WorldWideScience

Sample records for vapor transpiration model

  1. Comparing three models to estimate transpiration of desert shrubs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Shiqin; Yu, Zhongbo; Ji, Xibin; Sudicky, Edward A.

    2017-07-01

    The role of environmental variables in controlling transpiration (Ec) is an important, but not well-understood, aspect of transpiration modeling in arid desert regions. Taking three dominant desert shrubs, Haloxylon ammodendron, Nitraria tangutorum, and Calligonum mongolicum, as examples, we aim to evaluate the applicability of three transpiration models, i.e. the modified Jarvis-Stewart model (MJS), the simplified process-based model (BTA), and the artificial neural network model (ANN) at different temporal scales. The stem sap flow of each species was monitored using the stem heat balance approach over both the 2014 and 2015 main growing seasons. Concurrent environmental variables were also measured with an automatic weather station. The ANN model generally produced better simulations of Ec than the MJS and BTA models at both hourly and daily scales, indicating its advantage in solving complicated, nonlinear problems between transpiration rate and environmental driving forces. The solar radiation and vapor pressure deficit were crucial variables in modeling Ec for all three species. The performance of the MJS and ANN models was significantly improved by incorporating root-zone soil moisture. We also found that the difference between hourly and daily fitted parameter values was considerable for the MJS and BTA models. Therefore, these models need to be recalibrated when applied at different temporal scales. This study provides insights regarding the application and performance of current transpiration models in arid desert regions, and thus provides a deeper understanding of eco-hydrological processes and sustainable ecosystem management at the study site.

  2. Effects of altitude on transpiration, leaf vapor pressure deficit and leaf water potential in oriental beech

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatih Bayraktar

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This study was designed to determine the effect of altitude on transpiration, leaf vapor pressure deficit and leaf water potential in oriental beech (Fagus orientalis Lipsky. The study area was located in Ortaköy, Artvin, and the experimental area had the same soil structure and aspect. The study showed that transpiration and leaf vapor pressure deficit increased but leaf water potential decreased by altitudinal gradient

  3. Measuring and Modeling Tree Stand Level Transpiration

    Science.gov (United States)

    J.M. Vose; G.J. Harvey; K.J. Elliott; B.D. Clinton

    2003-01-01

    Transpiration is a key process in the application of phytoremediation to soil or groundwater pollutants. To be successful, vegetation must transpire enough water from the soil or groundwater to control or take up the contaminant. Transpiration is driven by a combination of abiotic (climate, soil water availability, and groundwater depth) and biotic (leaf area, stomatal...

  4. Modelling maximum canopy conductance and transpiration in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    There is much current interest in predicting the maximum amount of water that can be transpired by Eucalyptus trees. It is possible that industrial waste water may be applied as irrigation water to eucalypts and it is important to predict the maximum transpiration rates of these plantations in an attempt to dispose of this ...

  5. Mathematical Modeling of Dual Intake Transparent Transpired Solar Collector

    OpenAIRE

    Thomas Semenou; Rousse, Daniel R.; Brice Le Lostec; Hervé F. Nouanegue; Pierre-Luc Paradis

    2015-01-01

    Nowadays, in several types of commercial or institutional buildings, a significant rise of transpired solar collectors used to preheat the fresh air of the building can be observed. Nevertheless, when the air mass flow rate is low, the collector efficiency collapses and a large amount of energy remains unused. This paper presents a simple yet effective mathematical model of a transparent transpired solar collector (TTC) with dual intake in order to remove stagnation problems in the plenum and...

  6. Sound Propagation in Saturated Gas-Vapor-Droplet Suspensions Considering the Effect of Transpiration on Droplet Evaporation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandula, Max

    2012-01-01

    The Sound attenuation and dispersion in saturated gas-vapor-droplet mixtures with evaporation has been investigated theoretically. The theory is based on an extension of the work of Davidson (1975) to accommodate the effects of transpiration on the linear particle relaxation processes of mass, momentum and energy transfer. It is shown that the inclusion of transpiration in the presence of mass transfer improves the agreement between the theory and the experimental data of Cole and Dobbins (1971) for sound attenuation in air-water fogs at low droplet mass concentrations. The results suggest that transpiration has an appreciable effect on both sound absorption and dispersion for both low and high droplet mass concentrations.

  7. Modelling Interception and Transpiration at Monthly Time Steps Introducing Daily Variability through Markov Chains

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Groen, M.M.

    2002-01-01

    This dissertation presents improved equations for monthly water resources models, in particular for interception and transpiration. Most ofthe existing monthly models do not make a distinction between interception and transpiration, while this distinction is very important for management purposes.

  8. Mathematical Modeling of Dual Intake Transparent Transpired Solar Collector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Semenou

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, in several types of commercial or institutional buildings, a significant rise of transpired solar collectors used to preheat the fresh air of the building can be observed. Nevertheless, when the air mass flow rate is low, the collector efficiency collapses and a large amount of energy remains unused. This paper presents a simple yet effective mathematical model of a transparent transpired solar collector (TTC with dual intake in order to remove stagnation problems in the plenum and ensure a better thermal efficiency and more heat recovery. A thermal model and a pressure loss model were developed. Then, the combined model was validated with experimental data from the Solar Rating and Certification Corporation (SRCC. The results show that the collector efficiency can be up to 70% and even 80% regardless of operating conditions. The temperature gain is able to reach 20°K when the solar irradiation is high.

  9. Growth CO2 concentration modifies the transpiration response of Populus deltoides to drought and vapor pressure deficit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engel, Victor C; Griffin, Kevin L; Murthy, Ramesh; Patterson, Lane; Klimas, Christie; Potosnak, Mark

    2004-10-01

    Cottonwood (Populus deltoides Bartr. ex Marsh.) trees grown for 9 months in elevated carbon dioxide concentration ([CO2]) showed significant increases in height, leaf area and basal diameter relative to trees in a near-ambient [CO2] control treatment. Sample trees in the CO2 treatments were subjected to high and low atmospheric vapor pressure deficits (VPD) over a 5-week period at both high and low soil water contents (SWC). During these periods, transpiration rates at both the leaf and canopy levels were calculated based on sap flow measurements and leaf-to-sapwood area ratios. Leaf-level transpiration rates were approximately equivalent across [CO2] treatments when soil water was not limiting. In contrast, during drought stress, canopy-level transpiration rates were approximately equivalent across [CO2] treatments, indicating that leaf-level fluxes during drought stress were reduced in elevated [CO2] by a factor equal to the leaf area ratio of the two canopies. The shift from equivalent leaf-level transpiration to equivalent canopy-level transpiration with increasing drought stress suggests maximum water use rates were controlled primarily by atmospheric demand at high SWC and by soil water availability at low SWC. Changes in VPD had less effect on transpiration than changes in SWC for trees in both CO2 treatments. Transpiration rates of trees in both CO2 treatments reached maximum values at a VPD of about 2.0 kPa at high SWC, but leveled off and decreased slightly in both canopies as VPD increased above this value. At low SWC, increasing VPD from approximately 1.4 to 2.5 kPa caused transpiration rates to decline slightly in the canopies of trees in both treatments, with significant (P = 0.004) decreases occurring in trees in the near-ambient [CO2] treatment. The transpiration responses at high VPD in the presence of high SWC and throughout the low SWC treatment suggest some hydraulic limitations to water use occurred. Comparisons of midday leaf water potentials

  10. Comparison of Transpiration Models in Tomato Soilless Culture

    OpenAIRE

    Gabrijel Ondrašek; Davor Romić; Josip Borošić; Marija Romić; Ivo Stričević

    2007-01-01

    A two-year greenhouse study was performed to determine the possibility of estimating the transpiration rate in hydroponically grown tomato on the basis of climate parameters. Transpiration rate, determined by the water balance method on different substrates, was compared to the transpiration rate calculated using the Penman Monteith equation. Regression analysis of the comparison of two different approaches to water consumption determination confirmed that the transpiration rate of greenhouse...

  11. Bioenergy Sorghum Crop Model Predicts VPD-Limited Transpiration Traits Enhance Biomass Yield in Water-Limited Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truong, Sandra K.; McCormick, Ryan F.; Mullet, John E.

    2017-01-01

    Bioenergy sorghum is targeted for production in water-limited annual cropland therefore traits that improve plant water capture, water use efficiency, and resilience to water deficit are necessary to maximize productivity. A crop modeling framework, APSIM, was adapted to predict the growth and biomass yield of energy sorghum and to identify potentially useful traits for crop improvement. APSIM simulations of energy sorghum development and biomass accumulation replicated results from field experiments across multiple years, patterns of rainfall, and irrigation schemes. Modeling showed that energy sorghum's long duration of vegetative growth increased water capture and biomass yield by ~30% compared to short season crops in a water-limited production region. Additionally, APSIM was extended to enable modeling of VPD-limited transpiration traits that reduce crop water use under high vapor pressure deficits (VPDs). The response of transpiration rate to increasing VPD was modeled as a linear response until a VPD threshold was reached, at which the slope of the response decreases, representing a range of responses to VPD observed in sorghum germplasm. Simulation results indicated that the VPD-limited transpiration trait is most beneficial in hot and dry regions of production where crops are exposed to extended periods without rainfall during the season or to a terminal drought. In these environments, slower but more efficient transpiration increases biomass yield and prevents or delays the exhaustion of soil water and onset of leaf senescence. The VPD-limited transpiration responses observed in sorghum germplasm increased biomass accumulation by 20% in years with lower summer rainfall, and the ability to drastically reduce transpiration under high VPD conditions could increase biomass by 6% on average across all years. This work indicates that the productivity and resilience of bioenergy sorghum grown in water-limited environments could be further enhanced by development

  12. Measuring and modeling the variation in species-specific transpiration in temperate deciduous hardwoods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowden, Joseph D; Bauerle, William L

    2008-11-01

    We investigated which parameters required by the MAESTRA model were most important in predicting leaf-area-based transpiration in 5-year-old trees of five deciduous hardwood species-yoshino cherry (Prunus x yedoensis Matsum.), red maple (Acer rubrum L. 'Autumn Flame'), trident maple (Acer buergeranum Miq.), Japanese flowering cherry (Prunus serrulata Lindl. 'Kwanzan') and London plane-tree (Platanus x acerifolia (Ait.) Willd.). Transpiration estimated from sap flow measured by the heat balance method in branches and trunks was compared with estimates predicted by the three-dimensional transpiration, photosynthesis and absorbed radiation model, MAESTRA. MAESTRA predicted species-specific transpiration from the interactions of leaf-level physiology and spatially explicit micro-scale weather patterns in a mixed deciduous hardwood plantation on a 15-min time step. The monthly differences between modeled mean daily transpiration estimates and measured mean daily sap flow ranged from a 35% underestimation for Acer buergeranum in June to a 25% overestimation for A. rubrum in July. The sensitivity of the modeled transpiration estimates was examined across a 30% error range for seven physiological input parameters. The minimum value of stomatal conductance as incident solar radiation tends to zero was determined to be eight times more influential than all other physiological model input parameters. This work quantified the major factors that influence modeled species-specific transpiration and confirmed the ability to scale leaf-level physiological attributes to whole-crown transpiration on a species-specific basis.

  13. [Greenhouse tomato transpiration and its affecting factors: correlation analysis and model simulation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Yong-Zhe; Li, Jian-Ming; Zhang, Rong; Sun, San-Jie; Chen, Kai-Li

    2012-07-01

    A pot experiment was conducted to study the correlations between the daily transpiration of greenhouse tomato and the related affecting factors such as total leaf area per plant, soil relative moisture content, air temperature, relative humidity, and solar radiation under different treatments of supplementary irrigation. A regression model for the daily transpiration of greenhouse tomato was established. There existed significant linear correlations between the daily transpiration and the test affecting factors, and the affecting factors had complicated mutual effects. Soil relative moisture content was the main decision factor of the transpiration, with the decision coefficient being 27.4%, and daily minimum relative humidity was the main limiting factor, with the decision coefficient being -119.7%. The square value of the regression coefficient (R2) between the predicted and measured tomato daily transpiration was 0.81, root mean squared error (RMSE) was 68.52 g, and relative prediction error (RE) was 19.4%, suggesting that the regression model established by using the main affecting factors selected through path analysis could better simulate the daily transpiration of greenhouse tomato.

  14. Simulating nectarine tree transpiration and dynamic water storage from responses of leaf conductance to light and sap flow to stem water potential and vapor pressure deficit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paudel, Indira; Naor, Amos; Gal, Yoni; Cohen, Shabtai

    2015-04-01

    For isohydric trees mid-day water uptake is stable and depends on soil water status, reflected in pre-dawn leaf water potential (Ψpd) and mid-day stem water potential (Ψmd), tree hydraulic conductance and a more-or-less constant leaf water potential (Ψl) for much of the day, maintained by the stomata. Stabilization of Ψl can be represented by a linear relationship between canopy resistance (Rc) and vapor pressure deficit (D), and the slope (BD) is proportional to the steady-state water uptake. By analyzing sap flow (SF), meteorological and Ψmd measurements during a series of wetting and drying (D/W) cycles in a nectarine orchard, we found that for the range of Ψmd relevant for irrigated orchards the slope of the relationship of Rc to D, BD is a linear function of Ψmd. Rc was simulated using the above relationships, and its changes in the morning and evening were simulated using a rectangular hyperbolic relationship between leaf conductance and photosynthetic irradiance, fitted to leaf-level measurements. The latter was integrated with one-leaf, two-leaf and integrative radiation models, and the latter gave the best results. Simulated Rc was used in the Penman-Monteith equation to simulate tree transpiration, which was validated by comparing with SF from a separate data set. The model gave accurate estimates of diurnal and daily total tree transpiration for the range of Ψmds used in regular and deficit irrigation. Diurnal changes in tree water content were determined from the difference between simulated transpiration and measured SF. Changes in water content caused a time lag of 90-105 min between transpiration and SF for Ψmd between -0.8 and -1.55 MPa, and water depletion reached 3 l h(-1) before noon. Estimated mean diurnal changes in water content were 5.5 l day(-1) tree(-1) at Ψmd of -0.9 MPa and increased to 12.5 l day(-1) tree(-1) at -1.45 MPa, equivalent to 6.5 and 16.5% of daily tree water use, respectively. Sixteen percent

  15. Confronting a Process-based Model of Temperate Tree Transpiration with Data from Forests in Central Panama Exposed to Drought

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewers, B. E.; Bretfeld, M.; Millar, D.; Hall, J. S.; Beverly, D.; Hall, J. S.; Ogden, F. L.; Mackay, D. S.

    2016-12-01

    Process-based models of tree impacts on the hydrologic cycle must include not only plant hydraulic limitations but also photosynthetic controls because plants lose water to gain carbon. The Terrestrial Regional Ecosystem Exchange Simulator (TREES) is one such model. TREES includes a Bayesian model-data fusion approach that provides rigorous tests of patterns in tree transpiration data against biophysical processes in the model. TREES has been extensively tested against many temperate tree data sets including those experiencing severe and lethal drought. We test TREES against data from sap flow-scaled transpiration in 76 tropical trees (representing 42 different species) in secondary forests of three different ages (8, 25, and 80+ years) located in the Panama Canal Watershed. These data were collected during the third driest El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) event on record in Panama during 2015/2016. Tree transpiration response to vapor pressure deficit and solar radiation was the same in the two older forests, but showed an additional response to limited soil moisture in the youngest forest. Volumetric water content at 30 and 50 cm depths was 8% lower in the 8 year old forest than in the 80+ year old forest. TREES could not simulate this difference in soil moisture without increasing simulated root area. TREES simulations were improved by including light response curves of leaf photosynthesis, root vulnerability to cavitation and canopy position impacts on light. TREES was able to simulate the anisohydric (loose stomatal regulation of leaf water potential) and isohydric (tight stomatal regulation) of the 73 trees species a priori indicating that species level information is not required. Analyses of posterior probability distributions indicates TREES model predictions of individual tree transpiration would likely be improved with more detailed root and soil moisture in all forest ages data with the most improvement likely in the 8 year old forest. Our results

  16. Physical model for vaporization

    OpenAIRE

    Garai, Jozsef

    2006-01-01

    Based on two assumptions, the surface layer is flexible, and the internal energy of the latent heat of vaporization is completely utilized by the atoms for overcoming on the surface resistance of the liquid, the enthalpy of vaporization was calculated for 45 elements. The theoretical values were tested against experiments with positive result.

  17. A whole-plant hydraulic capacitance approach to modeling distributed root water uptake and actual transpiration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, Tomas; Votrubova, Jana; Dohnal, Michal; Dusek, Jaromir

    2017-04-01

    In the present study, we propose a simple transpiration stream model, based on the concept of whole-plant hydraulic capacitance. The suggested algorithm is implemented in a one-dimensional soil water flow model involving vertically distributed macroscopic root water uptake. The proposed transient plant water storage approach is compared with the more conventionally used quasi- steady-state approach. Both approaches are used to simulate soil water flow and diurnal variations of transpiration at a forest site covered with Norway spruce. The key parameter of the transient storage approach - plant hydraulic capacitance - is estimated by comparing the variations of potential transpiration rate, derived from micrometeorological measurements, with observed sap flow intensities. The application of the proposed model leads to improved predictions of root water uptake and actual transpiration rates. The algorithm can be easily implemented into existing soil water flow models and used to simulate transpiration stream responses to varying atmospheric and soil moisture conditions including isohydric and anisohydric plant responses to drought stress.

  18. Development of a simplified plant stomatal resistance model and its validation for potentially transpiring and water-stressed water hyacinths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idso, Sherwood B.

    A simple model of upper-canopy plant stomatal resistance ( ruC) was developed which requires but four input parameters: canopy aerodynamic resistance, upper-canopy foliage temperature, and air vapor pressure deficit and temperature. The model was tested against upper-canopy sunlit leaf stomatal resistance ( r l) measurements of both potentially and non-potentially transpiring water hyacinth plants over the upper-canopy-intercepted net radiation range of 300-450 W m -2 and over a 10-fold range of r l. In all instances, and indicative of the model's good performance, the ratio of r uC/r l consistently averaged about 1.25, due to partial self-shading of the upper-canopy foliage. The significance of this finding to air pollution studies arises from the facts that (1) contemporary knowledge of a plant canopy's leaf area index would allow the transformation of ruC to rC, the total canopy diffusive resistance, and (2) the proper accounting for different trace gas diffusivities would allow the transformation of rc for water vapor to the variety of rC values required to infer the gaseous deposition of important pollutant gas species at vegetated surfaces.

  19. Modelling of root ABA synthesis, stomatal conductance, transpiration and potato production under water saving irrigation regimes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Plauborg, Finn; Abrahamsen, Per; Gjettermann, Birgitte

    2010-01-01

    Application of water saving irrigation strategies in agriculture has become increasingly important. Both modelling and experimental work are needed to gain more insights into the biological and physical mechanisms in the soil-plant system, which regulates water flow in the system and plays...... a central role in reducing crop transpiration. This paper presented a mechanistic model (Daisy) developed based on data obtained in the SAFIR project on measured leaf gas exchange and soil water dynamics in irrigated potato crops grown in a semi-field environment subjected to different irrigation regimes....... Experimental data was compared to simulated results from the new enhanced Daisy model which include modelling 2D soil water flow, abscisic acid (ABA) signalling and its effect on stomatal conductance and hence on transpiration and assimilation, and finally crop yield. The results demonstrated that the enhanced...

  20. Predicting photosynthesis and transpiration responses to ozone: decoupling modeled photosynthesis and stomatal conductance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Lombardozzi

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Plants exchange greenhouse gases carbon dioxide and water with the atmosphere through the processes of photosynthesis and transpiration, making them essential in climate regulation. Carbon dioxide and water exchange are typically coupled through the control of stomatal conductance, and the parameterization in many models often predict conductance based on photosynthesis values. Some environmental conditions, like exposure to high ozone (O3 concentrations, alter photosynthesis independent of stomatal conductance, so models that couple these processes cannot accurately predict both. The goals of this study were to test direct and indirect photosynthesis and stomatal conductance modifications based on O3 damage to tulip poplar (Liriodendron tulipifera in a coupled Farquhar/Ball-Berry model. The same modifications were then tested in the Community Land Model (CLM to determine the impacts on gross primary productivity (GPP and transpiration at a constant O3 concentration of 100 parts per billion (ppb. Modifying the Vcmax parameter and directly modifying stomatal conductance best predicts photosynthesis and stomatal conductance responses to chronic O3 over a range of environmental conditions. On a global scale, directly modifying conductance reduces the effect of O3 on both transpiration and GPP compared to indirectly modifying conductance, particularly in the tropics. The results of this study suggest that independently modifying stomatal conductance can improve the ability of models to predict hydrologic cycling, and therefore improve future climate predictions.

  1. Modelling Transpiration and Growth of Salinity and Drought Stressed Tomatoes

    OpenAIRE

    Karlberg, Louise

    2002-01-01

    Irrigation with saline waters is an agricultural practicethat is becoming increasingly common as competition for freshwater increases. In this thesis the mechanisms behind salinityand drought stress has been studied using data from fieldexperiments in combination with a modelling tool, theCoupModel. Measurements from field experiments on salinity,boron toxicity and drought stressed tomatoes grown during twoclimatically different seasons in the Arava desert, Israel,showed a linear relationship...

  2. Model-assisted analysis of spatial and temporal variations in fruit temperature and transpiration highlighting the role of fruit development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thibault Nordey

    Full Text Available Fruit physiology is strongly affected by both fruit temperature and water losses through transpiration. Fruit temperature and its transpiration vary with environmental factors and fruit characteristics. In line with previous studies, measurements of physical and thermal fruit properties were found to significantly vary between fruit tissues and maturity stages. To study the impact of these variations on fruit temperature and transpiration, a modelling approach was used. A physical model was developed to predict the spatial and temporal variations of fruit temperature and transpiration according to the spatial and temporal variations of environmental factors and thermal and physical fruit properties. Model predictions compared well to temperature measurements on mango fruits, making it possible to accurately simulate the daily temperature variations of the sunny and shaded sides of fruits. Model simulations indicated that fruit development induced an increase in both the temperature gradient within the fruit and fruit water losses, mainly due to fruit expansion. However, the evolution of fruit characteristics has only a very slight impact on the average temperature and the transpiration per surface unit. The importance of temperature and transpiration gradients highlighted in this study made it necessary to take spatial and temporal variations of environmental factors and fruit characteristics into account to model fruit physiology.

  3. Cross-scale modelling of transpiration from stomata via the leaf boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Defraeye, Thijs; Derome, Dominique; Verboven, Pieter; Carmeliet, Jan; Nicolai, Bart

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aims Leaf transpiration is a key parameter for understanding land surface–climate interactions, plant stress and plant structure–function relationships. Transpiration takes place at the microscale level, namely via stomata that are distributed discretely over the leaf surface with a very low surface coverage (approx. 0·2–5 %). The present study aims to shed more light on the dependency of the leaf boundary-layer conductance (BLC) on stomatal surface coverage and air speed. Methods An innovative three-dimensional cross-scale modelling approach was applied to investigate convective mass transport from leaves, using computational fluid dynamics. The gap between stomatal and leaf scale was bridged by including all these scales in the same computational model (10−5–10−1 m), which implies explicitly modelling individual stomata. Key Results BLC was strongly dependent on stomatal surface coverage and air speed. Leaf BLC at low surface coverage ratios (CR), typical for stomata, was still relatively high, compared with BLC of a fully wet leaf (hypothetical CR of 100 %). Nevertheless, these conventional BLCs (CR of 100 %), as obtained from experiments or simulations on leaf models, were found to overpredict the convective exchange. In addition, small variations in stomatal CR were found to result in large variations in BLCs. Furthermore, stomata of a certain size exhibited a higher mass transfer rate at lower CRs. Conclusions The proposed cross-scale modelling approach allows us to increase our understanding of transpiration at the sub-leaf level as well as the boundary-layer microclimate in a way currently not feasible experimentally. The influence of stomatal size, aperture and surface density, and also flow-field parameters can be studied using the model, and prospects for further improvement of the model are presented. An important conclusion of the study is that existing measures of conductances (e.g. from artificial leaves) can be

  4. Modelled hydraulic redistribution by sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) matches observed data only after including night-time transpiration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumann, Rebecca B; Cardon, Zoe G; Teshera-Levye, Jennifer; Rockwell, Fulton E; Zwieniecki, Maciej A; Holbrook, N Michele

    2014-04-01

    The movement of water from moist to dry soil layers through the root systems of plants, referred to as hydraulic redistribution (HR), occurs throughout the world and is thought to influence carbon and water budgets and ecosystem functioning. The realized hydrologic, biogeochemical and ecological consequences of HR depend on the amount of redistributed water, whereas the ability to assess these impacts requires models that correctly capture HR magnitude and timing. Using several soil types and two ecotypes of sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) in split-pot experiments, we examined how well the widely used HR modelling formulation developed by Ryel et al. matched experimental determination of HR across a range of water potential driving gradients. H. annuus carries out extensive night-time transpiration, and although over the last decade it has become more widely recognized that night-time transpiration occurs in multiple species and many ecosystems, the original Ryel et al. formulation does not include the effect of night-time transpiration on HR. We developed and added a representation of night-time transpiration into the formulation, and only then was the model able to capture the dynamics and magnitude of HR we observed as soils dried and night-time stomatal behaviour changed, both influencing HR. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Detailed modeling of electron emission for transpiration cooling of hypersonic vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanquist, Kyle M.; Hara, Kentaro; Boyd, Iain D.

    2017-02-01

    Electron transpiration cooling (ETC) is a recently proposed approach to manage the high heating loads experienced at the sharp leading edges of hypersonic vehicles. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) can be used to investigate the feasibility of ETC in a hypersonic environment. A modeling approach is presented for ETC, which includes developing the boundary conditions for electron emission from the surface, accounting for the space-charge limit effects of the near-wall plasma sheath. The space-charge limit models are assessed using 1D direct-kinetic plasma sheath simulations, taking into account the thermionically emitted electrons from the surface. The simulations agree well with the space-charge limit theory proposed by Takamura et al. for emitted electrons with a finite temperature, especially at low values of wall bias, which validates the use of the theoretical model for the hypersonic CFD code. The CFD code with the analytical sheath models is then used for a test case typical of a leading edge radius in a hypersonic flight environment. The CFD results show that ETC can lower the surface temperature of sharp leading edges of hypersonic vehicles, especially at higher velocities, due to the increase in ionized species enabling higher electron heat extraction from the surface. The CFD results also show that space-charge limit effects can limit the ETC reduction of surface temperatures, in comparison to thermionic emission assuming no effects of the electric field within the sheath.

  6. Transpiration and CO2 fluxes of a pine forest: modelling the undergrowth effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Rivalland

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available A modelling study is performed in order to quantify the relative effect of allowing for the physiological properties of an undergrowth grass sward on total canopy water and carbon fluxes of the Le-Bray forest (Les-Landes, South-western France. The Le-Bray forest consists of maritime pine and an herbaceous undergrowth (purple moor-grass, which is characterised by a low stomatal control of transpiration, in contrast to maritime pine. A CO2-responsive land surface model is used that includes responses of woody and herbaceous species to water stress. An attempt is made to represent the properties of the undergrowth vegetation in the land surface model Interactions between Soil, Biosphere, and Atmosphere, CO2-responsive, ISBA-A-gs. The new adjustment allows for a fairly different environmental response between the forest canopy and the understory in a simple manner. The model's simulations are compared with long term (1997 and 1998 micro-meteorological measurements over the Le-Bray site. The fluxes of energy, water and CO2, are simulated with and without the improved representation of the undergrowth vegetation, and the two simulations are compared with the observations. Accounting for the undergrowth permits one to improve the model's scores. A simple sensitivity experiment shows the behaviour of the model in response to climate change conditions, and the understory effect on the water balance and carbon storage of the forest. Accounting for the distinct characteristics of the undergrowth has a substantial and positive effect on the model accuracy and leads to a different response to climate change scenarios.

  7. Assessing HYDRUS-2D model to estimate soil water contents and olive tree transpiration fluxes under different water distribution systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Autovino, Dario; Negm, Amro; Rallo, Giovanni; Provenzano, Giuseppe

    2016-04-01

    In Mediterranean countries characterized by limited water resources for agricultural and societal sectors, irrigation management plays a major role to improve water use efficiency at farm scale, mainly where irrigation systems are correctly designed to guarantee a suitable application efficiency and the uniform water distribution throughout the field. In the last two decades, physically-based agro-hydrological models have been developed to simulate mass and energy exchange processes in the soil-plant-atmosphere (SPA) system. Mechanistic models like HYDRUS 2D/3D (Šimunek et al., 2011) have been proposed to simulate all the components of water balance, including actual crop transpiration fluxes estimated according to a soil potential-dependent sink term. Even though the suitability of these models to simulate the temporal dynamics of soil and crop water status has been reported in the literature for different horticultural crops, a few researches have been considering arboreal crops where the higher gradients of root water uptake are the combination between the localized irrigation supply and the three dimensional root system distribution. The main objective of the paper was to assess the performance of HYDRUS-2D model to evaluate soil water contents and transpiration fluxes of an olive orchard irrigated with two different water distribution systems. Experiments were carried out in Castelvetrano (Sicily) during irrigation seasons 2011 and 2012, in a commercial farm specialized in the production of table olives (Olea europaea L., var. Nocellara del Belice), representing the typical variety of the surrounding area. During the first season, irrigation water was provided by a single lateral placed along the plant row with four emitters per plant (ordinary irrigation), whereas during the second season a grid of emitters laid on the soil was installed in order to irrigate the whole soil surface around the selected trees. The model performance was assessed based on the

  8. A Review of Vapor Intrusion Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Yijun; Suuberg, Eric M.

    2013-01-01

    A complete vapor intrusion (VI) model, describing vapor entry of volatile organic chemicals (VOCs) into buildings located on contaminated sites, generally consists of two main parts-one describing vapor transport in the soil and the other its entry into the building. Modeling the soil vapor transport part involves either analytically or numerically solving the equations of vapor advection and diffusion in the subsurface. Contaminant biodegradation must often also be included in this simulation, and can increase the difficulty of obtaining a solution, especially when explicitly considering coupled oxygen transport and consumption. The models of contaminant building entry pathway are often coupled to calculations of indoor air contaminant concentration, and both are influenced by building construction and operational features. The description of entry pathway involves consideration of building foundation characteristics, while calculation of indoor air contaminant levels requires characterization of building enclosed space and air exchange within this. This review summarizes existing VI models, and discusses the limits of current screening tools commonly used in this field. PMID:23360069

  9. Chemical vapor infiltration process modeling and optimization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Besmann, T.M.; Stinton, D.P. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Matlin, W.M. [Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering

    1995-12-31

    Chemical vapor infiltration is a unique method for preparing continuous fiber ceramic composites that spares the strong but relatively fragile fibers from damaging thermal, mechanical, and chemical degradation. The process is relatively complex and modeling requires detailed phenomenological knowledge of the chemical kinetics and mass and heat transport. An overview of some of the current understanding and modeling of CVI and examples of efforts to optimize the processes is given. Finally, recent efforts to scale-up the process to produce tubular forms are described.

  10. Modelling soil temperature and moisture and corresponding seasonality of photosynthesis and transpiration in a boreal spruce ecosystem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. H. Wu

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Recovery of photosynthesis and transpiration is strongly restricted by low temperatures in air and/or soil during the transition period from winter to spring in boreal zones. The extent to which air temperature (Ta and soil temperature (Ts influence the seasonality of photosynthesis and transpiration of a boreal spruce ecosystem was investigated using a process-based ecosystem model (CoupModel together with eddy covariance (EC data from one eddy flux tower and nearby soil measurements at Knottåsen, Sweden. A Monte Carlo-based uncertainty method (GLUE provided prior and posterior distributions of simulations representing a wide range of soil conditions and performance indicators. The simulated results showed sufficient flexibility to predict the measured cold and warm Ts in the moist and dry plots around the eddy flux tower. Moreover, the model presented a general ability to describe both biotic and abiotic processes for the Norway spruce stand. The dynamics of sensible heat fluxes were well described by the corresponding latent heat fluxes and net ecosystem exchange of CO2. The parameter ranges obtained are probably valid to represent regional characteristics of boreal conifer forests, but were not easy to constrain to a smaller range than that produced by the assumed prior distributions. Finally, neglecting the soil temperature response function resulted in fewer behavioural models and probably more compensatory errors in other response functions for regulating the seasonality of ecosystem fluxes.

  11. A simple model for simulating heat induced sterility in rice as a function of flowering time and transpirational cooling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oort, van P.A.J.; Saito, K.; Zwart, S.J.; Shrestha, S.

    2014-01-01

    Rice spikelets become sterile when exposed to high temperatures during flowering. Recent experimental studies have shown that transpirational cooling and flowering time (within the day) are important factors determining sterility. Extrapolation of the results from these experimental studies to other

  12. Sensitivity of stand transpiration to wind velocity in a mixed broadleaved deciduous forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dohyoung Kim; Ram Oren; A. Christopher Oishi; Cheng-I Hsieh; Nathan Phillips; Kimberly A. Novick; Paul C. Stoy

    2014-01-01

    Wind velocity (U) within and above forest canopies can alter the coupling between the vapor-saturated sub-stomatal airspace and the drier atmosphere aloft, thereby influencing transpiration rates. In practice, however, the actual increase in transpiration with increasing U depends on the aerodynamic resistance (RA) to vapor transfer compared to canopy resistance to...

  13. Bronchoscopic thermal vapor ablation in a canine model of emphysema

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tuck SA

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Stephanie A Tuck1, Vanessa Lopes-Berkas2, Sheree Beam3, Joseph C Anderson11Uptake Medical Corp, Seattle, WA, 2American Preclinical Services, Coon Rapids, MN, 3Preclinical Pathology Consulting Services, Ham Lake, MN, USAAbstract: Clinical studies indicate the potential of bronchoscopic thermal vapor ablation to result in clinically relevant improvements in severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients with upper lobe-predominant emphysema. However, the mechanisms by which vapor ablation results in lung volume reduction are not fully known. This study determined the 3-month safety and efficacy of vapor ablation in a canine model of emphysema and described the histopathological changes in the lung. The cranial lobes of papain-exposed dogs were treated with a vapor dose of ten calories per gram of lung tissue (n = 8 or were sham treated (n = 3. Safety was monitored peri- and postoperatively for 3 months. Animals were then sacrificed, estimates of lung volume reduction performed, and the lungs processed for histology. Vapor ablation was associated with an average of 20% volume reduction of the treated lobes and an absence of serious adverse events. The amount of lobar volume reduction was correlated with the amount of fibrosis and atelectasis in the treated lobe. Bronchoscopic thermal vapor ablation at a dose of 10 cal/g results in lobar volume reduction associated with remodeling of the targeted tissue characterized by mature collagen formation in the absence of major adverse events.Keywords: animal models, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, bronchoscopy, lung volume reduction

  14. Bronchoscopic thermal vapor ablation in a canine model of emphysema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuck, Stephanie A; Lopes-Berkas, Vanessa; Beam, Sheree; Anderson, Joseph C

    2012-01-01

    Clinical studies indicate the potential of bronchoscopic thermal vapor ablation to result in clinically relevant improvements in severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients with upper lobe-predominant emphysema. However, the mechanisms by which vapor ablation results in lung volume reduction are not fully known. This study determined the 3-month safety and efficacy of vapor ablation in a canine model of emphysema and described the histopathological changes in the lung. The cranial lobes of papain-exposed dogs were treated with a vapor dose of ten calories per gram of lung tissue (n = 8) or were sham treated (n = 3). Safety was monitored peri- and postoperatively for 3 months. Animals were then sacrificed, estimates of lung volume reduction performed, and the lungs processed for histology. Vapor ablation was associated with an average of 20% volume reduction of the treated lobes and an absence of serious adverse events. The amount of lobar volume reduction was correlated with the amount of fibrosis and atelectasis in the treated lobe. Bronchoscopic thermal vapor ablation at a dose of 10 cal/g results in lobar volume reduction associated with remodeling of the targeted tissue characterized by mature collagen formation in the absence of major adverse events.

  15. Navier slip model of drag reduction by Leidenfrost vapor layers

    KAUST Repository

    Berry, Joseph D.

    2017-10-17

    Recent experiments found that a hot solid sphere that is able to sustain a stable Leidenfrost vapor layer in a liquid exhibits significant drag reduction during free fall. The variation of the drag coefficient with Reynolds number deviates substantially from the characteristic drag crisis behavior at high Reynolds numbers. Measurements based on liquids of different viscosities show that the onset of the drag crisis depends on the viscosity ratio of the vapor to the liquid. Here we attempt to characterize the complexity of the Leidenfrost vapor layer with respect to its variable thickness and possible vapor circulation within, in terms of the Navier slip model that is defined by a slip length. Such a model can facilitate tangential flow and thereby alter the behavior of the boundary layer. Direct numerical and large eddy simulations of flow past a sphere at moderate to high Reynolds numbers (102≤Re≤4×104) are employed to quantify comparisons with experimental results, including the drag coefficient and the form of the downstream wake on the sphere. This provides a simple one parameter characterization of the drag reduction phenomenon due to a stable vapor layer that envelops a solid body.

  16. Navier slip model of drag reduction by Leidenfrost vapor layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Joseph D.; Vakarelski, Ivan U.; Chan, Derek Y. C.; Thoroddsen, Sigurdur T.

    2017-10-01

    Recent experiments found that a hot solid sphere that is able to sustain a stable Leidenfrost vapor layer in a liquid exhibits significant drag reduction during free fall. The variation of the drag coefficient with Reynolds number deviates substantially from the characteristic drag crisis behavior at high Reynolds numbers. Measurements based on liquids of different viscosities show that the onset of the drag crisis depends on the viscosity ratio of the vapor to the liquid. Here we attempt to characterize the complexity of the Leidenfrost vapor layer with respect to its variable thickness and possible vapor circulation within, in terms of the Navier slip model that is defined by a slip length. Such a model can facilitate tangential flow and thereby alter the behavior of the boundary layer. Direct numerical and large eddy simulations of flow past a sphere at moderate to high Reynolds numbers (1 02≤Re≤4 ×1 04) are employed to quantify comparisons with experimental results, including the drag coefficient and the form of the downstream wake on the sphere. This provides a simple one parameter characterization of the drag reduction phenomenon due to a stable vapor layer that envelops a solid body.

  17. Motionless heat pump - A new application of thermal transpiration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kugimoto, K.; Hirota, Y.; Kizaki, Y.

    2016-11-01

    A motionless heat pump system using a combination of thermal transpiration flow of a rarefied gas and a phase change of water has been proposed. This system consists primarily of a thermal transpiration pump, referred to as a Knudsen pump, and two chambers filled with water and water vapor, respectively. The Knudsen pump moves water vapor from one chamber to the other. The pressure drop in the outflow chamber promotes the evaporation of water and heat absorption, whereas the pressure increase in the inflow chamber promotes vapor condensation and heat generation. The maximum pressure difference and mass flow rate obtained by a Knudsen pump composed of a glass fiber filter were 57.6 Pa and 0.0484 mg/s/cm2, respectively, at a temperature difference across the filter of 120 K between the two chambers. The vapor delivery capacity of this pump was also measured experimentally.

  18. CFD Modeling of LNG Spill: Humidity Effect on Vapor Dispersion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannissi, S. G.; Venetsanos, A. G.; Markatos, N.

    2015-09-01

    The risks entailed by an accidental spill of Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) should be indentified and evaluated, in order to design measures for prevention and mitigation in LNG terminals. For this purpose, simulations are considered a useful tool to study LNG spills and to understand the mechanisms that influence the vapor dispersion. In the present study, the ADREA-HF CFD code is employed to simulate the TEEX1 experiment. The experiment was carried out at the Brayton Fire Training Field, which is affiliated with the Texas A&M University system and involves LNG release and dispersion over water surface in open- obstructed environment. In the simulation the source was modeled as a two-phase jet enabling the prediction of both the vapor dispersion and the liquid pool spreading. The conservation equations for the mixture are solved along with the mass fraction for natural gas. Due to the low prevailing temperatures during the spill ambient humidity condenses and this might affect the vapor dispersion. This effect was examined in this work by solving an additional conservation equation for the water mass fraction. Two different models were tested: the hydrodynamic equilibrium model which assumes kinetic equilibrium between the phases and the non hydrodynamic equilibrium model, in order to assess the effect of slip velocity on the prediction. The slip velocity is defined as the difference between the liquid phase and the vapor phase and is calculated using the algebraic slip model. Constant droplet diameter of three different sizes and a lognormal distribution of the droplet diameter were applied and the results are discussed and compared with the measurements.

  19. Biophysical control of whole tree transpiration under an urban environment in Northern China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lixin; Zhang, Zhiqiang; Li, Zhandong; Tang, Jianwu; Caldwell, Peter; Zhang, Wenjuan

    2011-05-01

    SummaryUrban reforestation in China has led to increasing debate about the impact of urban trees and forests on water resources. Although transpiration is the largest water flux leaving terrestrial ecosystems, little is known regarding whole tree transpiration in urban environments. In this study, we quantified urban tree transpiration at various temporal scales and examined the biophysical control of the transpiration pattern under different water conditions to understand how trees survive in an urban environment. Concurrent with microclimate and soil moisture measurements, transpiration from C edrus deodara(Roxb)Loud ., Zelkova schneideriana Hend.-Mazz., Euonymus bungeanus Maxim., and Metasequoia glyptostroboides Hu et cheng was measured over a 2-year period using thermal dissipation probe (TDP) techniques. The average monthly transpiration rates reached 12.78 ± 0.73 (S.E.) mm, 1.79 ± 0.16 mm, 10.18 ± 0.55 mm and 19.28 ± 2.24 mm for C. deodara, Z.schneideriana, E. bungeanus and M. glyptostroboides, respectively. Transpiration rates from M. glyptostroboides reported here may need further study as this species showed much higher sap flows and greater transpiration fluctuation under different environmental conditions than other species. Because of deep soil moisture supply, summer dry spells did not reduce transpiration rates even when tree transpiration exceeded rainfall. While vapor pressure deficit ( VPD) was the dominant environmental factor on transpiration, trees controlled canopy conductance effectively to limit transpiration in times of water stress. Our results provide evidence that urban trees could adopt strong physiological control over transpiration under high evaporative demands to avoid dehydration and can make use of water in deeper soil layers to survive summer dry spells. Moreover, urban trees have the ability to make the best use of precipitation when it is limited, and are sensitive to soil and air dryness.

  20. Enthalpy model for heating, melting, and vaporization in laser ablation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasilios Alexiades

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Laser ablation is used in a growing number of applications in various areas including medicine, archaeology, chemistry, environmental and materials sciences. In this work the heat transfer and phase change phenomena during nanosecond laser ablation of a copper (Cu target in a helium (He background gas at atmospheric pressure are presented. An enthalpy model is outlined, which accounts for heating, melting, and vaporization of the target. As far as we know, this is the first model that connects the thermodynamics and underlying kinetics of this challenging phase change problem in a self-consistent way.

  1. Modeling of Gallium Nitride Hydride Vapor Phase Epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyyappan, Meyya; Arnold, James O. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    A reactor model for the hydride vapor phase epitaxy of GaN is presented. The governing flow, energy, and species conservation equations are solved in two dimensions to examine the growth characteristics as a function of process variables and reactor geometry. The growth rate varies with GaCl composition but independent of NH3 and H2 flow rates. A change in carrier gas for Ga source from H2 to N2 affects the growth rate and uniformity for a fixed reactor configuration. The model predictions are in general agreement with observed experimental behavior.

  2. Advances in modeling of chemical vapor infiltration for tube fabrication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Starr, T.L. [Georgia Inst. of Tech., Atlanta, GA (United States). School of Materials Science and Technology

    1998-04-01

    The forced flow/thermal gradient chemical vapor infiltration process (FCVI) can be used for fabrication of tube-shaped components of ceramic matrix composites. Recent experimental work at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) includes process and materials development studies using a small tube reactor. Use of FCVI for this geometry involves significant changes in fixturing as compared to disk-shaped preforms previously fabricated. The authors have used their computer model of the CVI process to simulate tube densification and to identify process modifications that will decrease processing time. This report presents recent model developments and applications.

  3. Development of a simplified model for droplet vaporization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao Helin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Droplet vaporization is an essential sub-process of fuel spray in diesel engines,which has important effects on combustion and emissions performance. Development of a simplified droplet vaporization model is necessary to simulate gas mixture formation in cylinder for lower computational costs, and it is also applicable in practical multi-dimension spray calculations for diesel engines. An empirical exponential equation is introduced in this paper to approximate the internal temperature profile of droplet instead of solving the partial differential equation for temperature distribution. Results indicate that the computational cost has been reduced by almost thirty percent in total. Also, the concept of effective diffusion is introduced by using an enlarged diffusivity to take account of the effect of internal circulations inside droplets. The calculated result of the simplified evaporation model has been compared with that of the infinite diffusivity model and one-dimensional model respectively. It shows that the calculation precision of the simplified model is among those two models.

  4. Dynamics of canopy stomatal conductance, transpiration, and evaporation in a temperate deciduous forest, validated by carbonyl sulfide uptake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wehr, Richard; Commane, Róisín; Munger, J. William; McManus, J. Barry; Nelson, David D.; Zahniser, Mark S.; Saleska, Scott R.; Wofsy, Steven C.

    2017-01-01

    Stomatal conductance influences both photosynthesis and transpiration, thereby coupling the carbon and water cycles and affecting surface-atmosphere energy exchange. The environmental response of stomatal conductance has been measured mainly on the leaf scale, and theoretical canopy models are relied on to upscale stomatal conductance for application in terrestrial ecosystem models and climate prediction. Here we estimate stomatal conductance and associated transpiration in a temperate deciduous forest directly on the canopy scale via two independent approaches: (i) from heat and water vapor exchange and (ii) from carbonyl sulfide (OCS) uptake. We use the eddy covariance method to measure the net ecosystem-atmosphere exchange of OCS, and we use a flux-gradient approach to separate canopy OCS uptake from soil OCS uptake. We find that the seasonal and diurnal patterns of canopy stomatal conductance obtained by the two approaches agree (to within ±6 % diurnally), validating both methods. Canopy stomatal conductance increases linearly with above-canopy light intensity (in contrast to the leaf scale, where stomatal conductance shows declining marginal increases) and otherwise depends only on the diffuse light fraction, the canopy-average leaf-to-air water vapor gradient, and the total leaf area. Based on stomatal conductance, we partition evapotranspiration (ET) and find that evaporation increases from 0 to 40 % of ET as the growing season progresses, driven primarily by rising soil temperature and secondarily by rainfall. Counterintuitively, evaporation peaks at the time of year when the soil is dry and the air is moist. Our method of ET partitioning avoids concerns about mismatched scales or measurement types because both ET and transpiration are derived from eddy covariance data. Neither of the two ecosystem models tested predicts the observed dynamics of evaporation or transpiration, indicating that ET partitioning such as that provided here is needed to further

  5. Groundwater and unsaturated zone evaporation and transpiration in a semi-arid open woodland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balugani, E.; Lubczynski, M. W.; Reyes-Acosta, L.; van der Tol, C.; Francés, A. P.; Metselaar, K.

    2017-04-01

    Studies on evapotranspiration partitioning under eddy covariance (EC) towers rarely address the separate effects of transpiration and evaporation on groundwater resources. Such partitioning is important to accurately assess groundwater resources, especially in arid and semi-arid areas. The main objective of this study was to partition (evaluate separately) the evaporation and transpiration components of evapotranspiration, originated either from saturated or unsaturated zone, and estimate their contributions in a semi-arid area characterized by relatively shallow groundwater Table (0-10 m deep). Evapotranspiration, tree transpiration and subsurface evaporation were estimated with EC tower, using sap flow methods and HYDRUS1D model, respectively. To set up the HYDRUS1D model, soil material properties, soil moisture, soil temperature, soil matric potential and water table depth were measured in the area. The tree transpiration was sourced into groundwater and unsaturated zone components (∼0.017 mm d-1 for both) and accounted for only ∼6% of the evapotranspiration measured by the EC tower (∼0.565 mm d-1), due to the low canopy coverage in the study area (7%). The subsurface evaporation fluxes were also sourced into groundwater and unsaturated zone components using the SOURCE package, and their relative relevance in total evapotranspiration was assessed. Subsurface evaporation was the main flux year-round (∼0.526 mm d-1). During late autumn, winter and early spring time, the unsaturated zone evaporation was dominant, while in dry summer the relevance of groundwater evaporation increased, reaching one third of evapotranspiration, although errors in the water balance closure point still at its possible underestimation. The results show that, in arid and semi-arid areas with sparse vegetation, the often neglected groundwater evaporation is a relevant contribution to evapotranspiration, and that water vapor flow should be taken into account in the calculation of

  6. Modeling and Prediction of Soil Water Vapor Sorption Isotherms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arthur, Emmanuel; Tuller, Markus; Moldrup, Per

    2015-01-01

    Soil water vapor sorption isotherms describe the relationship between water activity (aw) and moisture content along adsorption and desorption paths. The isotherms are important for modeling numerous soil processes and are also used to estimate several soil (specific surface area, clay content......, cation exchange capacity) and engineering properties (e.g., swelling potential). Our objectives for this work were to: (i) evaluate the potential of several theoretical and empirical isotherm models to accurately describe measured moisture adsorption/desorption isotherms (aw range of 0.03 to 0.......93) for a wide range of soils; and (ii) develop and test regression models for estimating the isotherms from clay content. Preliminary results show reasonable fits of the majority of the investigated empirical and theoretical models to the measured data although some models were not capable to fit both sorption...

  7. Modeling and measurement of boiling point elevation during water vaporization from aqueous urea for SCR applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dan, Ho Jin; Lee, Joon Sik [Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-03-15

    Understanding of water vaporization is the first step to anticipate the conversion process of urea into ammonia in the exhaust stream. As aqueous urea is a mixture and the urea in the mixture acts as a non-volatile solute, its colligative properties should be considered during water vaporization. The elevation of boiling point for urea water solution is measured with respect to urea mole fraction. With the boiling-point elevation relation, a model for water vaporization is proposed underlining the correction of the heat of vaporization of water in the urea water mixture due to the enthalpy of urea dissolution in water. The model is verified by the experiments of water vaporization as well. Finally, the water vaporization model is applied to the water vaporization of aqueous urea droplets. It is shown that urea decomposition can begin before water evaporation finishes due to the boiling-point elevation.

  8. Estimation water vapor content using the mixing ratio method and validated with the ANFIS PWV model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suparta, W.; Alhasa, K. M.; Singh, M. S. J.

    2017-05-01

    This study reported the comparison between water vapor content, the surface meteorological data (pressure, temperature, and relative humidity), and precipitable water vapor (PWV) produced by PWV from adaptive neuro fuzzy inference system (ANFIS) for areas in the Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia Bangi (UKMB) station. The water vapor content value was estimated with mixing ratio method and the surface meteorological data as the parameter inputs. The accuracy of water vapor content was validated with PWV from ANFIS PWV model for the period of 20-23 December 2016. The result showed that the water vapor content has a similar trend with the PWV which produced by ANFIS PWV model (r = 0.975 at the 99% confidence level). This indicates that the water vapor content that obtained with mixing ratio agreed very well with the ANFIS PWV model. In addition, this study also found, the pattern of water vapor content and PWV have more influenced by the relative humidity.

  9. Nonequilibrium vapor-generation model for flashing flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saha, P.; Abuaf, N.; Wu, B. J.C.

    1981-01-01

    A nonequilibrium vapor generation model for flashing flows is presented. The model consists of a flashing inception point, a bubbly flow regime followed by a bubbly-slug regime, an annular or annular-mist regime, and finally a dispersed-droplet regime. Existence of superheated liquid at the inception point and beyond is recognized. The vapor generation rate in each flow regime is calculated from the estimates for interfacial area density and net interfacial heat flux. However, the bubble number density at the flashing inception point was varied to obtain optimum fits with the void fraction data taken in a vertical converging-diverging nozzle. The interfacial area density at the inception point, thus determined, showed a rapid increase with the decrease in the liquid superheat at that point. This trend is correct since in the limit of thermal equilibrium flow where the liquid superheat approaches zero, the interfacial area for heat and mass transfer should approach infinity. 32 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  10. [The study of transpiration influence on plant infrared radiation character].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Jun; Zhang, Shuan-Qin; Pan, Jia-Liang; Lian, Chang-Chun; Yang, Hui

    2012-07-01

    Studying vegetation infrared radiation character is the base of developing infrared camouflage and concealment technology of ground military target. Accurate fusion of target and background can be achieved by simulating formation mechanism of vegetation infrared radiation character. Leaf transpiration is characteristic physiological mechanism of vegetation and one of the main factors that influence its infrared radiation character. In the present paper, physical model of leaf energy balance is set up. Based on this model the influence of plant transpiration on leaf temperature is analyzed and calculated. The daily periodic variation of transpiration, leaf temperature and infrared radiation character of typical plants such as camphor tree and holly is actually measured with porometer and infrared thermal imaging system. By contrasting plant leaf with dryness leaf, experimental data indicates that plant transpiration can regulate leaf energy balance effectively and control leaf temperature in a reasonable range and suppress deep range variation of leaf infrared radiation character.

  11. Vapor pressures and enthalpies of vaporization of azides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verevkin, Sergey P., E-mail: sergey.verevkin@uni-rostock.de [Department of Physical Chemistry, University of Rostock, Dr-Lorenz-Weg 1, D-18059 Rostock (Germany); Emel' yanenko, Vladimir N. [Department of Physical Chemistry, University of Rostock, Dr-Lorenz-Weg 1, D-18059 Rostock (Germany); Algarra, Manuel [Centro de Geologia do Porto, Faculdade de Ciencias, Universidade do Porto, Rua do Campo Alegre 687, 4169-007 Porto (Portugal); Manuel Lopez-Romero, J. [Department of Organic Chemistry, University of Malaga. Campus de Teatinos s/n, 29071 Malaga (Spain); Aguiar, Fabio; Enrique Rodriguez-Borges, J.; Esteves da Silva, Joaquim C.G. [Centro de Investigacao em Quimica (CIQ-UP), Faculdade de Ciencias da Universidade do Porto, Rua do Campo Alegre 687, 4169-007 Porto (Portugal)

    2011-11-15

    Highlights: > We prepared and measured vapor pressures and vaporization enthalpies of 7 azides. > We examined consistency of new and available in the literature data. > Data for geminal azides and azido-alkanes selected for thermochemical calculations. - Abstract: Vapor pressures of some azides have been determined by the transpiration method. The molar enthalpies of vaporization {Delta}{sub l}{sup g}H{sub m} of these compounds were derived from the temperature dependencies of vapor pressures. The measured data sets were successfully checked for internal consistency by comparison with vaporization enthalpies of similarly structured compounds.

  12. Mass transport measurements and modeling for chemical vapor infiltration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Starr, T.L.; Chiang, D.Y.; Fiadzo, O.G.; Hablutzel, N. [Georgia Inst. of Tech., Atlanta, GA (United States). School of Materials Science and Engineering

    1997-12-01

    This project involves experimental and modeling investigation of densification behavior and mass transport in fiber preforms and partially densified composites, and application of these results to chemical vapor infiltration (CVI) process modeling. This supports work on-going at ORNL in process development for fabrication of ceramic matrix composite (CMC) tubes. Tube-shaped composite preforms are fabricated at ORNL with Nextel{trademark} 312 fiber (3M Corporation, St. Paul, MN) by placing and compressing several layers of braided sleeve on a tubular mandrel. In terms of fiber architecture these preforms are significantly different than those made previously with Nicalon{trademark} fiber (Nippon Carbon Corp., Tokyo, Japan) square weave cloth. The authors have made microstructure and permeability measurements on several of these preforms and a few partially densified composites so as to better understand their densification behavior during CVI.

  13. Modelling diurnal courses of photosynthesis and transpiration of leaves on the basis of stomatal and non-stomatal responses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yu, Q.; Goudriaan, J.; Wang, T.D.

    2001-01-01

    A mathematical model for photoinhibition of leaf photosynthesis was developed by formalising the assumptions that (1) the rate of photoinhibition is proportional to irradiance; and (2) the rate of recovery, derived from the formulae for a pseudo first-order process, is proportional to the extent of

  14. Nonisothermal particle modeling of municipal solid waste combustion with heavy metal vaporization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mazza, G. [Facultad de Ingenieria, Departamento de Quimica, Universidad Nacional del Comahue, IDEPA (CONICET - UNCo), Buenos Aires 1400, 8300 Neuquen (Argentina); Falcoz, Q.; Gauthier, D.; Flamant, G. [Laboratoire Procedes et Materiaux et Energie Solaire (CNRS-PROMES), 7 Rue du Four Solaire, Odeillo, 66120 Font-Romeu Cedex (France); Soria, J. [Facultad de Ingenieria, Departamento de Quimica, Universidad Nacional del Comahue, IDEPA (CONICET - UNCo), Buenos Aires 1400, 8300 Neuquen (Argentina); Laboratoire Procedes et Materiaux et Energie Solaire (CNRS-PROMES), 7 Rue du Four Solaire, Odeillo, 66120 Font-Romeu Cedex (France)

    2010-12-15

    A particulate model was developed for municipal solid-waste incineration in a fluidized bed combining solid-waste-particle combustion and heavy metal vaporization from the burning particles. Based on a simpler, isothermal version presented previously, this model combines an asymptotic-combustion model for carbonaceous-solid combustion and a shrinking-core model to describe the heavy metal vaporization phenomenon, in which the particle is now considered nonisothermal. A parametric study is presented that shows the influence of temperature on the global metal-vaporization process. The simulation results are compared to experimental data obtained with a lab-scale fluid bed incinerator and to the results of the simpler isothermal model. It is shown that conduction in the particle strongly affects the variation of the vaporization rate with time and that the present version of the model well fits both the shape of the plots and the maximum heavy metal vaporization rates for all bed temperatures. (author)

  15. Molecular interpretation of nonclassical gas dynamics of dense vapors under the van der Waals model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Colonna, P.; Guardone, A.

    2006-01-01

    The van der Waals polytropic gas model is used to investigate the role of attractive and repulsive intermolecular forces and the influence of molecular complexity on the possible nonclassical gas dynamic behavior of vapors near the liquid-vapor saturation curve. The decrease of the sound speed upon

  16. Thermal transpiration: A molecular dynamics study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    T, Joe Francis [Computational Nanotechnology Laboratory, School of Nano Science and Technology, National Institute of Technology Calicut, Kozhikode (India); Sathian, Sarith P. [Department of Applied Mechanics, Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai (India)

    2014-12-09

    Thermal transpiration is a phenomenon where fluid molecules move from the cold end towards the hot end of a channel under the influence of longitudinal temperature gradient alone. Although the phenomenon of thermal transpiration is observed at rarefied gas conditions in macro systems, the phenomenon can occur at atmospheric pressure if the characteristic dimensions of the channel is less than 100 nm. The flow through these nanosized channels is characterized by the free molecular flow regimes and continuum theory is inadequate to describe the flow. Thus a non-continuum method like molecular dynamics (MD) is necessary to study such phenomenon. In the present work, MD simulations were carried out to investigate the occurance of thermal transpiration in copper and platinum nanochannels at atmospheric pressure conditions. The mean pressure of argon gas confined inside the nano channels was maintained around 1 bar. The channel height is maintained at 2nm. The argon atoms interact with each other and with the wall atoms through the Lennard-Jones potential. The wall atoms are modelled using an EAM potential. Further, separate simulations were carried out where a Harmonic potential is used for the atom-atom interaction in the platinum channel. A thermally insulating wall was introduced between the low and high temperature regions and those wall atoms interact with fluid atoms through a repulsive potential. A reduced cut off radius were used to achieve this. Thermal creep is induced by applying a temperature gradient along the channel wall. It was found that flow developed in the direction of the increasing temperature gradient of the wall. An increase in the volumetric flux was observed as the length of the cold and the hot regions of the wall were increased. The effect of temperature gradient and the wall-fluid interaction strength on the flow parameters have been studied to understand the phenomenon better.

  17. An interim reference model for the variability of the middle atmosphere water vapor distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remsberg, E. E.; Russell, J. M., III; Wu, C.-Y.

    1990-01-01

    A reference model for the middle atmosphere water vapor distribution for some latitudes and seasons was developed using two data sets. One is the seven months of Nimbus LIMS data obtained during November 1978 to May 1979 over the range 64 deg S - 84 deg N latitude and from about 100-mb to 1-mb altitude, and the other is represented by water vapor profiles from 0.2 mb to 0.01 mb in the mid-mesosphere, measured on ground at several fixed mid-latitude sites in the Northern Hemisphere, using microwave-emission techniques. This model provides an interim water vapor profile for the entire vertical range of the middle atmosphere, with accuracies of better than 25 percent. The daily variability of stratospheric water vapor profiles about the monthly mean is demonstrated, and information is provided on the longitudinal variability of LIMS water vapor profiles about the daily, weekly, and monthly zonal means.

  18. Transpiration in an oil palm landscape: effects of palm age

    Science.gov (United States)

    Röll, A.; Niu, F.; Meijide, A.; Hardanto, A.; Hendrayanto; Knohl, A.; Hölscher, D.

    2015-10-01

    epiphytes. Diurnally, oil palm transpiration rates were characterized by an early peak between 10 and 11 a.m.; there was a pronounced hysteresis in the leaf water use response to changes in vapor pressure deficit for all palms of advanced age. On the day-to-day basis this resulted in a relatively low variability of oil palm water use regardless of fluctuations in vapor pressure deficit and radiation. We conclude that oil palm dominated landscapes show some spatial variations in (evapo)transpiration rates, e.g., due to varying age-structures, but that the temporal variability of oil palm transpiration is rather low. The stand transpiration of some of the studied oil palm stands was as high or even higher than values reported for different tropical forests, indicating a high water use of oil palms under yet to be explained site or management conditions. Our study provides first insights into the eco-hydrological characteristics of oil palms as well as a first estimate of oil palm water use across a gradient of plantation age. It sheds first light on some of the hydrological consequences of the continuing expansion of oil palm plantations.

  19. Modeling of vapor-liquid-liquid equilibria in binary mixtures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tzabar, Nir; ter Brake, Hermanus J.M.

    2016-01-01

    Vapor compression and Joule–Thomson (JT) cycles provide cooling power at the boiling temperatures of the refrigerants. Maintaining a fixed pressure in the evaporator allows for a stable cooling temperature at the boiling point of a pure refrigerant. In these coolers enhanced cooling power can be

  20. Evaluation of the representation of the hydrological cycle in Western Siberia in the LMDZ general circulation model using ground-based and satellite measurements of water vapor and precipitation isotopic composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gryazin, Victor; Risi, Camille; Jouzel, Jean; Zakharov, Vyacheslav; Gribanov, Konstantin; Rokotyan, Nikita; Bastrikov, Vladislav; Worden, John; Frankenberg, Christian; Kurita, Naoyuki

    2013-04-01

    The hydrological and biochemical cycles in regions of peatlands and permafrost are particularly sensitive to climate perturbations. Credible climate change projections in these regions require a realistic representation by climate models of atmospheric and hydrological processes specific to those regions. In this context, observations of the water vapor and precipitation composition are emerging as an additional constrain to better evaluate the realism of the representation of the hydrological cycle by models. In high latitude regions, the water isotopic composition keeps an imprint of various processes such as distillation of air masses, evaporation and transpiration recycling air masses along trajectories, cloud processes and vertical mixing. In this study we evaluate the isotopic composition simulated by LMDZ general circulation model in Western Siberia against a combination of isotopic measurements in precipitation and in water vapor. First, the GNIP and SNIP networks provide information on the geographical and seasonal variations of H218O and HDO composition (yielding δD and d-excess) in precipitation. Second, in-situ measurements by a Picarro analyzer and ground-based FTIR retrievals document hourly to seasonal variability in δD and d-excess in low-level water vapor at the site of Ekaterinburg in Western Siberia. Third, satellite measurements using the GOSAT and TES satellite instruments document the geographical and temporal (intra-seasonal to seasonal) variations of water vapor δD in the total column and at different levels of the troposphere respectively. To first order, observed geographical and temporal variations at different time scales are well captured by LMDZ, though the latitudinal gradient and the daily variability in water vapor δD are underestimated. Simulations are investigated to interpret these model-data differences in terms of physical processes. In particular, sensitivity tests to the representation of transport, cloud processes and

  1. Modeling chemical vapor deposition of silicon dioxide in microreactors at atmospheric pressure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Konakov, S.A.; Krzhizhanovskaya, V.V.

    2015-01-01

    We developed a multiphysics mathematical model for simulation of silicon dioxide Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) from tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS) and oxygen mixture in a microreactor at atmospheric pressure. Microfluidics is a promising technology with numerous applications in chemical synthesis

  2. Measuring Transpiration to Regulate Winter Irrigation Rates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samuelson, Lisa [Auburn University

    2006-11-08

    Periodic transpiration (monthly sums) in a young loblolly pine plantation between ages 3 and 6 was measured using thermal dissipation probes. Fertilization and fertilization with irrigation were better than irrigation alone in increasing transpiration of young loblolly pines during winter months, apparently because of increased leaf area in fertilized trees. Irrigation alone did not significantly increase transpiration compared with the non-fertilized and non-irrigated control plots.

  3. Model analysis of mechanisms controlling pneumatic soil vapor extraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høier, Camilla Kruse; Sonnenborg, Torben Obel; Jensen, Karsten Høgh

    2009-01-01

    The efficiency of traditional soil venting or soil vapor extraction (SVE) highly depends on the architecture of the subsurface because imposed advective air flow tends to bypass low-permeable contaminated areas. Pneumatic SVE is a technique developed to enhance remediation efficiency of heterogen......The efficiency of traditional soil venting or soil vapor extraction (SVE) highly depends on the architecture of the subsurface because imposed advective air flow tends to bypass low-permeable contaminated areas. Pneumatic SVE is a technique developed to enhance remediation efficiency...... of heterogeneous soils by enforcing large fluctuating pressure fronts through the contaminated area. Laboratory experiments have suggested that pneumatic SVE considerably improves the recovery rate from low-permeable units. We have analyzed the experimental results using a numerical code and quantified...... level the pneumatic venting technology is superior to the traditional technique, and that the method is particularly efficient in cases where large permeability contrasts exist between soil units in the subsurface....

  4. A photothermal model of selective photothermolysis with dynamically changing vaporization temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ji Zhuang; Zhang, Xue Xue; Audette, Michel

    2011-09-01

    The theory of selective photothermolysis (SP) is used in many fields of laser surgery and medicine. As several parameters and a number of complicated photothermal interactions are involved in SP, numerical simulations have been providing an important and effective way in SP studies. However, with different photothermal models of SP, simulated results differ considerably. In addition, insufficient attention has been paid to tissue pressure variation during SP in these models, so that vessel rupture and other clinical phenomena cannot be explained. A novel photothermal model of SP was proposed using a Monte Carlo method to simulate the laser transport in the tissue, a heat transfer equation with dynamically changing vaporization temperature to calculate the temperature distribution, and the Arrhenius equation to predict the thermal damage. A factor of trapped vaporized tissue water k was introduced to describe the effects on tissue pressure, temperature, and other related parameters. It was shown that the simulation results are affected significantly by k. Temperature and thermal damage volume are almost identical, respectively, to those obtained with models with vaporization at 100°C and models without vaporization when k = 0 and 1, while thermal damage volume is close to that obtained with models of vaporization at 110°C and 130°C, respectively, when k = 0.022 and k = 0.18. To some extent, the current models without vaporization and models with vaporization at constant temperature can be regarded as special cases at specific situations of this new photothermal model of SP. In addition, more descriptive simulation results, such as temperature, thermal damage, and pressure, are accessible with this model, although the accuracy depends on the value of k, the estimation of which is planned as future work.

  5. TRACER-II: a complete computational model for mixing and propagation of vapor explosions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bang, K.H. [School of Mechanical Engineering, Korea Maritime Univ., Pusan (Korea, Republic of); Park, I.G.; Park, G.C.

    1998-01-01

    A vapor explosion is a physical process in which very rapid energy transfer occurs between a hot liquid and a volatile, colder liquid when the two liquids come into a sudden contact. For the analyses of potential impacts from such explosive events, a computer program, TRACER-II, has been developed, which contains a complete description of mixing and propagation phases of vapor explosions. The model consists of fuel, fragmented fuel (debris), coolant liquid, and coolant vapor in two-dimensional Eulerian coordinates. The set of governing equations are solved numerically using finite difference method. The results of this numerical simulation of vapor explosions are discussed in comparison with the recent experimental data of FARO and KROTOS tests. When compared to some selected FARO and KROTOS data, the fuel-coolant mixing and explosion propagation behavior agree reasonably with the data, although the results are yet sensitive primarily to the melt breakup and fragmentation modeling. (author)

  6. Mass transfer relations for transpiration evaporation experiments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Limpt, J.A.C. van; Beerkens, R.G.C.; Lankhorst, A.M.; Habraken, A.

