based on surface tension velocity (Uσ=D/tσ) and surrounding ambient fluid were 8-10, and the viscosity ratio between the fluid drop and surrounding fluid was 0.14. The coalescence process investigated is driven by gravity and thus the initial drops are non-spherical and the interface is deformed by the drops. Previously, Mohamed-Kassim & Longmire (2004) showed that under these conditions, the film rupture typically occurs off-axis, and therefore the flow is three-dimensional. For a single drop, volumetric velocity vector fields are used to characterize the asymmetric film rupture occurring for 0

  15. Computed tomographic findings of cerebral paragonimiasis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bae, Weon Tae; Jung, Min Ki; Kang, Heoung Keun; Chung, Hyon De [Chonnam University Medicine School, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    1988-10-15

    Authors analyzed the computed tomographic (CT) findings of 19 cases pathologically and clinically proven cerebral paragonimiasis that were performed at Chonnam University Hospital from April 1983 through March 1987. The results were as follows: 1. Male to female ratio was 15:4 and the most prevalent age group was 3rd decade (7 cases). The common symptoms were epileptic seizure (16 cases) and headache (12 cases). 2. The multiplicity of cerebral paragonimiasis was 7 of 19 cases and the distributions of lesion were occipital (11 cases), temporal (6 cases), frontal (5 cases) and parietal (5 cases) lobe. 3. The calcification on CT scan were single (7 cases) or multiple (7 cases) and the shape of calcification were nodular (10 cases), soap babble of ring (8 cases), and stippled (6 cases). The pattern of contrast enhancement were ring (5 cases) or nodular (1 case), and along the basal cistern (1 case with arachnoiditis). 4. 12 out of 13 cases, had long clinical symptoms over 3 years with calcifications, could be analyzed according to Valentine's vascular territory; 6 cases in PCA territory, 3 in MCA and 3 in ACA. 5. CT findings were noted according to the duration of symptoms; 5 cases, had symptoms less than 1 year, showed abscess (5 cases) and arachnoiditis (1 case) with brain edema, mass effect, hydrocephalus and contrast enhancement but no calcification in all. One case, had symptom of 1 year and 2 months, showed partially calcified granulomatous lesion with perifocal edema and contrast enhancement, 13 cases, had symptoms over 3 years, showed multiple calcification with brain atrophy (10 cases), but no contrast enhancement in all cases.

  16. Computed tomographic and cross-sectional anatomy of the normal pacu (Colossoma macroponum).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, Alaina; Weber, E P Scott; Murphy, Chris J; Zwingenberger, Alison

    2014-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare and define the normal cross-sectional gross and computed tomographic (CT) anatomy for a species of boney fish to better gain insight into the use of advanced diagnostic imaging for future clinical cases. The pacu (Colossoma macropomum) was used because of its widespread presence in the aquarium trade, its relatively large body size, and its importance in the research and aquaculture settings. Transverse 0.6-mm CT images of three cadaver fish were obtained and compared to corresponding frozen cross sections of the fish. Relevant anatomic structures were identified and labeled at each level; the Hounsfield unit density of major organs was established. The images presented good anatomic detail and provide a reference for future research and clinical investigation.

  17. MO-DE-BRA-06: 3D Image Acquisition and Reconstruction Explained with Online Animations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kesner, A

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Understanding the principles of 3D imaging and image reconstruction is fundamental to the field of medical imaging. Clinicians, technologists, physicists, patients, students, and inquisitive minds all stand to benefit from greater comprehension of the supporting technologies. To help explain the basic principles of 3D imaging, we developed multi-frame animations that convey the concepts of tomographic imaging. The series of free (gif) animations are accessible online, and provide a multimedia introduction to the main concepts of image reconstruction. Methods: Text and animations were created to convey the principles of analytic tomography in CT, PET, and SPECT. Specific topics covered included: principles of sinograms/image data storage, forward projection, principles of PET acquisitions, and filtered backprojection. A total of 8 animations were created and presented for CT, PET, and digital phantom formats. In addition, a free executable is also provided to allow users to create their own tomographic animations – providing an opportunity for interaction and personalization to help foster user interest. Results: Tutorial text and animations have been posted online, freely available to view or download. The animations are in first position in a google search of “image reconstruction animations”. The website currently receives approximately 200 hits/month, from all over the world, and the usage is growing. Positive feedback has been collected from users. Conclusion: We identified a need for improved teaching tools to help visualize the (temporally variant) concepts of image reconstruction, and have shown that animations can be a useful tool for this aspect of education. Furthermore, posting animations freely on the web has shown to be a good way to maximize their impact in the community. In future endeavors, we hope to expand this animated content, to cover principles of iterative reconstruction, as well as other phenomena relating to imaging.

  18. Combining ART and FBP for improved fidelity of tomographic BOS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, Ulrich; Seume, Joerg R.

    2016-09-01

    Engine component defects along the hot-gas path (HGP) of jet engines influence the density distribution of the flow, and thus result in characteristic patterns in the exhaust jet. These characteristic patterns can be reconstructed with the optical background-oriented schlieren (BOS) method in a tomographic set-up, which in turn allows the identification of defects inside the engine through an exhaust jet analysis. The quality of the tomographic reconstruction strongly influences how easily defects can be detected inside the jet engine. In particular, the presence of high gradients in the reconstruction area has a strong impact on the reconstruction quality. An algebraic reconstruction algorithm (ART) is implemented and compared to a filtered-back projection (FBP) algorithm in terms of the capability of performing high-gradient tomographic BOS reconstructions. A combination of both algorithms is presented which significantly improves the reconstruction quality of high-gradient tomographic BOS in terms of artifact reduction. The combination of both algorithms is applied to both synthetic and real measurement data in this paper, in order to show possible applications and the achievable improvement of high-gradient tomographic BOS reconstructions.

  19. Anaplastic Thyroid Carcinoma: Computed Tomographic Differentiation from Other Thyroid Masses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jun Won; Yoon, Dae Young; Choi, Chul Soon; Chang, Suk Ki; Yun, Eun Joo; Seo, Young Lan; Rho, Young-Soo; Jin Cho, Sung; Kim, Keon Ha (Depts. of Radiology, Otorhinolaryngology, and Pathology, Kangdong Seong-Sim Hospital, Hallym Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (KR))

    2008-04-15

    Background: Anaplastic thyroid carcinoma is rare but is one of the most aggressive malignancies. Therefore, accurate diagnosis is important in order to provide appropriate therapy. Purpose: To establish useful computed tomographic (CT) criteria for differentiating anaplastic carcinoma from other thyroid masses. Material and Methods: The CT scans of nine patients with anaplastic carcinomas were retrospectively reviewed and compared with those of 32 patients with papillary carcinomas (n = 12) or benign lesions (n = 20) exceeding a maximum diameter of 2.0 cm. Image analysis was performed according to the following CT parameters: size, margin (well defined or ill defined), composition (cystic, mixed, or solid), mean attenuation value, ratio of attenuation of the mass to that of the adjacent muscle (M/m attenuation ratio), necrosis (present or absent), and calcification (stippled, nodular, or absent) of the thyroid mass; and tumor-spreading patterns including the presence of surrounding normal thyroid tissue in the involved lobe, involvement of the contralateral thyroid lobe, extension into the adjacent structures, and cervical lymphadenopathy. Results: Anaplastic carcinomas appeared as large (average 4.6 cm), solid (100%), and ill-defined (88.9%) masses accompanied by necrosis (100%), nodular calcification (44.4%), direct invasion into the adjacent organs (55.6%), and cervical lymph node involvement (77.8%). Tumor necrosis was the most valuable parameter in differentiating anaplastic carcinomas from other thyroid masses. Patient age (>70 years) and low attenuation value on postcontrast scan (attenuation value <100 HU, or M/m attenuation ratio <1.3) are also helpful predictors for anaplastic carcinoma. Conclusion: If a patient is older than 70 years of age and has a large necrotic thyroid mass of low attenuation, anaplastic carcinoma should be included in the differential diagnosis

  20. A review of US anthropometric reference data (1971 2000) with comparisons to both stylized and tomographic anatomic models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huh, C.; Bolch, W. E.

    2003-10-01

    Two classes of anatomic models currently exist for use in both radiation protection and radiation dose reconstruction: stylized mathematical models and tomographic voxel models. The former utilize 3D surface equations to represent internal organ structure and external body shape, while the latter are based on segmented CT or MR images of a single individual. While tomographic models are clearly more anthropomorphic than stylized models, a given model's characterization as being anthropometric is dependent upon the reference human to which the model is compared. In the present study, data on total body mass, standing/sitting heights and body mass index are collected and reviewed for the US population covering the time interval from 1971 to 2000. These same anthropometric parameters are then assembled for the ORNL series of stylized models, the GSF series of tomographic models (Golem, Helga, Donna, etc), the adult male Zubal tomographic model and the UF newborn tomographic model. The stylized ORNL models of the adult male and female are found to be fairly representative of present-day average US males and females, respectively, in terms of both standing and sitting heights for ages between 20 and 60-80 years. While the ORNL adult male model provides a reasonably close match to the total body mass of the average US 21-year-old male (within ~5%), present-day 40-year-old males have an average total body mass that is ~16% higher. For radiation protection purposes, the use of the larger 73.7 kg adult ORNL stylized hermaphrodite model provides a much closer representation of average present-day US females at ages ranging from 20 to 70 years. In terms of the adult tomographic models from the GSF series, only Donna (40-year-old F) closely matches her age-matched US counterpart in terms of average body mass. Regarding standing heights, the better matches to US age-correlated averages belong to Irene (32-year-old F) for the females and Golem (38-year-old M) for the males. Both

  1. COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHIC EVALUATION OF POSTERIOR REVERSIBLE ENCEPHALOPATHY SYNDROME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vishwaprem Raj

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Posterior Reversible Encephalopathy Syndrome (PRES is a neurotoxic state that occurs secondary to the inability of posterior circulation to autoregulate. The clinical spectrum and the underlying pathophysiology are still poorly defined. No conclusive evidence has been put forward regarding the relationship between clinical conditions and specific imaging findings of severity or location of oedema. PURPOSE To assess the role of computed tomography in evaluation of Posterior Reversible Encephalopathy Syndrome. MATERIALS AND METHODS 55 patients referred to the Department of Radio-Diagnosis, with a history of neurological abnormalities, including altered mental function, visual loss, stupor with a predisposing history favouring PRES and followed up for a period of 10 – 30 days. RESULTS 21 patients (38.2% were females. 32 patients (58.1% were in the age group between 21 to 30 years. Predisposing condition; 16 (29.1% presented with pre-eclampsia, 12 (21.8% with post-partum status in altered sensorium, 9 (16.4% with seizures, 7 (12.7% with hypertension, 6 (10.9% with visual disturbances, 4 (7.3% with eclampsia and 1 (1.8% with uraemia. 20 cases (36.4% showed findings suggestive of posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome on initial computed tomography examination. 35 cases showed no initial radiological evidence suggestive of posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome. Of the 20 cases which showed computed tomographic evidence of posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome, recovery was noted in 5 cases (9.1%. Persistence of findings detected on first CT was noted in 13 patients (23.6%. Regional predominance of the lesions was as follows. Frontal lobe (39%, Parietal lobe (32%, Temporal lobe (15% and occipital lobe (15%. CONCLUSION Varied clinical manifestations are associated with anatomical findings recognisable by neuro-imaging as PRES. Prompt imaging is necessary for the recognition of the condition and appropriate

  2. Visual hull method for tomographic PIV measurement of flow around moving objects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adhikari, D.; Longmire, E.K. [University of Minnesota, Department of Aerospace Engineering and Mechanics, Minneapolis, MN (United States)

    2012-10-15

    Tomographic particle image velocimetry (PIV) is a recently developed method to measure three components of velocity within a volumetric space. We present a visual hull technique that automates identification and masking of discrete objects within the measurement volume, and we apply existing tomographic PIV reconstruction software to measure the velocity surrounding the objects. The technique is demonstrated by considering flow around falling bodies of different shape with Reynolds number {proportional_to}1,000. Acquired image sets are processed using separate routines to reconstruct both the volumetric mask around the object and the surrounding tracer particles. After particle reconstruction, the reconstructed object mask is used to remove any ghost particles that otherwise appear within the object volume. Velocity vectors corresponding with fluid motion can then be determined up to the boundary of the visual hull without being contaminated or affected by the neighboring object velocity. Although the visual hull method is not meant for precise tracking of objects, the reconstructed object volumes nevertheless can be used to estimate the object location and orientation at each time step. (orig.)

  3. Visual hull method for tomographic PIV measurement of flow around moving objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adhikari, D.; Longmire, E. K.

    2012-10-01

    Tomographic particle image velocimetry (PIV) is a recently developed method to measure three components of velocity within a volumetric space. We present a visual hull technique that automates identification and masking of discrete objects within the measurement volume, and we apply existing tomographic PIV reconstruction software to measure the velocity surrounding the objects. The technique is demonstrated by considering flow around falling bodies of different shape with Reynolds number ~1,000. Acquired image sets are processed using separate routines to reconstruct both the volumetric mask around the object and the surrounding tracer particles. After particle reconstruction, the reconstructed object mask is used to remove any ghost particles that otherwise appear within the object volume. Velocity vectors corresponding with fluid motion can then be determined up to the boundary of the visual hull without being contaminated or affected by the neighboring object velocity. Although the visual hull method is not meant for precise tracking of objects, the reconstructed object volumes nevertheless can be used to estimate the object location and orientation at each time step.

  4. Ring artifacts correction in compressed sensing tomographic reconstruction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paleo, Pierre, E-mail: pierre.paleo@esrf.fr [ESRF, 71 Avenue des Martyrs, 38000 Grenoble (France); Université de Grenoble, Gipsa-Lab, 11 Rue des Mathématiques, 38400 Saint-Martin-d’Hères (France); Mirone, Alessandro, E-mail: pierre.paleo@esrf.fr [ESRF, 71 Avenue des Martyrs, 38000 Grenoble (France)

    2015-07-14

    The formalism of iterative tomographic reconstruction with sparsity inducing penalty is extended to enable ring artifacts correction. Ring artifacts are a very common problem in tomographic reconstruction, and numerous methods exist to either pre-process the sinogram or correct the reconstructed slice. A novel approach to perform the correction as part of the reconstruction process is presented. It is shown that for iterative techniques, which amount to optimizing an objective function, the ring artifacts correction can be easily integrated in the formalism, enabling simultaneous slice reconstruction and ring artifacts correction. This method is tested and compared with mainstream correction techniques for both simulated and experimental data. Results show that the correction is efficient, especially for undersampled datasets. This technique is included in the PyHST2 code which is used at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility for tomographic reconstruction.

  5. Fundamental Limitations of Resolution And Accuracy of Tomographic Regional Wave Q Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, J.; Chen, Y.

