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Sample records for variant antigens expressed

  1. Plasmodium falciparum variant STEVOR antigens are expressed in merozoites and possibly associated with erythrocyte invasion

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    Petter Michaela

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Plasmodium falciparum STEVOR proteins, encoded by the multicopy stevor gene family have no known biological functions. Their expression and unique locations in different parasite life cycle stages evoke multiple functionalities. Their abundance and hypervariability support a role in antigenic variation. Methods Immunoblotting of total parasite proteins with an anti-STEVOR antibody was used to identify variant antigens of this gene family and to follow changes in STEVOR expression in parasite populations panned on CSA or CD36 receptors. Immunofluorescence assays and immunoelectron microscopy were performed to study the subcellular localization of STEVOR proteins in different parasite stages. The capacity of the antibody to inhibit merozoite invasion of erythrocytes was assessed to determine whether STEVOR variants were involved in the invasion process. Results Antigenic variation of STEVORs at the protein level was observed in blood stage parasites. STEVOR variants were found to be present on the merozoite surface and in rhoptries. An insight into a participation in erythrocyte invasion was gained through an immunofluorescence analysis of a sequence of thin slides representing progressive steps in erythrocyte invasion. An interesting feature of the staining pattern was what appeared to be the release of STEVORs around the invading merozoites. Because the anti-STEVOR antibody did not inhibit invasion, the role of STEVORs in this process remains unknown. Conclusion The localization of STEVOR proteins to the merozoite surface and the rhoptries together with its prevalence as a released component in the invading merozoite suggest a role of these antigens in adhesion and/or immune evasion in the erythrocyte invasion process. These observations would also justify STEVORs for undergoing antigenic variation. Even though a role in erythrocyte invasion remains speculative, an association of members of the STEVOR protein family with

  2. Expressed var gene repertoire and variant surface antigen diversity in a shrinking Plasmodium falciparum population.

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    Carlos, Bianca C; Fotoran, Wesley L; Menezes, Maria J; Cabral, Fernanda J; Bastos, Marcele F; Costa, Fabio T M; Sousa-Neto, Jayme A; Ribolla, Paulo E M; Wunderlich, Gerhard; Ferreira, Marcelo U

    2016-11-01

    The var gene-encoded erythrocyte membrane protein-1 of Plasmodium falciparum (PfEMP-1) is the main variant surface antigen (VSA) expressed on infected erythrocytes. The rate at which antibody responses to VSA expressed by circulating parasites are acquired depends on the size of the local VSA repertoire and the frequency of exposure to new VSA. Because parasites from areas with declining malaria endemicity, such as the Amazon, typically express a restricted PfEMP-1 repertoire, we hypothesized that Amazonians would rapidly acquire antibodies to most locally circulating VSA. Consistent with our expectations, the analysis of 5878 sequence tags expressed by 10 local P. falciparum samples revealed little PfEMP-1 DBL1α domain diversity. Among the most commonly expressed DBL1α types, 45% were shared by two or more independent parasite lines. Nevertheless, Amazonians displayed major gaps in their repertoire of anti-VSA antibodies, although the breadth of anti-VSA antibody responses correlated positively with their cumulative exposure to malaria. We found little antibody cross-reactivity even when testing VSA from related parasites expressing the same dominant DBL1α types. We conclude that variant-specific immunity to P. falciparum VSAs develops slowly despite the relatively restricted PfEMP-1 repertoire found in low-endemicity settings. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Expression of senescent antigen on erythrocytes infected with a knobby variant of the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winograd, E.; Greenan, J.R.T.; Sherman, I.W.

    1987-01-01

    Erythrocytes infected with a knobby variant of Plasmodium falciparum selectively bind IgG autoantibodies in normal human serum. Quantification of membrane-bound IgG, by use of 125 I-labeled protein A, revealed that erythrocytes infected with the knobby variant bound 30 times more protein A than did noninfected erythrocytes; infection with a knobless variant resulted in less than a 2-fold difference compared with noninfected erythrocytes. IgG binding to knobby erythrocytes appeared to be related to parasite development, since binding of 125 I-labeled protein A to cells bearing young trophozoites (less than 20 hr after parasite invasion) was similar to binding to uninfected erythrocytes. By immunoelectron microscopy, the membrane-bound IgG on erythrocytes infected with the knobby variant was found to be preferentially associated with the protuberances (knobs) of the plasma membrane. The removal of aged or senescent erythrocytes from the peripheral circulation is reported to involve the binding of specific antibodies to an antigen (senescent antigen) related to the major erythrocyte membrane protein band 3. Since affinity-purified autoantibodies against band 3 specifically bound to the plasma membrane of erythrocytes infected with the knobby variant of P. falciparum, it is clear that the malaria parasite induces expression of senescent antigen

  4. Plasmodium falciparum parasites expressing pregnancy-specific variant surface antigens adhere strongly to the choriocarcinoma cell line BeWo

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    Haase, Rikke N; Megnekou, Rosette; Lundquist, Maja

    2006-01-01

    Placenta-sequestering Plasmodium falciparum parasites causing pregnancy-associated malaria express pregnancy-specific variant surface antigens (VSA(PAM)). We report here that VSA(PAM)-expressing patient isolates adhere strongly to the choriocarcinoma cell line BeWo and that the BeWo line can...... be used to efficiently select for VSA(PAM) expression in vitro....

  5. Temporal expression and localization patterns of variant surface antigens in clinical Plasmodium falciparum isolates during erythrocyte schizogony.

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    Anna Bachmann

    Full Text Available Avoidance of antibody-mediated immune recognition allows parasites to establish chronic infections and enhances opportunities for transmission. The human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum possesses a number of multi-copy gene families, including var, rif, stevor and pfmc-2tm, which encode variant antigens believed to be expressed on the surfaces of infected erythrocytes. However, most studies of these antigens are based on in vitro analyses of culture-adapted isolates, most commonly the laboratory strain 3D7, and thus may not be representative of the unique challenges encountered by P. falciparum in the human host. To investigate the expression of the var, rif-A, rif-B, stevor and pfmc-2tm family genes under conditions that mimic more closely the natural course of infection, ex vivo clinical P. falciparum isolates were analyzed using a novel quantitative real-time PCR approach. Expression patterns in the clinical isolates at various time points during the first intraerythrocytic developmental cycle in vitro were compared to those of strain 3D7. In the clinical isolates, in contrast to strain 3D7, there was a peak of expression of the multi-copy gene families rif-A, stevor and pfmc-2tm at the young ring stage, in addition to the already known expression peak in trophozoites. Furthermore, most of the variant surface antigen families were overexpressed in the clinical isolates relative to 3D7, with the exception of the pfmc-2tm family, expression of which was higher in 3D7 parasites. Immunofluorescence analyses performed in parallel revealed two stage-dependent localization patterns of RIFIN, STEVOR and PfMC-2TM. Proteins were exported into the infected erythrocyte at the young trophozoite stage, whereas they remained inside the parasite membrane during schizont stage and were subsequently observed in different compartments in the merozoite. These results reveal a complex pattern of expression of P. falciparum multi-copy gene families during

  6. Expression of variant surface antigens by Plasmodium falciparum parasites in the peripheral blood of clinically immune pregnant women indicates ongoing placental infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ofori, Michael F; Staalsoe, Trine; Bam, Victoria

    2003-01-01

    Placenta-sequestered Plasmodium falciparum parasites that cause pregnancy-associated malaria (PAM) in otherwise clinically immune women express distinct variant surface antigens (VSA(PAM)) not expressed by parasites in nonpregnant individuals. We report here that parasites from the peripheral blood...... of clinically immune pregnant women also express VSA(PAM), making them a convenient source of VSA(PAM) expressors for PAM vaccine research....

  7. Analysis of IgG with specificity for variant surface antigens expressed by placental Plasmodium falciparum isolates

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    Kremsner Peter G

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pregnancy-associated malaria (PAM is caused by Plasmodium falciparum-infected erythrocytes that can sequester in placental intervillous space by expressing particular variant surface antigens (VSA that can mediate adhesion to chondroitin sulfate A (CSA in vitro. IgG antibodies with specificity for the VSA expressed by these parasites (VSAPAM are associated with protection from maternal anaemia, prematurity and low birth weight, which is the greatest risk factor for death in the first month of life. Methods In this study, the development of anti-VSAPAM antibodies in a group of 151 women who presented to the maternity ward of Albert Schweitzer Hospital in Lambaréné, Gabon for delivery was analysed using flow cytometry assays. Plasma samples from placenta infected primiparous women were also investigated for their capacity to inhibit parasite binding to CSA in vitro. Results In the study cohort, primiparous as well as secundiparous women had the greatest risk of infection at delivery as well as during pregnancy. Primiparous women with infected placentas at delivery showed higher levels of VSAPAM-specific IgG compared to women who had no malaria infections at delivery. Placental isolates of Gabonese and Senegalese origin tested on plasma samples from Gabon showed parity dependency and gender specificity patterns. There was a significant correlation of plasma reactivity as measured by flow cytometry between different placental isolates. In the plasma of infected primiparous women, VSAPAM-specific IgG measured by flow cytometry could be correlated with anti-adhesion antibodies measured by the inhibition of CSA binding. Conclusion Recognition of placental parasites shows a parity- and sex- dependent pattern, like that previously observed in laboratory strains selected to bind to CSA. Placental infections at delivery in primiparous women appear to be sufficient to induce functional antibodies which can both recognize the surface of

  8. Transgenic Expression of IL15 Improves Antiglioma Activity of IL13Rα2-CAR T Cells but Results in Antigen Loss Variants.

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    Krenciute, Giedre; Prinzing, Brooke L; Yi, Zhongzhen; Wu, Meng-Fen; Liu, Hao; Dotti, Gianpietro; Balyasnikova, Irina V; Gottschalk, Stephen

    2017-07-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most aggressive primary brain tumor in adults and is virtually incurable with conventional therapies. Immunotherapy with T cells expressing GBM-specific chimeric antigen receptors (CAR) is an attractive approach to improve outcomes. Although CAR T cells targeting GBM antigens, such as IL13 receptor subunit α2 (IL13Rα2), HER2, and EGFR variant III (EGFRvIII), have had antitumor activity in preclinical models, early-phase clinical testing has demonstrated limited antiglioma activity. Transgenic expression of IL15 is an appealing strategy to enhance CAR T-cell effector function. We tested this approach in our IL13Rα2-positive glioma model in which limited IL13Rα2-CAR T-cell persistence results in recurrence of antigen-positive gliomas. T cells were genetically modified with retroviral vectors encoding IL13Rα2-CARs or IL15 (IL13Rα2-CAR.IL15 T cells). IL13Rα2-CAR.IL15 T cells recognized glioma cells in an antigen-dependent fashion, had greater proliferative capacity, and produced more cytokines after repeated stimulations in comparison with IL13Rα2-CAR T cells. No autonomous IL13Rα2-CAR.IL15 T-cell proliferation was observed; however, IL15 expression increased IL13Rα2-CAR T-cell viability in the absence of exogenous cytokines or antigen. In vivo , IL13Rα2-CAR.IL15 T cells persisted longer and had greater antiglioma activity than IL13Rα2-CAR T cells, resulting in a survival advantage. Gliomas recurring after 40 days after T-cell injection had downregulated IL13Rα2 expression, indicating that antigen loss variants occur in the setting of improved T-cell persistence. Thus, CAR T cells for GBM should not only be genetically modified to improve their proliferation and persistence, but also to target multiple antigens. Summary: Glioblastoma responds imperfectly to immunotherapy. Transgenic expression of IL15 in T cells expressing CARs improved their proliferative capacity, persistence, and cytokine production. The emergence of antigen

  9. Antigen Loss Variants: Catching Hold of Escaping Foes.

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    Vyas, Maulik; Müller, Rolf; Pogge von Strandmann, Elke

    2017-01-01

    Since mid-1990s, the field of cancer immunotherapy has seen steady growth and selected immunotherapies are now a routine and preferred therapeutic option of certain malignancies. Both active and passive cancer immunotherapies exploit the fact that tumor cells express specific antigens on the cell surface, thereby mounting an immune response specifically against malignant cells. It is well established that cancer cells typically lose surface antigens following natural or therapy-induced selective pressure and these antigen-loss variants are often the population that causes therapy-resistant relapse. CD19 and CD20 antigen loss in acute lymphocytic leukemia and chronic lymphocytic leukemia, respectively, and lineage switching in leukemia associated with mixed lineage leukemia (MLL) gene rearrangements are well-documented evidences in this regard. Although increasing number of novel immunotherapies are being developed, majority of these do not address the control of antigen loss variants. Here, we review the occurrence of antigen loss variants in leukemia and discuss the therapeutic strategies to tackle the same. We also present an approach of dual-targeting immunoligand effectively retargeting NK cells against antigen loss variants in MLL-associated leukemia. Novel immunotherapies simultaneously targeting more than one tumor antigen certainly hold promise to completely eradicate tumor and prevent therapy-resistant relapses.

  10. Construction and expression of hepatitis B surface antigen escape variants within the "a" determinant by site directed mutagenesis.

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    Golsaz Shirazi, Forough; Amiri, Mohammad Mehdi; Mohammadi, Hamed; Bayat, Ali Ahmad; Roohi, Azam; Khoshnoodi, Jalal; Zarnani, Amir Hassan; Jeddi-Tehrani, Mahmood; Kardar, Gholam Ali; Shokri, Fazel

    2013-09-01

    The antibody response to hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) controls hepatitis B virus infection. The "a" determinant of HBsAg is the most important target for protective antibody response, diagnosis and immunoprophylaxis. Mutations in this area may induce immune escape mutants and affect the performance of HBsAg assays. To construct clinically relevant recombinant mutant forms of HBsAg and assessment of their reactivity with anti-HBs monoclonal antibodies (MAbs). Wild type (wt) and mutant (mt) HBsAg genes were constructed by site directed mutagenesis and SEOing PCR. The amplified genes were inserted into pCMV6-neo plasmid and transfected in CHO cell line. The expression of wt- and mtHBsAg was assessed by commercial ELISA assays and stable cells were established and cloned by limiting dilution. The recombinant mutants were further characterized using a panel of anti-HBs monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) and the pattern of their reactivity was assessed by ELISA. Ten HBsAg mutants having single mutation within the "a" determinant including P120E, T123N, Q129H, M133L, K141E, P142S, D144A, G145R, N146S and C147S together with a wt form were successfully constructed and expressed in CHO cells. Reactivity of anti-HBs MAbs with mtHBsAgs displayed different patterns. The effect of mutations on antibody binding differed depending on the amino acid involved and its location within the ''a'' determinant. Mutation at amino acids 123 and 145 resulted in either complete loss or significant reduction of binding to all anti-HBs MAbs. Our panel of mtHBsAgs is a valuable tool for assessment of the antibody response to HBV escape mutants and may have substantial implications in HBV immunological diagnostics.

  11. In Vitro Variant Surface Antigen Expression in Plasmodium falciparum Parasites from a Semi-Immune Individual Is Not Correlated with Var Gene Transcription

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    Tschan, Serena; Flötenmeyer, Matthias; Koch, Iris; Berger, Jürgen; Kremsner, Peter; Frank, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Plasmodium falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 (PfEMP1) is considered to be the main variant surface antigen (VSA) of Plasmodium falciparum and is mainly localized on electron-dense knobs in the membrane of the infected erythrocyte. Switches in PfEMP1 expression provide the basis for antigenic variation and are thought to be critical for parasite persistence during chronic infections. Recently, strain transcending anti-PfEMP1 immunity has been shown to develop early in life, challenging the role of PfEMP1 in antigenic variation during chronic infections. In this work we investigate how P. falciparum achieves persistence during a chronic asymptomatic infection. The infected individual (MOA) was parasitemic for 42 days and multilocus var gene genotyping showed persistence of the same parasite population throughout the infection. Parasites from the beginning of the infection were adapted to tissue culture and cloned by limiting dilution. Flow cytometry using convalescent serum detected a variable surface recognition signal on isogenic clonal parasites. Quantitative real-time PCR with a field isolate specific var gene primer set showed that the surface recognition signal was not correlated with transcription of individual var genes. Strain transcending anti-PfEMP1 immunity of the convalescent serum was demonstrated with CD36 selected and PfEMP1 knock-down NF54 clones. In contrast, knock-down of PfEMP1 did not have an effect on the antibody recognition signal in MOA clones. Trypsinisation of the membrane surface proteins abolished the surface recognition signal and immune electron microscopy revealed that antibodies from the convalescent serum bound to membrane areas without knobs and with knobs. Together the data indicate that PfEMP1 is not the main variable surface antigen during a chronic infection and suggest a role for trypsin sensitive non-PfEMP1 VSAs for parasite persistence in chronic infections. PMID:27907004

  12. In vitro selection of Plasmodium falciparum 3D7 for expression of variant surface antigens associated with severe malaria in African children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Staalsoe, Trine; Nielsen, Morten A; Vestergaard, Lasse S

    2003-01-01

    ) in older semi-immune children. Establishment of the genetic mechanism underlying changes in VSA expression in response to in vitro selective pressure is now possible because of the availability of the entire genomic sequence of the P. falciparum clone 3D7. As a first step towards direct molecular...... identification of VSASM-encoding genes in 3D7, we report here a method of enforcing expression of VSASM-like antigens in this parasite clone by a novel selection method using plasma from semi-immune children with low VSAUM-specific, but high VSASM-specific, IgG reactivity. In addition to the resulting increase...... and epidemiologically diverse areas of endemic parasite transmission. The described selection method appears a useful tool in the identification of genes encoding VSA involved in severe and life-threatening P. falciparum malaria....

  13. Canine parvovirus: the worldwide occurrence of antigenic variants.

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    Miranda, Carla; Thompson, Gertrude

    2016-09-01

    The most important enteric virus infecting canids is canine parvovirus type 2 (CPV-2). CPV is the aetiologic agent of a contagious disease, mainly characterized by clinical gastroenteritis signs in younger dogs. CPV-2 emerged as a new virus in the late 1970s, which could infect domestic dogs, and became distributed in the global dog population within 2 years. A few years later, the virus's original type was replaced by a new genetic and antigenic variant, called CPV-2a. Around 1984 and 2000, virus variants with the single change to Asp or Glu in the VP2 residue 426 were detected (sometimes termed CPV-2b and -2c). The genetic and antigenic changes in the variants have also been correlated with changes in their host range; in particular, in the ability to replicate in cats and also host range differences in canine and other tissue culture cells. CPV-2 variants have been circulating among wild carnivores and have been well-documented in several countries around the world. Here, we have reviewed and summarized the current information about the worldwide distribution and evolution of CPV-2 variants since they emerged, as well as the host ranges they are associated with.

  14. Geographical and temporal conservation of antibody recognition of Plasmodium falciparum variant surface antigens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Morten A; Vestergaard, Lasse S; Lusingu, John

    2004-01-01

    The slow acquisition of protection against Plasmodium falciparum malaria probably reflects the extensive diversity of important antigens. The variant surface antigens (VSA) that mediate parasite adhesion to a range of host molecules are regarded as important targets of acquired protective immunity......, but their diversity makes them questionable vaccine candidates. We determined levels of VSA-specific immunoglobulin G (IgG) in human plasma collected at four geographically distant and epidemiologically distinct localities with specificity for VSA expressed by P. falciparum isolates from three African countries...

  15. Antibodies to variant antigens on the surfaces of infected erythrocytes are associated with protection from malaria in Ghanaian children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dodoo, D; Staalsoe, T; Giha, H

    2001-01-01

    Plasmodium falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 (PfEMP1) is a variant antigen expressed on the surface of infected erythrocytes. Each parasite genome contains about 40 PfEMP1 genes, but only 1 PfEMP1 gene is expressed at a given time. PfEMP1 serves as a parasite-sequestering ligand to endoth...

  16. Generation and characterization of antigenic variants induced by exposure of tumor cells to UV radiation in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hostetler, L.L.W.

    1988-01-01

    Antigenic changes present in nonantigenic tumor cells exposed to UV radiation (UV) in vitro were investigated by addressing the following questions: (1) Are antigenic variants (AV) produced that are rejected in normal but not immunosuppressed mice? (2) Does generation of AV depend upon intrinsic properties of the cells exposed or result from the action of UV? (3) Is antigenic modification induced by UV due to increased histocompatibility antigen expression? (4) Do AV crossreact immunologically with parental tumor or with other AV? and (5) Is the UV-associated common antigen expressed on UV-induced tumors present on UV-irradiated tumor cells? AV were generated at different frequencies following in vitro UV irradiation of a spontaneous murine fibrosarcoma, a murine melanoma, and two melanoma clones. Immunological experiments demonstrated that the AV and parental cells shared a determinant that was susceptible to immune recognition, but incapable of inducing immunity. In contrast, the AV were noncrossreactive, suggesting that variant-specific antigens were also expressed. Finally, the AV were recognized by UV-induced suppressor cells, indicating that the UV-associated common antigen expressed by UV-induced tumors was also present

  17. Specificity of antigens on UV radiation-induced antigenic tumor cell variants measured in vitro and in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hostetler, L.W.; Romerdahl, C.A.; Kripke, M.L.

    1989-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether antigenic variants cross-react immunologically with the parental tumor and whether the UVR-associated antigen unique to UVR-induced tumors is also present on the variants. Antigenic (regressor) variants and nonimmunogenic (progressor) clones derived from UV-irradiated cultures of the C3H K1735 melanoma and SF19 spontaneous fibrosarcoma cell lines were used to address these questions. In an in vivo immunization and challenge assay, the antigenic variants did not induce cross-protection among themselves, but each induced immunity against the immunizing variant, the parent tumor cells, and nonimmunogenic clones derived from UV-irradiated parent cultures. Therefore, the variants can be used to induce in mice a protective immunity that prevents the growth of the parent tumor and nonimmunogenic clones, but not other antigenic variants. In contrast, immunization with cells of the parental tumor or the nonimmunogenic clones induced no protective immunity against challenge with any of the cell lines. Utilizing the K1735 melanoma-derived cell lines in vitro, T-helper (Th) cells isolated from tumor-immunized mice were tested for cross-reactivity by their ability to collaborate with trinitrophenyl-primed B-cells in the presence of trinitrophenyl-conjugated tumor cells. Also, the cross-reactivity of cytotoxic T-lymphocytes from tumor-immunized mice was assessed by a 4-h 51Cr-release assay. Antigenic variants induced cytotoxic T-lymphocytes and Th activity that was higher than that induced by the parent tumor and nonimmunogenic clones from the UVR-exposed parent tumor and cross-reacted with the parental tumor cells and nonimmunogenic clones, but not with other antigenic variants

  18. Identification of a variant antigenic neutralizing epitope in hypervariable region 1 of avian leukosis virus subgroup J.

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    Hou, Minbo; Zhou, Defang; Li, Gen; Guo, Huijun; Liu, Jianzhu; Wang, Guihua; Zheng, Qiankun; Cheng, Ziqiang

    2016-03-08

    Avian leukosis virus subgroup J (ALV-J) is a hypervariable oncogenic retrovirus that causes great economic loss in poultry. Antigenic variations in the variable regions make the development of an effective vaccine a challenging task. In the present study, we identified a variant antigenic neutralizing epitope using reverse vaccinology methods. First, we predicted the B-cell epitopes in gp85 gene of ALV-J strains by DNAman and bioinformatics. Fourteen candidate epitopes were selected and linked in tandem with glycines or serines as a multi-epitope gene. The expressed protein of multi-epitope gene can induce high-titer antibody that can recognize nature ALV-J and neutralize the infectivity of ALV-J strains. Next, we identified a high effective epitope using eight overlapping fragments of gp85 gene reacting with mAb 2D5 and anti-multi-epitope sera. The identified epitope contained one of the predicted epitopes and localized in hyervariable region 1 (hr1), indicating a variant epitope. To better understand if the variants of the epitope have a good antigenicity, we synthesized four variants to react with mAb 2D5 and anti-ALV-J sera. The result showed that all variants could react with the two kinds of antibodies though they showed different antigenicity, while could not react with ALV-J negative sera. Thus, the variant antigenic neutralizing epitope was determined as 137-LRDFIA/E/TKWKS/GDDL/HLIRPYVNQS-158. The result shows a potential use of this variant epitopes as a novel multi-epitope vaccine against ALV-J in poultry. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. The leukocyte common antigen (CD45) on human pre-B leukemia cells: variant glycoprotein form expression during the cell exposure to phorbol ester is blocked by a nonselective protein kinase inhibitor H7

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duraj, J.; Sedlak, J.; Chorvath, B.; Rauko, P.

    1997-01-01

    The human pre-B acute lymphoblastic leukemia cell line REH6 was utilized for characterization of CD45 glycoprotein by monoclonal antibodies (mAb) recognizing four distinct CD45 antigen specificities, i.e. nonrestricted CD45, restricted, CD45RA, CD45RB and CD45R0. Immunoprecipitation revealed two antigen specificities on REH6 cells of m.w. 220 kDa and 190 kDa, both presenting wide range of isoelectric point pI∼6.0-7.5. Nonrestricted CD45 epitopes were not affected by the sialyl acid cleavage with sodium meta-periodate or neuraminidase, but were sensitive to both, tunicamycin, the N-glycosylation inhibitor and monensin, an inhibitor of protein transport through the Golgi compartment. O-sialoglycoprotein endopeptidase from Pasteurella haemolytica A1 partially cleaved CD45RA and CD45RB epitopes, while nonrestricted CD45 determinants were not affected by this enzyme. Limited proteolysis of this antigen resulted in the appearance of 160-180 kDa peptide domains which retained CD45 epitopes. Further, the treatment of cells with phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) induced marked down-regulation of 220 and 190 kDa isoforms and the appearance of new 210, 180 and 170 kDa variant glycoprotein forms which were not found on parental cells. This PMA effect was not accompanied by the programmed cell death and was markedly blocked by a nonselective protein kinase (PK) inhibitor iso-quinoline sulfonamide H7. Modulation of CD45 by phorbol esters might serve as an in vitro model for an additional insight into the function of CD45 in hematopoietic cells. (author)

  20. The role of Plasmodium falciparum variant surface antigens in protective immunity and vaccine development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hviid, Lars

    2010-01-01

    There is substantial immuno-epidemiological evidence that the parasite-encoded, so-called variant surface antigens (VSAs) such as PfEMP1 on the surface of infected erythrocytes (IEs) are important-in some cases probably decisive-determinants of clinical outcome of P. falciparum malaria. The evide...... of VSAs, and how vaccines based on this type of antigens fit into the current global strategy to reduce, eliminate and eventually eradicate the burden of malaria....

  1. Effects of pregnancy and intensity of Plasmodium falciparum transmission on immunoglobulin G subclass responses to variant surface antigens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Megnekou, Rosette; Staalsoe, Trine; Taylor, Diane W

    2005-01-01

    Placenta-sequestering Plasmodium falciparum involved in the pathogenesis of pregnancy-associated malaria (PAM) in otherwise clinically immune women expresses particular variant surface antigens (VSA(PAM)) on the surface of infected erythrocytes that differ from VSA found in parasitized nonpregnant...... individuals (non-PAM type VSA). We studied levels of immunoglobulin G (IgG) and IgG subclasses with specificity for VSA(PAM) and for non-PAM type VSA in pregnant and nonpregnant women from two sites with different endemicities in Cameroon. We found that VSA(PAM)-specific responses depended on the pregnancy......(PAM)-specific immunity to pregnancy-associated malaria....

  2. Differential Expression Profile of ZFX Variants Discriminates Breast Cancer Subtypes

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    Pourkeramati, Fatemeh; Asadi, Malek Hossein; Shakeri, Shahryar; Farsinejad, Alireza

    2018-05-13

    ZFX is a transcriptional regulator in embryonic stem cells that plays an important role in pluripotency and self-renewal. ZFX is widely expressed in pluripotent stem cells and is down-regulated during differentiation of embryonic stem cells. ZFX has five different variants that encode three different protein isoforms. While several reports have determined the overexpression of ZFX in a variety of somatic cancers, the expression of ZFX-spliced variants in cancer cells is not well-understood. We investigated the expression of ZFX variants in a series of breast cancer tissues and cell lines using quantitative PCR. The expression of ZFX variant 1/3 was higher in tumor tissue compared to marginal tissue. In contrast, the ZFX variant 5 was down-regulated in tumor tissues. While the ZFX variant 1/3 and ZFX variant 5 expression significantly increased in low-grade tumors, ZFX variant 4 was strongly expressed in high-grade tumors and demonstrating lymphatic invasion. In addition, our result revealed a significant association between the HER2 status and the expression of ZFX-spliced variants. Our data suggest that the expression of ZFX-spliced transcripts varies between different types of breast cancer and may contribute to their tumorigenesis process. Hence, ZFX-spliced transcripts could be considered as novel tumor markers with a probable value in diagnosis, prognosis, and therapy of breast cancer.

  3. Structure-guided evolution of antigenically distinct adeno-associated virus variants for immune evasion.

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    Tse, Longping Victor; Klinc, Kelli A; Madigan, Victoria J; Castellanos Rivera, Ruth M; Wells, Lindsey F; Havlik, L Patrick; Smith, J Kennon; Agbandje-McKenna, Mavis; Asokan, Aravind

    2017-06-13

    Preexisting neutralizing antibodies (NAbs) against adeno-associated viruses (AAVs) pose a major, unresolved challenge that restricts patient enrollment in gene therapy clinical trials using recombinant AAV vectors. Structural studies suggest that despite a high degree of sequence variability, antibody recognition sites or antigenic hotspots on AAVs and other related parvoviruses might be evolutionarily conserved. To test this hypothesis, we developed a structure-guided evolution approach that does not require selective pressure exerted by NAbs. This strategy yielded highly divergent antigenic footprints that do not exist in natural AAV isolates. Specifically, synthetic variants obtained by evolving murine antigenic epitopes on an AAV serotype 1 capsid template can evade NAbs without compromising titer, transduction efficiency, or tissue tropism. One lead AAV variant generated by combining multiple evolved antigenic sites effectively evades polyclonal anti-AAV1 neutralizing sera from immunized mice and rhesus macaques. Furthermore, this variant displays robust immune evasion in nonhuman primate and human serum samples at dilution factors as high as 1:5, currently mandated by several clinical trials. Our results provide evidence that antibody recognition of AAV capsids is conserved across species. This approach can be applied to any AAV strain to evade NAbs in prospective patients for human gene therapy.

  4. Expression and Antigenic Evaluation of VacA Antigenic Fragment of Helicobacter Pylori

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    Hasanzadeh, Leila; Ghaznavi-Rad, Ehsanollah; Soufian, Safieh; Farjadi, Vahideh; Abtahi, Hamid

    2013-01-01

    Objective(s) : Helicobacter pylori, a human specific gastric pathogen is a causative agent of chronic active gastritis. The vacuolating cytotoxin (VacA) is an effective virulence factor involved in gastric injury. The aim of this study was to construct a recombinant protein containing antigenic region of VacA gene and determine its antigenicity. Materials and Methods: The antigenic region of VacA gene was detected by bioinformatics methods. The polymerase chain reaction method was used to amplify a highly antigenic region of VacA gene from chromosomal DNA of H. pylori. The eluted product was cloned into the prokaryotic expression vector pET32a. The target protein was expressed in the Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3) pLysS. The bacteria including pET32a-VacA plasmids were induced by IPTG. The antigenicity was finally studied by western blotting using sera of 15 H. pylori infected patients after purification. Results: Enzyme digestion analysis, PCR and DNA sequencing results showed that the target gene was inserted correctly into the recombinant vector. The expressed protein was purified successfully via affinity chromatography. Data indicated that antigenic region of VacA protein from Helicobacter pylori was recognized by all 15 patient’s sera. Conclusion : Our data showed that antigenic region of VacA protein can be expressed by in E. co.li. This protein was recognized by sera patients suffering from H. pylori infection. the recombinant protein has similar epitopes and close antigenic properties to the natural form of this antigen. Recombinant antigenic region of VacA protein also seems to be a promising antigen for protective and serologic diagnosis . PMID:23997913

  5. Expression and Antigenic Evaluation of VacA Antigenic Fragment of Helicobacter Pylori

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leila Hasanzadeh

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective(s: Helicobacter pylori, a human specific gastric pathogen is a causative agent of chronic active gastritis. The vacuolating cytotoxin (VacA is an effective virulence factor involved in gastric injury. The aim of this study was to construct a recombinant protein containing antigenic region of VacA gene and determine its antigenicity.   Materials and Methods: The antigenic region of VacA gene was detected by bioinformatics methods. The polymerase chain reaction method was used to amplify a highly antigenic region of VacA gene from chromosomal DNA of H. pylori. The eluted product was cloned into the prokaryotic expression vector pET32a. The target protein was expressed in the Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3 pLysS. The bacteria including pET32a-VacA plasmids were induced by IPTG. The antigenicity was finally studied by western blotting using sera of 15 H. pylori infected patients after purification. Results: Enzyme digestion analysis, PCR and DNA sequencing results showed that the target gene was inserted correctly into the recombinant vector. The expressed protein was purified successfully via affinity chromatography. Data indicated that antigenic region of VacA protein from Helicobacter pylori was recognized by all 15 patient’s sera. Conclusion : Our data showed that antigenic region of VacA protein can be expressed by in E. co.li. This protein was recognized by sera patients suffering from H. pylori infection. the recombinant protein has similar epitopes and close antigenic properties to the natural form of this antigen. Recombinant antigenic region of VacA protein also seems to be a promising antigen for protective and serologic diagnosis .

  6. Novel Non-Histocompatibility Antigen Mismatched Variants Improve the Ability to Predict Antibody-Mediated Rejection Risk in Kidney Transplant

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    Silvia Pineda

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Transplant rejection is the critical clinical end-point limiting indefinite survival after histocompatibility antigen (HLA mismatched organ transplantation. The predominant cause of late graft loss is antibody-mediated rejection (AMR, a process whereby injury to the organ is caused by donor-specific antibodies, which bind to HLA and non-HLA (nHLA antigens. AMR is incompletely diagnosed as donor/recipient (D/R matching is only limited to the HLA locus and critical nHLA immunogenic antigens remain to be identified. We have developed an integrative computational approach leveraging D/R exome sequencing and gene expression to predict clinical post-transplant outcome. We performed a rigorous statistical analysis of 28 highly annotated D/R kidney transplant pairs with biopsy-confirmed clinical outcomes of rejection [either AMR or T-cell-mediated rejection (CMR] and no-rejection (NoRej, identifying a significantly higher number of mismatched nHLA variants in AMR (ANOVA—p-value = 0.02. Using Fisher’s exact test, we identified 123 variants associated mainly with risk of AMR (p-value < 0.001. In addition, we applied a machine-learning technique to circumvent the issue of statistical power and we found a subset of 65 variants using random forest, that are predictive of post-tx AMR showing a very low error rate. These variants are functionally relevant to the rejection process in the kidney and AMR as they relate to genes and/or expression quantitative trait loci (eQTLs that are enriched in genes expressed in kidney and vascular endothelium and underlie the immunobiology of graft rejection. In addition to current D/R HLA mismatch evaluation, additional mismatch nHLA D/R variants will enhance the stratification of post-tx AMR risk even before engraftment of the organ. This innovative study design is applicable in all solid organ transplants, where the impact of mitigating AMR on graft survival may be greater, with considerable benefits on

  7. The evolutionary dynamics of variant antigen genes in Babesia reveal a history of genomic innovation underlying host-parasite interaction

    KAUST Repository

    Jackson, Andrew P.

    2014-05-05

    Babesia spp. are tick-borne, intraerythrocytic hemoparasites that use antigenic variation to resist host immunity, through sequential modification of the parasite-derived variant erythrocyte surface antigen (VESA) expressed on the infected red blood cell surface. We identified the genomic processes driving antigenic diversity in genes encoding VESA (ves1) through comparative analysis within and between three Babesia species, (B. bigemina, B. divergens and B. bovis). Ves1 structure diverges rapidly after speciation, notably through the evolution of shortened forms (ves2) from 5? ends of canonical ves1 genes. Phylogenetic analyses show that ves1 genes are transposed between loci routinely, whereas ves2 genes are not. Similarly, analysis of sequence mosaicism shows that recombination drives variation in ves1 sequences, but less so for ves2, indicating the adoption of different mechanisms for variation of the two families. Proteomic analysis of the B. bigemina PR isolate shows that two dominant VESA1 proteins are expressed in the population, whereas numerous VESA2 proteins are co-expressed, consistent with differential transcriptional regulation of each family. Hence, VESA2 proteins are abundant and previously unrecognized elements of Babesia biology, with evolutionary dynamics consistently different to those of VESA1, suggesting that their functions are distinct. 2014 The Author(s) 2014.

  8. The evolutionary dynamics of variant antigen genes in Babesia reveal a history of genomic innovation underlying host-parasite interaction

    KAUST Repository

    Jackson, Andrew P.; Otto, Thomas D.; Darby, Alistair; Ramaprasad, Abhinay; Xia, Dong; Echaide, Ignacio Eduardo; Farber, Marisa; Gahlot, Sunayna; Gamble, John; Gupta, Dinesh; Gupta, Yask; Jackson, Louise; Malandrin, Laurence; Malas, Tareq B.; Moussa, Ehab; Nair, Mridul; Reid, Adam J.; Sanders, Mandy; Sharma, Jyotsna; Tracey, Alan; Quail, Mike A.; Weir, William; Wastling, Jonathan M.; Hall, Neil; Willadsen, Peter; Lingelbach, Klaus; Shiels, Brian; Tait, Andy; Berriman, Matt; Allred, David R.; Pain, Arnab

    2014-01-01

    Babesia spp. are tick-borne, intraerythrocytic hemoparasites that use antigenic variation to resist host immunity, through sequential modification of the parasite-derived variant erythrocyte surface antigen (VESA) expressed on the infected red blood cell surface. We identified the genomic processes driving antigenic diversity in genes encoding VESA (ves1) through comparative analysis within and between three Babesia species, (B. bigemina, B. divergens and B. bovis). Ves1 structure diverges rapidly after speciation, notably through the evolution of shortened forms (ves2) from 5? ends of canonical ves1 genes. Phylogenetic analyses show that ves1 genes are transposed between loci routinely, whereas ves2 genes are not. Similarly, analysis of sequence mosaicism shows that recombination drives variation in ves1 sequences, but less so for ves2, indicating the adoption of different mechanisms for variation of the two families. Proteomic analysis of the B. bigemina PR isolate shows that two dominant VESA1 proteins are expressed in the population, whereas numerous VESA2 proteins are co-expressed, consistent with differential transcriptional regulation of each family. Hence, VESA2 proteins are abundant and previously unrecognized elements of Babesia biology, with evolutionary dynamics consistently different to those of VESA1, suggesting that their functions are distinct. 2014 The Author(s) 2014.

  9. The evolutionary dynamics of variant antigen genes in Babesia reveal a history of genomic innovation underlying host–parasite interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Andrew P.; Otto, Thomas D.; Darby, Alistair; Ramaprasad, Abhinay; Xia, Dong; Echaide, Ignacio Eduardo; Farber, Marisa; Gahlot, Sunayna; Gamble, John; Gupta, Dinesh; Gupta, Yask; Jackson, Louise; Malandrin, Laurence; Malas, Tareq B.; Moussa, Ehab; Nair, Mridul; Reid, Adam J.; Sanders, Mandy; Sharma, Jyotsna; Tracey, Alan; Quail, Mike A.; Weir, William; Wastling, Jonathan M.; Hall, Neil; Willadsen, Peter; Lingelbach, Klaus; Shiels, Brian; Tait, Andy; Berriman, Matt; Allred, David R.; Pain, Arnab

    2014-01-01

    Babesia spp. are tick-borne, intraerythrocytic hemoparasites that use antigenic variation to resist host immunity, through sequential modification of the parasite-derived variant erythrocyte surface antigen (VESA) expressed on the infected red blood cell surface. We identified the genomic processes driving antigenic diversity in genes encoding VESA (ves1) through comparative analysis within and between three Babesia species, (B. bigemina, B. divergens and B. bovis). Ves1 structure diverges rapidly after speciation, notably through the evolution of shortened forms (ves2) from 5′ ends of canonical ves1 genes. Phylogenetic analyses show that ves1 genes are transposed between loci routinely, whereas ves2 genes are not. Similarly, analysis of sequence mosaicism shows that recombination drives variation in ves1 sequences, but less so for ves2, indicating the adoption of different mechanisms for variation of the two families. Proteomic analysis of the B. bigemina PR isolate shows that two dominant VESA1 proteins are expressed in the population, whereas numerous VESA2 proteins are co-expressed, consistent with differential transcriptional regulation of each family. Hence, VESA2 proteins are abundant and previously unrecognized elements of Babesia biology, with evolutionary dynamics consistently different to those of VESA1, suggesting that their functions are distinct. PMID:24799432

  10. The evolutionary dynamics of variant antigen genes in Babesia reveal a history of genomic innovation underlying host-parasite interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Andrew P; Otto, Thomas D; Darby, Alistair; Ramaprasad, Abhinay; Xia, Dong; Echaide, Ignacio Eduardo; Farber, Marisa; Gahlot, Sunayna; Gamble, John; Gupta, Dinesh; Gupta, Yask; Jackson, Louise; Malandrin, Laurence; Malas, Tareq B; Moussa, Ehab; Nair, Mridul; Reid, Adam J; Sanders, Mandy; Sharma, Jyotsna; Tracey, Alan; Quail, Mike A; Weir, William; Wastling, Jonathan M; Hall, Neil; Willadsen, Peter; Lingelbach, Klaus; Shiels, Brian; Tait, Andy; Berriman, Matt; Allred, David R; Pain, Arnab

    2014-06-01

    Babesia spp. are tick-borne, intraerythrocytic hemoparasites that use antigenic variation to resist host immunity, through sequential modification of the parasite-derived variant erythrocyte surface antigen (VESA) expressed on the infected red blood cell surface. We identified the genomic processes driving antigenic diversity in genes encoding VESA (ves1) through comparative analysis within and between three Babesia species, (B. bigemina, B. divergens and B. bovis). Ves1 structure diverges rapidly after speciation, notably through the evolution of shortened forms (ves2) from 5' ends of canonical ves1 genes. Phylogenetic analyses show that ves1 genes are transposed between loci routinely, whereas ves2 genes are not. Similarly, analysis of sequence mosaicism shows that recombination drives variation in ves1 sequences, but less so for ves2, indicating the adoption of different mechanisms for variation of the two families. Proteomic analysis of the B. bigemina PR isolate shows that two dominant VESA1 proteins are expressed in the population, whereas numerous VESA2 proteins are co-expressed, consistent with differential transcriptional regulation of each family. Hence, VESA2 proteins are abundant and previously unrecognized elements of Babesia biology, with evolutionary dynamics consistently different to those of VESA1, suggesting that their functions are distinct. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  11. Phase variable O antigen biosynthetic genes control expression of the major protective antigen and bacteriophage receptor in Vibrio cholerae O1.

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    Kimberley D Seed

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The Vibrio cholerae lipopolysaccharide O1 antigen is a major target of bacteriophages and the human immune system and is of critical importance for vaccine design. We used an O1-specific lytic bacteriophage as a tool to probe the capacity of V. cholerae to alter its O1 antigen and identified a novel mechanism by which this organism can modulate O antigen expression and exhibit intra-strain heterogeneity. We identified two phase variable genes required for O1 antigen biosynthesis, manA and wbeL. manA resides outside of the previously recognized O1 antigen biosynthetic locus, and encodes for a phosphomannose isomerase critical for the initial step in O1 antigen biosynthesis. We determined that manA and wbeL phase variants are attenuated for virulence, providing functional evidence to further support the critical role of the O1 antigen for infectivity. We provide the first report of phase variation modulating O1 antigen expression in V. cholerae, and show that the maintenance of these phase variable loci is an important means by which this facultative pathogen can generate the diverse subpopulations of cells needed for infecting the host intestinal tract and for escaping predation by an O1-specific phage.

  12. Spontaneous loss and alteration of antigen receptor expression in mature CD4+ T cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kyoizumi, Seishi; Akiyama, Mitoshi; Hirai, Yuko; Kusunoki; Yoichiro; Tanabe, Kazumi; Umeki, Shigeko; Nakamura, Nori; Yamakido, Michio; Hamamoto, Kazuko.

    1990-04-01

    The T-cell receptor CD3 (TCR/CD3) complex plays a central role in antigen recognition and activation of mature T cells, and therefore abnormalities in the expression of the complex should induce unresponsiveness of T cells to antigen stimulus. Using flow cytometry, we detected and enumerated variant cells with loss or alteration of surface TCR/CD3 expression among human mature CD4 + T cells. The presence of variant CD4 + T cells was demonstrated by isolating and cloning them from peripheral blood, and their abnormalities can be accounted for by alterations in TCR expression such as defects of protein expression and partial protein deletion. The variant frequency in peripheral blood increased with aging in normal donors and was highly elevated in patients with ataxia telangiectasia, an autosomal recessive inherited disease with defective DNA repair and variable T-cell immunodeficiency. These findings suggest that such alterations in TCR expression are induced by somatic mutagenesis of TCR genes and can be important factors related to age-dependent and genetic disease-associated T-cell dysfunction. (author)

  13. Cloning and Expressing Recombinant Protective Antigen Domains of B. anthracis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-01

    future predictive modeling toolkits. 1 1. Introduction The use of Bacillus anthracis as a bio - weapon in the United States in 2001 affirmed the need...for improved sensing and detection of biological weapons of mass destruction (WMD). Protective Antigen (PA) protein of Bacillus anthracis is the...Cloning and Expressing Recombinant Protective Antigen Domains of B. anthracis by Deborah A. Sarkes, Joshua M. Kogot, Irene Val-Addo

  14. Differential expression of the Escherichia coli autoaggregation factor antigen 43

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schembri, Mark; Hjerrild, Louise; Gjermansen, Morten

    2003-01-01

    Antigen 43 (Ag43) is a self-recognizing surface adhesin found in most Escherichia coli strains. Due to its excellent cell-to-cell aggregation characteristics, Ag43 expression confers clumping and fluffing of cells and promotes biofilm formation. Ag43 expression is repressed by the cellular redox...

  15. Evaluation of variants of melanoma-associated antigen genes and mRNA transcripts in melanomas of dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stell, Anneliese J; Dobson, Jane M; Scase, Timothy J; Catchpole, Brian

    2009-12-01

    OBJECTIVE-To characterize variability in melanoma-associated antigen (MAA) genes and gene expression in melanomas of dogs. ANIMALS-18 dogs with malignant melanomas and 8 healthy control dogs. PROCEDURES-cDNA was prepared from malignant melanoma biopsy specimens and from pigmented oral mucocutaneous tissues of healthy control dogs. Genomic DNA was extracted from poorly pigmented melanomas. A PCR assay was performed by use of Melan-A, SILV, or tyrosinase-specific primers. RESULTS-Splice variants of Melan-A and SILV were identified in malignant melanomas and also in healthy pigmented tissues, whereas a tyrosinase splice variant was detected in melanoma tissues only. A short interspersed nuclear element (SINE) insertion mutation was identified in the SILV gene in 1 of 10 poorly pigmented melanomas. Six novel exonic single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs; 3 synonymous and 3 nonsynonymous) were detected in the tyrosinase gene, and 1 nonsynonymous exonic SNP was detected in the SILV gene. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE-Variants of MAA mRNA were detected in malignant melanoma tissues of dogs. The importance of MAA alternative transcripts expressed in melanomas and normal pigmented tissues was unclear, but they may have represented a means of regulating melanin synthesis. The tyrosinase splice variant was detected only in melanomas and could potentially be a tumor-specific target for immunotherapy. A SILV SINE insertion mutation was identified in a melanoma from a Great Dane, a breed known to carry this mutation (associated with merle coat color). The nonsynonymous SNPs detected in tyrosinase and SILV transcripts did not appear to affect tumor pigmentation.

  16. Antigenic evaluation of a recombinant baculovirus-expressed Sarcocystis neurona SAG1 antigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, G D; Lakritz, J; Saville, W J; Livingston, R S; Dubey, J P; Middleton, J R; Marsh, A E

    2004-10-01

    Sarcocystis neurona is the primary parasite associated with equine protozoal myeloencephalitis (EPM). This is a commonly diagnosed neurological disorder in the Americas that infects the central nervous system of horses. Current serologic assays utilize culture-derived parasites as antigen. This method requires large numbers of parasites to be grown in culture, which is labor intensive and time consuming. Also, a culture-derived whole-parasite preparation contains conserved antigens that could cross-react with antibodies against other Sarcocystis species and members of Sarcocystidae such as Neospora spp., Hammondia spp., and Toxoplasma gondii. Therefore, there is a need to develop an improved method for the detection of S. neurona-specific antibodies. The sera of infected horses react strongly to surface antigen 1 (SnSAG1), an approximately 29-kDa protein, in immunoblot analysis, suggesting that it is an immunodominant antigen. The SnSAG1 gene of S. neurona was cloned, and recombinant S. neurona SAG1 protein (rSnSAG1-Bac) was expressed with the use of a baculovirus system. By immunoblot analysis, the rSnSAG1-Bac antigen detected antibodies to S. neurona from naturally infected and experimentally inoculated equids, cats, rabbit, mice, and skunk. This is the first report of a baculovirus-expressed recombinant S. neurona antigen being used to detect anti-S. neurona antibodies in a variety of host species.

  17. Surface co-expression of two different PfEMP1 antigens on single Plasmodium falciparum-infected erythrocytes facilitates binding to ICAM1 and PECAM1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Joergensen, Louise; Bengtsson, Dominique C; Bengtsson, Anja

    2010-01-01

    The Plasmodium falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 (PfEMP1) antigens play a major role in cytoadhesion of infected erythrocytes (IE), antigenic variation, and immunity to malaria. The current consensus on control of variant surface antigen expression is that only one PfEMP1 encoded by one var...

  18. Variant surface antigen-specific IgG and protection against clinical consequences of pregnancy-associated Plasmodium falciparum malaria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Staalsoe, Trine; Shulman, Caroline E; Bulmer, Judith N

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Pregnancy-associated malaria caused by Plasmodium falciparum adherence to chondroitin sulfate A in the placental intervillous space is a major cause of low birthweight and maternal anaemia in areas of endemic P falciparum transmission. Adhesion-blocking antibodies that specifically...... recognise parasite-encoded variant surface antigens (VSA) are associated with resistance to pregnancy-associated malaria. We looked for a possible relation between VSA-specific antibody concentrations, placental infection, and protection from low birthweight and maternal anaemia. METHODS: We used flow...... cytometry to measure VSA-specific IgG concentrations in plasma samples taken during child birth from 477 Kenyan women selected from a cohort of 910 women on the basis of HIV-1 status, gravidity, and placental histology. We measured VSA expressed by one placental P falciparum isolate and two isolates...

  19. Recruitment of PfSET2 by RNA polymerase II to variant antigen encoding loci contributes to antigenic variation in P. falciparum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uchechi E Ukaegbu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Histone modifications are important regulators of gene expression in all eukaryotes. In Plasmodium falciparum, these epigenetic marks regulate expression of genes involved in several aspects of host-parasite interactions, including antigenic variation. While the identities and genomic positions of many histone modifications have now been cataloged, how they are targeted to defined genomic regions remains poorly understood. For example, how variant antigen encoding loci (var are targeted for deposition of unique histone marks is a mystery that continues to perplex the field. Here we describe the recruitment of an ortholog of the histone modifier SET2 to var genes through direct interactions with the C-terminal domain (CTD of RNA polymerase II. In higher eukaryotes, SET2 is a histone methyltransferase recruited by RNA pol II during mRNA transcription; however, the ortholog in P. falciparum (PfSET2 has an atypical architecture and its role in regulating transcription is unknown. Here we show that PfSET2 binds to the unphosphorylated form of the CTD, a property inconsistent with its recruitment during mRNA synthesis. Further, we show that H3K36me3, the epigenetic mark deposited by PfSET2, is enriched at both active and silent var gene loci, providing additional evidence that its recruitment is not associated with mRNA production. Over-expression of a dominant negative form of PfSET2 designed to disrupt binding to RNA pol II induced rapid var gene expression switching, confirming both the importance of PfSET2 in var gene regulation and a role for RNA pol II in its recruitment. RNA pol II is known to transcribe non-coding RNAs from both active and silent var genes, providing a possible mechanism by which it could recruit PfSET2 to var loci. This work unifies previous reports of histone modifications, the production of ncRNAs, and the promoter activity of var introns into a mechanism that contributes to antigenic variation by malaria parasites.

  20. Anti-D Antibodies in Pregnant D Variant Antigen Carriers Initially Typed as RhD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukacevic Krstic, Jelena; Dajak, Slavica; Bingulac-Popovic, Jasna; Dogic, Vesna; Mratinovic-Mikulandra, Jela

    2016-11-01

    To evaluate the incidence, the consequences, and the prevention strategy of anti-D alloimmunizations of D variant carriers in the obstetric population of Split-Dalmatia County, Croatia. RhD immunization events were evaluated retrospectively for the period between 1993 and 2012. Women were tested for RhD antigen and irregular antibodies. Those with anti-D antibody who were not serologically D- were genotyped for RHD. They were evaluated for their obstetric and transfusion history and their titer of anti-D. The neonates were evaluated for RhD status, direct antiglobulin test (DAT), hemoglobin and bilirubin levels, transfusion therapy as well as phototherapy and outcome. Out of 104,884 live births 102,982 women were tested for RhD antigen. Anti-D immunization occurred in 184 women which accounts for 0.9% of individuals at risk of anti-D formation. 181 cases occurred in women serologically typed as D-. Three women were partial D carriers (DVa n = 2, DNB n = 1), initially typed RhD+, and recognized as D variant carriers after the immunization occurred. Anti-D titer varied from 1:1 to 1:16. Six children were RhD+, four had positive DAT, and two underwent phototherapy. Anti-D immunization occurred in pregnant partial D carriers (DVa, DNB). RhD+ children had serologic markers of hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn (HDFN), with no cases of severe HDFN.

  1. Expression of antigen tf and galectin-3 in fibroadenoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallegos, Itandehui Belem; Pérez-Campos, Eduardo; Martinez, Margarito; Mayoral, Miguel Ángel; Pérez, Laura; Aguilar, Sergio; Zenteno, Edgar; Pina, Maria del Socorro; Hernández, Pedro

    2012-12-24

    Fibroadenomas are benign human breast tumors, characterized by proliferation of epithelial and stromal components of the terminal ductal unit. They may grow, regress or remain unchanged, as the hormonal environment of the patient changes. Expression of antigen TF in mucin or mucin-type glycoproteins and of galectin-3 seems to contribute to proliferation and transformations events; their expression has been reported in ductal breast cancer and in aggressive tumors. Lectin histochemistry, immunohistochemistry, and immunofluorescence were used to examine the expression and distribution of antigen TF and galectin-3. We used lectins from Arachis hypogaea, Artocarpus integrifolia, and Amaranthus lecuocarpus to evaluate TF expression and a monoclonal antibody to evaluate galectin-3 expression. We used paraffin-embedded blocks from 10 breast tissues diagnosed with fibroadenoma and as control 10 healthy tissue samples. Histochemical and immunofluorescence analysis showed positive expression of galectin-3 in fibroadenoma tissue, mainly in stroma, weak interaction in ducts was observed; whereas, in healthy tissue samples the staining was also weak in ducts. Lectins from A. leucocarpus and A. integrifolia specificaly recognized ducts in healthy breast samples, whereas the lectin from A. hypogaea recognized ducts and stroma. In fibroadenoma tissue, the lectins from A. integrifolia, A. Hypogaea, and A. leucocarpus recognized mainly ducts. Our results suggest that expression of antigen TF and galectin-3 seems to participate in fibroadenoma development.

  2. Expression of antigen tf and galectin-3 in fibroadenoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gallegos Itandehui Belem

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fibroadenomas are benign human breast tumors, characterized by proliferation of epithelial and stromal components of the terminal ductal unit. They may grow, regress or remain unchanged, as the hormonal environment of the patient changes. Expression of antigen TF in mucin or mucin-type glycoproteins and of galectin-3 seems to contribute to proliferation and transformations events; their expression has been reported in ductal breast cancer and in aggressive tumors. Findings Lectin histochemistry, immunohistochemistry, and immunofluorescence were used to examine the expression and distribution of antigen TF and galectin-3. We used lectins from Arachis hypogaea, Artocarpus integrifolia, and Amaranthus lecuocarpus to evaluate TF expression and a monoclonal antibody to evaluate galectin-3 expression. We used paraffin-embedded blocks from 10 breast tissues diagnosed with fibroadenoma and as control 10 healthy tissue samples. Histochemical and immunofluorescence analysis showed positive expression of galectin-3 in fibroadenoma tissue, mainly in stroma, weak interaction in ducts was observed; whereas, in healthy tissue samples the staining was also weak in ducts. Lectins from A. leucocarpus and A. integrifolia specificaly recognized ducts in healthy breast samples, whereas the lectin from A. hypogaea recognized ducts and stroma. In fibroadenoma tissue, the lectins from A. integrifolia, A. Hypogaea, and A. leucocarpus recognized mainly ducts. Conclusions Our results suggest that expression of antigen TF and galectin-3 seems to participate in fibroadenoma development.

  3. Spleen-dependent regulation of antigenic variation in malaria parasites: Plasmodium knowlesi SICAvar expression profiles in splenic and asplenic hosts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stacey A Lapp

    Full Text Available Antigenic variation by malaria parasites was first described in Plasmodium knowlesi, which infects humans and macaque monkeys, and subsequently in P. falciparum, the most virulent human parasite. The schizont-infected cell agglutination (SICA variant proteins encoded by the SICAvar multigene family in P. knowlesi, and Erythrocyte Membrane Protein-1 (EMP-1 antigens encoded by the var multigene family in P. falciparum, are expressed at the surface of infected erythrocytes, are associated with virulence, and serve as determinants of naturally acquired immunity. A parental P. knowlesi clone, Pk1(A+, and a related progeny clone, Pk1(B+1+, derived by an in vivo induced variant antigen switch, were defined by the expression of distinct SICA variant protein doublets of 210/190 and 205/200 kDa, respectively. Passage of SICA[+] infected erythrocytes through splenectomized rhesus monkeys results in the SICA[-] phenotype, defined by the lack of surface expression and agglutination with variant specific antisera.We have investigated SICAvar RNA and protein expression in Pk1(A+, Pk1(B+1+, and SICA[-] parasites. The Pk1(A+ and Pk1(B+1+ parasites express different distinct SICAvar transcript and protein repertoires. By comparison, SICA[-] parasites are characterized by a vast reduction in SICAvar RNA expression, the lack of full-length SICAvar transcript signals on northern blots, and correspondingly, the absence of any SICA protein detected by mass spectrometry.SICA protein expression may be under transcriptional as well as post-transcriptional control, and we show for the first time that the spleen, an organ central to blood-stage immunity in malaria, exerts an influence on these processes. Furthermore, proteomics has enabled the first in-depth characterization of SICA[+] protein phenotypes and we show that the in vivo switch from Pk1(A+ to Pk1(B+1+ parasites resulted in a complete change in SICA profiles. These results emphasize the importance of studying

  4. High affinity antigen recognition of the dual specific variants of herceptin is entropy-driven in spite of structural plasticity.

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    Jenny Bostrom

    Full Text Available The antigen-binding site of Herceptin, an anti-human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor 2 (HER2 antibody, was engineered to add a second specificity toward Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF to create a high affinity two-in-one antibody bH1. Crystal structures of bH1 in complex with either antigen showed that, in comparison to Herceptin, this antibody exhibited greater conformational variability, also called "structural plasticity". Here, we analyzed the biophysical and thermodynamic properties of the dual specific variants of Herceptin to understand how a single antibody binds two unrelated protein antigens. We showed that while bH1 and the affinity-improved bH1-44, in particular, maintained many properties of Herceptin including binding affinity, kinetics and the use of residues for antigen recognition, they differed in the binding thermodynamics. The interactions of bH1 and its variants with both antigens were characterized by large favorable entropy changes whereas the Herceptin/HER2 interaction involved a large favorable enthalpy change. By dissecting the total entropy change and the energy barrier for dual interaction, we determined that the significant structural plasticity of the bH1 antibodies demanded by the dual specificity did not translate into the expected increase of entropic penalty relative to Herceptin. Clearly, dual antigen recognition of the Herceptin variants involves divergent antibody conformations of nearly equivalent energetic states. Hence, increasing the structural plasticity of an antigen-binding site without increasing the entropic cost may play a role for antibodies to evolve multi-specificity. Our report represents the first comprehensive biophysical analysis of a high affinity dual specific antibody binding two unrelated protein antigens, furthering our understanding of the thermodynamics that drive the vast antigen recognition capacity of the antibody repertoire.

  5. ELISA for detection of variant rabbit haemorrhagic disease virus RHDV2 antigen in liver extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalton, K P; Podadera, A; Granda, V; Nicieza, I; Del Llano, D; González, R; de Los Toyos, J R; García Ocaña, M; Vázquez, F; Martín Alonso, J M; Prieto, J M; Parra, F; Casais, R

    2018-01-01

    The emergence and rapid spread of variant of the rabbit hemorrhagic disease virus (RHDV2) require new diagnostic tools to ensure that efficient control measures are adopted. In the present study, a specific sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for detection of RHDV2 antigens in rabbit liver homogenates, based on the use of an RHDV2-specific monoclonal antibody (Mab) 2D9 for antigen capture and an anti-RHDV2 goat polyclonal antibody (Pab), was developed. This ELISA was able to successfully detect RHDV2 and RHDV2 recombinant virions with high sensitivity (100%) and specificity (97.22%). No cross-reactions were detected with RHDV G1 viruses while low cross-reactivity was detected with one of the RHDVa samples analyzed. The ELISA afforded good repeatability and had high analytical sensitivity as it was able to detect a dilution 1:163,640 (6.10ng/mL) of purified RHDV-N11 VLPs, which contained approximately 3.4×10 8 molecules/mL particles. The reliable discrimination between closely related viruses is crucial to understand the epidemiology and the interaction of co-existing pathogens. In the work described here we design and validate an ELISA for laboratory based, specific, sensitive and reliable detection of RHDVb/RHDV2. This ELISA is a valuable, specific virological tool for monitoring virus circulation, which will permit a better control of this disease. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Multiple Functional Variants in cis Modulate PDYN Expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babbitt, Courtney C; Silverman, Jesse S; Haygood, Ralph; Reininga, Jennifer M; Rockman, Matthew V; Wray, Gregory A

    2010-02-01

    Understanding genetic variation and its functional consequences within cis-regulatory regions remains an important challenge in human genetics and evolution. Here, we present a fine-scale functional analysis of segregating variation within the cis-regulatory region of prodynorphin, a gene that encodes an endogenous opioid precursor with roles in cognition and disease. In order to characterize the functional consequences of segregating variation in cis in a region under balancing selection in different human populations, we examined associations between specific polymorphisms and gene expression in vivo and in vitro. We identified five polymorphisms within the 5' flanking region that affect transcript abundance: a 68-bp repeat recognized in prior studies, as well as two microsatellites and two single nucleotide polymorphisms not previously implicated as functional variants. The impact of these variants on transcription differs by brain region, sex, and cell type, implying interactions between cis genotype and the differentiated state of cells. The effects of individual variants on expression level are not additive in some combinations, implying epistatic interactions between nearby variants. These data reveal an unexpectedly complex relationship between segregating genetic variation and its expression-trait consequences and highlights the importance of close functional scrutiny of natural genetic variation within even relatively well-studied cis-regulatory regions.

  7. Genetic Variants Contribute to Gene Expression Variability in Humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulse, Amanda M.; Cai, James J.

    2013-01-01

    Expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL) studies have established convincing relationships between genetic variants and gene expression. Most of these studies focused on the mean of gene expression level, but not the variance of gene expression level (i.e., gene expression variability). In the present study, we systematically explore genome-wide association between genetic variants and gene expression variability in humans. We adapt the double generalized linear model (dglm) to simultaneously fit the means and the variances of gene expression among the three possible genotypes of a biallelic SNP. The genomic loci showing significant association between the variances of gene expression and the genotypes are termed expression variability QTL (evQTL). Using a data set of gene expression in lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) derived from 210 HapMap individuals, we identify cis-acting evQTL involving 218 distinct genes, among which 8 genes, ADCY1, CTNNA2, DAAM2, FERMT2, IL6, PLOD2, SNX7, and TNFRSF11B, are cross-validated using an extra expression data set of the same LCLs. We also identify ∼300 trans-acting evQTL between >13,000 common SNPs and 500 randomly selected representative genes. We employ two distinct scenarios, emphasizing single-SNP and multiple-SNP effects on expression variability, to explain the formation of evQTL. We argue that detecting evQTL may represent a novel method for effectively screening for genetic interactions, especially when the multiple-SNP influence on expression variability is implied. The implication of our results for revealing genetic mechanisms of gene expression variability is discussed. PMID:23150607

  8. Effect of radiation on the expression of tumor-associated antigens of human lung adenocarcinoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hareyama, Masato

    1988-01-01

    We studied the effects of irradiation on the expression of a tumor-associated antigen (YH206 antigen) of cultured human lung adenocarcinoma A549 cells by using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and flow cytometry. YH206 antigen is preferentially expressed on adenocarcinoma cells. Irradiation of A549 cells remarkably increased the expression of YH206 antigen on the cell surface and the level of the antigen in the culture supernatant as well as in the cell lysate, whereas it significantly affected the expression of HLA (MHC-class I) antigen on the same cells. The expression of HLA antigen on the cell was also increased after treatment of the cells with interferon-γ. In an additional experiment, cells were stained simultaneously for surface antigens (fluorescein coupled antibodies) and for DNA content (propidium iodide), and then dual parameter measurements were performed by flow cytometry to analyse the relationship between antigen levels and the cell cycle. YH206 antigen and HLA antigen increased more in the S and G 2 /M phases of the cell cycle than in G 0 /G 1 . The expression of YH206 antigen was enhanced in the S and G 2 /M phases by irradiation, whereas the expression of HLA antigen was enhanced in each phase of the cell cycle with irradiation or IFN. These results suggest that irradiation plays a key role in the change of the expression of certain tumor-associated antigens. (author)

  9. Paired Expression Analysis of Tumor Cell Surface Antigens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rimas J. Orentas

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Adoptive immunotherapy with antibody-based therapy or with T cells transduced to express chimeric antigen receptors (CARs is useful to the extent that the cell surface membrane protein being targeted is not expressed on normal tissues. The most successful CAR-based (anti-CD19 or antibody-based therapy (anti-CD20 in hematologic malignancies has the side effect of eliminating the normal B cell compartment. Targeting solid tumors may not provide a similar expendable marker. Beyond antibody to Her2/NEU and EGFR, very few antibody-based and no CAR-based therapies have seen broad clinical application for solid tumors. To expand the way in which the surfaceome of solid tumors can be analyzed, we created an algorithm that defines the pairwise relative overexpression of surface antigens. This enables the development of specific immunotherapies that require the expression of two discrete antigens on the surface of the tumor target. This dyad analysis was facilitated by employing the Hotelling’s T-squared test (Hotelling–Lawley multivariate analysis of variance for two independent variables in comparison to a third constant entity (i.e., gene expression levels in normal tissues. We also present a unique consensus scoring mechanism for identifying transcripts that encode cell surface proteins. The unique application of our bioinformatics processing pipeline and statistical tools allowed us to compare the expression of two membrane protein targets as a pair, and to propose a new strategy based on implementing immunotherapies that require both antigens to be expressed on the tumor cell surface to trigger therapeutic effector mechanisms. Specifically, we found that, for MYCN amplified neuroblastoma, pairwise expression of ACVR2B or anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK with GFRA3, GFRA2, Cadherin 24, or with one another provided the strongest hits. For MYCN, non-amplified stage 4 neuroblastoma, neurotrophic tyrosine kinase 1, or ALK paired with GFRA2, GFRA3, SSK

  10. Immune selection and within-host competition can structure the repertoire of variant surface antigens in Plasmodium falciparum -a mathematical model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Noort, Sander P; Nunes, Marta C; Weedall, Gareth D

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The evolutionary mechanisms structuring the expression pattern of variant surface antigen (VSA) families that allow pathogens to evade immune responses and establish chronic and repeated infections pose major challenges to theoretical research. In Plasmodium falciparum, the best...... subset of PfEMP1 variants tends to dominate in non-immune patients and in patients with severe malaria, while more diverse subsets relate to uncomplicated infection and higher levels of pre-existing protective immunity. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here, we use the available molecular and serological......-host and diverse blocks that are favoured by immune selection at the population level. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The application of a monotonic dominance profile to VSAs encoded by a gene family generates two opposing selective forces and, consequently, two distinct clusters of genes emerge in adaptation to naïve...

  11. Heterologous expression of antigenic peptides in Bacillus subtilis biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogt, Cédric M; Schraner, Elisabeth M; Aguilar, Claudio; Eichwald, Catherine

    2016-08-11

    Numerous strategies have been developed for the display of heterologous proteins in the surface of live bacterial carriers, which can be used as vaccines, immune-modulators, cancer therapy or bioremediation. Bacterial biofilms have emerged as an interesting approach for the expression of proteins of interest. Bacillus subtilis is a well-described, endospore-forming organism that is able to form biofilms and also used as a probiotic, thus making it a suitable candidate for the display of heterologous proteins within the biofilm. Here, we describe the use of TasA, an important structural component of the biofilms formed by B. subtilis, as a genetic tool for the display of heterologous proteins. We first engineered the fusion protein TasA-mCherry and showed that was widely deployed within the B. subtilis biofilms. A significant enhancement of the expression of TasA-mCherry within the biofilm was obtained when depleting both tasA and sinR genes. We subsequently engineered fusion proteins of TasA to antigenic peptides of the E. granulosus parasite, paramyosin and tropomyosin. Our results show that the antigens were well expressed within the biofilm as denoted by macrostructure complementation and by the detection of the fusion protein in both immunoblot and immunohistochemistry. In addition, we show that the recombinant endospores of B. subtilis preserve their biophysical and morphological properties. In this work we provide strong evidence pointing that TasA is a suitable candidate for the display of heterologous peptides, such as antigens, cytokines, enzymes or antibodies, in the B. subtilis biofilms. Finally, our data portray that the recombinant endospores preserve their morphological and biophysical properties and could be an excellent tool to facilitate the transport and the administration.

  12. Expression cloning of camelid nanobodies specific for Xenopus embryonic antigens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keiji Itoh

    Full Text Available Developmental biology relies heavily on the use of conventional antibodies, but their production and maintenance involves significant effort. Here we use an expression cloning approach to identify variable regions of llama single domain antibodies (known as nanobodies, which recognize specific embryonic antigens. A nanobody cDNA library was prepared from lymphocytes of a llama immunized with Xenopus embryo lysates. Pools of bacterially expressed cDNAs were sib-selected for the ability to produce specific staining patterns in gastrula embryos. Three different nanobodies were isolated: NbP1 and NbP3 stained yolk granules, while the reactivity of NbP7 was predominantly restricted to the cytoplasm and the cortex. The isolated nanobodies recognized specific protein bands in immunoblot analysis. A reverse proteomic approach identified NbP1 target antigen as EP45/Seryp, a serine protease inhibitor. Given the unique stability of nanobodies and the ease of their expression in diverse systems, we propose that nanobody cDNA libraries represent a promising resource for molecular markers for developmental biology.

  13. Antigenic characterisation of yeast-expressed lyssavirus nucleoproteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kucinskaite, Indre; Juozapaitis, Mindaugas; Serva, Andrius; Zvirbliene, Aurelija; Johnson, Nicholas; Staniulis, Juozas; Fooks, Anthony R; Müller, Thomas; Sasnauskas, Kestutis; Ulrich, Rainer G

    2007-12-01

    In Europe, three genotypes of the genus Lyssavirus, family Rhabdoviridae, are present, classical rabies virus (RABV, genotype 1), European bat lyssavirus type 1 (EBLV-1, genotype 5) and European bat lyssavirus type 2 (EBLV-2, genotype 6). The entire authentic nucleoprotein (N protein) encoding sequences of RABV (challenge virus standard, CVS, strain), EBLV-1 and EBLV-2 were expressed in yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae at high level. Purification of recombinant N proteins by caesium chloride gradient centrifugation resulted in yields between 14-17, 25-29 and 18-20 mg/l of induced yeast culture for RABV-CVS, EBLV-1 and EBLV-2, respectively. The purified N proteins were evaluated by negative staining electron microscopy, which revealed the formation of nucleocapsid-like structures. The antigenic conformation of the N proteins was investigated for their reactivity with monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) directed against different lyssaviruses. The reactivity pattern of each mAb was virtually identical between immunofluorescence assay with virus-infected cells, and ELISA and dot blot assay using the corresponding recombinant N proteins. These observations lead us to conclude that yeast-expressed lyssavirus N proteins share antigenic properties with naturally expressed virus protein. These recombinant proteins have the potential for use as components of serological assays for lyssaviruses.

  14. Plasmodium knowlesi Sporozoite Antigen: Expression by Infectious Recombinant Vaccinia Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Geoffrey L.; Godson, G. Nigel; Nussenzweig, Victor; Nussenzweig, Ruth S.; Barnwell, John; Moss, Bernard

    1984-04-01

    The gene coding for the circumsporozoite antigen of the malaria parasite Plasmodium knowlesi was inserted into the vaccinia virus genome under the control of a defined vaccinia virus promoter. Cells infected with the recombinant virus synthesized polypeptides of 53,000 to 56,000 daltons that reacted with monoclonal antibody against the repeating epitope of the malaria protein. Furthermore, rabbits vaccinated with the recombinant virus produced antibodies that bound specifically to sporozoites. These data provide evidence for expression of a cloned malaria gene in mammalian cells and illustrate the potential of vaccinia virus recombinants as live malaria vaccines.

  15. Codon optimisation to improve expression of a Mycobacterium avium ssp. paratuberculosis-specific membrane-associated antigen by Lactobacillus salivarius.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Christopher; Douarre, Pierre E; Soulimane, Tewfik; Pletzer, Daniel; Weingart, Helge; MacSharry, John; Coffey, Aidan; Sleator, Roy D; O'Mahony, Jim

    2013-06-01

    Subunit and DNA-based vaccines against Mycobacterium avium ssp. paratuberculosis (MAP) attempt to overcome inherent issues associated with whole-cell formulations. However, these vaccines can be hampered by poor expression of recombinant antigens from a number of disparate hosts. The high G+C content of MAP invariably leads to a codon bias throughout gene expression. To investigate if the codon bias affects recombinant MAP antigen expression, the open reading frame of a MAP-specific antigen MptD (MAP3733c) was codon optimised for expression against a Lactobacillus salivarius host. Of the total 209 codons which constitute MAP3733c, 172 were modified resulting in a reduced G+C content from 61% for the native gene to 32.7% for the modified form. Both genes were placed under the transcriptional control of the PnisA promoter; allowing controlled heterologous expression in L. salivarius. Expression was monitored using fluorescence microscopy and microplate fluorometry via GFP tags translationally fused to the C-termini of the two MptD genes. A > 37-fold increase in expression was observed for the codon-optimised MAP3733synth variant over the native gene. Due to the low cost and improved expression achieved, codon optimisation significantly improves the potential of L. salivarius as an oral vaccine stratagem against Johne's disease. © 2013 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Cellulase variants with improved expression, activity and stability, and use thereof

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aehle, Wolfgang; Bott, Richard R; Bower, Benjamin; Caspi, Jonathan; Estell, David A; Goedegebuur, Frits; Hommes, Ronaldus W.J.; Kaper, Thijs; Kelemen, Bradley; Kralj, Slavko; Van Lieshout, Johan; Nikolaev, Igor; Van Stigt Thans, Sander; Wallace, Louise; Vogtentanz, Gudrun; Sandgren, Mats

    2014-03-25

    The present disclosure relates to cellulase variants. In particular the present disclosure relates to cellulase variants having improved expression, activity and/or stability. Also described are nucleic acids encoding the cellulase variants, compositions comprising the cellulase variants, and methods of use thereof.

