WorldWideScience

Sample records for vapor screen flow

  1. Low flow velocity, fine-screen heat exchangers and vapor-cooled cryogenic current leads

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steyert, W.A.; Stone, N.J.

    1978-09-01

    The design, construction, and testing of three compact, low temperature heat exchangers are reported. A method is given for the construction of a small (approximately = 20-cm 3 volume) exchanger that can handle 6 g/s helium flow with low pressure drops (ΔP/P = 10 percent) and adequate heat transfer (N/sub tu/ = 3). The use of screen for simple, vapor-cooled current leads into cryogenic systems is also discussed

  2. Vapor-droplet flow equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crowe, C.T.

    1975-01-01

    General features of a vapor-droplet flow are discussed and the equations expressing the conservation of mass, momentum, and energy for the vapor, liquid, and mixture using the control volume approach are derived. The phenomenological laws describing the exchange of mass, momentum, and energy between phases are also reviewed. The results have application to development of water-dominated geothermal resources

  3. Vapor Bubbles in Flow and Acoustic Fields

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prosperetti, Andrea; Hao, Yue; Sadhal, S.S

    2002-01-01

    A review of several aspects of the interaction of bubbles with acoustic and flow fields is presented. The focus of the paper is on bubbles in hot liquids, in which the bubble contains mostly vapor, with little or no permanent gas. The topics covered include the effect of translation on condensation

  4. Analysis of the transient compressible vapor flow in heat pipes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, J. H.; Faghri, A.; Chang, W. S.

    1989-01-01

    The transient compressible one-dimensional vapor flow dynamics in a heat pipe is modeled. The numerical results are obtained by using the implicit non-iterative Beam-Warming finite difference method. The model is tested for simulated heat pipe vapor flow and actual vapor flow in cylindrical heat pipes. A good comparison of the present transient results for the simulated heat pipe vapor flow with the previous results of a two-dimensional numerical model is achieved and the steady state results are in agreement with the existing experimental data. The transient behavior of the vapor flow under subsonic, sonic, and supersonic speeds and high mass flow rates are successfully predicted. The one-dimensional model also describes the vapor flow dynamics in cylindrical heat pipes at high temperatures.

  5. Analysis of the transient compressible vapor flow in heat pipe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jang, J.H.; Faghri, A.; Chang, W.S.

    1989-07-01

    The transient compressible one-dimensional vapor flow dynamics in a heat pipe is modeled. The numerical results are obtained by using the implicit non-iterative Beam-Warming finite difference method. The model is tested for simulated heat pipe vapor flow and actual vapor flow in cylindrical heat pipes. A good comparison of the present transient results for the simulated heat pipe vapor flow with the previous results of a two-dimensional numerical model is achieved and the steady state results are in agreement with the existing experimental data. The transient behavior of the vapor flow under subsonic, sonic, and supersonic speeds and high mass flow rates are successfully predicted. The one-dimensional model also describes the vapor flow dynamics in cylindrical heat pipes at high temperatures

  6. Analysis of the transient compressible vapor flow in heat pipe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Jong Hoon; Faghri, Amir; Chang, Won Soon

    1989-01-01

    The transient compressible one-dimensional vapor flow dynamics in a heat pipe is modeled. The numerical results are obtained by using the implicit non-iterative Beam-Warming finite difference method. The model is tested for simulated heat pipe vapor flow and actual flow in cylindrical heat pipes. A good comparison of the present transient results for the simulated heat pipe vapor flow with the previous results of a two-dimensional numerical model is achieved and the steady state results are in agreement with the existing experimental data. The transient behavior of the vapor flow under subsonic, sonic, and supersonic speeds and high mass flow rates are successfully predicted. The one-dimensional model also describes the vapor flow dynamics in cylindrical heat pipes at high temperatures.

  7. Shock wave of vapor-liquid two-phase flow

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liangju ZHAO; Fei WANG; Hong GAO; Jingwen TANG; Yuexiang YUAN

    2008-01-01

    The shock wave of vapor-liquid two-phase flow in a pressure-gain steam injector is studied by build-ing a mathematic model and making calculations. The results show that after the shock, the vapor is nearly com-pletely condensed. The upstream Mach number and the volume ratio of vapor have a great effect on the shock. The pressure and Mach number of two-phase shock con-form to the shock of ideal gas. The analysis of available energy shows that the shock is an irreversible process with entropy increase.

  8. Vapor generation rate model for dispersed drop flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Unal, C.; Tuzla, K.; Cokmez-Tuzla, A.F.; Chen, J.C.

    1991-01-01

    A comparison of predictions of existing nonequilibrium post-CHF heat transfer models with the recently obtained rod bundle data has been performed. The models used the experimental conditions and wall temperatures to predict the heat flux and vapor temperatures at the location of interest. No existing model was able to reasonably predict the vapor superheat and the wall heat flux simultaneously. Most of the models, except Chen-Sundaram-Ozkaynak, failed to predict the wall heat flux, while all of the models could not predict the vapor superheat data or trends. A recently developed two-region heat transfer model, the Webb-Chen two-region model, did not give a reasonable prediction of the vapor generation rate in the far field of the CHF point. A new correlation was formulated to predict the vapor generation rate in convective dispersed droplet flow in terms of thermal-hydraulic parameters and thermodynamic properties. A comparison of predictions of the two-region heat transfer model, with the use of a presently developed correlation, with all the existing post-CHF data, including single-tube and rod bundle, showed significant improvements in predicting the vapor superheat and tube wall heat flux trends. (orig.)

  9. Vaporizing Flow in Hot Fractures: Observations from Laboratory Experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kneafsey, T.; Pruess, K.

    1998-01-01

    Understanding water seepage in hot fractured rock is important in a number of fields including geothermal energy recovery and nuclear waste disposal. Heat-generating high-level nuclear waste packages which will be emplaced in the partially saturated fractured tuffs at the potential high-level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, if it becomes a high-level nuclear waste repository, will cause significant impacts on moisture distribution and migration. Liquid water, which occupies anywhere from 30 to 100% of the porespace, will be vaporized as the temperature reaches the boiling temperature. Flowing primarily in fractures, the vapor will condense where it encounters cooler rock, generating mobile water. This water will flow under gravitational and capillary forces and may flow back to the vicinity of the emplaced waste where it may partially escape vaporization. Water flowing down (sub-) vertical fractures may migrate considerable distances through fractured rock that is at above-boiling temperatures; thus, flowing condensate may contact waste packages, and provide a pathway for the transport of water-soluble radionuclides downward to the saturated zone. Thermally-driven flow processes induced by repository heat may be as important or even more important for repository performance than natural infiltration. For a nominal thermal loading of 57 kW/acre, vaporization may generate an average equivalent percolation flux from condensate of 23.1 mm/yr over 1,000 years, and 5.2 mm/yr over 10,000 years. These numbers are comparable to or larger than current estimates of net infiltration at Yucca Mountain. This condensate, which is generated in the immediate vicinity (meters) of the waste packages, will likely have a larger impact on waste package and repository performance than a similar amount of water introduced at the land surface

  10. Framework for simulating droplet vaporization in turbulent flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmore, John; Desjardins, Olivier

    2017-11-01

    A framework for performing direct numerical simulations of droplet vaporization is presented. The work is motivated by spray combustion in engines wherein fuel droplets vaporize in a turbulent gas flow. The framework is built into a conservative finite volume code for simulating low Mach number turbulent multiphase flows. Phase tracking is performed using a discretely conservative geometric volume of fluid method, while the transport of mass fraction and temperature is performed using the BQUICK scheme. Special attention is given to the implementation of transport equations near the interface to ensure the consistency between fluxes of mass, momentum, and scalars. The effect of evaporation on the flow appears as a system of coupled source terms which depend on the local thermodynamic equilibrium between the phases. The sources are implemented implicitly using an unconditionally stable, monotone scheme. Two methodologies for resolving the system's thermodynamic equilibrium are compared for their accuracy, robustness, and computational expense. Verification is performed by comparing results to known solutions in one and three dimensions. Finally, simulations of droplets vaporizing in turbulence are demonstrated, and trends for mass fraction and temperature fields are discussed.

  11. Preliminary characterization of an expanding flow of siloxane vapor MDM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spinelli, A.; Cozzi, F.; Cammi, G.; Zocca, M.; Gaetani, P.; Dossena, V.; Guardone, A.

    2017-03-01

    The early experimental results on the characterization of expanding flows of siloxane vapor MDM (C8H24O2Si3, octamethyltrisiloxane) are presented. The measurements were performed on the Test Rig for Organic VApors (TROVA) at the CREA Laboratory of Politecnico di Milano. The TROVA test-rig was built in order to investigate the non-ideal compressible-fluid behavior of typical expanding flows occurring within organic Rankine cycles (ORC) turbine passages. The test rig implements a batch Rankine cycle where a planar converging-diverging nozzle replaces the turbine and represents a test section. Investigations related to both fields of non-ideal compressible-fluid dynamics fundamentals and turbomachinery are allowed. The nozzle can be operated with different working fluids and operating conditions aiming at measuring independently the pressure, the temperature and the velocity field and thus providing data to verify the thermo-fluid dynamic models adopted to predict the behavior of these flows. The limiting values of pressure and temperature are 50 bar and 400 °C respectively. The early measurements are performed along the nozzle axis, where an isentropic process is expected to occur. In particular, the results reported here refer to the nozzle operated in adapted conditions using the siloxane vapor MDM as working fluid in thermodynamic regions where mild to medium non-ideal compressible-fluid effects are present. Both total temperature and total pressure of the nozzle are measured upstream of the test section, while static pressure are measured along the nozzle axis. Schlieren visualizations are also carried out in order to complement the pressure measurement with information about the 2D density gradient field. The Laser Doppler Velocimetry technique is planned to be used in the future for velocity measurements. The measured flow field has also been interpreted by resorting to the quasi-one-dimensional theory and two dimensional CFD viscous calculation. In both cases

  12. Engine flow visualization using a copper vapor laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regan, Carolyn A.; Chun, Kue S.; Schock, Harold J., Jr.

    1987-01-01

    A flow visualization system has been developed to determine the air flow within the combustion chamber of a motored, axisymmetric engine. The engine has been equipped with a transparent quartz cylinder, allowing complete optical access to the chamber. A 40-Watt copper vapor laser is used as the light source. Its beam is focused down to a sheet approximately 1 mm thick. The light plane is passed through the combustion chamber, and illuminates oil particles which were entrained in the intake air. The light scattered off of the particles is recorded by a high speed rotating prism movie camera. A movie is then made showing the air flow within the combustion chamber for an entire four-stroke engine cycle. The system is synchronized so that a pulse generated by the camera triggers the laser's thyratron. The camera is run at 5,000 frames per second; the trigger drives one laser pulse per frame. This paper describes the optics used in the flow visualization system, the synchronization circuit, and presents results obtained from the movie. This is believed to be the first published study showing a planar observation of airflow in a four-stroke piston-cylinder assembly. These flow visualization results have been used to interpret flow velocity measurements previously obtained with a laser Doppler velocimetry system.

  13. A screen-printed flexible flow sensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moschos, A; Kaltsas, G; Syrovy, T; Syrova, L

    2017-01-01

    A thermal flow sensor was printed on a flexible plastic substrate using exclusively screen-printing techniques. The presented device was implemented with custom made screen-printed thermistors, which allows simple, cost-efficient production on a variety of flexible substrates while maintaining the typical advantages of thermal flow sensors. Evaluation was performed for both static (zero flow) and dynamic conditions using a combination of electrical measurements and IR imaging techniques in order to determine important characteristics, such as temperature response, output repeatability, etc. The flow sensor was characterized utilizing the hot-wire and calorimetric principles of operation, while the preliminary results appear to be very promising, since the sensor was successfully evaluated and displayed adequate sensitivity in a relatively wide flow range. (paper)

  14. Vibration characteristics of an inclined flip-flow screen panel in banana flip-flow screens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Xiaoyan; Niu, Linkai; Gu, Chengxiang; Wang, Yinhua

    2017-12-01

    A banana flip-flow screen is an effective solution for the screening of high-viscosity, high-water and fine materials. As one of the key components, the vibration characteristics of the inclined flip-flow screen panel largely affects the screen performance and the processing capacity. In this paper, a mathematical model for the vibration characteristic of the inclined flip-flow screen panel is proposed based on Catenary theory. The reasonability of Catenary theory in analyzing the vibration characteristic of flip-flow screen panels is verified by a published experiment. Moreover, the effects of the rotation speed of exciters, the incline angle, the slack length and the characteristics of the screen on the vertical deflection, the vertical velocity and the vertical acceleration of the screen panel are investigated parametrically. The results show that the rotation speed of exciters, the incline angle, the slack length and the characteristics of the screen have significant effects on the vibrations of an inclined flip-flow screen panel, and these parameters should be optimized.

  15. Analysis of the one-dimensional transient compressible vapor flow in heat pipes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Jong H.; Faghri, Amir; Chang, Won S.

    1991-01-01

    The transient compressible one-dimensional vapor flow dynamics in a heat pipe is modeled. The numerical results are obtained by using the implicit non-iterative Beam-Warming finite difference method. The model is tested for simulated heat pipe vapor flow and actual vapor flow in cylindrical heat pipes. A good comparison of the present transient results for the simulated heat pipe vapor flow with the previous results of a two-dimensional numerical model is achieved and the steady state results are in agreement with the existing experimental data. The transient behavior of the vapor flow under subsonic, sonic, and supersonic speeds as well as high mass flow rates are successfully predicted.

  16. Flow Vaporization of CO{sub 2} in Microchannel Tubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pettersen, Jostein

    2002-07-01

    Carbon dioxide is receiving renewed interest as an efficient and environmentally safe refrigerant in a number of applications, including mobile air conditioning and heat pump systems, and hot water heat pumps. Compact heat exchangers for CO{sub 2} systems are designed with small-diameter tubing. The purpose of this study is therefore to provide a better basis for understanding and predicting heat transfer and pressure drop during flow vaporization of CO{sub 2} in microchannels. The ''unusual'' properties of carbon dioxide give heat transfer and two-phase flow characteristics that are very different from those of conventional refrigerants. Examples of these differences are the much higher pressure, the resulting high vapour density, a very low surface tension, and a low liquid viscosity. High pressure and low surface tension has a major effect on nucleate boiling characteristics, and earlier test data have shown a clear dominance of nucleate boiling even at very high mass flux. Heat transfer tests were conducted in a rig using a flat, extruded aluminium microchannel tube of 540 mm length with 25 channels of 0.81 mm diameter. The horizontal test tube was heated by a water jacket in order to get representative boundary conditions for air-to-refrigerant heat transfer (''fluid heating''). Constant heat flux conditions do not simulate these boundary conditions well, and may give unrealistic behaviour especially in relation to dryout and post-dryout heat transfer. Systematic tests at constant heat flux with single-phase CO{sub 2} flow on the inside generated data that were used in the derivation of a model for water-side beat transfer coefficient. A regression based on these data gave a calibrated equation for water-side heat transfer on the form NuNu(Re,Pr). This equation was then used in later experiments to subtract water-side thermal resistance from the measured overall resistance (1/UA), thereby finding the internal heat

  17. Prediction model for initial point of net vapor generation for low-flow boiling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Qi; Zhao Hua; Yang Ruichang

    2003-01-01

    The prediction of the initial point of net vapor generation is significant for the calculation of phase distribution in sub-cooled boiling. However, most of the investigations were developed in high-flow boiling, and there is no common model that could be successfully applied for the low-flow boiling. A predictive model for the initial point of net vapor generation for low-flow forced convection and natural circulation is established here, by the analysis of evaporation and condensation heat transfer. The comparison between experimental data and calculated results shows that this model can predict the net vapor generation point successfully in low-flow sub-cooled boiling

  18. Thermosyphon analysis of a repository: A simplified model for vapor flow and heat transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manteufel, R.D.; Powell, M.W.

    1994-01-01

    A simplified model is developed for thermally-driven buoyant gas flow in an unsaturated repository such as that anticipated at Yucca Mountain. Based on a simplified thermosyphon model, the strength of buoyant gas flow is related to key thermal-hydraulic parameters (e.g., bulk permeability and maximum repository temperature). The effects of buoyant gas flow on vapor flow and heat transport near the repository horizon are assessed, namely: (i) the strength of buoyant flow through the repository, (ii) the effect of buoyant flow on vapor transfer, and (iii) the effect of buoyant flow on heat transfer

  19. Identification of Alternative Vapor Intrusion Pathways Using Controlled Pressure Testing, Soil Gas Monitoring, and Screening Model Calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yuanming; Holton, Chase; Luo, Hong; Dahlen, Paul; Gorder, Kyle; Dettenmaier, Erik; Johnson, Paul C

    2015-11-17

    Vapor intrusion (VI) pathway assessment and data interpretation have been guided by an historical conceptual model in which vapors originating from contaminated soil or groundwater diffuse upward through soil and are swept into a building by soil gas flow induced by building underpressurization. Recent studies reveal that alternative VI pathways involving neighborhood sewers, land drains, and other major underground piping can also be significant VI contributors, even to buildings beyond the delineated footprint of soil and groundwater contamination. This work illustrates how controlled-pressure-method testing (CPM), soil gas sampling, and screening-level emissions calculations can be used to identify significant alternative VI pathways that might go undetected by conventional sampling under natural conditions at some sites. The combined utility of these tools is shown through data collected at a long-term study house, where a significant alternative VI pathway was discovered and altered so that it could be manipulated to be on or off. Data collected during periods of natural and CPM conditions show that the alternative pathway was significant, but its presence was not identifiable under natural conditions; it was identified under CPM conditions when measured emission rates were 2 orders of magnitude greater than screening-model estimates and subfoundation vertical soil gas profiles changed and were no longer consistent with the conventional VI conceptual model.

  20. A study of vapor bubble departure in subcooled flow boiling at low pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donevski, Bozin; Saga, Tetsuo; Kobayashi, Toshio; Segawa, Shigeki

    1999-01-01

    An experimental study of vapor bubble dynamics in sub-cooled flow boiling was conducted using the flow visualization and digital image processing methods. Vapor bubble departure departure in subcooled flow boiling have been experimentally investigated over a range of mass flux G=0.384 (kg/m 2 s), and heat flux q w = 27.2 x 10 4 (W/m 2 ), for the subcooled flow boiling region. It has been observed that once a vapor bubble departs from a nucleation site, it typically slides along the heating surface at sonic finite distance down-stream of nucleation site. The image processing method proposed in this study is based on the detachment and tracing of the edges of the bubbles and their background. The proposed method can be used in various fields of engineering applications. (Original)

  1. CFD modeling of condensation process of water vapor in supersonic flows

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Yan; Walther, Jens Honore; Yan, Yuying

    2017-01-01

    The condensation phenomenon of vapor plays an important role in various industries, such as the steam flow in turbines and refrigeration system. A mathematical model is developed to predict the spontaneous condensing phenomenon in the supersonic flows using the nucleation and droplet growth...... theories. The numerical approach is validated with the experimental data, which shows a good agreement between them. The condensation characteristics of water vapor in the Laval nozzle are described in detail. The results show that the condensation process is a rapid variation of the vapor-liquid phase...... change both in the space and in time. The spontaneous condensation of water vapor will not appear immediately when the steam reaches the saturation state. Instead, it occurs further downstream the nozzle throat, where the steam is in the state of supersaturation....

  2. Measurement of Vapor Flow As an Important Source of Water in Dry Land Eco-Hydrology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Z.; He, Z.; Wang, Y.; Gao, Z.; Hishida, K.

    2014-12-01

    When the temperature of land surface is lower than that of air and deeper soils, water vapor gathers toward the ground surface where dew maybe formed depending on the prevailing dew point and wind speed. Some plants are able to absorb the dew and vapor flow while the soil can readily absorb both. Certain animals such as desert beetles and ants harvest the dew or fog for daily survival. Recently, it is also realized that the dew and vapor flow can be a life-saving amount of water for plant survival at the driest seasons of the year in arid and semi-arid regions. Researches are conducted to quantify the amount of near-surface vapor flow in arid and semi-arid regions in China and USA. Quantitative leaf water absorption and desorption functions were derived based on laboratory experiments. Results show that plant leaves absorb and release water at different speeds depending on species and varieties. The "ideal" native plants in the dry climates can quickly absorb water and slowly release it. This water-holding capacity of plant is characterized by the absorption and desorption functions derived for plant physiology and water balance studies. Field studies are conducted to measure the dynamic vapor flow movements from the atmosphere and the groundwater table to soil surface. Results show that dew is usually formed on soil and plant surfaces during the daily hours when the temperature gradients are inverted toward the soil surface. The amount of dew harvested using gravels on the soil surface was enough to support water melon agriculture on deserts. The vapor flow can be effectively intercepted by artificially seeded plants in semi-arid regions forming new forests. New studies are attempted to quantify the role of vapor flow for the survival of giant sequoias in the southern Sierra Nevada Mountains of California.

  3. Screening for organic solvents in Hanford waste tanks using total non- methane organic compound vapor concentrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huckaby, J.L.; Glissmeyer, J.A.; Sklarew, D.S.

    1997-02-01

    The potential ignition of organic liquids stored in the Hanford high-level radioactive waste tanks is a safety issue because expanding gases could affect tank dome integrity. This report presents results of a screening test that was applied to 75 passively ventilated waste tanks at Hanford to determine those that might contain a significant amount of organic liquid waste. The screening test is based on a simple model of tank headspace, headspace organic vapor concentrations, and certain tank physical parameters. Analyses indicate that damage to the tank dome is credible only if the organic liquid burn rate is above a threshold value, and this can occur only if the surface area of organic liquid in a tank is above a corresponding threshold value of about one square meter. Twelve tanks were identified as potentially containing at least that amount of semivolatile organic liquid based on conservative estimates. Tank head space organic vapor concentrations and physical parameters required by the screening test have been compiled and are presented for each of the tanks studied. Estimates of the ventilation rates of the waste tanks were revised to reflect recent information obtained from hydrogen monitoring data. A simple analysis of the uncertainty in the test results suggests that the largest current uncertainty in the estimation of organic liquid surface area is that associated with knowledge of the tank ventilation rate. The uncertainty analysis is applied to determine 95% confidence limits for the estimated organic waste surface area in each tank

  4. The determination of the initial point of net vapor generation in flow subcooled boiling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan Changqi; Sun Zhongning

    2000-01-01

    The experimental results for the initial point of net vapor generation in up-flow subcooled boiling in an internally-heated annulus are given. The characteristics of the initial point of net vapor generation and the problem on gamma ray attenuation measurement are discussed. The comparison between the data and a calculation model is given, it is showed that the data agree well with the model

  5. Attenuation of concentration fluctuations of water vapor and other trace gases in turbulent tube flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. J. Massman

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies with closed-path eddy covariance (EC systems have indicated that the attenuation of fluctuations of water vapor concentration is dependent upon ambient relative humidity, presumably due to sorption/desorption of water molecules at the interior surface of the tube. Previous studies of EC-related tube attenuation effects have either not considered this issue at all or have only examined it superficially. Nonetheless, the attenuation of water vapor fluctuations is clearly much greater than might be expected from a passive tracer in turbulent tube flow. This study reexamines the turbulent tube flow issue for both passive and sorbing tracers with the intent of developing a physically-based semi-empirical model that describes the attenuation associated with water vapor fluctuations. Toward this end, we develop a new model of tube flow dynamics (radial profiles of the turbulent diffusivity and tube airstream velocity. We compare our new passive-tracer formulation with previous formulations in a systematic and unified way in order to assess how sensitive the passive-tracer results depend on fundamental modeling assumptions. We extend the passive tracer model to the vapor sorption/desorption case by formulating the model's wall boundary condition in terms of a physically-based semi-empirical model of the sorption/desorption vapor fluxes. Finally we synthesize all modeling and observational results into a single analytical expression that captures the effects of the mean ambient humidity and tube flow (Reynolds number on tube attenuation.

  6. Raman scattering temperature measurements for water vapor in nonequilibrium dispersed two-phase flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anastasia, C.M.; Neti, S.; Smith, W.R.; Chen, J.C.

    1982-09-01

    The objective of this investigation was to determine the feasibility of using Raman scattering as a nonintrusive technique to measure vapor temperatures in dispersed two-phase flow. The Raman system developed for this investigation is described, including alignment of optics and optimization of the photodetector for photon pulse counting. Experimentally obtained Raman spectra are presented for the following single- and two-phase samples: liquid water, atmospheric nitrogen, superheated steam, nitrogen and water droplets in a high void fraction air/water mist, and superheated water vapor in nonequilibrium dispersed flow

  7. Linkages Among Water Vapor Flows, Food Production, and Terrestrial Ecosystem Services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johan Rockström

    1999-12-01

    Full Text Available Global freshwater assessments have not addressed the linkages among water vapor flows, agricultural food production, and terrestrial ecosystem services. We perform the first bottom-up estimate of continental water vapor flows, subdivided into the major terrestrial biomes, and arrive at a total continental water vapor flow of 70,000 km3/yr (ranging from 56,000 to 84,000 km3/yr. Of this flow, 90% is attributed to forests, including woodlands (40,000 km3/yr, wetlands (1400 km3/yr, grasslands (15,100 km3/yr, and croplands (6800 km3/yr. These terrestrial biomes sustain society with essential welfare-supporting ecosystem services, including food production. By analyzing the freshwater requirements of an increasing demand for food in the year 2025, we discover a critical trade-off between flows of water vapor for food production and for other welfare-supporting ecosystem services. To reduce the risk of unintentional welfare losses, this trade-off must become embedded in intentional ecohydrological landscape management.

  8. 1,4-Dioxane Remediation by Extreme Soil Vapor Extraction (XSVE). Screening-Level Feasibility Assessment and Design Tool in Support of 1,4-Dioxane Remediation by Extreme Soil Vapor Extraction (XSVE) ESTCP Project ER 201326

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    USER GUIDE 1,4-Dioxane Remediation by Extreme Soil Vapor Extraction (XSVE) Screening-Level Feasibility Assessment and Design Tool in...Support of 1,4-Dioxane Remediation by Extreme Soil Vapor Extraction (XSVE) ESTCP Project ER-201326 OCTOBER 2017 Rob Hinchee Integrated Science...Technology, Inc. 1509 Coastal Highway Panacea, FL 32346 8/8/2013 - 8/8/2018 10-2017 1,4-Dioxane Remediation by Extreme Soil Vapor Extraction (XSVE) Screening

  9. Screening for organic solvents in Hanford waste tanks using organic vapor concentrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huckaby, J.L.; Sklarew, D.S.

    1997-09-01

    The potential ignition of organic liquids stored in the Hanford Site high-level radioactive waste tanks has been identified as a safety issue because expanding gases could potentially affect tank dome integrity. Organic liquid waste has been found in some of the waste tanks, but most are thought to contain only trace amounts. Due to the inhomogeneity of the waste, direct sampling of the tank waste to locate organic liquids may not conclusively demonstrate that a given tank is free of risk. However, organic vapors present above the organic liquid waste can be detected with a high degree of confidence and can be used to identify problem tanks. This report presents the results of a screening test that has been applied to 82 passively ventilated high-level radioactive waste tanks at the Hanford Site to identify those that might contain a significant amount of organic liquid waste. It includes seven tanks not addressed in the previous version of this report, Screening for Organic Solvents in Hanford Waste Tanks Using Total Non-Methane Organic Compound Vapor Concentrations. The screening test is based on a simple model of the tank headspace that estimates the effective surface area of semivolatile organic liquid waste in a tank. Analyses indicate that damage to the tank dome is credible only if the organic liquid burn rate is above a threshold value, and this can occur only if the surface area of organic liquid in a tank is above a corresponding threshold value of about one square meter. Thirteen tanks were identified as potentially containing at least that amount of semivolatile organic liquid based on conservative estimates. Most of the tanks identified as containing potentially significant quantities of organic liquid waste are in the 241-BY and 241-C tank farms, which agrees qualitatively with the fact that these tank farms received the majority of the PUREX process organic wash waste and waste organic liquids

  10. Integral Optimization of Systematic Parameters of Flip-Flow Screens

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    翟宏新

    2004-01-01

    The synthetic index Ks for evaluating flip-flow screens is proposed and systematically optimized in view of the whole system. A series of optimized values of relevant parameters are found and then compared with those of the current industrial specifications. The results show that the optimized value Ks approaches the one of those famous flip-flow screens in the world. Some new findings on geometric and kinematics parameters are useful for improving the flip-flow screens with a low Ks value, which is helpful in developing clean coal technology.

  11. Analysis of Petrol and Diesel Vapor Using Selective Ion Flow Tube/Mass Spectrometry

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ping, CH.; Weijun, Z.; Yaman, CH.; Španěl, Patrik; Smith, D.

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 5, - (2003), s. 548-551 ISSN 0253-3820 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4040901 Keywords : selected ion flow tube/mass spectrometry * fuel vapor Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 0.224, year: 2003

  12. Theoretical investigation on exciplex pumped alkali vapor lasers with sonic-level gas flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xingqi; Shen, Binglin; Huang, Jinghua; Xia, Chunsheng; Pan, Bailiang

    2017-07-01

    Considering the effects of higher excited and ion energy states and utilizing the methodology in the fluid mechanics, a modified model of exciplex pumped alkali vapor lasers with sonic-level flowing gas is established. A comparison of output characters between subsonic flow and supersonic flow is made. In this model, higher excited and ion energy states are included as well, which modifies the analysis of the kinetic process and introduces larger heat loading in an operating CW exciplex-pumped alkali vapor laser. The results of our calculations predict that subsonic flow has an advantage over supersonic flow under the same fluid parameters, and stimulated emission in the supersonic flow would be quenched while the pump power reaching a threshold value of the fluid choking effect. However, by eliminating the influence of fluid characters, better thermal management and higher optical conversion efficiency can be obtained in supersonic flow. In addition, we make use of the "nozzle-diffuser" to build up the closed-circle flowing experimental device and gather some useful simulated results.

  13. Dust mobilization by high-speed vapor flow under LOVA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuki, K.; Suzuki, S.; Ebara, S.; Yokomine, T.; Shimizu, A.

    2006-01-01

    In the safety analysis on the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER), the ingress of coolant (ICE) event and the loss of vacuum (LOVA) event are considered as one of the most serious accident. On the assumption of LOVA occurring after ICE, it is inferable that activated dusts are under the wet condition. Transport behavior of in-vessel activated dusts under the wet condition is not well understood in comparison with the dry case. In this study, we experimentally investigated the entrainment behavior of dust under LOVA after ICE. We measured dust entrainment by high-speed humid airflow with phase change. Graphite dusts and glass beads are used as substitutions for mobile inventory. The relations among the relative humidity, the entrainment of particles in the exhaust gas flow and the adhesion rate of dust particles on the pipe wall have been made clear, as has the distribution profile of dust deposition on the pipe wall. The entrainment ratio decreased as the relative humidity increased and increased as the initial pressure difference increased

  14. The self-similar turbulent flow of low-pressure water vapor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konyukhov, V. K.; Stepanov, E. V.; Borisov, S. K.

    2018-05-01

    We studied turbulent flows of water vapor in a pipe connecting two closed vessels of equal volume. The vessel that served as a source of water vapor was filled with adsorbent in the form of corundum ceramic balls. These ceramic balls were used to obtain specific conditions to lower the vapor pressure in the source vessel that had been observed earlier. A second vessel, which served as a receiver, was empty of either air or vapor before each vapor sampling. The rate of the pressure increase in the receiver vessel was measured in a series of six samplings performed with high precision. The pressure reduction rate in the source vessel was found to be three times lower than the pressure growth rate in the receiver vessel. We found that the pressure growth rates in all of the adjacent pairs of samples could be arranged in a combination that appeared to be identical for all pairs, and this revealed the existence of a rather interesting and peculiar self-similarity law for the sampling processes under consideration.

  15. Cavitating flow during water hammer using a generalized interface vaporous cavitation model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadafi, Mohamadhosein; Riasi, Alireza; Nourbakhsh, Seyed Ahmad

    2012-10-01

    In a transient flow simulation, column separation may occur when the calculated pressure head decreases to the saturated vapor pressure head in a computational grid. Abrupt valve closure or pump failure can result in a fast transient flow with column separation, potentially causing problems such as pipe failure, hydraulic equipment damage, cavitation or corrosion. This paper reports a numerical study of water hammer with column separation in a simple reservoir-pipeline-valve system and pumping station. The governing equations for two-phase transient flow in pipes are solved based on the method of characteristics (MOC) using a generalized interface vaporous cavitating model (GIVCM). The numerical results were compared with the experimental data for validation purposes, and the comparison indicated that the GIVCM describes the experimental results more accurately than the discrete vapor cavity model (DVCM). In particular, the GIVCM correlated better with the experimental data than the DVCM in terms of timing and pressure magnitude. The effects of geometric and hydraulic parameters on flow behavior in a pumping station with column separation were also investigated in this study.

  16. NASA Glenn Research Center, Propulsion Systems Laboratory: Plan to Measure Engine Core Flow Water Vapor Content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, Michael

    2014-01-01

    This presentation will be made at the 92nd AIAA Turbine Engine Testing Working Group (TETWoG), a semi-annual technical meeting of turbine engine testing professionals. The objective is to describe an effort by NASA to measure the water vapor content on the core airflow in a full scale turbine engine ice crystal icing test and to open a discussion with colleagues how to accurately conduct the measurement based on any previous collective experience with the procedure, instruments and nature of engine icing testing within the group. The presentation lays out the schematics of the location in the flow path from which the sample will be drawn, the plumbing to get it from the engine flow path to the sensor and several different water vapor measurement technologies that will be used: Tunable diode laser and infrared spectroscopy.

  17. Managing the Drivers of Air Flow and Water Vapor Transport in Existing Single Family Homes (Revised)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cummings, J.; Withers, C.; Martin, E.; Moyer, N.

    2012-10-01

    This document focuses on managing the driving forces which move air and moisture across the building envelope. While other previously published Measure Guidelines focus on elimination of air pathways, the ultimate goal of this Measure Guideline is to manage drivers which cause air flow and water vapor transport across the building envelope (and also within the home), control air infiltration, keep relative humidity (RH) within acceptable limits, avoid combustion safety problems, improve occupant comfort, and reduce house energy use.

  18. Managing the Drivers of Air Flow and Water Vapor Transport in Existing Single-Family Homes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cummings, James [Building America Partnership for Improved Residential Construction (BA-PIRC), Cocoa, FL (United States); Withers, Charles [Building America Partnership for Improved Residential Construction (BA-PIRC), Cocoa, FL (United States); Martin, Eric [Building America Partnership for Improved Residential Construction (BA-PIRC), Cocoa, FL (United States); Moyer, Neil [Building America Partnership for Improved Residential Construction (BA-PIRC), Cocoa, FL (United States)

    2012-10-01

    This report is a revision of an earlier report titled: Measure Guideline: Managing the Drivers of Air Flow and Water Vapor Transport in Existing Single-Family Homes. Revisions include: Information in the text box on page 1 was revised to reflect the most accurate information regarding classifications as referenced in the 2012 International Residential Code. “Measure Guideline” was dropped from the title of the report. An addition was made to the reference list.

  19. Application of a 2D air flow model to soil vapor extraction and bioventing case studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohr, D.H.; Merz, P.H.

    1995-01-01

    Soil vapor extraction (SVE) is frequently the technology of choice to clean up hydrocarbon contamination in unsaturated soil. A two-dimensional air flow model provides a practical tool to evaluate pilot test data and estimate remediation rates for soil vapor extraction systems. The model predictions of soil vacuum versus distance are statistically compared to pilot test data for 65 SVE wells at 44 sites. For 17 of 21 sites where there was asphalt paving, the best agreement was obtained for boundary conditions with no barrier to air flow at the surface. The model predictions of air flow rates and stream lines around the well allow an estimate of the gasoline removal rates by both evaporation and bioremediation. The model can be used to quickly estimate the effective radius of influence, defined here as the maximum distance from the well where there is enough air flow to remove the contaminant present within the allowable time. The effective radius of influence is smaller than a radius of influence defined by soil vacuum only. For a case study, in situ bioremediation rates were estimated using the air flow model and compared to independent estimates based on changes in soil temperature. These estimate bioremediation rates for heavy fuel oil ranged from 2.5 to 11 mg oil degraded per kg soil per day, in agreement with values in the literature

  20. Progress report on INEL full flow drag screen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arave, A.E.; Colson, J.B.; Fincke, J.R.

    1977-01-01

    The objective in developing a full flow drag screen is to obtain a total momentum flux measurement which when combined with a suitable independent velocity or density measurement will yield a total mass flux. The major design considerations are predicated by the fact that an accurate momentum flux measurement must be made over a wide range of flow conditions. The device should exhibit a constant calibration regardless of Reynolds number, void fraction, slip ratio, or flow regime. The dynamics of drag devices are well understood in single-phase flows. This is not true for two-phase flows. The present development program is directed toward gaining an understanding of the dynamics of drag devices which sample the total area of a pipe in two-phase flow and developing a method for deducing mass flow rate using such a device. Various geometric arrangements are to be investigated. Testing to date has shown excellent results using a round wire mesh screen in the Semiscale air/water loop. Future air/water testing will include perforated plates and wire meshes with both rectangular and diamond shaped cross sections. Analytical models of the hydrodynamics of the drag screen as well as the associated density or velocity measuring device are being used to select the optimum configuration. Alternate force sensing methods are also being considered. These include single and multiple transducer arrangements. Multistage springs and pressure drop across the body are to be evaluated for extending the dynamic range of the drag body

  1. An experimental study on critical flow rates in a water-vapor mixture, with low quality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seynhaeve, J.-M.

    1976-01-01

    The numerous existing studies about critical two-phase flows have shown the difficulty of getting a precise value of the critical flow rate, especially for low qualities. The comparison of results obtained on two different tests sections emphasizes the influence on the critical flow rate of such factors as geometry, channel types and laws governing the phenomena associated with vaporization. One suggests to evaluate the outlet conditions of the test channel from the inlet conditions. The first step is related to the single phase flow up to the section where the water is saturated. The second part takes the boiling delay into account; it is a function of the expansion's velocity. Finally, the last step leads to the determination of the outlet quality from the measured pressure losses [fr

  2. Flow Characterization of Vapor Phase of Geothermal Fluid in Pipe Using Isotope 85Kr and Residence Time Distribution Modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Sugiharto

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Measurement of vapor flow in geothermal pipe faces great challenges due to fast fluids flow in high-temperature and high-pressure environment. In present study the flow rate measurement has been performed to characterization the geothermal vapor flow in a pipe. The experiment was carried out in a pipe which is connected to a geothermal production well, KMJ-14. The pipe has a 10” outside diameter and contains dry vapor at a pressure of 8 kg/cm2 and a temperature of 170 oC. Krypton-85 gas isotope (85Kr has been injected into the pipe. Three collimated radiation detectors positioned respectively at 127, 177 and 227m from injection point were used to obtain experimental data which represent radiotracer residence time distribution (RTD in the pipe. The last detector at the position of 227 m did not respond, which might be due to problems in cable connections. Flow properties calculated using mean residence time (MRT shows that the flow rate of the vapor in pipe is 10.98 m/s, much faster than fluid flow commonly found in various industrial process plants. Best fitting evaluated using dedicated software developed by IAEA expert obtained the Péclet number Pe as 223. This means that the flow of vapor of geothermal fluids in pipe is plug flow in character. The molecular diffusion coefficient is 0.45 m2/s, calculated from the axial dispersion model.

  3. Numerical simulation of vapor flow and pressure drop across the demister of MSF desalination plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janajreh, I.; Hasania, A.; Fath, H.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Porous media was used to simulate the pressure drop across desalination demister. ► Simulation results plausibly compared with experimental results. ► FC inlet Velocity distribution has no effect on the demister pressure drop. ► Demister inertial resistance affects pressure drop more than viscous resistance. - Abstract: This paper presents a numerical simulation of the water vapor flow in an MSF flash chamber along with the pressure drop across the demister. The demister is a simple porous blanket of metal wires mesh (usually made of stainless steel wires) which retains liquid droplets entrained by the vapor momentum to enhance the quality of the product water. Two main areas of concern in wire mesh mist eliminators are; (i) the pressure drop and (ii) the mist removal efficiency. The present simulation focuses only on the pressure drop across the demister. The simulation is carried out considering a full scale flashing chamber of a typical operational MSF desalination plant and of a real industrial demister dimensions. The study simulates the demister as porous media flow. It takes into account the vapor velocity, the dimension of the demister, its porosity and wire thickness. The obtained pressure drop was found to be within a reasonable agreement with the published literature data and it follows a trend compatible with Ergun’s equation as well as the empirical correlation of Svendsen.

  4. Generalized modeling of multi-component vaporization/condensation phenomena for multi-phase-flow analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morita, K.; Fukuda, K.; Tobita, Y.; Kondo, Sa.; Suzuki, T.; Maschek, W.

    2003-01-01

    A new multi-component vaporization/condensation (V/C) model was developed to provide a generalized model for safety analysis codes of liquid metal cooled reactors (LMRs). These codes simulate thermal-hydraulic phenomena of multi-phase, multi-component flows, which is essential to investigate core disruptive accidents of LMRs such as fast breeder reactors and accelerator driven systems. The developed model characterizes the V/C processes associated with phase transition by employing heat transfer and mass-diffusion limited models for analyses of relatively short-time-scale multi-phase, multi-component hydraulic problems, among which vaporization and condensation, or simultaneous heat and mass transfer, play an important role. The heat transfer limited model describes the non-equilibrium phase transition processes occurring at interfaces, while the mass-diffusion limited model is employed to represent effects of non-condensable gases and multi-component mixture on V/C processes. Verification of the model and method employed in the multi-component V/C model of a multi-phase flow code was performed successfully by analyzing a series of multi-bubble condensation experiments. The applicability of the model to the accident analysis of LMRs is also discussed by comparison between steam and metallic vapor systems. (orig.)

  5. Numerical modelling of multiphase liquid-vapor-gas flows with interfaces and cavitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelanti, Marica

    2017-11-01

    We are interested in the simulation of multiphase flows where the dynamical appearance of vapor cavities and evaporation fronts in a liquid is coupled to the dynamics of a third non-condensable gaseous phase. We describe these flows by a single-velocity three-phase compressible flow model composed of the phasic mass and total energy equations, the volume fraction equations, and the mixture momentum equation. The model includes stiff mechanical and thermal relaxation source terms for all the phases, and chemical relaxation terms to describe mass transfer between the liquid and vapor phases of the species that may undergo transition. The flow equations are solved by a mixture-energy-consistent finite volume wave propagation scheme, combined with simple and robust procedures for the treatment of the stiff relaxation terms. An analytical study of the characteristic wave speeds of the hierarchy of relaxed models associated to the parent model system is also presented. We show several numerical experiments, including two-dimensional simulations of underwater explosive phenomena where highly pressurized gases trigger cavitation processes close to a rigid surface or to a free surface. This work was supported by the French Government Grant DGA N. 2012.60.0011.00.470.75.01, and partially by the Norwegian Grant RCN N. 234126/E30.

  6. The Effusive-Flow Properties of Target/Vapor-Transport Systems for Radioactive Ion Beam Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Kawai, Yoko; Liu, Yuan

    2005-01-01

    Radioactive atoms produced by the ISOL technique must diffuse from a target, effusively flow to an ion source, be ionized, be extracted, and be accelerated to research energies in a time commensurate with the lifetime of the species of interest. We have developed a fast valve system (closing time ~100 us) that can be used to accurately measure the effusion times of chemically active or inactive species through arbitrary geometry and size vapor transport systems with and without target material in the reservoir. The effusive flow times are characteristic of the system and thus serve as figures of merit for assessing the quality of a given vapor transport system as well as for assessing the permeability properties of a given target design. This article presents effusive flow data for noble gases flowing through a target reservoir and ion source system routinely used to generate radioactive species at the HRIBF with and without disks of 6 times and 10 times compressed Reticulated Vitreous Carbon Foam (RVCF) with...

  7. Study on onset of nucleate boiling and net vapor generation point in subcooled flow boiling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohtake, Hiroyasu; Wada, Noriyoshi; Koizumi, Yasuo

    2002-01-01

    The onset of nucleate boiling (ONB) and the point of net vapor generation on subcooled flow boiling, focusing on liquid subcooling and liquid velocity were investigated experimentally and analytically. Experiments were conducted using a copper thin-film (35μm) and subcooled water in a range of the liquid velocity from 0.27 to 4.6 m/s at 0.10MPa. The liquid subcoolings were 20, 30 and 40K, respectively. Temperatures at the onset of nucleate boiling obtained in the experiments increased with the liquid subcoolings and the liquid velocities. The increases in the temperature of ONB were represented with the classical stability theory of preexisting nuclei. The measured results of the net vapor generation agreed well with the results of correlation by Saha and Zuber in the range of the present experiments. (J.P.N.)

  8. Effects of argon and oxygen flow rate on water vapor barrier properties of silicon oxide coatings deposited on polyethylene terephthalate by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Sung-Ryong; Choudhury, Moinul Haque; Kim, Won-Ho; Kim, Gon-Ho

    2010-01-01

    Plasma polymer coatings were deposited from hexamethyldisiloxane on polyethylene terephthalate (PET) substrates while varying the operating conditions, such as the Ar and O 2 flow rates, at a fixed radio frequency power of 300 W. The water vapor transmission rate (WVTR) of the untreated PET was 54.56 g/m 2 /day and was decreased after depositing the silicon oxide (SiO x ) coatings. The minimum WVTR, 0.47 g/m 2 /day, was observed at Ar and O 2 flow rates of 4 and 20 sccm, respectively, with a coating thickness of 415.44 nm. The intensity of the peaks for the Si-O-Si bending at 800-820 cm -1 and Si-O-Si stretching at 1000-1150 cm -1 varied depending on the Ar and O 2 flow rates. The contact angle of the SiO x coated PET increased as the Ar flow rate was increased from 2 to 8 sccm at a fixed O 2 flow rate of 20 sccm. It decreased gradually as the oxygen flow rate increased from 12 to 28 sccm at a fixed Ar carrier gas flow rate. The examination by atomic force microscopy revealed a correlation of the SiO x morphology and the water vapor barrier performance with the Ar and O 2 flow rates. The roughness of the deposited coatings increased when either the O 2 or Ar flow rate was increased.

  9. Pressure drop and He II flow through fine mesh screens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maddocks, J. R.; van Sciver, S. W.

    1989-05-01

    Fluid acquisition systems for He II transfer devices will utilize gallery arms to ensure that the fluid encounters the pump inlet. In near term experiments such as Superfluid Helium on Orbit Transfer (SHOOT), the preferred configuration consists of several rectangular channels which have one side made from a Dutch weave stainless steel screen having 325 x 2300 wires per inch. The effective pore diameter for this screen is about 5 microns. The present paper reports on measurements of pressure drop across a screen when it is subjected to a flow of liquid helium. The experiment measures the time rate of change of the level in two different helium reservoirs connected by a screen-blocked channel. Results with normal helium are compared with predictions based on the Armour-Cannon (1968) equations. The He II data show considerable deviation from the classical result. A discussion of the He II pressure drop results in terms of two fluid hydrodynamics is included.

  10. Germanium doping of GaN by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition for polarization screening applications

    KAUST Repository

    Young, N.G.; Farrell, R.M.; Iza, M.; Nakamura, S.; DenBaars, S.P.; Weisbuch, C.; Speck, J.S.

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate n-type doping of GaN with Ge by MOCVD at high concentrations that are necessary to fully screen the polarization fields in c-plane InGaN/GaN quantum wells. Hall measurements show linear Ge incorporation with dopant flow rate and carrier concentrations exceeding 1×10 cm. GaN:Ge layers exhibit excellent electron mobility, high conductivity, and contact resistivity comparable to the best unannealed contacts to Si-doped GaN. However, the surface morphology begins to degrade with Ge concentrations above 1×10 cm, resulting in severe step bunching and a network of plateaus and trenches, even in layers as thin as 10 nm.

  11. Germanium doping of GaN by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition for polarization screening applications

    KAUST Repository

    Young, N.G.

    2016-10-01

    We demonstrate n-type doping of GaN with Ge by MOCVD at high concentrations that are necessary to fully screen the polarization fields in c-plane InGaN/GaN quantum wells. Hall measurements show linear Ge incorporation with dopant flow rate and carrier concentrations exceeding 1×10 cm. GaN:Ge layers exhibit excellent electron mobility, high conductivity, and contact resistivity comparable to the best unannealed contacts to Si-doped GaN. However, the surface morphology begins to degrade with Ge concentrations above 1×10 cm, resulting in severe step bunching and a network of plateaus and trenches, even in layers as thin as 10 nm.

  12. Flow-dependent directional growth of carbon nanotube forests by chemical vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hyeongkeun; Park, Young Chul; Chun, Kyoung-Yong; Kim, Young-Jin; Choi, Jae-Boong [School of Mechanical Engineering, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon, 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Keun Soo; Kang, Junmo; Hong, Byung Hee [SKKU Advanced Institute of Nanotechnology (SAINT) and Center for Human Interface Nano Technology (HINT), Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon, 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Boo, Jin-Hyo, E-mail: byunghee@skku.edu, E-mail: boong33@skku.edu [Department of Chemistry, RIAN and Institute of Basic Science, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon, 440-746 (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-03-04

    We demonstrated that the structural formation of vertically aligned carbon nanotube (CNT) forests is primarily affected by the geometry-related gas flow, leading to the change of growth directions during the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) process. By varying the growing time, flow rate, and direction of the carrier gas, the structures and the formation mechanisms of the vertically aligned CNT forests were carefully investigated. The growth directions of CNTs are found to be highly dependent on the nonlinear local gas flows induced by microchannels. The angle of growth significantly changes with increasing gas flows perpendicular to the microchannel, while the parallel gas flow shows almost no effect. A computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model was employed to explain the flow-dependent growth of CNT forests, revealing that the variation of the local pressure induced by microchannels is an important parameter determining the directionality of the CNT growth. We expect that the present method and analyses would provide useful information to control the micro- and macrostructures of vertically aligned CNTs for various structural/electrical applications.

  13. Flow-dependent directional growth of carbon nanotube forests by chemical vapor deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hyeongkeun; Park, Young Chul; Chun, Kyoung-Yong; Kim, Young-Jin; Choi, Jae-Boong; Kim, Keun Soo; Kang, Junmo; Hong, Byung Hee; Boo, Jin-Hyo

    2011-01-01

    We demonstrated that the structural formation of vertically aligned carbon nanotube (CNT) forests is primarily affected by the geometry-related gas flow, leading to the change of growth directions during the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) process. By varying the growing time, flow rate, and direction of the carrier gas, the structures and the formation mechanisms of the vertically aligned CNT forests were carefully investigated. The growth directions of CNTs are found to be highly dependent on the nonlinear local gas flows induced by microchannels. The angle of growth significantly changes with increasing gas flows perpendicular to the microchannel, while the parallel gas flow shows almost no effect. A computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model was employed to explain the flow-dependent growth of CNT forests, revealing that the variation of the local pressure induced by microchannels is an important parameter determining the directionality of the CNT growth. We expect that the present method and analyses would provide useful information to control the micro- and macrostructures of vertically aligned CNTs for various structural/electrical applications.

  14. Multiphase flow modeling of molten material-vapor-liquid mixtures in thermal nonequilibrium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Ik Kyu; Park, Goon Cherl; Bang, Kwang Hyun

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents a numerical model of multiphase flow of the mixtures of molten material-liquid-vapor, particularly in thermal nonequilibrium. It is a two-dimensional, transient, three-fluid model in Eulerian coordinates. The equations are solved numerically using the finite difference method that implicitly couples the rates of phase changes, momentum, and energy exchange to determine the pressure, density, and velocity fields. To examine the model's ability to predict an experimental data, calculations have been performed for tests of pouring hot particles and molten material into a water pool. The predictions show good agreement with the experimental data. It appears, however, that the interfacial heat transfer and breakup of molten material need improved models that can be applied to such high temperature, high pressure, multiphase flow conditions

  15. Experimental investigation on fluid flow and heat transfer characteristics of a submerged combustion vaporizer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Chang-Liang; Ren, Jing-Jie; Wang, Yan-Qing; Dong, Wen-Ping; Bi, Ming-Shu

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Thermal performance analysis of submerged combustion vaporizer (SCV) was performed experimentally. • Visualization study of shell-side flow field for SCV was carried out. • The effects of various operational parameters on the overall system performance were discussed. • Two new non-dimensional Nusselt correlations were proposed to predict the heat transfer performance of SCV. - Abstract: Submerged combustion vaporizer (SCV) occupies a decisive position in liquefied natural gas (LNG) industrial chain. In this paper, a visual experimental apparatus was established to have a comprehensive knowledge about fluid flow and heat transfer performance of SCV. Trans-critical liquid nitrogen (LN_2) was selected as alternative fluid to substitute LNG because of safety reason. Some unique experimental phenomena inside the SCV (local water bath freezes on the external surface of tube bundle) were revealed. Meanwhile the influences of static water height, superficial flue gas velocity, heat load, tube-side inlet pressure and tube-side mass flux on the system performance were systematically discussed. Finally, based on the obtained experimental results, two new empirical Nusselt number correlations were regressed to predict the shell-side and tube-side heat transfer characteristics of SCV. The maximum errors between predicted results and experimental data were respectively ±25% and ±20%. The outcomes of this paper were critical to the optimum design and economical operation of SCV.

  16. Simulation and modeling of turbulent non isothermal vapor-droplet dispersed flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baalbaki, Daoud

    2011-01-01

    One of the reference accident that may occur in PWR (Pressurized Water Reactor) is LOCA (Loss of Coolant Accident). The LOCA is studied to design some emergency systems implemented in the basic nuclear installations. The LOCA corresponds to the break of a pipe in the primary loop. This accident is associated with a loss of pressure which leads to the vaporization of the water in the reactor core and then to the rise of the temperature of the assemblies. In this study, we focus on the area of vapor-droplet flow, where the cooling effectiveness of such a mixture is a major concern. The droplets act as heat sinks for the vapor and control the vapor temperature profile which, in turn, determines the wall heat transfer rate. Our general objective is to ameliorate the modeling of the vapor-droplet flow (i.e. at CFD scale). Particularly the estimation of the radial distribution of the droplets. The volume fraction distribution of the two phases depends on the size and dispersion of the droplets in the flow. The size of the droplets is controlled by the rupture and coalescence mechanisms and the interfacial mass transfer (evaporation/condensation). The distribution of the droplets is controlled by the transfer of momentum between the two phases. Our study focuses particularly on the latter point. We are restricted to flows where the liquid water flows under the form of non-deformable spherical droplets that do not interact with each other. Both phases are treated by a two-fluid approach Euler-Euler. In chapter 2, a description of two-phase flow model is presented, using separate mass, momentum, and energy equations for the two phases. These separate balance equations are obtained in an averaging process starting from the local instantaneous conservation equations of the individual phases. During the averaging process, important information on local flow processes are lost and, consequently, additional correlations are needed in order to close the system of equations. The

  17. CVB: the Constrained Vapor Bubble Capillary Experiment on the International Space Station MARANGONI FLOW REGION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wayner, Peter C., Jr.; Kundan, Akshay; Plawsky, Joel

    2014-01-01

    The Constrained Vapor Bubble (CVB) is a wickless, grooved heat pipe and we report on a full- scale fluids experiment flown on the International Space Station (ISS). The CVB system consists of a relatively simple setup a quartz cuvette with sharp corners partially filled with either pentane or an ideal mixture of pentane and isohexane as the working fluids. Along with temperature and pressure measurements, the two-dimensional thickness profile of the menisci formed at the corners of the quartz cuvette was determined using the Light Microscopy Module (LMM). Even with the large, millimeter dimensions of the CVB, interfacial forces dominate in these exceedingly small Bond Number systems. The experiments were carried out at various power inputs. Although conceptually simple, the transport processes were found to be very complex with many different regions. At the heated end of the CVB, due to a high temperature gradient, we observed Marangoni flow at some power inputs. This region from the heated end to the central drop region is defined as a Marangoni dominated region. We present a simple analysis based on interfacial phenomena using only measurements from the ISS experiments that lead to a predictive equation for the thickness of the film near the heated end of the CVB. The average pressure gradient for flow in the film is assumed due to the measured capillary pressure at the two ends of the liquid film and that the pressure stress gradient due to cohesion self adjusts to a constant value over a distance L. The boundary conditions are the no slip condition at the wall interface and an interfacial shear stress at the liquid- vapor interface due to the Marangoni stress, which is due to the high temperature gradient. Although the heated end is extremely complex, since it includes three- dimensional variations in radiation, conduction, evaporation, condensation, fluid flow and interfacial forces, we find that using the above simplifying assumptions, a simple successful

  18. Automation in high-content flow cytometry screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naumann, U; Wand, M P

    2009-09-01

    High-content flow cytometric screening (FC-HCS) is a 21st Century technology that combines robotic fluid handling, flow cytometric instrumentation, and bioinformatics software, so that relatively large numbers of flow cytometric samples can be processed and analysed in a short period of time. We revisit a recent application of FC-HCS to the problem of cellular signature definition for acute graft-versus-host-disease. Our focus is on automation of the data processing steps using recent advances in statistical methodology. We demonstrate that effective results, on par with those obtained via manual processing, can be achieved using our automatic techniques. Such automation of FC-HCS has the potential to drastically improve diagnosis and biomarker identification.

  19. Net vapor generation point in boiling flow of trichlorotrifluoroethane at high pressures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dougall, R. S.; Lippert, T. E.

    1973-01-01

    The conditions at which the void in subcooled boiling starts to undergo a rapid increase were studied experimentally. The experiments were performed in a 12.7 x 9.5 mm rectangular channel. Heating was from a 3.2 mm wide strip embedded in one wall. The pressure ranged from 9.45 to 20.7 bar, mass velocity from 600 to 7000 kg/sq m sec, and subcooling from 16 to 67 C. Photographs were used to determine when detached bubbles first appeared in the bulk flow. Measurements of bubble layer thickness along the wall were also made. Results showed that the point of net vapor generation is close to the occurrence of fully-developed boiling.

  20. Two dimensional radial gas flows in atmospheric pressure plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Gwihyun; Park, Seran; Shin, Hyunsu; Song, Seungho; Oh, Hoon-Jung; Ko, Dae Hong; Choi, Jung-Il; Baik, Seung Jae

    2017-12-01

    Atmospheric pressure (AP) operation of plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) is one of promising concepts for high quality and low cost processing. Atmospheric plasma discharge requires narrow gap configuration, which causes an inherent feature of AP PECVD. Two dimensional radial gas flows in AP PECVD induces radial variation of mass-transport and that of substrate temperature. The opposite trend of these variations would be the key consideration in the development of uniform deposition process. Another inherent feature of AP PECVD is confined plasma discharge, from which volume power density concept is derived as a key parameter for the control of deposition rate. We investigated deposition rate as a function of volume power density, gas flux, source gas partial pressure, hydrogen partial pressure, plasma source frequency, and substrate temperature; and derived a design guideline of deposition tool and process development in terms of deposition rate and uniformity.

  1. A sharp interface method for compressible liquid–vapor flow with phase transition and surface tension

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fechter, Stefan, E-mail: stefan.fechter@iag.uni-stuttgart.de [Institut für Aerodynamik und Gasdynamik, Universität Stuttgart, Pfaffenwaldring 21, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Munz, Claus-Dieter, E-mail: munz@iag.uni-stuttgart.de [Institut für Aerodynamik und Gasdynamik, Universität Stuttgart, Pfaffenwaldring 21, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Rohde, Christian, E-mail: Christian.Rohde@mathematik.uni-stuttgart.de [Institut für Angewandte Analysis und Numerische Simulation, Universität Stuttgart, Pfaffenwaldring 57, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Zeiler, Christoph, E-mail: Christoph.Zeiler@mathematik.uni-stuttgart.de [Institut für Angewandte Analysis und Numerische Simulation, Universität Stuttgart, Pfaffenwaldring 57, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany)

    2017-05-01

    The numerical approximation of non-isothermal liquid–vapor flow within the compressible regime is a difficult task because complex physical effects at the phase interfaces can govern the global flow behavior. We present a sharp interface approach which treats the interface as a shock-wave like discontinuity. Any mixing of fluid phases is avoided by using the flow solver in the bulk regions only, and a ghost-fluid approach close to the interface. The coupling states for the numerical solution in the bulk regions are determined by the solution of local two-phase Riemann problems across the interface. The Riemann solution accounts for the relevant physics by enforcing appropriate jump conditions at the phase boundary. A wide variety of interface effects can be handled in a thermodynamically consistent way. This includes surface tension or mass/energy transfer by phase transition. Moreover, the local normal speed of the interface, which is needed to calculate the time evolution of the interface, is given by the Riemann solution. The interface tracking itself is based on a level-set method. The focus in this paper is the description of the two-phase Riemann solver and its usage within the sharp interface approach. One-dimensional problems are selected to validate the approach. Finally, the three-dimensional simulation of a wobbling droplet and a shock droplet interaction in two dimensions are shown. In both problems phase transition and surface tension determine the global bulk behavior.