    2016-12-01

    Imaging lateral variations of seismic Q is much more difficult than imaging those of velocity. The foremost reason for the difficulty is that 1/Q values are measured with "reduced amplitude" data rather than observed ground motion amplitudes. The reduced amplitudes are derived using logarithm of the ground motion amplitudes, after a 1D geometrical spreading term is removed. The reduced amplitudes contain modeling errors arising from the effects of the true 3D geometrical spreading and pre-arrival, ambient and coda noises. Statistical distribution of the modeling error has not been systematically explored, except being assumed to be normally distributed. This assumption brings the convenience of formulating Q tomography as a least-squares problem. Here we develop a statistical treatise of modeling error, which permits the calibration of the probability function, mean and variance of the error using real data. We develop a matrix operation methodology to solve for the inverse, error and resolution matrices associated with the two-station tomographic Q model. We apply this methodology to regional Lg wave data collected from SW China, and compare the resolution and error of the model with those associated with typical tomographic velocity models derived from the much simpler travel time data. Another fundamental limitation in Q tomography is caused by the inherently large variability of Q. In velocity and Q tomography, the laterally varying quantity that is solved for by linear equations is the inverse of velocity (slowness) or Q (attenuation coefficient), respectively. Variations of slowness are a small fraction of the mean slowness, so a tomographic slowness model can be robustly converted to a tomographic velocity model. The Q values in the Earth, on the other hand, vary drastically by up to an order of magnitude. The conversion between the attenuation coefficients and the Q values in such a large range is highly non-linear. High Q values corresponding to small

  6. An efficient and accurate approach to MTE-MART for time-resolved tomographic PIV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, K. P.; Scarano, F.

    2015-03-01

    The motion-tracking-enhanced MART (MTE-MART; Novara et al. in Meas Sci Technol 21:035401, 2010) has demonstrated the potential to increase the accuracy of tomographic PIV by the combined use of a short sequence of non-simultaneous recordings. A clear bottleneck of the MTE-MART technique has been its computational cost. For large datasets comprising time-resolved sequences, MTE-MART becomes unaffordable and has been barely applied even for the analysis of densely seeded tomographic PIV datasets. A novel implementation is proposed for tomographic PIV image sequences, which strongly reduces the computational burden of MTE-MART, possibly below that of regular MART. The method is a sequential algorithm that produces a time-marching estimation of the object intensity field based on an enhanced guess, which is built upon the object reconstructed at the previous time instant. As the method becomes effective after a number of snapshots (typically 5-10), the sequential MTE-MART (SMTE) is most suited for time-resolved sequences. The computational cost reduction due to SMTE simply stems from the fewer MART iterations required for each time instant. Moreover, the method yields superior reconstruction quality and higher velocity field measurement precision when compared with both MART and MTE-MART. The working principle is assessed in terms of computational effort, reconstruction quality and velocity field accuracy with both synthetic time-resolved tomographic images of a turbulent boundary layer and two experimental databases documented in the literature. The first is the time-resolved data of flow past an airfoil trailing edge used in the study of Novara and Scarano (Exp Fluids 52:1027-1041, 2012); the second is a swirling jet in a water flow. In both cases, the effective elimination of ghost particles is demonstrated in number and intensity within a short temporal transient of 5-10 frames, depending on the seeding density. The increased value of the velocity space

  7. Design considerations for a time-resolved tomographic diagnostic at DARHT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morris I. Kaufman, Daniel Frayer, Wendi Dreesen, Douglas Johnson, Alfred Meidinger

    2006-08-01

    An instrument has been developed to acquire time-resolved tomographic data from the electron beam at the DARHT [Dual-Axis Radiographic Hydrodynamic Test] facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The instrument contains four optical lines of sight that view a single tilted object. The lens design optically integrates along one optical axis for each line of sight. These images are relayed via fiber optic arrays to streak cameras, and the recorded streaks are used to reconstruct the original two-dimensional data. Installation of this instrument into the facility requires automation of both the optomechanical adjustments and calibration of the instrument in a constrained space. Additional design considerations include compound tilts on the object and image planes.

  8. Computed tomographic evaluation of TB spine in Ibadan

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    also of increasing importance, because of the resurgence of. TB in association with AIDS. This paper is designed to evaluate the applicability of CT in the diagnosis and definition of tuberculosis of the spine in Ibadan. Method:- A restrospective study of the Computed. Tomographic examination of 22 cases of spinal ...

  9. Gunshot injuries to the maxillofacial region: computed tomographic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate Computed Tomographic findings in patients with gunshot injury (GSI) to the maxillofacial region. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A retrospective cohort study of patients who had Computed Tomography (CT) scanning done for GSI to the maxillofacial region at the University of Benin Teaching ...

  10. Dense velocity reconstruction from tomographic PTV with material derivatives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schneiders, J.F.G.; Scarano, F.

    2016-01-01

    A method is proposed to reconstruct the instantaneous velocity field from time-resolved volumetric particle tracking velocimetry (PTV, e.g., 3D-PTV, tomographic PTV and Shake-the-Box), employing both the instantaneous velocity and the velocity material derivative of the sparse tracer particles. The

  11. Cranial Computed Tomographic (CT) findings in HIV-positive Nigerian

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    rological symptoms constitute a management challenge. Objective: T0 describe the pattern of cranial computed tomographic (CT) findings in neurosurgical patients with HIV infection. Study design: Retrospective analysis. Patients and method: A total of 1907 patients were adn mitted from October 1996 to October 2001.

  12. Computed tomographic findings in manifesting carriers of Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Visser, M.; Verbeeten, B.

    1985-01-01

    Clinical and computed tomographic (CT) findings in 3 manifesting carriers of Duchenne muscular dystrophy are reported. CT proved to be an important adjunct to the clinical examination: in all our 3 cases a decrease in density was found in various non-paretic muscles

  13. Computerised tomographic patterns in patients with head injury at ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Head injuries rank high among morbidities due to trauma. Computerised tomography is an important modality in the investigation of these cases. However, literature on this subject in the south.south geopolitical zone of Nigeria is sparse. This study therefore aimed to document the computerized tomographic ...

  14. On the statistical significance of correlations between synthetic mantle plumes and tomographic models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boschi, L.; Becker, Thorsten W.; Steinberger, Bernhard

    2008-04-01

    In a recent article, [Boschi, L., Becker, T.W., Steinberger, B., 2007. Mantle plumes: dynamic models and seismic images. Geochem. Geophys. Geosyst. 8, Q10006. doi:10.1029/2007GC001733] (BBS07) have re-evaluated the degree to which slow seismic tomography anomalies correlate with the possible locations of plume-like mantle upwellings connected to surface hotspots. They showed that several, but not all, hotspots are likely to have a deep mantle origin. Importantly, they found that when advection of plume conduits in mantle flow is considered, such correlations are significantly higher than when conduits are assumed to be vertical under hotspots. The validity of these statements depends, however, on the definition of statistical significance. BBS07 evaluated the significance of correlation through simple Student's t tests. Anderson (personal communication, July 2007) questioned this approach, given that the true information content of published tomography models is generally unknown, and proposed, instead, to evaluate the significance of correlation by comparing tomographic results with Monte Carlo simulations of randomly located plumes. Following this approach, we show here that the correlation found by BBS07 between advected plumes and slow anomalies in S-velocity tomography is less significant than previously stated, but still significant (at the 99.7% confidence level). We also find an indication that the seismic/geodynamic correlation observed by BBS07 does not only reflect the natural tendency of plumes to cluster in slow/hot regions of the mantle: although realistically advected, and thereby biased towards such regions, our random plumes correlate with slow tomographic anomalies significantly less than the plume models of BBS07. A less significant correlation with plume models characterizes P-velocity tomography; the correlation is, however, enhanced, if flow is computed from tomographic models with amplified heterogeneity, possibly accounting for the known

  15. Large-scale tomographic PIV in forced and mixed convection using a parallel SMART version

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuehn, Matthias; Ehrenfried, Klaus; Bosbach, Johannes; Wagner, Claus [German Aerospace Center (DLR), Institute of Aerodynamics and Flow Technology, Goettingen (Germany)

    2012-07-15

    Large-scale tomographic particle image velocimetry (tomographic PIV) was used to study large-scale flow structures of turbulent convective air flow in an elongated rectangular convection cell. Three flow cases have been investigated, that is, pure forced convection and mixed convection at two different Archimedes numbers. The Reynolds number was constant at Re=1.04 x 10{sup 4} for all cases, while the Archimedes numbers were Ar=2.1 and 3.6 for the mixed convection cases, corresponding to Rayleigh numbers of Ra=1.6 x 10{sup 8} and 2.8 x 10{sup 8}, respectively. In these investigations, the size of the measurement volume was as large as 840 mm x 500 mm x 240 mm. To allow for statistical analysis of the measured instantaneous flow fields, a large number of samples needed to be evaluated. Therefore, an efficient parallel implementation of the tomographic PIV algorithm was developed, which is based on a version of the simultaneous multiplicative reconstruction technique (SMART). Our algorithm distinguishes itself amongst other features by the fact that it does not store any weighting coefficients. The measurement of forced convection reveals an almost two-dimensional roll structure, which is orientated in the longitudinal cell direction. Its mean velocity field exhibits a core line with a wavy shape and a wavelength, which corresponds to the height and depth of the cell. In the instantaneous fields, the core line oscillates around its mean position. Under the influence of thermal buoyancy forces, the global structure of the flow field changes significantly. At lower Archimedes numbers, the resulting roll-like structure is shifted and deformed as compared to pure forced convection. Additionally, the core line oscillates much more strongly around its mean position due to the interaction of the roll structure with the rising hot air. If the Archimedes number is further increased, the roll-like structure breaks up into four counter-rotating convection rolls as a result of

  16. Clinical studies of pigmented lesions in human skin by using a multiphoton tomograph

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balu, Mihaela; Kelly, Kristen M.; Zachary, Christopher B.; Harris, Ronald M.; Krasieva, Tatiana B.; König, Karsten; Tromberg, Bruce J.

    2013-02-01

    In vivo imaging of pigmented lesions in human skin was performed with a clinical multiphoton microscopy (MPM)-based tomograph (MPTflex, JenLab, Germany). Two-photon excited fluorescence was used for visualizing endogenous fluorophores such as NADH/FAD, keratin, melanin in the epidermal cells and elastin fibers in the dermis. Collagen fibers were imaged by second harmonic generation. Our study involved in vivo imaging of benign melanocytic nevi, atypical nevi and melanoma. The goal of this preliminary study was to identify in vivo the characteristic features and their frequency in pigmented lesions at different stages (benign, atypical and malignant) and to evaluate the ability of in vivo MPM to distinguish atypical nevi from melanoma. Comparison with histopathology was performed for the biopsied lesions. Benign melanocytic nevi were characterized by the presence of nevus cell nests at the epidermal-dermal junction. In atypical nevi, features such as lentiginous hyperplasia, acanthosis and architectural disorder were imaged. Cytological atypia was present in all the melanoma lesions imaged, showing the strongest correlation with malignancy. The MPM images demonstrated very good correlation with corresponding histological images, suggesting that MPM could be a promising tool for in vivo non-invasive pigmented lesion diagnosis, particularly distinguishing atypical nevi from melanoma.

  17. Microwave Imaging for Breast Cancer Detection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rubæk, Tonny; Fhager, Andreas; Jensen, Peter Damsgaard

    2011-01-01

    Still more research groups are promoting microwave imaging as a viable supplement or substitution to more conventional imaging modalities. A widespread approach for microwave imaging of the breast is tomographic imaging in which one seeks to reconstruct the distributions of permittivity and condu......Still more research groups are promoting microwave imaging as a viable supplement or substitution to more conventional imaging modalities. A widespread approach for microwave imaging of the breast is tomographic imaging in which one seeks to reconstruct the distributions of permittivity...... and conductivity in the breast. In this paper two nonlinear tomographic algorithms are compared – one is a single-frequency algorithm and the other is a time-domain algorithm....

  18. Understanding the Correlation between Tomographic and Biomechanical Severity of Keratoconic Corneas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shetty, Rohit; Nuijts, Rudy M M A; Srivatsa, Purnima; Jayadev, Chaitra; Pahuja, Natasha; Akkali, Mukunda C; Sinha Roy, Abhijit

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. To evaluate correlation between tomographic gradation of keratoconus (KC) and its corresponding air-puff induced biomechanical response. Methods. Corneal tomography and biomechanics were measured with Scheimpflug imaging in 44 normal and 92 KC corneas. Deformation waveform was also analyzed with Fourier series. A custom KC severity scale was used from 1 to 3 with 3 as the most severe grade. Tomographic and biomechanical variables were assessed among the grades. Sensitivity and specificity of the variables were assessed using receiver operating characteristics (ROC). Results. Curvature variables were significantly different between normal and disease (P Biomechanical variables were significantly different between normal and disease (P 0.05). All variables had an area under the ROC curve greater than 0.5. The root mean square of the Fourier cosine coefficients had the best ROC (0.92, cut-off: 0.027, sensitivity: 83%, specificity: 88.6%). Spearman correlation coefficient was significant between most variables (P biomechanical segregation of the grades. Conclusions. There was lack of significant biomechanical difference between mild disease grades, despite progressive corneal thinning. Mathematical models that estimate corneal modulus from air-puff deformation may be more useful.

  19. PET/MR Tomographs: A Review with Technical, Radiochemical and Clinical Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giovacchini, Giampiero; Giovannini, Elisabetta; Riondato, Mattia; Ciarmiello, Andrea

    2017-11-10

    In the last decade, an increasing number of positron emission tomography / magnetic resonance (PET/MR) tomographs were installed and many clinical studies were performed in the neurological field. Although PET/MR has many favorable properties to support the application in brain imaging, attenuation correction, and therefore accurate quantification, is a problem that still requires optimal solution. In this review we have summarized the three main methods that are currently used to correct attenuation in PET/MR, namely atlas- or template-based methods, segmentation-based methods, and reconstruction-based methods. There is currently active ongoing research to refine available methods and improvements are reasonably expected in the next years. Clinical studies using PET/MR focused mainly on neurodegenerative and neurooncological disorders. PET/MR hybrids tomographs provided promising scientific results and were logistically more convenient for patients. Additionally, in order to explore all potential clinical benefits of this hybrid technology, the design and development of multimodal contrast agents has constantly increased the attention of radiochemists. Many PET/MR dual probes have been already devised, particularly in the nanotechnology field, sometimes preceding the identification of a clear diagnostic application in medicine. In the near future, we predict more clinical studies as the availability of PET/MR will further increase and new tracers for neurodegenerative disorders will accept broader clinical acceptance. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  20. Understanding the Correlation between Tomographic and Biomechanical Severity of Keratoconic Corneas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shetty, Rohit; Nuijts, Rudy M. M. A.; Srivatsa, Purnima; Pahuja, Natasha; Akkali, Mukunda C.; Sinha Roy, Abhijit

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. To evaluate correlation between tomographic gradation of keratoconus (KC) and its corresponding air-puff induced biomechanical response. Methods. Corneal tomography and biomechanics were measured with Scheimpflug imaging in 44 normal and 92 KC corneas. Deformation waveform was also analyzed with Fourier series. A custom KC severity scale was used from 1 to 3 with 3 as the most severe grade. Tomographic and biomechanical variables were assessed among the grades. Sensitivity and specificity of the variables were assessed using receiver operating characteristics (ROC). Results. Curvature variables were significantly different between normal and disease (P Biomechanical variables were significantly different between normal and disease (P 0.05). All variables had an area under the ROC curve greater than 0.5. The root mean square of the Fourier cosine coefficients had the best ROC (0.92, cut-off: 0.027, sensitivity: 83%, specificity: 88.6%). Spearman correlation coefficient was significant between most variables (P biomechanical segregation of the grades. Conclusions. There was lack of significant biomechanical difference between mild disease grades, despite progressive corneal thinning. Mathematical models that estimate corneal modulus from air-puff deformation may be more useful. PMID:25945330

  1. Trace: a high-throughput tomographic reconstruction engine for large-scale datasets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bicer, Tekin; Gürsoy, Doğa; Andrade, Vincent De; Kettimuthu, Rajkumar; Scullin, William; Carlo, Francesco De; Foster, Ian T

    2017-01-01

    Modern synchrotron light sources and detectors produce data at such scale and complexity that large-scale computation is required to unleash their full power. One of the widely used imaging techniques that generates data at tens of gigabytes per second is computed tomography (CT). Although CT experiments result in rapid data generation, the analysis and reconstruction of the collected data may require hours or even days of computation time with a medium-sized workstation, which hinders the scientific progress that relies on the results of analysis. We present Trace, a data-intensive computing engine that we have developed to enable high-performance implementation of iterative tomographic reconstruction algorithms for parallel computers. Trace provides fine-grained reconstruction of tomography datasets using both (thread-level) shared memory and (process-level) distributed memory parallelization. Trace utilizes a special data structure called replicated reconstruction object to maximize application performance. We also present the optimizations that we apply to the replicated reconstruction objects and evaluate them using tomography datasets collected at the Advanced Photon Source. Our experimental evaluations show that our optimizations and parallelization techniques can provide 158× speedup using 32 compute nodes (384 cores) over a single-core configuration and decrease the end-to-end processing time of a large sinogram (with 4501 × 1 × 22,400 dimensions) from 12.5 h to reconstruction engine can efficiently process large-scale tomographic data using many compute nodes and minimize reconstruction times.

