WorldWideScience

Sample records for variable slip induction

  1. Analytical method for determining breakdown slip of an induction motor based on of five parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petrović Nenad

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper proposes an explicite formula for determining the critical slip value of an induction squirel cage motor based upon five parameters. Three of these parameters - rated slip, rated and breakdown torque are known by catalogue data. Two missing parameters are the arbitrary slip between the rated and critical slip value and the corresponding torque value. These two parameters are to be experimentaly obtained. The breakdown torque value given by catalogue data is usually less accurate than the rated torque value. The proposed formula gives the possibility of analysing the error distribution of the critical slip value obtained from catalogue and measured data in comparison with the values obtained from the mechanical characteristic based on the physical parameters of an induction motor.

  2. Modeling and analysis of closed-loop slip energy recovery induction motor drive using a linearization technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akpinar, E.; Trahan, R.E.; Nguyen, A.D. [Univ. of New Orleans, LA (United States). Dept. of Electrical Engineering

    1993-12-01

    In this paper, a fourth order nonlinear model is derived from the previously developed model for an open-loop slip energy recovery induction motor drive. The nonlinear transient model of the open-loop drive is linearized around a steady-state operating point using a small signal perturbation technique and the transfer functions which relate the input and output variables are derived. The block diagram for the closed-loop control system is obtained. The response of the Proportional plus Integral (PI) controller employed to control the rotor speed and the PI controller used to control the dc link current are predicted and compared with experimental results.

  3. A Novel Tactile Sensor with Electromagnetic Induction and Its Application on Stick-Slip Interaction Detection

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    Yanjie Liu

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Real-time detection of contact states, such as stick-slip interaction between a robot and an object on its end effector, is crucial for the robot to grasp and manipulate the object steadily. This paper presents a novel tactile sensor based on electromagnetic induction and its application on stick-slip interaction. An equivalent cantilever-beam model of the tactile sensor was built and capable of constructing the relationship between the sensor output and the friction applied on the sensor. With the tactile sensor, a new method to detect stick-slip interaction on the contact surface between the object and the sensor is proposed based on the characteristics of friction change. Furthermore, a prototype was developed for a typical application, stable wafer transferring on a wafer transfer robot, by considering the spatial magnetic field distribution and the sensor size according to the requirements of wafer transfer. The experimental results validate the sensing mechanism of the tactile sensor and verify its feasibility of detecting stick-slip on the contact surface between the wafer and the sensor. The sensing mechanism also provides a new approach to detect the contact state on the soft-rigid surface in other robot-environment interaction systems.

  4. Variable frequency inverter for ac induction motors with torque, speed and braking control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nola, F. J. (Inventor)

    1975-01-01

    A variable frequency inverter was designed for driving an ac induction motor which varies the frequency and voltage to the motor windings in response to varying torque requirements for the motor so that the applied voltage amplitude and frequency are of optimal value for any motor load and speed requirement. The slip frequency of the motor is caused to vary proportionally to the torque and feedback is provided so that the most efficient operating voltage is applied to the motor. Winding current surge is limited and a controlled negative slip causes motor braking and return of load energy to a dc power source.

  5. Scalable conditional induction variables (CIV) analysis

    KAUST Repository

    Oancea, Cosmin E.

    2015-02-01

    Subscripts using induction variables that cannot be expressed as a formula in terms of the enclosing-loop indices appear in the low-level implementation of common programming abstractions such as Alter, or stack operations and pose significant challenges to automatic parallelization. Because the complexity of such induction variables is often due to their conditional evaluation across the iteration space of loops we name them Conditional Induction Variables (CIV). This paper presents a flow-sensitive technique that summarizes both such CIV-based and affine subscripts to program level, using the same representation. Our technique requires no modifications of our dependence tests, which is agnostic to the original shape of the subscripts, and is more powerful than previously reported dependence tests that rely on the pairwise disambiguation of read-write references. We have implemented the CIV analysis in our parallelizing compiler and evaluated its impact on five Fortran benchmarks. We have found that that there are many important loops using CIV subscripts and that our analysis can lead to their scalable parallelization. This in turn has led to the parallelization of the benchmark programs they appear in.

  6. Induction of genetic variability in oat

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    Jefferson Luis Meirelles Coimbra

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Genetic variability in plants can be maximized through techniques of induction to make selection of genotypeswith improved adaptation to cultivation conditions possible. For oat, these techniques are important for a sustainabledevelopment through plant breeding programs in southern Brazil. The effects of mutagens (one physical: 60Co gamma raysand two chemical agents: ethyl - methanesulfonate and methyl-methanesulfonate were compared in the segregating M2 andM3 generations derived from artificial hybridization and induced mutation to compare mechanisms of widening the geneticvariability of oat. The methodologies increased the genetic variability in the trait vegetative cycle effectively, by either increasingor reducing the number of days from emergence to full heading; both can be applied in oat breeding programs.

  7. A new formulation for minimum input volt-ampere (VA-slip relationship of three-phase induction motors

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    Haroon Ashfaq

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The magnetization component of input current of low-rating three-phase induction motor is large which results in poor power factor particularly at low-load conditions. The situation becomes critical when motor is fed from a distributed generating (DG system. In this paper, the performance analysis of induction motor is carried out for minimum input VA. A distinct novel slip is found at which the input VA is minimum independent of the load conditions. This optimum slip is expressed in terms of motor per-phase equivalent circuit parameters. This novel relationship is valid for every induction motor. As compared to rated conditions, a drastic reduction in VA with a large improvement in power factor is observed. Although, a marginal change in output power and efficiency is recorded. All the analytical, simulated and experimental results match each other with a very fair degree of accuracy.

  8. Performance analysis of a microcontroller based slip power recovery ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Slip power recovery wound rotor induction motor drives are used in high power, limited speed range applications where control of slip power provides the variable speed drive system. In this paper, the steady state performance analysis of conventional slip power recovery scheme using static line commutated inverter in the ...

  9. Long-Term Fatigue Life Expenditure of Turbine Shafts Owing to Noncharacteristic Harmonics Produced by Slip Energy Recovery Induction Motor Drives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Jong-Ian

    In this paper, the long-term effect of noncharacteristic harmonics resulting from a slip energy recovery induction motor drive (SERIMD) on the fatigue life expenditure of turbine-generator shafts is analyzed. A feed-water pump (FP) in power plants is one of the most essential pieces of auxiliary equipment and consumes considerably large quantities of energy. An SERIMD has many advantages and is an adequate candidate for the purpose of variable speed control. However, it gives rise to sustainable variable frequency subharmonics which induce electromechanical subsynchronous oscillations in turbine shafts through proposed deductions. Accordingly, the author has determined that the long-term effect of these subharmonics is a cause of fatigue damage on turbine shafts even under normal operating conditions through fatigue life estimation.

  10. Subduction zone slip variability during the last millennium, south-central Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dura, Tina; Horton, Benjamin P.; Cisternas, Macro; Ely, Lisa L; Hong, Isabel; Nelson, Alan R.; Wesson, Robert L.; Pilarczyk, Jessica E.; Parnell, Andrew C.; Nikitina, Daria

    2017-01-01

    The Arauco Peninsula (37°-38°S) in south-central Chile has been proposed as a possible barrier to the along-strike propagation of megathrust ruptures, separating historical earthquakes to the south (1960 AD 1837, 1737, and 1575) and north (2010 AD, 1835, 1751, 1657, and 1570) of the peninsula. However, the 2010 (Mw 8.8) earthquake propagated into the Arauco Peninsula, re-rupturing part of the megathrust that had ruptured only 50 years earlier during the largest subduction zone earthquake in the instrumental record (Mw 9.5). To better understand long-term slip variability in the Arauco Peninsula region, we analyzed four coastal sedimentary sections from two sites (Tirúa, 38.3°S and Quidico, 38.1°S) located within the overlap of the 2010 and 1960 ruptures to reconstruct a ∼600-year record of coseismic land-level change and tsunami inundation. Stratigraphic, lithologic, and diatom results show variable coseismic land-level change coincident with tsunami inundation of the Tirúa and Quidico marshes that is consistent with regional historical accounts of coseismic subsidence during earthquakes along the Valdivia portion of the subduction zone (1960 AD and 1575) and coseismic uplift during earthquakes along the Maule portion of the subduction zone (2010 AD, 1835, 1751). In addition, we document variable coseismic land-level change associated with three new prehistoric earthquakes and accompanying tsunamis in 1470–1570 AD, 1425–1455, and 270–410. The mixed record of coseismic subsidence and uplift that we document illustrates the variability of down-dip and lateral slip distribution at the overlap of the 2010 and 1960 ruptures, showing that ruptures have repeatedly propagated into, but not through the Arauco Peninsula and suggesting the area has persisted as a long-term impediment to slip through at least seven of the last megathrust earthquakes (∼600 years).

  11. Superconducting magnetic system with variable winding inductance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baev, V.P.; Berezin, G.L.; Buyanov, Yu.L.; Kir`enin, I.A.; Trifonov, E.S.; Sheinkman, V.S. [Institute of High Temperature, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    1994-10-01

    An experimental magnetic system with an energy capacity of 0.5 MJ is described. The discharge current to a high-resistance load can be controlled by varying the winding inductance. The voltage across the load during a controlled discharge can reach 45 kV at a current of 1100 A with a coupling efficiency of 0.76 and a current multiplier of 1.3.

  12. State variable participation in the limit cycle of induction motor

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    Chakrabarty, Krishnendu; Kar, Urmila

    2015-03-01

    The paper presents bifurcation behavior of a single phase induction motor. This paper also attempts to discuss the bifurcation behavior of the system based on the evolution of different state variables. The bifurcation diagrams drawn looking at different state variables are different in terms of periodicity and route to chaos. The knowledge of the dynamics of the system obtained from bifurcation diagrams give useful guidelines to control the operation of the induction motor depending on the need of an application for better performance.

  13. Distance and Azimuthal Dependence of Ground‐Motion Variability for Unilateral Strike‐Slip Ruptures

    KAUST Repository

    Vyas, Jagdish Chandra

    2016-06-21

    We investigate near‐field ground‐motion variability by computing the seismic wavefield for five kinematic unilateral‐rupture models of the 1992 Mw 7.3 Landers earthquake, eight simplified unilateral‐rupture models based on the Landers event, and a large Mw 7.8 ShakeOut scenario. We include the geometrical fault complexity and consider different 1D velocity–density profiles for the Landers simulations and a 3D heterogeneous Earth structure for the ShakeOut scenario. For the Landers earthquake, the computed waveforms are validated using strong‐motion recordings. We analyze the simulated ground‐motion data set in terms of distance and azimuth dependence of peak ground velocity (PGV). Our simulations reveal that intraevent ground‐motion variability Graphic is higher in close distances to the fault (<20  km) and decreases with increasing distance following a power law. This finding is in stark contrast to constant sigma‐values used in empirical ground‐motion prediction equations. The physical explanation of a large near‐field Graphic is the presence of strong directivity and rupture complexity. High values of Graphic occur in the rupture‐propagation direction, but small values occur in the direction perpendicular to it. We observe that the power‐law decay of Graphic is primarily controlled by slip heterogeneity. In addition, Graphic, as function of azimuth, is sensitive to variations in both rupture speed and slip heterogeneity. The azimuth dependence of the ground‐motion mean μln(PGV) is well described by a Cauchy–Lorentz function that provides a novel empirical quantification to model the spatial dependency of ground motion. Online Material: Figures of slip distributions, residuals to ground‐motion prediction equations (GMPEs), distance and azimuthal dependence, and directivity predictor of ground‐motion variability for different source models.

  14. Variable-frequency inverter controls torque, speed, and braking in ac induction motors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nola, F. J.

    1974-01-01

    Dc to ac inverter provides optimum frequency and voltage to ac induction motor, in response to different motor-load and speed requirements. Inverter varies slip frequency of motor in proportion to required torque. Inverter protects motor from high current surges, controls negative slip to apply braking, and returns energy stored in momentum of load to dc power source.

  15. A Clot Model Examination: with Impulsion of Nanoparticles under Influence of Variable Viscosity and Slip Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ijaz, S.; Shahzadi, Iqra; Nadeem, S.; Saleem, Anber

    2017-11-01

    In this speculative analysis, our main focused is to address the neurotic condition that occurs due to accumulation of blood components on the wall of the artery that results in blood coagulation. Specifically, to perceive this phenomena clot model is considered. To discuss this analysis mathematical model is formed in the presence of the effective thermal conductivity and variable viscosity of base fluid. Appropriate slip conditions are employed to obtain the close form solutions of temperature and velocity profile. The graphical illustrations have been presented for the assessment of pressure rise, pressure gradient and velocity profile. The effects of several parameters on the flow quantities for theoretical observation are investigated. At the end, the results confirmed that the impulsion of copper and silver nanoparticles as drug agent enlarges the amplitude of the velocity and hence nanoparticles play an important role in engineering and biomedical applications such as drug delivery system.

  16. Impact of Velocity Slip and Temperature Jump of Nanofluid in the Flow over a Stretching Sheet with Variable Thickness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Chengjie; Zheng, Liancun; Zhang, Chaoli; Chen, Xuehui; Zhang, Xinxin

    2016-05-01

    In this study, the generalised velocity slip and the generalised temperature jump of nanofluid in the flow over a stretching sheet with variable thickness are investigated. Because of the non-adherence of the fluid to a solid boundary, the velocity slip and the temperature jump between fluid and moving sheet may happen in industrial process, so taking velocity slip and temperature jump into account is indispensable. It is worth mentioning that the analysis of the velocity v, which has not been seen in the previous references related to the variable thickness sheet, is presented. The thermophoresis and the Brownian motion, which are the two very important physical parameters, are fully studied. The governing equations are simplified into ordinary differential equations by the proper transformations. The homotopy analysis method (HAM) is applied to solve the reduced equations for general conditions. In addition, the effects of involved parameters such as velocity slip parameter, temperature jump parameter, Prandtl number, magnetic field parameter, permeable parameter, Lewis number, thermophoresis parameter, and Brownian motion parameter are investigated and analysed graphically.

  17. Effect of preparation variables of plaster molds for slip casting of sanitary ware

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    Rafael E. Ochoa

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available A full factorial design was used to evaluate the effect of various preparation conditions for making plaster molds for slip casting of sanitary ware. We investigated the relationships between the processing conditions, microstructure, and final properties of the plaster molds. The results showed that the rheological behavior, and hence, the time during which the plaster suspension is pourable for making the plaster molds (before an important increase in viscosity due to the precipitation of gypsum crystals were dependent on the preparation conditions. Variations in the chemical composition, pore size distribution, and microstructure explained the statistically significant effect of preparation variables (including the mixing time, water temperature, and water quality. Preparation conditions that promoted high initial viscosity of the plaster suspension (accelerative effect of the setting time developed less porous structure in the mold that principally increased the compressive strength (16%, deionized water instead of tap water and the casting rate (9%, water at 25 °C instead of 38 °C. According to the results are proposed optimum conditions to make the molds while avoiding unnecessary energy use. Resumen: Mediante un diseño factorial completo se evaluaron diferentes condiciones de preparación de moldes de yeso para colado tradicional de muebles sanitarios. Se investigó la relación entre procesamiento, microestructura y propiedades del molde. Los resultados mostraron que el comportamiento reológico y por lo tanto el tiempo durante el cual la suspensión de yeso se puede verter para conformar los moldes (antes de un incremento importante de viscosidad debido a la formación de cristales de yeso fueron dependientes de las condiciones de preparación. Variaciones en composición química, distribución de tamaño de poro y microestructura explicaron el efecto estadísticamente significativo de las variables de preparación (que incluyeron

  18. A Variable Frequency Tuning Scheme for Inductive Plasma Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niazi, Kaveh; Chen, Zhan; Karpenko, Oleh

    2003-10-01

    A common approach for the efficient coupling of RF power to an inductive plasma source consists of a matching network with variable capacitive components that adjust in response to the varying load conditions of the plasma source. The use of variable capacitances in industrial applications such as semiconductor equipment is non-trivial, however. The high voltage ratings often required for semiconductor equipment result in capacitors that are expensive and quite bulky. In addition the motors that are used to adjust the capacitances often have a slower response time than desired. An alternate approach, the use of fixed capacitors and a variable frequency source signal to reduce the reflection coefficient, ñ, to an acceptable level, addresses both these concerns and is discussed in this paper. By using a circuit model for the plasma source and matching network, it is possible to predict an optimal frequency and corresponding reflection coefficient for a given plasma load condition. In this paper numerical predictions of the reflection coefficient for the variable frequency matching scheme are presented for common inductive plasma source impedance parameters. In addition if the limits on the allowed VSWR and the plasma source impedance are specified, the numerical model presented provides a simple scheme for specifying the required frequency range and fixed capacitance values for the matching network.

  19. Wireless Monitoring of Induction Machine Rotor Physical Variables

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jefferson Doolan Fernandes

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available With the widespread use of electric machines, there is a growing need to extract information from the machines to improve their control systems and maintenance management. The present work shows the development of an embedded system to perform the monitoring of the rotor physical variables of a squirrel cage induction motor. The system is comprised of: a circuit to acquire desirable rotor variable(s and value(s that send it to the computer; a rectifier and power storage circuit that converts an alternating current in a continuous current but also stores energy for a certain amount of time to wait for the motor’s shutdown; and a magnetic generator that harvests energy from the rotating field to power the circuits mentioned above. The embedded system is set on the rotor of a 5 HP squirrel cage induction motor, making it difficult to power the system because it is rotating. This problem can be solved with the construction of a magnetic generator device to avoid the need of using batteries or collector rings and will send data to the computer using a wireless NRF24L01 module. For the proposed system, initial validation tests were made using a temperature sensor (DS18b20, as this variable is known as the most important when identifying the need for maintenance and control systems. Few tests have shown promising results that, with further improvements, can prove the feasibility of using sensors in the rotor.

  20. Wireless Monitoring of Induction Machine Rotor Physical Variables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doolan Fernandes, Jefferson; Carvalho Souza, Francisco Elvis; Cipriano Maniçoba, Glauco George; Salazar, Andrés Ortiz; de Paiva, José Alvaro

    2017-11-18

    With the widespread use of electric machines, there is a growing need to extract information from the machines to improve their control systems and maintenance management. The present work shows the development of an embedded system to perform the monitoring of the rotor physical variables of a squirrel cage induction motor. The system is comprised of: a circuit to acquire desirable rotor variable(s) and value(s) that send it to the computer; a rectifier and power storage circuit that converts an alternating current in a continuous current but also stores energy for a certain amount of time to wait for the motor's shutdown; and a magnetic generator that harvests energy from the rotating field to power the circuits mentioned above. The embedded system is set on the rotor of a 5 HP squirrel cage induction motor, making it difficult to power the system because it is rotating. This problem can be solved with the construction of a magnetic generator device to avoid the need of using batteries or collector rings and will send data to the computer using a wireless NRF24L01 module. For the proposed system, initial validation tests were made using a temperature sensor (DS18b20), as this variable is known as the most important when identifying the need for maintenance and control systems. Few tests have shown promising results that, with further improvements, can prove the feasibility of using sensors in the rotor.

  1. Intelligent Multiobjective Slip and Speed Ratio Control of a Novel Dual-Belt Continuously Variable Transmission for Automobiles

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    Zhengchao Xie

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Van Doorne’s continuously variable transmission (CVT is the most popular CVT design for automotive transmission, but it is only applicable to low-power passenger cars because of its low torque capacity. To overcome this limitation of traditional single-belt CVT, a novel dual-belt Van Doorne’s CVT (DBVCVT system, which is applicable to heavy-duty vehicles, has been previously proposed by the authors. This paper, based on the published analytical model and test rig of DBVCVT, further proposes an intelligent multiobjective fuzzy controller for slip and speed ratio control of DBVCVT. The controller aims to safely control the clamping forces of both the primary and the secondary pulleys in order to improve the transmission efficiency, achieve the accurate speed ratio, and avoid the belt slip under different engine loads and vehicle speeds. The slip, speed ratio, and transmission efficiency dynamics of DBVCVT are firstly analyzed and modeled in this paper. With the aid of a flexible objective function, the analytical model, and fuzzy logic, a Pareto rule base for fuzzy controller is developed for multiobjective DBVCVT control. Experimental results show that the proposed controller for slip and speed ratio regulation of DBVCVT is effective and performs well under different user-defined weights.

  2. Variable slip-rate and slip-per-event on a plate boundary fault: The Dead Sea fault in northern Israel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wechsler, Neta; Rockwell, Thomas K.; Klinger, Yann

    2018-01-01

    We resolved displacement on buried stream channels that record the past 3400 years of slip history for the Jordan Gorge (JGF) section of the Dead Sea fault in Israel. Based on three-dimensional (3D) trenching, slip in the past millennium amounts to only 2.7 m, similar to that determined in previous studies, whereas the previous millennium experienced two to three times this amount of displacement with nearly 8 m of cumulative slip, indicating substantial short term variations in slip rate. The slip rate averaged over the past 3400 years, as determined from 3D trenching, is 4.1 mm/yr, which agrees well with geodetic estimates of strain accumulation, as well as with longer-term geologic slip rate estimates. Our results indicate that: 1) the past 1200 years appear to significantly lack slip, which may portend a significant increase in future seismic activity; 2) short-term slip rates for the past two millennia have varied by more than a factor of two and suggest that past behavior is best characterized by clustering of earthquakes. From these observations, the earthquake behavior of the Jordan Gorge fault best fits is a ;weak segment model; where the relatively short fault section (20 km), bounded by releasing steps, fails on its own in moderate earthquakes, or ruptures with adjacent segments.

  3. Highly Variable Latest Pleistocene-Holocene Incremental Slip Rates on the Awatere Fault at Saxton River, South Island, New Zealand, Revealed by Lidar Mapping and Luminescence Dating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zinke, Robert; Dolan, James F.; Rhodes, Edward J.; Van Dissen, Russ; McGuire, Christopher P.

    2017-11-01

    Geomorphic mapping using high-resolution lidar imagery and luminescence dating reveal highly variable incremental Holocene-latest Pleistocene slip rates at the well-known Saxton River site along the Awatere fault, a dextral strike-slip fault in the Marlborough Fault System, South Island, New Zealand. Using lidar and field observations, we measured seven fault offsets recorded by fluvial terraces and bedrock markers. Improved dating of the offsets is provided by post-IR-IRSL225 luminescence ages. Incremental slip rates varied from 15 mm/yr over intervals of thousands of years and tens of meters of slip, demonstrating order-of-magnitude temporal variations in rate at a single site. These observations have basic implications for earthquake fault behavior, lithospheric mechanics, discrepancies between geodetic and geologic slip rates, and probabilistic seismic hazard assessment.

  4. State variable participation in the limit cycle of induction motor

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2015-02-21

    Feb 21, 2015 ... The paper presents bifurcation behaviour of a single-phase induction motor. Study of bifurcation of a system gives the complete picture of its dynamical behaviour with the change in system's parameters. The system is mathematically described by a set of differential equations in the state space. Induction ...

  5. Model of Transient Process Where Three-Phase Transducer Feeds Induction Motor Equivalent as a Variable Active-Inductive Load

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nenad Marković

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents a new approach in the analysis of a transient state in a system where the feeding source is a transducer-IGBT inverter and load is introduced through the induction motor with its R-L parameters. Induction motors with different parameters of powers and power factors are tested. MATLAB simulation of the three-phase inverter that feeds the induction machine has replaced the missing lab equipment with which mathematical model of this system was verified. According to the selected parameters of the inverter and induction machine and through the simulation in the MATLAB program, the results are obtained in the form of diagrams that verify the model of a transient state of the induction machine operation when it operates as a motor which is presented as a variable R-L load. The transient process of the system three-phase bridge inverter whose active-inductive load is the induction machine in the conditions of the change of the load parameters is analyzed. The model of the transient process in the system formed by the inverter in PWM (Pulse Width Modulation converter and induction machine is developed in the time domain and phase coordinates.

  6. Variable-viscosity thermal hemodynamic slip flow conveying nanoparticles through a permeable-walled composite stenosed artery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akbar, Noreen Sher; Tripathi, Dharmendra; Bég, O. Anwar

    2017-07-01

    This paper presents a mathematical model for simulating viscous, incompressible, steady-state blood flow containing copper nanoparticles and coupled heat transfer through a composite stenosed artery with permeable walls. Wall slip hydrodynamic and also thermal buoyancy effects are included. The artery is simulated as an isotropic elastic tube, following Joshi et al. (2009), and a variable viscosity formulation is employed for the flowing blood. The equations governing the transport phenomena are non-dimensionalized and the resulting boundary value problem is solved analytically in the steady state subject to physically appropriate boundary conditions. Numerical computations are conducted to quantify the effects of relevant hemodynamic, thermophysical and nanoscale parameters emerging in the model on velocity and temperature profiles, wall shear stress, impedance resistance and also streamline distributions. The model may be applicable to drug fate transport modeling with nanoparticle agents and also to the optimized design of nanoscale medical devices for diagnosing stenotic diseases in circulatory systems.

  7. g-Jitter mixed convective slip flow of nanofluid past a permeable stretching sheet embedded in a Darcian porous media with variable viscosity.

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    Mohammed J Uddin

    Full Text Available The unsteady two-dimensional laminar g-Jitter mixed convective boundary layer flow of Cu-water and Al2O3-water nanofluids past a permeable stretching sheet in a Darcian porous is studied by using an implicit finite difference numerical method with quasi-linearization technique. It is assumed that the plate is subjected to velocity and thermal slip boundary conditions. We have considered temperature dependent viscosity. The governing boundary layer equations are converted into non-similar equations using suitable transformations, before being solved numerically. The transport equations have been shown to be controlled by a number of parameters including viscosity parameter, Darcy number, nanoparticle volume fraction, Prandtl number, velocity slip, thermal slip, suction/injection and mixed convection parameters. The dimensionless velocity and temperature profiles as well as friction factor and heat transfer rates are presented graphically and discussed. It is found that the velocity reduces with velocity slip parameter for both nanofluids for fluid with both constant and variable properties. It is further found that the skin friction decreases with both Darcy number and momentum slip parameter while it increases with viscosity variation parameter. The surface temperature increases as the dimensionless time increases for both nanofluids. Nusselt numbers increase with mixed convection parameter and Darcy numbers and decreases with the momentum slip. Excellent agreement is found between the numerical results of the present paper with published results.

  8. Slip rates and spatially variable creep on faults of the northern San Andreas system inferred through Bayesian inversion of Global Positioning System data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Jessica R.; Minson, Sarah E.; Svarc, Jerry L.

    2014-01-01

    Fault creep, depending on its rate and spatial extent, is thought to reduce earthquake hazard by releasing tectonic strain aseismically. We use Bayesian inversion and a newly expanded GPS data set to infer the deep slip rates below assigned locking depths on the San Andreas, Maacama, and Bartlett Springs Faults of Northern California and, for the latter two, the spatially variable interseismic creep rate above the locking depth. We estimate deep slip rates of 21.5 ± 0.5, 13.1 ± 0.8, and 7.5 ± 0.7 mm/yr below 16 km, 9 km, and 13 km on the San Andreas, Maacama, and Bartlett Springs Faults, respectively. We infer that on average the Bartlett Springs fault creeps from the Earth's surface to 13 km depth, and below 5 km the creep rate approaches the deep slip rate. This implies that microseismicity may extend below the locking depth; however, we cannot rule out the presence of locked patches in the seismogenic zone that could generate moderate earthquakes. Our estimated Maacama creep rate, while comparable to the inferred deep slip rate at the Earth's surface, decreases with depth, implying a slip deficit exists. The Maacama deep slip rate estimate, 13.1 mm/yr, exceeds long-term geologic slip rate estimates, perhaps due to distributed off-fault strain or the presence of multiple active fault strands. While our creep rate estimates are relatively insensitive to choice of model locking depth, insufficient independent information regarding locking depths is a source of epistemic uncertainty that impacts deep slip rate estimates.

  9. MHD boundary layer slip flow and radiative nonlinear heat transfer over a flat plate with variable fluid properties and thermophoresis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.K. Parida

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This work considers the two-dimensional steady MHD boundary layer flow of heat and mass transfer over a flat plate with partial slip at the surface subjected to the convective heat flux. The particular attraction lies in searching the effects of variable viscosity and variable thermal diffusivity on the behavior of the flow. In addition, non-linear thermal radiation effects and thermophoresis are taken into account. The governing nonlinear partial differential equations for the flow, heat and mass transfer are transformed into a set of coupled nonlinear ordinary differential equations by using similarity variable, which are solved numerically by applying Runge–Kutta fourth–fifth order integration scheme in association with quasilinear shooting technique. The novel results for the dimensionless velocity, temperature, concentration and ambient Prandtl number within the boundary layer are displayed graphically for various parameters that characterize the flow. The local skin friction, Nusselt number and Sherwood number are shown graphically. The numerical results obtained for the particular case are fairly in good agreement with the result of Rahman [6].

  10. The labor induction: integrated clinical and sonographic variables that predict the outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bueno, B; San-Frutos, L; Pérez-Medina, T; Barbancho, C; Troyano, J; Bajo, J

    2007-01-01

    To analyze the clinical and sonographic variables that predicts the success of labor induction. We studied the Bishop score, cervical length and parity in 196 pregnant women in the prediction of successful vaginal delivery within 24 h of induction. Logistic regression and segmentation analysis were performed. Cervical length (odds ratio (OR) 1.089, P<0.001), Bishop score (OR 0.751, P=0.001) and parity (OR 4.7, P<0.001) predict the success of labor induction. In a global analysis of the variables studied, the best statistic sequence that predicts the labor induction was found when we introduced parity in the first place. The success of labor induction in nulliparous was 50.8 and 83.3% in multiparous women (P=0.0001). Cervical length, Bishop score and parity, integrated in a flow chart, provide independent prediction of vaginal delivery within 24 h of induction.

  11. Speed Sensorless Variable Structure Torque Control of Induction Motor

    OpenAIRE

    Jezernik, Karel; Šabanović, Asif; Rodič, Miran

    2010-01-01

    Induction motor speed sensorless torque control, which allows operation at low and zero speed, optimizing both torque response and efficiency, is proposed. The control is quite different than the conventional field-oriented or direct torque controls. A new discontinuous stator current FPGA based controller and rotor flux observer based on sliding mode and Lyapunov theory are developed, analyzed and experimentally verified. A smooth transition into the field weakening region and the full utili...

  12. Genotypic variability in callus induction and plant regeneration ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Depending on different genotypes, the best plant regeneration was obtained on LS (Linsmaier and Skoog, 1965) based medium supplemented with 2 mgl-1 BAP + 1.5 mg l-1 2,4-D. Large variabilities in callus growth and plant regeneration potential were revealed among the cultivars tested. Cultivar HA-8 formed a high ...

  13. A variable frequency control for three-phase induction motors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, P.

    The speed control of a three-phase induction motor using a microprocessor controller is discussed. The motor is fed from a three-phase inverter, the frequency and voltage of which are controlled by the microprocessor controller. The v/f ratio is kept constant up to the rated frequency, and the voltage is kept constant above the rated frequency. To have satisfactory performance for the motor, the control strategies have to be carefully planned and evaluated. For transient performance of the motor, such as starting and speed changing, the in-rush current has to be minimized. In regard to the steady state performance of the motor, the controller should minimize the torque pulsations and heating of the motor and prevent short circuits of the power source. It is also of interest to compare various modulation techniques with regard to the harmonic losses in the motor and the pulsating torques developed. This comparison will lead to an optimized modulation technique which is suitable for the selected speed range.

  14. Similarity Solutions of MHD Mixed Convection Flow with Variable Reactive Index, Magnetic Field, and Velocity Slip Near a Moving Horizontal Plate: A Group Theory Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. A. Khan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The mixed convection of Newtonian fluid flow along a moving horizontal plate with higher-order chemical reaction, variable concentration reactant, and variable wall temperature and concentration is considered. Velocity slip and the thermal convective boundary conditions are applied at the plate surface. The governing partial differential equations are transformed into similarity equations via dimensionless similarity transformations developed by one-parameter continuous group method. The numerical solutions of the transformed ordinary differential equations are constructed for velocity, temperature and concentration functions, the skin friction factor, the rate of heat, and the rate of mass transfer using an implicit finite difference numerical technique. The investigated parameters are buoyancy parameters , , chemical reaction parameter , suction/injection parameter , velocity slip parameter convective heat transfer parameter , magnetic parameter , Prandtl number Pr and Schmidt number, Sc. Comparison with results from the open literature shows a very good agreement.

  15. Overall control strategy of variable speed doubly-fed induction generator wind turbine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, A. D.; Soerensen, P.; Iov, Florin

    2004-01-01

    turbine. The present control method is designed for normal continuous operations. The strongest feature of the implemented control method is that it allows the turbine to operate with the optimum power efficiency over a wider range of wind speeds. The variable speed/variable pitch wind turbine with doubly......The variable speed doubly-fed induction generator wind turbine is today the most widely used concept. The paper presents an overall control system of the variable speed DFIG wind turbine, with focus on the control strategies and algorithms applied at each hierarchical control level of the wind...

  16. Modeling the Effects of a Normal-Stress-Dependent State Variable, Within the Rate- and State-Dependent Friction Framework, at Stepovers and Dip-Slip Faults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Kenny J.; Oglesby, David D.

    2017-03-01

    The development of the rate- and state-dependent friction framework (Dieterich Appl Geophys 116:790-806, 1978; J Geophys Res 84, 2161-2168, 1979; Ruina Friction laws and instabilities: a quasistatic analysis of some dry friction behavior, Ph.D. Thesis, Brown Univ., Providence, R.I., 1980; J Geophys Res 88:10359-10370, 1983) includes the dependence of friction coefficient on normal stress (Linker and Dieterich J Geophys Res 97:4923-4940, 1992); however, a direct dependence of the friction law on time-varying normal stress in dynamic stepover and dip-slip fault models has not yet been extensively explored. Using rate- and state-dependent friction laws and a 2-D dynamic finite element code (Barall J Int 178, 845-859, 2009), we investigate the effect of the Linker-Dieterich dependence of state variable on normal stress at stepovers and dip-slip faults, where normal stress should not be constant with time (e.g., Harris and Day J Geophys Res 98:4461-4472, 1993; Nielsen Geophys Res Lett 25:125-128, 1998). Specifically, we use the relation d ψ/d t = -( α/ σ)(d σ/d t) from Linker and Dieterich (J Geophys Res 97:4923-4940, 1992), in which a change in normal stress leads to a change in state variable of the opposite sign. We investigate a range of values for alpha, which scales the impact of the normal stress change on state, from 0 to 0.5 (laboratory values range from 0.2 to 0.56). For stepovers, we find that adding normal-stress dependence to the state variable delays or stops re-nucleation on the secondary fault segment when compared to normal-stress-independent state evolution. This inhibition of jumping rupture is due to the fact that re-nucleation along the secondary segment occurs in areas of decreased normal stress in both compressional and dilational stepovers. However, the magnitude of such an effect differs between dilational and compressional systems. Additionally, it is well known that the asymmetric geometry of reverse and normal faults can lead to greater

  17. Induction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sprogøe, Jonas; Elkjaer, Bente

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to explore how induction of newcomers can be understood as both organizational renewal and the maintenance of status quo, and to develop ways of describing this in terms of learning.......The purpose of this paper is to explore how induction of newcomers can be understood as both organizational renewal and the maintenance of status quo, and to develop ways of describing this in terms of learning....

  18. Variable speed induction motor operation from a 20-kHz power bus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Irving G.

    Induction motors are recognized for their simple rugged construction to date, however, their application to variable speed or servo drives has been hampered by limitations on their control. Induction motor drives tend to be complex and to display troublesome low speed characteristics due in part to nonsinusoidal driving voltages. A technique was developed which involves direct synthesis of sinusoidal driving voltages from a high frequency power bus and independent control of frequency and voltages. Separation offrequency and voltage allows independent control of rotor and stator flux, full four-quadrant operation, and instantaneous torque control. Recent test results, current status of the technology, and proposed aerospace applications will be discussed.

  19. Experimental Analysis of Linear Induction Motor under Variable Voltage Variable Frequency (VVVF Power Supply

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prasenjit D. Wakode

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the complete analysis of Linear Induction Motor (LIM under VVVF. The complete variation of LIM air gap flux under ‘blocked Linor’ condition and starting force is analyzed and presented when LIM is given VVVF supply. The analysis of this data is important in further understanding of the equivalent circuit parameters of LIM and to study the magnetic circuit of LIM. The variation of these parameters is important to know the LIM response at different frequencies. The simulation and application of different control strategies such as vector control thus becomes quite easy to apply and understand motor’s response under such strategy of control.

  20. Electrical Activity in a Time-Delay Four-Variable Neuron Model under Electromagnetic Induction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keming Tang

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available To investigate the effect of electromagnetic induction on the electrical activity of neuron, the variable for magnetic flow is used to improve Hindmarsh–Rose neuron model. Simultaneously, due to the existence of time-delay when signals are propagated between neurons or even in one neuron, it is important to study the role of time-delay in regulating the electrical activity of the neuron. For this end, a four-variable neuron model is proposed to investigate the effects of electromagnetic induction and time-delay. Simulation results suggest that the proposed neuron model can show multiple modes of electrical activity, which is dependent on the time-delay and external forcing current. It means that suitable discharge mode can be obtained by selecting the time-delay or external forcing current, which could be helpful for further investigation of electromagnetic radiation on biological neuronal system.

  1. Variability in neural excitability and plasticity induction in the human cortex: A brain stimulation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hordacre, Brenton; Goldsworthy, Mitchell R; Vallence, Ann-Maree; Darvishi, Sam; Moezzi, Bahar; Hamada, Masashi; Rothwell, John C; Ridding, Michael C

    The potential of non-invasive brain stimulation (NIBS) for both probing human neuroplasticity and the induction of functionally relevant neuroplastic change has received significant interest. However, at present the utility of NIBS is limited due to high response variability. One reason for this response variability is that NIBS targets a diffuse cortical population and the net outcome to stimulation depends on the relative levels of excitability in each population. There is evidence that the relative excitability of complex oligosynaptic circuits (late I-wave circuits) as assessed by transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) is useful in predicting NIBS response. Here we examined whether an additional marker of cortical excitability, MEP amplitude variability, could provide additional insights into response variability following application of the continuous theta burst stimulation (cTBS) NIBS protocol. Additionally we investigated whether I-wave recruitment was associated with MEP variability. Thirty-four healthy subjects (15 male, aged 18-35 years) participated in two experiments. Experiment 1 investigated baseline MEP variability and cTBS response. Experiment 2 determined if I-wave recruitment was associated with MEP variability. Data show that both baseline MEP variability and late I-wave recruitment are associated with cTBS response, but were independent of each other; together, these variables predict 31% of the variability in cTBS response. This study provides insight into the physiological mechanisms underpinning NIBS plasticity responses and may facilitate development of more reliable NIBS protocols. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Modeling brittle fracture, slip weakening, and variable friction in geomaterials with an embedded strong discontinuity finite element.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Regueiro, Richard A. (University of Colorado, Boulder, CO); Borja, R. I. (Stanford University, Stanford, CA); Foster, C. D. (Stanford University, Stanford, CA)

    2006-10-01

    Localized shear deformation plays an important role in a number of geotechnical and geological processes. Slope failures, the formation and propagation of faults, cracking in concrete dams, and shear fractures in subsiding hydrocarbon reservoirs are examples of important effects of shear localization. Traditional engineering analyses of these phenomena, such as limit equilibrium techniques, make certain assumptions on the shape of the failure surface as well as other simplifications. While these methods may be adequate for the applications for which they were designed, it is difficult to extrapolate the results to more general scenarios. An alternative approach is to use a numerical modeling technique, such as the finite element method, to predict localization. While standard finite elements can model a wide variety of loading situations and geometries quite well, for numerical reasons they have difficulty capturing the softening and anisotropic damage that accompanies localization. By introducing an enhancement to the element in the form of a fracture surface at an arbitrary position and orientation in the element, we can regularize the solution, model the weakening response, and track the relative motion of the surfaces. To properly model the slip along these surfaces, the traction-displacement response must be properly captured. This report focuses on the development of a constitutive model appropriate to localizing geomaterials, and the embedding of this model into the enhanced finite element framework. This modeling covers two distinct phases. The first, usually brief, phase is the weakening response as the material transitions from intact continuum to a body with a cohesionless fractured surface. Once the cohesion has been eliminated, the response along the surface is completely frictional. We have focused on a rate- and state-dependent frictional model that captures stable and unstable slip along the surface. This model is embedded numerically into the

  3. Kinetic inductance as a microwave circuit design variable by multilayer fabrication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamyan, A. A.; de Graaf, S. E.; Kubatkin, S. E.; Danilov, A. V.

    2015-08-01

    We report on the development of a reliable NbN/Al/Nb/NbN multilayer fabrication technique for combining design elements with and without kinetic inductance in superconducting microwave circuits. As a proof-of-concept we demonstrate the application of the proposed technique to build a slow microwave propagation line matched to 50 Ω terminals. Fabrication details along with the design and measurements are discussed. At 8 GHz the presented device operates as a dc controllable full-turn phase shifter. We suggest that by exploiting the kinetic inductance as a design variable one can greatly improve operation parameters for a variety of standard microwave designs such as step-impedance filters and resonators.

  4. Supervisory control of a variable speed wind turbine with doubly fed induction generator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Viveiros

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper is on an onshore variable speed wind turbine with doubly fed induction generator and under supervisory control. The control architecture is equipped with an event-based supervisor for the supervision level and fuzzy proportional integral or discrete adaptive linear quadratic as proposed controllers for the execution level. The supervisory control assesses the operational state of the variable speed wind turbine and sends the state to the execution level. Controllers operation are in the full load region to extract energy at full power from the wind while ensuring safety conditions required to inject the energy into the electric grid. A comparison between the simulations of the proposed controllers with the inclusion of the supervisory control on the variable speed wind turbine benchmark model is presented to assess advantages of these controls.

  5. Very-low-speed variable-structure control of sensorless induction machine drives without signal injection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lascu, Christian; Boldea, Ion; Blaabjerg, Frede

    2005-01-01

    A sensorless induction machine drive is presented, in which the principles of variable-structure control and direct torque control (DTC) are combined to ensure high-performance operation in the steady state and under transient conditions. The drive employs a new torque and flux controller......, the "linear and variable-structure control", which realizes accurate and robust control in a wide speed range. Conventional DTC transient merits are preserved, while the steady-state behavior is significantly improved. The full-order state observer is a sliding-mode one, which does not require the rotor speed...... adaptation and provides accurate state estimation in the entire speed range. The proposed scheme is a complete variable-structure solution that allows persistent sensorless operation of the drive at very low speeds, including zero and 3 r/min, with full load. Simulations and extensive experimental results...

  6. Mathematical model for thermal solar collectors by using magnetohydrodynamic Maxwell nanofluid with slip conditions, thermal radiation and variable thermal conductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmood, Asif; Aziz, Asim; Jamshed, Wasim; Hussain, Sajid

    Solar energy is the cleanest, renewable and most abundant source of energy available on earth. The main use of solar energy is to heat and cool buildings, heat water and to generate electricity. There are two types of solar energy collection system, the photovoltaic systems and the solar thermal collectors. The efficiency of any solar thermal system depend on the thermophysical properties of the operating fluids and the geometry/length of the system in which fluid is flowing. In the present research a simplified mathematical model for the solar thermal collectors is considered in the form of non-uniform unsteady stretching surface. The flow is induced by a non-uniform stretching of the porous sheet and the uniform magnetic field is applied in the transverse direction to the flow. The non-Newtonian Maxwell fluid model is utilized for the working fluid along with slip boundary conditions. Moreover the high temperature effect of thermal radiation and temperature dependent thermal conductivity are also included in the present model. The mathematical formulation is carried out through a boundary layer approach and the numerical computations are carried out for cu-water and TiO2 -water nanofluids. Results are presented for the velocity and temperature profiles as well as the skin friction coefficient and Nusselt number and the discussion is concluded on the effect of various governing parameters on the motion, temperature variation, velocity gradient and the rate of heat transfer at the boundary.

  7. Variable-Speed Induction Motor Drives for Aircraft Environmental Control Compressors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mildice, J. W.; Hansen, I. G.; Schreiner, K. E.; Roth, M. E.

    1996-01-01

    New, more-efficient designs for aircraft jet engines are not capable of supplying the large quantities of bleed air necessary to provide pressurization and air conditioning for the environmental control systems (ECS) of the next generation of large passenger aircraft. System analysis and engineering have determined that electrically-driven ECS can help to maintain the improved fuel efficiencies; and electronic controllers and induction motors are now being developed in a NASA/NPD SBIR Program to drive both types of ECS compressors. Previous variable-speed induction motor/controller system developments and publications have primarily focused on field-oriented control, with large transient reserve power, for maximum acceleration and optimum response in actuator and robotics systems. The application area addressed herein is characterized by slowly-changing inputs and outputs, small reserve power capability for acceleration, and optimization for maximum efficiency. This paper therefore focuses on the differences between this case and the optimum response case, and shows the development of this new motor/controller approach. It starts with the creation of a new set of controller requirements. In response to those requirements, new control algorithms are being developed and implemented in an embedded computer, which is integrated into the motor controller closed loop. Buffered logic outputs are used to drive the power switches in a resonant-technology, power processor/motor-controller, at switching/resonant frequencies high enough to support efficient high-frequency induction motor operation at speeds up to 50,000-RPA

  8. Changes in heart rate variability during the induction and decay of heat acclimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flouris, Andreas D; Poirier, Martin P; Bravi, Andrea; Wright-Beatty, Heather E; Herry, Christophe; Seely, Andrew J; Kenny, Glen P

    2014-10-01

    We evaluated the changes in core temperature, heart rate, and heart rate variability (HRV) during the induction and decay of heat acclimation. Ten males (23 ± 3 years; 79.5 ± 3.5 kg; 15.2 ± 4.5 percent body fat; 51.13 ± 4.61 mLO(2)∙kg(-1)∙min(-1) peak oxygen uptake) underwent a 14-day heat acclimation protocol comprising of 90-min cycling at ~50 % peak oxygen uptake at 40 °C and ~20 % relative humidity. Core temperature, heart rate, and 102 HRV measures were recorded during a heat tolerance test conducted at baseline (day 0) and at the end of the induction (day 14) and decay (day 28) phases. Heat acclimation resulted in significantly reduced core temperature [rectal (χ (2) = 1298.14, p rate (χ (2) = 1230.17, p heat acclimation-induced reductions in rectal temperature, esophageal temperature, and heart rate, respectively, were lost. Heat acclimation was accompanied by profound and broad changes in HRV: at the end of the induction phase, 75 of the 102 variability measures computed were significantly different (p Heat acclimation is accompanied by reduced core temperature, significant bradycardia, and marked alterations in HRV, which we interpret as being related to vagal dominance. The observed changes in core temperature persist for at least 2 weeks of non-exposure to heat, while the changes in heart rate and HRV decay faster and are only partly evident after 2 weeks of non-exposure to heat.

  9. Variable fluid properties and variable heat flux effects on the flow and heat transfer in a non-Newtonian Maxwell fluid over an unsteady stretching sheet with slip velocity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, M. Megahed

    2013-09-01

    The effects of variable fluid properties and variable heat flux on the flow and heat transfer of a non-Newtonian Maxwell fluid over an unsteady stretching sheet in the presence of slip velocity have been studied. The governing differential equations are transformed into a set of coupled non-linear ordinary differential equations and then solved with a numerical technique using appropriate boundary conditions for various physical parameters. The numerical solution for the governing non-linear boundary value problem is based on applying the fourth-order Runge—Kutta method coupled with the shooting technique over the entire range of physical parameters. The effects of various parameters like the viscosity parameter, thermal conductivity parameter, unsteadiness parameter, slip velocity parameter, the Deborah number, and the Prandtl number on the flow and temperature profiles as well as on the local skin-friction coefficient and the local Nusselt number are presented and discussed. Comparison of numerical results is made with the earlier published results under limiting cases.

  10. Changes in heart rate variability during anaesthesia induction using sevoflurane or isoflurane with nitrous oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishiyama, Tomoki

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare cardiac sympathetic and parasympathetic balance using heart rate variability (HRV) during induction of anaesthesia between sevoflurane and isoflurane in combination with nitrous oxide. 40 individuals aged from 30 to 60 years, scheduled for general anaesthesia were equally divided into sevoflurane or isoflurane groups. After 100% oxygen inhalation for a few minutes, anaesthesia was induced with nitrous oxide 3 L min-1, oxygen 3 L min-1 and sevoflurane or isoflurane. Sevoflurane or isoflurane concentration was increased by 0.5% every 2 to 3 breaths until 5% was attained for sevoflurane, or 3% for isoflurane. Vecuronium was administered to facilitate tracheal intubation. After intubation, sevoflurane was set to 2% while isoflurane was set to 1% with nitrous oxide with oxygen (1:1) for 5 min. Both sevoflurane and isoflurane provoked a decrease in blood pressure, total power, the low frequency component (LF), and high frequency component (HF) of HRV. Although the heart rate increased during isoflurane anaesthesia, it decreased under sevoflurane. The power of LF and HF also decreased in both groups. LF was higher in the isoflurane group while HF was higher in the sevoflurane group. The LF/HF ratio increased transiently in the isoflurane group, but decreased in the sevoflurane group. Anaesthesia induction with isoflurane-nitrous oxide transiently increased cardiac sympathetic activity, while sevoflurane-nitrous oxide decreased both cardiac sympathetic and parasympathetic activities. The balance of cardiac parasympathetic/sympathetic activity was higher in sevoflurane anaesthesia.

  11. Torque control of synchronous and induction generators for variable speed operation of wind turbines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlson, Ola; Ulen, E. [Chalmers Univ. of Technology, Goeteborg (Sweden). Dept. of Electric Power Engineering

    1996-12-01

    The aim of this paper is to investigate variable speed electrical systems. Synchronous generators with diode rectifiers and line-commutated thyristor converters are compared with induction generators with force commutated transistor converters and scalar control. The system characteristics are examined regarding possible speed of response (bandwidth) of the torque control, including the sensitivity to disturbances for the drive train and also the possibility to get damping of the drive train resonance. Analyses, simulations and laboratory tests with a 40 kW machine set-up have been performed. The investigation shows that the system with synchronous generator is well suited for wind power applications. A rapid standard DC-current regulator is included in the torque control and can be used for damping of the resonance. The torque control has a bandwidth up to about 3 Hz and the DC-voltage controller up to about 1 Hz. The system with induction generator with scalar control (no transformations) is more difficult to control. A linear approach is only possible up to about 1.5 Hz. In this region it turns out that the behaviour can be visualized as an added inertia on the generator side that can be rather big. 4 refs, 9 figs

  12. Vector Control Algorithm for Electric Vehicle AC Induction Motor Based on Improved Variable Gain PID Controller

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gang Qin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The acceleration performance of EV, which affects a lot of performances of EV such as start-up, overtaking, driving safety, and ride comfort, has become increasingly popular in recent researches. An improved variable gain PID control algorithm to improve the acceleration performance is proposed in this paper. The results of simulation with Matlab/Simulink demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed algorithm through the control performance of motor velocity, motor torque, and three-phase current of motor. Moreover, it is investigated that the proposed controller is valid by comparison with the other PID controllers. Furthermore, the AC induction motor experiment set is constructed to verify the effect of proposed controller.

  13. Can we quantify the variability of soil moisture across scales using Electromagnetic Induction ?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinet, Jérémy; von Hebel, Christian; van der Kruk, Jan; Govers, Gerard; Vanderborght, Jan

    2017-04-01

    Soil moisture is a key variable in many natural processes. Therefore, technological and methodological advancements are of primary importance to provide accurate measurements of spatial and temporal variability of soil moisture. In that context, ElectroMagnetic Induction (EMI) instruments are often cited as a hydrogeophysical method with a large potential, through the measurement of the soil apparent electrical conductivity (ECa). To our knowledge, no studies have evaluated the potential of EMI to characterize variability of soil moisture on both agricultural and forested land covers in a (sub-) tropical environment. These differences in land use could be critical as differences in temperature, transpiration and root water uptake can have significant effect, notably on the electrical conductivity of the pore water. In this study, we used an EMI instrument to carry out a first assessment of the impact of deforestation and agriculture on soil moisture in a subtropical region in the south of Brazil. We selected slopes of different topographies (gentle vs. steep) and contrasting land uses (natural forest vs. agriculture) within two nearby catchments. At selected locations on the slopes, we measured simultaneously ECa using EMI and a depth-weighted average of the soil moisture using TDR probes installed within soil pits. We found that the temporal variability of the soil moisture could not be measured accurately with EMI, probably because of important temporal variations of the pore water electrical conductivity and the relatively small temporal variations in soil moisture content. However, we found that its spatial variability could be effectively quantified using a non-linear relationship, for both intra- and inter-slopes variations. Within slopes, the ECa could explained between 67 and 90% of the variability of the soil moisture, while a single non-linear model for all the slopes could explain 55% of the soil moisture variability. We eventually showed that combining

  14. Transient Simulation Study of Slip-Frequency Vector Control for Variable Speed Doubly-Fed Brushless Motor with Magnetic Barrier Rotor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingxiong ZHANG

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a transient simulation model of a variable speed doubly fed brushless motor (DFBM using back-to-back converter is described. Based on analysis of rotor flux oriented vector control theory of doubly fed induction motor, the control of the currents in DFBM that produce the magnetic flux and the torque is achieved by a digital controller, the speed is regulated by a PI controller which is tuned by a genetic algorithm. According to the state equation of DFBM and the control schemes, the system simulation module is established in MATLAB/ SIMULINK. An extensive simulation study is performed to examine the control characteristics of the machine-side converter under different operation conditions in variable-speed DFBM driver system.

  15. Image Reconstruction in Magnetoacoustic Tomography With Magnetic Induction With Variable Sound Speeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei; Ma, Ren; Zhang, Shunqi; Yin, Tao; Liu, Zhipeng

    2016-12-01

    Acoustic and electrical characteristics of biological tissue are important factors in magnetoacoustic tomography with magnetic induction (MAT-MI). Acoustic inhomogeneity significantly affects the propagations of sound waves. Differences in sound speed lead to distortions of the sound sources in the reconstruction process. The objective of this study is to develop a novel algorithm to reconstruct the sound source distribution in an acoustically inhomogeneous medium. The proposed algorithm is developed on the basis of the finite-difference time-domain method and time-reversal acoustic theory; it combines the relationship among symmetrical transducers with the back-projection algorithm. An acoustically inhomogeneous model with different regions of variable sound speeds is established to validate the proposed algorithm. From the data collected by a rotated focused transducer, first, the sound speed distribution is reconstructed, and then, the sound sources of the model are reconstructed. The reconstructed sound sources are obviously distorted when the speed differences are not considered. In contrast, the proposed algorithm yields reconstructed sound sources that are consistent with the model in terms of shape and size. Thus, the proposed algorithm is capable of accurately reconstructing the acoustic sources distribution in an acoustically inhomogeneous medium. This method provides a solution reducing the influence of acoustic inhomogeneity in MAT-MI. The distributions of sound speed can be obtained during the process of reconstructing the sound source. Consequently, the imaging of the acoustic speed and the electrical conductivity of biological tissues can be implemented simultaneously in MAT-MI.

  16. Peristaltic transport of MHD flow and heat transfer in an asymmetric channel: Effects of variable viscosity, velocity-slip and temperature jump

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Sinha

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In this article, a theoretical study is presented for peristaltic flow of a MHD fluid in an asymmetric channel. Effects of viscosity variation, velocity-slip as well as thermal-slip have been duly taken care of in the present study. The energy equation is formulated by including a heat source term which simulates either absorption or generation. The governing equations of motion and energy are simplified using long wave length and low Reynolds number approximation. The coupled non-linear differential equations are solved analytically by means of the perturbation method for small values of Reynolds model viscosity parameter. The salient features of pumping and trapping are discussed with particular focus on the effects of velocity-slip parameter, Grashof number and magnetic parameter. The study reveals that the velocity at the central region diminishes with increasing values of the velocity-slip parameter. The size of trapped bolus decreases and finally vanishes for large values of magnetic parameter.

  17. Stability Analysis of Static Slip-Energy Recovery Drive via ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The stability of the sub synchronous static slip energy recovery scheme for the speed control of slip-ring induction motor is presented. A set of nonlinear differential equations which describe the system dynamics are derived and linearized about an operating point using perturbation technique. The Eigenvalue analysis of the ...

  18. Assessment of an alternative calibration technique to record breathing pattern and its variability with respiratory inductive plethysmography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Wai Leung Ambrose; Huang, Dong Feng

    2017-08-01

    Recent literature has raised doubts on the existing calibration methods for respiratory inductive plethysmography (RIP) which can lead to erroneous estimation of tidal volume. This study sought to validate an alternative calibration method to record tidal volume and tidal volume variability during rest and exercise by comparing the measurements obtained from a RIP device against a pneumotachograph (PT) for breath-by-breath analysis. 11 healthy individuals were recruited. Tidal volume and variability were simultaneously recorded during 30 min of rest and 20 min of exercises. Pearson correlation coefficients for group mean tidal volume between PT and RIP were 0.8 during rest and exercises. No statistical significant difference was observed in tidal volume variability between devices during rest and exercises. This study provides support for an alternative calibration method, which addresses existing limitations. The simplicity of equipment set up process and no need to perform subject cooperated calibration procedure will improve the respiratory monitoring process.

  19. Behavior of three-phase induction motors with variable stator coil winding pitch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deshmukh, R.; Moses, A. J.; Anayi, F.

    2006-04-01

    A pulse-width modulation (PWM) inverter and sinusoidal output voltage supplies feeding four different chorded three-phase induction motors were tested for low-order odd voltage harmonic components and efficiency at different loads. The total harmonic distortion due to the third, fifth, and ninth harmonics was lowest in a motor with 160° coil pitch energized by both sinusoidal and PWM voltages. The efficiencies of the motor with the short-chorded winding were as much as 5% and 16% higher than that of the full-pitched motor under sinusoidal and PWM excitation, respectively, due to harmonic cancellation.

  20. Variable-Structure Direct Torque Control – A Class of Fast and Robust Controllers for Induction Machine Drives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lascu, Christian; Boldea, Ion; Blaabjerg, Frede

    2004-01-01

    A family of variable-structure controllers for induction machine drives is presented, in which the principles of direct torque control (DTC), variable-structure control (VSC) and space-vector pulsewidth modulation are combined to ensure high-performance operation, both in the steady state and under...... transient conditions. Three new VSC schemes are designed following the DTC voltage-control-based philosophy. These provide robust, fast and accurate torque and flux control, without the penalty of high chattering. Comparative results demonstrate that proposed techniques preserve the DTC transient merits......, while the steady-state behaviour is significantly improved. Experimental results prove the strong robustness, accuracy, quickness and low-ripple sensorless operation of the drive that uses the new schemes....

  1. Active Power and Flux Control of a Self-Excited Induction Generator for a Variable-Speed Wind Turbine Generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Na, Woonki; Muljadi, Eduard; Leighty, Bill; Kim, Jonghoon

    2017-05-11

    A Self-Excited Induction Generation (SEIG) for a variable speed wind turbine generation(VS-WG) is normally considered to be a good candidate for implementation in stand-alone applications such as battery charging, hydrogenation, water pumping, water purification, water desalination, and etc. In this study, we have examined a study on active power and flux control strategies for a SEIG for a variable speed wind turbine generation. The control analysis for the proposed system is carried out by using PSCAD software. In the process, we can optimize the control design of the system, thereby enhancing and expediting the control design procedure for this application. With this study, this control design for a SEIG for VS-WG can become the industry standard for analysis and development in terms of SEIG.

  2. Performance analysis of variable speed multiphase induction motor with pole phase modulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Huijuan

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The pole phase modulation (PPM technique is an effective method to extend speed range and torque capabilities for an integrated starter and hybrid electric vehicles applications. In this paper, the five pole-phase combination types of a multiphase induction motor (IM with 36 stator slots and 36 stator conductors are presented and compared quantitatively by using the time-stepping finite element method (TS-FEM. The 36 stator conductors of the proposed multiphase IM are fed by a 36 leg inverter and the current phase angle and amplitude of each stator conductor can be controlled independently. This paper focuses on the winding connection, the PPM technique and the performance comparative analysis of each pole-phase combination types of the proposed multiphase IM. The flux distribution, air-gap flux density, output torque, core losses and efficiency of five pole-phase combination types have been investigated.

  3. Role of Slip Velocity in a Magneto-Micropolar Fluid Flow from a Radiative Surface with Variable Permeability: A Numerical Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharma B.K.

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available An analysis is presented to describe the hydromagnetic mixed convection flow of an electrically conducting micropolar fluid past a vertical plate through a porous medium with radiation and slip flow regime. A uniform magnetic field has been considered in the study which absorbs the micropolar fluid with a varying suction velocity and acts perpendicular to the porous surface of the above plate. The governing non-linear partial differential equations have been transformed into linear partial differential equations, which are solved numerically by applying the explicit finite difference method. The numerical results are presented graphically in the form of velocity, micro-rotation, concentration and temperature profiles, the skin-friction coefficient, the couple stress coefficient, the rate of heat and mass transfers at the wall for different material parameters.

  4. Encoderless Model Predictive Control of Doubly-Fed Induction Generators in Variable-Speed Wind Turbine Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelrahem, Mohamed; Hackl, Christoph; Kennel, Ralph

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, an encoderless finite-control-set model predictive control (FCS-MPC) strategy for doubly-fed induction generators (DFIGs) based on variable-speed wind turbine systems (WTSs) is proposed. According to the FCS-MPC concept, the discrete states of the power converter are taken into account and the future converter performance is predicted for each sampling period. Subsequently, the voltage vector that minimizes a predefined cost function is selected to be applied in the next sampling instant. Furthermore, a model reference adaptive system (MRAS) observer is used to estimate the rotor speed and position of the DFIG. Estimation and control performance of the proposed encoderless control method are validated by simulation results for all operation conditions. Moreover, the performance of the MRAS observer is tested under variations of the DFIG parameters.

  5. SLIP CASTING METHOD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allison, A.G.

    1959-09-01

    S>A process is described for preparing a magnesium oxide slip casting slurry which when used in conjunction with standard casting techniques results in a very strong "green" slip casting and a fired piece of very close dimensional tolerance. The process involves aging an aqueous magnestum oxide slurry, having a basic pH value, until it attains a specified critical viscosity at which time a deflocculating agent is added without upsetting the basic pH value.

