WorldWideScience

Sample records for variable stars viii

  1. Historical Variable Star Catalogs

    OpenAIRE

    Pagnotta, Ashley; Graur, Or; Murray, Zachary; Kruk, Julia; Christie-Dervaux, Lucien; Chen, Dong Yi

    2015-01-01

    Slides from my talk during one of the Historical Astronomy Division sessions at AAS 225 in Seattle, WA (January 2015). A brief history of the variable star catalogs Henrietta Swan Leavitt and Cecilia Payne-Gaposchkin assembled at Harvard, and the update to them that some of our students at AMNH have done.(Figshare only previews the first few slides. Download the PDF to see all of them!)

  2. THE SUN AS A VARIABLE STAR III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    observations has taught us more about the variations of solar type stars than about the sun itself. The observations of 15 stars of spectral types F and...stars 40 Leo, beta CVn and eta Boo this deviation is less than 0.004 mag. No evidence of variability in the stars which are similar to the sun has been...detected during this program. If we assume the sun acts in similar fashion to each of these stars, its variability over a fifteen-year period probably

  3. Variable Star Search Using ROTSE3 Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrante, Farley; Kehoe, Robert

    2012-10-01

    I present results of a variable star search using data from the Robotic Optical Transient Search Experiment 3 (ROTSE3) telescopes. Variable stars fluctuate in magnitude as seen from Earth due either to changes in the star's luminosity or to changes in the amount of the star's light that reaches Earth. My research is focused on analysis of the time variation of optical light output as recorded in ROTSE 3 images. Specifically, I am attempting to identify short-period variable candidates such as delta Scuti stars, eclipsing binary stars, and contact binary stars. Amplitude variations for these classes of variables are on the order of one magnitude with periods on the order of two to five hours. The ROTSE3 telescope sensitivity holds the promise of significantly extending our reach to dimmer objects than previous searches and I will report on the confirmed discovery of a previously unidentified contact binary star in the constellation Sagittarius. This contact binary is now listed in the International Variable Star Index (VSX) maintained by the American Association of Variable Star Observers (AAVSO).

  4. Variable Stars in the Lepine List of Nearby Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blake, Melvin; McNutt, J.

    2006-12-01

    An analysis of Lepine’s list (2005, AJ 130, 1680) of newly identified nearby stars was conducted at the Pisgah Astronomical Research Institute in Rosman, NC in hopes of supporting future searches for potential hosts for nearby, extraterrestrial planets. The celestial coordinates were extracted from Lepine’s list and cross-referenced with the Northern Sky Variability Survey to determine which stars among them were variable. The stars deemed variable were then cross referenced with the ROSAT all sky survey to determine if any were X-ray sources. It was determined that roughly half of the list of newly discovered nearby stars coincided to within 3arcseconds of a NSVS variable. The search done with the ROSAT all sky survey is, at this point, being verified. Future work will include statistical studies of the sample and follow-up observations of candidate variable stars. We would like to acknowledge support for this work for one of us (McNutt) through 2006 PARSEC Internship Program, and was supported by NASA Award NNG05GQ66, the North Carolina Space Grant, and the Glaxo-Wellcome Endowment at UNCA.

  5. A new pulsating variable star in Lynx

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiacconi, Davide; Tinelli, Luciano

    2012-02-01

    We report the discovery of a new variable star in the Lynx constellation. The star is catalogued as GSC 03409-00999 (07 33 08.6, +48 03 53.5). From analysis of the light curve we are induced to think the star may be a RRab Lyrae-type variable. We calculated the epoch HJD0 = 2455644.363 +/- 0.007 and the period P = 0.61971 +/- 0.00003 d, during which the star changes its brightness from a minimum magnitude m_min = 13.65 +/- 0.01 to a maximum one m_max = 13.11 +/- 0.01. The light curve shows the asymmetry 0.248 +/- 0.001, with a rise time tau_ RT = 0.1539 +/- 0.0007 d.

  6. Machine learning techniques to select variable stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Varela, Alejandro; Pérez, Muriel; Sabogal, Beatriz; Quiroz, Adolfo

    2017-09-01

    In order to perform a supervised classification of variable stars, we propose and evaluate a set of six features extracted from the magnitude density of the light curves. They are used to train automatic classification systems using state-of-the-art classifiers implemented in the R statistical computing environment. We find that random forests is the most successful method to select variables.

  7. Observing variable stars. A guide for beginners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, David H.

    David Levy's entertaining, well-researched book is aimed at the amateur enthusiast who likes to learn enjoyably. Beginning with advice on binoculars and telescopes, and how to observe the night sky effectively, the author goes on to describe thoroughly the field of variable star observation, a field in which amateurs have made important contributions. He shows how to interpret variations in light output in terms of the life of a star, from birth through to sometimes violent death. All of the major variable stars are described and classified, as well as other variable objects such as active galaxies, asteroids, comets and the sun. The book also contains a guide to the seasonal night sky. Throughout, practical observations serve to complement the text, producing an exciting, very readable introduction to this fascinating subject.

  8. Forecasting neutron star temperatures: predictability and variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, Dany; Reddy, Sanjay

    2013-12-13

    It is now possible to model thermal relaxation of neutron stars after bouts of accretion during which the star is heated out of equilibrium by nuclear reactions in its crust. Major uncertainties in these models can be encapsulated in modest variations of a handful of control parameters that change the fiducial crustal thermal conductivity, specific heat, and heating rates. Observations of thermal relaxation constrain these parameters and allow us to predict longer term variability in terms of the neutron star core temperature. We demonstrate this explicitly by modeling ongoing thermal relaxation in the neutron star XTE J1701-462. Its future cooling, over the next 5 to 30 years, is strongly constrained and depends mostly on its core temperature, uncertainties in crust physics having essentially been pinned down by fitting to the first three years of observations.

  9. Machine learning techniques to select variable stars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    García-Varela Alejandro

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to perform a supervised classification of variable stars, we propose and evaluate a set of six features extracted from the magnitude density of the light curves. They are used to train automatic classification systems using state-of-the-art classifiers implemented in the R statistical computing environment. We find that random forests is the most successful method to select variables.

  10. The variable stars of NGC 1866

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welch, Douglas L.; Cote, Patrick; Fischer, Philippe; Mateo, Mario; Madore, Barry F.

    1991-01-01

    A search has been conducted for new variables in the LMC cluster NGC 1866 using new multiepoch CCD photometry. Eight previously unknown Cepheid variables, most near the cluster core, are found. Of the new variables reported by Storm et al. (188), only six of 10 appear to be Cepheids and one of these is not a member. Periods and mean magnitudes and colors for sufficiently uncrowded variables are reported, as is one red giant variable of long period and one Cepheid which is a single-lined spectroscopic binary with a velocity semiamplitude greater than or equal to 10.5 km/s. The variation of light-curve amplitude with position in the instability strip is reported along with an apparently nonvariable star, which is a radial velocity member, in the strip. A true distance modulus of 18.57 + or - 0.01 mag is obtained for the cluster.

  11. The diskmass survey. VIII. On the relationship between disk stability and star formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Westfall, Kyle B.; Verheijen, Marc A. W. [Kapteyn Astronomical Institute, University of Groningen, Landleven 12, 9747 AD Groningen (Netherlands); Andersen, David R. [NRC Herzberg Institute of Astrophysics, 5071 West Saanich Road, Victoria, BC V9E 2E7 (Canada); Bershady, Matthew A. [Department of Astronomy, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 475 North Charter Street, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Martinsson, Thomas P. K. [Leiden Observatory, Leiden University, P.O. Box 9513, 2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands); Swaters, Robert A., E-mail: westfall@astro.rug.nl [National Optical Astronomy Observatory, 950 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States)

    2014-04-10

    We study the relationship between the stability level of late-type galaxy disks and their star-formation activity using integral-field gaseous and stellar kinematic data. Specifically, we compare the two-component (gas+stars) stability parameter from Romeo and Wiegert (Q {sub RW}), incorporating stellar kinematic data for the first time, and the star-formation rate estimated from 21 cm continuum emission. We determine the stability level of each disk probabilistically using a Bayesian analysis of our data and a simple dynamical model. Our method incorporates the shape of the stellar velocity ellipsoid (SVE) and yields robust SVE measurements for over 90% of our sample. Averaging over this subsample, we find a meridional shape of σ{sub z}/σ{sub R}=0.51{sub −0.25}{sup +0.36} for the SVE and, at 1.5 disk scale lengths, a stability parameter of Q {sub RW} = 2.0 ± 0.9. We also find that the disk-averaged star-formation-rate surface density ( Σ-dot {sub e,∗}) is correlated with the disk-averaged gas and stellar mass surface densities (Σ {sub e,} {sub g} and Σ {sub e,} {sub *}) and anti-correlated with Q {sub RW}. We show that an anti-correlation between Σ-dot {sub e,∗} and Q {sub RW} can be predicted using empirical scaling relations, such that this outcome is consistent with well-established statistical properties of star-forming galaxies. Interestingly, Σ-dot {sub e,∗} is not correlated with the gas-only or star-only Toomre parameters, demonstrating the merit of calculating a multi-component stability parameter when comparing to star-formation activity. Finally, our results are consistent with the Ostriker et al. model of self-regulated star-formation, which predicts Σ-dot {sub e,∗}/Σ{sub e,g}∝Σ{sub e,∗}{sup 1/2}. Based on this and other theoretical expectations, we discuss the possibility of a physical link between disk stability level and star-formation rate in light of our empirical results.

  12. Outbursts and Disk Variability in Be Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labadie-Bartz, Jonathan; Chojnowski, S. Drew; Whelan, David G.; Pepper, Joshua; McSwain, M. Virginia; Borges Fernandes, Marcelo; Wisniewski, John P.; Stringfellow, Guy S.; Carciofi, Alex C.; Siverd, Robert J.; Glazier, Amy L.; Anderson, Sophie G.; Caravello, Anthoni J.; Stassun, Keivan G.; Lund, Michael B.; Stevens, Daniel J.; Rodriguez, Joseph E.; James, David J.; Kuhn, Rudolf B.

    2018-02-01

    In order to study the growth and evolution of circumstellar disks around classical Be stars, we analyze optical time-series photometry from the KELT survey with simultaneous infrared and visible spectroscopy from the Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment survey and Be Star Spectra database for a sample of 160 Galactic classical Be stars. The systems studied here show variability including transitions from a diskless to a disk-possessing state (and vice versa), and persistent disks that vary in strength, being replenished at either regularly or irregularly occurring intervals. We detect disk-building events (outbursts) in the light curves of 28% of our sample. Outbursts are more commonly observed in early- (57%), compared to mid- (27%) and late-type (8%) systems. A given system may show anywhere between 0 and 40 individual outbursts in its light curve, with amplitudes ranging up to ∼0.5 mag and event durations between ∼2 and 1000 days. We study how both the photometry and spectroscopy change together during active episodes of disk growth or dissipation, revealing details about the evolution of the circumstellar environment. We demonstrate that photometric activity is linked to changes in the inner disk, and show that, at least in some cases, the disk growth process is asymmetrical. Observational evidence of Be star disks both growing and clearing from the inside out is presented. The duration of disk buildup and dissipation phases are measured for 70 outbursts, and we find that the average outburst takes about twice as long to dissipate as it does to build up in optical photometry. Our analysis hints that dissipation of the inner disk occurs relatively slowly for late-type Be stars.

  13. ROAD (Remote Observatory Atacama Desert): Intensive Observations of Variable Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hambsch, F.-J.

    2012-10-01

    The author discusses his new remote observatory under pristine skies and the intensive observations of variable stars he is accomplishing. The stars under investigation are mainly cataclysmic variables, observed in response to AAVSO, CBA, and VSNET alerts; other types, such as RR Lyrae stars, were also observed. Examples are presented of dense observations of different cataclysmic variables as well as an RR Lyrae star. Featured is the first bright outburst of SV Ari (Nova Ari 1905) since its discovery, as well as the first outburst of UGWZ candidate BW Scl. Results for VW Hyi, another cataclysmic variable, will also be shown. Furthermore, an intensively observed RR Lyrae star will be highlighted.

  14. Jonckheere Double Star Photometry – Part VIII: Sextans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knapp, Wilfried

    2018-01-01

    If any double star discoverer is in urgent need of photometry then it is Jonckheere. There are over 3000 Jonckheere objects listed in the WDS catalog and a good part of them with magnitudes obviously far too bright. This report covers the Jonckheere objects in the constellation Sextans. One image per object was taken with V-filter to allow for visual magnitude measurement by differential photometry. All objects were additionally checked for common proper motion and a good part of the objects qualify indeed as potential CPM pairs.

  15. Félix de Roy: a life of variable stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shears, J.

    2011-08-01

    Félix de Roy (1883-1942), an internationally recognised amateur astronomer, made significant contributions to variable star research. As an active observer, he made some 91,000 visual estimates of a number of different variable stars. A Belgian national, he took refuge in England during World War I. While there, de Roy became well enough known to serve later as Director of the BAA Variable Star Section for seventeen years. Through this office, and his connections with other organisations around the world, he encouraged others to pursue the observation of variable stars. Not merely content to accumulate observational data, de Roy also analysed the data and published numerous papers.

  16. Felix de Roy: a life of variable stars

    CERN Document Server

    Shears, Jeremy

    2010-01-01

    Felix de Roy (1883-1942), an internationality recognised amateur astronomer, made significant contributions to variable star research. As an active observer, he made some 91,000 visual estimates of a number of different variable stars. A Belgian national, he took refuge in England during World War 1. While there, de Roy became well enough known to later serve as Director of the BAA Variable Star Section for seventeen years. Through this office, and his connections with other organisations around the world, he encouraged others to pursue the observation of variable stars. Not merely content to accumulate observational data, de Roy also analysed the data and published numerous papers.

  17. Variable stars with the Kepler space telescope

    OpenAIRE

    Molnár, László; Szabó, Róbert; Plachy, Emese

    2016-01-01

    The Kepler space telescope has revolutionised our knowledge about exoplanets and stars and is continuing to do so in the K2 mission. The exquisite photometric precision, together with the long, uninterrupted observations opened up a new way to investigate the structure and evolution of stars. Asteroseismology, the study of stellar oscillations, allowed us to investigate solar-like stars and to peer into the insides of red giants and massive stars. But many discoveries have been made about cla...

  18. Time Resolved Spectroscopy of Cepheid Variable Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartman, Katherine; Beaton, Rachael L.; SDSS-IV APOGEE-2 Team

    2018-01-01

    Galactic Cepheid variable stars have been used for over a century as standard candles and as the first rung of the cosmic distance ladder, integral to the calculation of the Hubble constant. However, it is challenging to observe Cepheids within the Milky Way Galaxy because of extinction, and there are still uncertainties in the Cepheid period-luminosity relation (or Leavitt Law) that affect these important distance calculations. The Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE) survey has provided spectra for a large sample of Galactic Cepheids, but the standard chemical abundance pipeline (ASPCAP) processing is not well-suited to pulsational variables, preventing us from using them to study metallicity effect in the Leavitt Law with standard processing. Using a standalone version of the ASPCAP pipeline, we present an analysis of individual visit spectra from a test sample of nine APOGEE Cepheids, and we compare its output to the stars’ literature abundance values. Based on the results of this comparison, we will be able to improve the standard analysis and process the entirety of APOGEE’s Cepheid catalogue to improve its abundance measurements. The resulting abundance data will allow us to constrain the effect of metallicity on the Leavitt Law and thus allow for more accurate Cepheid distance measurements for the determination of the Hubble constant.

  19. Variable Star Discovery with Ultra-Low Cost Equipment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paust, Nathaniel; Wilson, Danielle

    2016-06-01

    We present preliminary results of a variable star search using commercial DSLR equipment. The camera in use images the sky at DEC=+44 every ten minutes, day and night. A wide variety of open-source tools, from photo editors to specialty programs like the astrometry.net suite, are used to process the images and identify variable stars.

  20. Meta-classification for Variable Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pichara, Karim; Protopapas, Pavlos; León, Daniel

    2016-03-01

    The need for the development of automatic tools to explore astronomical databases has been recognized since the inception of CCDs and modern computers. Astronomers already have developed solutions to tackle several science problems, such as automatic classification of stellar objects, outlier detection, and globular clusters identification, among others. New scientific problems emerge, and it is critical to be able to reuse the models learned before, without rebuilding everything from the beginning when the sciencientific problem changes. In this paper, we propose a new meta-model that automatically integrates existing classification models of variable stars. The proposed meta-model incorporates existing models that are trained in a different context, answering different questions and using different representations of data. A conventional mixture of expert algorithms in machine learning literature cannot be used since each expert (model) uses different inputs. We also consider the computational complexity of the model by using the most expensive models only when it is necessary. We test our model with EROS-2 and MACHO data sets, and we show that we solve most of the classification challenges only by training a meta-model to learn how to integrate the previous experts.

  1. Pulsating variable stars and large spectroscopic surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Cat, Peter

    2017-09-01

    In the past decade, the research of pulsating variable stars has taken a giant leap forward thanks to the photometric measurements provided by space missions like Most, CoRoT, Kepler/K2, and Brite. These missions have provided quasi uninterrupted photometric time-series with an ultra-high quality and a total length that is not achievable from Earth. However, many of the success stories could not have been told without ground-based spectroscopic follow-up observations. Indeed, spectroscopy has some important assets as it can provide (more) accurate information about stellar parameters (like the effective temperature, surface gravity, metallicity, and abundances that are mandatory parameters for an in-depth asteroseismic study), the radial velocity (that is important for the detection of binaries and for the confirmation of cluster membership, if applicable), and the projected rotational velocity (that allows the study of the effects of rotation on pulsations). Fortunately, several large spectroscopic surveys are (becoming) available that can be used for these purposes. For some of these surveys, sub-projects have been initiated with the specific goal to complement space-based photometry. In this review, several spectroscopic surveys are introduced and compared with each other. We show that a large amount of spectroscopic data is (becoming) available for a large variety of objects.

  2. Little Bear's pulsating stars: Variable star census of UMi dSph Galaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinemuchi, K.; Jeffery, E.; Kuehn, C.; Grabowski, K.; Nemec, J.

    2017-09-01

    Recent observations and a photometric search for variable stars in the Ursa Minor dwarf spheroidal galaxy (UMi dSph) are presented. Our observations were taken at Apache Point Observatory in 2014 and 2016 using the 0.5m ARCSAT telescope and the West Mountain Observatory (WMO) 0.9m telescope of Brigham Young University in 2016. Previously known RR Lyrae stars in our field of view of the UMi dSph are identified, and we also catalog new variable star candidates. Tentative classifications are given for some of the new variable stars. We have conducted period searches with the data collected with the WMO telescope. Our ultimate goal is to create an updated catalog of variable stars in the UMi dSph and to compare the RR Lyrae stellar characteristics to other RR Lyrae stars found in the Local Group dSph galaxies.

  3. Little Bear’s pulsating stars: Variable star census of UMi dSph Galaxy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kinemuchi K.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent observations and a photometric search for variable stars in the Ursa Minor dwarf spheroidal galaxy (UMi dSph are presented. Our observations were taken at Apache Point Observatory in 2014 and 2016 using the 0.5m ARCSAT telescope and the West Mountain Observatory (WMO 0.9m telescope of Brigham Young University in 2016. Previously known RR Lyrae stars in our field of view of the UMi dSph are identified, and we also catalog new variable star candidates. Tentative classifications are given for some of the new variable stars. We have conducted period searches with the data collected with the WMO telescope. Our ultimate goal is to create an updated catalog of variable stars in the UMi dSph and to compare the RR Lyrae stellar characteristics to other RR Lyrae stars found in the Local Group dSph galaxies.

  4. Roche tomography of cataclysmic variables - VIII. The irradiated and spotted dwarf nova, SS Cygni

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, C. A.; Smith, Robert Connon; Hebb, L.; Szkody, P.

    2017-12-01

    We present the results of our spectroscopic study of the dwarf nova SS Cygni, using Roche tomography to map the stellar surface and derive the system parameters. Given that this technique takes into account the inhomogeneous brightness distribution on the surface of the secondary star, our derived parameters are (in principle) the most robust yet found for this system. Furthermore, our surface maps reveal that the secondary star is highly spotted, with strongly asymmetric irradiation on the inner hemisphere. Moreover, by constructing Doppler tomograms of several Balmer emission lines, we find strong asymmetric emission from the irradiated secondary star, and an asymmetric accretion disc that exhibits spiral structures.

  5. The Beginning of Variable star astronomy in Hungary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zsoldos, Endre

    Variable star astronomy began in Hungary as elsewhere: new objects have been recognized in the sky. Comets appeared in 16th - 17th century chronicles. The first mention of the new star of 1572 seems to be the "Prognosticon" of Wilhelm Misocacus, printed in 1578. New stars were discussed in the 17th century by Jesuits as well as Protestants. The work of Jacob Schnitzler is especially interesting from this point. The Cartesians dealt with new stars with less enthusiasm, they hardly mentioned them. The beginning of the 19th century saw the development of science in Hungarian, variable stars, however, were left out. The birth of variable star astronomy might be linked to the Ógyalla Observatory, originally a private observatory of Miklós Konkoly Thege. The 1885 supernova in the Andromeda Nebula were observed there, as well as the spectra of a few interesting variable stars. Theoretical astrophysics also has its beginnings in Ógyalla through the work of Radó Kövesligethy. Professional variable star astronomy started here in the early 20th century through the work of Antal Tass

  6. Classification of variable stars in the WFCAM Transit Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moya Andrés

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The WFCAM Transit Survey is a photometric survey in the near-infrared and aims at finding Earth-like planets transiting M-dwarf stars. As a by-product of the survey, a variety of variable stars has been detected. We report the discovery and classification of 192 periodic variable stars in the WFCAM Transit Survey. 185 of those objects are previously unknown variable sources. The derived parameters of their light curves will be helpful for the creation of a robust sample of light curves (and their parameters thereof of classified variable stars in the near-infrared for the automatic classification of light curves of stellar objects in the J-band.

  7. Discovering new variable stars at Key Stage 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chubb, Katy; Hood, Rosie; Wilson, Thomas; Holdship, Jonathan; Hutton, Sarah

    2017-05-01

    Details of the London pilot of the ‘Discovery Project’ are presented, where university-based astronomers were given the chance to pass on some real and applied knowledge of astronomy to a group of selected secondary school pupils. It was aimed at students in Key Stage 3 of their education, allowing them to be involved in real astronomical research at an early stage of their education, the chance to become the official discoverer of a new variable star, and to be listed in the International Variable Star Index database (The International Variable Star Index, Version 1.1, American Association of Variable Star Observers (AAVSO), 2016, http://aavso.org/vsx), all while learning and practising research-level skills. Future plans are discussed.

  8. The Bateson Legacy: Variable Stars Research at the Auckland Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christie, Grant

    2005-03-01

    Frank Bateson's advice to the Auckland Astronomical Society's members looking for projects for their new Auckland Observatory has stood the test of time. Decades later the observation of variable stars is still the mainstay of Auckland's research programmes.

  9. The Bateson legacy: variable star research at the Auckland Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christie, Grant

    2005-03-01

    Frank Bateson's advice to the Auckland Astronomical Society's members looking for projects for their new Auckland Observatory has stood the test of time. Decades later the observation of variable stars is still the mainstay of Auckland's research programmes.

  10. Variable Star Catalogs: Their Past, Present and Future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samus, N. N.; Kazarovets, E. V.; Kireeva, N. N.; Pastukhova, E. N.; Durlevich, O. V.

    2010-02-01

    After the second World War, the International Astronomical Union made astronomers of the Soviet Union responsible for variable-star catalogues. This work has been continued ever since the first edition of the General Catalogue of Variable Stars compiled by the team headed by P. P. Parenago and B. V. Kukarkin and published in 1948. Currently, the catalogue work is a joint project of the Institute of Astronomy (Russian Academy of Sciences) and Sternberg Astronomical Institute (Moscow University). This paper is a brief review of recent trends in the field of variable-star catalogues. We discuss problems as well as new prospects related to modern large-scale automatic photometric sky surveys, and outline the state of discussions on the future of the variable-star catalogues in the profile commissions of the IAU.

  11. Variable Stars in the Globular Cluster M 80

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopacki, G.

    2013-03-01

    We present results of a search for variable stars in the globular cluster M 80. Application of the image subtraction method to the ground-based times-series of CCD frames resulted in finding nine new RR Lyr stars, six of the RRc and three of the RRab type, and four SX Phe variables. Revised mean period of RRab stars, ab=0.68 d, and relative percentage of RRc stars, Nc/(Nab+Nc)=53%, strongly confirm that M 80 belongs to the Oosterhoff II group of globular clusters. The mean V magnitude of the horizontal branch of M 80 based on the ten RR Lyr stars has been estimated to be VHB=RR=16.14±0.03 mag. In two pulsating stars, one of the RR Lyr type and the other of the SX Phe type, oscillations with two close frequencies were detected, indicating excitation of nonradial modes in these stars. Moreover, we discovered two W UMa or ellipsoidal systems, two periodic stars of unknown type, one of which is probably a field star, and detected light variations in three red giants of the cluster.

  12. Variable stars in Leo A : RR Lyrae stars, short-period cepheids, and implications for stellar content

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dolphin, AE; Saha, A; Claver, J; Skillman, ED; Cole, AA; Gallagher, JS; Tolstoy, E; Dohm-Palmer, RC; Mateo, M

    We present the results of a search for short-period variable stars in Leo A. We have found 92 candidate variables, including eight candidate RR Lyrae stars. From the RR Lyrae stars, we measure a distance modulus of (m - M)(0) = 24.51 +/- 0.12, or 0.80 +/- 0.04 Mpc. This discovery of RR Lyrae stars

  13. A Modern Update and Usage of Historical Variable Star Catalogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagnotta, Ashley; Graur, Or; Murray, Zachary; Kruk, Julia; Christie-Dervaux, Lucien; Chen, Dong Yi

    2015-01-01

    One of the earliest modern variable star catalogs was constructed by Henrietta Swan Leavitt during her tenure at the Harvard College Observatory (HCO) in the early 1900s. Originally published in 1908, Leavitt's catalog listed 1777 variables in the Magellanic Clouds (MCs). The construction and analysis of this catalog allowed her to subsequently discover the Cepheid period-luminosity relationship, now known as the Leavitt Law. The MC variable star catalogs were updated and expanded by Cecilia Payne-Gaposchkin in 1966 and 1971. Although newer studies of the MC variables have been performed since then, the new information has not always been correlated with the old due to a lack of modern descriptors of the stars listed in the Harvard MC catalogs. We will discuss the history of MC variable star catalogs, especially those compiled using the HCO plates, as well as our modernized version of the Leavitt and Payne-Gaposchkin catalogs. Our modern catalog can be used in conjunction with the archival plates (primarily via the Digital Access to a Sky Century @ Harvard scanning project) to study the secular behavior of the MC variable stars over the past century.

  14. Caroline Furness and the Evolution of Visual Variable Star Observing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Kristine

    2017-01-01

    An Introduction to the Study of Variable Stars by Dr. Caroline Ellen Furness (1869-1936), Director of the Vassar College Observatory, was published in October 2015. Issued in honor of the fiftieth anniversary of the founding of Vassar College, the work was meant to fill a void in the literature, namely as both an introduction to the topic of variable stars as well as a manual explaining how they should be observed and the resulting data analyzed. It was judged to be one of the hundred best books written by an American woman in the last hundred years at the 1933 World’s Fair in Chicago. The book covers the relevant history of and background on types of variable stars, star charts, catalogs, and the magnitude scale, then describes observing techniques, including visual, photographic, and photoelectric photometry. The work finishes with a discussion of light curves and patterns of variability, with a special emphasis on eclipsing binaries and long period variables. Furness’s work is therefore a valuable snapshot of the state of astronomical knowledge, technology, and observing techniques from a century ago. Furness’s book and its reception in the scientific community are analyzed, and parallels with (and departures from) the current advice given by the AAVSO to beginning variable star observers today are highlighted.

  15. The variability of magnetic activity in solar-type stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabbian, D.; Simoniello, R.; Collet, R.; Criscuoli, S.; Korhonen, H.; Krivova, N. A.; Oláh, K.; Jouve, L.; Solanki, S. K.; Alvarado-Gómez, J. D.; Booth, R.; García, R. A.; Lehtinen, J.; See, V.

    2017-09-01

    This article reviews the current knowledge and status of investigations on the variable magnetic activity of cool stars. We discuss the Sun in the context of solar-type stars, highlighting peculiarities and common features in terms of its magnetic activity and variability over different time scales. We examine how both theory and observations are providing new clues about the main physical processes that generate magnetic fields in the interior of cool stars, as well as about those that lead to evolving stellar surface magnetism and varying chromospheric and coronal phenomena. We then proceed to discuss the relations between stellar age, rotation, and activity throughout the evolution of cool stars. Finally, we touch upon the importance of understanding stellar magnetism also in view of its effect on planetary environments.

  16. Synergies between exoplanet surveys and variable star research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kovacs Geza

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available With the discovery of the first transiting extrasolar planetary system back in 1999, a great number of projects started to hunt for other similar systems. Because the incidence rate of such systems was unknown and the length of the shallow transit events is only a few percent of the orbital period, the goal was to monitor continuously as many stars as possible for at least a period of a few months. Small aperture, large field of view automated telescope systems have been installed with a parallel development of new data reduction and analysis methods, leading to better than 1% per data point precision for thousands of stars. With the successful launch of the photometric satellites CoRoT and Kepler, the precision increased further by one-two orders of magnitude. Millions of stars have been analyzed and searched for transits. In the history of variable star astronomy this is the biggest undertaking so far, resulting in photometric time series inventories immensely valuable for the whole field. In this review we briefly discuss the methods of data analysis that were inspired by the main science driver of these surveys and highlight some of the most interesting variable star results that impact the field of variable star astronomy.

  17. Synergies between exoplanet surveys and variable star research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovacs, Geza

    2017-09-01

    With the discovery of the first transiting extrasolar planetary system back in 1999, a great number of projects started to hunt for other similar systems. Because the incidence rate of such systems was unknown and the length of the shallow transit events is only a few percent of the orbital period, the goal was to monitor continuously as many stars as possible for at least a period of a few months. Small aperture, large field of view automated telescope systems have been installed with a parallel development of new data reduction and analysis methods, leading to better than 1% per data point precision for thousands of stars. With the successful launch of the photometric satellites CoRoT and Kepler, the precision increased further by one-two orders of magnitude. Millions of stars have been analyzed and searched for transits. In the history of variable star astronomy this is the biggest undertaking so far, resulting in photometric time series inventories immensely valuable for the whole field. In this review we briefly discuss the methods of data analysis that were inspired by the main science driver of these surveys and highlight some of the most interesting variable star results that impact the field of variable star astronomy.

  18. Near-IR Spectral Variability of Be Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Austin; Eisner, J. A.; Rudolph, A. L.

    2013-01-01

    Be class stars exhibit variability across the electromagnetic spectrum, including in both the visible and infrared regions. While variability in the optical range has been explored previously, spectroscopic variability in the near-IR has not been investigated as thoroughly. This study is focused on tracking the spectral variability of K Dra, one of the Be stars for which we collected data. We observed our sample using the FSPEC instrument on the 90-inch Bok telescope at Kitt Peak. The data were collected during four five-night runs, two in 2010 separated by one month and two in 2011 also separated by one month. A reduction pipeline written in Interactive Data Language (IDL) was used to produce emission spectra of the star from these data. Here we present spectra from these epochs that show emission from the Brackett Gamma hydrogen transition. We use changes in these features to constrain variability in the Hydrogen gas comprising the disk of this star as a function of time.

  19. Automatic Survey-invariant Classification of Variable Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benavente, Patricio; Protopapas, Pavlos; Pichara, Karim

    2017-08-01

    Machine learning techniques have been successfully used to classify variable stars on widely studied astronomical surveys. These data sets have been available to astronomers long enough, thus allowing them to perform deep analysis over several variable sources and generating useful catalogs with identified variable stars. The products of these studies are labeled data that enable supervised learning models to be trained successfully. However, when these models are blindly applied to data from new sky surveys, their performance drops significantly. Furthermore, unlabeled data become available at a much higher rate than their labeled counterpart, since labeling is a manual and time-consuming effort. Domain adaptation techniques aim to learn from a domain where labeled data are available, the source domain, and through some adaptation perform well on a different domain, the target domain. We propose a full probabilistic model that represents the joint distribution of features from two surveys, as well as a probabilistic transformation of the features from one survey to the other. This allows us to transfer labeled data to a study where they are not available and to effectively run a variable star classification model in a new survey. Our model represents the features of each domain as a Gaussian mixture and models the transformation as a translation, rotation, and scaling of each separate component. We perform tests using three different variability catalogs, EROS, MACHO, and HiTS, presenting differences among them, such as the number of observations per star, cadence, observational time, and optical bands observed, among others.

  20. Interactive online archive for short-period variable stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joner, Michael D.; Hintz, Eric G.

    1998-07-01

    We report initial results from a project to design an interactive on-line data archive for short-period variable stars. Our goal is to provide an easily accessible set of web pages for use by a researcher at the telescope. The first step is to provide the researcher with convenient access to data archives for a variety of short-period variable stars. In addition to the basic data archive, there is a page for each star that contains positional information, the most recent epoch and period data, basic physical parameters, and a set of helpful journal references. We also include a page for each of the program variables with a finder chart and a selection of comparison stars for use in differential photometry. Additionally, one entry point in the system is a phase calculator that will sort through the data and return a list of stars that are observable from various user input locations during a variety of time periods. The current system has a partial data set in place for over one hundred short-period variable stars. We intend to continue to expand this set to include a large number of complete data files. We are also considering a similar archive of galaxy images for comparison use in student conducted supernova searches. We find this system improves the scientific return form our two small telescopes at the West Mountain Observatory. We believe this model can also be employed to optimize data management and scientific return for a wide variety of projects from the new generation of large ground-based telescopes.

  1. The Chemical Compositions of RR Lyrae Type C Variable Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govea, Jose; Gomez, Thomas; Preston, George W.; Sneden, Christopher

    2014-02-01

    We present a detailed chemical abundance study of eight RR Lyrae variable stars of subclass c (RRc). The target RRc stars chosen for study exhibit "Blazhko-effect" period and amplitude modulations to their pulsational cycles. Data for this study were gathered with the echelle spectrograph of the 100 inch du Pont telescope at Las Campanas Observatory. Spectra were obtained throughout each star's pulsation cycle. Atmospheric parameters—effective temperature, surface gravity, microturbulent velocity, and metallicity—were derived at multiple phase points. We found metallicities and element abundance ratios to be constant within observational uncertainties over the pulsational cycles of all stars. Moreover, the α-element and Fe-group abundance ratios with respect to iron are consistent with other horizontal-branch members (RRab, blue and red non-variables). Finally, we have used the [Fe/H] values of these eight RRc stars to anchor the metallicity estimates of a large-sample RRc snapshot spectroscopic study being conducted with the same telescope and instrument combination employed here.

  2. The television, school, and family smoking prevention and cessation project. VIII. Student outcomes and mediating variables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flay, B R; Miller, T Q; Hedeker, D; Siddiqui, O; Britton, C F; Brannon, B R; Johnson, C A; Hansen, W B; Sussman, S; Dent, C

    1995-01-01

    This paper presents the student outcomes of a large-scale, social-influences-based, school and media-based tobacco use prevention and cessation project in Southern California. The study provided an experimental comparison of classroom delivery with television delivery and the combination of the two in a 2 x 2 plus 1 design. Schools were randomly assigned to conditions. Control groups included "treatment as usual" and an "attention control" with the same outcome expectancies as the treatment conditions. Students were surveyed twice in grade 7 and once in each of grades 8 and 9. The interventions occurred during grade 7. We observed significant effects on mediating variables such as knowledge and prevalence estimates, and coping effort. The knowledge and prevalence estimates effects decayed partially but remained significant up to a 2-year follow-up. The coping effort effect did not persist at follow-ups. There were significant main effects of both classroom training and TV programming on knowledge and prevalence estimates and significant interactions of classroom and TV programming on knowledge (negative), disapproval of parental smoking, and coping effort. There were no consistent program effects on refusal/self-efficacy, smoking intentions, or behavior. Previous reports demonstrated successful development and pilot testing of program components and measures and high acceptance of the program by students and parents. The lack of behavioral effects may have been the result of imperfect program implementation or low base rates of intentions and behavior.

  3. Software Development for Asteroid and Variable Star Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweckard, Teaghen; Clason, Timothy; Kenney, Jessica; Wuerker, Wolfgang; Palser, Sage; Giles, Tucker; Linder, Tyler; Sanchez, Richard

    2018-01-01

    The process of collecting and analyzing light curves from variable stars and asteroids is almost identical. In 2016 a collaboration was created to develop a simple fundamental way to study both asteroids and variable stars using methods that would allow the process to be repeated by middle school and high school students.Using robotic telescopes at Cerro Tololo (Chile), Yerkes Observatory (US), and Stone Edge Observatory (US) data were collected on RV Del and three asteroids. It was discovered that the only available software program which could be easily installed on lab computers was MPO Canopus. However, after six months it was determined that MPO Canopus was not an acceptable option because of the steep learning curve, lack of documentation and technical support.Therefore, the project decided that the best option was to design our own python based software. Using python and python libraries we developed code that can be used for photometry and can be easily changed to the user's needs. We accomplished this by meeting with our mentor astronomer, Tyler Linder, and in the beginning wrote two different programs, one for asteroids and one for variable stars. In the end, though, we chose to combine codes so that the program would be capable of performing photometry for both moving and static objects.The software performs differential photometry by comparing the magnitude of known reference stars to the object being studied. For asteroids, the image timestamps are used to obtain ephemeris of the asteroid from JPL Horizons automatically.

  4. An Undergraduate Research Experience on Studying Variable Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaral, A.; Percy, J. R.

    2016-06-01

    We describe and evaluate a summer undergraduate research project and experience by one of us (AA), under the supervision of the other (JP). The aim of the project was to sample current approaches to analyzing variable star data, and topics related to the study of Mira variable stars and their astrophysical importance. This project was done through the Summer Undergraduate Research Program (SURP) in astronomy at the University of Toronto. SURP allowed undergraduate students to explore and learn about many topics within astronomy and astrophysics, from instrumentation to cosmology. SURP introduced students to key skills which are essential for students hoping to pursue graduate studies in any scientific field. Variable stars proved to be an excellent topic for a research project. For beginners to independent research, it introduces key concepts in research such as critical thinking and problem solving, while illuminating previously learned topics in stellar physics. The focus of this summer project was to compare observations with structural and evolutionary models, including modelling the random walk behavior exhibited in the (O-C) diagrams of most Mira stars. We found that the random walk could be modelled by using random fluctuations of the period. This explanation agreed well with observations.

  5. The variable stars of the young LMC cluster NGC 2164

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welch, Douglas L.; Mateo, Mario; Olszewski, Edward W.; Fischer, Philippe; Takamiya, Marianne

    1993-01-01

    The present search of the LMC cluster NGC 2164 for variable stars has uncovered one new member classical Cepheid variable with 3.772-day period; attention is also given to photometry for a previously unknown field overtone Cepheid variable with 3.4626-day period, and the 10.6878-day period HV 12078, which may be a member of the young NGC 2156 cluster. The clear separation of fundamental and overtone pulsators in the period-luminosity-color relation of known LMC cluster Cepheids establishes that the NGC 2164 member is a true overtone.

  6. Luminous blue variables and the fates of very massive stars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Nathan

    2017-10-28

    Luminous blue variables (LBVs) had long been considered massive stars in transition to the Wolf-Rayet (WR) phase, so their identification as progenitors of some peculiar supernovae (SNe) was surprising. More recently, environment statistics of LBVs show that most of them cannot be in transition to the WR phase after all, because LBVs are more isolated than allowed in this scenario. Additionally, the high-mass H shells around luminous SNe IIn require that some very massive stars above 40  M ⊙ die without shedding their H envelopes, and the precursor outbursts are a challenge for understanding the final burning sequences leading to core collapse. Recent evidence suggests a clear continuum in pre-SN mass loss from super-luminous SNe IIn, to regular SNe IIn, to SNe II-L and II-P, whereas most stripped-envelope SNe seem to arise from a separate channel of lower-mass binary stars rather than massive WR stars.This article is part of the themed issue 'Bridging the gap: from massive stars to supernovae'. © 2017 The Author(s).

  7. Evolution of compact stars and dark dynamical variables

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhatti, M.Z.; Yousaf, Z. [University of the Punjab, Department of Mathematics, Lahore (Pakistan); Ilyas, M. [University of the Punjab, Centre for High Energy Physics, Lahore (Pakistan)

    2017-10-15

    This work aims to explore the dark dynamical effects of the f(R, T) modified gravity theory on the dynamics of a compact celestial star. We have taken the interior geometry of a spherical star which is filled with an imperfect fluid distribution. The modified field equations are explored by taking a particular form of the f(R, T) model, i.e. f(R, T) = f{sub 1}(R) + f{sub 2}(R)f{sub 3}(T). These equations are utilized to formulate the well-known structure scalars under the dark dynamical effects of this higher-order gravity theory. Also, with the help of these scalar variables, the evolution equations for expansion and shear are formulated. The whole analysis is made under the condition of a constant R and T. We found a crucial significance of dark source terms and dynamical variables on the evolution and density inhomogeneity of compact objects. (orig.)

  8. Pulsating variable stars in the MACHO bulge database: the semiregular variables

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minniti, D.; Alcock, C.; Allsman, R.A. [and others

    1997-11-01

    We review the pulsating stars contained in the top 24 fields of the MACHO bulge database, with special emphasis on the red semireg-ular stars. Based on period, amplitude and color cuts, we have selected a sample of 2000 semireguku variables with 15 < P < 100 days. Their period-luminosity relation is studied, as well ss their spatial distribution. We find that they follow the bar, unlike the RR Lyrae in these fields.

  9. Kepler Full-Frame Image Variable Star Catalog

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinemuchi, Karen; Still, M.; Fanelli, M.; Kepler Science Team

    2011-01-01

    Kepler, NASA's discovery mission to find Earth-sized planets within the habitable zone of nearby stars, provides an unique and powerful resource to perform serendipitous time-domain astrophysics. There are 107 sources brighter than the 21st magnitude Kepler confusion limit within the Kepler field. Thirty minute cadence relative photometry is good to 2% accuracy at 19th magnitude. However, telemetry bandwidth limits the data collection to only 170,000 targets per quarter, of which 96% are reserved for the primary, brighter than 16th magnitude, red-dominated exoplanet program. Through Guest Observer and open consortium avenues, the onus is upon the astrophysics community to choose their 4% share of the targets carefully so that serendipitous science opportunities with Kepler are optimized. One method for identifying potential targets of high astrophysical interest is to locate the variable objects in the Kepler field using the publicly available, 30-min exposure, Full-Frame Images (FFIs). These images are stored and transmitted by the spacecraft at one-month intervals, principally for engineering purposes. Here we describe a pilot study using eight FFIs obtained in rapid sequence over 1.5 days during the spacecraft commissioning phase. We present a catalog and light curves of variable objects mined from these "Golden" FFIs. Many of these objects will be eclipsing binaries, pulsators, eruptive stars, and other exotic variable stars exhibiting large brightness changes. This variable star catalog will provide an excellent stepping stone for Kepler astrophysics projects through the Kepler Asteroseismic Science Consortium (KASC), the Guest Observer Program, or Guest Observer Director's Discretionary Time. Kepler was selected as the 10th mission of the Discovery Program. Funding for this mission is provided by NASA, Science Mission Directorate.

  10. THE CARINA PROJECT. VI. THE HELIUM-BURNING VARIABLE STARS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coppola, G.; Marconi, M.; Ripepi, V.; Dall' Ora, M.; Musella, I. [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Capodimonte, Via Moiariello 16, I-80131 Napoli (Italy); Stetson, P. B. [Dominion Astrophysical Observatory, NRC-Herzberg, 5071 West Saanich Road, Victoria, BC V9E 2E7 (Canada); Bono, G.; Buonanno, R. [Dipartimento di Fisica-Universita di Roma Tor Vergata, Via della Ricerca Scientifica 1, I-00133 Roma (Italy); Fabrizio, M. [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Collurania, via M. Maggini, I-64100 Teramo (Italy); Ferraro, I.; Iannicola, G.; Pulone, L. [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Roma, Via Frascati 33, I-00040 Monte Porzio Catone (Italy); Fiorentino, G. [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Bologna, via Ranzani 1, I-40127 Bologna (Italy); Monelli, M. [Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias, Calle Via Lactea s/n, E-38205 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Nonino, M. [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Trieste, via G. B. Tiepolo 11, I-40131 Trieste (Italy); Thevenin, F. [Universite de Nice-Sophia Antipolis, Lab. Lagrange, UMR 7293, Observatoire de la Cote dAzur, BP 4229, F-06304 Nice (France); Walker, A. R., E-mail: coppola@na.astro.it [Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory, National Optical Astronomy Observatory, Casilla 603, La Serena (Chile)

    2013-09-20

    We present new optical (BVI) time-series data for the evolved variable stars in the Carina dwarf spheroidal galaxy. The quality of the data and the observing strategy allowed us to identify 14 new variable stars. Eight out of the 14 are RR Lyrae (RRL) stars, 4 are Anomalous Cepheids (ACs), and 2 are geometrical variables. Comparison of the period distribution for the entire sample of RRLs with similar distributions in nearby dwarf spheroidal galaxies and in the Large Magellanic Cloud indicates that the old stellar populations in these systems share similar properties. This finding is also supported by the RRL distribution in the Bailey diagram. On the other hand, the period distribution and the Bailey diagram of ACs display significant differences among the above stellar systems. This evidence suggests that the properties of intermediate-age stellar populations might be affected both by environmental effects and structural parameters. We use the BV Period-Wesenheit (PW) relation of RRLs together with evolutionary prescriptions and find a true distance modulus of 20.09 {+-} 0.07 (intrinsic) {+-} 0.1 (statistical) mag that agrees quite well with similar estimates available in the literature. We identified four peculiar variables. Taking into account their position in the Bailey diagram and in the BV PW relation, two of them (V14 and V149) appear to be candidate ACs, while two (V158 and V182) might be peculiar RRLs. In particular, the variable V158 has a period and a V-band amplitude very similar to the low-mass RRL-RRLR-02792-recently identified by Pietrzynski et al. in the Galactic bulge.

  11. Rapid variability of OB-stars: nature and diagnostic value.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baade, D.

    In the past decade, rapid photospheric variability has been recognized as the non-standard property that perhaps is the most common one among early-type stars. These proceedings offer an unusually complete overview of the existing observations. They are equally complete in their reflectance of the presently considered models. Because the simple definition 'on a rotational time scale' of the qualifier 'rapid' used in the title is very adequate for many stars, modulation is a strong contender also as a general model. The model that can be made to formally reproduce the widest range of observations is nonradial pulsation which, therefore, has earned itself the somewhat ambiguous reputation as a model for everything. An attraction of this model is that it would give the possibility to infer also structural and evolutionary quantities. It was the second purpose of the workshop to offer at least a glimpse of this potential.

  12. Development of a Mailing List on Variable Stars, VSNET

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nogami, D.; Kato, T.; Baba, H.; Kunjaya, C.

    Various usages of the Internet have been developed and made remarkable progress these years, which is now dramatically changing the style of astronomical study. Among those, the maing list is thought to be most useful to study of unpredictable objects for the characteristics, especially rapidness and equality. We started a mailing list (VSNET) on variable stars, mainly on cataclysmic variables and supernovae, in 1994 July for mutual exchange of information and ideas between astronomers including professionals and amateurs. Up to now, the various articles have been distributed, for example, calls for follow up observations of transient objects discovered in the UV or X-ray region, calls for ground-based observations simultaneous with ones by the space telescopes, discoveries of supernovae, alert notices of outbursts in long dormant dwarf novae (EG Cnc, AL Com, UZ Boo, HT Cas, etc), and so on. You can get long-term light curves of variable stars drawn using VSNET data on the VSNET web pages http://www.kusastro.kyoto-u.ac.jp/vsnet/. The archives of VSNET mails are available via VSNET web pages and anonymous ftp ftp://ftp.kusastro.kyoto-u.ac.jp/pub/vsnet/Mail/. If you have any questions and suggestions on VSNET, please feel free to contact us (vsnet-adm@kusastro.kyoto-u.ac.jp).

  13. Automatic Detection and Classification of Variability for the RAO Variable Star Search

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Michael D.; Milone, E. F.

    2006-06-01

    The RAO Variable Star Search (RAOVS) can sample on the order of 30000 stars in a single field. With so many light curves it is important to have an automated process for detecting variability and classifying the detections. To detect periodic variations we use an epoch shifting technique, based on an analysis of variance technique, ANOVA, described by S. R. Davis. This technique allows us to increase the signal to noise for periodic signals and requires no assumption about the shape of the intrinsic light curve. As well as automatically detecting variables we have also developed an automatic classification system. This work has been supported in part by Canadian NSERC grants to E. F. Milone.

  14. VizieR Online Data Catalog: AAVSO International Variable Star Index VSX (Watson+, 2006-2014)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, C.; Henden, A. A.; Price, A.

    2017-11-01

    This file contains Galactic stars known or suspected to be variable. It lists all stars that have an entry in the AAVSO International Variable Star Index (VSX; http://www.aavso.org/vsx). The database consisted initially of the General Catalogue of Variable Stars (GCVS) and the New Catalogue of Suspected Variables (NSV) and was then supplemented with a large number of variable star catalogues, as well as individual variable star discoveries or variables found in the literature. Effort has also been invested to update the entries with the latest information regarding position, type and period and to remove duplicates. The VSX database is being continually updated and maintained. For historical reasons some objects outside of the Galaxy have been included. (3 data files).

  15. Uncertain Classification of Variable Stars: Handling Observational GAPS and Noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, Nicolás; Protopapas, Pavlos; Pichara, Karim

    2018-01-01

    Automatic classification methods applied to sky surveys have revolutionized the astronomical target selection process. Most surveys generate a vast amount of time series, or “lightcurves,” that represent the brightness variability of stellar objects in time. Unfortunately, lightcurves’ observations take several years to be completed, producing truncated time series that generally remain without the application of automatic classifiers until they are finished. This happens because state-of-the-art methods rely on a variety of statistical descriptors or features that present an increasing degree of dispersion when the number of observations decreases, which reduces their precision. In this paper, we propose a novel method that increases the performance of automatic classifiers of variable stars by incorporating the deviations that scarcity of observations produces. Our method uses Gaussian process regression to form a probabilistic model of each lightcurve’s observations. Then, based on this model, bootstrapped samples of the time series features are generated. Finally, a bagging approach is used to improve the overall performance of the classification. We perform tests on the MAssive Compact Halo Object (MACHO) and Optical Gravitational Lensing Experiment (OGLE) catalogs, results show that our method effectively classifies some variability classes using a small fraction of the original observations. For example, we found that RR Lyrae stars can be classified with ~80% accuracy just by observing the first 5% of the whole lightcurves’ observations in the MACHO and OGLE catalogs. We believe these results prove that, when studying lightcurves, it is important to consider the features’ error and how the measurement process impacts it.

  16. Understanding Space Weather: The Sun as a Variable Star

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strong, Keith; Saba, Julia; Kucera, Therese

    2012-01-01

    The Sun is a complex system of systems and until recently, less than half of its surface was observable at any given time and then only from afar. New observational techniques and modeling capabilities are giving us a fresh perspective of the solar interior and how our Sun works as a variable star. This revolution in solar observations and modeling provides us with the exciting prospect of being able to use a vastly increased stream of solar data taken simultaneously from several different vantage points to produce more reliable and prompt space weather forecasts. Solar variations that cause identifiable space weather effects do not happen only on solar-cycle timescales from decades to centuries; there are also many shorter-term events that have their own unique space weather effects and a different set of challenges to understand and predict, such as flares, coronal mass ejections, and solar wind variations.

  17. Variable Star Signature Classification using Slotted Symbolic Markov Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, K. B.; Peter, A. M.

    2017-01-01

    With the advent of digital astronomy, new benefits and new challenges have been presented to the modern day astronomer. No longer can the astronomer rely on manual processing, instead the profession as a whole has begun to adopt more advanced computational means. This paper focuses on the construction and application of a novel time-domain signature extraction methodology and the development of a supporting supervised pattern classification algorithm for the identification of variable stars. A methodology for the reduction of stellar variable observations (time-domain data) into a novel feature space representation is introduced. The methodology presented will be referred to as Slotted Symbolic Markov Modeling (SSMM) and has a number of advantages which will be demonstrated to be beneficial; specifically to the supervised classification of stellar variables. It will be shown that the methodology outperformed a baseline standard methodology on a standardized set of stellar light curve data. The performance on a set of data derived from the LINEAR dataset will also be shown.

  18. Magnetic field measurements and wind-line variability of OB-type stars

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schnerr, R.S.; Henrichs, H.F.; Neiner, C.; Verdugo, E.; de Jong, J.; Geers, V.C.; Wiersema, K.; van Dalen, B.; Tijani, A.; Plaggenborg, B.; Rygl, K.L.J.

    2008-01-01

    Context. The first magnetic fields in O- and B-type stars that do not belong to the Bp-star class, have been discovered. The cyclic UV wind-line variability, which has been observed in a significant fraction of early-type stars, is likely to be related to such magnetic fields. Aims. We attempt to

  19. Utilizing the AAVSO's Variable Star Index (VSX) in Undergraduate Research Projects (Poster abstract)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, K.

    2016-12-01

    (Abstract only) Among the many important services that the American Association of Variable Star Observers (AAVSO) provides to the astronomical community is the Variable Star Index (VSX; https://www.aavso.org/vsx/). This online catalog of variable stars is the repository of data on over 334,000 variable stars, including information on spectral type, range of magnitude, period, and type of variable, among other properties. A number of these stars were identified as being variable through automated telescope surveys, such as ASAS (All Sky Automated Survey). The computer code of this survey classified newly discovered variables as best it could, but a significant number of false classifications have been noted. The reclassification of ASAS variables in the VSX data, as well as a closer look at variables identified as miscellaneous type in VSX, are two of many projects that can be undertaken by interested undergraduates. In doing so, students learn about the physical properties of various types of variable stars as well as statistical analysis and computer software, especially the vstar variable star data visualization and analysis tool that is available to the astronomical community free of charge on the AAVSO website (https://www.aavso.org/vstar-overview). Three such projects are described in this presentation, to identify BY Draconis variables misidentified as Cepheids or "miscellaneous", and SRD semiregular variables and ELL (rotating ellipsoidal) variables misidentified as "miscellaneous", in ASAS data and VSX.

  20. Magnetic fields and wind variability in massive stars

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schnerr, R.S.; Henrichs, H.F.; Hamann, W.-R.; Feldmeier, A.; Oskinova, L.

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes the thesis work of Schnerr (2007) entitled "Magnetic fields and mass loss in massive stars", which aimed at a better understanding of the impact of magnetic fields on the winds of massive stars.

  1. On the Variability of Blue Straggler Stars in the Globular Cluster M53

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soo-Chang Rey

    1998-06-01

    Full Text Available We present the results of a search for photometric variable blue straggler stars (BSSs in the globular cluster M53. Six of the 151 probable BSSs are identified as variable candidates based on the robust variable star detection technique of Welch & Stetson (1993. Most variable BSS candidates appear to occupy the instability strip in the color-magnitude diagram, and they appear to have visual light amplitudes of 0.2 mag - 0.3 mag. Further observations are required, however, to resolve the nature of variability between pulsating stars and eclipsing binaries for these variable BSS candidates.

  2. CLUSTERING-BASED FEATURE LEARNING ON VARIABLE STARS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mackenzie, Cristóbal; Pichara, Karim [Computer Science Department, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Santiago (Chile); Protopapas, Pavlos [Institute for Applied Computational Science, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA (United States)

    2016-04-01

    The success of automatic classification of variable stars depends strongly on the lightcurve representation. Usually, lightcurves are represented as a vector of many descriptors designed by astronomers called features. These descriptors are expensive in terms of computing, require substantial research effort to develop, and do not guarantee a good classification. Today, lightcurve representation is not entirely automatic; algorithms must be designed and manually tuned up for every survey. The amounts of data that will be generated in the future mean astronomers must develop scalable and automated analysis pipelines. In this work we present a feature learning algorithm designed for variable objects. Our method works by extracting a large number of lightcurve subsequences from a given set, which are then clustered to find common local patterns in the time series. Representatives of these common patterns are then used to transform lightcurves of a labeled set into a new representation that can be used to train a classifier. The proposed algorithm learns the features from both labeled and unlabeled lightcurves, overcoming the bias using only labeled data. We test our method on data sets from the Massive Compact Halo Object survey and the Optical Gravitational Lensing Experiment; the results show that our classification performance is as good as and in some cases better than the performance achieved using traditional statistical features, while the computational cost is significantly lower. With these promising results, we believe that our method constitutes a significant step toward the automation of the lightcurve classification pipeline.

  3. The TAOS Project Stellar Variability II. Detection of 15 Variable Stars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mondal, S; Lin, C C; Zhang, Z W; Alcock, C; Axelrod, T; Bianco, F B; Byun, Y I; Coehlo, N K; Cook, K H; Dave, R; Kim, D W; King, S K; Lee, T; Lehner, M J; Lin, H C; Marshall, S L; Protopapas, P; Rice, J A; Schwamb, M E; Wang, J H; Wang, S Y; Wen, C Y

    2010-01-28

    The Taiwanese-American Occultation Survey (TAOS) project has collected more than a billion photometric measurements since 2005 January. These sky survey data - covering timescales from a fraction of a second to a few hundred days - are a useful source to study stellar variability. A total of 167 star fields, mostly along the ecliptic plane, have been selected for photometric monitoring with the TAOS telescopes. This paper presents our initial analysis of a search for periodic variable stars from the time-series TAOS data on one particular TAOS field, No. 151 (RA = 17{sup h} 30{sup m} 6.67{sup s}, Dec = 27 degrees, 17 minutes, 30 seconds, J2000), which had been observed over 47 epochs in 2005. A total of 81 candidate variables are identified in the 3 square degree field, with magnitudes in the range 8 < R < 16. On the basis of the periodicity and shape of the lightcurves, 32 variables, 18 of which were previously unknown, are classified as RR Lyrae, Cepheid, {delta} Scuti, SX Phonencis, semi-regular and eclipsing binaries.

  4. Finding the most variable stars in the Orion Belt with the All Sky Automated Survey

    OpenAIRE

    Caballero, Jose A.; Cornide, M.; de Castro, E.

    2010-01-01

    We look for high-amplitude variable young stars in the open clusters and associations of the Orion Belt. We use public data from the ASAS-3 Photometric V-band Catalogue of the All Sky Automated Survey, infrared photometry from the 2MASS and IRAS catalogues, proper motions, and the Aladin sky atlas to obtain a list of the most variable stars in a survey area of side 5 deg centred on the bright star Alnilam (eps Ori) in the centre of the Orion Belt. We identify 32 highly-variable stars, of whic...

  5. Diagnosis of factor VIII deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verbruggen, B; Meijer, P; Novákova, I; Van Heerde, W

    2008-07-01

    The correct diagnosis of factor VIII deficiency and the assessment of severity of the disease are essential for a patient-tailored treatment strategy. An optimal diagnostic procedure comprises sensitive and specific screening methods and factor VIII activity assays. Different screening reagents show variable characteristics and receiver operator characteristic curves are presented showing the relation between sensitivity and specificity of eleven activated partial thromboplastin time reagents. The details of the three methods for factor VIII activity assay, one-stage and two-stage assay and chromogenic assays, are discussed. The chromogenic assay seems to be more sensitive than the one-stage assay with regard to the detection of severe haemophilia. Discrepant results obtained with one-stage and two-stage assays are reviewed and discussed.

  6. The Nainital–Cape Survey: A Search for Variability in Ap and Am Stars

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The ``Nainital–Cape Survey” program for searching photometric variability in chemically peculiar (CP) stars was initiated in 1997 at ARIES, Nainital. We present here the results obtained to date. The Am stars HD 98851, HD 102480, HD 13079 and HD 113878 were discovered to exhibit Scuti type variability. Photometric ...

  7. Search for Variable Stars in Six Southern Globular Clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dong-Joo; Lee, Chung-Uk; Kim, Dong-Jin; Hong, Kyeongsoo; Koo, Jae-Rim; Lee, Jae Woo; Ryu, Yoon-Hyun; Kim, Seung-Lee; Cha, Sang-Mok; Lee, Yongseok; Lim, Beomdu; Park, Byeong-Gon; Jeon, Young-Beom

    2015-08-01

    Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute (KASI) has installed wide-field photometric survey systems called Korea Microlensing Telescope Network (KMTNet) at three Southern observatories of CTIO in Chile, SAAO in South Africa, and SSO in Australia. Each system consists of a wide-field optical telescope with 1.6m diameter and a mosaic CCD camera with 18k by 18k pixels, having a 2.0 by 2.0 square degree field of view. Its primary scientific goal is to search for extrasolar planets, especially Earth-mass planets in the habitable zone, by using the gravitational microlensing method. We have performed the pre-science run of these three telescopes, with attaching a 4k CCD camera for a few months at each site before installing the 18k mosaic CCD camera. Considering the rather small field of view of the 4k CCD camera, we chose six globular clusters NGC 288, NGC 1851, NGC 3201, NGC 4372, NGC 6752, and NGC 6809 to monitor photometrically. Difference Image Analysis (DIA) technique was applied to the time-series CCD images in order to minimize the blending effect in the crowded field of globular clusters. We will present the preliminary results to search for variable stars in the clusters.

  8. Finding the most variable stars in the Orion Belt with the All Sky Automated Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caballero, J. A.; Cornide, M.; de Castro, E.

    2010-03-01

    We look for high-amplitude variable young stars in the open clusters and associations of the Orion Belt. We use public data from the ASAS-3 Photometric V-band Catalogue of the All Sky Automated Survey, infrared photometry from the 2MASS and IRAS catalogues, proper motions, and the Aladin sky atlas to obtain a list of the most variable stars in a survey area of side 5° centred on the bright star Alnilam (ɛ Ori) in the centre of the Orion Belt. We identify 32 highly variable stars, of which 16 had not been reported to vary before. They are mostly variable young stars and candidates (16) and background giants (8), but there are also field cataclysmic variables, contact binaries, and eclipsing binary candidates. Of the young stars, which typically are active Herbig Ae/Be and T Tauri stars with Hα emission and infrared flux excess, we discover four new variables and confirm the variability status of another two. Some of them belong to the well known σ Orionis cluster. Besides, six of the eight giants are new variables, and three are new periodic variables.

  9. On The Detection Of Periodic Variable Stars In The Explore II Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clement, Christine M.; Nguyen, D. C.; Rucinski, S. M.; Yee, H. K.; Mallen-Ornelas, G.; Gladders, M. D.; Seager, S.

    2006-06-01

    The EXPLORE (Extrasolar Planet Occulation Research) series of transit surveys uses 4m class telescopes to look for planetary transits in the Galactic plane (Mallen-Ornelas et al. 2003, ApJ, 582, 1123). The EXPLORE II search was carried out at the CFHT on 16 consecutive nights in December 2001-January 2002. Approximately 80,000 stars were identified in a field centered on the Galactic plane at l=203 degrees and b=0.85 degrees. Our investigation is based on an analysis of the observations of approximately 5500 of these stars on a total of 1950 frames.We used two period search methods (Fourier transform analysis and phase dispersion minimization) to identify periodic variable stars and derive their periods. As a result, 23 new variable stars have been discovered. This includes three binaries, three delta Scuti stars, one pulsating B star and sixteen variables of uncertain classification. Some of the unclassified variables are probably rotating stars that exhibit photometric variability because they have asymmetrically distributed starspots.To check on the success of our period searches, we inspected the individual light curve data for the 5500 stars and found that both methods were effective. In the future, we will apply these period search techniques to the remaining stars in the EXPLORE II database.Support from Science and Engineering research Canada (NSERC) and from a Clay Fellowship is gratefully acknowledged.

  10. Search for variable stars in the young open cluster Stock 18

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Tirthendu; Sharma, Saurabh; Pandey, Rakesh; Pandey, A. K.

    2017-09-01

    We have carried out multi-epoch deep I band photometry of the open cluster Stock 18 to search for variable stars in star forming regions. In the present study, we report identification of 28 periodic and 165 non-periodic variables stars. The periods of most of the periodic variables are in between 2 to 20 hours and their magnitude varies between 0.05 to 0.6 mag. We have derived spectral energy distributions for 48 probable pre-main sequence variables and the average age and mass is found to be 2.7 ± 0.3 Myrs and 2.7 ± 0.2 M⊙, respectively.

  11. Variable stars in the Cetus dwarf spheroidal galaxy: population gradients and connections with the star formation history

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monelli, M.; Bernard, E. J.; Gallart, C.; Fiorentino, G.; Drozdovsky, I.; Aparicio, A.; Bono, G.; Cassisi, S.; Skillman, E. D.; Stetson, P. B.