  2. Determination of mercury by multisyringe flow injection system with cold-vapor atomic absorption spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leal, L.O.; Elsholz, O.; Forteza, R.; Cerda, V.

    2006-01-01

    A new software-controlled time-based multisyringe flow injection system for mercury determination by cold-vapor atomic absorption spectrometry is proposed. Precise known volumes of sample, reducing agent (1.1% SnCl 2 in 3% HCl) and carrier (3% HCl) are dispensed into a gas-liquid separation cell with a multisyringe burette coupled with one three-way solenoid valve. An argon flow delivers the reduced mercury to the spectrometer. The optimization of the system was carried out testing reaction coils and gas-liquid separators of different design as well as changing parameters, such as sample and reagents volumes, reagent concentrations and carrier gas flow rate, among others. The analytical curves were obtained within the range 50-5000 ng L -1 . The detection limit (3σ b /S) achieved is 5 ng L -1 . The relative standard deviation (R.S.D.) was 1.4%, evaluated from 16 successive injections of 250 ng L -1 Hg standard solution. The injection and sample throughput per hour were 44 and 11, respectively. This technique was validated by means of solid and water reference materials with good agreement with the certified values and was successfully applied to fish samples

  3. VAPOR SAMPLING DEVICE FOR INTERFACE WITH MICROTOX ASSAY FOR SCREENING TOXIC INDUSTRIAL CHEMICALS

    Science.gov (United States)

    A time-integrated sampling system interfaced with a toxicity-based assay is reported for monitoring volatile toxic industrial chemicals (TICs). Semipermeable membrane devices (SPMDs) using dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) as the fill solvent accumulated each of 17 TICs from the vapor...

  4. THE EFFECT OF WATER (VAPOR-PHASE) AND CARBON ON ELEMENTAL MERCURY REMOVAL IN A FLOW REACTOR

    Science.gov (United States)

    The paper gives results of studying the effect of vapor-phase moisture on elemental mercury (Hgo) removal by activated carbon (AC) in a flow reactor. tests involved injecting AC into both a dry and a 4% moisture nitrogen (N2) /Hgo gas stream. A bituminous-coal-based AC (Calgon WP...

  5. Influence of the Flow Direction on the Mass Transport of Vapors through Membranes Consisting of Several Layers

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Loimer, T.; Uchytil, Petr

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 67, OCT 2015 (2015), s. 2-5 ISSN 0894-1777 R&D Projects: GA MŠk 7AMB12AT010; GA MŠk(CZ) 7AMB14AT011 Institutional support: RVO:67985858 Keywords : porous media * phase change * vapor flow Subject RIV: CI - Industrial Chemistry, Chemical Engineering Impact factor: 2.128, year: 2015

  6. Vapor bubble behavior in subcooled flow boiling in annuli heated by water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Licheng Sun; Zhongning Sun; Changqi Yan

    2005-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: This paper describes experimental and theoretical work conducted on vapor bubble behavior in subcooled flow boiling at atmospheric pressure. The test section is mainly consisted of two concentrically installed circular tubes, the outside tube is made of quartz and therefore all test courses can be visualized. Water is forced to flow through annuli with gap sizes of 3 mm and 5 mm, and is heated by high temperature water in the inner tube. The main objective is to visually study the bubble behavior of subcooled flow boiling water in the condition of surface heated by water. The results show that bubbles depart from wall directly or slide a certain distance before departure, this is same as that heated by electricity. There exists a bubble layer near the wall, most bubbles move and disappear in the layer after departure, the bubble sliding behavior is not very obvious in 5 mm annulus, however, we found that most bubbles in 3 mm annulus will slide a long distance before departure and their growth courses are different from usual experimental results. The bubbles are not always growing, but shrinking a little quickly after growing for some time, and then the course will repeat for some times till they depart from wall or disappeared, the collision and coalescence of bubbles is very common and makes the bubbles depart from wall more easily in 3 mm annulus. At last, the forces on bubbles growing and detaching in flow along the wall are analyzed to comprehend these phenomena more accurately. (authors)

  7. Numerical modeling of condensation from vapor-gas mixtures for forced down flow inside a tube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuann, R.Y.; Schrock, V.E.; Chen, Xiang, M.

    1995-01-01

    Laminar film condensation is the dominant heat transfer mode inside tubes. In the present paper direct numerical simulation of the detailed transport process within the steam-gas core flow and in the condensate film is carried out. The problem was posed as an axisymmetric two dimensional (r, z) gas phase inside an annular condensate film flow with an assumed smooth interface. The fundamental conservation equations were written for mass, momentum, species concentration and energy in the gaseous phase with effective diffusion parameters characterizing the turbulent region. The low Reynolds number two equation κ-ε model was employed to determine the eddy diffusion coefficients. The liquid film was described by similar formulation without the gas species equation. An empirical correlation was employed to correct for the effect of film waviness on the interfacial shear. A computer code named COAPIT (Condensation Analysis Program Inside Tube) was developed to implement numerical solution of the fundamental equations. The equations were solved by a marching technique working downstream from the entrance of the condensing section. COAPIT was benchmarked against experimental data and overall reasonable agreement was found for the key parameters such as heat transfer coefficient and tube inner wall temperature. The predicted axial development of radial profiles of velocity, composition and temperature and occurrence of metastable vapor add insight to the physical phenomena

  8. Numerical modeling of condensation from vapor-gas mixtures for forced down flow inside a tube

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuann, R Y [Taiwan Power Company, Taipei (Taiwan, Province of China); Schrock, V E [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Chen, Xiang

    1995-09-01

    Laminar film condensation is the dominant heat transfer mode inside tubes. In the present paper direct numerical simulation of the detailed transport process within the steam-gas core flow and in the condensate film is carried out. The problem was posed as an axisymmetric two dimensional (r, z) gas phase inside an annular condensate film flow with an assumed smooth interface. The fundamental conservation equations were written for mass, momentum, species concentration and energy in the gaseous phase with effective diffusion parameters characterizing the turbulent region. The low Reynolds number two equation {kappa}-{epsilon} model was employed to determine the eddy diffusion coefficients. The liquid film was described by similar formulation without the gas species equation. An empirical correlation was employed to correct for the effect of film waviness on the interfacial shear. A computer code named COAPIT (Condensation Analysis Program Inside Tube) was developed to implement numerical solution of the fundamental equations. The equations were solved by a marching technique working downstream from the entrance of the condensing section. COAPIT was benchmarked against experimental data and overall reasonable agreement was found for the key parameters such as heat transfer coefficient and tube inner wall temperature. The predicted axial development of radial profiles of velocity, composition and temperature and occurrence of metastable vapor add insight to the physical phenomena.

  9. ISS modeling strategy for the numerical simulation of turbulent sub-channel liquid-vapor flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olivier Lebaigue; Benoit Mathieu; Didier Jamet

    2005-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: The general objective is to perform numerical simulation of the liquid-vapor turbulent two-phase flows that occur in sub-channels of a nuclear plant assembly under nominal or incidental situations. Additional features concern nucleate boiling at the surface of fuel rods and the sliding of vapor bubbles on this surface with possible dynamic contact lines. The Interfaces and Sub-grid Scales (ISS) modeling strategy for numerical simulations is one of the possible two-phase equivalents for the one-phase LES concept. It consists in solving the two-phase flows features at the scales that are resolved by the grid of the numerical method, and to take into account the unresolved scales with sub-grid models. Interfaces are tracked in a DNS-like approach while specific features of the behavior of interfaces such as contact line physics, coalescence and fragmentation, and the smallest scales of turbulence within each phase have an unresolved scale part that is modeled. The problem of the modeling of the smallest scales of turbulence is rather simple even if the classical situation is altered by the presence of the interfaces. In a typical sub-channel situation (e.g., 15 MPa and 3.5 m.s -1 water flow in a PWR sub-channel), the Kolmogorov scale is ca. 1 μm whereas typical bubble size are supposed to be close to 150 μm. Therefore, the use of a simple sub-grid model between, e.g., 1 and 20 μm allows a drastic reduction of the number of nodes in the space discretization while it remains possible to validate by comparison to true DNS results. Other sub-grid models have been considered to recover physical phenomena that cannot be captured with a realistic discretization: they rely on physical scales from molecular size to 1 μm. In these cases, the use of sub-grid model is no longer a matter of CPU-time and memory saving only, but also a corner stone to recover physical behavior. From this point of view at least we are no longer performing true

  10. [A novel vapor dynamic headspace enrichment equipment for nontarget screening of volatile organic compounds in drinking water].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Huilian; Zhang, Haijun; Tian, Yuzeng; Wang, Longxing; Chen, Jiping

    2011-09-01

    A novel vapor dynamic headspace enrichment device was set up for nontarget screening of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in drinking water. The main operating parameters of this device, such as length of distillation tube, volume of collected condensate, and choice of absorbent, were optimized. In this device, vapor was utilized as a purge gas and water was utilized as a absorbent. With the help of the device, one liter of water sample could be concentrated to 5 mL and the sensitivity of traditional purge and trap-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (P&T-GC-MS) could be improved 1-2 orders of magnitude. Source and disinfected water samples from a water treatment plant were analyzed with this method. Compared with the traditional P&T-GC-MS analysis without pre-enrichment, the numbers of identified VOCs were improved from 0 to 16 for source water and 5 to 35 for disinfected water samples. It is also shown that there are many halide compounds in VOCs in disinfected water which do not exist in source water.

  11. Availability of MCNP and MATLAB for reconstructing the water-vapor two-phase flow pattern in neutron radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng Qixi; Feng Quanke; Takeshi, K.

    2008-01-01

    The China Advanced Research Reactor (CARR) is scheduled to be operated in the autumn of 2008. In this paper, we report preparations for installing the neutron radiography instrument (NRI) and for utilizing it efficiently. The 2-D relative neutron intensity profiles for the water-vapor two-phase flow inside the tube were obtained using the MCNP code without influence of γ-ray and electronic-noise. The MCNP simulation of the 2-D neutron intensity profile for the water-vapor two-phase flow was demonstrated. The simulated 2-D neutron intensity profiles could be used as the benchmark data base by calibrating part of the data measured by the CARR-NRI. The 3-D objective images allow us to understand the flow pattern more clearly and it is reconstructed using the MATLAB through the threshold transformation techniques. And thus it is concluded that the MCNP code and the MATLAB are very useful for constructing the benchmark data base for the investigation of the water-vapor two-phase flow using the CARR-NRI. (authors)

  12. Universal method for effusive-flow characterization target ion source/vapor transport systems for radioactive ion beam generation (abstract)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alton, G.D.; Bilheux, J.-C.; Liu, Y.; Cole, J. A.; Williams, C.

    2004-01-01

    Worldwide interest in the use of accelerated radioactive ion beams (RIBs) for exploring reactions important in understanding the structure of the nucleus and nuclear astrophysical phenomena has motivated the construction of facilities dedicated to their production and acceleration. Many facilities utilize the isotope-separator-on-line (ISOL) method in which species of interest are generated within a solid or liquid target matrix. Experimentally useful RIBs are often difficult to generate by this technique because of the times required for diffusion from the interior of the target material, and to effusively transport the species of interest to the ion source following diffusion release in relation to its lifetime. Therefore, these delay times must be minimized. We have developed an experimental method that can be used to determine effusive-flow times of arbitrary geometry target/vapor transport systems. The technique utilizes a fast valve to measure effusive-flow times as short as 0.1 ms for any chemically active or inactive species through any target system, independent of size, geometry and materials of construction. In this report, we provide a theoretical basis for effusive flow through arbitrary geometry vapor transport systems, describe a universal experimental apparatus for measuring effusive-flow times, and provide time spectra for noble gases through prototype RIB target/vapor-transport systems

  13. Screening method for piping wall loss by flow accelerated corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryu, Kyung Ha; Hwang, Il Soon; Lee, Na Young; Oh, Young Jin; Kim, Ji Hyun; Park, Jin Ho; Sohn, Chang Ho

    2008-01-01

    Flow accelerated corrosion (FAC) phenomenon has persisted its impact on plant reliability and personnel safety. Unless we change the operation condition drastically, most parameters affecting FAC will not be effectively controlled. In order to help expand piping inspection coverage, we have developed a screening approach to monitor the wall thinning by direct current potential drop (DCPD) technique. To improve the applicability to the complex piping network such as the secondary cooling water system in PWR's, we devised the equipotential control method that can eliminate undesired leakage currents outside a measurement section. In this paper, we present Wide Range Monitoring (WiRM) and Narrow Range Monitoring (NaRM) with Equipotential Switching Direct Current Potential Drop (ES-DCPD) method to rapidly monitor the thinning of piping. Based on the WiRM results, susceptible locations can be identified for further inspection by ultrasound technique (UT). On-line monitoring of a thinned location can be made by NaRM. Finite element analysis results and a closed-form resistance model are developed for the comparison with measured wall thinning by the developed DCPD technique. Verification experiments were conducted using UT as the reference. The result shows that model predictions and the experimental results agree well to confirm that both WiRM and NaRM based on ES-DCPD can be applicable to FAC management efforts

  14. Screening method for piping wall loss by flow accelerated corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryu, K.H.; Hwang, I.S.; Lee, N.Y.; Oh, Y.J.; Park, J.H.; Sohn, C.H.

    2007-01-01

    Flow accelerated corrosion (FAC) phenomenon has persisted in its impact on plant reliability and personnel safety. Unless we change the operation condition drastically, most parameters affecting FAC will not be effectively controlled. In order to help expand piping inspection coverage, we have developed a screening approach to monitor the wall thinning by a Direct Current Potential drop (DCPD) technique. To improve the applicability to the complex piping network such as the secondary cooling water system in PWR's, we devised the equipotential control method that can eliminate undesired leakage currents outside a measurement section. In this paper, we present Wide Range Monitoring (WiRM) and Narrow Range Monitoring (NaRM) with Equipotential Switching Direct Current Potential Drop (ES-DCPD) method to rapidly monitor the thinning of piping. Based on the WiRM results, susceptible locations can be identified for further inspection by Ultrasonic Technique (UT). On-line monitoring of a thinned location can be made by NaRM. Finite element analysis results and a closed-form resistance model are developed for the comparison with measured wall thinning by the developed DCPD technique. Verification experiments were conducted using UT as the reference. The result shows that model predictions and the experimental results agree well to confirm that both WiRM and NaRM based on ES-DCPD can be applicable to FAC management efforts. (author)

  15. Heat Flow Measurements on Beam Screens with and without Supports

    CERN Document Server

    Bozzini, D; Darve, C; Jenninger, B; Kos, N; Willems, D

    1999-01-01

    The thermal resistance between LHC beam screens and cold bores has been measured on two 10 m long models in the Cryostat Thermal Model (CTM). One beam screen was equipped with stainless steel spring supports and one had no supports and was inserted in a cold bore with reduced diameter. For both beam screens the heat load to the cold bore was well within the LHC budget that is allocated for the beam screen support system.

  16. The influence of carrier gas flow rate in inverse gas chromatography on the estimation of water vapor adsorption on Nylon-6 micro fiber

    OpenAIRE

    丸井, 正樹; 山本, 直子; 牛腸, ヒロミ; マルイ, マサキ; ヤマモト, ナオコ; ゴチョウ, ヒロミ; MASAKI, MARUI; NAOKO, YAMAMOTO; HIROMI, GOCHO

    2002-01-01

    The adsorption behaviors of water vapor on Nylon-6 micro fiber are measured at 90℃ with inverse gas chromatography, of which the carrier gas flow rates are 10~40ml/min. The values of retention volume decrease when the peak area is on the increase. lt indicates that Nylon-6 micro fiber has strong adsorption of water vapor at low vapor pressure. The adsorption isotherm as a whole is found to be of BET II type with certain number of adsorption sites. The gas flow rate has no effect on the estima...

  17. Condensation heat transfer correlation for water-ethanol vapor mixture flowing through a plate heat exchanger

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Weiqing; Hu, Shenhua; Ma, Xiangrong; Zhou, Feng

    2018-04-01

    Condensation heat transfer coefficient (HTC) as a function of outlet vapor quality was investigated using water-ethanol vapor mixture of different ethanol vapor concentrations (0%, 1%, 2%, 5%, 10%, 20%) under three different system pressures (31 kPa, 47 kPa, 83 kPa). A heat transfer coefficient was developed by applying multiple linear regression method to experimental data, taking into account the dimensionless numbers which represents the Marangoni condensation effects, such as Re, Pr, Ja, Ma and Sh. The developed correlation can predict the condensation performance within a deviation range from -22% to 32%. Taking PHE's characteristic into consideration and bringing in Ma number and Sh number, a new correlation was developed, which showed a much more accurate prediction, within a deviation from -3.2% to 7.9%.

  18. METHOD FOR NUMERICAL MODELING OF UNSTEADY SEPARATED FLOW AROUND AIRFOILS MOVING CLOSE TO FLAT SCREEN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Pogrebnaya Tamara

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this article an attempt is made to explain the nature of differences in measurements of forces and moments, which influence an aircraft at take-off and landing when testing on different types of stands. An algorithm for numerical simulation of unsteady separated flow around airfoil is given. The algorithm is based on the combination of discrete vortex method and turbulent boundary layer equations. An unsteady flow separation modeling has been used. At each interval vortex method was used to calculate the potential flow around airfoils located near a screen. Calculated pressures and velocities were then used in boundary layer calculations to determine flow separation points and separated vortex in- tensities. After that calculation were made to determine free vortex positions to next time step and the process was fulfilled for next time step. The proposed algorithm allows using numeric visualization to understand physical picture of flow around airfoil moving close to screen. Three different ways of flow modeling (mirror method, fixed or movable screens were tested. In each case the flow separation process, which determines pressure distribution over airfoil surface and influ- ences aerodynamic performance, was viewed. The results of the calculations showed that at low atitudes of airfoil over screen mirror method over predicts lift force compared with movable screen, while fixed screen under predicts it. The data obtained can be used when designing equipment for testing in wind tunnels.

  19. Modeling Two-Phase Flow and Vapor Cycles Using the Generalized Fluid System Simulation Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Amanda D.; Majumdar, Alok K.

    2017-01-01

    This work presents three new applications for the general purpose fluid network solver code GFSSP developed at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center: (1) cooling tower, (2) vapor-compression refrigeration system, and (3) vapor-expansion power generation system. These systems are widely used across engineering disciplines in a variety of energy systems, and these models expand the capabilities and the use of GFSSP to include fluids and features that are not part of its present set of provided examples. GFSSP provides pressure, temperature, and species concentrations at designated locations, or nodes, within a fluid network based on a finite volume formulation of thermodynamics and conservation laws. This paper describes the theoretical basis for the construction of the models, their implementation in the current GFSSP modeling system, and a brief evaluation of the usefulness of the model results, as well as their applicability toward a broader spectrum of analytical problems in both university teaching and engineering research.

  20. INTERACTION OF LIQUID FLAT SCREENS WITH GAS FLOW RESTRICTED BY CHANNEL WALLS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. T. Aksentiev

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper gives description of physical pattern of liquid screen interaction that are injected from the internal walls of a rectangular channel with gas flow. Criterion dependences for determination of intersection coordinates of external boundaries with longitudinal channel axis and factor of liquid screen head resistance.

  1. Surface roughness effects on onset of nucleate boiling and net vapor generation point in subcooled flow boiling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohtake, Hiroyasu; Wada, Noriyoshi; Koizumi, Yasuo

    2003-01-01

    The ability to predict void formation and void fraction in subcooled flow boiling is of importance to the nuclear reactor technology because the presence of voids affects the steady state and transient response of a reactor. The onset of nucleate boiling and the point of net vapor generation on subcooled flow boiling, focusing on surface roughness, liquid subcooling and liquid velocity were investigated experimentally and analytically. Experiments were conducted using a copper thin-film and subcooled water in a range of the liquid velocity from 0.27 to 4.6 m/s at 0.10MPa; the liquid subcoolings were 20, 30 and 40K, respectively. The surface roughness on the test heater was observed by SEM. Experimental results showed that temperatures at the onset nucleate boiling increased with increasing the liquid subcoolings or the liquid velocities. The trend of increase in the temperature at the ONB was in good agreement with the present analytical result based on the stability theory of preexisting nuclei. The measured results for the net vapor generation point agreed well with the results of correlation by Saha and Zuber in the range of the present experiments. The temperature at the ONB decreased with an increasing size of surface roughness, while the NVG-point was independent on the surface roughness. The dependence on the ONB temperature of the roughness size was also represented well by the present analytical model

  2. Noise reducing screen devices for in-flow pressure sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitz, Fredric (Inventor); Liu, Sandy (Inventor); Jaeger, Stephen (Inventor); Horne, W. Clifton (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    An acoustic sensor assembly is provided for sensing acoustic signals in a moving fluid such as high speed fluid stream. The assembly includes one or more acoustic sensors and a porous, acoustically transparent screen supported between the moving fluid stream and the sensor and having a major surface disposed so as to be tangent to the moving fluid. A layer of reduced velocity fluid separating the sensor from the porous screen. This reduced velocity fluid can comprise substantially still air. A foam filler material attenuates acoustic signals arriving at the assembly from other than a predetermined range of incident angles.

  3. High-Confidence Flow Accelerated Corrosion Screening Technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryu, Kyung Ha; Kim, Ji Hak; Hwang, Il Soon; Lee, Na Young; Kim, Ji Hyun

    2008-01-01

    All carbon steel pipes with fluid traveling through it could potentially be threatened by flowing fluid have a potential threat of Flow Accelerated Corrosion (FAC). FAC in a nuclear power plant (NPP) could cause not only pipe failure leading but fatalities sometimes. It is almost impossible to inspect all carbon steel pipes in NPPs, and FAC prediction programs such as CHECWORKS, WATHEC, and BRT-CICERO have limited capability to in predicting FAC area

  4. Performance of the flow cytometric E-screen assay in screening estrogenicity of pure compounds and environmental samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vanparys, Caroline, E-mail: caroline.vanparys@ua.ac.be [Laboratory of Ecophysiology, Biochemistry and Toxicology, University of Antwerp, Antwerp (Belgium); Depiereux, Sophie; Nadzialek, Stephanie [Research Unit in Organismal Biology (URBO), University of Namur (FUNDP), Namur (Belgium); Robbens, Johan; Blust, Ronny [Laboratory of Ecophysiology, Biochemistry and Toxicology, University of Antwerp, Antwerp (Belgium); Kestemont, Patrick [Research Unit in Organismal Biology (URBO), University of Namur (FUNDP), Namur (Belgium); De Coen, Wim [Laboratory of Ecophysiology, Biochemistry and Toxicology, University of Antwerp, Antwerp (Belgium); European Chemicals Agency (ECHA), Helsinki (Finland)

    2010-09-15

    In vitro estrogenicity screens are believed to provide a first prioritization step in hazard characterization of endocrine disrupting chemicals. When applied to complex environmental matrices or mixture samples, they have been indicated valuable in estimating the overall estrogen-mimicking load. In this study, the performance of an adapted format of the classical E-screen or MCF-7 cell proliferation assay was profoundly evaluated to rank pure compounds as well as influents and effluents of sewage treatment plants (STPs) according to estrogenic activity. In this adapted format, flow cytometric cell cycle analysis was used to allow evaluation of the MCF-7 cell proliferative effects after only 24 h of exposure. With an average EC{sub 50} value of 2 pM and CV of 22%, this assay appears as a sensitive and reproducible system for evaluation of estrogenic activity. Moreover, estrogenic responses of 17 pure compounds corresponded well, qualitatively and quantitatively, with other in vitro and in vivo estrogenicity screens, such as the classical E-screen (R{sup 2} = 0.98), the estrogen receptor (ER) binding (R{sup 2} = 0.84) and the ER transcription activation assay (R{sup 2} = 0.87). To evaluate the applicability of this assay for complex samples, influents and effluents of 10 STPs covering different treatment processes, were compared and ranked according to estrogenic removal efficiencies. Activated sludge treatment with phosphorus and nitrogen removal appeared most effective in eliminating estrogenic activity, followed by activated sludge, lagoon and filter bed. This is well in agreement with previous findings based on chemical analysis or biological activity screens. Moreover, ER blocking experiments indicated that cell proliferative responses were mainly ER mediated, illustrating that the complexity of the end point, cell proliferation, compared to other ER screens, does not hamper the interpretation of the results. Therefore, this study, among other E-screen studies

  5. Performance of the flow cytometric E-screen assay in screening estrogenicity of pure compounds and environmental samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vanparys, Caroline; Depiereux, Sophie; Nadzialek, Stephanie; Robbens, Johan; Blust, Ronny; Kestemont, Patrick; De Coen, Wim

    2010-01-01

    In vitro estrogenicity screens are believed to provide a first prioritization step in hazard characterization of endocrine disrupting chemicals. When applied to complex environmental matrices or mixture samples, they have been indicated valuable in estimating the overall estrogen-mimicking load. In this study, the performance of an adapted format of the classical E-screen or MCF-7 cell proliferation assay was profoundly evaluated to rank pure compounds as well as influents and effluents of sewage treatment plants (STPs) according to estrogenic activity. In this adapted format, flow cytometric cell cycle analysis was used to allow evaluation of the MCF-7 cell proliferative effects after only 24 h of exposure. With an average EC 50 value of 2 pM and CV of 22%, this assay appears as a sensitive and reproducible system for evaluation of estrogenic activity. Moreover, estrogenic responses of 17 pure compounds corresponded well, qualitatively and quantitatively, with other in vitro and in vivo estrogenicity screens, such as the classical E-screen (R 2 = 0.98), the estrogen receptor (ER) binding (R 2 = 0.84) and the ER transcription activation assay (R 2 = 0.87). To evaluate the applicability of this assay for complex samples, influents and effluents of 10 STPs covering different treatment processes, were compared and ranked according to estrogenic removal efficiencies. Activated sludge treatment with phosphorus and nitrogen removal appeared most effective in eliminating estrogenic activity, followed by activated sludge, lagoon and filter bed. This is well in agreement with previous findings based on chemical analysis or biological activity screens. Moreover, ER blocking experiments indicated that cell proliferative responses were mainly ER mediated, illustrating that the complexity of the end point, cell proliferation, compared to other ER screens, does not hamper the interpretation of the results. Therefore, this study, among other E-screen studies, supports the use of

  6. Measurement of Heat Flow Transmitted through a Stacked-Screen Regenerator of Thermoacoustic Engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu Han Hsu

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available A stacked-screen regenerator is a key component in a thermoacoustic Stirling engine. Therefore, the choice of suitable mesh screens is important in the engine design. To verify the applicability of four empirical equations used in the field of thermoacoustic engines and Stirling engines, this report describes the measurements of heat flow rates transmitted through the stacked screen regenerator inserted in an experimental setup filled with pressurized Argon gas having mean pressure of 0.45 MPa. Results show that the empirical equations reproduce the measured heat flow rates to a mutually similar degree, although their derivation processes differ. Additionally, results suggest that two effective pore radii would be necessary to account for the viscous and thermal behaviors of the gas oscillating in the stacked-screen regenerators.

  7. A multiscale method for compressible liquid-vapor flow with surface tension*

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaegle Felix

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Discontinuous Galerkin methods have become a powerful tool for approximating the solution of compressible flow problems. Their direct use for two-phase flow problems with phase transformation is not straightforward because this type of flows requires a detailed tracking of the phase front. We consider the fronts in this contribution as sharp interfaces and propose a novel multiscale approach. It combines an efficient high-order Discontinuous Galerkin solver for the computation in the bulk phases on the macro-scale with the use of a generalized Riemann solver on the micro-scale. The Riemann solver takes into account the effects of moderate surface tension via the curvature of the sharp interface as well as phase transformation. First numerical experiments in three space dimensions underline the overall performance of the method.

  8. Petroleum Vapor - Field Technical

    Science.gov (United States)

    The screening approach being developed by EPA OUST to evaluate petroleum vapor intrusion (PVI) requires information that has not be routinely collected in the past at vapor intrusion sites. What is the best way to collect this data? What are the relevant data quality issues and ...

  9. Low-gravity sensing of liquid/vapor interface and transient liquid flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, Saul A.; Korba, James M.; Lynnworth, Lawrence C.; Nguyen, Toan H.; Orton, George F.

    1987-03-01

    The work reported here deals mainly with tests on internally vaned cylindrical shell acrylic containers capped by hemispherical acrylic or aluminum end domes. Three different ultrasonic sensor techniques and one nucleonic technique presently are evaluated as possible solutions to the low-gravity liquid gauging problem. The ultrasonic techniques are as follows: use of a torsional wave sensor in which transit time is proportional to the integral of wetted distance x liquid density; integration of the flow rate output signal of a fast-response ultrasonic flowmeter; and use of multiplexed externally mounted 'point-sensor' transducers that sense transit times to liquid-gas interfaces. Using two commercial flowmeters and a thickness gauge modified for this particular project, bench tests were conducted at 1 g on liquids such as water, freon, and solvent 140, including both steady flow and pulsating flow with 40, 80, and 120 ms flow pulses. Subsequently, flight tests were conducted in the NASA KC-135 aircraft in which nearly 0-g conditions are obtainable for up to about 5 s in each of a number of repetitive parabolic flight trajectories. In some of these brief low-gravity flight tests freon was replaced with a higher-viscosity fuel to reduce sloshing and thereby obtain settled surfaces more quickly.

  10. On the relation between the ratio of energy of vaporization to activation energy for flow and physical properties of liquid metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dutt, N.V.K.; Ravikumar, Y.V.L.; Prasad, D.H.L.

    1993-01-01

    A relation between the ratio of energy of vaporization (Esub(vap) to the activation energy for flow (Esub(vis)) and the ratio of melting point (T m ) to the critical temperature (T c ) has been developed for liquid metals, and is shown to be superior to the examinations from Eyring theory. (author). 12 refs

  11. On The Validity of the Assumed PDF Method for Modeling Binary Mixing/Reaction of Evaporated Vapor in GAS/Liquid-Droplet Turbulent Shear Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, R. S.; Bellan, J.

    1997-01-01

    An Investigation of the statistical description of binary mixing and/or reaction between a carrier gas and an evaporated vapor species in two-phase gas-liquid turbulent flows is perfomed through both theroetical analysis and comparisons with results from direct numerical simulations (DNS) of a two-phase mixing layer.

  12. 42 CFR 84.162 - Man test for gases and vapors; Type C respirators, continuous-flow class and Type CE supplied-air...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Man test for gases and vapors; Type C respirators, continuous-flow class and Type CE supplied-air respirators; test requirements. 84.162 Section 84.162 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH RESEARCH AND RELATED ACTIVITIES APPROVAL...

  13. Effect of gas flow on the selective area growth of gallium nitride via metal organic vapor phase epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodak, L. E.; Kasarla, K. R.; Korakakis, D.

    2007-08-01

    The effect of gas flow on the selective area growth (SAG) of gallium nitride (GaN) grown via metal organic vapor phase epitaxy (MOVPE) has been investigated. In this study, the SAG of GaN was carried out on a silicon dioxide striped pattern along the GaN direction. SAG was initiated with the striped pattern oriented parallel and normal to the incoming gas flow in a horizontal reactor. The orientation of the pattern did not impact cross section of the structure after re-growth as both orientations resulted in similar trapezoidal structures bounded by the (0 0 0 1) and {1 1 2¯ n} facets ( n≈1.7-2.2). However, the growth rates were shown to depend on the orientation of the pattern as the normally oriented samples exhibited enhanced vertical and cross-sectional growth rates compared to the parallel oriented samples. All growths occurred under identical conditions and therefore the difference in growth rates must be attributed to a difference in mass transport of species.

  14. Mixed convection between horizontal plates and consequences for chemical vapor deposition flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiu, K.C.

    1986-01-01

    To simulate the fluid dynamics of VD systems, mixed convection between horizontal plates (AR = width/height = 10) heated from below was studied by laser Doppler anemometry in a range 1368 < Ra < 8300 and 15 < R3 < 170. The entrance effects were characterized by two lengths: one for the onset of bouyancy-driven instability, and one for the full development of longitudinal convection rolls. Explicit expressions for both entrance lengths are given in terms of Ra and Re. In addition, unsteady longitudinal convection rolls were observed. These are discussed in terms of the admixture of transverse convection rolls and/or contributions from upstream turbulence. For the fully developed region it is shown analytically that the transverse velocities of the longitudinal convection rolls, v and w, are independent of the forced flow and are identical to those of the two-dimensional Rayleigh-Benard convection rolls. These fundamental results serve as a base for the discussion of horizontal CVD flows. The entrance and sidewall effects are found to have pronounced influences on the flow patterns observed in CVD (AR = 2) reactors

  15. General well function for soil vapor extraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perina, Tomas

    2014-04-01

    This paper develops a well function applicable to extraction of groundwater or soil vapor from a well under the most common field test conditions. The general well function (Perina and Lee, 2006) [12] is adapted to soil vapor extraction and constant head boundary at the top. For groundwater flow, the general well function now applies to an extraction well of finite diameter with uniform drawdown along the screen, finite-thickness skin, and partially penetrating an unconfined, confined, and leaky aquifer, or an aquifer underneath a reservoir. With a change of arguments, the model applies to soil vapor extraction from a vadose zone with no cover or with leaky cover at the ground surface. The extraction well can operate in specified drawdown (pressure for soil vapor) or specified flowrate mode. Frictional well loss is computed as flow-only dependent component of the drawdown inside the extraction well. In general case, the calculated flow distribution is not proportional to screen length for a multiscreen well.

  16. Determination of forces induced by steam flow in turbines; Determinacion de fuerzas inducidas por flujo de vapor en turbinas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia Castrejon, Juan Carlos

    2008-09-15

    The steam flow induced vibrations in turbines is a common problem during the operation of 300 MW turbines and it is one of the problems that requires solution to develop 1 GW steam turbines. The flow induced vibration is caused because there is an interaction between blades and the flow field. Blades are subjected to the forces caused by the flow field, but also the flow field is affected by the blades and its movement. The nozzle wakes cause uneven pressure field downstream and produces alternating forces on blades which lead to blade vibrations. Some of the vibrations originated in this way may damage the blades and affect the turbine performance. The forces acting on blades (and causing forced vibrations) as a result of the variations in the flow field in the axial rotor-stator clearance are studied in this project. These forces were determined applying computer fluid dynamics (CFD) in two turbine stages. The CFD analysis was carried out in the Curtis stage and in the last stage, using 2D and 3D models. An important part of the analysis is focused on discussing the pressure field variation, because this variation caused the forces acting on blades. The flow field was resolved using CFD and the computed pressure field was integrated around the blades to get the forces acting on blades. These computed dynamical forces were analyzed using a FFT analysis and the results were used in the blade useful life estimation and in the investigation of the failure causes of these blades. In every turbine stage the RNG - turbulence model and the sliding mesh method was used to deal with the blade motion. The 3D models were resolved using parallel computation in a cluster of 6 AMD 64 Opteron processors of 2412.36 MHz and 8 Gb of RAM. The results of the simulation in both stages get the pressure field behavior in the axial rotor-stator clearance and determine the force acting on the blades. These results showed that both, the pressure field and the force magnitude acting on

  17. In vitro flow cytometry-based screening platform for cellulase engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Körfer, Georgette; Pitzler, Christian; Vojcic, Ljubica; Martinez, Ronny; Schwaneberg, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    Ultrahigh throughput screening (uHTS) plays an essential role in directed evolution for tailoring biocatalysts for industrial applications. Flow cytometry-based uHTS provides an efficient coverage of the generated protein sequence space by analysis of up to 107 events per hour. Cell-free enzyme production overcomes the challenge of diversity loss during the transformation of mutant libraries into expression hosts, enables directed evolution of toxic enzymes, and holds the promise to efficiently design enzymes of human or animal origin. The developed uHTS cell-free compartmentalization platform (InVitroFlow) is the first report in which a flow cytometry-based screened system has been combined with compartmentalized cell-free expression for directed cellulase enzyme evolution. InVitroFlow was validated by screening of a random cellulase mutant library employing a novel screening system (based on the substrate fluorescein-di-β-D-cellobioside), and yielded significantly improved cellulase variants (e.g. CelA2-H288F-M1 (N273D/H288F/N468S) with 13.3-fold increased specific activity (220.60 U/mg) compared to CelA2 wildtype: 16.57 U/mg). PMID:27184298

  18. Screen-printed sensor for batch and flow injection potentiometric chromium(VI) monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanchez-Moreno, Raul A.; Gismera, M.J.; Sevilla, M.T.; Procopio, Jesus R. [Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Departamento de Quimica Analitica y Analisis Instrumental, Madrid (Spain)

    2010-05-15

    A disposable screen-printed electrode was designed and evaluated for direct detection of chromium(VI) in batch and flow analysis. The carbon screen-printed electrode was modified with a graphite-epoxy composite. The optimal graphite-epoxy matrix contains 37.5% graphite powder, 12.5% diphenylcarbohydrazide, a selective compound for chromium(VI), and 50% epoxy resin. The principal analytical parameters of the potentiometric response in batch and flow analysis were optimized and calculated. The screen-printed sensor exhibits a response time of 20 {+-} 1 s. In flow analysis, the analytical frequency of sampling is 70 injections per hour using 0.1 M NaNO{sub 3} solution at pH 3 as the carrier, a flow rate of 2.5 mL.min{sup -1}, and an injection sample volume of 0.50 mL. The sensor shows potentiometric responses that are very selective for chromium(VI) ions and optimal detection limits in both static mode (2.1 x 10{sup -7} M) and online analysis (9.4 x 10{sup -7} M). The disposable potentiometric sensor was employed to determine toxicity levels of chromium(VI) in mineral, tap, and river waters by flow-injection potentiometry and batch potentiometry. Chromium(VI) determination was also carried out with successful results in leachates from municipal solid waste landfills. (orig.)

  19. A Fully Automated High-Throughput Flow Cytometry Screening System Enabling Phenotypic Drug Discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joslin, John; Gilligan, James; Anderson, Paul; Garcia, Catherine; Sharif, Orzala; Hampton, Janice; Cohen, Steven; King, Miranda; Zhou, Bin; Jiang, Shumei; Trussell, Christopher; Dunn, Robert; Fathman, John W; Snead, Jennifer L; Boitano, Anthony E; Nguyen, Tommy; Conner, Michael; Cooke, Mike; Harris, Jennifer; Ainscow, Ed; Zhou, Yingyao; Shaw, Chris; Sipes, Dan; Mainquist, James; Lesley, Scott

    2018-05-01

    The goal of high-throughput screening is to enable screening of compound libraries in an automated manner to identify quality starting points for optimization. This often involves screening a large diversity of compounds in an assay that preserves a connection to the disease pathology. Phenotypic screening is a powerful tool for drug identification, in that assays can be run without prior understanding of the target and with primary cells that closely mimic the therapeutic setting. Advanced automation and high-content imaging have enabled many complex assays, but these are still relatively slow and low throughput. To address this limitation, we have developed an automated workflow that is dedicated to processing complex phenotypic assays for flow cytometry. The system can achieve a throughput of 50,000 wells per day, resulting in a fully automated platform that enables robust phenotypic drug discovery. Over the past 5 years, this screening system has been used for a variety of drug discovery programs, across many disease areas, with many molecules advancing quickly into preclinical development and into the clinic. This report will highlight a diversity of approaches that automated flow cytometry has enabled for phenotypic drug discovery.

  20. Study on characteristics of vapor-liquid two-phase flow in mini-channels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo Lei; Zhang Shusheng; Cheng Lin

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → I- and Z-shaped mini-channels are studied with water and ethanol respectively. → The smaller the wall contact angles are, the less time the bubbles take to depart. → Bubble bottom micro-layer can enhance heat transfer. → Z-shaped channels show a higher heat transfer coefficient but a larger pressure drop. → Water reflects a higher heat transfer coefficient than ethanol in the same channels. - Abstract: To explore the mechanism of boiling bubble dynamics in narrow channels, two types of channels are investigated which have I- and Z-shaped with width of 2 mm. Using VOF model and self-programming, the whole flow field is simulated with two different kinds of media, namely, water and ethanol. The influence of wall contact angle on the process of bubble generating and growth is studied, and the relationship between different channel shapes and the pressure drop is also investigated taking into account the effects of gravity, viscosity, surface tension and wall adhesion. The bubble generation, growth and departure processes are analyzed through numerical simulation and self-programming, and the influence of interface movements and changes on internal pressure difference and average surface heat transfer coefficient is investigated by using geometry reconstruction and interface tracking. It is found that wall contact angle has a great influence on the morphology of bubble. The smaller the wall contact angles are, the more round the bubbles are, and the less time the bubbles take to depart from the wall. The variation of contact angle also has effect upon the heat transfer coefficient. The greater the wall contact angle is, the larger the bubble-covered area is, thus the wall thermal resistance gets higher, and bubble nucleation is suppressed, and the heat transfer coefficient becomes lower. The role of surface tension in the process of boiling heat transfer is much more important than the gravity in narrow channels. The generation of bubbles

  1. Screens

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    This Sixth volume in the series The Key Debates. Mutations and Appropriations in European Film Studies investigates the question of screens in the context both of the dematerialization due to digitalization and the multiplication of media screens. Scholars offer various infomations and theories of topics such as the archeology of screen, film and media theories, contemporary art, pragmatics of new ways of screening (from home video to street screening).

  2. Screening values for Non-Carcinogenic Hanford Waste Tank Vapor Chemicals that Lack Established Occupational Exposure Limits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poet, Torka S.; Mast, Terryl J.; Huckaby, James L.

    2006-02-06

    Over 1,500 different volatile chemicals have been reported in the headspaces of tanks used to store high-level radioactive waste at the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford Site. Concern about potential exposure of tank farm workers to these chemicals has prompted efforts to evaluate their toxicity, identify chemicals that pose the greatest risk, and incorporate that information into the tank farms industrial hygiene worker protection program. Established occupation exposure limits for individual chemicals and petroleum hydrocarbon mixtures have been used elsewhere to evaluate about 900 of the chemicals. In this report headspace concentration screening values were established for the remaining 600 chemicals using available industrial hygiene and toxicological data. Screening values were intended to be more than an order of magnitude below concentrations that may cause adverse health effects in workers, assuming a 40-hour/week occupational exposure. Screening values were compared to the maximum reported headspace concentrations.

  3. Screening Effect of Plasma Flow on RMP Penetration in EXTRAP T2R

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frassinetti, Lorenzo; Olofsson, Erik; Brunsell, Per; Menmuir, Sheena; Drake, James

    2011-10-01

    The penetration of resonant magnetic perturbations (RMP) can be screened by plasma flow and the understanding of this phenomenon is important for ELM mitigation techniques. This work studies the screening effect in EXTRAP T2R. EXTRAP T2R is equipped with a feedback system able to suppress all error fields and to produce one or more external perturbations in a controlled fashion. The EXTRAP T2R feedback system is used to generate a RMP that interacts with the dynamics of its corresponding tearing mode (TM). The level of RMP penetration is quantified by analyzing the RMP effect on the TM amplitude and velocity. To study the screening effect, the flow is changed by applying a second perturbation that is non resonant (non-RMP). This produces the flow reduction without perturbing significantly the other parameters. By modifying the amplitude of the non-RMP, an experimental study of the flow effect on the RMP penetration is performed. Experimental results are compared with the model described in [Fitzpatrick R et al., Phys. Plasmas 8, 4489 (2001)].

  4. In situ growth of ceramic quantum dots in polyaniline host via water vapor flow diffusion as potential electrode materials for energy applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mombrú, Dominique [Centro NanoMat/CryssMat/Física – DETEMA – Facultad de Química – Universidad de la República, C.P. 11800 Montevideo (Uruguay); Romero, Mariano, E-mail: mromero@fq.edu.uy [Centro NanoMat/CryssMat/Física – DETEMA – Facultad de Química – Universidad de la República, C.P. 11800 Montevideo (Uruguay); Faccio, Ricardo, E-mail: rfaccio@fq.edu.uy [Centro NanoMat/CryssMat/Física – DETEMA – Facultad de Química – Universidad de la República, C.P. 11800 Montevideo (Uruguay); Castiglioni, Jorge [Laboratorio de Fisicoquímica de Superficies – DETEMA – Facultad de Química – Universidad de la República, C.P. 11800 Montevideo (Uruguay); Mombrú, Alvaro W., E-mail: amombru@fq.edu.uy [Centro NanoMat/CryssMat/Física – DETEMA – Facultad de Química – Universidad de la República, C.P. 11800 Montevideo (Uruguay)

    2017-06-15

    In situ preparation of polyaniline-ceramic nanocomposites has recently demonstrated that the electrical properties are highly improved with respect to the typical ex situ preparations. In this report, we present for the first time, to the best of our knowledge, the in situ growth of titanium oxide quantum dots in polyaniline host via water vapor flow diffusion as an easily adaptable route to prepare other ceramic-polymer nanocomposites. The main relevance of this method is the possibility to prepare ceramic quantum dots from alkoxide precursors using water vapor flow into any hydrophobic polymer host and to achieve good homogeneity and size-control. In addition, we perform full characterization by means of high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, X-ray powder diffraction, small angle X-ray scattering, thermogravimetric and calorimetric analyses, confocal Raman microscopy and impedance spectroscopy analyses. The presence of the polymer host and interparticle Coulomb repulsive interactions was evaluated as an influence for the formation of ~3–8 nm equally-sized quantum dots independently of the concentration. The polyaniline polaron population showed an increase for the quantum dots diluted regime and the suppression at the concentrated regime, ascribed to the formation of chemical bonds at the interface, which was confirmed by theoretical simulations. In agreement with the previous observation, the in situ growth of ceramic quantum dots in polyaniline host via water vapor flow diffusion could be very useful as a novel approach to prepare electrode materials for energy conversion and storage applications. - Highlights: • In situ growth of titanium oxide quantum dots in polyaniline host via water vapor flow diffusion. • Polyaniline charge carriers at the interface and charge interactions between quantum dots. • Easy extrapolation to sol-gel derived quantum dots into polymer host as potential electrode materials.

  5. Evaluation of a commercial packed bed flow hydrogenator for reaction screening, optimization, and synthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marian C. Bryan

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The performance of the ThalesNano H-Cube®, a commercial packed bed flow hydrogenator, was evaluated in the context of small scale reaction screening and optimization. A model reaction, the reduction of styrene to ethylbenzene through a 10% Pd/C catalyst bed, was used to examine performance at various pressure settings, over sequential runs, and with commercial catalyst cartridges. In addition, the consistency of the hydrogen flow was indirectly measured by in-line UV spectroscopy. Finally, system contamination due to catalyst leaching, and the resolution of this issue, is described. The impact of these factors on the run-to-run reproducibility of the H-Cube® reactor for screening and reaction optimization is discussed.

  6. Screening of Compounds Toxicity against Human Monocytic cell line-THP-1 by Flow Cytometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pick Neora

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The worldwide rapid increase in bacterial resistance to numerous antibiotics requires on-going development of new drugs to enter the market. As the development of new antibiotics is lengthy and costly, early monitoring of compound's toxicity is essential in the development of novel agents. Our interest is in a rapid, simple, high throughput screening method to assess cytotoxicity induced by potential agents. Some intracellular pathogens, such as Mycobacterium tuberculosis primary site of infection is human alveolar macrophages. Thus, evaluation of candidate drugs for macrophage toxicity is crucial. Protocols for high throughput drug toxicity screening of macrophages using flow cytometry are lacking in the literature. For this application we modified a preexisting technique, propidium iodide (PI exclusion staining and utilized it for rapid toxicity tests. Samples were prepared in 96 well plates and analyzed by flow cytometry, which allowed for rapid, inexpensive and precise assessment of compound's toxicity associated with cell death.

  7. Flow Cytometry Enables Multiplexed Measurements of Genetically Encoded Intramolecular FRET Sensors Suitable for Screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doucette, Jaimee; Zhao, Ziyan; Geyer, Rory J; Barra, Melanie M; Balunas, Marcy J; Zweifach, Adam

    2016-07-01

    Genetically encoded sensors based on intramolecular FRET between CFP and YFP are used extensively in cell biology research. Flow cytometry has been shown to offer a means to measure CFP-YFP FRET; we suspected it would provide a unique way to conduct multiplexed measurements from cells expressing different FRET sensors, which is difficult to do with microscopy, and that this could be used for screening. We confirmed that flow cytometry accurately measures FRET signals using cells transiently transfected with an ERK activity reporter, comparing responses measured with imaging and cytometry. We created polyclonal long-term transfectant lines, each expressing a different intramolecular FRET sensor, and devised a way to bar-code four distinct populations of cells. We demonstrated the feasibility of multiplexed measurements and determined that robust multiplexed measurements can be conducted in plate format. To validate the suitability of the method for screening, we measured responses from a plate of bacterial extracts that in unrelated experiments we had determined contained the protein kinase C (PKC)-activating compound teleocidin A-1. The multiplexed assay correctly identifying the teleocidin A-1-containing well. We propose that multiplexed cytometric FRET measurements will be useful for analyzing cellular function and for screening compound collections. © 2016 Society for Laboratory Automation and Screening.

  8. Flows of a Vapor due to Phase Change Processes at the Condensed Phases with Temperature Fields as their Internal Structures

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Onishi, Yoshimoto; Ooshida, Takeshi

    2005-01-01

    Transient to steady motions of a vapor caused by the evaporation and condensation processes occurring at the condensed phases placed in parallel have been studied based on the Boltzmann equation of BGK type...

  9. Evaporation and Condensation Flows of a Vapor-Gas Mixture from or onto the Condensed Phase with an Internal Structure

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Onishi, Yoshimoto; Yamada, Ken

    2005-01-01

    Transient motions of a vapor-gas mixture due to the evaporation and condensation processes from or onto the plane condensed phase, with a temperature field as its internal structure, have been studied...

  10. Development of flow-through and dip-stick immunoassays for screening of sulfonamide residues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hongyan; Zhang, Yan; Wang, Shuo

    2008-08-20

    Two formats of membrane-based competitive enzyme immunoassays (flow-through and dip-stick) have been developed for the screening of sulfonamide residues in pig muscle and milk. Membrane was coated with anti-sulfonamide antibody and a sulfonamide hapten D2-horseradish peroxidase (HRP) conjugant was used as the labeled antigen for competitive assay of sulfonamides. Visual detection limits of the flow-through or dip-stick assay were 1-5 microg L(-1) or 1-10 microg L(-1) in buffer for seven sulfonamides, respectively. Assay validation was performed using samples spiked with single sulfonamide, spiked samples were tested using the developed strip assays and results were compared with those obtained by a validated high-performance liquid chromatograph (HPLC) method. Results showed that the two strip assays were correlated well with HPLC, respectively. With assay times of 5 min (flow-through) and 15 min (dip-stick), these rapid tests could offer simple, rapid and cost-effective on-site screening tools to detect sulfonamides in pig muscle (flow-through or dip-stick) or milk (only dip-stick).

  11. A pilot study of a simple screening technique for estimation of salivary flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanehira, Takashi; Yamaguchi, Tomotaka; Takehara, Junji; Kashiwazaki, Haruhiko; Abe, Takae; Morita, Manabu; Asano, Kouzo; Fujii, Yoshinori; Sakamoto, Wataru

    2009-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a simple screening technique for estimation of salivary flow and to test the usefulness of the method for determining decreased salivary flow. A novel assay system comprising 3 spots containing 30 microg starch and 49.6 microg potassium iodide per spot on filter paper and a coloring reagent, based on the color reaction of iodine-starch and theory of paper chromatography, was designed. We investigated the relationship between resting whole salivary rates and the number of colored spots on the filter produced by 41 hospitalized subjects. A significant negative correlation was observed between the number of colored spots and the resting salivary flow rate (n = 41; r = -0.803; P bedridden and disabled elderly people.

  12. Effect of transient liquid flow on retention characteristics of screen acquisition systems. [design of Space Shuttle feed system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cady, E. C.

    1977-01-01

    A design analysis, is developed based on experimental data, to predict the effects of transient flow and pressure surges (caused either by valve or pump operation, or by boiling of liquids in warm lines) on the retention performance of screen acquisition systems. A survey of screen liquid acquisition system applications was performed to determine appropriate system environment and classification. A screen model was developed which assumed that the screen device was a uniformly distributed composite orthotropic structure, and which accounted for liquid inflow/outflow, gas ingestion quality, screen stress, and liquid spill. A series of 177 tests using 13 specimens (5 screen meshes, 4 screen device construction/backup methods, and 2 orientations) with three test fluids (isopropyl alcohol, Freon 114, and LH2) provided data which verified important features of the screen model and resulted in a design tool which could accurately predict the transient startup performance acquisition devices.

  13. State of the Art High-Throughput Approaches to Genotoxicity: Flow Micronucleus, Ames II, GreenScreen and Comet

    Science.gov (United States)

    State of the Art High-Throughput Approaches to Genotoxicity: Flow Micronucleus, Ames II, GreenScreen and Comet (Presented by Dr. Marilyn J. Aardema, Chief Scientific Advisor, Toxicology, Dr. Leon Stankowski, et. al. (6/28/2012)

  14. The effect of carrier gas flow rate and source cell temperature on low pressure organic vapor phase deposition simulation by direct simulation Monte Carlo method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wada, Takao; Ueda, Noriaki

    2013-01-01

    The process of low pressure organic vapor phase deposition (LP-OVPD) controls the growth of amorphous organic thin films, where the source gases (Alq3 molecule, etc.) are introduced into a hot wall reactor via an injection barrel using an inert carrier gas (N2 molecule). It is possible to control well the following substrate properties such as dopant concentration, deposition rate, and thickness uniformity of the thin film. In this paper, we present LP-OVPD simulation results using direct simulation Monte Carlo-Neutrals (Particle-PLUS neutral module) which is commercial software adopting direct simulation Monte Carlo method. By estimating properly the evaporation rate with experimental vaporization enthalpies, the calculated deposition rates on the substrate agree well with the experimental results that depend on carrier gas flow rate and source cell temperature. PMID:23674843

  15. The effect of carrier gas flow rate and source cell temperature on low pressure organic vapor phase deposition simulation by direct simulation Monte Carlo method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wada, Takao; Ueda, Noriaki

    2013-04-01

    The process of low pressure organic vapor phase deposition (LP-OVPD) controls the growth of amorphous organic thin films, where the source gases (Alq3 molecule, etc.) are introduced into a hot wall reactor via an injection barrel using an inert carrier gas (N2 molecule). It is possible to control well the following substrate properties such as dopant concentration, deposition rate, and thickness uniformity of the thin film. In this paper, we present LP-OVPD simulation results using direct simulation Monte Carlo-Neutrals (Particle-PLUS neutral module) which is commercial software adopting direct simulation Monte Carlo method. By estimating properly the evaporation rate with experimental vaporization enthalpies, the calculated deposition rates on the substrate agree well with the experimental results that depend on carrier gas flow rate and source cell temperature.

  16. Two-phase flow modelling of a solar concentrator applied as ammonia vapor generator in an absorption refrigerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ortega, N. [Posgrado en Ingenieria (Energia), Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Privada Xochicalco s/n, Temixco, Morelos 62580 (Mexico); Garcia-Valladares, O.; Best, R.; Gomez, V.H. [Centro de Investigacion en Energia, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Privada Xochicalco s/n, Temixco, Morelos 62580 (Mexico)

    2008-09-15

    A detailed one-dimensional numerical model describing the heat and fluid-dynamic behavior inside a compound parabolic concentrator (CPC) used as an ammonia vapor generator has been developed. The governing equations (continuity, momentum, and energy) inside the CPC absorber tube, together with the energy equation in the tube wall and the thermal analysis in the solar concentrator were solved. The computational method developed is useful for the solar vapor generator design applied to absorption cooling systems. The effect on the outlet temperature and vapor quality of a range of CPC design parameters was analyzed. These parameters were the acceptance half-angle and CPC length, the diameter and coating of the absorber tube, and the manufacture materials of the cover, the reflector, and the absorber tube. It was found that the most important design parameters in order to obtain a higher ammonia-water vapor production are, in order of priority: the reflector material, the absorber tube diameter, the selective surface, and the acceptance half-angle. The direct ammonia-water vapor generation resulting from a 35 m long CPC was coupled to an absorption refrigeration system model in order to determine the solar fraction, cooling capacity, coefficient of performance, and overall efficiency during a typical day of operation. The results show that approximately 3.8 kW of cooling at -10{sup o}C could be produced with solar and overall efficiencies up to 46.3% and 21.2%, respectively. (author)

  17. Pressure Drop Across Woven Screens Under Uniform and Nonuniform Flow Conditions. [flow characteristics of water through Dutch twill and square weave fabrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludewig, M.; Omori, S.; Rao, G. L.

    1974-01-01

    Tests were conducted to determine the experimental pressure drop and velocity data for water flowing through woven screens. The types of materials used are dutch twill and square weave fabrics. Pressure drop measures were made at four locations in a rectangular channel. The data are presented as change in pressure compared with the average entry velocity and the numerical relationship is determined by dividing the volumetric flow rate by the screen area open to flow. The equations of continuity and momentum are presented. A computer program listing an extension of a theoretical model and data from that computer program are included.

  18. Vapor liquid fraction determination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    This invention describes a method of measuring liquid and vapor fractions in a non-homogeneous fluid flowing through an elongate conduit, such as may be required with boiling water, non-boiling turbulent flows, fluidized bed experiments, water-gas mixing analysis, and nuclear plant cooling. (UK)

  19. A critical review of vapor generation laws used for the analysis of two-phase flows in pipes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berne, P.

    1983-05-01

    Some vapor generation laws are reviewed and discussed. They are divided into empirical and analytical laws. Analytical laws are first examined. These laws result from analytical solutions of the local instantaneous equations applied to elementary cases. Empirical laws, i.e. laws that are determined by correlations with experimental data, are then discussed [fr

  20. Rapid food decomposition by H2O2-H2SO4 for determination of total mercury by flow injection cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zenebon, Odair; Sakuma, Alice M; Dovidauskas, Sergio; Okada, Isaura A; de, MaioFrancaD; Lichtig, Jaim

    2002-01-01

    A mixture of 50% H2O2-H2SO4 (3 + 1, v/v) was used for decomposition of food in open vessels at 80 degrees C. The treatment allowed rapid total mercury determination by flow injection cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry. Cabbage, potatoes, peanuts paste, hazelnuts paste, oats, tomatoes and their derivatives, oysters, shrimps, prawns, shellfish, marine algae, and many kinds of fish were analyzed by the proposed methodology with a limit of quantitation of 0.86 +/- 0.08 microg/L mercury in the final solution. Reference materials tested also gave excellent recovery.

  1. A multipumping flow system for in vitro screening of peroxynitrite scavengers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Marta F T; Dias, Ana C B; Santos, João L M; Fernandes, Eduarda; Lima, José L F C; Zagatto, Elias A G

    2007-09-01

    Peroxynitrite anion is a reactive nitrogen species formed in vivo by the rapid, controlled diffusion reaction between nitric oxide and superoxide radicals. By reacting with several biological molecules, peroxynitrite may cause important cellular and tissue deleterious effects, which have been associated with many diseases. In this work, an automated flow-based procedure for the in vitro generation of peroxynitrite and subsequent screening of the scavenging activity of selected compounds is developed. This procedure involves a multipumping flow system (MPFS) and exploits the ability of compounds such as lipoic acid, dihydrolipoic acid, cysteine, reduced glutathione, oxidized glutathione, sulindac, and sulindac sulfone to inhibit the chemiluminescent reaction of luminol with peroxynitrite under physiological simulated conditions. Peroxynitrite was generated in the MPFS by the online reaction of acidified hydrogen peroxide with nitrite, followed by a subsequent stabilization by merging with a sodium hydroxide solution to rapidly quench the developing reaction. The pulsed flow and the timed synchronized insertion of sample and reagent solutions provided by the MPFS ensure the establishment of the reaction zone only inside the flow cell, thus allowing maximum chemiluminescence emission detection. The results obtained for the assayed compounds show that, with the exception of oxidized glutathione, all are highly potent scavengers of peroxynitrite at the studied concentrations.

  2. Effect of Channel Geometry and Properties of a Vapor-Gas Mixture on Volume Condensation in a Flow through a Nozzle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidorov, A. A.; Yastrebov, A. K.