  2. TOMOGRAPHIC MAMMOGRAPHY AND TOMOSYNTHESIS USING OPENGL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. A. Zolotarev

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Computed tomography is still being intensively studied and widely used to solve a number of industrial and medical applications. The simultaneous algebraic reconstruction technique (SART and Bayesian inference reconstruction (BIR are considered as advantageous iteration methods that are most suitable for improving the quality of the reconstructed 3D-images. The paper deals with the parallel iterative algorithms to ensure the reconstruction of threedimensional images of the breast, recovered from a limited set of noisy X-ray projections. Algebraic method of reconstruction with simultaneous iterations – SART and iterative method for statistical reconstruction of BIR are deemed to be the most preferred iterative methods. We believe that these methods are particularly useful for improving the quality of breast reconstructed image. We use the graphics processor (GPU to accelerate the process of reconstruction. Preliminary results show that all investigated methods are useful in breast reconstruction layered images. However, it was found that the method of classical tomosynthesis SAA is less efficient than iterative methods SART and BIR as the worst suppress the anatomical noise. Despite the fact that the estimated ratio of the contrast / noise ratio in the presence of internal structures with low contrast is higher for classical tomosynthesis method the SAA, its effectiveness in the presence of highly structured background is low. In our opinion the best results can be achieved using statistical iterative reconstruction BIR.

  3. Tomographic, hydrochemical and isotopic investigations of the ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    An electrical imaging tomography survey was carried out to identify the lateral and vertical salinity distribution in the oasis shallow aquifers of the Nefzaoua region located in southwestern Tunisia. In addition, hydrochemical and isotopic data were examined to determine the main factors and mechanisms controlling the ...

  4. A Mobile Automated Tomographic Gamma Scanning System - 13231

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirkpatrick, J.M.; LeBlanc, P.J.; Nakazawa, D.; Petroka, D.L.; Kane Smith, S.; Venkataraman, R.; Villani, M. [Canberra Industries, Inc. 800 Research Parkway, Meriden CT 06450 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    Canberra Industries have recently designed and built a new automated Tomographic Gamma Scanning (TGS) system for mobile deployment. The TGS technique combines high-resolution gamma spectroscopy with low spatial resolution 3-dimensional image reconstruction to provide increased accuracy over traditional approaches for the assay of non-uniform source distributions in low-to medium-density, non-heterogeneous matrices. Originally pioneered by R. Estep at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), the TGS method has been further developed and commercialized by Canberra Industries in recent years. The present system advances the state of the art on several fronts: it is designed to be housed in a standard cargo transport container for ease of transport, allowing waste characterization at multiple facilities under the purview of a single operator. Conveyor feed, drum rotator, and detector and collimator positioning mechanisms operated by programmable logic control (PLC) allow automated batch mode operation. The variable geometry settings can accommodate a wide range of waste packaging, including but not limited to standard 220 liter drums, 380 liter overpack drums, and smaller 20 liter cans. A 20 mCi Eu-152 transmission source provides attenuation corrections for drum matrices up to 1 g/cm{sup 3} in TGS mode; the system can be operated in Segmented Gamma Scanning (SGS) mode to measure higher density drums. To support TGS assays at higher densities, the source shield is sufficient to house an alternate Co-60 transmission source of higher activity, up to 250 mCi. An automated shutter and attenuator assembly is provided for operating the system with a dual intensity transmission source. The system's 1500 kg capacity rotator turntable can handle heavy containers such as concrete lined 380 liter overpack drums. Finally, data acquisition utilizes Canberra's Broad Energy Germanium (BEGE) detector and Lynx MCA, with 32 k channels, providing better than 0.1 ke

  5. Tomographic findings of lobar consolidation in primary pulmonary tuberculosis; Aspectos tomograficos da consolidacao lobar na tuberculose pulmonar primaria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pereira, Bruno Alberto Falcao [Hopital Europeen Georges Pompidou, Paris (France); Macedo, Solange Goncalves David de [Hospital Municipal Jesus, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Setor de Pneumologia; Nogueira, Renata do Amaral [Clinica de Diagnostico por Imagem (CDPI), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Setor de Pediatria; Castiel, Lola Celeste Pantoja [Clinica Radiologica Dr. Samuel Castiel, Porto Velho, RO (Brazil); Penna, Claudia Renata Rezende [Hospital Municipal Jesus, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Servico de Radiologia Pediatrica], e-mail: cr-penna@uol.com.br

    2009-03-15

    Objective: To describe tomographic findings of lobar consolidation as early manifestation of primary pulmonary tuberculosis. Materials and methods: The present study was developed at Hospital Municipal Jesus, Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brazil, in the period between 2002 and 2006, retrospectively evaluating tomographic findings in four children aged from 3 to 14 months with lobar consolidation as an early manifestation of primary pulmonary tuberculosis. Results: The most frequently found radiological pattern was lobar consolidation with calcifications, cavitation and intermingle necrotic areas, associated with bulging fissure. Signs of bronchogenic dissemination and lymph node enlargement were observed in all of the four children. Consolidation with a pseudotumor aspect and masslike effect was observed in one case. Conclusion: The cases included in the present study have demonstrated that primary pulmonary tuberculosis manifested as lobar consolidation presents typical tomographic images such as cavitation, hypodense areas and calcifications intermingled with consolidation. The association with lymph node enlargement with central necrosis and signs of bronchogenic dissemination reinforce the diagnosis of tuberculosis. (author)

  6. Experimental evaluation and basis function optimization of the spatially variant image-space PSF on the Ingenuity PET/MR scanner

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kotasidis, Fotis A.; Zaidi, Habib

    Purpose: The Ingenuity time-of-flight (TF) PET/MR is a recently developed hybrid scanner combining the molecular imaging capabilities of PET with the excellent soft tissue contrast of MRI. It is becoming common practice to characterize the system's point spread function (PSF) and understand its

  7. Genetic variants of the NOTCH3 gene in the elderly and magnetic resonance imaging correlates of age-related cerebral small vessel disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. Schmidt (Reinhold); M. Zeginigg (Marion); M. Wiltgen (Marco); P. Freudenberger (Paul); K. Petrovic (Katja); M. Cavalieri (Margherita); P. Gider (Pierre); C. Enzinger (Christian); M. Fornage (Myriam); S. Debette (Stéphanie); J.I. Rotter (Jerome); M.A. Ikram (Arfan); L.J. Launer (Lenore)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractCerebral small vessel disease-related brain lesions such as white matter lesions and lacunes are common findings of magnetic resonance imaging in the elderly. These lesions are thought to be major contributors to disability in old age, and risk factors that include age and hypertension

  8. Tomographic findings of acute pulmonary toxoplasmosis in immunocompetent patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Souza Giassi, Karina; Costa, Andre Nathan; Apanavicius, Andre; Teixeira, Fernando Bin; Fernandes, Caio Julio Cesar; Helito, Alfredo Salim; Kairalla, Ronaldo Adib

    2014-11-25

    Toxoplasmosis is one of the most common human zoonosis, and is generally benign in most of the individuals. Pulmonary involvement is common in immunocompromised subjects, but very rare in immunocompetents and there are scarce reports of tomographic findings in the literature. The aim of the study is to describe three immunocompetent patients diagnosed with acute pulmonary toxoplasmosis and their respective thoracic tomographic findings. Acute toxoplasmosis was diagnosed according to the results of serological tests suggestive of recent primary infection and the absence of an alternative etiology. From 2009 to 2013, three patients were diagnosed with acute respiratory failure secondary to acute toxoplasmosis. The patients were two female and one male, and were 38, 56 and 36 years old. Similarly they presented a two-week febrile illness and progressive dyspnea before admission. Laboratory tests demonstrated lymphocytosis, slight changes in liver enzymes and high inflammatory markers. Tomographic findings were bilateral smooth septal and peribronchovascular thickening (100%), ground-glass opacities (100%), atelectasis (33%), random nodules (33%), lymph node enlargement (33%) and pleural effusion (66%). All the patients improved their symptoms after treatment, and complete resolution of tomographic findings were found in the followup. These cases provide a unique description of the presentation and evolution of pulmonary tomographic manifestations of toxoplasmosis in immunocompetent patients. Toxoplasma pneumonia manifests with fever, dyspnea and a non-productive cough that may result in respiratory failure. In animal models, changes were described as interstitial pneumonitis with focal infiltrates of neutrophils that can finally evolve into a pattern of diffuse alveolar damage with focal necrosis. The tomographic findings are characterized as ground glass opacities, smooth septal and marked peribronchovascular thickening; and may mimic pulmonary congestion

  9. Desmoplastic variant of ameloblastoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sohn, Jeong Ick; Kim, Dong Youn; Choi, Karp Shik [Dept. of Dental Radiology, College of Dentistry, Kyungpook National University, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-02-15

    Desmoplastic variant of ameloblastoma is new and unusual variant of ameloblastoma with extensive stromal desmoplastic proliferation. The authors experienced a case of desmoplastic variant of amleloblastoma with moderate-defined radiolucency on the right maxillary anterior area in 62-year-old female. As a result of careful analysis of clinical, radiological examinations, we diagnosed it as desmoplastic variant of ameloblastoma. The following results were obtained; 1. Main clinical symptoms were nontender bony swelling with normal intact overlying mucosa on the right maxillary anterior area. 2. Radiographically, moderate-defined, multilocular radioluceney on the right maxillary anterior area were shown, and severe cortical bony thinning and expansion to labial and palatal sides were also observed. And this lesion was shown to be extended to the right nasal cavity. 3. Histopathologically, follicle-like epithelial islands with densely abundant collagenous stroma were morphologically compressed.

  10. Computer tomographic findings in mitral valve disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heuser, L.; Neufang, K.F.R.; Jansen, W.

    1984-04-01

    In 38 patients suffering from mitral valve disease the findings of cardiac CT scans were compared to the results of echocardiographic, standard roentgenographic, and cineangiocardiographic studies as well as to intraoperative and histological findings. CT proved to be superior to the other imaging modalities in detecting mitral calcifications and in demonstrating the morphological changes, but cannot replace cardiac catheterization as it does not yield haemodynamic data. The indication for CT in mitral valve disease therefore is restricted to cases with extremely enlarged left atria in which the other methods do not provide satisfactory visualization, and to patients with suspected intracavitary thrombus or tumor. 8 figs.

  11. Lq regularization-based unobserved baselines' data estimation method for tomographic synthetic aperture radar inversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bi, Hui; Zhang, Bingchen; Hong, Wen

    2016-07-01

    The elevation image quality of tomographic synthetic aperture radar (TomoSAR) data depends mainly on the elevation aperture size, number of baselines, and baseline distribution. In TomoSAR, due to the restricted number of baselines with irregular distributions, the elevation imaging quality is always unacceptable using the conventional spectral analysis approach. Therefore, for a given limited number of irregular baselines, the completion of data for the unobserved virtual uniform baseline distribution should be addressed to improve the spectral analysis-based TomoSAR reconstruction quality. We propose an Lq(0TomoSAR, which uses the geometric imaging relationship between the observed and unobserved baseline distributions. In the proposed method, we first estimate the transformation matrix between the acquisitions and the data of virtual uniform baseline distribution by solving an optimization problem, before calculating the data for virtual baseline distribution based on the acquisitions and the transformation matrix. Finally, the elevation reflectivity function is recovered using the spectral analysis method based on the estimated data. Compared with the reconstructed results only based on the limited irregular acquisitions, the image recovered using the dataset with a virtual uniform baseline distribution can improve the elevation image quality in an efficient manner.

  12. Tomographic reconstruction with B-splines surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, Eric F.; Dantas, Carlos C., E-mail: ccd@ufpe.br [Department of Nuclear Energy (DEN). Federal University of Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil); Melo, Silvio B.; Mota, Icaro V.; Lira, Mailson, E-mail: sbm@cin.ufpe.br [Informatic Center (CIN). Federal University of Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    Algebraic reconstruction techniques when applied to a limited number of data usually suffer from noise caused by the process of correction or by inconsistencies in the data coming from the stochastic process of radioactive emission and oscillation equipment. The post - processing of the reconstructed image with the application of filters can be done to mitigate the presence of noise. In general these processes also attenuate the discontinuities present in edges that distinguish objects or artifacts, causing excessive blurring in the reconstructed image. This paper proposes a built-in noise reduction at the same time that it ensures adequate smoothness level in the reconstructed surface, representing the unknowns as linear combinations of elements of a piecewise polynomial basis, i.e. a B-splines basis. For that, the algebraic technique ART is modified to accommodate the first, second and third degree bases, ensuring C{sup 0}, C{sup 1} and C{sup 2} smoothness levels, respectively. For comparisons, three methodologies are applied: ART, ART post-processed with regular B-splines filters (ART*) and the proposed method with the built-in B-splines filter (BsART). Simulations with input data produced from common mathematical phantoms were conducted. For the phantoms used the BsART method consistently presented the smallest errors, among the three methods. This study has shown the superiority of the change made to embed the filter in the ART when compared to the post-filtered ART. (author)

  13. Attenuation correction for small animal PET tomographs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chow, Patrick L [David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Crump Institute for Molecular Imaging, University of California, 700 Westwood Plaza, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Rannou, Fernando R [Departamento de Ingenieria Informatica, Universidad de Santiago de Chile (USACH), Av. Ecuador 3659, Santiago (Chile); Chatziioannou, Arion F [David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Crump Institute for Molecular Imaging, University of California, 700 Westwood Plaza, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States)

    2005-04-21

    Attenuation correction is one of the important corrections required for quantitative positron emission tomography (PET). This work will compare the quantitative accuracy of attenuation correction using a simple global scale factor with traditional transmission-based methods acquired either with a small animal PET or a small animal x-ray computed tomography (CT) scanner. Two phantoms (one mouse-sized and one rat-sized) and two animal subjects (one mouse and one rat) were scanned in CTI Concorde Microsystem's microPET (registered) Focus{sup TM} for emission and transmission data and in ImTek's MicroCAT{sup TM} II for transmission data. PET emission image values were calibrated against a scintillation well counter. Results indicate that the scale factor method of attenuation correction places the average measured activity concentration about the expected value, without correcting for the cupping artefact from attenuation. Noise analysis in the phantom studies with the PET-based method shows that noise in the transmission data increases the noise in the corrected emission data. The CT-based method was accurate and delivered low-noise images suitable for both PET data correction and PET tracer localization.