  17. Cellulase variants with improved expression, activity and stability, and use thereof

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aehle, Wolfgang; Bott, Richard R.; Bower, Benjamin S.; Caspi, Jonathan; Goedegebuur, Frits; Hommes, Ronaldus Wilhelmus Joannes; Kaper, Thijs; Kelemen, Bradley R.; Kralj, Slavko; Van Lieshout, Johannes Franciscus Thomas; Nikolaev, Igor; Wallace, Louise; Van Stigt Thans, Sander; Vogtentanz, Gudrun; Sandgren, Mats

    2016-12-20

    The present disclosure relates to cellulase variants. In particular the present disclosure relates to cellulase variants having improved expression, activity and/or stability. Also described are nucleic acids encoding the cellulase variants, compositions comprising the cellulase variants, and methods of use thereof.

  18. Abnormal expression of blood group-related antigens in uterine endometrial cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsukazaki, K; Sakayori, M; Arai, H; Yamaoka, K; Kurihara, S; Nozawa, S

    1991-08-01

    The expression of A, B, and H group antigens, Lewis group antigens (Lewis(a), Lewis(b), Lewis(x), and Lewis(y)), and Lc4 and nLc4 antigens, the precursor antigens of both groups, was examined immunohistochemically with monoclonal antibodies in 9 normal endometria, 6 endometrial hyperplasias, and 31 endometrial cancers. 1) A, B and/or H antigens were detected in endometrial cancers at an incidence of 51.6%, while no distinct localization of these antigens was observed in normal endometria. H antigen, the precursor of A and B antigens, was particularly frequently detected in endometrial cancers. 2) An increased rate of expression of Lewis group antigens, particularly Lewis(b) antigen, was observed in endometrial cancers compared with its expression in normal endometria. 3) Lc4 and nLc4 antigens were detected in endometrial cancers at rates of 41.9% and 38.7%, respectively, these expressions being increased compared with those in normal endometria. 4) These results suggest that a highly abnormal expression of blood group-related antigens in endometrial cancers occurs not only at the level of A, B, and H antigens and Lewis group antigens, but also at the level of their precursor Lc4 and nLc4 antigens. 5) Lewis(a), Lewis(b), and Lc4 antigens, built on the type-1 chain, are more specific to endometrial cancers than their respective positional isomers, Lewis(x), Lewis(y), and nLc4 antigens, built on the type-2 chain.

  19. Liver cancer: expression features of hepatitis B antigens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. A. Tumanskiy

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC is currently the fifth most common malignancy in men and the eighth in women worldwide. According to the latest European Union countries’ statistics the incidence of HC cancer is about 8,29 per 100000 accidents, cholangiocellular (CC cancer – 0,9-1,3 per 100 thousand of population per year[10,14]. Hepatitis B virus (HBV is the major etiologic factor for the development of HCC [18]. People chronically infected with HBV are 20 times more likely to develop liver cancer than uninfected people [1,22,28]. Many studies have shown the association between Hepatitis B virus (HBV and hepatitis C virus (HCV infections and the development of cholangiocarcinoma (CCA [4,6,9,11,12]. At the same time, the expression features of HBsAg, HBcAg in HCC and CCA have not been studied clearly yet. Aim of investigation: to study the expression features of hepatitis B antigens in tumor tissue from patients with hepatocellular carcinoma and cholangiocarcinoma. Materials and methods. The complex pathomorphological research was performed using liver biopsies of 87 patients aged from 33 up to 83 years, where 50 (57,47% of them had HCC carcinoma and 37 (42,53% had cholangiocellular cancer. 15 patients among examined 87 ones were ill with chronic viral hepatitis (11 were ill with HCV, 3 – HBV B, 1 – HBV + HCV before, 72 cancer patients, corresponding to the clinical data, never had this one in their past medical history. The localization of hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg and core antigen (HBcAg was investigated by an indirect immunoperoxidase method in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded liver specimens obtained from 50 (57,47% patients with hepatocellular carcinoma and 37 (42,53% patients with cholangiocarcinoma. using antibodies Rb a-Hu Primary Hepatitis B Virus Core Antigen (HBcAg and Mo a-Hu Primary Hepatitis B Virus Surface Antigen (HBsAg, Сlone 3E7, and visualization system DAKO EnVision+ with diaminobenzidine. Liver

  20. Cloning, expression, purification and characterization of tryptophan hydroxylase variants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boesen, Jane

    in the anion exchange, indicating that the protein still exists in different oligomer forms. This was also observed in the gel filtration. Variants of both hTPH1 and hTPH2 containing the regulatory domain or parts of it were constructed and tested for expression in Escherichia coli as well as solubility....... It was observed that changes in the amino acid sequence of the regulatory domain by point mutations or truncations in the N-terminal had a huge impact on the solubility of the protein and caused the protein to be insoluble. The regulatory domain of human TPH1 (rhTPH1), and two fusion proteins of rhTPH1 fused...... to the green fluorescent protein (GFP) in the C-terminal and the glutathione S-transferase (GST) in the N-terminal, respectively, were expressed in a soluble form. The purification trials of the variants containing the regulatory domain showed that a high salt concentration was necessary to stabilize...

  1. Mature IgM-expressing plasma cells sense antigen and develop competence for cytokine production upon antigenic challenge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanc, Pascal; Moro-Sibilot, Ludovic; Barthly, Lucas; Jagot, Ferdinand; This, Sébastien; de Bernard, Simon; Buffat, Laurent; Dussurgey, Sébastien; Colisson, Renaud; Hobeika, Elias; Fest, Thierry; Taillardet, Morgan; Thaunat, Olivier; Sicard, Antoine; Mondière, Paul; Genestier, Laurent; Nutt, Stephen L.; Defrance, Thierry

    2016-01-01

    Dogma holds that plasma cells, as opposed to B cells, cannot bind antigen because they have switched from expression of membrane-bound immunoglobulins (Ig) that constitute the B-cell receptor (BCR) to production of the secreted form of immunoglobulins. Here we compare the phenotypical and functional attributes of plasma cells generated by the T-cell-dependent and T-cell-independent forms of the hapten NP. We show that the nature of the secreted Ig isotype, rather than the chemical structure of the immunizing antigen, defines two functionally distinct populations of plasma cells. Fully mature IgM-expressing plasma cells resident in the bone marrow retain expression of a functional BCR, whereas their IgG+ counterparts do not. Antigen boost modifies the gene expression profile of IgM+ plasma cells and initiates a cytokine production program, characterized by upregulation of CCL5 and IL-10. Our results demonstrate that IgM-expressing plasma cells can sense antigen and acquire competence for cytokine production upon antigenic challenge. PMID:27924814

  2. Cancer-testis antigen expression and immunogenicity in AL amyloidosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenzweig, M A; Landau, H; Seldin, D; O'Hara, C; Girnius, S; Hanson, N; Frosina, D; Sedrak, C; Arcila, M; Comenzo, R L; Giralt, S; Gnjatic, S; Jungbluth, A A; Koehne, G

    2012-01-01

    Light-chain amyloidosis (AL) is a plasma cell dyscrasia closely related to multiple myeloma. In multiple myeloma, the cancer-testis antigens (CTAs) CT7 (MAGE-C1), CT10 (MAGE-C2) and MAGE-A CTAs are expressed in up to 80% of cases. In this study, we investigated the expression and immunogenicity of several CTAs in patients with AL amyloidosis in a total of 38 bone marrow specimens by employing standard immunohistochemistry techniques on paraffin-embedded archival tissues. Plasma samples from 35 patients (27 with matched bone marrow samples) were also analyzed by ELISA for sero reactivity to a group of full-length CTA proteins. CT7 was present in 25/38 (66%) while CT10 was demonstrated in 3/38 and GAGE in 1/38 AL amyloid cases. The expression pattern was mostly focal. There were no significant differences with regard to organ involvement, response to treatment, or prognosis in CTA positive compared to negative cases. None of the specimens showed spontaneous humoral immunity to CT7, but sero reactivity was observed in individual patients to other CTAs. This study identifies CT7 as the prevalent CTA in plasma cells of patients with AL amyloidosis. Further analyses determining the biology of CTAs in AL amyloidosis and their value as potential targets for immunotherapy are warranted

  3. Determinants of variant surface antigen antibody response in severe Plasmodium falciparum malaria in an area of low and unstable malaria transmission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    A-Elgadir, T M E; Theander, T G; Elghazali, G

    2006-01-01

    The variant surface antigens (VSA) of infected erythrocytes are important pathogenic markers, a set of variants (VSA(SM)), were assumed to be associated with severe malaria (SM), while SM constitutes clinically diverse forms, such as, severe malarial anemia (SMA) and cerebral malaria (CM). This s...

  4. MRl of prostate cancer antigen expression for diagnosis and immunotherapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Ren

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Tumor antigen (TA-targeted monoclonal antibody (mAb immunotherapy can be effective for the treatment of a broad range of cancer etiologies; however, these approaches have demonstrated variable clinical efficacy for the treatment of patients with prostate cancer (PCa. An obstacle currently impeding translational progress has been the inability to quantify the mAb dose that reaches the tumor site and binds to the targeted TAs. The coupling of mAb to nanoparticle-based magnetic resonance imaging (MRI probes should permit in vivo measurement of patient-specific biodistributions; these measurements could facilitate future development of novel dosimetry paradigms wherein mAb dose is titrated to optimize outcomes for individual patients. METHODS: The prostate stem cell antigen (PSCA is broadly expressed on the surface of prostate cancer (PCa cells. Anti-human PSCA monoclonal antibodies (mAb 7F5 were bound to Au/Fe(3O(4 (GoldMag nanoparticles (mAb 7F5@GoldMag to serve as PSCA-specific theragnostic MRI probe permitting visualization of mAb biodistribution in vivo. First, the antibody immobilization efficiency of the GoldMag particles and the efficacy for PSCA-specific binding was assessed. Next, PC-3 (prostate cancer with PSCA over-expression and SMMC-7721 (hepatoma cells without PSCA expression tumor-bearing mice were injected with mAb 7F5@GoldMag for MRI. MRI probe biodistributions were assessed at increasing time intervals post-infusion; therapy response was evaluated with serial tumor volume measurements. RESULTS: Targeted binding of the mAb 7F5@GoldMag probes to PC-3 cells was verified using optical images and MRI; selective binding was not observed for SMMC-7721 tumors. The immunotherapeutic efficacy of the mAb 7F5@GoldMag in PC-3 tumor-bearing mice was verified with significant inhibition of tumor growth compared to untreated control animals. CONCLUSION: Our promising results suggest the feasibility of using mAb 7F5@GoldMag probes as a

  5. Analysis of CD83 antigen expression in human breast fibroadenoma and adjacent tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcus Nascimento Borges

    Full Text Available CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVE: Dendritic cell maturation is considered essential for starting an immune response. The CD83 antigen is an important marker of dendritic cell maturation. The objectives here were to analyze CD83 antigen expression in human breast fibroadenoma and breast tissue adjacent to the lesion and to identify clinical factors that might influence this expression. DESIGN AND SETTING: This was a retrospective study at a public university hospital, in which 29 histopathological samples of breast fibroadenoma and adjacent breast tissue, from 28 women of reproductive age, were analyzed. METHODS: The immunohistochemistry method was used to analyze the cell expression of the antigen. The antigen expression in the cells was evaluated by means of random manual counting using an optical microscope. RESULTS: Positive expression of the CD83 antigen in the epithelial cells of the fibroadenoma (365.52; standard deviation ± 133.13 in relation to the adjacent breast tissue cells (189.59; standard deviation ± 140.75 was statistically larger (P < 0.001. Several clinical features were analyzed, but only parity was shown to influence CD83 antigen expression in the adjacent breast tissue, such that positive expression was more evident in nulliparous women (P = 0.042. CONCLUSIONS: The expression of the CD83 antigen in the fibroadenoma was positive and greater than in the adjacent breast tissue. Positive expression of the antigen in the adjacent breast tissue was influenced by parity, and was significantly more evident in nulliparous women.

  6. Molecular characterization of atypical antigenic variants of canine rabies virus reveals its reintroduction by wildlife vectors in southeastern Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcés-Ayala, Fabiola; Aréchiga-Ceballos, Nidia; Ortiz-Alcántara, Joanna M; González-Durán, Elizabeth; Pérez-Agüeros, Sandra I; Méndez-Tenorio, Alfonso; Torres-Longoria, Belem; López-Martínez, Irma; Hernández-Rivas, Lucía; Díaz-Quiñonez, José Alberto; Ramírez-González, José Ernesto

    2017-12-01

    Rabies is an infectious viral disease that is practically always fatal following the onset of clinical signs. In Mexico, the last case of human rabies transmitted by dogs was reported in 2006 and canine rabies has declined significantly due to vaccination campaigns implemented in the country. Here we report on the molecular characterization of six rabies virus strains found in Yucatan and Chiapas, remarkably, four of them showed an atypical reaction pattern when antigenic characterization with a reduced panel of eight monoclonal antibodies was performed. Phylogenetic analyses on the RNA sequences unveiled that the three atypical strains from Yucatan are associated with skunks. Analysis using the virus entire genome showed that they belong to a different lineage distinct from the variants described for this animal species in Mexico. The Chiapas atypical strain was grouped in a lineage that was considered extinct, while the others are clustered within classic dog variants.

  7. Carbon-13 NMR study of switch variant anti-dansyl antibodies: Antigen binding and domain-domain interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kato, Koichi; Matsunaga, Chigusa; Odaka, Asano; Yamato, Sumie; Takaha, Wakana; Shimada, Ichio; Arata, Yoji (Univ. of Tokyo (Japan))

    1991-07-02

    A {sup 13}C NMR study is reported of switch variant anti-dansyl antibodies, which possess the identical V{sub H}, V{sub L}, and C{sub L} domains in conjunction with highly homologous but not identical heavy-chain constant regions. Each of the antibodies has been selectively labeled with {sup 13}C at the carbonyl carbon of Trp, Tyr, His, or Cys residue by growing hybridoma cells in serum-free medium. Spectral assignments have been made by folowing the procedure described previously for the switch variant antibodies labeled with (1-{sup 13}C)Met. On the basis of the spectral data collected for the antibodies and their proteolytic fragments, the authors discuss how {sup 13}C NMR spectroscopy can be used for the structural analyses of antigen binding and also of domain-domain interactions in the antibody molecule.

  8. Carbon-13 NMR study of switch variant anti-dansyl antibodies: Antigen binding and domain-domain interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Koichi; Matsunaga, Chigusa; Odaka, Asano; Yamato, Sumie; Takaha, Wakana; Shimada, Ichio; Arata, Yoji

    1991-01-01

    A 13 C NMR study is reported of switch variant anti-dansyl antibodies, which possess the identical V H , V L , and C L domains in conjunction with highly homologous but not identical heavy-chain constant regions. Each of the antibodies has been selectively labeled with 13 C at the carbonyl carbon of Trp, Tyr, His, or Cys residue by growing hybridoma cells in serum-free medium. Spectral assignments have been made by folowing the procedure described previously for the switch variant antibodies labeled with [1- 13 C]Met. On the basis of the spectral data collected for the antibodies and their proteolytic fragments, the authors discuss how 13 C NMR spectroscopy can be used for the structural analyses of antigen binding and also of domain-domain interactions in the antibody molecule

  9. Antigenic variants of yellow fever virus with an altered neurovirulence phenotype in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryman, K D; Xie, H; Ledger, T N; Campbell, G A; Barrett, A D

    1997-04-14

    The live-attenuated yellow fever (YF) vaccine virus, strain 17D-204, has long been known to consist of a heterologous population of virions. Gould et al. (J. Gen. Virol. 70, 1889-1894 (1989)) previously demonstrated that variant viruses exhibiting a YF wild-type-specific envelope (E) protein epitope are present at low frequency in the vaccine pool and were able to isolate representative virus variants with and without this epitope, designated 17D(+wt) and 17D(-wt), respectively. These variants were employed here in an investigation of YF virus pathogenesis in the mouse model. Both the 17D-204 parent and the 17D(+wt) variant viruses were lethal for adult outbred mice by the intracerebral route of inoculation. However, the 17D(-wt) variant was significantly attenuated (18% mortality rate) and replicated to much lower titer in the brains of infected mice. A single amino acid substitution in the envelope (E) protein at E-240 (Ala-->Val) was identified as responsible for the restricted replication of the 17D(-wt) variant in vivo. The 17D(+wt) variant has an additional second-site mutation, believed to encode a reversion to the neurovirulence phenotype of the 17D-204 parent virus. The amino acid substitution in the E protein at E-173 (Thr-->Ile) of the 17D(+wt) variant which results in the appearance of the wild-type-specific epitope or nucleotide changes in the 5' and 3' noncoding regions of the virus are proposed as a candidates.

  10. Unpolarized release of vaccinia virus and HIV antigen by colchicine treatment enhances intranasal HIV antigen expression and mucosal humoral responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Zhang

    Full Text Available The induction of a strong mucosal immune response is essential to building successful HIV vaccines. Highly attenuated recombinant HIV vaccinia virus can be administered mucosally, but even high doses of immunization have been found unable to induce strong mucosal antibody responses. In order to solve this problem, we studied the interactions of recombinant HIV vaccinia virus Tiantan strain (rVTT-gagpol in mucosal epithelial cells (specifically Caco-2 cell layers and in BALB/c mice. We evaluated the impact of this virus on HIV antigen delivery and specific immune responses. The results demonstrated that rVTT-gagpol was able to infect Caco-2 cell layers and both the nasal and lung epithelia in BALB/c mice. The progeny viruses and expressed p24 were released mainly from apical surfaces. In BALB/c mice, the infection was limited to the respiratory system and was not observed in the blood. This showed that polarized distribution limited antigen delivery into the whole body and thus limited immune response. To see if this could be improved upon, we stimulated unpolarized budding of the virus and HIV antigens by treating both Caco-2 cells and BALB/c mice with colchicine. We found that, in BALB/c mice, the degree of infection and antigen expression in the epithelia went up. As a result, specific immune responses increased correspondingly. Together, these data suggest that polarized budding limits antigen delivery and immune responses, but unpolarized distribution can increase antigen expression and delivery and thus enhance specific immune responses. This conclusion can be used to optimize mucosal HIV vaccine strategies.

  11. Comparative immunological evaluation of recombinant Salmonella Typhimurium strains expressing model antigens as live oral vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Song-yue; Yu, Bin; Zhang, Ke; Chen, Min; Hua, Yan-Hong; Yuan, Shuofeng; Watt, Rory M; Zheng, Bo-Jian; Yuen, Kwok-Yung; Huang, Jian-Dong

    2012-09-26

    Despite the development of various systems to generate live recombinant Salmonella Typhimurium vaccine strains, little work has been performed to systematically evaluate and compare their relative immunogenicity. Such information would provide invaluable guidance for the future rational design of live recombinant Salmonella oral vaccines. To compare vaccine strains encoded with different antigen delivery and expression strategies, a series of recombinant Salmonella Typhimurium strains were constructed that expressed either the enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) or a fragment of the hemagglutinin (HA) protein from the H5N1 influenza virus, as model antigens. The antigens were expressed from the chromosome, from high or low-copy plasmids, or encoded on a eukaryotic expression plasmid. Antigens were targeted for expression in either the cytoplasm or the outer membrane. Combinations of strategies were employed to evaluate the efficacy of combined delivery/expression approaches. After investigating in vitro and in vivo antigen expression, growth and infection abilities; the immunogenicity of the constructed recombinant Salmonella strains was evaluated in mice. Using the soluble model antigen EGFP, our results indicated that vaccine strains with high and stable antigen expression exhibited high B cell responses, whilst eukaryotic expression or colonization with good construct stability was critical for T cell responses. For the insoluble model antigen HA, an outer membrane expression strategy induced better B cell and T cell responses than a cytoplasmic strategy. Most notably, the combination of two different expression strategies did not increase the immune response elicited. Through systematically evaluating and comparing the immunogenicity of the constructed recombinant Salmonella strains in mice, we identified their respective advantages and deleterious or synergistic effects. Different construction strategies were optimally-required for soluble versus

  12. Novel Plasmodium falciparum malaria vaccines: evidence-based searching for variant surface antigens as candidates for vaccination against pregnancy-associated malaria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Staalsoe, Trine; Jensen, Anja T R; Theander, Thor G

    2002-01-01

    Malaria vaccine development has traditionally concentrated on careful molecular, biochemical, and immunological characterisation of candidate antigens. In contrast, evidence of the importance of identified antigens in immunity to human infection and disease has generally been limited to statistic......Malaria vaccine development has traditionally concentrated on careful molecular, biochemical, and immunological characterisation of candidate antigens. In contrast, evidence of the importance of identified antigens in immunity to human infection and disease has generally been limited...... to statistically significant co-variation with protection rather than on demonstration of causal relationships. We have studied the relationship between variant surface antigen-specific antibodies and clinical protection from Plasmodium falciparum malaria in general, and from pregnancy-associated malaria (PAM......) in particular, to provide robust evidence of a causal link between the two in order to allow efficient and evidence-based identification of candidate antigens for malaria vaccine development....

  13. Distinctive expression pattern of OCT4 variants in different types of breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soheili, Saamaaneh; Asadi, Malek Hossein; Farsinejad, Alireza

    2017-01-01

    OCT4 is a key regulator of self-renewal and pluripotency in embryonic stem cells which can potentially encode three spliced variants designated OCT4A, OCT4B and OCT4B1. Based on cancer stem cell concept, it is suggested that the stemness factors misexpressed in cancer cells and potentially is involved in tumorigenesis. Accordingly, in this study, we investigated the potential expression of OCT4 variants in breast cancer tissues. A total of 94 tumoral and peritumoral breast specimens were evaluated with respect to the expression of OCT4 variants using quantitative RT-PCR and immunohistochemical (IHC) analysis. We detected the expression of OCT4 variants in breast tumor tissues with no or very low levels of expression in peritumoral samples of the same patients. While OCT4B was highly expressed in lobular type of breast cancer, OCT4A and OCTB1 variants are highly expressed in low grade (I and II) ductal tumors. Furthermore, the results of this study revealed a considerable association between the expression level of OCT4 variants and the expression of ER, PR, Her2 and P53 factors. All data demonstrated a distinctive expression pattern of OCT4 spliced variants in different types of breast cancer and provide further evidence for the involvement of embryonic genes in carcinogenesis.

  14. Epstein-Barr virus nuclear antigen 2 specifically induces expression of the B-cell activation antigen CD23

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, F.; Gregory, C.D.; Rowe, M.; Rickinson, A.B.; Wang, D.; Birkenbach, M.; Kikutani, H.; Kishimoto, T.; Kieff, E.

    1987-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection of EBV-negative Burkitt lymphoma (BL) cells includes some changes similar to those seen in normal B lymphocytes that have been growth transformed by EBV. The role of individual EBV genes in this process was evaluated by introducing each of the viral genes that are normally expressed in EBV growth-transformed and latently infected lymphoblasts into an EBV-negative BL cell line, using recombinant retrovirus-mediated transfer. Clones of cells were derived that stably express the EBV nuclear antigen 1 (EBNA-1), EBNA-2, EBNA-3, EBNA-leader protein, or EBV latent membrane protein (LMP). These were compared with control clones infected with the retrovirus vector. All 10 clones converted to EBNA-2 expression differed from control clones or clones expressing other EBV proteins by growth in tight clumps and by markedly increased expression of one particular surface marker of B-cell activation, CD23. Other activation antigens were unaffected by EBNA-2 expression, as were markers already expressed on the parent BL cell line. The results indicate that EBNA-2 is a specific direct or indirect trans-activator of CD23. This establishes a link between an EBV gene and cell gene expression. Since CD23 has been implicated in the transduction of B-cell growth signals, its specific induction by EBNA-2 could be important in EBV induction of B-lymphocyte transformation

  15. Using multiple linear regression and physicochemical changes of amino acid mutations to predict antigenic variants of influenza A/H3N2 viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Haibo; Wei, Xiaomei; Huang, Yu; Hu, Bin; Fang, Yaping; Wang, Jia

    2014-01-01

    Among human influenza viruses, strain A/H3N2 accounts for over a quarter of a million deaths annually. Antigenic variants of these viruses often render current vaccinations ineffective and lead to repeated infections. In this study, a computational model was developed to predict antigenic variants of the A/H3N2 strain. First, 18 critical antigenic amino acids in the hemagglutinin (HA) protein were recognized using a scoring method combining phi (ϕ) coefficient and information entropy. Next, a prediction model was developed by integrating multiple linear regression method with eight types of physicochemical changes in critical amino acid positions. When compared to other three known models, our prediction model achieved the best performance not only on the training dataset but also on the commonly-used testing dataset composed of 31878 antigenic relationships of the H3N2 influenza virus.

  16. Isolation and characterization of NIH 3T3 cells expressing polyomavirus small T antigen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noda, T.; Satake, M.; Robins, T.; Ito, Y.

    1986-01-01

    The polyomavirus small T-antigen gene, together with the polyomavirus promoter, was inserted into retrovirus vector pGV16 which contains the Moloney sarcoma virus long terminal repeat and neomycin resistance gene driven by the simian virus 40 promoter. This expression vector, pGVST, was packaged into retrovirus particles by transfection of PSI2 cells which harbor packaging-defective murine retrovirus genome. NIH 3T3 cells were infected by this replication-defective retrovirus containing pGVST. Of the 15 G418-resistant cell clones, 8 express small T antigen at various levels as revealed by immunoprecipitation. A cellular protein with an apparent molecular weight of about 32,000 coprecipitates with small T antigen. Immunofluorescent staining shows that small T antigen is mainly present in the nuclei. Morphologically, cells expressing small T antigen are indistinguishable from parental NIH 3T3 cells and have a microfilament pattern similar to that in parental NIH 3T3 cells. Cells expressing small T antigen form a flat monolayer but continue to grow beyond the saturation density observed for parental NIH 3T3 cells and eventually come off the culture plate as a result of overconfluency. There is some correlation between the level of expression of small T antigen and the growth rate of the cells. Small T-antigen-expressing cells form small colonies in soft agar. However, the proportion of cells which form these small colonies is rather small. A clone of these cells tested did not form tumors in nude mice within 3 months after inoculation of 10 6 cells per animal. Thus, present studies establish that the small T antigen of polyomavirus is a second nucleus-localized transforming gene product of the virus (the first one being large T antigen) and by itself has a function which is to stimulate the growth of NIH 3T3 cells beyond their saturation density in monolayer culture

  17. Expression and the antigenicity of recombinant coat proteins of tungro viruses expressed in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yee, Siew Fung; Chu, Chia Huay; Poili, Evenni; Sum, Magdline Sia Henry

    2017-02-01

    Rice tungro disease (RTD) is a recurring disease affecting rice farming especially in the South and Southeast Asia. The disease is commonly diagnosed by visual observation of the symptoms on diseased plants in paddy fields and by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). However, visual observation is unreliable and PCR can be costly. High-throughput as well as relatively cheap detection methods are important for RTD management for screening large number of samples. Due to this, detection by serological assays such as immunoblotting assays and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay are preferred. However, these serological assays are limited by lack of continuous supply of antibodies as reagents due to the difficulty in preparing sufficient purified virions as antigens. This study aimed to generate and evaluate the reactivity of the recombinant coat proteins of Rice tungro bacilliform virus (RTBV) and Rice tungro spherical virus (RTSV) as alternative antigens to generate antibodies. The genes encoding the coat proteins of both viruses, RTBV (CP), and RTSV (CP1, CP2 and CP3) were cloned and expressed as recombinant fusion proteins in Escherichia coli. All of the recombinant fusion proteins, with the exception of the recombinant fusion protein of the CP2 of RTSV, were reactive against our in-house anti-tungro rabbit serum. In conclusion, our study showed the potential use of the recombinant fusion coat proteins of the tungro viruses as alternative antigens for production of antibodies for diagnostic purposes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Mendelian and non-mendelian mutations affecting surface antigen expression in Paramecium tetraurelia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Epstein, L.M.; Forney, J.D.

    1984-01-01

    A screening procedure was devised for the isolation of X-ray-induced mutations affecting the expression of the A immobilization antigen (i-antigen) in Paramecium tetraurelia. Two of the mutations isolated by this procedure proved to be in modifier genes. The two genes are unlinked to each other and unlinked to the structural A i-antigen gene. These are the first modifier genes identified in a Paramecium sp. that affect surface antigen expression. Another mutation was found to be a deletion of sequences just downstream from the A i-antigen gene. In cells carrying this mutation, the A i-antigen gene lies in close proximity to the end of a macronuclear chromosome. The expression of the A i-antigen is not affected in these cells, demonstrating that downstream sequences are not important for the regulation and expression of the A i-antigen gene. A stable cell line was also recovered which shows non-Mendelian inheritance of a macronuclear deletion of the A i-antigen gene. This mutant does not contain the gene in its macronucleus, but contains a complete copy of the gene in its micronucleus. In the cytoplasm of wild-type animals, the micronuclear gene is included in the developing macronucleus; in the cytoplasm of the mutant, the incorporation of the A i-antigen gene into the macronucleus is inhibited. This is the first evidence that a mechanism is available in ciliates to control the expression of a gene by regulating its incorporation into developing macronuclei

  19. Antigenically Diverse Swine Origin H1N1 Variant Influenza Viruses Exhibit Differential Ferret Pathogenesis and Transmission Phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulit-Penaloza, Joanna A; Jones, Joyce; Sun, Xiangjie; Jang, Yunho; Thor, Sharmi; Belser, Jessica A; Zanders, Natosha; Creager, Hannah M; Ridenour, Callie; Wang, Li; Stark, Thomas J; Garten, Rebecca; Chen, Li-Mei; Barnes, John; Tumpey, Terrence M; Wentworth, David E; Maines, Taronna R; Davis, C Todd

    2018-06-01

    Influenza A(H1) viruses circulating in swine represent an emerging virus threat, as zoonotic infections occur sporadically following exposure to swine. A fatal infection caused by an H1N1 variant (H1N1v) virus was detected in a patient with reported exposure to swine and who presented with pneumonia, respiratory failure, and cardiac arrest. To understand the genetic and phenotypic characteristics of the virus, genome sequence analysis, antigenic characterization, and ferret pathogenesis and transmissibility experiments were performed. Antigenic analysis of the virus isolated from the fatal case, A/Ohio/09/2015, demonstrated significant antigenic drift away from the classical swine H1N1 variant viruses and H1N1 pandemic 2009 viruses. A substitution in the H1 hemagglutinin (G155E) was identified that likely impacted antigenicity, and reverse genetics was employed to understand the molecular mechanism of antibody escape. Reversion of the substitution to 155G, in a reverse genetics A/Ohio/09/2015 virus, showed that this residue was central to the loss of hemagglutination inhibition by ferret antisera raised against a prototypical H1N1 pandemic 2009 virus (A/California/07/2009), as well as gamma lineage classical swine H1N1 viruses, demonstrating the importance of this residue for antibody recognition of this H1 lineage. When analyzed in the ferret model, A/Ohio/09/2015 and another H1N1v virus, A/Iowa/39/2015, as well as A/California/07/2009, replicated efficiently in the respiratory tract of ferrets. The two H1N1v viruses transmitted efficiently among cohoused ferrets, but respiratory droplet transmission studies showed that A/California/07/2009 transmitted through the air more efficiently. Preexisting immunity to A/California/07/2009 did not fully protect ferrets from challenge with A/Ohio/09/2015. IMPORTANCE Human infections with classical swine influenza A(H1N1) viruses that circulate in pigs continue to occur in the United States following exposure to swine. To

  20. Effects of radiation on the expression of antigens on the membranes of human adenocarcinoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hareyama, Masato; Imai, Kozo; Oouchi, Atsushi; Shidou, Mitsuo; Takahashi, Hiroki; Koshiba, Hirohumi; Yachi, Akira; Morita, Kazuo

    1992-01-01

    We have investigated the effects of irradiation on the membranes of tumor cells. X-ray irradiation caused remarkable increases in the expression of tumor-associated antigens (YH206, CEA) and c-erbB-2 protein by flow cytometry, whereas IFN had no obvious effect on the expression of tumor-associated antigens and c-erbB-2 protein. On the other hand, the expression of MHC Class I and ICAM-1 antigen on the membrane by flow cytometry was enhanced by both irradiation and IFN. In addition, the irradiated cells, when analyzed using a CEA specific probe, showed remarkable increases in the CEA mRNA compared to IFN-treated cells. It is possible that enhancement of the expression of tumor-associated antigens and c-erbB-2 protein, together with the enhancement of that of MHC-Class I and ICAM-1, would help cytotoxic killer cells recognize the tumor cells. (author)

  1. T cells expressing VHH-directed oligoclonal chimeric HER2 antigen receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jamnani, Fatemeh Rahimi; Rahbarizadeh, Fatemeh; Shokrgozar, Mohammad Ali

    2014-01-01

    Adoptive cell therapy with engineered T cells expressing chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) originated from antibodies is a promising strategy in cancer immunotherapy. Several unsuccessful trials, however, highlight the need for alternative conventional binding domains and the better combination...

  2. Postnatal Expression of V2 Vasopressin Receptor Splice Variants in the Rat Cerebellum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas, Karina J.; Sarmiento, José M.; Ehrenfeld, Pamela; Añazco, Carolina C.; Villanueva, Carolina I.; Carmona, Pamela L.; Brenet, Marianne; Navarro, Javier; Müller-Esterl, Werner; Figueroa, Carlos D.; González, Carlos B.

    2010-01-01

    The V2 vasopressin receptor gene contains an alternative splice site in exon-3, which leads to the generation of two splice variants (V2a and V2b) first identified in the kidney. The open reading frame of the alternatively spliced V2b transcripten codes a truncated receptor, showing the same amino acid sequence as the canonical V2a receptor up to the 6th transmembrane segment, but displaying a distinct sequence to the corresponding 7th transmembrane segment and C-terminal domain relative to the V2a receptor. Here, we demonstrate the postnatal expression of V2a and V2b variants in the rat cerebellum. Most importantly, we showed by in situ hybridization and immunocytochemistry that both V2 splice variants were preferentially expressed in Purkinje cells, from early to late postnatal development. In addition, both variants were transiently expressed in the neuroblastic external granule cells and Bergmann fibers. These results indicate that the cellular distributions of both splice variants are developmentally regulated, and suggest that the transient expression of the V2 receptor is involved in the mechanisms of cerebellar cytodifferentiation by AVP. Finally, transfected CHO-K1 .expressing similar amounts of both V2 splice variants, as that found in the cerebellum, showed a significant reduction in the surface expression of V2a receptors, suggesting that the differential expression of the V2 splice variants regulate the vasopressin signaling in the cerebellum. PMID:19281786

  3. Genetic variant as a marker for bladder cancer therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patients who have inherited a specific common genetic variant develop bladder cancer tumors that strongly express a protein known as prostate stem cell antigen (PSCA), which is also expressed in many pancreatic and prostate tumors, according to research a

  4. Analysis of CD83 antigen expression in human breast fibroadenoma and adjacent tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borges, Marcus Nascimento; Facina, Gil; Silva, Ismael Dale Cotrin Guerreiro; Waitzberg, Angela Flávia Logullo; Nazario, Afonso Celso Pinto

    2011-12-01

    Dendritic cell maturation is considered essential for starting an immune response. The CD83 antigen is an important marker of dendritic cell maturation. The objectives here were to analyze CD83 antigen expression in human breast fibroadenoma and breast tissue adjacent to the lesion and to identify clinical factors that might influence this expression. This was a retrospective study at a public university hospital, in which 29 histopathological samples of breast fibroadenoma and adjacent breast tissue, from 28 women of reproductive age, were analyzed. The immunohistochemistry method was used to analyze the cell expression of the antigen. The antigen expression in the cells was evaluated by means of random manual counting using an optical microscope. Positive expression of the CD83 antigen in the epithelial cells of the fibroadenoma (365.52; standard deviation ± 133.13) in relation to the adjacent breast tissue cells (189.59; standard deviation ± 140.75) was statistically larger (P fibroadenoma was positive and greater than in the adjacent breast tissue. Positive expression of the antigen in the adjacent breast tissue was influenced by parity, and was significantly more evident in nulliparous women.

  5. Identification of new TSGA10 transcript variants in human testis with conserved regulatory RNA elements in 5'untranslated region and distinct expression in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salehipour, Pouya; Nematzadeh, Mahsa; Mobasheri, Maryam Beigom; Afsharpad, Mandana; Mansouri, Kamran; Modarressi, Mohammad Hossein

    2017-09-01

    Testis specific gene antigen 10 (TSGA10) is a cancer testis antigen involved in the process of spermatogenesis. TSGA10 could also play an important role in the inhibition of angiogenesis by preventing nuclear localization of HIF-1α. Although it has been shown that TSGA10 messenger RNA (mRNA) is mainly expressed in testis and some tumors, the transcription pattern and regulatory mechanisms of this gene remain largely unknown. Here, we report that human TSGA10 comprises at least 22 exons and generates four different transcript variants. It was identified that using two distinct promoters and splicing of exons 4 and 7 produced these transcript variants, which have the same coding sequence, but the sequence of 5'untanslated region (5'UTR) is different between them. This is significant because conserved regulatory RNA elements like upstream open reading frame (uORF) and putative internal ribosome entry site (IRES) were found in this region which have different combinations in each transcript variant and it may influence translational efficiency of them in normal or unusual environmental conditions like hypoxia. To indicate the transcription pattern of TSGA10 in breast cancer, expression of identified transcript variants was analyzed in 62 breast cancer samples. We found that TSGA10 tends to express variants with shorter 5'UTR and fewer uORF elements in breast cancer tissues. Our study demonstrates for the first time the expression of different TSGA10 transcript variants in testis and breast cancer tissues and provides a first clue to a role of TSGA10 5'UTR in regulation of translation in unusual environmental conditions like hypoxia. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  6. Expression of Lewisa, Sialyl Lewisa, Lewisx, Sialyl Lewisx, Antigens as Prognostic Factors in Patients with Colorectal Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tohru Nakagoe

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Altered expression of blood group-related carbohydrate antigens such as sialyl Lewis (Lex antigen in tumours is associated with tumour progression behaviour and subsequent prognosis. However, the prognostic value of the expression of Le-related antigens in colorectal tumours remains unclear.

  7. Expression and immunogenicity of novel subunit enterovirus 71 VP1 antigens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Juan [China-US Vaccine Research Center, The First Affiliated Hospital, Nanjing Medical University (China); Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Nanjing Medical University (China); Wang, Shixia [China-US Vaccine Research Center, The First Affiliated Hospital, Nanjing Medical University (China); Department of Medicine, University of Massachusetts Medical School (United States); Gan, Weihua [Department of Pediatrics, The Second Affiliated Hospital, Nanjing Medical University (China); Zhang, Wenhong [Department of Infectious Diseases, Huashan Hospital, Fudan University (China); Ju, Liwen [School of Public Health, Fudan University (China); Huang, Zuhu [Department of Infectious Diseases, The First Affiliated Hospital, Nanjing Medical University (China); China-US Vaccine Research Center, The First Affiliated Hospital, Nanjing Medical University (China); Lu, Shan, E-mail: shan.lu@umassmed.edu [Department of Infectious Diseases, The First Affiliated Hospital, Nanjing Medical University (China); China-US Vaccine Research Center, The First Affiliated Hospital, Nanjing Medical University (China); Department of Medicine, University of Massachusetts Medical School (United States)

    2012-04-20

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer EV71 is a major emerging infectious disease in many Asian countries. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Inactivated EV71 vaccines are in clinical studies but their safety and efficacy are unknown. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Developing subunit based EV71 vaccines is significant and novel antigen design is needed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer DNA immunization is an efficient tool to test the immunogenicity of VP1 based EV71 vaccines. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Multiple VP1 antigens are developed showing immunogenic potential. -- Abstract: Hand, foot, and mouth disease (HFMD) is a common viral illness in young children. HFMD is caused by viruses belonging to the enterovirus genus of the picornavirus family. Recently, enterovirus 71 (EV71) has emerged as a virulent agent for HFMD with severe clinical outcomes. In the current report, we conducted a pilot antigen engineering study to optimize the expression and immunogenicity of subunit VP1 antigen for the design of EV71 vaccines. DNA immunization was adopted as a simple technical approach to test different designs of VP1 antigens without the need to express VP1 protein in vitro first. Our studies indicated that the expression and immunogenicity of VP1 protein can be improved with alternated VP1 antigen designs. Data presented in the current report revealed novel pathways to optimize the design of VP1 antigen-based EV71 vaccines.

  8. Expression and immunogenicity of novel subunit enterovirus 71 VP1 antigens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Juan; Wang, Shixia; Gan, Weihua; Zhang, Wenhong; Ju, Liwen; Huang, Zuhu; Lu, Shan

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► EV71 is a major emerging infectious disease in many Asian countries. ► Inactivated EV71 vaccines are in clinical studies but their safety and efficacy are unknown. ► Developing subunit based EV71 vaccines is significant and novel antigen design is needed. ► DNA immunization is an efficient tool to test the immunogenicity of VP1 based EV71 vaccines. ► Multiple VP1 antigens are developed showing immunogenic potential. -- Abstract: Hand, foot, and mouth disease (HFMD) is a common viral illness in young children. HFMD is caused by viruses belonging to the enterovirus genus of the picornavirus family. Recently, enterovirus 71 (EV71) has emerged as a virulent agent for HFMD with severe clinical outcomes. In the current report, we conducted a pilot antigen engineering study to optimize the expression and immunogenicity of subunit VP1 antigen for the design of EV71 vaccines. DNA immunization was adopted as a simple technical approach to test different designs of VP1 antigens without the need to express VP1 protein in vitro first. Our studies indicated that the expression and immunogenicity of VP1 protein can be improved with alternated VP1 antigen designs. Data presented in the current report revealed novel pathways to optimize the design of VP1 antigen-based EV71 vaccines.

  9. Effect of radiation on the expression of carcinoembryonic antigen of human gastric adenocarcinoma cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hareyama, M.; Imai, K.; Kubo, K.; Takahashi, H.; Koshiba, H.; Hinoda, Y.; Shidou, M.; Oouchi, A.; Yachi, A.; Morita, K. (Sapporo Medical College (Japan))

    1991-05-01

    The changes of antigenic expression of cultured human gastric adenocarcinoma MKN45 cells caused by irradiation were investigated to elucidate the immune responses to localized irradiation. The expression of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) showed remarkable increases in the culture supernatant and on the surface of the membrane of irradiated cells. The expression of major histocompatibility complex Class I antigen on the membrane also was enhanced by irradiation. In addition, the irradiated cell groups, when analyzed using a CEA-specific probe, showed remarkable increases in the CEA mRNA. These enhancements increased in the 10-Gy and 15-Gy irradiated populations compared with the 5-Gy irradiated population. These results suggest that the enhancement of expression of CEA by radiation takes place at the CEA gene expression (mRNA) level but not at the protein level.

  10. Expression of CD44 splice variants in human primary brain tumors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kaaijk, P.; Troost, D.; Morsink, F.; Keehnen, R. M.; Leenstra, S.; Bosch, D. A.; Pals, S. T.

    1995-01-01

    Expression of CD44, particularly of certain splice variants, has been linked to tumor progression and metastatic potential in a number of different animal and human cancers. Although differential expression of CD44 standard epitopes (CD44s) in human brain tumors has been reported, the expression of

  11. Association of breast cancer risk with genetic variants showing differential allelic expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hamdi, Yosr; Soucy, Penny; Adoue, Véronique

    2016-01-01

    There are significant inter-individual differences in the levels of gene expression. Through modulation of gene expression, cis-acting variants represent an important source of phenotypic variation. Consequently, cis-regulatory SNPs associated with differential allelic expression are functional...

  12. Cloning and expression of the Legionella micdadei "common antigen" in Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bangsborg, Jette Marie; Collins, M T; Høiby, N

    1989-01-01

    To study individual Legionella antigens, a Legionella micdadei genomic library in Escherichia coli SC181 was established. Partially Sau3A digested L. micdadei DNA fragments (15-25 kilobase pairs (kb] were cloned into the tetracycline resistance gene of the cosmid vector pHC79. Four thousand...... ampicillin resistant recombinants were obtained; seven hundred were screened for expression of Legionella antigens in Western blot analysis with a polyspecific E. coli-absorbed anti-L. micdadei rabbit antibody. One of the positive clones expressed a 60 kilodalton (K) antigen, which reacted strongly...... will provide important information with respect to genetic vs. antigenic relatedness among Legionellae and other Gram-negative species, as well as to CA structure and possible function....

  13. The monoclonal antibody SM5-1 recognizes a fibronectin variant which is widely expressed in melanoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guo Yajun

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previously we have generated the monoclonal antibody SM5-1 by using a subtractive immunization protocol of human melanoma. This antibody exhibits a high sensitivity for primary melanomas of 99% (248/250 tested and for metastatic melanoma of 96% (146/151 tested in paraffin embedded sections. This reactivity is superior to the one obtained by HMB-45, anti-MelanA or anti-Tyrosinase and is comparable to anti-S100. However, as compared to anti-S100, the antibody SM5-1 is highly specific for melanocytic lesions since 40 different neoplasms were found to be negative for SM5-1 by immunohistochemistry. The antigen recognized by SM5-1 is unknown. Methods In order to characterize the antigen recognized by mAb SM5-1, a cDNA library was constructed from the metastatic human melanoma cell line SMMUpos in the Uni-ZAP lambda phage and screened by mAb SM5-1. The cDNA clones identified by this approach were then sequenced and subsequently analyzed. Results Sequence analysis of nine independent overlapping clones (length 3100–5600 bp represent fibronectin cDNA including the ED-A, but not the ED-B region which are produced by alternative splicing. The 89aa splicing variant of the IIICS region was found in 8/9 clones and the 120aa splicing variant in 1/9 clones, both of which are included in the CS1 region of fibronectin being involved in melanoma cell adhesion and spreading. Conclusion The molecule recognized by SM5-1 is a melanoma associated FN variant expressed by virtually all primary and metastatic melanomas and may play an important role in melanoma formation and progression. This antibody is therefore not only of value in immunohistochemistry, but potentially also for diagnostic imaging and immunotherapy.

  14. Expression of P. falciparum var Genes Involves Exchange of the Histone Variant H2A.Z at the Promoter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petter, Michaela; Lee, Chin Chin; Byrne, Timothy J.; Boysen, Katja E.; Volz, Jennifer; Ralph, Stuart A.; Cowman, Alan F.; Brown, Graham V.; Duffy, Michael F.

    2011-01-01

    Plasmodium falciparum employs antigenic variation to evade the human immune response by switching the expression of different variant surface antigens encoded by the var gene family. Epigenetic mechanisms including histone modifications and sub-nuclear compartmentalization contribute to transcriptional regulation in the malaria parasite, in particular to control antigenic variation. Another mechanism of epigenetic control is the exchange of canonical histones with alternative variants to generate functionally specialized chromatin domains. Here we demonstrate that the alternative histone PfH2A.Z is associated with the epigenetic regulation of var genes. In many eukaryotic organisms the histone variant H2A.Z mediates an open chromatin structure at promoters and facilitates diverse levels of regulation, including transcriptional activation. Throughout the asexual, intraerythrocytic lifecycle of P. falciparum we found that the P. falciparum ortholog of H2A.Z (PfH2A.Z) colocalizes with histone modifications that are characteristic of transcriptionally-permissive euchromatin, but not with markers of heterochromatin. Consistent with this finding, antibodies to PfH2A.Z co-precipitate the permissive modification H3K4me3. By chromatin-immunoprecipitation we show that PfH2A.Z is enriched in nucleosomes around the transcription start site (TSS) in both transcriptionally active and silent stage-specific genes. In var genes, however, PfH2A.Z is enriched at the TSS only during active transcription in ring stage parasites. Thus, in contrast to other genes, temporal var gene regulation involves histone variant exchange at promoter nucleosomes. Sir2 histone deacetylases are important for var gene silencing and their yeast ortholog antagonises H2A.Z function in subtelomeric yeast genes. In immature P. falciparum parasites lacking Sir2A or Sir2B high var transcription levels correlate with enrichment of PfH2A.Z at the TSS. As Sir2A knock out parasites mature the var genes are

  15. Blood group antigen A type 3 expression is a favorable prognostic factor in advanced NSCLC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, L H; Kuemmel, A; Schliemann, C; Schulze, A; Humberg, J; Mohr, M; Görlich, D; Hartmann, W; Bröckling, S; Marra, A; Hillejan, L; Goletz, S; Karsten, U; Berdel, W E; Spieker, T; Wiewrodt, R

    2016-02-01

    Several blood group-related carbohydrate antigens are prognosis-relevant markers of tumor tissues. A type 3 (repetitive A) is a blood group antigen specific for A1 erythrocytes. Its potential expression in tumor tissues has so far not been examined. We have evaluated its expression in normal lung and in lung cancer using a novel antibody (A69-A/E8). For comparison an anti-A antibody specific to A types 1 and 2 was used, because its expression on lung cancer tissue has been previously reported to be of prognostic relevance. Resected tissue samples of 398 NSCLC patients were analyzed in immunohistochemistry using tissue microarrays. Expression of A type 3 was not observed in non-malignant lung tissues. A type 3 was expressed on tumor cells of around half of NSCLC patients of blood group A1 (ptype 1/2 antigen was observed (p=0.562), the expression of A type 3 by tumor cells indicated a highly significant favorable prognosis among advanced NSCLC patients (p=0.011) and in NSCLC patients with lymphatic spread (p=0.014). Univariate prognostic results were confirmed in a Cox proportional hazards model. In this study we present for the first time prognostic data for A type 3 antigen expression in lung cancer patients. Prospective studies should be performed to confirm the prognostic value of A type 3 expression for an improved risk stratification in NSCLC patients. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Biosynthetic basis of incompatible histo-blood group A antigen expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    David, L; Leitao, D; Sobrinho-Simoes, M

    1993-01-01

    The expression of incompatible A carbohydrate antigens in some adenocarcinomas may provide an explanation for the generally observed lower incidence of adenocarcinoma among types O and B versus type A individuals. The chemistry and genetic basis of incompatible A expression is largely unknown. He...

  17. Expression of the human growth hormone variant gene in cultured fibroblasts and transgenic mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selden, R.F.; Wagner, T.E.; Blethen, S.; Yun, J.S.; Rowe, M.E.; Goodman, H.M.

    1988-01-01

    The nucleotide sequence of the human growth hormone variant gene, one of the five members of the growth hormone gene family, predicts that it encodes a growth hormone-like protein. As a first step in determining whether this gene is functional in humans, the authors have expressed a mouse methallothionein I/human growth hormone variant fusion gene in mouse L cells and in transgenic mice. The growth hormone variant protein expressed in transiently transfected L cells is distinct from growth hormone itself with respect to reactivity with anti-growth hormone monoclonal antibodies, behavior during column chromatography, and isoelectric point. Transgenic mice expressing the growth hormone variant protein are 1.4- to 1.9-fold larger than nontransgenic controls, suggesting that the protein has growth-promoting properties

  18. JC polyomavirus infection is strongly controlled by human leucocyte antigen class II variants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilie Sundqvist

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available JC polyomavirus (JCV carriers with a compromised immune system, such as in HIV, or subjects on immune-modulating therapies, such as anti VLA-4 therapy may develop progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML which is a lytic infection of oligodendrocytes in the brain. Serum antibodies to JCV mark infection occur only in 50-60% of infected individuals, and high JCV-antibody titers seem to increase the risk of developing PML. We here investigated the role of human leukocyte antigen (HLA, instrumental in immune defense in JCV antibody response. Anti-JCV antibody status, as a surrogate for JCV infection, were compared to HLA class I and II alleles in 1621 Scandinavian persons with MS and 1064 population-based Swedish controls and associations were replicated in 718 German persons with MS. HLA-alleles were determined by SNP imputation, sequence specific (SSP kits and a reverse PCR sequence-specific oligonucleotide (PCR-SSO method. An initial GWAS screen displayed a strong HLA class II region signal. The HLA-DRB1*15 haplotype was strongly negatively associated to JCV sero-status in Scandinavian MS cases (OR = 0.42, p = 7×10(-15 and controls (OR = 0.53, p = 2×10(-5. In contrast, the DQB1*06:03 haplotype was positively associated with JCV sero-status, in Scandinavian MS cases (OR = 1.63, p = 0.006, and controls (OR = 2.69, p = 1×10(-5. The German dataset confirmed these findings (OR = 0.54, p = 1×10(-4 and OR = 1.58, p = 0.03 respectively for these haplotypes. HLA class II restricted immune responses, and hence CD4+ T cell immunity is pivotal for JCV infection control. Alleles within the HLA-DR1*15 haplotype are associated with a protective effect on JCV infection. Alleles within the DQB1*06:03 haplotype show an opposite association. These associations between JC virus antibody response and human leucocyte antigens supports the notion that CD4+ T cells are crucial in the immune defence to JCV and

  19. Enhanced specificity in immunoscreening of expression cDNA clones using radiolabeled antigen overlay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chao, S.; Chao, L.; Chao, J.

    1989-01-01

    A highly sensitive and specific method has been developed for immunoscreening clones from an expression cDNA library. The procedures utilize a radiolabeled antigen detection method described originally for the immunoblotting of plasma proteins. Screening of rat alpha 1-antitrypsin clones was used. Comparison between Western blots of alpha 1-antitrypsin using both labeled antigen and protein A detection methods showed that the former yielded lower background and greater sensitivity than the latter. Further, this technique was shown to have a lower detection limit of less than 20 ng through Western blot analysis of varying concentrations of alpha 1-antitrypsin. The procedures are based on the expression of the protein by cDNA clones containing the DNA inserts in the correct reading frame. Following the transfer of phage proteins to nitrocellulose membranes, the bivalent antibodies bind monovalently to both nitrocellulose-bound-antigen in the phage lysates and radiolabeled antigen. The radiolabeled antigen overlay method is superior to the protein A detection method in sensitivity, specificity and reproducibility. This improved method can be applied in general for screening expression cDNA libraries, provided that the specific antiserum and radiolabeled antigen are available

  20. Lynch syndrome associated with two MLH1 promoter variants and allelic imbalance of MLH1 expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hesson, Luke B; Packham, Deborah; Kwok, Chau-To; Nunez, Andrea C; Ng, Benedict; Schmidt, Christa; Fields, Michael; Wong, Jason W H; Sloane, Mathew A; Ward, Robyn L

    2015-06-01

    Lynch syndrome is a hereditary cancer syndrome caused by a constitutional mutation in one of the mismatch repair genes. The implementation of predictive testing and targeted preventative surveillance is hindered by the frequent finding of sequence variants of uncertain significance in these genes. We aimed to determine the pathogenicity of previously reported variants (c.-28A>G and c.-7C>T) within the MLH1 5'untranslated region (UTR) in two individuals from unrelated suspected Lynch syndrome families. We investigated whether these variants were associated with other pathogenic alterations using targeted high-throughput sequencing of the MLH1 locus. We also determined their relationship to gene expression and epigenetic alterations at the promoter. Sequencing revealed that the c.-28A>G and c.-7C>T variants were the only potentially pathogenic alterations within the MLH1 gene. In both individuals, the levels of transcription from the variant allele were reduced to 50% compared with the wild-type allele. Partial loss of expression occurred in the absence of constitutional epigenetic alterations within the MLH1 promoter. We propose that these variants may be pathogenic due to constitutional partial loss of MLH1 expression, and that this may be associated with intermediate penetrance of a Lynch syndrome phenotype. Our findings provide further evidence of the potential importance of noncoding variants in the MLH1 5'UTR in the pathogenesis of Lynch syndrome. © 2015 The Authors. **Human Mutation published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Expression of blood group antigens A and B in pancreas of vertebrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ELENKA GEORGIEVA

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The biological role of blood group antigens (BGA A and B in tissues of different vertebrates is still controversial. There are few investigations on vertebrate pancreas and no obvious explanation of their tissue expression. The aim of the present study is to follow and compare the pancreatic expression of BGA A and B in representatives of five vertebrate classes. The biotin-streptavidin-proxidase labeling system was used for immunohistochemical detection of BGA by monoclonal antibodies to human A and B antigens. The present study reveals specific immunoreactivity in acinar and epithelial cells of pancreatic efferent ducts in species free-living vertebrates. The immunoperoxidase staining shows antigenic heterogeneity in the cellular localization. The number of positive cells and the intensity of expression vary in different species. Endothelial cells are positive only in the pancreas of Emys orbicularis. The lack of BGA A and B in some species suggests that the expression of these antigens is dependent not only on the evolutionary level of the species, but mainly on some genetic control mechanisms. The production of BGA A and B and the variability in their cellular localization probably reflect the stage of cell differentiation and the mechanisms of pancreatic secretor function. The presence of histo BGA in endodermal acinar pancreatic cells confirms the assumption for the high antigenic stability and conservatism of these molecules in vertebrate histogenesis and evolution.

  2. ST6GalNAc-I controls expression of sialyl-Tn antigen in gastrointestinal tissues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marcos, Nuno T; Bennett, Eric Paul; Gomes, Joana

    2011-01-01

    -Tn biosynthesis. We developed novel monoclonal antibodies specific for ST6GalNAc-I and evaluated its expression in gastrointestinal tissues. ST6GalNAc-I was detected in normal colon mucosa co-localized with O-acetylated sialyl-Tn. Expression was largely unaltered in colorectal adenocarcinomas. In contrast, we......NAc-I as the major enzyme controlling the expression of cancer-associated sialyl-Tn antigen in gastrointestinal tissues....

  3. The effects of Ostertagia occidentalis somatic antigens on ovine TLR2 and TLR4 expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassan BORJI

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Recognition of helminth-derived pathogen associated molecular patterns (PAMPs by pattern recognition receptors (PRRs, including toll like recep­tors (TLRs is the first step towards initiating anti–helminth immune re­sponses.Methods: Using somatic antigens of Ostertagia occidentalis, an important abomasal parasite of ruminants, the expression of ovine TLR2 and TLR4 in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs was analyzed by real-time quatitative reverse-transcrip­tion polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR. Somatic antigens of O. occidentalis were prepared to stimulate ovine PBMCs in a time and dose dependent manner.Results: A high expression of TLR2 and TLR4 was observed in PBMCs cultured with somatic antigens of the parasites specially when PBMCs were cultured with 100 µg/ml of somatic antigens and incubated for 2h. Up-regulation of TLR2 expres­sion was more pronounced and evident in our study.Conclsusion: Somatic antigens of O. occidentalis have immunostimulatory and domi­nant role on peripheral immune cells. This study provide for the first time evidence of induction of TLRs in ovine PBMCs by somatic antigen of O. occidentalis

  4. Multiple sclerosis risk variant HLA-DRB1*1501 associates with high expression of DRB1 gene in different human populations.

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    Antonio Alcina

    Full Text Available The human leukocyte antigen (HLA DRB1*1501 has been consistently associated with multiple sclerosis (MS in nearly all populations tested. This points to a specific antigen presentation as the pathogenic mechanism though this does not fully explain the disease association. The identification of expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL for genes in the HLA locus poses the question of the role of gene expression in MS susceptibility. We analyzed the eQTLs in the HLA region with respect to MS-associated HLA-variants obtained from genome-wide association studies (GWAS. We found that the Tag of DRB1*1501, rs3135388 A allele, correlated with high expression of DRB1, DRB5 and DQB1 genes in a Caucasian population. In quantitative terms, the MS-risk AA genotype carriers of rs3135388 were associated with 15.7-, 5.2- and 8.3-fold higher expression of DQB1, DRB5 and DRB1, respectively, than the non-risk GG carriers. The haplotype analysis of expression-associated variants in a Spanish MS cohort revealed that high expression of DRB1 and DQB1 alone did not contribute to the disease. However, in Caucasian, Asian and African American populations, the DRB1*1501 allele was always highly expressed. In other immune related diseases such as type 1 diabetes, inflammatory bowel disease, ulcerative colitis, asthma and IgA deficiency, the best GWAS-associated HLA SNPs were also eQTLs for different HLA Class II genes. Our data suggest that the DR/DQ expression levels, together with specific structural properties of alleles, seem to be the causal effect in MS and in other immunopathologies rather than specific antigen presentation alone.

  5. Multiple Sclerosis Risk Variant HLA-DRB1*1501 Associates with High Expression of DRB1 Gene in Different Human Populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abad-Grau, María del Mar; Fedetz, María; Izquierdo, Guillermo; Lucas, Miguel; Fernández, Óscar; Ndagire, Dorothy; Catalá-Rabasa, Antonio; Ruiz, Agustín; Gayán, Javier; Delgado, Concepción; Arnal, Carmen

    2012-01-01

    The human leukocyte antigen (HLA) DRB1*1501 has been consistently associated with multiple sclerosis (MS) in nearly all populations tested. This points to a specific antigen presentation as the pathogenic mechanism though this does not fully explain the disease association. The identification of expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL) for genes in the HLA locus poses the question of the role of gene expression in MS susceptibility. We analyzed the eQTLs in the HLA region with respect to MS-associated HLA-variants obtained from genome-wide association studies (GWAS). We found that the Tag of DRB1*1501, rs3135388 A allele, correlated with high expression of DRB1, DRB5 and DQB1 genes in a Caucasian population. In quantitative terms, the MS-risk AA genotype carriers of rs3135388 were associated with 15.7-, 5.2- and 8.3-fold higher expression of DQB1, DRB5 and DRB1, respectively, than the non-risk GG carriers. The haplotype analysis of expression-associated variants in a Spanish MS cohort revealed that high expression of DRB1 and DQB1 alone did not contribute to the disease. However, in Caucasian, Asian and African American populations, the DRB1*1501 allele was always highly expressed. In other immune related diseases such as type 1 diabetes, inflammatory bowel disease, ulcerative colitis, asthma and IgA deficiency, the best GWAS-associated HLA SNPs were also eQTLs for different HLA Class II genes. Our data suggest that the DR/DQ expression levels, together with specific structural properties of alleles, seem to be the causal effect in MS and in other immunopathologies rather than specific antigen presentation alone. PMID:22253788

  6. Neural system antigens are recognized by autoantibodies from patients affected by a new variant of endemic pemphigus foliaceus in Colombia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abreu-Velez, Ana Maria; Howard, Michael S; Yi, Hong; Gao, Weiqing; Hashimoto, Takashi; Grossniklaus, Hans E

    2011-06-01

    Endemic pemphigus foliaceus (EPF), is also known as "fogo selvagem" or "wild fire," reflecting the intense burning sensation of the skin reported by patients with this disease. Based on this finding, we tested for neural autoreactivity in patients affected by a new variant of EPF (El Bagre-EPF). We tested 20 El Bagre-EPF patients, 20 normal controls from the endemic area, and 20 age- and sex-matched normal controls from outside the endemic area. We tested for autoreactivity to several immunoglobulins and complement. Both human skin and bovine tail were used as antigens. We detected autoreactivity to neural structures, mechanoreceptors, nerves, perineural cell layers of the arachnoid envelope around the optic nerve, brain structures, and to neuromuscular spindles; these structures colocalized with several neural markers. The patient antibodies also colocalized with desmoplakins 1 and 2, with the armadillo repeat protein deleted in velo-cardio-facial syndrome and with p0071 antibodies. Autoreactivity was also found associated with neurovascular bundles innervating the skin, and immunoelectron microscopy using protein A gold against patient antibodies was positive against the nerve axons. Paucicellularity of the intraepidermal nerve endings and defragmentation of the neural plexus were seen in 70% of the cases and not in the controls from the endemic area (pEPF patients vis-a-vis the weakness of the extensor nerves, and furthermore, the autoreactivity to nerves in EPF could explain the "burning sensation" encountered in EPF disease.

  7. Humoral immunity provides resident intestinal eosinophils access to luminal antigen via eosinophil-expressed low affinity Fc gamma receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Kalmia M.; Rahman, Raiann S.; Spencer, Lisa A.

    2016-01-01

    Eosinophils are native to the healthy gastrointestinal tract, and are associated with inflammatory diseases likely triggered by exposure to food allergens (e.g. food allergies and eosinophilic gastrointestinal disorders). In models of allergic respiratory diseases and in vitro studies, direct antigen engagement elicits eosinophil effector functions including degranulation and antigen presentation. However, it was not known whether intestinal tissue eosinophils that are separated from luminal food antigens by a columnar epithelium might similarly engage food antigens. Using an intestinal ligated loop model in mice, here we determined that resident intestinal eosinophils acquire antigen from the lumen of antigen-sensitized but not naïve mice in vivo. Antigen acquisition was immunoglobulin-dependent; intestinal eosinophils were unable to acquire antigen in sensitized immunoglobulin-deficient mice, and passive immunization with immune serum or antigen-specific IgG was sufficient to enable intestinal eosinophils in otherwise naïve mice to acquire antigen in vivo. Intestinal eosinophils expressed low affinity IgG receptors, and the activating receptor FcγRIII was necessary for immunoglobulin-mediated acquisition of antigens by isolated intestinal eosinophils in vitro. Our combined data suggest that intestinal eosinophils acquire lumen-derived food antigens in sensitized mice via FcγRIII antigen focusing, and may therefore participate in antigen-driven secondary immune responses to oral antigens. PMID:27683752

  8. Axotomy induces MHC class I antigen expression on rat nerve cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maehlen, J; Schröder, H D; Klareskog, L

    1988-01-01

    Immunomorphological staining demonstrates that class I major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-coded antigen expression can be selectively induced on otherwise class I-negative rat nerve cells by peripheral axotomy. Induction of class I as well as class II antigen expression was simultaneously seen...... on non-neural cells in the immediate vicinity of the injured nerve cells. As nerve regeneration after axotomy includes growth of new nerve cell processes and formation of new nerve cell contacts, the present findings raise the question of a role for MHC-coded molecules in cell-cell interactions during...... nerve cell growth....

  9. Exosomes derived from tumor cells genetically modified to express Mycobacterium tuberculosis antigen: a novel vaccine for cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koyama, Yoshiyuki; Ito, Tomoko; Hasegawa, Aya; Eriguchi, Masazumi; Inaba, Toshio; Ushigusa, Takahiro; Sugiura, Kikuya

    2016-11-01

    To examine the potential of exosomes derived from the tumor cells, which had been genetically modified to express a Mycobacterium tuberculosis antigen, as a cancer vaccine aimed at overcoming the weak immunogenicity of tumor antigens. We transfected B16 melanoma cells with a plasmid encoding the M. tuberculosis antigen, early secretory antigenic target-6 (ESAT-6). The secreted exosomes bearing both tumor-associated antigens and the pathogenic antigen (or their epitopes) were collected. When the exosomes were injected into foot pads of mice, they significantly (p exosomes significantly suppressed (p exosomes derived from the non-transfected B16 cells showed no effect on tumor growth, although both exosomes should have similar tumor antigens. Exosomes bearing both tumor antigens and the M. tuberculosis antigen (or their epitopes) have a high potential as a candidate for cancer vaccine to overcome the immune escape by tumor cells.

  10. The promoter for a variant surface glycoprotein gene expression site in Trypanosoma brucei

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zomerdijk, J. C.; Ouellette, M.; ten Asbroek, A. L.; Kieft, R.; Bommer, A. M.; Clayton, C. E.; Borst, P.

    1990-01-01

    The variant-specific surface glycoprotein (VSG) gene 221 of Trypanosoma brucei is transcribed as part of a 60 kb expression site (ES). We have identified the promoter controlling this multigene transcription unit by the use of 221 chromosome-enriched DNA libraries and VSG gene 221 expression site

  11. [Neoretinal antigen expression: a comparison of anatomical and clinical features of a murine uveoretinitis model].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terrada, C; Pâques, M; Fisson, S; De Kozak, Y; Klatzmann, D; Salomon, B; LeHoang, P; Bodaghi, B

    2008-02-01

    Uveitis is an inflammation involving the retina. The antigens targeted by the experimental models are located in the pigmentary epithelium-photoreceptor complex. To gain insights into the variations in topographic expression of the antigen in the retina, we studied a new mouse model. and methods: Stable retinal expression of the influenza virus hemagglutinin (HA) was obtained after intravitreal or subretinal injection of recombinant adeno-associated virus carrying HA (AAV-HA). One month later, we transferred HA-specific T cells, followed by a subcutaneous immunization of the cognate antigen emulsified in CFA. The animals were clinically examined with a slit lamp biomicroscope. Infiltration of donor cells was detected by immunostaining on retina flatmounts with anti-Thy-1.1 antibody, and infiltrating cells were studied using FACS analysis. Whatever the location of the HA expression, intraocular inflammation was clinically and histologically detected in all animals, between 10 and 15 days after immunization with HA. Lesions were identified with histopathological analysis. The ocular infiltrate was mostly composed of macrophages and HA-specific T cells in different proportions. The topographic variations of targeted ocular antigens do not seem to modify the development of inflammatory reactions in our model. By targeting different antigen-presenting cells, ocular infiltrating cells are different.

  12. Neural Crest Cells Isolated from the Bone Marrow of Transgenic Mice Express JCV T-Antigen.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Gordon

    Full Text Available JC virus (JCV, a common human polyomavirus, is the etiological agent of the demyelinating disease, progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML. In addition to its role in PML, studies have demonstrated the transforming ability of the JCV early protein, T-antigen, and its association with some human cancers. JCV infection occurs in childhood and latent virus is thought to be maintained within the bone marrow, which harbors cells of hematopoietic and non-hematopoietic lineages. Here we show that non-hematopoietic mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs isolated from the bone marrow of JCV T-antigen transgenic mice give rise to JCV T-antigen positive cells when cultured under neural conditions. JCV T-antigen positive cells exhibited neural crest characteristics and demonstrated p75, SOX-10 and nestin positivity. When cultured in conditions typical for mesenchymal cells, a population of T-antigen negative cells, which did not express neural crest markers arose from the MSCs. JCV T-antigen positive cells could be cultured long-term while maintaining their neural crest characteristics. When these cells were induced to differentiate into neural crest derivatives, JCV T-antigen was downregulated in cells differentiating into bone and maintained in glial cells expressing GFAP and S100. We conclude that JCV T-antigen can be stably expressed within a fraction of bone marrow cells differentiating along the neural crest/glial lineage when cultured in vitro. These findings identify a cell population within the bone marrow permissible for JCV early gene expression suggesting the possibility that these cells could support persistent viral infection and thus provide clues toward understanding the role of the bone marrow in JCV latency and reactivation. Further, our data provides an excellent experimental model system for studying the cell-type specificity of JCV T-antigen expression, the role of bone marrow-derived stem cells in the pathogenesis of JCV-related diseases

  13. Regulation of antigenic variation in Plasmodium falciparum: censoring freedom of expression?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffy, Michael F; Reeder, John C; Brown, Graham V

    2003-03-01

    Plasmodium falciparum employs a strategy of clonal antigenic variation to evade the host immune response during the intraerythrocytic stage of its life cycle. The major variant parasite molecule is the P. falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein (PfEMP)1, which is encoded by the var multigene family. The parasite switches between different PfEMP1 molecules through regulation of var transcription. Recent studies have shed considerable light on this process, but much remains unknown. However, striking parallels between transcriptional control of var and genes in other organisms provide direction for future studies.

  14. Construction, expression, purification and biotin labeling of a single recombinant multi-epitope antigen for double-antigen sandwich ELISA to detect hepatitis C virus antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Jing; Xiu, Bingshui; Wang, Guohua; Chen, Kun; Feng, Xiaoyan; Song, Xiaoguo; Zhu, Cuixia; Yang, Xiqin; Bai, Guanzhong; Ling, Shigan; Zhang, Heqiu

    2011-08-01

    Based on B cell epitope predictions, a recombinant antigen with multiple epitopes from four Hepatitis C Virus fragments (C, NS3, NS4 and NS5) were engineered. The recombinant gene was then highly expressed in E. coli. The non-modified and C-terminal-modified recombinant proteins were used for coating and biotin labeling, respectively, to establish the double-antigen sandwich ELISA. Ten positive reference samples confirmed by the CHIRON RIBA HCV 3.0 SIA kit were detected positive, Forty one plasma samples were positive among samples from 441 volunteers, which indicated that the recombinant antigen could readily react well with plasma HCV antibody. As critical reagents of double-antigen sandwich ELISA, the recombinant multi-epitope antigen and the C-terminal-modified and biotin-conjugated antigen show good antigenicity. In this study, we provide a simple approach to produce multiple epitopes within one recombinant protein in order to avoid the costly expression of less-effective pools of multiple proteins, which is the conventional strategy of diagnostic antigen production for HCV antibody detection.

  15. Pre- and Post-Conditions Expressed in Variants of the Modal µ-Calculus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanabe, Yoshinori; Sekizawa, Toshifusa; Yuasa, Yoshifumi; Takahashi, Koichi

    Properties of Kripke structures can be expressed by formulas of the modal µ-calculus. Despite its strong expressive power, the validity problem of the modal µ-calculus is decidable, and so are some of its variants enriched by inverse programs, graded modalities, and nominals. In this study, we show that the pre- and post-conditions of transformations of Kripke structures, such as addition/deletion of states and edges, can be expressed using variants of the modal µ-calculus. Combined with decision procedures we have developed for those variants, the properties of sequences of transformations on Kripke structures can be deduced. We show that these techniques can be used to verify the properties of pointer-manipulating programs.

  16. Variation of prostate-specific antigen expression in different tumour growth patterns present in prostatectomy specimens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.P.W. Gallee; E. Visser-de Jong (E.); J.A.G.M. van der Korput (J. A G M); Th.H. van der Kwast (Theo); F.J.W. ten Kate (Fiebo); F.H. Schröder (Fritz); J. Trapman (Jan)

    1990-01-01

    textabstractA series of 55 randomly chosen radical prostatectomy specimens was analyzed for expression of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) by immunohistochemical techniques. Tissue sections were selected in such a manner that in addition to glandular benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), one or more

  17. Differentiation of EL4 lymphoma cells by tumoral environment is associated with inappropriate expression of the large chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan PG-M and the tumor-associated antigen HTgp-175.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rottiers, P; Verfaillie, T; Contreras, R; Revets, H; Desmedt, M; Dooms, H; Fiers, W; Grooten, J

    1998-11-09

    Progression to malignancy of transformed cells involves complex genetic alterations and aberrant gene expression patterns. While aberrant gene expression is often caused by alterations in individual genes, the contribution of the tumoral environment to the triggering of this gene expression is less well established. The stable but heterogeneous expression in cultured EL4/13 cells of a novel tumor-associated antigen, designated as HTgp-175, was chosen for the investigation of gene expression during tumor formation. Homogeneously HTgp-175-negative EL4/13 cells, isolated by cell sorting or obtained by subcloning, acquired HTgp-175 expression as a result of tumor formation. The tumorigenicity of HTgp-175-negative vs. HTgp-175-positive EL4 variants was identical, indicating that induction but not selection accounted for the phenotypic switch from HTgp-175-negative to HTgp-175-positive. Although mutagenesis experiments showed that the protein was not essential for tumor establishment, tumor-derived cells showed increased malignancy, linking HTgp-175 expression with genetic changes accompanying tumor progression. This novel gene expression was not an isolated event, since it was accompanied by ectopic expression of the large chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan PG-M and of normal differentiation antigens. We conclude that signals derived from the tumoral microenvironment contribute significantly to the aberrant gene expression pattern of malignant cells, apparently by fortuitous activation of differentiation processes and cause expression of novel differentiation antigens as well as of inappropriate tumor-associated and ectopic antigens.