    2018-01-01

    A method of direct numerical solution of the kinetic equation for the droplet size distribution function was used for the numerical investigation of volume condensation in a supersonic vapor-gas flow. Distributions of temperature for the gas phase and droplets, degree of supersaturation, pressure, fraction of droplets by weight, the number of droplets per unit mass, and of the nucleation rate along the channel were determined. The influence of nozzle geometry, mixture composition, and temperature dependence of the mixture properties on the investigated process was evaluated. It has been found that the nozzle divergence angle determines the vapor-gas mixture expansion rate: an increase in the divergence angle enhances the temperature decrease rate and the supersaturation degree raise rate. With an increase or decrease in the partial pressure of incondensable gas, the droplet temperature approaches the gas phase temperature or the saturation temperature at the partial gas pressure, respectively. A considerable effect of the temperature dependence of the liquid surface tension and properties on gas phase parameters and the integral characteristics of condensation aerosol was revealed. However, the difference in results obtained with or without considering the temperature dependence of evaporation heat is negligible. The predictions are compared with experimental data of other investigations for two mixtures: a mixture of heavy water vapor with nitrogen (incondensable gas) or n-nonane vapor with nitrogen. The predictions agree quite well qualitatively and quantitatively with the experiment. The comparison of the predictions with numerical results from other publications obtained using the method of moments demonstrates the usefulness of the direct numerical solution method and the method of moments in a wide range of input data.

  3. Heat flow in vapor dominated areas of the Yellowstone Plateau volcanic field: implications for the thermal budget of the Yellowstone Caldera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurwitz, Shaul; Harris, Robert; Werner, Cynthia Anne; Murphy, Fred

    2012-01-01

    Characterizing the vigor of magmatic activity in Yellowstone requires knowledge of the mechanisms and rates of heat transport between magma and the ground surface. We present results from a heat flow study in two vapor dominated, acid-sulfate thermal areas in the Yellowstone Caldera, the 0.11 km2 Obsidian Pool Thermal Area (OPTA) and the 0.25 km2 Solfatara Plateau Thermal Area (SPTA). Conductive heat flux through a low permeability layer capping large vapor reservoirs is calculated from soil temperature measurements at >600 locations and from laboratory measurements of soil properties. The conductive heat output is 3.6 ± 0.4 MW and 7.5 ± 0.4 MW from the OPTA and the SPTA, respectively. The advective heat output from soils is 1.3 ± 0.3 MW and 1.2 ± 0.3 MW from the OPTA and the SPTA, respectively and the heat output from thermal pools in the OPTA is 6.8 ± 1.4 MW. These estimates result in a total heat output of 11.8 ± 1.4 MW and 8.8 ± 0.4 MW from OPTA and SPTA, respectively. Focused zones of high heat flux in both thermal areas are roughly aligned with regional faults suggesting that faults in both areas serve as conduits for the rising acid vapor. Extrapolation of the average heat flux from the OPTA (103 ± 2 W·m−2) and SPTA (35 ± 3 W·m−2) to the ~35 km2 of vapor dominated areas in Yellowstone yields 3.6 and 1.2 GW, respectively, which is less than the total heat output transported by steam from the Yellowstone Caldera as estimated by the chloride inventory method (4.0 to 8.0 GW).

  4. Ga N nano wires and nano tubes growth by chemical vapor deposition method at different NH{sub 3} flow rate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, P.; Liu, Y.; Meng, X. [Wuhan University, School of Physics and Technology, Key Laboratory of Artificial Micro and Nanostructures of Ministry of Education, Wuhan 430072 (China)

    2016-11-01

    Ga N nano wires and nano tubes have been successfully synthesized via the simple chemical vapor deposition method. NH{sub 3} flow rate was found to be a crucial factor in the synthesis of different type of Ga N which affects the shape and the diameter of generated Ga N nano structures. X-ray diffraction confirms that Ga N nano wires grown on Si(111) substrate under 900 degrees Celsius and with NH{sub 3} flow rate of 50 sc cm presents the preferred orientation growth in the (002) direction. It is beneficial to the growth of nano structure through catalyst annealing. Transmission electron microscopy and scanning electron microscopy were used to measure the size and structures of the samples. (Author)

  5. Microstructure evolution, thermal stability and fractal behavior of water vapor flow assisted in situ growth poly(vinylcarbazole)-titania quantum dots nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mombrú, Dominique; Romero, Mariano; Faccio, Ricardo; Mombrú, Alvaro W.

    2017-12-01

    Here, we report a novel strategy for the preparation of TiO2 quantum dots fillers prepared from alkoxide precursor via in situ water vapor flow diffusion into poly(N-vinylcarbazole) host. A detailed characterization by means of infrared and Raman spectroscopy, X-ray powder diffraction, small angle X-ray scattering and differential scanning calorimetry is reported. The growth mechanism of both crystallites and particles was mostly governed by the classical coarsening reaction limited growth and the polymer host showed no detectable chemical modifications at the interface or active participation in the growing process. The main relevance of our strategy respect to the typical sol-gel growth in solution is the possibility of the interruption of the reaction by simple stopping the water vapor flow diffusion into the polymer host thus achieving good control in the nanoparticles size. The thermal stability and fractal behavior of our nanocomposites were also studied by differential scanning calorimetry and in situ small angle X-ray scattering versus temperature. Strong correlations between modifications in the fractal behavior and glass transition or fusion processes were observed for these nanocomposites.

  6. MHD flow in multichannel U-bends: Screening experiments and theoretical analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reimann, J.; Molokov, S.; Platnieks, I.; Platacis, E.

    1993-02-01

    In electrically coupled multichannel ducts with a U-bend geometry magnetohydrodynamic effects are expected to cause strongly ununiform distributions of flow rates Q i and pressure drops Δp i in the individual channels. A multichannel U-bend geometry is part of the KfK self-cooled Pb-17 Li blanket design (radial-toroidal-radial channels). However, inserts are proposed which isolate electrically the radial channels (not the toroidal ones). To investigate the multichannel effect (MCE), screening experiments were performed at LAS, Riga, with different flow channel geometries and channel numbers between 1 and 5 and using InGaSn as liquid metal. These experiments were carried out with either Δp i ∼const or Q i ∼const. Hartmann Numbers were varied between 0 and ∼1600 (maximum magnetic field strength: 4.1 T) and Interaction Parameters between 0 and 10000. For experiments with electrically conducting walls between the channels, the volume flow rates in the outer channels are significantly larger than those in the inner channels in the experiments with Δp i ∼const. For Q i ∼const., this tendency is reversed, with the highest pressure drop in the middle channel and the lowest in the outer channels. The flow geometry with electrically separated radial channels, similar to the KfK-design result in a fairly even flow rate and pressure drop distribution. The single channels behave approximately like electrically separated channels; no marked MCE occurrs. A theoretical analysis was carried out to describe the MCE for the multichannel U-bend with thin electrically conducting outside walls. This analysis is based on the Core Flow Approximation (CFA), valid for infinitely large Interaction Parameters and Hartmann Numbers. The theory predicts correctly all tendencies observed for the pressure measurements. Moreover, the method is able to describe in detail the flow structure in the toroidal channel. The most essential result is that the flow rate in the layer close to the

  7. Periodic flow hydrodynamic resistance parameters for woven screen matrices at cryogenic temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrella, M. D.; Ghiaasiaan, S. M.

    2017-12-01

    The regenerator is a critical component in all Stirling and Pulse Tube cryocoolers. It generally consists of a microporous metallic or rare-earth filler material contained within a cylindrical shell. Accurate modelling of the hydrodynamic and thermal behaviour of different regenerator materials is crucial to the successful design of cryogenic systems. Previous investigations have used experimental measurements at steady and periodic flow conditions in conjunction with pore-level CFD analysis to determine the pertinent hydrodynamic parameters, namely the Darcy permeability and Forchheimer coefficients. Due to the difficulty associated with experimental measurement at cryogenic temperatures, past investigations were mostly performed at ambient conditions and their results are assumed to be appropriate for cryogenic temperatures. In this study, a regenerator filled with woven screen matrices such as 400 mesh T316 stainless steel were assembled and experimentally tested under periodic helium flow at cryogenic temperatures. The mass flow and pressure drop data were analysed using CFD to determine the dimensionless friction factor, Darcy Permeability and Forchheimer coefficients. These results are compared to previous investigations at ambient temperature conditions, and the relevance of room-temperature models and correlations to cryogenic temperatures is critically assessed.

  8. Effectiveness of common fish screen materials for protecting lamprey ammocoetes—Influence of sweeping velocities and decreasing flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesa, Matthew G.; Liedtke, Theresa L.; Weiland, Lisa K.; Christiansen, Helena E.

    2017-12-14

    In previous tests of the effectiveness of four common fish screen materials for excluding lamprey ammocoetes, we determined that woven wire (WW) allowed substantially more entrainment than perforated plate (PP), profile bar (PB), or Intralox (IL) material. These tests were simplistic because they used small vertically-oriented screens positioned perpendicular to the flow without a bypass or a sweeping velocity (SV). In the subsequent test discussed in this report, we exposed ammocoetes to much larger (2.5-m-wide) screen panels with flows up to 10 ft3 /s, a SV component, and a simulated bypass channel. The addition of a SV modestly improved protection of lamprey ammocoetes for all materials tested. A SV of 35 cm/s with an approach velocity (AV) of 12 cm/s, was able to provide protection for fish about 5–15 mm smaller than the protection provided by an AV of 12 cm/s without a SV component. The best-performing screen panels (PP, IL, and PB) provided nearly complete protection from entrainment for fish greater than 50-mm toal length, but the larger openings in the WW material only protected fish greater than 100-mm total length. Decreasing the AV and SV by 50 percent expanded the size range of protected lampreys by about 10–15 mm for those exposed to IL and WW screens, and it decreased the protective ability of PP screens by about 10 mm. Much of the improvement for IL and WW screens under the reduced flow conditions resulted from an increase in the number of lampreys swimming away from the screen. Fish of all sizes became impinged (that is, stuck on the screen surface for more than 1 s) on the screens, with the rate of impingement highest on PP (39– 72 percent) and lowest on WW (7–22 percent). Although impingements were common, injuries were rare, and 24-h post-test survival was greater than 99 percent. Our results refined the level of protection provided by these screen materials when both an AV and SV are present and confirmed our earlier recommendation that

  9. Piezoelectric trace vapor calibrator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verkouteren, R. Michael; Gillen, Greg; Taylor, David W.

    2006-01-01

    The design and performance of a vapor generator for calibration and testing of trace chemical sensors are described. The device utilizes piezoelectric ink-jet nozzles to dispense and vaporize precisely known amounts of analyte solutions as monodisperse droplets onto a hot ceramic surface, where the generated vapors are mixed with air before exiting the device. Injected droplets are monitored by microscope with strobed illumination, and the reproducibility of droplet volumes is optimized by adjustment of piezoelectric wave form parameters. Complete vaporization of the droplets occurs only across a 10 deg. C window within the transition boiling regime of the solvent, and the minimum and maximum rates of trace analyte that may be injected and evaporated are determined by thermodynamic principles and empirical observations of droplet formation and stability. By varying solution concentrations, droplet injection rates, air flow, and the number of active nozzles, the system is designed to deliver--on demand--continuous vapor concentrations across more than six orders of magnitude (nominally 290 fg/l to 1.05 μg/l). Vapor pulses containing femtogram to microgram quantities of analyte may also be generated. Calibrated ranges of three explosive vapors at ng/l levels were generated by the device and directly measured by ion mobility spectrometry (IMS). These data demonstrate expected linear trends within the limited working range of the IMS detector and also exhibit subtle nonlinear behavior from the IMS measurement process

  10. Development of a flow controller for long-term sampling of gases and vapors using evacuated canisters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossner, Alan; Farant, Jean Pierre; Simon, Philippe; Wick, David P

    2002-11-15

    Anthropogenic activities contribute to the release of a wide variety of volatile organic compounds (VOC) into microenvironments. Developing and implementing new air sampling technologies that allow for the characterization of exposures to VOC can be useful for evaluating environmental and health concerns arising from such occurrences. A novel air sampler based on the use of a capillary flow controller connected to evacuated canisters (300 mL, 1 and 6 L) was designed and tested. The capillary tube, used to control the flow of air, is a variation on a sharp-edge orifice flow controller. It essentially controls the velocity of the fluid (air) as a function of the properties of the fluid, tube diameter and length. A model to predict flow rate in this dynamic system was developed. The mathematical model presented here was developed using the Hagen-Poiseuille equation and the ideal gas law to predict flow into the canisters used to sample for long periods of time. The Hagen-Poiseuille equation shows the relationship between flow rate, pressure gradient, capillary resistance, fluid viscosity, capillary length and diameter. The flow rates evaluated were extremely low, ranging from 0.05 to 1 mL min(-1). The model was compared with experimental results and was shown to overestimate the flow rate. Empirical equations were developed to more accurately predict flow for the 300 mL, 1 and 6 L canisters used for sampling periods ranging from several hours to one month. The theoretical and observed flow rates for different capillary geometries were evaluated. Each capillary flow controller geometry that was tested was found to generate very reproducible results, RSD gas chromatograph. The capillary flow controller was found to exceed the performance of the sorbent samplers in this comparison.

  11. Development of a selection support expert system of mathematical models for dynamic simulation of liquid-vapor two-phase flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gofuku, Akio; Shimizu, Kenji; Sugano, Keiji; Morimoto, Takashi; Yoshikawa, Hidekazu; Wakabayashi, Jiro

    1992-01-01

    This paper deals with computerized supporting techniques of a numerical simulation of complex and large-scale engineering systems like nuclear power plants. As an example of the intelligent support systems of dynamic simulation, a prototype expert system is developed on an expert system development tool to support the selection of mathematical model which is a first step of numerical simulation and is required both wide expert knowledge and high-level decision making. The expert system supports the selection of liquid-vapor two phase flow models (fluid model and constitutive equations) consistent with simulation purpose and condition in the case of thermal-hydraulic simulation of nuclear power plants. The possibility of the expert system is examined for various selection support cases by both investigation of the appropriateness of the selection support logic and comparison between support results and decision results of several experts. (author)

  12. Depicting mass flow rate of R134a /LPG refrigerant through straight and helical coiled adiabatic capillary tubes of vapor compression refrigeration system using artificial neural network approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, Jatinder; Singh, Jagdev

    2018-07-01

    In this work, an experimental investigation is carried out with R134a and LPG refrigerant mixture for depicting mass flow rate through straight and helical coil adiabatic capillary tubes in a vapor compression refrigeration system. Various experiments were conducted under steady-state conditions, by changing capillary tube length, inner diameter, coil diameter and degree of subcooling. The results showed that mass flow rate through helical coil capillary tube was found lower than straight capillary tube by about 5-16%. Dimensionless correlation and Artificial Neural Network (ANN) models were developed to predict mass flow rate. It was found that dimensionless correlation and ANN model predictions agreed well with experimental results and brought out an absolute fraction of variance of 0.961 and 0.988, root mean square error of 0.489 and 0.275 and mean absolute percentage error of 4.75% and 2.31% respectively. The results suggested that ANN model shows better statistical prediction than dimensionless correlation model.

  13. Automatic flow-batch system for cold vapor atomic absorption spectroscopy determination of mercury in honey from Argentina using online sample treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domínguez, Marina A; Grünhut, Marcos; Pistonesi, Marcelo F; Di Nezio, María S; Centurión, María E

    2012-05-16

    An automatic flow-batch system that includes two borosilicate glass chambers to perform sample digestion and cold vapor atomic absorption spectroscopy determination of mercury in honey samples was designed. The sample digestion was performed by using a low-cost halogen lamp to obtain the optimum temperature. Optimization of the digestion procedure was done using a Box-Behnken experimental design. A linear response was observed from 2.30 to 11.20 μg Hg L(-1). The relative standard deviation was 3.20% (n = 11, 6.81 μg Hg L(-1)), the sample throughput was 4 sample h(-1), and the detection limit was 0.68 μg Hg L(-1). The obtained results with the flow-batch method are in good agreement with those obtained with the reference method. The flow-batch system is simple, allows the use of both chambers simultaneously, is seen as a promising methodology for achieving green chemistry goals, and is a good proposal to improving the quality control of honey.

  14. Hydrodynamics of vapor-liquid annular dispersed flows in channels with heated rod clusters under unsteady conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kroshilin, A.E.; Kroshilin, V.E.; Nigmatulin, B.I.

    1984-01-01

    A one-dimensional unsteady hydrodynamic model of vapour-liquid disperse-annular flows in channels with heated fuel rod clusters has been constructed. Regularities in the appearance of critical heat transfer due to the dryout of a near-wall liquid film on rod surfaces in such channels are investigated. The model developed takes into account the main flow regularities in the channels with heated rod clusters. The calculations made have shown that the time before crisis appearance agrees satisfactorily with the experimental data

  15. Apparatus for monitoring two-phase flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheppard, John D.; Tong, Long S.

    1977-03-01

    A method and apparatus for monitoring two-phase flow is provided that is particularly related to the monitoring of transient two-phase (liquid-vapor) flow rates such as may occur during a pressurized water reactor core blow-down. The present invention essentially comprises the use of flanged wire screens or similar devices, such as perforated plates, to produce certain desirable effects in the flow regime for monitoring purposes. One desirable effect is a measurable and reproducible pressure drop across the screen. The pressure drop can be characterized for various known flow rates and then used to monitor nonhomogeneous flow regimes. Another useful effect of the use of screens or plates in nonhomogeneous flow is that such apparatus tends to create a uniformly dispersed flow regime in the immediate downstream vicinity. This is a desirable effect because it usually increases the accuracy of flow rate measurements determined by conventional methods.

  16. Apparatus for monitoring two-phase flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheppard, J.D.; Tong, L.S.

    1977-01-01

    A method and apparatus for monitoring two-phase flow is provided that is particularly related to the monitoring of transient two-phase (liquid-vapor) flow rates such as may occur during a pressurized water reactor core blow-down. The present invention essentially comprises the use of flanged wire screens or similar devices, such as perforated plates, to produce certain desirable effects in the flow regime for monitoring purposes. One desirable effect is a measurable and reproducible pressure drop across the screen. The pressure drop can be characterized for various known flow rates and then used to monitor nonhomogeneous flow regimes. Another useful effect of the use of screens or plates in nonhomogeneous flow is that such apparatus tends to create a uniformly dispersed flow regime in the immediate downstream vicinity. This is a desirable effect because it usually increases the accuracy of flow rate measurements determined by conventional methods. 3 claims, 9 figures

  17. Flow Injection Photochemical Vapor Generation Coupled with Miniaturized Solution-Cathode Glow Discharge Atomic Emission Spectrometry for Determination and Speciation Analysis of Mercury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mo, Jiamei; Li, Qing; Guo, Xiaohong; Zhang, Guoxia; Wang, Zheng

    2017-10-03

    A novel, compact, and green method was developed for the determination and speciation analysis of mercury, based on flow injection photochemical vapor generation (PVG) coupled with miniaturized solution cathode glow discharge-atomic emission spectroscopy (SCGD-AES). The SCGD was generated between a miniature hollow titanium tube and a solution emerging from a glass capillary. Cold mercury vapor (Hg(0)) was generated by PVG and subsequently delivered to the SCGD for excitation, and finally the emission signals were recorded by a miniaturized spectrograph. The detection limits (DLs) of Hg(II) and methylmercury (MeHg) were both determined to be 0.2 μg L -1 . Moreover, mercury speciation analysis could also be performed by using different wavelengths and powers from the UV lamp and irradiation times. Both Hg(II) and MeHg can be converted to Hg(0) for the determination of total mercury (T-Hg) with 8 W/254 nm UV lamp and 60 s irradiation time; while only Hg(II) can be reduced to Hg(0) and determined selectively with 4 W/365 nm UV lamp and 20 s irradiation time. Then, the concentration of MeHg can be calculated by subtracting the Hg(II) from the T-Hg. Because of its similar sensitivity and DL at 8 W/254 nm, the simpler and less toxic Hg(II) was used successfully as a primary standard for the quantification of T-Hg. The novel PVG-SCGD-AES system provides not only a 365-fold improvement in the DL for Hg(II) but also a nonchromatographic method for the speciation analysis of mercury. After validating its accuracy, this method was successfully used for mercury speciation analysis of water and biological samples.

  18. Slurry sampling flow injection chemical vapor generation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry for the determination of trace Ge, As, Cd, Sb, Hg and Bi in cosmetic lotions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Wei-Ni [Department of Chemistry, National Sun Yat-sen University, Kaohsiung 80424, Taiwan (China); Jiang, Shiuh-Jen, E-mail: sjjiang@faculty.nsysu.edu.tw [Department of Chemistry, National Sun Yat-sen University, Kaohsiung 80424, Taiwan (China); Department of Medical Laboratory Science and Biotechnology, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung 80708, Taiwan (China); Chen, Yen-Ling [Department of Fragrance and Cosmetic Science, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung 80708, Taiwan (China); Sahayam, A.C. [National Centre for Compositional Characterisation of Materials (CCCM), Hyderabad (India)

    2015-02-20

    Highlights: • Determination of Ge, As, Cd, Sb, Hg and Bi in cosmetic lotions in a single run. • Accurate analysis using isotope dilution and standard addition methods. • Vapor generation ICP-MS yielded superior detection limits compared to ETV-ICP-MS. • No sample dissolution increased sample through put. • Analysis of GBW09305 Cosmetic (Cream) reference material for accuracy. - Abstract: A slurry sampling inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) method has been developed for the determination of Ge, As, Cd, Sb, Hg and Bi in cosmetic lotions using flow injection (FI) vapor generation (VG) as the sample introduction system. A slurry containing 2% m/v lotion, 2% m/v thiourea, 0.05% m/v L-cysteine, 0.5 μg mL{sup −1} Co(II), 0.1% m/v Triton X-100 and 1.2% v/v HCl was injected into a VG-ICP-MS system for the determination of Ge, As, Cd, Sb, Hg and Bi without dissolution and mineralization. Because the sensitivities of the analytes in the slurry and that of aqueous solution were quite different, an isotope dilution method and a standard addition method were used for the determination. This method has been validated by the determination of Ge, As, Cd, Sb, Hg and Bi in GBW09305 Cosmetic (Cream) reference material. The method was also applied for the determination of Ge, As, Cd, Sb, Hg and Bi in three cosmetic lotion samples obtained locally. The analysis results of the reference material agreed with the certified value and/or ETV-ICP-MS results. The detection limit estimated from the standard addition curve was 0.025, 0.1, 0.2, 0.1, 0.15, and 0.03 ng g{sup −1} for Ge, As, Cd, Sb, Hg and Bi, respectively, in original cosmetic lotion sample.

  19. Slurry sampling flow injection chemical vapor generation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry for the determination of trace Ge, As, Cd, Sb, Hg and Bi in cosmetic lotions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Wei-Ni; Jiang, Shiuh-Jen; Chen, Yen-Ling; Sahayam, A.C.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Determination of Ge, As, Cd, Sb, Hg and Bi in cosmetic lotions in a single run. • Accurate analysis using isotope dilution and standard addition methods. • Vapor generation ICP-MS yielded superior detection limits compared to ETV-ICP-MS. • No sample dissolution increased sample through put. • Analysis of GBW09305 Cosmetic (Cream) reference material for accuracy. - Abstract: A slurry sampling inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) method has been developed for the determination of Ge, As, Cd, Sb, Hg and Bi in cosmetic lotions using flow injection (FI) vapor generation (VG) as the sample introduction system. A slurry containing 2% m/v lotion, 2% m/v thiourea, 0.05% m/v L-cysteine, 0.5 μg mL −1 Co(II), 0.1% m/v Triton X-100 and 1.2% v/v HCl was injected into a VG-ICP-MS system for the determination of Ge, As, Cd, Sb, Hg and Bi without dissolution and mineralization. Because the sensitivities of the analytes in the slurry and that of aqueous solution were quite different, an isotope dilution method and a standard addition method were used for the determination. This method has been validated by the determination of Ge, As, Cd, Sb, Hg and Bi in GBW09305 Cosmetic (Cream) reference material. The method was also applied for the determination of Ge, As, Cd, Sb, Hg and Bi in three cosmetic lotion samples obtained locally. The analysis results of the reference material agreed with the certified value and/or ETV-ICP-MS results. The detection limit estimated from the standard addition curve was 0.025, 0.1, 0.2, 0.1, 0.15, and 0.03 ng g −1 for Ge, As, Cd, Sb, Hg and Bi, respectively, in original cosmetic lotion sample

  20. Vapor generation methods for explosives detection research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grate, Jay W.; Ewing, Robert G.; Atkinson, David A.

    2012-12-01

    The generation of calibrated vapor samples of explosives compounds remains a challenge due to the low vapor pressures of the explosives, adsorption of explosives on container and tubing walls, and the requirement to manage (typically) multiple temperature zones as the vapor is generated, diluted, and delivered. Methods that have been described to generate vapors can be classified as continuous or pulsed flow vapor generators. Vapor sources for continuous flow generators are typically explosives compounds supported on a solid support, or compounds contained in a permeation or diffusion device. Sources are held at elevated isothermal temperatures. Similar sources can be used for pulsed vapor generators; however, pulsed systems may also use injection of solutions onto heated surfaces with generation of both solvent and explosives vapors, transient peaks from a gas chromatograph, or vapors generated by s programmed thermal desorption. This article reviews vapor generator approaches with emphasis on the method of generating the vapors and on practical aspects of vapor dilution and handling. In addition, a gas chromatographic system with two ovens that is configurable with up to four heating ropes is proposed that could serve as a single integrated platform for explosives vapor generation and device testing. Issues related to standards, calibration, and safety are also discussed.

  1. Investigation of Steady Fluid Flow in Pre-Screen Zone of Well During Its Regeneration while Using Tube Post-Filter Flushing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Ivashechkin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes a steady pressure and free-flow circulation flow in the pre-screen zone of a well during its hydrodynamic reagent-free flushing. Calculation dependences for description of a filtration flow and creation of a hydrodynamic grid have been obtained in the paper. The paper presents results of experimental investigations on filtration flow. The obtained results agree completely with the calculation dependences that testifies about the possibility to use the obtained formulas for description of the filtration flow originating in the pre-screen zone of a well during its hydrodynamic reagent-free flushing.

  2. Trace mercury determination in drinking and natural water samples by room temperature ionic liquid based-preconcentration and flow injection-cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinis, Estefanía M; Bertón, Paula; Olsina, Roberto A; Altamirano, Jorgelina C; Wuilloud, Rodolfo G

    2009-08-15

    A liquid-liquid extraction procedure (L-L) based on room temperature ionic liquid (RTIL) was developed for the preconcentration and determination of mercury in different water samples. The analyte was quantitatively extracted with 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate ([C(4)mim][PF(6)]) under the form of Hg-2-(5-bromo-2-pyridylazo)-5-diethylaminophenol (Hg-5-Br-PADAP) complex. A volume of 500 microl of 9.0 mol L(-1) hydrochloric acid was used to back-extract the analyte from the RTIL phase into an aqueous media prior to its analysis by flow injection-cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry (FI-CV-AAS). A preconcentration factor of 36 was achieved upon preconcentration of 20 mL of sample. The limit of detection (LOD) obtained under the optimal conditions was 2.3ngL(-1) and the relative standard deviation (RSD) for 10 replicates at 1 microg L(-1) Hg(2+) was 2.8%, calculated with peaks height. The method was successfully applied to the determination of mercury in river, sea, mineral and tap water samples and a certified reference material (CRM).

  3. Trace mercury determination in drinking and natural water samples by room temperature ionic liquid based-preconcentration and flow injection-cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinis, Estefania M.; Berton, Paula; Olsina, Roberto A.; Altamirano, Jorgelina C.; Wuilloud, Rodolfo G.

    2009-01-01

    A liquid-liquid extraction procedure (L-L) based on room temperature ionic liquid (RTIL) was developed for the preconcentration and determination of mercury in different water samples. The analyte was quantitatively extracted with 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate ([C 4 mim][PF 6 ]) under the form of Hg-2-(5-bromo-2-pyridylazo)-5-diethylaminophenol (Hg-5-Br-PADAP) complex. A volume of 500 μl of 9.0 mol L -1 hydrochloric acid was used to back-extract the analyte from the RTIL phase into an aqueous media prior to its analysis by flow injection-cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry (FI-CV-AAS). A preconcentration factor of 36 was achieved upon preconcentration of 20 mL of sample. The limit of detection (LOD) obtained under the optimal conditions was 2.3 ng L -1 and the relative standard deviation (RSD) for 10 replicates at 1 μg L -1 Hg 2+ was 2.8%, calculated with peaks height. The method was successfully applied to the determination of mercury in river, sea, mineral and tap water samples and a certified reference material (CRM).

  4. Effect of the hydrogen flow rate on the structural and optical properties of hydrogenated amorphous silicon thin films prepared by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ben Amor, Sana; Dimassi, Wissem; Ali Tebai, Mohamed; Ezzaouia, Hatem [Photovoltaic Laboratory Research and Technology Centre of Energy, Borj-Cedria Science and Technology Park, BP 95, 2050 Hammam-Lif (Tunisia)

    2012-10-15

    Hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) thin films were deposited from pure silane (SiH{sub 4}) and hydrogen (H{sub 2}) gas mixture by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) method at low temperature (400 C) using high rf power (60 W). The structural and optical properties of these films are systematically investigated as a function of the flow rate of hydrogen (F{sub H2}).The surface morphology is analyzed by atomic force microscopy (AFM). The characterization of these films with low angle X-ray diffraction revealed that the crystallite size in the films tends to decrease with increase in (F{sub H2}). The Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopic analysis showed that at low values of (F{sub H2}),the hydrogen bonding in Si:H films shifts from di-hydrogen (Si-H{sub 2}) and (Si-H{sub 2})n complexes to the mono-hydrogen (Si-H) bonding configuration. Finally, for these optimized conditions, the deposition rate decreases with increasing (F{sub H2}). (copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  5. A Novel Tool for High-Throughput Screening of Granulocyte-Specific Antibodies Using the Automated Flow Cytometric Granulocyte Immunofluorescence Test (Flow-GIFT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuan Duc Nguyen

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI is a severe complication related with blood transfusion. TRALI has usually been associated with antibodies against leukocytes. The flow cytometric granulocyte immunofluorescence test (Flow-GIFT has been introduced for routine use when investigating patients and healthy blood donors. Here we describe a novel tool in the automation of the Flow-GIFT that enables a rapid screening of blood donations. We analyzed 440 sera from healthy female blood donors for the presence of granulocyte antibodies. As positive controls, 12 sera with known antibodies against anti-HNA-1a, -b, -2a; and -3a were additionally investigated. Whole-blood samples from HNA-typed donors were collected and the test cells isolated using cell sedimentation in a Ficoll density gradient. Subsequently, leukocytes were incubated with the respective serum and binding of antibodies was detected using FITC-conjugated antihuman antibody. 7-AAD was used to exclude dead cells. Pipetting steps were automated using the Biomek NXp Multichannel Automation Workstation. All samples were prepared in the 96-deep well plates and analyzed by flow cytometry. The standard granulocyte immunofluorescence test (GIFT and granulocyte agglutination test (GAT were also performed as reference methods. Sixteen sera were positive in the automated Flow-GIFT, while five of these sera were negative in the standard GIFT (anti—HNA 3a, n = 3; anti—HNA-1b, n = 1 and GAT (anti—HNA-2a, n = 1. The automated Flow-GIFT was able to detect all granulocyte antibodies, which could be only detected in GIFT in combination with GAT. In serial dilution tests, the automated Flow-GIFT detected the antibodies at higher dilutions than the reference methods GIFT and GAT. The Flow-GIFT proved to be feasible for automation. This novel high-throughput system allows an effective antigranulocyte antibody detection in a large donor population in order to prevent TRALI due to transfusion of

  6. A novel tool for high-throughput screening of granulocyte-specific antibodies using the automated flow cytometric granulocyte immunofluorescence test (Flow-GIFT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Xuan Duc; Dengler, Thomas; Schulz-Linkholt, Monika; Klüter, Harald

    2011-02-03

    Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) is a severe complication related with blood transfusion. TRALI has usually been associated with antibodies against leukocytes. The flow cytometric granulocyte immunofluorescence test (Flow-GIFT) has been introduced for routine use when investigating patients and healthy blood donors. Here we describe a novel tool in the automation of the Flow-GIFT that enables a rapid screening of blood donations. We analyzed 440 sera from healthy female blood donors for the presence of granulocyte antibodies. As positive controls, 12 sera with known antibodies against anti-HNA-1a, -b, -2a; and -3a were additionally investigated. Whole-blood samples from HNA-typed donors were collected and the test cells isolated using cell sedimentation in a Ficoll density gradient. Subsequently, leukocytes were incubated with the respective serum and binding of antibodies was detected using FITC-conjugated antihuman antibody. 7-AAD was used to exclude dead cells. Pipetting steps were automated using the Biomek NXp Multichannel Automation Workstation. All samples were prepared in the 96-deep well plates and analyzed by flow cytometry. The standard granulocyte immunofluorescence test (GIFT) and granulocyte agglutination test (GAT) were also performed as reference methods. Sixteen sera were positive in the automated Flow-GIFT, while five of these sera were negative in the standard GIFT (anti-HNA 3a, n = 3; anti-HNA-1b, n = 1) and GAT (anti-HNA-2a, n = 1). The automated Flow-GIFT was able to detect all granulocyte antibodies, which could be only detected in GIFT in combination with GAT. In serial dilution tests, the automated Flow-GIFT detected the antibodies at higher dilutions than the reference methods GIFT and GAT. The Flow-GIFT proved to be feasible for automation. This novel high-throughput system allows an effective antigranulocyte antibody detection in a large donor population in order to prevent TRALI due to transfusion of blood products.

  7. Passive vapor extraction feasibility study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rohay, V.J.

    1994-01-01

    Demonstration of a passive vapor extraction remediation system is planned for sites in the 200 West Area used in the past for the disposal of waste liquids containing carbon tetrachloride. The passive vapor extraction units will consist of a 4-in.-diameter pipe, a check valve, a canister filled with granular activated carbon, and a wind turbine. The check valve will prevent inflow of air that otherwise would dilute the soil gas and make its subsequent extraction less efficient. The granular activated carbon is used to adsorb the carbon tetrachloride from the air. The wind turbine enhances extraction rates on windy days. Passive vapor extraction units will be designed and operated to meet all applicable or relevant and appropriate requirements. Based on a cost analysis, passive vapor extraction was found to be a cost-effective method for remediation of soils containing lower concentrations of volatile contaminants. Passive vapor extraction used on wells that average 10-stdft 3 /min air flow rates was found to be more cost effective than active vapor extraction for concentrations below 500 parts per million by volume (ppm) of carbon tetrachloride. For wells that average 5-stdft 3 /min air flow rates, passive vapor extraction is more cost effective below 100 ppm

  8. Numerical and experimental flow analysis in centifluidic systems for rapid allergy screening tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dethloff Manuel

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available For the development of the automated processing of a membrane-based rapid allergy test, the flow characteristics in one part of the test, the reagents module, are analysed. This module consists of a multichannel system with several inputs and one output. A return flow from one input channel into another should be avoided. A valveless module with pointed channels at an angle of 12° is analysed with numerical and experimental methods with regard to the flow characteristics.

  9. Bedside screen for oral cavity structure, salivary flow, and vocal production over the 14days following endotracheal extubation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Cheryl Chia-Hui; Wu, Kuo-Hsiang; Ku, Shih-Chi; Chan, Ding-Cheng; Lee, Jang-Jaer; Wang, Tyng-Guey; Hsiao, Tzu-Yu

    2018-06-01

    To describe the sequelae of oral endotracheal intubation by evaluating prevalence rates of structural injury, hyposalivation, and impaired vocal production over 14days following extubation. Consecutive adults (≥20years, N=114) with prolonged (≥48h) endotracheal intubation were enrolled from medical intensive care units at a university hospital. Participants were assessed by trained nurses at 2, 7, and 14days after extubation, using a standardized bedside screening protocol. Within 48-hour postextubation, structural injuries were common, with 51% having restricted mouth opening. Unstimulated salivary flow was reduced in 43%. For vocal production, 51% had inadequate breathing support for phonation, dysphonia was common (94% had hoarseness and 36% showed reduced efficiency of vocal fold closure), and >40% had impaired articulatory precision. By 14days postextubation, recovery was noted in most conditions, but reduced efficiency of vocal fold closure persisted. Restricted mouth opening (39%) and reduced salivary flow (34%) remained highly prevalent. After extubation, restricted mouth opening, reduced salivary flow, and dysphonia were common and prolonged in recovery. Reduced efficiency of vocal cord closure persisted at 14days postextubation. The extent and duration of these sequelae remind clinicians to screen for them up to 2weeks after extubation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Determination of thiomersal by flow injection coupled with microwave-assisted photochemical online oxidative decomposition of organic mercury and cold vapor atomic fluorescence spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campanella, Beatrice; Onor, Massimo; Mascherpa, Marco Carlo; D’Ulivo, Alessandro [National Research Council of Italy, C.N.R., Istituto di Chimica dei Composti Organo Metallici-ICCOM-UOS Pisa, Area di Ricerca, Via G. Moruzzi 1, 56124 Pisa (Italy); Ferrari, Carlo [National Research Council of Italy, C.N.R., Istituto Nazionale di Ottica, INO–UOS Pisa, Area di Ricerca, Via G. Moruzzi 1, 56124 Pisa (Italy); Bramanti, Emilia, E-mail: bramanti@pi.iccom.cnr.it [National Research Council of Italy, C.N.R., Istituto di Chimica dei Composti Organo Metallici-ICCOM-UOS Pisa, Area di Ricerca, Via G. Moruzzi 1, 56124 Pisa (Italy)

    2013-12-04

    Graphical abstract: -- Highlights: •Thiomersal was determined on line using FI-MW/UV-CVGAFS. •MW/UV allows a “green” on line oxidation of organic mercury to Hg{sup II}. •Each measure requires less than 5 min with a LOD of 3 ng mL{sup −1} (as mercury). •Hg concentration in commercial ophthalmic solutions ranges between 7.5 and 59.0 μg mL{sup −1}. -- Abstract: We developed a flow injection (FI) method for the determination of thiomersal (sodium ethylmercurithiosalicylate, C{sub 9}H{sub 9}HgNaO{sub 2}S) based on the UV/microwave (MW) photochemical, online oxidation of organic mercury, followed by cold vapor generation atomic fluorescence spectrometry (CVG-AFS) detection. Thiomersal was quantitatively converted in the MW/UV process to Hg(II), with a yield of 97 ± 3%. This reaction was followed by the reduction of Hg(II) to Hg(0) performed in a knotted reaction coil with NaBH{sub 4} solution, and AFS detection in an Ar/H{sub 2} miniaturized flame. The method was linear in the 0.01–2 μg mL{sup −1} range, with a LOD of 0.003 μg mL{sup −1}. This method has been applied to the determination of thiomersal in ophthalmic solutions, with recoveries ranging between 97% and 101%. We found a mercury concentration in commercial ophthalmic solutions ranging between 7.5 and 59.0 μg mL{sup −1}.

  11. Determination of thiomersal by flow injection coupled with microwave-assisted photochemical online oxidative decomposition of organic mercury and cold vapor atomic fluorescence spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campanella, Beatrice; Onor, Massimo; Mascherpa, Marco Carlo; D’Ulivo, Alessandro; Ferrari, Carlo; Bramanti, Emilia

    2013-01-01

    Graphical abstract: -- Highlights: •Thiomersal was determined on line using FI-MW/UV-CVGAFS. •MW/UV allows a “green” on line oxidation of organic mercury to Hg II . •Each measure requires less than 5 min with a LOD of 3 ng mL −1 (as mercury). •Hg concentration in commercial ophthalmic solutions ranges between 7.5 and 59.0 μg mL −1 . -- Abstract: We developed a flow injection (FI) method for the determination of thiomersal (sodium ethylmercurithiosalicylate, C 9 H 9 HgNaO 2 S) based on the UV/microwave (MW) photochemical, online oxidation of organic mercury, followed by cold vapor generation atomic fluorescence spectrometry (CVG-AFS) detection. Thiomersal was quantitatively converted in the MW/UV process to Hg(II), with a yield of 97 ± 3%. This reaction was followed by the reduction of Hg(II) to Hg(0) performed in a knotted reaction coil with NaBH 4 solution, and AFS detection in an Ar/H 2 miniaturized flame. The method was linear in the 0.01–2 μg mL −1 range, with a LOD of 0.003 μg mL −1 . This method has been applied to the determination of thiomersal in ophthalmic solutions, with recoveries ranging between 97% and 101%. We found a mercury concentration in commercial ophthalmic solutions ranging between 7.5 and 59.0 μg mL −1

  12. Non-chromatographic speciation analysis of mercury by flow injection on-line preconcentration in combination with chemical vapor generation atomic fluorescence spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu Hong [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, State Key Laboratory of Coordination Chemistry and Key Laboratory of MOE for Life Science, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Department of Chemistry, Xuzhou Normal University, Xuzhou 221116 (China); Jin Yan [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, State Key Laboratory of Coordination Chemistry and Key Laboratory of MOE for Life Science, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Han Weiying [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, State Key Laboratory of Coordination Chemistry and Key Laboratory of MOE for Life Science, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Miao, Qiang [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, State Key Laboratory of Coordination Chemistry and Key Laboratory of MOE for Life Science, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Bi Shuping [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, State Key Laboratory of Coordination Chemistry and Key Laboratory of MOE for Life Science, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China)]. E-mail: bisp@nju.edu.cn

    2006-07-15

    A novel non-chromatographic approach for direct speciation of mercury, based on the selective retention inorganic mercury and methylmercury on the inner wall of a knotted reactor by using ammonium diethyl dithiophosphate and dithizone as complexing agents respectively, was developed for flow injection on-line sorption preconcentration coupled with chemical vapor generation non-dispersive atomic fluorescence spectrometry. With the sample pH kept at 2.0, the preconcentration of inorganic mercury on the inner walls of the knotted reactor was carried out based on the exclusive retention of Hg-DDP complex in the presence of methylmercury via on-line merging the sample solution with ammonium diethyl dithiophosphate solution, and selective preconcentration methylmercury was achieved with dithizone instead of ammonium diethyl dithiophosphate. A 15% (v/v) HCl was introduced to elute the retained mercury species and merge with KBH{sub 4} solution for atomic fluorescence spectrometry detection. Under the optimal experimental conditions, the sample throughputs of inorganic mercury and methylmercury were 30 and 20 h{sup -1} with the enhancement factors of 13 and 24. The detection limits were found to be 3.6 ng l{sup -1} for Hg{sup 2+} and 2.0 ng l{sup -1} for CH{sub 3}Hg{sup +}. The precisions (RSD) for the 11 replicate measurements of each 0.2 {mu}g l{sup -1} of Hg{sup 2+} and CH{sub 3}Hg{sup +} were 2.2% and 2.8%, respectively. The developed method was validated by the analysis of certified reference materials (simulated natural water, rice flour and pork) and by recovery measurements on spiked samples, and was applied to the determination of inorganic mercury and methylmercury in biological and environmental water samples.

  13. Non-chromatographic speciation analysis of mercury by flow injection on-line preconcentration in combination with chemical vapor generation atomic fluorescence spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Hong; Jin Yan; Han Weiying; Miao, Qiang; Bi Shuping

    2006-01-01

    A novel non-chromatographic approach for direct speciation of mercury, based on the selective retention inorganic mercury and methylmercury on the inner wall of a knotted reactor by using ammonium diethyl dithiophosphate and dithizone as complexing agents respectively, was developed for flow injection on-line sorption preconcentration coupled with chemical vapor generation non-dispersive atomic fluorescence spectrometry. With the sample pH kept at 2.0, the preconcentration of inorganic mercury on the inner walls of the knotted reactor was carried out based on the exclusive retention of Hg-DDP complex in the presence of methylmercury via on-line merging the sample solution with ammonium diethyl dithiophosphate solution, and selective preconcentration methylmercury was achieved with dithizone instead of ammonium diethyl dithiophosphate. A 15% (v/v) HCl was introduced to elute the retained mercury species and merge with KBH 4 solution for atomic fluorescence spectrometry detection. Under the optimal experimental conditions, the sample throughputs of inorganic mercury and methylmercury were 30 and 20 h -1 with the enhancement factors of 13 and 24. The detection limits were found to be 3.6 ng l -1 for Hg 2+ and 2.0 ng l -1 for CH 3 Hg + . The precisions (RSD) for the 11 replicate measurements of each 0.2 μg l -1 of Hg 2+ and CH 3 Hg + were 2.2% and 2.8%, respectively. The developed method was validated by the analysis of certified reference materials (simulated natural water, rice flour and pork) and by recovery measurements on spiked samples, and was applied to the determination of inorganic mercury and methylmercury in biological and environmental water samples

  14. Method and apparatus for monitoring two-phase flow. [PWR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheppard, J.D.; Tong, L.S.

    1975-12-19

    A method and apparatus for monitoring two-phase flow is provided that is particularly related to the monitoring of transient two-phase (liquid-vapor) flow rates such as may occur during a pressurized water reactor core blow-down. The present invention essentially comprises the use of flanged wire screens or similar devices, such as perforated plates, to produce certain desirable effects in the flow regime for monitoring purposes. One desirable effect is a measurable and reproducible pressure drop across the screen. The pressure drop can be characterized for various known flow rates and then used to monitor nonhomogeneous flow regimes. Another useful effect of the use of screens or plates in nonhomogeneous flow is that such apparatus tends to create a uniformly dispersed flow regime in the immediate downstream vicinity. This is a desirable effect because it usually increases the accuracy of flow rate measurements determined by conventional methods.

  15. Factors Affecting the Improvement of the Initial Peak Urinary Flow Rate after Transurethral Resection of the Prostate or Photoselective Vaporization of the Prostate for Treating Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hwa Sub Choi

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose We evaluated the factors that affect the improvement of the initial peak flow rate after transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP or photoselective vaporization of the prostate (PVP for benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH patients by using noninvasive tools. Methods One hundred and twenty seven BPH patients who had undergone TURP or PVP between January 2005 and May 2009 were evaluated. They were divided into 2 groups: the postoperative initial peak urinary flow rate (Qmax was less than 10 mL/sec (Group 1; n=37, TURP=11, PVP=26 and more than 10 mL/sec (Group 2; n=90, TURP=41, PVP=49. We confirmed the patients' preoperative check lists. The check list were the international prostate symptom score (IPSS, the quality of life score, a past history of acute urinary retention (AUR, body mass index and/or pyuria, the serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA level and the prostate volume, the prostate transitional zone volume and prostatic calcification. The initial Qmax was measured at the outpatient clinic one week after discharge. Results The improvement rate was not significant difference between the TURP group (78.8% and the PVP group (65.3%. The efficacy parameters were the IPSS-storage symptom score, the prostate volume, the PSA level and a past history of AUR. The IPSS-storage symptom scores of Group 1 (12.3±3.3 was higher than those of Group 2 (10.5±1.7. The prostate volume of Group 2 (42.3±16.6 g was bigger than that of Group 1 (36.6±7.8 g. The PSA level of Group 2 (3.8±2.6 ng/mL was higher than that of Group 1 (2.6±2.6 ng/mL. A past history of AUR in Group 1 (35.1% was more prevalent than that of Group 2 (15.6%. Conclusions The non-invasive factors affecting the initial Qmax after TURP or PVP were the IPSS-storage symptom score, the prostate volume and a past history of AUR. Accordingly, in patients who have a higher IPSS-storage symptom score, a smaller prostate volume and a history of AUR, there might be a detrimental effect on

  16. Mobile vapor recovery and vapor scavenging unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stokes, C.A.; Steppe, D.E.

    1991-01-01

    This patent describes a mobile anti- pollution apparatus, for the recovery of hydrocarbon emissions. It comprises a mobile platform upon which is mounted a vapor recovery unit for recovering vapors including light hydrocarbons, the vapor recovery unit having an inlet and an outlet end, the inlet end adapted for coupling to an external source of hydrocarbon vapor emissions to recover a portion of the vapors including light hydrocarbons emitted therefrom, and the outlet end adapted for connection to a means for conveying unrecovered vapors to a vapor scavenging unit, the vapor scavenging unit comprising an internal combustion engine adapted for utilizing light hydrocarbon in the unrecovered vapors exiting from the vapor recovery unit as supplemental fuel

  17. Screening for urinary tract infection with the Sysmex UF-1000i urine flow cytometer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broeren, M.A.C.; Bahceci, C.; Vader, H.; Arents, N.L.A.

    2011-01-01

    The diagnosis of urinary tract infection (UTI) by urine culture is time-consuming and can produce up to 60 to 80% negative results. Fast screening methods that can reduce the necessity for urine cultures will have a large impact on overall turnaround time and laboratory economics. We have evaluated

  18. The lithium vapor box divertor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldston, R J; Schwartz, J; Myers, R

    2016-01-01

    It has long been recognized that volumetric dissipation of the plasma heat flux from a fusion power system is preferable to its localized impingement on a material surface. Volumetric dissipation mitigates both the anticipated very high heat flux and intense particle-induced damage due to sputtering. Recent projections to a tokamak demonstration power plant suggest an immense upstream parallel heat flux, of order 20 GW m −2 , implying that fully detached operation may be a requirement for the success of fusion power. Building on pioneering work on the use of lithium by Nagayama et al and by Ono et al as well as earlier work on the gas box divertor by Watkins and Rebut, we present here a concept for a lithium vapor box divertor, in which lithium vapor extracts momentum and energy from a fusion-power-plant divertor plasma, using fully volumetric processes. At the high powers and pressures that are projected this requires a high density of lithium vapor, which must be isolated from the main plasma in order to avoid lithium build-up on the chamber walls or in the plasma. Isolation is achieved through a powerful multi-box differential pumping scheme available only for condensable vapors. The preliminary box-wise calculations are encouraging, but much more work is required to demonstrate the practical viability of this scheme, taking into account at least 2D plasma and vapor flows within and between the vapor boxes and out of the vapor boxes to the main plasma. (paper)

  19. Electrochemical study and flow injection analysis of paracetamol in pharmaceutical formulations based on screen-printed electrodes and carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fanjul-Bolado, Pablo; Lamas-Ardisana, Pedro Jose; Hernandez-Santos, David; Costa-Garcia, Agustin

    2009-01-01

    Acetaminophenol or paracetamol is one of the most commonly used analgesics in pharmaceutical formulations. Acetaminophen is electroactive and voltammetric mechanistic studies for the electrode processes of the acetaminophenol/N-acetyl-p-quinoneimine redox system are presented. Carbon nanotubes modified screen-printed electrodes with enhanced electron transfer properties are used for the study of the electrochemical-chemical oxidation mechanism of paracetamol at pH 2.0. Quantitative analysis of paracetamol by using its oxidation process (in a Britton-Robinson buffer solution pH 10.0) at +0.20 V (vs. an Ag pseudoreference electrode) on an untreated screen-printed carbon electrode (SPCE) was carried out. Thus, a cyclic voltammetric based reproducible determination of acetaminophen (R.S.D., 2.2%) in the range 2.5 x 10 -6 M to 1 x 10 -3 M, was obtained. However, when SPCEs are used as amperometric detectors coupled to a flow injection analysis (FIA) system, the detection limit achieved for paracetamol was 1 x 10 -7 M, one order of magnitude lower than that obtained by voltammetric analysis. The repeatability of the amperometric detection with the same SPCE is 2% for 15 successive injections of 10 -5 M acetaminophen and do not present any memory effect. Finally, the applicability of using screen-printed carbon electrodes for the electrochemical detection of paracetamol (i.e. for quality control analysis) was demonstrated by using two commercial pharmaceutical products.

  20. Electrochemical study and flow injection analysis of paracetamol in pharmaceutical formulations based on screen-printed electrodes and carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fanjul-Bolado, Pablo [DropSens, S.L., Edificio Severo Ochoa, Campus El Cristo, 33006 Oviedo, Asturias (Spain); Lamas-Ardisana, Pedro Jose [Departamento de Quimica Fisica y Analitica, Universidad de Oviedo, Julian Claveria 8, 33006 Oviedo, Asturias (Spain); Hernandez-Santos, David [DropSens, S.L., Edificio Severo Ochoa, Campus El Cristo, 33006 Oviedo, Asturias (Spain); Costa-Garcia, Agustin, E-mail: costa@fq.uniovi.es [Departamento de Quimica Fisica y Analitica, Universidad de Oviedo, Julian Claveria 8, 33006 Oviedo, Asturias (Spain)

    2009-04-13

    Acetaminophenol or paracetamol is one of the most commonly used analgesics in pharmaceutical formulations. Acetaminophen is electroactive and voltammetric mechanistic studies for the electrode processes of the acetaminophenol/N-acetyl-p-quinoneimine redox system are presented. Carbon nanotubes modified screen-printed electrodes with enhanced electron transfer properties are used for the study of the electrochemical-chemical oxidation mechanism of paracetamol at pH 2.0. Quantitative analysis of paracetamol by using its oxidation process (in a Britton-Robinson buffer solution pH 10.0) at +0.20 V (vs. an Ag pseudoreference electrode) on an untreated screen-printed carbon electrode (SPCE) was carried out. Thus, a cyclic voltammetric based reproducible determination of acetaminophen (R.S.D., 2.2%) in the range 2.5 x 10{sup -6} M to 1 x 10{sup -3} M, was obtained. However, when SPCEs are used as amperometric detectors coupled to a flow injection analysis (FIA) system, the detection limit achieved for paracetamol was 1 x 10{sup -7} M, one order of magnitude lower than that obtained by voltammetric analysis. The repeatability of the amperometric detection with the same SPCE is 2% for 15 successive injections of 10{sup -5} M acetaminophen and do not present any memory effect. Finally, the applicability of using screen-printed carbon electrodes for the electrochemical detection of paracetamol (i.e. for quality control analysis) was demonstrated by using two commercial pharmaceutical products.

  1. An analysis of the vapor flow and the heat conduction through the liquid-wick and pipe wall in a heat pipe with single or multiple heat sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ming-Ming; Faghri, Amir

    1990-01-01

    A numerical analysis is presented for the overall performance of heat pipes with single or multiple heat sources. The analysis includes the heat conduction in the wall and liquid-wick regions as well as the compressibility effect of the vapor inside the heat pipe. The two-dimensional elliptic governing equations in conjunction with the thermodynamic equilibrium relation and appropriate boundary conditions are solved numerically. The solutions are in agreement with existing experimental data for the vapor and wall temperatures at both low and high operating temperatures.

  2. Vapor generating unit blowdown arrangement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDonald, B.N.

    1978-01-01

    A vapor generating unit having a U-shaped tube bundle is provided with an orificed downcomer shroud and a fluid flow distribution plate between the lower hot and cold leg regions to promote fluid entrained sediment deposition in proximity to an apertured blowdown pipe

  3. Design, fabrication and testing of porous tungsten vaporizers for mercury ion thrusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zavesky, R.; Kroeger, E.; Kami, S.

    1983-01-01

    The dispersions in the characteristics, performance and reliability of vaporizers for early model 30-cm thrusters were investigated. The purpose of the paper is to explore the findings and to discuss the approaches that were taken to reduce the observed dispersion and present the results of a program which validated those approaches. The information that is presented includes porous tungsten materials specifications, a discussion of assembly procedures, and a description of a test program which screens both material and fabrication processes. There are five appendices providing additional detail in the areas of vaporizer contamination, nitrogen flow testing, bubble testing, porosimeter testing, and mercury purity. Four neutralizers, seven cathodes and five main vaporizers were successfully fabricated, tested, and operated on thrusters. Performance data from those devices is presented and indicates extremely repeatable results from using the design and fabrication procedures.

  4. Petroleum Vapor Intrusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    One type of vapor intrusion is PVI, in which vapors from petroleum hydrocarbons such as gasoline, diesel, or jet fuel enter a building. Intrusion of contaminant vapors into indoor spaces is of concern.

  5. Multiparameter FLAER-based flow cytometry for screening of paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria enhances detection rates in patients with aplastic anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sachdeva, Man Updesh Singh; Varma, Neelam; Chandra, Dinesh; Bose, Parveen; Malhotra, Pankaj; Varma, Subhash

    2015-05-01

    Flow cytometry is the gold standard methodology for screening of paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria. In the last few years, proaerolysin conjugated with fluorescein (FLAER) has become an important component of antibody panel used for the detection of paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH) clone. This study aimed to compare PNH clone detection by flow cytometry in the pre-FLAER era versus the FLAER era. This was a retrospective analysis of 4 years and included 1004 individuals screened for PNH clone, either presenting as hemolytic anemia or as aplastic anemia. In the pre-FLAER time period, the RBCs and neutrophils were screened with antibodies against CD55 and CD59. With the introduction of FLAER, neutrophils were screened with FLAER/CD24/CD15 and monocytes with FLAER/CD14/CD33 combination. A comparative analysis was done for detection of PNH clone in aplastic anemia patients versus non-aplastic anemia patients, as well as between pre-FLAER and FLAER era. Out of a total of 1004 individuals, 59 (5.8%) were detected to have PNH clone positivity. The frequency of PNH clone detected in aplastic anemia and non-aplastic anemia groups was 12.02 and 3.36%, respectively. The detection rate of PNH clone increased from 4.5% (32/711) in the pre-FLAER era to 9.2% (27/293) with the introduction of FLAER. However, this increase could be attributed to increased detection of PNH clone in the aplastic anemia group, which showed a significant increase from 8.3 to 18.2% after use of FLAER. In the non-aplastic group, PNH clone was detected with similar frequencies before and after use of FLAER (3.2 versus 3.8%, respectively). Mean PNH clone size was lower in the aplastic anemia group when compared with the non-aplastic group. RBCs always showed a lower clone size than neutrophils. PNH clone on neutrophils and monocytes was however similar. Inclusion of FLAER increases the sensitivity of the test which is especially useful in picking up small PNH clones in patients of aplastic anemia.

  6. Preliminary Borehole Disposal In Medium Flow Hydrogeological Condition Using IAEA Screening Tools

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nazran Harun; Mohd Abd Wahab Yusof; Norasalwa Zakaria; Mohd Zaidi Ibrahim; Muhammad Fathi Sujan

    2014-01-01

    A screening tool developed by International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has been used to provide means of improving the capacity of Malaysian Nuclear Agency (Nuclear Malaysia) in assessing the potential sites for Borehole Disposal for Disused Sealed Radioactive Sources. It allows the isolation provided by the capsule and disposal container to be evaluated. In addition, it has a conservative model of radionuclide transport with no retardation of radionuclide. Hence, rapid decisions can be made by providing an early indication of the potential suitability of sites based on their hydro-chemical characteristics. The objective of this paper is to identify and determine the types and radionuclide activities of inventory that can be disposed in the borehole. The results of the analysis show the volume of gas doses occur from the disposal and time taken for the cement to be corroded. (author)

  7. Cathepsin D immobilized capillary reactors for on-flow screening assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornelio, Vivian Estevam; de Moraes, Marcela Cristina; Domingues, Vanessa de Cassia; Fernandes, João Batista; da Silva, Maria Fátima das Gracas Fernandes; Cass, Quezia Bezerra; Vieira, Paulo Cezar

    2018-03-20

    The treatment of diseases using enzymes as targets has called for the development of new and reliable methods for screening. The protease cathepsin D is one such target involved in several diseases such as tumors, degenerative processes, and vital processes of parasites causing schistosomiasis. Herein, we describe the preparation of a fused silica capillary, cathepsin D (CatD)-immobilized enzyme reactor (IMER) using in a multidimensional High Performance Liquid Chromatography-based method (2D-HPLC) and zonal affinity chromatography as an alternative in the search for new ligands. The activity and kinetic parameters of CatD-IMER were evaluated by monitoring the product MOCAc-Gly-Lys-Pro-Ile-Leu-Phe (P-MOCAc) (K M  = 81.9 ± 7.49 μmol/L) generated by cleavage of the fluorogenic substrate MOCAc-Gly-Lys-Pro-Ile-Leu-Phe-Phe-Arg-Leu-Lys(DNP)-d-Arg-NH2 (S-MOCAc). Stability studies have indicated that CatD-IMER retained 20% of activity after 5 months, a relevant result, because proteases are susceptible to autoproteolysis in solution assays with free enzyme. In the search for inhibitors, 12 crude natural product extracts were analyzed using CatD-IMER as the target, resulting in the isolation of different classes of natural products. In addition, 26 compounds obtained from different species of plants were also screened, demonstrating the efficiency and reproducibility of the herein reported assay even in the case of complex matrices such as plant crude extracts. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Quick cytogenetic screening of breeding bulls using flow cytometric sperm DNA histogram analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagy, Szabolcs; Polgár, Péter J; Andersson, Magnus; Kovács, András

    2016-09-01

    The aim of the present study was to test the FXCycle PI/RNase kit for routine DNA analyses in order to detect breeding bulls and/or insemination doses carrying cytogenetic aberrations. In a series of experiments we first established basic DNA histogram parameters of cytogenetically healthy breeding bulls by measuring the intraspecific genome size variation of three animals, then we compared the histogram profiles of bulls carrying cytogenetic defects to the baseline values. With the exception of one case the test was able to identify bulls with cytogenetic defects. Therefore, we conclude that the assay could be incorporated into the laboratory routine where flow cytometry is applied for semen quality control.