    2012-05-01

    We investigate the variable star content of the isolated, Local Group, dwarf spheroidal (dSph) galaxy Cetus. Multi-epoch, wide-field images collected with the Very Large Telescope/Visible Multiobject Spectrograph camera allowed us to detect 638 variable stars (630 RR Lyrae stars and eight anomalous Cepheids), 475 of which are new detections. We present a full catalogue of periods, amplitudes and mean magnitudes. Motivated by the recent discovery that the pulsational properties of the RR Lyrae stars in the Tucana dSph revealed the presence of a metallicity gradient within the oldest (>rsim10 Gyr old) stellar populations, we investigated the possibility of an analogous effect in Cetus. We found that, despite the obvious radial gradient in the horizontal branch and red giant branch morphologies, both becoming bluer on average for increasing distance from the centre of Cetus, the properties of the RR Lyrae stars are homogeneous within the investigated area (out to r˜ 15 arcmin), with no significant evidence of a radial gradient. We discuss this in connection with the star formation history previously derived for the two galaxies. The observed differences between these two systems show that even systems this small show a variety of early evolutionary histories. These differences could be due to different merger or accretion histories.

  12. Massive star evolution: Luminous Blue Variables as unexpected Supernova progenitors

    OpenAIRE

    Groh, Jose H.; Meynet, Georges; Ekström, Sylvia

    2013-01-01

    Stars more massive than about 8 Msun end their lives as a Supernova (SN), an event of fundamental importance Universe-wide. Theoretically, these stars have been expected to be either at the red supergiant, blue supergiant, or Wolf-Rayet stage before the explosion. We performed coupled stellar evolution and atmospheric modeling of stars with initial masses between 20 Msun and 120 Msun. We found that the 20 Msun and 25 Msun rotating models, before exploding as SN, have spectra that do not resem...

  13. Modernizing the Harvard Observatory Catalog of Variable Stars in the Magellanic Clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Zachary; Kruk, Julia; Christie-Dervaux, Lucien; Chen, Dong Yi; Graur, Or; Pagnotta, Ashley

    2015-01-01

    We have modernized the Harvard College Observatory's catalog of variable stars in the Magellanic Clouds, compiled by Henrietta Swan Leavitt in 1908 and expanded by Cecilia Payne-Gaposchkin in 1966 and 1971. This catalog was originally used by Leavitt in 1912 to formulate the period-luminosity relation for Cepheid variable stars, one of the most important rungs on the extragalactic distance ladder. Many of the stars were identified in current catalogs by only their Harvard Variable number, without coordinates or magnitudes. We have digitized the variable-star catalog and converted the coordinates of the 2,184 variable stars from the Harvard College Observatory's now-defunct planar-grid system to the spherical Equatorial coordinate system. Our modernized version of the catalog will allow for more efficient use of the Harvard archival plates currently being scanned by the Digital Access to a Sky Century @ Harvard (DASCH) project. The combination of DASCH and our catalog allows users to readily access more than a century's worth of data on the variable stars in the Magellanic Clouds, leading to such projects as studying the long-term evolution of variable stars.

  14. The VESPA Survey: 100 New Variable Stars Discovered in Two Years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quadri, U.; Strabla, L.; Girelli, R.

    2017-06-01

    We describe the VESPA project made at IAU station 565, Astronomical Observatory in Bassano Bresciano (BS), Italy. It is one photometric survey of the northern hemisphere which has the aim of discovering and investigating new variable stars. In the first two years of activity we have discovered 100 new variable stars in the course of observations carried out from August 2014 to September 2016. The newly discovered stars comprise 80 eclipsing binary stars (66 of them classified as W Ursae Majoris, 11 as beta Lyrae, and 3 beta Persei), one rotating (ROT), one ellipsoidal variable (ELL), and 18 pulsating variables (5 of them classified as RRAB, 7 RRC, 3 HADS, 2 delta Scuti and one Cepheid). Variability classification is based on the properties of the optical light curves that we obtained using our 255 mm F/4.7 Newton robotic telescope.

  15. About the new B- and A-type periodic variable stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mowlavi, Nami; Saesen, Sophie; Barblan, Fabio; Semaan, Thierry; Eyer, Laurent

    2015-08-01

    New periodic variable stars of type B and A were discovered in 2013 in the open cluster NGC 3766 (Mowlavi et al. 2013), in a region of the Hertzsprung-Rusell diagram on the main sequence, between delta-Scuti and Slowly Pulsating B stars, where no periodic star was expected to be found. The observational properties of the potentially new class of variability challenged model predictions of pulsating stars that were available at the time of their discovery, and triggered new theoretical developments in the field.Meanwhile, we obtained additional observational elements that shed new light on these new periodic variable stars. First, we analyzed photometric data of three other young clusters with ages between about 15 to about 70 million years, for which we had up to seven years of observations. The analysis reveals the presence of the new periodic B- and A-type stars in those clusters as well, with properties similar to those found in NGC 3766, but with also new features. Second, we took spectra of all new periodic variables found in NGC 3766, using Giraffe multi-fiber spectrometer mounted on the VLT. Those data enable a better characterization of the nature of those stars.We present in this contribution the results of those two new studies, and their impacts on our understanding of the new periodic stars.

  16. The ancient stellar population of M 32 : RR Lyrae variable stars confirmed

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fiorentino, G.; Ramos, R. Contreras; Tolstoy, E.; Clementini, G.; Saha, A.

    Using archival multi-epoch ACS/WFC images in the F606W and F814W filters of a resolved stellar field in Local Group dwarf elliptical galaxy M 32 we have made an accurate colour-magnitude diagram and a careful search for RR Lyr variable stars. We identified 416 bona fide RR Lyr stars over our field

  17. First Kepler results on compact pulsators – VIII. Mode identifications via period spacings in g-mode pulsating subdwarf B stars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reed, M.D.; Baran, A.; Quint, A.C.

    2011-01-01

    We investigate the possibility of nearly equally spaced periods in 13 hot subdwarf B (sdB) stars observed with the Kepler spacecraft and one observed with CoRoT. Asymptotic limits for gravity (g-)mode pulsations provide relationships between equal-period spacings of modes with differing degrees ℓ...... that the detected spacings could be produced randomly. Period transforms for nine of the Kepler stars indicate ℓ= 1 period spacings, with five also showing peaks for ℓ= 2 modes. 12 stars indicate ℓ= 1 modes using the Kolmogorov–Smirnov test while another shows solely ℓ= 2 modes. Monte Carlo results indicate...... that equal-period spacings are significant in 10 stars above 99 per cent confidence, and 13 of the 14 are above 94 per cent confidence. For 12 stars, the various methods find consistent period spacings to within the errors, two others show some inconsistencies, likely caused by binarity, and the last has...

  18. Angular Size Measurements of 18 Mira Variable Stars at 2.2 microns

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Belle, G. T.; Dyck, H. M.; Benson, J. A.; Lacasse, M. G.

    1996-11-01

    We present angular size measurements of 18 oxygen-rich Mira variable stars. These data are part of a long term observational program using the Infrared Optical Telescope Array (IOTA) to characterize the observable behavior of these stars. Complementing the infrared angular size measurements, values for variable star phase, spectral type, bolometric flux, and distance were established for stars in the sample; flux and distance led to values for effective temperature (TEFF), and linear radius, respectively. We are able to define an effective temperature versus spectral type scale for Mira variables that we compare to the temperature scales for K and M giants and supergiants. TEFF'S and linear radii for these stars are shown to lie between approximately 2100 and 3200 K, and 200 and 600 Rsun, respectively. Relationships among the Mira variable parameters are explored for significant trends. Notably, the phase dependence of TEFF is shown to follow simple expectations, and examination of the radius-T relationship yields a plausible description of the V and K band light curves of these stars. A simple examination of the oscillation mode of the stars in the sample does not strongly suggest either fundamental or first-overtone oscillation as the primary mode of oscillation. This conclusion differs from that recently presented by Haniff et al. (1995), who argue that Mira variables are all first-overtone pulsators. We discuss some possible reasons for the different conclusions between the two studies.

  19. General Catalogue of Variable Stars: Current Status and New Name-Lists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samus, N. N.; Kazarovets, E. V.; Kireeva, N. N.; Pastukhova, E. N.; Durlevich, O. V.

    2010-12-01

    A short history of variable-star catalogs is presented. After the second World War, the International Astronomical Union asked astronomers of the Soviet Union to become responsible for variable-star catalogs. Currently, the catalog is kept electronically and is a joint project of the Institute of Astronomy (Russian Academy of Sciences) and Sternberg Astronomical Institute (Moscow University). We review recent trends in the field of variable-star catalogs, discuss problems and new prospects related to modern large-scale automatic photometric sky surveys, outline the subject of discussions on the future of the variable-star catalogs in the profile commissions of the IAU, and call for suggestions from the astronomical community.

  20. HST Snapshot Study of Variable Stars in Globular Clusters: Inner Region of NGC 6441

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pritzl, Barton J.; Smith, Horace A.; Stetson, Peter B.; Catelan, Marcio; Sweigart, Allen V.; Layden, Andrew C.; Rich, R. Michael

    2003-01-01

    We present the results of a Hubble Space Telescope snapshot program to survey the inner region of the metal-rich globular cluster NGC 6441 for its variable stars. A total of 57 variable stars was found including 38 RR Lyrae stars, 6 Population II Cepheids, and 12 long period variables. Twenty-four of the RR Lyrae stars and all of the Population II Cepheids were previously undiscovered in ground-based surveys. Of the RR Lyrae stars observed in h s survey, 26 are pulsating in the fundamental mode with a mean period of 0.753 d and 12 are first-overtone mode pulsators with a mean period of 0.365 d. These values match up very well with those found in ground-based surveys. Combining all the available data for NGC 6441, we find mean periods of 0.759 d and 0.375 d for the RRab and RRc stars, respectively. We also find that the RR Lyrae in this survey are located in the same regions of a period-amplitude diagram as those found in ground-based surveys. The overall ratio of RRc to total RR Lyrae is 0.33. Although NGC 6441 is a metal-rich globular cluster and would, on that ground, be expected either to have few RR Lyrae stars, or to be an Oosterhoff type I system, its RR Lyrae more closely resemble those in Oosterhoff type II globular clusters. However, even compared to typical Oosterhoff type II systems, the mean period of its RRab stars is unusually long. We also derived I-band period-luminosity relations for the RR Lyrae stars. Of the six Population II Cepheids, five are of W Virginis type and one is a BL Herculis variable star. This makes NGC 6441, along with NGC 6388, the most metal-rich globular cluster known to contain these types of variable stars. Another variable, V118, may also be a Population II Cepheid given its long period and its separation in magnitude from the RR Lyrae stars. We examine the period-luminosity relation for these Population II Cepheids and compare it to those in other globular clusters and in the Large Magellanic Cloud. We argue that there does

  1. The Kepler characterization of the variability among A- and F-type stars. I. General overview

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Uytterhoeven, K.; Moya, A.; Grigahcène, A.

    2011-01-01

    candidate A-F type stars, and observationally investigate the relation between γ Doradus (γ Dor), δ Scuti (δ Sct), and hybrid stars. Methods: We compile a database of physical parameters for the sample stars from the literature and new ground-based observations. We analyse the Kepler light curve of each...... star and extract the pulsational frequencies using different frequency analysis methods. We construct two new observables, "energy" and "efficiency", related to the driving energy of the pulsation mode and the convective efficiency of the outer convective zone, respectively. Results: We propose three...... constructed variables, "efficiency" and "energy", as a means to explore the relation between γ Dor and δ Sct stars. Conclusions: Our results suggest a revision of the current observational instability strips of δ Sct and γ Dor stars and imply an investigation of pulsation mechanisms to supplement the κ...

  2. Photometric Variability of Four Coronally Active Stars J. C. Pandey ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R. Narasimhan (Krishtel eMaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    S. A. Drake. 4. 1State Observatory, Naini Tal 263 129, India. 2Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Mumbai, India. 3Indian Institute of Astrophysics, Bangalore, India. 4Code 668, LHEA, NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771, USA. Abstract. We present photometric observations of four stars that are.

  3. Spectroscopic Variability of Supergiant Star HD14134, B3Ia

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Y. M. Maharramov

    2017-06-19

    Jun 19, 2017 ... Abstract. Profile variations in the Hα and Hβ lines in the spectra of the star HD14134 are investigated using observations carried out in 2013–2014 and 2016 with the 2-m telescope at the Shamakhy Astrophysical Obser- vatory. The absorption and emission components of the Hα line are found to disappear ...

  4. The motion of a star with variable mass inside a layered inhomogeneous elliptical galaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasanov, S. A.

    2009-08-01

    We consider the motion of a variable-mass star inside a layered, inhomogeneous, rotating elliptical variable-mass galaxy. Under certain conditions, the differential equations of motion of a star inside the galaxy admit autonomization. The autonomized differential equations in this problem are similar to those for the motion of a constant-mass star. We have found analogs for the Jacobi integral and the Eddington-Jeans law for the variation of the density of the galaxy in its center and layers.

  5. Variable Stars in Leo A: RR Lyrae Stars, Short-Period Cepheids, and Implications for Stellar Content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolphin, Andrew E.; Saha, A.; Claver, Jennifer; Skillman, Evan D.; Cole, A. A.; Gallagher, J. S.; Tolstoy, Eline; Dohm-Palmer, R. C.; Mateo, Mario

    2002-06-01

    We present the results of a search for short-period variable stars in Leo A. We have found 92 candidate variables, including eight candidate RR Lyrae stars. From the RR Lyrae stars, we measure a distance modulus of (m-M)0=24.51+/-0.12, or 0.80+/-0.04 Mpc. This discovery of RR Lyrae stars confirms for the first time the presence of an ancient (older than ~11 Gyr) population in Leo A, accounting for at least 0.1% of the galaxy's V luminosity. We have also discovered a halo of old (more than ~2 Gyr) stars surrounding Leo A, with a scale length roughly 50% larger than that of the dominant young population. We also report the discovery of a large population of Cepheids in Leo A. The median absolute magnitude of our Cepheid sample is MV=-1.1, fainter than 96% of SMC and 99% of LMC Cepheids. Their periods are also unusual, with three Cepheids that are deduced to be pulsating in the fundamental mode having periods of under 1 day. Upon examination, these characteristics of the Leo A Cepheid population appear to be a natural extension of the classical Cepheid period-luminosity relations to low metallicity, rather than being indicative of a large population of ``anomalous'' Cepheids. We demonstrate that the periods and luminosities are consistent with the expected values of low-metallicity blue helium-burning stars (BHeB's), which populate the instability strip at lower luminosities than do higher metallicity BHeB's.

  6. Optical and Infrared Variability of UX Ori-Type Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rostopchina-Shakhovskaya, A.; Grinin, V.; Shenavrin, V.; Shakhovskoy, D.; Demidova, T.; Belan, S.

    2017-06-01

    Analyzing data of the long-term simultaneous NIR and optical photometry of five UX Ori type stars we estimate intrinsic NIR luminosity of their circumstellar disks in I, J, H bands. The H to J flux ratio for WW Vul, CQ Tau, RR Tau, UX Ori is consistent with 1500 K blackbody radiation, a typical temperature of dust sublimation. For the same stars except RR Tau, J to I flux ratio suggests much hotter source with T>2000 K, probably the inner dust-free disk. In case of RR Tau this value is close to 1500 K, implying sublimating dust as a main contributor in all three bands. The SED for BF Ori differs from the rest of objects, with flux density peaking in J band, probably due to an unresolved cool companion.

  7. Blue large-amplitude pulsators as a new class of variable stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietrukowicz, Paweł; Dziembowski, Wojciech A.; Latour, Marilyn; Angeloni, Rodolfo; Poleski, Radosław; di Mille, Francesco; Soszyński, Igor; Udalski, Andrzej; Szymański, Michał K.; Wyrzykowski, Łukasz; Kozłowski, Szymon; Skowron, Jan; Skowron, Dorota; Mróz, Przemek; Pawlak, Michał; Ulaczyk, Krzysztof

    2017-08-01

    Regular intrinsic brightness variations observed in many stars are caused by pulsations. These pulsations provide information on the global and structural parameters of the star. The pulsation periods range from seconds to years, depending on the compactness of the star and properties of the matter that forms its outer layers. Here, we report the discovery of more than a dozen previously unknown short-period variable stars: blue large-amplitude pulsators. These objects show very regular brightness variations with periods in the range of 20-40 min and amplitudes of 0.2-0.4 mag in the optical passbands. The phased light curves have a characteristic sawtooth shape, similar to the shape of classical Cepheids and RR Lyrae-type stars pulsating in the fundamental mode. The objects are significantly bluer than main-sequence stars observed in the same fields, which indicates that all of them are hot stars. Follow-up spectroscopy confirms a high surface temperature of about 30,000 K. Temperature and colour changes over the cycle prove the pulsational nature of the variables. However, large-amplitude pulsations at such short periods are not observed in any known type of stars, including hot objects. Long-term photometric observations show that the variable stars are very stable over time. Derived rates of period change are of the order of 10-7 per year and, in most cases, they are positive. According to pulsation theory, such large-amplitude oscillations may occur in evolved low-mass stars that have inflated helium-enriched envelopes. The evolutionary path that could lead to such stellar configurations remains unknown.

  8. Amplitude Variability in gamma Dor and delta Sct Stars Observed by Kepler

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guzik, Joyce Ann [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kosak, Mary Katherine [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bradley, Paul Andrew [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Jackiewicz, Jason [New Mexico State University, Las Cruces, NM

    2015-08-17

    The NASA Kepler spacecraft data revealed a large number of new multimode nonradially pulsating gamma Dor and delta Sct variable stars. The Kepler high-precision long time-series photometry makes it possible to study amplitude variations of the frequencies, and recent literature on amplitude and frequency variations in nonradially pulsating variables is summarized. Several methods are applied to study amplitude variability in about a dozen gamma Doradus or delta Scuti candidate variable stars observed for several quarters as part of the Kepler Guest Observer program. The magnitude and timescale of the amplitude variations are discussed, along with the presence or absence of correlations between amplitude variations for different frequencies of a given star. Proposed causes of amplitude spectrum variability that will require further investigation are also discussed.

  9. Stellar Variability of the Exoplanet Hosting Star HD 63454

    OpenAIRE

    {Kane} S.~R.; {Dragomir} D.; {Ciardi} D.~R.; {Lee} J.-W.; {Lo Curto} G.; {Lovis} C.; {Naef} D.; {Mahadevan} S.; {Pilyavsky} G.; {Udry} S.; {Wang} X.; {Wright} J.

    2011-01-01

    Of the hundreds of exoplanets discovered using the radial velocity technique, many are orbiting close to their host stars with periods less than 10 days. One of these, HD 63454, is a young active K dwarf which hosts a Jovian planet in a 2.82 day period orbit. The planet has a 14% transit probability and a predicted transit depth of 1.2%. Here we provide a re-analysis of the radial velocity data to produce an accurate transit ephemeris. We further analyse 8 nights of time series data to search...

  10. Variable stars around selected open clusters in the VVV area: Young Stellar Objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina, Nicolas; Borissova, Jura; Bayo, Amelia; Kurtev, Radostin; Lucas, Philip

    2017-09-01

    Time-varying phenomena are one of the most substantial sources of astrophysical information, and led to many fundamental discoveries in modern astronomy. We have developed an automated tool to search and analyze variable sources in the near infrared Ks band, using the data from the Vista Variables in the Vía Láctea (VVV) ESO Public Survey ([5, 8]). One of our main goals is to investigate the Young Stellar Objects (YSOs) in the Galactic star forming regions, looking for: •Variability. •New pre-main sequence star clusters. Here we present the newly discovered YSOs within some selected stellar clusters in our Galaxy.

  11. All-Sky Census of Variable Stars from the ATLAS Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinze, Aren Nathaniel; Tonry, John; Denneau, Larry; Stalder, Brian

    2018-01-01

    The Asteroid Terrestrial-Impact Last Alert Survey uses two custom-built 0.5 meter telescopes to scan the whole accessible sky down to magnitude 19.5 every two nights, with a cadence optimized to detect small asteroids on their 'final plunge' toward impact with Earth. This cadence is also well suited to the detection of variable stars with a huge range of periods and properties, while ATLAS' use of two filters provides additional scientific depth. From the first two years of ATLAS data we have constructed a catalog of several hundred thousand variable objects with periods from one hour to hundreds of days. These include RR Lyrae stars, Cepheids, eclipsing binaries, spotted stars, ellipsoidal variables, Miras; and other objects both regular and irregular. We describe the construction of this catalog, including our multi-step confirmation process for genuine variables; some big-picture scientific conclusions; and prospects for more detailed results.

  12. Search for variable stars in the young open cluster Stock 18

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sinha Tirthendu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We have carried out multi-epoch deep I band photometry of the open cluster Stock 18 to search for variable stars in star forming regions. In the present study, we report identification of 28 periodic and 165 non-periodic variables stars. The periods of most of the periodic variables are in between 2 to 20 hours and their magnitude varies between 0.05 to 0.6 mag. We have derived spectral energy distributions for 48 probable pre-main sequence variables and the average age and mass is found to be 2.7 ± 0.3 Myrs and 2.7 ± 0.2 M⊙, respectively.

  13. Faint (and bright variable stars in the satellites of the Milky Way

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivas A. Katherina

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available I describe two ongoing projects related with variable stars in the satellites of the MilkyWay. In the first project, we are searching for dwarf Cepheid stars (a.k.a δ Scuti and/or SX Phe in some of the classical dwarf spheroidal galaxies. Our goal is to characterize the population of these variable stars under different environments (age, metallicity in order to study their use as standard candles in systems for which the metallicity is not necessarily known. In the second project we search for RR Lyrae stars in the new ultra-faint satellite galaxies that have been discovered around the Milky Way in recent years.

  14. Photometric variability of 14 PMS stars in the NGC 7000/IC 5070 complex

    OpenAIRE

    Ibryamov, Sunay I.; Semkov, Evgeni H.

    2015-01-01

    New photometric data from CCD multicolour BVRI observations of 14 pre-main sequence stars during the period from 2013 April to 2015 September are presented. The studied objects are located in the field of 'Gulf of Mexico' in the NGC 7000/IC 5070 star-forming complex. The stars from our study exhibit different types of photometric variability in all optical passbands. Using our long-term observations and data published by other authors, we tried to define the reasons for the observed brightnes...

  15. On the Central Helium-burning Variable Stars of the LeoI Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiorentino, G.; Stetson, P. B.; Monelli, M.; Bono, G.; Bernard, E. J.; Pietrinferni, A.

    2012-11-01

    We present a study of short-period, central helium-burning variable stars in the Local Group dwarf spheroidal galaxy LeoI, including 106 RR Lyrae stars and 51 Cepheids. So far, this is the largest sample of Cepheids and the largest Cepheids to RR Lyrae ratio found in such a kind of galaxy. Comparison with other Local Group dwarf spheroidals, Carina and Fornax, shows that the period distribution of RR Lyrae stars is quite similar, suggesting similar properties of the parent populations, whereas the Cepheid period distribution in LeoI peaks at longer periods (P ~ 1.26 days instead of ~0.5 days) and spans over a broader range, from 0.5 to 1.78 days. Evolutionary and pulsation predictions indicate, assuming a mean metallicity peaked within -1.5 <~ [Fe/H] <~ -1.3, that the current sample of LeoI Cepheids traces a unique mix of anomalous Cepheids (blue extent of the red-clump, partially electron-degenerate central helium-burning stars) and short-period classical Cepheids (blue-loop, quiescent central helium-burning stars). Current evolutionary prescriptions also indicate that the transition mass between the two different groups of stars is M HeF ~ 2.1 M ⊙, and it is constant for stars metal-poorer than [Fe/H] ~ -0.7. Finally, we briefly outline the different implications of the current findings on the star formation history of LeoI.

  16. Analysis of the variability in the sdB star KIC 10670103: DFA approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zebende, Gilney F.; Fernandez, Basilio F.; Pereira, Marildo G.

    2017-01-01

    The brightness variation of the stars is an object of study in astronomy and astrophysics for representing the rich inherent source of physical information. Launched in 2009, the Kepler spacecraft with the primary mission of identifying equivalent to the Earth by the Sun transits also gave birth to thousands of light curves of targets of scientific interest. KIC 10670103, the richest pulsating sub-dwarf B (sdB) star, is one of the many stars identified by the mission. With 3.72 yr of Kepler spacecraft observations, we analysed in this paper the light curve of this sdB star, by the detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA) method. The behaviour of this pulsating star reveals self-affinity at specific time-scales, with changes in DFA exponent, αDFA. This fact suggests some light variability in KIC 10670103, as for example, from a non-periodic to a periodic case, among others. Therefore, we propose to connect the pulsation pattern of the KIC 10670103 star, which presents trends and non-stationarity, with the αDFA exponent. In this sense, we obtain five values of αDFA related to the light variability properties of KIC 10670103. A pictorial figure will describe the relationship between these variables.

  17. Disk Variability and Pulsation in the Be Star π Aquarii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Geraldine J.; Gies, Douglas R.; Wang, Luqian

    2015-01-01

    π Aqr is a bright Be star that lost its circumstellar disk in the late-1990s after showing strong disk emission lines for about five decades. We have analyzed spectra in the Hα/He I 6678 region that were obtained during the hiatus in its mass loss and the epoch of early disk buildup afterwards to investigate the star's pulsation and its possible connection with mass loss activity. The spectra were obtained with the Coudé Feed Telescope at KPNO during three observing runs on 1999 November 20-29, 2000 October 29 - November 3, and 2001 January 4-8. A total of 55 images with a S/N~350 and spectral resolution of 0.103 Å/pixel were obtained. The time resolution was 15 m and the observation sets spanned 1.5-3.0 hr. Rapid nonradial pulsations (NRP) with l=|m| =5 were observed with a period of 1.88 ± 0.02 hours. The motion was prograde for a rotation period of 1.8 days. Pulsation amplitudes were largest during the middle observing run. The power in the high frequency signal declined in the final run accompanied by an increase in the low frequency power (as in HD 49330, Huat et al. 2009) suggesting that p waves may have been replaced with g waves. The photospheric lines are broader during a mass loss episode (increased Hα emission). The NRP variations in Hα during 2000 Nov. 1 suggest a formation in a low pressure gas perhaps at the equator. The NRP bumps are slightly broader in Hα than in He I and C II, which implies a photospheric origin. Since the structure is quite visible in Hα, the apparent NRP is probably occurring in the upper atmosphere, as Stark line broadening would render the features more diffuse if they prevailed at deep layers. Narrow stationary violet and red-shifted features that varied in strength on the time scale of the pulsations were observed in Hα, and suggest that disk changes may be driven by pulsation. Additional spectra from KPNO and the BeSS archive reveal that Hα disk emission peaked in 2011 July (comparable to that observed in 1993

  18. Local stellar kinematics from RAVE data—VIII. Effects of the Galactic disc perturbations on stellar orbits of red clump stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Önal Taş, Ö.; Bilir, S.; Plevne, O.

    2018-02-01

    We aim to probe the dynamic structure of the extended Solar neighborhood by calculating the radial metallicity gradients from orbit properties, which are obtained for axisymmetric and non-axisymmetric potential models, of red clump (RC) stars selected from the RAdial Velocity Experiment's Fourth Data Release. Distances are obtained by assuming a single absolute magnitude value in near-infrared, i.e. M_{Ks}=-1.54±0.04 mag, for each RC star. Stellar orbit parameters are calculated by using the potential functions: (i) for the MWPotential2014 potential, (ii) for the same potential with perturbation functions of the Galactic bar and transient spiral arms. The stellar age is calculated with a method based on Bayesian statistics. The radial metallicity gradients are evaluated based on the maximum vertical distance (z_{max}) from the Galactic plane and the planar eccentricity (ep) of RC stars for both of the potential models. The largest radial metallicity gradient in the 01 kpc, the radial metallicity gradients have zero or positive values and they do not depend on ep subsamples. There is a large radial metallicity gradient for thin disc, but no radial gradient found for thick disc. Moreover, the largest radial metallicity gradients are obtained where the outer Lindblad resonance region is effective. We claim that this apparent change in radial metallicity gradients in the thin disc is a result of orbital perturbation originating from the existing resonance regions.

  19. Mythological Evidence for Ancient Observations of Variable Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilk, Stephen R.

    I suggest that the variability of Algol was known in pre-classical Greece, and that knowledge of its period is reflected in the myth of Perseus. Moreover, knowledge of the variability of Algol, Mira, delta Cephei, and gamma Cassiopeiae accounts for all their parent constellations being associated in the same myth as antagonists of Perseus. Finally, I propose alternative interpretations of the same constellations which show their influence upon classical myth.

  20. Haemophilus influenzae biotype VIII.

    OpenAIRE

    Sottnek, F O; Albritton, W L

    1984-01-01

    Six Haemophilus influenzae strains could not be classified as biotypes I through VII. The strains were indole, urease, and ornithine decarboxylase negative. We propose that they be classified as biotype VIII, a previously unreported biotype.

  1. H-alpha/H-beta Light Curves for Pulsating Variable Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hintz, Eric G.; Joner, Michael D.; Barnes, Jonathan

    2017-06-01

    In Joner & Hintz (2015) they discuss the development of a new calibrated H-alpha index similar in nature to the traditional H-beta index. It is demonstrated that the new H-alpha index tracks very well with the equivalent width of the line and the surface temperature. Therefore, we selected a sample of pulsating variable stars to test the possible use of the new index to track temperature changes in those stars over a pulsation cycle. We will present data on a sample of Cepheid, RR Lyrae, and delta Scuti variables. We will also examine changes in the H-alpha index potentially related to period changes in these objects.

  2. The Electromagnetic Counterpart of the Binary Neutron Star Merger LIGO/Virgo GW170817. VIII. A Comparison to Cosmological Short-duration Gamma-Ray Bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fong, W.; Berger, E.; Blanchard, P. K.; Margutti, R.; Cowperthwaite, P. S.; Chornock, R.; Alexander, K. D.; Metzger, B. D.; Villar, V. A.; Nicholl, M.; Eftekhari, T.; Williams, P. K. G.; Annis, J.; Brout, D.; Brown, D. A.; Chen, H.-Y.; Doctor, Z.; Diehl, H. T.; Holz, D. E.; Rest, A.; Sako, M.; Soares-Santos, M.

    2017-10-01

    We present a comprehensive comparison of the properties of the radio through X-ray counterpart of GW170817 and the properties of short-duration gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). For this effort, we utilize a sample of 36 short GRBs spanning a redshift range of z≈ 0.12{--}2.6 discovered over 2004-2017. We find that the counterpart to GW170817 has an isotropic-equivalent luminosity that is ≈ 3000 times less than the median value of on-axis short GRB X-ray afterglows, and ≳104 times less than that for detected short GRB radio afterglows. Moreover, the allowed jet energies and particle densities inferred from the radio and X-ray counterparts to GW170817 and on-axis short GRB afterglows are remarkably similar, suggesting that viewing angle effects are the dominant, and perhaps only, difference in their observed radio and X-ray behavior. From comparison to previous claimed kilonovae following short GRBs, we find that the optical and near-infrared (NIR) counterpart to GW170817 is comparatively under-luminous by a factor of ≈ 3{--}5, indicating a range of kilonova luminosities and timescales. A comparison of the optical limits following short GRBs on ≲ 1 day timescales also rules out a “blue” kilonova of comparable optical isotropic-equivalent luminosity in one previous short GRB. Finally, we investigate the host galaxy of GW170817, NGC 4993, in the context of short GRB host galaxy stellar population properties. We find that NGC 4993 is superlative in terms of its large luminosity, old stellar population age, and low star formation rate compared to previous short GRB hosts. Additional events within the Advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (LIGO)/Virgo volume will be crucial in delineating the properties of the host galaxies of neutron star-neutron star (NS-NS) mergers, and connecting them to their cosmological counterparts.

  3. Variable Stars and Stellar Populations in Andromeda XXVII. IV. An Off-centered, Disrupted Galaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cusano, Felice; Garofalo, Alessia; Clementini, Gisella; Cignoni, Michele; Muraveva, Tatiana; Tessicini, Gianni; Testa, Vincenzo; Paris, Diego; Federici, Luciana; Marconi, Marcella; Ripepi, Vincenzo; Musella, Ilaria

    2017-12-01

    We present B and V time-series photometry of the M31 satellite galaxy Andromeda XXVII (And XXVII) that we observed with the Large Binocular Cameras of the Large Binocular Telescope. In the field of And XXVII we have discovered a total of 90 variables: 89 RR Lyrae stars and 1 Anomalous Cepheid. The average period of the fundamental mode RR Lyrae stars (RRab) =0.59 {days} (σ = 0.05 day) and the period-amplitude diagram place And XXVII in the class of Oosterhoff I/Intermediate objects. Combining information from the color-magnitude diagram (CMD) and the variable stars, we find evidence for a single old and metal-poor stellar population with [Fe/H] ˜ -1.8 dex and t ˜ 13 Gyr in And XXVII. The spatial distributions of RR Lyrae and red giant branch (RGB) stars give clear indication that And XXVII is a completely disrupted system. This is also supported by the spread observed along the line of sight in the distance to the RR Lyrae stars. The highest concentration of RGB and RR Lyrae stars is found in a circular area of 4 arcmin in radius, centered about 0.°2 in the southeast direction from Richardson et al.’s center coordinates of And XXVII. The CMD of this region is well-defined, with a prominent RGB and 15 RR Lyrae stars (out of the 18 found in the region) tracing a very tight horizontal branch at =25.24 {mag} σ = 0.06 mag (average over 15 stars). We show that And XXVII is a strong candidate building block of the M31 halo. Based on data collected with the Large Binocular Cameras at the Large Binocular Telescope, PI: G. Clementini.

  4. VizieR Online Data Catalog: RR Lyr variable stars in M32 (Fiorentino+, 2012)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiorentino, G.; Contreras Ramos, R.; Tolstoy, E.; Clementini, G.; Saha, A.

    2012-01-01

    Using archival multi-epoch ACS/WFC images in the F606W and F814W filters of a resolved stellar field in Local Group dwarf elliptical galaxy M 32 we have made an accurate Colour-Magnitude Diagram and a careful search for RR Lyr variable stars. We identified 416 bona fide RR Lyr stars over our field of view, and their spatial distribution shows a rising number density towards the centre of M 32. These new observations clearly confirm the tentative result of Fiorentino et al. (2010ApJ...708..817F), on a much smaller field of view, associating an ancient population of RR Lyr variables to M 32. We associate at least 83 RR Lyr stars in our field to M 32. (1 data file).

  5. Photometric variability of the Be star population with the KELT survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labadie-Bartz, Jonathan; Pepper, Joshua; Chojnowski, S. Drew; McSwain, M. Virginia

    2017-11-01

    We are using light curves from the KELT exoplanet transit survey (Pepper et al. 2007) to study the variability of hundreds of Be stars. Combining these light curves with simultaneous time-series spectra from the APOGEE survey (Majewski et al. 2015) provides a glimpse into how changes in the circumstellar environment are correlated to brightness variations.

  6. The OGLE Collection of Variable Stars. Classical, Type II, and Anomalous Cepheids toward the Galactic Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soszyński, I.; Udalski, A.; Szymański, M. K.; Wyrzykowski, Ł.; Ulaczyk, K.; Poleski, R.; Pietrukowicz, P.; Kozłowski, S.; Skowron, D. M.; Skowron, J.; Mróz, P.; Pawlak, M.; Rybicki, K.; Jacyszyn-Dobrzeniecka, A.

    2017-12-01

    We present a collection of classical, typeII, and anomalous Cepheids detected in the OGLE fields toward the Galactic center. The sample contains 87 classical Cepheids pulsating in one, two or three radial modes, 924 type II Cepheids divided into BL Her, W Vir, peculiar W Vir, and RV Tau stars, and 20 anomalous Cepheids - first such objects found in the Galactic bulge. Additionally, we upgrade the OGLE Collection of RR Lyr stars in the Galactic bulge by adding 828 newly identified variables. For all Cepheids and RRLyr stars, we publish time-series VI photometry obtained during the OGLE-IV project, from 2010 through 2017. We discuss basic properties of our classical pulsators: their spatial distribution, light curve morphology, period-luminosity relations, and position in the Petersen diagram. We present the most interesting individual objects in our collection: a typeII Cepheid with additional eclipsing modulation, WVir stars with the period doubling effect and the RVb phenomenon, a mode-switching RR Lyr star, and a triple-mode anomalous RRd star.

  7. Luminous and Variable Stars in M31 and M33. V. The Upper HR Diagram

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Humphreys, Roberta M.; Davidson, Kris; Hahn, David [Minnesota Institute for Astrophysics, 116 Church St SE, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States); Martin, John C. [Barber Observatory, University of Illinois, Springfield, IL 62703 (United States); Weis, Kerstin, E-mail: roberta@umn.edu [Astronomical Institute, Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum (Germany)

    2017-07-20

    We present HR diagrams for the massive star populations in M31 and M33, including several different types of emission-line stars: the confirmed luminous blue variables (LBVs), candidate LBVs, B[e] supergiants, and the warm hypergiants. We estimate their apparent temperatures and luminosities for comparison with their respective massive star populations and evaluate the possible relationships of these different classes of evolved, massive stars, and their evolutionary state. Several of the LBV candidates lie near the LBV/S Dor instability strip that supports their classification. Most of the B[e] supergiants, however, are less luminous than the LBVs. Many are very dusty with the infrared flux contributing one-third or more to their total flux. They are also relatively isolated from other luminous OB stars. Overall, their spatial distribution suggests a more evolved state. Some may be post-RSGs (red supergiants) like the warm hypergiants, and there may be more than one path to becoming a B[e] star. There are sufficient differences in the spectra, luminosities, spatial distribution, and the presence or lack of dust between the LBVs and B[e] supergiants to conclude that one group does not evolve into the other.

  8. White Dwarfs in Cataclysmic Variable Stars: Surface Temperatures and Evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward M. Sion

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available A summary is presented of what is currently known about the surface temperatures of accreting white dwarfs (WDs detected in non-magnetic and magnetic cataclysmic variables (CVs based upon synthetic spectral analyses of far ultraviolet data. A special focus is placed on WD temperatures above and below the CV period gap as a function of the orbital period, Porb. The principal uncertainty of the temperatures for the CV WDs in the Teff - Porb distribution, besides the distance to the CV, is the mass of the WD. Only in eclipsing CV systems, an area of eclipsing binary studies, which was so central to Robert H. Koch’s career, is it possible to know CV WD masses with high precision.

  9. Variable stars in the VVV globular clusters. I. 2MASS-GC 02 and Terzan 10

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alonso-García, Javier; Dékány, István; Catelan, Márcio; Ramos, Rodrigo Contreras; Gran, Felipe; Leyton, Paul; Minniti, Dante [Instituto de Astrofísica, Facultad de Física, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Av. Vicuña Mackenna 4860, 782-0436 Macul, Santiago (Chile); Amigo, Pía, E-mail: jalonso@astro.puc.cl, E-mail: idekany@astro.puc.cl, E-mail: mcatelan@astro.puc.cl, E-mail: rcontrer@astro.puc.cl, E-mail: fgran@astro.puc.cl, E-mail: pia.amigo@uv.cl, E-mail: pleyton@astro.puc.cl, E-mail: dante@astrofisica.cl [Millennium Institute of Astrophysics, Av. Vicuña Mackenna 4860, 782-0436 Macul, Santiago (Chile)

    2015-03-01

    The VISTA Variables in the Vía Láctea (VVV) ESO Public Survey is opening a new window to study inner Galactic globular clusters (GCs) using their variable stars. These GCs have been neglected in the past due to the difficulties caused by the presence of elevated extinction and high field stellar densities in their lines of sight. However, the discovery and study of any present variables in these clusters, especially RR Lyrae stars, can help to greatly improve the accuracy of their physical parameters. It can also help to shed some light on the questions raised by the intriguing Oosterhoff dichotomy in the Galactic GC system. In a series of papers we plan to explore variable stars in the GCs falling inside the field of the VVV survey. In this first paper, we search for and study the variables present in two highly reddened, moderately metal-poor, faint, inner Galactic GCs: 2MASS-GC 02 and Terzan 10. We report the discovery of sizable populations of RR Lyrae stars in both GCs. We use near-infrared period–luminosity relations to determine the color excess of each RR Lyrae star, from which we obtain both accurate distances to the GCs and the ratios of the selective-to-total extinction in their directions. We find the extinction toward both clusters to be elevated, non-standard, and highly differential. We also find both clusters to be closer to the Galactic center than previously thought, with Terzan 10 being on the far side of the Galactic bulge. Finally, we discuss their Oosterhoff properties, and conclude that both clusters stand out from the dichotomy followed by most Galactic GCs.

  10. SpecDB: The AAVSO’s Public Repository for Spectra of Variable Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kafka, Stella; Weaver, John; Silvis, George; Beck, Sara

    2018-01-01

    SpecDB is the American Association of Variable Star Observers (AAVSO) spectral database. Accessible to any astronomer with the capability to perform spectroscopy, SpecDB provides an unprecedented scientific opportunity for amateur and professional astronomers around the globe. Backed by the Variable Star Index, one of the most utilized variable star catalogs, SpecDB is expected to become one of the world leading databases of its kind. Once verified by a team of expert spectroscopists, an observer can upload spectra of variable stars target easily and efficiently. Uploaded spectra can then be searched for, previewed, and downloaded for inclusion in publications. Close community development and involvement will ensure a user-friendly and versatile database, compatible with the needs of 21st century astrophysics. Observations of 1D spectra are submitted as FITS files. All spectra are required to be preprocessed for wavelength calibration and dark subtraction; Bias and flat are strongly recommended. First time observers are required to submit a spectrum of a standard (non-variable) star to be checked for errors in technique or equipment. Regardless of user validation, FITS headers must include several value cards detailing the observation, as well as information regarding the observer, equipment, and observing site in accordance with existing AAVSO records. This enforces consistency and provides necessary details for follow up analysis. Requirements are provided to users in a comprehensive guidebook and accompanying technical manual. Upon submission, FITS headers are automatically checked for errors and any anomalies are immediately fed back to the user. Successful candidates can then submit at will, including multiple simultaneous submissions. All published observations can be searched and interactively previewed. Community involvement will be enhanced by an associated forum where users can discuss observation techniques and suggest improvements to the database.

  11. Field #3 of the Palomar-Groningen Survey; 1, Variable stars at the edge of the Sagittarius dwarf galaxy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schultheis, M.

    1996-01-01

    Submitted to: Astron. Astrophys. Abstract: A catalogue is presented with variable (RR Lyrae, semiregular and Mira) stars located inside field #3 of the Palomar-Groningen Survey, at the outer edge of the Sagittarius dwarf galaxy. One of the semiregular variables is a carbon star, comparable with

  12. Multi-Epoch Hubble Space Telescope Observations of IZw18 : Characterization of Variable Stars at Ultra-Low Metallicities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fiorentino, G.; Ramos, R. Contreras; Clementini, G.; Marconi, M.; Musella, I.; Aloisi, A.; Annibali, F.; Saha, A.; Tosi, M.; van der Marel, R. P.

    2010-01-01

    Variable stars have been identified for the first time in the very metal-poor blue compact dwarf galaxy IZw18, using deep multi-band (F606W, F814W) time-series photometry obtained with the Advanced Camera for Surveys on board the Hubble Space Telescope. We detected 34 candidate variable stars in the

  13. Mira Variable Stars from LAMOST DR4 Data: Emission Features, Temperature Types, and Candidate Selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Yuhan; Liu, Chao; Deng, Licai; de Grijs, Richard; Matsunaga, Noriyuki

    2017-09-01

    Based on an extensive spectral study of a photometrically confirmed sample of Mira variables, we find a relationship between the relative Balmer emission-line strengths and spectral temperatures of O-rich Mira stars. The {F}{{H}δ }/{F}{{H}γ } flux ratio increases from less than unity to five as stars cool down from M0 to M10, which is likely driven by increasing TiO absorption above the deepest shock-emitting regions. We also discuss the relationship between the equivalent widths of the Balmer emission lines and the photometric luminosity phase of our Mira sample stars. Using our 291 Mira spectra as templates for reference, 191 Mira candidates are newly identified from the LAMOST DR4 catalog. We summarize the criteria adopted to select Mira candidates based on emission-line indices and molecular absorption bands. This enlarged spectral sample of Mira variables has the potential to contribute significantly to our knowledge of the optical properties of Mira stars and will facilitate further studies of these late-type, long-period variables.

  14. The POINT-AGAPE Survey I: The Variable Stars in M31

    CERN Document Server

    An Jun Hong; Hewett, P C; Baillon, Paul; Calchi-Novati, S; Carr, B J; Creze, M; Giraud-Héraud, Yannick; Gould, A; Jetzer, P; Kaplan, J; Kerins, E; Paulin-Henriksson, S; Smartt, S J; Stalin, C S; Tsapras, Y; An, Jin H.; Jetzer, Ph.

    2004-01-01

    The POINT-AGAPE collaboration has been monitoring M31 for three seasons with the Wide Field Camera on the Isaac Newton Telescope. In each season, data are taken for one hour per night for roughly sixty nights during the six months that M31 is visible. The two fields of view straddle the central bulge, northwards and southwards. We have calculated the locations, periods and amplitudes of 35414 variable stars in M31 as a by-product of our microlensing search. The variables are classified according to their period and amplitude of variation. They are classified into population I and II Cepheids, Miras and semi-regular long-period variables. The population I Cepheids are associated with the spiral arms, while the central concentration of the Miras and long-period variables varies noticeably, the stars with brighter (and shorter) variations being much more centrally concentrated. A crucial role in the microlensing experiment is played by the asymmetry signal. It was initially assumed that the variable stars would ...

  15. Active Learning to Overcome Sample Selection Bias: Application to Photometric Variable Star Classification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Joseph W.; Starr, Dan L.; Brink, Henrik; Miller, Adam A.; Bloom, Joshua S.; Butler, Nathaniel R.; James, J. Berian; Long, James P.; Rice, John

    2012-01-01

    Despite the great promise of machine-learning algorithms to classify and predict astrophysical parameters for the vast numbers of astrophysical sources and transients observed in large-scale surveys, the peculiarities of the training data often manifest as strongly biased predictions on the data of interest. Typically, training sets are derived from historical surveys of brighter, more nearby objects than those from more extensive, deeper surveys (testing data). This sample selection bias can cause catastrophic errors in predictions on the testing data because (1) standard assumptions for machine-learned model selection procedures break down and (2) dense regions of testing space might be completely devoid of training data. We explore possible remedies to sample selection bias, including importance weighting, co-training, and active learning (AL). We argue that AL—where the data whose inclusion in the training set would most improve predictions on the testing set are queried for manual follow-up—is an effective approach and is appropriate for many astronomical applications. For a variable star classification problem on a well-studied set of stars from Hipparcos and Optical Gravitational Lensing Experiment, AL is the optimal method in terms of error rate on the testing data, beating the off-the-shelf classifier by 3.4% and the other proposed methods by at least 3.0%. To aid with manual labeling of variable stars, we developed a Web interface which allows for easy light curve visualization and querying of external databases. Finally, we apply AL to classify variable stars in the All Sky Automated Survey, finding dramatic improvement in our agreement with the ASAS Catalog of Variable Stars, from 65.5% to 79.5%, and a significant increase in the classifier's average confidence for the testing set, from 14.6% to 42.9%, after a few AL iterations.

  16. HAZMAT. II. Ultraviolet Variability of Low-mass Stars in the GALEX Archive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miles, Brittany E.; Shkolnik, Evgenya L.

    2017-08-01

    The ultraviolet (UV) light from a host star influences a planet’s atmospheric photochemistry and will affect interpretations of exoplanetary spectra from future missions like the James Webb Space Telescope. These effects will be particularly critical in the study of planetary atmospheres around M dwarfs, including Earth-sized planets in the habitable zone. Given the higher activity levels of M dwarfs compared to Sun-like stars, time-resolved UV data are needed for more accurate input conditions for exoplanet atmospheric modeling. The Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX) provides multi-epoch photometric observations in two UV bands: near-ultraviolet (NUV; 1771-2831 Å) and far-ultraviolet (FUV; 1344-1786 Å). Within 30 pc of Earth, there are 357 and 303 M dwarfs in the NUV and FUV bands, respectively, with multiple GALEX observations. Simultaneous NUV and FUV detections exist for 145 stars in both GALEX bands. Our analyses of these data show that low-mass stars are typically more variable in the FUV than the NUV. Median variability increases with later spectral types in the NUV with no clear trend in the FUV. We find evidence that flares increase the FUV flux density far more than the NUV flux density, leading to variable FUV to NUV flux density ratios in the GALEX bandpasses.The ratio of FUV to NUV flux is important for interpreting the presence of atmospheric molecules in planetary atmospheres such as oxygen and methane as a high FUV to NUV ratio may cause false-positive biosignature detections. This ratio of flux density in the GALEX bands spans three orders of magnitude in our sample, from 0.008 to 4.6, and is 1 to 2 orders of magnitude higher than for G dwarfs like the Sun. These results characterize the UV behavior for the largest set of low-mass stars to date.

  17. HAZMAT. II. Ultraviolet Variability of Low-mass Stars in the GALEX Archive

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miles, Brittany E. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California, 1156 High Street, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Shkolnik, Evgenya L., E-mail: bmiles@ucsc.edu [School of Earth and Space Exploration, Arizona State University, 781 S Terrace Road, Tempe, AZ 85281 (United States)

    2017-08-01

    The ultraviolet (UV) light from a host star influences a planet’s atmospheric photochemistry and will affect interpretations of exoplanetary spectra from future missions like the James Webb Space Telescope . These effects will be particularly critical in the study of planetary atmospheres around M dwarfs, including Earth-sized planets in the habitable zone. Given the higher activity levels of M dwarfs compared to Sun-like stars, time-resolved UV data are needed for more accurate input conditions for exoplanet atmospheric modeling. The Galaxy Evolution Explorer ( GALEX ) provides multi-epoch photometric observations in two UV bands: near-ultraviolet (NUV; 1771–2831 Å) and far-ultraviolet (FUV; 1344–1786 Å). Within 30 pc of Earth, there are 357 and 303 M dwarfs in the NUV and FUV bands, respectively, with multiple GALEX observations. Simultaneous NUV and FUV detections exist for 145 stars in both GALEX bands. Our analyses of these data show that low-mass stars are typically more variable in the FUV than the NUV. Median variability increases with later spectral types in the NUV with no clear trend in the FUV. We find evidence that flares increase the FUV flux density far more than the NUV flux density, leading to variable FUV to NUV flux density ratios in the GALEX bandpasses.The ratio of FUV to NUV flux is important for interpreting the presence of atmospheric molecules in planetary atmospheres such as oxygen and methane as a high FUV to NUV ratio may cause false-positive biosignature detections. This ratio of flux density in the GALEX bands spans three orders of magnitude in our sample, from 0.008 to 4.6, and is 1 to 2 orders of magnitude higher than for G dwarfs like the Sun. These results characterize the UV behavior for the largest set of low-mass stars to date.

  18. Low-amplitude Variables: Distinguishing RR Lyrae Stars from Eclipsing Binaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinman, T. D.; Brown, Warren R.

    2010-05-01

    It is not easy to identify and classify low-amplitude variables, but it is important that the classification is done correctly. We use photometry and spectroscopy to classify low-amplitude variables in a 246 deg2 part of the Akerlof et al. field. Akerlof and Collaborators found that 38% of the RR Lyrae stars in their 2000 deg2 test field were RR1 (type c). This suggests that these RR Lyrae stars belong to an Oosterhoff Type II population, while their period distribution is primarily Oosterhoff Type I. Our observations support their RR0 (type ab) classifications; however, six of the seven stars that they classified as RR1 (type c) are eclipsing binaries. Our classifications are supported by spectroscopic metallicities, line-broadening, and Galactic rotation measurements. Our 246 deg2 field contains 16 RR Lyrae stars that are brighter than mR = 14.5; only four of these are RR1 (type c). This corresponds to an Oosterhoff Type I population in agreement with the period distribution.

  19. The MUSE Hubble Ultra Deep Field Survey. VIII. Extended Lyman-α haloes around high-z star-forming galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leclercq, Floriane; Bacon, Roland; Wisotzki, Lutz; Mitchell, Peter; Garel, Thibault; Verhamme, Anne; Blaizot, Jérémy; Hashimoto, Takuya; Herenz, Edmund Christian; Conseil, Simon; Cantalupo, Sebastiano; Inami, Hanae; Contini, Thierry; Richard, Johan; Maseda, Michael; Schaye, Joop; Marino, Raffaella Anna; Akhlaghi, Mohammad; Brinchmann, Jarle; Carollo, Marcella

    2017-11-01

    We report the detection of extended Lyα haloes around 145 individual star-forming galaxies at redshifts 3 ≤ z ≤ 6 in the Hubble Ultra Deep Field observed with the Multi-Unit Spectroscopic Explorer (MUSE) at ESO-VLT. Our sample consists of continuum-faint (- 15 ≥ MUV ≥ -22) Lyα emitters (LAEs). Using a 2D, two-component (continuum-like and halo) decomposition of Lyα emission assuming circular exponential distributions, we measure scale lengths and luminosities of Lyα haloes. We find that 80% of our objects having reliable Lyα halo measurements show Lyα emission that is significantly more extended than the UV continuum detected by HST (by a factor ≈4 to >20). The median exponential scale length of the Lyα haloes in our sample is ≈4.5 kpc with a few haloes exceeding 10 kpc. By comparing the maximal detected extent of the Lyα emission with the predicted dark matter halo virial radii of simulated galaxies, we show that the detected Lyα emission of our selected sample of Lyα emitters probes a significant portion of the cold circum-galactic medium of these galaxies (>50% in average). This result therefore shows that there must be significant HI reservoirs in the circum-galactic medium and reinforces the idea that Lyα haloes are ubiquitous around high-redshift Lyα emitting galaxies. Our characterization of the Lyα haloes indicates that the majority of the Lyα flux comes from the halo (≈65%) and that their scale lengths seem to be linked to the UV properties of the galaxies (sizes and magnitudes). We do not observe a significant Lyα halo size evolution with redshift, although our sample for z> 5 is very small. We also explore the diversity of the Lyα line profiles in our sample and we find that the Lyα lines cover a large range of full width at half maximum (FWHM) from 118 to 512 km s-1. While the FWHM does not seem to be correlated to the Lyα scale length, most compact Lyα haloes and those that are not detected with high significance tend

  20. New variable stars discovered in the fields of three Galactic open clusters using the VVV survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palma, T.; Minniti, D.; Dékány, I.; Clariá, J. J.; Alonso-García, J.; Gramajo, L. V.; Ramírez Alegría, S.; Bonatto, C.

    2016-11-01

    This project is a massive near-infrared (NIR) search for variable stars in highly reddened and obscured open cluster (OC) fields projected on regions of the Galactic bulge and disk. The search is performed using photometric NIR data in the J-, H- and Ks- bands obtained from the Vista Variables in the Vía Láctea (VVV) Survey. We performed in each cluster field a variability search using Stetson's variability statistics to select the variable candidates. Later, those candidates were subjected to a frequency analysis using the Generalized Lomb-Scargle and the Phase Dispersion Minimization algorithms. The number of independent observations range between 63 and 73. The newly discovered variables in this study, 157 in total in three different known OCs, are classified based on their light curve shapes, periods, amplitudes and their location in the corresponding color-magnitude (J -Ks ,Ks) and color-color (H -Ks , J - H) diagrams. We found 5 possible Cepheid stars which, based on the period-luminosity relation, are very likely type II Cepheids located behind the bulge. Among the newly discovered variables, there are eclipsing binaries, δ Scuti, as well as background RR Lyrae stars. Using the new version of the Wilson & Devinney code as well as the "Physics Of Eclipsing Binaries" (PHOEBE) code, we analyzed some of the best eclipsing binaries we discovered. Our results show that these studied systems turn out to be ranging from detached to double-contact binaries, with low eccentricities and high inclinations of approximately 80°. Their surface temperatures range between 3500 K and 8000 K.

  1. Early-20th-century visual observations of M13 variable stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osborn, W.; Barnard, E. E.

    2016-08-01

    In 1900 E. E. Barnard published 37 visual observations of Variable 2 (V2) in the globular clustter M13 made in 1899 and 1900. A review of Barnard's notebooks revealed he made many additional brightness estimates up to 1911, and he had also recorded the variations of V1 starting in 1904. These data provide the earliest-epoch light curves for these stars and thus are useful for studying their period changes. This paper presents Barnard's observations of the M13 variables along with their derived heliocentric Julian Dates and approximate V magnitudes. These include 231 unpublished observations of V2 and 94 of V1. How these data will be of value for determing period changes by these stars is described.

  2. The ancient stellar population of M 32: RR Lyrae variable stars confirmed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiorentino, G.; Contreras Ramos, R.; Tolstoy, E.; Clementini, G.; Saha, A.

    2012-03-01

    Using archival multi-epoch ACS/WFC images in the F606W and F814W filters of a resolved stellar field in Local Group dwarf elliptical galaxy M 32 we have made an accurate colour-magnitude diagram and a careful search for RR Lyr variable stars. We identified 416 bona fide RR Lyr stars over our field of view, and their spatial distribution shows a rising number density towards the centre of M 32. These new observations clearly confirm the tentative result of Fiorentino et al. (2010b, ApJ, 708, 817), on a much smaller field of view, associating an ancient population of RR Lyr variables to M 32. We associate at least 83 RR Lyr stars in our field to M 32. In addition the detection of 4 anomalous Cepheids with masses in the range 1.2-1.9 M⊙ indicates the presence of relatively young, 1-4 Gyr old, stars in this field. They are most likely associated to the presence of the blue plume in the colour-magnitude diagram. However these young stars are unlikely to be associated with M 32 because the radial distribution of the blue plume does not follow the M 32 density profile, and thus they are more likely to belong to the underlying M 31 stellar population. Finally the detection of 3 Population II Cepheids in this field gives an independent measurement of the distance modulus in good agreement with that obtained from the RR Lyr, μ0 = 24.33 ± 0.21 mag. Full Table 2 is available in electronic form at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/539/A138

  3. Automated Classification of Variable Stars in the Asteroseismology Program of the Kepler Space Mission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blomme, J.; Debosscher, J.; De Ridder, J.

    2010-01-01

    We present the first results of the application of supervised classification methods to the Kepler Q1 long-cadence light curves of a subsample of 2288 stars measured in the asteroseismology program of the mission. The methods, originally developed in the framework of the CoRoT and Gaia space...... missions, are capable of identifying the most common types of stellar variability in a reliable way. Many new variables have been discovered, among which a large fraction are eclipsing/ellipsoidal binaries unknown prior to launch. A comparison is made between our classification from the Kepler data...

  4. Examining the infrared variable star population discovered in the Small Magellanic Cloud using the SAGE-SMC survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Polsdofer, Elizabeth; Marengo, M. [Iowa State University, Department of Physics and Astronomy, 12 Physics Hall, Ames, Iowa 50011 (United States); Seale, J.; Sewiło, M. [The Johns Hopkins University, Department of Physics and Astronomy, 366 Bloomberg Center, 3400 N. Charles Street, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Vijh, U. P.; Terrazas, M. [Ritter Astrophysical Research Center, University of Toledo, Toledo, OH 43606 (United States); Meixner, M., E-mail: empolsdofer@gmail.com [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Dr., Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States)

    2015-02-01

    We present our study on the infrared variability of point sources in the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC). We use the data from the Spitzer Space Telescope Legacy Program “Surveying the Agents of Galaxy Evolution in the Tidally Stripped, Low Metallicity Small Magellanic Cloud” (SAGE-SMC) and the “Spitzer Survey of the Small Magellanic Cloud” (S{sup 3}MC) survey, over three different epochs, separated by several months to 3 years. Variability in the thermal infrared is identified using a combination of Spitzer’s InfraRed Array Camera 3.6, 4.5, 5.8, and 8.0 μm bands, and the Multiband Imaging Photometer for Spitzer 24 μm band. An error-weighted flux difference between each pair of three epochs (“variability index”) is used to assess the variability of each source. A visual source inspection is used to validate the photometry and image quality. Out of ∼2 million sources in the SAGE-SMC catalog, 814 meet our variability criteria. We matched the list of variable star candidates to the catalogs of SMC sources classified with other methods, available in the literature. Carbon-rich Asymptotic Giant Branch (AGB) stars make up the majority (61%) of our variable sources, with about a third of all of our sources being classified as extreme AGB stars. We find a small, but significant population of oxygen-rich (O-rich) AGB (8.6%), Red Supergiant (2.8%), and Red Giant Branch (<1%) stars. Other matches to the literature include Cepheid variable stars (8.6%), early type stars (2.8%), Young-stellar objects (5.8%), and background galaxies (1.2%). We found a candidate OH maser star, SSTISAGE1C J005212.88-730852.8, which is a variable O-rich AGB star, and would be the first OH/IR star in the SMC, if confirmed. We measured the infrared variability of a rare RV Tau variable (a post-AGB star) that has recently left the AGB phase. 59 variable stars from our list remain unclassified.

  5. Orbital variations and outbursts of the unusual variable star V1129 Centauri

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruch, Albert

    2017-11-01

    The variable star V1129 Cen is classified in the GCVS as being of β Lyr type. Unusual for such stars, it exhibits outbursts roughly once a year, lasting for ∼ 40 days. For this reason, a relationship to the dwarf novae has been suspected. Here, for the first time a detailed analysis of the light curve of the system is presented. Based on observations with high time resolution obtained at the Observatório do Pico dos Dias and on the long term ASAS light curve the orbital variations of the system are studied. They are dominated by ellipsoidal variations and partial eclipses of a probably slightly evolved F2 star in a binary with an orbital period of 21h 26m. Comparison with the characteristics of dwarf novae show that the observational properties of V1129 Cen can be explained if it is just another dwarf novae, albeit with an unusually bright and early type mass donor which outshines the accretion disk and the mass gainer to a degree that many normal photometric and spectroscopic hallmarks of cataclysmic variables remain undetected.

  6. Variable Stars in (Not Only) Dwarf Galaxies: Key Tools to Constrain Distances and Stellar Content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiorentino, G.

    2011-07-01

    The important role of Cepheid and RR Lyrae variable stars and what they teach us about dwarf galaxies is discussed. Despite ever improving star formation histories of Local Group dwarf galaxies uncertainties remain, in particular in the identification and characterisation of the oldest stellar populations. The old stellar populations sometimes can be hard to interpret, or even to detect, due to their inherent faintness and scarcity, and often a strong overlying young population makes the crowding due to much brighter stars difficult to overcome. Recent and some preliminary results for RR Lyrae searches (in M 32 and Leo A) carried out with HST and Gemini-North/GMOS are presented. In these cases variables represent the only way to constrain the nature and, sometimes, the presence of a stellar population ≥10 Gyrs old. The recent discovery of Cepheids in I Zw 18 with HST is discussed. This allowed the first accurate distance determination, enabling a more secure detection of the Tip of the Red Giant Branch, and confirmed the existence of a population ≥2 Gyrs old.

  7. Homogeneous Photometry VI: Variable Stars in the Leo I Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stetson, Peter B.; Fiorentino, Giuliana; Bono, Giuseppe; Bernard, Edouard J.; Monelli, Matteo; Iannicola, Giacinto; Gallart, Carme; Ferraro, Ivan

    2014-07-01

    We have characterized the pulsation properties of 164 candidate RR Lyrae variables (RRLs) and 55 candidate Anomalous and/or short-period Cepheids in Leo I dwarf spheroidal galaxy. On the basis of its RRLs Leo I is confirmed to be an Oosterhoff-intermediate type galaxy, like several other dwarfs. We show that in their pulsation properties, the RRLs representing the oldest stellar population in the galaxy are not significantly different from those of five other nearby, isolated dwarf spheroidal galaxies. A similar result is obtained when comparing them to RR Lyrae stars in recently discovered ultra-faint dwarf galaxies. We are able to compare the period distributions and period-amplitude relations for a statistically significant sample of ab type RR Lyrae stars in dwarf galaxies (~1300stars) with those in the Galactic halo field (~14,000stars) and globular clusters (~1000stars). Field RRLs show a significant change in their period distribution when moving from the inner (dG14kpc) halo regions. This suggests that the halo formed from (at least) two dissimilar progenitors or types of progenitor. Considered together, the RRLs in classical dwarf spheroidal and ultra-faint dwarf galaxies-as observed today-do not appear to follow the well defined pulsation properties shown by those in either the inner or the outer Galactic halo, nor do they have the same properties as RRLs in globular clusters. In particular, the samples of fundamental-mode RRLs in dwarfs seem to lack High Amplitudes and Short Periods ("HASP":AV>1.0mag and P <0.48d) when compared with those observed in the Galactic halo field and globular clusters. The observed properties of RRLs do not support the idea that currently existing classical dwarf spheroidal and ultra-faint dwarf galaxies are surviving representative examples of the original building blocks of the Galactic halo.

  8. Sonification of Kepler Field SU UMa Cataclysmic Variable Stars V344 Lyr and V1504 Cyg

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tutchton, Roxanne M.; Wood, Matt A.; Still, Martin D.; Howell, Steve B.; Cannizzo, John K.; Smale, Alan P.

    2012-01-01

    Sonification is the conversion of quantitative data into sound. In this work we explain the methods used in the sonification of light curves provided by the Kepler instrument from Q2 through Q6 for the cataclysmic variable systems V344 Lyr and V1504 Cyg . Both systems are SU UMa stars showing dwarf nova outbursts and superoutbursts as well as positive and negative superhumps. Focused sonifications were done from average pulse shapes of each superhump, and separate sonifications of the full, residual light curves were done for both stars. The audio of these data reflected distinct patterns within the evolutions of supercycles and superhumps that matched pervious observations and proved to be effective aids in data analysis.