  6. Variability in micronucleus induction with different mutagens applied to several species of fish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cesar Koppe Grisolia

    2000-03-01

    Full Text Available Fish are often used for screening genotoxicity of water. For such programs, a knowledge of the sensitivity to clastogens, spontaneous micronucleus frequency and cell cycle kinetics of the target tissue is necessary. To investigate the pattern of inter-specific sensitivity to micronucleus induction three species of fish, Tilapia rendalli, Oreochromis niloticus and Cyprinus carpio, were exposed to the clastogens bleomycin (BLM, cyclophosphamide (CP, 5-fluorouracil (5-FU, and mitomycin C (MMC. The binucleate/mononucleate ratio in peripheral erythrocytes exposed to cytochalasin B was also used to evaluate the time-dependent response of micronucleus formation during hematopoesis in the kidney and the micronucleus peak in peripheral erythrocytes. Micronucleus frequencies induced by CP were significantly greater than their respective controls for the three fish species throughout all treatment periods. During the whole evaluation period (30 days CP was also the most effective clastogen. In general, until the 14th day of evaluation period T. rendalii was the most sensitive species to clastogens. No difference in micronucleus frequencies among species was observed in the 4th evaluation (at the 30th day. A micronucleus peak was observed at the 7th day after treatment. After the 14th day the frequencies were stabilized. The cytochalasin B experiment was carried out to demonstrate that micronuclei induced in the young kidney erythrocyte cells were detected in the circulating blood 2-4 days later.Este estudo fez uma avaliação da indução de micronúcleos em eritrócitos de sangue periférico de peixes Tilapia rendalli, Oreochromis niloticus e Cyprinus carpio após o tratamento com mitomicina C, ciclofosfamida, 5-fluorouracil e bleomicina. Foram colhidas amostras periódicas de sangue com 2, 7, 14 e 30 dias após o tratamento único. Os tratamentos com citocalasina B tiveram como objetivo analisar as proporções entre células binucleadas

  7. Is the co-seismic slip distribution fractal?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milliner, Christopher; Sammis, Charles; Allam, Amir; Dolan, James

    2015-04-01

    Co-seismic along-strike slip heterogeneity is widely observed for many surface-rupturing earthquakes as revealed by field and high-resolution geodetic methods. However, this co-seismic slip variability is currently a poorly understood phenomenon. Key unanswered questions include: What are the characteristics and underlying causes of along-strike slip variability? Do the properties of slip variability change from fault-to-fault, along-strike or at different scales? We cross-correlate optical, pre- and post-event air photos using the program COSI-Corr to measure the near-field, surface deformation pattern of the 1992 Mw 7.3 Landers and 1999 Mw 7.1 Hector Mine earthquakes in high-resolution. We produce the co-seismic slip profiles of both events from over 1,000 displacement measurements and observe consistent along-strike slip variability. Although the observed slip heterogeneity seems apparently complex and disordered, a spectral analysis reveals that the slip distributions are indeed self-affine fractal i.e., slip exhibits a consistent degree of irregularity at all observable length scales, with a 'short-memory' and is not random. We find a fractal dimension of 1.58 and 1.75 for the Landers and Hector Mine earthquakes, respectively, indicating that slip is more heterogeneous for the Hector Mine event. Fractal slip is consistent with both dynamic and quasi-static numerical simulations that use non-planar faults, which in turn causes heterogeneous along-strike stress, and we attribute the observed fractal slip to fault surfaces of fractal roughness. As fault surfaces are known to smooth over geologic time due to abrasional wear and fracturing, we also test whether the fractal properties of slip distributions alters between earthquakes from immature to mature fault systems. We will present results that test this hypothesis by using the optical image correlation technique to measure historic, co-seismic slip distributions of earthquakes from structurally mature, large

  8. Poincaré plot indexes of heart rate variability detect dynamic autonomic modulation during general anesthesia induction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Che-Hao; Tsai, Ming-Ya; Huang, Go-Shine; Lin, Tso-Chou; Chen, Kuen-Pao; Ho, Shung-Tai; Shyu, Liang-Yu; Li, Chi-Yuan

    2012-03-01

    Beat-to-beat heart rate variability (HRV) is caused by the fluctuating balance of sympathetic and parasympathetic tone. The Poincaré plot has been used to evaluate HRV. In this study, we validate that this new method may qualitatively and quantitatively assess the sympathovagal fluctuation in patients during induction of anesthesia with sevoflurane. Twenty-eight young patients were allocated for the study. The patients received a tilt test and on the next day they sustained anesthesia induced with inhaled anesthetics. Electrocardiography signals from the patients were relayed to an analogue-digital converter. The Poincaré plot is quantified by measuring SD1, SD2, and SD1/SD2. Power spectral analyses were performed and LF, HF and HF/LF were calculated. The LF power and the SD2 of the Poincaré plot increased while subjects were tilt-up from the supine position. Additionally, a significant correlation were found between LF and SD2, HF and SD1 (p < 0.05), and LF/HF and SD2/SD1 (p < 0.01). Sevoflurane inhalation for 10 minutes had no effect on heart rate, but diminished LF, total power and SD1, SD2 of the Poincaré plot respectively. However, the LF, SD2 and LF/HF increased; the HF, SD1 and SD1/SD2 ratio decreased after intubation stimulation. Poincaré plot and power spectral analysis of HRV during tilt test and sevoflurane induction significantly correlate. Poincaré plot analysis is easier and more sensitive at evaluating the sympathovagal balance and observing the beat-to-beat HRV. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  9. Two-Phase Induction Motor Drives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gholam Reza Arab Markadeh

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The lack of variable-speed drives for two (single induction motor is a reality. This article attempts mainly to investigate the reasons for this lack of variable – speed drives. This paper deals with literature survey of various existing converter topologies, which have been proposed for adjustable speed single phase induction motor drives. Various converter topologies have been compared in this paper. Among these converter topologies, the adjustable frequency PWM inverter is the best choice for single-phase induction motor drives. However, adjustable-frequency drives have not been widely used with single-phase Induction motors. The open-loop constant V/F control law cannot be used with the single-phase induction motor drives as it is used with three phase motors. The variation of the operating frequency at lower speed range with constant load torque causes variation in motor's slip. A constant V/F control is suitable only over the upper speed range.

  10. Nonlinear dynamical triggering of slow slip

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Paul A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Knuth, Matthew W [WISCONSIN; Kaproth, Bryan M [PENN STATE; Carpenter, Brett [PENN STATE; Guyer, Robert A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Le Bas, Pierre - Yves [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Daub, Eric G [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Marone, Chris [PENN STATE

    2010-12-10

    Among the most fascinating, recent discoveries in seismology have been the phenomena of triggered slip, including triggered earthquakes and triggered-tremor, as well as triggered slow, silent-slip during which no seismic energy is radiated. Because fault nucleation depths cannot be probed directly, the physical regimes in which these phenomena occur are poorly understood. Thus determining physical properties that control diverse types of triggered fault sliding and what frictional constitutive laws govern triggered faulting variability is challenging. We are characterizing the physical controls of triggered faulting with the goal of developing constitutive relations by conducting laboratory and numerical modeling experiments in sheared granular media at varying load conditions. In order to simulate granular fault zone gouge in the laboratory, glass beads are sheared in a double-direct configuration under constant normal stress, while subject to transient perturbation by acoustic waves. We find that triggered, slow, silent-slip occurs at very small confining loads ({approx}1-3 MPa) that are smaller than those where dynamic earthquake triggering takes place (4-7 MPa), and that triggered slow-slip is associated with bursts of LFE-like acoustic emission. Experimental evidence suggests that the nonlinear dynamical response of the gouge material induced by dynamic waves may be responsible for the triggered slip behavior: the slip-duration, stress-drop and along-strike slip displacement are proportional to the triggering wave amplitude. Further, we observe a shear-modulus decrease corresponding to dynamic-wave triggering relative to the shear modulus of stick-slips. Modulus decrease in response to dynamical wave amplitudes of roughly a microstrain and above is a hallmark of elastic nonlinear behavior. We believe that the dynamical waves increase the material non-affine elastic deformation during shearing, simultaneously leading to instability and slow-slip. The inferred

  11. An Electro-Thermal Analysis of a Variable-Speed Doubly-Fed Induction Generator in a Wind Turbine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yingning Qiu

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper focuses on the electro-thermal analysis of a doubly-fed induction generator (DFIG in a wind turbine (WT with gear transmission configuration. The study of the thermal mechanism plays an important role in the development of cost-effective fault diagnostic techniques, design for reliability and premature failure prevention. Starting from an analysis of the DFIG system control and its power losses mechanism, a model that synthesizes the thermal mechanism of the DFIG and a WT system principle is developed to study the thermodynamics of generator stator winding. The transient-state and steady-state temperature characteristics of stator winding under constant and step-cycle patterns of wind speed are studied to show an intrinsic thermal process within a variable-speed WT generator. Thermal behaviors of two failure modes, i.e., generator ventilation system failure and generator stator winding under electric voltage unbalance, are examined in details and validated by both simulation and data analysis. The effective approach presented in this paper for generator fault diagnosis using the acquired SCADA data shows the importance of simulation models in providing guidance for post-data analysis and interpretation. WT generator winding lifetime is finally estimated based on a thermal ageing model to investigate the impacts of wind speed and failure mode.

  12. A control strategy for a variable-speed wind energy conversion system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, A.; Rajagopalan, V.; Veillette, D.

    1980-01-01

    In this article, a method of calculating an optimal control strategy for a variable-speed wind power generation scheme incorporating a squirrel cage induction machine and operating in a self-excited induction generator mode is discussed. This scheme also uses a conventional three-phase thyristor rectifier, a line-commutated inverter and an economical auxiliary commutated-voltage-source inverter. The three regulated variables are: (1) drive speed as a function of available mechanical energy by manipulating the resistive torque developed by induction generator; (2) induction motor power consumption during start-up of the wind machine of vertical axis type; (3) operating slip of the induction machine, thereby limiting start-up and braking currents. The developed strategy is also suitable for any other variable-speed drive system incorporating an induction machine.

  13. Gait abnormalities following slipped capital femoral epiphysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Kit M; Halliday, Suzanne; Reilly, Chris; Keezel, William

    2004-01-01

    The authors evaluated 30 subjects with treated unilateral slipped capital femoral epiphysis and a range of severity from mild to severe to characterize gait and strength abnormalities using instrumented three-dimensional gait analysis and isokinetic muscle testing. For slip angles less than 30 degrees, kinematic, kinetic, and strength variables were not significantly different from age- and weight-matched controls. For moderate to severe slips, as slip angle increased, passive hip flexion, hip abduction, and internal rotation in the flexed and extended positions decreased significantly. Persistent pelvic obliquity, medial lateral trunk sway, and trunk obliquity in stance increased, as did extension, adduction, and external rotation during gait. Gait velocity and step length decreased with increased amount of time spent in double limb stance. Hip abductor moment, hip extension moment, knee flexion moment, and ankle dorsiflexion moment were all decreased on the involved side. Hip and knee strength also decreased with increasing slip severity. All of these changes were present on the affected and to a lesser degree the unaffected side. Body center of mass translation or pelvic obliquity in mid-stance greater than one standard deviation above normal correlated well with the impression of compensated or uncompensated Trendelenburg gait.

  14. Slipped Capital Femoral Epiphysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... be on crutches?Will my child need physical therapy?Are other treatment options available?My child only has problems in one hip. Is he/she likely to have problems in the other hip?When can my child return to exercise/sports? What kind of exercises are ok? ResourcesSlipped Capital ...

  15. Inorganic glass ceramic slip rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glossbrenner, E. W.; Cole, S. R.

    1972-01-01

    Prototypes of slip rings have been fabricated from ceramic glass, a material which is highly resistant to deterioration due to high temperature. Slip ring assemblies were not structurally damaged by mechanical tests and performed statisfactorily for 200 hours.

  16. Association between Slip Severity and Muscle Synergies of Slipping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Moein Nazifi

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Falls impose significant negative impacts to the US population and economy. A significant number of falls may be prevented via appropriate slip-responses since a strong relation exists between slips and falls. More importantly, as severe slips are more prone to result in a fall, identifying severe slippers along with the responsible factors for their adverse motor control and severe slipping should be the highest priority in fall prevention process. Previous studies have suggested that muscle synergies may be building blocks of the central nervous system in controlling motor tasks. Muscle synergies observed during slipping (‘post-slip-initiation synergies’ or ‘just briefly,’ ‘slipping muscle synergies’, may represent the fundamental blocks of the neural control during slipping. Hence, studying the differences in slipping muscle synergies of mild and severe slippers can potentially reveal the differences in their neural control and subsequently, indicate the responsible factors for the adverse post-slip response in severe slippers. Even though the slipping muscle synergies have been investigated before, it still remains unclear on how the slip severity is associated with the slipping muscle synergies. More importantly, muscle synergies can be interpreted not only as neural blocks but also as physical sub-tasks of the main motor task. Hence, studying the differences of slipping synergies of mild and severe slippers would reveal the discrepancies in sub-tasks of their post-slip response. These discrepancies help pinpoint the malfunctioning sub-function associated with inadequate motor response seen in severe slippers. Twenty healthy subjects were recruited and underwent an unexpected slip (to extract their slipping synergies. Subjects were classified into mild and severe slippers based on their Peak Heel Speed. An independent t-test revealed several significant inter-group differences for muscle synergies of mild and severe slippers

  17. Association between Slip Severity and Muscle Synergies of Slipping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazifi, Mohammad Moein; Beschorner, Kurt E.; Hur, Pilwon

    2017-01-01

    Falls impose significant negative impacts to the US population and economy. A significant number of falls may be prevented via appropriate slip-responses since a strong relation exists between slips and falls. More importantly, as severe slips are more prone to result in a fall, identifying severe slippers along with the responsible factors for their adverse motor control and severe slipping should be the highest priority in fall prevention process. Previous studies have suggested that muscle synergies may be building blocks of the central nervous system in controlling motor tasks. Muscle synergies observed during slipping (‘post-slip-initiation synergies’ or ‘just briefly,’ ‘slipping muscle synergies’), may represent the fundamental blocks of the neural control during slipping. Hence, studying the differences in slipping muscle synergies of mild and severe slippers can potentially reveal the differences in their neural control and subsequently, indicate the responsible factors for the adverse post-slip response in severe slippers. Even though the slipping muscle synergies have been investigated before, it still remains unclear on how the slip severity is associated with the slipping muscle synergies. More importantly, muscle synergies can be interpreted not only as neural blocks but also as physical sub-tasks of the main motor task. Hence, studying the differences of slipping synergies of mild and severe slippers would reveal the discrepancies in sub-tasks of their post-slip response. These discrepancies help pinpoint the malfunctioning sub-function associated with inadequate motor response seen in severe slippers. Twenty healthy subjects were recruited and underwent an unexpected slip (to extract their slipping synergies). Subjects were classified into mild and severe slippers based on their Peak Heel Speed. An independent t-test revealed several significant inter-group differences for muscle synergies of mild and severe slippers indicating

  18. Numerical simulation of the slip power recovery system using functional adapted blocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marques, G.D. [Technical University of Lisbon, Instituto Superior Tecnico, Seccao de Maquinas Electricas e de Electronica de Potencia, Lisboa (Portugal)

    2000-08-01

    This paper presents a numerical simulation method for the Slip Power Recovery System. The dq induction machine model using stator flux linkages as state variables is used. This leads to a simple and efficient computer program. The diode bridge rectifier is modeled using three switching functions that are determined by the sign of the corresponding AC currents. The model obtained is very simple and accurately represents the three-phase diode bridge rectifier including the current commutation process. When a DC current circuit is used in the intermediate circuit, a model of the whole 'Induction machine and diode bridge rectifier' should be used in other simulation methods. In this paper a different approach is presented. The operations performed to model the system are equivalent to assume that the induction machine has two state variables, i.e, the stator flux linkages. From the rotor point of view, the induction machine is equivalent to a three-phase RLE circuit. MATLAB/Simulink is used to integrate the equations. Experimental and simulated results are presented and compared showing good accuracy. (orig.)

  19. Vaporization of fault water during seismic slip

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jianye; Niemeijer, André R.; Fokker, Peter A.

    2017-06-01

    Laboratory and numerical studies, as well as field observations, indicate that phase transitions of pore water might be an important process in large earthquakes. We present a model of the thermo-hydro-chemo-mechanical processes, including a two-phase mixture model to incorporate the phase transitions of pore water, occurring during fast slip (i.e., a natural earthquake) in order to investigate the effects of vaporization on the coseismic slip. Using parameters from typical natural faults, our modeling shows that vaporization can indeed occur at the shallow depths of an earthquake, irrespective of the wide variability of the parameters involved (sliding velocity, friction coefficient, gouge permeability and porosity, and shear-induced dilatancy). Due to the fast kinetics, water vaporization can cause a rapid slip weakening even when the hydrological conditions of the fault zone are not favorable for thermal pressurization, e.g., when permeability is high. At the same time, the latent heat associated with the phase transition causes the temperature rise in the slip zone to be buffered. Our parametric analyses reveal that the amount of frictional work is the principal factor controlling the onset and activity of vaporization and that it can easily be achieved in earthquakes. Our study shows that coseismic pore fluid vaporization might have played important roles at shallow depths of large earthquakes by enhancing slip weakening and buffering the temperature rise. The combined effects may provide an alternative explanation for the fact that low-temperature anomalies were measured in the slip zones at shallow depths of large earthquakes.

  20. Stochastic stick-slip nanoscale friction on oxide surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craciun, A. D.; Gallani, J. L.; Rastei, M. V.

    2016-02-01

    The force needed to move a nanometer-scale contact on various oxide surfaces has been studied using an atomic force microscope and theoretical modeling. Force-distance traces unveil a stick-slip movement with erratic slip events separated by several nanometers. A linear scaling of friction force with normal load along with low pull-off forces reveals dispersive adhesive interactions at the interface. We model our findings by considering a variable Lennard-Jones-like interaction potential, which accounts for slip-induced variation of the effective contact area. The model explains the formation and fluctuation of stick-slip phases and provides guidelines for predicting transitions from stick-slip to continuous sliding on oxide surfaces.

  1. [Slipped capital femoral epiphysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Álvarez, S; Martínez-González, C; Miranda Gorozarri, C; Abril, J C; Epeldegui, T

    2012-01-01

    Slipped capital femoral epiphysis (SCFE) is characterized by displacement of the capital femoral epiphysis from the metaphysis through the physis. The term is confusing, because the metaphysis moves upward and outward while the epiphysis remains in the acetabulum. The SCFE is considered stable when the child is able to walk with or without crutches, and it is considered unstable when the child cannot walk with or without crutches. Patients with SCFE present with pain in the groin, knee and limp. The current treatment of stable SCFE is in situ stabilization with a single screw. Copyright © 2012 SECOT. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  2. Slips of the Pun

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balle, Søren Hattesen

    ’ at the same time, the second one of which gets told as a result of a simple slip of a pun. If one story of the poem is the poet-speaker’s hermeneutic quest for the possible meaningfulness of a past love affair, the other – somewhat less conspicuously – introduces his attempt to remember and recover the bodily...... relationship with them if one extends Ashbery’s playing with word to what goes one in the reader’s interpretive act? Ashbery’s friend and fellow poet Kenneth Koch once said of the former’s poetry that “it wants to go to bed with you”....

  3. Slips of the Pun

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balle, Søren Hattesen

    2008-01-01

    ’ at the same time, the second one of which gets told as a result of a simple slip of a pun. If one story of the poem is the poet-speaker’s hermeneutic quest for the possible meaningfulness of a past love affair, the other – somewhat less conspicuously – introduces his attempt to remember and recover the bodily...... relationship with them if one extends Ashbery’s playing with word to what goes one in the reader’s interpretive act? Ashbery’s friend and fellow poet Kenneth Koch once said of the former’s poetry that “it wants to go to bed with you”....

  4. Effects of stellate ganglion block on cardiovascular reaction and heart rate variability in elderly patients during anesthesia induction and endotracheal intubation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yong-Quan; Jin, Xiao-Ju; Liu, Zhao-Fang; Zhu, Mei-Fang

    2015-03-01

    To investigate the effects of stellate ganglion block (SGB) on cardiovascular response and heart rate (HR) variability in elderly patients during anesthesia induction and endotracheal intubation. A randomized, double-blinded, and placebo-controlled study. University-affiliated teaching hospital. Eighty elderly patients (American Society of Anesthesiologists grades I and II) receiving elective surgery during general anesthesia. Right stellate ganglion injection (SGB) was performed in all patients using 10 mL of 1% lidocaine or normal saline. Systolic blood pressure (BP), diastolic BP, HR, and calculated rate pressure product. HR variability at the following time points: conscious status before induction (T0); immediately before intubation (T1); immediately after intubation (T2); and 1, 3, and 5 minutes postintubation (T3, T4, and T5). No significant differences in BP and HR were observed between the 2 groups. Rate pressure product values significantly increased in the control group compared with baseline and SGB group values. Low-frequency power (LF) and LF/high-frequency power (HF) significantly increased, and HF and normalized units of HF significantly decreased in the control group compared with baseline values. LF, normalized units of LF, and LF/HF in the SGB group significantly decreased compared with those of the control group. SGB protects the myocardium and effectively suppresses stress responses during anesthesia induction and tracheal intubation in elderly patients. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Simple Navier’s slip boundary condition for the non-Newtonian Lattice Boltzmann fluid dynamics solver

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svec, Oldrich; Skoček, Jan

    2013-01-01

    The ability of the Lattice Boltzmann method, as the fluid dynamics solver, to properly simulate macroscopic Navier’s slip boundary condition is investigated. An approximate equation relating the Lattice Boltzmann variable slip boundary condition with the macroscopic Navier’s slip boundary condition...

  6. Valgus slipped capital femoral epiphysis with contralateral pre-slip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amiraian, Dana E; Sarwar, Zahir; Bireley, William R; Moran, Elizabeth

    2017-09-01

    Slipped capital femoral epiphysis (SCFE) is a common hip disorder in older children and adolescents, classically with medial and posterior slippage of the proximal femoral epiphysis. However, valgus SCFE is a very rare entity, where the proximal femoral epiphysis slips laterally and posteriorly. To our knowledge, valgus SCFE with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) features of contralateral pre-slip has not yet been reported. We present a case of a 9 year old girl with symptomatic valgus SCFE on the left and asymptomatic contralateral pre-slip on the right with concurrent radiographic, sonographic, and MRI findings. Such findings include bilateral coxa valga, radiographic irregularity of the left proximal femoral physis, bilateral hip effusions, abnormal MRI signal and enhancement about both proximal femoral physes, and minimal posterolateral slippage of the left proximal femoral epiphysis. We highlight these pertinent imaging findings and review the importance of accurately diagnosing this rare entity for appropriate surgical management.

  7. Slips of the Pun

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balle, Søren Hattesen

    2008-01-01

    of view. On the one hand, it obviously raises the question of signification and interpretation. On the other hand, it seems to pun on the double meaning of the word ‘sense’, thus signifying not only ‘meaning’, but also ‘sensuality’. In this way, Ashbery’s poem turns out to read as ‘two different stories...... are just as much about how their punning is a mere suggestive play with words, having no determinate, let alone finally determinable sense – sexual or otherwise. Incidentally, Ashbery’s poetic ‘I’ in his long poem “A Wave” (1984) asks: “Were we making sense?” The question is interesting from two points......’ at the same time, the second one of which gets told as a result of a simple slip of a pun. If one story of the poem is the poet-speaker’s hermeneutic quest for the possible meaningfulness of a past love affair, the other – somewhat less conspicuously – introduces his attempt to remember and recover the bodily...

  8. Comparison of Geodetic and Late Pleistocene Slip Rates for the Southern Dead Sea Fault System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cochran, W. J.; Gomez, F.; Abu Rajab, J. S.; Al-Tarazi, E.

    2012-12-01

    Comparisons of short-term (geodetic) and Late Quaternary slip rates have been used to assess time-variable fault kinematics along various active faults, globally. Differences between such types slip rates may have implications for crustal rheology and/or temporal variations in plate motion. This research aims to compare the geodetically-derived slip rates with slip rates based on Late Pleistocene landforms along the southern Dead Sea fault system (DSFS). The DSFS is an active, left-lateral transform that accommodates differential movement between the Arabian and Sinai plates. A number of slip rates have been previously reported ranging from 2 to 6mm/yr. However, comparison of various slip rates requires ensuring that associated uncertainties are assessed using a standard. New GPS velocities from Jordan are combined with other available GPS data, and are used to model slip rates using elastic block models. Resulting slip rates are 4.3 to 5.3 mm/yr with fault locking depths of 8 - 15 km. Late Pleistocene rates are assessed from published observations, as well as new data. New mapping of offset alluvial fans in the southern Wadi Araba was facilitated by multi-spectral imagery and high-resolution digital elevation model. These fans correlate with regional aggradation events, with the resulting Late Pleistocene slip rates ranging from 4.2 to 5.1 mm/yr. Statistically, the geodetic and neotectonic slip rates are identical. Additionally, a 3-dimensional slip vector for the last earthquake in the northern Wadi Araba is constructed using close-range photogrammetry of a faulted Byzantine aqueduct that indicates both horizontal and vertical displacements. Previous studies suggested characteristic earthquake slip, so slip rates and this slip vector provide a means of assessing mean EQ recurrence interval, as well as the role of earthquakes in constructing the long-term topography along this part of the transform.

  9. Effects of perturbation-based slip training using a virtual reality environment on slip-induced falls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parijat, Prakriti; Lockhart, Thurmon E; Liu, Jian

    2015-04-01

    The purpose of the current study was to design and evaluate the effectiveness of virtual reality training in improving recovery reactions and reducing fall frequency in older adults. Twenty-four older adults were recruited and randomly assigned to two groups (virtual reality training and control). Both groups underwent three sessions including baseline slip, training and transfer of training on slippery surface. Both groups experienced two slips, one during baseline and the other during the transfer of training trial. The training group underwent 12 simulated slips using a visual perturbation induced by tilting a virtual reality scene while walking on the treadmill and the control group performed normal walking during the training session. Kinematic and kinetic data were collected during all the sessions. Results demonstrated a reduced incidence of falls in the training group during the transfer of training trial as compared to the control group. The training group was able to transfer reactive control strategies learned during training to the second slip trial. The reactive adjustments included reduced slip distance. Additionally, gait parameters reflective of gait instability (stride length, step width, variability in stride velocity) reduced after walking in the VR environment for 15-20 min. The results indicated a beneficial effect of the virtual reality training in reducing slip severity and recovery kinematics in healthy older adults.

  10. SLIP VELOCITY IN PULSED DISC AND DOUGHNUT EXTRACTION COLUMN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Outokesh

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available In the present work, slip velocity has been measured in a 76 mm diameter pulsed disc and doughnut extraction column for four different liquid-liquid systems. The effects of operating variables including pulsation intensity and dispersed and continuous phase flow rates on slip velocity have been investigated. The existence of three different operational regimes, namely mixersettler, transition, and emulsion regimes, was observed when the energy input was changed. Empirical correlations are derived for prediction of the slip velocity in terms of operating variables, physical properties of the liquid systems, and column geometry for different regimes. Good agreement between prediction and experiments was found for all operating conditions that were investigated.

  11. Fully developed natural convective micropolar fluid flow in a vertical channel with slip

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.A. Ashmawy

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The problem of fully developed natural convective micropolar fluid flow is investigated. The slip boundary conditions for fluid velocity are applied. Non-dimensional variables are introduced. The closed form solutions of the field equations are represented graphically. As expected, it can be seen that the increase in micropolarity parameter results in a decrease in the velocity and an increase in the microrotation. Also, it is observed that the increase in the slip parameter increases the velocity and decreases the microrotation. The no slip case can be recovered as a limiting case of this work when the slip parameter goes to infinity.

  12. High performance SPWM frequency converter three-phase cage induction motor's synchronous modulation variable frequency speed regulation system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Xiaomei; Chen Yaozhong [Taiyuan University of Technology, College of Information Engineering, Shanxi (China)

    2000-08-01

    The paper discusses the synchronous modulation model of SPWM frequency converter at the carrier ratio N=27, and presents the interval values of a small period pulse at modulation depth M=0.1{approx} 0.7 and the line-voltage u{sub AB(t)} express formula of double-pole modulation at M=0.1. Basing on the parameters of a practical three-phase cage induction motor the fundamental frequency f{sub 1} and mechanical characteristic parameters are calculated. The system's control part is simple, the mechanical characteristic is hard and running steadily at a low speed. So it can constitute high performance system with variable frequency and speed regulation. (orig.)

  13. Whillans Ice Plain Stick Slip

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipovsky, B.; Dunham, E. M.

    2015-12-01

    Concern about future sea level rise motivates the study of fast flowing ice. The Whillans Ice Plain (WIP) region of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet is notable for decelerating from previously fast motion during the instrumental record. Since most ice flux in Antarctica occurs through ice streams, understanding the conditions that cause ice stream stagnation is of basic importance in understanding the continent's contribution to future sea level rise. Although recent progress has been made in understanding the relationship between basal conditions and ice stream motion, direct observation of the temporal variation in subglacial conditions during ice stream stagnation has remained elusive. The Whillans Ice Plain flows to the sea mostly by way of stick-slip motion. We present numerical simulations of this stick-slip motion that capture the inertial dynamics, seismic waves, and the evolution of sliding with rate- and state-dependent basal friction. Large scale stick-slip behavior is tidally modulated and encompasses the entire WIP. Sliding initiates within one of several locked regions and then propagates outward with low average rupture velocity (~ 200 m/s). Sliding accelerates over a period of 200 s attain values as large as 65 m/d. From Newton's second law, this acceleration is ~ T / (rho H) for average shear stress drop T, ice thickness H, and ice density rho. This implies a 3 Pa stress drop that must be reconciled with the final stress drop of 300 Pa inferred from the total slip and fault dimensions. A possible explanation of this apparent discrepancy is that deceleration of the ice is associated with a substantial decrease in traction within rate-strengthening regions of the bed. During these large-scale sliding events, m-scale patches at the bed produce rapid (20 Hz) stick-slip motion. Each small event occurs over ~ 1/100 s, produces ~ 40 microns of slip, and gives rise to a spectacular form of seismic tremor. Variation between successive tremor episodes allows us

  14. Slip flow in graphene nanochannels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    . Kannam, Sridhar; Billy, Todd; Hansen, Jesper Schmidt

    2011-01-01

    We investigate the hydrodynamic boundary condition for simple nanofluidic systems such as argon and methane flowing in graphene nanochannels using equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations (EMD) in conjunction with our recently proposed method [J. S. Hansen, B. D. Todd, and P. J. Daivis, Phys. Rev....... E 84, 016313 (2011)10.1103/PhysRevE.84.016313]. We first calculate the fluid-graphene interfacial friction coefficient, from which we can predict the slip length and the average velocity of the first fluid layer close to the wall (referred to as the slip velocity). Using direct nonequilibrium...

  15. Slip length measurement using BBM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadzadegan, Adib; Snoeyink, Craig

    2015-11-01

    We will be presenting experimental characterizations of slip lengths of fluids in nano/micro channels. These channels are becoming increasingly important in sensor and separations applications. However, crucial questions still remain on the mechanisms that govern slip-length behavior. We used Bessel Beam microscopy (BBM), a novel super-resolution imaging system, in conjunction with TIRF system. These two, together led us to be able to do Particle Tracking Velocimetry with significantly higher accuracy than previously possible. We will be presenting results demonstrating the feasibility of this approach and advantages that make this method unique.

  16. Slip-Cast Superconductive Parts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wise, Stephanie A.; Buckley, John D.; Vasquez, Peter; Buck, Gregory M.; Hicks, Lana P.; Hooker, Matthew W.; Taylor, Theodore D.

    1993-01-01

    Complex shapes fabricated without machining. Nonaqueous slip-casting technique used to form complexly shaped parts from high-temperature superconductive materials like YBa(2)Cu(3)O(7-delta). Such parts useful in motors, vibration dampers, and bearings. In process, organic solvent used as liquid medium. Ceramic molds made by lost-wax process used instead of plaster-of-paris molds, used in aqueous slip-casting but impervious to organic solvents and cannot drain away liquid medium. Organic-solvent-based castings do not stick to ceramic molds as they do to plaster molds.

  17. Similarity Analysis for Effects of Variable Diffusivity and Heat Generation/Absorption on Heat and Mass Transfer for a MHD Stagnation-Point Flow of a Convective Viscoelastic Fluid over a Stretching Sheet with a Slip Velocity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. M. El-Hawary

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A mathematical analysis has been carried out for stagnation-point heat and mass transfer of a viscoelastic fluid over a stretching sheet with surface slip velocity, concentration dependent diffusivity, thermal convective boundary conditions, and heat source/sink. The governing partial differential equations are reduced to a system of nonlinear ordinary differential equations using Lie group analysis. Numerical solutions of the resulting ordinary differential equations are obtained using shooting method. The influences of various parameters on velocity, temperature, and mass profiles have been studied. Also, the effects of various parameters on the local skin-friction coefficient, the local Nusselt number, and the local Sherwood number are given in graphics form and discussed.

  18. Routing Slips from the Computer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blair, Joan

    1972-01-01

    To facilitate the routing of periodicals, a computerized system of printing and updating routing lists was designed to replace a manual one. A computer program generates a data base of staff routing choices and prints out routing slips for each periodical. (Author/NH)

  19. Shaker slip-plate adapter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holm, O. S.

    1969-01-01

    Magnesium adapter ties in all of the attachment bosses on a horizontal slip table and makes a rigid coupling which terminates in a single row of attachment bosses at the edge of the horizontal plate. This eliminates ineffective dissipation of the driving force in vibration tests.

  20. Slip rate and tremor genesis in Cascadia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wech, Aaron G.; Bartlow, Noel M.

    2014-01-01

    At many plate boundaries, conditions in the transition zone between seismogenic and stable slip produce slow earthquakes. In the Cascadia subduction zone, these events are consistently observed as slow, aseismic slip on the plate interface accompanied by persistent tectonic tremor. However, not all slow slip at other plate boundaries coincides spatially and temporally with tremor, leaving the physics of tremor genesis poorly understood. Here we analyze seismic, geodetic, and strainmeter data in Cascadia to observe for the first time a large, tremor-generating slow earthquake change from tremor-genic to silent and back again. The tremor falls silent at reduced slip speeds when the migrating slip front pauses as it loads the stronger adjacent fault segment to failure. The finding suggests that rheology and slip-speed-regulated stressing rate control tremor genesis, and the same section of fault can slip both with and without detectable tremor, limiting tremor's use as a proxy for slip.

  1. Labor Induction

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... QUESTIONS FAQ154 LABOR, DELIVERY, AND POSTPARTUM CARE Labor Induction • What is labor induction? • Why is labor induced? • What is the Bishop ... oxytocin? • What are the risks associated with labor induction? • Is labor induction always effective? •Glossary What is ...

  2. Nonoperative treatment of slipped capital femoral epiphysis: a scientific study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Treatment of the Slipped Capital Femoral Epiphysis remains a cause of concern due to the fact that the true knowledge of the etiopathogeny is unknown, as well as one of its major complications: chondrolysis. The conservative treatment remains controversial; it has been overlooked in the studies and subjected to intense criticism. The purpose of this study is to investigate the results of treatment on the hip of patients displaying slipped capital femoral epiphysis, using the plaster cast immobilization method and its link to chondrolysis. Methods The research was performed based on the study of the following variables: symptomatology, and the degree of slipping. A hip spica cast and bilateral short/long leg casts in abduction, internal rotation with anti-rotational bars were used for immobilizing the patient's hip for twelve weeks. Statistical analysis was accomplished by Wilcoxon's marked position test and by the Fisher accuracy test at a 5% level. Results A satisfactory result was obtained in the acute group, 70.5%; 94%; in the chronic group (chronic + acute on chronic). Regarding the degree of the slipping, a satisfactory result was obtained in 90.5% of hips tested with a mild slip; in 76% with moderate slip and 73% in the severe slip. The statistical result revealed that a significant improvement was found for flexion (p = 0.0001), abduction (p = 0.0001), internal rotation (p = 0.0001) and external rotation (p = 0.02). Chondrolysis was present in 11.3% of the hips tested. One case of pseudoarthrosis with aseptic capital necrosis was presented. There was no significant variation between age and chondrolysis (p = 1.00).Significant variation between gender/non-white patients versus chondrolysis (p = 0.031) and (p = 0.037), respectively was verified. No causal association between plaster cast and chondrolysis was observed (p = 0.60). In regard to the symptomatology group and the slip degree versus chondrolysis, the p value was not statistically

  3. Nonoperative treatment of slipped capital femoral epiphysis: a scientific study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pinheiro Pedro

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Treatment of the Slipped Capital Femoral Epiphysis remains a cause of concern due to the fact that the true knowledge of the etiopathogeny is unknown, as well as one of its major complications: chondrolysis. The conservative treatment remains controversial; it has been overlooked in the studies and subjected to intense criticism. The purpose of this study is to investigate the results of treatment on the hip of patients displaying slipped capital femoral epiphysis, using the plaster cast immobilization method and its link to chondrolysis. Methods The research was performed based on the study of the following variables: symptomatology, and the degree of slipping. A hip spica cast and bilateral short/long leg casts in abduction, internal rotation with anti-rotational bars were used for immobilizing the patient's hip for twelve weeks. Statistical analysis was accomplished by Wilcoxon's marked position test and by the Fisher accuracy test at a 5% level. Results A satisfactory result was obtained in the acute group, 70.5%; 94%; in the chronic group (chronic + acute on chronic. Regarding the degree of the slipping, a satisfactory result was obtained in 90.5% of hips tested with a mild slip; in 76% with moderate slip and 73% in the severe slip. The statistical result revealed that a significant improvement was found for flexion (p = 0.0001, abduction (p = 0.0001, internal rotation (p = 0.0001 and external rotation (p = 0.02. Chondrolysis was present in 11.3% of the hips tested. One case of pseudoarthrosis with aseptic capital necrosis was presented. There was no significant variation between age and chondrolysis (p = 1.00.Significant variation between gender/non-white patients versus chondrolysis (p = 0.031 and (p = 0.037, respectively was verified. No causal association between plaster cast and chondrolysis was observed (p = 0.60. In regard to the symptomatology group and the slip degree versus chondrolysis, the p value was not

  4. Brushless Slip-Power Recovery System Simulation by Using Modified Nodal Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Shinji; Hoshi, Nobukazu; Oguchi, Kuniomi

    A novel simulation model for multiphase induction machines formulated by the modified nodal analysis is proposed. In the proposed model, the voltage and the torque equations for an elementary induction machine are used to formulate a multiphase induction machine. It is not necessary to derive the state equations for the multiphase induction machine corresponding to the conduction modes of a power electronics circuit. Thus, it is easy to simulate the complex systems including the multiphase induction machines and many power devices. Two brushless slip-power recovery systems are discussed in this paper to verify the effectiveness of the proposed model. The simulation results show good agreements with the experimental results. The proposed model enables to simulate the systems consisting of the multiphase induction machines and many power devices without derivations of the state equations for multiphase induction machines corresponding to the conduction modes of a power electronics circuit.

  5. Slow slip events in the early part of the earthquake cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voss, Nicholas K.; Malservisi, Rocco; Dixon, Timothy H.; Protti, Marino

    2017-08-01

    In February 2014 a Mw = 7.0 slow slip event (SSE) took place beneath the Nicoya Peninsula, Costa Rica. This event occurred 17 months after the 5 September 2012, Mw = 7.6, earthquake and along the same subduction zone segment, during a period when significant postseismic deformation was ongoing. A second SSE occurred in the middle of 2015, 21 months after the 2014 SSE and 38 months after the earthquake. The recurrence interval for Nicoya SSEs was unchanged by the earthquake. However, the spatial distribution of slip for the 2014 event differed significantly from previous events, having only deep ( 40 km) slip, compared to previous events, which had both deep and shallow slip. The 2015 SSE marked a return to the combination of deep plus shallow slip of preearthquake SSEs. However, slip magnitude in 2015 was nearly twice as large (Mw = 7.2) as preearthquake SSEs. We employ Coulomb Failure Stress change modeling in order to explain these changes. Stress changes associated with the earthquake and afterslip were highest near the shallow portion of the megathrust, where preearthquake SSEs had significant slip. Lower stress change occurred on the deeper parts of the plate interface, perhaps explaining why the deep ( 40 km) region for SSEs remained unchanged. The large amount of shallow slip in the 2015 SSE may reflect lack of shallow slip in the prior SSE. These observations highlight the variability of aseismic strain release rates throughout the earthquake cycle.type="synopsis">type="main">Plain Language SummaryWe analyzed small signals in continuous GPS time series. By averaging many GPS measurements over a day, we are able to get very precise measurements of the motion of the ground. We found two events in the Nicoya Peninsula of Costa Rica where the GPS changed direction and began moving toward the oceanic trench in the opposite direction of subduction plate motion. These events are called slow slip events and have been found in other regions such as Cascadia, Alaska

  6. Analysing earthquake slip models with the spatial prediction comparison test

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, L.

    2014-11-10

    Earthquake rupture models inferred from inversions of geophysical and/or geodetic data exhibit remarkable variability due to uncertainties in modelling assumptions, the use of different inversion algorithms, or variations in data selection and data processing. A robust statistical comparison of different rupture models obtained for a single earthquake is needed to quantify the intra-event variability, both for benchmark exercises and for real earthquakes. The same approach may be useful to characterize (dis-)similarities in events that are typically grouped into a common class of events (e.g. moderate-size crustal strike-slip earthquakes or tsunamigenic large subduction earthquakes). For this purpose, we examine the performance of the spatial prediction comparison test (SPCT), a statistical test developed to compare spatial (random) fields by means of a chosen loss function that describes an error relation between a 2-D field (‘model’) and a reference model. We implement and calibrate the SPCT approach for a suite of synthetic 2-D slip distributions, generated as spatial random fields with various characteristics, and then apply the method to results of a benchmark inversion exercise with known solution. We find the SPCT to be sensitive to different spatial correlations lengths, and different heterogeneity levels of the slip distributions. The SPCT approach proves to be a simple and effective tool for ranking the slip models with respect to a reference model.

  7. Fiber-Reinforced Slip Castings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blome, J. C.; Drennan, D. N.; Keeser, H. M.

    1982-01-01

    Addition of silica fibers greatly reduces shrinkage and cracking during casting of ceramics. Fiber-reinforced slip-cast silica ceramics are also tougher and have lower dielectric loss. Silica fibers are hyperpure material containing only 1 part per million total metal-ion impurities. Hyperpure fibers ensure high reflectance and allow casting to be fired at temperature greater than 2,200 degrees F without loss of strength from devitrification.

  8. Predicting the probability of slip in gait: methodology and distribution study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gragg, Jared; Yang, James

    2016-01-01

    The likelihood of a slip is related to the available and required friction for a certain activity, here gait. Classical slip and fall analysis presumed that a walking surface was safe if the difference between the mean available and required friction coefficients exceeded a certain threshold. Previous research was dedicated to reformulating the classical slip and fall theory to include the stochastic variation of the available and required friction when predicting the probability of slip in gait. However, when predicting the probability of a slip, previous researchers have either ignored the variation in the required friction or assumed the available and required friction to be normally distributed. Also, there are no published results that actually give the probability of slip for various combinations of required and available frictions. This study proposes a modification to the equation for predicting the probability of slip, reducing the previous equation from a double-integral to a more convenient single-integral form. Also, a simple numerical integration technique is provided to predict the probability of slip in gait: the trapezoidal method. The effect of the random variable distributions on the probability of slip is also studied. It is shown that both the required and available friction distributions cannot automatically be assumed as being normally distributed. The proposed methods allow for any combination of distributions for the available and required friction, and numerical results are compared to analytical solutions for an error analysis. The trapezoidal method is shown to be highly accurate and efficient. The probability of slip is also shown to be sensitive to the input distributions of the required and available friction. Lastly, a critical value for the probability of slip is proposed based on the number of steps taken by an average person in a single day.

  9. Sensitivity of tsunami wave profiles and inundation simulations to earthquake slip and fault geometry for the 2011 Tohoku earthquake

    KAUST Repository

    Goda, Katsuichiro

    2014-09-01

    In this study, we develop stochastic random-field slip models for the 2011 Tohoku earthquake and conduct a rigorous sensitivity analysis of tsunami hazards with respect to the uncertainty of earthquake slip and fault geometry. Synthetic earthquake slip distributions generated from the modified Mai-Beroza method captured key features of inversion-based source representations of the mega-thrust event, which were calibrated against rich geophysical observations of this event. Using original and synthesised earthquake source models (varied for strike, dip, and slip distributions), tsunami simulations were carried out and the resulting variability in tsunami hazard estimates was investigated. The results highlight significant sensitivity of the tsunami wave profiles and inundation heights to the coastal location and the slip characteristics, and indicate that earthquake slip characteristics are a major source of uncertainty in predicting tsunami risks due to future mega-thrust events.

  10. Relationships between along-fault heterogeneous normal stress and fault slip patterns during the seismic cycle: Insights from a strike-slip fault laboratory model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caniven, Yannick; Dominguez, Stéphane; Soliva, Roger; Peyret, Michel; Cattin, Rodolphe; Maerten, Frantz

    2017-12-01

    We use a strike-slip fault analog model to study experimentally the role played by along-fault non-uniform and asymmetric applied normal stress on both coseismic slip and long-term fault behavior. Our model is based on a visco-elasto-plastic multi-layered rheology that allows to produce several hundreds of scaled analog microquakes and associated seismic cycles. Uniform or heterogeneous applied normal stress along the fault plane is imposed and maintained constant during the whole experiment durations. Our results suggest that coseismic slip patterns are strongly controlled by spatial normal stress variations and subsequent accumulated shear stress along fault strike. Major microquakes occur preferentially in zones of major shear stress asperities. Coseismic slip distributions exhibit a pattern similar to the along-fault applied normal stress distribution. The occurrence of isolated low to moderate microquakes where residual stresses persist around secondary stress asperities, indicates that stress conditions along the fault also control the whole variability of fault slip events. Moreover, when fault slip stability conditions are modulated by normal stress distribution, our experiments suggest that the along-fault stress heterogeneity influences the seismic cycle regularity and, consequently, long-term fault slip behavior. Uniform applied normal stress favors irregular seismic cycles and the occurrence of earthquakes clustering, whereas non-uniform normal stress with a single high amplitude stress asperity generates strong characteristic microquake events with stable return periods. Together our results strengthen the assumption that coseismic slip distribution and earthquake variability along an active fault may provide relevant information on long term tectonic stress and could thus improve seismic hazard assessment.

  11. Slip avalanche in nanoscratching of metallic glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, D. X.; Wang, G.; Ren, J. L.; Song, S. X.; Li, J.; Yi, J.; Jia, Y. D.; Xu, H.; Chan, K. C.; Liaw, P. K.

    2017-09-01

    Slip avalanches, similar to discrete earthquake events, of Zr-, Co-, and Ce-based metallic glasses during nanoscratching were investigated. Differing from the conventional continuum approach, mean-field theory, which is an inherently-discrete model, was applied to analytically compute intermittent slip avalanches. Mean-field theory was first connected with the potential energy barrier and concentration of free volume in order to study the stick-slip behavior. The results suggest that the motion behavior of free volume affects the critical slip avalanche size.

  12. Longitudinal wheel slip during ABS braking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartikainen, Lassi; Petry, Frank; Westermann, Stephan

    2015-02-01

    Anti-lock braking system (ABS) braking tests with two subcompact passenger cars were performed on dry and wet asphalt, as well as on snow and ice surfaces. The operating conditions of the tyres in terms of wheel slip were evaluated using histograms of the wheel slip data. The results showed different average slip levels for different road surfaces. It was also found that changes in the tyre tread stiffness affected the slip operating range through a modification of the slip value at which the maximum longitudinal force is achieved. Variation of the tyre footprint length through modifications in the inflation pressure affected the slip operating range as well. Differences in the slip distribution between vehicles with different brake controllers were also observed. The changes in slip operating range in turn modified the relative local sliding speeds between the tyre and the road. The results highlight the importance of the ABS controller's ability to adapt to changing slip-force characteristics of tyres and provide estimates of the magnitude of the effects of different tyre and road operating conditions.

  13. Slip systems, lattice rotations and dislocation boundaries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winther, Grethe

    2008-01-01

    Plastic deformation by slip induces rotations of the crystallographic lattice and evolution of dislocation structures. Both lattice rotations and dislocation structures exhibit a dependence on the grain orientation, which reflects underlying relations to the slip pattern. Relations between the type...... of dislocation structure formed, in particular the crystallographic alignment of dislocation boundaries, and the slip pattern are demonstrated. These relations are applied to polycrystals deformed in tension and rolling, producing good agreement with experiment for rolling but less good agreement for tension...... of these discrepancies is discussed. Finally, the implications of the relations between slip and dislocation structures for the modelling of mechanical properties are discussed....

  14. Shared and Task-Specific Muscle Synergies during Normal Walking and Slipping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazifi, Mohammad Moein; Yoon, Han Ul; Beschorner, Kurt; Hur, Pilwon

    2017-01-01

    Falling accidents are costly due to their prevalence in the workplace. Slipping has been known to be the main cause of falling. Understanding the motor response used to regain balance after slipping is crucial to developing intervention strategies for effective recovery. Interestingly, studies on spinalized animals and studies on animals subjected to electrical microstimulation have provided major evidence that the Central Nervous System (CNS) uses motor primitives, such as muscle synergies, to control motor tasks. Muscle synergies are thought to be a critical mechanism used by the CNS to control complex motor tasks by reducing the dimensional complexity of the system. Even though synergies have demonstrated potential for indicating how the body responds to balance perturbations by accounting for majority of the data set's variability, this concept has not been applied to slipping. To address this gap, data from 11 healthy young adults were collected and analyzed during both unperturbed walking and slipping. Applying an iterative non-negative matrix decomposition technique, four muscle synergies and the corresponding time-series activation coefficients were extracted. The synergies and the activation coefficients were then compared between baseline walking and slipping to determine shared vs. task-specific synergies. Correlation analyses found that among four synergies, two synergies were shared between normal walking and slipping. However, the other two synergies were task-specific. Both limbs were contributing to each of the four synergies, suggesting substantial inter-limb coordination during gait and slip. These findings stay consistent with previous unilateral studies that reported similar synergies between unperturbed and perturbed walking. Activation coefficients corresponding to the two shared synergies were similar between normal walking and slipping for the first 200 ms after heel contact and differed later in stance, suggesting the activation of muscle

  15. Stick and slip actuators (SSA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, Carl; Breguet, Jean-Marc; Bergander, Arvid; Clavel, Reymond

    2000-10-01

    Stick and Skip Actuators (SSA) are particularly well adapted to micro- robotics. A simple design, a very high intrinsic resolution (a few nanometers) and a high rigidity make them especially interesting in high precision micro-manipulations. Moreover, a smart design allows to combine the guiding and actuating function. The mechanical interface between the piezo-elements and the guiding mechanisms in an important point of the stick and slip actuators. The design of this interface and the choice of the material are very important. Both aspects have an impact on the rigidity, which has an influence on the behavior of the actuator. They have also an incidence onf the reliability (lifetime) because the design gives the contact condition and the material the wear resistance. In addition, a loading system allowing to keep the mechanical contact at this interface has a direct effect on the contact pressure. In order to confirm the performance of SSA, prototypes have been developed at the ISR. Their designs have bene made for application in optical microscopy, for manipulators in industrial assembly of micro- engineering products, for micro-factory, chemical and bio-engineering equipment for research or routine tasks, such as testing, screening etc. This paper presents a short description of several SSA made by the IRS and describes the parameters characterizing the stick and slip motion and the mechanical interface.

  16. Application of Doehlert matrix and factorial designs in optimization of experimental variables associated with preconcentration and determination of molybdenum in sea-water by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry

    OpenAIRE

    Ferreira, Sergio Luis Costa; Santos,Hilda Costa dos; Carvalho, Marcelo Souza de; Fernandes, Marcelo Santiago

    2002-01-01

    p. 115–120 A simple and efficient procedure for the preconcentration and determination of molybdenum in sea-water was developed using solid-phase extraction (SPE) of molybdenum(V) ion as the thiocyanate complex by polyurethane foam and inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES). The optimization process was carried out using two-level full factorial and Doehlert matrix designs. Four variables (solution volume, shaking time, thiocyanate concentration and hydrochlo...

  17. Slip dynamics in an analogue faultzone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudolf, Michael; Rosenau, Matthias; Oncken, Onno

    2017-04-01

    Elastic stress in the lithosphere releases through slip along pre-existing planes of weakness (fault zones). Slip events may occur on many spatial and temporal scales. They range from short-term localised seismic slip (earthquakes) to aseismic slip transients and long-term distributed slip in cataclastic or ductile shear zones. The interplay of seismic and aseismic fault slip is poorly understood, potentially complex and very costly to model numerically. Therefore, we designed an analogue experiment using a rate-and-state frictional material (fused glass beads), that shows unstable (seismic) and stable (aseismic) slip. This is embedded in an elastic material (ballistic gelatin) that models upper crustal elastic rebound. In the analogue model presented here, we examine the influence of multiple parameters on the slip dynamics and overall statistics of ruptures within a glass bead shear zone. We use a customised rotary shear apparatus (Schulze ring-shear tester) to monitor shear stress during shear. The apparatus allows a direct control of shear rate and normal stress. Its transparent lid enables concurrent monitoring of the frictional contact surface. Digital image correlation is used to measure on-fault deformation. Because of the rate-and-state frictional properties of glass beads (a-b = -0.0138), the used setup produces regular stick-slip events under certain normal loading and strain rate conditions. Preliminary analysis shows the following: The events feature statistics similar to natural slip systems, i.e. a magnitude distribution similar to single faults. Estimated moment magnitudes of the laboratory earthquakes range from MW = -7 to -6. A Gutenberg-Richter like decay up to a certain corner magnitude followed by a characteristic peak is observable. With decreasing loading rate the recurrence time and size of events increase exponentially with exponents similar to natural events. Rupture dynamics are characterised by a transition from two-dimensional crack

  18. Structured surfaces for a giant liquid slip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Choongyeop; Choi, Chang-Hwan; Kim, Chang-Jin Cj

    2008-08-08

    We study experimentally how two key geometric parameters (pitch and gas fraction) of textured hydrophobic surfaces affect liquid slip. The two are independently controlled on precisely fabricated microstructures of posts and grates, and the slip length of water on each sample is measured using a rheometer system. The slip length increases linearly with the pitch but dramatically with the gas fraction above 90%, the latter trend being more pronounced on posts than on grates. Once the surfaces are designed for very large slips (>20 microm), however, further increase is not obtained in regular practice because the meniscus loses its stability. By developing near-perfect samples that delay the transition from a dewetted (Cassie) to a wetted (Wenzel) state until near the theoretical limit, we achieve giant slip lengths, as large as 185 microm.

  19. The role of water in slip casting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mccauley, R. A.; Phelps, G. W.

    1984-01-01

    Slips and casting are considered in terms of physical and colloidal chemistry. Casting slips are polydisperse suspensions of lyophobic particles in water, whose degree of coagulation is controlled by interaction of flocculating and deflocculating agents. Slip casting rate and viscosity are functions of temperature. Slip rheology and response to deflocculating agents varies significantly as the kinds and amounts of colloid modifiers change. Water is considered as a raw material. Various concepts of water/clay interactions and structures are discussed. Casting is a de-watering operation in which water moves from slip to cast to mold in response to a potential energy termed moisture stress. Drying is an evaporative process from a free water surface.

  20. Implementation of Close Loop Speed Control with VVVF Control and Slip Regulation on LIM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Aditya

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Open loop VVVF control has the disadvantage of low output torque when working at low frequency and poor speed precision at different load conditions.Various performance-improving schemes have been proposed for the basic VVVF control by compensating slips occurring in the low frequency range and slips caused by changing loads. Numerous papers have been published on the close loop speed control of rotary induction motor. In this paper a close loop speed control with VVVF control and slip regulation has been implemented for LIM based conveyor belt test Rig which compensates the disadvantages of traditional Volts/Hz control. SIMULINK results are presented to validate the effectiveness of proposed scheme.

  1. Slow slip generated by dehydration reaction coupled with slip-induced dilatancy and thermal pressurization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamashita, Teruo; Schubnel, Alexandre

    2016-10-01

    Sustained slow slip, which is a distinctive feature of slow slip events (SSEs), is investigated theoretically, assuming a fault embedded within a fluid-saturated 1D thermo-poro-elastic medium. The object of study is specifically SSEs occurring at the down-dip edge of seismogenic zone in hot subduction zones, where mineral dehydrations (antigorite, lawsonite, chlorite, and glaucophane) are expected to occur near locations where deep slow slip events are observed. In the modeling, we introduce dehydration reactions, coupled with slip-induced dilatancy and thermal pressurization, and slip evolution is assumed to interact with fluid pressure change through Coulomb's frictional stress. Our calculations show that sustained slow slip events occur when the dehydration reaction is coupled with slip-induced dilatancy. Specifically, slow slip is favored by a low initial stress drop, an initial temperature of the medium close to that of the dehydration reaction equilibrium temperature, a low permeability, and overall negative volume change associated with the reaction (i.e., void space created by the reaction larger than the space occupied by the fluid released). Importantly, if we do not assume slip-induced dilatancy, slip is accelerated with time soon after the slip onset even if the dehydration reaction is assumed. This suggests that slow slip is sustained for a long time at hot subduction zones because dehydration reaction is coupled with slip-induced dilatancy. Such slip-induced dilatancy may occur at the down-dip edge of seismogenic zone at hot subduction zones because of repetitive occurrence of dehydration reaction there.

  2. Slow slip events, the earthquake cycle, and rheological effects in Nicoya, Costa Rica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voss, Nicholas; Malservisi, Rocco; Dixon, Timothy; Protti, Marino

    2017-04-01

    In February of 2014 a Mw=7.0 slow slip event (SSE) took place beneath the Nicoya Peninsula, Costa Rica. This event occurred 17 months after the 5 September 2012, Mw=7.6, earthquake and along the same subduction zone segment, during a period when significant postseismic deformation was ongoing. A second SSE occurred in the middle of 2015, 21 months after the 2014 SSE. SSEs prior to the earthquake were also well-recorded, allowing analysis of SSE behavior during both the late and early stages of the earthquake cycle. The recurrence interval for Nicoya SSEs was unchanged by the earthquake. However, the spatial distribution of slip for the 2014 event differed significantly from previous events, only having deep ( 40 km) slip. Previous events showed both deep and shallow slip. The 2015 SSE marked a return to earlier pattern. However, slip magnitude in 2015 was nearly twice as large (Mw=7.2) as pre-earthquake SSEs. The large amount of shallow slip in the 2015 SSE maybe a result of slip missed during the 2014 SSE. These observations highlight the variability of aseismic strain release throughout the earthquake cycle generating considerable uncertainty when considering long term strain accumulation rates. The deep slip patch in Nicoya is located near the mantle wedge. Serpentinization of the wedge is thought to be one source of fluids, commonly thought to promote SSEs and and seismic tremor. However, the presence of fluids provokes drastic changes in rheology, usually ignored when calculating simple elastic dislocation models of SSEs. Here we explore how simple models using viscoelastic rheology may change the inferred deformation field, leading to mis-estimation of the magnitude of slip, and mis-estimation of long term strain accumulation rates.

  3. Screw placement in slipped upper femoral epiphysis: is good the enemy of better?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamil, Wiqqas; Allami, Mohamad K; Varghese, Bobin; Almaiyah, Mohammed; Giannoudis, Peter

    2007-09-01

    Introduction and aims A single hip screw is the recommended method of fixation for slipped upper femoral epiphysis (SUFE). Current practice favours the placement of the screw in the centre of the femoral head on both anteroposterior and lateral planes to avoid the risks of chondrolysis and avascular necrosis (AVN). We investigated the correlation between different positions of the screw in the femoral head and the prevalence of AVN, chondrolysis, late slippage and the time to epiphyseal closure. Methods The clinical notes and radiographs of 38 consecutive patients (61 hips) who underwent single screw fixation for SUFE were evaluated retrospectively with a mean follow-up of 36 months. Two-way ANOVA and the post hoc test was performed to analyse the correlation between the different variables and the outcome at the 5% level of significance. Results There were 16 acute slips, 18 chronic slips and ten acute-on-chronic slips. Seventeen slips were treated prophylactically. Mild slip was encountered in 39 hips, moderate slip in four and severe slip in one. The central-central position was only achieved in 51% of cases. The most significant results of the study were as follows: (1) no significant difference between the time to epiphyseal closure and the position of the screw, and (2) no late slippage or chondrolysis was observed in our series. Conclusion Our results showed that the positioning of the screw other than in the centre of the femoral head has the ability to provide physeal stability and has no correlation with the timing to closure of the epiphysis and the risk of avascular necrosis or chondrolysis. We therefore recommend that other positions be considered if the "optimal central-central position" is not initially achieved - specifically for the treatment of mild slip - as the potential hazards from several attempts to achieve the optimum position outweigh the benefits.

  4. Discussion on the qd/qd model of slip energy recovery drive

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akpinar, E. [Department of Electrical and Electronics Engineering, Dokuz Eyluel University, 35160 Buca, Izmir (Turkey)

    2007-01-15

    The transient and steady-state models of slip energy recovery drive (SERD) are obtained in synchronously rotating reference frame in [P.C. Krause, O.Wasynczuk, M.S. Hildebrandt, Reference frame analysis of a slip energy recovery system, IEEE Trans. Energy Convers. 3 (2) (1988) 404-408; E. Akpinar, R.E. Trahan, A.D. Nguyen, Modeling and analysis of closed-loop slip energy recovery induction motor drive using a Linerizatio technique, IEEE Trans. Energy Convers. 8 (4) (1993) 688-697; S.A. Papathanassiou, M.P. Papadopoulos, State-space modeling and eigenvalue analysis of slip energy recovery drive, IEE Proc. Electr. Power Appl. 144 (1) (1997) 27-36; M.Y. Uctug, I. Eskadarzadeh, H. Ince, Modelling and output power optimization of a wind turbine driven double output induction generator, IEE Proc. Electr. Power Appl. 141 (2) (1994) 33-38]. The steady-state solution is provided in [P.C. Krause, O.Wasynczuk, M.S. Hildebrandt, Reference frame analysis of a slip energy recovery system, IEEE Trans. Energy Convers. 3 (2) (1988) 404-408; M.Y. Uctug, I. Eskadarzadeh, H. Ince, Modelling and output power optimization of a wind turbine driven double output induction generator, IEE Proc. Electr. Power Appl. 141 (2) (1994) 33-38]. A fourth and fifth order transient models are obtained in [E. Akpinar, R.E. Trahan, A.D. Nguyen, Modeling and analysis of closed-loop slip energy recovery induction motor drive using a Linerizatio technique, IEEE Trans. Energy Convers. 8 (4) (1993) 688-697; S.A. Papathanassiou, M.P. Papadopoulos, State-space modeling and eigenvalue analysis of slip energy recovery drive, IEE Proc. Electr. Power Appl. 144 (1) (1997) 27-36], respectively. These models can be used to predict the performance, when the effect of overlap angle and rectifier input current harmonics are ignored, and the rectifier input power factor is also assumed to be unity. In this paper, both models are solved in Matlab and results are compared to the results of Simulink model of the SERD

  5. Dynamical stability of slip-stacking particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eldred, Jeffrey; Zwaska, Robert

    2014-09-01

    We study the stability of particles in slip-stacking configuration, used to nearly double proton beam intensity at Fermilab. We introduce universal area factors to calculate the available phase space area for any set of beam parameters without individual simulation. We find perturbative solutions for stable particle trajectories. We establish Booster beam quality requirements to achieve 97% slip-stacking efficiency. We show that slip-stacking dynamics directly correspond to the driven pendulum and to the system of two standing-wave traps moving with respect to each other.