  9. Point of net vapor generation and vapor void fraction in subcooled boiling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saha, P.; Zuber, N.

    1974-01-01

    An analysis is presented directed at predicting the point of net vapor generation and vapor void fraction in subcooled boiling. It is shown that the point of net vapor generation depends upon local conditions--thermal and fluid dynamic. Thus, at low mass flow rates the net vapor generation is determined by thermal conditions, whereas at high mass flow rates the phenomenon is hydrodynamically controlled. Simple criteria are derived which can be used to predict these local conditions for net vapor generation. These criteria are used to determine the vapor void fraction is subcooled boiling. Comparison between the results predicted by this analysis and experimental data presently available shows good agreement for wide range of operating conditions, fluids and geometries. (U.S.)

  10. Screening of carcinoma metastasis by flow cytometry: A study of 238 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acosta, Maria; Pereira, José; Arroz, Maria

    2016-05-01

    Malignant epithelial cells may be detected in different specimens, by immunophenotyping using flow cytometry (FCM). CD326 (epithelial-specific antigen, clone Ber-Ep4) was used to identify epithelial cells, CD45 to discriminate between leucocytes (positive for this antigen) and non-hematological cells (negative for this antigen), and CD33 to identify monocytes/macrophages. This combination is particularly useful in effusions to characterize large cells and distinguish between monocyte/macrophages (CD45+ CD33+ CD326-), mesothelial cells (CD45 ± (dim) CD33 - CD326-) and epithelial cells (CD45 - CD33 - CD326 +). We evaluated the efficiency of flow cytometry to detect malignant epithelial cells in 238 fresh samples, including effusions, lymph node biopsies, fine needle aspirates, bone marrow aspirates, cerebrospinal fluid, among others. These are specimens expected to lack epithelial cells. FCM results were then compared to the results of smear and cell block morphology, as well as immunocytochemistry on paraffin wax embedded cell blocks, when available. Final diagnosis was the gold standard and a very good sensitivity (96.7%) and specificity (99.3%) were obtained. We concluded that the detection of CD326 positive cells using FCM is strongly indicative of the presence of carcinoma cells. © 2015 International Clinical Cytometry Society. © 2015 International Clinical Cytometry Society.

  11. Detection of Total Phenol in Green and Black Teas by Flow Injection System and Unmodified Screen Printed Electrode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivanildo Luiz de Mattos

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A flow injection system using an unmodified gold screen-printed electrode was employed for total phenol determination in black and green teas. In order to avoid passivation of the electrode surface due to the redox reaction, preoxidation of the sample was realized by hexacyanoferrate(III followed by addition of an EDTA solution. The complex formed in the presence of EDTA minimizes or avoids polymerization of the oxidized phenols. The previously filtered tea sample and hexacyanoferrate(III reagent were introduced simultaneously into two-carrier streams producing two reproducible zones. At confluence point, the pre-oxidation of the phenolic compounds occurs while this zone flows through the coiled reactor and receives the EDTA solution before phenol detection. The consumption of ferricyanide was monitorized at 360 mV versus Ag/AgCl and reflected the total amount of phenolic compounds present in the sample. Results were reported as gallic acid equivalents (GAEs. The proposed system is robust, versatile, environmentally-friendly (since the reactive is used only in the presence of the sample, and allows the analysis of about 35–40 samples per hour with detection limit = 1 mg/L without the necessity for surface cleaning after each measurement. Precise results are in agreement with those obtained by the Folin-Ciocalteu method.

  12. Mobile laminar air flow screen for additional operating room ventilation: reduction of intraoperative bacterial contamination during total knee arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sossai, D; Dagnino, G; Sanguineti, F; Franchin, F

    2011-12-01

    Surgical site infections are important complications in orthopedic surgery. A mobile laminar air flow (LAF) screen could represent a useful addition to an operating room (OR) with conventional turbulent air ventilation (12.5 air changes/h), as it could decrease the bacterial count near the operating field. The purpose of this study was to evaluate LAF efficacy at reducing bacterial contamination in the surgical area during 34 total knee arthroplasties (TKAs). The additional unit was used in 17 operations; the LAF was positioned beside the operating table between two of the surgeons, with the air flow directed towards the surgical area (wound). The whole team wore conventional OR clothing and the correct hygiene procedures and rituals were used. Bacterial air contamination (CFU/m(3)) was evaluated in the wound area in 17 operations with the LAF unit and 17 without the LAF unit. The LAF unit reduced the mean bacterial count in the wound area from 23.5 CFU/m(3) without the LAF to 3.5 CFU/m(3) with the LAF (P contamination of the wound area significantly decreased to below the accepted level for an ultraclean OR, preventing SSI infections.

  13. Elimination of macrostep-induced current flow nonuniformity in vertical GaN PN diode using carbon-free drift layer grown by hydride vapor phase epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujikura, Hajime; Hayashi, Kentaro; Horikiri, Fumimasa; Narita, Yoshinobu; Konno, Taichiro; Yoshida, Takehiro; Ohta, Hiroshi; Mishima, Tomoyoshi

    2018-04-01

    In vertical GaN PN diodes (PNDs) grown entirely by metal–organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD), large current nonuniformity was observed. This nonuniformity was induced by macrosteps on the GaN surface through modulation of carbon incorporation into the n-GaN crystal. It was eliminated in a hybrid PND consisting of a carbon-free n-GaN layer grown by hydride vapor phase epitaxy (HVPE) and an MOCVD-regrown p-GaN layer. The hybrid PND showed a fairly low on-resistance (2 mΩ cm2) and high breakdown voltage (2 kV) even without a field plate electrode. These results clearly indicated the strong advantages of the HVPE-grown drift layer for improving power device performance, uniformity, and yield.

  14. Analysis and control of erosion by solid particles in the elements of the flow system of steam turbines; Analisis y control de erosion por particulas solidas en los elementos del sistema de flujo de turbinas de vapor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mazur Czerwiec, Zdzislaw; Campos Amezcua, Alfonso; Campos Amezcua, Rafael [Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas, Cuernavaca, Morelos (Mexico)

    2010-07-01

    The analysis of erosion by solid particles is presented of different elements of the flow channel of the steam turbines that operate in Mexico: nozzles, stop valves, blade bosses, labyrinth seals and rotor disc; using tools of of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD). In these main elements of turbines a strong problem of erosion was registered that threatens the reliable operation of the turbines, its availability and its optimal yield. With base on the results of the numerical analyses, the design modifications of the different elements were developed from the flow channel of the steam turbines, in order to reduce the erosion and thus diminishing the energy losses and increasing the steam turbine efficiency. This work presents the main benefits that the Thermoelectric Power Plants obtain with the reduction of the erosion by solid particles that affect the critical components of steam turbines: extension of the period between maintenance, replacement of components, reduction of operation and maintenance costs of the turbines, and extension of the useful life of the main components. [Spanish] Se presenta el analisis de erosion por particulas solidas de diferentes elementos del canal de flujo de las turbinas de vapor que operan en Mexico: toberas, valvula de paro, tetones de los alabes, sellos de laberinto y disco del rotor; utilizando herramientas de Dinamica de Fluidos Computacional (DFC). En estos elementos principales de turbinas se registro un fuerte problema de erosion que amenaza la operacion confiable de las turbinas, su disponibilidad y su rendimiento optimo. Con base en los resultados de los analisis numericos, se desarrollaron las modificaciones de diseno de los diferentes elementos del canal de flujo de las turbinas de vapor, con el proposito de reducir la erosion y asi, disminuir las perdidas de energia e incrementar el rendimiento de las turbinas de vapor. Este trabajo presenta los principales beneficios que obtienen las Centrales Termoelectricas con la

  15. Establish an automated flow injection ESI-MS method for the screening of fragment based libraries: Application to Hsp90.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riccardi Sirtori, Federico; Caronni, Dannica; Colombo, Maristella; Dalvit, Claudio; Paolucci, Mauro; Regazzoni, Luca; Visco, Carlo; Fogliatto, Gianpaolo

    2015-08-30

    ESI-MS is a well established technique for the study of biopolymers (nucleic acids, proteins) and their non covalent adducts, due to its capacity to detect ligand-target complexes in the gas phase and allows inference of ligand-target binding in solution. In this article we used this approach to investigate the interaction of ligands to the Heat Shock Protein 90 (Hsp90). This enzyme is a molecular chaperone involved in the folding and maturation of several proteins which has been subjected in the last years to intensive drug discovery efforts due to its key role in cancer. In particular, reference compounds, with a broad range of dissociation constants from 40pM to 100μM, were tested to assess the reliability of ESI-MS for the study of protein-ligand complexes. A good agreement was found between the values measured with a fluorescence polarization displacement assay and those determined by mass spectrometry. After this validation step we describe the setup of a medium throughput screening method, based on ESI-MS, suitable to explore interactions of therapeutic relevance biopolymers with chemical libraries. Our approach is based on an automated flow injection ESI-MS method (AFI-MS) and has been applied to screen the Nerviano Medical Sciences proprietary fragment library of about 2000 fragments against Hsp90. In order to discard false positive hits and to discriminate those of them interacting with the N-terminal ATP binding site, competition experiments were performed using a reference inhibitor. Gratifyingly, this group of hits matches with the ligands previously identified by NMR FAXS techniques and confirmed by X-ray co-crystallization experiments. These results support the use of AFI-MS for the screening of medium size libraries, including libraries of small molecules with low affinity typically used in fragment based drug discovery. AFI-MS is a valid alternative to other techniques with the additional opportunities to identify compounds interacting with

  16. Selection of the optimal combination of water vapor absorption lines for detection of temperature in combustion zones of mixing supersonic gas flows by diode laser absorption spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mironenko, V.R.; Kuritsyn, Yu.A.; Bolshov, M.A.; Liger, V.V.

    2017-01-01

    Determination of a gas medium temperature by diode laser absorption spectrometry (DLAS) is based on the measurement of integral intensities of the absorption lines of a test molecule (generally water vapor molecule). In case of local thermodynamic equilibrium temperature is inferred from the ratio of the integral intensities of two lines with different low energy levels. For the total gas pressure above 1 atm the absorption lines are broadened and one cannot find isolated well resolved water vapor absorption lines within relatively narrow spectral interval of fast diode laser (DL) tuning range (about 3 cm"−"1). For diagnostics of a gas object in the case of high temperature and pressure DLAS technique can be realized with two diode lasers working in different spectral regions with strong absorption lines. In such situation the criteria of the optimal line selection differs significantly from the case of narrow lines. These criteria are discussed in our work. The software for selection the optimal spectral regions using the HITRAN-2012 and HITEMP data bases is developed. The program selects spectral regions of DL tuning, minimizing the error of temperature determination δT/T, basing on the attainable experimental error of line intensity measurement δS. Two combinations of optimal spectral regions were selected – (1.392 & 1.343 μm) and (1.392 & 1.339 μm). Different algorithms of experimental data processing are discussed.

  17. Stable and sensitive flow-through monitoring of phenol using a carbon nanotube based screen printed biosensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alarcon, G; Guix, M; Ambrosi, A; Merkoci, A; Ramirez Silva, M T; Palomar Pardave, M E

    2010-01-01

    A stable and sensitive biosensor for phenol detection based on a screen printed electrode modified with tyrosinase, multiwall carbon nanotubes and glutaraldehyde is designed and applied in a flow injection analytical system. The proposed carbon nanotube matrix is easy to prepare and ensures a very good entrapment environment for the enzyme, being simpler and cheaper than other reported strategies. In addition, the proposed matrix allows for a very fast operation of the enzyme, that leads to a response time of 15 s. Several parameters such as the working potential, pH of the measuring solution, biosensor response time, detection limit, linear range of response and sensitivity are studied. The obtained detection limit for phenol was 0.14 x 10 -6 M. The biosensor keeps its activity during continuous FIA measurements at room temperature, showing a stable response (RSD 5%) within a two week working period at room temperature. The developed biosensor is being applied for phenol detection in seawater samples and seems to be a promising alternative for automatic control of seawater contamination. The developed detection system can be extended to other enzyme biosensors with interest for several other applications.

  18. Stable and sensitive flow-through monitoring of phenol using a carbon nanotube based screen printed biosensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alarcon, G; Guix, M; Ambrosi, A; Merkoci, A [Nanobioelectronics and Biosensors Group, Catalan Institute of Nanotechnology, Campus UAB, 08193 Bellaterra, Barcelona, Catalonia (Spain); Ramirez Silva, M T [Departamento de Quimica, Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana Iztapalapa, 09340 Mexico Distrito Federal (Mexico); Palomar Pardave, M E, E-mail: arben.merkoci.icn@uab.es [Departamento de Materiales, Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana, Azcapotzalco, 02200 Mexico Distrito Federal (Mexico)

    2010-06-18

    A stable and sensitive biosensor for phenol detection based on a screen printed electrode modified with tyrosinase, multiwall carbon nanotubes and glutaraldehyde is designed and applied in a flow injection analytical system. The proposed carbon nanotube matrix is easy to prepare and ensures a very good entrapment environment for the enzyme, being simpler and cheaper than other reported strategies. In addition, the proposed matrix allows for a very fast operation of the enzyme, that leads to a response time of 15 s. Several parameters such as the working potential, pH of the measuring solution, biosensor response time, detection limit, linear range of response and sensitivity are studied. The obtained detection limit for phenol was 0.14 x 10{sup -6} M. The biosensor keeps its activity during continuous FIA measurements at room temperature, showing a stable response (RSD 5%) within a two week working period at room temperature. The developed biosensor is being applied for phenol detection in seawater samples and seems to be a promising alternative for automatic control of seawater contamination. The developed detection system can be extended to other enzyme biosensors with interest for several other applications.

  19. Value of venous color flow duplex scan as initial screening test for geriatric inpatients with clinically suspected pulmonary embolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kreidy R

    2011-09-01

    extremities. A total of 28 patients (84.8% with positive duplex scan had associated risk factors for venous thromboembolism. Conclusion: Lower extremity venous color flow duplex scan appears to be a reasonable initial screening test in the diagnostic algorithm of pulmonary embolism in geriatric inpatients with clinically suspected pulmonary embolism. This is particularly true in patients with a history of venous thromboembolism, in patients with a clinical presentation suggesting venous thrombosis, in uremic patients and in patients with altered general and mental status who are not candidates for chest computed tomography. Keywords: venous thrombosis, lower extremities, geriatric

  20. Vaporization of Samarium trichloride studied by thermogravimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esquivel, Marcelo R.; Pasquevich, Daniel M.

    2003-01-01

    In the present work, the vaporization reaction of SmCl 3 (l) obtained from the 'in situ' reaction of Sm 2 O 3 (s) and Cl 2 (g)-C(s) was studied by thermogravimetry under controlled atmosphere. The effects of both the temperature between 825 C degrees and 950 C degrees and the total flow gas on the vaporization rate of the following reaction: SmCl 3 (l) = SmCl 3 (g) were analyzed. The vaporization rate of the process was found to be independent of then total gas flow rate and highly dependent on the temperature. E ap calculation led to a value of 240 ± 10 kJ.mol -1 . A comparison between this value and that of the molar enthalpy of vaporization allow to the conclusion that the reaction occur in conditions near to equilibrium. The SmCl 3 identity was determined by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). (author)

  1. Physical and numerical modeling of multidimensional liquid-vapor flows advanced two-fluid models, application to upwind finite volume methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seignole, V.

    2005-01-01

    This report presents the work of thesis realized under the direction of Jean-Michel Ghidaglia (thesis director, ENS-Cachan) and of Anela Kumbaro (tutor, CEA) within the framework of the modeling of two-phase flows with OAP code. The report consists of two parts of unequal size: the first part concentrates on aspects related exclusively to two-phase flows, while the second one is devoted to the study of a numerical problem inherent to the resolution of two-phase flow systems, but whose action has a broader framework. (author)

  2. Numerical Analysis of Fully Developed Laminar Flow in Trapezoidal and Sinusoidal Grooves with Shear Stress at the Liquid-Vapor Interface

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Thomas, Scott

    2000-01-01

    .... A computer model was developed using a finite difference solution which finds the mean velocity, Poiseuille number, and volumetric flow rate in terms of the groove geometry, meniscus contact angle...

  3. GeoSteamNet: A computer code to simulate geothermal steam flow in a pipeline network; GeoSteamNet: Programa de computo para simular el flujo de vapor geotermico de una red de vaporductos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verma P., Mahendra; Aragon A., Alfonso [Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas, Cuernavaca, Morelos (Mexico)]. E-mail: mahendra@iie.org.mx; Ruiz L., Alejando; Mendoza C., Alfredo [Comision Federal de Electricidad, Campo Geotermico Los Azufres, Campamento Agua Fria, Michoacan (Mexico)

    2011-07-15

    A computer package, GeoSteamNet, was developed to simulate steam transport in a pipeline network of a geothermal field. The fluid motion is governed by the following basic principles: conservation of mass, linear momentum principle (Newton's second law or the Navier Stokes equations), and the first and second laws of thermodynamics. The second law of thermodynamics defines the direction of a spontaneous process, which is indirectly validated in the algorithm as vapor flows from high-to-low pressure, and heat flows from high-to-low temperatures. The nonlinear equations are solved with the Newton-Raphson method. Using the ActiveX component OrificeMeter, the steam-flow balance was calculated for power plants U-15 and U-16 in Los Azufres Geothermal Field, Mich., in February 2009. U-15 was fed by the production wells AZ-04, AZ-28, AZ-30, AZ-65D, and AZ-66, whereas wells AZ-28A, AZ-45, AZ-56, AZ-67, AZ-69D were connected to U-16. The analytical error is within {+-}4%, which is acceptable for practical purposes for steam-supply management, considering the uncertainties in parameters, such as pressure, temperature, pressure fluctuation at the wellhead, etc. The steam simulation results by GeoSteamNet for a hypothetical-pipeline network in a geothermal system with two production wells and a power plant illustrate its functionality. Several points need to be emphasized. For a specific geometry-pipeline network, there is only a certain amount of mass (vapor) that can be transported at a given pressure at the wellheads and the power plant. The construction and modification of a pipeline network is very expensive and the production of geothermal wells depends on many natural factors; therefore, there is need to conduct a tolerance study for each component of the network. A simulation study of the virtual-pipeline network for the design of a geothermal power plant can save money, effort, and time. [Spanish] Se desarrollo un paquete de computo, GeoSteamNet, para simular el

  4. 75 FR 65151 - Marine Vapor Control Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-21

    ... Classification UFL Upper flammable limit USCG U.S. Coast Guard VCS Vapor control system VOC Volatile organic... transfer substance to new Subpart P, beginning with 33 CFR 154.2000, to facilitate the substantive changes... that guidance. Limit requirements for flame arresters or flame screens to the flammable, combustible...

  5. Development of Y-BA-CU-O Coated Conductor Using Metal Organic Chemical Vapor Deposition

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Selvamanickam, V

    2003-01-01

    .... The program includes a study of the a) influence of MOCVD processing conditions such as the flow rate of precursor vapors, precursor vaporization temperatures, oxygen partial pressure, reactor pressure, and the deposition temperature...

  6. Application of hydrocyanic acid vapor generation via focused microwave radiation to the preparation of industrial effluent samples prior to free and total cyanide determinations by spectrophotometric flow injection analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quaresma, Maria Cristina Baptista; de Carvalho, Maria de Fátima Batista; Meirelles, Francis Assis; Santiago, Vânia Maria Junqueira; Santelli, Ricardo Erthal

    2007-02-01

    A sample preparation procedure for the quantitative determination of free and total cyanides in industrial effluents has been developed that involves hydrocyanic acid vapor generation via focused microwave radiation. Hydrocyanic acid vapor was generated from free cyanides using only 5 min of irradiation time (90 W power) and a purge time of 5 min. The HCN generated was absorbed into an accepting NaOH solution using very simple glassware apparatus that was appropriate for the microwave oven cavity. After that, the cyanide concentration was determined within 90 s using a well-known spectrophotometric flow injection analysis system. Total cyanide analysis required 15 min irradiation time (90 W power), as well as chemical conditions such as the presence of EDTA-acetate buffer solution or ascorbic acid, depending on the effluent to be analyzed (petroleum refinery or electroplating effluents, respectively). The detection limit was 0.018 mg CN l(-1) (quantification limit of 0.05 mg CN l(-1)), and the measured RSD was better than 8% for ten independent analyses of effluent samples (1.4 mg l(-1) cyanide). The accuracy of the procedure was assessed via analyte spiking (with free and complex cyanides) and by performing an independent sample analysis based on the standard methodology recommended by the APHA for comparison. The sample preparation procedure takes only 10 min for free and 20 min for total cyanide, making this procedure much faster than traditional methodologies (conventional heating and distillation), which are time-consuming (they require at least 1 h). Samples from oil (sour and stripping tower bottom waters) and electroplating effluents were analyzed successfully.

  7. Fuel vapor pressure (FVAPRS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mason, R.E.

    1979-04-01

    A subcode (FVAPRS) is described which calculates fuel vapor pressure. This subcode was developed as part of the fuel rod behavior modeling task performed at EG and G Idaho, Inc. The fuel vapor pressure subcode (FVAPRS), is presented and a discussion of literature data, steady state and transient fuel vapor pressure equations and estimates of the standard error of estimate to be expected with the FVAPRS subcode are included

  8. Multilevel soil-vapor extraction test for heterogeneous soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Widdowson, M.A.; Haney, O.R.; Reeves, H.W.

    1997-01-01

    The design, performance, and analysis of a field method for quantifying contaminant mass-extraction rates and air-phase permeability at discrete vertical locations of the vadose zones are presented. The test configuration consists of a multiscreen extraction well and multilevel observation probes located in soil layers adjacent to the extraction well. For each level tested an inflatable packer system is used to pneumatically isolate a single screen in the extraction well, and a vacuum is applied to induce air flow through the screen. Test data include contaminant concentration and flow characteristics at the extraction well, and transient or steady-state pressure drawdown data at observation probes located at variable radii from the extraction well. The test method is applicable to the design of soil-vapor extraction (SVE) and bioventing remediation systems in a variety of geologic settings, particularly stratified soils. Application of the test method at a gasoline-polluted site located in the Piedmont physiographic region is described. Contaminant mass-extraction rates, expressed in terms of volatile hydrocarbons, varied from 0.16 to 14 kg/d

  9. Water-vapor pressure control in a volume

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scialdone, J. J.

    1978-01-01

    The variation with time of the partial pressure of water in a volume that has openings to the outside environment and includes vapor sources was evaluated as a function of the purging flow and its vapor content. Experimental tests to estimate the diffusion of ambient humidity through openings and to validate calculated results were included. The purging flows required to produce and maintain a certain humidity in shipping containers, storage rooms, and clean rooms can be estimated with the relationship developed here. These purging flows are necessary to prevent the contamination, degradation, and other effects of water vapor on the systems inside these volumes.

  10. The Influences of Water Vapor/Hydrogen Ratio, Gas-Flow Rate and Antimony on the Surface Oxidation of Trip Steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwon, You Jong; Zhu, Jing Xi; Sridhar, Seetharaman; Sohn, Il Ryong

    2011-01-01

    In the current paper, we are reporting the results from an investigation of the surface and sub-surface oxidation of a TRIP steel containing 2 wt.% Mn and 0.5 wt.% Al with and without 0.03 wt.% Sb. The oxidizing conditions in the gas were successively varied in terms of the linear gas flow-rate and dew-point, from conditions were gas-phase mass transport limited conditions prevailed, to those were solid state processes became the rate determining conditions. It was found, that at sufficient low oxidizing conditions (defined as flow-rate/dew-point), the metal surfaces were clear of any external oxides, and as the oxidizing conditions were increased, Mn- and Si- oxide nodules formed along with magnetite. As the oxidizing conditions were increased further, a dense magnetite layer was present. The limits of the various regions were experimentally quantified and a proposed hypothesis for their occurrences is presented. No obvious effect of Sb was noted in this micro-structural research of the oxides that results from the various conditions investigated in this study

  11. DSMC simulations of vapor transport toward development of the lithium vapor box divertor concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagoe, Christopher; Schwartz, Jacob; Goldston, Robert

    2016-10-01

    The lithium vapor divertor box concept attempts to achieve volumetric dissipation of the high heat efflux from a fusion power system. The vapor extracts the heat of the incoming plasma by ionization and radiation, while remaining localized in the vapor box due to differential pumping based on rapid condensation. Preliminary calculations with lithium vapor at densities appropriate for an NSTX-U-scale machine give Knudsen numbers between 0.01 and 1, outside both the range of continuum fluid dynamics and of collisionless Monte Carlo. The direct-simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method, however, can simulate rarefied gas flows in this regime. Using the solver contained in the OpenFOAM package, pressure-driven flows of water vapor will be analyzed. The use of water vapor in the relevant range of Knudsen number allows for a flexible similarity experiment to verify the reliability of the code before moving to tests with lithium. The simulation geometry consists of chains of boxes on a temperature gradient, connected by slots with widths that are a representative fraction of the dimensions of the box. We expect choked flow, sonic shocks, and order-of-magnitude pressure and density drops from box to box, but this expectation will be tested in the simulation and then experiment. This work is supported by the Princeton Environmental Institute.

  12. Clinical flow cytometric screening of SAP and XIAP expression accurately identifies patients with SH2D1A and XIAP/BIRC4 mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gifford, Carrie E; Weingartner, Elizabeth; Villanueva, Joyce; Johnson, Judith; Zhang, Kejian; Filipovich, Alexandra H; Bleesing, Jack J; Marsh, Rebecca A

    2014-07-01

    X-linked lymphoproliferative disease is caused by mutations in two genes, SH2D1A and XIAP/BIRC4. Flow cytometric methods have been developed to detect the gene products, SAP and XIAP. However, there is no literature describing the accuracy of flow cytometric screening performed in a clinical lab setting. We reviewed the clinical flow cytometric testing results for 656 SAP and 586 XIAP samples tested during a 3-year period. Genetic testing was clinically performed as directed by the managing physician in 137 SAP (21%) and 115 XIAP (20%) samples. We included these samples for analyses of flow cytometric test accuracy. SH2D1A mutations were detected in 15/137 samples. SAP expression was low in 13/15 (sensitivity 87%, CI 61-97%). Of the 122 samples with normal sequencing, SAP was normal in 109 (specificity 89%, CI 82-94%). The positive predictive values (PPVs) and the negative predictive values (NPVs) were 50% and 98%, respectively. XIAP/BIRC4 mutations were detected in 19/115 samples. XIAP expression was low in 18/19 (sensitivity 95%, CI 73-100%). Of the 96 samples with normal sequencing, 59 had normal XIAP expression (specificity 61%, CI 51-71%). The PPVs and NPVs were 33% and 98%, respectively. Receiver-operating characteristic analysis was able to improve the specificity to 75%. Clinical flow cytometric screening tests for SAP and XIAP deficiencies offer good sensitivity and specificity for detecting genetic mutations, and are characterized by high NPVs. We recommend these tests for patients suspected of having X-linked lymphoproliferative disease type 1 (XLP1) or XLP2. © 2014 Clinical Cytometry Society.

  13. Natural convection and vapor loss during underground waste storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plys, M.G.; Epstein, M.; Turner, D.

    1996-01-01

    Natural convection and vapor loss from underground waste storage tanks is examined here. Stability criteria are provided for the onset of natural convection flow within the headspace of a tank, and between tanks and the environment. The flowrate is quantified and used to predict vapor losses during storage

  14. Physical model for vaporization

    OpenAIRE

    Garai, Jozsef

    2006-01-01

    Based on two assumptions, the surface layer is flexible, and the internal energy of the latent heat of vaporization is completely utilized by the atoms for overcoming on the surface resistance of the liquid, the enthalpy of vaporization was calculated for 45 elements. The theoretical values were tested against experiments with positive result.

  15. High-Throughput Flow Cytometry Screening Reveals a Role for Junctional Adhesion Molecule A as a Cancer Stem Cell Maintenance Factor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lathia, Justin D; Li, Meizhang; Sinyuk, Maksim

    2014-01-01

    Stem cells reside in niches that regulate the balance between self-renewal and differentiation. The identity of a stem cell is linked with the ability to interact with its niche through adhesion mechanisms. To identify targets that disrupt cancer stem cell (CSC) adhesion, we performed a flow...... brain versus GBM. Targeting JAM-A compromised the self-renewal of CSCs. JAM-A expression negatively correlated to GBM patient prognosis. Our results demonstrate that GBM-targeting strategies can be identified through screening adhesion receptors and JAM-A represents a mechanism for niche-driven CSC...

  16. Epitaxial growth of GaN by radical-enhanced metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (REMOCVD) in the downflow of a very high frequency (VHF) N2/H2 excited plasma - effect of TMG flow rate and VHF power

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yi; Kondo, Hiroki; Ishikawa, Kenji; Oda, Osamu; Takeda, Keigo; Sekine, Makoto; Amano, Hiroshi; Hori, Masaru

    2014-04-01

    Gallium nitride (GaN) films have been grown by using our newly developed Radical-Enhanced Metalorganic Chemical Vapor Deposition (REMOCVD) system. This system has three features: (1) application of very high frequency (60 MHz) power in order to increase the plasma density, (2) introduction of H2 gas together with N2 gas in the plasma discharge region to generate not only nitrogen radicals but also active NHx molecules, and (3) radical supply under remote plasma arrangement with suppression of charged ions and photons by employing a Faraday cage. Using this new system, we have studied the effect of the trimethylgallium (TMG) source flow rate and of the plasma generation power on the GaN crystal quality by using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and double crystal X-ray diffraction (XRD). We found that this REMOCVD allowed the growth of epitaxial GaN films of the wurtzite structure of (0001) orientation on sapphire substrates with a high growth rate of 0.42 μm/h at a low temperature of 800 °C. The present REMOCVD is a promising method for GaN growth at relatively low temperature and without using costly ammonia gas.

  17. Seamless integration of dose-response screening and flow chemistry: efficient generation of structure-activity relationship data of β-secretase (BACE1) inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, Michael; Kuratli, Christoph; Martin, Rainer E; Hochstrasser, Remo; Wechsler, David; Enderle, Thilo; Alanine, Alexander I; Vogel, Horst

    2014-02-03

    Drug discovery is a multifaceted endeavor encompassing as its core element the generation of structure-activity relationship (SAR) data by repeated chemical synthesis and biological testing of tailored molecules. Herein, we report on the development of a flow-based biochemical assay and its seamless integration into a fully automated system comprising flow chemical synthesis, purification and in-line quantification of compound concentration. This novel synthesis-screening platform enables to obtain SAR data on b-secretase (BACE1) inhibitors at an unprecedented cycle time of only 1 h instead of several days. Full integration and automation of industrial processes have always led to productivity gains and cost reductions, and this work demonstrates how applying these concepts to SAR generation may lead to a more efficient drug discovery process. Copyright © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Simulation and analysis of the tangential flow in the combustion chamber of a steam generator; Simulacion y analisis del flujo tangencial en la camara de combustion de un generador de vapor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernandez Ramirez, Isaias

    1997-06-01

    supplying ducts, were obtained, with a maximum discrepancy of 5.5 m/s between the data published by McKenty and Gravel (1997) and this analysis, for the case of combustion gases in the interior of the furnace. Temperature profiles were obtained, which were overestimated in the order of 417 Celsius degrees for the case of the temperature of gases in the center of the combustion chamber, when comparing them with the corresponding ones obtained by McKenty and Gravel (1997). It is speculated that this discrepancy must to be due to the omission of the connection of the radiation model to the global computational model and; the contours of concentration of species for the combustion products in the chamber were considered (carbon dioxide, oxygen and nitrogen), obtaining only the qualitative behavior of these. It is proposed as conclusion that the computational model developed in this thesis work can be used for the estimation of flow of fluids patterns, heat transference and transference of mass of a steam generator VU-60 of the tangential type and similar to the one taken as a base for this analysis. One improvement to the computational model developed could be achieved including the radiation effect, which requires a larger memory capacity of the computer hardware than the one available during the elaboration of this thesis. [Espanol] El presente trabajo de tesis describe la simulacion y analisis de la camara de combustion de un generador de vapor VU-60 del tipo tangencial, el cual esta basado en la solucion de la ecuacion generalizada de transporte, empleando modelos matematicos desarrollados para la caracterizacion de fenomenos fisicos para cerrar los sistemas de ecuaciones gobernantes. Para la solucion de los modelos matematicos y ecuaciones gobernantes se empleo el metodo de volumen finito, el cual se basa en el concepto de volumen de control. Se desarrollo un modelo computacional tridimensional por medio del cual se estimaron los perfiles de velocidad, presion, temperatura

  19. A Numerical Investigation of Vapor Intrusion — the Dynamic Response of Contaminant Vapors to Rainfall Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Rui; Pennell, Kelly G.; Suuberg, Eric M.

    2013-01-01

    The U.S. government and various agencies have published guidelines for field investigation of vapor intrusion, most of which suggest soil gas sampling as an integral part of the investigation. Contaminant soil gas data are often relatively more stable than indoor air vapor concentration measurements, but meteorological conditions might influence soil gas values. Although a few field and numerical studies have considered some temporal effects on soil gas vapor transport, a full explanation of the contaminant vapor concentration response to rainfall events is not available. This manuscript seeks to demonstrate the effects on soil vapor transport during and after different rainfall events, by applying a coupled numerical model of fluid flow and vapor transport. Both a single rainfall event and seasonal rainfall events were modeled. For the single rainfall event models, the vapor response process could be divided into three steps: namely, infiltration, water redistribution, and establishment of a water lens atop the groundwater source. In the infiltration step, rainfall intensity was found to determine the speed of the wetting front and wash-out effect on the vapor. The passage of the wetting front led to an increase of the vapor concentration in both the infiltration and water redistribution steps and this effect is noted at soil probes located 1 m below the ground surface. When the mixing of groundwater with infiltrated water was not allowed, a clean water lens accumulated above the groundwater source and led to a capping effect which can reduce diffusion rates of contaminant from the source. Seasonal rainfall with short time intervals involved superposition of the individual rainfall events. This modeling results indicated that for relatively deeper soil that the infiltration wetting front could not flood, the effects were damped out in less than a month after rain; while in the long term (years), possible formation of a water lens played a larger role in

  20. A technique to depress desflurane vapor pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brosnan, Robert J; Pypendop, Bruno H

    2006-09-01

    To determine whether the vapor pressure of desflurane could be decreased by using a solvent to reduce the anesthetic molar fraction in a solution (Raoult's Law). We hypothesized that such an anesthetic mixture could produce anesthesia using a nonprecision vaporizer instead of an agent-specific, electronically controlled, temperature and pressure compensated vaporizer currently required for desflurane administration. One healthy adult female dog. Propylene glycol was used as a solvent for desflurane, and the physical characteristics of this mixture were evaluated at various molar concentrations and temperatures. Using a circle system with a breathing bag attached at the patient end and a mechanical ventilator to simulate respiration, an in-circuit, nonprecision vaporizer containing 40% desflurane and 60% propylene glycol achieved an 11.5% +/- 1.0% circuit desflurane concentration with a 5.2 +/- 0.4 (0 = off, 10 = maximum) vaporizer setting. This experiment was repeated with a dog attached to the breathing circuit under spontaneous ventilation with a fresh gas flow of 0.5 L minute(-1). Anesthesia was maintained for over 2 hours at a mean vaporizer setting of 6.2 +/- 0.4, yielding mean inspired and end-tidal desflurane concentrations of 8.7% +/- 0.5% and 7.9% +/- 0.7%, respectively. Rather than alter physical properties of vaporizers to suit a particular anesthetic agent, this study demonstrates that it is also possible to alter physical properties of anesthetic agents to suit a particular vaporizer. However, propylene glycol may not prove an ideal solvent for desflurane because of its instability in solution and substantial-positive deviation from Raoult's Law.

  1. Improvements to vapor generators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keller, Arthur; Monroe, Neil.

    1976-01-01

    A supporting system is proposed for vapor generators of the 'supported' type. Said supporting system is intended to compensate the disparities of thermal expansion due to the differences in the vertical dimensions of the tubes in the walls of the combustion chamber and their collectors compared to that of the balloon tanks and the connecting tube clusters of vaporization, the first one being longer than the second ones. Said system makes it possible to build said combustion chamber higher than the balloon tanks and the tube clusters of vaporization. The capacity of steam production is thus enhanced [fr

  2. Acoustic Sample Deposition MALDI-MS (ASD-MALDI-MS): A Novel Process Flow for Quality Control Screening of Compound Libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, Jefferson; Wood, Elizabeth; Peters, Grace S; Drexler, Dieter M

    2016-02-01

    In the early stages of drug discovery, high-throughput screening (HTS) of compound libraries against pharmaceutical targets is a common method to identify potential lead molecules. For these HTS campaigns to be efficient and successful, continuous quality control of the compound collection is necessary and crucial. However, the large number of compound samples and the limited sample amount pose unique challenges. Presented here is a proof-of-concept study for a novel process flow for the quality control screening of small-molecule compound libraries that consumes only minimal amounts of samples and affords compound-specific molecular data. This process employs an acoustic sample deposition (ASD) technique for the offline sample preparation by depositing nanoliter volumes in an array format onto microscope glass slides followed by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometric (MALDI-MS) analysis. An initial study of a 384-compound array employing the ASD-MALDI-MS workflow resulted in a 75% first-pass positive identification rate with an analysis time of <1 s per sample. © 2015 Society for Laboratory Automation and Screening.

  3. Advances in directed monooxygenase evolution : from diversity generation and flow cytometry screening to tailor-made monooxygenases

    OpenAIRE

    Ruff, Anna Joëlle

    2012-01-01

    Directed Evolution became a powerful tool for proteins engineers to generate tailor-made biocatalyst. Directed protein evolution consist of the following three consecutive main steps, which are performed in iterative cycles; Step 1 the gene diversity generation, Step 2 the screening for improved variants and Step 3 the isolation of gene encoding for improved proteins. In this thesis, methodological advancements in the two key steps of the directed evolution, the diversity generation (SeSaM me...

  4. Amperometric screen-printed algal biosensor with flow injection analysis system for detection of environmental toxic compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shitanda, Isao [Department of Pure and Applied Chemistry, Faculty of Science and Technology, Tokyo University of Science, 2641 Yamazaki, Noda, Chiba 278-8510 (Japan)], E-mail: shitanda@rs.noda.tus.ac.jp; Takamatsu, Satoshi; Watanabe, Kunihiro; Itagaki, Masayuki [Department of Pure and Applied Chemistry, Faculty of Science and Technology, Tokyo University of Science, 2641 Yamazaki, Noda, Chiba 278-8510 (Japan)

    2009-08-30

    A screen-printed algal biosensor was fabricated for evaluation of toxicity of chemicals. An algal ink was prepared by mixing unicellular microalga Chlorella vulgaris cells, carbon nanotubes and sodium alginate solution. The algal ink was immobilized directly on a screen-printed carbon electrode surface using screen-printing technique. Photosynthetically generated oxygen of the immobilized algae was monitored amperometically. Responses of the algal biosensor to four toxic compounds, 6-chloro-N-ethyl-N-isopropyl-1,3,5-triazine-2,4-diamine (atrazine) and 3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-diethylurea (DCMU) were evaluated as inhibition ratios of the reduction current. The concentrations that gave 50% inhibition of the oxygen reduction current (IC{sup '}{sub 50}) for atrazine and DCMU were 12 and 1 {mu}mol dm{sup -3}, respectively. In comparison with the conventional algal biosensors, in which the algal cells were entrapped in an alginate gel and immobilized on the surface of a transparent indium tin oxide electrode, the present sensor is much smaller and less expensive, with the shorter assay time.

  5. Amperometric screen-printed algal biosensor with flow injection analysis system for detection of environmental toxic compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shitanda, Isao; Takamatsu, Satoshi; Watanabe, Kunihiro; Itagaki, Masayuki

    2009-01-01

    A screen-printed algal biosensor was fabricated for evaluation of toxicity of chemicals. An algal ink was prepared by mixing unicellular microalga Chlorella vulgaris cells, carbon nanotubes and sodium alginate solution. The algal ink was immobilized directly on a screen-printed carbon electrode surface using screen-printing technique. Photosynthetically generated oxygen of the immobilized algae was monitored amperometically. Responses of the algal biosensor to four toxic compounds, 6-chloro-N-ethyl-N-isopropyl-1,3,5-triazine-2,4-diamine (atrazine) and 3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-diethylurea (DCMU) were evaluated as inhibition ratios of the reduction current. The concentrations that gave 50% inhibition of the oxygen reduction current (IC ' 50 ) for atrazine and DCMU were 12 and 1 μmol dm -3 , respectively. In comparison with the conventional algal biosensors, in which the algal cells were entrapped in an alginate gel and immobilized on the surface of a transparent indium tin oxide electrode, the present sensor is much smaller and less expensive, with the shorter assay time.

  6. Gasoline Reid Vapor Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA regulates the vapor pressure of gasoline sold at retail stations during the summer ozone season to reduce evaporative emissions from gasoline that contribute to ground-level ozone and diminish the effects of ozone-related health problems.

  7. Feasibility of using of the second gradient theory for the direct numerical simulation of liquid-vapor flows with phase-change; Etude des potentialites de la theorie du second gradient pour la simulation numerique directe des ecoulements liquide-vapeur avec changement de phase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jamet, D. [CEA Grenoble, 38 (France). Dept. de Thermohydraulique et de Physique]|[Ecole Centrale de Paris, 75 (France)

    1998-12-31

    One on the main difficulties encountered in the direct numerical simulation of two-phase flows in general and of liquid-vapor flows with phase-change in particular, is the interface tracking. The idea developed in this work consists in modeling a liquid-vapor interface as a volumetric zone across which physical properties vary continuously instead of a discontinuous surface. The second gradient theory allows to establish the evolution equations of the fluid in the whole system: bulk phases and interfaces. That means that the resolution of a unique system of partial differential equations is necessary to determine the whole two-phase flow, the interfaces and their evolution in time being a part of the solution of this unique system. We show in this work that it is possible to artificially enlarge an interface without changing its surface tension and the latent heat of vaporization. That means than it is possible to track all the interfaces of a liquid-vapor two-phase flow with phase-change on a mesh the size of which is imposed by the smallest Kolmogorov scale of the bulk phases for example. The artificial enlargement of an interfacial zone is obtained by modifying the thermodynamic behavior of the fluid within the binodal. We show that this modification does not change the dynamics of an interface. However, although the thickness of an interface and its surface tension vary with the mass and heat fluxes that go though it, the thermodynamic modification necessary to the artificial enlargement of an interface drastically increases these variations. Consequently, the artificial enlargement of an interface must be made carefully to avoid a too much important variation of its surface tension during dynamic situations. (author) 60 refs.

  8. R-22 vapor explosions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, R.P.; Armstrong, D.R.

    1977-01-01

    Previous experimental and theoretical studies of R-22 vapor explosions are reviewed. Results from two experimental investigations of vapor explosions in a medium scale R-22/water system are reported. Measurements following the drop of an unrestrained mass of R-22 into a water tank demonstrated the existence of two types of interaction behavior. Release of a constrained mass of R-22 beneath the surface of a water tank improved the visual resolution of the system thus allowing identification of two interaction mechansims: at low water temperatures, R-22/water contact would produce immediate violent boiling; at high water temperatures a vapor film formed around its R-22 as it was released, explosions were generated by a surface wave which initiated at a single location and propagated along the vapor film as a shock wave. A new vapor explosion model is proposed, it suggests explosions are the result of a sequence of three independent steps: an initial mixing phase, a trigger and growth phase, and a mature phase where a propagating shock wave accelerates the two liquids into a collapsing vapor layer causing a high velocity impact which finely fragments and intermixes the two liquids

  9. Investigation of mental health and its influence on Chinese cancer patients using a multidisciplinary screening flow:an epidemiological survey in the west of China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SONG Huan; LI Jin; LU You; DENG Lei; SUN Xue-li

    2013-01-01

    Background Despite psycho-oncological concerns and studies having thrived these past decades,sparse reports illustrate to what extent Chinese cancer patients are involved and influenced by comorbid mental health problems.To investigate the mental health condition of cancer patient,as well as its possible impacts on prognosis,the first large-scale survey was performed in the west of China.Methods For standardizing and facilitating the assessment of mental illness in inpatients with cancer,a multidisciplinary rating flow was designed and established.On the basis of this system,between May 1st and 31st 2009,2279 cancer inpatients from nine medical centers received preliminarily screening executed by oncologists using screening scales Mental Health Screening Questionnaire (MHSQ),Zung self-rating depression scales (SDS),Zung self-rating anxiety scale (SAS),and posttraumatic stress disorder checklist-civilian version (PCL-C).Further analyses of the ones screened positively were conducted by psychiatrists applying corresponding symptom-rating scales (HAMA/HAMD/BPRS).We summarized the overall proportion of patients with impaired mental health based on the data acquired from preliminary screening,and then calculated occurrence rates of each clinical syndrome of mental disorder according to symptom conclusions.The impact of comorbid mental illness was evaluated through the follow-up scheduled 1 year later,by comparing the survival rate,progression of disease,and quality of life (QoL) between subgroup patients with or without clinical syndrome of mental disorder.Results In preliminary screenings,26.1% (595/2279) yielded positive results.Further symptom conclusions confirmed 15.8% (359/2279) with clinical syndrome of mental disorder.Regarding specific type of syndrome,the occurrence rates of depression,anxiety,psychotic symptoms,and stress-related disorders were 13.3%,10.2%,2.8%,and 1.4%,respectively.Follow-up assessments were successfully performed in 1918

  10. Pre-screening tectonic heat flows for basin modelling - Some implications for deep water exploration in the mediterranean

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wees, J.D. van; Bertotti, G.; David, P.; Bergen, F. van; Cloetingh, S.

    2007-01-01

    Basin modelling results can be very sensitive to (paleo-)temperature uncertainties. For frontier basins, in particular for deep water settings, the thermal signature of the basin is poorly constrained, as data from wells are lacking. This may lead to wrong heat flow assumptions if these are

  11. The tracking of interfaces in an electron-beam vaporizer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Westerberg, K.W.; McClelland, M.A.; Finlayson, B.A.

    1993-03-01

    A numerical analysis is made of the material and energy flow in an electron beam vaporizer. In this system the energy from an electron beam heats metal confined in a water-cooled crucible. Metal is vaporized from a liquid pool circulating in a shell of its own solid. A modified Galerkin finite element method is used to calculate the flow and temperature fields along with the interface locations. The mesh is parameterized with spines which stretch and pivot as the phase boundaries move. The discretized equations are arranged in an ''arrow'' matrix and solved using the Newton-Raphson method. Results are given for an experimental aluminum vaporizer. The effects of buoyancy and capillary driven flow are included along with the surface contributions of vapor thrust, latent heat, thermal radiation, and crucible contact resistance

  12. Online turbulent flow extraction coupled with liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry for high throughput screening of anabolic steroids in horse urine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Hyun Du; Suh, Joon Hyuk; Kim, Junghyun; Cho, Hyun-Deok; Lee, Su Duk; Han, Kwan Seok; Wang, Yu; Han, Sang Beom

    2017-10-25

    A high throughput method for simultaneous screening of anabolic steroids and their metabolites (4-esterendione, trenbolone, boldenone, oxandrolone, nandrolone, methandrostenolone, testosterone, 1-androstendione, ethisterone, normethandrolone, methyltestosterone, 16β-Hydroxystanozolol, epitestosterone, bolasterone, norethandrolone, danazol, stanozolol and androstadienone) in equine urine by online turbulent flow extraction coupled with liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry was developed. The use of turbulent flow chromatography could simplify pretreatment of horse urine, which has complex matrices as well as high viscosity. The urine was extracted by mixed-mode cation exchange solid phase extraction, and hydrolyzed using β-glucuronidase/arylsulfatase. Then, the sample was automatically loaded on the TurboFlow Cyclone extraction column for removal of further matrix, followed by separation on a fused core C18 column before MS/MS detection. Optimization and validation of the method were discussed in detail. All analytes were rapidly detected within 10min with high sensitivity (picogram to nanogram per milliliter level), and no interference was observed. The linearity range was from 0.1-10ng/mL for nine steroids and 1.0-50ng/mL for the others, with correlation of coefficient values over 0.995. Precision and accuracy ranged from 0.1 to 14.5% and 1.7 to 12.4%, respectively. The developed method was successfully applied to the analysis of anabolic steroids in horse urine after administration of a model drug. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Combination of microfluidic high-throughput production and parameter screening for efficient shaping of gold nanocubes using Dean-flow mixing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiele, Matthias; Knauer, Andrea; Malsch, Daniéll; Csáki, Andrea; Henkel, Thomas; Köhler, J Michael; Fritzsche, Wolfgang

    2017-04-11

    Metal nanoparticles and their special optical properties, the so-called localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR), facilitate many applications in various fields. Due to the strong dependency of the LSPR on particle geometry, their synthesis is a challenging and time-consuming procedure especially for non-spherical shapes. In contrast, micromixers offer new experimental approaches and therefore enable the simplification of several processes. By using a zigzag micromixer (Dean-Flow-Mixer, DFM) that induces Dean-flow secondary flow patterns, we theoretically and experimentally show the mixing efficiency. Thus, we highlight the advantages of using it in the multistep synthesis of Au nanoparticles. Based on a narrow size distribution of Au nanocubes and an increased yield in combination with higher reproducibility, we depict the need for and advantage of the DFM to control the incubation times during the growth process. We further show that, by using the DFM, easy and very fast Au nanocube edge length tuning (53 nm, 58 nm, 70 nm and 75 nm) is possible by simultaneously reducing the consumption of the materials by up to 95%. We finally demonstrate the versatile abilities by using the DFM for parameter screening on examples of different halides and accessible bromide in the growth solutions. Therefore, we highlight the optimal concentration for the different growth regimes and the influences on the Au nanoparticle morphology (spheres, cubes and rods) and their defined shaping.

  14. Control of sodium vapor transport in annuli

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meadows, G.E.; Bohringer, A.P.

    1983-11-01

    The method used to control sodium vapor transport in the annuli of various components at the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) is a downward purge of the annuli with high purity argon. The purge rates for the FFTF were selected by calculating the gas velocity required to overcome thermal convection transport in the annuli. To evaluate the effectiveness of the gas purge, laboratory apparatus was fabricated which simulated selected annuli in the FFTF In-Vessel Handling Machine (IVHM) and the Instrument Tree (IT) annuli. Tests were conducted at temperatures similar to FFTF conditions. Gas purge rates ranged from zero to 130% of FFTF flow rates. Test results show the effectiveness of a high purity gas purge in decreasing the accumulation of sodium vapor deposits in an annulus. The presence of water vapor and oxygen in the purge gas increased the sodium deposition rate by a factor of three over other tests usig high purity argon. The presence of a vapor control collar used in the IT annulus was shown to be beneficial for controlling vapor transport into the upper region of the annulus

  15. Electrochemical biotin detection based on magnetic beads and a new magnetic flow cell for screen printed electrode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biscay, Julien; González García, María Begoña; Costa García, Agustín

    2015-01-01

    The use of the first flow-cell for magnetic assays with an integrated magnet is reported here. The flow injection analysis system (FIA) is used for biotin determination. The reaction scheme is based on a one step competitive assay between free biotin and biotin labeled with horseradish peroxidase (B-HRP). The mixture of magnetic beads modified with streptavidin (Strep-MB), biotin and B-HRP is left 15 min under stirring and then a washing step is performed. After that, 100 μL of the mixture is injected and after 30s 100 μL of 3,3',5,5'-Tetramethylbenzidine (TMB) is injected and the FIAgram is recorded applying a potential of -0.2V. The linear range obtained is from 0.01 to 1 nM of biotin and the sensitivity is 758 nA/nM. The modification and cleaning of the electrode are performed in an easy way due to the internal magnet of the flow cell. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. A new continuous-flow process for catalytic conversion of glycerol to oxygenated fuel additive: Catalyst screening

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nanda, Malaya R.; Yuan, Zhongshun; Qin, Wensheng; Ghaziaskar, Hassan S.; Poirier, Marc-Andre; Xu, Chunbao

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • A continuous-flow process for catalytic synthesis of solketal from glycerol. • Six different heterogeneous acid catalysts were studied in the process. • Glycerol conversion and solketal yield of 90% and 88% respectively were achieved. • The process has the potential to be scaled-up for industrial applications. - Abstract: A new continuous-flow reactor was designed for the conversion of glycerol to solketal, an oxygenated fuel additive, through ketalization with acetone. Six heterogeneous catalysts were investigated with respect to their catalytic activity and stability in a flow reactor. The acidity of the catalysts positively influences the catalyst’s activity. Among all the solid acid catalysts tested, the maximum solketal yield from experiments at 40 °C, 600 psi and WHSV of 4 h −1 attained 73% and 88% at the acetone/glycerol molar ratio of 2.0 and 6.0, respectively, with Amberlyst Wet. Based on the solketal yield and glycerol conversion results, the activity of all catalysts tested follows the following order of sequence: Amberlyst Wet ≈ Zeolite ≈ Amberlyst Dry > Zirconium Sulfate > Montmorillonite > Polymax. An increase in acetone/glycerol molar ratio or a decrease in WHSV enhanced the glycerol conversion as expected. This process offers an attractive route for converting glycerol, the main by-product of biodiesel, to solketal – a value-added green product with potential industrial applications as a valuable fuel additive or combustion promoter for gasoline engines

  17. Released air during vapor and air cavitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jablonská, Jana, E-mail: jana.jablonska@vsb.cz; Kozubková, Milada, E-mail: milada.kozubkova@vsb.cz [VŠB-Technical University of Ostrava, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Department of Hydromechanics and Hydraulic Equipment, 17. listopadu 15, 708 33 Ostrava-Poruba (Czech Republic)

    2016-06-30

    Cavitation today is a very important problem that is solved by means of experimental and mathematical methods. The article deals with the generation of cavitation in convergent divergent nozzle of rectangular cross section. Measurement of pressure, flow rate, temperature, amount of dissolved air in the liquid and visualization of cavitation area using high-speed camera was performed for different flow rates. The measurement results were generalized by dimensionless analysis, which allows easy detection of cavitation in the nozzle. For numerical simulation the multiphase mathematical model of cavitation consisting of water and vapor was created. During verification the disagreement with the measurements for higher flow rates was proved, therefore the model was extended to multiphase mathematical model (water, vapor and air), due to release of dissolved air. For the mathematical modeling the multiphase turbulence RNG k-ε model for low Reynolds number flow with vapor and air cavitation was used. Subsequently the sizes of the cavitation area were verified. In article the inlet pressure and loss coefficient depending on the amount of air added to the mathematical model are evaluated. On the basis of the approach it may be create a methodology to estimate the amount of released air added at the inlet to the modeled area.

  18. Vaporization of a mixed precursors in chemical vapor deposition for YBCO films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Gang; Meng, Guangyao; Schneider, Roger L.; Sarma, Bimal K.; Levy, Moises

    1995-01-01

    Single phase YBa2Cu3O7-delta thin films with T(c) values around 90 K are readily obtained by using a single source chemical vapor deposition technique with a normal precursor mass transport. The quality of the films is controlled by adjusting the carrier gas flow rate and the precursor feed rate.

  19. Comparative study of the vapor analytes of trinitrotoluene (TNT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edge, Cindy C.; Gibb, Julie; Dugan, Regina E.

    1998-12-01

    Trinitrotoluene (TNT) is a high explosive used in most antipersonnel and antitank landmines. The Institute for Biological Detection Systems (IBDS) has developed a quantitative vapor delivery system, termed olfactometer, for conducting canine olfactory research. The research is conducted utilizing dynamic conditions, therefore, it is imperative to evaluate the headspace of TNT to ensure consistency with the dynamic generation of vapor. This study quantified the vapor headspace of military- grade TNT utilizing two different vapor generated methodologies, static and dynamic, reflecting differences between field and laboratory environments. Static vapor collection, which closely mimics conditions found during field detection, is defined as vapor collected in an open-air environment at ambient temperature. Dynamic vapor collection incorporates trapping of gases from a high flow vapor generation cell used during olfactometer operation. Analysis of samples collected by the two methodologies was performed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry and the results provided information with regard to the constituents detected. However, constituent concentration did vary between the sampling methods. This study provides essential information regarding the vapor constituents associated with the TNT sampled using different sampling methods. These differences may be important in determining the detection signature dogs use to recognize TNT.

  20. Vapor pressures and enthalpies of vaporization of azides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verevkin, Sergey P.; Emel'yanenko, Vladimir N.; Algarra, Manuel; Manuel Lopez-Romero, J.; Aguiar, Fabio; Enrique Rodriguez-Borges, J.; Esteves da Silva, Joaquim C.G.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → We prepared and measured vapor pressures and vaporization enthalpies of 7 azides. → We examined consistency of new and available in the literature data. → Data for geminal azides and azido-alkanes selected for thermochemical calculations. - Abstract: Vapor pressures of some azides have been determined by the transpiration method. The molar enthalpies of vaporization Δ l g H m of these compounds were derived from the temperature dependencies of vapor pressures. The measured data sets were successfully checked for internal consistency by comparison with vaporization enthalpies of similarly structured compounds.

  1. High-Throughput Flow Cytometry Screening Reveals a Role for Junctional Adhesion Molecule A as a Cancer Stem Cell Maintenance Factor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justin D. Lathia

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Stem cells reside in niches that regulate the balance between self-renewal and differentiation. The identity of a stem cell is linked with the ability to interact with its niche through adhesion mechanisms. To identify targets that disrupt cancer stem cell (CSC adhesion, we performed a flow cytometry screen on patient-derived glioblastoma (GBM cells and identified junctional adhesion molecule A (JAM-A as a CSC adhesion mechanism essential for self-renewal and tumor growth. JAM-A was dispensable for normal neural stem/progenitor cell (NPC function, and JAM-A expression was reduced in normal brain versus GBM. Targeting JAM-A compromised the self-renewal of CSCs. JAM-A expression negatively correlated to GBM patient prognosis. Our results demonstrate that GBM-targeting strategies can be identified through screening adhesion receptors and JAM-A represents a mechanism for niche-driven CSC maintenance.

  2. Computational Fluid Dynamics Model for Saltstone Vault 4 Vapor Space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Si Young

    2005-01-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) methods have been used to estimate the flow patterns for vapor space inside the Saltstone Vault No.4 under different operating scenarios. The purpose of this work is to examine the gas motions inside the vapor space under the current vault configurations. A CFD model took three-dimensional transient momentum-energy coupled approach for the vapor space domain of the vault. The modeling calculations were based on prototypic vault geometry and expected normal operating conditions as defined by Waste Solidification Engineering. The modeling analysis was focused on the air flow patterns near the ventilated corner zones of the vapor space inside the Saltstone vault. The turbulence behavior and natural convection mechanism used in the present model were benchmarked against the literature information and theoretical results. The verified model was applied to the Saltstone vault geometry for the transient assessment of the air flow patterns inside the vapor space of the vault region using the boundary conditions as provided by the customer. The present model considered two cases for the estimations of the flow patterns within the vapor space. One is the reference baseline case. The other is for the negative temperature gradient between the roof inner and top grout surface temperatures intended for the potential bounding condition. The flow patterns of the vapor space calculated by the CFD model demonstrate that the ambient air comes into the vapor space of the vault through the lower-end ventilation hole, and it gets heated up by the Benard-cell type circulation before leaving the vault via the higher-end ventilation hole. The calculated results are consistent with the literature information

  3. Analysis of organic vapors with laser induced breakdown spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nozari, Hadi; Tavassoli, Seyed Hassan; Rezaei, Fatemeh

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is utilized in the study of acetone, ethanol, methanol, cyclohexane, and nonane vapors. Carbon, hydrogen, oxygen, and nitrogen atomic emission spectra have been recorded following laser-induced breakdown of the organic vapors that are mixed with air inside a quartz chamber at atmospheric pressure. The plasma is generated with focused, Q-switched Nd:YAG radiation at the wavelength of 1064 nm. The effects of ignition and vapor pressure are discussed in view of the appearance of the emission spectra. The recorded spectra are proportional to the vapor pressure in air. The hydrogen and oxygen contributions diminish gradually with consecutive laser-plasma events without gas flow. The results show that LIBS can be used to characterize organic vapor

  4. Analysis of organic vapors with laser induced breakdown spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nozari, Hadi; Tavassoli, Seyed Hassan [Laser and Plasma Research Institute, Shahid Beheshti University, G. C, 1983963113 Evin, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Rezaei, Fatemeh, E-mail: fatemehrezaei@kntu.ac.ir [Department of Physics, K. N. Toosi University of Technology, 15875-4416 Shariati, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-09-15

    In this paper, laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is utilized in the study of acetone, ethanol, methanol, cyclohexane, and nonane vapors. Carbon, hydrogen, oxygen, and nitrogen atomic emission spectra have been recorded following laser-induced breakdown of the organic vapors that are mixed with air inside a quartz chamber at atmospheric pressure. The plasma is generated with focused, Q-switched Nd:YAG radiation at the wavelength of 1064 nm. The effects of ignition and vapor pressure are discussed in view of the appearance of the emission spectra. The recorded spectra are proportional to the vapor pressure in air. The hydrogen and oxygen contributions diminish gradually with consecutive laser-plasma events without gas flow. The results show that LIBS can be used to characterize organic vapor.