    2005-01-01

    Transpiration evaporation experiments are often used to study evaporation kinetics from liquids or melts. The mass transport of volatile species in a transpiration experiment depends among others on the flow conditions of the carrier gas in the tube and on the geometrical configuration. For a

  7. A Laboratory Exercise to Assess Transpiration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrock, Gould F.

    1982-01-01

    Procedures are outlined for a laboratory exercise in which students use a gravimetric method to determine the rate of transpiration in sunflower seedlings. Discusses the data in terms of the effectiveness of stomatal openings, mechanisms for water movement in plants, and the role of transpiration in the environment. (DC)

  8. Modeling of chemical vapor deposition. I. General considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korec, J.; Heyen, M.

    1982-12-01

    In this study a general analysis of chemical vapor deposition (CVD) processes carried out in open flow systems is presented. In this treatment the successive process steps, namely mass transport in the gas phase, adsorption, chemical reaction and surface diffusion are included. The proposed approach allows computation of the activity of the material to be deposited; this quantity is determined by a balance between the rates of gas phase diffusion and of surface processes. An expression is presented relating the activity near the interface to the growth rate of the deposited layer. It is shown that the same approach can be used for etching conditions.

  9. Ricor's Nanostar water vapor compact cryopump: applications and model overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Rodney S.; Nachman, Ilan; Tauber, Tomer; Kootzenko, Michael; Barak, Boris; Aminov, Eli; Gover, Dan

    2017-05-01

    Ricor Systems has developed a compact, single stage cryopump that fills the gap where GM and other type cryopumps can't fit in. Stirling cycle technology is highly efficient and is the primary cryogenic technology for use in IR, SWIR, HOT FPA, and other IR detector technology in military, security, and aerospace applications. Current GM based dual stage cryopumps have been the legacy type water vapor pumping system for more than 50 years. However, the typically large cryopanel head, compressor footprint, and power requirements make them not cost and use effective for small, tabletop evaporation / sputtering systems, portable analysis systems, and other systems requiring small volume vacuum creation from medium, high, and UHV levels. This single stage cryopump works well in-line with diffusion and molecular turbopumps. Studies have shown effective cooperation with non-evaporable getter technology as well for UHV levels. Further testing in this area are ongoing. Temperatures created by Stirling cycle cryogenic coolers develop a useful temperature range of 40 to 150K. Temperatures of approximately 100 K are sufficient to condense water and all hydrocarbons oil vapors.

  10. A particulate model of solid waste incineration in a fluidized bed combining combustion and heavy metal vaporization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mazza, G. [Facultad de Ingenieria, Departamento de Quimica, Universidad Nacional del Comahue, UE Neuquen (CONICET - UNCo), Buenos Aires 1400, 8300 Neuquen (Argentina); Falcoz, Q.; Gauthier, D.; Flamant, G. [Laboratoire Procedes Materiaux et Energie Solaire (CNRS-PROMES), 7 Rue du Four Solaire, Odeillo, 66120 Font-Romeu (France)

    2009-11-15

    This study aims to develop a particulate model combining solid waste particle combustion and heavy metal vaporization from burning particles during MSW incineration in a fluidized bed. The original approach for this model combines an asymptotic combustion model for the carbonaceous solid combustion and a shrinking core model to describe the heavy metal vaporization. A parametric study is presented. The global metal vaporization process is strongly influenced by temperature. Internal mass transfer controls the metal vaporization rate at low temperatures. At high temperatures, the chemical reactions associated with particle combustion control the metal vaporization rate. A comparison between the simulation results and experimental data obtained with a laboratory-scale fluid bed incinerator and Cd-spiked particles shows that the heavy metal vaporization is correctly predicted by the model. The predictions are better at higher temperatures because of the temperature gradient inside the particle. Future development of the model will take this into account. (author)

  11. Comparison of a model vapor deposited glass films to equilibrium glass films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flenner, Elijah; Berthier, Ludovic; Charbonneau, Patrick; Zamponi, Francesco

    Vapor deposition of particles onto a substrate held at around 85% of the glass transition temperature can create glasses with increased density, enthalpy, kinetic stability, and mechanical stability compared to an ordinary glass created by cooling. It is estimated that an ordinary glass would need to age thousands of years to reach the kinetic stability of a vapor deposited glass, and a natural question is how close to the equilibrium is the vapor deposited glass. To understand the process, algorithms akin to vapor deposition are used to create simulated glasses that have a higher kinetic stability than their annealed counterpart, although these glasses may not be well equilibrated either. Here we use novel models optimized for a swap Monte Carlo algorithm in order to create equilibrium glass films and compare their properties with those of glasses obtained from vapor deposition algorithms. This approach allows us to directly assess the non-equilibrium nature of vapor-deposited ultrastable glasses. Simons Collaboration on Cracking the Glass Problem and NSF Grant No. DMR 1608086.

  12. Microclimatological and Physiological Controls of Stomatal Conductance and Transpiration of Co-Occurring Seedlings with Varying Shade Tolerance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegert, C. M.; Levia, D. F.

    2010-12-01

    Forest ecosystems provide a significant portion of fresh water to the hydrologic cycle through transpiration, the majority of which is supplied by saplings and mature trees. However, a smaller, yet measurable, proportion is also supplied by seedlings. The contribution of seedlings is dependent upon physiological characteristics of the species, whose range of habitat is ultimately controlled by microclimate. The objectives of this study were to (1) observe meteorological conditions of two forest microlimates and (2) assess the intra- and interspecific stomatal conductance and transpiration responses of naturally occurring seedlings of varying shade tolerance. Naturally established seedlings in a deciduous forest understory and an adjacent clearing were monitored throughout the 2008 growing season in southeastern Pennsylvania (39°49'N, 75°43'W). Clear spatial and temporal trends of stomatal conductance and transpiration were observed throughout this study. The understory microclimate conditions overall had a lower degree of variability and had consistently lower mean quantum flux density, air temperature, vapor pressure deficit, volumetric water content, and soil temperature than the clearing plot. Shade tolerant understory seedlings (Fagus grandifolia Ehrh. (American beech) and Prunus serotina L. (black cherry)) had significantly lower mean monthly rates of water loss (p = 0.05) than shade intolerant clearing seedlings (P. serotina and Liriodendron tulipifera L. (yellow poplar)). Additionally, water loss by shade grown P. serotina was significantly lower (p = 0.05) than by sun grown P. serotina. Significant intraspecific responses (p = 0.05) were also observed on a monthly basis, with the exception of L. tulipifera. These findings indicate that physiological differences, specifically shade tolerance, play an important role in determining rates of stomatal conductance and transpiration in tree seedlings. To a lesser degree, microclimate variability was also shown

  13. Species differences in evergreen tree transpiration at daily, seasonal, and interannual timescales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Link, P.; Simonin, K. A.; Oshun, J.; Dietrich, W.; Dawson, T. E.; Fung, I.

    2012-12-01

    Mediterranean climates have rainy winter and dry summer seasons, so the season of water availability (winter) is out of phase with the season of light availability and atmospheric demand (summer). In this study, we investigate the seasonality of tree transpiration in a Mediterranean climate, using observations from a small (8000 m2), forested, steep (~35 degree) hillslope at the UC Angelo Reserve, in the northern California Coast Range. The site is instrumented with over 850 sensors transmitting hydrologic and meteorological data at less than 30-minute intervals. Here, we analyze four years of high-frequency measurements from 45 sap flow sensors in 30 trees, six depth profiles of soil moisture measured by TDR, and spatially distributed measurements of air temperature, relative humidity, solar radiation, and other meteorological variables. The sap flow measurements show a difference in transpiration seasonality between common California Coast Range evergreen tree species. Douglas firs (Pseudotsuga menziesii) maintain significant transpiration through the winter rainy season and transpire maximally in the spring, but Douglas fir transpiration declines sharply in the summer dry season. Madrones (Arbutus menziesii), in contrast, transpire maximally in the summer dry season. The seasonal patterns are quantified using principal component analysis. Nonlinear regressions against environmental variables show that the difference in transpiration seasonality arises from different sensitivities to atmospheric demand (VPD) and root-zone moisture. The different sensitivities to VPD and root-zone moisture cause species differences not just in seasonal patterns, but also in high temporal frequency (daily to weekly) variability of transpiration. We also contrast the interannual variability of dry season transpiration among the different species, and show that precipitation above a threshold triggers a Douglas fir response. Finally, we use a simple 1-D model of the atmospheric

  14. How Reliable Are Heat Pulse Velocity Methods for Estimating Tree Transpiration?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael A. Forster

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Transpiration is a significant component of the hydrologic cycle and its accurate quantification is critical for modelling, industry, and policy decisions. Sap flow sensors provide a low cost and practical method to measure transpiration. Various methods to measure sap flow are available and a popular family of methods is known as heat pulse velocity (HPV. Theory on thermal conductance and convection, that underpins HPV methods, suggests transpiration can be directly estimated from sensor measurements without the need for laborious calibrations. To test this accuracy, transpiration estimated from HPV sensors is compared with an independent measure of plant water use such as a weighing lysimeter. A meta-analysis of the literature that explicitly tested the accuracy of a HPV sensors against an independent measure of transpiration was conducted. Data from linear regression analysis was collated where an R2 of 1 indicates perfect precision and a slope of 1 of the linear regression curve indicates perfect accuracy. The average R2 and slope from all studies was 0.822 and 0.860, respectively. However, the overall error, or deviation from real transpiration values, was 34.706%. The results indicate that HPV sensors are precise in correlating heat velocity with rates of transpiration, but poor in quantifying transpiration. Various sources of error in converting heat velocity into sap velocity and sap flow are discussed including probe misalignment, wound corrections, thermal diffusivity, stem water content, placement of sensors in sapwood, and scaling of point measurements to whole plants. Where whole plant water use or transpiration is required in a study, it is recommended that all sap flow sensors are calibrated against an independent measure of transpiration.

  15. Modeling Convection of Water Vapor into the Mid-latitude Summer Stratosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clapp, C.; Leroy, S. S.; Anderson, J. G.

    2016-12-01

    Water vapor in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere (UTLS) from the tropics to the poles is important both radiatively and chemically. Water vapor is the most important greenhouse gas, and increases in water vapor concentrations in the UTLS lead to cooling at these levels and induce warming at the surface [Forster and Shine, 1999; 2002; Solomon et al., 2010]. Water vapor is also integral to stratospheric chemistry. It is the dominant source of OH in the lower stratosphere [Hanisco et al., 2001], and increases in water vapor concentrations promote stratospheric ozone loss by raising the reactivity of several key heterogeneous reactions as well as by promoting the growth of reactive surface area [Anderson et al., 2012; Carslaw et al., 1995; Carslaw et al., 1997; Drdla and Muller , 2012; Kirk-Davidoff et al., 1999; Shi et al., 2001]. However, the processes that control the distribution and phase of water in this region of the atmosphere are not well understood. This is especially true at mid-latitudes where several different dynamical mechanisms are capable of influencing UTLS water vapor concentrations. The contribution by deep convective storm systems that penetrate into the lower stratosphere is the least well understood and the least well represented in global models because of the small spatial scales and short time scales over which convection occurs. To address this issue, we have begun a modeling study to investigate the convective injection of water vapor from the troposphere into the stratosphere in the mid-latitudes. Fine-scale models have been previously used to simulate convection from the troposphere to the stratosphere [e.g., Homeyer et al., 2014]. Here we employ the Advanced Research Weather and Research Forecasting model (ARW) at 3-km resolution to resolve convection over the mid-western United States during August of 2013 including a storm system observed by SEAC4RS. We assess the transport of water vapor into the stratosphere over the model

  16. A mathematical model and simulation results of plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition of silicon nitride films

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Konakov, S.A.; Krzhizhanovskaya, V.V.

    2015-01-01

    We developed a mathematical model of Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition (PECVD) of silicon nitride thin films from SiH4-NH3-N2-Ar mixture, an important application in modern materials science. Our multiphysics model describes gas dynamics, chemical physics, plasma physics and electrodynamics.

  17. Improved thermal lattice Boltzmann model for simulation of liquid-vapor phase change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qing; Zhou, P.; Yan, H. J.

    2017-12-01

    In this paper, an improved thermal lattice Boltzmann (LB) model is proposed for simulating liquid-vapor phase change, which is aimed at improving an existing thermal LB model for liquid-vapor phase change [S. Gong and P. Cheng, Int. J. Heat Mass Transfer 55, 4923 (2012), 10.1016/j.ijheatmasstransfer.2012.04.037]. First, we emphasize that the replacement of ∇ .(λ ∇ T ) /∇.(λ ∇ T ) ρ cV ρ cV with ∇ .(χ ∇ T ) is an inappropriate treatment for diffuse interface modeling of liquid-vapor phase change. Furthermore, the error terms ∂t 0(T v ) +∇ .(T vv ) , which exist in the macroscopic temperature equation recovered from the previous model, are eliminated in the present model through a way that is consistent with the philosophy of the LB method. Moreover, the discrete effect of the source term is also eliminated in the present model. Numerical simulations are performed for droplet evaporation and bubble nucleation to validate the capability of the model for simulating liquid-vapor phase change. It is shown that the numerical results of the improved model agree well with those of a finite-difference scheme. Meanwhile, it is found that the replacement of ∇ .(λ ∇ T ) /∇ .(λ ∇ T ) ρ cV ρ cV with ∇ .(χ ∇ T ) leads to significant numerical errors and the error terms in the recovered macroscopic temperature equation also result in considerable errors.

  18. UNCERTAINTY AND THE JOHNSON-ETTINGER MODEL FOR VAPOR INTRUSION CALCULATIONS

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Johnson-Ettinger Model is widely used for assessing the impacts of contaminated vapors on residential air quality. Typical use of this model relies on a suite of estimated data, with few site-specific measurements. Software was developed to provide the public with automate...

  19. Numerical modeling of physical vapor transport under microgravity conditions: Effect of thermal creep and stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackowski, Daniel W.; Knight, Roy W.

    1993-01-01

    One of the most promising applications of microgravity (micro-g) environments is the manufacture of exotic and high-quality crystals in closed cylindrical ampoules using physical vapor transport (PVT) processes. The quality enhancements are believed to be due to the absence of buoyant convection in the weightless environment - resulting in diffusion-limited transport of the vapor. In a typical experiment, solid-phase sample material is initially contained at one end of the ampoule. The sample is made to sublime into the vapor phase and deposit onto the opposite end by maintaining the source at an elevated temperature with respect to the deposit. Identification of the physical factors governing both the rates and uniformity of crystal growth, and the optimization of the micro-g technology, will require an accurate modeling of the vapor transport within the ampoule. Previous micro-g modeling efforts have approached the problem from a 'classical' convective/diffusion formulation, in which convection is driven by the action of buoyancy on thermal and solutal density differences. The general conclusion of these works have been that in low gravity environments the effect of buoyancy on vapor transport is negligible, and vapor transport occurs in a diffusion-limited mode. However, it has been recently recognized than in the non-isothermal (and often low total pressure) conditions encountered in ampoules, the commonly-assumed no-slip boundary condition to the differential equations governing fluid motion can be grossly unrepresentative of the actual situation. Specifically, the temperature gradients can give rise to thermal creep flows at the ampoule side walls. In addition, temperature gradients in the vapor itself can, through the action of thermal stress, lead to bulk fluid convection.

  20. Vaporization inside a mini microfin tube: experimental results and modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diani, A.; Rossetto, L.

    2015-11-01

    This paper proposes a comparison among the common R134a and the extremely low GWP refrigerant R1234yf during vaporization inside a mini microfin tube. This microfin tube has an internal diameter of 2.4 mm, it has 40 fins, with a fin height of 0.12 mm. Due to the high heat transfer coefficients shown by this tube, this technology can lead to a refrigerant charge reduction. Tests were run in the Heat Transfer in Micro Geometries Lab of the Dipartimento di Ingegneria Industriale of the Università di Padova. Mass velocities range between 375 and 940 kg m-2 s-1, heat fluxes from 10 to 50 kW m-2, vapour qualities from 0.10 to 0.99, at a saturation temperature of 30°C. The comparison among the two fluids is proposed at the same operating conditions, in order to highlight the heat transfer and pressure drop differences among the two refrigerants. In addition, two correlations are proposed to estimate the heat transfer coefficient and frictional pressure drop during refrigerant flow boiling inside mini microfin tubes. These correlations well predict the experimental values, and thus they can be used as a useful tool to design evaporators based on these mini microfin tubes.

  1. Wind effects on leaf transpiration challenge the concept of "potential evaporation"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schymanski, S. J.; Or, D.

    2015-06-01

    Transpiration is commonly conceptualised as a fraction of some potential rate, driven by so-called "atmospheric evaporative demand". Therefore, atmospheric evaporative demand or "potential evaporation" is generally used alongside with precipitation and soil moisture to characterise the environmental conditions that affect plant water use. Consequently, an increase in potential evaporation (e.g. due to climate change) is believed to cause increased transpiration and/or vegetation water stress. In the present study, we investigated the question whether potential evaporation constitutes a meaningful reference for transpiration and compared sensitivity of potential evaporation and leaf transpiration to atmospheric forcing. A physically-based leaf energy balance model was used, considering the dependence of feedbacks between leaf temperature and exchange rates of radiative, sensible and latent heat on stomatal resistance. Based on modelling results and supporting experimental evidence, we conclude that stomatal resistance cannot be parameterised as a factor relating transpiration to potential evaporation, as the ratio between transpiration and potential evaporation not only varies with stomatal resistance, but also with wind speed, air temperature, irradiance and relative humidity. Furthermore, the effect of wind speed in particular implies increase in potential evaporation, which is commonly interpreted as increased "water stress", but at the same time can reduce leaf transpiration, implying a decrease in water demand at leaf scale.

  2. Contribution to the Study of Optical Properties of a Dielectric Medium (Atomic Vapor) Using the Lorentz Model

    OpenAIRE

    Benosman, H; T. Benouaz; A CHIKHAOUI

    2012-01-01

    Optical properties of a dielectric medium consisting of an atomic vapor are investigated theoretically using the model of elastically bound electrons. This model describes the interaction of an electromagnetic field with the bound electrons to the vapor atoms [7]. In this paper, we propose a formalism which takes into accurate the effect of the number of electrons on the vapor index. We use the approximation of free electrons (no interaction between free electrons)...

  3. Numerical Analysis of Convection/Transpiration Cooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glass, David E.; Dilley, Arthur D.; Kelly, H. Neale

    1999-01-01

    An innovative concept utilizing the natural porosity of refractory-composite materials and hydrogen coolant to provide CONvective and TRANspiration (CONTRAN) cooling and oxidation protection has been numerically studied for surfaces exposed to a high heat flux, high temperature environment such as hypersonic vehicle engine combustor walls. A boundary layer code and a porous media finite difference code were utilized to analyze the effect of convection and transpiration cooling on surface heat flux and temperature. The boundary, layer code determined that transpiration flow is able to provide blocking of the surface heat flux only if it is above a minimum level due to heat addition from combustion of the hydrogen transpirant. The porous media analysis indicated that cooling of the surface is attained with coolant flow rates that are in the same range as those required for blocking, indicating that a coupled analysis would be beneficial.

  4. High atmospheric demand for water can limit forest carbon uptake and transpiration as severely as dry soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulman, Benjamin N.; Roman, D. Tyler; Yi, Koong; Wang, Lixin; Phillips, Richard P.; Novick, Kimberly A.

    2016-09-01

    When stressed by low soil water content (SWC) or high vapor pressure deficit (VPD), plants close stomata, reducing transpiration and photosynthesis. However, it has historically been difficult to disentangle the magnitudes of VPD compared to SWC limitations on ecosystem-scale fluxes. We used a 13 year record of eddy covariance measurements from a forest in south central Indiana, USA, to quantify how transpiration and photosynthesis respond to fluctuations in VPD versus SWC. High VPD and low SWC both explained reductions in photosynthesis relative to its long-term mean, as well as reductions in transpiration relative to potential transpiration estimated with the Penman-Monteith equation. Flux responses to typical fluctuations in SWC and VPD had similar magnitudes. Integrated over the year, VPD fluctuations accounted for significant reductions of GPP in both nondrought and drought years. Our results suggest that increasing VPD under climatic warming could reduce forest CO2 uptake regardless of changes in SWC.

  5. FPGA-based Fused Smart Sensor for Real-Time Plant-Transpiration Dynamic Estimation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irineo Torres-Pacheco

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Plant transpiration is considered one of the most important physiological functions because it constitutes the plants evolving adaptation to exchange moisture with a dry atmosphere which can dehydrate or eventually kill the plant. Due to the importance of transpiration, accurate measurement methods are required; therefore, a smart sensor that fuses five primary sensors is proposed which can measure air temperature, leaf temperature, air relative humidity, plant out relative humidity and ambient light. A field programmable gate array based unit is used to perform signal processing algorithms as average decimation and infinite impulse response filters to the primary sensor readings in order to reduce the signal noise and improve its quality. Once the primary sensor readings are filtered, transpiration dynamics such as: transpiration, stomatal conductance, leaf-air-temperature-difference and vapor pressure deficit are calculated in real time by the smart sensor. This permits the user to observe different primary and calculated measurements at the same time and the relationship between these which is very useful in precision agriculture in the detection of abnormal conditions. Finally, transpiration related stress conditions can be detected in real time because of the use of online processing and embedded communications capabilities.

  6. FPGA-based Fused Smart Sensor for Real-Time Plant-Transpiration Dynamic Estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millan-Almaraz, Jesus Roberto; de Jesus Romero-Troncoso, Rene; Guevara-Gonzalez, Ramon Gerardo; Contreras-Medina, Luis Miguel; Carrillo-Serrano, Roberto Valentin; Osornio-Rios, Roque Alfredo; Duarte-Galvan, Carlos; Rios-Alcaraz, Miguel Angel; Torres-Pacheco, Irineo

    2010-01-01

    Plant transpiration is considered one of the most important physiological functions because it constitutes the plants evolving adaptation to exchange moisture with a dry atmosphere which can dehydrate or eventually kill the plant. Due to the importance of transpiration, accurate measurement methods are required; therefore, a smart sensor that fuses five primary sensors is proposed which can measure air temperature, leaf temperature, air relative humidity, plant out relative humidity and ambient light. A field programmable gate array based unit is used to perform signal processing algorithms as average decimation and infinite impulse response filters to the primary sensor readings in order to reduce the signal noise and improve its quality. Once the primary sensor readings are filtered, transpiration dynamics such as: transpiration, stomatal conductance, leaf-air-temperature-difference and vapor pressure deficit are calculated in real time by the smart sensor. This permits the user to observe different primary and calculated measurements at the same time and the relationship between these which is very useful in precision agriculture in the detection of abnormal conditions. Finally, transpiration related stress conditions can be detected in real time because of the use of online processing and embedded communications capabilities. PMID:22163656

  7. Transpiration by two poplar varieties grown as coppice for biomass production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Simon J.; Hall, Robin L.; Rosier, Paul T. W.

    1999-07-01

    Fast-growing tree clones selected for biomass plantations are highly productive and therefore likely to use more water than the agricultural crops they replace. We report field measurements of transpiration through the summer of 1994 from two poplar clones, Beaupré (Populus trichocarpa Torr. & A. Gray x P. deltoides Bartr. ex Marsh.) and Dorschkamp (P. deltoides x P. nigra L.), grown as unirrigated short-rotation coppice in southern England. Stand transpiration was quantified by scaling up from sap flow measurements made with the heat balance method in a sample of stems. Leaf conductances, leaf area development, meteorological variables and soil water deficit were also measured to investigate the response of the trees to the environment. High rates of transpiration were found for Beaupré. In June, when soil water was plentiful, the mean (+/- SD) transpiration rate over an 18-day period was 5.0 +/- 1.8 mm day(-1), reaching a maximum of 7.9 mm day(-1). Transpiration rates from Dorschkamp were lower, as a result of its lower leaf area index. High total leaf conductances were measured for both Beaupré (0.34 +/- 0.17 mol m(-2) s(-1)) and Dorschkamp (0.39 +/- 0.16 mol m(-2) s(-1)). Leaf conductance declined slightly with increasing atmospheric vapor pressure deficit in both clones, but only in Beaupré did leaf conductance decrease as soil water deficit increased.

  8. A kinetic model for heterogeneous condensation of vapor on an insoluble spherical particle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Xisheng; Fan, Yu; Qin, Fenghua; Gui, Huaqiao; Liu, Jianguo

    2014-01-14

    A kinetic model is developed to describe the heterogeneous condensation of vapor on an insoluble spherical particle. This new model considers two mechanisms of cluster growth: direct addition of water molecules from the vapor and surface diffusion of adsorbed water molecules on the particle. The effect of line tension is also included in the model. For the first time, the exact expression of evaporation coefficient is derived for heterogeneous condensation of vapor on an insoluble spherical particle by using the detailed balance. The obtained expression of evaporation coefficient is proved to be also correct in the homogeneous condensation and the heterogeneous condensation on a planar solid surface. The contributions of the two mechanisms to heterogeneous condensation including the effect of line tension are evaluated and analysed. It is found that the cluster growth via surface diffusion of adsorbed water molecules on the particle is more important than the direct addition from the vapor. As an example of our model applications, the growth rate of the cap shaped droplet on the insoluble spherical particle is derived. Our evaluation shows that the growth rate of droplet in heterogeneous condensation is larger than that in homogeneous condensation. These results indicate that an explicit kinetic model is benefit to the study of heterogeneous condensation on an insoluble spherical particle.

  9. Vaporization of heavy metals during thermal treatment of model solid waste in a fluidized bed incinerator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jie; Sun, Lushi; Xiang, Jun; Hu, Song; Su, Sheng; Qiu, Jianrong

    2012-03-01

    This paper investigated the volatilization behavior of heavy metals during thermal treatment of model solid waste in a fluidized bed reactor. Four metal chlorides (Cd, Pb, Cu and Zn) were chosen as metal sources. The influence of redox conditions, water and mineral matrice on heavy metal volatilization was investigated. In general, Cd shows significant vaporization especially when HCl was injected, while Cu and Pb vaporize moderately and Zn vaporization is negligible. Increasing oxygen concentration can lower heavy metal vaporization. Heavy metal interactions with the mineral matter can result in the formation of stable metallic species thus playing a negative effect on their behavior. However, HCl can promote the heavy metal release by preventing the formation of stable metallic species. The chemical sorption (either physical or chemical) inside the pores, coupled with the internal diffusion of gaseous metal species, may also control the vaporization process. With SO(2) injected, Cd and Pb show a higher volatility as a result of SO(2) reducing characteristics. From the analysis, the subsequent order of heavy metal volatility can be found: Cd>Cu≥Pb≫Zn. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Fluorometric Measurement of Individual Stomata Activity and Transpiration via a “Brush-on”, Water-Responsive Polymer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Minjeong; Park, Dong-Hoon; Lee, Chan Woo; Jaworski, Justyn; Kim, Jong-Man

    2016-08-01

    Much of atmospheric water originates from transpiration, the process by which plants release H2O from pores, known as stomata, that simultaneously intake CO2 for photosynthesis. Controlling stomatal aperture can regulate the extent of water transport in response to dynamic environmental factors including osmotic stress, temperature, light, and wind. While larger leaf regions are often examined, the extent of water vapor release from individual stomata remains unexplored. Using a “brush-on” sensing material, we can now assess transpiration using a water-responsive, polydiacetylene-based coating on the leaves surfaces. By eliciting a fluorometric signal to passing water vapor, we obtained information regarding the activity of individual stomata. In this demonstration, our results prove that this coating can identify the proportion of active stomata and the extent of transpirational diffusion of water in response to different conditions.

  11. Interpretation of TOVS Water Vapor Radiances Using a Random Strong Line Model

    CERN Document Server

    Soden, B J; Soden, Brian J.; Bretherton, Francis P.

    1995-01-01

    This study illustrates the application of a random strong line (RSL) model of radiative transfer to the interpretation of satellite observations of the upwelling radiation in the 6.3 micron water vapor absorption band. The model, based upon an assemblage of randomly overlapped, strongly absorbing, pressure broadened lines, is compared to detailed radiative transfer calculations of the upper (6.7 micron) tropospheric water vapor radiance and demonstrated to be accurate to within ~ 1.2 K. Similar levels of accuracy are found when the model is compared to detailed calculations of the middle (7.3 micron) and lower (8.3 micron) tropospheric water vapor radiance, provided that the emission from the underlying surface is taken into account. Based upon these results, the RSL model is used to interpret TOVS-observed water vapor radiances in terms of the relative humidity averaged over deep layers of the upper, middle, and lower troposphere. We then present near-global maps of the geographic distribution and climatolog...

  12. CFD modelling of condensation process of water vapor in supersonic flows

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wen, Chuang; Walther, Jens Honore; Yan, Yuying

    2016-01-01

    The condensation phenomenon of vapor plays an important role in various industries, such as the steam flow in turbines and refrigeration system. A mathematical model is developed to predict the spontaneous condensing phenomenon in the supersonic conditions using the nucleation and droplet growth...

  13. CFD modeling of condensation process of water vapor in supersonic flows

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Yan; Walther, Jens Honore; Yan, Yuying

    2017-01-01

    The condensation phenomenon of vapor plays an important role in various industries, such as the steam flow in turbines and refrigeration system. A mathematical model is developed to predict the spontaneous condensing phenomenon in the supersonic flows using the nucleation and droplet growth...

  14. Structural adjustments in resprouting trees drive differences in post-fire transpiration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolan, Rachael H; Mitchell, Patrick J; Bradstock, Ross A; Lane, Patrick N J

    2014-02-01

    Following disturbance many woody species are capable of resprouting new foliage, resulting in a reduced leaf-to-sapwood area ratio and altered canopy structure. We hypothesized that such changes would promote adjustments in leaf physiology, resulting in higher rates of transpiration per unit leaf area, consistent with the mechanistic framework proposed by Whitehead et al. (Whitehead D, Jarvis PG, Waring RH (1984) Stomatal conductance, transpiration and resistance to water uptake in a Pinus sylvestris spacing experiment. Can J For Res 14:692-700). We tested this in Eucalyptus obliqua L'Hér following a wildfire by comparing trees with unburnt canopies with trees that had been subject to 100% canopy scorch and were recovering their leaf area via resprouting. In resprouting trees, foliage was distributed along the trunk and on lateral branches, resulting in shorter hydraulic path lengths. We evaluated measurements of whole-tree transpiration and structural and physiological traits expected to drive any changes in transpiration. We used these structural and physiological measurements to parameterize the Whitehead et al. equation, and found that the expected ratio of transpiration per unit leaf area between resprouting and unburnt trees was 3.41. This is similar to the observed ratio of transpiration per unit leaf area, measured from sapflow observations, which was 2.89 (i.e., resprouting trees had 188% higher transpiration per unit leaf area). Foliage at low heights (tree crown (14-18 m) in a number of traits, including higher specific leaf area, midday leaf water potential and higher rates of stomatal conductance and photosynthesis. We conclude that these post-fire adjustments in resprouting trees help to drive increased stomatal conductance and hydraulic efficiency, promoting the rapid return of tree-scale transpiration towards pre-disturbance levels. These transient patterns in canopy transpiration have important implications for modelling stand-level water fluxes

  15. Modeling free convective gravitational effects in chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stinespring, C. D.; Annen, K. D.

    1987-01-01

    In this paper, a combined fluid-mechanics, mass-transport, and chemistry model describing CVD in an open-tube atmospheric-pressure flow reactor is developed. The model allows gas-phase reactions to proceed to equilibrium and accounts for finite reaction rates at the surface of the deposition substrate. This model is a useful intermediate step toward a model employing fully rate-limited chemistry. The model is used to predict the effects of free convection on flow patterns, temperature and species-concentration profiles, and local deposition rates for silicon deposited by silane pyrolysis. These results are discussed in terms of implications for CVD of silicon and other compounds, microgravity studies, and techniques for testing and validating the model.

  16. Development of a Computational Chemical Vapor Deposition Model: Applications to Indium Nitride and Dicyanovinylaniline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardelino, Carlos

    1999-01-01

    A computational chemical vapor deposition (CVD) model is presented, that couples chemical reaction mechanisms with fluid dynamic simulations for vapor deposition experiments. The chemical properties of the systems under investigation are evaluated using quantum, molecular and statistical mechanics models. The fluid dynamic computations are performed using the CFD-ACE program, which can simulate multispecies transport, heat and mass transfer, gas phase chemistry, chemistry of adsorbed species, pulsed reactant flow and variable gravity conditions. Two experimental setups are being studied, in order to fabricate films of: (a) indium nitride (InN) from the gas or surface phase reaction of trimethylindium and ammonia; and (b) 4-(1,1)dicyanovinyl-dimethylaminoaniline (DCVA) by vapor deposition. Modeling of these setups requires knowledge of three groups of properties: thermodynamic properties (heat capacity), transport properties (diffusion, viscosity, and thermal conductivity), and kinetic properties (rate constants for all possible elementary chemical reactions). These properties are evaluated using computational methods whenever experimental data is not available for the species or for the elementary reactions. The chemical vapor deposition model is applied to InN and DCVA. Several possible InN mechanisms are proposed and analyzed. The CVD model simulations of InN show that the deposition rate of InN is more efficient when pulsing chemistry is used under conditions of high pressure and microgravity. An analysis of the chemical properties of DCVA show that DCVA dimers may form under certain conditions of physical vapor transport. CVD simulations of the DCVA system suggest that deposition of the DCVA dimer may play a small role in the film and crystal growth processes.

  17. Q Conversion Factor Models for Estimating Precipitable Water Vapor for Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deniz, Ilke; Mekik, Cetin; Gurbuz, Gokhan

    2015-04-01

    Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) have recently proved to be one of the crucial tools for determining continuous and precise precipitable water vapor (GNSS-MET networks). GNSS, especially CORS networks such as CORS-TR (the Turkish Network-RTK), provide high temporal and spatial accuracy for the wet tropospheric zenith delays which are then converted to the precipitable water vapor due to the fact that they can operate in all weather conditions continuously and economically. The accuracy of wet tropospheric zenith delay highly depends on the accuracy of precipitable water vapor content in the troposphere. Therefore, the precipitable water vapor is an important element of the tropospheric zenith delay. A number of studies can be found in the literature on the determination of the precipitable water vapor from the tropospheric zenith delay. Studies of Hogg showed that when the precipitable water vapor is known, the tropospheric zenith delay can be computed. Askne and Nodius have developed fundamental equations between the wet tropospheric zenith delay and the precipitable water vapor from the equation of the index of refraction in the troposphere. Furthermore, Bevis have developed a linear regression model to determine the weighted mean temperature (Tm) depending on the surface temperature (Ts) in Askne and Nodius studies. For this reason, nearly 9000 radiosonde profiles in USA were analyzed and the coefficients calculated. Similarly, there are other studies on the calculation of those coefficients for different regions: Solbrig for Germany, Liou for Taiwan, Jihyun for South Korea, Dongseob for North Korea, Suresh Raju for India, Boutiouta and Lahcene for Algeria, Bokoye for Canada, Baltink for Netherlands and Baltic, Bock for Africa. It is stated that the weighted mean temperature can be found with a root mean square error of ±2-5 K. In addition, there are studies on the calculation of the coefficients globally. Another model for the determination of

  18. High atmospheric demand for water can limit forest carbon uptake and transpiration as severely as dry soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benjamin N. Sulman; Daniel Tyler Roman; Koong Yi; Lixin Wang; Richard P. Phillips; Kimberly A. Novick

    2016-01-01

    When stressed by low soil water content (SWC) or high vapor pressure deficit (VPD), plants close stomata, reducing transpiration and photosynthesis. However, it has historically been difficult to disentangle the magnitudes of VPD compared to SWC limitations on ecosystem-scale fluxes. We used a 13 year record of eddy covariance measurements from a forest in south...

  19. Vaporization dynamics of volatile perfluorocarbon droplets: A theoretical model and in vitro validation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doinikov, Alexander A., E-mail: doinikov@bsu.by; Bouakaz, Ayache [Inserm U930, Université François Rabelais, Tours 37044 (France); Sheeran, Paul S.; Dayton, Paul A. [Joint Department of Biomedical Engineering, The University of North Carolina and North Carolina State University, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States)

    2014-10-15

    Purpose: Perfluorocarbon (PFC) microdroplets, called phase-change contrast agents (PCCAs), are a promising tool in ultrasound imaging and therapy. Interest in PCCAs is motivated by the fact that they can be triggered to transition from the liquid state to the gas state by an externally applied acoustic pulse. This property opens up new approaches to applications in ultrasound medicine. Insight into the physics of vaporization of PFC droplets is vital for effective use of PCCAs and for anticipating bioeffects. PCCAs composed of volatile PFCs (with low boiling point) exhibit complex dynamic behavior: after vaporization by a short acoustic pulse, a PFC droplet turns into a vapor bubble which undergoes overexpansion and damped radial oscillation until settling to a final diameter. This behavior has not been well described theoretically so far. The purpose of our study is to develop an improved theoretical model that describes the vaporization dynamics of volatile PFC droplets and to validate this model by comparison with in vitro experimental data. Methods: The derivation of the model is based on applying the mathematical methods of fluid dynamics and thermodynamics to the process of the acoustic vaporization of PFC droplets. The used approach corrects shortcomings of the existing models. The validation of the model is carried out by comparing simulated results with in vitro experimental data acquired by ultrahigh speed video microscopy for octafluoropropane (OFP) and decafluorobutane (DFB) microdroplets of different sizes. Results: The developed theory allows one to simulate the growth of a vapor bubble inside a PFC droplet until the liquid PFC is completely converted into vapor, and the subsequent overexpansion and damped oscillations of the vapor bubble, including the influence of an externally applied acoustic pulse. To evaluate quantitatively the difference between simulated and experimental results, the L2-norm errors were calculated for all cases where the

  20. Vaporization dynamics of volatile perfluorocarbon droplets: A theoretical model and in vitro validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doinikov, Alexander A.; Sheeran, Paul S.; Bouakaz, Ayache; Dayton, Paul A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Perfluorocarbon (PFC) microdroplets, called phase-change contrast agents (PCCAs), are a promising tool in ultrasound imaging and therapy. Interest in PCCAs is motivated by the fact that they can be triggered to transition from the liquid state to the gas state by an externally applied acoustic pulse. This property opens up new approaches to applications in ultrasound medicine. Insight into the physics of vaporization of PFC droplets is vital for effective use of PCCAs and for anticipating bioeffects. PCCAs composed of volatile PFCs (with low boiling point) exhibit complex dynamic behavior: after vaporization by a short acoustic pulse, a PFC droplet turns into a vapor bubble which undergoes overexpansion and damped radial oscillation until settling to a final diameter. This behavior has not been well described theoretically so far. The purpose of our study is to develop an improved theoretical model that describes the vaporization dynamics of volatile PFC droplets and to validate this model by comparison with in vitro experimental data. Methods: The derivation of the model is based on applying the mathematical methods of fluid dynamics and thermodynamics to the process of the acoustic vaporization of PFC droplets. The used approach corrects shortcomings of the existing models. The validation of the model is carried out by comparing simulated results with in vitro experimental data acquired by ultrahigh speed video microscopy for octafluoropropane (OFP) and decafluorobutane (DFB) microdroplets of different sizes. Results: The developed theory allows one to simulate the growth of a vapor bubble inside a PFC droplet until the liquid PFC is completely converted into vapor, and the subsequent overexpansion and damped oscillations of the vapor bubble, including the influence of an externally applied acoustic pulse. To evaluate quantitatively the difference between simulated and experimental results, the L2-norm errors were calculated for all cases where the

  1. Optimal laser fiber rotational movement during photoselective vaporization of the prostate in a bovine ex-vivo animal model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osterberg, E Charles; Kauffman, Eric C; Kang, Hyun Wook; Koullick, Ed; Choi, Benjamin B

    2011-07-01

    Photoselective vaporization of the prostate (PVP) has emerged as an effective debulking procedure for prostatic urinary obstruction. Surgical technique for the most efficient vaporization has, however, received little scientific investigation. We used an ex-vivo bovine prostate model to investigate how variation in the angle of laser fiber rotational movement ("sweeping") affects prostate tissue vaporization efficiency. Experiments were conducted using the GreenLight™ HPS 120W laser system. A single surgeon performed a clinical PVP video analysis, forming the basis of our study design. Sixty bovine prostate specimens were vaporized using an ex-vivo chamber equipped with computer-assisted axial movements. Specimens were vaporized at a fixed sweeping speed (0.5 sweeps/sec) and variable sweeping angles (0, 15, 30, 60, 90, and 120 degrees). The volume of tissue vaporized was calculated from cross sections and compared by a two-sample t test. Clinical PVP video analysis of a single experienced surgeon showed a mean angle of 47.7 degrees with 25% of vaporization between 0 and 30 degrees. Ex-vivo analysis showed larger sweeping angles generated wider but more superficial vaporization defects, leading to smaller vaporized volumes. Specifically, vaporization volumes with angles of 0, 15, or 30 degrees were significantly greater than those with rotational angles of 45, 60, and 90 degrees (1.5-3.0 X; Pvaporization efficiency.

  2. Effects of anti-transpirants on transpiration and energy use in greenhouse cultivation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marcelis, L.F.M.; Kempkes, F.L.K.; Stanghellini, C.; Grashoff, C.

    2008-01-01

    Greenhouse production in North-West Europe consumes a lot of energy. The energy is needed for heating the greenhouse and controlling air humidity. Transpiration of a crop increases the energy use. The aim of this study was to explore the possibilities for the application of anti-transpirants to save

  3. Effect of Leaf Water Potential on Internal Humidity and CO2 Dissolution: Reverse Transpiration and Improved Water Use Efficiency under Negative Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vesala, Timo; Sevanto, Sanna; Grönholm, Tiia; Salmon, Yann; Nikinmaa, Eero; Hari, Pertti; Hölttä, Teemu

    2017-01-01

    The pull of water from the soil to the leaves causes water in the transpiration stream to be under negative pressure decreasing the water potential below zero. The osmotic concentration also contributes to the decrease in leaf water potential but with much lesser extent. Thus, the surface tension force is approximately balanced by a force induced by negative water potential resulting in concavely curved water-air interfaces in leaves. The lowered water potential causes a reduction in the equilibrium water vapor pressure in internal (sub-stomatal/intercellular) cavities in relation to that over water with the potential of zero, i.e., over the flat surface. The curved surface causes a reduction also in the equilibrium vapor pressure of dissolved CO2, thus enhancing its physical solubility to water. Although the water vapor reduction is acknowledged by plant physiologists its consequences for water vapor exchange at low water potential values have received very little attention. Consequences of the enhanced CO2 solubility to a leaf water-carbon budget have not been considered at all before this study. We use theoretical calculations and modeling to show how the reduction in the vapor pressures affects transpiration and carbon assimilation rates. Our results indicate that the reduction in vapor pressures of water and CO2 could enhance plant water use efficiency up to about 10% at a leaf water potential of −2 MPa, and much more when water potential decreases further. The low water potential allows for a direct stomatal water vapor uptake from the ambient air even at sub-100% relative humidity values. This alone could explain the observed rates of foliar water uptake by e.g., the coastal redwood in the fog belt region of coastal California provided the stomata are sufficiently open. The omission of the reduction in the water vapor pressure causes a bias in the estimates of the stomatal conductance and leaf internal CO2 concentration based on leaf gas exchange

  4. Modeling Two-Phase Flow and Vapor Cycles Using the Generalized Fluid System Simulation Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Amanda D.; Majumdar, Alok K.

    2017-01-01

    This work presents three new applications for the general purpose fluid network solver code GFSSP developed at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center: (1) cooling tower, (2) vapor-compression refrigeration system, and (3) vapor-expansion power generation system. These systems are widely used across engineering disciplines in a variety of energy systems, and these models expand the capabilities and the use of GFSSP to include fluids and features that are not part of its present set of provided examples. GFSSP provides pressure, temperature, and species concentrations at designated locations, or nodes, within a fluid network based on a finite volume formulation of thermodynamics and conservation laws. This paper describes the theoretical basis for the construction of the models, their implementation in the current GFSSP modeling system, and a brief evaluation of the usefulness of the model results, as well as their applicability toward a broader spectrum of analytical problems in both university teaching and engineering research.

  5. Vapor-liquid phase equilibria of water modelled by a Kim-Gordon potential

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maerzke, K A; McGrath, M J; Kuo, I W; Tabacchi, G; Siepmann, J I; Mundy, C J

    2009-03-16

    Gibbs ensemble Monte Carlo simulations were carried out to investigate the properties of a frozen-electron-density (or Kim-Gordon, KG) model of water along the vapor-liquid coexistence curve. Because of its theoretical basis, such a KG model provides for seamless coupling to Kohn-Sham density functional theory for use in mixed quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) implementations. The Gibbs ensemble simulations indicate rather limited transferability of such a simple KG model to other state points. Specifically, a KG model that was parameterized by Barker and Sprik to the properties of liquid water at 300 K, yields saturated vapor pressures and a critical temperature that are significantly under- and over-estimated, respectively.

  6. Modeling of vapor-liquid-solid equilibrium in gas - aqueous electrolyte systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Kaj; Rasmussen, Peter

    1999-01-01

    A thermodynamic model for the description of vapor-liquid-solid equilibria is introduced. This model is a combination of the extended UNIQUAC model for electrolytes and the Soave-Redlich-Kwong cubic equation of state. The model has been applied to aqueous systems containing ammonia and/or carbon...... dioxide along with various salts. Model parameters valid in the temperature range 0-110 degrees C, the pressure range from 0-100 bar, and the concentration range up to approximately 80 molal ammonia are given. The model parameters were evaluated on the basis of more than 7000 experimental data points. (C...

  7. Statistical models for nuclear decay from evaporation to vaporization

    CERN Document Server

    Cole, A J

    2000-01-01

    Elements of equilibrium statistical mechanics: Introduction. Microstates and macrostates. Sub-systems and convolution. The Boltzmann distribution. Statistical mechanics and thermodynamics. The grand canonical ensemble. Equations of state for ideal and real gases. Pseudo-equilibrium. Statistical models of nuclear decay. Nuclear physics background: Introduction. Elements of the theory of nuclear reactions. Quantum mechanical description of scattering from a potential. Decay rates and widths. Level and state densities in atomic nuclei. Angular momentum in quantum mechanics. History of statistical

  8. Pore‐scale modeling of vapor transport in partially saturated capillary tube with variable area using chemical potential

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Addassi, Mouadh; Schreyer, Lynn; Johannesson, Björn; Lin, Hai

    2016-01-01

    .... We demonstrate that isothermal vapor transport can be accurately modeled without modeling the details of the contact angle, microscale temperature fluctuations, or pressure fluctuations using a modification of the Fick‐Jacobs equation...

  9. Modeling of a water vapor selective membrane unit to increase the energy efficiency of humidity harvesting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergmair, D.; Metz, S. J.; de Lange, H. C.; van Steenhoven, A. A.

    2012-11-01

    Air humidity is a promising source of clean and safe drinking water. However, in conventional systems a lot of energy is wasted on the production of cold air, rather than the condensation of water vapor. This study examines the possibility of using a hollow fiber membrane module to make this process more energy efficient, by separating the vapor from other gases, prior to the cooling process with the help of selective membranes. The water vapor concentration within a fiber has been modeled using a random walker approach, and the membrane permeability has been implemented as a re-bounce probability for simulation particles interacting with the membrane. Considering the additional work requirement for driving a feed flow through the membrane section and the computed water vapor permeation it could be shown that the energy demand per unit water is lowest for slow flow speeds and favors short and thin fibers. The total energy requirement was estimated to be less than half of the conventional one. Comparison with other CFD simulations and a real life module has shown a good level of agreement, indicating that a membrane section could improve the energy efficiency of humidity harvesting significantly.

  10. Vaporization and Zonal Mixing in Performance Modeling of Advanced LOX-Methane Rockets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, George J., Jr.; Stiegemeier, Benjamin R.

    2013-01-01

    Initial modeling of LOX-Methane reaction control (RCE) 100 lbf thrusters and larger, 5500 lbf thrusters with the TDK/VIPER code has shown good agreement with sea-level and altitude test data. However, the vaporization and zonal mixing upstream of the compressible flow stage of the models leveraged empirical trends to match the sea-level data. This was necessary in part because the codes are designed primarily to handle the compressible part of the flow (i.e. contraction through expansion) and in part because there was limited data on the thrusters themselves on which to base a rigorous model. A more rigorous model has been developed which includes detailed vaporization trends based on element type and geometry, radial variations in mixture ratio within each of the "zones" associated with elements and not just between zones of different element types, and, to the extent possible, updated kinetic rates. The Spray Combustion Analysis Program (SCAP) was leveraged to support assumptions in the vaporization trends. Data of both thrusters is revisited and the model maintains a good predictive capability while addressing some of the major limitations of the previous version.

  11. Dominant controls of transpiration along a hillslope transect inferred from ecohydrological measurements and thermodynamic limits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renner, Maik; Hassler, Sibylle K.; Blume, Theresa; Weiler, Markus; Hildebrandt, Anke; Guderle, Marcus; Schymanski, Stanislaus J.; Kleidon, Axel

    2016-05-01

    We combine ecohydrological observations of sap flow and soil moisture with thermodynamically constrained estimates of atmospheric evaporative demand to infer the dominant controls of forest transpiration in complex terrain. We hypothesize that daily variations in transpiration are dominated by variations in atmospheric demand, while site-specific controls, including limiting soil moisture, act on longer timescales. We test these hypotheses with data of a measurement setup consisting of five sites along a valley cross section in Luxembourg. Both hillslopes are covered by forest dominated by European beech (Fagus sylvatica L.). Two independent measurements are used to estimate stand transpiration: (i) sap flow and (ii) diurnal variations in soil moisture, which were used to estimate the daily root water uptake. Atmospheric evaporative demand is estimated through thermodynamically constrained evaporation, which only requires absorbed solar radiation and temperature as input data without any empirical parameters. Both transpiration estimates are strongly correlated to atmospheric demand at the daily timescale. We find that neither vapor pressure deficit nor wind speed add to the explained variance, supporting the idea that they are dependent variables on land-atmosphere exchange and the surface energy budget. Estimated stand transpiration was in a similar range at the north-facing and the south-facing hillslopes despite the different aspect and the largely different stand composition. We identified an inverse relationship between sap flux density and the site-average sapwood area per tree as estimated by the site forest inventories. This suggests that tree hydraulic adaptation can compensate for heterogeneous conditions. However, during dry summer periods differences in topographic factors and stand structure can cause spatially variable transpiration rates. We conclude that absorption of solar radiation at the surface forms a dominant control for turbulent heat and

  12. Modeling of chemical vapor deposition. III. Silicon epitaxy from chlorosilanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korec, J.

    1983-02-01

    The approach presented in part I is applied here to model epitaxial growth of silicon from SiH 2Cl 2, SiHCl 3 and SiCl 4. We adopt the system of chemical reactions proposed by Nishizawa and Nihira and we assume the rate determining step to be the chemical reaction between adsorbed SiCl 2 and gaseous H 2. The basis of this approach is the computation of the activity of silicon in the gas phase near the substrate surface from the balance between the rate of mass transport in the gas phase and surface processes. The considered surface processes are: adsorption and surface diffusion of SiCl 2 and heterogenous chemical reaction. The calculated growth rate of the film agrees with experimental data for a wide range of technological conditions.

  13. Seasonal Shift in Climatic Limiting Factors on Tree Transpiration: Evidence from Sap Flow Observations at Alpine Treelines in Southeast Tibet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xinsheng; Nie, Yuqin; Luo, Tianxiang; Yu, Jiehui; Shen, Wei; Zhang, Lin

    2016-01-01

    Alpine and northern treelines are primarily controlled by low temperatures. However, little is known about the impact of low soil temperature on tree transpiration at treelines. We aim to test the hypothesis that in cold-limited forests, the main limiting factors for tree transpiration switch from low soil temperature before summer solstice to atmospheric evaporative demand after summer solstice, which generally results in low transpiration in the early growing season. Sap flow, meteorological factors and predawn needle water potential were continuously monitored throughout one growing season across Smith fir (Abies georgei var. smithii) and juniper (Juniperus saltuaria) treelines in southeast Tibet. Sap flow started in early May and corresponded to a threshold mean air-temperature of 0°C. Across tree species, transpiration was mainly limited by low soil temperature prior to the summer solstice but by vapor pressure deficit and solar radiation post-summer solstice, which was further confirmed on a daily scale. As a result, tree transpiration for both tree species was significantly reduced in the pre-summer solstice period as compared to post-summer solstice, resulting in a lower predawn needle water potential for Smith fir trees in the early growing season. Our data supported the hypothesis, suggesting that tree transpiration mainly responds to soil temperature variations in the early growing season. The results are important for understanding the hydrological response of cold-limited forest ecosystems to climate change. PMID:27468289

  14. Seasonal shift in climatic limiting factors on tree transpiration: evidence from sap flow observations at alpine treelines in southeast Tibet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Xinsheng

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Alpine and northern treelines are primarily controlled by low temperatures. However, little is known about the impact of low soil temperature on tree transpiration at treelines. We aim to test the hypothesis that in cold-limited forests, the main limiting factors for tree transpiration switch from low soil temperature before summer solstice to atmospheric evaporative demand after summer solstice, which generally results in low transpiration in the early growing season. Sap flow, meteorological factors and predawn needle water potential were continuously monitored throughout one growing season across Smith fir (Abies georgei var. smithii and juniper (Juniperus saltuaria treelines in southeast Tibet. Sap flow started in early May and corresponded to a threshold mean air-temperature of 0 oC. Across tree species, transpiration was mainly limited by low soil temperature prior to the summer solstice but by vapor pressure deficit and solar radiation post-summer solstice, which was further confirmed on a daily scale. As a result, tree transpiration for both tree species was significantly reduced in the pre-summer solstice period as compared to post-summer solstice, resulting in a lower predawn needle water potential for Smith fir trees in the early growing season. Our data supported the hypothesis, suggesting that tree transpiration mainly responds to soil temperature variations in the early growing season. The results are important for understanding the hydrological response of cold-limited forest ecosystems to climate change.

  15. Seasonal Shift in Climatic Limiting Factors on Tree Transpiration: Evidence from Sap Flow Observations at Alpine Treelines in Southeast Tibet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xinsheng; Nie, Yuqin; Luo, Tianxiang; Yu, Jiehui; Shen, Wei; Zhang, Lin

    2016-01-01

    Alpine and northern treelines are primarily controlled by low temperatures. However, little is known about the impact of low soil temperature on tree transpiration at treelines. We aim to test the hypothesis that in cold-limited forests, the main limiting factors for tree transpiration switch from low soil temperature before summer solstice to atmospheric evaporative demand after summer solstice, which generally results in low transpiration in the early growing season. Sap flow, meteorological factors and predawn needle water potential were continuously monitored throughout one growing season across Smith fir (Abies georgei var. smithii) and juniper (Juniperus saltuaria) treelines in southeast Tibet. Sap flow started in early May and corresponded to a threshold mean air-temperature of 0°C. Across tree species, transpiration was mainly limited by low soil temperature prior to the summer solstice but by vapor pressure deficit and solar radiation post-summer solstice, which was further confirmed on a daily scale. As a result, tree transpiration for both tree species was significantly reduced in the pre-summer solstice period as compared to post-summer solstice, resulting in a lower predawn needle water potential for Smith fir trees in the early growing season. Our data supported the hypothesis, suggesting that tree transpiration mainly responds to soil temperature variations in the early growing season. The results are important for understanding the hydrological response of cold-limited forest ecosystems to climate change.

  16. Assessing the Transferability of Transpiration-use Efficiency Models of Biomass Production Comprobando la Transferibilidad de Modelos para la Producción de Biomasa basados en la Eficiencia del uso de la Transpiración

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristián Kremer

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Transpiration-use efficiency (w, defined as the ratio of biomass produced per unit water transpired, has been used to evaluate crop performance under limited water supply. However, the lack of consistency of w values through different environmental conditions has not allowed, using it as a transferable parameter. Thus, simple approaches have been developed, including: 1 w = kDa Da¹ and; 2 w = kEto ETo-¹ where kDa and kETo are crop-dependent parameters, with the underlying concept that normalization by Da or ET0 would accounts for the effects of climate variations on w, while these parameters would be reasonably constant across diverse environments. The objective of this study was to assess the transferability of kDa and kET^0 for wheat (Triticum aestivum L. and maize (Zea mays L.. The scarcity of experimental information and discrepancy of the methodology used, justified the use of a canopy transpiration and photosynthesis model which was developed, tested, and fitted with weather data from eight environmentally different locations to simulate values of w, kDa and kETOo. The results indicated that kDa and kET0 were more variable than expected; suggesting that calibration would be desirable. A consistent trend of change of the parameter values as function of Da or ET0 was found, which can be represented by mathematical functions, allowing transferring w, kDa and kET0 (maize. In contrast, the kETOo for wheat correlated weakly with Da and ET0, but a low overall coefficient of variation (10% allowed using an average value as a reasonable predictor of w.Eficiencia del uso de la transpiración (w, definida como la relación entre biomasa producida por unidad de agua transpirada, se ha utilizado para evaluar productividad bajo condiciones limitadas de agua. Sin embargo, la falta de consistencia de valores w bajo condiciones climáticas distintas no ha permitido su uso como parámetro transferible. Consecuentemente, aproximaciones simples han sido

  17. Modeling of chemical vapor deposition. II. Gas phase epitaxy of (100) GaAs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korec, J.; Heyen, M.

    1982-12-01

    The approach described in part I of this paper is applied here to model the CVD of GaAs in a halide transport system. A quantitative description of the effect of growth temperature on the growth rate is obtained. Also the effect of GaCl and arsenic vapor pressure on the growth rate is described. The theoretical estimate of the transition point between etching and growth is close to the experimental value.

  18. A corresponding-states analysis of the liquid-vapor equilibrium properties of common water models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fugel, Malte; Weiss, Volker C.

    2017-02-01

    Many atomistic potential models have been proposed to reproduce the properties of real water and to capture as many of its anomalies as possible. The large number of different models indicates that this task is by no means an easy one. Some models are reasonably successful for various properties, while others are designed to account for only a very few specific features of water accurately. Among the most popular models are SPC/E, TIP4P, TIP4P/2005, TIP4P/Ice, and TIP5P-E. Here, we report the equilibrium properties of the liquid-vapor coexistence, such as the densities of the liquid phase and the vapor phase, the interfacial tension between them, and the vapor pressure at saturation. From these data, the critical parameters are determined and subsequently used to cast the liquid-vapor coexistence properties into a corresponding-states form following Guggenheim's suggestions. Doing so reveals that the three TIP4P-based models display the same corresponding-states behavior and that the SPC/E model behaves quite similarly. Only the TIP5P-E model shows clear deviations from the corresponding-states properties of the other models. A comparison with data for real water shows that the reduced surface tension is well described, while the reduced coexistence curve is too wide. The models underestimate the critical compressibility factor and overestimate Guggenheim's ratio as well as the reduced boiling temperature (Guldberg's ratio). As demonstrated by the collapse of the data for the TIP4P-based models, these deviations are inherent to the specific model and cannot be corrected by a simple reparametrization. For comparison, the results for two recent polarizable models, HBP and BK3, are shown, and both models are seen to perform well in terms of absolute numbers and in a corresponding-states framework. The kind of analysis applied here can therefore be used as a guideline in the design of more accurate and yet simple multi-purpose models of water.

  19. A corresponding-states analysis of the liquid-vapor equilibrium properties of common water models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fugel, Malte; Weiss, Volker C

    2017-02-14

    Many atomistic potential models have been proposed to reproduce the properties of real water and to capture as many of its anomalies as possible. The large number of different models indicates that this task is by no means an easy one. Some models are reasonably successful for various properties, while others are designed to account for only a very few specific features of water accurately. Among the most popular models are SPC/E, TIP4P, TIP4P/2005, TIP4P/Ice, and TIP5P-E. Here, we report the equilibrium properties of the liquid-vapor coexistence, such as the densities of the liquid phase and the vapor phase, the interfacial tension between them, and the vapor pressure at saturation. From these data, the critical parameters are determined and subsequently used to cast the liquid-vapor coexistence properties into a corresponding-states form following Guggenheim's suggestions. Doing so reveals that the three TIP4P-based models display the same corresponding-states behavior and that the SPC/E model behaves quite similarly. Only the TIP5P-E model shows clear deviations from the corresponding-states properties of the other models. A comparison with data for real water shows that the reduced surface tension is well described, while the reduced coexistence curve is too wide. The models underestimate the critical compressibility factor and overestimate Guggenheim's ratio as well as the reduced boiling temperature (Guldberg's ratio). As demonstrated by the collapse of the data for the TIP4P-based models, these deviations are inherent to the specific model and cannot be corrected by a simple reparametrization. For comparison, the results for two recent polarizable models, HBP and BK3, are shown, and both models are seen to perform well in terms of absolute numbers and in a corresponding-states framework. The kind of analysis applied here can therefore be used as a guideline in the design of more accurate and yet simple multi-purpose models of water.

  20. Atmospheric absorption model for dry air and water vapor at microwave frequencies below 100 GHz derived from spaceborne radiometer observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wentz, Frank J.; Meissner, Thomas

    2016-05-01

    The Liebe and Rosenkranz atmospheric absorption models for dry air and water vapor below 100 GHz are refined based on an analysis of antenna temperature (TA) measurements taken by the Global Precipitation Measurement Microwave Imager (GMI) in the frequency range 10.7 to 89.0 GHz. The GMI TA measurements are compared to the TA predicted by a radiative transfer model (RTM), which incorporates both the atmospheric absorption model and a model for the emission and reflection from a rough-ocean surface. The inputs for the RTM are the geophysical retrievals of wind speed, columnar water vapor, and columnar cloud liquid water obtained from the satellite radiometer WindSat. The Liebe and Rosenkranz absorption models are adjusted to achieve consistency with the RTM. The vapor continuum is decreased by 3% to 10%, depending on vapor. To accomplish this, the foreign-broadening part is increased by 10%, and the self-broadening part is decreased by about 40% at the higher frequencies. In addition, the strength of the water vapor line is increased by 1%, and the shape of the line at low frequencies is modified. The dry air absorption is increased, with the increase being a maximum of 20% at the 89 GHz, the highest frequency considered here. The nonresonant oxygen absorption is increased by about 6%. In addition to the RTM comparisons, our results are supported by a comparison between columnar water vapor retrievals from 12 satellite microwave radiometers and GPS-retrieved water vapor values.

  1. Relating xylem cavitation to transpiration in cotton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acoustic emmisions (AEs) from xylem cavitation events are characteristic of transpiration processes. Even though a body of work employing AE exists with a large number of species, cotton and other agronomically important crops have either not been investigated, or limited information exists. A few s...

  2. Hydraulic Limits on Maximum Plant Transpiration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzoni, S.; Vico, G.; Katul, G. G.; Palmroth, S.; Jackson, R. B.; Porporato, A. M.

    2011-12-01

    Photosynthesis occurs at the expense of water losses through transpiration. As a consequence of this basic carbon-water interaction at the leaf level, plant growth and ecosystem carbon exchanges are tightly coupled to transpiration. In this contribution, the hydraulic constraints that limit transpiration rates under well-watered conditions are examined across plant functional types and climates. The potential water flow through plants is proportional to both xylem hydraulic conductivity (which depends on plant carbon economy) and the difference in water potential between the soil and the atmosphere (the driving force that pulls water from the soil). Differently from previous works, we study how this potential flux changes with the amplitude of the driving force (i.e., we focus on xylem properties and not on stomatal regulation). Xylem hydraulic conductivity decreases as the driving force increases due to cavitation of the tissues. As a result of this negative feedback, more negative leaf (and xylem) water potentials would provide a stronger driving force for water transport, while at the same time limiting xylem hydraulic conductivity due to cavitation. Here, the leaf water potential value that allows an optimum balance between driving force and xylem conductivity is quantified, thus defining the maximum transpiration rate that can be sustained by the soil-to-leaf hydraulic system. To apply the proposed framework at the global scale, a novel database of xylem conductivity and cavitation vulnerability across plant types and biomes is developed. Conductivity and water potential at 50% cavitation are shown to be complementary (in particular between angiosperms and conifers), suggesting a tradeoff between transport efficiency and hydraulic safety. Plants from warmer and drier biomes tend to achieve larger maximum transpiration than plants growing in environments with lower atmospheric water demand. The predicted maximum transpiration and the corresponding leaf water

  3. Transpiration by trees under seasonal water logging and drought in monsoon central Cambodia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyazawa, Y.; Tateishi, M.; Kajisa, T.; Ma, V.; Heng, S.; Kumagai, T.; Mizoue, N.

    2012-04-01

    Cambodia is situated in the center of Indochina Peninsula and experiences severe drought for 5 months of dry season and subsequent rainy season. Around the Tonlesap Lake where both natural and secondary forests exist without intensive destruction by human activity, forest hydrology is characterized by seasonal water logging in mid rainy season. Tree- and stand-scale transpiration is thought to be influenced by the changing soil water conditions and trees' site-specific adaptation to the environment, but less is measured about transpiration and leaf ecophysiological traits in this region. The objectives of this study is to reveal the ecophysiology of the two native (Dipterocarpus obtusifolius and Shorea roxburghii) and two exotic species (Acacia auriculiformis and Eucalyptus camaldulensis) and to detect the effects of soil water conditions on day to week scale transpiration in mid rainy and dry season. Seasonal leaf-level photosynthesis measurements suggested that photosynthetic capacity (Vcmax25) showed no clear seasonal change in each species without clear interspecific variation. Two native species had stomatal control in response to the environment different from previous studies and showed stomatal conductance higher than most woody species in other seasonal tropical forests, suggesting the species- and site-specific adaptation to the easy access to the ground water. Sap flow rate per leaf area was expressed in two parameters: measured transpiration rate based on the continuous sap flow measurements (Esap) and modeled transpiration rate (Emod) using a multilayer model based on the measured data of atmospheric environments, radiation and the leaf ecophysiological traits. Esap was lower in rainy season than those in dry season, with short but pronounced drop near the end of the dry season, although Emod was higher in rainy season than in dry season. In dry season, Emod well fit the diurnal and day to day trend of Esap, suggesting that soil drought did not limit

  4. Computer modeling of the vapor compression cycle with constant flow area expansion device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domanski, P.; Didion, D.

    1983-05-01

    An analysis of the vapor compression cycle and the main components of an air source heat pump during steady state operator was performed with emphasis on fundamental phenomena taking place between key locations in the refrigerant system. The basis of the general heat pump model formulation is the logic which links the analytical models of heat pump components together in a format requiring an iterative solution of refrigerant pressure, enthalpy and mass balances. The modeling effort emphasis was on the local thermodynamic phenomena which were described by fundamental heat transfer equations and equation of state relationships among material properties.

  5. Seasonal, synoptic and diurnal variation of atmospheric water-isotopologues in the boundary layer of Southwestern Germany caused by plant transpiration, cold-front passages and dewfall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christner, Emanuel; Dyroff, Christoph; Kohler, Martin; Zahn, Andreas; Gonzales, Yenny; Schneider, Matthias

    2013-04-01

    Atmospheric water is an enormously crucial trace gas. It is responsible for ~70 % of the natural greenhouse effect (Schmidt et al., JGR, 2010) and carries huge amounts of latent heat. The isotopic composition of water vapor is an elegant tracer for a better understanding and quantification of the extremely complex and variable hydrological cycle in Earth's atmosphere (evaporation, cloud condensation, rainout, re-evaporation, snow), which in turn is a prerequisite to improve climate modeling and predictions. As H216O, H218O and HDO differ in vapor pressure and mass, isotope fractionation occurs due to condensation, evaporation and diffusion processes. In contrast to that, plants are able to transpire water with almost no isotope fractionation. For that reason the ratio of isotopologue concentrations in the boundary layer (BL) provides, compared to humidity measurements alone, independent and additional constraints for quantifying the strength of evaporation and transpiration. Furthermore the isotope ratios contain information about transport history of an air mass and microphysical processes, that is not accessible by humidity measurements. Within the project MUSICA (MUlti-platform remote Sensing of Isotopologues for investigating the Cycle of Atmospheric water) a commercial Picarro Analyzer L2120-i is operated at Karlsruhe in Southwestern Germany, which is continuously measuring the isotopologues H216O, HDO and H218O of atmospheric water vapor since January 2012. A one year record of H216O, HDO and H218O shows clear seasonal, synoptic and diurnal characteristics and reveals the main driving processes affecting the isotopic composition of water vapor in the Middle European BL. Changes in continental plant transpiration and evaporation throughout the year lead to a slow seasonal HDO/H216O-variation, that cannot be explained by pure Rayleigh condensation. Furthermore, cold-front passages from NW lead to fast and pronounced depletion of the HDO/H216O-ratio within

  6. Use of a novel new irrigation system to observe and model water vapor flow through dry soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todman, L. C.; Ireson, A. M.; Butler, A. P.; Templeton, M.