  14. Virtual adaptation of physical phantoms to datasets derived from clinical tomographic examinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schöfer, Felix H.; Schneider, Karl; Hoeschen, Christoph

    2007-03-01

    Thoracic radiography was simulated making use of a virtual pediatric model created from tomographic data (voxelphantom) of a child eight weeks old. The dataset was scaled down to fit the dimensions of a premature newborn. The simulation allows a quantitative and spatially resolved analysis of the x-ray image generation. The transmission behavior of different anatomical regions present in the voxelphantom was compared to the output of the simulation of a step-like phantom made from aluminum and PMMA. The step like structure of the simulated model can be easily built and statements about its x-ray related behavior can be directly validated by means of experiments. A thin contrast plate was placed on each step to make the determination of dependences e.g. between the applied radiation energy and the contrast to noise ratio possible.

  15. Identification and analysis of boundary layer structures in Tomographic PIV data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz-Duenas, Cecilia; Saikrishnan, Neelakantan; Longmire, Ellen

    2009-11-01

    Tomographic particle image velocimetry data were acquired in a turbulent boundary layer flow generated in a wind tunnel facility. The friction Reynolds number Reτ was 1160. Measurement volumes of streamwise and spanwise dimension 0.7δ and wall normal thickness 0.07δ, which resolved the range z^+ = 70-150, were analyzed using custom software. Various criteria, including streamwise velocity, two- and three-dimensional swirl, individual vorticity components, and Reynolds shear stress, in combination with region growing and coincidence algorithms, were employed to identify and characterize coherent structures present in instantaneous fields. The results of the present study will be described and also compared with results from earlier experiments by Ganapathisubramani et al., 2003, 2006, that relied on planar PIV data only.

  16. Hybrid computing: CPU+GPU co-processing and its application to tomographic reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agulleiro, J I; Vázquez, F; Garzón, E M; Fernández, J J

    2012-04-01

    Modern computers are equipped with powerful computing engines like multicore processors and GPUs. The 3DEM community has rapidly adapted to this scenario and many software packages now make use of high performance computing techniques to exploit these devices. However, the implementations thus far are purely focused on either GPUs or CPUs. This work presents a hybrid approach that collaboratively combines the GPUs and CPUs available in a computer and applies it to the problem of tomographic reconstruction. Proper orchestration of workload in such a heterogeneous system is an issue. Here we use an on-demand strategy whereby the computing devices request a new piece of work to do when idle. Our hybrid approach thus takes advantage of the whole computing power available in modern computers and further reduces the processing time. This CPU+GPU co-processing can be readily extended to other image processing tasks in 3DEM. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Photon and electron absorbed fractions calculated from a new tomographic rat model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peixoto, P H R [Departamento de Energia Nuclear, Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, Av. Prof. Luiz Freire 1000, Cidade Universitaria, CEP 50740-540, Recife, PE (Brazil); Vieira, J W [Centro Federal de Educacao Tecnologica de Pernambuco, Recife, PE (Brazil); Yoriyaz, H [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Lima, F R A [Centro Regional de Ciencias Nucleares-CNEN, Recife, PE (Brazil)], E-mail: phrpeixoto@yahoo.com.br

    2008-10-07

    This paper describes the development of a tomographic model of a rat developed using CT images of an adult male Wistar rat for radiation transport studies. It also presents calculations of absorbed fractions (AFs) under internal photon and electron sources using this rat model and the Monte Carlo code MCNP. All data related to the developed phantom were made available for the scientific community as well as the MCNP inputs prepared for AF calculations in that phantom and also all estimated AF values, which could be used to obtain absorbed dose estimates-following the MIRD methodology-in rats similar in size to the presently developed model. Comparison between the rat model developed in this study and that published by Stabin et al (2006 J. Nucl. Med. 47 655) for a 248 g Sprague-Dawley rat, as well as between the estimated AF values for both models, has been presented.

  18. Computed tomographic scan in the diagnosis of bilateral renal lymphangiectasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rastogi Rajul

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Renal lymphangiectasia is a rarely reported disorder of lymphatic malformation. Although benign, it may lead to hypertension and renal failure in undetected or undiagnosed cases. Adult polycystic kidney disease is a close mimic. We herewith present a rare case of bilateral renal lymphangiectasia that was strongly suspected on Computed tomographic (CT scan and confirmed by aspiration cytology. Awareness about this condition will result in early diagnosis, early treatment and reduced morbidity.

  19. Images

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Images for the website main pages and all configurations. The upload and access points for the other images are: Website Template RSW images BSCW Images HIRENASD...

  20. Information fusion in regularized inversion of tomographic pumping tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohling, G.C.; ,

    2008-01-01

    In this chapter we investigate a simple approach to incorporating geophysical information into the analysis of tomographic pumping tests for characterization of the hydraulic conductivity (K) field in an aquifer. A number of authors have suggested a tomographic approach to the analysis of hydraulic tests in aquifers - essentially simultaneous analysis of multiple tests or stresses on the flow system - in order to improve the resolution of the estimated parameter fields. However, even with a large amount of hydraulic data in hand, the inverse problem is still plagued by non-uniqueness and ill-conditioning and the parameter space for the inversion needs to be constrained in some sensible fashion in order to obtain plausible estimates of aquifer properties. For seismic and radar tomography problems, the parameter space is often constrained through the application of regularization terms that impose penalties on deviations of the estimated parameters from a prior or background model, with the tradeoff between data fit and model norm explored through systematic analysis of results for different levels of weighting on the regularization terms. In this study we apply systematic regularized inversion to analysis of tomographic pumping tests in an alluvial aquifer, taking advantage of the steady-shape flow regime exhibited in these tests to expedite the inversion process. In addition, we explore the possibility of incorporating geophysical information into the inversion through a regularization term relating the estimated K distribution to ground penetrating radar velocity and attenuation distributions through a smoothing spline model. ?? 2008 Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.

  1. Multi-pinhole fluorescent x-ray computed tomography for molecular imaging

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tenta Sasaya; Naoki Sunaguchi; Kazuyuki Hyodo; Tsutomu Zeniya; Tetsuya Yuasa

    2017-01-01

    We propose a multi-pinhole fluorescent x-ray computed tomography (mp-FXCT) technique for preclinical molecular imaging that can provide the complete data necessary to produce 3-D tomographic images during anaesthesia...

  2. Tomographic diagnosis and relevant aspects of otosclerosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaiotti, Juliana Oggioni; Gomes, Natalia Delage; Costa, Ana Maria Doffemond; Villela, Caroline Laurita Batista Couto; Moreira, Wanderval; Diniz, Renata Lopes Furletti Caldeira, E-mail: jugaiotti@gmail.com [Hospital Mater Dei-Mater Imagem, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2013-09-15

    A literature review and pictorial essay were developed to discuss the importance of knowing the main findings and locations of otosclerosis at multidetector computed tomography (MDCT). The authors performed a retrospective review of cases of otosclerosis diagnosed in their institution by means of high resolution multidetector computed tomography. Otosclerosis corresponds to otic capsule dysplasia characterized by metabolic derangement of its endochondral layer. Such condition constitutes a relevant cause of sensorineural hearing loss, affecting about 7% to 10% of the general population. The diagnosis is usually clinical, but imaging methods play a significant role in the anatomical detailing, differential diagnosis, surgical planning and evaluation of postoperative complications. Among such methods, the relevance of MDCT is highlighted. Radiologists should be familiar with the MDCT findings of otosclerosis, as well as with the temporal bone anatomy to assist in the appropriate clinical management of this disease. (author)

  3. Initial experience with adaptive iterative dose reduction 3D to reduce radiation dose in computed tomographic urography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juri, Hiroshi; Matsuki, Mitsuru; Itou, Yasushi; Inada, Yuki; Nakai, Go; Azuma, Haruhito; Narumi, Yoshifumi

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the feasibility of low-dose computed tomographic (CT) urography with adaptive iterative dose reduction 3D (AIDR 3D). Thirty patients underwent routine-dose CT scans with filtered back projection and low-dose CT scans with AIDR 3D in the excretory phase of CT urography. Visual evaluations were performed with respect to internal image noises, sharpness, streak artifacts, and diagnostic acceptability. Quantitative measures of the image noise and radiation dose were also obtained. All results were compared on the basis of body mass index (BMI). At visual evaluations, streak artifacts in the urinary bladder were statistically weaker on low-dose CT than on routine-dose CT in the axial and coronal images (P urography with AIDR 3D allows 45% reduction of radiation dose without degenerating of the image quality in the excretory phase independently to a BMI.

  4. Quantifying phosphoric acid in high-temperature polymer electrolyte fuel cell components by X-ray tomographic microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eberhardt, S H; Marone, F; Stampanoni, M; Büchi, F N; Schmidt, T J

    2014-11-01

    Synchrotron-based X-ray tomographic microscopy is investigated for imaging the local distribution and concentration of phosphoric acid in high-temperature polymer electrolyte fuel cells. Phosphoric acid fills the pores of the macro- and microporous fuel cell components. Its concentration in the fuel cell varies over a wide range (40-100 wt% H3PO4). This renders the quantification and concentration determination challenging. The problem is solved by using propagation-based phase contrast imaging and a referencing method. Fuel cell components with known acid concentrations were used to correlate greyscale values and acid concentrations. Thus calibration curves were established for the gas diffusion layer, catalyst layer and membrane in a non-operating fuel cell. The non-destructive imaging methodology was verified by comparing image-based values for acid content and concentration in the gas diffusion layer with those from chemical analysis.

  5. Evaluation of sample holders designed for long-lasting X-ray micro-tomographic scans of ex-vivo soft tissue samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudak, J.; Zemlicka, J.; Krejci, F.; Karch, J.; Patzelt, M.; Zach, P.; Sykora, V.; Mrzilkova, J.

    2016-03-01

    X-ray microradiography and microtomography are imaging techniques with increasing applicability in the field of biomedical and preclinical research. Application of hybrid pixel detector Timepix enables to obtain very high contrast of low attenuating materials such as soft biological tissue. However X-ray imaging of ex-vivo soft tissue samples is a difficult task due to its structural instability. Ex-vivo biological tissue is prone to fast drying-out which is connected with undesired changes of sample size and shape producing later on artefacts within the tomographic reconstruction. In this work we present the optimization of our Timepix equipped micro-CT system aiming to maintain soft tissue sample in stable condition. Thanks to the suggested approach higher contrast of tomographic reconstructions can be achieved while also large samples that require detector scanning can be easily measured.

  6. Tomographic reconstruction of neopterous carboniferous insect nymphs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Russell Garwood

    Full Text Available Two new polyneopteran insect nymphs from the Montceau-les-Mines Lagerstätte of France are presented. Both are preserved in three dimensions, and are imaged with the aid of X-ray micro-tomography, allowing their morphology to be recovered in unprecedented detail. One-Anebos phrixos gen. et sp. nov.-is of uncertain affinities, and preserves portions of the antennae and eyes, coupled with a heavily spined habitus. The other is a roachoid with long antennae and chewing mouthparts very similar in form to the most generalized mandibulate mouthparts of extant orthopteroid insects. Computer reconstructions reveal limbs in both specimens, allowing identification of the segments and annulation in the tarsus, while poorly developed thoracic wing pads suggest both are young instars. This work describes the morphologically best-known Palaeozoic insect nymphs, allowing a better understanding of the juveniles' palaeobiology and palaeoecology. We also consider the validity of evidence from Palaeozoic juvenile insects in wing origin theories. The study of juvenile Palaeozoic insects is currently a neglected field, yet these fossils provide direct evidence on the evolution of insect development. It is hoped this study will stimulate a renewed interest in such work.

  7. Tomographic Reconstruction of Neopterous Carboniferous Insect Nymphs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garwood, Russell; Ross, Andrew; Sotty, Daniel; Chabard, Dominique; Charbonnier, Sylvain; Sutton, Mark; Withers, Philip J.

    2012-01-01

    Two new polyneopteran insect nymphs from the Montceau-les-Mines Lagerstätte of France are presented. Both are preserved in three dimensions, and are imaged with the aid of X-ray micro-tomography, allowing their morphology to be recovered in unprecedented detail. One–Anebos phrixos gen. et sp. nov.–is of uncertain affinities, and preserves portions of the antennae and eyes, coupled with a heavily spined habitus. The other is a roachoid with long antennae and chewing mouthparts very similar in form to the most generalized mandibulate mouthparts of extant orthopteroid insects. Computer reconstructions reveal limbs in both specimens, allowing identification of the segments and annulation in the tarsus, while poorly developed thoracic wing pads suggest both are young instars. This work describes the morphologically best-known Palaeozoic insect nymphs, allowing a better understanding of the juveniles’ palaeobiology and palaeoecology. We also consider the validity of evidence from Palaeozoic juvenile insects in wing origin theories. The study of juvenile Palaeozoic insects is currently a neglected field, yet these fossils provide direct evidence on the evolution of insect development. It is hoped this study will stimulate a renewed interest in such work. PMID:23049858

  8. Smartphone based Tomographic PIV using colored shadows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguirre-Pablo, Andres A.; Alarfaj, Meshal K.; Li, Er Qiang; Thoroddsen, Sigurdur T.

    2016-11-01

    We use low-cost smartphones and Tomo-PIV, to reconstruct the 3D-3C velocity field of a vortex ring. The experiment is carried out in an octagonal tank of water with a vortex ring generator consisting of a flexible membrane enclosed by a cylindrical chamber. This chamber is pre-seeded with black polyethylene microparticles. The membrane is driven by an adjustable impulsive air-pressure to produce the vortex ring. Four synchronized smartphone cameras, of 40 Mpx each, are used to capture the location of particles from different viewing angles. We use red, green and blue LED's as backlighting sources, to capture particle locations at different times. The exposure time on the smartphone cameras are set to 2 seconds, while exposing each LED color for about 80 μs with different time steps that can go below 300 μs. The timing of these light pulses is controlled with a digital delay generator. The backlight is blocked by the instantaneous location of the particles in motion, leaving a shadow of the corresponding color for each time step. The image then is preprocessed to separate the 3 different color fields, before using the MART reconstruction and cross-correlation of the time steps to obtain the 3D-3C velocity field. This proof of concept experiment represents a possible low-cost Tomo-PIV setup.

  9. Tomographic reconstruction of neopterous carboniferous insect nymphs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garwood, Russell; Ross, Andrew; Sotty, Daniel; Chabard, Dominique; Charbonnier, Sylvain; Sutton, Mark; Withers, Philip J

    2012-01-01

    Two new polyneopteran insect nymphs from the Montceau-les-Mines Lagerstätte of France are presented. Both are preserved in three dimensions, and are imaged with the aid of X-ray micro-tomography, allowing their morphology to be recovered in unprecedented detail. One-Anebos phrixos gen. et sp. nov.-is of uncertain affinities, and preserves portions of the antennae and eyes, coupled with a heavily spined habitus. The other is a roachoid with long antennae and chewing mouthparts very similar in form to the most generalized mandibulate mouthparts of extant orthopteroid insects. Computer reconstructions reveal limbs in both specimens, allowing identification of the segments and annulation in the tarsus, while poorly developed thoracic wing pads suggest both are young instars. This work describes the morphologically best-known Palaeozoic insect nymphs, allowing a better understanding of the juveniles' palaeobiology and palaeoecology. We also consider the validity of evidence from Palaeozoic juvenile insects in wing origin theories. The study of juvenile Palaeozoic insects is currently a neglected field, yet these fossils provide direct evidence on the evolution of insect development. It is hoped this study will stimulate a renewed interest in such work.