  6. Molecular Simulation of Thermo-osmotic Slip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganti, Raman; Liu, Yawei; Frenkel, Daan

    2017-07-21

    Thermo-osmotic slip-the flow induced by a thermal gradient along a surface-is a well-known phenomenon, but curiously there is a lack of robust molecular-simulation techniques to predict its magnitude. Here, we compare three different molecular-simulation techniques to compute the thermo-osmotic slip at a simple solid-fluid interface. Although we do not expect the different approaches to be in perfect agreement, we find that the differences are barely significant for a range of different physical conditions, suggesting that practical molecular simulations of thermo-osmotic slip are feasible.

  7. Improved Slip Casting Of Ceramic Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buck, Gregory M.; Vasquez, Peter; Hicks, Lana P.

    1994-01-01

    Improved technique of investment slip casting developed for making precise ceramic wind-tunnel models. Needed in wind-tunnel experiments to verify predictions of aerothermodynamical computer codes. Ceramic materials used because of their low heat conductivities and ability to survive high temperatures. Present improved slip-casting technique enables casting of highly detailed models from aqueous or nonaqueous solutions. Wet shell molds peeled off models to ensure precise and undamaged details. Used at NASA Langley Research Center to form superconducting ceramic components from nonaqueous slip solutions. Technique has many more applications when ceramic materials developed further for such high-strength/ temperature components as engine parts.

  8. Practicing induction:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sprogøe, Jonas; Rohde, Nicolas

    2009-01-01

    We claim that induction potentially triggers both individual and organizational learning and by drawing on practice-based theory we discuss how the interplay between individual and organization, what we call a generative dance, ignites both kinds of learning....

  9. The contralateral slip. An avoidable complication and indication for prophylactic pinning in slipped upper femoral epiphysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacLean, J G B; Reddy, S K

    2006-11-01

    Between July 1994 and June 2004, 60 patients with 76 slipped upper femoral epiphyses were managed within the adult trauma service of three hospitals. Treatment was by a single cannulated screw. Of these cases, 53 were unilateral, in 17 of which uncomplicated prophylactic fixation of the contralateral hip was performed. Of the other 36 cases, nine presented with a subsequent slip despite ongoing out-patient care. The subsequent slip was unpredictable in timing and unrelated to the age at the initial slip. It was more often unstable and in one case avascular necrosis developed. The overall rate of avascular necrosis, although in accordance with the literature, was 60% in acute unstable slips with a slip angle greater than 40 degrees. In our experience, prophylactic fixation was safer than continued observation of the contralateral hip.

  10. Falls study: Proprioception, postural stability, and slips.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohn, Jeehoon; Kim, Sukwon

    2015-01-01

    The present study evaluated effects of exercise training on the proprioception sensitivity, postural stability, and the likelihood of slip-induced falls. Eighteen older adults (6 in balance, 6 in weight, and 6 in control groups) participated in this study. Three groups met three times per week over the course of eight weeks. Ankle and knee proprioception sensitivities and postural stability were measured. Slip-induced events were introduced for all participants before and after training. The results indicated that, overall, strength and postural stability were improved only in the training group, although proprioception sensitivity was improved in all groups. Training for older adults resulted in decreased likelihood of slip-induced falls. The study suggested that proprioception can be improved by simply being active, however, the results suggested that training would aid older adults in reducing the likelihood of slip-induced falls.

  11. Bone scintigraphy in slipped capital femoral epiphysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gelfand, M.J.; Strife, J.L.; Graham, E.J.; Crawford, A.H.

    1983-12-01

    Tc-/sub 99m/ diphosphonate bone scans were performed on 11 children with slipped capital femoral epiphysis. On pinhole hip images, seven hips in seven patients had increased radionuclide uptake in the physis and adjacent proximal femoral metaphysis where the slip had occurred. Three hips in three patients had decreased radionuclide uptake in the femoral head on the side of the slipped epiphysis, indicating compromise of the femoral head blood supply. Three or more months following internal fixation, three children had scintigraphy that showed loss of the usual focal uptake in the physis and adjacent proximal femoral metaphysis. Bone scintigraphy in pediatric patients with slipped capital femoral epiphysis is valuable in defining the metabolic status of the femoral head. Absence of radiopharmaceutical uptake in the affected femoral head indicates that the femoral head is at risk for development of radiographic changes associated with aseptic necrosis.

  12. Slipped capital femoral epiphysis in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moores, A P; Owen, M R; Fews, D; Coe, R J; Brown, P J; Butterworth, S J

    2004-12-01

    In a retrospective review of 43 femoral fractures, three dogs had separation of the femoral capital epiphysis from the metaphysis in the absence of trauma. Two of these dogs also had evidence of pathology in the contralateral femoral neck including, in one dog, displacement of the capital epiphysis in relation to the metaphysis without actual separation. The case histories, radiographic features and histopathological findings of these cases were reviewed and compared with previous cases of slipped capital femoral epiphysis (SCFE) reported in dogs and also with SCFE in children. Pre-slip, acute, chronic and acute-on-chronic slips were Identified. Based on the cases reviewed, the authors advise internal fixation of stable slipped epiphyses in dogs. This may also be appropriate for unstable separations, although resorption of the femoral neck may preclude stable fixation and necessitate femoral head and neck excision.

  13. Nonequilibrium Chromosome Looping via Molecular Slip Links

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brackley, C. A.; Johnson, J.; Michieletto, D.; Morozov, A. N.; Nicodemi, M.; Cook, P. R.; Marenduzzo, D.

    2017-09-01

    We propose a model for the formation of chromatin loops based on the diffusive sliding of molecular slip links. These mimic the behavior of molecules like cohesin, which, along with the CTCF protein, stabilize loops which contribute to organizing the genome. By combining 3D Brownian dynamics simulations and 1D exactly solvable nonequilibrium models, we show that diffusive sliding is sufficient to account for the strong bias in favor of convergent CTCF-mediated chromosome loops observed experimentally. We also find that the diffusive motion of multiple slip links along chromatin is rectified by an intriguing ratchet effect that arises if slip links bind to the chromatin at a preferred "loading site." This emergent collective behavior favors the extrusion of loops which are much larger than the ones formed by single slip links.

  14. Stability improvement of induction generator-based wind turbine systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Zhe; Hu, Y.; Blaabjerg, Frede

    2007-01-01

    The stability improvement of induction-generator-based wind turbine systems under power system fault conditions has been studied. Two types of generators are considered, namely rotor short-circuited induction generators and dynamic slip-controlled wound rotor induction generators. The factors...... affecting the stability are analysed. The characteristics of the induction-generator-based wind turbines are described, and possible methods of improving stability of the wind generators are discussed. The system modelling is presented, and then the discussed methods of improving stability are investigated...

  15. Seismic slip on clay nano-foliation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aretusini, Stefano; Plümper, Oliver; Spagnuolo, Elena; Di Toro, Giulio

    2017-04-01

    Deformation processes active at seismic slip rates (ca. 1 m/s) on smectite-rich slipping zones are not well understood, although they likely control the mechanical behaviour of: i) subduction zone faults affected by tsunamigenic earthquakes and seismic surface rupturing, and ii) landslide decollements. Here we present a set of rotary experiments performed on water-dampened 2 mm thick clay-rich (70% wt. smectite and 30% wt. opal) gouge layers sheared at slip rates V ranging from 0.01 to 1.5 m/s, for 3 m of displacement under 5 MPa normal stress. Microstructural analyses were conducted on pre- and post-sheared gouges using focused ion beam scanning electron and transmission electron microscopy. All sheared gouges were slip weakening in the first 0.1 m of displacement, with friction coefficient decreasing from 0.4-0.3 to 0.1-0.05. Then, with progressive slip, gouges evolved to slip-strengthening (final friction coefficient of 0.47-0.35) at V ≤0.1 m/s and slip-neutral (final friction of 0.05) at V=1.5 m/s. Despite the large difference in the imposed slip rate and frictional behaviour, the slipping zone always consisted of a nano-foliation defined by sub-micrometric smectite crystals wrapping opal grains. The microstructural differences were (1) the thickness of the slipping zone which decreased from 1.5 mm at V≤0.1 m/s to 0.15 mm at V=1.5 m/s, and (2) the structure of the foliated fabric, which was S/C'-type at V≤0.1 m/s and anastomosing-type at V=1.5 m/s. The presence of a similar nano-foliation in all the smectite-rich wet gouges suggests the activation of similar frictional processes, most likely grain boundary and interlayer frictional sliding aided by water films, operating from sub-seismic to seismic strain rates ( 10-10000 1/s). Water films on crystal boundaries and interlayers possibly control the micro- and nano-mechanics of smectite deformation, therefore influencing the bulk frictional behaviour during seismic slip.

  16. Parametric analysis of the statistical model of the stick-slip process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Roberta; Sampaio, Rubens

    2017-06-01

    In this paper it is performed a parametric analysis of the statistical model of the response of a dry-friction oscillator. The oscillator is a spring-mass system which moves over a base with a rough surface. Due to this roughness, the mass is subject to a dry-frictional force modeled as a Coulomb friction. The system is stochastically excited by an imposed bang-bang base motion. The base velocity is modeled by a Poisson process for which a probabilistic model is fully specified. The excitation induces in the system stochastic stick-slip oscillations. The system response is composed by a random sequence alternating stick and slip-modes. With realizations of the system, a statistical model is constructed for this sequence. In this statistical model, the variables of interest of the sequence are modeled as random variables, as for example, the number of time intervals in which stick or slip occur, the instants at which they begin, and their duration. Samples of the system response are computed by integration of the dynamic equation of the system using independent samples of the base motion. Statistics and histograms of the random variables which characterize the stick-slip process are estimated for the generated samples. The objective of the paper is to analyze how these estimated statistics and histograms vary with the system parameters, i.e., to make a parametric analysis of the statistical model of the stick-slip process.

  17. Asynchronous slip-ring motor synchronized with permanent magnets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glinka Tadeusz

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The electric LSPMSM motor presented in the paper differs from standard induction motor by rotor design. The insulated start-up winding is located in slots along the rotor circumference. The winding ends are connected to the slip-rings. The rotor core contains permanent magnets. The electromechanical characteristics for synchronous operation were calculated, as were the start-up characteristics for operation with a short-circuited rotor winding. Two model motors were used for the calculations, the V-shaped Permanent Magnet (VPM – Fig. 3, and the Linear Permanent Magnet (IPM – Fig. 4, both rated at 14.5 kW. The advantages of the investigated motor are demonstrated in the conclusions.

  18. Slipped capital femoral epiphysis: diagnosis and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peck, David

    2010-08-01

    Slipped capital femoral epiphysis is the most common hip disorder in adolescents, and it has a prevalence of 10.8 cases per 100,000 children. It usually occurs in children eight to 15 years of age, and it is one of the most commonly missed diagnoses in children. Slipped capital femoral epiphysis is classified as stable or unstable based on the stability of the physis. The condition is associated with obesity and growth surges, and it is occasionally associated with endocrine disorders such as hypothyroidism, growth hormone supplementation, hypogonadism, and panhypopituitarism. Patients usually present with limping and poorly localized pain in the hip, groin, thigh, or knee. Diagnosis is confirmed by bilateral hip radiography, which needs to include anteroposterior and frog-leg lateral views in patients with stable slipped capital femoral epiphysis, and anteroposterior and cross-table lateral views in patients with the unstable form. The goals of treatment are to prevent slip progression and avoid complications such as avascular necrosis and chondrolysis. Stable slipped capital femoral epiphysis is usually treated using in situ screw fixation. Treatment of unstable slipped capital femoral epiphysis usually involves in situ fixation, but there is controversy about the timing of surgery, value of reduction, and whether traction should be used.

  19. Testing the time dependence of slip on the West Klamath Lake fault zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speth, G.; Amos, C. B.; Amidon, W. H.; Meigs, A.

    2016-12-01

    Detailed inventories of fault slip over multiple time intervals are critical to our understanding of strain accumulation and release during the earthquake cycle, as well as for resolving potential variability in slip rates over time. Such variations are potentially associated with spatially or temporally clustered earthquakes and possible time-dependent changes in shear zone strength. The West Klamath Lake fault zone (WKLFZ) in southern Oregon provides an excellent opportunity to study incremental fault slip rates because it displaces multiple generations of datable landforms and has remarkable surface expression in airborne lidar imagery. There, we utilize these lidar data and new 3He cosmogenic exposure dating to reconstruct fault slip rates over intervals ranging from 103 - 105 years. Our surficial geologic mapping along the northern extent of the WKLFZ reveals at least two generations of late-Pleistocene glacial landforms as well as several Holocene fan surfaces, all of which are progressively offset by an array of predominately down-to-the-east normal fault scarps. Dating of these features relies on 3He exposure dating of basaltic andesite boulders and depth profiles from glacial outwash terraces. Preliminary exposure dating of an offset moraine along Sevenmile Creek reveals ages consistent with the last glacial maximum ( 15 - 25 ka), suggesting normal fault slip rates of 0.1 mm/yr over this period. This estimate is consistent with slip rates determined from K-Ar dating of offset lava flows near Crater Lake, 20 km to the north. Two dozen additional samples will focus on older glacial moraines and outwash surfaces, as well as debris-flow boulders on Holocene fans. These data will test the constancy of this preliminary slip rate over time. Taken together, our results will provide a detailed slip inventory for the WKLFZ over the last 105 years, and elucidate the role of this structure in accommodating active deformation at the eastern edge of the Oregon Coast

  20. Induction Brazing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henningsen, Poul

    Induction brazing is a fast and appropriate method for industrial joining of complex geometries and metal combinations. In all types of brazing processes it is important to heat the joint interface of the two materials to the same, high temperature. If one of the specimens is warmer than the other...... materials has large influence on the heating time and temperature distribution in induction heating. In order to ensure high and uniform temperature distribution near the interface of a joint between dissimilar materials the precise coil geometry and position is of great importance. The present report...... presents a combined numerical and experimental method for determination of appropriate/optimiged coil geometry and position in induction brazing tube-to-plate joints of different ratios between tube and plate thickness and different combinations of the materials stainless steel, brass and copper...

  1. Induction accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Takayama, Ken

    2011-01-01

    A broad class of accelerators rests on the induction principle whereby the accelerating electrical fields are generated by time-varying magnetic fluxes. Particularly suitable for the transport of bright and high-intensity beams of electrons, protons or heavy ions in any geometry (linear or circular) the research and development of induction accelerators is a thriving subfield of accelerator physics. This text is the first comprehensive account of both the fundamentals and the state of the art about the modern conceptual design and implementation of such devices. Accordingly, the first part of the book is devoted to the essential features of and key technologies used for induction accelerators at a level suitable for postgraduate students and newcomers to the field. Subsequent chapters deal with more specialized and advanced topics.

  2. Progressive slip after removal of screw fixation in slipped capital femoral epiphysis: two case reports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Engelsma Yde

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction In slipped capital femoral epiphysis the femoral neck displaces relative to the head due to weakening of the epiphysis. Early recognition and adequate surgical fixation is essential for a good functional outcome. The fixation should be secured until the closure of the epiphysis to prevent further slippage. A slipped capital femoral epiphysis should not be confused with a femoral neck fracture. Case presentation Case 1 concerns a 15-year-old boy with an adequate initial screw fixation of his slipped capital femoral epiphysis. Unfortunately, it was thought that the epiphysis had healed and the screw was removed after 11 weeks. This caused new instability with a progressive slip of the femoral epiphysis and subsequently re-fixation and a subtrochanteric correction osteotomy was obligatory. Case 2 concerns a 13-year-old girl with persistent hip pain after screw fixation for slipped capital femoral epiphysis. The screw was removed as lysis was seen around the screw on the hip X-ray. This operation created a new unstable situation and the slip progressed resulting in poor hip function. A correction osteotomy with re-screw fixation was performed with a good functional result. Conclusion A slipped epiphysis of the hip is not considered ‘healed’ after a few months. Given the risk of progression of the slip the fixation material cannot be removed before closure of the growth plate.

  3. Study of interference in power supply for induction motors by variable frequency drivers; Estudo de interferencias na alimentacao eletrica de motores de inducao por inversores de frequencia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sousa, Andre Luis de Oliveira e; Silva, Marcos Morais da [Centro Universitario de Belo Horizonte (UniBH), MG (Brazil)], e-mails: alosousa@gmail.com, marcosmoraisdasilva@hotmail.com; Pires, Igor Amariz [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (PPGEE/UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia de Eletronica], e-mail: iap@ufmg.br

    2012-07-01

    First of all, this work went into an exploratory study which shows the variety of factors that the induction motors are submitted for being driven by frequency inverters. It's target was to address the leading technical aspects of the induction motors cage, and also, to discuss the influences of the inverters about the motor characteristics such as reflection voltage, common mode of noise, rise-time, and so on. On the top of it, this work have had a deep study about the interferences from installation and the distance between the frequency inverter and electric motor such as the aggravation of these factors for both the inverter-motor system and for electrical systems. They are magnetically linked to this system by a bunch of wires and cables. Also, some solutions about electric motor's manufacturers are also showed. Inverters, wire's suppliers and insulation materials have sought in order to get a great interaction between the electric motor and frequency inverter to avoid disturbing the system. Not only for themselves but also for the adjacent systems. Once we had faced it's subject, we can define that the factors here presented can directly interfere with the engine's life or lead it into problems with the electrical systems, if installed next to the drive by a frequency inverter. As it is a kind of trigger that only had got the confidence of the industries recently, regarding to the replacement of DC motors, many companies that provide it, are not technically ready to correctly specify the whole set, in order avoid the interference generated as it was well showed in this work. (author)

  4. Slip resistant properties of footwear on ice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Chuansi; Abeysekera, John; Hirvonen, Mikko; Grönqvist, Raoul

    2004-05-15

    Current research on slipperiness of footwear has mainly focused on floors and lubricated floors. Slips and falls on icy and snowy surfaces involve not only outdoor workers, but also pedestrians and the general public; and occur in cold regions and in winter season in many parts of the world. However, in comparison with the size of the problem, research on slips and falls on icy and snowy surfaces has been scarce. The objective of this paper is to explore the slip resistant properties of footwear (soling materials, roughness and hardness) on ice. The coefficients of kinetic friction of four different soling materials (synthetic rubber, nitrile rubber, natural rubber and polyurethane) were measured on ice (-12 degrees C). The outsole roughness and hardness were also measured. Results showed that the polyurethane soling did not perform better than synthetic rubber, nitrile rubber and natural rubber on pure hard ice (-12 degrees C). Soling roughness was positively correlated with the coefficient of kinetic friction. The most slip resistant soling material (polyurethane) on floors and lubricated floors may not provide sufficient slip resistance on ice.

  5. Constraining the roughness degree of slip heterogeneity

    KAUST Repository

    Causse, Mathieu

    2010-05-07

    This article investigates different approaches for assessing the degree of roughness of the slip distribution of future earthquakes. First, we analyze a database of slip images extracted from a suite of 152 finite-source rupture models from 80 events (Mw = 4.1–8.9). This results in an empirical model defining the distribution of the slip spectrum corner wave numbers (kc) as a function of moment magnitude. To reduce the “epistemic” uncertainty, we select a single slip model per event and screen out poorly resolved models. The number of remaining models (30) is thus rather small. In addition, the robustness of the empirical model rests on a reliable estimation of kc by kinematic inversion methods. We address this issue by performing tests on synthetic data with a frequency domain inversion method. These tests reveal that due to smoothing constraints used to stabilize the inversion process, kc tends to be underestimated. We then develop an alternative approach: (1) we establish a proportionality relationship between kc and the peak ground acceleration (PGA), using a k−2 kinematic source model, and (2) we analyze the PGA distribution, which is believed to be better constrained than slip images. These two methods reveal that kc follows a lognormal distribution, with similar standard deviations for both methods.

  6. Slip in viscous contact-line movement

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Lengerich, Henrik; Steen, Paul; Breuer, Kenneth

    2011-11-01

    The typical continuum fluid dynamics formulation cannot be used to model the spreading of a liquid on a solid because a stress singularity prevents contact-line motion. It is well known that this situation can be remedied by introducing a slip. We perform Stokes-flow simulations with slip and compare these with experiments. In the experiment, liquid (squalane) is forced through two parallel sapphire plates (roughness 0.6nm), and the meniscus shape and its speed are measured. The slip-length for this liquid/solid pair has been measured previously in an independent experiment absent of contact lines (T. Schmatko et. al. PRL 94, 244501). The same geometry is used in a boundary integral method simulation, accurate to within a few molecular diameters in the vicinity of the contact-line. The slip-length in the simulations can be varied such that the meniscus shape matches the experiment. Preliminary results suggest this slip-length is an order of magnitude lower than that reported by Schmatko. Now at the University of Minnesota TC

  7. Quantifying slip balance in the earthquake cycle: Coseismic slip model constrained by interseismic coupling

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Lifeng

    2015-11-11

    The long-term slip on faults has to follow, on average, the plate motion, while slip deficit is accumulated over shorter time scales (e.g., between the large earthquakes). Accumulated slip deficits eventually have to be released by earthquakes and aseismic processes. In this study, we propose a new inversion approach for coseismic slip, taking interseismic slip deficit as prior information. We assume a linear correlation between coseismic slip and interseismic slip deficit, and invert for the coefficients that link the coseismic displacements to the required strain accumulation time and seismic release level of the earthquake. We apply our approach to the 2011 M9 Tohoku-Oki earthquake and the 2004 M6 Parkfield earthquake. Under the assumption that the largest slip almost fully releases the local strain (as indicated by borehole measurements, Lin et al., 2013), our results suggest that the strain accumulated along the Tohoku-Oki earthquake segment has been almost fully released during the 2011 M9 rupture. The remaining slip deficit can be attributed to the postseismic processes. Similar conclusions can be drawn for the 2004 M6 Parkfield earthquake. We also estimate the required time of strain accumulation for the 2004 M6 Parkfield earthquake to be ~25 years (confidence interval of [17, 43] years), consistent with the observed average recurrence time of ~22 years for M6 earthquakes in Parkfield. For the Tohoku-Oki earthquake, we estimate the recurrence time of~500-700 years. This new inversion approach for evaluating slip balance can be generally applied to any earthquake for which dense geodetic measurements are available.

  8. Slip rate and slip magnitudes of past earthquakes along the Bogd left-lateral strike-slip fault (Mongolia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prentice, Carol S.; Rizza, M.; Ritz, J.F.; Baucher, R.; Vassallo, R.; Mahan, S.

    2011-01-01

    We carried out morphotectonic studies along the left-lateral strike-slip Bogd Fault, the principal structure involved in the Gobi-Altay earthquake of 1957 December 4 (published magnitudes range from 7.8 to 8.3). The Bogd Fault is 260 km long and can be subdivided into five main geometric segments, based on variation in strike direction. West to East these segments are, respectively: the West Ih Bogd (WIB), The North Ih Bogd (NIB), the West Ih Bogd (WIB), the West Baga Bogd (WBB) and the East Baga Bogd (EBB) segments. Morphological analysis of offset streams, ridges and alluvial fans—particularly well preserved in the arid environment of the Gobi region—allows evaluation of late Quaternary slip rates along the different faults segments. In this paper, we measure slip rates over the past 200 ka at four sites distributed across the three western segments of the Bogd Fault. Our results show that the left-lateral slip rate is∼1 mm yr–1 along the WIB and EIB segments and∼0.5 mm yr–1 along the NIB segment. These variations are consistent with the restraining bend geometry of the Bogd Fault. Our study also provides additional estimates of the horizontal offset associated with the 1957 earthquake along the western part of the Bogd rupture, complementing previously published studies. We show that the mean horizontal offset associated with the 1957 earthquake decreases progressively from 5.2 m in the west to 2.0 m in the east, reflecting the progressive change of kinematic style from pure left-lateral strike-slip faulting to left-lateral-reverse faulting. Along the three western segments, we measure cumulative displacements that are multiples of the 1957 coseismic offset, which may be consistent with a characteristic slip. Moreover, using these data, we re-estimate the moment magnitude of the Gobi-Altay earthquake at Mw 7.78–7.95. Combining our slip rate estimates and the slip distribution per event we also determined a mean recurrence interval of∼2500

  9. Support for the slip hypothesis from whisker-related tactile perception of rats in a noisy environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waiblinger, Christian; Brugger, Dominik; Whitmire, Clarissa J.; Stanley, Garrett B.; Schwarz, Cornelius

    2015-01-01

    Rodents use active whisker movements to explore their environment. The “slip hypothesis” of whisker-related tactile perception entails that short-lived kinematic events (abrupt whisker movements, called “slips”, due to bioelastic whisker properties that occur during active touch of textures) carry the decisive texture information. Supporting this hypothesis, previous studies have shown that slip amplitude and frequency occur in a texture-dependent way. Further, experiments employing passive pulsatile whisker deflections revealed that perceptual performance based on pulse kinematics (i.e., signatures that resemble slips) is far superior to the one based on time-integrated variables like frequency and intensity. So far, pulsatile stimuli were employed in a noise free environment. However, the realistic scenario involves background noise (e.g., evoked by rubbing across the texture). Therefore, if slips are used for tactile perception, the tactile neuronal system would need to differentiate slip-evoked spikes from those evoked by noise. To test the animals under these more realistic conditions, we presented passive whisker-deflections to head-fixed trained rats, consisting of “slip-like” events (waveforms mimicking slips occurring with touch of real textures) embedded into background noise. Varying the (i) shapes (ramp or pulse); (ii) kinematics (amplitude, velocity, etc.); and (iii) the probabilities of occurrence of slip-like events, we observed that rats could readily detect slip-like events of different shapes against noisy background. Psychophysical curves revealed that the difference of slip event and noise amplitude determined perception, while increased probability of occurrence (frequency) had barely any effect. These results strongly support the notion that encoding of kinematics dominantly determines whisker-related tactile perception while the computation of frequency or intensity plays a minor role. PMID:26528148

  10. Support for the slip hypothesis from whisker-related tactile perception of rats in a noisy environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian eWaiblinger

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Rodents use active whisker movements to explore their environment. The ‘slip hypothesis’ of whisker-related tactile perception entails that short-lived kinematic events (abrupt whisker movements, called ‘slips’, due to bioelastic whisker properties that occur during active touch of textures carry the decisive texture information. Supporting this hypothesis, previous studies have shown that slip amplitude and frequency occur in a texture dependent way. Further, experiments employing passive pulsatile whisker deflections revealed that perceptual performance based on pulse kinematics (i.e. signatures that resemble slips is far superior to the one based on time-integrated variables like frequency and intensity. So far, pulsatile stimuli were employed in a noise free environment. However, the realistic scenario involves background noise (e.g. evoked by rubbing across the texture. Therefore, if slips are used for tactile perception, the tactile neuronal system would need to differentiate slip-evoked spikes from those evoked by noise. To test the animals under these more realistic conditions, we presented passive whisker-deflections to head-fixed trained rats, consisting of 'slip-like' events (waveforms mimicking slips occurring with touch of real textures embedded into background noise. Varying the i shapes (ramp or pulse, ii kinematics (amplitude, velocity, etc., and iii the probabilities of occurrence of slip-like events, we observed that rats could readily detect slip-like events of different shapes against noisy background. Psychophysical curves revealed that the difference of slip event and noise amplitude determined perception, while increased probability of occurrence (frequency had barely any effect. These results strongly support the notion that encoding of kinematics dominantly determines whisker-related tactile perception while the computation of frequency or intensity plays a minor role.

  11. Fault slip and earthquake recurrence along strike-slip faults — Contributions of high-resolution geomorphic data

    KAUST Repository

    Zielke, Olaf

    2015-01-01

    Understanding earthquake (EQ) recurrence relies on information about the timing and size of past EQ ruptures along a given fault. Knowledge of a fault\\'s rupture history provides valuable information on its potential future behavior, enabling seismic hazard estimates and loss mitigation. Stratigraphic and geomorphic evidence of faulting is used to constrain the recurrence of surface rupturing EQs. Analysis of the latter data sets culminated during the mid-1980s in the formulation of now classical EQ recurrence models, now routinely used to assess seismic hazard. Within the last decade, Light Detection and Ranging (lidar) surveying technology and other high-resolution data sets became increasingly available to tectono-geomorphic studies, promising to contribute to better-informed models of EQ recurrence and slip-accumulation patterns. After reviewing motivation and background, we outline requirements to successfully reconstruct a fault\\'s offset accumulation pattern from geomorphic evidence. We address sources of uncertainty affecting offset measurement and advocate approaches to minimize them. A number of recent studies focus on single-EQ slip distributions and along-fault slip accumulation patterns. We put them in context with paleoseismic studies along the respective faults by comparing coefficients of variation CV for EQ inter-event time and slip-per-event and find that a) single-event offsets vary over a wide range of length-scales and the sources for offset variability differ with length-scale, b) at fault-segment length-scales, single-event offsets are essentially constant, c) along-fault offset accumulation as resolved in the geomorphic record is dominated by essentially same-size, large offset increments, and d) there is generally no one-to-one correlation between the offset accumulation pattern constrained in the geomorphic record and EQ occurrence as identified in the stratigraphic record, revealing the higher resolution and preservation potential of

  12. Fault slip and earthquake recurrence along strike-slip faults - Contributions of high-resolution geomorphic data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zielke, Olaf; Klinger, Yann; Arrowsmith, J. Ramon

    2015-01-01

    Understanding earthquake (EQ) recurrence relies on information about the timing and size of past EQ ruptures along a given fault. Knowledge of a fault's rupture history provides valuable information on its potential future behavior, enabling seismic hazard estimates and loss mitigation. Stratigraphic and geomorphic evidence of faulting is used to constrain the recurrence of surface rupturing EQs. Analysis of the latter data sets culminated during the mid-1980s in the formulation of now classical EQ recurrence models, now routinely used to assess seismic hazard. Within the last decade, Light Detection and Ranging (lidar) surveying technology and other high-resolution data sets became increasingly available to tectono-geomorphic studies, promising to contribute to better-informed models of EQ recurrence and slip-accumulation patterns. After reviewing motivation and background, we outline requirements to successfully reconstruct a fault's offset accumulation pattern from geomorphic evidence. We address sources of uncertainty affecting offset measurement and advocate approaches to minimize them. A number of recent studies focus on single-EQ slip distributions and along-fault slip accumulation patterns. We put them in context with paleoseismic studies along the respective faults by comparing coefficients of variation CV for EQ inter-event time and slip-per-event and find that a) single-event offsets vary over a wide range of length-scales and the sources for offset variability differ with length-scale, b) at fault-segment length-scales, single-event offsets are essentially constant, c) along-fault offset accumulation as resolved in the geomorphic record is dominated by essentially same-size, large offset increments, and d) there is generally no one-to-one correlation between the offset accumulation pattern constrained in the geomorphic record and EQ occurrence as identified in the stratigraphic record, revealing the higher resolution and preservation potential of the

  13. Using Deep Slow Slip in New Zealand to Constrain Slip Partitioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartlow, N. M.; Wallace, L. M.

    2016-12-01

    Underneath New Zealand's North Island, the Pacific plate subducts obliquely beneath the Australian plate. Just to the south, subduction ceases and the plate boundary transitions to the mainly strike-slip, steeply dipping Alpine fault that runs along the South Island. In the region of the southern North Island, the relative plate motion has significant components of both convergence and along strike motion, and slip is partitioned between the main Hikurangi subduction interface and a series of shallower strike-slip faults running thurough the North Island (Wallace and Beavan, GRL, 2010). This region also hosts deep ( 50 km), long duration ( 1 year) slow slip events (SSEs). From early 2013 to early 2016, continuous GPS stations maintained by GeoNet in this region recorded two such deep SSEs on the Hikurangi megathrust. The first SSE occurred on the Kapiti patch, just southwest of the North Island coast. SSEs previous occurred here in 2003 and 2008 (Wallace and Beavan, JGR, 2010). The 2014 Kapiti SSE is unique because it was rapidly decelerated following increased normal stress (clamping) caused by a nearby M 6.3 earthquake (Wallace et al., GRL, 2014). However, GPS data indicates that slip did not stop entirely, and soon after the Manawatu slow slip patch just to the northeast ruptured in another SSE. This patch previously had large SSEs in 2004/2005 and 2010/2011. Given the previous repeat interval of 5.5 years, the 2014/2015 Manawatu SSE is early; however, the record is very short. Here we show Network Inversion Filter derived models of slow slip for the various phases of the Kapiti and Manawatu SSEs, which indicate a possible continuous migration of slip from the Kapiti SSE patch to the Manawatu SSE patch, and we quantify the shear stress increase on the Manawatu patch after the Kapiti SSE. Additionally, we explore allowing the Network Inversion Filter to vary the direction of slip on the plate interface to better fit the data. We estimate how much of the strike-slip

  14. Determination of variator robustness under macro slip conditions for a push belt CVT

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Drogen, Mark; van der Laan, Maaike

    2004-01-01

    Developments in clamping force control for the push belt Continuously Variable Transmission (CVT) aim at increased efficiency in combination with improved robustness. Current control strategies attempt to prevent macro slip between elements and pulleys at all times for maximum robustness. In order

  15. Slipped Capital Femoral Epiphysis in Atypical Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whyte, Noelle; Sullivan, Christopher

    2016-04-01

    When patients who are thin present with knee pain, it can be easy to overlook the possibility of slipped capital femoral epiphysis (SCFE). Although 80% of patients with a "slip" are obese, thin children are not immune to this problem. Endocrinopathies, especially hypothyroidism, can be associated with SCFE. This article describes guidelines for evaluating patients for a slip and highlights some important considerations for the atypical SCFE. Patients with open growth plates with thigh or knee pain should routinely have a hip examination as part of the evaluation. Plain radiographs, with an emphasis on obtaining a frog lateral image, are usually sufficient to make the diagnosis of SCFE. Patients diagnosed with SCFE should be immediately referred to an orthopedic surgeon because treatment for this condition is always surgical. Copyright 2016, SLACK Incorporated.

  16. Slipped extraocular muscles: characteristics and surgical outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Haddad, Christiane; Abdul Fattah, Maamoun

    2017-02-01

    To study the frequency and characteristics of slipped extraocular muscles after strabismus surgery and report the postoperative outcomes longitudinally. Retrospective chart review. Electronic medical records of 493 patients who underwent strabismus surgery and were found to have a slipped muscle intraoperatively were reviewed. Records were retrieved and operative reports were screened for the presence of slipped muscles. Data pertaining to the eye examination and surgery were collected, including vision, ocular motility in all positions, duction limitations, slipped muscle, empty sheath length, amount of slippage, amount of advancement, and amount of recession of the antagonist muscle. Twelve patients (mean age 29.1 ± 6.4 years; 5 males) were found to have 15 slipped medial rectus muscles. Average amount of slippage was 15.7 ± 2.0 mm; from limbus empty sheath length was 5.9 ± 1.9 mm. Average preoperative deviation was 32.2 ± 10.0 prism diopters (PD) exotropia. Mean follow-up after corrective surgery was 13.3 months (1 week to 42 months). Four patients were transiently overcorrected postoperatively (7.0 ± 7.0 PD esotropia). The rest had mean residual exotropia of 13.5 ± 9.2 PD with a change of 26.6 ± 10.3 PD from baseline (p muscle movement was 10.3 ± 2.2 mm with a mean postoperative change of 2.6 PD for each 1 mm of muscle advancement. There was no significant increase over time in the postoperative angle of deviation during all follow-up periods except for 1 patient who was re-explored after 4 years. Slipped muscle should be suspected in the presence of limited ductions and consecutive deviations after strabismus surgery. A change of 2.6 PD for every 1 mm of medial rectus muscle advancement was observed and maintained over time. Copyright © 2017 Canadian Ophthalmological Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Real-time on-line ultrasonic monitoring for bubbles in ceramic 'slip' in pottery pipelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yim, Geun Tae; Leighton, Timothy G

    2010-01-01

    nature of the slip (which can be very variable). It must also be capable of detecting bubbles amongst the myriad solid particles and other species present in the flowing slip. The completed prototype was tested around several factories in Europe, and proved not only to be more versatile, but also more sensitive, than the state-of-the-art method.

  18. Imbricated slip rate processes during slow slip transients imaged by low-frequency earthquakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lengliné, O.; Frank, W. B.; Marsan, D.; Ampuero, J.-P.

    2017-10-01

    Low Frequency Earthquakes (LFEs) often occur in conjunction with transient strain episodes, or Slow Slip Events (SSEs), in subduction zones. Their focal mechanism and location consistent with shear failure on the plate interface argue for a model where LFEs are discrete dynamic ruptures in an otherwise slowly slipping interface. SSEs are mostly observed by surface geodetic instruments with limited resolution and it is likely that only the largest ones are detected. The time synchronization of LFEs and SSEs suggests that we could use the recorded LFEs to constrain the evolution of SSEs, and notably of the geodetically-undetected small ones. However, inferring slow slip rate from the temporal evolution of LFE activity is complicated by the strong temporal clustering of LFEs. Here we apply dedicated statistical tools to retrieve the temporal evolution of SSE slip rates from the time history of LFE occurrences in two subduction zones, Mexico and Cascadia, and in the deep portion of the San Andreas fault at Parkfield. We find temporal characteristics of LFEs that are similar across these three different regions. The longer term episodic slip transients present in these datasets show a slip rate decay with time after the passage of the SSE front possibly as t - 1 / 4. They are composed of multiple short term transients with steeper slip rate decay as t-α with α between 1.4 and 2. We also find that the maximum slip rate of SSEs has a continuous distribution. Our results indicate that creeping faults host intermittent deformation at various scales resulting from the imbricated occurrence of numerous slow slip events of various amplitudes.

  19. Production of nanoparticles during experimental deformation of smectite and implications for seismic slip

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aretusini, S.; Mittempergher, S.; Plümper, O.; Spagnuolo, E.; Gualtieri, A. F.; Di Toro, G.

    2017-04-01

    Nanoparticles and amorphous materials are common constituents of the shallow sections of active faults. Understanding the conditions at which nanoparticles are produced and their effects on friction can further improve our understanding of fault mechanics and earthquake energy budgets. Here we present the results of 59 rotary shear experiments conducted at room humidity conditions on gouge consisting of mixtures of smectite (Ca-montmorillonite) and quartz. Experiments with 60, 50, 25, 0 wt.% Ca-montmorillonite, were performed to investigate the influence of variable clay content on nanoparticle production and their influence on frictional processes. All experiments were performed at a normal stress of 5 MPa, slip rate of 0.0003 ≤ V ≤ 1.5 ms-1, and at a displacement of 3 m. To monitor the development of fabric and the mineralogical changes during the experiments, we investigated the deformed gouges using scanning and transmission electron microscopy combined with X-ray powder diffraction quantitative phase analysis. This integrated analytical approach reveals that, at all slip rates and compositions, the nanoparticles (grain size of 10-50 nm) are partly amorphous and result from cataclasis, wear and mechanical solid-state amorphization of smectite. The maximum production of amorphous nanoparticle occurs in the intermediate slip rate range (0.0003 ≤ V ≤ 0.1 ms-1), at the highest frictional work, and is associated to diffuse deformation and slip strengthening behavior. Instead, the lowest production of amorphous nanoparticles occurs at co-seismic slip rates (V ≥ 1.3 ms-1), at the highest frictional power and is associated with strain and heat localization and slip weakening behavior. Our findings suggest that, independently of the amount of smectite nanoparticles, they produce fault weakening only when typical co-seismic slip rates (>0.1 ms-1) are achieved. This implies that estimates of the fracture surface energy dissipated during earthquakes in natural

  20. Induction practice -

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rohde, Nicolas; Sprogøe, Jonas

    2007-01-01

    of learning. We focus on and describe the interplay that takes place in particular induction events and analyze the "dance" through the lens of learning. The paper concludes with a brief discussion about the implications for practitioners and the challenges and future research prospects we have encountered....... We draw on an empirical enquiry in two organizational settings, a Danish management consulting company and a German retail bank....

  1. Ground Reaction Forces in Alternative Footwear during Slip Events

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harish Chander

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Slips, trips and falls are major causitive factors for occupational and non-occupational falls. Alternative footwear such has crocs and flip flops have been used in and around work places and communities that can be slip prone environments. The purpose of the study is to analyze the effects of alternative footwear [crocs (CC, flip-flops (FF] and industry standard slip resistant shoes (LT on ground reaction forces (GRFs during slip events. Eighteen healthy male participants following a repeated measures design for each footwear condition, were tested for heel kinematics during normal dry surface gait (NG; unexpected slip (US, alert slip (AS and expected slip (ES. A 3x4 repeated measures ANOVA was used to analyze the dependent vertical GRFs parameters (Mean Z-GRF and Peak Z-GRF at p = 0.05. Significant interactions between footwear and gait trials were found for Mean Z-GRF and significant main effect in gait trials for Peak Z-GRF were evident. On average significantly lower GRFs were seen in slip trials compared to normal gait. FF exhibited significantly lower GRFs during slip trials while LT demonstrated lower GRFs in normal gait. The reduced ground reaction forces during all slip events compared to normal gait can be attributed to the incomplete weight transfer on the slipping foot during the unexpected and alert slips and to the anticipation of the slippery environment in expected slips. Flip flops which had greater incidence of slips also demonstrated reduced GRFs compared to CC and LT during slip events, further suggesting incomplete weight transfer, while during normal gait, LT demonstrated reduced GRFs compared to alternative footwear owing to its cushioning midsole properties. The LT with lowest incidence of slips demonstrates to be the choice of footwear for maneuvering slippery flooring conditions and for reducing impact reaction forces during non-slippery flooring conditions. Keywords: Slips, Falls, Alternative Footwear, Ground Reaction

  2. Hybrid-secondary uncluttered induction machine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, John S.

    2001-01-01

    An uncluttered secondary induction machine (100) includes an uncluttered rotating transformer (66) which is mounted on the same shaft as the rotor (73) of the induction machine. Current in the rotor (73) is electrically connected to current in the rotor winding (67) of the transformer, which is not electrically connected to, but is magnetically coupled to, a stator secondary winding (40). The stator secondary winding (40) is alternately connected to an effective resistance (41), an AC source inverter (42) or a magnetic switch (43) to provide a cost effective slip-energy-controlled, adjustable speed, induction motor that operates over a wide speed range from below synchronous speed to above synchronous speed based on the AC line frequency fed to the stator.

  3. Hydrodynamic slip length as a surface property

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos-Alvarado, Bladimir; Kumar, Satish; Peterson, G. P.

    2016-02-01

    Equilibrium and nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations were conducted in order to evaluate the hypothesis that the hydrodynamic slip length is a surface property. The system under investigation was water confined between two graphite layers to form nanochannels of different sizes (3-8 nm). The water-carbon interaction potential was calibrated by matching wettability experiments of graphitic-carbon surfaces free of airborne hydrocarbon contamination. Three equilibrium theories were used to calculate the hydrodynamic slip length. It was found that one of the recently reported equilibrium theories for the calculation of the slip length featured confinement effects, while the others resulted in calculations significantly hindered by the large margin of error observed between independent simulations. The hydrodynamic slip length was found to be channel-size independent using equilibrium calculations, i.e., suggesting a consistency with the definition of a surface property, for 5-nm channels and larger. The analysis of the individual trajectories of liquid particles revealed that the reason for observing confinement effects in 3-nm nanochannels is the high mobility of the bulk particles. Nonequilibrium calculations were not consistently affected by size but by noisiness in the smallest systems.

  4. Slip Dynamics in Small Scale Crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maass, Robert; Derlet, Peter; Greer, Julia; Volkert, Cynthia

    2015-03-01

    Classical work showed that dislocation velocities are strongly dependent on applied stress. Numerous experiments have validated this for individual or groups of dislocations in macroscopic crystals by using imaging techniques combined with either mechanical data or time resolved topological data. Developments in small scale mechanical testing allow to correlate the intermittency of collective dislocation motion with the mechanical response. Discrete forward surges in displacement can be related to dislocation avalanches, which are triggered by the evolving dislocation sub-structure. We study the spatiotemporal characteristics of intermittent plastic flow in quasi-statically sheared single crystalline Au crystals with diameters between 300 nm and 10000 nm, whose displacement bursts were recorded at several kHz (Scripta Mater. 2013, 69, 586; Small, available online). Both the crystallographic slip magnitude, as well as the velocity of the slip events are exhibiting power-law scaling as. The obtained slip velocity distribution has a cubic decay at high values, and a saturated flat shoulder at lower velocities. No correlation between the slip velocity and the applied stress or plastic strain is found. Further, we present DD-simulations that are supportive of our experimental findings. The simulations suggest that the dynamics of the internal stress fields dominate the evolving dislocation structure leading to velocities that are insensitive to the applied stress - a regime indicative of microplasticity.

  5. Slip resistance testing - Zones of uncertainty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bowman, R.

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper considers recent and current potential developments in the international standardisation of slip resistance. It identifies some limitations of the wet barefoot ramp test, such that changes should be made if it is to be more widely used. It also identifies some limitations of the new European SlipSTD Publicly Available Specification, such as insufficient allowance for the deterioration of slip resistance as tiles inevitably wear.

    Este trabajo considera los desarrollos recientes y potenciales que hay en la actualidad en el desarrollo de las normas internacionales sobre la resistencia al resbalamiento. Identifica algunas limitaciones del ensayo de la rampa para pies descalzos en húmedo, para que se realicen cambios, si se va a usar de forma más extendida. También identifica algunas limitaciones de la nueva Especificación Europea Públicamente Disponible SlipSTD, como la falta de tener en cuenta adecuadamente el deterioro de la resistencia al resbalamiento de las baldosas a medida que inevitablemente se vayan desgastando.

  6. Slip casting and nitridation of silicon powder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seiko, Y.

    1985-01-01

    Powdered Silicon was slip-cast with a CaSO4 x 0.5H2O mold and nitrided in a N atm. containing 0 or 5 vol. % H at 1000 to 1420 deg. To remove the castings, the modeling faces were coated successively with an aq. salt soap and powdered cellulose containing Na alginate, and thus prevented the sticking problem.

  7. Next generation GNSS single receiver cycle slip reliability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Teunissen, P.J.G.; De Bakker, P.F.

    2009-01-01

    In this contribution we study the multi-frequency, carrier-phase slip detection capabilities of a single receiver. Our analysis is based on an analytical expression that we present for themulti-frequencyminimal detectable carrier phase cycle slip.

  8. PROCESSING OF CONCENTRATED AQUEOUS ZIRCONIA-BIOGLASS SLIPS BY SLIP CASTING

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Leon, Beltina

    2017-01-01

    ...) bioglass, were used to produce Y-TZP- bioglass slip cast compacts. The rheological properties of concentrated aqueous Y-TZP- 64S suspensions prepared with two different glass contents: 10.5 vol% and 19.9 vol...

  9. Vaccine Induction of Antibodies Against a Structurally Heterogeneous Site of Immune Pressure within HIV-1 Envelope Protein Variable Regions 1 and 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Hua-Xin; Bonsignori, Mattia; Alam, S. Munir; McLellan, Jason S.; Tomaras, Georgia D.; Moody, M. Anthony; Kozink, Daniel M.; Hwang, Kwan-Ki; Chen, Xi; Tsao, Chun-Yen; Liu, Pinghuang; Lu, Xiaozhi; Parks, Robert J.; Montefiori, David C.; Ferrari, Guido; Pollara, Justin; Rao, Mangala; Peachman, Kristina K.; Santra, Sampa; Letvin, Norman L.; Karasavvas, Nicos; Yang, Zhi-Yong; Dai, Kaifan; Pancera, Marie; Gorman, Jason; Wiehe, Kevin; Nicely, Nathan I.; Rerks-Ngarm, Supachai; Nitayaphan, Sorachai; Kaewkungwal, Jaranit; Pitisuttithum, Punnee; Tartaglia, James; Sinangil, Faruk; Kim, Jerome H.; Michael, Nelson L.; Kepler, Thomas B.; Kwong, Peter D.; Mascola, John R.; Nabel, Gary J.; Pinter, Abraham; Zolla-Pazner, Susan; Haynes, Barton F.

    2013-01-01

    Summary The RV144 HIV-1 trial of the canary pox vector (ALVAC-HIV) plus the gp120 AIDSVAX B/E vaccine demonstrated an estimated efficacy of 31%, that correlated directly with antibodies to HIV-1 envelope variable regions 1 and 2 (V1–V2). Genetic analysis of trial viruses revealed increased vaccine efficacy against viruses matching the vaccine strain at V2 residue 169. Here, we isolated four V2 monoclonal antibodies from RV144 vaccinees that recognize residue 169, neutralize laboratory-adapted HIV-1, and mediate killing of field isolate HIV-1-infected CD4+ T cells. Crystal structures of two of the V2 antibodies demonstrated residue 169 can exist within divergent helical and loop conformations, which contrasted dramatically with the beta strand conformation previously observed with a broadly neutralizing antibody PG9. Thus, RV144 vaccine-induced immune pressure appears to target a region that may be both sequence variable and structurally polymorphic. Variation may signal sites of HIV-1 envelope vulnerability, providing vaccine designers with new options. PMID:23313589

  10. Ultrasonographic Diagnosis of Slipped Capital Femoral Epiphysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palaniappan, Manikandan; Indiran, Venkatraman; Maduraimuthu, Prabakaran

    2017-01-01

    Slipped capital femoral epiphysis (SCFE), a fracture through the physis with resultant slip of the epiphysis, is the most common hip abnormality in adolescents and is a major cause of early osteoarthritis. Plain radiograph is the initial modality used to evaluate patients with painful hip joints. Ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which do not involve radiation exposure, have also been used. This case report supports the view that ultrasound can be used as an initial, cost-effective and radiation-free modality for the evaluation of suspected SCFE. A 15-year-old male patient presented with pain in the right hip for 5 days, following a slip and fall accident while playing soccer. The patient was referred to the Department of Radio-diagnosis for ultrasound. A posterior displacement of the femoral head epiphysis with a physeal step was seen on the longitudinal section obtained over the right hip joint region. The anterior physeal step (APS) measured ~3.8 mm on the right side. The distance between the anterior rim of the acetabulum and the metaphysis measured ~20.4 mm on the affected right side and ~23.6 mm on the left side. A plain radiograph in frog leg position showed a widening of the right proximal physis below the right femoral head, with a medial and posterior slip of the right femoral head. A frontal radiograph of the pelvis taken six months before showed a widening of the proximal right femoral physis. Although MRI appears to be the most sensitive modality for identifying slips early, ultrasound may be used as a cost-effective and radiation-free alternative before proceeding with further evaluation of suspected SCFE, especially considering the demographics of the affected population.

  11. Interfacial stick–slip transition in hydroxyapatite filled high density ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Effect of filler addition and temperature on the stick–slip transition in high density polyethylene melt was studied. Results showed that shear stresses corresponding to stick–slip transition increases with the addition of filler. Increase in temperature also increases the shear stresses for stick–slip transition. The features of the ...

  12. Evidence for Truncated Exponential Probability Distribution of Earthquake Slip

    KAUST Repository

    Thingbaijam, Kiran K. S.

    2016-07-13

    Earthquake ruptures comprise spatially varying slip on the fault surface, where slip represents the displacement discontinuity between the two sides of the rupture plane. In this study, we analyze the probability distribution of coseismic slip, which provides important information to better understand earthquake source physics. Although the probability distribution of slip is crucial for generating realistic rupture scenarios for simulation-based seismic and tsunami-hazard analysis, the statistical properties of earthquake slip have received limited attention so far. Here, we use the online database of earthquake source models (SRCMOD) to show that the probability distribution of slip follows the truncated exponential law. This law agrees with rupture-specific physical constraints limiting the maximum possible slip on the fault, similar to physical constraints on maximum earthquake magnitudes.We show the parameters of the best-fitting truncated exponential distribution scale with average coseismic slip. This scaling property reflects the control of the underlying stress distribution and fault strength on the rupture dimensions, which determines the average slip. Thus, the scale-dependent behavior of slip heterogeneity is captured by the probability distribution of slip. We conclude that the truncated exponential law accurately quantifies coseismic slip distribution and therefore allows for more realistic modeling of rupture scenarios. © 2016, Seismological Society of America. All rights reserverd.

  13. Navier slip model of drag reduction by Leidenfrost vapor layers

    KAUST Repository

    Berry, Joseph D.

    2017-10-17

    Recent experiments found that a hot solid sphere that is able to sustain a stable Leidenfrost vapor layer in a liquid exhibits significant drag reduction during free fall. The variation of the drag coefficient with Reynolds number deviates substantially from the characteristic drag crisis behavior at high Reynolds numbers. Measurements based on liquids of different viscosities show that the onset of the drag crisis depends on the viscosity ratio of the vapor to the liquid. Here we attempt to characterize the complexity of the Leidenfrost vapor layer with respect to its variable thickness and possible vapor circulation within, in terms of the Navier slip model that is defined by a slip length. Such a model can facilitate tangential flow and thereby alter the behavior of the boundary layer. Direct numerical and large eddy simulations of flow past a sphere at moderate to high Reynolds numbers (102≤Re≤4×104) are employed to quantify comparisons with experimental results, including the drag coefficient and the form of the downstream wake on the sphere. This provides a simple one parameter characterization of the drag reduction phenomenon due to a stable vapor layer that envelops a solid body.

  14. Navier slip model of drag reduction by Leidenfrost vapor layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Joseph D.; Vakarelski, Ivan U.; Chan, Derek Y. C.; Thoroddsen, Sigurdur T.

    2017-10-01

    Recent experiments found that a hot solid sphere that is able to sustain a stable Leidenfrost vapor layer in a liquid exhibits significant drag reduction during free fall. The variation of the drag coefficient with Reynolds number deviates substantially from the characteristic drag crisis behavior at high Reynolds numbers. Measurements based on liquids of different viscosities show that the onset of the drag crisis depends on the viscosity ratio of the vapor to the liquid. Here we attempt to characterize the complexity of the Leidenfrost vapor layer with respect to its variable thickness and possible vapor circulation within, in terms of the Navier slip model that is defined by a slip length. Such a model can facilitate tangential flow and thereby alter the behavior of the boundary layer. Direct numerical and large eddy simulations of flow past a sphere at moderate to high Reynolds numbers (1 02≤Re≤4 ×1 04) are employed to quantify comparisons with experimental results, including the drag coefficient and the form of the downstream wake on the sphere. This provides a simple one parameter characterization of the drag reduction phenomenon due to a stable vapor layer that envelops a solid body.

  15. Surface slip during large Owens Valley earthquakes

    KAUST Repository

    Haddon, E. K.

    2016-01-10

    The 1872 Owens Valley earthquake is the third largest known historical earthquake in California. Relatively sparse field data and a complex rupture trace, however, inhibited attempts to fully resolve the slip distribution and reconcile the total moment release. We present a new, comprehensive record of surface slip based on lidar and field investigation, documenting 162 new measurements of laterally and vertically displaced landforms for 1872 and prehistoric Owens Valley earthquakes. Our lidar analysis uses a newly developed analytical tool to measure fault slip based on cross-correlation of sublinear topographic features and to produce a uniquely shaped probability density function (PDF) for each measurement. Stacking PDFs along strike to form cumulative offset probability distribution plots (COPDs) highlights common values corresponding to single and multiple-event displacements. Lateral offsets for 1872 vary systematically from approximate to 1.0 to 6.0 m and average 3.31.1 m (2 sigma). Vertical offsets are predominantly east-down between approximate to 0.1 and 2.4 m, with a mean of 0.80.5 m. The average lateral-to-vertical ratio compiled at specific sites is approximate to 6:1. Summing displacements across subparallel, overlapping rupture traces implies a maximum of 7-11 m and net average of 4.41.5 m, corresponding to a geologic M-w approximate to 7.5 for the 1872 event. We attribute progressively higher-offset lateral COPD peaks at 7.12.0 m, 12.8 +/- 1.5 m, and 16.6 +/- 1.4 m to three earlier large surface ruptures. Evaluating cumulative displacements in context with previously dated landforms in Owens Valley suggests relatively modest rates of fault slip, averaging between approximate to 0.6 and 1.6 mm/yr (1 sigma) over the late Quaternary.

  16. Stokes equations with penalised slip boundary conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dione, Ibrahima; Tibirna, Cristian; Urquiza, José

    2013-07-01

    We consider the finite-element approximation of Stokes equations with slip boundary conditions imposed with the penalty method. In the case of a smooth curved boundary, our numerical results suggest that curved finite elements, regularised normal vectors or reduced integration techniques can be used to avoid a Babuska's-type paradox and ensure the convergence of finite-element approximations to the exact solution. Convergence orders with these remedies are also compared.

  17. Seismic slip recorded in tourmaline fault mirrors from Elba Island (Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viti, C.; Brogi, A.; Liotta, D.; Mugnaioli, E.; Spiess, R.; Dini, A.; Zucchi, M.; Vannuccini, G.

    2016-05-01

    This paper reports the first example of fault mirrors developed in an unusual protolith, consisting of tourmaline crystals with interstitial goethite. The deformation mechanisms active in the fault zone have been investigated from the outcrop to the nanoscale, aiming to identify possible traces of frictional heating at seismic slip rate, as observed for other fault mirrors in different protoliths. The investigation revealed the superposition of two main deformational stages. The first was dominated by brittle processes and produced a cataclastic/ultracataclastic principal slip zone, a few mm thick; the second was associated with seismic slip and produced a sharp discontinuity (the principal slip surface) within the cataclastic/ultracataclastic zone. The mirror-like coating, a few microns thick, occurs on the principal slip surface, and is characterized by 1) absence of interstitial goethite; 2) occurrence of truncated tourmaline crystals; 3) highly variable grain size, from 200 μm to 200 nm; 4) tourmaline close packing with interlobate grain boundaries, and 5) tourmaline random crystallographic orientation. Micro and nanostructural investigations indicate the occurrence of thermally-activated processes, involving both interstitial goethite and tourmaline. In particular, close to the principal slip surface, goethite is completely decomposed, and produced an amorphous porous material, with local topotactic recrystallization of hematite. Tourmaline clasts are typically characterized by strongly lobate boundaries, indicative of reaction and partial decomposition at grain boundaries. TEM observations revealed the occurrence of tourmaline nanograins, a few tens of nm in size, characterized by rounded shape and fading amorphous boundaries, that cannot be obtained by brittle processes. Lastly, the peculiar interlobate microstructure of the mirror surface is interpreted as the result of grain boundary recrystallization processes taking place by deformation at high

  18. A precision based regularization scheme for slip inversion: Application to the Central Andean Subduction Zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega-Culaciati, Francisco; Becerra, Valeria; Simons, Mark; Moreno, Marcos; Ruiz, Javier; Comte, Diana; Contreras-Reyes, Eduardo; Maksymowicz, Andrei; Socquet, Anne; Jara, Jorge; Carrizo, Daniel

    2017-04-01

    Imaging subsurface slip behavior from surface observations is essential to increase our level of understanding of the kinematics and physical processes controlling earthquake and tsunami occurrence. As the estimation procedure is an inherently ill-posed problem, the adopted inverse methodology to obtain such estimates, particularly the form of the a priori information, plays a key role in this learning process. There are two general end member approaches to estimate the distribution of slip on a fault that deals with the inherent instability of the inverse problem: An unregularized, computationally expensive, fully Bayesian MCMC approach and a much more expedient but biased optimization approach using some form of regularized least squares. We focus our efforts in the latter approach. On the regularized inversion, the chosen form of a priori information, or regularization scheme, will introduce a bias on fault slip estimates that needs to be well understood to be able to achieve rigorous interpretation of the obtained slip values. Here we discuss the effects that the a priori information implied by commonly used regularization schemes has on slip estimates of fault behavior. Also, we propose a novel regularization scheme, based on the precision of the model parameters in the unregularized problem, that accounts for the spatial variability of the constraints provided by the observations (typically onland). The proposed regularization scheme improves the stability and resolution of the inferred slip distributions of fault behavior. We illustrate our findings by analyzing synthetic cases in the Central Andean subduction megathrust, and apply the methodology to perform an analysis of the seismic cycle in the region.

  19. Influence of tire dynamics on slip ratio estimation of independent driving wheel system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jianqiu; Song, Ziyou; Wei, Yintao; Ouyang, Minggao

    2014-11-01

    The independent driving wheel system, which is composed of in-wheel permanent magnet synchronous motor(I-PMSM) and tire, is more convenient to estimate the slip ratio because the rotary speed of the rotor can be accurately measured. However, the ring speed of the tire ring doesn't equal to the rotor speed considering the tire deformation. For this reason, a deformable tire and a detailed I-PMSM are modeled by using Matlab/Simulink. Moreover, the tire/road contact interface(a slippery road) is accurately described by the non-linear relaxation length-based model and the Magic Formula pragmatic model. Based on the relatively accurate model, the error of slip ratio estimated by the rotor rotary speed is analyzed in both time and frequency domains when a quarter car is started by the I-PMSM with a definite target torque input curve. In addition, the natural frequencies(NFs) of the driving wheel system with variable parameters are illustrated to present the relationship between the slip ratio estimation error and the NF. According to this relationship, a low-pass filter, whose cut-off frequency corresponds to the NF, is proposed to eliminate the error in the estimated slip ratio. The analysis, concerning the effect of the driving wheel parameters and road conditions on slip ratio estimation, shows that the peak estimation error can be reduced up to 75% when the LPF is adopted. The robustness and effectiveness of the LPF are therefore validated. This paper builds up the deformable tire model and the detailed I-PMSM models, and analyzes the effect of the driving wheel parameters and road conditions on slip ratio estimation.

  20. Calculation of the overlap angle in slip energy recovery drives using a d,q/abc model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akpinar, E.; Pillay, P. (Univ. of New Orleans, LA (United States). Dept. of Electrical Engineering); Ersak, A. (Middle East Technical Univ., Ankara (Turkey). Dept. of Electrical and Electronics)

    1993-06-01

    In this paper, a closed-form expression to estimate the overlap angle in a slip energy recovery system is presented. The prediction of the overlap angle is important in the case of doubly-fed induction motor drives, because of its influence on speed and torque. A closed-form expression is derived using a hybrid model of the induction motor and a dynamic model of the rotor rectifier. The ripple content of the dc link current and the inverter input voltage are neglected. The predicted results obtained using the closed form expression are verified experimentally.