  9. First-Ever Census of Variable Mira-Type Stars in Galaxy Outside the Local Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-05-01

    First-Ever Census of Variable Mira-Type Stars in Galaxy Outsidethe Local Group Summary An international team led by ESO astronomer Marina Rejkuba [1] has discovered more than 1000 luminous red variable stars in the nearby elliptical galaxy Centaurus A (NGC 5128) . Brightness changes and periods of these stars were measured accurately and reveal that they are mostly cool long-period variable stars of the so-called "Mira-type" . The observed variability is caused by stellar pulsation. This is the first time a detailed census of variable stars has been accomplished for a galaxy outside the Local Group of Galaxies (of which the Milky Way galaxy in which we live is a member). It also opens an entirely new window towards the detailed study of stellar content and evolution of giant elliptical galaxies . These massive objects are presumed to play a major role in the gravitational assembly of galaxy clusters in the Universe (especially during the early phases). This unprecedented research project is based on near-infrared observations obtained over more than three years with the ISAAC multi-mode instrument at the 8.2-m VLT ANTU telescope at the ESO Paranal Observatory . PR Photo 14a/03 : Colour image of the peculiar galaxy Centaurus A . PR Photo 14b/03 : Location of the fields in Centaurus A, now studied. PR Photo 14c/03 : "Field 1" in Centaurus A (visual light; FORS1). PR Photo 14d/03 : "Field 2" in Centaurus A (visual light; FORS1). PR Photo 14e/03 : "Field 1" in Centaurus A (near-infrared; ISAAC). PR Photo 14f/03 : "Field 2" in Centaurus A (near-infrared; ISAAC). PR Photo 14g/03 : Light variation of six variable stars in Centaurus A PR Photo 14h/03 : Light variation of stars in Centaurus A (Animated GIF) PR Photo 14i/03 : Light curves of four variable stars in Centaurus A. Mira-type variable stars Among the stars that are visible in the sky to the unaided eye, roughly one out of three hundred (0.3%) displays brightness variations and is referred to by astronomers as a

  10. The ISLAnds Project. III. Variable Stars in Six Andromeda Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Vázquez, Clara E.; Monelli, Matteo; Bernard, Edouard J.; Gallart, Carme; Stetson, Peter B.; Skillman, Evan D.; Bono, Giuseppe; Cassisi, Santi; Fiorentino, Giuliana; McQuinn, Kristen B. W.; Cole, Andrew A.; McConnachie, Alan W.; Martin, Nicolas F.; Dolphin, Andrew E.; Boylan-Kolchin, Michael; Aparicio, Antonio; Hidalgo, Sebastian L.; Weisz, Daniel R.

    2017-12-01

    We present a census of variable stars in six M31 dwarf spheroidal satellites observed with the Hubble Space Telescope. We detect 870 RR Lyrae (RRL) stars in the fields of And I (296), II (251), III (111), XV (117), XVI (8), and XXVIII (87). We also detect a total of 15 Anomalous Cepheids, three eclipsing binaries, and seven field RRL stars compatible with being members of the M31 halo or the Giant Stellar Stream. We derive robust and homogeneous distances to the six galaxies using different methods based on the properties of the RRL stars. Working with the up-to-date set of Period-Wesenheit (I, B-I) relations published by Marconi et al., we obtain distance moduli of μ 0 = [24.49, 24.16, 24.36, 24.42, 23.70, 24.43] mag (respectively), with systematic uncertainties of 0.08 mag and statistical uncertainties <0.11 mag. We have considered an enlarged sample of 16 M31 satellites with published variability studies, and compared their pulsational observables (e.g., periods and amplitudes) with those of 15 Milky Way satellites for which similar data are available. The properties of the (strictly old) RRL in both satellite systems do not show any significant difference. In particular, we found a strikingly similar correlation between the mean period distribution of the fundamental RRL pulsators (RRab) and the mean metallicities of the galaxies. This indicates that the old RRL progenitors were similar at the early stage in the two environments, suggesting very similar characteristics for the earliest stages of evolution of both satellite systems. Based on observations made with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS 5-26555. These observations are associated with programs 13028 and 13739.

  11. A Comprehensive GALEX Catalog of UV Variable Hot Stars with Broad Science Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianchi, Luciana

    The Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX) has performed sky surveys in the Ultraviolet (UV) with different depth and coverage. Its database of about 300 million photometric source measurements in far-UV and near-UV offers unique sensitivity for identifying and studying classes of astrophysical objects such as hot stars, star-forming galaxies, and zMCP detectors. Until now, only integrated images and photometry from each observation were available in the public archive. Now it is possible to search through the photon list, and extract photometry with chosen time integrations for a given source. Such facility opens up unprecedented opportunities for investigations of short-term UV variability, serendipitous and unbiased, over samples orders-of-magnitude larger than any dedicated variability search could afford, and the only one in the UV. We will search for variability on all time scales afforded by the database (from seconds to the >9 years of GALEX operations), but especially on the fast cadences, for all hot stellar sources in the GALEX database. Most of these are very hot white dwarfs (WD), elusive at all wavelengths except the UV owing to their small radii and hot temperatures. We have identified about half a million hot WD candidates in the GALEX database, with corollary data at longer wavelengths. The GALEX-selected hot-WD samples are orders of magnitude larger than previous catalogs, and unbiased thanks to the UV selection (e.g., Bianchi et al. 2011a). Of particular interest are the hot WDs in binaries with a cooler (less evolved) star, uniquely identified and characterized from matched UV-À

  12. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Updated catalog of variable stars in globular clusters (Clement+ 2017)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clement, C. M.

    2017-02-01

    This Catalogue is an update to Helen Sawyer Hogg's Third Catalogue on Variable Stars in Globular Clusters (1973, David Dunlap Observatory Publications, Volume 3, Number 6: 1973PDDO....3....6S; see Cat V/97; see also Clement+, 2001AJ....122.2587C). This catalogue is based on the individual cluster files downloaded on http://www.astro.utoronto.ca/~cclement/cat/listngc.html on the 01-Feb-2017. Later updates are indicated in clusters.dat; column "Update". (7 data files).

  13. Effect of process variables on the osmotic dehydration of star-fruit slices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camila Dalben Madeira Campos

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to study the effect of blanching and the influence of temperature, solution concentration, and the initial fruit:solution ratio on the osmotic dehydration of star-fruit slices. For blanching, different concentrations of citric and ascorbic acids were studied. The samples immersed in 0.75% citric acid presented little variation in color in relation to the fresh star-fruit. Osmotic dehydration was carried out in an incubator with orbital shaking, controlled temperature, and constant shaking at 120 rpm. The influence of process variables was studied in trials defined by a complete 23 central composite design. In general, water loss and solids gain were positively influenced by temperature and by solution concentration. Nevertheless, lower temperatures reduced water loss throughout the osmotic dehydration process. An increase in the amount of dehydrating solution (initial fruit:solution ratio slightly influenced the evaluated responses. The process carried out at 50 ºC with a solution concentration of 50% resulted in a product with lower solids gain and greater water loss. Under these conditions, blanching minimized the effect of the osmotic treatment on star-fruit browning, and therefore the blanched fruits showed little variation in color in relation to the fresh fruit.

  14. RR Lyrae variable stars in M31-M33 super-halo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanakul, Nahathai; Sarajedini, Ata

    2017-01-01

    RR Lyrae variable stars can serve as powerful probes of their host stellar populations. Information such as distance, metallicity, reddening, and age can be gleaned from their pulsation properties. Therefore, studying them in the nearest spiral galaxies M31 and M33 will yield important information about the early history of these galaxies. The main goals of this study are: 1) To investigate the Oosterhoff type of RR Lyrae stars in M31 and M33 and compare them with the Milky Way to better understand the formation of these galaxies. 2) To investigate the early formation history of these two galaxies through knowledge of their RR Lyrae stars. In order to achieve these goals, we have analyzed 10 fields in M31 and M33 (6 fields in M31 and 4 fields in M33) using archival imaging from the Hubble Space Telescope. Published data for M31, M33, and several M31 dwarf spheroidal galaxies are also used to study the global properties of RR Lyrae in these systems. The results are then compared with those in the Milky Way galaxy.

  15. The optical gravitational lensing experiment. Variable stars in globular clusters. I. Fields 5139A-C in ω Centauri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaluzny, J.; Kubiak, M.; Szymanski, M.; Udalski, A.; Krzeminski, W.; Mateo, M.

    1996-11-01

    Three fields covering the central part of the globular cluster ω Cen were surveyed in a search for variable stars. We present V-band light curves for 39 periodic variables: 24 SX Phe stars, 7 contact binaries, 5 detached or semi-detached binaries, and 3 likely spotted variables (FK Com or RS CVn type stars). Only 2 of these variables were previously known. All SX Phe stars and all contact binaries from our sample belong to blue stragglers. Observed properties of these stars are consistent with their cluster membership. Of particular interest is detection of two well detached binaries with periods P=1.50day and P=2.47day. Further study of these two binaries can provide direct information about properties of turnoff stars in ω Cen. An incomplete light curve of a Mira variable known as V2 was obtained. We present V vs. V-I color-magnitude diagrams for the monitored part of the cluster.

  16. Diagnosis of factor VIII deficiency.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verbruggen, B.; Meijer, P.; Novakova, I.; Heerde, W. Van

    2008-01-01

    The correct diagnosis of factor VIII deficiency and the assessment of severity of the disease are essential for a patient-tailored treatment strategy. An optimal diagnostic procedure comprises sensitive and specific screening methods and factor VIII activity assays. Different screening reagents show

  17. Application of multivariate analysis methods to search for variable stars in the Pi of the Sky experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obara, Lukasz

    2017-08-01

    The purpose of this article is to present novel algorithm for searching variable stars in the Pi of the Sky data, based on Multivariate Analysis (MVA). Pi of the Sky is a system of wide field-of-view robotic telescopes, which search for short timescale astrophysical phenomena, especially for prompt optical emission from GRB. The system was designed for autonomous operation, monitoring a large fraction of the sky with 12m -13m range and time resolution of the order of 1 - 100 seconds. Dedicated photometric algorithm was implemented in the LUIZA framework and optimized on a sample of test sky images. It was then used on a "training" image sample, which was obtained by modifying the test sample of images, using different patterns of variability to selected constant stars. Different statistical estimators were considered to find the most efficient algorithm, based on MVA method, for variable star identification. Analysis of the test results indicated that most efficient candidate star selection can be based on the so called Boosted Decision Tree (BDT) approach. The algorithm is then used to search for variable star candidates in the actual data. New results of the analysis and three candidate stars found are presented.

  18. The Gaia spectrophotometric standard stars survey - III. Short-term variability monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinoni, S.; Pancino, E.; Altavilla, G.; Bellazzini, M.; Galleti, S.; Tessicini, G.; Valentini, G.; Cocozza, G.; Ragaini, S.; Braga, V.; Bragaglia, A.; Federici, L.; Schuster, W. J.; Carrasco, J. M.; Castro, A.; Figueras, F.; Jordi, C.

    2016-11-01

    We present the results of the short-term constancy monitoring of candidate Gaia Spectrophotometric Standard Stars (SPSS). We obtained time series of typically 1.24 h - with sampling periods from 1-3 min to a few hours, depending on the case - to monitor the constancy of our candidate SPSS down to 10 mmag, as required for the calibration of Gaia photometric data. We monitored 162 out of a total of 212 SPSS candidates. The observing campaign started in 2006 and finished in 2015, using 143 observing nights on nine different instruments covering both hemispheres. Using differential photometry techniques, we built light curves with a typical precision of 4 mmag, depending on the data quality. As a result of our constancy assessment, 150 SPSS candidates were validated against short-term variability, and only 12 were rejected because of variability including some widely used flux standards such as BD+174708, SA 105-448, 1740346, and HD 37725.

  19. A recurrent neural network for classification of unevenly sampled variable stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naul, Brett; Bloom, Joshua S.; Pérez, Fernando; van der Walt, Stéfan

    2018-02-01

    Astronomical surveys of celestial sources produce streams of noisy time series measuring flux versus time (`light curves'). Unlike in many other physical domains, however, large (and source-specific) temporal gaps in data arise naturally due to intranight cadence choices as well as diurnal and seasonal constraints1-5. With nightly observations of millions of variable stars and transients from upcoming surveys4,6, efficient and accurate discovery and classification techniques on noisy, irregularly sampled data must be employed with minimal human-in-the-loop involvement. Machine learning for inference tasks on such data traditionally requires the laborious hand-coding of domain-specific numerical summaries of raw data (`features')7. Here, we present a novel unsupervised autoencoding recurrent neural network8 that makes explicit use of sampling times and known heteroskedastic noise properties. When trained on optical variable star catalogues, this network produces supervised classification models that rival other best-in-class approaches. We find that autoencoded features learned in one time-domain survey perform nearly as well when applied to another survey. These networks can continue to learn from new unlabelled observations and may be used in other unsupervised tasks, such as forecasting and anomaly detection.

  20. NuSTAR and XMM-Newton observations of NGC 1365: Extreme absorption variability and a constant inner accretion disk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Walton, D. J.; Risaliti, G.; Harrison, F. A.

    2014-01-01

    We present a spectral analysis of four coordinated NuSTAR+XMM-Newton observations of the Seyfert galaxy NGC 1365. These exhibit an extreme level of spectral variability, which is primarily due to variable line-of-sight absorption, revealing relatively unobscured states in this source for the first...

  1. The nova-like variable KQ Mon and the nature of the UX Ursa Majoris stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sion, E. M.; Guinan, E. F.

    1982-01-01

    The KQ Mon is a UX UMa type nova-like variable discovered by Howard Bond. Optical spectra taken by Bond in 1978 reveal very shallow Balmer absorption lines and He I absorption. Bond also did UBV and high speed photometry in 1978 and early 1981. There has been no evidence of orbital variations but the appearance of the optical spectrum and the presence of low amplitude flickering suggested a strong similarity to CD-42-14462 (=V3885 Sgr) and other members of the UX UMa class. Low dispersion observations of KQ Mon were made with the International Ultraviolet Explorer satellite. Six spectra taken with the shot wavelength prime camera are dominated by strong broad absorption lines due to N V, O I, Si III, Si IV, C IV, He II, N IV, and Al III. There is little evidence of orbital phase modulation over the time baseline of the observations. Unlike UV observations of other UX UMa type objects, KQ Mon exhibits no emission lines or P Cygni type profiles and the velocity displacements appear to be smaller, suggesting the absence of a hot, high velocity wind characterizing other UX UMa stars. The relationship of KQ Mon to other UX UMa disk stars is discussed and a model is suggested to explain their observed properties and the lack of major outbursts.

  2. Radial-Velocity Variability of the Sun as a Star with HAPRS And HAPRS-N

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haywood, Raphaëlle D.; Collier Cameron, Andrew; Dumusque, Xavier; Glenday, Alex; Latham, David W.; Lovis, Christophe; Maldonado, Jesus; Micela, Giusi; Molinari, Emiliano; Mortier, Annelies; Pepe, Francesco; Phillips, David F.; Udry, Stephane

    2016-06-01

    Since we can resolve the surface of the Sun directly, we can explore the origin of radial-velocity variations induced by individual solar surface features such as faculae/plage, sunspots and granulation.I will present my recent investigation of the radial-velocity variations of the Sun as a star, based on high-resolution HARPS spectra of reflected sunlight and simultaneous images from the Solar Dynamics Observatory. We found that faculae are the dominant source of activity-induced radial-velocity variations, via suppression of convective blueshift. We investigated possible proxies for activity-induced radial-velocity variations and found that optical lightcurves can only provide a partial representation of these signals; the full-disc magnetic flux, however, is an excellent tracer. In addition to this dataset, the HARPS-N spectrograph has been operating with a new solar telescope feed since 2015 July. I will present results from the first year observations, which show radial-velocity variations of up to 7-8 m/s.Identifying proxies for solar radial-velocity variations is key to understanding the radial-velocity variability of other Sun-like stars, and is also essential for other investigations such as exoplanet detection surveys.

  3. Periodic Variability of Low-mass Stars in Sloan Digital Sky Survey Stripe 82

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, A. C.; Bochanski, J. J.; Hawley, S. L.; Ivezić, Ž.; Kowalski, A. F.; Sesar, B.; West, A. A.

    2011-04-01

    We present a catalog of periodic stellar variability in the "Stripe 82" region of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. After aggregating and re-calibrating catalog-level data from the survey, we ran a period-finding algorithm (Supersmoother) on all point-source light curves. We used color selection to identify systems that are likely to contain low-mass stars, in particular M dwarfs and white dwarfs. In total, we found 207 candidates, the vast majority of which appear to be in eclipsing binary systems. The catalog described in this paper includes 42 candidate M dwarf/white dwarf pairs, four white dwarf pairs, 59 systems whose colors indicate they are composed of two M dwarfs and whose light-curve shapes suggest they are in detached eclipsing binaries, and 28 M dwarf systems whose light-curve shapes suggest they are in contact binaries. We find no detached systems with periods longer than 3 days, thus the majority of our sources are likely to have experienced orbital spin-up and enhanced magnetic activity. Indeed, 26 of 27 M dwarf systems that we have spectra for show signs of chromospheric magnetic activity, far higher than the 24% seen in field stars of the same spectral type. We also find binaries composed of stars that bracket the expected boundary between partially and fully convective interiors, which will allow the measurement of the stellar mass-radius relationship across this transition. The majority of our contact systems have short orbital periods, with small variance (0.02 days) in the sample near the observed cutoff of 0.22 days. The accumulation of these stars at short orbital period suggests that the process of angular momentum loss, leading to period evolution, becomes less efficient at short periods. These short-period systems are in a novel regime for studying the effects of orbital spin-up and enhanced magnetic activity, which are thought to be the source of discrepancies between mass-radius predictions and measurements of these properties in eclipsing

  4. Investigating the potential magnetic origin of wind variability in OB stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    David-Uraz, Alexandre

    2016-05-01

    In this thesis, the origin of large-scale structures in hot star winds, believed to be responsible for the presence of discrete absorption components (DACs) in the absorption troughs of ultraviolet resonance lines, is constrained using both observations and numerical simulations. These structures are understood as arising from bright regions on the stellar surface, although their physical cause remains unknown. First, we use high quality circular spectropolarimetric observations of 13 well-studied OB stars to evaluate the potential role of dipolar magnetic fields in producing DACs. We perform longitudinal field measurements and place limits on the field strength using Bayesian inference, assuming that it is dipolar. No magnetic field was detected within this sample. The derived constraints statistically refute any significant dynamical influence from a magnetic dipole on the wind for all of these stars, ruling out such fields as a cause for DACs. Second, we perform numerical simulations using bright spots constrained by broadband optical photometric observations. We calculate hydrodynamical wind models using three sets of spot sizes and strengths. Co-rotating interaction regions are yielded in each model, and radiative transfer shows that the properties of the variations in the UV resonance lines synthesized from these models are consistent with those found in observed UV spectra, establishing the first consistent link between UV spectroscopic line profile variability and photometric variations and thus supporting the bright spot paradigm (BSP). Finally, we develop and apply a phenomenological model to quantify the measurable effects co-rotating bright spots would have on broadband optical photometry and on the profiles of photospheric lines in optical spectra. This model can be used to evaluate the existence of these spots, and, in the event of their detection, characterize them. Furthermore, a tentative spot evolution model is presented. A preliminary analysis of

  5. Variable stars in the field of the open cluster NGC 6939

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maciejewski, G.; Georgiev, Ts.; Niedzielski, A.

    2008-05-01

    The results of CCD photometric survey performed with the 90/180 cm Schmidt-Cassegrain Telescope of the Nicolaus Copernicus University Astronomical Observatory in Piwnice (Poland) and the 70/172 cm Schmidt Telescope of the National Astronomical Observatory (NAO) at Rozhen (Bulgaria) of the field of the 1 Gyr old open cluster NGC 6939 are presented. Twenty two variable stars were detected, four of them previously known. Four eclipsing systems (3 detached and 1 contact binary) were found to be members of the cluster. Analysis of the brightness of the contact binary V20 strongly supports the distance to the cluster of 1.74 ± 0.20 kpc. The small population of contact binaries in NGC 6939 confirms also the relatively young age of the cluster.

  6. Results from the Rothney Astrophysical Observatory Variable Star Search Program: Background, Procedure, and Results from RAO Field 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Michael D.; Milone, E. F.

    2013-12-01

    We describe a variable star search program and present the fully reduced results of a search in a 19 square degree (4.4 × 4.4) field centered on J2000 RA = 22:03:24, DEC= +18:54:32. The search was carried out with the Baker-Nunn Patrol Camera located at the Rothney Astrophysical Observatory in the foothills of the Canadian Rockies. A total of 26,271 stars were detected in the field, over a range of about 11-15 (instrumental) magnitudes. Our image processing made use of the IRAF version of the DAOPHOT aperture photometry routine and we used the ANOVA method to search for periodic variations in the light curves. We formally detected periodic variability in 35 stars, that we tentatively classify according to light curve characteristics: 6 EA (Algol), 5 EB (?? Lyrae), 19 EW (W UMa), and 5 RR (RR Lyrae) stars. Eleven of the detected variable stars have been reported previously in the literature. The eclipsing binary light curves have been analyzed with a package of light curve modeling programs and 25 have yielded converged solutions. Ten of these are of systems that are detached, 3 semi-detached, 10 overcontact, and 2 are of systems that appear to be in marginal contact. We discuss these results as well as the advantages and disadvantages of the instrument and of the program.

  7. Searching for variable stars in the cores of five metal-rich globular clusters using EMCCD observations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skottfelt, Jesper; Bramich, D. M.; Jaimes, R. Figuera

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we present the analysis of time-series observations from 2013 and 2014 of five metal rich ([Fe/H] $>$ -1) globular clusters: NGC~6388, NGC~6441, NGC~6528, NGC~6638, and NGC~6652. The data have been used to perform a census of the variable stars in the central parts of these cluster...... Virginis stars, and the rest are long period semi-regular/irregular variables on the red giant branch. We have also detected the first double mode RR Lyrae in the cluster.......In this paper, we present the analysis of time-series observations from 2013 and 2014 of five metal rich ([Fe/H] $>$ -1) globular clusters: NGC~6388, NGC~6441, NGC~6528, NGC~6638, and NGC~6652. The data have been used to perform a census of the variable stars in the central parts of these clusters...... known or suspected variable stars in the central regions of the five clusters. Furthermore, we were able to identify, and in most cases classify 48, 49, 7, 8, and 2 previously unknown variables in NGC~6388, NGC~6441, NGC~6528, NGC~6638, and NGC~6652, respectively. Especially interesting is the case...

  8. Chinese SLE Treatment and Research Group (CSTAR) registry:VIII. Influence of socioeconomic and geographical variables on disease phenotype and activity in Chinese patients with SLE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Yongjing; Li, Mengtao; Zhao, Jiuliang; Ye, Zhizhong; Li, Caifeng; Li, Xiaofeng; Zhu, Ping; Wang, Zhengang; Zheng, Yi; Li, Xiangpei; Zhang, Miaojia; Huang, Cibo; Zeng, Xiaofeng

    2017-03-13

    The aim of this study was to estimate the influence of socioeconomic and geographical variables on disease phenotype and activity of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) in a Chinese population. Data on 904 therapy-naïve SLE patients from the Chinese SLE Treatment and Research Group (CSTAR), which is a nation-wide database of SLE patients, were used to evaluate the influence of socioeconomic status (SES) and geographical regions on disease phenotypes. The influence of regional climate and economic variables (i.e., data from the database of the Chinese Statistical Yearly Annals) on disease activity and nephropathy was further analyzed in a multivariate analysis to identify some of the environmental factors contributing to SLE. Phenotype differences in SLE were found between patients with different SES. In the multivariate regression analysis that considered regional economic and climate factors, after adjusting for age, gender and disease duration, lower educational levels (β: -0.122, P = 0.001), lower availability of medical technical personnel (MTP) per 1000 people (β: -0.192, P SLE patients by SES and other regional variables, such as educational level, availability of medical technical personnel, annual sunshine duration and regional temperature. © 2017 Asia Pacific League of Associations for Rheumatology and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  9. Differential proteolytic activation of factor VIII-von Willebrand factor complex by thrombin.

    OpenAIRE

    Hill-Eubanks, D C; Parker, C G; Lollar, P

    1989-01-01

    Blood coagulation factor VIII (fVIII) is a plasma protein that is decreased or absent in hemophilia A. It is isolated as a mixture of heterodimers that contain a variably sized heavy chain and a common light chain. Thrombin catalyzes the activation of fVIII in a reaction that is associated with cleavages in both types of chain. We isolated a serine protease from Bothrops jararacussu snake venom that catalyzes thrombin-like heavy-chain cleavage but not light-chain cleavage in porcine fVIII as ...

  10. Variability of Disk Emission in Pre-Main Sequence and Related Stars. II. Variability in the Gas and Dust Emission of the Herbig Fe Star SAO 206462

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sitko, Michael L.; Day, Amanda N.; Kimes, Robin L.; Beerman, Lori C.; Martus, Cameron; Lynch, David K.; Russell, Ray W.; Grady, Carol A.; Schneider, Glenn; Lisse, Carey M.; hide

    2011-01-01

    We present thirteen epochs of near-infrared (0.8-5 microns) spectroscopic observations of the pre-transitional, "gapped" disk system in SAO 206462 (=HD 135344B). In all, six gas emission lines (Br(alpha) , Br(gamma), Pa(beta), Pa(delta), Pa(epsilon), and the 0.8446 microns line of O I) along with continuum measurements made near the standard J, H, K, and L photometric bands were measured. A mass accretion rate of approximately 2 x 10(exp 8)Solar Mass/yr was derived from the Br(gamma) and Pa(beta) lines. However, the fluxes of these lines varied by a factor of over two during the course of a few months. The continuum also varied, but by only approx.30%, and even decreased at a time when the gas emission was increasing. The H I line at 1.083 microns was also found to vary in a manner inconsistent with that of either the hydrogen lines or the dust. Both the gas and dust variabilities indicate significant changes in the region of the inner gas and the inner dust belt that may be common to many young disk systems. If planets are responsible for defining the inner edge of the gap, they could interact with the material on time scales commensurate with what is observed for the variations in the dust, while other disk instabilities (thermal, magneto-rotational) would operate there on longer time scales than we observe for the inner dust belt. For SAO 206462, the orbital period would likely be 1-3 years. If the changes are being induced in the disk material closer to the star than the gap, a variety of mechanisms (disk instabilities, interactions via planets) might be responsible for the changes seen. The He I feature is most likely due to a wind whose orientation changes with respect to the observer on time scales of a day or less. To further constrain the origin of the gas and dust emission will require multiple spectroscopic and interferometric observations on both shorter and longer time scales that have been sampled so far.

  11. Globular cluster photometry with the Hubble Space Telescope. 3: Blue stragglers and variable stars in the core of M3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guhathakurta, Puragra; Yanny, Brian; Bahcall, John N.; Schneider, Donald P.

    1994-01-01

    This paper describes Hubble Space Telescope (HST)/Planetary Camera-I images of the core of the dense globular cluster M3 (NGC 5272). Stellar photometry in the F555W (V) and F785LP (I) bands, with a 1-sigma photometric accuracy of about 0.1 mag, has been used to construct color-magnitude diagrams of about 4700 stars above the main-sequence turnoff within r less than or approximately equal to 1 min of the cluster center. We have also analyzed archival HST F336W (U) images of M3 obtained by the Wide Field/Planetary Camera-I Instrument Definition Team. The UVI data are used to identify 28 blue straggler (BS) stars within the central 0.29 sq. arcmin. The specific frequency of BSs in this region of M3, N(sub BS)/N(sub V less than (V(HB)+2)) = 0.094 +/- 0.019, is about a factor of 2 - 3 higher than that found by Bolte et al. in a recent ground-based study of the same region, but comparable to that seen in the sparse outer parts of the same cluster and in HST observations of the core of the higher density cluster 47 Tuc. The BSs in M3 are slightly more centrally concentrated than red giant branch stars while horizontal branch stars are somewhat less concentrated red giants. The radial distribution of V-selected subgiant and turnoff stars is well fit by a King model with a core radius r(sub core) = 28 arcmin +/- 2 arcmin (90% confidence limits), which corresponds to 1.4 pc. Red giant and horizontal branch stars selected in the ultraviolet data (U less than 18) have a somewhat more compact distribution (r(sub core) = 22.5 arcmin). The HST U data consist of 17 exposures acquired over a span of three days. We have used these data to isolate 40 variable stars for which relative astrometry, brightnesses, colors, and light curves are presented. A Kolmogorov-Smirnov test indicates that, typically, the variability for each star is significant at the 95% level. We identify two variable BS candidates (probably of the SX Phe type), out of a sample of approximately 25 BSs in which

  12. Long-term Variability of H2CO Masers in Star-forming Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreev, N.; Araya, E. D.; Hoffman, I. M.; Hofner, P.; Kurtz, S.; Linz, H.; Olmi, L.; Lorran-Costa, I.

    2017-10-01

    We present results of a multi-epoch monitoring program on variability of 6 cm formaldehyde (H2CO) masers in the massive star-forming region NGC 7538 IRS 1 from 2008 to 2015, conducted with the Green Bank Telescope, the Westerbork Radio Telescope , and the Very Large Array. We found that the similar variability behaviors of the two formaldehyde maser velocity components in NGC 7538 IRS 1 (which was pointed out by Araya and collaborators in 2007) have continued. The possibility that the variability is caused by changes in the maser amplification path in regions with similar morphology and kinematics is discussed. We also observed 12.2 GHz methanol and 22.2 GHz water masers toward NGC 7538 IRS 1. The brightest maser components of CH3OH and H2O species show a decrease in flux density as a function of time. The brightest H2CO maser component also shows a decrease in flux density and has a similar LSR velocity to the brightest H2O and 12.2 GHz CH3OH masers. The line parameters of radio recombination lines and the 20.17 and 20.97 GHz CH3OH transitions in NGC 7538 IRS 1 are also reported. In addition, we observed five other 6 cm formaldehyde maser regions. We found no evidence of significant variability of the 6 cm masers in these regions with respect to previous observations, the only possible exception being the maser in G29.96-0.02. All six sources were also observed in the {{{H}}}213{CO} isotopologue transition of the 6 cm H2CO line; {{{H}}}213{CO} absorption was detected in five of the sources. Estimated column density ratios [{{{H}}}212{CO}]/[{{{H}}}213{CO}] are reported.

  13. The spectral variability and magnetic field characteristics of the Of?p star HD 148937

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wade, G. A.; Grunhut, J.; Gräfener, G.; Howarth, I. D.; Martins, F.; Petit, V.; Vink, J. S.; Bagnulo, S.; Folsom, C. P.; Nazé, Y.; Walborn, N. R.; Townsend, R. H. D.; Evans, C. J.

    2012-01-01

    We report magnetic and spectroscopic observations and modelling of the Of?p star HD 148937 within the context of the Magnetism in Massive Stars (MiMeS) Large Program at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope. 32 high signal-to-noise ratio circularly polarized (Stokes V) spectra and 13 unpolarized (Stokes I) spectra of HD 148937 were acquired in 2009 and 2010. A definite detection of a Stokes V Zeeman signature is obtained in the grand mean of all observations [in both least-squares deconvolved (LSD) mean profiles and individual spectral lines]. The longitudinal magnetic field inferred from the Stokes V LSD profiles is consistently negative, in contrast to the essentially zero field strength measured from the diagnostic null profiles. A period search of new and archival equivalent width measurements confirms the previously reported 7.03 d variability period. The variation of equivalent widths is not strictly periodic: we present evidence for evolution of the amount or distribution of circumstellar plasma. Interpreting the 7.03 d period as the stellar rotational period within the context of the oblique rotator paradigm, we have phased the equivalent widths and longitudinal field measurements. The longitudinal field measurements show a weak sinusoidal variation of constant sign, with extrema out of phase with the Hα variation by about 0.25 cycles. From our constraint on v sin i≤ 45 km s-1, we infer that the rotational axis inclination i≤ 30°. Modelling the longitudinal field phase variation directly, we obtain the magnetic obliquity β= 38+17-28° and dipole polar intensity Bd= 1020-380+310 G. Simple modelling of the Hα equivalent width variation supports the derived geometry. The inferred magnetic configuration confirms the suggestion of Nazé et al., who proposed that the weaker variability of HD 148937 as compared to other members of this class is a consequence of the stellar geometry. Based on the derived magnetic properties and published wind characteristics

  14. Active optics: variable curvature mirrors for ELT laser guide star refocusing systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Challita, Zalpha; Hugot, Emmanuel; Madec, Fabrice; Ferrari, Marc; Le Mignant, David; Vivès, Sébastien; Cuby, Jean-Gabriel

    2011-10-01

    The future generation of Extremely Large Telescopes will require a complex combination of technologies for adaptive optics (AO) systems assisted by laser guide stars (LGS). In this context, the distance from the LGS spot to the telescope pupil ranges from about 80 to 200 km, depending on the Sodium layer altitude and the elevation of the telescope. This variation leads to a defocusing effect on the LGS wave-front sensor which needs to be compensated. We propose an active mirror able to compensate for this variation, based on an original optical design including this active optics component. This LGS Variable Curvature Mirror (LGS-VCM) is a 120 mm spherical active mirror able to achieve 820 μm deflection sag with an optical quality better than 150 nm RMS, allowing the radius of curvature variation from F/12 to F/2. Based on elasticity theory, the deformation of the metallic mirror is provided by an air pressure applied on a thin meniscus with a variable thickness distribution. In this article, we detail the analytical development leading to the specific geometry of the active component, the results of finite element analysis and the expected performances in terms of surface error versus the range of refocalisation. Three prototypes have been manufactured to compare the real behavior of the mirror and the simulations data. Results obtained on the prototypes are detailed, showing that the deformation of the VCM is very close to the simulation, and leads to a realistic active concept.

  15. The multi-layer variable absorbers in NGC 1365 revealed by XMM-Newton and NuSTAR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rivers, E.; Risaliti, G.; Walton, D. J.

    2015-01-01

    Between 2012 July and 2013 February, NuSTAR and XMM-Newton performed four long-look joint observations of the type 1.8 Seyfert, NGC 1365. We have analyzed the variable absorption seen in these observations in order to characterize the geometry of the absorbing material. Two of the observations...

  16. The mass-metallicity relations for gas and stars in star-forming galaxies: strong outflow versus variable IMF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lian, Jianhui; Thomas, Daniel; Maraston, Claudia; Goddard, Daniel; Comparat, Johan; Gonzalez-Perez, Violeta; Ventura, Paolo

    2018-02-01

    We investigate the mass-metallicity relations for the gaseous (MZRgas) and stellar components (MZRstar) of local star-forming galaxies based on a representative sample from Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 12. The mass-weighted average stellar metallicities are systematically lower than the gas metallicities. This difference in metallicity increases towards galaxies with lower masses and reaches 0.4-0.8 dex at 109 M⊙ (depending on the gas metallicity calibration). As a result, the MZRstar is much steeper than the MZRgas. The much lower metallicities in stars compared to the gas in low-mass galaxies imply dramatic metallicity evolution with suppressed metal enrichment at early times. The aim of this paper is to explain the observed large difference in gas and stellar metallicity and to infer the origin of the mass-metallicity relations. To this end we develop a galactic chemical evolution model accounting for star formation, gas inflow and outflow. By combining the observed mass-metallicity relation for both gas and stellar components to constrain the models, we find that only two scenarios are able to reproduce the observations. Either strong metal outflow or a steep initial mass function (IMF) slope at early epochs of galaxy evolution is needed. Based on these two scenarios, for the first time we successfully reproduce the observed MZRgas and MZRstar simultaneously, together with other independent observational constraints in the local Universe. Our model also naturally reproduces the flattening of the MZRgas at the high-mass end leaving the MZRstar intact, as seen in observational data.

  17. The optical gravitational lensing experiment. Variable stars in globular clusters. IV. Fields 104A-E in 47 Tucanae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaluzny, J.; Kubiak, M.; Szymanski, M.; Udalski, A.; Krzeminski, W.; Mateo, M.; Stanek, K. Z.

    1998-02-01

    Five fields located close to the center of the globular cluster NGC 104=47 Tuc were surveyed in a search for variable stars. We present V-band light curves for 42 variables. This sample includes 13 RR Lyr stars - 12 of them belong to the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC) and 1 is a background object from the galactic halo. Twelve eclipsing binaries were identified - 9 contact systems and 3 detached/semi-detached systems. Seven eclipsing binaries are located in the blue straggler region on the cluster color-magnitude diagram (CMD) and four binaries can be considered main-sequence systems. One binary is probably a member of the SMC. Eight contact binaries are likely members of the cluster and one is most probably a foreground star. We show that for the surveyed region of 47 Tuc, the relative frequency of contact binaries is very low as compared with other recently surveyed globular clusters. The sample of identified variables also includes 15 red variables with periods ranging from about 2 days to several weeks. A large fraction of these 15 variables probably belong to the SMC but a few stars are likely to be red giants in 47 Tuc. VI photometry for about 50 000 stars from the cluster fields was obtained as a by product of our survey The photometric data presented in this paper are available in electronic form at the CDS, via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsweb.u-strasbg.fr/Abstract.html}. Based on observations collected at the Las Campanas Observatory of the Carnegie Institution of Washington.

  18. Differential proteolytic activation of factor VIII-von Willebrand factor complex by thrombin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hill-Eubanks, D.C.; Parker, C.G.; Lollar, P. (Univ. of Vermont, Burlington (USA))

    1989-09-01

    Blood coagulation factor VIII (fVIII) is a plasma protein that is decreased or absent in hemophilia A. It is isolated as a mixture of heterodimers that contain a variably sized heavy chain and a common light chain. Thrombin catalyzes the activation of fVIII in a reaction that is associated with cleavages in both types of chain. The authors isolated a serine protease from Bothrops jararacussu snake venom that catalyzes thrombin-like heavy-chain cleavage but not light-chain cleavage in porcine fVIII as judged by NaDodSO{sub 4}/PAGE and N-terminal sequence analysis. Using a plasma-free assay of the ability of activated {sup 125}I-fVIII to function as a cofactor in the activation of factor X by factor IXa, they found that fVIII is activated by the venom enzyme. The venom enzyme-activated fVIII was isolated in stable form by cation-exchange HPLC. von Willebrand factor inhibited venom enzyme-activated fVIII but not thrombin-activated fVIII. These results suggest that the binding of fVIII to von Willebrand factor depends on the presence of an intact light chain and that activated fVIII must dissociate from von Willebrand factor to exert its cofactor effect. Thus, proteolytic activation of fVIII-von Willebrand factor complex appears to be differentially regulated by light-chain cleavage to dissociate the complex and heavy-chain cleavage to activate the cofactor function.

  19. CSI 2264: Simultaneous optical and X-ray variability in pre-main sequence stars. I. Time resolved X-ray spectral analysis during optical dips and accretion bursts in stars with disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guarcello, M. G.; Flaccomio, E.; Micela, G.; Argiroffi, C.; Sciortino, S.; Venuti, L.; Stauffer, J.; Rebull, L.; Cody, A. M.

    2017-06-01

    Context. Pre-main sequence stars are variable sources. The main mechanisms responsible for their variability are variable extinction, unsteady accretion, and rotational modulation of both hot and dark photospheric spots and X-ray-active regions. In stars with disks, this variability is related to the morphology of the inner circumstellar region (≤0.1 AU) and that of the photosphere and corona, all impossible to be spatially resolved with present-day techniques. This has been the main motivation for the Coordinated Synoptic Investigation of NGC 2264, a set of simultaneous observations of NGC 2264 with 15 different telescopes. Aims: In this paper, we focus on the stars with disks. We analyze the X-ray spectral properties extracted during optical bursts and dips in order to unveil the nature of these phenomena. Stars without disks are studied in a companion paper. Methods: We analyze simultaneous CoRoT and Chandra/ACIS-I observations to search for coherent optical and X-ray flux variability in stars with disks. Then, stars are analyzed in two different samples. In stars with variable extinction, we look for a simultaneous increase of optical extinction and X-ray absorption during the optical dips; in stars with accretion bursts, we search for soft X-ray emission and increasing X-ray absorption during the bursts. Results: We find evidence for coherent optical and X-ray flux variability among the stars with variable extinction. In 9 of the 24 stars with optical dips, we observe a simultaneous increase of X-ray absorption and optical extinction. In seven dips, it is possible to calculate the NH/AV ratio in order to infer the composition of the obscuring material. In 5 of the 20 stars with optical accretion bursts, we observe increasing soft X-ray emission during the bursts that we associate to the emission of accreting gas. It is not surprising that these properties are not observed in all the stars with dips and bursts, since favorable geometric configurations are

  20. Near-infrared variability study of the central 2.3 × 2.3 arcmin2 of the Galactic Centre - II. Identification of RR Lyrae stars in the Milky Way nuclear star cluster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Hui; Schödel, Rainer; Williams, Benjamin F.; Nogueras-Lara, Francisco; Gallego-Cano, Eulalia; Gallego-Calvente, Teresa; Wang, Q. Daniel; Rich, R. Michael; Morris, Mark R.; Do, Tuan; Ghez, Andrea

    2017-11-01

    Because of strong and spatially highly variable interstellar extinction and extreme source crowding, the faint (K ≥ 15) stellar population in the Milky Way's nuclear star cluster is still poorly studied. RR Lyrae stars provide us with a tool to estimate the mass of the oldest, relative dim stellar population. Recently, we analysed HST/WFC3/IR observations of the central 2.3 × 2.3 arcmin2 of the Milky Way and found 21 variable stars with periods between 0.2 and 1 d. Here, we present a further comprehensive analysis of these stars. The period-luminosity relationship of RR Lyrae is used to derive their extinctions and distances. Using multiple approaches, we classify our sample as 4 RRc stars, 4 RRab stars, 3 RRab candidates and 10 binaries. Especially, the four RRab stars show sawtooth light curves and fall exactly on to the Oosterhoff I division in the Bailey diagram. Compared to the RRab stars reported by Minniti et al., our new RRab stars have higher extinction (AK > 1.8) and should be closer to the Galactic Centre. The extinction and distance of one RRab stars match those for the Milky Way's nuclear star cluster given in previous works. We perform simulations and find that after correcting for incompleteness, there could be not more than 40 RRab stars within the Milky Way's nuclear star cluster and in our field of view. Through comparing with the known globular clusters of the Milky Way, we estimate that if there exists an old, metal-poor (-1.5 nuclear star cluster on a scale of 5 × 5 pc, then it contributes at most 4.7 × 105 M⊙, i.e. ˜18 per cent of the stellar mass.

  1. Stellar parameters and H α line profile variability of Be stars in the BeSOS survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arcos, C.; Kanaan, S.; Chávez, J.; Vanzi, L.; Araya, I.; Curé, M.

    2018-03-01

    The Be phenomenon is present in about 20 per cent of B-type stars. Be stars show variability on a broad range of time-scales, which in most cases is related to the presence of a circumstellar disc of variable size and structure. For this reason, a time-resolved survey is highly desirable in order to understand the mechanisms of disc formation, which are still poorly understood. In addition, a complete observational sample would improve the statistical significance of the study of stellar and disc parameters. The `Be Stars Observation Survey' (BeSOS) is a survey containing reduced spectra obtained using the Pontifica Universidad Católica High Echelle Resolution Optical Spectrograph (PUCHEROS) with a spectral resolution of 17 000 in the range 4260-7300 Å. BeSOS's main objective is to offer consistent spectroscopic and time-resolved data obtained with one instrument. The user can download or plot the data and obtain stellar parameters directly from the website. We also provide a star-by-star analysis based on photometric, spectroscopic and interferometric data, as well as general information about the whole BeSOS sample. Recently, BeSOS led to the discovery of a new Be star HD 42167 and facilitated study of the V/R variation of HD 35165 and HD 120324, the steady disc of HD 110335 and the Be shell status of HD 127972. Optical spectra used in this work, as well as the stellar parameters derived, are available online at http://besos.ifa.uv.cl.

  2. The Kepler characterization of the variability among A- and F-type stars. - I: General overview

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Uytterhoeven, K.; Moya, A.; Grigahcène, A.; Guzik, J.A.; Gutiérrez-Soto, J.; Smalley, B.; Handler, G.; Balona, L.A.; Niemczura, E.; Fox Machado, L.; Benatti, S.; Chapellier, E.; Tkachenko, A.; Szabó, R.; Suárez, J.C.; Ripepi, V.; Pascual, J.; Mathias, P.; Martín-Ruíz, S.; Lehmann, H.; Jackiewicz, J.; Hekker, S.; Gruberbauer, M.; García, R.A.; Dumusque, X.; Díaz-Fraile, D.; Bradley, P.; Antoci, V.; Roth, M.; Leroy, B.; Murphy, S.J.; De Cat, P.; Cuypers, J.; Kjeldsen, H.; Christensen-Dalsgaard, J.; Breger, M.; Pigulski, A.; Kiss, L.L.; Still, M.; Thompson, S.E.; Van Cleve, J.

    2011-01-01

    Context. The Kepler spacecraft is providing time series of photometric data with micromagnitude precision for hundreds of A-F type stars. Aims. We present a first general characterization of the pulsational behaviour of A-F type stars as observed in the Kepler light curves of a sample of 750

  3. NuSTAR Detection of High-Energy X-Ray Emission and Rapid Variability from Sagittarius A(star) Flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barriere, Nicolas M.; Tomsick, John A.; Baganoff, Frederick K.; Boggs, Steven E.; Christensen, Finn E.; Craig, William W.; Dexter, Jason; Grefenstette, Brian; Hailey, Charles J.; Zhang, William W.

    2014-01-01

    Sagittarius A(star) harbors the supermassive black hole that lies at the dynamical center of our Galaxy. Sagittarius A(star) spends most of its time in a low luminosity emission state but flares frequently in the infrared and X-ray, increasing up to a few hundred fold in brightness for up to a few hours at a time. The physical processes giving rise to the X-ray flares are uncertain. Here we report the detection with the NuSTAR observatory in Summer and Fall 2012 of four low to medium amplitude X-ray flares to energies up to 79 keV. For the first time, we clearly see that the power-law spectrum of Sagittarius A(star) X-ray flares extends to high energy, with no evidence for a cut off. Although the photon index of the absorbed power-law fits are in agreement with past observations, we find a difference between the photon index of two of the flares (significant at the 95% confidence level). The spectra of the two brightest flares (approx. 55 times quiescence in the 2- 10 keV band) are compared to simple physical models in an attempt to identify the main X-ray emission mechanism, but the data do not allow us to significantly discriminate between them. However, we confirm the previous finding that the parameters obtained with synchrotron models are, for the X-ray emission, physically more reasonable than those obtained with inverse-Compton models. One flare exhibits large and rapid (less than 100 s) variability, which, considering the total energy radiated, constrains the location of the flaring region to be within approx. 10 Schwarzschild radii of the black hole.

  4. Wide-Field Variability Survey of the Globular Cluster M 79 and a New Period-Luminosity Relation for SX Phe Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopacki, G.

    2015-03-01

    We present the results of a search for variable stars in a 26×39 arcmin2 field around globular cluster M 79 (NGC 1904). The search was made by means of an extended version of image subtraction, which allows us to analyze in a uniform manner CCD frames obtained with different telescopes and cameras of different sizes and resolutions. The search resulted in finding 20 new variable stars, among which 13 are cluster members. The members include one new RR Lyr star of subtype c, three SX Phe stars, and nine variable red giants. We also show that V7 is a W Vir star with a period of 13.985 d. Revised mean periods of RRab and RRc stars, ab=0.71 d and c=0.34 d, respectively, and relative percentage of RRc stars, Nc/(Nab+Nc)=45% confirm that M 79 belongs to the Oosterhoff II group of globular clusters. The mean V magnitude of the horizontal branch of M 79 based on ten RR Lyr stars has been estimated to be VHB=RR=16.11±0.03 mag. In one RRc star, V9, light changes with three close frequencies were detected, indicating excitation of nonradial modes. An SX Phe star, V18, is a double-mode pulsator with two radial modes excited, fundamental and first overtone. Moreover, we have discovered two SX Phe or δ Sct stars and one W UMa type system, all likely field objects. We also studied the period-luminosity relation for SX Phe stars. Using 62 fundamental and fundamentalized periods of radial double-mode and high-amplitude SX Phe stars known in Galactic globular clusters, we have derived the slope and zero point of this relation to be, -3.3±0.27 and 2.68±0.03 mag (at log(P/d)=-1.24), respectively.

  5. Acquired Factor VIII Inhibitors: Three Cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tay Za Kyaw

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Acquired hemophilia A is a rare, but devastating bleeding disorder caused by spontaneous development of autoantibodies directed against coagulation factor VIII. In 40%-50% of patients it is associated with such conditions as the postpartum period, malignancy, use of medications, and autoimmune diseases; however, its cause is unknown in most cases. Acquired hemophilia A should be suspected in patients that present with a coagulation abnormality, and a negative personal and family history of bleeding. Herein we report 3 patients with acquired hemophilia A that had different underlying pathologies, clinical presentations, and therapeutic responses. Factor VIII inhibitor formation in case 1 occurred 6 months after giving birth; underlying disorders were not identified in cases 2 or 3. The bleeding phenotype in these patients’ ranged from no bleeding tendency with isolated prolongation of APTT (activated partial thromboplastin time to severe intramuscular hematoma and hemarthrosis necessitating recombinant activated factor VII infusion and blood components transfusion. Variable responses to immunosuppressive treatment were also observed.

  6. The Soft State of Cygnus X-1 Observed with NuSTAR: A Variable Corona and a Stable Inner Disk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walton, D. J.; Tomsick, J. A.; Madsen, K. K.; Grinberg, V.; Barret, D.; Boggs, S. E.; Christensen, F. E.; Clavel, M.; Craig, W. W.; Fabian, A. C.; hide

    2016-01-01

    We present a multi-epoch hard X-ray analysis of Cygnus X-1 in its soft state based on four observations with the Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR). Despite the basic similarity of the observed spectra, there is clear spectral variability between epochs. To investigate this variability, we construct a model incorporating both the standard disk-corona continuum and relativistic reflection from the accretion disk, based on prior work on Cygnus X-1, and apply this model to each epoch independently. We find excellent consistency for the black hole spin and the iron abundance of the accretion disk, which are expected to remain constant on observational timescales. In particular, we confirm that Cygnus X-1 hosts a rapidly rotating black hole, 0.93 < approx. a* < approx. 0.96, in broad agreement with the majority of prior studies of the relativistic disk reflection and constraints on the spin obtained through studies of the thermal accretion disk continuum. Our work also confirms the apparent misalignment between the inner disk and the orbital plane of the binary system reported previously, finding the magnitude of this warp to be approx.10deg-15deg. This level of misalignment does not significantly change (and may even improve) the agreement between our reflection results and the thermal continuum results regarding the black hole spin. The spectral variability observed by NuSTAR is dominated by the primary continuum, implying variability in the temperature of the scattering electron plasma. Finally, we consistently observe absorption from ionized iron at approx. 6.7 keV, which varies in strength as a function of orbital phase in a manner consistent with the absorbing material being an ionized phase of the focused stellar wind from the supergiant companion star.

  7. Multi-Epoch Hubble Space Telescope Observations of IZw18: Characterization of Variable Stars at Ultra-Low Metallicities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiorentino, G.; Contreras Ramos, R.; Clementini, G.; Marconi, M.; Musella, I.; Aloisi, A.; Annibali, F.; Saha, A.; Tosi, M.; van der Marel, R. P.

    2010-03-01

    Variable stars have been identified for the first time in the very metal-poor blue compact dwarf galaxy IZw18, using deep multi-band (F606W, F814W) time-series photometry obtained with the Advanced Camera for Surveys on board the Hubble Space Telescope. We detected 34 candidate variable stars in the galaxy. We classify three of them as Classical Cepheids, with periods of 8.71, 125.0, and 130.3 days, respectively, and other two as long period variables with periodicities longer than 100 days. These are the lowest metallicity Classical Cepheids known so far, thus providing the opportunity to explore and fit models of stellar pulsation for Classical Cepheids at previously inaccessible metallicities. The period distribution of the confirmed Cepheids is markedly different from what is seen in other nearby galaxies, which is likely related to the star bursting nature of IZw18. The long period Cepheids we have detected in IZw18 seem to indicate that massive stars at the metallicity of IZw18 (Z = 0.0004) may cross the instability strip long enough to be observed. By applying to the 8.71 days Cepheid theoretical Wesenheit (V, I) relations based on new pulsation models of Classical Cepheids specifically computed for the extremely low metallicity of this galaxy (Z = 0.0004, Y = 0.24), we estimate the distance modulus of IZw18 to be μ0 = 31.4 ± 0.3 (D = 19.0+2.8 -2.5 Mpc) for canonical models of Classical Cepheids, and of 31.2 ± 0.3 mag (D = 17.4+2.6 -2.2 Mpc) using over luminous models. The theoretical modeling of the star's light curves provides μ0 = 31.4± 0.2 mag, D = 19.0+1.8 -1.7 Mpc, in good agreement with the results from the theoretical Wesenheit relations. These pulsation distances bracket the distance of 18.2 ±1.5 Mpc inferred by Aloisi et al. using the galaxy's red giant branch tip. Based on observations with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by AURA Inc., under NASA contract NAS 5-26555.

  8. Variable Stars in Local Group Galaxies. III. And VII, NGC 147, and NGC 185: Insight into the Building Blocks of the M31 Halo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monelli, M.; Fiorentino, G.; Bernard, E. J.; Martínez-Vázquez, C. E.; Bono, G.; Gallart, C.; Dall’Ora, M.; Stetson, P. B.

    2017-06-01

    We present the discovery of 1568 RR Lyrae stars in three of the most luminous M31 satellites: And VII (573), NGC 147 (177), and NGC 185 (818). We use their properties to study the formation history of Local Group spiral haloes, and in particular, to infer about the nature of their possible building blocks by comparison with available data for RR Lyrae stars in the halo and in a sample of satellites of M31 and the Milky Way. We find that the brightest satellites and the halos of both galaxies host a number of High Amplitude Short Period (HASP) RR Lyrae variable stars, which are missing in the faintest satellites. HASP variable stars have been shown by Fiorentino et al. to be tracers of a population of stars as metal-rich as [Fe/H] ≃ ‑1.5 and older than ≃ 10 {Gyr}. This suggests that the metal-rich M31 and MW halo component, which manifests through the HASP phenomenon, comes from massive dwarf galaxy building blocks, as the low-mass dwarfs did not chemically enrich fast enough to produce them. All detected variable stars are new discoveries; in particular, this work presents the first detections of RR Lyrae stars in And VII. Moreover, a number of candidate Anomalous Cepheids, and binary and long-period variable stars have been detected. We provide pulsation properties (period, amplitude, mean magnitude), light curves, and time series photometry for all of the variable stars in the three galaxies. Based on observations made with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS 5-26555. These observations are associated with programs #10430 and #11724.

  9. Astronomical Observatory at Kolonicke Sedlo and its Results in Variable Stars Observing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudzej, I.; Karetnikov, V. G.; Dubovsky, P. A.; Paulin, L. S.; Fashchevskyi, N. N.; Ryabov, A. V.; Dorokhova, T. N.; Dorokhov, N. I.; Koshkin, N. I.; Vadila, M.; Parimucha, S.

    There is presented a brief report of the actual equipments in the Astronomical Observa tory at the Kolonicke Sedlo. Description of Vihorlat National Telescope of 1 meter diameter equipped with the two-star high-speed photoelectric photometer and autoguiding system as well as various small telescopes capabilities are included. The results of CCD and PMT observations are presented. The future observational programs are presented as well.

  10. ASTRONOMICAL OBSERVATORY AT KOLONICKE SEDLO AND ITS RESULTS IN VARIABLE STARS OBSERVING

    OpenAIRE

    Kudzej, I.; Karetnikov, V. G.; Dubovsky, P. A.; Paulin, L. S.; Fashchevskyi, N. N.; Ryabov, A. V.; Dorokhova, T. N.; Dorokhov, N.I.; Koshkin, N. I.; Vadila, M.; Parimucha, S.

    2007-01-01

    There is presented a brief report of the actual equipments in the Astronomical Observa tory at the Kolonicke Sedlo. Description of Vihorlat National Telescope of 1 meter diameter equipped with the two-star high-speed photoelectric photometer and autoguiding system as well as various small telescopes capabilities are included. The results of CCD and PMT observations are presented. The future observational programs are presented as well.

  11. Self-assembly of star micelle into vesicle in solvents of variable quality: the star micelle retains its core-shell nanostructure in the vesicle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Nijuan; He, Qun; Bu, Weifeng

    2015-03-03

    Intra- and intermolecular interactions of star polymers in dilute solutions are of fundamental importance for both theoretical interest and hierarchical self-assembly into functional nanostructures. Here, star micelles with a polystyrene corona and a small ionic core bearing platinum(II) complexes have been regarded as a model of star polymers to mimic their intra- and interstar interactions and self-assembled behaviors in solvents of weakening quality. In the chloroform/methanol mixture solvents, the star micelles can self-assemble to form vesicles, in which the star micelles shrink significantly and are homogeneously distributed on the vesicle surface. Unlike the morphological evolution of conventional amphiphiles from micellar to vesicular, during which the amphiphilic molecules are commonly reorganized, the star micelles still retain their core-shell nanostructures in the vesicles and the coronal chains of the star micelle between the ionic cores are fully interpenetrated.

  12. Rapid Spectral Variability of the Symbiotic Star CH Cyg During One Night

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikayilov, Kh. M.; Rustamov, B. N.; Alakbarov, I. A.; Rustamova, A. B.

    2017-06-01

    During one night (15.07.2015), within 6 hours 14 echelle spectrograms of this star were obtained. It was revealed that the profile of Ha and Hβ lines have two-component emission structure with a central absorption, parameters which vary from spectrum to spectrum during the night. The intensity of blue emission component (V) have been changed strongly during the night: the value of ratio of intensities of violet and red components (V/R) of line Hα decreased from 0:93 to 0:49 in the beginning and then increased to a value of 0.97. The synchronous variations of values of V/R for the Hα and Hβ lines have been revealed. The parameters of blue emission components of Hα and of line Hel λ5876 Å are correlated. We propose that revealed by us the rapid spectral changes in the spectrum of the star CH Cyg could be connected with a flickering in the optical brightness of the star that is typical for the active phase of this system.

  13. Photometric and spectroscopic variability of the B5IIIe star HD 171219

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade, L.; Janot-Pacheco, E.; Emilio, M.; Frémat, Y.; Neiner, C.; Poretti, E.; Mathias, P.; Rainer, M.; Suárez, J. C.; Uytterhoeven, K.; Briquet, M.; Diago, P. D.; Fabregat, J.; Gutiérrez-Soto, J.

    2017-07-01

    We analyzed the star HD 171219, one of the relatively bright Be stars observed in the seismo field of the CoRoT satellite, in order to determine its physical and pulsation characteristics. Classical Be stars are main-sequence objects of mainly B-type, whose spectra show, or have shown at some epoch, Balmer lines in emission and an infrared excess. Both characteristics are attributed to an equatorially concentrated circumstellar disk fed by non-periodic mass-loss episodes (outbursts). Be stars often show nonradial pulsation gravity modes and, as more recently discovered, stochastically excited oscillations. Applying the CLEANEST algorithm to the high-cadence and highly photometrically precise measurements of the HD 171219 light curve led us to perform an unprecedented detailed analysis of its nonradial pulsations. Tens of frequencies have been detected in the object compatible with nonradial g-modes. Additional high-resolution ground-based spectroscopic observations were obtained at La Silla (HARPS) and Haute Provence (SOPHIE) observatories during the month preceding CoRoT observations. Additional information was obtained from low-resolution spectra from the BeSS database. From spectral line fitting we determined physical parameters of the star, which is seen equator-on (I = 90°). We also found in the ground data the same frequencies as in CoRoT data. Additionally, we analyzed the circumstellar activity through the traditional method of violet to red emission Hα line variation. A quintuplet was identified at approximately 1.113 c d-1 (12.88 μHz) with a separation of 0.017 c d-1 that can be attributed to a pulsation degree ℓ 2. The light curve shows six small- to medium-scale outbursts during the CoRoT observations. The intensity of the main frequencies varies after each outburst, suggesting a possible correlation between the nonradial pulsations regime and the feeding of the envelope. The CoRoT space mission was developed and operated by the French space agency

  14. Reducing the impact of insulin sensitivity variability on glycaemic outcomes using separate stochastic models within the STAR glycaemic protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Felicity; Pretty, Christopher G; Fisk, Liam; Shaw, Geoffrey M; Chase, J Geoffrey; Desaive, Thomas

    2014-04-16

    The metabolism of critically ill patients evolves dynamically over time. Post critical insult, levels of counter-regulatory hormones are significantly elevated, but decrease rapidly over the first 12-48 hours in the intensive care unit (ICU). These hormones have a direct physiological impact on insulin sensitivity (SI). Understanding the variability of SI is important for safely managing glycaemic levels and understanding the evolution of patient condition. The objective of this study is to assess the evolution of SI over the first two days of ICU stay, and using this data, propose a separate stochastic model to reduce the impact of SI variability during glycaemic control using the STAR glycaemic control protocol. The value of SI was identified hourly for each patient using a validated physiological model. Variability of SI was then calculated as the hour-to-hour percentage change in SI. SI was examined using 6 hour blocks of SI to display trends while mitigating the effects of noise. To reduce the impact of SI variability on achieving glycaemic control a new stochastic model for the most variable period, 0-18 hours, was generated. Virtual simulations were conducted using an existing glycaemic control protocol (STAR) to investigate the clinical impact of using this separate stochastic model during this period of increased metabolic variability. For the first 18 hours, over 80% of all SI values were less than 0.5 × 10(-3) L/mU x min, compared to 65% for >18 hours. Using the new stochastic model for the first 18 hours of ICU stay reduced the number of hypoglycaemic measurements during virtual trials. For time spent below 4.4, 4.0, and 3.0 mmol/L absolute reductions of 1.1%, 0.8% and 0.1% were achieved, respectively. No severe hypoglycaemic events (BG < 2.2 mmol/L) occurred for either case. SI levels increase significantly, while variability decreases during the first 18 hours of a patients stay in ICU. Virtual trials, using a separate stochastic model for this

  15. Photometric variability of the T Tauri star TW Hya on time-scales of hours to years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rucinski, Slavek M.; Matthews, Jaymie M.; Kuschnig, Rainer; Pojmański, Grzegorz; Rowe, Jason; Guenther, David B.; Moffat, Anthony F. J.; Sasselov, Dimitar; Walker, Gordon A. H.; Weiss, Werner W.

    2008-12-01

    Microvariability & Oscillations of STars (MOST) and All Sky Automated Survey (ASAS) observations have been used to characterize photometric variability of TW Hya on time-scales from a fraction of a day to 7.5 weeks and from a few days to 8 yr, respectively. The two data sets have very different uncertainties and temporal coverage properties and cannot be directly combined, nevertheless, they suggest a global variability spectrum with `flicker-noise' properties, that is with amplitudes , over >4 decades in frequency, in the range f = 0.0003-10cd-1. A 3.7d period is clearly present in the continuous 11d, 0.07d time resolution, observations by MOST in 2007. Brightness extrema coincide with zero-velocity crossings in periodic (3.56d) radial-velocity variability detected in contemporaneous spectroscopic observations of Setiawan et al. and interpreted as caused by a planet. The 3.56/3.7d periodicity was entirely absent in the second, 4 times longer MOST run in 2008, casting doubt on the planetary explanation. Instead, a spectrum of unstable single periods within the range of 2-9d was observed; the tendency of the periods to progressively shorten was well traced using the wavelet analysis. The evolving periodicities and the overall flicker-noise characteristics of the TW Hya variability suggest a combination of several mechanisms, with the dominant ones probably related to the accretion processes from the disc around the star. Based on data from the MOST satellite, a Canadian Space Agency mission jointly operated by Dynacon Inc., the University of Toronto Institute for Aerospace Studies and the University of British Columbia, with the assistance of the University of Vienna, and on data from the All Sky Automated Survey (ASAS) conducted by the Warsaw University Observatory, Warsaw, Poland at the Las Campanas Observatory, Chile. E-mail: rucinski@astro.utoronto.ca

  16. Southern RS CVn systems - Candidate list. [spectral catalog of variable binary stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiler, E. J.; Stencel, R. E.

    1979-01-01

    A list of 43 candidate RS CVn binary systems in the far southern hemisphere of the sky (south of -40 deg declination) is presented. The candidate systems were selected from the first two volumes of the Michigan Spectral Catalog (1975, 1978), which provides MK classifications for southern HD stars and identifies any unusual characteristics noted for individual stellar spectra. The selection criteria used were: (1) the occurrence of Ca II H and K emission; (2) known or suspected binary nature; (3) regular light variations of zero to one magnitude; and (4) spectral type between F0 and K2 and luminosity less than bright giant (II).