  5. Cost-effective flow injection amperometric system with metal nanoparticle loaded carbon nanotube modified screen printed carbon electrode for sensitive determination of hydrogen peroxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reanpang, Preeyaporn; Themsirimongkon, Suwaphid; Saipanya, Surin; Chailapakul, Orawon; Jakmunee, Jaroon

    2015-11-01

    Various metal nanoparticles (NPs) decorated on carbon nanotube (CNT) was modified on the home-made screen printed carbon electrode (SPCE) in order to enhances sensitivity of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) determination. The simple casting method was used for the electrode modification. The monometallic and bimetallic NPs modified electrodes were investigated for their electrochemical properties for H2O2 reduction. The Pd-CNT/SPCE is appropriated to measure the H2O2 reduction at a potential of -0.3 V, then this modified electrode was incorporated with a home-made flow through cell and applied in a simple flow injection amperometry (FI-Amp). Some parameters influencing the resulted modified electrode and the FI-Amp system were studied. The proposed detection system was able to detect H2O2 in the range of 0.1-1.0 mM, with detection limit of 20 µM. Relative standard deviation for 100 replicated injections of 0.6 mM H2O2 was 2.3%. The reproducibility of 6 electrodes preparing in 3 different lots was 8.2%. It was demonstrated for determination of H2O2 in disinfectant, hair colorant and milk samples. Recoveries in the range of 90-109% were observed. The developed system provided high stability, good repeatability, high sample throughput and low reagent consumption. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Improved cell for water-vapor electrolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aylward, J. R.

    1981-01-01

    Continuous-flow electrolytic cells decompose water vapor in steam and room air into hydrogen and oxygen. Sintered iridium oxide catalytic anode coating yields dissociation rates hundredfold greater than those obtained using platinum black. Cell consists of two mirror-image cells, with dual cathode sandwiched between two anodes. Gas traverses serpentine channels within cell and is dissociated at anode. Oxygen mingles with gas stream, while hydrogen migrates through porous matrix and is liberated as gas at cathode.

  7. Vaporization of irradiated droplets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Armstrong, R.L.; O'Rourke, P.J.; Zardecki, A.

    1986-01-01

    The vaporization of a spherically symmetric liquid droplet subject to a high-intensity laser flux is investigated on the basis of a hydrodynamic description of the system composed of the vapor and ambient gas. In the limit of the convective vaporization, the boundary conditions at the fluid--gas interface are formulated by using the notion of a Knudsen layer in which translational equilibrium is established. This leads to approximate jump conditions at the interface. For homogeneous energy deposition, the hydrodynamic equations are solved numerically with the aid of the CON1D computer code (''CON1D: A computer program for calculating spherically symmetric droplet combustion,'' Los Alamos National Laboratory Report No. LA-10269-MS, December, 1984), based on the implict continuous--fluid Eulerian (ICE) [J. Comput. Phys. 8, 197 (1971)] and arbitrary Lagrangian--Eulerian (ALE) [J. Comput. Phys. 14, 1227 (1974)] numerical mehtods. The solutions exhibit the existence of two shock waves propagating in opposite directions with respect to the contact discontinuity surface that separates the ambient gas and vapor

  8. Heat of vaporization spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edwards, D. Jr.

    1978-01-01

    Multilayer desorption measurements of various substances adsorbed on a stainless steel substrate are found to exhibit desorption profiles consistent with a zeroth order desorption model. The singleness of the desorption transients together with their narrow peak widths makes the technique ideally suited for a heat of vaporization spectrometer for either substance analysis or identification

  9. Enthalpy of Vaporization and Vapor Pressures: An Inexpensive Apparatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battino, Rubin; Dolson, David A.; Hall, Michael A.; Letcher, Trevor M.

    2007-01-01

    A simple and inexpensive method to determine the enthalpy of vaporization of liquids by measuring vapor pressure as a function of temperature is described. The vapor pressures measured with the stopcock cell were higher than the literature values and those measured with the sidearm rubber septum cell were both higher and lower than literature…

  10. A level set method for vapor bubble dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Can, E.; Prosperetti, Andrea

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes a finite-difference computational method suitable for the simulation of vapor–liquid (or gas–liquid) flows in which the dynamical effects of the vapor can be approximated by a time-dependent, spatially uniform pressure acting on the interface. In such flows it is not necessary

  11. Depression Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Depression Screening Substance Abuse Screening Alcohol Use Screening Depression Screening (PHQ-9) - Instructions The following questions are ... this tool, there is also text-only version . Depression Screening - Manual Instructions The following questions are a ...

  12. Sustainable in-well vapor stripping: A design, analytical model, and pilot study for groundwater remediation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutton, Patrick T.; Ginn, Timothy R.

    2014-12-01

    A sustainable in-well vapor stripping system is designed as a cost-effective alternative for remediation of shallow chlorinated solvent groundwater plumes. A solar-powered air compressor is used to inject air bubbles into a monitoring well to strip volatile organic compounds from a liquid to vapor phase while simultaneously inducing groundwater circulation around the well screen. An analytical model of the remediation process is developed to estimate contaminant mass flow and removal rates. The model was calibrated based on a one-day pilot study conducted in an existing monitoring well at a former dry cleaning site. According to the model, induced groundwater circulation at the study site increased the contaminant mass flow rate into the well by approximately two orders of magnitude relative to ambient conditions. Modeled estimates for 5 h of pulsed air injection per day at the pilot study site indicated that the average effluent concentrations of dissolved tetrachloroethylene and trichloroethylene can be reduced by over 90% relative to the ambient concentrations. The results indicate that the system could be used cost-effectively as either a single- or multi-well point technology to substantially reduce the mass of dissolved chlorinated solvents in groundwater.

  13. Vapor pressure and enthalpy of vaporization of linear aliphatic alkanediamines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pozdeev, Vasiliy A.; Verevkin, Sergey P.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → We measured vapor pressure of diamines H 2 N-(CH 2 ) n -NH 2 with n = 3 to 12. → Vaporization enthalpies at 298 K were derived. → We examined consistency of new and available in the literature data. → Enthalpies of vaporization show linear dependence on numbers n. → Enthalpies of vaporization correlate linearly with Kovat's indices. - Abstract: Vapor pressures and the molar enthalpies of vaporization of the linear aliphatic alkanediamines H 2 N-(CH 2 ) n -NH 2 with n = (3 to 12) have been determined using the transpiration method. A linear correlation of enthalpies of vaporization (at T = 298.15 K) of the alkanediamines with the number n and with the Kovat's indices has been found, proving the internal consistency of the measured data.

  14. Method and apparatus for suppressing electron generation in a vapor source for isotope separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janes, G.S.

    1979-01-01

    A system for applying accelerating forces to ionized particles of a vapor in a manner to suppress the flow of electron current from the vapor source. The accelerating forces are applied as an electric field in a configuration orthogonal to a magnetic field. The electric field is applied between one or more anodes in the plasma and one or more cathodes operated as electron emitting surfaces. The circuit for applying the electric field floats the cathodes with respect to the vapor source, thereby removing the vapor source from the circuit of electron flow through the plasma and suppressing the flow of electrons from the vapor source. The potential of other conducting structures contacting the plasma is controlled at or permitted to seek a level which further suppresses the flow of electron currents from the vapor source. Reducing the flow of electrons from the vapor source is particularly useful where the vapor is ionized with isotopic selectivity because it avoids superenergization of the vapor by the electron current

  15. Measurement of the Specific Gravity of the Water-Steam Emulsion Flowing in a Screen Tube of an Industrial Boiler Using Sodium-24; Mesure du Poids Specifique de l'Emulsion (Eau-Vapeur) s'Ecoulant dans un Tube-Ecran de Chaudiere Industrielle: Emploi de Sodium-24; ИЗМЕРЕНИЕ УДЕЛЬНОГО ВЕСА ЭМУЛЬСИИ (ВОДА - ПАР), ПРОТЕКАВШЕЙ В ЭКРАНИРУЮЩЕЙ ТРУБЕ ПРОМЫШЛЕННОГО КОТЛА С ПОМОЩЬЮ НАТРИЯ-24; Medicion con Ayuda de Sodio-24 del Peso Especifico de la Emulsion (Agua-Vapor) que Atraviesa la Parrilla de Agua de una Caldera Industrial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maille, C.; Moinard, J. [Societe Steinet Roubaix, Paris (France); Blanc, D.; Fontan, J. [Faculte des Sciences, Toulouse (France)

    1963-03-15

    The circulation inside an industrial boiler depends cm the flow-rate and on the specific gravity of the water-steam emulsion. Conventional methods for measuring flow-rate in screen tubes require complex devices and may disturb the phenomenon under study. The employment of an external radioactive source and detector for densitometry measurements is simple and in common use. Unfortunately, it is difficult to use in the present case. The authors have therefore developed a method consisting of the introduction of a calculated amount of sodium-24 into the boiler water. This very simple device does not disturb the flow. The experimental design, built up at die test station of Stein and Roubaix Co., is described. Sodium-24 gives consistent results, although less accurate than the densitometric process using an external source of Co{sup 60}. Investigations are now being made on a series of parallel tubes with the geometry, used in industrial boilers. (author) [French] La circulation a l'interieur d'une chaudiere industrielle est conditionnee par la vitesse d'ecoulement et le poids specifique, de l'emulsion (eau - vapeur). Les procedes classiques de mesure de la vitesse d'ecoulement dans les tubes d'ecrans necessitent des montages difficiles et risquent de perturber le phenomene a mesurer. L'emploi d'une source radioactive externe est un procede simple et courant de densimetrie; il est helas difficile a adapter dans le cas actuel. C'est pourquoi les auteurs ont adopte une technique qui consiste a Introduire dans l'eau de la chaudiere une quantite calculee de sodium-24. Ce procede, tres simple, ne perturbe pas l'ecoulement. Les auteurs decrivent le montage experimental realise a la station d'essais de la Societe Stein et Roubaix. La methode du sodium-24 conduit a des resultats coherents, bien que moins precis que le procede densime- trique employant une source externe de MCo. Les etudes en cours concernent une serie de tubes paralleles, disposes selon la geometrie adoptee

  16. Acting performance and flow state enhanced with sensory-motor rhythm neurofeedback comparing ecologically valid immersive VR and training screen scenarios.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruzelier, John; Inoue, Atsuko; Smart, Roger; Steed, Anthony; Steffert, Tony

    2010-08-16

    Actors were trained in sensory-motor rhythm (SMR) neurofeedback interfaced with a computer rendition of a theatre auditorium. Enhancement of SMR led to changes in the lighting while inhibition of theta and high beta led to a reduction in intrusive audience noise. Participants were randomised to a virtual reality (VR) representation in a ReaCTor, with surrounding image projection seen through glasses, or to a 2D computer screen, which is the conventional neurofeedback medium. In addition there was a no-training comparison group. Acting performance was evaluated by three experts from both filmed, studio monologues and Hamlet excerpts on the stage of Shakespeare's Globe Theatre. Neurofeedback learning reached an asymptote earlier as did identification of the required mental state following training in the ReaCTor training compared with the computer screen, though groups reached the same asymptote. These advantages were paralleled by higher ratings of acting performance overall, well-rounded performance, and especially the creativity subscale including imaginative expression, conviction and characterisation. On the Flow State scales both neurofeedback groups scored higher than the no-training controls on self-ratings of sense of control, confidence and feeling at-one. This is the first demonstration of enhancement of artistic performance with eyes-open neurofeedback training, previously demonstrated only with eyes-closed slow-wave training. Efficacy is attributed to psychological engagement through the ecologically relevant learning context of the acting-space, putatively allowing transfer to the real world otherwise achieved with slow-wave training through imaginative visualisation. The immersive VR technology was more successful than a 2D rendition. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. A FGGE water vapor wind data set

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Tod R.; Hayden, Christopher M.

    1985-01-01

    It has been recognized for some time that water vapor structure visible in infrared imagery offers a potential for obtaining motion vectors when several images are considered in sequence (Fischer et al., 1981). A study evaluating water vapor winds obtained from the VISSR atmospheric sounder (Stewart et al., 1985) has confirmed the viability of the approach. More recently, 20 data sets have been produced from METEOSAT water vapor imagery for the FGGE period of 10-25 November 1979. Where possible, two data sets were prepared for each day at 0000 and 1200 GMT and compared with rawinsondes over Europe, Africa, and aircraft observations over the oceans. Procedures for obtaining winds were, in general, similar to the earlier study. Motions were detected both by a single pixel tracking and a cross correlation method by using three images individually separated by one hour. A height assignment was determined by matching the measured brightness temperature to the temperature structure represented by the FGGE-IIIB analyses. Results show that the METEOSAT water vapor winds provide uniform horizontal coverage of mid-level flow over the globe with good accuracy.

  18. Multicomponent droplet vaporization in a convecting environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Megaridis, C.M.; Sirignano, W.A.

    1990-01-01

    In this paper a parametric study of the fundamental exchange processes for energy, mass and momentum between the liquid and gas phases of multicomponent liquid vaporizing droplets is presented. The model, which examines an isolated, vaporizing, multicomponent droplet in an axisymmetric, convecting environment, considers the different volatilities of the liquid components, the alteration of the liquid-phase properties due to the spatial/temporal variations of the species concentrations and also the effects of multicomponent diffusion. In addition, the model accounts for variable thermophysical properties, surface blowing and droplet surface regression due to vaporization, transient droplet heating with internal liquid circulation, and finally droplet deceleration with respect to the free flow due to drag. The numerical calculation employs finite-difference techniques and an iterative solution procedure that provides time-varying spatially-resolved data for both phases. The effects of initial droplet composition, ambient temperature, initial Reynolds number (based on droplet diameter), and volatility differential between the two liquid components are investigated for a liquid droplet consisting of two components with very different volatilities. It is found that mixtures with higher concentration of the less volatile substance actually vaporize faster on account of intrinsically higher liquid heating rates

  19. Constrained Vapor Bubble Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gokhale, Shripad; Plawsky, Joel; Wayner, Peter C., Jr.; Zheng, Ling; Wang, Ying-Xi

    2002-11-01

    Microgravity experiments on the Constrained Vapor Bubble Heat Exchanger, CVB, are being developed for the International Space Station. In particular, we present results of a precursory experimental and theoretical study of the vertical Constrained Vapor Bubble in the Earth's environment. A novel non-isothermal experimental setup was designed and built to study the transport processes in an ethanol/quartz vertical CVB system. Temperature profiles were measured using an in situ PC (personal computer)-based LabView data acquisition system via thermocouples. Film thickness profiles were measured using interferometry. A theoretical model was developed to predict the curvature profile of the stable film in the evaporator. The concept of the total amount of evaporation, which can be obtained directly by integrating the experimental temperature profile, was introduced. Experimentally measured curvature profiles are in good agreement with modeling results. For microgravity conditions, an analytical expression, which reveals an inherent relation between temperature and curvature profiles, was derived.

  20. A numerical investigation of vapor intrusion--the dynamic response of contaminant vapors to rainfall events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Rui; Pennell, Kelly G; Suuberg, Eric M

    2012-10-15

    The U.S. government and various agencies have published guidelines for field investigation of vapor intrusion, most of which suggest soil gas sampling as an integral part of the investigation. Contaminant soil gas data are often relatively more stable than indoor air vapor concentration measurements, but meteorological conditions might influence soil gas values. Although a few field and numerical studies have considered some temporal effects on soil gas vapor transport, a full explanation of the contaminant vapor concentration response to rainfall events is not available. This manuscript seeks to demonstrate the effects on soil vapor transport during and after different rainfall events, by applying a coupled numerical model of fluid flow and vapor transport. Both a single rainfall event and seasonal rainfall events were modeled. For the single rainfall event models, the vapor response process could be divided into three steps: namely, infiltration, water redistribution, and establishment of a water lens atop the groundwater source. In the infiltration step, rainfall intensity was found to determine the speed of the wetting front and wash-out effect on the vapor. The passage of the wetting front led to an increase of the vapor concentration in both the infiltration and water redistribution steps and this effect is noted at soil probes located 1m below the ground surface. When the mixing of groundwater with infiltrated water was not allowed, a clean water lens accumulated above the groundwater source and led to a capping effect which can reduce diffusion rates of contaminant from the source. Seasonal rainfall with short time intervals involved superposition of the individual rainfall events. This modeling results indicated that for relatively deeper soil that the infiltration wetting front could not flood, the effects were damped out in less than a month after rain; while in the long term (years), possible formation of a water lens played a larger role in determining

  1. Screening for trisomy 21 based on maternal age, nuchal translucency measurement, first trimester biochemistry and quantitative and qualitative assessment of the flow in the DV - the assessment of efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czuba, Bartosz; Zarotyński, Dariusz; Dubiel, Mariusz; Borowski, Dariusz; Węgrzyn, Piotr; Cnota, Wojciech; Reska-Nycz, Małgorzata; Mączka, Marek; Wielgoś, Mirosław; Sodowski, Krzysztof; Serafin, Dawid; Kubaty, Anna; Bręborowicz, Grzegorz H

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the study was to compare effects of addition of two methods of ductus venosus (DV) flow assessment: qualitative - the assessment of shape of the A-wave (positive or negative), and quantitative - based on the pulsatility index for veins (DVPI) to the basic screening for trisomy 21 at 11 to 13 + 6 weeks of pregnancy. The ultrasound examination was performed in 8230 fetuses in singleton pregnancies at 11- -13 + 6 wks, as a part of a routine screening for chromosomal defects. In DV A-wave was assessed and DVPI was calculated. After the scan blood sample was taken for first trimester biochemistry (BC). Risk for chromosomal defects was calculated and high-risk patients were offered an invasive test for karyotyping. Basic screening with following combination of markers: MA, NT and BC provided lowest detection rate (DR) 87.50% for FPR = 6.94%. After adding qualitative DV A-wave assessment DR increased to 88.75% for FPR = 5.65%. The best DR = 93.75% for FPR = 5.55% was achieved when quantitative DVPI was added. The application of the Receiver Operating Curves curve confirmed validity of the addition of DV flow assessment to the screening model. The highest diagnostic power of the test was achieved when DVPI was added, with the ROC AUC of 0.974. The assessment of DV flow performed at 11-13 + 6 weeks increases DR for trisomy 21 and reduces FPR. The screening model based on the quantitative DV flow analysis (DVPI) gives better results compared to the qualitative flow assessment.

  2. Vapor condensation device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakurai, Manabu; Hirayama, Fumio; Kurosawa, Setsumi; Yoshikawa, Jun; Hosaka, Seiichi.

    1992-01-01

    The present invention enables to separate and remove 14 C as CO 3 - ions without condensation in a vapor condensation can of a nuclear facility. That is, the vapor condensation device of the nuclear facility comprises (1) a spray pipe for spraying an acidic aqueous solution to the evaporation surface of an evaporation section, (2) a spray pump for sending the acidic aqueous solution to the spray pipe, (3) a tank for storing the acidic aqueous solution, (4) a pH sensor for detecting pH of the evaporation section, (5) a pH control section for controlling the spray pump, depending on the result of the detection of the pH sensor. With such a constitution, the pH of liquid wastes on the vaporization surface is controlled to 7 by spraying an aqueous solution of dilute sulfuric acid to the evaporation surface, thereby enabling to increase the transfer rate of 14 C to condensates to 60 to 70%. If 14 C is separated and removed as a CO 2 gas from the evaporation surface, the pH of the liquid wastes returns to the alkaline range of 9 to 10 and the liquid wastes are returned to a heating section. The amount of spraying the aqueous solution of dilute sulfuric acid can be controlled till the pH is reduced to 5. (I.S.)

  3. The vapor pressures of explosives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ewing, Robert G.; Waltman, Melanie J.; Atkinson, David A.; Grate, Jay W.; Hotchkiss, Peter

    2013-01-05

    The vapor pressures of many explosive compounds are extremely low and thus determining accurate values proves difficult. Many researchers, using a variety of methods, have measured and reported the vapor pressures of explosives compounds at single temperatures, or as a function of temperature using vapor pressure equations. There are large variations in reported vapor pressures for many of these compounds, and some errors exist within individual papers. This article provides a review of explosive vapor pressures and describes the methods used to determine them. We have compiled primary vapor pressure relationships traceable to the original citations and include the temperature ranges for which they have been determined. Corrected values are reported as needed and described in the text. In addition, after critically examining the available data, we calculate and tabulate vapor pressures at 25 °C.

  4. VAPOR PRESSURES AND HEATS OF VAPORIZATION OF PRIMARY COAL TARS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eric M. Suuberg; Vahur Oja

    1997-07-01

    This project had as its main focus the determination of vapor pressures of coal pyrolysis tars. It involved performing measurements of these vapor pressures and from them, developing vapor pressure correlations suitable for use in advanced pyrolysis models (those models which explicitly account for mass transport limitations). This report is divided into five main chapters. Each chapter is a relatively stand-alone section. Chapter A reviews the general nature of coal tars and gives a summary of existing vapor pressure correlations for coal tars and model compounds. Chapter B summarizes the main experimental approaches for coal tar preparation and characterization which have been used throughout the project. Chapter C is concerned with the selection of the model compounds for coal pyrolysis tars and reviews the data available to us on the vapor pressures of high boiling point aromatic compounds. This chapter also deals with the question of identifying factors that govern the vapor pressures of coal tar model materials and their mixtures. Chapter D covers the vapor pressures and heats of vaporization of primary cellulose tars. Chapter E discusses the results of the main focus of this study. In summary, this work provides improved understanding of the volatility of coal and cellulose pyrolysis tars. It has resulted in new experimentally verified vapor pressure correlations for use in pyrolysis models. Further research on this topic should aim at developing general vapor pressure correlations for all coal tars, based on their molecular weight together with certain specific chemical characteristics i.e. hydroxyl group content.

  5. On the vapor-liquid equilibrium in hydroprocessing reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, J.; Munteanu, M.; Farooqi, H. [National Centre for Upgrading Technology, Devon, AB (Canada)

    2009-07-01

    When petroleum distillates undergo hydrotreating and hydrocracking, the feedstock and hydrogen pass through trickle-bed catalytic reactors at high temperatures and pressures with large hydrogen flow. As such, the oil is partially vaporized and the hydrogen is partially dissolved in liquid to form a vapor-liquid equilibrium (VLE) system with both vapor and liquid phases containing oil and hydrogen. This may result in considerable changes in flow rates, physical properties and chemical compositions of both phases. Flow dynamics, mass transfer, heat transfer and reaction kinetics may also be modified. Experimental observations of VLE behaviours in distillates with different feedstocks under a range of operating conditions were presented. In addition, VLE was predicted along with its effects on distillates in pilot and commercial scale plants. tabs., figs.

  6. A Local Propagation for Vapor Explosions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ochiai, M.; Bankoff, S.G.

    1976-01-01

    Explosive boiling, defined as energy transfer leading to formation of vapor rapidly enough to produce large shock waves, has been widely studied in a number of contexts. Depending upon the nature and temperatures of the liquids and mode of contacting, large-scale mixing and explosive vaporization may occur, or alternatively, only relatively non-energetic, film-type boiling may exist. The key difference is whether a mechanism is operative for increasing the liquid-liquid interfacial area in a time scale consistent with the formation of a detonation wave. Small drops of a cold volatile liquid were dropped onto a free surface of a hot, non-volatile liquid. The critical Weber number for coalescence is obtained from the envelope of the film boiling region. Markedly different behavior for the two hot liquids is observed. A 'splash' theory for local propagation of vapor explosions in spontaneously nucleating liquid-liquid systems is now formulated. After a random contact is made, explosive growth and coalescence of the vapor bubbles occurs as soon as the surrounding pressure is relieved, resulting in a high-pressure vapor layer at the liquid-liquid contact area. This amounts to an impact pressure applied to the free surface, with a resulting velocity distribution obtained from potential flow theory. The peak pressure predictions are. consistent with data for Freon-oil mixing, but further evaluation will await additional experimental data. Nevertheless, the current inference is that a UO 2 -Na vapor explosion in a reactor environment cannot be visualized. In conclusion: The propagation model presented here differs in some details from that of Henry and Fauske, although both are consistent with some peak pressure data obtained by Henry, et al. Clearly, additional experimental information is needed for further evaluation of these theories. Nevertheless, it should be emphasized that even at this time a number of important observations concerning the requirements for a vapor

  7. Techniques for the generation and monitoring of vapors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, G.O.

    1981-01-01

    Controlled test atmospheres can be produced using a variety of techniques. Gases are usually generated by using flow dilution methods while vapors are produced by using solvent injection and vaporization, saturation, permeation and diffusion techniques. The resulting gas mixtures can be monitored and measured using flame ionization, photoionization, electrochemical and infrared analytical systems. An ideal system for the production of controlled test atmospheres would not only be able to generate controlled test atmospheres, but also monitor all pertinent environmental parameters, such as temperature, humidity, and air flow

  8. Tritium-gas/water-vapor monitor. Tests and evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jalbert, R.A.

    1982-07-01

    A tritium gas/water-vapor monitor was designed and built by the Health Physics Group at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. In its prototype configuration, the monitor took the shape of two separate instruments: a (total) tritium monitor and a water-vapor monitor. Both instruments were tested and evaluated. The tests of the (total) tritium monitor, basically an improved version of the standard flow-through ion-chamber instrument, are briefly reported here and more completely elsewhere. The tests of the water-vapor monitor indicated that the novel approach used to condense water vapor for scintillation counting has a number of serious drawbacks and that further development of the instrument is unwarranted

  9. A study on vapor explosions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takagi, N.; Shoji, M.

    1979-01-01

    An experimental study was carried out for vapor explosions of molten tin falling in water. For various initial metal temperatures and subcooling of water, transient pressure of the explosions, relative frequency of the explosions and the position where the explosions occur were measured in detail. The influence of ambient pressure was also investigated. From the results, it was concluded that the vapor explosion is closely related to the collapse of a vapor film around the molten metal. (author)

  10. Nuclear system vaporization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bougault, R.; Brou, R.; Colin, J.; Cussol, D.; Durand, D.; Le Brun, C.; Lecolley, J.F.; Lopez, O.; Louvel, M.; Nakagawa, T.; Peter, J.; Regimbart, R.; Steckmeyer, J.C.; Tamain, B.; Vient, E.; Yuasa-Nakagawa, K.; Wieloch, A.

    1998-01-01

    A particular case of the hot nuclei de-excitation is the total nuclear dislocation into light particles (n, p, d, t, 3 He and α). Such events were first observed at bombarding energies lower than 100 MeV/nucleon due to high detection performances of the INDRA multidetector. The light system Ar + Ni was studied at several bombarding energies ranging from 32 to 95 MeV/nucleon. The events associated to a total vaporization of the system occur above the energy threshold of ∼ 50 MeV/nucleon. A study of the form of these events shows that we have essentially two sources. The excitation energy of these sources may be determined by means of the kinematic properties of their de-excitation products. A preliminary study results in excitation energy values of the order 10 - 14 MeV/nucleon. The theoretical calculation based on a statistical model modified to take into account high excitation energies and excited levels in the lightest nuclei predicts that the vaporization of the two partner nuclei in the Ar + Ni system takes place when the excitation energy exceeds 12 MeV/nucleon what is qualitatively in agreement with the values deduced from calorimetric analysis

  11. [Impact of screening and treatment of low systemic blood flow in the prevention of severe intraventricular haemorrhage and/or death in pre-term infants].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oulego Erroz, Ignacio; Alonso Quintela, Paula; Jiménez Gonzalez, Aquilina; Terroba Seara, Sandra; Rodríguez Blanco, Silvia; Rosón Varas, María; Castañón López, Leticia

    2018-04-02

    To assess the effect of a protocolised intervention for low systemic blood flow (SBF) in the occurrence of severe intraventricular haemorrhage (IVH) or death in pre-term infants. A study with a quasi-experimental design with retrospective controls was conducted on pre-term infants of less than 30weeks of gestational age, born between January 2016 and July 2017, who were consecutively included in the intervention period. The control cohort included pre-term infants (born between January 2013 and December 2015) matched by gestational age, birth weight, and gender (two controls for each case). The cases of low SBF diagnosed according to functional echocardiography during the study period received dobutamine (5-10μg/kg/min) for 48hours. The study included 29 cases (intervention period) and 54 controls (pre-intervention period). Ten out of 29 (34.5%) infants received dobutamine for low SBF during the intervention period, with 3/29 (10.3%) cases of severe IVH and/or death compared to 17/54 (31.5%) in the control cohort (p=.032). There was an independent association between the intervention and a decreased occurrence of severe IVH/death after adjusting for confounding factors both in the logistic regression model [OR 0.11 (95%CI: 0.01-0.65), p=.015], as well as in the sensitivity analysis using inverse probability of treatment weighting [OR 0.23 (95%CI: 0.09-0.56); p=.001]. In this study with retrospective controls, a protocolised screening, and treatment for low SBF was associated with a decreased occurrence of severe IVH or death in preterm infants. Large, adequately powered trials, are needed in order to determine whether postnatal interventions directed at low SBF can improve neurological outcomes. Copyright © 2018. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U.

  12. The direct observation of alkali vapor species in biomass combustion and gasification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    French, R J; Dayton, D C; Milne, T A

    1994-01-01

    This report summarizes new data from screening various feedstocks for alkali vapor release under combustion conditions. The successful development of a laboratory flow reactor and molecular beam, mass spectrometer interface is detailed. Its application to several herbaceous and woody feedstocks, as well as a fast-pyrolysis oil, under 800 and 1,100{degrees}C batch combustion, is documented. Chlorine seems to play a large role in the facile mobilization of potassium. Included in the report is a discussion of relevant literature on the alkali problem in combustors and turbines. Highlighted are the phenomena identified in studies on coal and methods that have been applied to alkali speciation. The nature of binding of alkali in coal versus biomass is discussed, together with the implications for the ease of release. Herbaceous species and many agricultural residues appear to pose significant problems in release of alkali species to the vapor at typical combustor temperatures. These problems could be especially acute in direct combustion fired turbines, but may be ameliorated in integrated gasification combined cycles.

  13. Chemical vapor composites (CVC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reagan, P.

    1993-01-01

    The Chemical Vapor Composite, CVC trademark , process fabricates composite material by simply mixing particles (powders and or fibers) with CVD reactants which are transported and co-deposited on a hot substrate. A key feature of the CVC process is the control provided by varing the density, geometry (aspect ratio) and composition of the entrained particles in the matrix material, during deposition. The process can fabricate composite components to net shape (± 0.013 mm) on a machined substrate in a single step. The microstructure of the deposit is described and several examples of different types of particles in the matrix are illustrated. Mechanical properties of SiC composite material fabricated with SiC powder and fiber will be presented. Several examples of low cost ceramic composite products will be shown. (orig.)

  14. Iron bromide vapor laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhanov, V. B.; Shiyanov, D. V.; Trigub, M. V.; Dimaki, V. A.; Evtushenko, G. S.

    2016-03-01

    We have studied the characteristics of a pulsed gas-discharge laser on iron bromide vapor generating radiation with a wavelength of 452.9 nm at a pulse repetition frequency (PRF) of 5-30 kHz. The maximum output power amounted to 10 mW at a PRF within 5-15 kHz for a voltage of 20-25 kV applied to electrodes of the discharge tube. Addition of HBr to the medium produced leveling of the radial profile of emission. Initial weak lasing at a wavelength of 868.9 nm was observed for the first time, which ceased with buildup of the main 452.9-nm line.

  15. Combination downflow-upflow vapor-liquid separator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kidwell, John H. (Uniontown, OH); Prueter, William P. (Alliance, OH); Eaton, Andrew M. (Alliance, OH)

    1987-03-10

    An improved vapor-liquid separator having a vertically disposed conduit for flow of a mixture. A first, second and third plurality of curved arms penetrate and extend within the conduit. A cylindrical member is radially spaced from the conduit forming an annulus therewith and having perforations and a retaining lip at its upper end.

  16. Combination downflow-upflow vapor-liquid separator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kidwell, J.H.; Prueter, W.P.; Eaton, A.M.

    1987-03-10

    An improved vapor-liquid separator is described having a vertically disposed conduit for flow of a mixture. A first, second and third plurality of curved arms penetrate and extend within the conduit. A cylindrical member is radially spaced from the conduit forming an annulus therewith and having perforations and a retaining lip at its upper end. 11 figs.

  17. Quality and Control of Water Vapor Winds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jedlovec, Gary J.; Atkinson, Robert J.

    1996-01-01

    Water vapor imagery from the geostationary satellites such as GOES, Meteosat, and GMS provides synoptic views of dynamical events on a continual basis. Because the imagery represents a non-linear combination of mid- and upper-tropospheric thermodynamic parameters (three-dimensional variations in temperature and humidity), video loops of these image products provide enlightening views of regional flow fields, the movement of tropical and extratropical storm systems, the transfer of moisture between hemispheres and from the tropics to the mid- latitudes, and the dominance of high pressure systems over particular regions of the Earth. Despite the obvious larger scale features, the water vapor imagery contains significant image variability down to the single 8 km GOES pixel. These features can be quantitatively identified and tracked from one time to the next using various image processing techniques. Merrill et al. (1991), Hayden and Schmidt (1992), and Laurent (1993) have documented the operational procedures and capabilities of NOAA and ESOC to produce cloud and water vapor winds. These techniques employ standard correlation and template matching approaches to wind tracking and use qualitative and quantitative procedures to eliminate bad wind vectors from the wind data set. Techniques have also been developed to improve the quality of the operational winds though robust editing procedures (Hayden and Veldon 1991). These quality and control approaches have limitations, are often subjective, and constrain wind variability to be consistent with model derived wind fields. This paper describes research focused on the refinement of objective quality and control parameters for water vapor wind vector data sets. New quality and control measures are developed and employed to provide a more robust wind data set for climate analysis, data assimilation studies, as well as operational weather forecasting. The parameters are applicable to cloud-tracked winds as well with minor

  18. Vapor pressure and enthalpy of vaporization of aliphatic propanediamines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verevkin, Sergey P.; Chernyak, Yury

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► We measured vapor pressure of four aliphatic 1,3-diamines. ► Vaporization enthalpies at 298 K were derived. ► We examined consistency of new and available data in the literature. ► A group-contribution method for prediction was developed. - Abstract: Vapor pressures of four aliphatic propanediamines including N-methyl-1,3-propanediamine (MPDA), N,N-dimethyl-1,3-propanediamine (DMPDA), N,N-diethyl-1,3-propanediamine (DEPDA) and N,N,N′,N′-tetramethyl-1,3-propanediamine (4MPDA) were measured using the transpiration method. The vapor pressures developed in this work and reported in the literature were used to derive molar enthalpy of vaporization values at the reference temperature 298.15 K. An internal consistency check of the enthalpy of vaporization was performed for the aliphatic propanediamines studied in this work. A group-contribution method was developed for the validation and prediction vaporization enthalpies of amines and diamines.

  19. A Citizen's Guide to Vapor Intrusion Mitigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    This guide describes how vapor intrusion is the movement of chemical vapors from contaminated soil and groundwater into nearby buildings.Vapors primarily enter through openings in the building foundation or basement walls.

  20. Vapor pressure measured with inflatable plastic bag

    Science.gov (United States)

    1965-01-01

    Deflated plastic bag in a vacuum chamber measures initial low vapor pressures of materials. The bag captures the test sample vapors and visual observation of the vapor-inflated bag under increasing external pressures yields pertinent data.

  1. Spray Evaporation in Turbulent Flow: Numerical Calculations and Detailed Experiments by Phase-Doppler Anemometry Évaporation de brouillard en flux turbulent : calculs numériques et expériences détaillées par anémometrie de phase-Doppler

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sommerfeld M.

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available The present paper concerns experiments and numerical calculations of an isopropyl-alcohol spray evaporating in a co-flowing turbulent heated air flow. The measurements provided detailed inlet and boundary conditions for the numerical calculations and allowed the validation of the numerical method and models. Phase-Doppler anemometry was used in order to obtain the spatial change of the droplet size distribution and the correlation between droplet size and velocity throughout the flow field. Additionally, a reliable method based on the detection of the signal amplitudes was applied to determine the droplet mass flux. By integration of the droplet mass flux profiles, the global evaporation rates could be determined for different flow conditions. Numerical calculations of the evaporating spray were performed by the Eulerian / Lagrangian approach. The modelling of droplet evaporation is briefly reviewed prior to the description of the applied numerical models and methods. Calculations for a single phase flow showed good agreement with the experiments. Also for all of the droplet phase properties reasonable agreement with the experiments could be achieved and the global evaporation rates agreed well with the measurements. Cet article expose en détail les expériences et les calculs concernant l'évaporation d'isopropanol pulvérisé dans un flux d'air chaud turbulent. Les mesures ont fourni le détail des conditions initiales et des conditions limites pour les calculs numériques ; elles ont également permis de valider la méthode et le modèle. L'anémométrie de phase-Doppler a permis de définir la modification spatiale de la distribution des dimensions de gouttelettes ainsi que la corrélation entre dimension et vitesse des gouttelettes, dans l'ensemble du champ d'écoulement. De plus, une méthode fiable fondée sur la détection des amplitudes de signal a été appliquée afin de déterminer le débit massique des gouttelettes. L

  2. Heat transfer by gas-liquid mixture in forced turbulent flow with weak vaporization of the liquid phase (1962); Transfert de chaleur par melange de liquide et de gaz en convection forcee turbulente avec faible vaporisation de la phase liquide (1962)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huyghe, J; Mondin, G [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Grenoble (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1962-07-01

    The present study deals with measures of heat transfer and pressure drop in two-phase liquid flow. The stream is of annular dispersed type, obtained by introducing a small quantity of liquid in a gas turbulent flow. The heat transfer experiments are performed without vaporization of the liquid phase. A notable improvement of the heat transfer coefficient of such a stream is observed, compared with a gas-alone or liquid-alone flow. The improvement concerning the gas-alone is of about 20 when it is compared with the same gas Reynolds's number, of about 8 when it is compared with the same total mass flow rate. A hydrodynamic study of the flow pattern lets us know the original structure of the flow, and allows to foresee the experimental results by means of a simplified theory. (authors) [French] II est fait etat de mesures de transfert thermique et de perte de charge dans un ecoulement en double phase gaz-liquide. L'ecoulement est du type annulaire disperse, obtenu par injection d'une faible quantite de liquide dans un ecoulement gazeux en regime turbulent. Les experiences de transfert thermique sont menees sans vaporisation de la phase liquide. On note une amelioration sensible du coefficient de transfert thermique dans un tel ecoulement par rapport a un ecoulement de gaz seul ou de liquide seul. L'augmentation est de l'ordre de 20 par rapport au gaz seul si on opere a meme nombre de REYNOLDS du gaz, de l'ordre de 8 si on opere a meme debit massique total. Une etude hydrodynamique rapide de l'ecoulement permet de connaitre la structure originale de l'ecoulement, puis de prevoir par une theorie simplifiee le phenomene thermique observe. (auteurs)

  3. Navier slip model of drag reduction by Leidenfrost vapor layers

    KAUST Repository

    Berry, Joseph D.; Vakarelski, Ivan Uriev; Chan, Derek Y. C.; Thoroddsen, Sigurdur T

    2017-01-01

    Recent experiments found that a hot solid sphere that is able to sustain a stable Leidenfrost vapor layer in a liquid exhibits significant drag reduction during free fall. The variation of the drag coefficient with Reynolds number deviates substantially from the characteristic drag crisis behavior at high Reynolds numbers. Measurements based on liquids of different viscosities show that the onset of the drag crisis depends on the viscosity ratio of the vapor to the liquid. Here we attempt to characterize the complexity of the Leidenfrost vapor layer with respect to its variable thickness and possible vapor circulation within, in terms of the Navier slip model that is defined by a slip length. Such a model can facilitate tangential flow and thereby alter the behavior of the boundary layer. Direct numerical and large eddy simulations of flow past a sphere at moderate to high Reynolds numbers (102≤Re≤4×104) are employed to quantify comparisons with experimental results, including the drag coefficient and the form of the downstream wake on the sphere. This provides a simple one parameter characterization of the drag reduction phenomenon due to a stable vapor layer that envelops a solid body.

  4. Navier slip model of drag reduction by Leidenfrost vapor layers

    KAUST Repository

    Berry, Joseph D.

    2017-10-17

    Recent experiments found that a hot solid sphere that is able to sustain a stable Leidenfrost vapor layer in a liquid exhibits significant drag reduction during free fall. The variation of the drag coefficient with Reynolds number deviates substantially from the characteristic drag crisis behavior at high Reynolds numbers. Measurements based on liquids of different viscosities show that the onset of the drag crisis depends on the viscosity ratio of the vapor to the liquid. Here we attempt to characterize the complexity of the Leidenfrost vapor layer with respect to its variable thickness and possible vapor circulation within, in terms of the Navier slip model that is defined by a slip length. Such a model can facilitate tangential flow and thereby alter the behavior of the boundary layer. Direct numerical and large eddy simulations of flow past a sphere at moderate to high Reynolds numbers (102≤Re≤4×104) are employed to quantify comparisons with experimental results, including the drag coefficient and the form of the downstream wake on the sphere. This provides a simple one parameter characterization of the drag reduction phenomenon due to a stable vapor layer that envelops a solid body.

  5. Boundary vapor contentsin an annular channel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Remizov, O.V.; Shurkin, N.G.; Podgornyj, K.K.; Gal'chenko, Eh.F.; Bukhteev, I.S.

    1978-01-01

    The work is aimed at the experimental investigation of the worsening of the heat transfer in an annular channel. The experiments have been carried out on the annular channel 32x28x3000 mm with the even distribution of the heat flux along the length at pressures of 6.9-19.6 MPa, flow rate of 350-1000 kg/m 2 s, and specific heat fluxes from 0.18 up to 0.6 MW/m 2 . Heating is external, oneside. Water monodistillate of the following composition has been used as a coolant: pH 9; dry residue - 0.8-1.2 mg/kg, oxygen -10-15 mg/kg. It is found out that the change character of the temperature field of the heating surface of the annular channel at the regime with the worsen of heat emission depends on the ratio of regime parameters. At pressures of 6.9-13.7 MPa and flow rate of 350-500 kg/m 2 s the channel wall temperature rises monotoneously, never reaching its maximum. With pressure rise > 13.7 MPa and mass velocity > 500 kg/m 2 s the temperature of the heat emitting surface reaches its maximum, and then slowly falls. At pressures of 6.9-11.8 MPa the boundary vapor content value within the whole range of mass velocities does not depend on the specific heat flux q. At pressures higher than 13.7 MPa and mass velocities of 350-1000 kg/m 2 s the boundary vapor content depends on q. The heating of the external or internal surface of the annular channel affects the value of the boundary vapor content within the whole range of regime parameters' change under investigation

  6. Physical and mathematical modeling of diesel fuel liquid and vapor movement in porous media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, T.E.; Kreamer, D.K.

    1994-01-01

    Two-dimensional physical modeling of diesel fuel leaks was conducted in sand tanks to determine liquid and vapor migration characteristics. Mathematical modeling provided estimation of vapor concentrations at discrete times and distances from the vapor source and was compared to the physical experiment. The mathematical gaseous diffusion model was analogous to the Theis equation for ground-water flow, accounted for sorptive effects of the media, and was calibrated using measured concentrations from the sand tank. Mathematically different positions of the vapor source were tested to better relate observed liquid flow rates and media configuration to gaseous concentrations. The calculated diffusion parameters were then used to estimate theoretical, three-dimensional vapor transport from a hypothetical liquid leak of 2.0 1/hr for 30 days. The associated three-dimensional vapor plume, which would be reasonably detectable by commercially available vadose zone monitors, was estimated to have a diameter of 8 m with a vapor concentration of 50 ppm at the outside edge of the vapor plume. A careful application of the method and values can be used to give a first approximation to the number of vapor monitors required at a field site as well as the optimal locations for the monitors

  7. Experimental study of the spill and vaporization of a volatile liquid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bohl, Douglas; Jackson, Gregory

    2007-01-01

    Pool and vapor cloud characteristics of an acetone spill issuing from the downstream wall of a flow obstruction oriented perpendicular to a uniform flow were investigated experimentally. Data indicate that the spill event was largely governed by the temperature of the surface in relation to the boiling point of the spilled liquid. The free stream velocity (ranging from 0.75 to 3.0 m/s) also impacted the spreading of the spill. Planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) was used to measure acetone vapor concentrations during the transient pool spreading and vaporization in a window 60 cm long by 50 cm high and located downstream of the 16 cm high obstruction. The recirculation region induced by the flow obstruction caused upstream transport of the acetone vapor along the spill surface, after which it was convected vertically along the obstruction wall before being entrained into the flow and convected downstream. The recirculating flow caused regions of vapor within the flammability limits to be localized near the flow obstruction. These regions moved into and out of the measurement plane by large three-dimensional flow structures. The flammable region of the evolved vapor cloud was observed to grow well past the downstream edge of the measurement domain. With decreasing wind speeds, both the mass of acetone vapor within the flammability limits and the total spill event time increased significantly. The data presented herein provides a basis for validating future spill models of hazardous chemical releases, where complex turbulent flow modeling must be coupled with spill spreading and vaporization dynamics

  8. Dimers in nucleating vapors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lushnikov, A. A.; Kulmala, M.

    1998-09-01

    The dimer stage of nucleation may affect considerably the rate of the nucleation process at high supersaturation of the nucleating vapor. Assuming that the dimer formation limits the nucleation rate, the kinetics of the particle formation-growth process is studied starting with the definition of dimers as bound states of two associating molecules. The partition function of dimer states is calculated by summing the Boltzmann factor over all classical bound states, and the equilibrium population of dimers is found for two types of intermolecular forces: the Lennard-Jones (LJ) and rectangular well+hard core (RW) potentials. The principle of detailed balance is used for calculating the evaporation rate of dimers. The kinetics of the particle formation-growth process is then investigated under the assumption that the trimers are stable with respect to evaporation and that the condensation rate is a power function of the particle mass. If the power exponent λ=n/(n+1) (n is a non-negative integer), the kinetics of the process is described by a finite set of moments of particle mass distribution. When the characteristic time of the particle formation by nucleation is much shorter than that of the condensational growth, n+2 universal functions of a nondimensional time define the kinetic process. These functions are calculated for λ=2/3 (gas-to-particle conversion in the free molecular regime) and λ=1/2 (formation of islands on surfaces).

  9. Method of purifying zirconium tetrachloride and hafnium tetrachloride in a vapor stream

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snyder, T.S.; Stolz, R.A.

    1992-01-01

    This patent describes a method of purifying zirconium tetrachloride and hafnium tetrachloride in a vapor stream from a sand chlorinator in which the silicon and metals present in sand fed to the chlorinator are converted to chlorides at temperatures over about 800 degrees C. It comprises cooling a vapor stream from a sand chlorinator, the vapor stream containing principally silicon tetrachloride, zirconium tetrachloride, and hafnium tetrachloride contaminated with ferric chloride, to a temperature of from about 335 degrees C to about 600 degrees C; flowing the vapor stream through a gaseous diffusion separative barrier to produce a silicon tetrachloride-containing vapor stream concentrated in zirconium tetrachloride and hafnium tetrachloride and a silicon tetrachloride-containing vapor stream depleted in zirconium tetrachloride and hafnium tetrachloride; adsorbing the ferric chloride in the separative barrier; and recovering the silicon tetrachloride stream concentrated in zirconium tetrachloride and hafnium tetrachloride separately from the silicon tetrachloride stream depleted in zirconium tetrachloride and hafnium tetrachloride

  10. CONDENSATION OF WATER VAPOR IN A VERTICAL TUBE CONDENSER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Havlík

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an analysis of heat transfer in the process of condensation of water vapor in a vertical shell-and-tube condenser. We analyze the use of the Nusselt model for calculating the condensation heat transfer coefficient (HTC inside a vertical tube and the Kern, Bell-Delaware and Stream-flow analysis methods for calculating the shell-side HTC from tubes to cooling water. These methods are experimentally verified for a specific condenser of waste process vapor containing air. The operating conditions of the condenser may be different from the assumptions adopted in the basic Nusselt theory. Modifications to the Nusselt condensation model are theoretically analyzed.

  11. Vaporization of tungsten-metal in steam at high temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greene, G.A.; Finfrock, C.C.

    2000-01-01

    The vaporization of tungsten from the APT spallation target dominates the radiological source term for unmitigated target overheating accidents. Chemical reactions of tungsten with steam which persist to tungsten temperatures as low as 800 C result in the formation of a hydrated tungsten-oxide which has a high vapor pressure and is readily convected in a flowing atmosphere. This low-temperature vaporization reaction essentially removes the oxide film that forms on the tungsten-metal surface as soon as it forms, leaving behind a fresh metallic surface for continued oxidation and vaporization. Experiments were conducted to measure the oxidative vaporization rates of tungsten in steam as part of the effort to quantify the MT radiological source term for severe target accidents. Tests were conducted with tungsten rods (1/8 inch diameter, six inches long) heated to temperatures from approximately 700 C to 1350 C in flowing steam which was superheated to 140 C. A total of 19 experiments was conducted. Fifteen tests were conducted by RF induction heating of single tungsten rods held vertical in a quartz glass retort. Four tests were conducted in a vertically-mounted tube furnace for the low temperature range of the test series. The aerosol which was generated and transported downstream from the tungsten rods was collected by passing the discharged steam through a condenser. This procedure insured total collection of the steam along with the aerosol from the vaporization of the rods. The results of these experiments revealed a threshold temperature for tungsten vaporization in steam. For the two tests at the lowest temperatures which were tested, approximately 700 C, the tungsten rods were observed to oxidize without vaporization. The remainder of the tests was conducted over the temperature range of 800 C to 1350 C. In these tests, the rods were found to have lost weight due to vaporization of the tungsten and the missing weight was collected in the downstream condensate

  12. Tubing For Sampling Hydrazine Vapor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Travis, Josh; Taffe, Patricia S.; Rose-Pehrsson, Susan L.; Wyatt, Jeffrey R.

    1993-01-01

    Report evaluates flexible tubing used for transporting such hypergolic vapors as those of hydrazines for quantitative analysis. Describes experiments in which variety of tubing materials, chosen for their known compatibility with hydrazine, flexibility, and resistance to heat.

  13. Vapor trap for liquid metal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watanabe, T

    1968-05-22

    In a pipe system which transfers liquid metal, inert gas (cover gas) is packed above the surface of the liquid metal to prevent oxidization of the liquid. If the metal vapor is contained in such cover gas, the circulating system of the cover gas is blocked due to condensation of liquid metal inside the system. The present invention relates to an improvement in vapor trap to remove the metal vapor from the cover gas. The trap consists of a cylindrical outer body, an inlet nozzle which is deeply inserted inside the outer body and has a number of holes to inject the cove gas into the body, metal mesh or steel wool which covers the exterior of the nozzle and on which the condensation of the metal gas takes place, and a heater wire hich is wound around the nozzle to prevent condensation of the metal vapor at the inner peripheral side of the mesh.

  14. The development of substitute inks and controls for reducing workplace concentrations of organic solvent vapors in a vinyl shower curtain printing plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piltingsrud, Harley V; Zimmer, Anthony T; Rourke, Aaron B

    2003-08-01

    During the summer of 1994, football players at a practice field reported noxious odors in the area. Ohio Environmental Protection Agency (OEPA) investigations of industries surrounding the field included a printing facility producing vinyl shower curtains with screen-printed designs. Though not the source of the odor, they were discharging volatile organic compounds directly to the environs in violation of OEPA regulations. To achieve compliance they installed a catalytic oxidizer for treating discharged air. Due to high equipment costs, the capacity of the installed catalytic oxidizer resulted in a substantial reduction in discharged air flow rates and increased solvent vapor concentrations within the workplace. Vapor levels caused worker discomfort, prompting a request for assistance from the Ohio Bureau of Workers Compensation. The vapor concentrations were found to exceed NIOSH, OSHA, and ACGIH acceptable exposure levels. The workers were then required to wear organic vapor removing respirators full-time while printing as a temporary protective measure. The company requested NIOSH assistance in finding methods to reduce solvent vapor concentrations. NIOSH studies included the identification of the sources and relative magnitude of solvent emissions from the printing process, the design of controls for the emissions, and the development of substitute inks using non-photochemically reactive solvents. The new ink system and controls allowed OEPA removal of the requirement for the treatment of discharged air and substantial increases in dilution ventilation. Increased ventilation would permit reduction in worker exposures to less than 1/3 mixture TLV levels and removal of requirements for respirator usage. This solution was the result of a comprehensive review of all facets of the problem, including OEPA regulations. It also required cooperative work between the company and federal, state, and local governmental agencies.

  15. Vapor plume oscillation mechanisms in transient keyhole during tandem dual beam fiber laser welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xin; Zhang, Xiaosi; Pang, Shengyong; Hu, Renzhi; Xiao, Jianzhong

    2018-01-01

    Vapor plume oscillations are common physical phenomena that have an important influence on the welding process in dual beam laser welding. However, until now, the oscillation mechanisms of vapor plumes remain unclear. This is primarily because mesoscale vapor plume dynamics inside a millimeter-scale, invisible, and time-dependent keyhole are difficult to quantitatively observe. In this paper, based on a developed three-dimensional (3D) comprehensive model, the vapor plume evolutions in a dynamical keyhole are directly simulated in tandem dual beam, short-wavelength laser welding. Combined with the vapor plume behaviors outside the keyhole observed by high-speed imaging, the vapor plume oscillations in dynamical keyholes at different inter-beam distances are the first, to our knowledge, to be quantitatively analyzed. It is found that vapor plume oscillations outside the keyhole mainly result from vapor plume instabilities inside the keyhole. The ejection velocity at the keyhole opening and dynamical behaviors outside the keyhole of a vapor plume both violently oscillate with the same order of magnitude of high frequency (several kHz). Furthermore, the ejection speed at the keyhole opening and ejection area outside the keyhole both decrease as the beam distance increases, while the degree of vapor plume instability first decreases and then increases with increasing beam distance from 0.6 to 1.0 mm. Moreover, the oscillation mechanisms of a vapor plume inside the dynamical keyhole irradiated by dual laser beams are investigated by thoroughly analyzing the vapor plume occurrence and flow process. The vapor plume oscillations in the dynamical keyhole are found to mainly result from violent local evaporations and severe keyhole geometry variations. In short, the quantitative method and these findings can serve as a reference for further understanding of the physical mechanisms in dual beam laser welding and of processing optimizations in industrial applications.

  16. Melt and vapor characteristics in an electron beam evaporator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blumenfeld, L.; Fleche, J.L.; Gonella, C.; Soubbaramayer

    1994-12-31

    Two different approaches have been compared for the calculation of the free surface temperature Ts in cerium or copper evaporation experiments: the first method considers properties of the melt: an empirical law is used to take into account turbulent thermal convection, instabilities and characterization of the free surface. The second method considers the vapor flow expansion and connects Ts to the measured terminal temperature and terminal mean parallel velocity of the vapor jet, by direct simulation Monte Carlo calculations including an atom-atom inelastic collision algorithm. The agreement between the two approaches is better for cerium than for copper in the high characterization case. The analysis, from the point of view of the properties of the melt, of the terminal parameters of the vapor jet for the high beam powers shows that Ts and the Knudsen number at the vapour source reach a threshold when the beam power increases. (author). 12 figs., 1 tab., 21 refs.

  17. Acoustic droplet vaporization of vascular droplets in gas embolotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bull, Joseph

    2016-11-01

    This work is primarily motivated by a developmental gas embolotherapy technique for cancer treatment. In this methodology, infarction of tumors is induced by selectively formed vascular gas bubbles that arise from the acoustic vaporization of vascular droplets. Additionally, micro- or nano-droplets may be used as vehicles for localized drug delivery, with or without flow occlusion. In this talk, we examine the dynamics of acoustic droplet vaporization through experiments and theoretical/computational fluid mechanics models, and investigate the bioeffects of acoustic droplet vaporization on endothelial cells and in vivo. Functionalized droplets that are targeted to tumor vasculature are examined. The influence of fluid mechanical and acoustic parameters, as well as droplet functionalization, is explored. This work was supported by NIH Grant R01EB006476.

  18. Melting temperature, vapor density, and vapor pressure of molybdenum pentafluoride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krause, Jr, R F; Douglas, T B [National Bureau of Standards, Washington, D.C. (USA). Inst. for Materials Research

    1977-12-01

    A sample of MoF/sub 5/ was prepared by reaction of MoF/sub 6/(g) and Mo(c). Melting curves of temperature against time established the melting temperature at zero impurity to be 318.85 K, the enthalpy of fusion to be 6.1 kJ mol/sup -1/ (+ - 5 per cent), and the cryoscopic impurity of the sample to be 0.15 mole per cent. In the presence of MoF/sub 6/(g) which was added to suppress disproportionation, the vapor density of MoF/sub 5/ over the liquid was measured by the transpiration method at 343, 363, and 383 K, the total MoF/sub 5/ that evaporated being determined by permanganate titration. The total vapor pressure of MoF/sub 5/ oligomers over the liquid was measured by a simple static method at 373 and 392 K, while melting temperatures were taken alternately to monitor possible contamination of the sample. Although the vapor pressures were adjusted for disproportionation, solution of MoF/sub 6/ in MoF/sub 5/ (1), and wall adsorption of MoF/sub 6/ their percentage uncertainty is probably several times that of the vapor densities. A combination of the two properties indicates the average extent of association of the saturated vapor to be near 2, which is the value for the dimer species (MoF/sub 5/)/sub 2/.

  19. Toxicology screen

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003578.htm Toxicology screen To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. A toxicology screen refers to various tests that determine the ...

  20. Radionuclide transport as vapor through unsaturated fractured rock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, R.T.

    1986-01-01

    The objective of this study is to identify and examine potential mechanisms of radionuclide transport as vapor at a high-level radioactive waste repository located in unsaturated fractured rock. Transport mechanisms and processes have been investigated near the repository and at larger distances. Transport mechanisms potentially important at larger distances include ordinary diffusion, viscous flow and free convection. Ordinary diffusion includes self and binary diffusion, Knudsen flow and surface diffusion. Pressure flow and slip flow comprise viscous flow. Free convective flow results from a gas density contrast. Transport mechanisms or processes dominant near the repository include ordinary diffusion, viscous flow plus several mechanisms whose driving forces arise from the non-isothermal, radioactive nature of high-level waste. The additional mechanisms include forced diffusion, aerosol transport, thermal diffusion and thermophoresis. Near a repository vapor transport mechanisms and processes can provide a significant means of transport from a failed canister to the geologic medium from which other processes can transport radionuclides to the accessible environment. These issues are believed to be important factors that must be addressed in the assessment of specific engineering designs and site selection of any proposed HLW repository

  1. Ultrasound-assisted vapor generation of mercury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ribeiro, Anderson S.; Vieira, Mariana A. [Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, Departamento de Quimica, Florianopolis, SC (Brazil); Willie, Scott; Sturgeon, Ralph E. [National Research Council Canada, Institute for National Measurement Standards, Ottawa, ON (Canada)

    2007-06-15

    Cold vapor generation arising from reduction of both Hg{sup 2+} and CH{sub 3}Hg{sup +} occurs using ultrasonic (US) fields of sufficient density to achieve both localized heating as well as radical-based attack in solutions of formic and acetic acids and tetramethylammonium hydroxide (TMAH). A batch sonoreactor utilizing an ultrasonic probe as an energy source and a flow through system based on a US bath were optimized for this purpose. Reduction of CH{sub 3}Hg{sup +} to Hg{sup 0} occurs only at relatively high US field density (>10 W cm{sup -3} of sample solution) and is thus not observed when a conventional US bath is used for cold vapor generation. Speciation of mercury is thus possible by altering the power density during the measurement process. Thermal reduction of Hg{sup 2+} is efficient in formic acid and TMAH at 70 C and occurs in the absence of the US field. Room temperature studies with the batch sonoreactor reveal a slow reduction process, producing temporally broad signals having an efficiency of approximately 68% of that arising from use of a conventional SnCl{sub 2} reduction system. Molecular species of mercury are generated at high concentrations of formic and acetic acid. Factors affecting the generation of Hg{sup 0} were optimized and the batch sonoreactor used for the determination of total mercury in SLRS-4 river water reference material. (orig.)