  1. Lexicographic Path Induction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schürmann, Carsten; Sarnat, Jeffrey

    2009-01-01

    an induction principle that combines the comfort of structural induction with the expressive strength of transfinite induction. Using lexicographic path induction, we give a consistency proof of Martin-Löf’s intuitionistic theory of inductive definitions. The consistency of Heyting arithmetic follows directly...

  2. Long-term slip deficit and the forecasting of slip in future earthquakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCloskey, John; NicBhloscaidh, Mairead; Simao, Nuno

    2014-05-01

    In the last decade a series of devastating earthquakes have between them killed more than three-quarters of a million people. None of the events were formally forecast and have been repeatedly referred to a seismological 'surprises'. Here we argue that while earthquakes within the wide swath of diffuse deformation comprising the Alpine-Himalayan belt pose a set of particularly difficult set of challenges, earthquakes which are driven by high strain-rates at plate boundaries and which have relatively short nominal recurrence times might be forecast if the data exists to perform long-term slip deficit modelling and stress reconstruction. We show that two instrumentally recorded event on the Sumatran margin in 2007 and 2010 occurred in regions of high slip deficit identified by reconstruction of slip in historical earthquakes in 1797 and 1833 under the Mentawai Islands using more than 200 years of geodetic data recorded in the stratigraphy of coral micro-atolls growing there. In the presentation we will describe the data and a new Bayesian-Monte Carlo slip reconstruction technique. The technique is based on the stochastic forward modelling of many slip distributions each using the same set of elastic Green's functions to estimate, by superposition of contributions from each fault cell, the vertical displacement at the coral locations resulting from each simulated event. Every solution, weighted by its goodness of fit to the data, is added to a stack whose final values contain an estimate of the most likely distribution of slip in the historical earthquakes. Further, we estimate the Kullback-Liebler divergence over the fault area providing a non-arbitrary assessment of the spatial distribution of information gain, identifying regions of low- and high- model confidence. We then model the long-term slip deficit on the megathrust assuming a zero of stress immediately after the 1652 Mentawai Islands earthquake. We use the resulting slip deficit field to compute the entire

  3. Earthquake scaling laws for rupture geometry and slip heterogeneity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thingbaijam, Kiran K. S.; Mai, P. Martin; Goda, Katsuichiro

    2016-04-01

    We analyze an extensive compilation of finite-fault rupture models to investigate earthquake scaling of source geometry and slip heterogeneity to derive new relationships for seismic and tsunami hazard assessment. Our dataset comprises 158 earthquakes with a total of 316 rupture models selected from the SRCMOD database (http://equake-rc.info/srcmod). We find that fault-length does not saturate with earthquake magnitude, while fault-width reveals inhibited growth due to the finite seismogenic thickness. For strike-slip earthquakes, fault-length grows more rapidly with increasing magnitude compared to events of other faulting types. Interestingly, our derived relationship falls between the L-model and W-model end-members. In contrast, both reverse and normal dip-slip events are more consistent with self-similar scaling of fault-length. However, fault-width scaling relationships for large strike-slip and normal dip-slip events, occurring on steeply dipping faults (δ~90° for strike-slip faults, and δ~60° for normal faults), deviate from self-similarity. Although reverse dip-slip events in general show self-similar scaling, the restricted growth of down-dip fault extent (with upper limit of ~200 km) can be seen for mega-thrust subduction events (M~9.0). Despite this fact, for a given earthquake magnitude, subduction reverse dip-slip events occupy relatively larger rupture area, compared to shallow crustal events. In addition, we characterize slip heterogeneity in terms of its probability distribution and spatial correlation structure to develop a complete stochastic random-field characterization of earthquake slip. We find that truncated exponential law best describes the probability distribution of slip, with observable scale parameters determined by the average and maximum slip. Applying Box-Cox transformation to slip distributions (to create quasi-normal distributed data) supports cube-root transformation, which also implies distinctive non-Gaussian slip

  4. Interplate coupling and seismic-aseismic slip patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senatorski, Piotr

    2017-04-01

    Numerical simulations were carried out to explain the seismic and aseismic slip paradox. Recent observations of megathrust faults show that stable and unstable slip movements can occur at the same locations. This contradicts the previous view based on frictional sliding theories. In the present work, an asperity fault model with the slip-dependent friction and stress dependent healing is used to show that the character of slip can change, even if friction parameters, such as strength and slip-weakening distance, are fixed. The reason is that the slow versus fast slip interplay is more than just about the friction law problem. The character of slip depends both on the local friction and on the system stiffness. The stiffness is related to the slipping area size and distribution of slips, so it changes from one event to another. It is also shown that the high strength interplate patches, such as subducted seamounts, can both promote and restrain large earthquakes, depending on the slip-weakening distance lengths.

  5. A terrestrial lidar-based workflow for determining three-dimensional slip vectors and associated uncertainties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gold, Peter O.; Cowgill, Eric; Kreylos, Oliver; Gold, Ryan D.

    2012-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) slip vectors recorded by displaced landforms are difficult to constrain across complex fault zones, and the uncertainties associated with such measurements become increasingly challenging to assess as landforms degrade over time. We approach this problem from a remote sensing perspective by using terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) and 3D structural analysis. We have developed an integrated TLS data collection and point-based analysis workflow that incorporates accurate assessments of aleatoric and epistemic uncertainties using experimental surveys, Monte Carlo simulations, and iterative site reconstructions. Our scanning workflow and equipment requirements are optimized for single-operator surveying, and our data analysis process is largely completed using new point-based computing tools in an immersive 3D virtual reality environment. In a case study, we measured slip vector orientations at two sites along the rupture trace of the 1954 Dixie Valley earthquake (central Nevada, United States), yielding measurements that are the first direct constraints on the 3D slip vector for this event. These observations are consistent with a previous approximation of net extension direction for this event. We find that errors introduced by variables in our survey method result in <2.5 cm of variability in components of displacement, and are eclipsed by the 10–60 cm epistemic errors introduced by reconstructing the field sites to their pre-erosion geometries. Although the higher resolution TLS data sets enabled visualization and data interactivity critical for reconstructing the 3D slip vector and for assessing uncertainties, dense topographic constraints alone were not sufficient to significantly narrow the wide (<26°) range of allowable slip vector orientations that resulted from accounting for epistemic uncertainties.

  6. Simulation of Couette flow using conventional Burnett equations with modified slip boundary conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hualin; Zhao, Wenwen; Chen, Weifang

    2016-11-01

    Gas or liquid flow through small channels has become more and more popular due to the micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) fabrication technologies such as micro-motors, electrostatic comb-drive, micro-chromatographs, micro-actuators, micro-turbines and micro-pumps, etc. The flow conditions in and around these systems are always recognized as typical transitional regimes. Under these conditions, the mean free path of gas molecules approaches the characteristic scale of the micro-devices itself, and due to the little collisions the heat and momentum cannot equilibrate between the wall and fluids quickly. Couette flow is a simple and critical model in fluid dynamics which focuses on the mechanism of the heat transfer in shear-driven micro-cavities or micro-channels. Despite numerous work on the numerical solutions of the Couette flow, how to propose stable and accurate slip boundary conditions in rarefied flow conditions still remains to be elucidated. In this paper, converged solutions for steady-state micro Couette flows are obtained by using conventional Burnett equations with a set of modified slip boundary conditions. Instead of using the physical variables at the wall, the modified slip conditions use the variables at the edge of the Knudsen layer based on a physically plausible assumption in literature that Knudsen layer has a thickness only in the order of a mean free path and molecules are likely to travel without collision in this layer. Numerical results for non-dimensional wall shear stress and heat flux are compared with those of the DSMC solutions. Although there are not much improvement in the accuracy by using this modified slip conditions, the modified conditions perform much better than the unmodified slip conditions for numerical stabilization. All results show that the set of conventional Burnett equations with second order modified conditions are proved to be an appropriate model for the micro-Couette flows.

  7. Cyclic hardening and slip localization in single slip oriented copper crystals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, O.B.; Winter, A.T.

    1995-01-01

    A static-dynamic model is applied to the interpretation of slip localization modes observed in a systematic study of the evolution of dislocation structures in single slip intermediate amplitude fatigue in copper deformed at room temperature. The model assumes that veins do not deform plastically...... and in the more extended wall structures produced by this process are about equal. Nevertheless, the model and microscopy suggest convincingly that minimization of dislocation line energy in the dynamic structure between glissile walls and veins controls the condensation mode and the equilibrium wall spacing...

  8. Scalable conditional induction variables (CIV) analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oancea, Cosmin Eugen; Rauchwerger, Lawrence

    2015-01-01

    representation. Our technique requires no modifications of our dependence tests, which is agnostic to the original shape of the subscripts, and is more powerful than previously reported dependence tests that rely on the pairwise disambiguation of read-write references. We have implemented the CIV analysis in our...... parallelizing compiler and evaluated its impact on five Fortran benchmarks. We have found that that there are many important loops using CIV subscripts and that our analysis can lead to their scalable parallelization. This in turn has led to the parallelization of the benchmark programs they appear in....

  9. Closed central slip injuries--a missed diagnosis?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Nugent, N

    2011-09-01

    The extensor apparatus of the finger is a complex structure and injury can lead to significant digital dysfunction. Closed central slip injuries may be missed or diagnosis delayed because of lack of an open wound and often no radiographic abnormality, and can result in boutonniere deformities if untreated. This study aimed to quantify the number of patients attending with closed central slip injuries and to ascertain if the initial diagnosis was correct. The number of patients presenting to us over a 6 month period was recorded. The original diagnosis, time to diagnosis of central slip injury and the presence\\/absence of a boutonniere deformity were recorded. Ten patients were included in the study. Seven (70%) injuries were due to sport. Eight (80%) had a delayed diagnosis of central slip injury. Six (60%) had previously presented to general practitioners or emergency departments. Seven (70%) had boutonniere deformities. Closed central slip injuries can be missed. Simple clinical tests can diagnose central slip disruption.

  10. Slipped capital femoral epiphysis: what's new?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peck, Kathryn; Herrera-Soto, José

    2014-01-01

    Slipped capital femoral epiphysis (SCFE) is a common hip disorder among adolescents, whereby the epiphysis is displaced posteriorly and inferiorly to the metaphysis. Treatment modalities aim to stabilize the epiphysis, prevent further slippage, and avoid complications associated with long-term morbidity, such as osteonecrosis and chondrolysis. Controversy exists with SCFE regarding prophylactic fixation of the contralateral, painless, normal hip, the role of femoroacetabular impingement with SCFE, and whether in situ fixation is the best treatment method for SCFE. This article presents and discusses the latest diagnostic and treatment modalities for SCFE. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Modeling and Design of Brushless Doubly-Fed Induction Machines

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, X.

    2017-01-01

    The rapid increase of wind power in the power grid results in high grid connection requirements for wind turbines. Moreover, the reliability of wind turbines becomes more and more important, especially in offshore applications. One potential solution for these demands is the wind turbine drive-train based on the brushless doubly-fed induction machine (DFIM). This machine type has no brushes or slip-rings on the rotor side which provides an attractive alternative to the DFIM which is commonly ...

  12. Correlation between stick-slip frictional sliding and charge transfer

    OpenAIRE

    Ananthakrishna, G.; Kumar, Jagadish

    2010-01-01

    A decade ago, Budakian and Putterman (Phys. Rev. Lett., {\\bf 85}, 1000 (2000)) ascribed friction to the formation of bonds arising from contact charging when a gold tip of a surface force apparatus was dragged on polymethylmethacrylate surface. We propose a stick-slip model that captures the observed correlation between stick-slip events and charge transfer, and the lack of dependence of the scale factor connecting the force jumps and charge transfer on normal load. Here, stick-slip dynamics ...

  13. DWT analysis of numerical and experimental data for the diagnosis of dynamic eccentricities in induction motors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonino-Daviu, J.; Jover, P.; Riera, M.; Arkkio, A.; Roger-Folch, J.

    2007-08-01

    The behaviour of an induction machine during a startup transient can provide useful information for the diagnosis of electromechanical faults. During this process, the machine works under high stresses and the effects of the faults may also be larger than those in steady-state. These facts may help to amplify the magnitude of the indicators of some incipient faults. In addition, fault components with frequencies dependant on the slip evolve in a particular way during that transient, a fact that allows the diagnosis of the corresponding fault and the discrimination between different faults. The discrete wavelet transform (DWT) is an ideal tool for analysing signals with frequency spectrum variable in time. Some research works have applied with success the DWT to the stator startup current in order to diagnose the presence of broken rotor bars in induction machines. However, few works have used this technique for the study of other common faults, such as eccentricities. In this work, time-frequency analysis of the stator startup current is carried out in order to detect the presence of dynamic eccentricities in an induction motor. For this purpose, the DWT is applied and wavelet signals at different levels are studied. Data are obtained from simulations, using a finite element (FE) model of an induction motor, which allows forcing several kinds of faults in the machine, and also from experimental tests. The results show the validity of the approach for detecting the fault and discriminating with respect to other failures, presenting for certain applications (or working conditions) some advantages over the traditional stationary analysis.

  14. EMG and Kinematic Responses to Unexpected Slips After Slip Training in Virtual Reality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parijat, Prakriti; Lockhart, Thurmon E.

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the study was to design a virtual reality (VR) training to induce perturbation in older adults similar to a slip and examine the effect of the training on kinematic and muscular responses in older adults. Twenty-four older adults were involved in a laboratory study and randomly assigned to two groups (virtual reality training and control). Both groups went through three sessions including baseline slip, training, and transfer of training on slippery surface. The training group experienced twelve simulated slips using a visual perturbation induced by tilting a virtual reality scene while walking on the treadmill and the control group completed normal walking during the training session. Kinematic, kinetic, and EMG data were collected during all the sessions. Results demonstrated the proactive adjustments such as increased trunk flexion at heel contact after training. Reactive adjustments included reduced time to peak activations of knee flexors, reduced knee coactivation, reduced time to trunk flexion, and reduced trunk angular velocity after training. In conclusion, the study findings indicate that the VR training was able to generate a perturbation in older adults that evoked recovery reactions and such motor skill can be transferred to the actual slip trials. PMID:25296401

  15. Progressive slip after removal of screw fixation in slipped capital femoral epiphysis: two case reports

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Engelsma, Y.; Morgenstern, P.; van der Sluijs, J.A.; Witbreuk, M.M.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction. In slipped capital femoral epiphysis the femoral neck displaces relative to the head due to weakening of the epiphysis. Early recognition and adequate surgical fixation is essential for a good functional outcome. The fixation should be secured until the closure of the epiphysis to

  16. Stochastic Wheel-Slip Compensation Based Robot Localization and Mapping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SIDHARTHAN, R. K.

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Wheel slip compensation is vital for building accurate and reliable dead reckoning based robot localization and mapping algorithms. This investigation presents stochastic slip compensation scheme for robot localization and mapping. Main idea of the slip compensation technique is to use wheel-slip data obtained from experiments to model the variations in slip velocity as Gaussian distributions. This leads to a family of models that are switched depending on the input command. To obtain the wheel-slip measurements, experiments are conducted on a wheeled mobile robot and the measurements thus obtained are used to build the Gaussian models. Then the localization and mapping algorithm is tested on an experimental terrain and a new metric called the map spread factor is used to evaluate the ability of the slip compensation technique. Our results clearly indicate that the proposed methodology improves the accuracy by 72.55% for rotation and 66.67% for translation motion as against an uncompensated mapping system. The proposed compensation technique eliminates the need for extro receptive sensors for slip compensation, complex feature extraction and association algorithms. As a result, we obtain a simple slip compensation scheme for localization and mapping.

  17. Prediction of fluid velocity slip at solid surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jesper Schmidt; Todd, Billy; Daivis, Peter

    2011-01-01

    The observed flow enhancement in highly confining geometries is believed to be caused by fluid velocity slip at the solid wall surface. Here we present a simple and highly accurate method to predict this slip using equilibrium molecular dynamics. Unlike previous equilibrium molecular dynamics...... methods, it allows us to directly compute the intrinsic wall-fluid friction coefficient rather than an empirical friction coefficient that includes all sources of friction for planar shear flow. The slip length predicted by our method is in excellent agreement with the slip length obtained from direct...

  18. Slipped capital femoral epiphysis: A modern treatment protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slavković Nemanja

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The treatment of a patient with slipped capital femoral epiphysis begins with an early diagnosis and accurate classification. On the basis of symptom duration, clinical findings and radiographs, slipped capital femoral epiphysis is classified as pre-slip, acute, acute-on-chronic and chronic. The long-term outcome of slipped capital femoral epiphysis is directly related to severity and the presence or absence of avascular necrosis and/or chondrolysis. Therefore, the first priority in the treatment of slipped capital femoral epiphysis is to avoid complications while securing the epiphysis from further slippage. Medical treatment of patients with acute and acute-on-chronic slipped capital femoral epiphysis, as well as those presented in pre-slip stage, is the safest, although time-consuming. Manipulations, especially forced and repeated, are not recommended due to higher avascular necrosis risk. The use of intraoperative fluoroscopy to assist in the placement of internal fixation devices has markedly increased the success of surgical treatment. Controversy remains as to whether the proximal femoral epiphysis in severe, chronic slipped capital femoral epiphysis should be realigned by extracapsular osteotomies or just fixed in situ. The management protocol for slipped capital femoral epiphysis depends on the experience of the surgeon, motivation of the patient and technical facilities.

  19. The nucleation of "fast" and "slow" stick slip instabilities in sheared granular aggregates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korkolis, Evangelos; Ampuero, Jean-Paul; Niemeijer, André

    2017-04-01

    Seismological observations in the past few decades have revealed a diversity of slip behaviors of faults, involving interactions and transition between slow to fast slip phenomena. Field studies show that exhumed fault zones comprise mixtures of materials with variable frictional strength and stability. Emergent models of slip diversity emphasize the role of heterogeneities of fault zone properties and the potential interactions between seismic and aseismic deformation. Here, we develop analog laboratory experiments to study the mechanics of heterogeneous faults with the goal to identify factors controlling their slip stability and rupture style. We report on results from room temperature sliding experiments using a rotary shear apparatus. We simulated gouge heterogeneity by using materials with different frictional strength and stability. At room temperature conditions, dry glass beads typically stick slip, whereas dry granular calcite exhibits stable sliding. The peak strength of glass beads aggregates is typically lower than that of granular calcite aggregates. Our samples consisted of a layer of glass beads sandwiched between two layers of granular calcite. The initial particle size was between 100 and 200 μm for both materials and the initial thickness of each layer was about 1.5 mm. We tested our layered aggregates under 1 to 7 MPa normal stress and at sliding velocities between 1 and 100 μm/s. Within that range of conditions, high normal stress and slow sliding velocities promoted fast, regular stick slip. For normal stress values of less than about 4 MPa, the recurrence time and stress drop of stick slips became irregular, particularly at sliding rates above 20 μm/s. As the accumulated shear displacement increased, slip events became slower and the magnitudes of their stress drop, compaction and slip distance decreased. We recorded acoustic emissions (AEs) associated with each slip event (fast and slow) and estimated their source azimuth. AE activity was

  20. Slipped Capital Femoral Epiphysis: Diagnosis and Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peck, David M; Voss, Lisa M; Voss, Tyler T

    2017-06-15

    Slipped capital femoral epiphysis (SCFE) is the most common hip disorder in adolescents, occurring in 10.8 per 100,000 children. SCFE usually occurs in those eight to 15 years of age and is one of the most commonly missed diagnoses in children. SCFE is classified as stable or unstable based on the stability of the physis. It is associated with obesity, growth spurts, and (occasionally) endocrine abnormalities such as hypothyroidism, growth hormone supplementation, hypogonadism, and panhypopituitarism. Patients with SCFE usually present with limping and poorly localized pain in the hip, groin, thigh, or knee. Diagnosis is confirmed by bilateral hip radiography, which should include anteroposterior and frog-leg views in patients with stable SCFE, and anteroposterior and cross-table lateral views in unstable SCFE. The goals of treatment are to prevent slip progression and avoid complications such as avascular necrosis, chondrolysis, and femoroacetabular impingement. Stable SCFE is usually treated using in situ screw fixation. Treatment of unstable SCFE also usually involves in situ fixation, but there is controversy about timing of surgery and the value of reduction. Postoperative rehabilitation of patients with SCFE may follow a five-phase protocol.

  1. Fault-slip distribution of the 1995 Colima-Jalisco, Mexico, earthquake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendoza, C.; Hartzell, S.

    1999-01-01

    Broadband teleseismic P waves have been analyzed to recover the rupture history of the large (M(s) 7.4) Colima-Jalisco, Mexico, shallow interplate thrust earthquake of 9 October 1995. Ground-displacement records in the period range of 1-60 sec are inverted using a linear, finite-fault waveform inversion procedure that allows a variable dislocation duration on a prescribed fault. The method is applied using both a narrow fault that simulates a line source with a dislocation window of 50 sec and a wide fault with a possible rise time of up to 20 sec that additionally allows slip updip and downdip from the hypocenter. The line-source analysis provides a spatio-temporal image of the slip distribution consisting of several large sources located northwest of the hypocenter and spanning a range of rupture velocities. The two-dimensional finite-fault inversion allows slip over this rupture-velocity range and indicates that the greatest coseismic displacement (3-4 m) is located between 70 and 130 km from the hypocenter at depths shallower than about 15 km. Slip in this shallow region consists of two major sources, one of which is delayed by about 10 sec relative to a coherent propagation of rupture along the plate interface. These two slip sources account for about one-third of the total P-wave seismic moment of 8.3 X 1027 dyne-cm (M(w) 7.9) and may have been responsible for the local tsunami observed along the coast following the earthquake.

  2. Parametric study of the factors affecting wheel slip and sinkage for the Mars Exploration Rovers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, J.; Kulchitsky, A. V.; Duvoy, P.; Arvidson, R. E.; Iagnemma, K.; Senatore, C.

    2013-12-01

    In 2004 two rovers landed on Mars to conduct scientific investigations of the Martian surface in an effort to better understand its surface geology, climate, and potential to support life. During the mission, both rovers experienced events of severe rover wheel sinkage and slip in the highly variable Martian regolith. Mars Exploration Rover (MER) Opportunity experienced high wheel slip and sinkage when it attempted to cross a series of wind-blown ripples. MER rover Spirit became immobilized after breaking through a soil crust into highly deformable poorly sorted sands. Events of MER rover wheel high-sinkage and slip make mobility difficult, creating challenges for rover drive planners and increasing the risk of ending a mission early due to a lack of rover mobility. The ARTEMIS (Adams- based Rover Terramechanics and Mobility Interaction Simulator) MER rover simulation tool was developed in an effort to improve the ability to simulate rover mobility on planetary surfaces to aid planning of rover drives and to extract a rover if it becomes embedded in soil [1]. While ARTEMIS has demonstrated its ability to simulate a wide variety of rover mobility scenarios using a library of empirically based terramechanics subroutines and high-resolution digital elevation maps of Mars, it has had less success at simulating the high-sinkage, high-slip conditions that pose the highest risk to rover mobility. To improve ARTEMIS's high-slip, high-sinkage terramechanics subroutines, the COUPi discrete element method (DEM) model of MER rover wheel motion under conditions of high-sinkage and slip is being used to examine the effects of soil particle size distribution (PSD), shape, and bulk density. DEM simulations of MER wheel digging tests and the resistance forces of penetrometers in soil have demonstrated the importance of particle shape and bulk density on soil strength [2, 3]. Simulations of the densification of particle beds as functions of the spread (ratio of largest to smallest

  3. Application of factorial designs and Doehlert matrix in optimization of experimental variables associated with the preconcentration and determination of vanadium and copper in seawater by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Sérgio L. C.; Queiroz, Adriana S.; Fernandes, Marcelo S.; dos Santos, Hilda C.

    2002-12-01

    In the present paper a procedure for preconcentration and determination of vanadium and copper in seawater using inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP OES) is proposed, which is based on solid-phase extraction of vanadium (IV), vanadium (V) and copper (II) ions as 1-(2-pyridylazo)-2-naphthol (PAN) complexes by active carbon. The optimization process was carried out using two-level full factorials and Doehlert matrix designs. Four variables (PAN mass, pH, active carbon mass and shaking time) were regarded as factors in the optimization. Results of the two-level full factorial design 2 4 with 16 runs for vanadium extraction, based on the variance analysis (ANOVA), demonstrated that the factors pH and active carbon mass, besides the interaction (pH×active carbon mass), are statistically significant. For copper, the ANOVA revealed that the factors PAN mass, pH and active carbon mass and the interactions (PAN mass×pH) and (pH×active carbon mass) are statistically significant. Doehlert designs were applied in order to determine the optimum conditions for extraction. The procedure proposed allowed the determination of vanadium and copper with detection limits (3σ/ S) of 73 and 94 ng l -1, respectively. The precision, calculated as relative standard deviation (R.S.D.), was 1.22 and 1.37% for 12.50 μg l -1 of vanadium and copper, respectively. The preconcentration factor was 80. The recovery achieved for determination of vanadium and copper in the presence of several cations demonstrated that this procedure improved the selectivity required for seawater analysis. The procedure was applied to the determination of vanadium and copper in seawater samples collected in Salvador City, Brazil. Results showed good agreement with other data reported in the literature.

  4. Earthquake source properties from instrumented laboratory stick-slip

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilgore, Brian D.; McGarr, Arthur F.; Beeler, Nicholas M.; Lockner, David A.; Thomas, Marion Y.; Mitchell, Thomas M.; Bhat, Harsha S.

    2017-01-01

    Stick-slip experiments were performed to determine the influence of the testing apparatus on source properties, develop methods to relate stick-slip to natural earthquakes and examine the hypothesis of McGarr [2012] that the product of stiffness, k, and slip duration, Δt, is scale-independent and the same order as for earthquakes. The experiments use the double-direct shear geometry, Sierra White granite at 2 MPa normal stress and a remote slip rate of 0.2 µm/sec. To determine apparatus effects, disc springs were added to the loading column to vary k. Duration, slip, slip rate, and stress drop decrease with increasing k, consistent with a spring-block slider model. However, neither for the data nor model is kΔt constant; this results from varying stiffness at fixed scale.In contrast, additional analysis of laboratory stick-slip studies from a range of standard testing apparatuses is consistent with McGarr's hypothesis. kΔt is scale-independent, similar to that of earthquakes, equivalent to the ratio of static stress drop to average slip velocity, and similar to the ratio of shear modulus to wavespeed of rock. These properties result from conducting experiments over a range of sample sizes, using rock samples with the same elastic properties as the Earth, and scale-independent design practices.

  5. The No-Slip Boundary Condition in Fluid Mechanics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    gradient near a wall have to satisfy the no-slip condition at every instant. ... The well known Bernoulli equation giving a relation .... resistance being proportional to the slip velocity itself. leads to infinite stress. But this model was proposed before the. N-S equations were known. The third hypothesis was due to Navier himself.

  6. Stokes flow with slip and Kuwabara boundary conditions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... distributed parallel circular cylinder or spheres in uniform viscous flow are investigated with slip boundary condition under Stokes approximation using particle-in-cell model technique and the result compared with the no-slip case. The corresponding problem of streaming flow past spheroidal particles departing but little in ...

  7. Earthquake slip weakening and asperities explained by thermal pressurization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wibberley, Christopher A J; Shimamoto, Toshihiko

    2005-08-04

    An earthquake occurs when a fault weakens during the early portion of its slip at a faster rate than the release of tectonic stress driving the fault motion. This slip weakening occurs over a critical distance, D(c). Understanding the controls on D(c) in nature is severely limited, however, because the physical mechanism of weakening is unconstrained. Conventional friction experiments, typically conducted at slow slip rates and small displacements, have obtained D(c) values that are orders of magnitude lower than values estimated from modelling seismological data for natural earthquakes. Here we present data on fluid transport properties of slip zone rocks and on the slip zone width in the centre of the Median Tectonic Line fault zone, Japan. We show that the discrepancy between laboratory and seismological results can be resolved if thermal pressurization of the pore fluid is the slip-weakening mechanism. Our analysis indicates that a planar fault segment with an impermeable and narrow slip zone will become very unstable during slip and is likely to be the site of a seismic asperity.

  8. A Transformational Approach to Slip-Slide Factoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steckroth, Jeffrey

    2015-01-01

    In this "Delving Deeper" article, the author introduces the slip-slide method for solving Algebra 1 mathematics problems. This article compares the traditional method approach of trial and error to the slip-slide method of factoring. Tools that used to be taken for granted now make it possible to investigate relationships visually,…

  9. Performance analysis of a microcontroller based slip power recovery ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    International Journal of Engineering, Science and Technology ... Keywords: Slip power recovery drive; simulation; experiment; speed control. 1. Introduction ... rotor side converter, inverter and transformer circuit in SPRD is designed to be smaller, ... Akpinar and Pillai, 1990 proposed modeling and performance of slip power.

  10. Multiparameter Monitoring and Prevention of Fault-Slip Rock Burst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shan-chao Hu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Fault-slip rock burst is one type of the tectonic rock burst during mining. A detailed understanding of the precursory information of fault-slip rock burst and implementation of monitoring and early warning systems, as well as pressure relief measures, are essential to safety production in deep mines. This paper first establishes a mechanical model of stick-slip instability in fault-slip rock bursts and then reveals the failure characteristics of the instability. Then, change rule of mining-induced stress and microseismic signals before the occurrence of fault-slip rock burst are proposed, and multiparameter integrated early warning methods including mining-induced stress and energy are established. Finally, pressure relief methods targeting large-diameter boreholes and coal seam infusion are presented in accordance with the occurrence mechanism of fault-slip rock burst. The research results have been successfully applied in working faces 2310 of the Suncun Coal Mine, and the safety of the mine has been enhanced. These research results improve the theory of fault-slip rock burst mechanisms and provide the basis for prediction and forecasting, as well as pressure relief, of fault-slip rock bursts.

  11. Three cases of slipped capital femoral epiphysis in one family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skelley, Nathan W; Papp, Derek F; Leu, Dirk; Sargent, M Catherine

    2011-08-08

    Slipped capital femoral epiphysis is a relatively common disorder of the hip that affects children in late childhood and early adolescence, with an incidence in the United States of approximately 10 per 100,000. Although the diagnosis and treatment of slipped capital femoral epiphysis have been well described, the search for its cause and a method of early identification continues. Recent publications have suggested that there is a familial association among individuals with slipped capital femoral epiphysis, but there is no current genetic marker established for the disorder. This article reports a series of 3 biologically related Caucasian sisters who were athletic; had body mass indices slipped capital femoral epiphysis. This is the first report of a series of 3 sisters with slipped capital femoral epiphysis in the United States. Our goals were to document our experience in the identification and treatment of these patients to highlight the complexities of slipped capital femoral epiphysis presentation patterning, to increase the awareness and reporting of familial cases of slipped capital femoral epiphysis by other physicians, and to encourage additional research in this area. As clinicians progress in the ability to diagnose and treat patients with slipped capital femoral epiphysis, they also must be mindful of the varying presentation characteristics. Copyright 2011, SLACK Incorporated.

  12. Slip casting parameters for commercial Si3N4 powders

    OpenAIRE

    Hartmann, WJAM; Dijen, van, FK Frans; Metselaar, R Ruud; Siskens, CAM Carol

    1986-01-01

    Properties of aqueous slips of silicon nitride were studied on two types of commercially available powders. Results are given of measurements of ζ-potential, critical coagulation coefficient and viscosity as a function of pH, concentration of deflocculant and solid-liquid ratio. Optimized slip casting conditions are given.

  13. Fabric evolution of quartz-gouge from stable sliding to stick-slip and implications for fault slip mode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scuderi, Marco; Collettini, Cristiano; Viti, Cecilia; Tinti, Elisa; Marone, Chris

    2017-04-01

    Numerous laboratory studies have documented the mechanisms that control the earthquake nucleation phase, when fault slip velocity is slow (1 cm/s). Although these studies are fundamental to characterize specific phases of the seismic cycle, they are not able of capturing the entire evolution of fabric and mechanical data from stable sliding to stick-slip. Here we report on laboratory experiments that illuminate the mechanisms controlling the transition from stable sliding (v= 0.001 cm/s) to dynamic stick-slip (v > 1 cm/s), by altering the elastic stiffness of the loading system (k) to match the critical rheologic stiffness of the fault gouge (kc). In particular we observe that the stiffness ratio, K = kc/k, controls the transition from slow-and-silent (K = 0.9, slip velocity 0.01 cm/s, stress drop 0.5 MPa, slip duration 0.5 s) to fast-and-audible (K = 0.5, slip velocity 3 cm/s, stress drop 2.4 MPa, slip duration 0.003 s) slip events. Microstructural observations show that with accumulated strain, deformation localizes along sharp shear planes consisting of nano-metric grains, which favour the development of frictional instabilities. Once this fabric is established, for the tested boundary conditions (normal stress 13-35 MPa), fault fabric does not change significantly with slip velocity, and fault slip behaviour is mainly controlled by the interplay between fault rheological properties and the stiffness of the loading system. As applied to tectonic faults, our results suggest that a single fault segment can experience a spectrum of fault slip behaviour depending on the evolution of fault rock frictional properties and elastic conditions of the loading system.

  14. Slipping and rolling on an inclined plane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aghamohammadi, Cina [Department of Electrical Engineering, Sharif University of Technology, PO Box 11365-11155, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Aghamohammadi, Amir, E-mail: mohamadi@alzahra.ac.ir [Department of Physics, Alzahra University, Tehran 19938-91176 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2011-07-15

    In the first part of the paper, using a direct calculation two-dimensional motion of a particle sliding on an inclined plane is investigated for general values of friction coefficient ({mu}). A parametric equation for the trajectory of the particle is also obtained. In the second part of the paper, the motion of a sphere on the inclined plane is studied. It is shown that the evolution equation for the contact point of a sliding sphere is similar to that of a point particle sliding on an inclined plane whose friction coefficient is 7/2 {mu}. If {mu} > 2/7 tan {theta}, for any arbitrary initial velocity and angular velocity, the sphere will roll on the inclined plane after some finite time. In other cases, it will slip on the inclined plane. In the case of rolling, the centre of the sphere moves on a parabola. Finally the velocity and angular velocity of the sphere are exactly computed.

  15. Stick-slip substructure in rapid tape peeling

    KAUST Repository

    Thoroddsen, Sigurdur T.

    2010-10-15

    The peeling of adhesive tape is known to proceed with a stick-slip mechanism and produces a characteristic ripping sound. The peeling also produces light and when peeled in a vacuum, even X-rays have been observed, whose emissions are correlated with the slip events. Here we present direct imaging of the detachment zone when Scotch tape is peeled off at high speed from a solid surface, revealing a highly regular substructure, during the slip phase. The typical 4-mm-long slip region has a regular substructure of transverse 220 μm wide slip bands, which fracture sideways at speeds over 300 m/s. The fracture tip emits waves into the detached section of the tape at ∼100 m/s, which promotes the sound, so characteristic of this phenomenon.

  16. Proposed Cavity for Reduced Slip-Stacking Loss

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eldred, J. [Indiana U.; Zwaska, R. [Fermilab

    2015-06-01

    This paper employs a novel dynamical mechanism to improve the performance of slip-stacking. Slip-stacking in an accumulation technique used at Fermilab since 2004 which nearly double the proton intensity. During slip-stacking, the Recycler or the Main Injector stores two particles beams that spatially overlap but have different momenta. The two particle beams are longitudinally focused by two 53 MHz 100 kV RF cavities with a small frequency difference between them. We propose an additional 106 MHz 20 kV RF cavity, with a frequency at the double the average of the upper and lower main RF frequencies. In simulation, we find the proposed RF cavity significantly enhances the stable bucket area and reduces slip-stacking losses under reasonable injection scenarios. We quantify and map the stability of the parameter space for any accelerator implementing slip-stacking with the addition of a harmonic RF cavity.

  17. Critical Nucleation Length for Accelerating Frictional Slip

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldam, Michael; Weikamp, Marc; Spatschek, Robert; Brener, Efim A.; Bouchbinder, Eran

    2017-11-01

    The spontaneous nucleation of accelerating slip along slowly driven frictional interfaces is central to a broad range of geophysical, physical, and engineering systems, with particularly far-reaching implications for earthquake physics. A common approach to this problem associates nucleation with an instability of an expanding creep patch upon surpassing a critical length Lc. The critical nucleation length Lc is conventionally obtained from a spring-block linear stability analysis extended to interfaces separating elastically deformable bodies using model-dependent fracture mechanics estimates. We propose an alternative approach in which the critical nucleation length is obtained from a related linear stability analysis of homogeneous sliding along interfaces separating elastically deformable bodies. For elastically identical half-spaces and rate-and-state friction, the two approaches are shown to yield Lc that features the same scaling structure, but with substantially different numerical prefactors, resulting in a significantly larger Lc in our approach. The proposed approach is also shown to be naturally applicable to finite-size systems and bimaterial interfaces, for which various analytic results are derived. To quantitatively test the proposed approach, we performed inertial Finite-Element-Method calculations for a finite-size two-dimensional elastically deformable body in rate-and-state frictional contact with a rigid body under sideway loading. We show that the theoretically predicted Lc and its finite-size dependence are in reasonably good quantitative agreement with the full numerical solutions, lending support to the proposed approach. These results offer a theoretical framework for predicting rapid slip nucleation along frictional interfaces.

  18. Continued growth after fixation of slipped capital femoral epiphysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmdahl, Per; Backteman, Torsten; Danielsson, Aina; Kärrholm, Johan; Riad, Jacques

    2016-12-01

    When treating slipped capital femoral epiphysis (SCFE), a smooth pin with a hook or a short threaded screw can be used to allow further growth, which could be important to prevent the development of impingement and early arthritis. The purpose of this investigation was to measure growth in three dimensions after fixation of SCFE. Sixteen participants with unilateral SCFE, nine girls and seven boys with a median age of 12.0 years (range 8.4-15.7 years), were included. The slipped hip was fixed with a smooth pin with a hook, and the non-slipped hip was prophylactically pinned. At the time of surgery, tantalum markers were installed bilaterally on each side of the growth plate through the drilled hole for the pin. Examination with radiostereometric analysis (RSA) was performed postoperatively and at 3, 6 and 12 months. The position of the epiphysis in relation to the metaphysis was calculated. At 12 months, the epiphysis moved caudally, median 0.16 mm and posteriorly 2.28 mm on the slipped side, in comparison to 2.28 cranially and 0.91 mm posteriorly on the non-slipped side, p = 0.003 and p = 0.030, respectively. Both slipped and non-slipped epiphysis moved medially, 1.52 and 1.74 mm, respectively. A marked variation in the movement was noted, especially on the slipped side. The epiphysis moved in relation to the metaphysis after smooth pin fixation, both on the slipped side and on the prophylactically fixed non-slipped side, implying further growth. The RSA method can be used to understand remodelling after 'growth-sparing' fixation of SCFE.

  19. Slow Slip in the Alaska Subduction Zone and the Long-term Slip Budget on the Megathrust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freymueller, J. T.; Li, S.; Fu, Y.; McCaffrey, R.

    2016-12-01

    The Cook Inlet region of Alaska has experienced some of the longest-lasting slow slip events yet discovered, with the longest event being at least 9 years long and having a moment equivalent to an Mw7.8 earthquake. Three other long-lasting events have been identified as well, with durations ranging from 2-4 years. Small and short-lived events (roughly comparable to some of the Cascadia ETS events) are also seen in the geodetic time series. Based on the record so far, the large slow slip events may be confined to certain segments of the plate interface, although data coverage is not as good or as comprehensive in time. At least one event occurred near Kodiak Island, but other segments of the subduction zone may not have experienced any significant slip events over the last two decades. Within the rupture zone of the 1964 Alaska earthquake, the area experiencing slow slip events overlaps with the area that experienced afterslip following the earthquake. Within uncertainty (which is considerable), there is no evidence for overlap between areas of significant coseismic slip and the areas of the slow slip events. Published papers on the various slow slip events have used different geometric models for the plate interface, which contributes to the present uncertainty in constraining the slip budget.

  20. Lateral traction of laminar flow between sliding pair with heterogeneous slip/no-slip surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zhenpeng; Zeng, Liangcai; Chen, Xiaolan; Chen, Keying; Ding, Xianzhong

    2017-11-01

    The problem of shaft axial motion which significantly affects the lubrication performance has been a common phenomenon in journal bearing systems. The existing work involved in the solution of shaft axial motion is also very rare. In this study, we choose to examine the flow between sliding pair in which regard we present a unique heterogeneous surface consisting of a slip zone and a no-slip zone. The results reveal the following points: 1) By appropriately arranging the slip zone to change the angle between the borderline and the moving direction of the upper plate, it is possible to control the direction of the lateral traction in which the liquid film acts on the upper plate. 2) Exponent of the power function of the borderline and aspect ratio of the computational domain are large or small are not conducive to increasing the effect of lateral traction. For the object of this study, the final results of the optimization are shown that the lateral traction can account for 20% of the resistance.

  1. PROCESSING OF CONCENTRATED AQUEOUS ZIRCONIA-BIOGLASS SLIPS BY SLIP CASTING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beltina Leon

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available 3 mol% yttria-partially stabilized zirconia (Y-TZP powder and a sol-gel derived CaO- P₂O₅- SiO₂ (64S bioglass, were used to produce Y-TZP- bioglass slip cast compacts. The rheological properties of concentrated aqueous Y-TZP- 64S suspensions prepared with two different glass contents: 10.5 vol% and 19.9 vol%, and ammonium polyacrylate (NH₄PA as dispersant, were investigated and compared with those of Y-TZP. The density of green cast samples was related to the degree of slip dispersion. The substitution of Y-TZP by 64S glass in the mixtures resulted in greater adsorption of NH₄PA; however, the viscosity and yield stress values of Y-TZP-64S slips were higher than those of Y-TZP ones for the solid loadings studied. The increase in the glass content from 10.5 to 19.9 vol% increased the viscosity and yield stress values. The presence of 64S glass in the mixtures resulted in a less dense packing of cast samples.

  2. Variable Amplitude Fatigue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranganathan, Narayanaswami; Joly, Damien; Leroy, René

    Fatigue crack growth behavior of selected aluminum alloys under variable amplitude loading is discussed in this study, based principally on experimental observations. The tests include single overloads tests in different environments, block load tests and tests using an aircraft wing loading spectrum. It is shown that conditions favoring a planar slip behavior lead to very high delays as opposed to conditions leading to multiple slip behavior. The Aluminium Liithium alloy studied here, has the best fatigue crack growth resistance in almost all test conditions studied here as compared to other conventional alloys. Under the spectrum loading studied here, the same alloy exhibits a change in micromechanism leading to a four fould acceleration of growth rates. Acceptable life predictions can be made, by taking into account this crack acceleration effect.

  3. Convergence of the identification algorithm applied to the mutual inductance of the induction motor

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jąderko, Andrzej; Pietryka, Jędrzej

    2012-01-01

    A new observer of induction motor state variables is proposed in the paper. A nonlinearity of the main magnetic path is expressed as a function of a properly chosen parameter versus the position vector length...

  4. Analysis of indirect rotor field oriented control-based induction machine performance under inaccurate field-oriented condition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Yang; Tao, Geng; Wang, Huai

    2017-01-01

    Indirect rotor field oriented control (IRFOC) plays an important role in the high performance induction machine drives. In the indirect rotor field oriented control — based induction machine adjustable speed control system, the rotor field angle is usually obtained by the rotor angular velocity...... and the slip angular velocity. The rotor angular velocity can be sensed by an encoder with sufficient accuracy. However, the slip angular velocity is affected by the rotor parameters variations and the current control performance degradation especially in the field-weakening region. Therefore, the field angle...

  5. Inductive Monitoring System (IMS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — IMS: Inductive Monitoring System The Inductive Monitoring System (IMS) is a tool that uses a data mining technique called clustering to extract models of normal...

  6. The Epidemiology and Demographics of Slipped Capital Femoral Epiphysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loder, Randall T.; Skopelja, Elaine N.

    2011-01-01

    The etiology of slipped capital femoral epiphysis (SCFE) is unknown with many insights coming from epidemiologic/demographic information. A systematic medical literature review regarding SCFE was performed. The incidence is 0.33/100,000 to 24.58/100,000 children 8 to 15 years of age. The relative racial frequency, relative to Caucasians at 1.0, is 5.6 for Polynesians, 3.9 for Blacks, and 2.5 for Hispanics. The average age is 12.0 years for boys and 11.2 years for girls. The physiologic age when SCFE occurs is less variable than the chronologic age. The average symptom duration is 4 to 5 months. Most children are obese: >50% are >95th percentile weight for age with average BMI is 25–30 kg/m2. The onset of SCFE is in the summer when north of 40°N. Bilaterality ranges from 18 to 50%. In children with bilateral involvement, 50–60% present with simultaneous SCFEs and those who present with a unilateral SCFE and subsequently develop a contralateral SCFE do so within 18 months. The age at presentation is younger for those who present with a unilateral SCFE and later develop a contralateral SCFE. The age-weight, age-height, and height test are useful to differentiate between an idiopathic and atypical SCFE. PMID:24977061

  7. Factors associated with worker slipping in limited-service restaurants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courtney, Theodore K; Verma, Santosh K; Huang, Yueng-Hsiang; Chang, Wen-Ruey; Li, Kai Way; Filiaggi, Alfred J

    2010-02-01

    Slips, trips and falls (STF) are responsible for a substantial injury burden in the global workplace. Restaurant environments are challenged by STF. This study assessed individual and work environment factors related to slipping in US limited-service restaurant workers. Workers in 10 limited-service restaurants in Massachusetts were recruited to participate. Workers' occupational slip and/or fall history within the past 4 weeks was collected by multilingual written questionnaires. Age, gender, job tenure, work hours per week and work shift were also collected. Shoe type, condition and gross shoe contamination were visually assessed. Floor friction was measured and each restaurant's overall mean coefficient of friction (COF) was calculated. The logistic generalised estimating equations model was used to compute adjusted odds ratios (OR). Of 125 workers, 42 reported one or more slips in the past 4 weeks with two reporting a resultant fall. Results from multivariable regression showed that higher restaurant mean COF was significantly associated with a decreased risk of self-reported slipping (OR 0.59, 95% CI 0.42 to 0.82). From the highest to the lowest COF restaurant, the odds of a positive slip history increased by a factor of more than seven. Younger age, male gender, lower weekly work hours and the presence of gross contamination on worker's shoe sole were also associated with increased odds of slip history. Published findings of an association between friction and slipping and falling in actual work environments are rare. The findings suggest that effective intervention strategies to reduce the risk of slips and falls in restaurant workers could include increasing COF and improving housekeeping practices.

  8. Numerical Simulation of Methane Slip in Dual Fuel Marine Engines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Han, Jaehyun; Jensen, Michael Vincent; Pang, Kar Mun

    and the valve timings on the methane slip was investigated. MAN L28/32DF engine was modeled to simulate the gas exchange process of the four stroke NG-diesel dual fuel engines. The mesh size of the model was decided based on the sensitivity study on the peak pressure of the cylinder and the fuel mass......The methane slip is the problematic issue for the engines using natural gas(NG). Because methane is more powerful greenhouse gas (GHG) than CO2, understanding of the methane slip during gas exchange process of the engines is essential. In this study, the influence of the gas pipe geometry...

  9. Construction of a statistical model for the dynamics of a base-driven stick-slip oscillator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Roberta; Sampaio, Rubens

    2017-07-01

    In this paper the dynamics of a dry-friction oscillator driven by a stochastic base motion has been analyzed. The system consists of a simple oscillator (mass-spring) moving on a base with a rough surface. This roughness induces a dry-frictional force between the mass and the base which is modeled as a Coulomb friction. It is considered that the base has an imposed stochastic bang-bang motion which excites the system in a stochastic way. The non-smooth behavior of the dry-frictional force associated with the non-smooth stochastic base motion induces in the system stochastic stick-slip oscillations. A statistical model is constructed for the stick-slip dynamics of the system. The objective is to characterize, from a statistical view point, the response of the dry-friction oscillator composed by a sequence of stick and slip-modes. Defined a time interval for analysis, some of the variables which appear in this statistical model are the number of time intervals in which stick and slip occur, the instants at which they begin and their duration. These variables are modeled as stochastic objects. Statistics of them, as mean, variance and entropy, and histograms, are computed by the integration of the dynamics equations of the system using independent samples of the base movement generated with the Monte Carlo method.

  10. Vertically bounded double diffusive convection in the fingering regime: comparing no-slip vs free-slip boundary conditions

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, Yantao; Lohse, Detlef

    2016-01-01

    Vertically bounded fingering double diffusive convection (DDC) is numerically investigated, focusing on the influences of different velocity boundary conditions, i.e. the no-slip condition which is inevitable in the lab-scale experimental research, and the free-slip condition which is an approximation for the interfaces in many natural environments, such as the oceans. For both boundary conditions the flow is dominated by fingers and the global responses follow the same scaling laws, with enhanced prefactors for the free-slip cases. Therefore, the laboratory experiments with the no-slip boundaries serve as a good model for the finger layers in the ocean. Moreover, in the free-slip case although the tangential shear stress is eliminated at the boundaries, the local dissipation rate in the near-wall region may exceed the value found in the no-slip cases, which is caused by the stronger vertical motions of fingers and sheet structures near the free-slip boundaries. This counter intuitive result might be relevant...

  11. San Andreas-sized Strike-slip Fault on Europa

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-01-01

    This mosaic of the south polar region of Jupiter's moon Europa shows the northern 290 kilometers (180 miles) of a strike-slip fault named Astypalaea Linea. The entire fault is about 810 kilometers (500 miles) long, about the size of the California portion of the San Andreas fault, which runs from the California-Mexico border north to the San Francisco Bay. In a strike-slip fault, two crustal blocks move horizontally past one another, similar to two opposing lanes of traffic. Overall motion along the fault seems to have followed a continuous narrow crack along the feature's entire length, with a path resembling steps on a staircase crossing zones that have been pulled apart. The images show that about 50 kilometers (30 miles) of displacement have taken place along the fault. The fault's opposite sides can be reconstructed like a puzzle, matching the shape of the sides and older, individual cracks and ridges broken by its movements. [figure removed for brevity, see original site] The red line marks the once active central crack of the fault. The black line outlines the fault zone, including material accumulated in the regions which have been pulled apart. Bends in the fault have allowed the surface to be pulled apart. This process created openings through which warmer, softer ice from below Europa's brittle ice shell surface, or frozen water from a possible subsurface ocean, could reach the surface. This upwelling of material formed large areas of new ice within the boundaries of the original fault. A similar pulling-apart phenomenon can be observed in the geological trough surrounding California's Salton Sea, in Death Valley and the Dead Sea. In those cases, the pulled-apart regions can include upwelled materials, but may be filled mostly by sedimentary and eroded material from above. One theory is that fault motion on Europa is induced by the pull of variable daily tides generated by Jupiter's gravitational tug on Europa. Tidal tension opens the fault and

  12. Wheel Slip Control for Improving Traction-Ability and Energy Efficiency of a Personal Electric Vehicle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanghyun Nam

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a robust wheel slip control system based on a sliding mode controller is proposed for improving traction-ability and reducing energy consumption during sudden acceleration for a personal electric vehicle. Sliding mode control techniques have been employed widely in the development of a robust wheel slip controller of conventional internal combustion engine vehicles due to their application effectiveness in nonlinear systems and robustness against model uncertainties and disturbances. A practical slip control system which takes advantage of the features of electric motors is proposed and an algorithm for vehicle velocity estimation is also introduced. The vehicle velocity estimator was designed based on rotational wheel dynamics, measurable motor torque, and wheel velocity as well as rule-based logic. The simulations and experiments were carried out using both CarSim software and an experimental electric vehicle equipped with in-wheel-motors. Through field tests, traction performance and effectiveness in terms of energy saving were all verified. Comparative experiments with variations of control variables proved the effectiveness and practicality of the proposed control design.

  13. Laboratory study of electromagnetic initiation of slip

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Chikhladze

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available Recently Russian seismologists reported the triggering effect of MHD soundings on microseismic activity in the Central Asia test area.The paper focuses on an experimental test of the possibility of triggering the mechanical instability of a system that is close to critical state by a series of electromagnetic pulses.The mechanical system consisted of two pieces of rock;the upper piece can slip on the fixed supporting sample if the latter one is tilted up to the critical angle.In this state,the triggering of mechanical instability by some weak impact such as electrical pulse became more probable.The slope of support in the experiment is an analogue of tectonic stress in natural conditions.The preliminary experiments,carried out in a dry environment,at the humidity of atmosphere 30-50%,show that a strong EM-pulse induces sliding of a sample of rock (granite,basalt,labradoriteplaced on the supporting sample which is inclined at the slope close to,but less than,the critical angle with a probability 0.07.

  14. Induction generator-induction motor wind-powered pumping system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miranda, M.S.; Lyra, R.O.C.; Silva, S.R. [CPDEE - UFMG, Belo Horizonte (Brazil)

    1997-12-31

    The energy storage matter plays an important role in wind-electric conversion systems for isolated applications. Having that in mind, two different approaches can be basically considered: either the immediate conversion of the generated electric energy, as in a water pumping system or electric energy storage for later use, as in a battery charging system. Due to some features such as no need of an external reactive power source and, sometimes, a gearbox, permanent-magnet synchronous generators have been broadly used in low rated power isolated systems. Despite that, system performance can be affected when the generator is feeding an inductive load (e.g., an induction motor) under variable-speed-variable-frequency operational conditions. Since there is no effective flux control, motor overload may occur at high wind speeds. Thus, good system performance can be obtained through additional control devices which may increase system cost. Although being rugged and cheap, induction machines always work as a reactive power drain; therefore, they demand an external reactive power source. Considering that, reactive static compensators appear as an attractive alternative to the cost x performance problem. In addition to that, different control strategies can be used so that system performance can be improved.

  15. An adaptive feedback linearization strategy for variable speed wind energy conversion systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valenciaga, F.; Puleston, P.F.; Battaiotto, P.E.; Mantz, R.J. [Universidad Nacional de La Plata, Depto. de Electrotecnia, La Plata (Argentina)

    2000-07-01

    This paper presents a control strategy based on adaptive feedback linearization intended for variable speed grid-connected wind energy conversion systems (WECS). The proposed adaptive control law accomplishes energy capture maximization by tracking the wind speed fluctuations. In addition, it linearizes the system even in the presence of turbine model uncertainties, allowing the closed-loop dynamic behaviour to be determined by a simple tuning of the controller parameters. Particularly, the attention is focused on WECS with slip power recovery, which use a power conversion stage as a rotor-controlled double-output induction generator. However, the concepts behind the proposed control strategy are general and can be easily extended to other WECS configurations. (Author)

  16. Induction machine handbook

    CERN Document Server

    Boldea, Ion

    2002-01-01

    Often called the workhorse of industry, the advent of power electronics and advances in digital control are transforming the induction motor into the racehorse of industrial motion control. Now, the classic texts on induction machines are nearly three decades old, while more recent books on electric motors lack the necessary depth and detail on induction machines.The Induction Machine Handbook fills industry's long-standing need for a comprehensive treatise embracing the many intricate facets of induction machine analysis and design. Moving gradually from simple to complex and from standard to

  17. Experimental Characterization of a Flexible Thermal Slip Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eugenio Guglielmelli

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Tactile sensors are needed for effectively controlling the interaction between a robotic hand and the environment, e.g., during manipulation of objects, or for the tactile exploration of unstructured environments, especially when other sensing modalities, such as vision or audition, become ineffective. In the case of hand prostheses, mainly intended for dexterous manipulation of daily living objects, the possibility of quickly detecting slip occurrence, thus avoiding inadvertent falling of the objects, is prodromal to any manipulation task. In this paper we report on a slip sensor with no-moving parts, based on thermo-electrical phenomena, fabricated on a flexible substrate and suitable for integration on curved surfaces, such as robotic finger pads. Experiments performed using a custom made test bench, which is capable of generating controlled slip velocities, show that the sensor detects slip events in less than 50 ms. This response time is short enough for enabling future applications in the field of hand prosthetics.

  18. Revealing Slip Bands In A Metal-Matrix/Fiber Composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerch, Bradley A.

    1995-01-01

    Experimental procedure includes heat treatments and metallographic techniques developed to facilitate studies of deformation of metal-matrix/fiber composite under stress. Reveals slip bands, indicative of plastic flow occurring in matrix during mechanical tests of specimens of composite.

  19. Experimental characterization of a flexible thermal slip sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francomano, Maria Teresa; Accoto, Dino; Guglielmelli, Eugenio

    2012-11-08

    Tactile sensors are needed for effectively controlling the interaction between a robotic hand and the environment, e.g., during manipulation of objects, or for the tactile exploration of unstructured environments, especially when other sensing modalities, such as vision or audition, become ineffective. In the case of hand prostheses, mainly intended for dexterous manipulation of daily living objects, the possibility of quickly detecting slip occurrence, thus avoiding inadvertent falling of the objects, is prodromal to any manipulation task. In this paper we report on a slip sensor with no-moving parts, based on thermo-electrical phenomena, fabricated on a flexible substrate and suitable for integration on curved surfaces, such as robotic finger pads. Experiments performed using a custom made test bench, which is capable of generating controlled slip velocities, show that the sensor detects slip events in less than 50 ms. This response time is short enough for enabling future applications in the field of hand prosthetics.

  20. Stick-slip and Torsional Friction Factors in Inclined Wellbores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aarsnes Ulf Jakob F.

    2018-01-01

    The model is shown to have a good match with the surface and downhole behavior of two deviated wellbores for depths ranging from 1500 to 3000 meters. In particular, the model replicates the amplitude and period of the oscillations, in both the topside torque and the downhole RPM, as caused by the along-string stick slip. It is further shown that by using the surface behavior of the drill-string during rotational startup, an estimate of the static and dynamic friction factors along the wellbore can be obtained, even during stick-slip oscillations, if axial tension in the drillstring is considered. This presents a possible method to estimate friction factors in the field when off-bottom stick slip is encountered, and points in the direction of avoiding stick slip through the design of an appropriate torsional start-up procedure without the need of an explicit friction test.

  1. Quantifying effective slip length over micropatterned hydrophobic surfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tsai, Peichun Amy; Peters, A.M.; Pirat, C.; Wessling, Matthias; Lammertink, Rob G.H.; Lohse, Detlef

    2009-01-01

    We employ microparticle image velocimetry to investigate laminar microflows in hydrophobic microstructured channels, in particular the slip length. These microchannels consist of longitudinal microgrooves, which can trap air and prompt a shear-free boundary condition and thus slippage enhancement.

  2. Continued growth after fixation of slipped capital femoral epiphysis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Holmdahl, Per; Backteman, Torsten; Danielsson, Aina; Kärrholm, Johan; Riad, Jacques

    2016-01-01

    When treating slipped capital femoral epiphysis (SCFE), a smooth pin with a hook or a short threaded screw can be used to allow further growth, which could be important to prevent the development of impingement and early arthritis...

  3. Controversies in management of slipped capital femoral epiphysis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Johari, Ashok N; Pandey, Ritesh A

    2016-01-01

    .... This being a recent development, it lacks the support of long term follow up and it remains to be seen if this is a better alternative of managing displaced and unstable slipped capital femoral epiphysis...

  4. Case report: bilateral slipped capital femoral epiphyses and hormone replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nourbakhsh, Ali; Ahmed, Hasan A; McAuliffe, Thomas B; Garges, Kim J

    2008-03-01

    A 24-year-old woman presented with an 11-year history of bilateral hip pain. Radiographs of the hips revealed severe bilateral slipped upper femoral epiphyses; the left side was more severely slipped than the right. While moving the hips under fluoroscopy we observed motion at the physes and reproduced the patient's pain; the motion confirmed the diagnosis of chronic slipped capital femoral epiphysis. Endocrinology tests showed hypothyroidism. After 1 year of thyroxin therapy, the patient's pain subsided and radiographs of the hips showed fusion of the physes. This case emphasizes the importance of screening for an endocrine disorder in patients with slipped capital femoral epiphysis particularly in adults and shows fusion can occur once the underlying endocrine abnormality is treated.

  5. [Study on the compatibility of slip casting aluminous ceramic crowns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Q B; Xue, M; You, L; Du, C S; Chao, Y L

    1997-03-01

    One of the key factors for a good slip casting aluminous ceramic crown is good compatibility between its core material and the veneering porcelain.The chemical and thermal compatibility of two slip casting aluminous ceramic crown systems(In-Ceram and GI-I) were investigated by means of SEM and EDAX,thermal shock tests were also performed to evaluate the crazing resistance.The results showed: the crazing resistance of In-Ceram was 158 degrees centigrade,and that of GI-I was degrees centigrade;there existed tightly bonded interfaces between the slip casting aluminous ceramic cores and the veneering porcelains in both of the two systems,where ion transferences were found.The results also suggested good compatibility of the two slip casting aluminous ceramic crown systems.

  6. [Slip casting of stainless steel powder (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okawa, S; Ota, M; Kondo, S

    1976-01-01

    Slip casting of stainless steel powder (AISI type 316 L) was investigated as means of forming medical and dental porous restorations. This research was undertaken to evaluate the effects of the particle size and aging of casting slip and firing conditions. Bulk density was used as a measure of the degree of sintering. Water contents of casting bodies decreased with the particle size and its casting rates, bulk densities and bending strengths increased. Aging of slip decreased casting rates, water contents and bending strengths of the casts. The bulk densities of the sintered stainless steel increased with sintering time and temperature. The porosities of the materials decreased with the particle size and the elevating temperature. The bending strengths of the materials increased sharply with the decreasing particle size. The optical micrographs did not always show the uniform elimination of pores in the sintered. Aging of slip increased a little the bulk densities of the materials and decreased the porosity and the bending strength.

  7. Characterization of Natural Slip Surfaces Relevant to Earthquake Mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chester, J. S.; Kronenberg, A. K.; Chester, F. M.; Guillemette, R. N.