  17. Oscillation Mode Variability in Evolved Compact Pulsators from Kepler Photometry. I. The Hot B Subdwarf Star KIC 3527751

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zong, Weikai; Charpinet, Stéphane; Fu, Jian-Ning; Vauclair, Gérard; Niu, Jia-Shu; Su, Jie

    2018-02-01

    We present the first results of an ensemble and systematic survey of oscillation mode variability in pulsating hot B subdwarf (sdB) and white dwarf stars observed with the original Kepler mission. The satellite provides uninterrupted high-quality photometric data with a time baseline that can reach up to 4 yr collected on pulsating stars. This is a unique opportunity to characterize long-term behaviors of oscillation modes. A mode modulation in amplitude and frequency can be independently inferred by its fine structure in the Fourier spectrum, from the sLSP, or with prewhitening methods applied to various parts of the light curve. We apply all these techniques to the sdB star KIC 3527751, a long-period-dominated hybrid pulsator. We find that all the detected modes with sufficiently large amplitudes to be thoroughly studied show amplitude and/or frequency variations. Components of three identified quintuplets around 92, 114, and 253 μHz show signatures that can be linked to nonlinear interactions according to the resonant mode coupling theory. This interpretation is further supported by the fact that many oscillation modes are found to have amplitudes and frequencies showing correlated or anticorrelated variations, a behavior that can be linked to the amplitude equation formalism, where nonlinear frequency corrections are determined by their amplitude variations. Our results suggest that oscillation modes varying with diverse patterns are a very common phenomenon in pulsating sdB stars. Close structures around main frequencies therefore need to be carefully interpreted in light of this finding to secure a robust identification of real eigenfrequencies, which is crucial for seismic modeling. The various modulation patterns uncovered should encourage further developments in the field of nonlinear stellar oscillation theory. It also raises a warning to any long-term project aiming at measuring the rate of period change of pulsations caused by stellar evolution, or at

  18. Mira and SR type variable stars from the ROTSE-IIID archive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gucsav, B.; Yesilyaprak, C.

    2016-12-01

    Applications of machine-learned algorithms in the field of variable classification have been popular as they are simple to implement and performing as well. A few years back, a small MPI application developed as the core of a variable detection pipeline for the ROTSE-IIID robotic telescope archive. Now it has been extended to involve the parallel approach for machine learned classification specifically for the long-term variables like Mira and Semi-regular variables. This presentation mainly covers the efforts to put the methodology in reality.

  19. Large-scale Periodic Variability of the Wind of the Wolf-Rayet Star WR 1 (HD 4004)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chené, A.-N.; St-Louis, N.

    2010-06-01

    We present the results of an intensive photometric and spectroscopic monitoring campaign of the WN4 Wolf-Rayet (WR) star WR 1 = HD 4004. Our broadband V photometry covering a timespan of 91 days shows variability with a period of P = 16.9+0.6 -0.3 days. The same period is also found in our spectral data. The light curve is non-sinusoidal with hints of a gradual change in its shape as a function of time. The photometric variations nevertheless remain coherent over several cycles and we estimate that the coherence timescale of the light curve is of the order of 60 days. The spectroscopy shows large-scale line-profile variability which can be interpreted as excess emission peaks moving from one side of the profile to the other on a timescale of several days. Although we cannot unequivocally exclude the unlikely possibility that WR 1 is a binary, we propose that the nature of the variability we have found strongly suggests that it is due to the presence in the wind of the WR star of large-scale structures, most likely corotating interaction regions (CIRs), which are predicted to arise in inherently unstable radiatively driven winds when they are perturbed at their base. We also suggest that variability observed in WR 6, WR 134, and WR 137 is of the same nature. Finally, assuming that the period of CIRs is related to the rotational period, we estimate the rotation rate of the four stars for which sufficient monitoring has been carried out, i.e., v rot = 6.5, 40, 70, and 275 km s-1 for WR 1, WR 6, WR 134, and WR 137, respectively. Based on observations obtained at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT) which is operated by the National Research Council of Canada, the Institut National des Sciences de l'Univers of the Centre National de Recherche Scientifique of France, and the University of Hawaii. Also based on observations obtained at the Observatoire du Mont Mégantic with is operated by the Centre de Recherche en Astrophysique du Québec and the Observatoire de

  20. Potentiation of thrombin generation in hemophilia A plasma by coagulation factor VIII and characterization of antibody-specific inhibition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhavya S Doshi

    Full Text Available Development of inhibitory antibodies to coagulation factor VIII (fVIII is the primary obstacle to the treatment of hemophilia A in the developed world. This adverse reaction occurs in 20-30% of persons with severe hemophilia A treated with fVIII-replacement products and is characterized by the development of a humoral and neutralizing immune response to fVIII. Patients with inhibitory anti-fVIII antibodies are treated with bypassing agents including recombinant factor VIIa (rfVIIa. However, some patients display poor hemostatic response to bypass therapy and improved treatment options are needed. Recently, we demonstrated that fVIII inhibitors display widely variable kinetics of inhibition that correlate with their respective target epitopes. Thus, it was hypothesized that for antibodies that display slow rates of inhibition, supplementation of rfVIIa with fVIII would result in improved thrombin generation and be predictive of clinical responses to this novel treatment regimen. In order to test this hypothesis, 10 murine monoclonal antibodies (MAbs with non-overlapping epitopes spanning fVIII, differential inhibition titers, and inhibition kinetics were studied using a thrombin generation assay. Of the 3 MAbs with high inhibitory titers, only the one with fast and complete (classically defined as "type I" kinetics displayed significant inhibition of thrombin generation with no improvement upon supplementation of rfVIIa with fVIII. The other two MAbs that displayed incomplete (classically defined as "type II" inhibition did not suppress the potentiation of thrombin generation by fVIII. All antibodies that did not completely inhibit fVIII activity demonstrated potentiation of thrombin generation by the addition of fVIII as compared to rfVIIa alone. In conclusion, fVIII alone or in combination with rfVIIa corrects the thrombin generation defect produced by the majority of anti-fVIII MAbs better than single agent rfVIIa. Therefore, combined fVIII

  1. A Suzaku, NuSTAR, and XMM-Newton view on variable absorption and relativistic reflection in NGC 4151

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beuchert, T.; Markowitz, A. G.; Dauser, T.; García, J. A.; Keck, M. L.; Wilms, J.; Kadler, M.; Brenneman, L. W.; Zdziarski, A. A.

    2017-07-01

    We disentangle X-ray disk reflection from complex line-of-sight absorption in the nearby Seyfert NGC 4151, using a suite of Suzaku, NuSTAR, and XMM-Newton observations. Extending upon earlier published work, we pursue a physically motivated model using the latest angle-resolved version of the lamp-post geometry reflection model relxillCp_lp together with a Comptonization continuum. We use the long-look simultaneous Suzaku/NuSTAR observation to develop a baseline model wherein we model reflected emission as a combination of lamp-post components at the heights of 1.2 and 15.0 gravitational radii. We argue for a vertically extended corona as opposed to two compact and distinct primary sources. We find two neutral absorbers (one full-covering and one partial-covering), an ionized absorber (log ξ = 2.8), and a highly-ionized ultra-fast outflow, which have all been reported previously. All analyzed spectra are well described by this baseline model. The bulk of the spectral variability between 1 keV and 6 keV can be accounted for by changes in the column density of both neutral absorbers, which appear to be degenerate and inversely correlated with the variable hard continuum component flux. We track variability in absorption on both short (2 d) and long ( 1 yr) timescales; the observed evolution is either consistent with changes in the absorber structure (clumpy absorber at distances ranging from the broad line region to the inner torus or a dusty radiatively driven wind) or a geometrically stable neutral absorber that becomes increasingly ionized at a rising flux level. The soft X-rays below 1 keV are dominated by photoionized emission from extended gas that may act as a warm mirror for the nuclear radiation.

  2. SHORT- AND LONG-TERM RADIO VARIABILITY OF YOUNG STARS IN THE ORION NEBULA CLUSTER AND MOLECULAR CLOUD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rivilla, V. M.; Martín-Pintado, J. [Osservatorio Astrofisico di Arcetri, Largo Enrico Fermi 5, I-50125, Firenze (Italy); Chandler, C. J. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, P.O. Box O, Socorro, NM 87801 (United States); Sanz-Forcada, J. [Centro de Astrobiología (CSIC/INTA), ESAC Campus, P.O. Box 78, E-28691 Villanueva de la Cañada, Madrid (Spain); Jiménez-Serra, I. [European Southern Observatory, Karl-Schwarzschild-Str. 2, D-85748, Garching (Germany); Forbrich, J., E-mail: rivilla@arcetri.astro.it [Department of Astrophysics, University of Vienna, Türkenschanzstr. 17, 1180 Vienna (Austria)

    2015-08-01

    We have used the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) to carry out multi-epoch radio continuum monitoring of the Orion Nebula Cluster (ONC) and the background Orion Molecular Cloud (OMC; 3 epochs at Q band and 11 epochs at Ka band). Our new observations reveal the presence of 19 radio sources, mainly concentrated in the Trapezium Cluster and the Orion Hot Core (OHC) regions. With the exception of the Becklin–Neugebauer object and source C (which we identify here as dust emission associated with a proplyd) the sources all show radio variability between the different epochs. We have found tentative evidence of variability in the emission from the massive object related to source I. Our observations also confirm radio flux density variations of a factor >2 on timescales of hours to days in five sources. One of these flaring sources, OHC-E, has been detected for the first time. We conclude that the radio emission can be attributed to two different components: (i) highly variable (flaring) non-thermal radio gyrosynchrotron emission produced by electrons accelerated in the magnetospheres of pre-main-sequence low-mass stars and (ii) thermal emission due to free–free radiation from ionized gas and/or heated dust around embedded massive objects and proplyds. Combining our sample with other radio monitoring at 8.3 GHz and the X-ray catalog provided by Chandra, we have studied the properties of the entire sample of radio/X-ray stars in the ONC/OMC region (51 sources). We have found several hints of a relation between the X-ray activity and the mechanisms responsible for (at least some fraction of) the radio emission. We have estimated a radio flaring rate of ∼0.14 flares day{sup −1} in the dense stellar cluster embedded in the OHC region. This suggests that radio flares are more common events during the first stages of stellar evolution than previously thought. The advent of improved sensitivity with the new VLA and ALMA will dramatically increase the number of stars

  3. Carbon Stars

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. In this paper, the present state of knowledge of the carbon stars is discussed. Particular attention is given to issues of classification, evolution, variability, populations in our own and other galaxies, and circumstellar material.

  4. A Suzaku, NuSTAR and XMMNewton} view on variable absorption and relativistic reflection in NGC 4151

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beuchert, T.; Markowitz, A.; Dauser, T.; Garcia, J.; Keck, M.; Wilms, J.; Kadler, M.; Brenneman, L.; Zdziarski, A.

    2017-10-01

    We disentangle X-ray disk reflection from complex line-of-sight absorption in NGC 4151 using Suzaku, NuSTAR, and XMMNewton}. Extending upon Keck et al. (2015), we develop a physically-motivated baseline model using the latest lamp-post reflection code relxillCp_lp, which includes a Comptonization continuum. We identify two components at heights of 1.2 and 15.0 gravitational radii using a long-look simultaneous Suzaku/NuSTAR observation but argue for a vertically extended corona as opposed to distinct primary sources. We also find two neutral absorbers (one full-covering and one partial-covering), an ionized absorber (log ξ=2.8), and a highly-ionized ultra-fast outflow, all reported previously. All analyzed spectra are well described by this baseline model. The bulk of the spectral variability on time-scales from days to years can be attributed to changes of both neutral absorbers, which are inversely correlated with the hard X-ray continuum flux. The observed evolution is either consistent with changes in the absorber structure (clumpy absorber in the outer BLR or a dusty radiatively driven wind) or a geometrically stable neutral absorber that becomes increasingly ionized at a rising flux level. The soft X-rays below 1 keV are dominated by photoionized emission from extended gas, which may act as a warm mirror for the nuclear radiation.

  5. THE RHYTHM OF FAIRALL 9. I. OBSERVING THE SPECTRAL VARIABILITY WITH XMM-NEWTON AND NuSTAR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lohfink, A. M.; Pinto, C.; Alston, W.; Fabian, A. C.; Kara, E.; Parker, M. L. [Institute of Astronomy, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0HA (United Kingdom); Reynolds, C. S. [Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland College Park, College Park, Maryland 20742 (United States); Boggs, S. E.; Craig, W. W. [Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, 7 Gauss Way, Berkeley, CA 94720-7450 (United States); Christensen, F. E.; Hailey, C. J. [Danish Technical University, DK-2800 Lyngby (Denmark); Harrison, F. A. [Cahill Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Caltech, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Matt, G. [Dipartimento di Matematica e Fisica, Università degli Studi Roma Tre, via della Vasca Navale 84, I-00146 Roma (Italy); Stern, D.; Walton, D. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Zhang, W. W., E-mail: alohfink@ast.cam.ac.uk [X-ray Astrophysics Laboratory, NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD, 20771 (United States)

    2016-04-10

    We present a multi-epoch X-ray spectral analysis of the Seyfert 1 galaxy Fairall 9. Our analysis shows that Fairall 9 displays unique spectral variability in that its ratio residuals to a simple absorbed power law in the 0.5–10 keV band remain constant with time in spite of large variations in flux. This behavior implies an unchanging source geometry and the same emission processes continuously at work at the timescale probed. With the constraints from NuSTAR on the broad-band spectral shape, it is clear that the soft excess in this source is a superposition of two different processes, one being blurred ionized reflection in the innermost parts of the accretion disk, and the other a continuum component such as a spatially distinct Comptonizing region. Alternatively, a more complex primary Comptonization component together with blurred ionized reflection could be responsible.

  6. The Rhythm of Fairall 9. I. Observing the Spectral Variability with XMM-Newton and NuSTAR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lohfink, A. M.; Reynolds, C. S.; Pinto, C.

    2016-01-01

    We present a multi-epoch X-ray spectral analysis of the Seyfert 1 galaxy Fairall 9. Our analysis shows that Fairall 9 displays unique spectral variability in that its ratio residuals to a simple absorbed power law in the 0.5–10 keV band remain constant with time in spite of large variations in flux....... This behavior implies an unchanging source geometry and the same emission processes continuously at work at the timescale probed. With the constraints from NuSTAR on the broad-band spectral shape, it is clear that the soft excess in this source is a superposition of two different processes, one being blurred...

  7. The Rhythm of Fairall 9. I. Observing the Spectral Variability With XMM-Newton and NuSTAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohfink, A. M.; Reynolds, S. C.; Pinto, C.; Alston, W.; Boggs, S. E.; Christensen, F. E.; Craig, W. W.; Fabian, A.C; Hailey, C. J.; Harrison, F. A.; hide

    2016-01-01

    We present a multi-epoch X-ray spectral analysis of the Seyfert 1 galaxy Fairall 9. Our analysis shows that Fairall 9 displays unique spectral variability in that its ratio residuals to a simple absorbed power law in the 0.510 keV band remain constant with time in spite of large variations in flux. This behavior implies an unchanging source geometry and the same emission processes continuously at work at the timescale probed. With the constraints from NuSTAR on the broad-band spectral shape, it is clear that the soft excess in this source is a superposition of two different processes, one being blurred ionized reflection in the innermost parts of the accretion disk, and the other a continuum component such as a spatially distinct Comptonizing region. Alternatively, a more complex primary Comptonization component together with blurred ionized reflection could be responsible.

  8. A Detailed Study of the Variable Stars in Five Galactic Globular Clusters: IC4499, NGC4833, NGC6171 (M107), NGC6402 (M14), and NGC6584

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Brian W.; Darragh, Andrew; Hettinger, Paul; Hibshman, Adam; Johnson, Elliott W.; Liu, Z. J.; Pajkos, Michael A.; Stephenson, Hunter R.; Vondersaar, John R.; Conroy, Kyle E.; McCombs, Thayne A.; Reinhardt, Erik D.; Toddy, Joseph

    2015-08-01

    We present the results of an extensive study intended to search for and properly classify the variable stars in five galactic globular clusters. Each of the five clusters was observed hundreds to thousands of times over a time span ranging from 2 to 4 years using the SARA 0.6m located at Cerro Tololo Interamerican Observatory. The images were analyzed using the image subtract method of Alard (2000) to identify and produce light curves of all variables found in each cluster. In total we identified 373 variables with 140 of these being newly discovered increasing the number of known variables stars in these clusters by 60%. Of the total we have identified 312 RR Lyrae variables (187 RR0, 18 RR01, 99 RR1, 8 RR2), 9 SX Phe stars, 6 Cepheid variables, 11 eclipsing variables, and 35 long period variables. For IC4499 we identified 64 RR0, 18 RR01, 14 RR1, 4 RR2, 1 SX Phe, 1 eclipsing binary, and 2 long period variables. For NGC4833 we identified 10 RR0, 7 RR1, 2 RR2, 6 SX Phe, 5 eclipsing binaries, and 9 long period variables. For NGC6171 (M107) we identified 13 RR0, 7 RR1, and 1 SX Phe. For NGC6402 (M14) we identified 52 RR0, 56 RR1, 1 RR2, 1 SX Phe, 6 Cepheids, 1 eclipsing binary, and 15 long period variables. For NGC6584 we identified 48 RR0, 15 RR1, 1 RR2, 5 eclipsing binaries, and 9 long period variables. Using the RR Lyrae variables we found the mean V magnitude of the horizontal branch to be VHB = ⟨V ⟩RR = 17.63, 15.51, 15.72, 17.13, and 16.37 magnitudes for IC4499, NGC4833, NGC6171 (M107), NGC6402 (M14), and NGC6584, respectively. From our extensive data set we were able to obtain sufficient temporal and complete phase coverage of the RR Lyrae variables. This has allowed us not only to properly classify each of the RR Lyrae variables but also to use Fourier decomposition of the light curves to further analyze the properties of the variable stars and hence physical properties of each clusters. In this poster we will give the temperature, radius, stellar mass

  9. A 10-h period revealed in optical spectra of the highly variable WN8 Wolf-Rayet star WR 123

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chené, A.-N.; Foellmi, C.; Marchenko, S. V.; St-Louis, N.; Moffat, A. F. J.; Ballereau, D.; Chauville, J.; Zorec, J.; Poteet, C. A.

    2011-06-01

    Aims: What is the origin of the large-amplitude variability in Wolf-Rayet WN8 stars in general and WR123 in particular? A dedicated spectroscopic campaign targets the ten-hour period previously found in the high-precision photometric data obtained by the MOST satellite. Methods: In June-August 2003 we obtained a series of high signal-to-noise, mid-resolution spectra from several sites in the λλ 4000-6940 Å domain. We also followed the star with occasional broadband (Johnson V) photometry. The acquired spectroscopy allowed a detailed study of spectral variability on timescales from ~5 min to months. Results: We find that all observed spectral lines of a given chemical element tend to show similar variations and that there is a good correlation between the lines of different elements, without any significant time delays, save the strong absorption components of the Hei lines, which tend to vary differently from the emission parts. We find a single sustained periodicity, P ~ 9.8 h, which is likely related to the relatively stable pulsations found in MOST photometry obtained one year later. In addition, seemingly stochastic, large-amplitude variations are also seen in all spectral lines on timescales of several hours to several days. Based on observations obtained at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT) which is operated by the National Research Concil of Canada, the Institut National des Sciences de l'Univers of the Centre National de Recherche Scientifique of France, and the University of Hawaii. Based also on observations made with ESO Telescopes at the La Silla Observatory, under programme ID 271.D-5025.Photometric data presented in Fig. 1 are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/530/A151

  10. Studies of early-type variable stars. XIV. Spectroscopic orbit and absolute parameters of HU Tauri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxted, P. F. L.; Hill, G.; Hilditch, R. W.

    1995-09-01

    We present a new spectroscopic orbit for the Algol-type eclipsing binary system HU Tau (HD 29365, P=2.0563 days α(2000.0) = 04 38 15.80, δ= +20 41 05.3, V=5.87-6.8, B8V + G2). We find : m_1_ sin^3^i=4.17+/-0.09Msun_, m_2_ sin^3^i=1.07+/-0.025Msun_, (a_p_+a_s_)sin i=11.8 +/-0.1Rsun_, m_1_/m_2_=3.90+/-0.07. The spectroscopic orbit includes corrections for non-Keplerian effects derived from the solutions of the BV light curves of Ito (1988). We have been able to derive much improved absolute parameters for this system as follows: M_1_=4.43+/-0.09Msun_, M_2_=1.14+/-0.03Msun_, R _1_=2.57+/-0.03Rsun_, R _2_=4.21+/-0.03Rsun_, log(L_1_/Lsun_)= 2.09+/-0.15, log(L_2_/Lsun_)= 0.92+/-0.05. Comparison of HU Tau with non-conservative case B evolution models of De Greve (1993) suggests that the system evolved from an initial mass ratio <~0.5. However, the orbital period of HU Tau is more than 3 days shorter than any of the model systems, and the observed secondary luminosity of order 10 times less than a model star of the same mass during the slow mass transfer phase.

  11. Stark broadening parameter tables for Ar VIII

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitrijević M.S.

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Using a semiclassical approach, we have calculated electron−, proton−, and He III−impact line widths and shifts for 9 Ar VIII transitions as a function of temperature and perturber density.

  12. Stark broadening parameter tables for Kr VIII

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitrijević M.S.

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Using a semiclassical approach, we have calculated electron−, proton−, and He III−impact line widths and shifts for 6 Kr VIII multiplets as a function of temperature and perturber density.

  13. The Multi-Layer Variable Absorbers in NGC 1365 Revealed by XMM-Newton and NuSTAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivers, E.; Risaliti, G.; Walton, D. J.; Harrison, F.; Arevalo, P.; Baur, F. E.; Boggs, S. E.; Brenneman, L. W.; Brightman, M.; Zhang, W. W.

    2015-01-01

    Between 2012 July and 2013 February, NuSTAR and XMM-Newton performed four long-look joint observations of the type 1.8 Seyfert, NGC 1365. We have analyzed the variable absorption seen in these observations in order to characterize the geometry of the absorbing material. Two of the observations caught NGC 1365 in an unusually low absorption state, revealing complexity in the multi-layer absorber that had previously been hidden. We find the need for three distinct zones of neutral absorption in addition to the two zones of ionized absorption and the Compton-thick torus previously seen in this source. The most prominent absorber is likely associated with broad-line region clouds with column densities of around approximately 10 (sup 23) per square centimeter and a highly clumpy nature as evidenced by an occultation event in 2013 February. We also find evidence of a patchy absorber with a variable column around approximately 10 (sup 22) per square centimeter and a line-of-sight covering fraction of 0.3-0.9, which responds directly to the intrinsic source flux, possibly due to a wind geometry. A full-covering, constant absorber with a low column density of approximately 1 by 10 (sup 22) per square centimeter is also present, though the location of this low density haze is unknown.

  14. Binary Central Stars of Planetary Nebulae Discovered Through Photometric Variability. V. The Central Stars of HaTr 7 and ESO 330-9

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillwig, Todd C.; Frew, David J.; Reindl, Nicole; Rotter, Hannah; Webb, Andrew; Margheim, Steve

    2017-01-01

    We find the central stars (CSs) of the planetary nebulae (PNe) HaTr 7 and ESO 330-9 to be close-binary systems. Both have orbital periods of less than half a day and contain an irradiated cool companion to the hot CS. We provide light curves, spectra, radial velocity curves, orbital periods, and binary modeling results for both systems. The binary modeling leads to system parameters, or ranges of allowed parameters for each system. We find that for the CS of HaTr 7 we need to use limb-darkening values for the cool companion that are different than the expected values for an isolated star. We also fit the CS spectrum to determine {log}g and temperature values independent of the binary modeling. For ESO 330-9 we find that based on our binary modeling, the hot CS is most likely a post-red giant branch (RGB) star with a mass of around 0.4 {M}⊙ . We discuss our derived stellar and nebular parameters in the broader context of close-binary CSs and their surrounding planetary nebulae (PNe). We also discuss the present status of known or suspected post-RGB stars in PNe.

  15. Concluding Henrietta Leavitt's Work on Classical Cepheids in the Magellanic System and Other Updates of the OGLE Collection of Variable Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soszyński, I.; Udalski, A.; Szymański, M. K.; Wyrzykowski, Ł.; Ulaczyk, K.; Poleski, R.; Pietrukowicz, P.; Kozłowski, S.; Skowron, D. M.; Skowron, J.; Mróz, P.; Pawlak, M.

    2017-06-01

    More than a century ago, Henrietta Leavitt discovered the first Cepheids in the Magellanic Clouds together with the famous period-luminosity relationship revealed by these stars, which soon after revolutionized our view of the Universe. Over the years, the number of known Cepheids in these galaxies has steadily increased with the breakthrough in the last two decades thanks to the new generation of large-scale long-term sky variability surveys. Here we present the final upgrade of the OGLE Collection of Cepheids in the Magellanic System which already contained the vast majority of known Cepheids. The updated collection now comprises 9649 classical and 262 anomalous Cepheids. Type-II Cepheids will be updated shortly. Thanks to high completeness of the OGLE survey the sample of classical Cepheids includes virtually all stars of this type in the Magellanic Clouds. Thus, the OGLE survey concludes the work started by Henrietta Leavitt. Additionally, the OGLE sample of RR Lyr stars in the Magellanic System has been updated. It now counts 46 443 variables. A collection of seven anomalous Cepheids in the halo of our Galaxy detected in front of the Magellanic Clouds is also presented. OGLE photometric data are available to the astronomical community from the OGLE Internet Archive. The time-series photometry of all pulsating stars in the OGLE Collection has been supplemented with new observations.

  16. Physicochemical characterisation of rVIII-SingleChain, a novel recombinant single-chain factor VIII.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidbauer, Stefan; Witzel, Reinhild; Robbel, Lars; Sebastian, Petra; Grammel, Nicolas; Metzner, Hubert J; Schulte, Stefan

    2015-08-01

    rVIII-SingleChain is a novel recombinant single-chain factor VIII (FVIII) construct, comprising covalently bonded heavy and light chains. Post-translational modifications of FVIII affect physicochemical parameters, including hydrophobicity and charge. The most relevant post-translational modifications of FVIII products are N-glycosylation of asparagine residues and tyrosine sulphations. Here, the physicochemical properties, thrombin cleavage products and post-translational modifications of rVIII-SingleChain were investigated and compared against commercially available recombinant FVIII (rFVIII) products with a predominant two-chain structure (B-domain deleted rFVIII and full-length rFVIII). rVIII-SingleChain was expressed in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells and purified by chromatographic methods. Physicochemical properties of rVIII-SingleChain or thrombin-derived cleavage products were assessed using size-exclusion chromatography, reversed-phase chromatography and sodium dodecyl sulphate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Analysis of the respective carbohydrate structures was performed after release of N-glycans by PNGase F followed by fluorescence labelling and high-performance liquid chromatography. Proteolysis by trypsin generated the corresponding peptides, which were analysed for sulphated tyrosines by liquid chromatography-electrospray ionisation time of flight-mass spectrometry. rVIII-SingleChain was shown to be of high purity and homogeneity, and presented a well-defined single-chain molecule with predominant β-sheet conformation. The coagulation-relevant thrombin-activation products of rVIII-SingleChain were comparable with those obtained by activation of commercially available rFVIII products. rVIII-SingleChain post-translational modifications were similar to other CHO cell-derived rFVIII products for N-glycopattern and tyrosine sulphation. In conclusion, rVIII-SingleChain is of high homogeneity and purity, and provides an expected cleavage pattern on

  17. Kepler sheds new and unprecedented light on the variability of a blue supergiant: Gravity waves in the O9.5Iab star HD 188209

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aerts, C.; Símon-Díaz, S.; Bloemen, S.; Debosscher, J.; Pápics, P. I.; Bryson, S.; Still, M.; Moravveji, E.; Williamson, M. H.; Grundahl, F.; Fredslund Andersen, M.; Antoci, V.; Pallé, P. L.; Christensen-Dalsgaard, J.; Rogers, T. M.

    2017-06-01

    Stellar evolution models are most uncertain for evolved massive stars. Asteroseismology based on high-precision uninterrupted space photometry has become a new way to test the outcome of stellar evolution theory and was recently applied to a multitude of stars, but not yet to massive evolved supergiants.Our aim is to detect, analyse and interpret the photospheric and wind variability of the O9.5 Iab star HD 188209 from Kepler space photometry and long-term high-resolution spectroscopy. We used Kepler scattered-light photometry obtained by the nominal mission during 1460 d to deduce the photometric variability of this O-type supergiant. In addition, we assembled and analysed high-resolution high signal-to-noise spectroscopy taken with four spectrographs during some 1800 d to interpret the temporal spectroscopic variability of the star. The variability of this blue supergiant derived from the scattered-light space photometry is in full in agreement with the one found in the ground-based spectroscopy. We find significant low-frequency variability that is consistently detected in all spectral lines of HD 188209. The photospheric variability propagates into the wind, where it has similar frequencies but slightly higher amplitudes. The morphology of the frequency spectra derived from the long-term photometry and spectroscopy points towards a spectrum of travelling waves with frequency values in the range expected for an evolved O-type star. Convectively-driven internal gravity waves excited in the stellar interior offer the most plausible explanation of the detected variability. Based on photometric observations made with the NASA Kepler satellite and on spectroscopic observations made with four telescopes: the Nordic Optical Telescope operated by NOTSA and the Mercator Telescope operated by the Flemish Community, both at the Observatorio del Roque de los Muchachos (La Palma, Spain) of the Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias, the T13 2.0 m Automatic Spectroscopic

  18. Variability in stellar granulation and convective blueshift with spectral type and magnetic activity . II. From young to old main-sequence K-G-F stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meunier, N.; Mignon, L.; Lagrange, A.-M.

    2017-11-01

    Context. The inhibition of small-scale convection in the Sun dominates the long-term radial velocity (RV) variability: it therefore has a critical effect on light exoplanet detectability using RV techniques. Aims: We here extend our previous analysis of stellar convective blueshift and its dependence on magnetic activity to a larger sample of stars in order to extend the Teff range, to study the impact of other stellar properties, and finally to improve the comparison between observed RV jitter and expected RV variations. Methods: We estimate a differential velocity shift for Fe and Ti lines of different depths and derive an absolute convective blueshift using the Sun as a reference for a sample of 360 F7-K4 stars with different properties (age, Teff, metallicity). Results: We confirm the strong variation in convective blueshift with Teff and its dependence on (as shown in the line list in Paper I) activity level. Although we do not observe a significant effect of age or cyclic activity, stars with a higher metallicity tend to have a lower convective blueshift, with a larger effect than expected from numerical simulations. Finally, we estimate that for 71% of the stars in our sample the RV and Log R' _HK variations are compatible with the effect of activity on convection, as observed in the solar case, while for the other stars, other sources (such as binarity or companions) must be invoked to explain the large RV variations. We also confirm a relationship between Log R' _HK and metallicity, which may affect discussions of the possible relationship between metallicity and exoplanets, as RV surveys are biased toward low Log R' _HK and possibly toward high-metallicity stars. Conclusions: We conclude that activity and metallicity strongly affect the small-scale convection levels in stars in the F7-K4 range, with a lower amplitude for the lower mass stars and a larger amplitude for low-metallicity stars. Full Table A.1 is only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to

  19. Variable stars in Local Group Galaxies - I. Tracing the early chemical enrichment and radial gradients in the Sculptor dSph with RR Lyrae stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Vázquez, C. E.; Monelli, M.; Bono, G.; Stetson, P. B.; Ferraro, I.; Bernard, E. J.; Gallart, C.; Fiorentino, G.; Iannicola, G.; Udalski, A.

    2015-12-01

    We identified and characterized the largest (536) RR Lyrae (RRL) sample in a Milky Way dSph satellite (Sculptor) based on optical photometry data collected over ˜24 years. The RRLs display a spread in V-magnitude (˜0.35 mag) which appears larger than photometric errors and the horizontal branch (HB) luminosity evolution of a mono-metallic population. Using several calibrations of two different reddening free and metal independent period-Wesenheit relations we provide a new distance estimate μ = 19.62 mag (σμ = 0.04 mag) that agrees well with literature estimates. We constrained the metallicity distribution of the old population, using the MI period-luminosity relation, and we found that it ranges from -2.3 to -1.5 dex. The current estimate is narrower than suggested by low and intermediate spectroscopy of RGBs (Δ [Fe/H]≤ 1.5). We also investigated the HB morphology as a function of the galactocentric distance. The HB in the innermost regions is dominated by red HB stars and by RRLs, consistent with a more metal-rich population, while in the outermost regions it is dominated by blue HB stars and RRLs typical of a metal-poor population. Our results suggest that fast chemical evolution occurred in Sculptor, and that the radial gradients were in place at an early epoch.

  20. Blood coagulation factor VIII: An overview

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Factor VIII (FVIII) functions as a co-factor in the blood coagulation cascade for the proteolytic activation of factor X by factor IXa. Deficiency of FVIII causes hemophilia A, the most commonly inherited bleeding disorder. This review highlights current knowledge on selected aspects of FVIII in which both the scientist and the ...

  1. New Variable Stars Discovered by Data Mining Images Taken during Recent Asteroid Photometric Observations. II. Results from July 2015 through December 2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papini, R.; Marchini, A.; Salvaggio, F.; Agnetti, D.; Bacci, P.; Banfi, M.; Bianciardi, G.; Collina, M.; Franco, L.; Galli, G.; Milani, M. G. A.; Lopresti, C.; Marino, G.; Rizzuti, L.; Ruocco, N.; Quadri, U.

    2017-12-01

    This paper follows the previous publication of new variables discovered at Astronomical Observatory, DSFTA, University of Siena, while observing asteroids in order to determine their rotational periods. Usually, this task requires time series images acquisition on a single field for as long as possible on a few nights not necessarily consecutive. Checking continually this "goldmine" allowed us to discover 57 variable stars not yet listed in catalogues or databases. While most of the new variables are eclipsing binaries, a few belong to the RR Lyrae or delta Scuti class. Since asteroid work is definitely a time-consuming activity, coordinated campaigns of follow-up with other observatories have been fundamental in order to determine the elements of the ephemeris and sometimes the right subclass of variability. Further observations of these new variables are therefore strongly encouraged in order to better characterize these stars, especially pulsating ones whose data combined with those taken during professional surveys seem to suggest the presence of light curve amplitude and period variations.

  2. Tidal effects in pulsating stars. III. l=1p/sub 5/-modes in the ellipsoidal variable 14 Aurigae A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fitch, W.S.; Wisniewski, W.Z.

    1979-08-01

    The noneclipsing single-lined spectroscopic binary 14 Aur A has a circular orbit of period 3.78858 days, and the A9 IV primary is a delta Scuti variable. Analysis of our 158 hours of blue light photometry obtained on 40 nights in 1972--1975 and of others' radial velocity measures provides an identification of three standing wave (in the rotating frame) pulsation modes as the tidal m=0, +- 1 substates belonging to an l=1 surface harmonic, with periods, P/sub 1,+1/=0./sup d/088088, P/sub 1,0/=0./sup d/096533, and P/sub 1,-1/=0./sup d/088243. These l=1 surface harmonics are probably p/sub 5/ global modes. The observed amplitudes A/sub l/m of these periods P/sub l/m, when combined with approximate theoretical visibility functions for the integrated flux variations (for l< or approx. =2, vertical-barmvertical-bar< or approx. =l) and with the assumption of energy equipartition among the observed substates, lead to an orbital inclination i=21./sup 0/2 ( +- 1./sup 0/4). The photometrically defined ellipticity of figure of the primary, the orbital velocity variation, published uvby..beta.. photometry and calibrations, pulsation theory, double-star theory, and stellar evolution theory all combine to yield these system characteristics: T/sub e,1/=7900 +- 110 K; M/sub 1//Msun=2.6 +- 0.7; /Rsun=5.2 +- 0.7; /Lsun=96 +- 26; Q/sub 1/=0./sup d/0124 +- 0./sup d/0011; M/sub 2//Msun=1.1 +- 0.3. The relative differences in the principal semiaxes are (b/sub 1/--b/sub 2/)/ =0.022 +- 0.004 and (b/sub 2/--b/sub 3/)/=0.025 +- 0.004 if rotation is synchronous with orbital motion. Both components of the binary are well detached from their respective Roche lobes. The relative amplitudes and phase of the pulsations in light and velocity agree satisfactorily with both theory and other observations.

  3. Rotationally modulated variability and pulsations of the He-rich star CPD -62°2124 with an extraordinarily strong magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubrig, S.; Mikulášek, Z.; Kholtygin, A. F.; Ilyin, I.; Schöller, M.; Järvinen, S. P.; Scholz, R.-D.; Zejda, M.

    2017-11-01

    A longitudinal magnetic field with a strength of 5.2 kG was recently detected in CPD -62°2124, which has a fractional main-sequence lifetime of about 60 per cent. Strongly magnetic early-B type chemically peculiar stars in an advanced evolutionary state are of special interest to understand the evolution of the angular momentum and spin-down time-scales in the presence of a global magnetic field. We made use of 17 FORS 2 low-resolution spectropolarimetric observations and 844 ASAS3 photometric measurements for the determination of the rotation period, pulsationsand the magnetic field geometry of the star. We calculated periodograms and applied phenomenological models of photometric, spectral and spectropolarimetric variability. We found that all quantities studied, specifically equivalent widths, the mean longitudinal magnetic field 〈Bz〉 and the flux in the V filter, vary with the same period P = 2.628 d, which was identified as the rotation period. The observed variations can be fully explained by a rigidly rotating main-sequence star with an uneven distribution of chemical elements, photometric spots and a stable, nearly dipolar magnetic field with a polar field strength of about 21 kG, frozen into the body of the star. The magnetic field of CPD -62°2124 is tilted to the rotation axis by β = 28° ± 7°, while the inclination of the rotation axis towards the line of sight is only I = 20° ± 5°. In the acquired FORS 2 spectra, we detect short-term line profile variations indicating the presence of β Cephei type pulsations. As of today, no other pulsating star of this type is known to possess such a strong magnetic field.

  4. The Seyfert 2 galaxy NGC 2110: hard X-ray emission observed by NuSTAR and variability of the iron Kα line

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marinucci, A.; Matt, G.; Bianchi, S.

    2015-01-01

    We present NuSTAR observations of the bright Seyfert 2 galaxy NGC 2110 obtained in 2012, when the source was at the highest flux level ever observed, and in 2013, when the source was at a more typical flux level. We include archival observations from other X-ray satellites, namely XMM-Newton, Suz......We present NuSTAR observations of the bright Seyfert 2 galaxy NGC 2110 obtained in 2012, when the source was at the highest flux level ever observed, and in 2013, when the source was at a more typical flux level. We include archival observations from other X-ray satellites, namely XMM...... is found and, by using temporal information collected over more than a decade, we investigate variations of the iron Kα line on time-scales of years. The Fe K alpha line is likely the sum of two components: one constant (originating from distant Compton-thick material) and the other one variable...

  5. An extremely luminous and variable ultraluminous x-ray source in the outskirts of circinus observed with NuSTAR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Walton, D. J.; Fuerst, F.; Harrison, F.

    2013-01-01

    Following a serendipitous detection with the Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR), we present a multi-epoch spectral and temporal analysis of an extreme ultraluminous X-ray source (ULX) located in the outskirts of the Circinus galaxy, hereafter Circinus ULX5, including coordinated XMM-N...

  6. The Variable Quiescent X-Ray Emission of the Neutron Star Transient XTE J1701-462

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fridriksson, Joel K.; Homan, J.; Wijnands, R.; Cackett, E. M.; Degenaar, N.; Mendez, M.; Altamirano, D.; Brown, E. F.; Belloni, T. M.; Lewin, W. H. G.

    We have monitored the cooling of the neutron star in the transient low-mass X-ray binary XTE J1701-462 with Chandra and XMM-Newton since the source entered quiescence in 2007 after an exceptionally luminous 19-month outburst. A recent Chandra observation made almost 1200 days into quiescence

  7. Mid-Infrared Interferometric Monitoring of Evolved Stars: The Dust Shell Around the Mira Variable RR Aquilae at 13 Epochs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Prescribed by ANSI Std Z39-18 A&A 532, A134 (2011) the planetary nebula phase, leaving the core as a white dwarf . Generally many aspects of the...mass loss is important, as AGB stars play a cru- cial role in the chemical enrichment and evolution of galaxies by returning gas and dust to the ISM

  8. Dance of the double stars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Theokas, A.

    1985-09-19

    The paper concerns pairs of stars orbiting one another. The evolutionary path model for close binary stars, involving a mass transfer of gases between the stars, is described. The life history of a single star; cataclysmic variables; the algol paradox, matter and lagranges' point; x-ray binaries and bursters; and pulsars; are all briefly discussed.

  9. Heat transfer burnout of Mark VIII fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernath, L.

    1956-08-01

    The operating conditions to which the special Mark VIII quatrefoils will be exposed during the proposed piloting program have been compared with the conditions required to cause burnout, using an established method of calculating these conditions. The results of this comparison permit the following conclusions to be drawn: (1) With normal flow of coolant through the special elements the heat flux to be encountered in the R-8 cycle (1400 MW) will be 70% or that required to cause burnout (30% margin from burnout). (2) With a reduction of coolant flow to 82% of normal through one tube of a special element, burnout of that fuel column is possible in the R-8 cycle. (3) In the R-6 cycle (1280 MW), the margin from burnout in the special Mark VIII quatrefoils is 42% with full flow and 20% with the above reduced coolant flow. A similar comparison of operating conditions predicted for the L-3 cycle (full Mark VIII charge) shows that, even at the highest power level (1250 MW), the margin from burnout is greater than 55% with normal flow and 40% with reduced flow.

  10. Investigating the origin of cyclical wind variability in hot massive stars - II. Hydrodynamical simulations of corotating interaction regions using realistic spot parameters for the O giant ξ Persei

    Science.gov (United States)

    David-Uraz, A.; Owocki, S. P.; Wade, G. A.; Sundqvist, J. O.; Kee, N. D.

    2017-09-01

    OB stars exhibit various types of spectral variability historically associated with wind structures, including the apparently ubiquitous discrete absorption components (DACs). These features have been proposed to be caused either by magnetic fields or non-radial pulsations. In this second paper of this series, we revisit the canonical phenomenological hydrodynamical modelling used to explain the formation of DACs by taking into account modern observations and more realistic theoretical predictions. Using constraints on putative bright spots located on the surface of the O giant ξ Persei derived from high precision space-based broad-band optical photometry obtained with the Microvariability and Oscillations of Stars (MOST) space telescope, we generate 2D hydrodynamical simulations of corotating interaction regions in its wind. We then compute synthetic ultraviolet (UV) resonance line profiles using Sobolev Exact Integration and compare them with historical timeseries obtained by the International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE) to evaluate if the observed behaviour of ξ Persei's DACs is reproduced. Testing three different models of spot size and strength, we find that the classical pattern of variability can be successfully reproduced for two of them: the model with the smallest spots yields absorption features that are incompatible with observations. Furthermore, we test the effect of the radial dependence of ionization levels on line driving, but cannot conclusively assess the importance of this factor. In conclusion, this study self-consistently links optical photometry and UV spectroscopy, paving the way to a better understanding of cyclical wind variability in massive stars in the context of the bright spot paradigm.

  11. Luminous and Variable Stars in M31 and M33. IV. Luminous Blue Variables, Candidate LBVs, B[e] Supergiants, and the Warm Hypergiants: How to Tell Them Apart

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphreys, Roberta M.; Gordon, Michael S.; Martin, John C.; Weis, Kerstin; Hahn, David

    2017-02-01

    In this series of papers we have presented the results of a spectroscopic survey of luminous stars in the nearby spirals M31 and M33. Here, we present spectroscopy of 132 additional stars. Most have emission-line spectra, including luminous blue variables (LBVs) and candidate LBVs, Fe II emission line stars, the B[e] supergiants, and the warm hypergiants. Many of these objects are spectroscopically similar and are often confused with each other. We examine their similarities and differences and propose the following guidelines that can be used to help distinguish these stars in future work. (1) The B[e] supergiants have emission lines of [O I] and [Fe II] in their spectra. Most of the spectroscopically confirmed sgB[e] stars also have warm circumstellar dust in their spectral energy distributions (SEDs). (2) Confirmed LBVs do not have the [O I] emission lines in their spectra. Some LBVs have [Fe II] emission lines, but not all. Their SEDs show free-free emission in the near-infrared but no evidence for warm dust. Their most important and defining characteristic is the S Dor-type variability. (3) The warm hypergiants spectroscopically resemble the LBVs in their dense wind state and the B[e] supergiants. However, they are very dusty. Some have [Fe II] and [O I] emission in their spectra like the sgB[e] stars, but are distinguished by their A- and F-type absorption-line spectra. In contrast, the B[e] supergiant spectra have strong continua and few if any apparent absorption lines. Candidate LBVs should share the spectral characteristics of the confirmed LBVs with low outflow velocities and the lack of warm circumstellar dust. Based on observations with the Multiple Mirror Telescope, a joint facility of the Smithsonian Institution and the University of Arizona and on observations obtained with the Large Binocular Telescope (LBT), an international collaboration among institutions in the United States, Italy, and Germany. LBT Corporation partners are The University of

  12. SN2015bh: NGC2770's 4th supernova or a luminous blue variable on its way to a Wolf-Rayet star?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thone, C. C.; de Ugarte Postigo, A.; Leloudas, G.

    2017-01-01

    shell plunging into a dense CSM. The emission lines show a single narrow P Cygni profile during the LBV phase and a double P Cygni profile post maximum suggesting an association of the second component with the possible SN. Since 1994 the star has been redder than an LBV in an S-Dor-like outburst. SN......Very massive stars in the final phases of their lives often show unpredictable outbursts that can mimic supernovae, so-called, "SN impostors", but the distinction is not always straightforward. Here we present observations of a luminous blue variable (LBV) in NGC2770 in outburst over more than 20...... 2015bh lies within a spiral arm of NGC2770 next to several small star-forming regions with a metallicity of similar to 0.5 solar and a stellar population age of 7-10 Myr. SN 2015bh shares many similarities with SN 2009ip and may form a new class of objects that exhibit outbursts a few decades prior...

  13. Rapid X-ray variability properties during the unusual very hard state in neutron-star low-mass X-ray binaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijnands, R.; Parikh, A. S.; Altamirano, D.; Homan, J.; Degenaar, N.

    2017-11-01

    Here, we study the rapid X-ray variability (using XMM-Newton observations) of three neutron-star low-mass X-ray binaries (1RXS J180408.9-342058, EXO 1745-248 and IGR J18245-2452) during their recently proposed very hard spectral state. All our systems exhibit a strong to very strong noise component in their power density spectra (rms amplitudes ranging from 34 per cent to 102 per cent) with very low characteristic frequencies (as low as 0.01 Hz). These properties are more extreme than what is commonly observed in the canonical hard state of neutron-star low-mass X-ray binaries observed at X-ray luminosities similar to those we observe from our sources. This suggests that indeed the very hard state is a spectral-timing state distinct from the hard state, although we argue that the variability behaviour of IGR J18245-2452 is very extreme and possibly this source was in a very unusual state. We also compare our results with the rapid X-ray variability of the accreting millisecond X-ray pulsars IGR J00291+5934 and Swift J0911.9-6452 (also using XMM-Newton data) for which previously similar variability phenomena were observed. Although their energy spectra (as observed using the Swift X-ray telescope) were not necessarily as hard (i.e. for Swift J0911.9-6452) as for our other three sources, we conclude that likely both sources were also in very similar state during their XMM-Newton observations. This suggests that different sources that are found in this new state might exhibit different spectral hardness and one has to study both the spectral and the rapid variability to identify this unusual state.

  14. Preparing for ENDF/B-VIII

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, David

    2017-09-01

    Although the next major release of the ENDF/B library is not due until the 2017-2018 time frame, ENDF/B-VIII is already positioned to become the most important release of the library in some time. ENDF/B-VIII will be built around the Neutron Reaction Standards as well as the 1H, 16O, 56Fe, 235U, 238U and 239Pu evaluations developed as part of the Coordinated International Evaluation Library Organization (CIELO) pilot project. In this contribution, we summarize these improvements as well as the many other improvements to ENDF that have already been made or are scheduled to be made in the next year. Improvements already included in the ENDF/B-VIII beta releases: • Aggressive use of the flexible and physically correct LRF=7 resolved resonance format in 12 updated evaluations (35,37Cl, 40Ca, 54,56,57Fe, 63,65Cu and 182,183,184,186W) • Thermal capture gammas from the EGAF project (6,7Li, 11B, 19F, 23Na, 27Al, 28Si, 35,37Cl) • Thermal Scattering Law evaluations from NCSU (α and β phase SiO2, SiC, lucite, BeO, and polyethylene) and from the CAB-CNL collaboration (heavy and light water) • Many new evaluations in the neutron sublibrary (n, 12,13C, 40Ar, 54,57,58Fe, 58,59,60,61,62,64Ni, 63,65Cu, 73As, 120Sn, 236m1Np) Inclusion of Red Cullen's EPICS2014 library, updating the photo-atomic, electron and atomic-relaxation sublibraries. Many improvements are planned in the next year including new evaluations such as charged particle evaluations translated from LLNL's ECPL. In addition to these major changes, ENDF/B-VIII will be the first official library released simultaneously in the legacy ENDF-6 and the newly developed Generalized Nuclear Data (GND) formats.

  15. High-resolution TNG spectra of T Tauri stars. Near-IR GIANO observations of the young variables XZ Tauri and DR Tauri

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antoniucci, S.; Nisini, B.; Biazzo, K.; Giannini, T.; Lorenzetti, D.; Sanna, N.; Harutyunyan, A.; Origlia, L.; Oliva, E.

    2017-10-01

    Aims: We aim to characterise the star-disk interaction region in T Tauri stars that show photometric and spectroscopic variability. Methods: We used the GIANO instrument at the Telescopio Nazionale Galileo to obtain near-infrared high-resolution spectra (R 50 000) of XZ Tau and DR Tau, which are two actively accreting T Tauri stars classified as EXors. Equivalent widths and profiles of the observed features are used to derive information on the properties of the inner disk, the accretion columns, and the winds. Results: Both sources display composite H I line profiles, where contributions from both accreting gas and high-velocity winds can be recognised. These lines are progressively more symmetric and narrower with increasing upper energy which may be interpreted in terms of two components with different decrements or imputed to self-absorption effects. XZ Tau is observed in a relatively high state of activity with respect to literature observations. The variation of the He I 1.08 μm line blue-shifted absorption, in particular, suggests that the inner wind has undergone a dramatic change in its velocity structure, connected with a recent accretion event. DR Tau has a more stable wind as its He I 1.08 μm absorption does not show variations with time in spite of strong variability of the emission component. The IR veiling in the two sources can be interpreted as due to blackbody emission at temperatures of 1600 K and 2300 K for XZ Tau and DR Tau, respectively, with emitting areas 30 times larger than the central star. While for XZ Tau these conditions are consistent with emission from the inner rim of the dusty disk, the fairly high temperature inferred for DR Tau might suggest that its veiling originates from a thick gaseous disk located within the dust sublimation radius. Strong and broad metallic lines, mainly from C I and Fe I, are detected in XZ Tau, similar to those observed in other EXor sources during burst phases. At variance, DR Tau shows weaker and

  16. Multi-technique investigation of the binary fraction of A-F type candidate hybrid variable stars discovered by Kepler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lampens, P.; Frémat, Y.; Vermeylen, L.; Sódor, Á.; Skarka, M.; De Cat, P.; Bognár, Zs.; De Nutte, R.; Dumortier, L.; Escorza, A.; Oomen, G. M.; Van de Steene, G.; Kamath, D.; Laverick, M.; Samadi, A.; Triana, S.; Lehmann, H.

    2018-02-01

    Context. Hundreds of candidate hybrid pulsators of intermediate type A-F were revealed by recent space missions. Hybrid pulsators allow us to study the full stellar interiors, where both low-order p- and high-order g-modes are simultaneously excited. The true hybrid stars must be identified since other processes, related to stellar multiplicity or rotation, might explain the presence of (some) low frequencies observed in their periodograms. Aims: We measured the radial velocities of 50 candidate δ Scuti -γ Doradus hybrid stars from the Kepler mission with the Hermes and ACE spectrographs over a time span of months to years. We aim to derive the fraction of binary and multiple systems and to provide an independent and homogeneous determination of the atmospheric properties and v sin i for all targets. The long(er)-term objective is to identify the (probable) physical cause of the low frequencies. Methods: We computed one-dimensional cross-correlation functions (CCFs) in order to find the best set of parameters in terms of the number of components, spectral type(s), and v sin i for each target. Radial velocities were measured using spectrum synthesis and a two-dimensional cross-correlation technique in the case of double- and triple-lined systems. Fundamental parameters were determined by fitting (composite) synthetic spectra to the normalised median spectra corrected for the appropriate Doppler shifts. Results: We report on the analysis of 478 high-resolution Hermes and 41 ACE spectra of A/F-type candidate hybrid pulsators from the Kepler field. We determined their radial velocities, projected rotational velocities, and atmospheric properties and classified our targets based on the shape of the CCFs and the temporal behaviour of the radial velocities. We derived orbital solutions for seven new systems. Three preliminary long-period orbital solutions are confirmed by a photometric time-delay analysis. Finally, we determined a global multiplicity fraction of 27% in

  17. Non-contrast-enhanced 4D MR angiography with STAR spin labeling and variable flip angle sampling: a feasibility study for the assessment of Dural Arteriovenous Fistula

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, Jinhee; Kim, Bom-yi; Choi, Hyun Seok; Jung, So-Lyung; Ahn, Kook-Jin; Kim, Bum-soo [The Catholic University of Korea, Department of Radiology, Seoul St. Mary' s Hospital, College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Schmitt, Peter [Siemens AG, Healthcare Sector, Erlangen (Germany); Kim, Inseong; Paek, Munyoung [Siemens AG, Healthcare, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-04-15

    This study aimed to evaluate the feasibility of non-contrast-enhanced 4D magnetic resonance angiography (NCE 4D MRA) with signal targeting with alternative radiofrequency (STAR) spin labeling and variable flip angle (VFA) sampling in the assessment of dural arteriovenous fistula (DAVF) in the transverse sinus. Nine patients underwent NCE 4D MRA for the evaluation of DAVF in the transverse sinus at 3 T. One patient was examined twice, once before and once after the interventional treatment. All patients also underwent digital subtraction angiography (DSA) and/or contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (CEMRA). For the acquisition of NCE 4D MRA, a STAR spin tagging method was used, and a VFA sampling was applied in the data readout module instead of a constant flip angle. Two readers evaluated the NCE 4D MRA data for the diagnosis of DAVF and its type with consensus. The results were compared with those from DSA and/or CEMRA. All patients underwent NCE 4D MRA without any difficulty. Among seven patients with patent DAVFs, all cases showed an early visualization of the transverse sinus on NCE 4D MRA. Except for one case, the type of DAVF of NCE 4D MRA was agreed with that of reference standard study. Cortical venous reflux (CVR) was demonstrated in two cases out of three patients with CVR. NCE 4D MRA with STAR tagging and VFA sampling is technically and clinically feasible and represents a promising technique for assessment of DAVF in the transverse sinus. Further technical developments should aim at improvements of spatial and temporal coverage. (orig.)

  18. A new method for studying the thermospheric density variability derived from CHAMP/STAR accelerometer data for magnetically active conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Menvielle

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Thermospheric densities deduced from STAR accelerometer measurements onboard the CHAMP satellite are used to characterize the thermosphere and its response to space weather events. The STAR thermospheric density estimates are analysed using a Singular Value Decomposition (SVD approach allowing one to decouple large scale spatial and temporal variations from fast and local transients. Because SVD achieves such decomposition by using the reproducibility of orbital variations, it provides more meaningful results than any method based upon data smoothing or filtering.

    SVD analysis enables us to propose a new thermosphere proxy, based on the projection coefficient of the CHAMP densities on the first singular vector. The large scale spatial variations in the density, mostly related to altitude/latitude variations are captured by the first singular vector; time variations are captured by the associated projection coefficient.

    The study presented here is focused on time dependent global scale variations in the thermospheric density between 50 N and 50 S geographic latitudes. We show that the time variations in the projection coefficient do in fact represent those in the global density that are associated with magnetic activity as well as with solar EUV radiations. We also show that the NRLMSISE-00 empirical model better accounts for the density forcing by Solar radiations when tuned using Mg II indices. Using the so modified model with an additional geomagnetic parameterization corresponding to quiet geomagnetic situation enables one to define time reference values which are then used to evaluate the impact of geomagnetic activity. The ratio of CHAMP density projection coefficient to the quiet model projection coefficient is a global quantity, independent of altitude and latitude, which quantifies the thermospheric density response to auroral energy deposition. It will serve as a proxy of the response of thermospheric density to

  19. A new method for studying the thermospheric density variability derived from CHAMP/STAR accelerometer data for magnetically active conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Menvielle

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Thermospheric densities deduced from STAR accelerometer measurements onboard the CHAMP satellite are used to characterize the thermosphere and its response to space weather events. The STAR thermospheric density estimates are analysed using a Singular Value Decomposition (SVD approach allowing one to decouple large scale spatial and temporal variations from fast and local transients. Because SVD achieves such decomposition by using the reproducibility of orbital variations, it provides more meaningful results than any method based upon data smoothing or filtering. SVD analysis enables us to propose a new thermosphere proxy, based on the projection coefficient of the CHAMP densities on the first singular vector. The large scale spatial variations in the density, mostly related to altitude/latitude variations are captured by the first singular vector; time variations are captured by the associated projection coefficient. The study presented here is focused on time dependent global scale variations in the thermospheric density between 50 N and 50 S geographic latitudes. We show that the time variations in the projection coefficient do in fact represent those in the global density that are associated with magnetic activity as well as with solar EUV radiations. We also show that the NRLMSISE-00 empirical model better accounts for the density forcing by Solar radiations when tuned using Mg II indices. Using the so modified model with an additional geomagnetic parameterization corresponding to quiet geomagnetic situation enables one to define time reference values which are then used to evaluate the impact of geomagnetic activity. The ratio of CHAMP density projection coefficient to the quiet model projection coefficient is a global quantity, independent of altitude and latitude, which quantifies the thermospheric density response to auroral energy deposition. It will serve as a proxy of the response of thermospheric density to geomagnetic activity

  20. Evaluation of B&W UO2/ThO2 VIII experimental core: criticality and thermal disadvantage factor analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlo Parisi; Emanuele Negrenti

    2017-02-01

    In the framework of the OECD/NEA International Reactor Physics Experiment (IRPHE) Project, an evaluation of core VIII of the Babcock & Wilcox (B&W) Spectral Shift Control Reactor (SSCR) critical experiment program was performed. The SSCR concept, moderated and cooled by a variable mixture of heavy and light water, envisaged changing of the thermal neutron spectrum during the operation to encourage breeding and to sustain the core criticality. Core VIII contained 2188 fuel rods with 93% enriched UO2-ThO2 fuel in a moderator mixture of heavy and light water. The criticality experiment and measurements of the thermal disadvantage factor were evaluated.

  1. 12 CFR 611.1137 - Title VIII service corporations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Title VIII service corporations. 611.1137 Section 611.1137 Banks and Banking FARM CREDIT ADMINISTRATION FARM CREDIT SYSTEM ORGANIZATION Service... authorities granted under title VIII of the Act to act as an agricultural mortgage marketing facility. (b) How...

  2. The influence of prophylactic factor VIII in severe hemophilia A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gissel, Matthew; Whelihan, Matthew F; Ferris, Lauren A; Mann, Kenneth G; Rivard, Georges E; Brummel-Ziedins, Kathleen E

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Hemophilia A individuals displaying a similar genetic defect have heterogeneous clinical phenotypes. Aim To evaluate the underlying effect of exogenous factor (f)VIII on tissue factor (Tf)-initiated blood coagulation in severe hemophilia utilizing both empirical and computational models. Methods We investigated twenty-five clinically severe hemophilia A patients. All individuals were on fVIII prophylaxis and had not received fVIII from 0.25 to 4 days prior to phlebotomy. Coagulation was initiated by the addition of Tf to contact-pathway inhibited whole blood ± an anti-fVIII antibody. Aliquots were quenched over 20 min and analyzed for thrombin generation and fibrin formation. Coagulation factor levels were obtained and used to computationally predict thrombin generation with fVIII set to either zero or its value at the time of the draw. Results Due to prophylactic fVIII, at the time of the blood draw, the individuals had fVIII levels that ranged from hemophilia A. The combination of each individual's coagulation factors (outside of fVIII) determine each individual's baseline thrombin potential and may affect bleeding risk. PMID:21899664

  3. Constraints on Variability of Brightness and Surface Magnetism on Time Scales of Decades to Centuries in the Sun and Sun-Like Stars: A Source of Potential Terrestrial Climate Variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baliunas, Sallie L.; Sharber, James (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    These four points summarize our work to date. (1) Conciliation of solar and stellar photometric variability. Previous research by us and colleagues suggested that the Sun might at present be showing unusually low photometric variability compared to other sun-like stars. Those early results would question the suitability of the technique of using sun-like stars as proxies for solar irradiance change on time scales of decades to centuries. However, our results indicate the contrary: the Sun's observed short-term (seasonal) and longterm (year-to-year) brightness variations closely agree with observed brightness variations in stars of similar mass and age. (2) We have demonstrated an inverse correlation between the global temperature of the terrestrial lower troposphere, inferred from the NASA Microwave Sounding Unit (MSU) radiometers, and the total area of the Sun covered by coronal holes from January 1979 to present (up to May 2000). Variable fluxes of either solar charged particles or cosmic rays, or both, may influence the terrestrial tropospheric temperature. The geographical pattern of the correlation is consistent with our interpretation of an extra-terrestrial charged particle forcing. (3) Possible climate mechanism amplifying the impact of solar ultraviolet irradiance variations. The key points of our proposed climate hypersensitivity mechanism are: (a) The Sun is more variable in the UV (ultraviolet) than in the visible. However, the increased UV irradiance is mainly absorbed in the lower stratosphere/upper troposphere rather than at the surface. (b) Absorption in the stratosphere raises the temperature moderately around the vicinity of the tropopause, and tends to stabilize the atmosphere against vertical convective/diffusive transport, thus decreasing the flux of heat and moisture carried upward from surface. (c) The decrease in the upward convection of heat and moisture tends to raise the surface temperature because a drier upper atmosphere becomes less

  4. VLT/X-shooter observations of the low-metallicity blue compact dwarf galaxy PHL 293B including a luminous blue variable star

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izotov, Y. I.; Guseva, N. G.; Fricke, K. J.; Henkel, C.

    2011-09-01

    Context. We present VLT/X-shooter spectroscopic observations in the wavelength range λλ3000-23 000 Å of the extremely metal-deficient blue compact dwarf (BCD) galaxy PHL 293B containing a luminous blue variable (LBV) star and compare them with previous data. Aims: This BCD is one of the two lowest-metallicity galaxies where LBV stars were detected, allowing us to study the LBV phenomenon in the extremely low metallicity regime. Methods: We determine abundances of nitrogen, oxygen, neon, sulfur, argon, and iron by analyzing the fluxes of narrow components of the emission lines using empirical methods and study the properties of the LBV from the fluxes and widths of broad emission lines. Results: We derive an interstellar oxygen abundance of 12+log O/H = 7.71 ± 0.02, which is in agreement with previous determinations. The observed fluxes of narrow Balmer, Paschen and Brackett hydrogen lines correspond to the theoretical recombination values after correction for extinction with a single value C(Hβ) = 0.225. This implies that the star-forming region observed in the optical range is the only source of ionisation and there is no additional source of ionisation that is seen in the NIR range but is hidden in the optical range. We detect three v = 1-0 vibrational lines of molecular hydrogen. Their flux ratios and non-detection of v = 2-1 and 3-1 emission lines suggest that collisional excitation is the main source producing H2 lines. For the LBV star in PHL 293B we find broad emission with P Cygni profiles in several Balmer hydrogen emission lines and for the first time in several Paschen hydrogen lines and in several He i emission lines, implying temporal evolution of the LBV on a time scale of 8 years. The Hα luminosity of the LBV star is by one order of magnitude higher than the one obtained for the LBV star in NGC 2363 ≡ Mrk 71 which has a slightly higher metallicity 12+logO/H = 7.87. The terminal velocity of the stellar wind in the low-metallicity LBV of PHL293

  5. NuSTAR detection of high-energy X-ray emission and rapid variability from sagittarius A* flares

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barrière, Nicolas M.; Tomsick, John A.; Baganoff, Frederick K.

    2014-01-01

    Sagittarius A* harbors the supermassive black hole that lies at the dynamical center of our Galaxy. Sagittarius A* spends most of its time in a low luminosity emission state but flares frequently in the infrared and X-ray, increasing up to a few hundred fold in brightness for up to a few hours...... at a time. The physical processes giving rise to the X-ray flares are uncertain. Here we report the detection with the NuSTAR observatory in Summer and Fall 2012 of four low to medium amplitude X-ray flares to energies up to 79 keV. For the first time, we clearly see that the power-law spectrum...... of Sagittarius A* X-ray flares extends to high energy, with no evidence for a cutoff. Although the photon index of the absorbed power-law fits are in agreement with past observations, we find a difference between the photon index of two of the flares (significant at the 95% confidence level). The spectra...

  6. The Astrophysics of Emission-Line Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Kogure, Tomokazu

    2007-01-01

    Many types of stars show conspicuous emission lines in their optical spectra. These stars are broadly referred to as emission line stars. Emission line stars are attractive to many people because of their spectacular phenomena and their variability. The Astrophysics of Emission Line Stars offers general information on emission line stars, starting from a brief introduction to stellar astrophysics, and then moving toward a broad overview of emission line stars including early and late type stars as well as pre-main sequence stars. Detailed references have been prepared along with an index for further reading.

  7. Additional photoelectric observations and analysis of the variability of the beta Cephei stars 12 and 16 Lacertae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarzebowski, T.; Jerzykiewicz, M.; Rios Herrera, M.; Rios Berumen, M.