  10. A case of reninoma with variant angina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyung Ah Jo

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Reninoma is a tumor of the renal juxtaglomerular cell apparatus that causes hypertension and hypokalemia because of hypersecretion of renin. We present a case of a 29-year-old female patient with reninoma and concomitant variant angina. The patient had uncontrolled hypertension and elevated plasma renin activity and aldosterone levels. Imaging studies revealed a mass in the left kidney, which was further confirmed as a renin-producing lesion via selective venous catheterization. During the evaluation, the patient had acute-onset chest pain that was diagnosed as variant angina after a provocation test. After partial nephrectomy, the plasma renin activity and plasma aldosterone levels decreased and blood pressure normalized. We report a case of reninoma with variant angina.

  11. Middle east respiratory syndrome-corona virus infection: A case report of sieral computed tomographic findings in a young male patient

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Won Jin; Lee, Ki Nam; Kang, Eun Ju; Lee, Hyuck [Dong A University Hospital, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-02-15

    Radiologic findings of Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS), a novel coronavirus infection, have been rarely reported. We report a 30-year-old male presented with fever, abdominal pain, and diarrhea, who was diagnosed with MERS. A chest computed tomographic scan revealed rapidly developed multifocal nodular consolidations with ground-glass opacity halo and mixed consolidation, mainly in the dependent and peripheral areas. After treatment, follow-up imaging showed that these abnormalities markedly decreased but fibrotic changes developed.

  12. Hemoglobin Variants in Mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Popp, Raymond A.

    1965-04-22

    Variability among mammalian hemoglobins was observed many years ago (35). The chemical basis for differences among hemoglobins from different species of mammals has been studied by several investigators (5, 11, 18, 48). As well as interspecies differences, hemoglobin variants are frequently found within a species of mammals (2, 3, 7, 16) The inheritance of these intraspecies variants can be studied, and pedigrees indicate that the type of hemoglobin synthesized in an individual is genetically controlled (20). Several of the variant human hemoglobins are f'unctionally deficient (7, 16). Such hemoglobin anomalies are of basic interest to man because of the vital role of hemoglobin for transporting oxygen to all tissues of the body.

  13. [Histone variants and histone exchange].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Nan; Gui, Jian-Fang

    2006-04-01

    Histones, as the basic components of nucleosome, are essential to chromatin structure and function. To adapt to various states of chromatin, corresponding histone variants are incorporated in nucleosome, and certain modifications also occur on the variants' tails. These variants change the conformation and stability of nucleosome to facilitate transcriptional activation or deactivation, DNA repairing, heterochromatin formation, and others. During histone exchange, chromatin remodeling complex facilitates histone variant deposition into nucleosome, and different variants have diverse deposition pathways. Recently, research on histone variants is not only a new hotspot in epigenetics, but also a new annotation of "histone code". In addition, histone exchange reveals new changing mechanism of DNA-histone interaction.

  14. Application of tomographic inversion in studying airglow in the mesopause region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Nygrén

    Full Text Available It is pointed out that observations of periodic nightglow structures give excellent information on atmospheric gravity waves in the mesosphere and lower thermosphere. The periods, the horizontal wavelengths and the phase speeds of the waves can be determined from airglow images and, using several cameras, the approximate altitude of the luminous layer can also be determined by triangulation. In this paper the possibility of applying tomographic methods for reconstructing the airglow structures is investigated using numerical simulations. A ground-based chain of cameras is assumed, two-dimensional airglow models in the vertical plane above the chain are constructed, and simulated data are calculated by integrating the models along a great number of rays with different elevation angles for each camera. After addition of random noise, these data are then inverted to obtain reconstructions of the models. A tomographic analysis package originally designed for satellite radiotomography is used in the inversion. The package is based on a formulation of stochastic inversion which allows the input of a priori information to the solver in terms of regularization variances. The reconstruction is carried out in two stages. In the first inversion, constant regularization variances are used within a wide altitude range. The results are used in determining the approximate altitude range of the airglow structures. Then, in the second inversion, constant non-zero regularization variances are used inside this region and zero variances outside it. With this method reliable reconstructions of the models are obtained. The number of cameras as well as their separations are varied in order to find out the limitations of the method.

    Key words. Tomography · Airglow · Mesopause · Gravity waves

  15. A distributed multi-GPU system for high speed electron microscopic tomographic reconstruction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Shawn Q.; Branlund, Eric; Kesthelyi, Bettina; Braunfeld, Michael B.; Cheng, Yifan; Sedat, John W. [The Howard Hughes Medical Institute and the W.M. Keck Advanced Microscopy Laboratory, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics, University of California, San Francisco, 600, 16th Street, Room S412D, CA 94158-2517 (United States); Agard, David A., E-mail: agard@msg.ucsf.edu [The Howard Hughes Medical Institute and the W.M. Keck Advanced Microscopy Laboratory, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics, University of California, San Francisco, 600, 16th Street, Room S412D, CA 94158-2517 (United States)

    2011-07-15

    Full resolution electron microscopic tomographic (EMT) reconstruction of large-scale tilt series requires significant computing power. The desire to perform multiple cycles of iterative reconstruction and realignment dramatically increases the pressing need to improve reconstruction performance. This has motivated us to develop a distributed multi-GPU (graphics processing unit) system to provide the required computing power for rapid constrained, iterative reconstructions of very large three-dimensional (3D) volumes. The participating GPUs reconstruct segments of the volume in parallel, and subsequently, the segments are assembled to form the complete 3D volume. Owing to its power and versatility, the CUDA (NVIDIA, USA) platform was selected for GPU implementation of the EMT reconstruction. For a system containing 10 GPUs provided by 5 GTX295 cards, 10 cycles of SIRT reconstruction for a tomogram of 4096{sup 2}x512 voxels from an input tilt series containing 122 projection images of 4096{sup 2} pixels (single precision float) takes a total of 1845 s of which 1032 s are for computation with the remainder being the system overhead. The same system takes only 39 s total to reconstruct 1024{sup 2}x256 voxels from 122 1024{sup 2} pixel projections. While the system overhead is non-trivial, performance analysis indicates that adding extra GPUs to the system would lead to steadily enhanced overall performance. Therefore, this system can be easily expanded to generate superior computing power for very large tomographic reconstructions and especially to empower iterative cycles of reconstruction and realignment. -- Highlights: {yields} A distributed multi-GPU system has been developed for electron microscopic tomography (EMT). {yields} This system allows for rapid constrained, iterative reconstruction of very large volumes. {yields} This system can be easily expanded to generate superior computing power for large-scale iterative EMT realignment.

  16. A distributed multi-GPU system for high speed electron microscopic tomographic reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Shawn Q; Branlund, Eric; Kesthelyi, Bettina; Braunfeld, Michael B; Cheng, Yifan; Sedat, John W; Agard, David A

    2011-07-01

    Full resolution electron microscopic tomographic (EMT) reconstruction of large-scale tilt series requires significant computing power. The desire to perform multiple cycles of iterative reconstruction and realignment dramatically increases the pressing need to improve reconstruction performance. This has motivated us to develop a distributed multi-GPU (graphics processing unit) system to provide the required computing power for rapid constrained, iterative reconstructions of very large three-dimensional (3D) volumes. The participating GPUs reconstruct segments of the volume in parallel, and subsequently, the segments are assembled to form the complete 3D volume. Owing to its power and versatility, the CUDA (NVIDIA, USA) platform was selected for GPU implementation of the EMT reconstruction. For a system containing 10 GPUs provided by 5 GTX295 cards, 10 cycles of SIRT reconstruction for a tomogram of 4096(2) × 512 voxels from an input tilt series containing 122 projection images of 4096(2) pixels (single precision float) takes a total of 1845 s of which 1032 s are for computation with the remainder being the system overhead. The same system takes only 39 s total to reconstruct 1024(2) × 256 voxels from 122 1024(2) pixel projections. While the system overhead is non-trivial, performance analysis indicates that adding extra GPUs to the system would lead to steadily enhanced overall performance. Therefore, this system can be easily expanded to generate superior computing power for very large tomographic reconstructions and especially to empower iterative cycles of reconstruction and realignment. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Optical imaging and spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Brady, David J

    2009-01-01

    An essential reference for optical sensor system design This is the first text to present an integrated view of the optical and mathematical analysis tools necessary to understand computational optical system design. It presents the foundations of computational optical sensor design with a focus entirely on digital imaging and spectroscopy. It systematically covers: Coded aperture and tomographic imaging Sampling and transformations in optical systems, including wavelets and generalized sampling techniques essential to digital system analysis Geometric, wave, and statis

  18. Normal computed tomographic features and reference values for the coelomic cavity in pet parrots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veladiano, Irene A; Banzato, Tommaso; Bellini, Luca; Montani, Alessandro; Catania, Salvatore; Zotti, Alessandro

    2016-09-05

    The increasing popularity gained by pet birds over recent decades has highlighted the role of avian medicine and surgery in the global veterinary scenario; such a need for speciality avian medical practice reflects the rising expectation for high-standard diagnostic imaging procedures. The aim of this study is to provide an atlas of matched anatomical cross-sections and contrast-enhanced CT images of the coelomic cavity in three highly diffused psittacine species. Contrast-enhanced computed tomographic studies of the coelomic cavity were performed in 5 blue-and-gold macaws, 4 African grey parrots and 6 monk parakeets by means of a 4-multidetector-row CT scanner. Both pre- and post-contrast scans were acquired. Anatomical reference cross-sections were obtained from 5 blue-and-gold macaw, 7 African grey parrot, and 9 monk parakeet cadavers. The specimens were stored in a -20 °C freezer until completely frozen and then sliced at 5-mm intervals by means of a band saw. All the slices were photographed on both sides. Individual anatomical structures were identified by means of the available literature. Pre- and post-contrast attenuation reference values for the main coelomic organs are reported in Hounsfield units (HU). The results provide an atlas of matched anatomical cross-sections and contrast-enhanced CT images of the coelomic cavity in three highly diffused psittacine species.

  19. Non tumoral intracranial expansive processes: clinical-tomographic correlation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Campos

    1991-09-01

    Full Text Available Presentation of clinical-tomographic correlation in 111 cases of non tumoral intracranial expansive processes seen between 1984-1988 in the Hospital Cayetano Heredia (Lima, Peru. Emphasis is given fundamentally to: (1 the importance of stablishing the or-ganicity of partial and late epilepsy; (2 the high incidence rate of inflammatory infectious processes with CNS compromise in underdeveloping countries; (3 the necessity of making public the importance of two parisitic diseases in the differential diagnosis of non tumoral intracranial expansive processes: free living amebiasis, and toxoplasmosis (especially in association with AIDS.

  20. Multidetector Computed Tomographic Angiography (MDCTA for Penetrating Neck Injuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason Pasley

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Evaluation of patients after penetrating neck injury has evolved over time. Previously, location of injury and symptoms were used to determine management. The contemporary management of penetrating neck injuries relies on physical examination. Patients with hard signs of vascular or aerodigestive tract injury require immediate operation, regardless of location of injury. Those with no signs can be observed. For the remainder with soft signs, multidetector computed tomographic angiography (MDCTA is a highly sensitive and specific screening modality for evaluating the vasculature and aerodigestive structures in the neck. Utilizing MDCTA, the patient can be safely directed towards operative intervention, observation, or further investigation.

  1. Tomographic quantum cryptography: equivalence of quantum and classical key distillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruss, Dagmar; Christandl, Matthias; Ekert, Artur; Englert, Berthold-Georg; Kaszlikowski, Dagomir; Macchiavello, Chiara

    2003-08-29

    The security of a cryptographic key that is generated by communication through a noisy quantum channel relies on the ability to distill a shorter secure key sequence from a longer insecure one. For an important class of protocols, which exploit tomographically complete measurements on entangled pairs of any dimension, we show that the noise threshold for classical advantage distillation is identical with the threshold for quantum entanglement distillation. As a consequence, the two distillation procedures are equivalent: neither offers a security advantage over the other.

  2. Technical innovation: Multidimensional computerized software enabled subtraction computed tomographic angiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatia, Mona; Rosset, Antoine; Platon, Alexandra; Didier, Dominique; Becker, Christoph D; Poletti, Pierre-Alexandre

    2010-01-01

    Computed tomographic angiography (CTA) is a frequent noninvasive alternative to digital subtraction angiography. We previously reported the development of a new subtraction software to overcome limitations of adjacent bone and calcification in CT angiographic subtraction. Our aim was to further develop and improve this fast and automated computerized software, universally available for free use and compatible with most CT scanners, thus enabling better delineation of vascular structures, artifact reduction, and shorter reading times with potential clinical benefits. This computer-based free software will be available as an open source in the next release of OsiriX at the Web site http://www.osirix-viewer.com.

  3. Comparison between two tomographic sections in the diagnosis of external root resorption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cláudio Afonso Lermen

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To assess the accuracy of coronal and sagittal CT sections to detect cavities simulating root resorption. MATERIAL AND METHODS: 60 mandibular incisors were embedded in plaster bases, and cavities with 0.6, 1.2 or 1.8 mm in diameter and 0.3, 0.6 or 0.9 mm in depth (small, medium and large cavities were drilled on the buccal surfaces with high-speed round burs with diameters of 0.6, 1.2 and 1.8 mm to simulate external inflammatory root resorption. Simulations in the cervical, middle and apical thirds of each tooth root were made randomly. The Dental Scan software was used to obtain 1-mm-thick axial images from direct scanning, which were reconstructed in the coronal and sagittal planes using 3D software (Syngo FastView. Each series was loaded into the software. Fourteen images of each tooth were reconstructed in the coronal plane and 14 in the sagittal plane. A total of 1,652 images were obtained for analysis. Series information, tooth number and the plane reconstructed were stored. The images generated were saved on a CD-ROM together with the visualization software (Syngo FastView. Images were analyzed by a previously calibrated blinded, radiologist. Cochran's Q test was conducted separately for each region analyzed followed by pair-wise comparison by the McNemar test (p=0.05. RESULTS: No statistically significant difference (p>0.05 was observed in the diagnosis of simulated resorption between the apical, middle, and coronal thirds. When the axial plane was assessed separately, diagnoses were statistically different (p0.05 between planes, irrespective of the third in which the resorptions were located. CONCLUSION: When tomographic sections are requested for the diagnosis of buccal or lingual external root resorption, sagittal sections afford the best image characterization of the resorption process.