    2003-12-01

    The Punchbowl fault, an ancient trace of the San Andreas, displays extreme localization of displacement to a meters-thick fault core containing an ultracataclasite layer with mesoscale slip surfaces. New maps of the Punchbowl fault slip surface and ultracataclasite produced using optical and electron microscopy document that extreme localization of slip also occurred at the microscopic scale. The prominent mesoscopic scale slip surface is a thin (mm thick), texturally distinct layer of ultracataclasite with a crystal-lattice preferred orientation, as evidenced by uniform birefringence, within which distinct microscopic slip surfaces are evident. Thin sinuous seams and possible injection-like structures of opaque, ultrafine material and thin zones of cataclastic flow occur at the microscopic slip surface. Evidence for multiple episodes of synfaulting mineral alteration and cementation in the surrounding ultracataclasite documents chemical processes likely were important to strength recovery. Overall, microstructural features are consistent with the inference that repeated slip occurred on the mesoscopic-scale slip surface, and that older slip-surfaces are present throughout the ultracataclasite layer. Diffraction-contrast TEM imaging, micro-electron diffraction, quantitative elemental mapping and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) are being used to determine relative abundance and types of crystalline phases, glass, or other friction-induced amorphous phases (e.g., silica gel). Preliminary TEM observations indicate that the ultracataclasite consists almost entirely of ultrafine particles (4 to 400 nm diameter), with rounded relict grains of the host rocks, faulted and unfaulted veins, sheared and kinked clay minerals, and new, euhedral grains. Low permeabilities are implied by the fine grain size and corresponding nm-scale pores. Although rapid slip on mesoscopic scale slip surfaces would be expected to have produced thermal transients, we have not, as yet, found

  8. Modelling Paleoearthquake Slip Distributions using a Gentic Algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsay, Anthony; Simão, Nuno; McCloskey, John; Nalbant, Suleyman; Murphy, Shane; Bhloscaidh, Mairead Nic

    2013-04-01

    Along the Sunda trench, the annual growth rings of coral microatolls store long term records of tectonic deformation. Spread over large areas of an active megathrust fault, they offer the possibility of high resolution reconstructions of slip for a number of paleo-earthquakes. These data are complex with spatial and temporal variations in uncertainty. Rather than assuming that any one model will uniquely fit the data, Monte Carlo Slip Estimation (MCSE) modelling produces a catalogue of possible models for each event. From each earthquake's catalogue, a model is selected and a possible history of slip along the fault reconstructed. By generating multiple histories, then finding the average slip during each earthquake, a probabilistic history of slip along the fault can be generated and areas that may have a large slip deficit identified. However, the MCSE technique requires the production of many hundreds of billions of models to yield the few models that fit the observed coral data. In an attempt to accelerate this process, we have designed a Genetic Algorithm (GA). The GA uses evolutionary operators to recombine the information held by a population of possible slip models to produce a set of new models, based on how well they reproduce a set of coral deformation data. Repeated iterations of the algorithm produce populations of improved models, each generation better satisfying the coral data. Preliminary results have shown the GA to be capable of recovering synthetically generated slip distributions based their displacements of sets of corals faster than the MCSE technique. The results of the systematic testing of the GA technique and its performance using both synthetic and observed coral displacement data will be presented.

  9. Stick-slip patterns in a model frictional interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsekenis, Georgios; Tatar, Demet; Rubinstein, Shmuel; Weitz, David; Aziz, Michael; Spaepen, Frans

    2015-03-01

    We present measurements of the local displacements during slip-stick motion of two rough surfaces sliding over one another. The surfaces are cast in polymer and have roughness on the order of 30 μm . The displacements are observed by confocal microscopy of embedded fluorescent particles, and measured by PIV. The displacement patterns during large and small slip events are directly observed and analyzed by statistical methods.

  10. Nucleation of dynamic slip on a hydraulically fractured fault

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azad, M.; Garagash, D. I.; Satish, M.

    2017-04-01

    This work is concerned with the relationship between hydraulic fracturing injection into a fault and the possibility of a seismic slip. The results of this study show that the nucleation of dynamic slip on a fault with slip-weakening friction is only weakly dependent on the magnitude of the stress perturbation ahead of the propagating hydraulic fracture (HF), or the HF propagation regime, and is mainly controlled by the hydraulic fracture length (i.e., the size of the fully unloaded fault segment at a given time). The growth of the fault slipping patch remains stable when the background shear stress τ0 is smaller than the residual fault strength τr under ambient conditions. Otherwise (τ0>τr), nucleation of dynamic slip takes place when the hydraulic fracture grows to the critical size ℓc, which is vanishingly small ∝τp-τ0 for critically stressed faults (i.e., when the background stress approaches the fault peak strength, τ0→τp) and is diverging as ∝1/(τ0-τr) when the stability boundary is approached (τ0→τr). Our solution for the critical HF size allows to infer the corresponding fluid injection volume that may lead to slip instability on a fault with given frictional properties and background stress.

  11. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Slip on Curved Surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ross D.A.

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available We present Molecular Dynamics (MD simulations of liquid water confined within nanoscale geometries, including slit-like and cylindrical graphitic pores. These equilibrium results are used for calculating friction coefficients, which in turn can be used to calculate slip lengths. The slip length is a material property independent of the fluid flow rate. It is therefore a better quantity for study than the fluid velocity at the wall, also known as the slip velocity. Once the slip length has been found as a function of surface curvature, it can be used to parameterise Lattice Boltzmann (LB simulations. These larger scale simulations are able to tell us about how fluid transport is affected by slip in complex geometries; not just limited to single pores. Applications include flow and transport in nano-porous engine valve deposits and gas shales. The friction coefficient is found to be a function of curvature and is higher for fluid on convex surfaces and lower for concave surfaces. Both concave and convex surfaces approach the same value of the friction coefficient, which is constant above some critical radius of curvature, here found to be 7.4 ± 2.9 nm. The constant value of the friction coefficient is 10,000 ± 600 kg m−2 s−1, which is equivalent to a slip length of approximately 67 ± 4 nm.

  12. Triggering the mechanical (slip) instability in laboratory experimental model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devidze, M.; Chelidze, T.; Varamashvili, N.

    2008-05-01

    Recent laboratory experiments testify possibility of significant influence of elastic and electromagnetic (EM) fields to affect (hamper or initiate) slip. This work focuses on experimental test of possibility of triggering the mechanical instability of system, which is close to the critical state, by electromagnetic pulses. The mechanical system consisted of two pieces of rock (basalt).This system is driven close to the critical state, namely by placing the rock plate on the inclined supporting sample at the slope angle less than, but close to the critical slip angle. In this state the triggering of mechanical instability by some weak impact such as electrical pulse became more probable. It has been found that when the EM field is nearly parallel to the slip plane the EM impact initiates the slip with the probability at the voltage and with the probability at . On the other hand, if the EM field is normal to the slip surface, application of EM pulse hampers the slip. The slope of support in experiment is analogue of tectonic stress in natural conditions. We conclude that our laboratory experiments give a sound principal basis for the interpretation of the field data on the control of seismic regime by relatively weak natural or artificial perturbations; of course, in the earth crust the detailed physical mechanisms of coupling between tectonic forces and superimposed perturbations may be different.

  13. Measurement of Newtonian fluid slip using a torsional ultrasonic oscillator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willmott, G. R.; Tallon, J. L.

    2007-12-01

    The composite torsional ultrasonic oscillator, a versatile experimental system, can be used to investigate slip of a Newtonian fluid at a smooth surface. A rigorous analysis of slip-dependent damping for the oscillator is presented. Initially, the phenomenon of finite surface slip and the slip length are considered for a half space of Newtonian fluid in contact with a smooth, oscillating solid surface. Definitions are reconsidered and clarified in light of inconsistencies in the literature. We point out that, in general oscillating flows, Navier’s slip length b is a complex number. An intuitive velocity discontinuity parameter of unrestricted phase is used to describe the effect of slip on measurement of viscous shear damping. The analysis is applied to the composite oscillator, and preliminary experimental work for a 40 kHz oscillator is presented. The nonslip boundary condition has been verified for a hydrophobic surface in water to within ˜60nm of |b|=0nm . Experiments were carried out at shear rate amplitudes between 230 and 6800s-1 , corresponding to linear displacement amplitudes between 3.2 and 96 nm.

  14. Valgus slipped capital femoral epiphysis: subcapital growth plate orientation analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koczewski, Paweł

    2013-11-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the risk factors of unusual, lateral direction of epiphyseal displacement in primarily unilateral slipped capital femoral epiphysis (SCFE) patients with a special focus on radiological parameters of an unaffected hip. A total of 115 patients (75 boys, 40 girls), mean age 13.2 years (8.4-18.6), were analyzed. The mean follow-up time was 11 years (2-29). The proportion of valgus slip among SCFE patients was 11 of 115 cases (9.6%). The patients with valgus slip compared with the classic ones were predominantly females (55 vs. 33%), were younger (11.1 vs. 13.4 years), had a greater epiphyseal-shaft angle (67.4 vs. 59.1°), smaller displacement in the frontal plane (absolute value 6.7 vs. 15°), and a lower risk of contralateral slip (27 vs. 65%). There was no difference in the neck-shaft angle and epiphyseal-neck angle value. A more horizontal orientation of the subcapital growth plate, assessed by epiphyseal-shaft angle, can be considered a conducive factor in the valgus direction of epiphyseal slip in SCFE. In valgus SCFE cases, there is a smaller degree of epiphyseal displacement in both the sagittal and the coronal plane and a lower risk of consecutive contralateral slip.

  15. Nocturia Is Associated with Slipping and Falling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    So Young Kim

    Full Text Available Several reports have demonstrated associations between falls and nocturia in the elderly. However, little information is available regarding other age groups. This study evaluated the relationship between the frequency of nocturia and falls in men using a large, population-based survey in Korea, and the results were adjusted for various confounding factors. Data from a 2011 Korean community health survey (KCHS were retrieved for 92,660 men aged 19 to 103 years. Information regarding the history of slips or falls in the past year was collected. The frequency of nocturia was classified as 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, and ≥ 5 instances a night. Walking during the day, education, income, body mass index (BMI, smoking, alcohol consumption, sleep time, stress level and medical histories of hypertension, diabetes mellitus, hyperlipidemia, cerebral stroke, angina or myocardial infarction, arthritis, and osteoporosis were adjusted using multiple logistic regression analysis with complex sampling. A subgroup analysis was conducted for young (19-30 years, middle-aged (31-60 years, and elderly individuals (61+ years. Approximately 14.6% of the men had a history of falls. Their mean age was 42.9 years, which was significantly higher than that of the non-faller group (P < 0.001. An increased frequency of nocturia was associated with increased adjusted odds ratio (AOR for falls (AOR for 1 instance of nocturia/night = 1.41 [95% confidence interval, 1.33-1.50]; AOR for 2 instances = 1.41 [1.33-1.50]; AOR for 3 instances = 2.00 [1.75-2.28]; AOR for 4 instances = 2.12 [1.73-2.61]; AOR for ≥ 5 instances = 2.02 [1.74-2.36], P < 0.001. In the subgroup analysis, the AORs for falls significantly increased in all age groups as the frequency of nocturia increased.

  16. Scaling of micro-slip in tangentially loaded rock contact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grzemba, Birthe; Pohrt, Roman; Teidelt, Elena; Popov, Valentin L.

    2014-05-01

    A dry contact between randomly rough surfaces is examined which is loaded in normal and tangential direction. If the tangential load is below the friction force, no macroscopic tangential movement takes place. Nevertheless, some part of the contact area will be in sticking and some will be in sliding state depending on the local stress configuration. This effect will be called micro-slip. The maximum value of this micro-slip is reached when the last contacting spot goes into sliding state. The maximum micro-slip is a core characteristic of the contact problem. It appears in rock friction laws as a characteristic length parameter, which is often empirically determined. It can be interpreted as the characteristic size of micro-contacts appearing in rate-and-state friction theory (1). The scaling behavior of this characteristic length parameter is not yet clarified (2). It is of special interest for geophysical applications, where laboratory experiments and real systems differ in size by several orders of magnitude. In former works many suggestions have been made on the scaling context of this length parameter: surface roughness, total slip length, shear strain and system size ((1),(3),(4),(5)) are some of the proposed connected parameters. We recently presented a theoretical estimation of the maximum micro-slip for randomly rough surfaces, which is based on the iterrelation of the normal and tangential contact problem. Using recent finding concerning the normal contact problem of randomly rough surfaces (6) we were able to suggest a scaling law for the maximum micro-slip. It suggests a power-law scaling with the present normal force (7). A numerical contact model using the boundary element method was implemented for comparison, both results coincide perfectly. In addition we will present experiments with rock-rock contact in the preface of instable sliding. The set-up is a single-block slider model. From high resolution measurements, we were able to capture the micro-slip

  17. A Multicoefficient Slip-Corrected Reynolds Equation for Micro-Thin Film Gas Lubrication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ng Eddie Yin-Kwee

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available This work investigates and analyzes the performance of conventional slip models among various regimes of Knudsen number and developes a new multicoefficient slip-velocity model, by using Taguchi quality control techniques and numerical analysis. A modified Reynolds equation is also derived based on the new slip-flow model. The multicoefficient slip model and its slip-corrected Reynolds equation are suitable to a wide Knudsen range from slip to transition regime. In comparison with other conventional slip models, it is found that the current results have a better agreement with the solution obtained from the linearized Boltzmann equation and direct simulation of Monte Carlo method (DSMC.

  18. High Performance Variable Speed Drive System and Generating System with Doubly Fed Machines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Yifan

    Doubly fed machines are another alternative for variable speed drive systems. The doubly fed machines, including doubly fed induction machine, self-cascaded induction machine and doubly excited brushless reluctance machine, have several attractive advantages for variable speed drive applications, the most important one being the significant cost reduction with a reduced power converter rating. With a better understanding, improved machine design, flexible power converters and innovated controllers, the doubly fed machines could favorably compete for many applications, which may also include variable speed power generations. The goal of this research is to enhance the attractiveness of the doubly fed machines for both variable speed drive and variable speed generator applications. Recognizing that wind power is one of the favorable clean, renewable energy sources that can contribute to the solution to the energy and environment dilemma, a novel variable-speed constant-frequency wind power generating system is proposed. By variable speed operation, energy capturing capability of the wind turbine is improved. The improvement can be further enhanced by effectively utilizing the doubly excited brushless reluctance machine in slip power recovery configuration. For the doubly fed machines, a stator flux two -axis dynamic model is established, based on which a flexible active and reactive power control strategy can be developed. High performance operation of the drive and generating systems is obtained through advanced control methods, including stator field orientation control, fuzzy logic control and adaptive fuzzy control. System studies are pursued through unified modeling, computer simulation, stability analysis and power flow analysis of the complete drive system or generating system with the machine, the converter and the control. Laboratory implementations and tested results with a digital signal processor system are also presented.

  19. The slow slip event in the Tokai region, central Japan, since 2013 as seen from GPS data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakaue, H.; Fukuda, J.; Kato, T.; Nishimura, T.

    2016-12-01

    In the Tokai region, cetral Japan, the previous long-term slow slip event (SSE) occurred on the subducting Philippine Sea plate from 2000 to 2005, the longest SSE ever found. In addition, many short-term SSEs have been observed in the Tokai region since 2004. Ozawa et al. (2016) reported that a slow slip event seems to have started in the similar area of the previous Tokai long term SSE in the beginning of 2013. We analyzed GPS data in the Tokai region to estimate the temporal evolution of the current event. GPS data from 1 Jan. 2008 to 30 Apr. 2015 were used in this study. The GIPSY-OASIS II software was used to estimate daily coordinates of 226 GPS stations from the GEONET in the Tokai district. The 2011 Tohoku-oki earthquake (Mw9.0) occurred on 11 Mar. 2011 and post-seismic deformation has also been observed in the Tokai region since then. Therefore, the effects of the post-seismic deformation due to the Tohoku-oki earthquake were removed by fitting the data from 11 Mar. 2011 to 31 Dec. 2012 with simple mathematical functions. We approximate the post-seismic deformations by the sum of exponential and logarithmic functions and subtract the estimated post-seismic deformation from the GPS time series. After removing this compornent, we applied a time-dependent inversion method to the data to obtain the spatio-temporal evolution of slip on the Philippine Sea plate beneath the Tokai region. For this purpose, we used a modified Network Inversion Filter (NIF) (Fukuda et al., 2008). The original NIF (Segall and Matthews, 1997) assumes a constant hyperparameter for the temporal smoothing of slip rate and thus results in oversmoothing of slip rate. The modified NIF assumes a time variable hyperparameter, so that changes in slip rate are effectively extracted from GPS time series. The results indicate that maximum slip for the long-term SSE from 1 Jan. 2013 to 30 Apr. 2015 was estimated to be about 6 cm and the large slip was located in nearly the same area as or slightly

  20. Resolution analysis of the tsunami generated by the 2014 Mw 8.1 Pisagua earthquake using a simple slip model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, J. A.; Riquelme, S.; Fuentes, M. A.; Arriola, S.; Yamazaki, Y.; Schindelé, F.; Campos, J. A.

    2014-12-01

    earthquake model to describe the coseismic slip associated to the 2014 Pisagua earthquake. By varying the crack location and fault geometry, we are currently estimating the variability of runup distribution and seawater elevation in the near-field.

  1. Interaction between slip events, erosion and sedimentation along an active strike-slip fault: Insights from analog models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatton, M.; Malavieille, J.; Dominguez, S.; Manighetti, I.; Romano, C.; Beauprêtre, S.; Garembois, S.; Larroque, C.

    2012-04-01

    Recovering information on past (i.e., last 102-104 yrs) large earthquakes on faults is a challenge. The classical approach -especially used on strike-slip faults- consists in searching morphological markers such as river channels, streams, alluvial fans, ridges or terrace risers, etc, that would be offset by the fault, and measure these offsets by reconstructing the original position and shape of the markers. Combined with the dating of the offset markers, this morphotectonic paleoseismological approach may provide information on the slips and ages of the most recent earthquakes on the fault under study. Yet, the approach is complex as it depends on the recognition of unambiguous paired markers on either side of the fault. And our capability to recognize similar markers on either side of a fault in turn greatly depends on the 'evolution' that these markers may have sustained subsequently to their very first slip disruption. Did the repeating earthquake slip events modify their surface appearance? Did their morphology and position (ex: burying, destruction, modification, etc) evolve with the sedimentation and erosion that might have occurred during the fault history? Etc. These questions have rarely been approached for they are difficult to address in natural settings. And as we are unable to answer them in the natural cases that we study, the slip reconstructions that we provide are generally uncertain as they are likely based on an incomplete or biased record of the past fault slips. Therefore, the objective of our work is to contribute to better understand and document the nature and 'evolution' of the morphological markers that are commonly used in morphotectonic and paleoseismological analyses, especially along strike-slip faults. We approach these questions experimentally. We have developed an original experimental set-up made to simulate repeated slip events on a strike-slip fault placed in a wet environment sustaining sedimentation and erosion. The fault

  2. Controller design for a bipedal walking robot using variable stiffness actuators

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ketekaar, J.G.; Visser, L.C.; Stramigioli, Stefano; Carloni, Raffaella

    The (SLIP) model captures characteristic properties of human locomotion, and it is therefore often used to study human- like walking. The extended variable spring-loaded inverted pendulum (V-SLIP) model provides a control input for gait stabilization and shows robust and energy-efficient walking

  3. Controller design for a bipedal walking robot using variable stiffness actuators

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ketelaar, J. G.; Visser, L. C.; Stramigioli, S.; Carloni, R.

    2013-01-01

    The bipedal spring-loaded inverted pendulum (SLIP) model captures characteristic properties of human locomotion, and it is therefore often used to study human-like walking. The extended variable spring-loaded inverted pendulum (V-SLIP) model provides a control input for gait stabilization and shows

  4. The effect of temperature on photosynthetic induction under fluctuating light in Chrysanthemum morifolium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Öztürk, Isik; Ottosen, Carl-Otto; Ritz, Christian

    2013-01-01

    The temporal course of photosynthetic induction was investigated on Chrysanthemum morifolium under dynamic light and temperature conditions to evaluate the effect of climatic variables on photosynthetic induction. The Plant material was grown under uniform, controlled conditions and analyzed...

  5. Motion of a Deformed Sphere with Slip in Creeping Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benard, Andre; Jia, Liping; Petty, Charles

    2004-11-01

    An analytical solution for the motion of a slightly deformed sphere in creeping flows with the assumption of slip on the particle surface is presented. Explicit expressions are obtained for the hydrodynamic force and torque exerted by the fluid on the deformed sphere. A perturbation method, based on previous work done by Brenner [1964] and Lamb[1945], is used to solve for the motion of a fluid influenced by the presence of a deformed sphere. Slip is assumed at the surface of the particle. Hydrodynamic force and torque exerted by the fluid on the deformed sphere are expressed explicitly for a translational and rotational deformed sphere. The equation governing the motion and orientation of a spheroid induced by homogenous flows is also presented. This evolution equation for the orientation of the spheroid is similar to the equation derived by Jeffery [1922]. Solutions of this equation show that the period of rotation of the particle with slip is longer than for the same particle without slip. Furthermore, when the slip coefficient is sufficiently low, the particle rotates to a fixed angle that corresponds to a quasi-steady state in the flow. REFERENCES Brenner, H. 1964 The Stokes resistance of a slightly deformed sphere. Chemical Engineering Science 19, 519-539 Jeffery, G.B.1922 The motion of ellipsoidal particles immersed in a viscous fluid. Proc. Soc. Lond. Math., 102, 161-179 Lamb, H. 1945 Hydrodynamics, sixth version, Dover, New York, U.S.A

  6. Soil slips and debris flows on terraced slopes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. B. Crosta

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Terraces cover large areas along the flanks of many alpine and prealpine valleys. Soil slips and soil slips-debris flows are recurrent phenomena along terraced slopes. These landslides cause damages to people, settlements and cultivations. This study investigates the processes related to the triggering of soil slip-debris flows in these settings, analysing those occurred in Valtellina (Central Alps, Italy on November 2000 after heavy prolonged rainfalls. 260 landslides have been recognised, mostly along the northern valley flank. About 200 soil slips and slumps occurred in terraced areas and a third of them evolved into debris flows. Field work allowed to recognise the settings at soil slip-debris flow source areas. Landslides affected up to 2.5 m of glacial, fluvioglacial and anthropically reworked deposits overlying metamorphic basement. Laboratory and in situ tests allowed to characterise the geotechnical and hydraulic properties of the terrains involved in the initial failure. Several stratigraphic and hydrogeologic factors have been individuated as significant in determining instabilities on terraced slopes. They are the vertical changes of physical soil properties, the presence of buried hollows where groundwater convergence occurs, the rising up of perched groundwater tables, the overflow and lateral infiltration from superficial drainage network, the runoff concentration by means of pathways and the insufficient drainage of retaining walls.

  7. Measurement of Quantum Phase-Slips in Josephson Junction Chains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guichard, Wiebke

    2011-03-01

    Quantum phase-slip dynamics in Josephson junction chains could provide the basis for the realization of a new type of topologically protected qubit or for the implementation of a new current standard. I will present measurements of the effect of quantum phase-slips on the ground state of a Josephson junction chain. We can tune in situ the strength of the phase-slips. These phase-slips are the result of fluctuations induced by the finite charging energy of each junction in the chain. Our measurements demonstrate that a Josephson junction chain under phase bias constraint behaves in a collective way. I will also show evidence of coherent phase-slip interference, the so called Aharonov-Casher effect. This phenomenon is the dual of the well known Aharonov-Bohm interference. In collaboration with I.M. Pop, Institut Neel, C.N.R.S. and Universite Joseph Fourier, BP 166, 38042 Grenoble, France; I. Protopopov, L. D. Landau Institute for Theoretical Physics, Kosygin str. 2, Moscow 119334, Russia and Institut fuer Nanotechnologie, Karlsruher Institut fuer Technologie, 76021 Karlsruhe, Germany; and F. Lecocq, Z. Peng, B. Pannetier, O. Buisson, Institut Neel, C.N.R.S. and Universite Joseph Fourier. European STREP MIDAS, ANR QUANTJO.

  8. Relating stick-slip friction experiments to earthquake source parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGarr, Arthur F.

    2012-01-01

    Analytical results for parameters, such as static stress drop, for stick-slip friction experiments, with arbitrary input parameters, can be determined by solving an energy-balance equation. These results can then be related to a given earthquake based on its seismic moment and the maximum slip within its rupture zone, assuming that the rupture process entails the same physics as stick-slip friction. This analysis yields overshoots and ratios of apparent stress to static stress drop of about 0.25. The inferred earthquake source parameters static stress drop, apparent stress, slip rate, and radiated energy are robust inasmuch as they are largely independent of the experimental parameters used in their estimation. Instead, these earthquake parameters depend on C, the ratio of maximum slip to the cube root of the seismic moment. C is controlled by the normal stress applied to the rupture plane and the difference between the static and dynamic coefficients of friction. Estimating yield stress and seismic efficiency using the same procedure is only possible when the actual static and dynamic coefficients of friction are known within the earthquake rupture zone.

  9. Scaling analysis for the investigation of slip mechanisms in nanofluids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Savithiri S

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The primary objective of this study is to investigate the effect of slip mechanisms in nanofluids through scaling analysis. The role of nanoparticle slip mechanisms in both water- and ethylene glycol-based nanofluids is analyzed by considering shape, size, concentration, and temperature of the nanoparticles. From the scaling analysis, it is found that all of the slip mechanisms are dominant in particles of cylindrical shape as compared to that of spherical and sheet particles. The magnitudes of slip mechanisms are found to be higher for particles of size between 10 and 80 nm. The Brownian force is found to dominate in smaller particles below 10 nm and also at smaller volume fraction. However, the drag force is found to dominate in smaller particles below 10 nm and at higher volume fraction. The effect of thermophoresis and Magnus forces is found to increase with the particle size and concentration. In terms of time scales, the Brownian and gravity forces act considerably over a longer duration than the other forces. For copper-water-based nanofluid, the effective contribution of slip mechanisms leads to a heat transfer augmentation which is approximately 36% over that of the base fluid. The drag and gravity forces tend to reduce the Nusselt number of the nanofluid while the other forces tend to enhance it.

  10. The viscous slip coefficient for a binary gas mixture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knackfuss, Rosenei F. [Universidade Federal de Santa Maria (UFSM), RS (Brazil). Centro de Ciencias Naturais e Exatas. Dept. de Matematica], e-mail: rfknackfuss@gmail.com

    2009-07-01

    For a moderately small rarefaction, the Navier-Stokes equations are associated with of the slip boundary condition, i e the velocity of the gas on the surface is different from zero at the surface, but its tangential component, depends on the profile distribution of velocity and temperature near the surface. The slip for the velocity profile near the surface is determined by the viscous slip coefficient. The viscous slip coefficient can be determined solving the equation of the Boltzmann or the kinetic equations which are simplified forms of Boltzmann equation with respect to the operator of collision. For this reason, in this work is presented the derivation of the solution of the viscous-slip problem for the mixtures of two noble gases, based on the McCormack model that is developed in terms of an analytical version of the discrete ordinates method has been applied with excellent results, to derive solutions to several problems in rarefied gas dynamics. To complete the problem, include the gas-surface interaction, based on the model of Cercignani-Lampis, which, unlike the model of Maxwell, has two accommodation coefficients: the coefficient of accommodation of tangential moment and the energy accommodation coefficient kinetics due to normal component of velocity. (author)

  11. Slip-rate-dependent melt extraction at oceanic transform faults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Hailong; Montési, Laurent G. J.

    2015-02-01

    Crustal thickness differences between oceanic transform faults and associated mid-ocean ridges may be explained by melt migration and extraction processes. Slow-slipping transform faults exhibit more positive gravity anomalies than the adjacent spreading centers, indicating relative thin crust in the transform domain, whereas at intermediate-spreading and fast-spreading ridges transform faults are characterized by more negative gravity anomalies than the adjacent spreading centers, indicating thick crust in the transform domain. We present numerical models reproducing these observations and infer that melt can be extracted at fast-slipping transforms, but not at slow-slipping ones. Melt extraction is modeled as a three-step process. (1) Melt moves vertically through buoyancy-driven porous flow enhanced by subvertical dissolution channels. (2) Melt accumulates in and travels along a decompaction channel lining a low-permeability barrier at the base of the thermal boundary layer. (3) Melt is extracted to the surface when it enters a melt extraction zone. A melt extraction width of 2-4 km and a melt extraction depth of 15-20 km are needed to fit the tectonic damages associated with oceanic plate boundaries that reach into the upper mantle. Our conclusions are supported by the different degrees of magmatic activities exhibited at fast-slipping and slow-slipping transforms as reflected in geological features, geochemical signals, and seismic behaviors. We also constrain that the maximum lateral distance of crust-level dike propagation is about 50-70 km.

  12. Induction Therapy for Mesothelioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opitz, Isabelle; Weder, Walter

    2015-01-01

    One particular approach of multimodality treatment for mesothelioma is induction therapy followed by surgery. Among its several advantages, the most important is downstaging of the tumor into a resectable stage, although morbidity and mortality might be increased. In this article we review the principles and outcome of different modalities for induction treatment of mesothelioma. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Progress in Induction Linacs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caporaso, G J

    2000-09-27

    This presentation will be a broad survey of progress in induction technology over the past four years. Much work has been done on accelerators for hydrodynamic test radiography and other applications. Solid-state pulsers have been developed which can provide unprecedented flexibility and precision in pulse format and accelerating voltage for both ion and electron induction machines. Induction linacs can now be built which can operate with MHz repetition rates. Solid-state technology has also made possible the development of fast kickers for precision control of high current beams. New insulator technology has been developed which will improve conventional induction linacs in addition to enabling a new class of high gradient induction linacs.

  14. Development of anti-slip sustainable tiles from agricultural waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zulkefli, Zainordin Firdaus; Zainol, Mohd Remy Rozainy Mohd Arif; Osman, Norhayati

    2017-04-01

    In general of 80% the human activities is located in the building. Buildings constructed should be in line with full functions and optimum safety features. Aspects to be emphasized is the slip on the floor of the building. The selection of tiles must have anti-slip characteristics and achieve standard strength stress. This study is conducted to develop anti-slip tiles modification using agricultural waste. The material used is agricultural waste such rice husks, palm fibre and saw dusk mixed into the clay and then baked at a temperature of 900-1185 C °. Agricultural waste mixture ratio is 5%, 10% and 15%. The samples of tiles are produced for experiments. The results of agricultural waste tiles show that the strength is higher than standard strength, the water absorption less than standard tiles and pendulum value test is exceeds 36.

  15. Slip systems, dislocation boundaries and lattice rotations in deformed metals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winther, Grethe

    2009-01-01

    Metals are polycrystals and consist of grains, which are subdivided on a finer scale upon plastic deformation due to formation of dislocation boundaries. The crystallographic alignment of planar dislocation boundaries in face centred cubic metals, like aluminium and copper, deformed to moderate...... slip systems. Actual prediction of the dislocation boundary alignment has become possible through establishment of general relations between slip systems and dislocation boundary planes. The practical relevance of these relations has been exemplified by applying them as a basis for further prediction...... of the mechanical anisotropy of rolled sheets. The rotation of the crystallographic lattice in each grain during deformation also exhibits grain orientation dependence, originating from the slip systems. A combined analysis of dislocation boundaries and lattice rotations concludes that the two phenomena are coupled...

  16. Slip-stick excitation and travelling waves excite silo honking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Warburton Katarzyna

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Silo honking is the harmonic sound generated by the discharge of a silo filled with a granular material. In industrial storage silos, the acoustic emission during discharge of PET-particles forms a nuisance for the environment and may ultimately result in structural failure. This work investigates the phenomenon experimentally using a laboratory-scale silo, and successfully correlates the frequency of the emitted sound with the periodicity of the mechanical motion of the grains. The key driver is the slip-stick interaction between the wall and the particles, characterized as a wave moving upwards through the silo. A quantitative correlation is established for the first time between the frequency of the sound, measured with an electret microphone, and the slip-frequency, measured with a high-speed camera. In the lower regions of the tube, both the slip-stick motion and the honking sound disappear.

  17. Creep and slip: Seismic precursors to the Nuugaatsiaq landslide (Greenland)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poli, Piero

    2017-09-01

    Precursory signals to material's failure are predicted by numerical models and observed in laboratory experiments or using field data. These precursory signals are a marker of slip acceleration on weak regions, such as crustal faults. Observation of these precursory signals of catastrophic natural events, such as earthquakes and landslides, is necessary for improving our knowledge about the physics of the nucleation process. Furthermore, observing such precursory signals may help to forecast these catastrophic events or reduce their hazard. I report here the observation of seismic precursors to the Nuugaatsiaq landslide in Greenland. Time evolution of the detected precursors implies that an aseismic slip event is taking place for hours before the landslide, with an exponential increase of slip velocity. Furthermore, time evolution of the precursory signals' amplitude sheds light on the evolution of the fault physics during the nucleation process.

  18. Atomistic Determination of Cross-Slip Pathway and Energetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Torben; Jacobsen, Karsten Wedel; Leffers, Torben

    1997-01-01

    plane. The transition state and activation energy for cross slip as well as the energies of the involved dislocation constrictions are determined. One constriction has a negative energy compared to parallel partials. The energy vs splitting width for recombination of parallel partials into a perfect......The mechanism for cross slip of a screw dislocation in Cu is determined by atomistic simulations that only presume the initial and final states of the process. The dissociated dislocation constricts in the primary plane and redissociates into the cross-slip plane while still partly in the primary...... dislocation is determined. The breakdown of linear elasticity theory for small splitting widths is studied. [S0031-9007(97)04444-X]....

  19. Offset of latest pleistocene shoreface reveals slip rate on the Hosgri strike-slip fault, offshore central California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Samuel Y.; Hartwell, Stephen R.; Dartnell, Peter

    2014-01-01

    The Hosgri fault is the southern part of the regional Hosgri–San Gregorio dextral strike‐slip fault system, which extends primarily in the offshore for about 400 km in central California. Between Morro Bay and San Simeon, high‐resolution multibeam bathymetry reveals that the eastern strand of the Hosgri fault is crossed by an ∼265  m wide slope interpreted as the shoreface of a latest Pleistocene sand spit. This sand spit crossed an embayment and connected a western fault‐bounded bedrock peninsula and an eastern bedrock highland, a paleogeography resembling modern coastal geomorphology along the San Andreas fault. Detailed analysis of the relict shoreface with slope profiles and slope maps indicates a lateral slip rate of 2.6±0.9  mm/yr, considered a minimum rate for the Hosgri given the presence of an active western strand. This slip rate indicates that the Hosgri system takes up the largest share of the strike‐slip fault budget and is the most active strike‐slip fault west of the San Andreas fault in central California. This result further demonstrates the value and potential of high‐resolution bathymetry in characterization of active offshore faults.

  20. Back analysis of fault-slip in burst prone environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sainoki, Atsushi; Mitri, Hani S.

    2016-11-01

    In deep underground mines, stress re-distribution induced by mining activities could cause fault-slip. Seismic waves arising from fault-slip occasionally induce rock ejection when hitting the boundary of mine openings, and as a result, severe damage could be inflicted. In general, it is difficult to estimate fault-slip-induced ground motion in the vicinity of mine openings because of the complexity of the dynamic response of faults and the presence of geological structures. In this paper, a case study is conducted for a Canadian underground mine, herein called "Mine-A", which is known for its seismic activities. Using a microseismic database collected from the mine, a back analysis of fault-slip is carried out with mine-wide 3-dimensional numerical modeling. A back analysis is conducted to estimate the physical and mechanical properties of the causative fracture or shear zones. One large seismic event has been selected for the back analysis to detect a fault-slip related seismic event. In the back analysis, the shear zone properties are estimated with respect to moment magnitude of the seismic event and peak particle velocity (PPV) recorded by a strong ground motion sensor. The estimated properties are then validated through comparison with peak ground acceleration recorded by accelerometers. Lastly, ground motion in active mining areas is estimated by conducting dynamic analysis with the estimated values. The present study implies that it would be possible to estimate the magnitude of seismic events that might occur in the near future by applying the estimated properties to the numerical model. Although the case study is conducted for a specific mine, the developed methodology can be equally applied to other mines suffering from fault-slip related seismic events.

  1. Histological, histochemical and ultrastructural study of slipped capital femoral epiphysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tresoldi, I; Modesti, A; Dragoni, M; Potenza, V; Ippolito, E

    2017-04-01

    The purpose of our study was to investigate the histological, histochemical and ultrastructural aspects of the proximal femoral growth plate in slipped capital femoral epiphysis (SCFE). Eight core biopsies of the proximal femoral growth plate were performed during in situ epiphysiodesis in patients with SCFE that was at the pre-slipping stage in two cases and at the mild slipping stage (Southwick angle femoral growth plate was thicker than normal in the SCFE cases, and the 3:1 ratio between the thickness of the resting zone and the other zones of the plate was reversed. Chondrocytes of the proliferating, maturation, hypertrophic and degenerating zones were arranged in large clusters rather than in columns, which were separated by loose fibrillary septae that appeared moderately alcian blue positive and metachromatic. The collagen fibrils of the longitudinal septae were uniformly thin, measuring about 200 Å, whereas in the normal plate collagen fibrils were in the range of 300 to 1200 Å in thickness. Chondrocytes were elongated and smaller than normal, with a dark cytoplasm. In the degenerating zone, mineralisation of the longitudinal and transversal septae was scanty and enchondral ossification was impaired, with a few small osteoblasts forming thin bone trabeculae on the cartilage septae of the degenerating zone. In SCFE, the proximal femoral growth plate undergoes several histological, histochemical and ultrastructural changes that precede slipping of the epiphysis since they are already present at a pre-slipping stage of the disease. The loss of solidity of the extracellular matrix and the disarrangement of the normal architecture of the physis very likely cause the consequent slipping of the proximal femoral epiphysis. SCFE aetiology remains unknown.

  2. Continuously variable transmissions: theory and practice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beachley, Norman H. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Frank, Andrew A. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    1979-08-01

    The five basic principles that can be used in the design of continuously variable transmissions (CVT) for motor vehicles are examined and compared. These include: hydrostatic, traction drive (V-belt and rolling contact), overrunning clutch, electric, and multispeed gearbox with slipping clutch. Appendix A discusses commercially available CVTs suitable for motor vehicles, and Appendix B describes research and development programs for CVTs.

  3. Phase-slip centers in superconducting indium microbridges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weissbrod, H.; Huebener, R. P.; Clauss, W.

    1987-10-01

    Measurement is made of the transition to the resistive state of nearly one-dimensional superconducting microbridges of indium. The length of the microbridges ranged from 30 to 130 µm. The experiments concentrated in particular on the onset and temperature dependence of the hysteresis of the voltage-current characteristic, the temperature dependence of the excess current, and the equivalent normal length of the phase-slip centers generated during the resistive transition. The results are in good agreement with the dynamic model of a phase-slip center proposed by Kadin, Smith, and Skocpol.

  4. Phase-slip centers in superconducting indium microbridges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weissbrod, H.; Huebener, R.P.; Clauss, W.

    1987-10-01

    Measurement is made of the transition to the resistive state of nearly one-dimensional superconducting microbridges of indium. The length of the microbridges ranged from 30 to 130 ..mu..m. The experiments concentrated in particular on the onset and temperature dependence of the hysteresis of the voltage-current characteristic, the temperature dependence of the excess current, and the equivalent normal length of the phase-slip centers generated during the resistive transition. The results are in good agreement with the dynamic model of a phase-slip center proposed by Kadin, Smith, and Skocpol.

  5. Analytical solutions for squeeze flow with partial wall slip

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laun, HM; Rady, M; Hassager, Ole

    1999-01-01

    Squeeze flow between parallel plates of a purely viscous material is considered for small gaps both for a Newtonian and power law fluid with partial wall slip. The results for the squeeze force as a function of the squeezing speed reduce to the Stefan and Scott equations in the no slip limit...... if plotted versus 1/H. The slope of the straight line is equal to 6 upsilon(s) whereas the intersect with the ordinate yields the effective Newtonian rim shear rate to be converted into the true rim shear rate by means of the power law exponent. The advantage of the new technique is the separation of bulk...

  6. Comment on Cercignani's second-order slip coefficient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadjiconstantinou, Nicolas G.

    2003-08-01

    Cercignani's second-order slip model has been neglected over the years, perhaps due to Sreekanth's claim that it cannot fit his experimental data. In this paper we show that Sreekanth's claim was based on an incorrect interpretation of this model. We also show that Cercignani's second-order slip model, when modified and used appropriately, is in good agreement with solutions of the Boltzmann equation for a hard-sphere gas for a wide range of rarefaction. Given its simplicity, we expect this model to be a valuable tool for describing isothermal micro- and nanoscale flows to the extent that the hard-sphere approximation is appropriate.

  7. Complications Related to the Treatment of Slipped Capital Femoral Epiphysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roaten, John; Spence, David D

    2016-04-01

    Slipped capital femoral epiphysis (SCFE) is a condition of the immature hip in which mechanical overload of the proximal femoral physis results in anterior and superior displacement of the femoral metaphysis relative to the epiphysis. The treatment of SCFE is surgical, as the natural history of nonsurgical treatment is slip progression and early arthritis. Despite advances in treatment, much controversy exists regarding the best treatment, and complication rates remain high. Complications include osteonecrosis, chondrolysis, SCFE-induced impingement, and related articular degeneration, fixation failure and deformity progression, growth disturbance of the proximal femur, and development of bilateral disease. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Kinematically Coupled Strike-Slip and Normal Faults in the Lake Mead Strike-Slip Fault System, Southeast Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kattenhorn, S. A.; Marshall, S. T.; Cooke, M. L.

    2008-12-01

    The Lake Mead fault system consists of a ~95 km long, northeast-trending zone of strike-slip faults of Miocene age that accommodate a total left-lateral offset of 20-65 km. We use a combination of detailed field mapping and numerical modeling to show that a previously unnamed left-lateral strike-slip segment of the Lake Mead fault system and a dense cluster of dominantly west-dipping normal faults acted in concert to accommodate regional left-lateral offset. We suggest that the strike-slip fault that we refer to as the Pinto Ridge fault: (1) was kinematically related to other faults of the Lake Mead fault system; (2) was responsible for the creation of the normal fault cluster at Pinto Ridge; and (3) utilized these normal faults as linking structures between separate strike-slip fault segments to create a longer, through-going fault. Results from numerical models demonstrate that the observed location and curving strike patterns of the normal fault cluster is consistent with the faults having formed as secondary structures as the result of the perturbed stress field around the slipping Pinto Ridge fault. Comparison of mechanical efficiency of various normal fault geometries within extending terranes suggests that the observed west dip of normal faults reflects a west- dipping anisotropy at depth, such as a detachment. The apparent terminations of numerous strike-slip faults of the Lake Mead fault system into west-dipping normal faults suggest that a west-dipping detachment may be regionally coherent.

  9. Transformation of fault slip modes in laboratory experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martynov, Vasilii; Alexey, Ostapchuk; Markov, Vadim

    2017-04-01

    Slip mode of crust fault can vary because of many reasons. It's well known that fault structure, material of fault gouge, pore fluid et al. in many ways determines slip modes from creep and slow slip events to mega-earthquakes [1-3]. Therefore, the possibility of fault slip transformation due to external action is urgent question. There is popular and developing approach of fluid injection into central part of fault. The phenomenon of earthquakes induced due to pumping of water was investigated on small and large scales [4, 5]. In this work the laboratory experiments were conducted to study the evolution of the experimental fault slip when changing the properties of the interstitial fluid. The scheme of experiments is the classical slider-model set-up, in which the block under the shear force slips along the interface. In our experiments the plexiglas block 8x8x3 cm3 in size was put on the plexiglas base. The contact of the blocks was filled with a thin layer (about 3 mm thick) of a granular material. The normal load varied from 31 to 156 kPa. The shear load was applied through a spring with stiffness 60 kN/m, and the rate of spring deformation was 20 or 5 mcm/s. Two parameters were recorded during experiments: the shear force acting on the upper block (with an accuracy of 1 N) and its displacement relatively the base (with an accuracy of 0.1 μm). The gouge was composed of quartz sand (97.5%) and clay (2.5%). As a moisturizer were used different fluids with viscosity varying from 1 to 103 mPa x s. Different slip modes were simulated during slider-experiments. In our experiments slip mode is the act of instability manifested in an increase of slip velocity and a drop of shear stress acting on a movable block. The amplitude of a shear stress drop and the peak velocity of the upper block were chosen as the characteristics of the slip mode. In the laboratory experiments, slip events of one type can be achieved either as regularly recurring (regular mode) or as random

  10. Bilateral unstable slipped capital femoral epiphysis: a look at risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera-Soto, José A; Vanderhave, Kelly L; Gordon, Eric; Fabregas, Jorge; Phillips, Jonathan H; Schoenecker, Perry; Parsch, Klaus

    2011-06-14

    Unstable slipped capital femoral epiphysis can have disastrous complications including osteonecrosis and chondrolysis. It has been shown that 20% to 80% of patients may develop a contralateral slip ≤18 months after diagnosis. The purpose of this article is to report and characterize patients who developed bilateral unstable slips. After Institutional Review Board approval, the patients included were only those with bilateral unstable slipped capital femoral epiphyses. A minimum 2-year follow-up was required. Seven patients, all female, were included in the study, with an average age of 11.4 years at the time of their first slips. The interval between slips averaged 127 days (range, 0-245 days). All but 1 patient presented with a severe slip. The second slip was also severe in 3 patients and less severe in 4 patients. The triradiate cartilage was open in 3 patients. Two patients required corrective osteotomies. Chondrolysis developed in 2 patients with no osteonecrosis reported. The incidence of bilateral unstable slips ranged from 4% to 20% of all unstable slipped capital femoral epiphyses based on our findings. Skeletal immaturity was not a risk factor. The surgeon must be vigilant for the possibility of bilateral slips. The family must be instructed on precautions patients must take while recuperating from unstable slipped capital femoral epiphyses. Contralateral fixation of the unaffected side may be warranted in patients with initial severe unstable slipped capital femoral epiphyses to prevent this condition. Copyright 2011, SLACK Incorporated.

  11. Investigating Electromagnetic Induction through a Microcomputer-Based Laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trumper, Ricardo; Gelbman, Moshe

    2000-01-01

    Describes a microcomputer-based laboratory experiment designed for high school students that very accurately analyzes Faraday's law of electromagnetic induction, addressing each variable separately while the others are kept constant. (Author/CCM)

  12. Models of the Evolution of Finite Strain at Strike-Slip Plate Boundaries and Potential Implications for Seismic Anisotropy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurz, I.; Roy, M.

    2014-12-01

    While we are aware of the extent and distribution of strain at the surface near the Pacific-North America plate boundary at the San Andreas Fault (SAF) system in California, at depth, our understanding is poor. Recent seismic observations suggest a narrow shear zone throughout the lithosphere corresponding to the narrow plate boundary at the surface. Surrounding the SAF in California, measurements of seismic anisotropy demonstrate orientations which vary depending on the location relative to the fault. Specifically, in northern California, the orientations align along the fault in its proximity, and in the east-west direction elsewhere. We investigate how the finite-strain ellipsoid (FSE) evolves for tracers in a 3D model of the lithosphere and asthenosphere beneath the SAF. The top surface of the mesh has a right-lateral strike-slip velocity boundary condition, and the bottom, a uniform asthenospheric flow velocity condition perpendicular to the strike-slip fault. We calculate the orientations of the FSE for various ratios of strike-slip to asthenospheric velocity and viscosity stratification. The two classes of models which we investigate simulate an asthenospheric channel beneath a uniform-thickness lithosphere and a variable-depth lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary (LAB). In an isoviscous fluid beneath a uniform-thickness lithosphere, strain rates, and thus FSE orientations, are constant throughout the channel, dependent on the ratio of the velocities but not the viscosity. For a two-layered asthenospheric channel of a higher-viscosity layer overlying a lower-viscosity layer, FSE orientations align with the strike-slip boundary in the upper layer and the drag in the lower layer. When we emulate a lithosphere of variable thickness across the fault by increasing the viscosity of the upper layer, we observe asymmetric FSE orientations across the step in the LAB. The direction of lithospheric thickening across the strike-slip fault govern these orientations

  13. Induction melter apparatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roach, Jay A [Idaho Falls, ID; Richardson, John G [Idaho Falls, ID; Raivo, Brian D [Idaho Falls, ID; Soelberg, Nicholas R [Idaho Falls, ID

    2008-06-17

    Apparatus and methods of operation are provided for a cold-crucible-induction melter for vitrifying waste wherein a single induction power supply may be used to effect a selected thermal distribution by independently energizing at least two inductors. Also, a bottom drain assembly may be heated by an inductor and may include an electrically resistive heater. The bottom drain assembly may be cooled to solidify molten material passing therethrough to prevent discharge of molten material therefrom. Configurations are provided wherein the induction flux skin depth substantially corresponds with the central longitudinal axis of the crucible. Further, the drain tube may be positioned within the induction flux skin depth in relation to material within the crucible or may be substantially aligned with a direction of flow of molten material within the crucible. An improved head design including four shells forming thermal radiation shields and at least two gas-cooled plenums is also disclosed.

  14. Thermal kinetic inductance detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cecil, Thomas; Gades, Lisa; Miceli, Antonio; Quaranta, Orlando

    2016-12-20

    A microcalorimeter for radiation detection that uses superconducting kinetic inductance resonators as the thermometers. The detector is frequency-multiplexed which enables detector systems with a large number of pixels.

  15. Lidar and Luminescence Dating Analysis of Latest Pleistocene-Holocene Slip Rates on the Awatere fault at Saxton River, South Island, New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zinke, R. W.; Dolan, J. F.; Van Dissen, R. J.; McGuire, C. P.; Rhodes, E. J.; Hatem, A. E.; Grenader, J.; Langridge, R.

    2015-12-01

    We use high-resolution lidar imagery and luminescence dating to constrain incremental Holocene-late Pleistocene slip rates at the well-known Saxton River site along the Awatere fault, which is a primary fault in the Marlborough Fault System, South Island, New Zealand. Previous studies examining the ages and displacements of offset fluvial terraces and bedrock features at the Saxton River site suggest that slip rates along the Awatere fault have been highly variable since ~16 ka, exhibiting rates as low as ~3 mm/yr and as fast ~13 mm/yr, with an average of ~6 mm/yr (e.g., Mason et al., 2006). Mapping on high-resolution lidar topographic data and additional field surveys yield revised measurements of the five fluvial terrace risers and bedrock ridge that have been offset by the Awatere fault at the Saxton River site. Improved dating of those geomorphic features provided by post-IR50-IRSL225 luminescence ages allows us to more accurately constrain the incremental slip rates recorded at this site. Preliminary results suggest that the slip rate during latest Pleistocene-Holocene time has indeed varied considerably over millennial timescales. This study is part of a broader effort aimed at determining incremental slip rates and paleo-earthquake ages and displacements from all four main Marlborough faults. Collectively, these data will allow us to determine how the Marlborough system faults have worked together during the Holocene-late Pleistocene to accommodate plate-boundary deformation in time and space.

  16. Double diffusive magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) mixed convective slip flow along a radiating moving vertical flat plate with convective boundary condition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashidi, Mohammad M; Kavyani, Neda; Abelman, Shirley; Uddin, Mohammed J; Freidoonimehr, Navid

    2014-01-01

    In this study combined heat and mass transfer by mixed convective flow along a moving vertical flat plate with hydrodynamic slip and thermal convective boundary condition is investigated. Using similarity variables, the governing nonlinear partial differential equations are converted into a system of coupled nonlinear ordinary differential equations. The transformed equations are then solved using a semi-numerical/analytical method called the differential transform method and results are compared with numerical results. Close agreement is found between the present method and the numerical method. Effects of the controlling parameters, including convective heat transfer, magnetic field, buoyancy ratio, hydrodynamic slip, mixed convective, Prandtl number and Schmidt number are investigated on the dimensionless velocity, temperature and concentration profiles. In addition effects of different parameters on the skin friction factor, [Formula: see text], local Nusselt number, [Formula: see text], and local Sherwood number [Formula: see text] are shown and explained through tables.

  17. Longitudinal velocity and road slope estimation in hybrid electric vehicles employing early detection of excessive wheel slip

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klomp, Matthijs; Gao, Yunlong; Bruzelius, Fredrik

    2014-05-01

    Vehicle speed is one of the important quantities in vehicle dynamics control. Estimation of the slope angle is in turn a necessity for correct dead reckoning from vehicle acceleration. In the present work, estimation of vehicle speed is applied to a hybrid vehicle with an electric motor on the rear axle and a combustion engine on the front axle. The wheel torque information, provided by electric motor, is used to early detect excessive wheel slip and improve the accuracy of the estimate. A best-wheel selection approach is applied as the observation variable of a Kalman filter which reduces the influence of slipping wheels as well as reducing the computational effort. The performance of the proposed algorithm is illustrated on a test data recorded at a winter test ground with excellent results, even for extreme conditions such as when all four wheels are spinning.

  18. Partial slip and dissipation on MHD radiative ferro-fluid over a non-linear permeable convectively heated stretching sheet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Sivakumar

    Full Text Available The simultaneous interaction of viscous dissipative and thermal radiation in MHD two dimensional flows of ferro-liquid over a nonlinear moving surface is analyzed here. The slip on velocity and convective boundary condition on temperature are imposed on stretching surface. We used water as conventional base liquid which have magnetite (Fe3O4 and alumina (Al2O3 as nanoparticles. The governing mathematical expressions are converted into non-dimensional form via nonlinear type similarity variables. The resulting mathematical model is numerically solved with the help of MATLAB solver bvp4c. The roles of non-dimensional constraints on velocity and temperature are elaborated through plots. The numerical data of skin-friction coefficient and Nusselt number is presented and visualized. The validity of computed results is analyzed through comparative benchmark. Keywords: Ferro fluid, Velocity slip condition, Convective boundary condition, Viscous dissipation, Radiation

  19. Modelling, Analysis, and Control Aspects of a Rotating Power Electronic Brushless Doubly-Fed Induction Generator

    OpenAIRE

    Malik, Naveed ur Rehman

    2015-01-01

    This thesis deals with the modeling, analysis and control of a novel brushlessgenerator for wind power application. The generator is named as rotatingpower electronic brushless doubly-fed induction machine/generator (RPEBDFIM/G). A great advantage of the RPE-BDFIG is that the slip power recoveryis realized in a brushless manner. This is achieved by introducing an additionalmachine termed as exciter together with the rotating power electronicconverters, which are mounted on the shaft of a DFIG...

  20. A temperature dependent slip factor based thermal model for friction ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    This paper proposes a new slip factor based three-dimensional thermal model to predict the temperature distribution during friction stir welding of 304L stainless steel plates. The proposed model employs temperature and radius dependent heat source to study the thermal cycle, temperature distribution, power required, the ...

  1. A temperature dependent slip factor based thermal model for friction ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. This paper proposes a new slip factor based three-dimensional thermal model to predict the temperature distribution during friction stir welding of 304L stainless steel plates. The proposed model employs temperature and radius dependent heat source to study the thermal cycle, temperature distribution, power ...

  2. The No-Slip Boundary Condition in Fluid Mechanics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 9; Issue 4. The No-Slip Boundary Condition in Fluid Mechanics - 1.The Riddle of Fluid Sticking to the Wall in Flow. Sandeep Prabhakara M D Deshpande. General Article Volume 9 Issue 4 April 2004 pp 50-60 ...

  3. The No-Slip Boundary Condition in Fluid Mechanics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A moving fluid in contact with a solid body cannot have velocity relative to the body. Even though the question whether there is slip has been satisfactorily resolved now, it was a difficult and controversial problem. In the first part of this article several basic ideas and details related to this problem are discussed.

  4. Evaluation of slips of white yam ( Dioscorea rotundata poir ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Landrace Hembamkwase had the longest vine (163.3cm), followed by hybrid TDr 89/02665 while Ame produced the shortest vine. Hembamkwase also out-yielded other genotypes except Ame in 2011 and Nwopoko in 2012. Generally, slips of the hybrid varieties, especially TDr 89/02665 and TDr 97/19177 performed ...

  5. Numerical Simulation of Methane Slip in Dual Fuel Marine Engines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Han, Jaehyun; Jensen, Michael Vincent; Pang, Kar Mun

    2017-01-01

    and the valve timings on the methane slip was investigated. MAN L28/32DF engine was modeled to simulate the gas exchange process of the four stroke NG-diesel dual fuel engines. The mesh size of the model was decided based on the sensitivity study on the peak pressure of the cylinder and the fuel mass...

  6. Slip, Swim, Mix, Pack: Fluid Mechanics at the Micron Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauga, Eric

    2006-11-01

    This talk summarizes my thesis work which was advised by Michael P. Brenner and Howard A. Stone at Harvard University and is devoted to fluid behavior at the micrometer length scale. We consider four different problems. We first address the topic of the no-slip boundary condition in Newtonian liquids. After briefly reviewing the field, we (1) present models for apparent slip in three distinct experimental settings, (2) propose a new method to probe slip and (3) show that slip has virtually no influence on the non-modal stability of shear flows. The second problem we consider addresses mixing in micro-devices. We show that microchannels which are obtained with a single step of microfabrication (that is, have constant height) are able to generate fully three-dimensional flows. The third problem we present proposes a mechanical model for the motion of the bacterium E. coli near solid boundaries. It has been observed that, near a solid surface, E. coli does not swim in a straight line but in clockwise circles, which we show is a consequence of the hydrodynamic interactions between the free- swimming bacterium and the surface. The final problem we consider addresses self-assembly of micro- particles. We show that when spherical particles located on a liquid droplet are forced to come together by evaporation of the droplet, the geometrical and mechanical constraints arising during the process lead to unique final clusters.

  7. Discrete dislocation plasticity analysis of single slip tension

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deshpande, VS; Needleman, A; Van der Giessen, E

    2005-01-01

    The effect of loading conditions on the tensile stress versus strain response of micron-sized planar crystals with a single active slip system is investigated via finite and small deformation discrete dislocation plasticity analyses. When rotation of the tensile axis is prevented, lattice curvature

  8. Determination of the of rate cross slip of screw dislocations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vegge, Tejs; Rasmussen, Torben; Leffers, Torben

    2000-01-01

    The rate for cross slip of screw dislocations during annihilation of screw dipoles in copper is determined by molecular dynamics simulations. The temperature dependence of the rate is seen to obey an Arrhenius behavior in the investigated temperature range: 225-375 K. The activation energy...

  9. Third Party Fraud inducing Material Mistake Slip Knot Investments ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In Slip Knot Investments v Du Toit 2011 4 SA 72 (SCA) the Supreme Court of Appeal had to determine if the material mistake of a contractual party induced by the fraud of an independent third party could sustain a plea of iustus error raised by the mistaken party. The position prior to this decision was uncertain and ...

  10. Analysis of slip flow heat transfer between two unsymmetrically ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    This paper presents an analytical investigation to study the heat transfer and fluid flow characteristics in the slip flow region for hydrodynamically and thermally fully developed flow between parallel plates.Both upper and lower plates are subjected to asymmetric heat flux boundary conditions. The effect of first ordervelocity ...

  11. The No-Slip Boundary Condition in Fluid Mechanics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 9; Issue 5. The No-Slip Boundary Condition in Fluid Mechanics - Solution of the Sticky Problem. Sandeep Prabhakara M D Deshpande. General Article Volume 9 Issue 5 May 2004 pp 61-71 ...

  12. Slip and flow dynamics of polydisperse thin polystyrene films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabzevari, Seyed Mostafa; McGraw, Joshua D.; Jacobs, Karin; Wood-Adams, Paula M.

    2015-03-01

    We investigate the slip of binary and ternary mixtures of nearly monodisperse polystyrene samples on Teflon-coated (AF2400) silicon wafers using dewetting experiments. Binary mixtures of long and short chains along with ternary mixtures with a fixed weight-average molecular weight Mw but different number-average molecular weight Mn were prepared. Thin films of ca. 200 nm were spin coated on mica from polymer solutions and transferred to Teflon substrates. Above the glass transition temperature Tg the films break up via nucleation and growth of holes. The hole growth rate and rim morphology are monitored as a function of Mn and annealing protocol of the films before transfer to Teflon substrates. Slip properties, accessed using hydrodynamic models, and flow dynamics are then examined and compared. We found that the rim morphology and slip of polystyrene blends on Teflon depends on the molecular weight distribution. Similarly, flow dynamics is affected by the presence of short chains in mixture. Moreover, we can provoke differences in slip by choosing appropriate annealing and film transfer protocols for PS films that have first been spin cast on mica surfaces.

  13. Duration of slip-resistant shoe usage and the rate of slipping in limited-service restaurants: results from a prospective and crossover study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Santosh K; Zhao, Zhe; Courtney, Theodore K; Chang, Wen-Ruey; Lombardi, David A; Huang, Yueng-Hsiang; Brennan, Melanye J; Perry, Melissa J

    2014-01-01

    Several studies have indicated that slip-resistant shoes may have a positive effect on reducing the risk of slips and falls, a leading cause of injury at work. Few studies, however, have examined how duration of shoe usage affects their slip-resistance properties. This study examined the association between the duration of slip-resistant shoes usage and the self-reported rate of slipping in limited-service restaurant workers. A total of 475 workers from 36 limited-service restaurants in the USA were recruited to participate in a 12-week prospective study of workplace slipping. Of the 475 participants, 83 reported changing to a new pair of shoes at least once during the 12-week follow-up. The results show that slip-resistant shoes worn for less than six months were moderately more effective than those worn for more than six months. Changing to a new pair of shoes among those wearing slip-resistant shoes at baseline was associated with a 55% reduction in the rate of slipping (RR = 0.45, 95% CI = 0.23-0.89). Further research is needed to develop criteria for the replacement of slip-resistant shoes.

  14. Slip of a one-body dynamical spring-slider model in the presence of slip-weakening friction and viscosity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeen-Hwa Wang

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available This study is focused on analytic study at small displacements and numerical simulations of slip of a one-body dynamical slider-slider model in the presence of slip-weakening friction and viscosity. Analytic results with numerical computations show that the displacement of the slider is controlled by the decreasing rate, [gamma], of friction force with slip and viscosity, [eta], of fault-zone material. The natural period of the system with slip-weakening friction and viscosity is longer than that of the system without the two factors. There is a solution regime for [eta] and [gamma] to make the slider slip steadily without strong attenuation. The viscous effect is stronger than the frictional effect. Meanwhile, a change of [eta] results in a larger effect on the slip of the slider than a change of [gamma]. Numerical simulations are made for a one-body dynamical slider-slider model in the presence of three slip-weakening friction laws, i.e., the thermal-pressurization (TP friction law, the softening-hardening (SH friction law, and a simple slip-weakening (SW friction law, and viscosity. Results show that slip-weakening friction and viscosity remarkably affect slip of the slider. The TP and SW friction laws cause very similar results. The results caused by the SH friction law are quite different from those by the other two. For the cases in study, the fixed points are not an attractor.

  15. Slip estimation methods for proprioceptive terrain classification using tracked mobile robots

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Masha, Ditebogo F

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Recent work has shown that proprioceptive measurements such as terrain slip can be used for terrain classification. This paper investigates the suitability of four simple slip estimation methods for differentiating between indoor and outdoor terrain...

  16. Investigation into slipping and falling accidents and materials handling in the South African mining industry.

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Schutte, PC

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to analyze information on slipping and falling accidents and materials handling activities in the South African mining industry. Accident data pertaining to slipping, falling and materials handling accidents...