    1980-04-01

    We present photoelectric observations of two Cephei variables - 12 and 16 Lacertae- made in 1977 in the Observatory of Zacatecas. The results of a frequency analysis made with these data and with the data obtained in the same year at the San Pedro Martir, Chiran and Bialkow Observatories are also given.

  8. Bilateral Renal Vein Thrombosis due to Elevated Factor VIII Levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patole, Shalom; Ramya, I

    2015-08-01

    Recent evidence has shown that high level of factor VIII is associated with increased risk of thromboembolism. High factor VIII levels are associated with a seven-fold increase in the risk of venous thrombosis. Renal vein thrombosis is usually associated with nephrotic syndrome, procoagulant state or oral contraceptive pills. We report a case of a lady who presented with bilateral renal vein thrombosis due to high factor VIII levels and oral contraceptive pills (OCP) use. © Journal of the Association of Physicians of India 2011.

  9. Factoring in Factor VIII With Acute Ischemic Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegler, James E; Samai, Alyana; Albright, Karen C; Boehme, Amelia K; Martin-Schild, Sheryl

    2015-10-01

    There is growing research interest into the etiologies of cryptogenic stroke, in particular as it relates to hypercoagulable states. An elevation in serum levels of the procoagulant factor VIII is recognized as one such culprit of occult cerebral infarctions. It is the objective of the present review to summarize the molecular role of factor VIII in thrombogenesis and its clinical use in the diagnosis and prognosis of acute ischemic stroke. We also discuss the utility of screening for serum factor VIII levels among patients at risk for, or those who have experienced, ischemic stroke. © The Author(s) 2015.

  10. Study of a Variable Star Discovered with the 0.5-M F/1 Baker-nunn Patrol Camera of the RAO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenhardt, Tyler; Williams, M.; Milone, E.; Langill, P.

    2006-06-01

    At the Rothney Astrophysical Observatory (RAO) of the University of Calgary, the Baker-Nunn Patrol Camera (BNPC) has discovered dozens of variable stars. Follow-up observations on RAOVS001-000107, a close binary system, were carried out using the 0.4-m telescope at the RAO. Whereas the BNPC is limited to a single passband ( RJ) the 0.4-m telescope provides observations in UBVRI passbands, fills in gaps in the BNPC light curve, and provides higher-resolution images. The measured light curve will be analyzed with a version of the Wilson-Devinney program (WD2006) developed by J. Kallrath and EM to attempt to determine as many of this stellar systems' fundamental properties. RAOVS001-000107 was discovered by MW, who developed the pipeline process to carry out image processing, identify variables, and produce preliminary light curves. The field of the camera is 19 square degrees.The BNPC was developed under a provincial research infrastructure improvement grant from the Alberta Science Research Authority to EM and A. Hildebrand, with major contributions from several partners and other agencies. The FLI CCD has been available by special arrangement with Peter Brown, UWO. This work has been funded in part with Canadian NSERC grants to EM and a federal SCPP grant, for which TL is appreciative.

  11. Stark broadening parameter tables for K VIII and K IX

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitrijević M.S.

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Using a semiclassical approach, we have calculated electron−, proton−, and He III−impact line widths and shifts for 4 K VIII and 30 K IX multiplets as a function of temperature and perturber density.

  12. Abnormal cerebellar development and ataxia in CARP VIII morphant zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aspatwar, Ashok; Tolvanen, Martti E E; Jokitalo, Eija; Parikka, Mataleena; Ortutay, Csaba; Harjula, Sanna-Kaisa E; Rämet, Mika; Vihinen, Mauno; Parkkila, Seppo

    2013-02-01

    Congenital ataxia and mental retardation are mainly caused by variations in the genes that affect brain development. Recent reports have shown that mutations in the CA8 gene are associated with mental retardation and ataxia in humans and ataxia in mice. The gene product, carbonic anhydrase-related protein VIII (CARP VIII), is predominantly present in cerebellar Purkinje cells, where it interacts with the inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor type 1, a calcium channel. In this study, we investigated the effects of the loss of function of CARP VIII during embryonic development in zebrafish using antisense morpholino oligonucleotides against the CA8 gene. Knockdown of CA8 in zebrafish larvae resulted in a curved body axis, pericardial edema and abnormal movement patterns. Histologic examination revealed gross morphologic defects in the cerebellar region and in the muscle. Electron microscopy studies showed increased neuronal cell death in developing larvae injected with CA8 antisense morpholinos. These data suggest a pivotal role for CARP VIII during embryonic development. Furthermore, suppression of CA8 expression leads to defects in motor and coordination functions, mimicking the ataxic human phenotype. This work reveals an evolutionarily conserved function of CARP VIII in brain development and introduces a novel zebrafish model in which to investigate the mechanisms of CARP VIII-related ataxia and mental retardation in humans.

  13. Factor VIII/V C-domain swaps reveal discrete C-domain roles in factor VIII function and intracellular trafficking

    OpenAIRE

    Ebberink, Eduard H T M; Bouwens, Eveline A. M.; Bloem, Esther; Boon-Spijker, Mariëtte; van den Biggelaar, Maartje; Voorberg, Jan; Alexander B. Meijer; Mertens, Koen

    2017-01-01

    Factor VIII C-domains are believed to have specific functions in cofactor activity and in interactions with von Willebrand factor. We have previously shown that factor VIII is co-targeted with von Willebrand factor to the Weibel-Palade bodies in blood outgrowth endothelial cells, even when factor VIII carries mutations in the light chain that are associated with defective von Willebrand factor binding. In this study, we addressed the contribution of individual factor VIII C-domains in intrace...

  14. Stars and Star Myths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eason, Oliver

    Myths and tales from around the world about constellations and facts about stars in the constellations are presented. Most of the stories are from Greek and Roman mythology; however, a few Chinese, Japanese, Polynesian, Arabian, Jewish, and American Indian tales are also included. Following an introduction, myths are presented for the following 32…

  15. 2FGL J0846.0+2820: A New Neutron Star Binary with a Giant Secondary and Variable γ-Ray Emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swihart, Samuel J.; Strader, Jay; Johnson, Tyrel J.; Cheung, C. C.; Sand, David; Chomiuk, Laura; Wasserman, Asher; Larsen, Søren; Brodie, Jean P.; Simonian, Gregory V.; Tremou, Evangelia; Shishkovsky, Laura; Reichart, Daniel E.; Haislip, Joshua

    2017-12-01

    We present optical photometric and spectroscopic observations of the likely stellar counterpart to the unassociated Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) γ-ray source 2FGL J0846.0+2820, selected for study based on positional coincidences of optical variables with unassociated LAT sources. Using optical spectroscopy from the SOAR telescope, we have identified a late-G giant in an eccentric (e = 0.06) 8.133-day orbit with an invisible primary. Modeling the spectroscopy and photometry together led us to infer a heavy neutron star primary of ˜ 2 {M}⊙ and a partially stripped giant secondary of ˜ 0.8 {M}⊙ . Hα emission is observed in some of the spectra, perhaps consistent with the presence of a faint accretion disk. We find that the γ-ray flux of 2FGL J0846.0+2820 dropped substantially in mid-2009, accompanied by an increased variation in the optical brightness, and since then, it has not been detected by Fermi. The long period and giant secondary are reminiscent of the γ-ray bright binary 1FGL J1417.7-4407, which hosts a millisecond pulsar (MSP) apparently in the final stages of the pulsar recycling process. The discovery of 2FGL J0846.0+2820 suggests the identification of a new subclass of MSP binaries that are the likely progenitors of typical field MSPs.

  16. AAV5-Factor VIII Gene Transfer in Severe Hemophilia A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rangarajan, Savita; Walsh, Liron; Lester, Will; Perry, David; Madan, Bella; Laffan, Michael; Yu, Hua; Vettermann, Christian; Pierce, Glenn F; Wong, Wing Y; Pasi, K John

    2017-12-28

    Patients with hemophilia A rely on exogenous factor VIII to prevent bleeding in joints, soft tissue, and the central nervous system. Although successful gene transfer has been reported in patients with hemophilia B, the large size of the factor VIII coding region has precluded improved outcomes with gene therapy in patients with hemophilia A. We infused a single intravenous dose of a codon-optimized adeno-associated virus serotype 5 (AAV5) vector encoding a B-domain-deleted human factor VIII (AAV5-hFVIII-SQ) in nine men with severe hemophilia A. Participants were enrolled sequentially into one of three dose cohorts (low dose [one participant], intermediate dose [one participant], and high dose [seven participants]) and were followed through 52 weeks. Factor VIII activity levels remained at 3 IU or less per deciliter in the recipients of the low or intermediate dose. In the high-dose cohort, the factor VIII activity level was more than 5 IU per deciliter between weeks 2 and 9 after gene transfer in all seven participants, and the level in six participants increased to a normal value (>50 IU per deciliter) that was maintained at 1 year after receipt of the dose. In the high-dose cohort, the median annualized bleeding rate among participants who had previously received prophylactic therapy decreased from 16 events before the study to 1 event after gene transfer, and factor VIII use for participant-reported bleeding ceased in all the participants in this cohort by week 22. The primary adverse event was an elevation in the serum alanine aminotransferase level to 1.5 times the upper limit of the normal range or less. Progression of preexisting chronic arthropathy in one participant was the only serious adverse event. No neutralizing antibodies to factor VIII were detected. The infusion of AAV5-hFVIII-SQ was associated with the sustained normalization of factor VIII activity level over a period of 1 year in six of seven participants who received a high dose, with

  17. Idiopathic Acquired Hemophilia A with Undetectable Factor VIII Inhibitor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas B. Abt

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. We present the case of a 73-year-old female, with no family or personal history of a bleeding disorder, who had a classic presentation for acquired hemophilia A. Factor VIII activity was low but detectable and a factor VIII inhibitor was undetectable. Methods. The patient’s plasma was comprehensively studied to determine the cause of the acquired coagulopathy. Using the Nijmegen modification of the Bethesda assay, no factor VIII autoantibody was measureable despite varying the incubation time from 1 to 3 hours. Results. The aPTT was prolonged at 46.8 seconds, which did not correct in the 4 : 1 mix but did with 1 : 1 mix. Using a one stage factor VIII activity assay, the FVIII activity was 16% and chromogenic FVIII activity was also 16%. The patient was treated with recombinant FVII and transfusion, significantly reducing bleeding. Long-term therapy was initiated with cyclophosphamide and prednisone with normalization of FVIII activity. Conclusions. Physicians can be presented with the challenging clinical picture of an acquired factor VIII inhibitor without a detectable inhibitor by the Bethesda assay. Standard therapy for an acquired hemophilia A should be considered.

  18. Variability of Disk Emission in Pre-main Sequence and Related Stars. IV. Occultation Events from the Innermost Disk Region of the Herbig AE Star HD 163296 = MWC 275

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pikhartova, Monika; Long, Zachary; Fernandes, Rachel; Sitko, Michael; Grady, Carol; Rich, Evan; Wisniewski, John

    2018-01-01

    We studied the structure and the dynamics of the innermost region of the circumstellar disk around the star HD 163296, MWC 275. We extracted the emission line strengths of Pa beta and Br gamma and calculated the line fluxes, from which we then computed the mass accretion rates onto the star. We investigated the brightness drop at visible wavelengths in 2001 using the Monte Carlo Radiative Transfer Code, hochunk3d. Since the star has bipolar outflows, we looked at whether changes in the outflow, with dust entrained with the gas, could produce such a drop in brightness. We fitted data from 2001 and 2005 onto SED and temperaturedensity models of the disk and generated JHK disk images, then noted the changes in image brightness and in SED plots. Our models succesfully produce the drop in brightness.

  19. Wave Star

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kramer, Morten; Brorsen, Michael; Frigaard, Peter

    Denne rapport beskriver numeriske beregninger af forskellige flydergeometrier for bølgeenergianlæget Wave Star.......Denne rapport beskriver numeriske beregninger af forskellige flydergeometrier for bølgeenergianlæget Wave Star....

  20. NuSTAR detection of high-energy X-ray emission and rapid variability from Sagittarius A{sup *} flares

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barrière, Nicolas M.; Tomsick, John A.; Boggs, Steven E.; Craig, William W.; Zoglauer, Andreas [Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Baganoff, Frederick K. [Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and Space Research, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139-4307 (United States); Christensen, Finn E. [DTU Space, National Space Institute, Technical University of Denmark, Elektrovej 327, DK-2800 Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark); Dexter, Jason [Departments of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Grefenstette, Brian; Harrison, Fiona A.; Madsen, Kristin K. [Cahill Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Caltech, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Hailey, Charles J.; Mori, Kaya; Zhang, Shuo [Columbia Astrophysics Laboratory, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027 (United States); Stern, Daniel [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Zhang, William W. [X-ray Astrophysics Laboratory, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

    2014-05-01

    Sagittarius A{sup *} harbors the supermassive black hole that lies at the dynamical center of our Galaxy. Sagittarius A{sup *} spends most of its time in a low luminosity emission state but flares frequently in the infrared and X-ray, increasing up to a few hundred fold in brightness for up to a few hours at a time. The physical processes giving rise to the X-ray flares are uncertain. Here we report the detection with the NuSTAR observatory in Summer and Fall 2012 of four low to medium amplitude X-ray flares to energies up to 79 keV. For the first time, we clearly see that the power-law spectrum of Sagittarius A{sup *} X-ray flares extends to high energy, with no evidence for a cutoff. Although the photon index of the absorbed power-law fits are in agreement with past observations, we find a difference between the photon index of two of the flares (significant at the 95% confidence level). The spectra of the two brightest flares (∼55 times quiescence in the 2-10 keV band) are compared to simple physical models in an attempt to identify the main X-ray emission mechanism, but the data do not allow us to significantly discriminate between them. However, we confirm the previous finding that the parameters obtained with synchrotron models are, for the X-ray emission, physically more reasonable than those obtained with inverse Compton models. One flare exhibits large and rapid (<100 s) variability, which, considering the total energy radiated, constrains the location of the flaring region to be within ∼10 Schwarzschild radii of the black hole.

  1. Star clusters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gieles, M.

    2006-01-01

    Star clusters are observed in almost every galaxy. In this thesis we address several fundamental problems concerning the formation, evolution and disruption of star clusters. From observations of (young) star clusters in the interacting galaxy M51, we found that clusters are formed in complexes of

  2. Hybrid stars

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    from two classes of EOS's and discuss their implications. Keywords. Neutron stars; phase transition. It is generally believed that the evolutionary journey of a star after it has exhausted all its fuel culminates into the formation of a compact object in the form of a white dwarf, a neutron star or a black hole depending on its mass.

  3. Massive Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livio, Mario; Villaver, Eva

    2009-11-01

    Participants; Preface Mario Livio and Eva Villaver; 1. High-mass star formation by gravitational collapse of massive cores M. R. Krumholz; 2. Observations of massive star formation N. A. Patel; 3. Massive star formation in the Galactic center D. F. Figer; 4. An X-ray tour of massive star-forming regions with Chandra L. K. Townsley; 5. Massive stars: feedback effects in the local universe M. S. Oey and C. J. Clarke; 6. The initial mass function in clusters B. G. Elmegreen; 7. Massive stars and star clusters in the Antennae galaxies B. C. Whitmore; 8. On the binarity of Eta Carinae T. R. Gull; 9. Parameters and winds of hot massive stars R. P. Kudritzki and M. A. Urbaneja; 10. Unraveling the Galaxy to find the first stars J. Tumlinson; 11. Optically observable zero-age main-sequence O stars N. R. Walborn; 12. Metallicity-dependent Wolf-Raynet winds P. A. Crowther; 13. Eruptive mass loss in very massive stars and Population III stars N. Smith; 14. From progenitor to afterlife R. A. Chevalier; 15. Pair-production supernovae: theory and observation E. Scannapieco; 16. Cosmic infrared background and Population III: an overview A. Kashlinsky.

  4. Stars on Local Time: A Personal Almanac

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottlieb-Roberts, M.

    2016-01-01

    First presented at INSAP VIII, the artwork A Personal Almanac is my interpretation of the familiar seasons-of-life allegory. The booklet's eight pairs of seasonal pages— spring equinox through the cross-quarter Groundhog Day—portray a life in the decades from the 1940s to the 2010s under the stars of rural Georgia, France, Miami, West Africa and the other places I have lived. A Personal Almanac is included in the art book A Durable Tale, the illustrated story of my thirty-year search in the Southeast United States and in West Africa for living memories of old star almanacs. In that odyssey I uncovered some very deep roots for an oral literature of the African desert, the nomadic bard's star story that I believe inspired creation of the first nine tablets of the standard version Babylonian Gilgamesh.

  5. The hot γ Doradus and Maia stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balona, L. A.; Engelbrecht, C. A.; Joshi, Y. C.; Joshi, S.; Sharma, K.; Semenko, E.; Pandey, G.; Chakradhari, N. K.; Mkrtichian, David; Hema, B. P.; Nemec, J. M.

    2016-08-01

    The hot γ Doradus stars have multiple low frequencies characteristic of γ Dor or SPB variables, but are located between the red edge of the SPB and the blue edge of the γ Dor instability strips where all low-frequency modes are stable in current models of these stars. Though δ Sct stars also have low frequencies, there is no sign of high frequencies in hot γ Dor stars. We obtained spectra to refine the locations of some of these stars in the H-R diagram and conclude that these are, indeed, anomalous pulsating stars. The Maia variables have multiple high frequencies characteristic of β Cep and δ Sct stars, but lie between the red edge of the β Cep and the blue edge of the δ Sct instability strips. We compile a list of all Maia candidates and obtain spectra of two of these stars. Again, it seems likely that these are anomalous pulsating stars which are currently not understood.

  6. Stars and Flowers, Flowers and Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minti, Hari

    2012-12-01

    The author, a graduated from the Bucharest University (1964), actually living and working in Israel, concerns his book to variable stars and flowers, two domains of his interest. The analogies includes double stars, eclipsing double stars, eclipses, Big Bang. The book contains 34 chapters, each of which concerns various relations between astronomy and other sciences and pseudosciences such as Psychology, Religion, Geology, Computers and Astrology (to which the author is not an adherent). A special part of the book is dedicated to archeoastronomy and ethnoastronomy, as well as to history of astronomy. Between the main points of interest of these parts: ancient sanctuaries in Sarmizegetusa (Dacia), Stone Henge(UK) and other. The last chapter of the book is dedicated to flowers. The book is richly illustrated. It is designed for a wide circle of readers.

  7. The nebular variables

    CERN Document Server

    Glasby, John S

    1974-01-01

    The Nebular Variables focuses on the nebular variables and their characteristics. Discussions are organized by type of nebular variable, namely, RW Aurigae stars, T Orionis stars, T Tauri stars, and peculiar nebular objects. Topics range from light variations of the stars to their spectroscopic and physical characteristics, spatial distribution, interaction with nebulosity, and evolutionary features. This volume is divided into four sections and consists of 25 chapters, the first of which provides general information on nebular variables, including their stellar associations and their classifi

  8. Igor Zabel 14. VIII 1958 - 23. VII 2005

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2005-01-01

    Igor Zabel oli Ida-Euroopa tuntumaid kunstiteoreetikuid ja kuraatoreid. Töötas 1986. aastast Ljubljana moodsa kunsti muuseumi kuraatorina. 9. VIII avatakse seal viimane I. Zabeli kureeritud näitus "Territories, Identities, Nets-Slovene Art 1995-2005"

  9. What history tells us VIII. The progressive construction of a ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2007-02-09

    Feb 9, 2007 ... Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences; Volume 32; Issue 2. What history tells us VIII. The progressive construction of a mechanism for prion diseases. Michel Morange. Series Volume 32 Issue 2 March 2007 pp 223-227. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  10. The labour ward analgesic service at King Edward VIII Hospital ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    dence of shivering9 and an improved sense of maternal well-being.lo. In summary, the study presented here shows that the analgesia service provided ro the labour ward at King. Edward VIII Hospital is at present grossly inadequate. In particular, a high proportion (76%) of mothers with a specific indication for epidural ...

  11. Functional regions in coagulation factor VIII explored by mass spectrometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bloem, E.

    2013-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms behind the function of factor VIII (FVIII) have remained poorly understood. FVIII acts in the blood coagulation cascade as cofactor for activated factor IX (FIXa) in the membrane bound activated factor X generating (FXase) complex. A functional absence in FVIII leads to the

  12. Comparison of factor VIII transgenes bioengineered for improved expression in gene therapy of hemophilia A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dooriss, Kerry L; Denning, Gabriela; Gangadharan, Bagirath; Javazon, Elisabeth H; McCarty, David A; Spencer, H Trent; Doering, Christopher B

    2009-05-01

    Successful gene therapy of hemophilia A depends on the sustained expression of therapeutic levels of factor VIII (fVIII). Because of mRNA instability, interactions with resident endoplasmic reticulum (ER) chaperones, and the requirement for carbohydrate-facilitated transport from the ER to the Golgi apparatus, fVIII is expressed at much lower levels from mammalian cells than other proteins of similar size and complexity. A number of bioengineered forms of B domain-deleted (BDD) human fVIII have been generated and shown to have enhanced expression. Previously, we demonstrated that recombinant BDD porcine fVIII exhibits high-level expression due to specific sequence elements that increase biosynthesis via enhanced posttranslational transit through the secretory pathway. In the current study, high-expression recombinant fVIII constructs were compared directly in order to determine the relative expression of the various bioengineered fVIII transgenes. The data demonstrate that BDD porcine fVIII expression is superior to that of any of the human fVIII variant constructs tested. Mean fVIII expression of 18 units/10(6) cells/24 hr was observed from HEK-293 cells expressing a single copy of the porcine fVIII transgene, which was 36- to 225-fold greater than that of any human fVIII transgene tested. Furthermore, greater than 10-fold higher expression was observed in human cells transduced with BDD porcine fVIII versus BDD human fVIII-encoding lentiviral vectors, even at low proviral copy numbers, supporting its use over other human fVIII variants in future hemophilia A gene therapy clinical trials.

  13. The ACS LCID Project - VIII. The short-period Cepheids of Leo A

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bernard, Edouard J.; Monelli, Matteo; Gallart, Carme; Fiorentino, Giuliana; Cassisi, Santi; Aparicio, Antonio; Cole, Andrew A.; Drozdovsky, Igor; Hidalgo, Sebastian L.; Skillman, Evan D.; Stetson, Peter B.; Tolstoy, Eline

    We present the results of a new search for variable stars in the Local Group dwarf galaxy Leo A, based on deep photometry from the Advanced Camera for Surveys onboard the Hubble Space Telescope. We detected 166 bona fide variables in our field, of which about 60 per cent are new discoveries and 33

  14. The ACS LCID Project : VIII. The short-period Cepheids of Leo A

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bernard, Edouard J.; Monelli, Matteo; Gallart, Carme; Fiorentino, Giuliana; Cassisi, Santi; Aparicio, Antonio; Cole, Andrew A.; Drozdovsky, Igor; Hidalgo, Sebastian L.; Skillman, Evan D.; Stetson, Peter B.; Tolstoy, Eline

    2013-01-01

    We present the results of a new search for variable stars in the Local Group dwarf galaxy Leo A, based on deep photometry from the Advanced Camera for Surveys onboard the Hubble Space Telescope. We detected 166 bona fide variables in our field, of which about 60 per cent are new discoveries and 33

  15. Star Wreck

    CERN Document Server

    Kusenko, A; Tinyakov, Peter G; Tkachev, Igor I; Kusenko, Alexander; Shaposhnikov, Mikhail; Tkachev, Igor I.

    1998-01-01

    Electroweak models with low-energy supersymmetry breaking predict the existence of stable non-topological solitons, Q-balls, that can be produced in the early universe. The relic Q-balls can accumulate inside a neutron star and gradually absorb the baryons into the scalar condensate. This causes a slow reduction in the mass of the star. When the mass reaches a critical value, the neutron star becomes unstable and explodes. The cataclysmic destruction of the distant neutron stars may be the origin of the gamma-ray bursts.

  16. Neutron Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cottam, J.

    2007-01-01

    Neutron stars were discovered almost 40 years ago, and yet many of their most fundamental properties remain mysteries. There have been many attempts to measure the mass and radius of a neutron star and thereby constrain the equation of state of the dense nuclear matter at their cores. These have been complicated by unknown parameters such as the source distance and burning fractions. A clean, straightforward way to access the neutron star parameters is with high-resolution spectroscopy. I will present the results of searches for gravitationally red-shifted absorption lines from the neutron star atmosphere using XMM-Newton and Chandra.

  17. The ACS LCID Project - VIII. The short-period Cepheids of Leo A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernard, Edouard J.; Monelli, Matteo; Gallart, Carme; Fiorentino, Giuliana; Cassisi, Santi; Aparicio, Antonio; Cole, Andrew A.; Drozdovsky, Igor; Hidalgo, Sebastian L.; Skillman, Evan D.; Stetson, Peter B.; Tolstoy, Eline

    2013-07-01

    We present the results of a new search for variable stars in the Local Group dwarf galaxy Leo A, based on deep photometry from the Advanced Camera for Surveys onboard the Hubble Space Telescope. We detected 166 bona fide variables in our field, of which about 60 per cent are new discoveries and 33 candidate variables. Of the confirmed variables, we found 156 Cepheids, but only 10 RR Lyrae stars despite nearly 100 per cent completeness at the magnitude of the horizontal branch. The RR Lyrae stars include seven fundamental and three first-overtone pulsators, with mean periods of 0.636 and 0.366 d, respectively. From their position on the period-luminosity (PL) diagram and light-curve morphology, we classify 91, 58 and 4 Cepheids as fundamental, first-overtone and second-overtone mode Classical Cepheids (CC), respectively, and two as Population II Cepheids. However, due to the low metallicity of Leo A, about 90 per cent of the detected Cepheids have periods shorter than 1.5 d. Comparison with theoretical models indicate that some of the fainter stars classified as CC could be Anomalous Cepheids. We estimate the distance to Leo A using the tip of the red giant branch (TRGB) and various methods based on the photometric and pulsational properties of the Cepheids and RR Lyrae stars. The distances obtained with the TRGB and RR Lyrae stars agree well with each other while that from the Cepheid PL relations is somewhat larger, which may indicate a mild metallicity effect on the luminosity of the short-period Cepheids. Due to its very low metallicity, Leo A thus serves as a valuable calibrator of the metallicity dependences of the variable star luminosities.

  18. Periodic Variations in DQ Herculis Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bless, Robert

    1991-07-01

    The DQ Herculis Stars are cataclysmic variables showing rapid, strictly periodic luminosity variations at either optical or X-ray wavelengths, and usually both. The periods range from 33 sec in AE AQR through 71 sec in DQ Her to 18690 sec in TV Col. The cataclysmic variables are all close binary stars consisting of a late-type star transferring mass to its companion white dwarf star. The white dwarf in the DQ Her stars is magnetized. The periodicities of the DQ Her stars are caused by rotation of the magnetized, acreting white dwarf. We propose to observe the DQ Her stars at ultraviolet wavelengths using the high speed photometer on the space telescope. The purpose of the observations is to investigate the physics of accretion onto compact stars. Revision History: Prepared for future cycles submission--BJW 4/22/92; Cycle 3 to cycle 2, PRISM to SINGLE--BJW 8/27/92;

  19. Star Imager

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Peter Buch; Jørgensen, John Leif; Thuesen, Gøsta

    1997-01-01

    The version of the star imager developed for Astrid II is described. All functions and features are described as well as the operations and the software protocol.......The version of the star imager developed for Astrid II is described. All functions and features are described as well as the operations and the software protocol....

  20. Star Polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Jing M; McKenzie, Thomas G; Fu, Qiang; Wong, Edgar H H; Xu, Jiangtao; An, Zesheng; Shanmugam, Sivaprakash; Davis, Thomas P; Boyer, Cyrille; Qiao, Greg G

    2016-06-22

    Recent advances in controlled/living polymerization techniques and highly efficient coupling chemistries have enabled the facile synthesis of complex polymer architectures with controlled dimensions and functionality. As an example, star polymers consist of many linear polymers fused at a central point with a large number of chain end functionalities. Owing to this exclusive structure, star polymers exhibit some remarkable characteristics and properties unattainable by simple linear polymers. Hence, they constitute a unique class of technologically important nanomaterials that have been utilized or are currently under audition for many applications in life sciences and nanotechnologies. This article first provides a comprehensive summary of synthetic strategies towards star polymers, then reviews the latest developments in the synthesis and characterization methods of star macromolecules, and lastly outlines emerging applications and current commercial use of star-shaped polymers. The aim of this work is to promote star polymer research, generate new avenues of scientific investigation, and provide contemporary perspectives on chemical innovation that may expedite the commercialization of new star nanomaterials. We envision in the not-too-distant future star polymers will play an increasingly important role in materials science and nanotechnology in both academic and industrial settings.

  1. Wave Star

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kramer, Morten; Brorsen, Michael; Frigaard, Peter

    Nærværende rapport beskriver numeriske beregninger af den hydrodynamiske interaktion mellem 5 flydere i bølgeenergianlægget Wave Star.......Nærværende rapport beskriver numeriske beregninger af den hydrodynamiske interaktion mellem 5 flydere i bølgeenergianlægget Wave Star....

  2. PENGARUH KEMANDIRIAN BELAJAR DAN PENGGUNAAN UANG SAKU TERHADAP PRESTASI BELAJAR KOMPETENSI DASAR EKONOMI KELAS VII DAN VIII

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Apri Dwi Astuti

    2012-10-01

    kriteria ketuntasan minimum (KKM � � Learning Independency is crucial for students. Additionality, learning independence helps students to be responsible and grows the willing of learning. The management of the use of pocket money creates a feeling of responsibility, commitment and discipline. The finale of this research to know learning independence and the use of pocket money influence the learning achievement in Economics subject on VII and VIII of SMP Semesta Boarding School in the Academic year of 2011/2012. The populations of this research are all VII and VIII grade studentsof SMP Semesta Boarding School. Learning Independency and The use of Pocket Money act as free variable, while students�learning achievement acts asbound variable. The data was gathered from interview, questionnaire and teacher�s documentation. The analysis of the data applies double regression linear analysis.Based on the double linear analysis simultaneously, it is revealed that Learning Independency and The use of Pocket Money influene� the learning achievement in Economics subject on VII and VIII until up to 51,3%. Partially, thev ariable of Learning Independency influence the learning achievement in Economics is 66,2% and The use of Pocket Money influene� the learning achievement in Economics is 62,5%.According to the result of the research above, it can be concluded that learning independence and the use of Pocket Money influence the learning independence and the use of pocket money influence the learning achievement of Econimics subject for VII and VIII grade of SMP Semesta Boarding School Semarang in the academic year of 2011/2012 on simultan and partially . Based on this research, hopefullythe, 1 School give a little change to student when they go home. 2 Parents observe give of pocket money by the students activity in the dormitory.3 student hopefully to progress their learning independency actually to the learning achievement that still under minimum criteria (KKM.

  3. PENGARUH VIRTUAL LABORATORY BERBASIS FLASH ANIMATION TERHADAP PEMAHAMAN KONSEP DAN KETERAMPILAN BERPIKIR KRITIS PESERTA DIDIK TEMA OPTIK KELAS VIII SMP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuzul Andri Permana

    2017-02-01

    ___________________________________________________________________ Availability of practical tools in learning of science subject is needed to achieve the learning objectives. Based on observations in Junior High School 10 Semarang, practicum low intensity because of practical tools ara not available that support learning activities. The intensity of practicum is low, it make critical thinking skills of students is low. Critical thinking skills to be one of the variables that influence of understanding concept of learners. Availability of practicum tools that incomplete requires teachers to achieve the learning objectives by using media that can support learners to be able to do practicum virtually. Media that can support to do practicum virtually is a virtual laboratory. This study aims to determine the influence of virtual laboratory based flash animation againts understanding concepts and critical thinking skills of students in grade VIII SMP in optical theme. The population used in this study were all students of grade VIII Junior High School 10 Semarang academic year 2015/2016. Sampling technique used is purposive sampling and obtained VIII C as the experimental class and VIII F as the control class. The design of study is nonequivalent control group design. The results showed that the correlation value of understanding concept of students is 0.660 which shows in the strong category and correlation analysis of students' critical thinking skills of 0,729 based on observational data and 0.69 based on the posttest data that shows in the strong category. The influence of the use of virtual laboratory-based flash animation againts understanding concept of students is 43.53%, whereas the influence the use of virtual laboratory based flash animation againts the critical thinking skills of students is 53.14% based on observational data and 47.06% based on the posttest data. The conclusion is there are infuence of virtual laboratory based flash animation againts

  4. The detection of variable radio emission from the fast rotating magnetic hot B-star HR\\xA07355 and evidence for its X-ray aurorae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leto, P.; Trigilio, C.; Oskinova, L.; Ignace, R.; Buemi, C. S.; Umana, G.; Ingallinera, A.; Todt, H.; Leone, F.

    2017-05-01

    In this paper, we investigate the multiwavelength properties of the magnetic early B-type star HR 7355. We present its radio light curves at several frequencies, taken with the Jansky Very Large Array, and X-ray spectra, taken with the XMM-Newton X-ray telescope. Modelling of the radio light curves for the Stokes I and V provides a quantitative analysis of the HR 7355 magnetosphere. A comparison between HR 7355 and a similar analysis for the Ap star CU Vir allows us to study how the different physical parameters of the two stars affect the structure of the respective magnetospheres where the non-thermal electrons originate. Our model includes a cold thermal plasma component that accumulates at high magnetic latitudes that influences the radio regime, but does not give rise to X-ray emission. Instead, the thermal X-ray emission arises from shocks generated by wind stream collisions close to the magnetic equatorial plane. The analysis of the X-ray spectrum of HR 7355 also suggests the presence of a non-thermal radiation. Comparison between the spectral index of the power-law X-ray energy distribution with the non-thermal electron energy distribution indicates that the non-thermal X-ray component could be the auroral signature of the non-thermal electrons that impact the stellar surface, the same non-thermal electrons that are responsible for the observed radio emission. On the basis of our analysis, we suggest a novel model that simultaneously explains the X-ray and the radio features of HR 7355 and is likely relevant for magnetospheres of other magnetic early-type stars.

  5. The Compton Hump and Variable Blue Wing in the Extreme Low-Flux NuSTAR Observations of 1H0707-495

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kara, E.; Fabian, A.C.; Lohfink, A. M.; Parker, M. L.; Walton, D. J.; Boggs, S. E.; Christensen, F. E.; Hailey, C. J.; Harrison, F. A.; Matt, G.; hide

    2015-01-01

    The narrow-line Seyfert I galaxy, 1H0707-495, has been well observed in the 0.3-10 kiloelectronvolt band, revealing a dramatic drop in flux in the iron K-alpha band, a strong soft excess, and short time-scale reverberation lags associated with these spectral features. In this paper, we present the first results of a deep 250-kilosecond NuSTAR (Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array) observation of 1H0707-495, which includes the first sensitive observations above 10 kiloelectronvolts. Even though the NuSTAR observations caught the source in an extreme low-flux state, the Compton hump is still significantly detected. NuSTAR, with its high effective area above 7 kiloelectronvolts, clearly detects the drop in flux in the iron K-alpha band, and by comparing these observations with archival XMM-Newton observations, we find that the energy of this drop increases with increasing flux. We discuss possible explanations for this, the most likely of which is that the drop in flux is the blue wing of the relativistically broadened iron K-alpha emission line. When the flux is low, the coronal source height is low, thus enhancing the most gravitationally red-shifted emission.

  6. TT virus contaminates first-generation recombinant factor VIII concentrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azzi, A; De Santis, R; Morfini, M; Zakrzewska, K; Musso, R; Santagostino, E; Castaman, G

    2001-10-15

    Recombinant factor VIII and factor IX concentrates, human-plasma-derived albumin, and samples from previously untreated patients with hemophilia were examined for the presence of TT virus (TTV) by using polymerase chain reaction testing. Blood samples from the patients were obtained prospectively before and every 3 to 6 months after therapy was begun. TTV was detected in 23.5% of the recombinant-product lots and 55.5% of the albumin lots tested. Only first-generation factor VIII recombinant concentrates stabilized with human albumin were positive for TTV, whereas all second-generation (human protein-free) concentrates were negative for the virus. In 59% of patients treated with either first- or second-generation recombinant factor concentrates, TTV infection developed at some point after the initial infusion. Infection with TTV in these patients before and after treatment did not appear to be clinically important. Thus, first-generation recombinant factor VIII concentrates may contain TTV and the source of the viral contamination may be human albumin.

  7. Pulsating star research and the Gaia revolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eyer Laurent

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this article we present an overview of the ESA Gaia mission and of the unprecedented impact that Gaia will have on the field of variable star research. We summarise the contents and impact of the first Gaia data release on the description of variability phenomena, with particular emphasis on pulsating star research. The Tycho-Gaia astrometric solution, although limited to 2.1 million stars, has been used in many studies related to pulsating stars. Furthermore a set of 3,194 Cepheids and RR Lyrae stars with their times series have been released. Finally we present the plans for the ongoing study of variable phenomena with Gaia and highlight some of the possible impacts of the second data release on variable, and specifically, pulsating stars.

  8. Keefektifan Experiential Learning Berbantuan Origami Terhadap Kemampuan Keruangan Siswa Kelas VIII

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isnaeni Umi Machromah

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available AbstrakPenelitian eksperimen ini bertujuan untuk mengetahui keefektifan pembelajaran Experiential Learning berbantuan origami terhadap kemampuan keruangan siswa dengan kualifikasi keefektifan yang telah ditentukan. Populasi yaitu siswa kelas VIII SMP Negeri 3 Colomadu tahun pelajaran 2012/2013. Sampel diambil secara simple random sampling. Hasil penelitian ini yaitu: (1 Uji proporsi ketuntasan belajar menunjukkan siswa kelompok eksperimen telah mencapai ketuntasan belajar; (2 Uji perbedaan dua rata-rata menghasilkan simpulan bahwa rata-rata hasil post-test kemam-puan keruangan siswa kelompok eksperimen lebih dari kelompok kontrol; (3 Analisis re-gresi menunjukkan bahwa motivasi belajar siswa memberikan pengaruh positif sebesar 49,3% terhadap kemampuan keruangan siswa; (4 Uji gain ternormalisasi menunjukkan terdapat peningkatan kemampuan keruangan siswa secara signifikan pada kategaori sedang untuk kelompok eksperimen dan kategori rendah untuk kelompok kontrol. Simpulan yang diperoleh yaitu Experiential Learning berbantuan origami efektif terhadap kemampuan keruangan siswa kelas VIII. AbstractThis experiment research aims to determine the effectiveness of Experiential Learning with Origami to the students’s spatial abilities by the criteria of effectiveness. The population of this research is students of grade VIII of SMP Negeri 3 Colomadu 2012/2013 academic year. Independent variables used in this research are learning by Experiential Learning with origami and student’s motivation. While the dependent variable is the student’s spatial abilities. This research is using documentation, spatial abilities’s test, dan motivation’s scale for collecting data method. Result of this research are: (1 proportion test show that the experiment group has reached mastering of learning clasically and personally; (2 result of spatial ablities’s post test in experiment group better than control group; (3 result of regretion shows that student

  9. Wave Star

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kramer, Morten; Andersen, Thomas Lykke

    Nærværende rapport beskriver modelforsøg udført på Aalborg Universitet, Institut for Vand, Jord og Miljøteknik med bølgeenergianlægget Wave Star.......Nærværende rapport beskriver modelforsøg udført på Aalborg Universitet, Institut for Vand, Jord og Miljøteknik med bølgeenergianlægget Wave Star....

  10. Wave Star

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kramer, Morten; Frigaard, Peter

    Nærværende rapport beskriver modelforsøg udført på Aalborg Universitet, Institut for Byggeri og Anlæg med bølgeenergianlæget Wave Star.......Nærværende rapport beskriver modelforsøg udført på Aalborg Universitet, Institut for Byggeri og Anlæg med bølgeenergianlæget Wave Star....

  11. 40 CFR Appendix Viii to Part 600 - Fuel Economy Label Formats

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 29 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Fuel Economy Label Formats VIII... POLICY FUEL ECONOMY AND CARBON-RELATED EXHAUST EMISSIONS OF MOTOR VEHICLES Pt. 600, App. VIII Appendix VIII to Part 600—Fuel Economy Label Formats EC01MY92.117 EC01MY92.118 EC01MY92.119 EC01MY92.120...

  12. Localization of collagen type VIII in normal and pathological human cornea

    OpenAIRE

    Zenklová, Kateřina

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this work was to localize collagen type VIII in different layers of the cornea and to compare it's localization in normal corneas with pathological corneas obtained from patients with Fuchs endothelial dystrophy, posterior polymorphous dystrophy or keratoconus.The only comercially available antibody did not proove sufficient specifiky for collagen type VIII. With use of the antibody 9H3 anti alCVIII was collagen VIII evidenced in the cornea. This antibody can be used for detection ...

  13. Analysis of factor VIII gene inversions in 164 unrelated hemophilia A families

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vnencak-Jones, L.; Phillips, J.A. III; Janco, R.L. [Vanderbilt Univ. School of Medicine, Nashville, TN (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Hemophilia A is an X-linked recessive disease with variable phenotype and both heterogeneous and wide spread mutations in the factor VIII (F8) gene. As a result, diagnostic carrier or prenatal testing often relies upon laborious DNA linkage analysis. Recently, inversion mutations resulting from an intrachromosomal recombination between DNA sequences in one of two A genes {approximately}500 kb upstream from the F8 gene and a homologous A gene in intron 22 of the F8 gene were identified and found in 45% of severe hemophiliacs. We have analyzed banked DNA collected since 1986 from affected males or obligate carrier females representing 164 unrelated hemophilia A families. The disease was sporadic in 37%, familial in 54% and in 10% of families incomplete information was given. A unique deletion was identified in 1/164, a normal pattern was observed in 110/164 (67%), and 53/164 (32%) families had inversion mutations with 43/53 (81%) involving the distal A gene (R3 pattern) and 10/53 (19%) involving the proximal A gene (R2 pattern). While 19% of all rearrangements were R2, in 35 families with severe disease (< 1% VIII:C activity) all 16 rearrangements seen were R3. In 18 families with the R3 pattern and known activities, 16 (89%) had levels < 1%, with the remaining 2 families having {le} 2.4% activity. Further, 18 referrals specifically noted the production of inhibitors and 8/18 (45%) had the R3 pattern. Our findings demonstrate that the R3 inversion mutation patterns is (1) only seen with VIII:C activity levels of {le} 2.4%, (2) seen in 46% of families with severe hemophilia, (3) seen in 45% of hemophiliacs known to have inhibitors, (4) not correlated with sporadic or familial disease and (5) not in disequilibrium with the Bcl I or Taq I intron 18 or ST14 polymorphisms. Finally, in families positive for an inversion mutation, direct testing offers a highly accurate and less expensive alternative to DNA linkage analysis.

  14. The OmegaWhite Survey for Short-period Variable Stars. V. Discovery of an Ultracompact Hot Subdwarf Binary with a Compact Companion in a 44-minute Orbit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kupfer, T.; Ramsay, G.; van Roestel, J.; Brooks, J.; MacFarlane, S. A.; Toma, R.; Groot, P. J.; Woudt, P. A.; Bildsten, L.; Marsh, T. R.; Green, M. J.; Breedt, E.; Kilkenny, D.; Freudenthal, J.; Geier, S.; Heber, U.; Bagnulo, S.; Blagorodnova, N.; Buckley, D. A. H.; Dhillon, V. S.; Kulkarni, S. R.; Lunnan, R.; Prince, T. A.

    2017-12-01

    We report the discovery of the ultracompact hot subdwarf (sdOB) binary OW J074106.0-294811.0 with an orbital period of {P}{orb}=44.66279+/- 1.16× {10}-4 minutes, making it the most compact hot subdwarf binary known. Spectroscopic observations using the VLT, Gemini and Keck telescopes revealed a He-sdOB primary with an intermediate helium abundance, {T}{eff} = 39 400+/- 500 K and {log}g = 5.74 ± 0.09. High signal-to-noise ratio light curves show strong ellipsoidal modulation resulting in a derived sdOB mass {M}{sdOB}=0.23+/- 0.12 {M}⊙ with a WD companion ({M}{WD}=0.72+/- 0.17 {M}⊙ ). The mass ratio was found to be q={M}{sdOB}/{M}{WD}=0.32+/- 0.10. The derived mass for the He-sdOB is inconsistent with the canonical mass for hot subdwarfs of ≈ 0.47 {M}⊙ . To put constraints on the structure and evolutionary history of the sdOB star we compared the derived {T}{eff}, {log}g, and sdOB mass to evolutionary tracks of helium stars and helium white dwarfs calculated with Modules for Experiments in Stellar Astrophysics (MESA). We find that the best-fitting model is a helium white dwarf with a mass of 0.320 {M}⊙ , which left the common envelope ≈ 1.1 {Myr} ago, which is consistent with the observations. As a helium white dwarf with a massive white dwarf companion, the object will reach contact in 17.6 Myr at an orbital period of 5 minutes. Depending on the spin-orbit synchronization timescale the object will either merge to form an R CrB star or end up as a stably accreting AM CVn-type system with a helium white dwarf donor.

  15. Pulsating Star Mystery Solved

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-01

    By discovering the first double star where a pulsating Cepheid variable and another star pass in front of one another, an international team of astronomers has solved a decades-old mystery. The rare alignment of the orbits of the two stars in the double star system has allowed a measurement of the Cepheid mass with unprecedented accuracy. Up to now astronomers had two incompatible theoretical predictions of Cepheid masses. The new result shows that the prediction from stellar pulsation theory is spot on, while the prediction from stellar evolution theory is at odds with the new observations. The new results, from a team led by Grzegorz Pietrzyński (Universidad de Concepción, Chile, Obserwatorium Astronomiczne Uniwersytetu Warszawskiego, Poland), appear in the 25 November 2010 edition of the journal Nature. Grzegorz Pietrzyński introduces this remarkable result: "By using the HARPS instrument on the 3.6-metre telescope at ESO's La Silla Observatory in Chile, along with other telescopes, we have measured the mass of a Cepheid with an accuracy far greater than any earlier estimates. This new result allows us to immediately see which of the two competing theories predicting the masses of Cepheids is correct." Classical Cepheid Variables, usually called just Cepheids, are unstable stars that are larger and much brighter than the Sun [1]. They expand and contract in a regular way, taking anything from a few days to months to complete the cycle. The time taken to brighten and grow fainter again is longer for stars that are more luminous and shorter for the dimmer ones. This remarkably precise relationship makes the study of Cepheids one of the most effective ways to measure the distances to nearby galaxies and from there to map out the scale of the whole Universe [2]. Unfortunately, despite their importance, Cepheids are not fully understood. Predictions of their masses derived from the theory of pulsating stars are 20-30% less than predictions from the theory of the

  16. Instabilities in Interacting Binary Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andronov, I. L.; Andrych, K. D.; Antoniuk, K. A.; Baklanov, A. V.; Beringer, P.; Breus, V. V.; Burwitz, V.; Chinarova, L. L.; Chochol, D.; Cook, L. M.; Cook, M.; Dubovský, P.; Godlowski, W.; Hegedüs, T.; Hoňková, K.; Hric, L.; Jeon, Y.-B.; Juryšek, J.; Kim, C.-H.; Kim, Y.; Kim, Y.-H.; Kolesnikov, S. V.; Kudashkina, L. S.; Kusakin, A. V.; Marsakova, V. I.; Mason, P. A.; Mašek, M.; Mishevskiy, N.; Nelson, R. H.; Oksanen, A.; Parimucha, S.; Park, J.-W.; Petrík, K.; Quiñones, C.; Reinsch, K.; Robertson, J. W.; Sergey, I. M.; Szpanko, M.; Tkachenko, M. G.; Tkachuk, L. G.; Traulsen, I.; Tremko, J.; Tsehmeystrenko, V. S.; Yoon, J.-N.; Zola, S.; Shakhovskoy, N. M.

    2017-07-01

    The types of instability in the interacting binary stars are briefly reviewed. The project “Inter-Longitude Astronomy” is a series of smaller projects on concrete stars or groups of stars. It has no special funds, and is supported from resources and grants of participating organizations, when informal working groups are created. This “ILA” project is in some kind similar and complementary to other projects like WET, CBA, UkrVO, VSOLJ, BRNO, MEDUZA, AstroStatistics, where many of us collaborate. Totally we studied 1900+ variable stars of different types, including newly discovered variables. The characteristic timescale is from seconds to decades and (extrapolating) even more. The monitoring of the first star of our sample AM Her was initiated by Prof. V.P. Tsesevich (1907-1983). Since more than 358 ADS papers were published. In this short review, we present some highlights of our photometric and photo-polarimetric monitoring and mathematical modeling of interacting binary stars of different types: classical (AM Her, QQ Vul, V808 Aur = CSS 081231:071126+440405, FL Cet), asynchronous (BY Cam, V1432 Aql), intermediate (V405 Aql, BG CMi, MU Cam, V1343 Her, FO Aqr, AO Psc, RXJ 2123, 2133, 0636, 0704) polars and magnetic dwarf novae (DO Dra) with 25 timescales corresponding to different physical mechanisms and their combinations (part “Polar”); negative and positive superhumpers in nova-like (TT Ari, MV Lyr, V603 Aql, V795 Her) and many dwarf novae stars (“Superhumper”); eclipsing “non-magnetic” cataclysmic variables(BH Lyn, DW UMa, EM Cyg; PX And); symbiotic systems (“Symbiosis”); super-soft sources (SSS, QR And); spotted (and not spotted) eclipsing variables with (and without) evidence for a current mass transfer (“Eclipser”) with a special emphasis on systems with a direct impact of the stream into the gainer star's atmosphere, which we propose to call “Impactor” (short from “Extreme Direct Impactor”), or V361 Lyr-type stars. Other

  17. The Sun: Our Nearest Star

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, M. L.; Six, N. Frank (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We have in our celestial backyard, a prime example of a variable star. The Sun, long thought to be "perfect" and unvarying, began to reveal its cycles in the early 1600s as Galileo Galilei and Christoph Scheiner used a telescope to study sunspots. For the past four hundred years, scientists have accumulated data, showing a magnetic cycle that repeats, on average, every eleven (or twenty-two) years. In addition, modern satellites have shown that the energy output at radio and x-ray wavelengths also varies with this cycle. This talk will showcase the Sun as a star and discuss how solar studies may be used to understand other stars.

  18. War and peace: Factor VIII and the adaptive immune response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgescu, Maria T; Lai, Jesse D; Hough, Christine; Lillicrap, David

    2016-03-01

    The development of neutralizing anti-factor VIII (FVIII) antibodies (inhibitors) remains a major challenge for FVIII replacement therapy in hemophilia A patients. The adaptive immune response plays a crucial role in the development and maintenance of inhibitors. In this review, we focus on our current understanding of FVIII interactions with cells of the adaptive immune system and the phenotype of the resultant response. Additionally, we examine both current and novel FVIII tolerance induction methods that function at the level of the adaptive immune response. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Factor VIII therapy for hemophilia A: current and future issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aledort, Louis; Ljung, Rolf; Mann, Kenneth; Pipe, Steven

    2014-06-01

    Hemophilia A is a congenital, recessive, X-linked bleeding disorder that is managed with infusions of plasma-derived or recombinant factor (F) VIII. The primary considerations in FVIII replacement therapy today are the: 1) immunogenicity of FVIII concentrates, 2) role of longer-acting FVIII products, 3) prophylactic use of FVIII in children and adults with severe hemophilia A, and 4) affordability and availability of FVIII products. Improving patient outcomes by increasing the use of FVIII prophylaxis, preventing or eliminating FVIII inhibitors, and expanding access to FVIII concentrates in developing countries are the major challenges confronting clinicians who care for patients with hemophilia A.

  20. Factor VIII and transmissible spongiform encephalopathy: the case for safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervenakova, L; Brown, P; Hammond, D J; Lee, C A; Saenko, E L

    2002-03-01

    Haemophilia A is the most common inherited bleeding disorder, caused by a deficiency in coagulation factor VIII (FVIII). Current treatment of haemophilia A is based on repeated infusions of plasma-derived FVIII concentrate or of recombinant FVIII, which may be exposed to plasma-derived material of human or animal origin used in its tissue culture production process. We review epidemiological and experimental studies relevant to blood infectivity in the transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs, or 'prion' diseases), and evaluate the hypothetical risk of TSE transmission through treatment with plasma-derived or recombinant FVIII.

  1. PENERAPAN METODE PENEMUAN TERBIMBING DI KELAS VIII SMP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toni Hidayat

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available This study was a classroom action research which aims to investigate how the implementation of guided discovery learning can improve students’ activeness and attainment in the class VIII of Laboraturium UM Senior High School Malang city. The study subject was Class VIII that consists of 36 students, year 2016/2017. This study consisted of two cycles, and the data was collected from the result of the final test, observation, and interview. Based on the research of cycle I, the students’ activeness with mean scores of the meeting I, II, III was 78.88%, 79%, 86.6% respectively. The students’ activeness on cycle II, the mean scores of analyst meeting V and VI were 89.22% and 92.24% respectively. The result of Mathematics learning was increased, it is shown on the test mean of the cycle I that was achieved by 36 students with the percentage of successful learning 83 %. On the cycle test II, the average of 36 gained 82 (score with 7.2 increased from the score mean of the cycle I and with classical mastery learning cycle II 88.88%. Penelitian ini merupakan Penelitian Tindakan Kelas (PTK yang bertujuan untuk mengetahui bagaimana penerapan metode penemuan terbimbing yang dapat meningkatan keaktifan dan hasil belajar siswa kelas VIII SMP Laboratorium UM Kota Malang. Subjek penelitian ini ialah siswa kelas VIII yang berjumlah 36 siswa tahun pelajaran 2016/2017. Penelitian ini terdiri atas dua siklus dan data dikumpulkan dari hasil tes akhir tindakan, observasi, dan wawancara. Berdasarakan hasil penelitian pada siklus I, keaktifan siswa siswa dengan skor rata-rata pertemuan I, II, III adalah 78,88% 79,%, dan 86,6%. Aktivitas siswa pada siklus II, rata-rata skor pengamat pertemuan V dan VI berturut-turut 89,22 % dan 92,24%. Hasil belajar matematika siswa meningkat, hal ini terlihat bahwa rata-rata tes siklus I yang diperoleh 36 siswa sebesar 74,8 dengan presentase keberhasilan belajar 83,33%. Pada tes siklus II rata-rata nilai menjadi 82 dengan

  2. A rare combination: Combined factor V and factor VIII deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Başak Ünver Koluman

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Combined factor V (FV and factor VIII (FVIII deficiency is a rare factor deficiency with mild-moderate hemorrhage. It is an autosomal recessive coagulation disorder . Prolonged prothrombin time and partial thromboplastic time is characteristic, platelet count remains in normal ranges. The main stay of treatment is to control the hemorrhage. Fresh frozen plasma, desmopressin, specific FVIII concentrates (plasma- derived or recombinant may be used. Being very rare in the general population, we present a case with a combined FV and FVIII deficiency. J Clin Exp Invest 2014; 5 (2: 323-325

  3. The Safety and Feasibility of Three-Dimensional Visualization Technology Assisted Right Posterior Lobe Allied with Part of V and VIII Sectionectomy for Right Hepatic Malignancy Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Min; Hu, Haoyu; Cai, Wei; Mo, Zhikang; Xiang, Nan; Yang, Jian; Fang, Chihua

    2017-11-27

    Hepatectomy is the optimal method for liver cancer; the virtual liver resection based on three-dimensional visualization technology (3-DVT) could provide better preoperative strategy for surgeon. We aim to introduce right posterior lobe allied with part of V and VIII sectionectomy assisted by 3-DVT as a promising treatment for massive or multiple right hepatic malignancies to retain maximum residual liver volume on the basis of R0 resection. Among 126 consecutive patients who underwent hepatectomy, 9 (7%) underwent right posterior lobe allied with part of V and VIII sectionectomy. 21 (17%) underwent right hemihepatectomy (RH). The virtual RH was performed with 3-DVT, which provided better observation of spatial position relationship between tumor and vessels, and the more accurate estimation of the remnant liver volume. If remnant liver volume was right posterior lobe allied with part of V and VIII sectionectomy should be undergone. Then, the precut line ought to be planned on the basis of protecting the portal branch of subsegment 5 and 8. The postoperative outcome of patients was compared before and after propensity score matching. Nine patients meeting the eligibility criteria received right posterior lobe allied with part of V and VIII sectionectomy. The variables, including the overall mean operation time, blood transfusion, operation length, liver function, and postoperative complications, were similar between two groups before and after propensity matching. The postoperative first, third, fifth, and seventh days mean value of aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), albumin (ALB), and total bilirubin had no significant difference compared with preoperative value. One patient in each group had recurrence six months after surgery. Right posterior lobe allied with part of V and VIII sectionectomy based on 3-DVT is safe and feasible surgery way, and can be a very promising method in massive or multiple right hepatic malignancy therapy.

  4. Temporal Spectral Analysis of Be stars observed with CoRoT satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emilio, Marcelo; Janot Pacheco, Eduardo; Andrade, Laerte

    Classical Be stars are rapid rotators of spectral type late O to early A and luminosity class V-III, which exhibit Balmer emission lines and often a near infrared excess originating in an equatorially concentrated circumstellar envelope, both produced by sporadic mass ejection episodes. The causes of the abnormal mass loss (the so-called Be phenomenon) are as yet unknown. In spite of their high V sin i, rapid rotation alone cannot explain the ejection episodes as most Be stars do not rotate at their critical rotation rates. High-resolution, high signal-to-noise spectroscopic observations have been analyzed to demonstrate short-term variations are rather common among early-type Be. The observed line profile variability (LPV) is characterized by moving bumps traveling from blue to red across the line profile on timescales ranging from minutes to a few days. The phenomenon has also been observed in O stars and delta Sct variables, among others. Non-radial pulsations (NRP) have been proposed as an explanation of the LPV observed in hot stars. NRP produce LPV thanks to the combination of the Doppler displacement of stellar surface elements with their associated temperature variations due to the compression/expansion caused by the passage of waves through the photosphere. NRP could be the additional mechanism required for a rapidly rotating B star to become a Be star, that is to trigger the Be phenomenon by means of mass ejection. Indeed in mu Cen a correlation exists between mass ejection episodes and the beating pattern of the multiperiodicity. The finding of new cases of Be stars for which beating periods of multiperiodic NRPs coincide with matter ejections would help us to confirm this model. The periodic variability of the star has been reproduced in detail by NRP modeling. Short-periodic LPV of other Be stars have also been modeled using NRP. Observations with the MOST satellite showed that multiperiodicity due to NRP is a rather common phenomenon among Be stars

  5. Pulsating stars

    CERN Document Server

    Catelan, M?rcio

    2014-01-01

    The most recent and comprehensive book on pulsating stars which ties the observations to our present understanding of stellar pulsation and evolution theory.  Written by experienced researchers and authors in the field, this book includes the latest observational results and is valuable reading for astronomers, graduate students, nuclear physicists and high energy physicists.

  6. Stars Underground

    CERN Multimedia

    Jean Leyder

    1996-01-01

    An imaginary voyage in time where we were witness of the birth of the universe itself, the time of the Big-Bang 15 billion years ago. Particules from the very first moments of time : protons, neutrons and electrons, and also much more energetic one. These particules are preparing to interact collider and generating others which will be the birth to the stars ........

  7. Multiperiodicity, modulations and flip-flops in variable star light curves. II. Analysis of II Pegasus photometry during 1979-2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindborg, M.; Mantere, M. J.; Olspert, N.; Pelt, J.; Hackman, T.; Henry, G. W.; Jetsu, L.; Strassmeier, K. G.

    2013-11-01

    Aims: According to previously published Doppler images of the magnetically active primary giant component of the RS CVn binary II Peg, the surface of the star was dominated by one single active longitude that was clearly drifting in the rotational frame of the binary system during 1994-2002; later imaging for 2004-2010, however, showed decreased and chaotic spot activity, with no signs of the drift pattern. Here we set out to investigate from a more extensive photometric dataset whether this drift is a persistent phenomenon, in which case it could be caused either by an azimuthal dynamo wave or be an indication that the binary system's orbital synchronization is still incomplete. On a differentially rotating stellar surface, spot structures preferentially on a certain latitude band could also cause such a drift, the disruption of which could arise from the change of the preferred spot latitude. Methods: We analyzed the datasets using the carrier fit (CF) method, which is especially suitable for analyzing time series in which a fast clocking frequency (such as the rotation of the star) is modulated with a slower process (such as the stellar activity cycle). Results: We combined all collected photometric data into one single data set and analyzed it with the CF method. We confirm the previously published results that the spot activity has been dominated by one primary spotted region almost through the entire data set and also confirm a persistent, nearly linear drift. Disruptions of the linear trend and complicated phase behavior are also seen, but the period analysis reveals a rather stable periodicity with Pspot = 6.71054d ± 0.00005d. After removing the linear trend from the data, we identified several abrupt phase jumps, three of which are analyzed in more detail with the CF method. These phase jumps closely resemble what is called a flip-flop event, but the new spot configurations do not persist for longer than a few months in most cases. Conclusions: There is

  8. Evidence for the formation of sodium hassate(VIII)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zweidorf, A. von [Inst. fuer Kernchemie, Johannes Gutenberg-Univ. Mainz, Mainz (Germany); Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung mbH, Darmstadt (Germany); Angert, R.; Bruechle, W.; Buerger, S.; Eberhardt, K.; Eichler, R.; Hummrich, H.; Jaeger, E.; Kling, H.O.; Kratz, J.V.; Kuczewski, B.; Langrock, G.; Mendel, M.; Rieth, U.; Schaedel, M.; Schausten, B.; Schimpf, E.; Thoerle, P.; Trautmann, N.; Tsukada, K.; Wiehl, N.; Wirth, G.

    2004-07-01

    Hassium, element 108, was produced in the fusion reaction between {sup 26}Mg and {sup 248}Cm. The hassium recoils were oxidized in-situ to a highly volatile oxide, presumably HsO{sub 4}, and were transported in a mixture of He and O{sub 2} to a deposition and detection system. The latter consisted of 16 silicon PIN-photodiodes facing a layer of NaOH, which served, in the presence of a certain partial pressure of water in the transport gas, as reactive surface for the deposition of the volatile tetroxides. Six correlated {alpha}-decay chains of Hs were detected in the first 5 detectors centred around detection position 3. In analogy to OsO{sub 4}, which forms Na{sub 2}[OsO{sub 4}(OH){sub 2}], an osmate(VIII), with aqueous NaOH, HsO{sub 4} presumably was deposited as Na{sub 2}[HsO{sub 4}(OH){sub 2}], a hassate(VIII). (orig.)

  9. The space distribution of AGB stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jura, M.

    1990-01-01

    The AGB stars can be classified into three main types on the basis of their atmospheric composition: carbon-rich, oxygen-rich, and S-type. The carbon-rich stars typically have 1.5-solar-mass main sequence stars as progenitors. There are about 40 of these stars per sq kpc projected onto the plane of the Milky Way galaxy in the neighborhood of the sun with an exponential scale height above the galactic disk of about 200 pc. Contrary to the general distribution of mass, there is no decrease with galactocentric radius of the surface density of these stars for at least 3 kpc beyond the solar circle. The S-type stars appear to have the same spatial distribution as the carbon stars; there are about 1/3 as many 'pure' S stars as there are luminous carbon stars. One major class of oxygen-rich AGB stars is the Mira variables. There are approximately between 1 and 2 times as many of these stars per sq kpc projected onto the galactic plane of the Milky Way as there are carbon stars.

  10. Aristóteles y las series causales infinitas en Física VII y VIII

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Ross

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to show that we have at least two different arguments that prove the First Motor's existence. Even though there are coincidences between Physics VII 1 and VIII 5, their arguments are not identical. Physics VII argue the impossibility of an infinite movement in a finite time and VIII 5 the necessity of a "principal" cause.

  11. Effectiveness of Mind Mapping in English Teaching among VIII Standard Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallen, D.; Sangeetha, N.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study is to find out the effectiveness of mind mapping technique over conventional method in teaching English at high school level (VIII), in terms of Control and Experimental group. The sample of the study comprised, 60 VIII Standard students in Tiruchendur Taluk. Mind Maps and Achievement Test (Pretest & Posttest) were…

  12. 40 CFR Appendix Viii to Part 85 - Vehicle and Engine Parameters and Specifications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    .... a. Control parameters and calibrations. b. EGR valve flow calibration. 3. Catalytic converter system.... a. Control parameters and calibrations. b. EGR valve flow calibration. 3. Catalytic converter system... Specifications VIII Appendix VIII to Part 85 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED...

  13. 40 CFR Appendix Viii to Part 266 - Organic Compounds for Which Residues Must Be Analyzed

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) STANDARDS FOR THE MANAGEMENT OF SPECIFIC HAZARDOUS WASTES AND SPECIFIC TYPES OF HAZARDOUS WASTE MANAGEMENT FACILITIES Pt. 266, App. VIII Appendix VIII to Part 266... residues collected from areas downstream of the combustion chamber (e.g., ductwork, boiler tubes, heat...

  14. Star Products and Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Iida, Mari; Yoshioka, Akira

    2010-01-01

    Star products parametrized by complex matrices are defined. Especially commutative associative star products are treated, and star exponentials with respect to these star products are considered. Jacobi's theta functions are given as infinite sums of star exponentials. As application, several concrete identities are obtained by properties of the star exponentials.