  4. Histone variants and lipid metabolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borghesan, Michela; Mazzoccoli, Gianluigi; Sheedfar, Fareeba; Oben, Jude; Pazienza, Valerio; Vinciguerra, Manlio

    2014-01-01

    Within nucleosomes, canonical histones package the genome, but they can be opportunely replaced with histone variants. The incorporation of histone variants into the nucleosome is a chief cellular strategy to regulate transcription and cellular metabolism. In pathological terms, cellular steatosis

  5. Body Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-01

    The high-tech art of digital signal processing (DSP) was pioneered at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) in the mid-1960s for use in the Apollo Lunar Landing Program. Designed to computer enhance pictures of the Moon, this technology became the basis for the Landsat Earth resources satellites and subsequently has been incorporated into a broad range of Earthbound medical and diagnostic tools. DSP is employed in advanced body imaging techniques including Computer-Aided Tomography, also known as CT and CATScan, and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI). CT images are collected by irradiating a thin slice of the body with a fan-shaped x-ray beam from a number of directions around the body's perimeter. A tomographic (slice-like) picture is reconstructed from these multiple views by a computer. MRI employs a magnetic field and radio waves, rather than x-rays, to create images.

  6. Large-scale volumetric pressure from tomographic PTV with HFSB tracers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schneiders, J.F.G.; Caridi, Giuseppe Carlo Alp; Sciacchitano, A.; Scarano, F.

    2016-01-01

    The instantaneous volumetric pressure in the near-wake of a truncated cylinder is measured by use of tomographic particle tracking velocimetry (PTV) using helium-filled soap bubbles (HFSB) as tracers. The measurement volume is several orders of magnitude larger than that reported in tomographic

  7. Computed tomographic retrograde positive contrast cystography and computed tomographic excretory urography characterization of a urinary bladder diverticulum in a dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anson, Agustina; Strohmayer, Carina; Larrinaga, Jose M; Iglesias, Esteban; Almela, Ramon; Ramírez, Gustavo; Cervera, Vicente

    2018-01-14

    A one-year-old intact male German shepherd dog was referred with a 3-month history of dysuria and pollakiuria. Physical examination revealed a large firm mass in the caudal abdomen. Findings from survey radiography, negative contrast cystography, computed tomographic (CT) retrograde positive contrast cystography, and CT excretory urography were consistent with a large urinary bladder diverticulum. An exploratory laparotomy revealed a normal wall appearance in the ventral compartment (true bladder) and marked thinning of the wall in the dorsal compartment (diverticulum). Both ureters inserted into the ventral compartment. The dorsal compartment was excised and histopathology confirmed the diagnosis of urinary bladder diverticulum. © 2018 American College of Veterinary Radiology.

  8. Tomographic Constraints on High-Energy Neutrinos of Hadronuclear Origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ando, Shin'ichiro; Tamborra, Irene; Zandanel, Fabio

    2015-11-27

    Mounting evidence suggests that the TeV-PeV neutrino flux detected by the IceCube telescope has mainly an extragalactic origin. If such neutrinos are primarily produced by a single class of astrophysical sources via hadronuclear (pp) interactions, a similar flux of gamma-ray photons is expected. For the first time, we employ tomographic constraints to pinpoint the origin of the IceCube neutrino events by analyzing recent measurements of the cross correlation between the distribution of GeV gamma rays, detected by the Fermi satellite, and several galaxy catalogs in different redshift ranges. We find that the corresponding bounds on the neutrino luminosity density are up to 1 order of magnitude tighter than those obtained by using only the spectrum of the gamma-ray background, especially for sources with mild redshift evolution. In particular, our method excludes any hadronuclear source with a spectrum softer than E^{-2.1} as a main component of the neutrino background, if its evolution is slower than (1+z)^{3}. Starburst galaxies, if able to accelerate and confine cosmic rays efficiently, satisfy both spectral and tomographic constraints.

  9. Investigation of liquid-liquid drop coalescence using tomographic PIV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz-Dueñas, Cecilia; Kim, Jungyong; Longmire, Ellen K.

    2010-07-01

    High-speed tomographic PIV was used to investigate the coalescence of drops placed on a liquid/liquid interface; the coalescence of a single drop and of a drop in the presence of an adjacent drop (side-by-side drops) was investigated. The viscosity ratio between the drop and surrounding fluids was 0.14, the Ohnesorge number (Oh = μd/(ρdσD)1/2) was 0.011, and Bond numbers (Bo = ( ρ d - ρ s ) gD 2/ σ) were 3.1-7.5. Evolving volumetric velocity fields of the full coalescence process allowed for quantification of the velocity scales occurring over different time scales. For both single and side-by-side drops, the coalescence initiates with an off-axis film rupture and film retraction speeds an order of magnitude larger than the collapse speed of the drop fluid. This is followed by the formation and propagation of an outward surface wave along the coalescing interface with wavelength of approximately 2D. For side-by-side drops, the collapse of the first drop is asymmetric due to the presence of the second drop and associated interface deformation. Overall, tomographic PIV provides insight into the flow physics and inherent three-dimensionalities in the coalescence process that would not be achievable with flow visualization or planar PIV only.

  10. Tomographic Environmental Sections for Environmental Mitigation Devices in Historical Centers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberta Cocci Grifoni

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Urban heat waves and the overall growing trend in the annual global temperature underline the importance of urban/architectural resilience and the need to reduce energy consumption. By designing urban voids, it is possible to create thermodynamic buffers, i.e., bubbles of controlled atmosphere that act as mediators between the natural and built environments, between the human body and the surrounding air, between meteorology and physiology (meteorological architecture. Multiple small actions in the urban fabric’s open spaces, such as replacing dark pavements or inserting vegetation and green spaces, are intended to improve outdoor comfort conditions and therefore the resilience of the city itself. This not only benefits the place’s quality, which is intrinsic to the new project, but also the insulating capacity of buildings, which are relieved of an external heat load. The design emphasis therefore changes from solid structures to the climate and weather conditions, which are invisible but perceivable. To design and control these constructed atmopheres, tomographic sections processed with computational fluid dynamics software (tomographic environmental section, TENS becomes necessary. It allows the effects of an extreme event on an outdoor environment to be evaluated in order to establish the appropriate (adaptive climate mitigation devices, especially in historical centers where energy retrofits are often discouraged. By fixing boundary conditions after a local intervention, the virtual environment can be simulated and then "sliced" to analyze initial values and verify the design improvements.

  11. Clinical findings in 16 patients with tomographic diagnosis of schizencephaly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodrigues, Maria do Carmo de Souza [Universidade Federal do Espirito Santo, Vitoria, ES (Brazil). Hospital Universitario Cassiano Antonio Moraes]. E-mail: rodriguesmcs@yahoo.com.br; Monteiro, Alexandra Maria Vieira [Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Faculdade de Ciencias Medicas; Llerena Junior, Juan Clinton [Fundacao Oswaldo Cruz, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Instituto Fernandes Figueira. Centro de Genetica Medica; Fernandes, Alexandre Ribeiro [Universidade Gama Filho, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Dept. de Pediatria

    2006-09-15

    Objective: to establish a correlation between clinical features in a group of children with tomographic diagnosis of schizencephaly and clefts extent and localization. Materials and methods: retrospective study of dossiers from the archives of Neurology and Medical Genetics Services at Instituto Fernandes Figueira/FIOCRUZ and Hospital Municipal Jesus, Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brazil, in the period between 2000 and 2003. The study included 16 patients, nine female and seven male, with tomographic diagnosis of schizencephaly investigated for clinical findings, psychomotor development, motor/cognitive deficits and epilepsy. Results: predominance of bilateral clefts in 10:16 patients, open-lip schizencephaly type in 23:27 patients, and small lips in 11:27 patients. As regards anomalies associated with schizencephaly, pellucid septum absence was the most frequent one (10:16 patients). As regards clinical findings, 15 patients presented with developmental delay and motor deficit, six patients with cognitive deficit and ten with epilepsy. In three patients, we observed discordant clinical findings and cleft sizes, although the clefts were small, the clinical features severity was high because of other cerebral anomalies. Conclusion: the clinical features of schizencephaly are related to the size of the clefts, regardless laterality, presenting higher severity when associated with other cerebral anomalies. (author)

  12. Spontaneous Intracerebral Hemorrhage: Computed Tomographic Characteristics and Outcome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aimara de la Caridad Vergara Santos

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: strokes are the third leading cause of death among adults and 10-15 % of them are due to spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage. Objective: to characterize spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage through computed tomography scan and its outcome. Methods: a case series study was conducted comprising patients diagnosed with spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage admitted to the Arnaldo Milián Castro Provincial University Hospital in Villa Clara from January 2009 to January 2010. Tomographic variables of interest were derived from evaluation of spontaneous intracerebral hematomas. Results: fifty-nine cases of spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage were studied, 23 were located in lobar regions, 4 had severe midline shift, and 2 showed volume greater than 80 ml. Eight out of eleven with extension into the ventricular system had an unfavorable outcome. Among those with thalamic hemorrhage, patients with diameter larger than 4cm and extension into the ventricular system died. Patients with putaminal hemorrhage larger than 4 cm and posterior fossa hematoma with hydrocephalus had a poor outcome, as well as most individuals (55 with other mass effects. Most lobar hematomas (14 out of 23 had a satisfactory outcome, unlike cerebellar and brainstem hematomas. Conclusions: tomographic variables that had a negative impact on the outcome were: volume greater than 80 ml, severe midline shift, diameter larger than 4 cm, extension into the ventricular system, hydrocephalus, other signs of mass effect and brainstem location.

  13. Tomographic retrieval of cloud liquid water fields from a single scanning microwave radiometer aboard a moving platform – Part 1: Field trial results from the Wakasa Bay experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Huang

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Tomographic methods offer great potential for retrieving three-dimensional spatial distributions of cloud liquid water from radiometric observations by passive microwave sensors. Fixed tomographic systems require multiple radiometers, while mobile systems can use just a single radiometer. Part 1 (this paper examines the results from a limited cloud tomography trial with a single-radiometer airborne system carried out as part of the 2003 AMSR-E validation campaign over Wakasa Bay of the Sea of Japan. During this trial, the Polarimetric Scanning Radiometer (PSR and Microwave Imaging Radiometer (MIR aboard the NASA P-3 research aircraft provided a useful dataset for testing the cloud tomography method over a system of low-level clouds. We do tomographic retrievals with a constrained inversion algorithm using three configurations: PSR, MIR, and combined PSR and MIR data. The liquid water paths from the PSR retrieval are consistent with those from the MIR retrieval. The retrieved cloud field based on the combined data appears to be physically plausible and consistent with the cloud image obtained by a cloud radar. We find that some vertically-uniform clouds appear at high altitudes in the retrieved field where the radar shows clear sky. This is likely due to the sub-optimal data collection strategy. This sets the stage for Part 2 of this study that aims to define optimal data collection strategies using observation system simulation experiments.

  14. VARIANT project - further progress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korepanov, V.; Negoda, O.; Alleyne, H.; Balikhin, M.; Fedorov, A.; Juchniewicz, J.; Klimov, S.; Krasnoselskikh, V.; Lefeuvre, F.; Lizunov, G.

    VARIANT is a joint international space experiment which will be performed onboard the Ukrainian remote sensing satellite SICH-1M, that will be launched in 2003 at the polar circular orbit with the altitude 670s30 km. The scientific payload includes three instruments for registration of space current density: split Langmuir probe, Rogovski coil and Faraday cup. The equipment also includes sensors for measurements of electric and magnetic fields in the frequency range from DC to 40 kHz. Main objectives of the VARIANT mission are as follows: u direct comparison of the spectral characteristics of the electric and magnetic fields with the characteristics of the field aligned currents in the polar regions; mapping of the field aligned current distribution; u comparative study of the field aligned current structures with the characteristics of the ionospheric convection observed by the system of radars SuperDARN; u comparative study of technological problems associated with different techniques of current density measurements; and the secondary objectives are: u active experiments with the onboard radar; registration of the signatures of the seismo-active and volcanic phenomena; investigation of the man-made impact upon the ionosphere (anthropogenichazards, pollution, etc). Recent space experiments tendency U smaller and cheaper U stimulated the new approach to the functions division between scientific instruments and DPU. The peculiarities of such approach and the practical example of onboard DPU for VARIANT experiment to be launched next year are reported. Flight model of the VARIANT instrument is already installed onboard the satellite and successfully tested. The methodological questions of the spatial current density direct measurement in space plasma are constantly studied and recent advances in this branch, as well as the experimental tests results are discussed. This work was partially supported by NSAU contract 1221 and INTAS grant 2000-465.

  15. Variants of glycoside hydrolases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teter, Sarah; Ward, Connie; Cherry, Joel; Jones, Aubrey; Harris, Paul; Yi, Jung

    2017-07-11

    The present invention relates to variants of a parent glycoside hydrolase, comprising a substitution at one or more positions corresponding to positions 21, 94, 157, 205, 206, 247, 337, 350, 373, 383, 438, 455, 467, and 486 of amino acids 1 to 513 of SEQ ID NO: 2, and optionally further comprising a substitution at one or more positions corresponding to positions 8, 22, 41, 49, 57, 113, 193, 196, 226, 227, 246, 251, 255, 259, 301, 356, 371, 411, and 462 of amino acids 1 to 513 of SEQ ID NO: 2 a substitution at one or more positions corresponding to positions 8, 22, 41, 49, 57, 113, 193, 196, 226, 227, 246, 251, 255, 259, 301, 356, 371, 411, and 462 of amino acids 1 to 513 of SEQ ID NO: 2, wherein the variants have glycoside hydrolase activity. The present invention also relates to nucleotide sequences encoding the variant glycoside hydrolases and to nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the nucleotide sequences.