  2. Ultrasound-assisted vapor generation of mercury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Anderson S; Vieira, Mariana A; Willie, Scott; Sturgeon, Ralph E

    2007-06-01

    Cold vapor generation arising from reduction of both Hg(2+) and CH(3)Hg(+) occurs using ultrasonic (US) fields of sufficient density to achieve both localized heating as well as radical-based attack in solutions of formic and acetic acids and tetramethylammonium hydroxide (TMAH). A batch sonoreactor utilizing an ultrasonic probe as an energy source and a flow through system based on a US bath were optimized for this purpose. Reduction of CH(3)Hg(+) to Hg(0) occurs only at relatively high US field density (>10 W cm(-3) of sample solution) and is thus not observed when a conventional US bath is used for cold vapor generation. Speciation of mercury is thus possible by altering the power density during the measurement process. Thermal reduction of Hg(2+) is efficient in formic acid and TMAH at 70 degrees C and occurs in the absence of the US field. Room temperature studies with the batch sonoreactor reveal a slow reduction process, producing temporally broad signals having an efficiency of approximately 68% of that arising from use of a conventional SnCl(2) reduction system. Molecular species of mercury are generated at high concentrations of formic and acetic acid. Factors affecting the generation of Hg(0) were optimized and the batch sonoreactor used for the determination of total mercury in SLRS-4 river water reference material.

  3. Measurement of vapor behavior in tight-lattice bundles by neutron radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kureta, Masatoshi; Akimoto, Hajime

    2004-01-01

    Three-dimensional and instantaneous void fractions in tight-lattice 7-rod and 14-rod bundles were measured by neutron radiography in order to make clear the flow behavior and to verify the advanced fine-mesh numerical analysis codes for the R and D of the Reduced-Moderation Water Reactors (RMWR). Time-averaged 3D void fraction distribution is evaluated with the spatial resolution of 0.1 - 0.2 mm using neutron tomography, and consecutive change of vapor behavior is observed quantitatively with time step of 1 ms using high-frame-rate neutron radiography (HFR-NR). In this paper, void fraction distribution and vapor behavior of flow boiling of water in tight-lattice rod bundles are focused on and discussed based on the obtained results. 'High void fraction spot', 'void drift phenomenon', and 'vapor chimney' were observed under atmospheric pressure conditions. Here, 'high void fraction spot' indicates that high void fraction regions are appeared between adjacent rods, narrow space, at/near point of net vapor generation region. 'Void drift' and 'vapor chimney' represent that high void fraction region moves to wide triangular space and is formed a vapor flow channel so-called 'vapor chimney'. It was confirmed from the time-averaged 3D data that void fraction in the center is higher than that in the periphery. On the other hand, it was found from the HFR-NR experiments that big vapor bubbles and/or cluster flow upward intermittently not only in the center but in the periphery of the channel and, therefore, point of net vapor generation is scattered statistically in wide region. (author)

  4. Using screen-based simulation of inhaled anaesthetic delivery to improve patient care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philip, J H

    2015-12-01

    Screen-based simulation can improve patient care by giving novices and experienced clinicians insight into drug behaviour. Gas Man(®) is a screen-based simulation program that depicts pictorially and graphically the anaesthetic gas and vapour tension from the vaporizer to the site of action, namely the brain and spinal cord. The gases and vapours depicted are desflurane, enflurane, ether, halothane, isoflurane, nitrogen, nitrous oxide, sevoflurane, and xenon. Multiple agents can be administered simultaneously or individually and the results shown on an overlay graph. Practice exercises provide in-depth knowledge of the subject matter. Experienced clinicians can simulate anaesthesia occurrences and practices for application to their clinical practice, and publish the results to benefit others to improve patient care. Published studies using this screen-based simulation have led to a number of findings, as follows: changing from isoflurane to desflurane toward the end of anaesthesia does not accelerate recovery in humans; vital capacity induction can produce loss of consciousness in 45 s; simulated context-sensitive decrement times explain recovery profiles; hyperventilation does not dramatically speed emergence; high fresh gas flow is wasteful; fresh gas flow and not the vaporizer setting should be reduced during intubation; re-anaesthetization can occur with severe hypoventilation after extubation; and in re-anaesthetization, the anaesthetic redistributes from skeletal muscle. Researchers using screen-based simulations can study fewer subjects to reach valid conclusions that impact clinical care. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Journal of Anaesthesia. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. Thermal plasma chemical vapor deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heberlein, J.; Pfender, E.

    1993-01-01

    Thermal plasmas, with temperatures up to and even exceeding 10 4 K, are capable of producing high density vapor phase precursors for the deposition of relatively thick films. Although this technology is still in its infancy, it will fill the void between the relatively slow deposition processes such as physical vapor deposition and the high rate thermal spray deposition processes. In this chapter, the present state-of-the-art of this field is reviewed with emphasis on the various types of reactors proposed for this emerging technology. Only applications which attracted particular attention, namely diamond and high T c superconducting film deposition, are discussed in greater detail. (orig.)

  6. Optimization of Xenon Difluoride Vapor Delivery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sweeney, Joseph; Marganski, Paul; Kaim, Robert; Wodjenski, Mike; Gregg, John; Yedave, Sharad; Sergi, Steve; Bishop, Steve; Eldridge, David; Zou Peng

    2008-01-01

    Xenon difluoride (XeF 2 ) has been shown to provide many process benefits when used as a daily maintenance recipe for ion implant. Regularly flowing XeF 2 into the ion source cleans the deposits generated by ion source operation. As a result, significant increases in productivity have been demonstrated. However, XeF 2 is a toxic oxidizer that must be handled appropriately. Furthermore, it is a low vapor pressure solid under standard conditions (∼4.5 torr at 25 deg. C). These aspects present unique challenges for designing a package for delivering the chemistry to an ion implanter. To address these challenges, ATMI designed a high-performance, re-usable cylinder for dispensing XeF 2 in an efficient and reliable manner. Data are presented showing specific attributes of the cylinder, such as the importance of internal heat transfer media and the cylinder valve size. The impact of mass flow controller (MFC) selection and ion source tube design on the flow rate of XeF 2 are also discussed. Finally, cylinder release rate data are provided.

  7. The influence of liquid/vapor phase change onto the Nusselt number

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popescu, Elena-Roxana; Colin, Catherine; Tanguy, Sebastien

    2017-11-01

    In spite of its significant interest in various fields, there is currently a very few information on how an external flow will modify the evaporation or the condensation of a liquid surface. Although most applications involve turbulent flows, the simpler configuration where a laminar superheated or subcooled vapor flow is shearing a saturated liquid interface has still never been solved. Based on a numerical approach, we propose to characterize the interaction between a laminar boundary layer of a superheated or subcooled vapor flow and a static liquid pool at saturation temperature. By performing a full set of simulations sweeping the parameters space, correlations are proposed for the first time on the Nusselt number depending on the dimensionless numbers that characterize both vaporization and condensation. As attended, the Nusselt number decreases or increases in the configurations involving respectively vaporization or condensation. More unexpected is the behaviour of the friction of the vapor flow on the liquid pool, for which we report that it is weakly affected by the phase change, despite the important variation of the local flow structure due to evaporation or condensation.

  8. Dynamic Leidenfrost temperature on micro-textured surfaces: Acoustic wave absorption into thin vapor layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jerng, Dong Wook; Kim, Dong Eok

    2018-01-01

    The dynamic Leidenfrost phenomenon is governed by three types of pressure potentials induced via vapor hydrodynamics, liquid dynamic pressure, and the water hammer effect resulting from the generation of acoustic waves at the liquid-vapor interface. The prediction of the Leidenfrost temperature for a dynamic droplet needs quantitative evaluation and definition for each of the pressure fields. In particular, the textures on a heated surface can significantly affect the vapor hydrodynamics and the water hammer pressure. We present a quantitative model for evaluating the water hammer pressure on micro-textured surfaces taking into account the absorption of acoustic waves into the thin vapor layer. The model demonstrates that the strength of the acoustic flow into the liquid droplet, which directly contributes to the water hammer pressure, depends on the magnitude of the acoustic resistance (impedance) in the droplet and the vapor region. In consequence, the micro-textures of the surface and the increased spacing between them reduce the water hammer coefficient ( kh ) defined as the ratio of the acoustic flow into the droplet to total generated flow. Aided by numerical calculations that solve the laminar Navier-Stokes equation for the vapor flow, we also predict the dynamic Leidenfrost temperature on a micro-textured surface with reliable accuracy consistent with the experimental data.

  9. Waste Tank Vapor Project: Tank vapor database development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seesing, P.R.; Birn, M.B.; Manke, K.L.

    1994-09-01

    The objective of the Tank Vapor Database (TVD) Development task in FY 1994 was to create a database to store, retrieve, and analyze data collected from the vapor phase of Hanford waste tanks. The data needed to be accessible over the Hanford Local Area Network to users at both Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) and Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). The data were restricted to results published in cleared reports from the laboratories analyzing vapor samples. Emphasis was placed on ease of access and flexibility of data formatting and reporting mechanisms. Because of time and budget constraints, a Rapid Application Development strategy was adopted by the database development team. An extensive data modeling exercise was conducted to determine the scope of information contained in the database. a A SUN Sparcstation 1000 was procured as the database file server. A multi-user relational database management system, Sybase reg-sign, was chosen to provide the basic data storage and retrieval capabilities. Two packages were chosen for the user interface to the database: DataPrism reg-sign and Business Objects trademark. A prototype database was constructed to provide the Waste Tank Vapor Project's Toxicology task with summarized and detailed information presented at Vapor Conference 4 by WHC, PNL, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and Oregon Graduate Institute. The prototype was used to develop a list of reported compounds, and the range of values for compounds reported by the analytical laboratories using different sample containers and analysis methodologies. The prototype allowed a panel of toxicology experts to identify carcinogens and compounds whose concentrations were within the reach of regulatory limits. The database and user documentation was made available for general access in September 1994

  10. Measurement of the enthalpies of vaporization and sublimation of solids aromatic hydrocarbons by differential scanning calorimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rojas, Aaron; Orozco, Eulogio

    2003-01-01

    An experimental procedure is proposed for direct measurement of the heat involved in the vaporization of a solid organic compound above its normal melting temperature. This technique consists on the fusion of a solid aromatic hydrocarbon, which is then vaporized by a sudden decrease of the pressure. The direct register of heat flow as function of time by differential scanning calorimetry allows the quantifying of the enthalpy of vaporization of compounds such as phenanthrene, β-naphthol, pyrene, and anthracene. Enthalpies of vaporization were measured in an isothermal mode over a range of temperatures from 10 to 20 K above the melting temperatures of each compound, while enthalpies of fusion were determined from separate experiments performed in a scanning mode. Enthalpies of sublimation are computed from results of fusion and vaporization, and then compared with results from the literature, which currently are obtained by calorimetric or indirect techniques

  11. Colon cancer screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Screening for colon cancer; Colonoscopy - screening; Sigmoidoscopy - screening; Virtual colonoscopy - screening; Fecal immunochemical test; Stool DNA test; sDNA test; Colorectal cancer - screening; Rectal ...

  12. Estimated vapor pressure for WTP process streams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pike, J. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Poirier, M. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2015-01-01

    Design assumptions during the vacuum refill phase of the Pulsed Jet Mixers (PJMs) in the Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) equate the vapor pressure of all process streams to that of water when calculating the temperature at which the vacuum refill is reduced or eliminated. WTP design authority asked the authors to assess this assumption by performing calculations on proposed feed slurries to calculate the vapor pressure as a function of temperature. The vapor pressure was estimated for each WTP waste group. The vapor pressure suppression caused by dissolved solids is much greater than the increase caused by organic components such that the vapor pressure for all of the waste group compositions is less than that of pure water. The vapor pressure for each group at 145°F ranges from 81% to 98% of the vapor pressure of water. If desired, the PJM could be operated at higher temperatures for waste groups with high dissolved solids that suppress vapor pressure. The SO4 group with the highest vapor pressure suppression could be operated up to 153°F before reaching the same vapor pressure of water at 145°F. However, most groups would reach equivalent vapor pressure at 147 to 148°F. If any of these waste streams are diluted, the vapor pressure can exceed the vapor pressure of water at mass dilution ratios greater than 10, but the overall effect is less than 0.5%.

  13. Distribution of Vapor Pressure in the Vacuum Freeze-Drying Equipment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiwei Zhang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In the big vacuum freeze-drying equipment, the drying rate of materials is uneven at different positions. This phenomenon can be explained by the uneven distribution of vapor pressure in chamber during the freeze-drying process. In this paper, a mathematical model is developed to describe the vapor flow in the passageways either between material plates and in the channel between plate groups. The distribution of vapor pressure along flow passageway is given. Two characteristic factors of passageways are defined to express the effects of structural and process parameters on vapor pressure distribution. The affecting factors and their actions are quantitatively discussed in detail. Two examples are calculated and analyzed. The analysis method and the conclusions are useful to estimate the difference of material drying rate at different parts in equipment and to direct the choice of structural and process parameters.

  14. Hanford soil partitioning and vapor extraction study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yonge, D.; Hossain, A.; Cameron, R.; Ford, H.; Storey, C.

    1996-07-01

    This report describes the testing and results of laboratory experiments conducted to assist the carbon tetrachloride soil vapor extraction project operating in the 200 West Area of the Hanford Site in Richland, Washington. Vapor-phase adsorption and desorption testing was performed using carbon tetrachloride and Hanford Site soils to estimate vapor-soil partitioning and reasonably achievable carbon tetrachloride soil concentrations during active vapor extractions efforts at the 200 West Area. (CCl 4 is used in Pu recovery from aqueous streams.)

  15. Vapor Pressure Data Analysis and Statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-01

    near 8, 2000, and 200, respectively. The A (or a) value is directly related to vapor pressure and will be greater for high vapor pressure materials...1, (10) where n is the number of data points, Yi is the natural logarithm of the i th experimental vapor pressure value, and Xi is the...VAPOR PRESSURE DATA ANALYSIS AND STATISTICS ECBC-TR-1422 Ann Brozena RESEARCH AND TECHNOLOGY DIRECTORATE

  16. The numerical methods for the development of the mixture region in the vapor explosion simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Y.; Ohashi, H.; Akiyama, M. [Univ. of Tokyo (Japan)

    1995-09-01

    An attempt to numerically simulate the process of the vapor explosion with a general multi-component and multi-dimension code is being challenged. Because of the rapid change of the flow field and extremely nonuniform distribution of the components in the system of the vapor explosion, the numerical divergence and diffusion are subject to occur easily. A dispersed component model and a multiregion scheme, by which these difficulties can be effectively overcome, were proposed. The simulations have been performed for the processes of the premixing and the fragmentation propagation in the vapor explosion.

  17. Liquid-Vapor Phase Transition: Thermomechanical Theory, Entropy Stable Numerical Formulation, and Boiling Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-05-01

    vapor bubbles may generate near blades [40]. This is the phenomenon of cavitation and it is still a limiting factor for ship propeller design. Phase...van der Waals theory with hydrodynamics [39]. The fluid equations based on the van der Waals theory are called the Navier-Stokes-Korteweg equations... cavitating flows, the liquid- vapor phase transition induced by pressure variations. A potential challenge for such a simulation is a proper design of open

  18. Formulation and analyses of vaporization and diffusion-controlled combustion of fuel sprays

    OpenAIRE

    Arrieta Sanagustín, Jorge

    2012-01-01

    This dissertation focuses on the modelling of vaporization and combustion of sprays. A general two-continua formulation is given for the numerical computation of spray flows, including the treatment of the droplets as homogenized sources. Group combustion is considered, with the reaction between the fuel coming from the vaporizing droplets and the oxygen of the air modeled in the Burke-Schumann limit of infinitely fast chemical reaction, with nonunity Lewis numbers allowed for the different r...

  19. Method of estimating changes in vapor concentrations continuously generated from two-component organic solvents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hori, Hajime; Ishidao, Toru; Ishimatsu, Sumiyo

    2010-12-01

    We measured vapor concentrations continuously evaporated from two-component organic solvents in a reservoir and proposed a method to estimate and predict the evaporation rate or generated vapor concentrations. Two kinds of organic solvents were put into a small reservoir made of glass (3 cm in diameter and 3 cm high) that was installed in a cylindrical glass vessel (10 cm in diameter and 15 cm high). Air was introduced into the glass vessel at a flow rate of 150 ml/min, and the generated vapor concentrations were intermittently monitored for up to 5 hours with a gas chromatograph equipped with a flame ionization detector. The solvent systems tested in this study were the methanoltoluene system and the ethyl acetate-toluene system. The vapor concentrations of the more volatile component, that is, methanol in the methanol-toluene system and ethyl acetate in the ethyl acetate-toluene system, were high at first, and then decreased with time. On the other hand, the concentrations of the less volatile component were low at first, and then increased with time. A model for estimating multicomponent organic vapor concentrations was developed, based on a theory of vapor-liquid equilibria and a theory of the mass transfer rate, and estimated values were compared with experimental ones. The estimated vapor concentrations were in relatively good agreement with the experimental ones. The results suggest that changes in concentrations of two-component organic vapors continuously evaporating from a liquid reservoir can be estimated by the proposed model.

  20. Estimating enthalpy of vaporization from vapor pressure using Trouton's rule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacLeod, Matthew; Scheringer, Martin; Hungerbühler, Konrad

    2007-04-15

    The enthalpy of vaporization of liquids and subcooled liquids at 298 K (delta H(VAP)) is an important parameter in environmental fate assessments that consider spatial and temporal variability in environmental conditions. It has been shown that delta H(VAP)P for non-hydrogen-bonding substances can be estimated from vapor pressure at 298 K (P(L)) using an empirically derived linear relationship. Here, we demonstrate that the relationship between delta H(VAP)and PL is consistent with Trouton's rule and the ClausiusClapeyron equation under the assumption that delta H(VAP) is linearly dependent on temperature between 298 K and the boiling point temperature. Our interpretation based on Trouton's rule substantiates the empirical relationship between delta H(VAP) degree and P(L) degrees for non-hydrogen-bonding chemicals with subcooled liquid vapor pressures ranging over 15 orders of magnitude. We apply the relationship between delta H(VAP) degrees and P(L) degrees to evaluate data reported in literature reviews for several important classes of semivolatile environmental contaminants, including polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, chlorobenzenes, polychlorinated biphenyls and polychlorinated dibenzo-dioxins and -furans and illustrate the temperature dependence of results from a multimedia model presented as a partitioning map. The uncertainty associated with estimating delta H(VAP)degrees from P(L) degrees using this relationship is acceptable for most environmental fate modeling of non-hydrogen-bonding semivolatile organic chemicals.

  1. Three-dimensional calculation of pollutant migration via compressible two-phase flow, for analysis of the methods of in situ air sparging and soil vapor extraction; Raeumliche Berechnung des Schadstofftransportes mit einer kompressiblen Zweiphasenstroemung zur Untersuchung der Drucklufteinblasung und Bodenluftabsaugung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuepper, S.

    1997-12-01

    In this study an analysis method is presented which allows numerical simulation of in situ air sparging coupled with soil vapor extraction. The improved FE-program takes the following phenomena into account: - Two-phase flow of compressible air and incompressible water - convective-dispersive contamination migration with air and water - transfer of volatile components from liquid phase to gas and water phase - sorption of contaminants onto soil - transfer of contaminants between air and water phase - biological processes. By means of back calculations of the results of laboratory experiments made by Eisele (1989) it was shown that with the developed program GWLCOND some of the necessary parameters for the numerical simulation of remedial systems can be determined. (orig./SR) [Deutsch] In dieser Arbeit wird ein Verfahren vorgestellt, mit dem eine numerische Simulation der Drucklufteinblasung und Bodenluftabsaugung durchgefuehrt werden kann. Das weiterentwickelte FE-Programmsystem beinhaltet folgende Ablaeufe: - Zweiphasenstroemung der kompressiblen Luft- und der inkompressiblen Wasserphase - Konvektiv-dispersiver Schadstofftransport mit der Gas- und der Wasserphase - Uebergang fluessiger Schadstoffe in die Gas- und in die Wasserphase - Sorption der Schadstoffe an der Feststoffphase - Uebergang der Schadstoffe zwischen der Gas- und der Wasserphase - Biologischer Abbau. Anhand der Nachrechnung eines Laborversuches von Eisele (1989) wird gezeigt, wie mit dem entwickelten Transportprogramm GWLCOND ein Teil der fuer die numerische Simulation des Sanierungsverfahrens benoetigten Kennwerte ermittelt werden kann. (orig./SR)

  2. Determination of Chlorinated Solvent Sorption by Porous Material-Application to Trichloroethene Vapor on Cement Mortar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musielak, Marion; Brusseau, Mark L; Marcoux, Manuel; Morrison, Candice; Quintard, Michel

    2014-08-01

    Experiments have been performed to investigate the sorption of trichloroethene (TCE) vapor by concrete material or, more specifically, the cement mortar component. Gas-flow experiments were conducted using columns packed with small pieces of cement mortar obtained from the grinding of typical concrete material. Transport and retardation of TCE at high vapor concentrations (500 mg L -1 ) was compared to that of a non-reactive gas tracer (Sulfur Hexafluoride, SF6). The results show a large magnitude of retardation (retardation factor = 23) and sorption (sorption coefficient = 10.6 cm 3 g -1 ) for TCE, compared to negligible sorption for SF6. This magnitude of sorption obtained with pollutant vapor is much bigger than the one obtained for aqueous-flow experiments conducted for water-saturated systems. The considerable sorption exhibited for TCE under vapor-flow conditions is attributed to some combination of accumulation at the air-water interface and vapor-phase adsorption, both of which are anticipated to be significant for this system given the large surface area associated with the cement mortar. Transport of both SF6 and TCE was simulated successfully with a two-region physical non-equilibrium model, consistent with the dual-medium structure of the crushed cement mortar. This work emphasizes the importance of taking into account sorption phenomena when modeling transport of volatile organic compounds through concrete material, especially in regard to assessing vapor intrusion.

  3. Low temperature synthesis of Zn nanowires by physical vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schroeder, Philipp; Kast, Michael; Brueckl, Hubert [Austrian Research Centers GmbH ARC, Nano- Systemtechnologies, Donau-City-Strasse 1, A-1220 Wien (Austria)

    2007-07-01

    We demonstrate catalytic growth of zinc nanowires by physical vapor deposition at modest temperatures of 125-175 C on various substrates. In contrast to conventional approaches using tube furnaces our home-built growth system allows to control the vapor sources and the substrate temperature separately. The silicon substrates were sputter coated with a thin gold layer as metal catalyst. The samples were heated to the growth temperature and subsequently exposed to the zinc vapor at high vacuum conditions. The work pressure was adjusted by the partial pressure of oxygen or argon flow gas. Scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy characterizations revealed that the nanowires exhibit straight, uniform morphology and have diameters in the range of 50-350 nm and lengths up to 70 {mu}m. The Zn nanowires grow independently of the substrates crystal orientation via a catalytic vapor-solid growth mechanism. Since no nanowire formation was observed without gold coating, we expect that the onedimensional growth is initiated by a surface reactive Au seed. ZnO nanowires can be produced in the same preparation chamber by oxidation at 500 C in 1atm (80% Ar, 20% O{sub 2}) for 1 hour. ZnO is highly attractive for sensor applications.

  4. New Regenerative Cycle for Vapor Compression Refrigeration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mark J. Bergander

    2005-08-29

    The main objective of this project is to confirm on a well-instrumented prototype the theoretically derived claims of higher efficiency and coefficient of performance for geothermal heat pumps based on a new regenerative thermodynamic cycle as comparing to existing technology. In order to demonstrate the improved performance of the prototype, it will be compared to published parameters of commercially available geothermal heat pumps manufactured by US and foreign companies. Other objectives are to optimize the design parameters and to determine the economic viability of the new technology. Background (as stated in the proposal): The proposed technology closely relates to EERE mission by improving energy efficiency, bringing clean, reliable and affordable heating and cooling to the residential and commercial buildings and reducing greenhouse gases emission. It can provide the same amount of heating and cooling with considerably less use of electrical energy and consequently has a potential of reducing our nations dependence on foreign oil. The theoretical basis for the proposed thermodynamic cycle was previously developed and was originally called a dynamic equilibrium method. This theory considers the dynamic equations of state of the working fluid and proposes the methods for modification of T-S trajectories of adiabatic transformation by changing dynamic properties of gas, such as flow rate, speed and acceleration. The substance of this proposal is a thermodynamic cycle characterized by the regenerative use of the potential energy of two-phase flow expansion, which in traditional systems is lost in expansion valves. The essential new features of the process are: (1) The application of two-step throttling of the working fluid and two-step compression of its vapor phase. (2) Use of a compressor as the initial step compression and a jet device as a second step, where throttling and compression are combined. (3) Controlled ratio of a working fluid at the first and

  5. Chemically assisted release of transition metals in graphite vaporizers for atomic spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katskov, Dmitri; Darangwa, Nicholas; Grotti, Marco

    2006-01-01

    The processes associated with the vaporization of microgram samples and modifiers in a graphite tube ET AAS were investigated by the example of transition metals. The vapor absorption spectra and vaporization behavior of μg-amounts Cd, Zn, Cu, Ag, Au, Ni, Co, Fe, Mn and Cr were studied using the UV spectrometer with CCD detector, coupled with a continuum radiation source. The pyrocoated, Ta or W lined tubes, with Ar or He as internal gases, and filter furnace were employed in the comparative experiments. It was found that the kinetics of atomic vapor release changed depending on the specific metal-substrate-gas combination; fast vaporization at the beginning was followed by slower 'tailing.' The absorption continuum, overlapped by black body radiation at longer wavelengths, accompanied the fast vaporization mode for all metals, except Cd and Zn. The highest intensity of the continuum was observed in the pyrocoated tube with Ar. For Cu and Ag the molecular bands overlapped the absorption continuum; the continuum and bands were suppressed in the filter furnace. It is concluded that the exothermal interaction of sample vapor with the material of the tube causes the energy evolution in the gas phase. The emitted heat is dispersed near the tube wall in the protective gas and partially transferred back to the surface of the sample, thus facilitating the vaporization. The increased vapor flow causes over-saturation and gas-phase condensation in the absorption volume at some distance from the wall, where the gas temperature is not affected by the reaction. The condensation is accompanied by the release of phase transition energy via black body radiation and atomic emission. The particles of condensate and molecular clusters cause the scattering of light and molecular absorption; slow decomposition of the products of the sample vapor-substrate reaction produces the 'tailing' of atomic absorption signal. The interaction of graphite with metal vapor or oxygen, formed in the

  6. Vapor deposition of tantalum and tantalum compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trkula, M.

    1996-01-01

    Tantalum, and many of its compounds, can be deposited as coatings with techniques ranging from pure, thermal chemical vapor deposition to pure physical vapor deposition. This review concentrates on chemical vapor deposition techniques. The paper takes a historical approach. The authors review classical, metal halide-based techniques and current techniques for tantalum chemical vapor deposition. The advantages and limitations of the techniques will be compared. The need for new lower temperature processes and hence new precursor chemicals will be examined and explained. In the last section, they add some speculation as to possible new, low-temperature precursors for tantalum chemical vapor deposition

  7. What Good is Raman Water Vapor Lidar?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitman, David

    2011-01-01

    Raman lidar has been used to quantify water vapor in the atmosphere for various scientific studies including mesoscale meteorology and satellite validation. Now the international networks of NDACC and GRUAN have interest in using Raman water vapor lidar for detecting trends in atmospheric water vapor concentrations. What are the data needs for addressing these very different measurement challenges. We will review briefly the scientific needs for water vapor accuracy for each of these three applications and attempt to translate that into performance specifications for Raman lidar in an effort to address the question in the title of "What good is Raman water vapor Iidar."

  8. High temperature vapors science and technology

    CERN Document Server

    Hastie, John

    2012-01-01

    High Temperature Vapors: Science and Technology focuses on the relationship of the basic science of high-temperature vapors to some areas of discernible practical importance in modern science and technology. The major high-temperature problem areas selected for discussion include chemical vapor transport and deposition; the vapor phase aspects of corrosion, combustion, and energy systems; and extraterrestrial high-temperature species. This book is comprised of seven chapters and begins with an introduction to the nature of the high-temperature vapor state, the scope and literature of high-temp

  9. Determination of inorganic mercury and total mercury in biological and environmental samples by flow injection-cold vapor-atomic absorption spectrometry using sodium borohydride as the sole reducing agent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rio Segade, Susana; Tyson, Julian F.

    2003-01-01

    A simple, fast, precise and accurate method to determine inorganic mercury and total mercury in biological and environmental samples was developed. The optimized flow-injection mercury system permitted the separate determination of inorganic mercury and total mercury using sodium borohydride as reducing agent. Inorganic mercury was selectively determined after reduction with 10 -4 % w/v sodium borohydride, while total mercury was determined after reduction with 0.75% w/v sodium borohydride. The calibration graphs were linear up to 30 ng ml -1 . The detection limits of the method based on three times the standard deviation of the blank were 24 and 3.9 ng l -1 for total mercury and inorganic mercury determination, respectively. The relative standard deviation was less than 1.5% for a 10 ng ml -1 mercury standard. As a means of checking method performance, deionized water and pond water samples were spiked with methylmercury and inorganic mercury; quantitative recovery for total mercury and inorganic mercury was obtained. The accuracy of the method was verified by analyzing alkaline and acid extracts of five biological and sediment reference materials. Microwave-assisted extraction procedures resulted in higher concentrations of recovered mercury species, lower matrix interference with mercury determination and less time involved in sample treatment than conventional extraction procedures. The standard addition method was only needed for calibration when biological samples were analyzed. The detection limits were in the range of 1.2-19 and 6.6-18 ng g -1 in biological and sediment samples for inorganic mercury and total mercury determination, respectively

  10. To the kinetics of moisture formation in disturbed flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bazarov, S.M.; Shpenzer, G.G.

    1979-01-01

    A peculiar feature of disperse multiphase flows is the existence of pronounced fluctuations of parameters of state. An effect of fluctuations of parameters of vapor flows state on a degree of vapor flow supersaturation, a critical dimension of condensation nuclei, nucleation rate and droplet growth rate in disturbed flows has been analytically investigated. The analysis of obtained correlations is shown that state parameter pulsations and relaxation phenomena hardly effect on initial moisture formation and determine disperce composition of a suspended phase

  11. Importance Profiles for Water Vapor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mapes, Brian; Chandra, Arunchandra S.; Kuang, Zhiming; Zuidema, Paquita

    2017-11-01

    Motivated by the scientific desire to align observations with quantities of physical interest, we survey how scalar importance functions depend on vertically resolved water vapor. Definitions of importance begin from familiar examples of water mass I m and TOA clear-sky outgoing longwave flux I OLR, in order to establish notation and illustrate graphically how the sensitivity profile or "kernel" depends on whether specific humidity S, relative humidity R, or ln( R) are used as measures of vapor. Then, new results on the sensitivity of convective activity I con to vapor (with implied knock-on effects such as weather prediction skill) are presented. In radiative-convective equilibrium, organized (line-like) convection is much more sensitive to moisture than scattered isotropic convection, but it exists in a drier mean state. The lesson for natural convection may be that organized convection is less susceptible to dryness and can survive and propagate into regions unfavorable for disorganized convection. This counterintuitive interpretive conclusion, with respect to the narrow numerical result behind it, highlights the importance of clarity about what is held constant at what values in sensitivity or susceptibility kernels. Finally, the sensitivities of observable radiance signals I sig for passive remote sensing are considered. While the accuracy of R in the lower free troposphere is crucial for the physical importance scalars, this layer is unfortunately the most difficult to isolate with passive remote sensing: In high emissivity channels, water vapor signals come from too high in the atmosphere (for satellites) or too low (for surface radiometers), while low emissivity channels have poor altitude discrimination and (in the case of satellites) are contaminated by surface emissions. For these reasons, active ranging (LiDAR) is the preferred observing strategy.

  12. Vapor Pressure of Antimony Triiodide

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-12-07

    unlimited. iii Contents List of Figures iv 1. Introduction 1 2. Vapor Pressure 1 3. Experiment 3 4. Discussion and Measurements 5 5...SbI3 as a function of temperature ......................... 6 Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. 1 1. Introduction ...single-crystal thin films of n-type (Bi,Sb)2(Te,Se)3 materials presents new doping challenges because it is a nonequilibrium process. (Bi,Sb)2(Te,Se)3

  13. Sodium vapor charge exchange cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hiddleston, H.R.; Fasolo, J.A.; Minette, D.C.; Chrien, R.E.; Frederick, J.A.

    1976-01-01

    An operational sequential charge-exchange ion source yielding a 50 MeV H - current of approximately 8 mA is planned for use with the Argonne 500 MeV booster synchrotron. We report on the progress for development of a sodium vapor charge-exchange cell as part of that planned effort. Design, fabrication, and operating results to date are presented and discussed. (author)

  14. Direct analysis of prostaglandin-E2 and -D2 produced in an inflammatory cell reaction and its application for activity screening and potency evaluation using turbulent flow chromatography liquid chromatography-high resolution mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Jeong-Sook; Peng, Lei; Kang, Kyungsu; Choi, Yongsoo

    2016-09-09

    Direct analysis of prostaglandin-E2 (PGE2) and -D2 (PGD2) produced from a RAW264.7 cell-based reaction was performed by liquid chromatography high-resolution mass spectrometry (LC-HRMS), which was online coupled with turbulent flow chromatography (TFC). The capability of this method to accurately measure PG levels in cell reaction medium containing cytokines or proteins as a reaction byproduct was cross-validated by two conventional methods. Two methods, including an LC-HRMS method after liquid-liquid extraction (LLE) of the sample and a commercial PGE2 enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), showed PGE2 and/or PGD2 levels almost similar to those obtained by TFC LC-HRMS over the reaction time after LPS stimulation. After the cross-validation, significant analytical throughputs, allowing simultaneous screening and potency evaluation of 80 natural products including 60 phytochemicals and 20 natural product extracts for the inhibition of the PGD2 produced in the cell-based inflammatory reaction, were achieved using the TFC LC-HRMS method developed. Among the 60 phytochemicals screened, licochalcone A and formononetin inhibited PGD2 production the most with IC50 values of 126 and 151nM, respectively. For a reference activity, indomethacin and diclofenac were used, measuring IC50 values of 0.64 and 0.21nM, respectively. This method also found a butanol extract of Akebia quinata Decne (AQ) stem as a promising natural product for PGD2 inhibition. Direct and accurate analysis of PGs in the inflammatory cell reaction using the TFC LC-HRMS method developed enables the high-throughput screening and potency evaluation of as many as 320 samples in less than 48h without changing a TFC column. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. LC-HR-MS/MS standard urine screening approach: Pros and cons of automated on-line extraction by turbulent flow chromatography versus dilute-and-shoot and comparison with established urine precipitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helfer, Andreas G; Michely, Julian A; Weber, Armin A; Meyer, Markus R; Maurer, Hans H

    2017-02-01

    Comprehensive urine screening for drugs and metabolites by LC-HR-MS/MS using Orbitrap technology has been described with precipitation as simple workup. In order to fasten, automate, and/or simplify the workup, on-line extraction by turbulent flow chromatography and a dilute-and-shoot approach were developed and compared. After chromatographic separation within 10min, the Q-Exactive mass spectrometer was run in full scan mode with positive/negative switching and subsequent data dependent acquisition mode. The workup approaches were validated concerning selectivity, recovery, matrix effects, process efficiency, and limits of identification and detection for typical drug representatives and metabolites. The total workup time for on-line extraction was 6min, for the dilution approach 3min. For comparison, the established urine precipitation and evaporation lasted 10min. The validation results were acceptable. The limits for on-line extraction were comparable with those described for precipitation, but lower than for dilution. Thanks to the high sensitivity of the LC-HR-MS/MS system, all three workup approaches were sufficient for comprehensive urine screening and allowed fast, reliable, and reproducible detection of cardiovascular drugs, drugs of abuse, and other CNS acting drugs after common doses. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Vapor Delivery Systems for the Study of the Effects of Reformate Gas Impurities in HT-PEM Fuel Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Araya, Samuel Simon; Kær, Søren Knudsen; Andreasen, Søren Juhl

    2011-01-01

    , impurities in the reformate gas produced from methanol steam reforming can affect the performance and durability of fuel cells. In this paper different vapor delivery systems, intended to assist in the study of the effects of some of the impurities, are described and compared with each other. A system based...... on a pump and electrically heated evaporator was found to be more suitable for the typical flow rates involved in the anode feed of an H3PO4/PBI based HT-PEMFC unit cell assembly. Test stations composed of vapor delivery systems and mass flow controllers for testing the effects of methanol slip, water vapor...

  17. High temperature measurement of water vapor absorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keefer, Dennis; Lewis, J. W. L.; Eskridge, Richard

    1985-01-01

    An investigation was undertaken to measure the absorption coefficient, at a wavelength of 10.6 microns, for mixtures of water vapor and a diluent gas at high temperature and pressure. The experimental concept was to create the desired conditions of temperature and pressure in a laser absorption wave, similar to that which would be created in a laser propulsion system. A simplified numerical model was developed to predict the characteristics of the absorption wave and to estimate the laser intensity threshold for initiation. A non-intrusive method for temperature measurement utilizing optical laser-beam deflection (OLD) and optical spark breakdown produced by an excimer laser, was thoroughly investigated and found suitable for the non-equilibrium conditions expected in the wave. Experiments were performed to verify the temperature measurement technique, to screen possible materials for surface initiation of the laser absorption wave and to attempt to initiate an absorption wave using the 1.5 kW carbon dioxide laser. The OLD technique was proven for air and for argon, but spark breakdown could not be produced in helium. It was not possible to initiate a laser absorption wave in mixtures of water and helium or water and argon using the 1.5 kW laser, a result which was consistent with the model prediction.

  18. Continuous condensation device for vapors in the atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tricot, M.

    1983-01-01

    The continuous condensation device for vapors from the atmosphere is such those in which this atmosphere circulates in contact with a cold source involving the condensation of these vapors. It includes a thermoelectric module using the Peltier effect; the hot side is bonded to a heat sink and the cold side is in contact with an insulated condensation chamber in which flows the atmosphere charged with vapors to be condensated. The condensation chamber has a metallic structure through which a low voltage direct current is passed; this structure has small blades with holes, through which the condensate flows under gravity in the lower part of the chamber which have a hole to evacuate this liquid. The thermoelectric module comprises an assembly of thermocouples made of an array of alloy plates. The temperature inside the condensation chamber is maintained at just above 0 0 C. This device is used for the sampling of atmosphere water especially in the determination of tritium content of the atmosphere around nuclear installations [fr

  19. Two-Phase Annular Flow in Helical Coil Flow Channels in a Reduced Gravity Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keshock, Edward G.; Lin, Chin S.

    1996-01-01

    A brief review of both single- and two-phase flow studies in curved and coiled flow geometries is first presented. Some of the complexities of two-phase liquid-vapor flow in curved and coiled geometries are discussed, and serve as an introduction to the advantages of observing such flows under a low-gravity environment. The studies proposed -- annular two-phase air-water flow in helical coil flow channels are described. Objectives of the studies are summarized.

  20. Screen dealing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barlow, J.W.

    1991-01-01

    The screen dealing system provides a facility whereby buyers and sellers of spot thermal coal can make bids and offers via the medium of the Reuters screen. A sale results when a market participant notifies his acceptance of a price to a central dealing desk. Use of the system is available to all genuine participants in the coal trade. This paper reports that it provides a focus for information and for the visible making of coal prices. For years screen trading has been used successfully to trade other commodities. At last coal is being traded electronically. It makes sense. It works. Users like it

  1. Potential of cross-priming amplification and DNA-based lateral-flow strip biosensor for rapid on-site GMO screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xin; Zhai, Congcong; You, Qimin; Chen, Hongjun

    2014-07-01

    The requirement to monitor the presence of genetically modified organisms (GMO) in a variety of marked products has generated an increasing demand for reliable, rapid, and time and cost-effective analytical methods. Here we report an on-site method for rapid detection of cauliflower mosaic virus promoter (CaMV 35S), a common element present in most GMO, using cross-priming amplification (CPA) technology. Detection was achieved using a DNA-based contamination-proof strip biosensor. The limit of detection was 30 copies for the pBI121 plasmid containing the CaMV 35S gene. The certified reference sample of GM maize line MON810 was detectable even at the low relative mass concentration of 0.05%. The developed CPA method had high specificity for the CaMV 35S gene, as compared with other GM lines not containing this gene and non-GM products. The method was further validated using nine real-world samples, and the results were confirmed by real-time PCR analysis. Because of its simplicity, rapidity, and high sensitivity, this method of detecting the CaMV 35S gene has great commercial prospects for rapid GMO screening of high-consumption food and agriculture products.

  2. Airport Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Health Physics Society Specialists in Radiation Safety Airport Screening Fact Sheet Adopted: May 2011 Photo courtesy of Dan ... a safe level. An American National Standards Institute/Health Physics Society industry standard states that the maxi- mum ...

  3. Hypertension screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foulke, J. M.

    1975-01-01

    An attempt was made to measure the response to an announcement of hypertension screening at the Goddard Space Center, to compare the results to those of previous statistics. Education and patient awareness of the problem were stressed.

  4. Carrier Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... How accurate is carrier screening? No test is perfect. In a small number of cases, test results ... in which an egg is removed from a woman’s ovary, fertilized in a laboratory with the man’s ...

  5. Deflagration explosion of an unconfined fuel vapor cloud

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taki, S.; Ogawa, Y.

    1981-01-01

    In the reported study, explosions are produced by injecting a small amount of liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) into air. The ignition and subsequent evolution of the explosion of the unconfined vapor cloud are observed by the simultaneous use of direct photographs and pressure recording. The intensity of the compression waves generated by unconfined combustion are modeled on the basis of the solution of the conservation equations for the flow associated with a spherically symmetric expanding piston. The obtained results are compared with the measurements. It is pointed out that the development of unconfined fuel vapor cloud explosions can be divided into two stages, including a deflagration propagating in premixed gases, which is followed by a diffusion flame promoted by buoyancy and convection. The experimental result from the pressure measurement is found to be quantitatively consistent with the result obtained from the spherical piston model

  6. Absorption coefficients for water vapor at 193 nm from 300 to 1073 K

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessler, W. J.; Carleton, K. L.; Marinelli, W. J.

    1993-01-01

    Measurements of the water absorption coefficient at 193 nm from 300 to 1073 K are reported. The measurements were made using broadband VUV radiation and a monochromator-based detection system. The water vapor was generated by a saturator and metered into a flowing, 99 cm absorption cell via a water vapor mass flow meter. The 193 nm absorption coefficient measurements are compared to room temperature and high temperature shock tube measurements with good agreement. The absorption can be parameterized by a nu3 vibrational mode reaction coordinate and the thermal population of the nu3 mode.

  7. Microwave assisted chemical vapor infiltration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Devlin, D.J.; Currier, R.P.; Barbero, R.S.; Espinoza, B.F.; Elliott, N.

    1991-01-01

    A microwave assisted process for production of continuous fiber reinforced ceramic matrix composites is described. A simple apparatus combining a chemical vapor infiltration reactor with a conventional 700 W multimode oven is described. Microwave induced inverted thermal gradients are exploited with the ultimate goal of reducing processing times on complex shapes. Thermal gradients in stacks of SiC (Nicalon) cloths have been measured using optical thermometry. Initial results on the ''inside out'' deposition of SiC via decomposition of methyltrichlorosilane in hydrogen are presented. Several key processing issues are identified and discussed. 5 refs

  8. Overview of chemical vapor infiltration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Besmann, T.M.; Stinton, D.P.; Lowden, R.A.

    1993-06-01

    Chemical vapor infiltration (CVI) is developing into a commercially important method for the fabrication of continuous filament ceramic composites. Current efforts are focused on the development of an improved understanding of the various processes in CVI and its modeling. New approaches to CVI are being explored, including pressure pulse infiltration and microwave heating. Material development is also proceeding with emphasis on improving the oxidation resistance of the interfacial layer between the fiber and matrix. This paper briefly reviews these subjects, indicating the current state of the science and technology.

  9. Screening for suitable areas for Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage within the Brussels Capital Region, Belgium using coupled groundwater flow and heat transport modelling tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anibas, Christian; Kukral, Janik; Touhidul Mustafa, Syed Md; Huysmans, Marijke

    2017-04-01

    Urban areas have a great potential for shallow geothermal systems. Their energy demand is high, but currently they have only a limited potential to cover their own energy demand. The transition towards a low-carbon energy regime offers alternative sources of energy an increasing potential. Urban areas however pose special challenges for the successful exploitation of shallow geothermal energy. High building densities limit the available space for drillings and underground investigations. Urban heat island effects and underground structures influence the thermal field, groundwater pollution and competing water uses limit the available subsurface. To tackle these challenges in the Brussels Capital Region, Belgium two projects 'BruGeo' and the recently finished 'Prospective Research of Brussels project 2015-PRFB-228' address the investigation in urban geothermal systems. They aim to identify the key factors of the underground with respect to Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage (ATES) installations like thermal properties, aquifer thicknesses, groundwater flow velocities and their heterogeneity. Combined numerical groundwater and heat transport models are applied for the assessment of both open and closed loop shallow geothermal systems. The Brussels Capital Region comprises of the Belgian Capital, the City of Brussels and 18 other municipalities covering 161 km2 with almost 1.2 million inhabitants. Beside the high population density the Brussels Capital Region has a pronounced topography and a relative complex geology. This is both a challenge and an opportunity for the exploitation of shallow geothermal energy. The most important shallow hydrogeological formation in the Brussels-Capital Region are the Brussels Sands with the Brussels Sands Aquifer. Scenarios where developed using criteria for the hydrogeological feasibility of ATES installations such as saturated aquifer thickness, groundwater flow velocity and the groundwater head below surface. The Brussels Sands

  10. A Lithium Vapor Box Divertor Similarity Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Robert A.; Emdee, Eric D.; Goldston, Robert J.; Jaworski, Michael A.; Schwartz, Jacob A.

    2017-10-01

    A lithium vapor box divertor offers an alternate means of managing the extreme power density of divertor plasmas by leveraging gaseous lithium to volumetrically extract power. The vapor box divertor is a baffled slot with liquid lithium coated walls held at temperatures which increase toward the divertor floor. The resulting vapor pressure differential drives gaseous lithium from hotter chambers into cooler ones, where the lithium condenses and returns. A similarity experiment was devised to investigate the advantages offered by a vapor box divertor design. We discuss the design, construction, and early findings of the vapor box divertor experiment including vapor can construction, power transfer calculations, joint integrity tests, and thermocouple data logging. Heat redistribution of an incident plasma-based heat flux from a typical linear plasma device is also presented. This work supported by DOE Contract No. DE-AC02-09CH11466 and The Princeton Environmental Institute.

  11. Thermogravimetric measurements of liquid vapor pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rong Yunhong; Gregson, Christopher M.; Parker, Alan

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Rapid determination of vapor pressure by TGA. ► Demonstration of limitations of currently available approaches in literature. ► New model for vapor pressure assessment of small size samples in TGA. ► New model accounts for vapor diffusion and sample geometry and measures vapor pressure normally within 10%. - Abstract: A method was developed using thermo-gravimetric analysis (TGA) to determine the vapor pressure of volatile liquids. This is achieved by measuring the rate of evaporation (mass loss) of a pure liquid contained within a cylindrical pan. The influence of factors like sample geometry and vapor diffusion on evaporation rate are discussed. The measurement can be performed across a wide range of temperature yielding reasonable results up to 10 kPa. This approach may be useful as a rapid and automatable method for measuring the volatility of flavor and fragrance raw materials.

  12. Vortex-Induced Vapor Explosion during Drop Impact on a Superheated Pool

    KAUST Repository

    Alchalabi, M.A.; Kouraytem, Nadia; Li, Erqiang; Thoroddsen, Sigurdur T

    2017-01-01

    Ultra high-speed imaging is used to investigate the vapor explosion when a drop impacts onto a high-temperature pool. The two liquids are immiscible, a low boiling-temperature perfluorohexane drop, at room temperature, which impacts a high boiling-temperature soybean-oil pool, which is heated well above the boiling temperature of the drop. We observe different regimes: weak and strong nucleate boiling, film boiling or Leidenfrost regime and entrainment followed by vapor explosion. The vapor explosions were seen to depend on the formation of a rotational flow at the edge of the impact crater, near the pool surface, which resembles a vortex ring. This rotational motion entrains a thin sheet of the drop liquid, to become surrounded by the oil. In that region, the vapor explosion starts at a point after which it propagates azimuthally along the entire periphery at high speed.

  13. Vortex-Induced Vapor Explosion during Drop Impact on a Superheated Pool

    KAUST Repository

    Alchalabi, M.A.

    2017-04-18

    Ultra high-speed imaging is used to investigate the vapor explosion when a drop impacts onto a high-temperature pool. The two liquids are immiscible, a low boiling-temperature perfluorohexane drop, at room temperature, which impacts a high boiling-temperature soybean-oil pool, which is heated well above the boiling temperature of the drop. We observe different regimes: weak and strong nucleate boiling, film boiling or Leidenfrost regime and entrainment followed by vapor explosion. The vapor explosions were seen to depend on the formation of a rotational flow at the edge of the impact crater, near the pool surface, which resembles a vortex ring. This rotational motion entrains a thin sheet of the drop liquid, to become surrounded by the oil. In that region, the vapor explosion starts at a point after which it propagates azimuthally along the entire periphery at high speed.

  14. Ion vapor deposition and its application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bollinger, H.; Schulze, D.; Wilberg, R.

    1981-01-01

    Proceeding from the fundamentals of ion vapor deposition the characteristic properties of ion-plated coatings are briefly discussed. Examples are presented of successful applications of ion-plated coatings such as coatings with special electrical and dielectric properties, coatings for corrosion prevention, and coatings for improving the surface properties. It is concluded that ion vapor deposition is an advantageous procedure in addition to vapor deposition. (author)

  15. Effect of melt surface depression on the vaporization rate of a metal heated by an electron beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guilbaud, D.

    1995-01-01

    In order to produce high density vapor, a metal confined in a water cooled crucible is heated by an electron beam (eb). The energy transfer to the metal causes partial melting, forming a pool where the flow is driven by temperature induced buoyancy and capillary forces. Furthermore, when the vaporization rate is high, the free surface is depressed by the thrust of the vapor. The main objective of this paper is to analyse the combined effects of liquid flow and vapor condensation back on the liquid surface. This is done with TRIO-EF, a general purpose fluid mechanics finite element code. A suitable iterative scheme is used to calculate the free surface flow and the temperature field. The numerical simulation gives an insight about the influence of the free surface in heat transfer. The depression of the free surface induces strong effects on both liquid and vapor. As liquid is concerned, buoyancy convection in the pool is enhanced, the energy flux from electron beam is spread and constriction of heat flux under the eb spot is weakened. It results that heat transfer towards the crucible is reinforced. As vapor is concerned, its fraction that condenses back on the liquid surface is increased. These phenomena lead to a saturation of the net vaporization rate as the eb spot radius is reduced, at constant eb power. (author). 8 refs., 13 figs., 2 tabs

  16. Monofilament Vaporization Propulsion (MVP) System, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Monofilament Vaporization Propulsion (MVP) is a new propulsion technology targeted at secondary payload applications. It does not compromise on performance while...

  17. Experiences of marijuana-vaporizer users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malouff, John M; Rooke, Sally E; Copeland, Jan

    2014-01-01

    Using a marijuana vaporizer may have potential harm-reduction advantages on smoking marijuana, in that the user does not inhale smoke. Little research has been published on use of vaporizers. In the first study of individuals using a vaporizer on their own initiative, 96 adults anonymously answered questions about their experiences with a vaporizer and their use of marijuana with tobacco. Users identified 4 advantages to using a vaporizer over smoking marijuana: perceived health benefits, better taste, no smoke smell, and more effect from the same amount of marijuana. Users identified 2 disadvantages: inconvenience of setup and cleaning and the time it takes to get the device operating for each use. Only 2 individuals combined tobacco in the vaporizer mix, whereas 15 combined tobacco with marijuana when they smoked marijuana. Almost all participants intended to continue using a vaporizer. Vaporizers seem to have appeal to marijuana users, who perceive them as having harm-reduction and other benefits. Vaporizers are worthy of experimental research evaluating health-related effects of using them.

  18. Vapor pressures and thermophysical properties of selected hexenols and recommended vapor pressure for hexan-1-ol

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Štejfa, V.; Fulem, Michal; Růžička, K.; Matějka, P.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 402, Sep (2015), 18-29 ISSN 0378-3812 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : alcohols * vapor pressure * heat capacity * ideal - gas thermodynamic properties * vaporization enthalpy Subject RIV: BJ - Thermodynamics Impact factor: 1.846, year: 2015

  19. Relationship between the evaporation rate and vapor pressure of moderately and highly volatile chemicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Wesenbeeck, Ian; Driver, Jeffrey; Ross, John

    2008-04-01

    Volatilization of chemicals can be an important form of dissipation in the environment. Rates of evaporative losses from plant and soil surfaces are useful for estimating the potential for food-related dietary residues and operator and bystander exposure, and can be used as source functions for screening models that predict off-site movement of volatile materials. A regression of evaporation on vapor pressure from three datasets containing 82 pesticidal active ingredients and co-formulants, ranging in vapor pressure from 0.0001 to >30,000 Pa was developed for this purpose with a regression correlation coefficient of 0.98.

  20. Luminescent screens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, C.-I.

    1982-01-01

    Luminescent screens which are useful for such purposes as intensifying screens for radiographs are comprised of a support bearing a layer of finely divided particles of a phosphor dispersed in a cross-linked polymeric matrix formed by heat-curing of a coating composition comprising an unsaturated cross-linkable polymer, a polymerizable acrylic monomer, a thermoplastic polyurethane elastomer, and a heat-activatable polymerization initiator. The phosphor layer includes voids formed by evaporation of an evaporable component which is present in the coating composition from which such layer is formed. (author)

  1. Enthalpy of vaporization and vapor pressure of whiskey lactone and menthalactone by correlation gas chromatography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simmons, Daniel; Chickos, James

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • The vapor pressure and vaporization enthalpies of cis and trans-whiskey lactone have been evaluated. • Enthalpies of vaporization and vapor pressures of (+)-isomintlactone and (−)-mintlactone were also evaluated. • The sublimation enthalpy and corresponding vapor pressure of (+) -isomintlactone at T = 298.15 K is estimated. - Abstract: Enthalpies of vaporization at T = 298.15 K of cis and trans-whiskey lactone have been evaluated by correlation gas chromatography to be (68.4 ± 1.7) kJ·mol −1 and (67.5 ± 1.7) kJ·mol −1 , respectively. The enthalpies of vaporization of isomintlactone and mintlactone also evaluated by correlation gas chromatography have been found to have vaporization enthalpies of (74.2 ± 1.8) kJ·mol −1 and (73.2 ± 1.8) kJ·mol −1 respectively. The vapor pressures for cis and trans-whiskey lactone at T = 298.15 K have been evaluated as (1.5 ± 0.09) Pa and (2.0 ± 0.1) Pa using vapor pressures of a series of lactones as standards. Vapor pressures for isomintlactone and mintlactone were evaluated as (0.26 ± 0.012) Pa and (0.33 ± 0.02) Pa, respectively. Fusion and sublimation enthalpies for (+)-isomintlactone as well as the vapor pressure of the solid have been estimated.

  2. Alcohol Use Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Depression Screening Substance Abuse Screening Alcohol Use Screening Alcohol Use Screening (AUDIT-C) - Instructions The following questions ... this tool, there is also text-only version . Alcohol Use Screening (AUDIT-C) - Manual Instructions The following ...

  3. Flow in Pelton turbines

    OpenAIRE

    Furnes, Kjartan

    2013-01-01

    The flow in Pelton turbines is subsonic, turbulent, multiphase (water, air, and water vapor from cavitation), has high speeds, sharp gradients, free surface and dynamic boundary conditions. A static grid is unsuitable for modeling this mainly due to the turbine wheel and the liquid having a non-stationary relative motion.In recent times, significant progress in CFD simulation has been made, which also is relevant for Pelton turbines.Nevertheless, it is still common to perform costly model tes...

  4. Optical Sensor for Diverse Organic Vapors at ppm Concentration Ranges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dora M. Paolucci

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available A broadly responsive optical organic vapor sensor is described that responds to low concentrations of organic vapors without significant interference from water vapor. Responses to several classes of organic vapors are highlighted, and trends within classes are presented. The relationship between molecular properties (vapor pressure, boiling point, polarizability, and refractive index and sensor response are discussed.

  5. Vibrationally Excited Carbon Monoxide Produced via a Chemical Reaction Between Carbon Vapor and Oxygen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jans, Elijah R.; Eckert, Zakari; Frederickson, Kraig; Rich, Bill; Adamovich, Igor V.

    2017-06-01

    Measurements of the vibrational distribution function of carbon monoxide produced via a reaction between carbon vapor and molecular oxygen has shown a total population inversion on vibrational levels 4-7. Carbon vapor, produced using an arc discharge to sublimate graphite, is mixed with an argon oxygen flow. The excited carbon monoxide is vibrationally populated up to level v=14, at low temperatures, T=400-450 K, in a collision-dominated environment, 15-20 Torr, with total population inversions between v=4-7. The average vibrational energy per CO molecule formed by the reaction is 0.6-1.2 eV/molecule, which corresponds to 10-20% of the reaction enthalpy. Kinetic modeling of the flow reactor, including state specific vibrational processes, was performed to infer the vibrational distribution of the products of the reaction. The results show viability of developing of a new chemical CO laser from the reaction of carbon vapor and oxygen.

  6. Advances in modeling of chemical vapor infiltration for tube fabrication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Starr, T.L. [Georgia Inst. of Tech., Atlanta, GA (United States). School of Materials Science and Technology

    1998-04-01

    The forced flow/thermal gradient chemical vapor infiltration process (FCVI) can be used for fabrication of tube-shaped components of ceramic matrix composites. Recent experimental work at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) includes process and materials development studies using a small tube reactor. Use of FCVI for this geometry involves significant changes in fixturing as compared to disk-shaped preforms previously fabricated. The authors have used their computer model of the CVI process to simulate tube densification and to identify process modifications that will decrease processing time. This report presents recent model developments and applications.

  7. Three-dimensional computer simulations of bioremediation and vapor extraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Travis, B.; Trent, B.

    1991-01-01

    Numerical simulations of two remediation strategies are presented. These calculations are significant in that they will play a major role in the actual field implementation of two very different techniques. The first set of calculations simulates the actual spill event of nearly 60,000 gallons of No. 2 diesel fuel oil and its subsequent flow toward the water table for 13 years. Hydrogen peroxide saturated water flooding is then performed and bioremediation of the organic material is then calculated. The second set of calculations describes the vacuum extraction of organic vapors subject to various assumed formation properties and boundary conditions

  8. Estimated effects of interfacial vaporization on fission product scrubbing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moody, F.J.; Nagy, S.G.

    1983-01-01

    When bubbles containing non-condensible gas rise through a water pool, interfacial evaporation causes a flow of vapor into the bubbles. The inflow reduces the outward particle motion toward the bubble wall, diminishing the effectiveness of fission product particle removal. This analysis provides an estimate of evaporation on pool scrubbing effectiveness. It is shown that hot gas, which boils water at the bubble wall, reduces the effective scrubbing height by less than five centimeters. Although the evaporative humidification in a rising bubble containing non-condensible gas has a diminishing effect on scrubbing mechanisms, substantial decontamination is still expected even for the limiting case of a saturated pool

  9. Hearing Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson-Curiskis, Nanette

    2012-01-01

    Hearing levels are threatened by modern life--headsets for music, rock concerts, traffic noises, etc. It is crucial we know our hearing levels so that we can draw attention to potential problems. This exercise requires that students receive a hearing screening for their benefit as well as for making the connection of hearing to listening.

  10. Vision Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... an efficient and cost-effective method to identify children with visual impairment or eye conditions that are likely to lead ... main goal of vision screening is to identify children who have or are at ... visual impairment unless treated in early childhood. Other problems that ...

  11. Analysis of vapor extraction data from applications in Europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hiller, D.; Gudemann, H.

    1989-01-01

    This paper discusses vapor extraction, an in-situ process to remove volatile organic compounds (VOC) from soils of the vadose zone, applied in Europe since the early 1980s. In a vapor extraction well a negative differential pressure is created by a blower or similar device. The differential pressure generates a steady flow of soil gas towards the extraction well and thus provides a flushing of the soil with air undersaturated in respect to the contaminant concentration. Contaminants will evaporate into the gaseous phase both form the liquid phase and form the soil. Differential pressures applied range from 15 inches - 350 inches of water. The contaminated discharge air can be treated by activated carbon or other suitable methods. The effective radius of vapor extraction systems (VES) ranges typically form 20 feet to 150 feet underneath non-sealed - and up to 300 feet underneath sealed surfaces. Contamination from volatile organic compounds (VOC) have turned out to be widespread due to their almost ubiquitous presence in industrial processes. Specifically, VOC include halogenated hydrocarbons like TCE, PCE or TCA, aromatic hydrocarbons like benzene, toluene, xylene and volatile fuels like gasoline

  12. Enhanced Attenuation Technologies: Passive Soil Vapor Extraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vangelas, K.; Looney, B.; Kamath, R.; Adamson, D.; Newell, C.