  15. A SOFIA FORCAST Grism Study of the Mineralogy of Dust in the Winds of Proto-planetary Nebulae: RV Tauri Stars and SRd Variables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arneson, R. A.; Gehrz, R. D.; Woodward, C. E.; Helton, L. A.; Shenoy, D.; Evans, A.; Keller, L. D.; Hinkle, K. H.; Jura, M.; Lebzelter, T.; Lisse, C. M.; Rushton, M. T.; Mizrachi, J.

    2017-07-01

    We present a SOFIA FORCAST grism spectroscopic survey to examine the mineralogy of the circumstellar dust in a sample of post-asymptotic giant branch (post-AGB) yellow supergiants that are believed to be the precursors of planetary nebulae. Our mineralogical model of each star indicates the presence of both carbon-rich and oxygen-rich dust species—contrary to simple dredge-up models—with a majority of the dust in the form of amorphous carbon and graphite. The oxygen-rich dust is primarily in the form of amorphous silicates. The spectra do not exhibit any prominent crystalline silicate emission features. For most of the systems, our analysis suggests that the grains are relatively large and have undergone significant processing, supporting the hypothesis that the dust is confined to a Keplerian disk and that we are viewing the heavily processed, central regions of the disk from a nearly face-on orientation. These results help to determine the physical properties of the post-AGB circumstellar environment and to constrain models of post-AGB mass loss and planetary nebula formation.

  16. Wave Star

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kramer, Morten; Frigaard, Peter; Brorsen, Michael

    Nærværende rapport beskriver foreløbige hovedkonklusioner på modelforsøg udført på Aalborg Universitet, Institut for Vand, Jord og Miljøteknik med bølgeenergianlægget Wave Star i perioden 13/9 2004 til 12/11 2004.......Nærværende rapport beskriver foreløbige hovedkonklusioner på modelforsøg udført på Aalborg Universitet, Institut for Vand, Jord og Miljøteknik med bølgeenergianlægget Wave Star i perioden 13/9 2004 til 12/11 2004....

  17. Rainbow's Stars

    OpenAIRE

    Garattini, Remo; Mandanici, Gianluca

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, a growing interest in the equilibrium of compact astrophysical objects like white dwarf and neutron stars has been manifested. In particular, various modifications due to Planck-scale energy effects have been considered. In this paper we analyze the modification induced by gravity’s rainbow on the equilibrium configurations described by the Tolman–Oppenheimer–Volkoff (TOV) equation. Our purpose is to explore the possibility that the rainbow Planck-scale deformation of space-t...

  18. Maternally transferred anti-factor VIII IgG reduce the anti-factor VIII humoral immune response in factor VIII-deficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meslier, Yann; André, Sébastien; Teyssandier, Maud; Kaveri, Srinivas V; Lacroix-Desmazes, Sébastien

    2010-12-01

    Replacement therapy with exogenous factor VIII (FVIII) to treat haemorrhages or used in prophylaxis induces inhibitory anti-FVIII immunoglobulin G (IgG) in some patients with haemophilia A. Therapeutic strategies to prevent the onset of the deleterious anti-FVIII immune response are still lacking. Maternal IgG is transferred to the offspring during fetal and neonatal life. While protecting the offspring from bacterial and viral infections, maternal IgG may alter the repertoires of T and B lymphocytes, and may impair vaccination in early infancy. Using haemophilic mice, we demonstrate that the transfer of maternal anti-FVIII IgG modulates the onset of anti-FVIII inhibitory IgG in early adulthood. The protective effect is reproduced upon reconstitution of naive mice with anti-FVIII IgG, suggesting that the reduced ability to mount an anti-FVIII immune response is the result of an interference between circulating anti-FVIII IgG and the administered FVIII rather than to a profound remodelling of lymphocyte repertoires occurring during the ontogeny of the immune system. © 2010 The Authors. Immunology © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  19. Acquired factor VIII inhibitor syndrome: A rare cause of hematuria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muthuvel Seral Kannan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A 50-year-old woman presented with gross hematuria for 1 month. Clinical examinations, laboratory investigations, ultrasound and contrast computed tomography were normal, except anemia. Cystoscopy revealed bloody efflux from the right side. Retrograde pyelogram showed filling defect in the renal pelvis and biopsy was inconclusive. Renal angiogram was normal. She developed ecchymosis on the right thigh and arm with elevated activated partial thromboplastin time. The partial thromboplastin time correction study and Bethesda study confirmed the presence of acquired factor VIII inhibitor (acquired hemophilia. With flexible ureterorenoscopy, the mass in the renal pelvis was removed and its histopathology revealed clotted blood. The patient was subsequently managed with steroids and Factor eight inhibitor bypass activity.

  20. A bispecific antibody mimicking factor VIII in hemophilia A therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nogami, Keiji

    2016-06-01

    Serious issues in current hemostatic treatment of hemophilia A are the requirement for frequent intravenous administrations of factor (F) VIII, FVIII inhibitor development, and hemostatic treatment for patients with this inhibitor. For the purpose of overcoming these challenges, the FVIIIa-substituting bispecific antibody against FIXa/FX (ACE910, INN emicizumab) was produced. Emicizumab demonstrated marked hemostatic effects on both ongoing and spontaneous joint bleeding in the acquired hemophilia A primate model. The clinical phase 1 study designed to assess the pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics and safety of emicizumab has been initiated. Severe emicizumab-related adverse events were minimal. The t1/2 was approximately 30 days, and bleeding events were significantly decreased by weekly subcutaneous administration in severe hemophilia A patients, independently of the presence of the inhibitor. Currently, the phase 1/2 extension study is ongoing. We anticipate that emicizumab will show the benefits of prophylactic efficacy with subcutaneous administration at a much lower frequency.

  1. The Chemical Compositions of the SRd Variable Stars. III. KK Aquilae, AG Aurigae, Z Aurigae, W Leo Minoris, and WW Tauri

    OpenAIRE

    Giridhar, S.; Lambert, D. L.; Gonzalez, G.

    2000-01-01

    Chemical compositions are derived from high-resolution spectra for five field SRd variables. These supergiants not previously analysed are shown to be metal-poor: KK Aql with [Fe/H] = -1.2, AG Aur with [Fe/H] = -1.8, Z Aur with [Fe/H] = -1.4, W LMi with [Fe/H] = -1.1, and WW Tau with [Fe/H] = -1.1. Their compositions are, except for two anomalies, identical to within the measurement errors with the compositions of subdwarfs, subgiants, and less evolved giants of the same [Fe/H]. One anomaly i...

  2. Agnostic Stacking of Intergalactic Doublet Absorption: Measuring the Ne VIII Population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Stephan; Pieri, Matthew M.; Mathur, Smita; Danforth, Charles W.; Michael Shull, J.

    2018-02-01

    We present a blind search for doublet intergalactic metal absorption with a method dubbed `agnostic stacking'. Using a forward-modelling framework we combine this with direct detections in the literature to measure the overall metal population. We apply this novel approach to the search for Ne VIII absorption in a set of 26 high-quality COS spectra. We probe to an unprecedented low limit of log N>12.3 at 0.47≤z ≤1.34 over a pathlength Δz = 7.36. This method selects apparent absorption without requiring knowledge of its source. Stacking this mixed population dilutes doublet features in composite spectra in a deterministic manner, allowing us to measure the proportion corresponding to Ne VIII absorption. We stack potential Ne VIII absorption in two regimes: absorption too weak to be significant in direct line studies (12.3 13.7). We do not detect Ne VIII absorption in either regime. Combining our measurements with direct detections, we find that the Ne VIII population is reproduced with a power law column density distribution function with slope β = -1.86+0.18-0.26 and normalisation log f_{13.7} = -13.99+0.20-0.23, leading to an incidence rate of strong Ne VIII absorbers dn/dz =1.38+0.97-0.82. We infer a cosmic mass density for Ne VIII gas with 12.3 constituting 4% of the total baryonic mass.

  3. Constraints on the Distance Moduli, Helium, and Metal Abundances, and Ages of Globular Clusters from Their RR Lyrae and Non-variable Horizontal Branch Stars. II. Multiple Stellar Populations in 47 Tuc, M3, and M13

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denissenkov, Pavel A.; VandenBerg, Don A.; Kopacki, Grzegorz; Ferguson, Jason W.

    2017-11-01

    We present a new set of horizontal branch (HB) models computed with the MESA stellar evolution code. The models adopt α-enhanced Asplund et al. metal mixtures and include the gravitational settling of He. They are used in our HB population synthesis tool to generate theoretical distributions of HB stars in order to describe the multiple stellar populations in the globular clusters 47 Tuc, M3, and M13. The observed HB in 47 Tuc is reproduced very well by our simulations for [{Fe}/{{H}}]=-0.70 and [α /{Fe}]=+0.4 if the initial helium mass fraction varies by {{Δ }}{Y}0˜ 0.03, and approximately 21%, 37%, and 42% of the stars have {Y}0=0.257, 0.270, and 0.287, respectively. These simulations yield {(m-M)}V=13.27, implying an age near 13.0 Gyr. In the case of M3 and M13, our synthetic HBs for [{Fe}/{{H}}]=-1.55 and [α /{Fe}]=0.4 match the observed ones quite well if M3 has {{Δ }}{Y}0˜ 0.01 and {(m-M)}V=15.02, resulting in an age of 12.6 Gyr, whereas M13 has {{Δ }}{Y}0˜ 0.08 and {(m-M)}V=14.42, implying an age of 12.9 Gyr. Mass loss during giant branch evolution and {{Δ }}{Y}0 appear to be the primary second parameters for M3 and M13. New observations for seven of the nine known RR Lyrae in M13 are also reported. Surprisingly, periods predicted for the c-type variables tend to be too high (by up to ˜0.1 days).

  4. When stars collide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Glebbeek, E.; Pols, O.R.

    2007-01-01

    When two stars collide and merge they form a new star that can stand out against the background population in a star cluster as a blue straggler. In so called collision runaways many stars can merge and may form a very massive star that eventually forms an intermediate mass blackhole. We have

  5. Type VIII collagen is elevated in diseases associated with angiogenesis and vascular remodeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, N. U. B.; Willumsen, N.; Bülow Sand, Jannie Marie

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Type VIII collagen is involved in angiogenesis and remodeling of arteries. We hypothesized that type VIII collagen was upregulated in diseases associated with vascular remodeling, e.g. pulmonary fibrosis and cancer. In this paper we present the development and validation of a competitive...... performance, and in relevant disease cohorts. The developed ELISA was applied for the assessment of type VIII collagen in serum from patients diagnosed with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) and various cancers. Results The C8-C ELISA was technically stable...

  6. Delta Scuti and related stars - Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breger, M.; Stockenhuber, H.

    Present knowledge on Delta Scuti stars, short-period pulsators of spectral types A and F situated on or above the main sequence, is reviewed. The topics discussed include: pulsation periods, pulsational mode-typing through line profiles, cluster stars, and SX Phe-type variables. The position of Delta Scuti stars in the H-R diagram is shown along with the observed period-luminosity-color relation for the stars. Correlations of average pulsation period and M(v) with cluster age are given, showing that the observed correlations can be explained by the PLC relation and main sequence evolution of the clusters.

  7. Separable metrics and radiating stars

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We study the junction condition relating the pressure to heat flux at the boundary of an accelerating and expanding spherically symmetric radiating star. We transform the junction condition to an ordinary differential equation by making a separability assumption on the metric functions in the space–time variables.

  8. Separable metrics and radiating stars

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-12-14

    Dec 14, 2016 ... and expanding spherically symmetric radiating star. We transform the junction condition to an ordinary differ- ential equation by making a separability assumption on the metric functions in the space–time variables. The condition of separability on the metric functions yields several new exact solutions.

  9. NIR properties of Be stars in star clusters in the Magellanic Clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, K. T.; Subramaniam, Annapurni; Mathew, Blesson; Shruthi, S. B.

    2017-10-01

    Magellanic Clouds are the nearby galaxies which are ideal to study the properties of metal poor stellar population. In this study, we explore the near-IR properties of optically identified classical Be stars in 19 star clusters in the Magellanic Clouds. From an optically identified sample of 835 Be stars we obtained the J, H, K magnitudes of 389 stars from the IRSF MCPS catalog. Among these, 247 stars (36.4%) are found in 9 clusters in the Large Magellanic Cloud and 142 stars (55.5%) in 10 clusters in the Small Magellanic Cloud. After correcting for reddening, we studied their NIR properties in the (H - K)0 vs (J - H)0 diagram. We identified 14 stars with abnormally large near IR excesses, which were removed from the analysis, there by restricting our study to 355 classical Be stars. We propose an extended area in the near-IR (H - K)0 vs (J - H)0 diagram as the diagnostic location of Classical Be stars in the Magellanic Clouds. We identified 14 stars to have near-IR excess, higher than those seen in classical Be stars. From the analysis based on spectral energy distribution and luminosity estimate, we found that 8 candidate Be stars may be Herbig Ae/Be stars. We identified a new sample of 6 sgB[e] stars, which when added to the sparse existing sample of 15 sgB[e] stars in the Magellanic Clouds can provide insight to understand the evolutionary link between sgB[e] stars and Luminous Blue variables.

  10. RR Lyrae Stars in M4

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuehn Charles A

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Observations by Kepler/K2 have revolutionized the study of RR Lyrae stars by allowing the detection of new phenomna, such as low amplitude additional modes and period doubling, which had not previously been seen from the ground. During campaign 2, K2 observed the globular cluster M4, providiing the first opportunity to study a sizeable group of RR Lyrae stars that belong to a single population; the other RR Lyrae stars that have been observed from space are field stars in the galactic halo and thus belong to an assortment of populations. In this poster we present the results of our study of the RR Lyrae variables in M4 from K2 photometry. We have identified additional, low amplitude pulsation modes in both observed RRc stars. In 3 RRab stars we have found the Blazhko effect with periods of 16.6d, 22.4d, and 44.5d.

  11. Historia y globalización. VIII Conversaciones Internacionales de Historia [Reseña

    OpenAIRE

    Olábarri-Gortázar, I. (Ignacio)

    2013-01-01

    Reseña de Francisco Javier Caspistegui (ed.), Historia y globalización. VIII Conversaciones Internacionales de Historia. Universidad de Navarra. Pamplona, 7-9 de octubre de 2010, Pamplona, EUNSA, 2012. 318 pp. ISBN: 9788431328801.

  12. THE APPEARANCE OF THE INHIBITORS TO FACTOR VIII IN AN ELDER PATIENT WITH MILD HAEMOPHILIA A

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Faganel

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Background. The inhibitors to F VIII are unusual in case of a mild haemophilia because the replacement therapy is seldom necessary. In case of severe trauma, when prolonged replacement therapy of F VIII is needed, the appearance of the inhibitors is more frequent. The mild form of the disease becomes a severe one and the haemorrhages are frequent.Patient and methods. In case of our patient with mild form of haemophilia, the inhibitors to F VIII developed after prolonged replacement therapy for treatement of subdural haemorrhage. In the article we describe recurrent haemorrhages and treatement of them with FEIBA and rF VIIa.Conclusions. Due to poor compliance of an elder patient we didn’t decide to treat the inhibitors for F VIII actively.

  13. [Organoleptic and physicochemical characteristics of propolis in the Province Of Nuble, VIII Region-Chile].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández, M S; Lazo, C S; Junod, J M; Arancibia, J M; Flores, R S; Valencia, A E; Valenzuela, E V

    2005-12-01

    Propolis ("bee-glue") is a gummy resinous substance elaborated by honey bees (Apis mellifera) from different types of plant resins. The chemical composition of propolis is very complex and variable as it depends on the botanical source and the environmental conditions prevailing at the location where the resin is collected by bees. The objective [corrected] of this study was to determine the propolis organoleptic and physicochemical properties of different types in the Province of Nuble (VIII Región, Chile). Samples were collected at different sites located in the Central Valley, ranging from the coast to the mountain skirts. Analyses included humidity, ashes, wax content, total phenolics content, total flavonoids, mechanical impurities, oxidation time, and solubility in ethanol. Results showed that propolis extracts from coastal sites are better quality than those collected at mountain skirts, and these in turn are better than propolis obtained from the Central Valley. All propolis analyzed in this study can be classified according to the Brazilian norm as high flavonoid content. The same homogeneity is observed in the amounts of total phenolics found in the samples. In general terms, properties of the propolis samples analyzed fulfill the quality requirements of the current international standards.

  14. Allometry of Factor VIII and informed scaling of next generation therapeutic proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosloski, Matthew P.; Pisal, Dipak S.; Mager, Donald E.; Balu-Iyer, Sathy V.

    2013-01-01

    Allometric scaling has been applied to the pharmacokinetics (PK) of factor VIII (FVIII), but published relationships are based on relatively small subsets of available data. Numerous next generation forms of FVIII are being developed (e.g. Fc fusion, PEGylated, and liposomal formulations) and traditional pharmacokinetic scaling of these products would not incorporate the wealth of existing knowledge for current FVIII therapy in humans. We conducted a meta-analysis and developed allometric relationships of FVIII from over 100 PK studies collected from literature. Normalized Wajima curves were used to relate mean FVIII profiles between species. An ‘informed scaling’ approach was derived for predicting first-in-human PK parameters and demonstrated with a case study for an Fc fusion FVIII. NCA values for FVIII PK were well described by the allometric equations CL=6.59·W0.85 and Vss=65.0·W0.97. A subset of studies characterized by two compartment modeling showed strong linearity in scaling of total clearance and central volume, but more variability in distributional clearance and peripheral volume. Wajima curves for FVIII superimposed across species and the disposition of Fc fusion FVIII in humans was well predicted by ‘informed scaling.’ This approach might be generally applicable for predicting human PK of next generational therapeutics. PMID:23620343

  15. A Cranial Trauma was the Cause of Death of Charles VIII of France (1470-1498).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markatos, Konstantinos; Karamanou, Marianna; Arkoudi, Konstantina; Konstantinidi, Apostolia; Androutsos, Georgios

    2017-09-01

    This article summarizes the reign, life and death, of Charles VIII of France. Also we intend to investigate current views on his cause of death, contradictions and opinions of his biographers. Poisoning, disease, and injury are the possible causes of his death but, according to the literature, cranial trauma was the most probable cause of death of the King Charles VIII of France. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. PENGARUH KONSELING KELOMPOK TERHADAP KONFORMITAS SISWI KELAS VIII SMPIT BINA AMAL SEMARANG

    OpenAIRE

    sudyastuti sudyastuti; heru mugiarso

    2017-01-01

    This research was conducted based on the phenomenon that happens to grade VIII SMPIT Bina Amal Semarang which has the social conformity low. The purpose of this research is to proof  the influence of counseling service groups towards the conformity. The type of this research is experimental research. The research was conducted with seven times the grant of preferential treatment on grade VIII SMPIT Bina Amal Semarang, research subject with 8 students. The data collection method used is the ps...

  17. Type VIII collagen has a restricted distribution in specialized extracellular matrices

    OpenAIRE

    1988-01-01

    A pepsin-resistant triple helical domain (chain 50,000 Mr) of type VIII collagen was isolated from bovine corneal Descemet's membrane and used as an immunogen for the production of mAbs. An antibody was selected for biochemical and tissue immunofluorescence studies which reacted both with Descemet's membrane and with type VIII collagen 50,000-Mr polypeptides by competition ELISA and immunoblotting. This antibody exhibited no crossreactivity with collagen types I-VI by competition ELISA. The m...

  18. Implications of an updated ultraviolet background for the ionization mechanisms of intervening Ne VIII absorbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Tanvir; Khaire, Vikram; Srianand, Raghunathan; Muzahid, Sowgat; Pathak, Amit

    2017-04-01

    Ne VIII absorbers seen in QSO spectra are useful tracers of warm ionized gas, when collisional ionization is the dominant ionization process. While photoionization by the ultraviolet background (UVB) is a viable option, it tends to predict large line-of-sight thickness for the absorbing gas. Here, we study the implications of the recently updated UVB at low z to understand the ionization mechanisms of intervening Ne VIII absorbers. With the updated UVB, one typically needs higher density and metallicity to reproduce the observed ionic column densities under photoionization. Both reduce the inferred line-of-sight thicknesses of the absorbers. We find a critical density of ≥5 × 10-5 cm-3 above which the observed N({Ne VIII})/N({O VI}) can be reproduced by pure collisional processes. If the gas is of near solar metallicity (as measured for the low ions) then the cooling time-scales will be small (inferred low ion metallicity is near solar or supersolar. If we assume the Ne VIII phase to have similar metallicities then photoionization can reproduce the observed N({Ne VIII})/N({O VI}) without the line-of-sight thickness being unreasonably large and avoids cooling issues related to the collisional ionization at these metallicities. However, the indication of broad Lyα absorption in a couple of systems, if true, suggests that the Ne VIII phase is distinct from the low ion phase having much lower metallicity.

  19. Functional mapping of factor VIII C2 domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellequer, Jean-Luc; Chen, Shu-wen W; Saboulard, Didier; Delcourt, Marc; Négrier, Claude; Plantier, Jean-Luc

    2011-07-01

    The factor VIII (FVIII) is a cofactor of the coagulation cascade. The FVIII C2 domain is a critical domain that participates in the interactions with the von Willebrand factor and the phospholipidic surfaces. To assess the importance of each residue of this domain in the maintenance of the structure and the function of FVIII, a number (n=139) of mutants were generated by substituting the original residues, from Ser2173 to Gly2325, by an alanine. Mutants were built within a complete B domain-deleted FVIII and expressed in COS-1 cells. Mutant antigen levels and procoagulant activities were measured. Two in silico analyses, a sliding average procedure and an analysis of the mutation energy cost were conducted in parallel on the FVIII structure. Both results were in agreement with the functional data, and illustrated the benefit of using such strategies prior to targeting specific residues in the aim of generating active recombinant molecules. The functional assays identify the residues that are important to maintaining the structure of the C2 domain, mainly those forming β-sheet, and those that can afford substitution, establishing a detailed functional relation with the available crystallographic data. This study provided a comprehensive functional mapping of the FVIII C2 domain and discussed the implication of specific residues in respect to the maintenance in the activity and structure stability, the efficiency in secretion, the binding to phospholipids and the formation of epitope.

  20. piggyBac-mediated phenotypic correction of factor VIII deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janice M Staber

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Hemophilia A, caused by a deficiency in factor VIII (FVIII, is the most severe inherited bleeding disorder. Hemophilia A is an attractive gene therapy candidate because even small increases in FVIII levels will positively alter the phenotype. While several vectors are under investigation, gene addition from an integrated transgene offers the possibility of long term expression. We engineered the DNA transposon-based vector, piggyBac (PB, to carry a codon-optimized B-domain deleted human FVIII cDNA. Evaluation of gene transfer efficiency in FVIII null mice demonstrated that PB containing the FVIII cDNA, delivered via hydrodynamic injection to immunocompetent hemophilia mice, conferred persistent gene expression, attaining mean FVIII activity of approximately 60% with 3/19 developing inhibitors. In addition to efficacious expression, a goal of gene transfer-based therapies is to develop vectors with low toxicity. To assess endoplasmic reticulum stress in hepatocytes stably expressing the transgene, we evaluated levels of ER stress markers via qPCR and found no evidence of cell stress. To evaluate phenotypic correction, a tail clip assay performed at the end of the study revealed reduced blood loss. These data demonstrate that PB can be used to achieve sustained FVIII expression and long-term therapeutic benefit in a mouse model.

  1. Effect of process variables on the osmotic dehydration of star-fruit slices Efeito das variáveis de processo na desidratação osmótica de fatias de carambola

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camila Dalben Madeira Campos

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to study the effect of blanching and the influence of temperature, solution concentration, and the initial fruit:solution ratio on the osmotic dehydration of star-fruit slices. For blanching, different concentrations of citric and ascorbic acids were studied. The samples immersed in 0.75% citric acid presented little variation in color in relation to the fresh star-fruit. Osmotic dehydration was carried out in an incubator with orbital shaking, controlled temperature, and constant shaking at 120 rpm. The influence of process variables was studied in trials defined by a complete 23 central composite design. In general, water loss and solids gain were positively influenced by temperature and by solution concentration. Nevertheless, lower temperatures reduced water loss throughout the osmotic dehydration process. An increase in the amount of dehydrating solution (initial fruit:solution ratio slightly influenced the evaluated responses. The process carried out at 50 ºC with a solution concentration of 50% resulted in a product with lower solids gain and greater water loss. Under these conditions, blanching minimized the effect of the osmotic treatment on star-fruit browning, and therefore the blanched fruits showed little variation in color in relation to the fresh fruit.O objetivo deste trabalho foi estudar o efeito do branqueamento e a influência da temperatura, concentração de sacarose e da relação fruta:solução inicial na desidratação osmótica de fatias de carambola. Para o branqueamento, diferentes concentrações de ácido cítrico e ascórbico foram estudadas. As amostras imersas em 0,75% de ácido cítrico apresentaram pouca variação de cor em relação à carambola fresca. A desidratação osmótica foi conduzida em uma incubadora com agitação orbital, com temperatura controlada e agitação constante de 120 rpm. A influência das variáveis de processo foi avaliada através de ensaios definidos

  2. Lifestyles of the Stars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Cocoa Beach, FL. John F. Kennedy Space Center.

    Some general information on stars is provided in this National Aeronautics and Space Administration pamphlet. Topic areas briefly discussed are: (1) the birth of a star; (2) main sequence stars; (3) red giants; (4) white dwarfs; (5) neutron stars; (6) supernovae; (7) pulsars; and (8) black holes. (JN)

  3. Egyptian "Star Clocks"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Symons, Sarah

    Diagonal, transit, and Ramesside star clocks are tables of astronomical information occasionally found in ancient Egyptian temples, tombs, and papyri. The tables represent the motions of selected stars (decans and hour stars) throughout the Egyptian civil year. Analysis of star clocks leads to greater understanding of ancient Egyptian constellations, ritual astronomical activities, observational practices, and pharaonic chronology.

  4. Star Formation in IC 348

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbst, W.

    2008-12-01

    A review of work on the small, compact, nearby young cluster IC 348 is given. This region is particularly important because it is well surveyed at a variety of wavelengths and intermediate in nature between dense clusters and loose associations. Its earliest type star is B5 and it contains a few hundred stellar members as well as some brown dwarfs, protostars, Herbig-Haro objects and starless sub-mm cores. The total mass of its components is ˜90 M_⊙, most of which is in the form of pre-main sequence stars. Perhaps the biggest challenge to work on the cluster is the relatively high and variable extinction (A_v=3D1-7 mag). Studies to date have provided particularly valuable insights into the initial mass function, disk lifetimes, stellar rotation properties, X-ray properties, outflows and substructure of the cluster. Results on the stellar component include the following: 1) the initial mass function matches that for field stars in the stellar and brown dwarf regimes, 2) the fraction of stars with disks is probably normal for the cluster's age, 3) the rotation properties match those of the Orion Nebula Cluster and are significantly different, in the sense of slower rotation, than NGC 2264, 4) the X-ray properties of the stars appear normal for T Tauri stars. There is a ridge of high extinction that lies ˜10 arcmin (0.9 pc in projection) to the southwest of IC 348 and contains about a dozen Class 0 and I protostars as well as some Herbig Haro objects and sub-mm cores. This region, which also contains the "Flying Ghost Nebula" and the well-studied object HH 211, clearly signals that star formation in this part of the Perseus dark clouds is not yet finished. An extensive kinematical study involving both proper motions and radial velocities for the 400 members of the cluster would be most desirable.

  5. Classifying TDSS Stellar Variables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaro, Rachael Christina; Green, Paul J.; TDSS Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The Time Domain Spectroscopic Survey (TDSS), a subprogram of SDSS-IV eBOSS, obtains classification/discovery spectra of point-source photometric variables selected from PanSTARRS and SDSS multi-color light curves regardless of object color or lightcurve shape. Tens of thousands of TDSS spectra are already available and have been spectroscopically classified both via pipeline and by visual inspection. About half of these spectra are quasars, half are stars. Our goal is to classify the stars with their correct variability types. We do this by acquiring public multi-epoch light curves for brighter stars (rclassifications and parameters in the Catalina Surveys Periodic Variable Star Catalog. Variable star classifications include RR Lyr, close eclipsing binaries, CVs, pulsating white dwarfs, and other exotic systems. The key difference between our catalog and others is that along with the light curves, we will be using TDSS spectra to help in the classification of variable type, as spectra are rich with information allowing estimation of physical parameters like temperature, metallicity, gravity, etc. This work was supported by the SDSS Research Experience for Undergraduates program, which is funded by a grant from Sloan Foundation to the Astrophysical Research Consortium.

  6. The Birth of Massive Stars and Star Clusters

    OpenAIRE

    Tan, Jonathan C.

    2005-01-01

    In the present-day universe, it appears that most, and perhaps all, massive stars are born in star clusters. It also appears that all star clusters contain stars drawn from an approximately universal initial mass function, so that almost all rich young star clusters contain massive stars. In this review I discuss the physical processes associated with both massive star formation and with star cluster formation. First I summarize the observed properties of star-forming gas clumps, then address...

  7. Iron Abundance in the Prototype PG 1159 Star, GW Vir Pulsator PG 1159-035, and Related Objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, K.; Rauch, T.; Kruk, J. W.; Kurucz, R. L.

    2011-01-01

    We performed an iron abundance determination of the hot, hydrogen deficient post-AGB star PG 1159-035. which is the prototype of the PG 1159 spectral class and the GW Vir pulsators, and of two related objects (PG 1520+525, PG 1144+005), based on the first detection of Fe VIII lines in stellar photospheres. In another PG 1159 star. PG 1424+535. we detect Fe VII lines. In all four stars, each within T(sub eff) = 110,000-150,000 K, we find a solar iron abundance. This result agrees with our recent abundance analysis of the hottest PG 1159 stars (T(sub eff) = 150,000-200,000 K) that exhibit Fe x lines. On the whole, we find that the PG 1159 stars are not significantly iron deficient, in contrast to previous notions.

  8. Photometric Variability of Four Coronally Active Stars

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Author Affiliations. J. C. Pandey1 K. P. Singh2 R. Sagar1 3 S. A. Drake4. State Observatory, Naini Tal 263 129, India. Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Mumbai, India. Indian Institute of Astrophysics, Bangalore, India. Code 668, LHEA, NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771, USA.

  9. Factor VIII and fibrinogen recovery in plasma after Theraflex methylene blue-treatment: effect of plasma source and treatment time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapaille, André; Reichenberg, Stefan; Najdovski, Tome; Cellier, Nicolas; de Valensart, Nicolas; Deneys, Véronique

    2014-04-01

    The quality of fresh-frozen plasma is affected by different factors. Factor VIII is sensitive to blood component storage processes and storage as well as pathogen-reduction technologies. The level of fibrinogen in plasma is not affected by the collection processes but it is affected by preparation and pathogen-reduction technologies. The quality of plasma from whole blood and apheresis donations harvested at different times and treated with a pathogen-reduction technique, methylene blue/light, was investigated, considering, in particular, fibrinogen and factor VIII levels and recovery. The mean factor VIII level after methylene blue treatment exceeded 0.5 IU/mL in all series. Factor VIII recovery varied between 78% and 89% in different series. The recovery of factor VIII was dependent on plasma source as opposed to treatment time. The interaction between the two factors was statistically significant. Mean levels of fibrinogen after methylene blue/light treatment exceeded 200 mg/dL in all arms. The level of fibrinogen after treatment correlated strongly with the level before treatment. There was a negative correlation between fibrinogen level before treatment and recovery. Pearson's correlation coefficient between factor VIII recovery and fibrinogen recovery was 0.58. These results show a difference in recovery of factor VIII and fibrinogen correlated with plasma source. The recovery of both factor VIII and fibrinogen was higher in whole blood plasma than in apheresis plasma. Factor VIII and fibrinogen recovery did not appear to be correlated.

  10. Recombinant factor VIII in the management of hemophilia A: current use and future promise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerry S Powell

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Jerry S PowellDivision of Hematology and Oncology, University of California Davis Cancer Center, Sacramento, CA, USAAbstract: Hemophilia A is a rare inherited bleeding disorder due to mutation of the gene that encodes the coagulation protein factor VIII. Historically, prior to the availability of treatment with factor VIII preparations, most boys died from uncontrolled bleeding, either spontaneous bleeding or after injury, before reaching 20 years of age. One of the most impressive triumphs of modern medicine is that with current recombinant factor VIII replacement therapy, a boy born in the 21st century with severe hemophilia A can anticipate a normal life expectancy with essentially no permanent complications from bleeding. For severe hemophilia A, current optimal treatment should have two goals: first, to provide sufficient factor VIII to prevent spontaneous bleeding, and second, to provide sufficient factor VIII to have normal coagulation function after any trauma. However, the replacement therapy requires tremendous resources for effective use, and remains extraordinarily expensive. Thus there are opportunities for further advances in therapy for hemophilia A. Two major concerns continue to trouble current optimal treatment approaches: some patients will develop neutralizing antibodies during the first 50 infusions of therapeutic factor VIII, and second, to administer therapeutic factor VIII every other day in young boys often requires placement of a central venous access device, and such use carries the life-threatening risks of infection and thrombosis. Because of the effectiveness of current therapy, any new developments in treatment will require significant concerns for safety, both immediate and in the long term. A number of research groups seek to prolong the biological efficacy of infused recombinant factor VIII. Currently, one such promising development is in the advanced stages of clinical trial. The goals will be to improve

  11. Application of near infrared spectroscopy in monitoring the moisture content in freeze-drying process of human coagulation factor VIII

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fei Wang

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available As an important process analysis tool, near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS has been widely used in process monitoring. In the present work, the feasibility of NIRS for monitoring the moisture content of human coagulation factor VIII (FVIII in freeze-drying process was investigated. A partial least squares regression (PLS-R model for moisture content determination was built with 88 samples. Different pre-processing methods were explored, and the best method found was standard normal variate (SNV transformation combined with 1st derivation with Savitzky–Golay (SG 15 point smoothing. Then, four different variable selection methods, including uninformative variable elimination (UVE, interval partial least squares regression (iPLS, competitive adaptive reweighted sampling (CARS and manual method, were compared for eliminating irrelevant variables, and iPLS was chosen as the best variable selection method. The correlation coefficient (R, correlation coefficient of calibration set (Rcal, correlation coefficient of validation set (Rval, root mean square errors of cross-validation (RMSECV and root mean square errors of prediction (RMSEP of PLS model were 0.9284, 0.9463, 0.8890, 0.4986% and 0.4514%, respectively. The results showed that the model for moisture content determination has a wide range, good linearity, accuracy and precision. The developed approach was demonstrated to be a potential for monitoring the moisture content of FVIII in freeze-drying process.

  12. Spectral Properties and Variability of BIS objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaudenzi, S.; Nesci, R.; Rossi, C.; Sclavi, S.; Gigoyan, K. S.; Mickaelian, A. M.

    2017-10-01

    Through the analysis and interpretation of newly obtained and of literature data we have clarified the nature of poorly investigated IRAS point sources classified as late type stars, belonging to the Byurakan IRAS Stars catalog. From medium resolution spectroscopy of 95 stars we have strongly revised 47 spectral types and newly classified 31 sources. Nine stars are of G or K types, four are N carbon stars in the Asymptotic Giant Branch, the others being M-type stars. From literature and new photometric observations we have studied their variability behaviour. For the regular variables we determined distances, absolute magnitudes and mass loss rates. For the other stars we estimated the distances, ranging between 1.3 and 10 kpc with a median of 2.8 kpc from the galactic plane, indicating that BIS stars mostly belong to the halo population.

  13. Temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, bottle and other instruments from USCGC POLAR STAR in the Arctic Ocean from 2002-08-19 to 2002-09-23 (NODC Accession 0115588)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0115588 includes discrete sample and profile data collected from USCGC POLAR STAR in the Arctic Ocean from 2002-08-19 to 2002-09-23. These data...

  14. The F309S mutation increases factor VIII secretion in human cell line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daianne Maciely Carvalho Fantacini

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT OBJECTIVES: The capacity of a human cell line to secrete recombinant factor VIII with a F309S point mutation was investigated, as was the effect of the addition of chemical chaperones (betaine and sodium-4-phenylbutyrate on the secretion of factor VIII. METHODS: This work used a vector with a F309S mutation in the A1 domain to investigate FVIII production in the HEK 293 human cell line. Factor VIII activity was measured by chromogenic assay. Furthermore, the effects of chemical drugs on the culture were evaluated. RESULTS: The addition of the F309S mutation to a previously described FVIII variant increased FVIII secretion by 4.5 fold. Moreover, the addition of betaine or sodium-4-phenylbutyrate increased the secretion rate of FVIIIΔB proteins in HEK 293 cells, but the same effect was not seen for FVIIIΔB-F309S indicating that all the recombinant protein produced had been efficiently secreted. CONCLUSION: Bioengineering factor VIII expressed in human cells may lead to an efficient production of recombinant factor VIII and contribute toward low-cost coagulation factor replacement therapy for hemophilia A. FVIII-F309S produced in human cells can be effective in vivo.

  15. Search of Short-Period Pulsating Variables(I

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chulhee Kim

    1996-06-01

    Full Text Available CCD differential photometry was carried out for seven stars in the "New Catalogue of Suspected Variable Stars" in order to discover new short-period pulsating variables such as low and high amplitude δ Scuti stars and RR Lyrae stars. It was found that NSV1132, NSV3031, and NSV5119 are RRs, Irregular, and low amplitude δ Scuti type variables respectively.

  16. Desenvolvimento de inibidores do fator VIII na hemofilia A Development of factor VIII inhibitors in hemophilia A

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel G. Chaves

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available A hemofilia A é uma coagulopatia genética com herança recessiva ligada ao cromossomo X que afeta 1-2 a cada 10 mil indivíduos do sexo masculino nascidos vivos. Estes indivíduos têm baixas concentrações ou ausência do fator VIII (FVIII da coagulação no plasma e apresentam quadros hemorrágicos leves, moderados e graves, dependendo da atividade de FVIII circulante. Estes pacientes necessitam de constante reposição proteica e aproximadamente 30% deles desenvolvem aloanticorpos contra a proteína exógena. A síntese dos anticorpos anti-FVIII é iniciada quando o FVIII exógeno é endocitado por células apresentadoras de antígeno, degradado e apresentado às células T CD4+ na forma de peptídeos ligados a moléculas do complexo maior de histocompatibilidade (MHC de classe II. Alguns fatores de risco (paciente/tratamento podem ser relacionados ao desenvolvimento desta resposta imune. Neste contexto, as mutações no gene do FVIII e polimorfismos em genes envolvidos na resposta imune são candidatos moleculares como determinantes imunogenéticos na predisposição para o desenvolvimento de inibidores. Por não ser completamente entendido e controlado, o desenvolvimento desta resposta imune contra o FVIII constitui o maior problema decorrente do tratamento de indivíduos portadores de hemofilia A e faz-se necessária busca de opções que visem minimizar suas ações deletérias. Algumas alternativas de tratamento têm se mostrado eficazes no tratamento (anti-CD20, plasmaférese, concentrado de complexo protrombínico (PCCs, concentrado de complexo protrombínico ativado (APCCs, fator VII humano ativado, mas a retirada ou neutralização específica dos inibidores de FVIII ainda não foram alcançadas.Hemophilia A, which affects 1-2:10,000 live-born male neonates, is a genetic coagulopathy with recessive inheritance linked to the X chromosome. These individuals have low concentrations or no coagulation factor VIII (FVIII in the plasma

  17. Post common envelope binaries from SDSS. VIII. Evidence for disrupted magnetic braking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreiber, M. R.; Gänsicke, B. T.; Rebassa-Mansergas, A.; Nebot Gomez-Moran, A.; Southworth, J.; Schwope, A. D.; Müller, M.; Papadaki, C.; Pyrzas, S.; Rabitz, A.; Rodríguez-Gil, P.; Schmidtobreick, L.; Schwarz, R.; Tappert, C.; Toloza, O.; Vogel, J.; Zorotovic, M.

    2010-04-01

    Context. The standard prescription of angular momentum loss in compact binaries assumes magnetic braking to be very efficient as long as the secondary star has a radiative core, but to be negligible if the secondary star is fully convective. This prescription has been developed to explain the orbital period gap observed in the orbital period distribution of cataclysmic variables but has so far not been independently tested. Because the evolutionary time-scale of post common envelope binaries (PCEBs) crucially depends on the rate of angular momentum loss, a fundamental prediction of the disrupted magnetic braking theory is that the relative number of PCEBs should dramatically decrease for companion-star masses exceeding the mass that corresponds to the fully-convective boundary. Aims: We present the results of a large survey of PCEBs among white dwarf/main sequence (WDMS) binaries that allows us to determine the fraction of PCEBs as a function of secondary star mass and therewith to ultimately test the disrupted magnetic braking hypothesis. Methods: We obtained multiple spectroscopic observations spread over at least two nights for 670 WDMS binaries. Systems showing at least 3σ radial velocity variations are considered to be strong PCEB candidates. Taking into account observational selection effects we compare our results with the predictions of binary population simulations. Results: Among the 670 WDMS binaries we find 205 strong PCEB candidates. The fraction of PCEBs among WDMS binaries peaks around Msec ~ 0.25 M⊙ and steeply drops towards higher mass secondary stars in the range of Msec = 0.25-0.4 M⊙. Conclusions: The decrease of the number of PCEBs at the fully convective boundary strongly suggests that the evolutionary time scales of PCEBs containing fully convective secondaries are significantly longer than those of PCEBs with secondaries containing a radiative core. This is consistent with significantly reduced magnetic wind braking of fully convective

  18. Unexplained Brightening of Unusual Star

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    compact objects), both high- and low-luminosity X-ray sources , and cataclysmic variables (double stars whose light `flickers'). The kinds and numbers of these objects in cluster cores constrain the complex and as yet incompletely understood formation channels, most of which involve encounters with binaries. Many of the above exotic objects are strong emitters of ultraviolet light. The globular cluster 47 Tucanae 47 Tucanae is an impressive globular cluster that is visible with the naked eye from the southern hemisphere. It is one of the closest (distance 15,000 lightyears) and heaviest (total mass about 1 million solar masses) in our Galaxy. It contains about 1 million stars and the member stars have been intensively studied for decades. The observed structure of 47 Tucanae indicates that it is now approaching its ultimate fate during a core collapse phase. There are five known low-luminosity X-ray sources in the core of this cluster, eleven millisecond pulsars, many blue stragglers, and a centrally concentrated population of eclipsing binary stars. The observations support the idea that the population of primordial binaries in this cluster has been heavily modified by stellar encounters. The HST observations In late 1996, the group of astronomers obtained time to observe the central area of 47 Tucanae with the Hubble Space Telescope and the second Wide Field and Planetary Camera (WFPC2). During a period of more than 4 hours, a total of 15 CCD exposures were obtained through an ultraviolet filter (transmission near 3000 A), showing the thousands of individual stars in this densely populated region. Caption to ESO PR Photo 03/97 [GIF, 57k] When inspecting this material, it immediately became clear that one of the stars had undergone a substantial brightening in the course of these observations. In fact, its brightness increased by as much as 2.1 magnitudes, that is a factor of seven, in less than one hour; see the photos that accompany this Press Release. By the end of

  19. UXOR Hunting among Algol Variables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poxon, M.

    2015-06-01

    The class of variable typified by UX Orionis (UXORs or UXors) are young stars characterised by aperiodic or semiperiodic fades from maximum. This has led to several of the class being formerly catalogued as Algol-type eclipsing binaries (EAs), which can show superficially similar light variations. With this in view, I propose a campaign to search for more UX Ori type stars.

  20. Generation of an optimized lentiviral vector encoding a high-expression factor VIII transgene for gene therapy of hemophilia A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, J M; Denning, G; Doering, C B; Spencer, H T

    2013-06-01

    We previously compared the expression of several human factor VIII (fVIII) transgene variants and demonstrated the superior expression properties of B domain-deleted porcine fVIII. Subsequently, a hybrid human/porcine fVIII molecule (HP-fVIII) comprising 91% human amino-acid sequence was engineered to maintain the high-expression characteristics of porcine fVIII. The bioengineered construct then was used effectively to treat knockout mice with hemophilia A. In the current study, we focused on optimizing self-inactivating (SIN) lentiviral vector systems by analyzing the efficacy of various lentiviral components in terms of virus production, transduction efficiency and transgene expression. Specifically, three parameters were evaluated: (1) the woodchuck hepatitis post-transcriptional regulatory element (WPRE), (2) HIV versus SIV viral vector systems and (3) various internal promoters. The inclusion of a WPRE sequence had negligible effects on viral production and HP-fVIII expression. HIV and SIV vectors were compared and found to be similar with respect to transduction efficiency in both K562s and HEK-293T cells. However, there was an enhanced expression of HP-fVIII by the SIV system, which was evident in both K562 and BHK-M cell lines. To further compare expression of HP-fVIII from an SIV-based lentiviral system, we constructed expression vectors containing the high expression transgene and a human elongation factor-1 alpha, cytomegalovirus (CMV) or phosphoglycerate kinase promoter. Expression was significantly greater from the CMV promoter, which also yielded therapeutic levels of HP-fVIII in hemophilia A mice. Based on these studies, an optimized vector contains the HP-fVIII transgene driven by a CMV internal promoter within a SIV-based lentiviral backbone lacking a WPRE.

  1. Incidence of low-titre factor VIII inhibitors in patients with haemophilia A: meta-analysis of observational studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messori, A; Peyvandi, F; Mengato, D; Mannucci, P M

    2017-03-01

    A few studies have been focused on low-titre inhibitors in patients with haemophilia A. Although several putative factors have been implicated in the development of these inhibitors, solid data are still lacking. The aim of this study was to perform a proportion meta-analysis on the incidence of low-titre inhibitors in haemophilia A. We surveyed the PubMed database to identify studies on de novo development of low-titre inhibitors in haemophilia A patients. On the basis of these data, we carried out a proportion meta-analysis to summarize information on incidence and between-study variability. Furthermore, the following three covariates were assessed by meta-regression: (i) mild disease vs. severe haemophilia; (ii) status of previously untreated patient (PUP) as opposed to multi-transfused and (iii) type of factor VIII. Our literature search on PubMed extracted 340 eligible articles. From these, we selected 33 patient cohorts that were included in our meta-analysis (19 cohorts for PUPs and 14 cohorts for multi-transfused or unselected patients). The pooled incidence of low-titre inhibitors was 10.3% (95%CI: 8.3-12.5%) for studies including PUPs and 5.8% (95%CI: 2.5-10.4%) for the other studies; the difference was statistically significant (P = 0.003). Meta-regression of 31 patient cohorts found that mild disease and type of factor VIII were not associated with an increased incidence of low-titre inhibitors. Our results confirmed that PUPs show a higher incidence of low-titre inhibitors than the other patients. Furthermore, our data showed that mild haemophilia was not associated with an increased incidence of low-titre inhibitors. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. On the distribution of visual double stars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelov T.

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available An integrated distribution function is derived for visual double stars according to the magnitude difference Δm between the components. For this purpose the author uses a sample of 1626 double stars with Δm ∈ [0m − 4m]. The increment of the descriptive distribution function for an arbitrary increment of the variable Δm is also determined.

  3. Hemodialysis in a patient with severe hemophilia A and factor VIII inhibitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopalakrishnan, Natarajan; Usha, Thiruvengadam; Thopalan, Balasubramaniyan; Dhanapriya, Jeyachandran; Dineshkumar, Thanigachalam; Thirumalvalavan, Kaliaperumal; Sakthirajan, Ramanathan

    2016-10-01

    Hemophilia A is a hereditary X-linked recessive disease caused by mutations in the gene encoding factor VIII (FVIII), occurring in 1 out of 10,000 persons. Life expectancy and quality of life have dramatically improved recently in patients with hemophilia. Chronic kidney disease and need for renal replacement therapy in these patients are rare. The development of inhibitors to FVIII is the most serious complication of hemophilia and makes treatment of bleeds very challenging. We describe here a 28-year-old male patient with severe hemophilia A with presence of factor VIII inhibitor, who had end stage renal disease. Central venous access device was inserted along with infusion of factor eight inhibitor bypass activity before and after the procedure. He is currently on thrice weekly hemodialysis and doing well for 6 months without bleeding episodes. To our knowledge, hemophilia A with factor VIII inhibitor managed with hemodialysis has not been reported so far. © 2016 International Society for Hemodialysis.

  4. Identification of a Chemical Probe for Family VIII Bromodomains through Optimization of a Fragment Hit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerstenberger, Brian S; Trzupek, John D; Tallant, Cynthia; Fedorov, Oleg; Filippakopoulos, Panagis; Brennan, Paul E; Fedele, Vita; Martin, Sarah; Picaud, Sarah; Rogers, Catherine; Parikh, Mihir; Taylor, Alexandria; Samas, Brian; O'Mahony, Alison; Berg, Ellen; Pallares, Gabriel; Torrey, Adam D; Treiber, Daniel K; Samardjiev, Ivan J; Nasipak, Brian T; Padilla-Benavides, Teresita; Wu, Qiong; Imbalzano, Anthony N; Nickerson, Jeffrey A; Bunnage, Mark E; Müller, Susanne; Knapp, Stefan; Owen, Dafydd R

    2016-05-26

    The acetyl post-translational modification of chromatin at selected histone lysine residues is interpreted by an acetyl-lysine specific interaction with bromodomain reader modules. Here we report the discovery of the potent, acetyl-lysine-competitive, and cell active inhibitor PFI-3 that binds to certain family VIII bromodomains while displaying significant, broader bromodomain family selectivity. The high specificity of PFI-3 for family VIII was achieved through a novel bromodomain binding mode of a phenolic headgroup that led to the unusual displacement of water molecules that are generally retained by most other bromodomain inhibitors reported to date. The medicinal chemistry program that led to PFI-3 from an initial fragment screening hit is described in detail, and additional analogues with differing family VIII bromodomain selectivity profiles are also reported. We also describe the full pharmacological characterization of PFI-3 as a chemical probe, along with phenotypic data on adipocyte and myoblast cell differentiation assays.

  5. 'Polaris, Mark Kummerfeldt's Star, and My Star.'

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLure, John W.

    1984-01-01

    In most astronomy courses, descriptions of stars and constellations reveal the western European origins of the astronomers who named them. However, it is suggested that a study of non-western views be incorporated into astronomy curricula. Descriptions of various stars and constellations from different cultures and instructional strategies are…

  6. ENERGY STAR Certified Computers

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Certified models meet all ENERGY STAR requirements as listed in the Version 6.1 ENERGY STAR Program Requirements for Computers that are effective as of June 2, 2014....

  7. ENERGY STAR Certified Boilers

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Certified models meet all ENERGY STAR requirements as listed in the Version 3.0 ENERGY STAR Program Requirements for Boilers that are effective as of October 1,...

  8. ENERGY STAR Certified Dehumidifiers

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Certified models meet all ENERGY STAR requirements as listed in the Version 3.0 ENERGY STAR Program Requirements for Dehumidifiers that are effective as of October...

  9. ENERGY STAR Certified Displays

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Certified models meet all ENERGY STAR requirements as listed in the Version 7.0 ENERGY STAR Program Requirements for Displays that are effective as of July 1, 2016....

  10. Drevnerusskij pamflet na Mihaila VIII Paleologa v svete germenevtičeskogo analiza

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Demincev Mihail

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In the article the perception of the image of Michael VIII Palaeologus by literate citizens of Tsardom of Russia is considered. The study is based on analysis of writings that date back to XVII century. The study focuses on identifying the symbols and latent ideas, that point to a semantic connection of the studied writings with The Old Testament, Apocalypse and some antique texts. In the end of the article the authjr makes a conclusion, that the perception of the image of Michael VIII Palaeologus in Tsardom of Russia was negative.

  11. Wavelengths and energy levels of Xe VII and Xe VIII obtained by collision-based spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larsson, M.O. [Uppsala Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Theoretical Physics; Gonzalez, A.M. [Centro de Investigaciones Energeticas, Medioambientales y Tecnologicas (CIEMAT), Madrid (Spain). Inst. de Investigacion Basica; Hallin, R. [Uppsala Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Theoretical Physics; Heijkenskjoeld, F. [Uppsala Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Theoretical Physics; Hutton, R. [Lund Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Physics; Langereis, A. [Uppsala Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Theoretical Physics; Nystroem, B. [Lund Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Physics; O`Sullivan, G. [University Coll., Dublin (Ireland). Dept. of Physics; Waennstroem, A. [Uppsala Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Theoretical Physics

    1995-01-01

    The Xe VII and Xe VIII spectra have been investigated by collision-based spectroscopy. The radiation emitted following electron capture by 10q keV Xe{sup q+} ions (q = 6-8) impinging on a He (Ar) gas target has, with some exceptions, been recorded in the 350-8000 (1200-2500) A wavelength region. The xenon ions were provided by the Uppsala University ECR ion source. Many of the observed, previously unreported spectral lines have been identified. In total, nine new energy levels of Xe VII and Xe VIII have been established, of which two are tentative. The analysis was supported by Hartree-Fock calculations. (orig.).

  12. Acquired factor VIII inhibitor (acquired hemophilia A) presenting as spontaneous blood-filled scrotum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Rajanshu; Noack, Jill; Vemuri, Radhakrishna; Loehrke, Mark E

    2011-05-01

    Acquired hemophilia A, also known as acquired factor VIII deficiency, is an exceedingly rare bleeding diathesis that does not require any personal or family history of bleeding or clotting disorder. Because treatment is available, misdiagnosing or completely missing this diagnosis can be life threatening for patients. Clinicians should be aware that acquired forms of hemophilia do exist and are associated with high morbidity and mortality in elderly adults. We present a case of a 74-year-old man who was diagnosed with acquired factor VIII inhibitor during an admission for community-acquired pneumonia.

  13. Autonomous Star Tracker Algorithms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Betto, Maurizio; Jørgensen, John Leif; Kilsgaard, Søren

    1998-01-01

    Proposal, in response to an ESA R.f.P., to design algorithms for autonomous star tracker operations.The proposal also included the development of a star tracker breadboard to test the algorithms performances.......Proposal, in response to an ESA R.f.P., to design algorithms for autonomous star tracker operations.The proposal also included the development of a star tracker breadboard to test the algorithms performances....

  14. Star operations and Pullbacks

    OpenAIRE

    Fontana, Marco; Park, Mi Hee

    2003-01-01

    In this paper we study the star operations on a pullback of integral domains. In particular, we characterize the star operations of a domain arising from a pullback of ``a general type'' by introducing new techniques for ``projecting'' and ``lifting'' star operations under surjective homomorphisms of integral domains. We study the transfer in a pullback (or with respect to a surjective homomorphism) of some relevant classes or distinguished properties of star operations such as $v-, t-, w-, b...

  15. America's Star Libraries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyons, Ray; Lance, Keith Curry

    2009-01-01

    "Library Journal"'s new national rating of public libraries, the "LJ" Index of Public Library Service, identifies 256 "star" libraries. It rates 7,115 public libraries. The top libraries in each group get five, four, or three Michelin guide-like stars. All included libraries, stars or not, can use their scores to learn from their peers and improve…

  16. Superfluid neutron stars

    OpenAIRE

    Langlois, David

    2001-01-01

    Neutron stars are believed to contain (neutron and proton) superfluids. I will give a summary of a macroscopic description of the interior of neutron stars, in a formulation which is general relativistic. I will also present recent results on the oscillations of neutron stars, with superfluidity explicitly taken into account, which leads in particular to the existence of a new class of modes.

  17. 46 CFR 54.01-2 - Adoption of division 1 of section VIII of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Adoption of division 1 of section VIII of the ASME... division 1 of section VIII of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code. (a) Pressure vessels shall be designed, constructed, and inspected in accordance with section VIII of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel...

  18. Variation in baseline factor VIII concentration in a retrospective cohort of mild/moderate hemophilia A patients carrying identical F8 mutations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loomans, J.I.; Velzen, A.S. van; Eckhardt, C.L.; Peters, M.; Makipernaa, A.; Holmstrom, M.; Brons, P.P.T.; Dors, N.; Haya, S.; Voorberg, J.; Bom, J.G. Van Der; Fijnvandraat, K.

    2017-01-01

    Essentials Factor VIII levels vary in mild and moderate hemophilia A (MHA) patients with the same mutation. We aimed to estimate the variation and determinants of factor VIII levels among MHA patients. Age and genotype explain 59% of the observed inter-individual variation in factor VIII levels.

  19. Rotating Stars in Relativity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stergioulas Nikolaos

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Rotating relativistic stars have been studied extensively in recent years, both theoretically and observationally, because of the information they might yield about the equation of state of matter at extremely high densities and because they are considered to be promising sources of gravitational waves. The latest theoretical understanding of rotating stars in relativity is reviewed in this updated article. The sections on the equilibrium properties and on the nonaxisymmetric instabilities in f-modes and r-modes have been updated and several new sections have been added on analytic solutions for the exterior spacetime, rotating stars in LMXBs, rotating strange stars, and on rotating stars in numerical relativity.

  20. Rotating Stars in Relativity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolaos Stergioulas

    1998-06-01

    Full Text Available Because of the information they can yield about the equation of state of matter at extremely high densities and because they are one of the more possible sources of detectable gravitational waves, rotating relativistic stars have been receiving significant attention in recentyears. We review the latest theoretical and numerical methods for modeling rotating relativistic stars, including stars with a strong magnetic field and hot proto-neutron stars. We also review nonaxisymmetric oscillations and instabilities in rotating stars and summarize the latest developments regarding the gravitational wave-driven (CFS instability in both polar and axial quasi-normal modes.

  1. Nuclear physics of stars

    CERN Document Server

    Iliadis, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Most elements are synthesized, or ""cooked"", by thermonuclear reactions in stars. The newly formed elements are released into the interstellar medium during a star's lifetime, and are subsequently incorporated into a new generation of stars, into the planets that form around the stars, and into the life forms that originate on the planets. Moreover, the energy we depend on for life originates from nuclear reactions that occur at the center of the Sun. Synthesis of the elements and nuclear energy production in stars are the topics of nuclear astrophysics, which is the subject of this book

  2. Spectrophotometry of Symbiotic Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, David

    2017-06-01

    Symbiotic stars are fascinating objects - complex binary systems comprising a cool red giant star and a small hot object, often a white dwarf, both embedded in a nebula formed by a wind from the giant star. UV radiation from the hot star ionises the nebula producing a range of emission lines. These objects have composite spectra with contributions from both stars plus the nebula and these spectra can change on many timescales. Being moderately bright, they lend themselves well to amateur spectroscopy. This paper describes the symbiotic star phenomenon, shows how spectrophotometry can be used to extract astrophysically useful information about the nature of these systems, and gives results for three symbiotic stars based on the author's observations.

  3. Desain Pembelajaran Materi Luas Permukaan Prisma Menggunakan Pendekatan PMRI bagi Siswa Kelas VIII

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Djuwita Trisnawati

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Penelitian ini bertujuan menghasilkan lintasan belajar untuk membantu siswa dalam pembelajaran luas permukaan prisma menggunakan kemasan produk di kelas VIII SMP. Penelitian ini berdasarkan PMRI yang dikaitkan dengan pembelajaran Kurikulum 2006/KTSP. Metode yang digunakan dalam penelitian ini adalah design research type validation study yang bertujuan untuk membuktikan teori-teori pembelajaran. Penelitian ini dilaksanakan di SMP Negeri 24 Palembang dengan melibatkan siswa kelas VIII yang berjumlah 31 siswa. Aktivitas-aktivitas pembelajaran yang dilakukan siswa meliputi: 1 memahami bentuk dan sifat prisma, 2 menemukan dan memahami konsep luas permukaan prisma, dan 3 menyelesaikan permasalahan dalam kehidupan sehari-hari yang berhubungan dengan luas permukaan prisma. Hasil dari penelitian ini menunjukkan bahwa melalui serangkaian aktivitas yang telah dilakukan membantu siswa dalam pembelajaran luas permukaan prisma.This research aimed to produce learning trajectory in learning surface area of prism using product packaging in class VIII. This study was based PMRI associated with learning curriculum 2006 / KTSP. The method used was design research of type validation study that aimed to prove the theories of learning. The research was conducted on 31 students of class VIII SMPN 24 Palembang. Students learning activities that were conducted including: (1 comprehending the shape and the characteristic of prism, (2 finding and comprehending the concept surface area of prism, and (3 solving the problems in daily life related to the surface area of prism. The results of this study indicate that a series of activities can help students in learning surface area of prism.

  4. A natural anatoxin, Amm VIII, induces neutralizing antibodies against the potent scorpion alpha-toxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin-Eauclaire, M-F; Alami, M; Giamarchi, A; Missimilli, V; Rosso, J-P; Bougis, P E

    2006-03-15

    In this study, we have used Amm VIII, a natural anatoxin from the scorpion Androctonus mauretanicus mauretanicus, to elicit specific polyclonal antibodies in rabbit. Using liquid-phase radioimmunoassay, we have studied its selectivity and its neutralizing activity both in vitro and in vivo for the most lethal scorpion alpha-toxins described, in particular the alpha-toxin of reference AaH II. We have shown that the anti-Amm VIII serum prevents the association of 125I-AaH II with its receptor and is able to remove 125I-AaH II already bound to its site (the half-life of the complex 125I-AaH II-receptor site was 12 min in the absence of anti-Amm VIII serum but decreased to only 2 min in the presence of anti-Amm VIII serum). In vivo, the serum also has a protective effect in mice: 42 LD50 of AaH II by millilitre are neutralized, measured by subcutaneous injection.

  5. Analysis of mutations in the entire coding sequence of the factor VIII gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bidichadani, S.I.; Lanyon, W.G.; Connor, J.M. [Glascow Univ. (United Kingdom)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Hemophilia A is a common X-linked recessive disorder of bleeding caused by deleterious mutations in the gene for clotting factor VIII. The large size of the factor VIII gene, the high frequency of de novo mutations and its tissue-specific expression complicate the detection of mutations. We have used a combination of RT-PCR of ectopic factor VIII transcripts and genomic DNA-PCRs to amplify the entire essential sequence of the factor VIII gene. This is followed by chemical mismatch cleavage analysis and direct sequencing in order to facilitate a comprehensive search for mutations. We describe the characterization of nine potentially pathogenic mutations, six of which are novel. In each case, a correlation of the genotype with the observed phenotype is presented. In order to evaluate the pathogenicity of the five missense mutations detected, we have analyzed them for evolutionary sequence conservation and for their involvement of sequence motifs catalogued in the PROSITE database of protein sites and patterns.

  6. In vivo recovery and safety of human factor VIII product AAFACT in patients with haemophilia A

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vossebeld, P. J. M.; Tissing, M. H.; van den Berg, H. M.; Leebeek, F. W. G.; de Goede-Bolder, A.; Novakova, I. R. O.; Gerrits, W. B. J.; Peters, M.; Koopman, M. M. W.; Faber, A.; Hiemstra, H.; Grob, P.; Strengers, P. F. W.

    2003-01-01

    AAFACT, a monoclonal purified, solvent/detergent treated human plasma-derived coagulation factor VIII concentrate obtained from plasma of voluntary, non-remunerated blood donors, is manufactured and marketed in the Netherlands by Sanquin Plasma Products since 1995. In a postmarketing surveillance

  7. Intercombination lines of AlVIII, AlIX, and AlX ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denne, B.; Hinnov, E.

    1984-06-01

    Several aluminum lines observed in the Princeton Large Torus tokamak discharges have been identified as intersystem transitions, establishing the energies of the Al VIII 2s2p35S, Al IX 2s2p24P, and Al X 2s2p3P terms. Some observations of isoelectronic transitions in scandium and titanium ions are also reported.

  8. Living in a physical world VIII. Gravity and life in water

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2006-07-31

    Jul 31, 2006 ... Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences; Volume 31; Issue 3. Living in a physical world VIII. Gravity and life in water. Steven Vogel. Series Volume 31 Issue 3 September 2006 pp 309-322. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/jbsc/031/03/0309-0322 ...

  9. Idiopathic factor VIII inhibitor autoantibody in a man presented after accident.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mansouritorghabeh, H.; Lak, M.; Heerde, W.L. van

    2009-01-01

    Acquired hemophilia A is a rare but severe autoimmune bleeding disorder caused by autoantibodies against factor VIII activity and is a potentially life-threatening hemorrhagic disorder. The incidence of acquired hemophilia A has been estimated as 1.48 cases per million per year. The overall rate of

  10. Safety and Efficacy of BAY 94-9027, a Prolonged-Half-Life Factor VIII

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reding, M T; Ng, H J; Poulsen, Lone Hvitfeldt

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: BAY 94-9027 is a B-domain-deleted prolonged-half-life recombinant factor VIII (FVIII) conjugates in a site-specific manner with polyethylene glycol. OBJECTIVE: Assess efficacy and safety of BAY 94-9027 for prophylaxis and treatment of bleeds in patients with severe hemophilia A PATIEN...

  11. Factor VIII and von Willebrand factor co-delivery by endothelial cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouwens, E.A.M.

    2011-01-01

    A defect in coagulation factor VIII (FVIII) results in the inherited bleeding disorder hemophilia A. Current treatment of hemophilia A is hampered by the need of frequent administration of costly FVIII products. Therefore gene therapy is an attractive alternative for protein replacement to treat

  12. Storage and regulated secretion of factor VIII in blood outgrowth endothelial cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Biggelaar, M.; Bouwens, E.A.M.; Kootstra, N.A.; Hebbel, R.P.; Voorberg, J.; Mertens, K.