    2013-12-01

    In dry soils hydraulic connectivity within the liquid water phase decreases and vapor flow becomes a significant transport mechanism for water. The temperature or solute concentration of the liquid phase affects the vapor pressure of the surrounding air, thus temperature or solute gradients can drive vapor flows. However, in extremely dry soils where water is retained by adsorption rather than capillarity, vapor flows can also occur. In such soils tiny changes in water content significantly affect the equilibrium vapor pressure in the soil, and hence small differences in water content can initiate vapor pressure gradients. In many field conditions this effect may be negligible compared to vapor flows driven by other factors. However, flows of this type are particularly significant in a new type of subsurface irrigation system which uses pervaporation, via a polymer tubing, as the mechanism for water supply. In this system, water enters the soil in vapor phase. Experiments using this system therefore provide a rare opportunity to observe vapor flows initiating from a subsurface source without significant injection of heat. A model was developed to simulate water flow through the soil in liquid and vapor phase. In this model it was assumed that the two phases were in equilibrium. The equilibrium relationship was defined by a new mathematical expression that was developed to fit experimental data collected to characterize the sorption isotherm of three soils (sand, saline sand and top soil). The osmotic potential of the saline sand was defined as a function of water content using a continuous mathematical expression. The model was then calibrated to fit the data from laboratory experiments, in which the vapor flow into and out of the soil were quantified. The model successfully reproduced experimental observations of the total water flux, relative humidity and water content distribution in three soil types. This suggests that the model, including the proposed

  7. Estimation of Equilibrated Vapor Concentrations Using the UNIFAC Model for the Tetrachloroethylene-Chlorobenzene System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishidao, Toru; Ishimatsu, Sumiyo; Hori, Hajime

    2016-03-01

    Equilibrated vapor concentrations at 25°C of the tetrachloroethylene-chlorobenzene system were obtained in the presence of air to establish a method for estimating vapor concentrations in work environments where multicomponent organic solvents are used. The experimental data were correlated by introducing activity coefficients calculated by the UNIFAC (Universal Quasichemical Functional Group Activity Coefficient) model. There were four interaction parameters between groups in this solution system, and three had already been determined.However, the fourth parameter--the interaction parameter between ACCl and Cl-(C=C) groups--remains unknown. Therefore, this parameter was determined by a nonlinear least-squares method to obtain the best fit for the experimental data. The calculated values were found to be in good agreement with the experimental values.

  8. Modeling of Laser Vaporization and Plume Chemistry in a Boron Nitride Nanotube Production Rig

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gnoffo, Peter A.; Fay, Catharine C.

    2012-01-01

    Flow in a pressurized, vapor condensation (PVC) boron nitride nanotube (BNNT) production rig is modeled. A laser provides a thermal energy source to the tip of a boron ber bundle in a high pressure nitrogen chamber causing a plume of boron-rich gas to rise. The buoyancy driven flow is modeled as a mixture of thermally perfect gases (B, B2, N, N2, BN) in either thermochemical equilibrium or chemical nonequilibrium assuming steady-state melt and vaporization from a 1 mm radius spot at the axis of an axisymmetric chamber. The simulation is intended to define the macroscopic thermochemical environment from which boron-rich species, including nanotubes, condense out of the plume. Simulations indicate a high temperature environment (T > 4400K) for elevated pressures within 1 mm of the surface sufficient to dissociate molecular nitrogen and form BN at the base of the plume. Modifications to Program LAURA, a finite-volume based solver for hypersonic flows including coupled radiation and ablation, are described to enable this simulation. Simulations indicate that high pressure synthesis conditions enable formation of BN vapor in the plume that may serve to enhance formation of exceptionally long nanotubes in the PVC process.

  9. Local CFD kinetic model of cadmium vaporization during fluid bed incineration of municipal solid waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soria, J. [Instituto Multidisciplinario de Investigación y Desarrollo de la Patagonia Norte (IDEPA, CONICET-UNCo) y Facultad de Ingeniería, Universidad Nacional del Comahue, Buenos Aires 1400, 8300 Neuquén (Argentina); Laboratoire Procédés, Matériaux et Energie Solaire (CNRS-PROMES), 7 Rue du Four Solaire, Odeillo, 66120 Font-Romeu (France); Gauthier, D., E-mail: Daniel.Gauthier@promes.cnrs.fr [Laboratoire Procédés, Matériaux et Energie Solaire (CNRS-PROMES), 7 Rue du Four Solaire, Odeillo, 66120 Font-Romeu (France); Falcoz, Q.; Flamant, G. [Laboratoire Procédés, Matériaux et Energie Solaire (CNRS-PROMES), 7 Rue du Four Solaire, Odeillo, 66120 Font-Romeu (France); Mazza, G. [Instituto Multidisciplinario de Investigación y Desarrollo de la Patagonia Norte (IDEPA, CONICET-UNCo) y Facultad de Ingeniería, Universidad Nacional del Comahue, Buenos Aires 1400, 8300 Neuquén (Argentina)

    2013-03-15

    Highlights: ► A 2-D local CFD model for simulating the Cd vaporization process is presented. ► It includes a kinetic expression of Cd vaporization into the incineration process. ► Pyrolysis, volatiles’ combustion and residual carbon combustion are also taken into account. ► It fits very well the experimental results obtained on a lab-scale fluidized bed reported in literature. ► It also compares favorably with a model developed previously by the group. -- Abstract: The emissions of heavy metals during incineration of Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) are a major issue to health and the environment. It is then necessary to well quantify these emissions in order to accomplish an adequate control and prevent the heavy metals from leaving the stacks. In this study the kinetic behavior of Cadmium during Fluidized Bed Incineration (FBI) of artificial MSW pellets, for bed temperatures ranging from 923 to 1073 K, was modeled. FLUENT 12.1.4 was used as the modeling framework for the simulations and implemented together with a complete set of user-defined functions (UDFs). The CFD model combines the combustion of a single solid waste particle with heavy metal (HM) vaporization from the burning particle, and it takes also into account both pyrolysis and volatiles’ combustion. A kinetic rate law for the Cd release, derived from the CFD thermal analysis of the combusting particle, is proposed. The simulation results are compared with experimental data obtained in a lab-scale fluidized bed incinerator reported in literature, and with the predicted values from a particulate non-isothermal model, formerly developed by the authors. The comparison shows that the proposed CFD model represents very well the evolution of the HM release for the considered range of bed temperature.

  10. JSC Mars-1 Soil Moisture Characteristic and Soil Freezing Characteristic Curves for Modeling Bulk Vapor Flow and Soil Freezing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinwiddie, C. L.; Sizemore, H. G.

    2008-03-01

    A new JSC Mars-1 particle size distribution is used to establish soil moisture characteristic and soil freezing characteristic curves that are needed for modeling bulk (Darcy) vapor flow and soil freezing in the variably saturated subsurface of Mars.

  11. Comparison of corn transpiration, eddy covariance, and soil water loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stem flow gages are used to estimate plant transpiration, but only a few studies compare transpiration with other measures of soil water loss. The purpose of this study was to compare transpiration from stem flow measurements with soil water changes estimated by daily neutron probe readings. Monitor...

  12. The performance of simulated annealing in parameter estimation for vapor-liquid equilibrium modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Bonilla-Petriciolet

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we report the application and evaluation of the simulated annealing (SA optimization method in parameter estimation for vapor-liquid equilibrium (VLE modeling. We tested this optimization method using the classical least squares and error-in-variable approaches. The reliability and efficiency of the data-fitting procedure are also considered using different values for algorithm parameters of the SA method. Our results indicate that this method, when properly implemented, is a robust procedure for nonlinear parameter estimation in thermodynamic models. However, in difficult problems it still can converge to local optimums of the objective function.

  13. Modeling of fuel vapor jet eruption induced by local droplet heating

    KAUST Repository

    Sim, Jaeheon

    2014-01-10

    The evaporation of a droplet by non-uniform heating is numerically investigated in order to understand the mechanism of the fuel-vapor jet eruption observed in the flame spread of a droplet array under microgravity condition. The phenomenon was believed to be mainly responsible for the enhanced flame spread rate through a droplet cloud at microgravity conditions. A modified Eulerian-Lagrangian method with a local phase change model is utilized to describe the interfacial dynamics between liquid droplet and surrounding air. It is found that the localized heating creates a temperature gradient along the droplet surface, induces the corresponding surface tension gradient, and thus develops an inner flow circulation commonly referred to as the Marangoni convection. Furthermore, the effect also produces a strong shear flow around the droplet surface, thereby pushing the fuel vapor toward the wake region of the droplet to form a vapor jet eruption. A parametric study clearly demonstrated that at realistic droplet combustion conditions the Marangoni effect is indeed responsible for the observed phenomena, in contrast to the results based on constant surface tension approximation

  14. A kinetic model for stress generation in thin films grown from energetic vapor fluxes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chason, E.; Karlson, M. [School of Engineering, Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island 02912 (United States); Colin, J. J.; Abadias, G. [Institut P' , Département Physique et Mécanique des Matériaux, Université de Poitiers-CNRS-ENSMA, SP2MI, Téléport 2, Bd M. et P. Curie, F-86962 Chasseneuil-Futuroscope (France); Magnfält, D.; Sarakinos, K. [Nanoscale Engineering Division, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Linköping University, SE-581 83 Linköping (Sweden)

    2016-04-14

    We have developed a kinetic model for residual stress generation in thin films grown from energetic vapor fluxes, encountered, e.g., during sputter deposition. The new analytical model considers sub-surface point defects created by atomic peening, along with processes treated in already existing stress models for non-energetic deposition, i.e., thermally activated diffusion processes at the surface and the grain boundary. According to the new model, ballistically induced sub-surface defects can get incorporated as excess atoms at the grain boundary, remain trapped in the bulk, or annihilate at the free surface, resulting in a complex dependence of the steady-state stress on the grain size, the growth rate, as well as the energetics of the incoming particle flux. We compare calculations from the model with in situ stress measurements performed on a series of Mo films sputter-deposited at different conditions and having different grain sizes. The model is able to reproduce the observed increase of compressive stress with increasing growth rate, behavior that is the opposite of what is typically seen under non-energetic growth conditions. On a grander scale, this study is a step towards obtaining a comprehensive understanding of stress generation and evolution in vapor deposited polycrystalline thin films.

  15. A three-dimensional phase field model for nanowire growth by the vapor-liquid-solid mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yanming; Ryu, Seunghwa; McIntyre, Paul C.; Cai, Wei

    2014-07-01

    We present a three-dimensional multi-phase field model for catalyzed nanowire (NW) growth by the vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) mechanism. The equation of motion contains both a Ginzburg-Landau term for deposition and a diffusion (Cahn-Hilliard) term for interface relaxation without deposition. Direct deposition from vapor to solid, which competes with NW crystal growth through the molten catalyst droplet, is suppressed by assigning a very small kinetic coefficient at the solid-vapor interface. The thermodynamic self-consistency of the model is demonstrated by its ability to reproduce the equilibrium contact angles at the VLS junction. The incorporation of orientation dependent gradient energy leads to faceting of the solid-liquid and solid-vapor interfaces. The model successfully captures the curved shape of the NW base and the Gibbs-Thomson effect on growth velocity.

  16. A multi-compartment mass transfer model applied to building vapor intrusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Brian L.; Chan, Wanyu R.

    2011-12-01

    We develop a systematic approach to model steady-state advective and diffusive fluxes, as well as phase changes, between multi-media environmental compartments. The approach results in four simple rules for constructing mass transfer coefficients. Results are analogous to electrical circuit theory with resistors, including variable resistors or potentiometers, in parallel and series. This general approach lends itself particularly well to vapor intrusion calculations where there are multi-media compartments involving groundwater, soil, and air. In addition to showing that the model reduces to the well-known Johnson & Ettinger model in limiting cases, we illustrate its simplicity and ease of use with several examples: (1) an example of how multiple partition coefficients collapse into a single partition coefficient illustrated by a three-phase problem involving tar, water, and air, (2) determination of when the presence of a basement significantly lowers first floor exposures, and (3) addition of diffusion in the saturated zone to the model to investigate whether the resistance associated with this compartment can be neglected. We conclude that if the water table is truly steady, this resistance would be very significant. Therefore, a vapor intrusion model that neglects both water table fluctuations and diffusion in groundwater is ignoring important physical phenomena.

  17. Soil moisture and wild olive tree transpiration relationship in a water-limited Mediterranean ecosystem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curreli, M.; Montaldo, N.; Oren, R.

    2016-12-01

    Typically, during the dry summers, Mediterranean ecosystems are characterized by a simple dual PFTs system with strong-resistant woody vegetation and bare soil, since grass died. In these conditions the combined use of sap flow measurements, based on Granier's thermo-dissipative probes, eddy covariance technique and soil water content measurements provides a robust estimation of evapotranspiration (ET). An eddy covariance micrometeorological tower, thermo-dissipative probes based on the Granier technique and TDR sensors have been installed in the Orroli site in Sardinia (Italy). The site landscape is a mixture of Mediterranean patchy vegetation types: wild olives, different shrubs and herbaceous species, which died during the summer. 33 sap flow sensors have been installed at the Orroli site into 15 wild olives clumps with different characteristics (tree size, exposition to wind, solar radiation and soil depth). Sap flow measurements show the significantly impacts on transpiration of soil moisture, radiation and vapor pressure deficit (VPD). In addition ET is strongly influenced by the tree position into the clump. Results show a significant difference in sap flow rate for the south exposed trees compared to inside clump and north exposed trees. Using an innovative scaling procedure, the transpiration calculated from sap flow measurements have been compared to the eddy covariance ET. Sap flow measurements show night time uptake allows the recharge of the stem capacity, depleted during the day before due to transpiration. The night uptake increases with increasing VPD and transpiration but surprisingly it is independent to soil water content. Soil moisture probes allow monitoring spatial and temporal dynamics of water content at different soil depth and distance to the trees, and estimating its correlation with hydraulic lift. During the light hours soil moisture is depleted by roots to provide the water for transpiration and during night time the lateral roots

  18. Effect of aerosols on evapo-transpiration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murthy, B. S.; Latha, R.; Manoj, Kumar; Mahanti, N. C.

    2014-06-01

    Aerosol direct radiative forcing (ARF) at surface is estimated from instantaneous, simultaneous observations of global radiation and aerosol optical depth (AOD) during winter, pre-monsoon and monsoon seasons over a tropical Indian station at the south-eastern end of Indo Gangetic basin. A comparison of observed and model derived ARFs is made and possible reasons for mismatch are discussed. Aerosol-induced reduction in solar visible (0.4-0.7 μm) spectrum energy (SWvis), contributing 44% to total broad band (0.3-3.0 μm) energy (SW), and its effect on surface energy fluxes are discussed in this study. Aerosols on an average reduce SWvis at surface by ˜27%. SWvis reduces by 14.5 W m-2 for a 0.1 increase in AOD when single scattering albedo (SSA) is 0.979 where as it reduces by 67.5 W m-2 when SSA is 0.867 indicating the significant effect of absorbing aerosols. Effect of ARF on net radiation, Rn, sensible heat flux, H and latent heat flux/evapo-transpiration, LE are estimated using the observed ratios of Rn/SW, H/Rn and LE/Rn, having reasonably good correlation. Observed Rn/SW varies between 0.59 and 0.75 with a correlation of 0.99 between them. LE, calculated by energy balance method, varies from 56% to 74% of Rn but with a lesser correlation, the possible reasons are discussed. For a given ARF, LE decreases by ˜14% and Rn by ˜15% with respect to observed LE and Rn respectively. The reduction in LE increases from 37% to 54% of ARF when LE increases from 220 W m-2 to 440 W m-2, suggesting that wet soil induces relatively larger reduction in evaporation. The results agree with earlier model sensitivity studies that Rn reduces more with increase in aerosol absorption which is compensated by proportionate reductions in H and LE depending on soil and atmospheric conditions.

  19. Modeling and Uncertainty Quantification of Vapor Sorption and Diffusion in Heterogeneous Polymers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Yunwei [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Harley, Stephen J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Glascoe, Elizabeth A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2015-08-13

    A high-fidelity model of kinetic and equilibrium sorption and diffusion is developed and exercised. The gas-diffusion model is coupled with a triple-sorption mechanism: Henry’s law absorption, Langmuir adsorption, and pooling or clustering of molecules at higher partial pressures. Sorption experiments are conducted and span a range of relative humidities (0-95 %) and temperatures (30-60 °C). Kinetic and equilibrium sorption properties and effective diffusivity are determined by minimizing the absolute difference between measured and modeled uptakes. Uncertainty quantification and sensitivity analysis methods are described and exercised herein to demonstrate the capability of this modeling approach. Water uptake in silica-filled and unfilled poly(dimethylsiloxane) networks is investigated; however, the model is versatile enough to be used with a wide range of materials and vapors.

  20. Numerical modelling of multiphase liquid-vapor-gas flows with interfaces and cavitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelanti, Marica

    2017-11-01

    We are interested in the simulation of multiphase flows where the dynamical appearance of vapor cavities and evaporation fronts in a liquid is coupled to the dynamics of a third non-condensable gaseous phase. We describe these flows by a single-velocity three-phase compressible flow model composed of the phasic mass and total energy equations, the volume fraction equations, and the mixture momentum equation. The model includes stiff mechanical and thermal relaxation source terms for all the phases, and chemical relaxation terms to describe mass transfer between the liquid and vapor phases of the species that may undergo transition. The flow equations are solved by a mixture-energy-consistent finite volume wave propagation scheme, combined with simple and robust procedures for the treatment of the stiff relaxation terms. An analytical study of the characteristic wave speeds of the hierarchy of relaxed models associated to the parent model system is also presented. We show several numerical experiments, including two-dimensional simulations of underwater explosive phenomena where highly pressurized gases trigger cavitation processes close to a rigid surface or to a free surface. This work was supported by the French Government Grant DGA N. 2012.60.0011.00.470.75.01, and partially by the Norwegian Grant RCN N. 234126/E30.

  1. Fruit load governs transpiration of olive trees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bustan, Amnon; Dag, Arnon; Yermiyahu, Uri; Erel, Ran; Presnov, Eugene; Agam, Nurit; Kool, Dilia; Iwema, Joost; Zipori, Isaac; Ben-Gal, Alon

    2016-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that whole-tree water consumption of olives (Olea europaea L.) is fruit load-dependent and investigated the driving physiological mechanisms. Fruit load was manipulated in mature olives grown in weighing-drainage lysimeters. Fruit was thinned or entirely removed from trees at three separate stages of growth: early, mid and late in the season. Tree-scale transpiration, calculated from lysimeter water balance, was found to be a function of fruit load, canopy size and weather conditions. Fruit removal caused an immediate decline in water consumption, measured as whole-plant transpiration normalized to tree size, which persisted until the end of the season. The later the execution of fruit removal, the greater was the response. The amount of water transpired by a fruit-loaded tree was found to be roughly 30% greater than that of an equivalent low- or nonyielding tree. The tree-scale response to fruit was reflected in stem water potential but was not mirrored in leaf-scale physiological measurements of stomatal conductance or photosynthesis. Trees with low or no fruit load had higher vegetative growth rates. However, no significant difference was observed in the overall aboveground dry biomass among groups, when fruit was included. This case, where carbon sources and sinks were both not limiting, suggests that the role of fruit on water consumption involves signaling and alterations in hydraulic properties of vascular tissues and tree organs. PMID:26802540

  2. Experimental simulation and numerical modeling of vapor shield formation and divertor material erosion for ITER typical plasma disruptions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wuerz, H. [Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe, INR, Postfach 36 40, D-76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Arkhipov, N.I. [Troitsk Institute for Innovation and Fusion Research, 142092 Troitsk (Russian Federation); Bakhtin, V.P. [Troitsk Institute for Innovation and Fusion Research, 142092 Troitsk (Russian Federation); Konkashbaev, I. [Troitsk Institute for Innovation and Fusion Research, 142092 Troitsk (Russian Federation); Landman, I. [Troitsk Institute for Innovation and Fusion Research, 142092 Troitsk (Russian Federation); Safronov, V.M. [Troitsk Institute for Innovation and Fusion Research, 142092 Troitsk (Russian Federation); Toporkov, D.A. [Troitsk Institute for Innovation and Fusion Research, 142092 Troitsk (Russian Federation); Zhitlukhin, A.M. [Troitsk Institute for Innovation and Fusion Research, 142092 Troitsk (Russian Federation)

    1995-04-01

    The high divertor heat load during a tokamak plasma disruption results in sudden evaporation of a thin layer of divertor plate material, which acts as vapor shield and protects the target from further excessive evaporation. Formation and effectiveness of the vapor shield are theoretically modeled and are experimentally analyzed at the 2MK-200 facility under conditions simulating the thermal quench phase of ITER tokamak plasma disruptions. ((orig.)).

  3. Predicting of regional transpiration at elevated atmospheric CO2: influence of the PBL vegetation interaction.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jacobs, C.M.J.; Bruin, de H.A.R.

    1997-01-01

    A coupled planetary boundary layer (PBL)-vegetation model is used to study the influence of the PBL-vegetation interaction and the ambient CO2 concentration on surface resistance rs and regional transpiration E. Vegetation is described using the big-leaf model in which rs is modeled by means of a

  4. A non-equilibrium model for soil heating and moisture transport during extreme surface heating: The soil (heat-moisture-vapor) HMV-Model Version

    Science.gov (United States)

    William Massman

    2015-01-01

    Increased use of prescribed fire by land managers and the increasing likelihood of wildfires due to climate change require an improved modeling capability of extreme heating of soils during fires. This issue is addressed here by developing and testing the soil (heat-moisture-vapor) HMVmodel, a 1-D (one-dimensional) non-equilibrium (liquid- vapor phase change)...

  5. Estimation of Transpiration and Water Use Efficiency Using Satellite and Field Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhury, Bhaskar J.; Quick, B. E.

    2003-01-01

    Structure and function of terrestrial plant communities bring about intimate relations between water, energy, and carbon exchange between land surface and atmosphere. Total evaporation, which is the sum of transpiration, soil evaporation and evaporation of intercepted water, couples water and energy balance equations. The rate of transpiration, which is the major fraction of total evaporation over most of the terrestrial land surface, is linked to the rate of carbon accumulation because functioning of stomata is optimized by both of these processes. Thus, quantifying the spatial and temporal variations of the transpiration efficiency (which is defined as the ratio of the rate of carbon accumulation and transpiration), and water use efficiency (defined as the ratio of the rate of carbon accumulation and total evaporation), and evaluation of modeling results against observations, are of significant importance in developing a better understanding of land surface processes. An approach has been developed for quantifying spatial and temporal variations of transpiration, and water-use efficiency based on biophysical process-based models, satellite and field observations. Calculations have been done using concurrent meteorological data derived from satellite observations and four dimensional data assimilation for four consecutive years (1987-1990) over an agricultural area in the Northern Great Plains of the US, and compared with field observations within and outside the study area. The paper provides substantive new information about interannual variation, particularly the effect of drought, on the efficiency values at a regional scale.

  6. Three-dimensional kinetic and fluid dynamic modeling and three iterative algorithms for side-pumped alkali vapor lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Binglin; Xu, Xingqi; Xia, Chunsheng; Pan, Bailiang

    2017-11-01

    Combining the kinetic and fluid dynamic processes in static and flowing-gas diode-pumped alkali vapor lasers, a comprehensive physical model with three cyclically iterative algorithms for simulating the three-dimensional pump and laser intensities as well as temperature distribution in the vapor cell of side-pumped alkali vapor lasers is established. Comparison with measurement of a static side-pumped cesium vapor laser with a diffuse type hollow cylinder cavity, and with classical and modified models is made. Influences of flowed velocity and pump power on laser power are calculated and analyzed. The results have demonstrated that for high-power side-pumped alkali vapor lasers, it is necessary to take into account the three-dimensional distributions of pump energy, laser energy and temperature in the cell to simultaneously obtain the thermal features and output characteristics. Therefore, the model can deepen the understanding of the complete kinetic and fluid dynamic mechanisms of a side-pumped alkali vapor laser, and help with its further experimental design.

  7. Measurement of transpiration in Pinus taeda L. and Liquidambar styraciflua L. in an environmental chamber using tritiated water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, G. F.; Sonenshine, D. E.; Czoch, J. K.

    1976-01-01

    Transpiration rates of loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) and sweetgum (Liquidambar styraciflua L.) were measured at two different atmospheric water vapor pressure deficits (V.P.D.) in a controlled environment growth chamber using tritiated water as a tracer. The trees were maintained in a sealed plant bed containing a hydroponic nutrient solution into which labeled water (spike) was introduced. Samples of leaves, chamber air, spiked nutrient solution and control water were assayed for ratio-activity using liquid scintillation techniques to determine transpiration rates. The transpiration rate of sweetgum in ml./hr./gm. (4.95) was found to be 5 times greater than that of loblolly pine (1.03) at 1.84 V.P.D. and 8 times greater at 6.74 V.P.D. (15.99 for sweetgum vs. 2.19 for pine). Transpiration (based on measurements of leaf radioactivity) in both species rose with increasing deficit; however sweetgum increased its output by 3 times while pine only doubled its rate. Cyclical changes in transpiration rates were noted in both species; the sweetgum cycle required a 6 hour interval whereas the pine cycle required a 9 hour interval.

  8. Environmental and biological controls of urban tree transpiration in the Upper Midwest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, E. B.; McFadden, J.; Montgomery, R.

    2009-12-01

    Urban trees provide a variety of ecosystem services to urban and suburban areas, including carbon uptake, climate amelioration, energy reduction, and stormwater management. Tree transpiration, in particular, modifies urban water budgets by providing an alternative pathway for water after rain events. The relative importance of environmental and biological controls on transpiration are poorly understood in urban areas, yet these controls are important for quantifying and scaling up the ecosystem services that urban trees provide at landscape and regional scales and predicting how urban ecosystems will respond to climate changes. The objectives of our study were to quantify the annual cycle of tree transpiration in an urban ecosystem and to determine how different urban tree species and plant functional types respond to environmental drivers. We continuously measured whole-tree transpiration using thermal dissipation sap flow at four urban forest stands that were broadly representative of the species composition and tree sizes found in a suburban residential neighborhood of Minneapolis-Saint Paul, Minnesota. A total of 40 trees, representing different species, plant functional types, successional stages, and xylem anatomy, were sampled throughout the 2007 and 2008 growing seasons (April-November). At each site we monitored soil moisture, air temperature, and relative humidity continuously, and we measured leaf area index weekly. Urban tree transpiration was strongly correlated with diurnal changes in vapor pressure deficit and photosynthetically active radiation and with seasonal changes in leaf area index. We found that plant functional type better explained species differences in transpiration per canopy area than either successional stage or xylem anatomy, largely due to differences in canopy structure between conifer and broad-leaf deciduous trees. We also observed inter-annual differences in transpiration rates due to a mid-season drought and longer growing

  9. Nonequilibrium numerical model of homogeneous condensation in argon and water vapor expansions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, Ryan; Wysong, Ingrid; Gimelshein, Sergey; Zeifman, Michael; Buck, Udo

    2010-06-28

    A computational approach capable of modeling homogeneous condensation in nonequilibrium environments is presented. The approach is based on the direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method, extended as appropriate to include the most important processes of cluster nucleation and evolution at the microscopic level. The approach uses a recombination-reaction energy-dependent mechanism of the DSMC method for the characterization of dimer formation, and the RRK model for the cluster evaporation. Three-step testing and validation of the model is conducted by (i) comparison of clusterization rates in an equilibrium heat bath with theoretical predictions for argon and water vapor and adjustment of the model parameters, (ii) comparison of the nonequilibrium argon cluster size distributions with experimental data, and (iii) comparison of the nonequilibrium water cluster size distributions with experimental measurements. Reasonable agreement was observed for all three parts of the validation.

  10. A Kinetic Model for GaAs Growth by Hydride Vapor Phase Epitaxy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schulte, Kevin L.; Simon, John; Jain, Nikhil; Young, David L.; Ptak, Aaron J.

    2016-11-21

    Precise control of the growth of III-V materials by hydride vapor phase epitaxy (HVPE) is complicated by the fact that the growth rate depends on the concentrations of nearly all inputs to the reactor and also the reaction temperature. This behavior is in contrast to metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy (MOVPE), which in common practice operates in a mass transport limited regime where growth rate and alloy composition are controlled almost exclusively by flow of the Group III precursor. In HVPE, the growth rate and alloy compositions are very sensitive to temperature and reactant concentrations, which are strong functions of the reactor geometry. HVPE growth, particularly the growth of large area materials and devices, will benefit from the development of a growth model that can eventually be coupled with a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model of a specific reactor geometry. In this work, we develop a growth rate law using a Langmuir-Hinshelwood (L-H) analysis, fitting unknown parameters to growth rate data from the literature that captures the relevant kinetic and thermodynamic phenomena of the HVPE process. We compare the L-H rate law to growth rate data from our custom HVPE reactor, and develop quantitative insight into reactor performance, demonstrating the utility of the growth model.

  11. Water injection into vapor- and liquid-dominated reservoirs: Modeling of heat transfer and mass transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pruess, K.; Oldenburg, C.; Moridis, G.; Finsterle, S. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)

    1997-12-31

    This paper summarizes recent advances in methods for simulating water and tracer injection, and presents illustrative applications to liquid- and vapor-dominated geothermal reservoirs. High-resolution simulations of water injection into heterogeneous, vertical fractures in superheated vapor zones were performed. Injected water was found to move in dendritic patterns, and to experience stronger lateral flow effects than predicted from homogeneous medium models. Higher-order differencing methods were applied to modeling water and tracer injection into liquid-dominated systems. Conventional upstream weighting techniques were shown to be adequate for predicting the migration of thermal fronts, while higher-order methods give far better accuracy for tracer transport. A new fluid property module for the TOUGH2 simulator is described which allows a more accurate description of geofluids, and includes mineral dissolution and precipitation effects with associated porosity and permeability change. Comparisons between numerical simulation predictions and data for laboratory and field injection experiments are summarized. Enhanced simulation capabilities include a new linear solver package for TOUGH2, and inverse modeling techniques for automatic history matching and optimization.

  12. Modeling of the Enceladus water vapor jets for interpreting UVIS star and solar occultation observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portyankina, Ganna; Esposito, Larry W.; Aye, Klaus-Michael; Hansen, Candice J.

    2015-11-01

    One of the most spectacular discoveries of the Cassini mission is jets emitting from the southern pole of Saturn’s moon Enceladus. The composition of the jets is water vapor and salty ice grains with traces of organic compounds. Jets, merging into a wide plume at a distance, are observed by multiple instruments on Cassini. Recent observations of the visible dust plume by the Cassini Imaging Science Subsystem (ISS) identified as many as 98 jet sources located along “tiger stripes” [Porco et al. 2014]. There is a recent controversy on the question if some of these jets are “optical illusion” caused by geometrical overlap of continuous source eruptions along the “tiger stripes” in the field of view of ISS [Spitale et al. 2015]. The Cassini’s Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS) observed occultations of several stars and the Sun by the water vapor plume of Enceladus. During the solar occultation separate collimated gas jets were detected inside the background plume [Hansen et al., 2006 and 2011]. These observations directly provide data about water vapor column densities along the line of sight of the UVIS instrument and could help distinguish between the presence of only localized or also continuous sources. We use Monte Carlo simulations and Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) to model the plume of Enceladus with multiple (or continuous) jet sources. The models account for molecular collisions, gravitational and Coriolis forces. The models result in the 3-D distribution of water vapor density and surface deposition patterns. Comparison between the simulation results and column densities derived from UVIS observations provide constraints on the physical characteristics of the plume and jets. The specific geometry of the UVIS observations helps to estimate the production rates and velocity distribution of the water molecules emitted by the individual jets.Hansen, C. J. et al., Science 311:1422-1425 (2006); Hansen, C. J. et al, GRL 38:L11202 (2011

  13. System Model of Heat and Mass Transfer Process for Mobile Solvent Vapor Phase Drying Equipment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiwei Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The solvent vapor phase drying process is one of the most important processes during the production and maintenance for large oil-immersed power transformer. In this paper, the working principle, system composition, and technological process of mobile solvent vapor phase drying (MVPD equipment for transformer are introduced in detail. On the basis of necessary simplification and assumption for MVPD equipment and process, a heat and mass transfer mathematical model including 40 mathematical equations is established, which represents completely thermodynamics laws of phase change and transport process of solvent, water, and air in MVPD technological processes and describes in detail the quantitative relationship among important physical quantities such as temperature, pressure, and flux in key equipment units and process. Taking a practical field drying process of 500 KV/750 MVA power transformer as an example, the simulation calculation of a complete technological process is carried out by programming with MATLAB software and some relation curves of key process parameters changing with time are obtained such as body temperature, tank pressure, and water yield. The change trend of theoretical simulation results is very consistent with the actual production record data which verifies the correctness of mathematical model established.

  14. Step-flow kinetics model for the vapor-solid-solid Si nanowires growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, H; Lü, Y Y; Yang, G W; Chen, Y M; Wang, C X

    2015-05-13

    Vapor-solid-solid (VSS) process has recently received continued attention as an alternative to grow Si nanowire. In comparison with common vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) growth with liquid catalyst, VSS growth can prevent the catalyst species from incorporating into nanowires with deep-level impurity, and achieve the compositionally abrupt interfaces by restraining the so-called "reservoir effect". However, despite the huge advances in experimental observations with in situ electron microscopy, VSS growth still remains much less understood in theory. Here, we developed a general mass-transport-limited kinetic model to describe the VSS growth process of Si nanowires by considering three surface diffusion processes and a slow interface diffusion process, where the former determines the atoms supplies way, while the latter dominates the growth of nanowires. The present model is not only well consistent with the available experimental data of Si nanowire, but also gives a clear physical image for the successive side-to-side ledge flow VSS growth.

  15. Effect of Vapor Pressure Scheme on Multiday Evolution of SOA in an Explicit Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee-Taylor, J.; Madronich, S.; Aumont, B.; Camredon, M.; Emmons, L. K.; Tyndall, G. S.; Valorso, R.

    2011-12-01

    Recent modeling of the evolution of Secondary Organic Aerosol (SOA) has led to the critically important prediction that SOA mass continues to increase for several days after emission of primary pollutants. This growth of organic aerosol in dispersing plumes originating from urban point sources has direct implications for regional aerosol radiative forcing. We investigate the robustness of predicted SOA mass growth downwind of Mexico City in the model GECKO-A (Generator of Explicit Chemistry and Kinetics of Organics in the Atmosphere), by assessing its sensitivity to the choice of vapor pressure prediction scheme. We also explore the implications for multi-day SOA mass growth of glassification / solidification of SOA constituents during aging. Finally we use output from the MOZART-4 chemical transport model to evaluate our results in the regional and global context.

  16. Effect of tropospheric models on derived precipitable water vapor over Southeast Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahimi, Zhoobin; Mohd Shafri, Helmi Zulhaidi; Othman, Faridah; Norman, Masayu

    2017-05-01

    An interesting subject in the field of GPS technology is estimating variation of precipitable water vapor (PWV). This estimation can be used as a data source to assess and monitor rapid changes in meteorological conditions. So far, numerous GPS stations are distributed across the world and the number of GPS networks is increasing. Despite these developments, a challenging aspect of estimating PWV through GPS networks is the need of tropospheric parameters such as temperature, pressure, and relative humidity (Liu et al., 2015). To estimate the tropospheric parameters, global pressure temperature (GPT) model developed by Boehm et al. (2007) is widely used in geodetic analysis for GPS observations. To improve the accuracy, Lagler et al. (2013) introduced GPT2 model by adding annual and semi-annual variation effects to GPT model. Furthermore, Boehm et al. (2015) proposed the GPT2 wet (GPT2w) model which uses water vapor pressure to improve the calculations. The global accuracy of GPT2 and GPT2w models has been evaluated by previous researches (Fund et al., 2011; Munekane and Boehm, 2010); however, investigations to assess the accuracy of global tropospheric models in tropical regions such as Southeast Asia is not sufficient. This study tests and examines the accuracy of GPT2w as one of the most recent versions of tropospheric models (Boehm et al., 2015). We developed a new regional model called Malaysian Pressure Temperature (MPT) model, and compared this model with GPT2w model. The compared results at one international GNSS service (IGS) station located in the south of Peninsula Malaysia shows that MPT model has a better performance than GPT2w model to produce PWV during monsoon season. According to the results, MPT has improved the accuracy of estimated pressure and temperature by 30% and 10%, respectively, in comparison with GPT2w model. These results indicate that MPT model can be a good alternative tool in the absence of meteorological sensors at GPS stations in

  17. Application of multiphase transport models to field remediation by air sparging and soil vapor extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahbeh, M E; Mohtar, R H

    2007-05-08

    The design and operation of air sparging and soil vapor extraction (AS/SVE) remediation systems remains in large an art due to the absence of reliable physically based models that can utilize the limited available field data. In this paper, a numerical model developed for the design and operation of air sparging and soil vapor extractions systems was used to simulate two field case studies. The first-order mass transfer kinetics were incorporated into the model to account for contaminant mass transfer between the water and air (stripping), NAPL and water (dissolution), NAPL and air (volatilization), and water and soil (sorption/desorption), the model also accounted for soil heterogeneity. Benzene, toluene, ethyl benzene and xylenes (BTEX) were the contaminants of concern in both case studies. In the second case study, the model was used to evaluate the effect of pulsed sparging on the removal rate of BTEX compounds. The pulsed sparging operation was approximated assuming uniform contaminant redistribution at the beginning of the shut-off period. The close comparison between the observed and simulated contaminant concentration in the aqueous phase showed that the approximation of the pulsed sparging operation yielded reasonable prediction of the removal process. Field heterogeneity was simulated using Monte Carlo analysis. The model predicted about 80-85% of the contaminant mass was removed by air-water mass transfer, which was similar to the average removal obtained by Monte Carlo analysis. The analysis of the removal/rebound cycles demonstrated that removal rate was controlled by the organic-aqueous distribution coefficient K(oc). Due to the lack of site-specific data, the aerobic first-order biodegradation coefficients (k(bio)) were obtained from a literature survey, therefore, uncertainty analysis of the k(bio) was conducted to evaluate the contribution of the aerobic biodegradation to total contaminant removal. Results of both case studies showed that

  18. Responses of canopy transpiration and canopy conductance of peach (Prunus persica) trees to alternate partial root zone drip irrigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Daozhi; Kang, Shaozhong; Zhang, Jianhua

    2005-08-01

    We investigated canopy transpiration and canopy conductance of peach trees under three irrigation patterns: fixed 1/2 partial root zone drip irrigation (FPRDI), alternate 1/2 partial root zone drip irrigation (APRDI) and full root zone drip irrigation (FDI). Canopy transpiration was measured using heat pulse sensors, and canopy conductance was calculated using the Jarvis model and the inversion of the Penman-Monteith equation. Results showed that the transpiration rate and canopy conductance in FPRDI and APRDI were smaller than those in FDI. More significantly, the total irrigation amount was greatly reduced, by 34.7% and 39.6%, respectively for APRDI and FPRDI in the PRDI (partial root zone drip irrigation) treatment period. The daily transpiration was linearly related to the reference evapotranspiration in the three treatments, but daily transpiration of FDI is more than that of APRDI and FPRDI under the same evaporation demand, suggesting a restriction of transpiration water loss in the APRDI and FPRDI trees. FDI needed a higher soil water content to carry the same amount of transpiration as the APRDI and FPRDI trees, suggesting the hydraulic conductance of roots of APRDI and FPRDI trees was enhanced, and the roots had a greater water uptake than in FDI when the average soil water content in the root zone was the same. By a comparison between the transpiration rates predicted by the Penman-Monteith equation and the measured canopy transpiration rates for 60 days during the experimental period, an excellent correlation along the 1:1 line was found for all the treatments (R2 > 0.80), proving the reliability of the methodology.

  19. Pore-scale modeling of vapor transport in partially saturated capillary tube with variable area using chemical potential

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Addassi, Mouadh; Schreyer, Lynn; Johannesson, Björn

    2016-01-01

    Here we illustrate the usefulness of using the chemical potential as the primary unknown by modeling isothermal vapor transport through a partially saturated cylindrically symmetric capillary tube of variable cross-sectional area using a single equation. There are no fitting parameters and the nu......Here we illustrate the usefulness of using the chemical potential as the primary unknown by modeling isothermal vapor transport through a partially saturated cylindrically symmetric capillary tube of variable cross-sectional area using a single equation. There are no fitting parameters...... and the numerical solutions to the equation are compared with experimental results with excellent agreement. We demonstrate that isothermal vapor transport can be accurately modeled without modeling the details of the contact angle, microscale temperature fluctuations, or pressure fluctuations using a modification...

  20. Cirrus and water vapor transport in the tropical tropopause layer – Part 1: A specific case modeling study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Dinh

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available In a simulation of a tropical-tropopause-layer (TTL cirrus forced by a large-scale equatorial Kelvin wave, the radiatively induced mesoscale dynamics of the cloud actively contributes to the transport of water vapor in the vertical direction.

    In a typical TTL cirrus, the heating that results from absorption of radiation by ice crystals induces a mesoscale circulation. Advection of water vapor by the radiatively induced circulation leads to upward advection of the cloudy air. Upward advection of the cloudy air is equivalent to upward transport of water vapor when the air above the cloud is drier than the cloudy air. On the other hand, ice nucleation and depositional growth, followed by sedimentation and sublimation lead to downward transport of water vapor.

    Under the conditions specific to our simulation, the upward transport of water vapor by the mesoscale circulation dominates the downward transport by microphysical processes. The net result is upward transport of water vapor, which is equivalent to hydration of the lower stratosphere. Sensitivity to model conditions and parameters will be discussed in a follow-up paper.

  1. Numerical model investigation for potential methane explosion and benzene vapor intrusion associated with high-ethanol blend releases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jie; Luo, Hong; Devaull, George E; Rixey, William G; Alvarez, Pedro J J

    2014-01-01

    Ethanol-blended fuel releases usually stimulate methanogenesis in the subsurface, which could pose an explosion risk if methane accumulates in a confined space above the ground where ignitable conditions exist. Ethanol-derived methane may also increase the vapor intrusion potential of toxic fuel hydrocarbons by stimulating the depletion of oxygen by methanotrophs, and thus inhibiting aerobic biodegradation of hydrocarbon vapors. To assess these processes, a three-dimensional numerical vapor intrusion model was used to simulate the degradation, migration, and intrusion pathway of methane and benzene under different site conditions. Simulations show that methane is unlikely to build up to pose an explosion hazard (5% v/v) if diffusion is the only mass transport mechanism through the deeper vadose zone. However, if methanogenic activity near the source zone is sufficiently high to cause advective gas transport, then the methane indoor concentration may exceed the flammable threshold under simulated conditions. During subsurface migration, methane biodegradation could consume soil oxygen that would otherwise be available to support hydrocarbon degradation, and increase the vapor intrusion potential for benzene. Vapor intrusion would also be exacerbated if methanogenic activity results in sufficiently high pressure to cause advective gas transport in the unsaturated zone. Overall, our simulations show that current approaches to manage the vapor intrusion risk for conventional fuel released might need to be modified when dealing with some high ethanol blend fuel (i.e., E20 up to E95) releases.

  2. Forcing variables in simulation of transpiration of water stressed plants determined by principal component analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durigon, Angelica; Lier, Quirijn de Jong van; Metselaar, Klaas

    2016-10-01

    To date, measuring plant transpiration at canopy scale is laborious and its estimation by numerical modelling can be used to assess high time frequency data. When using the model by Jacobs (1994) to simulate transpiration of water stressed plants it needs to be reparametrized. We compare the importance of model variables affecting simulated transpiration of water stressed plants. A systematic literature review was performed to recover existing parameterizations to be tested in the model. Data from a field experiment with common bean under full and deficit irrigation were used to correlate estimations to forcing variables applying principal component analysis. New parameterizations resulted in a moderate reduction of prediction errors and in an increase in model performance. Ags model was sensitive to changes in the mesophyll conductance and leaf angle distribution parameterizations, allowing model improvement. Simulated transpiration could be separated in temporal components. Daily, afternoon depression and long-term components for the fully irrigated treatment were more related to atmospheric forcing variables (specific humidity deficit between stomata and air, relative air humidity and canopy temperature). Daily and afternoon depression components for the deficit-irrigated treatment were related to both atmospheric and soil dryness, and long-term component was related to soil dryness.

  3. Processes driving nocturnal transpiration and implications for estimating land evapotranspiration

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Dios, Víctor Resco; Roy, Jacques; Ferrio, Juan Pedro; Alday, Josu G.; Landais, Damien; Milcu, Alexandru; Gessler, Arthur

    2015-06-01

    Evapotranspiration is a major component of the water cycle, yet only daytime transpiration is currently considered in Earth system and agricultural sciences. This contrasts with physiological studies where 25% or more of water losses have been reported to occur occurring overnight at leaf and plant scales. This gap probably arose from limitations in techniques to measure nocturnal water fluxes at ecosystem scales, a gap we bridge here by using lysimeters under controlled environmental conditions. The magnitude of the nocturnal water losses (12-23% of daytime water losses) in row-crop monocultures of bean (annual herb) and cotton (woody shrub) would be globally an order of magnitude higher than documented responses of global evapotranspiration to climate change (51-98 vs. 7-8 mm yr-1). Contrary to daytime responses and to conventional wisdom, nocturnal transpiration was not affected by previous radiation loads or carbon uptake, and showed a temporal pattern independent of vapour pressure deficit or temperature, because of endogenous controls on stomatal conductance via circadian regulation. Our results have important implications from large-scale ecosystem modelling to crop production: homeostatic water losses justify simple empirical predictive functions, and circadian controls show a fine-tune control that minimizes water loss while potentially increasing posterior carbon uptake.

  4. A vaporization model for iron/silicate fractionation in the Mercury protoplanet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fegley, Bruce, Jr.; Cameron, A. G. W.

    1987-01-01

    A study has been carried out on the vaporization of a totally molten silicate magma of chondritic composition heated into the range 2500-3500 K. The motivation for this was to determine the changes in the composition of the mantle that would occur in the Mercury protoplanet should that body have been subjected to the high-temperature phase in the evolution of the primitive solar nebula, but the results are of more general interest. An empirical model based on ideal mixing of complex components was used to describe the nonideal magma. It is found that vaporization of about 70-80 percent of the original amount of silicate from a chondritic planet is required to produce an iron-rich body with a mean uncompressed density equal to that deduced for Mercury. At this point the silicate is depleted in the alkalis, FeO, and SiO2, and enriched in CaO, MgO, Al2O3, and TiO2 relative to chondritic material.

  5. Performance of density functionals for modeling vapor liquid equilibria of CO2 and SO2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goel, Himanshu; Windom, Zachary W; Jackson, Amber A; Rai, Neeraj

    2017-11-21

    Vapor liquid equilibria (VLE) and condensed phase properties of carbon dioxide and sulfur dioxide are calculated using first principles Monte Carlo (FPMC) simulations to assess the performance of several density functionals, notably PBE-D3, BLYP-D3, PBE0-D3, M062X-D3, and rVV10. GGA functionals were used to compute complete vapor liquid coexistence curves (VLCCs) to estimate critical properties, while the hybrid and nonlocal van der Waals functionals were used only for computing density at a single state point due to the high computational cost. Our results show that the BLYP-D3 functional performs well in predicting VLE properties for both molecules when compared with other functionals. In the liquid phase, pair correlation functions reveal that there is not a significant difference in the location of the peak for the first solvation shell while the peak heights are different for different functionals. Overall, the BLYP-D3 functional is a good choice for modeling VLE of acidic gases with significant environmental implications such as CO2 and SO2 . © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. A phytotoxicity test using transpiration of willows

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trapp, Stefan; Zambrano, Kim Cecilia; Kusk, Kresten Ole

    2000-01-01

    A short-term acute toxicity assay for willow trees growing in contaminated solution or in polluted soil was developed and tested. The test apparatus consists of an Erlenmeyer flask with a prerooted tree cutting growing in it. Growth and reduction of transpiration are used to determine toxicity. T.......8 and 9.6 mg/L were found. This is similar to the results from algal growth rate tests. The willow tree toxicity test may be useful for determining the site-specific toxicity of polluted soils and for terrestrial risk assessment of new chemicals and pesticides....

  7. Canopy Transpiration and Stomatal Responses to Prolonged Drought by a Dominant Desert Species in Central Asia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daxing Gu

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available In arid and semiarid lands, canopy transpiration and its dynamics depend largely on stomatal sensitivity to drought. In this study, the sap flow of a dominant species, Haloxylon ammodendron growing in Central Asian deserts, was monitored using Granier-type sensors, from which the canopy stomatal conductance was derived. The responses of canopy transpiration and stomatal conductance to environmental variables during the second half of the growing season, when annual prolonged drought occurred, was analyzed for four continuous years, from 2013 to 2016. A soil water content (SWC of 3% was identified as the lower soil water threshold for this species, below which the plant lost the ability for stomatal regulation on water loss and suffered the risk of mortality. Above this threshold, the sensitivity of canopy transpiration to vapor pressure deficit, VPD (K, was linearly correlated with SWC, which mainly resulted from different stomatal behaviors at varying drought intensities. Stomatal sensitivity to VPD (m/Gsref increased linearly with soil moisture deficit, inducing a shift from more anisohydric to a more isohydric stomatal behavior. The flexibility of stomatal behavior regarding soil drought was one key element facilitating the survival of H. ammodendron in such an extreme dry environment.

  8. Photosynthesis, Transpiration, Leaf Temperature, and Stomatal Activity of Cotton Plants under Varying Water Potentials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pallas, J E; Michel, B E; Harris, D G

    1967-01-01

    Cotton plants, Gossypium hirsutum L. were grown in a growth room under incident radiation levels of 65, 35, and 17 Langleys per hour to determine the effects of vapor pressure deficits (VPD's) of 2, 9, and 17 mm Hg at high soil water potential, and the effects of decreasing soil water potential and reirrigation on transpiration, leaf temperature, stomatal activity, photosynthesis, and respiration at a VPD of 9 mm Hg.Transpiration was positively correlated with radiation level, air VPD and soil water potential. Reirrigation following stress led to slow recovery, which may be related to root damage occurring during stress. Leaf water potential decreased with, but not as fast as, soil water potential.Leaf temperature was usually positively correlated with light intensity and negatively correlated with transpiration, air VPD, and soil water. At high soil water, leaf temperatures ranged from a fraction of 1 to a few degrees above ambient, except at medium and low light and a VPD of 19 mm Hg when they were slightly below ambient, probably because of increased transpirational cooling. During low soil water leaf temperatures as high as 3.4 degrees above ambient were recorded. Reirrigation reduced leaf temperature before appreciably increasing transpiration. The upper leaf surface tended to be warmer than the lower at the beginning of the day and when soil water was adequate; otherwise there was little difference or the lower surface was warmer. This pattern seemed to reflect transpiration cooling and leaf position effects.Although stomata were more numerous in the lower than the upper epidermis, most of the time a greater percentage of the upper were open. With sufficient soil water present, stomata opened with light and closed with darkness. Fewer stomata opened under low than high light intensity and under even moderate, as compared with high soil water. It required several days following reirrigation for stomata to regain original activity levels.Apparent photosynthesis

  9. Effects of thinning intensities on transpiration and productivity of 50-year-old Pinus koraeinsis stands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, J.; Kim, T.; Cho, S.; Ryu, D.; Moon, M.; Kim, H. S.

    2015-12-01

    This study investigated the effects of thinning intensities on stand transpiration and productivity of 50-year-old Korean pine forests for three years. Forest thinning, which remove some fraction of trees from stand, alters the microclimatic conditions such as radiation distribution within canopy, vapor pressure deficit, and amount of available soil water. These changes influence on the tree water use, and related tree growth. Thinning was conducted on March, 2012 with two intensities (Control, Light-thinning, and Heavy-thinning). Transpiration was estimated from sap flux density, which was measured with Granier-type thermal dissipation sensors. Tree diameter growth was measured with dendrometer, and converted to tree productivity using allometric equations developed specifically in our study sites.The climatic conditions showed remarkable differences among three years. In 2012, total precipitation was highest but spring was dry. 2013 was normal year with frequent rain events. In contrast, 2014 was hot and extremely dry. Stand transpiration was initially decreased ca. 20% and 42% on light-thinning and heavy-thinning stand, respectively. In second year, it gradually recovered in both thinning intensities, and was 19% and 37% lower on light-thinning and heavy-thinning stand, respectively. However, the recovery trends were different between two thinning intensities. Transpiration of heavy-thinning stand was recovered slowly than that of light thinning stand. In 2014, heavy-thinning stand transpired ca. 5% more than control plot in early growing season, but severe drought had negative effects that caused reduction of stand transpiration in thinned stand on late growing season. The tree-level productivity was increased initially ca. 24% and 28% on light-thinning and heavy-thinning stand, respectively. During the following growing seasons, this thinning-induced enhancement of productivity was diminished in light-thinning stand (21% in 2013 and 20% in 2014), but was

  10. Coupling scales for modelling heavy metal vaporization from municipal solid waste incineration in a fluid bed by CFD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soria, José, E-mail: jose.soria@probien.gob.ar [Institute for Research and Development in Process Engineering, Biotechnology and Alternative Energies (PROBIEN, CONICET – UNCo), 1400 Buenos Aires St., 8300 Neuquén (Argentina); Gauthier, Daniel; Flamant, Gilles [Processes, Materials and Solar Energy Laboratory (PROMES-CNRS, UPR 8521), 7 Four Solaire Street, Odeillo, 66120 Font-Romeu (France); Rodriguez, Rosa [Chemical Engineering Institute, National University of San Juan, 1109 Libertador (O) Avenue, 5400 San Juan (Argentina); Mazza, Germán [Institute for Research and Development in Process Engineering, Biotechnology and Alternative Energies (PROBIEN, CONICET – UNCo), 1400 Buenos Aires St., 8300 Neuquén (Argentina)

    2015-09-15

    Highlights: • A CFD two-scale model is formulated to simulate heavy metal vaporization from waste incineration in fluidized beds. • MSW particle is modelled with the macroscopic particle model. • Influence of bed dynamics on HM vaporization is included. • CFD predicted results agree well with experimental data reported in literature. • This approach may be helpful for fluidized bed reactor modelling purposes. - Abstract: Municipal Solid Waste Incineration (MSWI) in fluidized bed is a very interesting technology mainly due to high combustion efficiency, great flexibility for treating several types of waste fuels and reduction in pollutants emitted with the flue gas. However, there is a great concern with respect to the fate of heavy metals (HM) contained in MSW and their environmental impact. In this study, a coupled two-scale CFD model was developed for MSWI in a bubbling fluidized bed. It presents an original scheme that combines a single particle model and a global fluidized bed model in order to represent the HM vaporization during MSW combustion. Two of the most representative HM (Cd and Pb) with bed temperatures ranging between 923 and 1073 K have been considered. This new approach uses ANSYS FLUENT 14.0 as the modelling platform for the simulations along with a complete set of self-developed user-defined functions (UDFs). The simulation results are compared to the experimental data obtained previously by the research group in a lab-scale fluid bed incinerator. The comparison indicates that the proposed CFD model predicts well the evolution of the HM release for the bed temperatures analyzed. It shows that both bed temperature and bed dynamics have influence on the HM vaporization rate. It can be concluded that CFD is a rigorous tool that provides valuable information about HM vaporization and that the original two-scale simulation scheme adopted allows to better represent the actual particle behavior in a fluid bed incinerator.

  11. Biological and environmental controls on tree transpiration in a suburban landscape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Emily B.; McFadden, Joseph P.; Montgomery, Rebecca A.

    2010-12-01

    Tree transpiration provides a variety of ecosystem services in urban areas, including amelioration of urban heat island effects and storm water management. Tree species vary in the magnitude and seasonality of transpiration owing to differences in physiology, response to climate, and biophysical characteristics, thereby complicating efforts to manage evapotranspiration at city scales. We report sap flux measurements during the 2007 and 2008 growing seasons for dominant tree species in a suburban neighborhood of Minneapolis-Saint Paul, Minnesota, USA. Evergreen needleleaf trees had significantly higher growing season means and annual transpiration per unit canopy area (1.90 kg H2O m-2 d-1 and 307 kg H2O m-2 yr-1, respectively) than deciduous broadleaf trees (1.11 kg H2O m-2 d-1 and 153 kg H2O m-2 yr-1, respectively) because of a smaller projected canopy area (31.1 and 73.6 m2, respectively), a higher leaf area index (8.8 and 5.5 m2 m-2, respectively), and a longer growth season (8 and 4 months, respectively). Measurements also showed patterns consistent with the species' differences in xylem anatomy (conifer, ring porous, and diffuse porous). As the growing season progressed, conifer and diffuse porous genera had increased stomatal regulation to high vapor pressure deficit, while ring porous genera maintained greater and more constant stomatal regulation. These results suggest that evaporative responses to climate change in urban ecosystems will depend in part on species composition. Overall, plant functional type differences in canopy structure and growing season length were most important in explaining species' differences in midsummer and annual transpiration, offering an approach to predicting the evapotranspiration component of urban water budgets.

  12. EFFECTS OF ELEVATED ATMOSPHERIC CO{sub 2} ON CANOPY TRANSPIRATION IN SENESCENT SPRING WHEAT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    GROSSMAN,S.; KIMBALL,B.A.; HUNSAKER,D.J.; LONG,S.P.; GARCIA,R.L.; KARTSCHALL,TH.; WALL,G.W.; PINTER,P.J,JR.; WECHSUNG,F.; LAMORTE,R.L.

    1998-12-31

    The seasonal course of canopy transpiration and the diurnal courses of latent heat flux of a spring wheat crop were simulated for atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentrations of 370 {micro}mol mol{sup {minus}1} and 550 {micro}mol mol{sup {minus}1}. The hourly weather data, soil parameters and the irrigation and fertilizer treatments of the Free-Air Carbon Dioxide Enrichment wheat experiment in Arizona (1992/93) were used to drive the model. The simulation results were tested against field measurements with special emphasis on the period between anthesis and maturity. A model integrating leaf photosynthesis and stomatal conductance was scaled to a canopy level in order to be used in the wheat growth model. The simulated intercellular CO{sub 2} concentration, C{sub i} was determined from the ratio of C{sub i} to the CO{sub 2} concentration at the leaf surface, C{sub s} the leaf to air specific humidity deficit and a possibly unfulfilled transpiration demand. After anthesis, the measured assimilation rates of the flag leaves decreased more rapidly than their stomatal conductances, leading to a rise in the C{sub i}/C{sub s} ratio. In order to describe this observation, an empirical model approach was developed which took into account the leaf nitrogen content for the calculation of the C{sub i}/C{sub s} ratio. Simulation results obtained with the new model version were in good agreement with the measurements. If changes in the C{sub i}/C{sub s} ratio accorded to the decrease in leaf nitrogen content during leaf senescence were not considered in the model, simulations revealed an underestimation of the daily canopy transpiration of up to 20% and a decrease in simulated seasonal canopy transpiration by 10%. The measured reduction in the seasonal sum of canopy transpiration and soil evaporation owing to CO{sub 2} enrichment, in comparison, was only about 5%.

  13. A chemical kinetic model for chemical vapor deposition of carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raji, K.; Thomas, Shijo; Sobhan, C. B.

    2011-10-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are classified among the most promising novel materials due to their exceptional physical properties. Still, optimal fabrication of carbon nanotubes involves a number of challenges. Whatever be the fabrication method, a process optimization can be evolved only on the basis of a good theoretical model to predict the parametric influences on the final product. The work reported here investigates the dependence of the deposition parameters on the controllable parameters for carbon nanotube growth during Chemical vapor deposition (CVD), through a chemical kinetic model. The theoretical model consisted of the design equations and the energy balance equations, based on the reaction kinetics, for the plug flow and the batch reactor, which simulate the CVD system. The numerical simulation code was developed in-house in a g++ environment. The results predicted the growth conditions for CNT: the deposition temperature, pressure and number of atoms, which were found to be influenced substantially by the initial controllable parameters namely the temperature, volumetric flow rate of the carbon precursor, and the reaction time. An experimental study was also conducted on a CVD system developed in the laboratory, to benchmark the computational results. The experimental results were found to agree well with the theoretical predictions obtained from the model.

  14. Flow Characterization of Vapor Phase of Geothermal Fluid in Pipe Using Isotope 85Kr and Residence Time Distribution Modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Sugiharto

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Measurement of vapor flow in geothermal pipe faces great challenges due to fast fluids flow in high-temperature and high-pressure environment. In present study the flow rate measurement has been performed to characterization the geothermal vapor flow in a pipe. The experiment was carried out in a pipe which is connected to a geothermal production well, KMJ-14. The pipe has a 10” outside diameter and contains dry vapor at a pressure of 8 kg/cm2 and a temperature of 170 oC. Krypton-85 gas isotope (85Kr has been injected into the pipe. Three collimated radiation detectors positioned respectively at 127, 177 and 227m from injection point were used to obtain experimental data which represent radiotracer residence time distribution (RTD in the pipe. The last detector at the position of 227 m did not respond, which might be due to problems in cable connections. Flow properties calculated using mean residence time (MRT shows that the flow rate of the vapor in pipe is 10.98 m/s, much faster than fluid flow commonly found in various industrial process plants. Best fitting evaluated using dedicated software developed by IAEA expert obtained the Péclet number Pe as 223. This means that the flow of vapor of geothermal fluids in pipe is plug flow in character. The molecular diffusion coefficient is 0.45 m2/s, calculated from the axial dispersion model.

  15. respiration and transpiration characteristics of selected fresh fruits

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AISA

    Respiration and transpiration characteristics of mushrooms, strawberries, broccoli and tomatoes were determined under different ...... (L.) Gauthier and (A.) Gosselin. 1995. Stomatal and cuticular transpiration of greenhouse tomato plants in response to high solution electrical conductivity and low soil water content. J. AMER.

  16. Transpiration of greenhouse crops : an aid to climate management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stanghellini, C.

    1987-01-01

    In this book some physical aspects of greenhouse climate are analyzed to show the direct interrelation between microclimate and crop transpiration. The energy balance of a greenhouse crop is shown to provide a sound physical framework to quantify the impact of microclimate on transpiration

  17. Modeling the effect of ethanol vapor on the germination time of Penicillium chrysogenum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dantigny, P.; Tchobanov, I.; Bensoussan, M.; Zwietering, M.H.

    2005-01-01

    The influence of ethanol vapor on germination of Penicillium chrysogenum was determined on yeast nitrogen base plus glucose agar medium at 25°C. Ethanol vapors were generated by 0 to 6% (wt/wt) ethanol solutions at the bottom of hermetically closed petri dishes. The logistic equation was used to

  18. Membership function model for defining optimality of vapor pressure deficit in closed-field cultivation of tomato

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shamshiri, R.; Che Man, H.; Zakaria, A.J.; Beveren, van Peter; Wan Ismail, W.I.; Ahmad, D.

    2017-01-01

    Estimation of plant's evapotranspiration (ET) or water loss to the atmosphere depends on the vapor pressure deficit (VPD) of the closed-field environment (greenhouse). The objective of this work was to develop a membership function model for defining optimal VPD of greenhouse air for tomato

  19. Forward modeling and retrieval of water vapor from the Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment: Treatment of narrowband absorption spectra

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lang, R.; Maurellis, A.N.; van der Zande, W.J.; Aben, I.; Landgraf, J.; Ubachs, W.M.G.

    2002-01-01

    [1] We present the algorithm and results for a new fast forward modeling technique applied to the retrieval of atmospheric water vapor from satellite measurements using a weak ro-vibrational overtone band in the visible. The algorithm uses an Optical Absorption Coefficient Spectroscopy (OACS) method

  20. Profiling water vapor mixing ratios in Finland by means of a Raman lidar, a satellite and a model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filioglou, Maria; Nikandrova, Anna; Niemelä, Sami; Baars, Holger; Mielonen, Tero; Leskinen, Ari; Brus, David; Romakkaniemi, Sami; Giannakaki, Elina; Komppula, Mika

    2017-11-01

    We present tropospheric water vapor profiles measured with a Raman lidar during three field campaigns held in Finland. Co-located radio soundings are available throughout the period for the calibration of the lidar signals. We investigate the possibility of calibrating the lidar water vapor profiles in the absence of co-existing on-site soundings using water vapor profiles from the combined Advanced InfraRed Sounder (AIRS) and the Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit (AMSU) satellite product; the Aire Limitée Adaptation dynamique Développement INternational and High Resolution Limited Area Model (ALADIN/HIRLAM) numerical weather prediction (NWP) system, and the nearest radio sounding station located 100 km away from the lidar site (only for the permanent location of the lidar). The uncertainties of the calibration factor derived from the soundings, the satellite and the model data are change in disagreement between the lidar and the model has been studied. The analysis showed that, on average, the model underestimates water vapor mixing ratios at high altitudes during spring and summer.

  1. Steady streamwise transpiration control in turbulent pipe flow

    CERN Document Server

    Gómez, F; Rudman, M; Sharma, AS; McKeon, BJ

    2016-01-01

    A study of the the main features of low- and high amplitude steady streamwise wall transpiration applied to pipe flow is presented. The effect of the two transpiration parameters, amplitude and wavenumber, on the flow have been investigated by means of direct numerical simulation at a moderate turbulent Reynolds number. The behaviour of the three identified mechanisms that act in the flow: modification of Reynolds shear stress, steady streaming and generation of non-zero mean streamwise gradients, have been linked to the transpiration parameters. The observed trends have permitted the identification of wall transpiration configurations able to reduce or increase the overall flow rate in -36.1% and 19.3% respectively. A resolvent analysis has been carried out to obtain a description of the reorganization of the flow structures induced by the transpiration.

  2. Modeling Convective Injection of Water Vapor into the Lower Stratosphere in the Mid-Latitudes over North America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clapp, C.; Leroy, S. S.; Anderson, J. G.

    2015-12-01

    Water vapor in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere (UTLS) from the tropics to the poles is important both radiatively and chemically. Water vapor is the most important greenhouse gas, and increases in water vapor concentrations in the UTLS lead to cooling at these levels and induce warming at the surface [Forster and Shine, 1999; 2002;Solomon et al., 2010]. Water vapor is also integral to stratospheric chemistry. It is the dominant source of OH in the lower stratosphere [ Hanisco et al. , 2001], and increases in water vapor concentrations promote stratospheric ozone loss by raising the reactivity of several key heterogeneous reactions as well as by promoting the growth of reactive surface area [Anderson et al., 2012; Carslaw et al., 1995; Carslaw et al., 1997; Drdla and Muller , 2012; Kirk-Davidoff et al., 1999; Shi et al., 2001]. However, the processes that control the distribution and phase of water in this region of the atmosphere are not well understood. This is especially true at mid-latitudes where several different dynamical mechanisms are capable of influencing UTLS water vapor concentrations. The contribution by deep convective storm systems that penetrate into the lower stratosphere is the least well understood and the least well represented in global models because of the small spatial scales and short time scales over which convection occurs. To address this issue, we have begun a modeling study to investigate the convective injection of water vapor from the troposphere into the stratosphere in the mid-latitudes. Fine-scale models have been previously used to simulate convection from the troposphere to the stratosphere [e.g., Homeyer et al., 2014]. Here we employ the Advanced Research Weather and Research Forecasting model (ARW) at 3-km resolution to resolve convection over the eastern United States during August of 2007 and August of 2013. We conduct a comparison of MERRA, the reanalysis used to initialize ARW, and the model output to assess

  3. Modeling Insights into Deuterium Excess as an Indicator of Water Vapor Source Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Sophie C.; Legrande, Allegra Nicole; Kelley, Maxwell; Schmidt, Gavin A.

    2013-01-01

    Deuterium excess (d) is interpreted in conventional paleoclimate reconstructions as a tracer of oceanic source region conditions, such as temperature, where precipitation originates. Previous studies have adopted co-isotopic approaches to estimate past changes in both site and oceanic source temperatures for ice core sites using empirical relationships derived from conceptual distillation models, particularly Mixed Cloud Isotopic Models (MCIMs). However, the relationship between d and oceanic surface conditions remains unclear in past contexts. We investigate this climate-isotope relationship for sites in Greenland and Antarctica using multiple simulations of the water isotope-enabled Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS) ModelE-R general circulation model and apply a novel suite of model vapor source distribution (VSD) tracers to assess d as a proxy for source temperature variability under a range of climatic conditions. Simulated average source temperatures determined by the VSDs are compared to synthetic source temperature estimates calculated using MCIM equations linking d to source region conditions. We show that although deuterium excess is generally a faithful tracer of source temperatures as estimated by the MCIM approach, large discrepancies in the isotope-climate relationship occur around Greenland during the Last Glacial Maximum simulation, when precipitation seasonality and moisture source regions were notably different from present. This identified sensitivity in d as a source temperature proxy suggests that quantitative climate reconstructions from deuterium excess should be treated with caution for some sites when boundary conditions are significantly different from the present day. Also, the exclusion of the influence of humidity and other evaporative source changes in MCIM regressions may be a limitation of quantifying source temperature fluctuations from deuterium excess in some instances.

  4. Modelling stomatal conductance in Acacia caven: A two way approach to understand vapor fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raab, N.; Meza, F. J.