  18. Inhibitory activities of microalgal extracts against Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV antigen expression in lymphoblastoid cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koh Yih Yih

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The inhibitory activities of microalgal extracts against the expression of three EBV antigens, latent membrane protein (LMP1, Epstein-Barr nuclear antigen (EBNA1 and Z Epstein-Barr reactivation activator (ZEBRA were assessed by immunocytochemistry. The observation that the methanol extracts and their fractions from Ankistrodesmus convolutus, Synechococcus elongatus and Spirulina platensis exhibited inhibitory activity against EBV proteins in three Burkitt’s lymphoma cell lines at concentrations as low as 20 μg/ml suggests that microalgae could be a potential source of antiviral compounds against EBV.

  19. Antigenic variants of influenza A virus, PR8 strain. I. Their development during serial passage in the lungs of partially immune mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    GERBER, P; LOOSLI, C G; HAMBRE, D

    1955-06-01

    Antigenically different strains of mouse-adapted PR8 influenza A virus have been produced by 17 serial passages of the virus in the lungs of mice immunized with the homologous agent. Comparative serological tests show that the variant strains share antigenic components with the parent strain but the dominant antigen is different. By means of antibody absorption it was shown that the "new" antigenic component of the variant was already present in minor amounts up to the eighth passage and thereafter gained prominence with continued passage in vaccinated mice. Groups of mice vaccinated with either the PR8-S or T(21) virus and having comparable antibody titers showed no growth of virus in the lungs following aid-borne challenge with homologous strains. On the other hand, following heterologous air-borne challenge no deaths occurred, but virus grew in the lungs of both groups of vaccinated mice. Almost unrestricted virus multiplication took place in the lungs of mice vaccinated with the parent strain and challenged with the PR8-T(21) virus which resulted in extensive consolidation. Less virus grew in the lungs of the mice vaccinated with the variant strains and challenged with the PR8-S virus. In these animals only microscopic evidence of changes due to virus growth in the lungs was observed. The successful serial passage of PR8 influenza A virus in immunized animals was dependent on the initial selection of mice with uniformly low H.I. antibody titers as determined on tail blood, and the intranasal instillation of sufficient virus to favor the survival of those virus particles least related to the antibodies present. The epidemiological implications of these observations are discussed briefly.

  20. Extracellular Expression in Aspergillus niger of an Antibody Fused to Leishmania sp. Antigens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magaña-Ortíz, Denis; Fernández, Francisco; Loske, Achim M; Gómez-Lim, Miguel A

    2018-01-01

    Nucleoside hydrolase and sterol 24-c-methyltransferase, two antigenic proteins of Leishmania sp., were expressed in Aspergillus niger. Genetic transformation of conidia was achieved using underwater shock waves. scFv antibody addressed to DEC205, a receptor of dendritic cells, was fused to two proteins of Leishmania sp. Receptor 205 has a relevant role in the immune system in mammals; it can modulate T cell response to different antigens. Extracellular expression strategy of recombinant antibody was achieved using a fragment of native glucoamylase A (514 aa) as a carrier. Fermentations in shake flasks showed that the recombinant protein (104 kDa) was expressed and secreted only when maltose was used as carbon source; on the contrary, the expression was highly repressed in presence of xylose. Noteworthy, recombinant protein was secreted without glucoamylase-carrier and accumulation at intracellular level was not observed. The results presented here demonstrate the high value of Aspergillus niger as biotechnological platform for recombinant antibodies against Leishmania sp. at low cost. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report about the recombinant expression of antigenic proteins of Leishmania sp. in filamentous fungi. The protein obtained can be used to explore novel strategies to induce immunity against Leishmania sp. or it can be employed in diagnostic kits to detect this neglected disease.

  1. Biologico-clinical significance of DNMT3A variants expression in acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Na; Fu, Wei; Zhao, Chen; Li, Bixin; Yan, Xiaojing; Li, Yan

    2017-12-09

    DNA methyltransferase 3A (DNMT3A) catalyzes de novo DNA methylation and plays important roles in the pathogenesis of acute myeloid leukemia. However, the expression status of DNMT3A variants in acute myeloid leukemia remains obscure. This study aimed to assess the expression levels of alternative splicing of DNMT3A variants and explore their roles in acute myeloid leukemia (AML). DNMT3A variants gene expression were assessed, measuring their effects on cell proliferation. In addition, the expression of DNMT3A variants were evaluated in acute myeloid leukemia patients. Four DNMT3A variants were identified, with DNMT3A1 and DNMT3A2V found to be dominant in acute myeloid leukemia cell lines. Moreover, DNMT3A2V overexpression delayed cell proliferation; while, DNMT3A2V R882H mutation promoted cell proliferation. Further, DNMT3A1 and DNMT3A2V were detected in newly diagnosed acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients and controls with non-malignant hematological disease, with DNMT3A2V significantly up-regulated in AML patients. The main transcript switched from DNMT3A1 to DNMT3A2V in some patients, especially the low risk group based on the NCCN 2016 guidelines. These findings suggest that DNMT3A1 and DNMT3A2V are the main variants in acute myeloid leukemia with different clinical association, and might play important roles in the pathophysiology of acute myeloid leukemia. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Antigen presentation and MHC class II expression by human esophageal epithelial cells: role in eosinophilic esophagitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulder, Daniel J; Pooni, Aman; Mak, Nanette; Hurlbut, David J; Basta, Sameh; Justinich, Christopher J

    2011-02-01

    Professional antigen-presenting cells (APCs) play a crucial role in initiating immune responses. Under pathological conditions, epithelial cells at mucosal surfaces act as nonprofessional APCs, thereby regulating immune responses at the site of exposure. Epithelial cells in the esophagus may contribute to the pathogenesis of eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) by presenting antigens on the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II. Our goal was to demonstrate the ability of esophageal epithelial cells to process and present antigens on the MHC class II system and to investigate the contribution of epithelial cell antigen presentation to EoE. Immunohistochemistry detected HLA-DR, CD80, and CD86 expression and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay detected interferon-γ (IFNγ) in esophageal biopsies. Antigen presentation was studied using the human esophageal epithelial cell line HET-1A by reverse transcriptase-PCR, flow cytometry, and confocal microscopy. T helper cell lymphocyte proliferation was assessed by flow cytometry and IL-2 secretion. IFNγ and MHC class II were increased in mucosa of patients with EoE. IFNγ increased mRNA of HLA-DP, HLA-DQ, HLA-DR, and CIITA in HET-1A cells. HET-1A engulfed cell debris and processed ovalbumin. HET-1A cells expressed HLA-DR after IFNγ treatment. HET-1A stimulated T helper cell activation. In this study, we demonstrated the ability of esophageal epithelial cells to act as nonprofessional APCs in the presence of IFNγ. Esophageal epithelial cell antigen presentation may contribute to the pathophysiology of eosinophilic esophagitis. Copyright © 2011 American Society for Investigative Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Expression of the VP40 antigen from the Zaire ebolavirus in tobacco plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monreal-Escalante, Elizabeth; Ramos-Vega, Abel A; Salazar-González, Jorge A; Bañuelos-Hernández, Bernardo; Angulo, Carlos; Rosales-Mendoza, Sergio

    2017-07-01

    The plant cell is able to produce the VP40 antigen from the Zaire ebolavirus , retaining the antigenicity and the ability to induce immune responses in BALB/c mice. The recent Ebola outbreak evidenced the need for having vaccines approved for human use. Herein we report the expression of the VP40 antigen from the Ebola virus as an initial effort in the development of a plant-made vaccine that could offer the advantages of being cheap and scalable, which is proposed to overcome the rapid need for having vaccines to deal with future outbreaks. Tobacco plants were transformed by stable DNA integration into the nuclear genome using the CaMV35S promoter and a signal peptide to access the endoplasmic reticulum, reaching accumulation levels up to 2.6 µg g -1 FW leaf tissues. The antigenicity of the plant-made VP40 antigen was evidenced by Western blot and an initial immunogenicity assessment in test animals that revealed the induction of immune responses in BALB/c mice following three weekly oral or subcutaneous immunizations at very low doses (125 and 25 ng, respectively) without accessory adjuvants. Therefore, this plant-based vaccination prototype is proposed as an attractive platform for the production of vaccines in the fight against Ebola virus disease outbreaks.

  4. Cloning and expression of a novel human profilin variant, profilin II

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Honoré, B; Madsen, Peder; Andersen, A H

    1993-01-01

    We have isolated a 1.7 kbp cDNA encoding a 140 amino acid protein (15.1 kDa, pI 5.91) with a high sequence similarity (62%) to human profilin (profilin I). We have termed this variant profilin II. Northern blot analysis showed that profilin II is highly expressed in brain, skeletal muscle and kid...

  5. Establishment of Sf9 transformants constitutively expressing PBAN receptor variants: application to functional evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    To facilitate further evaluation of pheromone biosynthesis activating neuropeptide receptor (PBANR) functionality and regulation, we generated cultured insect cell lines stably expressing a number of fluorescent Bombyx mori PBANR (BommoPBANR) and Pseudaletia separata PBANR (PsesePBANR) variants incl...

  6. Selection of Highly Expressed Gene Variants in Escherichia coli Using Translationally Coupled Antibiotic Selection Markers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rennig, Maja; Daley, Daniel O.; Nørholm, Morten H. H.

    2018-01-01

    Strategies to select highly expressed variants of a protein coding sequence are usually based on trial-and-error approaches, which are time-consuming and expensive. We address this problem using translationally coupled antibiotic resistance markers. The system requires that the target gene can...

  7. Antigen uptake and expression of antigen presentation-related immune genes in flounder (Paralichthys olivaceus) after vaccination with an inactivated Edwardsiella tarda immersion vaccine, following hyperosmotic treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yingli; Tang, Xiaoqian; Sheng, Xiuzhen; Xing, Jing; Zhan, Wenbin

    2016-08-01

    Antigen uptake is a critical process for activation of the immune system, and therefore the ability to enhance antigen uptake is a primary consideration in the development of an immersion vaccination of fish. In the present work, flounders (Paralichthys olivaceus) were immersed in three hyperosmotic solutions with 40, 50 and 60‰ salinities, then transferred into seawater of normal salinity (i.e. 30‰) containing formalin-inactivated Edwardsiella tarda for 30 min. The antigen uptake in vaccinated flounder was determined using an absolute quantitative PCR (qPCR). The results showed significantly higher antigen uptake in the tissues of flounders immersed in solutions with 50‰ and 60‰ salinity compared to the control group directly immersed in vaccine (DI) (P immersed in the 50‰ salinity solution, whereas there was no significant difference in antigen uptake between the 40‰ salinity group and the DI group (P > 0.05). A rapid and significant increase in antigen uptake was detected in the mucosal-associated tissues including the gill, skin and intestine (P immersion, which was significantly higher than the levels of uptake measured in the other tissues (P immersion (hpi). The expression profiles of four antigen presentation-related immune genes (MHC Iα, MHC IIα, CD4-1 and CD8α) were investigated after immersion. These four genes showed a significantly stronger response in the immersed flounders exposed to 50‰ salinity compared with the DI group (P immersion, notably 50‰ salinity significantly enhanced antigen uptake and the expression of selected genes associated with antigen presentation, providing evidence for an enhanced immune activation of the fish's immune response by the hyperosmotic immersion treatment prior to vaccination. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. A family of splice variants of CstF-64 expressed in vertebrate nervous systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shankarling, Ganesh S; Coates, Penelope W; Dass, Brinda; MacDonald, Clinton C

    2009-01-01

    Background Alternative splicing and polyadenylation are important mechanisms for creating the proteomic diversity necessary for the nervous system to fulfill its specialized functions. The contribution of alternative splicing to proteomic diversity in the nervous system has been well documented, whereas the role of alternative polyadenylation in this process is less well understood. Since the CstF-64 polyadenylation protein is known to be an important regulator of tissue-specific polyadenylation, we examined its expression in brain and other organs. Results We discovered several closely related splice variants of CstF-64 – collectively called βCstF-64 – that could potentially contribute to proteomic diversity in the nervous system. The βCstF-64 splice variants are found predominantly in the brains of several vertebrate species including mice and humans. The major βCstF-64 variant mRNA is generated by inclusion of two alternate exons (that we call exons 8.1 and 8.2) found between exons 8 and 9 of the CstF-64 gene, and contains an additional 147 nucleotides, encoding 49 additional amino acids. Some variants of βCstF-64 contain only the first alternate exon (exon 8.1) while other variants contain both alternate exons (8.1 and 8.2). In mice, the predominant form of βCstF-64 also contains a deletion of 78 nucleotides from exon 9, although that variant is not seen in any other species examined, including rats. Immunoblot and 2D-PAGE analyses of mouse nuclear extracts indicate that a protein corresponding to βCstF-64 is expressed in brain at approximately equal levels to CstF-64. Since βCstF-64 splice variant family members were found in the brains of all vertebrate species examined (including turtles and fish), this suggests that βCstF-64 has an evolutionarily conserved function in these animals. βCstF-64 was present in both pre- and post-natal mice and in different regions of the nervous system, suggesting an important role for βCstF-64 in neural gene

  9. Construction of Nef-positive doxycycline-dependent HIV-1 variants using bicistronic expression elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Velden, Yme U. van der; Kleibeuker, Wendy; Harwig, Alex; Klaver, Bep; Siteur-van Rijnstra, Esther; Frankin, Esmay; Berkhout, Ben; Das, Atze T., E-mail: a.t.das@amc.uva.nl

    2016-01-15

    Conditionally replicating HIV-1 variants that can be switched on and off at will are attractive tools for HIV research. We previously developed a genetically modified HIV-1 variant that replicates exclusively when doxycycline (dox) is administered. The nef gene in this HIV-rtTA variant was replaced with the gene encoding the dox-dependent rtTA transcriptional activator. Because loss of Nef expression compromises virus replication in primary cells and precludes studies on Nef function, we tested different approaches to restore Nef production in HIV-rtTA. Strategies that involved translation via an EMCV or synthetic internal ribosome entry site (IRES) failed because these elements were incompatible with efficient virus replication. Fusion protein approaches with the FMDV 2A peptide and human ubiquitin were successful and resulted in genetically-stable Nef-expressing HIV-rtTA strains that replicate more efficiently in primary T-cells and human immune system (HIS) mice than Nef-deficient variants, thus confirming the positive effect of Nef on in vivo virus replication. - Highlights: • Different approaches to encode additional proteins in the HIV-1 genome were tested. • IRES translation elements are incompatible with efficient HIV-1 replication. • Ubiquitin and 2A fusion protein approaches allow efficient HIV-1 replication. • Doxycycline-controlled HIV-1 variants that encode all viral proteins were developed. • Nef stimulates HIV-rtTA replication in primary cells and human immune system mice.

  10. Evaluation of Parkinson disease risk variants as expression-QTLs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeanne C Latourelle

    Full Text Available The recent Parkinson Disease GWAS Consortium meta-analysis and replication study reports association at several previously confirmed risk loci SNCA, MAPT, GAK/DGKQ, and HLA and identified a novel risk locus at RIT2. To further explore functional consequences of these associations, we investigated modification of gene expression in prefrontal cortex brain samples of pathologically confirmed PD cases (N = 26 and controls (N = 24 by 67 associated SNPs in these 5 loci. Association between the eSNPs and expression was evaluated using a 2-degrees of freedom test of both association and difference in association between cases and controls, adjusted for relevant covariates. SNPs at each of the 5 loci were tested for cis-acting effects on all probes within 250 kb of each locus. Trans-effects of the SNPs on the 39,122 probes passing all QC on the microarray were also examined. From the analysis of cis-acting SNP effects, several SNPs in the MAPT region show significant association to multiple nearby probes, including two strongly correlated probes targeting the gene LOC644246 and the duplicated genes LRRC37A and LRRC37A2, and a third uncorrelated probe targeting the gene DCAKD. Significant cis-associations were also observed between SNPs and two probes targeting genes in the HLA region on chromosome 6. Expanding the association study to examine trans effects revealed an additional 23 SNP-probe associations reaching statistical significance (p<2.8 × 10(-8 including SNPs from the SNCA, MAPT and RIT2 regions. These findings provide additional context for the interpretation of PD associated SNPs identified in recent GWAS as well as potential insight into the mechanisms underlying the observed SNP associations.

  11. Evaluation of Parkinson disease risk variants as expression-QTLs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latourelle, Jeanne C; Dumitriu, Alexandra; Hadzi, Tiffany C; Beach, Thomas G; Myers, Richard H

    2012-01-01

    The recent Parkinson Disease GWAS Consortium meta-analysis and replication study reports association at several previously confirmed risk loci SNCA, MAPT, GAK/DGKQ, and HLA and identified a novel risk locus at RIT2. To further explore functional consequences of these associations, we investigated modification of gene expression in prefrontal cortex brain samples of pathologically confirmed PD cases (N = 26) and controls (N = 24) by 67 associated SNPs in these 5 loci. Association between the eSNPs and expression was evaluated using a 2-degrees of freedom test of both association and difference in association between cases and controls, adjusted for relevant covariates. SNPs at each of the 5 loci were tested for cis-acting effects on all probes within 250 kb of each locus. Trans-effects of the SNPs on the 39,122 probes passing all QC on the microarray were also examined. From the analysis of cis-acting SNP effects, several SNPs in the MAPT region show significant association to multiple nearby probes, including two strongly correlated probes targeting the gene LOC644246 and the duplicated genes LRRC37A and LRRC37A2, and a third uncorrelated probe targeting the gene DCAKD. Significant cis-associations were also observed between SNPs and two probes targeting genes in the HLA region on chromosome 6. Expanding the association study to examine trans effects revealed an additional 23 SNP-probe associations reaching statistical significance (p<2.8 × 10(-8)) including SNPs from the SNCA, MAPT and RIT2 regions. These findings provide additional context for the interpretation of PD associated SNPs identified in recent GWAS as well as potential insight into the mechanisms underlying the observed SNP associations.

  12. Enhanced expression of codon optimized Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis antigens in Lactobacillus salivarius

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher D Johnston

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available It is well documented that open reading frames containing high GC content show poor expression in A+T rich hosts. Specifically, G+C-rich codon usage is a limiting factor in heterologous expression of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP proteins using Lactobacillus salivarius. However, re-engineering opening reading frames through synonymous substitutions can offset codon bias and greatly enhance MAP protein production in this host. In this report, we demonstrate that codon-usage manipulation of two MAP genes (MAP2121c and MAP3733c can enhance the heterologous expression of two antigens (MMP and MptD respectively, analogous to the form to which they are produced natively by MAP bacilli. When heterologously over-expressed, antigenic determinants were preserved in synthetic MMP proteins as shown by monoclonal antibody mediated ELISA. Moreover, MMP is a membrane protein in MAP, which is also targeted to the cellular surface of recombinant L. salivarius at levels comparable to MAP. Additionally, codon optimised MptD displayed the tendency to associate with the cytoplasmic membrane boundary under confocal microscopy and the intracellularly accumulated protein selectively adhered with the MptD-specific bacteriophage fMptD. This work demonstrates there is potential for L. salivarius as a viable antigen delivery vehicle for MAP, which may provide an effective mucosal vaccine against Johne’s disease.

  13. [Expression changes of major outer membrane protein antigens in Leptospira interrogans during infection and its mechanism].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Linli; Ge, Yumei; Hu, Weilin; Yan, Jie

    2013-03-01

    To determine expression changes of major outer membrane protein(OMP) antigens of Leptospira interrogans serogroup Icterohaemorrhagiae serovar Lai strain Lai during infection of human macrophages and its mechanism. OmpR encoding genes and OmpR-related histidine kinase (HK) encoding gene of L.interrogans strain Lai and their functional domains were predicted using bioinformatics technique. mRNA level changes of the leptospiral major OMP-encoding genes before and after infection of human THP-1 macrophages were detected by real-time fluorescence quantitative RT-PCR. Effects of the OmpR-encoding genes and HK-encoding gene on the expression of leptospiral OMPs during infection were determined by HK-peptide antiserum block assay and closantel inhibitive assays. The bioinformatics analysis indicated that LB015 and LB333 were referred to OmpR-encoding genes of the spirochete, while LB014 might act as a OmpR-related HK-encoding gene. After the spirochete infecting THP-1 cells, mRNA levels of leptospiral lipL21, lipL32 and lipL41 genes were rapidly and persistently down-regulated (P Expression levels of L.interrogans strain Lai major OMP antigens present notable changes during infection of human macrophages. There is a group of OmpR-and HK-encoding genes which may play a major role in down-regulation of expression levels of partial OMP antigens during infection.

  14. Temporal expression profiling identifies pathways mediating effect of causal variant on phenotype.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saumya Gupta

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Even with identification of multiple causal genetic variants for common human diseases, understanding the molecular processes mediating the causal variants' effect on the disease remains a challenge. This understanding is crucial for the development of therapeutic strategies to prevent and treat disease. While static profiling of gene expression is primarily used to get insights into the biological bases of diseases, it makes differentiating the causative from the correlative effects difficult, as the dynamics of the underlying biological processes are not monitored. Using yeast as a model, we studied genome-wide gene expression dynamics in the presence of a causal variant as the sole genetic determinant, and performed allele-specific functional validation to delineate the causal effects of the genetic variant on the phenotype. Here, we characterized the precise genetic effects of a functional MKT1 allelic variant in sporulation efficiency variation. A mathematical model describing meiotic landmark events and conditional activation of MKT1 expression during sporulation specified an early meiotic role of this variant. By analyzing the early meiotic genome-wide transcriptional response, we demonstrate an MKT1-dependent role of novel modulators, namely, RTG1/3, regulators of mitochondrial retrograde signaling, and DAL82, regulator of nitrogen starvation, in additively effecting sporulation efficiency. In the presence of functional MKT1 allele, better respiration during early sporulation was observed, which was dependent on the mitochondrial retrograde regulator, RTG3. Furthermore, our approach showed that MKT1 contributes to sporulation independent of Puf3, an RNA-binding protein that steady-state transcription profiling studies have suggested to mediate MKT1-pleiotropic effects during mitotic growth. These results uncover interesting regulatory links between meiosis and mitochondrial retrograde signaling. In this study, we highlight the advantage

  15. New unstable variants of green fluorescent protein for studies of transient gene expression in bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jens Bo; Sternberg, Claus; Poulsen, Lars K.

    1998-01-01

    Use of the green fluorescent protein (Gfp) from the jellyfish Aequorea victoria ia is a powerful method for nondestructive in situ monitoring, since expression of green fluorescence does not require any substrate addition. To expand the use of Gfp as a reporter protein, new variants have been...... constructed by the addition of short peptide sequences to the C-terminal end of intact Gfp. This rendered the Gfp susceptible to the action of indigenous housekeeping proteases, resulting in protein variants with half-lives ranging from 40 min to a few hours when synthesized in Escherichia coli...

  16. Ectopic Expression of O Antigen in Bordetella pertussis by a Novel Genomic Integration System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishigaki, Keisuke; Shinzawa, Naoaki; Nishikawa, Sayaka; Suzuki, Koichiro; Fukui-Miyazaki, Aya; Horiguchi, Yasuhiko

    2018-01-01

    We describe a novel genome integration system that enables the introduction of DNA fragments as large as 50 kbp into the chromosomes of recipient bacteria. This system, named BPI, comprises a bacterial artificial chromosome vector and phage-derived gene integration machinery. We introduced the wbm locus of Bordetella bronchiseptica , which is required for O antigen biosynthesis, into the chromosome of B. pertussis , which intrinsically lacks O antigen, using the BPI system. After the introduction of the wbm locus, B. pertussis presented an additional substance in the lipooligosaccharide fraction that was specifically recognized by the anti- B. bronchiseptica antibody but not the anti- B. pertussis antibody, indicating that B. pertussis expressed O antigen corresponding to that of B. bronchiseptica . O antigen-expressing B. pertussis was less sensitive to the bactericidal effects of serum and polymyxin B than the isogenic parental strain. In addition, an in vivo competitive infection assay showed that O antigen-expressing B. pertussis dominantly colonized the mouse respiratory tract over the parental strain. These results indicate that the BPI system provides a means to alter the phenotypes of bacteria by introducing large exogenous DNA fragments. IMPORTANCE Some bacterial phenotypes emerge through the cooperative functions of a number of genes residing within a large genetic locus. To transfer the phenotype of one bacterium to another, a means to introduce the large genetic locus into the recipient bacterium is needed. Therefore, we developed a novel system by combining the advantages of a bacterial artificial chromosome vector and phage-derived gene integration machinery. In this study, we succeeded for the first time in introducing a gene locus involved in O antigen biosynthesis of Bordetella bronchiseptica into the chromosome of B. pertussis , which intrinsically lacks O antigen, and using this system we analyzed phenotypic alterations in the resultant

  17. Biological and clinical meaning of myeloid antigen expression in the acute lymphocytic leukemia in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marsan Suarez, Vianed; Sanchez Segura, Miriam; Socarras Ferrer, Bertha B; Valle Perez, Lazaro O del

    2009-01-01

    In 238 children presenting with acute lymphoid leukemia (ALL) authors studied the possible association between the myeloid antigens expression with determined biologic and clinic features at disease onset. The cellular immunophenotyping was performed by ultraimmunocytochemical method. From the total of diagnosed ALLs, the 21,8% were LLA-Mi+. There was a lymphadenopathies predominance (71,2%), splenomegaly (65,4%) and hepatomegaly (57,7%) in patients with LLA-Mi+ and very significant differences (p =0,003, p = 0,0068, and p = 0,000, respectively. There was also alight predominance of mediastinum adenopathies, CNS infiltration and hemorrahagic manifestations in patients with LLA-Mi+, no statistically significant. Results showed that in our patients the myeloid antigen expression on the lymphoid blasts influenced on appearance of determined presentation of morphologic and clinical features in children

  18. Synthesis and expression of CDw75 antigen in human colorectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costa-Nogueira, Clotilde; Villar-Portela, Susana; Cuevas, Elisa; Gil-Martín, Emilio; Fernández-Briera, Almudena

    2009-01-01

    Increased ST6Gal I activity has been associated with the α(2,6)sialylation enhancement of membrane glycoconjugates observed in metastatic colorectal carcinomas (CRC). Siaα(2,6)Galβ(1,4)GlcNAc sequence, known as CDw75, is a sialylated carbohydrate determinant generated by the ST6Gal I. This epitope has been reported to be associated with the progression of gastric and colorectal tumours, hence there are only a few conclusive studies to date. By radioisotopic techniques we evaluated the ST6Gal I activity in healthy, transitional and tumour tissues from 43 patients with CRC. By immunohistochemistry we assessed the CDw75 expression in 25 colorectal adenomas, 43 tumours, 13 transitional and 28 healthy tissues of CRC patients. ST6Gal I activity was likewise found to be statistically higher in tumour tissue respect to healthy tissue from CRC patients. CDw75 expression was positive in 20% of colorectal adenomas. Furthermore, 70% of tumour specimens and 8.3% of transitional specimens were positive for CDw75 expression, whereas none of the healthy ones showed the presence of the epitope. The major contribution of this study is the inclusion of data from transitional tissue and the analysis of CDw75 antigen expression in CRC and in colorectal adenomas, little known so far. ST6Gal I activity and CDw75 antigen expression were increased in CRC. Although their comparison did not reach the statistical significance, a great extent of patients showed both, an enhanced tumour ST6Gal I activity and an increased CDw75 expression in the tumour tissue. So, these two variables may play a role in malignant transformation. The expression of CDw75 in colorectal adenomas suggests that this antigen may be a tumour marker in CRC

  19. Human leukocyte antigen-G polymorphism in relation to expression, function, and disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Margit Hørup; Hviid, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    Human leukocyte antigen-G (HLA-G) is a nonclassical class Ib molecule belonging to the major histocompatibility complex. HLA-G appears to play a role in the suppression of immune responses and contribute to long-term immune escape or tolerance. The focus of this review is polymorphism in the HLA......-G gene and protein and its possible importance in expression, function, and disease associations....

  20. Association of Cytotoxic T-Lymphocyte Antigen 4 (CTLA4) and Thyroglobulin (TG) Genetic Variants with Autoimmune Hypothyroidism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Hinal; Mansuri, Mohmmad Shoab; Singh, Mala; Begum, Rasheedunnisa; Shastri, Minal; Misra, Ambikanandan

    2016-01-01

    Autoimmune hypothyroidism is known to be caused by immune responses related to the thyroid gland and its immunological feature includes presence of autoimmune antibodies. Therefore the aim was to analyze presence of anti-TPO antibodies in hypothyroidism patients in Gujarat. Cytotoxic T-Lymphocyte Antigen 4 (CTLA4) is one of the susceptibility genes for various autoimmune diseases. Hence, exon1 +49A/G and 3’UTR CT60A/G single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in CTLA4 and its mRNA expression levels were investigated in autoimmune hypothyroidism patients. Thyroglobulin (TG) is known to be associated with autoimmune thyroid disorders and thus exon 33 (E33) SNP in TG was investigated. We analyzed the presence of anti-TPO antibodies in the plasma samples of 84 hypothyroidism patients and 62 controls by ELISA. PCR-RFLP technique was used for genotyping of polymorphisms. sCTLA4 and flCTLA4 mRNA expression levels were assessed by real time PCR. 59.52% of hypothyroid patients had anti-TPO antibodies in their circulation. The genotype and allele frequencies differed significantly for +49A/G (p = 0.0004 for +49AG, p = 0.0019 for +49GG & p = 0.0004 for allele), CT60 (p = 0.0110 for CT60AG, p = 0.0005 for CT60GG & phypothyroidism when adjusted for age and gender. Our results suggest +49A/G and CT60 polymorphism of CTLA4 and E33 polymorphism of TG may be genetic risk factors for autoimmune hypothyroidism susceptibility and down regulation of both forms of CTLA4 advocates the crucial role of CTLA4 in pathogenesis of autoimmune hypothyroidism. PMID:26963610

  1. Innate immune activity conditions the effect of regulatory variants upon monocyte gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fairfax, Benjamin P; Humburg, Peter; Makino, Seiko; Naranbhai, Vivek; Wong, Daniel; Lau, Evelyn; Jostins, Luke; Plant, Katharine; Andrews, Robert; McGee, Chris; Knight, Julian C

    2014-03-07

    To systematically investigate the impact of immune stimulation upon regulatory variant activity, we exposed primary monocytes from 432 healthy Europeans to interferon-γ (IFN-γ) or differing durations of lipopolysaccharide and mapped expression quantitative trait loci (eQTLs). More than half of cis-eQTLs identified, involving hundreds of genes and associated pathways, are detected specifically in stimulated monocytes. Induced innate immune activity reveals multiple master regulatory trans-eQTLs including the major histocompatibility complex (MHC), coding variants altering enzyme and receptor function, an IFN-β cytokine network showing temporal specificity, and an interferon regulatory factor 2 (IRF2) transcription factor-modulated network. Induced eQTL are significantly enriched for genome-wide association study loci, identifying context-specific associations to putative causal genes including CARD9, ATM, and IRF8. Thus, applying pathophysiologically relevant immune stimuli assists resolution of functional genetic variants.

  2. [Cloning expression and serological evaluation on Mycobacterium tuberculosis four new antigens].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Q; Li, S J; Xiao, T Y; Li, M C; Liu, H C; Lou, Y L; Wan, K L

    2018-04-10

    Objective: To evaluate the serological diagnostic value of Mycobacterium (M.) tuberculosis four new antigens Rv0432, Rv0674, Rv1566c and Rv1547. Methods: Rv0432, Rv0674, Rv1566c and Rv1547 were amplified from M. tuberculosis strain H37Rv genomic DNA by using PCR, among which Rv1547 was divided into two segments for amplification ( Rv1547-1 and Rv1547-2 ). The segments were cloned into expression vector PET-32a while the recombinant proteins were purified by affinity chromatography. Serums were incubated with BL21 (DE3) proteins. Antibodies IgG against M. tuberculosis were tested with 151 serum samples (41 healthy people and 110 TB patients) by using ELISA. The diagnostic efficiency of antigens was analyzed by means of receiver operating characteristic curve. Difference of the objective proteins in TB patients and healthy controls was compared by t -test. Results: Recombinant antigens Rv0432, Rv0674, Rv1566c, Rv1547-1 and Rv1547-2 were successfully expressed and purified. Results from ELISA showed that the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value, Youden index and area under the curve of Rv0432, Rv0674, Rv1566c, Rv1547-1 and Rv1547-2, as 43.64%-92.73%, 80.49%-92.68%, 0.92-0.94, 0.38-0.80, 0.363-0.732 and 0.649-0.915. All the objective proteins showed significantly higher antibody levels in TB patients, when compared to the healthy controls ( P <0.000 1). Conclusion: The newly identified antigens Rv0432, Rv0674, Rv1566c, Rv1547-1 and Rv1547-2 all performed well when being used for TB serological diagnosis, thus were expected to be new candidate antigens used for TB diagnosis.

  3. [Expression, purification and protective antigen analysis of cell wall protein MRP of Streptococcus suis type 2].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ping-ping; Pian, Ya-ya; Yuan, Yuan; Zheng, Yu-ling; Jiang, Yong-qiang; Xiong, Zheng-ying

    2012-02-01

    To amplify the mrp gene of Streptococcus suis type 2 05ZYH33, express it in E.coli BL21 in order to acquire high purity recombinant protein MRP, then evaluate the protective antigen of recombinant protein MRP. Using PCR technology to obtain the product of mrp gene of 05ZYH33, and then cloned it into the expression vector pET28a(+). The recombinant protein was purified by affinity chromatography, later immunized New Zealand rabbit to gain anti-serum, then test the anti-serum titer by ELISA. The opsonophagocytic killing test demonstrated the abilities of protective antigen of MRP. The truncated of MRP recombinant protein in E.coli BL21 expressed by inclusion bodies, and purified it in high purity. After immunoprotection, the survival condition of CD-1 was significantly elevated. The survival rate of wild-type strain 05ZYH33 in blood was apparently decreased after anti-serum opsonophagocyticed, but the mutant delta; MRP showed no differences. MRP represent an important protective antigen activity.

  4. Effect of radiation on the expression of tumor-associated antigens of human lung adenocarcinoma cells. Immunological study using monoclonal antibodies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hareyama, Masato

    1988-12-01

    We studied the effects of irradiation on the expression of a tumor-associated antigen (YH206 antigen) of cultured human lung adenocarcinoma A549 cells by using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and flow cytometry. YH206 antigen is preferentially expressed on adenocarcinoma cells. Irradiation of A549 cells remarkably increased the expression of YH206 antigen on the cell surface and the level of the antigen in the culture supernatant as well as in the cell lysate, whereas it significantly affected the expression of HLA (MHC-class I) antigen on the same cells. The expression of HLA antigen on the cell was also increased after treatment of the cells with interferon-..gamma... In an additional experiment, cells were stained simultaneously for surface antigens (fluorescein coupled antibodies) and for DNA content (propidium iodide), and then dual parameter measurements were performed by flow cytometry to analyse the relationship between antigen levels and the cell cycle. YH206 antigen and HLA antigen increased more in the S and G/sub 2//M phases of the cell cycle than in G/sub 0//G/sub 1/. The expression of YH206 antigen was enhanced in the S and G/sub 2//M phases by irradiation, whereas the expression of HLA antigen was enhanced in each phase of the cell cycle with irradiation or IFN. These results suggest that irradiation plays a key role in the change of the expression of certain tumor-associated antigens.

  5. Molecular characterisation and expression analysis of SEREX-defined antigen NUCB2 in gastric epithelium, gastritis and gastric cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Line

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available NUCB2 is an EF-hand Ca2+ binding protein that has been implicated in various physiological processes like calcium homeostasis, hypothalamic regulation of feeding and TNF receptor shedding. In our previous study we identified NUCB2 as a potential tumour antigen eliciting autoantibody responses in 5.4% of gastric cancer patients but not in the healthy individuals. The current study aimed to elucidate the molecular mechanism underlying NUCB2 immunogenicity and to gain an insight into the physiological functions of NUCB2 in the stomach. mRNA expression analysis demonstrated that NUCB2 is ubiquitously expressed in normal tissues, including lymphoid tissues, and downregulated in gastric tumours when compared with the adjacent relatively normal stomach tissues. The search for molecular alterations resulted in the identification of novel mRNA variants transcribed from an alternative promoter and expressed predominantly in gastric cancers. Western blot analysis demonstrated that the protein levels correspond to mRNA levels and revealed that NUCB2 is phosphorylated in gastric mucosa. Furthermore, a 55 kDa isoform, generated presumably by yet an unidentified post-translational modification was detected in gastric tumours and AGS gastric cancer cells but was absent in the relatively normal gastric mucosa and thereby might have served as a trigger for the immune response against NUCB2. Staining of stomach tissue microarray with anti-NUCB2 antibody revealed that it is expressed in the secretory granules of chief cells and in the cytoplasm of parietal cells in the functioning gastric glands which are lost in atrophic glands and tumour cells. Hence we propose that NUCB2 may be implicated in gastric secretion by establishing an agonist-releasable Ca2+ store in ER or Golgi apparatus, signalling via heterotrimeric Ga proteins and/or mediating the exocytosis of the secretory granules.

  6. Molecular characterisation and expression analysis of SEREX-defined antigen NUCB2 in gastric epithelium, gastritis and gastric cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z Kalnina

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available NUCB2 is an EF-hand Ca2+ binding protein that has been implicated in various physiological processes like calcium homeostasis, hypothalamic regulation of feeding and TNF receptor shedding. In our previous study we identified NUCB2 as a potential tumour antigen eliciting autoantibody responses in 5.4% of gastric cancer patients but not in the healthy individuals. The current study aimed to elucidate the molecular mechanism underlying NUCB2 immunogenicity and to gain an insight into the physiological functions of NUCB2 in the stomach. mRNA expression analysis demonstrated that NUCB2 is ubiquitously expressed in normal tissues, including lymphoid tissues, and downregulated in gastric tumours when compared with the adjacent relatively normal stomach tissues. The search for molecular alterations resulted in the identification of novel mRNA variants transcribed from an alternative promoter and expressed predominantly in gastric cancers. Western blot analysis demonstrated that the protein levels correspond to mRNA levels and revealed that NUCB2 is phosphorylated in gastric mucosa. Furthermore, a 55 kDa isoform, generated presumably by yet an unidentified post-translational modification was detected in gastric tumours and AGS gastric cancer cells but was absent in the relatively normal gastric mucosa and thereby might have served as a trigger for the immune response against NUCB2. Staining of stomach tissue microarray with anti-NUCB2 antibody revealed that it is expressed in the secretory granules of chief cells and in the cytoplasm of parietal cells in the functioning gastric glands which are lost in atrophic glands and tumour cells. Hence we propose that NUCB2 may be implicated in gastric secretion by establishing an agonist-releasable Ca2+ store in ER or Golgi apparatus, signalling via heterotrimeric Ga proteins and/or mediating the exocytosis of the secretory granules.

  7. Breaking tolerance in hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) transgenic mice by vaccination with cross-reactive, natural HBsAg variants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schirmbeck, Reinhold; Dikopoulos, Nektarios; Kwissa, Marcin

    2003-01-01

    Processing exogenous hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) of the hepatitis B virus (HBV) generates the K(b)-binding S(208-215) epitope 1; processing endogenous HBsAg generates the K(b)-binding S(190-197) epitope 2. Cross-reactive CD8(+) T cell responses were primed to epitope 1 but not epitope 2...... HBs-tg mice showed reduced antigenemia. Hence, vaccination with natural HBsAg variants from different HBV sero/genotypes can prime cross-reactive, specific CD8(+) T cell immunity that breaks tolerance to HBsAg....

  8. Insecticide-treated bed nets reduce plasma antibody levels and limit the repertoire of antibodies to Plasmodium falciparum variant surface antigens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Askjaer, N; Maxwell, C; Chambo, W

    2001-01-01

    The use of insecticide-treated bed nets (ITN) has been documented to reduce malaria morbidity and mortality in areas with endemic malaria, but concerns have been raised that ITN usage could affect the acquisition of malaria immunity. Several lines of evidence have indicated that antibodies against...... variant surface antigens (VSA) are important in the development of naturally acquired immunity to Plasmodium falciparum malaria and may thus be good indicators of immune status. We have compared the levels of VSA antibodies in plasma from children who have used ITN for 4 years to levels in plasma from...

  9. Fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography scan may be helpful in the case of ductal variant prostate cancer when prostate specific membrane antigen ligand positron emission tomography scan is negative

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McEwan, Louise M.; Wong, David; Yaxley, John

    2017-01-01

    Gallium-68 prostate specific membrane antigen ligand (Ga-68 PSMA) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) scanning is emerging as a useful imaging modality for the staging of suspected and known recurrent or metastatic prostate cancer and in staging of newly diagnosed higher grade prostate cancer. However, we have observed at our institution that in some cases of the more aggressive ductal variant, Ga-68 PSMA uptake has sometimes been poor compared with prominent 18-fluorodeoxyglucose (F-18 FDG) avidity seen in F-18 FDG PET/CT, which would suggest that FDG PET/CT scans are important in staging of ductal pattern prostate cancer.

  10. Vascular expression of endothelial antigen PAL-E indicates absence of blood-ocular barriers in the normal eye

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schlingemann, R. O.; Hofman, P.; Anderson, L.; Troost, D.; van der Gaag, R.

    1997-01-01

    The endothelium-specific antigen PAL-E is expressed in capillaries and veins throughout the body with the exception of the brain, where the antigen is absent from anatomical sites with a patent blood-brain barrier. In this study we determined vascular endothelial staining for PAL-E in the normal eye

  11. Identification of Differentially Expressed K-Ras Transcript Variants in Patients With Leiomyoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zolfaghari, Nooshin; Shahbazi, Shirin; Torfeh, Mahnaz; Khorasani, Maryam; Hashemi, Mehrdad; Mahdian, Reza

    2017-10-01

    Molecular studies have demonstrated a wide range of gene expression variations in uterine leiomyoma. The rat sarcoma virus/rapidly accelerated fibrosarcoma/mitogen-activated protein kinase (RAS/RAF/MAPK) is the crucial cellular pathway in transmitting external signals into nucleus. Deregulation of this pathway contributes to excessive cell proliferation and tumorigenesis. The present study aims to investigate the expression profile of the K-Ras transcripts in tissue samples from patients with leiomyoma. The patients were leiomyoma cases who had no mutation in mediator complex subunit 12 ( MED12) gene. A quantitative approach has been applied to determine the difference in the expression of the 2 main K-Ras messenger RNA (mRNA) variants. The comparison between gene expression levels in leiomyoma and normal myometrium group was performed using relative expression software tool. The expression of K-Ras4B gene was upregulated in leiomyoma group ( P = .016), suggesting the involvement of K-Ras4B in the disease pathogenesis. Pairwise comparison of the K-Ras4B expression between each leiomyoma tissue and its matched adjacent normal myometrium revealed gene upregulation in 68% of the cases. The expression of K-Ras4A mRNA was relatively upregulated in leiomyoma group ( P = .030). In addition, the mean expression of K-Ras4A gene in leiomyoma tissues relative to normal samples was 4.475 (95% confidence interval: 0.10-20.42; standard error: 0.53-12.67). In total, 58% of the cases showed more than 2-fold increase in K-Ras4A gene expression. Our results demonstrated increased expression of both K-Ras mRNA splicing variants in leiomyoma tissue. However, the ultimate result of KRAS expression on leiomyoma development depends on the overall KRAS isoform balance and, consequently, on activated signaling pathways.

  12. Lack of ADAM2, CALR3 and SAGE1 Cancer/Testis Antigen Expression in Lung and Breast Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maheswaran, Emeaga; Pedersen, Christina B; Ditzel, Henrik J

    2015-01-01

    and antigenic properties, but the expression patterns of most of the more than 200 identified cancer/testis antigens in various cancers remain largely uncharacterized. In this study, we investigated the expression of the cancer/testis antigens ADAM2, CALR3 and SAGE1 in lung and breast cancer, the two most...... frequent human cancers, with the purpose of providing novel therapeutic targets for these diseases. We used a set of previously uncharacterized antibodies against the cancer/testis antigens ADAM2, CALR3 and SAGE1 to investigate their expression in a large panel of normal tissues as well as breast and lung...... cancers. Staining for the well-characterized MAGE-A proteins was included for comparison. Immunohistochemical staining confirmed previous mRNA analysis demonstrating that ADAM2, CALR3 and SAGE1 proteins are confined to testis in normal individuals. Negative tissues included plancenta, which express many...

  13. Adoptitive immunotherapy with genetically engineered T lymphocytes modified to express chimeric antigen receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. А. Pavlova

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Significant mortality due to oncological diseases as a whole, and oncohematological diseases in particular, motivates scientific and medical community to develop new treatment methods. One of the newest methods is adoptive cell therapy using patient’s own T-cells modified to express chimeric antigen receptors (CAR to tumor-specific antigens. Despite high cost and side effects of treatment, promising clinical trials even in patients with advanced disease allow to anticipate successful use of this method in clinical practice.The article includes a review of the main principles of this technique, published results of clinical studies of CAR T-cells with a focus on CD19 gene targeting, complications of this therapy, mechanisms of tumor resistance to CAR T-cells, and potential ways to overcome it.

  14. In vitro stimulation of rabbit T lymphocytes by cells expressing herpes simplex antigens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapoor, A K; Ling, N R; Nash, A A; Bachan, A; Wildy, P

    1982-04-01

    Lymphocyte stimulation responses to herpes antigens were studied using virus-infected X-irradiated cells. Rabbits were immunized with herpes simplex virus type 1 (strain HFEM) grown in RK 13 cells. For in vitro stimulation assay BHK21 cells were X-irradiated (15 000 rad) and infected with a high m.o.i. of a temperature-sensitive (ts) mutant (N102) of HFEM strain at the non-permissive temperature (38.5 degrees C) of virus. Virus antigens were expressed on the infected cells and there was no leakage of infectious virus into the medium at 38.5 degrees C. T lymphocytes from rabbits immunized with herpes simplex virus were specifically activated by herpesvirus-infected X-irradiated cells; lymph node cells from rabbits immunized with RK13 cells and from non-immune rabbits showed no proliferative response.

  15. Stabilization of Transfected Cells Expressing Low-Incidence Blood Group Antigens: Novel Methods Facilitating Their Use as Reagent-Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cecilia González

    Full Text Available The identification of erythrocyte antibodies in the serum of patients rely on panels of human red blood cells (RBCs, which coexpress many antigens and are not easily available for low-incidence blood group phenotypes. These problems have been addressed by generating cell lines expressing unique blood group antigens, which may be used as an alternative to human RBCs. However, the use of cell lines implies several drawbacks, like the requirement of cell culture facilities and the high cost of cryopreservation. The application of cell stabilization methods could facilitate their use as reagent cells in clinical laboratories.We generated stably-transfected cells expressing low-incidence blood group antigens (Dia and Lua. High-expresser clones were used to assess the effect of TransFix® treatment and lyophilization as cell preservation methods. Cells were kept at 4°C and cell morphology, membrane permeability and antigenic properties were evaluated at several time-points after treatment.TransFix® addition to cell suspensions allows cell stabilization and proper antigen detection for at least 120 days, despite an increase in membrane permeability and a reduction in antigen expression levels. Lyophilized cells showed minor morphological changes and antigen expression levels were rather conserved at days 1, 15 and 120, indicating a high stability of the freeze-dried product. These stabilized cells have been proved to react specifically with human sera containing alloantibodies.Both stabilization methods allow long-term preservation of the transfected cells antigenic properties and may facilitate their distribution and use as reagent-cells expressing low-incidence antigens, overcoming the limited availability of such rare RBCs.

  16. Enhanced expression of codon optimized Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis antigens in Lactobacillus salivarius.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Christopher D; Bannantine, John P; Govender, Rodney; Endersen, Lorraine; Pletzer, Daniel; Weingart, Helge; Coffey, Aidan; O'Mahony, Jim; Sleator, Roy D

    2014-01-01

    It is well documented that open reading frames containing high GC content show poor expression in A+T rich hosts. Specifically, G+C-rich codon usage is a limiting factor in heterologous expression of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) proteins using Lactobacillus salivarius. However, re-engineering opening reading frames through synonymous substitutions can offset codon bias and greatly enhance MAP protein production in this host. In this report, we demonstrate that codon-usage manipulation of MAP2121c can enhance the heterologous expression of the major membrane protein (MMP), analogous to the form in which it is produced natively by MAP bacilli. When heterologously over-expressed, antigenic determinants were preserved in synthetic MMP proteins as shown by monoclonal antibody mediated ELISA. Moreover, MMP is a membrane protein in MAP, which is also targeted to the cellular surface of recombinant L. salivarius at levels comparable to MAP. Additionally, we previously engineered MAP3733c (encoding MptD) and show herein that MptD displays the tendency to associate with the cytoplasmic membrane boundary under confocal microscopy and the intracellularly accumulated protein selectively adheres to the MptD-specific bacteriophage fMptD. This work demonstrates there is potential for L. salivarius as a viable antigen delivery vehicle for MAP, which may provide an effective mucosal vaccine against Johne's disease.

  17. Infrequent Expression of the Cancer-Testis Antigen, PASD1, in Ovarian Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghazala Khan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Ovarian cancer is very treatable in the early stages of disease; however, it is usually detected in the later stages, at which time, treatment is no longer as effective. If discovered early (Stage I, there is a 90% chance of five-year survival. Therefore, it is imperative that early-stage biomarkers are identified to enhance the early detection of ovarian cancer. Cancer-testis antigens (CTAs, such as Per ARNT SIM (PAS domain containing 1 (PASD1, are unique in that their expression is restricted to immunologically restricted sites, such as the testis and placenta, which do not express MHC class I, and cancer, making them ideally positioned to act as targets for immunotherapy as well as potential biomarkers for cancer detection where expressed. We examined the expression of PASD1a and b in a number of cell lines, as well as eight healthy ovary samples, eight normal adjacent ovarian tissues, and 191 ovarian cancer tissues, which were predominantly stage I ( n = 164 and stage II ( n = 14 disease. We found that despite the positive staining of skin cancer, only one stage Ic ovarian cancer patient tissue expressed PASD1a and b at detectable levels. This may reflect the predominantly stage I ovarian cancer samples examined. To examine the restriction of PASD1 expression, we examined endometrial tissue arrays and found no expression in 30 malignant tumor tissues, 23 cases of hyperplasia, or 16 normal endometrial tissues. Our study suggests that the search for a single cancer-testes antigen/biomarker that can detect early ovarian cancer must continue.

  18. Expression of the Gastrin-Releasing Peptide Receptor, the Prostate Stem Cell Antigen and the Prostate-Specific Membrane Antigen in Lymph Node and Bone Metastases of Prostate Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ananias, Hildo J. K.; van den Heuvel, Marius C.; Helfrich, Wijnand; de Jong, Igle J.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE. Cell membrane antigens like the gastrin-releasing peptide receptor (GRPR), the prostate stem cell antigen (PSCA), and the prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA), expressed in prostate cancer, are attractive targets for new therapeutic and diagnostic applications. Therefore, we

  19. Genetic variants alter T-bet binding and gene expression in mucosal inflammatory disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katrina Soderquest

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The polarization of CD4+ T cells into distinct T helper cell lineages is essential for protective immunity against infection, but aberrant T cell polarization can cause autoimmunity. The transcription factor T-bet (TBX21 specifies the Th1 lineage and represses alternative T cell fates. Genome-wide association studies have identified single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs that may be causative for autoimmune diseases. The majority of these polymorphisms are located within non-coding distal regulatory elements. It is considered that these genetic variants contribute to disease by altering the binding of regulatory proteins and thus gene expression, but whether these variants alter the binding of lineage-specifying transcription factors has not been determined. Here, we show that SNPs associated with the mucosal inflammatory diseases Crohn's disease, ulcerative colitis (UC and celiac disease, but not rheumatoid arthritis or psoriasis, are enriched at T-bet binding sites. Furthermore, we identify disease-associated variants that alter T-bet binding in vitro and in vivo. ChIP-seq for T-bet in individuals heterozygous for the celiac disease-associated SNPs rs1465321 and rs2058622 and the IBD-associated SNPs rs1551398 and rs1551399, reveals decreased binding to the minor disease-associated alleles. Furthermore, we show that rs1465321 is an expression quantitative trait locus (eQTL for the neighboring gene IL18RAP, with decreased T-bet binding associated with decreased expression of this gene. These results suggest that genetic polymorphisms may predispose individuals to mucosal autoimmune disease through alterations in T-bet binding. Other disease-associated variants may similarly act by modulating the binding of lineage-specifying transcription factors in a tissue-selective and disease-specific manner.

  20. Nuclear antigen expression by ultraviolet light irradiation - a contribution to the UV-induced autoimmunity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wollina, U

    1986-05-01

    A review is given of nuclear antigen expression due to UVB, UVA, and PUVA. UVB alters DNA resulting in strong immunogenic UVDNA and complementary antibodies. Antibodies to UVDNA cross react with double-stranded DNA. UVDNA plays a (hypothetical) role in the induction of cutaneous lesions in lupus erythematosus (LE). Investigations of SS-A/Ro expression due to UVB seem to be more important under this view. Antibodies against SS-A/Ro are related to an increased photosensitivity in LE. PUVA and UVA are able to induce antinuclear antibodies of unknown specificity. It is likely that PUVA enhances SS-A/Ro expression in vitro. The results are discussed in sense of LE photobiology and unwanted side effects of photo(chemo)therapy in psoriasis. 54 references.

  1. Expression of ras oncogene and major histocompatibility complex (MHC) antigen in carcinomas of the uterine cervix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Kyung Ja; Jang, Ja June; Kim, Yong Dae; Ha, Chang Won; Koh, Jae Soo

    1993-01-01

    Consecutive 50 cases of squamous cell carcinomas of the uterine cervix diagnosed in 1992 were subjected to immunohistochemical study for ras oncogene product (p21) and MHC class II (DR) antigen using a microprobe immunostainer. Activated ras and aberrant DR expression were noted in 26 cases (52%) and 11 cases (22%) of cervical squamous cell carcinomas, respectively, without difference among histologic types. The reaction was mainly intracytoplasmic, with granular staining pattern and diffuse distribution. No direct histologic correlation between ras and DR expression was found. Four cases with HPV 16/18 DNA in superficial koilocytotic cells, revealed by in situ hybridization, showed various expression of ras and DR, and these 3 factors histologically did not seem to be affected one another. (Author)

  2. Nuclear antigen expression by ultraviolet light irradiation - a contribution to the UV-induced autoimmunity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wollina, U.

    1986-01-01

    A review is given about nuclear antigen expression due to UVB, UVA, and PUVA. UVB alters DNA resulting in strong immunogenic UVDNA and complementary antibodies. Antibodies to UVDNA cross react with double-stranded DNA. UVDNA plays a (hypothetical) role in the induction of cutaneous lesions in lupus erythematosus (LE). Investigations about SS-A/Ro expression due to UVB seem to be more important under this view. Antibodies against SS-A/Ro are related to an increased photosensitivity in LE. PUVA and UVA are able to induce antinuclear antibodies of unknown specificity. It is likely that PUVA enhances SS-A/Ro expression in vitro. The results are discussed in sense of LE photobiology and unwanted side effects of photo(chemo)therapy in psoriasis. (author)

  3. Rh antigen expression during erythropoeisis: Comparison of cord and adult derived CD34 + cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gupta Namita

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Concentrations of O 2 and CO 2 in the fetal circulation differ to that in maternal blood. Previous studies done in algae demonstrate the functional role of Rh antigen as CO 2 transporter. As a preliminary study, it was the aim of this project to compare the expression of Rh polypeptides on cord and adult red blood cell progenitors during ex vivo proliferation and differentiation of CD34 + cells during erythropoeisis. Materials and Methods: CD34 positive hematopoeitic progenitor cells were isolated from umbilical cord blood and adult peripheral blood using an immunomagnetic system and cultured in serum free medium containing erythropoietin in order to compel them along the erythroid lineage. Cultured cells were analyzed for cell surface marker expression by flow cytometry, using monoclonal antibodies to RhAG, Glycophorin A, Rh polypeptides, CD47 and Band 3. Cytospin analysis was also done to study the morphology of cultured cells. Results: The appearance of cell surface markers analyzed on different days of culture varied slightly between samples. There was no evidence to suggest that RhAG, GPA, CD47 and Band 3 expression was any different between adult and cord derived cells. Nevertheless, the results of Rh antigenic expression suggest a reasonable difference between the two groups with adult sample derived cells showing higher and earlier expression than cord blood derived cells. These preliminary findings require further investigation. Conclusion: Comparing the expression of cell surface markers especially Rh polypeptides between adult and cord blood derived erythroid progenitors might assist in discerning their functions and could be valuable in the study of erythropoeisis.

  4. Analysis of a cDNA clone expressing a human autoimmune antigen: full-length sequence of the U2 small nuclear RNA-associated B antigen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Habets, W.J.; Sillekens, P.T.G.; Hoet, M.H.; Schalken, J.A.; Roebroek, A.J.M.; Leunissen, J.A.M.; Van de Ven, W.J.M.; Van Venrooij, W.J.

    1987-01-01

    A U2 small nuclear RNA-associated protein, designated B'', was recently identified as the target antigen for autoimmune sera from certain patients with systemic lupus erythematosus and other rheumatic diseases. Such antibodies enabled them to isolate cDNA clone λHB''-1 from a phage λgt11 expression library. This clone appeared to code for the B'' protein as established by in vitro translation of hybrid-selected mRNA. The identity of clone λHB''-1 was further confirmed by partial peptide mapping and analysis of the reactivity of the recombinant antigen with monospecific and monoclonal antibodies. Analysis of the nucleotide sequence of the 1015-base-pair cDNA insert of clone λHB''-1 revealed a large open reading frame of 800 nucleotides containing the coding sequence for a polypeptide of 25,457 daltons. In vitro transcription of the λHB''-1 cDNA insert and subsequent translation resulted in a protein product with the molecular size of the B'' protein. These data demonstrate that clone λHB''-1 contains the complete coding sequence of this antigen. The deduced polypeptide sequence contains three very hydrophilic regions that might constitute RNA binding sites and/or antigenic determinants. These findings might have implications both for the understanding of the pathogenesis of rheumatic diseases as well as for the elucidation of the biological function of autoimmune antigens

  5. Placenta-specific novel splice variants of Rho GDP dissociation inhibitor β are highly expressed in cancerous cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hatakeyama Keiichi

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Alternative splicing of pre-mRNA transcripts not only plays a role in normal molecular processes but is also associated with cancer development. While normal transcripts are ubiquitously expressed in normal tissues, splice variants created through abnormal alternative splicing events are often expressed in cancer cells. Although the Rho GDP dissociation inhibitor β (ARHGDIB gene has been found to be ubiquitously expressed in normal tissues and involved in cancer development, the presence of splice variants of ARHGDIB has not yet been investigated. Results Validation analysis for the presence of and exon structures of splice variants of ARHGDIB, performed using reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction and DNA sequencing, successfully identified novel splice variants of ARHGDIB, that is, 6a, 6b, and 6c, in colon, pancreas, stomach, and breast cancer cell lines. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis showed that these variants were also highly expressed in normal placental tissue but not in other types of normal tissue. Conclusions Expression of ARHGDIB variants 6a, 6b, and 6c appears to be restricted to cancer cells and normal placental tissue, suggesting that these variants possess cancer-specific functions and, as such, are potential cancer-related biomarkers.

  6. Habenular expression of rare missense variants of the β4 nicotinic receptor subunit alters nicotine consumption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta A Ślimak

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The CHRNA5-CHRNA3-CHRNB4 gene cluster, encoding the α5, α3 and β4 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR subunits, has been linked to nicotine dependence. The habenulo-interpeduncular (Hb-IPN tract is particularly enriched in α3β4 nAChRs. We recently showed that modulation of these receptors in the medial habenula (MHb in mice altered nicotine consumption. Given that β4 is rate-limiting for receptor activity and that single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in CHRNB4 have been linked to altered risk of nicotine dependence in humans, we were interested in determining the contribution of allelic variants of β4 to nicotine receptor activity in the MHb. We screened for missense SNPs with allele frequencies > 0.0005 and introduced the corresponding substitutions in Chrnb4. Fourteen variants were analyzed by co-expression with α3. We found that β4A90I and β4T374I variants, previously shown to associate with reduced risk of smoking, and an additional variant β4D447Y, significantly increased nicotine-evoked current amplitudes, while β4R348C, the mutation most frequently encountered in sporadic amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (sALS, showed reduced nicotine currents. We employed lentiviruses to express β4 or β4 variants in the MHb. Immunoprecipitation studies confirmed that β4 lentiviral-mediated expression leads to specific upregulation of α3β4 but not β2 nAChRs in the Mhb. Mice injected with the β4-containing virus showed pronounced aversion to nicotine as previously observed in transgenic Tabac mice overexpressing Chrnb4 at endogenous sites including the MHb. Habenular expression of the β4 gain-of-function allele T374I also resulted in strong aversion, while transduction with the β4 loss-of function allele R348C failed to induce nicotine aversion. Altogether, these data confirm the critical role of habenular β4 in nicotine consumption, and identify specific SNPs in CHRNB4 that modify nicotine-elicited currents and alter nicotine

  7. The androgen receptor controls expression of the cancer-associated sTn antigen and cell adhesion through induction of ST6GalNAc1 in prostate cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munkley, Jennifer; Oltean, Sebastian; Vodák, Daniel; Wilson, Brian T.; Livermore, Karen E.; Zhou, Yan; Star, Eleanor; Floros, Vasileios I.; Johannessen, Bjarne; Knight, Bridget; McCullagh, Paul; McGrath, John; Crundwell, Malcolm; Skotheim, Rolf I.; Robson, Craig N.; Leung, Hing Y.; Harries, Lorna W.; Rajan, Prabhakar; Mills, Ian G.; Elliott, David J.

    2015-01-01

    Patterns of glycosylation are important in cancer, but the molecular mechanisms that drive changes are often poorly understood. The androgen receptor drives prostate cancer (PCa) development and progression to lethal metastatic castration-resistant disease. Here we used RNA-Seq coupled with bioinformatic analyses of androgen-receptor (AR) binding sites and clinical PCa expression array data to identify ST6GalNAc1 as a direct and rapidly activated target gene of the AR in PCa cells. ST6GalNAc1 encodes a sialytransferase that catalyses formation of the cancer-associated sialyl-Tn antigen (sTn), which we find is also induced by androgen exposure. Androgens induce expression of a novel splice variant of the ST6GalNAc1 protein in PCa cells. This splice variant encodes a shorter protein isoform that is still fully functional as a sialyltransferase and able to induce expression of the sTn-antigen. Surprisingly, given its high expression in tumours, stable expression of ST6GalNAc1 in PCa cells reduced formation of stable tumours in mice, reduced cell adhesion and induced a switch towards a more mesenchymal-like cell phenotype in vitro. ST6GalNAc1 has a dynamic expression pattern in clinical datasets, being significantly up-regulated in primary prostate carcinoma but relatively down-regulated in established metastatic tissue. ST6GalNAc1 is frequently upregulated concurrently with another important glycosylation enzyme GCNT1 previously associated with prostate cancer progression and implicated in Sialyl Lewis X antigen synthesis. Together our data establishes an androgen-dependent mechanism for sTn antigen expression in PCa, and are consistent with a general role for the androgen receptor in driving important coordinate changes to the glycoproteome during PCa progression. PMID:26452038

  8. Microglial MHC antigen expression after ischemic and kainic acid lesions of the adult rat hippocampus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Finsen, B.R.; Jørgensen, Martin Balslev; Diemer, Nils Henrik

    1993-01-01

    Leukocyte common antigen, macrophages, blood-brain barrier, neural degeneration, fascia dentata, neuropathology......Leukocyte common antigen, macrophages, blood-brain barrier, neural degeneration, fascia dentata, neuropathology...

  9. Integrated analysis of genetic variation and gene expression reveals novel variant for increased warfarin dose requirement in African Americans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hernandez, W.; Gamazon, E. R.; Aquino-Michaels, K.; Smithberger, E.; O'Brien, T. J.; Harralson, A. F.; Tuck, M.; Barbour, A.; Cavallari, L. H.; Perera, M. A.

    2017-01-01

    Essentials Genetic variants controlling gene regulation have not been explored in pharmacogenomics. We tested liver expression quantitative trait loci for association with warfarin dose response. A novel predictor for increased warfarin dose response in African Americans was identified. Precision

  10. Affinity Maturation of an Anti-V Antigen IgG Expressed In Situ Via Adenovirus Gene Delivery Confers Enhanced Protection Against Yersinia pestis Challenge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Blarcom, Thomas J.; Sofer-Podesta, Carolina; Ang, John; Boyer, Julie L.; Crystal, Ronald G.; Georgiou, George

    2013-01-01

    Genetic transfer of neutralizing antibodies has been shown to confer strong and persistent protection against bacterial and viral infectious agents. While it is well established that for many exogenous neutralizing antibodies increased antigen affinity correlates with protection, the effect of antigen affinity on antibodies produced in situ following adenoviral gene transfer has not been examined. The mouse IgG2b monoclonal antibody 2C12.4 recognizes the Yersinia pestis Type III secretion apparatus protein LcrV (V antigen) and confers protection in mice when administered as an IgG intraperitoneally or, following genetic immunization with engineered, replication-defective serotype 5 human adenovirus (Ad) 1. 2C12.4 was expressed as a scFv fragment in E. coli and was shown to display a KD=3.5 nM by surface plasmon resonance (SPR) analysis. The 2C12.4 scFv was subjected to random mutagenesis and variants with increased affinity were isolated by flow cytometry using the Anchored Periplasmic Expression (APEx) bacterial display system. After a single round of mutagenesis, variants displaying up to 35-fold lower KD values (H8, KD=100 pM) were isolated. The variable domains of the H8 scFv were used to replace those of the parental 2C12.4 IgG encoded in the Ad vector, AdαV giving rise to AdαV.H8. The two adenoviral vectors resulted in similar titers of anti-V antigen antibodies 3 days post-immunization with 109, 1010 or 1011 particle units. Following intranasal challenge with 363 LD50Y. pestis CO92, 54% of the mice immunized with 1010 pu of AdαV.H8 survived at the 14 day end point compared to only 15% survivors for the group immunized with AdαV expressing the lower affinity 2C12.4 (Pgenetic transfer may confer increased protection not only for Y. pestis challenge but possibly for other pathogens. PMID:20393511

  11. CTNNB1, AXIN1 and APC expression analysis of different medulloblastoma variants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roseli da Silva

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: We investigated four components of the Wnt signaling pathway in medulloblastomas. Medulloblastoma is the most common type of malignant pediatric brain tumor, and the Wnt signaling pathway has been shown to be activated in this type of tumor. METHODS: Sixty-one medulloblastoma cases were analyzed for β-catenin gene (CTNNB1 mutations, β-catenin protein expression via immunostaining and Wnt signaling pathway-related gene expression. All data were correlated with histological subtypes and patient clinical information. RESULTS: CTNNB1 sequencing analysis revealed that 11 out of 61 medulloblastomas harbored missense mutations in residues 32, 33, 34 and 37, which are located in exon 3. These mutations alter the glycogen synthase kinase-3β phosphorylation sites, which participate in β-catenin degradation. No significant differences were observed between mutation status and histological medulloblastoma type, patient age and overall or progression-free survival times. Nuclear β-catenin accumulation, which was observed in 27.9% of the cases, was not associated with the histological type, CTNNB1 mutation status or tumor cell dissemination. The relative expression levels of genes that code for proteins involved in the Wnt signaling pathway (CTNNB1, APC, AXIN1 and WNT1 were also analyzed, but no significant correlations were found. In addition, large-cell variant medulloblastomas presented lower relative CTNNB1 expression as compared to the other tumor variants. CONCLUSIONS: A small subset of medulloblastomas carry CTNNB1 mutations with consequent nuclear accumulation of β-catenin. The Wnt signaling pathway plays a role in classic, desmoplastic and extensive nodularity medulloblastoma variants but not in large-cell medulloblastomas.

  12. Plant-expressed cocaine hydrolase variants of butyrylcholinesterase exhibit altered allosteric effects of cholinesterase activity and increased inhibitor sensitivity

    OpenAIRE

    Larrimore, Katherine E.; Kazan, I. Can; Kannan, Latha; Kendle, R. Player; Jamal, Tameem; Barcus, Matthew; Bolia, Ashini; Brimijoin, Stephen; Zhan, Chang-Guo; Ozkan, S. Banu; Mor, Tsafrir S.

    2017-01-01

    Butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) is an enzyme with broad substrate and ligand specificities and may function as a generalized bioscavenger by binding and/or hydrolyzing various xenobiotic agents and toxicants, many of which target the central and peripheral nervous systems. Variants of BChE were rationally designed to increase the enzyme?s ability to hydrolyze the psychoactive enantiomer of cocaine. These variants were cloned, and then expressed using the magnICON transient expression system in p...

  13. Expression analysis of carbohydrate antigens in ductal carcinoma in situ of the breast by lectin histochemistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kieber-Emmons Thomas

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The number of breast cancer patients diagnosed with ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS continues to grow. Laboratory and clinical data indicate that DCIS can progress to invasive disease. Carbohydrate-mediated cell-cell adhesion and tumor-stroma interaction play crucial roles in tumorigenesis and tumor aggressive behavior. Breast carcinogenesis may reflect quantitative as well as qualitative changes in oligosaccharide expression, which may provide a useful tool for early detection of breast cancer. Because tumor-associated carbohydrate antigens (TACA are implicated in tumor invasion and metastasis, the purpose of this study was to assess the expression of selected TACA by lectin histochemistry on DCIS specimens from the archival breast cancer tissue array bank of the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences. Methods For detection of TACA expression, specimens were stained with Griffonia simplicifolia lectin-I (GS-I and Vicia vilosa agglutinin (VVA. We studied associations of lectin reactivity with established prognostic factors, such as tumor size, tumor nuclear grade, and expression of Her-2/neu, p53 mutant and estrogen and progesterone receptors. Results We observed that both lectins showed significant associations with nuclear grade of DCIS. DCIS specimens with nuclear grades II and III showed significantly more intense reactivity than DCIS cases with nuclear grade I to GS-1 (Mean-score chi-square = 17.60, DF = 2; P = 0.0002 and VVA (Mean-score chi-square = 15.72, DF = 2; P = 0.0004. Conclusion The results suggest that the expression of VVA- and GS-I-reactive carbohydrate antigens may contribute to forming higher grade DCIS and increase the recurrence risk.

  14. Expression analysis of carbohydrate antigens in ductal carcinoma in situ of the breast by lectin histochemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korourian, Soheila; Siegel, Eric; Kieber-Emmons, Thomas; Monzavi-Karbassi, Behjatolah

    2008-01-01

    The number of breast cancer patients diagnosed with ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) continues to grow. Laboratory and clinical data indicate that DCIS can progress to invasive disease. Carbohydrate-mediated cell-cell adhesion and tumor-stroma interaction play crucial roles in tumorigenesis and tumor aggressive behavior. Breast carcinogenesis may reflect quantitative as well as qualitative changes in oligosaccharide expression, which may provide a useful tool for early detection of breast cancer. Because tumor-associated carbohydrate antigens (TACA) are implicated in tumor invasion and metastasis, the purpose of this study was to assess the expression of selected TACA by lectin histochemistry on DCIS specimens from the archival breast cancer tissue array bank of the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences. For detection of TACA expression, specimens were stained with Griffonia simplicifolia lectin-I (GS-I) and Vicia vilosa agglutinin (VVA). We studied associations of lectin reactivity with established prognostic factors, such as tumor size, tumor nuclear grade, and expression of Her-2/neu, p53 mutant and estrogen and progesterone receptors. We observed that both lectins showed significant associations with nuclear grade of DCIS. DCIS specimens with nuclear grades II and III showed significantly more intense reactivity than DCIS cases with nuclear grade I to GS-1 (Mean-score chi-square = 17.60, DF = 2; P = 0.0002) and VVA (Mean-score chi-square = 15.72, DF = 2; P = 0.0004). The results suggest that the expression of VVA- and GS-I-reactive carbohydrate antigens may contribute to forming higher grade DCIS and increase the recurrence risk

  15. Mosaic VSGs and the scale of Trypanosoma brucei antigenic variation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James P J Hall

    Full Text Available A main determinant of prolonged Trypanosoma brucei infection and transmission and success of the parasite is the interplay between host acquired immunity and antigenic variation of the parasite variant surface glycoprotein (VSG coat. About 0.1% of trypanosome divisions produce a switch to a different VSG through differential expression of an archive of hundreds of silent VSG genes and pseudogenes, but the patterns and extent of the trypanosome diversity phenotype, particularly in chronic infection, are unclear. We applied longitudinal VSG cDNA sequencing to estimate variant richness and test whether pseudogenes contribute to antigenic variation. We show that individual growth peaks can contain at least 15 distinct variants, are estimated computationally to comprise many more, and that antigenically distinct 'mosaic' VSGs arise from segmental gene conversion between donor VSG genes or pseudogenes. The potential for trypanosome antigenic variation is probably much greater than VSG archive size; mosaic VSGs are core to antigenic variation and chronic infection.