    2009-01-01

    Background Gene therapy provides an attractive alternative for protein replacement therapy in hemophilia A patients. Recent studies have shown the potential benefit of directing factor (F)VIII gene delivery to cells that also express its natural carrier protein von Willebrand factor (VWF). In this

  13. Endocytic receptor for pro-coagulant factor VIII: relevance to inhibitor formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarrete, Ana-Maria; Dasgupta, Suryasarathi; Teyssandier, Maud; Repesse, Yohann; Delignat, Sandrine; André, Sébastien; Bayry, Jagadeesh; Kaveri, Srinivas V; Lacroix-Desmazes, Sébastien

    2010-12-01

    The immunogenicity of therapeutic factor VIII (FVIII) in patients with haemophilia A remains a critical issue in patient management. This review describes the immunological processes involved in the activation of the immune system against FVIII, with a particular focus on the role of endocytic receptors for the recognition of FVIII by antigen-presenting cells.

  14. Limited promiscuity of HLA-DRB1 presented peptides derived of blood coagulation factor VIII

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Haren, Simon D.; Wroblewska, Aleksandra; Herczenik, Eszter; Kaijen, Paul H.; Ruminska, Aleksandra; ten Brinke, Anja; Meijer, Alexander B.; Voorberg, Jan

    2013-01-01

    The formation of inhibitory antibodies directed against coagulation factor VIII (FVIII) is a severe complication in the treatment of hemophilia A patients. The induction of anti-FVIII antibodies is a CD4(+) T cell-dependent process. Activation of FVIII-specific CD4(+) T cells is dependent on the

  15. Molecular characterization of a novel family VIII esterase from burkholderia multivorans UWC10

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Rashamuse, KJ

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available was identified. Full-length sequencing of the DNA insert showed that it consisted of a single open reading frame (ORF1) encoding a predicted protein of 398 amino acids. ORF1 (termed EstBL) had a high protein sequence identity to family VIII esterases. The Est...

  16. Physics of Eclipsing Binaries: Heartbeat Stars and Tidally Induced Pulsations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hambleton, K.; Degroote, P.; Conroy, K.; Bloemen, S.; Kurtz, D.; Thompson, S. E.; Fuller, J.; Giammarco, J.; Pablo, H.; Prša, A.

    2013-02-01

    Heartbeat stars are a relatively new class of eccentric ellipsoidal variable first discovered by Kepler. An overview of the current field is given with details of some of the interesting objects identified in our current Kepler sample of 135 heartbeats stars. Three objects that have recently been or are undergoing detailed study are described along with suggestions for further avenues of research. We conclude by discussing why heartbeat stars are an interesting new tool to study tidally induced pulsations and orbital dynamics.

  17. Pulsating stars in SuperWASP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holdsworth, Daniel L.

    2017-09-01

    SuperWASP is one of the largest ground-based surveys for transiting exoplanets. To date, it has observed over 31 million stars. Such an extensive database of time resolved photometry holds the potential for extensive searches of stellar variability, and provide solid candidates for the upcoming TESS mission. Previous work by e.g. [15], [5], [12] has shown that the WASP archive provides a wealth of pulsationally variable stars. In this talk I will provide an overview of the SuperWASP project, present some of the published results from the survey, and some of the on-going work to identify key targets for the TESS mission.

  18. Rapid variability of blazar 3C 279 during flaring states in 2013-2014 with joint FERMI-LAT, NuSTAR, swift, and ground-based multi-wavelength observations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hayashida, M.; Nalewajko, K.; Madejski, G. M.

    2015-01-01

    We report the results of a multiband observing campaign on the famous blazar 3C 279 conducted during a phase of increased activity from 2013 December to 2014 April, including first observations of it with NuSTAR. The γ-ray emission of the source measured by Fermi-LAT showed multiple distinct flar...

  19. Massive Star Burps, Then Explodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-04-01

    event was a complete surprise," added Alex Filippenko, leader of the UC Berkeley/Keck supernova group and a member of NASA'S Swift team. "It opens up a fascinating new window on how some kinds of stars die." All the observations suggest that the supernova's blast wave took only a few weeks to reach the shell of material ejected two years earlier, which did not have time to drift very far from the star. As the wave smashed into the ejecta, it heated the gas to millions of degrees, hot enough to emit copious X-rays. The Swift satellite saw the supernova continue to brighten in X-rays for 100 days, something that has never been seen before in a supernova. All supernovae previously observed in X-rays have started off bright and then quickly faded to invisibility. "You don't need a lot of mass in the ejecta to produce a lot of X-rays," notes Immler. Swift's ability to monitor the supernova's X-ray rise and decline over six months was crucial to his team's mass determination. But he adds that Chandra's sharp resolution enabled his group to resolve the supernova from a bright X-ray source that appears in the field of view of Swift's X-ray Telescope. "We could not have made this measurement without Chandra," says Immler, who will submit his team's paper next week to the Astrophysical Journal. "The synergy between Swift's fast response and its ability to observe a supernova every day for a long period, and Chandra's high spatial resolution, is leading to a lot of interesting results." Foley and his colleagues, whose paper appears in the March 10 Astrophysical Journal Letters, propose that the star recently transitioned from a Luminous Blue Variable (LBV) star to a Wolf-Rayet star. An LBV is a massive star in a brief but unstable phase of stellar evolution. Similar to the 2004 eruption, LBVs are prone to blow off large amounts of mass in outbursts so extreme that they are frequently mistaken for supernovae, events dubbed "supernova impostors." Wolf-Rayet stars are hot, highly

  20. Anisotropic models for compact stars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maurya, S.K.; Dayanandan, Baiju [University of Nizwa, Department of Mathematical and Physical Sciences, College of Arts and Science, Nizwa (Oman); Gupta, Y.K. [Jaypee Institute of Information Technology University, Department of Mathematics, Noida, Uttar Pradesh (India); Ray, Saibal [Government College of Engineering and Ceramic Technology, Department of Physics, Kolkata, West Bengal (India)

    2015-05-15

    In the present paper we obtain an anisotropic analog of the Durgapal and Fuloria (Gen Relativ Gravit 17:671, 1985) perfect fluid solution. The methodology consists of contraction of the anisotropic factor Δ with the help of both metric potentials e{sup ν} and e{sup λ}. Here we consider e{sup λ} the same as Durgapal and Fuloria (Gen Relativ Gravit 17:671, 1985) did, whereas e{sup ν} is as given by Lake (Phys Rev D 67:104015, 2003). The field equations are solved by the change of dependent variable method. The solutions set mathematically thus obtained are compared with the physical properties of some of the compact stars, strange star as well as white dwarf. It is observed that all the expected physical features are available related to the stellar fluid distribution, which clearly indicates the validity of the model. (orig.)

  1. Linear Isentropic Oscillations of Stars Theoretical Foundations

    CERN Document Server

    Smeyers, Paul

    2010-01-01

    The study of stellar oscillations is the preeminent way to investigate the stability of stars and to interpret their variability. The theory of the linear, isentropic oscillations of isolated gaseous stars, and thus of compressible spherically symmetric equilibrium configurations, has largely been developed from the viewpoint of the hypothesis of the physical radial pulsations of stars. Written for doctoral students and researchers, this monograph aims to provide a systematic and consistent survey of the fundamentals of the theory of free, linear, isentropic oscillations in spherically symmetric, gaseous equilibrium stars. The first part of the book presents basic concepts and equations, the distinction between spheroidal and toroidal normal modes, the solution of Poisson’s differential equation for the perturbation of the gravitational potential, and Hamilton’s variational principle. The second part is devoted to the possible existence of waves propagating in the radial direction, the origin and classifi...

  2. VIII Olimpíada Brasileira de Astronomia e Astronáutica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia Canalle, João Batista; Villas da Rocha, Jaime Fernando; Wuensche de Souza, Carlos Alexandre; Pereira Ortiz, Roberto; Aguilera, Nuricel Villalonga; Padilha, Maria De Fátima Catta Preta; Pessoa Filho, José Bezerra; Soares Rodrigues, Ivette Maria

    2007-07-01

    Neste trabalho apresentamos as motivações pelas quais organizamos, em conjunto, pela primeira vez, a Olimpíada Brasileira de Astronomia incluindo a Astronáutica, em colaboração com a Agência Espacial Brasileira. Esta ampliação contribuiu para atrair ainda mais alunos, professores, escolas e patrocinadores para participarem desta Olimpíada. Em 2005 participaram da VIII Olimpíada Brasileira de Astronomia e Astronáutica (VIII OBA) 187.726 alunos distribuídos por 3.229 escolas, pertencentes a todos os estados brasileiros, incluindo o Distrito Federal. O crescimento em número de alunos participantes foi 52,4% maior do que em 2004. Em abril de 2005 organizamos, em Itapecerica da Serra, SP, um curso para os 50 alunos previamente selecionados e participantes da VII OBA e ao final selecionamos, dentre eles, uma equipe de 5 alunos, os quais representaram o Brasil na X Olimpíada Internacional de Astronomia, na China, em outubro de 2005. Ganhamos, pela primeira vez, uma medalha de ouro naquele evento. Em Agosto de 2005, organizamos a VIII Escola de Agosto para 50 alunos e respectivos professores, em Águas de Lindóia, SP, juntamente com a XXXI reunião anual da Sociedade Astronômica Brasileira (SAB). Em novembro de 2005 realizamos a I Jornada Espacial, em São José dos Campos, com 22 alunos e 22 professores selecionados dentre os participantes que melhores resultados obtiveram nas questões de Astronáutica da VIII OBA. Neste trabalho detalhamos os resultados da VIII OBA bem como as ações subseqüentes.

  3. RELATIONSHIP OF INTEREST, LEARNING MOTIVATION AND ATTITUDE WITH RESULTS LEARNING CLASS VIII SMP STATE 13 MAKASSAR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Putri Athirah Azis

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The study aims at examining (1 the correlation of learning interest towards learning result of grade students, (2 the correlation of learning motivation towards learning result of grade students, (3 the correlation of students attitude towards learning result, (4 the correlationof interest, learning motivation, and attitude collaboratively towards learning result. The study is an ex post facto. The population of the study was grade VIII at SMPN 13 Makassar. Samples were 105 students taken by employing random sampling technique. Data were collected through questionnaire and documentation. Data were analyzed using regression test. The result of study reveal that (1 there is significant correlation (p<0,01 of interest towards learning result of grade VIII students at SMPN 13 Makassar. Co-efficient correlation (r is 0,718 and its effectiveness contribution (R2 is 51,5%, (2 there is significant correlation (p<0,01 of motivation towards learning result of grade VIII students at SMPN 13 Makassar. Co-efficient correlation (r is 0,775 and its effectiveness contribution (R2 is 60,1%, (3 there is significant correlation (p<0,01 of attitude towards learning result of grade VIII students at SMPN 13 Makassar. Co-efficient correlation (r is 0,737 and its effectiveness contribution (R2 is 54,4%, (4 there is significant correlation (p<0,01 of interest, motivation and attitude collaboratively towards learning result of grade VIII students at SMPN 13 Makassar. Co-efficient correlation (r is 0,861 and its effectiveness contribution (R2 is 74,1%,

  4. VARIABLES IN GLOBULAR CLUSTER NGC 5024

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Safonova, M.; Stalin, C. S., E-mail: rita@iiap.res.in, E-mail: stalin@iiap.res.in [Indian Institute of Astrophysics, Koramangala, Bangalore 560 034 (India)

    2011-12-15

    We present the results of a commissioning campaign to observe Galactic globular clusters for the search of microlensing events. The central 10' Multiplication-Sign 10' region of the globular cluster NGC 5024 was monitored using the 2 m Himalayan Chandra Telescope in R-band for a period of about 8 hr on 2010 March 24. Light curves were obtained for nearly 10,000 stars using a modified Differential Image Analysis technique. We identified all known variables within our field of view and revised the periods and status of some previously reported short-period variables. We report about 70 new variable sources and present their equatorial coordinates, periods, light curves, and possible types. Out of these, 15 are SX Phe stars, 10 are W UMa-type stars, and 14 are probable RR Lyrae stars. Nine of the newly discovered SX Phe stars and one eclipsing binary belong to the blue straggler star population.

  5. Massive Star and Star Cluster Formation

    OpenAIRE

    Tan, Jonathan C.

    2006-01-01

    I review the status of massive star formation theories: accretion from collapsing, massive, turbulent cores; competitive accretion; and stellar collisions. I conclude the observational and theoretical evidence favors the first of these models. I then discuss: the initial conditions of star cluster formation as traced by infrared dark clouds; the cluster formation timescale; and comparison of the initial cluster mass function in different galactic environments.

  6. Star-Branched Polymers (Star Polymers)

    KAUST Repository

    Hirao, Akira

    2015-09-01

    The synthesis of well-defined regular and asymmetric mixed arm (hereinafter miktoarm) star-branched polymers by the living anionic polymerization is reviewed in this chapter. In particular, much attention is being devoted to the synthetic development of miktoarm star polymers since 2000. At the present time, the almost all types of multiarmed and multicomponent miktoarm star polymers have become feasible by using recently developed iterative strategy. For example, the following well-defined stars have been successfully synthesized: 3-arm ABC, 4-arm ABCD, 5-arm ABCDE, 6-arm ABCDEF, 7-arm ABCDEFG, 6-arm ABC, 9-arm ABC, 12-arm ABC, 13-arm ABCD, 9-arm AB, 17-arm AB, 33-arm AB, 7-arm ABC, 15-arm ABCD, and 31-arm ABCDE miktoarm star polymers, most of which are quite new and difficult to synthesize by the end of the 1990s. Several new specialty functional star polymers composed of vinyl polymer segments and rigid rodlike poly(acetylene) arms, helical polypeptide, or helical poly(hexyl isocyanate) arms are introduced.

  7. Dark stars: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freese, Katherine; Rindler-Daller, Tanja; Spolyar, Douglas; Valluri, Monica

    2016-06-01

    Dark stars are stellar objects made (almost entirely) of hydrogen and helium, but powered by the heat from dark matter annihilation, rather than by fusion. They are in hydrostatic and thermal equilibrium, but with an unusual power source. Weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs), among the best candidates for dark matter, can be their own antimatter and can annihilate inside the star, thereby providing a heat source. Although dark matter constitutes only [Formula: see text]0.1% of the stellar mass, this amount is sufficient to power the star for millions to billions of years. Thus, the first phase of stellar evolution in the history of the Universe may have been dark stars. We review how dark stars come into existence, how they grow as long as dark matter fuel persists, and their stellar structure and evolution. The studies were done in two different ways, first assuming polytropic interiors and more recently using the MESA stellar evolution code; the basic results are the same. Dark stars are giant, puffy (∼10 AU) and cool (surface temperatures  ∼10 000 K) objects. We follow the evolution of dark stars from their inception at  ∼[Formula: see text] as they accrete mass from their surroundings to become supermassive stars, some even reaching masses  >[Formula: see text] and luminosities  >[Formula: see text], making them detectable with the upcoming James Webb Space Telescope. Once the dark matter runs out and the dark star dies, it may collapse to a black hole; thus dark stars may provide seeds for the supermassive black holes observed throughout the Universe and at early times. Other sites for dark star formation may exist in the Universe today in regions of high dark matter density such as the centers of galaxies. The current review briefly discusses dark stars existing today, but focuses on the early generation of dark stars.

  8. A comparison of the 12s rule and Bayesian approach for quality control: application to one-stage clotting factor VIII assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobas, Frédéric; Tsiamyrtzis, Panagiotis; Benattar, Norbert; Lienhart, Anne; Négrier, Claude

    2014-09-01

    An ideal medical biology internal quality control (IQC) plan should both monitor the laboratory methods efficiently and implement the relevant clinical-biological specifications. However, many laboratories continue to use the 12s quality control rule without considering the high risk of false rejection and without considering the relationship of analytical performance to quality requirements. Alternatively, one can move to the Bayesian arena, enabling probabilistic quantification of the information coming in, on a daily basis from the laboratory's IQC tests, and taking into account the laboratory's medical and economic contexts. Using the example of one-stage clotting factor VIII assay, the present study compares frequentist (12s quality control rule) and Bayesian IQC management with respect to prescriber requirements, process start-up phase issues, and abnormal scenarios in IQC results. To achieve comparable confidence, the traditional 12s quality control rule requires more data than the Bayesian approach in order to detect an increase in the random or systematic error of the method. Moreover, the Bayesian IQC management approach explicitly implements respect of prescriber requirements in terms of calculating the probability that the variable in question lies in a given predefined interval: for example, the factor VIII concentration required after knee surgery in a hemophilia patient.

  9. Isolated Neutron Stars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Popov S.

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Several aspects related to astrophysics of isolated neutron stars are discussed. We start with an introduction into the “new zoo” of young isolated neutron stars. In addition to classical radio pulsars, now we know several species (soft gamma-ray repeators, anomalous X-ray pulsars, central compact objects in supernova remnants, close-by cooling neutron stars - aka “Magnificent seven”, - RRATs, and some others. All these types are briefly discussed. In the second lecture a description of magneto-rotational evolution of neutron stars is given. Finally, in the third lecture we discuss population synthesis of isolated neutron stars. In some details we discuss population synthesis of young isolated radio pulsars and young close-by cooling neutron stars.

  10. The Theatre of stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavedon, M.; Peri, F.

    Planetariums are special instruments in education and didactics of Astronomy and Astrophysics. Since 1930 the Planetarium of Milan, the most important planetarium in Italy, has played a fundamental role in outreach to the public. Italian tradition always preferred didactics in ``live'' lessons. Now technology expands the potential of the star projector and the theatre of stars is a real window on the universe, where you can travel among the stars and galaxies, to reach the boundaries of space and time.

  11. Why Stars Matter

    OpenAIRE

    Ajay K. Agrawal; John McHale; Alex Oettl

    2014-01-01

    The growing peer effects literature pays particular attention to the role of stars. We decompose the causal effect of hiring a star in terms of the productivity impact on: 1) co-located incumbents and 2) new recruits. Using longitudinal university department-level data we report that hiring a star does not increase overall incumbent productivity, although this aggregate effect hides offsetting effects on related (positive) versus unrelated (negative) colleagues. However, the primary impact co...

  12. Interacting binary stars

    CERN Document Server

    Sahade, Jorge; Ter Haar, D

    1978-01-01

    Interacting Binary Stars deals with the development, ideas, and problems in the study of interacting binary stars. The book consolidates the information that is scattered over many publications and papers and gives an account of important discoveries with relevant historical background. Chapters are devoted to the presentation and discussion of the different facets of the field, such as historical account of the development in the field of study of binary stars; the Roche equipotential surfaces; methods and techniques in space astronomy; and enumeration of binary star systems that are studied

  13. Strange Nonchaotic Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindner, John F.; Kohar, Vivek; Kia, Behnam; Hippke, Michael; Learned, John G.; Ditto, William L.

    2015-08-01

    Exploiting the unprecedented capabilities of the planet-hunting Kepler space telescope, which stared at 150 000 stars for four years, we discuss recent evidence that certain stars dim and brighten in complex patterns with fractal features. Such stars pulsate at primary and secondary frequencies whose ratios are near the famous golden mean, the most irrational number. A nonlinear system driven by an irrational ratio of frequencies is generically attracted toward a “strange” behavior that is geometrically fractal without displaying the “butterfly effect” of chaos. Strange nonchaotic attractors have been observed in laboratory experiments and have been hypothesized to describe the electrochemical activity of the brain, but a bluish white star 16 000 light years from Earth in the constellation Lyra may manifest, in the scale-free distribution of its minor frequency components, the first strange nonchaotic attractor observed in the wild. The recognition of stellar strange nonchaotic dynamics may improve the classification of these stars and refine the physical modeling of their interiors. We also discuss nonlinear analysis of other RR Lyrae stars in Kepler field of view and discuss some toy models for modeling these stars.References: 1) Hippke, Michael, et al. "Pulsation period variations in the RRc Lyrae star KIC 5520878." The Astrophysical Journal 798.1 (2015): 42.2) Lindner, John F., et al. "Strange nonchaotic stars." Phys. Rev. Lett. 114, 054101 (2015)

  14. Covering tree with stars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baumbach, Jan; Guo, Jian-Ying; Ibragimov, Rashid

    2013-01-01

    We study the tree edit distance problem with edge deletions and edge insertions as edit operations. We reformulate a special case of this problem as Covering Tree with Stars (CTS): given a tree T and a set of stars, can we connect the stars in by adding edges between them such that the resulting...... tree is isomorphic to T? We prove that in the general setting, CST is NP-complete, which implies that the tree edit distance considered here is also NP-hard, even when both input trees having diameters bounded by 10. We also show that, when the number of distinct stars is bounded by a constant k, CTS...

  15. Covering tree with stars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baumbach, Jan; Guo, Jiong; Ibragimov, Rashid

    2015-01-01

    We study the tree edit distance problem with edge deletions and edge insertions as edit operations. We reformulate a special case of this problem as Covering Tree with Stars (CTS): given a tree T and a set of stars, can we connect the stars in by adding edges between them such that the resulting...... tree is isomorphic to T? We prove that in the general setting, CST is NP-complete, which implies that the tree edit distance considered here is also NP-hard, even when both input trees having diameters bounded by 10. We also show that, when the number of distinct stars is bounded by a constant k, CTS...

  16. ENERGY STAR Unit Reports

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Housing and Urban Development — These quarterly Federal Fiscal Year performance reports track the ENERGY STAR qualified HOME units that Participating Jurisdictions record in HUD's Integrated...

  17. Horizontal Branch stars as AmFm/HgMn stars

    OpenAIRE

    Michaud, G.; Richer, J.

    2008-01-01

    Recent observations and models for horizontal branch stars are briefly described and compared to models for AmFm stars. The limitations of those models are emphasized by a comparison to observations and models for HgMn stars.

  18. Gravitationally redshifted absorption lines in the X-ray burst spectra of a neutron star.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cottam, J; Paerels, F; Mendez, M

    2002-11-07

    The fundamental properties of neutron stars provide a direct test of the equation of state of cold nuclear matter, a relationship between pressure and density that is determined by the physics of the strong interactions between the particles that constitute the star. The most straightforward method of determining these properties is by measuring the gravitational redshift of spectral lines produced in the neutron star photosphere. The equation of state implies a mass-radius relation, while a measurement of the gravitational redshift at the surface of a neutron star provides a direct constraint on the mass-to-radius ratio. Here we report the discovery of significant absorption lines in the spectra of 28 bursts of the low-mass X-ray binary EXO0748-676. We identify the most significant features with the Fe XXVI and XXV n = 2-3 and O VIII n = 1-2 transitions, all with a redshift of z = 0.35, identical within small uncertainties for the respective transitions. For an astrophysically plausible range of masses (M approximately 1.3-2.0 solar masses; refs 2-5), this value is completely consistent with models of neutron stars composed of normal nuclear matter, while it excludes some models in which the neutron stars are made of more exotic matter.

  19. How animals follow the stars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, James J; Smolka, Jochen; Nilsson, Dan-Eric; Dacke, Marie

    2018-01-31

    Throughout history, the stars have provided humans with ever more information about our world, enabling increasingly accurate systems of navigation in addition to fuelling some of the greatest scientific controversies. What information animals have evolved to extract from a starry sky and how they do so, is a topic of study that combines the practical and theoretical challenges faced by both astronomers and field biologists. While a number of animal species have been demonstrated to use the stars as a source of directional information, the strategies that these animals use to convert this complex and variable pattern of dim-light points into a reliable 'stellar orientation' cue have been more difficult to ascertain. In this review, we assess the stars as a visual stimulus that conveys directional information, and compare the bodies of evidence available for the different stellar orientation strategies proposed to date. In this context, we also introduce new technologies that may aid in the study of stellar orientation, and suggest how field experiments may be used to characterize the mechanisms underlying stellar orientation. © 2018 The Author(s).

  20. Circumstellar carbonaceous material associated with late-type dusty WC Wolf-Rayet stars

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chiar, JE; Tielens, AGGM

    2001-01-01

    We have studied the 5-8.5 mum infrared spectra of the late-type Wolf-Rayet stars WR 118, WR 112, and WR 104, the WN star WR 147, the B5 hypergiant Cygnus OB2 No. 12, and the Galactic center luminous blue variable Pistol Star using the Short Wavelength Spectrometer on the Infrared Space Observatory.

  1. Four Star School Awards: Key Factors that Predict High Performance among Indiana School Corporations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veracco, Lawrence H.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the Four Star status of Indiana school corporations in order to determine if certain variables currently existing among school corporations could be predictive of Four Star status. Differences in Four Star status were examined with respect to school corporation size, school corporation average teacher…

  2. Merging strangeon stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Xiao-Yu; Yu, Yun-Wei; Zhou, En-Ping; Li, Yun-Yang; Xu, Ren-Xin

    2018-02-01

    The state of supranuclear matter in compact stars remains puzzling, and it is argued that pulsars could be strangeon stars. What would happen if binary strangeon stars merge? This kind of merger could result in the formation of a hyper-massive strangeon star, accompanied by bursts of gravitational waves and electromagnetic radiation (and even a strangeon kilonova explained in the paper). The tidal polarizability of binary strangeon stars is different from that of binary neutron stars, because a strangeon star is self-bound on the surface by the fundamental strong force while a neutron star by the gravity, and their equations of state are different. Our calculation shows that the tidal polarizability of merging binary strangeon stars is favored by GW170817. Three kinds of kilonovae (i.e., of neutron, quark and strangeon) are discussed, and the light curve of the kilonova AT 2017 gfo following GW170817 could be explained by considering the decaying strangeon nuggets and remnant star spin-down. Additionally, the energy ejected to the fireball around the nascent remnant strangeon star, being manifested as a gamma-ray burst, is calculated. It is found that, after a prompt burst, an X-ray plateau could follow in a timescale of 102 ‑ 103 s. Certainly, the results could be tested also by further observational synergies between gravitational wave detectors (e.g., Advanced LIGO) and X-ray telescopes (e.g., the Chinese HXMT satellite and eXTP mission), and especially if the detected gravitational wave form is checked by peculiar equations of state provided by the numerical relativistical simulation.

  3. Study of star formation in NGC 1084

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramya, S.; Sahu, D. K.; Prabhu, T. P.

    2007-10-01

    We present UBVRI broad-band, Hα narrow-band photometry of the star-forming complexes in the infrared bright galaxy NGC 1084. Results of medium-resolution spectroscopy of some of the brighter complexes are also discussed. Spectroscopic data are used to better estimate the internal reddening within the galaxy which is found to be highly variable and to calculate metallicity which is close to the solar value. A diagnostic diagram identifies the shocked regions within this galaxy. The narrow-band Hα flux and its equivalent width are used to determine the star formation rates of the complexes and the distribution of ages. Star formation rates for a few of the complexes are found to be as high as 0.5Msolar yr-1. The star-forming complexes lie in the age range 3 to 6.5 Myr. A U - B versus V - I colour-colour mixed population model created using the Starburst99 model colours is used to estimate the ages of the stellar populations present within these regions. Using this technique, it is found that the star formation in NGC 1084 has taken place in a series of short bursts over the last 40 Myr or so. It is proposed that the likely trigger for enhanced star formation is merger with a gas-rich dwarf galaxy.

  4. 75 FR 26196 - Notice of Proposed New Recreation Fee Site; Federal Lands Recreation Enhancement Act, (Title VIII...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-11

    ..., (Title VIII, Pub. L. 108-447) AGENCY: National Forests in Mississippi, Forest Service, USDA. ACTION... 39269. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The Federal Recreation Lands Enhancement Act (Title VII, Pub. L. 108...

  5. DAMPAK POSITIF DAN NEGATIF SOSIAL MEDIA TERHADAP PENDIDIKAN AKHLAK ANAK (Studi Kasus di SMP Negeri 2 Kelas VIII Banda Aceh)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    NISA KHAIRUNI

    2016-01-01

    The author examines the positive and negative effects of social media on the moral education of children in school SMPN 2 class VIII Banda Aceh, it is very interesting because of the many children who abuse social media...

  6. A novel approach in potential anticoagulants from peptides epitope 558-565 of A2 subunit of factor VIII.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anastasopoulos, C; Sarigiannis, Y; Stavropoulos, G

    2013-04-01

    Factor VIII, a human blood plasma protein, plays an important role during the intrinsic pathway of blood coagulation cascade after its activation by thrombin. The activated form of FVIII acts as cofactor to the serine protease Factor IXa, in the conversion of the zymogen Factor X to the active enzyme Factor Xa. The Ser558-Gln565 region of the A2 subunit of Factor VIII has been shown to be crucial for FVIIIa-FIXa interaction. Based on this, a series of linear peptides, analogs of the 558-565 loop of the A2 subunit of the heavy chain of Factor VIII were synthesized using the acid labile 2-chlorotrityl chloride resin and biologically evaluated in vitro by measuring the chronic delay of activated partial thromboplastin time and the inhibition of Factor VIII activity, as potential anticoagulants.

  7. Learning from Pulsating Stars: Progress over the Last Century (Abstract)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, H.

    2016-12-01

    (Abstract only) Scarcely more than a century has elapsed since it began to be widely accepted that pulsation plays an important role in the variability of stars. During that century pulsating stars have been used as tools to explore a variety of astrophysical questions, including the determination of distances to other galaxies, the testing of timescales of evolution through the HR diagram, and the identification of the ages and star formation histories of stellar populations. Among the significant early milestones along this investigative path are Henrietta Leavitt's discovery of a relation between the periods and luminosities of Cepheids, Harlow Shapley's proposal that all Cepheids are pulsating stars, and Arthur Stanley Eddington's use of the observed period change of d Cephei to constrain its power source. Today our explorations of pulsating stars are bolstered by long observational histories of brighter variables, surveys involving unprecedentedly large numbers of stars, and improved theoretical analyses. This talk will review aspects of the history and our current understanding of pulsating stars, paying particular attention to RR Lyrae, d Scuti, and Cepheid variables. Observations by AAVSO members have provided insight into several questions regarding the behavior of these stars.

  8. Star Trek in the Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Journal of Aerospace Education, 1977

    1977-01-01

    Describes specific educational programs for using the Star Trek TV program from kindergarten through college. For each grade level lesson plans, ideas for incorporating Star Trek into future classes, and reports of specific programs utilizing Star Trek are provided. (SL)

  9. Body weight and fat mass index as strong predictors of factor VIII in vivo recovery in adults with hemophilia A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henrard, S; Speybroeck, N; Hermans, C

    2011-09-01

    The treatment of hemophilia A requires infusions of factor VIII (FVIII) concentrates. The number of units to be given in order to obtain the target level is calculated using the formula: [body weight (BW) × desired FVIII increase]/2, which assumes that each unit infused per kg of BW increases the FVIII level by 2%. The present observational study evaluated the dependence of FVIII recovery on different morphometrical variables: BW, fat mass index (FMI), body mass index, and the difference between actual and ideal BW. FVIII recovery was measured in 46 non-actively bleeding hemophilia A patients, being treated with a recombinant FVIII concentrate. Regression trees were used to identify morphometrical predictors of recovery. The median recovery was 2.08 for all patients, 2.63 for those with a BW ≥ 81.0 kg and 1.87 for others (P recovery was significantly higher when FMI was ≥ 20% compared with FMI recovery: 2.35 vs. 1.74; P = 0.007). Using regression trees, three groups were created: BW recovery in these groups was 1.80, 2.16 and 2.63, respectively (P recovery after different FVIII concentrates should keep in mind morphometrical patient characteristics. © 2011 International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis.

  10. KEEFEKTIFAN PAIRED STORYTELLING DAN JIGSAW DALAM PENINGKATAN KOMPETENSI BERBICARA SISWA KELAS VIII SMP NEGERI 3 SLEMAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nurmiyati Nurmiyati

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk mengetahui: (1 apakah ada perbedaan keefektifan antara teknik paired storytelling, jigsaw, dan konvensional dalam meningkatkan kompetensi berbicara siswa, (2 teknik pembelajaran berbicara yang paling efektif antara ketiga teknik penelitian itu dalam meningkatkan kompetensi berbicara siswa kelas VIII SMP Negeri 3 Sleman. Penelitian ini menggunakan jenis penelitian eksperimen semu dengan nonequivalent control-group design. Hasil penelitian menunjukkan bahwa: (1 Ada perbedaan keefektifan antara teknik paired storytelling, jigsaw, and konvensional itu dalam meningkatkan kompetensi berbicara siswa dengan nilai F sebesar 3,532 dan signifikan dengan P < 0,05, yaitu sebesar 0,033, dan (2 teknik paired storytelling adalah teknik keterampilan berbicara yang paling efektif diantara ketiga teknik itu dalam meningkatkan kompetensi berbicara siswa kelas VIII SMP Negeri 3 Sleman dengan mean tertinggi sebesar 74,3492. Kata kunci: teknik paired storytelling, teknik jigsaw, teknik konvensional, kompetensi berbicara

  11. Genomic characterisation of the toxin Amm VIII from the scorpion Androctonus mauretanicus mauretanicus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alami, Meriem; Céard, Brigitte; Legros, Christian; Bougis, Pierre E; Martin-Eauclaire, Marie-France

    2006-04-01

    The genomic DNA sequence encoding the scorpion toxin Amm VIII was amplified from genomic DNA of the scorpion Androctonus mauretanicus mauretanicus from Morocco, subcloned and sequenced. An intron, with a high A+T content (73.5%), split a Gly codon at the end of the precursor signal peptide and the consensus GT/AG splice junction was identified in the Amm VIII gene. This intron of only 166 bp is the smallest intron described so far for a long-chain scorpion toxin gene. In addition, this study led to the identification of three new toxin-related genes. From the deduced amino acid sequences of the encoded precursor proteins, we found that the mature putative toxins were highly similar to the scorpion toxins Leiurus quinquestriatus quinquestriatus IV and Odonthobuthus doriae 1.

  12. Detection of Intracellular Factor VIII Protein in Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells by Flow Cytometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gouri Shankar Pandey

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Flow cytometry is widely used in cancer research for diagnosis, detection of minimal residual disease, as well as immune monitoring and profiling following immunotherapy. Detection of specific host proteins for diagnosis predominantly uses quantitative PCR and western blotting assays. In this study, we optimized a flow cytometry-based detection assay for Factor VIII protein in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs. An indirect intracellular staining (ICS method was standardized using monoclonal antibodies to different domains of human Factor VIII protein. The FVIII protein expression level was estimated by calculating the mean and median fluorescence intensities (MFI values for each monoclonal antibody. ICS staining of transiently transfected cell lines supported the method's specificity. Intracellular FVIII protein expression was also detected by the monoclonal antibodies used in the study in PBMCs of five blood donors. In summary, our data suggest that intracellular FVIII detection in PBMCs of hemophilia A patients can be a rapid and reliable method to detect intracellular FVIII levels.

  13. Acquired hemophilia A caused by factor VIII inhibitors: report of a case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosoya, Yoshinori; Matsumura, Miho; Madoiwa, Seiji; Zuiki, Toru; Matsumoto, Shiro; Nunomiya, Shin; Lefor, Alan; Sata, Naohiro; Yasuda, Yoshikazu

    2013-06-01

    We report a case of acquired hemophilia A (AHA) after esophageal resection. The patient was an 80-year-old woman whose preoperative activated partial-thromboplastin time (APTT) was well within the normal range, at 34.9 s. She underwent thoracic esophagectomy and gastric pull-up for superficial esophageal cancer (operative time, 315 min; intraoperative blood loss, 245 ml). Intrathoracic and subcutaneous bleeding occurred spontaneously on postoperative day (POD) 39. The APTT was prolonged, at 140 s, and factor VIII inhibitor was 36 Bethesda U/ml. Treatment with recombinant activated factor VII, prednisolone, and cyclophosphamide resulted in remission within 2 months. This case supports an association between surgery and the triggering of factor VIII inhibitors. The diagnosis of AHA requires clinical acumen and must be considered in any patient with bleeding and a prolonged APTT.

  14. Treatment of radiation osteomyelitis of the mandible in a patient with acquired factor VIII inhibitor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arimoto, Takamasa; Kishimoto, Hiromitsu; Matsumoto, Suwako; Kawanaka, Masao; Urabe, Masahiro; Yoshioka, Wataru [Hyogo Coll. of Medicine, Nishinomiya (Japan)

    1996-07-01

    A case of radiation osteomyelitis of mandible in a 56-year-old man with acquired factor VIII inhibitor is presented. He had undergone radiation therapy for malignant lymphoma of the tonsilar region seven years earlier, and also had received steroids to treat acquired factor VIII inhibitor for a year. On initial examination, he was given a diagnosis of phlegmon of the cheek caused by pericoronitis of the left lower wisdom tooth. To prevent the recurrence of inflammation, the wisdom tooth was extracted carefully, but radiation osteomyelitis occurred in association with a pathological fracture of the condylar head. After mini-pulse therapy with methylpredonisolone, segmental mandibulectomy and reconstruction with a titanium metal plate were performed. The postoperative course was satisfactory with no complications such as bleeding or infection. (author)

  15. Pengembangan Modul Matematika Untuk Pembelajaran Berbasis Masalah (Problem Based Learning) Pada Materi Pokok Persamaan Garis Lurus Kelas VIII SMP

    OpenAIRE

    Khayati, Fitrotul; Sujadi, Imam; Sari Saputro, Dewi Retno

    2016-01-01

    Absrtact:The objectives of this research were to investigate: (1) how to develop of Mathematics module development for problem-based learning on the topic of discussion of Linear Equation of Straight Line for Grade VIII of Junior Secondary School; and (2) the effectiveness of result of Mathematics module development for problem-based learning on the topic of discussion of Linear Equation of Straight Line for Grade VIII of Junior Secondary School. This research consisted of two phases. The fi...

  16. Hadrons in compact stars

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    volving Bose–Einstein condensates of antikaons within relativistic models. Also, the structures of non-rotating neutron stars are calculated using this EoS. 2. Hadrons in cold and dense medium. At normal nuclear matter density, neutron star matter mainly consists of neutrons, protons and electrons. The particle population is ...

  17. ENERGY STAR Certified Telephones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Certified models meet all ENERGY STAR requirements as listed in the Version 3.0 ENERGY STAR Program Requirements for Telephony (cordless telephones and VoIP telephones) that are effective as of October 1, 2014. A detailed listing of key efficiency criteria are available at http://www.energystar.gov/index.cfm?c=phones.pr_crit_phones

  18. Science Through ARts (STAR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolecki, Joseph; Petersen, Ruth; Williams, Lawrence

    2002-01-01

    Science Through ARts (STAR) is an educational initiative designed to teach students through a multidisciplinary approach to learning. This presentation describes the STAR pilot project, which will use Mars exploration as the topic to be integrated. Schools from the United Kingdom, Japan, the United States, and possibly eastern Europe are expected to participate in the pilot project.

  19. STAR FORMATION IN TWO LUMINOUS SPIRAL GALAXIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hunter, Deidre A.; Ashburn, Allison; Wright, Teresa [Lowell Observatory, 1400 West Mars Hill Road, Flagstaff, AZ 86001 (United States); Elmegreen, Bruce G. [IBM T. J. Watson Research Center, P.O. Box 218, Yorktown Heights, NY 10598 (United States); Rubin, Vera C. [Carnegie Institution of Washington, 5241 Broad Branch Road NW, Washington, DC 20015 (United States); Józsa, Gyula I. G.; Struve, Christian [ASTRON (Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research NWO), Oude Hoogeveensedijk 4, 7991-PD Dwingeloo (Netherlands)

    2013-10-01

    We examined star formation in two very luminous (M{sub V} = –22 to –23) Sc-type spiral galaxies, NGC 801 and UGC 2885, using ultra-deep Hα images. We combine these Hα images with UBV and Two-Micron All-Sky Survey JHK images and H I maps to explore the star formation characteristics of disk galaxies at high luminosity. Hα traces star formation in these galaxies to 4-6 disk scale lengths, but the lack of detection of Hα further out is likely due to the loss of Lyman continuum photons. Considering gravitational instabilities alone, we find that the gas and stars in the outer regions are marginally stable in an average sense, but considering dissipative gas and radial and azimuthal forcing, the outer regions are marginally unstable to forming spiral arms. Star formation is taking place in spiral arms, which are regions of locally higher gas densities. Furthermore, we have traced smooth exponential stellar disks over four magnitudes in V-band surface brightness and 4-6 disk scale lengths, in spite of a highly variable gravitational instability parameter. Thus, gravitational instability thresholds do not seem relevant to the stellar disk. One possibility for creating an exponential disk is that the molecular cloud densities and star formation rates have exponential profiles and this fact forces the stellar disk to build up such a profile. Another possibility is that the stellar disk is continuously adjusted to an exponential shape regardless of the star formation profile, for example, through global dynamical processes that scatter stars. However, such scattering processes are only known to operate in spiral systems, in which case they cannot explain the same dilemma of smooth exponential disks observed in dwarf irregular galaxies.

  20. Influence of the type of factor VIII concentrate on the incidence of factor VIII inhibitors in previously untreated patients with severe hemophilia A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goudemand, Jenny; Rothschild, Chantal; Demiguel, Virginie; Vinciguerrat, Christine; Lambert, Thierry; Chambost, Hervé; Borel-Derlon, Annie; Claeyssens, Ségolène; Laurian, Yves; Calvez, Thierry

    2006-01-01

    Inhibitor development is the major treatment complication in children with severe hemophilia A. It is not clear whether the risk of inhibitors is higher with recombinant factor VIII or with plasma-derived factor VIII. We used multivariate analysis to compare 2 cohorts of previously untreated patients (PUPs) with severe hemophilia A: 62 patients treated with the same brand of high-purity plasma-derived FVIII (pFVIII) containing von Willebrand factor (VWF) and 86 patients treated with full-length recombinant FVIII (rFVIII). In addition to the usual end points (all inhibitors, high inhibitors), we also examined a third end point (high inhibitors and/or immune tolerance induction). The risk of inhibitor development was higher in patients treated with rFVIII than in patients treated with pFVIII, regardless of other risk factors (F8 genotype; nonwhite origin; history of inhibitors in patients with a family history of hemophilia; age at first FVIII infusion). The adjusted relative risk (RRa) for inhibitor development with rFVIII versus pFVIII was 2.4 (all inhibitors), 2.6 (high inhibitors), and 3.2 (high inhibitors and/or immune tolerance induction), respectively, depending on the end point (above). The pathophysiology of this large effect must be understood in order to improve the characteristics of recombinant products and to reduce the incidence of inhibitors to FVIII.

  1. Neutron Stars: Formation and Structure

    OpenAIRE

    Kutschera, Marek

    1998-01-01

    A short introduction is given to astrophysics of neutron stars and to physics of dense matter in neutron stars. Observed properties of astrophysical objects containing neutron stars are discussed. Current scenarios regarding formation and evolution of neutron stars in those objects are presented. Physical principles governing the internal structure of neutron stars are considered with special emphasis on the possible spin ordering in the neutron star matter.

  2. Are Pulsars Bare Strange Stars?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, R. X.; Qiao, G. J.; Zhang, B.

    It is believed that pulsars are neutron stars or strange stars with crusts. However we suggest here that pulsars may be bare strange stars (i.e., strange stars without crust). Due to rapid rotation and strong emission, young strange stars produced in supernova explosions should be bare when they act as radio pulsars. Because of strong magnetic field, two polar-crusts would shield the polar caps of an accreting strange star. Such a suggestion can be checked by further observations.

  3. Magnetic Fields of Massive Stars

    OpenAIRE

    Lundin, Andreas

    2010-01-01

    This paper is an introduction to the subject of magnetic fields on stars, with a focus on hotter stars. Basic astrophysical concepts are explained, including: spectroscopy, stellar classification, general structure and evolution of stars. The Zeeman effect and how absorption line splitting  is used to detect and measure magnetic fields is explained. The properties of a prominent type of magnetic massive star, Ap-stars, are delved into. These stars have very stable, global, roughly dipolar mag...

  4. IMPLEMENTASI PENDEKATAN KONFLIK KOGNITIF DALAM PEMBELAJARAN FISIKA UNTUK MENUMBUHKAN KEMAMPUAN BERPIKIR KRITIS SISWA SMP KELAS VIII

    OpenAIRE

    A. Setyowati; B. Subali; Mosik -

    2012-01-01

    Tujuan dari penelitian ini adalah untuk mengetahui pengaruh implementasi pendekatan konflik kognitif dalam pembelajaran fisikapokok bahasan tekanan pada siswa kelas VIII terhadap kemampuan berpikir kritis, pemahaman konsep dan hasil belajar kognitifsiswa. Penelitian ini merupakan penelitian eksperimen. Setelah dilakukan pengambilan sampel secara random sampling,diperoleh kelas VIIIB sebagai kelas eksperimen dan kelas VIIIC sebagai kelas kontrol. Dari analisis uji rata-rata dua pihak atau uji ...

  5. Construction of a mouse model of factor VIII deficiency by gene targeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bi, L.; Lawler, A.; Gearhart, J. [Univ. of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    To develop a small animal model of hemophilia A for gene therapy experiments, we set out to construct a mouse model for factor VIII deficiency by gene targeting. First, we screened a mouse liver cDNA library using a human FVIII cDNA probe. We cloned a 2.6 Kb partial mouse factor VIII cDNA which extends from 800 base pairs of the 3{prime} end of exon 14 to the 5{prime} end of exon 26. A mouse genomic library made from strain 129 was then screened to obtain genomic fragments covering the exons desired for homologous recombination. Two genomic clones were obtained, and one covering exon 15 through 22 was used for gene targeting. To make gene targeting constructs, a 5.8 Kb genomic DNA fragment covering exons 15 to 19 of the mouse FVIII gene was subcloned, and the neo expression cassette was inserted into exons 16 and 17 separately by different strategies. These two constructs were named MFVIIIC-16 and MFVIIIC-17. The constructs were linearized and transfected into strain 129 mouse ES cells by electroporation. Factor VIII gene-knockout ES cell lines were selected by G-418 and screened by genomic Southern blots. Eight exon 16 targeted cell lines and five exon 17 targeted cell lines were obtained. Three cell lines from each construct were injected into blastocysts and surgically transferred into foster mothers. Multiple chimeric mice with 70-90% hair color derived from the ES-cell genotype were seen with both constructs. Germ line transmission of the ES-cell genotype has been obtained for the MFVIIIC-16 construct, and multiple hemophilia A carrier females have been identified. Factor VIII-deficient males will be conceived soon.

  6. Historical intensity VIII earthquakes along the Rhone valley (Valais, Switzerland): primary and secondary effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fritsche, S.; Faeh, D.; Schwarz-Zanetti, G.

    2012-06-15

    In recent years the upper Rhone Valley has been one of the most intensively investigated regions by the Swiss Seismological Service. The high seismicity in the region encourages research in the seismological field and one main focus has been historical seismology. This report presents the state of the art of our historical investigations by giving an overview of the effects of four damaging earthquakes with intensity larger than VII, for which a fairly large number of documents could be found and analyzed. The overview includes the events of 1584 (Aigle, epicentral intensity VIII), 1755 (Brig, epicentral intensity VIII), 1855 (Visp, epicentral intensity VIII), and 1946 (Sierre, epicentral intensity VIII for the main shock and intensity VII for the largest aftershock). The paper focuses mainly on primary and secondary effects in the epicentral region, providing the key data and a general characterization of the event. Generally, primary effects such as the reaction of the population and impact on buildings took more focus in the past. Thus building damage is more frequently described in historic documents. However, we also found a number of sources describing secondary effects such as landslides, snow avalanches, and liquefaction. Since the sources may be useful, we include citations of these documents. The 1584 Aigle event, for example, produced exceptional movements in the Lake of Geneva, which can be explained by an expanded sub aquatic slide with resultant tsunami and seiche. The strongest of the aftershocks of the 1584 event triggered a destructive landslide covering the villages Corbeyrier and Yvorne, Vaud. All macroseismic data on the discussed events are accessible through the web page of the Swiss Seismological Service (http://www.seismo.ethz.ch). (authors)

  7. The impact of von Willebrand factor on factor VIII memory immune responses

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Juan; Schroeder, Jocelyn A.; Luo, Xiaofeng; Shi, Qizhen

    2017-01-01

    Immune tolerance induction (ITI) with aggressive infusion of factor VIII (FVIII) is the current strategy used to eradicate FVIII inhibitors and restore normal FVIII pharmacokinetics in inhibitor patients. Whether the use of FVIII products containing von Willebrand factor (VWF) will affect the efficacy of ITI is still controversial. In this study, we explored the impact of VWF on FVIII memory immune responses in hemophilia A (HA) mice. A T-cell proliferation assay and cytokine profile analysis...

  8. Endonuclease VIII-like 3 (Neil3) DNA glycosylase promotes neurogenesis induced by hypoxia-ischemia

    OpenAIRE

    Sejersted, Yngve; Hildrestrand, Gunn A.; Kunke, David; Rolseth, Veslemøy; Krokeide, Silje Z.; Neurauter, Christine G.; Suganthan, Rajikala; Atneosen-Åsegg, Monica; Fleming, Aaron M.; Saugstad, Ola D.; Burrows, Cynthia J.; Luna, Luisa; Bjørås, Magnar

    2011-01-01

    Neural stem/progenitor cell proliferation and differentiation are required to replace damaged neurons and regain brain function after hypoxic-ischemic events. DNA base lesions accumulating during hypoxic-ischemic stress are removed by DNA glycosylases in the base-excision repair pathway to prevent cytotoxicity and mutagenesis. Expression of the DNA glycosylase endonuclease VIII-like 3 (Neil3) is confined to regenerative subregions in the embryonic and perinatal brains. Here we show profound n...

  9. Study of Stellar Clusters Containing Massive Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costado, Teresa; Alfaro, E. J.; Delgado, A. J.; Djupvik, A. A.; Maíz Apellániz, J.

    2013-06-01

    Most stars form in clusters, but the percentage of stars born in dense stellar systems is currently matter of controversy and depends very much on the own definition of cluster. The cluster definition and hence the morphologies of individual clusters appear to vary significantly from region to region, as well as with age, which suggests that either, star formation in clusters is not universal and may depend on the local environment, or that all clusters form with the same morphology but early dynamical evolution quickly modifies the structure of the phase space distribution. In addition, young populated clusters containing massive stars are excellent labs for the study of the formation of the massive stellar component of the Galactic disk. Three main scenarios have been proposed for the formation of high-mass stars (M > 7-8 M_{⊙}): a) monolithic collapse of proto-stellar nuclei; b) competitive accretion inside the proto-cluster molecular cloud; and c) coalescence of proto-stellar nuclei and low-mass stars in very dense atmospheres. Both scientific questions: a) cluster formation and b) formation of high mass stars in clusters are intimately connected via the structural description of the phase space distribution of cluster stars and their Mass Function (MF). Models of static clusters with different initial spatial and kinematic distributions show how the spatial distribution dynamically evolves with time, allowing a characterization of their dynamical state from snapshots of their spatial distribution. Four are the main variables (and their distribution with mass and position) needed for a reliable characterization of the cluster dynamical state: a) Mass segregation parameter; b) Mapping of surface density for different ranges of masses; c) Q morphological parameter based on the minimum spanning tree graph and its variation with mass and cluster age, and d) MF of the cluster members. Two years ago, the Stellar System Group of IAA has begun an observational

  10. Rotating stars in relativity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paschalidis, Vasileios; Stergioulas, Nikolaos

    2017-01-01

    Rotating relativistic stars have been studied extensively in recent years, both theoretically and observationally, because of the information they might yield about the equation of state of matter at extremely high densities and because they are considered to be promising sources of gravitational waves. The latest theoretical understanding of rotating stars in relativity is reviewed in this updated article. The sections on equilibrium properties and on nonaxisymmetric oscillations and instabilities in f -modes and r -modes have been updated. Several new sections have been added on equilibria in modified theories of gravity, approximate universal relationships, the one-arm spiral instability, on analytic solutions for the exterior spacetime, rotating stars in LMXBs, rotating strange stars, and on rotating stars in numerical relativity including both hydrodynamic and magnetohydrodynamic studies of these objects.

  11. Neutron Stars and Pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Becker, Werner

    2009-01-01

    Neutron stars are the most compact astronomical objects in the universe which are accessible by direct observation. Studying neutron stars means studying physics in regimes unattainable in any terrestrial laboratory. Understanding their observed complex phenomena requires a wide range of scientific disciplines, including the nuclear and condensed matter physics of very dense matter in neutron star interiors, plasma physics and quantum electrodynamics of magnetospheres, and the relativistic magneto-hydrodynamics of electron-positron pulsar winds interacting with some ambient medium. Not to mention the test bed neutron stars provide for general relativity theories, and their importance as potential sources of gravitational waves. It is this variety of disciplines which, among others, makes neutron star research so fascinating, not only for those who have been working in the field for many years but also for students and young scientists. The aim of this book is to serve as a reference work which not only review...

  12. How Stars Form

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKee, Christopher F.

    2017-01-01

    Stars are the atoms of the universe. The process by which stars form is at the nexus of astrophysics since they are believed to be responsible for the re-ionization of the universe, they created the heavy elements, they play a central role in the formation and evolution of galaxies, and their formation naturally leads to the formation of planets. Whereas early work on star formation was based on the assumption that it is a quiescent process, it is now believed that turbulence plays a dominant role. In this overview, I shall discuss the evolution of our understanding of how stars form and current ideas about the stellar initial mass function and the rate of star formation.

  13. Structural characterization of the novel aminoglycoside phosphotransferase AphVIII from Streptomyces rimosus with enzymatic activity modulated by phosphorylation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boyko, Konstantin M., E-mail: kmb@inbi.ras.ru [Bach Institute of Biochemistry, Federal Research Centre of Biotechnology of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Leninsky Prospekt. 33, Bld. 2, 119071, Moscow (Russian Federation); National Research Center “Kurchatov Institute”, Kurchatov Complex of NBICS-technologies, Akad. Kurchatova sqr., 1, Moscow, 123182 (Russian Federation); Gorbacheva, Marina A.; Korzhenevskiy, Dmitry A. [National Research Center “Kurchatov Institute”, Kurchatov Complex of NBICS-technologies, Akad. Kurchatova sqr., 1, Moscow, 123182 (Russian Federation); Alekseeva, Maria G.; Mavletova, Dilara A.; Zakharevich, Natalia V.; Elizarov, Sergey M.; Rudakova, Natalia N.; Danilenko, Valery N. [Vavilov Institute of General Genetics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Gubkina str. 3, Moscow, 119333 (Russian Federation); Popov, Vladimir O. [Bach Institute of Biochemistry, Federal Research Centre of Biotechnology of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Leninsky Prospekt. 33, Bld. 2, 119071, Moscow (Russian Federation); National Research Center “Kurchatov Institute”, Kurchatov Complex of NBICS-technologies, Akad. Kurchatova sqr., 1, Moscow, 123182 (Russian Federation)

    2016-09-02

    Aminoglycoside phosphotransferases represent a broad class of enzymes that promote bacterial resistance to aminoglycoside antibiotics via the phosphorylation of hydroxyl groups in the latter. Here we report the spatial structure of the 3′-aminoglycoside phosphotransferase of novel VIII class (AphVIII) solved by X-ray diffraction method with a resolution of 2.15 Å. Deep analysis of APHVIII structure and its comparison with known structures of aminoglycoside phosphotransferases of various types reveals that AphVIII has a typical two-domain fold and, however, possesses some unique characteristics that distinguish the enzyme from its known homologues. The most important difference is the presence of the activation loop with unique Ser146 residue. We demonstrate that in the apo-state of the enzyme the activation loop does not interact with other parts of the enzyme and seems to adopt catalytically competent state only after substrate binding. - Highlights: • 3D structure of the novel aminoglycoside phosphotransferase AphVIII was obtained. • AphVIII activation loop is clearly identified in the electron density. • AphVIII has some unique structural features in its substrate C-ring binding pocket.

  14. Neonatal helper-dependent adenoviral vector gene therapy mediates correction of hemophilia A and tolerance to human factor VIII.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Chuhong; Cela, Racel G; Suzuki, Masataka; Lee, Brendan; Lipshutz, Gerald S

    2011-02-01

    Neonatal gene therapy is a promising strategy for treating a number of congenital diseases diagnosed shortly after birth as expression of therapeutic proteins during postnatal life may limit the pathologic consequences and result in a potential "cure." Hemophilia A is often complicated by the development of antibodies to recombinant protein resulting in treatment failure. Neonatal administration of vectors may avoid inhibitory antibody formation to factor VIII (FVIII) by taking advantage of immune immaturity. A helper-dependent adenoviral vector expressing human factor VIII was administered i.v. to neonatal hemophilia A knockout mice. Three days later, mice produced high levels of FVIII. Levels declined rapidly with animal growth to 5 wk of age with stable factor VIII expression thereafter to >1 y of age. Decline in factor VIII expression was not related to cell-mediated or humoral responses with lack of development of antibodies to capsid or human factor VIII proteins. Subsequent readministration and augmentation of expression was possible as operational tolerance was established to factor VIII without development of inhibitors; however, protective immunity to adenovirus remained.

  15. Star spot location estimation using Kalman filter for star tracker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hai-bo; Yang, Jian-kun; Wang, Jiong-qi; Tan, Ji-chun; Li, Xiu-jian

    2011-04-20

    Star pattern recognition and attitude determination accuracy is highly dependent on star spot location accuracy for the star tracker. A star spot location estimation approach with the Kalman filter for a star tracker has been proposed, which consists of three steps. In the proposed approach, the approximate locations of the star spots in successive frames are predicted first; then the measurement star spot locations are achieved by defining a series of small windows around each predictive star spot location. Finally, the star spot locations are updated by the designed Kalman filter. To confirm the proposed star spot location estimation approach, the simulations based on the orbit data of the CHAMP satellite and the real guide star catalog are performed. The simulation results indicate that the proposed approach can filter out noises from the measurements remarkably if the sampling frequency is sufficient. © 2011 Optical Society of America

  16. Period Changes of 23 Field RR Lyrae Stars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soo-Chang Rey

    1994-12-01

    Full Text Available The secular period behavior of 23 field RR Lyrae stars is studied in order to determine if the observed period changes could be attributed, at least in the mean, to stellar evolution. The sample of stars is subdivided into two Oosterhoff groups based on the metallicity and period-shift. Despite the small sample size, we found a distinct bias toward positive period changes in the group variables. The period changes of the group variables in globular clusters. This provides yet another support for the Lee, Demarque, and Zinn(1990 evolutionary models of RR Lyrae stars and their explanation of the Sandage period-shift effect.

  17. A close insight to factor VIII inhibitor in the congenital hemophilia A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabriznia-Tabrizi, Shamsoreza; Gholampour, Marzie; Mansouritorghabeh, Hassan

    2016-09-01

    Hemophilia A (HA) has an X-linked pattern of inheritance and is the most common of the hemorrhagic disorders. HA is caused by a decreased or deficiency of the functional clotting factor VIII (FVIII) and effects 1 in 5000-10,000 male births. The common treatment for hemophilia is replacement therapy by plasma-derived or recombinant FVIII. Approximately 20-30% of people with a severe type of HA develop an inhibitor and this phenomenon is the main challenge in the management of these patients. Genetic factors and environmental determinants contribute to inhibitor development. Here, the roles of various genetic and environmental factors such as the type of FVIII concentrate used, the number of exposure days, and peak treatment time will be discussed in detail. It seems this information is helpful for hematologists. A literature review was done in January 2016 on PubMed and Scopus using the following keywords:' h(a)emophilia A & factor VIII inhibitor', 'h(a)emophilia A & factor VIII alloantibody', 'h(a)emophilia A & inhibitor'. There was no time limitation; however, there was an English language limitation placed on the articles selected. Expert commentary: Influential genetic and environmental factors in developing inhibitors have been discussed. Most of the risk factors are related to previously untreated patients with hemophili.

  18. [Structure and function of the factor VIII/von Willebrand factor complex].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, G

    1990-03-01

    In the blood plasma factor VIII is bound to the von Willebrand factor. The primary structure of the two proteins were clarified by gene clonation. Factor VIII descends from a precursor protein with 2,351 amino acids by splitting of 19 amino acid residues and is activated by partial proteolysis. In the blood coagulation factor VIII acts as co-factor for the activation of factor X by factor IX in the presence of phospholipids and Ca++ within the intrinsic coagulation system. The formation of the von Willebrand factor takes place by splitting of 22 and 741 amino acid residues, respectively, from pre-pro-von Willebrand factor via pro-von Willebrand factor. The subunits of the von Willebrand factor consist od 2,050 amino acid residues. In the blood plasma the von Willebrand factor is existing as a mixture of multimeres. Receptors of the von Willebrand factor on the thrombocytic membrane are the glycoproteins GPIb and GPIIb/GPIIIa, by means of which the adhesion of thrombocytes at the subendoethelium of the vascular wall and the aggregation of thrombocytes are mediated.

  19. Monte Carlo simulation of star/linear and star/star blends with chemically identical monomers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Theodorakis, P E [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Ioannina, 45110 Ioannina (Greece); Avgeropoulos, A [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Ioannina, 45110 Ioannina (Greece); Freire, J J [Departamento de Ciencias y Tecnicas FisicoquImicas, Universidad Nacional de Educacion a Distancia, Facultad de Ciencias, Senda del Rey 9, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Kosmas, M [Department of Chemistry, University of Ioannina, 45110 Ioannina (Greece); Vlahos, C [Department of Chemistry, University of Ioannina, 45110 Ioannina (Greece)

    2007-11-21

    The effects of chain size and architectural asymmetry on the miscibility of blends with chemically identical monomers, differing only in their molecular weight and architecture, are studied via Monte Carlo simulation by using the bond fluctuation model. Namely, we consider blends composed of linear/linear, star/linear and star/star chains. We found that linear/linear blends are more miscible than the corresponding star/star mixtures. In star/linear blends, the increase in the volume fraction of the star chains increases the miscibility. For both star/linear and star/star blends, the miscibility decreases with the increase in star functionality. When we increase the molecular weight of linear chains of star/linear mixtures the miscibility decreases. Our findings are compared with recent analytical and experimental results.

  20. VIII. THE PAST, PRESENT, AND FUTURE OF DEVELOPMENTAL METHODOLOGY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little, Todd D; Wang, Eugene W; Gorrall, Britt K

    2017-06-01

    This chapter selectively reviews the evolution of quantitative practices in the field of developmental methodology. The chapter begins with an overview of the past in developmental methodology, discussing the implementation and dissemination of latent variable modeling and, in particular, longitudinal structural equation modeling. It then turns to the present state of developmental methodology, highlighting current methodological advances in the field. Additionally, this section summarizes ample quantitative resources, ranging from key quantitative methods journal articles to the various quantitative methods training programs and institutes. The chapter concludes with the future of developmental methodology and puts forth seven future innovations in the field. The innovations discussed span the topics of measurement, modeling, temporal design, and planned missing data designs. Lastly, the chapter closes with a brief overview of advanced modeling techniques such as continuous time models, state space models, and the application of Bayesian estimation in the field of developmental methodology. © 2017 The Society for Research in Child Development, Inc.