  17. Airborne Antenna System for Minimum-Cycle-Slip GPS Reception

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, C. Wayne

    2009-01-01

    A system that includes a Global Positioning System (GPS) antenna and associated apparatus for keeping the antenna aimed upward has been developed for use aboard a remote-sensing-survey airplane. The purpose served by the system is to enable minimum- cycle-slip reception of GPS signals used in precise computation of the trajectory of the airplane, without having to restrict the airplane to maneuvers that increase the flight time needed to perform a survey. Cycle slip signifies loss of continuous track of the phase of a signal. Minimum-cycle-slip reception is desirable because maintaining constant track of the phase of the carrier signal from each available GPS satellite is necessary for surveying to centimeter or subcentimeter precision. Even a loss of signal for as short a time as a nanosecond can cause cycle slip. Cycle slips degrade the quality and precision of survey data acquired during a flight. The two principal causes of cycle slip are weakness of signals and multipath propagation. Heretofore, it has been standard practice to mount a GPS antenna rigidly on top of an airplane, and the radiation pattern of the antenna is typically hemispherical, so that all GPS satellites above the horizon are viewed by the antenna during level flight. When the airplane must be banked for a turn or other maneuver, the reception hemisphere becomes correspondingly tilted; hence, the antenna no longer views satellites that may still be above the Earth horizon but are now below the equatorial plane of the tilted reception hemisphere. Moreover, part of the reception hemisphere (typically, on the inside of a turn) becomes pointed toward ground, with a consequent increase in received noise and, therefore, degradation of GPS measurements. To minimize the likelihood of loss of signal and cycle slip, bank angles of remote-sensing survey airplanes have generally been limited to 10 or less, resulting in skidding or slipping uncoordinated turns. An airplane must be banked in order to make

  18. Four quadrant control of induction motors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Irving G.

    1991-03-01

    Induction motors are the nation's workhorse, being the motor of choice in most applications due to their simple rugged construction. It has been estimated that 14 to 27 percent of the country's total electricity use could be saved with adjustable speed drives. Until now, induction motors have not been suited well for variable speed or servo-drives, due to the inherent complexity, size, and inefficiency of their variable speed controls. Work at NASA Lewis Research Center on field oriented control of induction motors using pulse population modulation method holds the promise for the desired drive electronics. The system allows for a variable voltage to frequency ratio which enables the user to operate the motor at maximum efficiency, while having independent control of both the speed and torque of an induction motor in all four quadrants of the speed torque map. Multiple horsepower machine drives were demonstrated, and work is on-going to develop a 20 hp average, 40 hp peak class of machine. The pulse population technique, results to date, and projections for implementation of this existing new motor control technology are discussed.

  19. Translation and rotation of slightly deformed colloidal spheres experiencing slip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Yu C; Keh, Huan J

    2009-02-01

    The steady translation and rotation of a rigid, slightly deformed colloidal sphere in arbitrary directions in a viscous fluid are analyzed in the limit of small Reynolds number. The fluid is allowed to slip frictionally at the surface of the particle, and the Stokes equations are solved asymptotically using a method of perturbed expansions. To the second order in the small parameter characterizing the deformation of the particle from the spherical shape, the resistance problem is formulated for the general case and explicit expressions for the hydrodynamic drag force and torque exerted on the particle are obtained for the special cases of prolate and oblate spheroids. The agreement between our asymptotic results for a slip-surface spheroid and the relevant exact solutions in the literature is very good, even if the particle deformation from the spherical shape is not very small. As expected, the second-order expansions for the translational and rotational resistances in powers of the small deformation parameter make better consistency with the available exact results than the first-order expansions do. Depending on the value of the slip parameter, the hydrodynamic drag force and torque acting on a moving spheroid normalized by the corresponding values for a spherical particle with equal equatorial radius are not necessarily monotonic functions of the aspect ratio of the spheroid. Noticeable behavior of the drag force and torque is grasped in the second-order expansions; e.g., the torque exerted on a perfect-slip rotating spheroid is not necessarily zero. For a moving spheroid with a fixed aspect ratio, its normalized hydrodynamic drag force and torque decrease monotonically with an increase in the slip capability of the particle.

  20. Slipped capital femoral epiphysis with severe vitamin D deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skelley, Nathan W; Papp, Derek F; Lee, Rushyuan J; Sargent, M Catherine

    2010-12-01

    Slipped capital femoral epiphysis is a relatively common disorder in late childhood and early adolescence, with an incidence in the United States of approximately 10 per 100,000. Although clinicians have theorized that contributing factors to the development of slipped capital femoral epiphysis include 25-hydroxyvitamin D deficiency and other nutritional deficiencies, the roles of these factors have not been fully analyzed. This article presents a case of a morbidly obese 13-year-old African-American boy who presented with sudden worsening of chronic hip pain and was diagnosed with stable, bilateral, grade-III slipped capital femoral epiphysis and severe vitamin D deficiency. He was initially treated with bilateral single-screw percutaneous fixation, however, after continued pain and nonunion, a right valgus subtrochanteric osteotomy was performed in association with correction of his severe vitamin D deficiency. This procedure led to improvement of his hip function and successful resolution of the pain. Approximately 3 months after the second operation and vitamin supplementation, the patient had signs of union, and his weight bearing progressed without discomfort. Although the osteotomy provided substantial biomechanical advantage by changing the forces across the physis from shear to compressive, correction of the vitamin D deficiency was critical in providing metabolic capacity for bone healing. Vitamin D plays an important role in bone formation and development, but the level of 25-hydroxyvitamin D is not routinely measured during assessment and treatment of slipped capital femoral epiphysis patients. The early detection and proper treatment of vitamin D may assist in the treatment of patients with slipped capital femoral epiphysis. Copyright 2010, SLACK Incorporated.

  1. Stick-Slip Instabilities for Interfacial Chemical Bond-Induced Friction at the Nanoscale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Kaiwen; Gosvami, Nitya N; Goldsby, David L; Carpick, Robert W

    2017-12-08

    Earthquakes are generally caused by unstable stick-slip motion of faults. This stick-slip phenomenon, along with other frictional properties of materials at the macroscale, is well-described by empirical rate and state friction (RSF) laws. Here we study stick-slip behavior for nanoscale single-asperity silica-silica contacts in atomic force microscopy experiments. The stick-slip is quasiperiodic, and both the amplitude and spatial period of stick-slip increase with normal load and decrease with the loading point (i.e., scanning) velocity. The peak force prior to each slip increases with the temporal period logarithmically, and decreases with velocity logarithmically, consistent with stick-slip behavior at the macroscale. However, unlike macroscale behavior, the minimum force after each slip is independent of velocity. The temporal period scales with velocity in a nearly power law fashion with an exponent between -1 and -2, similar to macroscale behavior. With increasing velocity, stick-slip behavior transitions into steady sliding. In the transition regime between stick-slip and smooth sliding, some slip events exhibit only partial force drops. The results are interpreted in the context of interfacial chemical bond formation and rate effects previously identified for nanoscale contacts. These results contribute to a physical picture of interfacial chemical bond-induced stick-slip, and further establish RSF laws at the nanoscale.

  2. Navier-Stokes-Fourier analytic solutions for non-isothermal Couette slip gas flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milićev Snežana S.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The explicit and reliable analytical solutions for steady plane compressible non-isothermal Couette gas flow are presented. These solutions for velocity and temperature are developed by macroscopic approach from Navier-Stokes-Fourier system of continuum equations and the velocity slip and the temperature jump first order boundary conditions. Variability of the viscosity and thermal conductivity with temperature is involved in the model. The known result for the gas flow with constant and equal temperatures of the walls (isothermal walls is verified and a new solution for the case of different temperature of the walls is obtained. Evan though the solution for isothermal walls correspond to the gas flow of the Knudsen number Kn≤0.1, i.e. to the slip and continuum flow, it is shown that the gas velocity and related shear stress are also valid for the whole range of the Knudsen number. The deviation from numerical results for the same system is less than 1%. The reliability of the solution is confirmed by comparing with results of other authors which are obtained numerically by microscopic approach. The advantage of the presented solution compared to previous is in a very simple applicability along with high accuracy. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 35046 i 174014

  3. Induction in a Modular Learner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, Susanne E.

    2002-01-01

    Presents a theory of inductive learning--Autonomous Induction Theory--a form of induction that takes place within the autonomous and modular representational systems of the language faculty. Argues that Autonomous Induction Theory is constrained enough to be taken seriously as a plausible approach to explaining second language acquisition.…

  4. Development of Surface Structures for Large Effective Slip: How Much Slip Is Possible in Ideal, Lab and Real Conditions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Chang-Jin

    2009-11-01

    An ideal condition to reduce the drag of a liquid flowing on a solid surface is maintaining a lubricating gas layer between the solid and the liquid. For water flowing on a 1 or 10 μm-thick air layer, for example, the slip length is calculated to be roughly 50 or 500 μm, respectively - large enough to benefit a wide range of engineering applications. Unfortunately, however, the above ideal water-levitating condition is only imaginary, because such a liquid-gas meniscus cannot be sustained in nature. Instead, water-repelling structured surfaces bring us closer to the imaginary condition by minimizing the liquid-solid interface and keeping the water mostly on a layer of air. The underlying goal in developing a large-slip surface is, therefore, to create a condition as close as possible to the uniform air lubrication, which is often overlooked. For example, while a large contact angle on a superhydrophobic surface helps keep the liquid fakir, note that once levitated, the contact angle has little effect on increasing the slip length. Instead, the geometrical parameters of the surface structures, e.g., air fraction, pitch and depth of the structures, are the determining factors. A series of development efforts to create surfaces that bring us closer to the ideal air-lubricating condition will be presented, with the slip length currently measured as large as 400 μm. However, it will be also noted that they are valid only in laboratory conditions, where the sample is fabricated to near perfection and the pressure in the flowing liquid is under strict control. In real-life engineering conditions, which include high and fluctuating pressure, defective surfaces, and liquids full of impurities and particles, it remains to be seen if we will ever be able to create a slip surface that can be field-deployed - a millennium-old dream.

  5. Surgical hip dislocation in treatment of slipped capital femoral epiphysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elmarghany, Mohammed; Abd El-Ghaffar, Tarek M; Seddik, Mahmoud; Akar, Ahmed; Gad, Yousef; Ragheb, Eissa; Aprato, Alessandro; Massè, Alessandro

    2017-01-01

    Most surgeons advocate in situ fixation of the slipped epiphysis with acceptance of any persistent deformity in the proximal femur [Aronsson DD, Loder RT, Breur GJ, Weinstein SL (2006) Slipped capital femoral epiphysis: current concepts. J Am Acad Orthop Surg 14, 666-679]. This residual deformity can lead to osteoarthritis due to femoroacetabular cam impingement (FAI) [Leunig M, Slongo T, Ganz R (2008) Subcapital realignment in slipped capital femoral epiphysis: surgical hip dislocation and trimming of the stable trochanter to protect the perfusion of the epiphysis. Instr Course Lect 57, 499-507]. The primary aim of our study was to report the results of the technique of capital realignment with Ganz surgical hip dislocation and its reproducibility to restore hip anatomy and function. This prospective case series study included 30 patients (32 hips, 13 left (Lt) hips, 19 right (Rt) hips) with stable chronic slipped capital femoral epiphysis (SCFE) after surgical correction with a modified Dunn procedure. This study included 22 males and eight females. The mean age of our patients was 14 years (10-18 years). The mean follow-up period was 14.5 months (6-36 months). Thirty hips had excellent and good clinical and radiographic outcomes with respect to hip function and radiographic parameters. Two patients had fair to poor clinical outcome including three patients who developed Avascular Necrosis (AVN). The difference between those who developed AVN and those who did not develop AVN was statistically significant in postoperative clinical scores (p = 0.0000). The mean slip angle of the femoral head was 52.5° ± 14.6 preoperatively and was corrected to a mean value of 5.6° ± 8.2° with mean correction of 46.85° ± 14.9° (p = 0.0000). The mean postoperative alpha angle was 51.15° ± 4.2° with mean correction of 46.70 ± 14.20 (p = 0.0000). In our series, the mean postoperative Harris hip score (HHS) was (96.16 ± 9.7) and the mean improvement was

  6. Surgical hip dislocation in treatment of slipped capital femoral epiphysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elmarghany Mohammed

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Most surgeons advocate in situ fixation of the slipped epiphysis with acceptance of any persistent deformity in the proximal femur [Aronsson DD, Loder RT, Breur GJ, Weinstein SL (2006 Slipped capital femoral epiphysis: current concepts. J Am Acad Orthop Surg 14, 666–679]. This residual deformity can lead to osteoarthritis due to femoroacetabular cam impingement (FAI [Leunig M, Slongo T, Ganz R (2008 Subcapital realignment in slipped capital femoral epiphysis: surgical hip dislocation and trimming of the stable trochanter to protect the perfusion of the epiphysis. Instr Course Lect 57, 499–507]. Objective: The primary aim of our study was to report the results of the technique of capital realignment with Ganz surgical hip dislocation and its reproducibility to restore hip anatomy and function. Patients and methods: This prospective case series study included 30 patients (32 hips, 13 left (Lt hips, 19 right (Rt hips with stable chronic slipped capital femoral epiphysis (SCFE after surgical correction with a modified Dunn procedure. This study included 22 males and eight females. The mean age of our patients was 14 years (10–18 years. The mean follow-up period was 14.5 months (6–36 months. Results: Thirty hips had excellent and good clinical and radiographic outcomes with respect to hip function and radiographic parameters. Two patients had fair to poor clinical outcome including three patients who developed Avascular Necrosis (AVN. The difference between those who developed AVN and those who did not develop AVN was statistically significant in postoperative clinical scores (p = 0.0000. The mean slip angle of the femoral head was 52.5° ± 14.6 preoperatively and was corrected to a mean value of 5.6° ± 8.2° with mean correction of 46.85° ± 14.9° (p = 0.0000. The mean postoperative alpha angle was 51.15° ± 4.2° with mean correction of 46.70 ± 14.20 (p = 0.0000. In our series, the mean postoperative

  7. Slip on serpentine detachments at magma-poor margins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reston, Timothy; Lymer, Gael; Cresswell, Derren; Stevenson, Carl; Bull, Jonathan; Sawyer, Dale; Morgan, Julia; Galicia 3D working Group

    2017-04-01

    At magma-poor margins, the structures formed during rifting are not obscured by thick lavas, allowing detailed analysis of the tectonics of rifting and breakup. At most of these margins, the mantle beneath the thin crust has unusually low velocities, interpreted as a consequence of serpentinization following the embrittlement of the crust during rifting; models for the onset of serpentinization predict the thicknesses of crust that are observed at the landward limit of the serpentinized mantle. At a handful of margins the top of the serpentinized mantle appears to have acted as a detachment or decollement: faults that bound the overlying crustal blocks root on a bright reflection at the base of these blocks. Examples include the P reflection west of Ireland, the H reflection west of northern Portugal, and the S reflector west of Galicia. Corrugations observed on a 3D volume collected in 2013 above the S reflector strongly support its interpretation as a slip surface. A remaining question is whether slip on these "serpentine detachments" occurred at low-angle or not: for typical friction coefficients of 0.7, normal faults should lock-up and be replaced by steeper faults once they have rotated to perhaps 35°, an observation consistent with earthquake data. This angle can be reduced to 20-25° if the fault zone is composed of weak minerals such as serpentine. One possibility is that the detachment is actually composed of segments of faults that were active sequentially in a rolling hinge model. Beneath the centre of the Porcupine basin, the P reflection is sub-horizontal but its western continuation dips beneath the Porcupine bank at 20-25°, consistent with slip on serpentine-weakened rolling hinge system. West of Galicia, based on the geometrical relationships between late synrift wedges and their bounding faults which root on S, S has been interpreted to have slipped at angles below 20-25°. However, a 3D dataset collected over S in 2013 provides the opportunity

  8. Induction and Natural Kinds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Howard Sankey

    1997-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper sketches an ontological solution to an epistemological problem in the philosophy of science. Taking the work of Hilary Kornblith and Brian Ellis as a point of departure, it presents a realist solution to the Humean problem of induction, which is based on a scientific essentialist interpretation of the principle of the uniformity of nature. More specifically, it is argued that use of inductive inference in science is rationally justified because of the existence of real, natural kinds of things, which are characterized as such by the essential properties which all members of a kind necessarily possess in common. The proposed response to inductive scepticism combines the insights of epistemic naturalism with a metaphysical outlook that is due to s cientific realism.

  9. Numerical study of the effect of Navier slip on the driven cavity flow

    KAUST Repository

    He, Qiaolin

    2009-10-01

    We study the driven cavity flow using the Navier slip boundary condition. Our results have shown that the Navier slip boundary condition removes the corner singularity induced by the no-slip boundary condition. In the low Reynolds number case, the behavior of the tangential stress is examined and the results are compared with the analytic results obtained in [14]. For the high Reynolds number, we study the effect of the slip on the critical Reynolds number for Hopf bifurcation. Our results show that the first Hopf bifurcation critical Reynolds number is increasing with slip length. © 2009 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Drag on a slip spherical particle moving in a couple stress fluid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.A. Ashmawy

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The creeping motion of a rigid slip sphere in an unbounded couple stress fluid is investigated. The linear slip boundary condition and the vanishing couple stress condition are applied on the surface of the sphere. A simple formula for the drag force acting on a slip sphere translating in an unbounded couple stress fluid is obtained. Special cases of the deduced drag formula are concluded and compared with analogous results in the literature. The normalized drag force experienced by the fluid on the slip sphere is represented graphically and the effects of slip parameter and viscosity coefficients are discussed.

  11. Inductive dielectric analyzer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agranovich, Daniel; Polygalov, Eugene; Popov, Ivan; Ben Ishai, Paul; Feldman, Yuri

    2017-03-01

    One of the approaches to bypass the problem of electrode polarization in dielectric measurements is the free electrode method. The advantage of this technique is that, the probing electric field in the material is not supplied by contact electrodes, but rather by electromagnetic induction. We have designed an inductive dielectric analyzer based on a sensor comprising two concentric toroidal coils. In this work, we present an analytic derivation of the relationship between the impedance measured by the sensor and the complex dielectric permittivity of the sample. The obtained relationship was successfully employed to measure the dielectric permittivity and conductivity of various alcohols and aqueous salt solutions.

  12. Lateral Offset Quality Rating along Low Slip Rate Faults: Application to the Alhama de Murcia Fault (SE Iberian Peninsula

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Ferrater

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Seismic hazard assessment of strike-slip faults is based partly on the identification and mapping of landforms laterally offset due to fault activity. The characterization of these features affected by slow-moving faults is challenging relative to studies emphasizing rapidly slipping faults. We propose a methodology for scoring fault offsets based on subjective and objective qualities. We apply this methodology to the Alhama de Murcia fault (SE Iberian Peninsula where we identify 138 offset features that we mapped on a high-resolution (0.5 × 0.5 m pixel size Digital Elevation Model (DEM. The amount of offset, the uncertainty of the measurement, the subjective and objective qualities, and the parameters that affect objective quality are independent variables, suggesting that our methodological scoring approach is good. Based on the offset measurements and qualifications we calculate the Cumulative Offset Probability Density (COPD for the entire fault and for each fault segment. The COPD for the segments differ from each other. Tentative interpretation of the COPDs implies that the slip rate varies from one segment to the other (we assume that channels with the same amount of offset were incised synchronously. We compare the COPD with climate proxy curves (aligning using the very limited age control to test if entrenchment events are coincident with climatic changes. Channel incision along one of the traces in Lorca-Totana segment may be related to transitions from glacial to interglacial periods.

  13. Wheel slip control of ABS using ER valve pressure modulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Seung-Bok; Cho, Myung-Soo; Kim, Yong-Il; Choi, Young-Tai; Wereley, Norman M.

    2004-07-01

    This paper presents a wheel slip control via sliding mode controller for a new anti-lock brake system (ABS) of a passenger vehicle using electrorheological (ER) valve pressure modulator. The principal design parameters of the ER valves and hydraulic booster are appropriately determined by considering braking pressure variation during ABS operation. An electrically controllable pressure modulator using the ER valves is then constructed and its governing equations are derived. Subsequently, the pressure control performance of the new pressure modulator is experimentally evaluated. The governing equations of motion for a quarter car wheel model are derived and the sliding mode controller is formulated for wheel slip control. Hardware in the loop simulation (HILS) for braking performance evaluation is undertaken in order to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed ABS associated with the ER valve pressure modulator.

  14. Interaction between phase-slip centers in superconducting indium microbridges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kober, F.; Clauss, W.; Huebener, R. P.

    1989-02-01

    We have studied the electric behavior of phase-slip centers in superconducting indium microbridges of 0.9 µm thickness, 3 4 µm width, and 70 130 µm length. Our measurements were performed in the temperature range 3 10 mK below the critical temperature Tc resulting in relatively large values (about 10 20 µm) of the quasiparticle diffusion length. The temperature dependent Ginzburg-Landau coherence length ξ (T) has been determined for all samples from the measured temperature dependence of the critical current density. The fabrication of two notches in the indium bridge has been found to localize reliably the nucleation site of the first two phase-slip centers. Our measurements quantitatively confirmed the dc interaction predicted by the model of Kadin, Smith, and Skocpol. In addition, for temperatures very close to T c , an ac interaction has been observed which disappears abruptly for decreasing temperature. No voltage coupling has been detected.

  15. A Silent Slip Event on the Deeper Cascadia Subduction Interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dragert, Herb; Wang, Kelin; James, Thomas S.

    2001-05-01

    Continuous Global Positioning System sites in southwestern British Columbia, Canada, and northwestern Washington state, USA, have been moving landward as a result of the locked state of the Cascadia subduction fault offshore. In the summer of 1999, a cluster of seven sites briefly reversed their direction of motion. No seismicity was associated with this event. The sudden displacements are best explained by ~2 centimeters of aseismic slip over a 50-kilometer-by-300-kilometer area on the subduction interface downdip from the seismogenic zone, a rupture equivalent to an earthquake of moment magnitude 6.7. This provides evidence that slip of the hotter, plastic part of the subduction interface, and hence stress loading of the megathrust earthquake zone, can occur in discrete pulses.

  16. A silent slip event on the deeper Cascadia subduction interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dragert, G; Wang, K; James, T S

    2001-05-25

    Continuous Global Positioning System sites in southwestern British Columbia, Canada, and northwestern Washington state, USA, have been moving landward as a result of the locked state of the Cascadia subduction fault offshore. In the summer of 1999, a cluster of seven sites briefly reversed their direction of motion. No seismicity was associated with this event. The sudden displacements are best explained by approximately 2 centimeters of aseismic slip over a 50-kilometer-by-300-kilometer area on the subduction interface downdip from the seismogenic zone, a rupture equivalent to an earthquake of moment magnitude 6.7. This provides evidence that slip of the hotter, plastic part of the subduction interface, and hence stress loading of the megathrust earthquake zone, can occur in discrete pulses.

  17. Slipped Capital Femoral Epiphysis and Primary Hyperparathyroidism: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alghamdi, Anas A; Ahmad, Maswood M; Almalki, Mussa H

    2016-01-01

    The aim of reporting this case is to highlight the association of two disorders, primary hyperparathyroidism (PHPT) and slipped capital femoral epiphysis (SCFE). They are usually seen in two different age groups and rarely together. PHPT is a rare cause of SCFE and only 10 cases have been reported in the literature worldwide. The patient in our report is a 13-year-old girl who presented to our clinic with bilateral knee pain and a waddling gait. Subsequent investigations showed that she had PHPT and SCFE with low bone mass. On admission, a parathyroidectomy was performed; then, the slipped femoral epiphyses were fixed with satisfactory results. A systematic algorithmic approach that was illustrated in a previously published case was used. Such cases should be managed with a systematic approach based on the patient's clinical status to prevent future morbidity. A literature review was conducted by performing a Medline search of all reported cases of PHPT and SCFEs.

  18. Fault Zone Drainage, Heating and Melting During Earthquake Slip

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rempel, A. W.; Rice, J. R.; Jacques, L. M.

    2003-12-01

    The expansion of pore water caused by frictional heating during large crustal events provides a powerful weakening mechanism (Sibson, 1973; Lachenbruch, 1980). It may explain the magnitude of seismically inferred fracture energy and aspects of its variation with increased slip (Abercrombie and Rice, 2003; Rice et al., 2003; Rice, this section, 2003). The weakening is mediated by the effects of fluid transport, which are sensitive to the permeability structure of the fault zone and its modification by damage induced by the passing rupture front (Poliakov et al., 2002), as well as by the increase in pore pressure itself. Higher permeabilities allow partial drainage to occur, so that enough strength remains for the heat generated to cause partial melting of the fault gouge at large enough slip. We use recent field and laboratory data for fluid transport through pressurized fault gouge (e.g. Lockner et al., 2000; Wibberley and Shimamoto, 2003) to motivate models for drainage and melting during earthquake slip. A dramatic illustration of the role of drainage is provided by an idealized model in which we assume that a freshly damaged, highly permeable region extends right up to a localized shear zone of thickness ho=5 mm, with fixed porosity n and much lower permeability k. At 7 km depth, for n=0.02 and k=10-19 m2, the slip distance required to reach the onset of melting at 750oC is approximately 0.4 m for a constant friction coefficient of f=0.6. At 14 km depth, for n=0.01 and k=10-20 m2, the same temperature is reached after only 0.1 m of slip. Yet more efficient drainage might occur due to the permeability increases that accompany reductions in the effective stress, so that even more rapid temperature increases would be predicted. For example, with ten times higher k, melting begins after 0.1 m slip at 7 km depth and just 0.05 m at 14 km. At onset of melting the high melt viscosity impedes further drainage and, with increasing melt fraction, inter-particle contact is

  19. Slip Morphology of Elastic Strips on Frictional Rigid Substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sano, Tomohiko G; Yamaguchi, Tetsuo; Wada, Hirofumi

    2017-04-28

    The morphology of an elastic strip subject to vertical compressive stress on a frictional rigid substrate is investigated by a combination of theory and experiment. We find a rich variety of morphologies, which-when the bending elasticity dominates over the effect of gravity-are classified into three distinct types of states: pinned, partially slipped, and completely slipped, depending on the magnitude of the vertical strain and the coefficient of static friction. We develop a theory of elastica under mixed clamped-hinged boundary conditions combined with the Coulomb-Amontons friction law and find excellent quantitative agreement with simulations and controlled physical experiments. We also discuss the effect of gravity in order to bridge the difference in the qualitative behaviors of stiff strips and flexible strings or ropes. Our study thus complements recent work on elastic rope coiling and takes a significant step towards establishing a unified understanding of how a thin elastic object interacts vertically with a solid surface.

  20. Slipped Capital Femoral Epiphysis and Primary Hyperparathyroidism: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anas A. Alghamdi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of reporting this case is to highlight the association of two disorders, primary hyperparathyroidism (PHPT and slipped capital femoral epiphysis (SCFE. They are usually seen in two different age groups and rarely together. PHPT is a rare cause of SCFE and only 10 cases have been reported in the literature worldwide. The patient in our report is a 13-year-old girl who presented to our clinic with bilateral knee pain and a waddling gait. Subsequent investigations showed that she had PHPT and SCFE with low bone mass. On admission, a parathyroidectomy was performed; then, the slipped femoral epiphyses were fixed with satisfactory results. A systematic algorithmic approach that was illustrated in a previously published case was used. Such cases should be managed with a systematic approach based on the patient's clinical status to prevent future morbidity. A literature review was conducted by performing a Medline search of all reported cases of PHPT and SCFEs.

  1. Controversies in management of slipped capital femoral epiphysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johari, Ashok N; Pandey, Ritesh A

    2016-01-01

    The traditional treatment of the hip with a slip of the capital femoral epiphysis has been an in situ fixation using a single screw. This has the sanctity of a long term result. Recent literature stresses the outcomes of failure to restore the upper femoral alignment and on the basis of the poor results makes a plea for capital realignment. This being a recent development, it lacks the support of long term follow up and it remains to be seen if this is a better alternative of managing displaced and unstable slipped capital femoral epiphysis. The authors look at some of the available literature on the subject to highlight these controversies and their implications for orthopedic surgeons. Other controversies pertain to contralateral fixation, duration of immobilization and amount of weight bearing after an in situ fixation. PMID:26925378

  2. Quantum phase slips: from condensed matter to ultracold quantum gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Errico, C.; Abbate, S. Scaffidi; Modugno, G.

    2017-10-01

    Quantum phase slips (QPS) are the primary excitations in one-dimensional superfluids and superconductors at low temperatures. They have been well characterized in most condensed-matter systems, and signatures of their existence have been recently observed in superfluids based on quantum gases too. In this review, we briefly summarize the main results obtained on the investigation of phase slips from superconductors to quantum gases. In particular, we focus our attention on recent experimental results of the dissipation in one-dimensional Bose superfluids flowing along a shallow periodic potential, which show signatures of QPS. This article is part of the themed issue 'Breakdown of ergodicity in quantum systems: from solids to synthetic matter'.

  3. Nano-Rheology: Stress Shielding and Stick-Slip Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Xinguang; Chang, Hsueh-Chia

    2007-11-01

    A molecular Langevin theory explains the rich and nonlinear viscoelastic rheology exhibited by monolayers and bilayers of water confined between two charged mica surfaces. Elastic storage endowed by asymmetric water-surface and water-water interaction is shown to produce a curious stress shielding phenomenon. Noise-sensitive stick-slip dynamics occurs when the surface speed is comparable to the molecular equilibration speed, with distinct hopping statistics between surface sites captured by a Fokker-Planck analysis. At large displacement, two-time asymptotics shows that sliding dynamics over multiple sites is responsible for the viscous properties but the elastic component is due to slow near-equilibrium dynamics at the slow intervals. Scaling theories for the rheological moduli are favorably compared to literature data. Both stress shielding and slip at large amplitudes are responsible for the 1e4-1e5 order difference in reported viscosity.

  4. Slow slip rate and excitation efficiency of deep low-frequency tremors beneath southwest Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daiku, Kumiko; Hiramatsu, Yoshihiro; Matsuzawa, Takanori; Mizukami, Tomoyuki

    2018-01-01

    We estimated the long-term average slip rate on the plate interface across the Nankai subduction zone during 2002-2013 using deep low-frequency tremors as a proxy for short-term slow slip events based on empirical relations between the seismic moment of short-term slow slip events and tremor activities. The slip rate in each region is likely to compensate for differences between the convergence rate and the slip deficit rate of the subducting Philippine Sea plate estimated geodetically, although the uncertainty is large. This implies that the strain because of the subduction of the plate is partially stored as the slip deficit and partially released by slow slip events during the interseismic period. The excitation efficiency of the tremors for the slow slip events differs among regions: it is high in the northern Kii region. Some events in the western Shikoku region show a somewhat large value. Antigorite serpentinite of two types exists in the mantle wedge beneath southwest Japan. Slips with more effective excitation of tremors presumably occur in high-temperature conditions in the antigorite + olivine stability field. Other slip events with low excitation efficiency are distributed in the antigorite + brucite stability field. Considering the formation reactions of these minerals and their characteristic structures, events with high excitation efficiency can be correlated with a high pore fluid pressure condition. This result suggests that variation in pore fluid pressure on the plate interface affects the magnitude of tremors excited by slow slip events.

  5. In situ fixation for slipped capital femoral epiphysis: perspectives in 2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millis, Michael B; Novais, Eduardo N

    2011-05-01

    Slipped capital femoral epiphysis is usually treated with in situ fixation to prevent progression of deformity. However, slipped capital femoral epiphysis always is associated with structural risk factors for hip dysfunction in addition to the risk of slip progression. Femoro-acetabular impingement causes some mechanical abnormality in every hip affected by slipped capital femoral epiphysis, even when the slip is mild. The severity of femoro-acetabular impingement caused by slipped capital femoral epiphysis depends on several factors. Cumulative injury to the articular cartilage can result from impingement, and it is better to prevent this type of injury than to treat it later. In situ fixation alone rarely relieves femoro-acetabular impingement in slipped capital femoral epiphysis. Skillful and precise in situ fixation allows careful analysis of hip function in the stabilized slip by eliminating the major risk of acute instability. The more subtle risk of long-term articular damage caused by femoro-acetabular impingement must be considered. The treatment of femoro-acetabular impingement in patients who have slipped capital femoral epiphysis is a separate issue from instability of the proximal femoral physis. Femoro-acetabular impingement must be assessed in every hip that is affected by slipped capital femoral epiphysis, even when the deformity is mild. Several treatment options exist for treating femoro-acetabular impingement associated with slipped capital femoral epiphysis.

  6. Dependence of Strain Rate Sensitivity on the Slip System: A Molecular Dynamics Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Movahedi-Rad, A.; Alizadeh, R.

    2017-11-01

    The strain rate of deformation might affect mechanical properties of metallic materials, especially at elevated temperatures. Due to the nature of dislocation slip, it is anticipated that strain rate sensitivity (SRS) depends on the slip system. While the dependency of SRS on the temperature and strain rate of the deformation is well recognized, its dependence on the slip system is not well understood. Accordingly, the molecular dynamics simulation was used to investigate the dependence of strain rate sensitivity of pure Al single crystals on the slip system. In this study, the embedded atom method (EAM) potential for Al was employed. SRS and shear strength of the material were studied in four different slip systems and at two temperatures of 300 and 500 K. It was found that SRS of the material depends on the slip system in addition to the temperature, and SRS was higher in less compact systems with more difficult slip. The dislocation theories were used to rationalize the simulation results.

  7. Effects of foot placement, hand positioning, age and climbing biodynamics on ladder slip outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pliner, Erika M; Campbell-Kyureghyan, Naira H; Beschorner, Kurt E

    2014-01-01

    Ladder falls frequently cause severe injuries; yet the factors that influence ladder slips/falls are not well understood. This study aimed to quantify (1) the effects of restricted foot placement, hand positioning, climbing direction and age on slip outcomes, and (2) differences in climbing styles leading to slips versus styles leading to non-slips. Thirty-two occupational ladder users from three age groups (18-24, 25-44 and 45-64 years) were unexpectedly slipped climbing a vertical ladder, while being assigned to different foot placement conditions (unrestricted vs. restricted toe clearance) and different hand positions (rails vs. rungs). Constraining foot placement increased the climber's likelihood of slipping (p climbing techniques and individuals at risk of falling. The results suggest that ladders with unrestricted toe clearance and ladder climbing training programmes, particularly for younger and older workers, may reduce ladder slipping risk.

  8. Fault slip rates from three-dimensional models of the Los Angeles metropolitan area, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooke, Michele L.; Marshall, Scott T.

    2006-11-01

    We present results from the first mechanical model of active tectonics in the Los Angeles region to use non-planar, geologically representative fault surfaces compiled by the Southern California Earthquake Center Community Fault Model. The fault slip rates from our three-dimensional model match well the available geologic slip rates. Discrepancies in reverse slip along the Upper Elysian Park fault and strike-slip along the Raymond fault may reflect imprecise knowledge of local fault geometry. Discrepancy in the average dip slip rate along the Palos Verdes fault reveals variations in dip slip along that surface; model predictions at the location of the geological investigation have good match to geologic data. The validated model is used to estimate dip and strike slip rates for 26 active faults in the Los Angeles metropolitan region, many of which are otherwise unconstrained by geologic evidence.

  9. Evaluation of Slip Potentials on Bilecik Beige Marble with Pendulum Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdem Çerçevik, Ali; Yerel Kandemir, Suheyla; Ozgur Yayli, M.

    2016-10-01

    This study deals with the determining of slip resistance and classification of slip potential for 5 different type of Bilecik Beige Marble were applied tumbling. TS EN 14231 Standard “Determination of Slip Resistance with Pendulum Friction Test Equipment” was basically utilized in determining the slip resistances of Bilecik Beige Marble with wet and dry surfaces. After tumbling process, by depending on the Bilecik Beige Marble type reduce slip potential, especially wet conditions. Slip resistance values on marble sample plates were specified to be considerably change by depending on both the applied surface processing techniques and dry/wet of surface characteristics. Finally, marbles used in this research have been classified according to safety applications by taking into account their slip resistance values.

  10. Evidence for charge imbalance waves in phase-slip centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadin, A. M.; Varmazis, C.; Lukens, J. E.

    1981-08-01

    We have examined the I-V characteristics of superconducting phase-slip centers (PSCs) located in the middle of narrow In channels. Features in dV/dI can be associated with resonances in charge imbalance waves driven by the PSC, as suggested by the model of Kadin, Smith and Skocpol. The velocity and temperature dependence of the waves thus inferred are in rough accord with theoretical predictions.

  11. Implications of Fault Curvature for Slip Distributions, Opening, and Damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritz, E.; Pollard, D. D.; Griffith, W. A.

    2010-12-01

    In his seminal 1905 paper on the dynamics of faulting, E.M. Anderson idealized faults as planar structures. Although the theory of fault mechanics has developed from this idealization, abundant evidence from geological and geophysical investigations shows that fault surfaces exhibit geometric irregularities on many scales. Understanding the mechanical behavior of non-planar fault surfaces is a fundamental problem for scientists working on the brittle deformation of Earth’s crust and is of practical importance to disciplines such as rock mechanics, geotechnical engineering, and earthquake science. Geologic observations of exhumed meter-scale strike-slip faults in the Bear Creek drainage, Sierra Nevada, CA, provide insights into the relationship between non-planar fault geometry and frictional slip at depth. These faults have smoothly curving surface expressions which may be approximated as sinusoidal curves. We numerically investigate both the natural fault geometries and model sinusoidal faults. Earlier models for the stress and deformation near a sinusoidal fault assume boundary conditions and fault characteristics that are not observed in nature. The 2D displacement discontinuity boundary element method is combined with a complementarity algorithm to model quasi-static slip on non-planar faults, and the resulting deformation of the nearby rock. This numerical technique can provide an accurate solution for any boundary value problem regarding crack-like features in an otherwise homogeneous and isotropic elastic material. Both field and numerical investigations indicate that non-planar fault geometry perturbs the along-fault slip form the distribution predicted for planar faults. In addition, both field observations and numerical modeling show that sliding along curved faults at depth may lead to localized fault opening, affecting local permeability and fluid migration.

  12. Slip Potential for Commonly Used Inclined Grated Metal Walkways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollard, Jonisha P.; Heberger, John R.; Dempsey, Patrick G.

    2016-01-01

    Background No specific guidelines or regulations are provided by the Mine Safety and Health Administration for the use of inclined grated metal walkways in mining plants. Mining and other companies may be using walkway materials that do not provide sufficient friction, contributing to slip and fall injuries. Purpose The purpose of this study was to determine if there are significant differences in the required friction for different grated metal walkways during walking in diverse conditions. Methods The normalized coefficients of friction were measured for 12 participants while walking up and down an instrumented walkway with different inclinations (0°, 5°, 10°, 15°, and 20°) and with and without the presence of a contaminant (glycerol). Self-reported slip events were recorded and the required coefficients of friction were calculated considering only the anterior/posterior components of the shear forces. Additionally, the available coefficients of friction for these walkway materials were measured at the 0° orientation using a tribometer, with and without the presence of the contaminant, using a boot heel as well as Neolite as the test feet. Results The number of slips increased when the inclination angle reached 10° and above. Of all materials tested, the diamond weave grating was found to have the best performance at all inclines and when contaminated or dry. A high number of slips occurred for the perforated grating and serrated bar grating at 20° when contaminated. Conclusions Results of this study suggest that the diamond weave grating provides significantly better friction compared to serrated bar and perforated gratings, especially at inclines greater than 10°. PMID:26779388

  13. MHD Flow with Hall Current and Ion-Slip Effects due to a Stretching Porous Disk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faiza M. N. El-Fayez

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A partially ionized fluid is driven by a stretching disk, in the presence of a magnetic field that is strong enough to produce significant hall current and ion-slip effects. The limiting behavior of the flow is studied, as the magnetic field strength grows indefinitely. The flow variables are properly scaled, and uniformly valid asymptotic expansions of the velocity components are obtained. The leading order approximations show sinusoidal behavior that is decaying exponentially, as we move away from the disk surface. The two-term expansions of the radial and azimuthal surface shear stress components, as well as the far field inflow speed, compare well with the corresponding finite difference solutions, even at moderate magnetic fields. The effect of mass transfer (suction or injection through the disk is also considered.

  14. Variation in aseismic slip and fault normal strain along the creeping section of the San Andreas fault from GPS, InSAR and trilateration data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolandone, F.; Johanson, I.; Bürgmann, R.; Agnew, D.

    2004-12-01

    In central California most of the relative motion between the Pacific and North American plates is accommodated by strike slip along the San Andreas fault system. However, a small amount of convergence is accommodated by compressional structures in the California Coast Ranges on both sides of the fault. Recent examples of such activity are the Coalinga and the 2003 San Simeon earthquakes. Along the central San Andreas fault (CSAF), from San Juan Bautista to Parkfield, almost all the slip along the CSAF in the brittle upper crust is accommodated aseismically. We use GPS, InSAR and trilateration data to resolve both the distribution of aseismic slip along the CSAF, and the deformation across adjacent, secondary fault structures. In 2003 and 2004, we conducted several GPS surveys along the CSAF. We resurveyed 15 stations of the San Benito triangulation and trilateration network, which extends 40 km to the northeast of the creeping segment. We combine these measurements with old EDM measurements and data from a GPS campaign in 1998. We also occupied 13 sites along the creeping segment, for which previous data exist in the SCEC archive. These dense GPS measurements, along with data from permanent GPS stations in the area, allow us to constrain the regional strain distribution and contributions from adjacent faults. With the addition of InSAR data, we can also better resolve active strain accumulation and aseismic slip along the CSAF. We use a stack of about 10 interferograms from ERS-1 and ERS-2 satellites spanning 8 years. InSAR is well suited to monitoring details of the shallow slip along the CSAF and, in concert with the broadly spaced GPS velocities, to resolving the distribution of deformation along and across the plate boundary. The results are the basis for determining the kinematics of spatially variable fault slip on the CSAF, and help to better constrain the fault's constitutive properties, and fault interaction processes.

  15. Slip-driven electroosmotic transport through porous media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaikwad, Harshad; Mondal, Pranab Kumar

    2017-03-01

    We investigate the slip-driven transport of a Newtonian fluid through porous media under electrical double layer effect. We employ a semianalytical framework to obtain the underlying electrohydrodynamics for different configurations of porous media. We bring out an alteration in flow dynamics, stemming from interplay among the geometrical feature of the models and the interfacial slip as modulated by the electrical forcing. Further, we show the consequent effects of the underlying flow dynamics on the volumetric transport rate through different models. Also, we show the inception of reverse flow in the region close to the wall, resulting from the induced pressure gradient due to the convection of co-ions in the opposite direction to flow and pinpoint its effect of the flow rate variation under the influence of interfacial slip. We believe that the inferences obtained from the present analysis may improve the design of bio-MEMS (microelectromechanical systems) and microfluidic devices, which are used for in-situ bioremediation. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Hydrodynamics beyond Navier-Stokes: The slip flow model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yudistiawan, Wahyu P.; Ansumali, Santosh; Karlin, Iliya V.

    2008-07-01

    Recently, analytical solutions for the nonlinear Couette flow demonstrated the relevance of the lattice Boltzmann (LB) models to hydrodynamics beyond the continuum limit [S. Ansumali , Phys. Rev. Lett. 98, 124502 (2007)]. In this paper, we present a systematic study of the simplest LB kinetic equation—the nine-bit model in two dimensions—in order to quantify it as a slip flow approximation. Details of the aforementioned analytical solution are presented, and results are extended to include a general shear- and force-driven unidirectional flow in confined geometry. Exact solutions for the velocity, as well as for pertinent higher-order moments of the distribution functions, are obtained in both Couette and Poiseuille steady-state flows for all values of rarefaction parameter (Knudsen number). Results are compared with the slip flow solution by Cercignani, and a good quantitative agreement is found for both flow situations. Thus, the standard nine-bit LB model is characterized as a valid and self-consistent slip flow model for simulations beyond the Navier-Stokes approximation.

  17. Interfacial slip in entrained soap films containing associating hydrosoluble polymer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adelizzi, Eric A; Troian, Sandra M

    2004-08-31

    Frankel's law predicts that the thickness of a Newtonian soap film entrained at small capillary number scales as Ca2/3 provided the bounding surfaces are rigid. Previous studies have shown that soap films containing low concentrations of high molecular weight (Mw) polymer can exhibit strong deviations from this scaling at low Ca, especially for associating surfactant-polymer solutions. We report results of extensive measurements by laser interferometry of the entrained film thickness versus Ca for the associating pair SDS/PEO over a large range in polymer molecular weight. Comparison of our experimental results to predictions of hydrodynamic models based on viscoelastic behavior shows poor agreement. Modification of the Frankel derivation by an interfacial slip condition yields much improved agreement. These experiments also show that the slip length increases as where zeta = 0.58 +/- 0.07. This correlation is suggestive of the Tolstoi-Larsen prediction that the slip length increases in proportion to the characteristic size of the fluid constituent despite its original derivation for liquid-solid interfaces.

  18. Onset of aseismic creep on major strike-slip faults

    KAUST Repository

    Çakir, Ziyadin

    2012-10-02

    Time series analysis of spaceborne synthetic aperture radar (SAR) data, GPS measurements, and fi eld observations reveal that the central section of the Izmit (Turkey) fault that slipped with a supershear rupture velocity in the A.D. 1999, Mw7.4, Izmit earthquake began creeping aseismically following the earthquake. Rapid initial postseismic afterslip decayed logarithmically with time and appears to have reached a steady rate comparable to the preearthquake full fault-crossing rate, suggesting that it may continue for decades and possibly until late in the earthquake cycle. If confi rmed by future monitoring, these observations identify postseismic afterslip as a mechanism for initiating creep behavior along strike-slip faults. Long-term afterslip and/or creep has signifi cant implications for earthquake cycle models, recurrence intervals of large earthquakes, and accordingly, seismic hazard estimation along mature strike-slip faults, in particular for Istanbul which is believed to lie adjacent to a seismic gap along the North Anatolian fault in the Sea of Marmara. © 2012 Geological Society of America.

  19. Slip-stacking Dynamics and the 20 Hz Booster

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eldred, Jeffery; Zwaska, Robert

    2015-03-01

    Slip-stacking is an accumulation technique used at Fermilab since 2004 which nearly doubles the proton intensity. The Proton Improvement Plan II intensity upgrades require a reduction in slip-stacking losses by approximately a factor of 2. We study the single-particle dynamics that determine the stability of slip-stacking particles. We introduce universal area factors to calculate the available phase space area for any set of beam parameters without individual simulation. We show the particle loss as a function of time. We calculate the injection efficiency as a function of longitudinal emittance and aspect-ratio. We demonstrate that the losses from RF single particle dynamics can be reduced by a factor of 4-10 (depending on beam parameters) by upgrading the Fermilab Booster from a 15-Hz cycle-rate to a 20-Hz cycle-rate. We recommend a change in injection scheme to eliminate the need for a greater momentum aperture in the Fermilab Recycler.

  20. Delayed-onset of slipped capital femoral epiphysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Kwang Soon; Lim, Youg Wook; Ok, In Young; Lee, Si Wook

    2015-01-01

    Slipped capital femoral epiphysis in adults is uncommon. The purpose of this study was to report our own four cases (six hips) of slipped capital femoral epiphysis (SCFE) in adulthood and to review the cases reported in the literature. The authors attempted to investigate the various causative underlying disorders and clinical characteristics, treatment, outcome, and complications. We searched for all 22 reported cases of SCFE in adults age 18 years and older via MEDLINE and Google Scholar from 1963 to 2012 without any exception. In doing so, we documented our own four cases, along with seven additional reports that we found in the literature but were not reported by Hu et al. in 2011. All of 22 cases involved causative pathology: panhypopituitary disorders in 11, hypothyroidism in five, Kallmann syndrome in three, postradiation hypoestrogenism in one, hypogonadotropic hypogonadism as sequel of meningitis in one, and Klinefelter syndrome in one. Eight cases (36 %) involved both hips. The most common treatment modality was internal fixation combined with hormonal replacement therapy. Nineteen hips (63 %) healed well without any complications after fixation of the slipped epiphysis. Avascular necrosis of the femoral head developed in one hip after in situ pin fixation. Awareness of the variety of conditions under which SCFE can occur is an important factor in early diagnosis, especially in slippage at atypical ages. In the adults with SCFE, it is very important to look for bilateral involvement as this occurs in 36 % of cases.

  1. Incremental Holocene slip rates from the Hope fault at Hossack Station, Marlborough fault zone, South Island, New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatem, A. E.; Dolan, J. F.; Langridge, R.; Zinke, R. W.; McGuire, C. P.; Rhodes, E. J.; Van Dissen, R. J.

    2015-12-01

    The Marlborough fault system, which links the Alpine fault with the Hikurangi subduction zone within the complex Australian-Pacific plate boundary zone, partitions strain between the Wairau, Awatere, Clarence and Hope faults. Previous best estimates of dextral strike-slip along the Hope fault are ≤ ~23 mm/yr± 4 mm/year. Those rates, however, are poorly constrained and could be improved using better age determinations in conjunction with measurements of fault offsets using high-resolution imagery. In this study, we use airborne lidar- and field-based mapping together with the subsurface geometry of offset channels at the Hossack site 12 km ESE of Hanmer Springs to more precisely determine stream offsets that were previously identified by McMorran (1991). Specifically, we measured fault offsets of ~10m, ~75 m, and ~195m. Together with 65 radiocarbon ages on charcoal, peat, and wood and 25 pending post-IR50-IRSL225 luminescence ages from the channel deposits, these offsets yield three different fault slip rates for the early Holocene, the late Holocene, and the past ca. 500-1,000 years. Using the large number of age determinations, we document in detail the timing of initiation and abandonment of each channel, enhancing the geomorphic interpretation at the Hossack site as channels deform over many earthquake cycles. Our preliminary incremental slip rate results from the Hossack site may indicate temporally variable strain release along the Hope fault. This study is part of a broader effort aimed at determining incremental slip rates and paleo-earthquake ages and displacements from all four main Marlborough faults. Collectively, these data will allow us to determine how the four main Marlborough faults have work together during Holocene-late Pleistocene to accommodate plate-boundary deformation in time and space.

  2. Pressure loss in channel flow resulting from a sudden change in boundary condition from no-slip to partial-slip

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Chiu-On; Sun, Rui

    2017-10-01

    A semi-analytical model is presented for pressure-driven flow through a channel, where local pressure loss is incurred at a sudden change in the boundary condition: from no-slip to partial-slip. Assuming low-Reynolds-number incompressible flow and periodic stick-slip wall patterning, the problems for parallel-plate and circular channels are solved using the methods of eigenfunction expansion and point match. The present study aims to examine in detail how the flow will evolve, on passing through the cross section at which the change in the slip condition occurs, from a no-slip parabolic profile to a less sheared profile with a boundary slip. The present problem is germane to, among other applications, flow through a channel bounded by superhydrophobic surfaces, which intrinsically comprise an array of no-slip and partial-slip segments. Results are presented to show that the sudden change in the boundary condition will result in additional resistance to the flow. Near the point on the wall where a slip change occurs is a region of steep pressure gradient and intensive vorticity. The acceleration of near-wall fluid particles in combination with the no-slip boundary condition leads to a very steep velocity gradient at the wall, thereby a sharp increase in the wall shear stress, shortly before the fluid enters the channel with a slippery wall. Results are also presented to show the development of flow in the entrance region in the slippery channel. The additional pressure loss can be represented by a dimensionless loss parameter, which is a pure function of the slip length for channels much longer than the entrance length.

  3. Ultraregular inductive limits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Kucera

    1990-01-01

    Full Text Available An inductive limit E=indlim En is ultraregular if it is regular and each set B⊂En, which is bounded in E, is also bounded in En. A necessary and sufficient condition for ultraregularity of E is given provided each En is an LF-space which is closed in En+1.

  4. Modeling Induction Motor Imbalances

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Armah, Kabenla; Jouffroy, Jerome; Duggen, Lars

    2016-01-01

    This paper gives a study into the development of a generalized model for a three-phase induction motor that offers flexibility of simulating balanced and unbalanced parameter scenarios. By analyzing the interaction of forces within the motor, we achieve our main objective of deriving the system...

  5. Using Continuity Induction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hathaway, Dan

    2011-01-01

    Here is a technique for proving the fundamental theorems of analysis that provides a unified way to pass from local properties to global properties on the real line, just as ordinary induction passes from local implication (if true for "k", the theorem is true for "k" + 1) to a global conclusion in the natural numbers.

  6. Episodic tremor and slip in Northern Sumatra subduction zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sianipar, Dimas; Subakti, Hendri

    2017-07-01

    The first reported observation of non-volcanic tremor in Sunda Arc in Sumbawa, Indonesia open a possibility of discovery of episodic tremor and slip (ETS) from out of Pacific Rim. Non-volcanic tremor gives some important information about dynamic of plate boundaries. The characteristics of these tremors are visually as non-impulsive, high frequency, long-duration and low-amplitude signals. Tectonic tremor occurred in a transition part of brittle-ductile of a fault and frequently associated with the shearing mechanism of slow slip. Tectonic tremor is a seismic case that also very interested, because it shows strong sensitivity to stress changes. Deep non-volcanic tremor is usually associated with episodic slow-slip events. Tectonic tremor is found in close association with geodetically observed slow-slip events (SSE) in subduction zones. One research found that there is possibility of SSE occurrence on Banyak Islands, North Sumatra revealed from coral observation. The SSE occurred on the Banyak Islands portion of the megathrust at 30-55 km depth, within the downdip transition zone. We do a systematic search of episodic tremor and its possible relationship with slow-slip phenomena in Northern Sumatra subduction zone. The spectrogram analysis is done to analyze the potential tremor signals. We use three component broadband seismic stations with 20, 25, and 50 sampling per second (BH* and SH* channels). We apply a butterworth 5 Hz highpass filter to separate the signal as local tremor and teleseismic/regional earthquakes. Before computing spectrogram to avoid high-frequency artifacts to remote triggering, we apply a 0.5 Hz filter. We also convert the binary seismic data into sound waves to make sure that these events meet the tectonic tremor criterion. We successfully examine 3 seismic stations with good recording i.e. GSI, SNSI and KCSI. We find there are many evidences of high frequency episodic tremor like signals. This include an analysis of potential triggered

  7. Improved ceramic slip casting technique. [application to aircraft model fabrication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buck, Gregory M. (Inventor); Vasquez, Peter (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A primary concern in modern fluid dynamics research is the experimental verification of computational aerothermodynamic codes. This research requires high precision and detail in the test model employed. Ceramic materials are used for these models because of their low heat conductivity and their survivability at high temperatures. To fabricate such models, slip casting techniques were developed to provide net-form, precision casting capability for high-purity ceramic materials in aqueous solutions. In previous slip casting techniques, block, or flask molds made of plaster-of-paris were used to draw liquid from the slip material. Upon setting, parts were removed from the flask mold and cured in a kiln at high temperatures. Casting detail was usually limited with this technique -- detailed parts were frequently damaged upon separation from the flask mold, as the molded parts are extremely delicate in the uncured state, and the flask mold is inflexible. Ceramic surfaces were also marred by 'parting lines' caused by mold separation. This adversely affected the aerodynamic surface quality of the model as well. (Parting lines are invariably necessary on or near the leading edges of wings, nosetips, and fins for mold separation. These areas are also critical for flow boundary layer control.) Parting agents used in the casting process also affected surface quality. These agents eventually soaked into the mold, the model, or flaked off when releasing the case model. Different materials were tried, such as oils, paraffin, and even an algae. The algae released best, but some of it remained on the model and imparted an uneven texture and discoloration on the model surface when cured. According to the present invention, a wax pattern for a shell mold is provided, and an aqueous mixture of a calcium sulfate-bonded investment material is applied as a coating to the wax pattern. The coated wax pattern is then dried, followed by curing to vaporize the wax pattern and leave a shell

  8. Viscous-slip, thermal-slip, and temperature-jump coefficients as defined by the linearized Boltzmann equation and the Cercignani-Lampis boundary condition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siewert, C. E.

    2003-06-01

    A polynomial expansion procedure and an analytical discrete-ordinates method are used to evaluate the viscous-slip coefficient, the thermal-slip coefficient, and the temperature-jump coefficient as defined by a rigorous version of the linearized Boltzmann equation for rigid-sphere interactions and the Cercignani-Lampis boundary condition.

  9. Extreme multi-millennial slip rate variations on the Garlock fault, California: geomorphology and geochronology of slip rate constraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, Edward; Dolan, James; McGill, Sally; McAuliffe, Lee; Zinke, Robert

    2016-04-01

    Combining existing paleoseismology with new geomorphic constraints for the same part of the Central Garlock fault in California, USA, allows us to demonstrate pronounced variations in slip rate during the Holocene for this left-lateral strike-slip system. Our results have basic implications for understanding how faults store and release strain energy in large earthquakes, and for Probabilistic Seismic Hazard Assessment (PSHA). A series of well-preserved fluvial terraces within alluvial fans provide offset markers, and newly developed single grain K-feldspar IRSL dating allows us to constrain depositional ages and subsequent erosion of terrace risers with good precision, using multiple samples from several different locations. This new dating approach has wide applicability for paleoseismology and slip rate studies, besides understanding environmental response to climatic events; agreement with independent age control provided by C-14 and Be-10 profiles comes from sites in the USA, Mexico, Tibet and Mongolia. Sediments dominated by a range of grain sizes from silt to boulders can be dated, and the technique is often applicable in locations where quartz OSL does not work well. We examine the interplay and coupling between climate and tectonics at millennial timescales, along with sedimentary and geomorphic responses, and consider how our understanding of fault dynamics can be improved with the benefit of these new approaches.

  10. Workers' experience of slipping in U.S. limited-service restaurants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Santosh K; Chang, Wen-Ruey; Courtney, Theodore K; Lombardi, David A; Huang, Yueng-Hsiang; Brennan, Melanye J; Mittleman, Murray A; Perry, Melissa J

    2010-09-01

    The leading cause of injuries among restaurant workers is same-level falls, a significant proportion of which result from slipping. This study examines the experience of limited-service restaurant workers with slipping, their use of slip-resistant shoes, and their floor-cleaning practices. A total of 475 workers from 36 limited-service restaurants in six U.S. states participated in a 12-week prospective cohort study on slipping in the workplace. At baseline, participants completed a survey that gathered information about their demographics, perceptions of floor slipperiness, use of slip-resistant shoes, floor cleaning practices, and number of slips experienced in the previous 4 weeks. During the subsequent 12 weeks, participants reported their slip experience weekly. Restaurant managers reported kitchen floor cleaning protocols and shoe policies. The overall rate of slipping during the 12 weeks of the prospective study was 0.44 slips per 40 work hours. The mean of the individual rate of slipping varied among the restaurants from 0.02 to 2.49 slips per 40 work hours, a rate ratio of more than 100 among the restaurants with the highest and the lowest rate of slipping. Such a large variation, which is unlikely due to chance alone (p restaurants are better able to control slipping than others. The highest numbers of slips were reported in the sink and fryer areas, which were also identified by restaurant workers as being the most slippery. Liquid and grease were reported as floor contaminants in over 70% of the slips. In restaurants where slip-resistant shoes were provided by the employer, 91% of participants wore them; whereas if they were neither provided nor encouraged, only 53.5% wore them (p restaurants, however, 62% of the participants who were responsible for cleaning floors reported using hot/warm water, thus violating the manufacturer's cold water floor cleaning protocol. These findings suggest that focused prevention efforts based on practices from

  11. A comparison of induction of anaesthesia using two different ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Investigators have reported inter-patient variability with regard to propofol dosage for induction of anesthesia, since early dose finding studies. With the arrival of generic formulations of propofol, questions have arisen regarding further variability in dose requirements. Various studies have confirmed that generic ...

  12. Inductive Communication System Design Summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-09-01

    The report documents the experience obtained during the design and development of the Inductive Communications System used in the Morgantown People Mover. The Inductive Communications System is used to provide wayside-to-vehicle and vehicle-to-waysid...

  13. Temporal changes in the required shoe-floor friction when walking following an induced slip.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danielle N Beringer

    Full Text Available Biomechanical aspects of slips and falls have been widely studied to facilitate fall prevention strategies. Prior studies have shown changes in gait after an induced slipping event. As such, most researchers only slip participants one time to avoid such changes that would otherwise reduce the external validity of experimental results. The ability to slip participants more than once, after allowing gait to return to a natural baseline, would improve the experimental efficiency of such studies. Therefore, the goal of this study was to characterize the temporal changes in required shoe-floor friction when walking following an induced slip. Two experiments were completed, and each employed a different potential strategy to promote the return of gait to a natural baseline after slipping. In the first experiment, extended time away from the laboratory was used to promote the return of gait to baseline. We measured required coefficient-of-friction among 36 young adult male participants over four sessions. The first three sessions provided measurements during baseline (i.e., natural gait both prior to slipping and immediately after slipping. The fourth session provided a measurement 1-12 weeks after slipping. In the second experiment, an extensive number of walking trials was used to promote the return of gait to baseline. We measured required coefficient-of-friction among 10 young adult male participants in a single session. Measurements were collected during 10 baseline walking trials, immediately after slipping, and during 50-55 additional trials. In both experiments, required coefficient-of-friction decreased 12-16% immediately after a single slip, increased toward baseline levels over subsequent weeks/walking trials, but remained statistically different from baseline at the end of the experiments. Based on these results, experiments involving slipping participants multiple times may not have a high level of external validity, and researchers are

  14. Estimators of wheel slip for electric vehicles using torque and encoder measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boisvert, M.; Micheau, P.

    2016-08-01

    For the purpose of regenerative braking control in hybrid and electrical vehicles, recent studies have suggested controlling the slip ratio of the electric-powered wheel. A slip tracking controller requires an accurate slip estimation in the overall range of the slip ratio (from 0 to 1), contrary to the conventional slip limiter (ABS) which calls for an accurate slip estimation in the critical slip area, estimated at around 0.15 in several applications. Considering that it is not possible to directly measure the slip ratio of a wheel, the problem is to estimate the latter from available online data. To estimate the slip of a wheel, both wheel speed and vehicle speed must be known. Several studies provide algorithms that allow obtaining a good estimation of vehicle speed. On the other hand, there is no proposed algorithm for the conditioning of the wheel speed measurement. Indeed, the noise included in the wheel speed measurement reduces the accuracy of the slip estimation, a disturbance increasingly significant at low speed and low torque. Herein, two different extended Kalman observers of slip ratio were developed. The first calculates the slip ratio with data provided by an observer of vehicle speed and of propeller wheel speed. The second observer uses an original nonlinear model of the slip ratio as a function of the electric motor. A sinus tracking algorithm is included in the two observers, in order to reject harmonic disturbances of wheel speed measurement. Moreover, mass and road uncertainties can be compensated with a coefficient adapted online by an RLS. The algorithms were implemented and tested with a three-wheel recreational hybrid vehicle. Experimental results show the efficiency of both methods.

  15. Five-phase induction motor drive for weak and remote grid system ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Thus the paper focuses on the inverter controlled five-phase induction motor drive system for variable speed applications. The paper presents inverter control method for five-phase variable speed induction motor drives. The proposed solution may be employed in the applications not requiring very precise position and ...