    2010-03-15

    Passive soil vapor extraction (PSVE) is an enhanced attenuation (EA) approach that removes volatile contaminants from soil. The extraction is driven by natural pressure gradients between the subsurface and atmosphere (Barometric Pumping), or by renewable sources of energy such as wind or solar power (Assisted PSVE). The technology is applicable for remediating sites with low levels of contamination and for transitioning sites from active source technologies such as active soil vapor extraction (ASVE) to natural attenuation. PSVE systems are simple to design and operate and are more cost effective than active systems in many scenarios. Thus, PSVE is often appropriate as an interim-remedial or polishing strategy. Over the past decade, PSVE has been demonstrated in the U.S. and in Europe. These demonstrations provide practical information to assist in selecting, designing and implementing the technology. These demonstrations indicate that the technology can be effective in achieving remedial objectives in a timely fashion. The keys to success include: (1) Application at sites where the residual source quantities, and associated fluxes to groundwater, are relatively low; (2) Selection of the appropriate passive energy source - barometric pumping in cases with a deep vadose zone and barrier (e.g., clay) layers that separate the subsurface from the atmosphere and renewable energy assisted PSVE in other settings and where higher flow rates are required. (3) Provision of sufficient access to the contaminated vadose zones through the spacing and number of extraction wells. This PSVE technology report provides a summary of the relevant technical background, real-world case study performance, key design and cost considerations, and a scenario-based cost evaluation. The key design and cost considerations are organized into a flowchart that dovetails with the Enhanced Attenuation: Chlorinated Organics Guidance of the Interstate Technology and Regulatory Council (ITRC). The PSVE

  13. Atomic vapor laser isotope separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stern, R.C.; Paisner, J.A.

    1985-01-01

    Atomic vapor laser isotope separation (AVLIS) is a general and powerful technique. A major present application to the enrichment of uranium for light-water power reactor fuel has been under development for over 10 years. In June 1985 the Department of Energy announced the selection of AVLIS as the technology to meet the nation's future need for the internationally competitive production of uranium separative work. The economic basis for this decision is considered, with an indicated of the constraints placed on the process figures of merit and the process laser system. We then trace an atom through a generic AVLIS separator and give examples of the physical steps encountered, the models used to describe the process physics, the fundamental parameters involved, and the role of diagnostic laser measurements

  14. SOIL VAPOR EXTRACTION TECHNOLOGY: REFERENCE HANDBOOK

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soil vapor extraction (SVE) systems are being used in Increasing numbers because of the many advantages these systems hold over other soil treatment technologies. SVE systems appear to be simple in design and operation, yet the fundamentals governing subsurface vapor transport ar...

  15. Mechanics of gas-vapor bubbles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hao, Yue; Zhang, Yuhang; Prosperetti, Andrea

    2017-01-01

    Most bubbles contain a mixture of vapor and incondensible gases. While the limit cases of pure vapor and pure gas bubbles are well studied, much less is known about the more realistic case of a mixture. The bubble contents continuously change due to the combined effects of evaporation and

  16. Vapor Pressures of Several Commercially Used Alkanolamines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klepacova, Katarina; Huttenhuis, Patrick J. G.; Derks, Peter W. J.; Versteeg, Geert F.; Klepáčová, Katarína

    For the design of acid gas treating processes, vapor-liquid equilibrium (VLE) data must be available of the solvents to be applied. In this study the vapor pressures of seven frequently industrially used alkanolamines (diethanolamine, N-methylethanolamine, N,N-dimethylethanolamine,

  17. Recommended Vapor Pressure of Solid Naphthalen

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Růžička, K.; Fulem, Michal; Růžička, V.

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 50, - (2005), s. 1956-1970 ISSN 0021-9568 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100521 Keywords : solid naphthalene * vapor pressure * enthalpy of vaporization * enthalpy of fusion Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 1.610, year: 2005

  18. Effect of granosan vapors on mitosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lishenko, N P; Lishenko, I D

    1974-01-01

    Experiments were performed to determine the effects of granosan on the germination of vetch seeds. Vetch seeds were stored from 4-6 days in ethyl mercuric chloride vapors. Results indicated that the vapors caused a sharp decrease in germination and caused chromosomal aberrations during the anaphase.

  19. Condensation of vapor bubble in subcooled pool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horiuchi, K.; Koiwa, Y.; Kaneko, T.; Ueno, I.

    2017-02-01

    We focus on condensation process of vapor bubble exposed to a pooled liquid of subcooled conditions. Two different geometries are employed in the present research; one is the evaporation on the heated surface, that is, subcooled pool boiling, and the other the injection of vapor into the subcooled pool. The test fluid is water, and all series of the experiments are conducted under the atmospheric pressure condition. The degree of subcooling is ranged from 10 to 40 K. Through the boiling experiment, unique phenomenon known as microbubble emission boiling (MEB) is introduced; this phenomenon realizes heat flux about 10 times higher than the critical heat flux. Condensation of the vapor bubble is the key phenomenon to supply ambient cold liquid to the heated surface. In order to understand the condensing process in the MEB, we prepare vapor in the vapor generator instead of the evaporation on the heated surface, and inject the vapor to expose the vapor bubble to the subcooled liquid. Special attention is paid to the dynamics of the vapor bubble detected by the high-speed video camera, and on the enhancement of the heat transfer due to the variation of interface area driven by the condensation.

  20. 40 CFR 796.1950 - Vapor pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) CHEMICAL FATE TESTING GUIDELINES Physical and Chemical Properties § 796.1950 Vapor pressure. (a.... In addition, chemicals that are likely to be gases at ambient temperatures and which have low water... gases until the measured vapor pressure is constant, a process called “degassing.” Impurities more...

  1. Risk assessment of metal vapor arcing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Monika C. (Inventor); Leidecker, Henning W. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    A method for assessing metal vapor arcing risk for a component is provided. The method comprises acquiring a current variable value associated with an operation of the component; comparing the current variable value with a threshold value for the variable; evaluating compared variable data to determine the metal vapor arcing risk in the component; and generating a risk assessment status for the component.

  2. VAPOR MIXER FOR GELATINIZATION OF STARCH IN LIQUEFYING STATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Ananskikh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Starch hydrolysis is main technological process in production of starch sweeteners. Acid hydrolysis of starch using hydrochloric acid is carried out very fast but it does not allow to carry out full hydrolysis and to produce products with given carbohydrate composition. Bioconversion of starch allows to eliminate these limitations. At production of starch sweeteners from starch using enzymes starch hydrolysis is carried out in two stages At first starch – starch liquefaction the rapid increase of viscosity takes place which requires intensive mixing. Liquefying station consists of jet-cooker, holder, pressure regulator and evaporator. Jet-cooker of starch is its main part, starch is quickly turns into soluble (gelatinized state and it is partially liquefied by injection of starch suspension by flow of water vapor under pressure not less than 0,8 MPa. Heat and hydraulic calculation were carried out in order to determine constructive sizes of mixer for cooking of starch. The main hydraulic definable parameters are pressure drop in mixer, vapor pressure at mixer inlet, daily capacity of station by glucose syrup M, product consumption (starch suspension, diameter of inlet section of vapor nozzle. The goal of calculation was to determine vapor consumption M1, diameter d2 of outlet section of confuser injector, length l2 of gelatinization section. For heat calculation there was used Shukhov’s formula along with heat balance equation for gelatinization process. The numerical solution obtained with adopted assumptions given in applied mathematical package MATHCAD, for M = 50 t/day gives required daily vapor consumption M1 = 14,446 т. At hydraulic calculation of pressure drop in mixer there was used Bernoulli’s theorem. Solving obtained equations using MATHCAD found diameter of outlet section of consufer d2 = 0,023 м, vapor pressure inside of mixer p2 = 3,966·105 Па, l2 = 0,128 м. Developed method of calculation is used to determine

  3. Vapor-fed bio-hybrid fuel cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benyamin, Marcus S; Jahnke, Justin P; Mackie, David M

    2017-01-01

    Concentration and purification of ethanol and other biofuels from fermentations are energy-intensive processes, with amplified costs at smaller scales. To circumvent the need for these processes, and to potentially reduce transportation costs as well, we have previously investigated bio-hybrid fuel cells (FCs), in which a fermentation and FC are closely coupled. However, long-term operation requires strictly preventing the fermentation and FC from harming each other. We introduce here the concept of the vapor-fed bio-hybrid FC as a means of continuously extracting power from ongoing fermentations at ambient conditions. By bubbling a carrier gas (N 2 ) through a yeast fermentation and then through a direct ethanol FC, we protect the FC anode from the catalyst poisons in the fermentation (which are non-volatile), and also protect the yeast from harmful FC products (notably acetic acid) and from build-up of ethanol. Since vapor-fed direct ethanol FCs at ambient conditions have never been systematically characterized (in contrast to vapor-fed direct methanol FCs), we first assess the effects on output power and conversion efficiency of ethanol concentration, vapor flow rate, and FC voltage. The results fit a continuous stirred-tank reactor model. Over a wide range of ethanol partial pressures (2-8 mmHg), power densities are comparable to those for liquid-fed direct ethanol FCs at the same temperature, with power densities >2 mW/cm 2 obtained. We then demonstrate the continuous operation of a vapor-fed bio-hybrid FC with fermentation for 5 months, with no indication of performance degradation due to poisoning (of either the FC or the fermentation). It is further shown that the system is stable, recovering quickly from disturbances or from interruptions in maintenance. The vapor-fed bio-hybrid FC enables extraction of power from dilute bio-ethanol streams without costly concentration and purification steps. The concept should be scalable to both large and small

  4. Investigation of the condensing vapor bubble behavior through CFD simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sablania, Sidharth; Verma, Akash; Goyal, P.; Dutta, Anu; Singh, R.K.

    2013-09-01

    In nuclear systems the sub-cooled boiling flow is an important problem due to the behavior of condensing vapor bubble which has a large effect on the heat transfer characteristics as well as pressure drops and flow instability. The sub-cooled boiling flows become very complex and dynamic phenomena by the vapor bubble-water interaction. This happens due to the boiling/condensation, break-up, and coalescence of the bubble and needs to be addressed for characterizing the above mentioned flow parameters. There have been many researches to analyze the behavior of bubble experimentally and analytically. However, it is very difficult to get complete information about the behavior of bubble because of ever changing interface between vapor and water phase due to bubble condensation/evaporation Therefore, it is necessary to carry out a CFD simulation for better understanding the complex phenomenon of the bubble behavior. The present work focuses on the simulation of condensing bubble in subcooled boiling flow using (Volume of Fluid) VOF method in the CFD code CFD-ACE+. In order to simulate the heat and mass transfer through the bubble interface, CFD modeling for the bubble condensation was developed by modeling the source terms in the governing equations of VOF model using the User-Defined Function (UDF) in CFD-ACE+ code. The effect of condensation on bubble behavior was analyzed by comparing the behavior of condensing bubble with that of adiabatic bubble. It was observed that the behavior of condensing bubble was different from that of non condensing bubble in respect of bubble shape, diameter, velocity etc. The results obtained from the present simulation in terms of various parameters such as bubble velocity, interfacial area and bubble volume agreed well with the reported experimental results verified with FLUENT code in available literature. Hence, this CFD-ACE+ simulation of single bubble condensation will be a useful computational fluid dynamics tool for analyzing the

  5. Supercritical fluid extraction-capillary gas chromatography: on-line coupling with a programmed temperature vaporizer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Houben, R.J.; Janssen, J.G.M.; Leclercq, P.A.; Rijks, J.A.; Cramers, C.A.M.G.

    1990-01-01

    A simple and versatile system is described for the on-line coupling of SFE to capillary GC. The interfacing consists of a programmed temperature vaporizer (PTV) injector. With this injector it is possible to combine solute trapping, elimination of a high flow of extraction fluid, and quantitative

  6. Building blocks for ionic liquids: Vapor pressures and vaporization enthalpies of 1-(n-alkyl)-imidazoles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emel'yanenko, Vladimir N.; Portnova, Svetlana V.; Verevkin, Sergey P.; Skrzypczak, Andrzej; Schubert, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → We measured vapor pressures of the 1-(n-alkyl)-imidazoles by transpiration method. → Variations on the alkyl chain length n were C 3 , C 5 -C 7 , and C 9 -C 10 . → Enthalpies of vaporization were derived from (p, T) dependencies. → Enthalpies of vaporization at 298.15 K were linear dependent on the chain length. - Abstract: Vapor pressures of the linear 1-(n-alkyl)-imidazoles with the alkyl chain C 3 , C 5 -C 7 , and C 9 -C 10 have been measured by the transpiration method. The molar enthalpies of vaporization Δ l g H m of these compounds were derived from the temperature dependencies of vapor pressures. A linear correlation of enthalpies of vaporization Δ l g H m (298.15 K) of the 1-(n-alkyl)-imidazoles with the chain length has been found.

  7. Flow Pattern Identification of Horizontal Two-Phase Refrigerant Flow Using Neural Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-31

    classification of liquid–vapor structures into flow patterns is useful for predicting heat transfer rates and, ultimately, system performance. Most flow and...Here, ~x represents the spa- tial variables, x and y, and t is time. This normalization assigns εð~x; tÞ to be zero for only vapor (εg) and one for...tube surface [17,22]. As in stratified wavy flow, interfacial waves were also present in stratified wavy transitional flow. The waves were more fre

  8. Fish screens at hydroelectric diversions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ott, R.F.

    1994-01-01

    Preventing downstream migrating fish from entering the turbines at hydroelectric projects is a standard mitigation goal of state and federal fishery management agencies. The object is to minimize the adverse impacts to the fish associated with the exclusion and passage through the bypass water conveyance facilities. In the western United States, most of the fishery management agencies have fish screen design criteria that focus on the approach and transportational velocities, maximum opening dimensions of the screen material, and the cleaning standards. Recently, more attention has been given to fish behavioral traits such as attraction and sustained and darting swimming speed, which has resulted in more attention to the position of the screens to the flow and the length of time the downstream migrants are exposed to the screens. Criteria for length of time of exposure, size and position of bypass, flow and velocities in the bypass entrances, discharge requirements back into the receiving water, and exposure to predation have created unique challenges to the fish screen designer. This paper discusses some of the more recent types of fixed fish screens that are being installed at hydroelectric plants that meet these challenges

  9. Raman spectral features of single walled carbon nanotubes synthesized by laser vaporization

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Moodley, MK

    2006-07-05

    Full Text Available synthesized boxshadowdwnSemi-conductor tubes were favoured boxshadowdwnImproved crystallinity as indicated by narrower line- widths. Thank You Acknowledgements to the CSIR NLC for support on carbon nanotube research ... www.csir.co.za Experimental……..cont. Experimental parameters • two laser combined and vaporize a composite target • target in a tube furnace in continuous flow of Argon • temperature kept at 1000 OC • Ar flow of 200 sccm • Pressure at 375 Torr...

  10. Vision Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-01-01

    The Visi Screen OSS-C, marketed by Vision Research Corporation, incorporates image processing technology originally developed by Marshall Space Flight Center. Its advantage in eye screening is speed. Because it requires no response from a subject, it can be used to detect eye problems in very young children. An electronic flash from a 35 millimeter camera sends light into a child's eyes, which is reflected back to the camera lens. The photorefractor then analyzes the retinal reflexes generated and produces an image of the child's eyes, which enables a trained observer to identify any defects. The device is used by pediatricians, day care centers and civic organizations that concentrate on children with special needs.

  11. Evaporation of polydispersed droplets in a highly turbulent channel flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cochet, M.; Bazile, Rudy; Ferret, B.; Cazin, S. [INPT, UPS, IMFT (Institut de Mecanique des Fluides de Toulouse), Universite de Toulouse (France)

    2009-09-15

    A model experiment for the study of evaporating turbulent two-phase flows is presented here. The study focuses on a situation where pre-atomized and dispersed droplets vaporize and mix in a heated turbulent flow. The test bench consists in a channel flow with characteristics of homogeneous and isotropic turbulence where fluctuations levels reach very high values (25% in the established zone). An ultrasonic atomizer allows the injection of a mist of small droplets of acetone in the carrier flow. The large range diameters ensure that every kind of droplet behavior with regards to turbulence is possible. Instantaneous concentration fields of the vaporized phase are extracted from fluorescent images (PLIF) of the two phase flow. The evolution of the mixing of the acetone vapor is analyzed for two different liquid mass loadings. Despite the high turbulence levels, concentration fluctuations remain significant, indicating that air and acetone vapor are not fully mixed far from the injector. (orig.)

  12. Electrochemical generation of mercury cold vapor and its in-situ trapping in gold-covered graphite tube atomizers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cerveny, Vaclav; Rychlovsky, Petr; Netolicka, Jarmila; Sima, Jan

    2007-01-01

    The combination of more efficient flow-through electrochemical mercury cold vapor generation with its in-situ trapping in a graphite tube atomizer is described. This coupled technique has been optimized to attain the maximum sensitivity for Hg determination and to minimize the limits of detection and determination. A laboratory constructed thin-layer flow-through cell with a platinum cathode served as the cold vapor generator. Various cathode arrangements with different active surface areas were tested. Automated sampling equipment for the graphite atomizer with an untreated fused silica capillary was used for the introduction of the mercury vapor. The inner surface of the graphite tube was covered with a gold foil placed against the sampling hole. The results attained for the electrochemical mercury cold vapor generation (an absolute limit of detection of 80 pg; peak absorbance, 3σ criterion) were compared with the traditional vapor generation using NaBH 4 as the reducing agent (an absolute limit of detection of 124 pg; peak absorbance, 3σ criterion). The repeatability at the 5 ng ml -1 level was better than 4.1% (RSD) for electrochemical mercury vapor generation and better than 5.6% for the chemical cold vapor generation. The proposed method was applied to the determination the of Hg contents in a certified reference material and in spiked river water samples

  13. Johnson screen for cooling water intakes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cook, L.E.

    1978-01-01

    Johnson surface-water screens provide an alternative to vertical traveling screens for power plant cooling water intakes. In this paper, flow field modeling is discussed, and a series of case studies is presented. The hydraulic information obtained is discussed as it applies to the exclusion of biota and debris from cooling water intake systems

  14. Flash vaporization during earthquakes evidenced by gold deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weatherley, Dion K.; Henley, Richard W.

    2013-04-01

    Much of the world's known gold has been derived from arrays of quartz veins. The veins formed during periods of mountain building that occurred as long as 3 billion years ago, and were deposited by very large volumes of water that flowed along deep, seismically active faults. The veins formed under fluctuating pressures during earthquakes, but the magnitude of the pressure fluctuations and their influence on mineral deposition is not known. Here we use a simple thermo-mechanical piston model to calculate the drop in fluid pressure experienced by a fluid-filled fault cavity during an earthquake. The geometry of the model is constrained using measurements of typical fault jogs, such as those preserved in the Revenge gold deposit in Western Australia, and other gold deposits around the world. We find that cavity expansion generates extreme reductions in pressure that cause the fluid that is trapped in the jog to expand to a very low-density vapour. Such flash vaporization of the fluid results in the rapid co-deposition of silica with a range of trace elements to form gold-enriched quartz veins. Flash vaporization continues as more fluid flows towards the newly expanded cavity, until the pressure in the cavity eventually recovers to ambient conditions. Multiple earthquakes progressively build economic-grade gold deposits.

  15. Water vapor retrieval over many surface types

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borel, C.C.; Clodius, W.C.; Johnson, J.

    1996-04-01

    In this paper we present a study of of the water vapor retrieval for many natural surface types which would be valuable for multi-spectral instruments using the existing Continuum Interpolated Band Ratio (CIBR) for the 940 nm water vapor absorption feature. An atmospheric code (6S) and 562 spectra were used to compute the top of the atmosphere radiance near the 940 nm water vapor absorption feature in steps of 2.5 nm as a function of precipitable water (PW). We derive a novel technique called ``Atmospheric Pre-corrected Differential Absorption`` (APDA) and show that APDA performs better than the CIBR over many surface types.

  16. Water Vapor Permeation in Plastics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keller, Paul E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Kouzes, Richard T. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Polyvinyl toluene (PVT) and polystyrene (PS) (referred to as “plastic scintillator”) are used for gamma ray detectors. A significant decrease in radiation detection performance has been observed in some PVT-based gamma-ray detectors in systems in outdoor environments as they age. Recent studies have revealed that plastic scintillator can undergo an environmentally related material degradation that adversely affects gamma ray detection performance under certain conditions and histories. A significant decrease in sensitivity has been seen in some gamma-ray detectors in some systems as they age. The degradation of sensitivity of plastic scintillator over time is due to a variety of factors, and the term “aging” is used to encompass all factors. Some plastic scintillator samples show no aging effects (no significant change in sensitivity over more than 10 years), while others show severe aging (significant change in sensitivity in less than 5 years). Aging effects arise from weather (variations in heat and humidity), chemical exposure, mechanical stress, light exposure, and loss of volatile components. The damage produced by these various causes can be cumulative, causing observable damage to increase over time. Damage may be reversible up to some point, but becomes permanent under some conditions. The objective of this report is to document the phenomenon of permeability of plastic scintillator to water vapor and to derive the relationship between time, temperature, humidity and degree of water penetration in plastic. Several conclusions are documented about the properties of water permeability of plastic scintillator.

  17. Motion of liquid plugs between vapor bubbles in capillary tubes: a comparison between fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertossi, Rémi; Ayel, Vincent; Mehta, Balkrishna; Romestant, Cyril; Bertin, Yves; Khandekar, Sameer

    2017-11-01

    Pulsating heat pipes (PHP) are now well-known devices in which liquid/vapor slug flow oscillates in a capillary tube wound between hot and cold sources. In this context, this paper focuses on the motion of the liquid plug, trapped between vapor bubbles, moving in capillary tubes, to try to better understand the thermo-physical phenomena involved in such devices. This study is divided into three parts. In the first part, an experimental study presents the evolution of the vapor pressure during the evaporation process of a liquid thin film deposited from a liquid plug flowing in a heated capillary tube: it is found that the behavior of the generated and removed vapor can be very different, according to the thermophysical properties of the fluids. In the second part, a transient model allows to compare, in terms of pressure and duration, the motion of a constant-length liquid plug trapped between two bubbles subjected to a constant difference of vapor pressure: the results highlight that the performances of the four fluids are also very different. Finally, a third model that can be considered as an improvement of the second one, is also presented: here, the liquid slug is surrounded by two vapor bubbles, one subjected to evaporation, the pressure in both bubbles is now a result of the calculation. This model still allows comparing the behaviors of the fluid. Even if our models are quite far from a complete model of a real PHP, results do indicate towards the applicability of different fluids as suitable working fluids for PHPs, particularly in terms of the flow instabilities which they generate.

  18. Water screen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kutepov, A.I.; Fedotov, I.N.; Prokopov, O.I.

    1981-01-01

    The invention refers to ventilation and can be used for repair-fitting operations in a blasting-dangerous gas condition, for example, during elimination of gas-oil gushers, repair of gas-oil pipelines, equipment etc. In order to improve safety of labor, the nozzle adapters of the water collector are oriented towards each other. The collector is installed on a support with the possibility of rotating and vertical movement. The proposed screen excludes the possibility of blasting-dangerous concentrations of gases and guarantees extinguishing of the impact spark during operation of the tool.

  19. RBC Antibody Screen

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... C Cystic Fibrosis (CF) Gene Mutations Testing Cytomegalovirus (CMV) Tests D-dimer Dengue Fever Testing Des-gamma- ... Index of Screening Recommendations Not Listed? Not Listed? Newborn Screening Screening Tests for Infants Screening Tests for ...

  20. Mental Health Screening Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Releases & Announcements Public Service Announcements Partnering with DBSA Mental Health Screening Center These online screening tools are not ... you have any concerns, see your doctor or mental health professional. Depression Screening for Adult Depression Screening for ...

  1. Breast cancer screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mammogram - breast cancer screening; Breast exam - breast cancer screening; MRI - breast cancer screening ... is performed to screen women to detect early breast cancer when it is more likely to be cured. ...

  2. Oxidative vaporization kinetics of Cr2O3 in oxygen from 1000 to 1300 C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stearns, C. A.; Kohl, F. J.; Fryburg, G. C.

    1974-01-01

    Rates of oxidative vaporization of Cr2O3 on preoxidized resistively heated chromium were determined in flowing oxygen at a pressure of 0.115 Torr for temperatures from 1000 to 1300 C. Reaction controlled rates were obtained from experimental rates by a gold calibration technique, and these rates were shown to agree with those predicted by thermochemical analysis. The activation energy obtained for the oxidative vaporization reaction corresponded numerically with the thermochemical enthalpy of the reaction. A theoretical equation is given for calculating the rate from thermodynamic data using boundary-layer theory.

  3. Oxidative vaporization kinetics of chromium (III) oxide in oxygen from 1270 to 1570 K

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stearns, C. A.; Kohl, F. J.; Fryburg, G. C.

    1974-01-01

    Rates of oxidative vaporization of Cr2O3 on preoxidized resistively heated chromium were determined in flowing oxygen at 0.115 torr for temperatures from 1270 to 1570 K. Reaction controlled rates were obtained from experimental rates by a gold calibration technique. These rates were shown to agree with those predicted by thermochemical analysis. The activation energy obtained for the oxidative vaporation reaction corresponded numerically with the thermochemical enthalpy of the reaction. A theoretical equation is given for calculating the rate from thermodynamic data by using boundary layer theory.

  4. Investigation of Multiscale and Multiphase Flow, Transport and Reaction in Heavy Oil Recovery Processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yorstos, Yannis C.

    2003-03-19

    The report describes progress made in the various thrust areas of the project, which include internal drives for oil recovery, vapor-liquid flows, combustion and reaction processes and the flow of fluids with yield stress.

  5. Analysis of Limit Cycle Oscillation/Transonic High Alpha Flow Visualization. Part 1: Discussion

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Cunningham, Atlee M

    1998-01-01

    ...) at low alpha conditions typical of transonic LCO flows with and without tip stores. Laser light sheet/water vapor techniques were used to illuminate the flows, and video recording was used to obtain the data...

  6. Analysis of Limit Cycle Oscillation/Transonic High ALPHA Flow Visualization. Part 2 Stationary Model Data

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Cunningham, Atlee M

    1998-01-01

    ...) at low alpha conditions typical of transonic LCO flows with and without tip stores. Laser light sheet/water vapor techniques were used to illuminate the flows, and video recording was used to obtain the data...

  7. Analysis of Limit Cycle Oscillation/Transonic High Alpha Flow Visualization

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Cunningham, Atlee M

    1997-01-01

    ...) at low alpha condition typical of transonic LCO flows with and without tip stores. Laser light sheet/water vapor techniques were used to illuminate the flows, and video recording was used to obtain the data...

  8. Analysis of Limit Cycle Oscillation/Transonic High ALPHA Flow Visualization. Part 3 Oscillating Model Data

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Cunningham, Atlee M

    1998-01-01

    ...) at low alpha conditions typical of transonic LCO flows with and without tip stores. Laser light sheet/water vapor techniques were used to illuminate the flows, and video recording was used to obtain the data...

  9. A high selective cataluminescence sensor for the determination of tetrahydrofuran vapor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Xiaoan; Dai, Huimei; Chen, Suilin; Zeng, Jiayi; Zhang, Keke; Sun, Yan

    2013-02-01

    A novel tetrahydrofuran (THF) vapor sensor was designed based on the cataluminescence (CTL) of THF on nanosized γ-Al2O3/MgO (mol ratio = 1.5:1). SEM and XRD were applied for its characterization. We found that the CTL was strongly produced when THF vapor flowed through a nanosized Al-Mg mixed-metal oxide surface, while the CTL was weakly generated when THF vapor flowed through a single nanosized γ-Al2O3 or MgO surface. Quantitative analysis was performed at an optimal temperature of 279 °C, a wavelength of 460 nm and a flow rate of 360 mL min-1. The linear range of the CTL intensity versus concentrations of THF vapor was 1.0-3000 mL m-3 with a detection limit of 0.67 mL m-3. No (or only very low) interference was observed by formaldehyde, methanol, ethanol, benzene, toluene, ethyl acetate, ammonia, cyclohexane, chloroform, glycol armour ether, glycol ether, isopropyl ether and n-butyl ether or acetic acid. Since the response of the sensor was rapid and the system was easy to handle, we believe that the sensor has great potential for real-world use.

  10. Comparison of MRI, CT, TCD and SPECT in patients with spongiform leukoencephalopathy after inhaling heroin vapor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Qun; Lu Bingxun; Yuan Huijuan

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To compare the characteristics of MRI, CT, single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and transcranial Doppler sonography (TCD) in patients with spongiform leukoencephalopathy after inhaling heroin vapor. Methods: Seventeen patients were investigated. MRI or CT was scanned in 17 patients, SPECT in 9 patients' and TCD in 11 patients. Results: MRI or CT: Brain MRI and CT revealed extensive symmetric white matter involvement of bilateral cerebral and cerebellar hemispheres and the brainstem. The lesions, which showed no contrast enhancement, were hypodense on CT and hypointense on T 1 -weighted and hyperintense on T 2 -weighted MRI. SPECT: The regional cerebral blood flows (rCBF) of white matter involvement on bilateral cerebral and cerebellar hemispheres was reduced obviously. The rCBF of temporal lobes, parietal lobes, occipital lobes, cerebellar hemispheres, and basal ganglion was reduced in varying degrees. TCD: The systolic peak became sharpened, and end-diastolic flow velocity and mean flow velocity were reduced obviously and pulsatile index was increased markedly in patients with spongiform leukoencephalopathy after inhaling heroin vapor. Conclusion: The characteristic manifestations of MRI and CT imaging may be regarded as the main foundation of diagnosing spongiform leukoencephalopathy after inhaling heroin vapor; SPECT and TCD can help comprehend the changes of hemodynamics of cerebral vessels and the degree of cerebral ischemia in patients with spongiform leukoencephalopathy after inhaling heroin vapor

  11. Simultaneous separation of five major ribonucleic acids by capillary electrophoresis with laser-induced fluorescence in the presence of electroosmotic flow: application to the rapid screening of 5S rRNA from ovarian cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, Ya-Chu; Liao, Ching-Ru; Chung, I-Che; Chang, Yu-Sun; Chang, Po-Ling

    2014-10-17

    RNA integrity is important in RNA studies because poor RNA quality may impact downstream methodologies. This study proposes a rapid and cost-effective method for the determination of RNA integrity based on CE-LIF in the presence of electroosmotic flow. The proposed method uses poly(ethylene) oxide (Mavg=4,000,000 Da) as a sieving matrix for total RNA separation. Ethidium bromide (μg mL(-1)) was dissolved in a polymer solution as an interchelating dye for on-column fluorescent labeling. The 28S rRNA, 18S rRNA, 5.8S rRNA, 5S rRNA and tRNA from the total human RNA extracted from the cells were fully separated using the proposed method. The lowest detectable concentration of total RNA achieved was 100 pg μL(-1) with a 6 min sample injection followed by on-column concentration. In addition, the temperature-induced degradation of total RNA was observed by CE-LIF. The electropherograms revealed more fragmentation of 28S and 18S rRNAs by temperature-induced hydrolysis compared with the 5.8S rRNA, 5S rRNA and tRNA. Therefore, the results indicated that RNA degradation should be considered for long-term, high-temperature incubations in RNA-related experiments involving RNA hybridization. The proposed method is furthermore, applied to the determination of 5S rRNA overexpressed in ovarian cancer cells as compared to the cervical cancer cells. Overall, CE-LIF is highly promising for rapid screening of ovarian cancers without tedious pre-amplification steps. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. GOES WATER VAPOR TRANSPORT V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The GOES Water Vapor Transport CD contains nineteen months of geostationary satellite-derived products from the GOES-8 satellite spanning the 1987-1988 El Nino...

  13. Perspective: Highly stable vapor-deposited glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ediger, M. D.

    2017-12-01

    This article describes recent progress in understanding highly stable glasses prepared by physical vapor deposition and provides perspective on further research directions for the field. For a given molecule, vapor-deposited glasses can have higher density and lower enthalpy than any glass that can be prepared by the more traditional route of cooling a liquid, and such glasses also exhibit greatly enhanced kinetic stability. Because vapor-deposited glasses can approach the bottom of the amorphous part of the potential energy landscape, they provide insights into the properties expected for the "ideal glass." Connections between vapor-deposited glasses, liquid-cooled glasses, and deeply supercooled liquids are explored. The generality of stable glass formation for organic molecules is discussed along with the prospects for stable glasses of other types of materials.

  14. Fundamentals of Friction and Vapor Phase Lubrication

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gellman, Andrew

    2004-01-01

    This is the final report for the three year research program on "Fundamentals of Friction and Vapor Phase Lubrication" conducted at Carnegie Mellon with support from AFOSR grant number F49630-01-1-0069...

  15. GOES WATER VAPOR TRANSPORT V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The GOES Water Vapor Transport CD contains nineteen months of geostationary satellite-derived products spanning the 1987/1988 El Nino Southern Oscillation (ENSO)...

  16. Drag Reduction by Leidenfrost Vapor Layers

    KAUST Repository

    Vakarelski, Ivan Uriev; Marston, Jeremy O.; Chan, Derek Y. C.; Thoroddsen, Sigurdur T

    2011-01-01

    , we show that such vapor layers can reduce the hydrodynamic drag by over 85%. These results appear to approach the ultimate limit of drag reduction possible by different methods based on gas-layer lubrication and can stimulate the development

  17. DMSP SSMT/2 - Atmospheric Water Vapor Profiler

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The SSM/T-2 sensor is a five channel, total power microwave radiometer with three channels situated symmetrically about the 183.31 GHz water vapor resonance line and...

  18. 78 FR 42595 - Marine Vapor Control Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-16

    ... revise the substance As noted in the NPRM, the changes in this section were of this section. intended... the vapor-moving device, as recommended by CTAC in 1997 to maintain a minimum size of non-flammable...

  19. Characterization of tin dioxide film for chemical vapors sensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hafaiedh, I.; Helali, S.; Cherif, K.; Abdelghani, A.; Tournier, G.

    2008-01-01

    Recently, oxide semiconductor material used as transducer has been the central topic of many studies for gas sensor. In this paper we investigated the characteristic of a thick film of tin dioxide (SnO 2 ) film for chemical vapor sensor. It has been prepared by screen-printing technology and deposited on alumina substrate provided with two gold electrodes. The morphology, the molecular composition and the electrical properties of this material have been characterized respectively by Atomic Force Spectroscopy (AFM), Fourier Transformed Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) and Impedance Spectroscopy (IS). The electrical properties showed a resistive behaviour of this material less than 300 deg. C which is the operating temperature of the sensor. The developed sensor can identify the nature of the detected gas, oxidizing or reducing

  20. Chemical compatibility screening test results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nigrey, P.J.; Dickens, T.G.

    1997-12-01

    A program for evaluating packaging components that may be used in transporting mixed-waste forms has been developed and the first phase has been completed. This effort involved the screening of ten plastic materials in four simulant mixed-waste types. These plastics were butadiene-acrylonitrile copolymer rubber, cross-linked polyethylene (XLPE), epichlorohydrin rubber, ethylene-propylene rubber (EPDM), fluorocarbon (Viton or Kel-F), polytetrafluoroethylene, high-density polyethylene (HDPE), isobutylene-isoprene copolymer rubber (butyl), polypropylene, and styrene-butadiene rubber (SBR). The selected simulant mixed wastes were (1) an aqueous alkaline mixture of sodium nitrate and sodium nitrite; (2) a chlorinated hydrocarbon mixture; (3) a simulant liquid scintillation fluid; and (4) a mixture of ketones. The testing protocol involved exposing the respective materials to 286,000 rads of gamma radiation followed by 14-day exposures to the waste types at 60 degrees C. The seal materials were tested using vapor transport rate (VTR) measurements while the liner materials were tested using specific gravity as a metric. For these tests, a screening criterion of 0.9 g/hr/m 2 for VTR and a specific gravity change of 10% was used. Based on this work, it was concluded that while all seal materials passed exposure to the aqueous simulant mixed waste, EPDM and SBR had the lowest VTRs. In the chlorinated hydrocarbon simulant mixed waste, only Viton passed the screening tests. In both the simulant scintillation fluid mixed waste and the ketone mixture simulant mixed waste, none of the seal materials met the screening criteria. For specific gravity testing of liner materials, the data showed that while all materials with the exception of polypropylene passed the screening criteria, Kel-F, HDPE, and XLPE offered the greatest resistance to the combination of radiation and chemicals

  1. Metal Vapor Arcing Risk Assessment Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Monika C.; Leidecker, Henning W.

    2010-01-01

    The Tin Whisker Metal Vapor Arcing Risk Assessment Tool has been designed to evaluate the risk of metal vapor arcing and to help facilitate a decision toward a researched risk disposition. Users can evaluate a system without having to open up the hardware. This process allows for investigating components at risk rather than spending time and money analyzing every component. The tool points to a risk level and provides direction for appropriate action and documentation.

  2. Facile synthesis of graphene on single mode fiber via chemical vapor deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, C.; Man, B.Y.; Jiang, S.Z.; Yang, C.; Liu, M.; Chen, C.S.; Xu, S.C.; Feng, D.J.; Bi, D.; Liu, F.Y.; Qiu, H.W.

    2014-01-01

    Direct deposition of graphene film on the standard single mode fiber is offered using a Cu-vapor-assisted chemical vapor deposition system. The gas flow of H 2 and Ar before the growth process plays a crucial role for the direct deposition of the graphene film and the layers of the graphene can be controlled by the growth time. With a large gas flow, Cu atoms are carried off with the gas flow and hard to deposit on the surface of the single mode fiber before the growth process. Consequently, uniform graphene film is obtained in this case. On the contrary, with a lower one, Cu atoms is facile to deposit on the surface of the single mode fiber and form nanodots acting as active catalytic sites for the growth of carbon nanotubes. This method presents us a promising transfer-free technique for fabrication of the photonic applications.

  3. Achieving uniform layer deposition by atmospheric-pressure plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jae-Ok [Department of Plasma Engineering, Korea Institute of Machinery & Materials (KIMM), Daejeon 305-343 (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Woo Seok, E-mail: kang@kimm.re.kr [Department of Plasma Engineering, Korea Institute of Machinery & Materials (KIMM), Daejeon 305-343 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Environment & Energy Mechanical Engineering, University of Science & Technology (UST), Daejeon 305-350 (Korea, Republic of); Hur, Min; Lee, Jin Young [Department of Plasma Engineering, Korea Institute of Machinery & Materials (KIMM), Daejeon 305-343 (Korea, Republic of); Song, Young-Hoon [Department of Plasma Engineering, Korea Institute of Machinery & Materials (KIMM), Daejeon 305-343 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Environment & Energy Mechanical Engineering, University of Science & Technology (UST), Daejeon 305-350 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-12-31

    This work investigates the use of plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition under atmospheric pressure for achieving uniform layer formation. Electrical and optical measurements demonstrated that the counterbalance between oxygen and precursors maintained the homogeneous discharge mode, while creating intermediate species for layer deposition. Several steps of the deposition process of the layers, which were processed on a stationary stage, were affected by flow stream and precursor depletion. This study showed that by changing the flow streamlines using substrate stage motion uniform layer deposition under atmospheric pressure can be achieved. - Highlights: • Zirconium oxide was deposited by atmospheric-pressure plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition. • Homogeneous plasma was maintained by counterbalancing between discharge gas and precursors. • Several deposition steps were observed affected by the gas flow stream and precursor depletion. • Thin film layer was uniformly grown when the substrate underwent a sweeping motion.

  4. A heated vapor cell unit for dichroic atomic vapor laser lock in atomic rubidium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarron, Daniel J; Hughes, Ifan G; Tierney, Patrick; Cornish, Simon L

    2007-09-01

    The design and performance of a compact heated vapor cell unit for realizing a dichroic atomic vapor laser lock (DAVLL) for the D(2) transitions in atomic rubidium is described. A 5 cm long vapor cell is placed in a double-solenoid arrangement to produce the required magnetic field; the heat from the solenoid is used to increase the vapor pressure and correspondingly the DAVLL signal. We have characterized experimentally the dependence of important features of the DAVLL signal on magnetic field and cell temperature. For the weaker transitions both the amplitude and gradient of the signal are increased by an order of magnitude.

  5. A heated vapor cell unit for dichroic atomic vapor laser lock in atomic rubidium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCarron, Daniel J.; Hughes, Ifan G.; Tierney, Patrick; Cornish, Simon L.

    2007-01-01

    The design and performance of a compact heated vapor cell unit for realizing a dichroic atomic vapor laser lock (DAVLL) for the D 2 transitions in atomic rubidium is described. A 5 cm long vapor cell is placed in a double-solenoid arrangement to produce the required magnetic field; the heat from the solenoid is used to increase the vapor pressure and correspondingly the DAVLL signal. We have characterized experimentally the dependence of important features of the DAVLL signal on magnetic field and cell temperature. For the weaker transitions both the amplitude and gradient of the signal are increased by an order of magnitude

  6. Incorporation of Condensation Heat Transfer in a Flow Network Code

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anthony, Miranda; Majumdar, Alok

    2002-01-01

    Pure water is distilled from waste water in the International Space Station. The distillation assembly consists of an evaporator, a compressor and a condenser. Vapor is periodically purged from the condenser to avoid vapor accumulation. Purged vapor is condensed in a tube by coolant water prior to entering the purge pump. The paper presents a condensation model of purged vapor in a tube. This model is based on the Finite Volume Method. In the Finite Volume Method, the flow domain is discretized into multiple control volumes and a simultaneous analysis is performed.

  7. Vapor Explosions with Subcooled Freon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henry, R.E.; Fauske, Hans K.; McUmber, L.M.

    1976-01-01

    Explosive vapor formation accompanied by destructive shock waves, can be produced when two liquids, at much different temperatures, are brought into intimate contact. A proposed analytical model states that the interface temperature upon contact between the two liquid systems, gust be greater than or equal to the spontaneous nucleation temperature of that liquid-liquid system and that the thermal boundary layer must be sufficiently developed to support a critical size cavity. For time scales greater than 10-12 sec, the interface temperature upon contact of two semi-infinite masses, with constant thermal properties, can be related to the initial liquid temperatures. The spontaneous nucleation behavior at the interface can either be heterogeneous or homogeneous in nature. In either case, the critical size cavities, which initiate the vaporization process, are produced by local density fluctuations within the cold liquid. For homogeneous conditions, the two liquids present a well-wetted system and the vapor embryos are produced entirely within the cold liquid. For heterogeneous conditions, which result from poor, or imperfect wetting, at the liquid-liquid interface, the critical sized cavities are created at the interface at somewhat lower temperatures. A sequence of experiments, using Freon-22 and water, Freon-22 and mineral oil, and Freon-12 and mineral oil have been performed to test this spontaneous nucleation premise. For Freon-22 at its normal boiling point, the interface temperature of the water must be at least 77 deg. C before the interface temperature equals or exceeds the minimum homogeneous nucleation value of 54 deg. C and 84 deg. C before the interface temperature equals 60 deg. C where the homogeneous nucleation rate becomes truly explosive. The Freon-water test demonstrated explosive interactions for water temperatures considerably lower than this value and this was attributed to the heterogeneous nucleation characteristics of that particular system

  8. Effect of impact angle on vaporization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, Peter H.

    1996-09-01

    Impacts into easily vaporized targets such as dry ice and carbonates generate a rapidly expanding vapor cloud. Laboratory experiments performed in a tenuous atmosphere allow deriving the internal energy of this cloud through well-established and tested theoretical descriptions. A second set of experiments under near-vacuum conditions provides a second measure of energy as the internal energy converts to kinetic energy of expansion. The resulting data allow deriving the vaporized mass as a function of impact angle and velocity. Although peak shock pressures decrease with decreasing impact angle (referenced to horizontal), the amount of impact-generated vapor is found to increase and is derived from the upper surface. Moreover, the temperature of the vapor cloud appears to decrease with decreasing angle. These unexpected results are proposed to reflect the increasing roles of shear heating and downrange hypervelocity ricochet impacts created during oblique impacts. The shallow provenance, low temperature, and trajectory of such vapor have implications for larger-scale events, including enhancement of atmospheric and biospheric stress by oblique terrestrial impacts and impact recycling of the early atmosphere of Mars.

  9. Using laser absorption spectroscopy to monitor composition and physical properties of metal vapors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berzins, L.V.

    1993-01-01

    The Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation (AVLIS) program has been using laser absorption spectroscopy to monitor vapor densities for over 15 years. Laser absorption spectroscopy has proven itself to be an accurate and reliable method to monitor both density and composition. During this time the diagnostic has moved from a research tool toward a robust component of a process control system. The hardware used for this diagnostic is discussed elsewhere at this symposium. This paper describes how the laser absorption spectroscopy diagnostic is used as a component of a process control system as well as supplying detailed measurements on vapor densities, composition, flow velocity, internal and kinetic temperatures, and constituent distributions. Examples will be drawn from the uranium AVLIS program. In addition potential applications such as composition control in the production of metal matrix composites or aircraft alloys will be discussed

  10. Vaporization of elemental mercury from pools of molten lead at low concentrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greene, G.A.; Finfrock, C.C.

    2000-01-01

    Should coolant accidentally be lost to the APT (Accelerator Production of Tritium) blanket and target, and the decay heat in the target be deposited in the surrounding blanket by thermal radiation, temperatures in the blanket modules could exceed structural limits and cause a physical collapse of the blanket modules into a non-coolable geometry. Such a sequence of unmitigated events could result in some melting of the APT blanket and create the potential for the release of mercury into the target-blanket cavity air space. Experiments were conducted which simulate such hypothetical accident conditions in order to measure the rate of vaporization of elemental mercury from pools of molten lead to quantify the possible severe accident source term for the APT blanket region. Molten pools of from 0.01% to 0.10% mercury in lead were prepared under inert conditions. Experiments were conducted, which varied in duration from several hours to as long as a month, to measure the mercury vaporization from the lead pools. The melt pools and gas atmospheres were held fixed at 340 C during the tests. Parameters which were varied in the tests included the mercury concentration, gas flow rate over the melt and agitation of the melt, gas atmosphere composition and the addition of aluminum to the melt. The vaporization of mercury was found to scale roughly linearly with the concentration of mercury in the pool. Variations in the gas flow rates were not found to have any effect on the mass transfer, however agitation of the melt by a submerged stirrer did enhance the mercury vaporization rate. The rate of mercury vaporization with an argon (inert) atmosphere was found to exceed that for an air (oxidizing) atmosphere by as much as a factor of from ten to 20; the causal factor in this variation was the formation of an oxide layer over the melt pool with the air atmosphere which served to retard mass transfer across the melt-atmosphere interface. Aluminum was introduced into the melt to

  11. Investigation of the vaporization of boric acid by transpiration thermogravimetry and knudsen effusion mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balasubramanian, R; Lakshmi Narasimhan, T S; Viswanathan, R; Nalini, S

    2008-11-06

    The vaporization of H3BO3(s) was studied by using a commercial thermogravimetric apparatus and a Knudsen effusion mass spectrometer. The thermogravimetric measurements involved use of argon as the carrier gas for vapor transport and derivation of vapor pressures of H3BO3(g) in the temperature range 315-352 K through many flow dependence and temperature dependence runs. The vapor pressures as well as the enthalpy of sublimation obtained in this study represent the first results from measurements at low temperatures that are in accord with the previously reported near-classical transpiration measurements (by Stackelberg et al. 70 years ago) at higher temperatures (382-413 K with steam as the carrier gas). The KEMS measurements performed for the first time on boric acid showed H3BO3(g) as the principal vapor species with no meaningful information discernible on H2O(g) though. The thermodynamic parameters, both p(H3BO3) and Delta sub H degrees m(H3BO3,g), deduced from KEMS results in the temperature range 295-342 K are in excellent agreement with the transpiration results lending further credibility to the latter. All this information points toward congruent vaporization at the H3BO3 composition in the H2O-B2O3 binary system. The vapor pressures obtained from transpiration (this study and that of Stackelberg et al.) as well as from KEMS measurements are combined to recommend the following: log [p(H3BO3)/Pa]=-(5199+/-74)/(T/K)+(15.65+/-0.23), valid for T=295-413 K; and Delta sub H degrees m=98.3+/-9.5 kJ mol (-1) at T=298 K for H3BO3(s)=H3BO3(g).

  12. A Simple Experiment for Determining Vapor Pressure and Enthalpy of Vaporization of Water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levinson, Gerald S.

    1982-01-01

    Laboratory procedures, calculations, and sample results are described for a freshman chemistry experiment in which the Clausius-Clapeyron equation is introduced as a means of describing the variation of vapor pressure with temperature and for determining enthalpy of vaporization. (Author/SK)

  13. Vapor pressure and enthalpy of vaporization of oil of catnip by correlation gas chromatography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simmons, Daniel; Gobble, Chase; Chickos, James

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Vaporization enthalpies of the nepetalactones from oil of catnip have been evaluated. • Vapor pressures from T = (298.15 to 350) K have been evaluated. • Oil of catnip has a vapor pressure similar to DEET at T = 298.15 K. - Abstract: The vaporization enthalpy and vapor pressure of the two nepetalactones found in Nepeta cataria have been evaluated by correlation gas chromatography. Vaporization enthalpies at T = 298.15 K of {(68.0 ± 1.9) and (69.4 ± 1.9)} kJ ⋅ mol"−"1 have been derived for the minor diastereomer, (4aS,7S,7aS)-nepetalactone, and major one, (4aS,7S,7aR)-nepetalactone, respectively. Vapor pressures also at T = 298.15 K of p = (1.2 ± 0.04) Pa and (0.91 ± 0.03) Pa have been evaluated for the minor and the major stereoisomer. In addition to being of interest because of the remarkable effect it has on various felids, oil of catnip is also quite effective in repelling mosquitoes, comparable to diethyl-m-toluamide (DEET). The vapor pressures evaluated in this work suggest that the two stereoisomers have similar volatility to DEET at ambient temperatures.

  14. Vapor pressures and enthalpies of vaporization of a series of the linear aliphatic aldehydes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Verevkin, S. P.; Krasnykh, E. L.; Vasiltsova, T. V.; Koutek, Bohumír; Doubský, Jan; Heintz, A.

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 206, - (2003), s. 331-339 ISSN 0378-3812 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4055905 Keywords : aldehydes * vapor pressure * enthalpy of vaporization Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 1.165, year: 2003

  15. Vapor pressures and vaporization enthalpy of codlemone by correlation gas chromatography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schultz, Shannon M.; Harris, Harold H.; Chickos, James S.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • The vaporization enthalpy of codlemone has been evaluated. • The vapor pressure of codlemone has been evaluated from T = (298.15 to T b ) K. • Vapor pressures for the 1-alkanols standards are available from T = (298.15 to 500) K. - Abstract: The vapor pressure and vaporization enthalpy of codlemone (trans, trans 8,10-dodecadien-1-ol), the female sex hormone of the codling moth is evaluated by correlation gas chromatography using a series of saturated primary alcohols as standards. A vaporization enthalpy of (92.3 ± 2.6) kJ · mol −1 and a vapor pressure, p/Pa = (0.083 ± 0.012) were evaluated at T = 298.15 K. An equation for the evaluation of vapor pressure from ambient temperature to boiling has been derived by correlation for codlemone. The calculated boiling temperature of T B = 389 K at p = 267 Pa is within the temperature range reported in the literature. A normal boiling temperature of T B = (549.1 ± 0.1) K is also estimated by extrapolation

  16. Evidence of a sewer vapor transport pathway at the USEPA vapor intrusion research duplex

    Science.gov (United States)

    The role of sewer lines as preferential pathways for vapor intrusion is poorly understood. Although the importance of sewer lines for volatile organic compound (VOC) transport has been documented at a small number of sites with vapor intrusion, sewer lines are not routinely sampl...

  17. Portable device for generation of ultra-pure water vapor feeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velin, P.; Stenman, U.; Skoglundh, M.; Carlsson, P.-A.

    2017-11-01

    A portable device for the generation of co-feeds of water vapor has been designed, constructed, and evaluated for flexible use as an add-on component to laboratory chemical reactors. The vapor is formed by catalytic oxidation of hydrogen, which benefits the formation of well-controlled minute concentrations of ultra-pure water. Analysis of the effluent stream by on-line mass spectrometry and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy confirms that water vapor can be, with high precision, generated both rapidly and steadily over extended periods in the range of 100 ppm to 3 vol. % (limited by safety considerations) using a total flow of 100 to 1500 ml/min at normal temperature and pressure. Further, the device has been used complementary to a commercial water evaporator and mixing system to span water concentrations up to 12 vol. %. Finally, an operando diffuse reflective infrared Fourier transform spectroscopic measurement of palladium catalysed methane oxidation in the absence and presence of up to 1.0 vol. % water has been carried out to demonstrate the applicability of the device for co-feeding well-controlled low concentrations of water vapor to a common type of spectroscopic experiment. The possibilities of creating isotopically labeled water vapor as well as using tracer gases for dynamic experiments are discussed.

  18. Design, development and tests of high-performance silicon vapor chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cai, Qingjun; Chen, Bing-chung; Tsai, Chialun

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a novel triple stack process to develop an all-silicon thermal ground plane (TGP) vapor chamber that enables fabrication of compact, large scale, low thermal expansion coefficient mismatch and high-performance heat transfer devices. The TGP vapor chamber is formed through bonding three etched silicon wafers. On both the top and bottom wafers, microscale and high aspect ratio wick structures are etched for liquid transport. The 1.5 mm thick middle layer contains the cavities for vapor flow. To achieve hermetic seal, glass frit with four sealing rings, approximately 300 µm wide and 30 µm thick, is used to bond the edges and supporting posts. For experimental evaluations, 3 mm × 38 mm × 38 mm TGP vapor chambers are developed. The volume density of the heat transfer device is approximately 1.5 × 10 3 kg m −3 . Measurement of mass loss and stability studies of heat transfer indicates that the vapor chamber system is hermetically sealed. Using ethanol as the operating liquid, high heat transfer performance is demonstrated. Effective thermal conductivity reaches over 2500 W m −1  ⋅ K −1 . Under high g environment, experimental results show good liquid transport capabilities of the wick structures. (paper)

  19. Design, development and tests of high-performance silicon vapor chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Qingjun; Chen, Bing-chung; Tsai, Chialun

    2012-03-01

    This paper presents a novel triple stack process to develop an all-silicon thermal ground plane (TGP) vapor chamber that enables fabrication of compact, large scale, low thermal expansion coefficient mismatch and high-performance heat transfer devices. The TGP vapor chamber is formed through bonding three etched silicon wafers. On both the top and bottom wafers, microscale and high aspect ratio wick structures are etched for liquid transport. The 1.5 mm thick middle layer contains the cavities for vapor flow. To achieve hermetic seal, glass frit with four sealing rings, approximately 300 µm wide and 30 µm thick, is used to bond the edges and supporting posts. For experimental evaluations, 3 mm × 38 mm × 38 mm TGP vapor chambers are developed. The volume density of the heat transfer device is approximately 1.5 × 103 kg m-3. Measurement of mass loss and stability studies of heat transfer indicates that the vapor chamber system is hermetically sealed. Using ethanol as the operating liquid, high heat transfer performance is demonstrated. Effective thermal conductivity reaches over 2500 W m-1 ṡ K-1. Under high g environment, experimental results show good liquid transport capabilities of the wick structures.

  20. Method and apparatus for controlling the flow rate of mercury in a flow system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossman, Mark W.; Speer, Richard

    1991-01-01

    A method for increasing the mercury flow rate to a photochemical mercury enrichment utilizing an entrainment system comprises the steps of passing a carrier gas over a pool of mercury maintained at a first temperature T1, wherein the carrier gas entrains mercury vapor; passing said mercury vapor entrained carrier gas to a second temperature zone T2 having temperature less than T1 to condense said entrained mercury vapor, thereby producing a saturated Hg condition in the carrier gas; and passing said saturated Hg carrier gas to said photochemical enrichment reactor.

  1. Water vapor profiling using microwave radiometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, J. R.; Wilheit, T. T.

    1988-01-01

    Water vapor is one of the most important constituents in the Earth's atmosphere. Its spatial and temporal variations affect a wide spectrum of meteorological phenomena ranging from the formation of clouds to the development of severe storms. The passive microwave technique offers an excellent means for water vapor measurements. It can provide both day and night coverage under most cloud conditions. Two water vapor absorption features, at 22 and 183 GHz, were explored in the past years. The line strengths of these features differ by nearly two orders of magnitude. As a consequence, the techniques and the final products of water vapor measurements are also quite different. The research effort in the past few years was to improve and extend the retrieval algorithm to the measurements of water vapor profiles under cloudy conditions. In addition, the retrieval of total precipitable water using 183 GHz measurements, but in a manner analogous to the use of 22 GHz measurements, to increase measurement sensitivity for atmospheres of very low moisture content was also explored.

  2. Vapor pressure and thermodynamics of beryllium carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rinehart, G.H.; Behrens, R.G.

    1980-01-01

    The vapor pressure of beryllium carbide has been measured over the temperature range 1388 to 1763 K using Knudsen-effusion mass spectrometry. Vaporization occurs incongruently according to the reaction Be 2 C(s) = 2Be(g) + C(s). The equilibrium vapor pressure above the mixture of Be 2 C and C over the experimental temperature range is (R/J K -1 mol -1 )ln(p/Pa) = -(3.610 +- 0.009) x 10 5 (K/T) + (221.43 +- 1.06). The third-law enthalpy change for the above reaction obtained from the present vapor pressures is ΔH 0 (298.15 K) = (740.5 +- 0.1) kJ mol -1 . The corresponding second-law result is ΔH 0 (298.15 K) = (732.0 +- 1.8) kJ mol -1 . The enthalpy of formation for Be 2 C(s) calculated from the present third-law vaporization enthalpy and the enthalpy of formation of Be(g) is ΔH 0 sub(f)(298.15 K) = -(92.5 +- 15.7) kJ mol -1 . (author)

  3. Vapor pumps and gas-driven machines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guillet, R.

    1991-01-01

    The vapor pump, patented in 1979 by Gaz de France, is an additional mass and heat exchanger which uses the combustion air of fuel-burning machines as an additional cold source. This cold source is preheated and, above all, humidified before reaching the burner, by means of the residual sensible and latent heat in the combustion products of the fuel-burning process. This final exchanger thus makes it possible, in many cases, to recover all the gross calorific value of natural gas, even when the combustion products leave the process at a wet temperature greater than 60 0 C, the maximum dew point of the products of normal combustion. Another significant advantage of the vapor pump being worth highlighting is the selective recycling of water vapor by the vapor pump which reduces the adiabatic combustion temperature and the oxygen concentration in the combustion air, two factors which lead to considerable reductions in nitrogen oxides formation, hence limiting atmospheric pollution. Alongside a wide range of configurations which make advantageous use of the vapor pump in association with gas-driven machines and processes, including gas turbines, a number of boiler plant installations are also presented [fr

  4. Distribution of tropical tropospheric water vapor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, De-Zheng; Lindzen, Richard S.

    1993-01-01

    Utilizing a conceptual model for tropical convection and observational data for water vapor, the maintenance of the vertical distribution of the tropical tropospheric water vapor is discussed. While deep convection induces large-scale subsidence that constrains the turbulent downgradient mixing to within the convective boundary layer and effectively dries the troposphere through downward advection, it also pumps hydrometeors into the upper troposphere, whose subsequent evaporation appears to be the major source of moisture for the large-scale subsiding motion. The development of upper-level clouds and precipitation from these clouds may also act to dry the outflow, thus explaining the low relative humidity near the tropopause. A one-dimensional model is developed to simulate the mean vertical structure of water vapor in the tropical troposphere. It is also shown that the horizontal variation of water vapor in the tropical troposphere above the trade-wind boundary layer can be explained by the variation of a moisture source that is proportional to the amount of upper-level clouds. Implications for the nature of water vapor feedback in global warming are discussed.

  5. Thermodynamics and Kinetics of Silicate Vaporization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, Nathan S.; Costa, Gustavo C. C.

    2015-01-01

    Silicates are a common class of materials that are often exposed to high temperatures. The behavior of these materials needs to be understood for applications as high temperature coatings in material science as well as the constituents of lava for geological considerations. The vaporization behavior of these materials is an important aspect of their high temperature behavior and it also provides fundamental thermodynamic data. The application of Knudsen effusion mass spectrometry (KEMS) to silicates is discussed. There are several special considerations for silicates. The first is selection of an appropriate cell material, which is either nearly inert or has well-understood interactions with the silicate. The second consideration is proper measurement of the low vapor pressures. This can be circumvented by using a reducing agent to boost the vapor pressure without changing the solid composition or by working at very high temperatures. The third consideration deals with kinetic barriers to vaporization. The measurement of these barriers, as encompassed in a vaporization coefficient, is discussed. Current measured data of rare earth silicates for high temperature coating applications are discussed. In addition, data on magnesium-iron-silicates (olivine) are presented and discussed.