  16. Early prostate cancer antigen expression in predicting presence of prostate cancer in men with histologically negative biopsies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansel, D E; DeMarzo, A M; Platz, E A; Jadallah, S; Hicks, J; Epstein, J I; Partin, A W; Netto, G J

    2007-05-01

    Early prostate cancer antigen is a nuclear matrix protein that was recently shown to be expressed in prostate adenocarcinoma and adjacent benign tissue. Previous studies have demonstrated early prostate cancer antigen expression in benign prostate tissue up to 5 years before a diagnosis of prostate carcinoma, suggesting that early prostate cancer antigen could be used as a potential predictive marker. We evaluated early prostate cancer antigen expression by immunohistochemistry using a polyclonal antibody (Onconome Inc., Seattle, Washington) on benign biopsies from 98 patients. Biopsies were obtained from 4 groups that included 39 patients with first time negative biopsy (group 1), 24 patients with persistently negative biopsies (group 2), 8 patients with initially negative biopsies who were subsequently diagnosed with prostate carcinoma (group 3) and negative biopsies obtained from 27 cases where other concurrent biopsies contained prostate carcinoma (group 4). Early prostate cancer antigen staining was assessed by 2 of the authors who were blind to the group of the examined sections. Staining intensity (range 0 to 3) and extent (range 1 to 3) scores were assigned. The presence of intensity 3 staining in any of the blocks of a biopsy specimen was considered as positive for early prostate cancer antigen for the primary outcome in the statistical analysis. In addition, as secondary outcomes we evaluated the data using the proportion of blocks with intensity 3 early prostate cancer antigen staining, the mean of the product of staining intensity and staining extent of all blocks within a biopsy, and the mean of the product of intensity 3 staining and extent. Primary outcome analysis revealed the proportion of early prostate cancer antigen positivity to be highest in group 3 (6 of 8, 75%) and lowest in group 2 (7 of 24, 29%, p=0.04 for differences among groups). A relatively higher than expected proportion of early prostate cancer antigen positivity was present in

  17. Expression of androgen receptor and prostate-specific antigen in male breast carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kidwai, Noman; Gong, Yun; Sun, Xiaoping; Deshpande, Charuhas G; Yeldandi, Anjana V; Rao, M Sambasiva; Badve, Sunil

    2004-01-01

    The androgen-regulated proteins prostate-specific antigen (PSA) and prostate-specific acid phosphatase (PSAP) are present in high concentrations in normal prostate and prostatic cancer and are considered to be tissue-specific to prostate. These markers are commonly used to diagnose metastatic prostate carcinoma at various sites including the male breast. However, expression of these two proteins in tumors arising in tissues regulated by androgens such as male breast carcinoma has not been thoroughly evaluated. In this study we analyzed the expression of PSA, PSAP and androgen receptor (AR) by immunohistochemistry in 26 cases of male breast carcinomas and correlated these with the expression of other prognostic markers. AR, PSA and PSAP expression was observed in 81%, 23% and 0% of carcinomas, respectively. Combined expression of AR and PSA was observed in only four tumors. Although the biological significance of PSA expression in male breast carcinomas is not clear, caution should be exercised when it is used as a diagnostic marker of metastatic prostate carcinoma

  18. Calling genotypes from public RNA-sequencing data enables identification of genetic variants that affect gene-expression levels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deelen, Patrick; Zhernakova, Daria V.; de Haan, Mark; van der Sijde, Marijke; Bonder, Marc Jan; Karjalainen, Juha; van der Velde, K. Joeri; Abbott, Kristin M.; Fu, Jingyuan; Wijmenga, Cisca; Sinke, Richard J.; Swertz, Morris A.; Franke, Lude

    2015-01-01

    Background: RNA-sequencing (RNA-seq) is a powerful technique for the identification of genetic variants that affect gene-expression levels, either through expression quantitative trait locus (eQTL) mapping or through allele-specific expression (ASE) analysis. Given increasing numbers of RNA-seq

  19. Effective plague vaccination via oral delivery of plant cells expressing F1-V antigens in chloroplasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arlen, Philip A; Singleton, Michael; Adamovicz, Jeffrey J; Ding, Yi; Davoodi-Semiromi, Abdolreza; Daniell, Henry

    2008-08-01

    The chloroplast bioreactor is an alternative to fermentation-based systems for production of vaccine antigens and biopharmaceuticals. We report here expression of the plague F1-V fusion antigen in chloroplasts. Site-specific transgene integration and homoplasmy were confirmed by PCR and Southern blotting. Mature leaves showed the highest level of transgene expression on the third day of continuous illumination, with a maximum level of 14.8% of the total soluble protein. Swiss Webster mice were primed with adjuvant-containing subcutaneous (s.c.) doses of F1-V and then boosted with either adjuvanted s.c. doses (s.c. F1-V mice) or unadjuvanted oral doses (oral F1-V mice). Oral F1-V mice had higher prechallenge serum immunoglobulin G1 (IgG1) titers than s.c. F1-V mice. The corresponding serum levels of antigen-specific IgG2a and IgA were 2 and 3 orders of magnitude lower, respectively. After vaccination, mice were exposed to an inhaled dose of 1.02 x 10(6) CFU of aerosolized Yersinia pestis CO92 (50% lethal dose, 6.8 x 10(4) CFU). All control animals died within 3 days. F1-V given s.c. (with adjuvant) protected 33% of the immunized mice, while 88% of the oral F1-V mice survived aerosolized Y. pestis challenge. A comparison of splenic Y. pestis CFU counts showed that there was a 7- to 10-log reduction in the mean bacterial burden in survivors. Taken together, these data indicate that oral booster doses effectively elicit protective immune responses in vivo. In addition, this is the first report of a plant-derived oral vaccine that protected animals from live Y. pestis challenge, bringing the likelihood of lower-cost vaccines closer to reality.

  20. Interaction between polymorphisms of the Human Leukocyte Antigen and HPV-16 Variants on the risk of invasive cervical cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Araujo Souza, Patricia S de; Maciag, Paulo C; Ribeiro, Karina B; Petzl-Erler, Maria Luiza; Franco, Eduardo L; Villa, Luisa L

    2008-01-01

    Persistent infection with oncogenic types of human papillomavirus (HPV) is the major risk factor for invasive cervical cancer (ICC), and non-European variants of HPV-16 are associated with an increased risk of persistence and ICC. HLA class II polymorphisms are also associated with genetic susceptibility to ICC. Our aim is to verify if these associations are influenced by HPV-16 variability. We characterized HPV-16 variants by PCR in 107 ICC cases, which were typed for HLA-DQA1, DRB1 and DQB1 genes and compared to 257 controls. We measured the magnitude of associations by logistic regression analysis. European (E), Asian-American (AA) and African (Af) variants were identified. Here we show that inverse association between DQB1*05 (adjusted odds ratio [OR] = 0.66; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.39–1.12]) and HPV-16 positive ICC in our previous report was mostly attributable to AA variant carriers (OR = 0.27; 95%CI: 0.10–0.75). We observed similar proportions of HLA DRB1*1302 carriers in E-P positive cases and controls, but interestingly, this allele was not found in AA cases (p = 0.03, Fisher exact test). A positive association with DRB1*15 was observed in both groups of women harboring either E (OR = 2.99; 95% CI: 1.13–7.86) or AA variants (OR = 2.34; 95% CI: 1.00–5.46). There was an inverse association between DRB1*04 and ICC among women with HPV-16 carrying the 350T [83L] single nucleotide polymorphism in the E6 gene (OR = 0.27; 95% CI: 0.08–0.96). An inverse association between DQB1*05 and cases carrying 350G (83V) variants was also found (OR = 0.37; 95% CI: 0.15–0.89). Our results suggest that the association between HLA polymorphism and risk of ICC might be influenced by the distribution of HPV-16 variants

  1. Chloroplast-Derived Vaccine Antigens and Biopharmaceuticals: Expression, Folding, Assembly and Functionality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chebolu, S.; Daniell, H.

    2009-01-01

    Chloroplast genetic engineering offers several advantages, including high levels of transgene expression, transgene containment via maternal inheritance, and multi-gene expression in a single transformation event. Oral delivery is facilitated by hyperexpression of vaccine antigens against cholera, tetanus, anthrax, plague, or canine parvovirus (4%–31% of total soluble protein, TSP) in transgenic chloroplasts (leaves) or non-green plastids (carrots, tomato) as well as the availability of antibiotic free selectable markers or the ability to excise selectable marker genes. Hyperexpression of several therapeutic proteins, including human serum albumin (11.1% TSP), somatotropin (7% TSP), interferon-alpha (19% TSP), interferon-gamma (6% TSP), and antimicrobial peptide (21.5% TSP), facilitates efficient and economic purification. Also, the presence of chaperones and enzymes in chloroplasts facilitates assembly of complex multisubunit proteins and correct folding of human blood proteins with proper disulfide bonds. Functionality of chloroplast-derived vaccine antigens and therapeutic proteins has been demonstrated by several assays, including the macrophage lysis assay, GM1-ganglioside binding assay, protection of HeLA cells or human lung carcinoma cells against encephalomyocarditis virus, systemic immune response, protection against pathogen challenge, and growth or inhibition of cell cultures. Purification of human proinsulin has been achieved using novel purification strategies (inverse temperature transition property) that do not require expensive column chromatography techniques. Thus, transgenic chloroplasts are ideal bioreactors for production of functional human and animal therapeutic proteins in an environmentally friendly manner. PMID:19401820

  2. Multiparameter flow cytometry reveals myelodysplasia-related aberrant antigen expression in myelodysplastic/myeloproliferative neoplasms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kern, Wolfgang; Bacher, Ulrike; Schnittger, Susanne; Alpermann, Tamara; Haferlach, Claudia; Haferlach, Torsten

    2013-05-01

    Within the myelodysplastic/myeloproliferative neoplasm (MDS/MPN) category of the WHO (2008), only chronic myelomonocytic leukemia was so far evaluated by multiparameter flow cytometry (MFC). To investigate the potential of MFC for MDS/MPNs, unclassifiable (MDS/MPNu), and refractory anemia associated with ring sideroblasts and marked thrombocytosis (RARS-T), we studied 91 patients with these entities (60 males/31 females; 35.3-87.4 years) for MDS-related aberrant immunophenotypes (≥ 2 different cell lineages with ≥ 3 aberrantly expressed antigens). Data were correlated with cytomorphology and cytogenetics. MFC identified MDS-related immunophenotypes in 54/91 (59.3%) of patients. Patients with or without MDS-related immunophenotype did not differ significantly by demographic characteristics, blood values, or median overall survival. MDS-related immunophenotype cases showed a higher number of aberrantly expressed antigens (mean ± SD, 4.9 ± 2.4 vs. 2.0 ± 1.4; P MPNu and RARS-T. MFC therefore may be helpful to separate cases into more "MDS-like" or "MPN-like" subgroups. Copyright © 2012 International Clinical Cytometry Society.

  3. Prostate-specific antigen and hormone receptor expression in male and female breast carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cohen Cynthia

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Prostate carcinoma is among the most common solid tumors to secondarily involve the male breast. Prostate specific antigen (PSA and prostate-specific acid phosphatase (PSAP are expressed in benign and malignant prostatic tissue, and immunohistochemical staining for these markers is often used to confirm the prostatic origin of metastatic carcinoma. PSA expression has been reported in male and female breast carcinoma and in gynecomastia, raising concerns about the utility of PSA for differentiating prostate carcinoma metastasis to the male breast from primary breast carcinoma. This study examined the frequency of PSA, PSAP, and hormone receptor expression in male breast carcinoma (MBC, female breast carcinoma (FBC, and gynecomastia. Methods Immunohistochemical staining for PSA, PSAP, AR, ER, and PR was performed on tissue microarrays representing six cases of gynecomastia, thirty MBC, and fifty-six FBC. Results PSA was positive in two of fifty-six FBC (3.7%, focally positive in one of thirty MBC (3.3%, and negative in the five examined cases of gynecomastia. PSAP expression was absent in MBC, FBC, and gynecomastia. Hormone receptor expression was similar in males and females (AR 74.1% in MBC vs. 67.9% in FBC, p = 0.62; ER 85.2% vs. 68.5%, p = 0.18; and PR 51.9% vs. 48.2%, p = 0.82. Conclusions PSA and PSAP are useful markers to distinguish primary breast carcinoma from prostate carcinoma metastatic to the male breast. Although PSA expression appeared to correlate with hormone receptor expression, the incidence of PSA expression in our population was too low to draw significant conclusions about an association between PSA expression and hormone receptor status in breast lesions.

  4. Epigenetic modulation of cancer-germline antigen gene expression in tumorigenic human mesenchymal stem cells: implications for cancer therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjerstorff, Morten; Burns, Jorge S; Nielsen, Ole

    2009-01-01

    Cancer-germline antigens are promising targets for cancer immunotherapy, but whether such therapies will also eliminate the primary tumor stem cell population remains undetermined. We previously showed that long-term cultures of telomerized adult human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells can...... spontaneously evolve into tumor-initiating, mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC-TERT20), which have characteristics of clinical sarcoma cells. In this study, we used the hMSC-TERT20 tumor stem cell model to investigate the potential of cancer-germline antigens to serve as tumor stem cell targets. We found...... of cancer-germline antigens in hMSC-TERT20 cells, while their expression levels in primary human mesenchymal stem cells remained unaffected. The expression pattern of cancer-germline antigens in tumorigenic mesenchymal stem cells and sarcomas, plus their susceptibility to enhancement by epigenetic...

  5. [One example of false negative hepatitis B surface antigen (EIA) result due to variant S area strain and reagment reactiveness related to hepatitis B surface antigen].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuda, Chikashi; Moriyama, Hidehiko; Taketani, Takeshi; Shibata, Hiroshi; Nagai, Atsushi

    2011-01-01

    The presence in serum of the Hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg), the outer envelope of the hepatitis B virus (HBV), indicates viral infection, used in laboratory tests to confirm this. We report a case of discrepancy among HBsAg test results detected between measurements in a subject with HB infection. Gene analysis demonstrated several S region gene mutations, not detected previously. We tested 12 measurements e.g., EIA, CLIA, CLEIA, F-EIA, MAT, and IC for whether they could detect our subject's HBsAg and found that it was not recognized by a method using only a single monoclonal antibody to detect HBsAg in two detection processes, in contrast to the 11 other measurements, which used two different antibodies. This case shows that amino acid substitution may cause a false negative result for HBsAg. Gene mutations known to occur in HBV, should thus trigger an awareness of the need to keep in mind that false negative results can happen in case such as ours.

  6. NF-κB and androgen receptor variant expression correlate with human BPH progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austin, David C; Strand, Douglas W; Love, Harold L; Franco, Omar E; Jang, Alex; Grabowska, Magdalena M; Miller, Nicole L; Hameed, Omar; Clark, Peter E; Fowke, Jay H; Matusik, Robert J; Jin, Ren J; Hayward, Simon W

    2016-04-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is a common, chronic progressive disease. Inflammation is associated with prostatic enlargement and resistance to 5α-reductase inhibitor (5ARI) therapy. Activation of the nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) pathway is linked to both inflammation and ligand-independent prostate cancer progression. NF-κB activation and androgen receptor variant (AR-V) expression were quantified in transition zone tissue samples from patients with a wide range of AUASS from incidental BPH in patients treated for low grade, localized peripheral zone prostate cancer to advanced disease requiring surgical intervention. To further investigate these pathways, human prostatic stromal and epithelial cell lines were transduced with constitutively active or kinase dead forms of IKK2 to regulate canonical NF-κB activity. The effects on AR full length (AR-FL) and androgen-independent AR-V expression as well as cellular growth and differentiation were assessed. Canonical NF-κB signaling was found to be upregulated in late versus early stage BPH, and to be strongly associated with non-insulin dependent diabetes mellitus. Elevated expression of AR-variant 7 (AR-V7), but not other AR variants, was found in advanced BPH samples. Expression of AR-V7 significantly correlated with the patient AUASS and TRUS volume. Forced activation of canonical NF-κB in human prostatic epithelial and stromal cells resulted in elevated expression of both AR-FL and AR-V7, with concomitant ligand-independent activation of AR reporters. Activation of NF-κB and over expression of AR-V7 in human prostatic epithelial cells maintained cell viability in the face of 5ARI treatment. Activation of NF-κB and AR-V7 in the prostate is associated with increased disease severity. AR-V7 expression is inducible in human prostate cells by forced activation of NF-κB resulting in resistance to 5ARI treatment, suggesting a potential mechanism by which patients may become resistant to 5ARI therapy.

  7. Hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) expression in plant cell culture: Kinetics of antigen accumulation in batch culture and its intracellular form.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Mark L; Mason, Hugh S; Shuler, Michael L

    2002-12-30

    The production of edible vaccines in transgenic plants and plant cell culture may be improved through a better understanding of antigen processing and assembly. The hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) was chosen for study because it undergoes substantial and complex post-translational modifications, which are necessary for its immunogenicity. This antigen was expressed in soybean (Glycine max L. Merr. cv Williams 82) and tobacco NT1 (Nicotiana tabacum L.) cell suspension cultures, and HBsAg production in batch culture was characterized. The plant-derived antigen consisted predominantly of disulfide cross-linked HBsAg protein (p24(s)) dimers, which were all membrane associated. Similar to yeast, the plant-expressed HBsAg was retained intracellularly. The maximal HBsAg titers were obtained with soybean suspension cultures (20-22 mg/L) with titers in tobacco cultures being approximately 10-fold lower. For soybean cells, electron microscopy and immunolocalization demonstrated that all the HBsAg was localized to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and provoked dilation and proliferation of the ER network. Sucrose gradient analysis of crude extracts showed that HBsAg had a complex size distribution uncharacteristic of the antigen's normal structure of uniform 22-nm virus-like particles. The extent of authentic epitope formation was assessed by comparing total p24(s) synthesized to that reactive by polyclonal and monoclonal immunoassays. Depending on culture age, between 40% and 100% of total p24(s) was polyclonal antibody reactive whereas between 6% and 37% was recognized by a commercial monoclonal antibody assay. Possible strategies to increase HBsAg production and improve post-translational processing are discussed. Copyright 2002 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Cancer/testis antigen SPATA19 is frequently expressed in benign prostatic hyperplasia and prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Kah Keng; Hussain, Faezahtul Arbaeyah; Loo, Suet Kee; López, José I

    2017-12-01

    Spermatogenesis-associated 19 (SPATA19) is a cancer/testis antigen overexpressed in various cancers. However, its protein expression profile in malignant or non-malignant tissues remains unknown. Thus, in this study, we investigated SPATA19 protein expression patterns in a panel of non-malignant human samples and primary prostate cancer (PCa) with or without benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) tissues. SPATA19 was absent in all non-malignant tissues investigated (n=14) except testis and prostate tissues. In terms of malignancies, all PCa cases were positive for SPATA19 exhibiting frequency between 20 and 100% (median 85%) with 63 (52.5%) and 57 (47.5%) cases demonstrating weak/moderate and strong intensities, respectively. Thirty-nine PCa cases (32.5%) contained BPH, and all BPH glands were SPATA19 positive (frequency between 20 and 100%; median 90%) with 13 (33.3%) demonstrating strong SPATA19 expression. Higher SPATA19 expression (higher frequency, intensity, or H-score) was not associated with overall survival or disease-specific survival (DFS) in all PCa cases. However, biochemical recurrence (BR) was associated with worse DFS (p = 0.005) in this cohort of 120 patients, and cases with strong SPATA19 intensity were associated with BR (p = 0.020). In conclusion, we showed that SPATA19 protein was frequently expressed in both BPH and PCa glands, and this warrants future investigations on its pathogenic roles in the disease. © 2017 APMIS. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. ST6GalNAc-I controls expression of sialyl-Tn antigen in gastrointestinal tissues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marcos, Nuno T; Bennett, Eric P; Gomes, Joana

    2011-01-01

    Sialyl-Tn is a simple mucin-type carbohydrate antigen aberrantly expressed in gastrointestinal adenocarcinomas and in the precursor lesion intestinal metaplasia. Sialyl-Tn tumour expression is an independent indicator of poor prognosis. We have previously shown in vitro that ST6GalNAc-I and ST6GalNAc......-II sialyltransferases can synthesize sialyl-Tn. The aim of the present study was to establish whether ST6GalNAc-I is the major enzyme responsible for the expression of sialyl-Tn. We used a model of CHO-ldlD cells producing only MUC1-Tn glycoform and showed that ST6GalNAc-I is the key-enzyme leading to sialyl......-Tn biosynthesis. We developed novel monoclonal antibodies specific for ST6GalNAc-I and evaluated its expression in gastrointestinal tissues. ST6GalNAc-I was detected in normal colon mucosa co-localized with O-acetylated sialyl-Tn. Expression was largely unaltered in colorectal adenocarcinomas. In contrast, we...

  10. MAGE-A1, GAGE and NY-ESO-1 cancer/testis antigen expression during human gonadal development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjerstorff, Morten F; Kock, Kirsten; Nielsen, Ole

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cancer/testis antigens (CTAs) are expressed in several cancers and during normal adult male germ cell differentiation. Little is known about their role in fetal development of human germ cells. METHODS: We examined expression of the CTAs MAGE-A1, GAGE and NY-ESO-1 in fetal gonads...

  11. Positive Selection of γδ CTL by TL Antigen Expressed in the Thymus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsujimura, Kunio; Takahashi, Toshitada; Morita, Akimichi; Hasegawa-Nishiwaki, Hitomi; Iwase, Shigeru; Obata, Yuichi

    1996-01-01

    To elucidate the function of the mouse TL antigen in the thymus, we have derived two TL transgenic mouse strains by introducing Tla a -3 of A strain origin with its own promoter onto a C3H background with no expression of TL in the thymus. These transgenic mouse strains, both of which express high levels of Tlaa-3-TL antigen in their thymus, were analyzed for their T cell function with emphasis on cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) generation. A T cell response against TL was induced in Tg.Tlaa-3-1, Tg.Tlaa-3-2, and control C3H mice by skin grafts from H-2K b/T3 b transgenic mice, Tg.Con.3-1, expressing T3b-TL ubiquitously. Spleen cells from mice that had rejected the T3b-TL positive skin grafts were restimulated in vitro with Tg.Con.3-1 irradiated spleen cells. In mixed lymphocyte cultures (MLC), approximately 20% and 15% of Thy-1+ T cells derived from Tg.Tlaa-3-1 and Tg.Tlaa-3-2, respectively, expressed TCRγδ, whereas almost all those from C3H expressed TCRαβ. The MLC from Tg.Tlaa-3-2 and C3H demonstrated high CTL activity against TL, while those from Tg.Tlaa-3-1 had little or none. The generation of γδ CTL recognizing TL in Tg.Tlaa-3-2, but not C3H mice, was confirmed by the establishment of CTL clones. A total of 14 γδ CTL clones were established from Tg.Tlaa-3-2, whereas none were obtained from C3H. Of the 14 γδ CTL clones, 8 were CD8+ and 6 were CD4−CD8− double negative. The CTL activity of all these clones was TL specific and inhibited by anti-TL, but not by anti-H-2 antibodies, demonstrating that they recognize TL directly without antigen presentation by H-2. The CTL activity was blocked by antibodies to TCRγδ and CD3, and also by antibodies to CD8α and CD8β in CD8+ clones, showing that the activity was mediated by TCRγδ and coreceptors. The thymic origin of these γδ CTL clones was indicated by the expression of Thy-1 and Ly-1 (CD5), and also CD8αβ heterodimers in CD8+ clones on their surfaces and by the usage of TCR Vγ4 chains in 12 of

  12. HE4 Transcription- and Splice Variants-Specific Expression in Endometrial Cancer and Correlation with Patient Survival

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shi-Wen Jiang

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the HE4 variant-specific expression patterns in various normal tissues as well as in normal and malignant endometrial tissues. The relationships between mRNA variants and age, body weight, or survival are analyzed. ICAT-labeled normal and endometrial cancer (EC tissues were analyzed with multidimensional liquid chromatography followed by tandem mass spectrometry. Levels of HE4 mRNA variants were measured by real-time PCR. Mean mRNA levels were compared among 16 normal endometrial samples, 14 grade 1 and 14 grade 3 endometrioid EC, 15 papillary serous EC, and 14 normal human tissue samples. The relationship between levels of HE4 variants and EC patient characteristics was analyzed with the use of Pearson correlation test. We found that, although all five HE4 mRNA variants are detectable in normal tissue samples, their expression is highly tissue-specific, with epididymis, trachea, breast and endometrium containing the highest levels. HE4-V0, -V1, and -V3 are the most abundant variants in both normal and malignant tissues. All variants are significantly increased in both endometrioid and papillary serous EC, with higher levels observed in grade 3 endometrioid EC. In the EC group, HE4-V1, -V3, and -V4 levels inversely correlate with EC patient survival, whereas HE4-V0 levels positively correlate with age. HE4 variants exhibit tissue-specific expression, suggesting that each variant may exert distinct functions in normal and malignant cells. HE4 levels appear to correlate with EC patient survival in a variant-specific manner. When using HE4 as a biomarker for EC management, the effects of age should be considered.

  13. Milk-induced eczema is associated with the expansion of T cells expressing cutaneous lymphocyte antigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abernathy-Carver, K J; Sampson, H A; Picker, L J; Leung, D Y

    1995-02-01

    The extravasation of T cells at sites of inflammation is critically dependent on the activity of homing receptors (HR) involved in endothelial cell recognition and binding. Two such HR (the cutaneous lymphocyte antigen [CLA] and L-selectin) have been shown to be selectively involved in T cell migration to skin and peripheral lymph nodes, respectively. This study was designed to assess the relationship between the organ specificity of an allergic reaction to food and the expression of HR on T cells activated in vitro by the relevant food allergen. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells were isolated from seven milk allergic children with a history of eczema when exposed to milk. All patients had a positive prick skin test and double-blind placebo-controlled food challenge to milk. 10 children with either allergic eosinophilic gastroenteritis or milk-induced enterocolitis and 8 nonatopic adults served as controls. Five-parameter flow cytometry using monoclonal antibodies was used for detection of the specific HR on freshly isolated T cells versus T cell blasts induced by a 6-d incubation with casein, as compared with Candida albicans. After in vitro stimulation with casein, but not C. albicans, patients with milk allergy and atopic dermatitis had a significantly greater percentage of CLA+ T cells (P < 0.01) than controls with milk-induced enterocolitis, allergic eosinophilic gastroenteritis, or nonatopic healthy controls. In contrast, the percentage of L-selectin-expressing T cells did not differ significantly between these groups. These data suggest that after casein stimulation allergic patients with milk-induced skin disease have an expanded population of CLA+ T cells, as compared with nonatopics or allergic patients without skin involvement. We postulate that heterogeneity in the regulation of HR expression on antigen-specific T cells may play a role in determining sites of involvement in tissue-directed allergic responses.

  14. Characterization of the Ala62Pro polymorphic variant of human cytochrome P450 1A1 using recombinant protein expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Seung Heon; Kang, Sukmo [College of Veterinary Medicine, BK21plus Program for Creative Veterinary Science Research, and Research Institute for Veterinary Science, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Dong, Mi Sook [School of Life Sciences and Biotechnology, Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Jung-Duck [College of Medicine, Chung-Ang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Jinseo; Rhee, Sangkee [College of Agriculture of Life Science, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Ryu, Doug-Young, E-mail: dyryu@snu.ac.kr [College of Veterinary Medicine, BK21plus Program for Creative Veterinary Science Research, and Research Institute for Veterinary Science, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-06-15

    Cytochrome P450 (CYP) 1A1 is a heme-containing enzyme involved in detoxification of hydrophobic pollutants. Its Ala62Pro variant has been identified previously. Ala62 is located in α-helix A of CYP1A1. Residues such as Pro and Gly are α-helix breakers. In this study, the Ala62Pro variant was characterized using heterologous expression. E. coli expressing the Ala62Pro variant, and the purified variant protein, had lower CYP (i.e. holoenzyme) contents than their wild-type (WT) equivalents. The CYP variant from E. coli and mammalian cells exhibited lower 7-ethoxyresorufin O-dealkylation (EROD) and benzo[a]pyrene hydroxylation activities than the WT. Enhanced supplementation of a heme precursor during E. coli culture did not increase CYP content in E. coli expressing the variant, but did for the WT. As for Ala62Pro, E. coli expressing an Ala62Gly variant had a lower CYP content than the WT counterpart, but substitution of Ala62 with α-helix-compatible residues such as Ser and Val partially recovered the level of CYP produced. Microsomes from mammalian cells expressing Ala62Pro and Ala62Gly variants exhibited lower EROD activities than those expressing the WT or Ala62Val variant. A region harboring α-helix A has interactions with another region containing heme-interacting residues. Site-directed mutagenesis analyses suggest the importance of interactions between the two regions on holoenzyme expression. Together, these findings suggest that the Ala62Pro substitution leads to changes in protein characteristics and function of CYP1A1 via structural disturbance of the region where the residue is located. - Highlights: • Ala62 is located in α-helix A of the carcinogen-metabolizing enzyme CYP1A1. • Pro acts as an α-helix breaker. • A variant protein of CYP1A1, Ala62Pro, had lower heme content than the wild-type. • The variant of CYP1A1 had lower enzyme activities than the wild-type.

  15. Correlation Between Preoperative Serum Carcinoembryonic Antigen Levels and Expression on Pancreatic and Rectal Cancer Tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LSF Boogerd

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA–targeted imaging and therapeutic agents are being tested in clinical trials. If CEA overexpression in malignant tissue corresponds with elevated serum CEA, serum CEA could assist in selecting patients who may benefit from CEA-targeted agents. This study aims to assess the relationship between serum CEA and CEA expression in pancreatic (n = 20 and rectal cancer tissues (n = 35 using histopathology. According to local laboratory standards, a serum CEA >3 ng/mL was considered elevated. In pancreatic cancer patients a significant correlation between serum CEA and percentage of CEA-expressing tumor cells was observed ( P  = .04, ρ = .47. All 6 patients with homogeneous CEA expression in the tumor had a serum CEA >3 ng/mL. Most rectal cancer tissues (32/35 showed homogeneous CEA expression, independent of serum CEA levels. This study suggests that selection of pancreatic cancer patients for CEA-targeted agents via serum CEA appears adequate. For selection of rectal cancer patients, serum CEA levels are not informative.

  16. Expression of Hepatitis C Virus Core and E2 antigenic recombinant proteins and their use for development of diagnostic assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Amjad; Nisar, Muhammad; Idrees, Muhammad; Rafique, Shazia; Iqbal, Muhammad

    2015-05-01

    Early diagnosis of HCV infection is based on detection of antibodies against HCV proteins using recombinant viral antigens. The present study was designed to select, clone and express the antigenic regions of Core and E2 genes from local HCV-3a genotype and to utilize the antigenic recombinant proteins (Core & E2) to develop highly sensitive, specific and economical diagnostic assays for detection of HCV infection. The antigenic sites were determined within Core and E2 genes and were then cloned in pET-28a expression vector. The right orientation of the desired inserted fragments of Core and E2 were confirmed via sequencing prior to expression and were then transformed in BL21 (DE3) pLysS strains of E. coli and induced with 0.5mM Isopropyl-b-D-thiogalactopyranoside (IPTG) for the production of antigenic recombinant proteins. The produced truncated antigens were then purified by Nickel affinity chromatography and were confirmed by western blotting, immunoblotting and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The expressed Core and E2 recombinant antigens were used to develop immunoblotting assay for the detection of anti-HCV antibodies in sera. With immunoblotting, a total of 93-HCV infected sera and 35-HCV negative individuals were tested for the presence of anti-HCV antibodies to the Core and E2 antigens. Recombinant antigen showed 100% reactivity against HCV infected sera, with no cross reactivity against HCV-negative sera. The immunoblot assay mixture of recombinant antigens (Core+E2) showed a strong reaction intensity in the test area (TA) as compared to the individual truncated Core and E2 recombinant antigens. In the in-house ELISA assay, mixed Core and E2 recombinant antigens showed 100% reactivity against a standardized panel of 150-HCV-positive sera and non reactivity against a standardized panel of 150 HCV-negative sera while also being non reactive to sera positive for other viral infections. The antigenic recombinant antigens also were tested for the

  17. An inducible transgenic mouse model for immune mediated hepatitis showing clearance of antigen expressing hepatocytes by CD8+ T cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcin Cebula

    Full Text Available The liver has the ability to prime immune responses against neo antigens provided upon infections. However, T cell immunity in liver is uniquely modulated by the complex tolerogenic property of this organ that has to also cope with foreign agents such as endotoxins or food antigens. In this respect, the nature of intrahepatic T cell responses remains to be fully characterized. To gain deeper insight into the mechanisms that regulate the CD8+ T cell responses in the liver, we established a novel OVA_X_CreER(T2 mouse model. Upon tamoxifen administration OVA antigen expression is observed in a fraction of hepatocytes, resulting in a mosaic expression pattern. To elucidate the cross-talk of CD8+ T cells with antigen-expressing hepatocytes, we adoptively transferred K(b/OVA257-264-specific OT-I T cells to OVA_X_CreER(T2 mice or generated triple transgenic OVA_X CreER(T2_X_OT-I mice. OT-I T cells become activated in OVA_X_CreER(T2 mice and induce an acute and transient hepatitis accompanied by liver damage. In OVA_X_CreER(T2_X_OT-I mice, OVA induction triggers an OT-I T cell mediated, fulminant hepatitis resulting in 50% mortality. Surviving mice manifest a long lasting hepatitis, and recover after 9 weeks. In these experimental settings, recovery from hepatitis correlates with a complete loss of OVA expression indicating efficient clearance of the antigen-expressing hepatocytes. Moreover, a relapse of hepatitis can be induced upon re-induction of cured OVA_X_CreER(T2_X_OT-I mice indicating absence of tolerogenic mechanisms. This pathogen-free, conditional mouse model has the advantage of tamoxifen inducible tissue specific antigen expression that reflects the heterogeneity of viral antigen expression and enables the study of intrahepatic immune responses to both de novo and persistent antigen. It allows following the course of intrahepatic immune responses: initiation, the acute phase and antigen clearance.

  18. Identification of cDNA clones expressing immunodiagnostic antigens from Trichinella spiralis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zarlenga, D.; Gamble, H.R.

    1987-01-01

    A cDNA expression library was built in lambda gt11 phage using poly A mRNA isolated from Trichinella spiralis muscle stage larvae. This library was screened with rabbit antibodies to parasite excretory-secretory (ES) products and greater than 180 clones were isolated. Thirteen clones producing highly immunogenic protein antigens were plaque purified and rescreened with pig antisera to T.spiralis, Trichuris suis or Ascaris suum to identify clones producing epitopes specific to T.spiralis ES products, only. Two clones, TsAc-2 and TsAc-8, which displayed strong interactions with pig antisera to T. spiralis were lysogenized in E. coli Y1089 and the protein extracted. Western blots of the crude fusion proteins revealed molecular weights of 133 kD and 129 kD, respectively. Northern blot analysis of total RNA with 32 P labelled cDNA:lambda gt11 probes indicated single RNA transcripts for each clone with molecular sizes corresponding to 800-850 nucleotides. dscDNA inserts were estimated by southern blot analysis to be 500 bp and 340 bp, respectively, with no cross-hybridization observed between the cloned sequences. Dot blots using pig sera to screen crude fusion protein preparations, total bacterial protein (negative controls) and crude worm extract or ES products from T.spiralis, T.suis and A.suum (positive controls) corroborated the specificity and sensitivity of these clones as potential diagnostic antigens for swine trichinellosis

  19. Induction of carcinoembryonic antigen expression in a three-dimensional culture system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jessup, J. M.; Brown, D.; Fitzgerald, W.; Ford, R. D.; Nachman, A.; Goodwin, T. J.; Spaulding, G.

    1994-01-01

    MIP-101 is a poorly differentiated human colon carcinoma cell line established from ascites that produces minimal amounts of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), a 180 kDa glycoprotein tumor marker, and nonspecific cross-reacting antigen (NCA), a related protein that has 50 and 90 kDa isoforms, in vitro in monolayer culture. MIP-101 produces CEA when implanted into the peritoneum of nude mice but not when implanted into subcutaneous tissue. We tested whether MIP-101 cells may be induced to express CEA when cultured on microcarrier beads in three-dimensional cultures, either in static cultures as non-adherent aggregates or under dynamic conditions in a NASA-designed low shear stress bioreactor. MIP- 101 cells proliferated well under all three conditions and increased CEA and NCA production 3 - 4 fold when grown in three-dimensional cultures compared to MIP-101 cells growing logarithmically in monolayers. These results suggest that three-dimensional growth in vitro simulates tumor function in vivo and that three-dimensional growth by itself may enhance production of molecules that are associated with the metastatic process.

  20. PGC1α −1 Nucleosome Position and Splice Variant Expression and Cardiovascular Disease Risk in Overweight and Obese Individuals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tara M. Henagan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available PGC1α, a transcriptional coactivator, interacts with PPARs and others to regulate skeletal muscle metabolism. PGC1α undergoes splicing to produce several mRNA variants, with the NTPGC1α variant having a similar biological function to the full length PGC1α (FLPGC1α. CVD is associated with obesity and T2D and a lower percentage of type 1 oxidative fibers and impaired mitochondrial function in skeletal muscle, characteristics determined by PGC1α expression. PGC1α expression is epigenetically regulated in skeletal muscle to determine mitochondrial adaptations, and epigenetic modifications may regulate mRNA splicing. We report in this paper that skeletal muscle PGC1α  −1 nucleosome (−1N position is associated with splice variant NTPGC1α but not FLPGC1α expression. Division of participants based on the −1N position revealed that those individuals with a −1N phased further upstream from the transcriptional start site (UP expressed lower levels of NTPGC1α than those with the −1N more proximal to TSS (DN. UP showed an increase in body fat percentage and serum total and LDL cholesterol. These findings suggest that the −1N may be a potential epigenetic regulator of NTPGC1α splice variant expression, and −1N position and NTPGC1α variant expression in skeletal muscle are linked to CVD risk. This trial is registered with clinicaltrials.gov, identifier NCT00458133.

  1. Myosin-binding Protein C Compound Heterozygous Variant Effect on the Phenotypic Expression of Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafael, Julianny Freitas; Cruz, Fernando Eugênio Dos Santos; Carvalho, Antônio Carlos Campos de; Gottlieb, Ilan; Cazelli, José Guilherme; Siciliano, Ana Paula; Dias, Glauber Monteiro

    2017-04-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is an autosomal dominant genetic disease caused by mutations in genes encoding sarcomere proteins. It is the major cause of sudden cardiac death in young high-level athletes. Studies have demonstrated a poorer prognosis when associated with specific mutations. The association between HCM genotype and phenotype has been the subject of several studies since the discovery of the genetic nature of the disease. This study shows the effect of a MYBPC3 compound variant on the phenotypic HCM expression. A family in which a young man had a clinical diagnosis of HCM underwent clinical and genetic investigations. The coding regions of the MYH7, MYBPC3 and TNNT2 genes were sequenced and analyzed. The proband present a malignant manifestation of the disease, and is the only one to express HCM in his family. The genetic analysis through direct sequencing of the three main genes related to this disease identified a compound heterozygous variant (p.E542Q and p.D610H) in MYBPC3. A family analysis indicated that the p.E542Q and p.D610H alleles have paternal and maternal origin, respectively. No family member carrier of one of the variant alleles manifested clinical signs of HCM. We suggest that the MYBPC3-biallelic heterozygous expression of p.E542Q and p.D610H may cause the severe disease phenotype seen in the proband. Resumo A cardiomiopatia hipertrófica (CMH) é uma doença autossômica dominante causada por mutações em genes que codificam as proteínas dos sarcômeros. É a principal causa de morte súbita cardíaca em atletas jovens de alto nível. Estudos têm demonstrado um pior prognóstico associado a mutações específicas. A associação entre genótipo e fenótipo em CMH tem sido objeto de diversos estudos desde a descoberta da origem genética dessa doença. Este trabalho apresenta o efeito de uma mutação composta em MYBPC3 na expressão fenotípica da CMH. Uma família na qual um jovem tem o diagnóstico clínico de CMH foi

  2. Modeling malaria infection and immunity against variant surface antigens in Príncipe island, West Africa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bandeiras, Cátia; Trovoada, Maria Jesus; Gonçalves, Lígia A

    2014-01-01

    the impact of reducing exposure to the parasite on the immune repertoire against P. falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 (PfEMP1) variants. The model was parameterized with data from Príncipe Island, West Africa, and applied to simulate two alternative transmission scenarios: one where control measures...... are continued to eventually drive the system to elimination; and another where the effort is interrupted after 6 years of its initiation and the system returns to the initial transmission potential. Population dynamics of parasite prevalence predict that in a few years infection levels return to the pre...

  3. A recombinant raccoon poxvirus vaccine expressing both Yersinia pestis F1 and truncated V antigens protects animals against lethal plague.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocke, Tonie E.; Kingstad-Bakke, B; Berlier, W; Osorio, J.E.

    2014-01-01

    In previous studies, we demonstrated in mice and prairie dogs that simultaneous administration of two recombinant raccoon poxviruses (rRCN) expressing Yersinia pestis antigens (F1 and V307-a truncated version of the V protein) provided superior protection against plague challenge compared to individual single antigen constructs. To reduce costs of vaccine production and facilitate implementation of a sylvatic plague vaccine (SPV) control program for prairie dogs, a dual antigen construct is more desirable. Here we report the construction and characterization of a novel RCN-vectored vaccine that simultaneously expresses both F1 and V307 antigens. This dual antigen vaccine provided similar levels of protection against plague in both mice and prairie dogs as compared to simultaneous administration of the two single antigen constructs and was also shown to protect mice against an F1 negative strain of Y. pestis.. The equivalent safety, immunogenicity and efficacy profile of the dual RCN-F1/V307 construct warrants further evaluation in field efficacy studies in sylvatic plague endemic areas.

  4. Heterologous expression of carcinoembryonic antigen in Lactococcus lactis via LcsB-mediated surface displaying system for oral vaccine development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaowei; Hu, Shumin; Du, Xue; Li, Tiejun; Han, Lanlan; Kong, Jian

    2016-12-01

    Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) is an attractive target for immunotherapy because it is expressed minimally in normal tissue, but is overexpressed in a wide variety of malignant epithelial tissues. Lactic acid bacteria (LABs), widely used in food processes, are attractive candidates for oral vaccination. Thus, we examined whether LABs could be used as a live vaccine vector to deliver CEA antigen. CEA was cloned into an Escherichia coli/Lactococcus lactis shuttle vector pSEC:LEISS under the control of a nisin promoter. For displaying the CEA on the cell surface of the L. lactis strain, the anchor motif LcsB from the S-layer protein of Lactobacillus crispatus was fused with CEA. Intracellular and cell surface expression of the CEA-LcsB fusion was confirmed by western blot analysis. Significantly higher levels of CEA-specific secretory immunoglobulin A in the sera of mice were observed upon oral administration of strain cultures containing the CEA-LcsB fused protein. In addition, the CEA-LcsB antigen group showed a higher spleen index compared to the CEA antigen alone or negative control, demonstrating that surface-displayed CEA antigen could induce a higher immune response. These results provided the first evidence for displaying CEA antigen on the cell surfaces of LABs as oral vaccines against cancer or infectious diseases. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  5. Physiological relation between respiration activity and heterologous expression of selected benzoylformate decarboxylase variants in Escherichia coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pohl Martina

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The benzoylformate decarboxylase (BFD from Pseudomonas putida is a biotechnologically interesting biocatalyst. It catalyses the formation of chiral 2-hydroxy ketones, which are important building blocks for stereoselective syntheses. To optimise the enzyme function often the amino acid composition is modified to improve the performance of the enzyme. So far it was assumed that a relatively small modification of the amino acid composition of a protein does not significantly influence the level of expression or media requirements. To determine, which effects these modifications might have on cultivation and product formation, six different BFD-variants with one or two altered amino acids and the wild type BFD were expressed in Escherichia coli SG13009 pKK233-2. The oxygen transfer rate (OTR as parameter for growth and metabolic activity of the different E. coli clones was monitored on-line in LB, TB and modified PanG mineral medium with the Respiratory Activity MOnitoring System (RAMOS. Results Although the E. coli clones were genetically nearly identical, the kinetics of their metabolic activity surprisingly differed in the standard media applied. Three different types of OTR curves could be distinguished. Whereas the first type (clones expressing Leu476Pro-Ser181Thr or Leu476Pro had typical OTR curves, the second type (clones expressing the wild type BFD, Ser181Thr or His281Ala showed an early drop of OTR in LB and TB medium and a drastically reduced maximum OTR in modified PanG mineral medium. The third type (clone expressing Leu476Gln behaved variable. Depending on the cultivation conditions, its OTR curve was similar to the first or the second type. It was shown, that the kinetics of the metabolic activity of the first type depended on the concentration of thiamine, which is a cofactor of BFD, in the medium. It was demonstrated that the cofactor binding strength of the different BFD-variants correlated with the differences

  6. The chemokine receptor CXCR3 and its splice variant are expressed in human airway epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelsen, Steven G; Aksoy, Mark O; Yang, Yi; Shahabuddin, Syed; Litvin, Judith; Safadi, Fayez; Rogers, Thomas J

    2004-09-01

    Activation of the chemokine receptor CXCR3 by its cognate ligands induces several differentiated cellular responses important to the growth and migration of a variety of hematopoietic and structural cells. In the human respiratory tract, human airway epithelial cells (HAEC) release the CXCR3 ligands Mig/CXCL9, IP-10/CXCL10, and I-TAC/CXCL11. Simultaneous expression of CXCR3 by HAEC would have important implications for the processes of airway inflammation and repair. Accordingly, in the present study we sought to determine whether HAEC also express the classic CXCR3 chemokine receptor CXCR3-A and its splice variant CXCR3-B and hence may respond in autocrine fashion to its ligands. We found that cultured HAEC (16-HBE and tracheocytes) constitutively expressed CXCR3 mRNA and protein. CXCR3 mRNA levels assessed by expression array were approximately 35% of beta-actin expression. In contrast, CCR3, CCR4, CCR5, CCR8, and CX3CR1 were <5% beta-actin. Both CXCR3-A and -B were expressed. Furthermore, tracheocytes freshly harvested by bronchoscopy stained positively for CXCR3 by immunofluorescence microscopy, and 68% of cytokeratin-positive tracheocytes (i.e., the epithelial cell population) were positive for CXCR3 by flow cytometry. In 16-HBE cells, CXCR3 receptor density was approximately 78,000 receptors/cell when assessed by competitive displacement of 125I-labeled IP-10/CXCL10. Finally, CXCR3 ligands induced chemotactic responses and actin reorganization in 16-HBE cells. These findings indicate constitutive expression by HAEC of a functional CXC chemokine receptor, CXCR3. Our data suggest the possibility that autocrine activation of CXCR3 expressed by HAEC may contribute to airway inflammation and remodeling in obstructive lung disease by regulating HAEC migration.

  7. Expression of HIV-1 antigens in plants as potential subunit vaccines

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Meyers, A

    2008-06-23

    Full Text Available Open AcceResearch article Expression of HIV-1 antigens in plants as potential subunit vaccines Ann Meyers1,2, Ereck Chakauya1,2,3, Enid Shephard1,4, Fiona L Tanzer1,2, James Maclean1,2, Alisson Lynch1,2, Anna-Lise Williamson1,5 and Edward P Rybicki...Figure 1 The HIV-1 Gag-derived proteins used in this study. Scale diagram showing (A) native Pr55Gag ORF organisation in the Page 2 of 15 (page number not for citation purposes) gag gene, (B) the p17/p24 fusion protein ORF, (C) p24 ORF. ORFs labelled p7...

  8. Expression and immunological characterisation of Eimeria tenella glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored surface antigen-5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Sue-Kim; Nathan, Sheila; Wan, Kiew-Lian

    2016-11-01

    Eimeria tenella is the most pathogenic of the Eimeria species that infect chickens and causes huge economic losses to the poultry industry. The glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored surface antigen-5 (SAG5) found on the surface of the parasite has been shown to activate the chicken's immune system. In this study, recombinant SAG5 was expressed, purified and used to investigate the immune-inducing characteristics of the molecule. Chickens were immunized with purified recombinant SAG5 and sera were subjected to Enzyme-linked Immunosorbant Assay (ELISA). Results indicated that specific antibodies against rSAG5 were produced, with IgG detected at a higher level compared to IgA and IgM. Information on the immunological responses elicited by SAG5 provides essential knowledge that will contribute towards the effort to develop more effective strategies against coccidiosis.

  9. Ultraviolet radiation (UVR) induces cell-surface Ro/SSA antigen expression by human keratinocytes in vitro: a possible mechanism for the UVR induction of cutaneous lupus lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, S.K.

    1992-01-01

    Antinuclear antibodies are useful markers of connective tissue disease. In this study, UVB but not UVA induced the expression of Ro/SSA antigen on keratinocyte surfaces in vitro. This expression was also found with the extractable nuclear antigens RnP and Sm, but not with single or double-stranded DNA. The expression was prevented by blocking protein synthesis, suggesting that it was an active process. The results suggest that UVB exposure may result in the expression of Ro/SSA antigen on the surfaces of basal keratinocytes in vivo. This antigen could then bind circulating antibody leading to the cutaneous lesions in neonatal and subacute cutaneous lupus erythematosus. (Author)

  10. Differential expression of splicing variants of the human caldesmon gene (CALD1) in glioma neovascularization versus normal brain microvasculature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.P. Zheng (Pingpin); A.M. Sieuwerts (Anieta); T.M. Luider (Theo); M.M. van der Weiden (Marcel); J.M. Kros (Johan); P.A.E. Sillevis Smitt (Peter)

    2004-01-01

    textabstractCaldesmon is a cytoskeleton-associated protein which has not yet been related to neoplastic angiogenesis. In this study we investigated the expression of the caldesmon gene (CALD1) splicing variants and the protein expression level in glioma microvessels versus normal

  11. Corneal epithelium expresses a variant of P2X(7 receptor in health and disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Courtney Mankus

    Full Text Available Improper wound repair of the corneal epithelium can alter refraction of light resulting in impaired vision. We have shown that ATP is released after injury, activates purinergic receptor signaling pathways and plays a major role in wound closure. In many cells or tissues, ATP activates P2X(7 receptors leading to cation fluxes and cytotoxicity. The corneal epithelium is an excellent model to study the expression of both the full-length P2X(7 form (defined as the canonical receptor and its truncated forms. When Ca(2+ mobilization is induced by BzATP, a P2X(7 agonist, it is attenuated in the presence of extracellular Mg(2+ or Zn(2+, negligible in the absence of extracellular Ca(2+, and inhibited by the competitive P2X7 receptor inhibitor, A438079. BzATP enhanced phosphorylation of ERK. Together these responses indicate the presence of a canonical or full-length P2X(7 receptor. In addition BzATP enhanced epithelial cell migration, and transfection with siRNA to the P2X(7 receptor reduced cell migration. Furthermore, sustained activation did not induce dye uptake indicating the presence of truncated or variant forms that lack the ability to form large pores. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and Northern blot analysis revealed a P2X(7 splice variant. Western blots identified a full-length and truncated form, and the expression pattern changed as cultures progressed from monolayer to stratified. Cross-linking gels demonstrated the presence of homo- and heterotrimers. We examined epithelium from age matched diabetic and non-diabetic corneas patients and detected a 4-fold increase in P2X(7 mRNA from diabetic corneal epithelium compared to non-diabetic controls and an increased trend in expression of P2X(7variant mRNA. Taken together, these data indicate that corneal epithelial cells express full-length and truncated forms of P2X(7, which ultimately allows P2X(7 to function as a multifaceted receptor that can mediate cell proliferation and

  12. In vivo and in vitro expression of myeloid antigens on B-lineage acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hara, J; Kawa-Ha, K; Yumura-Yagi, K; Kurahashi, H; Tawa, A; Ishihara, S; Inoue, M; Murayama, N; Okada, S

    1991-01-01

    The expression of myeloid antigens has been extensively examined using two-color analysis in 43 children with B-lineage acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). On pre-culture cells, CD33 expression was frequently observed in CD19+, CD10- B-precursor ALL, and CD14 was expressed only on the cells from B-precursor ALL expressing CD19, CD10 and CD20, and B-ALL. After 2 or 3 days of culture without TPA, CD13 emerged on the cells from 21 of 29 patients irrespective of the presence or the absence of fetal calf serum in the culture. Of four patients with CD10+ B-precursor ALL, which showed no expression of CD13 after culture, two had T-cell associated antigens. Whereas the addition of TPA to the culture enhanced the expression of CD13 on the cells from acute non-lymphocytic leukemia (ANLL), TPA reduced the expression of this antigen on B-precursor cells. These findings suggest that the regulatory mechanism of CD13 expression may be different between B-precursor ALL and ANLL. Co-culture with cycloheximide mostly abrogated the induction of CD13, suggesting that CD13 expression was mainly dependent on de novo protein synthesis.

  13. Expression of TRAIL-splice variants in gastric carcinomas: identification of TRAIL-γ as a prognostic marker

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krieg, Andreas; Mahotka, Csaba; Mersch, Sabrina; Wolf, Nadine; Stoecklein, Nikolas H; Verde, Pablo E; Schulte am Esch, Jan; Heikaus, Sebastian; Gabbert, Helmut E; Knoefel, Wolfram T

    2013-01-01

    TNF-related apoptosis inducing ligand (TRAIL) belongs to the TNF-superfamily that induces apoptotic cell death in a wide range of neoplastic cells in vivo as well as in vitro. We identified two alternative TRAIL-splice variants, i.e. TRAIL-β and TRAIL-γ that are characterized by the loss of their proapoptotic properties. Herein, we investigated the expression and the prognostic values of the TRAIL-splice variants in gastric carcinomas. Real time PCR for amplification of the TRAIL-splice variants was performed in tumour tissue specimens and corresponding normal tissues of 41 consecutive patients with gastric carcinoma. Differences on mRNA-expression levels of the TRAIL-isoforms were compared to histo-pathological variables and correlated with survival data. All three TRAIL-splice variants could be detected in both non-malignant and malignant tissues, irrespective of their histological staging, grading or tumour types. However, TRAIL-β exhibited a higher expression in normal gastric tissue. The proapoptotic TRAIL-α expression was increased in gastric carcinomas when compared to TRAIL-β and TRAIL-γ. In addition, overexpression of TRAIL-γ was associated with a significant higher survival rate. This is the first study that investigated the expression of TRAIL-splice variants in gastric carcinoma tissue samples. Thus, we provide first data that indicate a prognostic value for TRAIL-γ overexpression in this tumour entity

  14. Expression of a hantavirus N protein and its efficacy as antigen in immune assays

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    L.T.M. Figueiredo

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Hantavirus cardiopulmonary syndrome (HCPS has been recognized as an important public heath problem. Five hantaviruses associated with HCPS are currently known in Brazil: Juquitiba, Araraquara, Laguna Negra-like, Castelo dos Sonhos, and Anajatuba viruses. The laboratory diagnosis of HCPS is routinely carried out by the detection of anti-hantavirus IgM and/or IgG antibodies. The present study describes the expression of the N protein of a hantavirus detected in the blood sample of an HCPS patient. The entire S segment of the virus was amplified and found to be 1858 nucleotides long, with an open reading frame of 1287 nucleotides that encodes a protein of 429 amino acids. The nucleotide sequence described here showed a high identity with the N protein gene of Araraquara virus. The entire N protein was expressed using the vector pET200D and the Escherichia coli BL21 strain. The expression of the recombinant protein was confirmed by the detection of a 52-kDa protein by Western blot using a pool of human sera obtained from HCPS patients, and by specific IgG detection in five serum samples of HCPS patients tested by ELISA. These results suggest that the recombinant N protein could be used as an antigen for the serological screening of hantavirus infection.

  15. Enhanced Expression of Interferon-γ-Induced Antigen-Processing Machinery Components in a Spontaneously Occurring Cancer

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    Fulvia Cerruti

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available In human tumors, changes in the surface expression and/or function of major histocompatibility complex (MHC class I antigens are frequently found and may provide malignant cells with a mechanism to escape control of the immune system. This altered human lymphocyte antigen (HLA class I phenotype can be caused by either structural alterations or dysregulation of genes encoding subunits of HLA class I antigens and/or components of the MHC class I antigen-processing machinery (APM. Herein we analyze the expression of several proteins involved in the generation of MHC class I epitopes in feline injection site sarcoma, a spontaneously occurring tumor in cats that is an informative model for the study of tumor biology in other species, including humans. Eighteen surgically removed primary fibrosarcoma lesions were analyzed, and an enhanced expression of two catalytic subunits of immunoproteasomes, PA28 and leucine aminopeptidase, was found in tumors compared to matched normal tissues. As a functional counterpart of these changes in protein levels, proteasomal activities were increased in tissue extracts from fibrosarcomas. Taken together, these results suggest that alterations in the APM system may account for reduced processing of selected tumor antigens and may potentially provide neoplastic fibroblasts with a mechanism for escape from T-cell recognition and destruction.

  16. TransAtlasDB: an integrated database connecting expression data, metadata and variants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adetunji, Modupeore O; Lamont, Susan J; Schmidt, Carl J

    2018-01-01

    Abstract High-throughput transcriptome sequencing (RNAseq) is the universally applied method for target-free transcript identification and gene expression quantification, generating huge amounts of data. The constraint of accessing such data and interpreting results can be a major impediment in postulating suitable hypothesis, thus an innovative storage solution that addresses these limitations, such as hard disk storage requirements, efficiency and reproducibility are paramount. By offering a uniform data storage and retrieval mechanism, various data can be compared and easily investigated. We present a sophisticated system, TransAtlasDB, which incorporates a hybrid architecture of both relational and NoSQL databases for fast and efficient data storage, processing and querying of large datasets from transcript expression analysis with corresponding metadata, as well as gene-associated variants (such as SNPs) and their predicted gene effects. TransAtlasDB provides the data model of accurate storage of the large amount of data derived from RNAseq analysis and also methods of interacting with the database, either via the command-line data management workflows, written in Perl, with useful functionalities that simplifies the complexity of data storage and possibly manipulation of the massive amounts of data generated from RNAseq analysis or through the web interface. The database application is currently modeled to handle analyses data from agricultural species, and will be expanded to include more species groups. Overall TransAtlasDB aims to serve as an accessible repository for the large complex results data files derived from RNAseq gene expression profiling and variant analysis. Database URL: https://modupeore.github.io/TransAtlasDB/ PMID:29688361

  17. Serodiagnosis of bovine trypanosomosis caused by non-tsetse transmitted Trypanosoma (Duttonella) vivax parasites using the soluble form of a Trypanozoon variant surface glycoprotein antigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uzcanga, Graciela L; Pérez-Rojas, Yenis; Camargo, Rocío; Izquier, Adriana; Noda, José A; Chacín, Ronny; Parra, Nereida; Ron, Lenin; Rodríguez-Hidalgo, Richar; Bubis, José

    2016-03-15

    Previous studies have shown that a 64-kDa antigen (p64) that was purified from the Venezuelan TeAp-N/D1 isolate of Trypanosoma (Trypanozoon) equiperdum corresponds to the soluble form of its predominant variant surface glycoprotein (VSG), and exhibited cross-reactivity with Trypanosoma (Duttonella) vivax. The course of experimental acute infections of bovines with T. vivax were followed by measuring whole anti-p64 antibodies and specific anti-p64 IgG and IgM antibodies in animal sera by indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The value of p64 to diagnose bovine trypanosomosis was also examined using 350 sera from healthy and T. vivax-infected cows living in a trypanosomosis-endemic and enzootic stable area, and 48 sera obtained during a trypanosomosis outbreak. Serological assays showed that ∼ 70-80% of the infected sera contained anti-p64 antibodies, based on the comparative immunodetection of the T. equiperdum clarified antigenic fraction used as a reference test. In the absence of a gold standard, Bayesian analysis for multiple testing estimated a sensitivity and specificity of 71.6% and 98.8%, respectively, for the indirect ELISA using p64 as antigen. An apparent prevalence of 37.7% for bovine trypanosomosis infection was also estimated with a Bayesian approach when the p64 ELISA test was used. Employing blood from acute infected cows, the indirect ELISA response against p64 was contrasted with the microhematocrit centrifuge method and analyses by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using specific primers targeting the inter-specific length variation of the internal transcribed spacer 1 region of the 18S ribosomal gene. The efficiency of p64 for the detection of anti-trypanosome antibodies in acute infected bovines was also corroborated serologically by comparing its response to that of the Indonesian Trypanosoma evansi Rode Trypanozoon antigen type (RoTat) 1.2 VSG, which possesses high specificity and sensitivity. As expected, PCR was the best

  18. Limited transplantation of antigen-expressing hematopoietic stem cells induces long-lasting cytotoxic T cell responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Warren L Denning

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Harnessing the ability of cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs to recognize and eradicate tumor or pathogen-infected cells is a critical goal of modern immune-based therapies. Although multiple immunization strategies efficiently induce high levels of antigen-specific CTLs, the initial increase is typically followed by a rapid contraction phase resulting in a sharp decline in the frequency of functional CTLs. We describe a novel approach to immunotherapy based on a transplantation of low numbers of antigen-expressing hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs following nonmyeloablative or partially myeloablative conditioning. Continuous antigen presentation by a limited number of differentiated transgenic hematopoietic cells results in an induction and prolonged maintenance of fully functional effector T cell responses in a mouse model. Recipient animals display high levels of antigen-specific CTLs four months following transplantation in contrast to dendritic cell-immunized animals in which the response typically declines at 4-6 weeks post-immunization. Majority of HSC-induced antigen-specific CD8+ T cells display central memory phenotype, efficiently kill target cells in vivo, and protect recipients against tumor growth in a preventive setting. Furthermore, we confirm previously published observation that high level engraftment of antigen-expressing HSCs following myeloablative conditioning results in tolerance and an absence of specific cytotoxic activity in vivo. In conclusion, the data presented here supports potential application of immunization by limited transplantation of antigen-expressing HSCs for the prevention and treatment of cancer and therapeutic immunization of chronic infectious diseases such as HIV-1/AIDS.

  19. Infrequent and low expression of cancer-testis antigens located on the X chromosome in colorectal cancer: implications for immunotherapy in South African populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dakshinamurthy, Amirtha Ganesh; Ramesar, Rajkumar; Goldberg, Paul; Blackburn, Jonathan M

    2008-11-01

    Cancer-testis (CT) antigens are a group of tumor antigens that are expressed in the testis and aberrantly in cancerous tissue but not in somatic tissues. The testis is an immune-privileged site because of the presence of a blood-testis barrier; as a result, CT antigens are considered to be essentially tumor specific and are attractive targets for immunotherapy. CT antigens are classified as the CT-X and the non-X CT antigens depending on the chromosomal location to which the genes are mapped. CT-X antigens are typically highly immunogenic and hence the first step towards tailored immunotherapy is to elucidate the expression profile of CT-X antigens in the respective tumors. In this study we investigated the expression profile of 16 CT-X antigen genes in 34 colorectal cancer (CRC) patients using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. We observed that 12 of the 16 CT-X antigen genes studied did not show expression in any of the CRC samples analyzed. The other 4 CT-X antigen genes showed low frequency of expression and exhibited a highly variable expression profile when compared to other populations. Thus, our study forms the first report on the expression profile of CT-X antigen genes among CRC patients in the genetically diverse South African population. The results of our study suggest that genetic and ethnic variations in population might have a role in the expression of the CT-X antigen genes. Thus our results have significant implications for anti-CT antigen-based immunotherapy trials in this population.

  20. [Effect of gene optimization on the expression and purification of HDV small antigen produced by genetic engineering].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Jun-Ying; Meng, Qing-Ling; Guo, Min-Zhuo; Yi, Yao; Su, Qiu-Dong; Lu, Xue-Xin; Qiu, Feng; Bi, Sheng-Li

    2012-10-01

    To study the effect of gene optimization on the expression and purification of HDV small antigen produced by genetic engineering. Based on the colon preference of E. coli, the HDV small antigen original gene from GenBank was optimized. Both the original gene and the optimized gene expressed in prokaryotic cells, SDS-PAGE was made to analyze the protein expression yield and to decide which protein expression style was more proportion than the other. Furthermore, two antigens were purified by chromatography in order to compare the purity by SDS-PAGE and Image Lab software. SDS-PAGE indicated that the molecular weight of target proteins from two groups were the same as we expected. Gene optimization resulted in the higher yield and it could make the product more soluble. After chromatography, the purity of target protein from optimized gene was up to 96.3%, obviously purer than that from original gene. Gene optimization could increase the protein expression yield and solubility of genetic engineering HDV small antigen. In addition, the product from the optimized gene group was easier to be purified for diagnosis usage.

  1. Expression of human placental lactogen and variant growth hormone genes in placentas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Rodriguez, H G; Guerra-Rodriguez, N E; Iturbe-Cantu, M A; Martinez-Torres, A; Barrera-Saldaña, H A

    1997-01-01

    Previous studies comparing the expression levels of human placental lactogen (hPL) genes have shown varying results, due to, perhaps, the fact that in all of them only one placenta was being analyzed. Here, the expression of hPL and growth hormone variant (hGH-V) genes in fifteen term placentas was comparatively analyzed at the RNA level, using reverse transcription coupled to polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). The abundance of the combined RNA transcripts derived from these genes varied from one placenta to another. The authors found that hPL-4 transcripts were more abundant than those of hPL-3 in most samples (ratios from 1:1 to 6:1), transcripts from the putative hPL-1 pseudogene were more abundant at the unprocessed stage while those of the hGH-V gene were mostly processed. Again, the authors of this study observed wide variation from placenta to placenta in the abundance of both of these types of transcripts. The same was observed when a group of six placentas from abortuses and nine from pregnancies complicated by preclampsia, diabetes and hypertension was studied. The authors conclude that the disagreeing results reported in the literature which are not in agreement concerning the expression levels of hPL genes could be explained by normal variations of their expression levels among the different placentas analyzed.

  2. Extracellular Matrix Proteins Expression Profiling in Chemoresistant Variants of the A2780 Ovarian Cancer Cell Line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radosław Januchowski

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Ovarian cancer is the leading cause of death among gynaecological malignancies. Extracellular matrix (ECM can affect drug resistance by preventing the penetration of the drug into cancer cells and increased resistance to apoptosis. This study demonstrates alterations in the expression levels of ECM components and related genes in cisplatin-, doxorubicin-, topotecan-, and paclitaxel-resistant variants of the A2780 ovarian cancer cell line. Affymetrix Gene Chip Human Genome Array Strips were used for hybridisations. The genes that had altered expression levels in drug-resistant sublines were selected and filtered by scatter plots. The genes that were up- or downregulated more than fivefold were selected and listed. Among the investigated genes, 28 genes were upregulated, 10 genes were downregulated, and two genes were down- or upregulated depending on the cell line. Between upregulated genes 12 were upregulated very significantly—over 20-fold. These genes included COL1A2, COL12A1, COL21A1, LOX, TGFBI, LAMB1, EFEMP1, GPC3, SDC2, MGP, MMP3, and TIMP3. Four genes were very significantly downregulated: COL11A1, LAMA2, GPC6, and LUM. The expression profiles of investigated genes provide a preliminary insight into the relationship between drug resistance and the expression of ECM components. Identifying correlations between investigated genes and drug resistance will require further analysis.

  3. Manufacture of clinical-grade CD19-specific T cells stably expressing chimeric antigen receptor using Sleeping Beauty system and artificial antigen presenting cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harjeet Singh

    Full Text Available Adoptive transfer of T cells expressing a CD19-specific chimeric antigen receptor (CAR is being evaluated in multiple clinical trials. Our current approach to adoptive immunotherapy is based on a second generation CAR (designated CD19RCD28 that signals through a CD28 and CD3-ζ endodomain. T cells are electroporated with DNA plasmids from the Sleeping Beauty (SB transposon/transposase system to express this CAR. Stable integrants of genetically modified T cells can then be retrieved when co-cultured with designer artificial antigen presenting cells (aAPC in the presence of interleukin (IL-2 and 21. Here, we reveal how the platform technologies of SB-mediated transposition and CAR-dependent propagation on aAPC were adapted for human application. Indeed, we have initiated clinical trials in patients with high-risk B-lineage malignancies undergoing autologous and allogeneic hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation (HSCT. We describe the process to manufacture clinical grade CD19-specific T cells derived from healthy donors. Three validation runs were completed in compliance with current good manufacturing practice for Phase I/II trials demonstrating that by 28 days of co-culture on γ-irradiated aAPC ∼10(10 T cells were produced of which >95% expressed CAR. These genetically modified and propagated T cells met all quality control testing and release criteria in support of infusion.

  4. Expression pattern of immunosurveillance-related antigen in adult T cell leukaemia/lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asano, Naoko; Miyoshi, Hiroaki; Kato, Takeharu; Shimono, Joji; Yoshida, Noriaki; Kurita, Daisuke; Sasaki, Yuya; Kawamoto, Keisuke; Ohshima, Koichi; Seto, Masao

    2018-05-01

    Adult T cell leukaemia/lymphoma (ATLL) is an aggressive malignancy with a poor prognosis. Human leucocyte antigen (HLA) and β2 microglobulin (β2M) serve as key molecules in tumour immunity, and their expression is reduced frequently in tumour cells. Programmed cell death (PD)-1/PD-ligand1 (PD-L1) interactions play a role in escape of tumour cells from T cell immunity. Therefore, this study aimed to determine the clinicopathological relevance of HLA and β2M expressions in ATLL cells and PD-L1 expression in lymphoma or stromal cells and predict the overall survival of patients with ATLL. We analysed a total of 123 biopsy samples from patients newly diagnosed with ATLL by using immunohistochemical analysis. Of the patients enrolled, 91 (74%) were positive for HLA (in cell membrane, 60 patients), 89 (72%) were positive for β2M (in cell membrane, 54 patients) and 48 (39%) were positive for both HLA and β2M in the cell membrane (HLA m+ β2M m+ ). No significant clinical differences other than prognosis were found between the HLA m+ β2M m+ group and the other groups. Immunophenotypical evaluation revealed significantly higher rates of CD30-positive lymphoma cells (P = 0.003) and PD-L1-positive stromal cells in microenvironments (miPD-L1 high ) (P = 0.011) of the HLA m+ β2M m+ group than in the other groups. The HLA m+ β2M m+ group had a significantly better prognosis that the other groups (P = 0.0096), and patients showing HLA m+ β2M m+ with miPD-L1 high had the most favourable prognosis among all groups. The membranous expression of HLA and β2M is likely to reflect the immune response and would be useful to predict prognosis before starting ATLL therapy. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Antigen Expression on Blast Cells and Hematological Parameters at Presentation in Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naeem, S.; Bukhari, M. H.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To analyze the expression of various antigens on the leukemic blasts and to determine the hematological parameters, in Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL) patients at presentation. Study Design: Observational study. Place and Duration of Study: King Edward Medical University, Lahore and Hameed Latif Hospital, Lahore, from February 2013 to March 2014. Methodology: A total of 50 newly diagnosed and untreated patients of ALL were selected from Mayo Hospital and Hameed Latif Hospital. These patients included both genders and all age groups. Hemoglobin, total leukocyte count and platelet count were determined on hematology analyser-Sysmex-Kx-2I. Blast cell percentage was estimated on Giemsa stained blood smears. Immuno phenotyping was done on bone marrow samples by 5 colour flow cytometery on Beckman Counter Navious Flow cytometer. An acute leukemia panel of 23 antibodies was used. The data was entered and analyzed in SPSS version 22. Results: Of the 50 ALL patients, 36 (72 percentage) were B-ALL and 14 (28 percentage) T-ALL. There were 18 (36 percentage) children and 32 (64 percentage) adults. T-ALL included 22 percentage of the childhood and 31 percentage of the adult cases. Immuno phenotypic analysis showed that CD19, CD79a and CD20 were B-lineage specific markers whereas cCD3, CD3 and CD5 were T-lineage specific. CD10 was the most sensitive marker for B-ALL and CD7 was the most sensitive marker of T-ALL. TdT was expressed in 92 percentage B-ALL and 71 percentage T-ALL cases, CD34 in 58 percentage and 43 percentage cases and CD45 in 83 percentage and 100 percentage respectively. High leukocyte count (> 50 x 109/L) was present in 58 percentage cases. Hemoglobin was < 10 g/dl in 74 percentage patients and platelet count was below 20 x 109/Lin 12 percentage patients. Leukocyte count, hemoglobin, platelet count and blast cell percentage did not show a significant difference in the two ALL immuno types. Conclusion: The frequency of T-ALL is higher in childhood

  6. Characterization of a new Lactobacillus salivarius strain engineered to express IBV multi-epitope antigens by chromosomal integration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Bing-cun; Yang, Xin; Wang, Hong-ning; Cao, Hai-peng; Xu, Peng-wei; Ding, Meng-die; Liu, Hui

    2016-01-01

    To obtain adhesive and safe lactic acid bacteria (LAB) strains for expressing heterologous antigens, we screened LAB inhabitants in intestine of Tibetan chickens by analyzing their adhesion and safety properties and the selected LAB was engineered to express heterologous antigen (UTEpi C-A) based on chromosomal integration strategy. We demonstrated that a new Lactobacillu salivarius TCMM17 strain is strongly adhesive to chicken intestinal epithelial cells, contains no endogenous plasmids, is susceptible to tested antimicrobials, and shows no toxicities. In order to examine the potential of TCMM17 strain as heterogenous antigen delivering vehicle, we introduced a UTEpi C-A expression cassette in its chromosome by constructing a non-replicative plasmid (pORI280-UUTEpi C-AD). The recombinant TCMM17 strain (∆TCMM17) stably was found to keep the gene cassette through 50 generations, and successfully displayed EpiC encoded by the cassette on its surface. This work provides a universal platform for development of novel oral vaccines and expression of further antigens of avian pathogens.

  7. Recombinant Salmonella Expressing Burkholderia mallei LPS O Antigen Provides Protection in a Murine Model of Melioidosis and Glanders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moustafa, Dina A; Scarff, Jennifer M; Garcia, Preston P; Cassidy, Sara K B; DiGiandomenico, Antonio; Waag, David M; Inzana, Thomas J; Goldberg, Joanna B

    2015-01-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei and Burkholderia mallei are the etiologic agents of melioidosis and glanders, respectively. These bacteria are highly infectious via the respiratory route and can cause severe and often fatal diseases in humans and animals. Both species are considered potential agents of biological warfare; they are classified as category B priority pathogens. Currently there are no human or veterinary vaccines available against these pathogens. Consequently efforts are directed towards the development of an efficacious and safe vaccine. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is an immunodominant antigen and potent stimulator of host immune responses. B. mallei express LPS that is structurally similar to that expressed by B. pseudomallei, suggesting the possibility of constructing a single protective vaccine against melioidosis and glanders. Previous studies of others have shown that antibodies against B. mallei or B. pseudomallei LPS partially protect mice against subsequent lethal virulent Burkholderia challenge. In this study, we evaluated the protective efficacy of recombinant Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium SL3261 expressing B. mallei O antigen against lethal intranasal infection with Burkholderia thailandensis, a surrogate for biothreat Burkholderia spp. in a murine model that mimics melioidosis and glanders. All vaccine-immunized mice developed a specific antibody response to B. mallei and B. pseudomallei O antigen and to B. thailandensis and were significantly protected against challenge with a lethal dose of B. thailandensis. These results suggest that live-attenuated SL3261 expressing B. mallei O antigen is a promising platform for developing a safe and effective vaccine.

  8. Recombinant Salmonella Expressing Burkholderia mallei LPS O Antigen Provides Protection in a Murine Model of Melioidosis and Glanders.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dina A Moustafa

    Full Text Available Burkholderia pseudomallei and Burkholderia mallei are the etiologic agents of melioidosis and glanders, respectively. These bacteria are highly infectious via the respiratory route and can cause severe and often fatal diseases in humans and animals. Both species are considered potential agents of biological warfare; they are classified as category B priority pathogens. Currently there are no human or veterinary vaccines available against these pathogens. Consequently efforts are directed towards the development of an efficacious and safe vaccine. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS is an immunodominant antigen and potent stimulator of host immune responses. B. mallei express LPS that is structurally similar to that expressed by B. pseudomallei, suggesting the possibility of constructing a single protective vaccine against melioidosis and glanders. Previous studies of others have shown that antibodies against B. mallei or B. pseudomallei LPS partially protect mice against subsequent lethal virulent Burkholderia challenge. In this study, we evaluated the protective efficacy of recombinant Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium SL3261 expressing B. mallei O antigen against lethal intranasal infection with Burkholderia thailandensis, a surrogate for biothreat Burkholderia spp. in a murine model that mimics melioidosis and glanders. All vaccine-immunized mice developed a specific antibody response to B. mallei and B. pseudomallei O antigen and to B. thailandensis and were significantly protected against challenge with a lethal dose of B. thailandensis. These results suggest that live-attenuated SL3261 expressing B. mallei O antigen is a promising platform for developing a safe and effective vaccine.