  16. Comparative evaluation of the cadaveric, radiographic and computed tomographic anatomy of the heads of green iguana (Iguana iguana), common tegu (Tupinambis merianae) and bearded dragon (Pogona vitticeps).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banzato, Tommaso; Selleri, Paolo; Veladiano, Irene A; Martin, Andrea; Zanetti, Emanuele; Zotti, Alessandro

    2012-05-11

    Radiology and computed tomography are the most commonly available diagnostic tools for the diagnosis of pathologies affecting the head and skull in veterinary practice. Nevertheless, accurate interpretation of radiographic and CT studies requires a thorough knowledge of the gross and the cross-sectional anatomy. Despite the increasing success of reptiles as pets, only a few reports over their normal imaging features are currently available. The aim of this study is to describe the normal cadaveric, radiographic and computed tomographic features of the heads of the green iguana, tegu and bearded dragon. 6 adult green iguanas, 4 tegus, 3 bearded dragons, and, the adult cadavers of: 4 green iguana, 4 tegu, 4 bearded dragon were included in the study. 2 cadavers were dissected following a stratigraphic approach and 2 cadavers were cross-sectioned for each species. These latter specimens were stored in a freezer (-20°C) until completely frozen. Transversal sections at 5 mm intervals were obtained by means of an electric band-saw. Each section was cleaned and photographed on both sides. Radiographs of the head of each subject were obtained. Pre- and post- contrast computed tomographic studies of the head were performed on all the live animals. CT images were displayed in both bone and soft tissue windows. Individual anatomic structures were first recognised and labelled on the anatomic images and then matched on radiographs and CT images. Radiographic and CT images of the skull provided good detail of the bony structures in all species. In CT contrast medium injection enabled good detail of the soft tissues to be obtained in the iguana whereas only the eye was clearly distinguishable from the remaining soft tissues in both the tegu and the bearded dragon. The results provide an atlas of the normal anatomical and in vivo radiographic and computed tomographic features of the heads of lizards, and this may be useful in interpreting any imaging modality involving these

  17. Comparative evaluation of the cadaveric, radiographic and computed tomographic anatomy of the heads of green iguana (Iguana iguana , common tegu ( Tupinambis merianae and bearded dragon ( Pogona vitticeps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Banzato Tommaso

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Radiology and computed tomography are the most commonly available diagnostic tools for the diagnosis of pathologies affecting the head and skull in veterinary practice. Nevertheless, accurate interpretation of radiographic and CT studies requires a thorough knowledge of the gross and the cross-sectional anatomy. Despite the increasing success of reptiles as pets, only a few reports over their normal imaging features are currently available. The aim of this study is to describe the normal cadaveric, radiographic and computed tomographic features of the heads of the green iguana, tegu and bearded dragon. Results 6 adult green iguanas, 4 tegus, 3 bearded dragons, and, the adult cadavers of : 4 green iguana, 4 tegu, 4 bearded dragon were included in the study. 2 cadavers were dissected following a stratigraphic approach and 2 cadavers were cross-sectioned for each species. These latter specimens were stored in a freezer (−20°C until completely frozen. Transversal sections at 5 mm intervals were obtained by means of an electric band-saw. Each section was cleaned and photographed on both sides. Radiographs of the head of each subject were obtained. Pre- and post- contrast computed tomographic studies of the head were performed on all the live animals. CT images were displayed in both bone and soft tissue windows. Individual anatomic structures were first recognised and labelled on the anatomic images and then matched on radiographs and CT images. Radiographic and CT images of the skull provided good detail of the bony structures in all species. In CT contrast medium injection enabled good detail of the soft tissues to be obtained in the iguana whereas only the eye was clearly distinguishable from the remaining soft tissues in both the tegu and the bearded dragon. Conclusions The results provide an atlas of the normal anatomical and in vivo radiographic and computed tomographic features of the heads of lizards, and this may be

  18. Tomographic Evaluation of Reparative Dentin Formation after Direct Pulp Capping with Ca(OH)2, MTA, Biodentine, and Dentin Bonding System in Human Teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowicka, Alicja; Wilk, Grażyna; Lipski, Mariusz; Kołecki, Janusz; Buczkowska-Radlińska, Jadwiga

    2015-08-01

    New materials can increase the efficiency of pulp capping through the formation of a complete reparative dentin bridge with no toxic effects. The present study involved tomographic evaluations of reparative dentin bridge formation after direct pulp capping with calcium hydroxide, mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA), Biodentine (Septodont, Saint Maur des Fossés, France), and Single Bond Universal (3M ESPE, Seefeld, Germany) in human teeth. Forty-four caries-free, intact, human third molars scheduled for extraction were subjected to mechanical pulp exposure and assigned to 1 of 4 experimental groups depending on the pulp capping agent used: calcium hydroxide, MTA, Biodentine, or Single Bond Universal. After 6 weeks, the teeth were extracted and processed for cone-beam computed tomographic imaging and histologic examination. Tomographic data, including the density and volume of formed reparative dentin bridges, were evaluated using a scoring system. The reparative dentin formed in the calcium hydroxide, MTA, and Biodentine groups was significantly superior to that formed in the Single Bond Universal group in terms of thickness and volume. The dentin bridges in the Biodentine group showed the highest average and maximum volumes. The mean density of dentin bridges was the highest in the MTA group and the lowest in the Single Bond Universal group. The volume of reparative dentin bridges formed after direct pulp capping is dependent on the material used. Biodentine and MTA resulted in the formation of bridges with a significantly higher average volume compared with Single Bond Universal, and cone-beam computed tomographic imaging allowed for the identification of the location of dentin bridges. Copyright © 2015 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Current Capabilities

    OpenAIRE

    Davis, Peter L.; Crooks, Lawrence E.; Margulis, Alexander R.; Kaufman, Leon

    1982-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging can produce tomographic images of the body without ionizing radiation. Images of the head, chest, abdomen, pelvis and extremities have been obtained and normal structures and pathology have been identified. Soft tissue contrast with this method is superior to that with x-ray computerized tomography and its spatial resolution is approaching that of x-ray computerized tomography. In addition, nuclear magnetic resonance imaging enables us to image along the sag...

  20. A case of adrenal tumour in a lion (Panthera leo: tomographic and ultrasonographic findings.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maurizio Longo

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Adrenal gland tumors are common in humans and in several animal species. Studies concerning this neoplasia in human medicine indicate that clinical signs have a high variability. Adrenal adenomas can be occasionally observed in asymptomatic patients during tomographic studies while estrogen-secreting tumors, known as "feminizing adrenal tumors" (FATs, have been rarely reported. The aim of this study is to describe for the first time the Imaging findings of a captivity lion affected by a neoplastic secreting adrenal tumour. An 8 year-old male lion with progressive lack of secondary sex characteristics, disorexia and weight loss was referred to our Institution. The patient was chemically immobilized to undergo general clinical evaluation, hematologic, serum biochemical and hormonal profile, FIV and FeLV tests. Three months later a total body computed tomography and abdominal ultrasonography were performed. Liver and left adrenal lesions FNABs were performed. Imaging findings showed the presence of an extended expansive neoplastic lesion on the left adrenal gland (40x39x37 mm with right adrenal gland atrophy. Generalized hepatopathy associated with a suspected intrahepatic cholestasis was confirmed by ultrasonography. Cytological evaluation ruled out the presence of neuroendocrine cells without malignancy evidences compatible with the adenomatous nature of the lesion, associated with moderate degenerative hepatopathy. Blood tests reported an estradiol concentration of 462 ng/dl. To our knowledge, this is the first description of adrenal mass in a lion associated with secondary feminization, inappetence and high values of hematic estradiol, referable to a feminizing adrenal tumor (FAT.

  1. Micro-Tomographic Investigation of Ice and Clathrate Formation and Decomposition under Thermodynamic Monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Arzbacher

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Clathrate hydrates are inclusion compounds in which guest molecules are trapped in a host lattice formed by water molecules. They are considered an interesting option for future energy supply and storage technologies. In the current paper, time lapse 3D micro computed tomographic (µCT imaging with ice and tetrahydrofuran (THF clathrate hydrate particles is carried out in conjunction with an accurate temperature control and pressure monitoring. µCT imaging reveals similar behavior of the ice and the THF clathrate hydrate at low temperatures while at higher temperatures (3 K below the melting point, significant differences can be observed. Strong indications for micropores are found in the ice as well as the THF clathrate hydrate. They are stable in the ice while unstable in the clathrate hydrate at temperatures slightly below the melting point. Significant transformations in surface and bulk structure can be observed within the full temperature range investigated in both the ice and the THF clathrate hydrate. Additionally, our results point towards an uptake of molecular nitrogen in the THF clathrate hydrate at ambient pressures and temperatures from 230 K to 271 K.

  2. Infrared tomographic PIV and 3D motion tracking system applied to aquatic predator-prey interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adhikari, Deepak; Longmire, Ellen K.

    2013-02-01

    Infrared tomographic PIV and 3D motion tracking are combined to measure evolving volumetric velocity fields and organism trajectories during aquatic predator-prey interactions. The technique was used to study zebrafish foraging on both non-evasive and evasive prey species. Measurement volumes of 22.5 mm × 10.5 mm × 12 mm were reconstructed from images captured on a set of four high-speed cameras. To obtain accurate fluid velocity vectors within each volume, fish were first masked out using an automated visual hull method. Fish and prey locations were identified independently from the same image sets and tracked separately within the measurement volume. Experiments demonstrated that fish were not influenced by the infrared laser illumination or the tracer particles. Results showed that the zebrafish used different strategies, suction and ram feeding, for successful capture of non-evasive and evasive prey, respectively. The two strategies yielded different variations in fluid velocity between the fish mouth and the prey. In general, the results suggest that the local flow field, the direction of prey locomotion with respect to the predator and the relative accelerations and speeds of the predator and prey may all be significant in determining predation success.

  3. Visual hull method for tomographic PIV of flow around moving objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adhikari, Deepak; Longmire, Ellen

    2011-11-01

    Measurement of velocity around arbitrarily moving objects is of interest in many applications. This includes flow around marine animals and flying insects, flow around supercavitating projectiles, and flow around discrete drops or particles in multiphase flows. We present a visual hull technique that employs existing tomographic PIV reconstruction software to automate identification, masking and tracking of discrete objects within a three-dimensional volume, while allowing computation and avoiding contamination of the surrounding three-component fluid velocity vectors. The technique is demonstrated by considering flow around falling objects of different shape, namely a sphere, cube, tetrahedron and cylinder. Four high-speed cameras and a laser are used to acquire images of these objects falling within liquid seeded with tracer particles. The acquired image sets are then processed to reconstruct both the object and the surrounding tracer particles. The reconstructed object is used to estimate the object location at each time step and mask the reconstructed particle volume, while the reconstructed tracer particles are cross-correlated with subsequent particle volumes to obtain the fluid velocity vectors. Supported by NSF IDBR Grant #0852875.

  4. Motion - Computerized Tomographic Colography is a Better Method for Screening for Polyps: Arguments Against the Motion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerome B Simon

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Computerized tomographic (CT colography is an exciting technique whereby images of the colonic wall and lumen can be obtained without colonoscopy. It is not as good as conventional colonoscopy, however, because of both inherent and performance limitations. Among the former is the inability to visualize subtle mucosal lesions, such as alterations in colour or pliability. More importantly, CT colography is strictly a diagnostic technique, and does not allow biopsy or removal of polyps. The vigorous bowel preparation required for this procedure can be very unpleasant for the patient, and includes purgatives followed by distension of the colon with air. Unlike with colonoscopy, adherent stool can be difficult to distinguish radiologically from polyps or cancers; as a result, many patients require colonoscopy anyway. The major performance limitations of CT colography are poor sensitivity and specificity compared with conventional colonoscopy. Rectal lesions, flat adenomas and diminutive adenomas are especially difficult to detect, and false-positive results are also common. In addition, the procedure is expensive and less cost effective than colonoscopy. CT colography takes relatively little patient time, but a substantial amount of time is needed for the radiologist to interpret the images. Interobserver variability is high. For all of these reasons, CT colography cannot be recommended as a screening test for colorectal neoplasia.

  5. Quantitative analysis of periapical lesions on cone beam computed tomograph and periapical radiograph

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jin Hoa; Lee, Wan; Kim, Kyung Soo; Roh, Young Chea; Lee, Byung Do [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, School of Dentistry, Wonkwang University, Iksan (Korea, Republic of); Kim, De Sok [Department of Electrical Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Deajeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-03-15

    To detect the progression of experimentally induced periapical lesions on periapical radiograph and cone beam computed tomograph (CBCT) by quantitative analysis. After the removal of coronal pulps from premolars of two Beagle dogs, the root canals of premolars were exposed to oral environment during one week and then sealed for 70 days. Digital periapical radiographs and CBCTs were taken at baseline and every 7 days for 77 days after pulp exposure. We examined occurrence and areas of periapical bone resorption. Three comparative groups of CBCT radiographs were prepared by average projection of thin slabs with different bucco-lingual thicknesses (0.1, 3.0, and 8.0 mm) using a 3D visualization software. Radiographic densities were compensated by image normalization. Digital images were processed with mathematical morphology operations. The radiographic density and morphological features of periapical lesions were compared among three groups of CBCT in different time points. In the CBCT group with 0.1 mm thickness, radiographic density (p<0.05) and trabecular bone area (p<0.01) were significantly decreased at the fifth week. However, in the CBCT groups with 3 mm and 8 mm thickness and periapical radiographs, none of densitometric and morphological features showed any significant differences in different time points. Radiographic density of periapical lesion showed increasing tendency at the eleventh week after pulp exposure. Radiographic detection of periapical lesions was possible at the fifth week after pulp contamination by quantitative method and was affected by buccolingual bone thickness.

  6. Effects of furosemide on ureteral diameter and attenuation using computed tomographic excretory urography in normal dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Secrest, Scott; Essman, Stephanie; Nagy, Jesse; Schultz, Loren

    2013-01-01

    One of the limitations of computed tomographic excretory urography (CTEU) for diagnosis of ureteral disease in dogs is that normal ureteral peristalsis can cause intermittent and inconsistent filling. The aims of this study were to determine if the addition of furosemide to a standard CTEU protocol would increase identification of the ureteral segments, increase ureteral attenuation and increase ureteral diameter in normal dogs. Standard and furosemide-enhanced CTEU scans were acquired in 14 healthy dogs 3 and 10 minutes postcontrast. Ureteral diameters, attenuation values, and percent ureteral filling scores were recorded without the knowledge of furosemide treatment. Comparisons were made between treatments for each postcontrast scan time. The addition of furosemide to the CTEU protocol improved visualization of the ureters by significantly increasing the number of ureteral segments that were able to be identified, as well as their diameter when imaging the patient 3 min following contrast injection (P = 0.012). No major side effects were observed at the dose of 4 mg/kg. There was no advantage to imaging dogs 10 min following contrast administration as the ureteral segments were less attenuating and a smaller percentage of the ureter could be identified. We conclude that the addition of furosemide to canine CTEU studies is safe and may help improve visualization of the ureters. © 2012 Veterinary Radiology & Ultrasound.

  7. Intermittent or continuous ultrasonically activated irrigation: micro-computed tomographic evaluation of root canal system cleaning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanomaru-FIlho, Mário; Torres, Fernanda Ferrari Esteves; Chávez-Andrade, Gisselle Moraima; Miano, Lucas Martinati; Guerreiro-Tanomaru, Juliane Maria

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of two passive ultrasonic irrigation (PUI) methods and conventional manual irrigation (CMI) in root canal system (RCS) cleaning. Artificial single-rooted teeth were used. Four lateral canals were made 2 and 7 mm short from the apex. Root canals were filled with a contrast solution. The specimens were divided into four groups (n = 8): PUI1-intermittent flushing; PUI2-continuous flushing; CMI1-at 1 mm; and CMI2-at 3 mm. Micro-computed tomographic images were obtained. New images were taken after the irrigation protocols enabling the evaluation of the contrast solution volume (in mm(3)) within RCS (main and lateral root canals) in comparison to the initial analysis. The comparison among groups was performed using ANOVA and Tukey's tests with 5 % significance level. There was no difference among PUI1, PUI2, and CMI1 regarding the contrast solution removal from RCS (p > 0.05). These methods demonstrated greater cleaning than CMI2. At the apical third, CMI2 showed lower cleaning capacity when compared to the other methods (p irrigation plays an important role in cleaning and disinfection of the RCS. Effective apical irrigation is an important procedure during root canal treatment. PUI and CMI (at 1 mm short) were effective in cleaning of the main and simulated lateral root canals.

  8. Positron emission mammography with tomographic acquisition using dual planar detectors: initial evaluations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mark F Smith; Raymond R Raylman; Stan Majewski; Andrew G Weisenberger

    2004-05-01

    Positron emission mammography (PEM) with tomographic acquisition using dual planar detectors rotating about the breast can obtain complete angular sampling and has the potential to improve activity estimation compared with PEM using stationary detectors. PEM tomography (PEMT) was compared with stationary PEM for point source and compressed breast phantom studies performed with a compact dual detector system. The acquisition geometries were appropriate for the target application of PEM guidance of stereotactic core biopsy. Images were reconstructed with a three-dimensional iterative maximum likelihood expectation maximization algorithm. PEMT eliminated blurring normal to the detectors seen with stationary PEM. Depth of interaction effects distorted the shape of the point spread functions for PEMT as the angular range from normal incidence of lines of response used in image reconstruction increased. Streak artifacts in PEMT for large detector rotation increments led to the development of an expression for the maximum rotation increment that maintains complete angular sampling. Studies with a compressed breast phantom were used to investigate contrast and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) trade-offs for different sized spherical tumor models. PEMT and PEM both had advantages depending on lesion size and detector separation. The most appropriate acquisition method for specific detection or quantitation tasks requires additional investigation.