  1. Planck 2013 results. VIII. HFI photometric calibration and mapmaking

    CERN Document Server

    Ade, P A R; Armitage-Caplan, C; Arnaud, M; Ashdown, M; Atrio-Barandela, F; Aumont, J; Baccigalupi, C; Banday, A J; Barreiro, R B; Battaner, E; Benabed, K; Benoît, A; Benoit-Lévy, A; Bernard, J -P; Bersanelli, M; Bertincourt, B; Bielewicz, P; Bobin, J; Bock, J J; Bond, J R; Borrill, J; Bouchet, F R; Boulanger, F; Bridges, M; Bucher, M; Burigana, C; Cardoso, J -F; Catalano, A; Challinor, A; Chamballu, A; Chary, R -R; Chen, X; Chiang, L -Y; Chiang, H C; Christensen, P R; Church, S; Clements, D L; Colombi, S; Colombo, L P L; Combet, C; Couchot, F; Coulais, A; Crill, B P; Curto, A; Cuttaia, F; Danese, L; Davies, R D; de Bernardis, P; de Rosa, A; de Zotti, G; Delabrouille, J; Delouis, J -M; Désert, F -X; Dickinson, C; Diego, J M; Dole, H; Donzelli, S; Doré, O; Douspis, M; Dupac, X; Efstathiou, G; Enßlin, T A; Eriksen, H K; Filliard, C; Finelli, F; Forni, O; Frailis, M; Franceschi, E; Galeotta, S; Ganga, K; Giard, M; Giardino, G; Giraud-Héraud, Y; González-Nuevo, J; Górski, K M; Gratton, S; Gregorio, A; Gruppuso, A; Hansen, F K; Hanson, D; Harrison, D; Helou, G; Henrot-Versillé, S; Hernández-Monteagudo, C; Herranz, D; Hildebrandt, S R; Hivon, E; Hobson, M; Holmes, W A; Hornstrup, A; Hovest, W; Huffenberger, K M; Jaffe, T R; Jaffe, A H; Jones, W C; Juvela, M; Keihänen, E; Keskitalo, R; Kisner, T S; Kneissl, R; Knoche, J; Knox, L; Kunz, M; Kurki-Suonio, H; Lagache, G; Lamarre, J -M; Lasenby, A; Laureijs, R J; Lawrence, C R; Jeune, M Le; Lellouch, E; Leonardi, R; Leroy, C; Lesgourgues, J; Liguori, M; Lilje, P B; Linden-Vørnle, M; López-Caniego, M; Lubin, P M; Macías-Pérez, J F; Maffei, B; Mandolesi, N; Maris, M; Marshall, D J; Martin, P G; Martínez-González, E; Masi, S; Matarrese, S; Matthai, F; Maurin, L; Mazzotta, P; McGehee, P; Meinhold, P R; Melchiorri, A; Mendes, L; Mennella, A; Migliaccio, M; Mitra, S; Miville-Deschênes, M -A; Moneti, A; Montier, L; Moreno, R; Morgante, G; Mortlock, D; Munshi, D; Murphy, J A; Naselsky, P; Nati, F; Natoli, P; Netterfield, C B; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H U; Noviello, F; Novikov, D; Novikov, I; Osborne, S; Oxborrow, C A; Paci, F; Pagano, L; Pajot, F; Paladini, R; Paoletti, D; Partridge, B; Pasian, F; Patanchon, G; Perdereau, O; Perotto, L; Perrotta, F; Piacentini, F; Piat, M; Pierpaoli, E; Pietrobon, D; Plaszczynski, S; Pointecouteau, E; Polenta, G; Ponthieu, N; Popa, L; Poutanen, T; Pratt, G W; Prézeau, G; Prunet, S; Puget, J -L; Rachen, J P; Reinecke, M; Remazeilles, M; Renault, C; Ricciardi, S; Riller, T; Ristorcelli, I; Rocha, G; Rosset, C; Roudier, G; Rusholme, B; Santos, D; Savini, G; Shellard, E P S; Spencer, L D; Starck, J -L; Stolyarov, V; Stompor, R; Sudiwala, R; Sunyaev, R; Sureau, F; Sutton, D; Suur-Uski, A -S; Sygnet, J -F; Tauber, J A; Tavagnacco, D; Techene, S; Terenzi, L; Tomasi, M; Tristram, M; Tucci, M; Umana, G; Valenziano, L; Valiviita, J; Van Tent, B; Vielva, P; Villa, F; Vittorio, N; Wade, L A; Wandelt, B D; Yvon, D; Zacchei, A; Zonca, A

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes the processing applied to the HFI cleaned time-ordered data to produce photometrically calibrated maps. HFI observes the sky over a broad range of frequencies, from 100 to 857 GHz. To get the best accuracy on the calibration on such a large range, two different photometric calibration schemes have to be used. The 545 and 857 \\GHz\\ data are calibrated using Uranus and Neptune flux density measurements, compared with models of their atmospheric emissions to calibrate the data. The lower frequencies (below 353 GHz) are calibrated using the cosmological microwave background dipole.One of the components of this anisotropy results from the orbital motion of the satellite in the Solar System, and is therefore time-variable. Photometric calibration is thus tightly linked to mapmaking, which also addresses low frequency noise removal. The 2013 released HFI data show some evidence for apparent gain variations of the HFI bolometers' detection chain. These variations were identified by comparing obse...

  2. Star Cluster Structure from Hierarchical Star Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grudic, Michael; Hopkins, Philip; Murray, Norman; Lamberts, Astrid; Guszejnov, David; Schmitz, Denise; Boylan-Kolchin, Michael

    2018-01-01

    Young massive star clusters (YMCs) spanning 104-108 M⊙ in mass generally have similar radial surface density profiles, with an outer power-law index typically between -2 and -3. This similarity suggests that they are shaped by scale-free physics at formation. Recent multi-physics MHD simulations of YMC formation have also produced populations of YMCs with this type of surface density profile, allowing us to narrow down the physics necessary to form a YMC with properties as observed. We show that the shallow density profiles of YMCs are a natural result of phase-space mixing that occurs as they assemble from the clumpy, hierarchically-clustered configuration imprinted by the star formation process. We develop physical intuition for this process via analytic arguments and collisionless N-body experiments, elucidating the connection between star formation physics and star cluster structure. This has implications for the early-time structure and evolution of proto-globular clusters, and prospects for simulating their formation in the FIRE cosmological zoom-in simulations.

  3. Binary stars: Mass transfer and chemical composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, D. L.

    1982-01-01

    It is noted that mass exchange (and mass loss) within a binary system should produce observable changes in the surface chemical composition of both the mass losing and mass gaining stars as a stellar interior exposed to nucleosyntheses is uncovered. Three topics relating mass exchange and/or mass loss to nucleosynthesis are sketched: the chemical composition of Algol systems; the accretion disk of a cataclysmic variable fed by mass from a dwarf secondary star; and the hypothesis that classical Ba II giants result from mass transfer from a more evolved companion now present as a white dwarf.

  4. OPTICAL SPECTROSCOPY OF X-RAY-SELECTED YOUNG STARS IN THE CARINA NEBULA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaidya, Kaushar [Physics Department, Birla Institute of Technology and Science Pilani, Pilani 333031, Rajasthan (India); Chen, Wen-Ping; Lee, Hsu-Tai [Graduate Institute of Astronomy, National Central University, 300 Zhongda Road, Zhongli 32001, Taiwan (China)

    2015-12-15

    We present low-resolution optical spectra for 29 X-ray sources identified as either massive star candidates or low-mass pre-main-sequence (PMS) star candidates in the clusters Trumpler 16 and Trumpler 14 of the Carina Nebula. Spectra of two more objects (one with an X-ray counterpart, and one with no X-ray counterpart), not originally our targets, but found close (∼3″) to two of our targets, are presented as well. Twenty early-type stars, including an O8 star, seven B1–B2 stars, two B3 stars, a B5 star, and nine emission-line stars, are identified. Eleven T Tauri stars, including eight classical T Tauri stars (CTTSs) and three weak-lined T Tauri stars, are identified. The early-type stars in our sample are more reddened compared to the previously known OB stars of the region. The Chandra hardness ratios of our T Tauri stars are found to be consistent with the Chandra hardness ratios of T Tauri stars of the Orion Nebula Cluster. Most early-type stars are found to be nonvariable in X-ray emission, except the B2 star J104518.81–594217.9, the B3 star J104507.84–594134.0, and the Ae star J104424.76–594555.0, which are possible X-ray variables. J104452.20–594155.1, a CTTS, is among the brightest and the hardest X-ray sources in our sample, appears to be a variable, and shows a strong X-ray flare. The mean optical and near-infrared photometric variability in the V and K{sub s} bands, of all sources, is found to be ∼0.04 and 0.05 mag, respectively. The T Tauri stars show significantly larger mean variation, ∼0.1 mag, in the K{sub s} band. The addition of one O star and seven B1–B2 stars reported here contributes to an 11% increase of the known OB population in the observed field. The 11 T Tauri stars are the first ever confirmed low-mass PMS stars in the Carina Nebula region.

  5. Making star teams out of star players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mankins, Michael; Bird, Alan; Root, James

    2013-01-01

    Top talent is an invaluable asset: In highly specialized or creative work, for instance, "A" players are likely to be six times as productive as "B" players. So when your company has a crucial strategic project, why not multiply all that firepower and have a team of your best performers tackle it? Yet many companies hesitate to do this, believing that all-star teams don't work: Big egos will get in the way. The stars won't be able to work with one another. They'll drive the team Leader crazy. Mankins, Bird, and Root of Bain & Company believe it's time to set aside that thinking. They have seen all-star teams do extraordinary work. But there is a right way and a wrong way to organize them. Before you can even begin to assemble such a team, you need to have the right talent management practices, so you hire and develop the best people and know what they're capable of. You have to give the team appropriate incentives and leaders and support staffers who are stars in their own right. And projects that are ill-defined or small scale are not for all-star teams. Use them only for critical missions, and make sure their objectives are clear. Even with the right setup, things can still go wrong. The wise executive will take steps to manage egos, prune non-team-players, and prevent average coworkers from feeling completely undervalued. She will also invest a lot of time in choosing the right team Leader and will ask members for lots of feedback to monitor how that leader is doing.

  6. PENINGKATAN PEMBELAJARAN MENULIS PUISI BEBAS MELALUI MEDIA LAGU MEDLEY SISWA KELAS VIII SMP SINTANG

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rohanawati Silalahi

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk meningkatkan pembelajaran menulis puisi bebas melalui media lagu medley siswa kelas VIII B SMP Sintang. Subjek penelitian adalah siswa kelas VIII B SMP Sintang. Penelitian ini merupakan Penelitian Tindakan Kelas (PTK. Prosedur pelaksanaan dan implementasi penelitian dilaksanakan dalam dua siklus. Teknik pengumpulan data berupa obsevasi, wawancara, catatan lapangan, angket, evaluasi dan dokumentasi. Instrumen pengumpulan data meliputi lembar wawancara, lembar catatan lapangan, lembar angket, lembar tes hasil belajar dan lembar portofolio serta dokumentasi foto kegiatan. Teknik analisis data yang digunakan adalah analisis data kuantitatif dan kualitatif. Hasil penelitian ini menunjukkan bahwa penggunaan media lagu medley dapat meningkatkan pembelajaran menulis puisi bebas. Peningkatan hasil atau produk dapat dilihat dari perbandingan skor rata-rata keterampilan menulis puisi bebas siswa pada setiap siklus. Nilai rata-rata siswa pada tahap pratindakan adalah 55,23, pada saat siklus I meningkat menjadi 71,18, dan pada siklus II meningkat menjadi 73,4. ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ DEVELOPING THE TEACHING OF FREE VERSE WRITING THROUGH MEDLEY SONG MEDIA TO GRADE VIII STUDENTS OF SMP SINTANG   Abstract This study aims to improve the teaching of free verse writing through medley song media to Grade VIII B students of SMP Sintang. The research subjects were Grade VIII B students of SMP Sintang,. This was a classroom action research (CAR. The research procedure and implementation were conducted in two cycles. The data were collected through observations, field notes, questionnaires, evaluations, and documentations. The data collecting instruments included interview sheets, field note sheets

  7. Massive runaway stars in the Large Magellanic Cloud

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gvaramadze, V. V.; Kroupa, P.; Pflamm-Altenburg, J.

    2010-09-01

    The origin of massive field stars in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) has long been an enigma. The recent measurements of large offsets (˜ 100 km s-1) between the heliocentric radial velocities of some very massive (O2-type) field stars and the systemic LMC velocity provides a possible explanation of this enigma and suggests that the field stars are runaway stars ejected from their birthplaces at the very beginning of their parent cluster's dynamical evolution. A straightforward way to prove this explanation is to measure the proper motions of the field stars and to show that they are moving away from one of the nearby star clusters or OB associations. This approach is, however, complicated by the long distance to the LMC, which makes accurate proper motion measurements difficult. We used an alternative approach for solving the problem (first applied for Galactic field stars), based on the search for bow shocks produced by runaway stars. The geometry of detected bow shocks would allow us to infer the direction of stellar motion, thereby determining their possible parent clusters. In this paper we present the results of a search for bow shocks around six massive field stars that have been proposed as candidate runaway stars. Using archival Spitzer Space Telescope data, we found a bow shock associated with one of our programme stars, the O2 V((f*)) star BI 237, which is the first-ever detection of bow shocks in the LMC. Orientation of the bow shock suggests that BI 237 was ejected from the OB association LH 82 (located at ≃ 120 pc in projection from the star). A by-product of our search is the detection of bow shocks generated by four OB stars in the field of the LMC and an arc-like structure attached to the candidate luminous blue variable R81 (HD 269128). The geometry of two of these bow shocks is consistent with the possibility that their associated stars were ejected from the 30 Doradus star-forming complex. We discuss implications of our findings for the

  8. Pseudosynchronization of Heartbeat Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerman, Mara; Thompson, Susan E.; Hambleton, Kelly; Fuller, Jim; Shporer, Avi; Isaacson, Howard T.; Howard, Andrew; Kurtz, Donald

    2016-01-01

    A type of eccentric binary star that undergoes extreme dynamic tidal forces, known as Heartbeat stars, were discovered by the Kepler Mission. As the two stars pass through periastron, the tidal distortion causes unique brightness variations. Short period, eccentric binary stars, like these, are theorized to pseudosynchronize, or reach a rotational frequency that matches the weighted average orbital angular velocity of the system. This pseudosynchronous rate, as predicted by Hut (1981), depends on the binary's orbital period and eccentricity. We tested whether sixteen heartbeat stars have pseudosynchronized. We measure the rotation rate from obvious spot signatures in the light curve. We measure the eccentricity by fitting the light curve using PHOEBE and are actively carrying out a radial velocity monitoring program with Keck/HIRES in order to improve these orbital parameters. Our initial results show that while most heartbeat stars appear to have pseudosynchronized we find stars with rotation frequencies both longer and shorter than this rate. We thank the SETI Institute REU program, the NSF, and the Kepler Guest Observer Program for making this work possible.

  9. Dense Axion Stars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braaten, Eric; Mohapatra, Abhishek; Zhang, Hong

    2016-09-16

    If the dark matter particles are axions, gravity can cause them to coalesce into axion stars, which are stable gravitationally bound systems of axions. In the previously known solutions for axion stars, gravity and the attractive force between pairs of axions are balanced by the kinetic pressure. The mass of these dilute axion stars cannot exceed a critical mass, which is about 10^{-14}M_{⊙} if the axion mass is 10^{-4}  eV. We study axion stars using a simple approximation to the effective potential of the nonrelativistic effective field theory for axions. We find a new branch of dense axion stars in which gravity is balanced by the mean-field pressure of the axion Bose-Einstein condensate. The mass on this branch ranges from about 10^{-20}M_{⊙} to about M_{⊙}. If a dilute axion star with the critical mass accretes additional axions and collapses, it could produce a bosenova, leaving a dense axion star as the remnant.

  10. Cooling of Neutron Stars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grigorian H.

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available We introduce the theoretical basis for modeling the cooling evolution of compact stars starting from Boltzmann equations in curved space-time. We open a discussion on observational verification of different neutron star models by consistent statistics. Particular interest has the question of existence of quark matter deep inside of compact object, which has to have a specific influence on the cooling history of the star. Besides of consideration of several constraints and features of cooling evolution, which are susceptible of being critical for internal structure of hot compact stars we have introduced a method of extraction of the mass distribution of the neutron stars from temperature and age data. The resulting mass distribution has been compared with the one suggested by supernove simulations. This method can be considered as an additional checking tool for the consistency of theoretical modeling of neutron stars. We conclude that the cooling data allowed existence of neutron stars with quark cores even with one-flavor quark matter.

  11. Entropy Production of Stars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonid M. Martyushev

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The entropy production (inside the volume bounded by a photosphere of main-sequence stars, subgiants, giants, and supergiants is calculated based on B–V photometry data. A non-linear inverse relationship of thermodynamic fluxes and forces as well as an almost constant specific (per volume entropy production of main-sequence stars (for 95% of stars, this quantity lies within 0.5 to 2.2 of the corresponding solar magnitude is found. The obtained results are discussed from the perspective of known extreme principles related to entropy production.

  12. Hyperons in neutron stars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tetsuya Katayama

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Using the Dirac–Brueckner–Hartree–Fock approach, the properties of neutron-star matter including hyperons are investigated. In the calculation, we consider both time and space components of the vector self-energies of baryons as well as the scalar ones. Furthermore, the effect of negative-energy states of baryons is partly taken into account. We obtain the maximum neutron-star mass of 2.08M⊙, which is consistent with the recently observed, massive neutron stars. We discuss a universal, repulsive three-body force for hyperons in matter.

  13. Infrared spectroscopy of stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merrill, K. M.; Ridgway, S. T.

    1979-01-01

    This paper reviews applications of IR techniques in stellar classification, studies of stellar photospheres, elemental and isotopic abundances, and the nature of remnant and ejected matter in near-circumstellar regions. Qualitative IR spectral classification of cool and hot stars is discussed, along with IR spectra of peculiar composite star systems and of obscured stars, and IR characteristics of stellar populations. The use of IR spectroscopy in theoretical modeling of stellar atmospheres is examined, IR indicators of stellar atmospheric composition are described, and contributions of IR spectroscopy to the study of stellar recycling of interstellar matter are summarized. The future of IR astronomy is also considered.

  14. Pulsating stars in ω Centauri. Near-IR properties and period-luminosity relations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Navarrete Camila

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available ω Centauri (NGC 5139 contains many variable stars of different types, including the pulsating type II Cepheids, RR Lyrae and SX Phoenicis stars. We carried out a deep, wide-field, near-infrared (IR variability survey of ω Cen, using the VISTA telescope. We assembled an unprecedented homogeneous and complete J and KS near-IR catalog of variable stars in the field of ω Cen. In this paper we compare optical and near-IR light curves of RR Lyrae stars, emphasizing the main differences. Moreover, we discuss the ability of near-IR observations to detect SX Phoenicis stars given the fact that the amplitudes are much smaller in these bands compared to the optical. Finally, we consider the case in which all the pulsating stars in the three different variability types follow a single period-luminosity relation in the near-IR bands.

  15. Periodic Variations in DQ Herculis Stars - CYC2HIGH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bless, Robert

    1992-06-01

    The DQ Herculis Stars are cataclysmic variables showing rapid, strictly periodic luminosity variations at either optical or X-ray wavelengths, and usually both. The periods range from 33 sec in AE AQR through 71 sec in DQ Her to 18690 sec in TV Col. The cataclysmic variables are all close binary stars consisting of a late-type star transferring mass to its companion white dwarf star. The white dwarf in the DQ Her stars is magnetized. The periodicities of the DQ Her stars are caused by rotation of the magnetized, acreting white dwarf. We propose to observe the DQ Her stars at ultraviolet wavelengths using the high speed photometer on the space telescope. The purpose of the observations is to investigate the physics of accretion onto compact stars. Revision History: Received on RPS 9/1/89; Added to SCCS 9/5/89 RPSS V7.2 remote & local; Typos corrected; Added data-fmt - SALM 9/7/89 Updated text - SALM 9/28/89; Moved 5 targ to cycle 2 - SALM 2/12/90 Switched 1 targ in cycles 1 & 2 - SALM

  16. Observational Effects of Strange Stars

    OpenAIRE

    Lu, T.

    1998-01-01

    In this talk, after briefly reviewing some historical remarks concerning strange stars, the achievements in physics and dynamical behavior of strange stars are discussed. Especially, various observational effects in distinguishing strange stars from neutron stars such as mechanical effects, cooling effects, phase transition and related interesting phenomena are stressed.

  17. Short-Period Binary Stars: Observations, Analyses, and Results

    CERN Document Server

    Milone, Eugene F; Hobill, David W

    2008-01-01

    Short-period binaries run the gamut from widely separated stars to black-hole pairs; in between are systems that include neutron stars and white dwarfs, and partially evolved systems such as tidally distorted and over-contact systems. These objects represent stages of evolution of binary stars, and their degrees of separation provide critical clues to how their evolutionary paths differ from that of single stars. The widest and least distorted systems provide astronomers with the essential precise data needed to study all stars: mass and radius. The interactions of binary star components, on the other hand, provide a natural laboratory to observe how the matter in these stars behaves under different and often varying physical conditions. Thus, cataclysmic variables with and without overpoweringly strong magnetic fields, and stars with densities from that found in the Sun to the degenerate matter of white dwarfs and the ultra-compact states of neutron stars and black holes are all discussed. The extensive inde...

  18. Frequency and epitope specificity of anti-factor VIII C1 domain antibodies in acquired and congenital hemophilia A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahle, Joerg; Orlowski, Aleksander; Stichel, Diana; Healey, John F; Parker, Ernest T; Jacquemin, Marc; Krause, Manuela; Tiede, Andreas; Schwabe, Dirk; Lollar, Pete; Königs, Christoph

    2017-08-10

    Several studies showed that neutralizing anti-factor VIII (anti-fVIII) antibodies (inhibitors) in patients with acquired hemophilia A (AHA) and congenital hemophilia A (HA) are primarily directed to the A2 and C2 domains. In this study, the frequency and epitope specificity of anti-C1 antibodies were analyzed in acquired and congenital hemophilia inhibitor patients (n = 178). The domain specificity of antibodies was studied by homolog-scanning mutagenesis (HSM) with single human domain human/porcine fVIII proteins and antibody binding to human A2, C1, and C2 domains presented as human serum albumin (HSA) fusion proteins. The analysis with HSA-fVIII domain proteins confirmed the results of the HSM approach but resulted in higher detection levels. The higher detection levels with HSA-fVIII domain proteins are a result of antibody cross-reactivity with human and porcine fVIII leading to false-negative HSM results. Overall, A2-, C1-, and C2-specific antibodies were detected in 23%, 78%, and 68% of patients with AHA (n = 115) and in 52%, 57%, and 81% of HA inhibitor patients (n = 63). Competitive binding of the human monoclonal antibody (mAb) LE2E9 revealed overlapping epitopes with murine C1-specific group A mAbs including 2A9. Mutational analyses identified distinct crucial binding residues for LE2E9 (E2066) and 2A9 (F2068) that are also recognized by anti-C1 antibodies present in patients with hemophilia. A strong contribution of LE2E9- and 2A9-like antibodies was particularly observed in patients with AHA. Overall, our study demonstrates that the C1 domain, in addition to the A2 and C2 domains, contributes significantly to the humoral anti-fVIII immune response in acquired and congenital hemophilia inhibitor patients. © 2017 by The American Society of Hematology.

  19. Dry-heat treatment process for enhancing viral safety of an antihemophilic factor VIII concentrate prepared from human plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, In Seop; Choi, Yong Woon; Kang, Yong; Sung, Hark Mo; Shin, Jeong Sup

    2008-05-01

    Viral safety is a prerequisite for manufacturing clinical antihemophilic factor VIII concentrates from human plasma. With particular regard to the hepatitis A virus (HAV), a terminal dry-heat treatment (100 degrees for 30 min) process, following lyophilization, was developed to improve the virus safety of a solvent/detergent-treated antihemophilic factor VIII concentrate. The loss of factor VIII activity during dry-heat treatment was of about 5%. No substantial changes were observed in the physical and biochemical characteristics of the dry-heat-treated factor VIII compared with those of the factor VIII before dry-heat treatment. The dry-heat-treated factor VIII was stable for up to 24 months at 4oC. The dry-heat treatment after lyophilization was an effective process for inactivating viruses. The HAV, murine encephalomyocarditis virus (EMCV), and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) were completely inactivated to below detectable levels within 10 min of the dry-heat treatment. Bovine herpes virus (BHV) and bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) were potentially sensitive to the treatment. However porcine parvovirus (PPV) was slightly resistant to the treatment. The log reduction factors achieved during lyophilization and dry-heat treatment were > or =5.55 for HAV, > or =5.87 for EMCV, > or =5.15 for HIV, 6.13 for BHV, 4.46 for BVDV, and 1.90 for PPV. These results indicate that dry-heat treatment improves the virus safety of factor VIII concentrates, without destroying the activity. Moreover, the treatment represents an effective measure for the inactivation of non-lipid-enveloped viruses, in particular HAV, which is resistant to solvent/detergent treatment.

  20. Interferometric star tracker Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Optical Physics Company (OPC) proposes to develop a high accuracy version of its interferometric star tracker capable of meeting the milli-arcsecond-level pointing...

  1. Principles of star formation

    CERN Document Server

    Bodenheimer, Peter H

    2011-01-01

    Understanding star formation is one of the key fields in present-day astrophysics. This book treats a wide variety of the physical processes involved, as well as the main observational discoveries, with key points being discussed in detail. The current star formation in our galaxy is emphasized, because the most detailed observations are available for this case. The book presents a comparison of the various scenarios for star formation, discusses the basic physics underlying each one, and follows in detail the history of a star from its initial state in the interstellar gas to its becoming a condensed object in equilibrium. Both theoretical and observational evidence to support the validity of the general evolutionary path are presented, and methods for comparing the two are emphasized. The author is a recognized expert in calculations of the evolution of protostars, the structure and evolution of disks, and stellar evolution in general. This book will be of value to graduate students in astronomy and astroph...

  2. Sounds of a Star

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-06-01

    Acoustic Oscillations in Solar-Twin "Alpha Cen A" Observed from La Silla by Swiss Team Summary Sound waves running through a star can help astronomers reveal its inner properties. This particular branch of modern astrophysics is known as "asteroseismology" . In the case of our Sun, the brightest star in the sky, such waves have been observed since some time, and have greatly improved our knowledge about what is going on inside. However, because they are much fainter, it has turned out to be very difficult to detect similar waves in other stars. Nevertheless, tiny oscillations in a solar-twin star have now been unambiguously detected by Swiss astronomers François Bouchy and Fabien Carrier from the Geneva Observatory, using the CORALIE spectrometer on the Swiss 1.2-m Leonard Euler telescope at the ESO La Silla Observatory. This telescope is mostly used for discovering exoplanets (see ESO PR 07/01 ). The star Alpha Centauri A is the nearest star visible to the naked eye, at a distance of a little more than 4 light-years. The new measurements show that it pulsates with a 7-minute cycle, very similar to what is observed in the Sun . Asteroseismology for Sun-like stars is likely to become an important probe of stellar theory in the near future. The state-of-the-art HARPS spectrograph , to be mounted on the ESO 3.6-m telescope at La Silla, will be able to search for oscillations in stars that are 100 times fainter than those for which such demanding observations are possible with CORALIE. PR Photo 23a/01 : Oscillations in a solar-like star (schematic picture). PR Photo 23b/01 : Acoustic spectrum of Alpha Centauri A , as observed with CORALIE. Asteroseismology: listening to the stars ESO PR Photo 23a/01 ESO PR Photo 23a/01 [Preview - JPEG: 357 x 400 pix - 96k] [Normal - JPEG: 713 x 800 pix - 256k] [HiRes - JPEG: 2673 x 3000 pix - 2.1Mb Caption : PR Photo 23a/01 is a graphical representation of resonating acoustic waves in the interior of a solar-like star. Red and blue

  3. Catch a Star 2008!

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-10-01

    ESO and the European Association for Astronomy Education have just launched the 2008 edition of 'Catch a Star', their international astronomy competition for school students. Now in its sixth year, the competition offers students the chance to win a once-in-a-lifetime trip to ESO's flagship observatory in Chile, as well as many other prizes. CAS logo The competition includes separate categories - 'Catch a Star Researchers' and 'Catch a Star Adventurers' - to ensure that every student, whatever their level, has the chance to enter and win exciting prizes. In teams, students investigate an astronomical topic of their choice and write a report about it. An important part of the project for 'Catch a Star Researchers' is to think about how ESO's telescopes such as the Very Large Telescope (VLT) or future telescopes such as the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) and the European Extremely Large Telescope (E-ELT) could contribute to investigations of the topic. Students may also include practical activities such as observations or experiments. For the artistically minded, 'Catch a Star' also offers an artwork competition, 'Catch a Star Artists'. Last year, hundreds of students from across Europe and beyond took part in 'Catch a Star', submitting astronomical projects and artwork. "'Catch a Star' gets students thinking about the wonders of the Universe and the science of astronomy, with a chance of winning great prizes. It's easy to take part, whether by writing about astronomy or creating astronomically inspired artwork," said Douglas Pierce-Price, Education Officer at ESO. As well as the top prize - a trip to ESO's Very Large Telescope in Chile - visits to observatories in Austria and Spain, and many other prizes, can also be won. 'Catch a Star Researchers' winners will be chosen by an international jury, and 'Catch a Star Adventurers' will be awarded further prizes by lottery. Entries for 'Catch a Star Artists' will be displayed on the web and winners

  4. STAR: Copperhead interface

    OpenAIRE

    Cahill, Thomas Everett

    1981-01-01

    Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited This thesis provides the general design logic for a computer representation of the Field Artillery's precision guided munition- Copperhead. The design has been specifically structured to enable its integration into the Simulation of Tactical Alternative Responses (STAR) model. (STAR is a stochastic force-on-force combat simulation.) Routines and events are developed which portray the target identification, target selection, firing a...

  5. Characterizing bursty star formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emami, Najmeh

    2018-01-01

    An ongoing area of research in galaxy evolution is the efficiency of star formation as a function of galaxy halo mass. At low mass, it is believed that supernova feedback can expel gas from the galaxy and shut down star formation. However, there are still significant uncertainties in how the momentum/energy of the supernova couple with the gas and the efficiency with which it drives winds. Particularly uncertain are the parameters of the resulting bursts of star formation —amplitudes, durations, and periods — with important implications for interpreting observations of dwarf galaxies. Some hydrodynamical simulations predict order of magnitude bursts (and quenching) on very short (indicators of dwarf galaxies (H-alpha and ultraviolet luminosities) that trace star formation on different time scales (~5 Myr and ~20 Myr, respectively), as well as their relation to the average galaxies of similar stellar mass, to better constrain the parameters of the star formation bursts. We find that the burst amplitude increases with decreasing stellar mass, with amplitudes ranging two orders of magnitude at stellar masses of 10^7. We also find that the star formation is quenched very rapidly, with e-folding times less than 10 Myr in galaxies with stellar masses less than 10^(7.5). We conclude by comparing our results to recent hydrodynamical simulations and discussing the effects of stochastic sampling of the stellar initial mass function.

  6. NuSTAR discovery of a luminosity dependent cyclotron line energy in Vela X-1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fuerst, Felix; Pottschmidt, Katja; Wilms, Joern

    2014-01-01

    We present NuSTAR observations of Vela X-1, a persistent, yet highly variable, neutron star high-mass X-ray binary (HMXB). Two observations were taken at similar orbital phases but separated by nearly a year. They show very different 3-79 keV flux levels as well as strong variability during each...

  7. Collapsing Enormous Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2015-09-01

    One of the big puzzles in astrophysics is how supermassive black holes (SMBHs) managed to grow to the large sizes weve observed in the very early universe. In a recent study, a team of researchers examines the possibility that they were formed by the direct collapse of supermassive stars.Formation MysterySMBHs billions of times as massive as the Sun have been observed at a time when the universe was less than a billion years old. But thats not enough time for a stellar-mass black hole to grow to SMBH-size by accreting material so another theory is needed to explain the presence of these monsters so early in the universes history. A new study, led by Tatsuya Matsumoto (Kyoto University, Japan), poses the following question: what if supermassive stars in the early universe collapsed directly into black holes?Previous studies of star formation in the early universe have suggested that, in the hot environment of these primordial times, stars might have been able to build up mass much faster than they can today. This could result in early supermassive stars roughly 100,000 times more massive than the Sun. But if these early stars end their lives by collapsing to become massive black holes in the same way that we believe massive stars can collapse to form stellar-mass black holes today this should result in enormously violent explosions. Matusmoto and collaborators set out to model this process, to determine what we would expect to see when it happens!Energetic BurstsThe authors modeled the supermassive stars prior to collapse and then calculated whether a jet, created as the black hole grows at the center of the collapsing star, would be able to punch out of the stellar envelope. They demonstrated that the process would work much like the widely-accepted collapsar model of massive-star death, in which a jet successfully punches out of a collapsing star, violently releasing energy in the form of a long gamma-ray burst (GRB).Because the length of a long GRB is thought to

  8. Characterizing the Cool KOIs. VIII. Parameters of the Planets Orbiting Kepler's Coolest Dwarfs

    OpenAIRE

    Swift, Jonathan J.; Montet, Benjamin T.; Vanderburg, Andrew; Morton, Timothy; Muirhead, Philip S.; Johnson, John Asher

    2015-01-01

    The coolest dwarf stars targeted by the Kepler Mission constitute a relatively small but scientifically valuable subset of the Kepler target stars, and provide a high-fidelity, nearby sample of transiting planetary systems. Using archival Kepler data spanning the entire primary mission, we perform a uniform analysis to extract, confirm, and characterize the transit signals discovered by the Kepler pipeline toward M-type dwarf stars. We recover all but two of the signals reported in a recent l...

  9. Crystal Structure of Human Factor VIII: Implications for the Formation of the Factor IXa-Factor VIIIa Complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chi Ki Ngo,J.; Huang, M.; Roth, D.; Furie, B.; Furie, B.

    2008-01-01

    Factor VIII is a procofactor that plays a critical role in blood coagulation, and is missing or defective in hemophilia A. We determined the X-ray crystal structure of B domain-deleted human factor VIII. This protein is composed of five globular domains and contains one Ca(2+) and two Cu(2+) ions. The three homologous A domains form a triangular heterotrimer where the A1 and A3 domains serve as the base and interact with the C2 and C1 domains, respectively. The structurally homologous C1 and C2 domains reveal membrane binding features. Based on biochemical studies, a model of the factor IXa-factor VIIIa complex was constructed by in silico docking. Factor IXa wraps across the side of factor VIII, and an extended interface spans the factor VIII heavy and light chains. This model provides insight into the activation of factor VIII and the interaction of factor VIIIa with factor IXa on the membrane surface.

  10. Crystal Structure of Human Factor VIII: Implications for the Formation of the Factor IXa-Factor VIIIa Complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ngo, J.C.; Huang, M.; Roth, D.A.; Furie, B.C.; Furie, B. (Wyeth); (MBL)

    2008-06-03

    Factor VIII is a procofactor that plays a critical role in blood coagulation, and is missing or defective in hemophilia A. We determined the X-ray crystal structure of B domain-deleted human factor VIII. This protein is composed of five globular domains and contains one Ca{sup 2+} and two Cu{sup 2+} ions. The three homologous A domains form a triangular heterotrimer where the A1 and A3 domains serve as the base and interact with the C2 and C1 domains, respectively. The structurally homologous C1 and C2 domains reveal membrane binding features. Based on biochemical studies, a model of the factor IXa-factor VIIIa complex was constructed by in silico docking. Factor IXa wraps across the side of factor VIII, and an extended interface spans the factor VIII heavy and light chains. This model provides insight into the activation of factor VIII and the interaction of factor VIIIa with factor IXa on the membrane surface.

  11. Analysis of inversions in the factor VIII gene in Spanish hemophilia A patients and families

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Domenech, M.; Tizzano, E.; Baiget, M. [Hospital de Sant Pau, Barcelona (Spain); Altisent, C. [Hospital Vall d`Hebron, Barcelona (Spain)

    1994-09-01

    Intron 22 is the largest intron of the factor VIII gene and contains a CpG island from which two additional transcripts originate. One of these transcripts corresponds to the F8A gene which have telomeric extragenic copies in the X chromosome. An inversion involving homologous recombination between the intragenic and the distal or proximal copies of the F8A gene has been recently described as a common cause of severe hemophilia A (HA). We analyzed intron 22 rearrangements in 195 HA patients (123 familial and 72 sporadic cases). According to factor VIII levels, our sample was classified as severe in 114 cases, moderate in 29 cases and mild in 52 cases. An intron 22 (F8A) probe was hybridized to Southern blots of BcII digested DNA obtained from peripheral blood. A clear pattern of altered bands identifies distal or proximal inversions. We detected an abnormal pattern identifying an inversion in 49 (25%) of the analyzed cases. 43% of severe HA patients (49 cases) showed an inversion. As expected, no inversion was found in the moderate and mild group of patients. We found a high proportion (78%) of the distal rearrangement. From 49 identified inversions, 33 were found in familial cases (27%), while the remaining 15 were detected in sporadic patients (22%) in support that this mutational event occurs with a similar frequency in familial or sporadic cases. In addition, we detected a significant tendency of distal inversion to occur more frequently in familial cases than in sporadic cases. Inhibitor development to factor VIII was documented in approximately 1/3 of the patients with inversion. The identification of such a frequent molecular event in severe hemophilia A patients has been applied in our families to carrier and prenatal diagnosis, to determine the origin of the mutation in the sporadic cases and to detect the presence of germinal mosaicism.

  12. AKTIVITAS FISIK, ASUPAN ENERGI DAN STATUS GIZI WANITA PEMETIK TEH DI PTPN VIII BANDUNG, JAWA BARAT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venny Agustiani Mahardikawati

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available 800x600 Normal 0 false false false IN X-NONE X-NONE MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 Quality of human resources is very important to improve productivity. The worker productivity is correlated with nutritional status and health status. The objective of the research is to analyze physical activity, energy intake, nutritional status, of women workers at Tea Plantation PTPN VIII Bandung, West Java. The cross sectional design was used in this study to elaborate physical activity, nutritional status, and productivity of tea picker’s women. The criteria of study sample were tea picker’s women at cluster area of Malabar tea plantation of PTPN VIII Bandung, having infant and they were willing to be interviewed. The total number of 92 women sample was chosen randomly. Primary data consisted of physical activity recall (2x24 hours, food consumption recall (2x24 hours, anthropometry data (weight and height, and productivity (passage of tea sprout. Secondary data were included data of PT Perkebunan Nusantara VIII Bandung, West Java. The result showed that more than a half of samples having active or moderate physical activity level (PAL. The physical activity level of samples during work day (average PAL=1.87 was higher than holiday (average PAL=1.69 (p2362 kcal and 2134 kcal. The average energy adequacy level during workday and day off according to Schofield and Oxford equation were not significantly different, respectively 97,2% and 103,3%. The majority of samples had normal nutritional status, and 30.4% of the sample was overweight. The energy adequacy level according to Schofield and Oxford equation are related to nutritional status of women workers. Keywords: physical activity, energy expenditure, nutritional status, plantation women

  13. BAY 81-8973, a full-length recombinant factor VIII: results from an International comparative laboratory field study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitchen, S; Beckmann, H; Katterle, Y; Bruns, S; Tseneklidou-Stoeter, D; Maas Enriquez, M

    2016-05-01

    BAY 81-8973 is a full-length, unmodified, recombinant human factor VIII (FVIII) with the same primary amino acid sequence as sucrose-formulated recombinant FVIII but produced with certain more advanced manufacturing technologies. This global laboratory study evaluated variability in measurement of BAY 81-8973 using one-stage and chromogenic assays compared with antihaemophilic factor (recombinant) plasma/albumin-free method (rAHF-PFM; Advate(®) ) under assay conditions routinely used in clinical laboratories. BAY 81-8973 or rAHF-PFM was spiked into FVIII-deficient plasma at 0.043 (low), 0.375 (medium) and 0.865 (normal) IU mL(-1) . Participating laboratories analysed blinded samples and normal plasma in triplicate using their routine assay, reagents and standards. Results were analysed for intra- and interlaboratory variability. Forty-one laboratories in 11 countries participated in the study. One-stage assay and chromogenic assays were used by 40 and 10 laboratories, respectively; 9 laboratories used both assays. Intralaboratory variability was <11% for both assays and both products at all concentrations. Interlaboratory variability was highest at the low concentration in the chromogenic and one-stage assay for BAY 81-8973 (60.0% and 33.7%, respectively) and rAHF-PFM (51.0% and 30.8%) and was lowest at the normal concentration (BAY 81-8973, 5.4% and 14.0%; rAHF-PFM, 5.8% and 12.4%), which was similar to the plasma control (6.6% and 10.3%). The chromogenic:one-stage assay ratio ranged from 0.95 (low concentration) to 1.10 (normal concentration) for BAY 81-8973 and 0.96-1.18 for rAHF-PFM. BAY 81-8973 can be accurately measured in plasma using the one-stage and chromogenic assays routinely used in clinical laboratories without a product-specific standard. © 2016 The Authors. Haemophilia Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. The Fundamental Properties of Young Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czekala, Ian

    Accurate knowledge of the fundamental properties of stars--mass, temperature, and luminosity--is key to our understanding of stellar evolution. In particular, empirical measurements of stellar mass are difficult to make and are generally limited to stars that dynamically interact with a companion (e.g., eclipsing or astrometric binaries), a precious but ultimately small sample. We developed a technique that uses the rotation of the protoplanetary disk--a consequence of the star formation process still present around many pre-main sequence stars--to measure the stellar mass. To establish the absolute accuracy of this technique, in ALMA Cycle 1/2 we observed the few circumbinary disks around double-lined spectroscopic binary stars, enabling an independent confirmation of the total stellar mass. This comparison with radial-velocity results demonstrates that the disk-based dynamical mass technique can reliably achieve precise measurements of stellar mass on the order of 2-5%, clearing the way for widespread application of this technique to measure the masses of single stars. We discuss our calibration in the context of two sources, AK Sco and DQ Tau. Second, we developed novel statistical techniques for spectroscopic inference. Young stars exhibit rich and variable spectra; although interesting phenomena in their own right, accretion veiling and star spots complicate the retrieval of accurate photospheric properties. The subtraction of an imperfect model from a continuously sampled spectrum introduces covariance between adjacent datapoints (pixels) into the residual spectrum. For the high signal-to-noise data with large spectral range that is commonly employed in stellar astrophysics, that covariant structure can lead to dramatically underestimated parameter uncertainties (and, in some cases, biases). We construct a likelihood function that accounts for the structure of the covariance matrix, utilizing the machinery of Gaussian process kernels. This framework

  15. Super Star Clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connell, R. W.

    1994-05-01

    Super star clusters represent an extreme in the star formation process. They are very luminous, compact objects with L_V > 10(6) L_{V,sun} and diameters = 100 times higher than normal OB associations and clusters in ``giant H II regions''. Prior to HST about a dozen such objects had been identified in nearby galaxies, but at ground-based resolution they are nearly point sources. We review recent HST observations of individual super star clusters in NGC 1140, 1569, and 1705. They have half-light radii of only 2--3.5 pc, and some show evidence of substructure which should be resolvable with the repaired HST. After allowing for age differences, the surface brightness of NGC 1569-A is over 65 times higher than the core of 30 Doradus in the LMC and 1200 times higher than the mean rich LMC star cluster. In some cases, the energy released by the clusters into their surroundings is sufficient to drive galaxy-wide winds. Their properties make super star clusters good analogues of young globular clusters. In some, though not all, cases super star clusters appear to form in the aftermath of a merger or accretion event. The most impressive examples are the clusters detected by HST in NGC 1275 and 7252, one of which has the extraordinary luminosity ~ 6 times 10(8) L_{V,sun}. M82 affords a nearby view of a post-interaction system. HST imaging has identified over 80 super star clusters in its central regions with mean luminosities of ~ 3 times 10(6) L_{V,sun}. Their close packing and signs of interaction with the well-known supernova-driven wind suggest that they do not evolve independently. Super cluster evolution in starbursts is probably a collective phenomenon.

  16. IMPLIKASI YURIDIS PUTUSAN MK NOMOR 46/PUU- VIII/ 2010 TERHADAP AKTA KELAHIRAN ANAK LUAR KAWIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Djumikasih Djumikasih

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This paper aims to identify and analyze what the juridical implications of the publication of the decision of the Constitutional Court No. 46/PUU-VIII / 2010 on Child Outside Marriage Deed which has been published by the Department of Population and Civil Registration prior to the establishment of the Constitutional Court's decision . The method used in this study is a normative juridical approach legislation. From the discussion, it can be concluded that the Constitutional Court 46/PUU-VIII/2010 Number of Tests on Article 43 paragraph ( 1 Marriage Act ( Act No. 1 of 1974 when viewed from the angle of legal certainty it will lead to legal certainty . But the decision will not have any juridical implications of the child's birth certificate that has been published outside of marriage and illegitimate child who was born before the date of February 17, 2012, as if enacted would be contrary to the principle of legality is interpreted Article 47 of the Law on the Constitutional Court and Article 28 ( i of the 1945 Constitution . Likewise, if the terms of the fairness and usefulness , especially for justice seekers / applicant , the timing of this decision is not fair and not useful , because although the Court granted the petition but the Constitutional Court can not be applied to her .   Key words: yuridical implication, birth certificate, children who are born outside of marriage   Abstrak   Tulisan ini bertujuan untuk mengetahui dan menganalisis apa implikasi yuridis dari terbitnya putusan MK Nomor 46/PUU-VIII/ 2010 terhadap Akta Anak Luar Kawin yang sudah diterbitkan oleh Dinas Kependudukan dan Catatan Sipil sebelum lahirnya putusan MK tersebut. Metode yang digunakan dalam penelitian ini adalah yuridis normative dengan pendekatan perundang-undangan. Dari pembahasan dapat disimpulkan bahwa Putusan MK Nomer 46/PUU-VIII/2010 tentang Pengujian terhadap Pasal 43 ayat (1 UU Perkawinan (UU NO 1 Tahun 1974 jika dilihat dari sudut kepastian

  17. Underground Test Area Subproject Phase I Data Analysis Task. Volume VIII - Risk Assessment Documentation Package

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1996-12-01

    Volume VIII of the documentation for the Phase I Data Analysis Task performed in support of the current Regional Flow Model, Transport Model, and Risk Assessment for the Nevada Test Site Underground Test Area Subproject contains the risk assessment documentation. Because of the size and complexity of the model area, a considerable quantity of data was collected and analyzed in support of the modeling efforts. The data analysis task was consequently broken into eight subtasks, and descriptions of each subtask's activities are contained in one of the eight volumes that comprise the Phase I Data Analysis Documentation.

  18. Comercio Internacional mediterráneo en el siglo VIII a.C.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paloma Cabrera Bonet

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The VIII century B.C. saw, for the first time after the breakdown of the system in the Late Bronze Age, the revival of a true intemational trade at a growing scale, especíally protagonized by Phoenicians and Greeks. In this article we analyze sorne aspects of this phenomenon, from the Aegean to the Far West, which made possíble, through a vaste network of trading routes, a large multinational ínteractíon. We understand the international trade as a key factor in the proccess of economic, social and political changes of the Mediterranean areas submerged in this complex "world-system".

  19. Production of Lentiviral Vectors Encoding Recombinant Factor VIII Expression in Serum-Free Suspension Cultures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelo Luis Caron

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Lentiviral vector-mediated gene transfer offers several advantages over other gene delivery vectors when considering gene and cell therapy applications. However, using these therapies in clinical applications involves large-scale vector production in an efficient and cost-effective manner. Here we describe a high yield production of a lentivirus encoding recombinant factor VIII in a scalable and GMP-compliant culture system, based on serum free suspension cultures and transient transfection with an inexpensive reagent, polyethylenimine (PEI, reaching a total viral yield of 2.48x108 particles.

  20. Measurements of Sheath Currents and Equilibrium Potential on the Explorer VIII Satellite (1960 xi)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourdeau, R. E.; Donley, J. L.; Serbu, G. P.; Whipple, E. C., Jr.

    1961-01-01

    Experimental data were obtained from the Explorer VIII satellite on five parameters pertinent to the problem of the interaction of space vehicles with an ionized atmosphere. The five parameters are: photoemission current due to electrons emitted from the satellite surfaces as a result of solar radiation; electron and positive ion currents due to the diffusion of charged particles from the medium to the spacecraft; the vehicle potential relative to the medium, and the ambient electron temperature. Included in the experimental data is the aspect dependence of the photoemission and diffusion currents. On the basis of the observations, certain characteristics of the satellite's plasma sheath are postulated.

  1. Pulsating stars in SuperWASP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holdsworth Daniel L.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available SuperWASP is one of the largest ground-based surveys for transiting exoplanets. To date, it has observed over 31 million stars. Such an extensive database of time resolved photometry holds the potential for extensive searches of stellar variability, and provide solid candidates for the upcoming TESS mission. Previous work by e.g. [15], [5], [12] has shown that the WASP archive provides a wealth of pulsationally variable stars. In this talk I will provide an overview of the SuperWASP project, present some of the published results from the survey, and some of the on-going work to identify key targets for the TESS mission.

  2. A SECOND NEUTRON STAR IN M4?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaluzny, J.; Rozanska, A.; Rozyczka, M.; Krzeminski, W. [Nicolaus Copernicus Astronomical Center, Bartycka 18, 00-716 Warsaw (Poland); Thompson, Ian B. [Observatories of the Carnegie Institution of Washington, 813 Santa Barbara Street, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States)

    2012-05-01

    We show that the optical counterpart of the X-ray source CX 1 in M4 is a {approx}20th magnitude star, located in the color-magnitude diagram on (or very close to) the main sequence of the cluster, and exhibiting sinusoidal variations of the flux. We find the X-ray flux to be also periodically variable, with X-ray and optical minima coinciding. Stability of the optical light curve, lack of UV-excess, and unrealistic mean density resulting from period-density relation for semidetached systems speak against the original identification of CX 1 as a cataclysmic variable. We argue that the X-ray active component of this system is a neutron star (probably a millisecond pulsar).

  3. Circulation of Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boitani, P.

    2016-01-01

    Since the dawn of man, contemplation of the stars has been a primary impulse in human beings, who proliferated their knowledge of the stars all over the world. Aristotle sees this as the product of primeval and perennial “wonder” which gives rise to what we call science, philosophy, and poetry. Astronomy, astrology, and star art (painting, architecture, literature, and music) go hand in hand through millennia in all cultures of the planet (and all use catasterisms to explain certain phenomena). Some of these developments are independent of each other, i.e., they take place in one culture independently of others. Some, on the other hand, are the product of the “circulation of stars.” There are two ways of looking at this. One seeks out forms, the other concentrates on the passing of specific lore from one area to another through time. The former relies on archetypes (for instance, with catasterism), the latter constitutes a historical process. In this paper I present some of the surprising ways in which the circulation of stars has occurred—from East to West, from East to the Far East, and from West to East, at times simultaneously.

  4. New insight into the physics of atmospheres of early type stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamers, H. J. G. L. M.

    1981-01-01

    The phenomenon of mass loss and stellar winds from hot stars are discussed. The mass loss rate of early type stars increases by about a factor of 100 to 1000 during their evolution. This seems incompatible with the radiation driven wind models and may require another explanation for the mass loss from early type stars. The winds of early type stars are strongly variable and the stars may go through active phases. Eclipses in binary systems by the stellar winds can be used to probe the winds. A few future IUE studies are suggested.

  5. KEEFEKTIFAN MODEL TGT DENGAN PENDEKATAN SCIENTIFIC BERBANTUAN CD PEMBELAJARAN TERHADAP KEMAMPUAN PEMECAHAN MASALAH SISWA SMP KELAS VIII PADA MATERI LINGKARAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Singgih Baswendro

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Artikel ini dibuat berdasarkan penelitian skripsi yang telah dilaksanakan. Tujuan penelitian ini adalah (1 untuk mengetahui hasil kemampuan pemecahan masalah siswa kelas VIII pada materi lingkaran dengan menggunakan model TGT mencapai KKM, dan (2 untuk mengetahui rata-rata kemampuan pemecahan masalah siswa dengan model TGT lebih tinggi daripada dengan model ekspositori. Penelitian ini dilaksanakan di SMP Negeri 3 Ungaran dengan populasi siswa kelas VIII tahun ajaran 2014/2015. Pengambilan kelas sampel menggunakan teknik cluster random sampling. Untuk mengetahui hasil penelitian ini, data hasil akhir diuji dengan uji proporsi dan uji perbedaan rata-rata. Hasil penelitan ini menunjukkan bahwa (1 hasil kemampuan pemecahan masalah siswa kelas VIII pada materi lingkaran dengan menggunakan model TGT mencapai KKM, dan (2 rata-rata kemampuan pemecahan masalah siswa dengan model TGT lebih tinggi daripada dengan model ekspositori. Dengan ini maka model TGT dengan pendekatan scientific berbantuan CD pembelajaran efektif terhadap kemampuan pemecahan masalah siswa.

  6. Radio stars observed in the LAMOST spectral survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Li-Yun; Yue, Qiang; Lu, Hong-Peng; Han, Xian-Ming L.; Zhang, Yong; Shi, Jian-Rong; Wang, Yue-Fei; Hou, Yong-Hui; Zi-Huang, Cao

    2017-09-01

    Radio stars have attracted astronomers’ attention for several decades. To better understand the physics behind stellar radio emissions, it is important to study their optical behaviors. The LAMOST survey provides a large database for researching stellar spectroscopic properties of radio stars. In this work, we concentrate on their spectroscopic properties and infer physical properties from their spectra, such as stellar activity and variability. We mined big data from the LAMOST spectral survey Data Release 2 (DR2), published on 2016 June 30, by cross-matching them with radio stars from FIRST and other surveys. We obtained 783 good stellar spectra with high signal to noise ratio for 659 stars. The criteria for selection were positional coincidence within 1.5‧‧ and LAMOST objects classified as stars. We calculated the equivalent widths (EWs) of the Ca ii H&K, Hδ, Hγ, Hβ, Hα and Ca ii IRT lines by integrating the line profiles. Using the EWs of the Hα line, we detected 147 active stellar spectra of 89 objects having emissions above the Hα continuum. There were also 36 objects with repeated spectra, 28 of which showed chromospheric activity variability. Furthermore, we found 14 radio stars emitting noticeably in the Ca ii IRT lines. The low value of the EW8542/EW8498 ratio for these 14 radio stars possibly alludes to chromospheric plage regions.

  7. Stars a very short introduction

    CERN Document Server

    King, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    Stars: A Very Short Introduction looks at how stars live, producing all the chemical elements beyond helium, and how they die, leaving remnants such as black holes. Every atom of our bodies has been part of a star. Our very own star, the Sun, is crucial to the development and sustainability of life on Earth. Understanding stars is key to understanding the galaxies they inhabit, the existence of planets, and the history of our entire Universe. This VSI explores the science of stars, the mechanisms that allow them to form, the processes that allow them to shine, and the results of their death.

  8. Lithium in LMC carbon stars

    OpenAIRE

    Hatzidimitriou, D.; Morgan, D. H.; Cannon, R. D.; Croke, B. F. W.

    2003-01-01

    Nineteen carbon stars that show lithium enrichment in their atmospheres have been discovered among a sample of 674 carbon stars in the Large Magellanic Cloud. Six of the Li-rich carbon stars are of J-type, i.e. with strong 13C isotopic features. No super-Li-rich carbon stars were found. The incidence of lithium enrichment among carbon stars in the LMC is much rarer than in the Galaxy, and about five times more frequent among J-type than among N-type carbon stars. The bolometric magnitudes of ...

  9. Variability of young stellar objects: Accretion, disks, outflows, and magnetic activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stelzer, B.

    2015-06-01

    Variability is a key characteristic of young stars. Two major origins may be distinguished: a scaled-up version of the magnetic activity seen on main-sequence stars and various processes related to circumstellar disks, accretion, and outflows.

  10. The Physical Nature of Subdwarf A Stars: White Dwarf Impostors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Warren R.; Kilic, Mukremin; Gianninas, A.

    2017-04-01

    We address the physical nature of subdwarf A-type (sdA) stars and their possible link to extremely low mass (ELM) white dwarfs (WDs). The two classes of objects are confused in low-resolution spectroscopy. However, colors and proper motions indicate that sdA stars are cooler and more luminous, and thus larger in radius, than published ELM WDs. We demonstrate that surface gravities derived from pure hydrogen models suffer a systematic ˜1 dex error for sdA stars, likely explained by metal line blanketing below 9000 K. A detailed study of five eclipsing binaries with radial velocity orbital solutions and infrared excess establishes that these sdA stars are metal-poor ≃1.2 M ⊙ main sequence stars with ≃0.8 M ⊙ companions. While WDs must exist at sdA temperatures, only ˜1% of a magnitude-limited sdA sample should be ELM WDs. We conclude that the majority of sdA stars are metal-poor A-F type stars in the halo, and that recently discovered pulsating ELM WD-like stars with no obvious radial velocity variations may be SX Phe variables, not pulsating WDs.

  11. The Physical Nature of Subdwarf A Stars: White Dwarf Impostors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Warren R. [Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Kilic, Mukremin; Gianninas, A., E-mail: wbrown@cfa.harvard.edu, E-mail: kilic@ou.edu, E-mail: alexg@nhn.ou.edu [Homer L. Dodge Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Oklahoma, 440 W. Brooks Street, Norman, OK, 73019 (United States)

    2017-04-10

    We address the physical nature of subdwarf A-type (sdA) stars and their possible link to extremely low mass (ELM) white dwarfs (WDs). The two classes of objects are confused in low-resolution spectroscopy. However, colors and proper motions indicate that sdA stars are cooler and more luminous, and thus larger in radius, than published ELM WDs. We demonstrate that surface gravities derived from pure hydrogen models suffer a systematic ∼1 dex error for sdA stars, likely explained by metal line blanketing below 9000 K. A detailed study of five eclipsing binaries with radial velocity orbital solutions and infrared excess establishes that these sdA stars are metal-poor ≃1.2 M {sub ⊙} main sequence stars with ≃0.8 M {sub ⊙} companions. While WDs must exist at sdA temperatures, only ∼1% of a magnitude-limited sdA sample should be ELM WDs. We conclude that the majority of sdA stars are metal-poor A–F type stars in the halo, and that recently discovered pulsating ELM WD-like stars with no obvious radial velocity variations may be SX Phe variables, not pulsating WDs.

  12. Yttrium in the peculiar A and B stars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allen, M.S.

    1977-04-01

    Spectroscopic analyses of 18 late B and early A stars have been conducted by use of 2.4 A mm/sup -1/ blue plate region spectra from the Dominion Astrophysical Observatory. The physical characteristics of the stellar atmospheres have been determined and abundances calculated for iron, strontium, yttrium, and zirconium with an LTE spectrum synthesis algorithm. Included in the sample were nine mercury-manganese stars; for some of these, previous studies have indicated abundance excesses of yttrium over both strontium and zirconium in violation of the systematics of neutron-addition nucleosynthesis. No such anomalous excess was expected for the nine control stars, which included normal, Am, and Ap spectrum variable stars.The present work failed to confirm the anomalous yttrium abundance pattern in any star in the sample. The following conclusions were drawn from the detailed abundance results for the Hg-Mn stars: (i) their Sr-Y-Zr abundances are all enhanced relative to the star content; (ii) the relative Sr-Y-Zr abundance patterns are frequently nonsolar in these stars; (iii) but they are not demonstrably nonnuclear; (iv) the prediction of the radiative diffusion theory of element separation for yttrium relative to its neighbors for the appropriate stellar mass range is still to be clearly established, but does not appear promising.

  13. Giant star seismology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hekker, S.; Christensen-Dalsgaard, J.

    2017-06-01

    The internal properties of stars in the red-giant phase undergo significant changes on relatively short timescales. Long near-uninterrupted high-precision photometric timeseries observations from dedicated space missions such as CoRoT and Kepler have provided seismic inferences of the global and internal properties of a large number of evolved stars, including red giants. These inferences are confronted with predictions from theoretical models to improve our understanding of stellar structure and evolution. Our knowledge and understanding of red giants have indeed increased tremendously using these seismic inferences, and we anticipate that more information is still hidden in the data. Unraveling this will further improve our understanding of stellar evolution. This will also have significant impact on our knowledge of the Milky Way Galaxy as well as on exo-planet host stars. The latter is important for our understanding of the formation and structure of planetary systems.

  14. Dynamical Boson Stars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven L. Liebling

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The idea of stable, localized bundles of energy has strong appeal as a model for particles. In the 1950s, John Wheeler envisioned such bundles as smooth configurations of electromagnetic energy that he called geons, but none were found. Instead, particle-like solutions were found in the late 1960s with the addition of a scalar field, and these were given the name boson stars. Since then, boson stars find use in a wide variety of models as sources of dark matter, as black hole mimickers, in simple models of binary systems, and as a tool in finding black holes in higher dimensions with only a single Killing vector. We discuss important varieties of boson stars, their dynamic properties, and some of their uses, concentrating on recent efforts.

  15. Collapse of axion stars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eby, Joshua [Department of Physics, University of Cincinnati,2600 Clifton Ave, Cincinnati, OH, 45221 (United States); Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory,P.O. Box 500, Batavia, IL, 60510 (United States); Leembruggen, Madelyn; Suranyi, Peter; Wijewardhana, L.C.R. [Department of Physics, University of Cincinnati,2600 Clifton Ave, Cincinnati, OH, 45221 (United States)

    2016-12-15

    Axion stars, gravitationally bound states of low-energy axion particles, have a maximum mass allowed by gravitational stability. Weakly bound states obtaining this maximum mass have sufficiently large radii such that they are dilute, and as a result, they are well described by a leading-order expansion of the axion potential. Heavier states are susceptible to gravitational collapse. Inclusion of higher-order interactions, present in the full potential, can give qualitatively different results in the analysis of collapsing heavy states, as compared to the leading-order expansion. In this work, we find that collapsing axion stars are stabilized by repulsive interactions present in the full potential, providing evidence that such objects do not form black holes. In the last moments of collapse, the binding energy of the axion star grows rapidly, and we provide evidence that a large amount of its energy is lost through rapid emission of relativistic axions.

  16. Dynamical boson stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liebling, Steven L.; Palenzuela, Carlos

    2017-11-01

    The idea of stable, localized bundles of energy has strong appeal as a model for particles. In the 1950s, John Wheeler envisioned such bundles as smooth configurations of electromagnetic energy that he called geons, but none were found. Instead, particle-like solutions were found in the late 1960s with the addition of a scalar field, and these were given the name boson stars. Since then, boson stars find use in a wide variety of models as sources of dark matter, as black hole mimickers, in simple models of binary systems, and as a tool in finding black holes in higher dimensions with only a single Killing vector. We discuss important varieties of boson stars, their dynamic properties, and some of their uses, concentrating on recent efforts.

  17. Heavy Metal Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-08-01

    La Silla Telescope Detects Lots of Lead in Three Distant Binaries Summary Very high abundances of the heavy element Lead have been discovered in three distant stars in the Milky Way Galaxy . This finding strongly supports the long-held view that roughly half of the stable elements heavier than Iron are produced in common stars during a phase towards the end of their life when they burn their Helium - the other half results from supernova explosions. All the Lead contained in each of the three stars weighs about as much as our Moon. The observations show that these "Lead stars" - all members of binary stellar systems - have been more enriched with Lead than with any other chemical element heavier than Iron. This new result is in excellent agreement with predictions by current stellar models about the build-up of heavy elements in stellar interiors. The new observations are reported by a team of Belgian and French astronomers [1] who used the Coude Echelle Spectrometer on the ESO 3.6-m telescope at the La Silla Observatory (Chile). PR Photo 26a/01 : A photo of HD 196944 , one of the "Lead stars". PR Photo 26b/01 : A CES spectrum of HD 196944 . The build-up of heavy elements Astronomers and physicists denote the build-up of heavier elements from lighter ones as " nucleosynthesis ". Only the very lightest elements (Hydrogen, Helium and Lithium [2]) were created at the time of the Big Bang and therefore present in the early universe. All the other heavier elements we now see around us were produced at a later time by nucleosynthesis inside stars. In those "element factories", nuclei of the lighter elements are smashed together whereby they become the nuclei of heavier ones - this process is known as nuclear fusion . In our Sun and similar stars, Hydrogen is being fused into Helium. At some stage, Helium is fused into Carbon, then Oxygen, etc. The fusion process requires positively charged nuclei to move very close to each other before they can unite. But with increasing

  18. Dynamical boson stars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liebling, Steven L; Palenzuela, Carlos

    2017-01-01

    The idea of stable, localized bundles of energy has strong appeal as a model for particles. In the 1950s, John Wheeler envisioned such bundles as smooth configurations of electromagnetic energy that he called geons, but none were found. Instead, particle-like solutions were found in the late 1960s with the addition of a scalar field, and these were given the name boson stars. Since then, boson stars find use in a wide variety of models as sources of dark matter, as black hole mimickers, in simple models of binary systems, and as a tool in finding black holes in higher dimensions with only a single Killing vector. We discuss important varieties of boson stars, their dynamic properties, and some of their uses, concentrating on recent efforts.

  19. Atomic diffusion in stars

    CERN Document Server

    Michaud, Georges; Richer, Jacques

    2015-01-01

    This book gives an overview of atomic diffusion, a fundamental physical process, as applied to all types of stars, from the main sequence to neutron stars. The superficial abundances of stars as well as their evolution can be significantly affected. The authors show where atomic diffusion plays an essential role and how it can be implemented in modelling.  In Part I, the authors describe the tools that are required to include atomic diffusion in models of stellar interiors and atmospheres. An important role is played by the gradient of partial radiative pressure, or radiative acceleration, which is usually neglected in stellar evolution. In Part II, the authors systematically review the contribution of atomic diffusion to each evolutionary step. The dominant effects of atomic diffusion are accompanied by more subtle effects on a large number of structural properties throughout evolution. One of the goals of this book is to provide the means for the astrophysicist or graduate student to evaluate the importanc...

  20. Really Hot Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-04-01

    Spectacular VLT Photos Unveil Mysterious Nebulae Summary Quite a few of the most beautiful objects in the Universe are still shrouded in mystery. Even though most of the nebulae of gas and dust in our vicinity are now rather well understood, there are some which continue to puzzle astronomers. This is the case of a small number of unusual nebulae that appear to be the subject of strong heating - in astronomical terminology, they present an amazingly "high degree of excitation". This is because they contain significant amounts of ions, i.e., atoms that have lost one or more of their electrons. Depending on the atoms involved and the number of electrons lost, this process bears witness to the strength of the radiation or to the impact of energetic particles. But what are the sources of that excitation? Could it be energetic stars or perhaps some kind of exotic objects inside these nebulae? How do these peculiar objects fit into the current picture of universal evolution? New observations of a number of such unusual nebulae have recently been obtained with the Very Large Telescope (VLT) at the ESO Paranal Observatory (Chile). In a dedicated search for the origin of their individual characteristics, a team of astronomers - mostly from the Institute of Astrophysics & Geophysics in Liège (Belgium) [1] - have secured the first detailed, highly revealing images of four highly ionized nebulae in the Magellanic Clouds, two small satellite galaxies of our home galaxy, the Milky Way, only a few hundred thousand light-years away. In three nebulae, they succeeded in identifying the sources of energetic radiation and to eludicate their exceptional properties: some of the hottest, most massive stars ever seen, some of which are double. With masses of more than 20 times that of the Sun and surface temperatures above 90 000 degrees, these stars are truly extreme. PR Photo 09a/03: Nebula around the hot star AB7 in the SMC. PR Photo 09b/03: Nebula near the hot Wolf-Rayet star BAT99