  9. BRAF inhibition is associated with enhanced melanoma antigen expression and a more favorable tumor microenvironment in patients with metastatic melanoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frederick, Dennie Tompers; Piris, Adriano; Cogdill, Alexandria P.; Cooper, Zachary A.; Lezcano, Cecilia; Ferrone, Cristina R.; Mitra, Devarati; Boni, Andrea; Newton, Lindsay P.; Liu, Chengwen; Peng, Weiyi; Sullivan, Ryan J; Lawrence, Donald P.; Hodi, F. Stephen; Overwijk, Willem W.; Lizée, Gregory; Murphy, George F.; Hwu, Patrick; Flaherty, Keith T.; Fisher, David E.; Wargo, Jennifer A.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the effects BRAF inhibition on the tumor microenvironment in patients with metastatic melanoma. Experimental Design Thirty-five biopsies were collected from 16 patients with metastatic melanoma pretreatment (day 0) and at 10-14 days after initiation of treatment with either BRAF inhibitor alone (vemurafenib) or BRAF + MEK inhibition (dabrafenib + trametinib), and were also taken at time of progression. Biopsies were analyzed for melanoma antigens, T cell markers, and immunomodulatory cytokines. Results Treatment with either BRAF inhibitor alone or BRAF + MEK inhibitor was associated with an increased expression of melanoma antigens and an increase in CD8+ T cell infiltrate. This was also associated with a decrease in immunosuppressive cytokines (IL-6 & IL-8) and an increase in markers of T cell cytotoxicity. Interestingly, expression of exhaustion markers TIM-3 and PD1 and the immunosuppressive ligand PDL1 were increased on treatment. A decrease in melanoma antigen expression and CD8 T cell infiltrate was noted at time of progression on BRAF inhibitor alone, and was reversed with combined BRAF and MEK inhibition. Conclusions Together, this data suggests that treatment with BRAF inhibition enhances melanoma antigen expression and facilitates T cell cytotoxicity and a more favorable tumor microenvironment, providing support for potential synergy of BRAF-targeted therapy and immunotherapy. Interestingly, markers of T cell exhaustion and the immunosuppressive ligand PDL1 are also increased with BRAF inhibition, further implying that immune checkpoint blockade may be critical in augmenting responses to BRAF-targeted therapy in patients with melanoma. PMID:23307859

  10. PGC1? ?1 Nucleosome Position and Splice Variant Expression and Cardiovascular Disease Risk in Overweight and Obese Individuals

    OpenAIRE

    Henagan, Tara M.; Stewart, Laura K.; Forney, Laura A.; Sparks, Lauren M.; Johannsen, Neil; Church, Timothy S.

    2014-01-01

    PGC1α, a transcriptional coactivator, interacts with PPARs and others to regulate skeletal muscle metabolism. PGC1α undergoes splicing to produce several mRNA variants, with the NTPGC1α variant having a similar biological function to the full length PGC1α (FLPGC1α). CVD is associated with obesity and T2D and a lower percentage of type 1 oxidative fibers and impaired mitochondrial function in skeletal muscle, characteristics determined by PGC1α expression. PGC1α expression is epigenetically re...

  11. Peripheral nerve injury causes transient expression of MHC class I antigens in rat motor neurons and skeletal muscles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maehlen, J; Nennesmo, I; Olsson, A B

    1989-01-01

    After a peripheral nerve lesion (rat facial and sciatic) an induction of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) antigens class I was detected immunohistochemically in skeletal muscle fibers and motor neurons. This MHC expression was transient after a nerve crush, when regeneration occurred......, but persisted after a nerve cut, when regeneration was prevented. Since the time course of MHC class I expression correlates to that of regeneration a role for this cell surface molecule in regeneration may be considered....

  12. Altered expression of estrogen receptor-α variant messenger RNAs between adjacent normal breast and breast tumor tissues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leygue, Etienne; Dotzlaw, Helmut; Watson, Peter H; Murphy, Leigh C

    2000-01-01

    Using semiquantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction assays, we investigated the expression of variant messenger RNAs relative to wild-type estrogen receptor (ER)-α messenger RNA in normal breast tissues and their adjacent matched breast tumor tissues. Higher ER variant truncated after sequences encoding exon 2 of the wild-type ER-α (ERC4) messenger RNA and a lower exon 3 deleted ER-α variant (ERD3) messenger RNA relative expression in the tumor compartment were observed in the ER-positive/PR-positive and the ER-positive subsets, respectively. A significantly higher relative expression of exon 5 deleted ER-α varient (ERD5) messenger RNA was observed in tumor components overall. These data demonstrate that changes in the relative expression of ER-α variant messenger RNAs occur between adjacent normal and neoplastic breast tissues. We suggest that these changes might be involved in the mechanisms that underlie breast tumorigenesis. Estrogen receptor (ER)-α and ER-β are believed to mediate the action of estradiol in target tissues. Several ER-α and ER-β variant messenger RNAs have been identified in both normal and neoplastic human tissues. Most of these variants contain a deletion of one or more exons of the wild-type (WT) ER messenger RNAs. The putative proteins that are encoded by these variant messenger RNAs would therefore be missing some functional domains of the WT receptors, and might interfere with WT-ER signaling pathways. The detection of ER-α variants in both normal and neoplastic human breast tissues raised the question of their possible role in breast tumorigenesis. We have previously reported an increased relative expression of exon 5 deleted ER-α variant (ERD5) messenger RNA and of another ER-α variant truncated of all sequences following the exon 2 of the WT ER-α (ERC4) messenger RNA in breast tumor samples versus independent normal breast tissues. In contrast, a decreased relative expression of exon 3 deleted ER

  13. Sarcocystis neurona merozoites express a family of immunogenic surface antigens that are orthologues of the Toxoplasma gondii surface antigens (SAGs) and SAG-related sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howe, Daniel K; Gaji, Rajshekhar Y; Mroz-Barrett, Meaghan; Gubbels, Marc-Jan; Striepen, Boris; Stamper, Shelby

    2005-02-01

    Sarcocystis neurona is a member of the Apicomplexa that causes myelitis and encephalitis in horses but normally cycles between the opossum and small mammals. Analysis of an S. neurona expressed sequence tag (EST) database revealed four paralogous proteins that exhibit clear homology to the family of surface antigens (SAGs) and SAG-related sequences of Toxoplasma gondii. The primary peptide sequences of the S. neurona proteins are consistent with the two-domain structure that has been described for the T. gondii SAGs, and each was predicted to have an amino-terminal signal peptide and a carboxyl-terminal glycolipid anchor addition site, suggesting surface localization. All four proteins were confirmed to be membrane associated and displayed on the surface of S. neurona merozoites. Due to their surface localization and homology to T. gondii surface antigens, these S. neurona proteins were designated SnSAG1, SnSAG2, SnSAG3, and SnSAG4. Consistent with their homology, the SnSAGs elicited a robust immune response in infected and immunized animals, and their conserved structure further suggests that the SnSAGs similarly serve as adhesins for attachment to host cells. Whether the S. neurona SAG family is as extensive as the T. gondii SAG family remains unresolved, but it is probable that additional SnSAGs will be revealed as more S. neurona ESTs are generated. The existence of an SnSAG family in S. neurona indicates that expression of multiple related surface antigens is not unique to the ubiquitous organism T. gondii. Instead, the SAG gene family is a common trait that presumably has an essential, conserved function(s).

  14. Sarcocystis neurona Merozoites Express a Family of Immunogenic Surface Antigens That Are Orthologues of the Toxoplasma gondii Surface Antigens (SAGs) and SAG-Related Sequences†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howe, Daniel K.; Gaji, Rajshekhar Y.; Mroz-Barrett, Meaghan; Gubbels, Marc-Jan; Striepen, Boris; Stamper, Shelby

    2005-01-01

    Sarcocystis neurona is a member of the Apicomplexa that causes myelitis and encephalitis in horses but normally cycles between the opossum and small mammals. Analysis of an S. neurona expressed sequence tag (EST) database revealed four paralogous proteins that exhibit clear homology to the family of surface antigens (SAGs) and SAG-related sequences of Toxoplasma gondii. The primary peptide sequences of the S. neurona proteins are consistent with the two-domain structure that has been described for the T. gondii SAGs, and each was predicted to have an amino-terminal signal peptide and a carboxyl-terminal glycolipid anchor addition site, suggesting surface localization. All four proteins were confirmed to be membrane associated and displayed on the surface of S. neurona merozoites. Due to their surface localization and homology to T. gondii surface antigens, these S. neurona proteins were designated SnSAG1, SnSAG2, SnSAG3, and SnSAG4. Consistent with their homology, the SnSAGs elicited a robust immune response in infected and immunized animals, and their conserved structure further suggests that the SnSAGs similarly serve as adhesins for attachment to host cells. Whether the S. neurona SAG family is as extensive as the T. gondii SAG family remains unresolved, but it is probable that additional SnSAGs will be revealed as more S. neurona ESTs are generated. The existence of an SnSAG family in S. neurona indicates that expression of multiple related surface antigens is not unique to the ubiquitous organism T. gondii. Instead, the SAG gene family is a common trait that presumably has an essential, conserved function(s). PMID:15664946

  15. Plant bioreactors for the antigenic hook-associated flgK protein expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Rossi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Plants engineered with genes encoding for the antigenic proteins of various microorganisms have shown to correctly express the proteins that elicit the production of antibodies in mammalian hosts. In livestock, plant-based vaccines could represent an innovative strategy for oral vaccination, especially to prevent infection by enteric pathogens. The aim of this study was to evaluate tobacco plants as a seedspecific expression system for the production of the flgK flagellar hook-associated protein from a wild type Salmonella typhimurium strain, as a model of an edible vaccine. The flgK gene is the principal component of bacterial flagella and is recognised as virulence factor by the innate immune system. It was isolated from the Salmonella typhimurium strain by PCR. The encoding sequence of flgK was transferred into a pBI binary vector, under control of soybean basic 7S globulin promoter for the seed-specific. Plant transformation was carried out using recombinant EHA 105 Agrobacterium tumefaciens. A transgenic population was obtained made up of independently kanamycin-resistant transgenic plants, which had a similar morphological appearance to the wild-type plants. Molecular analyses of seeds confirmed the integration of the gene and the average expression level of flgK was estimated to be about 0.6 mg per gram of seeds, corresponding to 0.33% of the total amount of soluble protein in tobacco seeds. This study showed that the foreign flgK gene could be stably incorporated into the tobacco plant genome by transcription through the nuclear apparatus of the plant, and that these genes are inherited by the next generation.

  16. Expression of Tac antigen component of bovine interleukin-2 receptor in different leukocyte populations infected with Theileria parva or Theileria annulata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobbelaere, D A; Prospero, T D; Roditi, I J; Kelke, C; Baumann, I; Eichhorn, M; Williams, R O; Ahmed, J S; Baldwin, C L; Clevers, H

    1990-01-01

    The Tac antigen component of the bovine interleukin-2 receptor was expressed as a Cro-beta-galactosidase fusion protein in Escherichia coli and used to raise antibodies in rabbits. These antibodies were used for flow cytofluorimetric analysis to investigate the expression of Tac antigen in a variety of Theileria parva-infected cell lines and also in three Theileria annulata-infected cell lines. Cells expressing Tac antigen on their surface were found in all T. parva-infected cell lines tested whether these were of T- or B-cell origin. T cells expressing Tac antigen could be CD4- CD8-, CD4+ CD8-, CD4- CD8+, or CD4+ CD8+. Tac antigen expression was observed both in cultures which had been maintained in the laboratory for several years and in transformed cell lines which had recently been established by infection of lymphocytes in vitro with T. parva. Northern (RNA) blot analysis demonstrated Tac antigen transcripts in RNA isolated from all T. parva-infected cell lines. Three T. annulata-infected cell lines which were not of T-cell origin were also tested. Two of them expressed Tac antigen on their surface. Abundant Tac antigen mRNA was detected in these T. annulata-infected cell lines, but only trace amounts were demonstrated in the third cell line, which contained very few Tac antigen-expressing cells. In all cell lines tested, whether cloned or uncloned, a proportion of the cells did not express detectable levels of Tac antigen on their surface. This was also the case for a number of other leukocyte surface markers. In addition, we showed that the interleukin-2 receptors were biologically functional, because addition of recombinant interleukin-2 to cultures stimulated cell proliferation. Recombinant interleukin-2 treatment also resulted in increased amounts of steady-state Tac antigen mRNA. The relevance of interleukin-2 receptor expression on Theileria-infected cells is discussed. Images PMID:1979317

  17. Identification of variant-specific surface proteins in Giardia muris trophozoites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ropolo, Andrea S; Saura, Alicia; Carranza, Pedro G; Lujan, Hugo D

    2005-08-01

    Giardia lamblia undergoes antigenic variation, a process that might allow the parasite to evade the host's immune response and adapt to different environments. Here we show that Giardia muris, a related species that naturally infects rodents, possesses multiple variant-specific surface proteins (VSPs) and expresses VSPs on its surface, suggesting that it undergoes antigenic variation similar to that of G. lamblia.

  18. Identification of Variant-Specific Surface Proteins in Giardia muris Trophozoites

    OpenAIRE

    Ropolo, Andrea S.; Saura, Alicia; Carranza, Pedro G.; Lujan, Hugo D.

    2005-01-01

    Giardia lamblia undergoes antigenic variation, a process that might allow the parasite to evade the host's immune response and adapt to different environments. Here we show that Giardia muris, a related species that naturally infects rodents, possesses multiple variant-specific surface proteins (VSPs) and expresses VSPs on its surface, suggesting that it undergoes antigenic variation similar to that of G. lamblia.

  19. Age-Associated Decline in Thymic B Cell Expression of Aire and Aire-Dependent Self-Antigens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Cepeda

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Although autoimmune disorders are a significant source of morbidity and mortality in older individuals, the mechanisms governing age-associated increases in susceptibility remain incompletely understood. Central T cell tolerance is mediated through presentation of self-antigens by cells constituting the thymic microenvironment, including epithelial cells, dendritic cells, and B cells. Medullary thymic epithelial cells (mTECs and B cells express distinct cohorts of self-antigens, including tissue-restricted self-antigens (TRAs, such that developing T cells are tolerized to antigens from peripheral tissues. We find that expression of the TRA transcriptional regulator Aire, as well as Aire-dependent genes, declines with age in thymic B cells in mice and humans and that cell-intrinsic and cell-extrinsic mechanisms contribute to the diminished capacity of peripheral B cells to express Aire within the thymus. Our findings indicate that aging may diminish the ability of thymic B cells to tolerize T cells, revealing a potential mechanistic link between aging and autoimmunity.

  20. [Optimization of prokaryotic expression conditions of Leptospira interrogans trigeminy genus-specific protein antigen based on surface response analysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jiang; Luo, Dongjiao; Sun, Aihua; Yan, Jie

    2008-07-01

    Lipoproteins LipL32 and LipL21 and transmembrane protein OMPL1 have been confirmed as the superficial genus-specific antigens of Leptospira interrogans, which can be used as antigens for developing a universal genetic engineering vaccine. In order to obtain high expression of an artificial fusion gene lipL32/1-lipL21-ompL1/2, we optimized prokaryotic expression conditions. We used surface response analysis based on the central composite design to optimize culture conditions of a new antigen protein by recombinant Escherichia coli DE3.The culture conditions included initial pH, induction start time, post-induction time, Isopropyl beta-D-thiogalactopyranoside (IPTG) concentration, and temperature. The maximal production of antigen protein was 37.78 mg/l. The optimal culture conditions for high recombinant fusion protein was determined: initial pH 7.9, induction start time 2.5 h, a post-induction time of 5.38 h, 0.20 mM IPTG, and a post-induction temperature of 31 degrees C. Surface response analysis based on CCD increased the target production. This statistical method reduced the number of experiments required for optimization and enabled rapid identification and integration of the key culture condition parameters for optimizing recombinant protein expression.

  1. Low cost tuberculosis vaccine antigens in capsules: expression in chloroplasts, bio-encapsulation, stability and functional evaluation in vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priya Saikumar Lakshmi

    Full Text Available Tuberculosis (TB caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis is one of the leading fatal infectious diseases. The development of TB vaccines has been recognized as a major public health priority by the World Health Organization. In this study, three candidate antigens, ESAT-6 (6 kDa early secretory antigenic target and Mtb72F (a fusion polyprotein from two TB antigens, Mtb32 and Mtb39 fused with cholera toxin B-subunit (CTB and LipY (a cell wall protein were expressed in tobacco and/or lettuce chloroplasts to facilitate bioencapsulation/oral delivery. Site-specific transgene integration into the chloroplast genome was confirmed by Southern blot analysis. In transplastomic leaves, CTB fusion proteins existed in soluble monomeric or multimeric forms of expected sizes and their expression levels varied depending upon the developmental stage and time of leaf harvest, with the highest-level of accumulation in mature leaves harvested at 6PM. The CTB-ESAT6 and CTB-Mtb72F expression levels reached up to 7.5% and 1.2% of total soluble protein respectively in mature tobacco leaves. Transplastomic CTB-ESAT6 lettuce plants accumulated up to 0.75% of total leaf protein. Western blot analysis of lyophilized lettuce leaves stored at room temperature for up to six months showed that the CTB-ESAT6 fusion protein was stable and preserved proper folding, disulfide bonds and assembly into pentamers for prolonged periods. Also, antigen concentration per gram of leaf tissue was increased 22 fold after lyophilization. Hemolysis assay with purified CTB-ESAT6 protein showed partial hemolysis of red blood cells and confirmed functionality of the ESAT-6 antigen. GM1-binding assay demonstrated that the CTB-ESAT6 fusion protein formed pentamers to bind with the GM1-ganglioside receptor. The expression of functional Mycobacterium tuberculosis antigens in transplastomic plants should facilitate development of a cost-effective and orally deliverable TB booster vaccine with potential

  2. Low cost tuberculosis vaccine antigens in capsules: expression in chloroplasts, bio-encapsulation, stability and functional evaluation in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakshmi, Priya Saikumar; Verma, Dheeraj; Yang, Xiangdong; Lloyd, Bethany; Daniell, Henry

    2013-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis is one of the leading fatal infectious diseases. The development of TB vaccines has been recognized as a major public health priority by the World Health Organization. In this study, three candidate antigens, ESAT-6 (6 kDa early secretory antigenic target) and Mtb72F (a fusion polyprotein from two TB antigens, Mtb32 and Mtb39) fused with cholera toxin B-subunit (CTB) and LipY (a cell wall protein) were expressed in tobacco and/or lettuce chloroplasts to facilitate bioencapsulation/oral delivery. Site-specific transgene integration into the chloroplast genome was confirmed by Southern blot analysis. In transplastomic leaves, CTB fusion proteins existed in soluble monomeric or multimeric forms of expected sizes and their expression levels varied depending upon the developmental stage and time of leaf harvest, with the highest-level of accumulation in mature leaves harvested at 6PM. The CTB-ESAT6 and CTB-Mtb72F expression levels reached up to 7.5% and 1.2% of total soluble protein respectively in mature tobacco leaves. Transplastomic CTB-ESAT6 lettuce plants accumulated up to 0.75% of total leaf protein. Western blot analysis of lyophilized lettuce leaves stored at room temperature for up to six months showed that the CTB-ESAT6 fusion protein was stable and preserved proper folding, disulfide bonds and assembly into pentamers for prolonged periods. Also, antigen concentration per gram of leaf tissue was increased 22 fold after lyophilization. Hemolysis assay with purified CTB-ESAT6 protein showed partial hemolysis of red blood cells and confirmed functionality of the ESAT-6 antigen. GM1-binding assay demonstrated that the CTB-ESAT6 fusion protein formed pentamers to bind with the GM1-ganglioside receptor. The expression of functional Mycobacterium tuberculosis antigens in transplastomic plants should facilitate development of a cost-effective and orally deliverable TB booster vaccine with potential for long

  3. Efficacy of Recombinant Canine Distemper Virus Expressing Leishmania Antigen against Leishmania Challenge in Dogs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryuichi Miura

    Full Text Available Canine distemper virus (CDV vaccination confers long-term protection against CDV reinfection. To investigate the utility of CDV as a polyvalent vaccine vector for Leishmania, we generated recombinant CDVs, based on an avirulent Yanaka strain, that expressed Leishmania antigens: LACK, TSA, or LmSTI1 (rCDV-LACK, rCDV-TSA, and rCDV-LmSTI1, respectively. Dogs immunized with rCDV-LACK were protected against challenge with lethal doses of virulent CDV, in the same way as the parental Yanaka strain. To evaluate the protective effects of the recombinant CDVs against cutaneous leishmaniasis in dogs, dogs were immunized with one recombinant CDV or a cocktail of three recombinant CDVs, before intradermal challenge (in the ears with infective-stage promastigotes of Leishmania major. Unvaccinated dogs showed increased nodules with ulcer formation after 3 weeks, whereas dogs immunized with rCDV-LACK showed markedly smaller nodules without ulceration. Although the rCDV-TSA- and rCDV-LmSTI1-immunized dogs showed little protection against L. major, the cocktail of three recombinant CDVs more effectively suppressed the progression of nodule formation than immunization with rCDV-LACK alone. These results indicate that recombinant CDV is suitable for use as a polyvalent live attenuated vaccine for protection against both CDV and L. major infections in dogs.

  4. Efficacy of Recombinant Canine Distemper Virus Expressing Leishmania Antigen against Leishmania Challenge in Dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miura, Ryuichi; Kooriyama, Takanori; Yoneda, Misako; Takenaka, Akiko; Doki, Miho; Goto, Yasuyuki; Sanjoba, Chizu; Endo, Yasuyuki; Fujiyuki, Tomoko; Sugai, Akihiro; Tsukiyama-Kohara, Kyoko; Matsumoto, Yoshitsugu; Sato, Hiroki; Kai, Chieko

    2015-01-01

    Canine distemper virus (CDV) vaccination confers long-term protection against CDV reinfection. To investigate the utility of CDV as a polyvalent vaccine vector for Leishmania, we generated recombinant CDVs, based on an avirulent Yanaka strain, that expressed Leishmania antigens: LACK, TSA, or LmSTI1 (rCDV-LACK, rCDV-TSA, and rCDV-LmSTI1, respectively). Dogs immunized with rCDV-LACK were protected against challenge with lethal doses of virulent CDV, in the same way as the parental Yanaka strain. To evaluate the protective effects of the recombinant CDVs against cutaneous leishmaniasis in dogs, dogs were immunized with one recombinant CDV or a cocktail of three recombinant CDVs, before intradermal challenge (in the ears) with infective-stage promastigotes of Leishmania major. Unvaccinated dogs showed increased nodules with ulcer formation after 3 weeks, whereas dogs immunized with rCDV-LACK showed markedly smaller nodules without ulceration. Although the rCDV-TSA- and rCDV-LmSTI1-immunized dogs showed little protection against L. major, the cocktail of three recombinant CDVs more effectively suppressed the progression of nodule formation than immunization with rCDV-LACK alone. These results indicate that recombinant CDV is suitable for use as a polyvalent live attenuated vaccine for protection against both CDV and L. major infections in dogs.

  5. Variability in surface antigen expression on neuroblastoma cells as revealed by monoclonal antibodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malpas, J.S.; Kemshead, J.T.; Pritchard, J.; Greaves, M.F.

    1982-01-01

    In treatment programmes for neuroblastoma involving autologous bone marrow transplantation, a problem exists in the identification of small numbers of metastatic tumour cells present in the marrow aspirates. Reinfusion of tumour cells along with normal bone marrow may reseed the tumour within a patient who has received high dose chemotherapy. Formalin-induced fluorescence in neuroblastoma is a possible diagnostic aid, but this method has no therapeutic potential. Other methods of detecting tumour relying on gross physiological changes in the patient are not suitable for diagnosis of minimal metastatic disease. As an immunological approach to the problem, rabbit antisera to neuroblastoma have been raised but these reagents suffer from low titre after absorption to make them specific. The authors have used the technique of somatic cell hybridisation to raise monoclonal antibodies which bind to neuroblastoma cells and not to normal haemopoietic progenitors. A panel of such reagents to demonstrate heterogeneity in antigen expression amongst metastatic neuroblastoma cells was employed in a radioimmunoassay as diagnostic aid for this problem. (Auth.)

  6. Cell junction protein armadillo repeat gene deleted in velo-cardio-facial syndrome is expressed in the skin and colocalizes with autoantibodies of patients affected by a new variant of endemic pemphigus foliaceus in Colombia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abreu-Velez, Ana Maria; Yi, Hong; Howard, Michael S

    2017-10-01

    We previously described a new variant of endemic pemphigus foliaceus in El Bagre, Colombia, South America (El Bagre-EPF, or pemphigus Abreu-Manu). El Bagre-EPF differs from other types of EPF clinically, epidemiologically, immunologically and in its target antigens. We reported the presence of patient autoantibodies colocalizing with armadillo repeat gene deleted in velo-cardio-facial syndrome (ARVCF), a catenin cell junction protein colocalizing with El Bagre-EPF autoantibodies in the heart and within pilosebaceous units along their neurovascular supply routes. Here we investigate the presence of ARVCF in skin and its possibility as a cutaneous El Bagre-EPF antigen. We used a case-control study, testing sera of 45 patients and 45 controls via direct and indirect immunofluorescence (DIF/IIF), confocal microscopy, immunoelectron microscopy and immunoblotting for the presence of ARVCF and its relationship with El Bagre-EPF autoantibodies in the skin. We also immunoadsorbed samples with desmoglein 1 (Dsg1) ectodomain (El Bagre-EPF antigen) by incubating with the positive ARVCF samples from DIF and IIF. ARVCF was expressed in all the samples from the cases and controls. Immunoadsorption with Dsg1 on positive ARVCF immunofluorescence DIF/IIF cases showed that the immune response was present against non-desmoglein 1 antigen(s). Overall, 40/45 patients showed colocalization of their autoantibodies with ARVCF in the epidermis; no controls from the endemic area displayed colocalization. We demonstrate that ARVCF is expressed in many areas of human skin, and colocalizes with the majority of El Bagre-EPF autoantibodies as a putative antigen.

  7. Identification of immunogenic Salmonella enterica serotype Typhi antigens expressed in chronic biliary carriers of S. Typhi in Kathmandu, Nepal.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richelle C Charles

    Full Text Available Salmonella enterica serotype Typhi can colonize and persist in the biliary tract of infected individuals, resulting in a state of asymptomatic chronic carriage. Chronic carriers may act as persistent reservoirs of infection within a community and may introduce infection to susceptible individuals and new communities. Little is known about the interaction between the host and pathogen in the biliary tract of chronic carriers, and there is currently no reliable diagnostic assay to identify asymptomatic S. Typhi carriage.To study host-pathogen interactions in the biliary tract during S. Typhi carriage, we applied an immunoscreening technique called in vivo-induced antigen technology (IVIAT, to identify potential biomarkers unique to carriers. IVIAT identifies humorally immunogenic bacterial antigens expressed uniquely in the in vivo environment, and we hypothesized that S. Typhi surviving in the biliary tract of humans may express a distinct antigenic profile. Thirteen S. Typhi antigens that were immunoreactive in carriers, but not in healthy individuals from a typhoid endemic area, were identified. The identified antigens included a number of putative membrane proteins, lipoproteins, and hemolysin-related proteins. YncE (STY1479, an uncharacterized protein with an ATP-binding motif, gave prominent responses in our screen. The response to YncE in patients whose biliary tract contained S. Typhi was compared to responses in patients whose biliary tract did not contain S. Typhi, patients with acute typhoid fever, and healthy controls residing in a typhoid endemic area. Seven of 10 (70% chronic carriers, 0 of 8 bile culture-negative controls (0%, 0 of 8 healthy Bangladeshis (0%, and 1 of 8 (12.5% Bangladeshis with acute typhoid fever had detectable anti-YncE IgG in blood. IgA responses were also present.Further evaluation of YncE and other antigens identified by IVIAT could lead to the development of improved diagnostic assays to identify asymptomatic

  8. Chronic Hepatitis B Virus Infection: The Relation between Hepatitis B Antigen Expression, Telomere Length, Senescence, Inflammation and Fibrosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phaedra M Tachtatzis

    Full Text Available Chronic Hepatitis B virus (HBV infection can lead to the development of chronic hepatitis, cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. We hypothesized that HBV might accelerate hepatocyte ageing and investigated the effect of HBV on hepatocyte cell cycle state and biological age. We also investigated the relation between inflammation, fibrosis and cell cycle phase.Liver samples from patients with chronic HBV (n = 91, normal liver (n = 55 and regenerating liver (n = 15 were studied. Immunohistochemistry for cell cycle phase markers and HBV antigens was used to determine host cell cycle phase. Hepatocyte-specific telomere length was evaluated by quantitative fluorescent in-situ hybridization (Q-FISH in conjunction with hepatocyte nuclear area and HBV antigen expression. The effects of induced cell cycle arrest and induced cellular senescence on HBV production were assessed in vitro.13.7% hepatocytes in chronic HBV had entered cell cycle, but expression of markers for S, G2 and M phase was low compared with regenerating liver. Hepatocyte p21 expression was increased (10.9% in chronic HBV and correlated with liver fibrosis. Mean telomere length was reduced in chronic HBV compared to normal. However, within HBV-affected livers, hepatocytes expressing HBV antigens had longer telomeres. Telomere length declined and hepatocyte nuclear size increased as HBV core antigen (HBcAg expression shifted from the nucleus to cytoplasm. Nuclear co-expression of HBcAg and p21 was not observed. Cell cycle arrest induced in vitro was associated with increased HBV production, in contrast to in vitro induction of cellular senescence, which had no effect.Chronic HBV infection was associated with hepatocyte G1 cell cycle arrest and accelerated hepatocyte ageing, implying that HBV induced cellular senescence. However, HBV replication was confined to biologically younger hepatocytes. Changes in the cellular location of HBcAg may be related to the onset of cellular senescence.

  9. Monoclonal antibodies to murine thrombospondin-1 and thrombospondin-2 reveal differential expression patterns in cancer and low antigen expression in normal tissues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bujak, Emil; Pretto, Francesca; Ritz, Danilo; Gualandi, Laura; Wulhfard, Sarah; Neri, Dario

    2014-01-01

    There is a considerable interest for the discovery and characterization of tumor-associated antigens, which may facilitate antibody-based pharmacodelivery strategies. Thrombospondin-1 and thrombospondin-2 are homologous secreted proteins, which have previously been reported to be overexpressed during remodeling typical for wound healing and tumor progression and to possibly play a functional role in cell proliferation, migration and apoptosis. To our knowledge, a complete immunohistochemical characterization of thrombospondins levels in normal rodent tissues has not been reported so far. Using antibody phage technology, we have generated and characterized monoclonal antibodies specific to murine thrombospondin-1 and thrombospondin-2, two antigens which share 62% aminoacid identity. An immunofluorescence analysis revealed that both antigens are virtually undetectable in normal mouse tissues, except for a weak staining of heart tissue by antibodies specific to thrombospondin-1. The analysis also showed that thrombospondin-1 was strongly expressed in 5/7 human tumors xenografted in nude mice, while it was only barely detectable in 3/8 murine tumors grafted in immunocompetent mice. By contrast, a high-affinity antibody to thrombospondin-2 revealed a much lower level of expression of this antigen in cancer specimens. Our analysis resolves ambiguities related to conflicting reports on thrombosponding expression in health and disease. Based on our findings, thrombospondin-1 (and not thrombospondin-2) may be considered as a target for antibody-based pharmacodelivery strategies, in consideration of its low expression in normal tissues and its upregulation in cancer. - Highlights: • High affinity monoclonal antibodies to murine and human TSP1 and 2 were raised. • Both antigens are virtually undetectable in normal mouse tissues. • Strong positivity of human tumor xenografts for TSP1 was detected. • Study revealed much lower level of TSP2 expression in cancer specimens

  10. Monoclonal antibodies to murine thrombospondin-1 and thrombospondin-2 reveal differential expression patterns in cancer and low antigen expression in normal tissues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bujak, Emil [Department of Chemistry and Applied Biosciences, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (ETH Zürich), Vladimir-Prelog-Weg 2, CH-8093 Zurich (Switzerland); Pretto, Francesca; Ritz, Danilo; Gualandi, Laura; Wulhfard, Sarah [Philochem AG, Libernstrasse 3, CH-8112 Otelfingen (Switzerland); Neri, Dario, E-mail: neri@pharma.ethz.ch [Department of Chemistry and Applied Biosciences, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (ETH Zürich), Vladimir-Prelog-Weg 2, CH-8093 Zurich (Switzerland)

    2014-09-10

    There is a considerable interest for the discovery and characterization of tumor-associated antigens, which may facilitate antibody-based pharmacodelivery strategies. Thrombospondin-1 and thrombospondin-2 are homologous secreted proteins, which have previously been reported to be overexpressed during remodeling typical for wound healing and tumor progression and to possibly play a functional role in cell proliferation, migration and apoptosis. To our knowledge, a complete immunohistochemical characterization of thrombospondins levels in normal rodent tissues has not been reported so far. Using antibody phage technology, we have generated and characterized monoclonal antibodies specific to murine thrombospondin-1 and thrombospondin-2, two antigens which share 62% aminoacid identity. An immunofluorescence analysis revealed that both antigens are virtually undetectable in normal mouse tissues, except for a weak staining of heart tissue by antibodies specific to thrombospondin-1. The analysis also showed that thrombospondin-1 was strongly expressed in 5/7 human tumors xenografted in nude mice, while it was only barely detectable in 3/8 murine tumors grafted in immunocompetent mice. By contrast, a high-affinity antibody to thrombospondin-2 revealed a much lower level of expression of this antigen in cancer specimens. Our analysis resolves ambiguities related to conflicting reports on thrombosponding expression in health and disease. Based on our findings, thrombospondin-1 (and not thrombospondin-2) may be considered as a target for antibody-based pharmacodelivery strategies, in consideration of its low expression in normal tissues and its upregulation in cancer. - Highlights: • High affinity monoclonal antibodies to murine and human TSP1 and 2 were raised. • Both antigens are virtually undetectable in normal mouse tissues. • Strong positivity of human tumor xenografts for TSP1 was detected. • Study revealed much lower level of TSP2 expression in cancer specimens

  11. Deciphering the genetic control of gene expression following Mycobacterium leprae antigen stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manry, Jérémy; Nédélec, Yohann; Fava, Vinicius M; Cobat, Aurélie; Orlova, Marianna; Thuc, Nguyen Van; Thai, Vu Hong; Laval, Guillaume; Barreiro, Luis B; Schurr, Erwin

    2017-08-01

    Leprosy is a human infectious disease caused by Mycobacterium leprae. A strong host genetic contribution to leprosy susceptibility is well established. However, the modulation of the transcriptional response to infection and the mechanism(s) of disease control are poorly understood. To address this gap in knowledge of leprosy pathogenicity, we conducted a genome-wide search for expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL) that are associated with transcript variation before and after stimulation with M. leprae sonicate in whole blood cells. We show that M. leprae antigen stimulation mainly triggered the upregulation of immune related genes and that a substantial proportion of the differential gene expression is genetically controlled. Indeed, using stringent criteria, we identified 318 genes displaying cis-eQTL at an FDR of 0.01, including 66 genes displaying response-eQTL (reQTL), i.e. cis-eQTL that showed significant evidence for interaction with the M. leprae stimulus. Such reQTL correspond to regulatory variations that affect the interaction between human whole blood cells and M. leprae sonicate and, thus, likely between the human host and M. leprae bacilli. We found that reQTL were significantly enriched among binding sites of transcription factors that are activated in response to infection, and that they were enriched among single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with susceptibility to leprosy per se and Type-I Reaction, and seven of them have been targeted by recent positive selection. Our study suggested that natural selection shaped our genomic diversity to face pathogen exposure including M. leprae infection.

  12. Expression of a LINE-1 endonuclease variant in gastric cancer: its association with clinicopathological parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Gangshi; Wu, Benyan; Wang, Mengwei; Gao, Jie; Huang, Haili; Tian, Yu; Xue, Liyan; Wang, Weihua; You, Weidi; Lian, Hongwei; Duan, Xiaojian

    2013-01-01

    -specific PCR. BLASTP program analysis revealed that GCRG213p peptide shared 83.0% alignment with the C-terminal region of L1 endonuclease (L1-EN). GCRG213p sequence possesses the important residues that compose the conserved features of L1-EN. GCRG213p could be a variant of L1-EN, a functional member of L1-EN family. Overexpression of GCRG213p is common in both primary gastric cancer and lymph node metastasis. These findings provide evidence of somatic L1 expression in gastric cancer, and its potential consequences in the form of tumor

  13. Alphavirus Replicon DNA Vectors Expressing Ebola GP and VP40 Antigens Induce Humoral and Cellular Immune Responses in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shoufeng Ren

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Ebola virus (EBOV causes severe hemorrhagic fevers in humans, and no approved therapeutics or vaccine is currently available. Glycoprotein (GP is the major protective antigen of EBOV, and can generate virus-like particles (VLPs by co-expression with matrix protein (VP40. In this study, we constructed a recombinant Alphavirus Semliki Forest virus (SFV replicon vector DREP to express EBOV GP and matrix viral protein (VP40. EBOV VLPs were successfully generated and achieved budding from 293 cells after co-transfection with DREP-based GP and VP40 vectors (DREP-GP+DREP-VP40. Vaccination of BALB/c mice with DREP-GP, DREP-VP40, or DREP-GP+DREP-VP40 vectors, followed by immediate electroporation resulted in a mixed IgG subclass production, which recognized EBOV GP and/or VP40 proteins. This vaccination regimen also led to the generation of both Th1 and Th2 cellular immune responses in mice. Notably, vaccination with DREP-GP and DREP-VP40, which produces both GP and VP40 antigens, induced a significantly higher level of anti-GP IgG2a antibody and increased IFN-γ secreting CD8+ T-cell responses relative to vaccination with DREP-GP or DREP-VP40 vector alone. Our study indicates that co-expression of GP and VP40 antigens based on the SFV replicon vector generates EBOV VLPs in vitro, and vaccination with recombinant DREP vectors containing GP and VP40 antigens induces Ebola antigen-specific humoral and cellular immune responses in mice. This novel approach provides a simple and efficient vaccine platform for Ebola disease prevention.

  14. A mouse model for chronic lymphocytic leukemia based on expression of the SV40 large T antigen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    ter Brugge, Petra J; Ta, Van B T; de Bruijn, Marjolein J W

    2009-01-01

    The simian virus 40 (SV40) T antigen is a potent oncogene able to transform many cell types and has been implicated in leukemia and lymphoma. In this report, we have achieved sporadic SV40 T-antigen expression in mature B cells in mice, by insertion of a SV40 T antigen gene in opposite...... transcriptional orientation in the immunoglobulin (Ig) heavy (H) chain locus between the D and J(H) segments. SV40 T-antigen expression appeared to result from retention of the targeted germline allele and concomitant antisense transcription of SV40 large T in mature B cells, leading to chronic lymphocytic...... leukemia (CLL). Although B-cell development was unperturbed in young mice, aging mice showed accumulation of a monoclonal B-cell population in which the targeted IgH allele was in germline configuration and the wild-type IgH allele had a productive V(D)J recombination. These leukemic B cells were Ig...

  15. Assessing pathogenicity of MLH1 variants by co-expression of human MLH1 and PMS2 genes in yeast

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vogelsang, Matjaz; Comino, Aleksandra; Zupanec, Neja [Department for Biosynthesis and Biotransformation, National Institute of Chemistry, Hajdrihova 19, SI-1001 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Hudler, Petra [Medical Center for Molecular Biology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Ljubljana, Vrazov trg 2, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Komel, Radovan [Department for Biosynthesis and Biotransformation, National Institute of Chemistry, Hajdrihova 19, SI-1001 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Medical Center for Molecular Biology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Ljubljana, Vrazov trg 2, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia)

    2009-10-28

    Loss of DNA mismatch repair (MMR) in humans, mainly due to mutations in the hMLH1 gene, is linked to hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC). Because not all MLH1 alterations result in loss of MMR function, accurate characterization of variants and their classification in terms of their effect on MMR function is essential for reliable genetic testing and effective treatment. To date, in vivo assays for functional characterization of MLH1 mutations performed in various model systems have used episomal expression of the modified MMR genes. We describe here a novel approach to determine accurately the functional significance of hMLH1 mutations in vivo, based on co-expression of human MLH1 and PMS2 in yeast cells. Yeast MLH1 and PMS1 genes, whose protein products form the MutLα complex, were replaced by human orthologs directly on yeast chromosomes by homologous recombination, and the resulting MMR activity was tested. The yeast strain co-expressing hMLH1 and hPMS2 exhibited the same mutation rate as the wild-type. Eight cancer-related MLH1 variants were introduced, using the same approach, into the prepared yeast model, and their effect on MMR function was determined. Five variants (A92P, S93G, I219V, K618R and K618T) were classified as non-pathogenic, whereas variants T117M, Y646C and R659Q were characterized as pathogenic. Results of our in vivo yeast-based approach correlate well with clinical data in five out of seven hMLH1 variants and the described model was thus shown to be useful for functional characterization of MLH1 variants in cancer patients found throughout the entire coding region of the gene.

  16. Assessing pathogenicity of MLH1 variants by co-expression of human MLH1 and PMS2 genes in yeast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hudler Petra

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Loss of DNA mismatch repair (MMR in humans, mainly due to mutations in the hMLH1 gene, is linked to hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC. Because not all MLH1 alterations result in loss of MMR function, accurate characterization of variants and their classification in terms of their effect on MMR function is essential for reliable genetic testing and effective treatment. To date, in vivo assays for functional characterization of MLH1 mutations performed in various model systems have used episomal expression of the modified MMR genes. We describe here a novel approach to determine accurately the functional significance of hMLH1 mutations in vivo, based on co-expression of human MLH1 and PMS2 in yeast cells. Methods Yeast MLH1 and PMS1 genes, whose protein products form the MutLα complex, were replaced by human orthologs directly on yeast chromosomes by homologous recombination, and the resulting MMR activity was tested. Results The yeast strain co-expressing hMLH1 and hPMS2 exhibited the same mutation rate as the wild-type. Eight cancer-related MLH1 variants were introduced, using the same approach, into the prepared yeast model, and their effect on MMR function was determined. Five variants (A92P, S93G, I219V, K618R and K618T were classified as non-pathogenic, whereas variants T117M, Y646C and R659Q were characterized as pathogenic. Conclusion Results of our in vivo yeast-based approach correlate well with clinical data in five out of seven hMLH1 variants and the described model was thus shown to be useful for functional characterization of MLH1 variants in cancer patients found throughout the entire coding region of the gene.

  17. Assessing pathogenicity of MLH1 variants by co-expression of human MLH1 and PMS2 genes in yeast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vogelsang, Matjaz; Comino, Aleksandra; Zupanec, Neja; Hudler, Petra; Komel, Radovan

    2009-01-01

    Loss of DNA mismatch repair (MMR) in humans, mainly due to mutations in the hMLH1 gene, is linked to hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC). Because not all MLH1 alterations result in loss of MMR function, accurate characterization of variants and their classification in terms of their effect on MMR function is essential for reliable genetic testing and effective treatment. To date, in vivo assays for functional characterization of MLH1 mutations performed in various model systems have used episomal expression of the modified MMR genes. We describe here a novel approach to determine accurately the functional significance of hMLH1 mutations in vivo, based on co-expression of human MLH1 and PMS2 in yeast cells. Yeast MLH1 and PMS1 genes, whose protein products form the MutLα complex, were replaced by human orthologs directly on yeast chromosomes by homologous recombination, and the resulting MMR activity was tested. The yeast strain co-expressing hMLH1 and hPMS2 exhibited the same mutation rate as the wild-type. Eight cancer-related MLH1 variants were introduced, using the same approach, into the prepared yeast model, and their effect on MMR function was determined. Five variants (A92P, S93G, I219V, K618R and K618T) were classified as non-pathogenic, whereas variants T117M, Y646C and R659Q were characterized as pathogenic. Results of our in vivo yeast-based approach correlate well with clinical data in five out of seven hMLH1 variants and the described model was thus shown to be useful for functional characterization of MLH1 variants in cancer patients found throughout the entire coding region of the gene

  18. Vaccine Containing the Three Allelic Variants of the Plasmodium vivax Circumsporozoite Antigen Induces Protection in Mice after Challenge with a Transgenic Rodent Malaria Parasite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alba Marina Gimenez

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Plasmodium vivax is the most common species that cause malaria outside of the African continent. The development of an efficacious vaccine would contribute greatly to control malaria. Recently, using bacterial and adenoviral recombinant proteins based on the P. vivax circumsporozoite protein (CSP, we demonstrated the possibility of eliciting strong antibody-mediated immune responses to each of the three allelic forms of P. vivax CSP (PvCSP. In the present study, recombinant proteins representing the PvCSP alleles (VK210, VK247, and P. vivax-like, as well as a hybrid polypeptide, named PvCSP-All epitopes, were generated. This hybrid containing the conserved C-terminal of the PvCSP and the three variant repeat domains in tandem were successfully produced in the yeast Pichia pastoris. After purification and biochemical characterization, they were used for the experimental immunization of C57BL/6 mice in a vaccine formulation containing the adjuvant Poly(I:C. Immunization with a recombinant protein expressing all three different allelic forms in fusion elicited high IgG antibody titers reacting with all three different allelic variants of PvCSP. The antibodies targeted both the C-terminal and repeat domains of PvCSP and recognized the native protein on the surface of P. vivax sporozoites. More importantly, mice that received the vaccine formulation were protected after challenge with chimeric Plasmodium berghei sporozoites expressing CSP repeats of P. vivax sporozoites (Pb/PvVK210. Our results suggest that it is possible to elicit protective immunity against one of the most common PvCSP alleles using soluble recombinant proteins expressed by P. pastoris. These recombinant proteins are promising candidates for clinical trials aiming to develop a multiallele vaccine against P. vivax malaria.

  19. Characterization of Smoc-1 uncovers two transcript variants showing differential tissue and age specific expression in Bubalus bubalis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Jyoti; Premi, Sanjay; Kumar, Sudhir; Parwez, Iqbal; Ali, Sher

    2007-01-01

    Background Secreted modular calcium binding protein-1 (Smoc-1) belongs to the BM-40 family which has been implicated with tissue remodeling, angiogenesis and bone mineralization. Besides its anticipated role in embryogenesis, Smoc-1 has been characterized only in a few mammalian species. We made use of the consensus sequence (5' CACCTCTCCACCTGCC 3') of 33.15 repeat loci to explore the buffalo transcriptome and uncovered the Smoc-1 transcript tagged with this repeat. The main objective of this study was to gain an insight into its structural and functional organization, and expressional status of Smoc-1 in water buffalo, Bubalus bubalis. Results We cloned and characterized the buffalo Smoc-1, including its copy number status, in-vitro protein expression, tissue & age specific transcription/translation, chromosomal mapping and localization to the basement membrane zone. Buffalo Smoc-1 was found to encode a secreted matricellular glycoprotein containing two EF-hand calcium binding motifs homologous to that of BM-40/SPARC family. In buffalo, this single copy gene consisted of 12 exons and was mapped onto the acrocentric chromosome 11. Though this gene was found to be evolutionarily conserved, the buffalo Smoc-1 showed conspicuous nucleotide/amino acid changes altering its secondary structure compared to that in other mammals. In silico analysis of the Smoc-1 proposed its glycoprotein nature with a calcium dependent conformation. Further, we unveiled two transcript variants of this gene, varying in their 3'UTR lengths but both coding for identical protein(s). Smoc-1 evinced highest expression of both the variants in liver and modest to negligible in other tissues. The relative expression of variant-02 was markedly higher compared to that of variant-01 in all the tissues examined. Moreover, expression of Smoc-1, though modest during the early ages, was conspicuously enhanced after 1 year and remained consistently higher during the entire life span of buffalo with gradual

  20. Matrix Metalloproteinase-2, Squamous Cell Carcinoma Antigen, and Tissue Polypeptide-Specific Antigen Expression in Egyptian Patients with Cervical Carcinoma: Relationship with Prognosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maha Imam Ahmed

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs, a family of proteolytic enzymes produced by both stromal and tumor cells, appear to have a key role in the events leading to local invasion and metastasis by malignant neoplasms. In the present study, we evaluated the role of MMP-2, squamous cell carcinoma antigen (SCCA, and tissue polypeptide – specific antigen (TPS in cervical neoplasia. Using Western blotting and enzyme immunoassay (EIA, we analyzed 50 patients with cervical carcinoma (CC and 25 normal controls for expression of MMP-2 in tissue cell lysates. We also quantified SCCA and TPS with microparticle immunoassay and EIA, respectively. The results were correlated with human papilloma virus (HPV infection, clinicopathological findings, and disease outcome. The cutoff point for each marker was estimated from receiver operating characteristic curves. Logistic regression analysis was performed to estimate the odds ratio (OR and 95% confidence interval (CI for each marker. MMP-2, SCCA, and TPS protein expression were significantly higher in patients with CC than in normal controls. While TPS was the best marker for discriminating between patients and controls, MMP-2 was associated with an advanced tumor stage (OR, 13.9 [95% CI, 1.4-133.9] and poor histological grade (OR, 10.2 [95% CI, 1.7-60.5]. Moreover, independent of the effect of an advanced CC stage and grade, the patients' age, and the presence of HPV infection, MMP-2 was considered a strong predictor for CC recurrence (OR, 8.1 [95% CI, 1.3- 49.1]. Tissue markers may be used to select high-risk patients for early detection of and adjuvant therapy for recurrence. Our MMP-2 findings are particularly relevant to the development of protease inhibitors as a new cancer therapy approach.

  1. Comparison of Proliferating Cell Nuclear Antigen Expression in Odontogenic Keratocyst and Ameloblastoma: An Immunohistochemical Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroshi Takahashi

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA is a nuclear protein synthesized in the late G1 and S phase of the cell cycle, and immunohistochemical detection of the protein represents a useful marker for the proliferating fraction of cells in tissue specimens. PCNA expression was studied in odontogenic keratocysts (n = 15 and ameloblastomas (n = 46 using an avidin–biotin–peroxidase complex method on routinely processed paraffin sections. The percentage of PCNA-positive cells determined by point counting was significantly lower in the ameloblastomas (mean 9.4%, standard deviation (SD 11.0 than in odontogenic keratocysts (mean 29.9%, SD 24.0. In ameloblastomas, the mean percentage of PCNA-positive cells was lowest in the acanthomatous pattern and highest in plexiform pattern. The mean percentage of PCNA-positive cells in plexiform pattern was non-significantly higher than that in follicular pattern. The mean percentage of PCNA-positive cells in plexiform and follicular patterns was significantly higher than that in cyctic and acanthomatous patterns. The frequency of PCNA-positive cells was significantly higher in the peripheral cells of follicular and plexiform patterns than in the central cells of both patterns (p < 0.01. Therefore, peripheral cells were regarded as reserve cell of central cells. The mean percentage of PCNA-positive cells in the epithelial lining of odontogenic keratocyst was not significantly different from those in the peripheral cells of follicular and plexiform patterns of ameloblastoma. In contrast, the odontogenic keratocyst exhibited a mean percentage of PCNA-positive cells which was statistically higher than that in other histological elements of ameloblastomas. The present study suggests that odontogenic keratocyst is regarded as benign odontogenic tumour.

  2. Evaluation of Ki-67 Antigen and Protein P53 Expression in Orthokratinized and Parakratinized Odontogenic Keratocyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Baghaei

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Statement of Problem: Odontogenic Keratocysts (OKC make up 10-12% of all developmental cysts with dental origin. OKCs are classified into parakeratotic and orthokeratotic types, with completely different clinical features. In order to investigate biological behavior of OKCs, an immunohistochemical study was designed, using Ki-67 antigen as proliferation marker and P53 protein as tumor suppressor gene.Purposes: The aim of the present study was to investigate the expression of P53 and Ki-67 markers in two types of OKCs and to determine their relationship with the biological behaviour of OKC.Materials and Methods: A total of 20 OKCs (parakeratotic n=10, orthokeratotic n=10were stained immunohistochemically for Ki-67 and P53 protein by Biotin – Streptavidine method. Then, slides were studied quantitatively through optical lense (magnification=X10and the number of positively stained cells was counted/mm BM.Results: The average number of Positively stained cells for Ki-67 were 62.30±11.96 cells/mm BM in parakeratotic, and 29.90±4.90 cells/mmBM in orthokeratotic OKCs (P<0.05. Positive cells for Ki-67 were dominantly located in parabasal layer. Mean stainedcells for P53 were 4.30± 2.21cells/mmBM in parakeratinized and 4.80±1.75 cells/mmBM in orthokeratotic types that was not statistically significant. (P<0.58Parakeratotic OKCs mostly occur in the lower jaw (90%, whereas just 50% of orthokeratotic OKCs occur in mandible (P=0.05Conclusion: Regarding other clinical features and the existence of daughter cysts, no significant statistical difference was found between two types of OKCs.

  3. Systemic immunological tolerance to ocular antigens is mediated by TRAIL-expressing CD8+ T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffith, Thomas S; Brincks, Erik L; Gurung, Prajwal; Kucaba, Tamara A; Ferguson, Thomas A

    2011-01-15

    Systemic immunological tolerance to Ag encountered in the eye restricts the formation of potentially damaging immune responses that would otherwise be initiated at other anatomical locations. We previously demonstrated that tolerance to Ag administered via the anterior chamber (AC) of the eye required Fas ligand-mediated apoptotic death of inflammatory cells that enter the eye in response to the antigenic challenge. Moreover, the systemic tolerance induced after AC injection of Ag was mediated by CD8(+) regulatory T cells. This study examined the mechanism by which these CD8(+) regulatory T cells mediate tolerance after AC injection of Ag. AC injection of Ag did not prime CD4(+) T cells and led to increased TRAIL expression by splenic CD8(+) T cells. Unlike wild-type mice, Trail(-/-) or Dr5(-/-) mice did not develop tolerance to Ag injected into the eye, even though responding lymphocytes underwent apoptosis in the AC of the eyes of these mice. CD8(+) T cells from Trail(-/-) mice that were first injected via the AC with Ag were unable to transfer tolerance to naive recipient wild-type mice, but CD8(+) T cells from AC-injected wild-type or Dr5(-/-) mice could transfer tolerance. Importantly, the transferred wild-type (Trail(+/+)) CD8(+) T cells were also able to decrease the number of infiltrating inflammatory cells into the eye; however, Trail(-/-) CD8(+) T cells were unable to limit the inflammatory cell ingress. Together, our data suggest that "helpless" CD8(+) regulatory T cells generated after AC injection of Ag enforce systemic tolerance in a TRAIL-dependent manner to inhibit inflammation in the eye.

  4. Expression of verocytotoxic Escherichia coli antigens in tobacco seeds and evaluation of gut immunity after oral administration in mouse model

    OpenAIRE

    Rossi, Luciana; Di Giancamillo, Alessia; Reggi, Serena; Domeneghini, Cinzia; Baldi, Antonella; Sala, Vittorio; Dell'Orto, Vittorio; Coddens, Annelies; Cox, Eric; Fogher, Corrado

    2013-01-01

    Verocytotoxic Escherichia (E.) coli strains are responsible for swine oedema disease, which is an enterotoxaemia that causes economic losses in the pig industry. The production of a vaccine for oral administration in transgenic seeds could be an efficient system to stimulate local immunity. This study was conducted to transform tobacco plants for the seed-specific expression of antigenic proteins from a porcine verocytotoxic E. coli strain. Parameters related to an immunological response and ...

  5. Expression of cancer-associated simple mucin-type O-glycosylated antigens in parasites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osinaga, Eduardo

    2007-01-01

    Simple mucin-type O-glycan structures, such as Tn, TF, sialyl-Tn and Tk antigens, are among of the most specific human cancer-associated structures. These antigens are involved in several types of receptor-ligand interactions, and they are potential targets for immunotherapy. In the last few years several simple mucin-type O-glycan antigens were identified in different species belonging to the main two helminth parasite phyla, and sialyl-Tn bearing glycoproteins were detected in Trypanosoma cruzi. These results are of interest to understand new aspects in parasite glycoimmunology and may help identify new biological characteristics of parasites as well of the host-parasite relationship. Considering that different groups reported a negative correlation between certain parasite infections and cancer development, we could hypothesize that simple mucin-type O-glycosylated antigens obtained from parasites could be good potential targets for cancer immunotherapy.

  6. Expression of Brucella Antigens in Vaccinia Virus to Prevent Brucellosis in Humans: Protection Studies in Mice

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Schurig, Gerhardt

    2000-01-01

    .... Based on our present studies and the finding that Brucella Cu/ZN SOD and L7/Ll2 proteins are protective antigens and that the presence of IL-12 is necessary at the moment of immunization, we conclude...

  7. A novel thromboxane A2 receptor N42S variant results in reduced surface expression and platelet dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nisar, Shaista P; Lordkipanidzé, Marie; Jones, Matthew L; Dawood, Ban; Murden, Sherina; Cunningham, Margaret R; Mumford, Andrew D; Wilde, Jonathan T; Watson, Steve P; Mundell, Stuart J; Lowe, Gillian C

    2014-05-05

    A small number of thromboxane receptor variants have been described in patients with a bleeding history that result in platelet dysfunction. We have identified a patient with a history of significant bleeding, who expresses a novel heterozygous thromboxane receptor variant that predicts an asparagine to serine substitution (N42S). This asparagine is conserved across all class A GPCRs, suggesting a vital role for receptor structure and function.We investigated the functional consequences of the TP receptor heterozygous N42S substitution by performing platelet function studies on platelet-rich plasma taken from the patient and healthy controls. We investigated the N42S mutation by expressing the wild-type (WT) and mutant receptor in human embryonic kidney (HEK) cells. Aggregation studies showed an ablation of arachidonic acid responses in the patient, whilst there was right-ward shift of the U46619 concentration response curve (CRC). Thromboxane generation was unaffected. Calcium mobilisation studies in cells lines showed a rightward shift of the U46619 CRC in N42S-expressing cells compared to WT. Radioligand binding studies revealed a reduction in BMax in platelets taken from the patient and in N42S-expressing cells, whilst cell studies confirmed poor surface expression. We have identified a novel thromboxane receptor variant, N42S, which results in platelet dysfunction due to reduced surface expression. It is associated with a significant bleeding history in the patient in whom it was identified. This is the first description of a naturally occurring variant that results in the substitution of this highly conserved residue and confirms the importance of this residue for correct GPCR function.

  8. Expression defect size among unclassified MLH1 variants determines pathogenicity in Lynch syndrome diagnosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hinrichsen, Inga; Brieger, Angela; Trojan, Jörg

    2013-01-01

    Lynch syndrome is caused by a germline mutation in a mismatch repair gene, most commonly the MLH1 gene. However, one third of the identified alterations are missense variants with unclear clinical significance. The functionality of these variants can be tested in the laboratory, but the results...

  9. Salt-Sensitive Hypertension and Cardiac Hypertrophy in Transgenic Mice Expressing a Corin Variant Identified in African Americans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Cui, Yujie; Shen, Jianzhong; Jiang, Jingjing; Chen, Shenghan; Peng, Jianhao; Wu, Qingyu

    2012-01-01

    African Americans represent a high risk population for salt-sensitive hypertension and heart disease but the underlying mechanism remains unclear. Corin is a cardiac protease that regulates blood pressure by activating natriuretic peptides. A corin gene variant (T555I/Q568P) was identified in African Americans with hypertension and cardiac hypertrophy. In this study, we test the hypothesis that the corin variant contributes to the hypertensive and cardiac hypertrophic phenotype in vivo. Transgenic mice were generated to express wild-type or T555I/Q568P variant corin in the heart under the control of α-myosin heavy chain promoter. The mice were crossed into a corin knockout background to create KO/TgWT and KO/TgV mice that expressed WT or variant corin, respectively, in the heart. Functional studies showed that KO/TgV mice had significantly higher levels of pro-atrial natriuretic peptide in the heart compared with that in control KO/TgWT mice, indicating that the corin variant was defective in processing natriuretic peptides in vivo. By radiotelemetry, corin KO/TgV mice were found to have hypertension that was sensitive to dietary salt loading. The mice also developed cardiac hypertrophy at 12–14 months of age when fed a normal salt diet or at a younger age when fed a high salt diet. The phenotype of salt-sensitive hypertension and cardiac hypertrophy in KO/TgV mice closely resembles the pathological findings in African Americans who carry the corin variant. The results indicate that corin defects may represent an important mechanism in salt-sensitive hypertension and cardiac hypertrophy in African Americans. PMID:22987923

  10. Cloning, sequence analysis, and expression of the large subunit of the human lymphocyte activation antigen 4F2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lumadue, J.A.; Glick, A.B.; Ruddle, F.H.

    1987-01-01

    Among the earliest expressed antigens on the surface of activated human lymphocytes is the surface antigen 4F2. The authors have used DNA-mediated gene transfer and fluorescence-activated cell sorting to obtain cell lines that contain the gene encoding the large subunit of the human 4F2 antigen in a mouse L-cell background. Human DNAs cloned from these cell lines were subsequently used as hybridization probes to isolate a full-length cDNA clone expressing 4F2. Sequence analysis of the coding region has revealed an amino acid sequence of 529 residues. Hydrophobicity plotting has predicted a probable structure for the protein that includes an external carboxyl terminus, an internal leader sequence, a single hydrophobic transmembrane domain, and two possible membrane-associated domains. The 4F2 cDNA detects a single 1.8-kilobase mRNA in T-cell and B-cell lines. RNA gel blot analysis of RNA derived from quiescent and serum-stimulated Swiss 3T3 fibroblasts reveals a cell-cycle modulation of 4F2 gene expression: the mRNA is present in quiescent fibroblasts but increases 8-fold 24-36 hr after stimulation, at the time of maximal DNA synthesis

  11. Cell-Free Expression and In Situ Immobilization of Parasite Proteins from Clonorchis sinensis for Rapid Identification of Antigenic Candidates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christy Catherine

    Full Text Available Progress towards genetic sequencing of human parasites has provided the groundwork for a post-genomic approach to develop novel antigens for the diagnosis and treatment of parasite infections. To fully utilize the genomic data, however, high-throughput methodologies are required for functional analysis of the proteins encoded in the genomic sequences. In this study, we investigated cell-free expression and in situ immobilization of parasite proteins as a novel platform for the discovery of antigenic proteins. PCR-amplified parasite DNA was immobilized on microbeads that were also functionalized to capture synthesized proteins. When the microbeads were incubated in a reaction mixture for cell-free synthesis, proteins expressed from the microbead-immobilized DNA were instantly immobilized on the same microbeads, providing a physical linkage between the genetic information and encoded proteins. This approach of in situ expression and isolation enables streamlined recovery and analysis of cell-free synthesized proteins and also allows facile identification of the genes coding antigenic proteins through direct PCR of the microbead-bound DNA.

  12. Cloning, sequence analysis, and expression of the large subunit of the human lymphocyte activation antigen 4F2

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    Lumadue, J.A.; Glick, A.B.; Ruddle, F.H.

    1987-12-01

    Among the earliest expressed antigens on the surface of activated human lymphocytes is the surface antigen 4F2. The authors have used DNA-mediated gene transfer and fluorescence-activated cell sorting to obtain cell lines that contain the gene encoding the large subunit of the human 4F2 antigen in a mouse L-cell background. Human DNAs cloned from these cell lines were subsequently used as hybridization probes to isolate a full-length cDNA clone expressing 4F2. Sequence analysis of the coding region has revealed an amino acid sequence of 529 residues. Hydrophobicity plotting has predicted a probable structure for the protein that includes an external carboxyl terminus, an internal leader sequence, a single hydrophobic transmembrane domain, and two possible membrane-associated domains. The 4F2 cDNA detects a single 1.8-kilobase mRNA in T-cell and B-cell lines. RNA gel blot analysis of RNA derived from quiescent and serum-stimulated Swiss 3T3 fibroblasts reveals a cell-cycle modulation of 4F2 gene expression: the mRNA is present in quiescent fibroblasts but increases 8-fold 24-36 hr after stimulation, at the time of maximal DNA synthesis.

  13. Cancer antigens are expressed in a carcinogen-transformed Bloom syndrome B-lymphoblastoid cell line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shiraishi, Yukimasa; Soma, Hiroaki

    1988-01-01

    The authors have cloned malignant cells carrying specific antigens associated with ovarian cancer (OVC) and malignant lymphoma (ML) from BS-SHI-4M cells, a line derived from a 1-methyl-3-nitro-1-nitrosoguanidine-treated B-lymphoblastoid cell line isolated from a patient with Bloom syndrome. Since BS-SHI-4M cells react with sera from various individual cancer patients at relatively low frequencies (2-9%), as detected by an indirect immunofluorescence technique, cell clones that specifically react with sera from patients with OVC and ML were separated by the panning method in which polystyrene dishes were coated with sera from OVC and ML patients and cells with the corresponding antigens bound to the dishes. Subsequent cloning by limiting dilution provided cell clones highly enriched for OVC- and ML-associated antigens. Karyotype analyses revealed that cell clones with OVC and ML antigens had common marker chromosomes. Interestingly, in cell clones with a strong OVC antigen response, the distal part of the Y chromosome (Yq11) was missing in 100% of the cells. Therefore the cell line BS-SHI-4M appears to be a reservoir of cell clones each of which carries a specific tumor antigen and thus provides a potential tool for rapid serological diagnosis of cancer

  14. Expression of cancer-testis antigens MAGE-A4 and MAGE-C1 in oral squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montoro, José Raphael de Moura Campos; Mamede, Rui Celso Martins; Neder Serafini, Luciano; Saggioro, Fabiano Pinto; Figueiredo, David Livingstone Alves; Silva, Wilson Araújo da; Jungbluth, Achim A; Spagnoli, Giulio Cesare; Zago, Marco Antônio

    2012-08-01

    Tumor markers are genes or their products expressed exclusively or preferentially in tumor cells and cancer-testis antigens (CTAs) form a group of genes with a typical expression pattern expressed in a variety of malignant neoplasms. CTAs are considered potential targets for cancer vaccines. It is possible that the CTA MAGE-A4 (melanoma antigen) and MAGE-C1 are expressed in carcinoma of the oral cavity and are related with survival. This study involved immunohistochemical analysis of 23 patients with oral squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) and was carried out using antibodies for MAGE-A4 and MAGE-C1. Fisher's exact test and log-rank test were used to evaluate the results. The expression of the MAGE-A4 and MAGE-C1 were 56.5% and 47.8% without statistical difference in studied variables and survival. The expression of at least 1 CTA was present in 78.3% of the patients, however, without correlation with clinicopathologic variables and survival. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Immunophenotyping of Waldenstroms macroglobulinemia cell lines reveals distinct patterns of surface antigen expression: potential biological and therapeutic implications.

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    Aneel Paulus

    Full Text Available Waldenströms macroglobulinemia (WM is a subtype of Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma in which the tumor cell population is markedly heterogeneous, consisting of immunoglobulin-M secreting B-lymphocytes, plasmacytoid lymphocytes and plasma cells. Due to rarity of disease and scarcity of reliable preclinical models, many facets of WM molecular and phenotypic architecture remain incompletely understood. Currently, there are 3 human WM cell lines that are routinely used in experimental studies, namely, BCWM.1, MWCL-1 and RPCI-WM1. During establishment of RPCI-WM1, we observed loss of the CD19 and CD20 antigens, which are typically present on WM cells. Intrigued by this observation and in an effort to better define the immunophenotypic makeup of this cell line, we conducted a more comprehensive analysis for the presence or absence of other cell surface antigens that are present on the RPCI-WM1 model, as well as those on the two other WM cell lines, BCWM.1 and MWCL-1. We examined expression of 65 extracellular and 4 intracellular antigens, comprising B-cell, plasma cell, T-cell, NK-cell, myeloid and hematopoietic stem cell surface markers by flow cytometry analysis. RPCI-WM1 cells demonstrated decreased expression of CD19, CD20, and CD23 with enhanced expression of CD28, CD38 and CD184, antigens that were differentially expressed on BCWM.1 and MWCL-1 cells. Due to increased expression of CD184/CXCR4 and CD38, RPCI-WM1 represents a valuable model in which to study the effects anti-CXCR4 or anti-CD38 targeted therapies that are actively being developed for treatment of hematologic cancers. Overall, differences in surface antigen expression across the 3 cell lines may reflect the tumor clone population predominant in the index patients, from whom the cell lines were developed. Our analysis defines the utility of the most commonly employed WM cell lines as based on their immunophenotype profiles, highlighting unique differences that can be further studied for

  16. Impaired cell surface expression of HLA-B antigens on mesenchymal stem cells and muscle cell progenitors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Isa, Adiba; Nehlin, Jan; Sabir, Hardee Jawad

    2010-01-01

    HLA class-I expression is weak in embryonic stem cells but increases rapidly during lineage progression. It is unknown whether all three classical HLA class-I antigens follow the same developmental program. In the present study, we investigated allele-specific expression of HLA-A, -B, and -C...... at the mRNA and protein levels on human mesenchymal stem cells from bone marrow and adipose tissue as well as striated muscle satellite cells and lymphocytes. Using multicolour flow cytometry, we found high cell surface expression of HLA-A on all stem cells and PBMC examined. Surprisingly, HLA-B was either...... undetectable or very weakly expressed on all stem cells protecting them from complement-dependent cytotoxicity (CDC) using relevant human anti-B and anti-Cw sera. IFNgamma stimulation for 48-72 h was required to induce full HLA-B protein expression. Quantitative real-time RT-PCR showed that IFNgamma induced...

  17. Cancer testis antigens and NY-BR-1 expression in primary breast cancer: prognostic and therapeutic implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balafoutas, Dimitrios; zur Hausen, Axel; Mayer, Sebastian; Hirschfeld, Marc; Jaeger, Markus; Denschlag, Dominik; Gitsch, Gerald; Jungbluth, Achim; Stickeler, Elmar

    2013-06-03

    Cancer-testis antigens (CTA) comprise a family of proteins, which are physiologically expressed in adult human tissues solely in testicular germ cells and occasionally placenta. However, CTA expression has been reported in various malignancies. CTAs have been identified by their ability to elicit autologous cellular and or serological immune responses, and are considered potential targets for cancer immunotherapy. The breast differentiation antigen NY-BR-1, expressed specifically in normal and malignant breast tissue, has also immunogenic properties. Here we evaluated the expression patterns of CTAs and NY-BR-1 in breast cancer in correlation to clinico-pathological parameters in order to determine their possible impact as prognostic factors. The reactivity pattern of various mAbs (6C1, MA454, M3H67, 57B, E978, GAGE #26 and NY-BR-1 #5) were assessed by immunohistochemistry in a tissue micro array series of 210 randomly selected primary invasive breast cancers in order to study the diversity of different CTAs (e.g. MAGE-A, NY-ESO-1, GAGE) and NY-BR-1. These expression data were correlated to clinico-pathological parameters and outcome data including disease-free and overall survival. Expression of at least one CTA was detectable in the cytoplasm of tumor cells in 37.2% of the cases. NY-BR-1 expression was found in 46.6% of tumors, respectively. Overall, CTA expression seemed to be linked to adverse prognosis and M3H67 immunoreactivity specifically was significantly correlated to shorter overall and disease-free survival (p=0.000 and 0.024, respectively). Our findings suggest that M3H67 immunoreactivity could serve as potential prognostic marker in primary breast cancer patients. The exclusive expression of CTAs in tumor tissues as well as the frequent expression of NY-BR-1 could define new targets for specific breast cancer therapies.

  18. Induction of Oral Tolerance with Transgenic Plants Expressing Antigens for Prevention/Treatment of Autoimmune, Allergic and Inflammatory Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Shengwu; Liao, Yu-Cai; Jevnikar, Anthony M

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence and incidence of autoimmune and allergic diseases have increased dramatically over the last several decades, especially in the developed world. The treatment of autoimmune and allergic diseases is typically with the use of non-specific immunosuppressive agents that compromise the integrity of the host immune system and therefore, increase the risk of infections. Antigenspecific immunotherapy by reinstating immunological tolerance towards self antigens without compromising immune functions is a much desired goal for the treatment of autoimmune and allergic diseases. Mucosal administration of antigen is a long-recognized method of inducing antigen-specific immune tolerance known as oral tolerance, which is viewed as having promising potential in the treatment of autoimmune and allergic diseases. Plant-based expression and delivery of recombinant antigens provide a promising new platform to induce oral tolerance, having considerable advantages including reduced cost and increased safety. Indeed, in recent years the use of tolerogenic plants for oral tolerance induction has attracted increasing attention, and considerable progress has been made. This review summarizes recent advances in using plants to deliver tolerogens for induction of oral tolerance in the treatment of autoimmune, allergic and inflammatory diseases.

  19. Novel Variants in ZNF34 and Other Brain-Expressed Transcription Factors are Shared Among Early-Onset MDD Relatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subaran, Ryan L.; Odgerel, Zagaa; Swaminathan, Rajeswari; Glatt, Charles E.; Weissman, Myrna M.

    2018-01-01

    There are no known genetic variants with large effects on susceptibility to major depressive disorder (MDD). Although one proposed study approach is to increase sensitivity by increasing sample sizes, another is to focus on families with multiple affected individuals to identify genes with rare or novel variants with strong effects. Choosing the family-based approach, we performed whole-exome analysis on affected individuals (n = 12) across five MDD families, each with at least five affected individuals, early onset, and prepubertal diagnoses. We identified 67 genes where novel deleterious variants were shared among affected relatives. Gene ontology analysis shows that of these 67 genes, 18 encode transcriptional regulators, eight of which are expressed in the human brain, including four KRAB-A box-containing Zn2+ finger repressors. One of these, ZNF34, has been reported as being associated with bipolar disorder and as differentially expressed in bipolar disorder patients compared to healthy controls. We found a novel variant—encoding a non-conservative P17R substitution in the conserved repressor domain of ZNF34 protein—segregating completely with MDD in all available individuals in the family in which it was discovered. Further analysis showed a common ZNF34 coding indel segregating with MDD in a separate family, possibly indicating the presence of an unobserved, linked, rare variant in that particular family. Our results indicate that genes encoding transcription factors expressed in the brain might be an important group of MDD candidate genes and that rare variants in ZNF34 might contribute to susceptibility to MDD and perhaps other affective disorders. PMID:26823146

  20. A robust approach to identifying tissue-specific gene expression regulatory variants using personalized human induced pluripotent stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Je-Hyuk Lee

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Normal variation in gene expression due to regulatory polymorphisms is often masked by biological and experimental noise. In addition, some regulatory polymorphisms may become apparent only in specific tissues. We derived human induced pluripotent stem (iPS cells from adult skin primary fibroblasts and attempted to detect tissue-specific cis-regulatory variants using in vitro cell differentiation. We used padlock probes and high-throughput sequencing for digital RNA allelotyping and measured allele-specific gene expression in primary fibroblasts, lymphoblastoid cells, iPS cells, and their differentiated derivatives. We show that allele-specific expression is both cell type and genotype-dependent, but the majority of detectable allele-specific expression loci remains consistent despite large changes in the cell type or the experimental condition following iPS reprogramming, except on the X-chromosome. We show that our approach to mapping cis-regulatory variants reduces in vitro experimental noise and reveals additional tissue-specific variants using skin-derived human iPS cells.