  16. Inductive Supervised Quantum Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monràs, Alex; Sentís, Gael; Wittek, Peter

    2017-05-01

    In supervised learning, an inductive learning algorithm extracts general rules from observed training instances, then the rules are applied to test instances. We show that this splitting of training and application arises naturally, in the classical setting, from a simple independence requirement with a physical interpretation of being nonsignaling. Thus, two seemingly different definitions of inductive learning happen to coincide. This follows from the properties of classical information that break down in the quantum setup. We prove a quantum de Finetti theorem for quantum channels, which shows that in the quantum case, the equivalence holds in the asymptotic setting, that is, for large numbers of test instances. This reveals a natural analogy between classical learning protocols and their quantum counterparts, justifying a similar treatment, and allowing us to inquire about standard elements in computational learning theory, such as structural risk minimization and sample complexity.

  17. Induction motor control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Irving G.

    1990-01-01

    Electromechanical actuators developed to date have commonly ultilized permanent magnet (PM) synchronous motors. More recently switched reluctance (SR) motors have been advocated due to their robust characteristics. Implications of work which utilized induction motors and advanced control techniques are discussed. When induction motors are operated from an energy source capable of controlling voltages and frequencies independently, drive characteristics are obtained which are superior to either PM or SR motors. By synthesizing the machine frequency from a high-frequency carrier (nominally 20 kHz), high efficiencies, low distortion, and rapid torque response are available. At this time multiple horsepower machine drives were demonstrated, and work is on-going to develop a 20 hp average, 40 hp peak class of aerospace actuators. This effort is based upon high-frequency power distribution and management techniques developed by NASA for Space Station Freedom.

  18. Induction motor control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Irving G.

    Electromechanical actuators developed to date have commonly ultilized permanent magnet (PM) synchronous motors. More recently switched reluctance (SR) motors have been advocated due to their robust characteristics. Implications of work which utilized induction motors and advanced control techniques are discussed. When induction motors are operated from an energy source capable of controlling voltages and frequencies independently, drive characteristics are obtained which are superior to either PM or SR motors. By synthesizing the machine frequency from a high-frequency carrier (nominally 20 kHz), high efficiencies, low distortion, and rapid torque response are available. At this time multiple horsepower machine drives were demonstrated, and work is on-going to develop a 20 hp average, 40 hp peak class of aerospace actuators. This effort is based upon high-frequency power distribution and management techniques developed by NASA for Space Station Freedom.

  19. Inductive Temporal Logic Programming

    OpenAIRE

    Kolter, Robert

    2009-01-01

    We study the extension of techniques from Inductive Logic Programming (ILP) to temporal logic programming languages. Therefore we present two temporal logic programming languages and analyse the learnability of programs from these languages from finite sets of examples. In first order temporal logic the following topics are analysed: - How can we characterize the denotational semantics of programs? - Which proof techniques are best suited? - How complex is the learning task? In propositional ...

  20. Inductive Pulse Generation

    OpenAIRE

    Lindblom, Adam

    2006-01-01

    Pulsed power generators are a key component in compact systems for generation of high-power microwaves (HPM). HPM generation by virtual cathode devices such as Vircators put high demands on the source. The rise time and the pulse length of the source voltage are two key issues in the generation of HPM radiation. This thesis describes the construction and tests of several inductive high power pulse generators. The pulse generators were designed with the intent to deliver a pulse with fast rise...

  1. Compensation Performance for Induction Motor Load of Voltage Dip Compensator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagamoto, Takamichi; Takayama, Katsumi; Kai, Takaaki

    The variable speed drives of the power electronics application are the most sensitive to the voltage dip that is caused by power system fault. Variable speed drives are composed by the converter, the voltage source inverter and induction motor. They could fall into operation failure by wrong control in the converter when degree of the voltage dip exceeds 15% and 10ms. Therefore, important loads are equipped with the voltage dip compensation. Since the load characteristic of the converter equals nearly the impedance load, the induction motors connected directly to power supply are more sensitive to the output voltage waveform of the compensator than the converter. Thus, the induction motors are used as the important load (compensated load) on the simulation. The simulations of the compensation performance to the induction motors are carried out by using simulation tool PSCAD/EMTDC. It is confirmed that the goal of the compensation performance is able to be achieved.

  2. Measuring slip in paleoearthquakes using high-resolution aerial lidar data: Combined analysis of the Wairau, Awatere, Clarence, and Hope faults, South Island, New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zinke, R. W.; Dolan, J. F.; Hatem, A. E.; Van Dissen, R. J.; Langridge, R.; Grenader, J.; McGuire, C. P.; Rhodes, E. J.; Nicol, A., , Prof

    2016-12-01

    Analysis of a large new high-resolution aerial lidar microtopographic data set provides > 500 measured fault offsets from sections of the four primary right-lateral strike-slip faults of the Marlborough Fault System (MFS), in northern South Island, New Zealand. With a shot density of >12 shots/m2 (and locally up to 18 shots/m2) these high-quality data allow us to resolve topographically defined geomorphic offsets with decimeter precision along 250 km of combined fault length. The measured offsets range in size from 2 m to > 100 m, and allow us to constrain displacements in the past one to several surface ruptures along stretches of the Wairau, Awatere, Clarence, and Hope faults. Our results reveal a number of important details of the rupture history of these faults, including: (1) the amount of slip and spatial variability (along and across strike) of strain released in the most recent event along sections of each of the four faults; (2) the consistency of slip throughout the past several ruptures on specific faults; and (3) suggestions of potential linkages and segment boundaries along each fault. The lidar data also facilitate precise measurements of larger offsets that, when combined with age data collected as part of our broader collaborative analyses of incremental fault slip rates and paleoearthquake ages, help to constrain the broader spatial and temporal patterns of strain release across the MFS during Holocene and latest Pleistocene time.

  3. Seismic Slip on an Oblique Detachment Fault at Low Angles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janecke, S. U.; Steely, A. N.; Evans, J. P.

    2008-12-01

    Pseudotachylytes are one of the few accepted indicators of seismic slip along ancient faults. Low-angle normal faults have produced few large earthquakes in historic times and low-angle normal faults (detachment faults) are typically severely misoriented relative to a vertical maximum compressive stress. As a result many geoscientists question whether low-angle normal faults produce earthquakes at low angles. Relationships in southern California show that a major low-angle normal-oblique fault slipped at low angles and produced large earthquakes. The exhumed Late Cenozoic West Salton detachment fault preserves spectacular fault- related pseudotachylytes along its fault plane and injected into its hanging wall and footwall. Composite pseudotachylyte zones are up to 1.25 m thick and persists over lateral distances of at least 10's of meters. Pseudotachylyte is common in most thin sections of damaged fault rocks with more than 20% (by volume) of cataclasite. We recognized the presence of original melt using numerous criteria: abundant spherulites in thin sections, injection structures at both the thin-section and outcrop scale, black aphanitic textures, quenched vein margins, variations in microcrystallite textures and/or size with respect to the vein margin, and glassy textures in hand sample. Multiple earthquakes are inferred to produce the layered "stratigraphy" in some exposures of pseudotachylytes. We infer that the West Salton detachment fault formed and slipped at low angles because it nearly perfectly reactivates a Cretaceous ductile thrust system at the half km scale and dips between 10 and 45 degrees. The about 30 degree NNE dip of the detachment fault on the north side of Yaqui Ridge is likely steeper than its dip during detachment slip because there is local steepening on the flanks of the Yaqui Ridge antiform in a contractional stepover of a crosscutting Quaternary San Felipe dextral fault zone. These relationships indicate a low dip on the detachment

  4. Derivation of free energy expressions for tube models from coarse-grained slip-link models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steenbakkers, Rudi J A; Schieber, Jay D

    2012-07-21

    We present the free energy of a single-chain mean-field model for polymer melt dynamics, which uses a continuous (tube-like) approximation to the discrete entanglements with surrounding chains, but, in contrast to previous tube models, includes fluctuations in the number density of Kuhn steps along the primitive path and in the degree of entanglement. The free energy is obtained from that of the slip-link model with fluctuating entanglement positions [J. D. Schieber and K. Horio, J. Chem. Phys. 132, 074905 (2010)] by taking the continuous limit of (functions of) the discrete Kuhn-step numbers and end-to-end vectors of the strands between entanglements. This coarse-graining from a more-detailed level of description has the advantage that no ad hoc arguments need to be introduced. Moreover, the thermodynamic consistency of the slip-link model [J. D. Schieber, J. Non-Equilib. Thermodyn. 28, 179 (2003)] can be preserved. Fluctuations in the positions of entanglements lead to a harmonic bending term in the free energy of the continuous chain, similar to that derived by Read et al. [Macromolecules 41, 6843 (2008)] starting from a modified GLaMM model [R. S. Graham, A. E. Likhtman, T. C. B. McLeish, and S. T. Milner, J. Rheol. 47, 1171 (2003)]. If these fluctuations are set to zero, the free energy becomes purely Gaussian and corresponds to the continuous limit of the original slip-link model, with affinely moving entanglements [J. D. Schieber, J. Chem. Phys. 118, 5162 (2003)]. The free energy reduces to that of Read et al. under their assumptions of a homogeneous Kuhn-step number density and a constant degree of entanglement. Finally, we show how a transformation of the primitive-path coordinate can be applied to make the degree of entanglement an outcome of the model instead of a variable. In summary, this paper constitutes a first step towards a unified mathematical formulation of tube models. The next step will be to formulate the dynamics of the primitive

  5. High-current pulses from inductive energy stores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wipf, S. L.

    1981-11-01

    Superconducting inductive energy stores can be used for high power pulse supplies if a suitable current multiplication scheme is used. The concept of an inductive Marx generator is superior to a transformer. A third scheme, a variable flux linkage device, is suggested; in multiplying current it also compresses energy. Its function is in many ways analogous to that of a horsewhip. Superconductor limits indicate that peak power levels of TW can be reached for stored energies above 1 MJ.

  6. Multiphase induction motor drives - a technology status review

    OpenAIRE

    PROFUMO Francesco; Bojoi, Iustin Radu

    2007-01-01

    The area of multiphase variable-speed motor drives in general and multiphase induction motor drives in particular has experienced a substantial growth since the beginning of this century. Research has been conducted worldwide and numerous interesting developments have been reported in the literature. An attempt is made to provide a detailed overview of the current state-of-the-art in this area. The elaborated aspects include advantages of multiphase induction machines, modelling of multiphase...

  7. SCHEME-FIELD MODELING OF THERMAL PROCESSES IN INDUCTION MOTORS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. O. Litvinov

    2017-07-01

    Practical significance. The integrated method for converting data of induction motor field modeling into thermal model parameters allows at increase in the number of nodes in thermal scheme from one to ten to reduce the average value of a relative error from 9,2% to 2,42%, what completely meets requirements at designing of induction motors, and also for imitating modeling of thermal processes dynamics at the variable operating conditions.

  8. Study Regarding the Identification of the Induction Motor

    OpenAIRE

    Ioan Ruja; Ladislau Augustinov; Ion-Cornel Mituletu

    2011-01-01

    In the framework of the paper, we analyze some theoretical and practical aspects regarding the identification of the induction motor. The problem is important in the synthesis of different driving systems with automatic induction motors, usually with variable speed of rotations. The performances in the transitory and stationary regime of these quick adjustment systems are influenced by the precision of the mathematical model of the chosen driving motor. We present different ...

  9. Interchange Slip-Running Reconnection and Sweeping SEP-Beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masson, S.; Aulanier, G.; Pariat, E.; Klein, K.-L.

    2011-01-01

    We present a new model to explain how particles, accelerated at a reconnection site that is not magnetically connected to the Earth, could eventually propagate along the well-connected open flux tube. Our model is based on the results of a low-beta resistive magnetohydrodynamics simulation of a three-dimensional line-tied and initially current-free bipole, that is embedded in a non-uniform open potential field. The topology of this configuration is that of an asymmetric coronal null-point, with a closed fan surface and an open outer spine. When driven by slow photospheric shearing motions, field lines, initially fully anchored below the fan dome, reconnect at the null point, and jump to the open magnetic domain. This is the standard interchange mode as sketched and calculated in 2D. The key result in 3D is that, reconnected open field lines located in the vicinity of the outer spine, keep reconnecting continuously, across an open quasi-separatrix layer, as previously identified for non-open-null-point reconnection. The apparent slipping motion of these field lines leads to form an extended narrow magnetic flux tube at high altitude. Because of the slip-running reconnection, we conjecture that if energetic particles would be travelling through, or be accelerated inside, the diffusion region, they would be successively injected along continuously reconnecting field lines that are connected farther and farther from the spine. At the scale of the full Sun, owing to the super-radial expansion of field lines below 3 solar radius, such energetic particles could easily be injected in field lines slipping over significant distances, and could eventually reach the distant flux tube that is well-connected to the Earth.

  10. Slipped capital femoral epiphysis: relevant pathophysiological findings with open surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziebarth, Kai; Leunig, Michael; Slongo, Theddy; Kim, Young-Jo; Ganz, Reinhold

    2013-07-01

    Traditionally arthrotomy has rarely been performed during surgery for slipped capital femoral epiphysis (SCFE). As a result, most pathophysiological information about the articular surfaces was derived clinically and radiographically. Novel insights regarding deformity-induced damage and epiphyseal perfusion became available with surgical hip dislocation. We (1) determined the influence of chronicity of prodromal symptoms and severity of SCFE deformity on severity of cartilage damage. (2) In surgically confirmed disconnected epiphyses, we determined the influence of injury and time to surgery on epiphyseal perfusion; and (3) the frequency of new bone at the posterior neck potentially reducing perfusion during epimetaphyseal reduction. We reviewed 116 patients with 119 SCFE and available records treated between 1996 and 2011. Acetabular cartilage damage was graded as +/++/+++ in 109 of the 119 hips. Epiphyseal perfusion was determined with laser-Doppler flowmetry at capsulotomy and after reduction. Information about bone at the posterior neck was retrieved from operative reports. Ninety-seven of 109 hips (89%) had documented cartilage damage; severity was not associated with higher slip angle or chronicity; disconnected epiphyses had less damage. Temporary or definitive cessation of perfusion in disconnected epiphyses increased with time to surgery; posterior bone resection improved the perfusion. In one necrosis, the retinaculum was ruptured; two were in the group with the longest time interval. Posterior bone formation is frequent in disconnected epiphyses, even without prodromal periods. Addressing the cause of cartilage damage (cam impingement) should become an integral part of SCFE surgery. Early surgery for disconnected epiphyses appears to reduce the risk of necrosis. Slip reduction without resection of posterior bone apposition may jeopardize epiphyseal perfusion. Level IV, retrospective case series. See Guidelines for Authors for a complete description of

  11. Arthroscopic femoral neck osteoplasty in slipped capital femoral epiphysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Austin; Youderian, Ari; Watkins, Summer; Gourineni, Prasad

    2014-10-01

    To investigate the outcomes of arthroscopic femoral neck osteoplasty in patients with slipped capital femoral epiphysis (SCFE)-related impingement. We retrospectively reviewed 37 consecutive patients (40 hips; 19 male and 18 female patients; age range, 10 to 19 years) with SCFE who underwent hip arthroscopy for femoral neck osteoplasty over a 4-year period. Six hips were excluded because of the severity of the slip or conversion to an open procedure. The preoperative and postoperative slip angle, alpha angle, and internal rotation in flexion were compared. Patients were evaluated for pain, functional limitations, and obligatory external rotation deformity (OERD) at each follow-up visit. The mean follow-up period was 22 months (range, 12 to 56 months). We analyzed the results of 34 hips. Adequate distraction could not be obtained initially in 7 hips. The labral and acetabular cartilage damage appeared to be from crushing and abrasion from the bony prominence of the neck. The goals of complete pain relief and correction of OERD were achieved in 88% of the hips. OERD and pain persisted in 2 hips, and 2 patients had residual pain despite good motion. There was a statistically significant improvement in alpha angle (from 88.22° and 56.91°, P femoral neck osteoplasty is effective in decreasing pain, the alpha angle, and OERD in mild to moderate SCFE. Morbid obesity, scarring from previous surgery, and the presence of screws in the anterior neck presented challenges to the arthroscopic technique. Level IV, therapeutic case series. Copyright © 2014 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Slow slip hidden in the noise: the intermittence of tectonic release

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, W.

    2016-12-01

    Referred to as slow slip events, the transient aseismic slip that occurs along plate boundaries can be indirectly characterized through colocated seismicity, such as tectonic tremor and low-frequency earthquakes (LFEs). Using the timing of cataloged LFE and tremor activity in Guerrero, Mexico and northern Cascadia, I decompose the inter-aseismic GPS displacement, defined as the surface deformation between previously detected slow slip events, into separate regimes of tectonic loading and release. In such a way, previously undetected slow slip events that produce on average less than a millimeter of surface deformation are extracted from the geodetic noise. These new observations demonstrate that the inter-aseismic period is not quiescent and that slow slip occurs much more often than previously thought. This suggests that the plate interface where slow slip and tremor occur is in fact strongly coupled and undergoes rapid cycles of stress accumulation and release.

  13. Simulations of the atomic structure, energetics, and cross slip of screw dislocations in copper

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Torben; Jacobsen, Karsten Wedel; Leffers, Torben

    1997-01-01

    Using nanoscale atomistic simulations it has been possible to address the problem of cross slip of a dissociated screw dislocation in an fee metal (Cu) by a method not suffering from the limitations imposed by elasticity theory. The focus has been on different dislocation configurations relevant...... for cross slip via the Friedel-Escaig (FE) cross-slip mechanism. The stress free cross-slip activation energy and activation length for this mechanism are determined. We show that the two constrictions necessary for cross slip in the FE cross-slip mechanism are not equivalent and that a dislocation...... configuration with just one of these constrictions is energetically favored over two parallel Shockley partials. The effect of having the dislocation perpendicular to a free surface is investigated. The results are in qualitative agreement with transmission electron microscopy experiments and predictions from...

  14. Relation between surface slip topography and stress corrosion cracking in Ti-8 wt % Al

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, J. D.; Hoagland, R. G.

    1974-01-01

    The deformation behavior of Ti-8 wt % Al has been investigated in an inert environment (air), and an aggressive environment (salt water). Details of surface slip geometry were examined by high resolution surface replicas at various stages of deformation in both environments. Specimens aged to contain a fine dispersion of Ti3Al precipitates failed by subcritical crack growth in salt water, whereas specimens in the single phase condition showed no effects of environment on the yield or fracture characteristics. The Ti3Al precipitates produce little change in strength level or slip character compared to the single phase alloy, and there is no evidence of any effects of environment on the character of surface slip. Rather, the presence of trenches along slip bands on the surface of aged specimens suggest that the specific effect of the Ti3Al precipitates is to render the surface slip steps chemically active relative to the surrounding matrix by slip induced dissolution of the particles.

  15. Method of reducing the green density of a slip cast article

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangels, John A. (Inventor); Dickie, Ray A. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    The method disclosed in this specification is one of reducing the green density of an article cast in a slip casting operation. The article is cast from a casting slip containing silicon metal particles, yttrium containing particles, and a small amount of a fluoride salt which is effective to suppress flocculation of the silicon metal particles by y.sup.+3 ions derived from the yttrium containing particles. The method is characterized by the following step. A small amount of compound which produces a cation which will partly flocculate the particles of silicon metal is added to the casting slip. The small amount of this compound is added so that when the casting slip is slip cast into a casting mold, the partly flocculated particles of silicon will interrupt an otherwise orderly packing of the particles of silicon and particles of yttrium. In this manner, the green density of the slip cast article is reduced and the article may be more easily nitrided.

  16. Study Regarding the Identification of the Induction Motor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioan Ruja

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available In the framework of the paper, we analyze some theoretical and practical aspects regarding the identification of the induction motor. The problem is important in the synthesis of different driving systems with automatic induction motors, usually with variable speed of rotations. The performances in the transitory and stationary regime of these quick adjustment systems are influenced by the precision of the mathematical model of the chosen driving motor. We present different mathematical models of the induction motor, obtained in an experimental way

  17. Spatial and temporal variation of fault slip and distributed off-fault deformation, Santa Cruz Mountains, central California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horsman, E. M.; Graymer, R. W.

    2010-12-01

    The Santa Cruz Mountains of central California record a lengthy history of deformation, including slip on the dextral San Andreas Fault (SAF) system and off-fault deformation manifested by both slip on secondary faults as well as distributed strain. This complex history provides insight into regional deformation processes operating both before and after initiation of the SAF. We focus here on deformation SW of the SAF, where several distinct, fault-bounded crustal blocks record different histories. We evaluate the magnitude and significance of off-fault deformation SW of the SAF by considering spatial and temporal relationships between slip on secondary faults and distributed deformation. To conduct the analysis we combine a synthesis of the slip histories of five important regional faults with a new dataset constraining spatial and temporal variation of regional deformation magnitude. This new dataset is based on shortening measurements of several major unconformities compiled from more than 60 cross sections from the region. To estimate strain magnitude recorded by older surfaces, we progressively subtract shortening magnitude of young markers from older markers. Because uncertainties grow for older surfaces, this method is most reliable for younger surfaces. Results of the analysis demonstrate that strain magnitude recorded by several unconformity-bound sedimentary packages of different ages is largest within about 5 km of the SAF, providing evidence of long-term deformation partitioning near this major structure. This pattern of distributed deformation partitioning near faults is also apparent but less pronounced near the secondary faults SW of the SAF. When considering spatial and temporal ties between regional deformation and slip on secondary faults, no simple pattern emerges. Fault activity is highly variable in both space and time. Additionally, fault activity at any one time is highly localized; one fault may be active while a nearby structure is inactive

  18. Slipped upper femoral epiphysis: imaging of complications after treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tins, B. [Robert Jones and Agnes Hunt Orthopaedic and District Hospital, Twmpath Lane, Oswestry, Shropshire (United Kingdom)], E-mail: bernhard.tins@rjah.nhs.uk; Cassar-Pullicino, V.; McCall, I. [Robert Jones and Agnes Hunt Orthopaedic and District Hospital, Twmpath Lane, Oswestry, Shropshire (United Kingdom)

    2008-01-15

    Slipped upper femoral epiphysis (SUFE) is a multifactorial condition usually affecting adolescents. Obesity is one risk factor, and as this is increasing the incidence of SUFE is likely to rise. Diagnosis and treatment are usually straightforward and carried out by orthopaedic surgeons. However, the recognition of post-treatment complications poses a much greater challenge. This article focuses on possible complications of surgical treatment of SUFE particularly. Chondrolysis, avascular necrosis, as well as other complications of treatment and conditions leading to premature osteoarthritis are discussed. Checklists for a systematic approach to post-treatment imaging are provided.

  19. Fatigue Hardening and Nucleation of Persistent Slip Bands in Copper

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Ole Bøcker; Winter, A. T.

    1982-01-01

    that there is a large volume fraction of obstacles to plastic flow which are essentially non-deformable and give rise to inclusion stresses of considerable magnitude. The much lower hardening rates in cycles after saturation when persistent slip bands have formed suggest a lower volume fraction of obstacles......, as is observed by transmission electron microscopy. A simple composite model involving an inclusion stress, a bowing stress and a passing, stress accounts for the workhardening rates semi-quantitatively in terms of observed dislocation microstructures. Possible implications for polycrystals are considered....

  20. The Van Fault, Eastern Turkey: A Preliminary Geological Slip Rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackenzie, D.; Elliott, J. R.; Altunel, E.; Kurban, Y.; Walker, R. T.; Parsons, B.

    2014-12-01

    We present a preliminary quaternary slip-rate study on the Van fault, the source of the 2011 Mw7.1 reverse-slip earthquake which caused heavy damage to the cities of Van and Ercis, eastern Turkey. From the InSAR solution, we see a strong depth cut-off at 10km depth, above which there was no slip on the fault. We have carried out an investigation of the geomorphological expression of the fault in quaternary material, to determine whether the fault reaches the surface and, if so, whether this upper section could fail in an earthquake. On the western segment of the Van fault, we observe quaternary scarps coincident with the surface projection of the fault segment identified by InSAR, which displace quaternary alluvial fan and lake-bed deposits. These are coincident with the observation of fault gouge in quaternary deposits at a road cutting, providing evidence for a fault reaching the surface and suggesting that the upper section is capable of rupturing seismically. We use structure-from-motion photogrammetry, differential GPS and terrestrial LiDAR to determine offsets on two generations of fault scarps, and the creep offsets from the period following the earthquake. Preliminary radiocarbon and OSL dates from two uplifted terrace surfaces allow us to estimate a late quaternary geological slip-rate for the fault. Following the GPS and InSAR solution of Dogan et al. 2014 (GRL v41,i7), we also present field evidence and satellite image observations confirming the presence of a splay fault within the northern suburbs of Van city, which experienced creep following the 2011 earthquake. This fault is observed to be particularly evident in the early high resolution satellite imagery from the declassified CORONA missions, highlighting the potential for these datasets in identifying faults in areas now covered by urban sprawl. It remains unclear whether this fault could fail seismically. The fault which failed in 2011 is a north dipping reverse fault, unmapped prior to the

  1. Current concepts in management of slipped capital femoral epiphysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bittersohl, Bernd; Hosalkar, Harish S; Zilkens, Christoph; Krauspe, Rüdiger

    2015-01-01

    Slipped capital femoral epiphysis (SCFE) is a common hip condition that can be disabling. In this review, we provide an orientation on current trends in the clinical management of SCFE including conventional procedures and specialised surgical developments. Different methods of fixation of the epiphysis, risks of complications, and the rationale of addressing deformity, primarily or secondarily, are presented. Although improved understanding of the anatomy, vascularity and implications of residual deformity have changed management strategies, the best modality of treatment that would restore complete vascularity to the femoral head and prevent any residual deformity, impingement and early osteoarthritis remains elusive.

  2. Surgery for slipped capital femoral epiphysis in adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu Amara, S; Leroux, J; Lechevallier, J

    2014-02-01

    The treatment of slipped capital femoral epiphysis (SCFE) in adolescents remains controversial. The goal of initial treatment is to prevent further slippage of the epiphysis. In mild forms, both stable and unstable, in situ fixation is widely accepted as the reference treatment. In contrast, several techniques are available for stable moderate-to-severe SCFE. In unstable moderate-to-severe SCFE, emergent reduction with decompression and internal fixation is currently the preferred method. Selection of the surgical technique rests on an appraisal of advantages versus drawbacks. The goal of this review is to discuss the various surgical methods available for SCFE in adolescents. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. Sensorless Control of a Six-Phase Induction Motors Drive Using FOC in Stator Flux Reference Frame

    OpenAIRE

    G. R. Arab Markadeh; J. Soltani; N. R. Abjadi; M. Hajian

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, a direct torque control - space vector modulation (DTC-SVM) scheme is presented for a six-phase speed and voltage sensorless induction motor (IM) drive. The decoupled torque and stator flux control is achieved based on IM stator flux field orientation. The rotor speed is detected by on-line estimating of the rotor angular slip speed and stator vector flux speed. In addition, a simple method is introduced to estimate the stator resistance. Moreover in this control...

  4. Slip-stacking Dynamics for High-Power Proton Beams at Fermilab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eldred, Jeffrey Scott [Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (United States)

    2015-12-01

    Slip-stacking is a particle accelerator configuration used to store two particle beams with different momenta in the same ring. The two beams are longitudinally focused by two radiofrequency (RF) cavities with a small frequency difference between them. Each beam is synchronized to one RF cavity and perturbed by the other RF cavity. Fermilab uses slip-stacking in the Recycler so as to double the power of the 120 GeV proton beam in the Main Injector. This dissertation investigates the dynamics of slip-stacking beams analytically, numerically and experimentally. In the analytic analysis, I find the general trajectory of stable slip-stacking particles and identify the slip-stacking parametric resonances. In the numerical analysis, I characterize the stable phase-space area and model the particle losses. In particular, I evaluate the impact of upgrading the Fermilab Booster cycle-rate from 15 Hz to 20 Hz as part of the Proton Improvement Plan II (PIP-II). The experimental analysis is used to verify my approach to simulating slip-stacking loss. I design a study for measuring losses from the longitudinal single-particle dynamics of slip-stacking as a function of RF cavity voltage and RF frequency separation. I further propose the installation of a harmonic RF cavity and study the dynamics of this novel slip-stacking configuration. I show the harmonic RF cavity cancels out parametric resonances in slip-stacking, reduces emittance growth during slip-stacking, and dramatically enhances the stable phase-space area. The harmonic cavity is expected to reduce slip-stacking losses to far exceed PIP-II requirements. These results raise the possibility of extending slip-stacking beyond the PIP-II era.

  5. A Network Inversion Filter combining GNSS and InSAR for tectonic slip modeling

    OpenAIRE

    Bekaert, D.; Segall, P; Wright, TJ; Hooper, A.

    2016-01-01

    Studies of the earthquake cycle benefit from long-term time-dependent slip modeling, as it can be a powerful means to improve our understanding on the interaction of earthquake cycle processes such as interseismic, coseismic, postseismic, and aseismic slip. Observations from Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) allow us to model slip at depth with a higher spatial resolution than when using GNSS alone. While the temporal resolution of InSAR has typically been limited, the recent f...

  6. Analysis of boundary layer flow over a porous nonlinearly stretching sheet with partial slip at

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swati Mukhopadhyay

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The boundary layer flow of a viscous incompressible fluid toward a porous nonlinearly stretching sheet is considered in this analysis. Velocity slip is considered instead of no-slip condition at the boundary. Similarity transformations are used to convert the partial differential equation corresponding to the momentum equation into nonlinear ordinary differential equation. Numerical solution of this equation is obtained by shooting method. It is found that the horizontal velocity decreases with increasing slip parameter.

  7. Nucleation and Cross-Slip of Partial Dislocations in FCC Metals

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Gang

    2009-01-01

    Nucleation of partial dislocations at a crack and cross-slip of partial dislocations under general loading in FCC metals are analyzed based on a multiscale model which incorporates atomic information into continuum-mechanics approach. In both analyses, the crack and the slip planes are modeled as surfaces of displacement discontinuities embedded in elastic media. The atomic potentials between the adjacent atomic layers along the slip planes are assumed to be the generalized stacking fault ene...

  8. [Current aspects of labor induction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surbek, D V; Hösli, I; Holzgreve, W

    2002-12-01

    Induction of labor is one of the most important means for therapeutic intervention in modern obstetrics. The aim of labor induction is to achieve a better perinatal result for mother and baby as compared to expectative management. Different methods for induction include administration of oxytocin or prostaglandins, amniotomy, and mechanical means of cervical dilatation. The success of the labor induction depends primarily on the readiness of the uterus to go into labor, and the method used for induction. If the cervical ripeness is very advanced, induction with amniotomy and oxytocin seems beneficial. However if the cervix is not yet ready, intravaginal or intracervical prostaglandins are more promising. Until recently, prostaglandins E2 are used in the first line. Now, the prostaglandin E1-analogon misoprostol is also increasingly used. As a rule, induction of labor should be performed as an inpatient procedure in order to be able to provide the surveillance for maternal and fetal safety.

  9. Slip of polymer melts over micro/nano-patterned metallic surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebrahimi, Marzieh; Konaganti, Vinod Kumar; Moradi, Sona; Doufas, Antonios K; Hatzikiriakos, Savvas G

    2016-12-06

    The slip behavior of high-density polyethylenes (HDPEs) is studied over surfaces of different topology and surface energy. Laser ablation has been used to micro/nano-pattern the surface of dies in order to examine the effect of surface roughness on slip. In addition, fluoroalkyl silane-based coatings on smooth and patterned substrates were used to understand the effect of surface energy on slip. Surface roughness and surface energy effects were incorporated into the double reptation slip model (Ebrahimi et al., J. Rheol., 2015, 59, 885-901) in order to predict the slip velocity of studied polymers on different substrates. It was found that for dies with rough surfaces, polymer melt penetrates into the cavities of the substrate (depending on the depth and the distance between the asperities), thus decreasing wall slip. On the other hand, silanization of the surface increases the slip velocity of polymers in the case of smooth die, although it has a negligible effect on rough dies. Interestingly, the slip velocity of the studied polymers on various substrates of different degrees of roughness and surface energy, were brought into a mastercurve by modifying the double reptation slip velocity model.

  10. Strength of stick-slip and creeping subduction megathrusts from heat flow observations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Xiang; Wang, Kelin

    2014-08-29

    Subduction faults, called megathrusts, can generate large and hazardous earthquakes. The mode of slip and seismicity of a megathrust is controlled by the structural complexity of the fault zone. However, the relative strength of a megathrust based on the mode of slip is far from clear. The fault strength affects surface heat flow by frictional heating during slip. We model heat-flow data for a number of subduction zones to determine the fault strength. We find that smooth megathrusts that produce great earthquakes tend to be weaker and therefore dissipate less heat than geometrically rough megathrusts that slip mainly by creeping. Copyright © 2014, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  11. Slip triggered on southern California faults by the 1992 Joshua Tree, Landers, and big bear earthquakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodin, Paul; Bilham, Roger; Behr, Jeff; Gomberg, Joan; Hudnut, Kenneth W.

    1994-01-01

    Five out of six functioning creepmeters on southern California faults recorded slip triggered at the time of some or all of the three largest events of the 1992 Landers earthquake sequence. Digital creep data indicate that dextral slip was triggered within 1 min of each mainshock and that maximum slip velocities occurred 2 to 3 min later. The duration of triggered slip events ranged from a few hours to several weeks. We note that triggered slip occurs commonly on faults that exhibit fault creep. To account for the observation that slip can be triggered repeatedly on a fault, we propose that the amplitude of triggered slip may be proportional to the depth of slip in the creep event and to the available near-surface tectonic strain that would otherwise eventually be released as fault creep. We advance the notion that seismic surface waves, perhaps amplified by sediments, generate transient local conditions that favor the release of tectonic strain to varying depths. Synthetic strain seismograms are presented that suggest increased pore pressure during periods of fault-normal contraction may be responsible for triggered slip, since maximum dextral shear strain transients correspond to times of maximum fault-normal contraction.

  12. Rainfall triggering soil slips in the southern Apuan Alps (Tuscany, Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Giannecchini

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The Apuan Alps are characterized by frequent heavy rainfall. In several cases this triggered many shallow landslides (soil slips. With the aim of contributing to the landslide hazard evaluation of the southern Apuan Alps (upper Versilian area, a detailed analysis of the main pluviometric events was carried out. Data recorded at the main raingauge of the area from 1975 to 2002 were analysed and compared with the occurrence of soil slips, in order to examine the relationship between soil slip initiation and rainfall. Some thresholds for soil slip-debris flow activity in terms of mean intensity, duration and mean annual precipitation (MAP were defined for the study area.

  13. Stagnation-Point Flow towards a Stretching Vertical Sheet with Slip Effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khairy Zaimi

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The effects of partial slip on stagnation-point flow and heat transfer due to a stretching vertical sheet is investigated. Using a similarity transformation, the governing partial differential equations are reduced into a system of nonlinear ordinary differential equations. The resulting equations are solved numerically using a shooting method. The effect of slip and buoyancy parameters on the velocity, temperature, skin friction coefficient and the local Nusselt number are graphically presented and discussed. It is found that dual solutions exist in a certain range of slip and buoyancy parameters. The skin friction coefficient decreases while the Nusselt number increases as the slip parameter increases.

  14. The phase slip factor of the electrostatic cryogenic storage ring CSR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grieser, Manfred; von Hahn, Robert; Vogel, Stephen; Wolf, Andreas

    2017-07-01

    To determine the momentum spread of an ion beam from the measured revolution frequency distribution, the knowledge of the phase slip factor of the storage ring is necessary. The slip factor was measured for various working points of the cryogenic storage ring CSR at MPI for Nuclear Physics, Heidelberg and was compared with simulations. The predicted functional relationship of the slip factor and the horizontal tune depends on the different islands of stability, which has been experimentally verified. This behavior of the slip factor is in clear contrast to that of magnetic storage rings.

  15. Effects of second-order slip on the flow of a fractional Maxwell MHD fluid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaqing Liu

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The magnetohydrodynamic (MHD flow of a generalized Maxwell fluid induced by a moving plate has been investigated, where the second-order slip between the wall and the fluid in the wall is considered. The fractional calculus approach is used to establish the constitutive relationship model of the non-Newtonian fluid model. Exact analytical solutions for the velocity field and shear stress in terms of Fox H-function are obtained by means of the Laplace transform. The solutions for the generalized Maxwell second-order slip model without magnetic field, the MHD flow of generalized Maxwell flow without slip effects or first-order slip model can be derived as the special cases. Furthermore, the influence of the order of fractional derivative, the magnetic body force, the slip coefficients and power index on the velocity and shear stress are analyzed and discussed in detail. The results show that the velocity corresponding to flows with slip condition is lower than that for flow with non-slip conditions, and the velocity with second-slip condition is lower than that with first-order slip condition.

  16. A comparison study of radiographic and computerized tomographic angles in slipped capital femoral epiphysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datti, Iberê Pereira; Massa, Bruno Sérgio Ferreira; Ejnisman, Leandro; Montenegro, Nei Botter; Guarniero, Roberto; Kojima, Kodi Edson

    2017-01-01

    To compare proximal femur radiologic angles in patients with slipped capital femoral epiphysis and to analyze whether computerized tomography may modify the treatment. Cross-sectional study comparing and analyzing the similarity between angles and radiologic classification of interest in slipped capital femoral epiphysis (SCFE). It was observed that the therapeutic management in slipped capital femoral epiphysis might be modified depending on the classification and radiologic acquisition method adopted. Multiplanar assessment of proximal femoral deformity in patients with slipped capital femoral epiphysis is a viable option, with the potential to modify the disease classification and, consequently, the therapeutic management.

  17. A comparison study of radiographic and computerized tomographic angles in slipped capital femoral epiphysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibere Pereira Datti

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: To compare proximal femur radiologic angles in patients with slipped capital femoral epiphysis and to analyze whether computerized tomography may modify the treatment. Methods: Cross-sectional study comparing and analyzing the similarity between angles and radiologic classification of interest in slipped capital femoral epiphysis (SCFE . Results: It was observed that the therapeutic management in slipped capital femoral epiphysis might be modified depending on the classification and radiologic acquisition method adopted. Conclusion: Multiplanar assessment of proximal femoral deformity in patients with slipped capital femoral epiphysis is a viable option, with the potential to modify the disease classification and, consequently, the therapeutic management.

  18. Field oriented control of induction motors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burrows, Linda M.; Zinger, Don S.; Roth, Mary Ellen

    1990-01-01

    Induction motors have always been known for their simple rugged construction, but until lately were not suitable for variable speed or servo drives due to the inherent complexity of the controls. With the advent of field oriented control (FOC), however, the induction motor has become an attractive option for these types of drive systems. An FOC system which utilizes the pulse population modulation method to synthesize the motor drive frequencies is examined. This system allows for a variable voltage to frequency ratio and enables the user to have independent control of both the speed and torque of an induction motor. A second generation of the control boards were developed and tested with the next point of focus being the minimization of the size and complexity of these controls. Many options were considered with the best approach being the use of a digital signal processor (DSP) due to its inherent ability to quickly evaluate control algorithms. The present test results of the system and the status of the optimization process using a DSP are discussed.

  19. Association between body mass index-for-age and slipped capital femoral epiphysis: the long-term risk for subsequent slip in patients followed until physeal closure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aversano, Michael W; Moazzaz, Payam; Scaduto, Anthony A; Otsuka, Norman Y

    2016-06-01

    Children who present with idiopathic slipped capital femoral epiphysis (SCFE) have an increased risk of developing bilateral disease. Predicting which patients will develop problems with bilateral hips is important for determining treatment algorithms. This is a retrospective observational study that evaluates the relationship and risk between body mass index (BMI)-for-age and unilateral and bilateral SCFE in patients followed until physeal closure. This is a retrospective study of all patients with SCFE presenting to one institution from 1998-2005. Using the Center for Disease Control (CDC) references, BMI-for-age was calculated for each patient. The patients were followed up until complete closure of the bilateral proximal femoral physes, which was considered completion of the study. Statistical analysis for significant differences between groups was performed using the Kruskal-Wallis test for equality of populations. A logistic regression, controlling for age and gender, was used to identify BMI-for-age as a risk factor and to determine the significance of the odds ratios (ORs) for the relevant categorical variables-obese, overweight and healthy weight. Eighty patients (56 male, 24 female) presented to a single institution between 1998 and 2005 with a diagnosis of SCFE. The mean age of patients was 12.2 years at initial presentation (range 8.5-16). Forty-eight patients (32 male, 16 female) presented with unilateral SCFE, with 22 of the 48 patients having a BMI for-age percentile ≥95 %. Thirty-two patients (24 male, 8 female) presented with bilateral SCFE, with 29 of the 32 patients having a BMI-for-age percentile ≥95 %. Patients with a BMI-for-age ≥95 % had a significantly increased risk of presentation with bilateral slips (OR 4.83; relative risk [RR] 3.01; p risk of developing bilateral SCFE until physeal closure with a BMI-for-age ≥95 % was significantly increased (OR 3.84; RR 2.02; p risk for bilateral SCFE at presentation as well as

  20. Low inductance gas switching.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chavez, Ray; Harjes, Henry Charles III; Wallace, Zachariah; Elizondo, Juan E.

    2007-10-01

    The laser trigger switch (LTS) is a key component in ZR-type pulsed power systems. In ZR, the pulse rise time through the LTS is > 200 ns and additional stages of pulse compression are required to achieve the desired <100 ns rise time. The inductance of the LTS ({approx}500nH) in large part determines the energy transfer time through the switch and there is much to be gained in improving system performance and reducing system costs by reducing this inductance. The current path through the cascade section of the ZR LTS is at a diameter of {approx} 6-inches which is certainly not optimal from an inductance point of view. The LTS connects components of much greater diameter (typically 4-5 feet). In this LDRD the viability of switch concepts in which the diameter of cascade section is greatly increased have been investigated. The key technical question to be answered was, will the desired multi-channel behavior be maintained in a cascade section of larger diameter. This LDRD proceeded in 2 distinct phases. The original plan for the LDRD was to develop a promising switch concept and then design, build, and test a moderate scale switch which would demonstrate the key features of the concept. In phase I, a switch concept which meet all electrical design criteria and had a calculated inductance of 150 nH was developed. A 1.5 MV test switch was designed and fabrication was initiated. The LDRD was then redirected due to budgetary concerns. The fabrication of the switch was halted and the focus of the LDRD was shifted to small scale experiments designed to answer the key technical question concerning multi-channel behavior. In phase II, the Multi-channel switch test bed (MCST) was designed and constructed. The purpose of MCST was to provide a versatile, fast turn around facility for the study the multi-channel electrical breakdown behavior of a ZR type cascade switch gap in a parameter space near that of a ZR LTS. Parameter scans on source impedance, gap tilt, gap spacing and

  1. Friction mechanisms and interfacial slip at fluid-solid interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leger, Liliane [Institut Universitaire de France, Laboratoire de Physique des Fluides Organises, UMR CNRS 7125, College de France, 11 Place Marcelin Berthelot, 75231 Paris (France)

    2003-01-15

    We present series of experiments based on near field laser velocimetry, developed to characterize the friction mechanisms at fluid-solid interfaces. For polymers, entangled polymer melts are sheared against smooth solid surfaces, covered by surface attached polymer chains of the same chemical species, having a controlled surface density. Direct measurements of the interfacial velocity and of the shear force allow identification of the molecular mechanisms of friction. Depending on the value of the inverse of the shear rate experienced by the polymer compared to the reptation time, the transition between a regime of high and a regime of low friction observed when increasing the shear rate can be related to disentanglement or to the extraction of the surface chains from the bulk polymer. Surfaces with adjusted friction properties can thus be designed by choosing chain anchored length and surface density. For simple fluids, the direct measurements of the interfacial velocity show that, contrary to the usual hypothesis of hydrodynamics, a simple fluid can exhibit slip at the wall. Both the surface roughness and the strength of the fluid-solid interactions fix the amplitude of wall slip, acting in an antagonistic way.

  2. Links between sediment consolidation and Cascadia megathrust slip behaviour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Shuoshuo; Bangs, Nathan L.; Carbotte, Suzanne M.; Saffer, Demian M.; Gibson, James C.

    2017-12-01

    At sediment-rich subduction zones, megathrust slip behaviour and forearc deformation are tightly linked to the physical properties and in situ stresses within underthrust and accreted sediments. Yet the role of sediment consolidation at the onset of subduction in controlling the downdip evolution and along-strike variation in megathrust fault properties and accretionary wedge structure is poorly known. Here we use controlled-source seismic data combined with ocean drilling data to constrain the sediment consolidation and in situ stress state near the deformation front of the Cascadia subduction zone. Offshore Washington where the megathrust is inferred to be strongly locked, we find over-consolidated sediments near the deformation front that are incorporated into a strong outer wedge, with little sediment subducted. These conditions are favourable for strain accumulation on the megathrust and potential earthquake rupture close to the trench. In contrast, offshore Central Oregon, a thick under-consolidated sediment sequence is subducting, and is probably associated with elevated pore fluid pressures on the megathrust in a region where reduced locking is inferred. Our results suggest that the consolidation state of the sediments near the deformation front is a key factor contributing to megathrust slip behaviour and its along-strike variation, and it may also have a significant role in the deformation style of the accretionary wedge.

  3. Constructing constitutive relationships for seismic and aseismic fault slip

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beeler, N.M.

    2009-01-01

    For the purpose of modeling natural fault slip, a useful result from an experimental fault mechanics study would be a physically-based constitutive relation that well characterizes all the relevant observations. This report describes an approach for constructing such equations. Where possible the construction intends to identify or, at least, attribute physical processes and contact scale physics to the observations such that the resulting relations can be extrapolated in conditions and scale between the laboratory and the Earth. The approach is developed as an alternative but is based on Ruina (1983) and is illustrated initially by constructing a couple of relations from that study. In addition, two example constitutive relationships are constructed; these describe laboratory observations not well-modeled by Ruina's equations: the unexpected shear-induced weakening of silica-rich rocks at high slip speed (Goldsby and Tullis, 2002) and fault strength in the brittle ductile transition zone (Shimamoto, 1986). The examples, provided as illustration, may also be useful for quantitative modeling.

  4. Interaction between phase-slip centers in superconducting indium microbridges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kober, F.; Clauss, W.; Huebener, R.P.

    1989-02-01

    The authors have studied the electric behavior of phase-slip centers in superconducting indium microbridges of 0.9 /mu/m thickness, 3-4/mu/m width, and 70-130 /mu/m length. Their measurements were performed in the temperature range 3-10 mK below the critical temperature T/sub c/ resulting in relatively large values (about 10-20 /mu/m) of the quasiparticle diffusion length. The temperature dependent Ginzburg-Landau coherence length /omicron/(T) has been determined for all samples from the measured temperature dependence of the critical current density. The fabrication of two notches in the indium bridge has been found to localize reliably the nucleation site of the first two phase-slip centers. Their measurements quantitatively confirmed the dc interaction predicted by the model of Kadin, Smith, and Skocpol. In addition, for temperatures very close to T/sub c/, an ac interaction has been observed which disappears abruptly for decreasing temperature. No voltage coupling has been detected.

  5. Valgus Slipped Capital Femoral Epiphysis in Patient with Hypopituitarism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshihiro Kotoura

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Slipped capital femoral epiphysis (SCFE is a common disease of adolescent and the epiphysis is positioned more posteromedially in relation to the femoral neck shaft with varus SCFE; however, posterolateral displacement of the capital epiphysis, valgus SCFE, occurs less frequently. We report a case of valgus SCFE in a 17-year-old boy with hypopituitarism. After falling down, he experienced difficulty in walking. The radiographs were inconclusive; however three-dimensional computed tomography images showed lateral displacement of the epiphysis on the right femoral head. Valgus SCFE was diagnosed. The patient underwent in situ pinning of both sides. In situ pinning on the left side was performed as a prophylactic pinning because of endocrine abnormalities. At the 1-year follow-up, he could walk without any difficulty and there were no signs of pain. The epiphysis is commonly positioned more posteromedially in relation to the femoral neck shaft with most SCFE, but, in this case, the epiphysis slipped laterally. Differential diagnosis included femoral neck fracture (Delbet-Colonna type 1; however, this was less likely due to the absence of other clinical signs. Therefore, we diagnosed the patient as SCFE. When children complain of leg pain and limp, valgus SCFE that may not be visualized on anteroposterior radiographs needs to be considered.

  6. Recent geodynamics of major strike-slip zones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir G. Trifonov

    2015-09-01

    In all of the cases mentioned above, strike-slip deformation was expressed only or mainly during strong earthquakes. At other times, the rate of its accumulation was small and the dominant stress conditions led to transverse shortening, rarely resulting in local lengthening of the tectonic zone. These variations are caused by the tectonic peculiarities of these zones. The sinistral component of the deformation is related to the shift of the Arabian Plate relative to the African one, but also the transverse component is related to the continental slope and is expressed by the Coastal range shortening that exists in the El Ghab segment zone. There is not only a dextral deformation component, but also a transverse component, expressed by shortening of the Fergana and Talas ranges existing in the Talas-Fergana fault zone. In both zones, the shortening component became appreciable or dominant when the strike-slip deformation rate decreased. Similar, but more local, relationships were expressed in the epicentral area of the 2003 Altai earthquake and in the Western Palmyrides.

  7. An Analytical Tire Model with Flexible Carcass for Combined Slips

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nan Xu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The tire mechanical characteristics under combined cornering and braking/driving situations have significant effects on vehicle directional controls. The objective of this paper is to present an analytical tire model with flexible carcass for combined slip situations, which can describe tire behavior well and can also be used for studying vehicle dynamics. The tire forces and moments come mainly from the shear stress and sliding friction at the tread-road interface. In order to describe complicated tire characteristics and tire-road friction, some key factors are considered in this model: arbitrary pressure distribution; translational, bending, and twisting compliance of the carcass; dynamic friction coefficient; anisotropic stiffness properties. The analytical tire model can describe tire forces and moments accurately under combined slip conditions. Some important properties induced by flexible carcass can also be reflected. The structural parameters of a tire can be identified from tire measurements and the computational results using the analytical model show good agreement with test data.

  8. Surgical treatment of femoroacetabular impingement following slipped capital femoral epiphysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oduwole, K. O.; de SA, D.; Kay, J.; Findakli, F.; Duong, A.; Simunovic, N.; Yen, Y-M.

    2017-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of this study was to evaluate the existing literature from 2005 to 2016 reporting on the efficacy of surgical management of patients with femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) secondary to slipped capital femoral epiphysis (SCFE). Methods The electronic databases MEDLINE, EMBASE, and PubMed were searched and screened in duplicate. Data such as patient demographics, surgical technique, surgical outcomes and complications were retrieved from eligible studies. Results Fifteen eligible level IV studies were included in this review comprising 261 patients (266 hips). Treatment groups included arthroscopic osteochondroplasty, surgical hip dislocation, and traditional open osteotomy. The mean alpha angle corrections were 32.14° (standard deviation (sd) 7.02°), 41.45° (sd 10.5°) and 6.0° (sd 5.21°), for arthroscopy, surgical hip dislocation, and open osteotomy groups, respectively (p slipped capital femoral epiphysis: A systematic review. Bone Joint Res 2017;6:472–480. DOI: 10.1302/2046-3758.68.BJR-2017-0018.R1. PMID:28790036

  9. Preparation of Porcelanite Ceramic Filter by Slip Casting Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majid Muhi Shukur

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This work is conducted to study producing solid block porcelanite filter from Iraqi porcelanite rocks and kaolin clay (as binder material by slip casting technique, and investigating its ability of removing contaminant (Pentachlorophenol from water via the adsorption mechanism. Four particle sizes (74, 88, 105 and 125 µm of porcelanite powder were used. Each batch of particle size was mixed with (30 wt. % kaolin as a binding material to improve the mechanical properties. After that, the mixtures were formed by slip casting to disk and cylindrical filter samples, and then fired at 500 and 700 °C to specify the effects of particle size of porcelanite, temperature and formation technique on porcelanite filter properties. Some physical, mechanical and chemical tests have been done on filter samples. Multi-experiments were carried out to evaluate the ability of porcelanite to form the filter. Porosity, permeability and maximum pore diameter were increased with increasing porcelanite particle size and decreased by increasing temperature, whereas the density shows the reverse behavior. In addition, bending, compressive and tensile strength of samples were increased by increasing temperature, and decreased with increasing porcelanite particle size. Efficiency of disk filter sample to remove pentachlorophenol was 95.41% at a temperature of 700°C using 74 µm particle size of porcelanite. While the efficiency of cylindrical filter sample was 97.57% at the same conditions.

  10. Influence of inductance variation on performance of a permanent magnet claw pole soft magnetic composite motor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Youguang; Zhu, Jian Guo; Lin, Zhi Wei; Lu, Haiyan; Wang, Xiaolin; Chen, Jiaxin

    2008-04-01

    Winding inductance is an important parameter in determining the performance of electrical machines, particularly those with large inductance variation. This paper investigates the influence of winding inductance variation on the performance of a three-phase three-stack claw pole permanent magnet motor with soft magnetic composite (SMC) stator by using an improved phase variable model. The winding inductances of the machine are computed by using a modified incremental energy method, based on three-dimensional nonlinear time-stepping magnetic field finite element analyses. The inductance computation and performance simulation are verified by the experimental results of an SMC claw pole motor prototype.

  11. Testing Pixel Translation Digital Elevation Models to Reconstruct Slip Histories: An Example from the Agua Blanca Fault, Baja California, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, J.; Wetmore, P. H.; Malservisi, R.; Ferwerda, B. P.; Teran, O.

    2012-12-01

    approximately equal to that to the east. The ABF has varying kinematics along strike due to changes in trend of the fault with respect to the nearly east-trending displacement vector of the Ensenada Block to the north of the fault relative to a stable Baja Microplate to the south. These kinematics include nearly pure strike slip in the central portion of the ABF where the fault trends nearly E-W, and minor components of normal dip-slip motion on the NABF and eastern sections of the fault where the trends become more northerly. A pixel translation vector parallel to the trend of the ABF in the central segment (290 deg, 10.5 km) produces kinematics consistent with those described above. The block between the NABF and STF has a pixel translation vector parallel the STF (291 deg, 3.5 km). We find these vectors are consistent with the kinematic variability of the fault system and realign several major drainages and ridges across the fault. This suggests these features formed prior to faulting, and they yield preferred values of offset: 10.5 km on the ABF, 7 km on the NABF and 3.5 km on the STF. This model is consistent with the kinematic model proposed by Hamilton (1971) in which the ABF is a transform fault, linking extensional regions of Valle San Felipe and the Continental Borderlands.

  12. Doppler velocimetry and adverse outcome in labor induction for late IUGR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simeone, Serena; Marchi, Laura; Canarutto, Rita; Pina Rambaldi, Marianna; Serena, Caterina; Servienti, Cristina; Mecacci, Federico

    2017-02-01

    Late onset intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) represents one of the main causes of perinatal morbidity/mortality. No guidelines are available on labor induction in IUGRs, even if delivery at 37/38 weeks is suggested. This study aims to assess maternal-fetal variables related to adverse outcome in labor induction for late IUGR. One hundred cases of induction for late IUGR were retrospectively revised on fetal weight, MCA, UA, CPR and uterine artery (utA) Doppler, oligohydramnios, Bishop score, start of induction, augmentation. The variables were matched with the following adverse outcomes: CS or vacuum extractor delivery (IVD); NICU admission; low Apgar score; UA pH IUGRs.

  13. Large-scale dynamic triggering of shallow slow slip enhanced by overlying sedimentary wedge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Laura M.; Kaneko, Yoshihiro; Hreinsdóttir, Sigrún; Hamling, Ian; Peng, Zhigang; Bartlow, Noel; D'Anastasio, Elisabetta; Fry, Bill

    2017-10-01

    Slow slip events have become recognized in the last decade as an important mode of fault slip, and are most widely observed at subduction zones. Many episodes of tectonic tremor (related to slow slip) have been triggered by distant earthquakes due to dynamic-stress changes from passing seismic waves. However, there are few clear examples of large, geodetically detected slow slip events triggered by distant earthquakes. Here we use analyses of seismic and geodetic data to show that the magnitude 7.8 Kaikōura earthquake in New Zealand in 2016 triggered a large slow slip event between 250 and 600 km away. The slow slip was shallow, at less than 15 km deep, and spanned more than 15,000 km2 of the central and northern Hikurangi subduction margin. The slow slip initiated immediately after the earthquake, lasted one to two weeks and was accompanied by a swarm of seismicity. We show that changes in dynamic stress in the slow slip source area ranged from 100 to 600 kPa--approximately 1,000 times greater than the static-stress changes of 0.2 to 0.7 kPa. We therefore propose that the slow slip event was triggered by dynamic-stress changes caused by passing seismic waves. Furthermore, the dynamic-stress changes were greatest on the shallow subduction interface, at less than 10 km depth, in a region overlain by a sedimentary wedge that acts as a waveguide, trapping seismic energy and probably promoting triggering of slip. This suggests that shallow slow slip events are more easily triggered by dynamic-stress changes compared with deep events.

  14. Efficiency optimized control of medium-size induction motor drives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abrahamsen, F.; Blaabjerg, Frede; Pedersen, John Kim

    2000-01-01

    The efficiency of a variable speed induction motor drive can be optimized by adaption of the motor flux level to the load torque. In small drives (<10 kW) this can be done without considering the relatively small converter losses, but for medium-size drives (10-1000 kW) the losses can not be disr......The efficiency of a variable speed induction motor drive can be optimized by adaption of the motor flux level to the load torque. In small drives (

  15. Seismicity and tectonic tremor accompany the 2014 Gisborne Slow Slip Event: Insights from the Hikurangi Ocean Bottom Investigation of Tremor and Slow Slip (HOBITSS) Experiment, New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todd, E. K.; Schwartz, S. Y.; Sheehan, A. F.; Mochizuki, K.

    2016-12-01

    The northern Hikurangi Margin is host to some of the shallowest slow slip events (SSEs) in the world. Slow slip offshore Gisborne, New Zealand has been observed at depths as shallow as 2 km and may extend all the way to the trench. Gisborne SSEs are accompanied by tectonic tremor and increased levels of seismicity, but this activity has only been observed at the onshore, downdip edge of the slow slip patch. Between May 2014 and June 2015, 24 absolute pressure gauges, 10 broadband seismometers, and 5 short period seismometers were deployed offshore Gisborne along the east coast of the North Island of New Zealand as part of the HOBITSS Experiment. These instruments were in place during a large Gisborne SSE (peak slip 20 cm) in September and October 2014. Using this new ocean-derived dataset in conjunction with existing land data from the New Zealand National Seismograph Network operated by GeoNet (http://geonet.org.nz), we present an in-depth, systematic investigation of tremor and microseismicity associated with this shallow Gisborne SSE to further examine the spatial heterogeneity of slip processes on the shallow megathrust. Tremor and earthquakes are collocated with the geodetically inverted slow slip patch with tremor occurring offshore and earthquakes concentrated downdip of a shallowly subducted seamount near the region of peak displacement during the SSE. This discovery indicates that the region of the megathrust slipping in these SSEs is capable of multiple types of slip and understanding the spatiotemporal relationships between these strain release modes has implications for local seismic hazards.

  16. Characteristics and habitat of deep vs. shallow slow slip events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, L. M.; Saffer, D. M.

    2016-12-01

    It is well-known that slow slip events (SSEs) occur over a large depths range at subduction zones, from near the trench to 40-50 km depth. We review the characteristics and in situ conditions of shallow vs. deep SSEs, including duration, magnitude, seismic signatures, and inferences about the rock properties and stress state in their source regions. Deep SSEs (>15 km depth) exhibit a range of durations (days to years), while shallow SSEs (Mexico, Cascadia), although shallow SSEs offshore Costa Rica and Nankai have also been linked to tremor and/or very low frequency earthquakes. Shallow SSEs in central Japan (Boso), Hikurangi, and Ecuador are associated with bursts of microseismicity. Deep SSEs occur at the inferred down-dip limit of the locked seismogenic zone, whereas many shallow SSEs occur at mostly creeping plate boundaries (Hikurangi, Ecuador), or updip of the seismogenic zone (Nankai, Costa Rica). Despite the differences, there are many similarities between deep and shallow SSEs, suggesting that common physical mechanisms may be responsible for slow slip in these vastly different environments. Deep and shallow SSEs span a range of temperature and pressure conditions, implying that the physical conditions hosting SSEs are broad. Seismic imaging of shallow and deep SSE regions indicate likely fluid overpressure, supporting the idea that low effective normal stress may be a common factor promoting SSE behavior. High fluid pressure in shallow SSE zones is largely from disequilibrium compaction of low permeability marine sediments, while fluids in deep SSE regions are likely sourced from metamorphic dehydration reactions. That all shallow SSEs observed thus far are shorter in duration than many deep SSEs may be due to a number of factors, including higher effective stress on the plate boundary in deep vs. shallow regions, and differing degrees of subduction interface heterogeneity. Tremor vs. microseismicity may be related to the scale and distribution of

  17. Smectite reactions and slip instabilities in subduction zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadenne, Leslie; Raimbourg, Hugues; Champallier, Remi; Yamamoto, Yuzuru

    2015-04-01

    Though it is of prime importance in terms of seismic and tsunami risk, the mechanical behavior of the shallow (ztransformation of a soft sediment into a hard sedimentary rock, which modifies the rock potential to localize deformation and be involved in slip instabilities. While it is the major control on diagenetic reactions, the effect of temperature on the mechanical behavior is not well constrained experimentally. To address this question, we have designed triaxial deformation experiments in the Paterson rig either at ambient temperature or at 300 °C. The tested material includes siltstones from the Boso Peninsula in Japan (corresponding to the shallow domain of a paleo-accretionary prism), either as cylindrical cores or as ground powders as well as powders composed principally of smectite. For this material, the main consequence of the high temperature conditions is to trigger the smectite-to-illite reaction or the smectite interlayer space collapse. The first result is that at 300 °C, all tested samples show slip instabilities. These instabilities are apparent as a sudden (~ 4s) and large (~10 to 45 MPa depending on the starting material and the confining pressure) stress drop in the macroscopic stress-strain curve, in some cases followed by a rapid restrengthening of the material. In contrast, no instability was observed for the experiments at ambient temperature. As slip instabilities are activated by the temperature and occur as well in smectite powders, we attribute these instabilities to the diagenetic reactions of smectite. An additional experiment on a powder of smectite where the smectite-to-illite reaction has been inhibited by cationic exchanges does not show instabilities upon deformation at 300 °C. We propose therefore that catastrophic dehydration of smectite associated with the smectite-to-illite reaction may be responsible for triggering the instabilities. This catastrophic dehydration is potentially a major control on the genesis of

  18. RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN ROLLING AND SLIP RESISTANCE IN ROLLING BEARINGS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. M. Bondarenko

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. About one of the causes of slip rolling is known from the second half of the 19th century, it was believed that the slip resistance appears at the place of contact due to different speeds on the arc of contact. Only in the mid-20th century it was proved that this resistance is negligible in rolling resistance. However (for some unknown reason it is ignored the fact that in practice in rolling bearings may rotate both the inner ring with a stationary outer one, and vice versa almost in equal relations. It is not taken into account the fact that the ball or roller in the rolling bearings runs the different distance along the roller path of the outer and inner bearing cages in one revolution. This fact is not taken into account in determining the calculated values for the friction coefficient of a rolling bearing reduced to the shaft. Therefore, the aim of this work is to determine the influence of path length on the track riding the outer and inner race of the bearing on the determination of the calculated value of the coefficient of friction of rolling bearings is given to the shaft. Methodology. The solution technique is based on the theory of plane motion of a rigid body, the theory of Hertzian contact deformation and the analytical dependencies for determination of coefficient of rolling friction. Findings. The obtained dependences on determination of rolling resistance of the balls or rollers along the bearing tracks of inner and outer bearing cages as well as path difference metering of the rolling on them allows to analytically obtain the rolling resistance and slipping for any size of bearings and different devices of bearing units. It is also possible at the design stage of rolling nodes to handle not only the design but also the content of the node. Originality. Using the analytical dependences for determination of the rolling resistance of bodies at point and line contacts, and also account for the difference in the path of the

  19. Vector control of induction machines

    CERN Document Server

    Robyns, Benoit

    2012-01-01

    After a brief introduction to the main law of physics and fundamental concepts inherent in electromechanical conversion, ""Vector Control of Induction Machines"" introduces the standard mathematical models for induction machines - whichever rotor technology is used - as well as several squirrel-cage induction machine vector-control strategies. The use of causal ordering graphs allows systematization of the design stage, as well as standardization of the structure of control devices. ""Vector Control of Induction Machines"" suggests a unique approach aimed at reducing parameter sensitivity for

  20. Technological inductive power transfer systems

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Nikolay D. Madzharov; Valentin S. Nemkov

    2017-01-01

    Inductive power transfer is a very fast expanding technology with multiple design principles and practical implementations ranging from charging phones and computers to bionic systems, car chargers...