    2012-12-01

    Evapotranspiration fluxes from semi arid ecosystems show a strong interannual variability and dependence on water availability. Usually this variable is regarded as very small but at local scale could substantially affect water balance at basin level. Climate Change scenarios for these regions are a source of concern as they project an increase in temperature, leading to a greater atmospheric water demand. In addition, precipitation is expected to decrease, increasing pressure for this kind of ecosystems. At a plant level, a rise on the actual atmospheric CO2 concentration is expected to improve photosynthetic performance and water use efficiency. However, as stomatal conductance is the main pathway for water vapor flux, from the leaf to the atmosphere, and CO2 entrance to the substomatal cavity, a larger control of the stomatal opening, due to a severe water control lost from the plant, could lead to shortages in net assimilation, jeopardizing the behavior of Semi Arid ecosystems as natural carbon sinks. Stoma is also one of the main lock of the soil-plant-water continuum, thus finally controlling the rate of soil water depletion. Its modeling presents a key role in determining future groundwater availability and net ecosystem exchange. There are several approaches for stomatal conductance modeling, from mechanistic models, based on the physiological functioning of the stomata, to empirical models where the stomatal behavior is correlated with environmental conditions. We modeled stomatal conductance for a Chilean typical Mediterranean Savannanh, dominated by Acacia caven, comparing two different empirical approaches. We used a Shuttleworth and Wallace model for sparse canopies combined with an inversion of the Penman-Monteith equation. This model allowed us to link stomatal conductance to evapotranspiration. The second approach was based on a multiplicative model for stomatal conductance based on environmental limitation, following Jarvis's model

  5. On the correlation of water vapor and CO2: Application to flux partitioning of evapotranspiration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wen; Smith, James A.; Ramamurthy, Prathap; Baeck, Mary Lynn; Bou-Zeid, Elie; Scanlon, Todd M.

    2016-12-01

    The partitioning of evapotranspiration (ET) between plant transpiration (Et) and direct evaporation (Ed) presents one of the most important and challenging problems for characterizing ecohydrological processes. The exchange of water vapor (q) and CO2 (c) are closely coupled in ecosystem processes and knowledge of their controls can be gained through joint investigation of q and c. In this study we examine the correlation of water vapor and CO2 (Rqc) through analyses of high-frequency time series derived from eddy covariance measurements collected over a suburban grass field in Princeton, NJ during a 2 year period (2011-2013). Rqc at the study site exhibits pronounced seasonal and diurnal cycles, with maximum anticorrelation in June and maximum decorrelation in January. The diurnal cycle of Rqc varies seasonally and is characterized by a near-symmetric shape with peak anticorrelation around local noon. Wavelet and spectral analyses suggest that q and c are jointly transported for most eddy scales (1-200 m), which is important for ET partitioning methods based on flux variance similarity. The diurnal cycle of the transpiration fraction (ratio of Et to total ET) exhibits an asymmetric diurnal cycle, especially during the warm season, with peak values occurring in the afternoon. These ET partitioning results give similar diurnal and seasonal patterns compared with numerical simulations from the Noah Land Surface Model using the Jarvis canopy resistance formulation.

  6. An interim reference model for the variability of the middle atmosphere H2O vapor distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remsberg, E. E.; Russell, J. M., III; Wu, C. Y.

    1989-01-01

    Water vapor is an important minor constituent in the studies of the middle atmosphere for a variety of reasons, including its role as a source for active HO(y) chemicals and its use in analysis of transport processes. A number of in situ and remote techniques were employed in the determination of water vapor distributions. Two of the more complete data sets were used to develop an interim reference profile. First, there are the seven months of Nimbus 7 limb infrared monitor of the stratosphere (LIMS) data obtained during Nov. 1978 to May 1979 over the range 64S to 84N latitude and from about 100 to 1 mb in the mid-mesosphere at several fixed Northern Hemisphere mid-latitude sites. These two data sets were combined to give a mid-lattitude, interim reference water vapor profile for the entire vertical range of the middle atmosphere and with accuracies of better than 25 percent. The daily variability of stratospheric water vapor profiles about the monthly mean was also established from these data sets for selected months. Information is also provided on the longitudinal variability of LIMS water vapor profiles about the daily, weekly, and monthly zonal means. Generally, the interim reference water vapor profile and its variability are consistent with prevailing ideas about chemistry and transport.

  7. Risk assessment of vapor cloud explosions in a hydrogen production facility with consequence modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarei, Esameil; Jafari, Mohammad Javad; Badri, Naser

    2013-09-17

    New technologies using hazardous materials usually have certain risks. It is more serious when the technology is supposed to be applied in a large scale and become widely used by many people. The objective of this paper was to evaluate the risk of vapor cloud explosion in a hydrogen production process. Potential hazards were identified using the conventional hazard identification method (HAZID). The frequency of the proposed scenarios was estimated from statistical data and existing records. The PHAST professional software was applied for consequence modeling. Both individual and societal risks were evaluated. This cross-sectional study was conducted from June 2010 to December 2011 in a Hydrogen Production Plant in Tehran. The full bore rupture in heat exchanger had the highest harm effect distance. The full bore rupture in desulphurization reactor had the highest (57% of total) individual risk. Full bore rupture in heat exchanger was the highest contributor to social risk. It carried 64% & 66.7% of total risk in day and night respectively. For the sake of safety, mitigation measures should be implemented on heat exchanger, reformer and hydrogen purification absorbers. The main proposed risk reductive measures included; the increasing of installed equipment elevation, the application of smaller vessels and pipes.

  8. Vapor-Liquid Equilibrium of Carbon Dioxide + Ethanol: Experimental Measurements with Acoustic Method and Thermodynamic Modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Mehl

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Phase behavior of systems composed by supercritical carbon dioxide and ethanol is of great interest, especially in the processes involving supercritical extraction in which ethanol is used as a cosolvent. The development of an apparatus, which is able to perform the measurements of vapor-liquid equilibrium (VLE at high pressure using a combination of the visual and the acoustic methods, was successful and was proven to be suited for determining the isothermal VLE data of this system. The acoustic method, based on the variation of the amplitude of an ultra-sound signal passing through a mixture during a phase transition, was applied to investigate the phase equilibria of the system carbon dioxide + ethanol at temperatures ranging from 298.2 K to 323.2 K and pressures from 3.0 MPa to 9.0 MPa. The VLE data were correlated with Peng-Robinson equation of state combined with two different mixing rules and the SAFT equations of state as well. The compositions calculated with the models are in good agreement with the experimental data for the isotherms evaluated.

  9. Sodium vapor cell laser guide star experiments for continuous wave model validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedreros Bustos, Felipe; Holzlöhner, Ronald; Budker, Dmitry; Lewis, Steffan; Rochester, Simon

    2016-07-01

    Recent numerical simulations and experiments on sodium Laser Guide Star (LGS) have shown that a continuous wave (CW) laser with circular polarization and re-pumping should maximize the fluorescent photon return flux to the wavefront sensor for adaptive optics applications. The orientation and strength of the geomagnetic field in the sodium layer also play an important role affecting the LGS return ux. Field measurements of the LGS return flux show agreement with the CW LGS model, however, fluctuations in the sodium column abundance and geomagnetic field intensity, as well as atmospheric turbulence, induce experimental uncertainties. We describe a laboratory experiment to measure the photon return flux from a sodium vapor cell illuminated with a 589 nm CW laser beam, designed to approximately emulate a LGS under controlled conditions. Return flux measurements are carried out controlling polarization, power density, re-pumping, laser linewidth, and magnetic field intensity and orientation. Comparison with the numerical CW simulation package Atomic Density Matrix are presented and discussed.

  10. Modeling of Sheath Ion-Molecule Reactions in Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition of Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hash, David B.; Govindan, T. R.; Meyyappan, M.

    2004-01-01

    In many plasma simulations, ion-molecule reactions are modeled using ion energy independent reaction rate coefficients that are taken from low temperature selected-ion flow tube experiments. Only exothermic or nearly thermoneutral reactions are considered. This is appropriate for plasma applications such as high-density plasma sources in which sheaths are collisionless and ion temperatures 111 the bulk p!asma do not deviate significantly from the gas temperature. However, for applications at high pressure and large sheath voltages, this assumption does not hold as the sheaths are collisional and ions gain significant energy in the sheaths from Joule heating. Ion temperatures and thus reaction rates vary significantly across the discharge, and endothermic reactions become important in the sheaths. One such application is plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition of carbon nanotubes in which dc discharges are struck at pressures between 1-20 Torr with applied voltages in the range of 500-700 V. The present work investigates The importance of the inclusion of ion energy dependent ion-molecule reaction rates and the role of collision induced dissociation in generating radicals from the feedstock used in carbon nanotube growth.

  11. The in vitro zebrafish heart as a model to investigate the chronotropic effects of vapor anesthetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoyek, Matthew R; Schmidt, Michael K; Wilfart, Florentin M; Croll, Roger P; Smith, Frank M

    2017-12-01

    In addition to their intended clinical actions, all general anesthetic agents in common use have detrimental intrasurgical and postsurgical side effects on organs and systems, including the heart. The major cardiac side effect of anesthesia is bradycardia, which increases the probability of insufficient systemic perfusion during surgery. These side effects also occur in all vertebrate species so far examined, but the underlying mechanisms are not clear. The zebrafish heart is a powerful model for studying cardiac electrophysiology, employing the same pacemaker system and neural control as do mammalian hearts. In this study, isolated zebrafish hearts were significantly bradycardic during exposure to the vapor anesthetics sevoflurane (SEVO), desflurane (DES), and isoflurane (ISO). Bradycardia induced by DES and ISO continued during pharmacological blockade of the intracardiac portion of the autonomic nervous system, but the chronotropic effect of SEVO was eliminated during blockade. Bradycardia evoked by vagosympathetic nerve stimulation was augmented during DES and ISO exposure; nerve stimulation during SEVO exposure had no effect. Together, these results support the hypothesis that the cardiac chronotropic effect of SEVO occurs via a neurally mediated mechanism, while DES and ISO act directly upon cardiac pacemaker cells via an as yet unknown mechanism. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  12. Thermophoretically enhanced mass transport rates to solid and transpiration-cooled walls across turbulent (law-of-the-wall) boundary layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gokoglu, Suleyman A.; Rosner, Daniel E.

    1985-01-01

    Convective-diffusion mass transfer rate predictions are made for both solid wall and transpiration-cooled 'law-of-the-wall' nonisothermal turbulent boundary layers (TBLs), including the mechanism of thermophoresis, i.e., small particle mass transport 'down a temperature gradient'. The present calculations are confined to low mass-loading situations but span the entire particle size range from vapor molecules to particles near the onset of inertial ('eddy') impaction. It is shown that, when Sc is much greater than 1, thermophoresis greatly increases particle deposition rates to internally cooled solid walls, but only partially offsets the appreciable reduction in deposition rates associated with dust-free gas-transpiration-cooled surfaces. Thus, efficient particle sampling from hot dusty gases can be carried out using transpiration 'shielded' probe surfaces.

  13. UNIQUAC activity coefficient model and modified Redlich- Kwong EOS for the vapor liquid equilibrium systems of carbon dioxide-water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nurak Grisdanurak

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available The UNIQUAC activity coefficient model and fugacity coefficient model of modified Redlich-Kwong predicted vapor-liquid equilibrium between carbon dioxide and water efficiently. The activity coefficient model needed the energy interaction parameters between molecules of carbon dioxide and water. Those parameters can be obtained by non-linear regression method of the experimental data of the vapor-liquid equilibria of carbon dioxide and water (Lide, 1992. The fugacity coefficient model of modified Redlich- Kwong needed only some physical properties of carbon dioxide and water without any interaction parameters. The experimental data had ranges of temperature and partial pressure of carbon dioxide between 10 to 100ºC and 5 to 1,200 kPa, respectively. The parameters for the activity coefficient model are temperature dependent but are not concentration dependent. The regression results gave good agreements with the experimental data in which the mean absolute error (MAE between experiment and calculated partial pressure of carbon dioxide was 2.72% and the mean absolute standard deviation (MAD of that error was 1.35%. Comparing the effects of activity coefficients and fugacity coefficients, we found that the non-ideality in vapor phase was more influential than the non-ideality in liquid phase.

  14. Transpiration as landfill leachate phytotoxicity indicator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Białowiec, Andrzej

    2015-05-01

    An important aspect of constructed wetlands design for landfill leachate treatment is the assessment of landfill leachate phytotoxicity. Intravital methods of plants response observation are required both for lab scale toxicity testing and field examination of plants state. The study examined the toxic influence of two types of landfill leachate from landfill in Zakurzewo (L1) and landfill in Wola Pawłowska (L2) on five plant species: reed Phragmites australis (Cav.) Trin. ex Steud, manna grass Glyceria maxima (Hartm.) Holmb., bulrush Schoenoplectus lacustris (L.) Palla, sweet flag Acorus calamus L., and miscanthus Miscanthus floridulus (Labill) Warb. Transpiration measurement was used as indicator of plants response. The lowest effective concentration causing the toxic effect (LOEC) for each leachate type and plant species was estimated. Plants with the highest resistance to toxic factors found in landfill leachate were: sweet flag, bulrush, and reed. The LOEC values for these plants were, respectively, 17%, 16%, 9% in case of leachate L1 and 21%, 18%, 14% in case of L2. Leachate L1 was more toxic than L2 due to a higher pH value under similar ammonia nitrogen content, i.e. pH 8.74 vs. pH 8.00. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Sap flow measurements to determine the transpiration of facade greenings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hölscher, Marie-Therese; Nehls, Thomas; Wessolek, Gerd

    2014-05-01

    Facade greening is expected to make a major contribution to the mitigation of the urban heat-island effect through transpiration cooling, thermal insulation and shading of vertical built structures. However, no studies are available on water demand and the transpiration of urban vertical green. Such knowledge is needed as the plants must be sufficiently watered, otherwise the posited positive effects of vertical green can turn into disadvantages when compared to a white wall. Within the framework of the German Research Group DFG FOR 1736 "Urban Climate and Heat Stress" this study aims to test the practicability of the sap flow technique for transpiration measurements of climbing plants and to obtain potential transpiration rates for the most commonly used species. Using sap flow measurements we determined the transpiration of Fallopia baldschuanica, Parthenocissus tricuspidata and Hedera helix in pot experiments (about 1 m high) during the hot summer period from August 17th to August 30th 2012 under indoor conditions. Sap flow measurements corresponded well to simultaneous weight measurement on a daily base (factor 1.19). Fallopia baldschuanica has the highest daily transpiration rate based on leaf area (1.6 mm d-1) and per base area (5.0 mm d-1). Parthenocissus tricuspidata and Hedera helix show transpiration rates of 3.5 and 0.4 mm d-1 (per base area). Through water shortage, transpiration strongly decreased and leaf temperature measured by infrared thermography increased by 1 K compared to a well watered plant. We transferred the technique to outdoor conditions and will present first results for facade greenings in the inner-city of Berlin for the hottest period in summer 2013.

  16. Assessing the feasibility of separating a stoichiometric mixture of zinc vapor and oxygen by a fast quench. Model calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alxneit, Ivo [Paul Scherrer Institute, CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland)

    2008-11-15

    An aerosol kinetic model is applied to evaluate the feasibility of separating a stoichiometric mixture of zinc vapor and oxygen by a fast quench as proposed in the solar thermochemical Zn/ZnO cycle. The model is able to explain the experimental evidence collected so far in our laboratory: high zinc yields are only obtained if the zinc/oxygen mixture is strongly diluted with inert gas. This behavior can be understood because the desired condensation of zinc is slow compared to its oxidation when liquid zinc is involved due of its high vapor pressure. The oxidation reaction, however, is not limited by this as the equilibrium partial pressures of zinc and oxygen above ZnO are both negligible. For the same reason, the oxidation reaction continues even if the zinc saturation drops below S = 1. Here, initially condensed zinc begins to evaporate further decreasing the zinc yield. The model predicts that increasing the quench rate has a negligible effect even at an initial zinc vapor pressure of 11,000 Pa but that higher zinc yields can be expected if the quench is applied to more dilute mixtures. (author)

  17. Influence of irrigation and fertilization on transpiration and hydraulic properties of Populus deltoides.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samuelson, Lisa, J.; Stokes, Thomas, A.; Coleman, Mark, D.

    2007-02-01

    Summary Long-term hydraulic acclimation to resource availability was explored in 3-year-bld Populus deltoides Bartr. ex Marsh. clones by examining transpiration. leaf-specific hydraulic conductance (GL), canopy stomatal conductance (Gs) and leaf to sapwood area ratio (AL:Asi)n response to imgation (13 and 551 mm year in addition to ambient precipitation) and fertilization (0 and 120 kg N ha-' year-'). Sap flow was measured continuously over one growing season with thermal dissipation probes. Fertilization had a greater effect on growth and hydraulic properties than imgation, and fertilization effects were independent of irrigation treatment. Transpiration on a ground area basis (E) ranged between 0.3 and 1.8 mm day-', and increased 66% and 90% in response to imgation and fertilization, respectively. Increases in GL, Gs at a reference vapor pressure deficit of 1 kPa, and transpiration per unit leaf areain response to increases in resource availability were associated with reductions in AL:As and consequently a minimal change in the water potential gradient from soil to leaf. Imgation and fertilization increased leaf area index similarly, from an average 1.16 in control stands to 1.45, but sapwood area was increased from 4.0 to 6.3 m ha-' by irrigation and from 3.7 to 6.7 m2 ha-' by fertilization. The balance between leaf area and sapwood area was important in understanding long-term hydraulic acclimation to resource availability and mechanisms controlling maximum productivity in Populus deltoides.

  18. Influence of irrigation and fertilization on transpiration and hydraulic properties of Populus deltoides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuelson, Lisa J; Stokes, Thomas A; Coleman, Mark D

    2007-05-01

    Long-term hydraulic acclimation to resource availability was explored in 3-year-old Populus deltoides Bartr. ex Marsh. clones by examining transpiration, leaf-specific hydraulic conductance (G(L)), canopy stomatal conductance (G(S)) and leaf to sapwood area ratio (A(L):A(S)) in response to irrigation (13 and 551 mm year(-1) in addition to ambient precipitation) and fertilization (0 and 120 kg N ha(-1) year(-1)). Sap flow was measured continuously over one growing season with thermal dissipation probes. Fertilization had a greater effect on growth and hydraulic properties than irrigation, and fertilization effects were independent of irrigation treatment. Transpiration on a ground area basis (E) ranged between 0.3 and 1.8 mm day(-1), and increased 66% and 90% in response to irrigation and fertilization, respectively. Increases in G(L), G(S) at a reference vapor pressure deficit of 1 kPa, and transpiration per unit leaf area in response to increases in resource availability were associated with reductions in A(L):A(S) and consequently a minimal change in the water potential gradient from soil to leaf. Irrigation and fertilization increased leaf area index similarly, from an average 1.16 in control stands to 1.45, but sapwood area was increased from 4.0 to 6.3 m(2) ha(-1) by irrigation and from 3.7 to 6.7 m(2) ha(-1) by fertilization. The balance between leaf area and sapwood area was important in understanding long-term hydraulic acclimation to resource availability and mechanisms controlling maximum productivity in Populus deltoides.

  19. Measuring diurnal cycles of plant transpiration fluxes in the Arctic with an automated clear chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, L. R.; Raz Yaseef, N.; Curtis, J. B.; Rahn, T. A.; Young, J. M.; Newman, B. D.

    2013-12-01

    Evapotranspiration is an important greenhouse gas and a major component of the hydrological cycle, but methodological challenges still limit our knowledge of this flux. Measuring evapotranspiration is even more difficult when aiming to partition plant transpiration and soil evaporation. Information on this process for arctic systems is very limited. In order to decrease this gap, our objective was to directly measure plant transpiration in Barrow, Alaska (71.3°N 156.7°W). A commercial system allows measuring carbon soil respiration fluxes with an automated clear chamber connected to an infrared gas-analyzer (Licor 8100), and while it simultaneously measures water concentrations, it is not calibrated to measure vapor fluxes. We calibrated the clear chamber against a previously established method based on a Licor 6400 soil chamber, and we developed a code to calculate fluxes. We performed laboratory comparisons in New Mexico and field comparisons in the Arctic, suggesting that this is a valid tool for a large range of climates. In the field we found a strong correlation between the two instruments with R2 of 0.79. Even with 24 hours of daylight in the Arctic, the system captures a clear diurnal transpiration flux, peaking at 0.9 mmol m-2 s-1 and showing no flux at the lowest points. This new method should be a powerful approach for long term measurements of specific vegetation types or surface features. Such Data can also be used to help understand controls on larger scale eddy covariance tower measurements of evapotranspiration.

  20. VAPOR PRESSURES AND HEATS OF VAPORIZATION OF PRIMARY COAL TARS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eric M. Suuberg; Vahur Oja

    1997-07-01

    This project had as its main focus the determination of vapor pressures of coal pyrolysis tars. It involved performing measurements of these vapor pressures and from them, developing vapor pressure correlations suitable for use in advanced pyrolysis models (those models which explicitly account for mass transport limitations). This report is divided into five main chapters. Each chapter is a relatively stand-alone section. Chapter A reviews the general nature of coal tars and gives a summary of existing vapor pressure correlations for coal tars and model compounds. Chapter B summarizes the main experimental approaches for coal tar preparation and characterization which have been used throughout the project. Chapter C is concerned with the selection of the model compounds for coal pyrolysis tars and reviews the data available to us on the vapor pressures of high boiling point aromatic compounds. This chapter also deals with the question of identifying factors that govern the vapor pressures of coal tar model materials and their mixtures. Chapter D covers the vapor pressures and heats of vaporization of primary cellulose tars. Chapter E discusses the results of the main focus of this study. In summary, this work provides improved understanding of the volatility of coal and cellulose pyrolysis tars. It has resulted in new experimentally verified vapor pressure correlations for use in pyrolysis models. Further research on this topic should aim at developing general vapor pressure correlations for all coal tars, based on their molecular weight together with certain specific chemical characteristics i.e. hydroxyl group content.

  1. Atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition of ZnO: Process modeling and experiments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deelen, J. van; Illiberi, A.; Kniknie, B.; Beckers, E.H.A.; Simons, P.J.P.M.; Lankhorst, A.

    2014-01-01

    The deposition of zinc oxide has been performed by atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition and trends in growth rates are compared with the literature. Diethylzinc and tertiary butanol were used as the primary reactants and deposition rates above 800 nm/min were obtained. The reaction

  2. Atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition of ZnO: Process modeling and experiments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deelen, J. van; Illiberi, A.; Kniknie, B.; Beckers, E.H.A.; Simons, P.J.P.M.; Lankhorst, A.

    2013-01-01

    The deposition of zinc oxide has been performed by atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition and trends in growth rates are compared with the literature. Diethylzinc and tertiary butanol were used as the primary reactants and deposition rates above 800 nm/minwere obtained. The reaction

  3. Do Reductions in Dry Season Transpiration Allow Shallow Soil Water Uptake to Persist in a Tropical Lower Montane Cloud Forest?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munoz Villers, L. E.; Holwerda, F.; Alvarado-Barrientos, M. S.; Goldsmith, G. R.; Geissert Kientz, D. R.; González Martínez, T. M.; Dawson, T. E.

    2016-12-01

    Tropical montane cloud forests (TMCF) are ecosystems particularly sensitive to climate change; however, the effects of warmer and drier conditions on TMCF water cycling remain poorly understood. To investigate the plant functional response to reduced water availability, we conducted a study during the mid to late dry season (2014) in the lower limit (1,325 m asl) of the TMCF belt (1200-2500 m asl) in central Veracruz, Mexico. The temporal variation of transpiration rates of dominant upper canopy and mid-story tree species, depth of water uptake, as well as tree water sources were examined using micrometeorological, sapflow and soil moisture measurements, in combination with data on stable isotope (δ18O and δ2H) composition of rain, tree xylem, soil (bulk and low suction-lysimeter) and stream water. The sapflow data suggest that crown conductances decreased as temperature and vapor pressure deficit increased, and soil moisture decreased from the mid to late dry season. Across all samplings (January 21, April 12 and 26), upper canopy species (Quercus spp.) showed more depleted (negative) isotope values compared to mid-story trees (Carpinus tropicalis). Overall, we found that the evaporated soil water pool was the main source for the trees. Furthermore, our MixSIAR Bayesian mixing model results showed that the depth of tree water uptake changed over the course of the dry season. Unexpectedly, a shift in water uptake from deeper (60-120 cm depth) to shallower soil water (0-30 cm) sources was observed, coinciding with the decreases in transpiration rates towards the end of the dry season. A larger reduction in deep soil water contributions was observed for upper canopy trees (from 70±14 to 22±15%) than for mid-story species (from 10±13 to 7±10%). The use of shallow soil water by trees during the dry season seems consistent with the greater root biomass and higher macronutrient concentrations found in the first 10 cm of the soil profiles. These findings are an

  4. Modeling of the vapor cycle of Laguna Verde with the PEPSE code to conditions of thermal power licensed at present (2027 MWt); Modelado del ciclo de vapor de Laguna Verde con el codigo PEPSE a condiciones de potencia termica actualmente licenciada (2027 MWt)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castaneda G, M. A.; Maya G, F.; Medel C, J. E.; Cardenas J, J. B.; Cruz B, H. J.; Mercado V, J. J., E-mail: miguel.castaneda01@cfe.gob.mx [Comision Federal de Electricidad, Central Nucleoelectrica Laguna Verde, Carretera Cardel-Nautla Km 42.5, Veracruz (Mexico)

    2011-11-15

    By means of the use of the performance evaluation of power system efficiencies (PEPSE) code was modeled the vapor cycle of the nuclear power station of Laguna Verde to reproduce the nuclear plant behavior to conditions of thermal power, licensed at present (2027 MWt); with the purpose of having a base line before the implementation of the project of extended power increase. The model of the gauged vapor cycle to reproduce the nuclear plant conditions makes use of the PEPSE model, design case of the vapor cycle of nuclear power station of Laguna Verde, which has as main components of the model the great equipment of the vapor cycle of Laguna Verde. The design case model makes use of information about the design requirements of each equipment for theoretically calculating the electric power of exit, besides thermodynamic conditions of the vapor cycle in different points. Starting from the design model and making use of data of the vapor cycle measured in the nuclear plant; the adjustment factors were calculated for the different equipment s of the vapor cycle, to reproduce with the PEPSE model the real vapor cycle of Laguna Verde. Once characterized the model of the vapor cycle of Laguna Verde, we can realize different sensibility studies to determine the effects macros to the vapor cycle by the variation of certain key parameters. (Author)

  5. Coupling scales for modelling heavy metal vaporization from municipal solid waste incineration in a fluid bed by CFD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soria, José; Gauthier, Daniel; Flamant, Gilles; Rodriguez, Rosa; Mazza, Germán

    2015-09-01

    Municipal Solid Waste Incineration (MSWI) in fluidized bed is a very interesting technology mainly due to high combustion efficiency, great flexibility for treating several types of waste fuels and reduction in pollutants emitted with the flue gas. However, there is a great concern with respect to the fate of heavy metals (HM) contained in MSW and their environmental impact. In this study, a coupled two-scale CFD model was developed for MSWI in a bubbling fluidized bed. It presents an original scheme that combines a single particle model and a global fluidized bed model in order to represent the HM vaporization during MSW combustion. Two of the most representative HM (Cd and Pb) with bed temperatures ranging between 923 and 1073K have been considered. This new approach uses ANSYS FLUENT 14.0 as the modelling platform for the simulations along with a complete set of self-developed user-defined functions (UDFs). The simulation results are compared to the experimental data obtained previously by the research group in a lab-scale fluid bed incinerator. The comparison indicates that the proposed CFD model predicts well the evolution of the HM release for the bed temperatures analyzed. It shows that both bed temperature and bed dynamics have influence on the HM vaporization rate. It can be concluded that CFD is a rigorous tool that provides valuable information about HM vaporization and that the original two-scale simulation scheme adopted allows to better represent the actual particle behavior in a fluid bed incinerator. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Analytical model for the design of in situ horizontal permeable reactive barriers (HPRBs) for the mitigation of chlorinated solvent vapors in the unsaturated zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verginelli, Iason; Capobianco, Oriana; Hartog, Niels; Baciocchi, Renato

    2017-02-01

    In this work we introduce a 1-D analytical solution that can be used for the design of horizontal permeable reactive barriers (HPRBs) as a vapor mitigation system at sites contaminated by chlorinated solvents. The developed model incorporates a transient diffusion-dominated transport with a second-order reaction rate constant. Furthermore, the model accounts for the HPRB lifetime as a function of the oxidant consumption by reaction with upward vapors and its progressive dissolution and leaching by infiltrating water. Simulation results by this new model closely replicate previous lab-scale tests carried out on trichloroethylene (TCE) using a HPRB containing a mixture of potassium permanganate, water and sand. In view of field applications, design criteria, in terms of the minimum HPRB thickness required to attenuate vapors at acceptable risk-based levels and the expected HPRB lifetime, are determined from site-specific conditions such as vapor source concentration, water infiltration rate and HPRB mixture. The results clearly show the field-scale feasibility of this alternative vapor mitigation system for the treatment of chlorinated solvents. Depending on the oxidation kinetic of the target contaminant, a 1 m thick HPRB can ensure an attenuation of vapor concentrations of orders of magnitude up to 20 years, even for vapor source concentrations up to 10 g/m3. A demonstrative application for representative contaminated site conditions also shows the feasibility of this mitigation system from an economical point of view with capital costs potentially somewhat lower than those of other remediation options, such as soil vapor extraction systems. Overall, based on the experimental and theoretical evaluation thus far, field-scale tests are warranted to verify the potential and cost-effectiveness of HPRBs for vapor mitigation control under various conditions of application.

  7. Effects of elevated atmospheric CO{sub 2} on canopy transpiration in senescent spring wheat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grossman, S.; Kimball, B.A.; Hunsaker, D.J.; Long, S.P. et al

    1998-12-31

    The seasonal course of canopy transpiration and the diurnal courses of latent heat flux of a spring wheat crop were simulated for atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentrations of 370 {micro}mol mol{sup {minus}1} and 550 {micro}mol mol{sup {minus}1}. The hourly weather data, soil parameters and the irrigation and fertilizer treatments of the Free-Air Carbon Dioxide Enrichment wheat experiment in Arizona (1992/93) were used to drive the model. The simulation results were tested against field measurements with special emphasis on the period between anthesis and maturity. A model integrating leaf photosynthesis and stomatal conductance was scaled to a canopy level in order to be used in the wheat growth model. The simulated intercellular CO{sub 2} concentration, C{sub i} was determined from the ratio of C{sub i} to the CO{sub 2} concentration at the leaf surface, C{sub s}, the leaf to air specific humidity deficit and a possibly unfulfilled transpiration demand. After anthesis, the measured assimilation rates of the flag leaves decreased more rapidly than their stomatal conductances, leading to a rise in the C{sub i}/C{sub s} ratio. In order to describe this observation, an empirical model approach was developed which took into account the leaf nitrogen content for the calculation of the C{sub i}/C{sub s} ratio. Simulation results obtained with the new model version were in good agreement with the measurements. If changes in the C{sub i}/C{sub s} ratio accorded to the decrease in leaf nitrogen content during leaf senescence were not considered in the model, simulations revealed an underestimation of the daily canopy transpiration of up to twenty percent and a decrease in simulated seasonal canopy transpiration by ten percent. The measured reduction in the seasonal sum of canopy transpiration and soil evaporation owing to CO{sub 2} enrichment, in comparison, was only about five percent.

  8. A Well-Mixed Computational Model for Estimating Room Air Levels of Selected Constituents from E-Vapor Product Use

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali A. Rostami

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Concerns have been raised in the literature for the potential of secondhand exposure from e-vapor product (EVP use. It would be difficult to experimentally determine the impact of various factors on secondhand exposure including, but not limited to, room characteristics (indoor space size, ventilation rate, device specifications (aerosol mass delivery, e-liquid composition, and use behavior (number of users and usage frequency. Therefore, a well-mixed computational model was developed to estimate the indoor levels of constituents from EVPs under a variety of conditions. The model is based on physical and thermodynamic interactions between aerosol, vapor, and air, similar to indoor air models referred to by the Environmental Protection Agency. The model results agree well with measured indoor air levels of nicotine from two sources: smoking machine-generated aerosol and aerosol exhaled from EVP use. Sensitivity analysis indicated that increasing air exchange rate reduces room air level of constituents, as more material is carried away. The effect of the amount of aerosol released into the space due to variability in exhalation was also evaluated. The model can estimate the room air level of constituents as a function of time, which may be used to assess the level of non-user exposure over time.

  9. Tree-, stand- and site-specific controls on landscape-scale patterns of transpiration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kathrin Hassler, Sibylle; Weiler, Markus; Blume, Theresa

    2018-01-01

    Transpiration is a key process in the hydrological cycle, and a sound understanding and quantification of transpiration and its spatial variability is essential for management decisions as well as for improving the parameterisation and evaluation of hydrological and soil-vegetation-atmosphere transfer models. For individual trees, transpiration is commonly estimated by measuring sap flow. Besides evaporative demand and water availability, tree-specific characteristics such as species, size or social status control sap flow amounts of individual trees. Within forest stands, properties such as species composition, basal area or stand density additionally affect sap flow, for example via competition mechanisms. Finally, sap flow patterns might also be influenced by landscape-scale characteristics such as geology and soils, slope position or aspect because they affect water and energy availability; however, little is known about the dynamic interplay of these controls.We studied the relative importance of various tree-, stand- and site-specific characteristics with multiple linear regression models to explain the variability of sap velocity measurements in 61 beech and oak trees, located at 24 sites across a 290 km2 catchment in Luxembourg. For each of 132 consecutive days of the growing season of 2014 we modelled the daily sap velocity and derived sap flow patterns of these 61 trees, and we determined the importance of the different controls.Results indicate that a combination of mainly tree- and site-specific factors controls sap velocity patterns in the landscape, namely tree species, tree diameter, geology and aspect. For sap flow we included only the stand- and site-specific predictors in the models to ensure variable independence. Of those, geology and aspect were most important. Compared to these predictors, spatial variability of atmospheric demand and soil moisture explains only a small fraction of the variability in the daily datasets. However, the temporal

  10. Contribution of different processes to changes in tropical lower-stratospheric water vapor in chemistry–climate models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. M. Smalley

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Variations in tropical lower-stratospheric humidity influence both the chemistry and climate of the atmosphere. We analyze tropical lower-stratospheric water vapor in 21st century simulations from 12 state-of-the-art chemistry–climate models (CCMs, using a linear regression model to determine the factors driving the trends and variability. Within CCMs, warming of the troposphere primarily drives the long-term trend in stratospheric humidity. This is partially offset in most CCMs by an increase in the strength of the Brewer–Dobson circulation, which tends to cool the tropical tropopause layer (TTL. We also apply the regression model to individual decades from the 21st century CCM runs and compare them to a regression of a decade of observations. Many of the CCMs, but not all, compare well with these observations, lending credibility to their predictions. One notable deficiency is that most CCMs underestimate the impact of the quasi-biennial oscillation on lower-stratospheric water vapor. Our analysis provides a new and potentially superior way to evaluate model trends in lower-stratospheric humidity.

  11. Contribution of different processes to changes in tropical lower-stratospheric water vapor in chemistry-climate models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smalley, Kevin M.; Dessler, Andrew E.; Bekki, Slimane; Deushi, Makoto; Marchand, Marion; Morgenstern, Olaf; Plummer, David A.; Shibata, Kiyotaka; Yamashita, Yousuke; Zeng, Guang

    2017-07-01

    Variations in tropical lower-stratospheric humidity influence both the chemistry and climate of the atmosphere. We analyze tropical lower-stratospheric water vapor in 21st century simulations from 12 state-of-the-art chemistry-climate models (CCMs), using a linear regression model to determine the factors driving the trends and variability. Within CCMs, warming of the troposphere primarily drives the long-term trend in stratospheric humidity. This is partially offset in most CCMs by an increase in the strength of the Brewer-Dobson circulation, which tends to cool the tropical tropopause layer (TTL). We also apply the regression model to individual decades from the 21st century CCM runs and compare them to a regression of a decade of observations. Many of the CCMs, but not all, compare well with these observations, lending credibility to their predictions. One notable deficiency is that most CCMs underestimate the impact of the quasi-biennial oscillation on lower-stratospheric water vapor. Our analysis provides a new and potentially superior way to evaluate model trends in lower-stratospheric humidity.

  12. An energy balance model exploration of the impacts of interactions between surface albedo, cloud cover and water vapor on polar amplification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Södergren, A. Helena; McDonald, Adrian J.; Bodeker, Gregory E.

    2017-11-01

    We examine the effects of non-linear interactions between surface albedo, water vapor and cloud cover (referred to as climate variables) on amplified warming of the polar regions, using a new energy balance model. Our simulations show that the sum of the contributions to surface temperature changes due to any variable considered in isolation is smaller than the temperature changes from coupled feedback simulations. This non-linearity is strongest when all three climate variables are allowed to interact. Surface albedo appears to be the strongest driver of this non-linear behavior, followed by water vapor and clouds. This is because increases in longwave radiation absorbed by the surface, related to increases in water vapor and clouds, and increases in surface absorbed shortwave radiation caused by a decrease in surface albedo, amplify each other. Furthermore, our results corroborate previous findings that while increases in cloud cover and water vapor, along with the greenhouse effect itself, warm the polar regions, water vapor also significantly warms equatorial regions, which reduces polar amplification. Changes in surface albedo drive large changes in absorption of incoming shortwave radiation, thereby enhancing surface warming. Unlike high latitudes, surface albedo change at low latitudes are more constrained. Interactions between surface albedo, water vapor and clouds drive larger increases in temperatures in the polar regions compared to low latitudes. This is in spite of the fact that, due to a forcing, cloud cover increases at high latitudes and decreases in low latitudes, and that water vapor significantly enhances warming at low latitudes.

  13. Tree-, stand- and site-specific controls on landscape-scale patterns of transpiration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassler, Sibylle; Markus, Weiler; Theresa, Blume

    2017-04-01

    Transpiration is a key process in the hydrological cycle and a sound understanding and quantification of transpiration and its spatial variability is essential for management decisions as well as for improving the parameterisation of hydrological and soil-vegetation-atmosphere transfer models. For individual trees, transpiration is commonly estimated by measuring sap flow. Besides evaporative demand and water availability, tree-specific characteristics such as species, size or social status control sap flow amounts of individual trees. Within forest stands, properties such as species composition, basal area or stand density additionally affect sap flow, for example via competition mechanisms. Finally, sap flow patterns might also be influenced by landscape-scale characteristics such as geology, slope position or aspect because they affect water and energy availability; however, little is known about the dynamic interplay of these controls. We studied the relative importance of various tree-, stand- and site-specific characteristics with multiple linear regression models to explain the variability of sap velocity measurements in 61 beech and oak trees, located at 24 sites spread over a 290 km2-catchment in Luxembourg. For each of 132 consecutive days of the growing season of 2014 we modelled the daily sap velocities of these 61 trees and determined the importance of the different predictors. Results indicate that a combination of tree-, stand- and site-specific factors controls sap velocity patterns in the landscape, namely tree species, tree diameter, the stand density, geology and aspect. Compared to these predictors, spatial variability of atmospheric demand and soil moisture explains only a small fraction of the variability in the daily datasets. However, the temporal dynamics of the explanatory power of the tree-specific characteristics, especially species, are correlated to the temporal dynamics of potential evaporation. Thus, transpiration estimates at the

  14. Vapor-Liquid Equilibrium of Methane with Water and Methanol. Measurements and Modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frost, Michael Grynnerup; Karakatsani, Eirini; von Solms, Nicolas

    2014-01-01

    There is a need for high-quality experimental phase equilibrium data in the petroleum and chemical industries, for example, mixtures of oil and gas with gas hydrate inhibitors (methanol, glycols) and organic acids. This includes a wide range of different systems, which all deal with processes...... that rely on phase equilibrium data for optimization. The objective of this work is to provide experimental data for hydrocarbon systems with polar chemicals such as alcohols, glycols, and water. New vapor-liquid equilibrium data are reported for methane + water, methane + methanol, and methane + methanol...

  15. Comparison of molecular models of carbon monoxide for calculation of vapor-liquid equilibrium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bibian Alonso Hoyos-Madrigal

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Existen varios modelos moleculares para el monóxido de carbono desarrollados a partir de diferentes mediciones experimentales. El objetivo de este trabajo es comparar los resultados que varios de estos modelos producen en el cálculo del equilibrio líquido-vapor en busca de recomendar qué modelo debe ser usado de acuerdo la propiedad y la fase que se desea calcular. Los modelos seleccionados corresponden a cuatro modelos no polares, con uno o dos sitios Lennard-Jones, y cuatro modelos polares, con dipolos o cargas parciales para representar la polaridad del monóxido de carbono. Simulaciones Monte Carlo en la versión Gibbs canónica (NVT-GEMC se emplearon para determinar las densidades de las fases en equilibrio, la presión de vapor y la entalpia de vaporización entre 80 y 130 K con cada uno de los modelos seleccionados. Se encontró que los modelos más complejos SVH, ANC y PGB, son los que mejor describen la densidad del líquido saturado (alrededor de 7% de desviación promedio, pero estos modelos generan desviaciones mayores al 40% para las propiedades del vapor y al 20% para la entalpia de vaporización. Por otro lado, el modelo no- polar BLF generó las menores desviaciones para la presión de saturación y la densidad del vapor (6.8 y 21.5%, respectivamente. Este modelo, al igual que el modelo HCB, produce desviaciones aceptables para la densidad del líquido y la entalpia de vaporización (entre 10 y 12%. Los modelos no polares BLF y HCB, que no requieren el cálculo de las interacciones de largo alcance, se pueden considerar como los modelos moleculares que presentan un balance satisfactorio entre desviaciones en los resultados y complejidad de cálculo.

  16. Diagnosing the Role of Transpiration in the Transition from Dry to Wet Season Over the Amazon Using Satellite Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, J. S.; Fu, R.; Yin, L.; Chae, J.

    2013-12-01

    Reanalysis data indicates that land surface evapotranspiration plays a key role in determining the timing of wet season onset over the Amazon. Here, we use satellite observations of water vapor and its stable isotopes, carbon dioxide, leaf area index, and precipitation together with reanalysis data to explore the importance of transpiration in initiating the transition from dry season to wet season over the Amazon. The growth of vegetation in this region is primarily limited by the availability of sunlight rather than the availability of soil moisture, so that the increase of solar radiation during the dry season coincides with dramatic increases in leaf area index within forested ecosystems. This period of plant growth is accompanied by uptake of carbon dioxide and enrichment of heavy isotopes in water vapor, particularly near the land surface. Reanalysis data indicate that this pre-wet season enrichment of HDO is accompanied by sharp increases in the surface latent heat flux, which eventually triggers sporadic moist convection. The transport of transpiration-enriched near-surface air by this convection causes a dramatic increase in free-tropospheric HDO in late August and September. September also marks transition points in the annual cycles of leaf area index (maximum) and carbon dioxide (minimum). The increase in convective activity during this period creates convergence, enhancing moisture transport into the region and initiating the wet season.

  17. Using stable water isotopes in a two-layer soil moisture conceptual framework to understand transpiration dynamics in a semiarid shrubland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szutu, D. J.; Papuga, S. A.; Wehr, R.

    2014-12-01

    are used for transpiration in dryland ecosystems; ultimately these findings should improve how drylands are represented in models of land-atmosphere exchange.

  18. Vapor Detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waddell, H. M.; Garrard, G. C.; Houston, D. W.

    1982-01-01

    Detector eliminates need for removing covers to take samples. Detector is canister consisting of screw-in base and clear plastic tube that contains two colors of silica gel. Monoethylhydrazine and nitrogen tetroxide vapors are visually monitored with canister containing color-changing gels.

  19. Respiration and transpiration characteristics of selected fresh fruits ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Respiration and transpiration characteristics of mushrooms, strawberries, broccoli and tomatoes were determined under different temperature, atmospheric and humidity conditions in order to get information for modified humidity atmosphere conception. The respiration rate was determined using a static method (scanning ...

  20. Effects of storage conditions on transpiration rate of pomegranate ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study investigated the effects of temperature (5, 10, 15 and 22 °C) and relative humidity (RH) (76%, 86% and 96%) on the transpiration rate (TR) of pomegranate (Punica granatum L.) cv. Bhagwa fruit fractions, namely arils and aril-sac. Both temperature and RH had significant effects on the TR of fruit fractions. The TR ...

  1. Three-dimensional vapor intrusion modeling approach that combines wind and stack effects on indoor, atmospheric, and subsurface domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirazi, Elham; Pennell, Kelly G

    2017-12-13

    Vapor intrusion (IV) exposure risks are difficult to characterize due to the role of atmospheric, building and subsurface processes. This study presents a three-dimensional VI model that extends the common subsurface fate and transport equations to incorporate wind and stack effects on indoor air pressure, building air exchange rate (AER) and indoor contaminant concentration to improve VI exposure risk estimates. The model incorporates three modeling programs: (1) COMSOL Multiphysics to model subsurface fate and transport processes, (2) CFD0 to model atmospheric air flow around the building, and (3) CONTAM to model indoor air quality. The combined VI model predicts AER values, zonal indoor air pressures and zonal indoor air contaminant concentrations as a function of wind speed, wind direction and outdoor and indoor temperature. Steady state modeling results for a single-story building with a basement demonstrate that wind speed, wind direction and opening locations in a building play important roles in changing the AER, indoor air pressure, and indoor air contaminant concentration. Calculated indoor air pressures ranged from approximately -10 Pa to +4 Pa depending on weather conditions and building characteristics. AER values, mass entry rates and indoor air concentrations vary depending on weather conditions and building characteristics. The presented modeling approach can be used to investigate the relationship between building features, AER, building pressures, soil gas concentrations, indoor air concentrations and VI exposure risks.

  2. The importance of micrometeorological variations for photosynthesis and transpiration in a boreal coniferous forest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schurgers, Guy; Lagergren, F.; Molder, M.

    2015-01-01

    the importance of vertical variations in light, temperature, CO2 concentration and humidity within the canopy for fluxes of photosynthesis and transpiration of a boreal coniferous forest in central Sweden. A leaf-level photosynthesis-stomatal conductance model was used for aggregating these processes to canopy...... fluxes, where discrepancies are largely attributable to a lack of forest floor evaporation in the model. Simulations in which vertical heterogeneity was artificially suppressed revealed that the vertical distribution of light is the driver of vertical heterogeneity. Despite large differences between...

  3. EFFECT OF SOIL WATER POTENTIAL ON TRANSPIRATION RATE IN CUCUMBER PLANTS

    OpenAIRE

    Cho, Tosio; Eguchi, Hiromi; Kuroda, Masaharu; Tanaka, Akira; Koutaki, Masahiro; Ng, Ah Lek; Matsui, Tsuyoshi

    1985-01-01

    In an attempt to examine the effect of soil water potential (pF) on transpiration rate, leaf temperature of cucumber plants was measured under various conditions of soil water potential, and transpiration rate was calculated from heat balance of the leaf. Transpiration rate decreased with reduction in soil water potential; transpiration rate dropped at soil water potentials lower than pF 3.0. This fact suggests that the reduction in soil water potential restricts water uptake in roots and cau...

  4. Modeling vapor liquid equilibrium of ionic liquids + gas binary systems at high pressure with cubic equations of state

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. C. D. Freitas

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Ionic liquids (IL have been described as novel environmentally benign solvents because of their remarkable characteristics. Numerous applications of these solvents continue to grow at an exponential rate. In this work, high pressure vapor liquid equilibria for 17 different IL + gas binary systems were modeled at different temperatures with Peng-Robinson (PR and Soave-Redlich-Kwong (SRK equations of state, combined with the van der Waals mixing rule with two binary interaction parameters (vdW-2. The experimental data were taken from the literature. The optimum binary interaction parameters were estimated by minimization of an objective function based on the average absolute relative deviation of liquid and vapor phases, using the modified Simplex algorithm. The solubilities of all gases studied in this work decrease as the temperature increases and increase with increasing pressure. The correlated results were highly satisfactory, with average absolute relative deviations of 2.10% and 2.25% for PR-vdW-2 and SRK-vdW-2, respectively.

  5. Repeated aerosol-vapor JP-8 jet fuel exposure affects neurobehavior and neurotransmitter levels in a rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, Carol M; Figueredo, Aurelio J; Wright, Lynda S; Wong, Simon S; Witten, Mark L

    2007-07-01

    Four groups of Fischer Brown Norway hybrid rats were exposed for 5, 10, 15, or 20 d to aerosolized-vapor jet propulsion fuel 8 (JP-8) compared to freely moving (5 and 10-d exposures) or sham-confined controls (15 and 20-d exposures). Behavioral testing utilized the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Functional Observational Battery. Exploratory ethological factor analysis identified three salient factors (central nervous system [CNS] excitability, autonomic 1, and autonomic 2) for use in profiling JP-8 exposure in future studies. The factors were used as dependent variables in general linear modeling. Exposed animals were found to engage in more rearing and hyperaroused behavior compared to controls, replicating prior JP-8 exposure findings. Exposed animals also showed increasing but rapidly decelerating stool output (autonomic 1), and a significant increasing linear trend for urine output (autonomic 2). No significant trends were noted for either of the control groups for the autonomic factors. Rats from each of the groups for each of the time frames were randomly selected for tissue assay from seven brain regions for neurotransmitter levels. Hippocampal DOPAC was significantly elevated after 4-wk JP-8 exposure compared to both control groups, suggesting increased dopamine release and metabolism. Findings indicate that behavioral changes do not appear to manifest until wk 3 and 4 of exposure, suggesting the need for longitudinal studies to determine if these behaviors occur due to cumulative exposure, or due to behavioral sensitization related to repeated exposure to aerosolized-vapor JP-8.

  6. The effect of laser-fiber sweeping speed on the efficiency of photoselective vaporization of the prostate in an ex vivo bovine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kauffman, Eric C; Kang, Hyun Wook; Choi, Benjamin B

    2009-09-01

    Recommendations for efficient photoselective vaporization of the prostate (PVP) include a side-to-side rotational laser-fiber "sweeping" motion, yet scientific study of this technique is lacking. We investigated whether the speed of laser-fiber sweeping affects tissue vaporization efficiency. PVP was performed using the 120-W GreenLight high-performance system. Video analysis of a surgeon performing PVP was carried out to identify sweeping speeds used clinically. PVP efficiency was subsequently tested at four different sweeping speeds using two manipulations of an ex vivo bovine prostate model, including (1) excised prostate tissues (n = 40) in a vaporization chamber equipped with motorized laser-fiber movements; (2) retrograde endoscopic vaporization (n = 80) within whole lower urinary tracts. Vaporized cavity sizes and coagulative margins were measured by liquid-paraffin molding and histologic cross-sectioning approaches. Video analysis of clinical PVP showed wide variability in sweeping speed, mostly ranging between 0.5 and 2.0 (mean 1.50) sweeps/second. Using either manipulation of the ex vivo bovine prostate model described above, PVP at lower sweeping speeds (0.5 and 1.0 sweeps/second) removed significantly more tissue (up to twofold) compared with higher sweeping speeds (1.5 and 2.0 sweeps/second), with significant albeit minimal reductions in coagulation margins. In this ex vivo prostate model, our results suggest that vaporization efficiency is compromised with faster laser-fiber sweeping. This finding counters principles of traditional transurethral resection of the prostate, in which faster axial movement toward the surgeon removes tissue more efficiently. This study highlights that PVP technique can be tested in a scientific manner, identifying optimal parameters for achieving maximal tissue vaporization efficiency.

  7. Biophysical control of whole tree transpiration under an urban environment in Northern China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lixin Chen; Zhiqiang Zhang; Zhandong Li; Jianwu Tang; Peter Caldwell; et al

    2011-01-01

    Urban reforestation in China has led to increasing debate about the impact of urban trees and forests on water resources. Although transpiration is the largest water flux leaving terrestrial ecosystems, little is known regarding whole tree transpiration in urban environments. In this study, we quantified urban tree transpiration at various temporal scales and examined...

  8. Canopy-scale biophysical controls of transpiration and evaporation in the Amazon Basin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Mallick

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Canopy and aerodynamic conductances (gC and gA are two of the key land surface biophysical variables that control the land surface response of land surface schemes in climate models. Their representation is crucial for predicting transpiration (λET and evaporation (λEE flux components of the terrestrial latent heat flux (λE, which has important implications for global climate change and water resource management. By physical integration of radiometric surface temperature (TR into an integrated framework of the Penman–Monteith and Shuttleworth–Wallace models, we present a novel approach to directly quantify the canopy-scale biophysical controls on λET and λEE over multiple plant functional types (PFTs in the Amazon Basin. Combining data from six LBA (Large-scale Biosphere-Atmosphere Experiment in Amazonia eddy covariance tower sites and a TR-driven physically based modeling approach, we identified the canopy-scale feedback-response mechanism between gC, λET, and atmospheric vapor pressure deficit (DA, without using any leaf-scale empirical parameterizations for the modeling. The TR-based model shows minor biophysical control on λET during the wet (rainy seasons where λET becomes predominantly radiation driven and net radiation (RN determines 75 to 80 % of the variances of λET. However, biophysical control on λET is dramatically increased during the dry seasons, and particularly the 2005 drought year, explaining 50 to 65 % of the variances of λET, and indicates λET to be substantially soil moisture driven during the rainfall deficit phase. Despite substantial differences in gA between forests and pastures, very similar canopy–atmosphere "coupling" was found in these two biomes due to soil moisture-induced decrease in gC in the pasture. This revealed the pragmatic aspect of the TR-driven model behavior that exhibits a high sensitivity of gC to per unit change in wetness as opposed to gA that is marginally sensitive to

  9. From experiments to simulations: tracing Na+ distribution around roots under different transpiration rates and salinity levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perelman, Adi; Jorda, Helena; Vanderborght, Jan; Pohlmeier, Andreas; Lazarovitch, Naftali

    2017-04-01

    When salinity increases beyond a certain threshold it will result in reduced crop yield at a fixed rate, according to Maas and Hoffman model (1976). Thus, there is a great importance of predicting salinization and its impact on crops. Current models do not consider the impact of environmental conditions on plants salt tolerance, even though these conditions are affecting plant water uptake and therefore salt accumulation around the roots. Different factors, such as transpiration rates, can influence the plant sensitivity to salinity by influencing salt concentrations around the roots. Better parametrization of a model can help improving predicting the real effects of salinity on crop growth and yield. The aim of this research is to study Na+ distribution around roots at different scales using different non-invasive methods, and study how this distribution is being affected by transpiration rate and plant water uptake. Results from tomato plants growing on Rhizoslides (capillary paper growth system), show that Na+ concentration is higher at the root- substrate interface, compared with the bulk. Also, Na+ accumulation around the roots decreased under low transpiration rate, which is supporting our hypothesis. Additionally, Rhizoslides enable to study roots' growth rate and architecture under different salinity levels. Root system architecture was retrieved from photos taken during the experiment and enabled us to incorporate real root systems into a simulation. To observe the correlation of root system architectures and Na+ distribution in three dimensions, we used magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). MRI provides fine resolution of Na+ accumulation around a single root without disturbing the root system. With time, Na+ was accumulating only where roots were found in the soil and later on around specific roots. These data are being used for model calibration, which is expected to predict root water uptake in saline soils for different climatic conditions and different

  10. Metal vaporization from weld pools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Block-Bolten, A.; Eagar, T. W.

    1984-09-01

    Experimental studies of alloy vaporization from aluminum and stainless steel weld pools have been made in order to test a vaporization model based on thermodynamic data and the kinetic theory of gases. It is shown that the model can correctly predict the dominant metal vapors that form but that the absolute rate of vaporization is not known due to insufficient knowledge of the surface temperature distribution and subsequent condensation of the vapor in the cooler regions of the metal. Values of the net evaporation rates for different alloys have been measured and are found to vary by two orders of magnitude. Estimated maximum weld pool temperatures based upon the model are in good agreement with previous experimental measurements of electron beam welds.

  11. Analysis of the vapor-liquid-solid mechanism for nanowire growth and a model for this mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammad, S Noor

    2008-05-01

    The vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) mechanism is most widely employed to grow nanowires (NWs). The mechanism uses foreign element catalytic agent (FECA) to mediate the growth. Because of this, it is believed to be very stable with the FECA-mediated droplets not consumed even when reaction conditions change. Recent experiments however differ, which suggest that even under cleanest growth conditions, VLS mechanism may not produce long, thin, uniform, single-crystal nanowires of high purity. The present investigation has addressed various issues involving fundamentals of VLS growth. While addressing these issues, it has taken into consideration the influence of the electrical, hydrodynamic, thermodynamic, and surface tension effects on NW growth. It has found that parameters such as mesoscopic effects on nanoparticle seeds, charge distribution in FECA-induced droplets, electronegativity of the droplet with respect to those of reactive nanowire vapor species, growth temperature, and chamber pressure play important role in the VLS growth. On the basis of an in-depth analysis of various issues, a simple, novel, malleable (SNM) model has been presented for the VLS mechanism. The model appears to explain the formation and observed characteristics of a wide variety of nanowires, including elemental and compound semiconductor nanowires. Also it provides an understanding of the influence of the dynamic behavior of the droplets on the NW growth. This study finds that increase in diameter with time of the droplet of tapered nanowires results primarily from gradual incorporation of oversupplied nanowire species into the FECA-mediated droplet, which is supported by experiments. It finds also that optimum compositions of the droplet constituents are crucial for VLS nanowire growth. An approximate model presented to exemplify the parametric dependency of VLS growth provides good description of NW growth rate as a function of temperature.

  12. Predicting the lifetime of organic vapor cartridges exposed to volatile organic compound mixtures using a partial differential equations model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vuong, François; Chauveau, Romain; Grevillot, Georges; Marsteau, Stéphanie; Silvente, Eric; Vallieres, Cécile

    2016-09-01

    In this study, equilibria, breakthrough curves, and breakthrough times were predicted for three binary mixtures of four volatile organic compounds (VOCs) using a model based on partial differential equations of dynamic adsorption coupling a mass balance, a simple Linear Driving Force (LDF) hypothesis to describe the kinetics, and the well-known Extended-Langmuir (EL) equilibrium model. The model aims to predict with a limited complexity, the BTCs of respirator cartridges exposed to binary vapor mixtures from equilibria and kinetics data obtained from single component. In the model, multicomponent mass transfer was simplified to use only single dynamic adsorption data. The EL expression used in this study predicted equilibria with relatively good accuracy for acetone/ethanol and ethanol/cyclohexane mixtures, but the prediction of cyclohexane uptake when mixed with heptane is less satisfactory. The BTCs given by the model were compared to experimental BTCs to determine the accuracy of the model and the impact of the approximation on mass transfer coefficients. From BTCs, breakthrough times at 10% of the exposure concentration t10% were determined. All t10% were predicted within 20% of the experimental values, and 63% of the breakthrough times were predicted within a 10% error. This study demonstrated that a simple mass balance combined with kinetic approximations is sufficient to predict lifetime for respirator cartridges exposed to VOC mixtures. It also showed that a commonly adopted approach to describe multicomponent adsorption based on volatility of VOC rather than adsorption equilibrium greatly overestimated the breakthrough times.

  13. Evaluation of Empirical Tropospheric Models Using Satellite-Tracking Tropospheric Wet Delays with Water Vapor Radiometer at Tongji, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miaomiao Wang

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available An empirical tropospheric delay model, together with a mapping function, is commonly used to correct the tropospheric errors in global navigation satellite system (GNSS processing. As is well-known, the accuracy of tropospheric delay models relies mainly on the correction efficiency for tropospheric wet delays. In this paper, we evaluate the accuracy of three tropospheric delay models, together with five mapping functions in wet delays calculation. The evaluations are conducted by comparing their slant wet delays with those measured by water vapor radiometer based on its satellite-tracking function (collected data with large liquid water path is removed. For all 15 combinations of three tropospheric models and five mapping functions, their accuracies as a function of elevation are statistically analyzed by using nine-day data in two scenarios, with and without meteorological data. The results show that (1 no matter with or without meteorological data, there is no practical difference between mapping functions, i.e., Chao, Ifadis, Vienna Mapping Function 1 (VMF1, Niell Mapping Function (NMF, and MTT Mapping Function (MTT; (2 without meteorological data, the UNB3 is much better than Saastamoinen and Hopfield models, while the Saastamoinen model performed slightly better than the Hopfield model; (3 with meteorological data, the accuracies of all three tropospheric delay models are improved to be comparable, especially for lower elevations. In addition, the kinematic precise point positioning where no parameter is set up for tropospheric delay modification is conducted to further evaluate the performance of tropospheric delay models in positioning accuracy. It is shown that the UNB3 model is best and can achieve about 10 cm accuracy for the N and E coordinate component while 20 cm accuracy for the U coordinate component no matter the meteorological data is available or not. This accuracy can be obtained by the Saastamoinen model only when

  14. Transpiration cooled electrodes and insulators for MHD generators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoover, Jr., Delmer Q.

    1981-01-01

    Systems for cooling the inner duct walls in a magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) generator. The inner face components, adjacent the plasma, are formed of a porous material known as a transpiration material. Selected cooling gases are transpired through the duct walls, including electrically insulating and electrode segments, and into the plasma. A wide variety of structural materials and coolant gases at selected temperatures and pressures can be utilized and the gases can be drawn from the generation system compressor, the surrounding environment, and combustion and seed treatment products otherwise discharged, among many other sources. The conduits conducting the cooling gas are electrically insulated through low pressure bushings and connectors so as to electrically isolate the generator duct from the ground.

  15. A method to determine plant water source using transpired water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menchaca, L. B.; Smith, B. M.; Connolly, J.; Conrad, M.; Emmett, B.

    2007-04-01

    A method to determine the stable isotope ratio of a plant's water source using the plant's transpired water is proposed as an alternative to standard xylem extraction methods. The method consists of periodically sampling transpired waters from shoots or leaves enclosed in sealed, transparent bags which create a saturated environment, preclude further evaporation and allow the progressive mixing of evaporated transpired water and un-evaporated xylem water. The method was applied on trees and shrubs coexisting in a non-irrigated area where stable isotope ratios of local environmental waters are well characterized. The results show Eucalyptus globulus (tree) and Genista monspessulana (shrub) using water sources of different isotopic ratios congruent with groundwater and soil water respectively. In addition, tritium concentrations indicate that pine trees (Pinus sylvestris) switch water source from soil water in the winter to groundwater in the summer. The method proposed is particularly useful in remote or protected areas and in large scale studies related to water management, environmental compliance and surveillance, because it eliminates the need for destructive sampling and greatly reduces costs associated with laboratory extraction of xylem waters from plant tissues for isotopic analyses.

  16. Empirical model for mean temperature for Indian zone and estimation of precipitable water vapor from ground based GPS measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Suresh Raju

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Estimation of precipitable water (PW in the atmosphere from ground-based Global Positioning System (GPS essentially involves modeling the zenith hydrostatic delay (ZHD in terms of surface Pressure (Ps and subtracting it from the corresponding values of zenith tropospheric delay (ZTD to estimate the zenith wet (non-hydrostatic delay (ZWD. This further involves establishing an appropriate model connecting PW and ZWD, which in its simplest case assumed to be similar to that of ZHD. But when the temperature variations are large, for the accurate estimate of PW the variation of the proportionality constant connecting PW and ZWD is to be accounted. For this a water vapor weighted mean temperature (Tm has been defined by many investigations, which has to be modeled on a regional basis. For estimating PW over the Indian region from GPS data, a region specific model for Tm in terms of surface temperature (Ts is developed using the radiosonde measurements from eight India Meteorological Department (IMD stations spread over the sub-continent within a latitude range of 8.5°–32.6° N. Following a similar procedure Tm-based models are also evolved for each of these stations and the features of these site-specific models are compared with those of the region-specific model. Applicability of the region-specific and site-specific Tm-based models in retrieving PW from GPS data recorded at the IGS sites Bangalore and Hyderabad, is tested by comparing the retrieved values of PW with those estimated from the altitude profile of water vapor measured using radiosonde. The values of ZWD estimated at 00:00 UTC and 12:00 UTC are used to test the validity of the models by estimating the PW using the models and comparing it with those obtained from radiosonde data. The region specific Tm-based model is found to be in par with if not better than a

  17. Impact of single-point GPS integrated water vapor estimates on short-range WRF model forecasts over southern India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Prashant; Gopalan, Kaushik; Shukla, Bipasha Paul; Shyam, Abhineet

    2017-11-01

    Specifying physically consistent and accurate initial conditions is one of the major challenges of numerical weather prediction (NWP) models. In this study, ground-based global positioning system (GPS) integrated water vapor (IWV) measurements available from the International Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) Service (IGS) station in Bangalore, India, are used to assess the impact of GPS data on NWP model forecasts over southern India. Two experiments are performed with and without assimilation of GPS-retrieved IWV observations during the Indian winter monsoon period (November-December, 2012) using a four-dimensional variational (4D-Var) data assimilation method. Assimilation of GPS data improved the model IWV analysis as well as the subsequent forecasts. There is a positive impact of ˜10 % over Bangalore and nearby regions. The Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model-predicted 24-h surface temperature forecasts have also improved when compared with observations. Small but significant improvements were found in the rainfall forecasts compared to control experiments.

  18. Assessing the ability of isotope-enabled General Circulation Models to simulate the variability of Iceland water vapor isotopic composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erla Sveinbjornsdottir, Arny; Steen-Larsen, Hans Christian; Jonsson, Thorsteinn; Ritter, Francois; Riser, Camilla; Messon-Delmotte, Valerie; Bonne, Jean Louis; Dahl-Jensen, Dorthe

    2014-05-01

    During the fall of 2010 we installed an autonomous water vapor spectroscopy laser (Los Gatos Research analyzer) in a lighthouse on the Southwest coast of Iceland (63.83°N, 21.47°W). Despite initial significant problems with volcanic ash, high wind, and attack of sea gulls, the system has been continuously operational since the end of 2011 with limited down time. The system automatically performs calibration every 2 hours, which results in high accuracy and precision allowing for analysis of the second order parameter, d-excess, in the water vapor. We find a strong linear relationship between d-excess and local relative humidity (RH) when normalized to SST. The observed slope of approximately -45 o/oo/% is similar to theoretical predictions by Merlivat and Jouzel [1979] for smooth surface, but the calculated intercept is significant lower than predicted. Despite this good linear agreement with theoretical calculations, mismatches arise between the simulated seasonal cycle of water vapour isotopic composition using LMDZiso GCM nudged to large-scale winds from atmospheric analyses, and our data. The GCM is not able to capture seasonal variations in local RH, nor seasonal variations in d-excess. Based on daily data, the performance of LMDZiso to resolve day-to-day variability is measured based on the strength of the correlation coefficient between observations and model outputs. This correlation coefficient reaches ~0.8 for surface absolute humidity, but decreases to ~0.6 for δD and ~0.45 d-excess. Moreover, the magnitude of day-to-day humidity variations is also underestimated by LMDZiso, which can explain the underestimated magnitude of isotopic depletion. Finally, the simulated and observed d-excess vs. RH has similar slopes. We conclude that the under-estimation of d-excess variability may partly arise from the poor performance of the humidity simulations.

  19. Modeling the impact of vapor thymol concentration, temperature and modified atmosphere condition on growth behavior of Salmonella spp. on raw shrimp

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmonella spp. is a microorganism of concern, on a global basis, for raw shrimp. This research modeled the impact of vapor thymol concentration (0, 0.8 and 1.6 mg/l), storage temperature (8, 12 and 16 degree C) and modified atmosphere packaging (0.04 and 59.5 percent CO2) against the growth behavio...

  20. Pore-Network Modeling of Water and Vapor Transport in the Micro Porous Layer and Gas Diffusion Layer of a Polymer Electrolyte Fuel Cell

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Qin, C.; Hassanizadeh, S.M.; van Oosterhout, L.M.

    2016-01-01

    In the cathode side of a polymer electrolyte fuel cell (PEFC), a micro porous layer (MPL) added between the catalyst layer (CL) and the gas diffusion layer (GDL) plays an important role in water management. In this work, by using both quasi-static and dynamic pore-network models, water and vapor

  1. a Novel Investigation of the Oscillatory Field Over a Transpiring Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    BARRON, JAMES T.; VAN MOORHEM, WILLIAM K.; MAJDALANI, JOSEPH

    2000-08-01

    The flowfield character is investigated inside a long rectangular chamber in the presence of time-harmonic pressure waves. The chamber is designed with multiple interchangeable sections for the purpose of controlling the length and therefore the system's natural frequency. Pressure waves are induced externally at variable frequencies by means of a Scotch-yoke mechanism theoretically capable of imparting pure oscillatory motions. In characterizing the internal flowfield, velocity measurements are acquired inside a principal test section that can accommodate flat blocks of solid carbon dioxide (i.e., dry ice). As solid CO2sublimates, a flow of gaseous carbon dioxide is generated at the bottom of the principal section and enters the chamber in the transverse direction. The resulting generalized Stokes layer formed above the transpiring surface exhibits several features associated with oscillatory flows over impermeable surfaces, including an overshoot in the velocity amplitude in the vicinity of the transpiring wall known as Richardson's annular effect. Quantitative pressure and velocity measurements are in agreement with theoretical predictions obtained from recent models of the oscillatory field over transpiring surfaces. The acoustic Reynolds number based on the Stokes layer thickness increases linearly with increasing Scotch-yoke frequency except in the neighborhood of the system's natural frequency. Near resonance, a sharp non-linear increase in the acoustic Reynolds number is noted. Furthermore, both acoustic pressure and velocity amplitudes increase with the driving frequency in a manner that is consistent with current theories. Since the sublimation rate of dry ice can be expressed in a similar mathematical form to the regression rate at the burning surface of solid propellants, this experiment constitutes a cold flow simulation of the internal flowfield in solid rocket motors.