  1. Mucosal Blood Group Antigen Expression Profiles and HIV Infections: A Study among Female Sex Workers in Kenya.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadia Musimbi Chanzu

    Full Text Available The ABO blood group antigens are carbohydrate moieties expressed on human red blood cells however; these antigens can also be expressed on some other cells particularly the surface of epithelial cells and may be found in mucosal secretions. In many human populations 80% secrete ABO antigens (termed 'secretors' while 20% do not (termed 'non-secretors'. Furthermore, there are disease conditions that are associated with secretor status.To investigate correlations between secretor status and HIV infection among female sex workers in Nairobi, Kenya.This cross-sectional study recruited 280 female sex workers aged 18-65 years from the Pumwani Majengo cohort, Kenya. Blood typing was determined by serological techniques using monoclonal antibodies to the ABO blood group antigens. Secretor phenotyping was determined using anti-H specific lectins specific to salivary, vaginal and cervical blood group H antigen using the agglutination inhibition technique and correlated to individual HIV sero-status. Participants were additionally screened for Bacterial vaginosis, Neisseria gonorrhoea and Trichomonas vaginalis.Out of the 280 participants, 212 (75.7% were secretors and 68 (24.3% were non-secretors. The incidence of all infections: HIV, Bacterial vaginosis, Neisseria gonorrhoea and Trichomonas vaginalis was higher among secretors compared to non-secretors. However, this difference was only statistically significant for HIV infection incidence rates: HIV infected secretors (83.7% versus HIV un-infected secretors (71.8% (p = 0.029 Based on ABO phenotype stratification, the incidence of HIV infection was higher among blood group A secretors (26/52 = 50%, in comparison to B (12/39 = 33.3%: p = 0.066, AB (3/9 = 33.3%: p = 0.355, and O secretors (36/112 = 32.1%: p = 0.028.This is the first report to document the variable expression of the ABH blood group antigens profiling secretor and non-secretor phenotypes in the female genital tract among a high-risk population

  2. Cell-free translational screening of an expression sequence tag library of Clonorchis sinensis for novel antigen discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasi, Devi; Catherine, Christy; Lee, Seung-Won; Lee, Kyung-Ho; Kim, Yu Jung; Ro Lee, Myeong; Ju, Jung Won; Kim, Dong-Myung

    2017-05-01

    The rapidly evolving cloning and sequencing technologies have enabled understanding of genomic structure of parasite genomes, opening up new ways of combatting parasite-related diseases. To make the most of the exponentially accumulating genomic data, however, it is crucial to analyze the proteins encoded by these genomic sequences. In this study, we adopted an engineered cell-free protein synthesis system for large-scale expression screening of an expression sequence tag (EST) library of Clonorchis sinensis to identify potential antigens that can be used for diagnosis and treatment of clonorchiasis. To allow high-throughput expression and identification of individual genes comprising the library, a cell-free synthesis reaction was designed such that both the template DNA and the expressed proteins were co-immobilized on the same microbeads, leading to microbead-based linkage of the genotype and phenotype. This reaction configuration allowed streamlined expression, recovery, and analysis of proteins. This approach enabled us to identify 21 antigenic proteins. © 2017 American Institute of Chemical Engineers Biotechnol. Prog., 33:832-837, 2017. © 2017 American Institute of Chemical Engineers.

  3. Expression of the small T antigen of Lymphotropic Papovavirus is sufficient to transform primary mouse embryo fibroblasts

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    Gupta, Tushar; Robles, Maria Teresa Sáenz [Department of Biological Sciences, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15260 (United States); Schowalter, Rachel M.; Buck, Christopher B. [Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD 20892-4263 (United States); Pipas, James M., E-mail: pipas@pitt.edu [Department of Biological Sciences, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15260 (United States)

    2016-01-15

    Polyomaviruses induce cell proliferation and transformation through different oncoproteins encoded within the early region (ER): large T antigen (LT), small T antigen (sT) and, in some cases, additional components. Each virus utilizes different mechanisms to achieve transformation. For instance, the LTs of Simian virus 40 (SV40), BK and/or JC virus can induce transformation; but Merkel Cell Polyomavirus (MCPyV) requires expression of sT. Lymphotropic Papovavirus (LPV) is closely related to Human Polyomavirus 9 (HuPyV9) and, under similar conditions, mice expressing LPV.ER exhibit higher rates of tumor formation than mice expressing SV40.ER. We have investigated the contributions of individual LPV.ER components to cell transformation. In contrast to SV40, LPV.ER transforms mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs), but expression of LPV LT is insufficient to transform MEFs. Furthermore, LPV sT induces immortalization and transformation of MEFs. Thus, in the case of LPV, sT is the main mediator of oncogenesis. - Highlights: • Characterization of early region products from the Lymphotropic Polyomavirus (LPV). • On its own, sT immortalizes and transforms mouse primary cells, and is able to block p53 activation. • Combined LT and sT expression induces a greater rate of proliferation than either LT or sT alone.

  4. Changing of expression level of fas-antigen (CD95), cytokines synthesis and production after irradiation in low doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalinina, N.M.; Solntceva, O.S.; Bytchkova, N.V.; Nikiforov, A.M.

    1997-01-01

    It is known that bone marrow progenitor (CD34+), tymocytes and peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) are most radiosensitive than other cell types. Even low doses of radiation induce apoptosis. The investigators suggest that it is possible relationship between synthesis and production of cytokines and apoptotic process. With the purpose to determine correlation between expression of Fas-antigen and synthesis of cytokines after low doses irradiation the experiments by irradiation PBL of healthy persons in vitro were held. Cells were X-irradiated by 12,5, 25 and 50 cGy. In consequence of the experiments increasing of Fas-antigen was revealed. This increasing correlated with changing in synthesis and production of cytokines. Also the Chernobyl's accident liquidators (CAL) were investigated. After comparison data in the group CAL (I) with data in the control group (II) increasing of Fas-antigen expression was revealed. Also in I group was discovered increasing of the cell number sinthesied interleukine-4 (IL-4) and interleukine-6 (IL-6). Interleukine-lβ (IL-1 β) producing pell were decreased. These changes have been correlated with degree of immunodeficiency at CAL. These data allow to consider the apoptosis as cell mechanism included in pathogenesis of diseases, which can be showed later long time after irradiation. (author)

  5. Changes in global gene expression profiles induced by HPV 16 E6 oncoprotein variants in cervical carcinoma C33-A cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zacapala-Gómez, Ana Elvira; Del Moral-Hernández, Oscar; Villegas-Sepúlveda, Nicolás; Hidalgo-Miranda, Alfredo; Romero-Córdoba, Sandra Lorena

    2016-01-01

    We analyzed the effects of the expression of HPV 16 E6 oncoprotein variants (AA-a, AA-c, E-A176/G350, E-C188/G350, E-G350), and the E-Prototype in global gene expression profiles in an in vitro model. E6 gene was cloned into an expression vector fused to GFP and was transfected in C33-A cells. Affymetrix GeneChip Human Transcriptome Array 2.0 platform was used to analyze the expression of over 245,000 coding transcripts. We found that HPV16 E6 variants altered the expression of 387 different genes in comparison with E-Prototype. The altered genes are involved in cellular processes related to the development of cervical carcinoma, such as adhesion, angiogenesis, apoptosis, differentiation, cell cycle, proliferation, transcription and protein translation. Our results show that polymorphic changes in HPV16 E6 natural variants are sufficient to alter the overall gene expression profile in C33-A cells, explaining in part the observed differences in oncogenic potential of HPV16 variants. - Highlights: • Amino acid changes in HPV16 E6 variants modulate the transciption of specific genes. • This is the first comparison of global gene expression profile of HPV 16 E6 variants. • Each HPV 16 E6 variant appears to have its own molecular signature.

  6. Changes in global gene expression profiles induced by HPV 16 E6 oncoprotein variants in cervical carcinoma C33-A cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zacapala-Gómez, Ana Elvira, E-mail: zak_ana@yahoo.com.mx [Laboratorio de Biomedicina Molecular, Unidad Académica de Ciencias Químico Biológicas, Universidad Autónoma de Guerrero, Chilpancingo, Gro., México (Mexico); Del Moral-Hernández, Oscar, E-mail: odelmoralh@gmail.com [Laboratorio de Biomedicina Molecular, Unidad Académica de Ciencias Químico Biológicas, Universidad Autónoma de Guerrero, Chilpancingo, Gro., México (Mexico); Villegas-Sepúlveda, Nicolás, E-mail: nvillega@cinvestav.mx [Departamento de Biomedicina Molecular, Centro de Investigación y de Estudios Avanzados del Instituto Politécnico Nacional (CINVESTAV-IPN), México, D.F., México (Mexico); Hidalgo-Miranda, Alfredo, E-mail: ahidalgo@inmegen.gob.mx [Laboratorio de Genómica del Cáncer, Instituto Nacional de Medicina Genómica (INMEGEN), México, D.F., México (Mexico); Romero-Córdoba, Sandra Lorena, E-mail: sromero_cordoba@hotmail.com [Laboratorio de Genómica del Cáncer, Instituto Nacional de Medicina Genómica (INMEGEN), México, D.F., México (Mexico); and others

    2016-01-15

    We analyzed the effects of the expression of HPV 16 E6 oncoprotein variants (AA-a, AA-c, E-A176/G350, E-C188/G350, E-G350), and the E-Prototype in global gene expression profiles in an in vitro model. E6 gene was cloned into an expression vector fused to GFP and was transfected in C33-A cells. Affymetrix GeneChip Human Transcriptome Array 2.0 platform was used to analyze the expression of over 245,000 coding transcripts. We found that HPV16 E6 variants altered the expression of 387 different genes in comparison with E-Prototype. The altered genes are involved in cellular processes related to the development of cervical carcinoma, such as adhesion, angiogenesis, apoptosis, differentiation, cell cycle, proliferation, transcription and protein translation. Our results show that polymorphic changes in HPV16 E6 natural variants are sufficient to alter the overall gene expression profile in C33-A cells, explaining in part the observed differences in oncogenic potential of HPV16 variants. - Highlights: • Amino acid changes in HPV16 E6 variants modulate the transciption of specific genes. • This is the first comparison of global gene expression profile of HPV 16 E6 variants. • Each HPV 16 E6 variant appears to have its own molecular signature.

  7. Increased expression of beta 2-microglobulin and histocompatibility antigens on human lymphoid cells induced by interferon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hokland, M; Heron, I; Berg, K

    1982-01-01

    Normal human peripheral blood lymphocytes were incubated in the presence of different concentrations of interferon for various incubation periods. Subsequently, the amount of beta 2-Microglobulin and HLA-A, B and C surface antigens was estimated by means of quantitative immunofluorescence (flow...... cytofluorometry) and by a radioimmunoassay for beta 2-Microglobulin. It was found that the amounts of these MHC antigens increased in a dose and time-dependent way after interferon treatment. Furthermore, the influence of different temperatures on this IFN-induced increase in beta 2-Microglobulin was gradually...

  8. Dyslexia risk variant rs600753 is linked with dyslexia-specific differential allelic expression of DYX1C1

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    Bent Müller

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract An increasing number of genetic variants involved in dyslexia development were discovered during the last years, yet little is known about the molecular functional mechanisms of these SNPs. In this study we investigated whether dyslexia candidate SNPs have a direct, disease-specific effect on local expression levels of the assumed target gene by using a differential allelic expression assay. In total, 12 SNPs previously associated with dyslexia and related phenotypes were suitable for analysis. Transcripts corresponding to four SNPs were sufficiently expressed in 28 cell lines originating from controls and a family affected by dyslexia. We observed a significant effect of rs600753 on expression levels of DYX1C1 in forward and reverse sequencing approaches. The expression level of the rs600753 risk allele was increased in the respective seven cell lines from members of the dyslexia family which might be due to a disturbed transcription factor binding sites. When considering our results in the context of neuroanatomical dyslexia-specific findings, we speculate that this mechanism may be part of the pathomechanisms underlying the dyslexia-specific brain phenotype. Our results suggest that allele-specific DYX1C1 expression levels depend on genetic variants of rs600753 and contribute to dyslexia. However, these results are preliminary and need replication.

  9. Species-Specific Expression of Full-Length and Alternatively Spliced Variant Forms of CDK5RAP2.

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    John S Y Park

    Full Text Available CDK5RAP2 is one of the primary microcephaly genes that are associated with reduced brain size and mental retardation. We have previously shown that human CDK5RAP2 exists as a full-length form (hCDK5RAP2 or an alternatively spliced variant form (hCDK5RAP2-V1 that is lacking exon 32. The equivalent of hCDK5RAP2-V1 has been reported in rat and mouse but the presence of full-length equivalent hCDK5RAP2 in rat and mouse has not been examined. Here, we demonstrate that rat expresses both a full length and an alternatively spliced variant form of CDK5RAP2 that are equivalent to our previously reported hCDK5RAP2 and hCDK5RAP2-V1, repectively. However, mouse expresses only one form of CDK5RAP2 that is equivalent to the human and rat alternatively spliced variant forms. Knowledge of this expression of different forms of CDK5RAP2 in human, rat and mouse is essential in selecting the appropriate model for studies of CDK5RAP2 and primary microcephaly but our findings further indicate the evolutionary divergence of mouse from the human and rat species.

  10. Local binary pattern variants-based adaptive texture features analysis for posed and nonposed facial expression recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sultana, Maryam; Bhatti, Naeem; Javed, Sajid; Jung, Soon Ki

    2017-09-01

    Facial expression recognition (FER) is an important task for various computer vision applications. The task becomes challenging when it requires the detection and encoding of macro- and micropatterns of facial expressions. We present a two-stage texture feature extraction framework based on the local binary pattern (LBP) variants and evaluate its significance in recognizing posed and nonposed facial expressions. We focus on the parametric limitations of the LBP variants and investigate their effects for optimal FER. The size of the local neighborhood is an important parameter of the LBP technique for its extraction in images. To make the LBP adaptive, we exploit the granulometric information of the facial images to find the local neighborhood size for the extraction of center-symmetric LBP (CS-LBP) features. Our two-stage texture representations consist of an LBP variant and the adaptive CS-LBP features. Among the presented two-stage texture feature extractions, the binarized statistical image features and adaptive CS-LBP features were found showing high FER rates. Evaluation of the adaptive texture features shows competitive and higher performance than the nonadaptive features and other state-of-the-art approaches, respectively.

  11. STUDIES IN DYNAMICS OF APOPTOSIS-RELATED SURFACE ANTIGEN (CD95 EXPRESSION ON NEUTROPHILS FROM CERVICAL AND VAGINAL SECRETIONS IN WOMEN WITH CHLAMIDIA INFECTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. A. Giesinger

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available CD95 (Fas/APO-1 antigen expression was studied on the surface of neutrophil granulocytes from cervical secretions. Sixty-five female patients with established Chlamydia infection were found to have an increased CD95+ antigen expression following basic therapy. CD95+ receptors on neutrophils in the patients with Chlamydia infection have been shown to return to normal levels following a combined magnetic laser treatment.

  12. The MASP family of Trypanosoma cruzi: changes in gene expression and antigenic profile during the acute phase of experimental infection.

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    Sara Lopes dos Santos

    Full Text Available Trypanosoma cruzi is the etiological agent of Chagas disease, a debilitating illness that affects millions of people in the Americas. A major finding of the T. cruzi genome project was the discovery of a novel multigene family composed of approximately 1,300 genes that encode mucin-associated surface proteins (MASPs. The high level of polymorphism of the MASP family associated with its localization at the surface of infective forms of the parasite suggests that MASP participates in host-parasite interactions. We speculate that the large repertoire of MASP sequences may contribute to the ability of T. cruzi to infect several host cell types and/or participate in host immune evasion mechanisms.By sequencing seven cDNA libraries, we analyzed the MASP expression profile in trypomastigotes derived from distinct host cells and after sequential passages in acutely infected mice. Additionally, to investigate the MASP antigenic profile, we performed B-cell epitope prediction on MASP proteins and designed a MASP-specific peptide array with 110 putative epitopes, which was screened with sera from acutely infected mice.We observed differential expression of a few MASP genes between trypomastigotes derived from epithelial and myoblast cell lines. The more pronounced MASP expression changes were observed between bloodstream and tissue-culture trypomastigotes and between bloodstream forms from sequential passages in acutely infected mice. Moreover, we demonstrated that different MASP members were expressed during the acute T. cruzi infection and constitute parasite antigens that are recognized by IgG and IgM antibodies. We also found that distinct MASP peptides could trigger different antibody responses and that the antibody level against a given peptide may vary after sequential passages in mice. We speculate that changes in the large repertoire of MASP antigenic peptides during an infection may contribute to the evasion of host immune responses during the

  13. Increased seroreactivity to glioma-expressed antigen 2 in brain tumor patients under radiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabrina M Heisel

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Surgery and radiation are the mainstays of therapy for human gliomas that are the most common primary brain tumors. Most recently, cell culture and animal studies provided the first convincing evidence that radiation not only eliminates tumor cells, but also modulates the immune response and likely improves anti-tumor immunotherapy. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We present an in vivo study that analyzes the effects of radiation on the immune response in tumor patients. As readout system, we utilized the reactivity of glioma patients' sera against antigen GLEA2 as the most frequent antigen immunogenic in glioblastoma patients. We established an ELISA assay to analyze reactivity of 24 glioblastoma patients over a period of several months. As control we used 30 sera from healthy donors as well as 30 sera from lung cancer patients. We compared the course of GLEA2 seroreactivity at different times prior, during and after radiation. The GLEA2 seroreactivity was increased by the time of surgery, decreased after surgery, increased again under radiation, and slightly decreased after radiation. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results provide in vivo evidence for an increased antibody response against tumor antigens under radiation. Antigens that become immunogenic with an increased antibody response as result of radiation can serve as ideal targets for immunotherapy of human tumors.

  14. Increased expression of endothelial antigen PAL-E in human diabetic retinopathy correlates with microvascular leakage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schlingemann, R. O.; Hofman, P.; Vrensen, G. F.; Blaauwgeers, H. G.

    1999-01-01

    AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: The Pathologische Anatomie Leiden-Endothelium (PAL-E) antigen is a marker for loss of the blood-brain barrier function in brain tumours. It is endothelium specific and is associated with the endothelial plasmalemmal vesicles (caveolae) involved in transcellular transport. To test

  15. Advances in alfalfa mosaic virus-mediated expression of anthrax antigen in planta

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brodzik, R.; Bandurska, K.; Deka, D.; Golovkin, M.; Koprowski, H.

    2005-01-01

    Plant viruses show great potential for production of pharmaceuticals in plants. Such viruses can harbor a small antigenic peptide(s) as a part of their coat proteins (CP) and elicit an antigen-specific immune response. Here, we report the high yield and consistency in production of recombinant alfalfa mosaic virus (AlMV) particles for specific presentation of the small loop 15 amino acid epitope from domain-4 of the Bacillus anthracis protective antigen (PA-D4s). The epitope was inserted immediately after the first 25 N-terminal amino acids of AlMV CP to retain genome activation and binding of CP to viral RNAs. Recombinant AlMV particles were efficiently produced in tobacco, easily purified for immunological analysis, and exhibited extended stability and systemic proliferation in planta. Intraperitional injections of mice with recombinant plant virus particles harboring the PA-D4s epitope elicited a distinct immune response. Western blotting and ELISA analysis showed that sera from immunized mice recognized both native PA antigen and the AlMV CP

  16. The Survivin −31 Snp in Human Colorectal Cancer Correlates with Survivin Splice Variant Expression and Improved Overall Survival

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna G. Antonacopoulou

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Survivin is involved in the regulation of cell division and survival, two key processes in cancer. The majority of studies on survivin in colorectal cancer (CRC have focused on protein expression and less is known about the expression of survivin splicing variants or survivin gene polymorphisms in CRC. In the present study, the mRNA levels of the five known isoforms of survivin as well as survivin protein were assessed in matched normal and neoplastic colorectal tissue. Moreover, the 9386C/T and −31G/C polymorphisms were investigated.

  17. Nucleolin is required for DNA methylation state and the expression of rRNA gene variants in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frédéric Pontvianne

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available In eukaryotes, 45S rRNA genes are arranged in tandem arrays in copy numbers ranging from several hundred to several thousand in plants. Although it is clear that not all copies are transcribed under normal growth conditions, the molecular basis controlling the expression of specific sets of rRNA genes remains unclear. Here, we report four major rRNA gene variants in Arabidopsis thaliana. Interestingly, while transcription of one of these rRNA variants is induced, the others are either repressed or remain unaltered in A. thaliana plants with a disrupted nucleolin-like protein gene (Atnuc-L1. Remarkably, the most highly represented rRNA gene variant, which is inactive in WT plants, is reactivated in Atnuc-L1 mutants. We show that accumulated pre-rRNAs originate from RNA Pol I transcription and are processed accurately. Moreover, we show that disruption of the AtNUC-L1 gene induces loss of symmetrical DNA methylation without affecting histone epigenetic marks at rRNA genes. Collectively, these data reveal a novel mechanism for rRNA gene transcriptional regulation in which the nucleolin protein plays a major role in controlling active and repressed rRNA gene variants in Arabidopsis.

  18. Identification, expression and functional characterization of M4L, a muscarinic acetylcholine M4 receptor splice variant.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douglas A Schober

    Full Text Available Rodent genomic alignment sequences support a 2-exon model for muscarinic M4 receptor. Using this model a novel N-terminal extension was discovered in the human muscarinic acetylcholine M4 receptor. An open reading frame was discovered in the human, mouse and rat with a common ATG (methionine start codon that extended the N-terminus of the muscarinic acetylcholine M4 receptor subtype by 155 amino acids resulting in a longer variant. Transcriptional evidence for this splice variant was confirmed by RNA-Seq and RT-PCR experiments performed from human donor brain prefrontal cortices. We detected a human upstream exon indicating the translation of the mature longer M4 receptor transcript. The predicted size for the longer two-exon M4 receptor splice variant with the additional 155 amino acid N-terminal extension, designated M4L is 69.7 kDa compared to the 53 kDa canonical single exon M4 receptor (M4S. Western blot analysis from a mammalian overexpression system, and saturation radioligand binding with [3H]-NMS (N-methyl-scopolamine demonstrated the expression of this new splice variant. Comparative pharmacological characterization between the M4L and M4S receptors revealed that both the orthosteric and allosteric binding sites for both receptors were very similar despite the addition of an N-terminal extension.

  19. Identification, expression and functional characterization of M4L, a muscarinic acetylcholine M4 receptor splice variant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schober, Douglas A; Croy, Carrie H; Ruble, Cara L; Tao, Ran; Felder, Christian C

    2017-01-01

    Rodent genomic alignment sequences support a 2-exon model for muscarinic M4 receptor. Using this model a novel N-terminal extension was discovered in the human muscarinic acetylcholine M4 receptor. An open reading frame was discovered in the human, mouse and rat with a common ATG (methionine start codon) that extended the N-terminus of the muscarinic acetylcholine M4 receptor subtype by 155 amino acids resulting in a longer variant. Transcriptional evidence for this splice variant was confirmed by RNA-Seq and RT-PCR experiments performed from human donor brain prefrontal cortices. We detected a human upstream exon indicating the translation of the mature longer M4 receptor transcript. The predicted size for the longer two-exon M4 receptor splice variant with the additional 155 amino acid N-terminal extension, designated M4L is 69.7 kDa compared to the 53 kDa canonical single exon M4 receptor (M4S). Western blot analysis from a mammalian overexpression system, and saturation radioligand binding with [3H]-NMS (N-methyl-scopolamine) demonstrated the expression of this new splice variant. Comparative pharmacological characterization between the M4L and M4S receptors revealed that both the orthosteric and allosteric binding sites for both receptors were very similar despite the addition of an N-terminal extension.

  20. New Genome-Wide Algorithm Identifies Novel In-Vivo Expressed Mycobacterium Tuberculosis Antigens Inducing Human T-Cell Responses with Classical and Unconventional Cytokine Profiles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Coppola, Mariateresa; van Meijgaarden, Krista E.; Franken, Kees L. M. C.

    2016-01-01

    -wide transcriptomics of Mtb infected lungs we developed data sets and methods to identify IVE-TB (in-vivo expressed Mtb) antigens expressed in the lung. Quantitative expression analysis of 2,068 Mtb genes from the predicted first operons identified the most upregulated IVE-TB genes during in-vivo pulmonary infection...

  1. Production of dengue virus envelope protein domain III-based antigens in tobacco chloroplasts using inducible and constitutive expression systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottschamel, Johanna; Lössl, Andreas; Ruf, Stephanie; Wang, Yanliang; Skaugen, Morten; Bock, Ralph; Clarke, Jihong Liu

    2016-07-01

    Dengue fever is a disease in many parts of the tropics and subtropics and about half the world's population is at risk of infection according to the World Health Organization. Dengue is caused by any of the four related dengue virus serotypes DEN-1, -2, -3 and -4, which are transmitted to people by Aedes aegypti mosquitoes. Currently there is only one vaccine (Dengvaxia(®)) available (limited to a few countries) on the market since 2015 after half a century's intensive efforts. Affordable and accessible vaccines against dengue are hence still urgently needed. The dengue envelop protein domain III (EDIII), which is capable of eliciting serotype-specific neutralizing antibodies, has become the focus for subunit vaccine development. To contribute to the development of an accessible and affordable dengue vaccine, in the current study we have used plant-based vaccine production systems to generate a dengue subunit vaccine candidate in tobacco. Chloroplast genome engineering was applied to express serotype-specific recombinant EDIII proteins in tobacco chloroplasts using both constitutive and ethanol-inducible expression systems. Expression of a tetravalent antigen fusion construct combining EDIII polypeptides from all four serotypes was also attempted. Transplastomic EDIII-expressing tobacco lines were obtained and homoplasmy was verified by Southern blot analysis. Northern blot analyses showed expression of EDIII antigen-encoding genes. EDIII protein accumulation levels varied for the different recombinant EDIII proteins and the different expression systems, and reached between 0.8 and 1.6 % of total cellular protein. Our study demonstrates the suitability of the chloroplast compartment as a production site for an EDIII-based vaccine candidate against dengue fever and presents a Gateway(®) plastid transformation vector for inducible transgene expression.

  2. Profiling Lgals9 splice variant expression at the fetal-maternal interface: implications in normal and pathological human pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heusschen, Roy; Freitag, Nancy; Tirado-González, Irene; Barrientos, Gabriela; Moschansky, Petra; Muñoz-Fernández, Raquel; Leno-Durán, Ester; Klapp, Burghard F; Thijssen, Victor L J L; Blois, Sandra M

    2013-01-01

    Disruption of fetal-maternal tolerance mechanisms can contribute to pregnancy complications, including spontaneous abortion. Galectin-9 (LGALS9), a tandem repeat lectin associated with immune modulation, is expressed in the endometrium during the mid and late secretory phases and in decidua during human early pregnancy. However, the role of LGALS9 during pregnancy remains poorly understood. We used real-time PCR and immunohistochemical staining to analyze the expression of Lgals9/LGALS9 during mouse gestation as well as in human tissues obtained from normal pregnancy and spontaneous abortions. In mice, three Lgals9 splice variants were detected, the expression of which was differentially regulated during gestation. Furthermore, decidual Lgals9 expression was deregulated in a mouse model of spontaneous abortion, whereas placental levels did not change. We further found that the LGALS9 D5 isoform suppresses interferon gamma production by decidual natural killer cells. In human patients, six Lgals9 splice variants were detected, and a decrease in Lgals9 D5/10 was associated with spontaneous abortion. Altogether, these results show a differential regulation of Lgals9 isoform expression during normal and pathological pregnancies and designate Lgals9 as a potential marker for adverse pregnancy outcomes.

  3. Osteopontin and splice variant expression level in human malignant glioma: Radiobiologic effects and prognosis after radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Güttler, Antje; Giebler, Maria; Cuno, Peter; Wichmann, Henri; Keßler, Jacqueline; Ostheimer, Christian; Söling, Ariane; Strauss, Christian; Illert, Jörg; Kappler, Matthias; Vordermark, Dirk; Bache, Matthias

    2013-01-01

    Background and purpose: We investigated the role of the hypoxia-associated secreted glycoprotein osteopontin (OPN) in the response of malignant glioma to radiotherapy by characterizing OPN and its splice variants in vitro and in patient material. Material and methods: The effect of siRNA knockdown of OPN splice variants on cellular and radiobiologic behavior was analyzed in U251MG cells using OpnS siRNA (inhibition of all OPN splice variants) and OpnAC siRNA (knockdown only of OPNa and OPNc). OPN and splice variant mRNA levels were quantified in archival material of 41 glioblastoma tumor samples. Plasma OPN was prospectively measured in 33 malignant glioma patients. Results: Inhibition of OPNa and OPNc (OpnAC) reduced clonogenic survival in U251MG cells but did not affect proliferation, migration or apoptosis. Knockdown of all OPN splice variants (OpnS) resulted in an even stronger inhibition of clonogenic survival, while cell proliferation and migration were reduced and rate of apoptosis was increased. Additional irradiation had additive effects with both siRNAs. Plasma OPN increased continuously in malignant glioma patients and was associated with poor survival. Conclusions: OPNb is partially able to compensate the effects of OPNa and OPNc knockdown in U251MG cells. High OPN plasma levels at the end of radiotherapy are associated with poor survival

  4. Analysis of GAGE, NY-ESO-1 and SP17 cancer/testis antigen expression in early stage non-small cell lung carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gjerstorff, Morten F; Pøhl, Mette; Olsen, Karen E; Ditzel, Henrik J

    2013-01-01

    The unique expression pattern and immunogenic properties of cancer/testis antigens make them ideal targets for immunotherapy of cancer. The MAGE-A3 cancer/testis antigen is frequently expressed in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and vaccination with MAGE-A3 in patients with MAGE-A3-positive NSCLC has shown promising results. However, little is known about the expression of other cancer/testis antigens in NSCLC. In the present study the expression of cancer/testis antigens GAGE, NY-ESO-1 and SP17 was investigated in patients with completely resected, early stage, primary NSCLC. Tumor biopsies from normal lung tissue and from a large cohort (n = 169) of NSCLC patients were examined for GAGE, NY-ESO-1 and SP17 protein expression by immunohistochemical analysis. The expression of these antigens was further matched to clinical and pathological features using univariate cox regression analysis. GAGE and NY-ESO-1 cancer/testis antigens were not expressed in normal lung tissue, while SP17 was expressed in ciliated lung epithelia. The frequency of GAGE, NY-ESO-1 and SP17 expression in NSCLC tumors were 26.0% (44/169), 11.8% (20/169) and 4.7% (8/169), respectively, and 33.1% (56/169) of the tumors expressed at least one of these antigens. In general, the expression of GAGE, NY-ESO-1 and SP17 was not significantly associated with a specific histotype (adenocarcinoma vs. squamous cell carcinoma), but high-level GAGE expression (>50%) was more frequent in squamous cell carcinoma (p = 0.02). Furthermore, the frequency of GAGE expression was demonstrated to be significantly higher in stage II-IIIa than stage I NSCLC (17.0% vs. 35.8%; p = 0.02). Analysis of the relation between tumor expression of GAGE and NY-ESO-1 and survival endpoints revealed no significant associations. Our study demonstrates that GAGE, NY-ESO-1 and SP17 cancer/testis antigens are candidate targets for immunotherapy of NSCLC and further suggest that multi-antigen vaccines may be beneficial

  5. Immune response to Lactobacillus plantarum expressing Borrelia burgdorferi OspA is modulated by the lipid modification of the antigen.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatriz del Rio

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Over the past decade there has been increasing interest in the use of lactic acid bacteria as mucosal delivery vehicles for vaccine antigens, microbicides and therapeutics. We investigated the mechanism by which a mucosal vaccine based in recombinant lactic acid bacteria breaks the immunological tolerance of the gut in order to elicit a protective immune response.We analyzed how the lipid modification of OspA affects the localization of the antigen in our delivery vehicle using a number of biochemistry techniques. Furthermore, we examined how OspA-expressing L. plantarum breaks the oral tolerance of the gut by stimulating human intestinal epithelial cells, peripheral blood mononuclear cells and monocyte derived dendritic cells and measuring cytokine production. We show that the leader peptide of OspA targets the protein to the cell envelope of L. plantarum, and it is responsible for protein export across the membrane. Mutation of the lipidation site in OspA redirects protein localization within the cell envelope. Further, we show that lipidated-OspA-expressing L. plantarum does not induce secretion of the pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-8 by intestinal epithelial cells. In addition, it breaks oral tolerance of the gut via Th1/Th2 cell mediated immunity, as shown by the production of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines by human dendritic cells, and by the production of IgG2a and IgG1 antibodies, respectively.Lipid modification of OspA expressed in L. plantarum modulates the immune response to this antigen through a Th1/Th2 immune response.

  6. A SImplified method for Segregation Analysis (SISA) to determine penetrance and expression of a genetic variant in a family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Møller, Pål; Clark, Neal; Mæhle, Lovise

    2011-05-01

    A method for SImplified rapid Segregation Analysis (SISA) to assess penetrance and expression of genetic variants in pedigrees of any complexity is presented. For this purpose the probability for recombination between the variant and the gene is zero. An assumption is that the variant of undetermined significance (VUS) is introduced into the family once only. If so, all family members in between two members demonstrated to carry a VUS, are obligate carriers. Probabilities for cosegregation of disease and VUS by chance, penetrance, and expression, may be calculated. SISA return values do not include person identifiers and need no explicit informed consent. There will be no ethical complications in submitting SISA return values to central databases. Values for several families may be combined. Values for a family may be updated by the contributor. SISA is used to consider penetrance whenever sequencing demonstrates a VUS in the known cancer-predisposing genes. Any family structure at hand in a genetic clinic may be used. One may include an extended lineage in a family through demonstrating the same VUS in a distant relative, and thereby identifying all obligate carriers in between. Such extension is a way to escape the selection biases through expanding the families outside the clusters used to select the families. © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  7. Increasing a Robust Antigen-Specific Cytotoxic T Lymphocyte Response by FMDV DNA Vaccination with IL-9 Expressing Construct

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiang Zou

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Various chemokines and cytokines as adjuvants can be used to improve efficacy of DNA vaccination. In this study, we sought to investigate if a DNA construct expressing IL-9 (designed as proV-IL9 as a molecular adjuvant enhance antigen specific immune responses elicited by the pcD-VP1 DNA vaccination. Mice immunized with pcD-VP1 combined with proV-IL9 developed a strong humoral response. In addition, the coinoculation induced significant higher level of antigen-specific cell proliferation and cytotoxic response. This agreed well with higher expression level of IFN-γ and perforin in CD8+ T cells, but not with IL-17 in these T cells. The results indicate that IL-9 induces the development of IFN-γ-producing CD8+ T cells (Tc1, but not the IL-17-producing CD8+ T cells (Tc17. Up-regulated expressions of BCL-2 and BCL-XL were exhibited in these Tc1 cells, suggesting that IL-9 may trigger antiapoptosis mechanism in these cells. Together, these results demonstrated that IL-9 used as molecular adjuvant could enhance the immunogenicity of DNA vaccination, in augmenting humoral and cellular responses and particularly promoting Tc1 activations. Thus, the IL-9 may be utilized as a potent Tc1 adjuvant for DNA vaccines.

  8. Tumor-associated antigens identified by mRNA expression profiling induce protective anti-tumor immunity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mathiassen, S; Lauemøller, S L; Ruhwald, M

    2001-01-01

    Defined tumor-associated antigens (TAA) are attractive targets for anti-tumor immunotherapy. Here, we describe a novel genome-wide approach to identify multiple TAA from any given tumor. A panel of transplantable thymomas was established from an inbred p53-/- mouse strain. The resulting tumors were...... of autoimmune reactions were observed. Thus, it appears possible to evaluate the entire metabolism of any given tumor and use this information rationally to identify multiple epitopes of value in the generation of tumor-specific immunotherapy. We expect that human tumors express similar tumor-specific metabolic...

  9. The tryptic cleavage product of the mature form of the bovine desmoglein 1 ectodomain is one of the antigen moieties immunoprecipitated by all sera from symptomatic patients affected by a new variant of endemic pemphigus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abréu-Vélez, Ana María; Javier Patiño, Pablo; Montoya, Fernando; Bollag, Wendy B

    2003-01-01

    Multiple antigens are recognized by sera from patients with pemphigus foliaceus (PF). Several have been identified including keratin 59, desmocollins, envoplakin, periplakin, and desmogleins 1 and 3 (Dsg1 and Dsg3). In addition, an 80 kDa antigen was identified as the N-terminal fragment of Dsg1 using as antigen source an insoluble epidermal cell envelope preparation. However, still unsolved was the identity of the most important antigenic moiety, a 45 kDa tryptic fragment which is recognized by all sera from patients with fogo selvagem, pemphigus foliaceus, by half of pemphigus vulgaris sera and by a new variant of endemic pemphigus in E1 Bagre, Colombia that resembles Senear-Usher syndrome. Here, we report the identification of the 45 kDa conformational epitope of a soluble tryptic cleavage product from viable bovine epidermis. To elucidate the nature of this peptide, viable bovine epidermis was trypsin-digested, and glycosylated peptides were partially purified on a concanavalin A (Con-A) affinity column. This column fraction was then used as an antigen source for further immunoaffinity purification. A PF patient's serum covalently coupled to a Staphylococcus aureus protein A column was incubated with the Con-A eluted products and the immuno-isolated antigen was separated by SDS-PAGE, transferred to a membrane, and visualized with Coomassie blue, silver and amido black stains. The 45 kD band was subjected to amino acid sequence analysis revealing the sequence, EXIKFAAAXREGED, which matched the mature form of the extracellular domain of bovine Dsg1. This study confirms the biological importance of the ectodomain of Dsg1 as well as the relevance of conformational epitopes in various types of pemphigus.

  10. The expression of prostate-specific antigen in invasive breast carcinoma and its relationship with routine clinicopathologic parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fereshteh Mohammadizadeh

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Invasive breast carcinoma is one of the most common cancers of women. Parameters such as lymph node status, tumor grade, and the status of hormone receptors are among the main prognostic determinants of this cancer. Immunohistochemical detection of prostate-specific antigen (PSA is widely used to identify metastatic prostatic adenocarcinoma. However, its immunoreactivity has been found in some non-prostatic tissues. This study was conducted to assess PSA expression in invasive breast carcinoma and its relationship with routine clinicopathologic parameters. Materials and Methods: 100 formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded invasive breast carcinoma tissue specimens from the pathology archive of Alzahra hospital (Isfahan, Iran were studied for the expression of estrogen receptor (ER, progesterone receptor (PR, HER2/neu, and PSA by immunohistochemistry. Stained sections were classified according to the intensity of staining and the percentage of cells showing PSA staining. The relationship between PSA expression and other markers, age, lymph node status, tumor subtype, and tumor grade was then studied. Results: No association was found between PSA expression on one hand and PR, Her2/neu, age, lymph node status, tumor grade, and tumor subtype on the other. PSA score was reversely correlated with ER expression (P = 0.015. Conclusion: Despite the reverse relationship between PSA expression and the immunoreactivity of ER, PSA expression was not correlated with other prognostic factors. Therefore, the detection of PSA by immunohistochemistry does not seem to be a significant prognostic parameter in patients with invasive breast carcinoma.

  11. Cytotoxic T cells in chronic idiopathic neutropenia express restricted antigen receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mastrodemou, Semeli; Stalika, Evangelia; Vardi, Anna; Gemenetzi, Katerina; Spanoudakis, Michalis; Karypidou, Maria; Mavroudi, Irene; Hadzidimitriou, Anastasia; Stavropoulos-Giokas, Catherine; Papadaki, Helen A; Stamatopoulos, Kostas

    2017-12-01

    Chronic idiopathic neutropenia (CIN) is an acquired disorder of granulopoiesis characterized by female predominance and mostly uncomplicated course. Crucial to CIN pathophysiology is the presence of activated T lymphocytes with myelosuppressive properties in both peripheral blood (PB) and bone marrow (BM). We systematically profiled the T cell receptor beta chain (TRB) gene repertoire in CD8 + cells of 34 CIN patients through subcloning/Sanger sequencing analysis of TRBV-TRBD-TRBJ gene rearrangements. Remarkable repertoire skewing and oligoclonality were observed, along with shared clonotypes between different patients, alluding to antigen selection. Cross-comparison of our sequence dataset with public TRB sequence databases revealed that CIN may rarely share common immunogenetic features with other entities, however, the CIN TRB repertoire is largely disease-biased. Overall, these findings suggest that CIN may be driven by long-term exposure to a restricted set of specific CIN-associated antigens.

  12. Expression of cathepsins B, L, S, and D by gastric epithelial cells implicates them as antigen presenting cells in local immune responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrera, C; Ye, G; Espejo, R; Gunasena, S; Almanza, R; Leary, J; Crowe, S; Ernst, P; Reyes, V E

    2001-10-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection is linked to chronic gastritis, peptic ulcer and gastric carcinoma. During H. pylori infection, class II MHC expression by the gastric epithelium increases, as does the number of local CD4(+) T cells, which appear to be important in the associated pathogenesis. These observations suggested that the epithelium might present antigens to T cells. Thus, we sought to determine whether gastric epithelial cells process antigens to establish their function as local antigen presenting cells (APC). We examined a panel of gastric epithelial cell lines for expression of the antigen processing cathepsins B (CB), L (CL), S (CS), and D (CD). The mRNA for these enzymes were detected by RT-PCR and the enzymes in the gastric epithelial cells were identified by various independent methods. We corroborated the expression of CB and CD on gastric epithelial cells from human biopsy samples. The functions of these proteases were confirmed by assessing their ability to digest ovalbumin, a conventional dietary antigen, and proteins from H. pylori. In summary, multiple lines of evidence suggest gastric epithelial cells process antigens for presentation to CD4(+) T cells. To our knowledge, these are the first studies to document the antigen processing capacity of human gastric epithelial cells.

  13. Diagnostic value of soluble receptor-binding cancer antigen expressed on SiSo cells and carcinoembryonic antigen in differentiating malignant from benign pleural effusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Jiahui; Sun, Gengyun; Zhu, Hongbin

    2016-03-01

    Diagnosis of malignant pleural effusion (MPE) remains a major clinical challenge. The aim of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic value of combined detection of receptor-binding cancer antigen expressed on SiSo cells (RCAS1) and carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) in patients with MPE and benign pleural effusion (BPE). The serum and pleural fluid samples were collected from 53 patients diagnosed with MPE and 49 patients with BPE. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was used to detect the concentration of RCAS1 in serum and pleural effusion. The clinical data and laboratory information, including CEA levels, were gathered from these cases. The concentration of RCAS1 in MPE was significantly higher than that of BPE (P < 0.001). There was no significant difference between the two serum groups. The diagnostic sensitivity and specificity of pleural fluid RCAS1 were 67.92 and 81.63 %, respectively, at the optimized cutoff value of 7.326 U/mL; meanwhile, the sensitivity and specificity of pleural fluid CEA were 83.02 and 91.84 % at the cutoff value of 3.93 ng/mL. The specificity could be elevated to 98.50 % in serial detection, while the sensitivity may be improved to 94.55 % in parallel detection. Serum RCAS1 concentration was only detected in 53 serum samples out of the 102 samples, indicating that serum RCAS1 may not be a better option in differential diagnosis of malignancies compared with serum CEA, of which the diagnostic sensitivity and specificity were 64.15 and 83.67 % at the cutoff value of 3.90 ng/mL. No significant differences were found in pleural fluid RCAS1 concentration in MPE patients with different ages, gender, and pathological types of lung cancers. The detection of RCAS1 concentration in pleural fluid is informative for the diagnosis of MPE. Joint detection of RCAS1 and CEA can improve the diagnostic sensitivity and specificity. However, the diagnostic value of RCAS1 is not higher than that of CEA.

  14. Behavioral and Neural Manifestations of Reward Memory in Carriers of Low-Expressing versus High-Expressing Genetic Variants of the Dopamine D2 Receptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, Anni; Barman, Adriana; Wüstenberg, Torsten; Soch, Joram; Schanze, Denny; Deibele, Anna; Behnisch, Gusalija; Assmann, Anne; Klein, Marieke; Zenker, Martin; Seidenbecher, Constanze; Schott, Björn H.

    2017-01-01

    Dopamine is critically important in the neural manifestation of motivated behavior, and alterations in the human dopaminergic system have been implicated in the etiology of motivation-related psychiatric disorders, most prominently addiction. Patients with chronic addiction exhibit reduced dopamine D2 receptor (DRD2) availability in the striatum, and the DRD2 TaqIA (rs1800497) and C957T (rs6277) genetic polymorphisms have previously been linked to individual differences in striatal dopamine metabolism and clinical risk for alcohol and nicotine dependence. Here, we investigated the hypothesis that the variants of these polymorphisms would show increased reward-related memory formation, which has previously been shown to jointly engage the mesolimbic dopaminergic system and the hippocampus, as a potential intermediate phenotype for addiction memory. To this end, we performed functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in 62 young, healthy individuals genotyped for DRD2 TaqIA and C957T variants. Participants performed an incentive delay task, followed by a recognition memory task 24 h later. We observed effects of both genotypes on the overall recognition performance with carriers of low-expressing variants, namely TaqIA A1 carriers and C957T C homozygotes, showing better performance than the other genotype groups. In addition to the better memory performance, C957T C homozygotes also exhibited a response bias for cues predicting monetary reward. At the neural level, the C957T polymorphism was associated with a genotype-related modulation of right hippocampal and striatal fMRI responses predictive of subsequent recognition confidence for reward-predicting items. Our results indicate that genetic variations associated with DRD2 expression affect explicit memory, specifically for rewarded stimuli. We suggest that the relatively better memory for rewarded stimuli in carriers of low-expressing DRD2 variants may reflect an intermediate phenotype of addiction memory. PMID

  15. Behavioral and Neural Manifestations of Reward Memory in Carriers of Low-Expressing versus High-Expressing Genetic Variants of the Dopamine D2 Receptor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anni Richter

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Dopamine is critically important in the neural manifestation of motivated behavior, and alterations in the human dopaminergic system have been implicated in the etiology of motivation-related psychiatric disorders, most prominently addiction. Patients with chronic addiction exhibit reduced dopamine D2 receptor (DRD2 availability in the striatum, and the DRD2 TaqIA (rs1800497 and C957T (rs6277 genetic polymorphisms have previously been linked to individual differences in striatal dopamine metabolism and clinical risk for alcohol and nicotine dependence. Here, we investigated the hypothesis that the variants of these polymorphisms would show increased reward-related memory formation, which has previously been shown to jointly engage the mesolimbic dopaminergic system and the hippocampus, as a potential intermediate phenotype for addiction memory. To this end, we performed functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI in 62 young, healthy individuals genotyped for DRD2 TaqIA and C957T variants. Participants performed an incentive delay task, followed by a recognition memory task 24 h later. We observed effects of both genotypes on the overall recognition performance with carriers of low-expressing variants, namely TaqIA A1 carriers and C957T C homozygotes, showing better performance than the other genotype groups. In addition to the better memory performance, C957T C homozygotes also exhibited a response bias for cues predicting monetary reward. At the neural level, the C957T polymorphism was associated with a genotype-related modulation of right hippocampal and striatal fMRI responses predictive of subsequent recognition confidence for reward-predicting items. Our results indicate that genetic variations associated with DRD2 expression affect explicit memory, specifically for rewarded stimuli. We suggest that the relatively better memory for rewarded stimuli in carriers of low-expressing DRD2 variants may reflect an intermediate phenotype of

  16. Characterization of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) BZLF1 gene promoter variants and comparison of cellular gene expression profiles in Japanese patients with infectious mononucleosis, chronic active EBV infection, and EBV-associated hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imajoh, Masayuki; Hashida, Yumiko; Murakami, Masanao; Maeda, Akihiko; Sato, Tetsuya; Fujieda, Mikiya; Wakiguchi, Hiroshi; Daibata, Masanori

    2012-06-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) genotypes can be distinguished based on gene sequence differences in EBV nuclear antigens 2, 3A, 3B, and 3C, and the BZLF1 promoter zone (Zp). EBV subtypes and BZLF1 Zp variants were examined in Japanese patients with infectious mononucleosis, chronic active EBV infection, and EBV-associated hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis. The results of EBV typing showed that samples of infectious mononucleosis, chronic active EBV infection, and EBV-associated hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis all belonged to EBV type 1. However, sequencing analysis of BZLF1 Zp found three polymorphic Zp variants in the same samples. The Zp-P prototype and the Zp-V3 variant were both detected in infectious mononucleosis and chronic active EBV infection. Furthermore, a novel variant previously identified in Chinese children with infectious mononucleosis, Zp-V1, was also found in 3 of 18 samples of infectious mononucleosis, where it coexisted with the Zp-P prototype. This is the first evidence that the EBV variant distribution in Japanese patients resembles that found in other Asian patients. The expression levels of 29 chronic active EBV infection-associated cellular genes were also compared in the three EBV-related disorders, using quantitative real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction analysis. Two upregulated genes, RIPK2 and CDH9, were identified as common specific markers for chronic active EBV infection in both in vitro and in vivo studies. RIPK2 activates apoptosis and autophagy, and could be responsible for the pathogenesis of chronic active EBV infection. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Molecular Cloning and Expression of Sequence Variants of Manganese Superoxide Dismutase Genes from Wheat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are very harmful to living organisms due to the potential oxidation of membrane lipids, DNA, proteins, and carbohydrates. Transformed E.coli strain QC 871, superoxide dismutase (SOD) double-mutant, with three sequence variant MnSOD1, MnSOD2, and MnSOD3 manganese supero...

  18. Association of breast cancer risk with genetic variants showing differential allelic expression: Identification of a novel breast cancer susceptibility locus at 4q21

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Y. Hamdi (Yosr); Soucy, P. (Penny); Adoue, V. (Véronique); K. Michailidou (Kyriaki); S. Canisius (Sander); Lemaçon, A. (Audrey); A. Droit (Arnaud); I.L. Andrulis (Irene); H. Anton-Culver (Hoda); Arndt, V. (Volker); Baynes, C. (Caroline); C. Blomqvist (Carl); N.V. Bogdanova (Natalia); S.E. Bojesen (Stig); M.K. Bolla (Manjeet K.); B. Bonnani (Bernardo); A.-L. Borresen-Dale (Anne-Lise); J.S. Brand (Judith S.); H. Brauch (Hiltrud); Brenner, H. (Hermann); A. Broeks (Annegien); B. Burwinkel (Barbara); J. Chang-Claude (Jenny); Couch, F.J. (Fergus J.); A. Cox (Angela); S.S. Cross (Simon); K. Czene (Kamila); H. Darabi (Hatef); J. Dennis (Joe); P. Devilee (Peter); T. Dörk (Thilo); I. dos Santos Silva (Isabel); M. Eriksson (Mats); P.A. Fasching (Peter); J.D. Figueroa (Jonine); H. Flyger (Henrik); M. García-Closas (Montserrat); Giles, G.G. (Graham G.); M.S. Goldberg (Mark); A. González-Neira (Anna); G. Grenaker Alnæs (Grethe); P. Guénel (Pascal); L. Haeberle (Lothar); C.A. Haiman (Christopher); U. Hamann (Ute); Hallberg, E. (Emily); M.J. Hooning (Maartje); J.L. Hopper (John); A. Jakubowska (Anna); M. Jones (Michael); M. Kabisch (Maria); V. Kataja (Vesa); Lambrechts, D. (Diether); L. Le Marchand (Loic); A. Lindblom (Annika); J. Lubinski (Jan); A. Mannermaa (Arto); M. Maranian (Melanie); S. Margolin (Sara); Marme, F. (Frederik); R.L. Milne (Roger); S.L. Neuhausen (Susan); H. Nevanlinna (Heli); P. Neven (Patrick); C. Olswold (Curtis); J. Peto (Julian); Plaseska-Karanfilska, D. (Dijana); K. Pykäs (Katri); P. Radice (Paolo); A. Rudolph (Anja); E.J. Sawyer (Elinor); M.K. Schmidt (Marjanka); X.-O. Shu (Xiao-Ou); M.C. Southey (Melissa); A.J. Swerdlow (Anthony ); R.A.E.M. Tollenaar (Rob); I.P. Tomlinson (Ian); D. Torres (Diana); T. Truong (Thérèse); C. Vachon (Celine); A.M.W. van den Ouweland (Ans); Q. Wang (Qin); R. Winqvist (Robert); W. Zheng (Wei); J. Benítez (Javier); G. Chenevix-Trench (Georgia); A.M. Dunning (Alison); P.D.P. Pharoah (Paul); Kristensen, V. (Vessela); P. Hall (Per); D.F. Easton (Douglas); T. Pastinen (Tomi); S. Nord (Silje); J. Simard (Jacques)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractThere are significant inter-individual differences in the levels of gene expression. Through modulation of gene expression, cis-acting variants represent an important source of phenotypic variation. Consequently, cis-regulatory SNPs associated with differential allelic expression are

  19. Differential expression of carbohydrate antigen 19-9 in human colorectal cancer: A comparison with colon and rectal cancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    ZHANG, SHUAI; CHEN, YIJUN; ZHU, ZHANMENG; DING, YUNLONG; REN, SHUANGYI; ZUO, YUNFEI

    2013-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is one of the leading causes of cancer-related mortality, being the third most commonly diagnosed cancer among men and the second among women. Accumulating evidence regarding carbohydrate antigen (CA) demonstrated that tumor-associated antigens are clinically useful for the diagnosis, staging and monitoring of human gastrointestinal cancers, particularly colorectal cancer. There has been an extensive investigation for sensitive and specific markers of this disease. Currently, the gastrointestinal cancer-associated carbohydrate antigen 19-9 (CA19-9) is the most widely applied tumor marker in cancer diagnosis. Despite a similar etiology and cancer incidence rates, there are anatomical and clinical differences between colon and rectal cancer, as well as differences regarding tumor progression and adjuvant treatments. To investigate whether CA19-9 is differentially expressed between colon and rectal cancer, we conducted a differential analysis of serum CA19-9 levels among 227 cases of colorectal cancer, analyzing gender, age, Dukes’ stage and distant metastasis for human colon and rectal cancer as a single entity, separately and as matched pairs. We demonstrated that the serum CA19-9 levels in colorectal cancer were upregulated in advanced stages with distant metastasis. By contrast, the serum CA19-9 levels in colon cancer displayed a differential and upregulated behavior in advanced stages with distant metastasis. By analyzing as matched pairs, the upregulated serum CA19-9 levels in rectal cancer during the early stages without distant metastasis further supported our hypothesis that the expression of CA19-9 displays a site-specific differential behavior. The integrative analysis suggested a significant difference between human colon and rectal cancer, justifying individualized therapy for these two types of cancer. PMID:24649295

  20. Epithelium Expressing the E7 Oncoprotein of HPV16 Attracts Immune-Modulatory Dendritic Cells to the Skin and Suppresses Their Antigen-Processing Capacity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janin Chandra

    Full Text Available Antigen presenting cells (APCs in skin can promote either antigen-specific effector functions or antigen tolerance, and thus determine clearance or persistence of cutaneous viral infections. Human papillomavirus (HPV infections can persist in squamous epithelium in immunocompetent individuals, and some persisting HPV infections, particularly with HPV16, promote malignant epithelial transformation. Here, we investigate whether local expression of the HPV16 protein most associated with malignant transformation, HPV16-E7, affects the phenotype and function of APC subsets in the skin. We demonstrate an expanded population of Langerhans cells in HPV16-E7 transgenic skin with distinct cell surface markers which express immune-modulatory enzymes and cytokines not expressed by cells from non transgenic skin. Furthermore, HPV16-E7 transgene expression in keratinocytes attracts new APC subsets to the epidermis. In vivo migration and transport of antigen to the draining lymph node by these APCs is markedly enhanced in HPV16-E7 expressing skin, whereas antigen-processing, as measured by proteolytic cleavage of DQ-OVA and activation of T cells in vivo by APCs, is significantly impaired. These data suggest that local expression of HPV16-E7 in keratinocytes can contribute to persisting infection with this oncogenic virus, by altering the phenotype and function of local APCs.

  1. Expression of tomato yellow leaf curl virus coat protein using baculovirus expression system and evaluation of its utility as a viral antigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elgaied, Lamiaa; Salem, Reda; Elmenofy, Wael

    2017-08-01

    DNA encoding the coat protein (CP) of an Egyptian isolate of tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV) was inserted into the genome of Autographa californica nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcNPV) under the control of polyhedrin promoter. The generated recombinant baculovirus construct harboring the coat protein gene was characterized using PCR analysis. The recombinant coat protein expressed in infected insect cells was used as a coating antigen in an indirect Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and dot blot to test its utility for the detection of antibody generated against TYLCV virus particles. The results of ELISA and dot blot showed that the TYLCV-antibodies reacted positively with extracts of infected cells using the recombinant virus as a coating antigen with strong signals as well as the TYLCV infected tomato and beat plant extracts as positive samples. Scanning electron microscope examination showed that the expressed TYLCV coat protein was self-assembled into virus-like particles (VLPs) similar in size and morphology to TYLCV virus particles. These results concluded that, the expressed coat protein of TYLCV using baculovirus vector system is a reliable candidate for generation of anti-CP antibody for inexpensive detection of TYLCV-infected plants using indirect CP-ELISA or dot blot with high specificity.

  2. Development of stable Vibrio cholerae O1 Hikojima type vaccine strains co-expressing the Inaba and Ogawa lipopolysaccharide antigens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan L Karlsson

    Full Text Available We describe here the development of stable classical and El Tor V. cholerae O1 strains of the Hikojima serotype that co-express the Inaba and Ogawa antigens of O1 lipopolysaccharide (LPS. Mutation of the wbeT gene reduced LPS perosamine methylation and thereby gave only partial transformation into Ogawa LPS on the cell surface. The strains express approximately equal amounts of Inaba- and Ogawa-LPS antigens which are preserved after formalin-inactivation of the bacteria. Oral immunizations of both inbred and outbred mice with formalin-inactivated whole-cell vaccine preparations of these strains elicited strong intestinal IgA anti-LPS as well as serum vibriocidal antibody responses against both Inaba and Ogawa that were fully comparable to the responses induced by the licensed Dukoral vaccine. Passive protection studies in infant mice showed that immune sera raised against either of the novel Hikojima vaccine strains protected baby mice against infection with virulent strains of both serotypes. This study illustrates the power of using genetic manipulation to improve the properties of bacteria strains for use in killed whole-cell vaccines.

  3. Transient expression of hemagglutinin antigen from low pathogenic avian influenza A (H7N7 in Nicotiana benthamiana.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selvaraju Kanagarajan

    Full Text Available The influenza A virus is of global concern for the poultry industry, especially the H5 and H7 subtypes as they have the potential to become highly pathogenic for poultry. In this study, the hemagglutinin (HA of a low pathogenic avian influenza virus of the H7N7 subtype isolated from a Swedish mallard Anas platyrhynchos was sequenced, characterized and transiently expressed in Nicotiana benthamiana. Recently, plant expression systems have gained interest as an alternative for the production of vaccine antigens. To examine the possibility of expressing the HA protein in N. benthamiana, a cDNA fragment encoding the HA gene was synthesized de novo, modified with a Kozak sequence, a PR1a signal peptide, a C-terminal hexahistidine (6×His tag, and an endoplasmic retention signal (SEKDEL. The construct was cloned into a Cowpea mosaic virus (CPMV-based vector (pEAQ-HT and the resulting pEAQ-HT-HA plasmid, along with a vector (pJL3:p19 containing the viral gene-silencing suppressor p19 from Tomato bushy stunt virus, was agro-infiltrated into N. benthamiana. The highest gene expression of recombinant plant-produced, uncleaved HA (rHA0, as measured by quantitative real-time PCR was detected at 6 days post infiltration (dpi. Guided by the gene expression profile, rHA0 protein was extracted at 6 dpi and subsequently purified utilizing the 6×His tag and immobilized metal ion adsorption chromatography. The yield was 0.2 g purified protein per kg fresh weight of leaves. Further molecular characterizations showed that the purified rHA0 protein was N-glycosylated and its identity confirmed by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. In addition, the purified rHA0 exhibited hemagglutination and hemagglutination inhibition activity indicating that the rHA0 shares structural and functional properties with native HA protein of H7 influenza virus. Our results indicate that rHA0 maintained its native antigenicity and specificity, providing a good source of

  4. Purification and refolding of anti-T-antigen single chain antibodies (scFvs) expressed in Escherichia coli as inclusion bodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuasa, Noriyuki; Koyama, Tsubasa; Fujita-Yamaguchi, Yoko

    2014-02-01

    T-antigen (Galβ1-3GalNAcα-1-Ser/Thr) is an oncofetal antigen that is commonly expressed as a carbohydrate determinant in many adenocarcinomas. Since it is associated with tumor progression and metastasis, production of recombinant antibodies specific for T-antigen could lead to the development of cancer diagnostics and therapeutics. Previously, we isolated and characterized 11 anti-T-antigen phage clones from a phage library displaying human single-chain antibodies (scFvs) and purified one scFv protein, 1G11. More recently, we purified and characterized 1E8 scFv protein using a Drosophila S2 expression system. In the current study, four anti-T-antigen scFv genes belonging to Groups 1-4 were purified from inclusion bodies expressed in Escherichia coli cells. Inclusion bodies isolated from E. coli cells were denatured in 3.5 M Gdn-HCl. Solubilized His-tagged scFv proteins were purified using Ni(2+)-Sepharose column chromatography in the presence of 3.5 M Gdn-HCl. Purified scFv proteins were refolded according to a previously published method of step-wise dialysis. Two anti-T-antigen scFv proteins, 1E6 and 1E8 that belong to Groups 1 and 2, respectively, were produced in sufficient amounts, thus allowing further characterization of their binding activity with T-antigen. Specificity and affinity constants determined using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and surface plasmon resonance (SPR), respectively, provided evidence that both 1E8 and 1E6 scFv proteins are T-antigen specific and suggested that 1E8 scFv protein has a higher affinity for T-antigen than 1E6 scFv protein.

  5. Highly specific expression of luciferase gene in lungs of naive nude mice directed by prostate-specific antigen promoter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Hongwei; Li Jinzhong; Helm, Gregory A.; Pan Dongfeng

    2005-01-01

    PSA promoter has been demonstrated the utility for tissue-specific toxic gene therapy in prostate cancer models. Characterization of foreign gene overexpression in normal animals elicited by PSA promoter should help evaluate therapy safety. Here we constructed an adenovirus vector (AdPSA-Luc), containing firefly luciferase gene under the control of the 5837 bp long prostate-specific antigen promoter. A charge coupled device video camera was used to non-invasively image expression of firefly luciferase in nude mice on days 3, 7, 11 after injection of 2 x 10 9 PFU of AdPSA-Luc virus via tail vein. The result showed highly specific expression of the luciferase gene in lungs of mice from day 7. The finding indicates the potential limitations of the suicide gene therapy of prostate cancer based on selectivity of PSA promoter. By contrary, it has encouraging implications for further development of vectors via PSA promoter to enable gene therapy for pulmonary diseases

  6. An engineered Lactococcus lactis strain exerts significant immune responses through efficient expression and delivery of Helicobacter pylori Lpp20 antigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Rongguang; Peng, Xiaoyan; Duan, Guangcai; Shi, Qingfeng; Chen, Shuaiyin; Wang, Chen; Fan, Qingtang; Xi, Yuanlin

    2016-12-01

    To produce and deliver Helicobacter pylori lipoprotein Lpp20 via using Lactococcus lactis with aim of developing an efficient way to use this protective antigen in vaccine formulation. An engineered L. lactis strain carrying the lpp20 gene from H. pylori was constructed. The inducible expression of Lpp20 in L. lactis was detected as a 20 kDa intracellular protein by SDS-PAGE. Lpp20 constituted 10 % of the L. lactis cellular proteins. The expression product was highly immunoreactive, as demonstrated by western blot assays using mouse anti-H. pylori sera. Animal experimentation showed that oral vaccination with the engineered strain excited significantly elevated levels of serum Lpp20-specific IgG antibodies in BALB/c mice (P lactis, demonstrating an efficient utilization mode of Lpp20 in anti-H. pylori vaccination.

  7. Expression, purification and characterization of the cancer-germline antigen GAGE12I: a candidate for cancer immunotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjerstorff, Morten F; Besir, Hüseyin; Larsen, Martin R

    2010-01-01

    GAGE cancer-germline antigens are frequently expressed in a broad range of different cancers, while their expression in normal tissues is limited to the germ cells of the immune privileged organs, testis and ovary. GAGE proteins are immunogenic in humans, which make them promising targets...... for immunotherapy and candidates for cancer vaccines. Recombinant proteins may be superior to peptides as immunogens, since they have the potential to prime both CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells and are not dependent on patient HLA-type. We have developed a method for production of highly pure recombinant GAGE12I...... filtration and formaldehyde cross-linking indicated that GAGE12I forms tetramers. The purified recombinant GAGE12I represents a candidate molecule for vaccination of cancer patients and will form the basis for further structural analysis of GAGE proteins....

  8. Identification of a novel splice variant form of the influenza A virus M2 ion channel with an antigenically distinct ectodomain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen M Wise

    Full Text Available Segment 7 of influenza A virus produces up to four mRNAs. Unspliced transcripts encode M1, spliced mRNA2 encodes the M2 ion channel, while protein products from spliced mRNAs 3 and 4 have not previously been identified. The M2 protein plays important roles in virus entry and assembly, and is a target for antiviral drugs and vaccination. Surprisingly, M2 is not essential for virus replication in a laboratory setting, although its loss attenuates the virus. To better understand how IAV might replicate without M2, we studied the reversion mechanism of an M2-null virus. Serial passage of a virus lacking the mRNA2 splice donor site identified a single nucleotide pseudoreverting mutation, which restored growth in cell culture and virulence in mice by upregulating mRNA4 synthesis rather than by reinstating mRNA2 production. We show that mRNA4 encodes a novel M2-related protein (designated M42 with an antigenically distinct ectodomain that can functionally replace M2 despite showing clear differences in intracellular localisation, being largely retained in the Golgi compartment. We also show that the expression of two distinct ion channel proteins is not unique to laboratory-adapted viruses but, most notably, was also a feature of the 1983 North American outbreak of H5N2 highly pathogenic avian influenza virus. In identifying a 14th influenza A polypeptide, our data reinforce the unexpectedly high coding capacity of the viral genome and have implications for virus evolution, as well as for understanding the role of M2 in the virus life cycle.

  9. Humanised IgG1 antibody variants targeting membrane-bound carcinoembryonic antigen by antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity and phagocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashraf, S Q; Umana, P; Mössner, E; Ntouroupi, T; Brünker, P; Schmidt, C; Wilding, J L; Mortensen, N J; Bodmer, W F

    2009-11-17

    The effect of glycoengineering a membrane specific anti-carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) (this paper uses the original term CEA for the formally designated CEACAM5) antibody (PR1A3) on its ability to enhance killing of colorectal cancer (CRC) cell lines by human immune effector cells was assessed. In vivo efficacy of the antibody was also tested. The antibody was modified using EBNA cells cotransfected with beta-1,4-N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase III and the humanised hPR1A3 antibody genes. The resulting alteration of the Fc segment glycosylation pattern enhances the antibody's binding affinity to the FcgammaRIIIa receptor on human immune effector cells but does not alter the antibody's binding capacity. Antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) is inhibited in the presence of anti-FcgammaRIII blocking antibodies. This glycovariant of hPR1A3 enhances ADCC 10-fold relative to the parent unmodified antibody using either unfractionated peripheral blood mononuclear or natural killer (NK) cells and CEA-positive CRC cells as targets. NK cells are far more potent in eliciting ADCC than either freshly isolated monocytes or granulocytes. Flow cytometry and automated fluorescent microscopy have been used to show that both versions of hPR1A3 can induce antibody-dependent cellular phagocytosis (ADCP) by monocyte-derived macrophages. However, the glycovariant antibody did not mediate enhanced ADCP. This may be explained by the relatively low expression of FcgammaRIIIa on cultured macrophages. In vivo studies show the efficacy of glycoengineered humanised IgG1 PR1A3 in significantly improving survival in a CRC metastatic murine model. The greatly enhanced in vitro ADCC activity of the glycoengineered version of hPR1A3 is likely to be clinically beneficial.

  10. Multiple injections of electroporated autologous T cells expressing a chimeric antigen receptor mediate regression of human disseminated tumor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yangbing; Moon, Edmund; Carpenito, Carmine; Paulos, Chrystal M; Liu, Xiaojun; Brennan, Andrea L; Chew, Anne; Carroll, Richard G; Scholler, John; Levine, Bruce L; Albelda, Steven M; June, Carl H

    2010-11-15

    Redirecting T lymphocyte antigen specificity by gene transfer can provide large numbers of tumor-reactive T lymphocytes for adoptive immunotherapy. However, safety concerns associated with viral vector production have limited clinical application of T cells expressing chimeric antigen receptors (CAR). T lymphocytes can be gene modified by RNA electroporation without integration-associated safety concerns. To establish a safe platform for adoptive immunotherapy, we first optimized the vector backbone for RNA in vitro transcription to achieve high-level transgene expression. CAR expression and function of RNA-electroporated T cells could be detected up to a week after electroporation. Multiple injections of RNA CAR-electroporated T cells mediated regression of large vascularized flank mesothelioma tumors in NOD/scid/γc(-/-) mice. Dramatic tumor reduction also occurred when the preexisting intraperitoneal human-derived tumors, which had been growing in vivo for >50 days, were treated by multiple injections of autologous human T cells electroporated with anti-mesothelin CAR mRNA. This is the first report using matched patient tumor and lymphocytes showing that autologous T cells from cancer patients can be engineered to provide an effective therapy for a disseminated tumor in a robust preclinical model. Multiple injections of RNA-engineered T cells are a novel approach for adoptive cell transfer, providing flexible platform for the treatment of cancer that may complement the use of retroviral and lentiviral engineered T cells. This approach may increase the therapeutic index of T cells engineered to express powerful activation domains without the associated safety concerns of integrating viral vectors. Copyright © 2010 AACR.

  11. Kinetics of human T-cell expression of LFA-1, IL-2 receptor, and ICAM-1 following antigenic stimulation in vitro

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hviid, L; Felsing, A; Theander, T G

    1993-01-01

    -specific stimulation is available. In the present study we have examined phenotypic T-cell changes after in vitro stimulation by the antigens purified derivative of tuberculin (PPD) and tetanus toxoid (TT). We show that the well-established differences in kinetics of mitogen- and antigen-induced T-cell proliferation...... of all 3 surface antigens showed similar kinetics, and correlated with the magnitude of the lymphoproliferative response. By day 8 (PHA-stimulation) or day 12 (PPD or TT stimulation), the lymphoproliferative response was essentially completed, the expression of CD11a and CD54 had approached...

  12. Reduced Penetrance and Variable Expression of SCN5A Mutations and the Importance of Co-inherited Genetic Variants: Case Report and Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Robyns, MD.

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Mutations in the SCN5A gene are responsible for multiple phenotypical presentations including Brugada syndrome, long QT syndrome, progressive familial heart block, sick sinus syndrome, dilated cardiomyopathy, lone atrial fibrillation and multiple overlap syndromes. These different phenotypic expressions of a mutation in a single gene can be explained by variable expression and reduced penetrance. One of the possible explanations of these phenomena is the co-inheritance of genetic variants. We describe a family where the individuals exhibit a compound heterozygosity in the SCN5A gene including a mutation (R1632H and a new variant (M858L. Individuals with both the mutation and new variant present with a more severe phenotype including spontaneous atrial tachyarrhythmia at young age. We give an overview of the different phenotypes of "SCN5A disease" and discuss the importance of co-inherited genetic variants in the expression of SCN5A disease.

  13. Effects of irradiation on the expression of major histocompatibility complex class I antigen and adhesion costimulation molecules ICAM-1 in human cervical cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santin, Alessandro D.; Hermonat, Paul L.; Hiserodt, John C.; Chiriva-Internati, Maurizio; Woodliff, Jeff; Theus, John W.; Barclay, David; Pecorelli, Sergio; Parham, Groesbeck P.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: We initiated studies to analyze the effects of high doses of gamma irradiation on the surface antigen expression of MHC Class I, Class II, and ICAM-1 on human cervical carcinoma cell lines. Methods and Materials: The expression of surface antigens (MHC Class I, Class II, and ICAM-1) was evaluated by FACS analysis on two cervical cell lines at different time points, following their exposure to high doses of gamma irradiation (i.e., 25.00, 50.00, and 100.00 Gy). Results: The CaSki and SiHa cervical cancer cells we analyzed in this study expressed variable levels of MHC Class I and ICAM-1 antigens, while Class II surface antigens were not detectable. Whereas irradiation doses of 25.00 Gy were not sufficient to totally block cell replication in both cell lines, exposure to 50.00 or 100.00 Gy was able to completely inhibit cell replication. Range doses from 25.00 to 100.00 Gy significantly and consistently increased the expression of all surface antigens present on the cells prior to irradiation but were unable to induce neoexpression of antigens previously not expressed by these cells (i.e., MHC Class II). Importantly, such upregulation was shown to be dose dependent, with higher radiation doses associated with increased antigen expression. Moreover, when the kinetic of this upregulation was studied after 2 and 6 days after irradiation, it was shown to be persistent and lasted until all the cells died. Conclusions: These findings may partially explain the increased immunogenicity of tumor cells following irradiation and may suggest enhanced immune recognition in tumor tissue in patients receiving radiation therapy

  14. Cloning and Expression of Fusion Genes of Domain A-1 Protective Antigen of Bacillus Anthracis and Shigella Enterotoxin B Subunit (Stxb In E. Coil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AH ahmadi

    2015-02-01

    Conclusion: The findings of the current study revealed that this antigen can be raised as an anti-cancer and recombinant vaccine candidate against types of Shigella, Escherichia coli and Bacillus anthracis which can be due to such factors as identification of antigen(PA by antibody PA20, its apoptosis induction properties, property of immunogenicity, adjuvant and delivery of STxB protein and high expression levels of Gb3 in human cancer cells.

  15. Changes in localization of human discs large (hDlg) during keratinocyte differentiation is associated with expression of alternatively spliced hDlg variants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roberts, S.; Calautti, E.; Vanderweil, S.; Nguyen, H.O.; Foley, A.; Baden, H.P.; Viel, A.