  1. A prospective study of floor surface, shoes, floor cleaning and slipping in US limited-service restaurant workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Santosh K; Chang, Wen Ruey; Courtney, Theodore K; Lombardi, David A; Huang, Yueng-Hsiang; Brennan, Melanye J; Mittleman, Murray A; Ware, James H; Perry, Melissa J

    2011-04-01

    Slips and falls are a leading cause of injury at work. Few studies, however, have systematically examined risk factors of slipping outside the laboratory environment. This study examined the association between floor surface characteristics, slip-resistant shoes, floor cleaning frequency and the risk of slipping in limited-service restaurant workers. 475 workers from 36 limited-service restaurants from three major chains in six states in the USA were recruited to participate in a prospective cohort study of workplace slipping. Kitchen floor surface roughness and coefficient of friction (COF) were measured in eight working areas and then averaged within each restaurant. The use of slip-resistant shoes was determined by examining the participant's shoes and noting the presence of a 'slip-resistant' marking on the sole. Restaurant managers reported the frequency of daily kitchen floor cleaning. Participants reported their slip experience and work hours weekly for up to 12 weeks. The survey materials were made available in three languages: English, Spanish and Portuguese. The associations between rate of slipping and risk factors were assessed using a multivariable negative binomial generalised estimating equation model. The mean of individual slipping rate varied among the restaurants from 0.02 to 2.49 slips per 40 work hours. After adjusting for age, gender, BMI, education, primary language, job tenure and restaurant chain, the use of slip-resistant shoes was associated with a 54% reduction in the reported rate of slipping (95% CI 37% to 64%), and the rate of slipping decreased by 21% (95% CI 5% to 34%) for each 0.1 increase in the mean kitchen COF. Increasing floor cleaning frequency was significantly associated with a decreasing rate of slipping when considered in isolation but not after statistical adjustment for other factors. These results provide support for the use of slip-resistant shoes and measures to increase COF as preventive interventions to reduce slips

  2. Slip distribution of the 2015 Lefkada earthquake and its implications for fault segmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bie, Lidong; González, Pablo J.; Rietbrock, Andreas

    2017-07-01

    It is widely accepted that fault segmentation limits earthquake rupture propagations and therefore earthquake size. While along-strike segmentation of continental strike-slip faults is well observed, direct evidence for segmentation of off-shore strike-slip faults is rare. A comparison of rupture behaviours in multiple earthquakes might help reveal the characteristics of fault segmentation. In this work, we study the 2015 Lefkada earthquake, which ruptured a major active strike slip fault offshore Lefkada Island, Greece. We report ground deformation mainly on the Lefkada Island measured by interferometric synthetic radar (InSAR), and infer a coseismic distributed slip model. To investigate how the fault location affects the inferred displacement based on our InSAR observations, we conduct a suite of inversions by taking various fault location from different studies as a prior. The result of these test inversions suggests that the Lefkada fault trace is located just offshore Lefkada Island. Our preferred model shows that the 2015 earthquake main slip patches are confined to shallow depth (Lefkada fault, we suggest that the 2015 earthquake closed the seismic gap, at least partially, left by the 2003 earthquake by rupturing the shallow part of the Lefkada fault. The spatial variation in slip distributions for the two earthquakes reveals segmentation along strike, and possibly downdip of the Lefkada fault. A comparison of aftershock locations and coseismic slip distribution shows that most aftershocks appear near the edge of main coseismic slip patches.

  3. Influence of spring stiffness and anisotropy on stick-slip atomic force microscopy imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kerssemakers, J.W J; de Hosson, J.T.M.

    1996-01-01

    This paper presents a detailed analysis of high-load friction atomic force microscopy (AFM) images of layered structures in terms of a discrete stick-slip model. It turned out that based on a geometric approach, the characteristics of slip behavior can be linked to the cantilever/sample spring

  4. Development and validation of the Specific Loss of Interest and Pleasure Scale (SLIPS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winer, E Samuel; Veilleux, Jennifer C; Ginger, Emily J

    2014-01-01

    Anhedonia, or loss of pleasure and/or interest in people or things, is a key component of many forms of psychopathology. Extant anhedonia measures only assess current state or longstanding trait anhedonia, which risks discounting recent changes. Thus, we created the Specific Loss of Interest and Pleasure Scale (SLIPS), to assess recent changes in anhedonia. Four studies assessed the reliability and validity of the SLIPS through factor and internal consistency analyses, convergent and divergent validity analyses, and incremental validity analyses in individuals reporting non-clinical and clinical levels of psychopathology. The SLIPS was internally consistent, converged with existing state measures of anhedonia and depression, and diverged from general measures of affect and trait anticipatory and consummatory pleasure. Furthermore, the SLIPS predicted recent changes in anhedonia independent of existing measures. Moreover, in respondents reporting moderate or severe symptoms of depression, only the SLIPS was associated with recent changes in anhedonia. Prospective limitations included a resulting one factor solution and the potential that the method of scaling influenced results. However, these limitations were offset by empirical verification and the unique strength of the scaling of the SLIPS. The SLIPS is the first validated measure that allows for the assessment of recent changes in anhedonia in non-clinical and clinical samples. Results suggest that the SLIPS offers unique clinical utility by discriminating changes in anhedonia within at-risk and clinically depressed groups. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Dislocation content of geometrically necessary boundaries aligned with slip planes in rolled aluminium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hong, Chuanshi; Huang, Xiaoxu; Winther, Grethe

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies have revealed that dislocation structures in metals with medium-to-high stacking fault energy, depend on the grain orientation and therefore on the slip systems. In the present work, the dislocations in eight slip-plane-aligned geometrically necessary boundaries (GNBs) in three g...

  6. Study of the pore structure of ceramics prepared by the slip casting method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzman, I. Y.; Dobysh, A. V.

    1984-01-01

    The porosity of the slip cast Si3N4 is similar to that of pressed Si3N4 formed at 2500 kg/sq cm. The porosity of cast Si oxynitride is equivalent to that of samples stressed at 10,000 kg/sq cm. Crucibles formed from these materials by slip casting have high thermal shock and corrosion resistance.

  7. State variable participation in the limit cycle of induction motor

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2National Institute of Technical Teachers' Training and Research, Kolkata 700 106, India ... and chaos has become a subject of active research in Electrical. Engineering due to the presence of nonlinearity in most of the systems. The qualitative. Pramana – J. Phys., Vol. 84, No. ... This information is very useful for designing.

  8. Comprehensive Teacher Induction: Linking Teacher Induction to Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keilwitz, Heather A.

    2014-01-01

    Teacher retention is a wide concern in education and in response school districts throughout the United States are developing more comprehensive teacher induction programs. Components of teacher induction programs that have assisted with successful teacher development include release time for teacher observation, assignment of a knowledgeable…

  9. Pre-Induction and Intrapartum Correlates of Successful Induction Of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Context: Induction of labour (IOL) is a therapeutic challenge and an alternative to Caesarean section. Objectives: To evaluate the success rate of IOL and its determinants at the Ebonyi State University Teaching Hospital (EBSUTH), Abakaliki. Methods: A retrospective study involving 251 parturients who had induction of ...

  10. Induction heating using induction coils in series-parallel circuits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsen, Marc Rollo; Geren, William Preston; Miller, Robert James; Negley, Mark Alan; Dykstra, William Chet

    2017-11-14

    A part is inductively heated by multiple, self-regulating induction coil circuits having susceptors, coupled together in parallel and in series with an AC power supply. Each of the circuits includes a tuning capacitor that tunes the circuit to resonate at the frequency of AC power supply.

  11. Faulted terrace risers place new constraints on the late Quaternary slip rate for the central Altyn Tagh fault, northwest Tibet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gold, R.D.; Cowgill, E.; Arrowsmith, J.R.; Chen, X.; Sharp, W.D.; Cooper, K.M.; Wang, X.-F.

    2011-01-01

    The active, left-lateral Altyn Tagh fault defines the northwestern margin of the Tibetan Plateau in western China. To clarify late Quaternary temporal and spatial variations in slip rate along the central portion of this fault system (85??-90??E), we have more than doubled the number of dated offset markers along the central Altyn Tagh fault. In particular, we determined offset-age relations for seven left-laterally faulted terrace risers at three sites (Kelutelage, Yukuang, and Keke Qiapu) spanning a 140-km-long fault reach by integrating surficial geologic mapping, topographic surveys (total station and tripod-light detection and ranging [T-LiDAR]), and geochronology (radiocarbon dating of organic samples, 230Th/U dating of pedogenic carbonate coatings on buried clasts, and terrestrial cosmogenic radionuclide exposure age dating applied to quartz-rich gravels). At Kelutelage, which is the westernmost site (37.72??N, 86.67??E), two faulted terrace risers are offset 58 ?? 3 m and 48 ?? 4 m, and formed at 6.2-6.1 ka and 5.9-3.7 ka, respectively. At the Yukuang site (38.00??N, 87.87??E), four faulted terrace risers are offset 92 ?? 12 m, 68 ?? 6 m, 55 ?? 13 m, and 59 ?? 9 m and formed at 24.2-9.5 ka, 6.4-5.0 ka, 5.1-3.9 ka, and 24.2-6.4 ka, respectively. At the easternmost site, Keke Qiapu (38.08??N, 88.12??E), a faulted terrace riser is offset 33 ?? 6 m and has an age of 17.1-2.2 ka. The displacement-age relationships derived from these markers can be satisfied by an approximately uniform slip rate of 8-12 mm/yr. However, additional analysis is required to test how much temporal variability in slip rate is permitted by this data set. ?? 2011 Geological Society of America.

  12. Collective Quantum Phase-Slip Dynamics in Superconducting Nanowire Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skacel, Sebastian T.; Voss, Jan N.; Bier, Tobias; Radke, Lucas; Weides, Martin; Rotzinger, Hannes; Mooij, Hans E.; Ustinov, Alexey V.

    2014-03-01

    Superconducting nanowire arrays exhibit quantum phase-slip (QPS) phenomenon if the superconductor has a very high normal-state sheet resistance. We experimentally study QPS effects in arrays of nanowires embedded in a resonant circuit at GHz frequencies. We probe this circuit at ultra-low microwave power, applied flux and mK temperatures. The nanowires are fabricated utilizing aluminium grown in a precisely-controlled oxygen atmosphere. In this way, we aim to control the QPS rate for a given wire width. The wires are defined with conventional electron beam lithography down to a width of 20 nm. We will present the fabrication of the nanowire arrays and first microwave measurements at mK temperatures. Center for Functional Nanostructures, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, D-76128 Karlsruhe, Germany.

  13. Self-heating of phase-slip centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuivinga, M.; Klapwijk, T. M.; Mooij, J. E.; Bezuijen, A.

    1983-12-01

    A model is constructed to describe the current-voltage characteristics of phase-slip centers, taking into account the heat generated by the nonequilibrium quasiparticle current and the oscillating supercurrent. If the temperature rise is sufficient to reach T c ,the description can be continued with the model of a normal hot spot between superconducting regions. Additional Joule heat is generated inside the superconductor due to the charge imbalance at the normal-superconducting boundaries. Analytical results in the limit of small heating are presented. A numerical solution generates current-voltage characteristics observed experimentally. The results obtained with the model differ in a qualitative and in a quantitative way from those found previously by Skocpol, Beasley, and Tinkham. A comparison with experimental results on tin and aluminum microstrips is made.

  14. Self-heating of phase-slip centers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stuivinga, M.; Klapwijk, T.M.; Mooij, J.E.; Bezuijen, A.

    1983-12-01

    A model is constructed to describe the current-voltage characteristics of phase-slip centers, taking into account the heat generated by the nonequilibrium quasiparticle current and the oscillating supercurrent. If the temperature rise is sufficient to reach T/sub c/, the description can be continued with the model of a normal hot spot between superconducting regions. Additional Joule heat is generated inside the supercconductor due to the charge imbalance at the normal-superconducting boundaries. Analytical results in the limit of small heating are presented. A numerical solution generates current-voltage characteristics observed experimentally. The results obtained with the model differ in a qualitative and in a quantitative way from those found previously by Skocpol, Beasley, and Tinkham. A comparison with experimental results on tin and aluminum microstrips is made.

  15. Entropy Content During Nanometric Stick-Slip Motion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Creeger

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available To explore the existence of self-organization during friction, this paper considers the motion of all atoms in a systems consisting of an Atomic Force Microscope metal tip sliding on a metal slab. The tip and the slab are set in relative motion with constant velocity. The vibrations of individual atoms with respect to that relative motion are obtained explicitly using Molecular Dynamics with Embedded Atom Method potentials. First, we obtain signatures of Self Organized Criticality in that the stick-slip jump force probability densities are power laws with exponents in the range (0.5, 1.5 for aluminum and copper. Second, we characterize the dynamical attractor by the entropy content of the overall atomic jittering. We find that in all cases, friction minimizes the entropy and thus makes a strong case for self-organization.

  16. A Thermal Technique of Fault Nucleation, Growth, and Slip

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garagash, D.; Germanovich, L. N.; Murdoch, L. C.; Martel, S. J.; Reches, Z.; Elsworth, D.; Onstott, T. C.

    2009-12-01

    -Coulomb strength criterion with standard Byerlee parameters, a fault will initiate before the net tension occurs. After a new fault is created, hot fluid can be injected into the boreholes to increase the temperature and reverse the direction of fault slip. This process can be repeated to study the formation of gouge, and how the properties of gouge control fault slip and associated seismicity. Instrumenting the site with arrays of geophones, tiltmeters, strain gauges, and displacement transducers as well as back mining - an opportunity provided by the DUSEL project - can reveal details of the fault geometry and gouge. We also expect to find small faults (with cm-scale displacement) during construction of DUSEL drifts. The same thermal technique can be used to induce slip on one of them and compare the “man-made” and natural gouges. The thermal technique appears to be a relatively simple way to rapidly change the stress field and either create slip on existing fractures or create new faults at scales up to 10 m or more.

  17. Magma storage in a strike-slip caldera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxby, J; Gottsmann, J; Cashman, K; Gutiérrez, E

    2016-07-22

    Silicic calderas form during explosive volcanic eruptions when magma withdrawal triggers collapse along bounding faults. The nature of specific interactions between magmatism and tectonism in caldera-forming systems is, however, unclear. Regional stress patterns may control the location and geometry of magma reservoirs, which in turn may control the spatial and temporal development of faults. Here we provide new insight into strike-slip volcano-tectonic relations by analysing Bouguer gravity data from Ilopango caldera, El Salvador, which has a long history of catastrophic explosive eruptions. The observed low gravity beneath the caldera is aligned along the principal horizontal stress orientations of the El Salvador Fault Zone. Data inversion shows that the causative low-density structure extends to ca. 6 km depth, which we interpret as a shallow plumbing system comprising a fractured hydrothermal reservoir overlying a magmatic reservoir with vol% exsolved vapour. Fault-controlled localization of magma constrains potential vent locations for future eruptions.

  18. Quantum phase slips and voltage fluctuations in superconducting nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Semenov, Andrew G. [I.E. Tamm Department of Theoretical Physics, P.N. Lebedev Physics Institute, Moscow (Russian Federation); National Research University Higher School of Economics, Moscow (Russian Federation); Zaikin, Andrei D. [I.E. Tamm Department of Theoretical Physics, P.N. Lebedev Physics Institute, Moscow (Russian Federation); Institute of Nanotechnology, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2017-06-15

    We argue that quantum phase slips (QPS) may generate non-equilibrium voltage fluctuations in superconducting nanowires. In the low frequency limit we evaluate all cumulants of the voltage operator which obey Poisson statistics and show a power law dependence on the external bias. We specifically address quantum shot noise which power spectrum S{sub Ω} may depend non-monotonously on temperature. In the long wire limit S{sub Ω} decreases with increasing frequency Ω and vanishes beyond a threshold value of Ω at T → 0. Our predictions can be directly tested in future experiments with superconducting nanowires. (copyright 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  19. Microarray analysis of slipped capital femoral epiphysis growth plates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Jeffrey S; Weiner, Dennis S; Jacquet, Robin; Adamczyk, Mark J; Morscher, Melanie A; Landis, William J

    2016-08-01

    Microarray technology has been used to analyze gene expression in patients with and without slipped capital femoral epiphysis (SCFE). Proximal femoral physis core biopsies from two patients with SCFE were compared with two control specimens from age-matched patients without SCFE. Extracted RNA from frozen ground samples was subjected to microarray analysis with data tests for statistical significance between SCFE and control tissues. Compared to controls, SCFE samples demonstrated significant up-regulation in gene expression pathways involving physiological defense and inflammatory responses and significant down-regulation in the regulation of cellular physiologic processes, cellular metabolic pathways, and skeletal development pathways including expression of aggrecan and type II collagen, genes affecting physeal structure and integrity. Up-regulation of inflammatory and immune response pathways in SCFE compared to controls relates to physeal mechanical displacement in SCFE. Globalized down-regulation of several other pathways suggests growth plate weakening. These novel microarray findings further define SCFE etiology.

  20. Slip-pulse rupture behavior on a 2 m granite fault

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaskey, Gregory C.; Kilgore, Brian D.; Beeler, Nicholas M.

    2015-09-01

    We describe observations of dynamic rupture events that spontaneously arise on meter-scale laboratory earthquake experiments. While low-frequency slip of the granite sample occurs in a relatively uniform and crack-like manner, instruments capable of detecting high-frequency motions show that some parts of the fault slip abruptly (velocity > 100 mm s-1, acceleration > 20 km s-2) while the majority of the fault slips more slowly. Abruptly slipping regions propagate along the fault at nearly the shear wave speed. We propose that the dramatic reduction in frictional strength implied by this pulse-like rupture behavior has a common mechanism to the weakening reported in high-velocity friction experiments performed on rotary machines. The slip pulses can also be identified as migrating sources of high-frequency seismic waves. As observations from large earthquakes show similar propagating high-frequency sources, the pulses described here may have relevance to the mechanics of larger earthquakes.

  1. Slip-pulse rupture behavior on a 2 meter granite fault

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaskey, Gregory C.; Kilgore, Brian D.; Beeler, Nicholas M.

    2015-01-01

    We describe observations of dynamic rupture events that spontaneously arise on meter-scale laboratory earthquake experiments. While low-frequency slip of the granite sample occurs in a relatively uniform and crack-like manner, instruments capable of detecting high frequency motions show that some parts of the fault slip abruptly (velocity >100 mm∙s-1, acceleration >20 km∙s-2) while the majority of the fault slips more slowly. Abruptly slipping regions propagate along the fault at nearly the shear wave speed. We propose that the dramatic reduction in frictional strength implied by this pulse-like rupture behavior has a common mechanism to the weakening reported in high velocity friction experiments performed on rotary machines. The slip pulses can also be identified as migrating sources of high frequency seismic waves. As observations from large earthquakes show similar propagating high frequency sources, the pulses described here may have relevance to the mechanics of larger earthquakes.

  2. Stick-slip instabilities in sheared granular flow: The role of friction and acoustic vibrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieou, Charles K C; Elbanna, Ahmed E; Langer, J S; Carlson, J M

    2015-08-01

    We propose a theory of shear flow in dense granular materials. A key ingredient of the theory is an effective temperature that determines how the material responds to external driving forces such as shear stresses and vibrations. We show that, within our model, friction between grains produces stick-slip behavior at intermediate shear rates, even if the material is rate strengthening at larger rates. In addition, externally generated acoustic vibrations alter the stick-slip amplitude, or suppress stick-slip altogether, depending on the pressure and shear rate. We construct a phase diagram that indicates the parameter regimes for which stick-slip occurs in the presence and absence of acoustic vibrations of a fixed amplitude and frequency. These results connect the microscopic physics to macroscopic dynamics and thus produce useful information about a variety of granular phenomena, including rupture and slip along earthquake faults, the remote triggering of instabilities, and the control of friction in material processing.

  3. Dual solutions of slip flow past a nonlinearly shrinking permeable sheet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudipta Ghosh

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the paper is to investigate the flow of an incompressible viscous fluid past a nonlinearly shrinking permeable sheet. Partial slip condition is considered instead of no slip condition at the boundary. The self similar equations are obtained and then solved numerically by a shooting technique. Dual solutions are obtained for the flow past a nonlinearly shrinking sheet with slip condition in the presence of suction. It is found that for the first solution the momentum boundary layer thickness decreases with slip and suction parameters; but it increases with the power-law index of the shrinking velocity. The dual solutions for the velocity field are obtained for the positive values of power-law index n and for certain values of the other parameters in the study. Velocity slip controls the boundary layer separation. However, the power-law index acts to accelerate the boundary layer separation.

  4. Seafloor observations indicate spatial separation of coseismic and postseismic slips in the 2011 Tohoku earthquake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iinuma, Takeshi; Hino, Ryota; Uchida, Naoki; Nakamura, Wataru; Kido, Motoyuki; Osada, Yukihito; Miura, Satoshi

    2016-01-01

    Large interplate earthquakes are often followed by postseismic slip that is considered to occur in areas surrounding the coseismic ruptures. Such spatial separation is expected from the difference in frictional and material properties in and around the faults. However, even though the 2011 Tohoku Earthquake ruptured a vast area on the plate interface, the estimation of high-resolution slip is usually difficult because of the lack of seafloor geodetic data. Here using the seafloor and terrestrial geodetic data, we investigated the postseismic slip to examine whether it was spatially separated with the coseismic slip by applying a comprehensive finite-element method model to subtract the viscoelastic components from the observed postseismic displacements. The high-resolution co- and postseismic slip distributions clarified the spatial separation, which also agreed with the activities of interplate and repeating earthquakes. These findings suggest that the conventional frictional property model is valid for the source region of gigantic earthquakes. PMID:27853138

  5. Boundary slip study on hydrophilic, hydrophobic, and superhydrophobic surfaces with dynamic atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhushan, Bharat; Wang, Yuliang; Maali, Abdelhamid

    2009-07-21

    Slip length has been measured using the dynamic atomic force microscopy (AFM) method. Unlike the contact AFM method, the sample surface approaches an oscillating sphere with a very low velocity in the dynamic AFM method. During this process, the amplitude and phase shift data are recorded to calculate the hydrodynamic damping coefficient, which is then used to obtain slip length. In this study, a glass sphere with a large radius was glued to the end of an AFM cantilever to measure the slip length on rough surfaces. Experimental results for hydrophilic, hydrophobic, and superhydrophobic surfaces show that the hydrodynamic damping coefficient decreases from the hydrophilic surface to the hydrophobic surface and from the hydrophobic one to the superhydrophobic one. The slip lengths obtained on the hydrophobic and superhydrophobic surfaces are 43 and 236 nm, respectively, which indicates increasing boundary slip from the hydrophobic surface to the superhydrophobic one.

  6. Fabrication of hydroxyapatite ceramics with controlled pore characteristics by slip casting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Xiumin; Tan, Shouhong; Jiang, Dongliang

    2005-02-01

    Porous hydroxyapatite (HAp) ceramics with controlled pore characteristics were fabricated using slip casting method by mixing PMMA with HAp powder. The optimum conditions of HAp slip for slip casting was achieved by employing various experimental techniques, zeta potential and sedimentation, as a function of pH of the slips in the pH range of 4-12. HAp suspensions displayed an absolute maximum in zeta potential values and a minimum in sedimentation height at pH 11.5. The optimal amount of dispersant for the HAp suspensions was found at 1.0 wt% according to the viscosity of 25 vol% HAp slurry. The rheological behaviour of HAp slurry displays a shear-thinning behavior without thixotropy, which is needed in slip casting processing. The pore characteristics of sintered porous hydroxyapatite bioceramics can be controlled by added PMMA particle size and volume. The obtained ceramics exhibit higher strength than those obtained by dry pressing.

  7. Dynamic growth of slip surfaces in catastrophic landslides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Germanovich, Leonid N; Kim, Sihyun; Puzrin, Alexander M

    2016-01-01

    This work considers a landslide caused by the shear band that emerges along the potential slip (rupture) surface. The material above the band slides downwards, causing the band to grow along the slope. This growth may first be stable (progressive), but eventually becomes dynamic (catastrophic). The landslide body acquires a finite velocity before it separates from the substrata. The corresponding initial-boundary value problem for a dynamic shear band is formulated within the framework of Palmer & Rice's (Proc. R. Soc. Lond. A332, 527-548. (doi:10.1098/rspa.1973.0040)) approach, which is generalized to the dynamic case. We obtain the exact, closed-form solution for the band velocity and slip rate. This solution assesses when the slope fails owing to a limiting condition near the propagating tip of the shear band. Our results are applicable to both submarine and subaerial landslides of this type. It appears that neglecting dynamic (inertia) effects can lead to a significant underestimation of the slide size, and that the volumes of catastrophic slides can exceed the volumes of progressive slides by nearly a factor of 2. As examples, we consider the Gaviota and Humboldt slides offshore of California, and discuss landslides in normally consolidated sediments and sensitive clays. In particular, it is conceivable that Humboldt slide is unfinished and may still displace a large volume of sediments, which could generate a considerable tsunami. We show that in the case of submarine slides, the effect of water resistance on the shear band dynamics may frequently be limited during the slope failure stage. For a varying slope angle, we formulate a condition of slide cessation.

  8. The Effects of Chemical Reaction, Hall, and Ion-Slip Currents on MHD Micropolar Fluid Flow with Thermal Diffusivity Using a Novel Numerical Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. S. Motsa

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The problem of magnetomicropolar fluid flow, heat, and mass transfer with suction through a porous medium is numerically analyzed. The problem was studied under the effects of chemical reaction, Hall, ion-slip currents, and variable thermal diffusivity. The governing fundamental conservation equations of mass, momentum, angular momentum, energy, and concentration are converted into a system of nonlinear ordinary differential equations by means of similarity transformation. The resulting system of coupled nonlinear ordinary differential equations is the then solved using a fairly new technique known as the successive linearization method together with the Chebyshev collocation method. A parametric study illustrating the influence of the magnetic strength, Hall and ion-slip currents, Eckert number, chemical reaction and permeability on the Nusselt and Sherwood numbers, skin friction coefficients, velocities, temperature, and concentration was carried out.

  9. Seismic and geodetic signatures of fault slip at the Slumgullion Landslide Natural Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomberg, J.; Schulz, W.; Bodin, P.; Kean, J.

    2011-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that the Slumgullion landslide is a useful natural laboratory for observing fault slip, specifically that slip along its basal surface and side-bounding strike-slip faults occurs with comparable richness of aseismic and seismic modes as along crustal- and plate-scale boundaries. Our study provides new constraints on models governing landslide motion. We monitored landslide deformation with temporary deployments of a 29-element prism array surveyed by a robotic theodolite and an 88-station seismic network that complemented permanent extensometers and environmental instrumentation. Aseismic deformation observations show that large blocks of the landslide move steadily at approximately centimeters per day, possibly punctuated by variations of a few millimeters, while localized transient slip episodes of blocks less than a few tens of meters across occur frequently. We recorded a rich variety of seismic signals, nearly all of which originated outside the monitoring network boundaries or from the side-bounding strike-slip faults. The landslide basal surface beneath our seismic network likely slipped almost completely aseismically. Our results provide independent corroboration of previous inferences that dilatant strengthening along sections of the side-bounding strike-slip faults controls the overall landslide motion, acting as seismically radiating brakes that limit acceleration of the aseismically slipping basal surface. Dilatant strengthening has also been invoked in recent models of transient slip and tremor sources along crustal- and plate-scale faults suggesting that the landslide may indeed be a useful natural laboratory for testing predictions of specific mechanisms that control fault slip at all scales.

  10. Strike-slip faults in the southernmost Andes and the development of the Patagonian orocline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, W. Dickson

    1993-02-01

    The Patagonian orocline is the 90° bend in the southernmost Andes between 50°S and 56°S. Paleomagnetic and structural data indicate that the orocline is, at least in part, the product of tectonic rotation. Recent field work in the Beagle Channel region of southernmost Chile provides evidence for widespread left-lateral strike-slip faulting in the internal zones of the mountain belt. Both arms of the Beagle Channel are interpreted to be left-lateral strike-slip faults based on detailed study of mesoscale strike-slip faults (Riedel shears) observed in coastal outcrops. Although much of the evidence indicates Cenozoic brittle strike-slip faulting, other fabric data, including vertical foliation zones containing horizontal quartz stretching lineations and ductile left-lateral kinematic indicators, suggest that Mesozoic ductile strike-slip or oblique-slip shearing also occurred. The implication is that the mid-Cretaceous Andean orogeny involved the transpressional inversion of the Rocas Verdes marginal basin and that transpression has been the dominant deformational regime in the region for the last 120 Ma. Regional left-lateral strike-slip faults are now recognized in all lithotectonic provinces of the southernmost Andes. A statistical study of regional lineament trends using aerial photographs and satellite imagery suggests that many unstudied lineaments are also strike-slip faults. A new model is proposed that integrates the development of strike-slip faulting and the structural evolution and uplift of the southernmost Andes with the rotational development of the orocline. The Patagonian orocline appears to be the product of broad interplate shearing accommodated by strike-slip faulting, block rotation, and contraction and is probably continuing to evolve today.

  11. Does fault strengthening in laboratory rock friction experiments really depend primarily upon time and not slip?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, Pathikrit; Rubin, Allan M.; Beeler, Nicholas M.

    2017-08-01

    The popular constitutive formulations of rate-and-state friction offer two end-member views on whether friction evolves only with slip (Slip law) or with time even without slip (Aging law). While rate stepping experiments show support for the Slip law, laboratory-observed frictional behavior near-zero slip rates has traditionally been inferred as supporting Aging law style time-dependent healing, in particular, from the slide-hold-slide experiments of Beeler et al. (1994). Using a combination of new analytical results and explicit numerical (Bayesian) inversion, we show instead that the slide-hold-slide data of Beeler et al. (1994) favor slip-dependent state evolution during holds. We show that, while the stiffness-independent rate of growth of peak stress (following reslides) with hold duration is a property shared by both the Aging and (under a more restricted set of parameter combinations) Slip laws, the observed stiffness dependence of the rate of stress relaxation during long holds is incompatible with the Aging law with constant rate-state parameters. The Slip law consistently fits the evolution of the stress minima at the end of the holds well, whether fitting jointly with peak stresses or otherwise. But neither the Aging nor Slip laws fit all the data well when a - b is constrained to values derived from prior velocity steps. We also attempted to fit the evolution of stress peaks and minima with the Kato-Tullis hybrid law and the shear stress-dependent Nagata law, both of which, even with the freedom of an extra parameter, generally reproduced the best Slip law fits to the data.

  12. Analysis and Control Aspects of Brushless Induction Machines with Rotating Power Electronic Converters

    OpenAIRE

    Malik, Naveed ur Rehman

    2012-01-01

    This thesis deals with the steady-state, dynamic and control aspects of new type of brushless configuration of a doubly-fed induction machine in which the slip rings and carbon brushes are replaced by rotating power electronics and a rotating exciter. The aim is to study the stability of this novel configuration of the generator under mechanical and grid disturbances for wind power applications. The derivation, development and analysis of the steady-state model of the brushless doubly-fed ind...

  13. Sampling Assumptions in Inductive Generalization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro, Daniel J.; Dry, Matthew J.; Lee, Michael D.

    2012-01-01

    Inductive generalization, where people go beyond the data provided, is a basic cognitive capability, and it underpins theoretical accounts of learning, categorization, and decision making. To complete the inductive leap needed for generalization, people must make a key "sampling" assumption about how the available data were generated.…

  14. Regularity of conservative inductive limits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Kucera

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available A sequentially complete inductive limit of Fréchet spaces is regular, see [3]. With a minor modification, this property can be extended to inductive limits of arbitrary locally convex spaces under an additional assumption of conservativeness.

  15. Slip Analysis at Fluid-Solid Interface in MHD Squeezing Flow of Casson Fluid through Porous Medium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mubashir Qayyum

    Full Text Available An unsteady squeezing flow of Casson fluid having Magneto Hydro Dynamic effect and passing through porous medium channel with slip at the boundaries has been modelled and analyzed. Similarity transformations are applied to the governing partial differential equations of the Casson model to get a highly non-linear fourth order ordinary differential equation. The obtained equation is then solved analytically using the Homotopy Perturbation Method (HPM for uniform and non-uniform slip at the boundaries. Five cases of boundary conditions, representing slip at upper wall only, uniform slip at both walls, non-uniform slip where slip at upper wall is greater than that of lower wall, non-uniform slip where slip at lower wall is greater than that of upper wall, and slip at lower wall only are considered and thoroughly investigated. Validation is performed by solving the equation numerically using fourth order explicit Runge Kutta method (ERK4. Both analytical and numerical results show good agreement. Lastly, the effects of various fluid parameters on the velocity profile are investigated for each case graphically. Analysis of these plots show that the positive and negative squeeze numbers have opposite effect on the velocity profile throughout all the cases. It is also observed that various fluid parameters like Casson, MHD, and Permeability have similar effects on the velocity profile in the cases when slip is occurring at the upper wall only, and non-uniform slip at both the boundaries with slip at lower wall is greater than upper wall. Furthermore, similar effects have been observed when slip is uniform at both the boundaries, and in case of non-uniform slip with slip at lower wall is less than the upper wall. Keywords: Squeezing flow, Casson fluid, Porous media, Magneto Hydro Dynamic, Slip parameter

  16. Twelve percent of hips with a primary cam deformity exhibit a slip-like morphology resembling sequelae of slipped capital femoral epiphysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albers, Christoph E; Steppacher, Simon D; Haefeli, Pascal C; Werlen, Stefan; Hanke, Markus S; Siebenrock, Klaus A; Tannast, Moritz

    2015-04-01

    In some hips with cam-type femoroacetabular impingement (FAI), we observed a morphology resembling a more subtle form of slipped capital femoral epiphysis (SCFE). Theoretically, the morphology in these hips should differ from hips with a primary cam-type deformity. We asked if (1) head-neck offset; (2) epiphyseal angle; and (3) tilt angle differ among hips with a slip-like morphology, idiopathic cam, hips after in situ pinning of SCFE, and normal hips; and (4) what is the prevalence of a slip-like morphology among cam-type hips? We retrospectively compared the three-dimensional anatomy of hips with a slip-like morphology (29 hips), in situ pinning for SCFE (eight hips), idiopathic cam deformity (171 hips), and 30 normal hips using radial MRI arthrography. Normal hips were derived from 17 asymptomatic volunteers. All other hips were recruited from a series of 277 hips (243 patients) seen at a specialized academic hip center between 2006 and 2010. Forty-one hips with isolated pincer deformity were excluded. Thirty-six of 236 hips had a known cause of cam impingement (secondary cam), including eight hips after in situ pinning of SCFE (postslip group). The 200 hips with a primary cam were separated in hips with a slip-like morphology (combination of positive fovea sign [if the neck axis did not intersect with the fovea capitis] and a tilt angle [between the neck axis and perpendicular to the basis of the epiphysis] exceeding 4°) and hips with an idiopathic cam. We evaluated offset ratio, epiphyseal angle (angle between the neck axis and line connecting the center of the femoral head and the point where the physis meets the articular surface), and tilt angle circumferentially around the femoral head-neck axis. Prevalence of slip-like morphology was determined based on the total of 236 hips with cam deformities. Offset ratio was decreased anterosuperiorly in idiopathic cam, slip-like, and postslip (eg, 1 o'clock position with a mean offset ranging from 0.00 to 0.14; p

  17. Multiple slip in a strain-gradient plasticity model motivated by a statistical-mechanics description of dislocations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yefimov, S; Van der Giessen, E

    We have recently proposed a nonlocal continuum crystal plasticity theory for single slip, which is based on a statistical-mechanics description of the collective behavior of dislocations in two dimensions. In the present paper we address the extension of the theory from single slip to multiple slip.

  18. Long-term slow slip events along the Nankai trough subduction zone after the 2011 Tohoku earthquake in Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozawa, Shinzaburo

    2017-04-01

    The global navigation satellite system (GNSS) network in Japan has detected transient crustal deformation in regions along the Nankai trough subduction zone in southwest Japan from approximately 2013, after the 2011 Tohoku earthquake. Using the GNSS data, we estimated the spatiotemporal evolution of long-term aseismic slip along the Nankai trough. The result indicates that aseismic slip has occurred on the plate interface in the Bungo, northern Miyazaki, and southern Miyazaki regions, southwest Japan. The estimated time evolution between October 2013 and April 2015 shows the simultaneous occurrence of northern and southern Miyazaki slow slips with different durations followed by a Bungo slow slip in 2014. A southern Miyazaki slow slip occurred from approximately July 2015, which was followed by a northern Miyazaki slow slip and a Bungo slow slip in 2016. The 2016 Bungo slow slip occurred in a shallow area that did not slip at the time of the 2014 Bungo slow slip. The two different rupture processes from 2013 to 2015 and from 2015 to 2016 may be an important clue toward understanding subduction tectonics in southwest Japan. These interplate slow slip events are changing the stress state in favor of the occurrence of Nankai and Hyuga-nada earthquakes together with Tokai and Kii channel slow slips, which have been occurring since approximately 2013 and 2014, respectively.[Figure not available: see fulltext.

  19. In vitro multiple shoot bud induction and regeneration from plumule ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The response of eleven Indian cultivars of pigeon pea for in vitro multiple shoot bud induction and regeneration from plumule junction explants under variable concentration of 6-benzyl amino purine (BAP), kinetin and thiadiazuron (TDZ) was assessed in the present study. The cultivar IPA-3088 showed best response with a ...

  20. Beliefs and practices in using misoprostol for induction of labour ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    composite of highly variable dose regimens referred to as 'other regimens' was the dosing regimen preferred by 34% of respondents. ... misoprostol for the induction of labour have been employed with the oral route preferred because of ease of administration and a short half-life.[1,3]. A reduced ... from the final analysis.

  1. Slip detection and grip adjustment using optical tracking in prosthetic hands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Luke; Singhal, Girish; Kaliki, Rahul

    2011-01-01

    We have designed a closed loop control system that adjusts the grasping force of a prosthetic hand based on the amount of object slip detected by an optical tracking sensor. The system was designed for the i-Limb (a multi-fingered prosthetic hand from Touch Bionics Inc.) and is comprised of an optical sensor embedded inside a silicone prosthetic glove and a control algorithm. In a proof of concept study to demonstrate the effectiveness of optical tracking in slip sensing, we record slip rate while increasing the weight held in the grasp of the hand and compare two cases: grip adjustment on and grip adjustment off. The average slip rate was found to be 0.314 slips/(s · oz) without grip adjustment and 0.0411 slips/(s · oz) with grip adjustment. This paper discusses the advantages of the optical approach in slip detection and presents the experiment and results utilizing the optical sensor and grip control algorithm.

  2. Ultra-thin clay layers facilitate seismic slip in carbonate faults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smeraglia, Luca; Billi, Andrea; Carminati, Eugenio; Cavallo, Andrea; Di Toro, Giulio; Spagnuolo, Elena; Zorzi, Federico

    2017-04-06

    Many earthquakes propagate up to the Earth's surface producing surface ruptures. Seismic slip propagation is facilitated by along-fault low dynamic frictional resistance, which is controlled by a number of physico-chemical lubrication mechanisms. In particular, rotary shear experiments conducted at seismic slip rates (1 ms -1 ) show that phyllosilicates can facilitate co-seismic slip along faults during earthquakes. This evidence is crucial for hazard assessment along oceanic subduction zones, where pelagic clays participate in seismic slip propagation. Conversely, the reason why, in continental domains, co-seismic slip along faults can propagate up to the Earth's surface is still poorly understood. We document the occurrence of micrometer-thick phyllosilicate-bearing layers along a carbonate-hosted seismogenic extensional fault in the central Apennines, Italy. Using friction experiments, we demonstrate that, at seismic slip rates (1 ms -1 ), similar calcite gouges with pre-existing phyllosilicate-bearing (clay content ≤3 wt.%) micro-layers weaken faster than calcite gouges or mixed calcite-phyllosilicate gouges. We thus propose that, within calcite gouge, ultra-low clay content (≤3 wt.%) localized along micrometer-thick layers can facilitate seismic slip propagation during earthquakes in continental domains, possibly enhancing surface displacement.

  3. Absence of molecular slip on ultraclean and SAM-coated surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pye, Justin; Wood, Clay; Burton, Justin

    2016-11-01

    The liquid/solid boundary condition is a complex problem that is becoming increasingly important for the development of nanoscale fluidic devices. Many groups have now measured slip near an interface at nanoscale dimensions using a variety of experimental techniques. In simple systems, large slip lengths are generally measured for non-wetting liquid/solid combinations, but many conflicting measurements and interpretations remain. We have developed a novel pseudo-differential technique using a quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) to measure slip lengths on various surfaces. A drop of one liquid is grown on the QCM in the presence of a second, ambient liquid. We have isolated any anomalous boundary effects such as interfacial slip by choosing two liquids which have identical bulk effects on the QCM frequency and dissipation in the presence of no-slip. Slip lengths are -less than 2 nm- for water (relative to undecane) on all surfaces measured, including plasma cleaned gold, SiO2, and two different self assembled monolayers (SAMs), regardless of contact angle. We also find that surface cleanliness is crucial to accurately measure slip lengths. Additionally, clean glass substrates appear to have a significant adsorbed water layer and SAM surfaces show excess dissipation, possibly associated with contact line motion. In addition to investigating other liquid pairs, future work will include extending this technique to surfaces with independently controllable chemistry and roughness, both of which are known to strongly affect interfacial hydrodynamics.

  4. Relative Effects of Asymmetry and Wall Slip on the Stability of Plane Channel Flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sukhendu Ghosh

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The effect of wall velocity slip on the stability of a pressure-driven two-dimensional asymmetric channel flow is examined by considering Navier slip condition on the channel walls. The two-parameter families of mean velocity profiles are considered to approximate the underlying asymmetric basic flow. Competing effects of skewness and maximum velocity on the stability of the flow are explored for a range of model parameters. The Orr–Sommerfeld system of the asymmetric flow is solved using a Chebyshev spectral collocation method for both symmetric and non-symmetric type slip boundary conditions. Numerical results indicate that moderate asymmetry in the basic flow has a significant role on the stability of the Poiseuille-kind parallel/nearly parallel flows. Wall slip shows a passive control on the instability of the asymmetric flow by increasing or decreasing the critical Reynolds number and the set of unstable wave numbers. The stabilizing/destabilizing effect of slip velocity on the flow instability is weak or strong depending on the presence of velocity slip at the upper or lower wall. Velocity slip has a profound grip on the flow behaviour by changing the shear rate inside the perturbed flow.

  5. Past seismic slip-to-the-trench recorded in Central America megathrust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vannucchi, Paola; Spagnuolo, Elena; Aretusini, Stefano; Di Toro, Giulio; Ujiie, Kohtaro; Tsutsumi, Akito; Nielsen, Stefan

    2017-12-01

    The 2011 Tōhoku-Oki earthquake revealed that co-seismic displacement along the plate boundary megathrust can propagate to the trench. Co-seismic slip to the trench amplifies hazards at subduction zones, so its historical occurrence should also be investigated globally. Here we combine structural and experimental analyses of core samples taken offshore from southeastern Costa Rica as part of the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) Expedition 344, with three-dimensional seismic reflection images of the subduction zone. We document a geologic record of past co-seismic slip to the trench. The core passed through a less than 1.9-million-year-old megathrust frontal ramp that superimposes older Miocene biogenic oozes onto late Miocene-Pleistocene silty clays. This, together with our stratigraphic analyses and geophysical images, constrains the position of the basal decollement to lie within the biogenic oozes. Our friction experiments show that, when wet, silty clays and biogenic oozes are both slip-weakening at sub-seismic and seismic slip velocities. Oozes are stronger than silty clays at slip velocities of less than or equal to 0.01 m s-1, and wet oozes become as weak as silty clays only at a slip velocity of 1 m s-1. We therefore suggest that the geological structures found offshore from Costa Rica were deformed during seismic slip-to-the-trench events. During slower aseismic creep, deformation would have preferentially localized within the silty clays.

  6. Slip elastography: a novel method for visualising and characterizing adherence between two surfaces in contact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Aabir; Bamber, Jeffrey C; Dorward, Neil L

    2012-03-01

    Identification of the anatomical location and mechanical properties such as adherence at the tissue tumour interface may be of clinical benefit in determination of tumour resectability and prognosis. There are currently no imaging modalities in routine clinical practice that can provide this information. This paper presents the development of a new imaging technique based on ultrasound elastography, called slip elastography, for determination of the anatomical location and measurement of the adherence between two surfaces. The theoretical basis of slip and its definition in relation to shear are described. In vitro testing with gelatine phantoms to determine the optimal parameters for shear strain estimation and slip boundary measurement and to test reliability are also described. The results suggest that slip elastography can reliably identify the anatomical location of a slip boundary and can measure the externally applied axial force required to initiate slip at that boundary in vitro. The vector based shear strain estimator was the most robust and worked with minimal angular dependence with minimal non-slip shearing artefact. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. An Improved Optimal Slip Ratio Prediction considering Tyre Inflation Pressure Changes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guoxing Li

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The prediction of optimal slip ratio is crucial to vehicle control systems. Many studies have verified there is a definitive impact of tyre pressure change on the optimal slip ratio. However, the existing method of optimal slip ratio prediction has not taken into account the influence of tyre pressure changes. By introducing a second-order factor, an improved optimal slip ratio prediction considering tyre inflation pressure is proposed in this paper. In order to verify and evaluate the performance of the improved prediction, a cosimulation platform is developed by using MATLAB/Simulink and CarSim software packages, achieving a comprehensive simulation study of vehicle braking performance cooperated with an ABS controller. The simulation results show that the braking distances and braking time under different tyre pressures and initial braking speeds are effectively shortened with the improved prediction of optimal slip ratio. When the tyre pressure is slightly lower than the nominal pressure, the difference of braking performances between original optimal slip ratio and improved optimal slip ratio is the most obvious.

  8. Intermittent tremor migrations beneath Guerrero, Mexico, and implications for fault healing within the slow slip zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Yajun; Rubin, Allan M.

    2017-01-01

    Slow slip events exhibit significant complexity in slip evolution and variations in recurrence intervals. Behavior that varies systematically with recurrence interval is likely to reflect different extents of fault healing between these events. Here we use high-resolution tremor catalogs beneath Guerrero, Mexico, to investigate the mechanics of slow slip. We observe complex tremor propagation styles, including rapid tremor migrations propagating either along the main tremor front or backward, reminiscent of those in northern Cascadia. We also find many migrations that originate well behind the front and repeatedly occupy the same source region during a tremor episode, similar to those previously reported from Shikoku, Japan. These migrations could be driven by slow slip in the surrounding regions, with recurrence intervals possibly modulated by tides. The propagation speed of these migrations decreases systematically with time since the previous migration over the same source area. Tremor amplitudes seem consistent with changes in the propagation speeds being controlled primarily by changes in the slip speeds. One interpretation is that the high propagation speeds and inferred high slip speeds during the migrations with short recurrence intervals are caused by incomplete healing within the host rock adjacent to the shear zone, which could lead to high permeability and reduced dilatant strengthening of the fault gouge. Similar processes may operate in other slow slip source regions such as Cascadia.

  9. Bond-slip analysis via a cohesive-zone model simulating damage, friction and interlocking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Serpieri

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available A recently proposed cohesive-zone model which effectively combines damage, friction and mechanical interlocking has been revisited and further validated by numerically simulating the pull-out test, from a concrete block, of a ribbed steel bar in the post-yield deformation range. The simulated response is in good agreement with experimental measurements of the bond slip characteristics in the post-yield range of deformed bars reported in the literature. This study highlights the main features of the model: with physically justified and relatively simple arguments, and within the sound framework of thermodynamics with internal variables, the model effectively separates the three main sources of energy dissipation, i.e. loss of adhesion, friction along flat interfaces and mechanical interlocking. This study provides further evidence that the proposed approach allows easier and physically clearer procedures for the determination of the model parameters of such three elementary mechanical behaviours, and makes possible their interpretation and measurement as separate material property, as a viable alternative to lumping these parameters into single values of the fracture energy. In particular, the proposed approach allows to consider a single value of the adhesion energy for modes I and II.

  10. Improvement of the efficiency of induction motors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falk, K.; Schoerner, J.

    1982-07-01

    The electric motor as energy converter was studied for four groups of parameters: process, network, foundations, and environment. The feasibility of reducing the losses of asynchronous three phase motors with squirrel cage or with slip rings in the power output range from 100 to 1500kW, was investigated. Mechanical losses from the bearings, from air friction, and from fan electromagnetic losses in the iron and in the copper, and the most efficient way of heat elimination due to this losses effect of a nonsinusoidal energy source on losses use of electronic controlled energy sources where variable load and speed are necessary, were studied. It is proved that for the studied motor range a better conception of ventilation is very useful and that the most efficient losses reduction are achieved by optimizing the electromagnetic design and the insulation techniques. Thyristor-based voltage regulators can achieve remarkable energy savings especially in the field of elevator technique in the speed range up to 2m/sec and in hoisting equipment.

  11. Valoración de métodos para la determinación de la eficiencia de motores de inducción que accionan cargas en régimen de trabajo continuo variables en el tiempo; Valoration or Methods to Determine the Induction Engines Efficiency that Carry Loods in a Conti

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daynell Santana Echevarría

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available En el trabajo se valoran varias metodologías para determinar la eficiencia de los motores de inducción queoperan en régimen continuo, con carga variable en el tiempo. Los métodos que se analizan, se desarrollarona partir de métodos ya existentes y reconocidos por las normas cubanas e internacionales para calcular laeficiencia de los motores de inducción con carga constante. La parte experimental de este trabajo serealizó en la empresa CEPIL, de Ciego de Ávila, por tener esta en su cadena productiva un númeroelevado de motores que trabajan con cargas de este tipo. Un aspecto que es importante valorar y de hechose realiza en el presente trabajo, es la factibilidad de aplicar cada uno de los métodos para determinar laeficiencia en motores de inducción que se encuentran instalados en alguna industria que se encuentraproduciendo y que por regla general es difícil interrumpir el proceso productivo. There are some methodology ways in order to determine the induction machine eficiece with time variableload in the uninterrumpible regimen. The methods are developed from already existing other ones,whichhave been recognized by national and international standarts.The experimental part of this project wasperfonmanced at CEPIL enterprise in Ciego de Avila district, because there are a lot of this type workingmachines. The most important thing we have evaluated at present is the reliability and the posibility ofapplying this methods avoinding brake the production process.

  12. Buried shallow fault slip from the South Napa earthquake revealed by near-field geodesy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Benjamin A; Minson, Sarah E; Glennie, Craig L; Nevitt, Johanna M; Dawson, Tim; Rubin, Ron; Ericksen, Todd L; Lockner, David; Hudnut, Kenneth; Langenheim, Victoria; Lutz, Andrew; Mareschal, Maxime; Murray, Jessica; Schwartz, David; Zaccone, Dana

    2017-07-01

    Earthquake-related fault slip in the upper hundreds of meters of Earth's surface has remained largely unstudied because of challenges measuring deformation in the near field of a fault rupture. We analyze centimeter-scale accuracy mobile laser scanning (MLS) data of deformed vine rows within ±300 m of the principal surface expression of the M (magnitude) 6.0 2014 South Napa earthquake. Rather than assuming surface displacement equivalence to fault slip, we invert the near-field data with a model that allows for, but does not require, the fault to be buried below the surface. The inversion maps the position on a preexisting fault plane of a slip front that terminates ~3 to 25 m below the surface coseismically and within a few hours postseismically. The lack of surface-breaching fault slip is verified by two trenches. We estimate near-surface slip ranging from ~0.5 to 1.25 m. Surface displacement can underestimate fault slip by as much as 30%. This implies that similar biases could be present in short-term geologic slip rates used in seismic hazard analyses. Along strike and downdip, we find deficits in slip: The along-strike deficit is erased after ~1 month by afterslip. We find no evidence of off-fault deformation and conclude that the downdip shallow slip deficit for this event is likely an artifact. As near-field geodetic data rapidly proliferate and will become commonplace, we suggest that analyses of near-surface fault rupture should also use more sophisticated mechanical models and subsurface geomechanical tests.

  13. Phase-slip-induced dissipation in an atomic Bose-Hubbard system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKay, D; White, M; Pasienski, M; DeMarco, B

    2008-05-01

    Phase-slips control dissipation in many bosonic systems, determining the critical velocity of superfluid helium and the generation of resistance in thin superconducting wires. Technological interest has been largely motivated by applications involving nanoscale superconducting circuit elements, such as standards based on quantum phase-slip junctions. Although phase slips caused by thermal fluctuations at high temperatures are well understood, controversy remains over the role of phase slips in small-scale superconductors--in solids, problems such as uncontrolled noise sources and disorder complicate their study and application. Here we show that phase slips can lead to dissipation in a clean and well-characterized Bose-Hubbard system, by experimentally studying the transport of ultracold atoms trapped in an optical lattice. In contrast to previous work, we explore a low-velocity regime described by the three-dimensional Bose-Hubbard model that is unaffected by instabilities, and we measure the effect of temperature on the dissipation strength. The damping rate of atomic motion (the analogue of electrical resistance in a solid) in the confining parabolic potential is well fitted by a model that includes finite damping at zero temperature. The low-temperature behaviour is consistent with the theory of quantum tunnelling of phase slips, whereas at higher temperatures a crossover consistent with a transition to thermal activation of phase slips is evident. Motion-induced features reminiscent of vortices and vortex rings associated with phase slips are also observed in time-of-flight imaging. These results clarify the role of phase slips in superfluid systems. They may also be of relevance in understanding the source of metallic phases observed in thin films, or serve as a test bed for theories of bosonic dissipation based upon variants of the Bose-Hubbard model.

  14. A Network Inversion Filter combining GNSS and InSAR for tectonic slip modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekaert, D. P.; Segall, P.; Wright, T. J.; Hooper, A. J.

    2016-12-01

    Time-dependent slip modeling can be a powerful tool to improve our understanding of the interaction of earthquake cycle processes such as interseismic, coseismic, postseismic, and aseismic slip. Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) observations allow us to model slip at depth with a higher spatial resolution than when using GNSS alone. Typically the temporal resolution of InSAR has been limited. However, the recent generation of SAR satellites including Sentinel-1, COSMO-SkyMED, and RADARSAT-2 permits the use of InSAR for time-dependent slip modeling, at intervals of a few days when combined. The increasing amount of SAR data makes a simultaneous data inversion of all epochs challenging. Here, we expanded the original Network Inversion Filter (Segall and Matthews, 1997) to include InSAR observations of surface displacements in addition to GNSS. In the NIF framework, geodetic observations are limited to those of a given epoch, where a physical model describes the slip evolution over time. The combination of the Kalman forward filtering and backward smoothing allows all geodetic observations to constrain the complete observation period. Combining GNSS and InSAR allows us to model time-dependent slip at an unprecedented spatial resolution. We validate the approach with a simulation of the 2006 Guerrero slow slip event. In our study, we emphasize the importance of including the InSAR covariance information, and demonstrate that InSAR provides an additional constraint on the spatial extent of the slow slip. References: Segall, P., and M. Matthews (1997), Time dependent inversion of geodetic data, J. Geophys. Res., 102 (B10), 22,391 - 22,409, doi:10.1029/97JB01795. Bekaert, D., P. Segall, T.J. Wright, and A. Hooper (2016), A Network Inversion Filter combining GNSS and InSAR for tectonic slip modeling, JGR, doi:10.1002/2015JB012638 (open access).

  15. Buried shallow fault slip from the South Napa earthquake revealed by near-field geodesy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Benjamin A.; Minson, Sarah E.; Glennie, Craig L.; Nevitt, Johanna; Dawson, Timothy E.; Rubin, Ron S.; Ericksen, Todd; Lockner, David A.; Hudnut, Kenneth W.; Langenheim, Victoria; Lutz, Andrew; Murray, Jessica R.; Schwartz, David P.; Zaccone, Dana

    2017-01-01

    Earthquake-related fault slip in the upper hundreds of meters of Earth’s surface has remained largely unstudied because of challenges measuring deformation in the near field of a fault rupture. We analyze centimeter-scale accuracy mobile laser scanning (MLS) data of deformed vine rows within ±300 m of the principal surface expression of the M (magnitude) 6.0 2014 South Napa earthquake. Rather than assuming surface displacement equivalence to fault slip, we invert the near-field data with a model that allows for, but does not require, the fault to be buried below the surface. The inversion maps the position on a preexisting fault plane of a slip front that terminates ~3 to 25 m below the surface coseismically and within a few hours postseismically. The lack of surface-breaching fault slip is verified by two trenches. We estimate near-surface slip ranging from ~0.5 to 1.25 m. Surface displacement can underestimate fault slip by as much as 30%. This implies that similar biases could be present in short-term geologic slip rates used in seismic hazard analyses. Along strike and downdip, we find deficits in slip: The along-strike deficit is erased after ~1 month by afterslip. We find no evidence of off-fault deformation and conclude that the downdip shallow slip deficit for this event is likely an artifact. As near-field geodetic data rapidly proliferate and will become commonplace, we suggest that analyses of near-surface fault rupture should also use more sophisticated mechanical models and subsurface geomechanical tests.

  16. Determinants of thiopental induction dose requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avram, M J; Sanghvi, R; Henthorn, T K; Krejcie, T C; Shanks, C A; Fragen, R J; Howard, K A; Kaczynski, D A

    1993-01-01

    Dose requirements for thiopental anesthetic induction have significant age- and gender-related variability. We studied the association of the patient characteristics age, gender, weight, lean body mass, and cardiac output with thiopental requirements. Doses of thiopental, infused at 150 mg/min, required to reach both a clinical end-point and an electroencephalographic (EEG) end-point were determined in 30 males and 30 females, aged 18-83 yr. Univariate least squares linear regression analysis revealed outliers in the relationships of age, weight, lean body mass, and cardiac output to thiopental dose at clinical and EEG endpoints. Differential weighting of data points minimized the effect of outliers in the construction of a robust multiple linear regression model of the relationship between several selected independent variables and the dependent variables thiopental dose at clinical and EEG endpoints. The multiple linear regression model for thiopental dose at the clinical end-point selecting the regressor variables age, weight, and gender (R2 = 0.76) was similar to that for age, lean body mass, and gender (R2 = 0.75). Thiopental dose at the EEG endpoint was better described by models selecting the variables age, weight, and cardiac output (R2 = 0.88) or age, lean body mass, and cardiac output (R2 = 0.87). Although cardiac output varied with age, age always remained a selected variable. Because weight and lean body mass differed with gender, their selection as variables in the model eliminated gender as a selected variable or minimized its importance.

  17. Effect of sorbitol in callus induction and plant regeneration in wheat ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Six wheat genotypes were evaluated for their response to callus induction and regeneration on MS medium modified with different concentrations of sorbitol, that is, 0, 10, 20, 30 gL-1 along with optimum (3 mgL-1) concentration of 2,4-D. Variability was observed among different genotypes for callus induction. Highest callus ...

  18. Comparison of Nested-Loop Rotors in Brushless Doubly-Fed Induction Machines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, X.; Liu, D.; Lahaye, D.J.P.; Polinder, H.; Ferreira, J.A.

    2017-01-01

    The brushless doubly-fed induction machine (DFIM) has great potential as a variable-speed generator for wind turbine applications. This special machine has a richer space-harmonic spectrum due to its special nested-loop rotor construction compared with conventional induction machines. It may result

  19. Antibody induction versus corticosteroid induction for liver transplant recipients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Penninga, Luit; Wettergren, André; Wilson, Colin H

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Liver transplantation is an established treatment option for end-stage liver failure. To date, no consensus has been reached on the use of immunosuppressive T-cell specific antibody induction compared with corticosteroid induction of immunosuppression after liver transplantation....... OBJECTIVES: To assess the benefits and harms of T-cell specific antibody induction versus corticosteroid induction for prevention of acute rejection in liver transplant recipients. SEARCH METHODS: We searched The Cochrane Hepato-Biliary Group Controlled Trials Register, the Cochrane Central Register...... of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, EMBASE, Science Citation Index Expanded, and the World Health Organization (WHO) International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP) on 30 September 2013 together with reference checking, citation searching, contact with trial authors and pharmaceutical companies...

  20. Induction, complexity, and economic methodology

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, Peter

    2009-01-01

    This paper focuses on induction, because the supposed weaknesses of that process are the main reason for favouring falsificationism, which plays an important part in scientific methodology generally; the paper is part of a wider study of economic methodology. The standard objections to, and paradoxes of, induction are reviewed, and this leads to the conclusion that the supposed ‘problem’ or ‘riddle’ of induction is a false one. It is an artefact of two assumptions: that the classic two-valued...