  2. Sapwood Area as a Scaling Factor for Transpiration Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinonez-Pinon, R.; Valeo, C.

    2004-05-01

    The process of transpiration in forested areas is a function of the spatial and temporal variations in vegetation structural attributes. Therefore, it is possible to scale up the transpiration of a single tree to multi-tree scales using vegetation structural patterns. The main goal of this research is to generate, apply and verify a procedure for scaling up the process of transpiration in forested areas over a range of three spatial scales {tree, plot, and catchment} and within daily/monthly/seasonal scale. In order to accomplish this goal, it is necessary to identify vegetation characteristics that are appropriate scaling factors. Sapwood is the active part of the xylem for water and nutrients transport towards the leaves. Thus, sapwood area is an effective scaling factor for transpiration rates from a single point in a tree to the whole tree. Also, sapwood area establishes the limit on the quantity of foliage for a tree, and thus its vigour. The study area for this research is in the Montane eco-region of southern Alberta which includes species of Jack Pine, Lodgepole Pine, Black Spruce and Trembling Aspen. Sapwood area is estimated as the cross-sectional area of the outer vascular tissue responsible for transporting water in the acropetal way. As sapwood depth does not form a perfect ring around the tree trunk, it was measured in the four cardinal compass points and then an average value for the estimation of sapwood area was obtained. Two methods were used to estimate sapwood depth: dye infusion and microscopic identification of sapwood tissue. While the former method is widely used, it was deemed unsuccessful in our study area due to damage that vessels/tracheids suffered during the coring/extraction process. The latter is a laborious method, due to the detailed scale at which the analysis is performed. However, it assures accuracies of roughly 98%\\ for determining sapwood depth. A more detailed comparison of both methods is presented. Results demonstrate a

  3. Modeling of thermal processes during vapor deposition of material on curvilinear surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savel’eva, I. Yu; Zhuravskii, A. V.

    2017-11-01

    A mathematical model has been constructed that describes the deposition of material on a curvilinear surface. This model considers convective heat transfer, heat transfer by radiation, and heat and mass transfer during the attachment of the substance to the surface. For the model numerical algorithm is constructed to find the temperature profile in a curvilinear plate; results of calculations for different materials are given.

  4. Numerical investigation of the pseudopotential lattice Boltzmann modeling of liquid-vapor for multi-phase flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemati, Maedeh; Shateri Najaf Abady, Ali Reza; Toghraie, Davood; Karimipour, Arash

    2018-01-01

    The incorporation of different equations of state into single-component multiphase lattice Boltzmann model is considered in this paper. The original pseudopotential model is first detailed, and several cubic equations of state, the Redlich-Kwong, Redlich-Kwong-Soave, and Peng-Robinson are then incorporated into the lattice Boltzmann model. A comparison of the numerical simulation achievements on the basis of density ratios and spurious currents is used for presentation of the details of phase separation in these non-ideal single-component systems. The paper demonstrates that the scheme for the inter-particle interaction force term as well as the force term incorporation method matters to achieve more accurate and stable results. The velocity shifting method is demonstrated as the force term incorporation method, among many, with accuracy and stability results. Kupershtokh scheme also makes it possible to achieve large density ratio (up to 104) and to reproduce the coexistence curve with high accuracy. Significant reduction of the spurious currents at vapor-liquid interface is another observation. High-density ratio and spurious current reduction resulted from the Redlich-Kwong-Soave and Peng-Robinson EOSs, in higher accordance with the Maxwell construction results.

  5. The climatology of carbon monoxide and water vapor on Mars as observed by CRISM and modeled by the GEM-Mars general circulation model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Michael D.; Daerden, Frank; Neary, Lori; Khayat, Alain

    2018-02-01

    Radiative transfer modeling of near-infrared spectra taken by the Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars (CRISM) instrument onboard Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) enables the column-integrated abundance of carbon monoxide (CO) and water vapor (H2O) to be retrieved. These results provide a detailed global description of the seasonal and spatial distribution of CO in the Mars atmosphere and new information about the interannual variability of H2O. The CRISM retrievals show the seasonally and globally averaged carbon monoxide mixing ratio to be near 800 ppm, but with strong seasonal variations, especially at high latitudes. At low latitudes, the carbon monoxide mixing ratio varies in response to the mean seasonal cycle of surface pressure and shows little variation with topography. At high latitudes, carbon monoxide is depleted in the summer hemisphere by a factor of two or more, while in the winter hemisphere there is relatively higher mixing ratio in regions with low-lying topography. Water vapor shows only modest interannual variations, with the largest observed difference being unusually dry conditions in the wake of the Mars Year 28 global dust storm. Modeling results from the GEM-Mars general circulation model generally reproduce the observed seasonal and spatial trends and provide insight into the underlying physical processes.

  6. A semi-empirical model for the complete orientation dependence of the growth rate for vapor phase epitaxy - Chloride VPE of GaAs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidel-Salinas, L. K.; Jones, S. H.; Duva, J. M.

    1992-01-01

    A semi-empirical model has been developed to determine the complete crystallographic orientation dependence of the growth rate for vapor phase epitaxy (VPE). Previous researchers have been able to determine this dependence for a limited range of orientations; however, our model yields relative growth rate information for any orientation. This model for diamond and zincblende structure materials is based on experimental growth rate data, gas phase diffusion, and surface reactions. Data for GaAs chloride VPE is used to illustrate the model. The resulting growth rate polar diagrams are used in conjunction with Wulff constructions to simulate epitaxial layer shapes as grown on patterned substrates. In general, this model can be applied to a variety of materials and vapor phase epitaxy systems.

  7. Relative contribution of groundwater to plant transpiration estimated with stable isotopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbeta, Adrià; Peñuelas, Josep

    2017-09-05

    Water stored underground in the saturated and subsurface zones below the soil are important sources of water for plants in water-limited ecosystems. The presence of deep-rooted plants worldwide, however, suggests that the use of groundwater is not restricted to arid and seasonally dry ecosystems. We compiled the available data (71 species) on the relative contribution of groundwater to plant water estimated using stable isotopes and mixing models, which provided information about relative groundwater use, and analyzed their variation across different climates, seasons, plant types, edaphic conditions, and landscape positions. Plant use of groundwater was more likely at sites with a pronounced dry season, and represented on average 49 per cent of transpired water in dry seasons and 28 per cent in wet seasons. The relative contribution of groundwater to plant-water uptake was higher on rocky substrates (saprolite, fractured bedrock), which had reduced groundwater uptake when this source was deep belowground. In addition, we found that the connectivity between groundwater pools and plant water may be quantitatively larger and more widespread than reported by recent global estimations based on isotopic averaged values. Earth System Models should account for the feedbacks between transpiration and groundwater recharge.

  8. Multi-component vapor-liquid equilibrium model for LES and application to ECN Spray A

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Matheis, J; Hickel, S.

    2016-01-01

    We present and evaluate a detailed multi-species two-phase thermodynamic equilibrium model for large-eddy simulations (LES) of liquid-fuel injection and mixing at high pressure. The model can represent the coexistence of supercritical states and multicomponent subcritical two-phase states. LES

  9. Profiling water vapor mixing ratios in Finland by means of a Raman lidar, a satellite and a model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Filioglou

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available We present tropospheric water vapor profiles measured with a Raman lidar during three field campaigns held in Finland. Co-located radio soundings are available throughout the period for the calibration of the lidar signals. We investigate the possibility of calibrating the lidar water vapor profiles in the absence of co-existing on-site soundings using water vapor profiles from the combined Advanced InfraRed Sounder (AIRS and the Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit (AMSU satellite product; the Aire Limitée Adaptation dynamique Développement INternational and High Resolution Limited Area Model (ALADIN/HIRLAM numerical weather prediction (NWP system, and the nearest radio sounding station located 100 km away from the lidar site (only for the permanent location of the lidar. The uncertainties of the calibration factor derived from the soundings, the satellite and the model data are  < 2.8, 7.4 and 3.9 %, respectively. We also include water vapor mixing ratio intercomparisons between the radio soundings and the various instruments/model for the period of the campaigns. A good agreement is observed for all comparisons with relative errors that do not exceed 50 % up to 8 km altitude in most cases. A 4-year seasonal analysis of vertical water vapor is also presented for the Kuopio site in Finland. During winter months, the air in Kuopio is dry (1.15±0.40 g kg−1; during summer it is wet (5.54±1.02 g kg−1; and at other times, the air is in an intermediate state. These are averaged values over the lowest 2 km in the atmosphere. Above that height a quick decrease in water vapor mixing ratios is observed, except during summer months where favorable atmospheric conditions enable higher mixing ratio values at higher altitudes. Lastly, the seasonal change in disagreement between the lidar and the model has been studied. The analysis showed that, on average, the model underestimates water vapor mixing ratios at high altitudes

  10. Modeling and optimizing a reactor for producing hydrogen through methane conversion with water vapor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Opris, I.; Gilca, Al.; Popa, Gh.; Vasilescu-Obrejan, A.

    1980-01-01

    A theoretical model is developed for a reactor for converting methane with steam which takes into consideration two sequential reactions: CH/sub 4/+H/sub 2/O yields CO/sup +/3H/sub 2/ and CO/sup +/H/sub 2/O equal and opposite reaction CO/sub 2//sup +/H/sub 2/; the model is constructed with consideration of certain simplifying hypotheses, as well as with the use of known kinetic, thermodynamic and other data. A program is developed for processing the model using a computer. The model may be used for optimizing the operational parameters of the cited reactor for the production of H/sub 2/ and a synthesis gas.

  11. A model for arsenic anti-site incorporation in GaAs grown by hydride vapor phase epitaxy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schulte, K. L.; Kuech, T. F. [Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States)

    2014-12-28

    GaAs growth by hydride vapor phase epitaxy (HVPE) has regained interest as a potential route to low cost, high efficiency thin film photovoltaics. In order to attain the highest efficiencies, deep level defect incorporation in these materials must be understood and controlled. The arsenic anti-site defect, As{sub Ga} or EL2, is the predominant deep level defect in HVPE-grown GaAs. In the present study, the relationships between HVPE growth conditions and incorporation of EL2 in GaAs epilayers were determined. Epitaxial n-GaAs layers were grown under a wide range of deposition temperatures (T{sub D}) and gallium chloride partial pressures (P{sub GaCl}), and the EL2 concentration, [EL2], was determined by deep level transient spectroscopy. [EL2] agreed with equilibrium thermodynamic predictions in layers grown under conditions in which the growth rate, R{sub G}, was controlled by conditions near thermodynamic equilibrium. [EL2] fell below equilibrium levels when R{sub G} was controlled by surface kinetic processes, with the disparity increasing as R{sub G} decreased. The surface chemical composition during growth was determined to have a strong influence on EL2 incorporation. Under thermodynamically limited growth conditions, e.g., high T{sub D} and/or low P{sub GaCl}, the surface vacancy concentration was high and the bulk crystal was close to equilibrium with the vapor phase. Under kinetically limited growth conditions, e.g., low T{sub D} and/or high P{sub GaCl}, the surface attained a high GaCl coverage, blocking As adsorption. This competitive adsorption process reduced the growth rate and also limited the amount of arsenic that incorporated as As{sub Ga}. A defect incorporation model which accounted for the surface concentration of arsenic as a function of the growth conditions, was developed. This model was used to identify optimal growth parameters for the growth of thin films for photovoltaics, conditions in which a high growth rate and low [EL2] could be

  12. Atomic vapor density monitor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sewall, N.; Harris, W.; Beeler, R.; Wooldridge, J.; Chen, H.L.

    1986-09-01

    This report presents information on the Atomic Vapor Density Monitor (AVDM) system that measures the density of a vapor by measuring the absorption of light from a swept-wavelength laser that passes through an atomic vapor stream.

  13. Petroleum Vapor Intrusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    One type of vapor intrusion is PVI, in which vapors from petroleum hydrocarbons such as gasoline, diesel, or jet fuel enter a building. Intrusion of contaminant vapors into indoor spaces is of concern.

  14. Transpiração do tomateiro cultivado fora do solo em estufa plástica e sua relação com os elementos meteorológicos Transpiration of tomato plants grown outside soil in plastic greenhouse and its relationship with meteorological elements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josemar Valandro

    2007-12-01

    , mean daily temperature, daily mean air humidity and vapor pressure deficit inside the greenhouse. The calculated regression models indicated that is possible to estimate transpiration with reazonable accuracy only during spring season. The best estimates were obtained using vapor pressure deficit with simple regression (R² = 0.814 and temperature and vapor pressure deficit with multiple regression (R² = 0.881.

  15. Vapor-Liquid Equilibrium Measurements and Modeling of the Propyl Mercaptan plus Methane plus Water System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Awan, Javeed; Thomsen, Kaj; Coquelet, Christophe

    2010-01-01

    In this work, vapor−liquid equilibrium (VLE) measurements of propyl mercaptan (PM) in pure water were performed at three different temperatures, (303, 323, and 365) K, with a pressure variation from (1 to 8) MPa. The total system pressure was maintained by CH4. The inlet mole fraction of propyl...... mercaptan in all experiments was the same, around 4.5·10−4 in the liquid phase. The objective was to provide experimental VLE data points of the propyl mercaptan + methane + water system for modeling since there is a lack of available data. These data will allow the industrial modeling of sulfur emission...

  16. Modeling vapor-liquid interfaces with the gradient theory in combination with the CPA equation of state

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Queimada, Antonio; Miqueu, C; Marrucho, IM

    2005-01-01

    and the correct phase equilibrium of water + hydrocarbon systems already obtained from CPA. In this work, preliminary studies involving the vapor-liquid interfacial tensions of some selected associating and non-associating pure components (water, ethanol, n-butane, n-pentane, n-hexane, n-heptane) are presented......With the final purpose of describing the important aqueous + hydrocarbon liquid-liquid interfaces, the gradient theory was combined with the Cubic-Plus-Association equation of state (CPA EOS), taking advantage of the correct representation of interfacial tensions provided by the gradient theory...... and discussed. The good description of equilibrium properties such as vapor pressure and liquid and vapor phase densities is shown in the full range of the vapor-liquid saturation line. For non-associating components, results are compared with those from the Soave-Redlich-Kwong and Peng-Robinson equations...

  17. Continuous Water Vapor Mass Flux and Temperature Measurements in a Model Scramjet Combustor Using a Diode Laser Sensor

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Upschulte, B. L; Miller, M. F; Allen, M. G; Jackson, K; Gruber, M; Mathur, T

    1998-01-01

    A sensor for simultaneous measurements of water vapor density, temperature and velocity has been developed based on absorption techniques using room temperature diode lasers (InGaAsP) operating at 1.31 micrometers...

  18. Evaluation of theoretical and empirical water vapor sorption isotherm models for soils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arthur, Emmanuel; Tuller, Markus; Moldrup, Per

    2016-01-01

    sorption isotherms of building materials, food, and other industrial products, knowledge about the 24 applicability of these functions for soils is noticeably lacking. We present validation of nine models for characterizing adsorption/desorption isotherms for a water activity range from 0.03 to 0...

  19. Finite Element Analysis Modeling of Chemical Vapor Deposition of Silicon Carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-19

    Kinetic Laws of the Chemical Process in the CVD of SiC Ceramics from CH3SiCl3-H2 Precursor. Journal de Physique IV, C3527-C3533. 13...a Hot Wall Reactor. Journal de Physique IV, C5253-C5260. 15. Oh, I., C. Takoudis & G. Neudeck. (1991). Mathematical Modeling of Epitaxial

  20. Recent advances in vapor intrusion site investigations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McHugh, Thomas; Loll, Per; Eklund, Bart

    2017-12-15

    Our understanding of vapor intrusion has evolved rapidly since the discovery of the first high profile vapor intrusion sites in the late 1990s and early 2000s. Research efforts and field investigations have improved our understanding of vapor intrusion processes including the role of preferential pathways and natural barriers to vapor intrusion. This review paper addresses recent developments in the regulatory framework and conceptual model for vapor intrusion. In addition, a number of innovative investigation methods are discussed. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  1. Multi-component vapor-liquid equilibrium model for LES and application to ECN Spray A

    CERN Document Server

    Matheis, Jan

    2016-01-01

    We present and evaluate a detailed multi-species two-phase thermodynamic equilibrium model for large-eddy simulations (LES) of liquid-fuel injection and mixing at high pressure. The model can represent the coexistence of supercritical states and multi-component subcritical two-phase states. LES results for the transcritical Spray A of the Engine Combustion Network (ECN) are found to agree very well to available experimental data. We also address well-known numerical challenges of trans- and supercritical fluid mixing and compare a fully conservative formulation to a quasi conservative formulation of the governing equations. Our results prove physical and numerical consistency of both methods on fine grids and demonstrate the effects of energy conservation errors associated with the quasi conservative formulation on typical LES grids.

  2. Quantum chemical modeling of humic acid/air equilibrium partitioning of organic vapors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niederer, Christian; Goss, Kai-Uwe

    2007-05-15

    Classical approaches for predicting soil organic matter partition coefficients of organic compounds require a calibration with experimental partition data and, for good accuracy, experimental compound descriptors. In this study we evaluate the quantum chemical model COSMO-RS in its COSMOtherm implementation for the prediction of about 200 experimental Leonardite humic acid/air partition coefficients without calibration or experimental compound descriptors, but simply based on molecular structures. For this purpose a Leonardite Humic Acid model monomer limited to 31 carbon atoms was derived from 13C NMR analysis, elemental analysis, and acidic function analysis provided in the literature. Altogether the COSMOtherm calculations showed a good performance and we conclude that it may become a very promising tool for the prediction of sorption in soil organic matter for compounds for which the molecular structure is the only reliable information available. COSMOtherm can be expected to be very robust with respectto new and complex compound structures because its calculations are based on a fundamental assessment of the underlying intermolecular forces. In contrast, other empirical models that are also based on the molecular structure of the sorbate have an application domain that is limited by their calibration data set that is often unknown to the user.

  3. Confirmation of Monod Model for Biofiltration of Styrene Vapors from Waste Flue Gas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza Dehghanzadeh

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: The objective of this research was to investigate the kinetic behavior of the biofil-tration process for the removal of styrene.Methods: A three stage compost based biofilter was inoculated with thickened activated sludge. The reaction order rate constants were obtained from continuous experiments and used as the specific growth rate for the Monod equation.Results: The measured concentration profiles show a linear dependence on the bed height in the biofilter at higher loadings, such as 75 and 45 g m-3 h-1. This is the condition of reaction limitation for a reaction with zero-order kinetics. From the experimental data, maximum elimination capac-ity (ECmax was estimated to be 44, 40 and 26 g m-3 h-1 at empty bed retention times (EBRTs of 120, 60 and 30 s, respectively. However, at lower loadings, the measured concentration profile of the biofilter is one of exponential increase, which is the condition of both reaction and diffusion limitations for a reaction with zero-order kinetics. Maximum elimination capacities found from the experimental results were the same as Monod model predictions. Both the experimental re-sults and the model predictions showed the influence of EBRT on the removal rate of styrene, particularly for the highest loading rate.Conclusion: In terms of the practical applications of the proposed models have the advantage of being simpler than Monod kinetics and Monod kinetics requires a numerical solution.

  4. Confirmation of monod model for biofiltration of styrene vapors from waste flue gas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dehghanzadeh, Reza; Roshani, Babak; Asadi, Mahzar; Fahiminia, Mohammad; Aslhashemi, Ahmad

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this research was to investigate the kinetic behavior of the biofil¬tration process for the removal of styrene. A three stage compost based biofilter was inoculated with thickened activated sludge. The reaction order rate constants were obtained from continuous experiments and used as the specific growth rate for the Monod equation. The measured concentration profiles show a linear dependence on the bed height in the biofilter at higher loadings, such as 75 and 45 g m-3 h-1. This is the condition of reaction limitation for a reaction with zero-order kinetics. From the experimental data, maximum elimination capac¬ity (ECmax) was estimated to be 44, 40 and 26 g m-3 h-1 at empty bed retention times (EBRTs) of 120, 60 and 30 s, respectively. However, at lower loadings, the measured concentration profile of the biofilter is one of exponential increase, which is the condition of both reaction and diffusion limitations for a reaction with zero-order kinetics. Maximum elimination capacities found from the experimental results were the same as Monod model predictions. Both the experimental re¬sults and the model predictions showed the influence of EBRT on the removal rate of styrene, particularly for the highest loading rate. In terms of the practical applications of the proposed models have the advantage of being simpler than Monod kinetics and Monod kinetics requires a numerical solution.

  5. Synthesis and modeling of uniform complex metal oxides by close-proximity atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoye, Robert L Z; Muñoz-Rojas, David; Musselman, Kevin P; Vaynzof, Yana; MacManus-Driscoll, Judith L

    2015-05-27

    A close-proximity atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition (AP-CVD) reactor is developed for synthesizing high quality multicomponent metal oxides for electronics. This combines the advantages of a mechanically controllable substrate-manifold spacing and vertical gas flows. As a result, our AP-CVD reactor can rapidly grow uniform crystalline films on a variety of substrate types at low temperatures without requiring plasma enhancements or low pressures. To demonstrate this, we take the zinc magnesium oxide (Zn(1-x)Mg(x)O) system as an example. By introducing the precursor gases vertically and uniformly to the substrate across the gas manifold, we show that films can be produced with only 3% variation in thickness over a 375 mm(2) deposition area. These thicknesses are significantly more uniform than for films from previous AP-CVD reactors. Our films are also compact, pinhole-free, and have a thickness that is linearly controllable by the number of oscillations of the substrate beneath the gas manifold. Using photoluminescence and X-ray diffraction measurements, we show that for Mg contents below 46 at. %, single phase Zn(1-x)Mg(x)O was produced. To further optimize the growth conditions, we developed a model relating the composition of a ternary oxide with the bubbling rates through the metal precursors. We fitted this model to the X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measured compositions with an error of Δx = 0.0005. This model showed that the incorporation of Mg into ZnO can be maximized by using the maximum bubbling rate through the Mg precursor for each bubbling rate ratio. When applied to poly(3-hexylthiophene-2,5-diyl) hybrid solar cells, our films yielded an open-circuit voltage increase of over 100% by controlling the Mg content. Such films were deposited in short times (under 2 min over 4 cm(2)).

  6. Flexible Transpiration Cooled Thermal Protection System for Inflatable Atmospheric Capture and Entry Systems Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Andrews Space, Inc. proposes an innovative transpiration cooled aerobrake TPS design that is thermally protective, structurally flexible, and lightweight. This...

  7. Model-aided fabrication of fiber-reinforced ceramic composite tubes using forced-flow chemical vapor infiltration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Probst, Kent Joseph

    Fiber-reinforced ceramic composites possess high thermal conductivity, high fracture toughness, and corrosion resistance, having potential for use in fossil-energy steam plants, where corrosive environments at high temperature and pressure exist. The utilization of fiber-reinforced ceramic composite tubes may enable plant operation at higher temperatures, and may extend the lifetime of specific plant operations, improving overall efficiencies and reducing down-time. Dense, fiber-reinforced ceramic composite tubes were fabricated using forced-flow, chemical vapor infiltration. This process involved gaseous ceramic precursor infiltration throughout a fibrous preform, where a temperature gradient was applied and a ceramic precursor was forced through its surface at lower temperature. The application of a suitable temperature gradient and total flow enabled the ceramic matrix deposition to preferentially translate from the preform hot-surface to the cold-surface, resulting in a dense, ceramic composite in a reasonable total process time. Fibrous tube preforms were fabricated with Nextel(TM) 312 fiber. Silicon carbide was the reinforced ceramic matrix, which was deposited throughout the tube preform using methyltrichlorosilane. A standard set of process conditions was attempted to evaluate the feasibility in achieving dense composites. Tube preform infiltrations with variation in temperature and total flow were performed to determine effects on final density and total process time. Density characterization was performed on tube preforms infiltrated with the same process conditions for various time lengths to study the transient tube densification. Tube density profiles were characterized using X-ray computed tomography and digital image analysis, and the results from both were compared for their effectiveness in the prediction of the transient tube densification. A comprehensive process model simulated the transient tube infiltration using multiple, steady

  8. Measurement and modeling of high-pressure (vapor + liquid) equilibria of (CO{sub 2} + alkanol) binary systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bejarano, Arturo; Gutierrez, Jorge E. [Departamento de Ingenieria Quimica y Ambiental, Universidad Tecnica Federico Santa Maria, Avda. Espana 1680, Valparaiso (Chile); Araus, Karina A. [Departamento de Ingenieria Quimica y Bioprocesos, Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Chile, Avda. Vicuna Mackenna 4860, Macul, Santiago (Chile); Fuente, Juan C. de la, E-mail: juan.delafuente@usm.c [Departamento de Ingenieria Quimica y Ambiental, Universidad Tecnica Federico Santa Maria, Avda. Espana 1680, Valparaiso (Chile); Centro Regional de Estudios en Alimentos Saludables, Blanco 1623, Valparaiso (Chile)

    2011-05-15

    Research highlights: (Vapor + liquid) equilibria of three (CO{sub 2} + C{sub 5} alcohol) binary systems were measured. Complementary data are reported at (313, 323 and 333) K and from (2 to 11) MPa. No liquid immiscibility was observed at the temperatures and pressures studied. Experimental data were correlated with the PR-EoS and the van de Waals mixing rules. Correlation results showed relative deviations {<=}8 % (liquid) and {<=}2 % (vapor). - Abstract: Complementary isothermal (vapor + liquid) equilibria data are reported for the (CO{sub 2} + 3-methyl-2-butanol), (CO{sub 2} + 2-pentanol), and (CO{sub 2} + 3-pentanol) binary systems at temperatures of (313, 323, and 333) K, and at pressure range of (2 to 11) MPa. For all (CO{sub 2} + alcohol) systems, it was visually monitored that there was no liquid immiscibility at the temperatures and pressures studied. The experimental data were correlated with the Peng-Robinson equation of state using the quadratic mixing rules of van der Waals with two adjustable parameters. The calculated (vapor + liquid) equilibria compositions were found to be in good agreement with the experimental data with deviations for the mole fractions <8% and <2% for the liquid and vapor phase, respectively.

  9. Calibrated vapor generator source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, J.P.; Larson, R.A.; Goodrich, L.D.; Hall, H.J.; Stoddard, B.D.; Davis, S.G.; Kaser, T.G.; Conrad, F.J.

    1995-09-26

    A portable vapor generator is disclosed that can provide a controlled source of chemical vapors, such as, narcotic or explosive vapors. This source can be used to test and calibrate various types of vapor detection systems by providing a known amount of vapors to the system. The vapor generator is calibrated using a reference ion mobility spectrometer. A method of providing this vapor is described, as follows: explosive or narcotic is deposited on quartz wool, placed in a chamber that can be heated or cooled (depending on the vapor pressure of the material) to control the concentration of vapors in the reservoir. A controlled flow of air is pulsed over the quartz wool releasing a preset quantity of vapors at the outlet. 10 figs.

  10. Separate Estimation of Evaporation and Transpiration by ENWATBAL Model

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    邱, 国玉; 籾井, 和朗; 矢野, 友久; 佐瀬, 勘紀

    1998-01-01

    ENWATBAL (ENergy and WATer BALance)は, 土壌蒸発量(E)と植物蒸散量(T)を計算する数値モデルである。本研究では, このモデルの裸地圃場とソルガム群落圃場への適用性について検討した。裸地におけるEの実測値と計算値を比較した結果, ENWATBALモデルは十分な精度でEを推定すること...

  11. Connections between groundwater flow and transpiration partitioning: using integrated continental-scale simulations at high resolution to diagnose hydrologic process interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxwell, Reed; Condon, Laura

    2017-04-01

    Understanding freshwater fluxes at continental scales will help us better predict hydrologic response and manage our terrestrial water resources. The partitioning of evapotranspiration into bare soil evaporation and plant transpiration remains a key uncertainty in the terrestrial water balance. We used integrated hydrologic simulations that couple vegetation and land energy processes with surface and subsurface hydrology to study transpiration partitioning at the continental scale. These high resolution, transient simulations encompass the major watersheds of the United States and demonstrate great complexity in hydrologic and land energy states. Two simulations were used to study the role lateral groundwater flow plays in transpiration partitioning. Results show that both latent heat flux and partitioning are connected to water table depth, and including lateral groundwater flow in the model increases transpiration partitioning from 47±13% to 62±12%. This suggests that lateral groundwater flow, which is generally simplified or excluded in earth system models, may provide a missing link to reconciling observations and global models of terrestrial water fluxes.

  12. Retrieval Assimilation and Modeling of Atmospheric Water Vapor from Ground- and Space-Based GPS Networks: Investigation of the Global and Regional Hydrological Cycles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickey, Jean O.

    1999-01-01

    Uncertainty over the response of the atmospheric hydrological cycle (particularly the distribution of water vapor and cloudiness) to anthropogenic forcing is a primary source of doubt in current estimates of global climate sensitivity, which raises severe difficulties in evaluating its likely societal impact. Fortunately, a variety of advanced techniques and sensors are beginning to shed new light on the atmospheric hydrological cycle. One of the most promising makes use of the sensitivity of the Global Positioning System (GPS) to the thermodynamic state, and in particular the water vapor content, of the atmosphere through which the radio signals propagate. Our strategy to derive the maximum benefit for hydrological studies from the rapidly increasing GPS data stream will proceed in three stages: (1) systematically analyze and archive quality-controlled retrievals using state-of-the-art techniques; (2) employ both currently available and innovative assimilation procedures to incorporate these determinations into advanced regional and global atmospheric models and assess their effects; and (3) apply the results to investigate selected scientific issues of relevance to regional and global hydrological studies. An archive of GPS-based estimation of total zenith delay (TZD) data and water vapor where applicable has been established with expanded automated quality control. The accuracy of the GPS estimates is being monitored; the investigation of systematic errors is ongoing using comparisons with water vapor radiometers. Meteorological packages have been implemented. The accuracy and utilization of the TZD estimates has been improved by implementing a troposphere gradient model. GPS-based gradients have been validated as real atmospheric moisture gradients, establishing a link between the estimated gradients and the passage of weather fronts. We have developed a generalized ray tracing inversion scheme that can be used to analyze occultation data acquired from space

  13. Impact of model resolution on simulating the water vapor transport through the central Himalayas: implication for models' wet bias over the Tibetan Plateau

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Changgui; Chen, Deliang; Yang, Kun; Ou, Tinghai

    2018-01-01

    Current climate models commonly overestimate precipitation over the Tibetan Plateau (TP), which limits our understanding of past and future water balance in the region. Identifying sources of such models' wet bias is therefore crucial. The Himalayas is considered a major pathway of water vapor transport (WVT) towards the TP. Their steep terrain, together with associated small-scale processes, cannot be resolved by coarse-resolution models, which may result in excessive WVT towards the TP. This paper, therefore, investigated the resolution dependency of simulated WVT through the central Himalayas and its further impact on precipitation bias over the TP. According to a summer monsoon season of simulations conducted using the weather research forecasting (WRF) model with resolutions of 30, 10, and 2 km, the study found that finer resolutions (especially 2 km) diminish the positive precipitation bias over the TP. The higher-resolution simulations produce more precipitation over the southern Himalayan slopes and weaker WVT towards the TP, explaining the reduced wet bias. The decreased WVT is reflected mostly in the weakened wind speed, which is due to the fact that the high resolution can improve resolving orographic drag over a complex terrain and other processes associated with heterogeneous surface forcing. A significant difference was particularly found when the model resolution is changed from 30 to 10 km, suggesting that a resolution of approximately 10 km represents a good compromise between a more spatially detailed simulation of WVT and computational cost for a domain covering the whole TP.

  14. Dynamics of transpiration, sap flow and use of stored water in tropical forest canopy trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frederick C. Meinzer; Shelley A. James; Guillermo. Goldstein

    2004-01-01

    In large trees the daily onset of transpiration causes water to be withdrawn from internal storage compartments resulting in lags between changes in transpiration and sap flow at the base of the tree. We measured time courses of sap flow, hydraulic resistance, plant water potential and stomatal resistance in co-occuring tropical forest canopy trees with trunk diameters...

  15. The sensitivity of regional transpiration to land-surface characteristics: significance of feedback.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jacobs, C.M.J.; Bruin, de H.A.R.

    1992-01-01

    Several authors have determined the sensitivity of transpiration to different environmental parameters using the Penman-Monteith equation. In their studies the interaction between transpiration and, for example, the humidity of the air is ignored: the feedback with the planetary boundary layer (PBL)

  16. The shape of the transpiration reduction function under plant water stress

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Metselaar, K.; Jong van Lier, de Q.

    2007-01-01

    Assuming transpiration to be reduced after a critical pressure head (usually chosen as −1.5 MPa or −150 m) at the root surface has been reached, transpiration rates in this so-called falling-rate phase were analyzed numerically for soils described by the van Genuchten–Mualem equations (numerical

  17. Transpiration of oak trees in the oak savannas of the Southwestern Borderlands region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peter F. Ffolliott; Cody L. Stropki; Aaron T. Kauffman; Gerald J. Gottfried

    2008-01-01

    Transpiration of oak trees on the Cascabel watersheds in the savannas on the eastern slope of the Peloncillo Mountains in southwestern New Mexico has been estimated by the sap-flow method. Transpiration represents the largest loss of gross precipitation falling on a watershed in approximations of water budgets for the more densely stocked oak woodlands of the...

  18. The linkage between stratospheric water vapor and surface temperature in an observation-constrained coupled general circulation model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuan; Su, Hui; Jiang, Jonathan H.; Livesey, Nathaniel J.; Santee, Michelle L.; Froidevaux, Lucien; Read, William G.; Anderson, John

    2017-04-01

    We assess the interactions between stratospheric water vapor (SWV) and surface temperature during the past two decades using satellite observations and the Community Earth System Model (CESM). From 1992 to 2013, to first order, the observed SWV exhibited three distinct piece-wise trends: a steady increase from 1992 to 2000, an abrupt drop from 2000 to 2004, and a gradual recovery after 2004, while the global-mean surface temperature experienced a strong increase until 2000 and a warming hiatus after 2000. The atmosphere-only CESM shows that the seasonal variation of tropical-mean (30°S-30°N) SWV is anticorrelated with that of the tropical-mean sea surface temperature (SST), while the correlation between the tropical SWV and SST anomalies on the interannual time scale is rather weak. By nudging the modeled SWV to prescribed profiles in coupled atmosphere-slab ocean experiments, we investigate the impact of SWV variations on surface temperature change. We find that a uniform 1 ppmv (0.5 ppmv) SWV increase (decrease) leads to an equilibrium global mean surface warming (cooling) of 0.12 ± 0.05 °C (-0.07 ± 0.05 °C). Sensitivity experiments show that the equilibrium response of global mean surface temperature to SWV perturbations over the extratropics is larger than that over the tropics. The observed sudden drop of SWV from 2000 to 2004 produces a global mean surface cooling of about -0.048 ± 0.041 °C, which suggests that a persistent change in SWV would make an imprint on long-term variations of global-mean surface temperature. A constant linear increase in SWV based on the satellite-observed rate of SWV change yields a global mean surface warming of 0.03 ± 0.01 °C/decade over a 50-year period, which accounts for about 19 % of the observed surface temperature increase prior to the warming hiatus. In the same experiment, trend analyses during different periods reveal a multi-year adjustment of surface temperature before the response to SWV forcing becomes

  19. Modelling non-steady-state isotope enrichment of leaf water in a gas-exchange cuvette environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Xin; Simonin, Kevin A; Loucos, Karen E; Barbour, Margaret M

    2015-12-01

    The combined use of a gas-exchange system and laser-based isotope measurement is a tool of growing interest in plant ecophysiological studies, owing to its relevance for assessing isotopic variability in leaf water and/or transpiration under non-steady-state (NSS) conditions. However, the current Farquhar & Cernusak (F&C) NSS leaf water model, originally developed for open-field scenarios, is unsuited for use in a gas-exchange cuvette environment where isotope composition of water vapour (δv ) is intrinsically linked to that of transpiration (δE ). Here, we modified the F&C model to make it directly compatible with the δv -δE dynamic characteristic of a typical cuvette setting. The resultant new model suggests a role of 'net-flux' (rather than 'gross-flux' as suggested by the original F&C model)-based leaf water turnover rate in controlling the time constant (τ) for the approach to steady sate. The validity of the new model was subsequently confirmed in a cuvette experiment involving cotton leaves, for which we demonstrated close agreement between τ values predicted from the model and those measured from NSS variations in isotope enrichment of transpiration. Hence, we recommend that our new model be incorporated into future isotope studies involving a cuvette condition where the transpiration flux directly influences δv . There is an increasing popularity among plant ecophysiologists to use a gas-exchange system coupled to laser-based isotope measurement for investigating non-steady state (NSS) isotopic variability in leaf water (and/or transpiration); however, the current Farquhar & Cernusak (F&C) NSS leaf water model is unsuited for use in a gas-exchange cuvette environment due to its implicit assumption of isotope composition of water vapor (δv ) being constant and independent of that of transpiration (δE ). In the present study, we modified the F&C model to make it compatible with the dynamic relationship between δv and δE as is typically associated

  20. Pore-Network Modeling of Water and Vapor Transport in the Micro Porous Layer and Gas Diffusion Layer of a Polymer Electrolyte Fuel Cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao-Zhong Qin

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In the cathode side of a polymer electrolyte fuel cell (PEFC, a micro porous layer (MPL added between the catalyst layer (CL and the gas diffusion layer (GDL plays an important role in water management. In this work, by using both quasi-static and dynamic pore-network models, water and vapor transport in the MPL and GDL has been investigated. We illustrated how the MPL improved water management in the cathode. Furthermore, it was found that dynamic liquid water transport in the GDL was very sensitive to the built-up thermal gradient along the through-plane direction. Thus, we may control water vapor condensation only along GDL-land interfaces by properly adjusting the GDL thermal conductivity. Our numerical results can provide guidelines for optimizing GDL pore structures for good water management.

  1. On Transpiration and Soil Moisture Content Sensitivity to Soil Hydrophysical Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ács, Ferenc

    Sensitivity of evapotranspiration E and root zone soil moisture content θ to the parameterization of soil water retention Ψ(θ) and soil water conductivity K(Ψ), as well as to the definition of field capacity soil moisture content, is investigated by comparing Psi1-PMSURF and Theta-PMSURF models. The core of PMSURF (Penman-Monteith Surface Fluxes) consists of a 3-layer soil moisture prediction module based on Richard’s equation in combination with the Penman-Monteith concept for estimating turbulent heat fluxes. Psi1- PMSURF and Theta-PMSURF differ only in the parameterization of the moisture availability function Fma. In Psi1,Fma is parameterized by using Ψ(θ) and K(Ψ) hydrophysical functions; in Theta, Fma is parameterized by using hydrophysical parameters: the field capacity θf and wilting point θw soil moisture contents. Both Psi1 and Theta are based on using soil hydrophysical data, that is, there is no conceptual difference between them in the parameterization of E even if in Psi1Fma depends on 12 parameters, while in Theta only on two soil/vegetation parameters. Sensitivity tests are performed using the Cabauw dataset. Three soil datasets are used: the vG (van Genuchten), CH/vG (Clapp and Hornberger/van Genuchten) and CH/PILPS (Clapp and Hornberger/Project for Intercomparison of Land-surface Parameterization Schemes) datasets. The vG dataset is used in van Genuchten’s parameterization, while in Clapp and Hornberger’s the CH/vG and CH/PILPS datasets are used. It is found that the consistency of soil hydrophysical data in the simulation of transpiration is quite important. The annual sum of E obtained by Psi1EPsi1, differs from the annual sum of E obtained by Theta, ETheta, because of the inconsistency between the fitting parameters of Ψ(θ) and K(Ψ) and the θf, and not because of the differencies in the parameterization of Fma. Further, θf can be estimated not only on the basis of using soil hydrophysical functions (the θf so obtained is

  2. Development and assessment of Transpirative Deficit Index (D-TDI) for agricultural drought monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borghi, Anna; Rienzner, Michele; Gandolfi, Claudio; Facchi, Arianna

    2017-04-01

    Drought is a major cause of crop yield loss, both in rainfed and irrigated agroecosystems. In past decades, many approaches have been developed to assess agricultural drought, usually based on the monitoring or modelling of the soil water content condition. All these indices show weaknesses when applied for a real time drought monitoring and management at the local scale, since they do not consider explicitly crops and soil properties at an adequate spatial resolution. This work describes a newly developed agricultural drought index, called Transpirative Deficit Index (D-TDI), and assesses the results of its application over a study area of about 210 km2 within the Po River Plain (northern Italy). The index is based on transforming the interannual distribution of the transpirative deficit (potential crop transpiration minus actual transpiration), calculated daily by means of a spatially distributed conceptual hydrological model and cumulated over user-selected time-steps, to a standard normal distribution (following the approach proposed by the meteorological index SPI - Standard Precipitation Index). For the application to the study area a uniform maize crop cover (maize is the most widespread crop in the area) and 22-year (1993-2014) meteorological data series were considered. Simulation results consist in maps of the index cumulated over 10-day time steps over a mesh with cells of 250 m. A correlation analysis was carried out (1) to study the characteristics and the memory of D-TDI and to assess its intra- and inter-annual variability, (2) to assess the response of the agricultural drought (i.e., the information provided by D-TDI) to the meteorological drought computed through the SPI over different temporal steps. The D-TDI is positively auto-correlated with a persistence of 30 days, and positively cross-correlated to the SPI with a persistence of 40 days, demonstrating that D-TDI responds to meteorological forcing. Correlation analyses demonstrate that soils

  3. Sapfluxnet: a global database of sap flow measurements to unravel the ecological factors of transpiration regulation in woody plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poyatos, Rafael; Martínez-Vilalta, Jordi; Molowny-Horas, Roberto; Steppe, Kathy; Oren, Ram; Katul, Gabriel; Mahecha, Miguel

    2016-04-01

    regulation and hydraulic status. SAPFLUXNET will lead to the first comprehensive study of the ecological drivers of tree-level transpiration across the globe and will aid to constrain the empirical upscaling between plant traits and ecosystem function. Finally, we anticipate that, once SAPFLUXNET is populated with sufficient observations, it will complement existing ecological networks like FLUXNET and it will also contribute to the evaluation of Earth-system models.

  4. Droplet Vaporization in a Supercritical Microgravity Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, E. W.; Farrell, P. V.

    1987-01-01

    A model is presented which describes single liquid droplet vaporization at nearly critical liquid pressures and temperatures. A modified Redlich-Kwong equation of state is used to evaluate the fugacities and liquid and vapor mole fractions at the interface under the assumption of interface equilibrium. Results obtained for different droplet sizes and conditions indicate significant differences in behavior in comparison with low-pressure quasi-steady droplet vaporization.

  5. Accurate Laser Measurements of the Water Vapor Self-Continuum Absorption in Four Near Infrared Atmospheric Windows. a Test of the MT_CKD Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campargue, Alain; Kassi, Samir; Mondelain, Didier; Romanini, Daniele; Lechevallier, Loïc; Vasilchenko, Semyon

    2017-06-01

    The semi empirical MT_CKD model of the absorption continuum of water vapor is widely used in atmospheric radiative transfer codes of the atmosphere of Earth and exoplanets but lacks of experimental validation in the atmospheric windows. Recent laboratory measurements by Fourier transform Spectroscopy have led to self-continuum cross-sections much larger than the MT_CKD values in the near infrared transparency windows. In the present work, we report on accurate water vapor absorption continuum measurements by Cavity Ring Down Spectroscopy (CRDS) and Optical-Feedback-Cavity Enhanced Laser Spectroscopy (OF-CEAS) at selected spectral points of the transparency windows centered around 4.0, 2.1 and 1.25 μm. The temperature dependence of the absorption continuum at 4.38 μm and 3.32 μm is measured in the 23-39 °C range. The self-continuum water vapor absorption is derived either from the baseline variation of spectra recorded for a series of pressure values over a small spectral interval or from baseline monitoring at fixed laser frequency, during pressure ramps. In order to avoid possible bias approaching the water saturation pressure, the maximum pressure value was limited to about 16 Torr, corresponding to a 75% humidity rate. After subtraction of the local water monomer lines contribution, self-continuum cross-sections, C_{S}, were determined with a few % accuracy from the pressure squared dependence of the spectra base line level. Together with our previous CRDS and OF-CEAS measurements in the 2.1 and 1.6 μm windows, the derived water vapor self-continuum provides a unique set of water vapor self-continuum cross-sections for a test of the MT_CKD model in four transparency windows. Although showing some important deviations of the absolute values (up to a factor of 4 at the center of the 2.1 μm window), our accurate measurements validate the overall frequency dependence of the MT_CKD2.8 model.

  6. Coupling gross primary production and transpiration for a consistent estimate of canopy water use efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yebra, Marta; van Dijk, Albert

    2015-04-01

    Water use efficiency (WUE, the amount of transpiration or evapotranspiration per unit gross (GPP) or net CO2 uptake) is key in all areas of plant production and forest management applications. Therefore, mutually consistent estimates of GPP and transpiration are needed to analysed WUE without introducing any artefacts that might arise by combining independently derived GPP and ET estimates. GPP and transpiration are physiologically linked at ecosystem level by the canopy conductance (Gc). Estimates of Gc can be obtained by scaling stomatal conductance (Kelliher et al. 1995) or inferred from ecosystem level measurements of gas exchange (Baldocchi et al., 2008). To derive large-scale or indeed global estimates of Gc, satellite remote sensing based methods are needed. In a previous study, we used water vapour flux estimates derived from eddy covariance flux tower measurements at 16 Fluxnet sites world-wide to develop a method to estimate Gc using MODIS reflectance observations (Yebra et al. 2013). We combined those estimates with the Penman-Monteith combination equation to derive transpiration (T). The resulting T estimates compared favourably with flux tower estimates (R2=0.82, RMSE=29.8 W m-2). Moreover, the method allowed a single parameterisation for all land cover types, which avoids artefacts resulting from land cover classification. In subsequent research (Yebra et al, in preparation) we used the same satellite-derived Gc values within a process-based but simple canopy GPP model to constrain GPP predictions. The developed model uses a 'big-leaf' description of the plant canopy to estimate the mean GPP flux as the lesser of a conductance-limited and radiation-limited GPP rate. The conductance-limited rate was derived assuming that transport of CO2 from the bulk air to the intercellular leaf space is limited by molecular diffusion through the stomata. The radiation-limited rate was estimated assuming that it is proportional to the absorbed photosynthetically

  7. Benefits of increasing transpiration efficiency in wheat under elevated CO2for rainfed regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christy, Brendan; Tausz-Posch, Sabine; Tausz, Michael; Richards, Richard; Rebetzke, Greg; Condon, Anthony; Mclean, Terry; Fitzgerald, Glenn; Bourgault, Maryse; O'Leary, Garry

    2018-01-13

    Higher transpiration efficiency (TE) has been proposed as a mechanism to increase crop yields in dry environments where water availability usually limits yield. The application of a coupled radiation and transpiration efficiency simulation model shows wheat yield advantage of a high TE cultivar (cv. Drysdale) over its almost identical low TE parent line (Hartog), from about -7 to 558 kg ha -1 (mean 187 kg ha -1 ) over the rainfed cropping region in Australia (221 to 1351 mm annual rainfall), under the present-day climate. The smallest absolute yield response occurred in the more extreme drier and wetter areas of the wheat belt. However, under elevated CO 2 conditions, the response of Drysdale was much greater overall, ranging from 51 to 886 kg ha -1 (mean 284 kg ha -1 ) with the greatest response in the higher rainfall areas. Changes in simulated TE under elevated CO 2 conditions are seen across Australia with notable increased areas of higher TE under a drier climate in Western Australia, Queensland and parts of New South Wales and Victoria. This improved efficiency is subtly deceptive, with highest yields not necessarily directly correlated with highest TE. Nevertheless, the advantage of Drysdale over Hartog is clear with the benefit of the trait advantage attributed to TE ranging from 102 to 118% (mean 109%). The potential annual cost-benefits of this increased genetic TE trait across the wheat growing areas of Australia (5 year average of area planted to wheat) totaled AUD 631 MIL (5 year average wheat price of AUD 260 t -1 ) with an average of 187 kg ha -1 under the present climate. The benefit to an individual farmer will depend on location but elevated CO 2 raises this nation-wide benefit to AUD 796 MIL in a 2°C warmer climate, slightly lower (AUD 715 MIL) if rainfall is also reduced by 20%. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  8. Vapor degreasing system

    Science.gov (United States)

    du Fresne, Eugene R. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    A vapor degreasing method and apparatus wherein a second cooling coil is used to prevent escape of solvent or solvent vapor from a degreaser. Gaseous refrigerant from the second coil can be released to the freeboard space above the solvent vapor zone to provide a barrier layer.

  9. Cultivar Differences in Plant Transpiration Rate at High Relative Air Humidity Are Not Related to Genotypic Variation in Stomatal Responsiveness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gebraegziabher, Habtamu Giday; Kjær, Katrine Heinsvig; Ottosen, Carl-Otto

    2015-01-01

    decline in plant transpiration by high RH, and that the variation in plant transpiration rate can be reflected by differences in leaf temperature (Tleaf). Plant leaf area, stomatal responsiveness to desiccation, together with plant transpiration and leaf temperature at growth conditions were analyzed...... in ten rose cultivars grown at moderate (60%) or high (85%) RH. Plants grown at high RH had a larger (9%) leaf area, and transpired less (45-50%) during the light period. At nighttime, plant transpiration decreased (28-49%) by high RH in three or four cultivars, depending on the light conditions. Within...

  10. Differentiating transpiration from evaporation in seasonal agricultural wetlands and the link to advective fluxes in the root zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachand, P.A.M.; S. Bachand,; Fleck, Jacob A.; Anderson, Frank E.; Windham-Myers, Lisamarie

    2014-01-01

    The current state of science and engineering related to analyzing wetlands overlooks the importance of transpiration and risks data misinterpretation. In response, we developed hydrologic and mass budgets for agricultural wetlands using electrical conductivity (EC) as a natural conservative tracer. We developed simple differential equations that quantify evaporation and transpiration rates using flowrates and tracer concentrations atwetland inflows and outflows. We used two ideal reactormodel solutions, a continuous flowstirred tank reactor (CFSTR) and a plug flow reactor (PFR), to bracket real non-ideal systems. From those models, estimated transpiration ranged from 55% (CFSTR) to 74% (PFR) of total evapotranspiration (ET) rates, consistent with published values using standard methods and direct measurements. The PFR model more appropriately represents these nonideal agricultural wetlands in which check ponds are in series. Using a fluxmodel, we also developed an equation delineating the root zone depth at which diffusive dominated fluxes transition to advective dominated fluxes. This relationship is similar to the Peclet number that identifies the dominance of advective or diffusive fluxes in surface and groundwater transport. Using diffusion coefficients for inorganic mercury (Hg) and methylmercury (MeHg) we calculated that during high ET periods typical of summer, advective fluxes dominate root zone transport except in the top millimeters below the sediment–water interface. The transition depth has diel and seasonal trends, tracking those of ET. Neglecting this pathway has profound implications: misallocating loads along different hydrologic pathways; misinterpreting seasonal and diel water quality trends; confounding Fick's First Law calculations when determining diffusion fluxes using pore water concentration data; and misinterpreting biogeochemicalmechanisms affecting dissolved constituent cycling in the root zone. In addition,our understanding of internal

  11. Modelling and numerical simulation of liquid-vapor phase transitions; Modelisation et simulation numerique des transitions de phase liquide-vapeur

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caro, F

    2004-11-15

    This work deals with the modelling and numerical simulation of liquid-vapor phase transition phenomena. The study is divided into two part: first we investigate phase transition phenomena with a Van Der Waals equation of state (non monotonic equation of state), then we adopt an alternative approach with two equations of state. In the first part, we study the classical viscous criteria for selecting weak solutions of the system used when the equation of state is non monotonic. Those criteria do not select physical solutions and therefore we focus a more recent criterion: the visco-capillary criterion. We use this criterion to exactly solve the Riemann problem (which imposes solving an algebraic scalar non linear equation). Unfortunately, this step is quite costly in term of CPU which prevent from using this method as a ground for building Godunov solvers. That is why we propose an alternative approach two equations of state. Using the least action principle, we propose a phase changing two-phase flow model which is based on the second thermodynamic principle. We shall then describe two equilibrium submodels issued from the relaxations processes when instantaneous equilibrium is assumed. Despite the weak hyperbolicity of the last sub-model, we propose stable numerical schemes based on a two-step strategy involving a convective step followed by a relaxation step. We show the ability of the system to simulate vapor bubbles nucleation. (author)

  12. Hyperspectral narrowband and multispectral broadband indices for remote sensing of crop evapotranspiration and its components (transpiration and soil evaporation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Michael T.; Thenkabail, Prasad S.; Biggs, Trent; Post, Kirk

    2016-01-01

    Evapotranspiration (ET) is an important component of micro- and macro-scale climatic processes. In agriculture, estimates of ET are frequently used to monitor droughts, schedule irrigation, and assess crop water productivity over large areas. Currently, in situ measurements of ET are difficult to scale up for regional applications, so remote sensing technology has been increasingly used to estimate crop ET. Ratio-based vegetation indices retrieved from optical remote sensing, like the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI), Soil Adjusted Vegetation Index, and Enhanced Vegetation Index are critical components of these models, particularly for the partitioning of ET into transpiration and soil evaporation. These indices have their limitations, however, and can induce large model bias and error. In this study, micrometeorological and spectroradiometric data collected over two growing seasons in cotton, maize, and rice fields in the Central Valley of California were used to identify spectral wavelengths from 428 to 2295 nm that produced the highest correlation to and lowest error with ET, transpiration, and soil evaporation. The analysis was performed with hyperspectral narrowbands (HNBs) at 10 nm intervals and multispectral broadbands (MSBBs) commonly retrieved by Earth observation platforms. The study revealed that (1) HNB indices consistently explained more variability in ET (ΔR2 = 0.12), transpiration (ΔR2 = 0.17), and soil evaporation (ΔR2 = 0.14) than MSBB indices; (2) the relationship between transpiration using the ratio-based index most commonly used for ET modeling, NDVI, was strong (R2 = 0.51), but the hyperspectral equivalent was superior (R2 = 0.68); and (3) soil evaporation was not estimated well using ratio-based indices from the literature (highest R2 = 0.37), but could be after further evaluation, using ratio-based indices centered on 743 and 953 nm (R2 = 0.72) or 428 and 1518 nm (R2 = 0.69).

  13. Low-Cost and Light-Weight Transpiration-Cooled Thrust Chambers Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The proposed effort aims to evaluate the feasibility of using transpiration-cooled Titanium as the primary material in small-scale thrust chambers for in-space...

  14. Ecophysiological variation of transpiration of pine forests: synthesis of new and published results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pantana Tor-ngern; Ram Oren; Andrew C. Oishi; Joshua M. Uebelherr; Sari Palmroth; Lasse Tarvainen; Mikaell Ottosson-Löfvenius; Sune Linder; Jean-Christophe Domec; Torgny Näsholm

    2017-01-01

    Canopy transpiration (EC) is a large fraction of evapotranspiration, integrating physical and biological processes within the energy, water, and carbon cycles of forests. Quantifying EC is of both scientific and practical importance, providing information relevant to...

  15. The effects of CO2 on growth and transpiration of radish (Raphanus sativus) in hypobaria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gohil, H. L.; Bucklin, R. A.; Correll, M. J.

    2010-04-01

    Plants grown on long-term space missions will likely be grown in low pressure environments (i.e., hypobaria). However, in hypobaria the transpiration rates of plants can increase and may result in wilting if the water is not readily replaced. It is possible to reduce transpiration by increasing the partial pressure of CO2 (pCO2), but the effects of pCO2 at high levels (>120 Pa) on the growth and transpiration of plants in hypobaria are not known. Therefore, the effects of pCO2 on the growth and transpiration of radish (Raphanus sativus var. Cherry Bomb II) in hypobaria were studied. The fresh weight (FW), leaf area, dry weight (DW), CO2 assimilation rates (CA), dark respiration rates (DR), and transpiration rates from 26 day-old radish plants that were grown for an additional seven days at different total pressures (33, 66 or 101 kPa) and pCO2 (40 Pa, 100 Pa and 180 Pa) were measured. In general, the dry weight of plants increased with CO2 enrichment and with lower total pressure. In limiting pCO2 (40 Pa) conditions, the transpiration for plants grown at 33 kPa was approximately twice that of controls (101 kPa total pressure with 40 Pa pCO2). Increasing the pCO2 from 40 Pa to 180 Pa reduced the transpiration rates for plants grown in hypobaria and in standard atmospheric pressures. However, for plants grown in hypobaria and high pCO2 (180 Pa) leaf damage was evident. Radish growth can be enhanced and transpiration reduced in hypobaria by enriching the gas phase with CO2 although at high levels leaf damage may occur.

  16. The absorption and transpiration of plants lead to a typical chaotic eco-hydrological process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, M.; Tian, F.; Hu, H.; Liu, D.; Tang, Y.

    2010-12-01

    In the past several decades, abundant complex dynamic characters shown in hydrological system are revealed, such as multiple stationary states, bifurcation and chaos. However, the mechanism of the dynamic character is usually unclear, for the main research method is based on nonlinear data analysis. In order to demonstrate the influence of plants on the dynamic behavior, a conceptual model with idealized and tractable mathematical form is established in this paper. A simple scheme of automatic irrigation is introduced to replace the stochastic rainfall mechanism. The simplification also can be generalized to real rainfall process, for rainfall time series can be considered as special kind of stochastic irrigation with given complicated rules. By nonlinear analysis and numerical simulation, a bundle of dynamic behaviors such as multiple stationary sates, bifurcation, jump and chaos are found in this deterministic eco-hydrological model. Notice that these complex dynamic behaviors are derived from a deterministic model without any stochastic processes. Further more, comparing with the bare soil model, one can see that the absorption and transpiration of plants play an important part in the eco-hydrological dynamic process. Briefly speaking, under some parameters, they lead a trivial dynamic behavior into a chaotic one.

  17. Relationships among climatological vertical moisture structure, column water vapor, and precipitation over the central Amazon in observations and CMIP5 models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lintner, Benjamin R.; Adams, David K.; Schiro, Kathleen A.; Stansfield, Alyssa M.; Amorim Rocha, Alciélio A.; Neelin, J. David

    2017-02-01

    Bias and spread in Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 simulated vertical specific humidity (q) structure are examined and related to both precipitation and column water vapor (cwv) near Manaus, Brazil, site of the recent Green Ocean Amazon campaign. Simulated seasonal mean q profiles are typically too dry, especially at low levels and during the local dry season, consistent with previously identified surface hydroclimate biases in the Amazon. Multimodel empirical orthogonal function analysis of the models' monthly climatological q profiles indicates two significant modes of ensemble spread in moisture vertical structure, with the leading mode peaked at low levels and the second mode in the lower free troposphere (LFT). While both modes project onto simulated cwv spread, only the first projects on precipitation, suggesting inconsistent sensitivity of simulated rainfall to LFT moisture. Relative to observations, models with high cwv and low-level moisture errors tend to exhibit high precipitation error.

  18. Prediciton of high-pressure vapor liquid equilibrium of six binary systems, carbon dioxide with six esters, using an artificial neural network model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Si-Moussa

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Artificial neural networks are applied to high-pressure vapor liquid equilibrium (VLE related literature data to develop and validate a model capable of predicting VLE of six CO2-ester binaries (CO2-ethyl caprate, CO2-ethyl caproate, CO2-ethyl caprylate, CO2-diethyl carbonate, CO2-ethyl butyrate and CO2-isopropyl acetate. A feed forward, back propagation network is used with one hidden layer. The model has five inputs (two intensive state variables and three pure ester properties and two outputs (two intensive state variables.The network is systematically trained with 112 data points in the temperature and pressure ranges (308.2-328.2 K, (1.665-9.218 MPa respectively and is validated with 56 data points in the temperature range (308.2-328.2 K. Different combinations of network architecture and training algorithms are studied. The training and validation strategy is focused on the use of a validation agreement vector, determined from linear regression analysis of the plots of the predicted versus experimental outputs, as an indication of the predictive ability of the neural network model. Statistical analyses of the predictability of the optimised neural network model show excellent agreement with experimental data (a coefficient of correlation equal to 0.9995 and 0.9886, and a root mean square error equal to 0.0595 and 0.00032 for the predicted equilibrium pressure and CO2 vapor phase composition respectively. Furthermore, the comparison in terms of average absolute relative deviation between the predicted results for each binary for the whole temperature range and literature results predicted by some cubic equation of state with various mixing rules and excess Gibbs energy models shows that the artificial neural network model gives far better results.

  19. Extended UNIQUAC Model for Correlation and Prediction of Vapor-Liquid-Liquid-Solid Equilibria in Aqueous Salt Systems Containing Non-Electrolytes. Part B. Alcohol (Ethanol, Propanols, Butanols) - Water-salt systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Kaj; Iliuta, Maria Cornelia; Rasmussen, Peter

    2004-01-01

    -Redlich-Kwong equation of state. The model only requires binary, temperature-dependent interaction parameters. It has previously been used to describe the excess Gibbs energy for aqueous electrolyte mixtures and aqueous electrolyte systems containing methanol. It has been found to be an adequate model for representing......, and liquid-liquid equilibrium data for solvent mixtures and for mixed solvent-electrolyte systems. The application of this model to represent the vapor-liquid-liquid-solid equilibria in aqueous systems containing various non-electrolytes (ethanol, 1-propanol, 2-propanol, 1-butanol, 2- butanol, 2-methyl I...... solid-liquid-vapor equilibrium and thermal property data for strongly non-ideal systems. In this work, the model is extended to aqueous salt systems containing higher alcohols. The calculations are based on an extensive database consisting of salt solubility data, vapor liquid equilibrium data...

  20. The Influence of Chemical Composition on LNG Pool Vaporization

    OpenAIRE

    Yu Zhidong

    2017-01-01

    A model is used to examine the influence of chemical composition on the vaporization rate of LNG during spreading. Calculations have been performed whereby the vaporization rate of the LNG mixtures has been compared to the vaporization of pure methane under the initial conditions. The detailed results indicate that the vaporization rate LNG mixture is different to that of pure methane. LNG as the liquid mixture gets rich in ethane and isobaric latent heat increases rapidly, leading to the rat...

  1. Stomatal and Aerodynamic Controls of Transpiration and Evaporation over Amazonian Landscapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trebs, I.; Mallick, K.; Boegh, E.; Giustarini, L.; Schlerf, M.; von Randow, C.; Kruijt, B.; De Araujo, A. C.; Hayek, M.; Wofsy, S. C.; Munger, J. W.; Saleska, S. R.; Ehleringer, J. R.; Domingues, T. F.; Ometto, J. P. H. B.; Leal de Moraes, O. L.; Hoffmann, L.; Jarvis, A.

    2015-12-01

    The dominant physical and ecophysiological state variables regulating the terrestrial latent heat flux (λE) are the aerodynamic conductance exerted by the boundary layer (gB) and the stomatal conductance (gS) exerted by the vegetation, and the Penman-Monteith (PM) model is a physically based method to directly quantify λE. However, the large scale application of the PM model suffers from the unavailability of any physical approach that explains the behaviour of gB and gSwithin the soil-plant-atmosphere-continuum. Here, we present a novel method to directly estimate gB and gS, and quantify their control on canopy scale transpiration (λET) and evaporation (λEE) using a Surface Temperature Initiated Closure (STIC) approach. STIC is driven with radiometric surface temperature (TR), air temperature (TA), relative humidity (RH), net radiation (RN), and ground heat flux (G). It physically integrates TR into the PM formulation to directly retrieve gB and gS and the conductances are physically constrained by near surface wetness, atmospheric vapour pressure deficit (DA) and radiative fluxes. Measurements from six ecohydrologically contrasting sites of the LBA (Large Scale Biosphere Atmosphere Transfer in Amazonia) eddy covariance network were used for estimating the conductances and quantifying their control on λET and λEE. The predicted λE from STIC based gB and gS retrievals revealed substantial correlation (R2 from 0.92 to 0.98), and mean absolute percent deviation (MAPD) of 14% to 20% with the observed fluxes. The 'decoupling coefficient' (Ω) indicated critical canopy control on λET and λEE for Tropical Moist Forest (TMF), Tropical Dry Forest (TDF) and pasture (PAS). On the contrary, for the Tropical Rain Forest (TRF) site, a non-significant relationship was found between Ω and λET (λEE) (p = 0.20 - 0.42), indicating no canopy control on λET (λEE) for this particular plant functional type. However, significant canopy control for the TRF was found in the

  2. Vapor intrusion risk of fuel ether oxygenates methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE), tert-amyl methyl ether (TAME) and ethyl tert-butyl ether (ETBE): A modeling study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jie; Xiong, Desen; Li, Haiyan; Ding, Yi; Xia, Xiangcheng; Yang, Yongqi

    2017-06-15

    Vapor intrusion of synthetic fuel additives represents a critical yet still neglected problem at sites contaminated by petroleum fuel releases. This study used an advanced numerical model to investigate the vapor intrusion potential of fuel ether oxygenates methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE), tert-amyl methyl ether (TAME), and ethyl tert-butyl ether (ETBE). Simulated indoor air concentration of these compounds can exceed USEPA indoor air screening level for MTBE (110μg/m 3 ). Our results also reveal that MTBE has much higher chance to cause vapor intrusion problems than TAME and ETBE. This study supports the statements made by USEPA in the Petroleum Vapor Intrusion (PVI) Guidance that the vertical screening criteria for petroleum hydrocarbons may not provide sufficient protectiveness for fuel additives, and ether oxygenates in particular. In addition to adverse impacts on human health, ether oxygenate vapor intrusion may also cause aesthetic problems (i.e., odour and flavour). Overall, this study points out that ether oxygenates can cause vapor intrusion problems. We recommend that USEPA consider including the field measurement data of synthetic fuel additives in the existing PVI database and possibly revising the PVI Guidance as necessary. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Increasing vertical resolution of three-dimensional atmospheric water vapor retrievals using a network of scanning compact microwave radiometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahoo, Swaroop

    2011-12-01

    The thermodynamic properties of the troposphere, in particular water vapor content and temperature, change in response to physical mechanisms, including frictional drag, evaporation, transpiration, heat transfer and flow modification due to terrain. The planetary boundary layer (PBL) is characterized by a high rate of change in its thermodynamic state on time scales of typically less than one hour. Large horizontal gradients in vertical wind speed and steep vertical gradients in water vapor and temperature in the PBL are associated with high-impact weather. Observation of these gradients in the PBL with high vertical resolution and accuracy is important for improvement of weather prediction. Satellite remote sensing in the visible, infrared and microwave provide qualitative and quantitative measurements of many atmospheric properties, including cloud cover, precipitation, liquid water content and precipitable water vapor in the upper troposphere. However, the ability to characterize the thermodynamic properties of the PBL is limited by the confounding factors of ground emission in microwave channels and of cloud cover in visible and IR channels. Ground-based microwave radiometers are routinely used to measure thermodynamic profiles. The vertical resolution of such profiles retrieved from radiometric brightness temperatures depends on the number and choice of frequency channels, the scanning strategy and the accuracy of brightness temperature measurements. In the standard technique, which uses brightness temperatures from vertically pointing radiometers, the vertical resolution of the retrieved water vapor profile is similar to or larger than the altitude at which retrievals are performed. This study focuses on the improvement of the vertical resolution of water vapor retrievals by including scanning measurements at a variety of elevation angles. Elevation angle scanning increases the path length of the atmospheric emission, thus improving the signal-to-noise ratio

  4. An automatic system using mobile-agent software to model the calculation process of a chemical vapor deposition film deposition simulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Takahiro; Fukui, Noriyuki; Arakawa, Masamoto; Funatsu, Kimito; Ema, Yoshinori

    2011-09-01

    We have developed an automatic modeling system for calculation processes of the simulator to reproduce experimental results of chemical vapor deposition (CVD), in order to decrease the calculation cost of the simulator. Replacing the simulator by the mathematical models proposed by the system will contribute towards decreasing the calculation costs for predicting the experimental results. The system consists of a mobile agent and two software resources in computer networks, that is, generalized modeling software and a simulator reproducing cross-sections of the deposited films on the substrates with the micrometer- or nanometer-sized trenches. The mobile agent autonomously creates appropriate models by moving to and then operating the software resources. The models are calculated by partial least squares regression (PLS), quadratic PLS (QPLS) and error back propagation (BP) methods using artificial neural networks (ANN) and expresses by mathematical formulas to reproduce the calculated results of the simulator. The models show good reproducibility and predictability both for uniformity and filling properties of the films calculated by the simulator. The models using the BP method yield the best performance. The filling property data are more suitable to modeling than film uniformity.