    2007-01-01

    Alternative spliced variants of the human discs large (hDlg) tumour suppressor are characterized by combinations of insertions. Here, using insertions I2- and I3-specific antibodies, we show that I2 and I3 variants have distinct distributions in epidermal and cervical epithelia. In skin and cervix, I3 variants are found in the cytoplasm. Cytoplasmic localization of I3 variants decreases as cervical keratinocytes differentiate, concomitant with relocalization to the cell periphery. I2 variants are found at the cell periphery of differentiated epidermal and cervical keratinocytes. Nuclear localization of I2 variants was evident in both tissues, with concentration of nuclear I2 variants in basal and parabasal cervical keratinocytes. A prominent nuclear localization of hDlg in cells of hyperproliferative layers of psoriatic lesions, but not in mature differentiated keratinocytes, together with I2 redistribution in differentiating keratinocytes, suggests that nuclear hDlg functions may be pertinent to growth of undifferentiated cells. Supporting our findings in squamous tissues, a decrease of nuclear hDlg and an increase of membrane-bound and cytoplasmic hDlg upon calcium-induced keratinocyte differentiation were not concomitant processes. Furthermore, we confirm that the exit of I2 variants from the nucleus is linked to stimulation of epithelial differentiation. The dynamic redistribution of hDlg also correlated with a marked increase in the expression of I3 variants while the level of I2 variants showed only a moderate decrease. Because changes in the intracellular distribution of hDlg splice variants, and in their expression levels, correlate with changes in differentiation state we hypothesize that the different hDlg isoforms play distinct roles at various stages of epithelial differentiation

  16. The expressions of P53 protein and proliferating cell nuclear antigen in specimens by CT-guidance percutaneous lung biopsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhuang Yiping; Shen Zongli; Zhang Jin; Kang Zheng; Zhu Yueqing; Feng Yong; Shen Wenrong; Wang Yaping

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate relations between lung cancer and the expressions of P53 protein together with proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) in specimens of lung lesions by needle biopsy. Methods: CT-guidance percutaneous biopsy of lung lesions were performed in 66 patients with the determination of expressions of p53 protein and PCNA by flow cytometer (FCM). Results: 1. The sensitivity of CT-guidance percutaneous biopsy was 94.3% in 53 cases of lung cancer with the diagnostic accuracy of 90.9% totally. The complication rate of pneumothorax was 4.6%. 2. The expression of P53 protein was (29.9 ± 2.7)% in lung cancer (53 cases), while (17.9 ± 2.8)% in benign lesions (13 cases) (t=2.0, P 2 =6.10, P 2 =9.71, P 0.05). Conclusions: FCM plays and valuable role in determining the expression of P53 protein and PCNA in the specimen of lung cancer by CT-guided percutaneous biopsy. The expression of p53 and PCNA may be useful in the diagnosis of lung cancer by providing the relation between imaging of lung cancer and the molecular mechanism, and furthermore revealing the characteristics of molecular biology of lung cancer at protein level. (authors)

  17. Biological, immunological and functional properties of two novel multi-variant chimeric recombinant proteins of CSP antigens for vaccine development against Plasmodium vivax infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shabani, Samaneh H; Zakeri, Sedigheh; Salmanian, Ali H; Amani, Jafar; Mehrizi, Akram A; Snounou, Georges; Nosten, François; Andolina, Chiara; Mourtazavi, Yousef; Djadid, Navid D

    2017-10-01

    The circumsporozoite protein (CSP) of the malaria parasite Plasmodium vivax is a major pre-erythrocyte vaccine candidate. The protein has a central repeat region that belongs to one of repeat families (VK210, VK247, and the P. vivax-like). In the present study, computer modelling was employed to select chimeric proteins, comprising the conserved regions and different arrangements of the repeat elements (VK210 and VK247), whose structure is similar to that of the native counterparts. DNA encoding the selected chimeras (named CS127 and CS712) were synthetically constructed based on E. coli codons, then cloned and expressed. Mouse monoclonal antibodies (mAbs; anti-Pv-210-CDC and -Pv-247-CDC), recognized the chimeric antigens in ELISA, indicating correct conformation and accessibility of the B-cell epitopes. ELISA using IgG from plasma samples collected from 221 Iranian patients with acute P. vivax showed that only 49.32% of the samples reacted to both CS127 and CS712 proteins. The dominant subclass for the two chimeras was IgG1 (48% of the positive responders, OD 492 =0.777±0.420 for CS127; 48.41% of the positive responders, OD 492 =0.862±0.423 for CS712, with no statistically significant difference P>0.05; Wilcoxon signed ranks test). Binding assays showed that both chimeric proteins bound to immobilized heparan sulphate and HepG2 hepatocyte cells in a concentration-dependent manner, saturable at 80μg/mL. Additionally, anti-CS127 and -CS712 antibodies raised in mice recognized the native protein on the surface of P. vivax sporozoite with high intensity, confirming the presence of common epitopes between the recombinant forms and the native proteins. In summary, despite structural differences at the molecular level, the expression levels of both chimeras were satisfactory, and their conformational structure retained biological function, thus supporting their potential for use in the development of vivax-based vaccine. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights

  18. Chimeric Antigen Receptor Expressing Natural Killer Cells for the Immunotherapy of Cancer

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    Rohtesh S. Mehta

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Adoptive cell therapy has emerged as a powerful treatment for advanced cancers resistant to conventional agents. Most notable are the remarkable responses seen in patients receiving autologous CD19-redirected chimeric antigen receptor (CAR T cells for the treatment of B lymphoid malignancies; however, the generation of autologous products for each patient is logistically cumbersome and has restricted widespread clinical use. A banked allogeneic product has the potential to overcome these limitations, yet allogeneic T-cells (even if human leukocyte antigen-matched carry a major risk of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD. Natural killer (NK cells are bone marrow-derived innate lymphocytes that can eliminate tumors directly, with their activity governed by the integration of signals from activating and inhibitory receptors and from cytokines including IL-15, IL-12, and IL-18. NK cells do not cause GVHD or other alloimmune or autoimmune toxicities and thus, can provide a potential source of allogeneic “off-the-shelf” cellular therapy, mediating major anti-tumor effects without inducing potentially lethal alloreactivity such as GVHD. Given the multiple unique advantages of NK cells, researchers are now exploring the use of CAR-engineered NK cells for the treatment of various hematological and non-hematological malignancies. Herein, we review preclinical data on the development of CAR-NK cells, advantages, disadvantages, and current obstacles to their clinical use.

  19. EXPRESSION OF A NEW A3 ANTIGEN IN THE CELLS OF PATIENTS WITH VARIOUS LYMPHOPROLIFERATIVE DISEASES

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    N. L. Deineko

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We have conducted a study of a novel monoclonal A3 antibody raised by means of hybridoma biotechnology. The study was performed with malignant cells of the patients with various lymphoproliferative disorders, and persons with nonmalignant diseases, as compared with intact lymphocytes from healthy people,using a method of immunocytochemical staining and indirect immunofluorescence technique. It was found that in cases of lymphoproliferative diseases with low proliferation rates, as based on the numbers of Ki-67 positive cells, as well as in non-malignant blood diseases, the A3 antigen was localized in nucleoli, and it was visualized as focal fluorescence. In malignant lymphoproliferative diseases with high proliferation indexes, the number of brightly fluorescent foci is observed, with formation of necklace-like structures within the nucleolar structures. The obtained data point to a diagnostic significance of A3 Mab in assessment of cellular proliferative rates in patients with various lymphoproliferative diseases. It was established that, in contrast to Ki-67, the proliferation stage could be determined for each cell, according to the number of fuorescent foci in nucleoli. This specific property of the A3 antigen points to its significance for diagnostics and malignancy staging of lymphoproliferative disorders.

  20. Expression of class 5 antigens by meningococcal strains obtained from patients in Brazil and evaluation of two new monoclonal antibodies

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    Elizabeth N. De Gaspari

    Full Text Available Determining the profile of antigen expression among meningococci is important for epidemiologic surveillance and vaccine development. To this end, two new mouse monoclonal antibodies (MAbs have been derived against Neisseria meningitidis proteins (class 5. The MAbs were reactive against outer membrane antigens and were bactericidal. Selected anti-class 5 MAbs [(5.1-3E6-2; (5.3-3BH4-C7; (5.4-1BG11-C7; (5.5-3DH-F5G9 also 5F1F4-T3(5.c], and the two new monoclonal antibodies C14F10Br2 (5.8 and 7F11B5Br3 (5.9, were then tested against different meningococcal strains, (63 strains of serogroup A, 60 strains of serogroup C (from 1972 to 1974; and 136 strains of serogroup B (from 1992 meningococci. Our results demonstrated that the expression of class 5 proteins in the N. meningitidis B Brazilian strains studied is highly heterogeneous. The serotypes and subtypes of B:4:P1.15, B:4:P1.9, B:4:P1.7, B:4:P1.3, B:4:P1.14, B:4:P1.16, B:4:NT, and B:NT:NT were detected in N. meningitidis B serogroups.The strains C:2a:P1.2 and A:4.21:P1.9 were dominant in the C and A serogroups, respectively. Serogroup B organisms expressed the class 5 epitopes 5.4 (18%, 5.5 (22%, 5.8 (3.6%, 5.9 (8.0% and 5c (38%. Serogroup C expressed class 5 epitopes 5.1 (81%, 5.4 (35%, 5.5 (33% and 5.9 (5.0%; and serogroup A showed reactivity directed at the class 5 protein 5c (47%; and reactivity was present with the new monoclonal antibody, 5.9 (5.5%. We conclude that the two new MAbs are useful in detecting important group B, class 5 antigens, and that a broad selection of serogroup B, class 5 proteins would be required for an effective vaccine based on the class 5 proteins.

  1. Expression of endogenous ALV antigens and susceptibility to subgroup E ALV in three strains of chickens (Endogenous avian C. type virus)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robinson, H.L.; Lamoreux, W.F.

    1976-01-01

    Cells from three strains of Kimber Farms chickens, K16, K18, and K28, have been characterized for the expression of endogenous avian C-type virus (ALV) antigens and for susceptibility to subgroup E ALV. In K16 the coordinate dominant expression of chick helper factor (chf ), the type specific antigen of endogenous subgroup E ALV, and the group specific (gs) antigen of ALV was observed. The expression of chf and gs antigen in K16 chf + gs + cells was similar to that observed in SPAFAS and H and N gs + cells. In K18 chf but not gs antigen was expressed. The expression of chf in K18 chf + gs + cells was distinct from that observed for the chf + gs + pedigrees but similar to that found in SPAFAS chf + gs - helper extremely high (h/sub E/) cells. Cells from K16 and K18 chickens were uniformly resistant to subgroup E ALV. In cells from K28 chickens, susceptibility to subgroup B virus correlated with susceptibility to subgroup E virus. The efficiency of plating of subgroup E virus on susceptible K28 cells with 10 3 --10 4 -fold lower on chf + cells than on chf - cells

  2. The expression and activity of thioredoxin reductase 1 splice variants v1 and v2 regulate the expression of genes associated with differentiation and adhesion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nalvarte, Ivan; Damdimopoulos, Anastasios E.; Rüegg, Joëlle; Spyrou, Giannis

    2015-01-01

    The mammalian redox-active selenoprotein thioredoxin reductase (TrxR1) is a main player in redox homoeostasis. It transfers electrons from NADPH to a large variety of substrates, particularly to those containing redox-active cysteines. Previously, we reported that the classical form of cytosolic TrxR1 (TXNRD1_v1), when overexpressed in human embryonic kidney cells (HEK-293), prompted the cells to undergo differentiation [Nalvarte et al. (2004) J. Biol. Chem. 279, 54510–54517]. In the present study, we show that several genes associated with differentiation and adhesion are differentially expressed in HEK-293 cells stably overexpressing TXNRD1_v1 compared with cells expressing its splice variant TXNRD1_v2. Overexpression of these two splice forms resulted in distinctive effects on various aspects of cellular functions including gene regulation patterns, alteration of growth rate, migration and morphology and susceptibility to selenium-induced toxicity. Furthermore, differentiation of the neuroblastoma cell line SH-SY5Y induced by all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) increased both TXNRD1_v1 and TXNRD1_v2 expressions along with several of the identified genes associated with differentiation and adhesion. Selenium supplementation in the SH-SY5Y cells also induced a differentiated morphology and changed expression of the adhesion protein fibronectin 1 and the differentiation marker cadherin 11, as well as different temporal expression of the studied TXNRD1 variants. These data suggest that both TXNRD1_v1 and TXNRD1_v2 have distinct roles in differentiation, possibly by altering the expression of the genes associated with differentiation, and further emphasize the importance in distinguishing each unique action of different TrxR1 splice forms, especially when studying the gene silencing or knockout of TrxR1. PMID:26464515

  3. A booster vaccine expressing a latency-associated antigen augments BCG induced immunity and confers enhanced protection against tuberculosis.

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    Bappaditya Dey

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In spite of a consistent protection against tuberculosis (TB in children, Mycobacterium bovis Bacille Calmette-Guerin (BCG fails to provide adequate protection against the disease in adults as well as against reactivation of latent infections or exogenous reinfections. It has been speculated that failure to generate adequate memory T cell response, elicitation of inadequate immune response against latency-associated antigens and inability to impart long-term immunity against M. tuberculosis infections are some of the key factors responsible for the limited efficiency of BCG in controlling TB. METHODS/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study, we evaluated the ability of a DNA vaccine expressing α-crystallin--a key latency antigen of M. tuberculosis to boost the BCG induced immunity. 'BCG prime-DNA boost' regimen (B/D confers robust protection in guinea pigs along with a reduced pathology in comparison to BCG vaccination (1.37 log(10 and 1.96 log(10 fewer bacilli in lungs and spleen, respectively; p<0.01. In addition, B/D regimen also confers enhanced protection in mice. Further, we show that B/D immunization in mice results in a heightened frequency of PPD and antigen specific multi-functional CD4 T cells (3(+ simultaneously producing interferon (IFNγ, tumor necrosis factor (TNFα and interleukin (IL2. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results clearly indicate the superiority of α-crystallin based B/D regimen over BCG. Our study, also demonstrates that protection against TB is predictable by an increased frequency of 3(+ Th1 cells with superior effector functions. We anticipate that this study would significantly contribute towards the development of superior booster vaccines for BCG vaccinated individuals. In addition, this regimen can also be expected to reduce the risk of developing active TB due to reactivation of latent infection.

  4. Tumor-Targeted Human T Cells Expressing CD28-Based Chimeric Antigen Receptors Circumvent CTLA-4 Inhibition.

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    Maud Condomines

    Full Text Available Adoptive T cell therapy represents a promising treatment for cancer. Human T cells engineered to express a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR recognize and kill tumor cells in a MHC-unrestricted manner and persist in vivo when the CAR includes a CD28 costimulatory domain. However, the intensity of the CAR-mediated CD28 activation signal and its regulation by the CTLA-4 checkpoint are unknown. We investigated whether T cells expressing an anti-CD19, CD3 zeta and CD28-based CAR (19-28z displayed the same proliferation and anti-tumor abilities than T cells expressing a CD3 zeta-based CAR (19z1 costimulated through the CD80/CD28, ligand/receptor pathway. Repeated in vitro antigen-specific stimulations indicated that 19-28z+ T cells secreted higher levels of Th1 cytokines and showed enhanced proliferation compared to those of 19z1+ or 19z1-CD80+ T cells. In an aggressive pre-B cell leukemia model, mice treated with 19-28z+ T cells had 10-fold reduced tumor progression compared to those treated with 19z1+ or 19z1-CD80+ T cells. shRNA-mediated CTLA-4 down-regulation in 19z1-CD80+ T cells significantly increased their in vivo expansion and anti-tumor properties, but had no effect in 19-28z+ T cells. Our results establish that CTLA-4 down-regulation may benefit human adoptive T cell therapy and demonstrate that CAR design can elude negative checkpoints to better sustain T cell function.

  5. Immunotoxicity of aflatoxin B1: Impairment of the cell-mediated response to vaccine antigen and modulation of cytokine expression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meissonnier, Guylaine M.; Pinton, Philippe; Laffitte, Joelle; Cossalter, Anne-Marie; Gong, Yun Yun; Wild, Christopher P.; Bertin, Gerard; Galtier, Pierre; Oswald, Isabelle P.

    2008-01-01

    Aflatoxin B1 (AFB1), a mycotoxin produced by Aspergillus flavus or A. parasiticus, is a frequent contaminant of food and feed. This toxin is hepatotoxic and immunotoxic. The present study analyzed in pigs the influence of AFB1 on humoral and cellular responses, and investigated whether the immunomodulation observed is produced through interference with cytokine expression. For 28 days, pigs were fed a control diet or a diet contaminated with 385, 867 or 1807 μg pure AFB1/kg feed. At days 4 and 15, pigs were vaccinated with ovalbumin. AFB1 exposure, confirmed by an observed dose-response in blood aflatoxin-albumin adduct, had no major effect on humoral immunity as measured by plasma concentrations of total IgA, IgG and IgM and of anti-ovalbumin IgG. Toxin exposure did not impair the mitogenic response of lymphocytes but delayed and decreased their specific proliferation in response to the vaccine antigen, suggesting impaired lymphocyte activation in pigs exposed to AFB1. The expression level of pro-inflammatory (TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, IFN-γ) and regulatory (IL-10) cytokines was assessed by real-time PCR in spleen. A significant up-regulation of all 5 cytokines was observed in spleen from pigs exposed to the highest dose of AFB1. In pigs exposed to the medium dose, IL-6 expression was increased and a trend towards increased IFN-γ and IL-10 was observed. In addition we demonstrate that IL-6 impaired in vitro the antigenic- but not the mitogenic-induced proliferation of lymphocytes from control pigs vaccinated with ovalbumin. These results indicate that AFB1 dietary exposure decreases cell-mediated immunity while inducing an inflammatory response. These impairments in the immune response could participate in failure of vaccination protocols and increased susceptibility to infections described in pigs exposed to AFB1

  6. Comparison of altered expression of histocompatibility antigens with altered immune function in murine spleen cells treated with ultraviolet radiation and/or TPA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pretell, J.O.; Cone, R.E.

    1985-01-01

    Previous studies in our laboratory demonstrated that several treatments that inhibited the ability of cells to stimulate the mixed lymphocyte reaction (MLR) also blocked the shedding of histocompatibility antigens and Ia antigens from murine spleen cells. In the present studies, one of these treatments, ultraviolet radiation (UV), was shown to cause an initial loss in the density of H-2K, IA, and IE antigens prior to the block in shedding observed after culture of these cells. Further analysis revealed that the UV-induced loss of antigens could be prevented by the presence of colchicine during irradiation. Biosynthetic analyses revealed the IA antigen synthesis was also inhibited in the UV-irradiated cells. Examination of the effects of a second agent, 12-0-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) on the turnover of histocompatibility antigens revealed that the biosynthesis and shedding of these antigens were accelerated by this agent. However, addition of TPA to UV-irradiated cells did not result in a reversal of the UV-induced block in biosynthesis of IA antigens. Results of immune function assays correlated with the biochemical studies: UV-irradiation inhibited the generation of the MLR, but TPA enhanced this reaction, and addition of TPA to mixed lymphocyte cultures with UV-irradiated stimulators did not reverse the UV-induced inhibition. These results suggest that, although the turnover of histocompatibility antigens may be affected by TPA and UV in an antagonistic fashion, additional factors other than the expression of histocompatibility antigens are operating in the inhibition of stimulation of an MLR by UV radiation or its enhancement by TPA

  7. MDS shows a higher expression of hTERT and alternative splice variants in unactivated T-cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Wen; Wu, Lei; Sun, Houfang; Ren, Xiubao; Epling-Burnette, Pearlie K; Yang, Lili

    2016-11-01

    Telomere instability and telomerase reactivation are believed to play an important role in the development of myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). Abnormal enzymatic activity of human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT), and its alternative splice variants have been reported to account for deregulated telomerase function in many cancers. In this study, we aim to compare the differences in expression of hTERT and hTERT splice variants, as well as telomere length and telomerase activity in unstimulated T-cells between MDS subgroups and healthy controls. Telomere length in MDS cases was significantly shorter than controls (n = 20, pMDS using World Health Organization classification (WHO subgroups versus control: RARS, p= 0.009; RCMD, p=0.0002; RAEB1/2, p=0.004, respectively) and the International Prognostic Scoring System (IPSS subgroups: Low+Int-1, pMDS patients (n=20) had significantly higher telomerase activity (p=0.002), higher total hTERT mRNA levels (p=0.001) and hTERT α+β- splice variant expression (pMDS (r=0.58, p=0.007). This data is in sharp contrast to data published previously by our group showing a reduction in telomerase and hTERT mRNA in MDS T-cells after activation. In conclusion, this study provides additional insight into hTERT transcript patterns and activity in peripheral T-cells of MDS patients. Additional studies are necessary to better understand the role of this pathway in MDS development and progression.

  8. Blockade of CD7 expression in T cells for effective chimeric antigen receptor targeting of T-cell malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Png, Yi Tian; Vinanica, Natasha; Kamiya, Takahiro; Shimasaki, Noriko; Coustan-Smith, Elaine; Campana, Dario

    2017-11-28

    Effective immunotherapies for T-cell malignancies are lacking. We devised a novel approach based on chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-redirected T lymphocytes. We selected CD7 as a target because of its consistent expression in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL), including the most aggressive subtype, early T-cell precursor (ETP)-ALL. In 49 diagnostic T-ALL samples (including 14 ETP-ALL samples), median CD7 expression was >99%; CD7 expression remained high at relapse (n = 14), and during chemotherapy (n = 54). We targeted CD7 with a second-generation CAR (anti-CD7-41BB-CD3ζ), but CAR expression in T lymphocytes caused fratricide due to the presence of CD7 in the T cells themselves. To downregulate CD7 and control fratricide, we applied a new method (protein expression blocker [PEBL]), based on an anti-CD7 single-chain variable fragment coupled with an intracellular retention domain. Transduction of anti-CD7 PEBL resulted in virtually instantaneous abrogation of surface CD7 expression in all transduced T cells; 2.0% ± 1.7% were CD7 + vs 98.1% ± 1.5% of mock-transduced T cells (n = 5; P < .0001). PEBL expression did not impair T-cell proliferation, interferon-γ and tumor necrosis factor-α secretion, or cytotoxicity, and eliminated CAR-mediated fratricide. PEBL-CAR T cells were highly cytotoxic against CD7 + leukemic cells in vitro and were consistently more potent than CD7 + T cells spared by fratricide. They also showed strong anti-leukemic activity in cell line- and patient-derived T-ALL xenografts. The strategy described in this study fits well with existing clinical-grade cell manufacturing processes and can be rapidly implemented for the treatment of patients with high-risk T-cell malignancies.

  9. Hepatitis Bx Antigen Stimulates Expression of a Novel Cellular Gene, URG4, that Promotes Hepatocellular Growth and Survival

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Lale Satiroglu Tufan

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Hepatitis B virus encoded X antigen (HBxAg may contribute to the development of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC by up-or downregulating the expression of cellular genes that promote cell growth and survival. To test this hypothesis, HBxAg-positive and-negative HepG2 cells were constructed, and the patterns of cellular gene expression compared by polymerase chain reaction select cDNA subtraction. The full-length clone of one of these upregulated genes (URG, URG4, encoded a protein of about 104 kDa. URG4 was strongly expressed in hepatitis 13-infected liver and in HCC cells, where it costained with HBxAg, and was weakly expressed in uninfected liver, suggesting URG4 was an effector of HBxAg in vivo. Overexpression of URG4 in HepG2 cells promoted hepatocellular growth and survival in tissue culture and in soft agar, and accelerated tumor development in nude mice. Hence, URG4 may be a natural effector of HBxAg that contributes importantly to multistep hepatocarcinogenesis.

  10. Ionizing radiation modulates the surface expression of human leukocyte antigen-G in a human melanoma cell line

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michelin, S.; Gallegos, C.E.; Dubner, D. [Radiopathology Laboratory, Nuclear Regulatory Authority, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Favier, B.; Carosella, E.D. [CEA, I2BM, Hopital Saint-Louis, IUH, Service de Recherches en Hemato-Immunologie, Paris (France)

    2009-07-01

    Human leukocyte antigen G (HLA-G) is a nonclassical HLA class I molecule involved in fetus protection from the maternal immune system, transplant tolerance, and viral and tumoral immune escape. Tumor-specific HLA-G expression has been described for a wide variety of malignancies, including melanomas. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether ionizing radiation (IR) could modulate the surface expression of HLA-G1 in a human melanoma cell line that expresses endogenously membrane-bound HLA-G1. For this purpose, cells were exposed to increasing doses of {gamma}-irradiation (0-20 Gy) and HLA-G1 levels at the plasma membrane were analyzed at different times postirradiation by flow cytometry. HLA-G total expression and the presence of the soluble form of HLA-G1 (sHLA-G1) in the culture medium of irradiated cells were also evaluated. IR was capable of down regulating cell surface and total HLA-G levels, with a concomitant increase of sHLA-G1 in the medium. These results could indicate that {gamma}-irradiation decreases HLA-G1 surface levels by enhancing the proteolytic cleavage of this molecule. (authors)

  11. Influence of radiotherapy on expression of the proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) and c-fos in human cervical cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi Mei; Wei Lichun; Sun Chaoyang; Ma Haixin; Guo Yan

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To investigate changes of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) expression in human cervical cancer following irradiation. Methods: Immunohistochemical staining for PCNA was performed in frozen sections of formalin-fixed cervical cancer biopsy tissues. Results: The majority of the cancer cells showed PCNA-immunoreactivity before irradiation. Following irradiation (30-40 Gy/15-20 f) PCNA-immuno-positive staining was hardly detectable in most of the cancer cells. The PCNA-immunoreactivity, however, increased after radiotherapy, and moderate or heavy immuno-positive staining for PCNA was seen in irradiated mesenchymal tissue cells. On the other hand, after irradiation Fos-immunoreactivity decreased remarkably, and Fos-immuno-positive staining was hardly detectable in most of cancer cells. No obvious change in Fos-immuno-reactivity, however, was seen in mesenchymal connective tissue following irradiation. Conclusion: Irradiation inhibits PCNA and c-fos expression in cervical cancer cells whereas it induces the expression of PCNA in mesenchymal tissue cells. The present results suggest that expression of PCNA and c-fos may be regarded as a molecular marker for evaluating the cancer cell proliferation and mesenchymal tissue repair during radiotherapy of human cervical cancer

  12. Ionizing radiation modulates the surface expression of human leukocyte antigen-G in a human melanoma cell line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michelin, S.; Gallegos, C.E.; Dubner, D.; Favier, B.; Carosella, E.D.

    2009-01-01

    Human leukocyte antigen G (HLA-G) is a nonclassical HLA class I molecule involved in fetus protection from the maternal immune system, transplant tolerance, and viral and tumoral immune escape. Tumor-specific HLA-G expression has been described for a wide variety of malignancies, including melanomas. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether ionizing radiation (IR) could modulate the surface expression of HLA-G1 in a human melanoma cell line that expresses endogenously membrane-bound HLA-G1. For this purpose, cells were exposed to increasing doses of γ-irradiation (0-20 Gy) and HLA-G1 levels at the plasma membrane were analyzed at different times postirradiation by flow cytometry. HLA-G total expression and the presence of the soluble form of HLA-G1 (sHLA-G1) in the culture medium of irradiated cells were also evaluated. IR was capable of down regulating cell surface and total HLA-G levels, with a concomitant increase of sHLA-G1 in the medium. These results could indicate that γ-irradiation decreases HLA-G1 surface levels by enhancing the proteolytic cleavage of this molecule. (authors)

  13. Expression of T cell antigen receptor genes in the thymus of irradiated mice after bone marrow transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuzaki, G.; Yoshikai, Y.; Kishihara, K.; Nomoto, K.

    1988-01-01

    Sequential appearance of the expression of T cell antigen receptor genes was investigated in the thymus of irradiated mice at the early stage after transplantation of Thy-1 congeneic H-2 compatible allogeneic bone marrow cells. The first cells to repopulate the thymus on day 7 after bone marrow transplantation were intrathymic radioresistant T cell precursors, which expanded mainly to CD4+CD8+ host-type thymocytes by day 14. A high level of gamma gene expression but a much reduced level of alpha and beta gene expression were detected in the host-type thymocytes on day 7. During regeneration of these cells, gamma-chain messages fell to low level and alpha and beta mRNA levels increased. The thymus of the recipients began to be repopulated by donor-derived T cells about 2 wk after bone marrow transplantation and was almost completely replaced by the third week. An ordered expression of gamma then beta and alpha-chain gene transcript was also observed in the donor-type thymocytes at the early stage after bone marrow transplantation. The use of thymocytes at early stage in whole-body irradiated bone marrow chimera provides a pertinent source for investigating the molecular mechanism of T cell differentiation in adult thymus

  14. Simultaneous cytoplasmic and nuclear protein expression of melanoma antigen-A family and NY-ESO-1 cancer-testis antigens represents an independent marker for poor survival in head and neck cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laban, Simon; Atanackovic, Djordje; Luetkens, Tim; Knecht, Rainald; Busch, Chia-Jung; Freytag, Marcus; Spagnoli, Giulio; Ritter, Gerd; Hoffmann, Thomas K; Knuth, Alexander; Sauter, Guido; Wilczak, Waldemar; Blessmann, Marco; Borgmann, Kerstin; Muenscher, Adrian; Clauditz, Till S

    2014-09-01

    The prognosis of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) patients remains poor. The identification of high-risk subgroups is needed for the development of custom-tailored therapies. The expression of cancer-testis antigens (CTAs) has been linked to a worse prognosis in other cancer types; however, their prognostic value in HNSCC is unclear because only few patients have been examined and data on CTA protein expression are sparse. A tissue microarray consisting of tumor samples from 453 HNSCC patients was evaluated for the expression of CTA proteins using immunohistochemistry. Frequency of expression and the subcellular expression pattern (nuclear, cytoplasmic, or both) was recorded. Protein expression of melanoma antigen (MAGE)-A family CTA, MAGE-C family CTA and NY-ESO-1 was found in approximately 30, 7 and 4% of tumors, respectively. The subcellular expression pattern in particular had a marked impact on the patients' prognosis. Median overall survival (OS) of patients with (i) simultaneous cytoplasmic and nuclear expression compared to (ii) either cytoplasmic or nuclear expression and (iii) negative patients was 23.0 versus 109.0 versus 102.5 months, for pan-MAGE (p family members or NY-ESO-1 represent a subgroup with an extraordinarily poor survival. The development of immunotherapeutic strategies targeting these CTA may, therefore, be a promising approach to improve the outcome of HNSCC patients. © 2014 UICC.

  15. Expression of Human CAR Splicing Variants in BAC-Transgenic Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Yu-Kun Jennifer; Lu, Hong; Klaassen, Curtis D.

    2012-01-01

    The nuclear receptor constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) is a key regulator for drug metabolism in liver. Human CAR (hCAR) transcripts are subjected to alternative splicing. Some hCAR splicing variants (SVs) have been shown to encode functional proteins by reporter assays. However, in vivo research on the activity of these hCAR SVs has been impeded by the absence of a valid model. This study engineered an hCAR-BAC-transgenic (hCAR-TG) mouse model by integrating the 8.5-kbp hCAR gene as wel...

  16. Expression of Immunoglobulin Receptors with Distinctive Features Indicating Antigen Selection by Marginal Zone B Cells from Human Spleen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colombo, Monica; Cutrona, Giovanna; Reverberi, Daniele; Bruno, Silvia; Ghiotto, Fabio; Tenca, Claudya; Stamatopoulos, Kostas; Hadzidimitriou, Anastasia; Ceccarelli, Jenny; Salvi, Sandra; Boccardo, Simona; Calevo, Maria Grazia; De Santanna, Amleto; Truini, Mauro; Fais, Franco; Ferrarini, Manlio

    2013-01-01

    Marginal zone (MZ) B cells, identified as surface (s)IgMhighsIgDlowCD23low/−CD21+CD38− B cells, were purified from human spleens, and the features of their V(D)J gene rearrangements were investigated and compared with those of germinal center (GC), follicular mantle (FM) and switched memory (SM) B cells. Most MZ B cells were CD27+ and exhibited somatic hypermutations (SHM), although to a lower extent than SM B cells. Moreover, among MZ B-cell rearrangements, recurrent sequences were observed, some of which displayed intraclonal diversification. The same diversifying sequences were detected in very low numbers in GC and FM B cells and only when a highly sensitive, gene-specific polymerase chain reaction was used. This result indicates that MZ B cells could expand and diversify in situ and also suggested the presence of a number of activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID)-expressing B cells in the MZ. The notion of antigen-driven expansion/selection in situ is further supported by the VH CDR3 features of MZ B cells with highly conserved amino acids at specific positions and by the finding of shared (“stereotyped”) sequences in two different spleens. Collectively, the data are consistent with the notion that MZ B cells are a special subset selected by in situ antigenic stimuli. PMID:23877718

  17. Enhanced expression in vivo of HLA-ABC antigens and beta 2-microglobulin on human lymphoid cells induced by human interferon-alpha in patients with lung cancer. Enhanced expression of class I major histocompatibility antigens prior to treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nissen, Mogens Holst; Plesner, T; Larsen, J K

    1985-01-01

    than 0.5, respectively) by day-to-day analysis of an untreated healthy control group. An increased expression of both HLA-ABC (mean 55%, P less than 0.0005) and beta 2m (mean 23%, P less than 0.01) was also observed prior to treatment in the lung cancer patients when compared to a group of age matched......The effect of cloned human interferon-alpha (IFN-alpha) on the expression of HLA-ABC antigens (HLA-ABC) and beta 2-microglobulin (beta 2m) on human peripheral lymphoid cells in vivo was studied by cytofluorometry using monoclonal antibodies and fluorescein-labelled rabbit anti-mouse immunoglobulin....... A significant increase in the mean fluorescence intensity of HLA-ABC (median 59%, P less than 0.001) and beta 2m (median 57%, P less than 0.001) on small lymphoid cells was observed 24 h after initiation of IFN-alpha treatment (50 X 10(6) units IFN-alpha/m2 three times a week). The enhanced expression...

  18. Cytotoxic T lymphocyte-Associated Antigen +49G Variant Confers Risk for Anti-CCP- and Rheumatoid Factor-Positive Type of Rheumatoid Arthritis Only in Combination with CT60∗G Allele

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernadett Farago

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Controversial observations have been published on the association of the cytotoxic T lymphocyte associated antigen gene's variants with rheumatoid arthritis (RA. After genotyping 428 patients and 230 matched controls, the prevalence of the CT60∗G allele was more frequent in RF- and/or anti-CCP-seropositive RApatients, compared to the healthy controls (P<.001. Regression analysis revealed that the CT60∗G allele is a possible predisposing factor for RA in these subgroups. No accumulation of the +49∗G allele was found among patients, and this variant was not found to correlate with RA. Assaying the possible genotype variations, the +49∗G-CT60∗G allelic combination was accumulated in seropositive RA-subtypes, and was associated with the risk of RA (OR=1.73, P=.001 for the whole RA-population. Although the +49∗G allele did not mean a predisposition to RA alone, in combination with CT60∗G it, also conferred risk, suggesting that the +49A/G variant is associated with the risk of RA only in certain haplotypes.

  19. Characterization of mussel H2A.Z.2: a new H2A.Z variant preferentially expressed in germinal tissues from Mytilus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera-Casas, Ciro; González-Romero, Rodrigo; Vizoso-Vazquez, Ángel; Cheema, Manjinder S; Cerdán, M Esperanza; Méndez, Josefina; Ausió, Juan; Eirin-Lopez, Jose M

    2016-10-01

    Histones are the fundamental constituents of the eukaryotic chromatin, facilitating the physical organization of DNA in chromosomes and participating in the regulation of its metabolism. The H2A family displays the largest number of variants among core histones, including the renowned H2A.X, macroH2A, H2A.B (Bbd), and H2A.Z. This latter variant is especially interesting because of its regulatory role and its differentiation into 2 functionally divergent variants (H2A.Z.1 and H2A.Z.2), further specializing the structure and function of vertebrate chromatin. In the present work we describe, for the first time, the presence of a second H2A.Z variant (H2A.Z.2) in the genome of a non-vertebrate animal, the mussel Mytilus. The molecular and evolutionary characterization of mussel H2A.Z.1 and H2A.Z.2 histones is consistent with their functional specialization, supported on sequence divergence at promoter and coding regions as well as on varying gene expression patterns. More precisely, the expression of H2A.Z.2 transcripts in gonadal tissue and its potential upregulation in response to genotoxic stress might be mirroring the specialization of this variant in DNA repair. Overall, the findings presented in this work complement recent reports describing the widespread presence of other histone variants across eukaryotes, supporting an ancestral origin and conserved role for histone variants in chromatin.

  20. A Novel Vaccine Delivery Model of the Apicomplexan Eimeria tenella Expressing Eimeria maxima Antigen Protects Chickens against Infection of the Two Parasites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Xinming; Liu, Xianyong; Yin, Guangwen; Suo, Jingxia; Tao, Geru; Zhang, Sixin; Suo, Xun

    2017-01-01

    Vaccine delivery is critical in antigen discovery and vaccine efficacy and safety. The diversity of infectious diseases in humans and livestock has required the development of varied delivery vehicles to target different pathogens. In livestock animals, previous strategies for the development of coccidiosis vaccines have encountered several hurdles, limiting the development of multiple species vaccine formulations. Here, we describe a novel vaccine delivery system using transgenic Eimeria tenella expressing immunodominant antigens of Eimeria maxima . In this delivery system, the immune mapped protein 1 of E. maxima (EmIMP1) was delivered by the closely related species of E. tenella to the host immune system during the whole endogenous life cycle. The overexpression of the exogenous antigen did not interfere with the reproduction and immunogenicity of transgenic Eimeria . After immunization with the transgenic parasite, we detected EmIMP1's and E. maxima oocyst antigens' specific humoral and cellular immune responses. In particular, we observed partial protection of chickens immunized with transgenic E. tenella against subsequent E. maxima infections. Our results demonstrate that the transgenic Eimeria parasite is an ideal coccidia antigen delivery vehicle and represents a new type of coccidiosis vaccines. In addition, this model could potentially be used in the development of malaria live sporozoite vaccines, in which antigens from different strains can be expressed in the vaccine strain.

  1. Sperm associated antigen 9 (SPAG9) expression and humoral response in benign and malignant salivary gland tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Sumit; Parashar, Deepak; Gupta, Namita; Jagadish, Nirmala; Thakar, Alok; Suri, Vaishali; Kumar, Rajive; Gupta, Anju; Ansari, Abdul S; Lohiya, Nirmal Kumar; Suri, Anil

    2015-01-01

    Salivary gland cancers are highly aggressive epithelial tumor associated with metastatic potential and high mortality. The tumors are biologically diverse and are of various histotypes. Besides, the detection and diagnosis is a major problem of salivary gland cancer for available treatment modalities. In the present study, we have investigated the association of sperm associated antigen 9 (SPAG9) expression with salivary gland tumor (SGT). Clinical specimens of benign (n = 16) and malignant tumors (n = 86) were examined for the SPAG9 expression. In addition, the sera and adjacent non-cancerous tissues (n = 72) from available patients were obtained. Our in situ RNA hybridization and immunohistochemistry (IHC) analysis revealed significant difference (p = 0.0001) in SPAG9 gene and protein expression in benign (63%) and malignant tumor (84%) specimens. Further, significant association was also observed between SPAG9 expression and malignant tumors (P = 0.05). A cut-off value of >10% cells expressing SPAG9 protein designated as positive in IHC, predicted presence of malignant SGT with 83.72% sensitivity, 100% specificity, 100% PPV and 83.72% NPV. Humoral response against SPAG9 protein was generated in 68% of SGT patients. A cut-off value of 0.212 OD for anti-SPAG9 antibodies in ELISA predicted presence of malignant SGT with 69.23% sensitivity, 100% specificity, 100% PPV and 78.94% NPV. Collectively, our data suggests that the majority of SGT show significant difference and association among benign and malignant tumors for SPAG9 gene and protein expression and also exhibit humoral response against SPAG9 protein. Hence, SPAG9 may be developed as a biomarker for detection and diagnosis of salivary gland tumors. PMID:25941602

  2. Development of Escherichia coli and Mycobacterium smegmatis recombinants expressing major Mycobacterium tuberculosis-specific antigenic proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanady A Amoudy

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: Positive results of cloning and expression suggest that the constructed clones are ready tools for further assessment of their immunogenicity and can be included in improved diagnostic tools and vaccines against TB.

  3. Neutrophil-surface antigens CD11b and CD64 expression: a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ehab

    chorioamnionitis5, or peripartum maternal fever6. Early detection of ... retrospectively, in two groups: sepsis and no infection, on basis of clinical observation over ..... expression in the diagnosis of late-onset nosocomial infection in the very low ...

  4. Differential expression of upstream stimulatory factor (USF 2 variants in eutopic endometria from women with endometriosis: estradiol regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jazmin Castro

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Endometriosis, pro-inflammatory and invasive benign disease estrogen dependent, abnormally express in endometria the enzyme P450Arom, positively regulated by steroid factor-1 (SF-1. Our objective was to study the nuclear protein contents of upstream stimulating factor 2 (USF2a and USF2b, a positive regulator of SF-1, throughout the menstrual cycle in eutopic endometria from women with and without (control endometriosis and the involvement of nuclear estrogen receptors (ER and G-coupled protein estrogen receptor (GPER-1 RESULTS: Upstream stimulating factor 2 protein contents were higher in mid (USF2b and late (USF2a and USF2b secretory phase in eutopic endometria from endometriosis than control (p < 0.05. In isolated control epithelial cells incubated with E2 and PGE2, to resemble the endometriosis condition, the data showed: (a significant increase of USF2a and USF2b nuclear protein contents when treated with E2, PPT (specific agonist for ERa or G1 (specific agonist for GPER1; (b no increase in USF2 binding to SF-1 E-Box/DNA consensus sequence in E2-treated cells; (c USF2 variants protein contents were not modified by PGE2; (d SF-1 nuclear protein content was significantly higher than basal when treated with PGE2, E2 or G1, stimulation unaffected by ICI (nuclear ER antagonist; and (e increased (p < 0.05 cytosolic protein contents of P450Arom when treated with PGE2, E2, PPT or G1 compared to basal, effect that was additive with E2 + PGE2 together. Nevertheless, in endometriosis cells, the high USF2, SF-1 and P450Arom protein contents in basal condition were unmodified CONCLUSION: These data strongly suggest that USF2 variants and P450Arom are regulated by E2 through ERa and GPER1, whereas SF-1 through GPER1, visualized by the response of the cells obtained from control endometria, being unaffected the endogenously stimulated cells from endometriosis origin. The lack of E2 stimulation on USF2/SF-1 E-Box/DNA-sequence binding and the

  5. Persistence of human parvovirus B19 in multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells expressing the erythrocyte P antigen: implications for transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundin, Mikael; Lindblom, Anna; Örvell, Claes; Barrett, A.John; Sundberg, Berit; Watz, Emma; Wikman, Agneta; Broliden, Kristina; Le Blanc, Katarina

    2014-01-01

    Multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) are used to improve the outcome of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation and in regenerative medicine. However, MSC may harbor persistent viruses that may compromise their clinical benefit. Retrospectively screened, 1 of 20 MSC from healthy donors contained parvovirus B19 (B19) DNA. We found that MSC express the B19 receptor (the globoside P antigen) and a co-receptor (Ku 80), and can transmit B19 to bone marrow cells in vitro, suggesting that the virus can persist in the marrow stroma of healthy individuals. Two stem cell transplant patients received the B19 positive MSC as treatment for graft-versus-host disease. Neither developed viremia nor symptomatic B19 infection. These results demonstrate for the first time that persistent B19 in MSC can infect hematopoietic cells and underscore the importance of monitoring B19 transmission by MSC products. PMID:18804048

  6. Characterization of a transcriptional promoter of human papillomavirus 18 and modulation of its expression by simian virus 40 and adenovirus early antigens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thierry, F.; Heard, J.M.; Dartmann, K.; Yaniv, M.

    1987-01-01

    RNA present in cells derived from cervical carcinoma that contained human papillomavirus 18 genomes was initiated in the 1.053-kilobase BamHI fragment that covered the complete noncoding region of this virus. When cloned upstream of the chloramphenicol acetyltransferase gene, this viral fragment directed the expression of the bacterial enzyme only in the sense orientation. Initiation sites were mapped around the ATG of open reading frame E6. This promoter was active in some human and simian cell lines, and its expression was modulated positively by simian virus 40 large T antigen and negatively by adenovirus type 5 E1a antigen

  7. Upregulated Expression of a Unique Gene by Hepatitis B x Antigen Promotes Hepatocellular Growth and Tumorigenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhaorui Lian

    2003-05-01

    Full Text Available Hepatitis B x antigen (HBxAg is a trans-activating protein that may be involved in hepatocarcinogenesis, although few natural effectors of HBxAg that participate in this process have been identified. To identify additional effectors, whole cell RNA isolated from HBxAg-positive and HBxAg-negative HepG2 cells were compared by polymerase chain reaction select cDNA subtraction, and one clone, upregulated gene, clone 11 (URG11, was chosen for further characterization. Elevated levels of URG11 mRNA and protein were observed in HBxAg-positive compared to HBxAg-negative HepG2 cells. Costaining was observed in infected liver (P<.01. URG11 stimulated cell growth in culture (P<.01, anchorage-independent growth in soft agar (P<.001, and accelerated tumor formation (P<.01, and yielded larger tumors (P<.02 in SCID mice injected subcutaneously with HepG2 cells. These data suggest that URG11 is a natural effector of HBxAg that may promote the development of hepatocellular carcinoma.

  8. The porcine circovirus type 1 capsid gene promoter improves antigen expression and immunogenicity in a HIV-1 plasmid vaccine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burger Marieta

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background One of the promising avenues for development of vaccines against Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 and other human pathogens is the use of plasmid-based DNA vaccines. However, relatively large doses of plasmid must be injected for a relatively weak response. We investigated whether genome elements from Porcine circovirus type 1 (PCV-1, an apathogenic small ssDNA-containing virus, had useful expression-enhancing properties that could allow dose-sparing in a plasmid vaccine. Results The linearised PCV-1 genome inserted 5' of the CMV promoter in the well-characterised HIV-1 plasmid vaccine pTHgrttnC increased expression of the polyantigen up to 2-fold, and elicited 3-fold higher CTL responses in mice at 10-fold lower doses than unmodified pTHgrttnC. The PCV-1 capsid gene promoter (Pcap alone was equally effective. Enhancing activity was traced to a putative composite host transcription factor binding site and a "Conserved Late Element" transcription-enhancing sequence previously unidentified in circoviruses. Conclusions We identified a novel PCV-1 genome-derived enhancer sequence that significantly increased antigen expression from plasmids in in vitro assays, and improved immunogenicity in mice of the HIV-1 subtype C vaccine plasmid, pTHgrttnC. This should allow significant dose sparing of, or increased responses to, this and other plasmid-based vaccines. We also report investigations of the potential of other circovirus-derived sequences to be similarly used.

  9. Constitutive transgene expression of Stem Cell Antigen-1 in the hair follicle alters the sensitivity to tumor formation and progression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rikke Christensen

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The cell surface protein Stem Cell Antigen-1 (Sca-1 marks stem or progenitor cells in several murine tissues and is normally upregulated during cancer development. Although the specific function of Sca-1 remains unknown, Sca-1 seems to play a role in proliferation, differentiation and cell migration in a number of tissues. In the skin epithelium, Sca-1 is highly expressed in the interfollicular epidermis but is absent in most compartments of the hair follicle; however, the function of Sca-1 in the skin has not been investigated. To explore the role of Sca-1 in normal and malignant skin development we generated transgenic mice that express Sca-1 in the hair follicle stem cells that are normally Sca-1 negative. Development of hair follicles and interfollicular epidermis appeared normal in Sca-1 mutant mice; however, follicular induction of Sca-1 expression in bulge region and isthmus stem cells reduced the overall yield of papillomas in a chemical carcinogenesis protocol. Despite that fewer papillomas developed in transgenic mice a higher proportion of the papillomas underwent malignant conversion. These findings suggest that overexpression of Sca-1 in the hair follicle stem cells contributes at different stages of tumour development. In early stages, overexpression of Sca-1 decreases tumour formation while at later stages overexpression of Sca-1 seems to drive tumours towards malignant progression.

  10. Unexpected dependence of RyR1 splice variant expression in human lower limb muscles on fiber-type composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willemse, Hermia; Theodoratos, Angelo; Smith, Paul N; Dulhunty, Angela F

    2016-02-01

    The skeletal muscle ryanodine receptor Ca(2+) release channel (RyR1), essential for excitation-contraction (EC) coupling, demonstrates a known developmentally regulated alternative splicing in the ASI region. We now find unexpectedly that the expression of the splice variants is closely related to fiber type in adult human lower limb muscles. We examined the distribution of myosin heavy chain isoforms and ASI splice variants in gluteus minimus, gluteus medius and vastus medialis from patients aged 45 to 85 years. There was a strong positive correlation between ASI(+)RyR1 and the percentage of type 2 fibers in the muscles (r = 0.725), and a correspondingly strong negative correlation between the percentages of ASI(+)RyR1 and percentage of type 1 fibers. When the type 2 fiber data were separated into type 2X and type 2A, the correlation with ASI(+)RyR1 was stronger in type 2X fibers (r = 0.781) than in type 2A fibers (r = 0.461). There was no significant correlation between age and either fiber-type composition or ASI(+)RyR1/ASI(-)RyR1 ratio. The results suggest that the reduced expression of ASI(-)RyR1 during development may reflect a reduction in type 1 fibers during development. Preferential expression of ASI(-) RyR1, having a higher gain of in Ca(2+) release during EC coupling than ASI(+)RyR1, may compensate for the reduced terminal cisternae volume, fewer junctional contacts and reduced charge movement in type 1 fibers.

  11. Zinc oxide nanoparticle reduced biofilm formation and antigen 43 expressions in uropathogenic Escherichia coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Shakerimoghaddam

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective(s: This study aimed to investigate the effect of zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO-np on biofilm formation and expression of the flu gene in uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC strains. Materials and Methods: Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC of ZnO-np was determined by agar dilution method. The effect of MIC and sub-MIC concentrations of ZnO-np on biofilm formation were determined by microtiter plate assay. The expression level of the flu gene was assessed by Real-Time PCR assay. Results: MIC and sub-MIC ZnO-np concentrations reduced biofilm formation by 50% and 33.4%, respectively. Sub-MIC ZnO-np concentration significantly reduced the flu gene expression in the UPEC isolates (P

  12. The HTLV-I tax protein transcriptionally modulates OX40 antigen expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pankow, R; Dürkop, H; Latza, U; Krause, H; Kunzendorf, U; Pohl, T; Bulfone-Paus, S

    2000-07-01

    OX40 is a member of the TNF receptor family, expressed on activated T cells. It is the only costimulatory T cell molecule known to be specifically up-regulated in human T cell leukemia virus type-I (HTLV-I)-producing cells. In a T cell line, OX40 surface expression was shown to be induced by HTLV-I Tax alone. To understand molecular mechanisms of OX40 gene regulation and modulation by HTLV-I Tax, we have cloned the human OX40 gene and analyzed its 5'-flanking region. By reporter gene analysis with progressive 5' deletions from nucleotides -1259 to -64, we have defined a 157-bp DNA fragment as a minimal promoter for constitutive expression. In addition, we show that in the OX40+ cell line, Co, Tax is able to further increase OX40 surface expression. Up-regulation of OX40 promoter activity by Tax requires two upstream NF-kappaB sites, which are not active in the constitutive OX40 expression. Their deletion abrogates Tax responsiveness in reporter gene analysis. The site-directed mutagenesis of each NF-kappaB site demonstrates that cooperative NF-kappaB binding is a prerequisite for Tax-directed activity as neither site alone is sufficient for a full Tax responsiveness of the OX40 promoter. Upon Tax expression, both sites bind p65 and c-Rel. These data provide new insight into the direct regulation of OX40 by Tax and add to our understanding of the possible role of the OX40/OX40 ligand system in the proliferation of HTLV-I+ T cells.

  13. Evaluation of a Salmonella vectored vaccine expressing Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis antigens against challenge in a goat model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syed M Faisal

    Full Text Available Johnes disease (JD, caused by Mycobacterium avium subsp paratuberculosis (MAP, occurs worldwide as chronic granulomatous enteritis of domestic and wild ruminants. To develop a cost effective vaccine, in a previous study we constructed an attenuated Salmonella strain that expressed a fusion product made up of partial fragments of MAP antigens (Ag85A, Ag85B and SOD that imparted protection against challenge in a mouse model. In the current study we evaluated the differential immune response and protective efficacy of the Sal-Ag vaccine against challenge in a goat model as compared to the live attenuated vaccine MAP316F. PBMCs from goats vaccinated with Sal-Ag and challenged with MAP generated significantly lower levels of IFN-γ, following in vitro stimulation with either Antigen-mix or PPD jhonin, than PBMC from MAP316F vaccinated animals. Flow cytometric analysis showed the increase in IFN-γ correlated with a significantly higher level of proliferation of CD4, CD8 and γδT cells and an increased expression of CD25 and CD45R0 in MAP316F vaccinated animals as compared to control animals. Evaluation of a range of cytokines involved in Th1, Th2, Treg, and Th17 immune responses by quantitative PCR showed low levels of expression of Th1 (IFN-γ, IL-2, IL-12 and proinflammatory cytokines (IL-6, IL-8, IL-18, TNF-α in the Sal-Ag immunized group. Significant levels of Th2 and anti-inflammatory cytokines transcripts (IL-4, IL-10, IL-13, TGF-β were expressed but their level was low and with a pattern similar to the control group. Over all, Sal-Ag vaccine imparted partial protection that limited colonization in tissues of some animals upon challenge with wild type MAP but not to the level achieved with MAP316F. In conclusion, the data indicates that Sal-Ag vaccine induced only a low level of protective immunity that failed to limit the colonization of MAP in infected animals. Hence the Sal-Ag vaccine needs further refinement to increase its efficacy.

  14. Failure to synthesize the CD3-gamma chain. Consequences for T cell antigen receptor assembly, processing, and expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Geisler, C

    1992-01-01

    surface expression of the Ti/CD3 complex. Transfection of the wild-type CD3-gamma gene into JGN reconstituted expression of functional Ti/CD3 complexes, and analysis of T cell lines producing different amounts of CD3-gamma indicated that CD3-gamma and CD3-delta competed for the binding to CD3-epsilon.......The TCR consists of the Ti alpha beta heterodimer and the associated CD3 chains, CD3 gamma delta epsilon zeta 2 or zeta eta. The structural relationships between the subunits of the Ti/CD3 complex are still not fully understood. To explore the roles of the individual CD3 chains for the assembly......, intracellular processing, and expression of the TCR, mutants of the T cell line Jurkat were isolated. One variant, JGN, was found to produce all the Ti/CD3 components with the exception of CD3-gamma. The results indicate that: 1) the tetrameric form (Ti alpha beta-CD3 delta epsilon) of the Ti/CD3 complex...

  15. Flow cytometric assay detecting cytotoxicity against human endogenous retrovirus antigens expressed on cultured multiple sclerosis cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller-Larsen, A; Brudek, T; Petersen, T

    2013-01-01

    on their surface. Polyclonal antibodies against defined peptides in the Env- and Gag-regions of the HERVs were raised in rabbits and used in antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) -assays. Rituximab® (Roche), a chimeric monoclonal antibody against CD20 expressed primarily on B cells, was used...

  16. Epigenetic priming restores the HLA class-I antigen processing machinery expression in Merkel cell carcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ritter, Cathrin; Fan, Kaiji; Paschen, Annette

    2017-01-01

    Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC) is a rare and aggressive, yet highly immunogenic skin cancer. The latter is due to its viral or UV-associated carcinogenesis. For tumor progression MCC has to escape the host's immuno-surveillance, e.g. by loss of HLA class-I expression. Indeed, a reduced HLA class...

  17. Effects of eccentric cycling exercise on IGF-I splice variant expression in the muscles of young and elderly people

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hameed, M.; Toft, A.D.; Harridge, S.D.

    2008-01-01

    growth factor (MGF) were studied in response to 1 h of eccentric cycling exercise in young and old individuals. Subjects (nine young, aged 20-27 years and eight elderly, aged 67-75 years) completed an eccentric exercise protocol that consisted of 60 min of reverse pedal cycling. Workloads were chosen......Recovery from micro damage resulting from intensive exercise has been shown to take longer in older muscles. To investigate the factors that may contribute to muscle repair, we have studied the expression of two splice variants of the insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) gene. IGF-IEa and mechano....... No difference was observed between the baseline levels of the two splice variants between the two subject groups. Eccentric cycling exercise resulted in a significant increase in the mean MGF mRNA in both young and old subjects but did not alter IGF-IEa mRNA levels in either age group. As reported previously...

  18. The rs391957 variant cis-regulating oncogene GRP78 expression contributes to the risk of hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xiao; Zhang, Jinfang; Fan, Wenguo; Wang, Fang; Yao, Hong; Wang, Zifeng; Hou, Shengping; Tian, Yinghong; Fu, Weiming; Xie, Dan; Zhu, Wei; Long, Jun; Wu, Leijie; Zheng, Xuebao; Kung, Hsiangfu; Zhou, Keyuan; Lin, Marie C M; Luo, Hui; Li, Dongpei

    2013-06-01

    Glucose-regulated protein 78 (GRP78) is one of the most important responders to disease-related stress. We assessed the association of the promoter polymorphisms of GRP78 with risk of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and GRP78 expression in a Chinese population. We examined 1007 patients undergoing diagnostic HCC and 810 unrelated healthy controls. Mechanisms by which the GRP78 promoter polymorphism modulates HCC risk and GRP78 levels were analyzed. The promoter haplotype and diplotype carrying rs391957 (-415bp) allele G and genotype GG was strongly associated with HCC risk. Luciferase reporter assays indicated that the promoter carrying rs391957 allele G (haplotype GCCd) showed increased activity in HepG2 cells and Hela cells. rs391957 was also shown to increase the affinity of the transcriptional activator Ets-2, the resistance to apoptosis, as well as cell instability in stressful microenvironment. Furthermore, compared with allele A, rs391957 allele G was associated with higher levels of GRP78 mRNA and protein in HCC tissues. These findings provided new insights into the pathogenesis of HCC and an unexpected effect of the interaction between rs391957 and Ets-2 on hepatocarcinogenesis, and especially supported the hypothesis that stress-related and evolutionarily conserved genetic variant(s) influencing transcriptional regulation could predict susceptibilities.

  19. Immunohistochemical Expression of Podoplanin in Clinical Variants of Oral Leukoplakia and Its Correlation With Epithelial Dysplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'souza, Brendan; Nayak, Ramakant; Kotrashetti, Vijayalakshmi S

    2018-02-01

    Oral leukoplakia is the most common premalignant lesion of the oral cavity and is associated with development of oral squamous cell carcinoma. Certain changes at cellular and molecular level are important indicators for transformation into carcinoma. Podoplanin, a transmembrane glycoprotein is involved in the cytoskeletal remodeling and increased motility of the cell which helps in determining the malignant potential of oral leukoplakic lesions. The objective of the study was to determine immunohistochemically the expression of podoplanin in homogenous (HOL) and nonhomogenous oral leukoplakia (NHOL) and to compare the expression with clinicopathological parameters. Study group included 15 cases each of HOL, NHOL and control group included 15 healthy volunteers. Both tissues were immunohistochemically stained for podoplanin (D2-40) antibody. No statistical significant difference was observed between the study and control groups for expression of podoplanin but significant difference was observed on comparison of podoplanin scores between HOL and NHOL. Statistical significant difference was observed when the podoplanin expression in the epithelium and the lymphatic vessel density were correlated with the histologic grading of HOL and NHOL. Expression of podoplanin was greater in NHOL as compared with HOL, this supports the fact that NHOL has a greater risk of malignant transformation when compared with HOL. Podoplanin expression, lymphangiogenesis, and lymphatic vessel density increased with increasing grades of dysplasia, suggesting that cellular modeling and motility is increased as the grade of dysplasia advances. Thus suggesting podoplanin can be used as a prognostic marker to determine the malignant potential in oral leukoplakias.

  20. Menstrual endometrial cells from women with endometriosis demonstrate increased adherence to peritoneal cells and increased expression of CD44 splice variants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffith, Jason S; Liu, Ya-Guang; Tekmal, Rajeshwar R; Binkley, Peter A; Holden, Alan E C; Schenken, Robert S

    2010-04-01

    We previously demonstrated that adherence of endometrial epithelial (EECs) and stromal cells (ESCs) to peritoneal mesothelial cells (PMCs) is partly regulated by ESC/EEC CD44 interactions with PMC associated hyaluronan. CD44, a transmembrane glycoprotein and major ligand for hyaluronan, has numerous splice variants which may impact hyaluronan binding. Here, we assessed whether ESCs and EECs from women with endometriosis demonstrate increased adherence to PMCs and examined CD44 splice variants' potential role in this process. In vitro study. Academic medical center. Fertility patients with and without endometriosis. Menstrual endometrium was collected from women with and without endometriosis confirmed surgically. The adherence of ESC/EECs to PMCs was measured. The ESC/EEC CD44 splice variants were assessed using dot-blot analysis. The ESCs and EECs from women with endometriosis demonstrated increased adherence to PMCs. The predominant CD44 splice variants expressed by ESCs and EECs from women with and without endometriosis were v3, v6, v7, v8, v9, and v10. The ESCs and EECs from women with endometriosis were more likely to express v6, v7, v8, and v9. Increased eutopic endometrial-PMC adherence and CD44 splice variant expression may contribute to the histogenesis of endometriotic lesions. Elucidation of factors controlling this expression may lead to novel endometriosis therapies. Copyright 2010 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. High-level expression, purification and characterization of a constitutively active thromboxane A2 receptor polymorphic variant.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bing Xu

    Full Text Available G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs exhibit some level of basal signaling even in the absence of a bound agonist. This basal or constitutive signaling can have important pathophysiological roles. In the past few years, a number of high resolution crystal structures of GPCRs have been reported, including two crystal structures of constitutively active mutants (CAM of the dim-light receptor, rhodopsin. The structural characterizations of CAMs are impeded by the lack of proper expression systems. The thromboxane A2 receptor (TP is a GPCR that mediates vasoconstriction and promotes thrombosis in response to the binding of thromboxane. Here, we report on the expression and purification of a genetic variant and CAM in TP, namely A160T, using tetracycline-inducible HEK293S-TetR and HEK293S (GnTI¯-TetR cell lines. Expression of the TP and the A160T genes in these mammalian cell lines resulted in a 4-fold increase in expression to a level of 15.8 ±0.3 pmol of receptor/mg of membrane protein. The receptors expressed in the HEK293S (GnTI(--TetR cell line showed homogeneous glycosylation. The functional yield of the receptors using a single step affinity purification was 45 µg/10⁶ cells. Temperature- dependent secondary structure changes of the purified TP and A160T receptors were characterized using circular dichroism (CD spectropolarimetry. The CD spectra shows that the loss of activity or thermal sensitivity that was previously observed for the A160T mutant, is not owing to large unfolding of the protein but rather to a more subtle effect. This is the first study to report on the successful high-level expression, purification, and biophysical characterization of a naturally occurring, diffusible ligand activated GPCR CAM.

  2. A statistical method for predicting splice variants between two groups of samples using GeneChip® expression array data

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    Olson James M

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Alternative splicing of pre-messenger RNA results in RNA variants with combinations of selected exons. It is one of the essential biological functions and regulatory components in higher eukaryotic cells. Some of these variants are detectable with the Affymetrix GeneChip® that uses multiple oligonucleotide probes (i.e. probe set, since the target sequences for the multiple probes are adjacent within each gene. Hybridization intensity from a probe correlates with abundance of the corresponding transcript. Although the multiple-probe feature in the current GeneChip® was designed to assess expression values of individual genes, it also measures transcriptional abundance for a sub-region of a gene sequence. This additional capacity motivated us to develop a method to predict alternative splicing, taking advance of extensive repositories of GeneChip® gene expression array data. Results We developed a two-step approach to predict alternative splicing from GeneChip® data. First, we clustered the probes from a probe set into pseudo-exons based on similarity of probe intensities and physical adjacency. A pseudo-exon is defined as a sequence in the gene within which multiple probes have comparable probe intensity values. Second, for each pseudo-exon, we assessed the statistical significance of the difference in probe intensity between two groups of samples. Differentially expressed pseudo-exons are predicted to be alternatively spliced. We applied our method to empirical data generated from GeneChip® Hu6800 arrays, which include 7129 probe sets and twenty probes per probe set. The dataset consists of sixty-nine medulloblastoma (27 metastatic and 42 non-metastatic samples and four cerebellum samples as normal controls. We predicted that 577 genes would be alternatively spliced when we compared normal cerebellum samples to medulloblastomas, and predicted that thirteen genes would be alternatively spliced when we compared metastatic

  3. Increased Expression of Intercellular Adhesion Molecule-1, Vascular Cellular Adhesion Molecule-1 and Leukocyte Common Antigen in Diabetic Rat Retina

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ningyan Bai; Shibo Tang; Jing Ma; Yan Luo; Shaofeng Lin

    2003-01-01

    Purpose: To understand the expression and distribution of intercellular adhesion molecule- 1(ICAM- 1),vascular cellular adhesion molecule- 1 (VCAM- 1)and CD45 (Leukocyte Common Antigen) in the control nondiabetic and various courses of diabetic rats retina. To explore the role of adhesion molecules (Ams) and the adhesion of leukocytes to vascular endothelial cells via Ams in diabetic retinopathy(DR).Methods: Sixty healthy adult male Wistar rats were randomly divided into diabetic groups(induced by Streptozotocin, STZ) and normal control groups. Rats in these two groups were further randomly divided into 3, 7, 14, 30, 90 and 180 days-group,including 5 rats respectively. The immunohistochemical studies of ICAM-1, VCAM-1 and CD45 were carried out in the retinal digest preparations or retinal paraffin sections, and the results were analyzed qualitatively, semi-quantitatively.Results: No positive reaction of VCAM-1 was found, and weak reactions of ICAM-1,CD45 were found in nondiabetic rats retina. The difference of 6 control groups had no statistical significance(P > 0.05). The increased ICAM-1 and CD45 staining pattern were detectable 3 days after diabetes induction, and a few VCAM-1 positive cells were observed in the retinal blood capillaries. The difference of diabetes and control is significant( P < 0.05).Following the course, the expressions of ICAM-1, VCAM-1 and CD45 were increasingly enhanced, reaching a peak at the 14th day.Conclusion: Increased expression of ICAM-1, VCAM-1 and leukocytes adhering and stacking in retinal capillaries are the very early events in DR. Coherence of expression and distribution of the three further accounts for it is the key point for the onset of DR that Ams mediates leukocytes adhesion and endothelial cell injury.

  4. Genetic variants related to disease susceptibility and immunotolerance in the Duffy antigen receptor for chemokines (DARC, Fy) gene in the black lion tamarin (Leontopithecus chrysopygus, primates).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansel, Ashley; Lewis, James D; Melnick, Don J; Martins, Cristiana; Valladares-Padua, Claudio; Perez-Sweeney, Beatriz

    2017-10-01

    The DARC (Duffy antigen receptor for chemokines) gene encodes the DARC protein, which serves multiple roles in the immune system, as a binding site for the malarial parasites Plasmodium vivax and Plasmodium knowlesi, a promiscuous chemokine receptor and a blood group antigen. Variation in DARC may play particularly significant roles in innate immunity, immunotolerance and pathogen entry in callitrichines, such as the black lion tamarin (Leontopithecus chrysopygus). We compared amino acid sequences of DARC in the black lion tamarin (BLT) to non-human Haplorhine primates and Homo sapiens. Consistent with prior studies in other Haplorhines, we observed that the chemokine receptor experiences two opposing selection forces: (1) positive selection on the Plasmodium binding site and (2) purifying selection. We observed also that D21N, F22L, and V25L differentiated BLT from humans at a critical site for P. vivax and P. knowlesi binding. One amino acid residue, F22L, was subject to both positive selection and fixation in New World monkeys, suggesting a beneficial role as an adaptive barrier to Plasmodium entry. Unlike in humans, we observed no variation in DARC among BLTs, suggesting that the protein does not play a role in immunotolerance. In addition, lion tamarins differed from humans at the blood compatibility Fy a /Fy b antigen-binding site 44, as well as at the putative destabilizing residues A61, T68, A187, and L215, further supporting a difference in the functional role of DARC in these primates compared with humans. Further research is needed to determine whether changes in the Plasmodium and Fy a /Fy b antigen-binding sites disrupt DARC function in callitrichines. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Immunochemical expression of proliferative cell nuclear antigen in aging cultured astrocytes

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    M. C. Vanzani

    2003-08-01

    Full Text Available Cell differentiation degree and mitotic activity were sequentially assessed by immunoperoxidase labeling of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP and proliferative cell nuclear antigen (PCNA, respectively, in rat brain cultured astrocytes maintained up to 60 days in vitro (DIV of first subculture, or weekly passaged until their 12th subculture. Cell count was performed through a 0.01 mm2 section reticule and morphometric analysis with a stereological grid. The number of double immunoreactive cells peaked by 2 DIV to achieve its lowest value at 60 DIV. At 24 hs of cell seeding of successive passages, such values peaked by the 6th subculture to gradually decrease thereafter. Increasing cell hypertrophy was found during the long-term first subculture but not after passaging. At the end of the observation period, doubly immunolabeled astrocytes were still recorded, thus evidencing retention of proliferative potential despite aging.El grado de diferenciación celular y la actividad mitótica fueron secuencialmente determinados mediante marcación por inmunoperoxidasa de la proteína gliofibrilar ácida (GFAP y del antígeno nuclear de proliferación celular (PCNA, respectivamente, en cultivos astrocitarios obtenidos de encéfalo de rata y mantenidos hasta 60 días in vitro (DIV de su primer subcultivo, o mediante pasajes semanales hasta el 12do subcultivo. El conteo celular se realizó mediante una retícula de 0.01-mm2 de sección y el análisis morfométrico con una grilla estereológica. El número de células doblemente inmunorreactivas alcanzó valores máximos a los 2 DIV para descender a los menores a los 60 DIV. A las 24 hs de sembrado celular de los sucesivos pasajes, esos valores ascendieron hacia el 6to subcultivo para luego declinar. En cuanto a la hipertrofia celular, se observó en todo el curso del primer subcultivo, pero no durante los posteriores pasajes. Al final del período de observación, todavía se continuaban detectando

  6. A new adenovirus based vaccine vector expressing an Eimeria tenella derived TLR agonist improves cellular immune responses to an antigenic target.

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    Daniel M Appledorn

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Adenoviral based vectors remain promising vaccine platforms for use against numerous pathogens, including HIV. Recent vaccine trials utilizing Adenovirus based vaccines expressing HIV antigens confirmed induction of cellular immune responses, but these responses failed to prevent HIV infections in vaccinees. This illustrates the need to develop vaccine formulations capable of generating more potent T-cell responses to HIV antigens, such as HIV-Gag, since robust immune responses to this antigen correlate with improved outcomes in long-term non-progressor HIV infected individuals.In this study we designed a novel vaccine strategy utilizing an Ad-based vector expressing a potent TLR agonist derived from Eimeria tenella as an adjuvant to improve immune responses from a [E1-]Ad-based HIV-Gag vaccine. Our results confirm that expression of rEA elicits significantly increased TLR mediated innate immune responses as measured by the influx of plasma cytokines and chemokines, and activation of innate immune responding cells. Furthermore, our data show that the quantity and quality of HIV-Gag specific CD8(+ and CD8(- T-cell responses were significantly improved when coupled with rEA expression. These responses also correlated with a significantly increased number of HIV-Gag derived epitopes being recognized by host T cells. Finally, functional assays confirmed that rEA expression significantly improved antigen specific CTL responses, in vivo. Moreover, we show that these improved responses were dependent upon improved TLR pathway interactions.The data presented in this study illustrate the potential utility of Ad-based vectors expressing TLR agonists to improve clinical outcomes dependent upon induction of robust, antigen specific immune responses.

  7. Novel Antitumor Strategy Utilizing a Plasmid Expressing a Mycobacterium tuberculosis Antigen as a “Danger Signal” to Block Immune Escape of Tumor Cells

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    Yoshiyuki Koyama

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Immune escape of tumor cells is one of the main obstacles hindering the effectiveness of cancer immunotherapy. We developed a novel strategy to block immune escape by transfecting tumor cells in vivo with genes of pathogenic antigens from Mycobacterium tuberculosis (TB. This induces presentation of the TB antigen on tumor cell surfaces, which can be recognized by antigen presenting cells (APCs as a “danger signal” to stimulate antitumor immune response. This strategy is also expected to amplify the immune response against tumor-associated antigens, and block immune escape of the tumor. DNA/PEI/chondroitin sulfate ternary complex is a highly effective non-viral gene vector system for in vivo transfection. A therapeutic complex was prepared using a plasmid encoding the TB antigen, early secretory antigenic target-6 (ESAT-6. This was injected intratumorally into syngeneic tumor-bearing mice, and induced significant tumor growth suppression comparable to or higher than similar complexes expressing cytokines such as interleukin-2 (IL-2 and interleukin-12 (IL-12. Co-transfection of the cytokine-genes and the ESAT-6-gene enhanced the antitumor efficacy of either treatment alone. In addition, complete tumor regression was achieved with the combination of ESAT-6 and IL-2 genes.

  8. The influence of concentration of inactivated Edwardsiella tarda bacterin and immersion time on antigen uptake and expression of immune-related genes in Japanese flounder (Paralichthys olivaceus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Yang; Tang, Xiaoqian; Sheng, Xiuzhen; Xing, Jing; Zhan, Wenbin

    2017-02-01

    Our previous work has demonstrated that the immune response of Japanese flounder was associated with the concentration of formalin-inactivated Edwardsiella tarda and immersion time. In order to further investigate the influence of immersion vaccine dose and bath time on the antigen uptake, formalin-killed Edwardsiella tarda bacterin was prepared and adjusted to four concentrations (10 9 , 10 8 , 10 7 , 10 6  cfu ml -1 ) for 30, 60 and 90 min immersion in Japanese flounder model, respectively. Absolute quantitative real-time PCR was employed to examine the bacterin uptake in gill, skin, spleen and kidney at 3 and 6 h post vaccination. The results showed that the antigen uptaken in gills and skin were significant higher than spleen and kidney, and the antigen amounts in gill and skin both declined from 3 to 6 h, whereas the antigen amounts in spleen and kidney gradually increased. Significant higher antigen amounts were detected in 10 9 -30, 10 9 -60, 10 8 -60, 10 8 -90 and 10 8 -90 groups than other groups (P immersion with formalin-inactivated E. tarda, especially under 10 8 -60 min condition could efficiently enhance the antigen uptake and the expression of immune-related genes, which provided evidences for an enhanced vaccination effects under an optimized combination of vaccine dose and immersion time. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. A Lactococcus lactis BFE920 feed vaccine expressing a fusion protein composed of the OmpA and FlgD antigens from Edwardsiella tarda was significantly better at protecting olive flounder (Paralichthys olivaceus) from edwardsiellosis than single antigen vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Bo Ram; Lee, Soon Ho; Kim, Daniel; Park, Ji Hye; Lee, Hyun Kyung; Kwon, San-Sung; Lee, Kwan Hee; Lee, Jae Il; Song, Seong Kyu

    2017-09-01

    Edwardsiellosis is a major fish disease that causes a significant economic damage in the aquaculture industry. Here, we assessed vaccine efficacy after feeding oral vaccines to olive flounder (Paralichthys olivaceus), either L. lactis BFE920 expressing Edwardsiella tarda outer membrane protein A (OmpA), flagellar hook protein D (FlgD), or a fusion antigen of the two. Feed vaccination was done twice with a one-week interval. Fish were fed regular feed adsorbed with the vaccines. Feed vaccination was given over the course of one week to maximize the interaction between the feed vaccines and the fish intestine. Flounder fed the vaccine containing the fusion antigen had significantly elevated levels T cell genes (CD4-1, CD4-2, and CD8α), type 1 helper T cell (Th1) subset indicator genes (T-bet and IFN-γ), and antigen-specific antibodies compared to the groups fed the single antigen-expressing vaccines. Furthermore, the superiority of the fusion vaccine was also observed in survival rates when fish were challenged with E. tarda: OmpA-FlgD-expressing vaccine (82.5% survival); FlgD-vaccine (55.0%); OmpA-vaccine (50%); WT L. lactis BFE920 (37.5%); Ctrl (10%). In addition, vaccine-fed fish exhibited increased weight gain (∼20%) and a decreased feed conversion ratio (∼20%) during the four week vaccination period. Flounder fed the FlgD-expressing vaccine, either the single or the fusion form, had significantly increased expression of TLR5M, IL-1β, and IL-12p40, suggesting that the FlgD may be a ligand of olive flounder TLR5M receptor or closely related to the TLR5M pathway. In conclusion, the present study demonstrated that olive flounder fed L. lactis BFE920 expressing a fusion antigen composed of E. tarda OmpA and FlgD showed a strong protective effect against edwardsiellosis indicating this may be developed as an E. tarda feed vaccine. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Expressed Centromere Specific Histone 3 (CENH3 Variants in Cultivated Triploid and Wild Diploid Bananas (Musa spp.