  6. Numerical analysis of fragmentation mechanisms in vapor explosions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koshizuka, Seiichi; Ikeda, Hirokazu; Oka, Yoshiaki [Tokyo Univ., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Nuclear Engineering Research Lab.

    1998-01-01

    Fragmentation of molten metal is the key process in vapor explosions. However this process is so rapid that the mechanisms have not been clarified yet in the experimental studies. Besides, numerical simulation is difficult because we have to analyze water, steam and molten metal simultaneously with evaporation and fragmentation. The authors have been developing a new numerical method, the Moving Particle Semi-implicit (MPS) method, based on moving particles and their interactions. Grids are not necessary. Incompressible flows with fragmentation on free surfaces have been calculated successfully using the MPS method. In the present study numerical simulation of the fragmentation processes using the MPS method is carried out to investigate the mechanisms. A numerical model to calculate evaporation from water to steam is developed. In this model, new particles are generated on water-steam interfaces. Effect of evaporation is also investigated. Growth of the filament is not accelerated when the normal evaporation is considered. This is because the normal evaporation needs a longer time than the moment of the jet impingement, though the filament growth is decided in this moment. Next, rapid evaporation based on spontaneous nucleation is considered. The filament growth is markedly accelerated. This result is consistent with the experimental fact that the spontaneous nucleation temperature is a necessary condition of small-scale vapor explosions. (J.P.N.)

  7. Modelling and numerical simulation of liquid-vapor phase transitions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caro, F.

    2004-11-01

    This work deals with the modelling and numerical simulation of liquid-vapor phase transition phenomena. The study is divided into two part: first we investigate phase transition phenomena with a Van Der Waals equation of state (non monotonic equation of state), then we adopt an alternative approach with two equations of state. In the first part, we study the classical viscous criteria for selecting weak solutions of the system used when the equation of state is non monotonic. Those criteria do not select physical solutions and therefore we focus a more recent criterion: the visco-capillary criterion. We use this criterion to exactly solve the Riemann problem (which imposes solving an algebraic scalar non linear equation). Unfortunately, this step is quite costly in term of CPU which prevent from using this method as a ground for building Godunov solvers. That is why we propose an alternative approach two equations of state. Using the least action principle, we propose a phase changing two-phase flow model which is based on the second thermodynamic principle. We shall then describe two equilibrium submodels issued from the relaxations processes when instantaneous equilibrium is assumed. Despite the weak hyperbolicity of the last sub-model, we propose stable numerical schemes based on a two-step strategy involving a convective step followed by a relaxation step. We show the ability of the system to simulate vapor bubbles nucleation. (author)

  8. Physically vapor deposited coatings on tools: performance and wear phenomena

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koenig, W.; Fritsch, R.; Kammermeier, D.

    1991-01-01

    Coatings produced by physical vapor deposition (PVD) enhance the performance of tools for a broad variety of production processes. In addition to TiN, nowadays (Ti,Al)N and Ti(C,N) coated tools are available. This gives the opportunity to compare the performance of different coatings under identical machining conditions and to evaluate causes and phenomena of wear. TiN, (Ti,Al)N and Ti(C,N) coatings on high speed steel (HSS) show different performances in milling and turning of heat treated steel. The thermal and frictional properties of the coating materials affect the structure, the thickness and the flow of the chips, the contact area on the rake face and the tool life. Model tests show the influence of internal cooling and the thermal conductivity of coated HSS inserts. TiN and (Ti,Zr)N PVD coatings on cemented carbides were examined in interrupted turning and in milling of heat treated steel. Experimental results show a significant influence of typical time-temperature cycles of PVD and chemical vapor deposition (CVD) coating processes on the physical data and on the performance of the substrates. PVD coatings increase tool life, especially towards lower cutting speeds into ranges which cannot be applied with CVD coatings. The reason for this is the superior toughness of the PVD coated carbide. The combination of tough, micrograin carbide and PVD coating even enables broaching of case hardened sliding gears at a cutting speed of 66 m min -1 . (orig.)

  9. Monte-Carlo simulation of complex vapor-transport systems for RIB applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Y.; Alton, G.D.

    2005-01-01

    In order to minimize decay losses of short-lived radioactive species at ISOL based RIB facilities, effusive-flow particle transit times between target and ion source must be as short as practically achievable. A Monte-Carlo code has been developed for simulating the effusive-flow of neutral particles through vapor-transport systems independent of materials of construction. The code provides average distance traveled and time information associated with the transit of individual particles through a system. It offers a cost effective and accurate means for arriving at vapor-transport system designs. In this report, the code will be described and results obtained by its use in evaluating several prototype vapor-transport systems using specular reflection, cosine and isotropic particle re-emission about the normal to the surface models following adsorption. Simulation results obtained with an isotropic distribution are in close agreement with experimental measurements of the properties of prototype vapor-transport systems fabricated at the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility

  10. Dynamics of vapor plume in transient keyhole during laser welding of stainless steel: Local evaporation, plume swing and gas entrapment into porosity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Shengyong; Chen, Xin; Shao, Xinyu; Gong, Shuili; Xiao, Jianzhong

    2016-07-01

    In order to better understand the local evaporation phenomena of keyhole wall, vapor plume swing above the keyhole and ambient gas entrapment into the porosity defects, the 3D time-dependent dynamics of the metallic vapor plume in a transient keyhole during fiber laser welding is numerically investigated. The vapor dynamical parameters, including the velocity and pressure, are successfully predicted and obtain good agreements with the experimental and literature data. It is found that the vapor plume flow inside the keyhole has complex multiple directions, and this various directions characteristic of the vapor plume is resulted from the dynamic evaporation phenomena with variable locations and orientations on the keyhole wall. The results also demonstrate that because of this dynamic local evaporation, the ejected vapor plume from the keyhole opening is usually in high frequency swinging. The results further indicate that the oscillation frequency of the plume swing angle is around 2.0-8.0 kHz, which is of the same order of magnitude with that of the keyhole depth (2.0-5.0 kHz). This consistency clearly shows that the swing of the ejected vapor plume is closely associated with the keyhole instability during laser welding. Furthermore, it is learned that there is usually a negative pressure region (several hundred Pa lower than the atmospheric pressure) of the vapor flow around the keyhole opening. This pressure could lead to a strong vortex flow near the rear keyhole wall, especially when the velocity of the ejected metallic vapor from the keyhole opening is high. Under the effect of this flow, the ambient gas is involved into the keyhole, and could finally be entrapped into the bubbles within a very short time (keyhole.

  11. Sensitivity study of the monogroove with screen heat pipe design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Austin L.; Joyce, Martin

    1988-01-01

    The present sensitivity study of design variable effects on the performance of a monogroove-with-screen heat pipe obtains performance curves for maximum heat-transfer rates vs. operating temperatures by means of a computer code; performance projections for both 1-g and zero-g conditions are obtainable. The variables in question were liquid and vapor channel design, wall groove design, and the number of feed lines in the evaporator and condenser. The effect on performance of three different working fluids, namely ammonia, methanol, and water, were also determined. Greatest sensitivity was to changes in liquid and vapor channel diameters.

  12. Auxiliary Electrodes for Chromium Vapor Sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fergus, Jeffrey; Shahzad, Moaiz; Britt, Tommy

    2018-05-15

    Measurement of chromia-containing vapors in solid oxide fuel cell systems is useful for monitoring and addressing cell degradation caused by oxidation of the chomia scale formed on alloys for interconnects and balance-of-plant components. One approach to measuring chromium is to use a solid electrolyte with an auxiliary electrode that relates the partial pressure of the chromium containing species to the mobile species in the electrolyte. One example is YCrO3 which can equilibrate with the chromium containing vapor and yttrium in yttria stabilized zirconia to establish an oxygen activity. Another is Na2CrO4 which can equilibrate with the chromium-containing vapor to establish a sodium activity.

  13. Monolithic microwave integrated circuit water vapor radiometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukamto, L. M.; Cooley, T. W.; Janssen, M. A.; Parks, G. S.

    1991-01-01

    A proof of concept Monolithic Microwave Integrated Circuit (MMIC) Water Vapor Radiometer (WVR) is under development at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL). WVR's are used to remotely sense water vapor and cloud liquid water in the atmosphere and are valuable for meteorological applications as well as for determination of signal path delays due to water vapor in the atmosphere. The high cost and large size of existing WVR instruments motivate the development of miniature MMIC WVR's, which have great potential for low cost mass production. The miniaturization of WVR components allows large scale deployment of WVR's for Earth environment and meteorological applications. Small WVR's can also result in improved thermal stability, resulting in improved calibration stability. Described here is the design and fabrication of a 31.4 GHz MMIC radiometer as one channel of a thermally stable WVR as a means of assessing MMIC technology feasibility.

  14. Numerical modeling of a vaporizing multicomponent droplet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Megaridis, C. M.; Sirignano, W. A.

    The fundamental processes governing the energy, mass, and momentum exchange between the liquid and gas phases of vaporizing, multicomponent liquid droplets have been investigated. The axisymmetric configuration under consideration consists of an isolated multicomponent droplet vaporizing in a convective environment. The model considers different volatilities of the liquid components, variable liquid properties due to variation of the species concentrations, and non-Fickian multicomponent gaseous diffusion. The bicomponent droplet model was employed to examine the commonly used assumptions of unity Lewis number in the liquid phase and Fickian gaseous diffusion. It is found that the droplet drag coefficients, the vaporization rates, and the related transfer numbers are not influenced by the above assumptions in a significant way.

  15. Secondhand Exposure to Vapors From Electronic Cigarettes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czogala, Jan; Fidelus, Bartlomiej; Zielinska-Danch, Wioleta; Travers, Mark J.; Sobczak, Andrzej

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes) are designed to generate inhalable nicotine aerosol (vapor). When an e-cigarette user takes a puff, the nicotine solution is heated and the vapor is taken into lungs. Although no sidestream vapor is generated between puffs, some of the mainstream vapor is exhaled by e-cigarette user. The aim of this study was to evaluate the secondhand exposure to nicotine and other tobacco-related toxicants from e-cigarettes. Materials and Methods: We measured selected airborne markers of secondhand exposure: nicotine, aerosol particles (PM2.5), carbon monoxide, and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in an exposure chamber. We generated e-cigarette vapor from 3 various brands of e-cigarette using a smoking machine and controlled exposure conditions. We also compared secondhand exposure with e-cigarette vapor and tobacco smoke generated by 5 dual users. Results: The study showed that e-cigarettes are a source of secondhand exposure to nicotine but not to combustion toxicants. The air concentrations of nicotine emitted by various brands of e-cigarettes ranged from 0.82 to 6.23 µg/m3. The average concentration of nicotine resulting from smoking tobacco cigarettes was 10 times higher than from e-cigarettes (31.60±6.91 vs. 3.32±2.49 µg/m3, respectively; p = .0081). Conclusions: Using an e-cigarette in indoor environments may involuntarily expose nonusers to nicotine but not to toxic tobacco-specific combustion products. More research is needed to evaluate health consequences of secondhand exposure to nicotine, especially among vulnerable populations, including children, pregnant women, and people with cardiovascular conditions. PMID:24336346

  16. Vapor characterization of Tank 241-C-103

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huckaby, J.L.; Story, M.S.

    1994-06-01

    The Westinghouse Hanford Company Tank Vapor Issue Resolution Program has developed, in cooperation with Northwest Instrument Systems, Inc., Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oregon Graduate Institute of Science and Technology, Pacific Northwest Laboratory, and Sandia National Laboratory, the equipment and expertise to characterize gases and vapors in the high-level radioactive waste storage tanks at the Hanford Site in south central Washington State. This capability has been demonstrated by the characterization of the tank 241-C-103 headspace. This tank headspace is the first, and for many reasons is expected to be the most problematic, that will be characterized (Osborne 1992). Results from the most recent and comprehensive sampling event, sample job 7B, are presented for the purpose of providing scientific bases for resolution of vapor issues associated with tank 241-C-103. This report is based on the work of Clauss et al. 1994, Jenkins et al. 1994, Ligotke et al. 1994, Mahon et al. 1994, and Rasmussen and Einfeld 1994. No attempt has been made in this report to evaluate the implications of the data presented, such as the potential impact of headspace gases and vapors to tank farm workers health. That and other issues will be addressed elsewhere. Key to the resolution of worker health issues is the quantitation of compounds of toxicological concern. The Toxicology Review Panel, a panel of Pacific Northwest Laboratory experts in various areas, of toxicology, has chosen 19 previously identified compounds as being of potential toxicological concern. During sample job 7B, the sampling and analytical methodology was validated for this preliminary list of compounds of toxicological concern. Validation was performed according to guidance provided by the Tank Vapor Conference Committee, a group of analytical chemists from academic institutions and national laboratories assembled and commissioned by the Tank Vapor Issue Resolution Program

  17. Vapor characterization of Tank 241-C-103

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huckaby, J.L. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States); Story, M.S. [Northwest Instrument Systems, Inc. Richland, WA (United States)

    1994-06-01

    The Westinghouse Hanford Company Tank Vapor Issue Resolution Program has developed, in cooperation with Northwest Instrument Systems, Inc., Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oregon Graduate Institute of Science and Technology, Pacific Northwest Laboratory, and Sandia National Laboratory, the equipment and expertise to characterize gases and vapors in the high-level radioactive waste storage tanks at the Hanford Site in south central Washington State. This capability has been demonstrated by the characterization of the tank 241-C-103 headspace. This tank headspace is the first, and for many reasons is expected to be the most problematic, that will be characterized (Osborne 1992). Results from the most recent and comprehensive sampling event, sample job 7B, are presented for the purpose of providing scientific bases for resolution of vapor issues associated with tank 241-C-103. This report is based on the work of Clauss et al. 1994, Jenkins et al. 1994, Ligotke et al. 1994, Mahon et al. 1994, and Rasmussen and Einfeld 1994. No attempt has been made in this report to evaluate the implications of the data presented, such as the potential impact of headspace gases and vapors to tank farm workers health. That and other issues will be addressed elsewhere. Key to the resolution of worker health issues is the quantitation of compounds of toxicological concern. The Toxicology Review Panel, a panel of Pacific Northwest Laboratory experts in various areas, of toxicology, has chosen 19 previously identified compounds as being of potential toxicological concern. During sample job 7B, the sampling and analytical methodology was validated for this preliminary list of compounds of toxicological concern. Validation was performed according to guidance provided by the Tank Vapor Conference Committee, a group of analytical chemists from academic institutions and national laboratories assembled and commissioned by the Tank Vapor Issue Resolution Program.

  18. Model analysis of mechanisms controlling pneumatic soil vapor extraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høier, Camilla Kruse; Sonnenborg, Torben Obel; Jensen, Karsten Høgh

    2009-01-01

    of heterogeneous soils by enforcing large fluctuating pressure fronts through the contaminated area. Laboratory experiments have suggested that pneumatic SVE considerably improves the recovery rate from low-permeable units. We have analyzed the experimental results using a numerical code and quantified......The efficiency of traditional soil venting or soil vapor extraction (SVE) highly depends on the architecture of the subsurface because imposed advective air flow tends to bypass low-permeable contaminated areas. Pneumatic SVE is a technique developed to enhance remediation efficiency...... level the pneumatic venting technology is superior to the traditional technique, and that the method is particularly efficient in cases where large permeability contrasts exist between soil units in the subsurface....

  19. Vacuum distillation/vapor filtration water recovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honegger, R. J.; Neveril, R. B.; Remus, G. A.

    1974-01-01

    The development and evaluation of a vacuum distillation/vapor filtration (VD/VF) water recovery system are considered. As a functional model, the system converts urine and condensates waste water from six men to potable water on a steady-state basis. The system is designed for 180-day operating durations and for function on the ground, on zero-g aircraft, and in orbit. Preparatory tasks are summarized for conducting low gravity tests of a vacuum distillation/vapor filtration system for recovering water from urine.

  20. Detection of water vapor on Jupiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, H. P.; Fink, U.; Treffers, R.; Gautier, T. N., III

    1975-01-01

    High-altitude (12.4 km) spectroscopic observations of Jupiter at 5 microns from the NASA 91.5 cm airborne infrared telescope have revealed 14 absorptions assigned to the rotation-vibration spectrum of water vapor. Preliminary analysis indicates a mixing ratio about 1 millionth for the vapor phase of water. Estimates of temperature (greater than about 300 K) and pressure (less than 20 atm) suggest observation of water deep in Jupiter's hot spots responsible for its 5 micron flux. Model-atmosphere calculations based on radiative-transfer theory may change these initial estimates and provide a better physical picture of Jupiter's atmosphere below the visible cloud tops.

  1. Vapor deposition in basaltic stalactites, Kilauea, Hawaii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baird, A. K.; Mohrig, D. C.; Welday, E. E.

    Basaltic stalacties suspended from the ceiling of a large lava tube at Kilauea, Hawaii, have totally enclosed vesicles whose walls are covered with euhedral FeTi oxide and silicate crystals. The walls of the vesicles and the exterior surfaces of stalactites are Fe and Ti enriched and Si depleted compared to common basalt. Minerals in vesicles have surface ornamentations on crystal faces which include alkali-enriched, aluminosilicate glass(?) hemispheres. No sulfide-, chloride-, fluoride-, phosphate- or carbonate-bearing minerals are present. Minerals in the stalactites must have formed by deposition from an iron oxide-rich vapor phase produced by the partial melting and vaporization of wall rocks in the tube.

  2. Flammability characteristics of combustible gases and vapors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zabetakis, M. G. [Bureau of Mines, Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    1964-05-01

    This is a summary of the available limit of flammability, autoignition and burning-rate data for more than 200 combustible gases and vapors in air and other oxidants, as well as of empirical rules and graphs that can be used to predict similar data for thousands of other combustibles under a variety of environmental conditions. Spec$c data are presented on the paraffinic, unsaturated, aromatic, and alicyclic hydrocarbons, alcohols, ethers, aldehydes, ketones, and sulfur compounds, and an assortment of fuels, fuel blends, hydraulic fluids, engine oils, and miscellaneous combustible gases and vapors.

  3. Laser vapor phase deposition of semiconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karlov, N.V.; Luk' ianchuk, B.S.; Sisakian, E.V.; Shafeev, G.A.

    1987-06-01

    The pyrolytic effect of IR laser radiation is investigated with reference to the initiation and control of the vapor phase deposition of semiconductor films. By selecting the gas mixture composition and laser emission parameters, it is possible to control the deposition and crystal formation processes on the surface of semiconductors, with the main control action achieved due to the nonadiabatic kinetics of reactions in the gas phase and high temperatures in the laser heating zone. This control mechanism is demonstrated experimentally during the laser vapor deposition of germanium and silicon films from tetrachlorides on single-crystal Si and Ge substrates. 5 references.

  4. The vertical distribution of Mars water vapor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, D. W.

    1979-01-01

    Analysis of observations made from the Viking 1 Orbiter indicates that the water vapor over the Viking 1 landing site is uniformly mixed with the atmosphere and not concentrated near the surface. The analysis incorporates the effects of atmospheric scattering and explains why previous earth-based observations showed a strong diurnal variation in water content. It also explains the lack of an early morning fog and removes the necessity of daily exchange of large amounts of water between the surface and the atmosphere. A water vapor volume mixing ratio of 1.5 x 10 to the -4th is inferred for the Viking 1 site in late summer.

  5. Drag Reduction by Leidenfrost Vapor Layers

    KAUST Repository

    Vakarelski, Ivan Uriev

    2011-05-23

    We demonstrate and quantify a highly effective drag reduction technique that exploits the Leidenfrost effect to create a continuous and robust lubricating vapor layer on the surface of a heated solid sphere moving in a liquid. Using high-speed video, we show that such vapor layers can reduce the hydrodynamic drag by over 85%. These results appear to approach the ultimate limit of drag reduction possible by different methods based on gas-layer lubrication and can stimulate the development of related energy saving technologies.

  6. Low temperature vapor phase digestion of graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pierce, Robert A.

    2017-04-18

    A method for digestion and gasification of graphite for removal from an underlying surface is described. The method can be utilized to remove graphite remnants of a formation process from the formed metal piece in a cleaning process. The method can be particularly beneficial in cleaning castings formed with graphite molding materials. The method can utilize vaporous nitric acid (HNO.sub.3) or vaporous HNO.sub.3 with air/oxygen to digest the graphite at conditions that can avoid damage to the underlying surface.

  7. Skin Cancer Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Genetics of Skin Cancer Skin Cancer Screening Research Skin Cancer Screening (PDQ®)–Patient Version What is screening? ... These are called diagnostic tests . General Information About Skin Cancer Key Points Skin cancer is a disease ...

  8. Screening for Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancer screening is checking for cancer in people who don't have symptoms. Screening tests can help doctors find and treat several types of cancer early, but cancer screening can have harms as well as benefits.

  9. Colorectal Cancer Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Genetics of Colorectal Cancer Colorectal Cancer Screening Research Colorectal Cancer Screening (PDQ®)–Patient Version What is screening? Go ... These are called diagnostic tests . General Information About Colorectal Cancer Key Points Colorectal cancer is a disease in ...

  10. Screen time and children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000355.htm Screen time and children To use the sharing features on ... videos is considered unhealthy screen time. Current Screen Time Guidelines Children under age 2 should have no ...

  11. Stomach (Gastric) Cancer Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Stomach Cancer Prevention Stomach Cancer Screening Research Stomach (Gastric) Cancer Screening (PDQ®)–Patient Version What is screening? Go ... are called diagnostic tests . General Information About Stomach (Gastric) Cancer Key Points Stomach cancer is a disease in ...

  12. A review of refractory materials for vapor-anode AMTEC cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Jeffrey C.; El-Genk, M. S.

    2000-01-01

    Recently, refractory alloys have been considered as structural materials for vapor-anode Alkali Metal Thermal-to-Electric Conversion (AMTEC) cells, for extended (7-15 years) space missions. This paper reviewed the existing database for refractory metals and alloys of potential use as structural materials for vapor-anode sodium AMTEC cells. In addition to requiring that the vapor pressure of the material be below 10-9 torr (133 nPa) at a typical hot side temperature of 1200 K, other screening considerations were: (a) low thermal conductivity, low thermal radiation emissivity, and low linear thermal expansion coefficient; (b) low ductile-to-brittle transition temperature, high yield and rupture strengths and high strength-to-density ratio; and (c) good compatibility with the sodium AMTEC operating environment, including high corrosion resistance to sodium in both the liquid and vapor phases. Nb-1Zr (niobium-1% zirconium) alloy is recommended for the hot end structures of the cell. The niobium alloy C-103, which contains the oxygen gettering elements zirconium and hafnium as well as titanium, is recommended for the colder cell structure. This alloy is stronger and less thermally conductive than Nb-1Zr, and its use in the cell wall reduces parasitic heat losses by conduction to the condenser. The molybdenum alloy Mo-44.5Re (molybdenum-44.5% rhenium) is also recommended as a possible alternative for both structures if known problems with oxygen pick up and embrittlement of the niobium alloys proves to be intractable. .

  13. Alcohol vapor sensing by cadmium-doped zinc oxide thick films based chemical sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zargar, R. A.; Arora, M.; Chackrabarti, S.; Ahmad, S.; Kumar, J.; Hafiz, A. K.

    2016-04-01

    Cadmium-doped zinc oxide nanoparticles were derived by simple chemical co-precipitation route using zinc acetate dihydrate and cadmium acetate dihydrate as precursor materials. The thick films were casted from chemical co-precipitation route prepared nanoparticles by economic facile screen printing method. The structural, morphological, optical and electrical properties of the film were characterized relevant to alcohol vapor sensing application by powder XRD, SEM, UV-VIS and DC conductivity techniques. The response and sensitivity of alcohol (ethanol) vapor sensor are obtained from the recovery curves at optimum working temperature range from 20∘C to 50∘C. The result shows that maximum sensitivity of the sensor is observed at 25∘C operating temperature. On varying alcohol vapor concentration, minor variation in resistance has been observed. The sensing mechanism of sensor has been described in terms of physical adsorption and chemical absorption of alcohol vapors on cadmium-doped zinc oxide film surface and inside film lattice network through weak hydrogen bonding, respectively.

  14. Separation of aromatics by vapor permeation through solvent swollen membrane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ito, A.; Adachi, K.; Feng, Y. [Niigata University, Niigata (Japan)

    1995-12-20

    A vapor permeation process for aromatics separation from a hydrocarbon mixture was studied by means of the simultaneous permeation of dimethylsulfoxide vapor as an agent for membrane swelling and preferential permeation of aromatics. The separation performance of the process was demonstrated by a polyvinylalcohol membrane for mixed vapors of benzene/cyclohexane, xylene/octane and a model gasoline. The aromatic vapors preferentially permeated from these mixed vapor feeds. The separation factor was over 10. The separation mechanism of the process mainly depends on the relative salability of the vapors between aromatics and other hydrocarbons in dimethylsulfoxide. 14 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  15. Process for the preparation of fiber-reinforced ceramic composites by chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lackey, Jr., Walter J.; Caputo, Anthony J.

    1986-01-01

    A chemical vapor deposition (CVD) process for preparing fiber-reinforced ceramic composites. A specially designed apparatus provides a steep thermal gradient across the thickness of a fibrous preform. A flow of gaseous ceramic matrix material is directed into the fibrous preform at the cold surface. The deposition of the matrix occurs progressively from the hot surface of the fibrous preform toward the cold surface. Such deposition prevents the surface of the fibrous preform from becoming plugged. As a result thereof, the flow of reactant matrix gases into the uninfiltrated (undeposited) portion of the fibrous preform occurs throughout the deposition process. The progressive and continuous deposition of ceramic matrix within the fibrous preform provides for a significant reduction in process time over known chemical vapor deposition processes.

  16. Vapor-cooled lead and stacks thermal performance and design analysis by finite difference techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peck, S.D.; Christensen, E.H.; O'Loughlin, J.M.

    1985-01-01

    Investigation of the combined thermal performance of the stacks and vapor cooled leads for the Mirror Fusion Test Facility-''B'' demonstrates considerable interdependency. For instance, the heat transfer to the vapor-cooled lead (VCL) from warm bus heaters, environmental enclosure, and stack is a significant additional heat load to the joule heating in the leads, proportionately higher for the lower current leads that have fewer current-carrying, counter flow coolant copper tubes. Consequently, the specific coolant flow (G/sec-kA-lead pair) increases as the lead current decreases. The definition of this interdependency and the definition of necessary thermal management has required an integrated thermal model for the entire stack/VCL assemblies

  17. Effect of superficial velocity on vaporization pressure drop with propane in horizontal circular tube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novianto, S.; Pamitran, A. S.; Nasruddin, Alhamid, M. I.

    2016-06-01

    Due to its friendly effect on the environment, natural refrigerants could be the best alternative refrigerant to replace conventional refrigerants. The present study was devoted to the effect of superficial velocity on vaporization pressure drop with propane in a horizontal circular tube with an inner diameter of 7.6 mm. The experiments were conditioned with 4 to 10 °C for saturation temperature, 9 to 20 kW/m2 for heat flux, and 250 to 380 kg/m2s for mass flux. It is shown here that increased heat flux may result in increasing vapor superficial velocity, and then increasing pressure drop. The present experimental results were evaluated with some existing correlations of pressure drop. The best prediction was evaluated by Lockhart-Martinelli (1949) with MARD 25.7%. In order to observe the experimental flow pattern, the present results were also mapped on the Wang flow pattern map.

  18. Computational Thermodynamics Analysis of Vaporizing Fuel Droplets in the Human Upper Airways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhe; Kleinstreuer, Clement

    The detailed knowledge of air flow structures as well as particle transport and deposition in the human lung for typical inhalation flow rates is an important precursor for dosimetry-and-health-effect studies of toxic particles as well as for targeted drug delivery of therapeutic aerosols. Focusing on highly toxic JP-8 fuel aerosols, 3-D airflow and fluid-particle thermodynamics in a human upper airway model starting from mouth to Generation G3 (G0 is the trachea) are simulated using a user-enhanced and experimentally validated finite-volume code. The temperature distributions and their effects on airflow structures, fuel vapor deposition and droplet motion/evaporation are discussed. The computational results show that the thermal effect on vapor deposition is minor, but it may greatly affect droplet deposition in human airways.

  19. Knudsen cell vaporization of rare earth nitrides: enthalpy of vaporization of HoN098

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, R.C.; Clark, N.J.

    1975-01-01

    The enthalpy of vaporization of HoN 0 . 98 was measured by the weight-loss Knudsen cell technique using Motzfeldt-Whitman extrapolations to zero orifice area. A third-law enthalpy of vaporization of HoN 0 . 98 of 155.9 +- 5 kcal mole -1 was obtained compared to a second-law value of 162.0 +- 5 kcal mole -1 . Similar measurements on the nitrides of samarium, erbium, and ytterbium gave third-law enthalpies of vaporization of 126.8 +-- 5 kcal mole -1 ; 159.6 +- 5 kcal mole -1 , and 121.0 +- 5 kcal mole -1 , respectively. 7 tables

  20. Collapsing criteria for vapor film around solid spheres as a fundamental stage leading to vapor explosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freud, Roy; Harari, Ronen; Sher, Eran

    2009-01-01

    Following a partial fuel-melting accident, a Fuel-Coolant Interaction (FCI) can result with the fragmentation of the melt into tiny droplets. A vapor film is then formed between the melt fragments and the coolant, while preventing a contact between them. Triggering, propagation and expansion typically follow the premixing stage. In the triggering stage, vapor film collapse around one or several of the fragments occurs. This collapse can be the result of fragments cooling, a sort of mechanical force, or by any other means. When the vapor film collapses and the coolant re-establishes contact with the dry surface of the hot melt, it may lead to a very rapid and rather violent boiling. In the propagation stage the shock wave front leads to stripping of the films surrounding adjacent droplets which enhance the fragmentation and the process escalates. During this process a large quantity of liquid vaporizes and its expansion can result in destructive mechanical damage to the surrounding structures. This multiphase thermal detonation in which high pressure shock wave is formed is regarded as 'vapor explosion'. The film boiling and its possible collapse is a fundamental stage leading to vapor explosion. If the interaction of the melt and the coolant does not result in a film boiling, no explosion occurs. Many studies have been devoted to determine the minimum temperature and heat flux that is required to maintain a film boiling. The present experimental study examines the minimum temperature that is required to maintain a film boiling around metal spheres immersed into a liquid (subcooled distilled water) reservoir. In order to simulate fuel fragments that are small in dimension and has mirror-like surface, small spheres coated with anti-oxidation layer were used. The heat flux from the spheres was calculated from the sphere's temperature profiles and the sphere's properties. The vapor film collapse was associated with a sharp rise of the heat flux during the cooling

  1. Analysis of heat flow in a tube bank of a condenser considering the influence of air

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joachimiak Magda

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The pressure of wet water vapor inside a condenser has a great impact on the efficiency of thermal cycle. The value of this pressure depends on the mass share of inert gases (air. The knowledge of the spots where the air accumulates allows its effective extraction from the condenser, thus improving the conditions of condensation. The condensation of water vapor with the share of inert gas in a model tube bank of a condenser has been analyzed in this paper. The models include a static pressure loss of the water vapor/air mixture and the resultant changes in the water vapor parameters. The mass share of air in water vapor was calculated using the Dalton’s law. The model includes changes of flow and thermodynamic parameters based on the partial pressure of water vapor utilizing programmed water vapor tables. In the description of the conditions of condensation the Nusselts theory was applied. The model allows for a deterioration of the heat flow conditions resulting from the presence of air. The paper contains calculations of the water vapor flow with the initial mass share of air in the range 0.2 to 1%. The results of calculations clearly show a great impact of the share of air on the flow conditions and the deterioration of the conditions of condensation. The data obtained through the model for a given air/water vapor mixture velocity upstream of the tube bank allow for identification of the spots where the air accumulates.

  2. Removal of styrene vapor from atmospheric air using a pulsed corona discharge and UV-irridiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shvedchikov, A.P.; Belousova, E.V.; Polyakova, A.V.; Ponizovskii, A.Z.; Goncharov, V.A.

    1993-01-01

    The authors have investigated processes for removal of styrene vapor from atmospheric air (volume content 0.007-0.06%) upon exposure to UV radiation and dc and pulsed corona discharges. The authors have studied the dependence of the degree of purification on various parameters (flow rate, temperature, composition, pulse frequency). It has been shown that the purification rate increases when UV radiation is combined with the discharge. A possible mechanism for the purification process is considered

  3. Ultrahigh temperature vapor core reactor-MHD system for space nuclear electric power

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maya, Isaac; Anghaie, Samim; Diaz, Nils J.; Dugan, Edward T.

    1991-01-01

    The conceptual design of a nuclear space power system based on the ultrahigh temperature vapor core reactor with MHD energy conversion is presented. This UF4 fueled gas core cavity reactor operates at 4000 K maximum core temperature and 40 atm. Materials experiments, conducted with UF4 up to 2200 K, demonstrate acceptable compatibility with tungsten-molybdenum-, and carbon-based materials. The supporting nuclear, heat transfer, fluid flow and MHD analysis, and fissioning plasma physics experiments are also discussed.

  4. Solvent-vapor-assisted imprint lithography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voicu, Nicoleta E.; Ludwigs, Sabine; Crossland, Edward J. W.; Andrew, Piers; Steiner, Ullrich

    2007-01-01

    Sub-micrometer features are replicated into high-molecular-weight polymer resists by using solvent-assisted nanoimprint lithography (see figure). By swelling the polymer in a controlled solvent-vapor atmosphere, millibar pressures and ambient temperatures are sufficient to achieve high-fidelity

  5. Atomic lithium vapor laser isotope separation

    CERN Document Server

    Olivares, I E

    2002-01-01

    An atomic vapor laser isotope separation in lithium was performed using tunable diode lasers. The method permits also the separation of the isotopes between the sup 6 LiD sub 2 and the sup 7 LiD sub 1 lines using a self-made mass separator which includes a magnetic sector and an ion beam designed for lithium. (Author)

  6. Atomic lithium vapor laser isotope separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olivares, I.E.; Rojas, C.

    2002-01-01

    An atomic vapor laser isotope separation in lithium was performed using tunable diode lasers. The method permits also the separation of the isotopes between the 6 LiD 2 and the 7 LiD 1 lines using a self-made mass separator which includes a magnetic sector and an ion beam designed for lithium. (Author)

  7. Resonant second harmonic generation in potassium vapor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, D.; Mullin, C.S.; Shen, Y.R.; Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA

    1995-06-01

    Picosecond pulses are used to study resonant second harmonic generation in potassium vapor. Although the process is both microscopically and macroscopically forbidden, it can readily be observed. The results can be quantitatively understood by a multiphoton-ionization-initiated, dc-field-induced, coherent transient model

  8. External fuel vaporization study, phase 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szetela, E. J.; Chiappetta, L.

    1981-01-01

    An analytical study was conducted to evaluate the effect of variations in fuel properties on the design of an external fuel vaporizaton system. The fuel properties that were considered included thermal stability, critical temperature, enthalpy a critical conditions, volatility, and viscosity. The design parameters that were evaluated included vaporizer weight and the impact on engine requirement such as maintenance, transient response, performance, and altitude relight. The baseline fuel properties were those of Jet A. The variation in thermal stability was taken as the thermal stability variation for Experimental Referee Broad Specification (ERBS) fuel. The results of the analysis indicate that a change in thermal stability equivalent to that of ERBS would increase the vaporization system weight by 20 percent, decrease oprating time between cleaning by 40 percent and make altitude relight more difficult. An increase in fuel critical temperature of 39 K would require a 40 percent increase in vaporization system weight. The assumed increase in enthalpy and volatility would also increase vaporizer weight by 40 percent and make altitude relight extremely difficult. The variation in fuel viscosity would have a negligible effect on the design parameters.

  9. Atomic-vapor-laser isotope separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davis, J.I.

    1982-10-01

    This paper gives a brief history of the scientific considerations leading to the development of laser isotope separation (LIS) processes. The close relationship of LIS to the broader field of laser-induced chemical processes is evaluated in terms of physical criteria to achieve an efficient production process. Atomic-vapor LIS processes under development at Livermore are reviwed. 8 figures

  10. Fractional condensation of biomass pyrolysis vapors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westerhof, Roel Johannes Maria; Brilman, Derk Willem Frederik; Garcia Perez, M.; Wang, Zhouhong; Oudenhoven, Stijn; van Swaaij, Willibrordus Petrus Maria; Kersten, Sascha R.A.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we have investigated the possibilities to steer the composition and, thus, the quality of pyrolysis liquids by the reactor temperature and the pyrolysis vapor condenser temperature. Pine wood was pyrolyzed in a 1 kg/h fluidized-bed pyrolysis reactor operated at 330 or 480 °C. The

  11. Covering sources of toxic vapors with foam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aue, W. P.; Guidetti, F.

    2009-01-01

    In a case of chemical terrorism, first responders might well be confronted with a liquid source of toxic vapor which keeps spreading out its hazardous contents. With foam as an efficient and simple means, such a source could be covered up in seconds and the spread of vapors mitigated drastically. Once covered, the source could then wait for a longer time to be removed carefully and professionally by a decontamination team. In order to find foams useful for covering up toxic vapor sources, a large set of measurements has been performed in order to answer the following questions: - Which foams could be used for this purpose? - How thick should the foam cover be? - For how long would such a foam cover be effective? - Could the practical application of foam cause a spread of the toxic chemical? The toxic vapors sources included GB, GD and HD. Among the foams were 10 fire fighter foams (e.g. AFFF, protein) and the aqueous decontamination foam CASCAD. Small scale experiments showed that CASCAD is best suited for covering a toxic source; a 10 cm layer of it covers and decontaminates GB. The large scale experiments confirmed that any fire fighter foam is a suitable cover for a longer or shorter period.(author)

  12. Similarities and differences in vapor explosion criteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cronenberg, A.W.

    1978-01-01

    An overview of recent ideas pertaining to vapor explosion criteria indicates that in general sense, a consensus of opinion is emerging on the conditions applicable to explosive vaporization. Experimental and theoretical work has lead a number of investigators to the formulation of such conditions which are quite similar in many respects, although the quantitative details of the model formulation of such conditions are somewhat different. All model concepts are consistent in that an initial period of stable film boiling, separating molten fuel from coolant, is considered necessary (at least for large-scale interactions and efficient intermixing), with subsequent breakdown of film boiling due to pressure and/or thermal effects, followed by intimate fuel-coolant contact and a rapid vaporization process which is sufficient to cause shock pressurization. Although differences arise as to the conditions for and the energetics associated with film boiling destabilization and the mode and energetics of fragmentation and intermixing. However, the principal area of difference seems to be the question of what constitutes the requisite condition(s) for rapid vapor production to cause shock pressurization

  13. HYDROCARBON VAPOR DIFFUSION IN INTACT CORE SLEEVES

    Science.gov (United States)

    The diffusion of 2,2,4-trimethylpentane (TMP) and 2,2,5-trimethylhexane (TMH) vapors put of residually contaminated sandy soil from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) field research site at Traverse City, Michigan, was measured and modeled. The headspace of an intact ...

  14. Terahertz radiation in alkali vapor plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, Xuan; Zhang, X.-C.

    2014-01-01

    By taking advantage of low ionization potentials of alkali atoms, we demonstrate terahertz wave generation from cesium and rubidium vapor plasmas with an amplitude nearly one order of magnitude larger than that from nitrogen gas at low pressure (0.02–0.5 Torr). The observed phenomena are explained by the numerical modeling based upon electron tunneling ionization

  15. Vapor pressure of selected organic iodides

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Fulem, M.; Růžička, K.; Morávek, P.; Pangrác, Jiří; Hulicius, Eduard; Kozyrkin, B.; Shatunov, V.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 55, č. 11 (2010), 4780-4784 ISSN 0021-9568 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/08/0217 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100521 Keywords : vapor pressure * static method * organic iodides Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 2.089, year : 2010

  16. Prenatal screening and genetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alderson, P; Aro, A R; Dragonas, T

    2001-01-01

    Although the term 'genetic screening' has been used for decades, this paper discusses how, in its most precise meaning, genetic screening has not yet been widely introduced. 'Prenatal screening' is often confused with 'genetic screening'. As we show, these terms have different meanings, and we...... examine definitions of the relevant concepts in order to illustrate this point. The concepts are i) prenatal, ii) genetic screening, iii) screening, scanning and testing, iv) maternal and foetal tests, v) test techniques and vi) genetic conditions. So far, prenatal screening has little connection...... with precisely defined genetics. There are benefits but also disadvantages in overstating current links between them in the term genetic screening. Policy making and professional and public understandings about screening could be clarified if the distinct meanings of prenatal screening and genetic screening were...

  17. Thermal behaviour of agitated gas-liquid reactors with a vaporizing solvent/air oxidation of hydrocarbons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westerterp, K.R.; Crombeen, P.R.J.J.

    1983-01-01

    Many highly exothermic gas-liquid reactions are carried out with a vaporizing solvent, which after condensation is returned to the reactor. In this way the liberated reaction heat for a large part is absorbed by the cooling water flowing through the condenser. In order to determine the influence of

  18. Vapor Extraction/Bioventing Sequential Treatment of Soil Contaminated with Volatile and SemiVolatile Hydrocarbon Mixtures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Malina, G.; Grotenhuis, J.T.C.; Rulkens, W.H.

    2002-01-01

    A cost-effective removal strategy was studied in bench-scale columns that involved vapor extraction and bioventing sequential treatment of toluene- and decane-contaminated soil. The effect of operating mode on treatment performance was examined at a continuous air flow and consecutively at two

  19. Plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposited silicon oxynitride films for optical waveguide bridges for use in mechanical sensors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Storgaard-Larsen, Torben; Leistiko, Otto

    1997-01-01

    In this paper the influence of RF power, ammonia flow, annealing temperature, and annealing time on the optical and mechanical properties of plasma-enhanced chemically vapor deposited silicon oxynitride films, is presented. A low refractive index (1.47 to 1.48) film having tensile stress has been...

  20. Novel Prospects for Plasma Spray-Physical Vapor Deposition of Columnar Thermal Barrier Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anwaar, Aleem; Wei, Lianglinag; Guo, Qian; Zhang, Baopeng; Guo, Hongbo

    2017-12-01

    Plasma spray-physical vapor deposition (PS-PVD) is an emerging coating technique that can produce columnar thermal barrier coatings from vapor phase. Feedstock treatment at the start of its trajectory in the plasma torch nozzle is important for such vapor-phase deposition. This study describes the effects of the plasma composition (Ar/He) on the plasma characteristics, plasma-particle interaction, and particle dynamics at different points spatially distributed inside the plasma torch nozzle. The results of calculations show that increasing the fraction of argon in the plasma gas mixture enhances the momentum and heat flow between the plasma and injected feedstock. For the plasma gas combination of 45Ar/45He, the total enthalpy transferred to a representative powder particle inside the plasma torch nozzle is highest ( 9828 kJ/kg). Moreover, due to the properties of the plasma, the contribution of the cylindrical throat, i.e., from the feed injection point (FIP) to the start of divergence (SOD), to the total transferred energy is 69%. The carrier gas flow for different plasma gas mixtures was also investigated by optical emission spectroscopy (OES) measurements of zirconium emissions. Yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) coating microstructures were produced when using selected plasma gas compositions and corresponding carrier gas flows; structural morphologies were found to be in good agreement with OES and theoretical predictions. Quasicolumnar microstructure was obtained with porosity of 15% when applying the plasma composition of 45Ar/45He.

  1. Influence of vapor phase turbulent stress to the onset of slugging in a horizontal pipe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Jee Won

    1995-01-01

    An influence of the vapor phase turbulent stress(i, e., the two-phase Reynolds stress)to the characteristics of two-phase system in a horizontal pipe has been theoretically investigated. The average two-fluid model has been constituted with closure relations for stratified flow in a horizontal pipe. A vapor phase turbulent stress model for the regular interface geometry has been included. It is found that the second order waves propagate in opposite direction with almost the same speed in the moving frame of reference of the liquid phase velocity. Using the well-posedness limit of the two-phase system, the dispersed-stratified flow regime boundary has been modeled. Two-phase Froude number has been found to be a convenient parameter in quantifying the onset of slugging as a function of the global void fraction. The influence of the vapor phase turbulent stress was found to stabilize the flow stratification. 4 figs., 12 refs. (Author)

  2. Effects of solvent evaporation conditions on solvent vapor annealed cylinder-forming block polymer thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Meagan; Jakubowski, William; Nelson, Gunnar; Drapes, Chloe; Baruth, A.

    Solvent vapor annealing is a less time and energy intensive method compared to thermal annealing, to direct the self-assembly of block polymer thin films. Periodic nanostructures have applications in ultrafiltration, magnetic arrays, or other structures with nanometer dimensions, driving its continued interest. Our goal is to create thin films with hexagonally packed, perpendicular aligned cylinders of poly(lactide) in a poly(styrene) matrix that span the thickness of the film with low anneal times and low defect densities, all with high reproducibility, where the latter is paramount. Through the use of our computer-controlled, pneumatically-actuated, purpose-built solvent vapor annealing chamber, we have the ability to monitor and control vapor pressure, solvent concentration within the film, and solvent evaporation rate with unprecedented precision and reliability. Focusing on evaporation, we report on two previously unexplored areas, chamber pressure during solvent evaporation and the flow rate of purging gas aiding the evaporation. We will report our exhaustive results following atomic force microscopy analysis of films exposed to a wide range of pressures and flow rates. Reliably achieving well-ordered films, while occurring within a large section of this parameter space, was correlated with high-flow evaporation rates and low chamber pressures. These results have significant implications on other methods of solvent annealing, including ``jar'' techniques.

  3. Study of vaporization of sodium metaborate by transpiration thermogravimetry and Knudsen effusion mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narasimhan, T S Lakshmi; Viswanathan, R; Nalini, S

    2011-11-17

    The vaporization of solid sodium metaborate NaBO(2)(s) was studied by transpiration thermogravimetry (TTG) and Knudsen effusion mass spectrometry (KEMS). The transpiration measurements, performed for the first time on NaBO(2)(s), involved use of argon as the carrier gas for vapor transport and derivation of vapor pressure of NaBO(2)(g) (by assuming it as the sole vapor species) through many flow-dependence runs and temperature-dependence runs in the temperature range 1075-1218 K. The KEMS measurements performed in the temperature range 1060-1185 K confirmed NaBO(2)(g) as the principal vapor species over NaBO(2)(s), in accord with the previously reported KEMS studies. The values of p(NaBO(2)) obtained by both TTG and KEMS are consistent within the uncertainties associated with each method and so are the second- and third-law values of enthalpy of sublimation, the latter aspect consistently missing in all previous vaporization studies. The results of both TTG and KEMS were combined to recommend the following thermodynamic parameters pertinent to the sublimation reaction, NaBO(2)(s) = NaBO(2)(g): Log{p(NaBO(2))/Pa} = -(17056 ± 441)/(T/K) + (14.73 ± 0.35) for the temperature range 1060-1218 K; Δ(r)H°(m)(298.15 K) = (346.3 ± 9.4) kJ·mol(-1); and Δ(r)S°(m)(298.15 K) = (210.2 ± 6.8) J·mol(-1)·K(-1).

  4. Tank vapor characterization project. Headspace vapor characterization of Hanford waste Tank SX-101: Results from samples collected on 07/21/95

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, J.C.; Clauss, T.W.; McVeety, B.D.; Pool, K.H.; Olsen, K.B.; Fruchter, J.S.; Silvers, K.L.

    1996-05-01

    Results described in this report were obtained to characterize the vapors present in the tank headspace and to support safety evaluations and tank-farm operations. They include air concentrations of inorganic and organic analytes and grouped compounds from samples. The vapor concentrations are based either on whole-volume samples or on sorbent traps exposed to sample flow. No immediate notifications were needed because analytical results indicated no specific analytes exceeded notification levels. Summary of results: NH3, 3.8 ppmv; NO2, 0.10 ppmv; NO, 0.13 ppm; H2O, 11.8 mg/L; CO2, 338 ppmv; CO, 3 ; methanol, 0.060 ppmv; acetone, 0.033 ppmv; trichlorofluoromethane, 0.023 ppmv; and acetone, 0.034 ppmv

  5. Vaporization of fault water during seismic slip

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jianye; Niemeijer, André R.; Fokker, Peter A.

    2017-06-01

    Laboratory and numerical studies, as well as field observations, indicate that phase transitions of pore water might be an important process in large earthquakes. We present a model of the thermo-hydro-chemo-mechanical processes, including a two-phase mixture model to incorporate the phase transitions of pore water, occurring during fast slip (i.e., a natural earthquake) in order to investigate the effects of vaporization on the coseismic slip. Using parameters from typical natural faults, our modeling shows that vaporization can indeed occur at the shallow depths of an earthquake, irrespective of the wide variability of the parameters involved (sliding velocity, friction coefficient, gouge permeability and porosity, and shear-induced dilatancy). Due to the fast kinetics, water vaporization can cause a rapid slip weakening even when the hydrological conditions of the fault zone are not favorable for thermal pressurization, e.g., when permeability is high. At the same time, the latent heat associated with the phase transition causes the temperature rise in the slip zone to be buffered. Our parametric analyses reveal that the amount of frictional work is the principal factor controlling the onset and activity of vaporization and that it can easily be achieved in earthquakes. Our study shows that coseismic pore fluid vaporization might have played important roles at shallow depths of large earthquakes by enhancing slip weakening and buffering the temperature rise. The combined effects may provide an alternative explanation for the fact that low-temperature anomalies were measured in the slip zones at shallow depths of large earthquakes.

  6. The vapor pressure and enthalpy of vaporization of M-xylene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rothenberg, S J; Seiler, F A; Bechtold, W E; Eidson, A F

    1988-12-01

    We measured the vapor pressure of m-xylene over the temperature range 273 to 293 deg K with a single-sided capacitance manometer. The enthalpy of vaporization was 42.2 {+-} 0.1 (SE) kj/ g{center_dot}mol. Combining our own data with previously published data, we recommend using the values 42.0, 40.6, and 39.1 ({+-} 0.1) (SE) kjg{center_dot}mol for the enthalpy of vaporization of m-xylene at 300, 340, and 380 deg. K, respectively, and a value for the change in heat capacity on vaporization ({delta}Cpdeg.) of 35 {+-} 3 (SE) J/g{center_dot}mol{center_dot}K over the temperature range studied. (author)

  7. The vapor pressure and enthalpy of vaporization of M-xylene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rothenberg, S.J.; Seiler, F.A.; Bechtold, W.E.; Eidson, A.F.

    1988-01-01

    We measured the vapor pressure of m-xylene over the temperature range 273 to 293 deg K with a single-sided capacitance manometer. The enthalpy of vaporization was 42.2 ± 0.1 (SE) kj/ g·mol. Combining our own data with previously published data, we recommend using the values 42.0, 40.6, and 39.1 (± 0.1) (SE) kjg·mol for the enthalpy of vaporization of m-xylene at 300, 340, and 380 deg. K, respectively, and a value for the change in heat capacity on vaporization (ΔCpdeg.) of 35 ± 3 (SE) J/g·mol·K over the temperature range studied. (author)

  8. 46 CFR 182.480 - Flammable vapor detection systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 100 GROSS TONS) MACHINERY INSTALLATION Specific Machinery Requirements § 182.480 Flammable vapor... permit calibration in a vapor free atmosphere. (g) Electrical connections, wiring, and components for a...

  9. Ammonia IR Absorbance Measurements with an Equilibrium Vapor Cell

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Field, Paul

    2004-01-01

    Infrared (IR) absorbance spectra were acquired for 18 ammonia vapor pressures. The vapor pressures were generated with 15 gravimetrically prepared aqueous solutions and three commercial aqueous solutions using a dynamic method I.E...

  10. Water vapor movement in freezing aggregate base materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-01

    The objectives of this research were to 1) measure the extent to which water vapor movement results in : water accumulation in freezing base materials; 2) evaluate the effect of soil stabilization on water vapor movement : in freezing base materials;...

  11. Structure of metal β-diketonates and their enthalpies of vaporization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Domrachev, G.A.; Sevast'yanov, V.G.; Zakharov, L.N.; Krasnodubskaya, S.V.; AN SSSR, Moscow. Inst. Obshchej i Neorganicheskoj Khimii)

    1987-01-01

    Using the method of additive schemes in combinaion with the structural estimation of the degree of screening of the central atom and other elements of β-diketonate molecule while analyzing the experimental enthalpies of vaporization, the contributions of separate fragments of complexes into the enthalpy of vaporization are found. It is shown that energies of intermolecular interaction in a condensed phase of monomeric metal β-diketonates with identical substituents do not depend on the central atom type. The enthalpies of dimer dissociation in a series of rare earth dipivaloylmethanates calculated. The proposed approach is advisable fo selecting forms of metal β-diketonates, the most suitable for the purposes of deep purificaion, which are characterized by maximum chemical and physico-chemical selectivity with respect to impurities, chemical inertness to equipment material, container, etc

  12. Bionanomaterials and Bioinspired Nanostructures for Selective Vapor Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-03

    agricultural crops. To meet the requirements for these and other demanding applications, new sensing approaches with improved sensor selectivity are required...of these vapors with key side- chain amino acids. DNT-binding peptide receptors were further conjugated to an oligo(ethylene glycol) hydrogel for vapor...coefficient for DNT over TNT vapor. Vapor-phase binding performance was attributed to the ability of the oligo(ethylene glycol) hydrogel to maintain the

  13. An evaluation of absorption spectroscopy to monitor YBa2Cu3O7-x precursors for metal organics chemical vapor deposition processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matthew Edward Thomas

    1999-01-01

    Absorption spectroscopy was evaluated as a technique to monitor the metal organics chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) process for forming YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7-x superconducting coated conductors. Specifically, this study analyzed the feasibility of using absorption spectroscopy to monitor the MOCVD supply vapor concentrations of the organic ligand 2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-3,5-heptanedionate (TMHD) metal chelates of barium, copper, and yttrium. Ba(TMHD) 2 , Cu(TMHD) 2 , and Y(TMHD) 3 compounds have successfully been vaporized in the MOCVD processing technique to form high temperature superconducting ''coated conductors,'' a promising technology for wire fabrication. The absorption study of the barium, copper, and yttrium (TMHD) precursors was conducted in the ultraviolet wavelength region from 200nm to 400nm. To simulate the MOCVD precursor flows the Ba(TMHD) 2 , Cu(TMHD) 2 , and Y(TMHD) 3 complexes were vaporized at vacuum pressures of (0.03--10)Torr. Spectral absorption scans of each precursor were conducted to examine potential measurement wavelengths for determining vapor concentrations of each precursor via Beer's law. The experimental results show that under vacuum conditions the barium, copper, and yttrium (TMHD) precursors begin to vaporize between 90 C and 135 C, which are considerably lower vaporization temperatures than atmospheric thermal gravimetric analyses indicate. Additionally, complete vaporization of the copper and yttrium (TMHD) precursors occurred during rapid heating at temperatures between 145 C and 195 C and after heating at constant temperatures between 90 C and 125 C for approximately one hour, whereas the Ba(TMHD) 2 precursor did not completely vaporize. At constant temperatures, near constant vaporization levels for each precursor were observed for extended periods of time. Detailed spectroscopic scans at stable vaporization conditions were conducted

  14. A three-dimensional numerical study on dynamics behavior of a rising vapor bubble in uniformly superheated liquid by lattice Boltzmann method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, Tao; Sun, Jiangang; Ang, Xueye; Li, Shanshan; Su, Xin

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Dynamics of vapor bubble in uniformly superheated liquid is studied by a 3D LBM. • The growth rate reaches a maximum value and then decrease until a certain value. • The vapor bubble will take place a larger deformation at high ratio of Re/Eo. • The bubble wake has a great influence on motion and deformation of vapor bubble. • Ratio of Re/Eo has an important influence on evolution of temperature field. - Abstract: In this paper, dynamics behaviors of a rising vapor bubble in uniformly superheated liquid are firstly studied by a hybrid three-dimensional lattice Boltzmann model. In order to validate this model, two test cases regarding bubble rising in an isothermal system and vapor bubble growth in a superheated liquid are performed, respectively. The test results are consistent with existing results and indicate the feasibility of the hybrid model. The hybrid model is further applied to simulate growth and deformation of a rising vapor bubble in different physical conditions. Some physical parameters of vapor bubble such as equivalent diameter and growth rate are evaluated accurately by three-dimensional simulations. It is found that the growth rate of vapor bubble changes with time and temperature gradient. It reaches a maximum value at the initial stage and then decrease until a certain value. The growth and deformation of vapor bubble at different ratios of Re/Eo are discussed. The numerical results show the vapor bubble will take place a larger deformation at high ratio of Re/Eo at the middle and final stages. In addition, the hybrid model is also applied to predict the evolution of flow and temperature fields. The bubble wake has a great influence on the motion and deformation of vapor bubble during rising process. As far as the temperature field is concerned, a ratio of Re/Eo has an important influence on heat transfer and evolution of temperature field.

  15. Buoyancy-Driven Heat Transfer During Application of a Thermal Gradient for the Study of Vapor Deposition at Low Pressure Using and Ideal Gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frazier, D. O.; Hung, R. J.; Paley, M. S.; Penn, B. G.; Long, Y. T.

    1996-01-01

    A mathematical model has been developed to determine heat transfer during vapor deposition of source materials under a variety of orientations relative to gravitational accelerations. The model demonstrates that convection can occur at total pressures as low as 10-2 mm Hg. Through numerical computation, using physical material parameters of air, a series of time steps demonstrates the development of flow and temperature profiles during the course of vapor deposition. These computations show that in unit gravity vapor deposition occurs by transport through a fairly complicated circulating flow pattern when applying heat to the bottom of the vessel with parallel orientation with respect to the gravity vector. The model material parameters for air predict the effect of kinematic viscosity to be of the same order as thermal diffusivity, which is the case for Prandtl number approx. 1 fluids. Qualitative agreement between experiment and the model indicates that 6-(2-methyl-4-nitroanilino)-2,4-hexadiyn-l-ol (DAMNA) at these pressures indeed approximates an ideal gas at the experiment temperatures, and may validate the use of air physical constants. It is apparent that complicated nonuniform temperature distribution in the vapor could dramatically affect the homogeneity, orientation, and quality of deposited films. The experimental test i's a qualitative comparison of film thickness using ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy on films generated in appropriately oriented vapor deposition cells. In the case where heating of the reaction vessel occurs from the top, deposition of vapor does not normally occur by convection due to a stable stratified medium. When vapor deposition occurs in vessels heated at the bottom, but oriented relative to the gravity vector between these two extremes, horizontal thermal gradients induce a complex flow pattern. In the plane parallel to the tilt axis, the flow pattern is symmetrical and opposite in direction from that where the vessel is

  16. Problems of hydrogen - water vapor - inert gas mixture use in heavy liquid metal coolant technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ul'yanov, V.V.; Martynov, P.N.; Gulevskij, V.A.; Teplyakov, Yu.A.; Fomin, A.S.

    2014-01-01

    The reasons of slag deposit formation in circulation circuits with heavy liquid metal coolants, which can cause reactor core blockage, are considered. To prevent formation of deposits hydrogen purification of coolant and surfaces of circulation circuit is used. It consists in introduction of gaseous mixtures hydrogen - water vapor - rare gas (argon or helium) directly into coolant flow. The principle scheme of hydrogen purification and the processes occurring during it are under consideration. Measures which make it completely impossible to overlap of the flow cross section of reactor core, steam generators, pumps and other equipment by lead oxides in reactor facilities with heavy liquid metal coolants are listed [ru

  17. 40 CFR 52.255 - Gasoline transfer vapor control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Gasoline transfer vapor control. 52.255... (CONTINUED) APPROVAL AND PROMULGATION OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS California § 52.255 Gasoline transfer vapor control. (a) “Gasoline” means any petroleum distillate having a Reid vapor pressure of 4 pounds or greater...

  18. 40 CFR 52.787 - Gasoline transfer vapor control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Gasoline transfer vapor control. 52.787... (CONTINUED) APPROVAL AND PROMULGATION OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS Indiana § 52.787 Gasoline transfer vapor control. (a) Gasoline means any petroleum distillate having a Reid vapor pressure of 4 pounds or greater...

  19. 21 CFR 888.4220 - Cement monomer vapor evacuator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cement monomer vapor evacuator. 888.4220 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Surgical Devices § 888.4220 Cement monomer vapor evacuator. (a) Identification. A cement monomer vapor evacuator is a device intended for use during surgery to contain or remove...

  20. Review of literature on the asymmetric collapse of vapor bubbles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fremd, R.; Froehlich, G.

    1977-06-01

    This report contains a review of literature on the asymmetric collape of vapor bubbles by cavitation with special consideration to vapor explosions. Two numerical models, which describe the collapse of cavities in the neighbourhood of a solid surface, are presented. Moreover experimental results for this case are provided. Propositions to apply the numerical models to vapor explosions are made. (orig.) [de