  5. Photochemical Reflectance Index (PRI) as a proxy of Light Use Efficiency (LUE) and transpiration in Mediterranean crop sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    LE Dantec, V.; Chebbi, W.; Boulet, G.; Merlin, O.; Lili-Chabaane, Z.; Er Raki, S.; Ceschia, E.; Khabba, S.; Fanise, P.; Zawilski, B.; Simonneaux, V.; Jarlan, L.

    2016-12-01

    The Photochemical Reflectance Index (PRI) is based on the short term reversible xanthophyll pigment changes accompanying plant stress and therefore of the associated photosynthetic activities. Strong relationships between PRI and Light Use Efficiency (LUE) were shown at leaf and canopy scales and over a wide range of species (Garbulsky et al., 2011). But very few previous works have explored the potential link with plant water status. In this study, we have first analyzed the link between PRI and LUE at canopy scale on two different crops in terms of canopy structure and crop management: olive grove (Tunisia) and wheat grown under different water regimes (irrigated or rainfed) and climate zones (France, Morocco). We have investigated the daily and seasonal dynamics of PRI; linking its variations to meteorological factors (global radiation and sun angle effects, soil water content, relative air humidity …) and plant processes. The highest correlations were mainly observed in clear skies conditions. We have found, whatever site, linear negative relationships between PRI and LUE using data acquired in midday (i.e. in solar zenithal angle condition). Linear link between PRI and sapflow measurements was also revealed. This correlation was obtained over periods characterized by a moderate soil water deficit, i.e. by when transpiration rate was mainly control by Vapor Pressure Deficit. We will then briefly presented alternative and complementary approaches to this index, to detect different level of water stress using thermal infrared emissions.

  6. Mesoscale modeling of the water vapor cycle at Mawrth Vallis: a Mars2020 and ExoMars exploration rovers high-priority landing site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pla-García, Jorge

    2017-04-01

    Introduction: The Mars Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (MRAMS) was used to predict meteorological conditions that are likely to be encountered by the Mars 2020 (NASA) Rover at several of their respective proposed landing sites during entry, descent, and landing at Ls5 [1] and by the ExoMars (ESA) Rover at one of the final landing sites. MRAMS is ideally suited for this type of investigation; the model is explicitly designed to simu-late Mars' atmospheric circulations at the mesoscale and smaller with realistic, high-resolution surface proper-ties [2, 3]. One of the sights studied for both rovers was Mawrth Vallis (MV), an ancient water outflow channel with light colored clay-rich rocks in the mid-latitude north hemisphere (Oxia Palus quadrangle). MV is the northernmost of the Mars2020 and ExoMars landing sites and the closest to the northern polar cap water source. The primary source of water vapor to the atmosphere is the northern polar cap during the northern summer. In order to highlight MV habitability implications, additional numerical experiments at Ls90, 140 and 180, highest column abundance of water vapor is found over MV [4], were performed to study how the atmospheric circulation connects MV with the polar water source. Once the winter CO2 retreats, the underlying polar water ice is exposed and begins to sublimate. The water is transported equatorward where it is manifested in the tropical aphelion cloud belt. If transport is assumed to be the result of the summer Hadley Cell, then the polar water is carried aloft in the northern high latitude rising branch before moving equatorward and eventually toward the southern high latitudes. Thus, the mean meridional summer circulation precludes a direct water vapor connection between MV and the polar source. Around the equinoxes (Ls0 and Ls180), there is a brief transition period where the rising branch quickly crosses from one hemisphere into the other as it migrates to its more typical solstitial location

  7. ANNUAL AND DIURNAL CYCLES OF THE INVERSE RELATION BETWEEN PLANT TRANSPIRATION AND CARBON SEQUESTRATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hernán Alonso Moreno

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Understanding biogeochemical cycles and especially carbon budgets is clue to validate global change models in the present and near future. As a consequence, sinks and sources of carbon in the world are being studied. One of those sinks is the non-well known behavior of the planet vegetation which involves the processes of photosynthesis and respiration. Carbon sequestration rates are highly related to the transpiration through a molecular diffusion process occurring at the stomatal level which can be recorded by an eddy covariance micrometeorological station. This paper explores annual and diurnal cycles of latent heat (LE and CO2 net (FC fluxes over 6 different ecosystems. Based on the physics of the transpiration process, different time-scale analysis are performed, finding a near-linear relation between LE and CO2 net fluxes, which is stronger at the more vegetated areas. The North American monsoon season increases carbon up taking and LE-CO2 flux relation preserves at different time scales analysis (hours to days to months.El conocimiento de los ciclos biogeoquímicos y, en especial, de los balances de carbono es clave para la validación de los modelos de cambio global para el presente y el futuro cercano. Como consecuencia, en el mundo se estudian las fuentes y los sumideros de carbono. Uno de esos sumideros es la vegetación del planeta, que involucra los procesos de respiración y fotosíntesis y cuyo comportamiento se empieza a estudiar. Las tasas de captura del carbono están muy ligadas a la transpiración mediante un proceso de difusión molecular en los estomas, que puede registrarse por un sistema micrometeorológico de eddy covarianza. Este artículo explora los ciclos anuales y diurnos de los flujos netos de CO2 y calor latente de seis ecosistemas diferentes. Se desarrollan diversos análisis de escala temporal, basados en la física de la transpiración, y se halla una relación cuasilineal entre los flujos netos de calor

  8. Environmental constraints on plant transpiration and the hydrological implications in a northern high latitude upland headwater catchment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, H.; Tetzlaff, D.; Soulsby, C.

    2016-12-01

    Vegetation affects water, carbon and energy transfer in the soil-plant-atmosphere system and mediates land-atmosphere interactions by altering surface albedo, roughness and soil macro-porosity, intercepting rainfall and transpiring water from soil layers. Vegetation water use (Ec) is regulated by stomata behaviour which is constrained by environmental variables including radiation, temperature, vapour pressure deficit, and soil water content. The relative influences of these variables on Ec are usually site specific reflecting climate and species differences. At a catchment scale, Ec can account for a large proportion of total evapotranspiration, and hence regulates water storage and fluxes in the soils, groundwater reservoirs and streams. In this study, we estimated transpiration from short vegetation (Calluna vulgaris) using the Maximum Entropy Production model (MEP), and measured sap flow of two forest plantations, together with meteorological variables, soil moisture and streamflow in an upland headwater catchment in northern Scotland. Our objectives were to investigate the environmental constraints on Ec in this wet humid and cool summer climate, and the hydrological responses and regulations of Ec in terms of rainfall and streamflow. Results will assist the assessment of hydrological implications of land management in terms of afforestation/deforestation.

  9. Influence of Soil Moisture on Soil Gas Vapor Concentration for Vapor Intrusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Rui; Pennell, Kelly G.; Suuberg, Eric M.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Mathematical models have been widely used in analyzing the effects of various environmental factors in the vapor intrusion process. Soil moisture content is one of the key factors determining the subsurface vapor concentration profile. This manuscript considers the effects of soil moisture profiles on the soil gas vapor concentration away from any surface capping by buildings or pavement. The “open field” soil gas vapor concentration profile is observed to be sensitive to the soil moisture distribution. The van Genuchten relations can be used for describing the soil moisture retention curve, and give results consistent with the results from a previous experimental study. Other modeling methods that account for soil moisture are evaluated. These modeling results are also compared with the measured subsurface concentration profiles in the U.S. EPA vapor intrusion database. PMID:24170970

  10. Structure and energetics of model amphiphilic molecules at the water liquid-vapor interface - A molecular dynamics study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohorille, Andrew; Benjamin, Ilan

    1993-01-01

    A molecular dynamics study of adsorption of p-n-pentylphenol at infinite dilution at the water liquid-vapor interface is reported. The calculated free energy of adsorption is -8.8 +/- 0.7 kcal/mol, in good agreement with the experimental value of -7.3 kcal/mol. The transition between the interfacial region and the bulk solution is sharp and well-defined by energetic, conformational, and orientational criteria. At the water surface, the phenol head group is mostly immersed in aqueous solvent. The most frequent orientation of the hydrocarbon tail is parallel to the interface, due to dispersion interactions with the water surface. This arrangement of the phenol ring and the alkyl chain requires that the chain exhibits a kink. As the polar head group is being moved into the solvent, the chain length increases and the tail becomes increasingly aligned toward the surface normal, such that the nonpolar part of the molecule exposed to water is minimized. The same effect was achieved when phenol was replaced by a more polar head group, phenolate.

  11. Evaluation of a low cost wireless heat ratio method system for measuring transpiration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eiriksson, D.; Boyer, B.; Aishlin, P. S.; Bowling, D. R.

    2016-12-01

    For decades, environmental measurements in remote locations have consisted of sensors hard wired to loggers that send data to central servers via radio, satellite, or cellular telemetry. This model of data collection is effective when all sensors are located in close proximity to the central data logger, such as on a weather station. Frequently, however, in order to adequately capture the spatial heterogeneity associated with environmental processes (e.g., transpiration, soil moisture, or snow depth), it is necessary to install many sensors 10's to 100's of meters from a central data logging station. This presents a practical and financial obstacle when considering the cost of cabling and conduit, in addition to the potential data collection and data quality problems associated with long cable runs. We offer a solution to this persistent challenge with a hybrid datalogging system that combines the power and reliability of Campbell Scientific logging and telemetry equipment with low cost Xbee radios and Arduino based data logging platforms. To evaluate the promise of this hybrid datalogging concept we developed a new generation of low cost, homemade heat ratio sapflux sensors and tested them at a forested site in the Wasatch Mountains, near Salt Lake City, Utah. We present data from this test site, heat ratio method sensor construction details, and example code that merges the capabilities of Arduino and Campbell Scientific datalogging systems.

  12. Numerical Modeling and Experimental Validation by Calorimetric Detection of Energetic Materials Using Thermal Bimorph Microcantilever Array: A Case Study on Sensing Vapors of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Seok-Won; Fragala, Joe; Banerjee, Debjyoti

    2015-08-31

    Bi-layer (Au-Si₃N₄) microcantilevers fabricated in an array were used to detect vapors of energetic materials such as explosives under ambient conditions. The changes in the bending response of each thermal bimorph (i.e., microcantilever) with changes in actuation currents were experimentally monitored by measuring the angle of the reflected ray from a laser source used to illuminate the gold nanocoating on the surface of silicon nitride microcantilevers in the absence and presence of a designated combustible species. Experiments were performed to determine the signature response of this nano-calorimeter platform for each explosive material considered for this study. Numerical modeling was performed to predict the bending response of the microcantilevers for various explosive materials, species concentrations, and actuation currents. The experimental validation of the numerical predictions demonstrated that in the presence of different explosive or combustible materials, the microcantilevers exhibited unique trends in their bending responses with increasing values of the actuation current.

  13. Incorporating Phase-Dependent Polarizability in Non-Additive Electrostatic Models for Molecular Dynamics Simulations of the Aqueous Liquid-Vapor Interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Brad A; Warren, G Lee; Patel, Sandeep

    2009-02-10

    We discuss a new classical water force field that explicitly accounts for differences in polarizability between liquid and vapor phases. The TIP4P-QDP (4-point transferable intermolecular potential with charge dependent-polarizability) force field is a modification of the original TIP4P-FQ fluctuating charge water force field of Rick et al.(1) that self-consistently adjusts its atomic hardness parameters via a scaling function dependent on the M-site charge. The electronegativity (χ) parameters are also scaled in order to reproduce condensed-phase dipole moments of comparable magnitude to TIP4P-FQ. TIP4P-QDP is parameterized to reproduce experimental gas-phase and select condensed-phase properties. The TIP4P-QDP water model possesses a gas phase polarizability of 1.40 Å(3) and gas-phase dipole moment of 1.85 Debye, in excellent agreement with experiment and high-level ab initio predictions. The liquid density of TIP4P-QDP is 0.9954(±0.0002) g/cm(3) at 298 K and 1 atmosphere, and the enthalpy of vaporization is 10.55(±0.12) kcal/mol. Other condensed-phase properties such as the isobaric heat capacity, isothermal compressibility, and diffusion constant are also calculated within reasonable accuracy of experiment and consistent with predictions of other current state-of-the-art water force fields. The average molecular dipole moment of TIP4P-QDP in the condensed phase is 2.641(±0.001) Debye, approximately 0.02 Debye higher than TIP4P-FQ and within the range of values currently surmised for the bulk liquid. The dielectric constant, ε = 85.8 ± 1.0, is 10% higher than experiment. This is reasoned to be due to the increase in the condensed phase dipole moment over TIP4P-FQ, which estimates ε remarkably well. Radial distribution functions for TIP4P-QDP and TIP4P-FQ show similar features, with TIP4P-QDP showing slightly reduced peak heights and subtle shifts towards larger distance interactions. Since the greatest effects of the phase-dependent polarizability are

  14. Water Vapor Effects on Silica-Forming Ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opila, E. J.; Greenbauer-Seng, L. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Silica-forming ceramics such as SiC and Si3N4 are proposed for applications in combustion environments. These environments contain water vapor as a product of combustion. Oxidation of silica-formers is more rapid in water vapor than in oxygen. Parabolic oxidation rates increase with the water vapor partial pressure with a power law exponent value close to one. Molecular water vapor is therefore the mobile species in silica. Rapid oxidation rates and large amounts of gases generated during the oxidation reaction in high water vapor pressures may result in bubble formation in the silica and nonprotective scale formation. It is also shown that silica reacts with water vapor to form Si(OH)4(g). Silica volatility has been modeled using a laminar flow boundary layer controlled reaction equation. Silica volatility depends on the partial pressure of water vapor, the total pressure, and the gas velocity. Simultaneous oxidation and volatilization reactions have been modeled with paralinear kinetics.

  15. Final report on "Modeling Diurnal Variations of California Land Biosphere CO2 Fluxes"

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fung, Inez

    2014-07-28

    In Mediterranean climates, the season of water availability (winter) is out of phase with the season of light availability and atmospheric demand for moisture (summer). Multi-year half-hourly observations of sap flow velocities in 26 evergreen trees in a small watershed in Northern California show that different species of evergreen trees have different seasonalities of transpiration: Douglas-firs respond immediately to the first winter rain, while Pacific madrones have peak transpiration in the dry summer. Using these observations, we have derived species-specific parameterization of normalized sap flow velocities in terms of insolation, vapor pressure deficit and near-surface soil moisture. A simple 1-D boundary layer model showed that afternoon temperatures may be higher by 1 degree Celsius in an area with Douglas-firs than with Pacific madrones. The results point to the need to develop a new representation of subsurface moisture, in particular pools beneath the organic soil mantle and the vadose zone. Our ongoing and future work includes coupling our new parameterization of transpiration with new representation of sub-surface moisture in saprolite and weathered bedrock. The results will be implemented in a regional climate model to explore vegetation-climate feedbacks, especially in the dry season.

  16. Vaporizers for medical marijuana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirken, B

    1999-09-17

    A major concern about the medical use of marijuana is the harmful effects that come from smoking it. Vaporizers are designed to release the active ingredients in marijuana without burning it, and therefore do not release the harmful substances found in the marijuana smoke. The Institute of Medicine recommends against the long-term medical use of smoked marijuana because of carcinogens and other chemicals in the smoke. Several vaporizers are on the market, but they have not been tested in the laboratory yet. A review of two vaporizers is given. Contact information is provided.

  17. Second Vapor-Level Sensor For Vapor Degreaser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Painter, Nance M.; Burley, Richard K.

    1990-01-01

    Second vapor-level sensor installed at lower level in vapor degreaser makes possible to maintain top of vapor at that lower level. Evaporation reduced during idle periods. Provides substantial benefit, without major capital cost of building new vapor degreaser with greater freeboard height.

  18. The failure of the Penman-Monteith equation in explaining leaf transpiration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schymanski, Stanislaus J.; Or, Dani

    2016-04-01

    The vast majority of current global land surface models, hydrological models and inverse approaches to deduce evaporation from remote sensing data employ an analytical solution for the latent heat flux from plant leaves derived by Monteith (1965), based on an earlier formulation for a wet surface by Penman (1948). This so-called Penman-Monteith (PM) equation was most commonly evaluated at the canopy scale, where aerodynamic and canopy resistance to water vapour are difficult to estimate, leading to various empirical corrections when scaling from leaf to canopy. Here we evaluated the PM equation directly at the leaf scale, using a controlled, insulated wind tunnel and artificial leaves with pre-defined stomatal conductance. Experimental results were consistent with a detailed leaf energy balance model, but we measured consistent deviations from PM-predicted fluxes, which pointed to fundamental problems with the PM equation. Detailed analysis of the derivation by Monteith (1965) and later amendments revealed inconsistencies concerning the effect of stomata and the two-sided exchange of sensible heat. A corrected set of analytical solutions for leaf temperature as well as latent and sensible heat flux is presented and comparison with the original PM equation indicates a major improvement in reproducing experimental results at the leaf scale. The inconsistencies in the original PM equation and its failure to reproduce experimental results at the leaf scale (for which it was originally derived) lets us conclude that the PM equation does not constitute an accurate representation of atmospheric forcing on transpiration and should be regarded as a semi-empirical equation.

  19. Vapor-liquid, liquid-liquid and vapor-liquid-liquid equilibrium of binary and multicomponent systems with MEG modeling with the CPA EoS and an EoS/G(E) model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Folas, Georgios; Kontogeorgis, Georgios; Michelsen, Michael Locht

    2006-01-01

    The cubic-plus-association (CPA) EoS is applied to multicomponent multiphase equilibria of systems containing MEG as a hydrate inhibitor. It is shown that the model provides very satisfactory prediction of the phase behavior for the systems tested. A more conventional engineering model for handli...

  20. Vapor Control Layer Recommendations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2009-09-08

    This information sheet describes the level of vapor control required on the interior side of framed walls with typical fibrous cavity insulation (fibreglass, rockwool, or cellulose, based on DOE climate zone of construction.

  1. Gasoline Reid Vapor Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA regulates the vapor pressure of gasoline sold at retail stations during the summer ozone season to reduce evaporative emissions from gasoline that contribute to ground-level ozone and diminish the effects of ozone-related health problems.

  2. The impact of data assimilation of ground-based GPS precipitable water vapor to numerical weather prediction model on estimation of ray-traced atmospheric slant delays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichikawa, R.; Hobiger, T.; Shoji, Y.; Miyauchi, Y.

    2012-12-01

    The ''KAshima RAytracing Tools (KARAT)'' is capable of calculating total slant delays and ray-bending angles considering real atmospheric phenomena. One advantage of KARAT is that the reduction of atmospheric path delay will become more accurate each time the numerical weather model is improved. On October 27, 2009 the JMA started data assimilation of zenith wet delays obtained by the GPS Earth Observation Network System (GEONET) operated by Geospatial Information Authority of Japan (GSI) for meso-scale NWP model. The improved NWP model data assimilating the GPS PWV data has the potential to correct the atmospheric path delay more precisely. Meteorological Research Institute (MRI) of Japan has evaluated the impact of ground-based GPS precipitable water vapor (GPS PWV) derived from the GEONET on meso-scale NWP model under the localized heavy rainfall event in Tokyo, Japan on 5 August 2008. A terrific thunderstorm occurred across the Kanto area of Japan, and it caused flooding in downtown Tokyo. During the event, the rainfall intensity increased to over 100 mm per hour within thirty minutes. We have assessed the impacts of GPS PWV assimilation into the NWP model on the KARAT correction by comparisons of the precise point positioning (PPP) solutions. In the nationwide scale of Japan, the short time repeatability of the PPP results for both horizontal and height positions applying KARAT correction through the MRI NWP model with GPS PWV assimilation are about several percent better than that through the conventional MRI NPW model w/o GPS PWV assimilation. In addition we are now investigating the impact of GPS PWV data assimilation in more detail. We will present the updated results of the comparison study.

  3. Chemical agent simulant release from clothing following vapor exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldman, Robert J

    2010-02-01

    Most ambulatory victims of a terrorist chemical attack will have exposure to vapor only. The study objective was to measure the duration of chemical vapor release from various types of clothing. A chemical agent was simulated using methyl salicylate (MeS), which has similar physical properties to sulfur mustard and was the agent used in the U.S. Army's Man-In-Simulant Test (MIST). Vapor concentration was measured with a Smiths Detection Advanced Portable Detector (APD)-2000 unit. The clothing items were exposed to vapor for 1 hour in a sealed cabinet; vapor concentration was measured at the start and end of each exposure. Clothing was then removed and assessed every 5 minutes with the APD-2000, using a uniform sweep pattern, until readings remained 0. Concentration and duration of vapor release from clothing varied with clothing composition and construction. Lightweight cotton shirts and jeans had the least trapped vapor; down outerwear, the most. Vapor concentration near the clothing often increased for several minutes after the clothing was removed from the contaminated environment. Compression of thick outerwear released additional vapor. Mean times to reach 0 ranged from 7 minutes for jeans to 42 minutes for down jackets. This simulation model of chemical vapor release demonstrates persistent presence of simulant vapor over time. This implies that chemical vapor may be released from the victims' clothing after they are evacuated from the site of exposure, resulting in additional exposure of victims and emergency responders. Insulated outerwear can release additional vapor when handled. If a patient has just moved to a vapor screening point, immediate assessment before additional vapor can be released from the clothing can lead to a false-negative assessment of contamination.

  4. HESS Opinions "a perspective on isotope versus non-isotope approaches to determine the contribution of transpiration to total evaporation"

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sutanto, S. J.; Van Den Hurk, B.; Dirmeyer, P. A.; Seneviratne, S. I.; Röckmann, T.; Trenberth, K. E.; Blyth, E. M.; Wenninger, J.; Hoffmann, G.

    2014-01-01

    Current techniques to disentangle the evaporative fluxes from the continental surface into a contribution evaporated from soils and canopy, or transpired by plants, are under debate. Many isotope-based studies show that transpiration contributes generally more than 70% to the total evaporation,

  5. How soil moisture mediates the influence of transpiration on streamflow at hourly to interannual scales in a forested catchment

    Science.gov (United States)

    G.W. Moore; J.A. Jones; B.J. Bond

    2011-01-01

    The water balance equation dictates that streamflow may be reduced by transpiration. Yet temporal disequilibrium weakens the relationship between transpiration and streamflow in many cases where inputs and outputs are unbalanced. We address two critical knowledge barriers in ecohydrology with respect to time, scale dependence and lags. Study objectives were to...

  6. The effects of environmental factors on the transpiration of leaves, with special reference to stomatal light response

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuiper, P.J.C.

    1961-01-01

    The transpiration of cut leaves (bean, tomato, Hyoscyamus ) in potometers was studied as affected by light intensity, leaf temperature and air humidity, with special attention to stomatal light response. Fick's diffusion law could be applied to evaporation of water and to transpiration of

  7. Steady state or non-steady state? Identifying driving mechanisms of oxygen isotope signatures of leaf transpiration in functionally distinct plant species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubbert, Maren; Kübert, Angelika; Cuntz, Matthias; Werner, Christiane

    2015-04-01

    Isotope techniques are widely applied in ecosystem studies. For example, isoflux models are used to separate soil evaporation from transpiration in ecosystems. These models often assume that plant transpiration occurs at isotopic steady state, i.e. that the transpired water shows the same isotopic signature as the source water. Yet, several studies found that transpiration did not occur at isotopic steady state, under both controlled and field conditions. Here we focused on identifying the internal and external factors which drive the isotopic signature of leaf transpiration. Using cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS), the effect of both environmental variables and leaf physiological traits on δ18OT was investigated under controlled conditions. Six plant species with distinct leaf physiological traits were exposed to step changes in relative air humidity (RH), their response in δ18OT and gas exchange parameters and their leaf physiological traits were assessed. Moreover, two functionally distinct plant types (tree, i.e. Quercus suber, and grassland) of a semi-arid Mediterranean oak-woodland where observed under natural conditions throughout an entire growth period in the field. The species differed substantially in their leaf physiological traits and their turn-over times of leaf water. They could be grouped in species with fast (240 min.) turn-over times, mostly due to differences in stomatal conductance, leaf water content or a combination of both. Changes in RH caused an immediate response in δ18OT, which were similarly strong in all species, while leaf physiological traits affected the subsequent response in δ18OT. The turn-over time of leaf water determined the speed of return to the isotopic steady or a stable δ18OT value (Dubbert & Kübert et al., in prep.). Under natural conditions, changes in environmental conditions over the diurnal cycle had a huge impact on the diurnal development of δ18OT in both observed plant functional types. However, in

  8. Development and evaluation of the NSSS model with four steam lines for the LVNP using the SCDAPSIM code; Desarrollo y evaluacion del modelo del NSSS con cuatro lineas de vapor para la CNLV utilizando el codigo SCDAPSIM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salazar C, J.H.; Nunez C, A.; Camargo C, R. [CNSNS, Dr. Barragan No. 779, Col. Narvarte, 03020 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2005-07-01

    The present work shows the pattern of the NSSS considering the four main vapor lines as well as their evaluation. The pattern was developed by the National Commission of Nuclear Security and Safeguards (CNSNS) and it has as main objective to account with a model of the Laguna Verde Nuclear power plant (CNLV) for the simulation and analysis of transitory events where are involved some of main vapor lines, or some relief valves and safety (SRV's). The model was evaluated with data of the CNLV. In 1996 the Federal Commission of Electricity (CFE) request to the CNSNS permission to operate the Unit 2 until the first recharge, having the main vapor line 'B' isolated and operating with a level of power corresponding to a flow of total vapor of 85% of the nominal one (of 1931 MWt). The obtained values were compared with the obtained registrations of the CNLV in order to evaluate the model. Those results show relative errors inferior to 3% among the CNLV reported value and the one calculated by the SCDAPSIM code. (Author)

  9. Modeling the fine fragmentation following the triggering stage of a vapor explosion; Modelisation de la fragmentaton fine lors de la phase de declenchement d`une explosion de vapeur

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Darbord, I. [CEA Grenoble, 38 (France). Service d`Etudes et de Modelisation Thermohydraulique

    1997-06-11

    In the frame of PWR severe accidents, where the core melt, this thesis studies one of the stages of an FCI (fuel coolant interaction) or vapor explosion. An FCI is a rapid evaporation of a coolant when it comes into contact with a hot liquid. More precisely, the subject of this study is the triggering stage of the FCI, when a fuel drop of diameter around one centimeter breaks up into many fragments, diameter of which is around a hundred micrometers. The model describes the cyclic collapse and growth of a vapor bubble around the fuel droplet and its fragmentation. The main features of the model are: - the destabilization of the film or the vapor bubble due to the growth of Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities (those form coolant jets that contact the fuel surface); - The mechanisms of fragmentation, following the contacts (in the case of entrapment of a certain amount of coolant in the fuel, the entrapped coolant evaporates violently after it has been heated to the homogeneous nucleation temperature); - the transient heat transfer from the fragments to the coolant and the elevated vapor production, which leads to an important expansion of the bubble (about this point, the cooling of the fragments has been described by a transient heat transfer coefficient linked to nucleate boiling). The results of the model show good agreement with experimental data. (Author) 68 refs.

  10. Determination of Cannabinoid Vapor Pressures to Aid in Vapor Phase Detection of Intoxication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovestead, Tara M; Bruno, Thomas J

    2017-09-01

    The quest for a reliable means to detect cannabis intoxication with a breathalyzer is ongoing. To design such a device, it is important to understand the fundamental thermodynamics of the compounds of interest. The vapor pressures of two important cannabinoids, cannabidiol (CBD) and Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ9-THC), are presented, as well as the predicted normal boiling temperature (NBT) and the predicted critical constants (these predictions are dependent on the vapor pressure data). The critical constants are typically necessary to develop an equation of state (EOS). EOS-based models can provide estimations of thermophysical properties for compounds to aid in designing processes and devices. An ultra-sensitive, quantitative, trace dynamic headspace analysis sampling called porous layered open tubular-cryoadsorption (PLOT-cryo) was used to measure vapor pressures of these compounds. PLOT-cryo affords short experiment durations compared to more traditional techniques for vapor pressure determination (minutes versus days). Additionally, PLOT-cryo has the inherent ability to stabilize labile solutes because collection is done at reduced temperature. The measured vapor pressures are approximately 2 orders of magnitude lower than those measured for n-eicosane, which has a similar molecular mass. Thus, the difference in polarity of these molecules must be impacting the vapor pressure dramatically. The vapor pressure measurements are presented in the form of Clausius-Clapeyron (or van't Hoff) equation plots. The predicted vapor pressures that would be expected at near ambient conditions (25 °C) are also presented.

  11. Water Vapor Corrosion in EBC Constituent Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalski, Benjamin; Fox, Dennis; Jacobson, Nathan S.

    2017-01-01

    Environmental Barrier Coating (EBC) materials are sought after to protect ceramic matrix composites (CMC) in high temperature turbine engines. CMCs are particularly susceptible to degradation from oxidation, Ca-Al-Mg-Silicate (CMAS), and water vapor during high temperature operation which necessitates the use of EBCs. However, the work presented here focuses on water vapor induced recession in EBC constituent materials. For example, in the presence of water vapor, silica will react to form Si(OH)4 (g) which will eventually corrode the material away. To investigate the recession rate in EBC constituent materials under high temperature water vapor conditions, thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA) is employed. The degradation process can then be modeled through a simple boundary layer expression. Ultimately, comparisons are made between various single- and poly-crystalline materials (e.g. TiO2, SiO2) against those found in literature.

  12. COMPARATIVE COMPUTATIONAL MODELING OF AIRFLOWS AND VAPOR DOSIMETY IN THE RESPIRATORY TRACTS OF RAT, MONKEY, AND HUMAN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corley, Richard A.; Kabilan, Senthil; Kuprat, Andrew P.; Carson, James P.; Minard, Kevin R.; Jacob, Rick E.; Timchalk, Charles; Glenny, Robb W.; Pipavath, Sudhaker; Cox, Timothy C.; Wallis, Chris; Larson, Richard; Fanucchi, M.; Postlewait, Ed; Einstein, Daniel R.

    2012-07-01

    Coupling computational fluid dynamics (CFD) with physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models is useful for predicting site-specific dosimetry of airborne materials in the respiratory tract and elucidating the importance of species differences in anatomy, physiology, and breathing patterns. Historically, these models were limited to discrete regions of the respiratory system. CFD/PBPK models have now been developed for the rat, monkey, and human that encompass airways from the nose or mouth to the lung. A PBPK model previously developed to describe acrolein uptake in nasal tissues was adapted to the extended airway models as an example application. Model parameters for each anatomic region were obtained from the literature, measured directly, or estimated from published data. Airflow and site-specific acrolein uptake patterns were determined under steadystate inhalation conditions to provide direct comparisons with prior data and nasalonly simulations. Results confirmed that regional uptake was dependent upon airflow rates and acrolein concentrations with nasal extraction efficiencies predicted to be greatest in the rat, followed by the monkey, then the human. For human oral-breathing simulations, acrolein uptake rates in oropharyngeal and laryngeal tissues were comparable to nasal tissues following nasal breathing under the same exposure conditions. For both breathing modes, higher uptake rates were predicted for lower tracheo-bronchial tissues of humans than either the rat or monkey. These extended airway models provide a unique foundation for comparing dosimetry across a significantly more extensive range of conducting airways in the rat, monkey, and human than prior CFD models.

  13. Modeling the vapor-liquid equilibria of polymer-solvent mixtures: Systems with complex hydrogen bonding behavior

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tsivintzelis, Ioannis; Kontogeorgis, Georgios

    2009-01-01

    The vapor–liquid equilibria of binary polymer–solvent systems was modeled using the Non-Random Hydrogen Bonding (NRHB) model. Mixtures of poly(ethylene glycol), poly(propylene glycol), poly(vinyl alcohol) and poly(vinyl acetate) with various solvents were investigated, while emphasis was put on h...

  14. Determination of Ti+-flux and Ar+-flux of ionized physical vapor deposition of titanium from multiscale model calibration with test structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, W.; Kersch, A.; Ruf, A.; Urbansky, N.

    2003-07-01

    In this article we determine physical parameters characterizing the ionized physical vapor deposition of titanium in a Hollow Cathode Magnetron by comparing experimental results obtained from suitable submicron test structures with a multiscale model. The model includes the reactor scale, the plasma sheath and presheath scale, and the feature scale. The reactor scale model delivers the energy and angular distribution of the neutral sputtered particles from the reactor geometry and an energy dependent collision model. The sheath and presheath model calculates the energy and angular distribution of the ions from the reactor model and a subsequent scattering model describes collisions in the presence of magnetic fields. The levelset-based feature scale simulator propagates the front according to local growth velocities which are calculated from Monte Carlo particle flux and reaction kinetics (derived from molecular dynamics calculation). The calibration is performed in two steps with help from bottle-shaped test structures as well as technologically relevant structures. First, hi-fill and ultra-hi-fill magnetron sputter processes of titanium are investigated in order to verify the transport model for the neutral particles. Second, a Hollow Cathode Magnetron sputter process of titanium is analyzed in order to verify the transport model for postionized particles. This analysis is performed for a floating substrate process and a process with rf-driven substrate bias. The postionized flux fraction of titanium in this technology is not calculated from a plasma model but treated as a free parameter. The prediction of the model and the comparison with the experimental data allow us to determine this value as 0.7+/-0.1 under a standard condition. The ionized flux of argon relative to the ionized flux of titanium is determined as 2. The results show that the bottom and sidewall coverage of the process depends significantly on the angular dependence of the ionized component

  15. Influence of irrigation and fertilization on transpiration and hydraulic properties of Populus deltoides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisa J. Samuelson; Thomas A. Stokes; Mark D. Coleman

    2007-01-01

    Long-term hydraulic acclimation to resource availability was explored in 3-year-old Populus deltoides Bartr. ex Marsh. clones by examining transpiration. leaf-specific hydraulic conductance (GL), canopy stomatal conductance (Gs) and leaf to sapwood area ratio (AL:Asi)n response to irrigation (13 and 551 mm in addition to ambient precipitation) and...

  16. Transpiration response of upland rice to water deficit changed by different levels of eucalyptus biochar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rogério Gomes Pereira

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to evaluate the effect of eucalyptus biochar on the transpiration rate of upland rice 'BRSMG Curinga' as an alternative means to decrease the effect of water stress on plant growth and development. Two-pot experiments were carried out using a completely randomized block design, in a split-plot arrangement, with six replicates. Main plots were water stress (WS and no-water stress (NWS, and the subplots were biochar doses at 0, 6, 12 and 24% in growing medium (sand. Total transpirable soil water (TTSW, the p factor - defined as the average fraction of TTSW which can be depleted from the root zone before water stress limits growth -, and the normalized transpiration rate (NTR were determined. Biochar addition increased TTSW and the p factor, and reduced NTR. Consequently, biochar addition was able to change the moisture threshold (p factor of the growing medium, up to 12% maximum concentration, delaying the point where transpiration declines and affects yield.

  17. Athletic field paint color impacts transpiration and canopy temperature in bermudagrass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Athletic field paints have varying impacts on turfgrass health which have been linked to their ability to alter photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) and photosynthesis based on color. It was further hypothesized they may also alter transpiration and canopy temperature by disrupting gas exchange...

  18. Differential effect of transpiration and Ca supply on growth and Ca concentration of tomato plants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amor, del F.M.; Marcelis, L.F.M.

    2006-01-01

    To determine the extent to which transpiration and Ca concentration in the nutrient solution affect the regulation of growth, two independent experiments with young tomato plants were carried out under fully controlled climate conditions and grown hydroponically. The first experiment consisted of

  19. Effect of solar loading on greenhouse containers used in transpiration efficiency screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Earlier we described a simple high throughput method of screening sorghum for transpiration efficiency (TE). Subsequently it was observed that while results were consistent between lines exhibiting high and low TE, ranking between lines with similar TE was variable. We hypothesized that variable mic...

  20. Minimizing instrumentation requirement for estimating crop water stress index and transpiration of maize

    Science.gov (United States)

    Research was conducted in northern Colorado in 2011 to estimate the Crop Water Stress Index (CWSI) and actual water transpiration (Ta) of maize under a range of irrigation regimes. The main goal was to obtain these parameters with minimum instrumentation and measurements. The results confirmed that ...

  1. The Precise Measurement of Vapor-Liquid Equilibrium Properties of the CO2/Isopentane Binary Mixture, and Fitted Parameters for a Helmholtz Energy Mixture Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyamoto, H.; Shoji, Y.; Akasaka, R.; Lemmon, E. W.

    2017-10-01

    Natural working fluid mixtures, including combinations of CO2, hydrocarbons, water, and ammonia, are expected to have applications in energy conversion processes such as heat pumps and organic Rankine cycles. However, the available literature data, much of which were published between 1975 and 1992, do not incorporate the recommendations of the Guide to the Expression of Uncertainty in Measurement. Therefore, new and more reliable thermodynamic property measurements obtained with state-of-the-art technology are required. The goal of the present study was to obtain accurate vapor-liquid equilibrium (VLE) properties for complex mixtures based on two different gases with significant variations in their boiling points. Precise VLE data were measured with a recirculation-type apparatus with a 380 cm3 equilibration cell and two windows allowing observation of the phase behavior. This cell was equipped with recirculating and expansion loops that were immersed in temperature-controlled liquid and air baths, respectively. Following equilibration, the composition of the sample in each loop was ascertained by gas chromatography. VLE data were acquired for CO2/ethanol and CO2/isopentane binary mixtures within the temperature range from 300 K to 330 K and at pressures up to 7 MPa. These data were used to fit interaction parameters in a Helmholtz energy mixture model. Comparisons were made with the available literature data and values calculated by thermodynamic property models.

  2. Constraining Ecosystem Gross Primary Production and Transpiration with Measurements of Photosynthetic 13CO2 Discrimination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blonquist, J. M.; Wingate, L.; Ogeé, J.; Bowling, D. R.

    2011-12-01

    The stable carbon isotope composition of atmospheric CO2 (δ13Ca) can provide useful information on water use efficiency (WUE) dynamics of terrestrial ecosystems and potentially constrain models of CO2 and water fluxes at the land surface. This is due to the leaf-level relationship between photosynthetic 13CO2 discrimination (Δ), which influences δ13Ca, and the ratio of leaf intercellular to atmospheric CO2 mole fractions (Ci / Ca), which is related to WUE and is determined by the balance between C assimilation (CO2 demand) and stomatal conductance (CO2 supply). We used branch-scale Δ derived from tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy measurements collected in a Maritime pine forest to estimate Ci / Ca variations over an entire growing season. We combined Ci / Ca estimates with rates of gross primary production (GPP) derived from eddy covariance (EC) to estimate canopy-scale stomatal conductance (Gs) and transpiration (T). Estimates of T were highly correlated to T estimates derived from sapflow data (y = 1.22x + 0.08; r2 = 0.61; slope P MuSICA) (y = 0.88x - 0.05; r2 = 0.64; slope P MuSICA (y = 1.10 + 0.42; r2 = 0.50; slope P < 0.001). Results demonstrate that the leaf-level relationship between Δ and Ci / Ca can be extended to the canopy-scale and that Δ measurements have utility for partitioning ecosystem-scale CO2 and water fluxes.

  3. Do hydraulic redistribution and nocturnal transpiration facilitate nutrient acquisition in Aspalathus linearis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matimati, Ignatious; Verboom, G Anthony; Cramer, Michael D

    2014-08-01

    The significance of soil water redistribution by roots and nocturnal transpiration for nutrient acquisition were assessed for deep-rooted 3-year-old leguminous Aspalathus linearis shrubs of the Cape Floristic Region (South Africa). We hypothesised that hydraulic redistribution and nocturnal transpiration facilitate nutrient acquisition by releasing moisture in shallow soil to enable acquisition of shallow-soil nutrients during the summer drought periods and by driving water fluxes from deep to shallow soil powering mass-flow nutrient acquisition, respectively. A. linearis was supplied with sub-surface (1-m-deep) irrigation rates of 0, 2 or 4 L day(-1 )plant(-1). Some plants were unfertilized, whilst others were surface- or deep-fertilized (1 m depth) with Na(15)NO3 and CaP/FePO4. We also supplied deuterium oxide ((2)H2O) at 1 m depth at dusk and measured its predawn redistribution to shallow soil and plant stems. Hydraulic redistribution of deep water was substantial across all treatments, accounting for 34-72 % of surface-soil predawn moisture. Fourteen days after fertilization, the surface-fertilized plants exhibited increased hydraulic redistribution and increased (15)N and P acquisition with higher rates of deep-irrigation. Deep-fertilization also increased hydraulic redistribution to surface soils, although these plants additionally accumulated (2)H2O in their stem tissue overnight, probably due to nocturnal transpiration. Plants engaged in nocturnal transpiration also increased (15)N and P acquisition from deep fertilizer sources. Thus, both nocturnal transpiration and hydraulic redistribution increased acquisition of shallow soil N and P, possibly through a combination of increased nutrient availability and mobility.

  4. Spatial Variation in Transpiration Within a Small Forest Patch in Hoa Binh, Northern Vietnam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giambelluca, T. W.; Ziegler, A. D.; Nullet, M. A.; Dao, T. M.

    2001-12-01

    We conducted measurements of small-scale variations in microclimate and sapflow within and near a small forest patch in Ban Tat Hamlet, Hoa Binh, northern Vietnam. Our observations provide evidence of the influences of surrounding clearings on forest patch microclimate and transpiration. The effects of proximity to the forest edge can be seen in the gradients in temperature, humidity, wind, and soil moisture content. Sapflow measurements in sample trees strongly indicate that transpiration rates are higher near the edge of the patch (edge effect). This effect is seen in the averages for the whole study period, despite infrequent wind flow into the instrumented edge of the patch. Edge effect is observed during both dry and wet periods, but is most apparent on days when solar and net radiation are high, relative humidity is low, or wind direction is from the clearing into the forest edge. These conditions are conducive to high positive heat advection from the clearing to the forest edge. Transpiration in both edge and interior trees is highly correlated with conditions in the clearing. Our results suggest that greater land-cover fragmentation tends to increase regional evaporative flux, i.e. fragmentation of remaining forested areas partly reverses the reduction in regional evaporation due to deforestation. We can infer from the distance-to-edge dependency of transpiration that the magnitude of this regional effect depends on the size, shape, and spatial distribution of landscape patches. It is also likely that the replacement land cover and moisture status of the clearings affect this process. Although we found slightly greater edge effect during the dry period of our observations, it is possible that under more prolonged or severe dry conditions, the soil moisture storage at the forest edge would become depleted leading to a reversal the transpiration pattern. >http://webdata.soc.hawaii.edu/climate/Frags/Frags.html

  5. A study of 2014 record drought in India with CFSv2 model: role of water vapor transport

    KAUST Repository

    Ramakrishna, S. S. V. S.

    2016-09-16

    The Indian summer monsoon season of 2014 was erratic and ended up with a seasonal rainfall deficit of 12 % and a record drought in June. In this study we analyze the moisture transport characteristics for the monsoon season of 2014 using both NCEP FNL reanalysis (FNL) and CFSv2 (CFS) model data. In FNL, in June 2014 there was a large area of divergence of moisture flux. In other months also there was lesser flux. This probably is the cause of 2014 drought. The CFS model overestimated the drought and it reproduces poorly the observed rainfall over central India (65E–95E; 5N–35N). The correlation coefficient (CC) between the IMD observed rainfall and CFS model rainfall is only 0.1 while the CC between rainfall and moisture flux convergence in CFS model is only 0.20 and with FNL data −0.78. This clearly shows that the CFS model has serious difficulty in reproducing the moisture flux convergence and rainfall. We found that the rainfall variations are strongly related to the moisture convergence or divergence. The hypothesis of Krishnamurti et al. (J Atmos Sci 67:3423–3441, 2010) namely the intrusion of west African desert air and the associated low convective available potential energy inhibiting convection and rainfall shows some promise to explain dry spells in Indian summer monsoon. However, the rainfall or lack of it is mainly explained by convergence or divergence of moisture flux. © 2016 Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg

  6. Controls on water vapor isotopes over Roorkee, India: Impact of convective activities and depression systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saranya, P.; Krishan, Gopal; Rao, M. S.; Kumar, Sudhir; Kumar, Bhishm

    2018-02-01

    The study evaluates the water vapor isotopic compositions and its controls with special reference to Indian Summer Monsoon (ISM) season at Roorkee, India. Precipitation is usually a discrete event spatially and temporally in this part of the country, therefore, the information provided is limited, while, the vapors have all time availability and have a significant contribution in the hydrological cycle locally or over a regional scale. Hence for understanding the processes altering the various sources, its isotopic signatures were studied. The Isotope Water Vapour Line (Iso Val) was drawn together with the Global Meteoric Water Line (GMWL) and the best fit line was δD = 5.42 * δ18O + 27.86. The precipitation samples were also collected during the study period and were best fitted with δD = 8.20(±0.18) * δ18O + 9.04(±1.16) in the Local Meteoric Water Line (LMWL). From the back trajectory analysis of respective vapor samples, it is unambiguous that three major sources viz; local vapor, western disturbance and monsoon vapor are controlling the fate of moisture over Roorkee. The d-excess in ground-level vapor (GLV) reveals the supply of recycled moisture from continental water bodies and evapo-transpiration as additional moisture sources to the study area. The intensive depletion in isotopic ratios was associated with the large-scale convective activity and low-pressure/cyclonic/depression systems formed over Bay of Bengal.

  7. Computing Carbon Dioxide and Water Vapor Fluxes Everywhere, All of the Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldocchi, D. D.; Ryu, Y.; Kobayashi, H.

    2011-12-01

    We examine a hierarchy of biophysical models which aim to produce information on the 'breathing of the biosphere' that is 'everywhere, all of the time'. The computational demands of this problem are daunting because the science must transcend fourteen orders of magnitude in time and space as one evaluates a panoply of non-linear biophysical processes from the dimension of the chloroplast of leaves to the globe. At the canopy to landscape scales, one must simulate the micro-habitat conditions of thousands of leaves, as they are displayed on groups of plants with a variety of angle orientations. Then one must apply the micro-habitat information (e.g. sunlight, temperature, humidity, CO2 concentration) to sets of coupled non-linear equations that simulate photosynthesis, respiration and the energy balance of the leaves to add up this information. In sparse canopies three-dimensional radiative transfer models are needed. At the regional to global scales, it is pertinent to apply lessons learned at the canopy scale and drive a system of biophysical equations, called the Breathing-Earth Science Simulator (BESS), with multiple layers of remote sensing datasets at high resolution (1 km) and frequent intervals (daily) to predict carbon dioxide and water vapor exchange. And parameterize these models with emerging ecological rules that can be assessed with remote sensing. With BESS, the global data products of ecosystem photosynthesis and transpiration compare well with direct flux measurements, and produce complex spatial and temporal patterns that will prove to be valuable for environmental modelers and scientists studying climate change and carbon and water cycles from local to global scales.

  8. Effects of air current speed, light intensity and co2 concentration on photosynthesis and transpiration of plant leaves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitaya, Y.; Tsuruyama, J.; Shibuya, T.; Kiyota, M.

    To obtain basic data for adequate air circulation to promote gas exchange and growth of plants in closed plant culture modules in bioregenerative life support systems in space, the effects of air current speeds less than 0.8 m s-1 on transpiration (Tr) and net photosynthetic rates (Pn) of sweetpotato and barley leaves were determined using a leaf chamber method under different photosynthetic photon flux densities (PPFDs) and CO_2 concentrations. The air current speed inside the leaf chamber was controlled by controlling the input voltages for an air circulation fan. The leaf surface boundary layer resistance was determined by the evaporation rate of wet paper and the water vapor pressure difference between the paper and surrounding air in the leaf chamber. The Tr and Pn of leaves rapidly increased as the air current speed increased from 0.01 to 0.1 m s-1 and gradually increased from 0.1 to 0.8 m s-1. These changes are correspondent to the change of the leaf surface boundary layer resistance. The depression of Tr by low air current speeds was greater than that of Pn. Tr and Pn decreased by 0.5 and 0.7 times, respectively, as the air current speed decreased from 0.8 to 0.01 m s-1. The depressions of Tr and Pn by low air current speeds were most notable at PPFDs of 500 and 250 μmol m-2 s-1, respectively. The air current speeds affected Tr and Pn at a CO_2 concentration of 700 μmol mol-1 as well as at 400 μmol mol-1. The results confirmed the importance of controlling air movement for enhancing Tr and Pn under the relatively high PPFD and elevated CO_2 levels likely in plant culture systems in space.

  9. The liquid to vapor phase transition in excited nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elliott, J.B.; Moretto, L.G.; Phair, L.; Wozniak, G.J.; Beaulieu, L.; Breuer, H.; Korteling, R.G.; Kwiatkowski, K.; Lefort, T.; Pienkowski, L.; Ruangma, A.; Viola, V.E.; Yennello, S.J.

    2001-05-08

    For many years it has been speculated that excited nuclei would undergo a liquid to vapor phase transition. For even longer, it has been known that clusterization in a vapor carries direct information on the liquid-vapor equilibrium according to Fisher's droplet model. Now the thermal component of the 8 GeV/c pion + 197 Au multifragmentation data of the ISiS Collaboration is shown to follow the scaling predicted by Fisher's model, thus providing the strongest evidence yet of the liquid to vapor phase transition.

  10. Bioeffects due to acoustic droplet vaporization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bull, Joseph

    2015-11-01

    Encapsulated micro- and nano-droplets can be vaporized via ultrasound, a process termed acoustic droplet vaporization. Our interest is primarily motivated by a developmental gas embolotherapy technique for cancer treatment. In this methodology, infarction of tumors is induced by selectively formed vascular gas bubbles that arise from the acoustic vaporization of vascular microdroplets. Additionally, the microdroplets may be used as vehicles for localized drug delivery, with or without flow occlusion. In this talk, we examine the dynamics of acoustic droplet vaporization through experiments and theoretical/computational fluid mechanics models, and investigate the bioeffects of acoustic droplet vaporization on endothelial cells and in vivo. Early timescale vaporization events, including phase change, are directly visualized using ultra-high speed imaging, and the influence of acoustic parameters on droplet/bubble dynamics is discussed. Acoustic and fluid mechanics parameters affecting the severity of endothelial cell bioeffects are explored. These findings suggest parameter spaces for which bioeffects may be reduced or enhanced, depending on the objective of the therapy. This work was supported by NIH grant R01EB006476.

  11. Fuel Vaporization Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosque, M. A.

    1983-01-01

    A study of the effects of fuel-air preparation characteristics on combustor performance and emissions at temperature and pressure ranges representative of actual gas turbine combustors is discussed. The effect of flameholding devices on the vaporization process and NOx formation is discussed. Flameholder blockage and geometry are some of the elements that affect the recirculation zone characteristics and subsequently alter combustion stability, emissions and performance. A water cooled combustor is used as the test rig. Preheated air and Jet A fuel are mixed at the entrance of the apparatus. A vaporization probe is used to determine percentage of vaporization and a gas sample probe to determine concentration of emissions in the exhaust gases. The experimental design is presented and experimental expected results are discussed.

  12. The sensitivity of stand-scale photosynthesis and transpiration to changes in atmospheric CO2 concentration and climate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Kruijt

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available The 3-dimensional forest model MAESTRO was used to simulate daily and annual photosynthesis and transpiration fluxes of forest stands and the sensitivity of these fluxes to potential changes in atmospheric CO2 concentration ([CO2], temperature, water stress and phenology. The effects of possible feed-backs from increased leaf area and limitations to leaf nutrition were simulated by imposing changes in leaf area and nitrogen content. Two different tree species were considered: Picea sitchensis (Bong. Carr., a conifer with long needle longevity and large leaf area, and Betula pendula Roth., a broad-leaved deciduous species with an open canopy and small leaf area. Canopy photosynthetic production in trees was predicted to increase with atmospheric [CO2] and length of the growing season and to decrease with increased water stress. Associated increases in leaf area increased production further only in the B. pendula canopy, where the original leaf area was relatively small. Assumed limitations in N uptake affected B. pendula more than P. sitchensis. The effect of increased temperature was shown to depend on leaf area and nitrogen content. The different sensitivities of the two species were related to their very different canopy structure. Increased [CO2] reduced transpiration, but larger leaf area, early leaf growth, and higher temperature all led to increased water use. These effects were limited by feedbacks from soil water stress. The simulations suggest that, with the projected climate change, there is some increase in stand annual `water use efficiency', but the actual water losses to the atmosphere may not always decrease.

  13. Numerical Modeling and Experimental Validation by Calorimetric Detection of Energetic Materials Using Thermal Bimorph Microcantilever Array: A Case Study on Sensing Vapors of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seok-Won Kang

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Bi-layer (Au-Si3N4 microcantilevers fabricated in an array were used to detect vapors of energetic materials such as explosives under ambient conditions. The changes in the bending response of each thermal bimorph (i.e., microcantilever with changes in actuation currents were experimentally monitored by measuring the angle of the reflected ray from a laser source used to illuminate the gold nanocoating on the surface of silicon nitride microcantilevers in the absence and presence of a designated combustible species. Experiments were performed to determine the signature response of this nano-calorimeter platform for each explosive material considered for this study. Numerical modeling was performed to predict the bending response of the microcantilevers for various explosive materials, species concentrations, and actuation currents. The experimental validation of the numerical predictions demonstrated that in the presence of different explosive or combustible materials, the microcantilevers exhibited unique trends in their bending responses with increasing values of the actuation current.

  14. Vapor Intrusion from Entrapped NAPL Sources and Groundwater Plumes: Process Understanding and Improved Modeling Tools for Pathway Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-07-01

    imaging for engineering site investigation in a crystalline basement terrain, southwestern Nigeria. Journ. Environ. Earth Scien ., DOI: 10.1007/s12665... library NumDwarf that is being developed by the author and verified against another model built using the COMSOL Multiphysics commercial software...transport in the porous medium. In the following section, we show how the NumDwarf computational library is used to discretize and solve the

  15. Incorporation of water vapor transfer in the JULES Land Surface Model: implications for key soil variables and land surface fluxes

    OpenAIRE

    Garcia Gonzalez, R.; Verhoef, A.; Luigi Vidale, P.; I. Braud

    2012-01-01

    This study focuses on the mechanisms underlying water and heat transfer in upper soil layers, and their effects on soil physical prognostic variables and the individual components of the energy balance. The skill of the JULES (Joint UK Environment Simulator) land surface model (LSM) to simulate key soil variables, such as soil moisture content and surface temperature, and fluxes such as evaporation, is investigated. The Richards equation for soil water transfer, as used in most LSMs, was upda...

  16. Vapor concentration monitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayly, John G.; Booth, Ronald J.

    1977-01-01

    An apparatus for monitoring the concentration of a vapor, such as heavy water, having at least one narrow bandwidth in its absorption spectrum, in a sample gas such as air. The air is drawn into a chamber in which the vapor content is measured by means of its radiation absorption spectrum. High sensitivity is obtained by modulating the wavelength at a relatively high frequency without changing its optical path, while high stability against zero drift is obtained by the low frequency interchange of the sample gas to be monitored and of a reference sample. The variable HDO background due to natural humidity is automatically corrected.

  17. Refraction of microwave signals by water vapor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldfinger, A. D.

    1980-01-01

    Tropospheric water vapor causes a refractive path length effect which is typically 5-10% of the 'dry' tropospheric effect and as large as several meters at elevation angles below 5 deg. The vertical water vapor profile is quite variable, and measurements of intensive atmospheric parameters such as temperature and humidity limited to the surface do not adequately predict the refractive effect. It is suggested that a water vapor refraction model that is a function of the amount of precipitable water alone can be successful at low elevation angles. From an extensive study of numerical ray tracings through radiosonde balloon data, such a model has been constructed. The model predicts the effect at all latitudes and elevation angles between 2 and 10 deg to an accuracy of better than 4% (11 cm at 3 deg elevation angle).

  18. Evaluating potential impacts of species conversion on transpiration in the Piedmont of North Carolina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boggs, J.; Treasure, E.; Simpson, G.; Domec, J.; Sun, G.; McNulty, S.

    2010-12-01

    Land management practices that include species conversion or vegetation manipulation can have consequences to surface water availability, groundwater recharge, streamflow generation, and water quality through altering the transpiration processes in forested watersheds. Our objective in this study is to compare stand water use or transpiration in a piedmont mixed hardwood stand (i.e., present stand) to five hypothetical single species stands (i.e., management scenarios), [Quercus spp. (oak), Acer Rubrum (red maple), Liquidambar styraciflua (sweetgum), Liriodendron tulipifera (tulip poplar), and Pinus Taeda (loblolly pine]. Since October 2007, six watersheds with a flume or v-notch weir installed at the watershed outlet have been monitored for baseline streamflow rates (mm d-1). In the summer of 2010, five trees from each of the above species were instrumented with sap flow sensors in the riparian upland of one watershed to develop linkages between stand stream runoff and transpiration. The sap flow or thermal heat dissipation method was used to calculate tree sap flux density for the mixed hardwood stand. Tree sapwood area and stand tree density were then used to compute stand transpiration rates, mm d-1, from June - August 2010. The parameters of the hypothetical single species stands were based on values determined from mixed hardwood stand conditions (e.g., the same stand sapwood area and stand tree density were applied to each option). The diameter at beast height of the monitored trees ranged from 10 cm to 38 cm with a water use range of 1.8 kg d-1 to 104 kg d-1. From our preliminary data, we found daily transpiration from the mixed hardwood stand (2.8 mm d-1 ± 0.06) was significantly (p < 0.05) lower than daily transpiration from the red maple (3.7 mm d-1 ± 0.14) and tulip poplar (3.5 mm d-1 ± 0.12) single species stand management option and significantly (p < 0.05) higher than the loblolly pine (2.3 mm d-1 ± 0.08), sweetgum (2.1 mm d-1 ± 0.08) and oak

  19. Lunar absorption spectrophotometer for measuring atmospheric water vapor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Querel, Richard R; Naylor, David A

    2011-02-01

    A novel instrument has been designed to measure the nighttime atmospheric water vapor column abundance by near-infrared absorption spectrophotometry of the Moon. The instrument provides a simple, effective, portable, and inexpensive means of rapidly measuring the water vapor content along the lunar line of sight. Moreover, the instrument is relatively insensitive to the atmospheric model used and, thus, serves to provide an independent calibration for other measures of precipitable water vapor from both ground- and space-based platforms.

  20. Overview of chemical vapor infiltration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Besmann, T.M.; Stinton, D.P.; Lowden, R.A.

    1993-06-01

    Chemical vapor infiltration (CVI) is developing into a commercially important method for the fabrication of continuous filament ceramic composites. Current efforts are focused on the development of an improved understanding of the various processes in CVI and its modeling. New approaches to CVI are being explored, including pressure pulse infiltration and microwave heating. Material development is also proceeding with emphasis on improving the oxidation resistance of the interfacial layer between the fiber and matrix. This paper briefly reviews these subjects, indicating the current state of the science and technology.

  1. Transpiration of Eucalyptus woodlands across a natural gradient of depth-to-groundwater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zolfaghar, Sepideh; Villalobos-Vega, Randol; Zeppel, Melanie; Cleverly, James; Rumman, Rizwana; Hingee, Matthew; Boulain, Nicolas; Li, Zheng; Eamus, Derek

    2017-07-01

    Water resources and their management present social, economic and environmental challenges, with demand for human consumptive, industrial and environmental uses increasing globally. However, environmental water requirements, that is, the allocation of water to the maintenance of ecosystem health, are often neglected or poorly quantified. Further, transpiration by trees is commonly a major determinant of the hydrological balance of woodlands but recognition of the role of groundwater in hydrological balances of woodlands remains inadequate, particularly in mesic climates. In this study, we measured rates of tree water-use and sapwood 13C isotopic ratio in a mesic, temperate Eucalypt woodland along a naturally occurring gradient of depth-to-groundwater (DGW), to examine daily, seasonal and annual patterns of transpiration. We found that: (i) the maximum rate of stand transpiration was observed at the second shallowest site (4.3 m) rather than the shallowest (2.4 m); (ii) as DGW increased from 4.3 to 37.5 m, stand transpiration declined; (iii) the smallest rate of stand transpiration was observed at the deepest (37.5 m) site; (iv) intrinsic water-use efficiency was smallest at the two intermediate DGW sites as reflected in the Δ13C of the most recently formed sapwood and largest at the deepest and shallowest DGW sites, reflecting the imposition of flooding at the shallowest site and the inaccessibility of groundwater at the deepest site; and (v) there was no evidence of convergence in rates of water-use for co-occurring species at any site. We conclude that even in mesic environments groundwater can be utilized by trees. We further conclude that these forests are facultatively groundwater-dependent when groundwater depth is <9 m and suggest that during drier-than-average years the contribution of groundwater to stand transpiration is likely to increase significantly at the three shallowest DGW sites. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All

  2. Responses of soil CO2 efflux to changes in plant CO2 uptake and transpiration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balogh, János; de Luca, Giulia; Mészáros, Ádám; Trieber, Júlia; Gecse, Bernadett; Fóti, Szilvia; Pintér, Krisztina; Nagy, Zoltán

    2017-04-01

    Biotic drivers of soil respiration represent a significant supply-side (plant) control of the process. Those biotic drivers that integrate over longer time periods are useful in describing the phenological changes and physiological state of the vegetation, but they are not suitable to explain the diel variability of soil respiration. Two plant physiological processes, acting in opposite directions, could be relevant at diel timescale: (1) photosynthesis, and (2) transpiration. Firstly, it was recently found that photosynthesis has a time-lagged (a few hours) positive effect on the respiration of roots and root-associated microbes. This can be explainedby an increase in easily accessible non-structural hydrocarbon sources for the roots and root-associated organisms within this period. Secondly, it was found that the effect of transpiration could reduce root respiration due to CO2 transport through the transpiration stream, and this effect is expected to be immediate. Removing the effect of the abiotic drivers from the soil efflux signal could help to clarify the role of other driving variables. In the present study, we conducted manipulation measurements in lab environment to be able to detect the effects of the plant physiological variables (CO2 uptake, transpiration) on soil CO2 efflux. Plant individuals were planted into field soil samples in small pots. Transpiration manipulation was done by regulating vapour pressure of the air around the plant canopy and by inhibitors. Photosynthesis manipulation consisted of programmed absence of light. Isotopic signatures of soil respiration were used for estimating the contribution of the autotrophic and heterotrophic soil respiration components. 13CO2 concentration of the CO2 efflux of the different soil components was measured continuously in open system by cavity ring-down spectroscopy (Picarro G1101-i gas analyser). Keeling-plot approach was also used to calculate the isotopic signals of the sources. According to the

  3. Vaporization of materials in the operation of high temperature fuel cells (SOFCs); Verdampfung von Werkstoffen beim Betrieb von Hochtemperaturbrennstoffzellen (SOFCs)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stanislowski, M.

    2006-07-01

    One of the main problems concerning the development of state of the art planar SOFCs are the occurrence of ageing effects in long term application. To a great deal these effects are caused by the release of volatile Cr-species from metallic interconnects which leads to an inhibition of the electrochemical processes at the cathode resulting in a rapid degradation of the cell performance. A goal in further development of SOFC-systems is the reduction of the operation temperature of the cell from currently 800 C to 700 C and below. For this purpose alternative electrolyte materials with higher oxygen ion conductivities have to be developed. Doped lanthanum gallates have been identified as promising materials. However for these materials a depletion of Ga by vaporization has been observed under anodic conditions which may lead to a destruction of their electrolyte properties. The aim of this work is the study of the vaporization processes leading to the mentioned degradation effects. For this purpose an experimental setup according to the transpiration method has been developed. Concerning the vaporization of chromium the Cr release rates of the main ferritic interconnect alloys, namely Crofer 22 APU, ZMG 232, E-Brite, IT-10, IT-11, IT-14 and Ducrolloy as well as a variety of Ni- and Co-base superalloys and stainless steels with different contents of Al, Si, Ti, Mn, W, Ni and Co were measured at 800 C in air and compared to each other. The alloys that form an upper layer of Cr-Mn-spinel on top of the grown chromia scale showed a reduction of the Cr release by 61-75 % compared to pure chromia scales whereas alloys with an outer Co3O4(s) scale had a by more than 90 % reduced Cr release. For the former alloys a significant vaporization of Mn under anodic conditions could be detected. Concerning the vaporization of doped lanthanum gallates the vaporization rates of the elements Ga, Mg, Sr and La were measured as function time, temperature, gas flow rate and stoichiometry

  4. Passive Vaporizing Heat Sink

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knowles, TImothy R.; Ashford, Victor A.; Carpenter, Michael G.; Bier, Thomas M.

    2011-01-01

    A passive vaporizing heat sink has been developed as a relatively lightweight, compact alternative to related prior heat sinks based, variously, on evaporation of sprayed liquids or on sublimation of solids. This heat sink is designed for short-term dissipation of a large amount of heat and was originally intended for use in regulating the temperature of spacecraft equipment during launch or re-entry. It could also be useful in a terrestrial setting in which there is a requirement for a lightweight, compact means of short-term cooling. This heat sink includes a hermetic package closed with a pressure-relief valve and containing an expendable and rechargeable coolant liquid (e.g., water) and a conductive carbon-fiber wick. The vapor of the liquid escapes when the temperature exceeds the boiling point corresponding to the vapor pressure determined by the setting of the pressure-relief valve. The great advantage of this heat sink over a melting-paraffin or similar phase-change heat sink of equal capacity is that by virtue of the =10x greater latent heat of vaporization, a coolant-liquid volume equal to =1/10 of the paraffin volume can suffice.

  5. Model polymer etching and surface modification by a time modulated RF plasma jet: role of atomic oxygen and water vapor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luan, P.; Knoll, A. J.; Wang, H.; Kondeti, V. S. S. K.; Bruggeman, P. J.; Oehrlein, G. S.

    2017-01-01

    The surface interaction of a well-characterized time modulated radio frequency (RF) plasma jet with polystyrene, poly(methyl methacrylate) and poly(vinyl alcohol) as model polymers is investigated. The RF plasma jet shows fast polymer etching but mild chemical modification with a characteristic carbonate ester and NO formation on the etched surface. By varying the plasma treatment conditions including feed gas composition, environment gaseous composition, and treatment distance, we find that short lived species, especially atomic O for Ar/1% O2 and 1% air plasma and OH for Ar/1% H2O plasma, play an essential role for polymer etching. For O2 containing plasma, we find that atomic O initiates polymer etching and the etching depth mirrors the measured decay of O atoms in the gas phase as the nozzle-surface distance increases. The etching reaction probability of an O atom ranging from 10-4 to 10-3 is consistent with low pressure plasma research. We also find that adding O2 and H2O simultaneously into Ar feed gas quenches polymer etching compared to adding them separately which suggests the reduction of O and OH density in Ar/O2/H2O plasma.

  6. Vaporization of droplets in premixing chambers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yule, A. J.; Chigier, N. A.

    1980-01-01

    Detailed measurements were made of the structures of turbulent fuel sprays vaporizing in heated airstreams. The measurements show the size dependent vaporization and dispersion of the droplets and the important influence of the large eddies in the turbulence. The measurements form a data base for the development of models of fuel spray vaporization. Two laser techniques were specially developed for the investigation. A laser tomography technique converts line-of-sight light scattering measurements into time averaged 'point' measurements of droplet size distribution and volume concentration. A laser anemometer particle sizing technique was further developed to permit accurate measurements of individual particle sizes and velocities, with backscatter collection of light. The experiments are combined with heat transfer models to analyze the performance of miniature thermocouples in liquid sprays.

  7. Genetic Variation of Morphological Traits and Transpiration in an Apple Core Collection under Well-Watered Conditions: Towards the Identification of Morphotypes with High Water Use Efficiency.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerardo Lopez

    Full Text Available Water use efficiency (WUE is a quantitative measurement which improvement is a major issue in the context of global warming and restrictions in water availability for agriculture. In this study, we aimed at studying the variation and genetic control of WUE and the respective role of its components (plant biomass and transpiration in a perennial fruit crop. We explored an INRA apple core collection grown in a phenotyping platform to screen one-year-old scions for their accumulated biomass, transpiration and WUE under optimal growing conditions. Plant biomass was decompose into morphological components related to either growth or organ expansion. For each trait, nine mixed models were evaluated to account for the genetic effect and spatial heterogeneity inside the platform. The Best Linear Unbiased Predictors of genetic values were estimated after model selection. Mean broad-sense heritabilities were calculated from variance estimates. Heritability values indicated that biomass (0.76 and WUE (0.73 were under genetic control. This genetic control was lower in plant transpiration with an heritability of 0.54. Across the collection, biomass accounted for 70% of the WUE variability. A Hierarchical Ascendant Classification of the core collection indicated the existence of six groups of genotypes with contrasting morphology and WUE. Differences between morphotypes were interpreted as resulting from differences in the main processes responsible for plant growth: cell division leading to the generation of new organs and cell elongation leading to organ dimension. Although further studies will be necessary on mature trees with more complex architecture and multiple sinks such as fruits, this study is a first step for improving apple plant material for the use of water.