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    Kariuki S. Muiruri

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Centromeres are specified by a centromere specific histone 3 (CENH3 protein, which exists in a complex environment, interacting with conserved proteins and rapidly evolving satellite DNA sequences. The interactions may become more challenging if multiple CENH3 versions are introduced into the zygote as this can affect post-zygotic mitosis and ultimately sexual reproduction. Here, we characterize CENH3 variant transcripts expressed in cultivated triploid and wild diploid progenitor bananas. We describe both splice- and allelic-[Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNP] variants and their effects on the predicted secondary structures of protein. Expressed CENH3 transcripts from six banana genotypes were characterized and clustered into three groups (MusaCENH-1A, MusaCENH-1B, and MusaCENH-2 based on similarity. The CENH3 groups differed with SNPs as well as presence of indels resulting from retained and/or skipped exons. The CENH3 transcripts from different banana genotypes were spliced in either 7/6, 5/4 or 6/5 exons/introns. The 7/6 and the 5/4 exon/intron structures were found in both diploids and triploids, however, 7/6 was most predominant. The 6/5 exon/introns structure was a result of failure of the 7/6 to splice correctly. The various transcripts obtained were predicted to encode highly variable N-terminal tails and a relatively conserved C-terminal histone fold domain (HFD. The SNPs were predicted in some cases to affect the secondary structure of protein by lengthening or shorting the affected domains. Sequencing of banana CENH3 transcripts predicts SNP variations that affect amino acid sequences and alternatively spliced transcripts. Most of these changes affect the N-terminal tail of CENH3.

  11. An adenoviral vector expressing lipoprotein A, a major antigen of Mycoplasma mycoides subspecies mycoides, elicits robust immune responses in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carozza, Marlène; Rodrigues, Valérie; Unterfinger, Yves; Galea, Sandra; Coulpier, Muriel; Klonjkowski, Bernard; Thiaucourt, François; Totté, Philippe; Richardson, Jennifer

    2015-01-01

    Contagious bovine pleuropneumonia (CBPP), caused by Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. mycoides small colony type (MmmSC), is a devastating respiratory disease of cattle. In sub-Saharan Africa, where CBPP is enzootic, live attenuated vaccines are deployed but afford only short-lived protection. In cattle, recovery from experimental MmmSC infection has been associated with the presence of CD4(+) T lymphocytes that secrete interferon gamma in response to MmmSC, and in particular to the lipoprotein A (LppA) antigen. In an effort to develop a better vaccine against CBPP, a viral vector (Ad5-LppA) that expressed LppA was generated from human adenovirus type 5. The LppA-specific immune responses elicited by the Ad5-LppA vector were evaluated in mice, and compared to those elicited by recombinant LppA formulated with a potent adjuvant. Notably, a single administration of Ad5-LppA, but not recombinant protein, sufficed to elicit a robust LppA-specific humoral response. After a booster administration, both vector and recombinant protein elicited strong LppA-specific humoral and cell-mediated responses. Ex vivo stimulation of splenocytes induced extensive proliferation of CD4(+) T cells for mice immunized with vector or protein, and secretion of T helper 1-associated and proinflammatory cytokines for mice immunized with Ad5-LppA. Our study - by demonstrating the potential of a viral-vectored prototypic vaccine to elicit prompt and robust immune responses against a major antigen of MmmSC - represents a first step in developing a recombinant vaccine against CBPP. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. The relationship between apoptosis and the expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen and the clinical stages in gastric carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, K; Chen, D; Tian, Y; Lu, X; Yang, X

    2000-01-01

    The relationship between the apoptosis and the expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) and the clinical stages in gastric cancers was studied. By using terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated nick end labeling (TUNEL) technique and PCNA immunohistochemical staining, the apoptosis and the expression of PCNA in tissue of gastric carcinoma were assayed in situ, the index of apoptosis (AI), index of PCNA (PI) and the rate of AI/PI were calculated. AI and PI in gastric cancer tissues were (6.5 +/- 3.7)% and (49.8 +/- 15.9)% respectively, and the rate of AI/PI was 0.13 +/- 0.05, which were obviously different from those of normal gastric mucosa in paragastric cancer (P stages of gastric carcinoma, the AI was decreased, PI was increased and the rate of AI/PI decreased in gastric carcinoma. There was significant difference in them between the gastric cancer tissues and normal gastric mucosa in pericarcinoma in TNM stage II to IV (P gastric carcinoma. The AI, PI and the rate of AI/PI would become the prognostic factors in advanced gastric carcinoma.

  13. Spacer length impacts the efficacy of targeted docetaxel conjugates in prostate-specific membrane antigen expressing prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Zheng-Hong; Sima, Monika; Salama, Mohamed E; Kopečková, Pavla; Kopeček, Jindřich

    2013-12-01

    Combination of targeted delivery and controlled release is a powerful technique for cancer treatment. In this paper, we describe the design, synthesis, structure validation and biological properties of targeted and non-targeted N-(2-hydroxypropyl)methacrylamide (HPMA) copolymer-docetaxel conjugates. Docetaxel (DTX) was conjugated to HPMA copolymer via a tetrapeptide spacer (-GFLG-). 3-(1,3-dicarboxypropyl)-ureido]pentanedioic acid (DUPA) was used as the targeting moiety to actively deliver DTX for treatment of Prostate-Specific Membrane Antigen (PSMA) expressing prostate cancer. Short and long spacer DUPA monomers were prepared, and four HPMA copolymer--DTX conjugates (non-targeted, two targeted with short spacer of different molecular weight and targeted with long spacer) were prepared via Reversible Addition-Fragmentation Chain Transfer (RAFT) copolymerization. Following confirmation of PSMA expression on C4-2 cell line, the DTX conjugates' in vitro cytotoxicity was tested against C4-2 tumor cells and their anticancer efficacies were assessed in nude mice bearing s.c. human prostate adenocarcinoma C4-2 xenografts. The in vivo results show that the spacer length between targeting moieties and HPMA copolymer backbone can significantly affect the treatment efficacy of DTX conjugates against C4-2 tumor bearing nu/nu mice. Moreover, histological analysis indicated that the DUPA-targeted DTX conjugate with longer spacer had no toxicity in major organs of treated mice.

  14. Chloroplast-derived vaccine antigens and biopharmaceuticals: protocols for expression, purification, or oral delivery and functional evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, N Dolendro; Ding, Yi; Daniell, Henry

    2009-01-01

    Many vaccine antigens and biopharmaceutical proteins have been expressed at high levels via the chloroplast genome and their functionality has been evaluated using in vitro assays in cell cultures (i.e., macrophage lysis assay, inhibition of vesicular stomatitis virus-induced cytopathicity in baby hamster kidney cells, or inhibition of human HIV infection in TZM-BL cells) as well as protection after challenge with bacterial or viral pathogens or antitumor assays or delay the onset of insulitis in suitable animal models. Production of therapeutic proteins in chloroplasts eliminates the expensive fermentation technology. Moreover, oral delivery of chloroplast-derived therapeutic proteins eliminates expensive purification steps, cold storage, cold transportation, and delivery via sterile needles, thereby further decreasing their cost. In this chapter, we describe detailed protocols for chloroplast transformation including the construction of chloroplast transformation vectors, delivery of DNA into plant cells using particle bombardment, selection and regeneration of transformants by tissue culture, confirmation of transgene integration into the chloroplast genome and homoplasmy, evaluation of foreign gene expression, purification of foreign protein, or oral delivery via bioencapsulation, functional evaluation using in vitro and in vivo assays, and evaluation of immunity after challenge with pathogens in suitable animal models.

  15. Expression of nestin, mesothelin and epithelial membrane antigen (EMA) in developing and adult human meninges and meningiomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petricevic, Josko; Forempoher, Gea; Ostojic, Ljerka; Mardesic-Brakus, Snjezana; Andjelinovic, Simun; Vukojevic, Katarina; Saraga-Babic, Mirna

    2011-11-01

    The spatial and temporal pattern of appearance of nestin, epithelial membrane antigen (EMA) and mesothelin proteins was immunohistochemically determined in the cells of normal developing and adult human meninges and meningiomas. Human meninges developed as two mesenchymal condensations in the head region. The simple squamous epithelium on the surface of leptomeninges developed during mesenchymal to epithelial transformation. Nestin appeared for the first time in week 7, EMA in week 8, while mesothelin appeared in week 22 of development. In the late fetal period and after birth, nestin expression decreased, whereas expression of EMA and mesothelin increased. EMA appeared in all surface epithelial cells and nodules, while mesothelin was found only in some of them. In adult meninges, all three proteins were predominantly localized in the surface epithelium and meningeal nodules. In meningothelial meningiomas (WHO grade I), EMA was detected in all tumor cells except in the endothelial cells, mesothelin characterized nests of tumor cells, while nestin was found predominantly in the walls of blood vessels. The distribution pattern of those proteins in normal meningeal and tumor cells indicates that nestin might characterize immature cells, while EMA and mesothelin appeared in maturing epithelial cells. Neoplastic transformation of these specific cell lineages contributes to the cell population in meningiomas. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  16. Expression, biosynthesis and release of preadipocyte factor-1/ delta-like protein/fetal antigen-1 in pancreatic beta-cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friedrichsen, B N; Carlsson, C; Møldrup, Annette

    2003-01-01

    Preadipocyte factor-1 (Pref-1)/delta-like protein/fetal antigen-1 (FA1) is a member of the epidermal growth factor-like family. It is widely expressed in embryonic tissues, whereas in adults it is confined to the adrenal gland, the anterior pituitary, the endocrine pancreas, the testis...

  17. Expression of the major histocompatibility antigens HLA-A2 and HLA-B7 by DNA-mediated gene transfer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bernabeu, C.; Finlay, D.; van de Rijn, M.; Maziarz, R. T.; Biro, P. A.; Spits, H.; de Vries, J.; Terhorst, C. P.

    1983-01-01

    Genes coding for the heavy chain of the class I antigens HLA-A2 or HLA-B7 of the human major histocompatibility complex have been introduced into mouse LtK- cells by cotransfection with the herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase gene. HAT-resistant colonies were isolated expressing either HLA-A2 or

  18. Study of the Expression of Survivin & Its Splice Variants; ΔEx3, 2b and 3b as Diagnostic Molecular Markers in Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E Babaei

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Survivin is a new member of the Inhibitor Apotosis Protein family (IAP which plays an important role in the regulation of both cell cycle and apoptosis. Its distinct expression in tumor cells as compared to normal adult cells introduces Survivin as the fourth transcriptom demonstrated in tumors. Breast cancer is the most common malignancy among women and scientist`s efforts to classify it has lead to various molecular subtypes and controversial results. Because of the high prevalence of these tumors and lack of suitable molecular markers for diagnosis and prognosis, there are ongoing efforts to find molecular markers which can distinguish nontumoral from tumor tissues. In this study we evaluate the potential usefulness of Survivin and its splice variants ΔEx3, 2b and 3b as molecular markers in breast cancer. Methods: We studied 18 tumor and 17 non tumor adjacent tissues. Transcription levels were measured by Semiquantitative Reverse Transcriptase-Polymerase Chain Reaction (RT-PCR and normalized by ß2m as an internal control. Results: 1Survivin and its splice variants; Δex3, 2b and 3b showed differentially higher expression levels in tumors than adjacent normal tissues. 2 The expression levels of Survivin, Survivin-ΔEx3 and Survivin-3b were significantly correlated with the type of tumors. 3 Survivin-2b was expressed in a few samples. 4 Survivin-3b was detected only in tumor samples. Also, our results showed that ΔEx3 variant can be introduced as a dominant expressed variant in breast cancer. Conclusion: Our data indicated that the expression of Survivin, Survivin ∆Ex3 and especially, Survivin-3b were correlated with cancerous nature of tumors and Survivin-∆Ex3 was the most common expressed variant in breast carcinomas. These results besides confirming the potential usefulness of Survivin and its splice variants as molecular markers in breast cancer, demonstrated the role of the gene and its splice variants, especially 3b

  19. Allele-dependent differences in quorum-sensing dynamics result in variant expression of virulence genes in Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geisinger, Edward; Chen, John; Novick, Richard P

    2012-06-01

    Agr is an autoinducing, quorum-sensing system that functions in many Gram-positive species and is best characterized in the pathogen Staphylococcus aureus, in which it is a global regulator of virulence gene expression. Allelic variations in the agr genes have resulted in the emergence of four quorum-sensing specificity groups in S. aureus, which correlate with different strain pathotypes. The basis for these predilections is unclear but is hypothesized to involve the phenomenon of quorum-sensing interference between strains of different agr groups, which may drive S. aureus strain isolation and divergence. Whether properties intrinsic to each agr allele directly influence virulence phenotypes within S. aureus is unknown. In this study, we examined group-specific differences in agr autoinduction and virulence gene regulation by utilizing congenic strains, each harboring a unique S. aureus agr allele, enabling a dissection of agr locus-dependent versus genotype-dependent effects on quorum-sensing dynamics and virulence factor production. Employing a reporter fusion to the principal agr promoter, P3, we observed allele-dependent differences in the timing and magnitude of agr activation. These differences were mediated by polymorphisms within the agrBDCA genes and translated to significant variations in the expression of a key transcriptional regulator, Rot, and of several important exoproteins and surface factors involved in pathogenesis. This work uncovers the contribution of divergent quorum-sensing alleles to variant expression of virulence determinants within a bacterial species.

  20. Genetical and functional investigation of fliC genes encoding flagellar serotype H4 in wildtype strains of Escherichia coli and in a laboratory E. coli K-12 strain expressing flagellar antigen type H48

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schaudinn Christoph

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Serotyping of O-(lipopolysaccharide and H-(flagellar antigens is a wideley used method for identification of pathogenic strains and clones of Escherichia coli. At present, 176 O- and 53 H-antigens are described for E. coli which occur in different combinations in the strains. The flagellar antigen H4 is widely present in E. coli strains of different O-serotypes and pathotypes and we have investigated the genetic relationship between H4 encoding fliC genes by PCR, nucleotide sequencing and expression studies. Results The complete nucleotide sequence of fliC genes present in E. coli reference strains U9-41 (O2:K1:H4 and P12b (O15:H17 was determined and both were found 99.3% (1043 of 1050 nucleotides identical in their coding sequence. A PCR/RFLP protocol was developed for typing of fliC-H4 strains and 88 E. coli strains reacting with H4 antiserum were investigated. Nucleotide sequencing of complete fliC genes of six E. coli strains which were selected based on serum agglutination titers, fliC-PCR genotyping and reference data revealed 96.6 to 100% identity on the amino acid level. The functional expression of flagellin encoded by fliC-H4 from strain U9-41 and from our strain P12b which is an H4 expressing variant type was investigated in the E. coli K-12 strain JM109 which encodes flagellar type H48. The fliC recombinant plasmid carrying JM109 strains reacted with both H4 and H48 specific antisera whereas JM109 reacted only with the H48 antiserum. By immunoelectron microscopy, we could show that the flagella made by the fliC-H4 recombinant plasmid carrying strain are constituted of H48 and H4 flagellins which are co-assembled into functional flagella. Conclusion The flagellar serotype H4 is encoded by closely related fliC genes present in serologically different types of E. coli strainswhich were isolated at different time periods and geographical locations. Our expression studies show for the first time, that flagellins of

  1. Tumor Necrosis Factor B (TNFB) Genetic Variants and Its Increased Expression Are Associated with Vitiligo Susceptibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laddha, Naresh C.; Dwivedi, Mitesh; Gani, Amina R.; Mansuri, Mohmmad Shoab; Begum, Rasheedunnisa

    2013-01-01

    Genetic polymorphisms in TNFB are involved in the regulation of its expression and are found to be associated with various autoimmune diseases. The aim of the present study was to determine whether TNFB +252A/G (rs909253) and exon 3 C/A (rs1041981) polymorphisms are associated with vitiligo susceptibility, and expression of TNFB and ICAM1 affects the disease onset and progression. We have earlier reported the role of TNFA in autoimmune pathogenesis of vitiligo, and we now show the involvement of TNFB in vitiligo pathogenesis. The two polymorphisms investigated in the TNFB were in strong linkage disequilibrium and significantly associated with vitiligo. TNFB and ICAM1 transcripts were significantly increased in patients compared to controls. Active vitiligo patients showed significant increase in TNFB transcripts compared to stable vitiligo. The genotype-phenotype analysis revealed that TNFB expression levels were higher in patients with GG and AA genotypes as compared to controls. Patients with the early age of onset and female patients showed higher TNFB and ICAM1 expression. Overall, our findings suggest that the increased TNFB transcript levels in vitiligo patients could result, at least in part, from variations at the genetic level which in turn leads to increased ICAM1 expression. For the first time, we show that TNFB +252A/G and exon 3 C/A polymorphisms are associated with vitiligo susceptibility and influence the TNFB and ICAM1 expression. Moreover, the study also emphasizes influence of TNFB and ICAM1 on the disease progression, onset and gender bias for developing vitiligo. PMID:24312346

  2. A single point in protein trafficking by Plasmodium falciparum determines the expression of major antigens on the surface of infected erythrocytes targeted by human antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Jo-Anne; Howell, Katherine B; Langer, Christine; Maier, Alexander G; Hasang, Wina; Rogerson, Stephen J; Petter, Michaela; Chesson, Joanne; Stanisic, Danielle I; Duffy, Michael F; Cooke, Brian M; Siba, Peter M; Mueller, Ivo; Bull, Peter C; Marsh, Kevin; Fowkes, Freya J I; Beeson, James G

    2016-11-01

    Antibodies to blood-stage antigens of Plasmodium falciparum play a pivotal role in human immunity to malaria. During parasite development, multiple proteins are trafficked from the intracellular parasite to the surface of P. falciparum-infected erythrocytes (IEs). However, the relative importance of different proteins as targets of acquired antibodies, and key pathways involved in trafficking major antigens remain to be clearly defined. We quantified antibodies to surface antigens among children, adults, and pregnant women from different malaria-exposed regions. We quantified the importance of antigens as antibody targets using genetically engineered P. falciparum with modified surface antigen expression. Genetic deletion of the trafficking protein skeleton-binding protein-1 (SBP1), which is involved in trafficking the surface antigen PfEMP1, led to a dramatic reduction in antibody recognition of IEs and the ability of human antibodies to promote opsonic phagocytosis of IEs, a key mechanism of parasite clearance. The great majority of antibody epitopes on the IE surface were SBP1-dependent. This was demonstrated using parasite isolates with different genetic or phenotypic backgrounds, and among antibodies from children, adults, and pregnant women in different populations. Comparisons of antibody reactivity to parasite isolates with SBP1 deletion or inhibited PfEMP1 expression suggest that PfEMP1 is the dominant target of acquired human antibodies, and that other P. falciparum IE surface proteins are minor targets. These results establish SBP1 as part of a critical pathway for the trafficking of major surface antigens targeted by human immunity, and have key implications for vaccine development, and quantifying immunity in populations.

  3. Evaluation of Vitronectin Expression in Prostate Cancer and the Clinical Significance of the Association of Vitronectin Expression with Prostate Specific Antigen in Detecting Prostate Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Yue; Zhang, Ling; Bi, Xing; Yuan, Shuai; Chen, Peng

    2016-03-05

    To detect the expression of vitronectin (VTN) in the tissues and blood serum of prostate cancer (PCa) patients, and evaluate its clinical significance and to evaluate the significance of the combined assay of VTN and prostate specific antigens (PSA) in PCa diagnosis. To detect the expression of VTN as a potential marker for PCa diagnosis and prognosis, immunohistochemistry was performed on the tissues of 32 patients with metastatic PCa (PCaM), 34 patients with PCa without metastasis (PCa), and 41 patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). The sera were then subjected to Western blot analysis. All cases were subsequently examined to determine the concentrations of PSA and VTN in the sera. The collected data were collated and analyzed. The positive expression rates of VTN in the tissues of the BPH and PCa groups (including PCa and PCaM groups) were 75.61% and 45.45%, respectively (P = .005). VTN was more highly expressed in the sera of the BPH patients (0.83 ± 0.07) than in the sera of the PCa patients (0.65 ± 0.06) (P < .05). It was also more highly expressed in the sera of the PCa patients than in the sera of the PCaM patients (0.35 ± 0.08) (P < .05). In the diagnosis of BPH and PCa, the Youden indexes of PSA detection, VTN detection, and combined detection were 0.2620, 0.3468, and 0.5635; the kappa values were 0.338, 0.304, and 0.448, respectively, and the areas under the receiver operating characteristic curve were 0.625, 0.673, and 0.703 (P < .05), respectively. VTN levels in sera may be used as a potential marker of PCa for the diagnosis and assessment of disease progression and metastasis. The combined detection of VTN and PSA in sera can be clinically applied in PCa diagnosis. .

  4. A Novel Vaccine Delivery Model of the Apicomplexan Eimeria tenella Expressing Eimeria maxima Antigen Protects Chickens against Infection of the Two Parasites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Xinming; Liu, Xianyong; Yin, Guangwen; Suo, Jingxia; Tao, Geru; Zhang, Sixin; Suo, Xun

    2018-01-01

    Vaccine delivery is critical in antigen discovery and vaccine efficacy and safety. The diversity of infectious diseases in humans and livestock has required the development of varied delivery vehicles to target different pathogens. In livestock animals, previous strategies for the development of coccidiosis vaccines have encountered several hurdles, limiting the development of multiple species vaccine formulations. Here, we describe a novel vaccine delivery system using transgenic Eimeria tenella expressing immunodominant antigens of Eimeria maxima. In this delivery system, the immune mapped protein 1 of E. maxima (EmIMP1) was delivered by the closely related species of E. tenella to the host immune system during the whole endogenous life cycle. The overexpression of the exogenous antigen did not interfere with the reproduction and immunogenicity of transgenic Eimeria. After immunization with the transgenic parasite, we detected EmIMP1’s and E. maxima oocyst antigens’ specific humoral and cellular immune responses. In particular, we observed partial protection of chickens immunized with transgenic E. tenella against subsequent E. maxima infections. Our results demonstrate that the transgenic Eimeria parasite is an ideal coccidia antigen delivery vehicle and represents a new type of coccidiosis vaccines. In addition, this model could potentially be used in the development of malaria live sporozoite vaccines, in which antigens from different strains can be expressed in the vaccine strain. PMID:29375584

  5. Highly efficient gene transfer using a retroviral vector into murine T cells for preclinical chimeric antigen receptor-expressing T cell therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kusabuka, Hotaka; Fujiwara, Kento; Tokunaga, Yusuke; Hirobe, Sachiko; Nakagawa, Shinsaku; Okada, Naoki

    2016-01-01

    Adoptive immunotherapy using chimeric antigen receptor-expressing T (CAR-T) cells has attracted attention as an efficacious strategy for cancer treatment. To prove the efficacy and safety of CAR-T cell therapy, the elucidation of immunological mechanisms underlying it in mice is required. Although a retroviral vector (Rv) is mainly used for the introduction of CAR to murine T cells, gene transduction efficiency is generally less than 50%. The low transduction efficiency causes poor precision in the functional analysis of CAR-T cells. We attempted to improve the Rv gene transduction protocol to more efficiently generate functional CAR-T cells by optimizing the period of pre-cultivation and antibody stimulation. In the improved protocol, gene transduction efficiency to murine T cells was more than 90%. In addition, almost all of the prepared murine T cells expressed CAR after puromycin selection. These CAR-T cells had antigen-specific cytotoxic activity and secreted multiple cytokines by antigen stimulation. We believe that our optimized gene transduction protocol for murine T cells contributes to the advancement of T cell biology and development of immunotherapy using genetically engineered T cells. - Highlights: • We established highly efficient gene transduction protocols for murine T cells. • CD8"+ CAR-T cells had antigen-specific cytotoxic activity. • CD4"+ CAR-T cells secreted multiple cytokines by antigen stimulation. • This finding can contribute to the development of T-cell biology and immunotherapy.

  6. Highly efficient gene transfer using a retroviral vector into murine T cells for preclinical chimeric antigen receptor-expressing T cell therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kusabuka, Hotaka; Fujiwara, Kento; Tokunaga, Yusuke; Hirobe, Sachiko; Nakagawa, Shinsaku, E-mail: nakagawa@phs.osaka-u.ac.jp; Okada, Naoki, E-mail: okada@phs.osaka-u.ac.jp

    2016-04-22

    Adoptive immunotherapy using chimeric antigen receptor-expressing T (CAR-T) cells has attracted attention as an efficacious strategy for cancer treatment. To prove the efficacy and safety of CAR-T cell therapy, the elucidation of immunological mechanisms underlying it in mice is required. Although a retroviral vector (Rv) is mainly used for the introduction of CAR to murine T cells, gene transduction efficiency is generally less than 50%. The low transduction efficiency causes poor precision in the functional analysis of CAR-T cells. We attempted to improve the Rv gene transduction protocol to more efficiently generate functional CAR-T cells by optimizing the period of pre-cultivation and antibody stimulation. In the improved protocol, gene transduction efficiency to murine T cells was more than 90%. In addition, almost all of the prepared murine T cells expressed CAR after puromycin selection. These CAR-T cells had antigen-specific cytotoxic activity and secreted multiple cytokines by antigen stimulation. We believe that our optimized gene transduction protocol for murine T cells contributes to the advancement of T cell biology and development of immunotherapy using genetically engineered T cells. - Highlights: • We established highly efficient gene transduction protocols for murine T cells. • CD8{sup +} CAR-T cells had antigen-specific cytotoxic activity. • CD4{sup +} CAR-T cells secreted multiple cytokines by antigen stimulation. • This finding can contribute to the development of T-cell biology and immunotherapy.

  7. The prognostic value of oncogenic antigen 519 (OA-519) expression and proliferative activity detected by antibody MIB-1 in node-negative breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, V; Ladekarl, M; Holm-Nielsen, P

    1995-01-01

    The prognostic value of oncogenic antigen 519 (OA-519) expression and tumour proliferative activity was evaluated in a retrospective series of 118 patients with low-risk breast cancer. Low risk was defined as negative axillary nodes, tumour diameter histological evidence...... analysis, both the MIB-1 index and OA-519 expression were of independent prognostic value (2p breast cancer who might benefit from adjuvant therapy....

  8. Chimeric antigen receptors with human scFvs preferentially induce T cell anti-tumor activity against tumors with high B7H6 expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gacerez, Albert T; Hua, Casey K; Ackerman, Margaret E; Sentman, Charles L

    2018-05-01

    B7H6 is emerging as a promising tumor antigen that is known to be expressed on a wide array of tumors and is reported to stimulate anti-tumor responses from the immune system. As such, B7H6 presents a good target for tumor-specific immunotherapies. B7H6-specific chimeric antigen receptors (CAR) based on a murine antibody showed successful targeting and elimination of tumors expressing B7H6. However, mouse single chain variable fragments (scFvs) have the potential to induce host anti-CAR responses that may limit efficacy, so human scFvs specific for B7H6 were selected by yeast surface display. In this study, we validate the functionality of these human scFvs when formatted into chimeric antigen receptors. The data indicate that T cells expressing these B7H6-specific human scFvs as CARs induced potent anti-tumor activity in vitro and in vivo against tumors expressing high amounts of B7H6. Importantly, these human scFv-based CARs are sensitive to changes in B7H6 expression which may potentially spare non-tumor cells that express B7H6 and provides the foundation for future clinical development.

  9. Simple mucin-type carbohydrate antigens in major salivary glands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Therkildsen, M H; Mandel, U; Thorn, J

    1994-01-01

    Simple mucin-type carbohydrate antigens Tn, sialosyl-Tn and T are often markers of neoplastic transformation and have very limited expression in normal tissues. We performed an immunohistological study of simple mucin-type carbohydrate antigens, including H and A variants, with well......-defined monoclonal antibodies (MAb) on frozen and paraffin-embedded normal salivary gland tissue from 22 parotid, 14 submandibular, six sublingual, and 13 labial glands to elucidate the simple mucin-type glycosylation pattern in relation to cyto- and histodifferentiation. The investigated carbohydrate structures...

  10. BRCA1 and BRCA2 missense variants of high and low clinical significance influence lymphoblastoid cell line post-irradiation gene expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nic Waddell

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available The functional consequences of missense variants in disease genes are difficult to predict. We assessed if gene expression profiles could distinguish between BRCA1 or BRCA2 pathogenic truncating and missense mutation carriers and familial breast cancer cases whose disease was not attributable to BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations (BRCAX cases. 72 cell lines from affected women in high-risk breast ovarian families were assayed after exposure to ionising irradiation, including 23 BRCA1 carriers, 22 BRCA2 carriers, and 27 BRCAX individuals. A subset of 10 BRCAX individuals carried rare BRCA1/2 sequence variants considered to be of low clinical significance (LCS. BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers had similar expression profiles, with some subclustering of missense mutation carriers. The majority of BRCAX individuals formed a distinct cluster, but BRCAX individuals with LCS variants had expression profiles similar to BRCA1/2 mutation carriers. Gaussian Process Classifier predicted BRCA1, BRCA2 and BRCAX status, with a maximum of 62% accuracy, and prediction accuracy decreased with inclusion of BRCAX samples carrying an LCS variant, and inclusion of pathogenic missense carriers. Similarly, prediction of mutation status with gene lists derived using Support Vector Machines was good for BRCAX samples without an LCS variant (82-94%, poor for BRCAX with an LCS (40-50%, and improved for pathogenic BRCA1/2 mutation carriers when the gene list used for prediction was appropriate to mutation effect being tested (71-100%. This study indicates that mutation effect, and presence of rare variants possibly associated with a low risk of cancer, must be considered in the development of array-based assays of variant pathogenicity.

  11. Immunohistochemical study of p53 and proliferating cell nuclear antigen expression in odontogenic keratocyst and periapical cyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thara Purath Sajeevan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: p53 protein is a product of p53 gene, which is now classified as a tumor suppressor gene. The gene is a frequent target for mutation, being seen as a common step in the pathogenesis of many human cancers. Proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA is an auxiliary protein of DNA polymerase delta and plays a critical role in initiation of cell proliferation. Aim: The aim of this study is to assess and compare the expression of p53 and PCNA in lining epithelium of odontogenic keratocyst (OKC and periapical cyst (PA. Materials and Methods: A total of 20 cases comprising 10 OKC and 10 PA were included in retrospective study. Three paraffin section of 4 μm were cut, one was used for routine hematoxylin and eosin stain, while the other two were used for immunohistochemistry. Statistical analysis was performed using Chi-square test. Results: The level of staining and intensity were assessed in all these cases. OKC showed PCNA expression in all cases (100%, whereas in perapical cyst only 60% of cases exhibited PCNA staining. (1 OKC showed p53 expression in 6 cases (60% whereas in PA only 10% of the cases exhibited p53 staining. Chi-square test showed PCNA staining intensity was more significant than p53 in OKC. (2 The staining intensity of PA using p53, PCNA revealed that PCNA stating intensity was more significant than p53. Conclusion: OKC shows significant proliferative activity than PA using PCNA and p53. PCNA staining was more intense when compared with p53 in both OKC and PA.

  12. Immunohistochemical study of p53 and proliferating cell nuclear antigen expression in odontogenic keratocyst and periapical cyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sajeevan, Thara Purath; Saraswathi, Tillai Rajasekaran; Ranganathan, Kannan; Joshua, Elizabeth; Rao, Uma Devi K

    2014-07-01

    p53 protein is a product of p53 gene, which is now classified as a tumor suppressor gene. The gene is a frequent target for mutation, being seen as a common step in the pathogenesis of many human cancers. Proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) is an auxiliary protein of DNA polymerase delta and plays a critical role in initiation of cell proliferation. The aim of this study is to assess and compare the expression of p53 and PCNA in lining epithelium of odontogenic keratocyst (OKC) and periapical cyst (PA). A total of 20 cases comprising 10 OKC and 10 PA were included in retrospective study. Three paraffin section of 4 μm were cut, one was used for routine hematoxylin and eosin stain, while the other two were used for immunohistochemistry. Statistical analysis was performed using Chi-square test. The level of staining and intensity were assessed in all these cases. OKC showed PCNA expression in all cases (100%), whereas in perapical cyst only 60% of cases exhibited PCNA staining. (1) OKC showed p53 expression in 6 cases (60%) whereas in PA only 10% of the cases exhibited p53 staining. Chi-square test showed PCNA staining intensity was more significant than p53 in OKC. (2) The staining intensity of PA using p53, PCNA revealed that PCNA stating intensity was more significant than p53. OKC shows significant proliferative activity than PA using PCNA and p53. PCNA staining was more intense when compared with p53 in both OKC and PA.

  13. Cloning and Expression of Leptospira LipL32 Antigen as a Candidate for Rapid Diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nooshin Sohrabi

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective: Leptospirosis as an important emerging infectious zoonotic disease caused by spirochetes of the genus Leptospira. Given the low sensitivity and long duration of its culture, the diagnosis of leptospirosis is mainly based on serological methods. The microscopic agglutination test (MAT is considered as the reference method. Because of the complexity of the MAT, there is an urgent need for the development of new reliable and rapid screening tests for leptospirosis. Major leptospiral outer membrane proteins (OMPs, present only in pathologic strains, could be regarded as a good candidate for diagnostic studies. Here we report the cloning and expression of LipL32, as a prominent immunogenic protein, in a prokaryotic system. Materials and Methods: After the amplification of LipL32 gene, it was cloned into the pQE30 vector. The insertion of LipL32 gene into the vector was screened and confirmed with restriction analysis and sequencing. The recombinant plasmid was transformed into E. coli M15 strain, and the expressed protein was identified by SDS-PAGE and western blotting. This recombinant protein with 6× His-tagged sequence was purified using Ni-NTA affinity column chromatography. Results: The results revealed that the selected gene was successfully cloned in pQE30 vector and recombinant protein (rLipL32 of approximately ~32 kDa was produced, purified and confirmed by western blotting. Conclusion: This recombinant protein could be potentially used for the development of serodiagnosis tests for the diagnosis of leptospirosis in humans and animals.

  14. Expression and Immunogenicity of the Mycobacterial Ag85B/ESAT-6 Antigens Produced in Transgenic Plants by Elastin-Like Peptide Fusion Strategy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doreen Manuela Floss

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This study explored a novel system combining plant-based production and the elastin-like peptide (ELP fusion strategy to produce vaccinal antigens against tuberculosis. Transgenic tobacco plants expressing the mycobacterial antigens Ag85B and ESAT-6 fused to ELP (TBAg-ELP were generated. Purified TBAg-ELP was obtained by the highly efficient, cost-effective, inverse transition cycling (ICT method and tested in mice. Furthermore, safety and immunogenicity of the crude tobacco leaf extracts were assessed in piglets. Antibodies recognizing mycobacterial antigens were produced in mice and piglets. A T-cell immune response able to recognize the native mycobacterial antigens was detected in mice. These findings showed that the native Ag85B and ESAT-6 mycobacterial B- and T-cell epitopes were conserved in the plant-expressed TBAg-ELP. This study presents the first results of an efficient plant-expression system, relying on the elastin-like peptide fusion strategy, to produce a safe and immunogenic mycobacterial Ag85B-ESAT-6 fusion protein as a potential vaccine candidate against tuberculosis.

  15. Over-expression of the splice variant of CONSTANS enhances the in vitro synthesis of silver nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhishek Kumar

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Eco-friendly biosynthetic approach for silver nanoparticles production using plant extracts is an exciting advancement in bio- nanotechnology and has been successfully attempted in more than 41 plant species. However, an established model plant system for unravelling the biochemical pathways of silver nanoparticle (AgNPs production is lacking. Here we have shown in Arabidopsis thaliana a genetic model plant and in its misexpressing lines of splice variant CONSTANS (COβ for the silver nanoparticle biosynthesis in vitro. Employing the biochemical, spectroscopic, Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM, Raman spectroscopy, Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR and powder x-rays diffraction (Powder XRD methods and using selected mutants and over- expressing line of Arabidopsis thaliana involved in sugar homeostasis. Additionally, a comparative analysis of AgNPs synthesis using different transgenic lines of Arabidopsis was explored. Here we have shown that plant extract of COβ and gi-100 (mutant line of GIGANTEA showed the highest potential of nanoparticle production as comparable to Col-0 and over- expressing line of GIGANTEA (35SGi. Silver nanoparticles production in the Arabidopsis not only opens up a possibility of using molecular genetics tool to understand the biochemical pathways, but also could address the mechanism behind different shapes of AgNPs produced using plant extracts.

  16. Characterization and differential gene expression between two phenotypic phase variants in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium.

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    Sheila K Patterson

    Full Text Available Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium strain 798 has previously been shown to undergo phenotypic phase variation. One of the phenotypes expresses virulence traits such as adhesion, while the other phenotype does not. Phenotypic phase variation appears to correlate with the ability of this strain to cause persistent, asymptomatic infections of swine. A new method to detect cells in either phenotypic phase was developed using Evans Blue-Uranine agar plates. Using this new assay, rates of phenotypic phase variation were obtained. The rate of phase variation from non-adhesive to adhesive phenotype was approximately 10(-4 per cell per generation while phase variation from the adhesive to the non-adhesive phenotype was approximately 10(-6 per cell per generation. Two highly virulent S. Typhimurium strains, SL1344 and ATCC 14028, were also shown to undergo phase variation. However, while the rate from adhesive to non-adhesive phenotype was approximately the same as for strain 798, the non-adhesive to adhesive phenotype shift was 37-fold higher. Differential gene expression was measured using RNA-Seq. Eighty-three genes were more highly expressed by 798 cells in the adhesive phenotype compared to the non-adhesive cells. Most of the up-regulated genes were in virulence genes and in particular all genes in the Salmonella pathogenicity island 1 were up-regulated. When compared to the virulent strain SL1344, expression of the virulence genes was approximately equal to those up-regulated in the adhesive phenotype of strain 798. A comparison of invasive ability demonstrated that strain SL1344 was the most invasive followed by the adhesive phenotype of strain 798, then the non-adhesive phenotype of strain 798. The least invasive strain was ATCC 14028. The genome of strain 798 was sequenced and compared to SL1344. Both strains had very similar genome sequences and gene deletions could not readily explain differences in the rates of phase variation from non

  17. Effects of Florida Red Tides on histone variant expression and DNA methylation in the Eastern oyster Crassostrea virginica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Romero, Rodrigo; Suarez-Ulloa, Victoria; Rodriguez-Casariego, Javier; Garcia-Souto, Daniel; Diaz, Gabriel; Smith, Abraham; Pasantes, Juan Jose; Rand, Gary; Eirin-Lopez, Jose M

    2017-05-01

    Massive algal proliferations known as Harmful Algal Blooms (HABs) represent one of the most important threats to coastal areas. Among them, the so-called Florida Red Tides (FRTs, caused by blooms of the dinoflagellate Karenia brevis and associated brevetoxins) are particularly detrimental in the southeastern U.S., causing high mortality rates and annual losses in excess of $40 million. The ability of marine organisms to cope with environmental stressors (including those produced during HABs) is influenced by genetic and epigenetic mechanisms, the latter resulting in phenotypic changes caused by heritable modifications in gene expression, without involving changes in the genetic (DNA) sequence. Yet, studies examining cause-effect relationships between environmental stressors, specific epigenetic mechanisms and subsequent responses are still lacking. The present work contributes to increase this knowledge by investigating the effects of Florida Red Tides on two types of mechanisms participating in the epigenetic memory of Eastern oysters: histone variants and DNA methylation. For that purpose, a HAB simulation was conducted in laboratory conditions, exposing oysters to increasing concentrations of K. brevis. The obtained results revealed, for the first time, the existence of H2A.X, H2A.Z and macroH2A genes in this organism, encoding histone variants potentially involved in the maintenance of genome integrity during responses to the genotoxic effect of brevetoxins. Additionally, an increase in H2A.X phosphorylation (γH2A.X, a marker of DNA damage) and a decrease in global DNA methylation were observed as the HAB simulation progressed. Overall, the present work provides a basis to better understand how epigenetic mechanisms participate in responses to environmental stress in marine invertebrates, opening new avenues to incorporate environmental epigenetics approaches into management and conservation programs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Effects of Florida Red Tides on histone variant expression and DNA methylation in the Eastern oyster Crassostrea virginica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez-Romero, Rodrigo; Suarez-Ulloa, Victoria [Environmental Epigenetics Group, Department of Biological Sciences, Florida International University, North Miami, FL 33181 (United States); Rodriguez-Casariego, Javier [Environmental Epigenetics Group, Department of Biological Sciences, Florida International University, North Miami, FL 33181 (United States); Ecotoxicology and Risk Assessment Laboratory, Southeast Environmental Research Center, Florida International University, North Miami, FL 33181 (United States); Garcia-Souto, Daniel [Departamento de Bioquimica, Xenetica e Inmunoloxia, Universidade de Vigo, E-36310 Vigo (Spain); Diaz, Gabriel [Environmental Epigenetics Group, Department of Biological Sciences, Florida International University, North Miami, FL 33181 (United States); Smith, Abraham [Ecotoxicology and Risk Assessment Laboratory, Southeast Environmental Research Center, Florida International University, North Miami, FL 33181 (United States); Pasantes, Juan Jose [Departamento de Bioquimica, Xenetica e Inmunoloxia, Universidade de Vigo, E-36310 Vigo (Spain); Rand, Gary [Ecotoxicology and Risk Assessment Laboratory, Southeast Environmental Research Center, Florida International University, North Miami, FL 33181 (United States); Eirin-Lopez, Jose M., E-mail: jeirinlo@fiu.edu [Environmental Epigenetics Group, Department of Biological Sciences, Florida International University, North Miami, FL 33181 (United States)

    2017-05-15

    Massive algal proliferations known as Harmful Algal Blooms (HABs) represent one of the most important threats to coastal areas. Among them, the so-called Florida Red Tides (FRTs, caused by blooms of the dinoflagellate Karenia brevis and associated brevetoxins) are particularly detrimental in the southeastern U.S., causing high mortality rates and annual losses in excess of $40 million. The ability of marine organisms to cope with environmental stressors (including those produced during HABs) is influenced by genetic and epigenetic mechanisms, the latter resulting in phenotypic changes caused by heritable modifications in gene expression, without involving changes in the genetic (DNA) sequence. Yet, studies examining cause-effect relationships between environmental stressors, specific epigenetic mechanisms and subsequent responses are still lacking. The present work contributes to increase this knowledge by investigating the effects of Florida Red Tides on two types of mechanisms participating in the epigenetic memory of Eastern oysters: histone variants and DNA methylation. For that purpose, a HAB simulation was conducted in laboratory conditions, exposing oysters to increasing concentrations of K. brevis. The obtained results revealed, for the first time, the existence of H2A.X, H2A.Z and macroH2A genes in this organism, encoding histone variants potentially involved in the maintenance of genome integrity during responses to the genotoxic effect of brevetoxins. Additionally, an increase in H2A.X phosphorylation (γH2A.X, a marker of DNA damage) and a decrease in global DNA methylation were observed as the HAB simulation progressed. Overall, the present work provides a basis to better understand how epigenetic mechanisms participate in responses to environmental stress in marine invertebrates, opening new avenues to incorporate environmental epigenetics approaches into management and conservation programs.

  19. Effects of Florida Red Tides on histone variant expression and DNA methylation in the Eastern oyster Crassostrea virginica

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez-Romero, Rodrigo; Suarez-Ulloa, Victoria; Rodriguez-Casariego, Javier; Garcia-Souto, Daniel; Diaz, Gabriel; Smith, Abraham; Pasantes, Juan Jose; Rand, Gary; Eirin-Lopez, Jose M.

    2017-01-01

    Massive algal proliferations known as Harmful Algal Blooms (HABs) represent one of the most important threats to coastal areas. Among them, the so-called Florida Red Tides (FRTs, caused by blooms of the dinoflagellate Karenia brevis and associated brevetoxins) are particularly detrimental in the southeastern U.S., causing high mortality rates and annual losses in excess of $40 million. The ability of marine organisms to cope with environmental stressors (including those produced during HABs) is influenced by genetic and epigenetic mechanisms, the latter resulting in phenotypic changes caused by heritable modifications in gene expression, without involving changes in the genetic (DNA) sequence. Yet, studies examining cause-effect relationships between environmental stressors, specific epigenetic mechanisms and subsequent responses are still lacking. The present work contributes to increase this knowledge by investigating the effects of Florida Red Tides on two types of mechanisms participating in the epigenetic memory of Eastern oysters: histone variants and DNA methylation. For that purpose, a HAB simulation was conducted in laboratory conditions, exposing oysters to increasing concentrations of K. brevis. The obtained results revealed, for the first time, the existence of H2A.X, H2A.Z and macroH2A genes in this organism, encoding histone variants potentially involved in the maintenance of genome integrity during responses to the genotoxic effect of brevetoxins. Additionally, an increase in H2A.X phosphorylation (γH2A.X, a marker of DNA damage) and a decrease in global DNA methylation were observed as the HAB simulation progressed. Overall, the present work provides a basis to better understand how epigenetic mechanisms participate in responses to environmental stress in marine invertebrates, opening new avenues to incorporate environmental epigenetics approaches into management and conservation programs.

  20. VARIANTS IMPERATIVE FORMS OF SECOND PERSON IN CENTURIES XIX AND XX: SOCIAL EXPRESSION

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    Márcia Cristina de Brito Rumeu

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In this text, looking to trace the synchronic reality of Brazilian Portuguese on the variable imperative grammatical expression of the second person singular ((“fala você” vs. (“Agora seja tu o laso de união...”,1919. Based on the analysis of 19th and 20th century personal letters,written by educated Brazilians, members of a same Brazilian family (the Pedreira Ferraz-Magalhaes family, whose sociolinguistic profiles have beenidentified (CONDE SILVEST RE, 2007; ROMAINE, 2010; HERNÀNDEX-CAMPOY; CONDE SILVESTRE, 2014, the results expound the representativeness of Gender and Age group as significant social categories for research on the variable imperative grammatical expression of the second person singular. Following the orientation of Labov’s methodological quantitative sociolinguistic analysis (LABOV, 1994,2001, is confirmed the hypothesis that the abrasileirado imperative, in terms of Scherre (2007, tends become established in Brazilian Portugueseas young people seemed be heading in the historic direction of change inprogress.

  1. MicroRNA Expression Profiling Altered by Variant Dosage of Radiation Exposure

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    Kuei-Fang Lee

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Various biological effects are associated with radiation exposure. Irradiated cells may elevate the risk for genetic instability, mutation, and cancer under low levels of radiation exposure, in addition to being able to extend the postradiation side effects in normal tissues. Radiation-induced bystander effect (RIBE is the focus of rigorous research as it may promote the development of cancer even at low radiation doses. Alterations in the DNA sequence could not explain these biological effects of radiation and it is thought that epigenetics factors may be involved. Indeed, some microRNAs (or miRNAs have been found to correlate radiation-induced damages and may be potential biomarkers for the various biological effects caused by different levels of radiation exposure. However, the regulatory role that miRNA plays in this aspect remains elusive. In this study, we profiled the expression changes in miRNA under fractionated radiation exposure in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells. By utilizing publicly available microRNA knowledge bases and performing cross validations with our previous gene expression profiling under the same radiation condition, we identified various miRNA-gene interactions specific to different doses of radiation treatment, providing new insights for the molecular underpinnings of radiation injury.

  2. [Pathogens in expressed prostatic secretion and their correlation with serum prostate specific antigen: analysis of 320 cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shu-Xia; Zhang, Jia-Ming; Wu, Kai; Chen, Juan; Shi, Jian-Feng

    2014-08-01

    To investigate the pathogenic infection and its drug resistance in expressed prostatic secretion (EPS) and its correlation with serum PSA, and provide some evidence for the systematic and normalized diagnosis and treatment of prostatitis. Three EPS swabs were collected from each of the 320 prostatis patients following measurement of the serum PSA level, 1 for bacterial culture and identification, 1 for detection of Mycoplasma and drug sensitivity, and the other for examination of Chlamydia trachomatis antigen by colloidal gold immunoblot. Totally 244 strains were isolated from the 320 EPS samples, including 188 bacterial strains (dominated by Staphylococcus and sensitive to vancomycin or linezolid) and 44 Mycoplasma and Chlamydia strains (mainly Ureaplasma urealyticum and susceptible to josamycin or doxycycline). The serum PSA level was significantly higher in the pathogen-positive than in the pathogen-negative group ([6.98 +/- 0.56] microg/L vs [2.32 +/- 0.12] microg/L, P Prostatitis may lead to the elevation of the serum PSA level and the pathogens involved vary in their resistance to different antibacterial spectrums. Therefore, appropriate and individualized antibiotic therapy should be selected according to etiological diagnosis and the results of drug sensitivity test.

  3. Mass Spectrometry Reveals Changes in MHC I Antigen Presentation After Lentivector Expression of a Gene Regulation System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roland Vogel

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The rapamycin-inducible gene regulation system was designed to minimize immune reactions in man and may thus be suited for gene therapy. We assessed whether this system indeed induces no immune responses. The protein components of the regulation system were produced in the human cell lines HEK 293T, D407, and HER 911 following lentiviral transfer of the corresponding genes. Stable cell lines were established, and the peptides presented by major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC I molecules on transduced and wild-type (wt cells were compared by differential mass spectrometry. In all cell lines examined, expression of the transgenes resulted in prominent changes in the repertoire of MHC I-presented self-peptides. No MHC I ligands originating from the transgenic proteins were detected. In vitro analysis of immunogenicity revealed that transduced D407 cells displayed slightly higher capacity than wt controls to promote proliferation of cytotoxic T cells. These results indicate that therapeutic manipulations within the genome of target cells may affect pathways involved in the processing of peptide antigens and their presentation by MHC I. This makes the genomic modifications visible to the immune system which may recognize these events and respond. Ultimately, the findings call attention to a possible immune risk.

  4. Increase in Docetaxel-Resistance of Ovarian Carcinoma-Derived RMG-1 Cells with Enhanced Expression of Lewis Y Antigen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bei Lin

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Epithelial carcinomas of the ovary exhibit the highest mortality rate among gynecologic malignancies. Studies found that the metabolism of glycolipids or carbohydrates is associated with acquirement of anticancer drug-resistance by cancer cells. This study was to characterize possible involvement of Lewis Y (LeY antigen in the drug-resistance of cancer cells. We transfected the α1,2-fucosyltransferase gene into human ovarian carcinoma-derived RMG-1 cells and established RMG-1-hFUT cells with enhanced expression of LeY. We determined the effects of docetaxel on the survival of cells by MTT assaying and observed the apoptosis of cells in the presence of docetaxel by flow cytometric analysis and by transmission electron microscopy. Plasma membranes and intracellular granules in RMG-1-hFUT cells were stained with anti-LeY antibody, the intensity of the staining was higher than that in control cells. The RMG-1-hFUT cells exhibited higher resistance to docetaxel than the control cells with regard to the docetaxel concentration and time course. After treatment with 10 μg/mL docetaxel for 72 h, the control cells, but not RMG-1-hFUT, contained abundant positively stained cell debris due to disintegration of the cytoskeleton. On transmission electron microscopy, although the control cells treated with docetaxel as above showed the following morphology, i.e., absence of villi, cells shrunken in size, pyknosis, agglutinated chromatin and cell buds containing nuclei in the process of apoptosis, the RMG-1-hFUT cells showed only agglutinated chromatin and vacuoles in the cytoplasm. In summary, cells with enhanced expression of LeY were shown to acquire docetaxel-resistance, indicating the possible involvement of glycoconjugates in the drug-resistance.

  5. Lignans isolated from Campylotropis hirtella (Franch.) Schindl. decreased prostate specific antigen and androgen receptor expression in LNCaP cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Hui-Ying; Wang, Xiang-Hong; Wang, Nai-Li; Ling, Ming-Tat; Wong, Yong-Chuan; Yao, Xin-Sheng

    2008-08-27

    Accumulating epidemiological data suggest that Asian men have lower incidences of prostate cancer and benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH) compared with American and European populations and may have benefited from their higher intake of phytoestrogens in their diet. However, how these phytochemicals affect prostatic diseases is still unclear. In this study, we isolated six lignans from a plant, Campylotropis hirtella (Franch.) Schindl., which has been used as a folk medicine for treatment of BPH in China, through bioassay guided fractionation. They were dehydrodiconiferyl alcohol (C1), 4-[(-6-hydroxy-2,3-dihydro-1-benzofuran-3-yl)methyl]-5-methoxybenzene-1,3-diol (C2), erythro-guaiacylglycerol-beta-O-4'-coniferyl ether (C3), threo-guaiacylglycerol-beta-O-4'-coniferyl ether (C4), secoisolariciresinol (C5), and prupaside (C6), where C2 was identified as a new lignan analog. Their IC50 values for inhibition of prostate specific antigen (PSA) secretion were 19, 45, 110, 128, 137, and 186 microM, respectively, from C1 to C6 in LNCaP cells. Further study showed that C1-5 down-regulated cellular PSA expression and C1-4 also decreased androgen receptor (AR) expression in LNCaP cells. Furthermore, we investigated the proapoptotic effect of C1 on LNCaP cells. The active forms of caspase 3 associated with the specific proteolysis of poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) were detected, and the antiapoptotic protein Bcl-2 was down-regulated after the treatment with C1. These results collectively indicated that these lignans may have chemopreventive or therapeutic actions for prostate cancer through suppressing AR signaling pathway and inducing apoptosis.

  6. A synbio approach for selection of highly expressed gene variants in Gram-positive bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ferro, Roberto; Rennig, Maja; Hernández Rollán, Cristina

    2018-01-01

    with a long history in food fermentation. We have developed a synbio approach for increasing gene expression in two Gram-positive bacteria. First of all, the gene of interest was coupled to an antibiotic resistance gene to create a growth-based selection system. We then randomised the translation initiation...... region (TIR) preceding the gene of interest and selected clones that produced high protein titres, as judged by their ability to survive on high concentrations of antibiotic. Using this approach, we were able to significantly increase production of two industrially relevant proteins; sialidase in B....... subtilis and tyrosine ammonia lyase in L. lactis. Gram-positive bacteria are widely used to produce industrial enzymes. High titres are necessary to make the production economically feasible. The synbio approach presented here is a simple and inexpensive way to increase protein titres, which can be carried...

  7. Expression of an estrogen-regulated variant transcript of the peroxisomal branched chain fatty acid oxidase ACOX2 in breast carcinomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bjørklund, Sunniva Stordal; Kristensen, Vessela N.; Seiler, Michael; Kumar, Surendra; Alnæs, Grethe I. Grenaker; Ming, Yao; Kerrigan, John; Naume, Bjørn; Sachidanandam, Ravi; Bhanot, Gyan; Børresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Ganesan, Shridar

    2015-01-01

    Alternate transcripts from a single gene locus greatly enhance the combinatorial flexibility of the human transcriptome. Different patterns of exon usage have been observed when comparing normal tissue to cancers, suggesting that variant transcripts may play a role in the tumor phenotype. Ribonucleic acid-sequencing (RNA-seq) data from breast cancer samples was used to identify an intronic start variant transcript of Acyl-CoA oxidase 2, ACOX2 (ACOX2-i9). Difference in expression between Estrogen Receptor (ER) positive and ER negative patients was assessed by the Wilcoxon rank sum test, and the findings validated in The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) breast cancer dataset (BRCA). ACOX2-i9 expression was also assessed in cell lines using both quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) and Western blot analysis. Knock down by short hairpin RNA (shRNA) and colony formation assays were used to determine whether ACOX2-i9 expression would influence cellular fitness. The effect of ACOX2-i9 expression on patient survival was assessed by the Kaplan-Meier survival function, and association to clinical parameters was analyzed using a Fisher exact test. The expression and translation of ACOX2-i9 into a 25 kDa protein was demonstrated in HepG2 cells as well as in several breast cancer cell lines. shRNA knock down of the ACOX2-i9 variant resulted in decreased cell viability of T47D and MDA-MB 436 cells. Moreover, expression of ACOX2-i9 was shown to be estrogen regulated, being induced by propyl pyrazoletriol and inhibited by tamoxifen and fulvestrant in ER+ T47D and Mcf-7 cells, but not in the ER- MDA-MB 436 cell line. This variant transcript showed expression predominantly in ER-positive breast tumors as assessed in our initial set of 53 breast cancers and further validated in 87 tumor/normal pairs from the TCGA breast cancer dataset, and expression was associated with better outcome in ER positive patients. ACOX2-i9 is specifically enriched in ER+ breast

  8. Expression of an estrogen-regulated variant transcript of the peroxisomal branched chain fatty acid oxidase ACOX2 in breast carcinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjørklund, Sunniva Stordal; Kristensen, Vessela N; Seiler, Michael; Kumar, Surendra; Alnæs, Grethe I Grenaker; Ming, Yao; Kerrigan, John; Naume, Bjørn; Sachidanandam, Ravi; Bhanot, Gyan; Børresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Ganesan, Shridar

    2015-07-17

    Alternate transcripts from a single gene locus greatly enhance the combinatorial flexibility of the human transcriptome. Different patterns of exon usage have been observed when comparing normal tissue to cancers, suggesting that variant transcripts may play a role in the tumor phenotype. Ribonucleic acid-sequencing (RNA-seq) data from breast cancer samples was used to identify an intronic start variant transcript of Acyl-CoA oxidase 2, ACOX2 (ACOX2-i9). Difference in expression between Estrogen Receptor (ER) positive and ER negative patients was assessed by the Wilcoxon rank sum test, and the findings validated in The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) breast cancer dataset (BRCA). ACOX2-i9 expression was also assessed in cell lines using both quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) and Western blot analysis. Knock down by short hairpin RNA (shRNA) and colony formation assays were used to determine whether ACOX2-i9 expression would influence cellular fitness. The effect of ACOX2-i9 expression on patient survival was assessed by the Kaplan-Meier survival function, and association to clinical parameters was analyzed using a Fisher exact test. The expression and translation of ACOX2-i9 into a 25 kDa protein was demonstrated in HepG2 cells as well as in several breast cancer cell lines. shRNA knock down of the ACOX2-i9 variant resulted in decreased cell viability of T47D and MDA-MB 436 cells. Moreover, expression of ACOX2-i9 was shown to be estrogen regulated, being induced by propyl pyrazoletriol and inhibited by tamoxifen and fulvestrant in ER+ T47D and Mcf-7 cells, but not in the ER- MDA-MB 436 cell line. This variant transcript showed expression predominantly in ER-positive breast tumors as assessed in our initial set of 53 breast cancers and further validated in 87 tumor/normal pairs from the TCGA breast cancer dataset, and expression was associated with better outcome in ER positive patients. ACOX2-i9 is specifically enriched in ER+ breast

  9. Identification of the thiamin pyrophosphokinase gene in rainbow trout: Characteristic structure and expression of seven splice variants in tissues and cell lines and during embryo development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuge, Shinya; Richter, Catherine A.; Wright-Osment, Maureen K.; Nicks, Diane; Saloka, Stephanie K.; Tillitt, Donald E.; Li, Weiming

    2012-01-01

    Thiamin pyrophosphokinase (TPK) converts thiamin to its active form, thiamin diphosphate. In humans, TPK expression is down-regulated in some thiamin deficiency related syndrome, and enhanced during pregnancy. Rainbow trout are also vulnerable to thiamin deficiency in wild life and are useful models for thiamin metabolism research. We identified the tpk gene transcript including seven splice variants in the rainbow trout. Almost all cell lines and tissues examined showed co-expression of several tpk splice variants including a potentially major one at both mRNA and protein levels. However, relative to other tissues, the longest variant mRNA expression was predominant in the ovary and abundant in embryos. During embryogenesis, total tpk transcripts increased abruptly in early development, and decreased to about half of the peak shortly after hatching. In rainbow trout, the tpk transcript complex is ubiquitously expressed for all tissues and cells examined, and its increase in expression could be important in the early-middle embryonic stages. Moreover, decimated tpk expression in a hepatoma cell line relative to hepatic and gonadal cell lines appears to be consistent with previously reported down-regulation of thiamin metabolism in cancer.

  10. Alphavirus replicon DNA expressing HIV antigens is an excellent prime for boosting with recombinant modified vaccinia Ankara (MVA or with HIV gp140 protein antigen.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria L Knudsen

    Full Text Available Vaccination with DNA is an attractive strategy for induction of pathogen-specific T cells and antibodies. Studies in humans have shown that DNA vaccines are safe, but their immunogenicity needs further improvement. As a step towards this goal, we have previously demonstrated that immunogenicity is increased with the use of an alphavirus DNA-launched replicon (DREP vector compared to conventional DNA vaccines. In this study, we investigated the effect of varying the dose and number of administrations of DREP when given as a prime prior to a heterologous boost with poxvirus vector (MVA and/or HIV gp140 protein formulated in glucopyranosyl lipid A (GLA-AF adjuvant. The DREP and MVA vaccine constructs encoded Env and a Gag-Pol-Nef fusion protein from HIV clade C. One to three administrations of 0.2 μg DREP induced lower HIV-specific T cell and IgG responses than the equivalent number of immunizations with 10 μg DREP. However, the two doses were equally efficient as a priming component in a heterologous prime-boost regimen. The magnitude of immune responses depended on the number of priming immunizations rather than the dose. A single low dose of DREP prior to a heterologous boost resulted in greatly increased immune responses compared to MVA or protein antigen alone, demonstrating that a mere 0.2 μg DREP was sufficient for priming immune responses. Following a DREP prime, T cell responses were expanded greatly by an MVA boost, and IgG responses were also expanded when boosted with protein antigen. When MVA and protein were administered simultaneously following multiple DREP primes, responses were slightly compromised compared to administering them sequentially. In conclusion, we have demonstrated efficient priming of HIV-specific T cell and IgG responses with a low dose of DREP, and shown that the priming effect depends on number of primes administered rather than dose.

  11. Transgenic mice expressing human glucocerebrosidase variants: utility for the study of Gaucher disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Angela; Hemmelgarn, Harmony; Melrose, Heather L; Hein, Leanne; Fuller, Maria; Clarke, Lorne A

    2013-08-01

    Gaucher disease is an autosomal recessively inherited storage disorder caused by deficiency of the lysosomal hydrolase, acid β-glucosidase. The disease manifestations seen in Gaucher patients are highly heterogeneous as is the responsiveness to therapy. The elucidation of the precise factors responsible for this heterogeneity has been challenging as the development of clinically relevant animal models of Gaucher disease has been problematic. Although numerous murine models for Gaucher disease have been described each has limitations in their specific utility. We describe here, transgenic murine models of Gaucher disease that will be particularly useful for the study of pharmacological chaperones. We have produced stable transgenic mouse strains that individually express wild type, N370S and L444P containing human acid β-glucosidase and show that each of these transgenic lines rescues the lethal phenotype characteristic of acid β-glucosidase null mice. Both the N370S and L444P transgenic models show early and progressive elevations of tissue sphingolipids with L444P mice developing progressive splenic Gaucher cell infiltration. We demonstrate the potential utility of these new transgenic models for the study of Gaucher disease pathogenesis. In addition, since these mice produce only human enzyme, they are particularly relevant for the study of pharmacological chaperones that are specifically targeted to human acid β-glucosidase and the common mutations underlying Gaucher disease. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. A synbio approach for selection of highly expressed gene variants in Gram-positive bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferro, Roberto; Rennig, Maja; Hernández-Rollán, Cristina; Daley, Daniel O; Nørholm, Morten H H

    2018-03-08

    The market for recombinant proteins is on the rise, and Gram-positive strains are widely exploited for this purpose. Bacillus subtilis is a profitable host for protein production thanks to its ability to secrete large amounts of proteins, and Lactococcus lactis is an attractive production organism with a long history in food fermentation. We have developed a synbio approach for increasing gene expression in two Gram-positive bacteria. First of all, the gene of interest was coupled to an antibiotic resistance gene to create a growth-based selection system. We then randomised the translation initiation region (TIR) preceding the gene of interest and selected clones that produced high protein titres, as judged by their ability to survive on high concentrations of antibiotic. Using this approach, we were able to significantly increase production of two industrially relevant proteins; sialidase in B. subtilis and tyrosine ammonia lyase in L. lactis. Gram-positive bacteria are widely used to produce industrial enzymes. High titres are necessary to make the production economically feasible. The synbio approach presented here is a simple and inexpensive way to increase protein titres, which can be carried out in any laboratory within a few days. It could also be implemented as a tool for applications beyond TIR libraries, such as screening of synthetic, homologous or domain-shuffled genes.

  13. CELLISA: reporter cell-based immunization and screening of hybridomas specific for cell surface antigens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Peter; Mesci, Aruz; Carlyle, James R

    2011-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) specific for cell surface antigens are an invaluable tool to study immune receptor expression and function. Here, we outline a generalized reporter cell-based approach to the generation and high-throughput screening of mAbs specific for cell surface antigens. Termed CELLISA, this technology hinges upon the capture of hybridoma supernatants in mAb arrays that facilitate ligation of an antigen of interest displayed on BWZ reporter cells in the form of a CD3ζ-fusion chimeric antigen receptor (zCAR); in turn, specific mAb-mediated cross-linking of zCAR on BWZ cells results in the production of β-galactosidase enzyme (β-gal), which can be assayed colorimetrically. Importantly, the BWZ reporter cells bearing the zCAR of interest may be used for immunization as well as screening. In addition, serial immunizations employing additional zCAR- or native antigen-bearing cell lines can be used to increase the frequency of the desired antigen-specific hybridomas. Finally, the use of a cohort of epitope-tagged zCAR (e.g., zCAR(FLAG)) variants allows visualization of the cell surface antigen prior to immunization, and coimmunization using these variants can be used to enhance the immunogenicity of the target antigen. Employing the CELLISA strategy, we herein describe the generation of mAb directed against an uncharacterized natural killer cell receptor protein.

  14. NY-BR-1 Antigen Expression and anti-NY-BR-1 IgG in Egyptian Breast Cancer Patients: Clinicopathological and Prognostic Significance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu El-Nazar, Salma Y; Ghazy, Amany A; Ghoneim, Hossam E; Zoheir, Malak; Ahmed, Ahmed S; Sorour, Sally S; Abouelella, Amira M

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common gynecological malignancy in the world. In Egypt, it ranks the first among female malignancies with incidence of 37.7%. Over the last decades, the integration of prognostic and predictive markers in treatment decisions has led to more individualized and optimized therapy. NY-BR-1 antigen has been shown to be frequently expressed in breast cancers. The study aimed to assess the tissue expression of NY-BR-1 antigen and serum IgG antibody to this antigen in Egyptian breast cancer females. The study was conducted on 60 females (10 healthy, 10 having benign breast lesions, 40 with malignant breast cancer). NY-BR-1 Ag expression was evaluated by immunohistochemistry and anti-NY-BR-1 IgG was assessed by ELISA. Results revealed a significant difference in NY-BR-1 Ag expression between benign and malignant breast cancer patients. There was a significant correlation between NY-BR-1 antigen expression and estrogen receptor's status (P = 0.019), stage of the disease (P = 0.008), menopausal status (P = 0.008), lymph node involvement (P = 0.022) and anti-NY-BR-1 IgG (P = 0.032) among the studied individuals. In addition, there was a statistically significant increase in anti-NY-BR-1 IgG O.D. results among malignant breast cancer group. It is correlated with tumor type (P < 0.001) and progesterone receptor status (P = 0.038). In conclusion, our work may represent a step towards identification of a new prognostic marker specific for breast cancer.

  15. The SnSAG merozoite surface antigens of Sarcocystis neurona are expressed differentially during the bradyzoite and sporozoite life cycle stages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gautam, A; Dubey, J P; Saville, W J; Howe, D K

    2011-12-29

    Sarcocystis neurona is a two-host coccidian parasite whose complex life cycle progresses through multiple developmental stages differing at morphological and molecular levels. The S. neurona merozoite surface is covered by multiple, related glycosylphosphatidylinositol-linked proteins, which are orthologous to the surface antigen (SAG)/SAG1-related sequence (SRS) gene family of Toxoplasma gondii. Expression of the SAG/SRS proteins in T. gondii and another related parasite Neospora caninum is life-cycle stage specific and seems necessary for parasite transmission and persistence of infection. In the present study, the expression of S. neurona merozoite surface antigens (SnSAGs) was evaluated in the sporozoite and bradyzoite stages. Western blot analysis was used to compare SnSAG expression in merozoites versus sporozoites, while immunocytochemistry was performed to examine expression of the SnSAGs in merozoites versus bradyzoites. These analyses revealed that SnSAG2, SnSAG3 and SnSAG4 are expressed in sporozoites, while SnSAG5 was appeared to be downregulated in this life cycle stage. In S. neurona bradyzoites, it was found that SnSAG2, SnSAG3, SnSAG4 and SnSAG5 were either absent or expression was greatly reduced. As shown for T. gondii, stage-specific expression of the SnSAGs may be important for the parasite to progress through its developmental stages and complete its life cycle successfully. Thus, it is possible that the SAG switching mechanism by these parasites could be exploited as a point of intervention. As well, the alterations in surface antigen expression during different life cycle stages may need to be considered when designing prospective approaches for protective vaccination. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Accelerated variant of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis: clinical behavior and gene expression pattern.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moisés Selman

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF is characterized by the insidious onset of dyspnea or cough. However, a subset of patients has a short duration of symptoms with rapid progression to end-stage disease. In this study, we evaluated clinical and molecular features of "rapid" and "slow" progressors with IPF. METHODS AND FINDINGS: 26 patients with 24 months of symptoms [slow progressors] were studied. Survival was analyzed by the Kaplan-Meyer method and proportional hazard's model. Lung microarrays and tissue proteins were measured in a subset of patients. No differences were found in age, physiologic impairment and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL cellular profile. There were more males (OR = 6.5; CI:1.4-29.5; p = 0.006 and smokers (OR = 3.04; CI:1.1-8.3; p = 0.04 in the rapid progressors group. Survival from the beginning of symptoms was significantly reduced in rapid progressors (HR = 9.0; CI:4.48-18.3; p2-fold increase of active matrix metalloproteinase-9, and induced a higher fibroblast migration compared with slow progressors and controls [238+/-98% versus 123+/-29% (p<0.05 and 30+/-17% (p<0.01]. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: A subgroup of IPF patients, predominantly smoking males, display an accelerated clinical course and have a gene expression pattern that is different from those with slower progression and longer survival. These findings highlight the variability in the progression of IPF, and may explain, in part, the difficulty in obtaining significant and reproducible results in studies of therapeutic interventions in patients with IPF.

  17. Radiation and chemical effects on viral transformation and tumor antigen expression. Annual progress report, August 1, 1978--May 1, 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coggin, J.H. Jr.

    1979-01-01

    Studies aimed at the biological, biochemical, and immunologic characterization of fetal antigens (EA) in hamsters and mice and locating and determining the distribution of fetal antigens in tumor tissues and in developing fetuses have been underway for several months. Progress has been made in isolating embryonic or fetal antigens from fetuses and from tumor cells. We have developed and reported a reliable lymphocyte transformation assay (LTA) which meets our needs in routinely assaying cell free tumor associated antigen (TAA) preparations from fetal and tumor cells. The assay correlated with transplantation resistance assays and has appropriate specificity. We have also developed the staph-A protein binding assay utilizing anti-serum derived against embryonic antigens present on SV40 tumor cells. In other studies, we have reported increases and perturbations in thymocytes during viral and chemical oncogenesis in hamsters, have developed a simple technique for preserving functional lymphocytes sensitized against TAA by freezing for use in our model system work, have reported the cross-reactivity of tranplantation resistance antigen on a spectrum of chemically induced tumors previously believed to only contain individually specific TSTAs and have recently reported the cross-reactivity of papovavirus induced transplantation resistance antigen in sarcoma cells induced by different viruses. We have concluded our studies of glycosyltransferases in the membranes of developing fetuses and noted no differences in their levels with advancing days of gestation using whold embryo cell populations

  18. Multiepitope fusion antigen induces broadly protective antibodies that prevent adherence of Escherichia coli strains expressing colonization factor antigen I (CFA/I), CFA/II, and CFA/IV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruan, Xiaosai; Knudsen, David E; Wollenberg, Katie M; Sack, David A; Zhang, Weiping

    2014-02-01

    Diarrhea is the second leading cause of death in children younger than 5 years and continues to be a major threat to global health. Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) strains are the most common bacteria causing diarrhea in developing countries. ETEC strains are able to attach to host small intestinal epithelial cells by using bacterial colonization factor antigen (CFA) adhesins. This attachment helps to initiate the diarrheal disease. Vaccines that induce antiadhesin immunity to block adherence of ETEC strains that express immunologically heterogeneous CFA adhesins are expected to protect against ETEC diarrhea. In this study, we created a CFA multiepitope fusion antigen (MEFA) carrying representative epitopes of CFA/I, CFA/II (CS1, CS2, and CS3), and CFA/IV (CS4, CS5, and CS6), examined its immunogenicity in mice, and assessed the potential of this MEFA as an antiadhesin vaccine against ETEC. Mice intraperitoneally immunized with this CFA MEFA exhibited no adverse effects and developed immune responses to CFA/I, CFA/II, and CFA/IV adhesins. Moreover, after incubation with serum of the immunized mice, ETEC or E. coli strains expressing CFA/I, CFA/II, or CFA/IV adhesins were significantly inhibited in adherence to Caco-2 cells. Our results indicated this CFA MEFA elicited antibodies that not only cross-reacted to CFA/I, CFA/II and CFA/IV adhesins but also broadly inhibited adherence of E. coli strains expressing these seven adhesins and suggested that this CFA MEFA could be a candidate to induce broad-spectrum antiadhesin protection against ETEC diarrhea. Additionally, this antigen construction approach (creating an MEFA) may be generally used in vaccine development against heterogenic pathogens.

  19. Short-Spindled Cell Haemangioblastoma with CD34 Expression: New Histopathological Variant or Just a Stochastic Cytological Singularity?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Fdo. Salazar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Haemangioblastomas are neoplasms of uncertain histogenesis with cellular and reticular variants advocated in current lore. Herein we describe an intriguing cerebellar specimen with unusual traits including spindle cell morphology and CD34 positivity. A thirty-nine-year old man had an infratentorial tumour discovered incidentally and resected three times. In all the instances, histopathological diagnosis was haemangioblastoma; nonetheless, he had neither physical stigmata nor family history of von Hippel-Lindau disease. By histology, the lesion was composed of areas of conventional stromal cells admixed with territories populated by short-spindled cells packed in lobules, sometimes giving the appearance of gomitoli. Immunoperoxidase-coupled reactions confirmed the expression of inhibin A, neuron-specific enolase (NSE, PS100, and CD57 but also revealed focal immunolabeling for CD34, CD99, and FXIIIa. This case highlights the potential phenotypical diversity that can be found within these neoplasms. Rather than uncertain histogenesis, it may in fact reflect multiple lines of differentiation—histomimesis—prone to adopt unusual morpho- and immunophenotypes in a subset of haemangioblastomas.

  20. Heterologous expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of Trichoderma reesei xylanase II and four variants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wan, Qun; Kovalevsky, Andrey; Zhang, Qiu; Hamilton-Brehm, Scott; Upton, Rosalynd; Weiss, Kevin L.; Mustyakimov, Marat; Graham, David; Coates, Leighton; Langan, Paul

    2013-01-01

    The wild-type protein and four active-site mutants of xylanase II from Trichoderma reesei that catalyzes the hydrolysis of glycosidic bonds in xylan have successfully been crystallized. The crystallization of several structures including ligand-free and protein ligand complexes containing the substrate (xylohexaose) or product (xylotriose) are detailed. Xylanase II from Trichoderma reesei catalyzes the hydrolysis of glycosidic bonds in xylan. Crystallographic studies of this commercially important enzyme have been initiated to investigate its reaction mechanism, substrate binding and dependence on basic pH conditions. The wild-type protein was heterologously expressed in an Escherichia coli host using the defined medium and four active-site amino acids were replaced to abolish its activity (E177Q and E86Q) or to change its pH optimum (N44D and N44H). Cation-exchange and size-exclusion chromatography were used to obtain >90% protein purity. The ligand-free proteins and variant complexes containing substrate (xylohexaose) or product (xylotriose) were crystallized in several different space groups and diffracted to high resolutions (from 1.07 to 1.55 Å)