  9. Identification of a novel alpha1-antitrypsin variant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camille de Seynes

    2017-01-01

    We report the identification of a novel alpha1-antitrypsin variant in a 64-year old woman presenting with dyspnea on exertion. Imaging revealed bilateral bronchiectasis associated with moderate panacinar emphysema. The pulmonary function tests (PFTs were subnormal but hypoxemia was noticed and A1AT quantitative analysis revealed a severe deficiency. DNA sequencing showed compound heterozygosity for the PIZ variant and a novel missense variant p.Phe232Leu (p.Phe208Leu. No specific treatment was proposed since PFTs were within the normal range at this stage of the disease. Close follow-up of pulmonary and hepatic parameters was recommended.

  10. An original acquisition chain for the TOHR High Resolution Tomograph[OASIS]; Conception d'une chaine d'acqusition originale pour le Tomographe Haute Resolution TOHR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinot, Laurent [Institut de Physique Nucleaire, Paris-11 Univ., 91 - Orsay (France)

    1999-04-02

    The framework of this work is part of a new approach of emission tomography adapted to small animals. The principle of our tomographic system TOHR (French acronym for High Resolution Tomograph) is based on the use of large solid angle and high resolution focusing collimators each mounted in front of a detection module of high efficiency. With a first-generation acquisition chain we were able to characterize TOHR, however, to take fully advantage of the TOHR possibilities, a completely new acquisition scheme had to be designed. This system, being the main topic of this work, makes use of temporal information. The detection of a particle that entered the detector is translated into temporal logical signals. These signals pass into a time coding circuitry and the coded results are transferred in a digital processor. According to the initial terms of delivery, the developed acquisition chain steers the detection of events dependent on the deposited energy and time of arrival. The latter is done by coincidence measurements. All elements are mounted on a special board included into a PC unit and a dedicated program controls the whole system. First experiments showed up the interest of the new acquisition unit for other application in physics or medical imaging.

  11. Established rheumatoid arthritis - new imaging modalities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McQueen, Fiona M; Østergaard, Mikkel

    2007-01-01

    New imaging modalities are assuming an increasingly important role in the investigation and management of rheumatoid arthritis. It is now possible to obtain information about all tissues within the joint in three dimensions using tomographic techniques such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI...

  12. Iterative Reconstruction for Differential Phase Contrast Imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koehler, T.; Brendel, B.; Roessl, E.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this work is to combine two areas of active research in tomographic x-ray imaging. The first one is the use of iterative reconstruction techniques. The second one is differential phase contrast imaging (DPCI). Method: We derive an SPS type maximum likelihood (ML)

  13. Evaluation of Cervical Spine Clearance by Computed Tomographic Scan Alone in Intoxicated Patients With Blunt Trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bush, Lisa; Brookshire, Robert; Roche, Breanna; Johnson, Amelia; Cole, Frederic; Karmy-Jones, Riyad; Long, William; Martin, Matthew J

    2016-09-01

    Current trauma guidelines dictate that the cervical spine should not be cleared in intoxicated patients, resulting in prolonged immobilization or additional imaging. Modern computed tomography (CT) technology may obviate this and allow for immediate clearance. To analyze cervical spine clearance practices and the utility of CT scans of the cervical spine in intoxicated patients with blunt trauma. We performed a prospective observational study of 1668 patients with blunt trauma aged 18 years and older who underwent cervical spine CT scans from March 2014 to March 2015 at an American College of Surgeons-verified Level I trauma center. Intoxication was determined by serum alcohol levels and urine drug screens. Physical examination and CT scan findings were evaluated for cervical spine injuries (CSI) and the incidence of missed injuries. Clinically relevant CSIs requiring cervical stabilization. The hypotheses formed prior to data collection were that cervical CT scans are sensitive and specific enough to diagnose CSIs that require stabilization and that normal CT scans are sufficient to clear CSIs in intoxicated patients. Of 1668 patients, 1103 (66.1%) were male, with a mean (SD) age of 49 (20) years and a mean (SD) Injury Severity Score of 10 (9). Vehicular (734 [44.0%]) and falls (579 [34.7%]) were the most common mechanisms for hospitalization. Intoxication was identified in 632 of 1429 of patients tested (44.2%; 425 [29.7%] by serum alcohol levels and 350 [24.5%] by urine drug screens). Half (316 [50.0%]) were admitted with cervical spine immobilization, and 38 (12%) of these were solely owing to the presence of intoxication. There were 65 abnormal CT scans (10.3%) in the intoxicated group. Among 567 normal CT scans, 4 (0.7%) had central cord syndrome found on initial physical examination, and 1 (0.2%) had a symptomatic unstable ligament injury that was misread as normal on CT scan but was abnormal on magnetic resonance imaging. The 316 patients kept in a

  14. Improved tilt sensing in an LGS-based tomographic AO system based on instantaneous PSF estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veran, Jean-Pierre

    2013-12-01

    Laser guide star (LGS)-based tomographic AO systems, such as Multi-Conjugate AO (MCAO), Multi-Object AO (MOAO) and Laser Tomography AO (LTAO), require natural guide stars (NGSs) to sense tip-tilt (TT) and possibly other low order modes, to get rid of the LGS-tilt indetermination problem. For example, NFIRAOS, the first-light facility MCAO system for the Thirty Meter Telescope requires three NGSs, in addition to six LGSs: two to measure TT and one to measure TT and defocus. In order to improve sky coverage, these NGSs are selected in a so-called technical field (2 arcmin in diameter for NFIRAOS), which is much larger than the on-axis science field (17x17 arcsec for NFIRAOS), on which the AO correction is optimized. Most times, the NGSs are far off-axis and thus poorly corrected by the high-order AO loop, resulting in spots with low contrast and high speckle noise. Accurately finding the position of such spots is difficult, even with advanced methods such as matched-filtering or correlation, because these methods rely on the knowledge of an average spot image, which is quite different from the instantaneous spot image, especially in case of poor correction. This results in poor tilt estimation, which, ultimately, impacts sky coverage. We propose to improve the estimation of the position of the NGS spots by using, for each frame, a current estimate of the instantaneous spot profile instead of an average profile. This estimate can be readily obtained by tracing wavefront errors in the direction of the NGS through the turbulence volume. The latter is already computed by the tomographic process from the LGS measurements as part of the high order AO loop. Computing such a wavefront estimate has actually already been proposed for the purpose of driving a deformable mirror (DM) in each NGS WFS, to optically correct the NGS spot, which does lead to improved centroiding accuracy. Our approach, however, is much simpler, because it does not require the complication of extra DMs

  15. X-ray tomographic microscopy for non-destructive inspection and advanced materials characterization. Final report, May 22, 1992--May 21, 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-04-27

    This was a CRADA to transfer the x-ray tomographic microscope technology to the Quality Technology Center of General Electric Air Craft Engines Division in Ohio. The x-ray tomographic microscope (XTM) is a high resolution, three-dimensional imaging system that can be used to image materials microstructures noninvasively. The apparatus consists of an x-ray source, x-ray collimators, sample positioning stages, a fluorescent screen to convert x-rays to visible light, an optical lens, and a thermoelectrically cooled charge coupled device detector. The details of the microscope`s design have been described elsewhere. In practice, the sample to be imaged is positioned on a rotating stage. The sample is initially translated out of the x-ray path, and an image is obtained of the incident x-ray beam (the reference image). Next, the sample is placed between the x-ray path and the scintillator, and another image, the projection image, is acquired. The ratios of the logarithms of the reference image and the projection image provide values of the integrated x-ray attenuation through the sample. By rotating the sample in discrete angular increments through 180 degrees, enough data can be obtained to reconstruct the two-dimensional projection images into a three-dimensional image of the mineral density distribution in the sample. This reconstruction procedure, known as reconstruction from projections, is usually performed with the technique of Fourier-filtered back-projection. Using the present microscope, a 1 cubic centimeter volume can be imaged with five micrometer volume elements in about one hour or less.

  16. Design of the first optical system for real-time tomographic holography (RTTH)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galeotti, John M.; Siegel, Mel; Rallison, Richard D.; Stetten, George

    2008-08-01

    The design of the first Real-Time-Tomographic-Holography (RTTH) optical system for augmented-reality applications is presented. RTTH places a viewpoint-independent real-time (RT) virtual image (VI) of an object into its actual location, enabling natural hand-eye coordination to guide invasive procedures, without requiring tracking or a head-mounted device. The VI is viewed through a narrow-band Holographic Optical Element (HOE) with built-in power that generates the largest possible near-field, in-situ VI from a small display chip without noticeable parallax error or obscuring direct view of the physical world. Rigidly fixed upon a medical-ultrasound probe, RTTH could show the scan in its actual location inside the patient, because the VI would move with the probe. We designed the image source along with the system-optics, allowing us to ignore both planer geometric distortions and field curvature, respectively compensated by using RT pre-processing software and attaching a custom-surfaced fiber-optic-faceplate (FOFP) to our image source. Focus in our fast, non-axial system was achieved by placing correcting lenses near the FOFP and custom-optically-fabricating our volume-phase HOE using a recording beam that was specially shaped by extra lenses. By simultaneously simulating and optimizing the system's playback performance across variations in both the total playback and HOE-recording optical systems, we derived and built a design that projects a 104x112 mm planar VI 1 m from the HOE using a laser-illuminated 19x16 mm LCD+FOFP image-source. The VI appeared fixed in space and well focused. Viewpoint-induced location errors were <3 mm, and unexpected first-order astigmatism produced 3 cm (3% of 1 m) ambiguity in depth, typically unnoticed by human observers.

  17. Performance of confocal scanning laser tomograph Topographic Change Analysis (TCA) for assessing glaucomatous progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowd, Christopher; Balasubramanian, Madhusudhanan; Weinreb, Robert N; Vizzeri, Gianmarco; Alencar, Luciana M; O'Leary, Neil; Sample, Pamela A; Zangwill, Linda M

    2009-02-01

    To determine the sensitivity and specificity of confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscope's Topographic Change Analysis (TCA; Heidelberg Retina Tomograph [HRT]; Heidelberg Engineering, Heidelberg, Germany) parameters for discriminating between progressing glaucomatous and stable healthy eyes. The 0.90, 0.95, and 0.99 specificity cutoffs for various (n=70) TCA parameters were developed by using 1000 permuted topographic series derived from HRT images of 18 healthy eyes from Moorfields Eye Hospital, imaged at least four times. The cutoffs were then applied to topographic series from 36 eyes with known glaucomatous progression (by optic disc stereophotograph assessment and/or standard automated perimetry guided progression analysis, [GPA]) and 21 healthy eyes from the University of California, San Diego (UCSD) Diagnostic Innovations in Glaucoma Study (DIGS), all imaged at least four times, to determine TCA sensitivity and specificity. Cutoffs also were applied to 210 DIGS patients' eyes imaged at least four times with no evidence of progression (nonprogressed) by stereophotography or GPA. The TCA parameter providing the best sensitivity/specificity tradeoff using the 0.90, 0.95, and 0.99 cutoffs was the largest clustered superpixel area within the optic disc margin (CAREA(disc) mm(2)). Sensitivities/specificities for classifying progressing (by stereophotography and/or GPA) and healthy eyes were 0.778/0.809, 0.639/0.857, and 0.611/1.00, respectively. In nonprogressing eyes, specificities were 0.464, 0.570, and 0.647 (i.e., lower than in the healthy eyes). In addition, TCA parameter measurements of nonprogressing eyes were similar to those of progressing eyes. TCA parameters can discriminate between progressing and longitudinally observed healthy eyes. Low specificity in apparently nonprogressing patients' eyes suggests early progression detection using TCA.

  18. In-cylinder air-flow characteristics of different intake port geometries using tomographic PIV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Avinash Kumar; Gadekar, Suresh; Singh, Akhilendra Pratap

    2017-09-01

    For improving the in-cylinder flow characteristics of intake air/charge and for strengthening the turbulence intensity, specific intake port geometries have shown significant potential in compression ignition engines. In this experimental study, effects of intake port geometries on air-flow characteristics were investigated using tomographic particle imaging velocimetry (TPIV). Experiments were performed using three experimental conditions, namely, swirl port open (SPO), tangential port open (TPO), and both port open (BPO) configurations in a single cylinder optical research engine. Flow investigations were carried out in a volumetric section located in the middle of the intake and exhaust valves. Particle imaging velocimetry (PIV) images were captured using two high speed cameras at a crank angle resolution of 2° in the intake and compression strokes. The captured PIV images were then pre-processed and post-processed to obtain the final air-flow-field. Effects of these two intake ports on flow-field are presented for air velocity, vorticity, average absolute velocity, and turbulent kinetic energy. Analysis of these flow-fields suggests the dominating nature of the swirl port over the tangential port for the BPO configuration and higher rate of flow energy dissipation for the TPO configuration compared to the SPO and BPO configurations. These findings of TPIV investigations were experimentally verified by combustion and particulate characteristics of the test engine in thermal cylinder head configuration. Combustion results showed that the SPO configuration resulted in superior combustion amongst all three port configurations. Particulate characteristics showed that the TPO configuration resulted in higher particulate compared to other port configurations.

  19. Influence of Endodontic Treatment and Coronal Restoration on Status of Periapical Tissues: A Cone-beam Computed Tomographic Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Aline C; Nejaim, Yuri; Silva, Amaro I V; Haiter-Neto, Francisco; Cohenca, Nestor; Zaia, Alexandre A; Silva, Emmanuel João Nogueira Leal

    2015-10-01

    This cross-sectional study determined the prevalence of apical radiolucency in 1290 root canal-treated teeth and the correlation between endodontic treatment quality and the presence of coronal restorations with apical radiolucency using cone-beam computed tomographic imaging. Cone-beam computed tomographic scans were analyzed, and teeth were classified as healthy or diseased according to the periapical status. Other factors were also evaluated for their association with the apical diagnosis including sex, quality of endodontic treatment, presence of coronal restorations and posts, and apical level of filling. Of the treated teeth, 48.83% were classified as healthy. Only 55.11% of the teeth had endodontic treatment rated as adequate. The quality of endodontic treatment and the presence of coronal restoration were statistically correlated with the presence or absence of an apical radiolucency (P endodontic treatment and the presence of coronal restoration showed significantly better apical status than the other combinations (P endodontic treatment, the presence of coronal restoration, and apical extent of the root canal filling were significantly associated with healthy apical tissues. Copyright © 2015 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Histologic and tomographic findings of bone block allografts in a 4 years follow-up: a case series

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deluiz, Daniel; Pires, Fabio Ramoa; Tinoco, Justine Monnerat; Tinoco, Eduardo Muniz Barretto [Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro (UERJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Oliveira, Luciano Santos, E-mail: d.deluiz@implanto-puc.org [Pontificia Universidade Catolica do Rio de Janeiro (PUC-Rio), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Fletcher, Paul [Department of Periodontology, Columbia University College of Dental Medicine, New York, NY (United States)

    2016-11-15

    The aim of this paper is to report histologic and tomographic findings of fresh frozen bone block allografts bearing dental implants in functional occlusion in a long-term follow-up. Four patients with implants functionally loaded for 4 years on augmented ridges requirin