  8. Transpiration and root development of urban trees in structural soil stormwater reservoirs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartens, Julia; Day, Susan D; Harris, J Roger; Wynn, Theresa M; Dove, Joseph E

    2009-10-01

    Stormwater management that relies on ecosystem processes, such as tree canopy interception and rhizosphere biology, can be difficult to achieve in built environments because urban land is costly and urban soil inhospitable to vegetation. Yet such systems offer a potentially valuable tool for achieving both sustainable urban forests and stormwater management. We evaluated tree water uptake and root distribution in a novel stormwater mitigation facility that integrates trees directly into detention reservoirs under pavement. The system relies on structural soils: highly porous engineered mixes designed to support tree root growth and pavement. To evaluate tree performance under the peculiar conditions of such a stormwater detention reservoir (i.e., periodically inundated), we grew green ash (Fraxinus pennsylvanica Marsh.) and swamp white oak (Quercus bicolor Willd.) in either CUSoil or a Carolina Stalite-based mix subjected to three simulated below-system infiltration rates for two growing seasons. Infiltration rate affected both transpiration and rooting depth. In a factorial experiment with ash, rooting depth always increased with infiltration rate for Stalite, but this relation was less consistent for CUSoil. Slow-drainage rates reduced transpiration and restricted rooting depth for both species and soils, and trunk growth was restricted for oak, which grew the most in moderate infiltration. Transpiration rates under slow infiltration were 55% (oak) and 70% (ash) of the most rapidly transpiring treatment (moderate for oak and rapid for ash). We conclude this system is feasible and provides another tool to address runoff that integrates the function of urban green spaces with other urban needs.

  9. Unglazed transpired solar collector having a low thermal-conductance absorber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Craig B.; Kutscher, Charles F.; Gawlik, Keith M.

    1997-01-01

    An unglazed transpired solar collector using solar radiation to heat incoming air for distribution, comprising an unglazed absorber formed of low thermal-conductance material having a front surface for receiving the solar radiation and openings in the unglazed absorber for passage of the incoming air such that the incoming air is heated as it passes towards the front surface of the absorber and the heated air passes through the openings in the absorber for distribution.

  10. Effects of increased atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentrations on transpiration of a wheat field in consideration of water and nitrogen limitation; Die Wirkung von erhoehten atmosphaerischen CO{sub 2}-Konzentrationen auf die Transpiration eines Weizenbestandes unter Beruecksichtigung von Wasser- und Stickstofflimitierung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grossman-Clarke, S.

    2000-09-01

    Primary responses of C{sub 3}-plants to elevated atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentrations are an increase in the net assimilation rate, leading to greater biomass, and an associated decrease in the transpiration rate per unit leaf area due to CO{sub 2}-induced stomatal closure. The question has therefore arisen: does canopy transpiration increase because of the greater biomass, or decrease because of the stomatal closure? The direct impact of an elevated atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentration of 550 {mu}mol mol{sup -1} on the seasonal course of canopy transpiration of a spring wheat crop was investigated by means of the simulation model DEMETER for production under unlimited water and nutrient supply, production under limited water but unlimited nutrient supply and the production under unlimited water but limited nitrogen supply. Independent data of the free-air carbon dioxide enrichment wheat experiments in Arizona, USA (1993-96) were used to test if the model is able to make reasonable predictions of water use and productivity of the spring wheat crop using only parameters derived from the literature. A model integrating leaf photosynthesis, stomatal conductance and energy fluxes between the plant and the atmosphere was scaled to a canopy level in order to be used in the wheat crop growth model. Temporal changes of the model parameters were considered by describing them as dependent on the changing leaf nitrogen content. Comparison of the simulation and experimental results showed that the applicability of the model approach was limited after anthesis by asynchronous changes in mesophyll and stomatal conductance. Therefore a new model approach was developed describing the interaction between assimilation rate and stomatal conductance during grain filling. The simulation results revealed only small differences in the cumulative sum of canopy transpiration and soil evaporation between elevated CO{sub 2} and control conditions. For potential growth conditions the model

  11. Effects of pruning intensity on jujube transpiration and soil moisture of plantation in the Loess Plateau

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Zhenyi; Wang, Xing; Wang, Youke; Ma, Jianpeng; Wei, Xinguang; Chen, Dianyu

    2017-01-01

    In order to ease soil desiccation and prevent ecological deterioration in the Loess Plateau, where jujube (Zizyphus jujube MIll) is widely cultivated as a drought tolerant plant, four pruning intensities (PI), from PI-1 (light) to PI-4 (heavy) were set up based on total length of secondary branches to study the effects of pruning on transpiration and soil moisture in jujube plantations. Furthermore, growth indexes were regularly monitored to estimate jujubes biomass. Sap flow, meteorological and soil moisture conditions were monitored using thermal dissipation probes (TDP), weather station (RR-9100) and the combination of time domain transmission (TDT) technology and neutron moisture gauges (CNC503B), respectively. The results showed that daily actual transpiration of jujube was positively correlated with leaf biomass. Compared with PI-1, jujube transpiration during growth period under PI-2, PI-3, and PI-4 dropped by 11.1%, 29.2%, and 47.9%, respectively. On the contrary, annual water storage under PI-2, PI-3, and PI-4 increased by 6.29 mm, 25.78 mm and 34.74 mm while water use efficiency increased by 5.1%, 15.7% and 24.2%, respectively. Overall, increase in pruning intensity could significantly reduce water consumption of jujube and improve soil moisture in jujube plantations.

  12. Effect of different soil water potential on leaf transpiration and on stomatal conductance in poinsettia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacek S. Nowak

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Euphorbia pulcherrima Wild.'Lilo' was grown in containers in 60% peat, 30% perlite and 10% clay (v/v mixture, with different irrigation treatments based on soil water potential. Plants were watered at two levels of drought stress: -50kPa or wilting. The treatments were applied at different stages of plant development for a month or soil was brought to the moisture stress only twice. Additionally, some plants were watered at -50 kPa during the entire cultivation period while the control plants were watered at -5kPa. Plants were also kept at maximum possible moisture level (watering at -0,5kPa or close to it (-1.OkPa through the entire growing period. Soil water potential was measured with tensiometer. Drought stress applied during entire cultivation period or during the flushing stage caused significant reduction in transpiration and conductance of leaves. Stress applied during bract coloration stage had not as great effect on the stomatal conductance and transpiration of leaves as the similar stress applied during the flushing stage. High soil moisture increased stomatal conductance and transpiration rate, respectively by 130% and 52% (flushing stage, and 72% and 150% (bract coloration stage at maximum, compared to the control.

  13. Expression of Arabidopsis hexokinase in citrus guard cells controls stomatal aperture and reduces transpiration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nitsan eLugassi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Hexokinase (HXK is a sugar-phosphorylating enzyme involved in sugar-sensing. It has recently been shown that HXK in guard cells mediates stomatal closure and coordinates photosynthesis with transpiration in the annual species tomato and Arabidopsis. To examine the role of HXK in the control of the stomatal movement of perennial plants, we generated citrus plants that express Arabidopsis HXK1 (AtHXK1 under KST1, a guard cell-specific promoter. The expression of KST1 in the guard cells of citrus plants has been verified using GFP as a reporter gene. The expression of AtHXK1 in the guard cells of citrus reduced stomatal conductance and transpiration with no negative effect on the rate of photosynthesis, leading to increased water-use efficiency. The effects of light intensity and humidity on stomatal behavior were examined in rooted leaves of the citrus plants. The optimal intensity of photosynthetically active radiation and lower humidity enhanced stomatal closure of AtHXK1-expressing leaves, supporting the role of sugar in the regulation of citrus stomata. These results suggest that HXK coordinates photosynthesis and transpiration and stimulates stomatal closure not only in annual species, but also in perennial species.

  14. Transpiration and leaf growth of potato clones in response to soil water deficit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Trevisan de Souza

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Potato (Solanum tuberosum ssp. Tuberosum crop is particularly susceptible to water deficit because of its small and shallow root system. The fraction of transpirable soil water (FTSW approach has been widely used in the evaluation of plant responses to water deficit in different crops. The FTSW 34 threshold (when stomatal closure starts is a trait of particular interest because it is an indicator of tolerance to water deficit. The FTSW threshold for decline in transpiration and leaf growth was evaluated in a drying soil to identify potato clones tolerant to water deficit. Two greenhouse experiments were carried out in pots, with three advanced clones and the cultivar Asterix. The FTSW, transpiration and leaf growth were measured on a daily basis, during the period of soil drying. FTSW was an efficient method to separate potato clones with regard to their response to water deficit. The advancedclones SMINIA 02106-11 and SMINIA 00017-6 are more tolerant to soil water deficit than the cultivar Asterix, and the clone SMINIA 793101-3 is more tolerant only under high solar radiation.

  15. Comparison of realistic and idealized breathing patterns in computational models of airflow and vapor dosimetry in the rodent upper respiratory tract

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colby, Sean M.; Kabilan, Senthil; Jacob, Richard E.; Kuprat, Andrew P.; Einstein, Daniel R.; Corley, Richard A.

    2016-03-17

    Abstract Context: Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations of airflows coupled with physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modeling of respiratory tissue doses of airborne materials have traditionally used either steady-state inhalation or a sinusoidal approximation of the breathing cycle for airflow simulations despite their differences from normal breathing patterns. Objective: Evaluate the impact of realistic breathing patterns, including sniffing, on predicted nasal tissue concentrations of a reactive vapor that targets the nose in rats as a case study. Materials and methods: Whole-body plethysmography measurements from a free-breathing rat were used to produce profiles of normal breathing, sniffing and combinations of both as flow inputs to CFD/PBPK simulations of acetaldehyde exposure. Results: For the normal measured ventilation profile, modest reductions in time- and tissue depth-dependent areas under the curve (AUC) acetaldehyde concentrations were predicted in the wet squamous, respiratory and transitional epithelium along the main airflow path, while corresponding increases were predicted in the olfactory epithelium, especially the most distal regions of the ethmoid turbinates, versus the idealized profile. The higher amplitude/frequency sniffing profile produced greater AUC increases over the idealized profile in the olfactory epithelium, especially in the posterior region. Conclusions: The differences in tissue AUCs at known lesion-forming regions for acetaldehyde between normal and idealized profiles were minimal, suggesting that sinusoidal profiles may be used for this chemical and exposure concentration. However, depending upon the chemical, exposure system and concentration and the time spent sniffing, the use of realistic breathing profiles, including sniffing, could become an important modulator for local tissue dose predictions.

  16. Water-vapor conductance of testudinian and crocodilian eggs (class reptilia).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Packard, G C; Taigen, T L; Packard, M J; Shuman, R D

    1979-09-01

    Flexible-shelled eggs of snapping turtles (Chelydra serpentina) have conductances to water vapor that are 55 times higher than predicted for avian eggs of similar size, whereas rigid-shelled eggs of softshell turtles (Trionyx spiniferus) and American alligators (Alligator mississippiensis) have conductances that are only five times higher than expected for comparable eggs of birds. The differences between empirical and predicted values result from the much higher effective pore areas in reptilian eggshells than in those of birds. The relatively high porosities of these reptilian eggs presumably facilitate the transport of oxygen and carbon dioxide eggshells in later stages of incubation when air trapped inside nest chambers may become hypoxic and hypercapnic, yet seem not to lead to excessive transpiration of water vapor owing to the high humidities in nests where incubation occurs.

  17. Modelagem de um reator integral aplicado na reação de reforma a vapor de metano = Modeling of integral reactor applied methane steam reforming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giane Gonçalves

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Freqüentemente, a validação de modelos matemáticos aplicados a reatores industriais esbarra na dificuldade de obtenção de medidas experimentais confiáveis. Uma maneira de contornar esta limitação corresponde à implantação de uma unidade em escala de bancada devidamente instrumentada, na qual são obtidos dados experimentais emcondições controladas. Neste contexto, foram efetuados ensaios em um reator integral de reforma a vapor de metano em escala de bancada, em diversas condições experimentais. As medidas de temperatura no leito foram efetuadas por meio de um termopar multiponto em seis posições axiais distintas, enquanto a composição do efluente do reator foi determinada por cromatografia gasosa. Estes dados experimentais foram comparados com as previsões de um modelo pseudo-homogêneo, unidimensional e dinâmico. Os resultados indicam que o modelo é adequado, sendo que tanto a atividade catalítica como a conversão são sensíveis à temperatura operacional, enquanto a temperatura do leito é praticamente insensível à vazão nas condições experimentais exploradas.Frequently, the validation of applied mathematical models of industrial reactors dash into the difficulty of obtaining reliable experimental data. A way to overcome this limitation is the proper use and operation or a in bench scale, experimental setup from whichexperimental data can be obtained in controlled conditions. In this context, experiments were carried out in an integral reactor of steam reform, in different experimental conditions. Thermocouples were placed along the catalyst bed to allow for temperature monitoring in six equally spaced and distinct positions of the reactor, the composition of the effluent of the reactor was determined by gas chromatography. These experimental data were compared with the theoretical results of a pseudo-homogeneous one-dimensional,dynamic mathematical model. The results indicate that the model can successfully

  18. Vapor scavenging by atmospheric aerosol particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrews, E.

    1996-05-01

    Particle growth due to vapor scavenging was studied using both experimental and computational techniques. Vapor scavenging by particles is an important physical process in the atmosphere because it can result in changes to particle properties (e.g., size, shape, composition, and activity) and, thus, influence atmospheric phenomena in which particles play a role, such as cloud formation and long range transport. The influence of organic vapor on the evolution of a particle mass size distribution was investigated using a modified version of MAEROS (a multicomponent aerosol dynamics code). The modeling study attempted to identify the sources of organic aerosol observed by Novakov and Penner (1993) in a field study in Puerto Rico. Experimentally, vapor scavenging and particle growth were investigated using two techniques. The influence of the presence of organic vapor on the particle`s hydroscopicity was investigated using an electrodynamic balance. The charge on a particle was investigated theoretically and experimentally. A prototype apparatus--the refractive index thermal diffusion chamber (RITDC)--was developed to study multiple particles in the same environment at the same time.

  19. Water vaporization on Ceres

    Science.gov (United States)

    A'Hearn, Michael F.; Feldman, Paul D.

    1992-01-01

    A search is presently conducted for OH generated by the photodissociation of atmospheric water vapor in long-exposure IUE spectra of the region around Ceres. A statistically significant detection of OH is noted in an exposure off the northern limb of Ceres after perihelion. The amount of OH is consistent with a polar cap that might be replenished during winter by subsurface percolation, but which dissipates in summer.

  20. Hydrogen isotope composition of leaf wax n-alkanes in Arabidopsis lines with different transpiration rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedentchouk, N.; Lawson, T.; Eley, Y.; McAusland, L.

    2012-04-01

    Stable isotopic compositions of oxygen and hydrogen are used widely to investigate modern and ancient water cycles. The D/H composition of organic compounds derived from terrestrial plants has recently attracted significant attention as a proxy for palaeohydrology. However, the role of various plant physiological and biochemical factors in controlling the D/H signature of leaf wax lipids in extant plants remains unclear. The focus of this study is to investigate the effect of plant transpiration on the D/H composition of n-alkanes in terrestrial plants. This experiment includes 4 varieties of Arabidopsis thaliana that differ with respect to stomatal density and stomatal geometry. All 4 varieties were grown indoors under identical temperature, relative humidity, light and watering regimes and then sampled for leaf wax and leaf water stable isotopic measurements. During growth, stomatal conductance to carbon dioxide and water vapour were also determined. We found that the plants varied significantly in terms of their transpiration rates. Transpiration rates were significantly higher in Arabidopsis ost1 and ost1-1 varieties (2.4 and 3.2 mmol m-2 s-1, respectively) than in Arabidopsis RbohD and Col-0 (1.5 and 1.4). However, hydrogen isotope measurements of n-alkanes extracted from leaf waxes revealed a very different pattern. Varieties ost1, ost1-1, and RbohD have very similar deltaD values of n-C29 alkane (-125, -128, and -127 per mil), whereas the deltaD value of Col-0 is more negative (-137 per mil). The initial results of this work suggest that plant transpiration is decoupled from the D/H composition of n-alkanes. In other words, physical processes that affect water vapour movement between the plant and its environment apparently cannot account for the stable hydrogen isotope composition of organic compounds that comprise leaf waxes. Additional, perhaps biochemical, processes that affect hydrogen isotope fractionation during photosynthesis might need to be invoked

  1. Transpiration and biomass production of the bioenergy crop Giant Knotweed Igniscum under various supplies of water and nutrients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mantovani Dario

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Soil water availability, nutrient supply and climatic conditions are key factors for plant production. For a sustainable integration of bioenergy plants into agricultural systems, detailed studies on their water uses and growth performances are needed. The new bioenergy plant Igniscum Candy is a cultivar of the Sakhalin Knotweed (Fallopia sachalinensis, which is characterized by a high annual biomass production. For the determination of transpiration-yield relations at the whole plant level we used wicked lysimeters at multiple irrigation levels associated with the soil water availability (25, 35, 70, 100% and nitrogen fertilization (0, 50, 100, 150 kg N ha-1. Leaf transpiration and net photosynthesis were determined with a portable minicuvette system. The maximum mean transpiration rate was 10.6 mmol m-2 s-1 for well-watered plants, while the mean net photosynthesis was 9.1 μmol m-2 s-1. The cumulative transpiration of the plants during the growing seasons varied between 49 l (drought stressed and 141 l (well-watered per plant. The calculated transpiration coefficient for Fallopia over all of the treatments applied was 485.6 l kg-1. The transpiration-yield relation of Igniscum is comparable to rye and barley. Its growth performance making Fallopia a potentially good second generation bioenergy crop.

  2. On The Validity of the Assumed PDF Method for Modeling Binary Mixing/Reaction of Evaporated Vapor in GAS/Liquid-Droplet Turbulent Shear Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, R. S.; Bellan, J.

    1997-01-01

    An Investigation of the statistical description of binary mixing and/or reaction between a carrier gas and an evaporated vapor species in two-phase gas-liquid turbulent flows is perfomed through both theroetical analysis and comparisons with results from direct numerical simulations (DNS) of a two-phase mixing layer.

  3. Vaporization of synthetic fuels. Final report. [Thesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sirignano, W.A.; Yao, S.C.; Tong, A.Y.; Talley, D.

    1983-01-01

    The problem of transient droplet vaporization in a hot convective environment is examined. The main objective of the present study is to develop an algorithm for the droplet vaporization which is simple enough to be feasibly incorporated into a complete spray combustion analysis and yet will also account for the important physics such as liquid-phase internal circulation, unsteady droplet heating and axisymmetric gas-phase convection. A simplified liquid-phase model has been obtained based on the assumption of the existence of a Hill's spherical vortex inside the droplet together with some approximations made in the governing diffusion equation. The use of the simplified model in a spray situation has also been examined. It has been found that droplet heating and vaporization are essentially unsteady and droplet temperature is nonuniform for a significant portion of its lifetime. It has also been found that the droplet vaporization characteristic can be quite sensitive to the particular liquid-phase and gas-phase models. The results of the various models are compared with the existing experimental data. Due to large scattering in the experimental measurements, particularly the droplet diameter, no definite conclusion can be drawn based on the experimental data. Finally, certain research problems which are related to the present study are suggested for future studies.

  4. Role of co-vapors in vapor deposition polymerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ji Eun; Lee, Younghee; Ahn, Ki-Jin; Huh, Jinyoung; Shim, Hyeon Woo; Sampath, Gayathri; Im, Won Bin; Huh, Yang-Il; Yoon, Hyeonseok

    2015-02-12

    Polypyrrole (PPy)/cellulose (PPCL) composite papers were fabricated by vapor phase polymerization. Importantly, the vapor-phase deposition of PPy onto cellulose was assisted by employing different co-vapors namely methanol, ethanol, benzene, water, toluene and hexane, in addition to pyrrole. The resulting PPCL papers possessed high mechanical flexibility, large surface-to-volume ratio, and good redox properties. Their main properties were highly influenced by the nature of the co-vaporized solvent. The morphology and oxidation level of deposited PPy were tuned by employing co-vapors during the polymerization, which in turn led to change in the electrochemical properties of the PPCL papers. When methanol and ethanol were used as co-vapors, the conductivities of PPCL papers were found to have improved five times, which was likely due to the enhanced orientation of PPy chain by the polar co-vapors with high dipole moment. The specific capacitance of PPCL papers obtained using benzene, toluene, water and hexane co-vapors was higher than those of the others, which is attributed to the enlarged effective surface area of the electrode material. The results indicate that the judicious choice and combination of co-vapors in vapor-deposition polymerization (VDP) offers the possibility of tuning the morphological, electrical, and electrochemical properties of deposited conducting polymers.

  5. A state-space modeling approach to estimating canopy conductance and associated uncertainties from sap flux density data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, David M; Ward, Eric J; Oishi, A Christopher; Oren, Ram; Flikkema, Paul G; Clark, James S

    2015-07-01

    Uncertainties in ecophysiological responses to environment, such as the impact of atmospheric and soil moisture conditions on plant water regulation, limit our ability to estimate key inputs for ecosystem models. Advanced statistical frameworks provide coherent methodologies for relating observed data, such as stem sap flux density, to unobserved processes, such as canopy conductance and transpiration. To address this need, we developed a hierarchical Bayesian State-Space Canopy Conductance (StaCC) model linking canopy conductance and transpiration to tree sap flux density from a 4-year experiment in the North Carolina Piedmont, USA. Our model builds on existing ecophysiological knowledge, but explicitly incorporates uncertainty in canopy conductance, internal tree hydraulics and observation error to improve estimation of canopy conductance responses to atmospheric drought (i.e., vapor pressure deficit), soil drought (i.e., soil moisture) and above canopy light. Our statistical framework not only predicted sap flux observations well, but it also allowed us to simultaneously gap-fill missing data as we made inference on canopy processes, marking a substantial advance over traditional methods. The predicted and observed sap flux data were highly correlated (mean sensor-level Pearson correlation coefficient = 0.88). Variations in canopy conductance and transpiration associated with environmental variation across days to years were many times greater than the variation associated with model uncertainties. Because some variables, such as vapor pressure deficit and soil moisture, were correlated at the scale of days to weeks, canopy conductance responses to individual environmental variables were difficult to interpret in isolation. Still, our results highlight the importance of accounting for uncertainty in models of ecophysiological and ecosystem function where the process of interest, canopy conductance in this case, is not observed directly. The StaCC modeling

  6. Transpirative Deficit Index (TDI) for the management of water scarcity in irrigated areas: development and application in northern Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borghi, Anna; Facchi, Arianna; Rienzner, Michele; Gandolfi, Claudio

    2016-04-01

    In Europe, the monitoring and assessment of drought is entrusted to the European Drought Observatory (EDO). EDO indicators are calculated considering rainfed agriculture and delivered on a 5 km grid. However, in southern Europe, irrigation may compensate for potentially severe agricultural droughts and specific water scarcity indicators that explicitly consider irrigation are needed. In the Po River Plain, irrigated crops cover more than 70% of the agricultural land, massive amounts of water are diverted from rivers for irrigation, and surface irrigation methods are largely applied. Nowadays, the region is not a water scarce basin, but irrigation water shortages have occurred with increased frequency during the last two decades. Moreover, a recent EU report shows that the Po River Plain is included among areas in Europe that by 2030 shall be affected by water scarcity. In this context, a study was started to select and develop indicators for the management and prevention of Water Scarcity and Drought (WS&D) based on the synergic use of hydrological modelling and Earth Observation data applied at a spatial scale of interest for end-users (250m grid). These indicators shall be better suited for the assessment of WS&D in Italy as well as in other southern European countries. This work presents the development and the application of the TDI (Transpirative Deficit Index) to a study area, within the Po River Plain. TDI is an agricultural drought index based on the transpiration deficit (TDx, calculated as the difference between potential and actual transpiration), computed by the spatially distributed hydrological model IDRAGRA and cumulated over a period of x days. TDx for each day of a specific year is compared to the long-term TDx probability distribution (e.g., over 20-30 years), which is transformed into a standardized normal distribution. The non-exceedance probability of TDx is finally expressed in terms of unit of standard deviation (TDI), following the approach

  7. A process-based evapotranspiration model incorporating coupled soil water-atmospheric controls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haghighi, Erfan; Kirchner, James

    2016-04-01

    Despite many efforts to develop evapotranspiration models (in the framework of the Penman-Monteith equation) with improved parametrizations of various resistance terms to water vapor transfer into the atmosphere, evidence suggests that estimates of evapotranspiration and its partitioning are prone to bias. Much of this bias could arise from the exclusion of surface hydro-thermal properties and of physical interactions close to the surface where heat and water vapor fluxes originate. Recent progress has been made in mechanistic modeling of surface-turbulence interactions, accounting for localized heat and mass exchange rates from bare soil surfaces covered by protruding obstacles. We seek to extend these results partially vegetated surfaces, to improve predictive capabilities and accuracy of remote sensing techniques quantifying evapotranspiration fluxes. The governing equations of liquid water, water vapor, and energy transport dynamics in the soil-plant-atmosphere system are coupled to resolve diffusive vapor fluxes from isolated pores (plant stomata and soil pores) across a near-surface viscous sublayer, explicitly accounting for pore-scale transport mechanisms and environmental forcing. Preliminary results suggest that this approach offers unique opportunities for directly linking transport properties in plants and adjacent bare soil with resulting plant transpiration and localized bare soil evaporation rates. It thus provides an essential building block for interpreting and upscaling results to field and landscape scales for a range of vegetation cover and atmospheric conditions.

  8. Numerical simulation of superheated vapor bubble rising in stagnant liquid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samkhaniani, N.; Ansari, M. R.

    2017-09-01

    In present study, the rising of superheated vapor bubble in saturated liquid is simulated using volume of fluid method in OpenFOAM cfd package. The surface tension between vapor-liquid phases is considered using continuous surface force method. In order to reduce spurious current near interface, Lafaurie smoothing filter is applied to improve curvature calculation. Phase change is considered using Tanasawa mass transfer model. The variation of saturation temperature in vapor bubble with local pressure is considered with simplified Clausius-Clapeyron relation. The couple velocity-pressure equation is solved using PISO algorithm. The numerical model is validated with: (1) isothermal bubble rising and (2) one-dimensional horizontal film condensation. Then, the shape and life time history of single superheated vapor bubble are investigated. The present numerical study shows vapor bubble in saturated liquid undergoes boiling and condensation. It indicates bubble life time is nearly linear proportional with bubble size and superheat temperature.

  9. Roles of Transpiration, Forest Bioproductivity and Fire on a Long-Term Dripwater Hydrochemistry Dataset from Golgotha Cave, SW Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treble, P. C.; Baker, A.; Fairchild, I. J.; Bradley, C.; Mahmud, K.; Andersen, M. S.; Meredith, K.; Mariethoz, G.

    2015-12-01

    Golgotha Cave is located in a forested catchment in SW Australia where evapotranspiration losses from the vadose-zone are high and forest biomass has been disturbed by fire. The cave has been continuously monitored since 2005 and this extensive dataset has been used to quantify key processes determining dripwater hydrology and chemistry (Mahmud et al., 2015; Treble et al., 2013; 2015). In this paper we present a synthesis of these findings and derive a conceptual model to illustrate the main hydrochemical processes that will impact cave dripwater in similar environments. We applied mass-balance techniques to quantify sources (water/rock interactions and aerosol) and sinks (prior calcite precipitation and biomass uptake). Mass-balance results suggest that transpiration and elemental sequestration into biomass modifies dripwater ion concentrations. The vegetation uptake impacts dripwater Mg, K and SO4, with the largest impact on SO4, estimated to be up to 60% at some drip sites. Overall, our findings suggest that varying amounts of transpiration by deeply-rooted trees contribute significantly to spatial and temporal variability in dripwater solute concentrations. This is in addition to the partitioning of infiltrating water between characteristic flow pathways. Applying principal components analysis, we identify a common long-term rising trend in dripwater Cl, Mg, K, Ca, Sr and Si. We assess whether the long-term trends in dripwater solutes are driven by post-fire biomass recovery and/or the impacts of a drying climate in SW Australia.ReferencesMahmud et al. (2015), Terrestrial Lidar Survey and Morphological Analysis to Identify Infiltration Properties in the Tamala Limestone, Western Australia, doi:10.1109/JSTARS.2015.2451088. Treble et al. (2013), An isotopic and modelling study of flow paths and storage in Quaternary calcarenite, doi:10.1016/J.Quascirev.2012.12.015. Treble et al. (2015), Impacts of cave air ventilation and in-cave prior calcite precipitation on

  10. Photosynthesis, transpiration and water use efficiencies of a plant canopy and plant leaves under restricted air current conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitaya, Yoshiaki; Shibuya, Toshio; Tsuruyama, Joshin

    A fundamental study was conducted to obtain the knowledge for culturing plants and exchanging gases with plants under restricted air circulation conditions in space agriculture. The effects of air velocities less than 1.3 m s-1 on net photosynthetic rates (Pn), transpiration rates (Tr) and Pn/Tr, water use efficiencies (WUE), of a canopy of cucumber seedlings and of single leaves of cucumber, sweet potato and barley were assessed with assimilation chamber methods in ground based experiments. The cucumber seedling canopy, which had a LAI of 1.4 and height of 0.1 m, was set in a wind tunnel installed in a plant canopy assimilation chamber. Each of the attached single leaves was set in a leaf assimilation chamber. The Pn and Tr of the plant canopy increased to 1.2 and 2.8 times, respectively, and WUE decreased to 0.4 times with increasing the air velocity from 0.02 to 1.3 m s-1. The Pn and Tr of the single leaves of all the species increased by 1.3-1.7 and 1.9-2.2 times, respectively, and WUE decreased to 0.6-0.8 times as the air velocity increased from 0.05 to 0.8 m s-1. The effect of air velocity was more significant on Tr than on Pn and thus WUE decreased with increasing air velocity in both the plant canopy and the individual leaves. The leaf boundary layer resistance was approximately proportional to the minus 1/3 power of the air velocity. Stomatal resistance was almost constant during the experiment. The CO2 concentrations in the sub-stomatal cavity in leaves of cucumber, sweet potato and barley, respectively, were 43, 31 and 58 mmol mol-1 lower at the air velocity of 0.05 m s-1 than at the air velocity of 0.8 m s-1, while the water vapor pressure in the sub-stomatal cavity was constant. We concluded that the change in the CO2 concentration in the sub-stomatal cavity was a cause of the different effect of the air velocity on Pn and Tr, and thus on WUE. The phenomenon will be more remarkable under restricted air convection conditions at lower gravity in space.

  11. Gravimetric phenotyping of whole plant transpiration responses to atmospheric vapour pressure deficit identifies genotypic variation in water use efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Annette C; Dodd, Ian C; Rothwell, Shane A; Jones, Ros; Tardieu, Francois; Draye, Xavier; Davies, William J

    2016-10-01

    There is increasing interest in rapidly identifying genotypes with improved water use efficiency, exemplified by the development of whole plant phenotyping platforms that automatically measure plant growth and water use. Transpirational responses to atmospheric vapour pressure deficit (VPD) and whole plant water use efficiency (WUE, defined as the accumulation of above ground biomass per unit of water used) were measured in 100 maize (Zea mays L.) genotypes. Using a glasshouse based phenotyping platform with naturally varying VPD (1.5-3.8kPa), a 2-fold variation in WUE was identified in well-watered plants. Regression analysis of transpiration versus VPD under these conditions, and subsequent whole plant gas exchange at imposed VPDs (0.8-3.4kPa) showed identical responses in specific genotypes. Genotype response of transpiration versus VPD fell into two categories: 1) a linear increase in transpiration rate with VPD with low (high WUE) or high (low WUE) transpiration rate at all VPDs, 2) a non-linear response with a pronounced change point at low VPD (high WUE) or high VPD (low WUE). In the latter group, high WUE genotypes required a significantly lower VPD before transpiration was restricted, and had a significantly lower rate of transpiration in response to VPD after this point, when compared to low WUE genotypes. Change point values were significantly positively correlated with stomatal sensitivity to VPD. A change point in stomatal response to VPD may explain why some genotypes show contradictory WUE rankings according to whether they are measured under glasshouse or field conditions. Furthermore, this novel use of a high throughput phenotyping platform successfully reproduced the gas exchange responses of individuals measured in whole plant chambers, accelerating the identification of plants with high WUE. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Solidago canadensis L essential oil vapor effectively inhibits Botrytis cinerea growth and preserves postharvest quality of strawberry as a food model system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shumin Liu

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the anti-fungal properties of Solidago canadensis L essential oil (SCLEO against Botrytis cinerea in vitro, and its ability to control gray mold and maintain quality in strawberry fruits. SCLEO exhibited dose-dependent antifungal activity against B. cinerea and profoundly altered mycelial morphology, cellular ultrastructure, and membrane permeability as evaluated by scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and fluorescence microscopy. SCLEO vapor at 0.1 mL/L maintained higher sensory acceptance and reduced decay of fresh strawberry fruit, and also reduced gray mold in artificially inoculated fruit. SCLEO treatment did not however, stimulate phenylalanin ammonia-lyase (PAL, polyphenol oxidase (POD, or chitinase (CHI, enzymes related to disease resistance. This suggests that SCLEO reduces gray mold by direct inhibition of pathogen growth. SCLEO vapor may provide a new and effective strategy for controlling postharvest disease and maintaining quality in strawberries.

  13. A stomatal optimization theory to describe the effects of atmospheric CO2 on leaf photosynthesis and transpiration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katul, Gabriel; Manzoni, Stefano; Palmroth, Sari; Oren, Ram

    2010-03-01

    Global climate models predict decreases in leaf stomatal conductance and transpiration due to increases in atmospheric CO2. The consequences of these reductions are increases in soil moisture availability and continental scale run-off at decadal time-scales. Thus, a theory explaining the differential sensitivity of stomata to changing atmospheric CO2 and other environmental conditions must be identified. Here, these responses are investigated using optimality theory applied to stomatal conductance. An analytical model for stomatal conductance is proposed based on: (a) Fickian mass transfer of CO2 and H2O through stomata; (b) a biochemical photosynthesis model that relates intercellular CO2 to net photosynthesis; and (c) a stomatal model based on optimization for maximizing carbon gains when water losses represent a cost. Comparisons between the optimization-based model and empirical relationships widely used in climate models were made using an extensive gas exchange dataset collected in a maturing pine (Pinus taeda) forest under ambient and enriched atmospheric CO2. Key Results and Conclusion In this interpretation, it is proposed that an individual leaf optimally and autonomously regulates stomatal opening on short-term (approx. 10-min time-scale) rather than on daily or longer time-scales. The derived equations are analytical with explicit expressions for conductance, photosynthesis and intercellular CO2, thereby making the approach useful for climate models. Using a gas exchange dataset collected in a pine forest, it is shown that (a) the cost of unit water loss lambda (a measure of marginal water-use efficiency) increases with atmospheric CO2; (b) the new formulation correctly predicts the condition under which CO2-enriched atmosphere will cause increasing assimilation and decreasing stomatal conductance.

  14. Released air during vapor and air cavitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jablonská, Jana, E-mail: jana.jablonska@vsb.cz; Kozubková, Milada, E-mail: milada.kozubkova@vsb.cz [VŠB-Technical University of Ostrava, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Department of Hydromechanics and Hydraulic Equipment, 17. listopadu 15, 708 33 Ostrava-Poruba (Czech Republic)

    2016-06-30

    Cavitation today is a very important problem that is solved by means of experimental and mathematical methods. The article deals with the generation of cavitation in convergent divergent nozzle of rectangular cross section. Measurement of pressure, flow rate, temperature, amount of dissolved air in the liquid and visualization of cavitation area using high-speed camera was performed for different flow rates. The measurement results were generalized by dimensionless analysis, which allows easy detection of cavitation in the nozzle. For numerical simulation the multiphase mathematical model of cavitation consisting of water and vapor was created. During verification the disagreement with the measurements for higher flow rates was proved, therefore the model was extended to multiphase mathematical model (water, vapor and air), due to release of dissolved air. For the mathematical modeling the multiphase turbulence RNG k-ε model for low Reynolds number flow with vapor and air cavitation was used. Subsequently the sizes of the cavitation area were verified. In article the inlet pressure and loss coefficient depending on the amount of air added to the mathematical model are evaluated. On the basis of the approach it may be create a methodology to estimate the amount of released air added at the inlet to the modeled area.

  15. Abscisic acid and transpiration rate are involved in the response to boron toxicity in Arabidopsis plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macho-Rivero, Miguel Ángel; Camacho-Cristóbal, Juan José; Herrera-Rodríguez, María Begoña; Müller, Maren; Munné-Bosch, Sergi; González-Fontes, Agustín

    2017-05-01

    Boron (B) is an essential microelement for vascular plant development, but its toxicity is a major problem affecting crop yields in arid and semi-arid areas of the world. In the literature, several genes involved in abscisic acid (ABA) signalling and responses are upregulated in Arabidopsis roots after treatment with excess B. It is known that the AtNCED3 gene, which encodes a crucial enzyme for ABA biosynthesis, plays a key role in the plant response to drought stress. In this study, root AtNCED3 expression and shoot ABA content were rapidly increased in wild-type plants upon B-toxicity treatment. The Arabidopsis ABA-deficient nced3-2 mutant had higher transpiration rate, stomatal conductance and accumulated more B in their shoots than wild-type plants, facts that were associated with the lower levels of ABA in this mutant. However, in wild-type plants, B toxicity caused a significant reduction in stomatal conductance, resulting in a decreased transpiration rate. This response could be a mechanism to limit the transport of excess B from the roots to the leaves under B toxicity. In agreement with the higher transpiration rate of the nced3-2 mutant, this genotype showed an increased leaf B concentration and damage upon exposure to 5 mM B. Under B toxicity, ABA application decreased B accumulation in wild-type and nced3-2 plants. In summary, this work shows that excess B applied to the roots leads to rapid changes in AtNCED3 expression and gas exchange parameters that would contribute to restrain the B entry into the leaves, this effect being mediated by ABA. © 2016 Scandinavian Plant Physiology Society.

  16. Stomatal Conductance, Plant Hydraulics, and Multilayer Canopies: A New Paradigm for Earth System Models or Unnecessary Uncertainty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonan, G. B.

    2016-12-01

    Soil moisture stress is a key regulator of canopy transpiration, the surface energy budget, and land-atmosphere coupling. Many land surface models used in Earth system models have an ad-hoc parameterization of soil moisture stress that decreases stomatal conductance with soil drying. Parameterization of soil moisture stress from more fundamental principles of plant hydrodynamics is a key research frontier for land surface models. While the biophysical and physiological foundations of such parameterizations are well-known, their best implementation in land surface models is less clear. Land surface models utilize a big-leaf canopy parameterization (or two big-leaves to represent the sunlit and shaded canopy) without vertical gradients in the canopy. However, there are strong biometeorological and physiological gradients in plant canopies. Are these gradients necessary to resolve? Here, I describe a vertically-resolved, multilayer canopy model that calculates leaf temperature and energy fluxes, photosynthesis, stomatal conductance, and leaf water potential at each level in the canopy. In this model, midday leaf water stress manifests in the upper canopy layers, which receive high amounts of solar radiation, have high leaf nitrogen and photosynthetic capacity, and have high stomatal conductance and transpiration rates (in the absence of leaf water stress). Lower levels in the canopy become water stressed in response to longer-term soil moisture drying. I examine the role of vertical gradients in the canopy microclimate (solar radiation, air temperature, vapor pressure, wind speed), structure (leaf area density), and physiology (leaf nitrogen, photosynthetic capacity, stomatal conductance) in determining above canopy fluxes and gradients of transpiration and leaf water potential within the canopy.

  17. Effects of some chemically inert dusts upon the transpiration rate of yellow coleus plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beasley, E.W.

    1942-01-01

    In an attempt to obtain critical evidence as to whether inert dusts affect cuticular or stomatal transpiration or both, investigations were conducted with coleus plants, which have stomata on only the lower leaf surfaces. Chemically inert dusts (silica, talc, and Bancroft clay) were applied to one leaf surface or the other, and the relative effects on the daytime and night water losses were measured. The results of these experiments show that for dusts to cause an increase in water loss the dust particles must be small, and the dust must be applied to the stomata-bearing side of the leaf when the stomata are open.

  18. Enhanced transpiration by riparian buffer trees in response to advection in a humid temperate agricultural landscape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez-Santana, V.; Asbjornsen, H.; Sauer, T.; Isenhart, T.; Schilling, K.; Schultz, Ronald

    2011-01-01

    Riparian buffers are designed as management practices to increase infiltration and reduce surface runoff and transport of sediment and nonpoint source pollutants from crop fields to adjacent streams. Achieving these ecosystem service goals depends, in part, on their ability to remove water from the soil via transpiration. In these systems, edges between crop fields and trees of the buffer systems can create advection processes, which could influence water use by trees. We conducted a field study in a riparian buffer system established in 1994 under a humid temperate climate, located in the Corn Belt region of the Midwestern U.S. (Iowa). The goals were to estimate stand level transpiration by the riparian buffer, quantify the controls on water use by the buffer system, and determine to what extent advective energy and tree position within the buffer system influence individual tree transpiration rates. We primarily focused on the water use response (determined with the Heat Ratio Method) of one of the dominant species (Acer saccharinum) and a subdominant (Juglans nigra). A few individuals of three additional species (Quercus bicolor, Betula nigra, Platanus occidentalis) were monitored over a shorter time period to assess the generality of responses. Meteorological stations were installed along a transect across the riparian buffer to determine the microclimate conditions. The differences found among individuals were attributed to differences in species sap velocities and sapwood depths, location relative to the forest edge and prevailing winds and canopy exposure and dominance. Sapflow rates for A. saccharinum trees growing at the SE edge (prevailing winds) were 39% greater than SE interior trees and 30% and 69% greater than NW interior and edge trees, respectively. No transpiration enhancement due to edge effect was detected in the subdominant J. nigra. The results were interpreted as indicative of advection effects from the surrounding crops. Further, significant

  19. Vapor spill pipe monitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianchini, G. M.; McRae, T. G.

    1983-06-01

    The invention is a method and apparatus for continually monitoring the composition of liquefied natural gas flowing from a spill pipe during a spill test by continually removing a sample of the LNG by means of a probe, gasifying the LNG in the probe, and sending the vaporized LNG to a remote IR gas detector for analysis. The probe comprises three spaced concentric tubes surrounded by a water jacket which communicates with a flow channel defined between the inner and middle, and middle and outer tubes. The inner tube is connected to a pump for providing suction, and the probe is positioned in the LNG flow below the spill pipe with the tip oriented partly downward so that LNG is continuously drawn into the inner tube through a small orifice. The probe is made of a high thermal conductivity metal. Hot water is flowed through the water jacket and through the flow channel between the three tubes to provide the necessary heat transfer to flash vaporize the LNG passing through the inner channel of the probe. The gasified LNG is transported through a connected hose or tubing extending from the probe to a remote IR sensor which measures the gas composition.

  20. Vaporization of fault water during seismic slip

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jianye; Niemeijer, André R.; Fokker, Peter A.

    2017-06-01

    Laboratory and numerical studies, as well as field observations, indicate that phase transitions of pore water might be an important process in large earthquakes. We present a model of the thermo-hydro-chemo-mechanical processes, including a two-phase mixture model to incorporate the phase transitions of pore water, occurring during fast slip (i.e., a natural earthquake) in order to investigate the effects of vaporization on the coseismic slip. Using parameters from typical natural faults, our modeling shows that vaporization can indeed occur at the shallow depths of an earthquake, irrespective of the wide variability of the parameters involved (sliding velocity, friction coefficient, gouge permeability and porosity, and shear-induced dilatancy). Due to the fast kinetics, water vaporization can cause a rapid slip weakening even when the hydrological conditions of the fault zone are not favorable for thermal pressurization, e.g., when permeability is high. At the same time, the latent heat associated with the phase transition causes the temperature rise in the slip zone to be buffered. Our parametric analyses reveal that the amount of frictional work is the principal factor controlling the onset and activity of vaporization and that it can easily be achieved in earthquakes. Our study shows that coseismic pore fluid vaporization might have played important roles at shallow depths of large earthquakes by enhancing slip weakening and buffering the temperature rise. The combined effects may provide an alternative explanation for the fact that low-temperature anomalies were measured in the slip zones at shallow depths of large earthquakes.

  1. Chemical vapor infiltration in single fiber bundles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Devlin, D.J.; Barbero, R.S.; Currier, R.P.

    1990-01-01

    Chemical vapor infiltration (CVI) in single fiber bundles is studied under isothermal conditions. Understanding infiltration dynamics in single bundles is essential to process design and modeling efforts. Deposition of pyrolytic carbon in carbon-fiber bundles is chosen as the experimental system, with densification data obtained from thermogravimetric analysis. Data are then compared to predictions from a recently proposed CVI model for fiber bundle densification. 10 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Elaborating equations of state of a liquid and its vapor for two-phase flow models; Elaboration des lois d'etat d'un liquide et de sa vapeur pour les modeles d'ecoulements diphasiques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Metayer, O.; Massoni, J. [Polytech Marseille, UMR CNRS 6595, Universite Aix-Marseille I, Technopole de Chateau Gombert, 5, rue E. Fermi, 13453 Marseille cedex 13 (France); Projet SMASH, INRIA, 2004, route des Lucioles, 06902 Sophia Antipolis (France); Saurel, R. [Polytech Marseille, UMR CNRS 6595, Universite Aix-Marseille I, Technopole de Chateau Gombert, 5, rue E. Fermi, 13453 Marseille cedex 13 (France); Projet SMASH, INRIA, 2004, route des Lucioles, 06902 Sophia Antipolis (France); Institut Universitaire de France (France)

    2004-03-01

    Some two-phase flow models have shown an excellent ability for the resolution of a wide class of applications ranging from interface problems to mixtures with several velocities. These models account for waves propagation (acoustic and convective) and consist in hyperbolic systems of partial differential equations. In this context, each phase is compressible and necessitates the knowledge of an appropriate pure fluid equation of state. The literature abounds in equations of state (Van der Waals for example) that consider the phases as a mixture and not as a separated phases flow in thermodynamical non-equilibrium, which makes them unsuited to such models. Moreover, their formulation leads to ill-posed problems for thermodynamic states inside the saturation dome (speed of sound squared is negative). In the present approach, each fluid is governed by a 'Stiffened Gas' EOS (3). Its particularly simple analytical form allows explicit mathematical calculations of important flow relations which are at the centre of theoretical analysis and building of modern numerical methods (acoustic properties, Riemann problems, reactive Riemann solvers,...) while retaining with a high accuracy the main physical properties of the matter (attractive and repulsive molecular effects). The determination of the corresponding parameters is complexified when the liquid is in presence of its vapor. In this case, the EOS parameters of each phase are strongly linked. The determination of the analytical forms of the EOS and their associated coefficients for miscible and non-miscible fluids is the subject of this article. (authors)

  3. LOX vaporization in high-pressure, hydrogen-rich gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litchford, Ron J.; Jeng, San-Mou

    1990-01-01

    LOX droplet vaporization in high-pressure hydrogen-rich gas is analyzed, with special attention to thermodynamic effects which compel the surface to heat to the critical state and to supercritical vaporization processes on heating to criticality. Subcritical vaporization is modeled using a quasi-steady diffusion-controlled gas-phase transport formulation coupled to an effective-conductivity internal-energy-transport model accounting for circulation effects. It is demonstrated how the droplet surface might heat to the critical state, for ambient pressures slightly greater than the critical pressure of oxygen, such that the bulk of propellant within the droplet remains substantially below the critical mixing temperature.

  4. Changes in transpiration and photosynthetic rates of various leaves during treatment with ozonated hexene or ozone gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Todd, G.W.; Propst, B.

    1963-01-01

    Measurements were made on the rates of photosynthesis and transpiration of bean, tomato and coleus leaves during and immediately following fumigation with either ozone or ozonated hexene gas. Both fumigants caused marked decreases in the rate of photosynthesis in all 3 species although in tomato and coleus leaves, the reduction in photosynthesis took place only during the fumigation with ozonated hexene gas and afterwards the rate returned to normal. Ozone fumigation caused decreases in transpiration but the decrease was not as large as that obtained for photosynthesis. Transpiration in tomato and coleus leaves showed little response to ozonated hexene gas although bean leaves responsed in much the same way as they did when they were treated with ozone alone. The white portions of coleus leaves (where the green outer portion had been removed) were used for similar fumigations and an increase in respiration and a decrease in transpiration with ozonated hexene was noted. There were no changes in transpiration from these leaves following ozone fumigations. Increases in respiration after ozone and ozonated hexene fumigations were obtained for bean, tomato and intact coleus leaves as had been reported previously for bean leaves. It was postulated that part of the decrease in growth (not accompanied by visible injury) obtained when plants were treated with ozonated hexene gas might be due directly to the reduction in photosynthesis. It would not appear in the species tested that the more resistant species close their stomates and thereby prevent the fumigant from entering.

  5. Revisiting the Lie-group symmetry method for turbulent channel flow with wall transpiration

    CERN Document Server

    Khujadze, George

    2016-01-01

    The Lie-group-based symmetry analysis, as first proposed in Avsarkisov et al. (2014) and then later modified in Oberlack et al. (2015), to generate invariant solutions in order to predict the scaling behavior of a channel flow with uniform wall transpiration, is revisited. By focusing first on the results obtained in Avsarkisov et al. (2014), we failed to reproduce two key results: (i) For different transpiration rates at a constant Reynolds number, the mean velocity profiles (in deficit form) do not universally collapse onto a single curve as claimed. (ii) The universally proposed logarithmic scaling law in the center of the channel does not match the direct numerical simulation (DNS) data for the presented parameter values. In fact, no universal scaling behavior in the center of the channel can be detected from their DNS data, as it is misleadingly claimed in Avsarkisov et al. (2014). Moreover, we will demonstrate that the assumption of a Reynolds-number independent symmetry analysis is not justified for th...

  6. A microfluidic pump/valve inspired by xylem embolism and transpiration in plants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Jingmin

    Full Text Available In plants, transpiration draws the water upward from the roots to the leaves. However, this flow can be blocked by air bubbles in the xylem conduits, which is called xylem embolism. In this research, we present the design of a biomimetic microfluidic pump/valve based on water transpiration and xylem embolism. This micropump/valve is mainly composed of three parts: the first is a silicon sheet with an array of slit-like micropores to mimic the stomata in a plant leaf; the second is a piece of agarose gel to mimic the mesophyll cells in the sub-cavities of a stoma; the third is a micro-heater which is used to mimic the xylem embolism and its self-repairing. The solution in the microchannels of a microfluidic chip can be driven by the biomimetic "leaf" composed of the silicon sheet and the agarose gel. The halting and flowing of the solution is controlled by the micro-heater. Results have shown that a steady flow rate of 1.12 µl/min can be obtained by using this micropump/valve. The time interval between the turning on/off of the micro-heater and the halt (or flow of the fluid is only 2∼3 s. This micropump/valve can be used as a "plug and play" fluid-driven unit. It has the potential to be used in many application fields.

  7. Hydrological effects of forest transpiration loss in bark beetle-impacted watersheds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bearup, Lindsay A.; Maxwell, Reed M.; Clow, David W.; McCray, John E.

    2014-01-01

    The recent climate-exacerbated mountain pine beetle infestation in the Rocky Mountains of North America has resulted in tree death that is unprecedented in recorded history. The spatial and temporal heterogeneity inherent in insect infestation creates a complex and often unpredictable watershed response, influencing the primary storage and flow components of the hydrologic cycle. Despite the increased vulnerability of forested ecosystems under changing climate1, watershed-scale implications of interception, ground evaporation, and transpiration changes remain relatively unknown, with conflicting reports of streamflow perturbations across regions. Here, contributions to streamflow are analysed through time and space to investigate the potential for increased groundwater inputs resulting from hydrologic change after infestation. Results demonstrate that fractional late-summer groundwater contributions from impacted watersheds are 30 ± 15% greater after infestation and when compared with a neighbouring watershed that experienced earlier and less-severe attack, albeit uncertainty propagations through time and space are considerable. Water budget analysis confirms that transpiration loss resulting from beetle kill can account for the relative increase in groundwater contributions to streams, often considered the sustainable flow fraction and critical to mountain water supplies and ecosystems.

  8. Transpiration Rate for Chile Peppers Irrigated with Brackish Groundwater and ro Concentrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, M. K.; Baath, G.

    2016-12-01

    Fresh water availability is declining in most of the semi-arid and arid regions across the world including southwestern United States. Use of marginal quality groundwater has been increasing for sustaining agriculture in these arid regions. Reverse Osmosis (RO) can treat brackish groundwater but the possibility of using RO concentrate for irrigation needs further exploration. This greenhouse study evaluates the transpiration rate, water use, leaching fraction and yield responses of five selected chile pepper (Capsicum annuum) cultivars irrigated with natural brackish groundwater and RO concentrate. The four saline water treatments used for irrigation were tap water of EC 0.6 (control), ground water of EC 3 and 5 dS/m and RO concentrate of EC 8 dS/m. The transpiration of all chile peppers cultivars decreased and leaching fraction increased with increasing irrigation water salinity. Based on the water use efficiency (WUEY) of selected chile pepper cultivars, brackish water of EC ≤ 3 dS/m can be used for irrigation. The average yield of chile peppers was stable up to a saturated soil paste extract electrical conductivity (ECe) of about 2 dS/m, although further increases in ECe resulted in an exponential yield decline. This study showed that yield reductions in chile peppers irrigated with Ca rich brackish groundwater were less than those reported using NaCl dominant saline solution studies. Environmentally safe reuse of RO concentrate could stimulate implementation of inland desalination in water scarce areas and increase greenhouse chile pepper cultivation.

  9. Student Exposure to Mercury Vapors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Joyce

    1986-01-01

    Discusses the problem of mercury vapors caused by spills in high school and college laboratories. Describes a study which compared the mercury vapor levels of laboratories in both an older and a newer building. Concludes that the mercurial contamination of chemistry laboratories presents minimal risks to the students. (TW)

  10. Using water vapor isotopes to examine evapotranspiration dynamics in corn and miscanthus reveals challenges to the technique as well as seasonal differences between crops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, J. N.; Bernacchi, C.

    2016-12-01

    Second-generation biofuel crops are being planted at an increasing extent around the globe. Changing land use from common field crops to perennial biofuel crops such as miscanthus or switchgrass is expected to alter ecohydrology via changes in evapotranspiration (ET). However, the direction in which evapotranspiration will shift, either partitioning more moisture through soil evaporation (E) or through plant transpiration (T) is uncertain. To investigate how land conversion from maize to miscanthus affects ET partitioning we measured the isotopic composition of water vapor via continuous air sampling. We obtained continuous diurnal measurements of δ2H and δ18O for miscanthus and maize on multiple days over the course of the growing season. Water vapor isotopes drawn from two heights were measured at 2 Hz using a cavity ringdown spectrometer and partitioned into components of E and T using a simple mixing equation. Partitioning was also accomplished with a combination of sap flow sensors and soil lysimeters. Preliminary results reveal that while daily transpiration fraction can be strongly influenced by meteorological events, the whole season transpiration fraction dominates variations in ET in miscanthus fields more so than in fields of maize.

  11. Elevated CO2 decreases both transpiration flow and concentrations of Ca and Mg in the xylem sap of wheat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houshmandfar, Alireza; Fitzgerald, Glenn J; Tausz, Michael

    2015-02-01

    The impact of elevated atmospheric [CO2] (e[CO2]) on plants often includes a decrease in their nutrient status, including Ca and Mg, but the reasons for this decline have not been clearly identified. One of the proposed hypotheses is a decrease in transpiration-driven mass flow of nutrients due to decreased stomatal conductance. We used glasshouse and Free Air CO2 Enrichment (FACE) experiments with wheat to show that, in addition to decrease in transpiration rate, e[CO2] decreased the concentrations of Ca and Mg in the xylem sap. This result suggests that uptake of nutrients is not only decreased by reduced transpiration-driven mass flow, but also by as yet unidentified mechanisms that lead to reduced concentrations in the xylem sap. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  12. Vaporization of perfluorocarbon droplets using optical irradiation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Strohm, Eric; Rui, Min; Gorelikov, Ivan; Matsuura, Naomi; Kolios, Michael

    2011-01-01

    .... Droplet vaporization has been previously demonstrated using acoustic methods. We propose using laser irradiation as a means to induce PFC droplet vaporization using a method we term optical droplet vaporization (ODV...

  13. A Citizen's Guide to Vapor Intrusion Mitigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    This guide describes how vapor intrusion is the movement of chemical vapors from contaminated soil and groundwater into nearby buildings.Vapors primarily enter through openings in the building foundation or basement walls.

  14. Modelling the flow and the two-phase science of heat inside a cross-section tube of a `once through` vapor generator overheated with sodium; Modelisation de l`ecoulement et de la thermique double phase a l`interieur d`un tube droit de generateur de vapeur `once-through` a surchauffe chauffe au sodium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mutelle, H

    1997-11-28

    Concerning the future fast neutrons reactors, studied in the frame of the European Fast Reactor (E.F.R.) project, several innovations have been proposed particularly in the field of vapor generators. These vapor generators have the particularity to use two different exchange fluids which can react violently one with the other. The thermodynamic fluid or secondary fluid is water under high pressure (18.5 MPa) which comes under saturated in the inlet of the device, warms and vaporizes inside the nest of boiler-tubes. At the outlet, vapor is overheated. The primary fluid is a liquid metal (sodium for French reactors) which flows outside the nest of boiler-tubes in the opposite direction of the secondary fluid. Several vapor generators models have been carried out. Concerning the European Fast Reactor project, the tubes have a cross-section and are in ferritic steel. Inside the boiler-tubes, the water-vapor flow can be divided into three areas. The first one is the liquid monophasic rate. It ends by the start of the boiling which is nucleated in the shell. Downstream, the two-phase flow passes from a bubbles flow to an annular flow. The liquid is then on the form of shell film and on the form of droplets carried along by the vapor flux. The dryout of the annular film is the start of the third area where there is vapor forced convection. At the present time, there is still no thermohydraulic code in the conditions of the E.F.R. vapor generator. In order to have a reliable size tool, the members of the E.F.R. project have then decided to do a two-phase flow model and have experimented a mono tubular scale model called ``ATLAS`` which represents well the real component for size, fluids and running conditions. The aim of the present work is then, in the frame of this experimental program, to 1)qualify the heat exchange and friction laws which will be later introduced in the thermohydraulic codes of cross-sections vapor generators 2)characterize the dryout phenomenon 3

  15. Vaporization Studies of Olivine via Knudsen Effusion Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, G. C. C.; Jacobson, N. S.

    2014-01-01

    Olivine is the major mineral in the Earth's upper mantle occurring predominantly in igneous rocks and has been identified in meteorites, asteroids, the Moon and Mars. Among many other important applications in planetary and materials sciences, the thermodynamic properties of vapor species from olivine are crucial as input parameters in computational modelling of the atmospheres of hot, rocky exoplanets (lava planets). There are several weight loss studies of olivine vaporization in the literature and one Knudsen Effusion Mass Spectrometry (KEMS) study. In this study, we examine a forsterite-rich olivine (93% forsterite and 7% fayalite, Fo93Fa7) with KEMS to further understand its vaporization and thermodynamic properties.

  16. Droplet vaporization in a supercritical microgravity environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, E. W.; Farrell, P. V.

    A model has been developed for non-convective vaporization of liquid fuel droplets in an environment above the liquid critical pressure and near or above the liquid critical temperature. The model employs conservation of mass, energy and chemical species, along with transport properties which vary with temperature and species concentration. The liquid interface is assumed to be in thermodynamic equilibrium. The interface problem is solved using the Gibbs-Duhem relationship, and evaluating mixture fugacities using a modified Redlich-Kwong equation of state for the mixture. Due to the limited range of this equation, a curve-fit equation of state suitable for conditions far from the liquid critical point was applied. Results are presented for an n-octane liquid drop in nitrogen gas. For two gas conditions, several droplet sizes are modeled. Results include droplet size histories, surface temperature histories, and liquid and gas phase temperature profiles. The liquid vaporization rate is increased significantly for supercritical conditions compared to subcritical conditions. Using the specified equation of state for the ambient conditions tested, the droplet is completely vaporized before the liquid surface is heated to the liquid critical temperature.

  17. The Amazon forest-rainfall feedback: the roles of transpiration and interception

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dekker, Stefan; Staal, Arie; Tuinenburg, Obbe

    2017-04-01

    In the Amazon, deep-rooted trees increase local transpiration and high tree cover increase local interception evaporation. These increased local evapotranspiration fluxes to the atmosphere have both positive effects on forests down-wind, as they stimulate rainfall. Although important for the functioning of the Amazon, we have an inadequate assessment on the strength and the timing of these forest-rainfall feedbacks. In this study we (i) estimate local forest transpiration and local interception evaporation, (ii) simulate the trajectories of these moisture flows through the atmosphere and (iii) quantify their contributions to the forest-rainfall feedback for the whole Amazon basin. To determine the atmospheric moisture flows in tropical South America we use a Lagrangian moisture tracking algorithm on 0.25° (c. 25 km) resolution with eight atmospheric layers on a monthly basis for the period 2003-2015. With our approach we account for multiple re-evaporation cycles of this moisture. We also calculate for each month the potential effects of forest loss on evapotranspiration. Combined, these calculations allow us to simulate the effects of land-cover changes on rainfall in downwind areas and estimate the effect on the forest. We found large regional and temporal differences in the importance how forest contribute to rainfall. The transpiration-rainfall feedback is highly important during the dry season. Between September-November, when large parts of the Amazon are at the end of the dry season, more than 50% of the rainfall is caused by the forests upstream. This means that droughts in the Amazon are alleviated by the forest. Furthermore, we found that much moisture cycles several times during its trajectory over the Amazon. After one evapotranspiration-rainfall cycle, more than 40% of the moisture is re-evaporated again. The interception-evaporation feedback is less important during droughts. Finally from our analysis, we show that the forest-rainfall feedback is

  18. Simulation of Evapotranspiration using an Optimality-based Ecohydrological Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lajiao

    2014-05-01

    Accurate estimation of evapotranspiration (ET) is essential in understanding the effect of climate change and human activities on ecosystem and water resource. As an important tool for ET estimation, most of the traditional hydrological or ecohydrological models treat ET as a physical process, controlled by energy, vapor, pressure and turbulence. It is at times questionable as transpiration, major component of ET, is biological activity closely linked to photosynthesis by stomatal conductivity. Optimality-based ecohydrological models consider the mutual interaction of ET and photosynthesis based on optimality principle. However, as a rising generation of ecohydrological models, so far there are only a few applications of the optimality-based model in different ecosystems. The ability and reliability of this kind of models for ecohydrological modeling need to be validated in more ecosystems. The objective of this study is to validate the optimality hypothesis for water-limited ecosystem. To achieve this, the study applied an optimality-based model Vegetation Optimality Model (VOM) to simulate ET and its components based on optimality principle. The model is applied in a semiarid watershed. The simulated ET and soil waster were compared with long term measurement data in Kendall and Lcukyhill sites in the watershed. The result showed that the temporal variations of simulated ET and soil water are in good agreement with observed data. Temporal dynamic of soil evaporation and transpiration and their response to precipitation events can be well captured with the model. This could come to a conclusion the optimality-based ecohydrological model could be a potential approach to simulate ET.

  19. HESS Opinions “A perspective on isotope versus non-isotope approaches to determine the contribution of transpiration to total evaporation”

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sutanto, S.J.; Van den Hurk, B.; Dirmeyer, P.A.; Seneviratne, S.I.; Röckmann, T.; Trenberth, K.E.; Blyth, E.M.; Wenninger, J.; Hoffmann, G.

    2014-01-01

    Current techniques to disentangle the evaporative fluxes from the continental surface into a contribution evaporated from soils and canopy, or transpired by plants, are under debate. Many isotope-based studies show that transpiration contributes generally more than 70% to the total evaporation,

  20. Mapping dry-season tree transpiration of an oak woodland at the catchment scale, using object-attributes derived from satellite imagery and sap flow measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reyes-Acosta, J.L.; Lubczynski, M.

    2013-01-01

    Tree transpiration is an important plant-physiological process that influences the water cycle, thereby influencing ecosystems and even the quantity of available water resources. However, direct tree-transpiration measurements, particularly at large spatial scales, are still rare, due to the

  1. Near-optimal response of instantaneous transpiration efficiency to vapour pressure deficit, temperature and [CO2] in cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    The instantaneous transpiration efficiency (ITE, the ratio of photosynthesis rate to transpiration) is an important variable for crops, because it ultimately affects dry mass production per unit of plant water lost to the atmosphere. The theory that stomata optimize carbon uptake per unit water used...

  2. Supercritical microgravity droplet vaporization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartfield, J.; Curtis, E.; Farrell, P.

    1990-01-01

    Supercritical droplet vaporization is an important issue in many combustion systems, such as liquid fueled rockets and compression-ignition (diesel) engines. In order to study the details of droplet behavior at these conditions, an experiment was designed to provide a gas phase environment which is above the critical pressure and critical temperature of a single liquid droplet. In general, the droplet begins as a cold droplet in the hot, high pressure environment. In order to eliminate disruptions to the droplet by convective motion in the gas, forced and natural convection gas motion are required to be small. Implementation of this requirement for forced convection is straightforward, while reduction of natural convection is achieved by reduction in the g-level for the experiment. The resulting experiment consists of a rig which can stably position a droplet without restraint in a high-pressure, high temperature gas field in microgravity. The microgravity field is currently achieved by dropping the device in the NASA Lewis 2.2 second drop tower. The performance of the experimental device and results to date are presented.

  3. An optimization model for the operations of steam production in industrial boilers Um modelo de otimização para as operações de produção de vapor em caldeiras industriais

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cleber Damião Rocco

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, a mixed integer linear programming model is presented to support some of the key decisions in the steam production system with industrial boilers. The model approaches the fuel management decisions (fuel replenishment and its inventory control, boiler operational decisions (start-up, warm-up, and shutdown operations, and which boiler should produce steam. The model adjustments and its validation were carried out through a case study in a large food industry. In face of the good outcomes achieved in applying the model and the lack of optimization tools to support the decisions in this system, the proposed model is a suitable alternative to support some of the key decisions in the system of steam production with multiple industrial boilers.Apresenta-se neste trabalho um modelo de programação linear inteira mista para apoiar algumas das principais decisões na operação de produção de vapor em caldeiras industriais. O modelo contempla as decisões de gerenciamento dos combustíveis: compra nos fornecedores, transporte para a fábrica e níveis dos estoques, assim como determina o modo de funcionamento das caldeiras: momentos de acionamento (start-up, regime de aquecimento (warm-up e desligamento dos equipamentos (shutdown, e em quais deles haverá produção de vapor. Os ajustes e a validação do modelo ocorreram por meio de um estudo de caso realizado em uma indústria de alimentos de grande porte. Diante dos bons resultados obtidos com a aplicação do modelo e da ausência de protocolos ou ferramentas de otimização para apoiar as decisões no sistema estudado, o modelo proposto apresenta-se como uma alternativa viável para apoiar algumas das principais decisões no sistema de produção de vapor em caldeiras industriais.

  4. Etude des relations entre photosynthese respiration, transpiration et nutrition minerale chez le ble

    Science.gov (United States)

    André, M.; Ducloux, H.; Richaud, C.; Massimino, D.; Daguenet, A.; Massimino, J.; Gerbaud, A.

    La croissance du Blé Triticum aestivum a été étudiée en environnement contrôlé et fermé pendant une période de 70 jours. Les échanges gazeux (Photosynthèse, Respiration) hydriques (Transpiration) et la consommation en éléments minéraux (Azote, Phosphore, Potassium) ont été mesurés en continu. On présentera les relations dynamiques observées entre les différentes fonctions physiologiques, d'une part sous l'influence de la croissance et d'autre part en réponse à des modifications de l'environnement. L'influence de la teneur en CO2 pendant la croissance (teneur normale ou doublée) sera mise en évidence.

  5. The effects of lead on photosynthesis, 14C distribution among photoassimilates and transpiration of maize seedlings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerzy W. Poskuta

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Roots of whole 3 week-old seedlings of maize were exposed for 24 h to a solution of PbCl2. The concentrations of Pb were: 0, 200, 400, 800, 1200, 2400 mg dm-3. The amount of Pb taken up by roots was independent of the concentration of this element in the medium. The Pb taken up by shoots increased linearly with increasing treatment concentration. Pb caused: concentration-dependent inhibition of photosynthesis (PS, transpiration (T, 14CO2 uptake and incorporation of label into photosynthetic products. The largest limitation by Pb of the flow of photoassimilated carbon occurred into starch and sugar phosphates. Among the water-soluble photoassimilates, the largest limitation of carbon flow occurred into organic acids and sugars and the smallest into amino acids.

  6. Configurational temperature and local properties of the anisotropic Gay-Berne liquid crystal model: applications to the isotropic liquid/vapor interface and isotropic/nematic transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghoufi, Aziz; Morineau, Denis; Lefort, Ronan; Malfreyt, Patrice

    2011-01-21

    Molecular simulations in the isothermal statistical ensembles require that the macroscopic thermal and mechanical equilibriums are respected and that the local values of these properties are constant at every point in the system. The thermal equilibrium in Monte Carlo simulations can be checked through the calculation of the configurational temperature, k(B)T(conf)=/, where ∇(r) is the nabla operator of position vector r. As far as we know, T(conf) was never calculated with the anisotropic Gay-Berne potential, whereas the calculation of T(conf) is much more widespread with more common potentials (Lennard Jones, electrostatic, ...). We establish here an operational expression of the macroscopic and local configurational temperatures, and we investigate locally the isotropic liquid phase, the liquid / vapor interface, and the isotropic-nematic transition by Monte Carlo simulations.

  7. Micro-mechanism of vapor film collapse on high temperature particle surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abe, Yutaka; Tochio, Daisuke [Dept. of Mechanical Systems Engineering, Yamagata Univ., Yonezawa, Yamagata (Japan)

    1999-07-01

    Thermal detonation model is proposed to describe vapor explosion. According to this model, vapor film on pre-mixed high temperature droplet surface is needed to be collapsed for the trigger of the vapor explosion. It is pointed out that the vapor film collapse behavior is significantly affected by the subcooling of low temperature liquid. However, the effect of subcooling on micro-mechanism of vapor film collapse behavior is not experimentally well identified. The objective of the present research is to experimentally investigate the effect of subcooling on micro-mechanism of film boiling collapse behavior. As the results, it is experimentally clarified that the vapor film collapse behavior in low subcool condition is qualitatively different from the vapor film collapse behavior in high subcooling condition. In high subcooling condition, instability of the vapor film dominates the vapor film collapse on the particle surface. On the other hand, micro-mechanism at the interface between vapor and liquid such as micro-jet is dominant in low subcool condition in case of vapor film collapse by pressure pulse. (author)

  8. Transpiration, potassium uptake and flow in tobacco as affected by nitrogen forms and nutrient levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Y X; Li, C J; Zhang, F S

    2005-05-01

    Ammonium can result in toxicity symptoms in many plants when it is supplied as the sole source of N. In this work, influences of different nitrogen forms at two levels (2 and 15 mm N) on growth, water relations and uptake and flow of potassium were studied in plants of Nicotiana tabacum 'K 326'. Xylem sap from different leaves was collected from 106-d-old tobacco plants cultured in quartz sand by application of pressure to the root system. Whole-shoot transpiration for each of the treatments was measured on a daily basis by weight determination. Total replacement of NO(3)(-)N by NH(4)(+)-N caused a substantial decrease in dry weight gain, even when plants grew under nutrient deficiency. Increasing nutrient concentration resulted in a greater net dry weight gain when nitrogen was supplied as NO(3)(-) or NH(4)NO(3), but resulted in little change when nitrogen was supplied as NH(4)(+). NH(4)(+)-N as the sole N-source also caused reduction in transpiration rate, changes in plant WUE (which depended on the nutrient levels) and a decrease in potassium uptake. However, the amount of xylem-transported potassium in the plants fed with NH(4)(+) was not reduced: it was 457 % or 596 % of the potassium currently taken up at low or high nutrient level, respectively, indicating a massive export from leaves and cycling of potassium in the phloem. Ammonium reduces leaf stomatal conductance of tobacco plants. The flow and partitioning of potassium in tobacco plants can be changed, depending on the nitrogen forms and nutrient levels.

  9. Reduced atmospheric pressure in Radish: Alteration of NCER and transpiration at decreased oxygen partial pressures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wehkamp, Cara Ann; Stasiak, Michael; Wheeler, Raymond; Dixon, Mike

    Fundamental to the future of space exploration is the development of advanced life support systems capable of maintaining crews for significant periods without re-supply from Earth. Significant research is focused on the development of bioregenerative life support systems to be used in conjunction with the current physico-chemical methods. These bioregenerative life support systems harness natural ecosystem processes and employ plant photosynthesis and transpiration to produce food, oxygen and regenerate water while consuming carbon dioxide. The forthcoming exploration of the Moon and Mars has prompted interest into the effects of hypobaria on plant development. Reduced atmospheric pressures will lessen the pressure gradient between the structure and the local environment thereby decreasing gas leakage and possibly the structural mass of the plant growth facility. In order to establish the optimal specifications for reduced pressure plant growth structures it is essential to determine the atmospheric pressure limits required for conventional plant development and growth. Due to its physiological importance, oxygen will compose a significant portion of these minimal environments. The objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that reduced atmospheric pressure and decreased oxygen partial pressures had no effect on radish productivity. Radishes (Raphanus sativa L. cv. Cherry Bomb II) were grown from seed in the University of Guelph's Hypobaric Plant Growth Chambers for a period of 21 days. Treatments included total pressures of 10, 33, 66 and 96 kPa and oxygen partial pressures of 2, 7, 14 and 20 kPa. Experiments demonstrated that reduced partial pressures of oxygen had a greater effect on radish growth than hypobaria. Results showed a reduction in net carbon exchange rate and transpiration with decreasing oxygen partial pressures leading to diminished productivity. Keywords: hypobaric, radish, oxygen partial pressure, variable pressure chamber

  10. Understanding Latent Heat of Vaporization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linz, Ed

    1995-01-01

    Presents a simple exercise for students to do in the kitchen at home to determine the latent heat of vaporization of water using typical household materials. Designed to stress understanding by sacrificing precision for simplicity. (JRH)

  11. Microenvironmental exposure to mercury vapor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stopford, W.; Bundy, S.D.; Goldwater, L.J.; Bittikofer, J.A.

    1978-05-01

    Work area and breathing zone samples were collected in a factory utilizing metallic mercury and analyzed for mercury vapor content. Breathing zone samples averaged several fold higher in concentration than concurrent area samples, reflecting a ''microenvironmental'' exposure to mercury vapor, presumably from contaminated clothing and hands. Blood and corrected total urine mercury values correlated well with the average microenvironmental exposure level for each worker. Measurements of unbound mercury in urine samples were sensitive at picking up minimal exposures. Excessive amounts of unbound mercury were not found in the urine, even with wide day-to-day swings in microenvironmental mercury vapor levels, suggesting that the human body can adapt to a chronic, moderate exposure to mercury vapor.

  12. Nutrient and water addition effects on day- and night-time conductance and transpiration in a C3 desert annual

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ludwig, F.; Jewitt, R.A.; Donovan, L.A.

    2006-01-01

    Recent research has shown that many C3 plant species have significant stomatal opening and transpire water at night even in desert habitats. Day-time stomatal regulation is expected to maximize carbon gain and prevent runaway cavitation, but little is known about the effect of soil resource

  13. Plant water relations as affected by osmotic potential of the nutrient solution and potential transpiration in tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, Y.L.; Marcelis, L.F.M.; Stanghellini, C.

    2004-01-01

    The hypothesis that water flow into tomato fruits is affected similarly by osmotic potential of the nutrient solution and potential transpiration (shoot environment) via their effects on stem water potential, was tested through experiments carried out in two glasshouses where climate was controlled

  14. Biophysical controls on canopy transpiration in a black locust ( Robinia pseudoacacia ) plantation on the semi-arid Loess Plateau, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei Jiao; Nan Lu; Ge Sun; Eric J. Ward; Bojie Fu

    2015-01-01

    In the semi-arid Loess Plateau of China, black locust (Robinia pseudoacacia) was widely planted for soil conservation and afforestation purposes during the past three decades. Investigating biophysical controls on canopy transpiration (Ec) of the plantations is essential to understanding the effects of afforestation on watershed hydrology and regional water resources....

  15. Effects of above- and below-ground competition from shrubs on photosynthesis, transpiration and growth in Quercus robur L

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anna M. Jensen; Magnus Lof; Emile S. Gardiner

    2011-01-01

    For a tree seedling to successfully establish in dense shrubbery, it must maintain function under heterogeneous resource availability. We evaluated leaf-level acclimation in photosynthetic capacity, seedling-level transpiration, and seedling morphology and growth to gain an understanding of the effects of above- and below-ground competition on Quercus robur seedlings....

  16. Response of tomato plants to a step-change in root zone salinity, under two different transpiration regimes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, Y.; Stanghellini, C.; Challa, H.

    2002-01-01

    The response of a tomato crop to a step-change in salinity was investigated under different potential transpiration conditions. A crop growing for 5 months under saline irrigation water (EC 9 dS m−1) was given thereafter a standard nutrient solution with an EC of 2 dS m−1. The previous effects of

  17. Responses of transpiration and hydraulic conductance to root temperature in nitrogen- and phosphorus-deficient cotton seedlings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radin, J W

    1990-03-01

    Suboptimal N or P availability and cool temperatures all decrease apparent hydraulic conductance (L) of cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) roots. The interaction between nutrient status and root temperature was tested in seedlings grown in nutrient solutions. The depression of L (calculated as the ratio of transpiration rate to absolute value of leaf water potential [Psi(w)]) by nutrient stress depended strongly on root temperature, and was minimized at high temperatures. In fully nourished plants, L was high at all temperatures >/=20 degrees C, but it decreased greatly as root temperature approached the chilling threshold of 15 degrees C. Decreasing temperature lowered Psi(w) first, followed by transpiration rate. In N- or P-deficient plants, L approached the value for fully nourished plants at root temperatures >/=30 degrees C, but it decreased almost linearly with temperature as roots were cooled. Nutrient effects on L were mediated only by differences in transpiration, and Psi(w) was unaffected. The responses of Psi(w) and transpiration to root cooling and nutrient stress imply that if a messenger is transmitted from cooled roots to stomata, the messenger is effective only in nutrient-stressed plants.

  18. Comparative measurements of transpiration an canopy conductance in two mixed deciduous woodlands differing in structure and species composition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herbst, Mathias; Rosier, Paul T.W.; Morecroft, Michael D.

    2008-01-01

    a continuous hazel (Corylus avellana L.) understory. Wytham Woods, which had an LAI of 3.6, was dominated by ash (Fraxinus excelsior L.) and sycamore (Acer pseudoplatanus L.) and had only a sparse understory. Annual canopy transpiration was 367 mm for Grimsbury Wood and 397 mm for Wytham Woods. These values...

  19. Quantifying structural and physiological controls on variation in canopy transpiration among planted pine and hardwood species in the southern Appalachians

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chelcy R. Ford; Robert M. Hubbard; James M. Vose

    2010-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that planted pine stands exhibit higher evapotranspiration (ET) and are more sensitive to climatic conditions compared with hardwood stands. Whether this is due to management and stand effects, biological effects or their interaction is poorly understood. We estimated growing season canopy- and sap flux-scaled leaf-level transpiration (Ec and...

  20. Modelling of soil salinity and halophyte crop production

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vermue, E.; Metselaar, K.; Zee, van der S.E.A.T.M.

    2013-01-01

    In crop modelling the soil, plant and atmosphere system is regarded as a continuum with regard to root water uptake and transpiration. Crop production, often assumed to be linearly related with transpiration, depends on several factors, including water and nutrient availability and salinity. The

  1. Quality and Control of Water Vapor Winds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jedlovec, Gary J.; Atkinson, Robert J.

    1996-01-01

    Water vapor imagery from the geostationary satellites such as GOES, Meteosat, and GMS provides synoptic views of dynamical events on a continual basis. Because the imagery represents a non-linear combination of mid- and upper-tropospheric thermodynamic parameters (three-dimensional variations in temperature and humidity), video loops of these image products provide enlightening views of regional flow fields, the movement of tropical and extratropical storm systems, the transfer of moisture between hemispheres and from the tropics to the mid- latitudes, and the dominance of high pressure systems over particular regions of the Earth. Despite the obvious larger scale features, the water vapor imagery contains significant image variability down to the single 8 km GOES pixel. These features can be quantitatively identified and tracked from one time to the next using various image processing techniques. Merrill et al. (1991), Hayden and Schmidt (1992), and Laurent (1993) have documented the operational procedures and capabilities of NOAA and ESOC to produce cloud and water vapor winds. These techniques employ standard correlation and template matching approaches to wind tracking and use qualitative and quantitative procedures to eliminate bad wind vectors from the wind data set. Techniques have also been developed to improve the quality of the operational winds though robust editing procedures (Hayden and Veldon 1991). These quality and control approaches have limitations, are often subjective, and constrain wind variability to be consistent with model derived wind fields. This paper describes research focused on the refinement of objective quality and control parameters for water vapor wind vector data sets. New quality and control measures are developed and employed to provide a more robust wind data set for climate analysis, data assimilation studies, as well as operational weather forecasting. The parameters are applicable to cloud-tracked winds as well with minor

  2. [Time lag effect between stem sap flow and photosynthetically active radiation, vapor pressure deficit of Acacia mangium].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hua; Zhao, Ping; Cai, Xi-An; Ma, Ling; Rao, Xing-Quan; Zeng, Xiao-Ping

    2008-02-01

    Based on the measurement of the stem sap flow of Acacia mangium with Granier' s thermal dissipation probe, and the cross-correlation and time serial analysis of the sap flow and corresponding photosynthetically active radiation and vapor pressure deficit, this paper studied the time lag effect between the stem sap flow of A. mangium and the driving factors of the tree canopy transpiration. The results indicated that the main driving factors of the transpiration were photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) and vapor pressure deficit (VPD). Sap flux density (Js) was more dependent on PAR than on VPD, and the dependence was more significant in dry season than in wet season. Sap flow lagged behind PAR but advanced than VPD in both dry and wet seasons. The time lag did not show any significant variation across different size tree individuals, but showed significant variation in different seasons. Time lag effect was not correlated with tree height, diameter at the breast, and canopy size. The time lag between Js and VPD was significantly related to nighttime water recharge in dry season, but reversed in wet season.

  3. Plant Growth Models Using Artificial Neural Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bubenheim, David

    1997-01-01

    In this paper, we descrive our motivation and approach to devloping models and the neural network architecture. Initial use of the artificial neural network for modeling the single plant process of transpiration is presented.

  4. Community level offset of rain use- and transpiration efficiency for a heavily grazed ecosystem in inner Mongolia grassland.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Z Gao

    Full Text Available Water use efficiency (WUE is a key indicator to assess ecosystem adaptation to water stress. Rain use efficiency (RUE is usually used as a proxy for WUE due to lack of transpiration data. Furthermore, RUE based on aboveground primary productivity (RUEANPP is used to evaluate whole plant water use because root production data is often missing as well. However, it is controversial as to whether RUE is a reliable parameter to elucidate transpiration efficiency (TE, and whether RUEANPP is a suitable proxy for RUE of the whole plant basis. The experiment was conducted at three differently managed sites in the Inner Mongolia steppe: a site fenced since 1979 (UG79, a winter grazing site (WG and a heavily grazed site (HG. Site HG had consistent lowest RUEANPP and RUE based on total net primary productivity (RUENPP. RUEANPP is a relatively good proxy at sites UG79 and WG, but less reliable for site HG. Similarly, RUEANPP is good predictor of transpiration efficiency based on aboveground net primary productivity (TEANPP at sites UG79 and WG but not for site HG. However, if total net primary productivity is considered, RUENPP is good predictor of transpiration efficiency based on total net primary productivity (TENPP for all sites. Although our measurements indicate decreased plant transpiration and consequentially decreasing RUE under heavy grazing, productivity was relatively compensated for with a higher TE. This offset between RUE and TE was even enhanced under water limited conditions and more evident when belowground net primary productivity (BNNP was included. These findings suggest that BNPP should be considered when studies fucus on WUE of more intensively used grasslands. The consideration of the whole plant perspective and "real" WUE would partially revise our picture of system performance and therefore might affect the discussion on the C-sequestration and resilience potential of ecosystems.

  5. Roles of forest bioproductivity, transpiration and fire in a nine-year record of cave dripwater chemistry from southwest Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treble, P. C.; Fairchild, I. J.; Baker, A.; Meredith, K. T.; Andersen, M. S.; Salmon, S. U.; Bradley, C.; Wynn, P. M.; Hankin, S. I.; Wood, A.; McGuire, E.

    2016-07-01

    Forest biomass has the potential to significantly impact the chemistry and volume of diffuse recharge to cave dripwater via the processes of nutrient uptake, transpiration and forest fire. Yet to-date, this role has been under-appreciated in the interpretation of speleothem trace element records from forested catchments. In this study, the impact of vegetation is examined and quantified in a long-term monitoring program from Golgotha Cave, SW Australia. The contribution of salts from rain and dry-deposition of aerosols and dissolved elements from soil mineral and bedrock dissolution to dripwater chemistry are also examined. This study is an essential pre-requisite for the future interpretation of trace element data from SW Australian stalagmite records, whose record of past environmental change will include alterations in these biogeochemical fluxes. Solute concentrations in dripwater vary spatially, supporting the existence of distinct flow paths governed by varying amounts of transpiration as well as nutrient uptake by deeply-rooted biomass. Applying principal components analysis, we identify a common pattern of variation in dripwater Cl, Mg, K, Ca, Sr and Si, interpreted as reflecting increasing transpiration, due to forest growth. Mass-balance calculations show that increasing elemental sequestration into biomass has the largest impact on SO4, providing an explanation for the overall falling dripwater SO4 concentrations through time, in contrast to the transpiration-driven rising trend dominating other ions. The long-term rise in transpiration and nutrient uptake driven by increased forest bioproductivity and its impact on our dripwater chemistry is attributed to (i) the post-fire recovery of the forest understorey after fire impacted the site in 2006 CE; (ii) and/or increased water and nutrient demand as trees in the overlying forest mature. The impact of climate-driven changes on the water balance is also examined. Finally, the implications for interpreting

  6. Feasibility of tropospheric water vapor profiling using infrared heterodyne differential absorption lidar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grund, C.J.; Hardesty, R.M. [National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Environmental Technology Laboratoy, Boulder, CO (United States); Rye, B.J. [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States)

    1996-04-01

    The development and verification of realistic climate model parameterizations for clouds and net radiation balance and the correction of other site sensor observations for interferences due to the presence of water vapor are critically dependent on water vapor profile measurements. In this study, we develop system performance models and examine the potential of infrared differential absoroption lidar (DIAL) to determine the concentration of water vapor.

  7. Effect of Precipitable Water Vapor Amount on Radiative Cooling Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Mingke; Zhao, Bin; Ao, Xianze; Pei, Gang

    2017-05-01

    A radiative cooler based on aluminum-evaporated polyvinyl-fluoride surface was employed to investigate the effect of precipitable water vapor amount on its radiative cooling performance. A mathematic model of steady heat transfer that considers the spectral radiant distribution of the sky, the transparent cover and the collecting surface was established. The results indicate that the amount of precipitable water vapor shows a remarkable and negative effect on radiative cooling performance of the radiative cooler. Both the temperature difference between the cooler and surroundings and the net radiative cooling power decrease as the precipitable water vapor amount increases. The net radiative cooling power drops by about 41.0% as the the precipitable water vapor amount changes from 1.0 cm to 7.0 cm. Besides, the radiative cooler shows better cooling performance in winter than in summer. The net radiative cooling power in summer of Hefei is about 82.2% of that in winter.

  8. Experimental Measurements of Diffusivity of Vapors through Porous Substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hongyang; Rincon, Carlos; Bowden, Elizabeth; Zand, Ali; Sikorski, Yuri; Sanders, Matthew; Navaz, Homayun

    2007-05-01

    The release of numerous toxic chemicals, such as hydrocarbons, pesticides, chemical warfare agents, etc.; into soil, subsurface, concrete, brick and asphalt poses a great threat to the biosphere environment. The quantification and extent of spread of these chemicals has primary importance for carrying out the remediation work. There are several well known spread mechanisms which govern the mass transport in porous media. They include various regimes of liquid and vapor transport/diffusion. Modeling the transport of vapors in porous substrates requires the knowledge of the diffusivity of each particular vapor in each substrate. We present a simple, effective and inexpensive experimental method and apparatus for measurement of vapor diffusivity in porous media. To cite this abstract, use the following reference: http://meetings.aps.org/link/BAPS.2007.OSS07.P1.24

  9. Solvent vapor annealing of an insoluble molecular semiconductor

    KAUST Repository

    Amassian, Aram

    2010-01-01

    Solvent vapor annealing has been proposed as a low-cost, highly versatile, and room-temperature alternative to thermal annealing of organic semiconductors and devices. In this article, we investigate the solvent vapor annealing process of a model insoluble molecular semiconductor thin film - pentacene on SiO 2 exposed to acetone vapor - using a combination of optical reflectance and two-dimensional grazing incidence X-ray diffraction measurements performed in situ, during processing. These measurements provide valuable and new insight into the solvent vapor annealing process; they demonstrate that solvent molecules interact mainly with the surface of the film to induce a solid-solid transition without noticeable swelling, dissolving or melting of the molecular material. © 2010 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  10. Reviews of experimental studies on various geometrical contact modes of vapor explosions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Hyun-sun; Yamano, Norihiro; Maruyama, Yu; Moriyama, Kiyofumi; Kudo, Tamotsu; Sugimoto, Jun [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1996-11-01

    The review aims to collect the available experimental information mainly on the stratified and injection modes of vapor explosions and identify areas requiring additional research. A substantial number of works have been performed on the pouring mode of vapor explosions since the pouring mode of vapor explosions is considered to be the most predominant geometric conditions in hypothetical severe accidents in nuclear power plants. However, other types of mode of vapor explosions are relatively less focused. Because of their different sequential progresses and mechanisms of vapor explosions especially at the initial stage of the event, it is essential to identify their mechanisms to make more clear understanding and eventually to provide a methodology for prevention in these types of vapor explosions. It has been recognized that the development of scaling methodologies in the experimental view points to bridge the experiment to prototypic conditions is of great importance under the circumstances of no relevant theoretical models in vapor explosion phenomena. In the sense, it will be useful to perform vapor explosion experiments in an experimental facility which can not only well control the initial and boundary experimental conditions, but also directly measure the energetics of vapor explosions. In particular, it is recommended to study the vapor explosion phenomena in such a facility which has additional capability of providing various contact modes to identify their mechanisms and to scale the energetics of vapor explosions in various contact modes in terms of a precisely measured conversion ratio. (J.P.N.). 51 refs.

  11. Ion Partitioning at the liquid/vapor interface of a multi-component alkali halidesolution: A model for aqueous sea salt aerosols

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghosal, Sutapa; Brown, Matthew A.; Bluhm, Hendrik; Krisch, Maria J.; Salmeron, Miquel; Jungwirth, Pavel; Hemminger, John C.

    2008-12-22

    The chemistry of Br species associated with sea salt ice and aerosols has been implicated in the episodes of ozone depletion reported at Arctic sunrise. However, Br{sup -} is only a minor component in sea salt, which has a Br{sup -}/Cl{sup -} molar ratio of {approx}0.0015. Sea salt is a complex mixture of many different species, with NaCl as the primary component. In recent years experimental and theoretical studies have reported enhancement of the large, more polarizable halide ion at the liquid/vapor interface of corresponding aqueous alkali halide solutions. The proposed enhancement is likely to influence the availability of sea salt Br{sup -} for heterogeneous reactions such as those involved in the ozone depletion episodes. We report here ambient pressure x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy studies and molecular dynamics simulations showing direct evidence of Br{sup -} enhancement at the interface of an aqueous NaCl solution doped with bromide. The experiments were carried out on samples with Br{sup -}/Cl{sup -} ratios in the range 0.1% to 10%, the latter being also the ratio for which simulations were carried out. This is the first direct measurement of interfacial enhancement of Br{sup -} in a multi-component solution with particular relevance to sea salt chemistry.

  12. A modified free-volume-based model for predicting vapor-liquid and solid-liquid equilibria for size asymmetric systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Radfarnia, H.R.; Ghotbi, C.; Taghikhani, V.

    2005-01-01

    with those obtained from the well-established entropic-FV based models, i.e., the original entropic-FV (EFV) and the modified entropic-FV (MEFV) models. The results were also compared with those of the original UNIFAC-FV model as well as a modified UNIFAC-FV model, Kannan-FV, recently proposed model...

  13. The influence of water vapor on atmospheric exchange measurements with an ICOS* based Laser absorption analyzer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunk, Rüdiger; Quan, Zhi; Wandel, Matthias; Yi, Zhigang; Bozem, Heiko; Kesselmeier, Jürgen

    2014-05-01

    Carbonyl sulfide and carbon monoxide are both atmospheric trace gases of high interest. Recent advances in the field of spectroscopy have enabled instruments that measure the concentration of the above and other trace gases very fast and with good precision. Increasing the effective path length by reflecting the light between two mirrors in a cavity, these instruments reach impressive sensitivities. Often it is possible to measure the concentration of more than one trace gas at the same time. The OCS/CO2 Analyzer by LGR (Los Gatos Research, Inc.) measures the concentration of water vapor [H2O], carbonyl sulfide [COS], carbon dioxide [CO2] and carbon monoxide [CO] simultaneously. For that the cavity is saturated with light, than the attenuation of light is measured as in standard absorption spectroscopy. The instrument proved to be very fast with good precision and to be able to detect even very low concentrations, especially for COS (as low as 30ppt in the case of COS). However, we observed a rather strong cross sensitivity to water vapor. Altering the water vapor content of the sampled air with two different methods led to a change in the perceived concentration of COS, CO and CO2. This proved especially problematic for enclosure (cuvette) measurements, where the concentrations of one of the above species in an empty cuvette are compared to the concentration of another cuvette containing a plant whose exchange of trace gases with the atmosphere is of interest. There, the plants transpiration leads to a large difference in water vapor content between the cuvettes and that in turn produces artifacts in the concentration differences between the cuvettes for the other above mentioned trace gases. For CO, simultaneous measurement with a UV-Emission Analyzer (AL 5002, Aerolaser) and the COS/CO Analyzer showed good agreement of perceived concentrations as long as the sample gas was dry and an increasing difference in perceived concentration when the sample gas was

  14. Modeling of transpiration reduction in van Genuchten-Mualem type soils

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lier, van Q.D.; Neto, D.D.; Metselaar, K.

    2009-01-01

    We derive an analytic expression for the matric flux potential (M) for van Genuchten-Mualem (VGM) type soils which can also be written in terms of a converging infinite series. Considering the first four terms of this series, the accuracy of the approximation was verified by comparing it to values

  15. Logarithmic radiative effect of water vapor and spectral kernels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bani Shahabadi, Maziar; Huang, Yi

    2014-05-01

    Radiative kernels have become a useful tool in climate analysis. A set of spectral kernels is calculated using a moderate resolution atmospheric transmission code MODTRAN and implemented in diagnosing spectrally decomposed global outgoing longwave radiation (OLR) changes. It is found that the effect of water vapor on the OLR is in proportion to the logarithm of its concentration. Spectral analysis discloses that this logarithmic dependency mainly results from water vapor absorption bands (0-560 cm-1 and 1250-1850 cm-1), while in the window region (800-1250 cm-1), the effect scales more linearly to its concentration. The logarithmic and linear effects in the respective spectral regions are validated by the calculations of a benchmark line-by-line radiative transfer model LBLRTM. The analysis based on LBLRTM-calculated second-order kernels shows that the nonlinear (logarithmic) effect results from the damping of the OLR sensitivity to layer-wise water vapor perturbation by both intra- and inter-layer effects. Given that different scaling approaches suit different spectral regions, it is advisable to apply the kernels in a hybrid manner in diagnosing the water vapor radiative effect. Applying logarithmic scaling in the water vapor absorption bands where absorption is strong and linear scaling in the window region where absorption is weak can generally constrain the error to within 10% of the overall OLR change for up to eightfold water vapor perturbations.

  16. Vaporization behavior of non-stoichiometric refractory carbide materials and direct observations of the vapor phase using laser diagnostics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butt, D.P.; Wantuck, P.J.; Rehse, S.J.; Wallace, T.C. Sr.

    1993-09-01

    Transition metal and actinide carbides, such as ZrC or NbC and UC or ThC, exhibit a wide range of stoichiometry, and therefore vaporize incongruently. At long times, steady state vaporization can be achieved where relative concentrations of atomic species on solid surface equals that in the gas phase. The surface composition under these steady state conditions is termed the congruently vaporizing composition, (CVC). Modeling the vaporization or corrosion behavior of this dynamic process is complex and requires an understanding of how the surface composition changes with time and a knowledge of CVC, which is both temperature and atmosphere dependent. This paper describes vaporization and corrosion behavior of non-stoichiometric refractory carbide materials and, as an example, describes a thermokinetic model that characterizes the vaporization behavior of the complex carbide U{sub x}Zr{sub 1-x}C{sub y} in hydrogen at 2500 to 3200 K. This model demonstrates that steady state corrosion of U{sub x}Zr{sub l-x}C{sub y} is rate limited by gaseous transport of Zr where partial pressure of Zr is determined by CVC. This paper also briefly describes efforts to image and characterize the vapor phase above the surface of ZrC in static and flowing gas environments using planar laser induced fluorescence. We have developed the method for monitoring and controlling the corrosion behavior of nuclear fuels in nuclear thermal rockets. However, the techniques described can be used, to image boundary layers, and could be used verifying corrosion models.

  17. Chemiluminescent imaging of transpired ethanol from the palm for evaluation of alcohol metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arakawa, Takahiro; Kita, Kazutaka; Wang, Xin; Miyajima, Kumiko; Toma, Koji; Mitsubayashi, Kohji

    2015-05-15

    A 2-dimensional imaging system was constructed and applied in measurements of gaseous ethanol emissions from the human palm. This imaging system measures gaseous ethanol concentrations as intensities of chemiluminescence by luminol reaction induced by alcohol oxidase and luminol-hydrogen peroxide-horseradish peroxidase system. Conversions of ethanol distributions and concentrations to 2-dimensional chemiluminescence were conducted on an enzyme-immobilized mesh substrate in a dark box, which contained a luminol solution. In order to visualize ethanol emissions from human palm skin, we developed highly sensitive and selective imaging system for transpired gaseous ethanol at sub ppm-levels. Thus, a mixture of a high-purity luminol solution of luminol sodium salt HG solution instead of standard luminol solution and an enhancer of eosin Y solution was adapted to refine the chemiluminescent intensity of the imaging system, and improved the detection limit to 3 ppm gaseous ethanol. The highly sensitive imaging allows us to successfully visualize the emissions dynamics of transdermal gaseous ethanol. The intensity of each site on the palm shows the reflection of ethanol concentrations distributions corresponding to the amount of alcohol metabolized upon consumption. This imaging system is significant and useful for the assessment of ethanol measurement of the palmar skin. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Tree sap flow and stand transpiration of two Acacia mangium plantations in Sabah, Borneo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cienciala, E.; Kučera, J.; Malmer, A.

    2000-09-01

    Water use of Acacia mangium trees grown in plantations was measured by a heat balance method in two stands that largely differed in tree density. Tree sap flow was closely coupled to climatic drivers and responded with minimal time delay. Using no time shift, sap flow rate could be tightly fitted to a simple equation that combined a parabolic response to radiation and an inverse linear response to air humidity. On the contrary, the analysis of canopy conductance showed no meaningful response to either individual or combined microclimatic variables. No indication of water deficit was observed, though the measurement period was during the dry period of the year. The measurements indicate a minimal diurnal use of water stored in plant tissues. The difference in tree water use from the two studied stands was effectively scaled by tree sapwood area. Canopy transpiration of the densest stand reached in average 3.9 mm d -1 compared with 2.7 mm d -1 for the stand representing the average conditions in the catchment.

  19. An Integrated View of Whole-Tree Hydraulic Architecture. Does Stomatal or Hydraulic Conductance Determine Whole Tree Transpiration?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Rodríguez-Gamir

    Full Text Available Hydraulic conductance exerts a strong influence on many aspects of plant physiology, namely: transpiration, CO2 assimilation, growth, productivity or stress response. However we lack full understanding of the contribution of root or shoot water transport capacity to the total water balance, something which is difficult to study in trees. Here we tested the hypothesis that whole plant hydraulic conductance modulates plant transpiration using two different seedlings of citrus rootstocks, Poncirus trifoliata (L. Raf. and Cleopatra mandarin (Citrus reshni Hort ex Tan.. The two genotypes presented important differences in their root or shoot hydraulic conductance contribution to whole plant hydraulic conductance but, even so, water balance proved highly dependent on whole plant conductance. Further, we propose there is a possible equilibrium between root and shoot hydraulic conductance, similar to that between shoot and root biomass production, which could be related with xylem anatomy.

  20. An Integrated View of Whole-Tree Hydraulic Architecture. Does Stomatal or Hydraulic Conductance Determine Whole Tree Transpiration?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Gamir, Juan; Primo-Millo, Eduardo; Forner-Giner, María Ángeles

    2016-01-01

    Hydraulic conductance exerts a strong influence on many aspects of plant physiology, namely: transpiration, CO2 assimilation, growth, productivity or stress response. However we lack full understanding of the contribution of root or shoot water transport capacity to the total water balance, something which is difficult to study in trees. Here we tested the hypothesis that whole plant hydraulic conductance modulates plant transpiration using two different seedlings of citrus rootstocks, Poncirus trifoliata (L.) Raf. and Cleopatra mandarin (Citrus reshni Hort ex Tan.). The two genotypes presented important differences in their root or shoot hydraulic conductance contribution to whole plant hydraulic conductance but, even so, water balance proved highly dependent on whole plant conductance. Further, we propose there is a possible equilibrium between root and shoot hydraulic conductance, similar to that between shoot and root biomass production, which could be related with xylem anatomy.

  1. Estimated vapor pressure for WTP process streams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pike, J. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Poirier, M. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2015-01-01

    Design assumptions during the vacuum refill phase of the Pulsed Jet Mixers (PJMs) in the Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) equate the vapor pressure of all process streams to that of water when calculating the temperature at which the vacuum refill is reduced or eliminated. WTP design authority asked the authors to assess this assumption by performing calculations on proposed feed slurries to calculate the vapor pressure as a function of temperature. The vapor pressure was estimated for each WTP waste group. The vapor pressure suppression caused by dissolved solids is much greater than the increase caused by organic components such that the vapor pressure for all of the waste group compositions is less than that of pure water. The vapor pressure for each group at 145°F ranges from 81% to 98% of the vapor pressure of water. If desired, the PJM could be operated at higher temperatures for waste groups with high dissolved solids that suppress vapor pressure. The SO4 group with the highest vapor pressure suppression could be operated up to 153°F before reaching the same vapor pressure of water at 145°F. However, most groups would reach equivalent vapor pressure at 147 to 148°F. If any of these waste streams are diluted, the vapor pressure can exceed the vapor pressure of water at mass dilution ratios greater than 10, but the overall effect is less than 0.5%.

  2. Atmospheric sugar alcohols: evaporation rates and saturation vapor pressures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bilde, Merete; Zardini, Alessandro Alessio; Hong, Juan

    volatile organic molecules. Saturation vapor pressure and the associated temperature dependence (dH) are key parameters for improving predictive atmospheric models. In this work we combine experiments and thermodynamic modeling to investigate these parameters for a series of polyols, so-called sugar...... are allowed to evaporate in a laminar flow reactor, and changes in particle size as function of evaporation time are determined using a scanning mobility particle sizer system. In this work saturation vapor pressures of sugar alcohols at several temperatures have been inferred from such measurements using...

  3. CONDENSATION OF WATER VAPOR IN A VERTICAL TUBE CONDENSER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Havlík

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an analysis of heat transfer in the process of condensation of water vapor in a vertical shell-and-tube condenser. We analyze the use of the Nusselt model for calculating the condensation heat transfer coefficient (HTC inside a vertical tube and the Kern, Bell-Delaware and Stream-flow analysis methods for calculating the shell-side HTC from tubes to cooling water. These methods are experimentally verified for a specific condenser of waste process vapor containing air. The operating conditions of the condenser may be different from the assumptions adopted in the basic Nusselt theory. Modifications to the Nusselt condensation model are theoretically analyzed.

  4. Photosynthesis and Transpiration Rates of Rice Cultivated Under the System of Rice Intensification and the Effects on Growth and Yield

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nurul Hidayati

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The system of rice intensification (SRI crop management method has been reported by many authors to significantly increase rice yield with lower inputs, but physiological bases of yielding improvement has not been studied. In this research we assessed some physiological parameters and the mechanism of rice yield improvement of rice plants under SRI cultivation method during both vegetative and generative phases compared to conventional rice cultivation methods. We measured photosynthetic rate, transpiration rate, leaf temperature, chlorophyll content, N and P uptake, plant growth parameters and yield for those comparison. SRI methods significantly increased both vegetative and reproductive (generative parameters of rice plants compared to conventional cultivation methods. Photosynthetic rate, chlorophyll content, N and P uptake under SRI cultivation were significantly higher compared to those of the conventional rice cultivation, but no differences were found in transpiration rate and leaf temperature. With SRI method, plants in their generative phase (especially in the grain-filling phase had the highest photosynthetic and the lowest transpiration rates. Grain yield under SRI method was significantly higher (ca. 24% than that of conventional method.

  5. Performance comparison between transpiration air cooled turbine 3000 F (1649 C) stator vanes and solid uncooled vanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manning, G. B.; Moskowitz, S.; Cole, R.

    1984-06-01

    Testing was conducted to compare the aerodynamic performance of a turbine vane using transpiration air-cooling capable of operation at 3000 F (1649 C) gas temperature with a vane of identical profile with no cooling provisions to determine the effect of cooling on vane kinetic energy efficiency and loss coefficient. The test configuration was a 10-vane section of full scale first stagae turbien stator annulus designed for 1.6 pressure ratio, cooling air flow equal to 6.1 percent of primary flow, 3000 F (1649 C) turbine inlet temperature and primary-to-coolant temperature ratio of 2.7. To enable comparison with other investigations, tests were conducted at three pressure ratios from 1.4 to 1.6, three coolant flows from 75 to 120 percent of design, and three primary-to-coolant temperature ratios from 2.70 to 1.15. Efficiency, loss coefficent and flow capacity test results were in good agreement with predicted values for both the transpiration air cooled and uncooled vanes. The testing demonstrated that it is necessary to conduct test evaluations of transpiration air-cooled components at or near design coolant-to-gas stream temperature ratio in order to achieve correct results.

  6. Water vapor adsorption on goethite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Xiaowei; Boily, Jean-François

    2013-07-02

    Goethite (α-FeOOH) is an important mineral contributing to processes of atmospheric and terrestrial importance. Their interactions with water vapor are particularly relevant in these contexts. In this work, molecular details of water vapor (0.0-19.0 Torr; 0-96% relative humidity at 25 °C) adsorption at surfaces of synthetic goethite nanoparticles reacted with and without HCl and NaCl were resolved using vibrational spectroscopy. This technique probed interactions between surface (hydr)oxo groups and liquid water-like films. Molecular dynamics showed that structures and orientations adopted by these waters are comparable to those adopted at the interface with liquid water. Particle surfaces reacted with HCl accumulated less water than acid-free surfaces due to disruptions in hydrogen bond networks by chemisorbed waters and chloride. Particles reacted with NaCl had lower loadings below ∼10 Torr water vapor but greater loadings above this value than salt-free surfaces. Water adsorption reactions were here affected by competitive hydration of coexisting salt-free surface regions, adsorbed chloride and sodium, as well as precipitated NaCl. Collectively, the findings presented in this study add further insight into the initial mechanisms of thin water film formation at goethite surfaces subjected to variations in water vapor pressure that are relevant to natural systems.

  7. Simple Chemical Vapor Deposition Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, Henrik

    2014-01-01

    Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) is a process commonly used for the synthesis of thin films for several important technological applications, for example, microelectronics, hard coatings, and smart windows. Unfortunately, the complexity and prohibitive cost of CVD equipment makes it seldom available for undergraduate chemistry students. Here, a…

  8. Vapor plume oscillation mechanisms in transient keyhole during tandem dual beam fiber laser welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xin; Zhang, Xiaosi; Pang, Shengyong; Hu, Renzhi; Xiao, Jianzhong

    2018-01-01

    Vapor plume oscillations are common physical phenomena that have an important influence on the welding process in dual beam laser welding. However, until now, the oscillation mechanisms of vapor plumes remain unclear. This is primarily because mesoscale vapor plume dynamics inside a millimeter-scale, invisible, and time-dependent keyhole are difficult to quantitatively observe. In this paper, based on a developed three-dimensional (3D) comprehensive model, the vapor plume evolutions in a dynamical keyhole are directly simulated in tandem dual beam, short-wavelength laser welding. Combined with the vapor plume behaviors outside the keyhole observed by high-speed imaging, the vapor plume oscillations in dynamical keyholes at different inter-beam distances are the first, to our knowledge, to be quantitatively analyzed. It is found that vapor plume oscillations outside the keyhole mainly result from vapor plume instabilities inside the keyhole. The ejection velocity at the keyhole opening and dynamical behaviors outside the keyhole of a vapor plume both violently oscillate with the same order of magnitude of high frequency (several kHz). Furthermore, the ejection speed at the keyhole opening and ejection area outside the keyhole both decrease as the beam distance increases, while the degree of vapor plume instability first decreases and then increases with increasing beam distance from 0.6 to 1.0 mm. Moreover, the oscillation mechanisms of a vapor plume inside the dynamical keyhole irradiated by dual laser beams are investigated by thoroughly analyzing the vapor plume occurrence and flow process. The vapor plume oscillations in the dynamical keyhole are found to mainly result from violent local evaporations and severe keyhole geometry variations. In short, the quantitative method and these findings can serve as a reference for further understanding of the physical mechanisms in dual beam laser welding and of processing optimizations in industrial applications.

  9. Thermodynamic Analysis of Combined Vapor Compression and Vapor Absorption Refrigeration System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AAMIR SHAIKH

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Two of the popular refrigeration cycles, VC (Vapor Compression, and VA (Vapor Absorption are used extensively for refrigeration purposes. In this paper, a system is proposed that works using both cycles powered by an IC (Internal Combustion engine, where mechanical energy is used to run the VC cycle while exhaust gasses are used to operate the VA cycle. The VC cycle works on R12 refrigerant while LiBr-H2O combination is selected for operation of VA cycle. Firstly, the refrigeration system is modeled, followed by a parametric study to investigate the impacts of various operating parameters on the system performance. The results exhibit that for maximum chilling and overall performance, the condenser and evaporator pressures in the VC cycle are obtained as 710 and 340 kPa, respectively, whereas generator and absorber temperatures in VA cycle are 85 and 20oC, respectively

  10. Atmospheric Hydrodeoxygenation of Biomass Fast Pyrolysis Vapor by MoO3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhou, Guofeng; Jensen, Peter Arendt; Le, Duy Michael

    2016-01-01

    was not significant at temperatures below 400 °C. At 450 °C catalyst temperature and 93 vol % H2 concentration, the wood pyrolysis vapor was more active toward cracking forming gas species instead of performing the desired HDO forming hydrocarbons. The lignin pyrolysis vapor was more resistant to cracking and yielded......MoO3 has been tested as a catalyst in hydrodeoxygenation (HDO) of both model compounds (acetone and guaiacol) and real biomass pyrolysis vapors under atmospheric pressure. The pyrolysis vapor was obtained by fast pyrolysis of wood or lignin in a continuous fast pyrolysis reactor at a fixed...... temperature of 500 °C, and it subsequently passed through a downstream, close coupled, fixed bed reactor containing the MoO3 catalyst. The influences of the catalyst temperature and the concentration of H2 on the HDO of the pyrolysis vapors were investigated. The level of HDO of the biomass pyrolysis vapors...

  11. Dynamic response of vaporizing droplet to pressure oscillation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Lei; Shen, Chibing; Zhang, Xinqiao

    2017-02-01

    Combustion instability is a major challenge in the development of the liquid propellant engines, and droplet vaporization is viewed as a potential mechanism for driving instabilities. Based on the previous work, an unsteady droplet heating and vaporization model was developed. The model and numerical method are validated by experimental data available in literature, and then the oscillatory vaporization of n-Heptane droplet exposed to unsteady harmonic nitrogen atmosphere was numerically investigated over a wide range of amplitudes and frequencies. Also, temperature variations inside the droplet were demonstrated under oscillation environments. It was found that the thermal wave is attenuated with significantly reduced wave intensities as it penetrates deep into droplet from the ambient gas. Droplet surface temperature exhibits smaller fluctuation than that of the ambient gas, and it exhibits a time lag with regard to the pressure variation. Furthermore, the mechanism leading to phase lag of vaporization rate with respect to pressure oscillation was unraveled. Results show that this phase lag varies during the droplet lifetime and it is strongly influenced by oscillation frequency, indicating droplet vaporization is only capable of driving combustion instability in some certain frequency domains. Instead, the amplitude of the oscillation does not have very significant effects. It is noteworthy that thermal inertia of the droplet also plays a considerable role in determining the phase lag.

  12. Liquid-propellant droplet vaporization and combustion in high pressure environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Vigor

    1991-01-01

    In order to correct the deficiencies of existing models for high-pressure droplet vaporization and combustion, a fundamental investigation into this matter is essential. The objective of this research are: (1) to acquire basic understanding of physical and chemical mechanisms involved in the vaporization and combustion of isolated liquid-propellant droplets in both stagnant and forced-convective environments; (2) to establish droplet vaporization and combustion correlations for the study of liquid-propellant spray combustion and two-phase flowfields in rocket motors; and (3) to investigate the dynamic responses of multicomponent droplet vaporization and combustion to ambient flow oscillations.

  13. Effects of CO[sub 2] concentration on photosynthesis, transpiration and production of greenhouse fruit vegetable crops

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nederhoff, E.M.

    1994-10-25

    The effect of the CO[sub 2] concentration of the greenhouse air (C) in the range 200 to 1100 [mu]mol mol[sup -1] was investigated in tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.), cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.), sweet pepper (Capsicum annuum L.) and eggplant (Solanum melongena L.), grown in greenhouses. The effect of C on canopy net photosynthetic CO[sub 2] assimilation rate (or photosynthesis, P) was expressed by a set of regression equations, relating P to PAR, C and LAI. A rule of thumb ('CO[sub 2]-rule') was derived, approximating the relative increase of P caused by additional CO[sub 2] at a certain C. This CO[sub 2]-rule is: X = (1000/C)[sup 2] * 1.5 (X in % per 100 [mu]mol[sup -1], and C in [mu]mol mol[sup -1]). Two models for canopy photosynthesis were examined by comparing them with the experimental photosynthesis data. No 'midday depression' in P was observed. The effects of C on leaf conductance (g) and on rate of crop transpiration (E) were investigated. An increase of 100 I[mu]mol mol[sup -1] ' in C reduced g by about 3-4% in sweet pepper, tomato and cucumber and by about 11% in eggplant. The effect of C on E was analyzed by combining the regression equation for g with the Penman-Monteith equation for E. C had only a relatively small effect on E, owing to thermal and hydrological feedback effects. The decoupling of g and E was quantified. No time-dependent variation or 'midday depression' in E was observed, and no significant effect of C on average leaf temperature was established. In five experiments, the effect of C on growth and production and on specific features were analyzed; fruit production (dry weight) was most affected by C in sweet pepper; fresh weight fruit production per unit CO[sub 2] was highest in cucumber; fruit quality was not influenced by C. High C promoted the 'short leaves syndrome' in tomato and 'leaf tip chlorosis' in eggplant, probably related to calcium and boron translocation

  14. Water stable isotope shifts of surface waters as proxies to quantify evaporation, transpiration and carbon uptake on catchment scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barth, Johannes; van Geldern, Robert; Veizer, Jan; Karim, Ajaz; Freitag, Heiko; Fowlwer, Hayley

    2017-04-01

    Comparison of water stable isotopes of rivers to those of precipitation enables separation of evaporation from transpiration on the catchment scale. The method exploits isotope ratio changes that are caused exclusively by evaporation over longer time periods of at least one hydrological year. When interception is quantified by mapping plant types in catchments, the amount of water lost by transpiration can be determined. When in turn pairing transpiration with the water use efficiency (WUE i.e. water loss by transpiration per uptake of CO2) and subtracting heterotrophic soil respiration fluxes (Rh), catchment-wide carbon balances can be established. This method was applied to several regions including the Great Lakes and the Clyde River Catchments ...(Barth, et al., 2007, Karim, et al., 2008). In these studies evaporation loss was 24 % and 1.3 % and transpiration loss was 47 % and 22 % when compared to incoming precipitation for the Great Lakes and the Clyde Catchment, respectively. Applying WUE values for typical plant covers and using area-typical Rh values led to estimates of CO2 uptake of 251 g C m-2 a-1 for the Great Lakes Catchment and CO2 loss of 21 g C m2 a-1 for the Clyde Catchment. These discrepancies are most likely due to different vegetation covers. The method applies to scales of several thousand km2 and has good potential for improvement via calibration on smaller scales. This can for instance be achieved by separate treatment of sub-catchments with more detailed mapping of interception as a major unknown. These previous studies have shown that better uncertainty analyses are necessary in order to estimate errors in water and carbon balances. The stable isotope method is also a good basis for comparison to other landscape carbon balances for instance by eddy covariance techniques. This independent method and its up-scaling combined with the stable isotope and area-integrating methods can provide cross validation of large-scale carbon budgets

  15. [Effects of tree diameter at breast height and soil moisture on transpiration of Schima superba based on sap flow pattern and normalization].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mei, Ting-ting; Zhao, Ping; Wang, Quan; Cai, Xi-an; Yu, Meng-hao; Zhu, Li-wei; Zou, Lü-liu; Zeng, Xiao-ping

    2010-10-01

    The eigenvalues of continuous sap flow pattern, i. e. , skewness and kurtosis, were used to investigate the water usage of Schima superba with different diameter at breast height (DBH), and the method of normalization was firstly applied to eliminate the effects of strong affecting factor (photosynthetic active radiation, PAR) to explore the possible relationship between weak affecting factor (soil moisture) and sap flow. Generally, the trees with larger DBH had smaller skewness of sap flux density and later-appeared but larger peak values, suggesting that much more water was transpired, and the larger trees showed smaller skewness and later-appeared larger peak values in wet season than in dry season, suggesting that more water was transpired in wet season. On the other hand, smaller trees had lesser differences in the skewness between dry and wet seasons, suggesting that there was no significant difference in the transpiration between the two seasons. The relationship between individual tree's transpiration and soil moisture was significant and positive after the two parameters being normalized with PAR peak values. When the soil moisture content was higher, the transpiration of the trees with larger DBH was steadily increasing with soil moisture, while that of the trees with moderate or smaller DBH had opposite trend, presumably due to their transpiration and water absorption were approached to the limit.

  16. 78 FR 42595 - Marine Vapor Control Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-16

    ... clarified the location of the gas injection and mixing arrangement relative to the vapor processing unit or... Parts 35 and 39 Marine Vapor Control Systems; Final Rule #0;#0;Federal Register / Vol. 78 , No. 136... Parts 154, 155, and 156 46 CFR Parts 35 and 39 RIN 1625-AB37 Marine Vapor Control Systems AGENCY: Coast...

  17. Sewer Gas: An Indoor Air Source of PCE to Consider During Vapor Intrusion Investigations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennell, Kelly G; Scammell, Madeleine Kangsen; McClean, Michael D; Ames, Jennifer; Weldon, Brittany; Friguglietti, Leigh; Suuberg, Eric M; Shen, Rui; Indeglia, Paul A; Heiger-Bernays, Wendy J

    2013-01-01

    The United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) is finalizing its vapor intrusion guidelines. One of the important issues related to vapor intrusion is background concentrations of volatile organic chemicals (VOCs) in indoor air, typically attributed to consumer products and building materials. Background concentrations can exist even in the absence of vapor intrusion and are an important consideration when conducting site assessments. In addition, the development of accurate conceptual models that depict pathways for vapor entry into buildings is important during vapor intrusion site assessments. Sewer gas, either as a contributor to background concentrations or as part of the site conceptual model, is not routinely evaluated during vapor intrusion site assessments. The research described herein identifies an instance where vapors emanating directly from a sanitary sewer pipe within a residence were determined to be a source of tetrachloroethylene (PCE) detected in indoor air. Concentrations of PCE in the bathroom range from 2.1 to 190 ug/m(3) and exceed typical indoor air concentrations by orders of magnitude resulting in human health risk classified as an "Imminent Hazard" condition. The results suggest that infiltration of sewer gas resulted in PCE concentrations in indoor air that were nearly two-orders of magnitude higher as compared to when infiltration of sewer gas was not known to be occurring. This previously understudied pathway whereby sewers serve as sources of PCE (and potentially other VOC) vapors is highlighted. Implications for vapor intrusion investigations are also discussed.

  18. Transpiration and Groundwater Uptake Dynamics of Pinus Brutia on a Fractured Mediterranean Mountain Slope during Two Hydrologically Contrasting Years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eliades, Marinos; Bruggeman, Adriana; Lubczynski, Maciek; Christou, Andreas; Camera, Corrado; Djuma, Hakan

    2017-04-01

    Semi-arid environments tend to have extreme temporal variability in rainfall, resulting in extended periods with little to no precipitation. The mountainous topography is characterized by steep slopes, often leading to shallow soil layers with limited water storage capacity. Tree species survive in these environments by developing various adaptation mechanisms to access water. The main objective of this study is to examine the differences of two hydrologically contrasting years on the transpiration and groundwater uptake dynamics of Pinus brutia trees. We selected four trees for sap flow monitoring in an 8966-m2 fenced area of Pinus brutia forest. The site is located at 620 m elevation, on the northern foothills of the Troodos mountains in Cyprus. The slope of the site ranges between 0 and 82%. The average daily minimum temperature is 5 0C in January and the average daily maximum temperature is 35 oC in August. The mean annual rainfall is 425 mm. Monitoring started on 1 January 2015 and is ongoing. We measured soil depth in a 1-m grid around each of the selected trees for monitoring. We processed soil depths in ArcGIS software (ESRI) to create a soil depth map. We used a Total Station and a differential GPS for the creation of a high resolution DEM of the area covering the selected trees. We installed seventeen soil moisture sensors at 12-cm depth and two at 30-cm depth, where the soil was deeper than 24 cm. We randomly installed 28 metric manual rain gauges under the trees' canopy to measure throughfall. For stemflow we installed a plastic tube around each tree trunk and connected it to a manual rain gauge. We used sap flow heat ratio method (HRM) instruments to determine sap flow rates of the Pinus brutia. Hourly meteorological conditions were observed by an automatic meteorological station. Here we present the results of the January to October periods, in order to have comparable results for the two contrasting years. During the wet year of 2015, we measured 439

  19. Sensitivity of forces to wall transpiration in flow past an aerofoil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, X

    2015-12-08

    The adjoint-based sensitivity analyses well explored in hydrodynamic stability studies are extended to calculate the sensitivity of forces acting on an aerofoil with respect to wall transpiration. The magnitude of the sensitivity quantifies the controllability of the force, and the distribution of the sensitivity represents a most effective control when the control magnitude is small enough. Since the sensitivity to streamwise control is one order smaller than that to the surface-normal one, the work is concentrated on the normal control. In direct numerical simulations of flow around a NACA0024 aerofoil, the unsteady controls are far less effective than the steady control owing to the lock-in effect. At a momentum coefficient of 0.0008 and a maximum control velocity of 3.6% of the free-stream velocity, the steady surface-normal control reduces drag by 20% or enhances lift by up to 140% at Re =1000. A suction around the low-pressure region on the upper surface upstream of the separation point is found to reduce drag and enhance lift. At higher Reynolds numbers, the uncontrolled flow becomes three dimensional and the sensitivity diverges owing to the chaotic dynamics of the flow. Then the mechanism identified at lower Reynolds numbers is exploited to obtain the control, which is localized and can be generated by a limited number of actuators. The control to reduce drag or enhance lift is found to suppress unsteadiness, e.g. vortex shedding and three-dimensional developments. For example, at Re =2000 and α =10°, the control with a momentum coefficient of 0.0001 reduces drag by 20%, enhances lift by up to 200% and leads to a steady controlled flow.

  20. Indirect heating of natural gas using vapor chambers; Aquecimento indireto de gas natural com uso de camaras de vapor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milanez, Fernando H.; Mantellil, Marcia H.B.; Borges, Thomaz P.F. [Santa Catarina Univ., Florianopolis, SC (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Mecanica; Landa, Henrique G. de [PETROBRAS, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Centro de Pesquisas

    2005-07-01

    Operation safety and reliability are major guidelines in the design of city-gate units. Conventional natural gas heaters operate by a indirect mechanism, where liquid water is used to transfer heat by natural convection between the combustion chamber and the natural gas coil. In this work, the concept of vapor chamber is evaluated as an indirect gas heater. In a vapor chamber, liquid water is in contact with the heat source, and vaporizes. The vapor condenses in contact with the heat sink. A reduced scale model was built and tested in order to compare these two heating concepts where the combustion chamber was replaced by electrical cartridge heaters. This engineering model can operate either as a conventional heater or as a vapor chamber. The comparison between the concepts was done by inducing a controlled power to the cartridges and by measuring the resulting temperature distributions. In the novel design, the heat exchanger efficiency increases, and the thermal inertia decreases, compared to the conventional system. The new sealed concept of the chamber prevents water evaporation losses. (author)

  1. Starting of the steam generator of a fossil fuel power plant, using predictive control based in a neuronal model; Arranque del generador de vapor de una central termoelectrica, usando control predictivo basado en un modelo neuronal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gallardo Dominguez, Tonatiuh

    2004-09-15

    In this thesis work it is presented the design and implementation of a simulator of total scope of a predictive controller based in the neuronal model of the temperature in two stages of the heating of the steam generator of a fossil fuel power plant. An implemented control scheme is detailed, as well as the methodology for the identification of a neuronal model utilized for the control. Finally the results of the implementation in the simulator located at the Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas (IIE) are shown to be satisfactory. This control structure is not applied directly in closed circuit, but provides the value of the control actions to a human operator. [Spanish] En este trabajo de tesis se presenta el diseno e implementacion, en un simulador de alcance total, de un controlador predictivo basado en un modelo neuronal para el control de la temperatura en dos etapas del calentamiento del generador de vapor de una central termoelectrica. Se detalla el esquema de control implementado, asi como la metodologia de identificacion de un modelo neuronal utilizado para la sintesis del control. Finalmente se muestran los resultados de la implementacion en el simulador que se encuentra en el Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas (IIE); dichos resultados fueron satisfactorios. Esta estructura de control no se aplica directamente en lazo cerrado, sino que provee el valor de las acciones de control a un operador humano.

  2. PnET Models: Carbon, Nitrogen, Water Dynamics in Forest Ecosystems (Vers. 4 and 5)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — PnET (Photosynthetic / EvapoTranspiration model) is a nested series of models of carbon, water, and nitrogen dynamics in forest ecosystems. The models can be used to...

  3. PnET Models: Carbon, Nitrogen, Water Dynamics in Forest Ecosystems (Vers. 4 and 5)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ABSTRACT: PnET (Photosynthetic / EvapoTranspiration model) is a nested series of models of carbon, water, and nitrogen dynamics in forest ecosystems. The models can...

  4. Improvements to water vapor transmission and capillary absorption measurements in porous materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuel L. Zelinka; Samuel V. Glass; Charles R. Boardman

    2016-01-01

    The vapor permeability (or equivalently the vapor diffusion resistance factor) and the capillary absorption coefficient are frequently used as inputs to hygrothermal or heat, air, and moisture (HAM) models. However, it has been well documented that the methods used to determine these properties are sensitive to the operator, and wide variations in the properties have...

  5. A new productivity function and stability criterion in chemical vapor transport processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klosse, K.

    1975-01-01

    The crystal growth rate in a chemical vapor transport process using a closed system is analyzed on the basis of a one-dimensional configuration. A simplified model of vapor transport enables one to obtain a set of equations yielding the rates of reaction without a complete evaluation of the partial

  6. High temperature vapors science and technology

    CERN Document Server

    Hastie, John

    2012-01-01

    High Temperature Vapors: Science and Technology focuses on the relationship of the basic science of high-temperature vapors to some areas of discernible practical importance in modern science and technology. The major high-temperature problem areas selected for discussion include chemical vapor transport and deposition; the vapor phase aspects of corrosion, combustion, and energy systems; and extraterrestrial high-temperature species. This book is comprised of seven chapters and begins with an introduction to the nature of the high-temperature vapor state, the scope and literature of high-temp

  7. Vaporization chambers and associated methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Terry D.; Wilding, Bruce M.; McKellar, Michael G.; Shunn, Lee P.

    2017-02-21

    A vaporization chamber may include at least one conduit and a shell. The at least one conduit may have an inlet at a first end, an outlet at a second end and a flow path therebetween. The shell may surround a portion of each conduit and define a chamber surrounding the portion of each conduit. Additionally, a plurality of discrete apertures may be positioned at longitudinal intervals in a wall of each conduit, each discrete aperture of the plurality of discrete apertures sized and configured to direct a jet of fluid into each conduit from the chamber. A liquid may be vaporized by directing a first fluid comprising a liquid into the inlet at the first end of each conduit, directing jets of a second fluid into each conduit from the chamber through discrete apertures in a wall of each conduit and transferring heat from the second fluid to the first fluid.

  8. Vaporization and combustion of fuel droplets at supercritical conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Vigor

    1991-01-01

    Vaporization and combustion liquid-fuel droplets in both sub- and super-critical environments have been examined. The formulation is based on the complete conservation equations for both gas and liquid phases, and accommodates finite-rate chemical kinetics and a full treatment of liquid-vapor phase equilibrium at the droplet surface. The governing equations and the associated interface boundary conditions are solved numerically using a fully coupled, implicit scheme with the dual time-stepping integration technique. The model is capable of treating the entire droplet history, including the transition from the subcritical to the supercritical state. As a specific example, the combustion of n-pentane fuel droplets in air is studied for pressures of 5-140 atm. In addition, the dynamic responses of droplet vaporization and combustion to ambient-pressure oscillations are investigated. Results indicate that the droplet gasification and burning mechanisms depend greatly on the ambient pressure. In particular, a rapid enlargement of the vaporization and combustion responses occurs when the droplet surface reaches its critical point, mainly due to the strong variations of latent heat of vaporization and thermophysical properties at the critical state.

  9. Stable isotope ratios of rain and vapor in 1995 hurricanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, James Robert; Gedzelman, Stanley David; Zhang, Xiaoping; Arnold, Robert

    1998-05-01

    Isotope ratios of rain and vapor samples collected at the surface from four tropical cyclones during the active 1995 Atlantic hurricane season were determined. A two-dimensional bulk microphysics isotope model was applied to steady symmetric tropical cyclones to explain the observed low mean values and inward decrease of isotope ratios of the rain and vapor. The low mean value is caused by the tropical cyclone's relatively large size, longevity, and deep clouds. The inward decrease is due to diffusive isotope exchange between falling rain and converging vapor in the atmospheric boundary layer. Dean, a minimal tropical storm, produced relatively high isotope ratios because of its small size and youth. Rains from the extreme outer edge of Felix, a category 3 hurricane, exhibited high isotope ratios similar to normal summer rain. Isotope ratios of rains and vapors from Hurricane Luis in Puerto Rico decreased as the storm approached. Isotope ratios of rain exhibited an abrupt jump from low values in the eastern half of Puerto Rico to high values farther west which is linked to the storm's rainbands. Isotope ratios of Hurricane Opal's rains reflected the storm's asymmetric structure, with lowest values west of the point of landfall. Record low isotope ratios from a squall line that struck eastern Texas two days before landfall are linked to low-level outflow from Opal and demonstrate that hurricanes can vent enormous quantities of vapor to the surroundings.

  10. Chemical vapor deposition of sialon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landingham, R.L.; Casey, A.W.

    A laminated composite and a method for forming the composite by chemical vapor deposition are described. The composite includes a layer of sialon and a material to which the layer is bonded. The method includes the steps of exposing a surface of the material to an ammonia containing atmosphere; heating the surface to at least about 1200/sup 0/C; and impinging a gas containing N/sub 2/, SiCl/sub 4/, and AlCl/sub 3/ on the surface.

  11. Importance Profiles for Water Vapor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mapes, Brian; Chandra, Arunchandra S.; Kuang, Zhiming; Zuidema, Paquita

    2017-10-01

    Motivated by the scientific desire to align observations with quantities of physical interest, we survey how scalar importance functions depend on vertically resolved water vapor. Definitions of importance begin from familiar examples of water mass I m and TOA clear-sky outgoing longwave flux I OLR, in order to establish notation and illustrate graphically how the sensitivity profile or "kernel" depends on whether specific humidity S, relative humidity R, or ln(R) are used as measures of vapor. Then, new results on the sensitivity of convective activity I con to vapor (with implied knock-on effects such as weather prediction skill) are presented. In radiative-convective equilibrium, organized (line-like) convection is much more sensitive to moisture than scattered isotropic convection, but it exists in a drier mean state. The lesson for natural convection may be that organized convection is less susceptible to dryness and can survive and propagate into regions unfavorable for disorganized convection. This counterintuitive interpretive conclusion, with respect to the narrow numerical result behind it, highlights the importance of clarity about what is held constant at what values in sensitivity or susceptibility kernels. Finally, the sensitivities of observable radiance signals I sig for passive remote sensing are considered. While the accuracy of R in the lower free troposphere is crucial for the physical importance scalars, this layer is unfortunately the most difficult to isolate with passive remote sensing: In high emissivity channels, water vapor signals come from too high in the atmosphere (for satellites) or too low (for surface radiometers), while low emissivity channels have poor altitude discrimination and (in the case of satellites) are contaminated by surface emissions. For these reasons, active ranging (LiDAR) is the preferred observing strategy.

  12. Vaporization Would Cool Primary Battery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhandari, Pradeep; Miyake, Robert N.

    1991-01-01

    Temperature of discharging high-power-density primary battery maintained below specified level by evaporation of suitable liquid from jacket surrounding battery, according to proposal. Pressure-relief valve regulates pressure and boiling temperature of liquid. Less material needed in cooling by vaporization than in cooling by melting. Technique used to cool batteries in situations in which engineering constraints on volume, mass, and location prevent attachment of cooling fins, heat pipes, or like.

  13. Importance Profiles for Water Vapor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mapes, Brian; Chandra, Arunchandra S.; Kuang, Zhiming; Zuidema, Paquita

    2017-11-01

    Motivated by the scientific desire to align observations with quantities of physical interest, we survey how scalar importance functions depend on vertically resolved water vapor. Definitions of importance begin from familiar examples of water mass I m and TOA clear-sky outgoing longwave flux I OLR, in order to establish notation and illustrate graphically how the sensitivity profile or "kernel" depends on whether specific humidity S, relative humidity R, or ln( R) are used as measures of vapor. Then, new results on the sensitivity of convective activity I con to vapor (with implied knock-on effects such as weather prediction skill) are presented. In radiative-convective equilibrium, organized (line-like) convection is much more sensitive to moisture than scattered isotropic convection, but it exists in a drier mean state. The lesson for natural convection may be that organized convection is less susceptible to dryness and can survive and propagate into regions unfavorable for disorganized convection. This counterintuitive interpretive conclusion, with respect to the narrow numerical result behind it, highlights the importance of clarity about what is held constant at what values in sensitivity or susceptibility kernels. Finally, the sensitivities of observable radiance signals I sig for passive remote sensing are considered. While the accuracy of R in the lower free troposphere is crucial for the physical importance scalars, this layer is unfortunately the most difficult to isolate with passive remote sensing: In high emissivity channels, water vapor signals come from too high in the atmosphere (for satellites) or too low (for surface radiometers), while low emissivity channels have poor altitude discrimination and (in the case of satellites) are contaminated by surface emissions. For these reasons, active ranging (LiDAR) is the preferred observing strategy.

  14. How do organic vapors contribute to new-particle formation?

    CERN Document Server

    Donahue, Neil M; Chuang, Wayne; Riipinen, Ilona; Riccobono, Francesco; Schobesberger, Siegfried; Dommen, Josef; Baltensperger, Urs; Kulmala, Markku; Worsnop, Douglas R; Vehkamaki, Hanna

    2013-01-01

    Highly oxidised organic vapors can effectively stabilize sulphuric acid in heteronuclear clusters and drive new-particle formation. We present quantum chemical calculations of cluster stability, showing that multifunctional species can stabilize sulphuric acid and also present additional polar functional groups for subsequent cluster growth. We also model the multi-generation oxidation of vapors associated with secondary organic aerosol formation using a two-dimensional volatility basis set. The steady-state saturation ratios and absolute concentrations of extremely low volatility products are sufficient to drive new-particle formation with sulphuric acid at atmospherically relevant rates.

  15. Study on vapor film collapse behavior on high temperature particle surface. 2. Effect of subcooling on micro-mechanism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abe, Yutaka [Yamagata University, Dept.